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Sample records for ablative tumor surgery

  1. The palatal island mucoperiosteal flap for primary intraoral reconstruction following tumor ablative surgery.

    PubMed

    Magdy, Emad A

    2011-11-01

    Reconstruction of intraoral mucosal defects following tumor ablative surgery can be a challenging problem. The objective of this study was to evaluate the use of the palatal island mucoperiosteal flap (PIMPF) in reconstructing intraoral defects resulting from ablative tumor resections. The study included eight consecutive patients who underwent primary reconstruction using the PIMPF following intraoral tumor resections in a 5-year period by a single surgeon at a tertiary referral institute. Patients included five men and three women ranging in age from 32 to 69 years. Four patients were smokers (averaging 40 pack-years). None had received prior irradiation therapy. Resultant surgical defects ranged in size from 6 to 16.5 cm(2) (mean 12.3 ± 3.9) and included areas of soft/hard palate, lateral pharyngeal wall, retromolar trigone and inner cheek. Final pathological findings revealed three benign and five malignant tumors, mostly from minor salivary gland origin. All patients began oral diet between postoperative days 1 and 4 (mean 2 days). All flaps survived well with good postoperative wound healing except one minor flap dehiscence that eventually healed by granulation tissue with no further surgery needed. All donor sites were completely healed by remucosalization within 5-13 weeks. No patients manifested permanent velopharyngeal insufficiency, speech impairment, or airway compromise after a follow-up period ranging from 13 to 56 months (mean 31.3 ± 15.9). The PIMPF was found to be an attractive single-staged versatile and reliable reconstructive option for postero-lateral oral cavity/oropharyngeal defects that provides well-vascularized, sensate mucosa with minimal morbidity.

  2. Radiofrequency Ablation of Liver Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Site Index A-Z Radiofrequency Ablation (RFA) of Liver Tumors Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a treatment that ... of Liver Tumors? What is Radiofrequency Ablation of Liver Tumors? Radiofrequency ablation, sometimes referred to as RFA, ...

  3. New percutaneous ablative modalities in nephron-sparing surgery of small renal tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Riese, Werner T. W.; Nelius, Thomas; Aronoff, David R.; Mittemeyer, Bernhard T.

    2004-07-01

    Renal tumors are increasingly detected on abdominal imaging studies. Standard treatment of small renal tumors includes partial or radical nephrectomy, done either open or laparoscopically. Several in situ ablative techniques to treat small renal lesions are currently in various phases of evolution. All involve imparting destructive energy to the tumor while minimizing injury to adjacent normal tissue. Cryotherapy (CryoT), radiofrequency ablation (RFA), high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFUS) and high-intensity radiation (HIR) are all being evaluated as tools to ablate renal tumors. The goal with these modalities is to minimize the blood loss, tissue manipulation, and morbidity associated with excisional approaches. Animal studies have shown that large, reproducible lesions can be ablated in normal kidney tissue by these new techniques. Studies of human renal tissue response to RFA are just beginning. Ex vivo studies reveal large, reproducible controlled lesions in normal renal tissue, similar to animal studies. In vivo studies have shown no significant toxicity, while efficacy is currently under evaluation. Preliminary clinical studies in humans have revealed that renal tumors are slow to regress after treatment, but about 75% of these small renal tumors appeared well treated. Mixed responses have been observed in the remaining cases. This paper presents a concise review of efficacy, advantages and disadvantages of these new minimal invasive techniques and their possible clinical implication in the future.

  4. Tumor Ablation and Nanotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Manthe, Rachel L.; Foy, Susan P.; Krishnamurthy, Nishanth; Sharma, Blanka; Labhasetwar, Vinod

    2010-01-01

    Next to surgical resection, tumor ablation is a commonly used intervention in the treatment of solid tumors. Tumor ablation methods include thermal therapies, photodynamic therapy, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) producing agents. Thermal therapies induce tumor cell death via thermal energy and include radiofrequency, microwave, high intensity focused ultrasound, and cryoablation. Photodynamic therapy and ROS producing agents cause increased oxidative stress in tumor cells leading to apoptosis. While these therapies are safe and viable alternatives when resection of malignancies is not feasible, they do have associated limitations that prevent their widespread use in clinical applications. To improve the efficacy of these treatments, nanoparticles are being studied in combination with nonsurgical ablation regimens. In addition to better thermal effect on tumor ablation, nanoparticles can deliver anticancer therapeutics that show synergistic anti-tumor effect in the presence of heat and can also be imaged to achieve precision in therapy. Understanding the molecular mechanism of nanoparticle-mediated tumor ablation could further help engineer nanoparticles of appropriate composition and properties to synergize the ablation effect. This review aims to explore the various types of nonsurgical tumor ablation methods currently used in cancer treatment and potential improvements by nanotechnology applications. PMID:20866097

  5. Lung Carcinoid Tumor: Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tumor Treating Lung Carcinoid Tumors Surgery to Treat Lung Carcinoid Tumors Surgery is the main treatment for ... often be cured by surgery alone. Types of lung surgery Different operations can be used to treat ( ...

  6. Percutaneous ablation of adrenal tumors.

    PubMed

    Venkatesan, Aradhana M; Locklin, Julia; Dupuy, Damian E; Wood, Bradford J

    2010-06-01

    Adrenal tumors comprise a broad spectrum of benign and malignant neoplasms and include functional adrenal adenomas, pheochromocytomas, primary adrenocortical carcinoma, and adrenal metastases. Percutaneous ablative approaches that have been described and used in the treatment of adrenal tumors include percutaneous radiofrequency ablation, cryoablation, microwave ablation, and chemical ablation. Local tumor ablation in the adrenal gland presents unique challenges, secondary to the adrenal gland's unique anatomic and physiological features. The results of clinical series employing percutaneous ablative techniques in the treatment of adrenal tumors are reviewed in this article. Clinical and technical considerations unique to ablation in the adrenal gland are presented, including approaches commonly used in our practices, and risks and potential complications are discussed.

  7. Recent advances in microvascular autologous breast reconstruction after ablative tumor surgery

    PubMed Central

    Pollhammer, Michael S; Duscher, Dominik; Schmidt, Manfred; Huemer, Georg M

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is a ubiquitous disease and one of the leading causes of death in women in western societies. With overall increasing survival rates, the number of patients who need post-mastectomy reconstruction is on the rise. Especially since its psychological benefits have been broadly recognized, breast reconstruction has become a key component of breast cancer treatment. Evolving from the early beginnings of breast reconstruction with synthetic implants in the 1960s, microsurgical tissue transfer is on the way to become the gold standard for post oncology restoration of the breast. Particularly since the advent of perforator based free flap surgery, free tissue transfer has become as safe option for breast reconstruction with low morbidity. The lower abdominal skin and subcutaneous fat tissue typically offer enough volume to create an aesthetically satisfying breast mound. Nowadays, the most commonly used flap from this donor site is the deep inferior epigastric artery perforator flap. If the lower abdomen is not available as a donor site, the gluteal area and thigh provide a number of flaps suitable for breast reconstruction. If the required breast volume is small, and there is enough tissue available on the upper medial thigh, then a transverse upper gracilis flap may be a practicable method to reconstruct the breast. In case of a higher amount of required volume, a gluteal artery perforator flap is the best choice. However, what is crucial in addition to selecting the best flap option for the individual patient is the timing of the operation. In patients with confirmed post-mastectomy radiation therapy, it is advisable to perform microvascular breast reconstruction only in a delayed fashion. PMID:26862495

  8. Percutaneous ablation of malignant thoracic tumors.

    PubMed

    Ghaye, B

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of death related to cancer. Fifteen to thirty percent of patients with a localized lung cancer are actually inoperable as they present with poor general condition, limited cardiopulmonary function, or a too high surgical risk. Therefore, minimally invasive treatments are needed and percutaneous ablation seems an attractive option. Thermal ablation can be performed by delivering heat (radiofrequency, microwave, laser) or cold (cryotherapy) through a needle inserted into the tumor under CT guidance. The ideal lesion is less than 2 or 3 cm in diameter. Success of percutaneous thermal ablation appears to be close to those of surgery for localized lung cancer. Nevertheless studies are still needed to definitely assess the role of ablation compared to other emerging techniques, as stereotactic radiotherapy as well as potential synergy with other treatments.

  9. [New techniques of tumor ablation (microwaves, electroporation)].

    PubMed

    de Baere, T

    2011-09-01

    Since the introduction of radiofrequency tumor ablation of liver tumors in the late 1990s, local destructive therapies have been applied to lung, renal and bone lesions. In addition, new techniques have been introduced to compensate for the limitations of radiofrequency ablation, namely the reduced rate of complete ablation for tumors larger than 3 cm and tumors near vessels larger than 3 mm. Microwave ablation is currently evolving rapidly. While it is a technique based on thermal ablation similar to radiofrequency ablation, there are significant differences between both techniques. Electroporation, of interest because of the non-thermal nature of the ablation process, also is under evaluation.

  10. Percutaneous image-guided ablation of breast tumors: an overview.

    PubMed

    Sag, Alan A; Maybody, Majid; Comstock, Christopher; Solomon, Stephen B

    2014-06-01

    Percutaneous non-surgical image-guided ablation is emerging as an adjunct or alternative to surgery in the management of benign and malignant breast tumors. This review covers the current state of the literature regarding percutaneous image-guided ablation modalities, clinical factors regarding patient selection, and future directions for research.

  11. Thermal ablation of lung tumors.

    PubMed

    McTaggart, Ryan A; Dupuy, Damian E

    2007-06-01

    Thermal ablation can be applied to treat any thoracic malignancy: primary lung cancers, recurrent primary lung cancers, metastatic disease, chest wall masses, and painful, bony metastases. Since the first reported use of thermal ablation for lung cancer in 2000 there has been an explosive use of the procedure, and by 2010 the number of procedures to treat thoracic malignancy is expected to exceed 150,000 per year. Presently, thermal ablation is best used for patients with early-stage lung cancers in patients who are not surgical candidates, patients with small and favorably located pulmonary metastases, and patients in whom palliation of tumor-related symptoms is the goal. Radiofrequency ablation, microwave ablation, and cryoablation are novel treatment modalities for lung cancer and can safely accomplish tumor destruction and even complete eradication of tumor in patients who are not candidates for surgical resection. In this article, we discuss technical considerations for each modality and the periprocedure and postprocedure management of patients with this disease.

  12. Radiofrequency Ablation Therapy for Solid Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Kam, Anthony

    2002-12-04

    Surgical resection, systemic chemotherapy, and local radiation have been the conventional treatments for localized solid cancer. Because certain patients are not candidates for tumor resection and because many tumors are poorly responsive to chemotherapy and radiation, there has been an impetus to develop alternative therapies. Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a minimally invasive therapy for localized solid cancers that has gained considerable attention in the last 12 years. Advantages of minimally invasive therapies over surgery include less recovery time, lower morbidity and mortality, eligibility of more patients, and lower cost. RFA has been applied most extensively to inoperable hepatic tumors. It is investigational for tumors in the kidney, lung, bone, breast, and adrenal gland. This colloquium will review the mechanism, techniques, limitations, and clinical applications of RFA. The ultimate role that RFA will play in cancer therapy will depend on the results of long-term follow-up and prospective randomized trials.

  13. Tumor Ablation with Irreversible Electroporation

    PubMed Central

    Al-Sakere, Bassim; André, Franck; Bernat, Claire; Connault, Elisabeth; Opolon, Paule; Davalos, Rafael V.; Rubinsky, Boris; Mir, Lluis M.

    2007-01-01

    We report the first successful use of irreversible electroporation for the minimally invasive treatment of aggressive cutaneous tumors implanted in mice. Irreversible electroporation is a newly developed non-thermal tissue ablation technique in which certain short duration electrical fields are used to permanently permeabilize the cell membrane, presumably through the formation of nanoscale defects in the cell membrane. Mathematical models of the electrical and thermal fields that develop during the application of the pulses were used to design an efficient treatment protocol with minimal heating of the tissue. Tumor regression was confirmed by histological studies which also revealed that it occurred as a direct result of irreversible cell membrane permeabilization. Parametric studies show that the successful outcome of the procedure is related to the applied electric field strength, the total pulse duration as well as the temporal mode of delivery of the pulses. Our best results were obtained using plate electrodes to deliver across the tumor 80 pulses of 100 µs at 0.3 Hz with an electrical field magnitude of 2500 V/cm. These conditions induced complete regression in 12 out of 13 treated tumors, (92%), in the absence of tissue heating. Irreversible electroporation is thus a new effective modality for non-thermal tumor ablation. PMID:17989772

  14. Percutaneous ablation of benign bone tumors.

    PubMed

    Welch, Brian T; Welch, Timothy J

    2011-09-01

    Percutaneous image-guided ablation has become a standard of practice and one of the primary modalities for treatment of benign bone tumors. Ablation is most commonly used to treat osteoid osteomas but may also be used in the treatment of chondroblastomas, osteoblastomas, and giant cell tumors. Percutaneous image-guided ablation of benign bone tumors carries a high success rate (>90% in case series) and results in decreased morbidity, mortality, and expense compared with traditional surgical methods. The ablation technique most often applied to benign bone lesions is radiofrequency ablation. Because the ablation technique has been extensively applied to osteoid osteomas and because of the uncommon nature of other benign bone tumors, we will primarily focus this discussion on the percutaneous ablation of osteoid osteomas.

  15. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided ethanol ablation therapy for tumors

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wen-Ying; Li, Zhao-Shen; Jin, Zhen-Dong

    2013-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) has evolved into a useful therapeutic tool for treating a broad range of tumors since being introduced into clinical practice as a diagnostic modality nearly three decades ago. In particular, EUS-guided fine-needle injection has proven a successful minimally invasive approach for treating benign lesions such as pancreatic cysts, relieving pancreatic pain through celiac plexus neurolysis, and controlling local tumor growth of unresectable malignancies by direct delivery of anti-tumor agents. One such ablative agent, ethanol, is capable of safely ablating solid or cystic lesions in hepatic tissues via percutaneous injection. Recent research and clinical interest has focused on the promise of EUS-guided ethanol ablation as a safe and effective method for treating pancreatic tumor patients with small lesions or who are poor operative candidates. Although it is not likely to replace radical resection of localized lesions or systemic treatment of metastatic tumors in all patients, EUS-guided ablation is an ideal method for patients who refuse or are not eligible for surgery. Moreover, this treatment modality may play an active role in the development of future pancreatic tumor treatments. This article reviews the most recent clinical applications of EUS-guided ethanol ablation in humans for treating pancreatic cystic tumors, pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors, and metastatic lesions. PMID:23801831

  16. Tumor Thermal Ablation Enhancement by Micromaterials.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Fan; Su, Hongying; Han, Xiangjun; Bao, Han; Qi, Ji

    2016-01-07

    Thermal ablation is a minimally invasive therapeutic technique that has shown remarkable potential in treating un resectable tumors. However, clinical applications have stalled, due to safety ambiguities, slow heat induction, lengthy ablation times, and post-therapeutic monitoring issues. To further improve treatment efficacy, an assortment of micro materials (eg, nano particulates of gold, silica, or iron oxide and single-walled carbon nanotubes) are under study as thermal ablative adjuncts.In recent years, the micro material domain has become especially interesting.In vivo and in vitro animal studies have validated the use of microspheres as embolic agents in liver tumors, in advance of radiofrequency ablation. Microcapsules and micro bubbles serving as ultrasound contrast and ablation sensibilizers are strong prospects for clinical applications. This review was conducted to explore benefits of the three aforementioned micro scale technologies, in conjunction with tumor thermal ablation.

  17. Small renal tumors: natural history, observation strategies and emerging modalities of energy based tumor ablation.

    PubMed

    Derweesh, Ithaar H; Novick, Andrew C

    2003-06-01

    With further advances in the technology of non-invasive imaging modalities as well as their utilization, diagnosis of incidental renal tumors has increased considerably. A large proportion of these renal tumors have been small (<4 cm) masses, for which nephron sparing surgery has been proven to be effective for. The trend toward minimally invasive options in the management of renal tumors has prompted interest in energy-based ablation techniques as a possible alternative to radical or partial nephrectomy in select patients. This article will review the natural history of small renal neoplasms and the emerging modalities of energy based energy ablation such as cryoablation, radiofrequency ablation, interstitial photon radiation, interstitial laser technology, microwave ablation, and Cyberknife extracorporeal renal tissue ablation.

  18. Predictive analysis of optical ablation in several dermatological tumoral tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fanjul-Vélez, F.; Blanco-Gutiérrez, A.; Salas-García, I.; Ortega-Quijano, N.; Arce-Diego, J. L.

    2013-06-01

    Optical techniques for treatment and characterization of biological tissues are revolutionizing several branches of medical praxis, for example in ophthalmology or dermatology. The non-invasive, non-contact and non-ionizing character of optical radiation makes it specially suitable for these applications. Optical radiation can be employed in medical ablation applications, either for tissue resection or surgery. Optical ablation may provide a controlled and clean cut on a biological tissue. This is particularly relevant in tumoral tissue resection, where a small amount of cancerous cells could make the tumor appear again. A very important aspect of tissue optical ablation is then the estimation of the affected volume. In this work we propose a complete predictive model of tissue ablation that provides an estimation of the resected volume. The model is based on a Monte Carlo approach for the optical propagation of radiation inside the tissue, and a blow-off model for tissue ablation. This model is applied to several types of dermatological tumoral tissues, specifically squamous cells, basocellular and infiltrative carcinomas. The parameters of the optical source are varied and the estimated resected volume is calculated. The results for the different tumor types are presented and compared. This model can be used for surgical planning, in order to assure the complete resection of the tumoral tissue.

  19. Thermal ablation for the treatment of abdominal tumors.

    PubMed

    Brace, Christopher L; Hinshaw, J Louis; Lubner, Meghan G

    2011-03-07

    associated bleeding risks frequently seen in cirrhotic patients. In addition, sudden release of tumor cellular contents when the frozen tissue thaws can lead to a potentially serious condition known as cryoshock. Thermal tumor ablation can be performed at open surgery, laparoscopy or using a percutaneous approach. When performed percutaneously, the ablation procedure relies on imaging for diagnosis, planning, applicator guidance, treatment monitoring and follow-up. Ultrasound is the most popular modality for guidance and treatment monitoring worldwide, but computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are commonly used as well. Contrast-enhanced CT or MRI are typically employed for diagnosis and follow-up imaging.

  20. Microwave ablation of renal tumors: state of the art and development trends.

    PubMed

    Floridi, Chiara; De Bernardi, Irene; Fontana, Federico; Muollo, Alessandra; Ierardi, Anna Maria; Agostini, Andrea; Fonio, Paolo; Squillaci, Ettore; Brunese, Luca; Fugazzola, Carlo; Carrafiello, Gianpaolo

    2014-07-01

    In the last decades an increased incidence of new renal tumor cases has been for clinically localized, small tumors <2.0 cm. This trend for small, low-stage tumors is the reflection of earlier diagnosis primarily as a result of the widespread and increasing use of non-invasive abdominal imaging modalities such as ultrasound, computerized tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging. Renal tumors are often diagnosed in elderly patients, with medical comorbidities whom the risk of surgical complications may pose a greater risk of death than that due to the tumor itself. In these patients, unsuitable for surgical approach, thermal ablation represents a valid alternative to traditional surgery. Thermal ablation is a less invasive, less morbid treatment option thanks to reduced blood loss, lower incidence of complications during the procedure and a less long convalescence. At present, the most widely used thermal ablative techniques are cryoablation, radiofrequency ablation and microwave ablation (MWA). MWA offers many benefits of other ablation techniques and offers several other advantages: higher intratumoral temperatures, larger tumor ablation volumes, faster ablation times, the ability to use multiple applicators simultaneously, optimal heating of cystic masses and tumors close to the vessels and less procedural pain. This review aims to provide the reader with an overview about the state of the art of microwave ablation for renal tumors and to cast a glance on the new development trends of this technique.

  1. Liver tumor ablation: percutaneous and open approaches.

    PubMed

    Padma, Srikanth; Martinie, John B; Iannitti, David A

    2009-12-15

    The global incidence of liver cancer is greater than a million cases a year. Surgical resection where applicable is still the standard of care for these patients. Various liver-directed regional therapies have been developed in an effort to treat the vast majority of unresectable liver tumors. This article reviews the principles behind various ablation therapies currently available for malignant liver tumors and their outcomes.

  2. Thermal tumor ablation in clinical use.

    PubMed

    Brace, C

    2011-01-01

    Although a surgical procedure is performed by visual inspection with histopathological assessment of the excised tumor and margins, percutaneous and noninvasive thermal ablation is performed strictly with the aid of imaging. Applicator guidance into the target zone, treatment monitoring and verification, and clinical follow-up rely on effective imaging. Detailed discussion of imaging is beyond the scope of this article, but the influence of imaging on the choice of thermal ablation or procedural approach will be discussed as needed. More information on imaging for interventional therapies can be found in other articles in this issue of IEEE Pulse.

  3. New tumor ablation techniques for cancer treatment (microwave, electroporation).

    PubMed

    de Baere, T; Deschamps, F

    2014-01-01

    Since the introduction of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) for the treatment of liver tumors at the end of the 1990s, indications for local ablation techniques have been extended to other organs, in particular, the lungs, kidneys and bones. These techniques have also been improved, in particular to try and overcome the limitations of radiofrequency techniques, especially the significant decrease in complete ablation rates for tumors larger than 3cm and tumors that are contiguous to vessels larger than 3mm. Microwave ablation is a rapidly developing thermal ablation technique similar to RFA but with numerous differences. Electroporation, a non-thermal ablation technique with other possibilities, is in earlier stages of clinical development.

  4. High intensity focused ultrasound in clinical tumor ablation

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yu-Feng

    2011-01-01

    Recent advances in high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU), which was developed in the 1940s as a viable thermal tissue ablation approach, have increased its popularity. In clinics, HIFU has been applied to treat a variety of solid malignant tumors in a well-defined volume, including the pancreas, liver, prostate, breast, uterine fibroids, and soft-tissue sarcomas. In comparison to conventional tumor/cancer treatment modalities, such as open surgery, radio- and chemo-therapy, HIFU has the advantages of non-invasion, non-ionization, and fewer complications after treatment. Over 100 000 cases have been treated throughout the world with great success. The fundamental principles of HIFU ablation are coagulative thermal necrosis due to the absorption of ultrasound energy during transmission in tissue and the induced cavitation damage. This paper reviews the clinical outcomes of HIFU ablation for applicable cancers, and then summarizes the recommendations for a satisfactory HIFU treatment according to clinical experience. In addition, the current challenges in HIFU for engineers and physicians are also included. More recent horizons have broadened the application of HIFU in tumor treatment, such as HIFU-mediated drug delivery, vessel occlusion, and soft tissue erosion (“histotripsy”). In summary, HIFU is likely to play a significant role in the future oncology practice. PMID:21603311

  5. Recent Advances in Tumor Ablation for Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kang, Tae Wook; Rhim, Hyunchul

    2015-09-01

    Image-guided tumor ablation for early stage hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is an accepted non-surgical treatment that provides excellent local tumor control and favorable survival benefit. This review summarizes the recent advances in tumor ablation for HCC. Diagnostic imaging and molecular biology of HCC has recently undergone marked improvements. Second-generation ultrasonography (US) contrast agents, new computed tomography (CT) techniques, and liver-specific contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have enabled the early detection of smaller and inconspicuous HCC lesions. Various imaging-guidance tools that incorporate imaging-fusion between real-time US and CT/MRI, that are now common for percutaneous tumor ablation, have increased operator confidence in the accurate targeting of technically difficult tumors. In addition to radiofrequency ablation (RFA), various therapeutic modalities including microwave ablation, irreversible electroporation, and high-intensity focused ultrasound ablation have attracted attention as alternative energy sources for effective locoregional treatment of HCC. In addition, combined treatment with RFA and chemoembolization or molecular agents may be able to overcome the limitation of advanced or large tumors. Finally, understanding of the biological mechanisms and advances in therapy associated with tumor ablation will be important for successful tumor control. All these advances in tumor ablation for HCC will result in significant improvement in the prognosis of HCC patients. In this review, we primarily focus on recent advances in molecular tumor biology, diagnosis, imaging-guidance tools, and therapeutic modalities, and refer to the current status and future perspectives for tumor ablation for HCC.

  6. Endoscopic surgery of pituitary tumors.

    PubMed

    Dhepnorrarat, Rataphol Chris; Ang, Beng Ti; Sethi, Dharambir Singh

    2011-08-01

    Endoscopic pituitary surgery has been gaining wide acceptance as the first-line treatment of most functional pituitary adenomas. This technique has many advantages over traditional procedures, and growing evidence supports its use for endocrine control of functioning tumors. This article reviews data on the different modalities of treatment of functioning pituitary adenomas and compares the results. Endoscopic pituitary surgery controls tumor growth and endocrinopathy as well as or better than other treatment modalities. Complication rates are low and patient recovery is fast. Furthermore, surgery provides a means of achieving prompt decompression of neurologic structures and endocrine remission.

  7. Brain Tumor Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... The surgical removal of a portion of the skull. Doing so allows the neurosurgeon to find the ... much of it as possible. The piece of skull that was removed is replaced following surgery. Craniectomy: ...

  8. Ablation techniques for primary and metastatic liver tumors

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Michael J; Willatt, Jonathon; Majdalany, Bill S; Kielar, Ania Z; Chong, Suzanne; Ruma, Julie A; Pandya, Amit

    2016-01-01

    Ablative treatment methods have emerged as safe and effective therapies for patients with primary and secondary liver tumors who are not surgical candidates at the time of diagnosis. This article reviews the current literature and describes the techniques, complications and results for radiofrequency ablation, microwave ablation, cryoablation, and irreversible electroporation. PMID:26839642

  9. Laser tumor treatment in oral and maxillofacial surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neukam, F. W.; Stelzle, F.

    Cancer treatment is an integral part of oral and maxillofacial surgery. Oral cancer in particular is a highly prevalent neoplasm. Standard treatment for most of the tumors is radical surgery combined with stage-based neo-/adjuvant therapy. Laser surgery has become a reliable treatment option for oral cancer as well as for precancerous lesions. Widely used lasers in oral and maxillofacial tumor surgery are the CO2 laser, the Er:YAG laser, the Nd:YAG laser and the KTM laser. The use of lasers in tumor surgery has several advantages: remote application, precise cutting, hemostasis, low cicatrization, reduced postoperative pain and swelling, can be combined with endoscopic, microscopic and robotic surgery. However, laser surgery has some major drawbacks: In contrast to conventional incisions with scalpels, the surgeon gets no feedback during laser ablation. There is no depth sensation and no tissue specificity with a laser incision, increasing the risk of iatrogenic damage to nerves and major blood vessels. Future prospects may solve these problems by means of an optical feedback mechanism that provides a tissue-specific laser ablation. First attempts have been made to perform remote optical tissue differentiation. Additionally, real time optical tumor detection during laser surgery would allow for a very precise and straight forward cancer resection, enhancing organ preservation and hence the quality of life for patients with cancer in the head and neck region.

  10. Radio-frequency ablation of small renal tumors: minimum follow up of 1 year

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Vipul; Thaly, Rahul; Shah, Ketul

    2007-02-01

    evidence of tumor recurrence which was corrected surgically. Two masses did show some mild enhancement on CT 6 months post operatively, biopsies showed no evidence of tumor with fibrosis. Of the patients with follow up of greater than 12 months 75% had decreasing size of the lesion, 25% had no change in size. No complications were seen. CONCLUSIONS: Radiofrequency ablation of renal tumors is a feasible alternative for patients that have imperative indication for nephron sparing surgery or those that have significant co-morbidities. The procedure is expedient, efficacious and carries minimal morbidity. It is of extreme importance to follow these patients closely with imaging of the lesion on a frequent basis.

  11. Recent Advances in Tumor Ablation for Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Tae Wook; Rhim, Hyunchul

    2015-01-01

    Image-guided tumor ablation for early stage hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is an accepted non-surgical treatment that provides excellent local tumor control and favorable survival benefit. This review summarizes the recent advances in tumor ablation for HCC. Diagnostic imaging and molecular biology of HCC has recently undergone marked improvements. Second-generation ultrasonography (US) contrast agents, new computed tomography (CT) techniques, and liver-specific contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have enabled the early detection of smaller and inconspicuous HCC lesions. Various imaging-guidance tools that incorporate imaging-fusion between real-time US and CT/MRI, that are now common for percutaneous tumor ablation, have increased operator confidence in the accurate targeting of technically difficult tumors. In addition to radiofrequency ablation (RFA), various therapeutic modalities including microwave ablation, irreversible electroporation, and high-intensity focused ultrasound ablation have attracted attention as alternative energy sources for effective locoregional treatment of HCC. In addition, combined treatment with RFA and chemoembolization or molecular agents may be able to overcome the limitation of advanced or large tumors. Finally, understanding of the biological mechanisms and advances in therapy associated with tumor ablation will be important for successful tumor control. All these advances in tumor ablation for HCC will result in significant improvement in the prognosis of HCC patients. In this review, we primarily focus on recent advances in molecular tumor biology, diagnosis, imaging-guidance tools, and therapeutic modalities, and refer to the current status and future perspectives for tumor ablation for HCC. PMID:26674766

  12. Heat-Based Tumor Ablation: Role of the Immune Response.

    PubMed

    Wu, Feng

    2016-01-01

    The ideal cancer therapy not only induces the death of all localized tumor cells with less damage to surrounding normal tissue, but also activates a systemic antitumor immunity. Heat-based tumor ablation has the potential to be such a treatment as it can minimal-invasively ablate a targeted tumor below the skin surface, and may subsequently augment host antitumor immunity. This chapter primarily introduces increasing pre-clinical and clinical evidence linking antitumor immune response to thermal tumor ablation, and then discusses the potential mechanisms involved in ablation-enhanced host antitumor immunity. The seminal studies performed so far indicate that although it is not possible to make definite conclusions on the connection between thermal ablation and antitumor immune response, it is nonetheless important to conduct extensive studies on the subject in order to elucidate the processes involved.

  13. Semi-autonomous Simulated Brain Tumor Ablation with RavenII Surgical Robot using Behavior Tree.

    PubMed

    Hu, Danying; Gong, Yuanzheng; Hannaford, Blake; Seibel, Eric J

    2015-05-01

    Medical robots have been widely used to assist surgeons to carry out dexterous surgical tasks via various ways. Most of the tasks require surgeon's operation directly or indirectly. Certain level of autonomy in robotic surgery could not only free the surgeon from some tedious repetitive tasks, but also utilize the advantages of robot: high dexterity and accuracy. This paper presents a semi-autonomous neurosurgical procedure of brain tumor ablation using RAVEN Surgical Robot and stereo visual feedback. By integrating with the behavior tree framework, the whole surgical task is modeled flexibly and intelligently as nodes and leaves of a behavior tree. This paper provides three contributions mainly: (1) describing the brain tumor ablation as an ideal candidate for autonomous robotic surgery, (2) modeling and implementing the semi-autonomous surgical task using behavior tree framework, and (3) designing an experimental simulated ablation task for feasibility study and robot performance analysis.

  14. Semi-autonomous Simulated Brain Tumor Ablation with RavenII Surgical Robot using Behavior Tree

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Danying; Gong, Yuanzheng; Hannaford, Blake; Seibel, Eric J.

    2015-01-01

    Medical robots have been widely used to assist surgeons to carry out dexterous surgical tasks via various ways. Most of the tasks require surgeon’s operation directly or indirectly. Certain level of autonomy in robotic surgery could not only free the surgeon from some tedious repetitive tasks, but also utilize the advantages of robot: high dexterity and accuracy. This paper presents a semi-autonomous neurosurgical procedure of brain tumor ablation using RAVEN Surgical Robot and stereo visual feedback. By integrating with the behavior tree framework, the whole surgical task is modeled flexibly and intelligently as nodes and leaves of a behavior tree. This paper provides three contributions mainly: (1) describing the brain tumor ablation as an ideal candidate for autonomous robotic surgery, (2) modeling and implementing the semi-autonomous surgical task using behavior tree framework, and (3) designing an experimental simulated ablation task for feasibility study and robot performance analysis. PMID:26405563

  15. Aggressive tumor recurrence after radiofrequency ablation for hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kang, Tae Wook; Lim, Hyo Keun; Cha, Dong Ik

    2017-03-01

    Image-guided radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is an evolving and growing treatment option for patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and hepatic metastasis. RFA offers significant advantages as it is less invasive than surgery and carries a low risk of major complications. However, serious complications, including aggressive tumor recurrence, may be observed during follow-up, and recently, mechanical or thermal damage during RFA has been proposed to be one of the causes of this kind of recurrence. Although the exact mechanism of this still remains unclear, physicians should be familiar with the imaging features of aggressive tumor recurrence after RFA for HCC and its risk factors. In addition, in order to prevent or minimize this newly recognized tumor recurrence, a modified RFA technique, combined RFA treatments with transarterial chemoembolization, and cryoablation can be used as alternative treatments. Ultimately, combining an understanding of this potential complication of RFA with an understanding of the possible risk factors for aggressive tumor recurrence and choosing alternative treatments are crucial to optimize clinical outcomes in each patient with HCC.

  16. Aggressive tumor recurrence after radiofrequency ablation for hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Tae Wook; Lim, Hyo Keun; Cha, Dong Ik

    2017-01-01

    Image-guided radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is an evolving and growing treatment option for patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and hepatic metastasis. RFA offers significant advantages as it is less invasive than surgery and carries a low risk of major complications. However, serious complications, including aggressive tumor recurrence, may be observed during follow-up, and recently, mechanical or thermal damage during RFA has been proposed to be one of the causes of this kind of recurrence. Although the exact mechanism of this still remains unclear, physicians should be familiar with the imaging features of aggressive tumor recurrence after RFA for HCC and its risk factors. In addition, in order to prevent or minimize this newly recognized tumor recurrence, a modified RFA technique, combined RFA treatments with transarterial chemoembolization, and cryoablation can be used as alternative treatments. Ultimately, combining an understanding of this potential complication of RFA with an understanding of the possible risk factors for aggressive tumor recurrence and choosing alternative treatments are crucial to optimize clinical outcomes in each patient with HCC. PMID:28349677

  17. Surgery of Glomus Jugulare Tumors.

    PubMed

    Pareschi, Roberto; Righini, Stefano; Destito, Domenico; Raucci, Aldo Falco; Colombo, Stefano

    2003-08-01

    The treatment of choice for glomus jugulare tumors is still controversial. High rates of morbidity, incomplete resection, and the aggressive behavior of these tumors are the main arguments for advocates of primary radiotherapy. However, constant refinements in skull base techniques have made complete resection of these lesions a realistic goal. The high probability of achieving local control of these tumors by surgery has convinced us to support this option strongly. Between 1993 and 2000 we diagnosed 52 glomus tumors of the temporal bone. Of these patients, only 42 had a class C lesion (glomus jugulare) and were included in this study; 37 of these patients underwent surgery, 10 of whom had intracranial extension of the disease. The overall resection rate was 96 %. Facial nerve function at 1 year was House-Brackmann grade I to II in 52 % of patients and grade III or better in 84 % of patients. Hospitalization was shorter than 14 days in 33 patients (89 %). All patients with pharyngolaryngeal palsy had sufficient compensation at discharge. Twelve vocal chord Teflon injections were performed after surgery to reduce hoarseness and aspiration. No patient died. No relapse was observed (mean follow-up, 4.9 years).

  18. Surgical Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation during Mitral-Valve Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Gillinov, A. Marc; Gelijns, Annetine C.; Parides, Michael K.; DeRose, Joseph J.; Moskowitz, Alan J.; Voisine, Pierre; Ailawadi, Gorav; Bouchard, Denis; Smith, Peter K.; Mack, Michael J.; Acker, Michael A.; Mullen, John C.; Rose, Eric A.; Chang, Helena L.; Puskas, John D.; Couderc, Jean-Philippe; Gardner, Timothy J.; Varghese, Robin; Horvath, Keith A.; Bolling, Steven F.; Michler, Robert E.; Geller, Nancy L.; Ascheim, Deborah D.; Miller, Marissa A.; Bagiella, Emilia; Moquete, Ellen G.; Williams, Paula; Taddei-Peters, Wendy C.; O’Gara, Patrick T.; Blackstone, Eugene H.; Argenziano, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Background Among patients undergoing mitral-valve surgery, 30 to 50% present with atrial fibrillation, which is associated with reduced survival and increased risk of stroke. Surgical ablation of atrial fibrillation has been widely adopted, but evidence regarding its safety and effectiveness is limited. Methods We randomly assigned 260 patients with persistent or long-standing persistent atrial fibrillation who required mitral-valve surgery to undergo either surgical ablation (ablation group) or no ablation (control group) during the mitral-valve operation. Patients in the ablation group underwent further randomization to pulmonary-vein isolation or a biatrial maze procedure. All patients underwent closure of the left atrial appendage. The primary end point was freedom from atrial fibrillation at both 6 months and 12 months (as assessed by means of 3-day Holter monitoring). Results More patients in the ablation group than in the control group were free from atrial fibrillation at both 6 and 12 months (63.2% vs. 29.4%, P<0.001). There was no significant difference in the rate of freedom from atrial fibrillation between patients who underwent pulmonary-vein isolation and those who underwent the biatrial maze procedure (61.0% and 66.0%, respectively; P = 0.60). One-year mortality was 6.8% in the ablation group and 8.7% in the control group (hazard ratio with ablation, 0.76; 95% confidence interval, 0.32 to 1.84; P = 0.55). Ablation was associated with more implantations of a permanent pacemaker than was no ablation (21.5 vs. 8.1 per 100 patient-years, P = 0.01). There were no significant between-group differences in major cardiac or cerebrovascular adverse events, overall serious adverse events, or hospital readmissions. Conclusions The addition of atrial fibrillation ablation to mitral-valve surgery significantly increased the rate of freedom from atrial fibrillation at 1 year among patients with persistent or long-standing persistent atrial fibrillation, but the

  19. MRI-guided laser ablation of neuroendocrine tumor hepatic metastases

    PubMed Central

    Perälä, Jukka; Klemola, Rauli; Kallio, Raija; Li, Chengli; Vihriälä, Ilkka; Salmela, Pasi I; Tervonen, Osmo

    2014-01-01

    Background Neuroendocrine tumors (NET) represent a therapeutically challenging and heterogeneous group of malignancies occurring throughout the body, but mainly in the gastrointestinal system. Purpose To describe magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided laser ablation of NET liver metastases and assess its role within the current treatment options and methods. Material and Methods Two patients with NET tumor hepatic metastases were treated with MRI-guided interstitial laser ablation (LITT). Three tumors were treated. Clinical follow-up time was 10 years. Results Both patients were successfully treated. There were no local recurrences at the ablation site during the follow-up. Both patients had survived at 10-year follow-up. One patient is disease-free. Conclusion MRI-guided laser ablation can be used to treat NET tumor liver metastases but combination therapy and a rigorous follow-up schedule are recommended. PMID:24778794

  20. Microwave tumors ablation: principles, clinical applications and review of preliminary experiences.

    PubMed

    Carrafiello, Gianpaolo; Laganà, Domenico; Mangini, Monica; Fontana, Federico; Dionigi, Gianlorenzo; Boni, Luigi; Rovera, Francesca; Cuffari, Salvatore; Fugazzola, Carlo

    2008-01-01

    Local ablative techniques have been developed to enable local control of unresectable tumors. Ablation has been performed with several modalities including ethanol ablation, laser ablation, cryoablation, and radiofrequency ablation. Microwave technology is a new thermal ablation technique for different types of tumors, providing all the benefits of radiofrequency and substantial advantages. Microwave ablation has been applied to liver, lung, kidney and more rarely to bone, pancreas and adrenal glands. Preliminary works show that microwave ablation may be a viable alternative to other ablation techniques in selected patients. However further studies are necessary to confirm short- and long-term effectiveness of the methods and to compare it with other ablative techniques, especially RF.

  1. CT-guided percutaneous microwave ablation of pulmonary malignant tumors

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Wei-Chun; Lee, Yee-Fan; Chen, Yi-Chang; Chien, Ning; Huang, Yu-Sen; Tseng, Yao-Hui; Lee, Jang-Ming; Hsu, Hsao-Hsun; Chen, Jin-Shing

    2016-01-01

    Background Microwave ablation (MWA) of lung tumors is a new approach for local tumor control. The purpose of this retrospective study was to evaluate the preliminary results of safety and efficacy of MWA with a dynamic frequency range (902–928 MHz) and power (10–32 W) for local tumor control of thoracic malignancies. Methods From December 1, 2013 to February 1, 2016, there were total 32 lung tumors among 15 patients (7 men, 8 women, age range 43–82 years, mean 57.8±11.1 years of age) receiving MWA of thoracic neoplasms, including lung adenocarcinoma (n=5), metastatic colorectal cancer (n=7), invasive thymoma (n=1), metastatic uterine leiomyosarcoma (n=1), and metastatic ampullary carcinoma (n=1). Mean tumor size was 13.5 mm (range, 3.0–32.0 mm). The mean sequential ablation during each MWA was 2.3±1.1 times (range, 1–5 times). The outcomes of ablation were evaluated by follow-up computed tomography (CT) scans and the complications were assessed by medical records and CT scan after ablation. Results The mean follow-up interval of each tumor was 446.8 days (range, 196–902 days). Local tumor recurrence was found in 5 of the 32 tumors resulting in a local control rate 84.4%. No MWA-related mortality was noted. After MWA, the incidence of pneumothorax was 37.5% (12/32). Only one patient with pneumothorax required air evacuation. Third-degree skin burn adjacent to the entry site occurred in one patient and required debridement and closure with flap. Conclusions After appropriate patient selection, MWA with a dynamic frequency range (902–928 MHz) and power (10–32 W) is an effective and safe procedure for local tumor control of recurrent and metastatic lung tumors. PMID:28066666

  2. Lung Tumor Radiofrequency Ablation: Where Do We Stand?

    SciTech Connect

    Baere, Thierry de

    2011-04-15

    Today, radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of primary and metastatic lung tumor is increasingly used. Because RFA is most often used with curative intent, preablation workup must be a preoperative workup. General anesthesia provides higher feasibility than conscious sedation. The electrode positioning must be performed under computed tomography for sake of accuracy. The delivery of RFA must be adapted to tumor location, with different impedances used when treating tumors with or without pleural contact. The estimated rate of incomplete local treatment at 18 months was 7% (95% confidence interval, 3-14) per tumor, with incomplete treatment depicted at 4 months (n = 1), 6 months (n = 2), 9 months (n = 2), and 12 months (n = 2). Overall survival and lung disease-free survival at 18 months were, respectively, 71 and 34%. Size is a key point for tumor selection because large size is predictive of incomplete local treatment and poor survival. The ratio of ablation volume relative to tumor volume is predictive of complete ablation. Follow-up computed tomography that relies on the size of the ablation zone demonstrates the presence of incomplete ablation. Positron emission tomography might be an interesting option. Chest tube placement for pneumothorax is reported in 8 to 12%. Alveolar hemorrhage and postprocedure hemoptysis occurred in approximately 10% of procedures and rarely required specific treatment. Death was mostly related to single-lung patients and hilar tumors. No modification of forced expiratory volume in the first second between pre- and post-RFA at 2 months was found. RFA in the lung provides a high local efficacy rate. The use of RFA as a palliative tool in combination with chemotherapy remains to be explored.

  3. Effects of Androgen Ablation on Anti-Tumor Immunity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-01

    Eradication of established tumors by vaccination with Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particles delivering human papillomavirus 16 E7...Androgen Ablation (AA) constitutes the most common therapy for the treatment of advanced prostate cancer. While initially effective at reducing tumor burden...most patients recur with androgen insensitive disease. There exists a clear need to augment the clinical efficacy of hormone-based therapies , and

  4. Rupture of benign thyroid tumors after radio-frequency ablation.

    PubMed

    Shin, J H; Jung, S L; Baek, J H; Kim, J-H

    2011-12-01

    Rupture of benign thyroid tumors after RFA is very rare. We experienced 6 cases in 4 institutions. All patients presented with abrupt neck swelling and pain between 9 and 60 days after RFA. Imaging and clinical findings of the ruptured tumors were anterior subcapsular location, mixed composition, large size, and repeated ablations. Conservative treatment was sufficient in 3 cases, whereas surgical management was required in 3.

  5. Frequency and Risk Factors of Various Complications After Computed Tomography-Guided Radiofrequency Ablation of Lung Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Okuma, Tomohisa Matsuoka, Toshiyuki; Yamamoto, Akira; Oyama, Yoshimasa; Toyoshima, Masami; Nakamura, Kenji; Inoue, Yuichi

    2008-01-15

    Objective. To retrospectively determine the frequency and risk factors of various side effects and complications after percutaneous computed tomography-guided radiofrequency (RF) ablation of lung tumors. Methods. We reviewed and analyzed records of 112 treatment sessions in 57 of our patients (45 men and 12 women) with unresectable lung tumors treated by ablation. Risk factors, including sex, age, tumor diameter, tumor location, history of surgery, presence of pulmonary emphysema, electrode gauge, array diameter, patient position, maximum power output, ablation time, and minimum impedance during ablation, were analyzed using univariate and multivariate analyses. Results. Total rates of side effects and minor and major complications occurred in 17%, 50%, and 8% of treatment sessions, respectively. Side effects, including pain during ablation (46% of sessions) and pleural effusion (13% of sessions), occurred with RF ablation. Minor complications, including pneumothorax not requiring chest tube drainage (30% of sessions), subcutaneous emphysema (16% of sessions), and hemoptysis (9% of sessions) also occurred after the procedure. Regarding major complications, three patients developed fever >38.5 deg. C; three patients developed abscesses; two patients developed pneumothorax requiring chest tube insertion; and one patient had air embolism and was discharged without neurologic deficit. Univariate and multivariate analyses suggested that a lesion located {<=}1 cm of the chest wall was significantly related to pain (p < 0.01, hazard index 5.76). Risk factors for pneumothorax increased significantly with previous pulmonary surgery (p < 0.05, hazard index 6.1) and presence of emphysema (p <0.01, hazard index 13.6). Conclusion. The total complication rate for all treatment sessions was 58%, and 25% of patients did not have any complications after RF ablation. Although major complications can occur, RF ablation of lung tumors can be considered a safe and minimally invasive

  6. [Overview of ablation devices for atrial fibrillation surgery].

    PubMed

    Hiromoto, Atsushi; Nitta, Takashi

    2014-07-01

    Since Cox-maze procedure was first reported in 1987, ablation technology has made great progress and revolutionized atrial fibrillation surgery. Various energy sources have been introduced to facilitate creating conduction block within the atria. These sources include radiofrequency, cryothermia, microwave, laser, and high-frequency focused ultrasound( HIFU). They have been utilized both endocardially in the arrested heart and epicardially in the beating heart. The goal of all these sources is to create transmural lesions which enable irreversible conduction block. They have been reported to have clinical efficacy, but each of them have their own advantages and disadvantages, and their ability of creating transmural lesions are also different. It is important for surgeons that they fully understand these differences to make appropriate use of these technologies for achieving safe atrial fibrillation surgery and developing less invasive new procedures.

  7. A mathematical framework for minimally invasive tumor ablation therapies.

    PubMed

    Hall, Sheldon K; Ooi, Ean Hin; Payne, Stephen J

    2014-01-01

    Minimally invasive tumor ablations (MITAs) are an increasingly important tool in the treatment of solid tumors across multiple organs. The problems experienced in modeling different types of MITAs are very similar, but the development of mathematical models is mostly performed in isolation according to modality. Fundamental research into the modeling of specific types of MITAs is indeed required, but to choose the optimal treatment for an individual the primary clinical requirement is to have reliable predictions for a range of MITAs. In this review of the mathematical modeling of MITAs 4 modalities are considered: radiofrequency ablation, microwave ablation, cryoablation, and irreversible electroporation. The similarities in the mathematical modeling of these treatments are highlighted, and the analysis of the models within a general framework is discussed. This will aid in developing a deeper understanding of the sensitivity of MITA models to physiological parameters and the impact of uncertainty on predictions of the ablation zone. Through robust validation and analysis of the models it will be possible to choose the best model for a given application. This is important because many different models exist with no objective comparison of their performance. The collection of relevant in vivo experimental data is also critical to parameterize such models accurately. This approach will be necessary to translate the field into clinical practice.

  8. Percutaneous Renal Tumor Ablation: Radiation Exposure During Cryoablation and Radiofrequency Ablation

    SciTech Connect

    McEachen, James C.; Leng, Shuai; Atwell, Thomas D.; Tollefson, Matthew K.; Friese, Jeremy L.; Wang, Zhen; Murad, M. Hassan; Schmit, Grant D.

    2016-02-15

    IntroductionOnce reserved solely for non-surgical cases, percutaneous ablation is becoming an increasingly popular treatment option for a wider array of patients with small renal masses and the radiation risk needs to be better defined as this transition continues.Materials and MethodsRetrospective review of our renal tumor ablation database revealed 425 patients who underwent percutaneous ablation for treatment of 455 renal tumors over a 5-year time period. Imparted radiation dose information was reviewed for each procedure and converted to effective patient dose and skin dose using established techniques. Statistical analysis was performed with each ablative technique.ResultsFor the 331 cryoablation procedures, the mean DLP was 6987 mGycm (SD = 2861) resulting in a mean effective dose of 104.7 mSv (SD = 43.5) and the mean CTDI{sub vol} was 558 mGy (SD = 439) resulting in a mean skin dose of 563.2 mGy (SD = 344.1). For the 124 RFA procedures, the mean DLP was 3485 mGycm (SD = 1630) resulting in a mean effective dose of 50.3 mSv (SD = 24.0) and the mean CTDI{sub vol} was 232 mGy (SD = 149) resulting in a mean skin dose of 233.2 mGy (SD = 117.4). The difference in patient radiation exposure between the two renal ablation techniques was statistically significant (p < 0.001).ConclusionBoth cryoablation and RFA imparted an average skin dose that was well below the 2 Gy deterministic threshold for appreciable sequela. Renal tumor cryoablation resulted in a mean skin and effective radiation dose more than twice that for RFA. The radiation exposure for both renal tumor ablation techniques was at the high end of the medical imaging radiation dose spectrum.

  9. Use of Semiflexible Applicators for Radiofrequency Ablation of Liver Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Gaffke, G. Gebauer, B.; Knollmann, F.D.; Helmberger, T.; Ricke, J.; Oettle, H.; Felix, R.; Stroszczynski, C.

    2006-04-15

    Purpose. To evaluate the feasibility and potential advantages of the radiofrequency ablation of liver tumors using new MRI-compatible semiflexible applicators in a closed-bore high-field MRI scanner. Methods. We treated 8 patients with 12 malignant liver tumors of different origin (5 colorectal carcinoma, 2 cholangiocellular carcinoma, 1 breast cancer) under MRI guidance. Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) was performed using 5 cm Rita Starburst Semi-Flex applicators (Rita Medical Systems, Milwaukee, WI, USA) which are suitable for MR- and CT-guided interventions and a 150 W RF generator. All interventions were performed in a closed-bore 1.5 T high-field MRI scanner for MRI-guided RFA using fast T1-weighted gradient echo sequences and T2-weighted ultra-turbo spin echo sequences. Control and follow-up MRI examinations were performed on the next day, at 6 weeks, and every 3 months after RFA. Control MRI were performed as double-contrast MRI examinations (enhancement with iron oxide and gadopentetate dimeglumine). All interventions were performed with the patient under local anesthesia and analgo-sedation. Results. The mean diameter of the treated hepatic tumors was 2.4 cm ({+-}0.6 cm, range 1.0-3.2 cm). The mean diameter of induced necrosis was 3.1 cm ({+-}0.4 cm). We achieved complete ablation in all patients. Follow-up examinations over a duration of 7 months ({+-}1.3 months, range 4-9 month) showed a local control rate of 100% in this group of patients. All interventions were performed without major complications; only 2 subcapsular hematomas were documented. Conclusion. RFA of liver tumors using semiflexible applicators in closed-bore 1.5 T scanner systems is feasible. These applicators might simplify the RFA of liver tumors under MRI control. The stiff distal part of the applicator facilitates its repositioning.

  10. Artificial ascites and pneumoperitoneum to facilitate thermal ablation of liver tumors: a pictorial essay.

    PubMed

    Bhagavatula, Sharath K; Chick, Jeffrey F B; Chauhan, Nikunj R; Shyn, Paul B

    2017-02-01

    Image-guided percutaneous thermal ablation is increasingly utilized in the treatment of hepatic malignancies. Peripherally located hepatic tumors can be difficult to access or located adjacent to critical structures that can be injured. As a result, ablation of peripheral tumors may be avoided or may be performed too cautiously, leading to inadequate ablation coverage. In these cases, separating the tumor from adjacent critical structures can increase the efficacy and safety of procedures. Artificial ascites and artificial pneumoperitoneum are techniques that utilize fluid and gas, respectively, to insulate critical structures from the thermal ablation zone. Induction of artificial ascites and artificial pneumoperitoneum can enable complete ablation of otherwise inaccessible hepatic tumors, improve tumor visualization, minimize unintended thermal injury to surrounding organs, and reduce post-procedural pain. This pictorial essay illustrates and discusses the proper technique and clinical considerations for successful artificial ascites and pneumoperitoneum creation to facilitate safe peripheral hepatic tumor ablation.

  11. Comparison of Percutaneous Ablation Technologies in the Treatment of Malignant Liver Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hyeon; Burke, Charles T.

    2014-01-01

    Tumor ablation is a minimally invasive technique used to deliver chemical, thermal, electrical, or ultrasonic damage to a specific focal tumor in an attempt to achieve substantial tumor destruction or complete eradication. As the technology continues to advance, several image-guided tumor ablations have emerged to effectively manage primary and secondary malignancies in the liver. Percutaneous chemical ablation is one of the oldest and most established techniques for treating small hepatocellular carcinomas. However, this technique has been largely replaced by newer modalities including radiofrequency ablation, microwave ablation, laser-induced interstitial thermotherapy, cryoablation, high-intensity–focused ultrasound ablation, and irreversible electroporation. Because there exist significant differences in underlying technological bases, understanding each mechanism of action is essential for achieving desirable outcomes. In this article, the authors review the current state of each ablation method including technological and clinical considerations. PMID:25071303

  12. Comparison of percutaneous ablation technologies in the treatment of malignant liver tumors.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hyeon; Burke, Charles T

    2014-06-01

    Tumor ablation is a minimally invasive technique used to deliver chemical, thermal, electrical, or ultrasonic damage to a specific focal tumor in an attempt to achieve substantial tumor destruction or complete eradication. As the technology continues to advance, several image-guided tumor ablations have emerged to effectively manage primary and secondary malignancies in the liver. Percutaneous chemical ablation is one of the oldest and most established techniques for treating small hepatocellular carcinomas. However, this technique has been largely replaced by newer modalities including radiofrequency ablation, microwave ablation, laser-induced interstitial thermotherapy, cryoablation, high-intensity-focused ultrasound ablation, and irreversible electroporation. Because there exist significant differences in underlying technological bases, understanding each mechanism of action is essential for achieving desirable outcomes. In this article, the authors review the current state of each ablation method including technological and clinical considerations.

  13. Dynamic Lung Tumor Tracking for Stereotactic Ablative Body Radiation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kunos, Charles A.; Fabien, Jeffrey M.; Shanahan, John P.; Collen, Christine; Gevaert, Thierry; Poels, Kenneth; Van den Begin, Robbe; Engels, Benedikt; De Ridder, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Physicians considering stereotactic ablative body radiation therapy (SBRT) for the treatment of extracranial cancer targets must be aware of the sizeable risks for normal tissue injury and the hazards of physical tumor miss. A first-of-its-kind SBRT platform achieves high-precision ablative radiation treatment through a combination of versatile real-time imaging solutions and sophisticated tumor tracking capabilities. It uses dual-diagnostic kV x-ray units for stereoscopic open-loop feedback of cancer target intrafraction movement occurring as a consequence of respiratory motions and heartbeat. Image-guided feedback drives a gimbaled radiation accelerator (maximum 15 x 15 cm field size) capable of real-time ±4 cm pan-and-tilt action. Robot-driven ±60° pivots of an integrated ±185° rotational gantry allow for coplanar and non-coplanar accelerator beam set-up angles, ultimately permitting unique treatment degrees of freedom. State-of-the-art software aids real-time six dimensional positioning, ensuring irradiation of cancer targets with sub-millimeter accuracy (0.4 mm at isocenter). Use of these features enables treating physicians to steer radiation dose to cancer tumor targets while simultaneously reducing radiation dose to normal tissues. By adding respiration correlated computed tomography (CT) and 2-[18F] fluoro-2-deoxy-ᴅ-glucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) images into the planning system for enhanced tumor target contouring, the likelihood of physical tumor miss becomes substantially less1. In this article, we describe new radiation plans for the treatment of moving lung tumors. PMID:26131774

  14. Intrawound Vancomycin Powder for Spine Tumor Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Okafor, Richard; Molinari, William; Molinari, Robert; Mesfin, Addisu

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective evaluation of prospectively collected data. Objective To evaluate infection rates following intrawound vancomycin powder application during spine tumor surgery. Methods Patients ≥18 years old undergoing spine tumor surgery and receiving intrawound vancomycin powder at a single center between January 2008 and January 2015 were enrolled. Patient demographics (age, sex, body mass index [BMI]), tumor type (metastatic, primary) and location, surgical data (estimated blood loss [EBL], levels fused, type of decompression, length of surgery and hospitalization, discharge status from hospital), radiation therapy use, and infection rates (surgery to a minimum of 30 days postoperative) were evaluated. Results Forty patients (46 procedures) undergoing spine tumor surgery and intrawound vancomycin powder application were identified. Five were excluded because of death less than 30 days postoperatively, and 35 patients (41 procedures) were enrolled: 11 women and 24 men with an average age of 61.4 years (range 19 to 92) and average BMI of 27.3 (range 17.4 to 36.8). Three cases were primary spine tumors. Five were hematologic malignancies, and 27 were metastatic cancers. Twenty-one tumors were in the thoracic spine, 12 in the lumbar spine, and 8 in the cervical spine. Average EBL was 899 mL (range 25 to 3,500), average length of surgery was 241 minutes (range 78 to 495), and average hospital stay was 15.1 days (range 3 to 49). Two culture-proven infections (Staphylococcus aureus, Enterobacter cloacae) were noted in 41 procedures (4.9%). Ten patients (28.6%) had preoperative radiation only; 14 (40%) had postoperative radiation only, 5 (14.3%) had both preoperative and postoperative radiation, and 6 (17.1%) had no radiation. There were no associations between radiation treatment and postsurgical infections (p = 0.19). Conclusion In this first study evaluating intrawound vancomycin powder for spine tumor surgery, we report an infection rate

  15. Intrawound Vancomycin Powder for Spine Tumor Surgery.

    PubMed

    Okafor, Richard; Molinari, William; Molinari, Robert; Mesfin, Addisu

    2016-05-01

    Study Design Retrospective evaluation of prospectively collected data. Objective To evaluate infection rates following intrawound vancomycin powder application during spine tumor surgery. Methods Patients ≥18 years old undergoing spine tumor surgery and receiving intrawound vancomycin powder at a single center between January 2008 and January 2015 were enrolled. Patient demographics (age, sex, body mass index [BMI]), tumor type (metastatic, primary) and location, surgical data (estimated blood loss [EBL], levels fused, type of decompression, length of surgery and hospitalization, discharge status from hospital), radiation therapy use, and infection rates (surgery to a minimum of 30 days postoperative) were evaluated. Results Forty patients (46 procedures) undergoing spine tumor surgery and intrawound vancomycin powder application were identified. Five were excluded because of death less than 30 days postoperatively, and 35 patients (41 procedures) were enrolled: 11 women and 24 men with an average age of 61.4 years (range 19 to 92) and average BMI of 27.3 (range 17.4 to 36.8). Three cases were primary spine tumors. Five were hematologic malignancies, and 27 were metastatic cancers. Twenty-one tumors were in the thoracic spine, 12 in the lumbar spine, and 8 in the cervical spine. Average EBL was 899 mL (range 25 to 3,500), average length of surgery was 241 minutes (range 78 to 495), and average hospital stay was 15.1 days (range 3 to 49). Two culture-proven infections (Staphylococcus aureus, Enterobacter cloacae) were noted in 41 procedures (4.9%). Ten patients (28.6%) had preoperative radiation only; 14 (40%) had postoperative radiation only, 5 (14.3%) had both preoperative and postoperative radiation, and 6 (17.1%) had no radiation. There were no associations between radiation treatment and postsurgical infections (p = 0.19). Conclusion In this first study evaluating intrawound vancomycin powder for spine tumor surgery, we report an infection rate

  16. Breast Tumor Ablation by Selective Autophagic Degradation of Postmitotic Midbodies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-01

    ADDRESS. 1. REPORT DATE 1 Aug 2014 2. REPORT TYPE Fnal 3. DATES COVERED 1 May 2012 - 30 Apr 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Breast Tumor Ablation by...Cycle. 11, 7-8, 2012 . 4. 83. Chen C-T, Hehnly H, Doxsey S, Orchestrating vesicle transport, ESCRTs and kinase surveillance during abscission. Nature...Reviews Molecular Cell Biology, 13:483-8, 2012 . 5. Chen C-T, Kuo T-C, Doxsey S. A new potential breast therapeutic strategy: targeting post-mitotic

  17. Variation of tumoral marker after radiofrequency ablation of pancreatic adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Barbi, Emilio; Girelli, Roberto; Tinazzi Martini, Paolo; De Robertis, Riccardo; Ciaravino, Valentina; Salvia, Roberto; Butturini, Giovanni; Frigerio, Isabella; Milazzo, Teresa; Crosara, Stefano; Paiella, Salvatore; Pederzoli, Paolo; Bassi, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Background To evaluate the correlation between variations of CA 19.9 blood levels and the entity of necrosis at CT after radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of unresectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Methods In this study, from June 2010 to February 2014, patients with diagnosis of unresectable and not metastatic pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, expressing tumor marker CA 19.9, treated with RFA procedure were included. All these patients underwent RFA. CT study was performed 1 week after RFA. The dosage of CA 19.9 levels was performed 1 month after RFA. Features of necrosis at CT, as mean entity, density and necrosis percentages compared to the original lesion, were evaluated and compared by using t-test with CA 19.9 blood levels variations after RFA procedure. Results In this study were included 51 patients with diagnosis of unresectable and not metastatic pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, expressing tumor marker CA 19.9, treated with RFA procedure and with CT study and CA 19.9 available for analysis. After the procedure, CA 19.9 blood levels reduced in 24/51 (47%), remained stable in 10/51 (20%) and increased in 17/51 (33%). In patients with CA 19.9 levels reduced, the tumor marker were reduced less than 20% in 4/24 (17%) and more than 20% in 20/24 (83%); instead the tumor marker were reduced less than 30% in 8/24 (33%) and more than 30% in 16/24 (67%). At CT scan necrotic area density difference was not statistically significant. Also there was no statistically significant difference among the mean area, the mean volume and the mean ablation volume in percentage related to the treated tumor among the three different groups of patients divided depending on the CA 19.9 blood levels. But a tendency to a statistically significant difference was found in comparing the mean percentage of ablation volume between two subgroups of patients with a decrease of CA 19.9 levels with less or more than 20% reduction of tumor markers and between two subgroups with less or more than

  18. [History of cranial surgery, cerebral tumor surgery and epilepsy surgery in Mexico].

    PubMed

    Chico-Ponce de León, F

    2009-08-01

    The first report of intra-cerebral tumor surgery was provided by Bennett & Goodle, in London, 1884. Worldwide this kind of surgery was performed in France by Chipault, in Italy by Durante, in the United States by Keen and in Deutchland by Krause & Oppenheim. Lavista in Mexico City operated on intra-cerebral tumor in 1891, and the report was printed in 1892. In the same publication, Lavista exhibited the first cases of epilepsy surgery. Since now, it is the first report of this kind of surgery in the Spanish-speaking world.

  19. [Image-guided ablation of bone tumors: review of current techniques].

    PubMed

    Moser, T; Buy, X; Goyault, G; Tok, C H; Irani, F; Gangi, A

    2008-04-01

    Multiple interventional radiology techniques are available for percutaneous ablation of bone tumors: alcohol, laser, radiofrequency, microwave, ultrasound, and cryogenic ablation. Several indications have already been validated, including radiofrequency ablation of osteoid osteoma and bone metastases, with results superior to conventional treatment. More indications should be added over the coming years. The purpose of this article is to review the principles of the different ablation techniques, summarize their respective indications and results and discuss their implementation and the eventual combination with cementoplasty techniques.

  20. Anesthetic approaches in carotid body tumor surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kavakli, Ali Sait; Ozturk, Nilgun Kavrut

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Carotid body tumors (CBT) are benign tumors that originate from neural non-chromaffin cells that are typically localized near carotid bifurcation. Surgical removal of the tumor is the most appropriate treatment. General anesthesia is preferred anesthetic technique for CBT surgery. Basic elements of anesthetic management are protection of hemodynamic stability and maintaining cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP). The aim of this study was to evaluate anesthetic management of CBT surgery and present the literature knowledge. METHODS: The study included 10 consecutive patients with diagnosis of CBT who underwent surgery at Antalya Training and Research Hospital, in Antalya, Turkey, between 2013 and 2016. Preoperative demographic details; comorbidities; side of surgical site; duration of operation; length of intensive care unit (ICU) and hospital stay; change of intraoperative blood pressure; use of inotropic drugs, blood products, and analgesics; postoperative visual analogue scale (VAS) pain score; and complications were recorded. RESULTS: According to Shamblin classification, 3 tumors were type I and the remaining 7 were type II. Tumors were located on right side in 6 patients, and on left in 4. Blood loss sufficient to require transfusion was observed in 1 patient. Average intraoperative blood loss was 287±68 mL. Tachycardia and hypertension were observed in 1 patient; bradycardia and hypotension were seen in 4 patients. Infusion for inotropic support was administered to 1 patient. Mean duration of operation was 109±20 minutes. Mean VAS score was 4±1, mean ICU tramadol consumption was 80±25 mg. Duration of stay in ICU and hospital were 2.4±1.1 hours and 3.8±0.7 days, respectively. Mortality and neurological complications were not seen in postoperative period. CONCLUSION: CBT surgery requires close and complex anesthesia management. Protection of hemodynamic stability against sudden hemodynamic changes, monitoring, and maintaining CPP are the most

  1. Ablative Tumor Radiation Can Change the Tumor Immune Cell Microenvironment to Induce Durable Complete Remissions

    PubMed Central

    Filatenkov, Alexander; Baker, Jeanette; Mueller, Antonia M.S.; Kenkel, Justin; Ahn, G-One; Dutt, Suparna; Zhang, Nigel; Kohrt, Holbrook; Jensen, Kent; Dejbakhsh-Jones, Sussan; Shizuru, Judith A.; Negrin, Robert N.; Engleman, Edgar G.; Strober, Samuel

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The goals of the study were to elucidate the immune mechanisms that contribute to desirable complete remissions of murine colon tumors treated with single radiation dose of 30 Gy. This dose is at the upper end of the ablative range used clinically to treat advanced or metastatic colorectal, liver, and non-small cell lung tumors. Experimental design Changes in the tumor immune microenvironment of single tumor nodules exposed to radiation were studied using 21 day (>1 cm in diameter) CT26 and MC38 colon tumors. These are well-characterized weakly immunogenic tumors. Results We found that the high dose radiation transformed the immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment resulting in an intense CD8+ T cell tumor infiltrate, and a loss of myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). The change was dependent on antigen cross-presenting CD8+ dendritic cells, secretion of IFN-γ, and CD4+ T cells expressing CD40L. Anti-tumor CD8+ T cells entered tumors shortly after radiotherapy, reversed MDSC infiltration, and mediated durable remissions in an IFN-γ dependent manner. Interestingly, extended fractionated radiation regimen did not result in robust CD8+ T cell infiltration. Conclusion For immunologically sensitive tumors, these results indicate that remissions induced by a short course of high dose radiation therapy depend on the development of anti-tumor immunity that is reflected by the nature and kinetics of changes induced in the tumor cell microenvironment. These results suggest that systematic examination of the tumor immune microenvironment may help in optimizing the radiation regimen used to treat tumors by adding a robust immune response. PMID:25869387

  2. Percutaneous treatment of bone tumors by radiofrequency thermal ablation.

    PubMed

    Ruiz Santiago, Fernando; Castellano García, María del Mar; Guzmán Álvarez, Luis; Martínez Montes, Jose Luis; Ruiz García, Manuel; Tristán Fernández, Juan Miguel

    2011-01-01

    We present our experience of the treatment of bone tumors with radiofrequency thermal ablation (RFTA). Over the past 4 years, we have treated 26 cases (22 benign and 4 malignant) using CT-guided RFTA. RFTA was the sole treatment in 19 cases and was combined with percutaneous cementation during the same session in the remaining seven cases. Our approach to the tumors was simplified, using a single point of entrance for both RFTA and percutaneous osteoplasty. In the benign cases, clinical success was defined as resolution of pain within 1 month of the procedure and no recurrence during the follow-up period. It was achieved in 19 out of the 21 patients in which curative treatment was attempted. The two non-resolved cases were a patient with osteoid osteoma who developed a symptomatic bone infarct after a symptom-free period of 2 months and another with femoral diaphysis osteoblastoma who suffered a pathological fracture after 8 months without symptoms. The procedure was considered clinically successful in the five cases (4 malign and 1 benign) in which palliative treatment was attempted, because there was a mean (±SD) reduction in visual analogue scale (VAS) pain score from 9.0±0.4 before the procedure to <4 during the follow-up period.

  3. Thermal ablation for hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Head, Hayden W; Dodd, Gerald D

    2004-11-01

    Thermal ablation, as a form of minimally invasive therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), has become an important treatment modality. Because of the limitations of surgery, the techniques of thermal ablation have become standard therapies for HCC in some situations. This article reviews 4 thermal ablation techniques-radiofrequency (RF) ablation, microwave ablation, laser ablation, and cryoablation. Each of these techniques may have a role in treating HCC, and the mechanisms, equipment, patient selection, results, and complications of each are considered. Furthermore, combined therapies consisting of thermal ablation and adjuvant chemotherapy also show promise for enhancing these techniques. Important areas of research into thermal ablation remain, including improving the ability of ablation to treat larger tumors, determining the indications for each thermal ablation modality, optimizing image guidance, and obtaining good outcome data on the efficacy of these techniques.

  4. Adrenal-preserving minimally invasive surgery: the role of laparoscopic partial adrenalectomy, cryosurgery, and radiofrequency ablation of the adrenal gland.

    PubMed

    Munver, Ravi; Del Pizzo, Joseph J; Sosa, R Ernest

    2003-02-01

    Adrenalectomy has become the standard of care for the management of hormonally active adrenal masses. Various surgical therapies have been proposed to excise completely or destroy these adrenal lesions, which may be benign or malignant. New minimally invasive, adrenal-sparing procedures have recently been introduced, among them laparoscopic partial adrenalectomy, cryosurgery, and radiofrequency ablation. These procedures focus on reducing patient morbidity and hastening postoperative recovery while preserving normal adrenal tissue. However, questions remain about the risks and benefits associated with routine application of minimally invasive therapies for adrenal-sparing surgery in terms of complete tumor extirpation. Clearly, more experience and longer follow-up is necessary to validate these procedures. Herein we describe the surgical techniques and early results of treatment with adrenal-sparing surgery.

  5. Hepatic tumor ablation with clustered microwave antennae: the US Phase II Trial

    PubMed Central

    Iannitti, David A.; Martin, Robert C.G.; Simon, Caroline J.; Hope, William W.; Newcomb, William L.; McMasters, Kelly M.; Dupuy, Damian

    2007-01-01

    Background: Thermal ablation techniques have become important treatment options for patients with unresectable hepatic malignancies. Microwave ablation (MWA) is a new thermal ablative technique that uses electromagnetic energy to produce coagulation necrosis. We report outcomes from the first clinical trial in the United States using MWA and a 915 MHz generator. Patients and methods: Patients with unresectable primary or metastatic liver cancer were enrolled in a multi-institutional trial from March 2004 through May 2006. Demographic information, diagnosis, treatment, and outcomes were documented. Results: Eighty-seven patients underwent 94 ablation procedures for 224 hepatic tumors. Forty-two ablations (45%) were performed open, 7 (7%) laparoscopically, and 45 (48%) percutaneously. The average tumor size was 3.6 cm (range 0.5–9.0 cm). Single antenna ablation volumes were 10.0 ml (range 7.8–14.0 ml), and clustered antennae ablation volumes were 50.5 ml (range 21.1–146.5 ml). Outcome variables were measured with a mean follow-up of 19 months. Local recurrence at the ablation site occurred in 6 (2.7%) tumors, and regional recurrence occurred in 37 (43%) patients. With a mean follow-up of 19 months, 41 (47%) patients were alive with no evidence of disease. There were no procedure-related deaths. The overall mortality rate was 2.3%. Conclusions: Microwave ablation is a safe and effective technology for hepatic tumor ablation. In our study, clustered antennae resulted in larger ablation volumes. Further studies with histological confirmation are needed to verify clinical results. PMID:18333126

  6. SwiftLase: a new technology for char-free ablation in rectal surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, David A.

    1995-05-01

    We describe layer-by-layer char-free ablation of hemorrhoids and other rectal lesions at very low CO2 laser power levels with a miniature `SwiftLaser' optomechanical flashscanner. Increased speed with excellent control, very shallow thermal damage, and less postoperative pain are the main advantages of the flashscan technology in rectal surgery.

