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Sample records for ablative tumor surgery

  1. [Tumor surgery].

    PubMed

    Hausamen, J E

    2000-05-01

    Surgery is still the primary therapeutic approach in treatment of tumors in the head and neck area, dating back to the early nineteenth century. More than 150 years ago, hemimaxillectomies and mandibular resections as well as hemiglossectomies were already performed by leading surgeons. The block principle we are now following dates back to Crile, who also established the principle of cervical lymph node dissection. Ablative oncologic surgery has always been closely linked with plastic and reconstructive surgery, rendering radical surgical interventions possible without disfiguring patients. The development of facial reconstructive surgery proceeded in stages, in the first instance as secondary reconstruction using tube pedicled flaps. The change to the concept of primary reconstruction occurred via arterialized skin flaps and myocutaneous flaps to the widely accepted and performed free tissue transfer. Free bone grafting, inaugurated earlier and still representing the majority of bone grafting, has been supplemented for certain reconstructive purposes by free vascularized bone transfer from various donor sites. Although the five-year-survival rate of carcinoma of the oral cavity has remained unchanged in the past 30 years, distinctive improvements in tumor surgery can be recorded. This is primarily based on improved diagnostics such as modern imaging techniques and the refinement of surgical techniques. The DOSAK has worked out distinctive guidelines for effective ablative oncologic surgery. Surgical approaches offering wide exposure and carrying low morbidity play a decisive role in radical resections. For this reason, midfacial degloving offers an essential improvement for the resection of midface tumors, especially from an aesthetic point of view. Tumors situated deep behind the viscerocranium at the skull base can be clearly exposed either through a lateral approach following a temporary osteotomy of the mandibular ramus or a transmandibular, transmaxillar, or

  2. New percutaneous ablative modalities in nephron-sparing surgery of small renal tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Riese, Werner T. W.; Nelius, Thomas; Aronoff, David R.; Mittemeyer, Bernhard T.

    2004-07-01

    Renal tumors are increasingly detected on abdominal imaging studies. Standard treatment of small renal tumors includes partial or radical nephrectomy, done either open or laparoscopically. Several in situ ablative techniques to treat small renal lesions are currently in various phases of evolution. All involve imparting destructive energy to the tumor while minimizing injury to adjacent normal tissue. Cryotherapy (CryoT), radiofrequency ablation (RFA), high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFUS) and high-intensity radiation (HIR) are all being evaluated as tools to ablate renal tumors. The goal with these modalities is to minimize the blood loss, tissue manipulation, and morbidity associated with excisional approaches. Animal studies have shown that large, reproducible lesions can be ablated in normal kidney tissue by these new techniques. Studies of human renal tissue response to RFA are just beginning. Ex vivo studies reveal large, reproducible controlled lesions in normal renal tissue, similar to animal studies. In vivo studies have shown no significant toxicity, while efficacy is currently under evaluation. Preliminary clinical studies in humans have revealed that renal tumors are slow to regress after treatment, but about 75% of these small renal tumors appeared well treated. Mixed responses have been observed in the remaining cases. This paper presents a concise review of efficacy, advantages and disadvantages of these new minimal invasive techniques and their possible clinical implication in the future.

  3. Tumor Ablation and Nanotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Manthe, Rachel L.; Foy, Susan P.; Krishnamurthy, Nishanth; Sharma, Blanka; Labhasetwar, Vinod

    2010-01-01

    Next to surgical resection, tumor ablation is a commonly used intervention in the treatment of solid tumors. Tumor ablation methods include thermal therapies, photodynamic therapy, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) producing agents. Thermal therapies induce tumor cell death via thermal energy and include radiofrequency, microwave, high intensity focused ultrasound, and cryoablation. Photodynamic therapy and ROS producing agents cause increased oxidative stress in tumor cells leading to apoptosis. While these therapies are safe and viable alternatives when resection of malignancies is not feasible, they do have associated limitations that prevent their widespread use in clinical applications. To improve the efficacy of these treatments, nanoparticles are being studied in combination with nonsurgical ablation regimens. In addition to better thermal effect on tumor ablation, nanoparticles can deliver anticancer therapeutics that show synergistic anti-tumor effect in the presence of heat and can also be imaged to achieve precision in therapy. Understanding the molecular mechanism of nanoparticle-mediated tumor ablation could further help engineer nanoparticles of appropriate composition and properties to synergize the ablation effect. This review aims to explore the various types of nonsurgical tumor ablation methods currently used in cancer treatment and potential improvements by nanotechnology applications. PMID:20866097

