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Sample records for ablative richtmyer-meshkov instability

  1. Ablative Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov Instabilities in Laser-Accelerated Colliding Foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aglitskiy, Y.; Metzler, N.; Karasik, M.; Serlin, V.; Weaver, J.; Obenschain, S. P.; Oh, J.; Schmitt, A. J.; Velikovich, A. L.; Zalesak, S. T.; Gardner, J. H.; Harding, E. C.

    2008-11-01

    In our experiments done on the Nike KrF laser, we study instability growth at shock-decelerated interfaces in planar colliding-foil experiments. We use streaked monochromatic (1.86 keV) x-ray face-on imaging diagnostics to measure the areal mass modulation growth caused by the instability. Higher x-ray energies up to 5.25 keV are used to follow the shock propagation as well as the 1D dynamics of the collision. While a laser-driven foil is accelerated towards the stationary low-density foam layer, an ablative RT instability develops. Having reached a high velocity, the foil hits the foam layer. The impact generates strong shocks in the plastic and in the foam. The reflected shock wave re-shocks the ablation front, its acceleration stops, and so does the observed RT growth. This is followed by areal mass oscillations due to the ablative RM instability and feedout mechanisms, of which the latter dominates.

  2. Further Experimental Investigations of the Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, P. L.; Peyser, T. A.; Stry, P. E.; Logory, L. M.; Farley, D. R.

    1996-11-01

    We report on further experimental investigations of the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability from an initially nonlinear perturbation, conducted on the Nova laser. The experiments use a Nova hohlraum as a driver source for a strong shock in a miniature shock tube attached to the hohlraum. The shock tube contains brominated plastic and low-density carbon foam as the two working fluids, with a micro-machined sawtooth interface between them serving as the perturbation. The shock, upon crossing the interface, instigates the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability from the perturbation. The resulting growth of the mixing layer is diagnosed radiographically. We have previously reported upon a results from a single wavelength and amplitude of perturbation (T. A. Peyser et al., Phys. Rev. Lett.) 75, 2332 (1996).. A study of the effect of variations in amplitude and wavelength on the nonlinear growth of the instability will be discussed.

  3. Richtmyer-Meshkov instability in shock-flame interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massa, Luca; Pallav Jha Collaboration

    2011-11-01

    Shock-flame interactions occur in supersonic mixing and detonation formation. Therefore, their analysis is important to explosion safety, internal combustion engine performance, and supersonic combustor design. The fundamental process at the basis of the interaction is the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability supported by the density difference between burnt and fresh mixtures. In the present study we analyze the effect of reactivity on the Richtmyer- Meshkov instability with particular emphasis on combustion lengths that typify the scaling between perturbation growth and induction. The results of the present linear analysis study show that reactivity changes the perturbation growth rate by developing a non-zero pressure gradient at the flame surface. The baroclinic torque based on the density gradient across the flame acts to slow down the instability growth for high wave numbers. A non-hydrodynamic flame representation leads to the definition of an additional scaling Peclet number, the effects of which are investigated. It is found that an increased flame-contact separation destabilizes the contact discontinuity by augmenting the tangential shear.

  4. A Twist on the Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rollin, Bertrand; Koneru, Rahul; Ouellet, Frederick

    2017-11-01

    The Richtmyer-Meshkov instability is caused by the interaction of a shock wave with a perturbed interface between two fluids of different densities. Typical contexts in which it plays a key role include inertial confinement fusion, supernovae or scramjets. However, little is known of the phenomenology of this instability if one of the interacting media is a dense solid-particle phase. In the context of an explosive dispersal of particles, this gas-particle variant of the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability may play a role in the late time formation of aerodynamically stable particle jets. Thus, this numerical experiment aims at shedding some light on this phenomenon with the help of high fidelity numerical simulations. Using a Eulerian-Lagrangian approach, we track trajectories of computational particles composing an initially corrugated solid particle curtain, in a two-dimensional planar geometry. This study explores the effects of the initial shape (designed using single mode and multimode perturbations) and volume fraction of the particle curtain on its subsequent evolution. Complexities associated with compaction of the curtain of particles to the random close packing limit are avoided by constraining simulations to modest initial volume fraction of particles. This work was supported by the U.S. DoE, NNSA, Advanced Simulation and Computing Program, as a Cooperative Agreement under the Predictive Science Academic Alliance Program, under Contract No. DE-NA0002378.

  5. Turbulent mixing induced by Richtmyer-Meshkov instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krivets, V. V.; Ferguson, K. J.; Jacobs, J. W.

    2017-01-01

    Richtmyer-Meshkov instability is studied in shock tube experiments with an Atwood number of 0.7. The interface is formed in a vertical shock tube using opposed gas flows, and three-dimensional random initial interface perturbations are generated by the vertical oscillation of gas column producing Faraday waves. Planar Laser Mie scattering is used for flow visualization and for measurements of the mixing process. Experimental image sequences are recorded at 6 kHz frequency and processed to obtain the time dependent variation of the integral mixing layer width. Measurements of the mixing layer width are compared with Mikaelian's [1] model in order to extract the growth exponent θ where a fairly wide range of values is found varying from θ ≈ 0.2 to 0.6.

  6. Investigation of the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability

    SciTech Connect

    Riccardo Bonazza; Mark Anderson; Jason Oakley

    2008-12-22

    The present program is centered on the experimental study of shock-induced interfacial fluid instabilities. Both 2-D (near-sinusoids) and 3-D (spheres) initial conditions are studied in a large, vertical square shock tube facility. The evolution of the interface shape, its distortion, the modal growth rates and the mixing of the fluids at the interface are all objectives of the investigation. In parallel to the experiments, calculations are performed using the Raptor code, on platforms made available by LLNL. These flows are of great relevance to both ICF and stockpile stewardship. The involvement of three graduate students is in line with themore » national laboratories' interest in the education of scientists and engineers in disciplines and technologies consistent with the labs' missions and activities.« less

  7. DSMC Studies of the Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallis, M. A.; Koehler, T. P.; Torczynski, J. R.

    2014-11-01

    A new exascale-capable Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) code, SPARTA, developed to be highly efficient on massively parallel computers, has extended the applicability of DSMC to challenging, transient three-dimensional problems in the continuum regime. Because DSMC inherently accounts for compressibility, viscosity, and diffusivity, it has the potential to improve the understanding of the mechanisms responsible for hydrodynamic instabilities. Here, the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability at the interface between two gases was studied parametrically using SPARTA. Simulations performed on Sequoia, an IBM Blue Gene/Q supercomputer at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, are used to investigate various Atwood numbers (0.33-0.94) and Mach numbers (1.2-12.0) for two-dimensional and three-dimensional perturbations. Comparisons with theoretical predictions demonstrate that DSMC accurately predicts the early-time growth of the instability. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  8. Nonlinear Saturation Amplitude in Classical Planar Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wan-Hai; Wang, Xiang; Jiang, Hong-Bin; Ma, Wen-Fang

    2016-04-01

    The classical planar Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI) at a fluid interface supported by a constant pressure is investigated by a formal perturbation expansion up to the third order, and then according to definition of nonlinear saturation amplitude (NSA) in Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI), the NSA in planar RMI is obtained explicitly. It is found that the NSA in planar RMI is affected by the initial perturbation wavelength and the initial amplitude of the interface, while the effect of the initial amplitude of the interface on the NSA is less than that of the initial perturbation wavelength. Without marginal influence of the initial amplitude, the NSA increases linearly with wavelength. The NSA normalized by the wavelength in planar RMI is about 0.11, larger than that corresponding to RTI. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos. 11472278 and 11372330, the Scientific Research Foundation of Education Department of Sichuan Province under Grant No. 15ZA0296, the Scientific Research Foundation of Mianyang Normal University under Grant Nos. QD2014A009 and 2014A02, and the National High-Tech ICF Committee

  9. Analytical scalings of the linear Richtmyer-Meshkov instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cobos, Francisco; Wouchuk, Juan Gustavo

    2017-11-01

    In the linear Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI), hydrodynamic perturbations are generated behind the transmitted and reflected rippled fronts. The contact surface reaches an asymptotic normal velocity and two different tangential velocities at each side, which are always different for moderate to strong levels of compression, depending on the amount of vorticity generated by the corrugated shocks. We show analytical scaling laws for the ripple velocity (δvi∞)in different physical limits and approximate formulas are provided, valid for arbitrary initial pre-shock parameters. An asymptotic growth for the contact surface ripple of the form ψi(t) ψ∞ + δ vi∞t is obtained. The quantity ψ∞ is in general different from the initial post-shock ripple amplitude, in agreement with the early finding of. Comparison to simulations and experimental work is shown. F.C. acknowledges support from UCLM for a predoctoral fellowship. This work has received support from MINECO, JCCM, and UCLM (Spain).

  10. An Experimental Investigation of Incompressible Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, J. W.; Niederhaus, C. E.

    2002-01-01

    Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instability occurs when two different density fluids are impulsively accelerated in the direction normal to their nearly planar interface. The instability causes small perturbations on the interface to grow and eventually become a turbulent flow. It is closely related to Rayleigh-Taylor instability, which is the instability of a planar interface undergoing constant acceleration, such as caused by the suspension of a heavy fluid over a lighter one in the earth's gravitational field. Like the well-known Kelvin-Helmholtz instability, RM instability is a fundamental hydrodynamic instability which exhibits many of the nonlinear complexities that transform simple initial conditions into a complex turbulent flow. Furthermore, the simplicity of RM instability (in that it requires very few defining parameters), and the fact that it can be generated in a closed container, makes it an excellent test bed to study nonlinear stability theory as well as turbulent transport in a heterogeneous system. However, the fact that RM instability involves fluids of unequal densities which experience negligible gravitational force, except during the impulsive acceleration, requires RM instability experiments to be carried out under conditions of microgravity. This experimental study investigates the instability of an interface between incompressible, miscible liquids with an initial sinusoidal perturbation. The impulsive acceleration is generated by bouncing a rectangular tank containing two different density liquids off a retractable vertical spring. The initial perturbation is produced prior to release by oscillating the tank in the horizontal direction to produce a standing wave. The instability evolves in microgravity as the tank travels up and then down the vertical rails of a drop tower until hitting a shock absorber at the bottom. Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence (PLIF) is employed to visualize the flow. PLIF images are captured by a video camera that travels

  11. Experiments on the Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability of Incompressible Fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, J.; Niederhaus, C.

    2000-01-01

    Richtmyer-Meshkov (R-M) instability occurs when two different density fluids are impulsively accelerated in the direction normal to their nearly planar interface. The instability causes small perturbations on the interface to grow and possibly become turbulent given the proper initial conditions. R-M instability is similar to the Rayleigh-Taylor (R-T) instability, which is generated when the two fluids undergo a constant acceleration. R-M instability is a fundamental fluid instability that is important to fields ranging from astrophysics to high-speed combustion. For example, R-M instability is currently the limiting factor in achieving a net positive yield with inertial confinement fusion. The experiments described here utilize a novel technique that circumvents many of the experimental difficulties previously limiting the study of the R-M instability. A Plexiglas tank contains two unequal density liquids and is gently oscillated horizontally to produce a controlled initial fluid interface shape. The tank is mounted to a sled on a high speed, low friction linear rail system, constraining the main motion to the vertical direction. The sled is released from an initial height and falls vertically until it bounces off of a movable spring, imparting an impulsive acceleration in the upward direction. As the sled travels up and down the rails, the spring retracts out of the way, allowing the instability to evolve in free-fall until impacting a shock absorber at the end of the rails. The impulsive acceleration provided to the system is measured by a piezoelectric accelerometer mounted on the tank, and a capacitive accelerometer measures the low-level drag of the bearings. Planar Laser-Induced Fluorescence is used for flow visualization, which uses an Argon ion laser to illuminate the flow and a CCD camera, mounted to the sled, to capture images of the interface. This experimental study investigates the instability of an interface between incompressible, miscible liquids

  12. Small-Amplitude Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability at a Re-Shocked Material Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velikovich, A. L.; Zalesak, S. T.; Metzler, N.; Aglitskiy, Y.

    2008-11-01

    We report an exact small-amplitude theory of the Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instability developing at a re-shocked material interface and favorably compare it to our simulations. The re-shock is seen to restart the classical RM instability growth from a larger initial amplitude, at a higher rate, and change its direction from heavy-to-light to light-to heavy and vice versa. Similarly, if a Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) unstable interface is strongly re-shocked from either the heavy or light fluid side, the fast RM growth is triggered. If a RT-unstable ablation front is re-shocked, it exhibits the ablative RM-instability, that is, low-frequency decaying oscillations [V. N. Goncharov, PRL 82, 2091 (1998); Y. Aglitskiy et al., PRL 87, 265001 (2001)]. This is predicted for colliding foil experiments on the Nike laser, where a RT-unstable ablation front is re-shocked by the strong shock wave produced in the collision of the laser-driven plastic foil with a stationary foam layer. The re-shock stops the acceleration and switches the perturbation evolution from the ablative RT to the ablative RM regime.

  13. Experimental growth of inertial forced Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities for different Atwood numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redondo, J. M.; Castilla, R.

    2009-04-01

    Richtmyer-Meshkov instability occurs when a shock wave impinges on an interface separating two fluids having different densities [1,2]. The instability causes perturbations on the interface to grow, bubbles and spikes, producing vortical structures which potentially result in a turbulent mixing layer. In addition to shock tube experiments, the incompressible Richtmyer-Meshkov instability has also been studied by impulsively accelerating containers of incompressible fluids. Castilla and Redondo (1994) [3] first exploited this technique by dropping tanks containing a liquid and air or two liquids onto a cushioned surface. This technique was improved upon by Niederhaus and Jacobs (2003)[4] by mounting the tank onto a rail system and then allowing it to bounce off of a fixed spring. A range of both miscible and inmiscible liquids were used, giving a wide range of Atwood numbers using the combinations of air, water, alcohol, oil and mercury. Experimental results show the different pattern selection of both the bubbles and spikes for the different Atwood numbers. Visual analysis of the marked interfaces allows to distinguish the regions of strong mixing and compare self-similarity growth of the mixing region. [1] Meshkov, E. E. 1969 Instability of the interface of two gases accelerated by a shock wave. Fluid Dynamics 4, 101-104. [2] Brouillette, M. & Sturtevant, B. 1994 Experiments on the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability: single-scale perturbations on a continuous interface. Journal of Fluid Mechanics 263, 271-292. [3] Castilla, R. & Redondo, J. M. 1994 Mixing Front Growth in RT and RM Instabilities. Proceedings of the Fourth International Workshop on the Physics of Compressible Turbulent Mixing, Cambridge, United Kingdom, edited by P. F. Linden, D. L. Youngs, and S. B. Dalziel, 11-31. [4] Niederhaus, C. E. & Jacobs, J. W. 2003 Experimental study of the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability of incompressible fluids. Journal of Fluid Mechanics 485, 243-277.

  14. The feed-out process: Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities in thin, laser-driven foils

    SciTech Connect

    Smitherman, D.P.

    Eight beams carrying a shaped pulse from the NOVA laser were focused into a hohlraum with a total energy of about 25 kJ. A planar foil was placed on the side of the hohlraum with perturbations facing away from the hohlraum. All perturbations were 4 {micro}m in amplitude and 50 {micro}m in wavelength. Three foils of pure aluminum were shot with thicknesses and pulse lengths respectively of 86 {micro}m and 2. 2 ns, 50 {micro}m and 4.5 ns, and 35 {micro}m with both 2.2 ns and 4. 5 ns pulses. Two composite foils constructed respectively of 32 and 84 {micro}mmore » aluminum on the ablative side and 10 {micro}m beryllium on the cold surface were also shot using the 2.2 ns pulse. X-ray framing cameras recorded perturbation growth using both face- and side-on radiography. The LASNEX code was used to model the experiments. A shock wave interacted with the perturbation on the cold surface generating growth from a Richtmyer-Meshkov instability and a strong acoustic mode. The cold surface perturbation fed-out to the Rayleigh-Taylor unstable ablation surface, both by differential acceleration and interface coupling, where it grew. A density jump did not appear to have a large effect on feed-out from interface coupling. The Rayleigh-Taylor instability`s vortex pairs overtook and reversed the direction of flow of the Richtmyer-Meshkov vortices, resulting in the foil moving from a sinuous to a bubble and spike configuration. The Rayleigh-Taylor instability may have acted as an ablative instability on the hot surface, and as a classical instability on the cold surface, on which grew second and third order harmonics.« less

  15. Growth rate of the linear Richtmyer-Meshkov instability when a shock is reflected

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wouchuk, J. G.

    2001-05-01

    An analytic model is presented to calculate the growth rate of the linear Richtmyer-Meshkov instability in the shock-reflected case. The model allows us to calculate the asymptotic contact surface perturbation velocity for any value of the incident shock intensity, arbitrary fluids compressibilities, and for any density ratio at the interface. The growth rate comes out as the solution of a system of two coupled functional equations and is expressed formally as an infinite series. The distinguishing feature of the procedure shown here is the high speed of convergence of the intermediate calculations. There is excellent agreement with previous linear simulations and experiments done in shock tubes.

  16. Use of the Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability to Infer Yield Stress at High-Energy Densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimonte, Guy; Terrones, G.; Cherne, F. J.; Germann, T. C.; Dupont, V.; Kadau, K.; Buttler, W. T.; Oro, D. M.; Morris, C.; Preston, D. L.

    2011-12-01

    We use the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI) at a metal-gas interface to infer the metal’s yield stress (Y) under shock loading and release. We first model how Y stabilizes the RMI using hydrodynamics simulations with a perfectly plastic constitutive relation for copper (Cu). The model is then tested with molecular dynamics (MD) of crystalline Cu by comparing the inferred Y from RMI simulations with direct stress-strain calculations, both with MD at the same conditions. Finally, new RMI experiments with solid Cu validate our simulation-based model and infer Y˜0.47GPa for a 36 GPa shock.

  17. Numerical simulation of the hydrodynamic instabilities of Richtmyer-Meshkov and Rayleigh-Taylor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortova, S. V.; Shepelev, V. V.; Troshkin, O. V.; Kozlov, S. A.

    2017-09-01

    The paper presents the results of numerical simulation of the development of hydrodynamic instabilities of Richtmyer-Meshkov and Rayleigh-Taylor encountered in experiments [1-3]. For the numerical solution used the TPS software package (Turbulence Problem Solver) that implements a generalized approach to constructing computer programs for a wide range of problems of hydrodynamics, described by the system of equations of hyperbolic type. As numerical methods are used the method of large particles and ENO-scheme of the second order with Roe solver for the approximate solution of the Riemann problem.

  18. Linear analysis of the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability in shock-flame interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massa, L.; Jha, P.

    2012-05-01

    Shock-flame interactions enhance supersonic mixing and detonation formation. Therefore, their analysis is important to explosion safety, internal combustion engine performance, and supersonic combustor design. The fundamental process at the basis of the interaction is the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability supported by the density difference between burnt and fresh mixtures. In the present study we analyze the effect of reactivity on the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability with particular emphasis on combustion lengths that typify the scaling between perturbation growth and induction. The results of the present linear analysis study show that reactivity changes the perturbation growth rate by developing a pressure gradient at the flame surface. The baroclinic torque based on the density gradient across the flame acts to slow down the instability growth of high wave-number perturbations. A gasdynamic flame representation leads to the definition of a Peclet number representing the scaling between perturbation and thermal diffusion lengths within the flame. Peclet number effects on perturbation growth are observed to be marginal. The gasdynamic model also considers a finite flame Mach number that supports a separation between flame and contact discontinuity. Such a separation destabilizes the interface growth by augmenting the tangential shear.

  19. Simultaneous density-field visualization and PIV of the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prestridge, Katherine; Rightley, Paul; Benjamin, Robert; Kurnit, Norman; Boxx, Isaac; Vorobieff, Peter

    1999-11-01

    We describe a highly-detailed experimental characterization of the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability. A vertical curtain of heavy gas (SF_6) flows into the test section of an air-filled, horizontal shock tube, and the instability evolves after the passage of a Mach 1.2 shock past the curtain. The evolution of the curtain is visualized by seeding the SF6 with small (d ≈ 0.5 μm) glycol/water droplets using a modified theatrical fog generator. Because the event lasts only 1 ms and the initial conditions vary from test to test, rapid and high-resolution (both spatial and temporal) data acquisition is required in order to characterize the initial and dynamic conditions for each experimental event. A customized, frequency-doubled, burst mode Nd:YAG laser and a commercial single-pulse laser are used for the implementation of simultaneous density-field imaging and PIV diagnostics. We have provided data about flow scaling and mixing through image analysis, and PIV data gives us further quantitative physical insight into the evolution of the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability.

  20. Nonlinear evolution of the Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Dimonte, G

    Scaled experiments on the nonlinear evolution of the Rayleigh- Taylor (RT) and Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instabilities are described under a variety, of conditions that occur in nature. At high Reynolds number, the mixing layer grows self-similarly - {alpha}{sub i}Agt{sup 2} for a constant acceleration (g), and as a power law t{sup {theta}{sub i}} for impulsive accelerations U{delta}(t) at low and high Mach numbers. The growth coefficients {alpha}{sub i} and {theta}{sub i} exponents are measured over a comprehensive range of Atwood numbers A. The RT instability is also investigated with Non- Newtonian materials which are independently characterized. A critical wavelength and amplitudemore » for instability is observed associated with the shear modulus and tensile yield of the material. The results are applicable from supernova explosions to geophysical flows subject to these hydrodynamic instabilities.« less

  1. Experiments to measure ablative Richtmyer-Meshkov growth of Gaussian bumps in plastic capsules

    SciTech Connect

    Loomis, Eric; Batha, Steve; Sedillo, Tom

    2010-06-02

    Growth of hydrodynamic instabilities at the interfaces of inertial confinement fusion capsules (ICF) due to ablator and fuel non-uniformities have been of primary concern to the ICF program since its inception. To achieve thermonuclear ignition at Megajoule class laser systems such as the NIF, targets must be designed for high implosion velocities, which requires higher in-flight aspect ratios (IFAR) and diminished shell stability. Controlling capsule perturbations is thus of the utmost importance. Recent simulations have shown that features on the outer surface of an ICF capsule as small as 10 microns wide and 100's of nanometers tall such as bumps,more » divots, or even dust particles can profoundly impact capsule performance by leading to material jetting or mix into the hotspot. Recent x-ray images of implosions on the NIF may be evidence of such mixing. Unfortunately, our ability to accurately predict these effects is uncertain due to disagreement between equation of state (EOS) models. In light of this, we have begun a campaign to measure the growth of isolated defects (Gaussian bumps) due to ablative Richtmyer-Meshkov in CH capsules to validate these models. The platform that has been developed uses halfraums with radiation temperatures near 75 eV (Rev. 4 foot-level) driven by 15-20 beams from the Omega laser (Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, NY), which sends a ~2.5 Mbar shock into a planar CH foil. Gaussian-shaped bumps (20 microns wide, 4-7 microns tall) are deposited onto the ablation side of the target. On-axis radiography with a saran (Cl He α - 2.8 keV) backlighter is used to measure bump evolution prior to shock breakout. Shock speed measurements will also be made with Omega's active shock breakout (ASBO) and streaked optical pyrometery (SOP) diagnostics in conjunction with filtered x-ray photodiode arrays (DANTE) to determine drive conditions in the target. These data will be used to discriminate between EOS models so that

  2. The Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability on a Circular Interface in Magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, Wolfgang; Maxon, W. Curtis; Denissen, Nicholas; McFarland, Jacob

    2017-11-01

    Hydrodynamic instabilities (HI) are ubiquitous in high energy density (HED) applications such as astrophysics, thermonuclear weapons, and inertial fusion. In these systems, fluid mixing is encouraged by the HI which can reduce the energy yield and eventually drive the system to equilibrium. The Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instability is one such HI and is created when a perturbed interface between a density gradient is impulsively accelerated. The physics can be complicated one step further by the inclusion of Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD), where HED systems experience the effects of magnetic and electric fields. These systems provide unique challenges and as such can be used to validate hydrodynamic codes capable of predicting HI. The work presented here will outline efforts to study the RMI in MHD for a circular interface utilizing the hydrocode FLAG, developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory.

  3. New Type of the Interface Evolution in the Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abarzhi, S. I.; Herrmann, M.

    2003-01-01

    We performed systematic theoretical and numerical studies of the nonlinear large-scale coherent dynamics in the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability for fluids with contrast densities. Our simulations modeled the interface dynamics for compressible and viscous uids. For a two-fluid system we observed that in the nonlinear regime of the instability the bubble velocity decays and its surface attens, and the attening is accompanied by slight oscillations. We found the theoretical solution for the system of conservation laws, describing the principal influence of the density ratio on the motion of the nonlinear bubble. The solution has no adjustable parameters, and shows that the attening of the bubble front is a distinct property universal for all values of the density ratio. This property follows from the fact that the RM bubbles decelerate. The theoretical and numerical results validate each other, describe the new type of the bubble front evolution in RMI, and identify the bubble curvature as important and sensitive diagnostic parameter.

  4. Simulations of the Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability in a two-shock vertical shock tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferguson, Kevin; Olson, Britton; Jacobs, Jeffrey

    2017-11-01

    Simulations of the Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability (RMI) in a new two-shock vertical shock tube configuration are presented. The simulations are performed using the ARES code at Lawrence-Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Two M=1.2 shock waves travel in opposing directions and impact an initially stationary interface formed by sulfur hexaflouride (SF6) and air. The delay between the two shocks is controlled to achieve a prescribed temporal separation in shock wave arrival time. Initial interface perturbations and diffusion profiles are generated in keeping with previously gathered experimental data. The effect of varying the inter-shock delay and initial perturbation structure on instability growth and mixing parameters is examined. Information on the design, construction, and testing of a new two-shock vertical shock tube are also presented.

  5. Maximum initial growth-rate of strong-shock-driven Richtmyer-Meshkov instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abarzhi, Snezhana I.; Bhowmich, Aklant K.; Dell, Zachary R.; Pandian, Arun; Stanic, Milos; Stellingwerf, Robert F.; Swisher, Nora C.

    2017-10-01

    We focus on classical problem of dependence on the initial conditions of the initial growth-rate of strong shocks driven Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI) by developing a novel empirical model and by employing rigorous theories and Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations to describe the simulations data with statistical confidence in a broad parameter regime. For given values of the shock strength, fluids' density ratio, and wavelength of the initial perturbation of the fluid interface, we find the maximum value of RMI initial growth-rate, the corresponding amplitude scale of the initial perturbation, and the maximum fraction of interfacial energy. This amplitude scale is independent of the shock strength and density ratio, and is characteristic quantity of RMI dynamics. We discover the exponential decay of the ratio of the initial and linear growth-rates of RMI with the initial perturbation amplitude that excellently agrees with available data. National Science Foundation, USA.

  6. Maximum initial growth-rate of strong-shock-driven Richtmyer-Meshkov instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abarzhi, Snezhana I.; Bhowmich, Aklant K.; Dell, Zachary R.; Pandian, Arun; Stanic, Milos; Stellingwerf, Robert F.; Swisher, Nora C.

    2017-11-01

    We focus on classical problem of dependence on the initial conditions of the initial growth-rate of strong shocks driven Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI) by developing a novel empirical model and by employing rigorous theories and Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations to describe the simulations data with statistical confidence in a broad parameter regime. For given values of the shock strength, fluids' density ratio, and wavelength of the initial perturbation of the fluid interface, we find the maximum value of RMI initial growth-rate, the corresponding amplitude scale of the initial perturbation, and the maximum fraction of interfacial energy. This amplitude scale is independent of the shock strength and density ratio, and is characteristic quantity of RMI dynamics. We discover the exponential decay of the ratio of the initial and linear growth-rates of RMI with the initial perturbation amplitude that excellently agrees with available data. National Science Foundation, USA.

  7. Shock induced Richtmyer-Meshkov instability in the presence of a wall boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jourdan, G.; Billiotte, M.; Houas, L.

    1996-06-01

    An experimental investigation on gaseous mixing zones originated from the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability has been undertaken in a square cross section shock tube. Mass concentration fields, of one of the two mixing constituents, have been determined within the mixing zone when the shock wave passes from the heavy gas to the light one, from one gas to an other of close density, and from the light gas to the heavy one. Results have been obtained before and after the coming back of the reflected shock wave. The diagnostic method is based on the infrared absorption of one of the two constituents of the mixing zone. It is shown that the mixing zone is strongly deformed by the wall boundary layer. The consequence is the presence of strong gradients of concentration in the direction perpendicular to the shock wave propagation. Finally, it is pointed out that the mixing goes more homogeneous when the Atwood number tends to zero.

  8. Computational Study of the Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability with a Complex Initial Condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFarland, Jacob; Reilly, David; Greenough, Jeffrey; Ranjan, Devesh

    2014-11-01

    Results are presented for a computational study of the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability with a complex initial condition. This study covers experiments which will be conducted at the newly-built inclined shock tube facility at the Georgia Institute of Technology. The complex initial condition employed consists of an underlying inclined interface perturbation with a broadband spectrum of modes superimposed. A three-dimensional staggered mesh arbitrary Lagrange Eulerian (ALE) hydrodynamics code developed at Lawerence Livermore National Laboratory called ARES was used to obtain both qualitative and quantitative results. Qualitative results are discussed using time series of density plots from which mixing width may be extracted. Quantitative results are also discussed using vorticity fields, circulation components, and energy spectra. The inclined interface case is compared to the complex interface case in order to study the effect of initial conditions on shocked, variable-density flows.

  9. Exploring Richtmyer-Meshkov instability phenomena and ejecta cloud physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zellner, M. B.; Buttler, W. T.

    2008-09-01

    This effort investigates ejecta cloud expansion from a shocked Sn target propagating into vacuum. To assess the expansion, dynamic ejecta cloud density distributions were measured via piezoelectric pin diagnostics offset at three heights from the target free surface. The dynamic distributions were first converted into static distributions, similar to a radiograph, and then self compared. The cloud evolved self-similarly at the distances and times measured, inferring that the amount of mass imparted to the instability, detected as ejecta, either ceased or approached an asymptotic limit.

  10. Observed transition from Richtmyer-Meshkov jet formation through feedout oscillations to Rayleigh-Taylor instability in a laser target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aglitskiy, Y.; Karasik, M.; Velikovich, A. L.; Serlin, V.; Weaver, J. L.; Kessler, T. J.; Schmitt, A. J.; Obenschain, S. P.; Nikitin, S. P.; Metzler, N.; Oh, J.

    2012-10-01

    Experimental study of hydrodynamic perturbation evolution triggered by a laser-driven shock wave breakout at the free rippled rear surface of a plastic target is reported. We observed a transition between two qualitatively distinct types of perturbation evolution: jet formation at low shock pressure and areal mass oscillations at high shock pressure, which correspond respectively to high and low values of effective adiabatic index. The experiments were done on the KrF Nike laser facility with laser wavelength 248 nm and a 4 ns pulse. We varied the number of beams overlapped on the plastic target to change the ablative pressure driving the shock wave through the target: 36 beams produce pressure of ˜8 Mbar, whereas a single beam irradiation reduces the pressure to ˜0.7 Mbar. With the help of side-on monochromatic x-ray imaging, planar jets manifesting the development of the Richtmyer-Meshkov-type instability in a non-accelerated target are observed at sub-megabar shock pressure. As the shock pressure exceeds 1 Mbar, instead of jet formation an oscillatory rippled expansion wave is observed, followed by the ``feedout'' of the rear-surface perturbations to the ablation front and the development of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability, which breaks up the accelerated target.

  11. A study of planar Richtmyer-Meshkov instability in fluids with Mie-Grüneisen equations of state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, G. M.; Pullin, D. I.

    2011-07-01

    We present a numerical comparison study of planar Richtmyer-Meshkov instability with the intention of exposing the role of the equation of state. Results for Richtmyer-Meshkov instability in fluids with Mie-Grüneisen equations of state derived from a linear shock-particle speed Hugoniot relationship (Jeanloz, J. Geophys. Res. 94, 5873, 1989; McQueen et al., High Velocity Impact Phenomena (1970), pp. 294-417; Menikoff and Plohr, Rev. Mod. Phys. 61(1), 75 1989) are compared to those from perfect gases under nondimensionally matched initial conditions at room temperature and pressure. The study was performed using Caltech's Adaptive Mesh Refinement, Object-oriented C++ (AMROC) (Deiterding, Adaptive Mesh Refinement: Theory and Applications (2005), Vol. 41, pp. 361-372; Deiterding, "Parallel adaptive simulation of multi-dimensional detonation structures," Ph.D. thesis (Brandenburgische Technische Universität Cottbus, September 2003)) framework with a low-dissipation, hybrid, center-difference, limiter patch solver (Ward and Pullin, J. Comput. Phys. 229, 2999 (2010)). Results for single and triple mode planar Richtmyer-Meshkov instability when a reflected shock wave occurs are first examined for mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB) and molybdenum modeled by Mie-Grüneisen equations of state. The single mode case is examined for incident shock Mach numbers of 1.5 and 2.5. The planar triple mode case is studied using a single incident Mach number of 2.5 with initial corrugation wavenumbers related by k1=k2+k3. Comparison is then drawn to Richtmyer-Meshkov instability in perfect gases with matched nondimensional pressure jump across the incident shock, post-shock Atwood ratio, post-shock amplitude-to-wavelength ratio, and time nondimensionalized by Richtmyer's linear growth time constant prediction. Differences in start-up time and growth rate oscillations are observed across equations of state. Growth rate oscillation frequency is seen to correlate directly to the oscillation

  12. Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov Instabilities in Turbulent Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimonte, G.

    1998-11-01

    The Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) and its shock driven analog, the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI), affect a wide variety of important phenomena from sub-terrainian to astrophysical environments. The ``fluids" are equally varied from plasmas and magnetic fields to elastic-plastic solids. In most applications, the instabilities occur with a complex acceleration history and evolve to a highly nonlinear state, making the theoretical description formidable. We will link the fluid and plasma regimes while describing the theoretical issues and basic experiments in different venues to isolate key physics issues. RMI experiments on the Nova laser investigate the affects of compressibility with strong radiatively driven shocks (Mach > 10) in near solid density plasmas of sub-millimeter scale. The growth of single sinusoidal and random 3-D perturbations are measured using backlit radiography. RTI experiments with the Linear Electric Motor (LEM) are conducted with a variety of acceleration (<< 10^4 m/s^2) histories and fluids of 10 cm scale. Turbulent RTI experiments with high Reynolds number liquids show self-similar growth which is characterized with laser induced fluorescence. LEM experiments with an elastic-plastic material (yogurt) exhibit a critical wavelength and amplitude for instability. The experimental results will be compared with linear and nonlinear theories and hydrodynamic simulations.

  13. Measuring the Ablative Richtmyer-Meshkov Growth of Isolated Defects on Plastic Capsules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loomis, Eric; Braun, Dave; Batha, Steve; Sedillo, Tom; Evans, Scott; Sorce, Chuck; Landen, Otto

    2010-11-01

    To achieve thermonuclear ignition at Megajoule class laser systems such as the NIF using inertially confined plasmas, targets must be designed with high in-flight aspect ratios (IFAR) resulting in low shell stability. Recent simulations and experiments have shown that isolated features on the outer surface of an ignition capsule can profoundly impact capsule performance by leading to material jetting or mix into the hotspot. Unfortunately, our ability to accurately predict these effects is uncertain due to disagreement between equation of state (EOS) models. In light of this, we have begun a campaign to measure the growth of isolated defects due to ablative Richtmyer-Meshkov in CH capsules to validate these models. Face- on transmission radiography has been used to measure the evolution of Gaussian bump arrays in plastic targets. Targets were indirectly-driven using Au halfraums to radiation temperatures near 65-75 eV at the Omega laser (Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, NY) simultaneous with x-ray backlighting from a saran (Cl) foil. Shock speed measurements were also made to determine drive conditions in the target. The results from these experiments will aid in the design of ignition drive pulses that minimize bump amplitude at the time of shell acceleration.

  14. A Computational Study of a Circular Interface Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability in MHD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maxon, William; Black, Wolfgang; Denissen, Nicholas; McFarland, Jacob; Los Alamos National Laboratory Collaboration; University of Missouri Shock Tube Laboratory Team

    2017-11-01

    The Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI) is a hydrodynamic instability that appears in several high energy density applications such as inertial confinement fusion (ICF). In ICF, as the thermonuclear fuel is being compressed it begins to mix due to fluid instabilities including the RMI. This mixing greatly decreases the energy output. The RMI occurs when two fluids of different densities are impulsively accelerated and the pressure and density gradients are misaligned. In magnetohydrodynamics (MHD), the RMI may be suppressed by introducing a magnetic field in an electrically conducting fluid, such as a plasma. This suppression has been studied as a possible mechanism for improving confinement in ICF targets. In this study,ideal MHD simulations are performed with a circular interface impulsively accelerated by a shock wave in the presence of a magnetic field. These simulations are executed with the research code FLAG, a multiphysics, arbitrary Lagrangian/Eulerian, hydrocode developed and utilized at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The simulation results will be assessed both quantitatively and qualitatively to examine the stabilization mechanism. These simulations will guide ongoing MHD experiments at the University of Missouri Shock Tube Facility.

  15. Simulations of the Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability with experimentally measured volumetric initial conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferguson, Kevin; Sewell, Everest; Krivets, Vitaliy; Greenough, Jeffrey; Jacobs, Jeffrey

    2016-11-01

    Initial conditions for the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI) are measured in three dimensions in the University of Arizona Vertical Shock Tube using a moving magnet galvanometer system. The resulting volumetric data is used as initial conditions for the simulation of the RMI using ARES at Lawrence-Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The heavy gas is sulfur hexafluoride (SF6), and the light gas is air. The perturbations are generated by harmonically oscillating the gasses vertically using two loudspeakers mounted to the shock tube which cause Faraday resonance, producing a random short wavelength perturbation on the interface. Planar Mie scattering is used to illuminate the flow field through the addition of propylene glycol particles seeded in the heavy gas. An M=1.2 shock impulsively accelerates the interface, initiating instability growth. Images of the initial condition and instability growth are captured at a rate of 6 kHz using high speed cameras. Comparisons between experimental and simulation results, mixing diagnostics, and mixing zone growth are presented.

  16. Reynolds number effects on the single-mode Richtmyer-Meshkov instability.

    PubMed

    Walchli, B; Thornber, B

    2017-01-01

    The Reynolds number effects on the nonlinear growth rates of the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability are investigated using two-dimensional numerical simulations. A decrease in Reynolds number gives an increased time to reach nonlinear saturation, with Reynolds number effects only significant in the range Re<256. Within this range there is a sharp change in instability properties. The bubble and spike amplitudes move towards equal size at lower Reynolds numbers and the bubble velocities decay faster than predicted by Sohn's model [S.-I. Sohn, Phys. Rev. E 80, 055302 (2009)PLEEE81539-375510.1103/PhysRevE.80.055302]. Predicted amplitudes show reasonable agreement with the existing theory of Carles and Popinet [P. Carles and S. Popinet, Phys. Fluids Lett. 13, 1833 (2001)10.1063/1.1377863; Eur. J. Mech. B 21, 511 (2002)EJBFEV0997-754610.1016/S0997-7546(02)01199-8] and Mikaelian [K. O. Mikaelian, Phys. Rev. E 47, 375 (1993)1063-651X10.1103/PhysRevE.47.375; K. O. Mikaelian, Phys. Rev. E 87, 031003 (2013)PLEEE81539-375510.1103/PhysRevE.87.031003], with the former being the closest match to the current computations.

  17. Reynolds number effects on the single-mode Richtmyer-Meshkov instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walchli, B.; Thornber, B.

    2017-01-01

    The Reynolds number effects on the nonlinear growth rates of the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability are investigated using two-dimensional numerical simulations. A decrease in Reynolds number gives an increased time to reach nonlinear saturation, with Reynolds number effects only significant in the range Re<256 . Within this range there is a sharp change in instability properties. The bubble and spike amplitudes move towards equal size at lower Reynolds numbers and the bubble velocities decay faster than predicted by Sohn's model [S.-I. Sohn, Phys. Rev. E 80, 055302 (2009), 10.1103/PhysRevE.80.055302]. Predicted amplitudes show reasonable agreement with the existing theory of Carles and Popinet [P. Carles and S. Popinet, Phys. Fluids Lett. 13, 1833 (2001), 10.1063/1.1377863; Eur. J. Mech. B 21, 511 (2002), 10.1016/S0997-7546(02)01199-8] and Mikaelian [K. O. Mikaelian, Phys. Rev. E 47, 375 (1993), 10.1103/PhysRevE.47.375; K. O. Mikaelian, Phys. Rev. E 87, 031003 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevE.87.031003], with the former being the closest match to the current computations.

  18. Manipulation of three-dimensional Richtmyer-Meshkov instability by initial interfacial principal curvatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Ben; Zhai, Zhigang; Si, Ting; Lu, Xiyun; Luo, Xisheng

    2017-03-01

    The characteristics of three-dimensional (3D) Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI) in the early stages are studied numerically. By designing 3D interfaces that initially possess various identical and opposite principal curvature combinations, the growth rate of perturbations can be effectively manipulated. The weighted essentially nonoscillatory scheme and the level set method combined with the real ghost fluid method are used to simulate the flow. The results indicate that the interface development and the shock propagation in 3D cases are much more complicated than those in 2D case, and the evolution of 3D interfaces is heavily dependent on the initial interfacial principal curvatures. The 3D structure of wave patterns induces high pressure zones in the flow field, and the pressure oscillations change the local instabilities of interfaces. In the linear stages, the perturbation growth rate follows regularity as the interfacial principal curvatures vary, which is further predicted by the stability theory of 2D and 3D interfaces. It is also found that hysteresis effects exist at the onset of the linear stages in the 3D case for the same initial perturbations as the 2D case, resulting in different evolutions of 3D RMI in the nonlinear stages.

  19. Nonlinear theory of classical cylindrical Richtmyer-Meshkov instability for arbitrary Atwood numbers

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wan Hai; HEDPS and CAPT, Peking University, Beijing 100871; Ping Yu, Chang, E-mail: champion-yu@163.com

    2014-06-15

    A nonlinear theory is developed to describe the cylindrical Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI) of an impulsively accelerated interface between incompressible fluids, which is based on both a technique of Padé approximation and an approach of perturbation expansion directly on the perturbed interface rather than the unperturbed interface. When cylindrical effect vanishes (i.e., in the large initial radius of the interface), our explicit results reproduce those [Q. Zhang and S.-I. Sohn, Phys. Fluids 9, 1106 (1996)] related to the planar RMI. The present prediction in agreement with previous simulations [C. Matsuoka and K. Nishihara, Phys. Rev. E 73, 055304(R) (2006)] leads usmore » to better understand the cylindrical RMI at arbitrary Atwood numbers for the whole nonlinear regime. The asymptotic growth rate of the cylindrical interface finger (bubble or spike) tends to its initial value or zero, depending upon mode number of the initial cylindrical interface and Atwood number. The explicit conditions, directly affecting asymptotic behavior of the cylindrical interface finger, are investigated in this paper. This theory allows a straightforward extension to other nonlinear problems related closely to an instable interface.« less

  20. Perturbation theory and numerical modelling of weakly and moderately nonlinear incompressible Richtmyer-Meshkov instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrmann, M.; Velikovich, A. L.; Abarzhi, S. I.

    2014-10-01

    A study of incompressible two-dimensional Richtmyer-Meshkov instability by means of high-order Eulerian perturbation theory and numerical simulations is reported. Nonlinear corrections to Richtmyer's impulsive formula for the bubble and spike growth rates have been calculated analytically for arbitrary Atwood number and an explicit formula has been obtained for it in the Boussinesq limit. Conditions for early-time acceleration and deceleration of the bubble and the spike have been derived. In our simulations we have solved 2D unsteady Navier-Stokes equations for immiscible incompressible fluids using the finite volume fractional step flow solver NGA developed by, coupled to the level set based interface solver LIT,. The impact of small amounts of viscosity and surface tension on the RMI flow dynamics is studied numerically. Simulation results are compared to the theory to demonstrate successful code verification and highlight the influence of the theory's ideal inviscid flow assumption. Theoretical time histories of the interface curvature at the bubble and spike tip and the profiles of vertical and horizontal velocities have been favorably compared to simulation results, which converge to the theoretical predictions as the Reynolds and Weber numbers are increased. Work supported by the US DOE/NNSA.

  1. The spikes from Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities in pused power cylindrical experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousculp, Chris; Cheng, Baolian; Oro, David; Griego, Jeffrey; Patten, Austin; Neukirch, Levi; Reinovsky, Robert; Turchi, Peter; Bradley, Joeph; Reass, Wlliam; Fierro, Franklin; Saunders, Alexsander; Mariam, Fesseha; Freeman, Matthew; Tang, Zhaowen

    2017-06-01

    The time evolution of the metal spikes resulting from the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI) of single-mode perturbations on the inside surface of a tin sample in cylindrical geometry has been measured for the first time. The shock condition was produced by a magnetically driven aluminum flyer utilizing the PHELIX capacitor bank. By varying the flyer velocity, a set of experiments conducted at the Los Alamos National Laboratory has explored the RMI evolution in the different release states (fluid, mixed, solid) of tin. The perturbation inversion and growth rate of the spikes were diagnosed in each experiment with a 21-image proton radiography (pRad) movie. Both theoretical model and numerical simulations are performed. Numerical simulations, theory and experimental data are in good agreement. Detailed analysis of the spike growth rates, comparison to planer geometry, as well as theory and computations will be presented. This work was conducted under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by the Los Alamos National Laboratory under Contract No. W-7405-ENG-36.

  2. Experimental Investigation of the Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability Through Simultaneous Measurements of Concentration and Velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reese, Daniel; Ames, Alex; Noble, Chris; Oakley, Jason; Rothamer, Dave; Bonazza, Riccardo

    2016-11-01

    The present work investigates the evolution of the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability through simultaneous measurements of concentration and velocity. In the Wisconsin Shock Tube Laboratory at the University of Wisconsin, a broadband, shear-layer initial condition is created at the interface between helium and argon (Atwood number A = 0.7). The helium is seeded with acetone vapor for use in planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF), while each gas in the shear layer cross flow is seeded with particulate TiO2, which is used to track the flow and allow for the Mie scattering of light. Once impulsively accelerated by a M = 1.57 shock wave, the interface is imaged twice in close succession using a planar laser sheet containing both the second and fourth harmonic output (532 nm and 266 nm, respectively) of a dual-cavity Nd:YAG laser. Particle image pairs are captured on a dual-frame CCD camera, for use in particle image velocimetry (PIV), while PLIF images are corrected to show concentration. Velocity fields are obtained from particle images using the Insight 4G software package by TSI, and velocity field structure is investigated and compared against concentration images. Probability density functions (PDFs) and planar energy spectra (of both velocity fluctuations and concentration) are then calculated and results are discussed.

  3. Simultaneous measurements of concentration and velocity in the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reese, Dan; Ames, Alex; Noble, Chris; Oakley, Jason; Rothamer, David; Bonazza, Riccardo

    2017-11-01

    The Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI) is studied experimentally in the Wisconsin Shock Tube Laboratory (WiSTL) using a broadband, shear layer initial condition at the interface between a helium-acetone mixture and argon. This interface (Atwood number A=0.7) is accelerated by either a M=1.6 or M=2.2 planar shock wave, and the development of the RMI is investigated through simultaneous planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) and particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements at the initial condition and four post-shock times. Three Reynolds stresses, the planar turbulent kinetic energy, the Taylor microscale are calculated from the concentration and velocity fields. The external Reynolds number is estimated from the Taylor scale and the velocity statistics. The results suggest that the flow transitions to fully developed turbulence by the third post-shock time for the high Mach number case, while it may not at the lower Mach number. The authors would like to acknowledge the support of the Department of Energy.

  4. Experimental Study of the Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability of Incompressible Fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niederhaus, Charles; Jacobs, Jeffrey W.

    2002-01-01

    The Richtmyer-Meshkov instability of a low Atwood number, miscible, two-liquid system is investigated experimentally. The initially stratified fluids are contained within a rectangular tank mounted to a sled that rides on a vertical set of rails. The instability is generated by dropping the sled onto a coil spring, producing a nearly impulsive upward acceleration. The subsequent freefall that occurs as the container travels upward and then downward on the rails allows the instability to evolve in the absence of gravity. The interface separating the two liquids initially has a well-defined, sinusoidal perturbation that quickly inverts and then grows in amplitude after undergoing the impulsive acceleration. Disturbance amplitudes are measured and compared to theoretical predictions. Linear stability theory gives excellent agreement with the measured initial growth rate, a(sub 0), for single-mode perturbations with the predicted amplitudes differing by less than 10% from experimental measurements up to a nondimensional time ka(sub 0)t = 0.7, where k is the wavenumber. Linear stability theory also provides excellent agreement for the individual mode amplitudes of multi-mode initial perturbations up until the interface becomes multi-valued. Comparison with previously published weakly nonlinear single-mode models shows good agreement up to ka(sub 0)t = 3, while published nonlinear single-mode models provide good agreement up to ka(sub 0)t = 30. The effects of Reynolds number on the vortex core evolution and overall growth rate of the interface are also investigated. Measurements of the overall amplitude are found to be unaffected by the Reynolds number for the range of values studied here. However, experiments carried out at lower values of Reynolds numbers were found to have decreased vortex core rotation rates. In addition, an instability in the vortex cores is observed.

  5. High Order Numerical Methods for the Investigation of the Two Dimensional Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability

    SciTech Connect

    Don, W-S; Gotllieb, D; Shu, C-W

    2001-11-26

    For flows that contain significant structure, high order schemes offer large advantages over low order schemes. Fundamentally, the reason comes from the truncation error of the differencing operators. If one examines carefully the expression for the truncation error, one will see that for a fixed computational cost that the error can be made much smaller by increasing the numerical order than by increasing the number of grid points. One can readily derive the following expression which holds for systems dominated by hyperbolic effects and advanced explicitly in time: flops = const * p{sup 2} * k{sup (d+1)(p+1)/p}/E{sup (d+1)/p} where flopsmore » denotes floating point operations, p denotes numerical order, d denotes spatial dimension, where E denotes the truncation error of the difference operator, and where k denotes the Fourier wavenumber. For flows that contain structure, such as turbulent flows or any calculation where, say, vortices are present, there will be significant energy in the high values of k. Thus, one can see that the rate of growth of the flops is very different for different values of p. Further, the constant in front of the expression is also very different. With a low order scheme, one quickly reaches the limit of the computer. With the high order scheme, one can obtain far more modes before the limit of the computer is reached. Here we examine the application of spectral methods and the Weighted Essentially Non-Oscillatory (WENO) scheme to the Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability. We show the intricate structure that these high order schemes can calculate and we show that the two methods, though very different, converge to the same numerical solution indicating that the numerical solution is very likely physically correct.« less

  6. A comparative study of the single-mode Richtmyer-Meshkov instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, X.; Deng, X.-L.; Jiang, L.

    2018-07-01

    In this work, the single-mode Richtmyer-Meshkov instability is studied numerically to find a reasonable nonlinear theoretical model which can be applied to predict the interface evolution from the linear stage to the early nonlinear stage. The cut-cell-based sharp-interface methods MuSiC+ (Chang et al. in J Comput Phys 242:946-990, 2013) and CCGF (Bai and Deng in Adv Appl Math Mech 9(5):1052-1075, 2017) are applied to generate numerical results for comparisons. Classical Air-SF6 and Air-Helium conditions are applied in this study, and initial amplitude and Atwood number are varied for comparison. Comparisons to the simulation results from the literature show the applicability of MuSiC+ and CCGF. Comparisons to the nonlinear theoretical models show that ZS (Zhang and Sohn in Phys Lett A 212:149-155, 1996; Phys Fluids 9:1106-1124, 1997), SEA (Sadot et al. in Phys Rev Lett 80:1654-1657, 1998), and DR (Dimonte and Ramaprabhu in Phys Fluids 22:014104, 2010) models are valid for both spike and bubble growth rates, and MIK (Mikaelian in Phys Rev E 67:026319, 2003) and ZG (Zhang and Guo in J Fluid Mech 786:47-61, 2016) models are valid for bubble growth rate, when the initial perturbation is small and the Atwood number is low, but only the DR model is applicable for both spike and bubble growth rates when the initial perturbation amplitude and the Atwood number are large. A new term of non-dimensional initial perturbation amplitude is presented and multiplied to the DR model to get a unified fitted DR model, which gives consistent results to the simulation ones for small and large initial amplitudes.

  7. Analytical scalings of the linear Richtmyer-Meshkov instability when a shock is reflected.

    PubMed

    Campos, F Cobos; Wouchuk, J G

    2016-05-01

    When a planar shock hits a corrugated contact surface between two fluids, hydrodynamic perturbations are generated in both fluids that result in asymptotic normal and tangential velocity perturbations in the linear stage, the so called Richtmyer-Meshkov instability. In this work, explicit and exact analytical expansions of the asymptotic normal velocity (δv_{i}^{∞}) are presented for the general case in which a shock is reflected back. The expansions are derived from the conservation equations and take into account the whole perturbation history between the transmitted and reflected fronts. The important physical limits of weak and strong shocks and the high/low preshock density ratio at the contact surface are shown. An approximate expression for the normal velocity, valid even for high compression regimes, is given. A comparison with recent experimental data is done. The contact surface ripple growth is studied during the linear phase showing good agreement between theory and experiments done in a wide range of incident shock Mach numbers and preshock density ratios, for the cases in which the initial ripple amplitude is small enough. In particular, it is shown that in the linear asymptotic phase, the contact surface ripple (ψ_{i}) grows as ψ_{∞}+δv_{i}^{∞}t, where ψ_{∞} is an asymptotic ordinate different from the postshock ripple amplitude at t=0+. This work is a continuation of the calculations of F. Cobos Campos and J. G. Wouchuk, [Phys. Rev. E 90, 053007 (2014)PLEEE81539-375510.1103/PhysRevE.90.053007] for a single shock moving into one fluid.

  8. Computational parametric study of a Richtmyer-Meshkov instability for an inclined interface.

    PubMed

    McFarland, Jacob A; Greenough, Jeffrey A; Ranjan, Devesh

    2011-08-01

    A computational study of the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability for an inclined interface is presented. The study covers experiments to be performed in the Texas A&M University inclined shock tube facility. Incident shock wave Mach numbers from 1.2 to 2.5, inclination angles from 30° to 60°, and gas pair Atwood numbers of ∼0.67 and ∼0.95 are used in this parametric study containing 15 unique combinations of these parameters. Qualitative results are examined through a time series of density plots for multiple combinations of these parameters, and the qualitative effects of each of the parameters are discussed. Pressure, density, and vorticity fields are presented in animations available online to supplement the discussion of the qualitative results. These density plots show the evolution of two main regions in the flow field: a mixing region containing driver and test gas that is dominated by large vortical structures, and a more homogeneous region of unmixed fluid which can separate away from the mixing region in some cases. The interface mixing width is determined for various combinations of the parameters listed at the beginning of the Abstract. A scaling method for the mixing width is proposed using the interface geometry and wave velocities calculated using one-dimensional gas dynamic equations. This model uses the transmitted wave velocity for the characteristic velocity and an initial offset time based on the travel time of strong reflected waves. It is compared to an adapted Richtmyer impulsive model scaling and shown to scale the initial mixing width growth rate more effectively for fixed Atwood number.

  9. A comparative study of the single-mode Richtmyer-Meshkov instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, X.; Deng, X.-L.; Jiang, L.

    2017-11-01

    In this work, the single-mode Richtmyer-Meshkov instability is studied numerically to find a reasonable nonlinear theoretical model which can be applied to predict the interface evolution from the linear stage to the early nonlinear stage. The cut-cell-based sharp-interface methods MuSiC+ (Chang et al. in J Comput Phys 242:946-990, 2013) and CCGF (Bai and Deng in Adv Appl Math Mech 9(5):1052-1075, 2017) are applied to generate numerical results for comparisons. Classical Air-SF6 and Air-Helium conditions are applied in this study, and initial amplitude and Atwood number are varied for comparison. Comparisons to the simulation results from the literature show the applicability of MuSiC+ and CCGF. Comparisons to the nonlinear theoretical models show that ZS (Zhang and Sohn in Phys Lett A 212:149-155, 1996; Phys Fluids 9:1106-1124, 1997), SEA (Sadot et al. in Phys Rev Lett 80:1654-1657, 1998), and DR (Dimonte and Ramaprabhu in Phys Fluids 22:014104, 2010) models are valid for both spike and bubble growth rates, and MIK (Mikaelian in Phys Rev E 67:026319, 2003) and ZG (Zhang and Guo in J Fluid Mech 786:47-61, 2016) models are valid for bubble growth rate, when the initial perturbation is small and the Atwood number is low, but only the DR model is applicable for both spike and bubble growth rates when the initial perturbation amplitude and the Atwood number are large. A new term of non-dimensional initial perturbation amplitude is presented and multiplied to the DR model to get a unified fitted DR model, which gives consistent results to the simulation ones for small and large initial amplitudes.

  10. Cylindrical effects on Richtmyer-Meshkov instability for arbitrary Atwood numbers in weakly nonlinear regime

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, W. H.; He, X. T.; LCP, Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100088

    2012-07-15

    When an incident shock collides with a corrugated interface separating two fluids of different densities, the interface is prone to Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI). Based on the formal perturbation expansion method as well as the potential flow theory, we present a simple method to investigate the cylindrical effects in weakly nonlinear RMI with the transmitted and reflected cylindrical shocks by considering the nonlinear corrections up to fourth order. The cylindrical results associated with the material interface show that the interface expression consists of two parts: the result in the planar system and that from the cylindrical effects. In the limit ofmore » the cylindrical radius tending to infinity, the cylindrical results can be reduced to those in the planar system. Our explicit results show that the cylindrical effects exert an inward velocity on the whole perturbed interface, regardless of bubbles or spikes of the interface. On the one hand, outgoing bubbles are constrained and ingoing spikes are accelerated for different Atwood numbers (A) and mode numbers k'. On the other hand, for ingoing bubbles, when |A|k'{sup 3/2} Less-Than-Or-Equivalent-To 1, bubbles are considerably accelerated especially at the small |A| and k'; otherwise, bubbles are decelerated. For outgoing spikes, when |A|k' Greater-Than-Or-Equivalent-To 1, spikes are dramatically accelerated especially at large |A| and k'; otherwise, spikes are decelerated. Furthermore, the cylindrical effects have a significant influence on the amplitudes of the ingoing spike and bubble for large k'. Thus, it should be included in applications where the cylindrical effects play a role, such as inertial confinement fusion ignition target design.« less

  11. Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov instability induced flow, turbulence, and mixing. I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ye

    2017-12-01

    Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) and Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instabilities play an important role in a wide range of engineering, geophysical, and astrophysical flows. They represent a triggering event that, in many cases, leads to large-scale turbulent mixing. Much effort has been expended over the past 140 years, beginning with the seminal work of Lord Rayleigh, to predict the evolution of the instabilities and of the instability-induced mixing layers. The objective of Part I of this review is to provide the basic properties of the flow, turbulence, and mixing induced by RT, RM, and Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instabilities. Historical efforts to study these instabilities are briefly reviewed, and the significance of these instabilities is discussed for a variety of flows, particularly for astrophysical flows and for the case of inertial confinement fusion. Early experimental efforts are described, and analytical attempts to model the linear, and nonlinear regimes of these mixing layers are examined. These analytical efforts include models for both single-mode and multi-mode initial conditions, as well as multi-scale models to describe the evolution. Comparisons of these models and theories to experimental and simulation studies are then presented. Next, attention is paid to the issue of the influence of stabilizing mechanisms (e.g., viscosity, surface tension, and diffuse interface) on the evolution of these instabilities, as well as the limitations and successes of numerical methods. Efforts to study these instabilities and mixing layers using group-theoretic ideas, as well as more formal notions of turbulence cascade processes during the later stages of the induced mixing layers, are inspected. A key element of the review is the discussion of the late-time self-similar scaling for the RT and RM growth factors, α and θ. These parameters are influenced by the initial conditions and much of the observed variation can be explained by this. In some cases, these instabilities

  12. Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov instability induced flow, turbulence, and mixing. II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ye

    2017-12-01

    Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) and Richtmyer-Meshkov(RM) instabilities are well-known pathways towards turbulent mixing layers, in many cases characterized by significant mass and species exchange across the mixing layers (Zhou, 2017. Physics Reports, 720-722, 1-136). Mathematically, the pathway to turbulent mixing requires that the initial interface be multimodal, to permit cross-mode coupling leading to turbulence. Practically speaking, it is difficult to experimentally produce a non-multi-mode initial interface. Numerous methods and approaches have been developed to describe the late, multimodal, turbulent stages of RT and RM mixing layers. This paper first presents the initial condition dependence of RT mixing layers, and introduces parameters that are used to evaluate the level of "mixedness" and "mixed mass" within the layers, as well as the dependence on density differences, as well as the characteristic anisotropy of this acceleration-driven flow, emphasizing some of the key differences between the two-dimensional and three-dimensional RT mixing layers. Next, the RM mixing layers are discussed, and differences with the RT mixing layer are elucidated, including the RM mixing layers dependence on the Mach number of the initiating shock. Another key feature of the RM induced flows is its response to a reshock event, as frequently seen in shock-tube experiments as well as inertial confinement events. A number of approaches to modeling the evolution of these mixing layers are then described, in order of increasing complexity. These include simple buoyancy-drag models, Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes models of increased complexity, including K- ε, K-L, and K- L- a models, up to full Reynolds-stress models with more than one length-scale. Multifield models and multiphase models have also been implemented. Additional complexities to these flows are examined as well as modifications to the models to understand the effects of these complexities. These complexities include the

  13. Using growth and arrest of Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities and Lagrangian simulations to study high-rate material strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prime, M. B.; Vaughan, D. E.; Preston, D. L.; Buttler, W. T.; Chen, S. R.; Oró, D. M.; Pack, C.

    2014-05-01

    Experiments applying a supported shock through mating surfaces (Atwood number = 1) with geometrical perturbations have been proposed for studying strength at strain rates up to 107/s using Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instabilities. Buttler et al. recently reported experimental results for RM instability growth in copper but with an unsupported shock applied by high explosives and the geometrical perturbations on the opposite free surface (Atwood number = -1). This novel configuration allowed detailed experimental observation of the instability growth and arrest. We present results and interpretation from numerical simulations of the Buttler RM instability experiments. Highly-resolved, two-dimensional simulations were performed using a Lagrangian hydrocode and the Preston-Tonks-Wallace (PTW) strength model. The model predictions show good agreement with the data. The numerical simulations are used to examine various assumptions previously made in an analytical model and to estimate the sensitivity of such experiments to material strength.

  14. A comparative study of Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities in 2D and 3D in tantalum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sternberger, Z.; Maddox, B. R.; Opachich, Y. P.; Wehrenberg, C. E.; Kraus, R. G.; Remington, B. A.; Randall, G. C.; Farrell, M.; Ravichandran, G.

    2017-01-01

    Driving a shock wave through the interface between two materials with different densities can result in the Richtmyer-Meshkov or Rayleigh-Taylor instability and initial perturbations at the interface will grow. If the shock wave is sufficiently strong, the instability will lead to plastic flow at the interface. Material strength will reduce the amount of plastic flow and suppress growth. While such instabilities have been investigated in 2D, no studies of this phenomena have been performed in 3D on materials with strength. Initial perturbations to seed the hydrodynamic instability were coined into tantalum recovery targets. Two types of perturbations were used, two dimensional (2D) perturbations (hill and valley) and three-dimensional (3D) perturbations (egg crate pattern). The targets were subjected to dynamic loading using the Janus laser at the Jupiter Laser Facility. Shock pressures ranged from 50 GPa up to 150 GPa and were calibrated using VISAR drive targets.

  15. Richtmyer-Meshkov instability for elastic-plastic solids in converging geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López Ortega, A.; Lombardini, M.; Barton, P. T.; Pullin, D. I.; Meiron, D. I.

    2015-03-01

    We present a detailed study of the interface instability that develops at the boundary between a shell of elastic-plastic material and a cylindrical core of confined gas during the inbound implosive motion generated by a shock-wave. The main instability in this configuration is the so-called Richtmyer-Meshkov instability that arises when the shock wave crosses the material interface. Secondary instabilities, such as Rayleigh-Taylor, due to the acceleration of the interface, and Kelvin-Helmholtz, due to slip between solid and fluid, arise as the motion progresses. The reflection of the shock wave at the axis and its second interaction with the material interface as the shock moves outbound, commonly known as re-shock, results in a second Richtmyer-Meshkov instability that potentially increases the growth rate of interface perturbations, resulting in the formation of a mixing zone typical of fluid-fluid configurations and the loss of the initial perturbation length scales. The study of this problem is of interest for achieving stable inertial confinement fusion reactions but its complexity and the material conditions produced by the implosion close to the axis prove to be challenging for both experimental and numerical approaches. In this paper, we attempt to circumvent some of the difficulties associated with a classical numerical treatment of this problem, such as element inversion in Lagrangian methods or failure to maintain the relationship between the determinant of the deformation tensor and the density in Eulerian approaches, and to provide a description of the different events that occur during the motion of the interface. For this purpose, a multi-material numerical solver for evolving in time the equations of motion for solid and fluid media in an Eulerian formalism has been implemented in a Cartesian grid. Equations of state are derived using thermodynamically consistent hyperelastic relations between internal energy and stresses. The resolution required

  16. Normal velocity freeze-out of the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability when a rarefaction is reflected

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wouchuk, J. G.; Sano, T.