  7. Rapid dramatic alterations to the tumor microstructure in pancreatic cancer following irreversible electroporation ablation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhuoli; Li, Weiguo; Procissi, Daniel; Tyler, Patrick; Omary, Reed A; Larson, Andrew C

    2013-01-01

    Aim NanoKnife® (Angiodynamics, Inc., NY, USA) or irreversible electroporation (IRE) is a newly available ablation technique to induce the formation of nanoscale pores within the cell membrane in targeted tissues. The purpose of this study was to elucidate morphological alterations following 30 min of IRE ablation in a mouse model of pancreatic cancer. Materials & methods Immunohistochemistry markers were compared with diffusion-weighted MRI apparent diffusion coefficient measurements before and after IRE ablation. Results Immunohistochemistry apoptosis index measurements were significantly higher in IRE-treated tumors than in controls. Rapid tissue alterations after 30 min of IRE ablation procedures (structural and morphological alterations along with significantly elevated apoptosis markers) were consistently observed and well correlated to apparent diffusion coefficient measurements. Discussion This imaging assay offers the potential to serve as an in vivo biomarker for noninvasive detection of tumor response following IRE ablation. PMID:24024571

  8. Transcatheter Arterial Embolization for Tumor Seeding in the Chest Wall After Radiofrequency Ablation for Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Shibata, Toshiya Shibata, Toyomichi; Maetani, Yoji; Kubo, Takeshi; Nishida, Naoshi; Itoh, Kyo

    2006-06-15

    Tumor seeding in the chest wall was depicted at follow-up CT obtained 9 months after radiofrequency ablation for hepatocellular carcinoma. Transcatheter arterial embolization was successfully performed, injecting emulsion of 10 mg of epirubicin and 1 ml of iodized oil followed by gelatin sponge particles via the microcatheter placed in the right eleventh intercostal artery. The patient died of tumor growth in the liver one year after the embolization, but no progression of the tumor seeding was noted during the follow-up period. We conclude that transcatheter arterial embolization was effective for the control of tumor seeding after radiofrequency ablation for hepatocellular carcinoma.

  9. Bone radiofrequency ablation combined with prophylactic internal fixation for metastatic bone tumor of the femur from hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ogura, Koichi; Miyake, Ryoko; Shiina, Shuichiro; Shinoda, Yusuke; Okuma, Tomotake; Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Goto, Takahiro; Nakamura, Kozo; Kawano, Hirotaka

    2012-08-01

    A 64-year-old man with 6-year history of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) was referred to us regarding bone metastasis to the right proximal femur. Although he underwent radiotherapy for pain palliation and local tumor control, the pain persisted and the tumor relapsed 3 months after the radiotherapy and he was thought to be at high risk of pathologic fracture. Given hypervascularity and large tumor size, a prophylactic internal fixation combined with adjuvant radiofrequency ablation (RFA) was proposed to reduce blood loss and prevent viable tumor cells being disseminated. His postoperative course was uneventful without requiring blood transfusion and preoperative symptoms immediately disappeared after surgery. He became capable of weight-bearing walk with a single cane and was almost asymptomatic without local progression on the plain radiographs when he died 14 months after surgery. Combination therapy of RFA and internal fixation using intramedullary nailing for metastases of the long bones from HCC seems to be a very promising technique both for sufficient pain relief and for local control of the tumor. Adjuvant RFA may become a potential option for patients with metastases of the long bones for the purpose of prevention of tumor dissemination and reduction of intraoperative blood loss.

  10. Laser ablation of liver tumors: An ancillary technique, or an alternative to radiofrequency and microwave?

    PubMed Central

    Sartori, Sergio; Di Vece, Francesca; Ermili, Francesca; Tombesi, Paola

    2017-01-01

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is currently the most popular and used ablation modality for the treatment of non surgical patients with primary and secondary liver tumors, but in the last years microwave ablation (MWA) is being technically improved and widely rediscovered for clinical use. Laser thermal ablation (LTA) is by far less investigated and used than RFA and MWA, but the available data on its effectiveness and safety are quite good and comparable to those of RFA and MWA. All the three hyperthermia-based ablative techniques, when performed by skilled operators, can successfully treat all liver tumors eligible for thermal ablation, and to date in most centers of interventional oncology or interventional radiology the choice of the technique usually depends on the physician’s preference and experience, or technical availability. However, RFA, MWA, and LTA have peculiar advantages and limitations that can make each of them more suitable than the other ones to treat patients and tumors with different characteristics. When all the three thermal ablation techniques are available, the choice among RFA, MWA, and LTA should be guided by their advantages and disadvantages, number, size, and location of the liver nodules, and cost-saving considerations, in order to give patients the best treatment option.

  11. Percutaneous tumor ablation tools: microwave, radiofrequency, or cryoablation--what should you use and why?

    PubMed

    Hinshaw, J Louis; Lubner, Meghan G; Ziemlewicz, Timothy J; Lee, Fred T; Brace, Christopher L

    2014-01-01

    Image-guided thermal ablation is an evolving and growing treatment option for patients with malignant disease of multiple organ systems. Treatment indications have been expanding to include benign tumors as well. Specifically, the most prevalent indications to date have been in the liver (primary and metastatic disease, as well as benign tumors such as hemangiomas and adenomas), kidney (primarily renal cell carcinoma, but also benign tumors such as angiomyolipomas and oncocytomas), lung (primary and metastatic disease), and soft tissue and/or bone (primarily metastatic disease and osteoid osteomas). Each organ system has different underlying tissue characteristics, which can have profound effects on the resulting thermal changes and ablation zone. Understanding these issues is important for optimizing clinical results. In addition, thermal ablation technology has evolved rapidly during the past several decades, with substantial technical and procedural improvements that can help improve clinical outcomes and safety profiles. Staying up to date on these developments is challenging but critical because the physical properties underlying the different ablation modalities and the appropriate use of adjuncts will have a tremendous effect on treatment results. Ultimately, combining an understanding of the physical properties of the ablation modalities with an understanding of the thermal kinetics in tissue and using the most appropriate ablation modality for each patient are key to optimizing clinical outcomes. Suggested algorithms are described that will help physicians choose among the various ablation modalities for individual patients.

  12. History and Technical Approaches and Considerations for Ablative Surgery for Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Saurabh; Danish, Shabbar F

    2016-01-01

    The history of epilepsy surgery is generally noted to have begun in 1886 with Victor Horsley's first report of craniotomies for posttraumatic epilepsy. With increased understanding of brain function and development of electroencephalographic methods, nonlesional epilepsy began to be treated with resection in the 1950s. Methodological improvements and increased understanding of pathophysiology followed, and the advent of stereotaxy and ablative technology in the 1960s and 1970s heralded a new era of minimally invasive, targeted procedures for lesional and nonlesional epilepsy. Current techniques combine stereotactic methods, improved ablative technologies, and electroencephalographic methods for a multidisciplinary approach to the neurosurgical treatment of epilepsy.

  13. Tracking Perfluorocarbon Nanoemulsion Delivery by 19F MRI for Precise High Intensity Focused Ultrasound Tumor Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Soo Hyun; Park, Eun-Joo; Min, Changki; Choi, Sun Il; Jeon, Soyeon; Kim, Yun-Hee; Kim, Daehong

    2017-01-01

    Perfluorocarbon nanoemulsions (PFCNEs) have recently been undergoing rigorous study to investigate their ability to improve the therapeutic efficacy of tumor ablation by high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU). For precise control of PFCNE delivery and thermal ablation, their accumulation and distribution in a tumor should be quantitatively analyzed. Here, we used fluorine-19 (19F) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to quantitatively track PFCNE accumulation in a tumor, and analyzed how intra-tumoral PFCNE quantities affect the therapeutic efficacy of HIFU treatment. Ablation outcomes were assessed by intra-voxel incoherent motion analysis and bioluminescent imaging up to 14 days after the procedure. Assessment of PFCNE delivery and treatment outcomes showed that 2-3 mg/mL of PFCNE in a tumor produces the largest ablation volume under the same HIFU insonation conditions. Histology showed varying degrees of necrosis depending on the amount of PFCNE delivered. 19F MRI promises to be a valuable platform for precisely guiding PFCNE-enhanced HIFU ablation of tumors. PMID:28255351

  14. Thermochemical Ablation Therapy of VX2 Tumor Using a Permeable Oil-Packed Liquid Alkali Metal

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Ziyi; Zhang, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Objective Alkali metal appears to be a promising tool in thermochemical ablation, but, it requires additional data on safety is required. The objective of this study was to explore the effectiveness of permeable oil-packed liquid alkali metal in the thermochemical ablation of tumors. Methods Permeable oil-packed sodium–potassium (NaK) was prepared using ultrasonic mixing of different ratios of metal to oil. The thermal effect of the mixture during ablation of muscle tissue ex vivo was evaluated using the Fluke Ti400 Thermal Imager. The thermochemical effect of the NaK-oil mixture on VX2 tumors was evaluated by performing perfusion CT scans both before and after treatment in 10 VX2 rabbit model tumors. VX2 tumors were harvested from two rabbits immediately after treatment to assess their viability using trypan blue and hematoxylin and eosin (H.E.) staining. Results The injection of the NaK–oil mixture resulted in significantly higher heat in the ablation areas. The permeable oil controlled the rate of heat released during the NaK reaction with water in the living tissue. Perfusion computed tomography and its parameter map confirmed that the NaK–oil mixture had curative effects on VX2 tumors. Both trypan blue and H.E. staining showed partial necrosis of the VX2 tumors. Conclusions The NaK–oil mixture may be used successfully to ablate tumor tissue in vivo. With reference to the controlled thermal and chemical lethal injury to tumors, using a liquid alkali in ablation is potentially an effective and safe method to treat malignant tumors. PMID:25885926

  15. In Vivo Evaluation of Lung Microwave Ablation in a Porcine Tumor Mimic Model

    SciTech Connect

    Planche, Olivier; Teriitehau, Christophe; Boudabous, Sana; Robinson, Joey Marie; Rao, Pramod; Deschamps, Frederic; Farouil, Geoffroy; Baere, Thierry de

    2013-02-15

    To evaluate the microwave ablation of created tumor mimics in the lung of a large animal model (pigs), with examination of the ablative synergy of multiple antennas. Fifty-six tumor-mimic models of various sizes were created in 15 pigs by using barium-enriched minced collected thigh muscle injected into the lung of the same animal. Tumors were ablated under fluoroscopic guidance by single-antenna and multiple-antenna microwaves. Thirty-five tumor models were treated in 11 pigs with a single antenna at 75 W for 15 min, with 15 measuring 20 mm in diameter, 10 measuring 30 mm, and 10 measuring 40 mm. Mean circularity of the single-antenna ablation zones measured 0.64 {+-} 0.12, with a diameter of 35.7 {+-} 8.7 mm along the axis of the antenna and 32.7 {+-} 12.8 mm perpendicular to the feeding point. Multiple-antenna delivery of 75 W for 15 min caused intraprocedural death of 2 animals; modified protocol to 60 W for 10 min resulted in an ablation zone with a diameter of 43.0 {+-} 7.7 along the axis of the antenna and 54.8 {+-} 8.5 mm perpendicular to the feeding point; circularity was 0.70 {+-} 0.10. A single microwave antenna can create ablation zones large enough to cover lung tumor mimic models of {<=}4 cm with no heat sink effect from vessels of {<=}6 mm. Synergic use of 3 antennas allows ablation of larger volumes than single-antenna or radiofrequency ablation, but great caution must be taken when 3 antennas are used simultaneously in the lung in clinical practice.

  16. Radiofrequency Ablation Versus Partial Nephrectomy in Treating Small Renal Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Xiaotao; Cui, Liang; Li, Fanglong; Qi, Siyong; Yin, Zhaoyang; Gao, Jiangping

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) has emerged as an alternative treatment to surgical partial nephrectomy (PN) in the treatment of small renal tumors (SRTs). But its safety and oncological efficacy are still controversial. We conducted this systematic review and meta-analysis to compare the peritoperative and oncological outcomes of RFA and PN in the treatment of SRTs. Pubmed, EMBASE, Cochrane CENTRAL, and Web of Science were searched to identify eligible studies that compared the RFA and PN in the treatment of SRTs. Twelve retrospective studies that compared RFA with PN in the treatment of SRTs met our selection criterion and were included in this meta-analysis. The pooled results indicated that the local recurrence rate (4.14% vs 4.10%, RR: 1.18, 95% CI: 0.68, 2.07, P = 0.550) and distant metastases rate (2.76% vs 1.89%, RR: 1.31, 95% CI: 0.70, 2.46, P = 0.686) were not significantly different between the RFA group and the PN group. In terms of perioperative outcomes, RFA was associated with shorter length of stay (LOS) (WMD: −2.02 days, 95% CI: −2.77, −1.27, P < 0.001), lower eGFR decline after treatment (WMD: −3.90, 95% CI: −6.660, −1.140, P = 0.006). However, the overall perioperative complication rate (7.5% vs 6.2%, RR:1.10, 95% CI: 0.64, 1.87, P = 0.740) and the major complication rate (3.7% vs 4.4%, RR: 0.83, 95% CI: 0.43, 1.60, P = 0.579) were both similar between RFA and PN groups. Compared with PN, RFA achieves an equal oncological outcome for SRTs with similar local recurrence rate and distant metastases rate. Additionally, RFA is associated with a similar perioperative complication rate, lower decline of eGFR, and shorter LOS. Therefore, RFA is an effective option in the treatment of SRTs for selected patients. PMID:26683944

  17. Lung Volume Reduction After Stereotactic Ablative Radiation Therapy of Lung Tumors: Potential Application to Emphysema

    SciTech Connect

    Binkley, Michael S.; Shrager, Joseph B.; Leung, Ann N.; Popat, Rita; Trakul, Nicholas; Atwood, Todd F.; Chaudhuri, Aadel; Maxim, Peter G.; Diehn, Maximilian; Loo, Billy W.

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: Lung volume reduction surgery (LVRS) improves dyspnea and other outcomes in selected patients with severe emphysema, but many have excessive surgical risk for LVRS. We analyzed the dose-volume relationship for lobar volume reduction after stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR) of lung tumors, hypothesizing that SABR could achieve therapeutic volume reduction if applied in emphysema. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively identified patients treated from 2007 to 2011 who had SABR for 1 lung tumor, pre-SABR pulmonary function testing, and ≥6 months computed tomographic (CT) imaging follow-up. We contoured the treated lobe and untreated adjacent lobe(s) on CT before and after SABR and calculated their volume changes relative to the contoured total (bilateral) lung volume (TLV). We correlated lobar volume reduction with the volume receiving high biologically effective doses (BED, α/β = 3). Results: 27 patients met the inclusion criteria, with a median CT follow-up time of 14 months. There was no grade ≥3 toxicity. The median volume reduction of the treated lobe was 4.4% of TLV (range, −0.4%-10.8%); the median expansion of the untreated adjacent lobe was 2.6% of TLV (range, −3.9%-11.6%). The volume reduction of the treated lobe was positively correlated with the volume receiving BED ≥60 Gy (r{sup 2}=0.45, P=.0001). This persisted in subgroups determined by high versus low pre-SABR forced expiratory volume in 1 second, treated lobe CT emphysema score, number of fractions, follow-up CT time, central versus peripheral location, and upper versus lower lobe location, with no significant differences in effect size between subgroups. Volume expansion of the untreated adjacent lobe(s) was positively correlated with volume reduction of the treated lobe (r{sup 2}=0.47, P<.0001). Conclusions: We identified a dose-volume response for treated lobe volume reduction and adjacent lobe compensatory expansion after lung tumor SABR, consistent across

  18. Clinical Outcomes of an Optimized Prolate Ablation Procedure for Correcting Residual Refractive Errors Following Laser Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Byunghoon; Lee, Hun; Choi, Bong Joon; Seo, Kyung Ryul; Kim, Eung Kwon; Kim, Dae Yune

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to investigate the clinical efficacy of an optimized prolate ablation procedure for correcting residual refractive errors following laser surgery. Methods We analyzed 24 eyes of 15 patients who underwent an optimized prolate ablation procedure for the correction of residual refractive errors following laser in situ keratomileusis, laser-assisted subepithelial keratectomy, or photorefractive keratectomy surgeries. Preoperative ophthalmic examinations were performed, and uncorrected distance visual acuity, corrected distance visual acuity, manifest refraction values (sphere, cylinder, and spherical equivalent), point spread function, modulation transfer function, corneal asphericity (Q value), ocular aberrations, and corneal haze measurements were obtained postoperatively at 1, 3, and 6 months. Results Uncorrected distance visual acuity improved and refractive errors decreased significantly at 1, 3, and 6 months postoperatively. Total coma aberration increased at 3 and 6 months postoperatively, while changes in all other aberrations were not statistically significant. Similarly, no significant changes in point spread function were detected, but modulation transfer function increased significantly at the postoperative time points measured. Conclusions The optimized prolate ablation procedure was effective in terms of improving visual acuity and objective visual performance for the correction of persistent refractive errors following laser surgery. PMID:28243019

  19. More than just tumor destruction: immunomodulation by thermal ablation of cancer.

    PubMed

    Haen, Sebastian P; Pereira, Philippe L; Salih, Helmut R; Rammensee, Hans-Georg; Gouttefangeas, Cécile

    2011-01-01

    Over the past decades, thermoablative techniques for the therapy of localized tumors have gained importance in the treatment of patients not eligible for surgical resection. Anecdotal reports have described spontaneous distant tumor regression after thermal ablation, indicating a possible involvement of the immune system, hence an induction of antitumor immunity after thermoinduced therapy. In recent years, a growing body of evidence for modulation of both adaptive and innate immunity, as well as for the induction of danger signals through thermoablation, has emerged. Induced immune responses, however, are mostly weak and not sufficient for the complete eradication of established tumors or durable prevention of disease progression, and combination therapies with immunomodulating drugs are being evaluated with promising results. This article aims to summarize published findings on immune modulation through radiofrequency ablation, cryoablation, microwave ablation therapy, high-intensity focused ultrasound, and laser-induced thermotherapy.

  20. Clinical Assessment of Percutaneous Radiofrequency Ablation for Painful Metastatic Bone Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Kojima, Hiroyuki Tanigawa, Noboru; Kariya, Shuji; Komemushi, Atsushi; Shomura, Yuzo; Sawada, Satoshi

    2006-12-15

    Purpose. To investigate the pain-alleviating effects of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) on metastatic bone tumors in relation to tumor size, combined therapy, and percent tumor necrosis rate following RFA. Methods. Subjects comprised 24 patients with 28 painful metastatic bone tumors. A 17G internally cooled electrode was inserted into the tumor for CT guidance and ablation was performed. Bone cement was injected following RFA for 4 tumors involving a weight-bearing bone, while 5 tumors were treated using combined RFA and external irradiation. Percent necrosis rate of the tumor was measured using contrast-enhanced computed tomography 1 week after RFA. Results. Improvement in the visual analog scale (VAS) score was 4.6 {+-} 2.2 for large tumors (>5 cm, n = 12), 3.7 {+-} 1.8 for medium-sized tumors (3.1-5.0 cm, n = 11), and 3.5 {+-} 1.7 for small tumors ({<=}3 cm, n = 4), with no significant differences noted among tumor sizes. Improvement in the VAS score was 3.5 {+-} 1.3 for the 4 tumors in the RFA + bone cement group, 3.2 {+-} 1.9 for the 5 tumors in the RFA + radiation therapy group, and 4.8 {+-} 2.2 for the 18 tumors in the RFA group. No significant differences were identified between groups. The improvement in the VAS score was 3.8 {+-} 2.3, 4.0 {+-} 1.9, and 4.7 {+-} 2.6 in patients with tumor necrosis rates of 0-49%, 50-74%, and 75-100%, respectively. No significant association was observed among these three groups. Conclusion. Percutaneous RFA therapy was effective in relieving pain due to metastatic bone tumors. No relationships appear to exist between initial response and tumor size, combined therapy, and percent tumor necrosis.

  1. Combined MRI and Fluoroscopic Guided Radiofrequency Ablation of a Renal Tumor

    SciTech Connect

    Fotiadis, Nikolas I.; Sabharwal, Tarun; Gangi, Afshin; Adam, Andreas

    2009-01-15

    Percutaneous CT- and ultrasound-guided radiofrequency ablation of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has been shown to have very promising medium-term results. We present a unique case of recurrent RCC after partial nephrectomy in a patient with a single kidney and impaired renal function. This tumor could not be visualized either with CT or with ultrasound. A combination of magnetic resonance imaging and fluoroscopic guidance was used, to the best of our knowledge for the first time, to ablate the tumor with radiofrequency. The patient was cancer-free and off dialysis at 30-month follow up.

  2. Optical nerve identification in head and neck surgery after Er:YAG laser ablation.

    PubMed

    Stelzle, Florian; Knipfer, Christian; Bergauer, Bastian; Rohde, Maximilian; Adler, Werner; Tangermann-Gerk, Katja; Nkenke, Emeka; Schmidt, Michael

    2014-09-01

    Facial nerve function may be hampered by iatrogenic damage during head and neck laser surgery procedures. Optical techniques can serve as a basis for feedback-controlled tissue-specific laser surgery on the jaw bone and the parotid gland. In order to preserve nerve tissue during laser surgery, the alteration of optical tissue properties through laser-tissue interactions have to be taken into account. It was the aim of this study to evaluate the viability of optical tissue differentiation through diffuse reflectance spectroscopy after exposure to laser light as a basis for a feedback system for tissue-specific laser surgery. Spectra of diffuse reflectance (wavelength, 350-650 nm) of nerves, salivary glands, and cortical and cancellous bone of the midfacial region (ex vivo domestic pig heads) were acquired before/after Er:YAG laser (wavelength, 2.94 μm) ablation (each 16,800 spectra). Principal component analysis was computed followed by quadratic discriminant analysis. The tissue classification performance as well as area under the curve (AUC) sensitivity and specificity for tissue differentiation was assessed before and after laser-tissue exposure. A high classification performance was observed before laser ablation (total error, 7.74%). Nerve tissue was differentiated from bone and salivary glands with results greater than 0.96 in AUC, sensitivity and specificity. After laser exposure, a total classification error of 18.61% was observed. The differentiation of nerve tissue was reduced with an AUC of >0.94, sensitivity of >0.95, and specificity >0.87. Er:YAG laser ablation only slightly reduces the differentiation performance through diffuse reflectance in the investigated tissue types. The results show the general viability of diffuse reflectance spectroscopy in identifying neural structures in the vicinity of salivary glands and bone as a basis for nerve preservation during feedback-controlled laser surgery.

  3. Salient Points in Reconstruction of Nasal Skin after Tumor Ablation with Local Flaps

    PubMed Central

    Ebrahimi, Ali; Motamedi, Mohammad Hosein Kalantar; Nejadsarvari, Nasrin; Ebrahimi, Azin; Rasouli, Hamid Reza

    2016-01-01

    Objective: A variety of nasal skin reconstruction methods are available to meet the esthetic patient's needs. In this article, we review some of modifications of these procedures and share our experience in reconstruction of different parts of the nasal skin following skin tumor ablation. Patients and Methods: From January 2010 to January 2014, 171 patients underwent nasal skin reconstruction after excising cancerous lesions of the involved nasal skin. The patient's history, pre- and post-operation photographs, and the surgery data were collected and assessed. Demographic data related to the type of cancer, defect size and location, type of reconstruction were collected. Results: A variety of local flaps were used based on location and defect features. Nearly all flaps healed primarily without postsurgical significant complications. Conclusion: According to the results and the outcomes of the operations, we concluded that a certain flaps are more effective than others in nasal skin reconstruction. Local flap reconstruction of the nose has good esthetic result with low complication rate. PMID:27761088

  4. CTS Trials Network: Surgical ablation of atrial fibrillation during mitral valve surgery - many questions unanswered.

    PubMed

    Afifi, Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    A disease that is associated with stroke and mortality, atrial fibrillation (AF) complicates 30 to 50% of mitral valve disease patients admitted for surgery.(1) Since the introduction of the Cox maze III procedure in 1992 many efforts have been made to come up with modified lesion sets and/or energy sources to surgically treat AF. This lead to the recently published American Heart Association (AHA)- American College of Cardiology (ACC)-Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) guidelines(2) stating that it is reasonable to perform atrial fibrillation ablation in selected patients undergoing other types of cardiac surgery. The effectiveness of different techniques in conversion to sinus rhythm and the clinical impact of freedom from AF remain a question. The CTS Trials Network have undertaken a trial to answer these questions. The first year results of their randomized trial comparing AF ablation at the time of mitral valve surgery with mitral valve surgery alone were published recently in The New England Journal of Medicine.(3).

  5. CTS Trials Network: Surgical ablation of atrial fibrillation during mitral valve surgery - many questions unanswered

    PubMed Central

    Afifi, Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    A disease that is associated with stroke and mortality, atrial fibrillation (AF) complicates 30 to 50% of mitral valve disease patients admitted for surgery.1 Since the introduction of the Cox maze III procedure in 1992 many efforts have been made to come up with modified lesion sets and/or energy sources to surgically treat AF. This lead to the recently published American Heart Association (AHA)– American College of Cardiology (ACC)–Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) guidelines2 stating that it is reasonable to perform atrial fibrillation ablation in selected patients undergoing other types of cardiac surgery. The effectiveness of different techniques in conversion to sinus rhythm and the clinical impact of freedom from AF remain a question. The CTS Trials Network have undertaken a trial to answer these questions. The first year results of their randomized trial comparing AF ablation at the time of mitral valve surgery with mitral valve surgery alone were published recently in The New England Journal of Medicine.3 PMID:26566527

  6. Remote Postoperative Epidural Hematoma after Brain Tumor Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Ho-Jung; Park, Jae-Sung; Jeun, Sin-Soo

    2015-01-01

    A postoperative epidural hematoma (EDH) is a serious and embarrassing complication, which usually occurs at the site of operation after intracranial surgery. However, remote EDH is relatively rare. We report three cases of remote EDH after brain tumor surgery. All three cases seemed to have different causes of remote postoperative EDH; however, all patients were managed promptly and showed excellent outcomes. Although the exact mechanism of remote postoperative EDH is unknown, surgeons should be cautious of the speed of lowering intracranial pressure and implement basic procedures to prevent this hazardous complication of brain tumor surgery. PMID:26605271

  7. Local tumor progression patterns after radiofrequency ablation of colorectal cancer liver metastases

    PubMed Central

    Napoleone, Marc; Kielar, Ania Z.; Hibbert, Rebecca; Saif, Sameh; Kwan, Benjamin Y.M.

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE We aimed to evaluate patterns of local tumor progression (LTP) after radiofrequency ablation (RF ablation) of colorectal cancer liver metastases (CRCLM) and to highlight the percentage of LTP not attributable to lesion size or RF ablation procedure-related factors (heat sink or insufficient ablation margin). METHODS CRCLM treated by RF ablation at a single tertiary care center from 2004–2012, with a minimum of six months of postprocedure follow-up, were included in this retrospective study. LTP morphology was classified as focal nodular (<90° of ablation margin), circumferential (>270°), or crescentic (90°–270°). Initial metastasis size, minimum ablation margin size, morphology of LTP, presence of a heat sink, and time to progression were recorded independently by two radiologists. RESULTS Thirty-two of 127 RF ablation treated metastases (25%) with a mean size of 23 mm (standard deviation 12 mm) exhibited LTP. Fifteen of 32 LTPs (47%) were classified as focal nodular, with seven having no procedure-related factor to explain recurrence. Ten of 32 LTPs (31%) were circumferential, with four having no procedure-related factor to explain recurrence. Seven of 32 LTPs (22%) were crescentic, with two having no procedure-related factor to explain recurrence. Of the 13 lesions without any obvious procedure-related reason for LTP, six (46%) were <3 cm in size. CONCLUSION Although LTP in RF ablation treated CRCLM can often be explained by procedure-related factors or size of the lesion, in this study up to six (5%) of the CRCLM we treated showed LTP without any reasonable cause. PMID:27705879

  8. Decreased dopamine concentrations in the frontal cortex after ablative surgeries in patients exhibiting self-injurious behavior: a microdialysis study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Aijun; Li, Anmin; Zhang, Haitao; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2014-01-01

    The authors examined brain neurochemistry in four patients with mental retardation with self-injurious behaviors after ablative surgeries. The authors found that surgeries in the human limbic system can alter dopamine levels in the frontal cortex over a 36-hour period.

  9. Indication guidelines for Mohs micrographic surgery in skin tumors*

    PubMed Central

    Cernea, Selma Schuartz; Gontijo, Gabriel; Pimentel, Eugenio Raul de Almeida; Tarlé, Roberto Gomes; Tassara, Glaysson; Ferreira, Juliana Areas de Souza Lima Beltrame; Fernandes, Victor Miguel Coutinho; Bernardo, Wanderley Marques

    2016-01-01

    Mohs micrographic surgery is a technique used to excise skin tumors based on comprehensive surgical mapping, in which the surgeon removes the tumor, followed by a complete histological evaluation of the tumor's margins. The correlation of the presence of a tumor in histological examinations and its precise location on the surgical map result in a complete removal of the tumor with maximum normal tissue preservation. The present article seeks to provide general practitioners and healthcare specialists with guidelines regarding recommendations for Mohs micrographic surgery to treat skin tumors, based on the most reliable evidence available in medical literature on the subject. This bibliographic review of scientific articles in this line of research was conducted based on data collected from MEDLINE/PubMed. The search strategy used in this study was based on structured questions in the Patient, Intervention, Control, and Outcome (PICO) format. MeSH terms were used as descriptors. The indications of this technique are related to recurrence, histology, size, definition of tumor margins, and location of tumors. These guidelines attempt to establish the indications of Mohs surgery for different types of skin tumors. PMID:27828636

  10. Radiofrequency ablation compared to surgery for the treatment of benign thyroid nodules.

    PubMed

    Bernardi, Stella; Dobrinja, Chiara; Fabris, Bruno; Bazzocchi, Gabriele; Sabato, Nicoletta; Ulcigrai, Veronica; Giacca, Massimo; Barro, Enrica; De Manzini, Nicolò; Stacul, Fulvio

    2014-01-01

    Objective. Benign thyroid nodules are a common occurrence whose only remedy, in case of symptoms, has always been surgery until the advent of new techniques, such as radiofrequency ablation (RFA). This study aimed at evaluating RFA efficacy, tolerability, and costs and comparing them to hemithyroidectomy for the treatment of benign thyroid nodules. Design and Methods. 37 patients who underwent RFA were retrospectively compared to 74 patients surgically treated, either in a standard inpatient or in a short-stay surgical regimen. Efficacy, tolerability, and costs were compared. The contribution of final pathology was also taken into account. Results. RFA reduced nodular volume by 70% after 12 months and it was an effective method for treating nodule-related clinical problems, but it was not as effective as surgery for the treatment of hot nodules. RFA and surgery were both safe, although RFA had less complications and pain was rare. RFA costed €1,661.50, surgery costed €4,556.30, and short-stay surgery costed €4,139.40 per patient. RFA, however, did not allow for any pathologic analysis of the nodules, which, in 6 patients who had undergone surgery (8%), revealed that the nodules harboured malignant cells. Conclusions. RFA might transform our approach to benign thyroid nodules.

  11. Radiofrequency Ablation Compared to Surgery for the Treatment of Benign Thyroid Nodules

    PubMed Central

    Bernardi, Stella; Dobrinja, Chiara; Fabris, Bruno; Bazzocchi, Gabriele; Sabato, Nicoletta; Ulcigrai, Veronica; Giacca, Massimo; Barro, Enrica; De Manzini, Nicolò; Stacul, Fulvio

    2014-01-01

    Objective. Benign thyroid nodules are a common occurrence whose only remedy, in case of symptoms, has always been surgery until the advent of new techniques, such as radiofrequency ablation (RFA). This study aimed at evaluating RFA efficacy, tolerability, and costs and comparing them to hemithyroidectomy for the treatment of benign thyroid nodules. Design and Methods. 37 patients who underwent RFA were retrospectively compared to 74 patients surgically treated, either in a standard inpatient or in a short-stay surgical regimen. Efficacy, tolerability, and costs were compared. The contribution of final pathology was also taken into account. Results. RFA reduced nodular volume by 70% after 12 months and it was an effective method for treating nodule-related clinical problems, but it was not as effective as surgery for the treatment of hot nodules. RFA and surgery were both safe, although RFA had less complications and pain was rare. RFA costed €1,661.50, surgery costed €4,556.30, and short-stay surgery costed €4,139.40 per patient. RFA, however, did not allow for any pathologic analysis of the nodules, which, in 6 patients who had undergone surgery (8%), revealed that the nodules harboured malignant cells. Conclusions. RFA might transform our approach to benign thyroid nodules. PMID:25045352

  12. Stereotactic Laser Ablation for Medically Intractable Epilepsy: The Next Generation of Minimally Invasive Epilepsy Surgery

    PubMed Central

    LaRiviere, Michael J.; Gross, Robert E.

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy is a common, disabling illness that is refractory to medical treatment in approximately one-third of patients, particularly among those with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. While standard open mesial temporal resection is effective, achieving seizure freedom in most patients, efforts to develop safer, minimally invasive techniques have been underway for over half a century. Stereotactic ablative techniques, in particular, radiofrequency (RF) ablation, were first developed in the 1960s, with refinements in the 1990s with the advent of modern computed tomography and magnetic resonance-based imaging. In the past 5 years, the most recent techniques have used MRI-guided laser interstitial thermotherapy (LITT), the development of which began in the 1980s, saw refinements in MRI thermal imaging through the 1990s, and was initially used primarily for the treatment of intracranial and extracranial tumors. The present review describes the original stereotactic ablation trials, followed by modern imaging-guided RF ablation series for mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. The developments of LITT and MRI thermometry are then discussed. Finally, the two currently available MRI-guided LITT systems are reviewed for their role in the treatment of mesial temporal lobe and other medically refractory epilepsies. PMID:27995127

  13. TECHNIQUES AND OUTCOMES OF MINIMALLY-INVASIVE TRABECULAR ABLATION AND BYPASS SURGERY

    PubMed Central

    Kaplowitz, Kevin; Schuman, Joel S.; Loewen, Nils A.

    2014-01-01

    Minimally invasive glaucoma surgeries (MIGS) can improve the conventional, pressure dependent outflow by bypassing or ablating the trabecular meshwork or create alternative drainage routes into the suprachoroidal or subconjunctival space. They have a highly favorable risk profile compared to penetrating surgeries and lower intraocular pressure with variable efficacy that may depend on the extent of outflow segments accessed. Since they are highly standardized procedures that use clear corneal incisions, they can elegantly be combined with cataract and refractive procedures to improve vision in the same session. There is a growing need for surgeons to become proficient in MIGS to address the increasing prevalence of glaucoma and cataracts in a well-informed, aging population. Techniques of visualization and instrumentation in an anatomically highly confined space with semi-transparent tissues are fundamentally different from other anterior segment surgeries and present even experienced surgeons with a substantial learning curve. Here, we provide practical tips and review techniques and outcomes of TM bypass and ablation MIGS. PMID:24338085

  14. Precisely shaped acoustic ablation of tumors utilizing steerable needle and 3D ultrasound image guidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boctor, Emad M.; Stolka, Philipp; Kang, Hyun-Jae; Clarke, Clyde; Rucker, Caleb; Croom, Jordon; Burdette, E. Clif; Webster, Robert J., III

    2010-02-01

    Many recent studies have demonstrated the efficacy of interstitial ablative approaches for the treatment of hepatic tumors. Despite these promising results, current systems remain highly dependent on operator skill, and cannot treat many tumors because there is little control of the size and shape of the zone of necrosis, and no control over ablator trajectory within tissue once insertion has taken place. Additionally, tissue deformation and target motion make it extremely difficult to place the ablator device precisely into the target. Irregularly shaped target volumes typically require multiple insertions and several overlapping (thermal) lesions, which are even more challenging to accomplish in a precise, predictable, and timely manner without causing excessive damage to surrounding normal tissues. In answer to these problems, we have developed a steerable acoustic ablator called the ACUSITT with the ability of directional energy delivery to precisely shape the applied thermal dose . In this paper, we address image guidance for this device, proposing an innovative method for accurate tracking and tool registration with spatially-registered intra-operative three-dimensional US volumes, without relying on an external tracking device. This method is applied to guid-ance of the flexible, snake-like, lightweight, and inexpensive ACUSITT to facilitate precise placement of its ablator tip within the liver, with ablation monitoring via strain imaging. Recent advancements in interstitial high-power ultrasound applicators enable controllable and penetrating heating patterns which can be dynamically altered. This paper summarizes the design and development of the first synergistic system that integrates a novel steerable interstitial acoustic ablation device with a novel trackerless 3DUS guidance strategy.

  15. Creation of a Tumor-Mimic Model Using a Muscle Paste for Radiofrequency Ablation of the Lung

    SciTech Connect

    Kawai, T. Kaminou, T.; Sugiura, K.; Hashimoto, M.; Ohuchi, Y.; Adachi, A.; Fujioka, S.; Ito, H.; Nakamura, K.; Ogawa, T.

    2009-03-15

    The purpose of this study was to develop an easily created tumor-mimic model and evaluate its efficacy for radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of the lung. The bilateral lungs of eight living adult swine were used. A tumor-mimic model was made by percutaneous injection of 1.0 ml muscle paste through the bone biopsy needle into the lung. An RFA probe was then inserted into the tumor mimics immediately after tumor creation. Ablation time, tissue impedance, and temperature were recorded. The tumor mimics and their coagulated regions were evaluated microscopically and macroscopically. The muscle paste was easily injected into the lung parenchyma through the bone biopsy needle and well visualized under fluoroscopy. In 10 of 12 sites the tumor mimics were oval shaped, localized, and homogeneous on gross specimens. Ten tumor mimics were successfully ablated, and four locations were ablated in the normal lung parenchyma as controls. In the tumor and normal lung parenchyma, ablation times were 8.9 {+-} 3.5 and 4.4 {+-} 1.6 min, respectively; tissue impedances at the start of ablation were 100.6 {+-} 16.6 and 145.8 {+-} 26.8 {Omega}, respectively; and temperatures at the end of ablation were 66.0 {+-} 7.9 and 57.5 {+-} 7.6{sup o}C, respectively. The mean size of tumor mimics was 13.9 x 8.2 mm, and their coagulated area was 18.8 x 13.1 mm. In the lung parenchyma, the coagulated area was 15.3 x 12.0 mm. In conclusion, our tumor-mimic model using muscle paste can be easily and safely created and can be ablated using the ablation algorithm in the clinical setting.

  16. Photoacoustic monitoring of clot formation during surgery and tumor surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juratli, Mazen A.; Galanzha, Ekaterina I.; Sarimollaoglu, Mustafa; Nedosekin, Dmitry A.; Suen, James Y.; Zharov, Vladimir P.

    2013-03-01

    When a blood vessel is injured, the normal physiological response of the body is to form a clot (thrombus) to prevent blood loss. Alternatively, even without injury to the blood vessel, the pathological condition called thromboembolism may lead to the formation of circulating blood clots (CBCs), also called emboli, which can clog blood vessels throughout the body. Veins of the extremities (venous thromboembolism), lungs (pulmonary embolism ), brain (embolic stroke), heart (myocardial infarction), kidneys, and gastrointestinal tract are often affected. Emboli are also common complications of infection, inflammation, cancer, surgery, radiation and coronary artery bypass grafts. Despite the clear medical significance of CBCs, however, little progress has been made in the development of methods for real-time detection and identification of CBCs. To overcome these limitations, we developed a new modification of in vivo photoacoustic (PA) flow cytometry (PAFC) for real-time detection of white, red, and mixed clots through a transient decrease, increase or fluctuation of PA signal amplitude, respectively. In this work, using PAFC and mouse models, we present for the first time direct evidence that some medical procedures, such as conventional or cancer surgery may initiate the formation of CBCs. In conclusion, the PA diagnostic platform can be used in real-time to define risk factors for cardiovascular diseases, assist in the prognosis and potential prevention of stroke by using a well-timed therapy or as a clot count as a marker of therapy efficacy.

  17. Radiofrequency Ablation of Lung Tumors: Imaging Features of the Postablation Zone

    PubMed Central

    Eradat, Jilbert; Gutierrez, Antonio J.; Lee, Christopher; Fishbein, Michael C.; Suh, Robert D.

    2012-01-01

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is used to treat pulmonary malignancies. Although preliminary results are suggestive of a survival benefit, local progression rates are appreciable. Because a patient can undergo repeat treatment if recurrence is detected early, reliable post-RFA imaging follow-up is critical. The purpose of this article is to describe (a) an algorithm for post-RFA imaging surveillance; (b) the computed tomographic (CT) appearance, size, enhancement, and positron emission tomographic (PET) metabolic activity of the ablation zone; and (c) CT, PET, and dual-modality imaging with PET and CT (PET/CT) features suggestive of partial ablation or tumor recurrence and progression. CT is routinely used for post-RFA follow-up. PET and PET/CT have emerged as auxiliary follow-up techniques. CT with nodule densitometry may be used to supplement standard CT. Post-RFA follow-up was divided into three phases: early (immediately after to 1 week after RFA), intermediate (>1 week to 2 months), and late (>2 months). CT and PET imaging features suggestive of residual or recurrent disease include (a) increasing contrast material uptake in the ablation zone (>180 seconds on dynamic images), nodular enhancement measuring more than 10 mm, any central enhancement greater than 15 HU, and enhancement greater than baseline anytime after ablation; (b) growth of the RFA zone after 3 months (compared with baseline) and definitely after 6 months, peripheral nodular growth and change from ground-glass opacity to solid opacity, regional or distant lymph node enlargement, and new intrathoracic or extrathoracic disease; and (c) increased metabolic activity beyond 2 months, residual activity centrally or at the ablated tumor, and development of nodular activity. © RSNA, 2012 PMID:22786987

  18. Investigating the ablation efficiency of a 1940-nm thulium fibre laser for intraoral surgery.

    PubMed

    Guney, M; Tunc, B; Gulsoy, M

    2014-08-01

    The use of a laser in surgical procedures involving the soft tissues is advantageous due to its sterile and hemostatic nature. Several different lasers are in use for intraoral soft tissue surgery; however, small, efficient, and fibre-coupled lasers are favoured due to the tightly confined nature of the intraoral environment. This study proposes the use of a 1940-nm thulium fibre laser (Tm:fibre laser) for intraoral soft tissue procedures. Its thermal effects when used to make incisions were investigated. This laser was chosen due to its output wavelength, which is absorbed well by water in biological tissues. Lamb tongues were used in the experiments. The laser was coupled to a 600-μm silica fibre and incisions were made in contact mode with a continuous wave. The extent of ablation and coagulation produced were measured at three different speeds, powers, and numbers of passes. The thermal effects of laser power, movement speed, and number of passes on incision depth and ablation efficiency were determined. The Tm:fibre laser is a promising tool for intraoral surgery, with excellent absorption by tissue, good coagulative qualities, and easy to manipulate fibre output. Its use as an incisional tool with very little to no carbonization is shown in this study.

  19. Magnetic Hyperthermia Ablation of Tumors Using Injectable Fe₃O₄/Calcium Phosphate Cement.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chunyan; Zheng, Yuanyi; Gao, Wei; Xu, Jinshun; Zuo, Guoqing; Chen, Yu; Zhao, Minzhu; Li, Jianbo; Song, Jinlin; Zhang, Nan; Wang, Zhigang; Zhao, Hongyun; Mei, Zhechuan

    2015-07-01

    In this work, we have developed an injectable and biodegradable material using CPC containing Fe3O4 nanoparticles for minimally invasive and efficiently magnetic hyperthermia ablation of tumors. When exposed to an alternating magnetic field, the MCPC could quickly generate heat. The temperature of PBS and the excised bovine liver increased with the MCPC weight, iron content, and time. The ablated liver tissue volume for 0.36 g of 10% MCPC was 0.2 ± 0.03, 1.01 ± 0.07, and 1.96 ± 0.19 cm(3), respectively, at the time point of 60, 180, and 300 s. In our in vivo experiment, the MCPC could be directly injected into the center of the tumors under the guidance of ultrasound imaging. The formed MCPC was well-restricted within the tumor tissues without leakage, and the tumors were completely ablated by 0.36 g of 10% injectable MCPC after 180 s of induction heating.

  20. Sequential activation of ground pads reduces skin heating during radiofrequency tumor ablation: in vivo porcine results.

    PubMed

    Schutt, David J; Swindle, M Michael; Helke, Kristi L; Bastarrika, Gorka; Schwarz, Florian; Haemmerich, Dieter

    2010-03-01

    Skin burns below ground pads during monopolar RF ablation are increasingly prevalent, thereby hindering the development of higher power RF generators capable of creating larger tumor ablation zones in combination with multiple or new applicators. Our goal was to evaluate reduction in skin temperatures via additional ground pads in an in vivo porcine model. Three ground pads placed on the animal's abdomen were activated either simultaneously or sequentially, where activation timing was adjusted to equilibrate skin temperature below each pad. Thirteen RF ablations (n = 4 simultaneous at 300 W, n = 5 sequential at 300 W, and n = 4 sequential at 375 W) were performed for 12 min via two internally cooled cluster electrodes placed in the gluteus maximus of domestic swine. Temperature rise at each pad and burn degree as determined via histology were compared. Ablation zone size was determined via T2-weighted MRI. Maximum temperature rise was significantly higher with simultaneous activation than with either of the sequential activation group (21.4 degrees C versus 8.1 degrees C or 9.6 degrees C, p < 0.01). Ablation zone diameters during simultaneous (300 W) and sequential activations (300 and 375 W) were and 6.9 +/- 0.3, 5.6 +/- 0.3, and 7.5 +/- 0.6 cm, respectively. Sequential activation of multiple ground pads results in significantly lower skin temperatures and less severe burns, as measured by histological examination.

  1. Image-guided tumor ablation: standardization of terminology and reporting criteria--a 10-year update.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Muneeb; Solbiati, Luigi; Brace, Christopher L; Breen, David J; Callstrom, Matthew R; Charboneau, J William; Chen, Min-Hua; Choi, Byung Ihn; de Baère, Thierry; Dodd, Gerald D; Dupuy, Damian E; Gervais, Debra A; Gianfelice, David; Gillams, Alice R; Lee, Fred T; Leen, Edward; Lencioni, Riccardo; Littrup, Peter J; Livraghi, Tito; Lu, David S; McGahan, John P; Meloni, Maria Franca; Nikolic, Boris; Pereira, Philippe L; Liang, Ping; Rhim, Hyunchul; Rose, Steven C; Salem, Riad; Sofocleous, Constantinos T; Solomon, Stephen B; Soulen, Michael C; Tanaka, Masatoshi; Vogl, Thomas J; Wood, Bradford J; Goldberg, S Nahum

    2014-10-01

    Image-guided tumor ablation has become a well-established hallmark of local cancer therapy. The breadth of options available in this growing field increases the need for standardization of terminology and reporting criteria to facilitate effective communication of ideas and appropriate comparison among treatments that use different technologies, such as chemical (eg, ethanol or acetic acid) ablation, thermal therapies (eg, radiofrequency, laser, microwave, focused ultrasound, and cryoablation) and newer ablative modalities such as irreversible electroporation. This updated consensus document provides a framework that will facilitate the clearest communication among investigators regarding ablative technologies. An appropriate vehicle is proposed for reporting the various aspects of image-guided ablation therapy including classification of therapies, procedure terms, descriptors of imaging guidance, and terminology for imaging and pathologic findings. Methods are addressed for standardizing reporting of technique, follow-up, complications, and clinical results. As noted in the original document from 2003, adherence to the recommendations will improve the precision of communications in this field, leading to more accurate comparison of technologies and results, and ultimately to improved patient outcomes. Online supplemental material is available for this article .

  2. Image-guided tumor ablation: standardization of terminology and reporting criteria--a 10-year update.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Muneeb; Solbiati, Luigi; Brace, Christopher L; Breen, David J; Callstrom, Matthew R; Charboneau, J William; Chen, Min-Hua; Choi, Byung Ihn; de Baère, Thierry; Dodd, Gerald D; Dupuy, Damian E; Gervais, Debra A; Gianfelice, David; Gillams, Alice R; Lee, Fred T; Leen, Edward; Lencioni, Riccardo; Littrup, Peter J; Livraghi, Tito; Lu, David S; McGahan, John P; Meloni, Maria Franca; Nikolic, Boris; Pereira, Philippe L; Liang, Ping; Rhim, Hyunchul; Rose, Steven C; Salem, Riad; Sofocleous, Constantinos T; Solomon, Stephen B; Soulen, Michael C; Tanaka, Masatoshi; Vogl, Thomas J; Wood, Bradford J; Goldberg, S Nahum

    2014-11-01

    Image-guided tumor ablation has become a well-established hallmark of local cancer therapy. The breadth of options available in this growing field increases the need for standardization of terminology and reporting criteria to facilitate effective communication of ideas and appropriate comparison among treatments that use different technologies, such as chemical (eg, ethanol or acetic acid) ablation, thermal therapies (eg, radiofrequency, laser, microwave, focused ultrasound, and cryoablation) and newer ablative modalities such as irreversible electroporation. This updated consensus document provides a framework that will facilitate the clearest communication among investigators regarding ablative technologies. An appropriate vehicle is proposed for reporting the various aspects of image-guided ablation therapy including classification of therapies, procedure terms, descriptors of imaging guidance, and terminology for imaging and pathologic findings. Methods are addressed for standardizing reporting of technique, follow-up, complications, and clinical results. As noted in the original document from 2003, adherence to the recommendations will improve the precision of communications in this field, leading to more accurate comparison of technologies and results, and ultimately to improved patient outcomes.

  3. Image-guided Tumor Ablation: Standardization of Terminology and Reporting Criteria—A 10-Year Update

    PubMed Central

    Solbiati, Luigi; Brace, Christopher L.; Breen, David J.; Callstrom, Matthew R.; Charboneau, J. William; Chen, Min-Hua; Choi, Byung Ihn; de Baère, Thierry; Dodd, Gerald D.; Dupuy, Damian E.; Gervais, Debra A.; Gianfelice, David; Gillams, Alice R.; Lee, Fred T.; Leen, Edward; Lencioni, Riccardo; Littrup, Peter J.; Livraghi, Tito; Lu, David S.; McGahan, John P.; Meloni, Maria Franca; Nikolic, Boris; Pereira, Philippe L.; Liang, Ping; Rhim, Hyunchul; Rose, Steven C.; Salem, Riad; Sofocleous, Constantinos T.; Solomon, Stephen B.; Soulen, Michael C.; Tanaka, Masatoshi; Vogl, Thomas J.; Wood, Bradford J.; Goldberg, S. Nahum

    2014-01-01

    Image-guided tumor ablation has become a well-established hallmark of local cancer therapy. The breadth of options available in this growing field increases the need for standardization of terminology and reporting criteria to facilitate effective communication of ideas and appropriate comparison among treatments that use different technologies, such as chemical (eg, ethanol or acetic acid) ablation, thermal therapies (eg, radiofrequency, laser, microwave, focused ultrasound, and cryoablation) and newer ablative modalities such as irreversible electroporation. This updated consensus document provides a framework that will facilitate the clearest communication among investigators regarding ablative technologies. An appropriate vehicle is proposed for reporting the various aspects of image-guided ablation therapy including classification of therapies, procedure terms, descriptors of imaging guidance, and terminology for imaging and pathologic findings. Methods are addressed for standardizing reporting of technique, follow-up, complications, and clinical results. As noted in the original document from 2003, adherence to the recommendations will improve the precision of communications in this field, leading to more accurate comparison of technologies and results, and ultimately to improved patient outcomes. © RSNA, 2014 Online supplemental material is available for this article. PMID:24927329

  4. Supercomputer Simulation of Radio-frequency Hepatic Tumor Ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosturski, N.; Margenov, S.

    2010-11-01

    We simulate the thermal and electrical processes, involved in the radio-frequency (RF) ablation procedure. The mathematical model consists of two parts—electrical and thermal. The energy from the applied AC voltage is determined first, by solving the Laplace equation to find the potential distribution. After that, the electric field intensity and the current density are directly calculated. Finally, the heat transfer equation is solved to determine the temperature distribution. Heat loss due to blood perfusion is also accounted for. The representation of the computational domain is based on a voxel mesh. Both partial differential equations are discretized in space via linear conforming FEM. After the space discretization, the backward Euler scheme is used for the time stepping. Large-scale linear systems arise from the FEM discretization. Moreover, they are ill-conditioned, due to the strong coefficient jumps and the complex geometry of the problem. Therefore, efficient parallel solution methods are required. The developed parallel solver is based on the preconditioned conjugate gradient (PCG) method. As a preconditioner, we use BoomerAMG—a parallel algebraic multigrid implementation from the package Hypre, developed in LLNL, Livermore. Parallel numerical tests, performed on the IBM Blue Gene/P massively parallel computer are presented.

  5. Selective ablation of immature blood vessels in established human tumors follows vascular endothelial growth factor withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Benjamin, L E; Golijanin, D; Itin, A; Pode, D; Keshet, E

    1999-01-01

    Features that distinguish tumor vasculatures from normal blood vessels are sought to enable the destruction of preformed tumor vessels. We show that blood vessels in both a xenografted tumor and primary human tumors contain a sizable fraction of immature blood vessels that have not yet recruited periendothelial cells. These immature vessels are selectively obliterated as a consequence of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) withdrawal. In a xenografted glioma, the selective vulnerability of immature vessels to VEGF loss was demonstrated by downregulating VEGF transgene expression using a tetracycline-regulated expression system. In human prostate cancer, the constitutive production of VEGF by the glandular epithelium was suppressed as a consequence of androgen-ablation therapy. VEGF loss led, in turn, to selective apoptosis of endothelial cells in vessels devoid of periendothelial cells. These results suggest that the unique dependence on VEGF of blood vessels lacking periendothelial cells can be exploited to reduce an existing tumor vasculature.

  6. Angled Cool-Tip Electrode for Radiofrequency Ablation of Small Superficial Subcapsular Tumors in the Liver: A Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Il Jung; Lee, Shin Jae; Shin, Min Woo; Shin, Won Sun; Chung, Yong Eun; Kim, Gyoung Min; Kim, Man Deuk; Won, Jong Yun; Lee, Do Yun; Choi, Jin Sub; Han, Kwang-Hyub

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the feasibility of angled cool-tip electrode for radiofrequency ablation of small superficial subcapsular liver tumors abutting abdominal wall, in order to traverse normal liver parenchyma, and thereby, obtain favorable configuration of ablation margin. Materials and Methods In this study, we retrospectively analyzed 15 small superficial subcapsular liver tumors abutting abdominal wall in 15 patients, treated with radiofrequency ablation from March 2013 to June 2015 using a cool-tip electrode manually modified to create 25–35° angle at the junction between exposed and insulated segments. The tumors were hepatocellular carcinoma (n = 13) and metastases (n = 2: cholangiocellular carcinoma and rectosigmoid cancer), with maximum diameter of 10–26 mm (mean, 15.68 ± 5.29 mm). Under ultrasonographic guidance, the electrode tip was advanced to the depth of the tumors' epicenter about 1 cm from the margin. The tip was re-directed to penetrate the tumor for radiofrequency ablation. Minimal ablation margin was measured at immediate post-treatment CT. Radiological images and medical records were evaluated for success rate, length of minimal ablation margin and complications. Results Technical success rate of obtaining complete necrosis of the tumors was 100%, with no procedure-related complication. Minimal ablation margin ranged from 3–12 mm (mean, 7.07 ± 2.23 mm). CT/MRI follow-up at 21–1022 days (mean, 519.47 ± 304.51 days) revealed no local recurrence, but distant recurrence in 9 patients. Conclusion Using an angled cool-tip electrode for radiofrequency ablation of small superficial subcapsular tumors abutting abdominal wall may be a feasible technique for obtaining adequate ablation margin and lower complication rate. PMID:27587963

  7. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided ethanol ablation of a large metastatic carcinoid tumor: success with a note of caution

    PubMed Central

    Mathers, Bradley W.; Harvey, Harold A.; Dye, Charles E.; Dougherty-Hamod, Brandy; Moyer, Matthew T.

    2014-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasonography with fine needle infusion (EUS-FNI) of alcohol is the most reported method for EUS-guided tumor ablation. Several studies have reported successful EUS-guided ablation of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. However, these tumors have been relatively small (< 3 cm). In this report, a 50-year-old man with a metastatic carcinoid tumor with a large porta hepatis mass was referred to our clinic for EUS-guided ethanol ablation. After two separate EUS-FNI ablations, there was a 36 % reduction in tumor size (9.0 × 11.4 cm to 6.7 × 9.8 cm) with associated tumor lysis syndrome. Chromogranin A levels decreased from 460 to 132 ng/mL. The patient reported complete resolution of abdominal pain within 2 weeks, but only mild improvement in flushing and diarrhea. In conclusion, large metastatic neuroendocrine tumors can be successfully treated with EUS-guided ethanol ablation. Evidence-based guidelines are needed with regard to the appropriate volume of ethanol injected in EUS-guided ablation to promote the efficacy and safety of this emerging procedure. PMID:26135103

  8. VEGF-ablation therapy reduces drug delivery and therapeutic response in ECM-dense tumors.

    PubMed

    Röhrig, F; Vorlová, S; Hoffmann, H; Wartenberg, M; Escorcia, F E; Keller, S; Tenspolde, M; Weigand, I; Gätzner, S; Manova, K; Penack, O; Scheinberg, D A; Rosenwald, A; Ergün, S; Granot, Z; Henke, E

    2017-01-05

    The inadequate transport of drugs into the tumor tissue caused by its abnormal vasculature is a major obstacle to the treatment of cancer. Anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (anti-VEGF) drugs can cause phenotypic alteration and maturation of the tumor's vasculature. However, whether this consistently improves delivery and subsequent response to therapy is still controversial. Clinical results indicate that not all patients benefit from antiangiogenic treatment, necessitating the development of criteria to predict the effect of these agents in individual tumors. We demonstrate that, in anti-VEGF-refractory murine tumors, vascular changes after VEGF ablation result in reduced delivery leading to therapeutic failure. In these tumors, the impaired response after anti-VEGF treatment is directly linked to strong deposition of fibrillar extracellular matrix (ECM) components and high expression of lysyl oxidases. The resulting condensed, highly crosslinked ECM impeded drug permeation, protecting tumor cells from exposure to small-molecule drugs. The reduced vascular density after anti-VEGF treatment further decreased delivery in these tumors, an effect not compensated by the improved vessel quality. Pharmacological inhibition of lysyl oxidases improved drug delivery in various tumor models and reversed the negative effect of VEGF ablation on drug delivery and therapeutic response in anti-VEGF-resistant tumors. In conclusion, the vascular changes after anti-VEGF therapy can have a context-dependent negative impact on overall therapeutic efficacy. A determining factor is the tumor ECM, which strongly influences the effect of anti-VEGF therapy. Our results reveal the prospect to revert a possible negative effect and to potentiate responsiveness to antiangiogenic therapy by concomitantly targeting ECM-modifying enzymes.

  9. TU-B-210-01: MRg HIFU - Bone and Soft Tissue Tumor Ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Ghanouni, P.

    2015-06-15

    MR guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS), or alternatively high-intensity focused ultrasound (MRgHIFU), is approved for thermal ablative treatment of uterine fibroids and pain palliation in bone metastases. Ablation of malignant tumors is under active investigation in sites such as breast, prostate, brain, liver, kidney, pancreas, and soft tissue. Hyperthermia therapy with MRgFUS is also feasible, and may be used in conjunction with radiotherapy and for local targeted drug delivery. MRI allows in situ target definition and provides continuous temperature monitoring and subsequent thermal dose mapping during HIFU. Although MRgHIFU can be very precise, treatment of mobile organs is challenging and advanced techniques are required because of artifacts in MR temperature mapping, the need for intercostal firing, and need for gated HIFU or tracking of the lesion in real time. The first invited talk, “MR guided Focused Ultrasound Treatment of Tumors in Bone and Soft Tissue”, will summarize the treatment protocol and review results from treatment of bone tumors. In addition, efforts to extend this technology to treat both benign and malignant soft tissue tumors of the extremities will be presented. The second invited talk, “MRI guided High Intensity Focused Ultrasound – Advanced Approaches for Ablation and Hyperthermia”, will provide an overview of techniques that are in or near clinical trials for thermal ablation and hyperthermia, with an emphasis of applications in abdominal organs and breast, including methods for MRTI and tracking targets in moving organs. Learning Objectives: Learn background on devices and techniques for MR guided HIFU for cancer therapy Understand issues and current status of clinical MRg HIFU Understand strategies for compensating for organ movement during MRgHIFU Understand strategies for strategies for delivering hyperthermia with MRgHIFU CM - research collaboration with Philips.

  10. Percutaneous and video-assisted ablation of endocrine tumors: liver, adrenal, and thyroid.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Lucy B; Berber, Eren

    2011-08-01

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) relies on cell destruction using heat, which is generated by the vibration of electrons as a result of high-frequency electrical energy. RFA was initially employed for the treatment of arrhythmogenic cardiac lesions. It has since been used to treat solid tumors of various organs, both primary and metastatic. Here we review the manner in which RFA technology delivered through minimally invasive techniques has been applied to endocrine problems and discuss some technical points.

  11. Enhanced Ablation of High Intensity Focused Ultrasound with Microbubbles: An Experimental Study on Rabbit Hepatic VX2 Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    He Wei; Wang Wei Zhou Ping; Wang, Yixiang J.; Zhou Peng; Li Ruizhen; Wang Jinsheng; Ahuja, Anil T.

    2011-10-15

    Purpose: This study was designed to assess the enhanced effect of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) ablation with microbubbles on rabbit hepatic VX2 tumors and to compare the detection sensitivity of CEUS and CECT to determine the residual viable tissue after ablation of HIFU. Methods: Forty rabbits with hepatic VX2 tumors were randomly separated into two groups (20 animals per group) before HIFU ablation. A bolus of 0.2 mL of saline or a microbubble-based ultrasound (US) contrast agent was injected intravenously to group I rabbits and group II rabbits, respectively. The HIFU ablation procedure was started 15 s after the injection. Tumors were examined with grayscale contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) and contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CECT) immediately before and after HIFU ablation. Histopathologic assessment was performed immediately after treatment imaging. Results: Before ablation, intense contrast enhancement during arterial phase was observed at the whole tumors or the periphery of the tumors by CEUS and CECT. Lower HIFU energy was used in group II than in group I (P < 0.001). Histopathologic assessment revealed local residual viable tumor tissues due to incomplete ablation in 47.4% (9/19) of tumors in group I and 10% (2/20) of tumors in group II (P < 0.05). The concordance rate of CEUS (90.9%) with histopathology on residual tumor detection was higher than that of CECT (27.3%, P < 0.05). Conclusions: Introduction of the microbubble agent enhances HIFU therapeutic efficacy. CEUS proves to have high sensitivity in assessment of residual viable rabbit VX2 tumor after HIFU.

  12. Use of High-Frequency Jet Ventilation for Percutaneous Tumor Ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Denys, Alban Lachenal, Yann; Duran, Rafael; Chollet-Rivier, Madeleine; Bize, Pierre

    2013-05-02

    PurposeTo report feasibility and potential benefits of high-frequency jet ventilation (HFJV) in tumor ablations techniques in liver, kidney, and lung lesions.MethodsThis prospective study included 51 patients (14 women, mean age 66 years) bearing 66 tumors (56 hepatic, 5 pulmonary, 5 renal tumors) with a median size of 16 ± 8.7 mm, referred for tumor ablation in an intention-to-treat fashion before preoperative anesthesiology visit. Cancellation and complications of HFJV were prospectively recorded. Anesthesia and procedure duration, as well as mean CO{sub 2} capnea, were recorded. When computed tomography guidance was used, 3D spacial coordinates of an anatomical target <2 mm in diameter on 8 slabs of 4 slices of 3.75-mm slice thickness were registered.ResultsHFJV was used in 41 of 51 patients. Of the ten patients who were not candidate for HFJV, two patients had contraindication to HFJV (severe COPD), three had lesions invisible under HFJV requiring deep inspiration apnea for tumor targeting, and five patients could not have HFJV because of unavailability of a trained anesthetic team. No specific complication or hypercapnia related to HFJV were observed despite a mean anesthetic duration of 2 h and ventilation performed in procubitus (n = 4) or lateral decubitus (n = 6). Measured internal target movement was 0.3 mm in x- and y-axis and below the slice thickness of 3.75 mm in the z-axis in 11 patients.ConclusionsHFJV is feasible in 80 % of patients allowing for near immobility of internal organs during liver, kidney, and lung tumor ablation.

  13. Nanoparticle-assisted photothermal ablation of brain tumor in an orthotopic canine model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, Jon A.; Shetty, Anil M.; Price, Roger E.; Stafford, R. Jason; Wang, James C.; Uthamanthil, Rajesh K.; Pham, Kevin; McNichols, Roger J.; Coleman, Chris L.; Payne, J. Donald

    2009-02-01

    We report on a pilot study demonstrating a proof of concept for the passive delivery of nanoshells to an orthotopic tumor where they induce a local, confined therapeutic response distinct from that of normal brain resulting in the photo-thermal ablation of canine Transmissible Venereal Tumor (cTVT) in a canine brain model. cTVT fragments grown in SCID mice were successfully inoculated in the parietal lobe of immuno-suppressed, mixed-breed hound dogs. A single dose of near-infrared absorbing, 150 nm nanoshells was infused intravenously and allowed time to passively accumulate in the intracranial tumors which served as a proxy for an orthotopic brain metastasis. The nanoshells accumulated within the intracranial cTVT suggesting that its neo-vasculature represented an interruption of the normal blood-brain barrier. Tumors were thermally ablated by percutaneous, optical fiber-delivered, near-infrared radiation using a 3.5 W average, 3-minute laser dose at 808 nm that selectively elevated the temperature of tumor tissue to 65.8+/-4.1ºC. Identical laser doses applied to normal white and gray matter on the contralateral side of the brain yielded sub-lethal temperatures of 48.6+/-1.1ºC. The laser dose was designed to minimize thermal damage to normal brain tissue in the absence of nanoshells and compensate for variability in the accumulation of nanoshells in tumor. Post-mortem histopathology of treated brain sections demonstrated the effectiveness and selectivity of the nanoshell-assisted thermal ablation.

  14. Vasculature segmentation for radio frequency ablation of non-resectable hepatic tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemler, Paul F.; McCreedy, Evan S.; Cheng, Ruida; Wood, Brad; McAuliffe, Matthew J.

    2006-03-01

    In Radio Frequency Ablation (RFA) procedures, hepatic tumor tissue is heated to a temperature where necrosis is insured. Unfortunately, recent results suggest that heating tumor tissue to necrosis is complicated because nearby major blood vessels provide a cooling effect. Therefore, it is fundamentally important for physicians to perform a careful analysis of the spatial relationship of diseased tissue to larger liver blood vessels. The liver contains many of these large vessels, which affect the RFA ablation shape and size. There are many sophisticated vasculature detection and segmentation techniques reported in the literature that identify continuous vessels as the diameter changes size and it transgresses through many bifurcation levels. However, the larger blood vessels near the treatment area are the only vessels required for proper RFA treatment plan formulation and analysis. With physician guidance and interaction, our system can segment those vessels which are most likely to affect the RFA ablations. We have found that our system provides the physician with therapeutic, geometric and spatial information necessary to accurately plan treatment of tumors near large blood vessels. The segmented liver vessels near the treatment region are also necessary for computing isolevel heating profiles used to evaluate different proposed treatment configurations.

  15. Feasibility of Respiratory Triggering for MR-Guided Microwave Ablation of Liver Tumors Under General Anesthesia

    SciTech Connect

    Morikawa, Shigehiro Inubushi, Toshiro; Kurumi, Yoshimasa; Naka, Shigeyuki; Sato, Koichiro; Demura, Koichi; Tani, Tohru; Haque, Hasnine A

    2004-08-15

    We obtained clear and reproducible MR fluoroscopic images and temperature maps for MR image-guided microwave ablation of liver tumors under general anesthesia without suspending the artificial ventilation. Respiratory information was directly obtained from air-way pressure without a sensor on the chest wall. The trigger signal started scanning of one whole image with a spoiled gradient echo sequence. The delay time before the start of scanning was adjusted to acquire the data corresponding to the k-space center at the maximal expiratory phase. The triggered images were apparently clearer than the nontriggered ones and the location of the liver was consistent, which made targeting of the tumor easy. MR temperature images, which were highly susceptible to the movement of the liver, during microwave ablation using a proton resonance frequency method, could be obtained without suspending the artificial ventilation. Respiratory triggering technique was found to be useful for MR fluoroscopic images and MR temperature monitoring in MR-guided microwave ablation of liver tumors under general anesthesia.

  16. [Techniques of thermal ablation in primary hepatic carcinoma and metastatic tumors of colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Rudzki, Sławomir; Jamroz, Adam

    2004-01-01

    Liver metastases develop in 30-50 per cent of patients with colorectal cancer. Without treatment, the median survival is approximately 7 months. Recent results from multiple investigations indicate that several minimally invasive treatment techniques are very effective for treating primary and secondary malignant hepatic tumors and they may replace surgical resection in the near future. Thermal ablation techniques for the treatment of primary and secondary malignant hepatic tumors include both freezing (cryoablation) and heating (microwave, laser, and high-intensity focused ultrasound) are characterized in this article.

  17. Imaging Features of Radiofrequency Ablation with Heat-Deployed Liposomal Doxorubicin in Hepatic Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Cheng William Chow, Lucy; Turkbey, Evrim B.; Lencioni, Riccardo; Libutti, Steven K.; Wood, Bradford J.

    2016-03-15

    IntroductionThe imaging features of unresectable hepatic malignancies in patients who underwent radiofrequency ablation (RFA) in combination with lyso-thermosensitive liposomal doxorubicin (LTLD) were determined.Materials and MethodsA phase I dose escalation study combining RFA with LTLD was performed with peri- and post- procedural CT and MRI. Imaging features were analyzed and measured in terms of ablative zone size and surrounding penumbra size. The dynamic imaging appearance was described qualitatively immediately following the procedure and at 1-month follow-up. The control group receiving liver RFA without LTLD was compared to the study group in terms of imaging features and post-ablative zone size dynamics at follow-up.ResultsPost-treatment scans of hepatic lesions treated with RFA and LTLD have distinctive imaging characteristics when compared to those treated with RFA alone. The addition of LTLD resulted in a regular or smooth enhancing rim on T1W MRI which often correlated with increased attenuation on CT. The LTLD-treated ablation zones were stable or enlarged at follow-up four weeks later in 69 % of study subjects as opposed to conventional RFA where the ablation zone underwent involution compared to imaging acquired immediately after the procedure.ConclusionThe imaging features following RFA with LTLD were different from those after standard RFA and can mimic residual or recurrent tumor. Knowledge of the subtle findings between the two groups can help avoid misinterpretation and proper identification of treatment failure in this setting. Increased size of the LTLD-treated ablation zone after RFA suggests the ongoing drug-induced biological effects.

  18. Evaluation of a Novel Thermal Accelerant for Augmentation of Microwave Energy during Image-guided Tumor Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Park, William Keun Chan; Maxwell, Aaron Wilhelm Palmer; Frank, Victoria Elizabeth; Primmer, Michael Patrick; Collins, Scott Andrew; Baird, Grayson Luderman; Dupuy, Damian Edward

    2017-01-01

    The primary challenge in thermal ablation of liver tumors (e.g. hepatocellular carcinoma and hepatic colorectal cancer) is the relatively high recurrence rate (~30%) for which incomplete ablation at the periphery of the tumor is the most common reason. In an attempt to overcome this, we have developed a novel thermal accelerant (TA) agent capable of augmenting microwave energy from a distance normally unattainable by a single microwave ablation antenna. This cesium-based block co-polymer compound transforms from a liquid to a gel at body temperature and is intrinsically visible by computed tomography. Using an agarose phantom model, herein we demonstrate that both the rate and magnitude of temperature increase during microwave ablation were significantly greater in the presence of TA when compared with controls. These results suggest robust augmentation of microwave energy, and may translate into larger ablation zone volumes within biologic tissues. Further work using in vivo techniques is necessary to confirm these findings. PMID:28382173

  19. Chronic Atrial Fibrillation Ablation with Harmonic Scalpel during Mitral Valve Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Brick, Alexandre Visconti; Braile, Domingo M.

    2017-01-01

    Objective To evaluate surgical treatment of chronic atrial fibrillation with ultrasound in patients with mitral valve disease, considering preoperative clinical characteristics of patients undergoing surgical procedure and follow-up in the immediate postoperative period, in hospital and up to 60 months after discharge. Methods We studied 100 patients with chronic atrial fibrillation and mitral valve disease who underwent surgical treatment using ultrasound ablation. Patient data were reviewed by consulting the control reports, including signs and symptoms, underlying disease, functional class, hospital stay, surgical procedure time, ablation time, immediate complications, and complications at discharged and up to 60 months later. Actuarial curve (Kaplan-Meier) was used for the study of permanence without recurrence after 12, 24, 36, 48 and 60 months. Results 86% of the patients had rheumatic mitral valve disease, 14% had degeneration of the mitral valve, 40% had mitral regurgitation, and 36% had mitral stenosis. Main symptoms included palpitations related to tachycardia by chronic atrial fibrillation (70%), congestive heart failure (70%), and previous episodes of acute pulmonary edema (27%). Early results showed that 94% of the patients undergoing ultrasound ablation reversed the rate of chronic atrial fibrillation, 86% being in sinus rhythm and 8% in atrioventricular block. At hospital discharge, maintenance of sinus rhythm was observed in 86% of patients and there was recurrence of chronic atrial fibrillation in 8% of patients. At follow-up after 60 months, 83.8% of patients maintained the sinus rhythm. Conclusion Surgical treatment of chronic atrial fibrillation with ultrasound concomitant with mitral valve surgery is feasible and satisfactory, with maintenance of sinus rhythm in most patients (83.8%) after 60 months of follow-up.

  20. Lung Tumors Treated With Percutaneous Radiofrequency Ablation: Computed Tomography Imaging Follow-Up

    SciTech Connect

    Palussiere, Jean Marcet, Benjamin; Descat, Edouard; Deschamps, Frederic; Rao, Pramod; Ravaud, Alain; Brouste, Veronique; Baere, Thierry de

    2011-10-15

    Purpose: To describe the morphologic evolution of lung tumors treated with radiofrequency ablation (RFA) by way of computed tomography (CT) images and to investigate patterns of incomplete RFA at the site of ablation. Materials and Methods: One hundred eighty-nine patients with 350 lung tumors treated with RFA underwent CT imaging at 2, 4, 6, and 12 months. CT findings were interpreted separately by two reviewers with consensus. Five different radiologic patterns were predefined: fibrosis, cavitation, nodule, atelectasis, and disappearance. The appearance of the treated area was evaluated at each follow-up CT using the predefined patterns. Results: At 1 year after treatment, the most common evolutions were fibrosis (50.5%) or nodules (44.8%). Differences were noted depending on the initial size of the tumor, with fibrosis occurring more frequently for tumors <2 cm (58.6% vs. 22.9%, P = 1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5}). Cavitation and atelectasis were less frequent patterns (2.4% and 1.4%, respectively, at 1 year). Tumor location (intraparenchymatous, with pleural contact <50% or >50%) was not significantly correlated with follow-up image pattern. Local tumor progressions were observed with each type of evolution. At 1 year, 12 local recurrences were noted: 2 cavitations, which represented 40% of the cavitations noted at 1 year; 2 fibroses (1.9%); 7 nodules (7.4%); and 1 atelectasis (33.3%). Conclusion: After RFA of lung tumors, follow-up CT scans show that the shape of the treatment zone can evolve in five different patterns. None of these patterns, however, can confirm the absence of further local tumor progression at subsequent follow-up.