  4. Ablation of kidney tumors.

    PubMed

    Karam, Jose A; Ahrar, Kamran; Matin, Surena F

    2011-04-01

    While surgical excision remains the gold standard for curative treatment of small renal cell carcinomas, ablative therapy has a place as a minimally invasive, kidney function-preserving therapy in carefully selected patients who are poor candidates for surgery. Although laparoscopic cryoablation and percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RFA) are commonly performed, percutaneous cryoablation and laparoscopic RFA are reportedly being performed with increasing frequency. The renal function and complication profiles following ablative therapy are favorable, while oncologic outcomes lag behind those of surgery, thus reinforcing the need for careful patient selection. PMID:21377587

  5. [Percutaneous ablation of renal tumors: radiofrequency ablation or cryoablation?].

    PubMed

    Buy, X; Lang, H; Garnon, J; Gangi, A

    2011-09-01

    Percutaneous ablation of renal tumors, including radiofrequency ablation and cryoablation, are increasingly being used for small tumors as an alternative to surgery for poor surgical candidates. Compared to radiofrequency ablation, cryoablation has several advantages: improved volume control and preservation of adjacent structures due to the excellent depiction of the ice ball on CT and MRI; better protection of the collecting system for central tumor with reduced risk of postprocedural urinary fistula. The main pitfall of cryoablation is the higher cost. Therefore, cryoablation should be reserved for the treatment of complex tumors. In this article, we will review the different steps of percutaneous renal tumor ablation procedures including patient selection, technical considerations, and follow-up imaging. PMID:21944236

  6. Percutaneous Tumor Ablation with Radiofrequency

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Bradford J.; Ramkaransingh, Jeffrey R.; Fojo, Tito; Walther, McClellan M.; Libutti, Stephen K.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND Radiofrequency thermal ablation (RFA) is a new minimally invasive treatment for localized cancer. Minimally invasive surgical options require less resources, time, recovery, and cost, and often offer reduced morbidity and mortality, compared with more invasive methods. To be useful, image-guided, minimally invasive, local treatments will have to meet those expectations without sacrificing efficacy. METHODS Image-guided, local cancer treatment relies on the assumption that local disease control may improve survival. Recent developments in ablative techniques are being applied to patients with inoperable, small, or solitary liver tumors, recurrent metachronous hereditary renal cell carcinoma, and neoplasms in the bone, lung, breast, and adrenal gland. RESULTS Recent refinements in ablation technology enable large tumor volumes to be treated with image-guided needle placement, either percutaneously, laparoscopically, or with open surgery. Local disease control potentially could result in improved survival, or enhanced operability. CONCLUSIONS Consensus indications in oncology are ill-defined, despite widespread proliferation of the technology. A brief review is presented of the current status of image-guided tumor ablation therapy. More rigorous scientific review, long-term follow-up, and randomized prospective trials are needed to help define the role of RFA in oncology. PMID:11900230

  7. Lung Carcinoid Tumor: Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... for lung carcinoid tumor symptoms Surgery to treat lung carcinoid tumors Surgery is the main treatment for ... often be cured by surgery alone. Types of lung surgery Different operations can be used to treat ( ...

  8. Percutaneous Ablation of Adrenal Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Venkatesan, Aradhana M.; Locklin, Julia; Dupuy, Damian E.; Wood, Bradford J.

    2010-01-01

    Adrenal tumors comprise a broad spectrum of benign and malignant neoplasms, and include functional adrenal adenomas, pheochromocytomas, primary adrenocortical carcinoma and adrenal metastases. Percutaneous ablative approaches that have been described and used in the treatment of adrenal tumors include percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RFA), cryoablation, microwave ablation and chemical ablation. Local tumor ablation in the adrenal gland presents unique challenges, secondary to the adrenal gland’s unique anatomic and physiologic features. The results of clinical series employing percutaneous ablative techniques in the treatment of adrenal tumors are reviewed in this article. Clinical and technical considerations unique to ablation in the adrenal gland are presented, including approaches commonly used in our practices, and risks and potential complications are discussed. PMID:20540918

  9. Ablative therapies for renal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Ramanathan, Rajan; Leveillee, Raymond J.