    2015-02-01

    The Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI) develops when a shock front hits a rippled contact surface separating two different fluids. After the incident shock refraction, a transmitted shock is always formed and another shock or a rarefaction is reflected back. The pressure-entropy-vorticity fields generated by the rippled wave fronts are responsible for the generation of hydrodynamic perturbations in both fluids. In linear theory, the contact surface ripple reaches an asymptotic normal velocity which is dependent on the incident shock Mach number, fluids density ratio, and compressibilities. It was speculated in the past about the possibility of getting a zero value for the asymptotic normal velocity, a phenomenon that was called "freeze-out" [G. Fraley, Phys. Fluids 29, 376 (1986), 10.1063/1.865722; K. Mikaelian, Phys. Fluids 6, 356 (1994), 10.1063/1.868091, A. L. Velikovich et al., Phys. Plasmas 8, 592 (2001), 10.1063/1.1335829]. In a previous paper, freeze-out was studied for the case when a shock is reflected at the contact surface [J. G. Wouchuk and K. Nishihara, Phys. Rev. E 70, 026305 (2004), 10.1103/PhysRevE.70.026305]. In this work the freeze-out of the RMI is studied for the case in which a rarefaction is reflected back. Two different regimes are found: nearly equal preshock densities at the interface at any shock intensity, and very large density difference for strong shocks. The contour curves that relate shock Mach number and preshock density ratio are obtained in both regimes for fluids with equal and different compressibilities. An analysis of the temporal evolution of different cases of freeze-out is shown. It is seen that the freeze-out is the result of the interaction between the unstable interface and the rippled wave fronts. As a general and qualitative criterion to look for freeze-out situations, it is seen that a necessary condition for freeze-out is the same orientation for the tangential velocities generated at each side of the contact

  17. Scaling Laws of Nonlinear Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov Instabilities in Two and Three Dimensions (IFSA 1999)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shvarts, D.; Oron, D.; Kartoon, D.; Rikanati, A.; Sadot, O.; Srebro, Y.; Yedvab, Y.; Ofer, D.; Levin, A.; Sarid, E.; Ben-Dor, G.; Erez, L.; Erez, G.; Yosef-Hai, A.; Alon, U.; Arazi, L.

    2016-10-01

    The late-time nonlinear evolution of the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) and Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instabilities for random initial perturbations is investigated using a statistical mechanics model based on single-mode and bubble-competition physics at all Atwood numbers (A) and full numerical simulations in two and three dimensions. It is shown that the RT mixing zone bubble and spike fronts evolve as h ~ α · A · gt2 with different values of a for the bubble and spike fronts. The RM mixing zone fronts evolve as h ~ tθ with different values of θ for bubbles and spikes. Similar analysis yields a linear growth with time of the Kelvin-Helmholtz mixing zone. The dependence of the RT and RM scaling parameters on A and the dimensionality will be discussed. The 3D predictions are found to be in good agreement with recent Linear Electric Motor (LEM) experiments.

  18. Time-resolved particle image velocimetry measurements of the 3D single-mode Richtmyer-Meshkov instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Qian

    The Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability (RMI) (Commun. Pure Appl. Math 23, 297-319, 1960; Izv. Akad. Nauk. SSSR Maekh. Zhidk. Gaza. 4, 151-157, 1969) occurs due to an impulsive acceleration acting on a perturbed interface between two fluids of different densities. In the experiments presented in this thesis, single mode 3D RMI experiments are performed. An oscillating speaker generates a single mode sinusoidal initial perturbation at an interface of two gases, air and SF6. A Mach 1.19 shock wave accelerates the interface and generates the Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability. Both gases are seeded with propylene glycol particles which are illuminated by an Nd: YLF pulsed laser. Three high-speed video cameras record image sequences of the experiment. Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) is applied to measure the velocity field. Measurements of the amplitude for both spike and bubble are obtained, from which the growth rate is measured. For both spike and bubble experiments, amplitude and growth rate match the linear stability theory at early time, but fall into a non-linear region with amplitude measurements lying between the modified 3D Sadot et al. model ( Phys. Rev. Lett. 80, 1654-1657, 1998) and the Zhang & Sohn model (Phys. Fluids 9. 1106-1124, 1997; Z. Angew. Math Phys 50. 1-46, 1990) at late time. Amplitude and growth rate curves are found to lie above the modified 3D Sadot et al. model and below Zhang & Sohn model for the spike experiments. Conversely, for the bubble experiments, both amplitude and growth rate curves lie above the Zhang & Sohn model, and below the modified 3D Sadot et al. model. Circulation is also calculated using the vorticity and velocity fields from the PIV measurements. The calculated circulation are approximately equal and found to grow with time, a result that differs from the modified Jacobs and Sheeley's circulation model (Phys. Fluids 8, 405-415, 1996).

  19. Using Growth and Arrest of Richtmyer-Meshkov Instabilities and Lagrangian Simulations to Study High-Rate Material Strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prime, Michael; Vaughan, Diane; Preston, Dean; Oro, David; Buttler, William

    2013-06-01

    Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities have been widely used to study the deviatoric (flow) strength of solids at high strain rates. More recently, experiments applying a supported shock through mating surfaces (Atwood number = 1) with geometrical perturbations have been proposed for studying strength at strain rates up to 107/sec using Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instabilities. Buttler et al. [J. Fluid Mech., 2012] recently reported experimental results for RM instability growth but with an unsupported shock applied by high explosives and the geometrical perturbations on the opposite free surface (Atwood number = -1). This novel configuration allowed detailed experimental observation of the instability growth and arrest. We present results and detailed interpretation from numerical simulations of the Buttler experiments on copper. Highly-resolved, two-dimensional simulations were performed using a Lagrangian hydrocode and the Preston-Tonks-Wallace (PTW) strength model. The model predictions show good agreement with the data in spite of the PTW model being calibrated on lower strain rate data. The numerical simulations are used to 1) examine various assumptions previously made in an analytical model, 2) to estimate the sensitivity of such experiments to material strength and 3) to explore the possibility of extracting meaningful strength information in the face of complicated spatial and temporal variations of stress, pressure, and temperature during the experiments.

  20. Oscillations of a standing shock wave generated by the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikaelian, Karnig O.

    2016-07-01

    In a typical Richtmyer-Meshkov experiment a fast moving flat shock strikes a stationary perturbed interface between fluids A and B creating a transmitted and a reflected shock, both of which are perturbed. We propose shock tube experiments in which the reflected shock is stationary in the laboratory. Such a standing perturbed shock undergoes well-known damped oscillations. We present the conditions required for producing such a standing shock wave, which greatly facilitates the measurement of the oscillations and their rate of damping. We define a critical density ratio Rcritical, in terms of the adiabatic indices of the two fluids, and a critical Mach number Mscritical of the incident shock wave, which produces a standing reflected wave. If the initial density ratio R of the two fluids is less than Rcritical then a standing shock wave is possible at Ms=Mscritical . Otherwise a standing shock is not possible and the reflected wave always moves in the direction opposite the incident shock. Examples are given for present-day operating shock tubes with sinusoidal or inclined interfaces. We consider the effect of viscosity, which affects the damping rate of the oscillations. We point out that nonlinear bubble and spike amplitudes depend relatively weakly on the viscosity of the fluids and that the interface area is a better diagnostic.

  1. Oscillations of a standing shock wave generated by the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability

    DOE PAGES

    Mikaelian, Karnig O.

    2016-07-13

    In a typical Richtmyer-Meshkov experiment a fast moving flat shock strikes a stationary perturbed interface between fluids A and B creating a transmitted and a reflected shock, both of which are perturbed. We propose shock tube experiments in which the reflected shock is stationary in the laboratory. Such a standing perturbed shock undergoes well-known damped oscillations. We present the conditions required for producing such a standing shock wave, which greatly facilitates the measurement of the oscillations and their rate of damping. We define a critical density ratio R critical, in terms of the adiabatic indices of the two fluids, andmore » a critical Mach number M critical s of the incident shock wave, which produces a standing reflected wave. If the initial density ratio R of the two fluids is less than R critical then a standing shock wave is possible at M s=M critical s. Otherwise a standing shock is not possible and the reflected wave always moves in the direction opposite the incident shock. Examples are given for present-day operating shock tubes with sinusoidal or inclined interfaces. We consider the effect of viscosity, which affects the damping rate of the oscillations. Furthermore, we point out that nonlinear bubble and spike amplitudes depend relatively weakly on the viscosity of the fluids and that the interface area is a better diagnostic.« less

  2. Time-resolved particle image velocimetry measurements of the 3D single-mode Richtmyer-Meshkov instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Qian; Krivets, Vitaliy V.; Sewell, Everest G.; Jacobs, Jeffrey W.

    2016-11-01

    A vertical shock tube is used to perform experiments on the single-mode three-dimensional Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability (RMI). The light gas (Air) and the heavy gas (SF6) enter from the top and the bottom of the shock tube driven section to form the interface. The initial perturbation is then generated by oscillating the gases vertically. Both gases are seeded with particles generated through vaporizing propylene glycol. An incident shock wave (M 1.2) impacts the interface to create an impulsive acceleration. The seeded particles are illuminated by a dual cavity 75W, Nd: YLF laser. Three high-speed CMOS cameras record time sequences of image pairs at a rate of 2 kHz. The initial perturbation used is that of a single, square-mode perturbation with either a single spike or a single bubble positioned at the center of the shock tube. The full time dependent velocity field is obtained allowing the determination of the circulation versus time. In addition, the evolution of time dependent amplitude is also determined. The results are compared with PIV measurements from previous two-dimensional single mode experiments along with PLIF measurements from previous three-dimensional single mode experiments.

  3. Comparing the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability of thermal and ion-species interfaces in two-fluid plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheatley, Vincent; Bond, Daryl; Li, Yuan; Samtaney, Ravi; Pullin, Dale

    2017-11-01

    The Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI) of a shock accelerated perturbed density interface is important in both inertial confinement fusion and astrophysics, where the materials involved are typically in the plasma state. Initial density interfaces can be due to either temperature or ion-species discontinuities. If the Atwood number of the interfaces and specific heat ratios of the fluids are matched, these two cases behave similarly when modeled using the equations of either hydrodynamics or magnetohydrodynamics. In the two-fluid ion-electron plasma model, however, there is a significant difference between them: In the thermal interface case, there is a discontinuity in electron density that is also subject to the RMI, while for the ion-species interface case there is not. It will be shown via ideal two-fluid plasma simulations that this causes substantial differences in the dynamics of the flow between the two cases. This work was partially supported by the KAUST Office of Sponsored Research under Award URF/1/2162-01.

  4. Molecular-dynamics simulation of Richtmyer-Meshkov instability on a Li-H2 interface at extreme compressing conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Shenghong; Wang, Weirong; Luo, Xisheng

    2018-06-01

    The new characteristics of Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI) under extreme shock conditions are numerically studied by using molecular dynamics simulation incorporated with the electron force field model. The emphasis is placed on the ionization effects caused by different impacting speeds (6-30 km/s) on the microscale RMI on a Li-H2 interface. The linear region of the amplitude growth rate of the shocked interface under extreme shock conditions is observed to be much longer than that at the ordinary impact, which is in good accord with experimental results obtained with a Nova laser. It is also found that the amplitude of the nonlinear region is larger than the ordinary counterpart or the prediction by theory without considering the ionization effect. The two new characteristics are attributed to the ambipolar acceleration induced by the extra electric field due to the electron/ion separation under extreme shock conditions. These new findings may shed new light on the very complex physical process of the inertial confinement fusion on nanoscales.

  5. Model experiment of magnetic field amplification in laser-produced plasmas via the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability

    SciTech Connect

    Kuramitsu, Y., E-mail: yasu@ncu.edu.tw; Moritaka, T.; Ohnishi, N.

    2016-03-15

    A model experiment of magnetic field amplification (MFA) via the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI) in supernova remnants (SNRs) was performed using a high-power laser. In order to account for very-fast acceleration of cosmic rays observed in SNRs, it is considered that the magnetic field has to be amplified by orders of magnitude from its background level. A possible mechanism for the MFA in SNRs is stretching and mixing of the magnetic field via the RMI when shock waves pass through dense molecular clouds in interstellar media. In order to model the astrophysical phenomenon in laboratories, there are three necessary factors formore » the RMI to be operative: a shock wave, an external magnetic field, and density inhomogeneity. By irradiating a double-foil target with several laser beams with focal spot displacement under influence of an external magnetic field, shock waves were excited and passed through the density inhomogeneity. Radiative hydrodynamic simulations show that the RMI evolves as the density inhomogeneity is shocked, resulting in higher MFA.« less

  6. Appearance of deterministic mixing behavior from ensembles of fluctuating hydrodynamics simulations of the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanan, Kiran; Samtaney, Ravi

    2018-04-01

    We obtain numerical solutions of the two-fluid fluctuating compressible Navier-Stokes (FCNS) equations, which consistently account for thermal fluctuations from meso- to macroscales, in order to study the effect of such fluctuations on the mixing behavior in the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI). The numerical method used was successfully verified in two stages: for the deterministic fluxes by comparison against air-SF6 RMI experiment, and for the stochastic terms by comparison against the direct simulation Monte Carlo results for He-Ar RMI. We present results from fluctuating hydrodynamic RMI simulations for three He-Ar systems having length scales with decreasing order of magnitude that span from macroscopic to mesoscopic, with different levels of thermal fluctuations characterized by a nondimensional Boltzmann number (Bo). For a multidimensional FCNS system on a regular Cartesian grid, when using a discretization of a space-time stochastic flux Z (x ,t ) of the form Z (x ,t ) →1 /√{h ▵ t }N (i h ,n Δ t ) for spatial interval h , time interval Δ t , h , and Gaussian noise N should be greater than h0, with h0 corresponding to a cell volume that contains a sufficient number of molecules of the fluid such that the fluctuations are physically meaningful and produce the right equilibrium spectrum. For the mesoscale RMI systems simulated, it was desirable to use a cell size smaller than this limit in order to resolve the viscous shock. This was achieved by using a modified regularization of the noise term via Z (h3,h03)>x ,t →1 /√ ▵ t max(i h ,n Δ t ) , with h0=ξ h ∀h

  7. Behaviour of rippled shocks from ablatively-driven Richtmyer-Meshkov in metals accounting for strength

    DOE PAGES

    Opie, S.; Gautam, S.; Fortin, E.; ...

    2016-05-26

    While numerous continuum material strength and phase transformation models have been proposed to capture their complex dependences on intensive properties and deformation history, few experimental methods are available to validate these models particularly in the large pressure and strain rate regime typical of strong shock and ramp dynamic loading. In the experiments and simulations we present, a rippled shock is created by laser-ablation of a periodic surface perturbation on a metal target. The strength of the shock can be tuned to access phase transitions in metals such as iron or simply to study high-pressure strength in isomorphic materials such asmore » copper. Simulations, with models calibrated and validated to the experiments, show that the evolution of the amplitude of imprinted perturbations on the back surface by the rippled shock is strongly affected by strength and phase transformation kinetics. Increased strength has a smoothing effect on the perturbed shock front profile resulting in smaller perturbations on the free surface. Lastly, in iron, faster phase transformations kinetics had a similar effect as increased strength, leading to smoother pressure contours inside the samples and smaller amplitudes of free surface perturbations in our simulations.« less

  8. Mathematical model of Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities for viscoelastic fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rollin, Bertrand; Andrews, Malcolm J.

    2011-04-01

    We extended the Goncharov model [V. N. Goncharov, Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.88.134502 88, 134502 (2002)] for nonlinear Rayleigh-Taylor instability of perfect fluids to the case of Rivlin-Ericksen viscoelastic fluids [R. S. Rivlin and J. L. Ericksen, Rat. Mech. Anal. 4, 323 (1955)], with surface tension. For Rayleigh-Taylor instability, viscosity, surface tension, and viscoelasticity decrease the exponential growth rate predicted by linear stability analysis. In particular, we find that viscosity and surface tension decrease the terminal bubble velocity, whereas viscoelasticity is found to have no effect. All three properties increase the saturation height of the bubble. In Richmyer-Meshkov instability, the decay of the asymptotic velocity depends on the balance between viscosity and surface tension, and viscoelasticity tends to slow the asymptotic velocity decay.

  9. Direct simulation Monte Carlo investigation of the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability

    DOE PAGES

    Gallis, Michail A.; Koehler, Timothy P.; Torczynski, John R.; ...

    2015-08-14

    The Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) is investigated using the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method of molecular gas dynamics. Here, fully resolved two-dimensional DSMC RTI simulations are performed to quantify the growth of flat and single-mode perturbed interfaces between two atmospheric-pressure monatomic gases as a function of the Atwood number and the gravitational acceleration. The DSMC simulations reproduce all qualitative features of the RTI and are in reasonable quantitative agreement with existing theoretical and empirical models in the linear, nonlinear, and self-similar regimes. At late times, the instability is seen to exhibit a self-similar behavior, in agreement with experimental observations. Formore » the conditions simulated, diffusion can influence the initial instability growth significantly.« less

  10. Investigations of the Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov Instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Riccardo Bonazza; Mark Anderson; Jason Oakley

    2008-03-14

    The present program is centered on the experimental study of shock-induced interfacial fluid instabilities. Both 2-D (near-sinusoids) and 3-D (spheres) initial conditions are studied in a large, vertical square shock tube facility. The evolution of the interface shape, its distortion, the modal growth rates and the mixing of the fluids at the interface are all objectives of the investigation. In parallel to the experiments, calculations are performed using the Raptor code, on platforms made available by LLNL. These flows are of great relevance to both ICF and stockpile stewardship. The involvement of four graduate students is in line with themore » national laboratories' interest in the education of scientists and engineers in disciplines and technologies consistent with the labs' missions and activities.« less

  11. Experiments and simulations of Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability with measured,volumetric initial conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sewell, Everest; Ferguson, Kevin; Jacobs, Jeffrey; Greenough, Jeff; Krivets, Vitaliy

    2016-11-01

    We describe experiments of single-shock Richtmyer-Meskhov Instability (RMI) performed on the shock tube apparatus at the University of Arizona in which the initial conditions are volumetrically imaged prior to shock wave arrival. Initial perturbations play a major role in the evolution of RMI, and previous experimental efforts only capture a single plane of the initial condition. The method presented uses a rastered laser sheet to capture additional images throughout the depth of the initial condition immediately before the shock arrival time. These images are then used to reconstruct a volumetric approximation of the experimental perturbation. Analysis of the initial perturbations is performed, and then used as initial conditions in simulations using the hydrodynamics code ARES, developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Experiments are presented and comparisons are made with simulation results.

  12. PIV measurements of the single-mode Richtmyer-Meshkov instability.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aure, Roger; Jacobs, Jeff

    2006-11-01

    Experiments will be presented where a system of two gases of different densities (A = 0.66) is impulsively accelerated to produce Richtmeyer-Meshkov (RM) instability. An interface is created by filling the driven section of a 9.8 meter long vertical shock tube with opposing gas flows of air and Sulfur Hexafluoride (SF6). The interface forms in the top of the Plexiglas test section where the two gasses meet and exit through two slots. The gases are seeded with 0.3 μm polystyrene Latex spheres. An initial 2-D perturbation in the form of a standing wave of sinusoidal shape is created by oscillating the driven section in the horizontal direction. The interface between the gases is impulsively accelerated by an M=1.2 shockwave. One image per experiment is captured with a cooled CCD camera. The image is doubly exposed by a double-pulsed ND-YAG laser and is analyzed using autocorrelation PIV techniques. Results will be presented showing velocity and vorticity distribution in the RM flow.

  13. Richtmyer-Meshkov instability of a sinusoidal interface driven by a cylindrical shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, L.; Ding, J.; Zhai, Z.; Luo, X.

    2018-04-01

    Evolution of a single-mode interface triggered by a cylindrically converging shock in a V-shaped geometry is investigated numerically using an adaptive multi-phase solver. Several physical mechanisms, including the Bell-Plesset (BP) effect, the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) effect, the nonlinearity, and the compressibility are found to be pronounced in the converging environment. Generally, the BP and nonlinear effects play an important role at early stages, while the RT effect and the compressibility dominate the late-stage evolution. Four sinusoidal interfaces with different initial amplitudes (a_0 ) and wavelengths (λ ) are found to evolve differently in the converging geometry. For the very small a_0 /λ interfaces, nonlinearity is negligible at the early stages and the sole presence of the BP effect results in an increasing growth rate, confining the linear growth of the instability to a relatively small amount of time. For the moderately small a_0 /λ cases, the BP and nonlinear effects, which, respectively, promote and inhibit the perturbation development, coexist in the early stage. The counterbalancing effects between them produce a very long period of growth that is linear in time, even to a moment when the amplitude over wavelength ratio approaches 0.6. The RT stabilization effect at late stages due to the interface deceleration significantly inhibits the perturbation growth, which can be reasonably predicted by a modified Bell model.

  14. A platform for studying the Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities in a planar geometry at high energy density at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagel, S. R.; Raman, K. S.; Huntington, C. M.; MacLaren, S. A.; Wang, P.; Barrios, M. A.; Baumann, T.; Bender, J. D.; Benedetti, L. R.; Doane, D. M.; Felker, S.; Fitzsimmons, P.; Flippo, K. A.; Holder, J. P.; Kaczala, D. N.; Perry, T. S.; Seugling, R. M.; Savage, L.; Zhou, Y.

    2017-07-01

    A new experimental platform has been developed at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) for studying the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) and Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instabilities in a planar geometry at high-energy-densities. The platform uses 60 beams of the NIF laser to drive an initially solid shock tube containing a pre-machined interface between dense and light materials. The strong shock turns the initially solid target into a plasma and the material boundary into a fluid interface with the imprinted initial condition. The interface evolves by action of the RT and RM instabilities, and the growth is imaged with backlit x-ray radiography. We present our first data involving sinusoidal interface perturbations driven from the heavy side to the light side. Late-time radiographic images show the initial conditions reaching the deeply nonlinear regime, and an evolution of fine structure consistent with a transition to turbulence. We show preliminary comparisons with post-shot numerical simulations and discuss the implications for future campaigns.

  15. Modal interactions between a large-wavelength inclined interface and small-wavelength multimode perturbations in a Richtmyer-Meshkov instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFarland, Jacob A.; Reilly, David; Black, Wolfgang; Greenough, Jeffrey A.; Ranjan, Devesh

    2015-07-01

    The interaction of a small-wavelength multimodal perturbation with a large-wavelength inclined interface perturbation is investigated for the reshocked Richtmyer-Meshkov instability using three-dimensional simulations. The ares code, developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, was used for these simulations and a detailed comparison of simulation results and experiments performed at the Georgia Tech Shock Tube facility is presented first for code validation. Simulation results are presented for four cases that vary in large-wavelength perturbation amplitude and the presence of secondary small-wavelength multimode perturbations. Previously developed measures of mixing and turbulence quantities are presented that highlight the large variation in perturbation length scales created by the inclined interface and the multimode complex perturbation. Measures are developed for entrainment, and turbulence anisotropy that help to identify the effects of and competition between each perturbations type. It is shown through multiple measures that before reshock the flow processes a distinct memory of the initial conditions that is present in both large-scale-driven entrainment measures and small-scale-driven mixing measures. After reshock the flow develops to a turbulentlike state that retains a memory of high-amplitude but not low-amplitude large-wavelength perturbations. It is also shown that the high-amplitude large-wavelength perturbation is capable of producing small-scale mixing and turbulent features similar to the small-wavelength multimode perturbations.

  16. Late-time growth rate, mixing, and anisotropy in the multimode narrowband Richtmyer-Meshkov instability: The θ-group collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thornber, B.; Griffond, J.; Poujade, O.; Attal, N.; Varshochi, H.; Bigdelou, P.; Ramaprabhu, P.; Olson, B.; Greenough, J.; Zhou, Y.; Schilling, O.; Garside, K. A.; Williams, R. J. R.; Batha, C. A.; Kuchugov, P. A.; Ladonkina, M. E.; Tishkin, V. F.; Zmitrenko, N. V.; Rozanov, V. B.; Youngs, D. L.

    2017-10-01

    Turbulent Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI) is investigated through a series of high resolution three-dimensional simulations of two initial conditions with eight independent codes. The simulations are initialised with a narrowband perturbation such that instability growth is due to non-linear coupling/backscatter from the energetic modes, thus generating the lowest expected growth rate from a pure RMI. By independently assessing the results from each algorithm and computing ensemble averages of multiple algorithms, the results allow a quantification of key flow properties as well as the uncertainty due to differing numerical approaches. A new analytical model predicting the initial layer growth for a multimode narrowband perturbation is presented, along with two models for the linear and non-linear regimes combined. Overall, the growth rate exponent is determined as θ =0.292 ±0.009 , in good agreement with prior studies; however, the exponent is decaying slowly in time. Also, θ is shown to be relatively insensitive to the choice of mixing layer width measurements. The asymptotic integral molecular mixing measures Θ =0.792 ±0.014 , Ξ =0.800 ±0.014 , and Ψ =0.782 ±0.013 are lower than some experimental measurements but within the range of prior numerical studies. The flow field is shown to be persistently anisotropic for all algorithms, at the latest time having between 49% and 66% higher kinetic energy in the shock parallel direction compared to perpendicular and does not show any return to isotropy. The plane averaged volume fraction profiles at different time instants collapse reasonably well when scaled by the integral width, implying that the layer can be described by a single length scale and thus a single θ. Quantitative data given for both ensemble averages and individual algorithms provide useful benchmark results for future research.

  17. In search of late time evolution self-similar scaling laws of Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov hydrodynamic instabilities - recent theorical advance and NIF Discovery-Science experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shvarts, Dov

    2017-10-01

    Hydrodynamic instabilities, and the mixing that they cause, are of crucial importance in describing many phenomena, from very large scales such as stellar explosions (supernovae) to very small scales, such as inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions. Such mixing causes the ejection of stellar core material in supernovae, and impedes attempts at ICF ignition. The Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) occurs at an accelerated interface between two fluids with the lower density accelerating the higher density fluid. The Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instability occurs when a shock wave passes an interface between the two fluids of different density. In the RTI, buoyancy causes ``bubbles'' of the light fluid to rise through (penetrate) the denser fluid, while ``spikes'' of the heavy fluid sink through (penetrate) the lighter fluid. With realistic multi-mode initial conditions, in the deep nonlinear regime, the mixing zone width, H, and its internal structure, progress through an inverse cascade of spatial scales, reaching an asymptotic self-similar evolution: hRT =αRT Agt2 for RT and hRM =αRM tθ for RM. While this characteristic behavior has been known for years, the self-similar parameters αRT and θRM and their dependence on dimensionality and density ratio have continued to be intensively studied and a relatively wide distribution of those values have emerged. This talk will describe recent theoretical advances in the description of this turbulent mixing evolution that sheds light on the spread in αRT and θRM. Results of new and specially designed experiments, done by scientists from several laboratories, were performed recently using NIF, the only facility that is powerful enough to reach the self-similar regime, for quantitative testing of this theoretical advance, will be presented.

  18. Richtmyer-Meshkov flow in elastic solids.

    PubMed

    Piriz, A R; López Cela, J J; Tahir, N A; Hoffmann, D H H

    2006-09-01

    Richtmyer-Meshkov flow is studied by means of an analytical model which describes the asymptotic oscillations of a corrugated interface between two perfectly elastic solids after the interaction with a shock wave. The model shows that the flow stability is due to the restoring effect of the elastic force. It provides a simple approximate but still very accurate formula for the oscillation period. It also shows that as it is observed in numerical simulations, the amplitude oscillates around a mean value equal to the post-shock amplitude, and that this is a consequence of the stress free conditions of the material immediately after the shock interaction. Extensive numerical simulations are presented to validate the model results.

  19. Richtmyer-Meshkov jet formation from rear target ripples in plastic and plastic/aluminum laser targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aglitskiy, Y.; Velikovich, A. L.; Karasik, M.; Serlin, V.; Weaver, J. L.; Schmitt, A. J.; Obenschain, S. P.

    2015-11-01

    We report experimental observations of jets produced from the rear surface of laser targets after a passage of the laser-driven shock wave. As in our previous work, Aglitskiy et al., Phys. Plasmas (2012), the jets are produced via the shaped-charge mechanism, a manifestation of a Richtmyer-Meshkov instability for a particular case of the Atwood number A =-1. The experiments done on the KrF Nike laser facility with laser wavelength 248 nm, a 4 ns pulse, and low-energy drive regime that used only 1 to 3 overlapping Nike beams and generated ablative pressure below 1 Mbar. Our 50 um thick planar targets were rippled on the rear side with wavelength 45 μm and peak-to-valley amplitude 15 μm. The targets were made either of solid plastic or of aluminum with a 10 μm thick plastic ablator attached to avoid the radiation preheat. The jets were extremely well collimated, which made possible our side-on observations with monochromatic x-ray imaging. We saw a regular set of jets, clearly separated along the 500 μm line of sight. Aluminum jets were found to be slightly better collimated than plastic jets. A quasi-spherical late-time expansion of Al jets starting from the tips has not been previously seen in experiments or simulations. Work supported by the US DOE/NNSA.

  20. Shock front distortion and Richtmyer-Meshkov-type growth caused by a small preshock nonuniformity

    SciTech Connect

    Velikovich, A. L.; Wouchuk, J. G.; Huete Ruiz de Lira, C.

    The response of a shock front to small preshock nonuniformities of density, pressure, and velocity is studied theoretically and numerically. These preshock nonuniformities emulate imperfections of a laser target, due either to its manufacturing, like joints or feeding tubes, or to preshock perturbation seeding/growth, as well as density fluctuations in foam targets, ''thermal layers'' near heated surfaces, etc. Similarly to the shock-wave interaction with a small nonuniformity localized at a material interface, which triggers a classical Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instability, interaction of a shock wave with periodic or localized preshock perturbations distributed in the volume distorts the shape of the shockmore » front and can cause a RM-type instability growth. Explicit asymptotic formulas describing distortion of the shock front and the rate of RM-type growth are presented. These formulas are favorably compared both to the exact solutions of the corresponding initial-boundary-value problem and to numerical simulations. It is demonstrated that a small density modulation localized sufficiently close to a flat target surface produces the same perturbation growth as an 'equivalent' ripple on the surface of a uniform target, characterized by the same initial areal mass modulation amplitude.« less

  1. Effect of pressure fluctuations on Richtmyer-Meshkov coherent structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhowmick, Aklant K.; Abarzhi, Snezhana

    2016-11-01

    We investigate the formation and evolution of Richtmyer Meshkov bubbles after the passage of a shock wave across a two fluid interface in the presence of pressure fluctuations. The fluids are ideal and incompressible and the pressure fluctuations are scale invariant in space and time, and are modeled by a power law time dependent acceleration field with exponent -2. Solutions indicate sensitivity to pressure fluctuations. In the linear regime, the growth of curvature and bubble velocity is linear. The growth rate is dominated by the initial velocity for weak pressure fluctuations, and by the acceleration term for strong pressure fluctuations. In the non-linear regime, the bubble curvature is constant and the solutions form a one parameter family (parametrized by the bubble curvature). The solutions are shown to be convergent and asymptotically stable. The physical solution (stable fastest growing) is a flat bubble for small pressure fluctuations and a curved bubble for large pressure fluctuations. The velocity field (in the frame of references accounting for the background motion) involves intense motion of the fluids in a vicinity of the interface, effectively no motion of the fluids away from the interfaces, and formation of vortical structures at the interface. The work is supported by the US National Science Foundation.

  2. Effect of pressure fluctuations on Richtmyer-Meshkov coherent structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhowmick, Aklant K.; Abarzhi, Snezhana

    2016-10-01

    We investigate the formation and evolution of Richtmyer Meshkov bubbles after the passage of a shock wave across a two fluid interface in the presence of pressure fluctuations. The fluids are ideal and incompressible and the pressure fluctuations are scale invariant in space and time, and are modeled by a power law time dependent acceleration field with exponent -2. Solutions indicate sensitivity to pressure fluctuations. In the linear regime, the growth of curvature and bubble velocity is linear. The growth rate is dominated by the initial velocity for weak pressure fluctuations, and by the acceleration term for strong pressure fluctuations. In the non-linear regime, the bubble curvature is constant and the solutions form a one parameter family (parametrized by the bubble curvature). The solutions are shown to be convergent and asymptotically stable. The physical solution (stable fastest growing) is a flat bubble for small pressure fluctuations and a curved bubble for large pressure fluctuations. The velocity field (in the frame of references accounting for the background motion) involves intense motion of the fluids in a vicinity of the interface, effectively no motion of the fluids away from the interfaces, and formation of vortical structures at the interface. The work is supported by the US National Science Foundation.

  3. Effect of a relative phase of waves constituting the initial perturbation and the wave interference on the dynamics of strong-shock-driven Richtmyer-Meshkov flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandian, Arun; Stellingwerf, Robert F.; Abarzhi, Snezhana I.

    2017-07-01

    While it is a common wisdom that initial conditions influence the evolution of the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI), the research in this area is focused primarily on the effects of the wavelength and amplitude of the interface perturbation. The information has hitherto largely ignored the influences on RMI dynamics of the relative phase of waves constituting a multiwave initial perturbation and the interference of the perturbation waves. In this work we systematically study the influence of the relative phase and the interference of waves constituting a multiwave initial perturbation on a strong-shock-driven Richtmyer-Meshkov unstable interface separating ideal fluids with contrast densities. We apply group theory analysis and smoothed particle hydrodynamics numerical simulations. For verification and validation of the simulations, qualitative and quantitative comparisons are performed with rigorous zeroth-order, linear, and nonlinear theories as well as with gas dynamics experiments achieving good agreement. For a sample case of a two-wave (two-mode) initial perturbation we select the first-wave amplitude enabling the maximum initial growth rate of the RMI and we vary the second-wave amplitude from 1% to 100% of the first-wave amplitude. We also vary the relative phase of the first and second waves and consider the in-phase, the antiphase and the random-phase cases. We find that the relative phase and the interference of waves are important factors of RMI dynamics influencing qualitatively and quantitatively the symmetry, morphology, and growth rate of the Richtmyer-Meshkov unstable interface, as well as the order and disorder in strong-shock-driven RMI.

  4. Application of Self-Similarity Constrained Reynolds-Averaged Turbulence Models to Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov Unstable Turbulent Mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartland, Tucker A.; Schilling, Oleg

    2016-11-01

    Analytical self-similar solutions corresponding to Rayleigh-Taylor, Richtmyer-Meshkov and Kelvin-Helmholtz instability are combined with observed values of the growth parameters in these instabilities to derive coefficient sets for K- ɛ and K- L- a Reynolds-averaged turbulence models. It is shown that full numerical solutions of the model equations give mixing layer widths, fields, and budgets in good agreement with the corresponding self-similar quantities for small Atwood number. Both models are then applied to Rayleigh-Taylor instability with increasing density contrasts to estimate the Atwood number above which the self-similar solutions become invalid. The models are also applied to a reshocked Richtmyer-Meshkov instability, and the predictions are compared with data. The expressions for the growth parameters obtained from the similarity analysis are used to develop estimates for the sensitivity of their values to changes in important model coefficients. Numerical simulations using these modified coefficient values are then performed to provide bounds on the model predictions associated with uncertainties in these coefficient values. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. This work was supported by the 2016 LLNL High-Energy-Density Physics Summer Student Program.

  5. Classical and Ablative Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability and Other ICF-Relevant Plasma Flows Diagnosed With Monochromatic X-Ray Imaging

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-08-01

    5] Our experiments on the 3 kJ Nike KrF laser at NRL [6] seek detailed understanding of laser plasma interactions and the physical processes...Research Laboratory (NRL). It has been first used in our ICF-related hydrodynamic experiments on the NRL’s Nike KrF laser [17], and later implemented...as implemented on Nike . In Section 3 we present some results of our hydrodynamic experiments, which have been made possible by this diagnostics. In

  6. Simulation of Richtmyer-Meshkov flows for elastic-plastic solids in planar and converging geometries using an Eulerian framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez Ortega, Alejandro

    This thesis presents a numerical and analytical study of two problems of interest involving shock waves propagating through elastic-plastic media: the motion of converging (imploding) shocks and the Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instability. Since the stress conditions encountered in these cases normally produce large deformations in the materials, an Eulerian description, in which the spatial coordinates are fixed, is employed. This formulation enables a direct comparison of similarities and differences between the present study of phenomena driven by shock-loading in elastic-plastic solids, and in fluids, where they have been studied extensively. In the first application, Whitham's shock dynamics (WSD) theory is employed for obtaining an approximate description of the motion of an elastic-plastic material processed by a cylindrically/spherically converging shock. Comparison with numerical simulations of the full set of equations of motion reveal that WSD is an accurate tool for characterizing the evolution of converging shocks at all stages. The study of the Richtmyer-Meshkov flow (i.e., interaction between the interface separating two materials of different density and a shock wave incoming at an angle) in solids is performed by means of analytical models for purely elastic solids and numerical simulations when plasticity is included in the material model. To this effect, an updated version of a previously developed multi-material, level-set-based, Eulerian framework for solid mechanics is employed. The revised code includes the use of a multi-material HLLD Riemann problem for imposing material boundary conditions, and a new formulation of the equations of motion that makes use of the stretch tensor while avoiding the degeneracy of the stress tensor under rotation. Results reveal that the interface separating two elastic solids always behaves in a stable oscillatory or decaying oscillatory manner due to the existence of shear waves, which are able to transport the

  7. Unstable 3D phenomena: Dynamic interactions of a cavitation bubble and Richtmyer-Meshkov unstable divot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buttler, William; Renner, Dru; Morris, Chris; Manzanares, Ruben; Heidemann, Joel; Kalas, Ryan; Llobet, Anna; Martinez, John; Payton, Jeremy; Saunders, Andy; Schmidt, Derek; Tainter, Amy; Vincent, Samuel; Vogan-McNeil, Wendy

    2017-06-01

    We radiographically explore a shock-induced Sn cavitation bubble as it interacts with a transverse cavitation wave caused by a Richtmyer-Meshkov unstable spike from a divot. The cavitation bubble forms as two shockwaves collide under the divot, as the shockwaves release to ambient pressure at the surface. The divot inverts and unstably grows, as expected and predicted, but the release waves that form the cavitation bubble reflect from and constrain the cavitation wave growth. As the cavitation wave grows it pierces the cavitation bubble, deflating it onto the unstable transverse cavitation wave.

  8. Richtmyer-Meshkov evolution under steady shock conditions in the high-energy-density regime

    DOE PAGES

    Di Stefano, C. A.; Malamud, G.; Kuranz, C. C.; ...

    2015-03-17

    This work presents direct experimental evidence of long-predicted nonlinear aspects of the Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) process, in which new modes first arise from the coupling of initially-present modes, and in which shorter-wavelength modes are eventually overtaken by longer-wavelength modes. This is accomplished using a technique we developed employing a long driving laser pulse to create a strong (Mach ~ 8) shock across a well-characterized material interface seeded by a two-mode sinusoidal perturbation. Furthermore, this technique further permits the shock to be sustained, without decay of the high-energy-density flow conditions, long enough for the system to evolve into the nonlinear phase.

  9. Progress in indirect and direct-drive planar experiments on hydrodynamic instabilities at the ablation front

    DOE PAGES

    Casner, A.; Masse, L.; Delorme, B.; ...

    2014-12-01

    Understanding and mitigating hydrodynamic instabilities and the fuel mix are the key elements for achieving ignition in Inertial Confinement Fusion. Cryogenic indirect-drive implosions on the National Ignition Facility have evidenced that the ablative Rayleigh-Taylor Instability (RTI) is a driver of the hot spot mix. This motivates the switch to a more flexible higher adiabat implosion design [O. A. Hurricane et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 056313 (2014)]. The shell instability is also the main candidate for performance degradation in low-adiabat direct drive cryogenic implosions [Goncharov et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 056315 (2014)]. This paper reviews recent results acquired in planar experimentsmore » performed on the OMEGA laser facility and devoted to the modeling and mitigation of hydrodynamic instabilities at the ablation front. In application to the indirect-drive scheme, we describe results obtained with a specific ablator composition such as the laminated ablator or a graded-dopant emulator. In application to the direct drive scheme, we discuss experiments devoted to the study of laser imprinted perturbations with special phase plates. The simulations of the Richtmyer-Meshkov phase reversal during the shock transit phase are challenging, and of crucial interest because this phase sets the seed of the RTI growth. Recent works were dedicated to increasing the accuracy of measurements of the phase inversion. We conclude by presenting a novel imprint mitigation mechanism based on the use of underdense foams. Lastly, the foams induce laser smoothing by parametric instabilities thus reducing the laser imprint on the CH foil.« less

  10. Using the Richtmyer-Meshkov flow to infer the strength of LY-12 aluminum at extreme conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Jianwei; Pan, Hao; Peng, Jiangxiang; Wu, Zihui; Yu, Yuying; Hu, Xiaomian

    2017-06-01

    An improved analytical model of the Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) flow in the elastoplastic materials is presented in this paper. This model describes the stabilization by yield strength (Y) effect on the RM flow in solids and linear relationships between initial configurations of perturbation and the growth. Then we make use of the model to analysis the explosion driven RM flow experiments with solid LY12 and test our model by comparing the predicted Y of existing strength models. Finally, we perform a plate impact experiment with solid LY12 aluminium alloy to validate our model and infer Y is about 1.23 GPa for a 28 GPa shock and a strain rate of 7.5 ×106 .

  11. Measurements of Reduced Hydrodynamic Instability Growth in Adiabat Shaped Implosions at the NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casey, Daniel; Macphee, Andrew; Milovich, Jose; Smalyuk, Vladimir; Clark, Dan; Robey, Harry; Peterson, Luc; Baker, Kevin; Weber, Chris

    2015-11-01

    Hydrodynamic instabilities can cause capsule defects and other perturbations to grow and degrade implosion performance in ignition experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Radiographic measurements of ablation front perturbation growth were performed using adiabat-shaped drives which are shown to have lower ablation front growth than the low foot drive. This is partly due to faster Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) oscillations during the shock transit phase of the implosion moving the node in the growth factor spectrum to lower mode numbers reducing the peak growth amplitude. This is demonstrated experimentally by a reversal of the perturbation phase at higher mode numbers (120-160). These results show that the ablation front growth and fuel adiabat can be controlled somewhat-independently and are providing insight into new, more stable, ignition designs. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  12. Richtmyer-Meshkov instability experiments of miscible and immiscible incompressible fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krivets, Vitaliy; Holt, Brason; Mokler, Matthew; Jacobs, Jeffrey

    2017-11-01

    Experiments were conducted in a 3 m tall vertical drop tower setup. A flat interface separating two liquids of differing density is formed in the Plexiglas tank with the heavier fluid in the bottom and the lighter one on top. Two liquids pairs were utilized, one - miscible (isopropyl alcohol and a calcium nitrate water mixture) and the other immiscible (silicone oil with the same heavy liquid), both with Atwood near 0.2. The tank is mounted on a rail mounted sled at 2 m initial height where an initial perturbation is generated using vertical periodic motion with 10 Hz frequency and 1 mm displacement, thus producing 3D interfacial waves. An impulsive acceleration, with approximately 100g magnitude, is imparted to the sled by a rail mounted weight released and allowed to fall, impacting the sled from above. Both weight and sled then travel freely down the rails where they are smoothly decelerated at the bottom of drop tower by magnetic brakes. PLIF is used to visualize mixing process by seeding fluorescein in the bottom fluid and illuminating using laser diode from above forming thin vertical sheet. The resulting fluorescent image sequences are captured using a digital camera mounted to the sled operating at a 100 Hz framing rate. Comparisons of the measured growth of the mixing zone for both immiscible and miscible liquid combinations with theoretical models are presented.

  13. Numerical Study of Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability with Re-Shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Man Long; Livescu, Daniel; Lele, Sanjiva

    2017-11-01

    The interaction of a Mach 1.45 shock wave with a perturbed planar interface between two gases with an Atwood number 0.68 is studied through 2D and 3D shock-capturing adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) simulations with physical diffusive and viscous terms. The simulations have initial conditions similar to those in the actual experiment conducted by Poggi et al. [1998]. The development of the flow and evolution of mixing due to the interactions with the first shock and the re-shock are studied together with the sensitivity of various global parameters to the properties of the initial perturbation. Grid resolutions needed for fully resolved and 2D and 3D simulations are also evaluated. Simulations are conducted with an in-house AMR solver HAMeRS built on the SAMRAI library. The code utilizes the high-order localized dissipation weighted compact nonlinear scheme [Wong and Lele, 2017] for shock-capturing and different sensors including the wavelet sensor [Wong and Lele, 2016] to identify regions for grid refinement. First and third authors acknowledge the project sponsor LANL.

  14. Instability Coupling Experiments*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrien, R. E.; Hoffman, N. M.; Magelssen, G. R.; Schappert, G. T.; Smitherman, D. P.

    1996-11-01

    The coupling of Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) and ablative Rayleigh-Taylor (ART) instabilities is being studied with indirectly-driven planar foil experiments on the Nova laser at Livermore. The foil is attached to a 1.6-mm-diameter, 2.75-mm-long Au hohlraum driven by a 2.2-ns long, 1:5-contrast-ratio shaped laser pulse. A shock is generated in 35-μm or 86-μm thick Al foils with a 50-μm-wavelength, 4-μm-amplitude sinusoidal perturbation on its rear surface. In some experiments, the perturbation is applied to a 10-μm Be layer on the Al. A RM instability develops when the shock encounters the perturbed surface. The flow field of the RM instability can ``feed out'' to the ablation surface of the foil and provide the seed for ART perturbation growth. Face-on and side-on x-radiography are used to observe areal density perturbations in the foil. For the 86-μm foil, the perturbation arrives at the ablation surface while the hohlraum drive is dropping and the data are consistent with RM instability alone. For the 35-μm foil, the perturbation feeds out while the hohlraum drive is close to its peak and the data appear to show strong ART perturbation growth. Comparisons with LASNEX simulations will be presented. *This work supported under USDOE contract W-7405-ENG-36.

  15. Surface Instabilities From Buried Explosives

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-07-21

    interface between soil and air during buried explosions. The purpose of understanding this instability is to determine its effect on local vehicle loading...Except when the target is on the surface, e.g., a tank track, the most important loading mechanism from a buried charge is the impact of soil propelled...rising soil and the air. This unstable 15. SUBJECT TERMS Buried Explosions, Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability, Target Loading, Jetting, 16 SECURITY

  16. Basic Hydrodynamics of Richtmyer-Meshkov-type Growth and Oscillations in the ICF-Relevant Conditions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    Washington, DC 20375 3ARTEP Inc ., Ellicott City, Maryland 21042 4Department of Mechanical Engineering, Ben Gurion University, Beer Sheva, Israel...the 56-beam Nike KrF laser facility at the Naval Research Laboratory (3 kJ in 0.248 μm, see Obenschain et al. 1996). Basic hydrodynamics of Richtmyer...2000 Nike (NRL) 0.248 8-13 4 400 40 30, 45 1.85 Si monochrom. Ablative RMI, feedout, classical RMI, impulsive loading, re- shock

  17. Effect of bromine-dopant on radiation-driven Rayleigh-Taylor instability in plastic foil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Binbin; Ma, Yanyun; Yang, Xiaohu; Tang, Wenhui; Ge, Zheyi; Zhao, Yuan; Ke, Yanzhao; Kawata, Shiego

    2017-10-01

    Effects of bromine (Br) dopant on the growth of radiation-driven ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) in plastic foils are studied by radiation hydrodynamics simulations and theoretical analysis. It is found that the Br-dopant in plastic foil reduces the seed of ablative RTI. The main reasons of the reduction are attributed to the smaller oscillation amplitude of ablative Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI) induced by the smaller post-shock sound speed, and the smaller oscillation frequency of ablative RMI induced by the smaller ablation velocity and blow-off plasma velocity. The Br-dopant also decreases the linear growth rate of ablative RTI due to the smaller acceleration. Treating the perturbation growth as a function of foil’s displacement, the perturbation growth would increase in Br-doped foil at the phase of ablative RTI, which is attributed to the decrease of the ablation velocity and the density gradient scale length. The results are helpful for further understanding the influence of high-Z dopant on the radiation-driven ablative RTI.

  18. Computational investigation of reshock strength in hydrodynamic instability growth at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bender, Jason; Raman, Kumar; Huntington, Channing; Nagel, Sabrina; Morgan, Brandon; Prisbrey, Shon; MacLaren, Stephan

    2017-10-01

    Experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) are studying Richtmyer-Meshkov and Rayleigh-Taylor hydrodynamic instabilities in multiply-shocked plasmas. Targets feature two different-density fluids with a multimode initial perturbation at the interface, which is struck by two X-ray-driven shock waves. Here we discuss computational hydrodynamics simulations investigating the effect of second-shock (``reshock'') strength on instability growth, and how these simulations are informing target design for the ongoing experimental campaign. A Reynolds-Averaged Navier Stokes (RANS) model was used to predict motion of the spike and bubble fronts and the mixing-layer width. In addition to reshock strength, the reshock ablator thickness and the total length of the target were varied; all three parameters were found to be important for target design, particularly for ameliorating undesirable reflected shocks. The RANS data are compared to theoretical models that predict multimode instability growth proportional to the shock-induced change in interface velocity, and to currently-available data from the NIF experiments. Work performed under the auspices of the U.S. D.O.E. by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344. LLNL-ABS-734611.

  19. Shock-driven Rayleigh-Taylor / Richtmyer-Meshkov 2D multimode ripple evolution before and after re-shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagel, Sabrina; Huntington, Channing; Bender, Jason; Raman, Kumar; Baumann, Ted; MacLaren, Stephan; Prisbrey, Shon; Zhou, Ye

    2017-10-01

    Laser-driven hydrodynamic experiments allow for the precise control over several important experimental parameters, including the timing of the laser irradiation delivered and the initial conditions of the laser-driven target. Our experimental platform at the National Ignition Facility enables the investigation of the physics of instability growth after the passage of a second shock (``reshock''). This is done by varying the laser to change the strength and timing of the secondary shock. Here we present x-ray images capturing the rapid post-reshock instability growth for a set of reshock strengths. The radiation hydrodynamics simulations used to design these experiments are also introduced. This work was performed under the auspices of the Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC, (LLNS) under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344. LLNL-ABS-734509.

  20. Theoretical and simulation research of hydrodynamic instabilities in inertial-confinement fusion implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, LiFeng; Ye, WenHua; He, XianTu; Wu, JunFeng; Fan, ZhengFeng; Xue, Chuang; Guo, HongYu; Miao, WenYong; Yuan, YongTeng; Dong, JiaQin; Jia, Guo; Zhang, Jing; Li, YingJun; Liu, Jie; Wang, Min; Ding, YongKun; Zhang, WeiYan

    2017-05-01

    Inertial fusion energy (IFE) has been considered a promising, nearly inexhaustible source of sustainable carbon-free power for the world's energy future. It has long been recognized that the control of hydrodynamic instabilities is of critical importance for ignition and high-gain in the inertial-confinement fusion (ICF) hot-spot ignition scheme. In this mini-review, we summarize the progress of theoretical and simulation research of hydrodynamic instabilities in the ICF central hot-spot implosion in our group over the past decade. In order to obtain sufficient understanding of the growth of hydrodynamic instabilities in ICF, we first decompose the problem into different stages according to the implosion physics processes. The decomposed essential physics pro- cesses that are associated with ICF implosions, such as Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI), Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI), Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (KHI), convergent geometry effects, as well as perturbation feed-through are reviewed. Analyti- cal models in planar, cylindrical, and spherical geometries have been established to study different physical aspects, including density-gradient, interface-coupling, geometry, and convergent effects. The influence of ablation in the presence of preheating on the RTI has been extensively studied by numerical simulations. The KHI considering the ablation effect has been discussed in detail for the first time. A series of single-mode ablative RTI experiments has been performed on the Shenguang-II laser facility. The theoretical and simulation research provides us the physical insights of linear and weakly nonlinear growths, and nonlinear evolutions of the hydrodynamic instabilities in ICF implosions, which has directly supported the research of ICF ignition target design. The ICF hot-spot ignition implosion design that uses several controlling features, based on our current understanding of hydrodynamic instabilities, to address shell implosion stability, has

  1. Hydrodynamic Instabilities in High-Energy-Density Settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smalyuk, Vladimir

    2016-10-01

    Our understanding of hydrodynamic instabilities, such as the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT), Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM), and Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instabilities, in high-energy-density (HED) settings over past two decades has progressed enormously. The range of conditions where hydrodynamic instabilities are experimentally observed now includes direct and indirect drive inertial confinement fusion (ICF) where surprises continue to emerge, linear and nonlinear regimes, classical interfaces vs. stabilized ablation fronts, tenuous ideal plasmas vs. high density Fermi degenerate plasmas, bulk fluid interpenetration vs. mixing down to the atomic level, in the presence of magnetic fields and/or intense radiation, and in solid state plastic flow at high pressures and strain rates. Regimes in ICF can involve extreme conditions of matter with temperatures up to kilovolts, densities of a thousand times solid densities, and time scales of nanoseconds. On the other hand, scaled conditions can be generated that map to exploding stars (supernovae) with length and time scales of millions of kilometers and hours to days or even years of instability evolution, planetary formation dynamics involving solid-state plastic flow which severely modifies the RT growth and continues to challenge reliable theoretical descriptions. This review will look broadly at progress in probing and understanding hydrodynamic instabilities in these very diverse HED settings, and then will examine a few cases in more depth to illustrate the detailed science involved. Experimental results on large-scale HED facilities such as the Omega, Nike, Gekko, and Shenguang lasers will be reviewed and the latest developments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) and Z machine will be covered. Finally, current overarching questions and challenges will be summarized to motivate research directions for future. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  2. Shock Driven Multiphase Instabilities in Scramjet Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFarland, Jacob

    2016-11-01

    Shock driven multiphase instabilities (SDMI) arise in many applications from dust production in supernovae to ejecta distribution in explosions. At the limit of small, fast reacting particles the instability evolves similar to the Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instability. However, as additional particle effects such as lag, phase change, and collisions become significant the required parameter space becomes much larger and the instability deviates significantly from the RM instability. In scramjet engines the SDMI arises during a cold start where liquid fuel droplets are injected and processed by shock and expansion waves. In this case the particle evaporation and mixing is important to starting and sustaining combustion, but the particles are large and slow to react, creating significant multiphase effects. This talk will examine multiphase mixing in scramjet relevant conditions in 3D multiphase hydrodynamic simulations using the FLASH code from the University of Chicago FLASH center.

  3. Progress Toward Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities in a High-Energy-Density Plasma on the Nike Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harding, E. C.; Drake, R. P.; Aglitskiy, Y.; Dwarkadas, V. V.; Gillespie, R. S.; Grosskopf, M. J.; Huntington, C. M.; Gjeci, N.; Campbell, D. A.; Marion, D. C.

    2007-11-01

    In the realm of high-energy-density (HED) plasmas, there exist three primary hydrodynamic instabilities: Rayleigh-Taylor (RT), Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM), and Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH). Although the RT and the RM instabilities have been observed in the laboratory, no experiment to our knowledge has cleanly diagnosed the KH instability. While the RT instability results from the acceleration of a more dense fluid into a less dense fluid and the RM instability is due to shock deposited vorticity onto an interface, the KH instability is driven by a lifting force generated by velocity shear at a perturbed fluid interface. Understanding the KH instability mechanism in HED plasmas will provide essential insight into detailed RT-spike development, mass stripping, many astrophysical processes, as well as laying the groundwork for future transition to turbulence experiments. We present 2D simulations and data from our initial attempts to create a pure KH system using the Nike laser at the Naval Research Laboratory.

  4. Progress toward Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities in a High-Energy-Density Plasma on the Nike laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harding, E. C.; Drake, R. P.; Gillespie, R. S.; Grosskopf, M. J.; Huntington, C. M.; Aglitskiy, Y.; Weaver, J. L.; Velikovich, A. L.; Plewa, T.; Dwarkadas, V. V.

    2008-04-01

    In the realm of high-energy-density (HED) plasmas, there exist three primary hydrodynamic instabilities of concern: Rayleigh-Taylor (RT), Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM), and Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH). Although the RT and the RM instabilities have been readily observed and diagnosed in the laboratory, the KH instability remains relatively unexplored in HED plasmas. Unlike the RT and RM instabilities, the KH instability is driven by a lifting force generated by a strong velocity gradient in a stratified fluid. Understanding the KH instability mechanism in HED plasmas will provide essential insight into oblique shock systems, jets, mass stripping, and detailed RT-spike development. In addition, our KH experiment will help provide the groundwork for future transition to turbulence experiments. We present 2D FLASH simulations and experimental data from our initial attempts to create a pure KH system using the Nike laser at the Naval Research Laboratory.

  5. shock driven instability of a multi-phase particle-gas system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFarland, Jacob; Black, Wolfgang; Dahal, Jeevan; Morgan, Brandon

    2015-11-01

    A computational study of a shock driven instability of a multiphse particle-gas system is presented. This instability can evolve in a similar fashion to the Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instability, but has addition parameters to be considered. Particle relaxation times, and density differences of the gas and particle-gas system can be adjusted to produce results which are different from the classical RM instability. We will show simulation results from the Ares code, developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, which uses a particle-in-cell approach to study the effects of the particle-gas system parameters. Mixing parameters will be presented to highlight the suppression of circulation and gas mixing by the particle phase.

  6. Instability of a planar expansion wave.

    PubMed

    Velikovich, A L; Zalesak, S T; Metzler, N; Wouchuk, J G

    2005-10-01

    An expansion wave is produced when an incident shock wave interacts with a surface separating a fluid from a vacuum. Such an interaction starts the feedout process that transfers perturbations from the rippled inner (rear) to the outer (front) surface of a target in inertial confinement fusion. Being essentially a standing sonic wave superimposed on a centered expansion wave, a rippled expansion wave in an ideal gas, like a rippled shock wave, typically produces decaying oscillations of all fluid variables. Its behavior, however, is different at large and small values of the adiabatic exponent gamma. At gamma > 3, the mass modulation amplitude delta(m) in a rippled expansion wave exhibits a power-law growth with time alpha(t)beta, where beta = (gamma - 3)/(gamma - 1). This is the only example of a hydrodynamic instability whose law of growth, dependent on the equation of state, is expressed in a closed analytical form. The growth is shown to be driven by a physical mechanism similar to that of a classical Richtmyer-Meshkov instability. In the opposite extreme gamma - 1 < 1, delta(m) exhibits oscillatory growth, approximately linear with time, until it reaches its peak value approximately (gamma - 1)(-1/2), and then starts to decrease. The mechanism driving the growth is the same as that of Vishniac's instability of a blast wave in a gas with low . Exact analytical expressions for the growth rates are derived for both cases and favorably compared to hydrodynamic simulation results.

  7. Pair-instability supernovae of fast rotating stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ke-Jung

    2015-01-01

    We present 2D simulations of pair-instability supernovae considering rapid rotation during their explosion phases. Recent studies of the Population III (Pop III) star formation suggested that these stars could be born with a mass scale about 100 M⊙ and with a strong rotation. Based on stellar evolution models, these massive Pop III stars might have died as highly energetic pair-instability supernovae. We perform 2D calculations to investigate the impact of rotation on pair-instability supernovae. Our results suggest that rotation leads to an aspherical explosion due to an anisotropic collapse. If the first stars have a 50% of keplerian rotational rate of the oxygen core before their pair-instability explosions, the overall 56Ni production can be significantly reduced by about two orders of magnitude. An extreme case of 100% keplerian rotational rate shows an interesting feature of fluid instabilities along the equatorial plane caused by non-synchronized and non-isotropic ignitions of explosions, so that the shocks run into the in-falling gas and generate the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability.

  8. Lessons Learned from Numerical Simulations of Interfacial Instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Andrew

    2015-11-01

    Rayleigh-Taylor (RT), Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) and Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instabilities serve as efficient mixing mechanisms in a wide variety of flows, from supernovae to jet engines. Over the past decade, we have used the Miranda code to temporally integrate the multi-component Navier-Stokes equations at spatial resolutions up to 29 billion grid points. The code employs 10th-order compact schemes for spatial derivatives, combined with 4th-order Runge-Kutta time advancement. Some of our major findings are as follows: The rate of growth of a mixing layer is equivalent to the net mass flux through the equi-molar plane. RT growth rates can be significantly reduced by adding shear. RT instability can produce shock waves. The growth rate of RM instability can be predicted from known interfacial perturbations. RM vortex projectiles can far outrun the mixing region. Thermal fluctuations in molecular dynamics simulations can seed instabilities along the braids in KH instability. And finally, enthalpy diffusion is essential in preserving the second law of thermodynamics. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  9. Simulations and model of the nonlinear Richtmyer–Meshkov instability

    DOE PAGES

    Dimonte, Guy; Ramaprabhu, P.

    2010-01-21

    The nonlinear evolution of the Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instability is investigated using numerical simulations with the FLASH code in two-dimensions (2D). The purpose of the simulations is to develop an empiricial nonlinear model of the RM instability that is applicable to inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and ejecta formation, namely, at large Atwood number A and scaled initial amplitude kh o (k ≡ wavenumber) of the perturbation. The FLASH code is first validated with a variety of RM experiments that evolve well into the nonlinear regime. They reveal that bubbles stagnate when they grow by an increment of 2/k and that spikesmore » accelerate for A > 0.5 due to higher harmonics that focus them. These results are then compared with a variety of nonlinear models that are based on potential flow. We find that the models agree with simulations for moderate values of A < 0.9 and kh o< 1, but not for the larger values that characterize ICF and ejecta formation. We thus develop a new nonlinear empirical model that captures the simulation results consistent with potential flow for a broader range of A and kh o. Our hope is that such empirical models concisely capture the RM simulations and inspire more rigorous solutions.« less

  10. Experimental study on ablative stabilization of Rayleigh-Taylor instability of laser-irradiated targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shigemori, Keisuke; Sakaiya, Tatsuhiko; Otani, Kazuto; Fujioka, Shinsuke; Nakai, Mitsuo; Azechi, Hiroshi; Shiraga, Hiroyuki; Tamari, Yohei; Okuno, Kazuki; Sunahara, Atsushi; Nagatomo, Hideo; Murakami, Masakatsu; Nishihara, Katsunobu; Izawa, Yasukazu

    2004-09-01

    Hydrodynamic instabilities are key issues of the physics of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets. Among the instabilities, Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability is the most important because it gives the largest growth factor in the ICF targets. Perturbations on the laser irradiated surface grow exponentially, but the growth rate is reduced by ablation flow. The growth rate γ is written as Takabe-Betti formula: γ = [kg/(1+kL)]1/2-βkm/pa, where k is wave number of the perturbation, g is acceleration, L is density scale-length, β is a coefficient, m is mass ablation rate per unit surface, and ρa is density at the ablation front. We experimentally measured all the parameters in the formula for polystyrene (CH) targets. Experiments were done on the HIPER laser facility at Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University. We found that the β value in the formula is ~ 1.7, which is in good agreements with the theoretical prediction, whereas the β for certain perturbation wavelengths are larger than the prediction. This disagreement between the experiment and the theory is mainly due to the deformation of the cutoff surface, which is created by non-uniform ablation flow from the ablation surface. We also found that high-Z doped plastic targets have multiablation structure, which can reduce the RT growth rate. When a low-Z target with high-Z dopant is irradiated by laser, radiation due to the high-Z dopant creates secondary ablation front deep inside the target. Since, the secondary ablation front is ablated by x-rays, the mass ablation rate is larger than the laser-irradiated ablation surface, that is, further reduction of the RT growth is expected. We measured the RT growth rate of Br-doped polystyrene targets. The experimental results indicate that of the CHBr targets show significantly small growth rate, which is very good news for the design of the ICF targets.

  11. Experimental Observation of Nonlinear Mode Coupling In the Ablative Rayleigh-Taylor Instability on the NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, David

    2015-11-01

    We investigate on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) the ablative Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability in the transition from linear to highly nonlinear regimes. This work is part of the Discovery Science Program on NIF and of particular importance to indirect-drive inertial confinement fusion (ICF) where careful attention to the form of the rise to final peak drive is calculated to prevent the RT instability from shredding the ablator in-flight and leading to ablator mixing into the cold fuel. The growth of the ablative RT instability was investigated using a planar plastic foil with pre-imposed two-dimensional broadband modulations and diagnosed using x-ray radiography. The foil was accelerated for 12ns by the x-ray drive created in a gas-filled Au radiation cavity with a radiative temperature plateau at 175 eV. The dependence on initial conditions was investigated by systematically changing the modulation amplitude, ablator material and the modulation pattern. For each of these cases bubble mergers were observed and the nonlinear evolution of the RT instability showed insensitivity to the initial conditions. This experiment provides critical data needed to validate current theories on the ablative RT instability for indirect drive that relies on the ablative stabilization of short-scale modulations for ICF ignition. This paper will compare the experimental data to the current nonlinear theories. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC.

  12. Linear sine wave profiling to machine instability targets

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, Derek William; Martinez, John Israel

    2016-08-01

    Specialized machining processes and programming have been developed to deliver thin tin and copper Richtmyer-Meshkov instability targets that have different amplitude perturbations across the face of one 4-in.-diameter target. Typical targets have anywhere from two to five different regions of sine waves that have different amplitudes varying from 4 to 200 μm across the face of the target. The puck is composed of multiple rings that are zero press fit together and diamond turned to create a flat platform with a tolerance of 2 μm for the shock experiment. A custom software program was written in Labview to write themore » point-to-point program for the diamond-turning profiler through the X-Y-Z movements to cut the pure planar straight sine wave geometry. As a result, the software is optimized to push the profile of the whole part into the face while eliminating any unneeded passes that do not cut any material.« less

  13. Hydrodynamic instabilities at an oblique interface: Experiments and Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglas-Mann, E.; Fiedler Kawaguchi, C.; Trantham, M. A.; Malamud, G.; Wan, W. C.; Klein, S. R.; Kuranz, C. C.

    2017-10-01

    Hydrodynamic instabilities are important phenomena that occur in high-energy-density systems, such as astrophysical systems and inertial confinement fusion experiments, where pressure, density, and velocity gradients are present. Using a 30 ns laser pulse from the Omega EP laser system, a steady shock wave is driven into a target. A Spherical Crystal Imager provides high-resolution x-ray radiographs to study the evolution of complex hydrodynamic structures. This experiment has a light-to-heavy interface at an oblique angle with a precision-machined perturbation. The incident shock wave deposits shear and vorticity at the interface causing the perturbation to grow via Richtmyer-Meshkov and Kelvin-Helmholtz processes. We present results from analysis of radiographic data and hydrodynamics simulations showing the evolution of the shock and unstable structure. This work is supported by the NNSA-DS and SC-OFES Joint Program in High-Energy-Density Laboratory Plasmas, Grant Number DE-NA0002956 and the National Science Foundation through the Basic Plasma Science and Engineering program and LILAC.

  14. Reshocks, rarefactions, and the generalized Layzer model for hydrodynamic instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikaelian, Karnig O.