  1. Image-guided tumor ablation: standardization of terminology and reporting criteria.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, S Nahum; Grassi, Clement J; Cardella, John F; Charboneau, J William; Dodd, Gerald D; Dupuy, Damian E; Gervais, Debra A; Gillams, Alice R; Kane, Robert A; Lee, Fred T; Livraghi, Tito; McGahan, John; Phillips, David A; Rhim, Hyunchul; Silverman, Stuart G; Solbiati, Luigi; Vogl, Thomas J; Wood, Bradford J; Vedantham, Suresh; Sacks, David

    2009-07-01

    The field of interventional oncology with use of image-guided tumor ablation requires standardization of terminology and reporting criteria to facilitate effective communication of ideas and appropriate comparison between treatments that use different technologies, such as chemical (ethanol or acetic acid) ablation, and thermal therapies, such as radiofrequency (RF), laser, microwave, ultrasound, and cryoablation. This document provides a framework that will hopefully facilitate the clearest communication between investigators and will provide the greatest flexibility in comparison between the many new, exciting, and emerging technologies. An appropriate vehicle for reporting the various aspects of image-guided ablation therapy, including classification of therapies and procedure terms, appropriate descriptors of imaging guidance, and terminology to define imaging and pathologic findings, are outlined. Methods for standardizing the reporting of follow-up findings and complications and other important aspects that require attention when reporting clinical results are addressed. It is the group's intention that adherence to the recommendations will facilitate achievement of the group's main objective: improved precision and communication in this field that lead to more accurate comparison of technologies and results and, ultimately, to improved patient outcomes. The intent of this standardization of terminology is to provide an appropriate vehicle for reporting the various aspects of image-guided ablation therapy.

  2. Non-Rigid Registration of Liver CT Images for CT-Guided Ablation of Liver Tumors.

    PubMed

    Luu, Ha Manh; Klink, Camiel; Niessen, Wiro; Moelker, Adriaan; Walsum, Theo van

    2016-01-01

    CT-guided percutaneous ablation for liver cancer treatment is a relevant technique for patients not eligible for surgery and with tumors that are inconspicuous on US imaging. The lack of real-time imaging and the use of a limited amount of CT contrast agent make targeting the tumor with the needle challenging. In this study, we evaluate a registration framework that allows the integration of diagnostic pre-operative contrast enhanced CT images and intra-operative non-contrast enhanced CT images to improve image guidance in the intervention. The liver and tumor are segmented in the pre-operative contrast enhanced CT images. Next, the contrast enhanced image is registered to the intra-operative CT images in a two-stage approach. First, the contrast-enhanced diagnostic image is non-rigidly registered to a non-contrast enhanced image that is conventionally acquired at the start of the intervention. In case the initial registration is not sufficiently accurate, a refinement step is applied using non-rigid registration method with a local rigidity term. In the second stage, the intra-operative CT-images that are used to check the needle position, which often consist of only a few slices, are registered rigidly to the intra-operative image that was acquired at the start of the intervention. Subsequently, the diagnostic image is registered to the current intra-operative image, using both transformations, this allows the visualization of the tumor region extracted from pre-operative data in the intra-operative CT images containing needle. The method is evaluated on imaging data of 19 patients at the Erasmus MC. Quantitative evaluation is performed using the Dice metric, mean surface distance of the liver border and corresponding landmarks in the diagnostic and the intra-operative images. The registration of the diagnostic CT image to the initial intra-operative CT image did not require a refinement step in 13 cases. For those cases, the resulting registration had a Dice

  3. Non-Rigid Registration of Liver CT Images for CT-Guided Ablation of Liver Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Luu, Ha Manh; Klink, Camiel; Niessen, Wiro; Moelker, Adriaan; van Walsum, Theo

    2016-01-01

    CT-guided percutaneous ablation for liver cancer treatment is a relevant technique for patients not eligible for surgery and with tumors that are inconspicuous on US imaging. The lack of real-time imaging and the use of a limited amount of CT contrast agent make targeting the tumor with the needle challenging. In this study, we evaluate a registration framework that allows the integration of diagnostic pre-operative contrast enhanced CT images and intra-operative non-contrast enhanced CT images to improve image guidance in the intervention. The liver and tumor are segmented in the pre-operative contrast enhanced CT images. Next, the contrast enhanced image is registered to the intra-operative CT images in a two-stage approach. First, the contrast-enhanced diagnostic image is non-rigidly registered to a non-contrast enhanced image that is conventionally acquired at the start of the intervention. In case the initial registration is not sufficiently accurate, a refinement step is applied using non-rigid registration method with a local rigidity term. In the second stage, the intra-operative CT-images that are used to check the needle position, which often consist of only a few slices, are registered rigidly to the intra-operative image that was acquired at the start of the intervention. Subsequently, the diagnostic image is registered to the current intra-operative image, using both transformations, this allows the visualization of the tumor region extracted from pre-operative data in the intra-operative CT images containing needle. The method is evaluated on imaging data of 19 patients at the Erasmus MC. Quantitative evaluation is performed using the Dice metric, mean surface distance of the liver border and corresponding landmarks in the diagnostic and the intra-operative images. The registration of the diagnostic CT image to the initial intra-operative CT image did not require a refinement step in 13 cases. For those cases, the resulting registration had a Dice

  4. Ablation of Cbl-b provides protection against transplanted and spontaneous tumors

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Jeffrey Y.; Jang, Ihn Kyung; Hodes, Richard; Gu, Hua

    2007-01-01

    A significant challenge to efforts aimed at inducing effective antitumor immune responses is that CD8+ T cells, which play a prominent role in these responses, may be unable to respond to tumors that lack costimulatory signals and that are protected by an immune suppressive environment such as that mediated by TGF-β produced by tumor cells themselves or by infiltrating Tregs, often resulting in tolerance or anergy of tumor-specific T cells. Here we show that the in vitro activation of Cblb–/– CD8+ T cells does not depend on CD28 costimulation and is resistant to TGF-β suppression. In vivo studies further demonstrated that Cblb–/– mice, but not WT controls, efficiently rejected inoculated E.G7 and EL4 lymphomas that did not express B7 ligands and that introduction of the Cblb–/– mutation into tumor-prone ataxia telangiectasia mutated–deficient mice markedly reduced the incidence of spontaneous thymic lymphomas. Immunohistological study showed that E.G7 tumors from Cblb–/– mice contained massively infiltrating CD8+ T cells. Adoptive transfer of purified Cblb–/– CD8+ T cells into E.G7 tumor-bearing mice led to efficient eradication of established tumors. Thus, our data indicate that ablation of Cbl-b can be an efficient strategy for eliciting immune responses against both inoculated and spontaneous tumors. PMID:17364027

  5. Ultrasound-directed robotic system for thermal ablation of liver tumors: a preliminary report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jian; Tian, Jie; Dai, Yakang; Zhang, Xing; Dong, Di; Xu, Min

    2010-03-01

    Thermal ablation has been proved safe and effective as the treatment for liver tumors that are not suitable for resection. Currently, manually performed thermal ablation is greatly dependent on the surgeon's acupuncture manipulation against hand tremor. Besides that, inaccurate or inappropriate placement of the applicator will also directly decrease the final treatment effect. In order to reduce the influence of hand tremor, and provide an accurate and appropriate guidance for a better treatment, we develop an ultrasound-directed robotic system for thermal ablation of liver tumors. In this paper, we will give a brief preliminary report of our system. Especially, three innovative techniques are proposed to solve the critical problems in our system: accurate ultrasound calibration when met with artifacts, realtime reconstruction with visualization using Graphic Processing Unit (GPU) acceleration and 2D-3D ultrasound image registration. To reduce the error of point extraction with artifacts, we propose a novel point extraction method by minimizing an error function which is defined based on the geometric property of our N-fiducial phantom. Then realtime reconstruction with visualization using GPU acceleration is provided for fast 3D ultrasound volume acquisition with dynamic display of reconstruction progress. After that, coarse 2D-3D ultrasound image registration is performed based on landmark points correspondences, followed by accurate 2D-3D ultrasound image registration based on Euclidean distance transform (EDT). The effectiveness of our proposed techniques is demonstrated in phantom experiments.

  6. Visualization tool for improved accuracy in needle placement during percutaneous radio-frequency ablation of liver tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stüdeli, Thomas; Kalkofen, Denis; Risholm, Petter; Ali, Wajid; Freudenthal, Adinda; Samset, Eigil

    2008-03-01

    The European research network "Augmented reality in Surgery" (ARIS*ER) developed a system that supports percutaneous radio frequency ablation of liver tumors. The system provides interventionists, during placement and insertion of the RFA needle, with information from pre-operative CT images and real-time tracking data. A visualization tool has been designed that aims to support (1) exploration of the abdomen, (2) planning of needle trajectory and (3) insertion of the needle in the most efficient way. This work describes a first evaluation of the system, where user performances and feedback of two visualization concepts of the tool - needle view and user view - are compared. After being introduced to the system, ten subjects performed three needle placements with both concepts. Task fulfillment rate, time for completion of task, special incidences, accuracy of needle placement recorded and analyzed. The results show ambiguous results with beneficial and less favorable effects on user performance and workload of both concepts. Effects depend on characteristics of intra-operative tasks as well as on task complexities depending on tumor location. The results give valuable input for the next design steps.

  7. Application value of computer assisted surgery system in precision surgeries for pediatric complex liver tumors

    PubMed Central

    Su, Lin; Zhou, Xian-Jun; Dong, Qian; Zhang, Hong; Shen, Feng; Chen, Yong-Jian; Hao, Xi-Wei; Li, Xiao-Fei

    2015-01-01

    We discussed the diagnostic and treatment value and clinical significance of computer assisted surgery system (Higemi) in precision surgeries for pediatric complex liver tumors. A total of 21 pediatric cases receiving hepatectomy for tumors in the portal vein and giant liver tumors from June 2012 to January 2015 were analyzed. Higemi was used for 3-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of thin-slice CT images and surgical planning. Tumors were precisely located and blood vessel neighborhood was determined so as to evaluate surgical feasibility. In addition, pathological classification, surgical time, intraoperative blood loss, transfusion rate and complications were predicted. After 3D reconstruction using Higemi, the neighboring relationship of tumors with blood vessels and the running direction of the blood vessels were clearly visualized. Of 21 cases, 10 cases had tumors located in the left lobe, 5 cases in the right lobe, 3 cases showing involvement of right trilobes, and 3 cases in the middle lobe. Lobes exceeding one third of the total liver volume were resected in 18 cases. Postoperative pathological examination indicated 10 cases of hepatoblastoma, 3 cases of hepatocellular carcinoma, 3 cases of hamartoma, 3 cases of infantile hemangioendothelioma, 1 case of teratoma and 1 case of undifferentiated malignant mesenchymoma. The surgical time was 90-240 min with an average of 130 min; the medium intraoperative blood loss was 60 ml and the minimum blood loss was 3 ml; the transfusion rate was 42.9% (9/21). Surgeries were successful in 20 cases, who were discharged after recovery. However, one case had giant liver tumor combined with severe obstructive jaundice and hepatic insufficiency and died of postoperative liver failure and DIC. 3D reconstruction of CT data using Higemi can clearly visualize the running direction of blood vessels and the neighboring relationship with tumors. Higemi can improve the precision and safety of complex hepatectomy. PMID:26770445

  8. Radiofrequency Ablation of Lung Tumors in Swine Assisted by a Navigation Device with Pre-procedural Volumetric Planning

    PubMed Central

    Banovac, Filip; Cheng, Patrick; Campos-Nanez, Enrique; Kallakury, Bhaskar; Popa, Teo; Wilson, Emmanuel; Abeledo, Hernan; Cleary, Kevin

    2009-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of the study was to develop an image guidance system that incorporates volumetric planning of spherical ablations and electromagnetic tracking of radiofrequency electrodes during insertion. Methods Simulated tumors were created in 3 live swine by percutaneously injecting agar nodules into the lung. A treatment plan was devised for each tumor using our optimization software to solve the planning problem. The desired output was the minimum number of overlapping ablation spheres necessary to ablate each tumor and the margin. The insertion plan was executed using the electromagnetic tracking system that guided the insertion of the probe into pre-computed locations. After a 72 hour survival, histopathologic sections of the tissue were examined for cell viability and burn pattern analysis. Results A planning algorithm to spherically cover the tumors and the margin was computed. Electromagnetic tracking allowed successful insertion of the instrument and impedance roll-off was reached in all ablations. Depending on their size, the tumors and the tumor margins were successfully covered with 2 to 4 ablation spheres. The image registration error was 1.0 ± 0.64mm. The overall error of probe insertion was 9.4 ± 3.0mm (n=8). Histopathologic sections confirmed successful ablations of the tissue. Conclusions Computer assisted RF ablation planning and electromagnetically tracked probe insertion were successful in 3 swine, thus validating the feasibility of electromagnetic tracking assisted tumor targeting. Image mis-registration due to respiratory motion and tissue deformation contributed to the overall error of probe insertion. PMID:19939704

  9. Imaging Intratumoral Nanoparticle Uptake after Combining Nanoembolization with Various Ablative Therapies in Hepatic VX2 Rabbit Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Tam, Alda L; Melancon, Marites P.; Abdelsalam, Mohamed; Figueira, Tomas Appleton; Dixon, Katherine; McWatters, Amanda; Zhou, Min; Huang, Qian; Mawlawi, Osama; Dunner, Kenneth; Li, Chun; Gupta, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    Combining image-guided therapy techniques for the treatment of liver cancers is a strategy that is being used to improve local tumor control rates. Here, we evaluate the intratumoral uptake of nanoparticles used in combination with radiofrequency ablation (RFA), irreversible electroporation (IRE), or laser induced thermal therapy (LITT). Eight rabbits with VX2 tumor in the liver underwent one of four treatments: (i) nanoembolization (NE) with radiolabeled, hollow gold nanoparticles loaded with doxorubicin (64Cu-PEG-HAuNS-DOX); (ii) NE+RFA; (iii) NE+IRE; (iv) NE+LITT. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) imaging was obtained 1-hr or 18-hrs after intervention. Tissue samples were collected for autoradiography and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis. PET/CT imaging at 1-hr showed focal deposition of oil and nanoparticles in the tumor only after NE+RFA but at 18-hrs, all animals had focal accumulation of oil and nanoparticles in the tumor region. Autoradiograph analysis demonstrated nanoparticle deposition in the tumor and in the ablated tissues adjacent to the tumor when NE was combined with ablation. TEM results showed the intracellular uptake of nanoparticles in tumor only after NE+IRE. Nanoparticles demonstrated a structural change, suggesting direct interaction, potentially leading to drug release, only after NE+LITT. The findings demonstrate that a combined NE and ablation treatment technique for liver tumors is feasible, resulting in deposition of nanoparticles in and around the tumor. Depending on the ablative energy applied, different effects are seen on nanoparticle localization and structure. These effects should be considered when designing nanoparticles for use in combination with ablation technologies. PMID:27305763

  10. Visualization of risk structures for interactive planning of image guided radiofrequency ablation of liver tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieder, Christian; Schwier, Michael; Weihusen, Andreas; Zidowitz, Stephan; Peitgen, Heinz-Otto

    2009-02-01

    Image guided radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is becoming a standard procedure as a minimally invasive method for tumor treatment in the clinical routine. The visualization of pathological tissue and potential risk structures like vessels or important organs gives essential support in image guided pre-interventional RFA planning. In this work our aim is to present novel visualization techniques for interactive RFA planning to support the physician with spatial information of pathological structures as well as the finding of trajectories without harming vitally important tissue. Furthermore, we illustrate three-dimensional applicator models of different manufactures combined with corresponding ablation areas in homogenous tissue, as specified by the manufacturers, to enhance the estimated amount of cell destruction caused by ablation. The visualization techniques are embedded in a workflow oriented application, designed for the use in the clinical routine. To allow a high-quality volume rendering we integrated a visualization method using the fuzzy c-means algorithm. This method automatically defines a transfer function for volume visualization of vessels without the need of a segmentation mask. However, insufficient visualization results of the displayed vessels caused by low data quality can be improved using local vessel segmentation in the vicinity of the lesion. We also provide an interactive segmentation technique of liver tumors for the volumetric measurement and for the visualization of pathological tissue combined with anatomical structures. In order to support coagulation estimation with respect to the heat-sink effect of the cooling blood flow which decreases thermal ablation, a numerical simulation of the heat distribution is provided.

  11. Multimodal treatment of gastrointestinal tract tumors: consequences for surgery.

    PubMed

    Siewert, J Rüdiger; Stein, Hubert J; von Rahden, Burkhard H A

    2005-08-01

    Formerly an exclusive business of surgery, gastrointestinal (GI) tumors are nowadays increasingly approached with multimodal strategies. Neoadjuvant concepts have had a particularly far-reaching impact on surgery and have contributed to improved survival. Modern pre-treatment staging and risk assessment provide the basis for decision on one of three general treatment concepts (1) Early cancers, confined to the mucosal/submucosal layers, are approached with primary surgery, without prior antineoplastic therapy. (2) Systemically metastasized tumors receive merely palliative treatment. (3) Locally advanced cancers are increasingly approached with neoadjuvant strategies. The benefit from these preoperative protocols is proven for diverse entities, but is evidently confined to a specific subgroup patients, i.e., the responders to neoadjuvant treatment. These are the ones benefiting most from subsequent surgical resection, which is required to ensure complete removal of the residual tumor tissue, as complete tumor regression occurs very rarely and cannot be proven without a specimen. The fact that responders will benefit and non-responders will not benefit or will even deteriorate during the neoadjuvant treatment makes early response prediction most demanding. An amazing new approach is the use of position emission tomography with fluro-desoxyglucose (FDG-PET) to assess the "metabolic response," which is possible as early as 14 days after initiation of the neoadjuvant protocol. This strategy offers the chance for modulating the surgical approach in accord i.e., with such metrobolic response termination of the protocol and proceeding to resection in the case of nonresponse. The future of GI cancer surgery is multimodal therapy in a response-based fashion and requires reponse-based trials for further evaluation.

  12. Novel Percutaneous Radiofrequency Ablation of Portal Vein Tumor Thrombus: Safety and Feasibility

    SciTech Connect

    Mizandari, Malkhaz; Ao, Guokun; Zhang Yaojun; Feng Xi; Shen Qiang; Chen Minshan; Lau, Wan Yee; Nicholls, Joanna; Jiao Long; Habib, Nagy

    2013-02-15

    We report our experience of the safety of partial recanalization of the portal vein using a novel endovascular radiofrequency (RF) catheter for portal vein tumor thrombosis. Six patients with liver cancer and tumor thrombus in the portal vein underwent percutaneous intravascular radiofrequency ablation (RFA) using an endovascular bipolar RF device. A 0.035-inch guidewire was introduced into a tributary of the portal vein and through which a 5G guide catheter was introduced into the main portal vein. After manipulation of the guide catheter over the thrombus under digital subtraction angiography, the endovascular RF device was inserted and activated around the thrombus. There were no observed technique specific complications, such as hemorrhage, vessel perforation, or infection. Post-RFA portography showed partial recanalization of portal vein. RFA of portal vein tumor thrombus in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma is technically feasible and warrants further investigation to assess efficacy compared with current recanalization techniques.

  13. The Mid-Term Results of Patients who Underwent Radiofrequency Atrial Fibrillation Ablation Together with Mitral Valve Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Çolak, Abdurrahim; Kaya, Ugur; Ceviz, Munacettin; Becit, Necip; Kocak, Hikmet

    2016-01-01

    Objetive Saline-irrigated radiofrequency ablation, which has been widely used for surgical treatment of atrial fibrillation in recent years, is 80-90% successful in achieving sinus rhythm. In our study, our surgical experience and mid-term results in patients who underwent mitral valve surgery and left atrial radiofrequency ablation were analyzed. Methods Forty patients (15 males, 25 females; mean age 52.05±9.9 years; range 32-74) underwent surgery for atrial fibrillation associated with mitral valvular disease. All patients manifested atrial fibrillation, which started at least six months before the surgical intervention. The majority of patients (36 patients, 90%) were in NYHA class III; 34 (85%) patients had rheumatic heart disease. In addition to mitral valve surgery and radiofrequency ablation, coronary artery bypass, DeVega tricuspid annuloplasty, left ventricular aneurysm repair, and left atrial thrombus excision were performed. Following discharge from the hospital, patients' follow-up was performed as outpatient clinic examinations and the average follow-up period of patients was 18±3 months. Results While the incidence of sinus rhythm was 85.3% on the first postoperative day, it was 80% during discharge and 71% in the 1st year follow-up examination. Conclusion Radiofrequency ablation is an effective method when it is performed by appropriate surgical technique. Its rate for returning to sinus rhythm is as high as the rate of conventional surgical procedure. PMID:27849303

  14. Alternatives to excimer laser refractive surgery: UV and mid-infrared laser ablation of intraocular lenses and porcine cornea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serafetinides, A. A.; Makropoulou, M.; Spyratou, E.; Bacharis, C.

    2007-03-01

    Despite the fact that the laser applications in human ophthalmology are well established, further research is still required, for better and predictable ablation dosimetry on both cornea tissue and intraocular lenses. Further studies for alternative laser sources to the well established excimer lasers, such as UV or mid-infrared solid state lasers, have been proposed for refractive surgery. The precise lens ablation requires the use of laser wavelengths possessing a small optical penetration depth in the cornea and in the synthetic lenses, in order to confine the laser energy deposition to a small volume. In order to eliminate some very well known problems concerning the reshaping of cornea and the modification of the optical properties of the intraocular lenses, ablation experiments of ex vivo porcine cornea, acrylic PMMA and hydrophilic lenses were conducted with an Er:YAG laser (2.94 μm) and the fifth harmonic of a Nd:YAG laser (213 nm). The morphology of cornea was recorded using a cornea topography system before and immediately after the ablation. Histology analysis of the specimens was obtained, in order to examine the microscopic appearance of the ablated craters and the existence of any thermal damage caused by the mid-infrared and UV laser irradiation. The macroscopic morphology of the intraocular lens craters was inspected with an optical transmission microscope. Measurements of the ablation rates of the lenses were performed and simulated by a mathematical model.

  15. Incidence and types of complications after ablative oral cancer surgery with primary microvascular free flap reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Lodders, Johannes N.; Parmar, Satyesh; Stienen, Niki LM.; Martin, Timothy J.; Karagozoglu, K. Hakki; Heymans, Martijn W.; Nandra, Baljeet

    2015-01-01

    Background The aims of the study were 1) to evaluate the incidence and types of postoperative complications after ablative oral cancer surgery with primary free flap reconstruction and 2) identify prognostic variables for postoperative complications. Material and Methods Desired data was retrieved from a computer database at the department of Oral and Maxillofacial Department, Queen Elisabeth hospital Birmingham, United Kingdom, between June 2007 and October 2012. Logistic regression was used to study relationships between preoperative variables and postoperative outcomes. Results The study population consisted 184 patients, comprising 189 composite resections with reconstruction. Complications developed in 40.2% of the patients. Three patients (1.6%) died, 11.1% returned to the operating room, 5.3% developed donor site complications and 6.9% flap complications of which 3.2% total flap failure. In the multivariable analysis systemic complications were associated with anaesthesia time and hospital stay with red cell transfusion. Conclusions A significant proportion of the patients with primary free flap reconstructions after oral cancer surgery develops postoperative complications. Prolonged anaesthesia time and red cell transfusion are possible predictors for systemic complications and hospital stay respectively. Preoperative screening for risk factors is advocated for patient selection and to have realistic information and expectations. Key words:Free flap, complications, oral cancer, risk factors, reconstruction. PMID:26116846

  16. The role of focal liver ablation in the treatment of unresectable primary and secondary malignant liver tumors.

    PubMed

    Gannon, Christopher J; Curley, Steven A

    2005-10-01

    Surgical resection is often the first-line treatment option for primary and select metastatic hepatic malignancies. A minority of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma undergo potentially curative resection. Similarly, patients with liver-only metastasis are candidates for resection less than 15% of the time because of bilobar disease in which resection would sacrifice too great a volume of hepatic parenchyma, tumor proximity to major vascular or biliary structures thus preventing adequate margins, or unfavorable tumor biology. Ablative techniques directed at tumor elimination while minimizing injury to the surrounding functional hepatic parenchyma may be offered to select patients with unresectable cancers. Radiofrequency ablation, percutaneous ethanol injection, transarterial chemoembolization, cryoablation, microwave coagulation, and laser-induced interstitial thermotherapy all offer potential local tumor control and occasionally achieve long-term disease-free survival. This review focuses on the indications, anticipated benefits, and limitations of these ablative techniques.

  17. Surgical strategies for managing foraminal nerve sheath tumors: the emerging role of CyberKnife ablation.

    PubMed

    Murovic, Judith A; Charles Cho, S; Park, Jon

    2010-02-01

    Sixteen Stanford University Medical Center (SUMC) patients with foraminal nerve sheath tumors had charts reviewed. CyberKnife radiosurgery was innovative in management. Parameters were evaluated for 16 foraminal nerve sheath tumors undergoing surgery, some with CyberKnife. Three neurofibromas had associated neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). Eleven patients had one resection; others had CyberKnife after one (two) and two (three) operations. The malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST) had prior field-radiation and adds another case. Approaches included laminotomy and laminectomies with partial (three) or total (two) facetectomies/fusions. Two cases each had supraclavicular, lateral extracavitary, retroperitoneal and Wiltze and costotransversectomy/thoracotomy procedures. Two underwent a laminectomy/partial facetectomy, then CyberKnife. Pre-CyberKnife, one of two others had a laminectomy/partial facetectomy, then total facetectomy/fusion and the other, two supraclavicular approaches. The MPNST had a hemi-laminotomy then laminectomy/total facetectomy/fusion, followed by CyberKnife. Roots were preserved, except in two. Of 11 single-operation-peripheral nerve sheath tumors, the asymptomatic case remained stable, nine (92%) improved and one (9%) worsened. Examinations remained intact in three (27%) and improved in seven (64%). Two having a single operation then CyberKnife had improvement after both. Of two undergoing two operations, one had symptom resolution post-operatively, worsened 4 years post-CyberKnife then has remained unchanged after re-operation. The other such patient improved post-operatively, had no change after re-operation and improved post-CyberKnife. The MPNST had presentation improvement after the first operation, worsened and after the second surgery \\and CyberKnife, the patient expired from tumor spread. In conclusion, surgery is beneficial for pain relief and function preservation in foraminal nerve sheath tumors. Open surgery with Cyber

  18. Artificial pleural effusion in percutaneous microwave ablation of hepatic tumors near the diaphragm under the guidance of ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Gang; Sun, Yao; Cong, Lin; Jing, Xuehong; Yu, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the feasibility, safety and efficacy of artificial pleural effusion in percutaneous microwave ablation of hepatic tumors near the diaphragm under ultrasound guidance. Methods: For localization and navigation of tumors near the dome of the diaphragm by ultrasound during microwave ablation in 14 tumors of 11 cases, artificial pleural effusion was performed in the volume of 1000~1500 ml of Normal saline or 5% Glucose injection solution via the right thoracic cavity. The tumor marker, AFP was monitored before and after operation in 6 times in a period of 2 years. We analyzed the successful rate and effectiveness of artificial pleural effusion. Results: The successful rate of artificial pleural effusion was 100% without complications. Artificial hydrothorax on the right eliminated the interference of intrapulmonary gas to the visualization of hepatic tumors near the diaphragm on ultrasound. In the follow-up of 2 years, the ablation rate reached to 92.9% with no serious complications. The AFP value before operation was in significant statistical difference with the others after operation (P = 0.000). Conclusions: Artificial pleural effusion aids the visualization of hepatic tumors near the diaphragm on ultrasound. A good therapeutic effectiveness can be reached in percutaneous microwave ablation of tumors in the hepatic dome under the guidance of ultrasound. PMID:26629218

  19. Gold-Nanoclustered Hyaluronan Nano-Assemblies for Photothermally Maneuvered Photodynamic Tumor Ablation.

    PubMed

    Han, Hwa Seung; Choi, Ki Young; Lee, Hansang; Lee, Minchang; An, Jae Yoon; Shin, Sol; Kwon, Seunglee; Lee, Doo Sung; Park, Jae Hyung

    2016-12-27

    Optically active nanomaterials have shown great promise as a nanomedicine platform for photothermal or photodynamic cancer therapies. Herein, we report a gold-nanoclustered hyaluronan nanoassembly (GNc-HyNA) for photothermally boosted photodynamic tumor ablation. Unlike other supramolecular gold constructs based on gold nanoparticle building blocks, this system utilizes the nanoassembly of amphiphilic hyaluronan conjugates as a drug carrier for a hydrophobic photodynamic therapy agent verteporfin, a polymeric reducing agent, and an organic nanoscaffold upon which gold can grow. Gold nanoclusters were selectively installed on the outer shell of the hyaluronan nanoassembly, forming a gold shell. Given the dual protection effect by the hyaluronan self-assembly as well as by the inorganic gold shell, verteporfin-encapsulated GNc-HyNA (Vp-GNc-HyNA) exhibited outstanding stability in the bloodstream. Interestingly, the fluorescence and photodynamic properties of Vp-GNc-HyNA were considerably quenched due to the gold nanoclusters covering the surface of the nanoassemblies; however, photothermal activation by 808 nm laser irradiation induced a significant increase in temperature, which empowered the PDT effect of Vp-GNc-HyNA. Furthermore, fluorescence and photodynamic effects were recovered far more rapidly in cancer cells due to certain intracellular enzymes, particularly hyaluronidases and glutathione. Vp-GNc-HyNA exerted a great potential to treat tumors both in vitro and in vivo. Tumors were completely ablated with a 100% survival rate and complete skin regeneration over the 50 days following Vp-GNc-HyNA treatment in an orthotopic breast tumor model. Our results suggest that photothermally boosted photodynamic therapy using Vp-GNc-HyNA can offer a potent therapeutic means to eradicate tumors.

  20. Surgical strategies for managing foraminal nerve sheath tumors: the emerging role of CyberKnife ablation

    PubMed Central

    Murovic, Judith A.; Charles Cho, S.

    2009-01-01

    Sixteen Stanford University Medical Center (SUMC) patients with foraminal nerve sheath tumors had charts reviewed. CyberKnife radiosurgery was innovative in management. Parameters were evaluated for 16 foraminal nerve sheath tumors undergoing surgery, some with CyberKnife. Three neurofibromas had associated neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). Eleven patients had one resection; others had CyberKnife after one (two) and two (three) operations. The malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST) had prior field-radiation and adds another case. Approaches included laminotomy and laminectomies with partial (three) or total (two) facetectomies/fusions. Two cases each had supraclavicular, lateral extracavitary, retroperitoneal and Wiltze and costotransversectomy/thoracotomy procedures. Two underwent a laminectomy/partial facetectomy, then CyberKnife. Pre-CyberKnife, one of two others had a laminectomy/partial facetectomy, then total facetectomy/fusion and the other, two supraclavicular approaches. The MPNST had a hemi-laminotomy then laminectomy/total facetectomy/fusion, followed by CyberKnife. Roots were preserved, except in two. Of 11 single-operation-peripheral nerve sheath tumors, the asymptomatic case remained stable, nine (92%) improved and one (9%) worsened. Examinations remained intact in three (27%) and improved in seven (64%). Two having a single operation then CyberKnife had improvement after both. Of two undergoing two operations, one had symptom resolution post-operatively, worsened 4 years post-CyberKnife then has remained unchanged after re-operation. The other such patient improved post-operatively, had no change after re-operation and improved post-CyberKnife. The MPNST had presentation improvement after the first operation, worsened and after the second surgery \\and CyberKnife, the patient expired from tumor spread. In conclusion, surgery is beneficial for pain relief and function preservation in foraminal nerve sheath tumors. Open surgery with Cyber

  1. [Using 3.0 T MR to dynamically observe ablated lung tumors after percutaneous cryotherapy therapy].

    PubMed

    Li, J; Qu, J R; Zhang, H K; Xiao, J C; Jiang, L N; Zhao, Y; Li, H L

    2016-09-20

    Objective: To initially explore MRI features and its changing trends including of lung tumors after Argon-Helium cryoablation therapy, and enhance the recognition of MR findings of lung tumors postcryoablation. Methods: Twenty-three cases of patients with twenty six nodules of pulmonary malignance who received Argon-Helium cryoablation therapy in Henan Cancer Hospital from July 2014 to January 2016 were enrolled.All patients underwent unenhanced and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI scans at pre-and 1-day, 1-week, 1-, 3-, 6-, 12-month postcryoablation. Two radiologists independently reviewed MRI images, signal intensity in the ablated zone on T1WI and T2WI were assessed by a 5-point scale.The changing trends of size and signal intensity with time were showed by time-maximum diameter and time-score curve.Time-signal intensity curves based on dynamic enhanced sequence were also performed. Results: Typical MRI findings includes: heterogeneous signal intensity on both T1WI and T2WI at 1-day postcryoablation(26/26, 100%). Hyper-intense on T1WI(22/26, 84.6%) and T2WI(17/26, 65.4%) with a hypo-intense rim at 1-week postcryoablation.Decreasing signal intensity on T1WI(17/26, 65.4%) and increasing signal intensity on T2WI(22/26, 84.6%) at 1-month.Signal intensity declined to the level of muscle on both T1WI(18/26, 69.2%) and T2WI(19/26, 73.1%) at 3-month, nineteen ablated zone turned into patchy shape(19/26, 73.1%). The maximum diameter was largest at 1-day and gradually shrunk with time. The mean score value toped at 1-week and gradually decreased. A straight line type without definite enhancement was found from 1-day to 1-month postcryoablation, an inflow curve with a mild delayed enhancement was seen from 3- to 12- month. Totally 4 recurrence (4/26, 15.4%) all occurred at 3-month and were lack of a complete hypo-intense rim at 1-week postcryoablation. Conclusion: MRI findings of lung tumors postcryoablation are characteristic, a complete hypo-intense rim at 1-week is helpful

  2. [Surgery of metastatic brain tumors with new surgical instruments].

    PubMed

    Nomura, K; Shibui, S; Matsuoka, K; Watanabe, T; Nakamura, O

    1987-05-01

    The risk of damages of neurological function by the operation of metastatic brain tumors was reduced considerably after introduction of neurosurgical apparatuses, such as ultrasonograph, ultrasonic surgical aspirator and laser scalpel. Of these, ultrasonograph is useful to indicate the exact location of brain tumor at real time during the operation. Ultrasonic surgical aspirator reduced the risk of damage on important brain structures due to the selectivity of fragmentation and the safety of the dissection in the vicinity of important vessels and nerve tissues. Laser scalpel is also useful to extirpate the hemorrhagic tumor with hard consistency. Cases introduced in this paper were: case 1, brain metastasis from lung cancer located just under the left motor area in brain; case 2, metastasis with abundant neovascularization from renal cancer to orbital cavity which showed invasion to orbital roof and frontal bone; case 3, radiation induced sarcoma after the treatment of retinoblastoma; case 4, a large cerebellar metastatic tumor; case 5, neurogenic sarcoma which were successfully removed by using one of or combination of ultrasonograph, ultrasonic aspirator and laser scalpel. Advantage of these new instruments for the surgery on metastatic brain tumor was mentioned here. However, it is necessarily to get a custom before we use these apparatuses at operation efficiently.

  3. Factors related to sinus rhythm at discharge after radiofrequency ablation of permanent atrial fibrillation in patients undergoing mitral valve surgery.

    PubMed

    Rostagno, Carlo; Gelsomino, Sandro; Capecchi, Irene; Rossi, Alessandra; Montesi, Gian Franco; Stefàno, Pier Luigi

    2016-04-01

    Late recovery of sinus rhythm is unusual in patients with permanent AF treated by (radiofrequency) RF maze procedure during mitral valve surgery. Identification of clinical and instrumental preoperative factors predictive of early success of RF ablation in patients with permanent AF undergoing mitral valve surgery may improve selection of subjects to obtain long-term results. Hundred and thirty consecutive patients with permanent AF and mitral valve disease underwent modified RF maze procedure during concomitant mitral valve surgery. Rheumatic valve disease (61 pts) and mitral valve prolapse (41 pts) were the more common aetiology of valve abnormalities. Mitral valve replacement was performed in 54 % of patients and mitral valve repair in the remaining 46 %. Four patients died after surgery. At discharge, 87 patients (69 %) were in sinus rhythm (group 1) and 43 patients in AF persisted (group 2). At an average 24-month follow-up, sinus rhythm was present in 67 % of patients, and 33 % were in atrial fibrillation. In this period, late recovery of sinus rhythm was observed only in five patients, while eight discharged in sinus rhythm developed again atrial fibrillation. Among preoperative parameters at univariate analysis female sex, atrial fibrillation >24 months, left atrial diameter >54 mm, left atrial area >24 cm(2), rheumatic valve disease and NYHA class were associated with persistence of AF. At Cox regression multivariate analysis, increased left atrial area (OR 1.07 per unit increase-95 % CI 1.01-1.131) and rheumatic aetiology of valve disease (OR 4.52, 95 % CI 1.65-12.4) were associated with persistence of AF at hospital discharge. Persistence of AF after RF ablation in patients undergoing mitral valve surgery is related to aetiology, e.g. rheumatic valve disease, and to increasing left atrial diameter. Due to low rate of late recovery of sinus rhythm, indication to RF ablation associated with MV surgery should be carefully considered in patients with large

  4. Transoral robotic surgery for sellar tumors: first clinical study.

    PubMed

    Chauvet, Dorian; Hans, Stéphane; Missistrano, Antoine; Rebours, Celeste; Bakkouri, Wissame El; Lot, Guillaume

    2016-12-23

    OBJECTIVE The aim of this study was to confirm the feasibility of an innovative transoral robotic surgery (TORS), using the da Vinci Surgical System, for patients with sellar tumors. This technique was designed to offer a new minimally invasive approach, without soft-palate splitting, that avoids the rhinological side effects of classic endonasal approaches. METHODS The authors performed a prospective study of TORS in patients with symptomatic sellar tumors. Specific anatomical features were required for inclusion in the study and were determined on the basis of preoperative open-mouth CT scans of the brain. The main outcome measure was sellar accessibility using the robot. Resection quality, mean operative time, postoperative changes in patients' vision, side effects, and complications were additionally reported. RESULTS Between February and May 2016, 4 patients (all female, mean age 49.5 years) underwent TORS for resection of sellar tumors as participants in this study. All patients presented with symptomatic visual deficits confirmed as bitemporal hemianopsia. All tumors had a suprasellar portion and a cystic part. In all 4 cases, the operation was performed via TORS, without the need for a second surgery. Sella turcica accessibility was satisfactory in all cases. In 3 cases, tumor resection was complete. The mean operative time was 2 hours 43 minutes. Three patients had a significant visual improvement at Day 1. No rhinological side effects or complications in patients occurred. No pathological examination was performed regarding the fluid component of the tumors. There was 1 postoperative delayed CSF leak and 1 case of transient diabetes insipidus. Side effects specific to TORS included minor sore throat, transient hypernasal speech, and 1 case of delayed otitis media. The mean length of hospital stay and mean follow up were 8.25 days and 82 days, respectively. CONCLUSIONS To our knowledge, this is the first report of the surgical treatment of sellar tumors by

  5. Endometrial ablation

    MedlinePlus

    Hysteroscopy-endometrial ablation; Laser thermal ablation; Endometrial ablation-radiofrequency; Endometrial ablation-thermal balloon ablation; Rollerball ablation; Hydrothermal ablation; Novasure ablation

  6. Emerging Applications of Therapeutic Ultrasound in Neuro-oncology: Moving Beyond Tumor Ablation.

    PubMed

    Hersh, David S; Kim, Anthony J; Winkles, Jeffrey A; Eisenberg, Howard M; Woodworth, Graeme F; Frenkel, Victor

    2016-11-01

    : Transcranial focused ultrasound (FUS) can noninvasively transmit acoustic energy with a high degree of accuracy and safety to targets and regions within the brain. Technological advances, including phased-array transducers and real-time temperature monitoring with magnetic resonance thermometry, have created new opportunities for FUS research and clinical translation. Neuro-oncology, in particular, has become a major area of interest because FUS offers a multifaceted approach to the treatment of brain tumors. FUS has the potential to generate cytotoxicity within tumor tissue, both directly via thermal ablation and indirectly through radiosensitization and sonodynamic therapy; to enhance the delivery of therapeutic agents to brain tumors by transiently opening the blood-brain barrier or improving distribution through the brain extracellular space; and to modulate the tumor microenvironment to generate an immune response. In this review, we describe each of these applications for FUS, the proposed mechanisms of action, and the preclinical and clinical studies that have set the foundation for using FUS in neuro-oncology.

  7. Effect of Surgical Atrial Fibrillation Ablation at the Time of Cardiac Surgery on Risk of Postoperative Pacemaker Implantation.

    PubMed

    El-Chami, Mikhael F; Binongo, José Nilo G; Levy, Mathew; Merchant, Faisal M; Halkos, Michael; Thourani, Vinod; Lattouf, Omar; Guyton, Robert; Puskas, John; Leon, Angel R

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study was to retrospectively investigate whether performing surgical atrial fibrillation (AF) ablation in conjunction with cardiac surgery (CS) increases the risk for postoperative permanent pacemaker (PPM) requirement. The 30-day risk for PPM requirement was analyzed in consecutive patients who underwent CS from January 2007 to August 27, 2013. Patients were divided into 3 groups: (1) those who underwent AF ablation concomitant with CS (AF ABL), (2) patients with any history of AF who underwent surgery who did not undergo ablation (AF NO ABL), and (3) those with no histories of AF who underwent surgery (NO AF). Logistic regression analysis was performed adjusting for age, gender, and surgery type. Of 13,453 CS patients, 353 (3%) were in the AF ABL group, 1,701 (12%) in the AF NO ABL group, and 11,399 (85%) in the NO AF group. A total of 7,651 patients (57%) underwent coronary artery bypass grafting, 4,384 (33%) underwent valve surgery, and 1,418 (10%) underwent coronary artery bypass grafting and valve surgery. The overall PPM risk was 1.6% (212 of 13,453); risk was 5.7% (20 of 353) in the AF ABL group, 3.1% (53 of 1,701) in the AF NO ABL group, and 1.2% (139 of 11,399) in the NO AF group. The unadjusted and adjusted odds of PPM were higher in the AF ABL and AF NO ABL groups than in the NO AF group (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 2.7, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.7 to 4.4, and adjusted OR 1.7, 95% CI 1.2 to 2.4, respectively). The unadjusted OR comparing the AF ABL group and the AF NO ABL group was significant (unadjusted OR 1.9, 95% CI 1.9 to 3.2); however, the OR adjusted for surgery type, age, and gender showed a trend toward significance (adjusted OR 1.6, 95% CI 0.9 to 2.7). In conclusion, in this large cohort of patients who underwent CS, surgical AF ablation appeared to carry an increased risk for postoperative PPM implantation.

  8. Plasma-mediated ablation: An optical tool for submicrometer surgery on neuronal and vascular systems

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Philbert S.; Blinder, Pablo; Migliori, Benjamin J.; Neev, Joseph; Jin, Yishi; Squier, Jeffrey A.; Kleinfeld, David

    2009-01-01

    Plasma-mediated ablation makes use of high energy laser pulses to ionize molecules within the first few femtoseconds of the pulse. This process leads to a submicrometer-sized bubble of plasma that can ablate tissue with negligible heat transfer and collateral damage to neighboring tissue. We review the physics of plasma-mediated ablation and its use as a tool to generate targeted insults at the subcellular level to neurons and blood vessels deep within nervous tissue. Illustrative examples from axon regeneration and microvascular research illustrate the utility of this tool. We further discuss the use of ablation as an integral part of automated histology. PMID:19269159

  9. Radiofrequency Ablation of the Main Lesion of Hepatocellular Carcinoma and Bile Duct Tumor Thrombus as a Radical Therapeutic Alternative

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jun; Zhang, Qingshuai; Zhang, Jun; Kong, Jian; Wang, Shaohong; Ding, Xuemei; Ke, Shan; Sun, Wenbing

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with bile duct tumor thrombus (BDTT) formation is a rare entity found microscopically in 1% to 9.2% of resected specimens. The ideal treatment for HCC is surgical resection. However, because of poor hepatic functional reserve in patients with HCC, most tumors are unresectable. Here, we report 2 cases of HCC with BDTT type III accompanied by hepatic dysfunction that were successfully treated with radiofrequency (RF) ablation. We used RF ablation as both a radical therapeutic method and an efficient way to control bleeding from the origin of BDTT after BDTT removal. At the time of writing, the 2 patients have been disease-free for 16 and 12 months, respectively. Our results show that RF ablation may be used as a radical therapeutic alternative for HCC with BDTT in patients with liver cirrhosis and obstructive jaundice. PMID:26166111

  10. Percutaneous Microwave Ablation of Hepatocellular Carcinoma with a Gas-Cooled System: Initial Clinical Results with 107 Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Ziemlewicz, Timothy J.; Hinshaw, J. Louis; Lubner, Meghan G.; Brace, Christopher L.; Alexander, Marci L.; Agarwal, Parul; Lee, Fred T.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To retrospectively review the results of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) treatment with a high-power, gas-cooled, multiantenna-capable microwave device. Materials and Methods A total of 107 HCCs in 75 patients (65 men) with a mean age of 61 years (range, 44–82 y) were treated via percutaneous approach. Combination microwave ablation and transarterial chemoembolization was performed for 22 tumors in 19 patients with tumors larger than 4 cm (n = 10), tumors larger than 3 cm with ill-defined margins (n = 7), or lesions not identified with ultrasonography (n = 5). Mean tumor size was 2.1 cm (range, 0.5–4.2 cm), with median follow-up of 14 months, for ablation alone; compared with 3.7 cm (range, 1.0–7.0 cm) and 12 months, respectively, for combination therapy. All procedures were performed with a single microwave system (Certus 140) with one to three 17-gauge antennas. Results Mean ablation time was 5.3 minutes (range, 1–11.5 min). All treatments were considered technically successful in a single session. Primary technique effectiveness rates were 91.6% (98 of 107) overall, 93.7% (89 of 95) for tumors 4 cm or smaller, and 75.0% (nine of 12) for tumors larger than 4 cm; and 91.8% (78 of 85) for ablation alone and 90.9% (20 of 22) for combination therapy. There was no major complication or procedure-related mortality. The overall survival rate was 76.0% at a median 14-month clinical follow-up, with most deaths related to end-stage liver disease (n = 11) or multifocal HCC (n = 5). Conclusions Treating HCC with a gas-cooled, multiantenna-capable microwave ablation device is safe, with promising treatment effectiveness. PMID:25446425

  11. Complications of Microwave Ablation for Liver Tumors: Results of a Multicenter Study

    SciTech Connect

    Livraghi, Tito; Meloni, Franca; Solbiati, Luigi; Zanus, Giorgio; Collaboration: For the Collaborative Italian Group using AMICA system

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: New technologies for microwave ablation (MWA) have been conceived, designed to achieve larger areas of necrosis compared with radiofrequency ablation (RFA). The purpose of this study was to report complications by using this technique in patients with focal liver cancer. Methods: Members of 14 Italian centers used a 2.45-GMHz generator delivering energy through a cooled miniature-choke MW antenna and a standardized protocol for follow-up. They completed a questionnaire regarding number and type of deaths, major and minor complications and side effects, and likelihood of their relationship to the procedure. Enrollment included 736 patients with 1.037 lesions: 522 had hepatocellular carcinoma with cirrhosis, 187 had metastases predominantly from colorectal cancer, and 27 had cholangiocellular carcinoma. Tumor size ranged from 0.5 to 10 cm. In 13 centers, the approach used was percutaneous, in 4 videolaparoscopic, and in 3 laparotomic. Results: No deaths were reported. Major complications occurred in 22 cases (2.9%), and minor complications in 54 patients (7.3%). Complications of MWA do not differ from those RFA, both being based on the heat damage. Conclusion: Results of this multicenter study confirmed those of single-center experiences, indicating that MWA is a safe procedure, with no mortality and a low rate of major complications. The low rate of complications was probably due to precautions adopted, knowing in advance possible risk conditions, on the basis of prior RFA experience.

  12. Stereotactic Ablative Radiation Therapy for Subcentimeter Lung Tumors: Clinical, Dosimetric, and Image Guidance Considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Louie, Alexander V.; Senan, Suresh; Dahele, Max; Slotman, Ben J.; Verbakel, Wilko F.A.R.

    2014-11-15

    Purpose: Use of stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR) for subcentimeter lung tumors is controversial. We report our outcomes for tumors with diameter ≤1 cm and their visibility on cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans and retrospectively evaluate the planned dose using a deterministic dose calculation algorithm (Acuros XB [AXB]). Methods and Materials: We identified subcentimeter tumors from our institutional SABR database. Tumor size was remeasured on an artifact-free phase of the planning 4-dimensional (4D)-CT. Clinical plan doses were generated using either a pencil beam convolution or an anisotropic analytic algorithm (AAA). All AAA plans were recalculated using AXB, and differences among D95 and mean dose for internal target volume (ITV) and planning target volume (PTV) on the average intensity CT dataset, as well as for gross tumor volume (GTV) on the end respiratory phases were reported. For all AAA patients, CBCT scans acquired during each treatment fraction were evaluated for target visibility. Progression-free and overall survival rates were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: Thirty-five patients with 37 subcentimeter tumors were eligible for analysis. For the 22 AAA plans recalculated using AXB, Mean D95 ± SD values were 2.2 ± 4.4% (ITV) and 2.5 ± 4.8% (PTV) lower using AXB; whereas mean doses were 2.9 ± 4.9% (ITV) and 3.7 ± 5.1% (PTV) lower. Calculated AXB doses were significantly lower in one patient (difference in mean ITV and PTV doses, as well as in mean ITV and PTV D95 ranged from 22%-24%). However, the end respiratory phase GTV received at least 95% of the prescription dose. Review of 92 CBCT scans from all AAA patients revealed that the tumor was visualized in 82 images, and its position could be inferred in other images. The 2-year local progression-free survival was 100%. Conclusions: Patients with subcentimeter lung tumors are good candidates for SABR, given the dosimetry, ability to localize

  13. Preclinical investigations of articular cartilage ablation with femtosecond and pulsed infrared lasers as an alternative to microfracture surgery.

    PubMed

    Su, Erica; Sun, Hui; Juhasz, Tibor; Wong, Brian J F

    2014-09-01

    Microfracture surgery is a bone marrow stimulation technique for treating cartilage defects and injuriesin the knee. Current methods rely on surgical skill and instrumentation. This study investigates the potential useof laser technology as an alternate means to create the microfracture holes. Lasers investigated in this study include an erbium:YAG laser (λ = 2.94 μm), titanium:sapphire femtosecond laser system (λ = 1700 nm), and Nd:glass femtosecond laser (λ = 1053 nm). Bovine samples were ablated at fluences of 8 to 18 J∕cm2 with the erbium:YAG laser, at a power of 300 ± 15 mW with the titanium:sapphire femtosecond system, and at an energy of 3 μJ∕pulse with the Nd:glass laser. Samples were digitally photographed and histological sections were taken for analysis. The erbium:YAG laser is capable of fast and efficient ablation; specimen treated with fluences of 12 and 18 J∕cm2 experienced significant amounts of bone removal and minimal carbonization with saline hydration. The femtosecond laser systems successfully removed cartilage but not clinically significant amounts of bone. Precise tissue removal was possible but not to substantial depths due to limitations of the systems. With additional studies and development, the use of femtosecond laser systems to ablate bone may be achieved at clinically valuable ablation rates.

  14. Preclinical investigations of articular cartilage ablation with femtosecond and pulsed infrared lasers as an alternative to microfracture surgery

    PubMed Central

    Su, Erica; Sun, Hui; Juhasz, Tibor; Wong, Brian J. F.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Microfracture surgery is a bone marrow stimulation technique for treating cartilage defects and injuries in the knee. Current methods rely on surgical skill and instrumentation. This study investigates the potential use of laser technology as an alternate means to create the microfracture holes. Lasers investigated in this study include an erbium:YAG laser (λ=2.94  μm), titanium:sapphire femtosecond laser system (λ=1700  nm), and Nd:glass femtosecond laser (λ=1053  nm). Bovine samples were ablated at fluences of 8 to 18  J/cm2 with the erbium:YAG laser, at a power of 300±15  mW with the titanium:sapphire femtosecond system, and at an energy of 3  μJ/pulse with the Nd:glass laser. Samples were digitally photographed and histological sections were taken for analysis. The erbium:YAG laser is capable of fast and efficient ablation; specimen treated with fluences of 12 and 18  J/cm2 experienced significant amounts of bone removal and minimal carbonization with saline hydration. The femtosecond laser systems successfully removed cartilage but not clinically significant amounts of bone. Precise tissue removal was possible but not to substantial depths due to limitations of the systems. With additional studies and development, the use of femtosecond laser systems to ablate bone may be achieved at clinically valuable ablation rates. PMID:25200394

  15. Preclinical investigations of articular cartilage ablation with femtosecond and pulsed infrared lasers as an alternative to microfracture surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Erica; Sun, Hui; Juhasz, Tibor; Wong, Brian J. F.

    2014-09-01

    Microfracture surgery is a bone marrow stimulation technique for treating cartilage defects and injuries in the knee. Current methods rely on surgical skill and instrumentation. This study investigates the potential use of laser technology as an alternate means to create the microfracture holes. Lasers investigated in this study include an erbium:YAG laser (λ=2.94 μm), titanium:sapphire femtosecond laser system (λ=1700 nm), and Nd:glass femtosecond laser (λ=1053 nm). Bovine samples were ablated at fluences of 8 to 18 J/cm2 with the erbium:YAG laser, at a power of 300±15 mW with the titanium:sapphire femtosecond system, and at an energy of 3 μJ/pulse with the Nd:glass laser. Samples were digitally photographed and histological sections were taken for analysis. The erbium:YAG laser is capable of fast and efficient ablation; specimen treated with fluences of 12 and 18 J/cm2 experienced significant amounts of bone removal and minimal carbonization with saline hydration. The femtosecond laser systems successfully removed cartilage but not clinically significant amounts of bone. Precise tissue removal was possible but not to substantial depths due to limitations of the systems. With additional studies and development, the use of femtosecond laser systems to ablate bone may be achieved at clinically valuable ablation rates.

  16. Image-Guided Radiofrequency Ablation of a Pancreatic Tumor with a New Triple Spiral-Shaped Electrode

    SciTech Connect

    Thanos, Loukas; Poulou, Loukia S.; Mailli, Lito; Pomoni, Maria; Kelekis, Dimitrios A.

    2010-02-15

    Image-guided, minimally invasive treatment modalities have become an area of considerable interest and research during the last few years for the treatment of primary and secondary liver tumors. We report our experience with an unresectable pancreatic tumor, treated with application of radiofrequency ablation under CT guidance that even though a complication occurred during the procedure, had excellent results on follow-up CT scans.

  17. Results of Free Flap Reconstruction After Ablative Surgery in the Head and Neck

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Heejin; Jeong, Woo-Jin

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Due to the complex anatomy and function of the head and neck region, the reconstruction of ablative defects in this area is challenging. In addition, an increasing interest in improving the quality of life of patients and achieving good functional results has highlighted the importance of free flaps. The aim of this study was to summarize the results of free flap reconstruction and salvage of free flaps in a single institute, and to analyze differences in the results by the flap donor site, recipient site, and learning curve. Methods The medical records of patients who underwent free flap reconstruction from 2004-2012 were reviewed retrospectively. One hundred and fifty free flaps were used in 134 patients, who had an average age of 57.7 years. The types of flaps applied, primary defect sites, success rates, results of salvage operations for compromised flap, and the learning curve were analyzed. Results The anterolateral thigh flap was preferred for the reconstruction of head and neck defects. The overall success rate was 90.7%, with 14 cases of failure. A total of 19 salvage operations (12.7%) for compromised flap were performed, and 12 flaps (63.2%) were salvaged successfully. Dependency on the facial vessels as recipient vessels was statistically different when oral and oropharyngeal defects were compared to hypopharyngeal and laryngeal defects. The learning curve for microvascular surgery showed decrease in the failure rate after 50 cases. Conclusion The free flap technique is safe but involves a significant learning period and requires careful postoperative monitoring of the patient. Early intervention is important for the salvage of free flaps and for lowering the failure rate. PMID:26045917

  18. One minute, sub-one-watt photothermal tumor ablation using porphysomes, intrinsic multifunctional nanovesicles.

    PubMed

    Jin, Cheng S; Lovell, Jonathan F; Zheng, Gang

    2013-09-17

    We recently developed porphysomes as intrinsically multifunctional nanovesicles. A photosensitizer, pyropheophorbide α, was conjugated to a phospholipid and then self-assembled to liposome-like spherical vesicles. Due to the extremely high density of porphyrin in the porphyrin-lipid bilayer, porphysomes generated large extinction coefficients, structure-dependent fluorescence self-quenching, and excellent photothermal efficacy. In our formulation, porphysomes were synthesized using high pressure extrusion, and displayed a mean particle size around 120 nm. Twenty-four hr post-intravenous injection of porphysomes, the local temperature of the tumor increased from 30 °C to 62 °C rapidly upon one minute exposure of 750 mW (1.18 W/cm(2)), 671 nm laser irradiation. Following the complete thermal ablation of the tumor, eschars formed and healed within 2 weeks, while in the control groups the tumors continued to grow and all reached the defined end point within 3 weeks. These data show how porphysomes can be used as potent photothermal therapy (PTT) agents.

  19. Surgery versus stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) for early-stage non-small cell lung cancer: less is not more

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, Scott J.

    2016-01-01

    High level evidence from randomized studies comparing surgery to stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) is lacking and available retrospective cohort and case control studies are highly variable in how thoroughly they define and stage lung cancer, in how they determine operability, and in the offered surgical approaches to operable lung cancer (open vs. video-assisted). This makes it difficult to compare best radiotherapy and best surgery approaches to treatment and to be confident in conclusions of equipoise between the two modalities. What has become clear from the controversy surrounding surgery versus SABR for early stage lung cancer is the desire to optimize treatment efficacy while minimizing invasiveness and morbidity. This review highlights the ongoing debate in light of these goals. PMID:27195137

  20. Non-specific internalization of laser ablated pure gold nanoparticles in pancreatic tumor cell.

    PubMed

    Sobhan, M A; Sreenivasan, V K A; Withford, M J; Goldys, E M

    2012-04-01

    We investigate the intracellular uptake of 7.3 nm, 21.2 nm and 31.3 nm average size pure colloidal gold nanoparticles synthesized using femtosecond laser ablation technique in pure water. Dark-field imaging, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to assess the uptake of these pure gold nanoparticles in the pancreatic tumor cell line. We show that these ligand-free gold nanoparticles are non-toxic to these cells. The nanoparticles and cell images indicated that unmodified gold nanoparticles interacted with the cells, despite negative surface charge on both the cells and the nanoparticles. We also demonstrate that the uptake of the gold nanoparticles is size-dependent.

  1. Optimizing a head-tracked stereo display system to guide hepatic tumor ablation.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Henry; State, Andrei; Yang, Hua; Peck, Tabitha; Lee, Sang Woo; Rosenthal, Michael; Bulysheva, Anna; Burke, Charles

    2008-01-01

    Radio frequency ablation is a minimally invasive intervention that introduces -- under 2D ultrasound guidance and via a needle-like probe -- high-frequency electrical current into non-resectable hepatic tumors. These recur mostly on the periphery, indicating errors in probe placement. Hypothesizing that a contextually correct 3D display will aid targeting and decrease recurrence, we have developed a prototype guidance system based on a head-tracked 3D display and motion-tracked instruments. We describe our reasoning and our experience in selecting components for, designing and constructing the 3D display. Initial candidates were an augmented reality see-through head-mounted display and a virtual reality "fish tank" system. We describe the system requirements and explain how we arrived at the final decision. We show the operational guidance system in use on phantoms and animals.

  2. Photothermal Ablation of in Situ Renal Tumor by PEG-IR780-C13 Micelles and Near-Infrared Irradiation.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Xuefeng; Xu, Linfeng; Zhang, Yanting; Yuan, Ahu; Wang, Kaikai; Zhao, Xiaozhi; Wu, Jinhui; Guo, Hongqian; Hu, Yiqiao

    2016-03-07

    PEG-IR780-C13 micelles have been demonstrated to be a novel photothermal agent with tumor-targeting property. This study was designed to explore the feasibility of applying PEG-IR780-C13 micelles and near-infrared (NIR) irradiation for thermal ablation of renal tumor by using an in situ tumor model. In addition, the potential thermal injury to normal renal tissue was evaluated. PEG-IR780-C13 micelles were intended to accumulate in renal tumor after systemic delivery. In vitro results revealed that PEG-IR780-C13 micelles were uptaken by RENCA cells mainly through caveola-mediated endocytosis and mainly distributed in late endosomes and lysosomes. Upon NIR irradiation, PEG-IR780-C13 micelles generated heat effectively both in vitro and in vivo, exhibiting a promising photothermal therapeutic property. The photothermal effect of PEG-IR780-C13 micelles could effectively destroy RENCA cells in vitro and adequately inhibit growth of in situ renal tumor in vivo. Meanwhile, PEG-IR780-C13 micelles mediated photothermal therapy (PTT) resulting in only limited injury to normal renal tissue surrounding tumor sites. Our data indicated that PEG-IR780-C13 micelles mediating PTT could generate tumor-specific heat for destruction of renal tumor in a minimally invasive way, providing a novel strategy for thermal ablation of renal tumor.

  3. Performance analysis of a dedicated breast MR-HIFU system for tumor ablation in breast cancer patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deckers, R.; Merckel, L. G.; de Senneville, B. Denis; Schubert, G.; Köhler, M.; Knuttel, F. M.; Mali, W. P. Th M.; Moonen, C. T. W.; van den Bosch, M. A. A. J.; Bartels, L. W.

    2015-07-01

    MR-guided HIFU ablation is a promising technique for the non-invasive treatment of breast cancer. A phase I study was performed to assess the safety and treatment accuracy and precision of MR-HIFU ablation in breast cancer patients (n=10 ) using a newly developed MR-HIFU platform dedicated to applications in the breast. In this paper a technical analysis of the performance of the dedicated breast MR-HIFU system during breast tumors ablation is described. The main points of investigation were the spatial targeting accuracy and precision of the system and the performance of real-time respiration-corrected MR thermometry. The mean targeting accuracy was in the range of 2.4-2.6 mm, whereas the mean targeting precision was in the range of 1.5-1.8 mm. To correct for respiration-induced magnetic field fluctuations during MR temperature mapping a look-up-table (LUT)-based correction method was used. An optimized procedural sedation protocol in combination with the LUT-based correction method allowed for precise MR thermometry during the ablation procedure (temperature standard deviation <3 °C). No unwanted heating in the near field (i.e. skin) nor in the far field (pectoral muscle) was detected. The newly developed dedicated breast MR-HIFU system allows for safe, accurate and precise ablation of breast tumors.

  4. Minimalist video-assisted thoracic surgery biopsy of mediastinal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Tacconi, Federico; Rogliani, Paola; Cristino, Benedetto; Gilardi, Francesco; Palombi, Leonardo

    2016-01-01

    Background Mediastinal tumors often require surgical biopsy to achieve a precise and rapid diagnosis. However, subjects with mediastinal tumors may be unfit for general anesthesia, particularly when compression of major vessels or airways does occur. We tested the applicability in this setting of a minimalist (M) uniportal, video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) strategy carried out under locoregional anesthesia in awake patients (MVATS). Methods We analyzed in a comparative fashion including propensity score matching, data from a prospectively collected database of patients who were offered surgical biopsy for mediastinal tumors through either MVATS or standard VATS. Tested outcome measures included feasibility, diagnostic yield, and morbidity. Results A total of 24 procedures were performed through MVATS. Diagnostic yield was 100%. Median hospital stay and time interval to oncologic treatment were 2 days (IQR, 2–3 days) and 7 days (IQR, 5.5–11.5 days), respectively. At overall comparison (MVATS, N=24 vs. VATS, N=23), there was a significant difference in both frequency and severity of postoperative complication as measured by Clavien-Dindo classification (P<0.006). In a propensity score matched comparison (8 patients per group), grade 3 or 4 complications requiring aggressive management were found only in the general anesthesia group. Global time spent in the operating room was shorter in the MVATS group (P=0.05). Time interval to oncological treatment was the same between groups. Other differences were also found in SIRS score (P=0.05) and PaO2/FiO2 (P=0.04) thus suggesting better adaption to perioperative stress. Conclusions MVATS biopsy appears to be a reliable tool to optimize diagnostic assessment in patients with mediastinal tumors. It can offer high diagnostic accuracy due to large tissue samples, while reducing morbidity rate compared to the same operation under general anesthesia. More robust evaluation is needed to define the appropriateness of

  5. Tumor Regression in HCC Patient with Portal Vein Tumor Thrombosis after Intraportal Radiofrequency Thermal Ablation

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the third leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Portal vein tumor thrombosis (PVTT) is a frequent entity in HCC, which strictly limits the gold standard treatment options such as surgical resection and transarterial chemoembolization. Therefore, the prognosis of patients with PVTT is extremely poor and an emergence of seeking an alternative option for intervention is inevitable. We present a case of a 60-year-old male patient with HCC induced PVTT who was subjected to the intraportal RFA and stenting-VesOpen procedure. No additional medical intervention was performed. The repeated CT performed 5 months after the VesOpen procedure revealed significant decrease of the tumor size, patent right, and main portal vein and a recanalization of the left portal vein, which was not processed. At this time point, liver functional tests, appetite, and general condition of the patient were improved evidently. This report designates the RFA as an instrumental option of therapeutic intervention for HCC patients with PVTT. PMID:27579192

  6. Effect of variable heat transfer coefficient on tissue temperature next to a large vessel during radiofrequency tumor ablation

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Icaro; Haemmerich, Dieter; Pinheiro, Cleber da Silva; da Rocha, Adson Ferreira

    2008-01-01

    Background One of the current shortcomings of radiofrequency (RF) tumor ablation is its limited performance in regions close to large blood vessels, resulting in high recurrence rates at these locations. Computer models have been used to determine tissue temperatures during tumor ablation procedures. To simulate large vessels, either constant wall temperature or constant convective heat transfer coefficient (h) have been assumed at the vessel surface to simulate convection. However, the actual distribution of the temperature on the vessel wall is non-uniform and time-varying, and this feature makes the convective coefficient variable. Methods This paper presents a realistic time-varying model in which h is a function of the temperature distribution at the vessel wall. The finite-element method (FEM) was employed in order to model RF hepatic ablation. Two geometrical configurations were investigated. The RF electrode was placed at distances of 1 and 5 mm from a large vessel (10 mm diameter). Results When the ablation procedure takes longer than 1–2 min, the attained coagulation zone obtained with both time-varying h and constant h does not differ significantly. However, for short duration ablation (5–10 s) and when the electrode is 1 mm away from the vessel, the use of constant h can lead to errors as high as 20% in the estimation of the coagulation zone. Conclusion For tumor ablation procedures typically lasting at least 5 min, this study shows that modeling the heat sink effect of large vessels by applying constant h as a boundary condition will yield precise results while reducing computational complexity. However, for other thermal therapies with shorter treatment using a time-varying h may be necessary. PMID:18620566

  7. Evaluation of the effective corneal ablation in refractive surgery by two 3D topographic surface matching methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bueeler, M.; Donitzky, Ch.; Mrochen, M.

    2006-02-01

    The effectiveness of the corneal ablation process in refractive surgery is mostly evaluated by indirect measures of vision or optical quality such as post-operative refraction or wavefront aberrometry. Yet, the effective amount of corneal tissue removed in the treatment can only be determined by correctly overlapping a pre- and a post-operative topography measurement. However such an overlap is not trivial due to the discrepancy in the centration axes used in the measurement and the treatment, as well as due to the shift of ocular axes through the treatment or tilt between the two surfaces. We therefore present two methods for overlapping pre- and post-operative topographies for the purpose of extracting an effective corneal ablation profile. Method one uses a 3-dimensional profile matching algorithm and cross-correlation analysis on surface rings outside the optical zone of the topographies. Method two employs a surface normal matching routine to align the two surfaces along their common ablation axis. The profile matching method implies the problem that it requires measurement data outside of the optical zone which was found to be uncertain with placido-disk-based topographers. Method number two is more simple and implies the advantage of using measurement data within the optical zone. For regular profiles the extracted ablation profiles showed a very good match with the planned ones. Surprisingly, even for highly irregular profiles of topography-guided laser treatments the method delivered reasonable overlaps when being compared to the planned profiles. Analysis of the effective tissue removal yields valuable information on the quality of the ablation process.

  8. Correlation between Ultrasound Reflection Intensity and Tumor Ablation Ratio of Late-Stage Pancreatic Carcinoma in HIFU Therapy: Dynamic Observation on Ultrasound Reflection Intensity

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Hui-Yu; Miao, Li-Ying; Wang, Jin-Rui; Xiong, Liu-Lin; Yan, Fang; Zheng, Cui-Shan; Jia, Jian-Wen; Cui, Li-Gang; Chen, Wen

    2013-01-01

    The minimally invasive high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapy is thermal ablation treatment for late-stage pancreatic carcinoma with widely recognized safety and effectiveness, but there are currently no instant assessment methods for its ablation effect. It is vital to find a real-time high-sensitive assessment method. This research aims to dynamically observe the variation rules of ultrasound reflection intensity, analyze the correlation between ultrasound reflection intensity and tumor ablation ratio, and find out the value of ultrasound reflection intensity in prognosis of HIFU ablation effect. HIFU intermittent therapies were retrospectively analyzed for 31 subjects with late-stage pancreatic carcinoma from March 2007 to December 2009 in the study. The variation rules of the ultrasound reflection intensity during HIFU therapy were summarized and the correlation between ultrasound reflection intensity and tumor ablation ratio was analyzed based on the tumor ablation ratio indicated by CT scanning. The conclusion is that variation of ultrasound reflection intensity can be used for initial assessment of tumor ablation in HIFU therapy and early prognosis of overall HIFU ablation, providing important clinical basis for improving safety and effectiveness of HIFU therapy. Ultrasound can work as a real-time imaging instrument for observation of HIFU ablation effect in treating late-stage pancreatic carcinoma. PMID:24453916

  9. Correlation between ultrasound reflection intensity and tumor ablation ratio of late-stage pancreatic carcinoma in HIFU therapy: dynamic observation on ultrasound reflection intensity.

    PubMed

    Ge, Hui-Yu; Miao, Li-Ying; Wang, Jin-Rui; Xiong, Liu-Lin; Yan, Fang; Zheng, Cui-Shan; Jia, Jian-Wen; Cui, Li-Gang; Chen, Wen

    2013-01-01

    The minimally invasive high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapy is thermal ablation treatment for late-stage pancreatic carcinoma with widely recognized safety and effectiveness, but there are currently no instant assessment methods for its ablation effect. It is vital to find a real-time high-sensitive assessment method. This research aims to dynamically observe the variation rules of ultrasound reflection intensity, analyze the correlation between ultrasound reflection intensity and tumor ablation ratio, and find out the value of ultrasound reflection intensity in prognosis of HIFU ablation effect. HIFU intermittent therapies were retrospectively analyzed for 31 subjects with late-stage pancreatic carcinoma from March 2007 to December 2009 in the study. The variation rules of the ultrasound reflection intensity during HIFU therapy were summarized and the correlation between ultrasound reflection intensity and tumor ablation ratio was analyzed based on the tumor ablation ratio indicated by CT scanning. The conclusion is that variation of ultrasound reflection intensity can be used for initial assessment of tumor ablation in HIFU therapy and early prognosis of overall HIFU ablation, providing important clinical basis for improving safety and effectiveness of HIFU therapy. Ultrasound can work as a real-time imaging instrument for observation of HIFU ablation effect in treating late-stage pancreatic carcinoma.

  10. Renal functional outcomes after surgery for renal cortical tumors

    PubMed Central

    Finkelstein, Julia B.; DeCastro, G. Joel; McKiernan, James M.

    2015-01-01

    Historically, radical nephrectomy represented the gold standard for the treatment of small (≤ 4cm) as well as larger renal masses. Recently, for small renal masses, the risk of ensuing chronic kidney disease and end stage renal disease has largely favored nephron-sparing surgical techniques, mainly partial nephrectomy. In this review, we surveyed the literature on renal functional outcomes after partial nephrectomy for renal tumors. The largest randomized control trial comparing radical and partial nephrectomy failed to show a survival benefit for partial nephrectomy. With regards to overall survival, surgically induced chronic kidney disease (GFR < 60 ml/min/ 1.73m2) caused by nephrectomy might not be as deleterious as medically induced chronic kidney disease. In evaluating patients who underwent donor nephrectomy, transplant literature further validates that surgically induced reductions in GFR may not affect patient survival, unlike medically induced GFR declines. Yet, because patients who present with a renal mass tend to be elderly with multiple comorbidities, many develop a mixed picture of medically, and surgically-induced renal disease after extirpative renal surgery. In this population, we believe that nephron sparing surgery optimizes oncological control while protecting renal function.

  11. Feasibility of large volume tumor ablation using multiple-mode strategy with fast scanning method: A numerical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Hao; Shen, Guofeng; Qiao, Shan; Chen, Yazhu

    2017-03-01

    Sonication with fast scanning method can generate homogeneous lesions without complex planning. But when the target region is large, switching focus too fast will reduce the heat accumulation, the margin of which may not ablated. Furthermore, high blood perfusion rate will reduce this maximum volume that can be ablated. Therefore, fast scanning method may not be applied to large volume tumor. To expand the therapy scope, this study combines the fast scan method with multiple mode strategy. Through simulation and experiment, the feasibility of this new strategy is evaluated and analyzed.

  12. Margin Size is an Independent Predictor of Local Tumor Progression After Ablation of Colon Cancer Liver Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Xiaodong; Sofocleous, Constantinos T. Erinjeri, Joseph P.; Petre, Elena N.; Gonen, Mithat; Do, Kinh G.; Brown, Karen T.; Covey, Anne M.; Brody, Lynn A.; Alago, William; Thornton, Raymond H.; Kemeny, Nancy E.; Solomon, Stephen B.