    2010-01-01

    Owing to an increased use of diagnostic imaging for evaluating patients with other abdominal conditions, incidentally discovered kidney masses now account for a majority of renal tumors. Renal ablative therapy is assuming a more important role in patients with borderline renal impairment. Renal ablation uses heat or cold to bring about cell death. Radiofrequency ablation and cryoablation are two such procedures, and 5-year results are now emerging from both modalities. Renal biopsy at the time of ablation is extremely important in order to establish tissue diagnosis. Real-time temperature monitoring at the time of radiofrequency ablation is very useful to ensure adequacy of ablation. PMID:21789083

  10. Recent advances in microvascular autologous breast reconstruction after ablative tumor surgery

    PubMed Central

    Pollhammer, Michael S; Duscher, Dominik; Schmidt, Manfred; Huemer, Georg M

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is a ubiquitous disease and one of the leading causes of death in women in western societies. With overall increasing survival rates, the number of patients who need post-mastectomy reconstruction is on the rise. Especially since its psychological benefits have been broadly recognized, breast reconstruction has become a key component of breast cancer treatment. Evolving from the early beginnings of breast reconstruction with synthetic implants in the 1960s, microsurgical tissue transfer is on the way to become the gold standard for post oncology restoration of the breast. Particularly since the advent of perforator based free flap surgery, free tissue transfer has become as safe option for breast reconstruction with low morbidity. The lower abdominal skin and subcutaneous fat tissue typically offer enough volume to create an aesthetically satisfying breast mound. Nowadays, the most commonly used flap from this donor site is the deep inferior epigastric artery perforator flap. If the lower abdomen is not available as a donor site, the gluteal area and thigh provide a number of flaps suitable for breast reconstruction. If the required breast volume is small, and there is enough tissue available on the upper medial thigh, then a transverse upper gracilis flap may be a practicable method to reconstruct the breast. In case of a higher amount of required volume, a gluteal artery perforator flap is the best choice. However, what is crucial in addition to selecting the best flap option for the individual patient is the timing of the operation. In patients with confirmed post-mastectomy radiation therapy, it is advisable to perform microvascular breast reconstruction only in a delayed fashion. PMID:26862495

  11. Recent advances in microvascular autologous breast reconstruction after ablative tumor surgery.

    PubMed

    Pollhammer, Michael S; Duscher, Dominik; Schmidt, Manfred; Huemer, Georg M

    2016-02-10

    Breast cancer is a ubiquitous disease and one of the leading causes of death in women in western societies. With overall increasing survival rates, the number of patients who need post-mastectomy reconstruction is on the rise. Especially since its psychological benefits have been broadly recognized, breast reconstruction has become a key component of breast cancer treatment. Evolving from the early beginnings of breast reconstruction with synthetic implants in the 1960s, microsurgical tissue transfer is on the way to become the gold standard for post oncology restoration of the breast. Particularly since the advent of perforator based free flap surgery, free tissue transfer has become as safe option for breast reconstruction with low morbidity. The lower abdominal skin and subcutaneous fat tissue typically offer enough volume to create an aesthetically satisfying breast mound. Nowadays, the most commonly used flap from this donor site is the deep inferior epigastric artery perforator flap. If the lower abdomen is not available as a donor site, the gluteal area and thigh provide a number of flaps suitable for breast reconstruction. If the required breast volume is small, and there is enough tissue available on the upper medial thigh, then a transverse upper gracilis flap may be a practicable method to reconstruct the breast. In case of a higher amount of required volume, a gluteal artery perforator flap is the best choice. However, what is crucial in addition to selecting the best flap option for the individual patient is the timing of the operation. In patients with confirmed post-mastectomy radiation therapy, it is advisable to perform microvascular breast reconstruction only in a delayed fashion. PMID:26862495

  12. Image-Guided Tumor Ablation: Emerging Technologies and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    McWilliams, Justin P.; Lee, Edward W.; Yamamoto, Shota; Loh, Christopher T.; Kee, Stephen T.