    2009-02-01

    We report numerical simulations and analytic modeling of shock tube experiments on Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities. We examine single interfaces of the type A /B where the incident shock is initiated in A and the transmitted shock proceeds into B. Examples are He/air and air/He. In addition, we study finite-thickness or double-interface A /B/A configurations such as air/SF6/air gas-curtain experiments. We first consider conventional shock tubes that have a "fixed" boundary: A solid endwall which reflects the transmitted shock and reshocks the interface(s). Then we focus on new experiments with a "free" boundary—a membrane disrupted mechanically or by the transmitted shock, sending back a rarefaction toward the interface(s). Complex acceleration histories are achieved, relevant for inertial confinement fusion implosions. We compare our simulation results with a generalized Layzer model for two fluids with time-dependent densities and derive a new freeze-out condition whereby accelerating and compressive forces cancel each other out. Except for the recently reported failures of the Layzer model, the generalized Layzer model and hydrocode simulations for reshocks and rarefactions agree well with each other and remain to be verified experimentally.

  15. Dynamic stabilization of Rayleigh-Taylor instability: Experiments with Newtonian fluids as surrogates for ablation fronts

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez Prieto, G.; Piriz, A. R.; Lopez Cela, J. J.

    2013-01-15

    A previous theory on dynamic stabilization of Rayleigh-Taylor instability at interfaces between Newtonian fluids is reformulated in order to make evident the analogy of this problem with the related one on dynamic stabilization of ablation fronts in the framework of inertial confinement fusion. Explicit analytical expressions are obtained for the boundaries of the dynamically stable region which turns out to be completely analogue to the stability charts obtained for the case of ablation fronts. These results allow proposing experiments with Newtonian fluids as surrogates for studying the case of ablation fronts. Experiments with Newtonian fluids are presented which demonstrate themore » validity of the theoretical approach and encourage to pursue experimental research on ablation fronts to settle the feasibility of dynamic stabilization in the inertial confinement fusion scenario.« less

  16. A comparison of hydro-instabilities in CH, HDC, and beryllium ablators on NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smalyuk, V. A.; Robey, H. F.; Ali, S.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Casey, D. T.; Celliers, P. M.; Clark, D. S.; Felker, S. J.; Field, J. E.; Haan, S. W.; Hammel, B. A.; Hsing, W. W.; Kroll, J. J.; Landen, O. L.; Lepape, S.; Macphee, A. G.; Martinez, D.; Milovich, J.; Nikroo, A.; Pickworth, L.; Stadermann, M.; Weber, C. R.; Kline, J.; Loomis, E.; Yi, A.

    2017-10-01

    A comparison of the hydrodynamic growth in plastic, high-density carbon, and beryllium ablators will be presented in indirect-drive implosions on National Ignition Facility. This comparison is based on experimentally measured instabilities in all phases of implosions for the three ablators. The 2-D and 3-D perturbations were measured at the ablation-surface with the Hydrodynamic Growth Radiography platform. In the deceleration phase of implosions, innovative self-emission and ``self-backlight'' techniques were used. Results of the 3-D perturbation growth including engineering features will also be presented for convergence up to 20 and compared for the three ablators. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  17. Evaporation effects in a shock-driven multiphase instability with a spherical interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paudel, Manoj; Dahal, Jeevan; McFarland, Jacob

    2017-11-01

    This talk presents results from 3D numerical simulations of a shock driven instability of a gas-particle system with a spherical interface. Two cases, one with an evaporating particle cloud and another with a gas only approximation of this particle cloud, were run in the hydrodynamics code FLASH, developed at University of Chicago. It is shown that the gas only approximation, a classical Richtmyer Meshkov instability, cannot replicate effects from particles like, lag, clustering, and evaporation. Instead, both gas hydrodynamics and particle properties influence one another and are coupled. Results are presented to highlight the coupling of interface evolution and particle evaporation. Qualitative and quantitative differences in the RMI and SDMI are presented by studying the change in gas properties like density and vorticity within the interface. Similarly, the effect of gas hydrodynamics on particles distribution and evaporation is studied. Particle evaporation rates are compared with 1D models and show poor agreement. The variation in evaporation rates for similar sized particles and the role of gas hydrodynamics in these variation is explored.

  18. Dynamic Stabilization of the Ablative Rayleigh-Taylor Instability for Heavy Ion Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, Hong; Davidson, Ronald C.; Logan, B. Grant

    2012-10-04

    Dynamic stabilization of the ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instability of a heavy ion fusion target induced by a beam wobbling system is studied. Using a sharp-boundary model and Courant-Synder theory, it is shown, with an appropriately chosen modulation waveform, that the instability can be sta- bilized in certain parameter regimes. It is found that the stabilization e ect has a strong dependence on the modulation frequency and the waveform. Modulation with frequency comparable to the instability growth rate is the most e ective in terms of stabilizing the instability. A modulation with two frequency components can result in a reduction of themore » growth rate larger than the sum of that due to the two components when applied separately.« less

  19. Experimental Investigation of the Electrothermal Instability on Planar Foil Ablation Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steiner, Adam; Patel, Sonal; Yager-Elorriaga, David; Jordan, Nicholas; Gilgenbach, Ronald; Lau, Y. Y.

    2014-10-01

    The electrothermal instability (ETI) is an important early-time physical effect on pulsed power foil ablation experiments due to its ability to seed the destructive magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor (MRT) instability. ETI occurs whenever electrical resistivity has temperature dependence; when resistivity increases with temperature, as with solid metal liners or foils, ETI forms striation structures perpendicular to current flow. These striations provide an initial perturbation for the MRT instability, which is the dominant late-time instability in planar foil ablations. The MAIZE linear transformer driver was used to drive current pulses of approximately 600 kA into 400 nm-thick aluminum foils in order to study ETI in planar geometry. Shadowgraph images of the aluminum plasmas were taken for multiple shots at various times within approximately 50 ns of current start. Fourier analysis extracted the approximate wavelengths of the instability structures on the plasma-vacuum interface. Surface metrology of pre-shot foils was performed to provide a comparison between surface roughness features and resulting plasma structure. This work was supported by US DoE. S.G. Patel and A.M. Steiner supported by NPSC funded by Sandia. D.A. Yager supported by NSF fellowship Grant # DGE 1256260.

  20. Ablative Rayleigh Taylor instability in the limit of an infinitely large density ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clavin, Paul; Almarcha, Christophe

    2005-05-01

    The instability of ablation fronts strongly accelerated toward the dense medium under the conditions of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) is addressed in the limit of an infinitely large density ratio. The analysis serves to demonstrate that the flow is irrotational to first order, reducing the nonlinear analysis to solve a two-potential flows problem. Vorticity appears at the following orders in the perturbation analysis. This result simplifies greatly the analysis. The possibility for using boundary integral methods opens new perspectives in the nonlinear theory of the ablative RT instability in ICF. A few examples are given at the end of the Note. To cite this article: P. Clavin, C. Almarcha, C. R. Mecanique 333 (2005).

  1. Nonlinear excitation of the ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instability for all wave numbers

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, H.; Betti, R.; Gopalaswamy, V.

    Small-scale perturbations in the ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instability (ARTI) are often neglected because they are linearly stable when their wavelength is shorter than a linear cutoff. Using 2D and 3D numerical simulations, it is shown that linearly stable modes of any wavelength can be destabilized. This instability regime requires finite amplitude initial perturbations and linearly stable ARTI modes are more easily destabilized in 3D than in 2D. In conclusion, it is shown that for conditions found in laser fusion targets, short wavelength ARTI modes are more efficient at driving mixing of ablated material throughout the target since the nonlinear bubble densitymore » increases with the wave number and small scale bubbles carry a larger mass flux of mixed material.« less

  2. Nonlinear excitation of the ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instability for all wave numbers

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, H.; Betti, R.; Gopalaswamy, V.; ...

    2018-01-16

    Small-scale perturbations in the ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instability (ARTI) are often neglected because they are linearly stable when their wavelength is shorter than a linear cutoff. Using 2D and 3D numerical simulations, it is shown that linearly stable modes of any wavelength can be destabilized. This instability regime requires finite amplitude initial perturbations and linearly stable ARTI modes are more easily destabilized in 3D than in 2D. In conclusion, it is shown that for conditions found in laser fusion targets, short wavelength ARTI modes are more efficient at driving mixing of ablated material throughout the target since the nonlinear bubble densitymore » increases with the wave number and small scale bubbles carry a larger mass flux of mixed material.« less

  3. Three-dimensional single-mode nonlinear ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, R.; Aluie, H.; Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627

    The nonlinear evolution of the single-mode ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instability is studied in three dimensions. As the mode wavelength approaches the cutoff of the linear spectrum (short-wavelength modes), it is found that the three-dimensional (3D) terminal bubble velocity greatly exceeds both the two-dimensional (2D) value and the classical 3D bubble velocity. Unlike in 2D, the 3D short-wavelength bubble velocity does not saturate. The growing 3D bubble acceleration is driven by the unbounded accumulation of vorticity inside the bubble. The vorticity is transferred by mass ablation from the Rayleigh-Taylor spikes to the ablated plasma filling the bubble volume.

  4. Three-dimensional single-mode nonlinear ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, R.; Betti, R.; Sanz, J.

    The nonlinear evolution of the single-mode ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instability is studied in three dimensions. As the mode wavelength approaches the cutoff of the linear spectrum (short-wavelength modes), it is found that the three-dimensional (3D) terminal bubble velocity greatly exceeds both the two-dimensional (2D) value and the classical 3D bubble velocity. Unlike in 2D, the 3D short-wavelength bubble velocity does not saturate. The growing 3D bubble acceleration is driven by the unbounded accumulation of vorticity inside the bubble. As a result, the vorticity is transferred by mass ablation from the Rayleigh-Taylor spikes to the ablated plasma filling the bubble volume.

  5. Vibration waveform effects on dynamic stabilization of ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    SciTech Connect

    Piriz, A. R.; Lucchio, L. Di; Rodriguez Prieto, G.

    2011-08-15

    An analysis of dynamic stabilization of Rayleigh-Taylor instability in an ablation front is performed by considering a general square wave for modulating the vertical acceleration of the front. Such a kind of modulation allows for clarifying the role of thermal conduction in the mechanism of dynamic stabilization. In addition, the study of the effect of different modulations by varying the duration and amplitude of the square wave in each half-period provides insight on the optimum performance of dynamic stabilization.

  6. Applications of Analytical Self-Similar Solutions of Reynolds-Averaged Models for Instability-Induced Turbulent Mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartland, Tucker; Schilling, Oleg

    2017-11-01

    Analytical self-similar solutions to several families of single- and two-scale, eddy viscosity and Reynolds stress turbulence models are presented for Rayleigh-Taylor, Richtmyer-Meshkov, and Kelvin-Helmholtz instability-induced turbulent mixing. The use of algebraic relationships between model coefficients and physical observables (e.g., experimental growth rates) following from the self-similar solutions to calibrate a member of a given family of turbulence models is shown. It is demonstrated numerically that the algebraic relations accurately predict the value and variation of physical outputs of a Reynolds-averaged simulation in flow regimes that are consistent with the simplifying assumptions used to derive the solutions. The use of experimental and numerical simulation data on Reynolds stress anisotropy ratios to calibrate a Reynolds stress model is briefly illustrated. The implications of the analytical solutions for future Reynolds-averaged modeling of hydrodynamic instability-induced mixing are briefly discussed. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  7. Coupled Hydrodynamic Instability Growth on Oblique Interfaces with a Reflected Rarefaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasmus, A. M.; Flippo, K. A.; di Stefano, C. A.; Doss, F. W.; Hager, J. D.; Merritt, E. C.; Cardenas, T.; Schmidt, D. W.; Kline, J. L.; Kuranz, C. C.

    2017-10-01

    Hydrodynamic instabilities play an important role in the evolution of inertial confinement fusion and astrophysical phenomena. Three of the Omega-EP long pulse beams (10 ns square pulse, 14 kJ total energy, 1.1 mm spot size) drive a supported shock across a heavy-to-light, oblique, interface. Single- and double-mode initial conditions seed coupled Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM), Rayleigh-Taylor (RT), and Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) growth. At early times, growth is dominated by RM and KH, whereas at late times a rarefaction from laser turn-off reaches the interface, leading to decompression and RT growth. The addition of a thirty degree tilt does not alter mix width to within experimental error bars, even while significantly altering spike and bubble morphology. The results of single and double-mode experiments along with simulations using the multi-physics hydro-code RAGE will be presented. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by LANL under contract DE-AC52-06NA25396. This work is funded by the NNSA-DS and SC-OFES Joint Program in High-Energy-Density Laboratory Plasmas, Grant Number DE-NA0002956. This material is partially supported by DOE Office of Science Graduate Student Research (SCGSR) program.

  8. Ablative stabilization of Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities resulting from a laser-driven radiative shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huntington, C. M.; Shimony, A.; Trantham, M.; Kuranz, C. C.; Shvarts, D.; Di Stefano, C. A.; Doss, F. W.; Drake, R. P.; Flippo, K. A.; Kalantar, D. H.; Klein, S. R.; Kline, J. L.; MacLaren, S. A.; Malamud, G.; Miles, A. R.; Prisbrey, S. T.; Raman, K. S.; Remington, B. A.; Robey, H. F.; Wan, W. C.; Park, H.-S.

    2018-05-01

    The Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability is a common occurrence in nature, notably in astrophysical systems like supernovae, where it serves to mix the dense layers of the interior of an exploding star with the low-density stellar wind surrounding it, and in inertial confinement fusion experiments, where it mixes cooler materials with the central hot spot in an imploding capsule and stifles the desired nuclear reactions. In both of these examples, the radiative flux generated by strong shocks in the system may play a role in partially stabilizing RT instabilities. Here, we present experiments performed on the National Ignition Facility, designed to isolate and study the role of radiation and heat conduction from a shock front in the stabilization of hydrodynamic instabilities. By varying the laser power delivered to a shock-tube target with an embedded, unstable interface, the radiative fluxes generated at the shock front could be controlled. We observe decreased RT growth when the shock significantly heats the medium around it, in contrast to a system where the shock did not produce significant heating. Both systems are modeled with a modified set of buoyancy-drag equations accounting for ablative stabilization, and the experimental results are consistent with ablative stabilization when the shock is radiative. This result has important implications for our understanding of astrophysical radiative shocks and supernova radiative hydrodynamics [Kuranz et al., Nature Communications 9(1), 1564 (2018)].

  9. Filamentation due to the Weibel instability in two counterstreaming laser ablated plasmas

    DOE PAGES

    Dong, Quan -Li; Yuan, Dawei; Gao, Lan; ...

    2016-05-01

    Weibel-type filamentation instability was observed in the interaction of two counter streaming laser ablated plasma flows, which were supersonic, collisionless, and closely relevant to astrophysical conditions. The plasma flows were created by irradiating a pair of oppositely standing plastic (CH) foils with 1ns-pulsed laser beams of total energy of 1.7 kJ in two laser spots. Finally, with characteristics diagnosed in experiments, the calculated features of Weibel-type filaments are in good agreement with measurements.

  10. Dynamic stabilization of Rayleigh-Taylor instability in an ablation front

    SciTech Connect

    Piriz, A. R.; Di Lucchio, L.; Rodriguez Prieto, G.

    2011-01-15

    Dynamic stabilization of Rayleigh-Taylor instability in an ablation front is studied by considering a modulation in the acceleration that consists of sequences of Dirac deltas. This allows obtaining explicit analytical expressions for the instability growth rate as well as for the boundaries of the stability region. As a general rule, it is found that it is possible to stabilize all wave numbers above a certain minimum value k{sub m}, but the requirements in the modulation amplitude and frequency become more exigent with smaller k{sub m}. The essential role of compressibility is phenomenologically addressed in order to find the constraint itmore » imposes on the stability region. The results for some different wave forms of the acceleration modulation are also presented.« less

  11. Nonlinear Excitation of the Ablative Rayleigh-Taylor Instability for All Wave Numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H.; Betti, R.; Gopalaswamy, V.; Aluie, H.; Yan, R.

    2017-10-01

    Small-scale modes of the ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instability (ARTI) are often neglected because they are linearly stable when their wavelength is shorter than a linear cutoff. Using 2-D and 3-D numerical simulations, it is shown that linearly stable modes of any wavelength can be destabilized. This instability regime requires finite amplitude initial perturbations. Compared to 2-D, linearly stable ARTI modes are more easily destabilized in 3-D and the penetrating bubbles have a higher density because of enhanced vorticity. It is shown that for conditions found in laser fusion targets, short-wavelength ARTI modes are more efficient at driving mixing of ablated material throughout the target since the nonlinear bubble density increases with the wave number and small-scale bubbles carry a larger mass flux of mixed material. This work was supported by the Office of Fusion Energy Sciences Nos. DE-FG02-04ER54789, DE-SC0014318, the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award No. DE-NA0001944, the Ministerio de Ciencia e Innovacion of Spain (Grant No. ENE2011-28489), and the NANL LDRD program through Project Number 20150568ER.

  12. Computational study of the shock driven instability of a multiphase particle-gas system

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    This paper considers the interaction of a shock wave with a multiphase particle-gas system which creates an instability somewhat similar to the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability but with a larger parameter space. Because this parameter space is large, we only present an introductory survey of the effects of many of these parameters. We highlight the effects of particle-gas coupling, incident shock strength, particle size, effective system density differences, and multiple particle relaxation time effects. We focus on dilute flows with mass loading up to 40% and do not attempt to cover all parametric combinations. Instead, we vary one parameter at a timemore » leaving additional parametric combinations for future work. The simulations are run with the Ares code, developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, which uses a multiphase particulate transport method to model two-way momentum and energy coupling. A brief validation of these models is presented and coupling effects are explored. It is shown that even for small particles, on the order of 1μm, multi-phase coupling effects are important and diminish the circulation deposition on the interface by up to 25%. These coupling effects are shown to create large temperature deviations from the dusty gas approximation, up to 20% greater, especially at higher shock strengths. It is also found that for a multiphase instability, the vortex sheet deposited at the interface separates into two sheets. In conclusion, depending on the particle and particle-gas Atwood numbers, the instability may be suppressed or enhanced by the interactions of these two vortex sheets.« less

  13. Computational study of the shock driven instability of a multiphase particle-gas system

    DOE PAGES

    None, None

    2016-02-01

    This paper considers the interaction of a shock wave with a multiphase particle-gas system which creates an instability somewhat similar to the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability but with a larger parameter space. Because this parameter space is large, we only present an introductory survey of the effects of many of these parameters. We highlight the effects of particle-gas coupling, incident shock strength, particle size, effective system density differences, and multiple particle relaxation time effects. We focus on dilute flows with mass loading up to 40% and do not attempt to cover all parametric combinations. Instead, we vary one parameter at a timemore » leaving additional parametric combinations for future work. The simulations are run with the Ares code, developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, which uses a multiphase particulate transport method to model two-way momentum and energy coupling. A brief validation of these models is presented and coupling effects are explored. It is shown that even for small particles, on the order of 1μm, multi-phase coupling effects are important and diminish the circulation deposition on the interface by up to 25%. These coupling effects are shown to create large temperature deviations from the dusty gas approximation, up to 20% greater, especially at higher shock strengths. It is also found that for a multiphase instability, the vortex sheet deposited at the interface separates into two sheets. In conclusion, depending on the particle and particle-gas Atwood numbers, the instability may be suppressed or enhanced by the interactions of these two vortex sheets.« less

  14. Computational study of the shock driven instability of a multiphase particle-gas system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFarland, Jacob A.; Black, Wolfgang J.; Dahal, Jeevan; Morgan, Brandon E.

    2016-02-01

    This paper considers the interaction of a shock wave with a multiphase particle-gas system which creates an instability similar in some ways to the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability but with a larger parameter space. As this parameter space is large, we only present an introductory survey of the effects of many of these parameters. We highlight the effects of particle-gas coupling, incident shock strength, particle size, effective system density differences, and multiple particle relaxation time effects. We focus on dilute flows with mass loading up to 40% and do not attempt to cover all parametric combinations. Instead, we vary one parameter at a time leaving additional parametric combinations for future work. The simulations are run with the Ares code, developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, which uses a multiphase particulate transport method to model two-way momentum and energy coupling. A brief validation of these models is presented and coupling effects are explored. It is shown that even for small particles, on the order of 1 μm, multi-phase coupling effects are important and diminish the circulation deposition on the interface by up to 25%. These coupling effects are shown to create large temperature deviations from the dusty gas approximation, up to 20% greater, especially at higher shock strengths. It is also found that for a multiphase instability, the vortex sheet deposited at the interface separates into two sheets. Depending on the particle and particle-gas Atwood numbers, the instability may be suppressed or enhanced by the interactions of these two vortex sheets.

  15. The analysis of harmonic generation coefficients in the ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yan; Fan, Zhengfeng; Lu, Xinpei; Ye, Wenhua; Zou, Changlin; Zhang, Ziyun; Zhang, Wen

    2017-10-01

    In this research, we use the numerical simulation method to investigate the generation coefficients of the first three harmonics and the zeroth harmonic in the Ablative Rayleigh-Taylor Instability. It is shown that the interface shifts to the low temperature side during the ablation process. In consideration of the third-order perturbation theory, the first three harmonic amplitudes of the weakly nonlinear regime are calculated and then the harmonic generation coefficients are obtained by curve fitting. The simulation results show that the harmonic generation coefficients changed with time and wavelength. Using the higher-order perturbation theory, we find that more and more harmonics are generated in the later weakly nonlinear stage, which is caused by the negative feedback of the later higher harmonics. Furthermore, extending the third-order theory to the fifth-order theory, we find that the second and the third harmonics coefficients linearly depend on the wavelength, while the feedback coefficients are almost constant. Further analysis also shows that when the fifth-order theory is considered, the normalized effective amplitudes of second and third harmonics can reach about 25%-40%, which are only 15%-25% in the frame of the previous third-order theory. Therefore, the third order perturbation theory is needed to be modified by the higher-order theory when ηL reaches about 20% of the perturbation wavelength.

  16. Droplet and multiphase effects in a shock-driven hydrodynamic instability with reshock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Middlebrooks, John B.; Avgoustopoulos, Constantine G.; Black, Wolfgang J.; Allen, Roy C.; McFarland, Jacob A.

    2018-06-01

    Shock-driven multiphase instabilities (SDMI) are unique physical phenomena that have far-reaching applications in engineering and science such as high energy explosions, scramjet combustors, and supernovae events. The SDMI arises when a multiphase field is impulsively accelerated by a shock wave and evolves as a result of gradients in particle-gas momentum transfer. A new shock tube facility has been constructed to study the SDMI. Experiments were conducted to investigate liquid particle and multiphase effects in the SDMI. A multiphase cylindrical interface was created with water droplet laden air in our horizontal shock tube facility. The interface was accelerated by a Mach 1.66 shock wave, and its reflection from the end wall. The interface development was captured using laser illumination and a high-resolution CCD camera. Laser interferometry was used to determine the droplet size distribution. A particle filtration technique was used to determine mass loading within an interface and verify particle size distribution. The effects of particle number density, particle size, and a secondary acceleration (reshock) of the interface were noted. Particle number density effects were found comparable to Atwood number effects in the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability for small (˜ 1.7 {μ }m) droplets. Evaporation was observed to alter droplet sizes and number density, markedly after reshock. For large diameter droplets (˜ 10.7 {μ }m), diminished development was observed with larger droplets lagging far behind the interface. These lagging droplets were also observed to breakup after reshock into structured clusters of smaller droplets. Mixing width values were reported to quantify mixing effects seen in images.

  17. Evidence for a Bubble-Competition Regime in Indirectly Driven Ablative Rayleigh-Taylor Instability Experiments on the NIF

    DOE PAGES

    Martinez, D. A.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Kane, J. O.; ...

    2015-05-29

    In this paper, we investigate on the National Ignition Facility the ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instability in the transition from weakly nonlinear to highly nonlinear regimes. A planar plastic package with preimposed two-dimensional broadband modulations is accelerated for up to 12 ns by the x-ray drive of a gas-filled Au radiation cavity with a radiative temperature plateau at 175 eV. This extended tailored drive allows a distance traveled in excess of 1 mm for a 130 μm thick foil. Measurements of the modulation optical density performed by x-ray radiography show that a bubble-merger regime for the Rayleigh-Taylor instability at an ablation frontmore » is achieved for the first time in indirect drive. Finally, the mutimode modulation amplitudes are in the nonlinear regime, grow beyond the Haan multimode saturation level, evolve toward the longer wavelengths, and show insensitivity to the initial conditions.« less

  18. Evidence for a bubble-competition regime in indirectly driven ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instability experiments on the NIF.

    PubMed

    Martinez, D A; Smalyuk, V A; Kane, J O; Casner, A; Liberatore, S; Masse, L P

    2015-05-29

    We investigate on the National Ignition Facility the ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instability in the transition from weakly nonlinear to highly nonlinear regimes. A planar plastic package with preimposed two-dimensional broadband modulations is accelerated for up to 12 ns by the x-ray drive of a gas-filled Au radiation cavity with a radiative temperature plateau at 175 eV. This extended tailored drive allows a distance traveled in excess of 1 mm for a 130  μm thick foil. Measurements of the modulation optical density performed by x-ray radiography show that a bubble-merger regime for the Rayleigh-Taylor instability at an ablation front is achieved for the first time in indirect drive. The mutimode modulation amplitudes are in the nonlinear regime, grow beyond the Haan multimode saturation level, evolve toward the longer wavelengths, and show insensitivity to the initial conditions.

  19. Evidence for a Bubble-Competition Regime in Indirectly Driven Ablative Rayleigh-Taylor Instability Experiments on the NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, D. A.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Kane, J. O.; Casner, A.; Liberatore, S.; Masse, L. P.

    2015-05-01

    We investigate on the National Ignition Facility the ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instability in the transition from weakly nonlinear to highly nonlinear regimes. A planar plastic package with preimposed two-dimensional broadband modulations is accelerated for up to 12 ns by the x-ray drive of a gas-filled Au radiation cavity with a radiative temperature plateau at 175 eV. This extended tailored drive allows a distance traveled in excess of 1 mm for a 130 μ m thick foil. Measurements of the modulation optical density performed by x-ray radiography show that a bubble-merger regime for the Rayleigh-Taylor instability at an ablation front is achieved for the first time in indirect drive. The mutimode modulation amplitudes are in the nonlinear regime, grow beyond the Haan multimode saturation level, evolve toward the longer wavelengths, and show insensitivity to the initial conditions.

  20. Stabilization of high-compression, indirect-drive inertial confinement fusion implosions using a 4-shock adiabat-shaped drive

    SciTech Connect

    MacPhee, A. G.; Peterson, J. L.; Casey, D. T.

    Hydrodynamic instabilities and poor fuel compression are major factors for capsule performance degradation in ignition experiments on the National Ignition Facility. Using a recently developed laser drive profile with a decaying first shock to tune the ablative Richtmyer-Meshkov (ARM) instability and subsequent in-flight Rayleigh-Taylor growth, we have demonstrated reduced growth compared to the standard ignition pulse whilst maintaining conditions for a low fuel adiabat needed for increased compression. Using in-flight x-ray radiography of pre-machined modulations, the first growth measurements using this new ARM-tuned drive have demonstrated instability growth reduction of ∼4× compared to the original design at a convergence ratiomore » of ∼2. Corresponding simulations give a fuel adiabat of ∼1.6, similar to the original goal and consistent with ignition requirements.« less

  1. Stabilization of high-compression, indirect-drive inertial confinement fusion implosions using a 4-shock adiabat-shaped drive

    SciTech Connect

    MacPhee, A. G.; Peterson, J. L.; Casey, D. T.

    Hydrodynamic instabilities and poor fuel compression are major factors for capsule performance degradation in ignition experiments on the National Ignition Facility. Using a recently developed laser drive profile with a decaying first shock to tune the ablative Richtmyer-Meshkov (ARM) instability and subsequent in-flight Rayleigh-Taylor growth, we have demonstrated reduced growth compared to the standard ignition pulse whilst maintaining conditions for a low fuel adiabat needed for increased compression. Here, using in-flight x-ray radiography of pre-machined modulations, the first growth measurements using this new ARM-tuned drive have demonstrated instability growth reduction of ~4× compared to the original design at a convergencemore » ratio of ~2. Corresponding simulations give a fuel adiabat of ~1.6, similar to the original goal and consistent with ignition requirements.« less

  2. Stabilization of high-compression, indirect-drive inertial confinement fusion implosions using a 4-shock adiabat-shaped drive

    DOE PAGES

    MacPhee, A. G.; Peterson, J. L.; Casey, D. T.; ...

    2015-08-01

    Hydrodynamic instabilities and poor fuel compression are major factors for capsule performance degradation in ignition experiments on the National Ignition Facility. Using a recently developed laser drive profile with a decaying first shock to tune the ablative Richtmyer-Meshkov (ARM) instability and subsequent in-flight Rayleigh-Taylor growth, we have demonstrated reduced growth compared to the standard ignition pulse whilst maintaining conditions for a low fuel adiabat needed for increased compression. Here, using in-flight x-ray radiography of pre-machined modulations, the first growth measurements using this new ARM-tuned drive have demonstrated instability growth reduction of ~4× compared to the original design at a convergencemore » ratio of ~2. Corresponding simulations give a fuel adiabat of ~1.6, similar to the original goal and consistent with ignition requirements.« less

  3. Single-interface Richtmyer-Meshkov turbulent mixing at the Los Alamos Vertical Shock Tube

    DOE PAGES

    Wilson, Brandon Merrill; Mejia Alvarez, Ricardo; Prestridge, Katherine Philomena

    2016-04-12

    We studied Mach number and initial conditions effects on Richtmyer–Meshkov (RM) mixing by the vertical shock tube (VST) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). At the VST, a perturbed stable light-to-heavy (air–SF 6, A=0.64) interface is impulsively accelerated with a shock wave to induce RM mixing. We investigate changes to both large and small scales of mixing caused by changing the incident Mach number (Ma=1.3 and 1.45) and the three-dimensional (3D) perturbations on the interface. Simultaneous density (quantitative planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF)) and velocity (particle image velocimetry (PIV)) measurements are used to characterize preshock initial conditions and the dynamic shockedmore » interface. Initial conditions and fluid properties are characterized before shock. Using two types of dynamic measurements, time series (N=5 realizations at ten locations) and statistics (N=100 realizations at a single location) of the density and velocity fields, we calculate several mixing quantities. Mix width, density-specific volume correlations, density–vorticity correlations, vorticity, enstrophy, strain, and instantaneous dissipation rate are examined at one downstream location. Results indicate that large-scale mixing, such as the mix width, is strongly dependent on Mach number, whereas small scales are strongly influenced by initial conditions. Lastly, the enstrophy and strain show focused mixing activity in the spike regions.« less

  4. Numerical investigation of turbulence in reshocked Richtmyer-Meshkov unstable curtain of dense gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shankar, S. K.; Lele, S. K.

    2014-01-01

    Moderate-resolution numerical simulations of the impulsive acceleration of a dense gas curtain in air by a Mach 1.21 planar shock are carried out by solving the 3D compressible multi-species Navier-Stokes equations coupled with localized artificial diffusivity method to capture discontinuities in the flow field. The simulations account for the presence of three species in the flow field: air, and acetone (used as a tracer species in the experiments). Simulations at different concentration levels of the species are conducted and the temporal evolution of the curtain width is compared with the measured data from the experimental studies by Balakumar et al. (Phys Fluids 20:124103-124113, 2008). The instantaneous density and velocity fields at two different times (prior and after the reshock) are compared with experimental data and show good qualitative agreement. The reshock process is studied by re-impacting the evolving curtain with the reflected shock wave. Reshock causes enhanced mixing and destroys the ordered velocity field causing a chaotic flow. The unsteady flow field is characterized by computing statistics of certain flow variables using two different definitions of the mean flow. The average profiles conditioned on the heavy gas (comprising and acetone) and the corresponding fluctuating fields provide metrics which are more suitable to comparing with experimentally measured data. Mean profiles (conditioned on the heavy gas) of stream-wise velocity, variance of stream-wise velocity, and turbulent kinetic energy and PDF (probability distribution function) of fluctuating velocity components are computed at two different times along the flow evolution and are seen to show trend towards grid convergence. The spectra of turbulent kinetic energy and scalar energy (of mass fraction of heavy gas) show the existence of more than half decade of inertial sub-range at late times following reshock. The Reynolds stresses in the domain are reported while identifying the term that is dominant in its contribution to the Reynolds stresses.

  5. Experimental evidence of a bubble-merger regime for the Rayleigh-Taylor Instability at the ablation front

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casner, A.; Liberatore, S.; Masse, L.; Martinez, D.; Haan, S. W.; Kane, J.; Moore, A. S.; Seugling, R.; Farrell, M.; Giraldez, E.; Nikroo, A.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Remington, B. A.

    2016-05-01

    Under the Discovery Science program, the longer pulses and higher laser energies provided by the National Ignition Facility (NIF) have been harnessed to study, first time in indirect-drive, the highly nonlinear stage of the Rayleigh-Taylor Instability (RTI) at the ablation front. A planar plastic package with pre-imposed two-dimensional broadband modulations is accelerated for up to 12 ns by the x-ray drive of a gas-filled gold radiation cavity with a radiative temperature plateau at 175 eV. This extended tailored drive allows a distance traveled in excess of 1 mm for a 130 μm thick foil, a factor 3x larger than previously achieved on other laser facilities. As a consequence, we have measured the ablative RTI in transition from the weakly nonlinear stage up to the deep nonlinear stage for various initial conditions. A bubble merger regime has been observed and the ablative stabilization strength varied by changing the plastic dopant from iodine to germanium.

  6. Numerical Simulations of Free Surface Magnetohydrodynamic Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samulyak, Roman; Glimm, James; Oh, Wonho; Prykarpatskyy, Yarema

    2003-11-01

    We have developed a numerical algorithm and performed simulations of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) free surface flows. The corresponding system of MHD equations is a system of strongly coupled hyperbolic and parabolic/elliptic equations in moving and geometrically complex domains. The hyperbolic system is solved using the front tracking technique for the free fluid interface. Parallel algorithms for solving elliptic and parabolic equations are based on a finite element discretization on moving grids dynamically conforming to fluid interfaces. The method has been implemented as an MHD extension of the FronTier code. The code has been applied for modeling the behavior of lithium and mercury jets in magnetic fields, laser ablation plumes, and the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability of a liquid mercury jet interacting with a high energy proton pulse in a strong magnetic field. Such an instability occurs in the target for the Muon Collider.

  7. Effects of Phase Transformations and Dynamic Material Strength on Hydrodynamic Instability Evolution in Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Opie, Saul

    Hydrodynamic phenomena such as the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) and Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instabilities can be described by exponential/linear growth of surface perturbations at a bimaterial interface when subjected to constant/impulsive acceleration. A challenge in designing systems to mitigate or exploit these effects is the lack of accurate material models at large dynamic strain rates and pressures. In particular, little stress-strain constitutive information at large strain rates and pressures is available for transient material phases formed at high pressures, and the continuum effect the phase transformation process has on the instability evolution. In this work, a phase-aware isotropic strength model is developed and partially validated with a novel RM-based instability experiment in addition to existing data from the literature. With the validated material model additional simulations are performed to provide insight into to the role that robust material constitutive behavior (e.g., pressure, temperature, rate dependence) has on RM instability and how RM instability experiments can be used to characterize and validated expected material behavior. For phase aware materials, particularly iron in this work, the simulations predict a strong dependence on the Atwood number that single phase materials do not have. At Atwood numbers close to unity, and pressures in the high pressure stability region, the high pressure phase dominates the RM evolution. However, at Atwood numbers close to negative one, the RM evolution is only weakly affected by the high-pressure phase even for shocks well above the phase transformation threshold. In addition to RM evolution this work looks at the closely related shock front perturbation evolution. Existing analytical models for isentropic processes in gases and liquids are modified for metal equation of states and plastic behavior for the first time. It is found that the presence of a volume collapsing phase transformation with increased

  8. Impact of ablator thickness and laser drive duration on a platform for supersonic, shockwave-driven hydrodynamic instability experiments

    DOE PAGES

    Wan, W. C.; Malamud, Guy; Shimony, A.; ...

    2016-12-07

    Here, we discuss changes to a target design that improved the quality and consistency of data obtained through a novel experimental platform that enables the study of hydrodynamic instabilities in a compressible regime. The experiment uses a laser to drive steady, supersonic shockwave over well-characterized initial perturbations. Early experiments were adversely affected by inadequate experimental timescales and, potentially, an unintended secondary shockwave. These issues were addressed by extending the 4 x 10 13 W/cm 2 laser pulse from 19 ns to 28 ns, and increasing the ablator thickness from 185 µm to 500 µm. We present data demonstrating the performancemore » of the platform.« less

  9. Impact of ablator thickness and laser drive duration on a platform for supersonic, shockwave-driven hydrodynamic instability experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, W. C.; Malamud, Guy; Shimony, A.

    Here, we discuss changes to a target design that improved the quality and consistency of data obtained through a novel experimental platform that enables the study of hydrodynamic instabilities in a compressible regime. The experiment uses a laser to drive steady, supersonic shockwave over well-characterized initial perturbations. Early experiments were adversely affected by inadequate experimental timescales and, potentially, an unintended secondary shockwave. These issues were addressed by extending the 4 x 10 13 W/cm 2 laser pulse from 19 ns to 28 ns, and increasing the ablator thickness from 185 µm to 500 µm. We present data demonstrating the performancemore » of the platform.« less

  10. Instability growth seeded by ablator material inhomogeneity in indirect drive implosions on the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haan, Steven; Ali, S. J.; Baxamusa, S. H.; Celliers, P. M.; Clark, D. S.; Kritcher, A. L.; Nikroo, A.; Stadermann, M.; Biener, J.; Wallace, R.; Smalyuk, V.; Robey, H.; Weber, C. R.; Huang, H.; Reynolds, H.; Carlson, L.; Rice, N.; Kline, J. L.; Simakov, A. N.; Yi, S. A.

    2017-10-01

    NIF indirect drive ablators (CH, Be, and high density carbon HDC) show hydrodynamic irregularity beyond that expected from surface features. Characterizing these seeds and estimating their growth is important in projecting performance. The resulting modulations can be measured in x-ray backlit implosions on NIF called Hydro Growth Radiography, and on Omega with 2D velocimetry. This presentation summarizes the experiments for the three ablators, along with simulations thereof and projections of the significance for NIF. For CH, dominant seeds are photo-induced oxidation, which might be mitigated with alumina coating. For Be, perturbations result from Ar and O contamination. For HDC, perturbations are seeded by shock propagation around melt, depend on shock strength, and may constrain the adiabat of future HDC implosions. Work performed under the auspices of the U.S. D.O.E. by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  11. Nike Experiment to Observe Strong Areal Mass Oscillations in a Rippled Target Hit by a Short Laser Pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aglitskiy, Y.; Karasik, M.; Velikovich, A. L.; Serlin, V.; Weaver, J. L.; Kessler, T. J.; Schmitt, A. J.; Obenschain, S. P.; Metzler, N.; Oh, J.

    2010-11-01

    When a short (sub-ns) laser pulse deposits finite energy in a target, the shock wave launched into it is immediately followed by a rarefaction wave. If the irradiated surface is rippled, theory and simulations predict strong oscillations of the areal mass perturbation amplitude in the target [A. L. Velikovich et al., Phys. Plasmas 10, 3270 (2003).] The first experiment designed to observe this effect has become possible by adding short-driving-pulse capability to the Nike laser, and has been scheduled for the fall of 2010. Simulations show that while the driving pulse of 0.3 ns is on, the areal mass perturbation amplitude grows by a factor ˜2 due to ablative Richtmyer-Meshkov instability. It then decreases, reverses phase, and reaches another maximum, also about twice its initial value, shortly after the shock breakout at the rear target surface. This signature behavior is observable with the monochromatic x-ray imaging diagnostics fielded on Nike.

  12. Strength and viscosity effects on perturbed shock front stability in metals

    DOE PAGES

    Opie, Saul; Loomis, Eric Nicholas; Peralta, Pedro; ...

    2017-05-09

    Here, computational modeling and experimental measurements on metal samples subject to a laser-driven, ablative Richtmyer-Meshkov instability showed differences between viscosity and strength effects. In particular, numerical and analytical solutions, coupled with measurements of fed-through perturbations, generated by perturbed shock fronts onto initially flat surfaces, show promise as a validation method for models of deviatoric response in the post shocked material. Analysis shows that measurements of shock perturbation amplitudes at low sample thickness-to-wavelength ratios are not enough to differentiate between strength and viscosity effects, but that surface displacement data of the fed-through fed-thru perturbations appears to resolve the ambiguity. Additionally, analyticalmore » and numerical results show shock front perturbation evolution dependence on initial perturbation amplitude and wavelength is significantly different in viscous and materials with strength, suggesting simple experimental geometry changes should provide data supporting one model or the other.« less

  13. 3D broadband Bubbles Dynamics for the imprinted ablative Rayleigh-Taylor Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casner, Alexis; Khan, S.; Mailliet, C.; Martinez, D.; Izumi, N.; Le Bel, E.; Remington, B. A.; Masse, L.; Smalyuk, V. A.

    2017-10-01

    We report on highly nonlinear ablative Rayleigh-Taylor growth measurements of 3D laser imprinted modulations. These experiments are part of the Discovery Science Program on NIF. Planar plastic samples were irradiated by 450 kJ of 3w laser light and the growth of 3D laser imprinted modulations is quantified through face-on radiography. The initial seed of the imprinted RTI is imposed by one beam focused in advance (-300 ps) without any optical smoothing (no CPP, no SSD). For the first time four generations of bubbles were created as larger bubbles overtake and merge with smaller bubbles because of the unprecedented long laser drive (30 ns). The experimental data, analyzed both in real and Fourier space, are compared with classical bubble-merger models, as well as recent theory and simulations predicting 3D bubbles reacceleration due to vorticity accumulation caused by mass ablation. These experiments are of crucial importance for benchmarking 2D and 3D radiation hydrodynamics code for Inertial Confinement Fusion.

  14. Probing the deep nonlinear stage of the ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instability in indirect drive experiments on the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Casner, A., E-mail: alexis.casner@cea.fr; Masse, L.; Liberatore, S.

    2015-05-15

    Academic tests in physical regimes not encountered in Inertial Confinement Fusion will help to build a better understanding of hydrodynamic instabilities and constitute the scientifically grounded validation complementary to fully integrated experiments. Under the National Ignition Facility (NIF) Discovery Science program, recent indirect drive experiments have been carried out to study the ablative Rayleigh-Taylor Instability (RTI) in transition from weakly nonlinear to highly nonlinear regime [A. Casner et al., Phys. Plasmas 19, 082708 (2012)]. In these experiments, a modulated package is accelerated by a 175 eV radiative temperature plateau created by a room temperature gas-filled platform irradiated by 60 NIF lasermore » beams. The unique capabilities of the NIF are harnessed to accelerate this planar sample over much larger distances (≃1.4 mm) and longer time periods (≃12 ns) than previously achieved. This extended acceleration could eventually allow entering into a turbulent-like regime not precluded by the theory for the RTI at the ablation front. Simultaneous measurements of the foil trajectory and the subsequent RTI growth are performed and compared with radiative hydrodynamics simulations. We present RTI growth measurements for two-dimensional single-mode and broadband multimode modulations. The dependence of RTI growth on initial conditions and ablative stabilization is emphasized, and we demonstrate for the first time in indirect-drive a bubble-competition, bubble-merger regime for the RTI at ablation front.« less

  15. Shock Front Distortion and Richtmyer-Meshkov-like Growth Caused by a Small Pre-Shock Non-Uniformity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    Washington, DC 20375, USA 2 Escuela Tecnica Superior de Ingenieros Industriales , Universidad de Castilla-la Mancha, 13071 Ciudad Real, Spain...the right of all the singularities of sP ~ . For ideal gases , as is the case in this work, the right-hand sides of Eqs. (43) and (46) do not have...3957 (1980); M. A. Tsikulin, E. G. Popov, Radiative Properties of Shock Waves in Gases (in Russian) (Moscow, Nauka, 1977). 13 J. Grun, R. Burris, G

  16. Experimental Investigation of the Effects of an Axial Magnetic Field on the Magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor Instability in Ablating Planar Foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yager-Elorriaga, D. A.; Patel, S. G.; Steiner, A. M.; Jordan, N. M.; Weiss, M. R.; Gilgenbach, R. M.; Lau, Y. Y.

    2014-10-01

    Experiments are underway to study the effects an axial magnetic field on the magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor instability (MRT) in ablating planar foils on the 1-MA LTD at the Michigan Accelerator for Inductive Z-pinch Experiments (MAIZE) facility at the University of Michigan. For 600 kA drive current, a 15 T axial magnetic field is produced using helical return current posts. During the current pulse, the magnetic field may diffuse into the foil, creating a sheared magnetic field along with the possibility of shear stabilization of the MRT instability. Theoretical investigation at UM has shown that a sheared azimuthal magnetic field coupled with an axial magnetic field reduces the MRT growth rate in general. In order to study this effect, the amount of magnetic shear is controlled by offsetting the initial position of the foil. A 775 nm Ti:sapphire laser will be used to shadowgraph the foil in order to measure the MRT growth rate. By comparing these results to previous experiments at UM, the effects of magnetic shear and an axial magnetic field will be determined. This work was supported by US DoE. S.G. Patel and A.M. Steiner supported by NPSC funded by Sandia. D.A. Yager-Elorriaga supported by NSF fellowship Grant DGE 1256260.

  17. H_Hyd_Shktub_Mshock_III, JJJ, KKK (S01,S02,S03) on the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Desjardins, Tiffany; Schmidt, Derek William; Di Stefano, Carlos

    2017-12-15

    These experiments are the first experiments in the Mshock campaign at the National Ignition Facility. The experiment is scheduled to be conducted on Dec. 14, 2017. The goal of the Mshock campaign is to study feedthrough dynamics of the Richtmyer- Meshkov instability in a thin layer. These dynamics will be studied in both a reshock configuration (initially) and then in a multi-shock configuration where it is planned to reshock the RM instability up to 3 times (four shocks total).

  18. SciTech Connect

    Desjardins, Tiffany; Schmidt, Derek William; Di Stefano, Carlos

    These experiments are the first experiments in the Mshock campaign at the National Ignition Facility. The experiment is scheduled to be conducted on Dec. 14, 2017. The goal of the Mshock campaign is to study feedthrough dynamics of the Richtmyer- Meshkov instability in a thin layer. These dynamics will be studied in both a reshock configuration (initially) and then in a multi-shock configuration where it is planned to reshock the RM instability up to 3 times (four shocks total).

  19. The Benjamin Shock Tube Problem in KULL

    SciTech Connect

    Ulitsky, M

    2005-08-26

    The goal of the EZturb mix model in KULL is to predict the turbulent mixing process as it evolves from Rayleigh-Taylor, Richtmyer-Meshkov, or Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities. In this report we focus on a simple example of the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (which occurs when a shock hits an interface between fluids of different densities) without the complication of reshock. The experiment by Benjamin et al. involving a Mach 1.21 incident shock striking an air / SF6 interface, is a good one to model and understand before moving onto shock tubes that follow the growth of the turbulent mixing zone from first shock throughmore » well after reshock.« less

  20. SciTech Connect

    Casner, A.; Masse, L.; Delorme, B.

    Understanding and mitigating hydrodynamic instabilities and the fuel mix are the key elements for achieving ignition in Inertial Confinement Fusion. Cryogenic indirect-drive implosions on the National Ignition Facility have evidenced that the ablative Rayleigh-Taylor Instability (RTI) is a driver of the hot spot mix. This motivates the switch to a more flexible higher adiabat implosion design [O. A. Hurricane et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 056313 (2014)]. The shell instability is also the main candidate for performance degradation in low-adiabat direct drive cryogenic implosions [Goncharov et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 056315 (2014)]. This paper reviews recent results acquired in planar experimentsmore » performed on the OMEGA laser facility and devoted to the modeling and mitigation of hydrodynamic instabilities at the ablation front. In application to the indirect-drive scheme, we describe results obtained with a specific ablator composition such as the laminated ablator or a graded-dopant emulator. In application to the direct drive scheme, we discuss experiments devoted to the study of laser imprinted perturbations with special phase plates. The simulations of the Richtmyer-Meshkov phase reversal during the shock transit phase are challenging, and of crucial interest because this phase sets the seed of the RTI growth. Recent works were dedicated to increasing the accuracy of measurements of the phase inversion. We conclude by presenting a novel imprint mitigation mechanism based on the use of underdense foams. Lastly, the foams induce laser smoothing by parametric instabilities thus reducing the laser imprint on the CH foil.« less

  1. SciTech Connect

    Casner, A., E-mail: alexis.casner@cea.fr; Masse, L.; Huser, G.

    Understanding and mitigating hydrodynamic instabilities and the fuel mix are the key elements for achieving ignition in Inertial Confinement Fusion. Cryogenic indirect-drive implosions on the National Ignition Facility have evidenced that the ablative Rayleigh-Taylor Instability (RTI) is a driver of the hot spot mix. This motivates the switch to a more flexible higher adiabat implosion design [O. A. Hurricane et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 056313 (2014)]. The shell instability is also the main candidate for performance degradation in low-adiabat direct drive cryogenic implosions [Goncharov et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 056315 (2014)]. This paper reviews recent results acquired in planar experimentsmore » performed on the OMEGA laser facility and devoted to the modeling and mitigation of hydrodynamic instabilities at the ablation front. In application to the indirect-drive scheme, we describe results obtained with a specific ablator composition such as the laminated ablator or a graded-dopant emulator. In application to the direct drive scheme, we discuss experiments devoted to the study of laser imprinted perturbations with special phase plates. The simulations of the Richtmyer-Meshkov phase reversal during the shock transit phase are challenging, and of crucial interest because this phase sets the seed of the RTI growth. Recent works were dedicated to increasing the accuracy of measurements of the phase inversion. We conclude by presenting a novel imprint mitigation mechanism based on the use of underdense foams. The foams induce laser smoothing by parametric instabilities thus reducing the laser imprint on the CH foil.« less

  2. Validating Hydrodynamic Growth in National Ignition Facility Implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, J. Luc

    2014-10-01

    The hydrodynamic growth of capsule imperfections can threaten the success of inertial confinement fusion implosions. Therefore, it is important to design implosions that are robust to hydrodynamic instabilities. However, the numerical simulation of interacting Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov growth in these implosions is sensitive to modeling uncertainties such as radiation drive and material equations of state, the effects of which are especially apparent at high mode number (small perturbation wavelength) and high convergence ratio (small capsule radius). A series of validation experiments were conducted at the National Ignition Facility to test the ability to model hydrodynamic growth in spherically converging ignition-relevant implosions. These experiments on the Hydro-Growth Radiography platform constituted direct measurements of the growth of pre-imposed imperfections up to Legendre mode 160 and a convergence ratio of greater than four using two different laser drives: a ``low-foot'' drive used during the National Ignition Campaign and a larger adiabat ``high-foot'' drive that is modeled to be relatively more robust to ablation front hydrodynamic growth. We will discuss these experiments and how their results compare to numerical simulations and analytic theories of hydrodynamic growth, as well as their implications for the modeling of future designs. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  3. Shock-induced perturbation evolution in planar laser targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aglitskiy, Y.; Karasik, M.; Velikovich, A. L.; Serlin, V.; Weaver, J. L.; Kessler, T. J.; Schmitt, A. J.; Obenschain, S. P.; Metzler, N.; Oh, J.

    2013-10-01

    Experimental studies of hydrodynamic perturbation evolution triggered by a laser-driven shock wave in a planar target done on the KrF Nike laser facility are reported. The targets were made of solid plastic and/or plastic foam with single mode sinusoidal perturbation on the front or back surface or plastic/foam interface. Two specific cases are discussed. When a planar solid plastic target rippled at the front side is irradiated with a 350 ps long laser pulse, ablative Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) oscillation of its areal mass modulation amplitude is detected while the laser is on, followed by observed strong oscillations of the areal mass in the unsupported shock flow after the laser pulse ends. When the target is rippled at the rear side, the nature of the perturbation evolution after the shock breakout is determined by the strength of the laser-driven shock wave. At pressure below 1 Mbar shock interaction with rear-surface ripples produces planar collimated jets manifesting the development of a classical RM instability in a weakly compressible shocked fluid. At shock pressure ~ 8 Mbar sufficient for vaporizing the shocked target material we observed instead the strong areal mass oscillations characteristic of a rippled centered rarefaction wave. Work supported by US DOE, Defense Programs.

  4. Observation of strong oscillations of areal mass in an unsupported shock wave produced by a short laser pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aglitskiy, Y.; Karasik, M.; Velikovich, A. L.; Serlin, V.; Weaver, J. L.; Kessler, T. J.; Schmitt, A. J.; Obenschain, S. P.; Metzler, N.; Oh, J.

    2011-10-01

    The first experimental study of hydrodynamic perturbation evolution in a strong unsupported shock wave, which is immediately followed by a rarefaction wave, is reported. Our planar solid polystyrene laser-machined targets, 50 to 100 μm thick, rippled from the front side with a single-mode wavelength 30 or 45 μm and peak-to-valley amplitude 4 to 6 μm, were irradiated with a 350 ps long Nike KrF laser pulse at peak intensity of up to 330 TW/cm2. The perturbation evolution in the target was observed using face-on monochromatic x-ray radiography while the pulse lasted and for 3 to 4 ns after it ended. While the driving pulse was on, the areal mass modulation amplitude in the target was observed to grow by a factor of up to ~4 due to the ablative Richtmyer-Meshkov instability. After the end of the pulse, while the strong unsupported shock wave propagated through the unperturbed target, the theoretically predicted large oscillations of the areal mass [A. L. Velikovich et al., Phys. Plasmas 10, 3270 (2003)] were observed. Multiple phase reversals of the areal mass modulation have been detected. Work supported by DOE/NNSA and Office of Naval Research.

  5. SciTech Connect

    Regan, S.P.

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering the period October--December 1998, includes two articles addressing issues applicable to direct-drive ICF on the National Ignition Facility (NIF): laser-plasma interactions and laser-irradiation uniformity. Additional highlights of the research presented in this issue are: (1) P.B. Radha and S. Skupsky present a novel charged-particle diagnostic that performs simultaneous {rho}R measurements of the fuel, shell, and ablator regions of a compressed ICF target, consisting of an inner DT fuel region, a plastic (CH) shell, and an ablator (CD), by measuring the knock-on deuteron spectrum. (2) F. Dahmani, S. Burns, J. Lambropoulos, S. Papernov, andmore » A. Schmid report results from stress-inhibited laser-driven crack propagation and stress-delayed damage-initiation experiments in fused silica at 351 nm. Research is underway presently to determine the ramifications of these findings for large-aperture systems, such as OMEGA. (3) V. Goncharov presents an analytic theory of the ablative Richtmyer-Meshkov instability, which shows that the main stabilizing mechanism of the ablation-front perturbations is the dynamic overpressure of the blowoff plasma with respect to the target material. The perturbation evolution during the shock transit time is studied to determine the initial conditions for the Rayleigh-Taylor phase of the instability and to analyze the level of laser imprint on ICF direct-drive targets. (4) J.M. Larkin, W.R. Donaldson, T.H. Foster, and R.S. Knox examine the triplet state of rose bengal, a dye used in photodynamic therapy, that is produced by 1,064-nm excitation of T{sub 1}. (5) R. Adam, M. Currie, R. Sobolewski, O. Harnack, and M. Darula report measurements of the picosecond photoresponse of a current-biased YBCO microbridge coupled to a bicrystal YBCO Josephson junction.« less

  6. Endometrial Ablation

    MedlinePlus

    ... or lighter levels. If ablation does not control heavy bleeding, further treatment or surgery may be needed. ... ablation is used to treat many causes of heavy bleeding. In most cases, women with heavy bleeding ...

  7. Suppression of transverse ablative Rayleigh-Taylor-like instability in the hole-boring radiation pressure acceleration by using elliptically polarized laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Wu, D; Zheng, C Y; Qiao, B; Zhou, C T; Yan, X Q; Yu, M Y; He, X T

    2014-08-01

    It is shown that the transverse Rayleigh-Taylor-like (RT) instability in the hole-boring radiation pressure acceleration can be suppressed by using an elliptically polarized (EP) laser. A moderate J×B heating of the EP laser will thermalize the local electrons, which leads to the transverse diffusion of ions, suppressing the short wavelength perturbations of RT instability. A proper condition of polarization ratio is obtained analytically for the given laser intensity and plasma density. The idea is confirmed by two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, showing that the ion beam driven by the EP laser is more concentrated and intense compared with that of the circularly polarized laser.

  8. The study of high-speed surface dynamics using a pulsed proton beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buttler, William T.; Oro, David M.; Preston, Dean; Mikaelian, Karnig O.; Cherne, Frank J.; Hixson, Robert S.; Mariam, Fesseha G.; Morris, Christopher L.; Stone, Joseph B.; Terrones, Guillermo; Tupa, Dale

    2012-03-01

    We present experimental results supporting physics based ejecta model development, where we assume ejecta form as a special limiting case of a Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instability with Atwood number A = -1. We present and use data to test established RM spike and bubble growth rate theory through application of modern laser Doppler velocimetry techniques applied in a novel manner to coincidentally measure bubble and spike velocities from shocked metals. We also explore the link of ejecta formation from a solid material to its plastic flow stress at high-strain rates (107/s) and high strains (700%).

  9. Ablation article and method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, W. D.; Sullivan, E. M. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    An ablation article, such as a conical heat shield, having an ablating surface is provided with at least one discrete area of at least one seed material, such as aluminum. When subjected to ablation conditions, the seed material is ablated. Radiation emanating from the ablated seed material is detected to analyze ablation effects without disturbing the ablation surface. By providing different seed materials having different radiation characteristics, the ablating effects on various areas of the ablating surface can be analyzed under any prevailing ablation conditions. The ablating article can be provided with means for detecting the radiation characteristics of the ablated seed material to provide a self-contained analysis unit.

  10. Two-length-scale turbulence model for self-similar buoyancy-, shock-, and shear-driven mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, Brandon E.; Schilling, Oleg; Hartland, Tucker A.

    The three-equation k-L-a turbulence model [B. Morgan and M. Wickett, Three-equation model for the self-similar growth of Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities," Phys. Rev. E 91 (2015)] is extended by the addition of a second length scale equation. It is shown that the separation of turbulence transport and turbulence destruction length scales is necessary for simultaneous prediction of the growth parameter and turbulence intensity of a Kelvin-Helmholtz shear layer when model coeficients are constrained by similarity analysis. Constraints on model coeficients are derived that satisfy an ansatz of self-similarity in the low-Atwood-number limit and allow the determination of model coeficients necessarymore » to recover expected experimental behavior. The model is then applied in one-dimensional simulations of Rayleigh-Taylor, reshocked Richtmyer-Meshkov, Kelvin{Helmholtz, and combined Rayleigh-Taylor/Kelvin-Helmholtz instability mixing layers to demonstrate that the expected growth rates are recovered numerically. Finally, it is shown that model behavior in the case of combined instability is to predict a mixing width that is a linear combination of Rayleigh-Taylor and Kelvin-Helmholtz mixing processes.« less

  11. Two-length-scale turbulence model for self-similar buoyancy-, shock-, and shear-driven mixing

    DOE PAGES

    Morgan, Brandon E.; Schilling, Oleg; Hartland, Tucker A.

    2018-01-10

    The three-equation k-L-a turbulence model [B. Morgan and M. Wickett, Three-equation model for the self-similar growth of Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities," Phys. Rev. E 91 (2015)] is extended by the addition of a second length scale equation. It is shown that the separation of turbulence transport and turbulence destruction length scales is necessary for simultaneous prediction of the growth parameter and turbulence intensity of a Kelvin-Helmholtz shear layer when model coeficients are constrained by similarity analysis. Constraints on model coeficients are derived that satisfy an ansatz of self-similarity in the low-Atwood-number limit and allow the determination of model coeficients necessarymore » to recover expected experimental behavior. The model is then applied in one-dimensional simulations of Rayleigh-Taylor, reshocked Richtmyer-Meshkov, Kelvin{Helmholtz, and combined Rayleigh-Taylor/Kelvin-Helmholtz instability mixing layers to demonstrate that the expected growth rates are recovered numerically. Finally, it is shown that model behavior in the case of combined instability is to predict a mixing width that is a linear combination of Rayleigh-Taylor and Kelvin-Helmholtz mixing processes.« less

  12. The Vetter-Sturtevant Shock Tube Problem in KULL

    SciTech Connect

    Ulitsky, M S

    2005-10-06

    The goal of the EZturb mix model in KULL is to predict the turbulent mixing process as it evolves from Rayleigh-Taylor, Richtmyer-Meshkov, or Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities. In this report we focus on an example of the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (which occurs when a shock hits an interface between fluids of different densities) with the additional complication of reshock. The experiment by Vetter & Sturtevant (VS) [1], involving a Mach 1.50 incident shock striking an air/SF{sub 6} interface, is a good one to model, now that we understand how the model performs for the Benjamin shock tube [2] and a prototypical incompressible Rayleigh-Taylormore » problem [3]. The x-t diagram for the VS shock tube is quite complicated, since the transmitted shock hits the far wall at {approx}2 millisec, reshocks the mixing zone slightly after 3 millisec (which sets up a release wave that hits the wall at {approx}4 millisec), and then the interface is hit with this expansion wave around 5 millisec. Needless to say, this problem is much more difficult to model than the Bejamin shock tube.« less

  13. The Instability of Instability

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-05-01

    thermodynamic principles, changes cannot be effected without some cost. The decision - making associated with Model I can be viewed as rational behavior. Consider...number Democratic simple majority voting is perhaps the most widely used method of group decision making i;i our time. Current theory, based on...incorporate any of several plausible characteristics of decision - making , then the instability theorems do not hold and in fact the probability of

  14. Collective instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    K.Y. Ng

    2003-08-25

    The lecture covers mainly Sections 2.VIII and 3.VII of the book ''Accelerator Physics'' by S.Y. Lee, plus mode-coupling instabilities and chromaticity-driven head-tail instability. Besides giving more detailed derivation of many equations, simple interpretations of many collective instabilities are included with the intention that the phenomena can be understood more easily without going into too much mathematics. The notations of Lee's book as well as the e{sup jwt} convention are followed.

  15. Shoulder Instability

    MedlinePlus

    ... as bad as the pain of a sudden injury. Your shoulder might be sore when you move it. It ... Treatment How is shoulder instability treated? Treatment for shoulder instability depends on how bad your injury is and how important it is for you ...

  16. [Shoulder instability].

    PubMed

    Sailer, J; Imhof, H

    2004-06-01

    Shoulder instability is a common clinical feature leading to recurrent pain and limited range of motion within the glenohumeral joint. Instability can be due a single traumatic event, general joint laxity or repeated episodes of microtrauma. Differentiation between traumatic and atraumatic forms of shoulder instability requires careful history and a systemic clinical examination. Shoulder laxity has to be differentiated from true instability followed by the clinical assessment of direction and degree of glenohumeral translation. Conventional radiography and CT are used for the diagnosis of bony lesions. MR imaging and MR arthrography help in the detection of soft tissue affection, especially of the glenoid labrum and the capsuloligamentous complex. The most common lesion involving the labrum is the anterior labral tear, associated with capsuloperiostal stripping (Bankart lesion). A number of variants of the Bankart lesion have been described, such as ALPSA, SLAP or HAGL lesions. The purpose of this review is to highlight different forms of shoulder instability and its associated radiological findings with a focus on MR imaging.

  17. Ankle instability.

    PubMed

    Ferran, Nicholas A; Oliva, Francesco; Maffulli, Nicola

    2009-06-01

    Acute ankle sprains are common, and if inadequately treated may result in chronic instability. Lateral ankle injuries are most common, with deltoid injuries rare and associated with ankle fractures/dislocation. Medial ankle instability is rare. Functional management of acute lateral ankle sprains is the treatment of choice, with acute ligament repair reserved for athletes. Chronic lateral ankle instability is initially managed conservatively, however, failure of rehabilitation is an indication for surgical management. Nonanatomic tenodesis reconstructions have poor long-term results, sacrifice peroneal tendons, and disrupt normal ankle and hindfoot biomechanics. Anatomic repair of the anterior talofibular and calcaneofibular ligaments is recommended when the quality of the ruptured ligaments permits. Anatomic reconstruction with autograft or allograft should be performed when ligaments are attenuated. The role of arthroscopic reconstruction is evolving. Ankle arthroscopy should be performed at the time of repair or reconstruction and should address any other intra-articular causes of pain.

  18. Global ablation techniques.

    PubMed

    Woods, Sarah; Taylor, Betsy

    2013-12-01

    Global endometrial ablation techniques are a relatively new surgical technology for the treatment of heavy menstrual bleeding that can now be used even in an outpatient clinic setting. A comparison of global ablation versus earlier ablation technologies notes no significant differences in success rates and some improvement in patient satisfaction. The advantages of the newer global endometrial ablation systems include less operative time, improved recovery time, and decreased anesthetic risk. Ablation procedures performed in an outpatient surgical or clinic setting provide advantages both of potential cost savings for patients and the health care system and improved patient convenience. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Simulation of Interaction of Strong Shocks with Gas Bubbles using the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puranik, Bhalchandra; Watvisave, Deepak; Bhandarkar, Upendra

    2016-11-01

    The interaction of a shock with a density interface is observed in several technological applications such as supersonic combustion, inertial confinement fusion, and shock-induced fragmentation of kidney and gall-stones. The central physical process in this interaction is the mechanism of the Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability (RMI). The specific situation where the density interface is initially an isolated spherical or cylindrical gas bubble presents a relatively simple geometry that exhibits all the essential RMI processes such as reflected and refracted shocks, secondary instabilities, turbulence and mixing of the species. If the incident shocks are strong, the calorically imperfect nature needs to be modelled. In the present work, we have carried out simulations of the shock-bubble interaction using the DSMC method for such situations. Specifically, an investigation of the shock-bubble interaction with diatomic gases involving rotational and vibrational excitations at high temperatures is performed, and the effects of such high temperature phenomena will be presented.

  20. Exploring Model Assumptions Through Three Dimensional Mixing Simulations Using a High-order Hydro Option in the Ares Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Justin; Olson, Britton; Morgan, Brandon; McFarland, Jacob; Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Team; University of Missouri-Columbia Team

    2015-11-01

    This work presents results from a large eddy simulation of a high Reynolds number Rayleigh-Taylor instability and Richtmyer-Meshkov instability. A tenth-order compact differencing scheme on a fixed Eulerian mesh is utilized within the Ares code developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. (LLNL) We explore the self-similar limit of the mixing layer growth in order to evaluate the k-L-a Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes (RANS) model (Morgan and Wickett, Phys. Rev. E, 2015). Furthermore, profiles of turbulent kinetic energy, turbulent length scale, mass flux velocity, and density-specific-volume correlation are extracted in order to aid the creation a high fidelity LES data set for RANS modeling. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  1. Taylor instability in the shock layer on a Jovian atmosphere entry probe.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Compton, D. L.