    2013-02-15

    This study was designed to evaluate the relationship between the minimal margin size and local tumor progression (LTP) following CT-guided radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of colorectal cancer liver metastases (CLM). An institutional review board-approved, HIPPA-compliant review identified 73 patients with 94 previously untreated CLM that underwent RFA between March 2003 and May 2010, resulting in an ablation zone completely covering the tumor 4-8 weeks after RFA dynamic CT. Comparing the pre- with the post-RFA CT, the minimal margin size was categorized to 0, 1-5, 6-10, and 11-15 mm. Follow-up included CT every 2-4 months. Kaplan-Meier methodology and Cox regression analysis were used to evaluate the effect of the minimal margin size, tumor location, size, and proximity to a vessel on LTP. Forty-five of 94 (47.9 %) CLM progressed locally. Median LTP-free survival (LPFS) was 16 months. Two-year LPFS rates for ablated CLM with minimal margin of 0, 1-5 mm, 6-10 mm, 11-15 mm were 26, 46, 74, and 80 % (p < 0.011). Minimal margin (p = 0.002) and tumor size (p = 0.028) were independent risk factors for LTP. The risk for LTP decreased by 46 % for each 5-mm increase in minimal margin size, whereas each additional 5-mm increase in tumor size increased the risk of LTP by 22 %. An ablation zone with a minimal margin uniformly larger than 5 mm 4-8 weeks postablation CT is associated with the best local tumor control.

  13. Long-Term Outcome of a Hepatocellular Carcinoma 71/2 Years After Surgery and Repeated Radiofrequency Ablation: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    SciTech Connect

    Thanos, L. Mylona, S.; Nikita, A.; Ptohis, N.; Kelekis, D.A.

    2007-04-15

    An interesting case is presented of a 78-year-old patient with cirrhosis who was managed with combined treatment (surgery and radiofrequency (RF) ablation) for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and has survived for 71/2 years. Elevation of the {alpha}-FP (alpha-fetoprotein) levels was noted 2 years after surgery. CT demonstrated two lesions: one central at the remaining right liver lobe, and the other at the excision site. Biopsy of the lesions confirmed the diagnosis of HCC for both of them. RF ablation of these two lesions was performed in one session with technical success. Four and a half years after the first RF ablation a new recurrence was demonstrated at the CT follow-up control. RF ablation was again applied successfully. The imaging findings and the therapeutic percutaneous management of this patient along with the natural course of HCC and its recurrence are discussed, and the literature concerning risk factors is reviewed.

  14. Investigation of interstitial ultrasound ablation of spinal and paraspinal tumors: A patient-specific and parametric simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Serena J.; Salgaonkar, Vasant; Prakash, Punit; Burdette, E. Clif; Diederich, Chris J.

    2017-03-01

    Preferential acoustic absorption and heating of bone can significantly impact interstitial ultrasound ablation of tumors within or bordering the spine. Furthermore, intervening cortical bone may provide acoustic and thermal insulation that can protect sensitive structures nearby, such as the spinal cord. The objectives of this study are firstly, to apply parametric and patient-specific models to theoretically assess the feasibility of interstitial ultrasound ablation of tumors within and near the spine, and secondly, to identify potential energy delivery strategies, safety criteria, advantages, and disadvantages of interstitial ultrasound in this setting. Transient biothermal models using previously validated approximations for power deposition within bone from interstitial sources were employed. Multilayered axisymmetric models were used to perform a parametric assessment of the impact of tumor dimensions, attenuation (dependent on residual bone content), perfusion, and maximum temperature thresholds on necessary treatment parameters and on treatment effectiveness. 3D patient-specific finite element models were generated based on segmented CT scans for nine representative patient cases selected to bracket a range of clinical interest, with tumors in or near the vertebrae, sacrum, and ilium. Tumors were 10-27 mm in diameter, 10-43 mm long, and 0-14 mm from the spinal canal. Paraspinal tumors, osteolytic vertebral tumors, and a mixed osteolytic/osteoblastic iliac bone tumor were considered. 7 MHz (1.5 mm OD) and 3.0 MHz (3.2 mm OD) applicators with an array of 1-4 tubular transducers (0.5 -1.5 cm long, 150-360° sector angles), were applied in various implant configurations. Variable thicknesses of bone insulating critical anatomy from the tumor and insulation of the spinal cord with injected carbon dioxide were also investigated for definition of safety margins and possible protection of critical structures. 6-44 mm diameter osteolytic tumors surrounded by bone and

  15. Combination radiofrequency (RF) ablation and IV liposomal heat shock protein suppression: Reduced tumor growth and increased animal endpoint survival in a small animal tumor model

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wei; Ahmed, Muneeb; Tasawwar, Beenish; Levchenko, Tatynana; Sawant, Rupa R.; Torchilin, Vladimir; Goldberg, S. Nahum

    2012-01-01

    Background To investigate the effect of IV liposomal quercetin (a known down-regulator of heat shock proteins) alone and with liposomal doxorubicin on tumor growth and end-point survival when combined with radiofrequency (RF) tumor ablation in a rat tumor model. Methods Solitary subcutaneous R3230 mammary adenocarcinoma tumors (1.3–1.5 cm) were implanted in 48 female Fischer rats. Initially, 32 tumors (n=8, each group) were randomized into four experimental groups: (a) conventional monopolar RF alone (70°C for 5 min), (b) IV liposomal quercetin alone (1 mg/kg), (c) IV liposomal quercetin followed 24hr later with RF, and (d) no treatment. Next, 16 additional tumors were randomized into two groups (n=8, each) that received a combined RF and liposomal doxorubicin (15 min post-RF, 8 mg/kg) either with or without liposomal quercetin. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis was performed using a tumor diameter of 3.0 cm as the defined survival endpoint. Results Differences in endpoint survival and tumor doubling time among the groups were highly significant (P<0.001). Endpoint survivals were 12.5±2.2 days for the control group, 16.6±2.9 days for tumors treated with RF alone, 15.5±2.1days for tumors treated with liposomal quercetin alone, and 22.0±3.9 days with combined RF and quercetin. Additionally, combination quercetin/RF/doxorubicin therapy resulted in the longest survival (48.3±20.4 days), followed by RF/doxorubicin (29.9±3.8 days). Conclusions IV liposomal quercetin in combination with RF ablation reduces tumor growth rates and improves animal endpoint survival. Further increases in endpoint survival can be seen by adding an additional anti-tumor adjuvant agent liposomal doxorubicin. This suggests that targeting several post-ablation processes with multi-drug nanotherapies can increase overall ablation efficacy. PMID:22230341

  16. Self-assembled tumor-targeting hyaluronic acid nanoparticles for photothermal ablation in orthotopic bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tingsheng; Yuan, Ahu; Zhao, Xiaozhi; Lian, Huibo; Zhuang, Junlong; Chen, Wei; Zhang, Qing; Liu, Guangxiang; Zhang, Shiwei; Chen, Wei; Cao, Wenmin; Zhang, Chengwei; Wu, Jinhui; Hu, Yiqiao; Guo, Hongqian

    2017-02-15

    Bladder cancer is one of the most frequent malignancies in the urinary system. Radical cystectomy is inevitable when bladder cancer progresses to a muscle-invasive disease. However, cystectomy still causes a high risk of death and a low quality of life (such as ureter-abdomen ostomy, uroclepsia for ileal-colon neobladder). Therefore, more effective treatments as well as bladder preservation are needed. We developed self-assembled tumor-targeting hyaluronic acid-IR-780 nanoparticles for photothermal ablation in over-expressing CD44 (the receptor for HA) bladder cancer, which show high tumor selectivity, high treatment efficacy, good bioavailability, and excellent biocompatibility. The nanoparticles demonstrated a stable spherical nanostructure in aqueous conditions with good mono-dispersity, and their average size was 171.3±9.14nm. The nanoparticles can be degraded by hyaluronidase when it is over-expressed in bladder cells; therefore, they appear to have a hyaluronidase-responsive "OFF/ON" behavior of a fluorescence signal. HA-IR-780 NPs also showed high photothermal efficiency; 2.5, 5, 10 and 20μg/mL of NPs had a maximum temperature increase of 11.2±0.66°C, 18.6±0.75°C, 26.8±1.11°C and 32.3±1.42°C. The in vitro cell viability showed that MB-49 cells could be efficiently ablated by combining HA-IR-780 NPs with 808nm laser irradiation. Then, in vivo biodistribution showed the HA-IR-780 NPs are targeted for accumulation in bladder cancer cells but have negligible accumulation in normal bladder wall. The photothermal therapeutic efficacy of HA-IR-780 NPs in the orthotopic bladder cancer model showed tumors treated with NPs had a maximum temperature of 48.1±1.81°C after 6min of laser irradiation. The tumor volume was approximately 65-75mm(3) prior to treatment. After 12days, the tumor sizes for the PBS, PBS plus laser irradiation and HA-IR-780 NPs-treated groups were 784.75mm(3), 707.5mm(3), and 711.37mm(3), respectively. None of the tumors in the HA-IR-780

  17. Early and Late Complications After Radiofrequency Ablation of Malignant Liver Tumors in 608 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Curley, Steven A.; Marra, Paolo; Beaty, Karen; Ellis, Lee M.; Vauthey, J Nicolas; Abdalla, Eddie K.; Scaife, Courtney; Raut, Chan; Wolff, Robert; Choi, Haesun; Loyer, Evelyne; Vallone, Paolo; Fiore, Francesco; Scordino, Fabrizio; De Rosa, Vincenzo; Orlando, Raffaele; Pignata, Sandro; Daniele, Bruno; Izzo, Francesco

    2004-01-01

    Background: Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) has become a common treatment of patients with unresectable primary and secondary hepatic malignancies. We performed this prospective analysis to determine early (within 30 days) and late (more than 30 days after) complication rates associated with hepatic tumor RFA. Methods: All patients treated between January 1, 1996 and June 30, 2002 with RFA for hepatic malignancies were entered into a prospective database. Patients were evaluated during RFA treatment, throughout the immediate post RFA course, and then every 3 months after RFA to assess for the development of treatment-related complications. Results: A total of 608 patients, 345 men (56.7%) and 263 women (43.3%), with a median age of 58 years (range 18–85 years) underwent RFA of 1225 malignant liver tumors. Open intraoperative RFA was performed in 382 patients (62.8%), while percutaneous RFA was performed in 226 (37.2%). The treatment-related mortality rate was 0.5%. Early complications developed in 43 patients (7.1%). Early complications were more likely to occur in patients treated with open RFA (33 [8.6%] of 382 patients) compared with percutaneous RFA (10 [4.4%] 226 patients, P < 0.01), and in patients with cirrhosis (25 [12.9%] complications in 194 patients) compared with noncirrhotic patients (31 [7.5%] complications in 414 patients, P < 0.05). Late complications arose in 15 patients (2.4%) with no difference in incidence between open and percutaneous RFA treatment. The combined overall early and late complication rate was 9.5%. Conclusions: Hepatic tumor RFA can be performed with low mortality and morbidity rates. Though relatively rare, late complications can develop and physicians performing hepatic RFA must be cognizant of these delayed treatment-related problems. PMID:15024305

  18. Alternative energy sources for surgical treatment of atrial fibrillation in patients undergoing mitral valve surgery: microwave ablation vs cryoablation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joon Bum; Cho, Won-Chul; Jung, Sung Ho; Chung, Cheol Hyun; Choo, Suk Jung; Lee, Jae Won

    2010-10-01

    The study aim was to compare maze outcomes using microwave ablation or cryoablation in patients with mitral disease and atrial fibrillation (AF). Between 1999 and 2005, 340 patients underwent mitral valve surgery and concomitant maze procedure involving either microwave ablation (n=96, MW group) or cryoablation (n=244, Cryo group). Mean age at operation was 50.0±12.5 yr. Follow-up period was 46.1±28.2 months. The Cryo group showed a longer aortic clamping time than the MW group (P=0.005). There were no differences in operative mortality and morbidity rates. The unadjusted 5-yr AF free rate was 61.3±1.2% in the MW group and 79.9±3.2% in the Cryo group (P=0.089). After adjustment, the MW group only showed a tendency toward more frequent AF recurrence than the Cryo group (Hazard ration 1.66, 95% confidence interval 0.89 to 3.07). Multivariate analysis revealed that older patient age (P<0.001) and greater left atrial size (P<0.001) were independent risk factors for AF recurrence. Although the use of microwave ablation results in shorter aortic clamping time, it has a tendency toward more frequent late AF recurrence than with cryoablation.

  19. Sequential activation of a segmented ground pad reduces skin heating during radiofrequency tumor ablation: optimization via computational models.

    PubMed

    Schutt, David J; Haemmerich, Dieter

    2008-07-01

    Radiofrequency (RF) ablation has become an accepted treatment modality for unresectable tumors. The need for larger ablation zones has resulted in increased RF generator power. Skin burns due to ground pad heating are increasingly limiting further increases in generator power, and thus, ablation zone size. We investigated a method for reducing ground pad heating in which a commercial ground pad is segmented into multiple ground electrodes, with sequential activation of ground electrode subsets. We created finite-element method computer models of a commercial ground pad (14 x 23 cm) and compared normal operation of a standard pad to sequential activation of a segmented pad (two to five separate ground electrode segments). A constant current of 1 A was applied for 12 min in all simulations. Time periods during sequential activation simulations were adjusted to keep the leading edge temperatures at each ground electrode equal. The maximum temperature using standard activation of the commercial pad was 41.7 degrees C. For sequential activation of a segmented pad, the maximum temperature ranged from 39.3 degrees C (five segments) to 40.9 degrees C (two segments). Sequential activation of a segmented ground pad resulted in lower tissue temperatures. This method may reduce the incidence of ground pad burns and enable the use of higher power generators during RF tumor ablation.

  20. Sequential Activation of a Segmented Ground Pad Reduces Skin Heating During Radiofrequency Tumor Ablation: Optimization via Computational Models

    PubMed Central

    Schutt, David J.; Haemmerich, Dieter

    2009-01-01

    Radiofrequency (RF) ablation has become an accepted treatment modality for unresectable tumors. The need for larger ablation zones has resulted in increased RF generator power. Skin burns due to ground pad heating are increasingly limiting further increases in generator power, and thus, ablation zone size. We investigated a method for reducing ground pad heating in which a commercial ground pad is segmented into multiple ground electrodes, with sequential activation of ground electrode subsets. We created finite-element method computer models of a commercial ground pad (14 × 23 cm) and compared normal operation of a standard pad to sequential activation of a segmented pad (two to five separate ground electrode segments). A constant current of 1 A was applied for 12 min in all simulations. Time periods during sequential activation simulations were adjusted to keep the leading edge temperatures at each ground electrode equal. The maximum temperature using standard activation of the commercial pad was 41.7 °C. For sequential activation of a segmented pad, the maximum temperature ranged from 39.3 °C (five segments) to 40.9 °C (two segments). Sequential activation of a segmented ground pad resulted in lower tissue temperatures. This method may reduce the incidence of ground pad burns and enable the use of higher power generators during RF tumor ablation. PMID:18595807

  1. Thermal ablation.

    PubMed

    Webb, Heather; Lubner, Meghan G; Hinshaw, J Louis

    2011-04-01

    Image-guided tumor ablation refers to a group of treatment modalities that have emerged during the past 2 decades as important tools in the treatment of a wide range of tumors throughout the body. Although most widely recognized in the treatment of hepatic and renal malignancies, the role of thermal ablation has expanded to include lesions of the lung, breast, prostate, bone, as well as other organs and its clinical applications continue to increase. In the following article, we discuss the major thermal ablation modalities, their respective strengths and weaknesses, potential complications and how to avoid them, as well as possible future applications.

  2. Gold nanoshelled liquid perfluorocarbon magnetic nanocapsules: a nanotheranostic platform for bimodal ultrasound/magnetic resonance imaging guided photothermal tumor ablation.

    PubMed

    Ke, Hengte; Wang, Jinrui; Tong, Sheng; Jin, Yushen; Wang, Shumin; Qu, Enze; Bao, Gang; Dai, Zhifei

    2013-01-01

    Imaging guided ablation therapy has been applied in both biomedical research and clinical trials and turned out to be one of the most promising approaches for cancer treatment. Herein, the multifunctional nanocapsules were fabricated through loading perfluorooctylbromide (PFOB) and superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIOs) into poly(lactic acid) (PLA) nanocapsules (NCs), followed by the formation of PEGylated gold nanoshell on the surface. The resulting multi-component NCs were proved to be able to act as nanotheranostic agent to achieve successful bimodal ultrasound (US)/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) guided photothermal ablation in human tumor xenograft models non-invasively. Such a single theranostic agent with the combination of real-time US and high-resolution MR imaging would be of great value to offer more comprehensive diagnostic information and dynamics of disease progression for the accurate location of therapeutic focusing spot in the targeted tumor tissue, showing great potential as an effective nanoplatform for contrast imaging guided photothermal therapy.

  3. Rehabilitation of the nose using CAD/CAM and rapid prototyping technology after ablative surgery of squamous cell carcinoma: a pilot clinical report.

    PubMed

    Ciocca, Leonardo; De Crescenzio, Francesca; Fantini, Massimiliano; Scotti, Roberto

    2010-01-01

    Restoration of a nasal defect after ablative surgery for squamous cell carcinoma necessitates replacing the missing volume and anchoring a prosthesis to the patient's face. This report describes the failure of plastic reconstructive surgery after ablation of a squamous cell cancer of the nose and the esthetic and functional restoration of the patient with a nasal prosthesis. The process of making an implant-supported prosthesis using digital technology, including digitized anatomic models from a "nose library," and the rapid prototyping of the mesiostructure for bar anchorage and of the mold for silicone processing are presented.

  4. Design and rationale of the PRAGUE-12 trial: a large, prospective, randomized, multicenter trial that compares cardiac surgery with left atrial surgical ablation with cardiac surgery without ablation in patients with coronary and/or valvular heart disease plus atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Straka, Zbyněk; Budera, Petr; Osmančík, Pavel; Vaněk, Tomáš; Hulman, Michal; Smíd, Michal; Malý, Marek; Widimský, Petr

    2013-01-01

    Surgical ablation procedure can restore sinus rhythm (SR) in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) undergoing cardiac surgery. However, it is not known whether it has any impact on clinical outcomes. There is a need for a randomized trial with long-term follow-up to study the outcome of surgical ablation in patients with coronary and/or valve disease and AF. Patients are prospectively enrolled and randomized either to group A (cardiac surgery with left atrial ablation) or group B (cardiac surgery alone). The primary efficacy outcome is the SR presence (without any AF episode) during a 24-hour electrocardiogram after 1 year. The primary safety outcome is the combined end point of death, myocardial infarction, stroke, and renal failure at 30 days. Long-term outcomes are a composite of total mortality, stroke, bleeding, and heart failure at 1 and 5 years. We finished the enrollment with a total of 224 patients from 3 centers in 2 countries in December 2011. Currently, the incomplete 1-year data are available, and the patients who enrolled first will have their 5-year visits shortly. PRAGUE-12 is the largest study to be conducted so far comparing cardiac surgery with surgical ablation of AF to cardiac surgery without ablation in an unselected population of patients who are operated on for coronary and/or valve disease. Its long-term results will lead to a better recognition of ablation's potential clinical benefits.

  5. Transarterial Ethanol Ablation Combined with Transarterial Chemoembolization for Hepatocellular Carcinoma with Portal Vein Tumor Thrombus

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Biao; You, Xin; Yuan, Min lan; Qin, Tian Qiang; Duan, Lin Jia; He, Jiao; Fei, Ze Jun; Zhou, Xuan; Zan, Rui Yu; Liao, Zheng Yin

    2016-01-01

    Background The prognosis for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with portal vein tumor thrombosis (PVTT) is extremely poor. Objectives This study aimed to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of transarterial ethanol ablation (TEA) for the treatment of HCC with PVTT. Methods Patients were treated with TEA for PVTT under cone-beam computed tomography and traditional transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) with epirubicin for intrahepatic lesions. Results Seventeen men were successfully treated with TACE plus TEA. The mean overall survival was 18.3 ± 9.0 months (95% CI: 13.7 - 3.0 months). The quality of life (QoL) score increased from 56.9 ± 15.7 before the procedure to 88.5 ± 11.7 at 4 weeks after the procedure. Lipiodol accumulation grades of 3, 2, 1, and 0 were obtained in 3 (17.6%), 8 (47.1%), 6 (35.3%), and 0 (0%) patients, respectively. Conclusions TEA is a safe and effective method for treating patients with PVTT, offering advantages for QoL, response rate after TEA, and OS. PMID:27799963

  6. Percutaneous minimally invasive therapies in the treatment of bone tumors: thermal ablation.

    PubMed

    Simon, Caroline J; Dupuy, Damian E

    2006-06-01

    Many percutaneous image-guided ablative techniques have been utilized in the treatment of bone cancers. These techniques are fast becoming a focus in the treatment of patients with both benign and malignant forms of bone cancer. This article will review the principles of radiofrequency ablation including its use in combination with other therapies, cryoablation, and microwave ablation in the treatment of osteoid osteomas and bone metastases.

  7. State of the art in computer-assisted planning, intervention, and assessment of liver-tumor ablation.

    PubMed

    Schumann, Christian; Rieder, Christian; Bieberstein, Jennifer; Weihusen, Andreas; Zidowitz, Stephan; Moltz, Jan Hendrik; Preusser, Tobias

    2010-01-01

    Percutaneous, image-guided thermal tumor ablation procedures are used increasingly for minimally invasive, local treatment of tumors in the liver. The planning of these procedures; the support of targeting, monitoring, and controlling during the intervention itself; and the assessment of the treatment response can all benefit significantly from computer assistance. The outcome can be optimized by supporting the physician in the process of determining an intervention strategy that enables complete destruction of the targeted tumor while reducing the danger of complications. During the intervention, computer-assisted methods can be used to guide the physician in the implementation of the intended strategy by providing planning information. Assessment of the intervention result is carried out by comparison of the achieved coagulation with the target tumor volume. Supporting this comparison facilitates the early detection of potential recurrences. This report provides an overview of state-of-the-art computer-assisted methods for the support of thermal tumor ablations in the liver. Proper approaches for image segmentation, access-path determination, simulation, visualization, interventional guidance, and post-interventional assessment, as well as integrated work flow-oriented solutions, are reviewed with respect to technical aspects and applicability in the clinical setting.

  8. Real-Time US-CT/MRI Image Fusion for Guidance of Thermal Ablation of Liver Tumors Undetectable with US: Results in 295 Cases

    SciTech Connect

    Mauri, Giovanni Cova, Luca; Beni, Stefano De; Ierace, Tiziana Tondolo, Tania Cerri, Anna; Goldberg, S. Nahum; Solbiati, Luigi

    2015-02-15

    PurposeThis study was designed to assess feasibility of US-CT/MRI fusion-guided ablation in liver tumors undetectable with US.MethodsFrom 2002 to 2012, 295 tumors (162 HCCs and 133 metastases; mean diameter 1.3 ± 0.6 cm, range 0.5–2.5 cm) detectable on contrast-enhanced CT/MRI, but completely undetectable with unenhanced US and either totally undetectable or incompletely conspicuous with contrast-enhanced US (CEUS), were treated in 215 sessions using either internally cooled radiofrequency or microwave with standard ablation protocols, guided by an image fusion system (Virtual Navigation System, Esaote S.p.A., Genova, Italy) that combines US with CT/ MRI images. Correct targeting and successful ablation of tumor were verified after 24 hours with CT or MRI.ResultsA total of 282 of 295 (95.6 %) tumors were correctly targeted with successful ablation achieved in 266 of 295 (90.2 %). Sixteen of 295 (5.4 %) tumors were correctly targeted, but unsuccessfully ablated, and 13 of 295 (4.4 %) tumors were unsuccessfully ablated due to inaccurate targeting. There were no perioperative deaths. Major complications were observed in 2 of the 215 treatments sessions (0.9 %).ConclusionsReal-time virtual navigation system with US-CT/MRI fusion imaging is precise for targeting and achieving successful ablation of target tumors undetectable with US alone. Therefore, a larger population could benefit from ultrasound guided ablation procedures.

  9. Using laser ablation/inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry to bioimage multiple elements in mouse tumors after hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Yi-Kong; Jiang, Pei-Shin; Yang, Bing-Shen; Sun, Tian-Ye; Peng, Hsu-Hsia; Wang, Chu-Fang

    2011-08-01

    In this study, we employed laser ablation/inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) to map the spatial distribution of Gd-doped iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) in one tumor slice that had been subjected to magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH). The mapping results revealed the high resolution of the elemental analysis, with the distribution of Gd atoms highly correlated with that of the Fe atoms. The spatial distributions of C, P, S, and Zn atoms revealed that the effect of MFH treatment was significantly dependent on the diffusion of the magnetic fluid in the tissue. An observed enrichment of Cu atoms after MFH treatment was probably due to inflammation in the tumor. The abnormal distribution of Ni atoms suggests a probable biochemical reaction in the tumor. Therefore, this LA-ICP-MS mapping technique can provide novel information regarding the spatial distribution of elements in tumors after cancer therapy.

  10. Randomized trial of radiofrequency ablation versus conventional surgery for superficial venous insufficiency: if you don’t tell, they won’t know

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida Mendes, Cynthia; de Arruda Martins, Alexandre; Fukuda, Juliana Maria; Parente, José Ben-Hur Ferraz; Munia, Marco Antonio Soares; Fioranelli, Alexandre; Teivelis, Marcelo Passos; Varella, Andrea Yasbek Monteiro; Caffaro, Roberto Augusto; Kuzniec, Sergio; Wolosker, Nelson

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study compared radiofrequency ablation versus conventional surgery in patients who had not undergone previous treatment for bilateral great saphenous vein insufficiency, with each patient serving as his own control. METHOD: This was a randomized controlled trial that included 18 patients and was carried out between November 2013 and May 2015. Each of the lower limbs of each patient was randomly assigned to undergo either radiofrequency ablation or conventional surgery. Clinical features (hyperpigmentation, hematoma, aesthetics, pain, skin burn, nerve injury, and thrombophlebitis) were evaluated at one week, one month, and six months postoperatively. Hemodynamic assessments (presence of resection or occlusion of the great saphenous vein and recurrent reflux in the sapheno-femoral junction and in the great saphenous vein) were performed at one month, six months, and 12 months postoperatively. The independent observer (a physician not involved in the original operation), patient, and duplex ultrasonographer were not made aware of the treatment done in each case. Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT02588911. RESULTS: Among the clinical variables analyzed, only the aesthetic evaluation by the physicians was significant, with radiofrequency ablation being considered better than conventional surgery (average, 0.91 points higher: standard deviation: 0.31; 95% confidence interval: -1.51, -0.30; p=0.003). However, in our study, we observed primary success rates of 80% for radiofrequency ablation and 100% for conventional surgery. CONCLUSIONS: If the physician is not required to inform the patient as to the technique being performed, the patient will not be able to identify the technique based on the signs and symptoms. Our study revealed that both techniques led to high levels of patient satisfaction, but our results favor the choice of conventional surgery over radiofrequency ablation, as patients who underwent conventional surgery had better hemodynamic assessments

  11. Radiofrequency ablation of renal tumors with an expandable multitined electrode: results, complications, and pilot evaluation of cooled pyeloperfusion for collecting system protection.

    PubMed

    Rouvière, Olivier; Badet, Lionel; Murat, François Joseph; Maréchal, Jean Marie; Colombel, Marc; Martin, Xavier; Lyonnet, Denis; Gelet, Albert

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to retrospectively evaluate the results of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of renal tumors with an impedance-based system using an expandable multitined electrode. Twenty-two patients (30 tumors) were treated with RFA over a 7-year period, percutaneously (16 tumors) or intraoperatively (14 tumors). Follow-up imaging was performed at 1-3, 6, and 12 months and yearly thereafter. Twenty-seven of 30 tumors (19/22 patients) showed no residual tumor on the first imaging control. Two residual tumors were successfully ablated by a second RFA procedure. Our mean follow-up period was 35 months (range, 3-84 months). Two tumors that had been completely ablated based on imaging criteria recurred 11 and 48 months after RFA. One was treated by partial nephrectomy. The other one was not treated because the patient developed bone metastases. One patient had nephrectomy because of an RFA-induced ureteropelvic junction stricture. Nine patients (11 sessions) had a pyeloperfusion of cooled saline during RFA. None developed symptomatic complications, even though in three patients the ablation zone extended to the closest calyx (3-5 mm from the tumor). We conclude that RFA of renal tumors is promising, but serious complications to the collecting system must be taken into consideration. Prophylactic per-procedural cooling of the collecting system is feasible but needs further assessment.

  12. Radiofrequency Ablation of Renal Tumors with an Expandable Multitined Electrode: Results, Complications, and Pilot Evaluation of Cooled Pyeloperfusion for Collecting System Protection

    SciTech Connect

    Rouviere, Olivier Badet, Lionel; Murat, Francois Joseph; Marechal, Jean Marie; Colombel, Marc; Martin, Xavier; Lyonnet, Denis; Gelet, Albert

    2008-05-15

    The objective of this study was to retrospectively evaluate the results of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of renal tumors with an impedance-based system using an expandable multitined electrode. Twenty-two patients (30 tumors) were treated with RFA over a 7-year period, percutaneously (16 tumors) or intraoperatively (14 tumors). Follow-up imaging was performed at 1-3, 6, and 12 months and yearly thereafter. Twenty-seven of 30 tumors (19/22 patients) showed no residual tumor on the first imaging control. Two residual tumors were successfully ablated by a second RFA procedure. Our mean follow-up period was 35 months (range, 3-84 months). Two tumors that had been completely ablated based on imaging criteria recurred 11 and 48 months after RFA. One was treated by partial nephrectomy. The other one was not treated because the patient developed bone metastases. One patient had nephrectomy because of an RFA-induced ureteropelvic junction stricture. Nine patients (11 sessions) had a pyeloperfusion of cooled saline during RFA. None developed symptomatic complications, even though in three patients the ablation zone extended to the closest calyx (3-5 mm from the tumor). We conclude that RFA of renal tumors is promising, but serious complications to the collecting system must be taken into consideration. Prophylactic per-procedural cooling of the collecting system is feasible but needs further assessment.

  13. Use of radiofrequency ablation in benign thyroid nodules: a literature review and updates.

    PubMed

    Wong, Kai-Pun; Lang, Brian Hung-Hin

    2013-01-01

    Successful thermal ablation using radiofrequency has been reported in various tumors including liver or kidney tumors. Nonsurgical minimally invasive ablative therapy such as radiofrequency ablation (RFA) has been reported to be a safe and efficient treatment option in managing symptomatic cold thyroid nodules or hyperfunctioning thyroid nodules. Pressure and cosmetic symptoms have been shown to be significantly improved both in the short and long terms after RFA. For hyperfunctioning thyroid nodules, RFA is indicated for whom surgery or radioiodine are not indicated or ineffective or for those who refuse surgery or radio-iodine. Improvement of thyroid function with decreased need for antithyroid medications has been reported. Complication rate is relatively low. By reviewing the current literature, we reported its efficacy and complications and compared the efficacy of RFA relative to other ablative options such as ethanol ablation and laser ablation.

  14. Minimisation of the thermal load of the ablation in high-speed laser corneal refractive surgery: the 'intelligent thermal effect control' of the AMARIS platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunsmann, Ulrich; Sauer, Udo; Dressler, Katharina; Triefenbach, Nico; Arba Mosquera, Samuel

    2010-03-01

    The purpose of this work was to evaluate the extent that minimisation of the thermal load of the ablation in high-speed laser corneal refractive surgery is possible. To do this, thermal load from ablations onto flat PMMA plates was recorded with an infrared thermal camera and analysed for different flying-spot sorting algorithms (from pure randomised to 36 Hz local frequency) using a 500 Hz laser system with a fluence of 500 mJ/cm2, and aspheric ablation profiles. Each ablation configuration was repeated three times. Thermal load valid for corneal ablations was modelled based upon the results from ablations onto flat PMMA plates. It was found that the thermal load of ablations onto flat PMMA plates declines steadily when the allowed local frequency decreases or when the diameter of the blocked area increases. With this laser system, a local frequency of 39 Hz dynamically controlled over a diameter of 3.865 mm seems to be optimal for avoiding corneal collagen denaturation with minimum compromise on treatment duration. Peak temperature changes of 48°C in PMMA (16°C equivalent cornea) using pure randomised flying-spot sorting algorithms were reduced to 27°C in PMMA (9°C equivalent cornea) using 36 Hz local frequency over a blocked diameter of 4.25 mm. Average temperature changes of 15°C in PMMA (5°C equivalent cornea) using pure randomised flying-spot sorting algorithms were reduced to 7°C in PMMA (2°C equivalent cornea) using 36 Hz local frequency over a blocked diameter of 4.25 mm. Hence, minimisation of the thermal load of the ablation in high-speed laser corneal refractive surgery seems feasible using 'Intelligent Thermal Effect Control'. Clinical evaluations of human eyes are needed to confirm the preliminary simulated results presented here.

  15. Robotic surgery for gastric tumor: current status and new approaches.

    PubMed

    Lim, Seung Hyun; Lee, Hae Min; Son, Taeil; Hyung, Woo Jin; Kim, Hyoung-Il

    2016-01-01

    Surgical techniques have evolved tremendously over this past century. To maximize the efficacy and minimize the invasiveness of laparoscopic surgery, researchers have sought to implement wider application of robotics. Nevertheless, both optimism without sound evidence and fear of new technology obscure the appropriate uses of robotic surgery. In the present review, we attempted to provide a balanced perspective on the current state of robotic gastrectomy, outlining evidence and opportunities for the use thereof. Although evidence is limited, the use of robotics is feasible for gastric cancer surgery, and less than 10 cases of robotic surgery are needed to become proficient therein. Compared to the clinical impact of laparoscopy on gastric cancer surgery, the additional benefits of robotic surgery to patients seem to be limited. Despite additional costs and longer surgeries, robotic surgery reportedly does not offer surgical outcomes superior to those for laparoscopic surgery, according to a recent multicenter study. Meanwhile, however, our in-depth review of retrospective and prospective reports revealed that robots could expand the indications of minimally invasive gastrectomy for patients requiring total gastrectomy and D2 lymph node dissection. Moreover, we found that robotic gastrectomy is associated with a higher number of retrieved lymph nodes, less bleeding, fewer complications, and shorter hospital stay, compared to laparoscopic gastrectomy. Accordingly, new surgical approaches using advanced technologies, such as near infrared detectors, the Tilepro(®) multi-input display, dual consoles, and the Single-Site(®) system, are under investigation. In conclusion, measuring the additional benefits of robotic over laparoscopic surgery would be difficult and clinically insignificant. Thus, developing new surgical procedures that extend the benefits of conventional laparoscopic surgery to patients in whom minimally invasive surgery would not be possible is

  16. Robotic surgery for gastric tumor: current status and new approaches

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Seung Hyun; Lee, Hae Min; Son, Taeil; Hyung, Woo Jin

    2016-01-01

    Surgical techniques have evolved tremendously over this past century. To maximize the efficacy and minimize the invasiveness of laparoscopic surgery, researchers have sought to implement wider application of robotics. Nevertheless, both optimism without sound evidence and fear of new technology obscure the appropriate uses of robotic surgery. In the present review, we attempted to provide a balanced perspective on the current state of robotic gastrectomy, outlining evidence and opportunities for the use thereof. Although evidence is limited, the use of robotics is feasible for gastric cancer surgery, and less than 10 cases of robotic surgery are needed to become proficient therein. Compared to the clinical impact of laparoscopy on gastric cancer surgery, the additional benefits of robotic surgery to patients seem to be limited. Despite additional costs and longer surgeries, robotic surgery reportedly does not offer surgical outcomes superior to those for laparoscopic surgery, according to a recent multicenter study. Meanwhile, however, our in-depth review of retrospective and prospective reports revealed that robots could expand the indications of minimally invasive gastrectomy for patients requiring total gastrectomy and D2 lymph node dissection. Moreover, we found that robotic gastrectomy is associated with a higher number of retrieved lymph nodes, less bleeding, fewer complications, and shorter hospital stay, compared to laparoscopic gastrectomy. Accordingly, new surgical approaches using advanced technologies, such as near infrared detectors, the Tilepro® multi-input display, dual consoles, and the Single-Site® system, are under investigation. In conclusion, measuring the additional benefits of robotic over laparoscopic surgery would be difficult and clinically insignificant. Thus, developing new surgical procedures that extend the benefits of conventional laparoscopic surgery to patients in whom minimally invasive surgery would not be possible is necessary

  17. [Pulmonary Metastasis from a Phyllodes Tumor of the Breast Developing Sixteen Years after Initial Surgery].

    PubMed

    Chang, Sung-Soo; Nakano, Takayuki; Okamoto, Taku; Takabatake, Daisuke

    2015-11-01

    We report a case of solitary pulmonary metastasis from a phyllodes tumor of the breast appearing 16 years after initial surgery. The patient was a 56-year-old woman who had undergone surgical extirpation of a left breast tumor diagnosed as phyllodes tumor (borderline malignancy) in 1998, and a right breast tumor diagnosed as fibromatosis in 2000. Sixteen years after the initial operation, she consulted our hospital because of a chest X-ray abnormality detected at a screening examination. Chest computed tomography revealed a well defined nodular shadow in the left upper lobe of the lung. Surgery was done since primary lung cancer was suspected. However, pathological diagnosis was a pulmonary metastasis from the phyllodes tumor of the left breast. Right breast tumor was also diagnosed as a metastasis from the left breast tumor by histopathological re-evaluation.

  18. Radiofrequency Ablation in Combination with Embolization in Metachronous Recurrent Renal Cancer in Solitary Kidney after Contralateral Tumor Nephrectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Gebauer, Bernhard Werk, Michael; Lopez-Haenninen, Enrique; Felix, Roland; Althaus, Peter

    2007-07-15

    Purpose. To evaluate the feasibility and safety of minimally invasive, percutaneous techniques in metachronous recurrent renal cell cancers (RCCs) in solitary kidneys. Methods. In 4 patients, recurrent RCC was treated by radiofrequency ablation (RFA) (RITA, StarBurst) alone, and in 2 patients by RFA in combination with superselective transarterial particle-lipiodol embolization using 3 Fr microcatheters. RFA was guided by computed tomography in 5 patients, and by magnetic resonance imaging in 1 patient. Mean tumor diameter was 26.7 mm (range 10-45 mm). All interventions were technically successful; during follow-up 1 patient developed recurrent RCC, which was retreated by RFA after embolization. Results. No major peri- or postprocedural complications occurred. Changes in creatinine (pre- vs. post-intervention, 122 vs. 127 {mu}mol/l) and calculated creatinine clearance (pre- vs. post-intervention, 78 vs. 73 ml/min) after ablation were minimal. Conclusion. In single kidneys, percutaneous, minimally invasive techniques are safe and feasible. In large tumors, or where there are adjacent critical structures, we prefer a combination of embolization and thermal ablation (RFA)

  19. Macrophage Ablation Reduces M2-Like Populations and Jeopardizes Tumor Growth in a MAFIA-Based Glioma Model12

    PubMed Central

    Gabrusiewicz, Konrad; Hossain, Mohammad B.; Cortes-Santiago, Nahir; Fan, Xuejun; Kaminska, Bozena; Marini, Frank C.; Fueyo, Juan; Gomez-Manzano, Candelaria

    2015-01-01

    Monocytes/macrophages are an influential component of the glioma microenvironment. However, understanding their diversity and plasticity constitute one of the most challenging areas of research due to the paucity of models to study these cells' inherent complexity. Herein, we analyzed the role of monocytes/macrophages in glioma growth by using a transgenic model that allows for conditional ablation of this cell population. We modeled glioma using intracranial GL261-bearing CSF-1R–GFP+ macrophage Fas-induced apoptosis (MAFIA) transgenic mice. Conditional macrophage ablation was achieved by exposure to the dimerizer AP20187. Double immunofluorescence was used to characterize M1- and M2-like monocytes/macrophages during tumor growth and after conditional ablation. During glioma growth, the monocyte/macrophage population consisted predominantly of M2 macrophages. Conditional temporal depletion of macrophages reduced the number of GFP+ cells, targeting mainly the repopulation of M2-polarized cells, and altered the appearance of M1-like monocytes/macrophages, which suggested a shift in the M1/M2 macrophage balance. Of interest, compared with control-treated mice, macrophage-depleted mice had a lower tumor mitotic index, microvascular density, and reduced tumor growth. These results demonstrated the possibility of studying in vivo the role and phenotype of macrophages in gliomas and suggested that transitory depletion of CSF-1R+ population influences the reconstitutive phenotypic pool of these cells, ultimately suppressing tumor growth. The MAFIA model provides a much needed advance in defining the role of macrophages in gliomas. PMID:25925380

  20. Fiber-optic combined FPI/FBG sensors for monitoring of radiofrequency thermal ablation of liver tumors: ex vivo experiments.

    PubMed

    Tosi, Daniele; Macchi, Edoardo Gino; Braschi, Giovanni; Cigada, Alfredo; Gallati, Mario; Rossi, Sandro; Poeggel, Sven; Leen, Gabriel; Lewis, Elfed

    2014-04-01

    We present a biocompatible, all-glass, 0.2 mm diameter, fiber-optic probe that combines an extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometry and a proximal fiber Bragg grating sensor; the probe enables dual pressure and temperature measurement on an active 4 mm length, with 40 Pa and 0.2°C nominal accuracy. The sensing system has been applied to monitor online the radiofrequency thermal ablation of tumors in liver tissue. Preliminary experiments have been performed in a reference chamber with uniform heating; further experiments have been carried out on ex vivo porcine liver, which allowed the measurement of a steep temperature gradient and monitoring of the local pressure increase during the ablation procedure.

  1. Technique for creation of artificial pneumothorax for pain relief during radiofrequency ablation of peripheral lung tumors: report of seven cases.

    PubMed

    Hiraki, Takao; Gobara, Hideo; Shibamoto, Kentaro; Mimura, Hidefumi; Soda, Yuko; Uka, Mayu; Masaoka, Yoshihisa; Toyooka, Shinichi; Kanazawa, Susumu

    2011-04-01

    This report describes seven cases in which a pneumothorax was artificially created for relief from severe pain that occurred during radiofrequency (RF) ablation of peripheral lung tumors. In this procedure, the multitined probe surrounding the lesion was advanced into the chest, displacing the tines and the peripheral tumor away from the parietal pleura and the chest wall and resulting in pain relief in one patient; in the remaining patients, an intravenous catheter was also introduced, followed by the administration of carbon dioxide (CO(2)) into the space between the tumor and the parietal pleura. The pain decreased considerably immediately after this procedure. No complication related to the creation of the artificial pneumothorax was observed. Creation of an artificial pneumothorax is a safe and effective method for pain relief.

  2. Radiofrequency Ablation of Liver Metastases-Software-Assisted Evaluation of the Ablation Zone in MDCT: Tumor-Free Follow-Up Versus Local Recurrent Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Keil, Sebastian Bruners, Philipp; Schiffl, Katharina; Sedlmair, Martin; Muehlenbruch, Georg; Guenther, Rolf W.; Das, Marco; Mahnken, Andreas H.

    2010-04-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate differences in change of size and CT value between local recurrences and tumor-free areas after CT-guided radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of hepatic metastases during follow-up by means of dedicated software for automatic evaluation of hepatic lesions. Thirty-two patients with 54 liver metastases from breast or colorectal cancer underwent triphasic contrast-enhanced multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) to evaluate hepatic metastatic spread and localization before CT-guided RFA and for follow-up after intervention. Sixteen of these patients (65.1 {+-} 10.3 years) with 30 metastases stayed tumor-free (group 1), while the other group (n = 16 with 24 metastases; 62.0 {+-} 13.8 years) suffered from local recurrent disease (group 2). Applying an automated software tool (SyngoCT Oncology; Siemens Healthcare, Forchheim, Germany), size parameters (volume, RECIST, WHO) and attenuation were measured within the lesions before, 1 day after, and 28 days after RFA treatment. The natural logarithm (ln) of the quotient of the volume 1 day versus 28 days after RFA treament was computed: lnQ1//28/0{sub volume}. Analogously, ln ratios of RECIST, WHO, and attenuation were computed and statistically evaluated by repeated-measures ANOVA. One lesion in group 2 was excluded from further evaluation due to automated missegmentation. Statistically significant differences between the two groups were observed with respect to initial volume, RECIST, and WHO (p < 0.05). Furthermore, ln ratios corresponding to volume, RECIST, and WHO differed significantly between the two groups. Attenuation evaluations showed no significant differences, but there was a trend toward attenuation assessment for the parameter lnQ28/0{sub attenuation} (p = 0.0527), showing higher values for group 1 (-0.4 {+-} 0.3) compared to group 2 (-0.2 {+-} 0.2). In conclusion, hepatic metastases and their zone of coagulation necrosis after RFA differed significantly between tumor

  3. Radiofrequency ablation of liver metastases-software-assisted evaluation of the ablation zone in MDCT: tumor-free follow-up versus local recurrent disease.

    PubMed

    Keil, Sebastian; Bruners, Philipp; Schiffl, Katharina; Sedlmair, Martin; Mühlenbruch, Georg; Günther, Rolf W; Das, Marco; Mahnken, Andreas H

    2010-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate differences in change of size and CT value between local recurrences and tumor-free areas after CT-guided radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of hepatic metastases during follow-up by means of dedicated software for automatic evaluation of hepatic lesions. Thirty-two patients with 54 liver metastases from breast or colorectal cancer underwent triphasic contrast-enhanced multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) to evaluate hepatic metastatic spread and localization before CT-guided RFA and for follow-up after intervention. Sixteen of these patients (65.1 + or - 10.3 years) with 30 metastases stayed tumor-free (group 1), while the other group (n = 16 with 24 metastases; 62.0 + or - 13.8 years) suffered from local recurrent disease (group 2). Applying an automated software tool (SyngoCT Oncology; Siemens Healthcare, Forchheim, Germany), size parameters (volume, RECIST, WHO) and attenuation were measured within the lesions before, 1 day after, and 28 days after RFA treatment. The natural logarithm (ln) of the quotient of the volume 1 day versus 28 days after RFA treament was computed: lnQ1//28/0(volume). Analogously, ln ratios of RECIST, WHO, and attenuation were computed and statistically evaluated by repeated-measures ANOVA. One lesion in group 2 was excluded from further evaluation due to automated missegmentation. Statistically significant differences between the two groups were observed with respect to initial volume, RECIST, and WHO (p < 0.05). Furthermore, ln ratios corresponding to volume, RECIST, and WHO differed significantly between the two groups. Attenuation evaluations showed no significant differences, but there was a trend toward attenuation assessment for the parameter lnQ28/0(attenuation) (p = 0.0527), showing higher values for group 1 (-0.4 + or - 0.3) compared to group 2 (-0.2 + or - 0.2). In conclusion, hepatic metastases and their zone of coagulation necrosis after RFA differed significantly between tumor

  4. High-intensity focused ultrasound with large scale spherical phased array for the ablation of deep tumors.

    PubMed

    Ji, Xiang; Bai, Jing-feng; Shen, Guo-feng; Chen, Ya-zhu

    2009-09-01

    Under some circumstances surgical resection is feasible in a low percentage for the treatment of deep tumors. Nevertheless, high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is beginning to offer a potential noninvasive alternative to conventional therapies for the treatment of deep tumors. In our previous study, a large scale spherical HIFU-phased array was developed to ablate deep tumors. In the current study, taking into account the required focal depth and maximum acoustic power output, 90 identical circular PZT-8 elements (diameter =1.4 cm and frequency=1 MHz) were mounted on a spherical shell with a radius of curvature of 18 cm and a diameter of 21 cm. With the developed array, computer simulations and ex vivo experiments were carried out. The simulation results theoretically demonstrate the ability of the array to focus and steer in the specified volume (a 2 cmx2 cmx3 cm volume) at the focal depth of 15 to 18 cm. Ex vivo experiment results also verify the capability of the developed array to ablate deep target tissue by either moving single focal point or generating multiple foci simultaneously.

  5. Femtosecond laser corneal surgery with in situ determination of the laser attenuation and ablation threshold by second harmonic generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plamann, Karsten; Nuzzo, Valeria; Albert, Olivier; Mourou, Gérard A.; Savoldelli, Michèle; Dagonet, Françoise; Donate, David; Legeais, Jean-Marc

    2007-02-01

    Femtosecond lasers start to be routinely used in refractive eye surgery. Current research focuses on their application to glaucoma and cataract surgery as well as cornea transplant procedures. To avoid unwanted tissue damage during the surgical intervention it is of utmost importance to maintain a working energy just above the ablation threshold and maintain the laser energy at this working point independently of the local and global tissue properties. To quantify the attenuation of the laser power density in the tissue by absorption, scattering and modification of the point spread function we monitor the second harmonic radiation generated in the collagen matrix of the cornea when exposed to ultrashort laser pulses. We use a CPA system with a regenerative amplifier delivering pulses at a wavelength of 1.06 μm, pulse durations of 400 fs and a maximum energy of 60 μJ. The repetition rate is adjustable from single shot up to 10 kHz. The experiments are performed on human corneas provided by the French Eye bank. To capture the SHG radiation we use a photomultiplier tube connected to a lockin amplifier tuned to the laser repetition rate. The measured data indicates an exponential decay of the laser beam intensity in the volume of the sample and allows for the quantification of the attenuation coefficient and its correlation with the optical properties of the cornea. Complementary analyses were performed on the samples by ultrastructural histology.

  6. Radiofrequency Ablation of Liver Tumors in Combination with Local OK-432 Injection Prolongs Survival and Suppresses Distant Tumor Growth in the Rabbit Model with Intra- and Extrahepatic VX2 Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Kageyama, Ken Yamamoto, Akira Okuma, Tomohisa Hamamoto, Shinichi Takeshita, Toru Sakai, Yukimasa Nishida, Norifumi Matsuoka, Toshiyuki Miki, Yukio

    2013-10-15

    Purpose: To evaluate survival and distant tumor growth after radiofrequency ablation (RFA) and local OK-432 injection at a single tumor site in a rabbit model with intra- and extrahepatic VX2 tumors and to examine the effect of this combination therapy, which we termed immuno-radiofrequency ablation (immunoRFA), on systemic antitumor immunity in a rechallenge test. Methods: Our institutional animal care committee approved all experiments. VX2 tumors were implanted to three sites: two in the liver and one in the left ear. Rabbits were randomized into four groups of seven to receive control, RFA alone, OK-432 alone, and immunoRFA treatments at a single liver tumor at 1 week after implantation. Untreated liver and ear tumor volumes were measured after the treatment. As the rechallenge test, tumors were reimplanted into the right ear of rabbits, which survived the 35 weeks and were followed up without additional treatment. Statistical significance was examined by log-rank test for survival and Student's t test for tumor volume. Results: Survival was significantly prolonged in the immunoRFA group compared to the other three groups (P < 0.05). Untreated liver and ear tumor sizes became significantly smaller after immunoRFA compared to controls (P < 0.05). In the rechallenge test, the reimplanted tumors regressed without further therapy compared to the ear tumors of the control group (P < 0.05). Conclusion: ImmunoRFA led to improved survival and suppression of distant untreated tumor growth. Decreases in size of the distant untreated tumors and reimplanted tumors suggested that systemic antitumor immunity was enhanced by immunoRFA.

  7. Phase one clinical trial of the use of focused ultrasound surgery for the treatment of soft-tissue tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ter Haar, Gail R.; Rivens, Ian H.; Moskovic, Eleanor; Huddart, Robert; Visioli, Andrew G.

    1998-04-01

    A prototype extra-corporeal focused ultrasound surgery device has been built and tested extensively in model systems both in vivo and ex vivo. A phase 1, normal tissue toxicity trial is now underway. Patients with soft tissue tumors lying 4 - 12 cm below the skin surface are being treated using a dose escalation technique. An in situ `ablative intensity' (AI) has been established from preclinical studies. This was found to be 1500 Wcm-2 for up to 3 seconds at 1.7 MHz. Groups of three patients are being treated at doses rising from 25% AI through 50%, 63%, 80%, 100% to 125% AI for 1 second. Finally, 2 and 3 second exposure will be used for the two highest doses. Patients receive no sedation or anaesthetic. Target sites include all soft tissue tumors, especially those of the prostate, kidney and liver. Patients are examined for skin erythema, and are asked to complete pain and symptom questionnaires prior to treatment, immediately after treatment, one week and one month later. Patients receive a diagnostic ultrasound scan before and immediately after exposure, and after 1 week. Those at the highest dose levels are also offered a magnetic resonance scan.

  8. Automatic Tracking Algorithm in Coaxial Near-Infrared Laser Ablation Endoscope for Fetus Surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yan; Yamanaka, Noriaki; Masamune, Ken

    2014-07-01

    This article reports a stable vessel object tracking method for the treatment of twin-to-twin transfusion syndrome based on our previous 2 DOF endoscope. During the treatment of laser coagulation, it is necessary to focus on the exact position of the target object, however it moves by the mother's respiratory motion and still remains a challenge to obtain and track the position precisely. In this article, an algorithm which uses features from accelerated segment test (FAST) to extract the features and optical flow as the object tracking method, is proposed to deal with above problem. Further, we experimentally simulate the movement due to the mother's respiration, and the results of position errors and similarity verify the effectiveness of the proposed tracking algorithm for laser ablation endoscopy in-vitro and under water considering two influential factors. At average, the errors are about 10 pixels and the similarity over 0.92 are obtained in the experiments.

  9. Harmonic Motion Imaging for Abdominal Tumor Detection and High-intensity Focused Ultrasound Ablation Monitoring: A Feasibility Study in a Transgenic Mouse Model of Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hong; Hou, Gary Y.; Han, Yang; Payen, Thomas; Palermo, Carmine F.; Olive, Kenneth P.; Konofagou, Elisa E.

    2015-01-01

    Harmonic motion imaging (HMI) is a radiation force-based elasticity imaging technique that tracks oscillatory tissue displacements induced by sinusoidal ultrasonic radiation force to assess relative tissue stiffness. The objective of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of HMI in pancreatic tumor detection and high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment monitoring. The HMI system consisted of a focused ultrasound transducer, which generated sinusoidal radiation force to induce oscillatory tissue motion at 50 Hz, and a diagnostic ultrasound transducer, which detected the axial tissue displacements based on acquired radiofrequency signals using a 1D cross-correlation algorithm. For pancreatic tumor detection, HMI images were generated for pancreatic tumors in transgenic mice and normal pancreases in wild-type mice. The obtained HMI images showed a high contrast between normal and malignant pancreases with an average peak-to-peak HMI displacement ratio of 3.2. Histological analysis showed that no tissue damage was associated with HMI when it was used for the sole purpose of elasticity imaging. For pancreatic tumor ablation monitoring, the focused ultrasound transducer was operated with a higher acoustic power and longer pulse length than that used in tumor detection to simultaneously induce HIFU thermal ablation and oscillatory tissue displacements, allowing HMI monitoring without interrupting tumor ablation. HMI monitoring of HIFU ablation found significant decreases in the peak-to-peak HMI displacements before and after HIFU ablation with a reduction rate ranging from 15.8% to 57.0%. The formation of thermal lesions after HIFU exposure was confirmed by histological analysis. This study demonstrated the feasibility of HMI in abdominal tumor detection and HIFU ablation monitoring. PMID:26415128

  10. Harmonic motion imaging for abdominal tumor detection and high-intensity focused ultrasound ablation monitoring: an in vivo feasibility study in a transgenic mouse model of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong; Hou, Gary Y; Han, Yang; Payen, Thomas; Palermo, Carmine F; Olive, Kenneth P; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2015-09-01

    Harmonic motion imaging (HMI) is a radiationforce- based elasticity imaging technique that tracks oscillatory tissue displacements induced by sinusoidal ultrasonic radiation force to assess the resulting oscillatory displacement denoting the underlying tissue stiffness. The objective of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of HMI in pancreatic tumor detection and high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment monitoring. The HMI system consisted of a focused ultrasound transducer, which generated sinusoidal radiation force to induce oscillatory tissue motion at 50 Hz, and a diagnostic ultrasound transducer, which detected the axial tissue displacements based on acquired radio-frequency signals using a 1-D cross-correlation algorithm. For pancreatic tumor detection, HMI images were generated for pancreatic tumors in transgenic mice and normal pancreases in wild-type mice. The obtained HMI images showed a high contrast between normal and malignant pancreases with an average peak-to-peak HMI displacement ratio of 3.2. Histological analysis showed that no tissue damage was associated with HMI when it was used for the sole purpose of elasticity imaging. For pancreatic tumor ablation monitoring, the focused ultrasound transducer was operated at a higher acoustic power and longer pulse length than that used in tumor detection to simultaneously induce HIFU thermal ablation and oscillatory tissue displacements, allowing HMI monitoring without interrupting tumor ablation. HMI monitoring of HIFU ablation found significant decreases in the peak-to-peak HMI displacements before and after HIFU ablation with a reduction rate ranging from 15.8% to 57.0%. The formation of thermal lesions after HIFU exposure was confirmed by histological analysis. This study demonstrated the feasibility of HMI in abdominal tumor detection and HIFU ablation monitoring.

  11. Image-Guided Ablation of Malignant Liver Tumors: Recommendations for Clinical Validation of Novel Thermal and Non-Thermal Technologies – A Western Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Lencioni, Riccardo; de Baere, Thierry; Martin, Robert C.; Nutting, Charles W.; Narayanan, Govindarajan

    2015-01-01

    Background Image-guided ablation is used to treat patients with unresectable malignant hepatic tumors that are limited in number and size, especially hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and colorectal hepatic metastases. While radiofrequency ablation (RFA) has been the most popular technique, several alternate options for focal tissue destruction have recently attracted attention. These technologies appear to be able to overcome some specific limitations of RFA. Currently, there is no accepted algorithm for the use of the different techniques for image-guided ablation. Summary A panel of physicians practicing in North America or Europe met to develop a set of recommendations aimed at providing directions for clinical validation of energy-based, thermal and non-thermal image-guided ablation technologies in the treatment of malignant liver tumors. The recommendations were developed through a critical appraisal of potential advantages and disadvantages of each ablation technology, based on experimental findings and available data, as well as on critical considerations for their clinical validation in hepatic tumor treatment from a Western perspective. Key Messages Significant variability appears to exist among the different equipment and devices within each type of technology. A comprehensive understanding of the data and a critical appraisal of the efficacy and safety profile of each ablation system is required. Clinical practice guidelines should include specific information of the recommended techniques and protocols instead of a generic indication of the technology. PMID:26734576

  12. Single port access laparoscopic surgery for large adnexal tumors: Initial 51 cases of a single institute

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Bo Ra; Han, Jae Won; Kim, Tae Hyun; Han, Ae Ra; Hur, Sung Eun; Lee, Sung Ki

    2017-01-01

    Objective Investigation of initial 51 cases of single port access (SPA) laparoscopic surgery for large adnexal tumors and evaluation of safety and feasibility of the surgical technique. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of the first 51 patients who received SPA laparoscopic surgery for large adnexal tumors greater than 10 cm, from July 2010 to February 2015. Results SPA adnexal surgeries were successfully completed in 51 patients (100%). The mean age, body mass index of the patients were 43.1 years and 22.83 kg/m2, respectively. The median operative time, median blood loss were 73.5 (range, 20 to 185) minutes, 54 (range, 5 to 500) mL, and the median tumor diameter was 13.6 (range, 10 to 30) cm. The procedures included bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy (n=18, 36.0%), unilateral salpingo-oophorectomy (n=14, 27.45%), and paratubal cystectomy (n=1, 1.96%). There were no cases of malignancy and none were insertion of additional ports or conversion to laparotomy. The cases with intraoperative spillage were 3 (5.88%) and benign cystic tumors. No other intraoperative and postoperative complications were observed during hospital days and 6-weeks follow-up period after discharge. Conclusion Our results suggest that SPA laparoscopic surgery for large adnexal tumors may be a safe and feasible alternative to conventional laparoscopic surgery. PMID:28217669

  13. Nonsurgical ablation of breast cancer: future options for small breast tumors.

    PubMed

    Sabel, Michael S

    2014-07-01

    The surgical management of breast cancer has evolved significantly, facilitated by advancements in technology and imaging and improvements in adjuvant therapy. The changes in surgical management have been characterized by equal or improved outcomes with significantly less morbidity. The next step in this evolution is the minimally invasive or noninvasive ablation of breast cancers as an alternative to lumpectomy. In this article, the various modalities for nonsurgical breast cancer ablation and the clinical experience are reviewed, and some of the next steps necessary for their clinical implementation are outlined.

  14. An intermediate term benefits and complications of gamma knife surgery in management of glomus jugulare tumor.

    PubMed

    Hafez, Raef F A; Morgan, Magad S; Fahmy, Osama M

    2016-02-15

    Glomus tumors are rare skull base slow-growing, hypervascular neoplasms that frequently involve critical neurovascular structures, and delay in diagnosis is frequent. Surgical removal is rarely radical and is usually associated with morbidity or mortality. Gamma knife surgery (GKS) has gained an increasing dependable role in the management of glomus jugulare tumors, with high rate of tumor growth control, preserving or improving clinical status and with limited complications. This study aims to evaluate intermediate term benefits and complications of gamma knife surgery in management of twenty-two patients bearing growing glomus jugulare tumors at the International Medical Center (IMC), Cairo, Egypt, between 2005 and 2011. The mean follow-up period was 56 months (range 36-108 months); there were 3 males, 19 females; mean age was 43.6 years; 15 patients had GKS as the primary treatment; 2 patients had surgical residuals; 2 had previous radiation therapy; and 3 previously underwent endovascular embolization. The average tumor volume was 7.26 cm3, and the mean marginal dose was 14.7 Gy. Post gamma knife surgery through the follow-up period neurological status was improved in 12 patients, 7 showed stable clinical condition and 3 patients developed new moderate deficits. Tumor volume post GKS was unchanged in 13 patients, decreased in 8, and showed tumor regrowth in 1 patient. Tumor progression-free survival in our studied patients was 95.5% at 5 and 7 years of the follow-up period post GKS. Gamma knife surgery could be used safely and effectively with limited complications as a primary management tool in the treatment of glomus jugulare tumors controlling tumor growth with preserving or improving clinical status especially those who do not have significant cranial or cervical extension, elderly, and surgically unfit patients; moreover, it is safe and highly effective as adjuvant therapy as well.

  15. Complications Following Primary and Revision Transsphenoidal Surgeries for Pituitary Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Krings, James G.; Kallogjeri, Dorina; Wineland, Andre; Nepple, Kenneth G.; Piccirillo, Jay F.; Getz, Anne E.

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to determine the incidence of major complications following both primary and revision transsphenoidal pituitary surgery. Major complications included endocrinopathic, skull base, orbital, hemorrhagic and thromboembolic complications, respiratory failure, and death. Secondarily, this study aimed to examine factors associated with the occurrence of complications. Study Design Retrospective cohort analysis of California and Florida all-payer databases from 2005-2008. Methods The major complication rate following both primary and revision transsphenoidal pituitary surgery was calculated. Bivariate analyses were performed to investigate the relationship of patient characteristics with complication occurrence, and a multivariate model was constructed to determine risk factors associated with these complications. Results 5,277 primary cases and 192 revision cases met inclusion criteria. There was a non-significant absolute difference of 3.09% (95% CI −11.00 to 16.14) between the rate of complications following primary (n=443; 8.39%) and revision (n=22; 11.46%) surgeries. Multivariate analyses showed that patients with Medicare (OR=1.74; 95% CI 1.17 to 2.61), Medicaid (OR=2.13; 95% CI 1.59 to 2.86), or a malignant neoplasm (OR=3.10; 95% CI 1.62 to 5.93) were more likely to have complications. Conclusions The rate of major complications following transsphenoidal pituitary surgery is lower than earlier retrospective reports. The overall complication rate following revision surgery was not significantly different from primary surgery. Insurance status and a diagnosis of a malignant neoplasm were associated with a higher rate of complications. PMID:25263939

  16. A preliminary study of the safety and efficacy of radiofrequency ablation with percutaneous kyphoplasty for thoracolumbar vertebral metastatic tumor treatment

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Longpo; Chen, Zhengqi; Sun, Mengxiong; Zeng, Hui; Zuo, Dongqing; Hua, Yingqi; Cai, Zhengdong

    2014-01-01

    Background Thoracolumbar vertebral metastasis (TVM) affects a large number of cancer patients. However, safe and effective palliative care remains controversial. The aim of the present study was to investigate the safety and efficacy of minimally invasive image-guided radiofrequency ablation (RFA) with percutaneous kyphoplasty (PKP) for TVM treatment. Material/Methods A retrospective study of 26 patients (mean age: 59.31±11.62 years) was conducted, including 38 vertebral metastases at T11, T12, L1, L2, L3, L4, L5, and S1 with abundant blood vessels. Patients underwent RFA with PKP (4–6 min, 95±5°C, 150 W, effective electrode area of 1.5–2.0 cm) under general anesthesia from February 2005 to January 2009. Electrodes were inserted into the lesions and pre- and post-operative visual analog scale (VAS) scores and X-rays were collected on day 3, week 1, and months 1, 3, and 6. Tumor recurrence and pain level were also evaluated. Safety assessment was conducted based on complications and adverse events. The mean follow-up time was 8.4±2.1 months. Results A mean of 2.69±0.93 ablation was performed per patient. The ablation procedure required a mean of 15.08±4.64 min, while the injection of bone cement required a mean of 6.73±0.83 min, for a mean total operating time of 47.77±7.13 min. Postoperative VAS scores were significantly lower on day 3, week 1, and months 1, 3, and 6 (P<0.01), without any complications or tumor recurrence. Conclusions Image-guided RFA with PKP was safe and effective for TVM treatment when used with careful consideration of bone cement volume/viscosity, injection location, and temperature. PMID:24699431

  17. Gold Nanoshelled Liquid Perfluorocarbon Magnetic Nanocapsules: a Nanotheranostic Platform for Bimodal Ultrasound/Magnetic Resonance Imaging Guided Photothermal Tumor Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Hengte; Wang, Jinrui; Tong, Sheng; Jin, Yushen; Wang, Shumin; Qu, Enze; Bao, Gang; Dai, Zhifei

    2014-01-01

    Imaging guided ablation therapy has been applied in both biomedical research and clinical trials and turned out to be one of the most promising approaches for cancer treatment. Herein, the multifunctional nanocapsules were fabricated through loading perfluorooctylbromide (PFOB) and superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIOs) into poly(lactic acid) (PLA) nanocapsules (NCs), followed by the formation of PEGylated gold nanoshell on the surface. The resulting multi-component NCs were proved to be able to act as nanotheranostic agent to achieve successful bimodal ultrasound (US)/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) guided photothermal ablation in human tumor xenograft models non-invasively. Such a single theranostic agent with the combination of real-time US and high-resolution MR imaging would be of great value to offer more comprehensive diagnostic information and dynamics of disease progression for the accurate location of therapeutic focusing spot in the targeted tumor tissue, showing great potential as an effective nanoplatform for contrast imaging guided photothermal therapy. PMID:24396512

  18. Stress (Tako-Tsubo) Cardiomyopathy Following Radiofrequency Ablation of a Liver Tumor: A Case Report

    SciTech Connect

    Joo, Ijin; Lee, Jeong Min Han, Joon Koo; Choi, Byung Ihn; Park, Eun-Ah

    2011-02-15

    Stress cardiomyopathy is characterized by transient left ventricular dysfunction occurring in the absence of obstructive coronary disease. It is precipitated by acute emotional or physical stress. We present a case of stress cardiomyopathy which developed during hepatic radiofrequency ablation of hepatocellular carcinoma.

  19. Treatment Failure After Image-Guided Percutaneous Radiofrequency Ablation (RFA) of Renal Tumors - A Systematic Review with Description of Type, Frequency, Risk Factors and Management.

    PubMed

    Vollherbst, Dominik; Bertheau, Robert; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Radeleff, Boris Alexis; Pereira, Philippe L; Sommer, Christof-Matthias

    2017-03-01

    Background Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is an established treatment for small renal tumors. The objective of this review is to systematically assess the type, frequency, risk factors and management of treatment failure after image-guided percutaneous RFA of renal tumors. Method 10 studies (967 patients, 1033 tumors) with a mean/median follow-up of ≥ 30 months were systematically identified and analyzed. Results and Conclusion Image-guided percutaneous RFA of localized renal tumors is very effective. The most common type of treatment failure is residual unablated tumor (5.9 %), followed by local tumor progression (4.7 %). De novo tumors in the kidneys occur in 1.3 % of cases and extra-renal metastases in 2.0 %. Local tumor progression, de novo tumors in the kidneys and extra-renal metastases occur predominantly later than 12 months after initial RFA. Tumor size > 3 cm and central tumor location are the major risk factors for treatment failure. In the case of treatment failure, repeated RFA shows high success rates (86.3 % for residual unablated tumors and 87.5 % for local tumor progression). Key Points: · Treatment failure can be subdivided into residual unablated tumor and local tumor progression.. · Residual unablated tumor occurs in 5.9 % of cases.. · Local tumor progression occurs in 4.7 % of cases.. · Tumor size and location are the major risk factors for treatment failure.. · Repeated RFA is effective and commonly used for management.. Citation Format · Vollherbst D, Bertheau R, Kauczor H et al. Treatment Failure After Image-Guided Percutaneous Radiofrequency Ablation (RFA) of Renal Tumors - A Systematic Review with Description of Type, Frequency, Risk Factors and Management. Fortschr Röntgenstr 2017; 189: 219 - 227.

  20. Localized Ablation of Thyroid Tissue by High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound: an Alternative to Surgery?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esnault, Olivier; Franc, Brigitte; Chapelon, Jean-Yves; Lacoste, Francois

    2006-05-01

    PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of using a High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) device to obtain a localised destruction of the thyroid with no damage to adjacent tissues. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The ewe model was used because its thyroid gland is easily accessible with ultrasound. The animals were anaesthetised with 10 mg / kg IV injection of Penthothal. The HIFU pulses were generated by a 3-MHz spherical transducer under ultrasound guidance. Macroscopic and microscopic tissue lesions were identified after formalin fixation of the anterior part of the ewe's neck. RESULTS: After determining the optimal instrument settings to obtain localized thyroid ablation, the repeatability of the method was evaluated using a HIFU prototype designed specifically for human use: in 13 ewes (26 treated lobes), an average of 20 (range: 14-27) ultrasound pulses (pulse duration: 3 s) per lobe covering a mean volume of 0.5 cm3 (range: 0.3-0.7 cm3) were delivered. The ewes were sacrificed 2-5 weeks after treatment delivery. No damage to the nerves, trachea, esophagus or muscle was observed. Only 3 ewes suffered superficial skin burns. The desired thyroid lesions were obtained in 25/26 treated lobes, as demonstrated by fibrotic tissues, which replaced necrotic areas. CONCLUSION: These results obtained in the ewe model show that thyroid lesions of defined volume can be induced safely and suggest that the HIFU device is now ready for human trials.

  1. Intra-lesional injection of the novel PKC activator EBC-46 rapidly ablates tumors in mouse models.

    PubMed

    Boyle, Glen M; D'Souza, Marjorie M A; Pierce, Carly J; Adams, Ryan A; Cantor, Aaron S; Johns, Jenny P; Maslovskaya, Lidia; Gordon, Victoria A; Reddell, Paul W; Parsons, Peter G

    2014-01-01

    Intra-lesional chemotherapy for treatment of cutaneous malignancies has been used for many decades, allowing higher local drug concentrations and less toxicity than systemic agents. Here we describe a novel diterpene ester, EBC-46, and provide preclinical data supporting its use as an intra-lesional treatment. A single injection of EBC-46 caused rapid inflammation and influx of blood, followed by eschar formation and rapid tumor ablation in a range of syngeneic and xenograft models. EBC-46 induced oxidative burst from purified human polymorphonuclear cells, which was prevented by the Protein Kinase C inhibitor bisindolylmaleimide-1. EBC-46 activated a more specific subset of PKC isoforms (PKC-βI, -βII, -α and -γ) compared to the structurally related phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA). Although EBC-46 showed threefold less potency for inhibiting cell growth than PMA in vitro, it was more effective for cure of tumors in vivo. No viable tumor cells were evident four hours after injection by ex vivo culture. Pharmacokinetic profiles from treated mice indicated that EBC-46 was retained preferentially within the tumor, and resulted in significantly greater local responses (erythema, oedema) following intra-lesional injection compared with injection into normal skin. The efficacy of EBC-46 was reduced by co-injection with bisindolylmaleimide-1. Loss of vascular integrity following treatment was demonstrated by an increased permeability of endothelial cell monolayers in vitro and by CD31 immunostaining of treated tumors in vivo. Our results demonstrate that a single intra-lesional injection of EBC-46 causes PKC-dependent hemorrhagic necrosis, rapid tumor cell death and ultimate cure of solid tumors in pre-clinical models of cancer.

  2. Intra-Lesional Injection of the Novel PKC Activator EBC-46 Rapidly Ablates Tumors in Mouse Models

    PubMed Central

    Pierce, Carly J.; Adams, Ryan A.; Cantor, Aaron S.; Johns, Jenny P.; Maslovskaya, Lidia; Gordon, Victoria A.; Reddell, Paul W.; Parsons, Peter G.

    2014-01-01

    Intra-lesional chemotherapy for treatment of cutaneous malignancies has been used for many decades, allowing higher local drug concentrations and less toxicity than systemic agents. Here we describe a novel diterpene ester, EBC-46, and provide preclinical data supporting its use as an intra-lesional treatment. A single injection of EBC-46 caused rapid inflammation and influx of blood, followed by eschar formation and rapid tumor ablation in a range of syngeneic and xenograft models. EBC-46 induced oxidative burst from purified human polymorphonuclear cells, which was prevented by the Protein Kinase C inhibitor bisindolylmaleimide-1. EBC-46 activated a more specific subset of PKC isoforms (PKC-βI, -βII, -α and -γ) compared to the structurally related phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA). Although EBC-46 showed threefold less potency for inhibiting cell growth than PMA in vitro, it was more effective for cure of tumors in vivo. No viable tumor cells were evident four hours after injection by ex vivo culture. Pharmacokinetic profiles from treated mice indicated that EBC-46 was retained preferentially within the tumor, and resulted in significantly greater local responses (erythema, oedema) following intra-lesional injection compared with injection into normal skin. The efficacy of EBC-46 was reduced by co-injection with bisindolylmaleimide-1. Loss of vascular integrity following treatment was demonstrated by an increased permeability of endothelial cell monolayers in vitro and by CD31 immunostaining of treated tumors in vivo. Our results demonstrate that a single intra-lesional injection of EBC-46 causes PKC-dependent hemorrhagic necrosis, rapid tumor cell death and ultimate cure of solid tumors in pre-clinical models of cancer. PMID:25272271

  3. Con_A-carbone nanotube conjugate with short wave near-infrared laser ablation for tumor therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Huan-Yao; Peng, Ching-An; Tang, Ming-Jer; Reindhart, Kit; Szu, Harold H.