    2010-01-01

    As the trend continues toward the decreased invasiveness of medical procedures, image-guided percutaneous ablation has begun to supplant surgery for the local control of small tumors in the liver, kidney, and lung. New ablation technologies, and refinements of existing technologies, will enable treatment of larger and more complex tumors in these and other organs. At the same time, improvements in intraprocedural imaging promise to improve treatment accuracy and reduce complications. In this review, the latest advancements in clinical and experimental ablation technologies will be summarized, and new applications of image-guided tumor ablation will be discussed. PMID:22550370

  13. Radiofrequency Ablation Therapy for Solid Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Kam, Anthony

    2002-12-04

    Surgical resection, systemic chemotherapy, and local radiation have been the conventional treatments for localized solid cancer. Because certain patients are not candidates for tumor resection and because many tumors are poorly responsive to chemotherapy and radiation, there has been an impetus to develop alternative therapies. Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a minimally invasive therapy for localized solid cancers that has gained considerable attention in the last 12 years. Advantages of minimally invasive therapies over surgery include less recovery time, lower morbidity and mortality, eligibility of more patients, and lower cost. RFA has been applied most extensively to inoperable hepatic tumors. It is investigational for tumors in the kidney, lung, bone, breast, and adrenal gland. This colloquium will review the mechanism, techniques, limitations, and clinical applications of RFA. The ultimate role that RFA will play in cancer therapy will depend on the results of long-term follow-up and prospective randomized trials.

  14. Thermal Ablation of Lung Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Sonntag, P. David; Hinshaw, J. Louis; Lubner, Meghan G.; Brace, Christopher L.; Lee, Fred T.

    2011-01-01

    Lung cancer remains the leading cause of cancer death in the United States, accounting for an estimated 29% of cancer deaths in 2009.1 Pneumonectomy or lobectomy with hilar and mediastinal lymph node sampling is the gold standard treatment and offers the best option for cure of stage 1/2 nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC).2 Unfortunately, only 15% of patients present with stage 1/2 disease, and many of these patients do not meet the pulmonary physiologic guidelines for lobar resection.3 In addition to lung cancer, pulmonary metastases are present in 25% to 30% of patients dying from all types of cancer.4 For some patients with oligometastatic pulmonary disease, metastectomy is associated with an improvement in survival.5 External beam radiation traditionally has been offered as the alternative to surgical resection for NSCLC or pulmonary metastatic disease. Unfortunately, the 5-year survival following radiation for stage 1 and 2 NSCLC remains low at 15% to 20%, with local recurrence being the most common mode of failure.6,7 Thermal ablation offers an intriguing therapeutic option to increase local tumor control and survival in patients with early stage NSCLC or with limited metastatic disease from nonlung primaries who are not surgical candidates because of poor cardiopulmonary reserve, anatomic constraints limiting resection, failure of traditional therapies, or refusal of operative approaches. Thermal ablation has been shown to be effective in treating tumors in bone, kidney, and liver.8–11 Most preclinical and clinical trials have focused on demonstrating the feasibility of three modalities for pulmonary thermal ablation, namely radiofrequency (RF) ablation, microwave (MW) ablation, and cryoablation. This article discusses the unique challenges of performing thermal ablation in lung tissue and reviews the current literature regarding RF, MW, and cryoablation in the lung. PMID:21377589

  15. Predictive analysis of optical ablation in several dermatological tumoral tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fanjul-Vélez, F.; Blanco-Gutiérrez, A.; Salas-García, I.; Ortega-Quijano, N.; Arce-Diego, J. L.

    2013-06-01

    Optical techniques for treatment and characterization of biological tissues are revolutionizing several branches of medical praxis, for example in ophthalmology or dermatology. The non-invasive, non-contact and non-ionizing character of optical radiation makes it specially suitable for these applications. Optical radiation can be employed in medical ablation applications, either for tissue resection or surgery. Optical ablation may provide a controlled and clean cut on a biological tissue. This is particularly relevant in tumoral tissue resection, where a small amount of cancerous cells could make the tumor appear again. A very important aspect of tissue optical ablation is then the estimation of the affected volume. In this work we propose a complete predictive model of tissue ablation that provides an estimation of the resected volume. The model is based on a Monte Carlo approach for the optical propagation of radiation inside the tissue, and a blow-off model for tissue ablation. This model is applied to several types of dermatological tumoral tissues, specifically squamous cells, basocellular and infiltrative carcinomas. The parameters of the optical source are varied and the estimated resected volume is calculated. The results for the different tumor types are presented and compared. This model can be used for surgical planning, in order to assure the complete resection of the tumoral tissue.