    1972-01-01

    Investigation of the Taylor instability relative to the dynamical instability whose presence in the shock layer on a spacecraft entering the Jovian atmosphere is to be expected because of the difference in velocity across the shear layer. Presented calculations show that the Taylor instability at the interface between shock-heated freestream gas and ablation products is inconsequential in comparison to the shear layer instability.

  2. Validating hydrodynamic growth in National Ignition Facility implosions

    DOE PAGES

    Peterson, J. L.; Casey, D. T.; Hurricane, O. A.; ...

    2015-05-12

    We present new hydrodynamic growth experiments at the National Ignition Facility, which extend previous measurements up to Legendre mode 160 and convergence ratio 4, continuing the growth factor dispersion curve comparison of the low foot and high foot pulses reported by Casey et al. [Phys. Rev. E 90, 011102(R) (2014)]. We show that the high foot pulse has lower growth factor and lower growth rate than the low foot pulse. Using novel on-capsule fiducial markers, we observe that mode 160 inverts sign (changes phase) for the high foot pulse, evidence of amplitude oscillations during the Richtmyer-Meshkov phase of a sphericallymore » convergent system. Post-shot simulations are consistent with the experimental measurements for all but the shortest wavelength perturbations, reinforcing the validity of radiation hydrodynamic simulations of ablation front growth in inertial confinement fusion capsules.« less

  3. Nonequilibrium Ablation of Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milos, Frank S.; Chen, Yih K.; Gokcen, Tahir

    2012-01-01

    In previous work, an equilibrium ablation and thermal response model for Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator was developed. In general, over a wide range of test conditions, model predictions compared well with arcjet data for surface recession, surface temperature, in-depth temperature at multiple thermocouples, and char depth. In this work, additional arcjet tests were conducted at stagnation conditions down to 40 W/sq cm and 1.6 kPa. The new data suggest that nonequilibrium effects become important for ablation predictions at heat flux or pressure below about 80 W/sq cm or 10 kPa, respectively. Modifications to the ablation model to account for nonequilibrium effects are investigated. Predictions of the equilibrium and nonequilibrium models are compared with the arcjet data.

  4. Transgenic Reproductive Cell Ablation.

    PubMed

    Lawit, Shai J; Chamberlin, Mark A

    2017-01-01

    Numerous cell ablation technologies are available and have been used in reproductive tissues, particularly for male tissues and cells. The importance of ablation of reproductive tissues is toward a fundamental understanding reproductive tissue development and fertilization, as well as, in developing sterility lines important to breeding strategies. Here, we describe techniques for developing ablation lines for both male and female reproductive cells. Also discussed are techniques for analysis, quality control, maintenance, and the lessening of pleiotropism in such lines.

  5. Ablative Thermal Protection System Fundamentals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, Robin A. S.

    2013-01-01

    This is the presentation for a short course on the fundamentals of ablative thermal protection systems. It covers the definition of ablation, description of ablative materials, how they work, how to analyze them and how to model them.

  6. Study of shock waves and related phenomena motivated by astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Drake, R. P.; Keiter, P. A.; Kuranz, C. C.

    This study discusses the recent research in High-Energy-Density Physics at our Center. Our work in complex hydrodynamics is now focused on mode coupling in the Richtmyer-Meshkov process and on the supersonic Kelvin-Helmholtz instability. These processes are believed to occur in a wide range of astrophysical circumstances. In radiation hydrodynamics, we are studying radiative reverse shocks relevant to cataclysmic variable stars. Our work on magnetized flows seeks to produce magnetized jets and study their interactions. We build the targets for all these experiments, and simulate them using our CRASH code. We also conduct diagnostic research, focused primarily on imaging x-ray spectroscopymore » and its applications to scattering and fluorescence.« less

  7. Study of shock waves and related phenomena motivated by astrophysics

    DOE PAGES

    Drake, R. P.; Keiter, P. A.; Kuranz, C. C.; ...

    2016-04-01

    This study discusses the recent research in High-Energy-Density Physics at our Center. Our work in complex hydrodynamics is now focused on mode coupling in the Richtmyer-Meshkov process and on the supersonic Kelvin-Helmholtz instability. These processes are believed to occur in a wide range of astrophysical circumstances. In radiation hydrodynamics, we are studying radiative reverse shocks relevant to cataclysmic variable stars. Our work on magnetized flows seeks to produce magnetized jets and study their interactions. We build the targets for all these experiments, and simulate them using our CRASH code. We also conduct diagnostic research, focused primarily on imaging x-ray spectroscopymore » and its applications to scattering and fluorescence.« less

  8. Hydrodynamic simulations of microjetting from shock-loaded grooves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roland, C.; de Rességuier, T.; Sollier, A.; Lescoute, E.; Soulard, L.; Loison, D.

    2017-01-01

    The interaction of a shock wave with a free surface which has geometrical defects, such as cavities or grooves, may lead to the ejection of micrometric debris at velocities of km/s. This process can be involved in many applications, like pyrotechnics or industrial safety. Recent laser shock experiments reported elsewhere in this conference have provided some insight into jet formation as well as jet tip velocities for various groove angles and shock pressures. Here, we present hydrodynamic simulations of these experiments, in both 2D and 3D geometries, using both finite element method and smoothed particle hydrodynamics. Numerical results are compared to several theoretical predictions including the Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities. The role of the elastic-plastic behavior on jet formation is illustrated. Finally, the possibility to simulate the late stage of jet expansion and fragmentation is explored, to evaluate the mass distribution of the ejecta and their ballistic properties, still essentially unknown in the experiments.

  9. Large Eddy simulation of compressible flows with a low-numerical dissipation patch-based adaptive mesh refinement method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pantano, Carlos

    2005-11-01

    We describe a hybrid finite difference method for large-eddy simulation (LES) of compressible flows with a low-numerical dissipation scheme and structured adaptive mesh refinement (SAMR). Numerical experiments and validation calculations are presented including a turbulent jet and the strongly shock-driven mixing of a Richtmyer-Meshkov instability. The approach is a conservative flux-based SAMR formulation and as such, it utilizes refinement to computational advantage. The numerical method for the resolved scale terms encompasses the cases of scheme alternation and internal mesh interfaces resulting from SAMR. An explicit centered scheme that is consistent with a skew-symmetric finite difference formulation is used in turbulent flow regions while a weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) scheme is employed to capture shocks. The subgrid stresses and transports are calculated by means of the streched-vortex model, Misra & Pullin (1997)

  10. Effects of Initial Conditions on Shock Driven Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, Adam A.; Mula, Swathi M.; Charonko, John; Prestridge, Kathy

    2017-11-01

    The spatial and temporal evolution of shock-driven, variable density flows, such as the Richtmyer Meshkov (RM) instability, are strongly influenced by the initial conditions (IC's) of the flow at the time of interaction with shockwave. We study the effects of the IC's on the Vertical Shock Tube (VST) and on flows from Mach =1.2 to Mach =9. Experiments at the VST are of an Air-SF6 (At =0.6) multimode interface. Perturbations are generated using a shear layer with a flapper plate. Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence (PLIF) is used to characterize the IC's. New experiments are occurring using the Powder Gun driver at LANL Proton Radiography (pRad) facility. Mach number up to M =9 accelerate a Xenon-Helium (At =0.94) interface that is perturbed using a membrane supported by different sized grids. This presentation focuses on how to design and characterize different types of initial conditions for experiments.

  11. Sprayable lightweight ablative coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, William G. (Inventor); Sharpe, Max H. (Inventor); Hill, William E. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    An improved lightweight, ablative coating is disclosed that may be spray applied and cured without the development of appreciable shrinkage cracks. The ablative mixture consists essentially of phenolic microballoons, hollow glass spheres, glass fibers, ground cork, a flexibilized resin binder, and an activated colloidal clay.

  12. Effects of Initial Condition Spectral Content on Shock Driven-Turbulent Mixing

    DOE PAGES

    Nelson, Nicholas James; Grinstein, Fernando F.

    2015-07-15

    The mixing of materials due to the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability and the ensuing turbulent behavior is of intense interest in a variety of physical systems including inertial confinement fusion, combustion, and the final stages of stellar evolution. Extensive numerical and laboratory studies of shock-driven mixing have demonstrated the rich behavior associated with the onset of turbulence due to the shocks. Here we report on progress in understanding shock-driven mixing at interfaces between fluids of differing densities through three-dimensional (3D) numerical simulations using the RAGE code in the implicit large eddy simulation context. We consider a shock-tube configuration with a band ofmore » high density gas (SF 6) embedded in low density gas (air). Shocks with a Mach number of 1.26 are passed through SF 6 bands, resulting in transition to turbulence driven by the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability. The system is followed as a rarefaction wave and a reflected secondary shock from the back wall pass through the SF 6 band. We apply a variety of initial perturbations to the interfaces between the two fluids in which the physical standard deviation, wave number range, and the spectral slope of the perturbations are held constant, but the number of modes initially present is varied. By thus decreasing the density of initial spectral modes of the interface, we find that we can achieve as much as 25% less total mixing at late times. This has potential direct implications for the treatment of initial conditions applied to material interfaces in both 3D and reduced dimensionality simulation models.« less

  13. Effects of initial condition spectral content on shock-driven turbulent mixing.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Nicholas J; Grinstein, Fernando F

    2015-07-01

    The mixing of materials due to the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability and the ensuing turbulent behavior is of intense interest in a variety of physical systems including inertial confinement fusion, combustion, and the final stages of stellar evolution. Extensive numerical and laboratory studies of shock-driven mixing have demonstrated the rich behavior associated with the onset of turbulence due to the shocks. Here we report on progress in understanding shock-driven mixing at interfaces between fluids of differing densities through three-dimensional (3D) numerical simulations using the rage code in the implicit large eddy simulation context. We consider a shock-tube configuration with a band of high density gas (SF(6)) embedded in low density gas (air). Shocks with a Mach number of 1.26 are passed through SF(6) bands, resulting in transition to turbulence driven by the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability. The system is followed as a rarefaction wave and a reflected secondary shock from the back wall pass through the SF(6) band. We apply a variety of initial perturbations to the interfaces between the two fluids in which the physical standard deviation, wave number range, and the spectral slope of the perturbations are held constant, but the number of modes initially present is varied. By thus decreasing the density of initial spectral modes of the interface, we find that we can achieve as much as 25% less total mixing at late times. This has potential direct implications for the treatment of initial conditions applied to material interfaces in both 3D and reduced dimensionality simulation models.

  14. Ablation for Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective To review the effectiveness, safety, and costing of ablation methods to manage atrial fibrillation (AF). The ablation methods reviewed were catheter ablation and surgical ablation. Clinical Need Atrial fibrillation is characterized by an irregular, usually rapid, heart rate that limits the ability of the atria to pump blood effectively to the ventricles. Atrial fibrillation can be a primary diagnosis or it may be associated with other diseases, such as high blood pressure, abnormal heart muscle function, chronic lung diseases, and coronary heart disease. The most common symptom of AF is palpitations. Symptoms caused by decreased blood flow include dizziness, fatigue, and shortness of breath. Some patients with AF do not experience any symptoms. According to United States data, the incidence of AF increases with age, with a prevalence of 1 per 200 people aged between 50 and 60 years, and 1 per 10 people aged over 80 years. In 2004, the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences (ICES) estimated that the rate of hospitalization for AF in Canada was 582.7 per 100,000 population. They also reported that of the patients discharged alive, 2.7% were readmitted within 1 year for stroke. One United States prevalence study of AF indicated that the overall prevalence of AF was 0.95%. When the results of this study were extrapolated to the population of Ontario, the prevalence of AF in Ontario is 98,758 for residents aged over 20 years. Currently, the first-line therapy for AF is medical therapy with antiarrhythmic drugs (AADs). There are several AADs available, because there is no one AAD that is effective for all patients. The AADs have critical adverse effects that can aggravate existing arrhythmias. The drug selection process frequently involves trial and error until the patient’s symptoms subside. The Technology Ablation has been frequently described as a “cure” for AF, compared with drug therapy, which controls AF but does not cure it

  15. Mix and hydrodynamic instabilities on NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smalyuk, V. A.; Robey, H. F.; Casey, D. T.; Clark, D. S.; Döppner, T.; Haan, S. W.; Hammel, B. A.; MacPhee, A. G.; Martinez, D.; Milovich, J. L.; Peterson, J. L.; Pickworth, L.; Pino, J. E.; Raman, K.; Tipton, R.; Weber, C. R.; Baker, K. L.; Bachmann, B.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Bond, E.; Caggiano, J. A.; Callahan, D. A.; Celliers, P. M.; Cerjan, C.; Dixit, S. N.; Edwards, M. J.; Felker, S.; Field, J. E.; Fittinghoff, D. N.; Gharibyan, N.; Grim, G. P.; Hamza, A. V.; Hatarik, R.; Hohenberger, M.; Hsing, W. W.; Hurricane, O. A.; Jancaitis, K. S.; Jones, O. S.; Khan, S.; Kroll, J. J.; Lafortune, K. N.; Landen, O. L.; Ma, T.; MacGowan, B. J.; Masse, L.; Moore, A. S.; Nagel, S. R.; Nikroo, A.; Pak, A.; Patel, P. K.; Remington, B. A.; Sayre, D. B.; Spears, B. K.; Stadermann, M.; Tommasini, R.; Widmayer, C. C.; Yeamans, C. B.; Crippen, J.; Farrell, M.; Giraldez, E.; Rice, N.; Wilde, C. H.; Volegov, P. L.; Gatu Johnson, M.

    2017-06-01

    Several new platforms have been developed to experimentally measure hydrodynamic instabilities in all phases of indirect-drive, inertial confinement fusion implosions on National Ignition Facility. At the ablation front, instability growth of pre-imposed modulations was measured with a face-on, x-ray radiography platform in the linear regime using the Hydrodynamic Growth Radiography (HGR) platform. Modulation growth of "native roughness" modulations and engineering features (fill tubes and capsule support membranes) were measured in conditions relevant to layered DT implosions. A new experimental platform was developed to measure instability growth at the ablator-ice interface. In the deceleration phase of implosions, several experimental platforms were developed to measure both low-mode asymmetries and high-mode perturbations near peak compression with x-ray and nuclear techniques. In one innovative technique, the self-emission from the hot spot was enhanced with argon dopant to "self-backlight" the shell in-flight. To stabilize instability growth, new "adiabat-shaping" techniques were developed using the HGR platform and applied in layered DT implosions.

  16. Mix and hydrodynamic instabilities on NIF

    DOE PAGES

    Smalyuk, V. A.; Robey, H. F.; Casey, D. T.; ...

    2017-06-01

    Several new platforms have been developed to experimentally measure hydrodynamic instabilities in all phases of indirect-drive, inertial confinement fusion implosions on National Ignition Facility. At the ablation front, instability growth of pre-imposed modulations was measured with a face-on, x-ray radiography platform in the linear regime using the Hydrodynamic Growth Radiography (HGR) platform. Modulation growth of "native roughness" modulations and engineering features (fill tubes and capsule support membranes) were measured in conditions relevant to layered DT implosions. A new experimental platform was developed to measure instability growth at the ablator-ice interface. Here in the deceleration phase of implosions, several experimental platformsmore » were developed to measure both low-mode asymmetries and high-mode perturbations near peak compression with x-ray and nuclear techniques. In one innovative technique, the self-emission from the hot spot was enhanced with argon dopant to "self-backlight" the shell in-flight. To stabilize instability growth, new "adiabat-shaping" techniques were developed using the HGR platform and applied in layered DT implosions.« less

  17. Robotic navigation and ablation.

    PubMed

    Malcolme-Lawes, L; Kanagaratnam, P

    2010-12-01

    Robotic technologies have been developed to allow optimal catheter stability and reproducible catheter movements with the aim of achieving contiguous and transmural lesion delivery. Two systems for remote navigation of catheters within the heart have been developed; the first is based on a magnetic navigation system (MNS) Niobe, Stereotaxis, Saint-Louis, Missouri, USA, the second is based on a steerable sheath system (Sensei, Hansen Medical, Mountain View, CA, USA). Both robotic and magnetic navigation systems have proven to be feasible for performing ablation of both simple and complex arrhythmias, particularly atrial fibrillation. Studies to date have shown similar success rates for AF ablation compared to that of manual ablation, with many groups finding a reduction in fluoroscopy times. However, the early learning curve of cases demonstrated longer procedure times, mainly due to additional setup times. With centres performing increasing numbers of robotic ablations and the introduction of a pressure monitoring system, lower power settings and instinctive driving software, complication rates are reducing, and fluoroscopy times have been lower than manual ablation in many studies. As the demand for catheter ablation for arrhythmias such as atrial fibrillation increases and the number of centres performing these ablations increases, the demand for systems which reduce the hand skill requirement and improve the comfort of the operator will also increase.

  18. Suppression of the Rayleigh Taylor instability and its implication for the impact ignition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azechi, H.; Shiraga, H.; Nakai, M.; Shigemori, K.; Fujioka, S.; Sakaiya, T.; Tamari, Y.; Ohtani, K.; Murakami, M.; Sunahara, A.; Nagatomo, H.; Nishihara, K.; Miyanaga, N.; Izawa, Y.

    2004-12-01

    The Rayleigh Taylor (RT) instability with material ablation through an unstable interface is the key physics that determines the success or failure of inertial fusion energy (IFE) generation, as the RT instability potentially quenches ignition and burn by disintegrating the IFE target. We present two suppression schemes of the RT growth without significant degradation of the target density. The first scheme is to generate a double ablation structure in high-Z doped plastic targets. In addition to the electron ablation surface, a new ablation surface is created by x-ray radiation from the high-Z ions. Contrary to the previous thought, the electron ablation surface is almost completely stabilized by extremely high flow velocity. On the other hand, the RT instability on the radiative ablation surface is significantly moderated. The second is to enhance the nonlocal nature of the electron heat transport by illuminating the target with long wavelength laser light, whereas the high ablation pressure is generated by irradiating with short wavelength laser light. The significant suppression of the RT instability may increase the possibility of impact ignition which uses a high-velocity fuel colliding with a preformed main fuel.

  19. Moldable cork ablation material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A successful thermal ablative material was manufactured. Moldable cork sheets were tested for density, tensile strength, tensile elongation, thermal conductivity, compression set, and specific heat. A moldable cork sheet, therefore, was established as a realistic product.

  20. Ablative skin resurfacing.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Nidhi; Smith, Greg; Heffelfinger, Ryan

    2014-02-01

    Ablative laser resurfacing has evolved as a safe and effective treatment for skin rejuvenation. Although traditional lasers were associated with significant thermal damage and lengthy recovery, advances in laser technology have improved safety profiles and reduced social downtime. CO2 lasers remain the gold standard of treatment, and fractional ablative devices capable of achieving remarkable clinical improvement with fewer side effects and shorter recovery times have made it a more practical option for patients. Although ablative resurfacing has become safer, careful patient selection and choice of suitable laser parameters are essential to minimize complications and optimize outcomes. This article describes the current modalities used in ablative laser skin resurfacing and examines their efficacy, indications, and possible side effects. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  1. Studies of Transitional Flow, Unsteady Separation Phenomena and Particle Induced Augmentation Heating on Ablated Nose Tips.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-10-01

    63 29 Variation of Profile Shape with Time for Axisyinmetric Camphor Models 63 30 The Development of Ablated Nose Shapes Over Which Flow...ablation tests using camphor models and inferred from downrange observation of full scale flight missions. Regions of gross instability on nose...been verified in wind tunnel tests of camphor models where shapes similar to those shown on Figure 29 can be developed under transitional conditions

  2. High-power and short-duration ablation for pulmonary vein isolation: Safety, efficacy, and long-term durability.

    PubMed

    Barkagan, Michael; Contreras-Valdes, Fernando M; Leshem, Eran; Buxton, Alfred E; Nakagawa, Hiroshi; Anter, Elad

    2018-05-30

    PV reconnection is often the result of catheter instability and tissue edema. High-power short-duration (HP-SD) ablation strategies have been shown to improve atrial linear continuity in acute pre-clinical models. This study compares the safety, efficacy and long-term durability of HP-SD ablation with conventional ablation. In 6 swine, 2 ablation lines were performed anterior and posterior to the crista terminalis, in the smooth and trabeculated right atrium, respectively; and the right superior PV was isolated. In 3 swine, ablation was performed using conventional parameters (THERMOCOOL-SMARTTOUCH ® SF; 30W/30 sec) and in 3 other swine using HP-SD parameters (QDOT-MICRO™, 90W/4 sec). After 30 days, linear integrity was examined by voltage mapping and pacing, and the heart and surrounding tissues were examined by histopathology. Acute line integrity was achieved with both ablation strategies; however, HP-SD ablation required 80% less RF time compared with conventional ablation (P≤0.01 for all lines). Chronic line integrity was higher with HP-SD ablation: all 3 posterior lines were continuous and transmural compared to only 1 line created by conventional ablation. In the trabeculated tissue, HP-SD ablation lesions were wider and of similar depth with 1 of 3 lines being continuous compared to 0 of 3 using conventional ablation. Chronic PVI without stenosis was evident in both groups. There were no steam-pops. Pleural markings were present in both strategies, but parenchymal lung injury was only evident with conventional ablation. HP-SD ablation strategy results in improved linear continuity, shorter ablation time, and a safety profile comparable to conventional ablation. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  3. Ablative Thermal Protection Systems Fundamentals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, Robin A. S.

    2017-01-01

    This is a presentation of the fundamentals of ablative TPS materials for a short course at TFAWS 2017. It gives an overall description of what an ablator is, the equations that define it, and how to model it.

  4. Advanced Ablative TPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gasch, Matthew J.

    2011-01-01

    Early NASA missions (Gemini, Apollo, Mars Viking) employed new ablative TPS that were tailored for the entry environment. After 40 years, heritage ablative TPS materials using Viking or Pathfinder era materials are at or near their performance limits and will be inadequate for future exploration missions. Significant advances in TPS materials technology are needed in order to enable any subsequent human exploration missions beyond Low Earth Orbit. This poster summarizes some recent progress at NASA in developing families of advanced rigid/conformable and flexible ablators that could potentially be used for thermal protection in planetary entry missions. In particular the effort focuses technologies required to land heavy (approx.40 metric ton) masses on Mars to facilitate future exploration plans.

  5. Advanced Rigid Ablative TPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gasch, Matthew J.

    2011-01-01

    NASA Exploration Systems Mission Directorate s (ESMD) Entry, Descent, and Landing (EDL) Technology Development Project (TDP) and the NASA Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate s (ARMD) Hypersonics Project are developing new advanced rigid ablators in an effort to substantially increase reliability, decrease mass, and reduce life cycle cost of rigid aeroshell-based entry systems for multiple missions. Advanced Rigid Ablators combine ablation resistant top layers capable of high heat flux entry and enable high-speed EDL with insulating mass-efficient bottom that, insulate the structure and lower the areal weight. These materials may benefit Commercial Orbital Transportation Services (COTS) vendors and may potentially enable new NASA missions for higher velocity returns (e.g. asteroid, Mars). The materials have been thermally tested to 400-450 W/sq cm at the Laser Hardened Materials Evaluation Lab (LHMEL), Hypersonics Materials Evaluation Test System (HyMETS) and in arcjet facilities. Tested materials exhibit much lower backface temperatures and reduced recession over the baseline materials (PICA). Although the EDL project is ending in FY11, NASA in-house development of advanced ablators will continue with a focus on varying resin systems and fiber/resin interactions.

  6. Modelling ultrafast laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rethfeld, Baerbel; Ivanov, Dmitriy S.; E Garcia, Martin; Anisimov, Sergei I.

    2017-05-01

    This review is devoted to the study of ultrafast laser ablation of solids and liquids. The ablation of condensed matter under exposure to subpicosecond laser pulses has a number of peculiar properties which distinguish this process from ablation induced by nanosecond and longer laser pulses. The process of ultrafast ablation includes light absorption by electrons in the skin layer, energy transfer from the skin layer to target interior by nonlinear electronic heat conduction, relaxation of the electron and ion temperatures, ultrafast melting, hydrodynamic expansion of heated matter accompanied by the formation of metastable states and subsequent formation of breaks in condensed matter. In case of ultrashort laser excitation, these processes are temporally separated and can thus be studied separately. As for energy absorption, we consider peculiarities of the case of metal irradiation in contrast to dielectrics and semiconductors. We discuss the energy dissipation processes of electronic thermal wave and lattice heating. Different types of phase transitions after ultrashort laser pulse irradiation as melting, vaporization or transitions to warm dense matter are discussed. Also nonthermal phase transitions, directly caused by the electronic excitation before considerable lattice heating, are considered. The final material removal occurs from the physical point of view as expansion of heated matter; here we discuss approaches of hydrodynamics, as well as molecular dynamic simulations directly following the atomic movements. Hybrid approaches tracing the dynamics of excited electrons, energy dissipation and structural dynamics in a combined simulation are reviewed as well.

  7. Turbine instabilities: Case histories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laws, C. W.

    1985-01-01

    Several possible causes of turbine rotor instability are discussed and the related design features of a wide range of turbomachinery types and sizes are considered. The instrumentation options available for detecting rotor instability and assessing its severity are also discussed.

  8. Benefits of Moderate-Z Ablators for Direct-Drive Inertial Confinement Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafon, M.; Betti, R.; Anderson, K. S.; Collins, T. J. B.; Skupsky, S.; McKenty, P. W.

    2014-10-01

    Control of hydrodynamic instabilities and DT-fuel preheating by hot electrons produced by laser-plasma interaction is crucial in inertial confinement fusion. Moderate- Z ablators have been shown to reduce the laser imprinting on target and suppress the generation of hot electrons from the two-plasmon-decay instability. These results have motivated the use of ablators of higher- Z than pure plastic in direct-drive-ignition target designs for the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Two-dimensional radiation-hydrodynamic simulations assess the robustness of these ignition designs to laser imprint and capsule nonuniformities. The complex behavior of the hydrodynamic stability of mid- Z ablators is investigated through single and multimode simulations. A polar-drive configuration is developed within the NIF Laser System specifications for each ablator material. The use of multilayer ablators is also investigated to enhance the hydrodynamic stability. Results indicate that ignition target designs using mid- Z ablators exhibit good hydrodynamic properties, leading to high target gain for direct-drive implosions on the NIF. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944 and the Office of Fusion Energy Sciences Number DE-FG02-04ER54786.

  9. OCDR guided laser ablation device

    DOEpatents

    Dasilva, Luiz B.; Colston, Jr., Bill W.; James, Dale L.

    2002-01-01

    A guided laser ablation device. The device includes a mulitmode laser ablation fiber that is surrounded by one or more single mode optical fibers that are used to image in the vicinity of the laser ablation area to prevent tissue damage. The laser ablation device is combined with an optical coherence domain reflectometry (OCDR) unit and with a control unit which initializes the OCDR unit and a high power laser of the ablation device. Data from the OCDR unit is analyzed by the control unit and used to control the high power laser. The OCDR images up to about 3 mm ahead of the ablation surface to enable a user to see sensitive tissue such as a nerve or artery before damaging it by the laser.

  10. Multiple target laser ablation system

    DOEpatents

    Mashburn, D.N.

    1996-01-09

    A laser ablation apparatus and method are provided in which multiple targets consisting of material to be ablated are mounted on a movable support. The material transfer rate is determined for each target material, and these rates are stored in a controller. A position detector determines which target material is in a position to be ablated, and then the controller controls the beam trigger timing and energy level to achieve a desired proportion of each constituent material in the resulting film. 3 figs.

  11. Multiple target laser ablation system

    DOEpatents

    Mashburn, Douglas N.

    1996-01-01

    A laser ablation apparatus and method are provided in which multiple targets consisting of material to be ablated are mounted on a movable support. The material transfer rate is determined for each target material, and these rates are stored in a controller. A position detector determines which target material is in a position to be ablated, and then the controller controls the beam trigger timing and energy level to achieve a desired proportion of each constituent material in the resulting film.

  12. Joint instability and osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Blalock, Darryl; Miller, Andrew; Tilley, Michael; Wang, Jinxi

    2015-01-01

    Joint instability creates a clinical and economic burden in the health care system. Injuries and disorders that directly damage the joint structure or lead to joint instability are highly associated with osteoarthritis (OA). Thus, understanding the physiology of joint stability and the mechanisms of joint instability-induced OA is of clinical significance. The first section of this review discusses the structure and function of major joint tissues, including periarticular muscles, which play a significant role in joint stability. Because the knee, ankle, and shoulder joints demonstrate a high incidence of ligament injury and joint instability, the second section summarizes the mechanisms of ligament injury-associated joint instability of these joints. The final section highlights the recent advances in the understanding of the mechanical and biological mechanisms of joint instability-induced OA. These advances may lead to new opportunities for clinical intervention in the prevention and early treatment of OA.

  13. Joint Instability and Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Blalock, Darryl; Miller, Andrew; Tilley, Michael; Wang, Jinxi

    2015-01-01

    Joint instability creates a clinical and economic burden in the health care system. Injuries and disorders that directly damage the joint structure or lead to joint instability are highly associated with osteoarthritis (OA). Thus, understanding the physiology of joint stability and the mechanisms of joint instability-induced OA is of clinical significance. The first section of this review discusses the structure and function of major joint tissues, including periarticular muscles, which play a significant role in joint stability. Because the knee, ankle, and shoulder joints demonstrate a high incidence of ligament injury and joint instability, the second section summarizes the mechanisms of ligament injury-associated joint instability of these joints. The final section highlights the recent advances in the understanding of the mechanical and biological mechanisms of joint instability-induced OA. These advances may lead to new opportunities for clinical intervention in the prevention and early treatment of OA. PMID:25741184

  14. Instability in Rotating Machinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The proceedings contain 45 papers on a wide range of subjects including flow generated instabilities in fluid flow machines, cracked shaft detection, case histories of instability phenomena in compressors, turbines, and pumps, vibration control in turbomachinery (including antiswirl techniques), and the simulation and estimation of destabilizing forces in rotating machines. The symposium was held to serve as an update on the understanding and control of rotating machinery instability problems.

  15. Imaging of shoulder instability

    PubMed Central

    Martínez Martínez, Alberto; Tomás Muñoz, Pablo; Pozo Sánchez, José; Zarza Pérez, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    This extended review tries to cover the imaging findings of the wide range of shoulder injuries secondary to shoulder joint instability. Usefulness of the different imaging methods is stressed, including radiography, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance. The main topics to be covered include traumatic, atraumatic and minor instability syndromes. Radiography may show bone abnormalities associated to instability, including developmental and post-traumatic changes. CT is the best technique depicting and quantifying skeletal changes. MR-arthrography is the main tool in diagnosing the shoulder instability injuries. PMID:28932699

  16. Improved Ablative Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1967-12-01

    Equipment 62 2. Gas Analysis 62 3. Chemical Analysis for Titanium and Boron 63 4. Tensile Strength Determinations 64 5. Density Determinations 64 6. X-ray...mils, and its density was about 4. 45 g/cm 3. Elastic modulus values averaged about 71 x 106 psi for the filament. -X- I. INTRODUCTION Ablative liner...20 4 /50 percent N 2H 4 -50 percent UDMH or L0 2 /LH. The more-energetic propellant systems, using fluorine or FLOX, demand more-effective abla- tive

  17. High temperature ablative foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Matthew T. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    An ablative foam composition is formed of approximately 150 to 250 parts by weight polymeric isocyanate having an isocyanate functionality of 2.6 to 3.2; approximately 15 to 30 parts by weight reactive flame retardant having a hydroxyl number range from 200-260; approximately 10 to 40 parts by weight non-reactive flame retardant; approximately 10 to 40 parts by weight nonhydrolyzable silicone copolymer having a hydroxyl number range from 75-205; and approximately 3 to 16 parts by weight amine initiated polyether resin having an isocyanate functionality greater than or equal to 3.0 and a hydroxyl number range from 400-800.

  18. Characteristic properties of laser ablation of translucent targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platonov, V. V.; Kochurin, E. A.; Osipov, V. V.; Lisenkov, V. V.; Zubarev, N. M.

    2018-07-01

    This study reveals the characteristic features of the laser ablation of the solid Nd:Y2O3 targets, such as the dynamics of the laser plume, the crater depth, and the weight and size distribution of liquid melt droplets. The ablation was initiated by the ytterbium fiber laser radiation pulses with constant energy (0.67 J) and with different power densities. The dependence on the power density of such parameters as the injection time of drops, mass distribution of drops, crater depth, and productivity of synthesis of nonopowder was revealed. To explain the formation of deep craters a model was proposed, stating that the formation of liquid droplets is a consequence of the Kelvin–Helmholtz instability’s appearing and developing on the border between the liquid melt on the crater’s wall and the vapor flow from the crater. The increment of this instability and its characteristic size was determined.

  19. [Radiofrequency ablation of hepatocellular carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Widmann, Gerlig; Schullian, Peter; Bale, Reto

    2013-03-01

    Percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is well established in the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Due to its curative potential, it is the method of choice for non resectable BCLC (Barcelona Liver Clinic) 0 and A. RFA challenges surgical resection for small HCC and is the method of choice in bridging for transplantation and recurrence after resection or transplantation. The technical feasibility of RFA depends on the size and location of the HCC and the availability of ablation techniques (one needle techniques, multi-needle techniques). More recently, stereotactic multi-needle techniques with 3D trajectory planning and guided needle placement substantially improve the spectrum of treatable lesions including large volume tumors. Treatment success depends on the realization of ablations with large intentional margins of tumor free tissue (A0 ablation in analogy to R0 resection), which has to be documented by fusion of post- with pre-ablation images, and confirmed during follow-up imaging.

  20. Instability of rectangular jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tam, Christopher K. W.; Thies, Andrew T.

    1993-01-01

    The instability of rectangular jets is investigated using a vortex-sheet model. It is shown that such jets support four linearly independent families of instability waves. Within each family there are infinitely many modes. A way to classify these modes according to the characteristics of their mode shapes or eigenfunctions is proposed. It is demonstrated that the boundary element method can be used to calculate the dispersion relations and eigenfunctions of these instability wave modes. The method is robust and efficient. A parametric study of the instability wave characteristics has been carried out. A sample of the numerical results is reported here. It is found that the first and third modes of each instability wave family are corner modes. The pressure fluctuations associated with these instability waves are localized near the corners of the jet. The second mode, however, is a center mode with maximum fluctuations concentrated in the central portion of the jet flow. The center mode has the largest spatial growth rate. It is anticipated that as the instability waves propagate downstream the center mode would emerge as the dominant instability of the jet.

  1. Simulation of Pellet Ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parks, P. B.; Ishizaki, Ryuichi

    2000-10-01

    In order to clarify the structure of the ablation flow, 2D simulation is carried out with a fluid code solving temporal evolution of MHD equations. The code includes electrostatic sheath effect at the cloud interface.(P.B. Parks et al.), Plasma Phys. Contr. Fusion 38, 571 (1996). An Eulerian cylindrical coordinate system (r,z) is used with z in a spherical pellet. The code uses the Cubic-Interpolated Psudoparticle (CIP) method(H. Takewaki and T. Yabe, J. Comput. Phys. 70), 355 (1987). that divides the fluid equations into non-advection and advection phases. The most essential element of the CIP method is in calculation of the advection phase. In this phase, a cubic interpolated spatial profile is shifted in space according to the total derivative equations, similarly to a particle scheme. Since the profile is interpolated by using the value and the spatial derivative value at each grid point, there is no numerical oscillation in space, that often appears in conventional spline interpolation. A free boundary condition is used in the code. The possibility of a stationary shock will also be shown in the presentation because the supersonic ablation flow across the magnetic field is impeded.

  2. Laboratory Simulations of Micrometeoroid Ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Evan Williamson

    Each day, several tons of meteoric material enters Earth's atmosphere, the majority of which consist of small dust particles (micrometeoroids) that completely ablate at high altitudes. The dust input has been suggested to play a role in a variety of phenomena including: layers of metal atoms and ions, nucleation of noctilucent clouds, effects on stratospheric aerosols and ozone chemistry, and the fertilization of the ocean with bio-available iron. Furthermore, a correct understanding of the dust input to the Earth provides constraints on inner solar system dust models. Various methods are used to measure the dust input to the Earth including satellite detectors, radar, lidar, rocket-borne detectors, ice core and deep-sea sediment analysis. However, the best way to interpret each of these measurements is uncertain, which leads to large uncertainties in the total dust input. To better understand the ablation process, and thereby reduce uncertainties in micrometeoroid ablation measurements, a facility has been developed to simulate the ablation of micrometeoroids in laboratory conditions. An electrostatic dust accelerator is used to accelerate iron particles to relevant meteoric velocities (10-70 km/s). The particles are then introduced into a chamber pressurized with a target gas, and they partially or completely ablate over a short distance. An array of diagnostics then measure, with timing and spatial resolution, the charge and light that is generated in the ablation process. In this thesis, we present results from the newly developed ablation facility. The ionization coefficient, an important parameter for interpreting meteor radar measurements, is measured for various target gases. Furthermore, experimental ablation measurements are compared to predictions from commonly used ablation models. In light of these measurements, implications to the broader context of meteor ablation are discussed.

  3. Measurements of Laser Imprint with High-Z Coated targets on Omega EP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karasik, Max; Oh, J.; Stoeckl, C.; Aglitskiy, Y.; Schmitt, A. J.; Bates, J. W.; Obenschain, S. P.

    2015-11-01

    Previous experiments on Nike KrF laser (λ = 248nm) at NRL found that a thin (400-800 Å) high-Z (Au or Pd) overcoat on the laser side of the target is effective in suppressing broadband imprint and reducing ablative Richtmyer-Meshkov growth. The overcoat initially absorbs the laser and emits soft x-rays that ablate the target, forming a large stand-off distance between laser absorption and ablation and driving the target at higher mass ablation rate. Implementation of this technique on the frequency-tripled Nd:glass (351 nm) NIF would enable a wider range direct drive experiments there. To this end, we are carrying out experiments using the NIF-like beams of Omega EP. Analogous to experiments on Nike, areal mass perturbations due to RT-amplified laser imprint are measured using curved crystal imaging coupled to a streak camera. High-Z coating dynamics and target trajectory are imaged side-on. First results indicate that imprint suppression is observed, albeit with thicker coatings. Work supported by the Department of Energy/NNSA.

  4. Is AF Ablation Cost Effective?

    PubMed Central

    Martin-Doyle, William; Reynolds, Matthew R.

    2010-01-01

    The use of catheter ablation to treat AF is increasing rapidly, but there is presently an incomplete understanding of its cost-effectiveness. AF ablation procedures involve significant up-front expenditures, but multiple randomized trials have demonstrated that ablation is more effective than antiarrhythmic drugs at maintaining sinus rhythm in a second-line and possibly first-line rhythm control setting. Although truly long-term data are limited, ablation, as compared with antiarrrhythmic drugs, also appears associated with improved symptoms and quality of life and a reduction in downstream hospitalization and other health care resource utilization. Several groups have developed cost effectiveness models comparing AF ablation primarily to antiarrhythmic drugs and the model results suggest that ablation likely falls within the range generally accepted as cost-effective in developed nations. This paper will review available information on the cost-effectiveness of catheter ablation for the treatment of atrial fibrillation, and discuss continued areas of uncertainty where further research is required. PMID:20936083

  5. Posterior Shoulder Instability

    PubMed Central

    Antosh, Ivan J.; Tokish, John M.; Owens, Brett D.

    2016-01-01

    Context: Posterior shoulder instability has become more frequently recognized and treated as a unique subset of shoulder instability, especially in the military. Posterior shoulder pathology may be more difficult to accurately diagnose than its anterior counterpart, and commonly, patients present with complaints of pain rather than instability. “Posterior instability” may encompass both dislocation and subluxation, and the most common presentation is recurrent posterior subluxation. Arthroscopic and open treatment techniques have improved as understanding of posterior shoulder instability has evolved. Evidence Acquisition: Electronic databases including PubMed and MEDLINE were queried for articles relating to posterior shoulder instability. Study Design: Clinical review. Level of Evidence: Level 4. Results: In low-demand patients, nonoperative treatment of posterior shoulder instability should be considered a first line of treatment and is typically successful. Conservative treatment, however, is commonly unsuccessful in active patients, such as military members. Those patients with persistent shoulder pain, instability, or functional limitations after a trial of conservative treatment may be considered surgical candidates. Arthroscopic posterior shoulder stabilization has demonstrated excellent clinical outcomes, high patient satisfaction, and low complication rates. Advanced techniques may be required in select cases to address bone loss, glenoid dysplasia, or revision. Conclusion: Posterior instability represents about 10% of shoulder instability and has become increasingly recognized and treated in military members. Nonoperative treatment is commonly unsuccessful in active patients, and surgical stabilization can be considered in patients who do not respond. Isolated posterior labral repairs constitute up to 24% of operatively treated labral repairs in a military population. Arthroscopic posterior stabilization is typically considered as first-line surgical

  6. Ablative heat shield design for space shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seiferth, R. W.

    1973-01-01

    Ablator heat shield configuration optimization studies were conducted for the orbiter. Ablator and reusable surface insulation (RSI) trajectories for design studies were shaped to take advantage of the low conductance of ceramic RSI and high temperature capability of ablators. Comparative weights were established for the RSI system and for direct bond and mechanically attached ablator systems. Ablator system costs were determined for fabrication, installation and refurbishment. Cost penalties were assigned for payload weight penalties, if any. The direct bond ablator is lowest in weight and cost. A mechanically attached ablator using a magnesium subpanel is highly competitive for both weight and cost.

  7. Flow instabilities of Alaskan glaciers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turrin, James Bradley

    Over 300 of the largest glaciers in southern Alaska have been identified as either surge-type or pulse-type, making glaciers with flow instabilities the norm among large glaciers in that region. Consequently, the bulk of mass loss due to climate change will come from these unstable glaciers in the future, yet their response to future climate warming is unknown because their dynamics are still poorly understood. To help broaden our understanding of unstable glacier flow, the decadal-scale ice dynamics of 1 surging and 9 pulsing glaciers are investigated. Bering Glacier had a kinematic wave moving down its ablation zone at 4.4 +/- 2.0 km/yr from 2002 to 2009, which then accelerated to 13.9 +/- 2.0 km/yr as it traversed the piedmont lobe. The wave first appeared in 2001 near the confluence with Bagley Ice Valley and it took 10 years to travel ~64 km. A surge was triggered in 2008 after the wave activated an ice reservoir in the midablation zone, and it climaxed in 2011 while the terminus advanced several km into Vitus Lake. Ruth Glacier pulsed five times between 1973 and 2012, with peak velocities in 1981, 1989, 1997, 2003, and 2010; approximately every 7 years. A typical pulse increased ice velocity 300%, from roughly 40 m/yr to 160 m/yr in the midablation zone, and involved acceleration and deceleration of the ice en masse; no kinematic wave was evident. The pulses are theorized to be due to deformation of a subglacial till causing enhanced basal motion. Eight additional pulsing glaciers are identified based on the spatiotemporal pattern of their velocity fields. These glaciers pulsed where they were either constricted laterally or joined by a tributary, and their surface slopes are 1-2°. These traits are consistent with an overdeepening. This observation leads to a theory of ice motion in overdeepenings that explains the cyclical behavior of pulsing glaciers. It is based on the concept of glaciohydraulic supercooling, and includes sediment transport and erosion

  8. TPS Ablator Technologies for Interplanetary Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curry, Donald M.

    2004-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the status of Thermal Protection System (TPS) Ablator technologies and the preparation for use in interplanetary spacecraft. NASA does not have adequate TPS ablatives and sufficient selection for planned missions. It includes a comparison of shuttle and interplanetary TPS requirements, the status of mainline TPS charring ablator materials, a summary of JSC SBIR accomplishments in developing advanced charring ablators and the benefits of SBIR Ablator/fabrication technology.

  9. Ion acceleration enhanced by target ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, S.; State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, and Key Lab of HEDPS, CAPT, Peking University, Beijing 100871; Institute of Radiation, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, 01314 Dresden

    2015-07-15

    Laser proton acceleration can be enhanced by using target ablation, due to the energetic electrons generated in the ablation preplasma. When the ablation pulse matches main pulse, the enhancement gets optimized because the electrons' energy density is highest. A scaling law between the ablation pulse and main pulse is confirmed by the simulation, showing that for given CPA pulse and target, proton energy improvement can be achieved several times by adjusting the target ablation.

  10. Bacterial Genome Instability

    PubMed Central

    Darmon, Elise

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Bacterial genomes are remarkably stable from one generation to the next but are plastic on an evolutionary time scale, substantially shaped by horizontal gene transfer, genome rearrangement, and the activities of mobile DNA elements. This implies the existence of a delicate balance between the maintenance of genome stability and the tolerance of genome instability. In this review, we describe the specialized genetic elements and the endogenous processes that contribute to genome instability. We then discuss the consequences of genome instability at the physiological level, where cells have harnessed instability to mediate phase and antigenic variation, and at the evolutionary level, where horizontal gene transfer has played an important role. Indeed, this ability to share DNA sequences has played a major part in the evolution of life on Earth. The evolutionary plasticity of bacterial genomes, coupled with the vast numbers of bacteria on the planet, substantially limits our ability to control disease. PMID:24600039

  11. State Instability and Terrorism

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    instability at the country-level using a modified breakdown theoretical framework. This framework is based especially upon the work of Emile Durkheim ...Quantitative Criminology, ed. Alex R. Piquero and David Weisburd. New York: Springer New York. 225 Durkheim , Emile . 1930 [1951]. Suicide: A...terrorism is a form ( Durkheim , 1930 [1951]; Useem, 1998). In addition, different types of instability ought to invite different levels of terrorism

  12. Rotor internal friction instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bently, D. E.; Muszynska, A.

    1985-01-01

    Two aspects of internal friction affecting stability of rotating machines are discussed. The first role of internal friction consists of decreasing the level of effective damping during rotor subsynchronous and backward precessional vibrations caused by some other instability mechanisms. The second role of internal frication consists of creating rotor instability, i.e., causing self-excited subsynchronous vibrations. Experimental test results document both of these aspects.

  13. Flow morphologies after oblique shock acceelration of a cylindrical density interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wayne, Patrick; Simons, Dylan; Olmstead, Dell; Truman, C. Randall; Vorobieff, Peter; Kumar, Sanjay

    2015-11-01

    We present an experimental study of instabilities developing after an oblique shock interaction with a heavy gas column. The heavy gas in our experiments is sulfur hexafluoride infused with 11% acetone by mass. A misalignment of the pressure and density gradients results in three-dimensional vorticity deposition on the gaseous interface, dtriggering the onset of Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI). Shortly thereafter, other instabilities develop along the interface, including a shear-driven instability that presents itself on the leading (with respect to the shock) and trailing edges of the column. This leads to the development of rows of co-rotating ``cat's eye'' vortices, characteristic of Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (KHI). Characteristics of the KHI, such as growth rate and wavelength, depend on several factors including the Mach number of the shock, the shock tube angle of inclination α (equal to the angle between the axis of the column and the plane of the shock), and the Atwood number. This work is supported by the US National Nuclear Security Agency (NNSA) via grant DE-NA0002913.

  14. Magnetic Resonance Mediated Radiofrequency Ablation.

    PubMed

    Hue, Yik-Kiong; Guimaraes, Alexander R; Cohen, Ouri; Nevo, Erez; Roth, Abraham; Ackerman, Jerome L

    2018-02-01

    To introduce magnetic resonance mediated radiofrequency ablation (MR-RFA), in which the MRI scanner uniquely serves both diagnostic and therapeutic roles. In MR-RFA scanner-induced RF heating is channeled to the ablation site via a Larmor frequency RF pickup device and needle system, and controlled via the pulse sequence. MR-RFA was evaluated with simulation of electric and magnetic fields to predict the increase in local specific-absorption-rate (SAR). Temperature-time profiles were measured for different configurations of the device in agar phantoms and ex vivo bovine liver in a 1.5 T scanner. Temperature rise in MR-RFA was imaged using the proton resonance frequency method validated with fiber-optic thermometry. MR-RFA was performed on the livers of two healthy live pigs. Simulations indicated a near tenfold increase in SAR at the RFA needle tip. Temperature-time profiles depended significantly on the physical parameters of the device although both configurations tested yielded temperature increases sufficient for ablation. Resected livers from live ablations exhibited clear thermal lesions. MR-RFA holds potential for integrating RF ablation tumor therapy with MRI scanning. MR-RFA may add value to MRI with the addition of a potentially disposable ablation device, while retaining MRI's ability to provide real time procedure guidance and measurement of tissue temperature, perfusion, and coagulation.

  15. Atrial fibrillation ablation using a closed irrigation radiofrequency ablation catheter.

    PubMed

    Golden, Keith; Mounsey, John Paul; Chung, Eugene; Roomiani, Pahresah; Morse, Michael Andew; Patel, Ankit; Gehi, Anil

    2012-05-01

    Catheter ablation is an effective therapy for symptomatic, medically refractory atrial fibrillation (AF). Open-irrigated radiofrequency (RF) ablation catheters produce transmural lesions at the cost of increased fluid delivery. In vivo models suggest closed-irrigated RF catheters create equivalent lesions, but clinical outcomes are limited. A cohort of 195 sequential patients with symptomatic AF underwent stepwise AF ablation (AFA) using a closed-irrigation ablation catheter. Recurrence of AF was monitored and outcomes were evaluated using Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and Cox proportional hazards models. Mean age was 59.0 years, 74.9% were male, 56.4% of patients were paroxysmal and mean duration of AF was 5.4 years. Patients had multiple comorbidities including hypertension (76.4%), tobacco abuse (42.1%), diabetes (17.4%), and obesity (mean body mass index 30.8). The median follow-up was 55.8 weeks. Overall event-free survival was 73.6% with one ablation and 77.4% after reablation (reablation rate was 8.7%). Median time to recurrence was 26.9 weeks. AF was more likely to recur in patients being treated with antiarrhythmic therapy at the time of last follow-up (recurrence rate 30.3% with antiarrhythmic drugs, 13.2% without antiarrhythmic drugs; hazard ratio [HR] 2.2, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.1-4.4, P = 0.024) and in those with a history of AF greater than 2 years duration (HR 2.7, 95% CI 1.1-6.9, P = 0.038). Our study represents the largest cohort of patients receiving AFA with closed-irrigation ablation catheters. We demonstrate comparable outcomes to those previously reported in studies of open-irrigation ablation catheters. Given the theoretical benefits of a closed-irrigation system, a large head-to-head comparison using this catheter is warranted. ©2012, The Authors. Journal compilation ©2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Boundary Layer Transition over Blunt Hypersonic Vehicles Including Effects of Ablation-Induced Out-Gassing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Fei; Choudhari, Meelan; Chang, Chau-Lyan; White, Jeffery

    2011-01-01

    Computations are performed to study the boundary layer instability mechanisms pertaining to hypersonic flow over blunt capsules. For capsules with ablative heat shields, transition may be influenced both by out-gassing associated with surface pyrolysis and the resulting modification of surface geometry including the formation of micro-roughness. To isolate the effects of out-gassing, this paper examines the stability of canonical boundary layer flows over a smooth surface in the presence of gas injection into the boundary layer. For a slender cone, the effects of out-gassing on the predominantly second mode instability are found to be stabilizing. In contrast, for a blunt capsule flow dominated by first mode instability, out-gassing is shown to be destabilizing. Analogous destabilizing effects of outgassing are also noted for both stationary and traveling modes of crossflow instability over a blunt sphere-cone configuration at angle of attack.

  17. Comparison of remote magnetic navigation ablation and manual ablation of idiopathic ventricular arrhythmia after failed manual ablation.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, Mitsuharu; Scheinman, Melvin M; Tseng, Zian H; Lee, Byron K; Marcus, Gregory M; Badhwar, Nitish

    2017-01-01

    Catheter ablation for idiopathic ventricular arrhythmia (VA) is effective and safe, but efficacy is frequently limited due to an epicardial origin and difficult anatomy. The remote magnetic navigation (RMN) catheter has a flexible catheter design allowing access to difficult anatomy. We describe the efficacy of the RMN for ablation of idiopathic VA after failed manual ablation. Among 235 patients with idiopathic VA referred for catheter ablation, we identified 51 patients who were referred for repeat ablation after a failed manual ablation. We analyzed the clinical characteristics, including the successful ablation site and findings at electrophysiology study, in repeat procedures conducted using RMN as compared with manual ablation. Among these patients, 22 (43 %) underwent repeat ablation with the RMN and 29 (57 %) underwent repeat ablation with a manual ablation. Overall, successful ablation rate was significantly higher using RMN as compared with manual ablation (91 vs. 69 %, P = 0.02). Fluoroscopy time in the RMN was 17 ± 12 min as compared with 43 ± 18 min in the manual ablation (P = 0.009). Successful ablation rate in the posterior right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT) plus posterior-tricuspid annulus was higher with RMN as compared with manual ablation (92 vs. 50 %, P = 0.03). Neither groups exhibited any major complications. The RMN is more effective in selected patients with recurrent idiopathic VA after failed manual ablation and is associated with less fluoroscopy time. The RMN catheters have a flexible design enabling them to access otherwise difficult anatomy including the posterior tricuspid annulus and posterior RVOT.

  18. Inferring Strength of Tantalum from Hydrodynamic Instability Recovery Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sternberger, Z.; Maddox, B.; Opachich, Y.; Wehrenberg, C.; Kraus, R.; Remington, B.; Randall, G.; Farrell, M.; Ravichandran, G.

    2018-05-01

    Hydrodynamic instability experiments allow access to material properties at extreme conditions, where strain rates exceed 105 s-1 and pressures reach 100 GPa. Current hydrodynamic instability experimental methods require in-flight radiography to image the instability growth at high pressure and high strain rate, limiting the facilities where these experiments can be performed. An alternate approach, recovering the sample after loading, allows measurement of the instability growth with profilometry. Tantalum samples were manufactured with different 2D and 3D initial perturbation patterns and dynamically compressed by a blast wave generated by laser ablation. The samples were recovered from peak pressures between 30 and 120 GPa and strain rates on the order of 107 s-1, providing a record of the growth of the perturbations due to hydrodynamic instability. These records are useful validation points for hydrocode simulations using models of material strength at high strain rate. Recovered tantalum samples were analyzed, providing an estimate of the strength of the material at high pressure and strain rate.

  19. Shock tube Multiphase Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Middlebrooks, John; Allen, Roy; Paudel, Manoj; Young, Calvin; Musick, Ben; McFarland, Jacob

    2017-11-01

    Shock driven multiphase instabilities (SDMI) are unique physical phenomena that have far-reaching practical applications in engineering and science. The instability is present in high energy explosions, scramjet combustors, and supernovae events. The SDMI arises when a multiphase interface is impulsively accelerated by the passage of a shockwave. It is similar in development to the Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instability however, particle-to-gas coupling is the driving mechanism of the SDMI. As particle effects such as lag and phase change become more prominent, the SDMI's development begins to significantly deviate from the RM instability. We have developed an experiment for studying the SDMI in our shock tube facility. In our experiments, a multiphase interface is created using a laminar jet and flowed into the shock tube where it is accelerated by the passage of a planar shockwave. The interface development is captured using CCD cameras synchronized with planar laser illumination. This talk will give an overview of new experiments conducted to examine the development of a shocked cylindrical multiphase interface. The effects of Atwood number, particle size, and a second acceleration (reshock) of the interface will be discussed.

  20. Spatial Holmboe instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, Sabine; Chomaz, Jean-Marc; Loiseleux, Thomas

    2002-08-01

    In mixing-layers between two parallel streams of different densities, shear and gravity effects interplay; buoyancy acts as a restoring force and the Kelvin-Helmholtz mode is known to be stabilized by the stratification. If the density interface is sharp enough, two new instability modes, known as Holmboe modes, appear, propagating in opposite directions. This mechanism has been studied in the temporal instability framework. The present paper analyzes the associated spatial instability problem. It considers, in the Boussinesq approximation, two immiscible inviscid fluids with a piecewise linear broken-line velocity profile. We show how the classical scenario for transition between absolute and convective instability should be modified due to the presence of propagating waves. In the convective region, the spatial theory is relevant and the slowest propagating wave is shown to be the most spatially amplified, as suggested by intuition. Predictions of spatial linear theory are compared with mixing-layer [C. G. Koop and F. K. Browand, J. Fluid Mech. 93, 135 (1979)] and exchange flow [G. Pawlak and L. Armi, J. Fluid Mech. 376, 1 (1999)] experiments. The physical mechanism for Holmboe mode destabilization is analyzed via an asymptotic expansion that predicts the absolute instability domain at large Richardson number.

  1. Spatial Holmboe Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabine, Ortiz; Marc, Chomaz Jean; Thomas, Loiseleux

    2001-11-01

    In mixing layers between two parallel streams of different densities, shear and gravity effects interplay. When the Roosby number, which compares the nonlinear acceleration terms to the Coriolis forces, is large enough, buoyancy acts as a restoring force, the Kelvin-Helmholtz mode is known to be stabilized by the stratification. If the density interface is sharp enough, two new instability modes, known as Holmboe modes, propagating in opposite directions appear. This mechanism has been study in the temporal instability framework. We analyze the associated spatial instability problem, in the Boussinesq approximation, for two immiscible inviscid fluids with broken-line velocity profile. We show how the classical scenario for transition between absolute and convective instability should be modified due to the presence of propagating waves. In convective region, the spatial theory is relevant and the slowest propagative wave is shown to be the most spatially amplified, as suggested by the intuition. Spatial theory is compared with mixing layer experiments (C.G. Koop and Browand J. Fluid Mech. 93, part 1, 135 (1979)), and wedge flows (G. Pawlak and L. Armi J. Fluid Mech. 376, 1 (1999)). Physical mechanism for the Holmboe mode destabilization is analyzed via an asymptotic expansion that explains precisely the absolute instability domain at large Richardson number.

  2. Minor shoulder instability.

    PubMed

    Castagna, Alessandro; Nordenson, Ulf; Garofalo, Raffaele; Karlsson, Jon

    2007-02-01

    The wide spectrum of shoulder instability is difficult to include in 1 classification. The distinction between traumatic, unidirectional, and atraumatic multidirectional instability is still widely used, even though this classification is not sufficiently precise to include all the different pathological findings of shoulder instability. We present "minor instability," which is a pathological condition causing a dysfunction of the glenohumeral articulation, especially in combination with microtrauma, repetitive or not, or after a period of immobilization or inactivity. When "minor shoulder instability" is suspected, the patient's history and detailed clinical examination represent the most important factors when establishing the diagnosis. In particular, the apprehension test stressing the middle glenohumeral ligament (MGHL)/labral complex in the position of midabduction and external rotation may be painful and may even reveal anterior instability or subluxation. Conventional radiographs are negative in most cases, as is magnetic resonance imaging arthrography. It is only after an accurate arthroscopic assessment that the pathological lesion can be found. The major pathological process can be identified at the level of the anterior superior labrum, in particular the MGHL complex, and appears as hyperemia, fraying, stretching, loosening, thinning, hypoplasia, or even absence. It may, however, be difficult to distinguish between a normal variant and a pathological lesion. Clinical symptoms and examination should always be correlated with arthroscopic findings. Recommended treatment is to restore shoulder stability and thereby prevent shoulder pain secondary to the increase in laxity. A reduction in range of motion should be expected during the postoperative phase, at least up to six to nine months. External rotation is usually permanently reduced by a few degrees.

  3. Femtosecond laser ablation of enamel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Quang-Tri; Bertrand, Caroline; Vilar, Rui

    2016-06-01

    The surface topographical, compositional, and structural modifications induced in human enamel by femtosecond laser ablation is studied. The laser treatments were performed using a Yb:KYW chirped-pulse-regenerative amplification laser system (560 fs and 1030 nm) and fluences up to 14 J/cm2. The ablation surfaces were studied by scanning electron microscopy, grazing incidence x-ray diffraction, and micro-Raman spectroscopy. Regardless of the fluence, the ablation surfaces were covered by a layer of resolidified material, indicating that ablation is accompanied by melting of hydroxyapatite. This layer presented pores and exploded gas bubbles, created by the release of gaseous decomposition products of hydroxyapatite (CO2 and H2O) within the liquid phase. In the specimen treated with 1-kHz repetition frequency and 14 J/cm2, thickness of the resolidified material is in the range of 300 to 900 nm. The micro-Raman analysis revealed that the resolidified material contains amorphous calcium phosphate, while grazing incidence x-ray diffraction analysis allowed detecting traces of a calcium phosphate other than hydroxyapatite, probably β-tricalcium phosphate Ca3), at the surface of this specimen. The present results show that the ablation of enamel involves melting of enamel's hydroxyapatite, but the thickness of the altered layer is very small and thermal damage of the remaining material is negligible.

  4. Image-Guided Ablation of Adrenal Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Yamakado, Koichiro

    2014-01-01

    Although laparoscopic adrenalectomy has remained the standard of care for the treatment for adrenal tumors, percutaneous image-guided ablation therapy, such as chemical ablation, radiofrequency ablation, cryoablation, and microwave ablation, has been shown to be clinically useful in many nonsurgical candidates. Ablation therapy has been used to treat both functioning adenomas and malignant tumors, including primary adrenal carcinoma and metastasis. For patients with functioning adenomas, biochemical and symptomatic improvement is achieved in 96 to 100% after ablation; for patients with malignant adrenal neoplasms, however, the survival benefit from ablation therapy remains unclear, though good initial results have been reported. This article outlines the current role of ablation therapy for adrenal lesions, as well as identifying some of the technical considerations for this procedure. PMID:25049444

  5. Microwave ablation of hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Poggi, Guido; Tosoratti, Nevio; Montagna, Benedetta; Picchi, Chiara

    2015-01-01

    Although surgical resection is still the optimal treatment option for early-stage hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in patients with well compensated cirrhosis, thermal ablation techniques provide a valid non-surgical treatment alternative, thanks to their minimal invasiveness, excellent tolerability and safety profile, proven efficacy in local disease control, virtually unlimited repeatability and cost-effectiveness. Different energy sources are currently employed in clinics as physical agents for percutaneous or intra-surgical thermal ablation of HCC nodules. Among them, radiofrequency (RF) currents are the most used, while microwave ablations (MWA) are becoming increasingly popular. Starting from the 90s’, RF ablation (RFA) rapidly became the standard of care in ablation, especially in the treatment of small HCC nodules; however, RFA exhibits substantial performance limitations in the treatment of large lesions and/or tumors located near major heat sinks. MWA, first introduced in the Far Eastern clinical practice in the 80s’, showing promising results but also severe limitations in the controllability of the emitted field and in the high amount of power employed for the ablation of large tumors, resulting in a poor coagulative performance and a relatively high complication rate, nowadays shows better results both in terms of treatment controllability and of overall coagulative performance, thanks to the improvement of technology. In this review we provide an extensive and detailed overview of the key physical and technical aspects of MWA and of the currently available systems, and we want to discuss the most relevant published data on MWA treatments of HCC nodules in regard to clinical results and to the type and rate of complications, both in absolute terms and in comparison with RFA. PMID:26557950

  6. Laser ablation based fuel ignition

    DOEpatents

    Early, J.W.; Lester, C.S.

    1998-06-23

    There is provided a method of fuel/oxidizer ignition comprising: (a) application of laser light to a material surface which is absorptive to the laser radiation; (b) heating of the material surface with the laser light to produce a high temperature ablation plume which emanates from the heated surface as an intensely hot cloud of vaporized surface material; and (c) contacting the fuel/oxidizer mixture with the hot ablation cloud at or near the surface of the material in order to heat the fuel to a temperature sufficient to initiate fuel ignition. 3 figs.

  7. Laser ablation based fuel ignition

    DOEpatents

    Early, James W.; Lester, Charles S.

    1998-01-01

    There is provided a method of fuel/oxidizer ignition comprising: (a) application of laser light to a material surface which is absorptive to the laser radiation; (b) heating of the material surface with the laser light to produce a high temperature ablation plume which emanates from the heated surface as an intensely hot cloud of vaporized surface material; and (c) contacting the fuel/oxidizer mixture with the hot ablation cloud at or near the surface of the material in order to heat the fuel to a temperature sufficient to initiate fuel ignition.

  8. Ablative Therapies for Barrett's Esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Garman, Katherine S.; Shaheen, Nicholas J.

    2011-01-01

    Barrett's esophagus has gained increased clinical attention because of its association with esophageal adenocarcinoma, a cancer with increasing incidence and poor survival rates. The goals of ablating Barrett's esophagus are to decrease esophageal cancer rates and to improve overall survival and quality of life. Different techniques have been developed and tested for their effectiveness eradicating Barrett's epithelium. This review assesses the literature associated with different ablative techniques. The safety and efficacy of different techniques are discussed. This review concludes with recommendations for the clinician, including specific strategies for patient care decisions for patients with Barrett's esophagus with varying degrees of dysplasia. PMID:21373836

  9. Tektite ablation - Some confirming calculations.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Keefe, J. A., III; Silver, A. D.; Cameron, W. S.; Adams , E. W.; Warmbrod, J. D.

    1973-01-01

    The calculation of tektite ablation has been redone, taking into account transient effects, internal radiation, melting and nonequilibrium vaporization of the glass, and the drag effect of the flanges. It is found that the results confirm the earlier calculations of Chapman and his group and of Adams and his co-workers. The general trend of the results is not sensitive to reasonable changes of the physical parameters. The ablation is predominantly by melting rather than by vaporization at all velocities up to 11 km/sec; this is surprising in view of the lack of detectable melt flow in most tektites. Chemical effects have not been considered.