    2009-04-01

    Using the characteristics of T cell mitogen called lectin protein from the jack-beam Canavalia ensiformis Concanavalin A (Con_A) with dual activities, cytotoxicity and immunomodulation, we have shown it has a therapeutic effect on hepatoma. Injection of Con_A can eradicate the established malign tumor, because Con_A can induce tumor cell autophagic, cell-programmed death, as well as activate the effector T cells. Combined, in this paper, with the absorption exceeding the Carbon NanoTube (CNT) band-gap (ɛbg=~1/CNT diameter) with an active short wave near-infrared (SWIR) (1.2~1.5 micron wavelengths), which happened to be translucent to the irradiation upon animal skin, similar to that used in hospital fingertip-clamped Pulse Oxymetry. Once the Con_ACNT is guided to hepatoma cells, it is bonded and internalized into the mitochondria (MC) compartment, the cellular energy factory. Con_A has the higher specificity for tumor cells useful for targeting because of the abnormal glycosylation on tumor cells. When CNT hitch hike with Con_A, they can t together like a laser-denotable chemical missile surgically targeting at the tumor cells precisely by Con_A-guidance. We switch on SWIR laser, when the Con_A-CNT conjugated complex has been bonded and internalized to MC of malign cells and already commenced cellular programmed death. Thus, it might appear to casual readers that we have initiated an overkill, chemical drugged autophage followed with physical laser ablation, but what if we can eradicate hepatoma totally if no blue print is left behind inadvertently in case of a partial failure. We conclude that using Con_A-CNT conjugated complex targeting specifically at malign tumor cells is a novel targeted-laser-radiation therapy for tumors in mice.

  4. Interpreting WAIS-III performance after primary brain tumor surgery.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Marta de A; Simões, Mário R; Castro-Caldas, Alexandre

    2017-01-01

    The literature lacks information on the performance of patients with brain tumors on the Wechsler Intelligence Scales. This study aimed to explore the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Third Edition (WAIS-III) performance profile of 23 consecutive patients with brain tumors and 23 matched controls selected from the Portuguese WAIS-III standardization sample, using the technical manual steps recommended for score interpretation. The control group was demographically matched to the tumor group regarding gender, age, education, profession, and geographic region. The technical manual steps recommended for score interpretation were applied. Patients with brain tumors had significantly lower performances on the Performance IQ, Full-Scale IQ, Perceptual Organization Index, Working Memory Index, Processing Speed Index, Arithmetic, Object Assembly, and Picture Arrangement, though all scaled scores were within the normal range according to the manual tables. Only Vocabulary and Comprehension scatter scores were statistically different between groups. No strengths or weaknesses were found for either group. The mean discrepancy scores do not appear to have clinical value for this population. In conclusion, the study results did not reveal a specific profile for patients with brain tumors on the WAIS-III.

  5. Final Report for completed IPP Project:"Development of Plasma Ablation for Soft Tissue and Bone Surgery"

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Ian

    2009-09-01

    ArthroCare is a medical device company that develops, manufactures, and markets an advanced surgical tool, a plasma electro-surgical system for cutting and removing tissue. The hand-held electrical discharge device produces plasma in a biocompatible conductive fluid and tissue to which it is applied during surgery. Its products allow surgeons to operate with increased precision and accuracy, limiting damage to surrounding tissue thereby reducing pain and speeding recovery for the patient. In the past, the design of ArthfoCare's plasma wands has been an empirical undertaking. One goal of this R&D program was to put the phenomena involved on a sound scientific footing, allowing optimization of existing plasma based electro-surgery system technology, and the design and manufacture of new and improved kinds of scalpels, in particular for the surgical cutting of bone. Another important related goal of the program was to develop, through an experimental approach, new plasma wand approaches to the cutting ('shaving') of hard bone tissue. The goals of the CRADA were accomplished - computer models were used to predict important parameters of the plasma discharge and the bone environment, and several different approaches to bone-shaving were developed and demonstrated. The primary goal of the project was to develop and demonstrate an atmospheric-pressure plasma tool that is suitable for surgical use for shaving bone in humans. This goal was accomplished, in fact with several different alternative plasma approaches. High bone ablation speeds were measured. The use of probes ('plasma wand' - the surgical tool) with moving active electrodes was also explored, and there are advantages to this method. Another important feature is that the newly-exposed bone surface have only a very thin necrosis layer; this feature was demonstrated. This CRADA has greatly advanced our understanding of bone removal by atmospheric pressure plasmas in liquid, and puts ArthroCare in a good position

  6. Near Infrared Fluorescent Nanoparticles Derived from Hyaluronic Acid Improve Tumor Contrast for Image-Guided Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Tanner K.; Kelkar, Sneha S.; Wojtynek, Nicholas E.; Souchek, Joshua J.; Payne, William M.; Stumpf, Kristina; Marini, Frank C.; Mohs, Aaron M.

    2016-01-01

    Tumor tissue that remains undetected at the primary surgical site can cause tumor recurrence, repeat surgery, and treatment strategy alterations that impose a significant patient and healthcare burden. Intraoperative near infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging is one potential method to identify remaining tumor by visualization of NIR fluorophores that are preferentially localized to the tumor. This requires development of fluorophores that consistently identify tumor tissue in different patients and tumor types. In this study we examined a panel of NIRF contrast agents consisting of polymeric nanoparticle (NP) formulations derived from hyaluronic acid (HA), with either physically entrapped indocyanine green (ICG) or covalently conjugated Cy7.5. Using orthotopic human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 xenografts in nude mice we identified two lead formulations. One, NanoICGPBA, with physicochemically entrapped ICG, showed 2.3-fold greater tumor contrast than ICG alone at 24 h (p < 0.01), and another, NanoCy7.5100-H, with covalently conjugated Cy7.5, showed 74-fold greater tumor contrast than Cy7.5 alone at 24 h (p < 0.0001). These two lead formulations were then tested in immune competent BALB/c mice bearing orthotopic 4T1 breast cancer tumors. NanoICGPBA showed 2.2-fold greater contrast than ICG alone (p < 0.0001), and NanoCy7.5100-H showed 14.8-fold greater contrast than Cy7.5 alone (p < 0.0001). Furthermore, both NanoICGPBA and NanoCy7.5100-H provided strong tumor enhancement using image-guided surgery in mice bearing 4T1 tumors. These studies demonstrate the efficacy of a panel of HA-derived NPs in delineating tumors in vivo, and identifies promising formulations that can be used for future in vivo tumor removal efficacy studies. PMID:27877237

  7. Ablation for atrial fibrillation during mitral valve surgery: 1-year results through continuous subcutaneous monitoring.

    PubMed

    Bogachev-Prokophiev, Alexandr; Zheleznev, Sergey; Romanov, Alexander; Pokushalov, Evgeny; Pivkin, Alexey; Corbucci, Giorgio; Karaskov, Alexander

    2012-07-01

    Continuous monitoring of cardiac rhythm may play an important role in measuring the true symptomatic/asymptomatic atrial fibrillation (AF) burden and improve the management of anti-arrhythmic and anti-thrombotic therapies. Forty-seven patients with mitral valve disease and longstanding persistent AF (LSPAF) underwent a left atrial maze procedure with bipolar radiofrequency and valve surgery. The follow-up data recorded by an implanted loop recorder were analysed after 3, 6 and 12 months. On discharge, 40 (85.1%) patients were in stable sinus rhythm, as documented by in-office electrocardiography (ECG), 4 (8.5%) were in pacemaker rhythm and 3 (6.4%) were in AF. One (2.1%) patient died after 7 months. On 12-month follow-up examination, 30 (65.2%) patients had an AF burden <0.5% and were classified as responders. Three (6.5%) of the 16 non-responders had atrial flutter and 13 (27.7%) had documented AF recurrences with an AF burden >0.5%. Two (4.3%) patients with AF recurrences were completely asymptomatic. Among the symptomatic events stored by the patients, only 27.6% was confirmed as genuine AF recurrences according to the concomitant ECG recorded by the implanted loop recorder. A concomitant bipolar maze procedure during mitral valve surgery is effective in treating AF, as proved by detailed 1-year continuous monitoring.

  8. Ablation for atrial fibrillation during mitral valve surgery: 1-year results through continuous subcutaneous monitoring†

    PubMed Central

    Bogachev-Prokophiev, Alexandr; Zheleznev, Sergey; Romanov, Alexander; Pokushalov, Evgeny; Pivkin, Alexey; Corbucci, Giorgio; Karaskov, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Continuous monitoring of cardiac rhythm may play an important role in measuring the true symptomatic/asymptomatic atrial fibrillation (AF) burden and improve the management of anti-arrhythmic and anti-thrombotic therapies. Forty-seven patients with mitral valve disease and longstanding persistent AF (LSPAF) underwent a left atrial maze procedure with bipolar radiofrequency and valve surgery. The follow-up data recorded by an implanted loop recorder were analysed after 3, 6 and 12 months. On discharge, 40 (85.1%) patients were in stable sinus rhythm, as documented by in-office electrocardiography (ECG), 4 (8.5%) were in pacemaker rhythm and 3 (6.4%) were in AF. One (2.1%) patient died after 7 months. On 12-month follow-up examination, 30 (65.2%) patients had an AF burden <0.5% and were classified as responders. Three (6.5%) of the 16 non-responders had atrial flutter and 13 (27.7%) had documented AF recurrences with an AF burden >0.5%. Two (4.3%) patients with AF recurrences were completely asymptomatic. Among the symptomatic events stored by the patients, only 27.6% was confirmed as genuine AF recurrences according to the concomitant ECG recorded by the implanted loop recorder. A concomitant bipolar maze procedure during mitral valve surgery is effective in treating AF, as proved by detailed 1-year continuous monitoring. PMID:22514258

  9. Anorectal function and outcomes after transanal minimally invasive surgery for rectal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Karakayali, Feza Y.; Tezcaner, Tugan; Moray, Gokhan

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Transanal endoscopic microsurgery is a minimally invasive technique that allows full-thickness resection and suture closure of the defect for large rectal adenomas, selected low-risk rectal cancers, or small cancers in patients who have a high risk for major surgery. Our aim, in the given prospective study was to report our initial clinical experience with TAMIS, and to evaluate its effects on postoperative anorectal functions. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In 10 patients treated with TAMIS for benign and malignant rectal tumors, preoperative and postoperative anorectal function was evaluated with anorectal manometry and Cleveland Clinic Incontinence Score. RESULTS: The mean distance of the tumors from the anal verge was 5.6 cm, and mean tumor diameter was 2.6 cm. All resection margins were tumor free. There was no difference in preoperative and 3-week postoperative anorectalmanometry findings; only mean minimum rectal sensory volume was lower at 3 weeks after surgery. The Cleveland Clinic Incontinence Score was normal in all patients except one which resolved by 6 weeks after surgery.The mean postoperative follow-up was 28 weeks without any recurrences. CONCLUSION: Transanal minimally invasive surgery is a safe and effective procedure for treatment of rectal tumors and can be performed without impairing anorectal functions. PMID:26622116

  10. Improving the accuracy of brain tumor surgery via Raman-based technology.

    PubMed

    Hollon, Todd; Lewis, Spencer; Freudiger, Christian W; Sunney Xie, X; Orringer, Daniel A

    2016-03-01

    Despite advances in the surgical management of brain tumors, achieving optimal surgical results and identification of tumor remains a challenge. Raman spectroscopy, a laser-based technique that can be used to nondestructively differentiate molecules based on the inelastic scattering of light, is being applied toward improving the accuracy of brain tumor surgery. Here, the authors systematically review the application of Raman spectroscopy for guidance during brain tumor surgery. Raman spectroscopy can differentiate normal brain from necrotic and vital glioma tissue in human specimens based on chemical differences, and has recently been shown to differentiate tumor-infiltrated tissues from noninfiltrated tissues during surgery. Raman spectroscopy also forms the basis for coherent Raman scattering (CRS) microscopy, a technique that amplifies spontaneous Raman signals by 10,000-fold, enabling real-time histological imaging without the need for tissue processing, sectioning, or staining. The authors review the relevant basic and translational studies on CRS microscopy as a means of providing real-time intraoperative guidance. Recent studies have demonstrated how CRS can be used to differentiate tumor-infiltrated tissues from noninfiltrated tissues and that it has excellent agreement with traditional histology. Under simulated operative conditions, CRS has been shown to identify tumor margins that would be undetectable using standard bright-field microscopy. In addition, CRS microscopy has been shown to detect tumor in human surgical specimens with near-perfect agreement to standard H & E microscopy. The authors suggest that as the intraoperative application and instrumentation for Raman spectroscopy and imaging matures, it will become an essential component in the neurosurgical armamentarium for identifying residual tumor and improving the surgical management of brain tumors.

  11. MRI-Based Assessment of Safe Margins in Tumor Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Bellanova, Laura; Schubert, Thomas; Cartiaux, Olivier; Lecouvet, Frédéric; Galant, Christine; Banse, Xavier; Docquier, Pierre-Louis

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. In surgical oncology, histological analysis of excised tumor specimen is the conventional method to assess the safety of the resection margins. We tested the feasibility of using MRI to assess the resection margins of freshly explanted tumor specimens in rats. Materials and Methods. Fourteen specimen of sarcoma were resected in rats and analysed both with MRI and histologically. Slicing of the specimen was identical for the two methods and corresponding slices were paired. 498 margins were measured in length and classified using the UICC classification (R0, R1, and R2). Results. The mean difference between the 498 margins measured both with histology and MRI was 0.3 mm (SD 1.0 mm). The agreement interval of the two measurement methods was [−1.7 mm; 2.2 mm]. In terms of the UICC classification, a strict correlation was observed between MRI- and histology-based classifications (κ = 0.84, P < 0.05). Discussion. This experimental study showed the feasibility to use MRI images of excised tumor specimen to assess the resection margins with the same degree of accuracy as the conventional histopathological analysis. When completed, MRI acquisition of resected tumors may alert the surgeon in case of inadequate margin and help advantageously the histopathological analysis. PMID:24701131

  12. Prosthetic limb salvage surgery for bone and soft tissue tumors around the knee.

    PubMed

    Niimi, Rui; Matsumine, Akihiko; Hamaguchi, Takahiko; Nakamura, Tomoki; Uchida, Atsumasa; Sudo, Akihiro

    2012-12-01

    In this study, we analyzed long-term survival, limb function and associated complications after prosthetic limb salvage treatment in patients with bone and soft tissue tumors around the knee joint. A total of 63 patients treated with prosthetic limb salvage surgery around the knee were reviewed. The bone tumors involved the distal femur in 45 patients, the proximal tibia in 14 patients and the soft tissue tumors of the proximal lower leg in 4 patients. The median follow-up period after the first operation was 8.0 years. The medical records of the patients, surgical reports, radiographs and histological specimens were retrospectively reviewed. The 5-year overall survival rate was 63.2% in the patients with distal femur tumors and 86.2% in those with tumors of the proximal lower leg. The 5‑year prosthetic survival rate was 72.8% in the distal femur and 74.6% in the proximal lower leg. The mean functional score according to the scoring system of the Musculoskeletal Tumor Society (MSTS) was 81% in the patients with distal femur tumors and 82% in the patients with proximal lower leg tumors. Post-operative complications occurred in 27 patients. Limb salvage surgery is considered to be an effective treatment option. However, the high complication rate is a major concern for prosthetic replacement. Future improvements of prostheses are very important.

  13. Indocyanine Green-Loaded Nanoparticles for Image-Guided Tumor Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Tanner K.; Abdulahad, Asem; Kelkar, Sneha S.; Marini, Frank C.; Long, Timothy E.; Provenzale, James M.; Mohs, Aaron M.

    2015-01-01

    Detecting positive tumor margins and local malignant masses during surgery is critical for long-term patient survival. The use of image-guided surgery for tumor removal, particularly with near-infrared fluorescent imaging, is a potential method to facilitate removing all neoplastic tissue at the surgical site. In this study we demonstrate a series of hyaluronic acid (HLA)-derived nanoparticles that entrap the near-infrared dye indocyanine green, termed NanoICG, for improved delivery of the dye to tumors. Self-assembly of the nanoparticles was driven by conjugation of one of three hydrophobic moieties: aminopropyl-1-pyrenebutanamide (PBA), aminopropyl-5β-cholanamide (5βCA), or octadecylamine (ODA). Nanoparticle self-assembly, dye loading, and optical properties were characterized. NanoICG exhibited quenched fluorescence that could be activated by disassembly in a mixed solvent. NanoICG was found to be nontoxic at physiologically relevant concentrations and exposure was not found to inhibit cell growth. Using an MDA-MB-231 tumor xenograft model in mice, strong fluorescence enhancement in tumors was observed with NanoICG using a fluorescence image-guided surgery system and a whole-animal imaging system. Tumor contrast with NanoICG was significantly higher than with ICG alone. PMID:25565445

  14. Indocyanine green-loaded nanoparticles for image-guided tumor surgery.

    PubMed

    Hill, Tanner K; Abdulahad, Asem; Kelkar, Sneha S; Marini, Frank C; Long, Timothy E; Provenzale, James M; Mohs, Aaron M

    2015-02-18

    Detecting positive tumor margins and local malignant masses during surgery is critical for long-term patient survival. The use of image-guided surgery for tumor removal, particularly with near-infrared fluorescent imaging, is a potential method to facilitate removing all neoplastic tissue at the surgical site. In this study we demonstrate a series of hyaluronic acid (HLA)-derived nanoparticles that entrap the near-infrared dye indocyanine green, termed NanoICG, for improved delivery of the dye to tumors. Self-assembly of the nanoparticles was driven by conjugation of one of three hydrophobic moieties: aminopropyl-1-pyrenebutanamide (PBA), aminopropyl-5β-cholanamide (5βCA), or octadecylamine (ODA). Nanoparticle self-assembly, dye loading, and optical properties were characterized. NanoICG exhibited quenched fluorescence that could be activated by disassembly in a mixed solvent. NanoICG was found to be nontoxic at physiologically relevant concentrations and exposure was not found to inhibit cell growth. Using an MDA-MB-231 tumor xenograft model in mice, strong fluorescence enhancement in tumors was observed with NanoICG using a fluorescence image-guided surgery system and a whole-animal imaging system. Tumor contrast with NanoICG was significantly higher than with ICG alone.

  15. Intraoperative targeted optical imaging: a guide towards tumor-free margins in cancer surgery.

    PubMed

    Orbay, Hakan; Bean, Jero; Zhang, Yin; Cai, Weibo

    2013-01-01

    Over the last several decades, development of various imaging techniques such as computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and positron emission tomography greatly facilitated the early detection of cancer. Another important aspect that is closely related to the survival of cancer patients is complete tumor removal during surgical resection. The major obstacle in achieving this goal is to distinguish between tumor tissue and normal tissue during surgery. Currently, tumor margins are typically assessed by visual assessment and palpation of the tumor intraoperatively. However, the possibility of microinvasion to the surrounding tissues makes it difficult to determine an adequate tumor-free excision margin, often forcing the surgeons to perform wide excisions including the healthy tissue that may contain vital structures. It would be ideal to remove the tumor completely, with minimal safety margins, if surgeons could see precise tumor margins during the operation. Molecular imaging with optical techniques can visualize the tumors via fluorophore conjugated probes targeting tumor markers such as proteins and enzymes that are upregulated during malignant transformation. Intraoperative use of this technique may facilitate complete excision of the tumor and tumor micromasses located beyond the visual capacity of the naked eye, ultimately improving the clinical outcome and survival rates of cancer patients.

  16. Lung Ablation: Whats New?

    PubMed

    Xiong, Lillian; Dupuy, Damian E

    2016-07-01

    Lung cancer had an estimated incidence of 221,200 in 2015, making up 13% of all cancer diagnoses. Tumor ablation is an important treatment option for nonsurgical lung cancer and pulmonary metastatic patients. Radiofrequency ablation has been used for over a decade with newer modalities, microwave ablation, cryoablation, and irreversible electroporation presenting as additional and possibly improved treatment options for patients. This minimally invasive therapy is best for small primary lesions or favorably located metastatic tumors. These technologies can offer palliation and sometimes cure of thoracic malignancies. This article discusses the current available technologies and techniques available for tumor ablation.

  17. Heat sink effect on tumor ablation characteristics as observed in monopolar radiofrequency, bipolar radiofrequency, and microwave, using ex vivo calf liver model.

    PubMed

    Pillai, Krishna; Akhter, Javid; Chua, Terence C; Shehata, Mena; Alzahrani, Nayef; Al-Alem, Issan; Morris, David L

    2015-03-01

    Thermal ablation of liver tumors near large blood vessels is affected by the cooling effect of blood flow, leading to incomplete ablation. Hence, we conducted a comparative investigation of heat sink effect in monopolar (MP) and bipolar (BP) radiofrequency ablation (RFA), and microwave (MW) ablation devices.With a perfused calf liver, the ablative performances (volume, mass, density, dimensions), with and without heat sink, were measured. Heat sink was present when the ablative tip of the probes were 8.0 mm close to a major hepatic vein and absent when >30 mm away. Temperatures (T1 and T2) on either side of the hepatic vein near the tip of the probes, heating probe temperature (T3), outlet perfusate temperature (T4), and ablation time were monitored.With or without heat sink, BP radiofrequency ablated a larger volume and mass, compared with MP RFA or MW ablation, with latter device producing the highest density of tissue ablated. MW ablation produced an ellipsoidal shape while radiofrequency devices produced spheres.Percentage heat sink effect in Bipolar radiofrequency : Mono-polar radiofrequency : Microwave was (Volume) 33:41:22; (mass) 23:56:34; (density) 9.0:26:18; and (relative elipscity) 5.8:12.9:1.3, indicating that BP and MW devices were less affected.Percentage heat sink effect on time (minutes) to reach maximum temperature (W) = 13.28:9.2:29.8; time at maximum temperature (X) is 87:66:16.66; temperature difference (Y) between the thermal probes (T3) and the temperature (T1 + T2)/2 on either side of the hepatic vessel was 100:87:20; and temperature difference between the (T1 + T2)/2 and temperature of outlet circulating solution (T4), Z was 20.33:30.23:37.5.MW and BP radiofrequencies were less affected by heat sink while MP RFA was the most affected. With a single ablation, BP radiofrequency ablated a larger volume and mass regardless of heat sink.

  18. [Management of complications in anal and transanal tumor surgery].

    PubMed

    Sailer, M; Eisoldt, S; Möllmann, C

    2015-08-01

    Anal and transanal tumor operations are safe and are associated with a very low morbidity. Perianal and anal lesions as well as low rectal tumors can be excised by direct exposure using an anal retractor. For lesions situated in the middle or upper third of the rectum, special instrumentation, such as transanal endoscopic microsurgery (TEM) and transanal endoscopic operation (TEO) should be used to avoid unnecessary R1 resections. Fatal complications are extremely rare and most complications, such as urinary retention or temporary subfebrile temperatures, are minor. Suture line dehiscences are usually clinically unremarkable. Major complications comprise significant hemorrhage and opening of the peritoneal cavity. The latter must be recognized intraoperatively and can usually be managed by primary suturing. Infections, abscess formation, rectovaginal fistula, injury of the prostate or even urethra are extremely rare complications.

  19. Preoperative Coiling of Coexisting Intracranial Aneurysm and Subsequent Brain Tumor Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Park, Keun Young; Kim, Dong Joon

    2016-01-01

    Objective Few studies have investigated treatment strategies for brain tumor with a coexisting unruptured intracranial aneurysm (cUIA). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of preoperative coiling for cUIA, and subsequent brain tumor surgery. Materials and Methods A total of 19 patients (mean age, 55.2 years; M:F = 4:15) underwent preoperative coiling for 23 cUIAs and subsequent brain tumor surgery. Primary brain tumors were meningiomas (n = 7, 36.8%), pituitary adenomas (n = 7, 36.8%), gliomas (n = 3, 15.8%), vestibular schwannoma (n = 1, 5.3%), and Rathke's cleft cyst (n = 1, 5.3%). cUIAs were located at the distal internal carotid artery (n = 9, 39.1%), anterior cerebral artery (n = 8, 34.8%), middle cerebral artery (n = 4, 17.4%), basilar artery top (n = 1, 4.3%), and posterior cerebral artery, P1 segment (n = 1, 4.3%). The outcomes of preoperative coiling of cUIA and subsequent brain tumor surgery were retrospectively evaluated. Results Single-microcatheter technique was used in 13 cases (56.5%), balloon-assisted in 4 cases (17.4%), double-microcatheter in 4 cases (17.4%), and stent-assisted in 2 cases (8.7%). Complete cUIA occlusion was achieved in 18 cases (78.3%), while residual neck occurred in 5 cases (21.7%). The only coiling-related complication was 1 transient ischemic attack (5.3%). Neurological deterioration did not occur in any patient during the period between coiling and tumor surgery. At the latest clinical follow-up (mean, 29 months; range, 2–120 months), 15 patients (78.9%) had favorable outcomes (modified Rankin Scale, 0–2), while 4 patients (21.1%) had unfavorable outcomes due to consequences of brain tumor surgery. Conclusion Preoperative coiling and subsequent tumor surgery was safe and effective, making it a reasonable treatment option for patients with brain tumor and cUIA. PMID:27833409

  20. Apoptosis during photodynamic therapy-induced ablation of RIF-1 tumors in C3H mice: electron microscopic, histopathologic and biochemical evidence.

    PubMed

    Zaidi, S I; Oleinick, N L; Zaim, M T; Mukhtar, H

    1993-12-01

    Very little is known about the applicability of the metabolic and biochemical events observed in cell culture systems to in vivo tumor shrinkage following photodynamic therapy (PDT). The purpose of this study was to assess whether PDT induces apoptosis during tumor ablation in vivo. We treated radiation-induced fibrosarcoma (RIF-1) tumors grown in C3H/HeN mice with PDT employing three photosensitizers, Photofrin-II, chloroaluminum phthalocyanine tetrasulfonate, or Pc IV (a promising phthalocyanine developed in this laboratory). Each photosensitizer was injected intraperitoneally and 24 h later the tumors were irradiated with an appropriate wavelength of red light using an argon-pumped dye laser. During the course of tumor shrinkage, the tumors were removed at 1, 2, 4 and 10 h post-PDT for DNA fragmentation, histopathologic, and electron microscopic studies. Markers of apoptosis, viz. the ladder of nucleosome-size DNA fragments, increased apoptotic bodies, and condensation of chromatin material around the periphery of the nucleus, were evident in tumor tissue even 1 h post-PDT; the extent of these changes increased during the later stages of tumor ablation. No changes were observed in tumors given photosensitizer alone or irradiation alone. Our data suggest that the damage produced by in vivo PDT may activate endonucleolysis and chromatin condensation, and that apoptosis is an early event in tumor shrinkage following PDT.

  1. Thermal therapy, Part III: ablation techniques.

    PubMed

    Habash, Riadh W Y; Bansal, Rajeev; Krewski, Daniel; Alhafid, Hafid T

    2007-01-01

    Ablative treatments are gaining increasing attention as an alternative to standard surgical therapies, especially for patients with contraindication or those who refuse open surgery. Thermal ablation is used in clinical applications mainly for treating heart arrhythmias, benign prostate hyperplasia, and nonoperable liver tumors; there is also increasing application to other organ sites, including the kidney, lung, and brain. Potential benefits of thermal ablation include reduced morbidity and mortality in comparison with standard surgical resection and the ability to treat nonsurgical patients. The purpose of this review is to outline and discuss the engineering principles and biological responses by which thermal ablation techniques can provide elevation of temperature in organs within the human body. Because of the individual problems associated with each type of treatment, a wide range of ablation techniques have evolved including cryoablation as well as ultrasound, radiofrequency (RF), microwave, and laser ablation. Aspects of each ablation technique, including mechanisms of action, equipment required, selection of eligible patients, treatment techniques, and patient outcomes are presented, along with a discussion of limitations of the techniques and future research directions.

  2. Comparison of the synergistic effect of lipid nanobubbles and SonoVue microbubbles for high intensity focused ultrasound thermal ablation of tumors.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yuanzhi; Yang, Ke; Cao, Yang; Zhou, Xuan; Xu, Jinshun; Liu, Jianxin; Wang, Qi; Wang, Zhigang; Wang, Dong

    2016-01-01

    Microbubbles (MBs) are considered as an important enhancer for high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment of benign or malignant tumors. Recently, different sizes of gas-filled bubbles have been investigated to improve the therapeutic efficiency of HIFU thermal ablation and reduce side effects associated with ultrasound power and irradiation time. However, nanobubbles (NBs) as an ultrasound contrast agent for synergistic therapy of HIFU thermal ablation remain controversial due to their small nano-size in diameter. In this study, phospholipid-shell and gas-core NBs with a narrow size range of 500-600 nm were developed. The synergistic effect of NBs for HIFU thermal ablation was carefully studied both in excised bovine livers and in breast tumor models of rabbits, and made a critical comparison with that of commercial SonoVue microbubbles (SonoVue MBs). In addition, the pathological changes of the targeted area in tumor tissue after HIFU ablation were further investigated. Phosphate buffer saline (PBS) was used as the control. Under the same HIFU parameters, the quantitative echo intensity of B-mode ultrasound image and the volume of coagulative necrosis in lipid NBs groups were significantly higher and larger than that in PBS groups, but could not be demonstrated a difference to that in SonoVue MBs groups both ex vivo and in vivo. These results showed that the synergistic effect of lipid NBs for HIFU thermal ablation were similar with that of SonoVue MBs, and further indicate that lipid NBs could potentially become an enhancer for HIFU thermal ablation of tumors.

  3. Comparison of the synergistic effect of lipid nanobubbles and SonoVue microbubbles for high intensity focused ultrasound thermal ablation of tumors

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Yuanzhi; Yang, Ke; Cao, Yang; Zhou, Xuan; Xu, Jinshun; Liu, Jianxin; Wang, Qi

    2016-01-01

    Microbubbles (MBs) are considered as an important enhancer for high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment of benign or malignant tumors. Recently, different sizes of gas-filled bubbles have been investigated to improve the therapeutic efficiency of HIFU thermal ablation and reduce side effects associated with ultrasound power and irradiation time. However, nanobubbles (NBs) as an ultrasound contrast agent for synergistic therapy of HIFU thermal ablation remain controversial due to their small nano-size in diameter. In this study, phospholipid-shell and gas-core NBs with a narrow size range of 500–600 nm were developed. The synergistic effect of NBs for HIFU thermal ablation was carefully studied both in excised bovine livers and in breast tumor models of rabbits, and made a critical comparison with that of commercial SonoVue microbubbles (SonoVue MBs). In addition, the pathological changes of the targeted area in tumor tissue after HIFU ablation were further investigated. Phosphate buffer saline (PBS) was used as the control. Under the same HIFU parameters, the quantitative echo intensity of B-mode ultrasound image and the volume of coagulative necrosis in lipid NBs groups were significantly higher and larger than that in PBS groups, but could not be demonstrated a difference to that in SonoVue MBs groups both ex vivo and in vivo. These results showed that the synergistic effect of lipid NBs for HIFU thermal ablation were similar with that of SonoVue MBs, and further indicate that lipid NBs could potentially become an enhancer for HIFU thermal ablation of tumors. PMID:26925336

  4. [Neurological disorders after cardiac surgery: Diagnosis of cerebral tumors in the postoperative period].

    PubMed

    López Álvarez, A; Rodríguez Fernández, P; Román Fernández, A; Filgueira Dávila, E; Gálvez Gómez, D; González Monzón, V

    2014-11-01

    The incidence of neurologic disorders in the postoperative period of cardiac surgery is high and usually due to a combination of pre- and intraoperative factors. We present 2 patients with brain tumors diagnosed in the immediate postoperative period after sudden onset of neurologic dysfunction. Image studies yielded clinically useful information in these 2 cases.

  5. Effects of surgery, immunization, and laser immunotherapy on a non-immunogenic metastic tumor model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei R.; Huang, Zheng; Andrienko, Kirill; Stefanov, Stefan; Wolf, Roman F.; Liu, Hong

    2006-08-01

    Traditional local cancer treatment modalities include surgery and radiation, which has the immediate tumor response due to tumor removal or radiation induced cell death. However, such therapeutic approaches usually do not result in eradiation of tumors, particularly when treating metastatic tumors. In fact, local treatment of primary tumors may stimulate the growth and spread of remote metastasis. Commonly used systemic therapies include chemotherapy and immunotherapy, which target the dividing cells or the immune systems. However, in addition to the severe side effects, chemotherapy often suppresses the immune systems, hence lessening the host's ability to fight the disease. Immunotherapy, on the other hand, aims at educating and stimulating immune systems using either general immune enhancements or antigen-oriented specific immune stimulation. However, so far, the traditional immunotherapy has yielded only limited success in treating cancer patients. A different approach is needed. To combine the advantages of both local therapies for acute and targeted treatment responses and the systemic therapies for stimulation of the immune systems, laser immunotherapy was proposed to use selective photothermal therapy as the local treatment modality and the adjuvant-assisted immunotherapy for systemic control. Laser immunotherapy has show positive results in treating metastatic tumors. In this study, we conducted a comparative study using surgery, freeze-thaw immunization and laser immunotherapy in the treatment of metastatic rat mammary tumors. Our results showed that removal of the primary tumors was unsuccessful at changing the course of tumor progression. The tumor cell lysate immunization delayed the emergence of metastases but did not provide immunity against the tumor challenge. Laser immunotherapy, on the other hand, resulted in regression and eradication.

  6. SN-38-loaded nanofiber matrices for local control of pediatric solid tumors after subtotal resection surgery.

    PubMed

    Monterrubio, Carles; Pascual-Pasto, Guillem; Cano, Francisco; Vila-Ubach, Monica; Manzanares, Alejandro; Schaiquevich, Paula; Tornero, Jose A; Sosnik, Alejandro; Mora, Jaume; Carcaboso, Angel M

    2016-02-01

    In addition to surgery, local tumor control in pediatric oncology requires new treatments as an alternative to radiotherapy. SN-38 is an anticancer drug with proved activity against several pediatric solid tumors including neuroblastoma, rhabdomyosarcoma and Ewing sarcoma. Taking advantage of the extremely low aqueous solubility of SN-38, we have developed a novel drug delivery system (DDS) consisting of matrices made of poly(lactic acid) electrospun polymer nanofibers loaded with SN-38 microcrystals for local release in difficult-to-treat pediatric solid tumors. To model the clinical scenario, we conducted extensive preclinical experiments to characterize the biodistribution of the released SN-38 using microdialysis sampling in vivo. We observed that the drug achieves high concentrations in the virtual space of the surgical bed and penetrates a maximum distance of 2 mm within the tumor bulk. Subsequently, we developed a model of subtotal tumor resection in clinically relevant pediatric patient-derived xenografts and used such models to provide evidence of the activity of the SN-38 DDS to inhibit tumor regrowth. We propose that this novel DDS could represent a potential future strategy to avoid harmful radiation therapy as a primary tumor control together with surgery.

  7. Imaging of Cu, Zn, Pb and U in human brain tumor resections by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoriy, M. V.; Dehnhardt, M.; Reifenberger, G.; Zilles, K.; Becker, J. S.

    2006-11-01

    Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) was used to produce images of element distribution in 20 [mu]m thin tissue sections of primary human brain tumors (glioblastoma multiforme--GBM) and adjacent non-neoplastic brain tissue. The sample surface was scanned (raster area ~1 cm2) with a focused laser beam (wavelength 266 nm, diameter of laser crater 50 [mu]m, and laser power density 1 x 109 W cm-2). The laser ablation system was coupled to a double-focusing sector field ICP-SFMS. Ion intensities of 63Cu+, 64Zn+, 208Pb+, and 238U+ were measured by LA-ICP-MS within the tumor area and the surrounding region invaded by GBM as well as in control tissue. The quantitative determination of copper, zinc, lead and uranium distribution in brain tissues by LA-ICP-MS was performed using prepared matrix-matched laboratory standards doped with these elements of interest. The limits of detection (LODs) obtained for Cu and Zn were 0.34 and 0.14 [mu]g g-1, respectively, while LODs of 12.5 and 6.9 ng g-1 were determined for Pb and U. The concentration and distribution of selected elements are compared between the control tissues and regions affected by GBM. A correlation was found between LA-ICP-MS and receptor-autoradiographic results. As receptor-autoradiographic techniques, a labeling for A1AR and the pBR was employed. Regarding the A1AR, we used the specific A1 adenosine receptor (A1AR)-ligand, 3H-CPFPX [3H-cyclopentyl-3-(3-fluoropropyl)-1-propylxanthine], which has been shown to specifically label the invasive zone around GBMs. The peripheral benzodiazepine receptor was labeled with 3H-Pk11195 [3H-1-(2-chlorphenyl)-N-methyl-N-(1-methylpropyl)-3-isoquinoline-carboxamide].

  8. Is Antibiotic Prophylaxis for Percutaneous Radiofrequency Ablation (RFA) of Primary Liver Tumors Necessary? Results From a Single-Center Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Bhatia, Shivank S.; Echenique, Ana Froud, Tatiana Suthar, Rekha Lawson, Ivy Dalal, Ravi; Yrizarry, Jose Narayanan, Govindarajan

    2015-08-15

    PurposeThe purpose of this study was to evaluate need for antibiotic prophylaxis for radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of liver tumors in patients with no significant co-existing risk factors for infection.Materials and MethodsFrom January 2004 to September 2013, 83 patients underwent 123 percutaneous RFA procedures for total of 152 hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) lesions. None of the patients had pre-existing biliary enteric anastomosis (BEA) or any biliary tract abnormality predisposing to ascending biliary infection or uncontrolled diabetes mellitus. No pre- or post-procedure antibiotic prophylaxis was provided for 121 procedures. Data for potential risk factors were reviewed retrospectively and analyzed for the frequency of infectious complications, including abscess formation.ResultsOne patient (1/121 (0.8 %) RFA sessions) developed a large segment 5 liver abscess/infected biloma communicating with the gallbladder 7 weeks after the procedure, successfully treated over 10 weeks with IV and PO antibiotic therapy and percutaneous catheter drainage. This patient did not receive any antibiotics prior to RFA. During the procedure, there was inadvertent placement of RFA probe tines into the gallbladder. No other infectious complications were documented.ConclusionThese data suggest that the routine use of prophylactic antibiotics for liver RFA is not necessary in majority of the patients undergoing liver ablation for HCC and could be limited to patients with high-risk factors such as the presence of BEA or other biliary abnormalities, uncontrolled diabetes mellitus, and large centrally located tumors in close proximity to central bile ducts. Larger randomized studies are needed to confirm this hypothesis.

  9. A comparison of clinical and surgical outcomes between laparo-endoscopic single-site surgery and traditional multiport laparoscopic surgery for adnexal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Lee, In Ok; Yoon, Jung Won; Chung, Dawn; Yim, Ga Won; Nam, Eun Ji; Kim, Sunghoon; Kim, Sang Wun

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to compare clinical and surgical outcomes between laparo-endoscopic single-site (LESS) surgery and traditional multiport laparoscopic (TML) surgery for treatment of adnexal tumors. Methods Medical records were reviewed for patients undergoing surgery for benign adnexal tumors between January 2008 and April 2012 at our institution. All procedures were performed by the same surgeon. Clinical and surgical outcomes for patients undergoing LESS surgery using Glove port were compared with those patients undergoing TML surgery. Results A review of 129 patient cases undergoing LESS surgery using Glove port and 100 patient cases undergoing TML surgery revealed no significant differences in the baseline characteristics of the two groups. The median operative time was shorter in the LESS group using Glove port at 44 minutes (range, 19-126 minutes) than the TML group at 49 minutes (range, 20-196 minutes) (P=0.0007). There were no significant differences between in the duration of postoperative hospital stay, change in hemoglobin levels, pain score or the rate of complications between the LESS and TML groups. Conclusion LESS surgery showed comparable clinical and surgical outcomes to TML surgery, and required less operative time. Future prospective trials are warranted to further define the benefits of LESS surgery for adnexal tumor treatment. PMID:25264529

  10. The promotion of tumor metastasis by surgery and stress: immunological basis and implications for psychoneuroimmunology.

    PubMed

    Ben-Eliyahu, Shamgar

    2003-02-01

    This mini-review emphasizes a psychoneuroimmunology (PNI) perspective of the hypothesis that stress and surgical excision of the primary tumor can promote tumor metastasis. It first establishes the empirical and theoretical basis for control of metastasis by cell-mediated immunity (CMI), as well as the interactive role of non-immunological risk factors. It then describes the various aspects of surgery that suppress CMI, and the neuroendocrine mechanisms mediating suppression by stress and surgery. Last, it briefly reviews the empirical evidence, from animal and human studies, for the promotion of metastasis by stress and surgery, with specific reference to the mediating role of CMI. It is concluded that: (a) Immunological mechanisms most likely play a role in limiting metastasis in patients with solid tumors. (b) Immunosuppression can be deleterious, especially when surgery is conducted early, before the tumor develops insurmountable mechanisms to escape immune destruction. (c) The most sensitive period for the establishment of metastases is the immediate aftermath of surgery. Interventions aiming at reducing stress and immunosuppression should thus strive to start beforehand. (d) 'Psychological and physiological insults activate similar neuroendocrine mechanisms of immunosuppression. Therefore, a multimodal therapeutic approach should be used to prevent tumor metastasis during the perioperative period. (e) Studies employing interventions aimed at reducing the surgical stress response should preferably assess immunological indices with an established clinical relevance, and follow up long-term recurrence provided sample size assure statistical power. (f) The progress toward earlier detection of cancer, and our growing understanding of immunosuppression, continuously improves the chances for successful PNI interventions.

  11. Evaluation of the results of surgery treatment in patients with benign lung tumors

    PubMed Central

    Bagheri, Reza; Haghi, Seyed Ziaollah; Dalouee, Marziyeh Nouri; Nasiri, Zakiyeh; Rajabnejad, Ata’ollah

    2015-01-01

    Background: Lung tumors are among the common tumors and can be benign or malignant. Benign lung tumors are less common compared to the malignant types. Recognition of the clinical symptoms, types of tumors, paraclinical findings, and treatment approaches can bring better therapeutic results. The present study aims to evaluate the characteristics, diagnosis methods, and therapeutic approaches of different benign lung tumors. Materials and Methods: In this retrospective study, 32 patients with a diagnosis of benign lung tumor, who had been referred to the Mashhad University of Medical Sciences between 1981 and 2009, were studied. Some of the studied variables were symptoms, the pulmonary location involved, surgery technique, pathology findings, recurrence, and surgery complications. Data were analyzed by SPSS package version 16. Results: The average age of the patients was 51.69 ± 20.5 years. Prevalence of benign lung tumors was equal in both genders. The most common symptom was cough (31.2%); right lung involvement was more common (71.9%), and the most common sampling technique was transbronchial lung biopsy (TBLB) (62.5%); 53.1% of the patients were operated on by thoracotomy and the wedge resection technique. In 78.1% of the patients, no complications occurred after surgery. There was no recurrence. Most operations were performed in one month after the start of the symptoms (68.8%). Conclusions: Benign lung tumors are commonly diagnosed by routine radiography because most of them are asymptomatic. The most common finding in radiography is the presence of mass in the lungs. Transbronchial lung biopsy is a valuable technique to be used for diagnosis. We chose thoracotomy and wedge resection for the treatment of patients. We recommend this approach as a useful method. PMID:25624593

  12. Endoscopic full-thickness resection and laparoscopic surgery for treatment of gastric stromal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Liu-Ye; Cui, Jun; Wu, Cheng-Rong; Zhang, Bo; Jiang, Li-Xin; Xian, Xiang-Shu; Lin, Shu-Juan; Xu, Ning; Cao, Xiao-Ling; Wang, Zhi-Hua

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To assess the effectiveness of endoscopic full-thickness resection (EFR) and laparoscopic surgery in the treatment of gastric stromal tumors arising from the muscularis propria. METHODS: Out of 62 gastric stromal tumors arising from the muscularis propria, each > 1.5 cm in diameter, 32 were removed by EFR, and 30 were removed by laparoscopic surgery. The tumor expression of CD34, CD117, Dog-1, S-100, and SMA was assessed immunohistochemically. The operative time, complete resection rate, length of hospital stay, incidence of complications, and recurrence rate were compared between the two groups. Continuous data were compared using independent samples t-tests, and categorical data were compared using χ2 tests. RESULTS: The 32 gastric stromal tumors treated by EFR and the 30 treated by laparoscopic surgery showed similar operative time [20-155 min (mean, 78.5 ± 30.1 min) vs 50-120 min (mean, 80.9 ± 46.7 min), P > 0.05], complete resection rate (100% vs 93.3%, P > 0.05), and length of hospital stay [4-10 d (mean, 5.9 ± 1.4 d) vs 4-19 d (mean, 8.9 ± 3.2 d), P >0.05]. None of the patients treated by EFR experienced complications, whereas two patients treated by laparoscopy required a conversion to laparotomy, and one patient had postoperative gastroparesis. No recurrences were observed in either group. Immunohistochemical staining showed that of the 62 gastric stromal tumors diagnosed by gastroscopy and endoscopic ultrasound, six were leiomyomas (SMA-positive), one was a schwannoglioma (S-100 positive), and the remaining 55 were stromal tumors. CONCLUSION: Some gastric stromal tumors arising from the muscularis propria can be completely removed by EFR. EFR could likely replace surgical or laparoscopic procedures for the removal of gastric stromal tumors. PMID:25009400

  13. Rotationplasty after failed limb-sparing tumor surgery: a report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Brigman, Brian E; Kumagai, Steven G; McGuire, Michael H

    2003-10-01

    Rotationplasty was used in two cases of failed limb salvage in adults after tumor resection and reconstruction. Each patient had distal femoral osteosarcoma, one treated with osteoarticular allograft reconstruction, the other with a custom endoprosthetic reconstruction. Both patients had failure attributable to infection, and after multiple surgeries, elected to have rotationplasty. Both had complications associated with the rotationplasty but went on to have functional limbs with Musculoskeletal Tumor Society functional scores of 67% and 87%. One patient died of metastatic disease 29 months after rotationplasty, the other had no problems 50 months after rotationplasty. Although rotationplasty offers a functional improvement over transfemoral amputation in the salvage of failed tumor reconstructions, only 10 such cases have been reported in adults. Rotationplasty should be considered in selected patients for whom an amputation is being considered after failed limb salvage surgery.

  14. Laparoscopic-endoscopic cooperative surgery is a safe and effective treatment for superficial nonampullary duodenal tumors.

    PubMed

    Kyuno, Daisuke; Ohno, Keisuke; Katsuki, Shinichi; Fujita, Tomoki; Konno, Ai; Murakami, Takeshi; Waga, Eriko; Takanashi, Kunihiro; Kitaoka, Keisuke; Komatsu, Yuya; Sasaki, Kazuaki; Hirata, Koichi

    2015-11-01

    The use of endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) for duodenal neoplasms has increased in recent years, but delayed perforation and bleeding are also known to frequently occur. We present two cases in which duodenal adenoma was successfully treated with laparoscopic-endoscopic cooperative surgery. ESD was combined with laparoscopic seromuscular sutures. The lesions in both cases were located in the second portion of the duodenum. The patients requested resection of the lesion, and we performed laparoscopic-endoscopic cooperative surgery. After the laparoscopic surgeon mobilized the duodenum, the endoscopic surgeon performed ESD for the duodenal tumor without perforation. The laparoscopic surgeon sutured the duodenal wall in the seromuscular layer to strengthen the ulcer bed after ESD. Histopathological studies confirmed that the surgical margins were tumor-free in both cases. The patients were discharged with no complications. This unique laparoscopic-endoscopic cooperative procedure is a safe and effective method for resecting superficial nonampullary duodenal tumors.

  15. Laparoscopic and endoscopic co-operative surgery for non-ampullary duodenal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Ichikawa, Daisuke; Komatsu, Shuhei; Dohi, Osamu; Naito, Yuji; Kosuga, Toshiyuki; Kamada, Kazuhiro; Okamoto, Kazuma; Itoh, Yoshito; Otsuji, Eigo

    2016-01-01

    AIM To assess the safety and feasibility of laparoscopic and endoscopic co-operative surgery (LECS) for early non-ampullary duodenal tumors. METHODS Twelve patients with a non-ampullary duodenal tumor underwent LECS at our hospital. One patient had two mucosal lesions in the duodenum. The indication for this procedure was the presence of duodenal tumors with a low risk for lymph node metastasis. In particular, the tumors included small (less than 10 mm) submucosal tumors (SMT) and epithelial mucosal tumors, such as mucosal cancers or large mucosal adenomas with malignant suspicion. The LECS procedures, such as full-thickness dissection for SMT and laparoscopic reinforcement after endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) for epithelial tumors, were performed for the 13 early duodenal lesions in 12 patients. Here we present the short-term outcomes and evaluate the safety and feasibility of this new technique. RESULTS Two SMT-like lesions and eleven superficial epithelial tumor-like lesions were observed. Seven and Six lesions were located in the second and third parts of the duodenum, respectively. All lesions were successfully resected en bloc. The defect in the duodenal wall was manually sutured after resection of the duodenal SMT. For epithelial duodenal tumors, the ulcer bed was laparoscopically reinforced via manual suturing after ESD. Intraoperative perforation occurred in two out of eleven epithelial tumor-like lesions during ESD; however, they were successfully laparoscopically repaired. The median operative time and intraoperative estimated blood loss were 322 min and 0 mL, respectively. Histological examination of the tumors revealed one adenoma with moderate atypia, ten adenocarcinomas, and two neuroendocrine tumors. No severe postoperative complications (Clavien-Dindo classification grade III or higher) were reported in this series, but minor leakage secondary to pancreatic fistula occurred in one patient. CONCLUSION LECS can be a safe and minimally

  16. Appendiceal carcinoid tumor in children: implications for less radical surgery?

    PubMed

    Malkan, A D; Wahid, F N; Fernandez-Pineda, I; Sandoval, J A

    2015-03-01

    The discovery of an appendiceal carcinoid tumor found incidentally or during the course of diagnostic or therapeutic procedures is a burden to both the patient and clinician. The role of the correct surgical operation is paramount for lesions suspected to be malignant. In the pediatric population, appendiceal carcinoids continue to challenge the clinician in choosing the optimal treatment when lesions are larger than 2 cm or involve the appendical base. While the criteria used to define these distinct lesions are available in most cases, the management and treatment are still debated and controversial when considering more radical surgical intervention. The purpose of this article is to give an overview regarding the history, diagnosis, histopathology, management, and controversies associated with appendiceal carcinoid in the pediatric population.

  17. Evaluation of Tumor Response after Short-Course Radiotherapy and Delayed Surgery for Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rega, Daniela; Pecori, Biagio; Scala, Dario; Avallone, Antonio; Pace, Ugo; Petrillo, Antonella; Aloj, Luigi; Tatangelo, Fabiana; Delrio, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Neoadjuvant therapy is able to reduce local recurrence in rectal cancer. Immediate surgery after short course radiotherapy allows only for minimal downstaging. We investigated the effect of delayed surgery after short-course radiotherapy at different time intervals before surgery, in patients affected by rectal cancer. Methods From January 2003 to December 2013 sixty-seven patients with the following characteristics have been selected: clinical (c) stage T3N0 ≤ 12 cm from the anal verge and with circumferential resection margin > 5 mm (by magnetic resonance imaging); cT2, any N, < 5 cm from anal verge; and patients facing tumors with enlarged nodes and/or CRM+ve who resulted unfit for chemo-radiation, were also included. Patients underwent preoperative short-course radiotherapy with different interval to surgery were divided in three groups: A (within 6 weeks), B (between 6 and 8 weeks) and C (after more than 8 weeks). Hystopatolgical response to radiotherapy was measured by Mandard’s modified tumor regression grade (TRG). Results All patients completed the scheduled treatment. Sixty-six patients underwent surgery. Fifty-three of which (80.3%) received a sphincter saving procedure. Downstaging occurred in 41 cases (62.1%). The analysis of subgroups showed an increasing prevalence of TRG 1–2 prolonging the interval to surgery (group A—16.7%, group B—36.8% and 54.3% in group C; p value 0.023). Conclusions Preoperative short-course radiotherapy is able to downstage rectal cancer if surgery is delayed. A higher rate of TRG 1–2 can be obtained if interval to surgery is prolonged to more than 8 weeks. PMID:27548058

  18. Intraoperative mass spectrometry mapping of an onco-metabolite to guide brain tumor surgery

    PubMed Central

    Santagata, Sandro; Eberlin, Livia S.; Norton, Isaiah; Calligaris, David; Feldman, Daniel R.; Ide, Jennifer L.; Liu, Xiaohui; Wiley, Joshua S.; Vestal, Matthew L.; Ramkissoon, Shakti H.; Orringer, Daniel A.; Gill, Kristen K.; Dunn, Ian F.; Dias-Santagata, Dora; Ligon, Keith L.; Jolesz, Ferenc A.; Golby, Alexandra J.; Cooks, R. Graham; Agar, Nathalie Y. R.

    2014-01-01

    For many intraoperative decisions surgeons depend on frozen section pathology, a technique developed over 150 y ago. Technical innovations that permit rapid molecular characterization of tissue samples at the time of surgery are needed. Here, using desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) MS, we rapidly detect the tumor metabolite 2-hydroxyglutarate (2-HG) from tissue sections of surgically resected gliomas, under ambient conditions and without complex or time-consuming preparation. With DESI MS, we identify isocitrate dehydrogenase 1-mutant tumors with both high sensitivity and specificity within minutes, immediately providing critical diagnostic, prognostic, and predictive information. Imaging tissue sections with DESI MS shows that the 2-HG signal overlaps with areas of tumor and that 2-HG levels correlate with tumor content, thereby indicating tumor margins. Mapping the 2-HG signal onto 3D MRI reconstructions of tumors allows the integration of molecular and radiologic information for enhanced clinical decision making. We also validate the methodology and its deployment in the operating room: We have installed a mass spectrometer in our Advanced Multimodality Image Guided Operating (AMIGO) suite and demonstrate the molecular analysis of surgical tissue during brain surgery. This work indicates that metabolite-imaging MS could transform many aspects of surgical care. PMID:24982150

  19. Cooperative laparoscopic endoscopic and hybrid laparoscopic surgery for upper gastrointestinal tumors: Current status

    PubMed Central

    Ntourakis, Dimitrios; Mavrogenis, Georgios

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the cooperative laparoscopic and endoscopic techniques used for the resection of upper gastrointestinal tumors. METHODS: A systematic research of the literature was performed in PubMed for English and French language articles about laparoscopic and endoscopic cooperative, combined, hybrid and rendezvous techniques. Only original studies using these techniques for the resection of early gastric cancer, benign tumors and gastrointestinal stromal tumors of the stomach and the duodenum were included. By excluding case series of less than 10 patients, 25 studies were identified. The study design, number of cases, tumor pathology size and location, the operative technique name, the endoscopy team and surgical team role, operative time, type of closure of visceral wall defect, blood loss, complications and length of hospital stay of these studies were evaluated. Additionally all cooperative techniques found were classified and are presented in a systematic approach. RESULTS: The studies identified were case series and retrospective cohort studies. A total of 706 patients were operated on with a cooperative technique. The tumors resected were only gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) in 4 studies, GIST and various benign submucosal tumors in 22 studies, early gastric cancer (pT1a and pT1b) in 6 studies and early duodenal cancer in 1 study. There was important heterogeneity between the studies. The operative techniques identified were: laparoscopic assisted endoscopic resection, endoscopic assisted wedge resection, endoscopic assisted transgastric and intragastric surgery, laparoscopic endoscopic cooperative surgery (LECS), laparoscopic assisted endoscopic full thickness resection (LAEFR), clean non exposure technique and non-exposed endoscopic wall-inversion surgery (NEWS). Each technique is illustrated with the roles of the endoscopic and laparoscopic teams; the indications, characteristics and short term results are described. CONCLUSION: Along with

  20. Ablation of hepatic malignant tumors with irreversible electroporation: A systematic review and meta-analysis of outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Guo; Zhao, Qiyu; Chen, Fen; Jiang, Tian’an; Wang, Weilin

    2017-01-01

    Background Irreversible electroporation (IRE) ablation is a new technique that is used to eliminate malignant tumors through nonthermal approaches. Objective The purpose of this review was to evaluate the efficiency of IRE for hepatic malignant tumors. Methods A systematic search was performed from PubMed, Embase, Web of science, Scopus and other potential literatures from references in relevant articles July 26th, 2016. Overall estimates of pooled standard mean difference (SMD) with 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated for the changes of the pre- and post-IRE longest diameter, alkaline phosphatase (ALP), aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and serum total bilirubin levels. Sensitivity analysis and publication bias and were performed after the pooled analysis, and the quality of the included literatures was appraised using Newcastle-Ottawa Scale (NOS). Results We finally included 300 patients (mean age: 51 to 66.6 years; male: 182; female: 118) from 9 studies of hepatic malignant tumors. The meta-analysis showed that comparing with the initial values, the longest diameter of the tumors was significantly decreased at the last follow-up months after IRE. Furthermore, the ALP, AST and total bilirubin levels were increased at 1 day after IRE while returned to baseline at the last follow-up month. No risk of publication bias was found, and all literatures were assessed good quality according to NOS. Conclusions The pooled data indicated that IRE could be a minimal invasive and effective approach for patients who had preoperative poor liver function or those whose masses were in refractory locations where surgical resection was unsuitable. PMID:28009979

  1. The Effect of Perioperative Radiation Therapy on Spinal Bone Fusion Following Spine Tumor Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae-Kyum; Youn, Sang Min; Chang, Ung-Kyu

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Perioperative irradiation is often combined with spine tumor surgery. Radiation is known to be detrimental to healing process of bone fusion. We tried to investigate bone fusion rate in spine tumor surgery cases with perioperative radiation therapy (RT) and to analyze significant factors affecting successful bone fusion. Methods Study cohort was 33 patients who underwent spinal tumor resection and bone graft surgery combined with perioperative RT. Their medical records and radiological data were analyzed retrospectively. The analyzed factors were surgical approach, location of bone graft (anterior vs. posterior), kind of graft (autologous graft vs. allograft), timing of RT (preoperative vs. postoperative), interval of RT from operation in cases of postoperative RT (within 1 month vs. after 1 month) radiation dose (above 38 Gy vs. below 38 Gy) and type of radiation therapy (conventional RT vs. stereotactic radiosurgery). The bone fusion was determined on computed tomography images. Result Bone fusion was identified in 19 cases (57%). The only significant factors to affect bony fusion was the kind of graft (75% in autograft vs. 41 in allograft, p=0.049). Other factors proved to be insignificant relating to postoperative bone fusion. Regarding time interval of RT and operation in cases of postoperative RT, the time interval was not significant (p=0.101). Conclusion Spinal fusion surgery which was combined with perioperative RT showed relatively low bone fusion rate (57%). For successful bone fusion, the selection of bone graft was the most important. PMID:27847573

  2. [Ectopic mediastinal parathyroid tumor resected by video-assisted thoracic surgery with intraoperative methylene blue infusion; report of a case].

    PubMed

    Okagawa, Takehiko; Hiramatsu, Yoshinori

    2014-03-01

    We report a surgical case of ectopic mediastinal parathyroid tumor resected by video-assisted thoracic surgery with intraoperative methylene blue infusion. It is often difficult to detect ectopic mediastinal parathyroid tumor during the operation because the tumor is soft, small and buried under mediastinal tissue. After methylene blue 4 mg/kg intravenously administration, the tumor was gradually dyed blue and easily detected and resected by video-assisted thoracic surgery. It is useful of methylene blue for detection of ectopic mediastinal parathyroid tumor.

  3. Fatal antiphospholipid syndrome following endoscopic transnasal-transsphenoidal surgery for a pituitary tumor

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chiao-Zhu; Li, Chiao-Ching; Hsieh, Chih-Chuan; Lin, Meng-Chi; Hueng, Dueng-Yuan; Liu, Feng-Chen; Chen, Yuan-Hao

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: The fatal type of antiphospholipid syndrome is a rare but life-threating condition. It may be triggered by surgery or infection. Endoscopic transnasal-transsphenoidal surgery is a common procedure for pituitary tumor. We report a catastrophic case of a young woman died of fatal antiphospholipid syndrome following endoscopic transnasal-transsphenoidal surgery. Methods and Result: A 31-year-old woman of a history of stroke received endoscopic transnasal-transsphenoidal surgery for a pituitary tumor. The whole procedure was smooth. However, the patient suffered from acute delirium on postoperative day 4. Then, her consciousness became comatose state rapidly with dilatation of pupils. Urgent magnetic resonance imaging of brain demonstrated multiple acute lacunar infarcts. The positive antiphosphoipid antibody and severe thrombocytopenia were also noted. Fatal antiphospholipid syndrome was diagnosed. Plasma exchange, corticosteroids, anticoagulant agent were prescribed. The hemodynamic condition was gradually stable. However, the consciousness was still in deep coma. The patient died of organ donation 2 months later. Conclusion: If patients have a history of cerebral stroke in their early life, such as a young stroke, the APS and higher risk of developing fatal APS after major surgery should be considered. The optimal management of APS remains controversial. The best treatment strategies are only early diagnosis and aggressive therapies combing of anticoagulant, corticosteroid, and plasma exchange. The intravenous immunoglobulin is prescribed for patients with refractory APS. PMID:28072724

  4. New Experiences of Treatment in Multiple Tumors with HIFU Ablation and Whole Body Hyperthermia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, Akira; Gondo, Hideki; Iijima, Norio; Xia, Yuantian; Takeuchi, Takashi

    2007-05-01

    We have performed some 5000 whole body hyperthermia (WBH) treatments using far-infrared equipment (RHD 7500: Enthermics medical systems, USA) in 1000 cancer patients since 1991 at Luke Hospital & Clinic (Nakano, Japan). Hyperthermia is a natural treatment whereby patients are heated within the fever temperature range of 41-42 C. However, this therapy alone is poorly suited to advanced cancer patients, where regional tumor control is needed. The potential of HIFU therapy for theses cases deserves further investigation. We have treated 20 times in 12 advanced cancer patients, since importing a new HIFU device (Sonic CZ901: Mianyang some electronic Ltd: China) last December and are able to report some interesting results of combination treatment with HIFU and WBH. Our first experience was a 20-year old female pharyngeal cancer patient with lung and multiple liver metastases. Her lung tumor reduced following WBH (given weekly, 4 times in total) and her liver tumor clearly reduced following HIFU treatment. Our second experience of combinative treatment was in a 65-year old male suffering from a neck tumor with bone metastasis. He received WBH after HIFU treatment into 7th lib bone metastasis. After 10 days, his neck tumor grew with evidence of internal necrosis, and finally ruptured. CT images showed necrotic changes in the focus of the neck tumor and also lib bone metastasis. We believe that this new thermal combinative therapy shows great promise.

  5. Microwave tumor ablation: cooperative academic-industry development of a high-power gas-cooled system with early clinical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brace, Christopher L.; Ziemlewicz, Timothy J.; Schefelker, Rick; Hinshaw, J. L.; Lubner, Meghan G.; Lee, Fred T.

    2013-02-01

    Microwave tumor ablation continues to evolve into a viable treatment option for many cancers. Current systems are poised to supplant radiofrequency ablation as the dominant percutaneous thermal therapy. Here is provided an overview of technical details and early clinical results with a high-powered, gas-cooled microwave ablation system. The system was developed with academic-industry collaboration using federal and private funding. The generator comprises three synchronous channels that each produce up to 140W at 2.45GHz. A mountable power distribution module facilitates CT imaging guidance and monitoring and reduces clutter in the sterile field. Cryogenic carbon-dioxide cools the coaxial applicator, permitting a thin applicator profile (~1.5 mm diameter) and high power delivery. A total of 106 liver tumors were treated (96 malignant, 10 benign) from December 2010 to June 2012 at a single academic institution. Mean tumor size +/- standard deviation was 2.5+/-1.3cm (range 0.5-13.9cm). Treatment time was 5.4+/-3.3min (range 1-20min). Median follow-up was 6 months (range 1-16 months). Technical success was reported in 100% of cases. Local tumor progression was noted in 4/96 (4.3%) of malignancies. The only major complication was a pleural effusion that was treated with thoracentesis. Microwave ablation with this system is an effective treatment for liver cancer. Compared to previous data from the same institution, these results suggest an increased efficacy and equivalent safety to RF ablation. Additional data from the lung and kidney support this conclusion.

  6. Comparison of Two Techniques for Radio-frequency Hepatic Tumor Ablation through Numerical Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosturski, N.; Margenov, S.; Vutov, Y.

    2011-11-01

    We simulate the thermal and electrical processes, involved in the radio-frequency ablation procedure. In this study, we take into account the observed fact, that the electrical conductivity of the hepatic tissue varies during the procedure. With the increase of the tissue temperature to a certain level, a sudden drop of the electrical conductivity is observed. This variation was neglected in some previous studies. The mathematical model consists of two parts—electrical and thermal. The energy from the applied AC voltage is determined first, by solving the Laplace equation to find the potential distribution. After that, the electric field intensity and the current density are directly calculated. Finally, the heat transfer equation is solved to determine the temperature distribution. Heat loss due to blood perfusion is also accounted for. The simulations were performed on the IBM Blue Gene/P massively parallel computer.

  7. Non-cerebellar primitive neuroectodermal tumors (PNET): summary of the Milan consensus and state of the art workshop on marrow ablative chemotherapy with hematopoietic cell rescue for malignant brain tumors of childhood and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Fangusaro, Jason; Massimino, Maura; Rutkowski, Stefan; Gururangan, Sridharan

    2010-04-01

    CNS non-cerebellar primitive neuroectodermal tumors (PNET) represent <5% of all childhood brain tumors. Despite similar therapies, these patients have had significantly worse outcomes compared to patients with medulloblastoma. Although these tumors have historically been considered analogous to medulloblastoma, there is growing evidence that they are biologically distinct. Since these tumors are relatively rare, there are few large series in the literature. Here we present the international experience treating these patients with a variety of therapies, including marrow ablative chemotherapy followed by autologous hematopoietic cell rescue.

  8. Factors affecting tumor recurrence after curative surgery for NSCLC: impacts of lymphovascular invasion on early tumor recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Park, Chanyeong; Jang, Seung Hun; Lee, Jae Woong

    2014-01-01

    Background Although surgery is potentially curative treatment for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), the risk of postoperative disease recurrence is still high. This study was conducted to assess the factors associated with postoperative tumor recurrence in patients who underwent curative surgery for NSCLC. Methods One hundred seventy-one patients who underwent curative surgery for NSCLC were included in this study. Clinicopathological factors of histologic type, pathologic TNM stage, T stage, N stage, lymphovascular invasion (LVI), perineural invasion (PNI), surgical procedure, adjuvant chemotherapy and adjuvant radiotherapy were investigated. Gender, age, and clinicopathologic factors were included in univariate and multivariate analyses using the Kaplan-Meier method and Cox proportional hazards model, respectively. Mann-Whitney U and Kruskal-Wallis tests were used to investigate the significance of differences in recurrence-free interval (RFI) according to clinicopathological factors. Results Median RFI was 20 months. Univariate and multivariate analyses for overall recurrence identified T stage, N stage, and LVI as significant factors (P=0.045, 0.044, and <0.001, respectively). Pathologic stage (P=0.005) was the only factor that was significantly associated with locoregional recurrence. T stage (P=0.040) and LVI (P<0.001) were significantly associated with distant recurrence. The difference in 2-year freedom from recurrence between LVI positive and negative groups was significant (14.9% vs. 44.6%, P<0.001). LVI was the only factor that was significantly associated with a shortened mean RFI (P<0.001). Conclusions LVI had a significant effect on both overall and distant recurrence rates as well as on early tumor recurrence after curative surgery for NSCLC. PMID:25364519

  9. Protective role of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptors in chronic intestinal inflammation: TNFR1 ablation boosts systemic inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Han, Gencheng; Chen, Yu; Wang, Ke; Liu, Guijun; Wang, Renxi; Xiao, He; Li, Xinying; Hou, Chunmei; Shen, Beifen; Guo, Renfeng; Li, Yan; Chen, Guojiang

    2013-09-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) acts as a key factor for the development of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs), whose function is known to be mediated by TNF receptor 1 (TNFR1) or TNFR2. However, the precise role of the two receptors in IBD remains poorly understood. Herein, chronic colitis was established by oral administration of dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) in TNFR1 or TNFR2-/- mice. Unexpectedly, TNFR1 or TNFR2 deficiency led to exacerbation of signs of colitis compared with wild-type (WT) counterparts. Of note, TNFR1 ablation rendered significantly increased mortality compared with TNFR2 and WT mice after DSS. Aggravated pathology of colitis in TNFR1-/- or TNFR2-/- mice correlated with elevated colonic expression of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Importantly, ablation of TNFR1 or TNFR2 increased apoptosis of colonic epithelial cells, which might be due to the heightened ratio of Bax/Bcl-2 and increased expression of caspase-8. Intriguingly, despite comparable intensity of intestinal inflammation in TNFR-deficient mice after DSS, systemic inflammatory response (including splenomegaly and myeloid expansion) was augmented dramatically in TNFR1-/- mice, instead of TNFR2-/- mice. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GMCSF) was identified as a key mediator in this process, as neutralization of GMCSF dampened peripheral inflammatory reaction and reduced mortality in TNFR1-/- mice. These data suggest that signaling via TNFR1 or TNFR2 has a protective role in chronic intestinal inflammation, and that lacking TNFR1 augments systemic inflammatory response in GMCSF-dependent manner.

  10. Intraoperative neurophysiological mapping and monitoring in spinal tumor surgery: sirens or indispensable tools?

    PubMed

    Scibilia, Antonino; Terranova, Carmen; Rizzo, Vincenzo; Raffa, Giovanni; Morelli, Adolfo; Esposito, Felice; Mallamace, Raffaella; Buda, Gaetano; Conti, Alfredo; Quartarone, Angelo; Germanò, Antonino

    2016-08-01

    Spinal tumor (ST) surgery carries the risk of new neurological deficits in the postoperative period. Intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring and mapping (IONM) represents an effective method of identifying and monitoring in real time the functional integrity of both the spinal cord (SC) and the nerve roots (NRs). Despite consensus favoring the use of IONM in ST surgery, in this era of evidence-based medicine, there is still a need to demonstrate the effective role of IONM in ST surgery in achieving an oncological cure, optimizing patient safety, and considering medicolegal aspects. Thus, neurosurgeons are asked to establish which techniques are considered indispensable. In the present study, the authors focused on the rationale for and the accuracy (sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values) of IONM in ST surgery in light of more recent evidence in the literature, with specific emphasis on the role of IONM in reducing the incidence of postoperative neurological deficits. This review confirms the role of IONM as a useful tool in the workup for ST surgery. Individual monitoring and mapping techniques are clearly not sufficient to account for the complex function of the SC and NRs. Conversely, multimodal IONM is highly sensitive and specific for anticipating neurological injury during ST surgery and represents an important tool for preserving neuronal structures and achieving an optimal postoperative functional outcome.

  11. [Laparoscopic nephron-sparing surgery for Wilms tumor: description of two cases].

    PubMed

    López, L; Copete, M; Villamizar, P

    2016-01-25

    Surgical resection is the mainstay of treatment for Wilms tumor. The research progress of the large study groups worldwide has reduced mortality. However, searching to minimize morbidity, the minimally invasive approach has been applied in selected patients. This article describes two cases of Wilms tumor managed with laparoscopic nephron sparing surgery. The case 1 with Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome and bilateral disease, and the case 2 non-syndromic unilateral. The approach was intraperitoneally, without intraoperative complications. The follow-up to 18 months (case 1) and six months (case 2) did not have recurrence or metastatic disease.

  12. Comparison of Survival Rate in Primary Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Among Elderly Patients Treated With Radiofrequency Ablation, Surgery, or Chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Heon; Jin, Gong Yong Han, Young Min; Chung, Gyung Ho; Lee, Yong Chul; Kwon, Keun Sang; Lynch, David

    2012-04-15

    Purpose: We retrospectively compared the survival rate in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with radiofrequency ablation (RFA), surgery, or chemotherapy according to lung cancer staging. Materials and Methods: From 2000 to 2004, 77 NSCLC patients, all of whom had WHO performance status 0-2 and were >60 years old, were enrolled in a cancer registry and retrospectively evaluated. RFA was performed on patients who had medical contraindications to surgery/unsuitability for surgery, such as advanced lung cancer or refusal of surgery. In the RFA group, 40 patients with inoperable NSCLC underwent RFA under computed tomography (CT) guidance. These included 16 patients with stage I to II cancer and 24 patients with stage III to IV cancer who underwent RFA in an adjuvant setting. In the comparison group (n = 37), 13 patients with stage I to II cancer underwent surgery; 18 patients with stage III to IV cancer underwent chemotherapy; and 6 patients with stage III to IV cancer were not actively treated. The survival curves for RFA, surgery, and chemotherapy in these patients were calculated using Kaplan-Meier method. Results: Median survival times for patients treated with (1) surgery alone and (2) RFA alone for stage I to II lung cancer were 33.8 and 28.2 months, respectively (P = 0.426). Median survival times for patients treated with (1) chemotherapy alone and (2) RFA with chemotherapy for stage III to IV cancer were 29 and 42 months, respectively (P = 0.03). Conclusion: RFA can be used as an alternative treatment to surgery for older NSCLC patients with stage I to II inoperable cancer and can play a role as adjuvant therapy with chemotherapy for patients with stage III to IV lung cancer.