  16. Lip Reconstruction after Tumor Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Ebrahimi, Ali; Kalantar Motamedi, Mohammad Hossein; Ebrahimi, Azin; Kazemi, Mohammad; Shams, Amin; Hashemzadeh, Haleh

    2016-01-01

    Approximately 25% of all oral cavity carcinomas involve the lips, and the primary management of these lesions is complete surgical resection. Loss of tissue in the lips after resection is treated with a variety of techniques, depending on the extension and location of the defect. Here we review highly accepted techniques of lip reconstruction and some of new trials with significant clinical results. Reconstruction choice is primarily depend to size of the defect, localization of defect, elasticity of tissues. But patient’s age, comorbidities, and motivation are also important. According to the defect location and size, different reconstruction methods can be used. For defects involved less than 30% of lips, primary closures are sufficient. In defects with 35–70% lip involvement, the Karapandzic, Abbe, Estlander, McGregor or Gillies’ fan flaps or their modifications can be used. When lip remaining tissues are insufficient, cheek tissue can be used in Webster and Bernard advancement flaps and their various modifications. Deltopectoral or radial forearm free flaps can be options for large defects of the lip extending to the Jaws. To achieve best functional and esthetic results, surgeons should be able to choose most appropriate reconstruction method. Considering defects’ size and location, patients’ expects and surgeon’s ability and knowledge, a variety of flaps are presented in order to reconstruct defects resulted from tumor ablation. It’s necessary for surgeons to trace the recent innovations in lip reconstruction to offer best choices to patients. PMID:27308236

  17. Percutaneous radiofrequency ablation: minimally invasive therapy for renal tumors.

    PubMed

    Ahrar, Kamran; Wallace, Michael J; Matin, Surena F

    2006-12-01

    Currently, up to 60% of renal tumors are detected incidentally by abdominal imaging. Most of these tumors are small and localized to the kidney. Owing to the shift to lower stage at diagnosis, radical nephrectomy has fallen out of favor and has been replaced by nephron-sparing surgery. Currently, partial nephrectomy is the treatment of choice for patients with small renal tumors. As the trend towards less invasive therapy continues, laparoscopic and percutaneous ablation techniques have gained popularity for the treatment of renal tumors in patients who are high-risk surgical candidates, or have a solitary kidney, limited renal function or multifocal disease. Percutaneous radiofrequency ablation is a safe, minimally invasive treatment option for those patients. PMID:17181487

  18. Tumor Ablation: Common Modalities and General Practices

    PubMed Central

    Knavel, Erica M.; Brace, Christopher L.

    2014-01-01

    Tumor ablation is a minimally invasive technique that is commonly used in the treatment of tumors of the liver, kidney, bone, and lung. During tumor ablation, thermal energy is used to heat or cool tissue to cytotoxic levels (less than −40°C or more than 60°C). An additional technique is being developed that targets the permeability of the cell membrane and is ostensibly nonthermal. Within the classification of tumor ablation, there are several modalities used worldwide: radiofrequency, microwave, laser, high-intensity focused ultrasound, cryoablation, and irreversible electroporation. Each technique, although similar in purpose, has specific and optimal indications. This review serves to discuss general principles and technique, reviews each modality, and discusses modality selection. PMID:24238374

  19. Image-Guided Percutaneous Ablation of Bone and Soft Tissue Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Kurup, A. Nicholas; Callstrom, Matthew R.

    2010-01-01

    Image-guided percutaneous ablation of bone and soft tissue tumors is an effective minimally invasive alternative to conventional therapies, such as surgery and external beam radiotherapy. Proven applications include treatment of benign primary bone tumors, particularly osteoid osteoma, as well as palliation of painful bone metastases. Use of percutaneous ablation in combination with cementoplasty can provide stabilization of metastases at risk for fracture. Local control of oligometastatic disease and treatment of desmoid tumors are emerging applications. PMID:22550367

  20. Current Tumor Ablation Technologies: Basic Science and Device Review

    PubMed Central

    Saldanha, David F.; Khiatani, Vishal L.; Carrillo, Tami C.; Yap, Felix Y.; Bui, James T.; Knuttinen, M. Grace; Owens, Charles A.; Gaba, Ron C.