  10. Ablative therapy for liver tumours

    PubMed Central

    Dick, E A; Taylor-Robinson, S D; Thomas, H C; Gedroyc, W M W

    2002-01-01

    Established ablative therapies for the treatment of primary and secondary liver tumours, including percutaneous ethanol injection, cryotherapy, and radiofrequency ablation, are discussed. Newer techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging guided laser interstitial thermal therapy of liver tumours has produced a median survival rate of 40.8 months after treatment. The merits of this newly emerging technique are discussed, together with future developments, such as focused ultrasound therapy, which holds the promise of non-invasive thermoablation treatment on an outpatient basis. PMID:11950826

  11. A connection between mix and adiabat in ICF capsules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Baolian; Kwan, Thomas; Wang, Yi-Ming; Yi, Sunghuan (Austin); Batha, Steven

    2016-10-01

    We study the relationship between instability induced mix, preheat and the adiabat of the deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel in fusion capsule experiments. Our studies show that hydrodynamic instability not only directly affects the implosion, hot spot shape and mix, but also affects the thermodynamics of the capsule, such as, the adiabat of the DT fuel, and, in turn, affects the energy partition between the pusher shell (cold DT) and the hot spot. It was found that the adiabat of the DT fuel is sensitive to the amount of mix caused by Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) and Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instabilities at the material interfaces due to its exponential dependence on the fuel entropy. An upper limit of mix allowed maintaining a low adiabat of DT fuel is derived. Additionally we demonstrated that the use of a high adiabat for the DT fuel in theoretical analysis and with the aid of 1D code simulations could explain some aspects of the 3D effects and mix in the capsule experiments. Furthermore, from the observed neutron images and our physics model, we could infer the adiabat of the DT fuel in the capsule and determine the possible amount of mix in the hot spot (LA-UR-16-24880). This work was conducted under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by the Los Alamos National Laboratory under Contract No. W-7405-ENG-36.

  12. The Origin of Radially Aligned Magnetic Fields in Young Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Shimoda, Jiro; Ohira, Yutaka; Yamazaki, Ryo

    2013-08-01

    It has been suggested by radio observations of polarized synchrotron emissions that downstream magnetic fields in some young supernova remnants (SNRs) are oriented radially. We study the magnetic field distribution of turbulent SNRs driven by the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI)—in other words, the effect of rippled shock—by using three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics simulations. We find that the induced turbulence has radially biased anisotropic velocity dispersion that leads to a selective amplification of the radial component of the magnetic field. The RMI is induced by the interaction between the shock and upstream density fluctuations. Future high-resolution polarization observations can distinguish the following candidates responsible for the upstream density fluctuations: (1) inhomogeneity caused by the cascade of large-scale turbulence in the interstellar medium, the so-called big power-law in the sky; (2) structures generated by the Drury instability in the cosmic-ray modified shock; and (3) fluctuations induced by the nonlinear feedback of the cosmic-ray streaming instability.

  13. The Study of High-Speed Surface Dynamics Using a Pulsed Proton Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buttler, William; Stone, Benjamin; Oro, David; Dimonte, Guy; Preston, Dean; Cherne, Frank; Germann, Timothy; Terrones, Guillermo; Tupa, Dale

    2011-06-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory is presently engaged in development and implementation of ejecta source term and transport models for integration into LANL hydrodynamic computer codes. Experimental support for the effort spans a broad array of activities, including ejecta source term measurements from machine roughened Sn surfaces shocked by HE or flyer plates. Because the underlying postulate for ejecta formation is that ejecta are characterized by Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI) phenomena, a key element of the theory and modeling effort centers on validation and verification RMI experiments at the LANSCE Proton Radiography Facility (pRad) to compare with modeled ejecta measurements. Here we present experimental results used to define and validate a physics based ejecta model together with remarkable, unexpected results of Sn instability growth in vacuum and gasses, and Sn and Cu RM growth that reveals the sensitivity of the RM instability to the yield strength of the material, Cu. The motivation of this last subject, RM growth linked to material strength, is to probe the shock pressure regions over which ejecta begins to form. Presenter

  14. Simulations of viscous and compressible gas-gas flows using high-order finite difference schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capuano, M.; Bogey, C.; Spelt, P. D. M.

    2018-05-01

    A computational method for the simulation of viscous and compressible gas-gas flows is presented. It consists in solving the Navier-Stokes equations associated with a convection equation governing the motion of the interface between two gases using high-order finite-difference schemes. A discontinuity-capturing methodology based on sensors and a spatial filter enables capturing shock waves and deformable interfaces. One-dimensional test cases are performed as validation and to justify choices in the numerical method. The results compare well with analytical solutions. Shock waves and interfaces are accurately propagated, and remain sharp. Subsequently, two-dimensional flows are considered including viscosity and thermal conductivity. In Richtmyer-Meshkov instability, generated on an air-SF6 interface, the influence of the mesh refinement on the instability shape is studied, and the temporal variations of the instability amplitude is compared with experimental data. Finally, for a plane shock wave propagating in air and impacting a cylindrical bubble filled with helium or R22, numerical Schlieren pictures obtained using different grid refinements are found to compare well with experimental shadow-photographs. The mass conservation is verified from the temporal variations of the mass of the bubble. The mean velocities of pressure waves and bubble interface are similar to those obtained experimentally.

  15. Laser driven supersonic flow over a compressible foam surface on the Nike lasera)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harding, E. C.; Drake, R. P.; Aglitskiy, Y.; Plewa, T.; Velikovich, A. L.; Gillespie, R. S.; Weaver, J. L.; Visco, A.; Grosskopf, M. J.; Ditmar, J. R.

    2010-05-01

    A laser driven millimeter-scale target was used to generate a supersonic shear layer in an attempt to create a Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) unstable interface in a high-energy-density (HED) plasma. The KH instability is a fundamental fluid instability that remains unexplored in HED plasmas, which are relevant to the inertial confinement fusion and astrophysical environments. In the experiment presented here the Nike laser [S. P. Obenschain et al., Phys. Plasmas 3, 2098 (1996)] was used to create and drive Al plasma over a rippled foam surface. In response to the supersonic Al flow (Mach=2.6±1.1) shocks should form in the Al flow near the perturbations. The experimental data were used to infer the existence and location of these shocks. In addition, the interface perturbations show growth that has possible contributions from both KH and Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities. Since compressible shear layers exhibit smaller growth, it is important to use the KH growth rate derived from the compressible dispersion relation.

  16. Supersonic shear flows in laser driven high-energy-density plasmas created by the Nike laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harding, E. C.; Drake, R. P.; Gillespie, R. S.; Grosskopf, M. J.; Ditmar, J. R.; Aglitskiy, Y.; Weaver, J. L.; Velikovich, A. L.; Plewa, T.

    2008-11-01

    In high-energy-density (HED) plasmas the Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability plays an important role in the evolution of Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) and Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) unstable interfaces, as well as material interfaces that experience the passage one or multiple oblique shocks. Despite the potentially important role of the KH instability few experiments have been carried out to explore its behavior in the high-energy-density regime. We report on the evolution of a supersonic shear flow that is generated by the release of a high velocity (>100 km/s) aluminum plasma onto a CRF foam (ρ = 0.1 g/cc) surface. In order to seed the Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability various two-dimensional sinusoidal perturbations (λ = 100, 200, and 300 μm with peak-to-valley amplitudes of 10, 20, and 30 μm respectively) have been machined into the foam surface. This experiment was performed using the Nike laser at the Naval Research Laboratory.

  17. Comparing Split and Unsplit Numerical Methods for Simulating Low and High Mach Number Turbulent Flows in Xrage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saenz, Juan; Grinstein, Fernando; Dolence, Joshua; Rauenzahn, Rick; Masser, Thomas; Francois, Marianne; LANL Team

    2017-11-01

    We report progress in evaluating an unsplit hydrodynamic solver being implemented in the radiation adaptive grid Eulerian (xRAGE) code, and compare to a split scheme. xRage is a Eulerian hydrodynamics code used for implicit large eddy simulations (ILES) of multi-material, multi-physics flows where low and high Mach number (Ma) processes and instabilities interact and co-exist. The hydrodynamic solver in xRAGE uses a directionally split, second order Godunov, finite volume (FV) scheme. However, a standard, unsplit, Godunov-type FV scheme with 2nd and 3rd order reconstruction options, low Ma correction and a variety of Riemann solvers has recently become available. To evaluate the hydrodynamic solvers for turbulent low Ma flows, we use simulations of the Taylor Green Vortex (TGV), where there is a transition to turbulence via vortex stretching and production of small-scale eddies. We also simulate a high-low Ma shock-tube flow, where a shock passing over a perturbed surface generates a baroclinic Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI); after the shock has passed, the turbulence in the accelerated interface region resembles Rayleigh Taylor (RT) instability. We compare turbulence spectra and decay in simulated TGV flows, and we present progress in simulating the high-low Ma RMI-RT flow. LANL is operated by LANS LLC for the U.S. DOE NNSA under Contract No. DE-AC52-06NA25396.

  18. DYNAMICAL FRAGMENTATION OF THE T PYXIDIS NOVA SHELL DURING RECURRENT ERUPTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Toraskar, Jayashree; Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark; Shara, Michael M.

    2013-05-01

    Hubble Space Telescope images of the ejecta surrounding the nova T Pyxidis resolve the emission into more than 2000 bright knots. We simulate the dynamical evolution of the ejecta from T Pyxidis during its multiple eruptions over the last 150 years using the adaptive mesh refinement code Ramses. We demonstrate that the observed knots are the result of Richtmyer-Meshkov gas dynamical instabilities (the equivalent of Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities in an accelerated medium). These instabilities are caused by the overrunning of the ejecta from the classical nova of 1866 by fast-moving ejecta from the six subsequent recurrent nova outbursts. Magnetic fields maymore » play a role in determining knot scale and preventing their conductive evaporation. The model correctly predicts the observed expansion and dimming of the T Pyx ejecta as well as the knotty morphology. The model also predicts that deeper, high-resolution imagery will show filamentary structure connecting the knots. We show reprocessed Hubble Space Telescope imagery that shows the first hints of such a structure.« less

  19. Fractional ablative laser skin resurfacing: a review.

    PubMed

    Tajirian, Ani L; Tarijian, Ani L; Goldberg, David J

    2011-12-01

    Ablative laser technology has been in use for many years now. The large side effect profile however has limited its use. Fractional ablative technology is a newer development which combines a lesser side effect profile along with similar efficacy. In this paper we review fractional ablative laser skin resurfacing.

  20. Radiofrequency ablation during continuous saline infusion can extend ablation margins

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Toru; Kubota, Tomoyuki; Horigome, Ryoko; Kimura, Naruhiro; Honda, Hiroki; Iwanaga, Akito; Seki, Keiichi; Honma, Terasu; Yoshida, Toshiaki

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To determine whether fluid injection during radiofrequency ablation (RFA) can increase the coagulation area. METHODS: Bovine liver (1-2 kg) was placed on an aluminum tray with a return electrode affixed to the base, and the liver was punctured by an expandable electrode. During RFA, 5% glucose; 50% glucose; or saline fluid was infused continuously at a rate of 1.0 mL/min through the infusion line connected to the infusion port. The area and volume of the thermocoagulated region of bovine liver were determined after RFA. The Joule heat generated was determined from the temporal change in output during the RFA experiment. RESULTS: No liquid infusion was 17.3 ± 1.6 mL, similar to the volume of a 3-cm diameter sphere (14.1 mL). Mean thermocoagulated volume was significantly larger with continuous infusion of saline (29.3 ± 3.3 mL) than with 5% glucose (21.4 ± 2.2 mL), 50% glucose (16.5 ± 0.9 mL) or no liquid infusion (17.3 ± 1.6 mL). The ablated volume for RFA with saline was approximately 1.7-times greater than for RFA with no liquid infusion, representing a significant difference between these two conditions. Total Joule heat generated during RFA was highest with saline, and lowest with 50% glucose. CONCLUSION: RFA with continuous saline infusion achieves a large ablation zone, and may help inhibit local recurrence by obtaining sufficient ablation margins. RFA during continuous saline infusion can extend ablation margins, and may be prevent local recurrence. PMID:23483097

  1. Brain Emboli After Left Ventricular Endocardial Ablation.

    PubMed

    Whitman, Isaac R; Gladstone, Rachel A; Badhwar, Nitish; Hsia, Henry H; Lee, Byron K; Josephson, S Andrew; Meisel, Karl M; Dillon, William P; Hess, Christopher P; Gerstenfeld, Edward P; Marcus, Gregory M

    2017-02-28

    Catheter ablation for ventricular tachycardia and premature ventricular complexes (PVCs) is common. Catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation is associated with a risk of cerebral emboli attributed to cardioversions and numerous ablation lesions in the low-flow left atrium, but cerebral embolic risk in ventricular ablation has not been evaluated. We enrolled 18 consecutive patients meeting study criteria scheduled for ventricular tachycardia or PVC ablation over a 9-month period. Patients undergoing left ventricular (LV) ablation were compared with a control group of those undergoing right ventricular ablation only. Patients were excluded if they had implantable cardioverter defibrillators or permanent pacemakers. Radiofrequency energy was used for ablation in all cases and heparin was administered with goal-activated clotting times of 300 to 400 seconds for all LV procedures. Pre- and postprocedural brain MRI was performed on each patient within a week of the ablation procedure. Embolic infarcts were defined as new foci of reduced diffusion and high signal intensity on fluid-attenuated inversion recovery brain MRI within a vascular distribution. The mean age was 58 years, half of the patients were men, half had a history of hypertension, and the majority had no known vascular disease or heart failure. LV ablation was performed in 12 patients (ventricular tachycardia, n=2; PVC, n=10) and right ventricular ablation was performed exclusively in 6 patients (ventricular tachycardia, n=1; PVC, n=5). Seven patients (58%) undergoing LV ablation experienced a total of 16 cerebral emboli, in comparison with zero patients undergoing right ventricular ablation ( P =0.04). Seven of 11 patients (63%) undergoing a retrograde approach to the LV developed at least 1 new brain lesion. More than half of patients undergoing routine LV ablation procedures (predominately PVC ablations) experienced new brain emboli after the procedure. Future research is critical to understanding the

  2. Mucosal ablation in Barrett's esophagus.

    PubMed

    Walker, S J; Selvasekar, C R; Birbeck, N

    2002-01-01

    Barrett's esophagus is a prevalent, premalignant condition affecting the gastroesophageal junction and distal esophagus. Ablation plus antireflux therapy has recently been advocated to prevent the development of adenocarcinoma or to treat those unfit or unwilling to undergo esophagectomy. The present article, based on a search of Medline/ISI databases and cross-referencing of relevant articles, reviews the literature on this subject. A number of techniques have been used to remove the affected mucosa, including laser, electrocoagulation, argon plasma coagulation and photodynamic therapy but, as yet, none has been shown to be superior. Depending on the method used, ablation results in complete removal of Barrett's esophagus in approximately one third of patients and a partial response in nearly two-thirds. The resultant squamous mucosa is apparently 'normal' but may regress. To promote and maintain regeneration, antireflux therapy must be sufficient to reduce repetitive injury to the esophageal mucosa. Whether ablation reduces the cancer risk or delays its occurrence is unknown, though recent data suggests benefit. Complications are infrequent and usually mild. Regular follow-up endoscopy and deep biopsies continue to be necessary. Careful data from much larger populations with long-term follow-up is required before ablation reaches the stage of broad clinical application.

  3. Modern Advances in Ablative TPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkatapathy, Ethiraj

    2013-01-01

    Topics covered include: Physics of Hypersonic Flow and TPS Considerations. Destinations, Missions and Requirements. State of the Art Thermal Protection Systems Capabilities. Modern Advances in Ablative TPS. Entry Systems Concepts. Flexible TPS for Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerators. Conformal TPS for Rigid Aeroshell. 3-D Woven TPS for Extreme Entry Environment. Multi-functional Carbon Fabric for Mechanically Deployable.

  4. Time-resolved Measurements of ICF Capsule Ablator Properties by Streaked X-Ray Radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, Damien

    2008-11-01

    Determining the capsule ablator thickness and peak laser or x-ray drive pressure required to optimize fuel compression is a critical part of ensuring ICF ignition on the NIF. If too little ablator is burned off, the implosion velocity will be too low for adequate final compression; if too much ablator is burned off, the fuel will be preheated or the shell will be broken up by growth of hydrodynamic instabilities, again compromising compression. Avoiding such failure modes requires having an accurate, in-flight measure of the implosion velocity, areal density, and remaining mass of the ablator near peak velocity. We present a new technique which achieves simultaneous time-resolved measurements of all these parameters in a single, area-backlit, x-ray streaked radiograph. This is accomplished by tomographic inversion of the radiograph to determine the radial density profile at each time step; scalar quantities such as the average position, areal density, and mass of the ablator can then be calculated by taking moments of this density profile. Details of the successful demonstration of this technique using backlit Cu-doped Be capsule implosions at the Omega facility will be presented. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S.Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344 and in collaboration with Brian Spears, David Braun, Peter Celliers, Gilbert Collins, and Otto Landen at LLNL and Rick Olson at SNL.

  5. Gravitational instabilities of superspinars

    SciTech Connect

    Pani, Paolo; Barausse, Enrico; Berti, Emanuele

    2010-08-15

    Superspinars are ultracompact objects whose mass M and angular momentum J violate the Kerr bound (cJ/GM{sup 2}>1). Recent studies analyzed the observable consequences of gravitational lensing and accretion around superspinars in astrophysical scenarios. In this paper we investigate the dynamical stability of superspinars to gravitational perturbations, considering either purely reflecting or perfectly absorbing boundary conditions at the 'surface' of the superspinar. We find that these objects are unstable independently of the boundary conditions, and that the instability is strongest for relatively small values of the spin. Also, we give a physical interpretation of the various instabilities that we find. Ourmore » results (together with the well-known fact that accretion tends to spin superspinars down) imply that superspinars are very unlikely astrophysical alternatives to black holes.« less

  6. Gravitational instabilities of superspinars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pani, Paolo; Barausse, Enrico; Berti, Emanuele; Cardoso, Vitor

    2010-08-01

    Superspinars are ultracompact objects whose mass M and angular momentum J violate the Kerr bound (cJ/GM2>1). Recent studies analyzed the observable consequences of gravitational lensing and accretion around superspinars in astrophysical scenarios. In this paper we investigate the dynamical stability of superspinars to gravitational perturbations, considering either purely reflecting or perfectly absorbing boundary conditions at the “surface” of the superspinar. We find that these objects are unstable independently of the boundary conditions, and that the instability is strongest for relatively small values of the spin. Also, we give a physical interpretation of the various instabilities that we find. Our results (together with the well-known fact that accretion tends to spin superspinars down) imply that superspinars are very unlikely astrophysical alternatives to black holes.

  7. Atrial Tachycardias Following Atrial Fibrillation Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Sághy, László; Tutuianu, Cristina; Szilágyi, Judith

    2015-01-01

    One of the most important proarrhythmic complications after left atrial (LA) ablation is regular atrial tachycardia (AT) or flutter. Those tachycardias that occur after atrial fibrillation (AF) ablation can cause even more severe symptoms than those from the original arrhythmia prior to the index ablation procedure since they are often incessant and associated with rapid ventricular response. Depending on the method and extent of LA ablation and on the electrophysiological properties of underlying LA substrate, the reported incidence of late ATs is variable. To establish the exact mechanism of these tachycardias can be difficult and controversial but correlates with the ablation technique and in the vast majority of cases the mechanism is reentry related to gaps in prior ablation lines. When tachycardias occur, conservative therapy usually is not effective, radiofrequency ablation procedure is mostly successful, but can be challenging, and requires a complex approach. PMID:25308808

  8. Instability in dynamic fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fineberg, J.; Marder, M.

    1999-05-01

    The fracture of brittle amorphous materials is an especially challenging problem, because the way a large object shatters is intimately tied to details of cohesion at microscopic scales. This subject has been plagued by conceptual puzzles, and to make matters worse, experiments seemed to contradict the most firmly established theories. In this review, we will show that the theory and experiments fit within a coherent picture where dynamic instabilities of a crack tip play a crucial role. To accomplish this task, we first summarize the central results of linear elastic dynamic fracture mechanics, an elegant and powerful description of crack motion from the continuum perspective. We point out that this theory is unable to make predictions without additional input, information that must come either from experiment, or from other types of theories. We then proceed to discuss some of the most important experimental observations, and the methods that were used to obtain the them. Once the flux of energy to a crack tip passes a critical value, the crack becomes unstable, and it propagates in increasingly complicated ways. As a result, the crack cannot travel as quickly as theory had supposed, fracture surfaces become rough, it begins to branch and radiate sound, and the energy cost for crack motion increases considerably. All these phenomena are perfectly consistent with the continuum theory, but are not described by it. Therefore, we close the review with an account of theoretical and numerical work that attempts to explain the instabilities. Currently, the experimental understanding of crack tip instabilities in brittle amorphous materials is fairly detailed. We also have a detailed theoretical understanding of crack tip instabilities in crystals, reproducing qualitatively many features of the experiments, while numerical work is beginning to make the missing connections between experiment and theory.

  9. Electrokinetic instability micromixing.

    PubMed

    Oddy, M H; Santiago, J G; Mikkelsen, J C

    2001-12-15

    We have developed an electrokinetic process to rapidly stir micro- and nanoliter volume solutions for microfluidic bioanalytical applications. We rapidly stir microflow streams by initiating a flow instability, which we have observed in sinusoidally oscillating, electroosmotic channel flows. As the effect occurs within an oscillating electroosmotic flow, we refer to it here as an electrokinetic instability (EKI). The rapid stretching and folding of material lines associated with this instability can be used to stir fluid streams with Reynolds numbers of order unity, based on channel depth and rms electroosmotic velocity. This paper presents a preliminary description of the EKI and the design and fabrication of two micromixing devices capable of rapidly stirring two fluid streams using this flow phenomenon. A high-resolution CCD camera is used to record the stirring and diffusion of fluorescein from an initially unmixed configuration. Integration of fluorescence intensity over measurement volumes (voxels) provides a measure of the degree to which two streams are mixed to within the length scales of the voxels. Ensemble-averaged probability density functions and power spectra of the instantaneous spatial intensity profiles are used to quantify the mixing processes. Two-dimensional spectral bandwidths of the mixing images are initially anisotropic for the unmixed configuration, broaden as the stirring associated with the EKI rapidly stretches and folds material lines (adding high spatial frequencies to the concentration field), and then narrow to a relatively isotropic spectrum at the well-mixed conditions.

  10. Relativistic centrifugal instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gourgouliatos, Konstantinos N.; Komissarov, Serguei S.

    2018-03-01

    Near the central engine, many astrophysical jets are expected to rotate about their axis. Further out they are expected to go through the processes of reconfinement and recollimation. In both these cases, the flow streams along a concave surface and hence, it is subject to the centrifugal force. It is well known that such flows may experience the centrifugal instability (CFI), to which there are many laboratory examples. The recent computer simulations of relativistic jets from active galactic nuclei undergoing the process of reconfinement show that in such jets CFI may dominate over the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability associated with velocity shear (Gourgouliatos & Komissarov). In this letter, we generalize the Rayleigh criterion for CFI in rotating fluids to relativistic flows using a heuristic analysis. We also present the results of computer simulations which support our analytic criterion for the case of an interface separating two uniformly rotating cylindrical flows. We discuss the difference between CFI and the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in flows with curved streamlines.

  11. Robust dynamic mitigation of instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Kawata, S.; Karino, T.

    2015-04-15

    A dynamic mitigation mechanism for instability growth was proposed and discussed in the paper [S. Kawata, Phys. Plasmas 19, 024503 (2012)]. In the present paper, the robustness of the dynamic instability mitigation mechanism is discussed further. The results presented here show that the mechanism of the dynamic instability mitigation is rather robust against changes in the phase, the amplitude, and the wavelength of the wobbling perturbation applied. Generally, instability would emerge from the perturbation of the physical quantity. Normally, the perturbation phase is unknown so that the instability growth rate is discussed. However, if the perturbation phase is known, themore » instability growth can be controlled by a superposition of perturbations imposed actively: If the perturbation is induced by, for example, a driving beam axis oscillation or wobbling, the perturbation phase could be controlled, and the instability growth is mitigated by the superposition of the growing perturbations.« less

  12. Chronic ankle instability: Current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Al-Mohrej, Omar A.; Al-Kenani, Nader S.

    2016-01-01

    Ankle sprain is reported to be among the most common recurrent injuries. About 20% of acute ankle sprain patients develop chronic ankle instability. The failure of functional rehabilitation after acute ankle sprain leads to the development of chronic ankle instability. Differentiation between functional and anatomical ankle instability is very essential to guide the proper treatment. Stability testing by varus stress test and anterior drawer test should be carried out. Subtalar instability is an important pathology that is commonly by passed during the assessment of chronic ankle instability. Unlike acute ankle sprain, chronic ankle instability might require surgical intervention. The surgical and conservative management options can be very much developed by in-depth knowledge of the ankle anatomy, biomechanics, and pathology. Anatomical repair, augmentation by tendon, or both are the basic methods of surgical intervention. Arthroscopy is becoming more popular in the management of chronic ankle instability. PMID:27843798

  13. Microwave Ablation Compared with Radiofrequency Ablation for Breast Tissue in an Ex Vivo Bovine Udder Model

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Toshihiro, E-mail: toshihir@bf6.so-net.ne.jp; Westphal, Saskia, E-mail: swestphal@ukaachen.de; Isfort, Peter, E-mail: isfort@hia.rwth-aachen.de

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: To compare the effectiveness of microwave (MW) ablation with radiofrequency (RF) ablation for treating breast tissue in a nonperfused ex vivo model of healthy bovine udder tissue. Materials and Methods: MW ablations were performed at power outputs of 25W, 35W, and 45W using a 915-MHz frequency generator and a 2-cm active tip antenna. RF ablations were performed with a bipolar RF system with 2- and 3-cm active tip electrodes. Tissue temperatures were continuously monitored during ablation. Results: The mean short-axis diameters of the coagulation zones were 1.34 {+-} 0.14, 1.45 {+-} 0.13, and 1.74 {+-} 0.11 cm for MWmore » ablation at outputs of 25W, 35W, and 45W. For RF ablation, the corresponding values were 1.16 {+-} 0.09 and 1.26 {+-} 0.14 cm with electrodes having 2- and 3-cm active tips, respectively. The mean coagulation volumes were 2.27 {+-} 0.65, 2.85 {+-} 0.72, and 4.45 {+-} 0.47 cm{sup 3} for MW ablation at outputs of 25W, 35W, and 45W and 1.18 {+-} 0.30 and 2.29 {+-} 0.55 cm{sup 3} got RF ablation with 2- and 3-cm electrodes, respectively. MW ablations at 35W and 45W achieved significantly longer short-axis diameters than RF ablations (P < 0.05). The highest tissue temperature was achieved with MW ablation at 45W (P < 0.05). On histological examination, the extent of the ablation zone in MW ablations was less affected by tissue heterogeneity than that in RF ablations. Conclusion: MW ablation appears to be advantageous with respect to the volume of ablation and the shape of the margin of necrosis compared with RF ablation in an ex vivo bovine udder.« less

  14. Impact of Inner Surface Perturbations on the Stability of Cylindrical Liner Implosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weis, Matthew; Peterson, Kyle; Hess, Mark; Lau, Y. Y.; Zhang, Peng; Gilgenbach, Ronald

    2015-11-01

    This paper studies the effects of initial perturbations on the inner liner surface (ILS) of an imploding cylindrical liner. In MagLIF, nonuniform preheat of the fuel could provide an additional source of spatial nonuniformity on the ILS. A blast wave generated by the laser preheat might trigger the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RM) on the ILS which then serves as another seed to the Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RT) during the stagnation (deceleration) phase of the implosion. Another scenario is that the shock initiated from the outer liner surface, during current rise, propagates inward and is reflected at the ILS. This reflected shock would carry the initial ILS perturbations which then serve as an additional seed for the magneto-RT (MRT) during the acceleration phase of the implosion. These potentially dangerous interactions are analyzed using the 2D HYDRA code. The effects of axial magnetic fields, of the initial surface roughness spectrum, and of gas fill or water fill (to examine deceleration phase RT) are studied. M. R. Weis was supported by the Sandia National Laboratories. This work was also supported by DoE Grant DE-SC0012328.

  15. Collisions of plastic and foam laser-driven foils studied by orthogonal x-ray imaging.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aglitskiy, Y.; Metzler, N.; Karasik, M.; Serlin, V.; Obenschain, S. P.; Schmitt, A. J.; Velikovich, A. L.; Zalesak, S. T.; Gardner, J. H.; Weaver, J.; Oh, J.; Harding, E. C.

    2007-11-01

    We report an experimental study of hydrodynamic Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov-type instabilities developing at the material interface produced in double-foil collisions. Our double-foil targets consist of a plastic foil irradiated by the 4 ns Nike KrF laser pulse at ˜50 TW/cm^2 and accelerated toward a stationary plastic or foam foil. Either the rear side of the front foil or the front side of the rear foil is rippled. Orthogonal imaging, i. e., a simultaneous side-on and face-on x-ray radiography of the targets has been used in these experiments to observe the process of collision and the evolution of the areal mass amplitude modulation. Its observed evolution is similar to the case of the classical RM instability in finite thickness targets first studied by Y. Aglitsky et al., Phys. Plasmas 13, 80703 (2006). Our data are favorably compared with 1D and 2D simulation results.

  16. Miniaturization of Microwave Ablation Antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luyen, Hung

    Microwave ablation (MWA) is a promising minimally invasive technique for the treatment of various types of cancers as well as non-oncological diseases. In MWA, an interstitial antenna is typically used to deliver microwave energy to the diseased tissue and heat it up to lethal temperature levels that induce cell death. The desired characteristics of the interstitial antenna include a narrow diameter to minimize invasiveness of the treatment, a low input reflection coefficient at the operating frequency, and a localized heating zone. Most interstitial MWA antennas are fed by coaxial cables and designed for operation at either 915 MHz or 2.45 GHz. Coax-fed MWA antennas are commonly equipped with coaxial baluns to achieve localized heating. However, the conventional implementation of coaxial baluns increases the overall diameters of the antennas and therefore make them more invasive. It is highly desirable to develop less invasive antennas with shorter active lengths and smaller diameters for MWA applications. In this work, we demonstrate the feasibility of using higher frequency microwaves for tissue ablation and present several techniques for decreasing diameters of MWA antennas. First, we investigated MWA at higher frequencies by conducting numerical and experimental studies to compare ablation performance at 10 GHz and 1.9 GHz. Simulation and ex vivo ablation experiment results demonstrate comparable ablation zone dimensions achieved at these two frequencies. Operating at higher frequencies enables interstitial antennas with shorter active lengths. This can be combined with smaller-diameter antenna designs to create less invasive applicators or allow integration of multiple radiating elements on a single applicator to have better control and customization of the heating patterns. Additionally, we present three different coax-fed antenna designs and a non-coaxial-based balanced antenna that have smaller-diameter configurations than conventional coax-fed balun

  17. Glue septal ablation: A promising alternative to alcohol septal ablation

    PubMed Central

    Aytemir, Kudret; Oto, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is defined as myocardial hypertrophy in the absence of another cardiac or systemic disease capable of producing the magnitude of present hypertrophy. In about 70% of patients with HCM, there is left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT) obstruction (LVOTO) and this is known as obstructive type of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HOCM). Cases refractory to medical treatment have had two options either surgical septal myectomy or alcohol septal ablation (ASA) to alleviate LVOT gradient. ASA may cause some life-threatening complications including conduction disturbances and complete heart block, hemodynamic compromise, ventricular arrhythmias, distant and massive myocardial necrosis. Glue septal ablation (GSA) is a promising technique for the treatment of HOCM. Glue seems to be superior to alcohol due to some intrinsic advantageous properties of glue such as immediate polymerization which prevents the leak into the left anterior descending coronary artery and it is particularly useful in patients with collaterals to the right coronary artery in whom alcohol ablation is contraindicated. In our experience, GSA is effective and also a safe technique without significant complications. GSA decreases LVOT gradient immediately after the procedure and this reduction persists during 12 months of follow-up. It improves New York Heart Association functional capacity and decrease interventricular septal wall thickness. Further studies are needed in order to assess the long-term efficacy and safety of this technique. PMID:27011786

  18. Modeling and simulations of radiative blast wave driven Rayleigh-Taylor instability experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimony, Assaf; Huntington, Channing M.; Trantham, Matthew; Malamud, Guy; Elbaz, Yonatan; Kuranz, Carolyn C.; Drake, R. Paul; Shvarts, Dov

    2017-10-01

    Recent experiments at the National Ignition Facility measured the growth of Rayleigh-Taylor RT instabilities driven by radiative blast waves, relevant to astrophysics and other HEDP systems. We constructed a new Buoyancy-Drag (BD) model, which accounts for the ablation effect on both bubble and spike. This ablation effect is accounted for by using the potential flow model ]Oron et al PoP 1998], adding another term to the classical BD formalism: βDuA / u , where β the Takabe constant, D the drag term, uA the ablation velocity and uthe instability growth velocity. The model results are compared with the results of experiments and 2D simulations using the CRASH code, with nominal radiation or reduced foam opacity (by a factor of 1000). The ablation constant of the model, βb / s, for the bubble and for the spike fronts, are calibrated using the results of the radiative shock experiments. This work is funded by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under subcontract B614207, and was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  19. [Percutaneous lung thermo-ablation].

    PubMed

    Palussière, Jean; Catena, Vittorio; Gaubert, Jean-Yves; Buy, Xavier; de Baere, Thierry

    2017-05-01

    Percutaneous lung thermo-ablation has steadily been developed over the past 15years. Main indications are early stage non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) for non-surgical patients and slow evolving localized metastatic disease, either spontaneous or following a general treatment. Radiofrequency, being the most evaluated technique, offers a local control rate of about 80-90% for tumors <3 cm in diameter. With excellent tolerance and very few complications, radiofrequency may be proposed for patients with a chronic disease. Other ablation techniques under investigation such as microwaves and cryotherapy could allow overcoming radiofrequency limits. Furthermore, stereotactic radiotherapy proposed for the same indications is efficient. Comparative studies are warranted to differentiate these techniques in terms of efficacy, tolerance and cost-effectiveness. Copyright © 2017 Société Française du Cancer. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Artificial meteor ablation studies: Olivine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, M. B.; Cunningham, G. G.

    1973-01-01

    Artificial meteor ablation was performed on a Mg-rich olivine sample using an arc-heated plasma of ionized air. Experimental conditions simulated a meteor traveling about 12 km/sec at an altitude of 70 km. The mineral content of the original olivine sample was 98% olivine (including traces of olivine alteration products) and 2% chromite. Forsterite content of the original olivine was Fo-89. After ablation, the forsterite content had increased to Fo-94 in the recrystallized olivine. In addition, lamella-like intergrowths of magnetite were prevalent constituents. Wherever magnetite occurred, there was an increase in Mg and a corresponding decrease in Fe for the recrystallized olivine. The Allende fusion crust consisted of a recrystallized olivine, which was more Mg-rich and Fe-deficient than the original meteorite's olivine, and abundant magnetite grains. Although troilite and pentlandite were the common opaque mineral constituents in this meteorite, magnetite was the principal opaque mineral found in the fusion crust.

  1. Percutaneous ablation of pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    D’Onofrio, Mirko; Ciaravino, Valentina; De Robertis, Riccardo; Barbi, Emilio; Salvia, Roberto; Girelli, Roberto; Paiella, Salvatore; Gasparini, Camilla; Cardobi, Nicolò; Bassi, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is a highly aggressive tumor with an overall 5-year survival rate of less than 5%. Prognosis and treatment depend on whether the tumor is resectable or not, which mostly depends on how quickly the diagnosis is made. Chemotherapy and radiotherapy can be both used in cases of non-resectable pancreatic cancer. In cases of pancreatic neoplasm that is locally advanced, non-resectable, but non-metastatic, it is possible to apply percutaneous treatments that are able to induce tumor cytoreduction. The aim of this article will be to describe the multiple currently available treatment techniques (radiofrequency ablation, microwave ablation, cryoablation, and irreversible electroporation), their results, and their possible complications, with the aid of a literature review. PMID:27956791

  2. Instability of warped discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doǧan, S.; Nixon, C. J.; King, A. R.; Pringle, J. E.

    2018-05-01

    Accretion discs are generally warped. If a warp in a disc is too large, the disc can `break' apart into two or more distinct planes, with only tenuous connections between them. Further, if an initially planar disc is subject to a strong differential precession, then it can be torn apart into discrete annuli that precess effectively independently. In previous investigations, torque-balance formulae have been used to predict where and when the disc breaks into distinct parts. In this work, focusing on discs with Keplerian rotation and where the shearing motions driving the radial communication of the warp are damped locally by turbulence (the `diffusive' regime), we investigate the stability of warped discs to determine the precise criterion for an isolated warped disc to break. We find and solve the dispersion relation, which, in general, yields three roots. We provide a comprehensive analysis of this viscous-warp instability and the emergent growth rates and their dependence on disc parameters. The physics of the instability can be understood as a combination of (1) a term that would generally encapsulate the classical Lightman-Eardley instability in planar discs (given by ∂(νΣ)/∂Σ < 0) but is here modified by the warp to include ∂(ν1|ψ|)/∂|ψ| < 0, and (2) a similar condition acting on the diffusion of the warp amplitude given in simplified form by ∂(ν2|ψ|)/∂|ψ| < 0. We discuss our findings in the context of discs with an imposed precession, and comment on the implications for different astrophysical systems.

  3. System Detects Vibrational Instabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozeman, Richard J., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Sustained vibrations at two critical frequencies trigger diagnostic response or shutdown. Vibration-analyzing electronic system detects instabilities of combustion in rocket engine. Controls pulse-mode firing of engine and identifies vibrations above threshold amplitude at 5.9 and/or 12kHz. Adapted to other detection and/or control schemes involving simultaneous real-time detection of signals above or below preset amplitudes at two or more specified frequencies. Potential applications include rotating machinery and encoders and decoders in security systems.

  4. Caries selective ablation: the handpiece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennig, Thomas; Rechmann, Peter; Holtermann, Andreas

    1995-05-01

    Caries selective ablation is fixed to a window of fluences predicted by the ablation thresholds of carious and healthy dentin, respectively. The aim of the study was to develop a dental handpiece which guarantees homogeneous fluence at the irradiated tooth surface. Furthermore the point of treatment should be cooled down without energy losses due to the cooling system. We suggest the direct coupling of the laser radiation into a laminar stream of liquid, which acts in turn as a lengthened beam guide. The impacts of the laser radiation and of the cooling medium fall exactly into the same point. Hot ablation debris is removed out of the crater by the flush of the water jet. Fluences are constant if the handpiece is used in contact mode or at a distance. Normally the surface of a bare fiber working in contact mode is destroyed after a few shots. Coupling the laser radiation into a stream of liquid prevents this destruction. Putting together the benefits of this special handpiece short overall treatment times seem to be possible. High average power can be applied to the tooth without the threat of thermal damage. Furthermore no time consuming cutting of the fiber prolongs the treatment time.

  5. Resonant Drag Instabilities in protoplanetary disks: the streaming instability and new, faster-growing instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Squire, Jonathan; Hopkins, Philip F.

    2018-04-01

    We identify and study a number of new, rapidly growing instabilities of dust grains in protoplanetary disks, which may be important for planetesimal formation. The study is based on the recognition that dust-gas mixtures are generically unstable to a Resonant Drag Instability (RDI), whenever the gas, absent dust, supports undamped linear modes. We show that the "streaming instability" is an RDI associated with epicyclic oscillations; this provides simple interpretations for its mechanisms and accurate analytic expressions for its growth rates and fastest-growing wavelengths. We extend this analysis to more general dust streaming motions and other waves, including buoyancy and magnetohydrodynamic oscillations, finding various new instabilities. Most importantly, we identify the disk "settling instability," which occurs as dust settles vertically into the midplane of a rotating disk. For small grains, this instability grows many orders of magnitude faster than the standard streaming instability, with a growth rate that is independent of grain size. Growth timescales for realistic dust-to-gas ratios are comparable to the disk orbital period, and the characteristic wavelengths are more than an order of magnitude larger than the streaming instability (allowing the instability to concentrate larger masses). This suggests that in the process of settling, dust will band into rings then filaments or clumps, potentially seeding dust traps, high-metallicity regions that in turn seed the streaming instability, or even overdensities that coagulate or directly collapse to planetesimals.

  6. Alternate energy sources for catheter ablation.

    PubMed

    Wang, P J; Homoud, M K; Link, M S; Estes III, N A

    1999-07-01

    Because of the limitations of conventional radiofrequency ablation in creating large or linear lesions, alternative energy sources have been used as possible methods of catheter ablation. Modified radiofrequency energy, cryoablation, and microwave, laser, and ultrasound technologies may be able to create longer, deeper, and more controlled lesions and may be particularly suited for the treatment of ventricular tachycardias and for linear atrial ablation. Future studies will establish the efficacy of these new and promising technologies.

  7. Emergency catheter ablation in critical patients

    PubMed Central

    Tebbenjohanns, Jürgen; Rühmkorf, Klaus

    2010-01-01

    Emergency catheter ablation is justified in critical patients with drug-refractory life-threatening arrhythmias. The procedure can be used for ablation of an accessory pathway in preexcitation syndrome with high risk of ventricular fibrillation and in patients with shock due to ischemic cardiomyopathy and incessant ventricular tachycardia. Emergency catheter ablation can also be justified in patients with an electrical storm of the implanted cardioverter-defibrillator or in patients with idiopathic ventricular fibrillation. PMID:20606793

  8. Study of cavitating inducer instabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, W. E.; Murphy, R.; Reddecliff, J. M.

    1972-01-01

    An analytic and experimental investigation into the causes and mechanisms of cavitating inducer instabilities was conducted. Hydrofoil cascade tests were performed, during which cavity sizes were measured. The measured data were used, along with inducer data and potential flow predictions, to refine an analysis for the prediction of inducer blade suction surface cavitation cavity volume. Cavity volume predictions were incorporated into a linearized system model, and instability predictions for an inducer water test loop were generated. Inducer tests were conducted and instability predictions correlated favorably with measured instability data.

  9. Instabilities in mimetic matter perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firouzjahi, Hassan; Gorji, Mohammad Ali; Mansoori, Seyed Ali Hosseini

    2017-07-01

    We study cosmological perturbations in mimetic matter scenario with a general higher derivative function. We calculate the quadratic action and show that both the kinetic term and the gradient term have the wrong sings. We perform the analysis in both comoving and Newtonian gauges and confirm that the Hamiltonians and the associated instabilities are consistent with each other in both gauges. The existence of instabilities is independent of the specific form of higher derivative function which generates gradients for mimetic field perturbations. It is verified that the ghost instability in mimetic perturbations is not associated with the higher derivative instabilities such as the Ostrogradsky ghost.

  10. Turbulence and instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belotserkovskii, Oleg

    2001-06-01

    The main principles for constructing of mathematical models for fully developed free shear turbulence and hydrodynamic instabilities are considered in the report. Such a “rational” modeling is applied for a variety of unsteady multidimensional problems. For the wide class of phenomena, by the large Reynolds numbers within the low-frequency and inertial intervals of turbulent motion, the effect of molecular viscosity and of the small elements of flow in the largest part of perturbation domain are not practically essential neither for the general characteristics of macroscopic structures of the flow developed, nor the flow pattern as a whole. This makes it possible not to take into consideration the effects of molecular viscosity when studying the dynamics of large vortices, and to implement the study of those on the basis of models of the ideal gas (using the methods of “rational” averaging, but without application of semi-empirical models of turbulence). Among the problems, which have been studied by such a way, there are those of the jet-type flow in the wake behind the body, the motions of ship frames with stern shearing, the formation of anterior stalling zones by the flow about blunted bodies with jets or needles directed to meet the flow, etc. As applications the problems of instability development and of spreading of smoke cloud from large-scale source of the fire are considered.

  11. ABLATIVE COMPOSITES FOR LIFTING REENTRY THERMAL PROTECTION.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    MECHANICAL PROPERTIES, THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY, ABLATION, DENSITY, TABLES(DATA), SPECIFIC HEAT, THERMOGRAVIMETRIC ANALYSIS, CORROSION RESISTANCE, COLORIMETRY , HEAT RESISTANT MATERIALS, ATMOSPHERE ENTRY.

  12. The simulation of shock- and impact-driven flows with Mie-Gruneisen equations of state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, Geoffrey M.

    An investigation of shock- and impact-driven flows with Mie-Gruneisen equation of state derived from a linear shock-particle speed Hugoniot relationship is presented. Cartesian mesh methods using structured adaptive refinement are applied to simulate several flows of interest in an Eulerian frame of reference. The flows central to the investigation include planar Richtmyer-Meshkov instability, the impact of a sphere with a plate, and an impact-driven Mach stem. First, for multicomponent shock-driven flows, a dimensionally unsplit, spatially high-order, hybrid, center-difference, limiter methodology is developed. Effective switching between center-difference and upwinding schemes is achieved by a set of robust tolerance and Lax-entropy-based criteria [49]. Oscillations that result from such a mixed stencil scheme are minimized by requiring that the upwinding method approaches the center-difference method in smooth regions. The solver is then applied to investigate planar Richtmyer-Meshkov instability in the context of an equation of state comparison. Comparisons of simulations with materials modeled by isotropic stress Mie-Gruneisen equations of state derived from a linear shock-particle speed Hugoniot relationship [36,52] to those of perfect gases are made with the intention of exposing the role of the equation of state. First, results for single- and triple-mode planar Richtmyer-Meshkov instability between mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB) and molybdenum modeled by Mie-Gruneisen equations of state are presented for the case of a reflected shock. The single-mode case is explored for incident shock Mach numbers of 1.5 and 2.5. Additionally, examined is single-mode Richtmyer-Meshkov instability when a reflected expansion wave is present for incident Mach numbers of 1.5 and 2.5. Comparison to perfect gas solutions in such cases yields a higher degree of similarity in start-up time and growth rate oscillations. Vorticity distribution and corrugation centerline shortly

  13. Analysis of iodinated contrast delivered during thermal ablation: is material trapped in the ablation zone?

    PubMed

    Wu, Po-Hung; Brace, Chris L

    2016-08-21

    Intra-procedural contrast-enhanced CT (CECT) has been proposed to evaluate treatment efficacy of thermal ablation. We hypothesized that contrast material delivered concurrently with thermal ablation may become trapped in the ablation zone, and set out to determine whether such an effect would impact ablation visualization. CECT images were acquired during microwave ablation in normal porcine liver with: (A) normal blood perfusion and no iodinated contrast, (B) normal perfusion and iodinated contrast infusion or (C) no blood perfusion and residual iodinated contrast. Changes in CT attenuation were analyzed from before, during and after ablation to evaluate whether contrast was trapped inside of the ablation zone. Visualization was compared between groups using post-ablation contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). Attenuation gradients were calculated at the ablation boundary and background to quantitate ablation conspicuity. In Group A, attenuation decreased during ablation due to thermal expansion of tissue water and water vaporization. The ablation zone was difficult to visualize (CNR  =  1.57  ±  0.73, boundary gradient  =  0.7  ±  0.4 HU mm(-1)), leading to ablation diameter underestimation compared to gross pathology. Group B ablations saw attenuation increase, suggesting that iodine was trapped inside the ablation zone. However, because the normally perfused liver increased even more, Group B ablations were more visible than Group A (CNR  =  2.04  ±  0.84, boundary gradient  =  6.3  ±  1.1 HU mm(-1)) and allowed accurate estimation of the ablation zone dimensions compared to gross pathology. Substantial water vaporization led to substantial attenuation changes in Group C, though the ablation zone boundary was not highly visible (boundary gradient  =  3.9  ±  1.1 HU mm(-1)). Our results demonstrate that despite iodinated contrast being trapped in the ablation zone, ablation visibility

  14. Relativistic electromagnetic ion cyclotron instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, K. R.; Huang, R. D.; Wang, J. C.; Chen, Y. Y.

    2005-03-01

    The relativistic instabilities of electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves driven by MeV ions are analytically and numerically studied. As caused by wave magnetic field and in sharp contrast to the electrostatic case, interesting characteristics such as Alfvénic behavior and instability transition are discovered and illuminated in detail. The instabilities are reactive and are raised from the coupling of slow ions’ first-order resonance and fast ions’ second-order resonance, that is an essential extra mechanism due to relativistic effect. Because of the wave magnetic field, the nonresonant plasma dielectric is usually negative and large, that affects the instability conditions and scaling laws. A negative harmonic cyclotron frequency mismatch between the fast and slow ions is required for driving a cubic (and a coupled quadratic) instability; the cubic (square) root scaling of the peak growth rate makes the relativistic effect more important than classical mechanism, especially for low fast ion density and Lorentz factor being close to unity. For the cubic instability, there is a threshold (ceiling) on the slow ion temperature and density (the external magnetic field and the fast ion energy); the Alfvén velocity is required to be low. This Alfvénic behavior is interesting in physics and important for its applications. The case of fast protons in thermal deuterons is numerically studied and compared with the analytical results. When the slow ion temperature or density (the external magnetic field or the fast ion energy) is increased (reduced) to about twice (half) the threshold (ceiling), the same growth rate peak transits from the cubic instability to the coupled quadratic instability and a different cubic instability branch appears. The instability transition is an interesting new phenomenon for instability.

  15. Perioral Rejuvenation With Ablative Erbium Resurfacing.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Joel L

    2015-11-01

    Since the introduction of the scanning full-field erbium laser, misconceptions regarding ablative erbium resurfacing have resulted in its being largely overshadowed by ablative fractional resurfacing. This case report illustrates the appropriateness of full-field erbium ablation for perioral resurfacing. A patient with profoundly severe perioral photodamage etched-in lines underwent full-field ablative perioral resurfacing with an erbium laser (Contour TRL, Sciton Inc., Palo Alto, CA) that allows separate control of ablation and coagulation. The pre-procedure consultations included evaluation of the severity of etched-in lines, and discussion of patient goals, expectations, and appropriate treatment options, as well as a review of patient photos and post-treatment care required. The author generally avoids full-field erbium ablation in patients with Fitzpatrick type IV and above. For each of 2 treatment sessions (separated by approximately 4 months), the patient received (12 cc plain 2% lidodaine) sulcus blocks before undergoing 4 passes with the erbium laser at 150 μ ablation, no coagulation, and then some very focal 30 μ ablation to areas of residual lines still visualized through the pinpoint bleeding. Similarly, full-field ablative resurfacing can be very reliable for significant wrinkles and creping in the lower eyelid skin--where often a single treatment of 80 μ ablation, 50 μ coagulation can lead to a nice improvement. Standardized digital imaging revealed significant improvement in deeply etched rhytides without significant adverse events. For appropriately selected patients requiring perioral (or periorbital) rejuvenation, full-field ablative erbium resurfacing is safe, efficacious and merits consideration.

  16. Neurocardiovascular Instability and Cognition

    PubMed Central

    O’Callaghan, Susan; Kenny, Rose Anne

    2016-01-01

    Neurocardiovascular instability (NCVI) refers to abnormal neural control of the cardiovascular system affecting blood pressure and heart rate behavior. Autonomic dysfunction and impaired cerebral autoregulation in aging contribute to this phenomenon characterized by hypotension and bradyarrhythmia. Ultimately, this increases the risk of falls and syncope in older people. NCVI is common in patients with neurodegenerative disorders including dementia. This review discusses the various syndromes that characterize NCVI icluding hypotension, carotid sinus hypersensitivity, postprandial hypotension and vasovagal syncope and how they may contribute to the aetiology of cognitive decline. Conversely, they may also be a consequence of a common neurodegenerative process. Regardless, recognition of their association is paramount in optimizing management of these patients. PMID:27505017

  17. Instability of liquid crystal elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Ning; Li, Meie; Zhou, Jinxiong

    2016-01-01

    Nematic liquid crystal elastomers (LCEs) contract in the director direction but expand in other directions, perpendicular to the director, when heated. If the expansion of an LCE is constrained, compressive stress builds up in the LCE, and it wrinkles or buckles to release the stored elastic energy. Although the instability of soft materials is ubiquitous, the mechanism and programmable modulation of LCE instability has not yet been fully explored. We describe a finite element method (FEM) scheme to model the inhomogeneous deformation and instability of LCEs. A constrained LCE beam working as a valve for microfluidic flow, and a piece of LCE laminated with a nanoscale poly(styrene) (PS) film are analyzed in detail. The former uses the buckling of the LCE beam to occlude the microfluidic channel, while the latter utilizes wrinkling or buckling to measure the mechanical properties of hard film or to realize self-folding. Through rigorous instability analysis, we predict the critical conditions for the onset of instability, the wavelength and amplitude evolution of instability, and the instability patterns. The FEM results are found to correlate well with analytical results and reported experiments. These efforts shed light on the understanding and exploitation of the instabilities of LCEs.

  18. Liquid propellant rocket combustion instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrje, D. T.

    1972-01-01

    The solution of problems of combustion instability for more effective communication between the various workers in this field is considered. The extent of combustion instability problems in liquid propellant rocket engines and recommendations for their solution are discussed. The most significant developments, both theoretical and experimental, are presented, with emphasis on fundamental principles and relationships between alternative approaches.

  19. Research on aviation fuel instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, C. E.; Bittker, D. A.; Cohen, S. M.; Seng, G. T.

    1983-01-01

    The underlying causes of fuel thermal degradation are discussed. Topics covered include: nature of fuel instability and its temperature dependence, methods of measuring the instability, chemical mechanisms involved in deposit formation, and instrumental methods for characterizing fuel deposits. Finally, some preliminary thoughts on design approaches for minimizing the effects of lowered thermal stability are briefly discussed.

  20. Jet formation in cerium metal to examine material strength

    DOE PAGES

    Jensen, B. J.; Cherne, F. J.; Prime, M. B.; ...

    2015-11-18

    Examining the evolution of material properties at extreme conditions advances our understanding of numerous high-pressure phenomena from natural events like meteorite impacts to general solid mechanics and fluid flow behavior. Some recent advances in synchrotron diagnostics coupled with dynamic compression platforms have introduced new possibilities for examining in-situ, spatially resolved material response with nanosecond time resolution. In this work, we examined jet formation from a Richtmyer-Meshkov instability in cerium initially shocked into a transient, high-pressure phase, and then released to a low-pressure, higher-temperature state. Cerium's rich phase diagram allows us to study the yield stress following a shock induced solid-solidmore » phase transition. X-ray imaging was used to obtain images of jet formation and evolution with 2–3 μm spatial resolution. And from these images, an analytic method was used to estimate the post-shock yield stress, and these results were compared to continuum calculations that incorporated an experimentally validated equation-of-state (EOS) for cerium coupled with a deviatoric strength model. Reasonable agreement was observed between the calculations and the data illustrating the sensitivity of jet formation on the yield stress values. Finally, the data and analysis shown here provide insight into material strength during dynamic loading which is expected to aid in the development of strength aware multi-phase EOS required to predict the response of matter at extreme conditions.« less

  1. Euler-Lagrange Simulations of Shock Wave-Particle Cloud Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koneru, Rahul; Rollin, Bertrand; Ouellet, Frederick; Park, Chanyoung; Balachandar, S.

    2017-11-01

    Numerical experiments of shock interacting with an evolving and fixed cloud of particles are performed. In these simulations we use Eulerian-Lagrangian approach along with state-of-the-art point-particle force and heat transfer models. As validation, we use Sandia Multiphase Shock Tube experiments and particle-resolved simulations. The particle curtain upon interaction with the shock wave is expected to experience Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) and Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instabilities. In the simulations evolving the particle cloud, the initial volume fraction profile matches with that of Sandia Multiphase Shock Tube experiments, and the shock Mach number is limited to M =1.66. Measurements of particle dispersion are made at different initial volume fractions. A detailed analysis of the influence of initial conditions on the evolution of the particle cloudis presented. The early time behavior of the models is studied in the fixed bed simulations at varying volume fractions and shock Mach numbers.The mean gas quantities are measured in the context of 1-way and 2-way coupled simulations. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Advanced Simulation and Computing Program, as a Cooperative Agreement under the Predictive Science Academic Alliance Program, Contract No. DE-NA0002378.

  2. Simulations of Shock Wave Interaction with a Particle Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koneru, Rahul; Rollin, Bertrand; Ouellet, Frederick; Annamalai, Subramanian; Balachandar, S.'Bala'

    2016-11-01

    Simulations of a shock wave interacting with a cloud of particles are performed in an attempt to understand similar phenomena observed in dispersal of solid particles under such extreme environment as an explosion. We conduct numerical experiments in which a particle curtain fills only 87% of the shock tube from bottom to top. As such, the particle curtain upon interaction with the shock wave is expected to experience Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) and Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instabilities. In this study, the initial volume fraction profile matches with that of Sandia Multiphase Shock Tube experiments, and the shock Mach number is limited to M =1.66. In these simulations we use a Eulerian-Lagrangian approach along with state-of-the-art point-particle force and heat transfer models. Measurements of particle dispersion are made at different initial volume fractions of the particle cloud. A detailed analysis of the evolution of the particle curtain with respect to the initial conditions is presented. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Advanced Simulation and Computing Program, as a Cooperative Agreement under the Predictive Science Academic Alliance Program, Contract No. DE-NA0002378.

  3. Simulations of material mixing in laser-driven reshock experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haines, Brian M.; Grinstein, Fernando F.; Welser-Sherrill, Leslie; Fincke, James R.

    2013-02-01

    We perform simulations of a laser-driven reshock experiment [Welser-Sherrill et al., High Energy Density Phys. (unpublished)] in the strong-shock high energy-density regime to better understand material mixing driven by the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability. Validation of the simulations is based on direct comparison of simulation and radiographic data. Simulations are also compared with published direct numerical simulation and the theory of homogeneous isotropic turbulence. Despite the fact that the flow is neither homogeneous, isotropic nor fully turbulent, there are local regions in which the flow demonstrates characteristics of homogeneous isotropic turbulence. We identify and isolate these regions by the presence of high levels of turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) and vorticity. After reshock, our analysis shows characteristics consistent with those of incompressible isotropic turbulence. Self-similarity and effective Reynolds number assessments suggest that the results are reasonably converged at the finest resolution. Our results show that in shock-driven transitional flows, turbulent features such as self-similarity and isotropy only fully develop once de-correlation, characteristic vorticity distributions, and integrated TKE, have decayed significantly. Finally, we use three-dimensional simulation results to test the performance of two-dimensional Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes simulations. In this context, we also test a presumed probability density function turbulent mixing model extensively used in combustion applications.

  4. Density-ratio effects on buoyancy-driven variable-density turbulent mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aslangil, Denis; Livescu, Daniel; Banerjee, Arindam

    2017-11-01

    Density-ratio effects on the turbulent mixing of two incompressible, miscible fluids with different densities subject to constant acceleration are studied by means of high-resolution Direct Numerical Simulations. In a triply periodic domain, turbulence is generated by stirring in response to the differential buoyancy forces within the flow. Later, as the fluids become molecularly mixed, dissipation starts to overcome turbulence generation by bouyancy. Thus, the flow evolution includes both turbulence growth and decay, and it displays features present in the core region of the mixing layer of the Rayleigh-Taylor as well as Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities. We extend the previous studies by investigating a broad range of density-ratio, from 1-14.4:1, corresponding to Atwood numbers of 0.05-0.87. Here, we focus on the Atwood number dependence of mixing-efficiency, that is defined based on the energy-conversion ratios from potential energy to total and turbulent kinetic energies, the decay characteristics of buoyancy-assisted variable-density homogeneous turbulence, and the effects of high density-ratios on the turbulence structure and mixing process. Authors acknowledge financial support from DOE-SSAA (DE-NA0003195) and NSF CAREER (#1453056) awards.

  5. Investigation of Surface Phenomena in Shocked Tin in Converging Geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Rousculp, Christopher L.; Oro, David Michael; Griego, Jeffrey Randall

    2016-03-21

    There is great interest in the behavior of the free surface of tin under shock loading. While it is known that meso-scale surface imperfections can seed the Richtmyer- Meshkov Instability (RMI) for a surface that is melted on release, much less is known about a tin surface that is solid, but plastically deforming. Here material properties such as shear and yield strength come into play especially in converging geometry. Previous experiments have been driven by direct contact HE. Usually a thin, flat target coupon is fielded with various single-mode, sinusoidal, machined, profiles on the free surface. The free surface ismore » adjacent to either vacuum or an inert receiver gas. Most of these previous driver/target configurations have been nominal planer geometry. With modern HE it has been straightforward to shock tin into melt on release. However it has been challenging to achieve a low enough pressure for solid state on release. Here we propose to extend the existing base of knowledge to include the behavior of the free surface of tin in cylindrical converging geometry. By shock loading a cylindrical tin shell with a magnetically driven cylindrical liner impactor, the free surface evolution can be diagnosed with proton radiography. With the PHELIX capacitor bank, the drive can easily be varied to span the pressure range to achieve solid, mixed, and liquid states on release. A conceptual cylindrical liner and target is shown in Figure 1.« less

  6. Cren(ulation)-­1,2 Preshot Report

    SciTech Connect

    Rousculp, Christopher L.; Oro, David Michael; Griego, Jeffrey Randall

    2015-12-21

    There is great interest in the behavior of the free surface of tin under shock loading. While it is known that meso-scale surface imperfections can seed the RichtmyerMeshkov Instability (RMI) for a surface that is melted on release, much less is known about a tin surface that is solid, but plastically deforming. Here material properties such as shear and yield strength come into play especially in converging geometry. Previous experiments have been driven by direct contact HE. Usually a thin, flat target coupon is fielded with various single-mode, sinusoidal, machined, profiles on the free surface. The free surface is adjacentmore » to either vacuum or an inert receiver gas. Most of these previous driver/target configurations have been nominal planer geometry. With modern HE it has been straightforward to shock tin into melt on release. However it has been challenging to achieve a low enough pressure for solid state on release. Here we propose to extend the existing base of knowledge to include the behavior of the free surface of tin in cylindrical converging geometry. By shock loading a cylindrical tin shell with a magnetically driven cylindrical liner impactor, the free surface evolution can be diagnosed with proton radiography. With the PHELIX capacitor bank, the drive can easily be varied to span the pressure range to achieve solid, mixed, and liquid states on release.« less

  7. Investigation of Surface Phenomena in Shocked Tin in Converging Geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Rousculp, Christopher L.; Oro, David Michael; Margolin, Len G.

    2015-08-06

    There is great interest in the behavior of the free surface of tin under shock loading. While it is known that meso-scale surface imperfections can seed the Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability (RMI) for a surface that is melted on release, much less is known about a tin surface that is solid, but plastically deforming. Here material properties such as shear and yield strength come into play especially in converging geometry. Previous experiments have been driven by direct contact HE. Usually a thin, flat target coupon is fielded with various single-mode, sinusoidal, machined, profiles on the free surface. The free surface is adjacentmore » to either vacuum or an inert receiver gas. Most of these previous driver/target configurations have been nominal planer geometry. With modern HE it has been straightforward to shock tin into melt on release. However it has been challenging to achieve a low enough pressure for solid state on release. Here we propose to extend the existing base of knowledge to include the behavior of the free surface of tin in cylindrical converging geometry. By shock loading a cylindrical tin shell with a magnetically driven cylindrical liner impactor, the free surface evolution can be diagnosed with proton radiography. With the PHELIX capacitor bank, the drive can easily be varied to span the pressure range to achieve solid, mixed, and liquid states on release.« less

  8. A 2D and 3D Code Comparison of Turbulent Mixing in Spherical Implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flaig, Markus; Thornber, Ben; Grieves, Brian; Youngs, David; Williams, Robin; Clark, Dan; Weber, Chris

    2016-10-01

    Turbulent mixing due to Richtmyer-Meshkov and Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities has proven to be a major obstacle on the way to achieving ignition in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions. Numerical simulations are an important tool for understanding the mixing process, however, the results of such simulations depend on the choice of grid geometry and the numerical scheme used. In order to clarify this issue, we compare the simulation codes FLASH, TURMOIL, HYDRA, MIRANDA and FLAMENCO for the problem of the growth of single- and multi-mode perturbations on the inner interface of a dense imploding shell. We consider two setups: A single-shock setup with a convergence ratio of 4, as well as a higher convergence multi-shock setup that mimics a typical NIF mixcap experiment. We employ both singlemode and ICF-like broadband perturbations. We find good agreement between all codes concerning the evolution of the mix layer width, however, the are differences in the small scale mixing. We also develop a Bell-Plesset model that is able to predict the mix layer width and find excellent agreement with the simulation results. This work was supported by resources provided by the Pawsey Supercomputing Centre with funding from the Australian Government.

  9. Proton radiography measurements and models of ejecta structure in shocked Sn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammerberg, J. E.; Buttler, W. T.; Llobet, A.; Morris, C.; Goett, J.; Manzanares, R.; Saunders, A.; Schmidt, D.; Tainter, A.; Vogan-McNeil, W.; Wilde, C.

    2017-06-01

    We discuss experimental validation of ejecta source mass and velocity models using proton radiography. We have performed ejecta measurements at the Los Alamos proton radiography facility on 7 mm thick 81 mm diameter Sn samples driven with a plane-wave high explosive lens (PBX9501 + TNT). The surface of the Sn, in contact with He gas at an initial pressure of 7 atmospheres, was machined to have 4 concentric sinusoidal features with a wavelength of λ = 2 mm in the radial direction and amplitude h0 = 0.159 mm (kh0 = 2 πh0 / λ = 0.5). The shock pressure was 27 GPa. 42 images were obtained between 0 and 14 μs from the time of shock breakout at 275 and 400 ns intervals. The Abel inverted density profiles evolve to a self-similar density distribution that depends on a scaling variable z /vs t where vs is the spike tip velocity, z is the distance from the free surface and t is the time after shock breakout. Both the density profiles and the time dependence of the mass per unit area in the evolving spikes are in good agreement with a Richtmyer-Meshkov instability based model for ejecta production and evolution. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Dept. of Energy under contract DE-AC52-06NA25396. The support of the LANL ASC-PEM and Science Campaign 2 programs is gratefully acknowledged.

  10. Proton radiography measurements of ejecta structure in shocked Sn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammerberg, J. E.; Buttler, W. T.; Llobet, A.; Morris, C.

    We have performed ejecta measurements at the Los Alamos proton radiography facility on 7 mm thick 50 mm diameter Sn samples driven with a PBX9501 high explosive. The surface of the Sn, in contact with He gas at an initial pressure of 7 atmospheres, was machined to have 3 concentric sinusoidal features with a wavelength of λ = 2mm in the radial direction and amplitude h0 = 0.159mm (kh0 = 2 πh0/ λ = 0.5). The shock pressure was 27 GPa. 28 images were obtained between 0 and 14 μs from the time of shock breakout at 500 ns intervals. The Abel inverted density profiles evolve to a self-similar density distribution that depends on a scaling variable z/vst where vs is the spike tip velocity, z is the distance from the free surface and t is the time after shock breakout. Both the density profiles and the time dependence of the mass per unit area in the evolving spikes are in good agreement with a Richtmyer-Meshkov instability based model for ejecta production and evolution. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Dept. of Energy under contract DE-AC52-06NA25396. The support of the LANL ASC- PEM and Science Campaign 2 programs is gratefully acknowledged.