  13. Evaluation of image quality of MRI data for brain tumor surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heckel, Frank; Arlt, Felix; Geisler, Benjamin; Zidowitz, Stephan; Neumuth, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    3D medical images are important components of modern medicine. Their usefulness for the physician depends on their quality, though. Only high-quality images allow accurate and reproducible diagnosis and appropriate support during treatment. We have analyzed 202 MRI images for brain tumor surgery in a retrospective study. Both an experienced neurosurgeon and an experienced neuroradiologist rated each available image with respect to its role in the clinical workflow, its suitability for this specific role, various image quality characteristics, and imaging artifacts. Our results show that MRI data acquired for brain tumor surgery does not always fulfill the required quality standards and that there is a significant disagreement between the surgeon and the radiologist, with the surgeon being more critical. Noise, resolution, as well as the coverage of anatomical structures were the most important criteria for the surgeon, while the radiologist was mainly disturbed by motion artifacts.

  14. Surgery Followed by Radiotherapy Versus Radiotherapy Alone for Metastatic Spinal Cord Compression From Unfavorable Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Rades, Dirk; Huttenlocher, Stefan; Bajrovic, Amira; Karstens, Johann H.; Adamietz, Irenaeus A.; Kazic, Nadja; Rudat, Volker; Schild, Steven E.

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: Despite a previously published randomized trial, controversy exists regarding the benefit of adding surgery to radiotherapy for metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC). It is thought that patients with MSCC from relatively radioresistant tumors or tumors associated with poor functional outcome after radiotherapy alone may benefit from surgery. This study focuses on these tumors. Methods and Materials: Data from 67 patients receiving surgery plus radiotherapy (S+RT) were matched to 134 patients (1:2) receiving radiotherapy alone (RT). Groups were matched for 10 factors and compared for motor function, ambulatory status, local control, and survival. Additional separate matched-pair analyses were performed for patients receiving direct decompressive surgery plus stabilization of involved vertebrae (DDSS) and patients receiving laminectomy (LE). Results: Improvement of motor function occurred in 22% of patients after S+RT and 16% after RT (p = 0.25). Posttreatment ambulatory rates were 67% and 61%, respectively (p = 0.68). Of nonambulatory patients, 29% and 19% (p = 0.53) regained ambulatory status. One-year local control rates were 85% and 89% (p = 0.87). One-year survival rates were 38% and 24% (p = 0.20). The matched-pair analysis of patients receiving LE showed no significant differences between both therapies. In the matched-pair analysis of patients receiving DDSS, improvement of motor function occurred more often after DDSS+RT than RT (28% vs. 19%, p = 0.024). Posttreatment ambulatory rates were 86% and 67% (p = 0.30); 45% and 18% of patients regained ambulatory status (p = 0.29). Conclusions: Patients with MSCC from an unfavorable primary tumor appeared to benefit from DDSS but not LE when added to radiotherapy in terms of improved functional outcome.

  15. The timing of surgery after neoadjuvant radiotherapy influences tumor dissemination in a preclinical model

    PubMed Central

    Leroi, Natacha; Sounni, Nor Eddine; Van Overmeire, Eva; Blacher, Silvia; Marée, Raphael; Van Ginderachter, Jo; Lallemand, François; Lenaerts, Eric; Coucke, Philippe; Noel, Agnès; Martinive, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Neoadjuvant radiotherapy (neoRT) used in cancer treatments aims at improving local tumor control and patient overall survival. The neoRT schedule and the timing of the surgical treatment (ST) are empirically based and influenced by the clinician's experience. The current study examines how the sequencing of neoRT and ST affects metastatic dissemination. In a breast carcinoma model, tumors were exposed to different neoRT schedules (2x5Gy or 5x2Gy) followed by surgery at day 4 or 11 post-RT. The impact on the tumor microenvironment and lung metastases was evaluated through immunohistochemical and flow cytometry analyses. After 2x5Gy, early ST (at day 4 post-RT) led to increased size and number of lung metastases as compared to ST performed at day 11. Inversely, after 5x2Gy neoRT, early ST protected the mice against lung metastases. This intriguing relationship between tumor aggressiveness and ST timing could not be explained by differences in classical parameters studied such as hypoxia, vessel density and matrix remodeling. The study of tumor-related inflammation and immunity reveals an increased circulating NK cell percentage following neoRT as compared to non irradiated mice. Then, radiation treatment and surgery were applied to tumor-bearing NOD/SCID mice. In the absence of NK cells, neoRT appears to increase lung metastatic dissemination as compared to non irradiated tumor-bearing mice. Altogether our data demonstrate that the neoRT schedule and the ST timing affect metastasis formation in a pre-clinical model and points out the potential role of NK cells. These findings highlight the importance to cautiously tailor the optimal window for ST following RT. PMID:26440148

  16. Towards intraoperative assessment of tumor margins in breast surgery using optical coherence elastography (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, Brendan F.; Wijesinghe, Philip; Allen, Wes M.; Chin, Lixin; Latham, Bruce; Saunders, Christobel M.; Sampson, David D.

    2016-03-01

    Surgical excision of tumor is a critical factor in the management of breast cancer. The most common surgical procedure is breast-conserving surgery. The surgeon's goal is to remove the tumor and a rim of healthy tissue surrounding the tumor: the surgical margin. A major issue in breast-conserving surgery is the absence of a reliable tool to guide the surgeon in intraoperatively assessing the margin. A number of techniques have been proposed; however, the re-excision rate remains high and has been reported to be in the range 30-60%. New tools are needed to address this issue. Optical coherence elastography (OCE) shows promise as a tool for intraoperative tumor margin assessment in breast-conserving surgery. Further advances towards clinical translation are limited by long scan times and small fields of view. In particular, scanning over sufficient areas to assess the entire margin in an intraoperative timeframe has not been shown to be feasible. Here, we present a protocol allowing ~75% of the surgical margins to be assessed within 30 minutes. To achieve this, we have incorporated a 65 mm-diameter (internal), wide-aperture annular piezoelectric transducer, allowing the entire surface of the excised tumor mass to be automatically imaged in an OCT mosaic comprised of 10 × 10 mm tiles. As OCT is effective in identifying adipose tissue, our protocol uses the wide-field OCT to selectively guide subsequent local OCE scanning to regions of solid tissue which often present low contrast in OCT images. We present promising examples from freshly excised human breast tissue.

  17. Targeted ablation of the WW domain-containing oxidoreductase tumor suppressor leads to impaired steroidogenesis.

    PubMed

    Aqeilan, Rami I; Hagan, John P; de Bruin, Alain; Rawahneh, Maysoon; Salah, Zaidoun; Gaudio, Eugenio; Siddiqui, Hasan; Volinia, Stefano; Alder, Hansjuerg; Lian, Jane B; Stein, Gary S; Croce, Carlo M

    2009-03-01

    The WW domain-containing oxidoreductase (WWOX) gene encodes a 46-kDa tumor suppressor. The Wwox protein contains two N-terminal WW domains that interact with several transcriptional activators containing proline-tyrosine motifs and a central short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase domain that has been suggested to play a role in steroid metabolism. Recently, we have shown that targeted deletion of the Wwox gene in mice leads to postnatal lethality and defects in bone growth. Here, we report that Wwox-deficient mice display impaired steroidogenesis. Mutant homozygous mice are born with gonadal abnormalities, including failure of Leydig cell development in testis and reduced theca cell proliferation in ovary. Furthermore, Wwox(-/-) mice displayed impaired gene expression of key steroidogenesis enzymes. Affymetrix microarray gene analysis revealed differentially expressed related genes in steroidogenesis in knockout mice testis and ovary as compared with control mice. These results demonstrate the essential requirement for the Wwox tumor suppressor in proper steroidogenesis.

  18. Dendrimer-Templated Ultrasmall and Multifunctional Photothermal Agents for Efficient Tumor Ablation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhengjie; Wang, Yitong; Yan, Yang; Zhang, Qiang; Cheng, Yiyun

    2016-04-26

    Ultrasmall and multifunctional nanoparticles are highly desirable for photothermal cancer therapy, but the synthesis of these nanoparticles remains a huge challenge. Here, we used a dendrimer as a template to synthesize ultrasmall photothermal agents and further modified them with multifunctional groups. Dendrimer-encapsulated nanoparticles (DENPs) including copper sulfide, platinum, and palladium nanoparticles possessed a sub-5 nm size and exhibited an excellent photothermal effect. DENPs were further modified with TAT or RGD peptides to facilitate their cellular uptake and targeting delivery to tumors. They were also decorated with fluorescent probes for real-time imaging and tracking of the particles' distribution. The in vivo study revealed RGD-modified DENPs efficiently reduced the tumor growth upon near-infrared irradiation. In all, our study provides a facile and flexible scaffold to prepare ultrasmall and multifunctional photothermal agents.

  19. Ablation of Neuropilin 1 from glioma-associated microglia and macrophages slows tumor progression

    PubMed Central

    Miyauchi, Jeremy T.; Chen, Danling; Choi, Matthew; Nissen, Jillian C.; Shroyer, Kenneth R.; Djordevic, Snezana; Zachary, Ian C.; Selwood, David; Tsirka, Stella E.

    2016-01-01

    Gliomas are the most commonly diagnosed primary tumors of the central nervous system (CNS). Median times of survival are dismal regardless of the treatment approach, underlying the need to develop more effective therapies. Modulation of the immune system is a promising strategy as innate and adaptive immunity play important roles in cancer progression. Glioma associated microglia and macrophages (GAMs) can comprise over 30% of the cells in glioma biopsies. Gliomas secrete cytokines that suppress the anti-tumorigenic properties of GAMs, causing them to secrete factors that support the tumor's spread and growth. Neuropilin 1 (Nrp1) is a transmembrane receptor that in mice both amplifies pro-angiogenic signaling in the tumor microenvironment and affects behavior of innate immune cells. Using a Cre-lox system, we generated mice that lack expression of Nrp1 in GAMs. We demonstrate, using an in vivo orthotopic glioma model, that tumors in mice with Nrp1-deficient GAMs exhibit less vascularity, grow at a slower pace, and are populated by increased numbers of anti-tumorigenic GAMs. Moreover, glioma survival times in mice with Nrp1-deficient GAMs were significantly longer. Treating wild-type mice with a small molecule inhibitor of Nrp1's b1 domain, EG00229, which we show here is selective for Nrp1 over Nrp2, yielded an identical outcome. Nrp1-deficient or EG00229-treated wild-type microglia exhibited a shift towards anti-tumorigenicity as evident by altered inflammatory marker profiles in vivo and decreased SMAD2/3 activation when conditioned in the presence of glioma-derived factors. These results provide support for the proposal that pharmacological inhibition of Nrp1 constitutes a potential strategy for suppressing glioma progression. PMID:26755653

  20. Enhancing tumor apparent diffusion coefficient histogram skewness stratifies the postoperative survival in recurrent glioblastoma multiforme patients undergoing salvage surgery.

    PubMed

    Zolal, Amir; Juratli, Tareq A; Linn, Jennifer; Podlesek, Dino; Sitoci Ficici, Kerim Hakan; Kitzler, Hagen H; Schackert, Gabriele; Sobottka, Stephan B; Rieger, Bernhard; Krex, Dietmar

    2016-05-01

    Objective To determine the value of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) histogram parameters for the prediction of individual survival in patients undergoing surgery for recurrent glioblastoma (GBM) in a retrospective cohort study. Methods Thirty-one patients who underwent surgery for first recurrence of a known GBM between 2008 and 2012 were included. The following parameters were collected: age, sex, enhancing tumor size, mean ADC, median ADC, ADC skewness, ADC kurtosis and fifth percentile of the ADC histogram, initial progression free survival (PFS), extent of second resection and further adjuvant treatment. The association of these parameters with survival and PFS after second surgery was analyzed using log-rank test and Cox regression. Results Using log-rank test, ADC histogram skewness of the enhancing tumor was significantly associated with both survival (p = 0.001) and PFS after second surgery (p = 0.005). Further parameters associated with prolonged survival after second surgery were: gross total resection at second surgery (p = 0.026), tumor size (0.040) and third surgery (p = 0.003). In the multivariate Cox analysis, ADC histogram skewness was shown to be an independent prognostic factor for survival after second surgery. Conclusion ADC histogram skewness of the enhancing lesion, enhancing lesion size, third surgery, as well as gross total resection have been shown to be associated with survival following the second surgery. ADC histogram skewness was an independent prognostic factor for survival in the multivariate analysis.

  1. Convection-enhanced delivery of topotecan into a PDGF-driven model of glioblastoma prolongs survival, ablates tumor initiating cells and recruited glial progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, Kim A.; Tannenbaum, Aaron M.; Assanah, Marcela C.; Linskey, Katy; Yun, Jonathan; Kangarlu, Alayar; Gil, Orlando D.; Canoll, Peter; Bruce, Jeffrey N.

    2011-01-01

    The contribution of microenvironment to tumor growth has important implications for optimizing chemotherapeutic response and understanding the biology of recurrent tumors. In this study, we tested the effects of locally administered topotecan on a rat model of glioblastoma that is induced by intracerebral injection of PDGF-IRES-GFP-expressing retrovirus, we treated the tumors by convection-enhanced delivery (CED) of topotecan (136 μM) for 1, 4, or 7 days and then characterized the effects on both the retrovirus-transformed tumor cells (GFP+ cells) as well as the uninfected glial progenitor cells (GFP- cells) that are recruited to the tumor. Topotecan treatment reduced GFP+ cells ~10-fold and recruited progenitors by ~80-fold while providing a significant survival advantage that improved with greater treatment duration. Regions of glial progenitor ablation occurred corresponding to the anatomical distribution of topotecan as predicted by MRI of a surrogate tracer. Histopathologic changes in recurrent tumors point to a decrease in recruitment, most likely due to the chemotherapeutic ablation of the recruitable progenitor pool. PMID:21464045

  2. Radiofrequency Ablation of Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, Marc; Mikityansky, Igor; Kam, Anthony; Libutti, Steven K.; Walther, McClellan M.; Neeman, Ziv; Locklin, Julia K.; Wood, Bradford J.

    2004-09-15

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) has been used for over 18 years for treatment of nerve-related chronic pain and cardiac arrhythmias. In the last 10 years, technical developments have increased ablation volumes in a controllable, versatile, and relatively inexpensive manner. The host of clinical applications for RFA have similarly expanded. Current RFA equipment, techniques, applications, results, complications, and research avenues for local tumor ablation are summarized.

  3. Transarterial embolization (TAE) as add-on to percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RFA) for the treatment of renal tumors: Review of the literature, overview of state-of-the-art embolization materials and further perspective of advanced image-guided tumor ablation.

    PubMed

    Sommer, C M; Pallwein-Prettner, L; Vollherbst, D F; Seidel, R; Rieder, C; Radeleff, B A; Kauczor, H U; Wacker, F; Richter, G M; Bücker, A; Rodt, T; Massmann, A; Pereira, P L

    2017-01-01

    Percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RFA) for the treatment of stage I renal cell carcinoma has recently gained significant attention as the now available long-term and controlled data demonstrate that RFA can result in disease-free and cancer-specific survival comparable with partial and/or radical nephrectomy. In the non-controlled single center trials, however, the rates of treatment failure vary. Operator experience and ablation technique may explain some of the different outcomes. In the controlled trials, a major limitation is the lack of adequate randomization. In case reports, original series and overview articles, transarterial embolization (TAE) before percutaneous RFA was promising to increase tumor control and to reduce complications. The purpose of this study was to systematically review the literature on TAE as add-on to percutaneous RFA for renal tumors. Specific data regarding technique, tumor and patient characteristics as well as technical, clinical and oncologic outcomes have been analyzed. Additionally, an overview of state-of-the-art embolization materials and the radiological perspective of advanced image-guided tumor ablation (TA) will be discussed. In conclusion, TAE as add-on to percutaneous RFA is feasible and very effective and safe for the treatment of T1a tumors in difficult locations and T1b tumors. Advanced radiological techniques and technologies such as microwave ablation, innovative embolization materials and software-based solutions are now available, or will be available in the near future, to reduce the limitations of bland RFA. Clinical implementation is extremely important for performing image-guided TA as a highly standardized effective procedure even in the most challenging cases of localized renal tumors.

  4. Framework for hyperspectral image processing and quantification for cancer detection during animal tumor surgery

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Guolan; Wang, Dongsheng; Qin, Xulei; Halig, Luma; Muller, Susan; Zhang, Hongzheng; Chen, Amy; Pogue, Brian W.; Chen, Zhuo Georgia; Fei, Baowei

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Hyperspectral imaging (HSI) is an imaging modality that holds strong potential for rapid cancer detection during image-guided surgery. But the data from HSI often needs to be processed appropriately in order to extract the maximum useful information that differentiates cancer from normal tissue. We proposed a framework for hyperspectral image processing and quantification, which includes a set of steps including image preprocessing, glare removal, feature extraction, and ultimately image classification. The framework has been tested on images from mice with head and neck cancer, using spectra from 450- to 900-nm wavelength. The image analysis computed Fourier coefficients, normalized reflectance, mean, and spectral derivatives for improved accuracy. The experimental results demonstrated the feasibility of the hyperspectral image processing and quantification framework for cancer detection during animal tumor surgery, in a challenging setting where sensitivity can be low due to a modest number of features present, but potential for fast image classification can be high. This HSI approach may have potential application in tumor margin assessment during image-guided surgery, where speed of assessment may be the dominant factor. PMID:26720879

  5. Framework for hyperspectral image processing and quantification for cancer detection during animal tumor surgery.

    PubMed

    Lu, Guolan; Wang, Dongsheng; Qin, Xulei; Halig, Luma; Muller, Susan; Zhang, Hongzheng; Chen, Amy; Pogue, Brian W; Chen, Zhuo Georgia; Fei, Baowei

    2015-01-01

    Hyperspectral imaging (HSI) is an imaging modality that holds strong potential for rapid cancer detection during image-guided surgery. But the data from HSI often needs to be processed appropriately in order to extract the maximum useful information that differentiates cancer from normal tissue. We proposed a framework for hyperspectral image processing and quantification, which includes a set of steps including image preprocessing, glare removal, feature extraction, and ultimately image classification. The framework has been tested on images from mice with head and neck cancer, using spectra from 450- to 900-nm wavelength. The image analysis computed Fourier coefficients, normalized reflectance, mean, and spectral derivatives for improved accuracy. The experimental results demonstrated the feasibility of the hyperspectral image processing and quantification framework for cancer detection during animal tumor surgery, in a challenging setting where sensitivity can be low due to a modest number of features present, but potential for fast image classification can be high. This HSI approach may have potential application in tumor margin assessment during image-guided surgery, where speed of assessment may be the dominant factor.

  6. Computer-assisted liver tumor surgery using a novel semiautomatic and a hybrid semiautomatic segmentation algorithm.

    PubMed

    Zygomalas, Apollon; Karavias, Dionissios; Koutsouris, Dimitrios; Maroulis, Ioannis; Karavias, Dimitrios D; Giokas, Konstantinos; Megalooikonomou, Vasileios

    2016-05-01

    We developed a medical image segmentation and preoperative planning application which implements a semiautomatic and a hybrid semiautomatic liver segmentation algorithm. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of computer-assisted liver tumor surgery using these algorithms which are based on thresholding by pixel intensity value from initial seed points. A random sample of 12 patients undergoing elective high-risk hepatectomies at our institution was prospectively selected to undergo computer-assisted surgery using our algorithms (June 2013-July 2014). Quantitative and qualitative evaluation was performed. The average computer analysis time (segmentation, resection planning, volumetry, visualization) was 45 min/dataset. The runtime for the semiautomatic algorithm was <0.2 s/slice. Liver volumetric segmentation using the hybrid method was achieved in 12.9 s/dataset (SD ± 6.14). Mean similarity index was 96.2 % (SD ± 1.6). The future liver remnant volume calculated by the application showed a correlation of 0.99 to that calculated using manual boundary tracing. The 3D liver models and the virtual liver resections had an acceptable coincidence with the real intraoperative findings. The patient-specific 3D models produced using our semiautomatic and hybrid semiautomatic segmentation algorithms proved to be accurate for the preoperative planning in liver tumor surgery and effectively enhanced the intraoperative medical image guidance.

  7. Framework for hyperspectral image processing and quantification for cancer detection during animal tumor surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Guolan; Wang, Dongsheng; Qin, Xulei; Halig, Luma; Muller, Susan; Zhang, Hongzheng; Chen, Amy; Pogue, Brian W.; Chen, Zhuo Georgia; Fei, Baowei

    2015-12-01

    Hyperspectral imaging (HSI) is an imaging modality that holds strong potential for rapid cancer detection during image-guided surgery. But the data from HSI often needs to be processed appropriately in order to extract the maximum useful information that differentiates cancer from normal tissue. We proposed a framework for hyperspectral image processing and quantification, which includes a set of steps including image preprocessing, glare removal, feature extraction, and ultimately image classification. The framework has been tested on images from mice with head and neck cancer, using spectra from 450- to 900-nm wavelength. The image analysis computed Fourier coefficients, normalized reflectance, mean, and spectral derivatives for improved accuracy. The experimental results demonstrated the feasibility of the hyperspectral image processing and quantification framework for cancer detection during animal tumor surgery, in a challenging setting where sensitivity can be low due to a modest number of features present, but potential for fast image classification can be high. This HSI approach may have potential application in tumor margin assessment during image-guided surgery, where speed of assessment may be the dominant factor.

  8. On the dose to a moving target in stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy to lung tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feygelman, V.; Dilling, T. J.; Moros, E. G.; Zhang, G. G.

    2017-01-01

    This review summarizes the hierarchy of potential dose inaccuracies in lung SABR in terms of their expected clinical impact. The two main terms are targeting accuracy and adequacy of the dose calculation algorithm. One can associate dose-errors at the 50-100% (zero order) and 10-20% (first order) levels with the former and the latter, respectively. At the first order level, strong evidence exists that using dose algorithms which do not account for 3D density scaling is associated with diminished local control. On the other hand, the second-order target dose-errors due to either static approximations to full 4D calculations, or interplay during modulated delivery, are rather unlikely to rise above 5% (conservatively, ≤ 1% tumor control probability change).

  9. Intraoperative Spectroscopy with Ultrahigh Sensitivity for Image-Guided Surgery of Malignant Brain Tumors.

    PubMed

    Kairdolf, Brad A; Bouras, Alexandros; Kaluzova, Milota; Sharma, Abhinav K; Wang, May Dongmei; Hadjipanayis, Constantinos G; Nie, Shuming

    2016-01-05

    Intraoperative cancer imaging and fluorescence-guided surgery have attracted considerable interest because fluorescence signals can provide real-time guidance to assist a surgeon in differentiating cancerous and normal tissues. Recent advances have led to the clinical use of a natural fluorophore called protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) for image-guided surgical resection of high-grade brain tumors (glioblastomas). However, traditional fluorescence imaging methods have only limited detection sensitivity and identification accuracy and are unable to detect low-grade or diffuse infiltrating gliomas (DIGs). Here we report a low-cost hand-held spectroscopic device that is capable of ultrasensitive detection of protoporphyrin IX fluorescence in vivo, together with intraoperative spectroscopic data obtained from both animal xenografts and human brain tumor specimens. The results indicate that intraoperative spectroscopy is at least 3 orders of magnitude more sensitive than the current surgical microscopes, allowing ultrasensitive detection of as few as 1000 tumor cells. For detection specificity, intraoperative spectroscopy allows the differentiation of brain tumor cells from normal brain cells with a contrast signal ratio over 100. In vivo animal studies reveal that protoporphyrin IX fluorescence is strongly correlated with both MRI and histological staining, confirming that the fluorescence signals are highly specific to tumor cells. Furthermore, ex vivo spectroscopic studies of excised brain tissues demonstrate that the hand-held spectroscopic device is capable of detecting diffuse tumor margins with low fluorescence contrast that are not detectable with current systems in the operating room. These results open new opportunities for intraoperative detection and fluorescence-guided resection of microscopic and low-grade glioma brain tumors with invasive or diffusive margins.

  10. [Pathological deglutition pattern after tumor surgery of the oro- and hypopharynx. Analysis by differentiated deglutition].

    PubMed

    Oursin, C; Trabucco, P; Bongartz, G; Steinbrich, W

    1999-03-01

    Dysphagia is a common complaint following surgical intervention in the oral cavity and hypopharynx, often leading to prolonged postoperative recovery. Videofluoroscopy allows detailed visualization of deglutition, demonstrating the morphology as well as the functional aspects. Therefore, videofluoroscopy provides the basis for further therapeutic management. We discuss the pathology of deglutition in 19 patients recovering from tumor surgery of the oro- and hypopharynx. In most cases the results demonstrated severe impairment of both the oral and pharyngeal phase of deglutition. Our data emphasize the importance of the oral phase of deglutition for preparation and initiation of the following phases.

  11. [Pathologic swallowing pattern after tumor surgery of oro- and hypopharynx. Analysis with differentiated deglutition imaging].

    PubMed

    Oursin, C; Trabucco, P; Bongartz, G; Steinbrich, W

    1998-02-01

    Dysphagia is a common complaint following surgical intervention in the oral cavity and hypopharynx, often leading to prolonged postoperative recovery. Videofluoroscopy allows detailed visualization of deglutition, demonstrating the morphology as well as the functional aspects. Therefore, videofluoroscopy provides the basis for further therapeutic management. We discuss the pathology of deglutition in 19 patients recovering from tumor surgery of the oro- and hypopharynx. In most cases the results demonstrated severe impairment of both the oral and pharyngeal phase of deglutition. Our data emphasize the importance of the oral phase of deglutition for preparation and initiation of the following phases.

  12. Correlation between intraoperative ultrasound and postoperative MRI in pediatric tumor surgery.

    PubMed

    Smith, Heather; Taplin, AmiLyn; Syed, Sohail; Adamo, Matthew A

    2016-11-01

    OBJECTIVE Malignant disease of the CNS is the primary etiology for deaths resulting from cancer in the pediatric population. It has been well documented that outcomes of pediatric neurosurgery rely on the extent of tumor resection. Therefore, techniques that improve surgical results have significant clinical implications. Intraoperative ultrasound (IOUS) offers real-time surgical guidance and a more accurate means for detecting residual tumor that is inconspicuous to the naked eye. The objective of this study was to evaluate the correlation of extent of resection between IOUS and postoperative MRI. The authors measured the correlation of extent of resection, negative predictive value, and sensitivity of IOUS and compared them with those of MRI. METHODS This study consisted of a retrospective review of the medical charts of all pediatric patients who underwent neurosurgical treatment of a tumor between August 2009 and July 2015 at Albany Medical Center. Included were patients who were aged ≤ 21 years, who underwent brain or spinal tumor resection, for whom IOUS was used during the tumor resection, and for whom postoperative MRI (with and without contrast) was performed within 1 week of surgery. RESULTS Sixty-two patients met inclusion criteria for the study (33 males, mean age 10.0 years). The IOUS results very significantly correlated with postoperative MRI results (φ = 0.726; p = 0.000000011; negative predictive value 86.3% [95% CI 73.7%-94.3%]). These results exemplify a 71% overall gross-total resection rate and 80% intended gross-total resection rate with the use of IOUS (i.e., excluding cases performed only for debulking purposes). CONCLUSIONS The use of IOUS may play an important role in achieving a greater extent of resection by providing real-time information on tumor volume and location in the setting of brain shift throughout the course of an operation. The authors support the use of IOUS in pediatric CNS tumor surgery to improve clinical outcomes at

  13. Surgery for massive malignant tumors of the left atrium – one center’s experience

    PubMed Central

    Andrushchuk, Uladzimir; Ostrovsky, Youry; Zharkov, Vladimir; Krutau, Valery; Yudina, Olga; Ilyina, Tatsiana; Grinchuk, Irina

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Surgery for primary non-resectable malignant tumors of the left atrium is controversial. Today heart autotransplantation as a method of surgical treatment for patients suffering primary massive malignant tumors of the left atrium is still not sufficiently studied. Material and methods We provide information on our single-center 5-year experience in performing surgical interventions for massive malignant tumors of the left atrium and including cases of 5 patients (3 males – 60%, 2 females – 40%). One case (1/5, 20%) involved debulking surgery with partial resection of the left atrial (LA) wall and its reconstruction using a xenopericardium patch. Orthotopic heart transplantation was performed in 1 patient (1/5, 20%) and heart autotransplantation (HA) in the 3 other cases (3/5, 60%). Results Mean myocardial ischemia duration was 165.6 ±12.0 minutes (range: 137–198), cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) duration was 248.6 ±36.6 minutes (range: 188–392), and intervention duration was 498.0 ±77.4 minutes (range: 330–780). Mean total blood loss was estimated to be 2432 ±616.5 ml (range: 1610–4880). Major in-hospital complications were registered in 4 patients (4/5, 80%). In-hospital mortality was registered in 3 patients (3/5, 60%). Survival time in 2 (2/5, 40%) patients discharged from the hospital was 29 and 9 months, respectively. Both died because of disease progression. Conclusions Surgery in patients with massive resectable primary malignant tumor of the left atrium is associated with high incidence of major hospital complications and mortality. Heart autotransplantation with radical tumor resection is the treatment of choice for these cases. The surgical approach implies thorough primary hemostasis and selection of a proper surgical approach, allowing revision of all the regions of intervention during each step. The possibility of excessive tension and bleeding in the area of bicaval anastomosis should be considered when performing heart

  14. The Use Fibrin Sealant after Spinal Intradural Tumor Surgery: Is It Necessary?

    PubMed Central

    Won, Young Il; Chung, Chun Kee; Jahng, Tae-Ahn; Park, Sung Bae

    2016-01-01

    Objective A fibrin sealant is commonly applied after closure of an incidental or intended durotomy to reduce the complications associated with the leakage of cerebrospinal fluid. Routine usage might not be essential after closure of an intended durotomy, which has clear cut-margins. We investigated the efficacy of fibrin sealants for primary intradural spinal cord tumor surgery. Methods A retrospective review was performed for 231 consecutive surgically treated patients with primary intradural spinal cord tumors without extradural extension. Fibrin sealants were not used for 47 patients (group I: age, 51.57±16.75 years) and were applied to 184 patients (group II: age, 48.8±14.7 years). The surgical procedures were identical except for the use of a fibrin sealant after closure of the durotomy. The primary outcome was the occurrence of complications (wound problems, hematoma collection, infection, and neurological deterioration). The covariates were age, sex, body mass index, operation time, pre-/postoperative ambulation, number of laminectomies, and type of tumor. Results Schwannoma was the most common pathology (n=134), followed by meningioma (n=35) and ependymoma (n=31). Complications occurred in 13 patients (3 in group I and 10 in group II, p=0.73). The postoperative ambulation status (p<0.01; odds ratio, 28.8; 95% confidence interval, 6.9-120.0) and operation time (p=0.04; cutoff, 229 minutes; sensitivity, 62%; specificity, 72%) were significant factors, whereas the use of a fibrin glue was not (p=0.47). Conclusion The use of a fibrin sealant might not be essential to reduce complications after surgery for primary spinal intradural tumor. PMID:27123027

  15. Improved tumor identification using dual tracer molecular imaging in fluorescence guided brain surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiaochun; Torres, Veronica; Straus, David; Brey, Eric M.; Byrne, Richard W.; Tichauer, Kenneth M.

    2015-03-01

    Brain tumors represent a leading cause of cancer death for people under the age of 40 and the probability complete surgical resection of brain tumors remains low owing to the invasive nature of these tumors and the consequences of damaging healthy brain tissue. Molecular imaging is an emerging approach that has the potential to improve the ability for surgeons to correctly discriminate between healthy and cancerous tissue; however, conventional molecular imaging approaches in brain suffer from significant background signal in healthy tissue or an inability target more invasive sections of the tumor. This work presents initial studies investigating the ability of novel dual-tracer molecular imaging strategies to be used to overcome the major limitations of conventional "single-tracer" molecular imaging. The approach is evaluated in simulations and in an in vivo mice study with animals inoculated orthotopically using fluorescent human glioma cells. An epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) targeted Affibody-fluorescent marker was employed as a targeted imaging agent, and the suitability of various FDA approved untargeted fluorescent tracers (e.g. fluorescein & indocyanine green) were evaluated in terms of their ability to account for nonspecific uptake and retention of the targeted imaging agent. Signal-to-background ratio was used to measure and compare the amount of reporter in the tissue between targeted and untargeted tracer. The initial findings suggest that FDA-approved fluorescent imaging agents are ill-suited to act as untargeted imaging agents for dual-tracer fluorescent guided brain surgery as they suffer from poor delivery to the healthy brain tissue and therefore cannot be used to identify nonspecific vs. specific uptake of the targeted imaging agent where current surgery is most limited.

  16. Treatment of Neuroendocrine Cancer Metastatic to the Liver: The Role of Ablative Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Atwell, T.D. Charboneau, J.W.; Que, F.G.; Rubin, J.; Lewis, B.D.; Nagorney, D.M.; Callstrom, M.R.; Farrell, M.A.; Pitot, H.C.; Hobday, T.J.

    2005-05-15

    Carcinoid tumors and islet cell neoplasms are neuroendocrine neoplasms with indolent patterns of growth and association with bizarre hormone syndromes. These tumors behave in a relatively protracted and predictable manner, which allows for multiple therapeutic options. Even in the presence of hepatic metastases, the standard of treatment for neuroendocrine malignancy is surgery, either with curative intent or for tumor cytoreduction, i.e., resection of 90% or more of the tumor volume. Image-guided ablation, as either an adjunct to surgery or a primary treatment modality, can be used to treat neuroendocrine cancer metastatic to the liver. Image-guided ablative techniques, including radiofrequency ablation, alcohol injection, and cryoablation, can be used in selected patients to debulk hepatic tumors and improve patient symptoms. Although long-term follow-up data are not available, the surgical literature indicates that significant ablative debulking may improve patient survival. In this review, we discuss metastatic neuroendocrine disease and its treatment options, especially image-guided ablative techniques.

  17. After insufficient radiofrequency ablation, tumor-associated endothelial cells exhibit enhanced angiogenesis and promote invasiveness of residual hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The mechanism regarding rapid progression of residual hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) after insufficient radiofrequency ablation (RFA) has been preliminarily discussed. However, most studies have mainly focused on RFA-induced changes in the tumor cells. The present study was designed to determine whether tumor-associated endothelial cells (TAECs) could contribute to the invasiveness of HCC after insufficient RFA. Methods TAECs were isolated from fresh HCC tissue and characterized. Morphological changes were observed in TAECs after heat treatment for 10 min. TAEC proliferation, migration and tube formation after heat treatment for 10 min at 37°C (control group), and 42 and 47°C (insufficient RFA groups) were examined. The differences in TAECs interactions with HepG2-GFP or HCCLM3-GFP cells among the two insufficient RFA groups and control group were evaluated. The expression of E-selectin, ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 in TAECs was measured. The effects of TAECs on the invasiveness of HepG2-GFP or HCCLM3-GFP cells after insufficient RFA were analyzed. The IL-6, IL-8, MCP-1 and GRO-α concentrations in conditioned medium from TAECs were measured after insufficient RFA. The associated signaling pathways of Akt, ERK1/2, STAT3 and NF-κB were analyzed in TAECs after insufficient RFA. Results TAECs expressed the EC-specific markers and took up complexes of Dil-Ac-LDL. Relative to the control group, the proliferation of TAECs was significantly inhibited and their migration and tube formation were significantly enhanced in the insufficient RFA groups. Significantly more HepG2-GFP or HCCLM3-GFP cells adhered to TACEs in these groups than in the control group (all P<0.001), via up-regulated expression of E-selectin, ICAM-1 and VCAM-1. TAECs promoted the invasiveness of HepG2-GFP or HCCLM3-GFP cells after insufficient RFA via the up-regulation of IL-6, IL-8, MCP-1 and GRO-α in conditioned medium (all P<0.05). Insufficient RFA enhanced the activities of Akt, ERK1/2 and NF

  18. A neuropathology-based approach to epilepsy surgery in brain tumors and proposal for a new terminology use for long-term epilepsy-associated brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Blumcke, Ingmar; Aronica, Eleonora; Urbach, Horst; Alexopoulos, Andreas; Gonzalez-Martinez, Jorge A

    2014-07-01

    Every fourth patient submitted to epilepsy surgery suffers from a brain tumor. Microscopically, these neoplasms present with a wide-ranging spectrum of glial or glio-neuronal tumor subtypes. Gangliogliomas (GG) and dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumors (DNTs) are the most frequently recognized entities accounting for 65 % of 1,551 tumors collected at the European Epilepsy Brain Bank (n = 5,842 epilepsy surgery samples). These tumors often present with early seizure onset at a mean age of 16.5 years, with 77 % of neoplasms affecting the temporal lobe. Relapse and malignant progression are rare events in this particular group of brain tumors. Surgical resection should be regarded, therefore, also as important treatment strategy to prevent epilepsy progression as well as seizure- and medication-related comorbidities. The characteristic clinical presentation and broad histopathological spectrum of these highly epileptogenic brain tumors will herein be classified as "long-term epilepsy associated tumors-LEATs". LEATs differ from most other brain tumors by early onset of spontaneous seizures, and conceptually are regarded as developmental tumors to explain their pleomorphic microscopic appearance and frequent association with Focal Cortical Dysplasia Type IIIb. However, the broad neuropathologic spectrum and lack of reliable histopathological signatures make these tumors difficult to classify using the WHO system of brain tumors. As another consequence from poor agreement in published LEAT series, molecular diagnostic data remain ambiguous. Availability of surgical tissue specimens from patients which have been well characterized during their presurgical evaluation should open the possibility to systematically address the origin and epileptogenicity of LEATs, and will be further discussed herein. As a conclusion, the authors propose a novel A-B-C terminology of epileptogenic brain tumors ("epileptomas") which hopefully promote the discussion between neuropathologists

  19. Intraoperative Motor Symptoms during Brain Tumor Resection in the Supplementary Motor Area (SMA) without Positive Mapping during Awake Surgery.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Riho; Nakada, Mitsutoshi; Miyashita, Katsuyoshi; Kinoshita, Masashi; Okita, Hirokazu; Yahata, Tetsutaro; Hayashi, Yutaka

    2015-01-01

    Awake surgery could be a useful modality for lesions locating in close proximity to the eloquent areas including primary motor cortex and pyramidal tract. In case with supplementary motor area (SMA) lesion, we often encounter with intraoperative motor symptoms during awake surgery even in area without positive mapping. Although the usual recovery of the SMA syndrome has been well documented, rare cases with permanent deficits could be encountered in the clinical setting. It has been difficult to evaluate during surgery whether the intraoperative motor symptoms lead to postoperative permanent deficits. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the intraoperative motor symptoms could be reversible, further to provide useful information for making decision to continue surgical procedure of tumor resection. Eight consecutive patients (from July 2012 to June 2014, six men and two women, aged 33-63 years) with neoplastic lesions around the SMA underwent an awake surgery. Using a retrospective analysis of intraoperative video records, intraoperative motor symptoms during tumor resection were investigated. In continuous functional monitoring during resection of SMA tumor under awake conditions, the following motor symptoms were observed during resection of the region without positive mapping: delayed motor weakness, delay of movement initiation, slowness of movement, difficulty in dual task response, and coordination disturbance. In seven patients hemiparesis observed immediately after surgery recovered to preoperative level within 6 weeks. During awake surgery for SMA tumors, the above-mentioned motor symptoms could occur in area without positive mapping and might be predictors for reversible SMA syndrome.

  20. Laparoscopic repair of diaphragm perforation with heart patch after microwave ablation.

    PubMed

    Liang, Qing-Chen; Tian, Yan-Jie; Jiang, Xiao-Ting

    2016-03-01

    Microwave ablation (MWA) is a new technology developed in recent years, which is widely used in various disciplines. Microwave ablation is an alternative to surgery in the management of various tumors, and it has been demonstrated to be effective in the management of primary tumors and metastatic tumors. Microwave ablation is widely used in the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma with an obvious effect and less side effects, and only 2.7% had serious complications. Many studies have confirmed the complications are thermal damage, hemorrhage, pleural effusion, bile leak, tumor seeding, hepatic abscess, cholangitis, and so forth. But diaphragm perforation is rare, and it is probably the first case reported. This article describes diaphragmatic perforation secondary to MWA of the liver with subsequent pleural effusion and diaphragmatic hernia. We also describe its management via the laparoscopic approach.

  1. Laparoscopic repair of diaphragm perforation with heart patch after microwave ablation

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Qing-Chen; Tian, Yan-Jie; Xiao-Jiang, Ting

    2016-01-01

    Microwave ablation (MWA) is a new technology developed in recent years, which is widely used in various disciplines. Microwave ablation is an alternative to surgery in the management of various tumors, and it has been demonstrated to be effective in the management of primary tumors and metastatic tumors. Microwave ablation is widely used in the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma with an obvious effect and less side effects, and only 2.7% had serious complications. Many studies have confirmed the complications are thermal damage, hemorrhage, pleural effusion, bile leak, tumor seeding, hepatic abscess, cholangitis, and so forth. But diaphragm perforation is rare, and it is probably the first case reported. This article describes diaphragmatic perforation secondary to MWA of the liver with subsequent pleural effusion and diaphragmatic hernia. We also describe its management via the laparoscopic approach. PMID:26905357

  2. Preoperative long-acting octreotide treatment for invasive thyrotropin-secreting pituitary macroadenoma after previous radioiodine thyroid ablation.

    PubMed

    Gruszka, Anna; Zielinski, Grzegorz M; Kunert-Radek, Jolanta

    2014-02-01

    We report a 33-year-old woman with invasive thyrotropin-secreting pituitary adenoma after previous thyroid ablation with radioiodine who was successfully treated with transsphenoidal surgery after pre-treatment with octreotide-LAR for 10 months. Since invasive and aggressive thyrotropin-secreting macroadenomas are more frequently observed in patients who have undergone thyroid ablation, we suggest preoperative treatment with somatostatin analogs should be considered in these patients to reduce serum thyrotropin and stabilize or reduce tumor size.

  3. Massive bone allografts in large skeletal defects after tumor surgery: a clinical and microradiographic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Delloye, C; de Nayer, P; Allington, N; Munting, E; Coutelier, L; Vincent, A

    1988-01-01

    Massive deep-frozen bone allografts were implanted in 13 patients after en bloc tumor resection. Patients were followed up for 14 months to 17 years. Most of the reconstructive procedures included a segmental bone allograft with knee or ankle fusion. Graft infections were the most critical complications in regard to the end results, finally requiring amputation in two cases. There were three stress fractures; two of which were successfully treated without further complication. Graft incorporation was assessed by bone scintimetry in four cases. Isotope uptake by the center of the graft was found to be superior to control bone segments at only 15 years after surgery. Two recovered allograft specimens were available for a microradiographic study. Creeping substitution was a very slow process, initiated at the outer surface of the graft and characterized at 2-3 years after implantation by large, incompletely filled osteons. The present investigation demonstrates that massive bone allografts are very slowly revascularized and are intimately anchored by the host bone. Provided that tumor control is effective and graft infection is avoided, reconstructive surgery with massive bone allografts represents a successful alternative to prosthetic implants in young adult with a long life expectancy.

  4. Irreversible Electroporation for Focal Ablation at the Porta Hepatis

    SciTech Connect

    Kasivisvanathan, Veeru; Thapar, Ankur Oskrochi, Youssof; Picard, John; Leen, Edward L. S.

    2012-12-15

    Patients with chemotherapy-refractory liver metastases who are not candidates for surgery may be treated with focal ablation techniques with established survival benefits. Irreversible electroporation is the newest of these and has the putative advantages of a nonthermal action, preventing damage to adjacent biliary structures and bowel. This report describes the use of irreversible electroporation in a 61-year-old man with a solitary chemoresistant liver metastasis unsuitable for radiofrequency ablation as a result of its proximity to the porta hepatis. At 3 months, tumor size was decreased on computed tomography from 28 Multiplication-Sign 19 to 20 Multiplication-Sign 17 mm, representing stable disease according to the response evaluation criteria in solid tumors. This corresponded to a decrease in tumor volume size from 5.25 to 3.16 cm{sup 3}. There were no early or late complications. Chemoresistant liver metastases in the proximity of the porta hepatis that are considered to be too high a risk for conventional surgery or thermal ablation may be considered for treatment by the novel ablation technique of irreversible electroporation.

  5. Analysis of Surgical Site Infection after Musculoskeletal Tumor Surgery: Risk Assessment Using a New Scoring System

    PubMed Central

    Nagano, Satoshi; Yokouchi, Masahiro; Setoguchi, Takao; Sasaki, Hiromi; Shimada, Hirofumi; Kawamura, Ichiro; Ishidou, Yasuhiro; Kamizono, Junichi; Yamamoto, Takuya; Kawamura, Hideki; Komiya, Setsuro

    2014-01-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) has not been extensively studied in musculoskeletal tumors (MST) owing to the rarity of the disease. We analyzed incidence and risk factors of SSI in MST. SSI incidence was evaluated in consecutive 457 MST cases (benign, 310 cases and malignant, 147 cases) treated at our institution. A detailed analysis of the clinical background of the patients, pre- and postoperative hematological data, and other factors that might be associated with SSI incidence was performed for malignant MST cases. SSI occurred in 0.32% and 12.2% of benign and malignant MST cases, respectively. The duration of the surgery (P = 0.0002) and intraoperative blood loss (P = 0.0005) was significantly more in the SSI group than in the non-SSI group. We established the musculoskeletal oncological surgery invasiveness (MOSI) index by combining 4 risk factors (blood loss, operation duration, preoperative chemotherapy, and the use of artificial materials). The MOSI index (0–4 points) score significantly correlated with the risk of SSI, as demonstrated by an SSI incidence of 38.5% in the group with a high score (3-4 points). The MOSI index score and laboratory data at 1 week after surgery could facilitate risk evaluation and prompt diagnosis of SSI. PMID:24672281

  6. CSF–Related Complications After Intradural Spinal Tumor Surgery: Utility of an Autologous Fat Graft

    PubMed Central

    Arnautovic, Kenan I.; Kovacevic, Marko

    2016-01-01

    Object: The incidence of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)-related complications after intradural spinal tumor (IST) surgery is high and reported in up to 18% of patients. However, no efficient way to prevent those complications has been reported so far. Treating these complications may require prolonged bed rest, re-exploration, external lumbar drain, use of antibiotics, and possible precipitation of other complications. To alleviate the risk of CSF-related complications, we prospectively adopted the intraoperative use of autologous fat grafting after IST surgery. Methods: This is a perspective analysis of 37 cases (out of 40 cases series) that a prospective use of abdominal fat autograft was applied during dural closure. After the tumor was resected and the dura closed, we used the Valsalva maneuver to ensure watertight closure. CSF leak was prevented with the enforcement of suture with a fat autograft as necessary. In addition a thin layer of fat tissue was then placed over the dura to obliterate any dead space. Fibrin glue was then applied over the graft. Filling the dead space with the fat graft prevented a low-pressure space in which CSF could pool and form a pseudomeningocele. Results: After adopting the fat autograft technique, we did not observe any post-surgery CSF-related complications in any of these patients. Conclusions: The prospective use of autologous fat grafting can ensure watertight dural closure and obliterate the dead space created during surgical exposure and bone removal. This technique significantly reduces, and may completely eliminate, postoperative CSF-related complications in patients with ISTs. PMID:28210022

  7. Percutaneous Radiofrequency Ablation of Painful Spinal Tumors Adjacent to the Spinal Cord with Real-Time Monitoring of Spinal Canal Temperature: A Prospective Study

    SciTech Connect

    Nakatsuka, Atsuhiro Yamakado, Koichiro; Takaki, Haruyuki; Uraki, Junji; Makita, Masashi; Oshima, Fumiyoshi; Takeda, Kan

    2009-01-15

    PurposeTo prospectively evaluate the feasibility, safety, and clinical utility of bone radiofrequency (RF) ablation with real-time monitoring of the spinal canal temperature for the treatment of spinal tumors adjacent to the spinal cord.Materials and MethodsOur Institutional Review Board approved this study. Patients gave informed consent. The inclusion criteria were (a) a painful spinal metastasis and (b) a distance of 1 cm or less between the metastasis and the spinal cord. The thermocouple was placed in the spinal canal under CT fluoroscopic guidance. When the spinal canal temperature reached 45{sup o}C, RF application was immediately stopped. RF ablation was considered technically successful when the procedure was performed without major complications. Clinical success was defined as a fall in the visual analogue scale score of at least 2 points.ResultsTen patients with spinal tumors measuring 3-8 cm (mean, 4.9 {+-} 1.5 cm) were enrolled. The distance between the tumor and the spinal cord was 1-6 mm (mean, 2.4 {+-} 1.6 mm). All procedures were judged technically successful (100%). The spinal canal temperature did not exceed 45{sup o}C in 9 of the 10 patients (90%). In the remaining patient, the temperature rose to 48{sup o}C, resulting in transient neural damage, although RF application was immediately stopped when the temperature reached 45{sup o}C. Clinical success was achieved within 1 week in all patients (100%).ConclusionBone RF ablation with real-time monitoring of the spinal canal temperature is feasible, safe, and clinically useful for the treatment of painful spinal metastases adjacent to the spinal cord.

  8. Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy for brain tumor image-guided surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yinghua; Hatami, Nisa; Yee, Matthew; Phipps, Jennifer; Elson, Daniel S.; Gorin, Fredric; Schrot, Rudolph J.; Marcu, Laura

    2010-09-01

    We demonstrate for the first time the application of an endoscopic fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) system to the intraoperative diagnosis of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). The clinically compatible FLIM prototype integrates a gated (down to 0.2 ns) intensifier imaging system with a fiber-bundle (fiber image guide of 0.5 mm diameter, 10,000 fibers with a gradient index lens objective 0.5 NA, and 4 mm field of view) to provide intraoperative access to the surgical field. Experiments conducted in three patients undergoing craniotomy for tumor resection demonstrate that FLIM-derived parameters allow for delineation of tumor from normal cortex. For example, at 460+/-25-nm wavelength band emission corresponding to NADH/NADPH fluorescence, GBM exhibited a weaker florescence intensity (35% less, p-value <0.05) and a longer lifetime τGBM-Amean=1.59+/-0.24 ns than normal cortex τNC-Amean=1.28+/-0.04 ns (p-value <0.005). Current results demonstrate the potential use of FLIM as a tool for image-guided surgery of brain tumors.

  9. Surgery and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Children With Extracranial Germ Cell Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-06

    Childhood Embryonal Tumor; Childhood Extracranial Germ Cell Tumor; Childhood Extragonadal Germ Cell Tumor; Childhood Malignant Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Childhood Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Childhood Teratoma; Ovarian Embryonal Carcinoma; Ovarian Yolk Sac Tumor; Stage II Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage III Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Testicular Choriocarcinoma and Yolk Sac Tumor; Testicular Embryonal Carcinoma

  10. "Tag-Team" Orbital and Strabismus Surgeries with Immediate Reconstruction After Tumor Excision Metastatic to the Inferior Rectus.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chris Y; Archer, Steven M; Kahana, Alon

    2016-01-01

    Carcinoid tumors are rare, slow-growing, low-grade neuroendocrine tumors with a propensity for orbital metastatic spread. The typical treatment paradigm for localized orbital disease involves excision, adjuvant radiotherapy, and/or receptor-targeted chemotherapy, followed by delayed evaluation for reconstructive strabismus surgery. We present a 58-year-old female patient with carcinoid tumor metastatic to the right inferior rectus muscle who presented with worsening binocular diplopia. The patient underwent coordinated "tag-team" orbital and strabismus surgeries that included excision of the right inferior rectus muscle to the annulus of Zinn followed immediately by reconstructive strabismus surgery. The patient required 1 additional strabismus surgery 1 year later. Follow up revealed no tumor recurrence at 4 years, and excellent binocular vision with good function. Deep orbital and strabismus surgeries, when performed simultaneously in a "tag-team" approach, may offer superior functional outcomes and improved patient quality of life, with expedited functional recovery. This approach may become a new treatment paradigm for surgical disease processes localized to the extraocular muscles.

  11. Vascular endothelial-targeted therapy combined with cytotoxic chemotherapy induces inflammatory intratumoral infiltrates and inhibits tumor relapses after surgery.

    PubMed

    Judy, Brendan F; Aliperti, Louis A; Predina, Jarrod D; Levine, Daniel; Kapoor, Veena; Thorpe, Philip E; Albelda, Steven M; Singhal, Sunil

    2012-04-01

    Surgery is the most effective therapy for cancer in the United States, but disease still recurs in more than 40% of patients within 5 years after resection. Chemotherapy is given postoperatively to prevent relapses; however, this approach has had marginal success. After surgery, recurrent tumors depend on rapid neovascular proliferation to deliver nutrients and oxygen. Phosphatidylserine (PS) is exposed on the vascular endothelial cells in the tumor microenvironment but is notably absent on blood vessels in normal tissues. Thus, PS is an attractive target for cancer therapy after surgery. Syngeneic mice bearing TC1 lung cancer tumors were treated with mch1N11 (a novel mouse chimeric monoclonal antibody that targets PS), cisplatin (cis), or combination after surgery. Tumor relapses and disease progression were decreased 90% by combination therapy compared with a 50% response rate for cis alone (P = .02). Mice receiving postoperative mch1N11 had no wound-related complications or added systemic toxicity in comparison to control animals. Mechanistic studies demonstrated that the effects of mch1N11 were associated with a dense infiltration of inflammatory cells, particularly granulocytes. This strategy was independent of the adaptive immune system. Together, these data suggest that vascular-targeted strategies directed against exposed PS may be a powerful adjunct to postoperative chemotherapy in preventing relapses after cancer surgery.

  12. Technologic advances in surgery for brain tumors: tools of the trade in the modern neurosurgical operating room.

    PubMed

    McPherson, Christopher M; Sawaya, Raymond

    2005-09-01

    Surgery is an essential part of the oncologic treatment of patients with brain tumors. Surgery is necessary for histologic diagnosis, and the cytoreduction of tumor mass has been shown to improve patient survival time and quality of life. Ultimately, the goal of any oncologic neurosurgery is to achieve maximal safe resection. Over the years, many technologic adjuncts have been developed to assist the surgeon in achieving this goal. In this article, we review the technologic advances of modern neurosurgery that are helping to reach this goal.

  13. Fluorescence-guided surgery of retroperitoneal-implanted human fibrosarcoma in nude mice delays or eliminates tumor recurrence and increases survival compared to bright-light surgery.

    PubMed

    Uehara, Fuminari; Hiroshima, Yukihiko; Miwa, Shinji; Tome, Yasunori; Yano, Shuya; Yamamoto, Mako; Matsumoto, Yasunori; Maehara, Hiroki; Tanaka, Kazuhiro; Bouvet, Michael; Kanaya, Fuminori; Hoffman, Robert M

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine if fluorescence-guided surgery (FGS) can eradicate human fibrosarcoma growing in the retroperitoneum of nude mice. One week after retroperitoneal implantation of human HT1080 fibrosarcoma cells, expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) (HT-1080-GFP), in nude mice, bright-light surgery (BLS) was performed on all tumor-bearing mice (n = 22). After BLS, mice were randomized into 2 treatment groups; BLS-only (n = 11) or the combination of BLS + FGS (n = 11). The residual tumors remaining after BLS were resected with FGS using a hand-held portable imaging system under fluorescence navigation. The average residual tumor area after BLS + FGS was significantly smaller than after BLS-only (0.4 ± 0.4 mm(2) and 10.5 ± 2.4 mm(2), respectively; p = 0.006). Five weeks after surgery, the fluorescent-tumor areas of BLS- and BLS + FGS-treated mice were 379 ± 147 mm(2) and 11.7 ± 6.9 mm(2), respectively, indicating that FGS greatly inhibited tumor recurrence compared to BLS. The combination of BLS + FGS significantly decreased fibrosarcoma recurrence compared to BLS-only treated mice (p < 0.001). Mice treated with BLS+FGS had a significantly higher disease-free survival rate than mice treated with BLS-only at five weeks after surgery. These results suggest that combination of BLS + FGS significantly reduced the residual fibrosarcoma volume after BLS and improved disease-free survival.

  14. Radiofrequency Ablation of Intrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma: Preliminary Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Carrafiello, Gianpaolo Lagana, Domenico; Cotta, Elisa; Mangini, Monica; Fontana, Federico; Bandiera, Francesca; Fugazzola, Carlo

    2010-08-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of percutaneous ultrasound (US)-guided radiofrequency ablation (RFA) in patients with intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICCA) in a small, nonrandomized series. From February 2004 to July 2008, six patients (four men and two women; mean age 69.8 years [range 48 to 83]) with ICCA underwent percutaneous US-guided RFA. Preintervetional transarterial embolization was performed in two cases to decrease heat dispersion during RFA in order to increase the area of ablation. The efficacy of RFA was evaluated using contrast-enhanced dynamic computed tomography (CT) 1 month after treatment and then every 3 months thereafter. Nine RFA sessions were performed for six solid hepatic tumors in six patients. The duration of follow-up ranged from 13 to 21 months (mean 17.5). Posttreatment CT showed total necrosis in four of six tumors after one or two RFA sessions. Residual tumor was observed in two patients with larger tumors (5 and 5.8 cm in diameter). All patients tolerated the procedure, and there with no major complications. Only 1 patient developed post-RFA syndrome (pain, fever, malaise, and leukocytosis), which resolved with oral administration of acetaminophen. Percutaneous RFA is a safe and effective treatment for patients with hepatic tumors: It is ideally suited for those who are not eligible for surgery. Long-term follow-up data regarding local and systemic recurrence and survival are still needed.

  15. Next generation NIR fluorophores for tumor imaging and fluorescence-guided surgery: A review.

    PubMed

    Haque, Ashanul; Faizi, Md Serajul Haque; Rather, Jahangir Ahmad; Khan, Muhammad S

    2017-04-01

    Cancer is a group of diseases responsible for the major causes of mortality and morbidity among people of all ages. Even though medical sciences have made enormous growth, complete treatment of this deadly disease is still a challenging task. Last few decades witnessed an impressive growth in the design and development of near infrared (NIR) fluorophores with and without recognition moieties for molecular recognitions, imaging and image guided surgeries. The present article reviews recently reported NIR emitting organic/inorganic fluorophores that targets and accumulates in organelle/organs specifically for molecular imaging of cancerous cells. Near infrared (NIR probe) with or without a tumor-targeting warhead have been considered and discussed for their applications in the field of cancer imaging. In addition, challenges persist in this area are also delineated in this review.

  16. Nephron-sparing surgery in bilateral Wilms’ tumor: A report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Sohrab; Kudchadkar, Sharmad; Yadav, Priyank; Ansari, M. S.

    2016-01-01

    Nephron-sparing surgery (NSS) has been proposed by many as an alternative to bilateral nephrectomies and renal replacement therapy in bilateral Wilms’ tumor (BWT). NSS is not without significant recurrence, morbidity, and mortality. Long-term follow-up, especially with regard to the renal function, remains lacking. Preoperative computed tomography angiogram can help prepare a roadmap for NSS but can underestimate the salvageable parenchyma due to compression of normal adjacent parenchyma. Intraoperative ultrasound can delineate the boundary of surgical margin and help achieve negative margins. We present two cases of BWT, aged 7 and 13 months, managed with neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by bilateral NSS and adjuvant chemotherapy and report the follow-up of the same. We also explore the role of preoperative imaging and intraoperative ultrasound in the management. Both patients are alive without recurrence at a follow-up of 12 and 8 months. PMID:28057999

  17. An Evolutionary Explanation for the Perturbation of the Dynamics of Metastatic Tumors Induced by Surgery and Acute Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Bayonas, Alberto Carmona

    2011-01-01

    Surgery has contributed to unveil a tumor behavior that is difficult to reconcile with the models of tumorigenesis based on gradualism. The postsurgical patterns of progression include unexpected features such as distant interactions and variable rhythms. The underlying evidence can be summarized as follows: (1) the resection of the primary tumor is able to accelerate the evolution of micrometastasis in early stages, and (2) the outcome is transiently opposed in advanced tumors. The objective of this paper is to give some insight into tumorigenesis and surgery-related effects, by applying the concepts of the evolutionary theory in those tumor behaviors that gompertzian and tissular-centered models are unable to explain. According to this view, tumors are the consequence of natural selection operating at the somatic level, which is the basic mechanism of tumorigenesis, notwithstanding the complementary role of the intrinsic constrictions of complex networks. A tumor is a complicated phenomenon that entails growth, evolution and development simultaneously. So, an evo-devo perspective can explain how and why tumor subclones are able to translate competition from a metabolic level into neoangiogenesis and the immune response. The paper proposes that distant interactions are an extension of the ecological events at the local level. This notion explains the evolutionary basis for tumor dormancy, and warns against the teleological view of tumorigenesis as a process directed towards the maximization of a concrete trait such as aggressiveness. PMID:24212648

  18. An evolutionary explanation for the perturbation of the dynamics of metastatic tumors induced by surgery and acute inflammation.

    PubMed

    Carmona Bayonas, Alberto

    2011-03-02

    Surgery has contributed to unveil a tumor behavior that is difficult to reconcile with the models of tumorigenesis based on gradualism. The postsurgical patterns of progression include unexpected features such as distant interactions and variable rhythms. The underlying evidence can be summarized as follows: (1) the resection of the primary tumor is able to accelerate the evolution of micrometastasis in early stages, and (2) the outcome is transiently opposed in advanced tumors. The objective of this paper is to give some insight into tumorigenesis and surgery-related effects, by applying the concepts of the evolutionary theory in those tumor behaviors that gompertzian and tissular-centered models are unable to explain. According to this view, tumors are the consequence of natural selection operating at the somatic level, which is the basic mechanism of tumorigenesis, notwithstanding the complementary role of the intrinsic constrictions of complex networks. A tumor is a complicated phenomenon that entails growth, evolution and development simultaneously. So, an evo-devo perspective can explain how and why tumor subclones are able to translate competition from a metabolic level into neoangiogenesis and the immune response. The paper proposes that distant interactions are an extension of the ecological events at the local level. This notion explains the evolutionary basis for tumor dormancy, and warns against the teleological view of tumorigenesis as a process directed towards the maximization of a concrete trait such as aggressiveness.

  19. Outcome of patients with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy after percutaneous transluminal septal myocardial ablation and septal myectomy surgery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Qin, J. X.; Shiota, T.; Lever, H. M.; Kapadia, S. R.; Sitges, M.; Rubin, D. N.; Bauer, F.; Greenberg, N. L.; Agler, D. A.; Drinko, J. K.; Martin, M.; Tuzcu, E. M.; Smedira, N. G.; Lytle, B.; Thomas, J. D.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study was conducted to evaluate follow-up results in patients with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy (HOCM) who underwent either percutaneous transluminal septal myocardial ablation (PTSMA) or septal myectomy. BACKGROUND: Controversy exists with regard to these two forms of treatment for patients with HOCM. METHODS: Of 51 patients with HOCM treated, 25 were treated by PTSMA and 26 patients via myectomy. Two-dimensional echocardiograms were performed before both procedures, immediately afterwards and at a three-month follow-up. The New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional class was obtained before the procedures and at follow-up. RESULTS: Interventricular septal thickness was significantly reduced at follow-up in both groups (2.3 +/- 0.4 cm vs. 1.9 +/- 0.4 cm for septal ablation and 2.4 +/- 0.6 cm vs. 1.7 +/- 0.2 cm for myectomy, both p < 0.001). Estimated by continuous-wave Doppler, the resting pressure gradient (PG) across the left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT) significantly decreased immediately after the procedures in both groups (64 +/- 39 mm Hg vs. 28 +/- 29 mm Hg for PTSMA, 62 +/- 43 mm Hg vs. 7 +/- 7 mm Hg for myectomy, both p < 0.0001). At three-month follow-up, the resting PG remained lower in the PTSMA and myectomy groups (24 +/- 19 mm Hg and 11 +/- 6 mm Hg, respectively, vs. those before procedures, both p < 0.0001). The NYHA functional class was also significantly improved in both groups (3.5 +/- 0.5 vs. 1.9 +/- 0.7 for PTSMA, 3.3 +/- 0.5 vs. 1.5 +/- 0.7 for myectomy, both p < 0.0001). CONCLUSIONS: Both myectomy and PTSMA reduce LVOT obstruction and significantly improve NYHA functional class in patients with HOCM. However, there are benefits and drawbacks for each therapeutic method that must be counterbalanced when deciding on treatment for LVOT obstruction.

  20. Comparative Study of Nanosecond Electric Fields In Vitro and In Vivo on Hepatocellular Carcinoma Indicate Macrophage Infiltration Contribute to Tumor Ablation In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xinmei; Jiang, Kai; Ye, Shuming; Feng, Xiaowen; Fan, Shifeng; Xie, Haiyang; Zhou, Lin; Zheng, Shusen

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aim Recurrence and metastasis are associated with poor prognosis in hepatocellular carcinoma even in the patients who have undergone radical resection. Therefore, effective treatment is urgently needed for improvement of patients' survival. Previously, we reported that nanosecond pulse electric fields (nsPEFs) can ablate melanoma by induction of apoptosis and inhibition of angiogenesis. This study aims to investigate the in vivo ablation strategy by comparing the dose effect of nanosecond electric fields in vitro and in vivo on hepatocellular carcinoma. Materials and Methods Four hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines HepG2, SMMC7721, Hep1-6, and HCCLM3 were pulsed to test the anti-proliferation and anti-migration ability of 100 ns nsPEFs in vitro. The animal model of human subdermal xenograft HCCLM3 cells into BALB/c nude mouse was used to test the anti-tumor growth and macrophage infiltration in vivo. Results In vitro assays showed anti-tumor effect of nsPEFs is dose-dependant. But the in vivo study showed the strategy of low dose and multiple treatments is superior to high dose single treatment. The macrophages infiltration significantly increased in the tumors which were treated by multiple low dose nsPEFs. Conclusion The low dose multiple nsPEFs application is more efficient than high dose single treatment in inhibiting the tumor volume in vivo, which is quite different from the dose-effect relationship in vitro. Beside the electric field strength, the macrophage involvement must be considered to account for effect variability and toxicology in vivo. PMID:24475118

  1. Combination Chemotherapy and Surgery in Treating Young Patients With Wilms Tumor

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-28

    Adult Renal Wilms Tumor; Beckwith-Wiedemann Syndrome; Childhood Renal Wilms Tumor; Diffuse Hyperplastic Perilobar Nephroblastomatosis; Hemihypertrophy; Stage I Renal Wilms Tumor; Stage II Renal Wilms Tumor; Stage III Renal Wilms Tumor; Stage IV Renal Wilms Tumor; Stage V Renal Wilms Tumor

  2. Prognostic Impact of Time to Ipsilateral Breast Tumor Recurrence after Breast Conserving Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Gosset, Marie; Hamy, Anne-Sophie; Mallon, Peter; Delomenie, Myriam; Mouttet, Delphine; Pierga, Jean-Yves; Lae, Marick; Fourquet, Alain; Rouzier, Roman; Reyal, Fabien; Feron, Jean-Guillaume

    2016-01-01

    Background The poor prognosis of patients who experience ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR) after breast conserving surgery (BCS) is established. A short time between primary cancer and IBTR is a prognostic factor but no clinically relevant threshold was determined. Classification of IBTR may help tailor treatment strategies. Purpose We determined a specific time frame, which differentiates IBTR into early and late recurrence, and identified prognostic factors for patients with IBTR at time of the recurrence. Methods We analyzed 2209 patients with IBTR after BCS. We applied the optimal cut-points method for survival data to determine the cut-off times to IBTR. A subgroup analysis was performed by hormone receptor (HR) status. Survival analyses were performed using a Cox proportional hazard model to determine clinical features associated with distant-disease-free survival (DDFS) after IBTR. We therefor built decision trees. Results On the 828 metastatic events observed, the majority occurred within the first 3 months after IBTR: 157 in the HR positive group, 98 in the HR negative group. We found different prognostic times to IBTR: 49 months in the HR positive group, 33 in the HR negative group. After multivariate analysis, time to IBTR was the first discriminant prognostic factor in both groups (HR 0.65 CI95% [0.54–0.79] and 0.42 [0.30–0.57] respectively). The other following variables were significantly correlated with the DDFS: the initial number of positive lymph nodes for both groups, the initial tumor size and grade for HR positive tumors. Conclusion A short interval time to IBTR is the strongest factor of poor prognosis and reflects occult distant disease. It would appear that prognosis after IBTR depends more on clinical and histological parameters than on surgical treatment. A prospective trial in a low-risk group of patients to validate the safety of salvage BCS instead of mastectomy in IBTR is needed. PMID:27494111

  3. EUS-Guided Ethanol Ablation of Insulinomas

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Shan-yu; Lu, Xiu-ping; Jiang, Hai-xing

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Surgical resection is a standard treatment for insulinomas; however, it is associated with a high risk of complications and limited to specific suitable candidates. In recent years, endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided ethanol ablation of insulinomas has emerged as a new therapeutic option, especially for elderly patients and candidates unfit for surgery. We aimed to evaluate the feasibility and safety of this technique for insulinomas. Four patients diagnosed with insulinomas based on EUS–fine-needle aspiration and immunohistochemistry results underwent EUS-guided 95% ethanol ablation. A comprehensive literature review was performed to understand the current status of the feasibility, safety, and effects of EUS-guided ethanol ablation of insulinomas. EUS-guided ethanol ablation of insulinomas was successfully completed in all the 4 patients. There were no perioperative or postoperative complications. The patients were discharged at 3 days after the procedure. No recurrence of hypoglycemia or tumors was noted during follow-up (range, 3–6 months). Literature review showed 8 patients with insulinomas who underwent EUS-guided ethanol ablation. All the procedures were successful, with no need for further surgical treatment. Among these reviewed cases, 6 patients had no post-procedural complications, while other 2 patients showed a mild increase in the serum levels of lipase and/or pancreatic enzymes within 48 h post-procedure; furthermore, 1 of these 2 patients presented at a later date with medically controllable hematoma and ulceration. During follow-up, 6 patients remained asymptomatic and normoglycemic, while the 2 patients who presented post-procedural complications developed occasional mild confusion. EUS-guided ethanol ablation of insulinomas is an effective and safe modality, with an acceptable level of post-procedural complications. However, the long-term effects of this new therapeutic option need to be validated in a large randomized controlled

  4. Tracking nonpalpable breast cancer for breast-conserving surgery with carbon nanoparticles: implication in tumor location and lymph node dissection.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yanyan; Lin, Nan; Huang, Sheng; Lin, Chongping; Jin, Na; Zhang, Zaizhong; Ke, Jun; Yu, Yinghao; Zhu, Jianping; Wang, Yu

    2015-03-01

    To examine the feasibility of using carbon nanoparticles to track nonpalpable breast cancer for breast-conserving surgery. During breast-conserving surgery, it is often very challenging to determine the boundary of tumor and identify involved lymph nodes. Currently used methods are useful in identifying tumor location, but do not provide direct visual guidance for resection margin during surgery. The study was approved by the Institutional Review Board of the Fuzhou General Hospital (Fuzhou, China). The current retrospective analysis included 16 patients with nonpalpable breast cancer receiving breast-conserving surgery under the guidance of preoperative marking using a carbon nanoparticle, as well as 3 patients receiving carbon nanoparticle marking followed by neoadjuvant treatment and then breast-conserving surgery. The Tumor Node Metastasis stage in the 16 cases included: T1N0M0 in 7, T1N1M0 in 2, T2N0M0 in 4, and T2N1M0 in the remaining 3 cases. The nanoparticle was injected at 12 sites at 0.5 cm away from the apparent edge under colored ultrasonography along 6 tracks separated by 60 degrees (2 sites every track). Lymph node status was also examined. The resection edge was free from cancer cells in all 16 cases (and the 3 cases with neoadjuvant treatment). Cancer cells were identified in majority of stained lymph nodes, but not in any of the unstained lymph nodes. No recurrence or metastasis was noticed after the surgery (2 to 22-month follow-up; median: 6 months). Tracking nonpalpable breast cancer with carbon nanoparticle could guide breast-conserving surgery.

  5. Tumor Location, Interval Between Surgery and Radiotherapy, and Boost Technique Influence Local Control After Breast-Conserving Surgery and Radiation: Retrospective Analysis of Monoinstitutional Long-Term Results

    SciTech Connect

    Knauerhase, Hellen; Strietzel, Manfred; Gerber, Bernd; Reimer, Toralf; Fietkau, Rainer

    2008-11-15

    Purpose: To obtain long-term data on local tumor control after treatment of invasive breast cancer by breast-conserving surgery and adjuvant radiotherapy (RT), in consideration of the interstitial high-dose-rate boost technique. Patients and Methods: A total of 263 women with 268 mammary carcinomas (International Union Against Cancer Stage I-IIB) who had undergone breast-conserving surgery and adjuvant RT between 1990 and 1994 were included. The potential risk factors for local recurrence-free survival were investigated. Results: During a median follow-up period of 94 months, 27 locoregional recurrences, 25 of which were in breast, were diagnosed. The cumulative rate of in-breast recurrence was 4.1% {+-} 1.4% at 5 years of follow-up and 9.9% {+-} 2.4% at 10 years. The multivariate analysis identified medial tumor location and delayed RT (defined as an interval of >2 months between surgery and the start of RT) as significant risk factors for in-breast recurrence in the overall study population. Medial tumor location vs. lateral/central location (hazard ratio, 2.48; 95% confidence interval, 1.06-5.84) resulted in a cumulative in-breast recurrence rate of 22.5% {+-} 8.3% vs. 6.9% {+-} 2.3% at 10 years. Delayed RT (hazard ratio, 2.84; 95% confidence interval, 1.13-7.13) resulted in a cumulative in-breast recurrence rate of 18.5% {+-} 6.2% vs. 6.8% {+-} 2.4% at 10 years. The multivariate analysis also showed that the risk of in-breast recurrence was lower after high-dose-rate boost therapy than after external beam boost therapy in patients with laterally/centrally located tumors (hazard ratio, 3.25; 95% confidence interval, 0.91-11.65). Conclusion: Tumor location, interval between surgery and RT, and boost technique might influence local control of breast cancer treated by breast-conserving surgery and RT.

  6. Semiquantitative Analysis Using Thallium-201 SPECT for Differential Diagnosis Between Tumor Recurrence and Radiation Necrosis After Gamma Knife Surgery for Malignant Brain Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Matsunaga, Shigeo; Shuto, Takashi; Takase, Hajime; Ohtake, Makoto; Tomura, Nagatsuki; Tanaka, Takahiro; Sonoda, Masaki

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Semiquantitative analysis of thallium-201 chloride single photon emission computed tomography ({sup 201}Tl SPECT) was evaluated for the discrimination between recurrent brain tumor and delayed radiation necrosis after gamma knife surgery (GKS) for metastatic brain tumors and high-grade gliomas. Methods and Materials: The medical records were reviewed of 75 patients, including 48 patients with metastatic brain tumor and 27 patients with high-grade glioma who underwent GKS in our institution, and had suspected tumor recurrence or radiation necrosis on follow-up neuroimaging and deteriorating clinical status after GKS. Analysis of {sup 201}Tl SPECT data used the early ratio (ER) and the delayed ratio (DR) calculated as tumor/normal average counts on the early and delayed images, and the retention index (RI) as the ratio of DR to ER. Results: A total of 107 tumors were analyzed with {sup 201}Tl SPECT. Nineteen lesions were removed surgically and histological diagnoses established, and the other lesions were evaluated with follow-up clinical and neuroimaging examinations after GKS. The final diagnosis was considered to be recurrent tumor in 65 lesions and radiation necrosis in 42 lesions. Semiquantitative analysis demonstrated significant differences in DR (P=.002) and RI (P<.0001), but not in ER (P=.372), between the tumor recurrence and radiation necrosis groups, and no significant differences between metastatic brain tumors and high-grade gliomas in all indices (P=.926 for ER, P=.263 for DR, and P=.826 for RI). Receiver operating characteristics analysis indicated that RI was the most informative index with the optimum threshold of 0.775, which provided 82.8% sensitivity, 83.7% specificity, and 82.8% accuracy. Conclusions: Semiquantitative analysis of {sup 201}Tl SPECT provides useful information for the differentiation between tumor recurrence and radiation necrosis in metastatic brain tumors and high-grade gliomas after GKS, and the RI may be the most

  7. ‘Extra-operatve’ MRI (eoMRI) for Brain Tumor Surgery – Initial Results at a Single Institution

    PubMed Central

    Abd-El-Barr, Muhammad M.; Santos, Seth M.; Aglio, Linda S.; Young, Geoffrey S.; Mukundan, Srinivasan; Golby, Alexandra J.; Gormley, William B.; Dunn, Ian F.

    2015-01-01

    Background There is accumulating evidence that extent of resection (EOR) in intrinsic brain tumor surgery prolongs overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS). One of the strategies to increase EOR is the use of intraoperative MRI (ioMRI). However, considerable infrastructure investment is needed to establish and maintain a sophisticated ioMRI. We report the preliminary results of an extra-operative (eoMRI) protocol, with a focus on safety, feasibility and EOR in intrinsic brain tumor surgery. Methods Ten patients underwent an eoMRI protocol consisting of surgical resection in a conventional operating room followed by an immediate MRI in a clinical MRI scanner while the patient was still under anesthesia. If MRI suggested residual safely resectable tumor, the patient was returned to the operating room. Retrospective volumetric analysis was undertaken to investigate the percentage of tumor resected after first resection and if applicable, after further resection. Results 6 out of 10 (60%) patients were felt to require no further resection after eoMRI. The EOR in these patients was 97.8±1.8%. In the 4 patients who underwent further resection, the EOR during the original surgery was 88.5±9.5% (p =0.04). There was an average of 10.1 % more tumor removed between the first and second surgery. In 3/4 (75%) of patients who returned for further resection, gross total resection of was achieved. Conclusion An eoMRI protocol appears to be a safe and practical method to ensure maximum safe resections in patients with brain tumors and can be performed readily in all centers with MRI capability. PMID:25700968

  8. Preoperative embolization versus local hemostatic agents in surgery of hypervascular spinal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Ptashnikov, Dmitry; Mikhaylov, Dmitry; Masevnin, Sergei

    2014-01-01

    Background Currently, there is no consensus about how to reduce the intraoperative risk of hemorrhage in spinal decompression surgery of hypervascular spinal tumors, such as aggressive hemangioma, multiple myeloma, plasmacytoma, metastasis of renal cell carcinoma. Methods A retrospective study of 110 patients, operated in our institute was held in the period between 2003 and 2013. There were 69 male and 41 female patients with extradural hypervascular spinal tumor. The study included 61 patients with metastasis of renal cell carcinoma, 27 with multiple myeloma, 15 with plasmacytoma and 7 with aggressive hemangioma. The first group included 57 patients who underwent preoperative tumor embolization. The second group consisted of 53 patients, which were treated surgically using intraoperative local hemostatic agents. We performed 2 types of treatment options: palliative decompression and total spondylectomy. The first group was divided into two subgroups: 30 patients with palliative decompression (1PD) and 27 with total spondylectomy (1TS). In the second group there were: 28 patients with palliative decompression (2PD) and 25 with total spondylectomy (2TS). The parameters under evaluation were the blood loss volume, drainage loss, operation time, hemoglobin level, possible complications and time of hospital stay. Results The average intraoperative blood loss for all embolized patients was slightly less than in subgroups with local hemostatic agents. No significant difference in blood loss volume was found between groups 1PD and 2PD (p > 0.05). In groups 1TS and 2TS, we did get significant difference (p < 0.05). Statistically significant difference in the average drainage loss was found between two methods of hemostasis in both subgroups (p < 0.05). The operation time was not significantly different between groups. Postoperative hemoglobin level reduce is almost equal in both groups of patients. Postoperative complications were also nearly equal in the groups. The

  9. Evaluation of the Therapeutic Efficacy of Sequential Therapy Involving Percutaneous Microwave Ablation in Combination with 131I-Hypericin Using the VX2 Rabbit Breast Solid Tumor Model

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Miao; Lin, Xiao-An; Zha, Xiao-Ming; Zhou, Wen-Bin; Xia, Tian-Song; Wang, Shui

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Combination of percutaneous microwave ablation (PMWA) and intravenous injection of 131I-hypericin(IIIH) may bear potential as a mini-invasive treatment for tumor. The objective of this study was to assess the effect of PMWA and IIIH in breast tumor growth. Methods Ten New Zealand White rabbits bearing VX2 breast carcinomas were randomly divided into two groups (each 5 examples) and processed using PMWA followed by IIIH and IIIH alone. The IIIH activity was evaluated using planar scintigraphy, autoradiography and biodistribution analysis. The maximum effective safe dose of IIIH was found through 48 rabbits with VX2 breast tumor, which were randomized into six groups (n=8 per group). Subsequently, a further 75 rabbits bearing VX2 breast solid tumors were randomly divided into five groups (each 15 examples) and treated as follows: A, no treatment group; B, PMWA alone; C, IIIH alone; D, PMWA+IIIH×1 (at 8 h post-PMWA); and E, PMWA+IIIH×2 (at 8 h and at 8 days post-PMWA). The therapeutic effect was assessed by measurement of tumor size and performation of positron emission tomography/computed tomograph (PET/CT) scans, liver and renal function tests and Kaplan-Meier survival analysis. Results The planar scintigraphy findings suggested a significant uptake of 131I in necrotic tumor tissue. The autoradiography gray scales indicated higher selective uptake of IIIH by necrotic tissue, with significant differences between the groups with and those without necrotic tumor tissue (P<0.05). The maximum effective safe dose of IIIH was 1mCi/kg. The PET/CT scans and tumor size measurement suggested improvements in treatment groups at all time points (P<0.01). Significant differences were detected among Groups A, B, D and E (P<0.05). Lower levels of lung metastasis were detected in Groups D and E (P<0.05). There were no abnormalities in liver and renal functions tests or other reported side effects. Conclusion IIIH exhibited selective uptake by necrotic tumor tissue

  10. Low molecular weight heparin in patients undergoing free tissue transfer following head and neck ablative surgery: review of efficacy and associated complications.

    PubMed

    Eley, Karen A; Parker, Rachel J; Watt-Smith, Stephen R

    2013-10-01

    Most microsurgeons report the use of anticoagulants in their routine practice. Anti-Xa concentrations are preferentially used to monitor treatment with low molecular weight heparin (LMWH). The aim of this retrospective study was to measure the therapeutic response to standard dosing with LMWH (using anti-Xa) in patients after ablative and reconstructive surgery for head and neck cancer, and to review the associated risk of bleeding. We retrospectively reviewed 153 patients who had undergone resection of primary or recurrent tumours of the head and neck with free flap reconstruction. In total, 173 free flap procedures were completed. Medical records were reviewed to find the anticoagulation regimen used, anti-Xa result, patients' weight, and any associated complications. Fourteen patients returned to theatre because of bleeding; of these no cause was identified in 6 and a haematoma was evacuated. The distribution of unexplained haematoma was similar for all dose regimens of dalteparin. Anti-Xa results were available in 47 cases, and of these, 22 (47%) were within the prophylactic range (0.2 IU/ml or more). Our results highlight the high incidence of inadequate response to standard prophylactic doses of LMWH in patients with head and neck cancer. Increasing the dose of dalteparin does not seem to increase the risk of bleeding or formation of a haematoma. These findings may be transferable to other surgical specialties.

  11. Is surgery mandatory in locally advanced gastrointestinal stromal tumors after imatinib? A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Congedo, Teresa; Ricci, Riccardo; Martini, Maurizio; Di Noia, Vincenzo; Di Dio, Carmela; Quirino, Michela; Barone, Carlo; Cassano, Alessandra

    2017-01-01

    Oesophageal gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are rare neoplasms (about 2% of all GISTs); radical surgery is the standard treatment of all GISTs but in case of locally advanced and unresectable disease no clear treatment guide lines are available. Studies including neoadjuvant imatinib mesylate (IM) are relatively recent, includes small sample size of heterogeneous patients and do not report a standardized duration of neoadjuvant treatment. The main question still remains whether surgery after neoadjuvant IM gives a survival benefit in locally advanced disease. A 46-year-old man with locally advanced unresectable oesophageal GIST harboring KIT exon 11 mutation was treated in our institution for 12 months with neoadjuvant IM; a reduction of 83% of tumor volume was obtained in 9-month of neoadjuvant IM, but in the last 3 months no further response was seen. After neoadjuvant therapy, patient underwent radical surgery and adjuvant IM, which is still ongoing. Since no definitive data are available about survival benefit of surgery after neoadjuvant IM in locally advanced GISTs, a careful balance between morbidity and mortality derived from surgery should be considered and more studies are needed to better define the utility and the optimal duration of neoadjuvant treatment. PMID:28280629

  12. Analysis of laser surgery in non-melanoma skin cancer for optimal tissue removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fanjul-Vélez, Félix; Salas-García, Irene; Arce-Diego, José Luis

    2015-02-01

    Laser surgery is a commonly used technique for tissue ablation or the resection of malignant tumors. It presents advantages over conventional non-optical ablation techniques, like a scalpel or electrosurgery, such as the increased precision of the resected volume, minimization of scars and shorter recovery periods. Laser surgery is employed in medical branches such as ophthalmology or dermatology. The application of laser surgery requires the optimal adjustment of laser beam parameters, taking into account the particular patient and lesion. In this work we present a predictive tool for tissue resection in biological tissue after laser surgery, which allows an a priori knowledge of the tissue ablation volume, area and depth. The model employs a Monte Carlo 3D approach for optical propagation and a rate equation for plasma-induced ablation. The tool takes into account characteristics of the specific lesion to be ablated, mainly the geometric, optical and ablation properties. It also considers the parameters of the laser beam, such as the radius, spatial profile, pulse width, total delivered energy or wavelength. The predictive tool is applied to dermatology tumor resection, particularly to different types of non-melanoma skin cancer tumors: basocellular carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma and infiltrative carcinoma. The ablation volume, area and depth are calculated for healthy skin and for each type of tumor as a function of the laser beam parameters. The tool could be used for laser surgery planning before the clinical application. The laser parameters could be adjusted for optimal resection volume, by personalizing the process to the particular patient and lesion.

  13. Expression of the circulating and the tissue microRNAs after surgery, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy in mice mammary tumor.

    PubMed

    Farsinejad, Sadaf; Rahaie, Mahdi; Alizadeh, Ali Mohammad; Mir-Derikvand, Mohammad; Gheisary, Zohre; Nosrati, Hassan; Khalighfard, Solmaz

    2016-10-01

    The expression of microRNAs (miRNAs), as novel biomarkers, is subject to change in many cancers. Therefore, the overall profile of miRNAs can be used for detection of cancer type, response to therapies, pathological variables, and other factors related to the disease. In this study, to evaluate miRNA expression associated with the tumor progression and response to treatment, 60 BALB/c mice received subcutaneous injections of 4T1 cells. The study includes ten groups: one group as control, six groups were euthanized at different time points to assess the role of miRNA expression in the tumor progression, and three groups received chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and surgery to evaluate miRNA expression in response to treatment. MicroRNAs were extracted from the breast tumor and the plasma samples, and their relative expressions were quantified using qRT-PCR. MiR-155 expression was increased in the plasma in the early weeks after the cell injection but decreased in the plasma after surgery and radiotherapy and also in tumor samples after chemotherapy and radiotherapy. MiR-10b expression was increased in the late weeks both in the plasma and the tumor and was decreased in the plasma after radiotherapy and surgery and in the tumor after radiotherapy. MiR-21 expression was increased in the plasma and the tumor tissue during the disease progression at the third and the fourth weeks following tumor induction but was decreased in the plasma in all the therapy groups. Interestingly, miR-125a showed a significant decrease during the tumor progression, and its expression was increased after the treatment. Our results showed that the candidate miRNAs could be divided into two groups of oncomiRs and tumor suppressor miR based on their deregulation after tumor growth and treatments. It seems that the oncomiRs in the plasma can be an ideal noninvasive candidate biomarker for the early detection of breast cancer and also for following the response of the common therapies.

  14. Health-Related Quality of Life in Brain Tumor Patients Treated with Surgery: Preliminary Result of a Single Institution

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chang-Wook; Joo, Jin-Deok; Kim, Young-Hoon; Han, Jung Ho

    2016-01-01

    Background Alongside the extent of removal and patients’ survival in the management of brain tumors, health-related quality of life (HRQOL) has become an important consideration. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the change of HRQOL in brain tumor patients before and after surgery and to assess the associated factors that contribute to the change of HRQOL. Methods A total of 258 patients who underwent surgical treatment were enrolled in this study. The European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire 30 (EORTC QLQ-C30) and the 20-item EORTC QLQ-Brain Neoplasm (QLQ-BN20) were used to assess HRQOL. Patients were asked to fill out the questionnaires before and 3-6 months after surgery. Results Global QOL (p<0.001) and emotional function (p<0.018) were significantly improved after surgery. Physical function (p=0.015) was significantly aggravated. Among the symptoms, headache, pain and nausea and vomiting were significantly decreased (p<0.01, p=0.041, p<0.001, respectively), while dyspnea, communication deficit and weakness of the legs were increased (p=0.005, p=0.040, and p=0.014, respectively). Preoperative neurologic deficit (p=0.019) and tumor diameter (p=0.016) were significantly related to the patients who showed aggravation of global QOL after brain tumor surgery. In the aggravated global QOL group, common complaints and concerns included role function, appetite loss, financial difficulty and future uncertainty. Conclusion In brain tumor patients, HRQOL has improved after surgery. Role function, appetite loss, financial difficulty and future uncertainty were important factors for HRQOL in brain tumor patients treated with surgery. Although there is National Health Insurance and Medical Aid program in Korea, financial difficulty and future uncertainty are much more important in influencing QOL than previously thought. The results of this short-term follow up preliminary study suggest that several factors were

  15. Intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring during endoscopic endonasal surgery for pediatric skull base tumors.

    PubMed

    Elangovan, Cheran; Singh, Supriya Palwinder; Gardner, Paul; Snyderman, Carl; Tyler-Kabara, Elizabeth C; Habeych, Miguel; Crammond, Donald; Balzer, Jeffrey; Thirumala, Parthasarathy D

    2016-02-01

    OBJECT The aim of this study was to evaluate the value of intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring (IONM) using electromyography (EMG), brainstem auditory evoked potentials (BAEPs), and somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEPs) to predict and/or prevent postoperative neurological deficits in pediatric patients undergoing endoscopic endonasal surgery (EES) for skull base tumors. METHODS All consecutive pediatric patients with skull base tumors who underwent EES with at least 1 modality of IONM (BAEP, SSEP, and/or EMG) at our institution between 1999 and 2013 were retrospectively reviewed. Staged procedures and repeat procedures were identified and analyzed separately. To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of significant free-run EMG activity, the prevalence of cranial nerve (CN) deficits and the sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values were calculated. RESULTS A total of 129 patients underwent 159 procedures; 6 patients had a total of 9 CN deficits. The incidences of CN deficits based on the total number of nerves monitored in the groups with and without significant free-run EMG activity were 9% and 1.5%, respectively. The incidences of CN deficits in the groups with 1 staged and more than 1 staged EES were 1.5% and 29%, respectively. The sensitivity, specificity, and negative predictive values (with 95% confidence intervals) of significant EMG to detect CN deficits in repeat procedures were 0.55 (0.22-0.84), 0.86 (0.79-0.9), and 0.97 (0.92-0.99), respectively. Two patients had significant changes in their BAEPs that were reversible with an increase in mean arterial pressure. CONCLUSIONS IONM can be applied effectively and reliably during EES in children. EMG monitoring is specific for detecting CN deficits and can be an effective guide for dissecting these procedures. Triggered EMG should be elicited intraoperatively to check the integrity of the CNs during and after tumor resection. Given the anatomical complexity of pediatric EES and

  16. Percutaneous thermal ablation of primary lung cancer.

    PubMed

    de Baere, T; Tselikas, L; Catena, V; Buy, X; Deschamps, F; Palussière, J

    2016-10-01

    Percutaneous ablation of small-size non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) has demonstrated feasibility and safety in nonsurgical candidates. Radiofrequency ablation (RFA), the most commonly used technique, has an 80-90% reported rate of complete ablation, with the best results obtained in tumors less than 2-3cm in diameter. The highest one-, three-, and five-year overall survival rates reported in NSCLC following RFA are 97.7%, 72.9%, and 55.7% respectively. Tumor size, tumor stage, and underlying comorbidities are the main predictors of survival. Other ablation techniques such as microwave or cryoablation may help overcome the limitations of RFA in the future, particularly for large tumors or those close to large vessels. Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) has its own complications and carries the risk of fiducial placement requiring multiple lung punctures. SABR has also demonstrated significant efficacy in treating small-size lung tumors and should be compared to percutaneous ablation.

  17. Image-guided ablation for hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lencioni, Riccardo; Crocetti, Laura

    2013-01-01

    Image-guided ablation is accepted as the best therapeutic choice for patients with early-stage hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) when surgical options-including resection and transplantation-are precluded. The term image-guided tumor ablation is defined as the direct application of chemical substances or sources of energy to a focal tumor in an attempt to achieve eradication or substantial tumor destruction. Over the past 25 years, several methods for local tumor destruction have been developed and clinically tested. Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) has shown superior anticancer effect and greater survival benefit with respect to the seminal percutaneous technique, ethanol injection, in meta-analyses of randomized controlled trials, and is currently established as the standard ablative modality. Nevertheless, novel thermal and nonthermal techniques for tumor ablation-including microwave ablation and irreversible electroporation-seem to have potential to improve the efficacy of RFA and are currently undergoing clinical investigation.

  18. Image-guided tumor surgery: will there be a role for fluorescent nanoparticles?

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Tanner K.; Mohs, Aaron M.

    2016-01-01

    Image-guided surgery (IGS) using fluorescent nanoparticles (NPs) has the potential to substantially impact patient treatment. The use of fluorescence imaging provides surgeons with real-time feedback on the location of diseased tissue using safe, low-cost imaging agents and instrumentation. Fluorescent NPs are likely to play a role as they are capable of taking advantage of the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect and can be modified to avoid clearance, increase circulation time, and specifically target tumors. Clinical trials of IGS using the FDA-approved fluorophores indocyanine green and methylene blue have already shown preliminary successes, and incorporation of fluorescent NPs will likely improve detection by providing higher signal to background ratio and reducing false-positive rates through active targeting. Preclinical development of fluorescent NP formulations is advancing rapidly, with strategies ranging from passive targeting to active targeting of cell surface receptors, creating pH-responsive NPs, and increasing cell uptake through cleavable proteins. This collective effort could lead to clinical trials using fluorescent NPs in the near future. PMID:26585556

  19. Three-dimensional virtual reality simulation of periarticular tumors using Dextroscope reconstruction and simulated surgery: A preliminary 10-case study

    PubMed Central

    Shi, JingSheng; Xia, Jun; Wei, YiBing; Wang, SiQun; Wu, JianGuo; Chen, FeiYan; Huang, GangYong; Chen, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Background Dextroscope® three-dimensional (3D) imaging has been extensively used to generate virtual reality (VR) workspaces for neurosurgery and laparoscopy, but few applications have been reported for orthopedic surgery. Here, we investigated orthopedic periarticular tumor surgery planning and anatomical characteristics using a Dextroscope. Material/Methods Patients undergoing surgery for periarticular tumors (n=10) between October 2008 and June 2010 were enrolled and presurgically subjected to computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and MRI angiography (MRI-A). Imaging data were transferred and integrated in a Dextroscope to produce a VR simulation. The presurgical 3D anatomical reconstructions and intraoperative anatomical characteristics (virtual vs. actual data) and surgical approach (virtual vs. actual situation) measurement and subjective appearance were compared. Results Anatomical characteristics in the area of interest and tumor diameters in all 3 planes (superior-inferior, medial-lateral, and anteroposterior) were consistent between virtual and actual data (3.92±1.22, 1.96±0.53, and 1.73±0.44 vs. 3.92±1.13, 1.91±0.44, and 1.81±0.41; P=0.99, 0.24, and 0.09, respectively). However, the virtual surgical situations were inconsistent with the actual intraoperative situation in many cases, leading to complications. The resolutions of the original CT, MRI, and MRI-A images directly correlated with 3D simulation quality, with soft tissues most poorly represented. Tumor tissue imaging quality in 3D varied extensively by tumor type. Conclusions Anatomical structures of periarticular tumors can be reconstructed using the Dextroscope system with good accuracy in the case of simple fenestration, increasing treatment individualization, surgical competence level, and potentially reducing intraoperative complications. However, further specialization of VR tools for use in orthopedic applications that involve specialized tools and procedures

  20. Activation and dramatically increased cytolytic activity of tumor specific T lymphocytes after radio-frequency ablation in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma and colorectal liver metastases

    PubMed Central

    Hänsler, Johannes; Wissniowski, Thaddäus Till; Schuppan, Detlef; Witte, Astrid; Bernatik, Thomas; Hahn, Eckhart Georg; Strobel, Deike

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To assess if a specific cytotoxic T cell response can be induced in patients with malignant liver tumors treated with radio-frequency ablation (RFA). METHODS: Six Patients with liver metastases of colorectal cancer and 6 with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) underwent RFA. Blood was sampled before, 4 and 8 wk after RFA. Test antigens were autologous liver and tumor lysate obtained from each patient by biopsy. Peripheral T cell activation was assessed by an interferon gamma (IFNγ) secretion assay and flow cytometry. T cells were double-stained for CD4/CD8 and IFNγ to detect cytotoxic T cells. The ratio of IFNγ positive and IFNγ negative T cells was determined as the stimulation index (SI). To assess cytolytic activity, T cells were co-incubated with human CaCo colorectal cancer and HepG2 HCC cells and release of cytosolic adenylate kinase was measured by a luciferase assay. RESULTS: Before RFA SI was 0.021 (± 0.006) for CD4+ and 0.022 (± 0.004) for CD8+ T cells against nonmalignant liver tissue and 0.018 (± 0.005) for CD4+ and 0.021 (± 0.004) for CD8+ cells against autologous tumor tissue. Four weeks after RFA SI against tumor tissue increased to 0.109 (± 0.005) for CD4+ and 0.11 (± 0.012) for CD8+ T cells against HCC, and to 0.115 (± 0.031) for CD4+ and 0.15 (± 0.02) for CD8+ cells for colorectal metastases (P < 0.0001). No increased SI was observed with nonmalignant tumor tissue at all time points. Before RFA cytolytic activity against the respective cancer cells was low with 2.62 (± 0.37) relative luminescence units (RLU), but rose more than 100 fold 4 and 8 wk after RFA. Spontaneous release was < 2% of maximum release in all experiments. CONCLUSION: Patients with primary and secondary tumors of the liver show a significant tumor-specific cytotoxic T-cell stimulation with a dramatically increased tumor specific cytolytic activity of CD8+ T cells after RFA. PMID:16773688

  1. Image-guided ablation of adrenal lesions.

    PubMed

    Yamakado, Koichiro

    2014-06-01

    Although laparoscopic adrenalectomy has remained the standard of care for the treatment for adrenal tumors, percutaneous image-guided ablation therapy, such as chemical ablation, radiofrequency ablation, cryoablation, and microwave ablation, has been shown to be clinically useful in many nonsurgical candidates. Ablation therapy has been used to treat both functioning adenomas and malignant tumors, including primary adrenal carcinoma and metastasis. For patients with functioning adenomas, biochemical and symptomatic improvement is achieved in 96 to 100% after ablation; for patients with malignant adrenal neoplasms, however, the survival benefit from ablation therapy remains unclear, though good initial results have been reported. This article outlines the current role of ablation therapy for adrenal lesions, as well as identifying some of the technical considerations for this procedure.

  2. Feasibility and Timing of Cytoreduction Surgery in Advanced (Metastatic or Recurrent) Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors During the Era of Imatinib

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Shih-Chun; Liao, Chien-Hung; Wang, Shang-Yu; Tsai, Chun-Yi; Chiang, Kun-Chun; Cheng, Chi-Tung; Yeh, Ta-Sen; Chen, Yen-Yang; MA, Ming-Chun; Liu, Chien-Ting; Yeh, Chun-Nan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The prognosis of advanced gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) was dramatically improved in the era of imatinib. Cytoreduction surgery was advocated as an additional treatment for advanced GISTs, especially when patients having poor response to imatinib or developing resistance to it. However, the efficacy and benefit of cytoreduction were still controversial. Likewise, the sequence between cytoreduction surgery and imatinib still need evaluation. In this study, we tried to assess the feasibility and efficiency of cytoreduction in advanced GISTs. Furthermore, we analyzed the impact of timing of the cytoreduction surgery on the prognosis of advanced GISTs. We conducted a prospective collecting retrospective review of patients with advanced GISTs (metastatic, unresectable, and recurrent GISTs) treated in Chang Gung memorial hospital (CGMH) since 2001 to 2013. We analyzed the impact of cytoreduction surgery to response to imatinib, progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS) in patients with advanced GISTs. Moreover, by the timing of cytoreduction to imatinib, we divided the surgical patients who had surgery before imatinib use into early group and those who had surgery after imatinib into late. We compared the clinical response to imatinib, PFS and OS between early and late cytoreduction surgical groups. Totally, 182 patients were enrolled into this study. Seventy-six patients underwent cytoreduction surgery. The demographic characteristics and tumor presentation were similar between surgical and non-surgical groups. The surgical group showed better complete response rate (P < 0.001) and partial response rate (P = 0.008) than non-surgical group. The 1-year, 3-year, and 5-year PFS were significantly superior in surgical group (P = 0.003). The 1-year, 3-year, and 5-year OS were superior in surgical group, but without statistical significance (P = 0.088). Dividing by cytoreduction surgical timing, the demographic

  3. Patient Specific Instruments for Complex Tumor Resection-Reconstruction Surgery within the Pelvis: A Series of 4 Cases.

    PubMed

    Cernat, Eduard; Docquier, Pierre-Louis; Paul, Laurent; Banse, Xavier; Codorean, Ion-Bogdan

    2016-01-01

    The pelvis bone resection-reconstruction surgery is one of the most challenging fields in orthopedics. Being applied for tumors, as for other complex reconstruction cases, this type of surgery needs careful planning and is time consuming, in order to obtain proper accuracy. Unfortunately not all the time the expected accuracy is met, with consequences for the patients. PSI proved to provide good cutting accuracy during simulated tumor surgery within the pelvis. This article present a series of 4 patients operated in our department between June 2014 and Mars 2015 for tumors resectionreconstructions. The patients were imaged using a CT and an MRI scan and the images were reconstructed in 3D. According to the bone bank stock, the most similar allograft was chosen and the stored CT scan was reconstructed in 3D. Patient specific instruments (PSI) were designed and manufactured using rapid-prototyping technology for the resection of the native tissues as for the resection of the careful selected hemipelvic allografts. Allografts fitting to the pelvis of the patients was excellent and allowed stable osteosynthesis.

  4. Structural Brain Alterations in Children an Average of 5 Years after Surgery and Chemotherapy for Brain Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Mary Baron; Macey, Paul M.; Harper, Ronald M.; Jacob, Eufemia; Patel, Sunita K.; Finlay, Jonathan L.; Nelson, Marvin D.; Compton, Peggy

    2014-01-01

    Background Young children with brain tumors are often treated with high-dose chemotherapy after surgery to avoid brain tissue injury associated with irradiation. The effects of systemic chemotherapy on healthy brain tissue in this population, however, are unclear. Our objective was to compare gray and white matter integrity using MRI procedures in children with brain tumors (n=7, mean age 8.3 years), treated with surgery and high-dose chemotherapy followed by autologous hematopoietic cell rescue (AuHCR) an average of 5.4 years earlier, to age- and gender-matched healthy controls (n=9, mean age 9.3 years). Methods Diffusion tensor imaging data were collected to evaluate tissue integrity throughout the brain, as measured by mean diffusivity (MD), a marker of glial, neuronal, and axonal status, and fractional anisotropy (FA), an index of axonal health. Individual MD and FA maps were calculated, normalized, smoothed, and compared between groups using analysis of covariance, with age and sex as covariates. Results Higher mean diffusivity values, indicative of injury, emerged in patients compared with controls (p<0.05, corrected for multiple comparisons), and were especially apparent in the central thalamus, external capsule, putamen, globus pallidus and pons. Reduced FA values in some regions did not reach significance after correction for multiple comparisons. Conclusions Children treated with surgery and high-dose chemotherapy with AuHCR for brain tumors an average of 5.4 years earlier show alterations in white and gray matter in multiple brain areas distant from the tumor site, raising the possibility for long-term consequences of the tumor or treatment. PMID:24830985

  5. Laser dosimetry planning tool for colonoscopic tumor resection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelayo-Fernández, M. L.; Fanjul-Vélez, F.; Salas-García, I.; Zverev, M.; Arce-Diego, J. L.

    2016-03-01

    Gastrointestinal tumoral pathologies are quite common nowadays. Diseases such as gastric antral vascular ectasia (GAVE) or actinic proctitis may require endoscopic surgery. Argon Plasma Coagulated (APC) or radiofrequency are usually employed. However, they present disadvantages, such as the reduced treated area, magnetic resonance incompatibility, or an uncontrolled ablation depth. Optical surgery could avoid these problems and contribute to a better and controlled treatment result, either ablative or coagulative, in a minimally invasive, non-contact and non-ionizing way. The treatment area could also be increased by adequate optical fiber probe design. In this work laser surgery is analyzed for resection of colonic tumors. A Monte Carlo model is employed to study optical propagation, and an optical ablation approach allows the estimation of the resected volume. The ablation approach is based on plasma-induced ablation, particularly taking into account the freeelectron density generated in the tissue by the pulsed optical source. Several wavelengths, radii and malignant tissue types are considered, either healthy, adenomatous or even coagulated tissues. Optimum source parameters as a function of tumor geometry can be estimated for treatment planning.

  6. Whole Abdominopelvic Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy for Desmoplastic Small Round Cell Tumor After Surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Pinnix, Chelsea C.; Fontanilla, Hiral P.; Hayes-Jordan, Andrea; Subbiah, Vivek; Bilton, Stephen D.; Chang, Eric L.; Grosshans, David R.; McAleer, Mary F.; Sulman, Eric P.; Woo, Shiao Y.; Anderson, Peter; Green, Holly L.; Mahajan, Anita

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: Desmoplastic small round cell tumor (DSCRT) is an uncommon pediatric tumor with a poor prognosis. Aggressive multimodality therapy is the current treatment approach; however. treatment toxicity is of concern. We report our results with whole abdominopelvic intensity-modulated radiation therapy (WAP-IMRT) as a component of multimodality therapy for DSCRT at a single institution. Materials/Methods: Medical records of all patients with DSCRT who received WAP-IMRT as part of definitive treatment at MD Anderson (2006-2010) were identified and reviewed. Results: Eight patients with DSRCT received WAP-IMRT with a median follow-up of 15.2 months. All patients received multiple courses of chemotherapy followed by surgical debulking of intra-abdominal disease; seven also had intraoperative hyperthermic cisplatin. WAP-IMRT was delivered to a total dose of 30 Gy postoperatively; four patients received a simultaneous boost (6-10 Gy) to sites of gross residual disease. Seven patients received concurrent chemotherapy during WAP-IMRT. No Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Grade 4 nausea, vomiting, or diarrhea occurred during RT. Red-cell transfusions were given to two patients to maintain hemoglobin levels >10 g/dL. Grade 4 cytopenia requiring growth factor support occurred in only one patient; no other significant cytopenias were noted. WAP-IMRT resulted in 25% lower radiation doses to the lumbosacral vertebral bodies and pelvic bones than conventional RT plans. The median time to local or distant failure after WAP-IMRT was 8.73 months in seven patients. One patient who had completed RT 20 months before the last follow-up remains alive without evidence of disease. Five patients (63%) experienced treatment failure in the abdomen. Distant failure occurred in three patients (37.5%). Conclusions: WAP-IMRT with concurrent radiosensitizing chemotherapy was well tolerated after aggressive surgery for DSCRT. Enhanced bone sparing with IMRT probably accounts for the low hematologic

  7. Conditional ablation of TGF-β signaling inhibits tumor progression and invasion in an induced mouse bladder cancer model

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Yu; Zhu, Fengyu; Zhang, Haojie; Chen, Demeng; Zhang, Xiuhong; Gao, Qian; Li, Yang

    2016-01-01

    The role of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) signaling in cancer progression is still under debate. To determine the function of TGF-β signaling in bladder cancer progression, we conditionally knocked out the Tgfbr2 in mouse model after a N-butyl-N-4-hydroxybutyl Nitrosamine induced bladder carcinogenesis. We found the ablation of TGF-β signaling could inhibit the cancer cell proliferation, cancer stem cell population and EMT, hence suppressed the invasive cancer progression, which is similar with the result of TGF-β receptor I inhibitor treatment. These findings recognize the roles and mechanisms of TGF-β signaling in bladder cancer progression in vivo for the first time. PMID:27378170

  8. Graphics processing unit-accelerated non-rigid registration of MR images to CT images during CT-guided percutaneous liver tumor ablations

    PubMed Central

    Tokuda, Junichi; Plishker, William; Torabi, Meysam; Olubiyi, Olutayo I; Zaki, George; Tatli, Servet; Silverman, Stuart G.; Shekhar, Raj; Hata, Nobuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Rationale and Objectives Accuracy and speed are essential for the intraprocedural nonrigid MR-to-CT image registration in the assessment of tumor margins during CT-guided liver tumor ablations. While both accuracy and speed can be improved by limiting the registration to a region of interest (ROI), manual contouring of the ROI prolongs the registration process substantially. To achieve accurate and fast registration without the use of an ROI, we combined a nonrigid registration technique based on volume subdivision with hardware acceleration using a graphical processing unit (GPU). We compared the registration accuracy and processing time of GPU-accelerated volume subdivision-based nonrigid registration technique to the conventional nonrigid B-spline registration technique. Materials and Methods Fourteen image data sets of preprocedural MR and intraprocedural CT images for percutaneous CT-guided liver tumor ablations were obtained. Each set of images was registered using the GPU-accelerated volume subdivision technique and the B-spline technique. Manual contouring of ROI was used only for the B-spline technique. Registration accuracies (Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC) and 95% Hausdorff Distance (HD)), and total processing time including contouring of ROIs and computation were compared using a paired Student’s t-test. Results Accuracy of the GPU-accelerated registrations and B-spline registrations, respectively were 88.3 ± 3.7% vs 89.3 ± 4.9% (p = 0.41) for DSC and 13.1 ± 5.2 mm vs 11.4 ± 6.3 mm (p = 0.15) for HD. Total processing time of the GPU-accelerated registration and B-spline registration techniques was 88 ± 14 s vs 557 ± 116 s (p < 0.000000002), respectively; there was no significant difference in computation time despite the difference in the complexity of the algorithms (p = 0.71). Conclusion The GPU-accelerated volume subdivision technique was as accurate as the B-spline technique and required significantly less processing time. The GPU

  9. CT Mapping of the Distribution of Saline During Radiofrequency Ablation with Perfusion Electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Gillams, A.R. Lees, W.R.

    2005-05-15

    Purpose. During radiofrequency (RF) ablation, adjunctive saline increases the size of the ablation zone and therefore electrodes that simultaneously deliver current and saline have been developed, but the addition of saline also results in an irregular ablation zone. Our aim was to study the distribution of saline during RF ablation. Methods. Four patients were treated: 3 with liver metastases and 1 with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Two different perfusion electrodes were used: a high-perfusion-rate, straight electrode (Berchtold, Germany) and a low-perfusion-rate, expandable electrode (RITA Medical Systems, USA). The saline perfusate was doped with non-ionic contrast medium to render it visible on CT and the electrical conductivity was measured. CT scans were obtained of each electrode position prior to ablation and repeated after ablation. Contrast-enhanced CT was performed 18-24 hr later to demonstrate the ablation zone. All treatments were carried out according to the manufacturer's recommended protocol. Results. The addition of a small quantity of non-ionic contrast did not alter the electrical conductivity of the saline. Contrast-doped saline extravasated beyond the tumor in all 3 patients with metastases but was limited in the patient with HCC. In some areas where saline had extravasated there was reduced enhancement on contrast-enhanced CT consistent with tissue ablation. One patient treated with the high-perfusion-rate system sustained a jejunal perforation requiring surgery. Conclusion. Saline can extravasate beyond the tumor and with the high-perfusion-rate system this resulted in an undesirable extension of the ablation zone and a complication.

  10. One Stage Posterior Minimal Laminectomy and Video-Assisted Thoracoscopic Surgery (VATS) for Removal of Thoracic Dumbbell Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Kyoung Hyup; Ahn, Hyo Yeoung; Cho, Jeong Su; Kim, Yeoung Dae; Choi, Byung Kwan; Han, In Ho

    2017-01-01

    Objective This study was conducted to assess the surgical results of one-stage posterior minimal laminectomy and video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) for the treatment of thoracic dumbbell tumor and to describe its precise technique. In addition, we investigated the technique’s usefulness and limitations. Methods Seven cases of thoracic dumbbell tumor (two men and five women, mean age, 43 years) were analyzed retrospectively. Pathological findings included schwannoma in four patients, neurofibroma in two patients, and hemangioma in one patient. The location of tumors varied from T2/3 to T12/L1. Dumbbell tumors were resected by one-stage operation using posterior laminectomy followed by VATS without instrumentation. Clinical data were reviewed. Results The mean follow-up period was 25 months (range, 3–58 months), and the operative time ranged from 255 to 385 min (mean, 331 min), with estimated blood loss ranging from 110 to 930 mL (mean, 348 mL). The tumor was completely resected without instrumentation and postoperative instability in all cases. Postoperative complications included atelectasis and facial anhydrosis in one case each. Conclusion One-stage posterior minimal laminectomy and VATS may be a safe and less invasive technique for removal of thoracic dumbbell tumor without instability. This method has the advantage of early ambulation and rapid recovery because it reduces blood loss and postoperative pain. PMID:28264248

  11. Interactive Volumetry Of Liver Ablation Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egger, Jan; Busse, Harald; Brandmaier, Philipp; Seider, Daniel; Gawlitza, Matthias; Strocka, Steffen; Voglreiter, Philip; Dokter, Mark; Hofmann, Michael; Kainz, Bernhard; Hann, Alexander; Chen, Xiaojun; Alhonnoro, Tuomas; Pollari, Mika; Schmalstieg, Dieter; Moche, Michael

    2015-10-01

    Percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a minimally invasive technique that destroys cancer cells by heat. The heat results from focusing energy in the radiofrequency spectrum through a needle. Amongst others, this can enable the treatment of patients who are not eligible for an open surgery. However, the possibility of recurrent liver cancer due to incomplete ablation of the tumor makes post-interventional monitoring via regular follow-up scans mandatory. These scans have to be carefully inspected for any conspicuousness. Within this study, the RF ablation zones from twelve post-interventional CT acquisitions have been segmented semi-automatically to support the visual inspection. An interactive, graph-based contouring approach, which prefers spherically shaped regions, has been applied. For the quantitative and qualitative analysis of the algorithm’s results, manual slice-by-slice segmentations produced by clinical experts have been used as the gold standard (which have also been compared among each other). As evaluation metric for the statistical validation, the Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC) has been calculated. The results show that the proposed tool provides lesion segmentation with sufficient accuracy much faster than manual segmentation. The visual feedback and interactivity make the proposed tool well suitable for the clinical workflow.

  12. Interactive Volumetry Of Liver Ablation Zones

    PubMed Central

    Egger, Jan; Busse, Harald; Brandmaier, Philipp; Seider, Daniel; Gawlitza, Matthias; Strocka, Steffen; Voglreiter, Philip; Dokter, Mark; Hofmann, Michael; Kainz, Bernhard; Hann, Alexander; Chen, Xiaojun; Alhonnoro, Tuomas; Pollari, Mika; Schmalstieg, Dieter; Moche, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a minimally invasive technique that destroys cancer cells by heat. The heat results from focusing energy in the radiofrequency spectrum through a needle. Amongst others, this can enable the treatment of patients who are not eligible for an open surgery. However, the possibility of recurrent liver cancer due to incomplete ablation of the tumor makes post-interventional monitoring via regular follow-up scans mandatory. These scans have to be carefully inspected for any conspicuousness. Within this study, the RF ablation zones from twelve post-interventional CT acquisitions have been segmented semi-automatically to support the visual inspection. An interactive, graph-based contouring approach, which prefers spherically shaped regions, has been applied. For the quantitative and qualitative analysis of the algorithm’s results, manual slice-by-slice segmentations produced by clinical experts have been used as the gold standard (which have also been compared among each other). As evaluation metric for the statistical validation, the Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC) has been calculated. The results show that the proposed tool provides lesion segmentation with sufficient accuracy much faster than manual segmentation. The visual feedback and interactivity make the proposed tool well suitable for the clinical workflow. PMID:26482818

  13. Tumor progression locus 2 ablation suppressed hepatocellular carcinoma development by inhibiting hepatic inflammation and steatosis in mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Tumor progression locus 2 (TPL2), a serine threonine kinase, functions as a critical regulator of inflammatory pathways and mediates oncogenic events. The potential role of Tpl2 in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) associated hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) development remains unkn...

  14. Photothermal tumor ablation in mice with repeated therapy sessions using NIR-absorbing micellar hydrogels formed in situ.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Chun-Wen; Chuang, Er-Yuan; Chen, Hsin-Lung; Wan, Dehui; Korupalli, Chiranjeevi; Liao, Zi-Xian; Chiu, Ya-Ling; Chia, Wei-Tso; Lin, Kun-Ju; Sung, Hsing-Wen

    2015-07-01

    Repeated cancer treatments are common, owing to the aggressive and resistant nature of tumors. This work presents a chitosan (CS) derivative that contains self-doped polyaniline (PANI) side chains, capable of self-assembling to form micelles and then transforming into hydrogels driven by a local change in pH. Analysis results of small-angle X-ray scattering indicate that the sol-gel transition of this CS derivative may provide the mechanical integrity to maintain its spatial stability in the microenvironment of solid tumors. The micelles formed in the CS hydrogel function as nanoscaled heating sources upon exposure to near-infrared light, thereby enabling the selective killing of cancer cells in a light-treated area. Additionally, photothermal efficacy of the micellar hydrogel is evaluated using a tumor-bearing mouse model; hollow gold nanospheres (HGNs) are used for comparison. Given the ability of the micellar hydrogel to provide spatial stability within a solid tumor, which prevents its leakage from the injection site, the therapeutic efficacy of this hydrogel, as a photothermal therapeutic agent for repeated treatments, exceeds that of nanosized HGNs. Results of this study demonstrate that this in situ-formed micellar hydrogel is a highly promising modality for repeated cancer treatments, providing a clinically viable, minimally invasive phototherapeutic option for therapeutic treatment.

  15. Thoracoscopic Surgery for Glomus Tumor: An Uncommon Mediastinal Neoplasm and Iatrogenic Tracheal Rupture

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Zhongjie; Ma, Dehua; Luo, Huarong

    2017-01-01

    Mediastinal glomus tumors are rarely recognized, and only seven cases have been reported in the literature. Here, we describe a rare mediastinal glomus tumor and review the characteristics of this rare clinical case. The patient was a 50-year-old female who presented with coughing for 3 months. Her chest computed tomography scan demonstrated a localized tumor in the posterior superior mediastinum. Intraoperatively, we found a longitudinal rupture of the membranous trachea above the carina. We completely resected the tumor and repaired the tracheal rupture under a thoracoscopy using a pedicled muscle flap. The tissue was diagnosed as a mediastinal glomus tumor according to its histological and immunophenotypic characteristics. PMID:28133561

  16. Minimally Invasive Treatment of Small Renal Tumors: Trends in Renal Cancer Diagnosis and Management

    SciTech Connect

    Breen, David J. Railton, Nicholas J.

    2010-10-15

    Renal cell carcinoma is a common malignancy causing significant mortality. In recent years abdominal imaging, often for alternate symptomatology, has led the trend toward the detection and confirmation of smaller renal tumors. This has permitted the greater use of localized and nephron-sparing techniques including partial nephrectomy and image-guided ablation. This article aims to review the current role of image-guided biopsy and ablation in the management of small renal tumors. The natural history of renal cell carcinoma, the role of renal biopsy, the principles and procedural considerations of thermal energy ablation, and the oncological outcomes of these minimally invasive treatments are discussed and illustrated with cases from the authors' institution. Image-guided ablation, in particular, has changed the treatment paradigm and, by virtue of its increasingly evident efficacy and low morbidity, now favors the treatment of smaller tumors in patients previously unfit for surgery.

  17. Replacement of the tumor bed following oncoplastic breast-conserving surgery with immediate latissimus dorsi mini-flap

    PubMed Central

    Alço, Gül; Igdem, Sefik; Okkan, Sait; Dincer, Maktav; Sarsenov, Dauren; Ilgun, Ahmet Serkan; Agacayak, Filiz; Elbüken, Filiz; Ercan, Tulay; Selamoglu, Derya; Ozmen, Vahit

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the geographic variability of the tumor bed following oncoplastic breast-conserving surgery (OP-BCS), and to assess its relevance for radiotherapy planning. In this prospective study, pre- and postoperative computerized tomography (CT) scans of 22 patients with early-stage breast cancer were fused. The preoperative gross tumor volume or excisional biopsy cavity were contoured under the guidance of preoperative radiological images. Postoperative lumpectomy cavities were contoured under the guidance of surgical clips. The conformity index (CI) was calculated and defined on a scale between 0 and 1, where 0 indicated no overlap and 1 indicated 100% concordance. Associations between CI and the number of clips, time interval between surgery and CT scans, pathological tumor size and age were assessed using independent sample testing. The median CI was 0.07 (in five cases, 1, and in eight cases, 0). The lumpectomy cavity shifted from the primary location in 36.4% of the cases. Median shifts between the isocenters of pre- and postoperative volumes were measured as 1.02 cm (range, 0.4–4.43 cm) in the x, 1.07 cm (range, 0.05–5.67 cm) in the y, and 1.12 cm (range, 0–3.75 cm) in the z directions. Only the clip number was determined to be significantly associated with CI (P=0.017). Pre- and postoperative tumor bed volumes were fully superposed in five of the 22 cases. The present study has shown that the tumor bed is markedly replaced following OP-BCS with latissimus dorsi mini-flap (LDMF) reconstruction. Special care should therefore be taken when defining the lumpectomy cavity following OP-BCS with LDMF reconstruction. PMID:27699027

  18. Catheter ablation.

    PubMed

    Fromer, M; Shenasa, M

    1991-02-01

    Catheter ablation is gaining increasing interest for the therapy of symptomatic, sustained arrhythmias of various origins. The scope of this review is to give an overview of the biophysical aspects and major characteristics of some of the most widely used energy sources in catheter ablation, e.g., the discharge of conventional defibrillators, modified defibrillators, laser light, and radiofrequency current application. Results from animal studies are considered to explain the basic mechanisms of catheter ablation. The recent achievements with the use of radiofrequency current to modify or ablate cardiac conduction properties are outlined in more detail.

  19. Laser applications in surgery

    PubMed Central

    Azadgoli, Beina

    2016-01-01

    In modern medicine, lasers are increasingly utilized for treatment of a variety of pathologies as interest in less invasive treatment modalities intensifies. The physics behind lasers allows the same basic principles to be applied to a multitude of tissue types using slight modifications of the system. Multiple laser systems have been studied within each field of medicine. The term “laser” was combined with “surgery,” “ablation,” “lithotripsy,” “cancer treatment,” “tumor ablation,” “dermatology,” “skin rejuvenation,” “lipolysis,” “cardiology,” “atrial fibrillation (AF),” and “epilepsy” during separate searches in the PubMed database. Original articles that studied the application of laser energy for these conditions were reviewed and included. A review of laser therapy is presented. Laser energy can be safely and effectively used for lithotripsy, for the treatment of various types of cancer, for a multitude of cosmetic and reconstructive procedures, and for the ablation of abnormal conductive pathways. For each of these conditions, management with lasers is comparable to, and potentially superior to, management with more traditional methods. PMID:28090508

  20. Theoretical Modeling for Hepatic Microwave Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Punit

    2010-01-01

    Thermal tissue ablation is an interventional procedure increasingly being used for treatment of diverse medical conditions. Microwave ablation is emerging as an attractive modality for thermal therapy of large soft tissue targets in short periods of time, making it particularly suitable for ablation of hepatic and other tumors. Theoretical models of the ablation process are a powerful tool for predicting the temperature profile in tissue and resultant tissue damage created by ablation devices. These models play an important role in the design and optimization of devices for microwave tissue ablation. Furthermore, they are a useful tool for exploring and planning treatment delivery strategies. This review describes the status of theoretical models developed for microwave tissue ablation. It also reviews current challenges, research trends and progress towards development of accurate models for high temperature microwave tissue ablation. PMID:20309393

  1. Trigeminal Neuralgia Due to a Small Meckel's Cave Epidermoid Tumor: Surgery Using an Extradural Corridor.

    PubMed

    Furtado, Sunil V; Hegde, Alangar S

    2009-09-01

    Tumors at the petrous apex are associated with a variety of symptoms, which most often involve the trigeminal nerve. The authors present a rare case of a small epidermoid tumor in Meckel's cave that caused medically refractory trigeminal neuralgia. The surgical challenge associated with approaches to such lesions is discussed. The skull base tumor was excised completely through a small temporal craniotomy. The practicality of neuronavigation in reaching the petrous apex using a small extradural window is presented.

  2. Inauguration of pediatric neurosurgery by Harvey W. Cushing: his contributions to the surgery of posterior fossa tumors in children. Historical vignette.

    PubMed

    Cohen-Gadol, Aaron A; Spencer, Dennis D

    2004-02-01

    Development of posterior fossa surgery remains Harvey Cushing's hallmark contribution to pediatric neurosurgery. During the era before Cushing, posterior fossa lesions were considered inoperable, and only osseous decompressive surgery was offered. The evolution of Cushing's surgical expertise from subtemporal decompressions to total extirpation of vascular fourth ventricular tumors, combined with a dramatic decrease in his operative mortality rate, reflects the maturation of modern neurosurgical techniques. A comprehensive review of the medical records of Cushing's pediatric patients treated between 1912 and 1932 revealed that procedures such as lateral ventricular puncture (to decrease cerebellar herniation), transvermian approach to midline tumors, and electrocoagulation were the key factors punctuating the path to his pioneering achievements in posterior fossa surgery. The outcome of such operations was improved by his recognition of the importance of tumor mural nodule in cyst recurrence, as well as elucidation of the histogenesis of pediatric posterior fossa tumors to tailor treatment including radiotherapy.

  3. Up-regulation of clusterin during phthalocyanine 4 photodynamic therapy-mediated apoptosis of tumor cells and ablation of mouse skin tumors.

    PubMed

    Kalka, K; Ahmad, N; Criswell, T; Boothman, D; Mukhtar, H

    2000-11-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) using the silicon phthalocyanine photo-sensitizer Pc 4 is an oxidative stress associated with the induction of apoptosis in many cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. The mechanisms of PDT-induced tumor cell killing leading to apoptosis are incompletely understood. Clusterin, a widely expressed glycoprotein, is induced in tissues regressing as a consequence of oxidative stress-mediated cell death. Treatment of apoptosis-sensitive human epidermoid carcinoma cells (A431) with PDT resulted in significant up-regulation of clusterin with a maximum at 12 h after treatment, whereas clusterin levels in Pc 4-PDT-treated, apoptosis-resistant, radiation-induced fibrosarcoma (RIF-1) cells remained unchanged. The i.v. administration of Pc 4 to mice bearing chemically or UVB radiation-induced skin papillomas, followed by light application, led to increased clusterin protein expression, peaking 24 h after the treatment, when tumor regression was apparently visible. These data, for the first time, demonstrate the involvement of clusterin in PDT-mediated cell death and during tumor regression. This may have relevance in improving the efficacy of PDT using pharmacological inducers of clusterin.

  4. Thyroid peroxidase (TPO) as a tumor marker in the follow-up of differentiated thyroid carcinomas with surgical and ablative radioiodine therapy. An assessment after evaluation.

    PubMed

    Franke, W G; Zöphel, K; Wunderlich, G; Kühne, A; Schimming, C; Kropp, J; Bredow, J

    1999-01-01

    The clinical significance of serum thyroid peroxidase (TPO) for differentiated thyroid carcinomas(DTA) is estimated differently. In our preliminary studies it was found that TPO presented information extending those that from hTG. For further clarification a prospective follow-up study was performed including 66 female and 14 male total thyroidectomized patients with DTA for the time course of TPO and human thyroglobulin (hTg) in relation to the ablative radioidine therapy (ART). In 34/50 evaluable cases TPO levels showed an approximately analogous time course with hTg. In relation to the extension of residues, some cases presented increasing of TPO and hTG after radioiodine treatment. 6/7 patients suffering from extended postoperative residues with high anti hTg levels but without elevated TPO concentrations showed distinctly elevated TPO values. Therefore, TPO seems to be an indicator for the destruction of normal thyroid cells or thyroid tumor cells. The clinical value of TPO seems to be in the time being limited to DTA due to false negative hTg values. However, it should be possible that TPO can did the evaluation of thyroid specific therapy.

  5. EF5 PET of Tumor Hypoxia: A Predictive Imaging Biomarker of Response to Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy (SABR) for Early Lung Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    Predictive Imaging Biomarker of Response to Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy (SABR) for Early Lung Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Billy W...CONTRACT NUMBER Response to Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy (SABR) for Early Lung Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-12-1-0236 5c...NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Purpose and scope: Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) has become a new standard of care for early stage lung

  6. Quantitative assessment of Cerenkov luminescence for radioguided brain tumor resection surgery.

    PubMed

    Klein, Justin S; Mitchell, Gregory; Cherry, Simon

    2017-03-13

    Cerenkov luminescence imaging (CLI) is a developing imaging modality that detects radiolabeled molecules via visible light emitted during the radioactive decay process. We used a Monte Carlo based computer simulation to quantitatively investigate CLI compared to direct detection of the ionizing radiation itself as an intraoperative imaging tool for assessment of brain tumor margins. Our brain tumor model consisted of a 1 mm spherical tumor remnant embedded up to 5 mm in depth below the surface of normal brain tissue. Tumor to background contrast ranging from 2:1 to 10:1 were considered. We quantified all decay signals (e+/-, gamma photon, Cerenkov photons) reaching the brain volume surface. CLI proved to be the most sensitive method for detecting the tumor volume in both imaging and non-imaging strategies as assessed by contrast-to-noise ratio and by receiver operating characteristic output of a channelized Hotelling observer.

  7. Fibre tip pH sensor for tumor detection during surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, Matthew R.; Schartner, Erik P.; Callen, David F.; Gill, P. Grantley; Monro, Tanya M.

    2015-05-01

    Surgery on tumours commonly involves a lumpectomy method, where a section of tissue containing the tumour is removed, to improve cosmetic outcomes and quality of life. Following surgery, the margins of the removed section are checked by pathology tests to ensure that the entire tumour has been removed. Unfortunately, approximately 15-20% of margins show incomplete removal and require a subsequent operation to remove the remaining tumour. Tumour detection during surgery could allow the removed section to be enlarged appropriately, reducing the likelihood of requiring subsequent surgery. A change in the extracellular pH in the vicinity of a tumour, when compared to normal tissue, has been shown previously in literature. We have fabricated an optical fibre tip pH sensor by embedding a fluorophore within a photopolymerised acrylamide polymer on the tip of a 200 micron diameter silica fibre. Preliminary measurements of human melanoma samples have shown a significant difference in the measured pH values between tumour and normal tissue. This demonstration paves to way to highly accurate margin detection during surgery.

  8. Robotically assisted intraoperative ultrasound with application to ablative therapy of liver cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boctor, Emad M.; Taylor, Russell H.; Fichtinger, Gabor; Choti, Michael A.

    2003-05-01

    Management of primary and metastatic tumors of the liver remains a significant challenge to the health care community worldwide. There has been an increasing interest in minimally invasive ablative approaches that typically require precise placement of the tissue ablator within the volumetric center of the tumor, in order to achieve adequate destruction. Standard clinical technique involves manual free hand ultrasonography (US) in conjunction with free hand positioning of the tissue ablator. Several investigational systems exist that simultaneously track a transcutaneous ultrasound (TCUS) probe and an ablator and provide visual overlay of the two on a computer screen, and some of those systems also register the TCUS images with pre-operative CT and/or MRI. Unfortunately, existing TCUS systems suffer from many limitations. TCUS fails to identify nearly half of all treatable liver lesions, whereas intraoperative or laparoscopic US provides excellent tissue differentiation. Furthermore, freehand manipulation of the US probe critically lacks the level of control, accuracy, and stability required for guiding liver ablation. Volumetric reconstruction from sparse and irregular 2D image data is suboptimal. Variable pressure from the sonographer's hand also causes anatomic deformation. Finally, maintaining optimal scanning position with respect to the target lesion is critical, but virtually impossible to achieve with freehand guidance. In response to these limitations, we propose the use of a fully encoded dexterous robotic arm to manipulate the US probe during surgery.

  9. Conservative Resectoscopic Surgery, Successful Delivery, and 60 Months of Follow-Up in a Patient with Endometrial Stromal Tumor with Sex-Cord-Like Differentiation.

    PubMed

    De Franciscis, Pasquale; Grauso, Flavio; Ambrosio, Domenico; Torella, Marco; Messalli, Enrico Michelino; Colacurci, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    Uterine tumors with sex-cord-like differentiation are extremely rare types of uterine stromal neoplasm. These tumors were classified into two groups with considerable practical relevance because clinical behaviour of uterine tumor resembling ovarian sex cord tumor (UTROSCT) differs widely from its closely related endometrial stromal tumors with sex-cord-like elements (ESTSCLE). Treatment and prognosis of these tumors are unresolved issues because of the exiguous number of reported cases. We describe a rare case of endometrial stromal tumor with sex-cord-like differentiation successfully treated by resectoscopic surgery and conservation of the uterus, in an infertile patient affected by metrorrhagia. This procedure resulted in a pregnancy immediately after treatment and in a successful delivery. During 60 months of follow-up no evidence of recurrence was observed.

  10. Conservative Resectoscopic Surgery, Successful Delivery, and 60 Months of Follow-Up in a Patient with Endometrial Stromal Tumor with Sex-Cord-Like Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    De Franciscis, Pasquale; Grauso, Flavio; Ambrosio, Domenico; Torella, Marco; Messalli, Enrico Michelino; Colacurci, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    Uterine tumors with sex-cord-like differentiation are extremely rare types of uterine stromal neoplasm. These tumors were classified into two groups with considerable practical relevance because clinical behaviour of uterine tumor resembling ovarian sex cord tumor (UTROSCT) differs widely from its closely related endometrial stromal tumors with sex-cord-like elements (ESTSCLE). Treatment and prognosis of these tumors are unresolved issues because of the exiguous number of reported cases. We describe a rare case of endometrial stromal tumor with sex-cord-like differentiation successfully treated by resectoscopic surgery and conservation of the uterus, in an infertile patient affected by metrorrhagia. This procedure resulted in a pregnancy immediately after treatment and in a successful delivery. During 60 months of follow-up no evidence of recurrence was observed. PMID:27213063

  11. Laser Ablation for Medical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Ken-Ichi

    Medical applications of laser are measurement, laser surgery, in-situ monitoring, and processing of medical devices. In this paper, author briefly reviews the trends of medical applications, describes some new applications, and then discuss about the future trends and problems of medical applications. At present, the domestic market of laser equipment for medical applications is nearly 1/10 of that for industrial applications, which has registered significant growth continuously. Laser surgery as a minimum invasive surgery under arthroscope is expected to decrease the pain of patients. Precise processing such as cutting and welding is suitable for manufacturing medical devices. Pulsed laser deposition has been successfully applied to the thin film coating. The corneal refractive surgery by ArF excimer laser has been widely accepted for its highly safe operation. Laser ablation for retinal implant in the visual prosthesis is one of the promising applications of laser ablation in medicine. New applications with femtosecond laser are expected in the near future.

  12. BSA-directed synthesis of CuS nanoparticles as a biocompatible photothermal agent for tumor ablation in vivo.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cai; Fu, Yan-Yan; Zhang, Xuejun; Yu, Chunshui; Zhao, Yan; Sun, Shao-Kai

    2015-08-07

    Photothermal therapy as a physical therapeutic approach has greatly attracted research interest due to its negligible systemic effects. Among the various photothermal agents, CuS nanoparticles have been widely used due to their easy preparation, low cost, high stability and strong absorption in the NIR region. However, the ambiguous biotoxicity of CuS nanoparticles limited their bio-application. So it is highly desirable to develop biocompatible CuS photothermal agents with the potential of clinical translation. Herein, we report a novel method to synthesize biocompatible CuS nanoparticles for photothermal therapy using bovine serum albumin (BSA) as a template via mimicking biomaterialization processes. Owing to the inherent biocompatibility of BSA, the toxicity assays in vitro and in vivo showed that BSA-CuS nanoparticles possessed good biocompatibility. In vitro and in vivo photothermal therapies were performed and good results were obtained. The bulk of the HeLa cells treated with BSA-CuS nanoparticles under laser irradiation (808 nm) were killed, and the tumor tissues of mice were also successfully eliminated without causing any obvious systemic damage. In summary, a novel strategy for the synthesis of CuS nanoparticles was developed using BSA as the template, and the excellent biocompatibility and efficient photothermal therapy effects of BSA-CuS nanoparticles show great potential as an ideal photothermal agent for cancer treatment.

  13. Local ablative therapies in HCC: percutaneous ethanol injection and radiofrequency ablation.

    PubMed

    Mahnken, Andreas H; Bruners, Philipp; Günther, Rolf W

    2009-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most common primary hepatic malignancy. Surgery and transarterial chemoembolization have for many years dominated the local treatment of HCC. The introduction of image-guided percutaneous techniques for local tumor ablation changed the treatment of liver cancer. Percutaneous ethanol injection (PEI) and radiofrequency ablation (RFA) have both successfully been employed in the treatment of HCC. In current guidelines both techniques are recommended as standard therapy in limited liver cancer. From the current literature both techniques have to be considered safe and effective in the treatment of HCC. Several randomized trials showed RFA to be superior to PEI for treating small HCC. Moreover, several studies analyzed survival after PEI or RFA in comparison with surgery, proving interventional therapy to be a serious competitor of resection. With introduction of combined interventional therapies including transarterial chemoembolization, PEI and RFA survival was improved further. In this article, we provide an insight into the technical basics of PEI and RFA and review the clinical results and indications of these interventional techniques in the treatment of HCC.

  14. Catheter Ablation

    MedlinePlus

    ... you during the procedure. Machines will measure your heart’s activity. All types of ablation require cardiac catheterization to place flexible tubes, or catheters, inside your heart to make the scars. Your doctor will clean ...

  15. Virtual wall-based haptic-guided teleoperated surgical robotic system for single-port brain tumor removal surgery.

    PubMed

    Seung, Sungmin; Choi, Hongseok; Jang, Jongseong; Kim, Young Soo; Park, Jong-Oh; Park, Sukho; Ko, Seong Young

    2017-01-01

    This article presents a haptic-guided teleoperation for a tumor removal surgical robotic system, so-called a SIROMAN system. The system was developed in our previous work to make it possible to access tumor tissue, even those that seat deeply inside the brain, and to remove the tissue with full maneuverability. For a safe and accurate operation to remove only tumor tissue completely while minimizing damage to the normal tissue, a virtual wall-based haptic guidance together with a medical image-guided control is proposed and developed. The virtual wall is extracted from preoperative medical images, and the robot is controlled to restrict its motion within the virtual wall using haptic feedback. Coordinate transformation between sub-systems, a collision detection algorithm, and a haptic-guided teleoperation using a virtual wall are described in the context of using SIROMAN. A series of experiments using a simplified virtual wall are performed to evaluate the performance of virtual wall-based haptic-guided teleoperation. With haptic guidance, the accuracy of the robotic manipulator's trajectory is improved by 57% compared to one without. The tissue removal performance is also improved by 21% ( p < 0.05). The experiments show that virtual wall-based haptic guidance provides safer and more accurate tissue removal for single-port brain surgery.

  16. Towards the clinical integration of an image-guided navigation system for percutaneous liver tumor ablation using freehand 2D ultrasound images.

    PubMed

    Spinczyk, Dominik

    2015-01-01

    Primary and metastatic liver tumors constitute a significant challenge for contemporary medicine. Several improvements are currently being developed and implemented to advance image navigation systems for percutaneous liver focal lesion ablation in clinical applications at the diagnosis, planning and intervention stages. First, the automatic generation of an anatomically accurate parametric model of the preoperative patient liver was proposed in addition to a method to visually evaluate and make manual corrections. Second, a marker was designed to facilitate rigid registration between the model of the preoperative patient liver and the patient during treatment. A specific approach was implemented and tested for rigid mapping by continuously tracking a set of uniquely identified markers and by accounting for breathing motion, facilitating the determination of the optimal breathing phase for needle insertion into the liver tissue. Third, to overcome the challenge of tracking the absolute position of the planned target point, an intra-operative ultrasound (US) system was integrated based on the Public Software Library for UltraSound and OpenIGTLink protocol, which tracks breathing motion in a 2D time sequence of US images. Additionally, to improve the visibility of liver focal lesions, an approach to determine spatio-temporal correspondence between the US sequence and the 4D computed tomography (CT) examination was developed, implemented and tested. This proposed method of processing anatomical model, rigid registration approach and the implemented US tracking and fusion method were tested in 20 anonymized CT and in 10 clinical cases, respectively. The presented methodology can be applied and used with any older 2D US systems, which are currently commonly used in clinical practice.

  17. Lung Cancer Ablation: Technologies and Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Erica S.; Dupuy, Damian E.

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of lung cancers in 2012 is estimated to reach 226,160 new cases, with only a third of patients suitable surgical candidates. Tumor ablation has emerged as an important and efficacious treatment option for nonsurgical lung cancer patients. This localized minimally invasive therapy is best suited for small oligonodular lesions or favorably located metastatic tumors. Radiofrequency ablation has been in use for over a decade, and newer modalities including microwave ablation, cryoablation, and irreversible electroporation have emerged as additional treatment options for patients. Ablation therapies can offer patients and clinicians a repeatable and effective therapy for palliation and, in some cases, cure of thoracic malignancies. This article discusses the available technologies and techniques available for tumor ablation of thoracic malignancies including patient selection, basic aspects of procedure technique, imaging follow-up, treatment outcomes, and comparisons between various therapies. PMID:24436530

  18. Lung cancer ablation: technologies and techniques.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Erica S; Dupuy, Damian E

    2013-06-01

    The incidence of lung cancers in 2012 is estimated to reach 226,160 new cases, with only a third of patients suitable surgical candidates. Tumor ablation has emerged as an important and efficacious treatment option for nonsurgical lung cancer patients. This localized minimally invasive therapy is best suited for small oligonodular lesions or favorably located metastatic tumors. Radiofrequency ablation has been in use for over a decade, and newer modalities including microwave ablation, cryoablation, and irreversible electroporation have emerged as additional treatment options for patients. Ablation therapies can offer patients and clinicians a repeatable and effective therapy for palliation and, in some cases, cure of thoracic malignancies. This article discusses the available technologies and techniques available for tumor ablation of thoracic malignancies including patient selection, basic aspects of procedure technique, imaging follow-up, treatment outcomes, and comparisons between various therapies.

  19. Reconstruction of the natural history of metastatic cancer and assessment of the effects of surgery: Gompertzian growth of the primary tumor.

    PubMed

    Hanin, Leonid; Bunimovich-Mendrazitsky, Svetlana

    2014-01-01

    This work deals with retrospective reconstruction of the individual natural history of solid cancer and assessment of the effects of treatment on metastatic progression. This is achieved through a mathematical model of cancer progression accounting for the growth of the primary tumor, shedding of metastases, their dormancy and growth at secondary sites. To describe dynamics of the primary tumor, we used the Gompertz law, a parsimonious model of tumor growth accounting for its saturation. Parameters of the model were estimated from the age and volume of the primary tumor at surgery and volumes of detectable bone metastases collected from one breast cancer patient and one prostate cancer patient. This allowed us to estimate, for each patient, the ages at cancer onset and inception of all detected metastases, the expected metastasis latency time, parameters of the Gompertzian growth of the primary tumor, and the rates of growth of metastases before and after surgery. We found that for both patients: (1) onset of metastasis occurred when primary tumor was undetectable; (2) inception of all surveyed metastases except one occurred before surgery; and most importantly, (3) resection of the primary tumor led to a dramatic increase in the rate of growth of metastases. The model provides an excellent fit to the observed volumes of bone metastases in both patients. Our results agree well with those obtained previously based on exponential growth of the primary tumor, which serves as model validation. Our findings support the notion of metastatic dormancy and indirectly confirm the existence of stem-like cancer cells in breast and prostate tumors. We also explored the logistic law of primary tumor growth; however, it degenerated into the exponential law for both patients analyzed. The conclusions of this work are supported by a vast body of experimental, clinical and epidemiological knowledge accumulated over the last century.

  20. Short report: interim safety results for a phase II trial measuring the integration of stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) plus surgery for early stage non-small cell lung cancer (MISSILE-NSCLC).

    PubMed

    Palma, David A; Nguyen, Timothy K; Kwan, Keith; Gaede, Stewart; Landis, Mark; Malthaner, Richard; Fortin, Dalilah; Louie, Alexander V; Frechette, Eric; Rodrigues, George B; Yaremko, Brian; Yu, Edward; Dar, A Rashid; Lee, Ting-Yim; Gratton, Al; Warner, Andrew; Ward, Aaron; Inculet, Richard

    2017-01-27

    A phase II trial was launched to evaluate if neoadjuvant stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) before surgery improves oncologic outcomes in patients with stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We report a mandated interim safety analysis for the first 10 patients who completed protocol treatment. Operable patients with biopsy-proven T1-2 N0 NSCLC were eligible. SABR was delivered using a risk-adapted fractionation (54Gy/3 fractions, 55/5 or 60/8). Surgical resection was planned 10 weeks later at a high-volume center (>200 lung cancer resections annually). Patients were imaged with dynamic positron emission tomography-computed tomography scans using (18)F-fludeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG-PET CT) and dynamic contrast-enhanced CT before SABR and again before surgery. Toxicity was recorded using CTCAE version 4.0. Twelve patients were enrolled between 09/2014 and 09/2015. Two did not undergo surgery, due to patient or surgeon preference; neither patient has developed toxicity or recurrence. For the 10 patients completing both treatments, median age was 70 (range: 54-76), 60% had T1 disease, and 60% had adenocarcinoma. Median FEV1 was 73% predicted (range: 54-87%). Median time to surgery post-SABR was 10.1 weeks (range: 9.3-15.6 weeks). Surgery consisted of lobectomy (n = 8) or wedge resection (n = 2). Median follow-up post-SABR was 6.3 months. After combined treatment, the rate of acute grade 3-4 toxicity was 10%. There was no post-operative mortality at 90 days. The small sample size included herein precludes any definitive conclusions regarding overall toxicity rates until larger datasets are available. However, these data may inform others who are designing or conducting similar trials.

  1. Second Tumor Induction Risk in IMRT for Prostate Cancer: An Unbalanced Comparison Between Surgery and Radiotherapy?

    PubMed

    Calandrino, Riccardo; Perna, Lucia; Belli, Maria Luisa; Botti, Andrea; Cattaneo, Mauro; Fiorino, Claudio; Cozzarini, Cesare; Iori, Mauro

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the risk of second tumor induction for prostate patients treated with volumetric modulated arc therapy in age classes 50-70. Based on both age-dependent models and doses to critical organs, the risk of second tumor induction was evaluated simulating the small field (prostate and seminal vesicles) and large field (whole pelvis) for Helical Tomotherapy and Rapid Arc. The doses to the organs closest to the treatment volume were derived from treatment planning system data. Whereas, due to the lack of calculation algorithms where leakage and internal radiation scattering are unreliable at a large distance from target, the doses to the organs outside the treatment volume were measured in an anthropomorphic phantom. Doses from Image Guided Radiotherapy (IGRT) were also assessed on phantom measurements. The Lifetime Attributable Risk (LAR) for second tumor induction increases from 2.2 to 13.7% as irradiated volume increases and age decreases. IGRT could add a non-negligible factor to the risk when daily set-up verification with high-resolution modality is included. As prostate cancer is detected earlier, the probability of an increase in early stage patients rises, and life expectancy thus increases. Radiotherapy has improved its capability in the tailoring of the dose around the target at the cost of a greater dose to surrounding organs, thus increasing the risk of second tumor induction, especially for those patients expected to survive 15 y or more.

  2. [Pulmonary Carcinoid Tumor with Cushing's Syndrome in a Patient who Underwent Pulmonary Resection by Video-Assisted Thoracic Surgery;Report of a Case].

    PubMed

    Sato, Hiroshi; Mishina, Taijiro; Miyajima, Masahiro; Watanabe, Atsushi

    2015-07-01

    Pulmonary carcinoid tumor with Cushing's syndrome is comparatively rare disease. It is difficult to make an early diagnosis due to small size lesion in its early stage. We report a case of pulmonary carcinoid tumor with Cushing's syndrome successfully localised by positron emission tomography/computed tomography and was resected in the early stage. The levels of serum cortisol and adrenocorticotropic hormone( ACTH) decreased immediately after surgery, and the symptoms of Cushing's syndrome were relieved.