  11. Experimental study on a heavy-gas cylinder accelerated by cylindrical converging shock waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Si, T.; Zhai, Z.; Luo, X.; Yang, J.

    2014-01-01

    The Richtmyer-Meshkov instability behavior of a heavy-gas cylinder accelerated by a cylindrical converging shock wave is studied experimentally. A curved wall profile is well-designed based on the shock dynamics theory [Phys. Fluids, 22: 041701 (2010)] with an incident planar shock Mach number of 1.2 and a converging angle of in a mm square cross-section shock tube. The cylinder mixed with the glycol droplets flows vertically through the test section and is illuminated horizontally by a laser sheet. The images obtained only one per run by an ICCD (intensified charge coupled device) combined with a pulsed Nd:YAG laser are first presented and the complete evolution process of the cylinder is then captured in a single test shot by a high-speed video camera combined with a high-power continuous laser. In this way, both the developments of the first counter-rotating vortex pair and the second counter-rotating vortex pair with an opposite rotating direction from the first one are observed. The experimental results indicate that the phenomena induced by the converging shock wave and the reflected shock formed from the center of convergence are distinct from those found in the planar shock case.

  12. (U) An Analytic Examination of Piezoelectric Ejecta Mass Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Tregillis, Ian Lee

    2017-02-02

    Ongoing efforts to validate a Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI) based ejecta source model [1, 2, 3] in LANL ASC codes use ejecta areal masses derived from piezoelectric sensor data [4, 5, 6]. However, the standard technique for inferring masses from sensor voltages implicitly assumes instantaneous ejecta creation [7], which is not a feature of the RMI source model. To investigate the impact of this discrepancy, we define separate “areal mass functions” (AMFs) at the source and sensor in terms of typically unknown distribution functions for the ejecta particles, and derive an analytic relationship between them. Then, for the case of single-shockmore » ejection into vacuum, we use the AMFs to compare the analytic (or “true”) accumulated mass at the sensor with the value that would be inferred from piezoelectric voltage measurements. We confirm the inferred mass is correct when creation is instantaneous, and furthermore prove that when creation is not instantaneous, the inferred values will always overestimate the true mass. Finally, we derive an upper bound for the error imposed on a perfect system by the assumption of instantaneous ejecta creation. When applied to shots in the published literature, this bound is frequently less than several percent. Errors exceeding 15% may require velocities or timescales at odds with experimental observations.« less

  13. Three- and Two- Dimensional Simulations of Re-shock Experiments at High Energy Densities at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ping; Raman, Kumar; MacLaren, Stephan; Huntington, Channing; Nagel, Sabrina

    2016-10-01

    We present simulations of recent high-energy-density (HED) re-shock experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The experiments study the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) and Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instability growth that occurs after successive shocks transit a sinusoidally-perturbed interface between materials of different densities. The shock tube is driven at one or both ends using indirect-drive laser cavities or hohlraums. X-ray area-backlit imaging is used to visualize the growth at different times. Our simulations are done with the three-dimensional, radiation hydrodynamics code ARES, developed at LLNL. We show the instabilitygrowth rate, inferred from the experimental radiographs, agrees well with our 2D and 3D simulations. We also discuss some 3D geometrical effects, suggested by our simulations, which could deteriorate the images at late times, unless properly accounted for in the experiment design. Work supported by U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE- AC52-06NA27279. LLNL-ABS-680789.

  14. Investigation of Atwood ratio influence on turbulent mixing transition of a shock-driven variable density flow after reshock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohaghar, Mohammad; Carter, John; Pathikonda, Gokul; Ranjan, Devesh

    2017-11-01

    The current study experimentally investigates the influence of the initial Atwood ratio (At) on the evolution of Richtmyer-Meshkov instability at the Georgia Tech Shock Tube and Advanced Mixing Laboratory. Two Atwood numbers (At =0.22 and 0.67) are studied, which correspond to the gas combinations of nitrogen seeded with acetone vapor (light) over carbon dioxide (heavy) and same light gas over sulfur hexafluoride (heavy) respectively. A perturbed, multi-mode, inclined interface (with an amplitude to wavelength ratio of 0.088) is impulsively accelerated by the incident shock traveling vertically from light to heavy gas with a Mach number 1.55. The effect of Atwood ratio on turbulent mixing transition after reshock at the same non-dimensional times between the two cases is examined through ensemble-averaged turbulence statistics from simultaneous planar laser induced uorescence (PLIF) and particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements. Preliminary studies over the smaller Atwood number indicates that turbulent mixing transition criteria can be satisfied after reshock. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation CAREER Award No. 1451994.

  15. Numerical simulations of the process of multiple shock-flame interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Hua; Dong, Gang; chen, Xiao; Wu, Jin-Tao

    2016-08-01

    Based on a weighted essentially nonoscillatory scheme, the multiple interactions of a flame interface with an incident shock wave and its reshock waves are numerically simulated by solving the compressible reactive Navier-Stokes equations with a single-step Arrhenius chemical reaction. The two-dimensional sinusoidally perturbed premixed flames with different initial perturbed amplitudes are used to investigate the effect of the initial perturbation on the flame evolutions. The results show that the development of the flame interface is directly affected by the initial perturbed amplitudes before the passages of reshock waves, and the perturbation development is mainly controlled by the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI). After the successive impacts of multiple reshock waves, the chemical reaction accelerates the consumption of reactants and leads to a gradual disappearance of the initial perturbed information. The perturbation developments in frozen flows with the same initial interface as those in reactive flows are also demonstrated. Comparisons of results between the reactive and frozen flows show that a chemical reaction changes the perturbation pattern of the flame interface by decreasing the density gradient, thereby weakening the baroclinic torque in the flame mixing region, and therefore plays a dominant role after the passage of reshock waves.

  16. Laser plasma instability experiments with KrF lasersa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, J. L.; Oh, J.; Afeyan, B.; Phillips, L.; Seely, J.; Feldman, U.; Brown, C.; Karasik, M.; Serlin, V.; Aglitskiy, Y.; Mostovych, A. N.; Holland, G.; Obenschain, S.; Chan, L.-Y.; Kehne, D.; Lehmberg, R. H.; Schmitt, A. J.; Colombant, D.; Velikovich, A.

    2007-05-01

    Deleterious effects of laser-plasma instability (LPI) may limit the maximum laser irradiation that can be used for inertial confinement fusion. The short wavelength (248nm), large bandwidth, and very uniform illumination available with krypton-fluoride (KrF) lasers should increase the maximum usable intensity by suppressing LPI. The concomitant increase in ablation pressure would allow implosion of low-aspect-ratio pellets to ignition with substantial gain (>20) at much reduced laser energy. The proposed KrF-laser-based Fusion Test Facility (FTF) would exploit this strategy to achieve significant fusion power (150MW) with a rep-rate system that has a per pulse laser energy well below 1 MJ. Measurements of LPI using the Nike KrF laser are presented at and above intensities needed for the FTF (I˜2×1015W/cm2). The results to date indicate that LPI is indeed suppressed. With overlapped beam intensity above the planar, single beam intensity threshold for the two-plasmon decay instability, no evidence of instability was observed via measurements of 3/2ωo and 1/2ωo harmonic emissions.

  17. Internal rotor friction instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walton, J.; Artiles, A.; Lund, J.; Dill, J.; Zorzi, E.

    1990-01-01

    The analytical developments and experimental investigations performed in assessing the effect of internal friction on rotor systems dynamic performance are documented. Analytical component models for axial splines, Curvic splines, and interference fit joints commonly found in modern high speed turbomachinery were developed. Rotor systems operating above a bending critical speed were shown to exhibit unstable subsynchronous vibrations at the first natural frequency. The effect of speed, bearing stiffness, joint stiffness, external damping, torque, and coefficient of friction, was evaluated. Testing included material coefficient of friction evaluations, component joint quantity and form of damping determinations, and rotordynamic stability assessments. Under conditions similar to those in the SSME turbopumps, material interfaces experienced a coefficient of friction of approx. 0.2 for lubricated and 0.8 for unlubricated conditions. The damping observed in the component joints displayed nearly linear behavior with increasing amplitude. Thus, the measured damping, as a function of amplitude, is not represented by either linear or Coulomb friction damper models. Rotordynamic testing of an axial spline joint under 5000 in.-lb of static torque, demonstrated the presence of an extremely severe instability when the rotor was operated above its first flexible natural frequency. The presence of this instability was predicted by nonlinear rotordynamic time-transient analysis using the nonlinear component model developed under this program. Corresponding rotordynamic testing of a shaft with an interference fit joint demonstrated the presence of subsynchronous vibrations at the first natural frequency. While subsynchronous vibrations were observed, they were bounded and significantly lower in amplitude than the synchronous vibrations.

  18. Seeding of capsule instability growth by fill tubes and support rods for inertial confinement fusion implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macphee, Andrew; Casey, Daniel; Clark, Daniel; Field, John; Haan, Steven; Hammel, Bruce; Kroll, Jeremy; Landen, Otto; Martinez, David; Milovich, Jose; Nikroo, Abbas; Rice, Neal; Robey, Harry; Smalyuk, Vladimir; Stadermann, Michael; Weber, Christopher; Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Collaboration; Atomics Collaboration, General

    2016-10-01

    Features associated with the target support tent and deuterium-tritium fuel fill tube and support rods can seed hydrodynamic instabilities leading to degraded performance for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments at the National Ignition Facility. We performed in-flight radiography of ICF capsules in the vicinity of the capsule support tent and fill tube surrogates to investigate instability growth associated with these features. For both plastic and high density carbon ablators, the shadow of the 10 μm diameter glass fill-tube cast by the x-ray spots on the hohlraum wall were observed to imprint radial instabilities around the fill tube/capsule interface. Similarly, instability growth was observed for the shadow cast by 12 μm diameter silicon carbide capsule support rods mounted orthogonal to the fill tube as a tent alternative for a plastic ablator. The orientation of the shadows is consistent with raytracing. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  19. Fingering instability of Bingham fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghadge, Shilpa; Myers, Tim

    2005-11-01

    Contact line instabilities have been extensively studied and many useful results obtained for industrial applications. Our research in this area is to explore these instabilities for non-Newtonian fluids which has wide scope in geological, biological as well as industrial areas. In this talk, we will present an analysis of fingering instability near a contact line of the thin sheet of fluid flowing down on a moderately inclined plane. This instability has been well studied for Newtonian fluids. We explore the effect of a yield strength of the fluid on this instability. We have conveniently assumed the presence of the precussor film of small thickness ahead of the fluid film to avoid some mathematical singularities. Using a lubrication-type approximation, we perform a linear stability analysis of a straight contact line. We will show comparison with some experimental results using suspensions of kaolin in silicone oil as a yield strength fluid.

  20. Gravitational Instabilities in Circumstellar Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kratter, Kaitlin; Lodato, Giuseppe

    2016-09-01

    Star and planet formation are the complex outcomes of gravitational collapse and angular momentum transport mediated by protostellar and protoplanetary disks. In this review, we focus on the role of gravitational instability in this process. We begin with a brief overview of the observational evidence for massive disks that might be subject to gravitational instability and then highlight the diverse ways in which the instability manifests itself in protostellar and protoplanetary disks: the generation of spiral arms, small-scale turbulence-like density fluctuations, and fragmentation of the disk itself. We present the analytic theory that describes the linear growth phase of the instability supplemented with a survey of numerical simulations that aim to capture the nonlinear evolution. We emphasize the role of thermodynamics and large-scale infall in controlling the outcome of the instability. Despite apparent controversies in the literature, we show a remarkable level of agreement between analytic predictions and numerical results. In the next part of our review, we focus on the astrophysical consequences of the instability. We show that the disks most likely to be gravitationally unstable are young and relatively massive compared with their host star, Md/M*≥0.1. They will develop quasi-stable spiral arms that process infall from the background cloud. Although instability is less likely at later times, once infall becomes less important, the manifestations of the instability are more varied. In this regime, the disk thermodynamics, often regulated by stellar irradiation, dictates the development and evolution of the instability. In some cases the instability may lead to fragmentation into bound companions. These companions are more likely to be brown dwarfs or stars than planetary mass objects. Finally, we highlight open questions related to the development of a turbulent cascade in thin disks and the role of mode-mode coupling in setting the maximum angular

  1. Thermal shrinkage for shoulder instability.

    PubMed

    Toth, Alison P; Warren, Russell F; Petrigliano, Frank A; Doward, David A; Cordasco, Frank A; Altchek, David W; O'Brien, Stephen J

    2011-07-01

    Thermal capsular shrinkage was popular for the treatment of shoulder instability, despite a paucity of outcomes data in the literature defining the indications for this procedure or supporting its long-term efficacy. The purpose of this study was to perform a clinical evaluation of radiofrequency thermal capsular shrinkage for the treatment of shoulder instability, with a minimum 2-year follow-up. From 1999 to 2001, 101 consecutive patients with mild to moderate shoulder instability underwent shoulder stabilization surgery with thermal capsular shrinkage using a monopolar radiofrequency device. Follow-up included a subjective outcome questionnaire, discussion of pain, instability, and activity level. Mean follow-up was 3.3 years (range 2.0-4.7 years). The thermal capsular shrinkage procedure failed due to instability and/or pain in 31% of shoulders at a mean time of 39 months. In patients with unidirectional anterior instability and those with concomitant labral repair, the procedure proved effective. Patients with multidirectional instability had moderate success. In contrast, four of five patients with isolated posterior instability failed. Thermal capsular shrinkage has been advocated for the treatment of shoulder instability, particularly mild to moderate capsular laxity. The ease of the procedure makes it attractive. However, our retrospective review revealed an overall failure rate of 31% in 80 patients with 2-year minimum follow-up. This mid- to long-term cohort study adds to the literature lacking support for thermal capsulorrhaphy in general, particularly posterior instability. The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s11420-010-9187-7) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.

  2. Possible role for cryoballoon ablation of right atrial appendage tachycardia when conventional ablation fails.

    PubMed

    Amasyali, Basri; Kilic, Ayhan

    2015-06-01

    Focal atrial tachycardia arising from the right atrial appendage usually responds well to radiofrequency ablation; however, successful ablation in this anatomic region can be challenging. Surgical excision of the right atrial appendage has sometimes been necessary to eliminate the tachycardia and prevent or reverse the resultant cardiomyopathy. We report the case of a 48-year-old man who had right atrial appendage tachycardia resistant to multiple attempts at ablation with use of conventional radiofrequency energy guided by means of a 3-dimensional mapping system. The condition led to cardiomyopathy in 3 months. The arrhythmia was successfully ablated with use of a 28-mm cryoballoon catheter that had originally been developed for catheter ablation of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. To our knowledge, this is the first report of cryoballoon ablation without isolation of the right atrial appendage. It might also be an alternative to epicardial ablation or surgery when refractory atrial tachycardia originates from the right atrial appendage.

  3. Instability timescale for the inclination instability in the solar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zderic, Alexander; Madigan, Ann-Marie; Fleisig, Jacob

    2018-04-01

    The gravitational influence of small bodies is often neglected in the study of solar system dynamics. However, this is not always an appropriate assumption. For example, mutual secular torques between low mass particles on eccentric orbits can result in a self-gravity instability (`inclination instability'; Madigan & McCourt 2016). During the instability, inclinations increase exponentially, eccentricities decrease (detachment), and orbits cluster in argument of perihelion. In the solar system, the orbits of the most distant objects show all three of these characteristics (high inclination: Volk & Malhotra (2017), detachment: Delsanti & Jewitt (2006), and argument of perihelion clustering: Trujillo & Sheppard (2014)). The inclination instability is a natural explanation for these phenomena.Unfortunately, full N-body simulations of the solar system are unfeasible (N ≈ O(1012)), and the behavior of the instability depends on N, prohibiting the direct application of lower N simulations. Here we present the instability timescale's functional dependence on N, allowing us to extrapolate our simulation results to that appropriate for the solar system. We show that ~5 MEarth of small icy bodies in the Sedna region is sufficient for the inclination instability to occur in the outer solar system.

  4. Applications of laser ablation to microengineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gower, Malcolm C.; Rizvi, Nadeem H.

    2000-08-01

    Applications of pulsed laser ablation to the manufacture of micro- electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) and micro-opto-electro-mechanical systems (MOEMS) devices are presented. Laser ablative processes used to manufacture a variety of microsystems technology (MST) components in the computer peripheral, sensing and biomedical industries are described together with a view of some future developments.

  5. Testing and evaluation of light ablation decontamination

    SciTech Connect

    Demmer, R.L.; Ferguson, R.L.

    1994-10-01

    This report details the testing and evaluation of light ablation decontamination. It details WINCO contracted research and application of light ablation efforts by Ames Laboratory. Tests were conducted with SIMCON (simulated contamination) coupons and REALCON (actual radioactive metal coupons) under controlled conditions to compare cleaning effectiveness, speed and application to plant process type equipment.

  6. Experimental Observation of Thin-shell Instability in a Collisionless Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, H.; Doria, D.; Dieckmann, M. E.; Sarri, G.; Romagnani, L.; Bret, A.; Cerchez, M.; Giesecke, A. L.; Ianni, E.; Kar, S.; Notley, M.; Prasad, R.; Quinn, K.; Willi, O.; Borghesi, M.

    2017-01-01

    We report on the experimental observation of the instability of a plasma shell, which formed during the expansion of a laser-ablated plasma into a rarefied ambient medium. By means of a proton radiography technique, the evolution of the instability is temporally and spatially resolved on a timescale much shorter than the hydrodynamic one. The density of the thin shell exceeds that of the surrounding plasma, which lets electrons diffuse outward. An ambipolar electric field grows on both sides of the thin shell that is antiparallel to the density gradient. Ripples in the thin shell result in a spatially varying balance between the thermal pressure force mediated by this field and the ram pressure force that is exerted on it by the inflowing plasma. This mismatch amplifies the ripples by the same mechanism that drives the hydrodynamic nonlinear thin-shell instability (NTSI). Our results thus constitute the first experimental verification that the NTSI can develop in colliding flows.

  7. Radiofrequency ablation versus electrocautery in tonsillectomy.

    PubMed

    Hall, Daniel J; Littlefield, Philip D; Birkmire-Peters, Deborah P; Holtel, Michael R

    2004-03-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the safety, difficulty of removal, and postoperative pain profile of radiofrequency ablation versus standard electrocautery removal of tonsils. A prospective, blinded study was designed to remove 1 tonsil with each of the 2 methods. Time of operation, estimated blood loss, difficulty of operation, postoperative pain, rate of postoperative hemorrhage, and the patient's preferred technique were evaluated. The operating time was significantly longer (P < 0.007) and the patients reported significantly less pain (P < 0.001) with radiofrequency ablation. There were no differences in blood loss, difficulty of operation, or postoperative hemorrhage rates. The patients preferred the radiofrequency ablation technique (P < 0.001). Radiofrequency ablation is a viable method to remove tonsillar tissue. Operating time for this procedure will likely decrease with experience. There was significantly less pain reported with radiofrequency ablation compared with standard electrocautery.

  8. Artificial meteor ablation studies - Iron oxides.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, M. B.

    1972-01-01

    Artificial meteor ablation was performed on natural minerals composed predominantly of magnetite and hematite by using an arc-heated plasma stream of air. Analysis indicates that most of the ablated debris was composed of two or more minerals. Wustite, a metastable mineral, was found to occur as a common product. The 'magnetite' sample, which was 80% magnetite, 14% hematite, 4% apatite, and 2% quartz, yielded ablated products consisting of more than 12 different minerals. Magnetite occurred in 91% of the specimens examined, hematite in 16%, and wustite in 30%. The 'hematite' sample, which was 96% hematite and 3% quartz, yielded ablated products consisting of more than 13 different minerals. Hematite occurred in 47% of the specimens examined, magnetite in 60%, and wustite in 28%. The more volatile elements (Si, P, and Cl) were depleted by about 50%. This study has shown that artificially created ablation products from iron oxides exhibit unique properties that can be used for identification.

  9. Stellar Ablation of Planetary Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Thomas E.; Horwitz, J. L.

    2007-01-01

    We review observations and theories of the solar ablation of planetary atmospheres, focusing on the terrestrial case where a large magnetosphere holds off the solar wind, so that there is little direct atmospheric impact, but also couples the solar wind electromagnetically to the auroral zones. We consider the photothermal escape flows known as the polar wind or refilling flows, the enhanced mass flux escape flows that result from localized solar wind energy dissipation in the auroral zones, and the resultant enhanced neutral atom escape flows. We term these latter two escape flows the "auroral wind." We review observations and theories of the heating and acceleration of auroral winds, including energy inputs from precipitating particles, electromagnetic energy flux at magnetohydrodynamic and plasma wave frequencies, and acceleration by parallel electric fields and by convection pickup processes also known as "centrifugal acceleration." We consider also the global circulation of ionospheric plasmas within the magnetosphere, their participation in magnetospheric disturbances as absorbers of momentum and energy, and their ultimate loss from the magnetosphere into the downstream solar wind, loading reconnection processes that occur at high altitudes near the magnetospheric boundaries. We consider the role of planetary magnetization and the accumulating evidence of stellar ablation of extrasolar planetary atmospheres. Finally, we suggest and discuss future needs for both the theory and observation of the planetary ionospheres and their role in solar wind interactions, to achieve the generality required for a predictive science of the coupling of stellar and planetary atmospheres over the full range of possible conditions.

  10. Femtosecond ablation of ultrahard materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumitru, G.; Romano, V.; Weber, H. P.; Sentis, M.; Marine, W.

    Several ultrahard materials and coatings of definite interest for tribological applications were tested with respect to their response when irradiated with fs laser pulses. Results on cemented tungsten carbide and on titanium carbonitride are reported for the first time and compared with outcomes of investigations on diamond and titanium nitride. The experiments were carried out in air, in a regime of 5-8 J/cm2 fluences, using the beam of a commercial Ti:sapphire laser. The changes induced in the surface morphology were analysed with a Nomarski optical microscope, and with SEM and AFM techniques. From the experimental data and from the calculated incident energy density distributions, the damage and ablation threshold values were determined. As expected, the diamond showed the highest threshold, while the cemented tungsten carbide exhibited typical values for metallic surfaces. The ablation rates determined (under the above-mentioned experimental conditions) were in the range 0.1-0.2 μm per pulse for all the materials investigated.

  11. Ablative shielding for hypervelocity projectiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rucker, Michelle A. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A hypervelocity projectile shield which includes a hollow semi-flexible housing fabricated from a plastic like, or otherwise transparent membrane which is filled with a fluid (gas or liquid) is presented. The housing has a inlet valve, similar to that on a tire or basketball, to introduce an ablating fluid into the housing. The housing is attached by a Velcro mount or double-sided adhesive tape to the outside surface of a structure to be protected. The housings are arrayed in a side-by-side relationship for complete coverage of the surface to be protected. In use, when a hypervelocity projectile penetrates the outer wall of a housing it is broken up and then the projectile is ablated as it travels through the fluid, much like a meteorite 'burns up' as it enters the earth's atmosphere, and the housing is deflated. The deflated housing can be easily spotted for replacement, even from a distance. Replacement is then accomplished by simply pulling a deflated housing off the structure and installing a new housing.

  12. Percutaneous Microwave Ablation of Renal Angiomyolipomas.

    PubMed

    Cristescu, Mircea; Abel, E Jason; Wells, Shane; Ziemlewicz, Timothy J; Hedican, Sean P; Lubner, Megan G; Hinshaw, J Louis; Brace, Christopher L; Lee, Fred T

    2016-03-01

    To evaluate the safety and efficacy of US-guided percutaneous microwave (MW) ablation in the treatment of renal angiomyolipoma (AML). From January 2011 to April 2014, seven patients (5 females and 2 males; mean age 51.4) with 11 renal AMLs (9 sporadic type and 2 tuberous sclerosis associated) with a mean size of 3.4 ± 0.7 cm (range 2.4-4.9 cm) were treated with high-powered, gas-cooled percutaneous MW ablation under US guidance. Tumoral diameter, volume, and CT/MR enhancement were measured on pre-treatment, immediate post-ablation, and delayed post-ablation imaging. Clinical symptoms and creatinine were assessed on follow-up visits. All ablations were technically successful and no major complications were encountered. Mean ablation parameters were ablation power of 65 W (range 60-70 W), using 456 mL of hydrodissection fluid per patient, over 4.7 min (range 3-8 min). Immediate post-ablation imaging demonstrated mean tumor diameter and volume decreases of 1.8% (3.4-3.3 cm) and 1.7% (27.5-26.3 cm(3)), respectively. Delayed imaging follow-up obtained at a mean interval of 23.1 months (median 17.6; range 9-47) demonstrated mean tumor diameter and volume decreases of 29% (3.4-2.4 cm) and 47% (27.5-12.1 cm(3)), respectively. Tumoral enhancement decreased on immediate post-procedure and delayed imaging by CT/MR parameters, indicating decreased tumor vascularity. No patients required additional intervention and no patients experienced spontaneous bleeding post-ablation. Our early experience with high-powered, gas-cooled percutaneous MW ablation demonstrates it to be a safe and effective modality to devascularize and decrease the size of renal AMLs.

  13. Machining of Two-Dimensional Sinusoidal Defects on Ignition-Type Capsules to Study Hydrodynamic Instability at the National Ignition Facility

    DOE PAGES

    Giraldez, E. M.; Hoppe Jr., M. L.; Hoover, D. E.; ...

    2016-07-07

    Hydrodynamic instability growth and its effects on capsule implosion performance are being studied at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Experimental results have shown that low-mode instabilities are the primary culprit for yield degradation. Ignition type capsules with machined 2D sinusoidal defects were used to measure low-mode hydrodynamic instability growth in the acceleration phase of the capsule implosion. The capsules were imploded using ignition-relevant laser pulses and the ablation-front modulation growth was measured using x-ray radiography. The experimentally measured growth was in good agreement with simulations.

  14. Longitudinal instability of the forearm.

    PubMed

    Phadnis, J; Watts, A C

    2016-10-01

    The Essex Lopresti lesion is a rare triad of injury to the radial head, interosseous membrane of the forearm and distal radio-ulnar joint, which results in longitudinal instability of the radius. If unrecognized this leads to chronic pain and disability which is difficult to salvage. Early recognition and appropriate treatment is therefore desirable to prevent long-term problems. The aim of this article is to review the pathoanatomy of longitudinal radius instability and use the existing literature and authors' experience to provide recommendations for recognition and treatment of acute and chronic forearm instability, including description of the author's technique for interosseous membrane reconstruction.

  15. Instabilities in mimetic matter perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    Firouzjahi, Hassan; Gorji, Mohammad Ali; Mansoori, Seyed Ali Hosseini, E-mail: firouz@ipm.ir, E-mail: gorji@ipm.ir, E-mail: shosseini@shahroodut.ac.ir, E-mail: shossein@ipm.ir

    2017-07-01

    We study cosmological perturbations in mimetic matter scenario with a general higher derivative function. We calculate the quadratic action and show that both the kinetic term and the gradient term have the wrong sings. We perform the analysis in both comoving and Newtonian gauges and confirm that the Hamiltonians and the associated instabilities are consistent with each other in both gauges. The existence of instabilities is independent of the specific form of higher derivative function which generates gradients for mimetic field perturbations. It is verified that the ghost instability in mimetic perturbations is not associated with the higher derivative instabilitiesmore » such as the Ostrogradsky ghost.« less

  16. Developmental instability and schizotypy.

    PubMed

    Rosa, A; van Os, J; Fañanás, L; Barrantes, N; Caparrós, B; Gutiérrez, B; Obiols, J

    2000-06-16

    It has been suggested that evidence of developmental disturbance of cognition and lateralisation in schizophrenia can be best understood from the perspective of developmental stability (DS), an indicator of the extent to which an individual develops according to a specified ontogenic programme in the presence of environmental noise. Higher levels of fluctuating asymmetry (FA; the difference between right and left side of a quantitative morphological trait such as dermatoglyphics) are thought to reflect less DS. We examined this issue for dimensions of schizotypy. Associations between FA, measures of laterality and cognitive function on the one hand, and negative and positive dimensions of schizotypy on the other, were examined in a sample of 260 healthy adolescents aged 11.9-15.6years. FA was measured as a-b ridge count right-left differences. Neuropsychological measures yielded a general cognitive ability score and a frontal function score. Laterality was assessed with the Annett scale. Measures of psychosis proneness were normally distributed. Negative schizotypy was associated with more FA and lower general cognitive ability in a dose-response fashion. The association with FA was more apparent in boys. No associations existed with laterality or frontal function. The negative dimension of schizotypy may be associated with early developmental instability, resembling the pattern seen in the negative symptom dimension of schizophrenia. Measures of fluctuating asymmetry may be more sensitive with regard to the schizotypy phenotype than measures of laterality.

  17. Resistive instabilities in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Rutherford, P.H.

    1985-10-01

    Low-m tearing modes constitute the dominant instability problem in present-day tokamaks. In this lecture, the stability criteria for representative current profiles with q(0)-values slightly less than unit are reviewed; ''sawtooth'' reconnection to q(0)-values just at, or slightly exceeding, unity is generally destabilizing to the m = 2, n = 1 and m = 3, n = 2 modes, and severely limits the range of stable profile shapes. Feedback stabilization of m greater than or equal to 2 modes by rf heating or current drive, applied locally at the magnetic islands, appears feasible; feedback by island current drive is much moremore » efficient, in terms of the radio-frequency power required, then feedback by island heating. Feedback stabilization of the m = 1 mode - although yielding particularly beneficial effects for resistive-tearing and high-beta stability by allowing q(0)-values substantially below unity - is more problematical, unless the m = 1 ideal-MHD mode can be made positively stable by strong triangular shaping of the central flux surfaces. Feedback techniques require a detectable, rotating MHD-like signal; the slowing of mode rotation - or the excitation of non-rotating modes - by an imperfectly conducting wall is also discussed.« less

  18. Nonlinear ideal magnetohydrodynamics instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfirsch, D.; Sudan, R. N.

    1993-07-01

    Explosive phenomena such as internal disruptions in toroidal discharges and solar flares are difficult to explain in terms of linear instabilities. A plasma approaching a linear stability limit can, however, become nonlinearly and explosively unstable, with noninfinitesimal perturbations even before the marginal state is reached. For such investigations, a nonlinear extension of the usual MHD (magnetohydrodynamic) energy principle is helpful. (This was obtained by Merkel and Schlüter, Sitzungsberichted. Bayer. Akad. Wiss., Munich, 1976, No. 7, for Cartesian coordinate systems.) A coordinate system independent Eulerian formulation for the Lagrangian allowing for equilibria with flow and with built-in conservation laws for mass, magnetic flux, and entropy is developed in this paper which is similar to Newcomb's Lagrangian method of 1962 [Nucl. Fusion, Suppl., Pt. II, 452 (1962)]. For static equilibria nonlinear stability is completely determined by the potential energy. For a potential energy which contains second- and nth order or some more general contributions only, it is shown in full generality that linearly unstable and marginally stable systems are explosively unstable even for infinitesimal perturbations; linearly absolutely stable systems require finite initial perturbations. For equilibria with Abelian symmetries symmetry breaking initial perturbations are needed, which should be observed in numerical simulations. Nonlinear stability is proved for two simple examples, m=0 perturbations of a Bennet Z-pinch and z-independent perturbations of a θ pinch. The algebra for treating these cases reduces considerably if symmetries are taken into account from the outset, as suggested by M. N. Rosenbluth (private communication, 1992).

  19. Benign thyroid nodule unresponsive to radiofrequency ablation treated with laser ablation: a case report.

    PubMed

    Oddo, Silvia; Balestra, Margherita; Vera, Lara; Giusti, Massimo

    2018-05-11

    Radiofrequency ablation and laser ablation are safe and effective techniques for reducing thyroid nodule volume, neck symptoms, and cosmetic complaints. Therapeutic success is defined as a nodule reduction > 50% between 6 and 12 months after the procedure, but a percentage of nodules inexplicably do not respond to thermal ablation. We describe the case of a young Caucasian woman with a solid benign thyroid nodule who refused surgery and who had undergone radiofrequency ablation in 2013. The nodule did not respond in terms of either volume reduction or improvement in neck symptoms. After 2 years, given the patient's continued refusal of thyroidectomy, we proposed laser ablation. The nodule displayed a significant volume reduction (- 50% from radiofrequency ablation baseline volume, - 57% from laser ablation baseline), and the patient reported a significant improvement in neck symptoms (from 6/10 to 1/10 on a visual analogue scale). We conjecture that some benign thyroid nodules may be intrinsically resistant to necrosis when one specific ablation technique is used, but may respond to another technique. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first description of the effect of performing a different percutaneous ablation technique in a nodule that does not respond to radiofrequency ablation.

  20. Robotically assisted ablation produces more rapid and greater signal attenuation than manual ablation.

    PubMed

    Koa-Wing, Michael; Kojodjojo, Pipin; Malcolme-Lawes, Louisa C; Salukhe, Tushar V; Linton, Nick W F; Grogan, Aaron P; Bergman, Dale; Lim, Phang Boon; Whinnett, Zachary I; McCarthy, Karen; Ho, Siew Yen; O'Neill, Mark D; Peters, Nicholas S; Davies, D Wyn; Kanagaratnam, Prapa

    2009-12-01

    Robotic remote catheter ablation potentially provides improved catheter-tip stability, which should improve the efficiency of radiofrequency energy delivery. Percentage reduction in electrogram peak-to-peak voltage has been used as a measure of effectiveness of ablation. We tested the hypothesis that improved catheter-tip stability of robotic ablation can diminish signals to a greater degree than manual ablation. In vivo NavX maps of 7 pig atria were constructed. Separate lines of ablation were performed robotically and manually, recording pre- and postablation peak-to-peak voltages at 10, 20, 30, and 60 seconds and calculating signal amplitude reduction. Catheter ablation settings were constant (25W, 50 degrees , 17 mL/min, 20-30 g catheter tip pressure). The pigs were sacrificed and ablation lesions correlated with NavX maps. Robotic ablation reduced signal amplitude to a greater degree than manual ablation (49 +/- 2.6% vs 29 +/- 4.5% signal reduction after 1 minute [P = 0.0002]). The mean energy delivered (223 +/- 184 J vs 231 +/- 190 J, P = 0.42), power (19 +/- 3.5 W vs 19 +/- 4 W, P = 0.84), and duration of ablation (15 +/- 9 seconds vs 15 +/- 9 seconds, P = 0.89) was the same for manual and robotic. The mean peak catheter-tip temperature was higher for robotic (45 +/- 5 degrees C vs 42 +/- 3 degrees C [P < 0.0001]). The incidence of >50% signal reduction was greater for robotic (37%) than manual (21%) ablation (P = 0.0001). Robotically assisted ablation appears to be more effective than manual ablation at signal amplitude reduction, therefore may be expected to produce improved clinical outcomes.

  1. Emerging needle ablation technology in urology.

    PubMed

    Leveillee, Raymond J; Pease, Karli; Salas, Nelson

    2014-01-01

    Thermal ablation of urologic tumors in the form of freezing (cryoablation) and heating (radiofrequency ablation) have been utilized successfully to treat and ablate soft tissue tumors for over 15 years. Multiple studies have demonstrated efficacy nearing that of extirpative surgery for certain urologic conditions. There are technical limitations to their speed and safety profile because of the physical limits of thermal diffusion. Recently, there has been a desire to investigate other forms of energy in an effort to circumvent the limitations of cryoblation and radiofrequency ablation. This review will focus on three relatively new energy applications as they pertain to tissue ablation: microwave, irreversible electroporation, and water vapor. High-intensity-focused ultrasound nor interstitial lasers are discussed, as there have been no recently published updates. Needle and probe-based ablative treatments will continue to play an important role. As three-dimensional imaging workstations move from the advanced radiologic interventional suite to the operating room, surgeons will likely still play a pivotal role in the +-application of these probe ablative devices. It is essential that the surgeon understands the fundamentals of these devices in order to optimize their application.

  2. Monitoring radiofrequency ablation with ultrasound Nakagami imaging.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chiao-Yin; Geng, Xiaonan; Yeh, Ta-Sen; Liu, Hao-Li; Tsui, Po-Hsiang

    2013-07-01

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a widely used alternative modality in the treatment of liver tumors. Ultrasound B-mode imaging is an important tool to guide the insertion of the RFA electrode into the tissue. However, it is difficult to visualize the ablation zone because RFA induces the shadow effect in a B-scan. Based on the randomness of ultrasonic backscattering, this study proposes ultrasound Nakagami imaging, which is a well-established method for backscattered statistics analysis, as an approach to complement the conventional B-scan for evaluating the ablation region. Porcine liver samples (n = 6) were ablated using a RFA system and monitored by employing an ultrasound scanner equipped with a 7.5 MHz linear array transducer. During the stages of ablation (0-12 min) and postablation (12-24 min), the raw backscattered data were acquired at a sampling rate of 30 MHz for B-mode, Nakagami imaging, and polynomial approximation of Nakagami imaging. The contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) was also calculated to compare the image contrasts of the B-mode and Nakagami images. The results demonstrated that the Nakagami image has the ability to visualize changes in the backscattered statistics in the ablation zone, including the shadow region during RFA. The average Nakagami parameter increased from 0.2 to 0.6 in the ablation stage, and then decreased to approximately 0.3 at the end of the postablation stage. Moreover, the CNR of the Nakagami image was threefold that of the B-mode image, showing that the Nakagami image has a better image contrast for monitoring RFA. Specifically, the use of the polynomial approximation equips the Nakagami image with an enhanced ability to estimate the range of the ablation region. This study demonstrated that ultrasound Nakagami imaging based on the analysis of backscattered statistics has the ability to visualize the RFA-induced ablation zone, even if the shadow effect exists in the B-scan.

  3. Loss of centrioles causes chromosomal instability in vertebrate somatic cells.

    PubMed

    Sir, Joo-Hee; Pütz, Monika; Daly, Owen; Morrison, Ciaran G; Dunning, Mark; Kilmartin, John V; Gergely, Fanni

    2013-12-09

    Most animal cells contain a centrosome, which comprises a pair of centrioles surrounded by an ordered pericentriolar matrix (PCM). Although the role of this organelle in organizing the mitotic spindle poles is well established, its precise contribution to cell division and cell survival remains a subject of debate. By genetically ablating key components of centriole biogenesis in chicken DT40 B cells, we generated multiple cell lines that lack centrioles. PCM components accumulated in acentriolar microtubule (MT)-organizing centers but failed to adopt a higher-order structure, as shown by three-dimensional structured illumination microscopy. Cells without centrioles exhibited both a delay in bipolar spindle assembly and a high rate of chromosomal instability. Collectively, our results expose a vital role for centrosomes in establishing a mitotic spindle geometry that facilitates correct kinetochore-MT attachments. We propose that centrosomes are essential in organisms in which rapid segregation of a large number of chromosomes needs to be attained with fidelity.

  4. Instability following total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Merchan, E Carlos

    2011-10-01

    Background Knee prosthesis instability (KPI) is a frequent cause of failure of total knee arthroplasty. Moreover, the degree of constraint required to achieve immediate and long-term stability in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is frequently debated. Questions This review aims to define the problem, analyze risk factors, and review strategies for prevention and treatment of KPI. Methods A PubMed (MEDLINE) search of the years 2000 to 2010 was performed using two key words: TKA and instability. One hundred and sixty-five initial articles were identified. The most important (17) articles as judged by the author were selected for this review. The main criteria for selection were that the articles addressed and provided solutions to the diagnosis and treatment of KPI. Results Patient-related risk factors predisposing to post-operative instability include deformity requiring a large surgical correction and aggressive ligament release, general or regional neuromuscular pathology, and hip or foot deformities. KPI can be prevented in most cases with appropriate selection of implants and good surgical technique. When ligament instability is anticipated post-operatively, the need for implants with a greater degree of constraint should be anticipated. In patients without significant varus or valgus malalignment and without significant flexion contracture, the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) can be retained. However, the PCL should be sacrificed when deformity exists particularly in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, previous patellectomy, previous high tibial osteotomy or distal femoral osteotomy, and posttraumatic osteoarthritis with disruption of the PCL. In most cases, KPI requires revision surgery. Successful outcomes can only be obtained if the cause of KPI is identified and addressed. Conclusions Instability following TKA is a common cause of the need for revision. Typically, knees with deformity, rheumatoid arthritis, previous patellectomy or high tibial osteotomy, and

  5. Magnetothermal instability in cooling flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loewenstein, Michael

    1990-01-01

    The effect of magnetic fields on thermal instability in cooling flows is investigated using linear, Eulerian perturbation analysis. As contrasted with the zero magnetic-field case, hydromagnetic stresses support perturbations against acceleration caused by buoyancy - comoving evolution results and global growth rates are straightforward to obtain for a given cooling flow entropy distribution. In addition, background and induced magnetic fields ensure that conductive damping of thermal instability is greatly reduced.

  6. Waves and instabilities in plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, L.

    1987-01-01

    The contents of this book are: Plasma as a Dielectric Medium; Nyquist Technique; Absolute and Convective Instabilities; Landau Damping and Phase Mixing; Particle Trapping and Breakdown of Linear Theory; Solution of Viasov Equation via Guilding-Center Transformation; Kinetic Theory of Magnetohydrodynamic Waves; Geometric Optics; Wave-Kinetic Equation; Cutoff and Resonance; Resonant Absorption; Mode Conversion; Gyrokinetic Equation; Drift Waves; Quasi-Linear Theory; Ponderomotive Force; Parametric Instabilities; Problem Sets for Homework, Midterm and Final Examinations.

  7. Aerodynamic instability: A case history

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eisenmann, R. C.

    1985-01-01

    The identification, diagnosis, and final correction of complex machinery malfunctions typically require the correlation of many parameters such as mechanical construction, process influence, maintenance history, and vibration response characteristics. The progression is reviewed of field testing, diagnosis, and final correction of a specific machinery instability problem. The case history presented addresses a unique low frequency instability problem on a high pressure barrel compressor. The malfunction was eventually diagnosed as a fluidic mechanism that manifested as an aerodynamic disturbance to the rotor assembly.

  8. Thermal protection system ablation sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorbunov, Sergey (Inventor); Martinez, Edward R. (Inventor); Scott, James B. (Inventor); Oishi, Tomomi (Inventor); Fu, Johnny (Inventor); Mach, Joseph G. (Inventor); Santos, Jose B. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    An isotherm sensor tracks space vehicle temperatures by a thermal protection system (TPS) material during vehicle re-entry as a function of time, and surface recession through calibration, calculation, analysis and exposed surface modeling. Sensor design includes: two resistive conductors, wound around a tube, with a first end of each conductor connected to a constant current source, and second ends electrically insulated from each other by a selected material that becomes an electrically conductive char at higher temperatures to thereby complete an electrical circuit. The sensor conductors become shorter as ablation proceeds and reduced resistance in the completed electrical circuit (proportional to conductor length) is continually monitored, using measured end-to-end voltage change or current in the circuit. Thermocouple and/or piezoelectric measurements provide consistency checks on local temperatures.

  9. Instability of enclosed horizons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kay, Bernard S.

    2015-03-01

    We point out that there are solutions to the scalar wave equation on dimensional Minkowski space with finite energy tails which, if they reflect off a uniformly accelerated mirror due to (say) Dirichlet boundary conditions on it, develop an infinite stress-energy tensor on the mirror's Rindler horizon. We also show that, in the presence of an image mirror in the opposite Rindler wedge, suitable compactly supported arbitrarily small initial data on a suitable initial surface will develop an arbitrarily large stress-energy scalar near where the two horizons cross. Also, while there is a regular Hartle-Hawking-Israel-like state for the quantum theory between these two mirrors, there are coherent states built on it for which there are similar singularities in the expectation value of the renormalized stress-energy tensor. We conjecture that in other situations with analogous enclosed horizons such as a (maximally extended) Schwarzschild black hole in equilibrium in a (stationary spherical) box or the (maximally extended) Schwarzschild-AdS spacetime, there will be similar stress-energy singularities and almost-singularities—leading to instability of the horizons when gravity is switched on and matter and gravity perturbations are allowed for. All this suggests it is incorrect to picture a black hole in equilibrium in a box or a Schwarzschild-AdS black hole as extending beyond the past and future horizons of a single Schwarzschild (/Schwarzschild-AdS) wedge. It would thus provide new evidence for 't Hooft's brick wall model while seeming to invalidate the picture in Maldacena's ` Eternal black holes in AdS'. It would thereby also support the validity of the author's matter-gravity entanglement hypothesis and of the paper ` Brick walls and AdS/CFT' by the author and Ortíz.

  10. Elastic instabilities in rubber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gent, Alan

    2009-03-01

    Materials that undergo large elastic deformations can exhibit novel instabilities. Several examples are described: development of an aneurysm on inflating a rubber tube; non-uniform stretching on inflating a spherical balloon; formation of internal cracks in rubber blocks at a critical level of triaxial tension or when supersaturated with a dissolved gas; surface wrinkling of a block at a critical amount of compression; debonding or fracture of constrained films on swelling, and formation of ``knots'' on twisting stretched cylindrical rods. These various deformations are analyzed in terms of a simple strain energy function, using Rivlin's theory of large elastic deformations, and the results are compared with experimental measurements of the onset of unstable states. Such comparisons provide new tests of Rivlin's theory and, at least in principle, critical tests of proposed strain energy functions for rubber. Moreover the onset of highly non-uniform deformations has serious implications for the fatigue life and fracture resistance of rubber components. [4pt] References: [0pt] R. S. Rivlin, Philos. Trans. Roy. Soc. Lond. Ser. A241 (1948) 379--397. [0pt] A. Mallock, Proc. Roy. Soc. Lond. 49 (1890--1891) 458--463. [0pt] M. A. Biot, ``Mechanics of Incremental Deformations'', Wiley, New York, 1965. [0pt] A. N. Gent and P. B. Lindley, Proc. Roy. Soc. Lond. A 249 (1958) 195--205. [0pt] A. N. Gent, W. J. Hung and M. F. Tse, Rubb. Chem. Technol. 74 (2001) 89--99. [0pt] A. N. Gent, Internatl. J. Non-Linear Mech. 40 (2005) 165--175.

  11. Nonlinear ideal magnetohydrodynamics instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Pfirsch, D.; Sudan, R.N.

    1993-07-01

    Explosive phenomena such as internal disruptions in toroidal discharges and solar flares are difficult to explain in terms of linear instabilities. A plasma approaching a linear stability limit can, however, become nonlinearly and explosively unstable, with noninfinitesimal perturbations even before the marginal state is reached. For such investigations, a nonlinear extension of the usual MHD (magnetohydrodynamic) energy principle is helpful. (This was obtained by Merkel and Schlueter, Sitzungsberichted. Bayer. Akad. Wiss., Munich, 1976, No. 7, for Cartesian coordinate systems.) A coordinate system independent Eulerian formulation for the Lagrangian allowing for equilibria with flow and with built-in conservation laws for mass,more » magnetic flux, and entropy is developed in this paper which is similar to Newcomb's Lagrangian method of 1962 [Nucl. Fusion, Suppl., Pt. II, 452 (1962)]. For static equilibria nonlinear stability is completely determined by the potential energy. For a potential energy which contains second- and [ital n]th order or some more general contributions only, it is shown in full generality that linearly unstable and marginally stable systems are explosively unstable even for infinitesimal perturbations; linearly absolutely stable systems require finite initial perturbations. For equilibria with Abelian symmetries symmetry breaking initial perturbations are needed, which should be observed in numerical simulations. Nonlinear stability is proved for two simple examples, [ital m]=0 perturbations of a Bennet Z-pinch and [ital z]-independent perturbations of a [theta] pinch. The algebra for treating these cases reduces considerably if symmetries are taken into account from the outset, as suggested by M. N. Rosenbluth (private communication, 1992).« less

  12. Direct His bundle pacing post AVN ablation.

    PubMed

    Lakshmanadoss, Umashankar; Aggarwal, Ashim; Huang, David T; Daubert, James P; Shah, Abrar

    2009-08-01

    Atrioventricular nodal (AVN) ablation with concomitant pacemaker implantation is one of the strategies that reduce symptoms in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). However, the long-term adverse effects of right ventricular (RV) apical pacing have led to the search for alternating sites of pacing. Biventricular pacing produces a significant improvement in functional capacity over RV pacing in patients undergoing AVN ablation. Another alternative site for pacing is direct His bundle to reduce the adverse outcome of RV pacing. Here, we present a case of direct His bundle pacing using steerable lead delivery system in a patient with symptomatic paroxysmal AF with concurrent AVN ablation.

  13. Caring for women undergoing cardiac ablation.

    PubMed

    Keegan, Beryl

    2008-09-01

    Radiofrequency cardiac ablation (RFCA) has become the treatment of choice for many cardiac arrhythmias that have not responded to medication. Complications of cardiac ablation include bleeding, thrombosis, pericardial tamponade, and stroke. Many complications are procedure specific, and several complications can be avoided with appropriate nursing care. Quality patient outcomes begin with competent nursing care. Therefore it is vital for a patient undergoing a percutaneous cardiac ablation procedure to receive supportive care and pre- and post-interventional patient education. This article discusses the nursing care of women undergoing RFCA.

  14. History of shoulder instability surgery.

    PubMed

    Randelli, Pietro; Cucchi, Davide; Butt, Usman

    2016-02-01

    The surgical management of shoulder instability is an expanding and increasingly complex area of study within orthopaedics. This article describes the history and evolution of shoulder instability surgery, examining the development of its key principles, the currently accepted concepts and available surgical interventions. A comprehensive review of the available literature was performed using PubMed. The reference lists of reviewed articles were also scrutinised to ensure relevant information was included. The various types of shoulder instability including anterior, posterior and multidirectional instability are discussed, focussing on the history of surgical management of these topics, the current concepts and the results of available surgical interventions. The last century has seen important advancements in the understanding and treatment of shoulder instability. The transition from open to arthroscopic surgery has allowed the discovery of previously unrecognised pathologic entities and facilitated techniques to treat these. Nevertheless, open surgery still produces comparable results in the treatment of many instability-related conditions and is often required in complex or revision cases, particularly in the presence of bone loss. More high-quality research is required to better understand and characterise this spectrum of conditions so that successful evidence-based management algorithms can be developed. IV.

  15. Urodynamic changes in patients with anterior urethral valves: before and after endoscopic valve ablation.

    PubMed

    Kajbafzadeh, Abdol-Mohammad; Payabvash, Seyedmehdi; Karimian, Golnar

    2007-08-01

    To retrospectively review a series of children with anterior urethral valves (AUV), with emphasis on patterns of urodynamic change and long-term outcome of endoscopic treatment. We reviewed the medical records of eight patients who had undergone thorough radiological and urodynamic exams before and after treatment. The diagnosis of AUV was based on radiological imaging and confirmed by urethrocystoscopy. The valves were ablated through either transurethral fulguration or resection. The upper urinary tracts were studied by renal scan and ultrasonography before and after the procedure. Bladder function was assessed urodynamically 3 months after surgery. Uroflowmetry was performed as soon as the children were toilet trained. Endoscopic ablation of AUV was successful in all cases and no surgical complications occurred. The initial symptoms resolved in all boys. VUR disappeared in two out of three patients, and five children had bladder trabeculation that was resolved after surgery. The final outcome was successful in seven patients (88%). The major urodynamic dysfunction was bladder hypercontractility that resolved following valve ablation. The mean maximum voiding detrusor pressure (P(detmax)) decreased from 213.2+/-17.9 cmH(2)O to 80.7+/-9.9 cmH(2)O, 6 months after treatment (P<0.001). None of the patients had low-compliant bladder, detrusor instability or myogenic failure. The voiding pattern in all toilet-trained patients was staccato and of an interrupted shape prior to surgery, but changed to a normal bell-shaped voiding pattern following valve ablation. AUV should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients presenting with infravesical obstruction. We recommend endoscopic valve ablation as the treatment of choice.

  16. Dual beam optical system for pulsed laser ablation film deposition

    DOEpatents

    Mashburn, D.N.

    1996-09-24

    A laser ablation apparatus having a laser source outputting a laser ablation beam includes an ablation chamber having a sidewall, a beam divider for dividing the laser ablation beam into two substantially equal halves, and a pair of mirrors for converging the two halves on a surface of the target from complementary angles relative to the target surface normal, thereby generating a plume of ablated material emanating from the target. 3 figs.

  17. Dual beam optical system for pulsed laser ablation film deposition

    DOEpatents

    Mashburn, Douglas N.

    1996-01-01

    A laser ablation apparatus having a laser source outputting a laser ablation beam includes an ablation chamber having a sidewall, a beam divider for dividing the laser ablation beam into two substantially equal halves, and a pair of mirrors for converging the two halves on a surface of the target from complementary angles relative to the target surface normal, thereby generating a plume of ablated material emanating from the target.

  18. Femtosecond laser ablation of dentin and enamel: relationship between laser fluence and ablation efficiency.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hu; Liu, Jing; Li, Hong; Ge, Wenqi; Sun, Yuchun; Wang, Yong; Lü, Peijun

    2015-02-01

    The objective was to study the relationship between laser fluence and ablation efficiency of a femtosecond laser with a Gaussian-shaped pulse used to ablate dentin and enamel for prosthodontic tooth preparation. A diode-pumped thin-disk femtosecond laser with wavelength of 1025 nm and pulse width of 400 fs was used for the ablation of dentin and enamel. The laser spot was guided in a line on the dentin and enamel surfaces to form a groove-shaped ablation zone under a series of laser pulse energies. The width and volume of the ablated line were measured under a three-dimensional confocal microscope to calculate the ablation efficiency. Ablation efficiency for dentin reached a maximum value of 0.020 mm3∕J when the laser fluence was set at 6.51 J∕cm2. For enamel, the maximum ablation efficiency was 0.009 mm3∕J at a fluence of 7.59 J∕cm2.Ablation efficiency of the femtosecond laser on dentin and enamel is closely related to the laser fluence and may reach a maximum when the laser fluence is set to an appropriate value. © 2015 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE)

  19. Evolution and stability of shock waves in dissipative gases characterized by activated inelastic collisions.

    PubMed

    Sirmas, N; Radulescu, M I

    2015-02-01

    Previous experiments have revealed that shock waves driven through dissipative gases may become unstable, for example, in granular gases and in molecular gases undergoing strong relaxation effects. The mechanisms controlling these instabilities are not well understood. We successfully isolated and investigated this instability in the canonical problem of piston-driven shock waves propagating into a medium characterized by inelastic collision processes. We treat the standard model of granular gases, where particle collisions are taken as inelastic, with a constant coefficient of restitution. The inelasticity is activated for sufficiently strong collisions. Molecular dynamic simulations were performed for 30,000 particles. We find that all shock waves investigated become unstable, with density nonuniformities forming in the relaxation region. The wavelength of these fingers is found to be comparable to the characteristic relaxation thickness. Shock Hugoniot curves for both elastic and inelastic collisions were obtained analytically and numerically. Analysis of these curves indicates that the instability is not of the Bethe-Zeldovich-Thompson or D'yakov-Kontorovich type. Analysis of the shock relaxation rates and rates for clustering in a convected fluid element with the same thermodynamic history ruled out the clustering instability of a homogeneous granular gas. Instead, wave reconstruction of the early transient evolution indicates that the onset of instability occurs during repressurization of the gas following the initial relaxation of the medium behind the lead shock. This repressurization gives rise to internal pressure waves in the presence of strong density gradients. This indicates that the mechanism of instability is more likely of the vorticity-generating Richtmyer-Meshkov type, relying on the action of the inner pressure wave development during the transient relaxation.

  20. Endometrial ablation: normal appearance and complications.

    PubMed

    Drylewicz, Monica R; Robinson, Kathryn; Siegel, Cary Lynn

    2018-03-14

    Global endometrial ablation is a commonly performed, minimally invasive technique aimed at improving/resolving abnormal uterine bleeding and menorrhagia in women. As non-resectoscopic techniques have come into existence, endometrial ablation performance continues to increase due to accessibility and decreased requirements for operating room time and advanced technical training. The increased utilization of this method translates into increased imaging of patients who have undergone the procedure. An understanding of the expected imaging appearances of endometrial ablation using different modalities is important for the abdominal radiologist. In addition, the frequent usage of the technique naturally comes with complications requiring appropriate imaging work-up. We review the expected appearance of the post-endometrial ablated uterus on multiple imaging modalities and demonstrate the more common and rare complications seen in the immediate post-procedural time period and remotely.

  1. Thermal Ablation Modeling for Silicate Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Yih-Kanq

    2016-01-01

    A general thermal ablation model for silicates is proposed. The model includes the mass losses through the balance between evaporation and condensation, and through the moving molten layer driven by surface shear force and pressure gradient. This model can be applied in the ablation simulation of the meteoroid and the glassy ablator for spacecraft Thermal Protection Systems. Time-dependent axisymmetric computations are performed by coupling the fluid dynamics code, Data-Parallel Line Relaxation program, with the material response code, Two-dimensional Implicit Thermal Ablation simulation program, to predict the mass lost rates and shape change. The predicted mass loss rates will be compared with available data for model validation, and parametric studies will also be performed for meteoroid earth entry conditions.

  2. Left Atrial Anatomy Relevant to Catheter Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Quintana, Damián; Cabrera, José Angel; Saremi, Farhood

    2014-01-01

    The rapid development of interventional procedures for the treatment of arrhythmias in humans, especially the use of catheter ablation techniques, has renewed interest in cardiac anatomy. Although the substrates of atrial fibrillation (AF), its initiation and maintenance, remain to be fully elucidated, catheter ablation in the left atrium (LA) has become a common therapeutic option for patients with this arrhythmia. Using ablation catheters, various isolation lines and focal targets are created, the majority of which are based on gross anatomical, electroanatomical, and myoarchitectual patterns of the left atrial wall. Our aim was therefore to review the gross morphological and architectural features of the LA and their relations to extracardiac structures. The latter have also become relevant because extracardiac complications of AF ablation can occur, due to injuries to the phrenic and vagal plexus nerves, adjacent coronary arteries, or the esophageal wall causing devastating consequences. PMID:25057427

  3. Femtosecond laser ablation of the stapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCaughey, Ryan G.; Sun, Hui; Rothholtz, Vanessa S.; Juhasz, Tibor; Wong, Brian J. F.

    2009-03-01

    A femtosecond laser, normally used for LASIK eye surgery, is used to perforate cadaveric human stapes. The thermal side effects of bone ablation are measured with a thermocouple in an inner ear model and are found to be within acceptable limits for inner ear surgery. Stress and acoustic events, recorded with piezoelectric film and a microphone, respectively, are found to be negligible. Optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and optical coherence tomography are used to confirm the precision of the ablation craters and lack of damage to the surrounding tissue. Ablation is compared to that from an Er:YAG laser, the current laser of choice for stapedotomy, and is found to be superior. Ultra-short-pulsed lasers offer a precise and efficient ablation of the stapes, with minimal thermal and negligible mechanical and acoustic damage. They are, therefore, ideal for stapedotomy operations.

  4. Laser ablation in analytical chemistry - A review

    SciTech Connect

    Russo, Richard E.; Mao, Xianglei; Liu, Haichen

    Laser ablation is becoming a dominant technology for direct solid sampling in analytical chemistry. Laser ablation refers to the process in which an intense burst of energy delivered by a short laser pulse is used to sample (remove a portion of) a material. The advantages of laser ablation chemical analysis include direct characterization of solids, no chemical procedures for dissolution, reduced risk of contamination or sample loss, analysis of very small samples not separable for solution analysis, and determination of spatial distributions of elemental composition. This review describes recent research to understand and utilize laser ablation for direct solid sampling,more » with emphasis on sample introduction to an inductively coupled plasma (ICP). Current research related to contemporary experimental systems, calibration and optimization, and fractionation is discussed, with a summary of applications in several areas.« less

  5. Optical ablation/temperature gage (COTA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassaing, J.; Balageas, D.

    ONERA has ground and flight tested for heat-shield recession a novel technique, different from current radiation and acoustic measurement methods. It uses a combined ablation/temperature gage that views the radiation optically from a cavity embedded within the heat shield. Flight measurements, both of temperature and of passage of the ablation front, are compared with data generated by a predictive numerical code. The ablation and heat diffusion into the instrumented ablator can be simulated numerically to evaluate accurately the errors due to the presence of the gage. This technology was established in 1978 and finally adopted after ground tests in arc heater facilities. After four years of flight evaluations, it is possible to evaluate and criticize the sensor reliability.

  6. Microwave Tissue Ablation: Biophysics, Technology and Applications

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Microwave ablation is an emerging treatment option for many cancers, cardiac arrhythmias and other medical conditions. During treatment, microwaves are applied directly to tissues to produce rapid temperature elevations sufficient to produce immediate coagulative necrosis. The engineering design criteria for each application differ, with individual consideration for factors such as desired ablation zone size, treatment duration, and procedural invasiveness. Recent technological developments in applicator cooling, power control and system optimization for specific applications promise to increase the utilization of microwave ablation in the future. This article will review the basic biophysics of microwave tissue heating, provide an overview of the design and operation of current equipment, and outline areas for future research for microwave ablation. PMID:21175404

  7. Photodynamic therapy toward selective endometrial ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tadir, Yona; Tromberg, Bruce J.; Krasieva, Tatiana B.; Berns, Michael W.

    1993-05-01

    Potential applications of photodynamic therapy for endometrial disease are discussed. Experimental models that may lead to diagnosis and treatment of endometriosis as well as selective endometrial ablation are summarized.

  8. Flexible Ablators: Applications and Arcjet Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, James O.; Venkatapathy, Ethiraj; Beck, Robin A S.; Mcguire, Kathy; Prabhu, Dinesh K.; Gorbunov, Sergey

    2011-01-01

    Flexible ablators were conceived in 2009 to meet the technology pull for large, human Mars Exploration Class, 23 m diameter hypersonic inflatable aerodynamic decelerators. As described elsewhere, they have been recently undergoing initial technical readiness (TRL) advancement by NASA. The performance limits of flexible ablators in terms of maximum heat rates, pressure and shear remain to be defined. Further, it is hoped that this emerging technology will vastly expand the capability of future NASA missions involving atmospheric entry systems. This paper considers four topics of relevance to flexible ablators: (1) Their potential applications to near/far term human and robotic missions (2) Brief consideration of the balance between heat shield diameter, flexible ablator performance limits, entry vehicle controllability and aft-body shear layer impingement of interest to designers of very large entry vehicles, (3) The approach for developing bonding processes of flexible ablators for use on rigid entry bodies and (4) Design of large arcjet test articles that will enable the testing of flexible ablators in flight-like, combined environments (heat flux, pressure, shear and structural tensile loading). Based on a review of thermal protection system performance requirements for future entry vehicles, it is concluded that flexible ablators have broad applications to conventional, rigid entry body systems and are enabling to large deployable (both inflatable and mechanical) heat shields. Because of the game-changing nature of flexible ablators, it appears that NASA's Office of the Chief Technologist (OCT) will fund a focused, 3-year TRL advancement of the new materials capable of performance in heat fluxes in the range of 200-600 W/sq. cm. This support will enable the manufacture and use of the large-scale arcjet test designs that will be a key element of this OCT funded activity.

  9. Femtosecond laser lithotripsy: feasibility and ablation mechanism.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Jinze; Teichman, Joel M H; Wang, Tianyi; Neev, Joseph; Glickman, Randolph D; Chan, Kin Foong; Milner, Thomas E

    2010-01-01

    Light emitted from a femtosecond laser is capable of plasma-induced ablation of various materials. We tested the feasibility of utilizing femtosecond-pulsed laser radiation (lambda=800 nm, 140 fs, 0.9 mJ/pulse) for ablation of urinary calculi. Ablation craters were observed in human calculi of greater than 90% calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM), cystine (CYST), or magnesium ammonium phosphate hexahydrate (MAPH). Largest crater volumes were achieved on CYST stones, among the most difficult stones to fragment using Holmium:YAG (Ho:YAG) lithotripsy. Diameter of debris was characterized using optical microscopy and found to be less than 20 microm, substantially smaller than that produced by long-pulsed Ho:YAG ablation. Stone retropulsion, monitored by a high-speed camera system with a spatial resolution of 15 microm, was negligible for stones with mass as small as 0.06 g. Peak shock wave pressures were less than 2 bars, measured by a polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) needle hydrophone. Ablation dynamics were visualized and characterized with pump-probe imaging and fast flash photography and correlated to shock wave pressures. Because femtosecond-pulsed laser ablates urinary calculi of soft and hard compositions, with micron-sized debris, negligible stone retropulsion, and small shock wave pressures, we conclude that the approach is a promising candidate technique for lithotripsy.

  10. Micrometeoroid ablation simulated in the laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sternovsky, Zoltan; Thomas, Evan W.; DeLuca, Michael; Horanyi, Mihaly; Janches, Diego; Munsat, Tobin L.; Plane, John M. C.

    2016-04-01

    A facility is developed to simulate the ablation of micrometeoroids in laboratory conditions, which also allows measuring the ionization probability of the ablated material. An electrostatic dust accelerator is used to generate iron and meteoric analog particles with velocities 10-50 km/s. The particles are then introduced into a cell filled with nitrogen, air or carbon dioxide gas with pressures adjustable in the 0.02 - 0.5 Torr range, where the partial or complete ablation of the particle occurs over a short distance. An array of biased electrodes is used to collect the ionized products with spatial resolution along the ablating particles' path, allowing thus the study of the temporal resolution of the process. A simple ablation model is used to match the observations. For completely ablated particles the total collected charge directly yields the ionization efficiency for. The measurements using iron particles in N2 and air are in relatively good agreement with earlier data. The measurements with CO2 and He gases, however, are significantly different from the expectations.

  11. Laser Ablated Carbon Nanodots for Light Emission.

    PubMed

    Reyes, Delfino; Camacho, Marco; Camacho, Miguel; Mayorga, Miguel; Weathers, Duncan; Salamo, Greg; Wang, Zhiming; Neogi, Arup

    2016-12-01

    The synthesis of fluorescent carbon dots-like nanostructures (CNDs) obtained through the laser ablation of a carbon solid target in liquid environment is reported. The ablation process was induced in acetone with laser pulses of 1064, 532, and 355 nm under different irradiation times. Close-spherical amorphous CNDs with sizes between 5 and 20 nm, whose abundance strongly depends on the ablation parameters were investigated using electron microscopy and was confirmed using absorption and emission spectroscopies. The π- π* electronic transition at 3.76 eV dominates the absorption for all the CNDs species synthesized under different irradiation conditions. The light emission is most efficient due to excitation at 3.54 eV with the photoluminescence intensity centered at 3.23 eV. The light emission from the CNDs is most efficient due to ablation at 355 nm. The emission wavelength of the CNDs can be tuned from the near-UV to the green wavelength region by controlling the ablation time and modifying the ablation and excitation laser wavelength.