  3. Radiosurgery to the Postoperative Tumor Bed for Metastatic Carcinoma Versus Whole Brain Radiation After Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Scheitler-Ring, Kristen; Ge, Bin; Petroski, Greg; Biedermann, Gregory

    2016-01-01

    Background The treatment paradigm from postoperative whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT) to post-operative stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) to the tumor bed has shifted with little data to evaluate whether each treatment modality confers equivalent tumor control and survival outcomes. Methods Patients with surgical resection of single brain metastases from January 2010 to December 2014 were treated postoperatively with either WBRT or SRS. Retrospective patient data was compared for local control, distant brain recurrence, overall survival, and radiation complications. Results Forty-six received WBRT, and 37 received tumor bed SRS. Twelve of 35 (34%) SRS patients experienced local recurrence compared to 17 of 31 (55%) WBRT patients (p = 0.09). The median survival was 440 days (14.7 months) for SRS and 202 days (6.7 months) for WBRT (p = 0.062, log-rank). SRS demonstrated improved survival benefit in the first six months (p = 0.0034; Wilcoxon). Radiation-related adverse changes after SRS (22%) were not statistically different from WBRT (8.7%) (p = 0.152). Age (p = 0.08), systemic cancer status (p = 0.30), Graded Prognostic Assessment (p = 0.28), number of brain metastases at diagnosis (p = 0.65), tumor volume at diagnosis (p = 0.13), new brain lesions (p = 0.74) and neurologic versus systemic cause of death (p = 0.11) did not differ between the groups. Conclusions Following surgical resection, tumor bed SRS can be used effectively in lieu of WBRT to treat brain metastases with comparable local control and distant control and without significantly more adverse events. PMID:28003949

  4. Surgery for retroperitoneal relapse in the setting of a prior retroperitoneal lymph node dissection for germ cell tumor

    PubMed Central

    Gotto, Geoffrey T.; Carver, Brett S.; Sogani, Pramod; Sheinfeld, Joel

    2010-01-01

    Recognition of the therapeutic role of retroperitoneal lymph node dissection (RPLND) in the setting of testicular germ cell tumors (GCTs) is of utmost importance. Although the histologic findings of RPLND provide diagnostic and prognostic information, the adequacy of initial RPLND is an independent predictor of clinical outcome. Despite the advent of effective cisplatin-based chemotherapy for testicular GCTs, patients who have undergone suboptimal surgery at the time of initial RPLND are compromised. Despite the initial enthusiasm surrounding anatomic mapping studies, the use of modified RPLND templates has the potential to leave a significant number of patients with unresected retroperitoneal disease. Teratomatous elements are particularly common. Patients with retroperitoneal relapse following initial RPLND should be treated with reoperative RPLND and chemotherapy and can expect long term survival rates nearing 70% when treated in tertiary centers by experienced surgeons. PMID:20535295

  5. First Report of Awake Craniotomy of a Famous Musician: Suprasellar Tumor Surgery of Pianist Clara Haskil in 1942.

    PubMed

    Gasenzer, Elena Romana; Kanat, Ayhan; Neugebauer, Edmund A M

    2017-02-20

    Clara Haskil (January 7, 1895-December 7, 1960) was one of the most famous female pianists of the 20th century. In her life and work she set new standards in piano playing. However, her career was beset by poor health and the adversities of two world wars. In her lifetime Haskil had three major disorders: juvenile scoliosis requiring treatment in her adolescence, a tumor of the sellar region requiring surgery at age 47 years, and a traumatic brain injury causing her death at the age of 65. Her medical history illustrates the development of surgical methods and rehabilitation in medicine before and after World War II. At an early age, she spent a year in a nursing home for orthopedic diseases due to scoliosis. In 1942, when she was 47 years old, she displayed the first symptoms of a suprasellar brain tumor: headache and hemianopsia. The famous surgeon Marcel David performed surgery on her without general anesthesia while Haskil mentally played a Mozart piano concerto as a neuronal representation to control her memory and mental abilities. Only 3 months after that operation she played a Mozart piano concerto at a concert that began her career as a great interpreter of Mozart. Her neurologic rehabilitation was remarkable and highlighted new methods in the field. In 1960, she traveled to Brussels for a concert. In the train station she stumbled on the stairs and hit her head on one of the steps. Skull fracture and intracranial hematoma were diagnosed. Doctors tried to operate on her but she lost consciousness and died. Haskil created new styles in piano playing, and her medical history offers indications of new concepts in neurosurgery.

  6. Gamma Knife surgery for tumor-related trigeminal neuralgia: targeting both the tumor and the trigeminal root exit zone in a single session.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung Kwon; Kim, Dong Gyu; Se, Young-Bem; Kim, Jin Wook; Kim, Yong Hwy; Chung, Hyun-Tai; Paek, Sun Ha

    2016-10-01

    OBJECTIVE Gamma Knife surgery (GKS) represents an alternative treatment for patients with tumor-related trigeminal neuralgia (TRTN). However, in previous studies, the primary GKS target was limited to mass lesions. The authors evaluated whether GKS could target both the tumor and the trigeminal root exit zone (REZ) in a single session while providing durable pain relief and minimizing radiation dose-related complications for TRTN patients. METHODS The authors' institutional review board approved the retrospective analysis of data from 15 consecutive patients (6 men and 9 women, median age 67 years, range 45-79 years) with TRTN who had undergone GKS. In all cases, the radiation was delivered in a single session targeting both the tumor and trigeminal REZ. The authors assessed the clinical outcomes, including the extent of pain relief, durability of the treatment response, and complications. Radiation doses to organs at risk (OARs), including the brainstem and the cranial nerve VII-VIII complex, were analyzed as doses received by 2% or 50% of the tissue volume and the tissue volume covered by a dose of 12 Gy (V12Gy). RESULTS The median length of clinical follow-up was 38 months (range 12-78 months). Pain relief with GKS was initially achieved in 14 patients (93.3%) and at the last follow-up in 13 patients (86.7%). The actuarial recurrence-free survival rates were 93%, 83%, and 69% at 1, 3, and 5 years after GKS, respectively. Persistent facial numbness was observed in 3 patients (20.0%). There were no complications such as facial weakness, altered taste function, hearing impairment, and balance difficulties indicating impaired function of the cranial nerve VII-VIII complex. The V12Gy in the brainstem was less than or equal to 0.24 cm(3) in all patients. There were no significant differences in any OAR values in the brainstem between patients with and without facial numbness after GKS. CONCLUSIONS The strategy of performing GKS for both tumor and trigeminal REZ in a

  7. Possible role for cryoballoon ablation of right atrial appendage tachycardia when conventional ablation fails.

    PubMed

    Amasyali, Basri; Kilic, Ayhan

    2015-06-01

    Focal atrial tachycardia arising from the right atrial appendage usually responds well to radiofrequency ablation; however, successful ablation in this anatomic region can be challenging. Surgical excision of the right atrial appendage has sometimes been necessary to eliminate the tachycardia and prevent or reverse the resultant cardiomyopathy. We report the case of a 48-year-old man who had right atrial appendage tachycardia resistant to multiple attempts at ablation with use of conventional radiofrequency energy guided by means of a 3-dimensional mapping system. The condition led to cardiomyopathy in 3 months. The arrhythmia was successfully ablated with use of a 28-mm cryoballoon catheter that had originally been developed for catheter ablation of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. To our knowledge, this is the first report of cryoballoon ablation without isolation of the right atrial appendage. It might also be an alternative to epicardial ablation or surgery when refractory atrial tachycardia originates from the right atrial appendage.

  8. Correlations between the clinical, histological and neurophysiological examinations in patients before and after parotid gland tumor surgery: verification of facial nerve transmission.

    PubMed

    Wiertel-Krawczuk, Agnieszka; Huber, Juliusz; Wojtysiak, Magdalena; Golusiński, Wojciech; Pieńkowski, Piotr; Golusiński, Paweł

    2015-05-01

    Parotid gland tumor surgery sometimes leads to facial nerve paralysis. Malignant more than benign tumors determine nerve function preoperatively, while postoperative observations based on clinical, histological and neurophysiological studies have not been reported in detail. The aims of this pilot study were evaluation and correlations of histological properties of tumor (its size and location) and clinical and neurophysiological assessment of facial nerve function pre- and post-operatively (1 and 6 months). Comparative studies included 17 patients with benign (n = 13) and malignant (n = 4) tumors. Clinical assessment was based on House-Brackmann scale (H-B), neurophysiological diagnostics included facial electroneurography [ENG, compound muscle action potential (CMAP)], mimetic muscle electromyography (EMG) and blink-reflex examinations (BR). Mainly grade I of H-B was recorded both pre- (n = 13) and post-operatively (n = 12) in patients with small (1.5-2.4 cm) benign tumors located in superficial lobes. Patients with medium size (2.5-3.4 cm) malignant tumors in both lobes were scored at grade I (n = 2) and III (n = 2) pre- and mainly VI (n = 4) post-operatively. CMAP amplitudes after stimulation of mandibular marginal branch were reduced at about 25 % in patients with benign tumors after surgery. In the cases of malignant tumors CMAPs were not recorded following stimulation of any branch. A similar trend was found for BR results. H-B and ENG results revealed positive correlations between the type of tumor and surgery with facial nerve function. Neurophysiological studies detected clinically silent facial nerve neuropathy of mandibular marginal branch in postoperative period. Needle EMG, ENG and BR examinations allow for the evaluation of face muscles reinnervation and facial nerve regeneration.

  9. Treatment for Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors (GISTs) Based on Tumor Spread

    MedlinePlus

    ... These treatments may include radiofrequency ablation (RFA; using electric currents to heat the tumor), or ethanol ablation ( ... Life Events College Relay For Life Donate a Car Ways to Give Memorial Giving Planned Giving Leadership ...

  10. [Combined spinal epidural anesthesia during endoprosthetic surgeries for bone tumors in old-age children].

    PubMed

    Matinian, N V; Saltanov, A I

    2005-01-01

    Thirty-five patients (ASA II-III) aged 12 to 17 years, diagnosed as having osteogenic sarcoma and Ewing's sarcoma localizing in the femur and tibia, were examined. Surgery was performed as sectoral resection of the affected bone along with knee joint endoprosthesis. Surgical intervention was made under combined spinal and epidural anesthesia (CSEA) with sedation, by using the methods for exact dosing of propofol (6-4 mg/kg x h). During intervention, a child's respiration remains is kept spontaneous with oxygen insufflation through a nasal catheter. CSEA was performed in two-segmental fashion. The epidural space was first catheterized. After administration of a test dose, 0.5% marcaine spinal was injected into dermatomas below the subarachnoidal space, depending on body weight (3.0-4.0 ml). Sensory blockade developed following 3-5 min and lasted 90-120 min, thereafter a local anesthetic (bupivacaine) or its mixture plus promedole was epidurally administered. ??Anesthesia was effective in all cases, motor blockade. During surgery, there was a moderate arterial hypotension that did not require the use of vasopressors. The acid-alkali balance suggested the adequacy of spontaneous respiration. The only significant complication we observed was atony of the bladder that requires its catheterization till the following day. An epidural catheter makes it possible to effect adequate postoperative analgesia.

  11. [A case report of the use of laparoscopic surgery to remove an adrenal tumor following resection of sigmoid colon cancer].

    PubMed

    Okano, Miho; Yasui, Masayoshi; Nishino, Masaya; Hosoda, Yohei; Nagai, Kenichi; Kim, Yongkook; Tsujinaka, Toshimasa

    2014-11-01

    A 58-year-old woman underwent sigmoidectomy and partial cystectomy for sigmoid colon cancer following colostomy. The final staging of the tumor was T3, N1, tub2, M0, fStage IIIa. She received 6 courses of CapeOX (oxaliplatin 130mg/m², capecitabine 200mg/m²) as adjuvant chemotherapy, which was discontinued because of severe general fatigue. At the same time, an increase in the levels of serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) was detected and abdominal computed tomography (CT) revealed an expanded adrenal mass. Since whole-body ¹⁸F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET/CT) showed no evidence of multiple organ metastases except for the right adrenal tumor, a solitary adrenal metastasis from sigmoid colon cancer was strongly suspected. Hence, colostomy closure and laparoscopic adrenalectomy were concurrently performed. Histological examination revealed non-functional adrenal adenoma. Therefore, laparoscopic surgery was a reasonable choice even in this complex case.

  12. Giant cell tumor of the bone: aggressive case initially treated with denosumab and intralesional surgery.

    PubMed

    von Borstel, Donald; A Taguibao, Roberto; A Strle, Nicholas; E Burns, Joseph

    2017-04-01

    Giant cell tumor of the bone (GCTB) is a locally aggressive benign tumor, which has historically been treated with wide surgical excision. We report a case of a 29-year-old male with histology-proven GCTB of the distal ulna. The initial imaging study was a contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination of the left wrist, which was from an outside facility performed before presenting to our institution. On the initial MRI, the lesion had homogenous T2-hyperintense and T1-hypointense signal with expansive remodeling of the osseous contour. A radiographic study performed upon presentation to our institution 1 month later showed progression of the lesion with atypical imaging characteristics. After confirming the diagnosis, denosumab therapy was implemented allowing for reconstitution of bone and intralesional treatment. The patient was treated with five doses of denosumab over the duration of 7 weeks. Therapeutic changes of the GCTB were evaluated by radiography and a post-treatment MRI. This MRI was interpreted as suspicious for worsening disease due to the imaging appearance of intralesional signal heterogeneity, increased perilesional fluid-like signal, and circumferential cortical irregularity. However, on subsequent intralesional curettage and bone autografting 6 weeks later, no giant cells were seen on the specimen. Thus, the appearance on the MRI, rather than representing a manifestation of lesion aggressiveness or a non-responding tumor, conversely represented the imaging appearance of a positive response to denosumab therapy. On follow-up evaluation, 5 months after intralesional treatment, the patient had recurrent disease and is now scheduled for wide-excision with joint prosthesis.

  13. Surgery of the anterior skull base: total ethmoidectomy for malignant ethmoidal tumors.

    PubMed

    Bebear, J P; Darrouzet, V; Stoll, D

    1992-01-01

    The authors report their 17-year experience of total ethmoidectomy using a combined rhinological and neurosurgical approach. As a result of new imaging methods significant progress has been made in the field of pre-operative topographic diagnosis as well as in the operative procedure itself. The optimal skull base reconstruction, which consists of epicranial graft and cryopreserved bone homograft, seems to reduce operative morbidity and mortality. The combined approach technique is shown to be successful in the treatment of both adenocarcinomas and olfactory bulb tumors. However, epidermoid carcinomas still have a poor prognosis due to frequent local recurrences and visceral metastases.

  14. Skull Metastasis of Gastric Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor Successfully Managed by Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Park, Inkeun; Chung, Dong Hae; Yoo, Chan Jong; Shin, Dong Bok

    2017-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are rare, but are the most common mesenchymal neoplasm of the gastrointestinal tract. The most common sites of metastasis are liver and peritoneum, while bone metastasis is rare. We report on a patient with skull metastasis after seven years of treatment with imatinib for metastatic GIST. She underwent metastasectomy consisting of craniectomy with excision of the mass, and cranioplasty and continued treatment with imatinib and sunitinib, without evidence of cranial recurrence. She died of pneumonia sepsis one year after metastasectomy. Skull metastasis of GIST is a very rare presentation, and an aggressive multidisciplinary approach should be considered whenever possible. PMID:28061498

  15. [Ovarian tumor in a koi carp (Cyprinus carpio): Diagnosis, surgery, postoperative care and tumour classification].

    PubMed

    Lewisch, E; Reifinger, M; Schmidt, P; El-Matbouli, M

    2014-01-01

    Although ovarian tumour in the koi (Cyprinus carpio) does not appear to be an uncommon condition, its occurrence and therapy has rarely been reported. In the present case, the decision for surgery was based on clinical and sonographic findings of an intracoelomic mass. We used tricaine methansulfonate for the anaesthesia. Laparotomy was performed by ventral access and an ovarian tumour of 12-cm diameter was removed. The wound was sutured in two layers using Vicryl®. In addition to the application of an analgesic, an antibiotic and vitamins, the postoperative conditions the patient was kept under were adapted to support wound healing. The fish recovered uneventfully and was clinically healthy during the 16-month observation period. Based on the histological findings, the tumour was diagnosed as a thecoma. Investigations using antibodies against vimentin, cytokeratin, S 100 and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) failed to provide reliable results.

  16. Percutaneous Radiofrequency Ablation for Treatment of Recurrent Retroperitoneal Liposarcoma

    SciTech Connect

    Keil, Sebastian Bruners, Philipp; Brehmer, Bernhard; Mahnken, Andreas Horst

    2008-07-15

    Percutaneous CT-guided radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is becoming more and more established in the treatment of various neoplasms, including retroperitoneal tumors of the kidneys and the adrenal glands. We report the case of RFA in a patient suffering from the third relapse of a retroperitoneal liposarcoma in the left psoas muscle. After repeated surgical resection and supportive radiation therapy of a primary retroperitoneal liposarcoma and two surgically treated recurrences, including replacement of the ureter by a fraction of the ileum, there was no option for further surgery. Thus, we considered RFA as the most suitable treatment option. Monopolar RFA was performed in a single session with a 2-cm umbrella-shaped LeVeen probe. During a 27-month follow-up period the patient remained free of tumor.

  17. Preliminary oncological results of endosopic laser surgery in advanced head and neck tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker-Schreyer, Antonio; Sadick, Haneen; Juncker, Cathrine; Bergler, Wolfgang; Hoermann, Karl

    1998-01-01

    Lasersurgery has established itself in the treatment of minor tumors (T1 - T2) of the upper aerodigestive tract. However, advanced carcinomas of the head and neck (T3 - T4) are generally treated with conventional surgical procedures which include pharyngolaryngectomy. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the oncological outcome of endoscopic lasersurgery in advanced head and neck tumors and to compare the results with conventional surgical procedures. Between January 1994 to December 1996, 86 patients with advanced squamous cell carcinomas of the larynx and hypopharynx underwent endoscopic lasersurgery instead of pharyngolaryngectomy as a curative measure. Besides the recurrence and survival rate, the necessity of tracheostomy, postoperative complications and the mean duration of hospitalization were documented. The results showed that the recurrence and survival rate were similar or even better after conventional pharyngolaryngectomy, whereas the patients' postoperative rehabilitation was better after lasersurgery. In this contribution the indication for lasersurgical intervention or pharyngolaryngectomy in advanced carcinomas of the head and neck is discussed.

  18. [Severe lower gastrointestinal bleeding due to GIST tumor. Radiological embolization and surgery].

    PubMed

    Navas, Diana; Ríos, Antonio; Febrero, Beatriz; Rodríguez, José Manuel; Lloret, Francisco; Parrilla, Pascual

    2014-01-01

    Antecedentes: los tumores del estroma gastrointestinal (GIST) se identificaron hace muy poco tiempo. Son tumores que no suelen alertar con síntomas mientras permanecen en fase localizada, operable y curable. Aunque son poco frecuentes, cuando no se diagnostican y tratan oportunamente son muy agresivos. Su manifestación clínica más común es la hemorragia gastrointestinal por erosión de la mucosa, pero su presentación como hemorragia baja del tubo digestivo severa es excepcional. Caso clínico: se comunica un caso de hemorragia baja del tubo digestivo severa estabilizada por radiología intervencionista, que posteriormente requirió cirugía para su tratamiento definitivo. Conclusiones: la embolización radiológica está cada vez más difundida como tratamiento de hemorragias en distintos sitios porque permite la estabilización hemodinámica de los pacientes. No hay que olvidar, sin embargo, que en los casos de hemorragia baja del tubo digestivo, de origen desconocido, es necesario investigar las posibles causas.

  19. Radiofrequency Ablation of Lung Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Radiography) - Chest Computed Tomography (CT) - Chest Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - ... note RadiologyInfo.org is not a medical facility. Please contact your physician with specific medical ...

  20. Radiofrequency Ablation of Lung Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... need to have a tube inserted in the space between the collapsed lung and the chest wall to remove the air and allow the lung to re-expand. If ... to a few days (usually) to drain the air allowing the small hole in the lung to ... may collect in the space between the lung and its covering membrane. If ...

  1. Radiofrequency Ablation of Liver Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... large cylinder-shaped tube surrounded by a circular magnet. You will lie on a moveable examination table that slides into the center of the magnet. Some MRI units, called short-bore systems , are ...

  2. A comparison study between gross tumor volumes defined by preoperative magnetic resonance imaging, postoperative specimens, and tumor bed for radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Aiping; Li, Jianbin; Wang, Wei; Wang, Yongsheng; Mu, Dianbin; Chen, Zhaoqiu; Shao, Qian; Li, Fengxiang

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: The identification and contouring of target volume is important for breast-conserving therapy. The aim of the study was to compare preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), postoperative pathology, excised specimens’ (ES) size, and tumor bed (TB) delineation as methods for determining the gross tumor volume (GTV) for radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery (BCS). Methods: Thirty-three patients with breast cancer who underwent preoperative MRI and radiotherapy after BCS were enrolled. The GTVs determined by MRI, pathology, and the ES were defined as GTVMRI, GTVPAT, and GTVES, respectively. GTVMRI+1 was defined as a 1.0-cm margin around the GTVMRI. The radiation oncologist delineated GTV of the TB (GTVTB) using planning computed tomography according to ≥5 surgical clips placed in the lumpectomy cavity (LC). Results: The median GTVMRI, GTVMRI+1, GTVPAT, GTVES, and GTVTB were 0.97 cm3 (range, 0.01–6.88), 12.58 cm3 (range, 3.90–34.13), 0.97 cm3 (range, 0.01–6.36), 15.46 cm3 (range, 1.15–70.69), and 19.24 cm3 (range, 4.72–54.33), respectively. There were no significant differences between GTVMRI and GTVPAT, GTVMRI+1 and GTVES, GTVES and GTVTB (P = 0.188, 0.070, and 0.264, respectively). GTVMRI is positively related with GTVPAT. However, neither GTVES nor GTVTB correlated with GTVMRI (P = 0.071 and 0.378, respectively). Furthermore, neither GTVES nor GTVTB correlated with GTVMRI+1 (P = 0.068 and 0.375, respectively). Conclusion: When ≥5 surgical clips were placed in the LC for BCS, the volume of TB was consistent with the volume of ES. Neither the volume of TB nor the volume of ES correlated significantly with the volume of tumor defined by preoperative MRI. PMID:28079816

  3. MR-guided Neurolytic Celiac Plexus Ablation: An Evaluation of Effect and Injection Spread Pattern in Cancer Patients with Celiac Tumor Infiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Akural, Etem; Ojala, Risto O.; Jaervimaeki, Voitto; Kariniemi, Juho; Tervonen, Osmo A.; Blanco Sequeiros, Roberto

    2013-04-15

    ObjectiveThe purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility, the initial accuracy, and the effects of the MR-guided neurolytic celiac plexus ablation as a method to treat cancer-induced chronic abdominal pain. Thirteen celiac plexus ablations were performed for 12 patients. A 0.23-T open MRI scanner with optical navigation was used for procedural guidance. As an adjunct to the MR-guided needle positioning, the needle location was confirmed with saline injection and consequent MR imaging (STIR sequence). The spread of the ablative injection material (alcohol-lidocaine mix) was observed by repeating this sequence after the therapeutic injection. Pain scores from seven patients (eight ablations) were used to assess the therapy effect. MR guidance allowed adequate needle positioning and visualization of injection material in all cases. The rest pain scores significantly decreased from 4 (median) at baseline to 1 (median) at 2 weeks (p < 0.05). Average and worst pain experienced during the past week were significantly lower at the 2-week time point compared with the baseline (p < 0.05). However, the intervention did not result in reduction of opioid use at 2 weeks.MR guidance is an accurate and safe method for celiac plexus ablation with positive therapeutic effect.

  4. Ablation of pulmonary malignancy: current status.

    PubMed

    Pua, Bradley B; Thornton, Raymond H; Solomon, Stephen B

    2010-08-01

    Since the first reported use of radiofrequency ablation of the lung in 2000, the field of image-guided lung ablation has received a considerable amount of attention. Survival studies have demonstrated the potential utility of thermal ablation in the treatment of patients with early-stage primary and limited secondary pulmonary tumors with promising results. Diagnostic imaging studies have advanced the understanding of the expected immediate postablation appearance of treated lesions, leading the way for early detection of local tumor progression. These survival studies and the expected imaging follow-up of these patients are reviewed herein.

  5. Endoscopic surgery for tumors of the pineal region via a paramedian infratentorial supracerebellar keyhole approach (PISKA).

    PubMed

    Thaher, Firas; Kurucz, Peter; Fuellbier, Lars; Bittl, Markus; Hopf, Nikolai J

    2014-10-01

    The tumors of the pineal region represent a significant challenge in terms of patient selection and surgical approach. Traditional surgical options were commonly used to approach this area causing considerable surgical morbidity and mortality. We report for the first time on a series of endoscopic procedures for lesions of the pineal region performed via an infratentorial supracerebellar keyhole approach (PISKA) in the prone position using endoscope-assisted and endoscope-controlled technique. A single-institution series of 11 consecutive patients (five male and six female patients [11 total cases]; mean age 21 years, range 1-75 years) treated via the endoscope-assisted and endoscope-controlled PISKA for a pathological entity in the pineal region was retrospectively reviewed. The mean follow-up time was 24 months. The endoscopic PISKA was successfully used to approach a variety of pineal lesions, including pineocytoma (three patients), pineal cysts (four patients), germinoma, lipoma, medulloblastoma, and glioblastoma (one patient each). Gross total resection was achieved in ten cases and subtotal resection in one case. The mean preoperative tumor volumes were approximately 2 × 2 cm. Five patients developed postoperatively transient Parinaud's syndrome. One patient underwent surgical revision for cerebrospinal fluid leak. There was no mortality. Ten patients had an uneventful postoperative course with restitutio ad integrum after a mean follow-up duration of 13.5 months. The endoscopically PISKA is a safe and effective minimally invasive approach that enables endoscopic treatment of different lesions of the pineal region with comparable results to standard microsurgical technique but less morbidity.

  6. Detection methods and clinical significance of free peritoneal tumor cells found during colorectal cancer surgery.

    PubMed

    Sibio, Simone; Fiorani, Cristina; Stolfi, Carmine; Divizia, Andrea; Pezzuto, Roberto; Montagnese, Fabrizio; Bagaglini, Giulia; Sammartino, Paolo; Sica, Giuseppe Sigismondo

    2015-09-27

    Peritoneal washing is now part of the standard clinical practice in several abdominal and pelvic neoplasias. However, in colorectal cancer surgery, intra-peritoneal free cancer cells (IFCC) presence is not routinely investigated and their prognostic meaning is still unclear. When peritoneal washing results are positive for the presence of IFCC a worse outcome is usually expected in these colorectal cancer operated patients, but it what is not clear is whether it is associated with an increased risk of local recurrence. It is authors' belief that one of the main reasons why IFCC are not researched as integral part of the routine staging system for colon cancer is that there still isn't a diagnostic or detection method with enough sensibility and specificity. However, the potential clinical implications of a routine research for the presence IFCC in colon neoplasias are enormous: not only to obtain a more accurate clinical staging but also to offer different therapy protocols, based on the presence of IFCC. Based on this, adjuvant chemotherapy could be offered to those patients found to be positive for IFCC; also, protocols of proactive intraperitoneal chemotherapy could be applied. Although presence of IFCC appears to have a valid prognostic significance, further studies are needed to standardize detection and examination procedures, to determine if there are and which are the stages more likely to benefit from routine search for IFCC.

  7. Comparative imaging of P, S, Fe, Cu, Zn and C in thin sections of rat brain tumor as well as control tissues by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoriy, Myroslav V.; Dehnhardt, Markus; Matusch, Andreas; Becker, J. Sabine

    2008-03-01

    Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) was used for quantitative imaging of selected elements (P, S, Fe, Cu, Zn and C) in thin sections of rat brain samples (thickness 20 μm). The sample surface was scanned (raster area ~ 2 cm 2) with a focused laser beam (wavelength 266 nm, diameter of laser crater 50 μm, and irradiance 1 × 10 9 W cm - 2 ). The laser ablation system was coupled to a double-focusing sector field. The possibility was evaluated of using carbon (via measurement of 13C +) as an internal standard element for imaging element distribution as part of this method. The LA-ICP-MS images obtained for P, S, Fe Cu and Zn were quantified using synthetically prepared matrix-matched laboratory standards. Depending on the sample analyzed, concentrations of Cu and Zn in the control tissue were found to be in the range of 8-10 μg g - 1 and 10-12 μg g - 1 , while in the tumor tissue these concentrations were in the range of 12-15 μg g - 1 and 15-17 μg g - 1 , respectively. The measurements of P, S and Fe distribution revealed the depletion of these elements in tumor tissue. In all the samples, the shape of the tumor could be clearly distinguished from the surrounding healthy tissue by the depletion in carbon. Additional experiments were performed in order to study the influence of the water content of the analyzed tissue on the intensity signal of the analyte. The results of these measurements show the linear correlation ( R2 = 0.9604) between the intensity of analyte and amount of water in the sample. The growth of a brain tumor was thus studied for the first time by imaging mass spectrometry.

  8. Flat-Panel Cone-Beam Ct-Guided Radiofrequency Ablation of Very Small (≤1.5 cm) Liver Tumors: Technical Note on a Preliminary Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Cazzato, Roberto Luigi Buy, Xavier Alberti, Nicolas Fonck, Mariane; Grasso, Rosario Francesco; Palussière, Jean

    2015-02-15

    PurposeThe aim of the present study was to investigate the technical feasibility of flat-panel cone-beam CT (CBCT)-guided radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of very small (<1.5 cm) liver tumors.Materials and MethodsPatients included were candidates for hepatic percutaneous RFA as they had single biopsy-proven hepatic tumors sized ≤1.5 cm and poorly defined on ultrasonography. Following apnea induction, unenhanced CBCT scans were acquired and used to deploy the RF electrode with the aid of a virtual navigation system. If the tumor was not clearly identified on the unenhanced CBCT scan, a right retrograde arterial femoral access was established to carry out hepatic angiography and localize the tumor. Patients’ lesions and procedural variables were recorded and analyzed.ResultsThree patients (2 male and 1 female), aged 68, 76, and 87 years were included; 3 lesions (2 hepato-cellular carcinoma and 1 metastasis from colorectal cancer) were treated. One patient required hepatic angiography. Cycles of apnea used to acquire CBCT images and to deploy the electrode lasted <120 s. Mean fluoroscopic time needed to deploy the electrode was 36.6 ± 5.7 min. Mean overall procedural time was 66.0 ± 22.9 min. No peri- or post-procedural complications were noted. No cases of incomplete ablation were noted at 1-month follow-up.ConclusionPercutaneous CBCT-guided liver RFA with or without arterial hepatic angiography is technically feasible.

  9. Sources of Variation Influencing Concordance between Functional MRI and Direct Cortical Stimulation in Brain Tumor Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Melanie A.; Tam, Fred; Garavaglia, Marco M.; Hare, Gregory M. T.; Cusimano, Michael D.; Schweizer, Tom A.; Das, Sunit; Graham, Simon J.

    2016-01-01

    Object: Preoperative functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) remains a promising method to aid in the surgical management of patients diagnosed with brain tumors. For patients that are candidates for awake craniotomies, surgical decisions can potentially be improved by fMRI but this depends on the level of concordance between preoperative brain maps and the maps provided by the gold standard intraoperative method, direct cortical stimulation (DCS). There have been numerous studies of the concordance between fMRI and DCS using sensitivity and specificity measures, however the results are variable across studies and the key factors influencing variability are not well understood. Thus, the present work addresses the influence of technical factors on fMRI and DCS concordance. Methods: Motor and language mapping data were collected for a group of glioma patients (n = 14) who underwent both preoperative fMRI and intraoperative DCS in an awake craniotomy procedure for tumor removal. Normative fMRI data were also acquired in a healthy control group (n = 12). The fMRI and DCS mapping data were co-registered; true positive (TP), true negative (TN), false positive (FP), and false negative (FN) occurrences were tabulated over the exposed brain surface. Sensitivity and specificity were measured for the total group, and for the motor and language sub-groups. The influence of grid placement, fMRI statistical thresholding, and task standardization were assessed. Correlations between proportions of agreement and error were also carefully scrutinized to evaluate concordance in more detail. Results: Concordance was significantly better for motor vs. language mapping. There was an inverse relationship between TP and TN with increasing statistical threshold, and FP dominated the total error. Sensitivity and specificity were reduced when tasks were not standardized across fMRI and DCS. Conclusions: Although the agreement between fMRI and DCS is good, variability is introduced by

  10. Percutaneous cytologic diagnosis of solid pseudopapillary tumors of pancreas in children.

    PubMed

    Tlili, Yemen; Thiesse, Philippe; Lemaistre, Anne I; Dubois, Remi; Faure-Conter, Cecile

    2013-03-01

    Solid pseudopapillary tumors of the pancreas, formerly known as Frantz tumors, are rare exocrine tumors that electively affect young women in their second and third decades of life, and are rarely observed in children. Histologic confirmation is nevertheless desirable before proceeding with treatment of pancreatic lesions, as appropriate treatment can range from conservative to ablative surgery. Here, we report 3 cases of solid pseudopapillary tumors of the pancreas and we postulate that percutaneous cytologic sample analysis (instead of biopsy) may be sufficient to reach an accurate diagnosis and eliminate differential diagnosis.

  11. Clinical Use of Diffusion Tensor Image-Merged Functional Neuronavigation for Brain Tumor Surgeries: Review of Preoperative, Intraoperative, and Postoperative Data for 123 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Jin Mo; Kim, Eui Hyun; Kim, Jinna; Lee, Seung Koo; Kim, Sun Ho; Lee, Kyu Sung

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To achieve maximal safe resection during brain tumor surgery, functional image-merged neuronavigation is widely used. We retrospectively reviewed our cases in which diffusion tensor image (DTI)-merged functional neuronavigation was performed during surgery. Materials and Methods Between November 2008 and May 2010, 123 patients underwent surgery utilizing DTI-merged neuronavigation. Anatomical magnetic resonance images (MRI) were obtained preoperatively and fused with DTI of major white matter tracts, such as the corticospinal tract, optic radiation, or arcuate fasciculus. We used this fused image for functional neuronavigation during brain tumor surgery of eloquent areas. We checked the DTI images together with postoperative MRI images and evaluated the integrity of white matter tracts. Results A single white matter tract was inspected in 78 patients, and two or more white matter tracts were checked in 45 patients. Among the 123 patients, a grossly total resection was achieved in 90 patients (73.2%), subtotal resection in 29 patients (23.6%), and partial resection in 4 patients (3.3%). Postoperative neurologic outcomes, compared with preoperative function, included the following: 100 patients (81.3%) displayed improvement of neurologic symptoms or no change, 7 patients (5.7%) experienced postoperative permanent neurologic deterioration (additional or aggravated neurologic symptoms), and 16 patients (13.0%) demonstrated transient worsening. Conclusion DTI-merged functional neuronavigation could be a useful tool in brain tumor surgery for maximal safe resection. However, there are still limitations, including white matter tract shift, during surgery and in DTI itself. Further studies should be conducted to overcome these limitations. PMID:25048489

  12. Evaluation of Diffusion-Tensor Imaging-Based Global Search and Tractography for Tumor Surgery Close to the Language System

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Mirco; Zolal, Amir; Ganslandt, Oliver; Buchfelder, Michael; Nimsky, Christopher; Merhof, Dorit

    2013-01-01

    Pre-operative planning and intra-operative guidance in neurosurgery require detailed information about the location of functional areas and their anatomo-functional connectivity. In particular, regarding the language system, post-operative deficits such as aphasia can be avoided. By combining functional magnetic resonance imaging and diffusion tensor imaging, the connectivity between functional areas can be reconstructed by tractography techniques that need to cope with limitations such as limited resolution and low anisotropic diffusion close to functional areas. Tumors pose particular challenges because of edema, displacement effects on brain tissue and infiltration of white matter. Under these conditions, standard fiber tracking methods reconstruct pathways of insufficient quality. Therefore, robust global or probabilistic approaches are required. In this study, two commonly used standard fiber tracking algorithms, streamline propagation and tensor deflection, were compared with a previously published global search, Gibbs tracking and a connection-oriented probabilistic tractography approach. All methods were applied to reconstruct neuronal pathways of the language system of patients undergoing brain tumor surgery, and control subjects. Connections between Broca and Wernicke areas via the arcuate fasciculus (AF) and the inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus (IFOF) were validated by a clinical expert to ensure anatomical feasibility, and compared using distance- and diffusion-based similarity metrics to evaluate their agreement on pathway locations. For both patients and controls, a strong agreement between all methods was observed regarding the location of the AF. In case of the IFOF however, standard fiber tracking and Gibbs tracking predominantly identified the inferior longitudinal fasciculus that plays a secondary role in semantic language processing. In contrast, global search resolved connections in almost every case via the IFOF which could be confirmed by

  13. Adapting non-local means of de-noising in intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging for brain tumor surgery.

    PubMed

    Mizukuchi, Takashi; Fujii, Masazumi; Hayashi, Yuichiro; Tsuzaka, Masatoshi

    2014-01-01

    In image-guided brain tumor surgery, intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging (iMRI) is a powerful tool for updating navigational information after brain shift, controlling the resection of brain tumors, and evaluating intraoperative complications. Low-field iMRI scans occasionally generate a lot of noise, the reason for which is yet to be determined. This noise adversely affects the neurosurgeons' interpretations. In this study, in order to improve the image quality of iMR images, we optimized and adapted an unbiased non-local means (UNLM) filter to iMR images. This noise appears to occur at a specific frequency-encoding band. In order to adapt the UNLM filter to the noise, we improved the UNLM, so that de-noising can be performed at different noise levels that occur at different frequency-encoding bands. As a result, clinical iMR images can be de-noised adequately while preserving crucial information, such as edges. The UNLM filter preserved the edges more clearly than did other classical filters attached to an anisotropic diffusion filter. In addition, UNLM de-noising can improve the signal-to-noise ratio of clinical iMR images by more than 2 times (p < 0.01). Although the computational time of the UNLM processing is very long, post-processing of UNLM filter images, for which the parameters were optimized, can be performed during other MRI scans. Therefore, The UNLM filter was more effective than increasing the number of signal averages. The iMR image quality was improved without extension of the MR scanning time. UNLM de-noising in post-processing is expected to improve the diagnosability of low-field iMR images.

  14. Evolving Ablative Therapies for Hepatic Malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Hochwald, Steven N.

    2014-01-01

    The liver is a common site for both primary and secondary malignancy. Hepatic resection and transplantation are the two treatment modalities that have been shown to achieve complete cure, but only 10 to 20% of patients are candidates for these treatments. For the remaining patients, tumor ablation has emerged as the most promising alternative modality. In addition to providing local control and improving survival outcomes, tumor ablation also helps to down stage patients for potential curative treatments, both alone as well as in combination with other treatments. While tumor ablation can be achieved in multiple ways, the introduction of newer ablative techniques has shifted the focus from palliation to potentially curative treatment. Because the long-term safety and survival benefits are not substantive at present, it is important that we strive to evaluate the results from these studies using appropriate comparative outcome methodologies. PMID:24877069

  15. Combination Chemotherapy, Radiation Therapy, and/or Surgery in Treating Patients With High-Risk Kidney Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-14

    Childhood Renal Cell Carcinoma; Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma; Clear Cell Sarcoma of the Kidney; Papillary Renal Cell Carcinoma; Rhabdoid Tumor of the Kidney; Stage I Renal Cell Cancer; Stage I Renal Wilms Tumor; Stage II Renal Cell Cancer; Stage II Renal Wilms Tumor; Stage III Renal Cell Cancer; Stage III Renal Wilms Tumor; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IV Renal Wilms Tumor

  16. Pleural tumor seeding following percutaneous cryoablation of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Conners, Douglas; Rilling, William

    2011-06-01

    Numerous modalities for hepatic tumor ablation are currently used including ethanol injection, radiofrequency ablation (RFA), cryoablation, and microwave ablation. The results and complications of these various tumor ablation techniques have been reported extensively, with the most data existing for percutaneous RFA. One of the most serious complications from tumor ablation is the seeding of cancer cells along the ablation tract. The incidence and risk factors for tract seeding in RFA have been reported, but little information regarding this complication with other ablation modalities has been reported. We report a case of tumor seeding into the pleural space following percutaneous cryoablation of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC).

  17. Localization of liver tumors in freehand 3D laparoscopic ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahin, O.; Martens, V.; Besirevic, A.; Kleemann, M.; Schlaefer, A.

    2012-02-01

    The aim of minimally invasive laparoscopic liver interventions is to completely resect or ablate tumors while minimizing the trauma caused by the operation. However, restrictions such as limited field of view and reduced depth perception can hinder the surgeon's capabilities to precisely localize the tumor. Typically, preoperative data is acquired to find the tumor(s) and plan the surgery. Nevertheless, determining the precise position of the tumor is required, not only before but also during the operation. The standard use of ultrasound in hepatic surgery is to explore the liver and identify tumors. Meanwhile, the surgeon mentally builds a 3D context to localize tumors. This work aims to upgrade the use of ultrasound in laparoscopic liver surgery. We propose an approach to segment and localize tumors intra-operatively in 3D ultrasound. We reconstruct a 3D laparoscopic ultrasound volume containing a tumor. The 3D image is then preprocessed and semi-automatically segmented using a level set algorithm. During the surgery, for each subsequent reconstructed volume, a fast update of the tumor position is accomplished via registration using the previously segmented and localized tumor as a prior knowledge. The approach was tested on a liver phantom with artificial tumors. The tumors were localized in approximately two seconds with a mean error of less than 0.5 mm. The strengths of this technique are that it can be performed intra-operatively, it helps the surgeon to accurately determine the location, shape and volume of the tumor, and it is repeatable throughout the operation.

  18. Nanoparticle-enhanced synergistic HIFU ablation and transarterial chemoembolization for efficient cancer therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Yufeng; Wang, Zhigang; Ran, Haitao; Zheng, Yuanyi; Wang, Dong; Xu, Jinshun; Wang, Zhibiao; Chen, Yu; Li, Pan

    2016-02-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is being generally explored as a non-invasive therapeutic modality to treat solid tumors. However, the clinical use of HIFU for large and deep tumor-ablation applications such as hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is currently entangled with long treatment duration and high operating energy. This critical issue can be potentially resolved by the introduction of HIFU synergistic agents (SAs). Traditional SAs such as microbubbles and microparticles face the problem of large size, short cycle time, damage to mononuclear phagocytic system and unsatisfactory targeting efficiency. In this work, we have developed a facile and versatile nanoparticle-based HIFU synergistic cancer surgery enhanced by transarterial chemoembolization for high-efficiency HCC treatment based on elaborately designed Fe3O4-PFH/PLGA nanocapsules. Multifunctional Fe3O4-PFH/PLGA nanocapsules were administrated into tumor tissues via transarterial injection combined with Lipiodol to achieve high tumor accumulation because transarterial chemoembolization by Lipiodol could block the blood vessels. The high synergistic HIFU ablation effect was successfully achieved against HCC tumors based on the phase-transformation performance of the perfluorohexane (PFH) inner core in the composite nanocapsules, as systematically demonstrated in VX2 liver tumor xenograft in rabbits. Multifunctional Fe3O4-PFH/PLGA nanocapsules were also demonstrated as efficient contrast agents for ultrasound, magnetic resonance and photoacoustic tri-modality imagings, potentially applicable for imaging-guided HIFU synergistic surgery. Therefore, the elaborate integration of traditional transarterial chemoembolization with recently developed nanoparticle-enhanced HIFU cancer surgery could efficiently enhance the HCC cancer treatment outcome, initiating a new and efficient therapeutic protocol/modality for clinic cancer treatment.

  19. P12.09MALIGNANT TUMORS OF ANTERIOR SKULL BASE: IS THE ROLE OF SURGERY ENHANCED IN THE ENDOSCOPY ERA?

    PubMed Central

    Nasi, D.; Iacoangeli, M.; Dallari, S.; Salvinelli, F.; Dobran, M.; di Somma, L.; Colasanti, R.; Nocchi, N.; Vaira, C.; Scerrati, M.

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Malignant tumors of anterior skull base represent a surgical challenge because of their anatomical location, the necessity of achieving negative margins, and the often-cosmetically disfiguring transfacial approaches needed. Recently, expanded endonasal endoscopic approaches (EEEA) have been developed, either alone or combined with transcranial approaches for treatment of these malignant lesions. We report our experience to illustrate the relative safety and effectiveness of the EEEA for skull base malignancies alone or combined when possible with minimally invasive approaches or traditional surgery. METHODS: From June 2009, 13 patients harbouring malignant neoplastic lesions of anterior skull base were treated at our department. Four patients affected by sinonasal malignancies with extension in anterior cranial fossa underwent to combined open subfrontal or minimally invasive supra orbital approach and EEEA. In 2 patients with respectively esthesioneuroblastoma and maxillary sinus squamous cell carcinoma a combined supraorbital key-hole craniotomy and EEEA were perfomed. Seven clival metastases with VI cranial nerve palsy were approached by the EEEA supplemented by neuronavigation. RESULTS: Gross total removal was performed in 9 out of 13 patients. In the other cases partial resection, but with adequate decompression and diagnosis were achieved. There were no mortality, 1 patient had infection and 1 deep vein thrombosis. CONCLUSIONS: In our experience EEEA are an integral part of the neurosurgical armamentarium for the treatment of the skull base malignancies. In properly selected cases, it affords similar oncologic outcomes with lower morbidity than traditional open approaches. The major potential advantage of the EEEA approach is direct “natural” anatomical route to the lesion without traversing any major neurovascular structures, so obviating brain retraction. Many tumors grow in a medial-to-lateral direction, displacing structures laterally as

  20. Percutaneous ablation of pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    D’Onofrio, Mirko; Ciaravino, Valentina; De Robertis, Riccardo; Barbi, Emilio; Salvia, Roberto; Girelli, Roberto; Paiella, Salvatore; Gasparini, Camilla; Cardobi, Nicolò; Bassi, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is a highly aggressive tumor with an overall 5-year survival rate of less than 5%. Prognosis and treatment depend on whether the tumor is resectable or not, which mostly depends on how quickly the diagnosis is made. Chemotherapy and radiotherapy can be both used in cases of non-resectable pancreatic cancer. In cases of pancreatic neoplasm that is locally advanced, non-resectable, but non-metastatic, it is possible to apply percutaneous treatments that are able to induce tumor cytoreduction. The aim of this article will be to describe the multiple currently available treatment techniques (radiofrequency ablation, microwave ablation, cryoablation, and irreversible electroporation), their results, and their possible complications, with the aid of a literature review. PMID:27956791

  1. Percutaneous ablation of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    D'Onofrio, Mirko; Ciaravino, Valentina; De Robertis, Riccardo; Barbi, Emilio; Salvia, Roberto; Girelli, Roberto; Paiella, Salvatore; Gasparini, Camilla; Cardobi, Nicolò; Bassi, Claudio

    2016-11-28

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is a highly aggressive tumor with an overall 5-year survival rate of less than 5%. Prognosis and treatment depend on whether the tumor is resectable or not, which mostly depends on how quickly the diagnosis is made. Chemotherapy and radiotherapy can be both used in cases of non-resectable pancreatic cancer. In cases of pancreatic neoplasm that is locally advanced, non-resectable, but non-metastatic, it is possible to apply percutaneous treatments that are able to induce tumor cytoreduction. The aim of this article will be to describe the multiple currently available treatment techniques (radiofrequency ablation, microwave ablation, cryoablation, and irreversible electroporation), their results, and their possible complications, with the aid of a literature review.

  2. A preliminary study of the clinical application of optic pathway diffusion tensor tractography in suprasellar tumor surgery: preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative assessment.

    PubMed

    Hajiabadi, Mohamadreza; Samii, Madjid; Fahlbusch, Rudolf

    2016-09-01

    OBJECT Visual impairments are the most common objective manifestations of suprasellar lesions. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is a noninvasive MRI modality that depicts the subcortical white matter tracts in vivo. In this study the authors tested the value of visual pathway tractography in comparison with visual field and visual acuity analyses. METHODS This prospective study consisted of 25 patients with progressive visual impairment due to suprasellar mass lesions and 6 control patients with normal vision without such lesions. Visual acuity, visual field, and the optic fundus were examined preoperatively and repeated 1 week and 3 months after surgery. Visual pathway DTI tractography was performed preoperatively, intraoperatively immediately after tumor resection, and 1 week and 3 months after surgery. RESULTS In the control group, pre- and postoperative visual status were normal and visual pathway tractography revealed fibers crossing the optic chiasm without any alteration. In patients with suprasellar lesions, vision improved in 24 of 25. The mean distance between optic tracts in tractography decreased after tumor resection and detectable fibers crossing the optic chiasm increased from 12% preoperatively to 72% postoperatively 3 months after tumor resection, and undetectable fibers crossing the optic chiasm decreased from 88% preoperatively to 27% postoperatively 3 months after tumor resection. Visual improvement after tumor removal 1 week and 3 months after surgery was significantly correlated with the distance between optic tracts in intraoperative tractography (p < 0.01). CONCLUSIONS Visual pathway DTI tractography appears to be a promising adjunct to the standard clinical and paraclinical visual examinations in patients with suprasellar mass lesions. The intraoperative findings, in particular the distance between optic tract fibers, can predict visual outcome after tumor resection. Furthermore, postoperative application of this technique may be useful in

  3. Laser Navigation for Radiofrequency Ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Varro, Zoltan; Locklin, Julia K. Wood, Bradford J.

    2004-09-15

    A 45-year-old male with renal cell carcinoma secondary to von-Hippel Lindau (VHL) disease presented for radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of kidney tumors. Due to his prior history of several partial nephrectomies and limited renal reserve, RFA was chosen because of its relatively nephron-sparing nature. A laser guidance device was used to help guide probe placement in an attempt to reduce procedure time and improve targeting accuracy. The device was successful at guiding needle placement, as both tumors were located with a single pass. Follow-up CT scan confirmed accurate needle placement, showing an area of coagulation necrosis covering the previously seen tumor.

  4. Tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... plants (aflatoxins) Excessive sunlight exposure Genetic problems Obesity Radiation exposure Viruses Types of tumors known to be caused by or linked with viruses are: Cervical cancer (human papillomavirus) Most anal cancers (human papillomavirus) Some throat ...

  5. Carcinoid Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    Carcinoid tumors are rare, slow-growing cancers. They usually start in the lining of the digestive tract or in the lungs. They grow ... trouble breathing. Surgery is the main treatment for carcinoid tumors. If they haven't spread to other parts of the body, surgery can cure the cancer.

  6. Causal Therapy of Breast Cancer Irrelevant of Age, Tumor Stage and 
ER-Status: Stimulation of Estrogen Signaling Coupled With Breast 
Conserving Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Suba, Zsuzsanna

    2016-01-01

    Abstract: Background Results of long-term studies justify that the rate of breast cancer recurrence and tumor-related mortality remains quite unpredictable, regardless of the use of any current therapeutic measures. Objective Since the application of standard therapies, such as surgery, radiation, chemotherapy and antiestrogen administration does not work as might be expected; our therapeutic practice requires thorough rethinking. Method Published long-term therapeutic results on breast cancer cases were analyzed in correlation with stage at diagnosis, ER-status of tumors and patients’ age. The effectiveness of current therapeutic measures was also compared by estimating the rate of tumor-free survival, breast cancer recurrence and breast cancer-specific mortality. Results Diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer at an early stage cannot improve the rate of tumor-free survival. Poor differentiation of tumors, ER-negativity in particular, defines poor prognosis even after applying aggressive therapies. In patients treated with in situ breast cancer, the recurrence-rate of invasive tumor increased directly with ageing irrespective of tumor size or ER-status at diagnosis. Women who underwent lumpectomy without adjuvant radiation or chemotherapy exhibited significantly better overall and breast cancer specific survival rates than those receiving mastectomy, regardless of stage and ER-status of tumors. Antiestrogen treatment exhibited unforeseeable effectiveness even on targeted ER-positive tumors. Recent patents propose the detection of ESR1-gene amplification or restoration of ER-alpha expression for prediction of effective antiestrogen treatment, suggesting a crucial inhibitory role of estrogen-signaling against tumor-growth. Conclusion Estradiol-induced upregulation of estrogen signaling coupled with sparing of the estrogen-rich mammary fatpad are the most effective strategies against breast cancer. PMID:27087654

  7. Surgery-induced wound response promotes stem-like and tumor-initiating features of breast cancer cells, via STAT3 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Segatto, Ilenia; Berton, Stefania; Sonego, Maura; Massarut, Samuele; Perin, Tiziana; Piccoli, Erica; Colombatti, Alfonso; Vecchione, Andrea; Baldassarre, Gustavo; Belletti, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation is clinically linked to cancer but the mechanisms are not fully understood. Surgery itself elicits a range of inflammatory responses, suggesting that it could represent a perturbing factor in the process of local recurrence and/or metastasis formation. Post-surgery wound fluids (WF), drained from breast cancer patients, are rich in cytokines and growth factors, stimulate the in vitro growth of breast cancer cells and are potent activators of the STAT transcription factors. We wondered whether STAT signaling was functionally involved in the response of breast cancer cells to post-surgical inflammation. We discovered that WF induced the enrichment of breast cancer cells with stem-like phenotypes, via activation of STAT3. In vitro, WF highly stimulated mammosphere formation and self-renewal of breast cancer cells. In vivo, STAT3 signaling was critical for breast cancer cell tumorigenicity and for the formation of local relapse after surgery. Overall, we demonstrate here that surgery-induced inflammation promotes stem-like phenotypes and tumor-initiating abilities of breast cancer cells. Interfering with STAT3 signaling with a peri-surgical treatment is sufficient to strongly suppress this process. The understanding of the crosstalk between breast tumor-initiating cells and their microenvironment may open the way to successful targeting of these cells in their initial stages of growth and be eventually curative. PMID:25026286

  8. Surgery-induced wound response promotes stem-like and tumor-initiating features of breast cancer cells, via STAT3 signaling.

    PubMed

    Segatto, Ilenia; Berton, Stefania; Sonego, Maura; Massarut, Samuele; Perin, Tiziana; Piccoli, Erica; Colombatti, Alfonso; Vecchione, Andrea; Baldassarre, Gustavo; Belletti, Barbara

    2014-08-15

    Inflammation is clinically linked to cancer but the mechanisms are not fully understood. Surgery itself elicits a range of inflammatory responses, suggesting that it could represent a perturbing factor in the process of local recurrence and/or metastasis. Post-surgery wound fluids (WF), drained from breast cancer patients, are rich in cytokines and growth factors, stimulate the in vitro growth of breast cancer cells and are potent activators of the STAT transcription factors. We wondered whether STAT signaling was functionally involved in the response of breast cancer cells to post-surgical inflammation. We discovered that WF induced the enrichment of breast cancer cells with stem-like phenotypes, via activation of STAT3. In vitro, WF highly stimulated mammosphere formation and self-renewal of breast cancer cells. In vivo, STAT3 signaling was critical for breast cancer cell tumorigenicity and for the formation of local relapse after surgery. Overall, we demonstrate here that surgery-induced inflammation promotes stem-like phenotypes and tumor-initiating abilities of breast cancer cells. Interfering with STAT3 signaling with a peri-surgical treatment was sufficient to strongly suppress this process. The understanding of the crosstalk between breast tumor-initiating cells and their microenvironment may open the way to successful targeting of these cells in their initial stages of growth and be eventually curative.

  9. Correlation of the extent of tumor volume resection and patient survival in surgery of glioblastoma multiforme with high-field intraoperative MRI guidance.

    PubMed

    Kuhnt, Daniela; Becker, Andreas; Ganslandt, Oliver; Bauer, Miriam; Buchfelder, Michael; Nimsky, Christopher

    2011-12-01

    Extent of resection (EOR) still remains controversial in therapy of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). However, an increasing number of studies favor maximum EOR as being associated with longer patient survival. One hundred thirty-five GBM patients underwent tumor resection aided by 1.5T intraoperative MRI (iMRI) and integrated multimodal navigation. Tumor volume was quantified by manual segmentation. The influences of EOR, patient age, recurrent tumor, tumor localization, and gender on survival time were examined. Intraoperative MRI detected residual tumor volume in 88 patients. In 19 patients surgery was continued; further resection resulted in final gross total resection (GTR) for 9 patients (GTR increased from 47 [34.80%] to 56 [41.49%] patients). Tumor volumes were significantly reduced from 34.25 ± 23.68% (first iMRI) to 1.22 ± 16.24% (final iMRI). According to Kaplan-Meier estimates, median survival was 14 months (95% confidence interval [CI]: 11.7-16.2) for EOR ≥ 98% and 9 months (95% CI: 7.4-10.5) for EOR <98% (P< .0001); it was 9 months (95% CI: 7.3-10.7) for patients ≥ 65 years and 12 months (95% CI: 8.4-15.6) for patients <65 years (P < .05). Multivariate analysis showed a hazard ratio of 0.39 (95% CI: 0.24-0.63; P = .001) for EOR ≥ 98% and 0.61 (95% CI: 0.38-0.97; P < .05) for patient age <65 years. To our knowledge, this is the largest study including correlation of iMRI, tumor volumetry, and survival time. We demonstrate that navigation guidance and iMRI significantly contribute to optimal EOR with low postoperative morbidity, where EOR ≥ 98% and patient age <65 years are associated with significant survival advantages. Thus, maximum EOR should be the surgical goal in GBM surgery while preserving neurological function.

  10. Cold Atmospheric Plasma for Selectively Ablating Metastatic Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Mian; Holmes, Benjamin; Cheng, Xiaoqian; Zhu, Wei; Keidar, Michael; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2013-01-01

    Traditional breast cancer treatments such as surgery and radiotherapy contain many inherent limitations with regards to incomplete and nonselective tumor ablation. Cold atomospheric plasma (CAP) is an ionized gas where the ion temperature is close to room temperature. It contains electrons, charged particles, radicals, various excited molecules, UV photons and transient electric fields. These various compositional elements have the potential to either enhance and promote cellular activity, or disrupt and destroy them. In particular, based on this unique composition, CAP could offer a minimally-invasive surgical approach allowing for specific cancer cell or tumor tissue removal without influencing healthy cells. Thus, the objective of this research is to investigate a novel CAP-based therapy for selectively bone metastatic breast cancer treatment. For this purpose, human metastatic breast cancer (BrCa) cells and bone marrow derived human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were separately treated with CAP, and behavioral changes were evaluated after 1, 3, and 5 days of culture. With different treatment times, different BrCa and MSC cell responses were observed. Our results showed that BrCa cells were more sensitive to these CAP treatments than MSCs under plasma dose conditions tested. It demonstrated that CAP can selectively ablate metastatic BrCa cells in vitro without damaging healthy MSCs at the metastatic bone site. In addition, our study showed that CAP treatment can significantly inhibit the migration and invasion of BrCa cells. The results suggest the great potential of CAP for breast cancer therapy. PMID:24040051

  11. Microwave ablation of hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Poggi, Guido; Tosoratti, Nevio; Montagna, Benedetta; Picchi, Chiara

    2015-01-01

    Although surgical resection is still the optimal treatment option for early-stage hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in patients with well compensated cirrhosis, thermal ablation techniques provide a valid non-surgical treatment alternative, thanks to their minimal invasiveness, excellent tolerability and safety profile, proven efficacy in local disease control, virtually unlimited repeatability and cost-effectiveness. Different energy sources are currently employed in clinics as physical agents for percutaneous or intra-surgical thermal ablation of HCC nodules. Among them, radiofrequency (RF) currents are the most used, while microwave ablations (MWA) are becoming increasingly popular. Starting from the 90s’, RF ablation (RFA) rapidly became the standard of care in ablation, especially in the treatment of small HCC nodules; however, RFA exhibits substantial performance limitations in the treatment of large lesions and/or tumors located near major heat sinks. MWA, first introduced in the Far Eastern clinical practice in the 80s’, showing promising results but also severe limitations in the controllability of the emitted field and in the high amount of power employed for the ablation of large tumors, resulting in a poor coagulative performance and a relatively high complication rate, nowadays shows better results both in terms of treatment controllability and of overall coagulative performance, thanks to the improvement of technology. In this review we provide an extensive and detailed overview of the key physical and technical aspects of MWA and of the currently available systems, and we want to discuss the most relevant published data on MWA treatments of HCC nodules in regard to clinical results and to the type and rate of complications, both in absolute terms and in comparison with RFA. PMID:26557950

  12. Contemporary Status of Percutaneous Ablation for the Small Renal Mass.

    PubMed

    Shin, Benjamin J; Chick, Jeffrey Forris Beecham; Stavropoulos, S William

    2016-03-01

    Renal cell carcinoma is the tenth most common malignancy in the USA, with upwards of 61,000 new cases and resulting in more than 14,000 deaths annually. Although partial nephrectomy remains the standard treatment, image-guided nephron-sparing ablative techniques including cryoablation, radiofrequency ablation, and microwave ablation have emerged as treatment options in certain patient populations. Ablative therapies have high technical successes, low tumor recurrence rates, and preserve renal parenchymal volume. The purpose of this article is to provide an update on ablation therapies for small renal masses.

  13. Quality indicators for colorectal cancer surgery and care according to patient-, tumor-, and hospital-related factors

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer (CRC) care has improved considerably, particularly since the implementation of a quality of care program centered on national evidence-based guidelines. Formal quality assessment is however still needed. The aim of this research was to identify factors associated with practice variation in CRC patient care. Methods CRC patients identified from all cancer centers in South-West France were included. We investigated variations in practices (from diagnosis to surgery), and compliance with recommended guidelines for colon and rectal cancer. We identified factors associated with three colon cancer practice variations potentially linked to better survival: examination of ≥12 lymph nodes (LN), non-use and use of adjuvant chemotherapy for stage II and stage III patients, respectively. Results We included 1,206 patients, 825 (68%) with colon and 381 (32%) with rectal cancer, from 53 hospitals. Compliance was high for resection, pathology report, LN examination, and chemotherapy use for stage III patients. In colon cancer, 26% of stage II patients received adjuvant chemotherapy and 71% of stage III patients. 84% of stage US T3T4 rectal cancer patients received pre-operative radiotherapy. In colon cancer, factors associated with examination of ≥12 LNs were: lower ECOG score, advanced stage and larger hospital volume; factors negatively associated were: left sided tumor location and one hospital district. Use of chemotherapy in stage II patients was associated with younger age, advanced stage, emergency setting and care structure (private and location); whereas under-use in stage III patients was associated with advanced age, presence of comorbidities and private hospitals. Conclusions Although some changes in practices may have occurred since this observational study, these findings represent the most recent report on practices in CRC in this region, and offer a useful methodological approach for assessing quality of care. Guideline compliance

  14. Abdominal desmoplastic small round cell tumor without extraperitoneal metastases: Is there a benefit for HIPEC after macroscopically complete cytoreductive surgery?

    PubMed Central

    Honoré, C.; Atallah, V.; Mir, O.; Orbach, D.; Ferron, G.; LePéchoux, C.; Delhorme, J. B.; Philippe-Chomette, P.; Sarnacki, S.; Msika, S.; Terrier, P.; Glehen, O.; Martelli, H.; Minard-Colin, V.; Bertucci, F.; Blay, J. Y.; Bonvalot, S.; Elias, D.; LeCesne, A.; Sargos, P.

    2017-01-01

    Background Desmoplastic Small Round Cell Tumor (DSRCT) is a rare disease affecting predominantly children and young adults and for which the benefit of hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC) after complete cytoreductive surgery (CCRS) remains unknown. Methods To identify patients with DSRCT without extraperitoneal metastases (EPM) who underwent CCRS between 1991 and 2015, a retrospective nation-wide survey was conducted by crossing the prospective and retrospective databases of the French Network for Rare Peritoneal Malignancies, French Reference Network in Sarcoma Pathology, French Sarcoma Clinical Network and French Pediatric Cancer Society. Results Among the 107 patients with DSRCT, 48 had no EPM and underwent CCRS. The median peritoneal cancer index (PCI) was 9 (range: 2–27). Among these 48 patients, 38 (79%) had pre- and/or postoperative chemotherapy and 23 (48%) postoperative whole abdominopelvic radiotherapy (WAP-RT). Intraperitoneal chemotherapy was administered to 11 patients (23%): two received early postoperative intraperitoneal chemotherapy (EPIC) and nine HIPEC. After a median follow-up of 30 months, the median overall survival (OS) of the entire cohort was 42 months. The 2-y and 5-y OS were 72% and 19%. The 2-y and 5-y disease-free survival (DFS) were 30% and 12%. WAP-RT was the only variable associated with longer peritoneal recurrence-free survival and DFS after CCRS. The influence of HIPEC/EPIC on OS and DFS was not statistically conclusive. Conclusion The benefit of HIPEC is still unknown and should be evaluated in a prospective trial. The value of postoperative WAP-RT seems to be confirmed. PMID:28234908

  15. Quality of Life and Cost-Effectiveness of Radiofrequency Ablation versus Open Surgery for Benign Thyroid Nodules: a retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Wen-Wen; Li, Xiao-Long; Xu, Hui-Xiong; Lu, Feng; Sun, Li-Ping; Guo, Le-Hang; He, Ya-Ping; Wang, Dan; Yin, Zhi-Qiang

    2016-01-01

    This study is to compare the health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and cost-effectiveness of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) and open thyroidectomy (OT) for benign thyroid nodules (BTNs) treatment. HRQoL and utility were assessed for 404 BTN patients immediately before treatments (RFA:OT = 137:267) and at 6-month visit. A cost-effectiveness analysis was performed from societal perspective in the China context. Resource use (hospitalization, sick leaves) was collected. We used the net monetary benefit approach and computed cost-effectiveness acceptability curves for RFA and OT. Sensitivity analyses of costs of RFA were performed. At 6-month visit, patients treated with RFA had significantly better HRQoL than patients treated with OT on general health (68.5 versus 66.7, P = 0.029), vitality (71.3 versus 67.5, P < 0.001) and mental health (80.9 versus 79.3, P = 0.038). RFA was more effective than OT in terms of quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs; 0.01QALY/patient) but more expensive (US$823/patient). The probability that RFA would be cost effective at a US$50,000/QALY threshold was 15.5% in China, and it would be increased to 88.4% when price of the RFA device was lowered by 30%. RFA exhibited a significant improvement of HRQoL relative to OT, but is unlikely to be cost effective at its current price in short time. PMID:27883069

  16. Quality of Life and Cost-Effectiveness of Radiofrequency Ablation versus Open Surgery for Benign Thyroid Nodules: a retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Yue, Wen-Wen; Li, Xiao-Long; Xu, Hui-Xiong; Lu, Feng; Sun, Li-Ping; Guo, Le-Hang; He, Ya-Ping; Wang, Dan; Yin, Zhi-Qiang

    2016-11-24

    This study is to compare the health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and cost-effectiveness of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) and open thyroidectomy (OT) for benign thyroid nodules (BTNs) treatment. HRQoL and utility were assessed for 404 BTN patients immediately before treatments (RFA:OT = 137:267) and at 6-month visit. A cost-effectiveness analysis was performed from societal perspective in the China context. Resource use (hospitalization, sick leaves) was collected. We used the net monetary benefit approach and computed cost-effectiveness acceptability curves for RFA and OT. Sensitivity analyses of costs of RFA were performed. At 6-month visit, patients treated with RFA had significantly better HRQoL than patients treated with OT on general health (68.5 versus 66.7, P = 0.029), vitality (71.3 versus 67.5, P < 0.001) and mental health (80.9 versus 79.3, P = 0.038). RFA was more effective than OT in terms of quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs; 0.01QALY/patient) but more expensive (US$823/patient). The probability that RFA would be cost effective at a US$50,000/QALY threshold was 15.5% in China, and it would be increased to 88.4% when price of the RFA device was lowered by 30%. RFA exhibited a significant improvement of HRQoL relative to OT, but is unlikely to be cost effective at its current price in short time.

  17. Radiofrequency Ablation of Large Renal Angiomyolipoma: Median-Term Follow-Up

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory, S. M. Anderson, C. J.; Patel, U.

    2013-06-15

    Purpose. To study the feasibility of percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of large angiomyolipomas (AMLs) using saline-cooled electrodes. Materials and Methods. Institutional Review Board approval for the study was received. Four patients (all female, age range 33-67 years) with large AMLs (maximal axis 6.1-32.4 cm) not suitable for embolotherapy or surgery consented to a trial of RFA. Procedures were performed under computerized tomographic guidance using 14G saline-infused electrodes. Two ablations (diameter 4-7 cm) were undertaken in each patient. Variables studied were technical success, treatment safety, alteration of tumor consistency, tumor size, effect on renal function, and medium-term freedom from haemorrhage. Results. All four patients underwent successful RFA without any intraprocedural complications. There has been no haemorrhage, or new renal specific symptom, during a minimum 48-month period, and normal renal function has been normal. On follow-up radiological imaging, the tumors have become fattier with involution of the soft-tissue elements (soft tissue-to-total tumor ratio decreased mean [range] of 0.26 [0.14-0.48] to 0.17 [0.04-0.34] U; p = 0.04 [paired Student t test]). Further evidence of treatment effect was the development of a capsule around the ablation zone, but there was no change in overall tumor volume (mean [range] 1,120 [118-2,845] to 1150 [90-3,013] ml; p = 1 [paired Student t test]). Conclusion. RFA of large AMLs is technically feasible using saline-infused electrodes. The soft-tissue elements decreased in volume; the tumors become fattier; and there has been no renal haemorrhage during a 48-month period.

  18. Modular endoprosthetic reconstruction in malignant bone tumors: indications and limits.

    PubMed

    Balke, Maurice; Ahrens, Helmut; Streitbürger, Arne; Gosheger, Georg; Hardes, Jendrik

    2009-01-01

    Modular tumor prostheses are well established today for the reconstruction of osseous defects after resection of malignant bone tumors. Almost every joint and even total bones (e.g., total femur or humerus) can be replaced with promising functional results, dramatically reducing the need for ablative procedures. Although the complication rate with the use of modern modular endoprostheses is constantly decreasing, the need for revision surgery is still significantly higher than in primary joint arthroplasty. In this review we present the modular endoprosthesis system developed in our institution, summarize the postoperative management, and discuss the indications, limits, and complications as well as the functional results.

  19. EF5 PET of Tumor Hypoxia: A Predictive Imaging Biomarker of Response to Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy (SABR) for Early Lung Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    stage lung cancer in patients who are not candidates for surgery because of excessive surgical risk, and will be an important treatment option for a...has become a new standard of care for early stage lung cancer in patients who are not candidates for surgery because of excessive surgical risk...ups are complete to date for the enrolled patients. Scheduled follow-up imaging is at 3-month intervals post-SABR. There has been no evidence of

  20. Positron Emission Tomography Using Fluorine F 18 EF5 to Find Oxygen in Tumor Cells of Patients Who Are Undergoing Surgery or Biopsy for Newly Diagnosed Brain Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-15

    Adult Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Adult Anaplastic Ependymoma; Adult Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Adult Brain Stem Glioma; Adult Central Nervous System Germ Cell Tumor; Adult Choroid Plexus Tumor; Adult Craniopharyngioma; Adult Diffuse Astrocytoma; Adult Ependymoblastoma; Adult Ependymoma; Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Adult Grade I Meningioma; Adult Grade II Meningioma; Adult Grade III Meningioma; Adult Medulloblastoma; Adult Meningeal Hemangiopericytoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Adult Myxopapillary Ependymoma; Adult Oligodendroglioma; Adult Pilocytic Astrocytoma; Adult Pineoblastoma; Adult Pineocytoma; Adult Subependymoma; Adult Supratentorial Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor (PNET); Meningeal Melanocytoma

  1. Pellet ablation and ablation model development

    SciTech Connect

    Houlberg, W.A.

    1989-01-01

    A broad survey of pellet ablation is given, based primarily on information presented at this meeting. The implications of various experimental observations for ablation theory are derived from qualitative arguments of the physics involved. The major elements of a more complete ablation theory are then outlined in terms of these observations. This is followed by a few suggestions on improving the connections between theory and experimental results through examination of ablation data. Although this is a rather aggressive undertaking for such a brief (and undoubtedly incomplete) assessment, some of the discussion may help us advance the understanding of pellet ablation. 17 refs.

  2. Propranolol Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Locally Recurrent or Metastatic Solid Tumors That Cannot Be Removed By Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-28

    Male Breast Cancer; Recurrent Melanoma; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Melanoma; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Hepatocellular Carcinoma

  3. Evaluation of sorafenib in Chinese unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma patients with prior surgery and portal vein tumor thrombosis: A subset analysis of GIDEON study data.

    PubMed

    Ye, Sheng-Long; Chen, Xiaoping; Yang, Jiamei; Bie, Ping; Zhang, Shuijun; Liu, Fengyong; Liu, Luming; Zhou, Jie; Dou, Kefeng; Yip, Christina Sm; Yang, Xiaolei

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the safety and efficacy of sorafenib in Chinese patients with unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma. Data of 338 Chinese patients from the Global Investigation of therapeutic DEcisions in hepatocellular carcinoma and Of its treatment with sorafeNib study database were included. Patients were divided into those who received and did not receive sorafenib prior to surgical resection and those with and without portal vein tumor thrombosis. In the non-surgery group, the median survival was 302 days (95% confidence interval: 244-371), and the median time from diagnosis to death was 428 days (95% confidence interval: 352-556); in the surgery group, half of the patients survived for 345 days and the median time from diagnosis to death was 1000 days (95% confidence interval: 750-2816). Median progression-free survival and median time to progression were not different between the two groups. Median overall survival was 360 days (95% confidence interval: 309-435) in the non-portal vein tumor thrombosis group and 240 days (95% confidence interval: 181-296) in the portal vein tumor thrombosis group; median time between hepatocellular carcinoma diagnosis and death was 750 days (95% confidence interval: 472-1000) and 420 days (95% confidence interval: 252-567), respectively, in the two groups. Median progression-free survival was 209 days (95% confidence interval: 166-264) for patients without portal vein tumor thrombosis and 154 days (95% confidence interval: 112-202) for patients with portal vein