  12. Novel Laser Ablation Technology for Surface Decontamination

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Chung H.

    2004-06-01

    Laser ablation for surface cleaning has been pursued for the removal of paint on airplanes. It has also been pursued for the cleaning of semiconductor surfaces. However, all these approaches have been pursued by laser ablation in air. For highly contaminated surface, laser ablation in air can easily cause secondary contamination. Thus it is not suitable to apply to achieve surface decontamination for DOE facilities since many of these facilities have radioactive contaminants on the surface. Any secondary contamination will be a grave concern. The objective of this project is to develop a novel technology for laser ablation in liquidmore » for surface decontamination. It aims to achieve more efficient surface decontamination without secondary contamination and to evaluate the economic feasibility for large scale surface decontamination with laser ablation in liquid. When laser ablation is pursued in the solution, all the desorbed contaminants will be confined in liquid. The contaminants can be precipitated and subsequently contained in a small volume for disposal. It can reduce the risk of the decontamination workers. It can also reduce the volume of contaminants dramatically.« less

  13. Faraday instability on patterned surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Jie; Rubinstein, Gregory; Jacobi, Ian; Stone, Howard

    2013-11-01

    We show how micro-scale surface patterning can be used to control the onset of the Faraday instability in thin liquid films. It is well known that when a liquid film on a planar substrate is subject to sufficient vibrational accelerations, the free surface destabilizes, exhibiting a family of non-linear standing waves. This instability remains a canonical problem in the study of spontaneous pattern formation, but also has practical uses. For example, the surface waves induced by the Faraday instability have been studied as a means of enhanced damping for mechanical vibrations (Genevaux et al. 2009). Also the streaming within the unstable layer has been used as a method for distributing heterogeneous cell cultures on growth medium (Takagi et al. 2002). In each of these applications, the roughness of the substrate significantly affects the unstable flow field. We consider the effect of patterned substrates on the onset and behavior of the Faraday instability over a range of pattern geometries and feature heights where the liquid layer is thicker than the pattern height. Also, we describe a physical model for the influence of patterned roughness on the destabilization of a liquid layer in order to improve the design of practical systems which exploit the Faraday instability.

  14. Kozai-Lidov disc instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubow, Stephen H.; Ogilvie, Gordon I.

    2017-08-01

    Recent results by Martin et al. showed in 3D smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations that tilted discs in binary systems can be unstable to the development of global, damped Kozai-Lidov (KL) oscillations in which the discs exchange tilt for eccentricity. We investigate the linear stability of KL modes for tilted inviscid discs under the approximations that the disc eccentricity is small and the disc remains flat. By using 1D equations, we are able to probe regimes of large ratios of outer to inner disc edge radii that are realistic for binary systems of hundreds of astronomical unit separations and are not easily probed by multidimensional simulations. For order unity binary mass ratios, KL instability is possible for a window of disc aspect ratios H/r in the outer parts of a disc that roughly scale as (nb/n)2 ≲ H/r ≲ nb/n, for binary orbital frequency nb and orbital frequency n at the disc outer edge. We present a framework for understanding the zones of instability based on the determination of branches of marginally unstable modes. In general, multiple growing eccentric KL modes can be present in a disc. Coplanar apsidal-nodal precession resonances delineate instability branches. We determine the range of tilt angles for unstable modes as a function of disc aspect ratio. Unlike the KL instability for free particles that involves a critical (minimum) tilt angle, disc instability is possible for any non-zero tilt angle depending on the disc aspect ratio.

  15. Localization of gaps during redo ablations of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation: Preferential patterns depending on the choice of cryoballoon ablation or radiofrequency ablation for the initial procedure.

    PubMed

    Galand, Vincent; Pavin, Dominique; Behar, Nathalie; Auffret, Vincent; Fénéon, Damien; Behaghel, Albin; Daubert, Jean-Claude; Mabo, Philippe; Martins, Raphaël P

    2016-11-01

    Pulmonary vein (PV) isolation, using cryoballoon or radiofrequency ablation, is the cornerstone therapy for symptomatic paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (AF) refractory to antiarrhythmic drugs. One-third of the patients have recurrences, mainly due to PV reconnections. To describe the different locations of reconnection sites in patients who had previously undergone radiofrequency or cryoballoon ablation, and to compare the characteristics of the redo procedures in both instances. Demographic data and characteristics of the initial ablation (cryoballoon or radiofrequency) were collected. Number and localization of reconduction gaps, and redo characteristics were reviewed. Seventy-four patients scheduled for a redo ablation of paroxysmal AF were included; 38 had been treated by radiofrequency ablation and 36 by cryoballoon ablation during the first procedure. For the initial ablation, procedural and fluoroscopy times were significantly shorter for cryoballoon ablation (147.8±52.6min vs. 226.6±64.3min [P<0.001] and 37.0±17.7min vs. 50.8±22.7min [P=0.005], respectively). Overall, an identical number of gaps was found during redo procedures of cryoballoon and radiofrequency ablations. However, a significantly higher number of gaps were located in the right superior PV for patients first ablated with radiofrequency (0.9±1.0 vs. 0.5±0.9; P=0.009). Gap localization displayed different patterns. Although not significant, redo procedures of cryoballoon ablation were slightly shorter and needed shorter durations of radiofrequency to achieve PV isolation. During redo procedures, gap localization pattern is different for patients first ablated with cryoballoon or radiofrequency ablation, and right superior PV reconnections occur more frequently after radiofrequency ablation. Redo ablation of a previous cryoballoon ablation appears to be easier. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. MR arthrography in glenohumeral instability.

    PubMed

    Van der Woude, H J; Vanhoenacker, F M

    2007-01-01

    The impact of accurate imaging in the work-up of patients with glenohumeral instability is high. Results of imaging may directly influence the surgeon's strategy to perform an arthroscopic or open treatment for (recurrent) instability. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, and MR arthrography in particular, is the optimal technique to detect, localize and characterize injuries of the capsular-labrum complex. Besides TI-weighted sequences with fat suppression in axial, oblique sagital and coronal directions, an additional series in abduction and exoroation position is highly advocated. This ABER series optimally depicts abnormalities of the inferior capsular-labrum complex and partial undersurface tears of the spinatus tendons. Knowledge of different anatomical variants that may mimic labral tears and of variants of the classic Bankart lesion are useful in the analysis of shoulder MR arthrograms in patients with glenohumeral instability.

  17. [Patellar instability : diagnosis and treatment].

    PubMed

    Ngo, Trieu Hoai Nam; Martin, Robin

    2017-12-13

    The aim of this paper is to present recent advances in surgical management of patellar instability. Several anatomical factors were reported to promote instability. We propose to classify them in two groups. Extra articular factors are valgus and torsion deformity. Articular factors include trochlea and patella dysplasia, tibial tubercle lateralization and medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) insufficiency. Acute patellar dislocations are treated conservatively, with exception for osteochondral and MPFL avulsion fractures that require acute reinsertion. Surgery is considered for recurrent instability. As we aim for a correction of all contributing elements, we prefer a two stages approach. Extra articular factors are treated first by osteotomy, followed by articular factors after 4-6 months. This allows separate rehabilitation protocols.

  18. Performance through Deformation and Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertoldi, Katia

    2015-03-01

    Materials capable of undergoing large deformations like elastomers and gels are ubiquitous in daily life and nature. An exciting field of engineering is emerging that uses these compliant materials to design active devices, such as actuators, adaptive optical systems and self-regulating fluidics. Compliant structures may significantly change their architecture in response to diverse stimuli. When excessive deformation is applied, they may eventually become unstable. Traditionally, mechanical instabilities have been viewed as an inconvenience, with research focusing on how to avoid them. Here, I will demonstrate that these instabilities can be exploited to design materials with novel, switchable functionalities. The abrupt changes introduced into the architecture of soft materials by instabilities will be used to change their shape in a sudden, but controlled manner. Possible and exciting applications include materials with unusual properties such negative Poisson's ratio, phononic crystals with tunable low-frequency acoustic band gaps and reversible encapsulation systems.

  19. Ablation mass features in multi-pulses femtosecond laser ablate molybdenum target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Dongye; Gierse, Niels; Wegner, Julian; Pretzler, Georg; Oelmann, Jannis; Brezinsek, Sebastijan; Liang, Yunfeng; Neubauer, Olaf; Rasinski, Marcin; Linsmeier, Christian; Ding, Hongbin

    2018-03-01

    In this study, the ablation mass features related to reflectivity of bulk Molybdenum (Mo) were investigated by a Ti: Sa 6 fs laser pulse at central wavelength 790 nm. The ablated mass removal was determined using Confocal Microscopy (CM) technique. The surface reflectivity was calibrated and measured by a Lambda 950 spectrophotometer as well as a CCD camera during laser ablation. The ablation mass loss per pulse increase with the increasing of laser shots, meanwhile the surface reflectivity decrease. The multi-pulses (100 shots) ablation threshold of Mo was determined to be 0.15 J/cm2. The incubation coefficient was estimated as 0.835. The reflectivity change of the Mo target surface following multi-pulses laser ablation were studied as a function of laser ablation shots at various laser fluences from 1.07 J/cm2 to 36.23 J/cm2. The results of measured reflectivity indicate that surface reflectivity of Mo target has a significant decline in the first 3-laser pulses at the various fluences. These results are important for developing a quantitative analysis model for laser induced ablation and laser induced breakdown spectroscopy for the first wall diagnosis of EAST tokamak.

  20. Dust Ablation in Pluto's Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horanyi, M.; Poppe, A. R.; Sternovsky, Z.

    2015-12-01

    Based on measurements by in situ dust detectors onboard the Pioneer and New Horizon spacecraft the total production rate of dust particles born in the Kuiper belt can be estimated to be on the order of 5 x 10 ^3 kg/s in the approximate size range of 1 - 10 micron. These particles slowly migrate inward due to Poynting - Robertson drag and their spatial distribution is shaped by mean motion resonances with the gas giant planets in the outer solar system. The expected mass influx into Pluto's atmosphere is on the order of 50 kg/day, and the arrival speed of the incoming particles is on the order of 3 - 4 km/s. We have followed the ablation history as function of speed and size of dust particles in Pluto's atmosphere, and found that, if the particles are rich in volatiles, they can fully sublimate due to drag heating and deposit their mass in a narrow layer. This deposition might promote the formation of the haze layers observed by the New Horizons spacecraft. This talk will explore the constraints on the composition of the dust particles, as well as on our newly developed models of Pluto's atmosphere that can be learned by matching the altitude where haze layers could be formed.

  1. Dust ablation in Pluto's atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horanyi, Mihaly; Poppe, Andrew; Sternovsky, Zoltan

    2016-04-01

    Based on measurements by dust detectors onboard the Pioneer 10/11 and New Horizons spacecraft the total production rate of dust particles born in the Edgeworth Kuiper Belt (EKB) has been be estimated to be on the order of 5 ṡ 103 kg/s in the approximate size range of 1 - 10 μm. Dust particles are produced by collisions between EKB objects and their bombardment by both interplanetary and interstellar dust particles. Dust particles of EKB origin, in general, migrate towards the Sun due to Poynting-Robertson drag but their distributions are further sculpted by mean-motion resonances as they first approach the orbit of Neptune and later the other planets, as well as mutual collisions. Subsequently, Jupiter will eject the vast majority of them before they reach the inner solar system. The expected mass influx into Pluto atmosphere is on the order of 200 kg/day, and the arrival speed of the incoming particles is on the order of 3 - 4 km/s. We have followed the ablation history as function of speed and size of dust particles in Pluto's atmosphere, and found that volatile rich particles can fully sublimate due to drag heating and deposit their mass in narrow layers. This deposition might promote the formation of the haze layers observed by the New Horizons spacecraft. This talk will explore the constraints on the composition of the dust particles by comparing the altitude of the deposition layers to the observed haze layers.

  2. Radiation-induced transgenerational instability.

    PubMed

    Dubrova, Yuri E

    2003-10-13

    To date, the analysis of mutation induction has provided an irrefutable evidence for an elevated germline mutation rate in the parents directly exposed to ionizing radiation and a number of chemical mutagens. However, the results of numerous publications suggest that radiation may also have an indirect effect on genome stability, which is transmitted through the germ line of irradiated parents to their offspring. This review describes the phenomenon of transgenerational instability and focuses on the data showing increased cancer incidence and elevated mutation rates in the germ line and somatic tissues of the offspring of irradiated parents. The possible mechanisms of transgenerational instability are also discussed.

  3. Research on aviation fuel instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, C. E.; Bittker, D. A.; Cohen, S. M.; Seng, G. T.

    1984-01-01

    The problems associated with aircraft fuel instability are discussed. What is currently known about the problem is reviewed and a research program to identify those areas where more research is needed is discussed. The term fuel instability generally refers to the gums, sediments, or deposits which can form as a result of a set of complex chemical reactions when a fuel is stored for a long period at ambient conditions or when the fuel is thermally stressed inside the fuel system of an aircraft.

  4. Beam instabilities in hadron synchrotrons

    DOE PAGES

    Metral, E.; T. Argyropoulos; Bartosik, H.; ...

    2016-04-01

    Beam instabilities cover a wide range of effects in particle accelerators and they have been the subjects of intense research for several decades. As the machines performance was pushed new mechanisms were revealed and nowadays the challenge consists in studying the interplays between all these intricate phenomena, as it is very often not possible to treat the different effects separately. Furthermore, the aim of this paper is to review the main mechanisms, discussing in particular the recent developments of beam instability theories and simulations.

  5. Ablation enhancement of silicon by ultrashort double-pulse laser ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Xin; Shin, Yung C.

    In this study, the ultrashort double-pulse ablation of silicon is investigated. An atomistic simulation model is developed to analyze the underlying physics. It is revealed that the double-pulse ablation could significantly increase the ablation rate of silicon, compared with the single pulse ablation with the same total pulse energy, which is totally different from the case of metals. In the long pulse delay range (over 1 ps), the enhancement is caused by the metallic transition of melted silicon with the corresponding absorption efficiency. At ultrashort pulse delay (below 1 ps), the enhancement is due to the electron excitation by the first pulse.more » The enhancement only occurs at low and moderate laser fluence. The ablation is suppressed at high fluence due to the strong plasma shielding effect.« less

  6. Helical instability in film blowing process: Analogy to buckling instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Joo Sung; Kwon, Ilyoung; Jung, Hyun Wook; Hyun, Jae Chun

    2017-12-01

    The film blowing process is one of the most important polymer processing operations, widely used for producing bi-axially oriented film products in a single-step process. Among the instabilities observed in this film blowing process, i.e., draw resonance and helical motion occurring on the inflated film bubble, the helical instability is a unique phenomenon portraying the snake-like undulation motion of the bubble, having the period on the order of few seconds. This helical instability in the film blowing process is commonly found at the process conditions of a high blow-up ratio with too low a freezeline position and/or too high extrusion temperature. In this study, employing an analogy to the buckling instability for falling viscous threads, the compressive force caused by the pressure difference between inside and outside of the film bubble is introduced into the simulation model along with the scaling law derived from the force balance between viscous force and centripetal force of the film bubble. The simulation using this model reveals a close agreement with the experimental results of the film blowing process of polyethylene polymers such as low density polyethylene and linear low density polyethylene.

  7. Photoacoustic characterization of radiofrequency ablation lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchard, Richard; Dana, Nicholas; Di Biase, Luigi; Natale, Andrea; Emelianov, Stanislav

    2012-02-01

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) procedures are used to destroy abnormal electrical pathways in the heart that can cause cardiac arrhythmias. Current methods relying on fluoroscopy, echocardiography and electrical conduction mapping are unable to accurately assess ablation lesion size. In an effort to better visualize RFA lesions, photoacoustic (PA) and ultrasonic (US) imaging were utilized to obtain co-registered images of ablated porcine cardiac tissue. The left ventricular free wall of fresh (i.e., never frozen) porcine hearts was harvested within 24 hours of the animals' sacrifice. A THERMOCOOLR Ablation System (Biosense Webster, Inc.) operating at 40 W for 30-60 s was used to induce lesions through the endocardial and epicardial walls of the cardiac samples. Following lesion creation, the ablated tissue samples were placed in 25 °C saline to allow for multi-wavelength PA imaging. Samples were imaged with a VevoR 2100 ultrasound system (VisualSonics, Inc.) using a modified 20-MHz array that could provide laser irradiation to the sample from a pulsed tunable laser (Newport Corp.) to allow for co-registered photoacoustic-ultrasound (PAUS) imaging. PA imaging was conducted from 750-1064 nm, with a surface fluence of approximately 15 mJ/cm2 maintained during imaging. In this preliminary study with PA imaging, the ablated region could be well visualized on the surface of the sample, with contrasts of 6-10 dB achieved at 750 nm. Although imaging penetration depth is a concern, PA imaging shows promise in being able to reliably visualize RF ablation lesions.

  8. Global microwave endometrial ablation for menorrhagia treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fallahi, Hojjatollah; Å ebek, Jan; Frattura, Eric; Schenck, Jessica; Prakash, Punit

    2017-02-01

    Thermal ablation is a dominant therapeutic option for minimally invasive treatment of menorrhagia. Compared to other energy modalities for ablation, microwaves offer the advantages of conformal energy delivery to tissue within short times. The objective of endometrial ablation is to destroy the endometrial lining of the uterine cavity, with the clinical goal of achieving reduction in bleeding. Previous efforts have demonstrated clinical use of microwaves for endometrial ablation. A considerable shortcoming of most systems is that they achieve ablation of the target by translating the applicator in a point-to-point fashion. Consequently, treatment outcome may be highly dependent on physician skill. Global endometrial ablation (GEA) not only eliminates this operator dependence and simplifies the procedure but also facilitates shorter and more reliable treatments. The objective of our study was to investigate antenna structures and microwave energy delivery parameters to achieve GEA. Another objective was to investigate a method for automatic and reliable determination of treatment end-point. A 3D-coupled FEM electromagnetic and heat transfer model with temperature and frequency dependent material properties was implemented to characterize microwave GEA. The unique triangular geometry of the uterus where lateral narrow walls extend from the cervix to the fundus forming a wide base and access afforded through an endocervical approach limit the overall diameter of the final device. We investigated microwave antenna designs in a deployed state inside the uterus. The impact of ablation duration on treatment outcome was investigated. Prototype applicators were fabricated and experimentally evaluated in ex vivo tissue to verify the simulation results and demonstrate proof-of-concept.

  9. Experiments on the Dynamics and Hydrodynamic Instabilities of Ablatively Accelerated Targets.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-02-01

    pressure and velocities obtained using the double foil tech - diance nonuniformities has been investigated previously and 430 Appi P"v$ Lett.. Vol 41. No, 5...NRL is evaluating for the Department of Energy the feasibility of using direct laser drive to Implode fusion pellets.t Mission Research Corporation...MRC) has contracted to support this experiment by using its best effort to perform the tasks summarized below: A parametric study shall be performed

  10. Epicardial Radiofrequency Ablation Failure During Ablation Procedures for Ventricular Arrhythmias: Reasons and Implications for Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Baldinger, Samuel H; Kumar, Saurabh; Barbhaiya, Chirag R; Mahida, Saagar; Epstein, Laurence M; Michaud, Gregory F; John, Roy; Tedrow, Usha B; Stevenson, William G

    2015-12-01

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) from the epicardial space for ventricular arrhythmias is limited or impossible in some cases. Reasons for epicardial ablation failure and the effect on outcome have not been systematically analyzed. We assessed reasons for epicardial RFA failure relative to the anatomic target area and the type of heart disease and assessed the effect of failed epicardial RFA on outcome after ablation procedures for ventricular arrhythmias in a large single-center cohort. Epicardial access was attempted during 309 ablation procedures in 277 patients and was achieved in 291 procedures (94%). Unlimited ablation in an identified target region could be performed in 181 cases (59%), limited ablation was possible in 22 cases (7%), and epicardial ablation was deemed not feasible in 88 cases (28%). Reasons for failed or limited ablation were unsuccessful epicardial access (6%), failure to identify an epicardial target (15%), proximity to a coronary artery (13%), proximity to the phrenic nerve (6%), and complications (<1%). Epicardial RFA was impeded in the majority of cases targeting the left ventricular summit region. Acute complications occurred in 9%. The risk for acute ablation failure was 8.3× higher (4.5-15.0; P<0.001) after no or limited epicardial RFA compared with unlimited RFA, and patients with unlimited epicardial RFA had better recurrence-free survival rates (P<0.001). Epicardial RFA for ventricular arrhythmias is often limited even when pericardial access is successful. Variability of success is dependent on the target area, and the presence of factors limiting ablation is associated with worse outcomes. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  11. Microwave ablation versus radiofrequency ablation in the kidney: high-power triaxial antennas create larger ablation zones than similarly sized internally cooled electrodes.

    PubMed

    Laeseke, Paul F; Lee, Fred T; Sampson, Lisa A; van der Weide, Daniel W; Brace, Christopher L

    2009-09-01

    To determine whether microwave ablation with high-power triaxial antennas creates significantly larger ablation zones than radiofrequency (RF) ablation with similarly sized internally cooled electrodes. Twenty-eight 12-minute ablations were performed in an in vivo porcine kidney model. RF ablations were performed with a 200-W pulsed generator and either a single 17-gauge cooled electrode (n = 9) or three switched electrodes spaced 1.5 cm apart (n = 7). Microwave ablations were performed with one (n = 7), two (n = 3), or three (n = 2) 17-gauge triaxial antennas to deliver 90 W continuous power per antenna. Multiple antennas were powered simultaneously. Temperatures 1 cm from the applicator were measured during two RF and microwave ablations each. Animals were euthanized after ablation and ablation zone diameter, cross-sectional area, and circularity were measured. Comparisons between groups were performed with use of a mixed-effects model with P values less than .05 indicating statistical significance. No adverse events occurred during the procedures. Three-electrode RF (mean area, 14.7 cm(2)) and single-antenna microwave (mean area, 10.9 cm(2)) ablation zones were significantly larger than single-electrode RF zones (mean area, 5.6 cm(2); P = .001 and P = .0355, respectively). No significant differences were detected between single-antenna microwave and multiple-electrode RF. Ablation zone circularity was similar across groups (P > .05). Tissue temperatures were higher during microwave ablation (maximum temperature of 123 degrees C vs 100 degrees C for RF). Microwave ablation with high-power triaxial antennas created larger ablation zones in normal porcine kidneys than RF ablation with similarly sized applicators.

  12. Indirect drive ablative Rayleigh-Taylor experiments with rugby hohlraums on OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casner, A.; Galmiche, D.; Huser, G.; Jadaud, J.-P.; Liberatore, S.; Vandenboomgaerde, M.

    2009-09-01

    Results of ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instability growth experiments performed in indirect drive on the OMEGA laser facility [T. R. Boehly, D. L. Brown, S. Craxton et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] are reported. These experiments aim at benchmarking hydrocodes simulations and ablator instabilities growth in conditions relevant to ignition in the framework of the Laser MégaJoule [C. Cavailler, Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 47, 389 (2005)]. The modulated samples under study were made of germanium-doped plastic (CHGe), which is the nominal ablator for future ignition experiments. The incident x-ray drive was provided using rugby-shaped hohlraums [M. Vandenboomgaerde, J. Bastian, A. Casner et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 065004 (2007)] and was characterized by means of absolute time-resolved soft x-ray power measurements through a dedicated diagnostic hole, shock breakout data and one-dimensional and two-dimensional (2D) side-on radiographies. All these independent x-ray drive diagnostics lead to an actual on-foil flux that is about 50% smaller than laser-entrance-hole measurements. The experimentally inferred flux is used to simulate experimental optical depths obtained from face-on radiographies for an extensive set of initial conditions: front-side single-mode (wavelength λ =35, 50, and 70 μm) and two-mode perturbations (wavelength λ =35 and 70 μm, in phase or in opposite phase). Three-dimensional pattern growth is also compared with the 2D case. Finally the case of the feedthrough mechanism is addressed with rear-side modulated foils.

  13. Comparison of the Three NIF Ablators

    SciTech Connect

    Kritcher, A. L.; Clark, D. S.; Haan, S. W.

    Indirect drive implosion experiments on NIF have now been performed using three different ablator materials: glow discharge polymer (GDP) or CH, high density carbon (HDC, which we also refer to as diamond), and sputtered beryllium (Be). It has been appreciated for some time that each of these materials has specific advantages and disadvantages as an ICF ablator.[1-4] In light of experiments conducted on NIF in the last few years, how do these ablators compare? Given current understanding, is any ablator more or less likely to reach ignition on NIF? Has the understanding of their respective strengths and weaknesses changed sincemore » NIF experiments began? How are those strengths and weaknesses highlighted by implosion designs currently being tested or planned for testing soon? This document aims to address these questions by combining modern simulation results with a survey of the current experimental data base. More particularly, this document is meant to fulfill an L2 Milestone for FY17 to “Document our understanding of the relative advantages and disadvantages of CH, HDC, and Be designs.” Note that this document does not aim to recommend a down-selection of the current three ablator choices. It is intended only to gather and document the current understanding of the differences between these ablators and thereby inform the choices made in planning future implosion experiments. This document has two themes: (i) We report on a reanalysis project in which post-shot simulations were done on a common basis for layered shots using each ablator. This included data from keyholes, 2D ConA, and so forth, from each campaign, leading up to the layered shots. (“Keyholes” are shots dedicated to measuring the shock timing in a NIF target, as described in Ref. 5. “2DConAs” are backlit implosions in which the symmetry of the implosion is measured between about half and full convergence, as described in Ref. 6.) This set of common-basis postshot simulations is

  14. Infrared thermography and thermocouple mapping of radiofrequency renal ablation to assess treatment adequacy and ablation margins.

    PubMed

    Ogan, Kenneth; Roberts, William W; Wilhelm, David M; Bonnell, Leonard; Leiner, Dennis; Lindberg, Guy; Kavoussi, Louis R; Cadeddu, Jeffrey A

    2003-07-01

    The primary disadvantage of renal tumor RF ablation is the inability to monitor the intraoperative propagation of the RF lesion with real-time imaging. We sought to assess whether adequately lethal temperatures are obtained at the margins of the intended ablation zone using laparoscopic thermography to monitor radiofrequency (RF) lesions in real time, thermocouple measurements, and histopathologic evaluation. Renal RF lesions were created under direct laparoscopic vision in the upper (1 cm diameter) and lower (2 cm) poles of the right kidney in 5 female pigs. The RF lesions were produced with the RITA generator and probe, set at 105 degrees C for 5-minute ablations. During RF treatment, a laparoscopic infrared (IR) camera measured the surface parenchymal temperatures, as did multiple thermocouples. The pigs were then either immediately killed (n = 3) or allowed to live for 2 weeks (n = 2). The kidneys were removed to correlate the temperature measurements with histologic analysis of the ablated lesion. Using a threshold temperature of greater than 70 degrees C for visual "temperature" color change, the IR camera identified the region of pathologic necrosis of the renal parenchyma during RF ablation. Thermocouple measurements demonstrated that the temperatures at the intended ablation radius reached 77.5 degrees C at the renal surface and 83.7 degrees C centrally, and temperatures 5 mm beyond the set radius reached 52.6 degrees C at the surface and 47.7 degrees C centrally. The average diameter of the gross lesion on the surface of the kidney measured 17.1 mm and 22.4 mm for 1-cm and 2-cm ablations, respectively. These surface measurements correlated with an average diameter of 16.1 mm and 15.9 mm (1-cm and 2-cm ablations, respectively) as measured with the IR camera. All cells within these ablation zones were nonviable by nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide diaphorase analysis. The average depth of the lesions measured 19 mm (1-cm ablation) and 25 mm (2-cm ablation

  15. Fracture in Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agrawal, Parul; Chavez-Garcia, Jose; Pham, John

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a novel technique to understand the failure mechanisms inside thermal protection materials. The focus of this research is on the class of materials known as phenolic impregnated carbon ablators. It has successfully flown on the Stardust spacecraft and is the thermal protection system material chosen for the Mars Science Laboratory and SpaceX Dragon spacecraft. Although it has good thermal properties, structurally, it is a weak material. To understand failure mechanisms in carbon ablators, fracture tests were performed on FiberForm(Registered TradeMark) (precursor), virgin, and charred ablator materials. Several samples of these materials were tested to investigate failure mechanisms at a microstructural scale. Stress-strain data were obtained simultaneously to estimate the tensile strength and toughness. It was observed that cracks initiated and grew in the FiberForm when a critical stress limit was reached such that the carbon fibers separated from the binder. However, both for virgin and charred carbon ablators, crack initiation and growth occurred in the matrix (phenolic) phase. Both virgin and charred carbon ablators showed greater strength values compared with FiberForm samples, confirming that the presence of the porous matrix helps in absorbing the fracture energy.

  16. Design calculations for NIF convergent ablator experiments.

    SciTech Connect

    Callahan, Debra; Leeper, Ramon Joe; Spears, B. K.

    2010-11-01

    Design calculations for NIF convergent ablator experiments will be described. The convergent ablator experiments measure the implosion trajectory, velocity, and ablation rate of an x-ray driven capsule and are a important component of the U. S. National Ignition Campaign at NIF. The design calculations are post-processed to provide simulations of the key diagnostics: (1) Dante measurements of hohlraum x-ray flux and spectrum, (2) streaked radiographs of the imploding ablator shell, (3) wedge range filter measurements of D-He3 proton output spectra, and (4) GXD measurements of the imploded core. The simulated diagnostics will be compared to the experimental measurements to providemore » an assessment of the accuracy of the design code predictions of hohlraum radiation temperature, capsule ablation rate, implosion velocity, shock flash areal density, and x-ray bang time. Post-shot versions of the design calculations are used to enhance the understanding of the experimental measurements and will assist in choosing parameters for subsequent shots and the path towards optimal ignition capsule tuning.« less

  17. The Chemistry of Beer Instability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Graham G.

    2004-01-01

    Brewing of beer, one of the oldest biotechnology industries was one of the earliest processes to be undertaken on commercial basis. Biological instability involves contamination of bacteria, yeast, or mycelia fungi and there is always a risk in brewing that beer can become contaminated by micro-organisms.

  18. Lending sociodynamics and economic instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkins, Raymond J.

    2011-11-01

    We show how the dynamics of economic instability and financial crises articulated by Keynes in the General Theory and developed by Minsky as the Financial Instability Hypothesis can be formalized using Weidlich’s sociodynamics of opinion formation. The model addresses both the lending sentiment of a lender in isolation as well as the impact on that lending sentiment of the behavior of other lenders. The risk associated with lending is incorporated through a stochastic treatment of loan dynamics that treats prepayment and default as competing risks. With this model we are able to generate endogenously the rapid changes in lending opinion that attend slow changes in lending profitability and find these dynamics to be consistent with the rise and collapse of the non-Agency mortgage-backed securities market in 2007/2008. As the parameters of this model correspond to well-known phenomena in cognitive and social psychology, we can both explain why economic instability has proved robust to advances in risk measurement and suggest how policy for reducing economic instability might be formulated in an experimentally sound manner.

  19. Cinerama sickness and postural instability.

    PubMed

    Bos, Jelte E; Ledegang, Wietse D; Lubeck, Astrid J A; Stins, John F

    2013-01-01

    Motion sickness symptoms and increased postural instability induced by motion pictures have been reported in a laboratory, but not in a real cinema. We, therefore, carried out an observational study recording sickness severity and postural instability in 19 subjects before, immediately and 45 min after watching a 1 h 3D aviation documentary in a cinema. Sickness was significantly larger right after the movie than before, and in a lesser extent still so after 45 min. The average standard deviation of the lateral centre of pressure excursions was significantly larger only right afterwards. When low-pass filtered at 0.1 Hz, lateral and for-aft excursions were both significantly larger right after the movie, while for-aft excursions then remained larger even after 45 min. Speculating on previous findings, we predict more sickness and postural instability in 3D than in 2D movies, also suggesting a possible, but yet unknown risk for work-related activities and vehicle operation. Watching motion pictures may be sickening and posturally destabilising, but effects in a cinema are unknown. We, therefore, carried out an observational study showing that sickness then is mainly an issue during the exposure while postural instability is an issue afterwards.

  20. Selected instability indices in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siedlecki, Mariusz

    2009-04-01

    A climatology of various parameters associated with severe weather and convective storms has been created for Europe that involves using radiosounding data collected at the University of Wyoming for the period from 1991 to 2005. The analysis is based on monthly means, frequency distributions of such parameters as convective available potential energy (CAPE), convective inhibition energy (CIN), KI - index, total totals index (TTI), and the severe weather threat index (SWEAT). Monthly average CAPE values exceeding 300 Jkg-1 are observed over the west Mediterranean Sea and the neighboring coastal countries. The similar seasonal cycle and spatial distributions exhibit CIN fields with summer monthly means above 100 Jkg-1 observed on the south part of the researched domain. The KI, TTI, and SWEAT indices, which assess both the lapse ratio between 850 and 500 hPa and low level humidity, show the privileged region (the Alpine area and the Carpathian Basin) with the highest instability conditions. Orography clearly plays an important role in this structure. Farther from this area, the monthly average decreases to the east, west, north, and south of the research domain. Ward’s procedure was applied to create objective regionalization according to instability conditions. This method tends to produce two regions with relatively different instability conditions and few subregions with similar conditions. The first region, covering the Alpine area, the west Mediterranean Sea, west Turkey and the southern Ukraine, is characterized by the highest instability. The rest of the investigated area is the second region with a more stable atmosphere.

  1. Mixing driven by transient buoyancy flows. I. Kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duval, W. M. B.; Zhong, H.; Batur, C.

    2018-05-01

    Mixing of two miscible liquids juxtaposed inside a cavity initially separated by a divider, whose buoyancy-driven motion is initiated via impulsive perturbation of divider motion that can generate the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability, is investigated experimentally. The measured Lagrangian history of interface motion that contains the continuum mechanics of mixing shows self-similar nearly Gaussian length stretch distribution for a wide range of control parameters encompassing an approximate Hele-Shaw cell to a three-dimensional cavity. Because of the initial configuration of the interface which is parallel to the gravitational field, we show that at critical initial potential energy mixing occurs through the stretching of the interface, which shows frontogenesis, and folding, owing to an overturning motion that results in unstable density stratification and produces an ideal condition for the growth of the single wavelength Rayleigh-Taylor instability. The initial perturbation of the interface and flow field generates the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability and causes kinks at the interface, which grow into deep fingers during overturning motion and unfold into local whorl structures that merge and self-organize into the Rayleigh-Taylor morphology (RTM) structure. For a range of parametric space that yields two-dimensional flows, the unfolding of the instability through a supercritical bifurcation yields an asymmetric pairwise structure exhibiting smooth RTM that transitions to RTM fronts with fractal structures that contain small length scales for increasing Peclet numbers. The late stage of the RTM structure unfolds into an internal breakwave that breaks down through wall and internal collision and sets up the condition for self-induced sloshing that decays exponentially as the two fluids become stably stratified with a diffusive region indicating local molecular diffusion.

  2. Studying Electromagnetic Beam Instabilities in Laser Plasmas for Alfvénic Parallel Shock Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorst, R. S.; Heuer, P. V.; Weidl, M. S.; Schaeffer, D. B.; Constantin, C. G.; Vincena, S.; Tripathi, S.; Gekelman, W.; Winske, D.; Niemann, C.

    2017-10-01

    We present measurements of the collisionless interaction between an exploding laser-produced plasma (LPP) and a large, magnetized ambient plasma. The LPP is created by focusing a high energy laser on a target embedded in the ambient Large Plasma Device (LAPD) plasma at the University of California, Los Angeles. The resulting super-Alfvénic (MA = 5) ablated material moves parallel to the background magnetic field (300 G) through 12m (80 δ i) of the LAPD, interacting with the ambient Helium plasma (ni = 9 ×1012 cm-3) through electromagnetic beam instabilities. The debris is characterized by Langmuir probes and a time-resolved fluorescence monochromator. Waves in the magnetic field produced by the instabilities are diagnosed by an array of 3-axis `bdot' magnetic field probes. Measurements are compared to hybrid simulations of both the experiment and of parallel shocks.

  3. Effects of material composition on the ablation performance of low density elastomeric ablators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tompkins, S. S.; Kabana, W. P.

    1973-01-01

    The ablation performance of materials composed of various concentrations of nylon, hollow silica spheres, hollow phenolic spheres, and four elastomeric resins was determined. Both blunt-body and flat-panel specimens were used, the cold-wall heating-rate ranges being 0.11 to 0.8 MW/sq m, respectively. The corresponding surface pressure ranges for these tests were 0.017 to 0.037 atmosphere and 0.004 to 0.005 atmosphere. Some of the results show that (1) the addition of nylon significantly improved the ablation performance, but the nylon was not compatible with one resin system; (2) panel and blunt-body specimen data do not show the same effect of phenolic sphere content on ablation effectiveness; and (3) there appears to be an optimum concentration of hollow silica spheres for good ablation performance. The composition of an efficient, nonproprietary ablator for lifting body application is identified and the ablation performance of this ablator is compared with the performance of three commercially available materials.

  4. Influence of ablation wavelength and time on optical properties of laser ablated carbon dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isnaeni, Hanna, M. Yusrul; Pambudi, A. A.; Murdaka, F. H.

    2017-01-01

    Carbon dots, which are unique and applicable materials, have been produced using many techniques. In this work, we have fabricated carbon dots made of coconut fiber using laser ablation technique. The purpose of this work is to evaluate two ablation parameters, which are ablation wavelength and ablation time. We used pulsed laser from Nd:YAG laser with emit wavelength at 355 nm, 532 nm and 1064 nm. We varied ablation time one hour and two hours. Photoluminescence and time-resolved photoluminescence setup were used to study the optical properties of fabricated carbon dots. In general, fabricated carbon dots emit bluish green color emission upon excitation by blue laser. We found that carbon dots fabricated using 1064 nm laser produced the highest carbon dots emission among other samples. The peak wavelength of carbon dots emission is between 495 nm until 505 nm, which gives bluish green color emission. Two hours fabricated carbon dots gave four times higher emission than one hour fabricated carbon dot. More emission intensity of carbon dots means more carbon dots nanoparticles were fabricated during laser ablation process. In addition, we also measured electron dynamics of carbon dots using time-resolved photoluminescence. We found that sample with higher emission has longer electron decay time. Our finding gives optimum condition of carbon dots fabrication from coconut fiber using laser ablation technique. Moreover, fabricated carbon dots are non-toxic nanoparticles that can be applied for health, bio-tagging and medical applications.

  5. Pulsed laser ablation of IC packages for device failure analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Ming Hui; Mai, ZhiHong; Chen, G. X.; Thiam, Thomas; Song, Wen D.; Lu, Yongfeng; Soh, Chye E.; Chong, Tow Chong

    2002-06-01

    Pulsed laser ablation of mold compounds for IC packaging in air and with steam assistance is investigated. It is applied to decap IC packages and expose computer CPU dies for the device failure analyses. Compared with chemical decapping, the laser ablation has advantages of being fast speed, non- contact and dry processing. Laser ablation with the steam assistance results in higher ablation rate and wider ablated crater with much smoother surface morphology. It implies that the steam assisted laser ablation can achieve a faster and better quality laser processing. Audible acoustic wave and plasma optical signal diagnostics are also carried out to have a better understanding of the mechanisms behind. Light wavelength and laser fluence applied in the decapping are two important parameters. The 532 nm Nd:YAG laser decapping at a low laser fluence can achieve a large decapping area with a fine ablation profile. IC packages decapped by the laser ablation show good quality for the device failure analyses.

  6. Laser ablated hard coating for microtools

    DOEpatents

    McLean, II, William; Balooch, Mehdi; Siekhaus, Wigbert J.

    1998-05-05

    Wear-resistant coatings composed of laser ablated hard carbon films, are deposited by pulsed laser ablation using visible light, on instruments such as microscope tips and micro-surgical tools. Hard carbon, known as diamond-like carbon (DLC), films produced by pulsed laser ablation using visible light enhances the abrasion resistance, wear characteristics, and lifetimes of small tools or instruments, such as small, sharp silicon tips used in atomic probe microscopy without significantly affecting the sharpness or size of these devices. For example, a 10-20 nm layer of diamond-like carbon on a standard silicon atomic force microscope (AFM) tip, enables the useful operating life of the tip to be increased by at least twofold. Moreover, the low inherent friction coefficient of the DLC coating leads to higher resolution for AFM tips operating in the contact mode.

  7. Modeling topology formation during laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodapp, T. W.; Fleming, P. R.

    1998-07-01

    Micromachining high aspect-ratio structures can be accomplished through ablation of surfaces with high-powered lasers. Industrial manufacturers now use these methods to form complex and regular surfaces at the 10-1000 μm feature size range. Despite its increasingly wide acceptance on the manufacturing floor, the underlying photochemistry of the ablation mechanism, and hence the dynamics of the machining process, is still a question of considerable debate. We have constructed a computer model to investigate and predict the topological formation of ablated structures. Qualitative as well as quantitative agreement with excimer-laser machined polyimide substrates has been demonstrated. This model provides insights into the drilling process for high-aspect-ratio holes.

  8. Specific Impulse Definition for Ablative Laser Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herren, Kenneth A.; Gregory, Don A.

    2004-01-01

    The term "specific impulse" is so ingrained in the field of rocket propulsion that it is unlikely that any fundamental argument would be taken seriously for its removal. It is not an ideal measure but it does give an indication of the amount of mass flow (mass loss/time), as in fuel rate, required to produce a measured thrust over some time period This investigation explores the implications of being able to accurately measure the ablation rate and how the language used to describe the specific impulse results may have to change slightly, and recasts the specific impulse as something that is not a time average. It is not currently possible to measure the ablation rate accurately in real time so it is generally just assumed that a constant amount of material will be removed for each laser pulse delivered The specific impulse dependence on the ablation rate is determined here as a correction to the classical textbook definition.

  9. Thermal Ablation Modeling for Silicate Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Yih-Kanq

    2016-01-01

    A thermal ablation model for silicates is proposed. The model includes the mass losses through the balance between evaporation and condensation, and through the moving molten layer driven by surface shear force and pressure gradient. This model can be applied in ablation simulations of the meteoroid or glassy Thermal Protection Systems for spacecraft. Time-dependent axi-symmetric computations are performed by coupling the fluid dynamics code, Data-Parallel Line Relaxation program, with the material response code, Two-dimensional Implicit Thermal Ablation simulation program, to predict the mass lost rates and shape change. For model validation, the surface recession of fused amorphous quartz rod is computed, and the recession predictions reasonably agree with available data. The present parametric studies for two groups of meteoroid earth entry conditions indicate that the mass loss through moving molten layer is negligibly small for heat-flux conditions at around 1 MW/cm(exp. 2).

  10. Numerical Modeling of Ablation Heat Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ewing, Mark E.; Laker, Travis S.; Walker, David T.

    2013-01-01

    A unique numerical method has been developed for solving one-dimensional ablation heat transfer problems. This paper provides a comprehensive description of the method, along with detailed derivations of the governing equations. This methodology supports solutions for traditional ablation modeling including such effects as heat transfer, material decomposition, pyrolysis gas permeation and heat exchange, and thermochemical surface erosion. The numerical scheme utilizes a control-volume approach with a variable grid to account for surface movement. This method directly supports implementation of nontraditional models such as material swelling and mechanical erosion, extending capabilities for modeling complex ablation phenomena. Verifications of the numerical implementation are provided using analytical solutions, code comparisons, and the method of manufactured solutions. These verifications are used to demonstrate solution accuracy and proper error convergence rates. A simple demonstration of a mechanical erosion (spallation) model is also provided to illustrate the unique capabilities of the method.

  11. Performance of Conformable Ablators in Aerothermal Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, J.; Fan, W.; Skokova, K.; Stackpoole, M.; Beck, R.; Chavez-Garcia, J.

    2012-01-01

    Conformable Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator, a cousin of Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator (PICA), was developed at NASA Ames Research Center as a lightweight thermal protection system under the Fundamental Aeronautics Program. PICA is made using a brittle carbon substrate, which has a very low strain to failure. Conformable PICA is made using a flexible carbon substrate, a felt in this case. The flexible felt significantly increases the strain to failure of the ablator. PICA is limited by its thermal mechanical properties. Future NASA missions will require heatshields that are more fracture resistant than PICA and, as a result, NASA Ames is working to improve PICAs performance by developing conformable PICA to meet these needs. Research efforts include tailoring the chemistry of conformable PICA with varying amounts of additives to enhance mechanical properties and testing them in aerothermal environments. This poster shows the performance of conformable PICA variants in arc jets tests. Some mechanical and thermal properties will also be presented.

  12. Laser ablated hard coating for microtools

    DOEpatents

    McLean, W. II; Balooch, M.; Siekhaus, W.J.

    1998-05-05

    Wear-resistant coatings composed of laser ablated hard carbon films, are deposited by pulsed laser ablation using visible light, on instruments such as microscope tips and micro-surgical tools. Hard carbon, known as diamond-like carbon (DLC), films produced by pulsed laser ablation using visible light enhances the abrasion resistance, wear characteristics, and lifetimes of small tools or instruments, such as small, sharp silicon tips used in atomic probe microscopy without significantly affecting the sharpness or size of these devices. For example, a 10--20 nm layer of diamond-like carbon on a standard silicon atomic force microscope (AFM) tip, enables the useful operating life of the tip to be increased by at least twofold. Moreover, the low inherent friction coefficient of the DLC coating leads to higher resolution for AFM tips operating in the contact mode. 12 figs.

  13. Image-Guided Spinal Ablation: A Review

    SciTech Connect

    Tsoumakidou, Georgia, E-mail: gtsoumakidou@yahoo.com; Koch, Guillaume, E-mail: guillaume.koch@chru-strasbourg.fr; Caudrelier, Jean, E-mail: jean.caudrelier@chru-strasbourg.fr

    2016-09-15

    The image-guided thermal ablation procedures can be used to treat a variety of benign and malignant spinal tumours. Small size osteoid osteoma can be treated with laser or radiofrequency. Larger tumours (osteoblastoma, aneurysmal bone cyst and metastasis) can be addressed with radiofrequency or cryoablation. Results on the literature of spinal microwave ablation are scarce, and thus it should be used with caution. A distinct advantage of cryoablation is the ability to monitor the ice-ball by intermittent CT or MRI. The different thermal insulation, temperature and electrophysiological monitoring techniques should be applied. Cautious pre-procedural planning and intermittent intra-procedural monitoring of themore » ablation zone can help reduce neural complications. Tumour histology, patient clinical-functional status and life-expectancy should define the most efficient and least disabling treatment option.« less

  14. Diagnosis and ablation of multiform fascicular tachycardia.

    PubMed

    Sung, Raphael K; Kim, Albert M; Tseng, Zian H; Han, Frederick; Inada, Keiichi; Tedrow, Usha B; Viswanathan, Mohan N; Badhwar, Nitish; Varosy, Paul D; Tanel, Ronn; Olgin, Jeffrey E; Stephenson, William G; Scheinman, Melvin

    2013-03-01

    Fascicular tachycardia (FT) is an uncommon cause of monomorphic sustained ventricular tachycardia (VT). We describe 6 cases of FT with multiform QRS morphologies. Six of 823 consecutive VT cases were retrospectively analyzed and found attributable to FT with multiform QRS patterns, with 3 cases exhibiting narrow QRS VT as well. All underwent electrophysiology study including fascicular potential mapping, entrainment pacing, and electroanatomic mapping. The first 3 cases describe similar multiform VT patterns with successful ablation in the upper mid septum. Initially, a right bundle branch block (RBBB) VT with superior axis was induced. Radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFCA) targeting the left posterior fascicle (LPF) resulted in a second VT with RBBB inferior axis. RFCA in the upper septum just apical to the LBB potential abolished VT in all cases. Cases 4 and 5 showed RBBB VT with alternating fascicular block compatible with upper septal dependent VT, resulting in bundle branch reentrant VT (BBRT) after ablation of LPF and left anterior fascicle (LAF). Finally, Cases 5 and 6 demonstrated spontaneous shift in QRS morphology during VT, implicating participation of a third fascicle. In Case 6, successful ablation was achieved over the proximal LAF, likely representing insertion of the auxiliary fascicle near the proximal LAF. Multiform FTs show a reentrant mechanism using multiple fascicular branches. We hypothesize that retrograde conduction over the septal fascicle produces alternate fascicular patterns as well as narrow VT forms. Ablation of the respective fascicle was successful in abolishing FT but does not preclude development of BBRT unless septal fascicle is targeted and ablated. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Effect of Radiofrequency Endometrial Ablation on Dysmenorrhea.

    PubMed

    Wyatt, Sabrina N; Banahan, Taylor; Tang, Ying; Nadendla, Kavita; Szychowski, Jeff M; Jenkins, Todd R

    To examine rates of dysmenorrhea after radiofrequency endometrial ablation in patients with and without known dysmenorrhea symptoms prior to the procedure in a diverse population. Retrospective cohort study (Canadian Task Force classification II-2). Academic gynecology practice. A total of 307 women underwent endometrial ablation between 2007 and 2013 at our institution. Patients who had preoperative and postoperative pain symptom assessments as well as a description of pain timing recorded were included in our analysis. Exclusion criteria were age <19 years and operative biopsy findings consistent with complex atypical hyperplasia. The difference in preoperative and postoperative rates of dysmenorrhea was evaluated. Demographic information and other outcome variables were used to evaluate factors associated with resolution of dysmenorrhea. A total of 307 patients who underwent radiofrequency endometrial ablation were identified. After exclusions, 296 charts were examined, and 144 patients met our enrollment criteria. The mean age of the study cohort was 45.4 ± 6.2 years; 57 patients (40%) were African American, 16 (11%) had a body mass index (BMI) > 40, and 41 (29%) were of normal weight. Preoperative dysmenorrhea was reported by 100 patients (69%); 48 of these patients (48%) experienced resolution of symptoms postoperatively. Only 3 of the 44 patients (7%) without preoperative dysmenorrhea reported new-onset dysmenorrhea postoperatively. Significantly fewer patients had dysmenorrhea after compared to before radiofrequency ablation (55 of 144 [38%] vs 100 of 144 [69%]; p < .001). Resolution of dysmenorrhea after ablation was associated with reduction in bleeding volume (p = .048) but not with a reduction in frequency of bleeding (p = .12). Approximately one-half of women who undergo radiofrequency endometrial ablation to treat heavy menstrual bleeding who also have preoperative dysmenorrhea exhibit documented pain resolution after the procedure

  16. [Magnetic navigation for ablation of cardiac arrhythmias].

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian; Hoff, Per Ivar; Solheim, Eivind; Schuster, Peter; Off, Morten Kristian; Ohm, Ole-Jørgen

    2010-08-12

    The first use of magnetic navigation for radiofrequency ablation of supraventricular tachycardias, was published in 2004. Subsequently, the method has been used for treatment of most types of tachyarrhythmias. This paper provides an overview of the method, with special emphasis on usefulness of a new remote-controlled magnetic navigation system. The paper is based on our own scientific experience and literature identified through a non-systematic search in PubMed. The magnetic navigation system consists of two external electromagnets (to be placed on opposite sides of the patient), which guide an ablation catheter (with a small magnet at the tip of the catheter) to the target area in the heart. The accuracy of this procedure is higher than that with manual navigation. Personnel can be quickly trained to use remote magnetic navigation, but the procedure itself is time-consuming, particularly for patients with atrial fibrillation. The major advantage is a considerably lower radiation burden to both patient and operator, in some studies more than 50 %, and a corresponding reduction in physical strain on the operator. The incidence of procedure-related complications seems to be lower than that observed with use of manually operated ablation catheters. Work is ongoing to improve magnetic ablation catheters and methods that can simplify mapping procedures and improve efficacy of arrhythmia ablation. The basic cost for installing a complete magnetic navigation laboratory may be three times that of a conventional electrophysiological laboratory. The new magnetic navigation system has proved to be applicable during ablation for a variety of tachyarrhythmias, but is still under development.

  17. Thermal Ablation for Benign Thyroid Nodules: Radiofrequency and Laser

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jeong Hyun; Valcavi, Roberto; Pacella, Claudio M.; Rhim, Hyunchul; Na, Dong Gyu

    2011-01-01

    Although ethanol ablation has been successfully used to treat cystic thyroid nodules, this procedure is less effective when the thyroid nodules are solid. Radiofrequency (RF) ablation, a newer procedure used to treat malignant liver tumors, has been valuable in the treatment of benign thyroid nodules regardless of the extent of the solid component. This article reviews the basic physics, techniques, applications, results, and complications of thyroid RF ablation, in comparison to laser ablation. PMID:21927553

  18. Subcellular analysis by laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Vertes, Akos; Stolee, Jessica A; Shrestha, Bindesh

    2014-12-02

    In various embodiments, a method of laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (LAESI-MS) may generally comprise micro-dissecting a cell comprising at least one of a cell wall and a cell membrane to expose at least one subcellular component therein, ablating the at least one subcellular component by an infrared laser pulse to form an ablation plume, intercepting the ablation plume by an electrospray plume to form ions, and detecting the ions by mass spectrometry.

  19. Mood instability: significance, definition and measurement.

    PubMed

    Broome, M R; Saunders, K E A; Harrison, P J; Marwaha, S

    2015-10-01

    Mood instability is common, and an important feature of several psychiatric disorders. We discuss the definition and measurement of mood instability, and review its prevalence, characteristics, neurobiological correlates and clinical implications. We suggest that mood instability has underappreciated transdiagnostic potential as an investigational and therapeutic target. © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2015.

  20. Voltage and pace-capture mapping of linear ablation lesions overestimates chronic ablation gap size.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Louisa; Harrison, James; Chubb, Henry; Whitaker, John; Mukherjee, Rahul K; Bloch, Lars Ølgaard; Andersen, Niels Peter; Dam, Høgni; Jensen, Henrik K; Niederer, Steven; Wright, Matthew; O'Neill, Mark; Williams, Steven E

    2018-04-26

    Conducting gaps in lesion sets are a major reason for failure of ablation procedures. Voltage mapping and pace-capture have been proposed for intra-procedural identification of gaps. We aimed to compare gap size measured acutely and chronically post-ablation to macroscopic gap size in a porcine model. Intercaval linear ablation was performed in eight Göttingen minipigs with a deliberate gap of ∼5 mm left in the ablation line. Gap size was measured by interpolating ablation contact force values between ablation tags and thresholding at a low force cut-off of 5 g. Bipolar voltage mapping and pace-capture mapping along the length of the line were performed immediately, and at 2 months, post-ablation. Animals were euthanized and gap sizes were measured macroscopically. Voltage thresholds to define scar were determined by receiver operating characteristic analysis as <0.56 mV (acutely) and <0.62 mV (chronically). Taking the macroscopic gap size as gold standard, error in gap measurements were determined for voltage, pace-capture, and ablation contact force maps. All modalities overestimated chronic gap size, by 1.4 ± 2.0 mm (ablation contact force map), 5.1 ± 3.4 mm (pace-capture), and 9.5 ± 3.8 mm (voltage mapping). Error on ablation contact force map gap measurements were significantly less than for voltage mapping (P = 0.003, Tukey's multiple comparisons test). Chronically, voltage mapping and pace-capture mapping overestimated macroscopic gap size by 11.9 ± 3.7 and 9.8 ± 3.5 mm, respectively. Bipolar voltage and pace-capture mapping overestimate the size of chronic gap formation in linear ablation lesions. The most accurate estimation of chronic gap size was achieved by analysis of catheter-myocardium contact force during ablation.

  1. Testing of Advanced Conformal Ablative TPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gasch, Matthew; Agrawal, Parul; Beck, Robin

    2013-01-01

    In support of the CA250 project, this paper details the results of a test campaign that was conducted at the Ames Arcjet Facility, wherein several novel low density thermal protection (TPS) materials were evaluated in an entry like environment. The motivation for these tests was to investigate whether novel conformal ablative TPS materials can perform under high heat flux and shear environment as a viable alternative to rigid ablators like PICA or Avcoat for missions like MSL and beyond. A conformable TPS over a rigid aeroshell has the potential to solve a number of challenges faced by traditional rigid TPS materials (such as tiled Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator (PICA) system on MSL, and honeycomb-based Avcoat on the Orion Multi Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV)). The compliant (high strain to failure) nature of the conformable ablative materials will allow better integration of the TPS with the underlying aeroshell structure and enable monolithic-like configuration and larger segments to be used in fabrication.A novel SPRITE1 architecture, developed by the researchers at NASA Ames was used for arcjet testing. This small probe like configuration with 450 spherecone, enabled us to test the materials in a combination of high heat flux, pressure and shear environment. The heat flux near the nose were in the range of 500-1000 W/sq cm whereas in the flank section of the test article the magnitudes were about 50 of the nose, 250-500W/sq cm range. There were two candidate conformable materials under consideration for this test series. Both test materials are low density (0.28 g/cu cm) similar to Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator (PICA) or Silicone Impregnated Refractory Ceramic Ablator (SIRCA) and are comprised of: A flexible carbon substrate (Carbon felt) infiltrated with an ablative resin system: phenolic (Conformal-PICA) or silicone (Conformal-SICA). The test demonstrated a successful performance of both the conformable ablators for heat flux conditions between 50

  2. General Model for Multicomponent Ablation Thermochemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milos, Frank S.; Marschall, Jochen; Rasky, Daniel J. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    A previous paper (AIAA 94-2042) presented equations and numerical procedures for modeling the thermochemical ablation and pyrolysis of thermal protection materials which contain multiple surface species. This work describes modifications and enhancements to the Multicomponent Ablation Thermochemistry (MAT) theory and code for application to the general case which includes surface area constraints, rate limited surface reactions, and non-thermochemical mass loss (failure). Detailed results and comparisons with data are presented for the Shuttle Orbiter reinforced carbon-carbon oxidation protection system which contains a mixture of sodium silicate (Na2SiO3), silica (SiO2), silicon carbide (SiC), and carbon (C).

  3. Effects of Laser Wavelength on Ablator Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Susan M.

    2014-01-01

    Wavelength-dependent or spectral radiation effects are potentially significant for thermal protection materials. NASA atmospheric entry simulations include trajectories with significant levels of shock layer radiation which is concentrated in narrow spectral lines. Tests using two different high powered lasers, the 10.6 micron LHMEL I CO2 laser and the near-infrared 1.07 micron fiber laser, on low density ablative thermal protection materials offer a unique opportunity to evaluate spectral effects. Test results indicated that the laser wavelength can impact the thermal response of an ablative material, in terms of bond-line temperatures, penetration times, mass losses, and char layer thicknesses.

  4. High throughput solar cell ablation system

    DOEpatents

    Harley, Gabriel; Pass, Thomas; Cousins, Peter John; Viatella, John

    2014-10-14

    A solar cell is formed using a solar cell ablation system. The ablation system includes a single laser source and several laser scanners. The laser scanners include a master laser scanner, with the rest of the laser scanners being slaved to the master laser scanner. A laser beam from the laser source is split into several laser beams, with the laser beams being scanned onto corresponding wafers using the laser scanners in accordance with one or more patterns. The laser beams may be scanned on the wafers using the same or different power levels of the laser source.

  5. High throughput solar cell ablation system

    DOEpatents

    Harley, Gabriel; Pass, Thomas; Cousins, Peter John; Viatella, John

    2012-09-11

    A solar cell is formed using a solar cell ablation system. The ablation system includes a single laser source and several laser scanners. The laser scanners include a master laser scanner, with the rest of the laser scanners being slaved to the master laser scanner. A laser beam from the laser source is split into several laser beams, with the laser beams being scanned onto corresponding wafers using the laser scanners in accordance with one or more patterns. The laser beams may be scanned on the wafers using the same or different power levels of the laser source.

  6. Experimental measurement of ablation effects in plasma armature railguns

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, J.V.; Parsons, W.M.

    1986-01-01

    Experimental evidence supporting the importance of ablation in plasma armature railguns is presented. Experiments conducted using the HYVAX and MIDI-2 railguns are described. Several indirect effects of ablation are identified from the experimental results. An improved ablation model of plasma armature dynamics is proposed which incorporates the restrike process.

  7. Experimental measurement of ablation effects in plasma armature railguns

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, J.V.; Parsons, W.M.

    1986-11-01

    Experimental evidence supporting the importance of ablation in plasma armature railguns is presented. Experiments conducted using the HYVAX and MIDI-2 railguns are described. Several indirect effects of ablation are identified from the experimental results. An improved ablation model of plasma armature dynamics is proposed which incorporates the restrike process.

  8. History and Physical Examination for Shoulder Instability.

    PubMed

    Haley, Col Chad A

    2017-09-01

    Glenohumeral instability frequently occurs in young active individuals especially those engaged in athletic and military activities. With advanced imaging and arthroscopic evaluation, our understanding of the injury patterns associated with instability has significantly improved. The majority of instability results from a traumatic anterior event which presents with common findings in the history, examination, and imaging studies. As such, a comprehensive evaluation of the patient is important to correctly diagnose the instability patterns and thus provide appropriate treatment intervention. With the correct diagnosis and improved surgical techniques, the majority of patients with instability can return to preinjury levels.

  9. A new classification system for shoulder instability.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, John E

    2010-04-01

    Glenohumeral joint instability is extremely common yet the definition and classification of instability remains unclear. In order to find the best ways to treat instability, the condition must be clearly defined and classified. This is particularly important so that treatment studies can be compared or combined, which can only be done if the patient population under study is the same. The purpose of this paper was to review the problems with historical methods of defining and classifying instability and to introduce the FEDS system of classifying instability, which was developed to have content validity and found to have high interobserver and intraobserver agreement.

  10. Developmental instability of gynodioecious Teucrium lusitanicum

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alados, C.L.; Navarro, T.; Cabezudo, B.; Emlen, J.M.; Freeman, C.

    1998-01-01

    Developmental instability was assessed in two geographical races of Teucrium lusitanicum using morphometric measures of vegetative and reproductive structures. T. lusitanicum is a gynodioecious species. Male sterile (female) individuals showed greater developmental instability at all sites. Plants located inland had higher developmental instability of vegetative characters and lower developmental instability of reproductive characters than coastal plants. These results support the contentions that (1) developmental instability is affected more by the disruption of co-adapted gene complexes than by lower heterozygosity, and (2) different habitat characteristics result in the differential response of vegetative and reproductive structures.

  11. Granular Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    SciTech Connect

    Vinningland, Jan Ludvig; Johnsen, Oistein; Flekkoey, Eirik G.

    2009-06-18

    A granular instability driven by gravity is studied experimentally and numerically. The instability arises as grains fall in a closed Hele-Shaw cell where a layer of dense granular material is positioned above a layer of air. The initially flat front defined by the grains subsequently develops into a pattern of falling granular fingers separated by rising bubbles of air. A transient coarsening of the front is observed right from the start by a finger merging process. The coarsening is later stabilized by new fingers growing from the center of the rising bubbles. The structures are quantified by means of Fouriermore » analysis and quantitative agreement between experiment and computation is shown. This analysis also reveals scale invariance of the flow structures under overall change of spatial scale.« less

  12. Instability after total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Werner, Brian C; Brown, Thomas E

    2012-01-01

    Instability following total hip arthroplasty (THA) is an unfortunately frequent and serious problem that requires thorough evaluation and preoperative planning before surgical intervention. Prevention through optimal index surgery is of great importance, as the management of an unstable THA is challenging even for an experienced joints surgeon. However, even after well-planned surgery, a significant incidence of recurrent instability still exists. Non-operative management is often successful if the components are well-fixed and correctly positioned in the absence of neurocognitive disorders. If conservative management fails, surgical options include revision of malpositioned components; exchange of modular components such as the femoral head and acetabular liner; bipolar arthroplasty; tripolar arthroplasty; use of a larger femoral head; use of a constrained liner; soft tissue reinforcement and advancement of the greater trochanter. PMID:22919568

  13. Plasma Instabilities in Hall Thrusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litvak, Andrei A.; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2000-10-01

    We describe theoretically waves in the channel of a Hall thruster, propagating transversely to the accelerated ion flow. In slab geometry, a two-fluid hydrodynamic theory with collisional terms shows that azimuthal lower-hybrid and Alfven waves will be unstable due to electron collisions in the presence of ExB drift. In addition, plasma inhomogeneities can drive other instabilities that can be analyzed through a dispersion relation in the well-known form of the Rayleigh equation. An instability condition is derived for azimuthal electrostatic waves, synchronized with the electron drift flow. Propagation with nonzero wavenumber along the magnetic field is also studied. Thus, several different aspects of wave propagation during thruster operation are explored. These waves may be important to understand and possibly to control in view of the possible influence of thruster electromagnetic effects on communication signal propagation.

  14. A cosmic ray driven instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorfi, E. A.; Drury, L. O.

    1985-01-01

    The interaction between energetic charged particles and thermal plasma which forms the basis of diffusive shock acceleration leads also to interesting dynamical phenomena. For a compressional mode propagating in a system with homogeneous energetic particle pressure it is well known that friction with the energetic particles leads to damping. The linear theory of this effect has been analyzed in detail by Ptuskin. Not so obvious is that a non-uniform energetic particle pressure can addition amplify compressional disturbances. If the pressure gradient is sufficiently steep this growth can dominate the frictional damping and lead to an instability. It is important to not that this effect results from the collective nature of the interaction between the energetic particles and the gas and is not connected with the Parker instability, nor with the resonant amplification of Alfven waves.

  15. PIC Simulations of Hypersonic Plasma Instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niehoff, D.; Ashour-Abdalla, M.; Niemann, C.; Decyk, V.; Schriver, D.; Clark, E.

    2013-12-01

    The plasma sheaths formed around hypersonic aircraft (Mach number, M > 10) are relatively unexplored and of interest today to both further the development of new technologies and solve long-standing engineering problems. Both laboratory experiments and analytical/numerical modeling are required to advance the understanding of these systems; it is advantageous to perform these tasks in tandem. There has already been some work done to study these plasmas by experiments that create a rapidly expanding plasma through ablation of a target with a laser. In combination with a preformed magnetic field, this configuration leads to a magnetic "bubble" formed behind the front as particles travel at about Mach 30 away from the target. Furthermore, the experiment was able to show the generation of fast electrons which could be due to instabilities on electron scales. To explore this, future experiments will have more accurate diagnostics capable of observing time- and length-scales below typical ion scales, but simulations are a useful tool to explore these plasma conditions theoretically. Particle in Cell (PIC) simulations are necessary when phenomena are expected to be observed at these scales, and also have the advantage of being fully kinetic with no fluid approximations. However, if the scales of the problem are not significantly below the ion scales, then the initialization of the PIC simulation must be very carefully engineered to avoid unnecessary computation and to select the minimum window where structures of interest can be studied. One method of doing this is to seed the simulation with either experiment or ion-scale simulation results. Previous experiments suggest that a useful configuration for studying hypersonic plasma configurations is a ring of particles rapidly expanding transverse to an external magnetic field, which has been simulated on the ion scale with an ion-hybrid code. This suggests that the PIC simulation should have an equivalent configuration

  16. Electrohydrodynamic instabilities of viscous drops*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlahovska, Petia M.

    2016-10-01

    A classic result due to Taylor is that a weakly conducting drop bearing zero net charge placed in a uniform electric field adopts a prolate or oblate spheroidal shape, the flow and shape being axisymmetrically aligned with the applied field. Here I overview some intriguing symmetry-breaking instabilities occurring in strong applied dc fields: Quincke rotation resulting in drop steady tilt or tumbling, and pattern formation on the surface of a particle-coated drop.

  17. Predicting Catastrophic BGP Routing Instabilities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-03-01

    predict a BGP routing instability confine their focus to either macro- or micro -level metrics, but not to both. The inherent limitations of each of...Level and Micro -Level Metrics Correlation; Worm Attack Studies; 16. PRICE CODE 17. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF REPORT Unclassified 18. SECURITY... micro -level metrics, but not to both. The inherent limitations of each of these forms of metric gives rise to an excessive rate of spurious alerts

  18. Hydrodynamic instabilities in miscible fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truzzolillo, Domenico; Cipelletti, Luca

    2018-01-01

    Hydrodynamic instabilities in miscible fluids are ubiquitous, from natural phenomena up to geological scales, to industrial and technological applications, where they represent the only way to control and promote mixing at low Reynolds numbers, well below the transition from laminar to turbulent flow. As for immiscible fluids, the onset of hydrodynamic instabilities in miscible fluids is directly related to the physics of their interfaces. The focus of this review is therefore on the general mechanisms driving the growth of disturbances at the boundary between miscible fluids, under a variety of forcing conditions. In the absence of a regularizing mechanism, these disturbances would grow indefinitely. For immiscible fluids, interfacial tension provides such a regularizing mechanism, because of the energy cost associated to the creation of new interface by a growing disturbance. For miscible fluids, however, the very existence of interfacial stresses that mimic an effective surface tension is debated. Other mechanisms, however, may also be relevant, such as viscous dissipation. We shall review the stabilizing mechanisms that control the most common hydrodynamic instabilities, highlighting those cases for which the lack of an effective interfacial tension poses deep conceptual problems in the mathematical formulation of a linear stability analysis. Finally, we provide a short overview on the ongoing research on the effective, out of equilibrium interfacial tension between miscible fluids.

  19. SciTech Connect

    Andronov, V.A.; Zhidov, I.G.; Meskov, E.E.

    The report presents the basic results of some calculations, theoretical and experimental efforts in the study of Rayleigh-Taylor, Kelvin-Helmholtz, Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities and the turbulent mixing which is caused by their evolution. Since the late forties the VNIIEF has been conducting these investigations. This report is based on the data which were published in different times in Russian and foreign journals. The first part of the report deals with calculations an theoretical techniques for the description of hydrodynamic instabilities applied currently, as well as with the results of several individual problems and their comparison with the experiment. These methods can bemore » divided into two types: direct numerical simulation methods and phenomenological methods. The first type includes the regular 2D and 3D gasdynamical techniques as well as the techniques based on small perturbation approximation and on incompressible liquid approximation. The second type comprises the techniques based on various phenomenological turbulence models. The second part of the report describes the experimental methods and cites the experimental results of Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meskov instability studies as well as of turbulent mixing. The applied methods were based on thin-film gaseous models, on jelly models and liquid layer models. The research was done for plane and cylindrical geometries. As drivers, the shock tubes of different designs were used as well as gaseous explosive mixtures, compressed air and electric wire explosions. The experimental results were applied in calculational-theoretical technique calibrations. The authors did not aim at covering all VNIIEF research done in this field of science. To a great extent the choice of the material depended on the personal contribution of the author in these studies.« less

  20. Hydrodynamic Instability, Integrated Code, Laboratory Astrophysics, and Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takabe, Hideaki

    2016-10-01

    This is an article for the memorial lecture of Edward Teller Medal and is presented as memorial lecture at the IFSA03 conference held on September 12th, 2003, at Monterey, CA. The author focuses on his main contributions to fusion science and its extension to astrophysics in the field of theory and computation by picking up five topics. The first one is the anomalous resisitivity to hot electrons penetrating over-dense region through the ion wave turbulence driven by the return current compensating the current flow by the hot electrons. It is concluded that almost the same value of potential as the average kinetic energy of the hot electrons is realized to prevent the penetration of the hot electrons. The second is the ablative stabilization of Rayleigh-Taylor instability at ablation front and its dispersion relation so-called Takabe formula. This formula gave a principal guideline for stable target design. The author has developed an integrated code ILESTA (ID & 2D) for analyses and design of laser produced plasma including implosion dynamics. It is also applied to design high gain targets. The third is the development of the integrated code ILESTA. The forth is on Laboratory Astrophysics with intense lasers. This consists of two parts; one is review on its historical background and the other is on how we relate laser plasma to wide-ranging astrophysics and the purposes for promoting such research. In relation to one purpose, I gave a comment on anomalous transport of relativistic electrons in Fast Ignition laser fusion scheme. Finally, I briefly summarize recent activity in relation to application of the author's experience to the development of an integrated code for studying extreme phenomena in astrophysics.

  1. Intumescent-ablator coatings using endothermic fillers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawko, P. M.; Riccitiello, S. R. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    An intumescent-ablator coating composition which contains the ammonium salt of 1,4-nitroaniline-2-sulfonic acid or 4,4 dinitrosul fanilide, a polymeric binder system and about 5 to 30% weight of an endothermic filler is reported. The filler has a decomposition temperature about or within the exothermic region of the intumescent agent.

  2. Combining Electrolysis and Electroporation for Tissue Ablation.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Mary; Rubinsky, Liel; Meir, Arie; Raju, Narayan; Rubinsky, Boris

    2015-08-01

    Electrolytic ablation is a method that operates by delivering low magnitude direct current to the target region over long periods of time, generating electrolytic products that destroy cells. This study was designed to explore the hypothesis stating that electrolytic ablation can be made more effective when the electrolysis-producing electric charges are delivered using electric pulses with field strength typical in reversible electroporation protocols. (For brevity we will refer to tissue ablation protocols that combine electroporation and electrolysis as E(2).) The mechanistic explanation of this hypothesis is related to the idea that products of electrolysis generated by E(2) protocols can gain access to the interior of the cell through the electroporation permeabilized cell membrane and therefore cause more effective cell death than from the exterior of an intact cell. The goal of this study is to provide a first-order examination of this hypothesis by comparing the charge dosage required to cause a comparable level of damage to a rat liver, in vivo, when using either conventional electrolysis or E(2) approaches. Our results show that E(2) protocols produce tissue damage that is consistent with electrolytic ablation. Furthermore, E(2) protocols cause damage comparable to that produced by conventional electrolytic protocols while delivering orders of magnitude less charge to the target tissue over much shorter periods of time. © The Author(s) 2014.

  3. Organized Atrial Tachycardias after Atrial Fibrillation Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Castrejón-Castrejón, Sergio; Ortega, Marta; Pérez-Silva, Armando; Doiny, David; Estrada, Alejandro; Filgueiras, David; López-Sendón, José L.; Merino, José L.

    2011-01-01

    The efficacy of catheter-based ablation techniques to treat atrial fibrillation is limited not only by recurrences of this arrhythmia but also, and not less importantly, by new-onset organized atrial tachycardias. The incidence of such tachycardias depends on the type and duration of the baseline atrial fibrillation and specially on the ablation technique which was used during the index procedure. It has been repeatedly reported that the more extensive the left atrial surface ablated, the higher the incidence of organized atrial tachycardias. The exact origin of the pathologic substrate of these trachycardias is not fully understood and may result from the interaction between preexistent regions with abnormal electrical properties and the new ones resultant from radiofrequency delivery. From a clinical point of view these atrial tachycardias tend to remit after a variable time but in some cases are responsible for significant symptoms. A precise knowledge of the most frequent types of these arrhythmias, of their mechanisms and components is necessary for a thorough electrophysiologic characterization if a new ablation procedure is required. PMID:21941669

  4. Atmospheric Profile Imprint in Firewall Ablation Coefficient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ceplecha, Z.; Pecina, P.

    1984-01-01

    A general formula which expresses the distance along the meteoric fireball trajectory 1 as a function of t is discussed. Differential equations which include the motion and ablation of a single nonfragmenting meteor body are presented. The importance of the atmospheric density profile in the meteor formula is emphasized.

  5. Femtosecond laser ablation of bovine cortical bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cangueiro, Liliana T.; Vilar, Rui; Botelho do Rego, Ana M.; Muralha, Vania S. F.

    2012-12-01

    We study the surface topographical, structural, and compositional modifications induced in bovine cortical bone by femtosecond laser ablation. The tests are performed in air, with a Yb:KYW chirped-pulse-regenerative amplification laser system (500 fs, 1030 nm) at fluences ranging from 0.55 to 2.24 J/cm2. The ablation process is monitored by acoustic emission measurements. The topography of the laser-treated surfaces is studied by scanning electron microscopy, and their constitution is characterized by glancing incidence x-ray diffraction, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and micro-Raman spectroscopy. The results show that femtosecond laser ablation allows removing bone without melting, carbonization, or cracking. The structure and composition of the remaining tissue are essentially preserved, the only constitutional changes observed being a reduction of the organic material content and a partial recrystallization of hydroxyapatite in the most superficial region of samples. The results suggest that, within this fluence range, ablation occurs by a combination of thermal and electrostatic mechanisms, with the first type of mechanism predominating at lower fluences. The associated thermal effects explain the constitutional changes observed. We show that femtosecond lasers are a promising tool for delicate orthopaedic surgeries, where small amounts of bone must be cut with negligible damage, thus minimizing surgical trauma.

  6. Pulsed Radiofrequency Ablation for Treating Sural Neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Abd-Elsayed, Alaa; Jackson, Markus; Plovanich, Elizabeth

    2018-01-01

    Sural neuralgia is persistent pain in the distribution of the sural nerve that provides sensation to the lateral posterior corner of the leg, lateral foot, and fifth toe. Sural neuralgia is a rare condition but can be challenging to treat and can cause significant limitation. We present 2 cases of sural neuralgia resistant to conservative management that were effectively treated by pulsed radiofrequency ablation. A 65-year-old female developed sural neuralgia after a foot surgery and failed conservative management. She had successful sural nerve blocks, and pulsed radiofrequency ablation led to an 80% improvement in her pain. A 33-year-old female presented with sural neuralgia secondary to two falls. The patient had tried several conservative modalities with no success. We performed diagnostic blocks and pulsed radiofrequency ablation, and the patient reported 80% improvement in her pain. Pulsed radiofrequency ablation may be a safe and effective treatment for patients with sural neuralgia that does not respond to conservative therapy. However, studies are needed to elucidate its effectiveness and safety profile.

  7. Microwave ablation devices for interventional oncology.

    PubMed

    Ward, Robert C; Healey, Terrance T; Dupuy, Damian E

    2013-03-01

    Microwave ablation is one of the several options in the ablation armamentarium for the treatment of malignancy, offering several potential benefits when compared with other ablation, radiation, surgical and medical treatment modalities. The basic microwave system consists of the generator, power distribution system and antennas. Often under image (computed tomography or ultrasound) guidance, a needle-like antenna is inserted percutaneously into the tumor, where local microwave electromagnetic radiation is emitted from the probe's active tip, producing frictional tissue heating, capable of causing cell death by coagulation necrosis. Half of the microwave ablation systems use a 915 MHz generator and the other half use a 2450 MHz generator. To date, there are no completed clinical trials comparing microwave devices head-to-head. Prospective comparisons of microwave technology with other treatment alternatives, as well as head-to-head comparison with each microwave device, is needed if this promising field will garner more widespread support and use in the oncology community.

  8. Ablation Resistant Zirconium and Hafnium Ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bull, Jeffrey (Inventor); White, Michael J. (Inventor); Kaufman, Larry (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    High temperature ablation resistant ceramic composites have been made. These ceramics are composites of zirconium diboride and zirconium carbide with silicon carbide, hafnium diboride and hafnium carbide with silicon carbide and ceramic composites which contain mixed diborides and/or carbides of zirconium and hafnium. along with silicon carbide.

  9. Aluminum X-ray mass-ablation rate measurements

    DOE PAGES

    Kline, John L.; Hager, Jonathan D.

    2016-10-15

    Measurements of the mass ablation rate of aluminum (Al) have been completed at the Omega Laser Facility. Measurements of the mass-ablation rate show Al is higher than plastic (CH), comparable to high density carbon (HDC), and lower than beryllium. The mass-ablation rate is consistent with predictions using a 1D Lagrangian code, Helios. Lastly, the results suggest Al capsules have a reasonable ablation pressure even with a higher albedo than beryllium or carbon ablators warranting further investigation into the viability of Al capsules for ignition should be pursued.

  10. Plume collimation for laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Vertes, Akos; Stolee, Jessica A.

    2016-06-07

    In various embodiments, a device may generally comprise a capillary having a first end and a second end; a laser to emit energy at a sample in the capillary to ablate the sample and generate an ablation plume in the capillary; an electrospray apparatus to generate an electrospray plume to intercept the ablation plume to produce ions; and a mass spectrometer having an ion transfer inlet to capture the ions. The ablation plume may comprise a collimated ablation plume. The device may comprise a flow cytometer. Methods of making and using the same are also described.

  11. Plume collimation for laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Vertes, Akos; Stolee, Jessica A.

    2014-09-09

    In various embodiments, a device may generally comprise a capillary having a first end and a second end; a laser to emit energy at a sample in the capillary to ablate the sample and generate an ablation plume in the capillary; an electrospray apparatus to generate an electrospray plume to intercept the ablation plume to produce ions; and a mass spectrometer having an ion transfer inlet to capture the ions. The ablation plume may comprise a collimated ablation plume. The device may comprise a flow cytometer. Methods of making and using the same are also described.

  12. Mitigation of X-ray shadow seeding of hydrodynamic instabilities on inertial confinement fusion capsules using a reduced diameter fuel fill-tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacPhee, A. G.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Landen, O. L.; Weber, C. R.; Robey, H. F.; Alfonso, E. L.; Biener, J.; Bunn, T.; Crippen, J. W.; Farrell, M.; Felker, S.; Field, J. E.; Hsing, W. W.; Kong, C.; Milovich, J.; Moore, A.; Nikroo, A.; Rice, N.; Stadermann, M.; Wild, C.

    2018-05-01

    We report a reduced X-ray shadow imprint of hydrodynamic instabilities on the high-density carbon ablator surface of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) capsules using a reduced diameter fuel fill tube on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The perturbation seed mass from hydrodynamic instabilities was reduced by approximately an order of magnitude by reducing both the diameter and wall thickness of the fill tube by ˜2×, consistent with analytical estimates. This work demonstrates a successful mitigation strategy for engineered features for ICF implosions on the NIF.

  13. Thermochemical Ablation Analysis of the Orion Heatshield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sixel, William

    2015-01-01

    The Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle will one day carry astronauts to the Moon and beyond, and Orion's heatshield is a critical component in ensuring their safe return to Earth. The Orion heatshield is the structural component responsible for absorbing the intense heating environment caused by re-entry to Earth's atmosphere. The heatshield is primarily composed of Avcoat, an ablative material that is consumed during the re-entry process. Ablation is primarily characterized by two processes: pyrolysis and recession. The decomposition of in-depth virgin material is known as pyrolysis. Recession occurs when the exposed surface of the heatshield reacts with the surrounding flow. The Orion heatshield design was changed from an individually filled Avcoat honeycomb to a molded block Avcoat design. The molded block Avcoat heatshield relies on an adhesive bond to keep it attached to the capsule. In some locations on the heatshield, the integrity of the adhesive bond cannot be verified. For these locations, a mechanical retention device was proposed. Avcoat ablation was modelled in CHAR and the in-depth virgin material temperatures were used in a Thermal Desktop model of the mechanical retention device. The retention device was analyzed and shown to cause a large increase in the maximum bondline temperature. In order to study the impact of individual ablation modelling parameters on the heatshield sizing process, a Monte Carlo simulation of the sizing process was proposed. The simulation will give the sensitivity of the ablation model to each of its input parameters. As part of the Monte Carlo simulation, statistical uncertainties on material properties were required for Avcoat. Several properties were difficult to acquire uncertainties for: the pyrolysis gas enthalpy, non-dimensional mass loss rate (B´c), and Arrhenius equation parameters. Variability in the elemental composition of Avcoat was used as the basis for determining the statistical uncertainty in pyrolysis gas

  14. Burn, freeze, or photo-ablate?: comparative symptom profile in Barrett's dysplasia patients undergoing endoscopic ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, Kanwar Rupinder S.; Gross, Seth A.; Greenwald, Bruce D.; Hemminger, Lois L.; Wolfsen, Herbert C.

    2009-06-01

    Background: There are few data available comparing endoscopic ablation methods for Barrett's esophagus with high-grade dysplasia (BE-HGD). Objective: To determine differences in symptoms and complications associated with endoscopic ablation. Design: Prospective observational study. Setting: Two tertiary care centers in USA. Patients: Consecutive patients with BE-HGD Interventions: In this pilot study, symptoms profile data were collected for BE-HGD patients among 3 endoscopic ablation methods: porfimer sodium photodynamic therapy, radiofrequency ablation and low-pressure liquid nitrogen spray cryotherapy. Main Outcome Measurements: Symptom profiles and complications from the procedures were assessed 1-8 weeks after treatment. Results: Ten BE-HGD patients were treated with each ablation modality (30 patients total; 25 men, median age: 69 years (range 53-81). All procedures were performed in the clinic setting and none required subsequent hospitalization. The most common symptoms among all therapies were chest pain, dysphagia and odynophagia. More patients (n=8) in the porfimer sodium photodynamic therapy group reported weight loss compared to radio-frequency ablactation (n=2) and cryotherapy (n=0). Four patients in the porfimer sodium photodynamic therapy group developed phototoxicity requiring medical treatment. Strictures, each requiring a single dilation, were found in radiofrequency ablactation (n=1) and porfimer sodium photodynamic therapy (n=2) patients. Limitations: Small sample size, non-randomized study. Conclusions: These three endoscopic therapies are associated with different types and severity of post-ablation symptoms and complications.

  15. [Catheter ablation for paroxysmal atrial fibrillation: new generation cryoballoon or contact force sensing radiofrequency ablation?].

    PubMed

    Nagy, Zsófia; Kis, Zsuzsanna; Som, Zoltán; Földesi, Csaba; Kardos, Attila

    2016-05-29

    Contact force sensing radiofrequency ablation and the new generation cryoballoon ablation are prevalent techniques for the treatment of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. The authors aimed to compare the procedural and 1-year outcome of patients after radiofrequency and cryoballoon ablation. 96 patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (radiofrequency ablation: 58, cryoballoon: 38 patients; 65 men and 31 women aged 28-70 years) were enrolled. At postprocedural 1, 3, 6 and 12 months ECG, Holter monitoring and telephone interviews were performed. Procedure and fluorosocopy time were: radiofrequency ablation, 118.5 ± 15 min and 15.8 ± 6 min; cryoballoon, 73.5 ± 16 min (p<0.05) and 13.8 ± 4.,1 min (p = 0.09), respectively. One year later freedom from atrial fibrillation was achieved in 76.5% of patients who underwent radiofrequency ablation and in 81% of patients treated with cryoballoon. Temporary phrenic nerve palsy occurred in two patients and pericardial tamponade developed in one patient. In this single center study freedom from paroxysmal atrial fibrillation was similar in the two groups with significant shorter procedure time in the cryoballoon group.

  16. Effects of laser energy fluence on the onset and growth of the Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities and its influence on the topography of the Fe thin film grown in pulsed laser deposition facility

    SciTech Connect

    Mahmood, S.; Department of Physics, University of Karachi, Karachi 75270; Rawat, R. S.

    2012-10-15

    The effect of laser energy fluence on the onset and growth of Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instabilities in laser induced Fe plasma is investigated using time-resolved fast gated imaging. The snow plow and shock wave models are fitted to the experimental results and used to estimate the ablation parameters and the density of gas atoms that interact with the ablated species. It is observed that RT instability develops during the interface deceleration stage and grows for a considerable time for higher laser energy fluence. The effects of RT instabilities formation on the surface topography of the Fe thin films grown in pulsedmore » laser deposition system are investigated (i) using different laser energy fluences for the same wavelength of laser radiation and (ii) using different laser wavelengths keeping the energy fluence fixed. It is concluded that the deposition achieved under turbulent condition leads to less smooth deposition surfaces with bigger sized particle agglomerates or network.« less

  17. The Femtosecond Laser Ablation on Ultrafine-Grained Copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Jianxun; Wu, Xiaoyu; Ruan, Shuangchen; Guo, Dengji; Du, Chenlin; Liang, Xiong; Wu, Zhaozhi

    2018-05-01

    To investigate the effects of femtosecond laser ablation on the surface morphology and microstructure of ultrafine-grained copper, point, single-line scanning, and area scanning ablation of ultrafine-grained and coarse-grained copper were performed at room temperature. The ablation threshold gradually increased and materials processing became more difficult with decreasing grain size. In addition, the ablation depth and width of the channels formed by single-line scanning ablation gradually increased with increasing grain size for the same laser pulse energy. The microhardness of the ablated specimens was also evaluated as a function of laser pulse energy using area scanning ablation. The microhardness difference before and after ablation increased with decreasing grain size for the same laser pulse energy. In addition, the microhardness after ablation gradually decreased with increasing laser pulse energy for the ultrafine-grained specimens. However, for the coarse-grained copper specimens, no clear changes of the microhardness were observed after ablation with varying laser pulse energies. The grain sizes of the ultrafine-grained specimens were also surveyed as a function of laser pulse energy using electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD). The heat generated by laser ablation caused recrystallization and grain growth of the ultrafine-grained copper; moreover, the grain size gradually increased with increasing pulse energy. In contrast, no obvious changes in grain size were observed for the coarse-grained copper specimens with increasing pulse energy.

  18. The Femtosecond Laser Ablation on Ultrafine-Grained Copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Jianxun; Wu, Xiaoyu; Ruan, Shuangchen; Guo, Dengji; Du, Chenlin; Liang, Xiong; Wu, Zhaozhi

    2018-07-01

    To investigate the effects of femtosecond laser ablation on the surface morphology and microstructure of ultrafine-grained copper, point, single-line scanning, and area scanning ablation of ultrafine-grained and coarse-grained copper were performed at room temperature. The ablation threshold gradually increased and materials processing became more difficult with decreasing grain size. In addition, the ablation depth and width of the channels formed by single-line scanning ablation gradually increased with increasing grain size for the same laser pulse energy. The microhardness of the ablated specimens was also evaluated as a function of laser pulse energy using area scanning ablation. The microhardness difference before and after ablation increased with decreasing grain size for the same laser pulse energy. In addition, the microhardness after ablation gradually decreased with increasing laser pulse energy for the ultrafine-grained specimens. However, for the coarse-grained copper specimens, no clear changes of the microhardness were observed after ablation with varying laser pulse energies. The grain sizes of the ultrafine-grained specimens were also surveyed as a function of laser pulse energy using electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD). The heat generated by laser ablation caused recrystallization and grain growth of the ultrafine-grained copper; moreover, the grain size gradually increased with increasing pulse energy. In contrast, no obvious changes in grain size were observed for the coarse-grained copper specimens with increasing pulse energy.

  19. Effects of pressure rise on cw laser ablation of tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LeCarpentier, Gerald L.; Motamedi, Massoud; Welch, Ashley J.

    1991-06-01

    The objectives of this research were to identify mechanisms responsible for the initiation of continuous wave (cw) laser ablation of tissue and investigate the role of pressure in the ablation process. Porcine aorta samples were irradiated in a chamber pressurized from 1 X 10-4 to 12 atmospheres absolute pressure. Acrylic and Zn-Se windows in the experimental pressure chamber allowed video and infrared cameras to simultaneously record mechanical and thermal events associated with cw argon laser ablation of these samples. Video and thermal images of tissue slabs documented the explosive nature of cw laser ablation of soft biological media and revealed similar ablation threshold temperatures and ablation onset times under different environmental pressures; however, more violent initiation explosions with decreasing environmental pressures were observed. These results suggest that ablation initiates with thermal alterations in the mechanical strength of the tissue and proceeds with an explosion induced by the presence superheated liquid within the tissue.

  20. Thermal Ablation of T1c Renal Cell Carcinoma: A Comparative Assessment of Technical Performance, Procedural Outcome, and Safety of Microwave Ablation, Radiofrequency Ablation, and Cryoablation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wenhui; Arellano, Ronald S

    2018-04-06

    To evaluate perioperative outcomes of thermal ablation with microwave (MW), radiofrequency (RF), and cryoablation for stage T1c renal cell carcinoma (RCC). A retrospective analysis of 384 patients (mean age, 71 y; range, 22-88 y) was performed between October 2006 and October 2016. Mean radius, exophytic/endophytic, nearness to collecting system or sinus, anterior/posterior, and location relative to polar lines; preoperative aspects and dimensions used for anatomic classification; and centrality index scores were 6.3, 7.9, and 2.7, respectively. Assessment of pre- and postablation serum blood urea nitrogen, creatinine, and estimated glomerular filtration rate was performed to assess functional outcomes. Linear regression analyses were performed to compare sedation medication dosages among the three treatment cohorts. Univariable and multivariable logistic regression analyses were performed to compare rates of residual disease and complications among treatment modalities. A total of 437 clinical stage T1N0M0 biopsy-proven RCCs measuring 1.2-6.9 cm were treated with computed tomography (CT)-guided MW ablation (n = 44; 10%), RF ablation (n = 347; 79%), or cryoablation (n = 46; 11%). There were no significant differences in patient demographic or tumor characteristics among cohorts. Complication rates and immediate renal function changes were similar among the three ablation modalities (P = .46 and P = .08, respectively). MW ablation was associated with significantly decreased ablation time (P < .05), procedural time (P < .05), and dosage of sedative medication (P < .05) compared with RF ablation and cryoablation. CT-guided percutaneous MW ablation is comparable to RF ablation or cryoablation for the treatment of stage T1N0M0 RCC with regard to treatment response and is associated with shorter treatment times and less sedation than RF ablation or cryoablation. In addition, the safety profile of CT-guided MW ablation is noninferior to those of RF ablation or

  1. Hydrodynamic instabilities and mix studies on NIF: predictions, observations, and a path forward

    SciTech Connect

    Remington, B. A.; Atherton, L. J.; Benedetti, L. R.

    The goals of the Mix Campaign are to determine how mix affects performance, locate the "mix cliff", locate the source of the mix, and develop mitigation methods that allow performance to be increased. We have used several different drive pulse shapes and capsule designs in the Mix Campaign, to understand sensitivity to drive peak power, level of coast, rise time to peak power, adiabat, and dopant level in the capsule. Ablator material mixing into the hot spot has been shown conclusively with x-ray spectroscopy. The observed neutron yield drops steeply when the hot spot mix mass becomes too large. Themore » mix appears to be driven by ablation- front Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities. A high foot, higher adiabat drive has a more stable ablation front and has allowed the mix mass in the hot spot to be reduced significantly. We found two recent high foot shots achieved neutron yields > 10 15 and measured neutron yield over clean 1D simulation (YOC) > 50%, which was one of the central goals of the Mix Campaign.« less

  2. Hydrodynamic instabilities and mix studies on NIF: predictions, observations, and a path forward

    DOE PAGES

    Remington, B. A.; Atherton, L. J.; Benedetti, L. R.; ...

    2016-04-01

    The goals of the Mix Campaign are to determine how mix affects performance, locate the "mix cliff", locate the source of the mix, and develop mitigation methods that allow performance to be increased. We have used several different drive pulse shapes and capsule designs in the Mix Campaign, to understand sensitivity to drive peak power, level of coast, rise time to peak power, adiabat, and dopant level in the capsule. Ablator material mixing into the hot spot has been shown conclusively with x-ray spectroscopy. The observed neutron yield drops steeply when the hot spot mix mass becomes too large. Themore » mix appears to be driven by ablation- front Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities. A high foot, higher adiabat drive has a more stable ablation front and has allowed the mix mass in the hot spot to be reduced significantly. We found two recent high foot shots achieved neutron yields > 10 15 and measured neutron yield over clean 1D simulation (YOC) > 50%, which was one of the central goals of the Mix Campaign.« less

  3. Regularization of instabilities in gravity theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramazanoǧlu, Fethi M.

    2018-01-01

    We investigate instabilities and their regularization in theories of gravitation. Instabilities can be beneficial since their growth often leads to prominent observable signatures, which makes them especially relevant to relatively low signal-to-noise ratio measurements such as gravitational wave detections. An indefinitely growing instability usually renders a theory unphysical; hence, a desirable instability should also come with underlying physical machinery that stops the growth at finite values, i.e., regularization mechanisms. The prototypical gravity theory that presents such an instability is the spontaneous scalarization phenomena of scalar-tensor theories, which feature a tachyonic instability. We identify the regularization mechanisms in this theory and show that they can be utilized to regularize other instabilities as well. Namely, we present theories in which spontaneous growth is triggered by a ghost rather than a tachyon and numerically calculate stationary solutions of scalarized neutron stars in these theories. We speculate on the possibility of regularizing known divergent instabilities in certain gravity theories using our findings and discuss alternative theories of gravitation in which regularized instabilities may be present. Even though we study many specific examples, our main point is the recognition of regularized instabilities as a common theme and unifying mechanism in a vast array of gravity theories.

  4. Outcomes of repeat catheter ablation using magnetic navigation or conventional ablation.

    PubMed

    Akca, Ferdi; Theuns, Dominic A M J; Abkenari, Lara Dabiri; de Groot, Natasja M S; Jordaens, Luc; Szili-Torok, Tamas

    2013-10-01

    After initial catheter ablation, repeat procedures could be necessary. This study evaluates the efficacy of the magnetic navigation system (MNS) in repeat catheter ablation as compared with manual conventional techniques (MANs). The results of 163 repeat ablation procedures were analysed. Ablations were performed either using MNS (n = 84) or conventional manual ablation (n = 79). Procedures were divided into four groups based on the technique used during the initial and repeat ablation procedure: MAN-MAN (n = 66), MAN-MNS (n = 31), MNS-MNS (n = 53), and MNS-MAN (n = 13). Three subgroups were analysed: supraventricular tachycardias (SVTs, n = 68), atrial fibrillation (AF, n = 67), and ventricular tachycardias (VT, n = 28). Recurrences were assessed during 19 ± 11 months follow-up. Overall, repeat procedures using MNS were successful in 89.0% as compared with 96.2% in the MAN group (P = ns). The overall recurrence rate was significantly lower using MNS (25.0 vs. 41.4%, P = 0.045). Acute success and recurrence rates for the MAN-MAN, MAN-MNS, MNS-MNS, and MNS-MAN groups were comparable. For the SVT subgroup a higher acute success rate was achieved using MAN (87.9 vs. 100.0%, P = 0.049). The use of MNS for SVT is associated with longer procedure times (205 ± 82 vs. 172 ± 69 min, P = 0.040). For AF procedure and fluoroscopy times were longer (257 ± 72 vs. 185 ± 64, P = 0.001; 59.5 ± 19.3 vs. 41.1 ± 18.3 min, P < 0.001). Less fluoroscopy was used for MNS-guided VT procedures (22.8 ± 14.7 vs. 41.2 ± 10.9, P = 0.011). Our data suggest that overall MNS is comparable with MAN in acute success after repeat catheter ablation. However, MNS is related to fewer recurrences as compared with MAN.

  5. Spatiotemporal chaos involving wave instability.

    PubMed

    Berenstein, Igal; Carballido-Landeira, Jorge

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate pattern formation in a model of a reaction confined in a microemulsion, in a regime where both Turing and wave instability occur. In one-dimensional systems, the pattern corresponds to spatiotemporal intermittency where the behavior of the systems alternates in both time and space between stationary Turing patterns and traveling waves. In two-dimensional systems, the behavior initially may correspond to Turing patterns, which then turn into wave patterns. The resulting pattern also corresponds to a chaotic state, where the system alternates in both space and time between standing wave patterns and traveling waves, and the local dynamics may show vanishing amplitude of the variables.

  6. Spatiotemporal chaos involving wave instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berenstein, Igal; Carballido-Landeira, Jorge

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate pattern formation in a model of a reaction confined in a microemulsion, in a regime where both Turing and wave instability occur. In one-dimensional systems, the pattern corresponds to spatiotemporal intermittency where the behavior of the systems alternates in both time and space between stationary Turing patterns and traveling waves. In two-dimensional systems, the behavior initially may correspond to Turing patterns, which then turn into wave patterns. The resulting pattern also corresponds to a chaotic state, where the system alternates in both space and time between standing wave patterns and traveling waves, and the local dynamics may show vanishing amplitude of the variables.

  7. Elastocapillary Instability in Mitochondrial Fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Rodriguez, David; Sart, Sébastien; Babataheri, Avin; Tareste, David; Barakat, Abdul I.; Clanet, Christophe; Husson, Julien

    2015-08-01

    Mitochondria are dynamic cell organelles that constantly undergo fission and fusion events. These dynamical processes, which tightly regulate mitochondrial morphology, are essential for cell physiology. Here we propose an elastocapillary mechanical instability as a mechanism for mitochondrial fission. We experimentally induce mitochondrial fission by rupturing the cell's plasma membrane. We present a stability analysis that successfully explains the observed fission wavelength and the role of mitochondrial morphology in the occurrence of fission events. Our results show that the laws of fluid mechanics can describe mitochondrial morphology and dynamics.

  8. Convective Instabilities in Liquid Foams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veretennikov, Igor; Glazier, James A.

    2004-01-01

    The main goal of this work is to better understand foam behavior both on the Earth and in microgravity conditions and to determine the relation between a foam's structure and wetness and its rheological properties. Our experiments focused on the effects of the bubble size distribution (BSD) on the foam behavior under gradual or stepwise in the liquid flow rate and on the onset of the convective instability. We were able to show experimentally, that the BSD affects foam rheology very strongly so any theory must take foam texture into account.

  9. Absolute instability of the Gaussian wake profile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hultgren, Lennart S.; Aggarwal, Arun K.

    1987-01-01

    Linear parallel-flow stability theory has been used to investigate the effect of viscosity on the local absolute instability of a family of wake profiles with a Gaussian velocity distribution. The type of local instability, i.e., convective or absolute, is determined by the location of a branch-point singularity with zero group velocity of the complex dispersion relation for the instability waves. The effects of viscosity were found to be weak for values of the wake Reynolds number, based on the center-line velocity defect and the wake half-width, larger than about 400. Absolute instability occurs only for sufficiently large values of the center-line wake defect. The critical value of this parameter increases with decreasing wake Reynolds number, thereby indicating a shrinking region of absolute instability with decreasing wake Reynolds number. If backflow is not allowed, absolute instability does not occur for wake Reynolds numbers smaller than about 38.

  10. Transverse Instabilities in the Fermilab Recycler

    SciTech Connect

    Prost, L.R.; Burov, A.; Shemyakin, A.

    2011-07-01

    Transverse instabilities of the antiproton beam have been observed in the Recycler ring soon after its commissioning. After installation of transverse dampers, the threshold for the instability limit increased significantly but the instability is still found to limit the brightness of the antiprotons extracted from the Recycler for Tevatron shots. In this paper, we describe observations of the instabilities during the extraction process as well as during dedicated studies. The measured instability threshold phase density agrees with the prediction of the rigid beam model within a factor of 2. Also, we conclude that the instability threshold can be significantly loweredmore » for a bunch contained in a narrow and shallow potential well due to effective exclusion of the longitudinal tails from Landau damping.« less

  11. Mode-locking via dissipative Faraday instability

    PubMed Central

    Tarasov, Nikita; Perego, Auro M.; Churkin, Dmitry V.; Staliunas, Kestutis; Turitsyn, Sergei K.

    2016-01-01

    Emergence of coherent structures and patterns at the nonlinear stage of modulation instability of a uniform state is an inherent feature of many biological, physical and engineering systems. There are several well-studied classical modulation instabilities, such as Benjamin–Feir, Turing and Faraday instability, which play a critical role in the self-organization of energy and matter in non-equilibrium physical, chemical and biological systems. Here we experimentally demonstrate the dissipative Faraday instability induced by spatially periodic zig-zag modulation of a dissipative parameter of the system—spectrally dependent losses—achieving generation of temporal patterns and high-harmonic mode-locking in a fibre laser. We demonstrate features of this instability that distinguish it from both the Benjamin–Feir and the purely dispersive Faraday instability. Our results open the possibilities for new designs of mode-locked lasers and can be extended to other fields of physics and engineering. PMID:27503708

  12. Mode-locking via dissipative Faraday instability.

    PubMed

    Tarasov, Nikita; Perego, Auro M; Churkin, Dmitry V; Staliunas, Kestutis; Turitsyn, Sergei K

    2016-08-09

    Emergence of coherent structures and patterns at the nonlinear stage of modulation instability of a uniform state is an inherent feature of many biological, physical and engineering systems. There are several well-studied classical modulation instabilities, such as Benjamin-Feir, Turing and Faraday instability, which play a critical role in the self-organization of energy and matter in non-equilibrium physical, chemical and biological systems. Here we experimentally demonstrate the dissipative Faraday instability induced by spatially periodic zig-zag modulation of a dissipative parameter of the system-spectrally dependent losses-achieving generation of temporal patterns and high-harmonic mode-locking in a fibre laser. We demonstrate features of this instability that distinguish it from both the Benjamin-Feir and the purely dispersive Faraday instability. Our results open the possibilities for new designs of mode-locked lasers and can be extended to other fields of physics and engineering.

  13. Spatiotemporal Variability of Great Lakes Basin Snow Cover Ablation Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suriano, Z. J.; Leathers, D. J.

    2017-12-01

    In the Great Lakes basin of North America, annual runoff is dominated by snowmelt. This snowmelt-induced runoff plays an important role within the hydrologic cycle of the basin, influencing soil moisture availability and driving the seasonal cycle of spring and summer Lake levels. Despite this, relatively little is understood about the patterns and trends of snow ablation event frequency and magnitude within the Great Lakes basin. This study uses a gridded dataset of Canadian and United States surface snow depth observations to develop a regional climatology of snow ablation events from 1960-2009. An ablation event is defined as an inter-diurnal snow depth decrease within an individual grid cell. A clear seasonal cycle in ablation event frequency exists within the basin and peak ablation event frequency is latitudinally dependent. Most of the basin experiences peak ablation frequency in March, while the northern and southern regions of the basin experience respective peaks in April and February. An investigation into the inter-annual frequency of ablation events reveals ablation events significantly decrease within the northeastern and northwestern Lake Superior drainage basins and significantly increase within the eastern Lake Huron and Georgian Bay drainage basins. In the eastern Lake Huron and Georgian Bay drainage basins, larger ablation events are occurring more frequently, and a larger impact to the hydrology can be expected. Trends in ablation events are attributed primarily to changes in snowfall and snow depth across the region.

  14. Bipolar radiofrequency ablation of spinal tumors: predictability, safety and outcome.

    PubMed

    Gazis, Angelos N; Beuing, Oliver; Franke, Jörg; Jöllenbeck, Boris; Skalej, Martin

    2014-04-01

    Bone metastases are often the cause of tumor-associated pain and reduction of quality of life. For patients that cannot be treated by surgery, a local minimally invasive therapy such as radiofrequency ablation can be a useful option. In cases in which tumorous masses are adjacent to vulnerable structures, the monopolar radiofrequency can cause severe neuronal damage because of the unpredictability of current flow. The aim of this study is to show that the bipolar radiofrequency ablation provides an opportunity to safely treat such spinal lesions because of precise predictability of the emerging ablation zone. Prospective cohort study of 36 patients undergoing treatment at a single institution. Thirty-six patients in advanced tumor stage with primary or secondary tumor involvement of spine undergoing radiofrequency ablation. Prediction of emerging ablation zone. Clinical outcome of treated patients. X-ray-controlled treatment of 39 lesions by bipolar radiofrequency ablation. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed pre- and postinterventionally. Patients were observed clinically during their postinterventional stay. The extent of the ablation zones was predictable to the millimeter because it did not cross the peri-interventional planned dorsal and ventral boundaries in any case. No complications were observed. Ablation of tumorous masses adjacent to vulnerable structures is feasible and predictable by using the bipolar radiofrequency ablation. Damage of neuronal structures can be avoided through precise prediction of the ablation area. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Ablation properties of carbon/carbon composites with tungsten carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Jian; Zhang, Hongbo; Xiong, Xiang; Huang, Baiyun; Zuo, Jinlv

    2009-02-01

    The ablation properties and morphologies of carbon/carbon (C/C) composites with tungsten carbide (WC) filaments were investigated by ablation test on an arc heater and scanning electron microscopy. And the results were compared with those without tungsten carbide (WC) filaments tested under the same conditions. It shows that there is a big difference between C/C composites with and without WC filaments on both macroscopic and microscopic ablation morphologies and the ablation rates of the former are higher than the latter. It is found that the ablation process of C/C composites with WC filaments includes oxidation of carbon fibers, carbon matrices and WC, melting of WC and WO 3, and denudation of WC, WO 3 and C/C composites. Oxidation and melting of WC leads to the formation of holes in z directional carbon fiber bundles, which increases the coarseness of the ablation surfaces of the composites, speeds up ablation and leads to the higher ablation rate. Moreover, it is further found that the molten WC and WO 3 cannot form a continuous film on the ablation surface to prevent further ablation of C/C composites.

  16. Filamentation instability in a quantum magnetized plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Bret, A.; and Instituto de Investigaciones Energeticas y Aplicaciones Industriales, Campus Universitario de Ciudad Real, 13071 Ciudad Real

    2008-02-15

    The filamentation instability occurring when a nonrelativistic electron beam passes through a quantum magnetized plasma is investigated by means of a cold quantum magnetohydrodynamic model. It is proved that the instability can be completely suppressed by quantum effects if and only if a finite magnetic field is present. A dimensionless parameter is identified that measures the strength of quantum effects. Strong quantum effects allow for a much smaller magnetic field to suppress the instability than in the classical regime.

  17. Subharmonic mechanism of the mode C instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheard, G. J.; Thompson, M. C.; Hourigan, K.

    2005-11-01

    The perturbation field of the recently discovered subharmonic mode C instability in the wake behind a ring is compared via a side-by-side comparison to the perturbation fields of the modes A and B instabilities familiar from past studies of the vortex street behind a circular cylinder. Snapshots of the wake are presented over a full shedding cycle, along with evidence from a linear stability analysis, to verify and better understand how the subharmonic instability is sustained.

  18. Jeans instability in a viscoelastic fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Janaki, M. S.; Chakrabarti, N.; Banerjee, D.

    2011-01-15

    The well known Jeans instability is studied for a viscoelastic gravitational fluid using generalized hydrodynamic equations of motions. It is found that the threshold for the onset of instability appears at higher wavelengths in a viscoelastic medium. Elastic effects playing a role similar to thermal pressure are found to lower the growth rate of the gravitational instability. Such features may manifest themselves in matter constituting dense astrophysical objects.

  19. Automated planning of ablation targets in atrial fibrillation treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keustermans, Johannes; De Buck, Stijn; Heidbüchel, Hein; Suetens, Paul

    2011-03-01

    Catheter based radio-frequency ablation is used as an invasive treatment of atrial fibrillation. This procedure is often guided by the use of 3D anatomical models obtained from CT, MRI or rotational angiography. During the intervention the operator accurately guides the catheter to prespecified target ablation lines. The planning stage, however, can be time consuming and operator dependent which is suboptimal both from a cost and health perspective. Therefore, we present a novel statistical model-based algorithm for locating ablation targets from 3D rotational angiography images. Based on a training data set of 20 patients, consisting of 3D rotational angiography images with 30 manually indicated ablation points, a statistical local appearance and shape model is built. The local appearance model is based on local image descriptors to capture the intensity patterns around each ablation point. The local shape model is constructed by embedding the ablation points in an undirected graph and imposing that each ablation point only interacts with its neighbors. Identifying the ablation points on a new 3D rotational angiography image is performed by proposing a set of possible candidate locations for each ablation point, as such, converting the problem into a labeling problem. The algorithm is validated using a leave-one-out-approach on the training data set, by computing the distance between the ablation lines obtained by the algorithm and the manually identified ablation points. The distance error is equal to 3.8+/-2.9 mm. As ablation lesion size is around 5-7 mm, automated planning of ablation targets by the presented approach is sufficiently accurate.

  20. Thermal distribution of microwave antenna for atrial fibrillation catheter ablation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huijuan; Nan, Qun; Liu, Youjun

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of ablation parameters on thermal distribution during microwave atrial fibrillation catheter ablation, such as ablation time, ablation power, blood condition and antenna placement, and give proper ablative parameters to realise transmural ablation. In this paper, simplified 3D antenna-myocardium-blood finite element method models were built to simulate the endocardial ablation operation. Thermal distribution was obtained based on the coupled electromagnetic-thermal analysis. Under different antenna placement conditions and different microwave power inputs within 60 s, the lesion dimensions (maximum depth, maximum width) of the ablation zones were analysed. The ablation width and depth increased with the ablation time. The increase rate significantly slowed down after 10 s. The maximum temperature was located in 1 mm under the antenna tip when perpendicular to the endocardium, while 1.5 mm away from the antenna axis and 26 mm along the antenna (with antenna length about 30 mm) in the myocardium when parallel to the endocardium. The maximum temperature in the ablated area decreased and the effective ablation area (with the temperature raised to 50°C) shifted deeper into the myocardium due to the blood cooling. The research validated that the microwave antenna can provide continuous long and linear lesions for the treatment of atrial fibrillation. The dimensions of the created lesion widths were all larger than those of the depths. It is easy for the microwave antenna to produce transmural lesions for an atrial wall thickness of 2-6 mm by adjusting the applied power and ablation time.

  1. A hydrodynamic mechanism of meteor ablation. The melt-spraying model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girin, Oleksandr G.

    2017-10-01

    Context. Hydrodynamic conditions are similar in a molten meteoroid and a liquid drop in a high-speed airflow. Despite the fact that the latter is well-studied, both experimentally and theoretically, hydrodynamic instability theory has not been applied to study the fragmentation of molten meteoroids. Aims: We aim to treat quasi-continuous spraying of meteoroid melt due to hydrodynamic instability as a possible mechanism of ablation. Our objectives are to calculate the time development of particle release, the released particle sizes and their distribution by sizes, as well as the meteoroid mass loss law. Methods: We have applied gradient instability theory to model the behaviour of the meteoroid melt layer and its interaction with the atmosphere. We have assumed a spherical meteoroid and that the meteoroid has a shallow entry angle, such that the density of the air stream interacting with the meteoroid is nearly constant. Results: High-frequency spraying of the molten meteoroid is numerically simulated. The intermediate and final size distributions of released particles are calculated, as well as the meteoroid mass loss law. Fast and slow meteoroids of iron and stone compositions are modelled, resulting in significant differences in the size distribution of melt particles sprayed from each meteoroid. Less viscous iron melt produces finer particles and a denser aerosol wake than a stony one does. Conclusions: Analysis of the critical conditions for the gradient instability mechanism shows that the dynamic pressure of the air-stream at heights up to 100 km is sufficient to overcome surface tension forces and pull out liquid particles from the meteoroid melt by means of unstable disturbances. Hence, the proposed melt-spraying model is able to explain quasi-continuous mode of meteoroid fragmentation at large heights and low dynamic pressures. A closed-form solution of the meteoroid ablation problem is obtained due to the melt-spraying model usage, at the meteoroid

  2. Gravitational instability in isotropic MHD plasma waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherkos, Alemayehu Mengesha

    2018-04-01

    The effect of compressive viscosity, thermal conductivity and radiative heat-loss functions on the gravitational instability of infinitely extended homogeneous MHD plasma has been investigated. By taking in account these parameters we developed the six-order dispersion relation for magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves propagating in a homogeneous and isotropic plasma. The general dispersion relation has been developed from set of linearized basic equations and solved analytically to analyse the conditions of instability and instability of self-gravitating plasma embedded in a constant magnetic field. Our result shows that the presence of viscosity and thermal conductivity in a strong magnetic field substantially modifies the fundamental Jeans criterion of gravitational instability.

  3. Pearling Instabilities of a Viscoelastic Thread

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deblais, A.; Velikov, K. P.; Bonn, D.

    2018-05-01

    Pearling instabilities of slender viscoelastic threads have received much attention, but remain incompletely understood. We study the instabilities in polymer solutions subject to uniaxial elongational flow. Two distinctly different instabilites are observed: beads on a string and blistering. The beads-on-a-string structure arises from a capillary instability whereas the blistering instability has a different origin: it is due to a coupling between stress and polymer concentration. By varying the temperature to change the solution properties we elucidate the interplay between flow and phase separation.

  4. Phase space evolution in linear instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Pantellini, F.G.E.; Burgess, D.; Schwartz, S.J.

    1994-12-01

    A simple and powerful way to investigate the linear evolution of particle distribution functions in kinetic instabilities in a homogeneous collisionless plasma is presented. The method can be applied to any kind of instability, provided the characteristics (growth rate, frequency, wave vector, and polarization) of the mode are known and can also be used to estimate the amplitude of the waves at the end of the linear phase of growth. Two didactic examples are used to illustrate the versatility of the technique: the Alfven Ion Cyclotron (AIC) instability, which is electromagnetic, and the Electron Ion Cyclotron (EIC) instability, which ismore » electrostatic.« less

  5. Secondary instabilities of hypersonic stationary crossflow waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edelman, Joshua B.

    A sharp, circular 7° half-angle cone was tested in the Boeing/AFOSR Mach-6 Quiet Tunnel at 6° angle of attack. Using a variety of roughness configurations, measurements were made using temperature-sensitive paint (TSP) and fast pressure sensors. High-frequency secondary instabilities of the stationary crossflow waves were detected near the aft end of the cone, from 110° to 163° from the windward ray. At least two frequency bands of the secondary instabilities were measured. The secondary instabilities have high coherence between upstream and downstream sensor pairs. In addition, the amplitudes of the instabilities increase with the addition of roughness elements near the nose of the cone. Two of the measured instabilities were captured over a range of axial Reynolds numbers of about 1 - 2 million, with amplitudes ranging from low to turbulent breakdown. For these instabilities, the wave speed and amplitude growth can be calculated. The wave speeds were all near the edge velocity. Measured growth before breakdown for the two instabilities are between e3 and e4 from background noise levels. The initial linear growth rates for the instabilities are near 50 /m. Simultaneous measurement of two frequency bands of the secondary instabilities was made during a single run. It was found that each mode was spatially confined within a small azimuthal region, and that the regions of peak amplitude for one mode correspond to regions of minimal amplitude for the other.

  6. Option price and market instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baaquie, Belal E.; Yu, Miao

    2017-04-01

    An option pricing formula, for which the price of an option depends on both the value of the underlying security as well as the velocity of the security, has been proposed in Baaquie and Yang (2014). The FX (foreign exchange) options price was empirically studied in Baaquie et al., (2014), and it was found that the model in general provides an excellent fit for all strike prices with a fixed model parameters-unlike the Black-Scholes option price Hull and White (1987) that requires the empirically determined implied volatility surface to fit the option data. The option price proposed in Baaquie and Cao Yang (2014) did not fit the data during the crisis of 2007-2008. We make a hypothesis that the failure of the option price to fit data is an indication of the market's large deviation from its near equilibrium behavior due to the market's instability. Furthermore, our indicator of market's instability is shown to be more accurate than the option's observed volatility. The market prices of the FX option for various currencies are studied in the light of our hypothesis.

  7. Radiation-induced genomic instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kronenberg, A.

    1994-01-01

    Quantitative assessment of the heritable somatic effects of ionizing radiation exposures has relied upon the assumption that radiation-induced lesions were 'fixed' in the DNA prior to the first postirradiation mitosis. Lesion conversion was thought to occur during the initial round of DNA replication or as a consequence of error-prone enzymatic processing of lesions. The standard experimental protocols for the assessment of a variety of radiation-induced endpoints (cell death, specific locus mutations, neoplastic transformation and chromosome aberrations) evaluate these various endpoints at a single snapshot in time. In contrast with the aforementioned approaches, some studies have specifically assessed radiation effects as a function of time following exposure. Evidence has accumulated in support of the hypothesis that radiation exposure induces a persistent destabilization of the genome. This instability has been observed as a delayed expression of lethal mutations, as an enhanced rate of accumulation of non-lethal heritable alterations, and as a progressive intraclonal chromosomal heterogeneity. The genetic controls and biochemical mechanisms underlying radiation-induced genomic instability have not yet been delineated. The aim is to integrate the accumulated evidence that suggests that radiation exposure has a persistent effect on the stability of the mammalian genome.

  8. Electric Field Induced Interfacial Instabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kusner, Robert E.; Min, Kyung Yang; Wu, Xiao-Lun; Onuki, Akira

    1996-01-01

    The study of the interface in a charge-free, nonpolar, critical and near-critical binary fluid in the presence of an externally applied electric field is presented. At sufficiently large fields, the interface between the two phases of the binary fluid should become unstable and exhibit an undulation with a predefined wavelength on the order of the capillary length. As the critical point is approached, this wavelength is reduced, potentially approaching length-scales such as the correlation length or critical nucleation radius. At this point the critical properties of the system may be affected. In zero gravity, the interface is unstable at all long wavelengths in the presence of a field applied across it. It is conjectured that this will cause the binary fluid to break up into domains small enough to be outside the instability condition. The resulting pattern formation, and the effects on the critical properties as the domains approach the correlation length are of acute interest. With direct observation, laser light scattering, and interferometry, the phenomena can be probed to gain further understanding of interfacial instabilities and the pattern formation which results, and dimensional crossover in critical systems as the critical fluctuations in a particular direction are suppressed by external forces.

  9. The Chemistry of Beer Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Graham G.

    2004-07-01

    Compared to most other alcoholic beverages, beer is unique because it is unstable when in the final package. This instability can be divided into biological and nonbiological instability. Nonbiological stability of beer involves a wide range of chemical processes and can be considered in a number of categories: physical, flavor, light, foam, and gushing. It is the balance between flavanoid polyphenols (tannoids) and sensitive proteins that specifically combine with polyphenols to form haze that largely dictates physical stability. The flavor stability of beer primarily depends on the oxygen concentration of packaged beer but is influenced by all stages of the brewing process. Foam stability in a glass of beer reflects the quality of the beverage. The backbone of foam is hydrophobic polypeptides. Novel brewing processes such as high-gravity brewing result in a disproportionate loss of these polypeptides and have a negative effect on the foam stability of the resulting beer. Beer is light sensitive, especially in the 350 500 nm range. Beer exposed to this wavelength range in clear or green glass containers quickly develop nauseous skunky-like off-flavors resulting from the formation of 3-methyl-2-butene-1-thiol. Methods of enhancing all of these types of beer stability are discussed.

  10. Optimal approach for complete liver tumor ablation using radiofrequency ablation: a simulation study.

    PubMed

    Givehchi, Sogol; Wong, Yin How; Yeong, Chai Hong; Abdullah, Basri Johan Jeet

    2018-04-01

    To investigate the effect of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) electrode trajectory on complete tumor ablation using computational simulation. The RFA of a spherical tumor of 2.0 cm diameter along with 0.5 cm clinical safety margin was simulated using Finite Element Analysis software. A total of 86 points inside one-eighth of the tumor volume along the axial, sagittal and coronal planes were selected as the target sites for electrode-tip placement. The angle of the electrode insertion in both craniocaudal and orbital planes ranged from -90° to +90° with 30° increment. The RFA electrode was simulated to pass through the target site at different angles in combination of both craniocaudal and orbital planes before being advanced to the edge of the tumor. Complete tumor ablation was observed whenever the electrode-tip penetrated through the epicenter of the tumor regardless of the angles of electrode insertion in both craniocaudal and orbital planes. Complete tumor ablation can also be achieved by placing the electrode-tip at several optimal sites and angles. Identification of the tumor epicenter on the central slice of the axial images is essential to enhance the success rate of complete tumor ablation during RFA procedures.

  11. Particle analysis using laser ablation mass spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Parker, Eric P.; Rosenthal, Stephen E.; Trahan, Michael W.; Wagner, John S.

    2003-09-09

    The present invention provides a method of quickly identifying bioaerosols by class, even if the subject bioaerosol has not been previously encountered. The method begins by collecting laser ablation mass spectra from known particles. The spectra are correlated with the known particles, including the species of particle and the classification (e.g., bacteria). The spectra can then be used to train a neural network, for example using genetic algorithm-based training, to recognize each spectra and to recognize characteristics of the classifications. The spectra can also be used in a multivariate patch algorithm. Laser ablation mass specta from unknown particles can be presented as inputs to the trained neural net for identification as to classification. The description below first describes suitable intelligent algorithms and multivariate patch algorithms, then presents an example of the present invention including results.

  12. 3D Multifunctional Ablative Thermal Protection System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, Jay; Venkatapathy, Ethiraj; Wilkinson, Curt; Mercer, Ken

    2015-01-01

    NASA is developing the Orion spacecraft to carry astronauts farther into the solar system than ever before, with human exploration of Mars as its ultimate goal. One of the technologies required to enable this advanced, Apollo-shaped capsule is a 3-dimensional quartz fiber composite for the vehicle's compression pad. During its mission, the compression pad serves first as a structural component and later as an ablative heat shield, partially consumed on Earth re-entry. This presentation will summarize the development of a new 3D quartz cyanate ester composite material, 3-Dimensional Multifunctional Ablative Thermal Protection System (3D-MAT), designed to meet the mission requirements for the Orion compression pad. Manufacturing development, aerothermal (arc-jet) testing, structural performance, and the overall status of material development for the 2018 EM-1 flight test will be discussed.

  13. Radiofrequency ablation of two femoral head chondroblastomas.

    PubMed

    Petsas, Theodore; Megas, Panagiotis; Papathanassiou, Zafiria

    2007-07-01

    Chondroblastoma is a rare benign cartilaginous bone tumor. Surgical resection is the treatment of choice for pain relief and prevention of further growth. Open surgical techniques are associated with complications, particularly when the tumors are located in deep anatomical sites. The authors performed RF ablation in two cases of subarticular femoral head chondroblastomas and emphasize its positive impact. The clinical course, the radiological findings and the post treatment results are discussed.

  14. A Review of Laser Ablation Propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Phipps, Claude; Bohn, Willy; Lippert, Thomas

    Laser Ablation Propulsion is a broad field with a wide range of applications. We review the 30-year history of laser ablation propulsion from the transition from earlier pure photon propulsion concepts of Oberth and Saenger through Kantrowitz's original laser ablation propulsion idea to the development of air-breathing 'Lightcraft' and advanced spacecraft propulsion engines. The polymers POM and GAP have played an important role in experiments and liquid ablation fuels show great promise. Some applications use a laser system which is distant from the propelled object, for example, on another spacecraft, the Earth or a planet. Others use a laser thatmore » is part of the spacecraft propulsion system on the spacecraft. Propulsion is produced when an intense laser beam strikes a condensed matter surface and produces a vapor or plasma jet. The advantages of this idea are that exhaust velocity of the propulsion engine covers a broader range than is available from chemistry, that it can be varied to meet the instantaneous demands of the particular mission, and that practical realizations give lower mass and greater simplicity for a payload delivery system. We review the underlying theory, buttressed by extensive experimental data. The primary problem in laser space propulsion theory has been the absence of a way to predict thrust and specific impulse over the transition from the vapor to the plasma regimes. We briefly discuss a method for combining two new vapor regime treatments with plasma regime theory, giving a smooth transition from one regime to the other. We conclude with a section on future directions.« less

  15. Stability analysis of unsteady ablation fronts

    SciTech Connect

    Betti, R.; McCrory, R.L.; Verdon, C.P.

    1993-08-01

    The linear stability analysis of unsteady ablation fronts, is carried out for a semi-infinite uniform medium. For a laser accelerated target, it is shown that a properly selected modulation of the laser intensity can lead to the dynamic stabilization or growth-rate reduction of a large portion of the unstable spectrum. The theory is in qualitative agreement with the numerical results obtained by using the two-dimensional hydrodynamic code ORCHID.

  16. Stability analysis of unsteady ablation fronts

    SciTech Connect

    Betti, R.; McCrory, R.L.; Verdon, C.P.

    1993-11-08

    The linear stability analysis of unsteady ablation fronts is carried out for a semi-infinite uniform medium. For a laser accelerated target, it is shown that a properly selected modulation of the laser intensity can lead to the dynamic stabilization or growth-rate reduction of a large portion of the unstable spectrum. The theory is in qualitative agreement with the numerical results obtained by using the two-dimensional hydrodynamic code ORCHID.

  17. Thermo-Chemical Phenomena Simulation for Ablation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-02-21

    DATES COVERED (1/01/08-30/11/10) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Thermo- Chemical Phenomena Simulation for Ablation 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER...First, a physic based chemical kinetic model for high-temperature gas is developed and verified by comparing with data from the RAM-C-II probe and the...found to be negligible and the energy exchange is dominated by the chemical process for conductive-convective heat transfer. A simplified and more

  18. Ablation of steel by microsecond pulse trains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Windeler, Matthew Karl Ross

    Laser micromachining is an important material processing technique used in industry and medicine to produce parts with high precision. Control of the material removal process is imperative to obtain the desired part with minimal thermal damage to the surrounding material. Longer pulsed lasers, with pulse durations of milli- and microseconds, are used primarily for laser through-cutting and welding. In this work, a two-pulse sequence using microsecond pulse durations is demonstrated to achieve consistent material removal during percussion drilling when the delay between the pulses is properly defined. The light-matter interaction moves from a regime of surface morphology changes to melt and vapour ejection. Inline coherent imaging (ICI), a broadband, spatially-coherent imaging technique, is used to monitor the ablation process. The pulse parameter space is explored and the key regimes are determined. Material removal is observed when the pulse delay is on the order of the pulse duration. ICI is also used to directly observe the ablation process. Melt dynamics are characterized by monitoring surface changes during and after laser processing at several positions in and around the interaction region. Ablation is enhanced when the melt has time to flow back into the hole before the interaction with the second pulse begins. A phenomenological model is developed to understand the relationship between material removal and pulse delay. Based on melt refilling the interaction region, described by logistic growth, and heat loss, described by exponential decay, the model is fit to several datasets. The fit parameters reflect the pulse energies and durations used in the ablation experiments. For pulse durations of 50 us with pulse energies of 7.32 mJ +/- 0.09 mJ, the logisitic growth component of the model reaches half maximum after 8.3 mus +/- 1.1 us and the exponential decays with a rate of 64 mus +/- 15 us. The phenomenological model offers an interpretation of the material

  19. Supersonic, shockwave-driven hydrodynamic instability experiments at OMEGA-EP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Willow

    2016-10-01

    Hydrodynamic instabilities play a dominant role in the transport of mass, momentum, and energy in nearly every plasma environment, governing the dynamics of natural and engineering systems such as solar convective zones, magnetospheric boundaries, and fusion experiments. In past decades, limitations in our understanding of hydrodynamic instabilities have led to discrepancies between observations and predictions. Since then, significant improvements have been made to our available experimental techniques, diagnostics, and simulation capabilities. Here, we present a novel experimental platform that can sustain a steady, supersonic flow across a precision-machined, well-characterized material interface for unprecedented durations We applied this platform to a series of Kelvin-Helmholtz instability experiments. The Kelvin-Helmholtz instability generates vortical structures and turbulence at an interface with shear flow. In a supersonic flow, the growth rate is inhibited and the instability structure is altered. The data were obtained at the OMEGA-EP facility by firing three laser beams in sequence to produce a 12 kJ, 28 ns stitched laser pulse. The ablation pressure sustained a steady shockwave for 70 ns over a foam-plastic, single-mode or dual-mode interface. A spherical crystal imager was used to measure the evolution of these modulations with high-resolution x-ray radiography using Cu Kα radiation at 8.0 keV. The observed structure was reproduced with 2D hydrodynamic simulations. Supported by the U.S. DOE, through NNSA Grants DE-NA0002956 (SSAA) and DE-NA0002719 (NLUF), by the LLE under DE-NA0001944, and by the LLNL under subcontract B614207 to DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  20. Calcified lesion modeling for excimer laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Holly A.; Archuleta, Andrew; Splinter, Robert

    2009-06-01

    Objective: Develop a representative calcium target model to evaluate penetration of calcified plaque lesions during atherectomy procedures using 308 nm Excimer laser ablation. Materials and Methods: An in-vitro model representing human calcified plaque was analyzed using Plaster-of-Paris and cement based composite materials as well as a fibrinogen model. The materials were tested for mechanical consistency. The most likely candidate(s) resulting from initial mechanical and chemical screening was submitted for ablation testing. The penetration rate of specific multi-fiber catheter designs and a single fiber probe was obtained and compared to that in human cadaver calcified plaque. The effects of lasing parameters and catheter tip design on penetration speed in a representative calcified model were verified against the results in human cadaver specimens. Results: In Plaster of Paris, the best penetration was obtained using the single fiber tip configuration operating at 100 Fluence, 120 Hz. Calcified human lesions are twice as hard, twice as elastic as and much more complex than Plaster of Paris. Penetration of human calcified specimens was highly inconsistent and varied significantly from specimen to specimen and within individual specimens. Conclusions: Although Plaster of Paris demonstrated predictable increases in penetration with higher energy density and repetition rate, it can not be considered a totally representative laser ablation model for calcified lesions. This is in part due to the more heterogeneous nature and higher density composition of cadaver intravascular human calcified occlusions. Further testing will require a more representative model of human calcified lesions.