    2010-01-01

    Image-guided tumor ablation is an increasingly utilized tool to treat focal malignancy. Tumor ablation can be divided into two large categories, thermal and chemical ablation. The authors provide an overview of the current methods used to achieve thermal and chemical ablation of tumors, specifically addressing the basic science behind the ablation methods as well as providing a brief synopsis of the commercial devices currently available for use in the United States. PMID:22550363

  1. Brain Tumor Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... The surgical removal of a portion of the skull. Doing so allows the neurosurgeon to find the ... much of it as possible. The piece of skull that was removed is replaced following surgery. Craniectomy: ...

  2. High intensity focused ultrasound in clinical tumor ablation

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yu-Feng

    2011-01-01

    Recent advances in high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU), which was developed in the 1940s as a viable thermal tissue ablation approach, have increased its popularity. In clinics, HIFU has been applied to treat a variety of solid malignant tumors in a well-defined volume, including the pancreas, liver, prostate, breast, uterine fibroids, and soft-tissue sarcomas. In comparison to conventional tumor/cancer treatment modalities, such as open surgery, radio- and chemo-therapy, HIFU has the advantages of non-invasion, non-ionization, and fewer complications after treatment. Over 100 000 cases have been treated throughout the world with great success. The fundamental principles of HIFU ablation are coagulative thermal necrosis due to the absorption of ultrasound energy during transmission in tissue and the induced cavitation damage. This paper reviews the clinical outcomes of HIFU ablation for applicable cancers, and then summarizes the recommendations for a satisfactory HIFU treatment according to clinical experience. In addition, the current challenges in HIFU for engineers and physicians are also included. More recent horizons have broadened the application of HIFU in tumor treatment, such as HIFU-mediated drug delivery, vessel occlusion, and soft tissue erosion (“histotripsy”). In summary, HIFU is likely to play a significant role in the future oncology practice. PMID:21603311

  3. Laser tumor treatment in oral and maxillofacial surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neukam, F. W.; Stelzle, F.

    Cancer treatment is an integral part of oral and maxillofacial surgery. Oral cancer in particular is a highly prevalent neoplasm. Standard treatment for most of the tumors is radical surgery combined with stage-based neo-/adjuvant therapy. Laser surgery has become a reliable treatment option for oral cancer as well as for precancerous lesions. Widely used lasers in oral and maxillofacial tumor surgery are the CO2 laser, the Er:YAG laser, the Nd:YAG laser and the KTM laser. The use of lasers in tumor surgery has several advantages: remote application, precise cutting, hemostasis, low cicatrization, reduced postoperative pain and swelling, can be combined with endoscopic, microscopic and robotic surgery. However, laser surgery has some major drawbacks: In contrast to conventional incisions with scalpels, the surgeon gets no feedback during laser ablation. There is no depth sensation and no tissue specificity with a laser incision, increasing the risk of iatrogenic damage to nerves and major blood vessels. Future prospects may solve these problems by means of an optical feedback mechanism that provides a tissue-specific laser ablation. First attempts have been made to perform remote optical tissue differentiation. Additionally, real time optical tumor detection during laser surgery would allow for a very precise and straight forward cancer resection, enhancing organ preservation and hence the quality of life for patients with cancer in the head and neck region.

  4. Efficacy and Safety of Endoscopic Ultrasound-guided Ethanol Ablation Therapy for Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Kazuyuki; Kato, Hironari; Tsutsumi, Koichiro; Mizukawa, Sho; Yabe, Syuntaro; Seki, Hiroyuki; Akimoto, Yutaka; Uchida, Daisuke; Tomoda, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Naoki; Horiguchi, Shigeru; Okada, Hiroyuki

    2016-08-01

    Recently, endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS)-guided ethanol ablation for small pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (p-NETs) has been reported. However, the efficacy and safety of the technique remain unclear. We have launched a prospective pilot study of EUS-guided ethanol ablation for p-NETs. The major eligibility criteria are the presence of a pathologically diagnosed grade (G) 1 or G2 p-NET, a tumor size of 2cm, and being a poor candidate for surgery. A total of 5 patients will be treated. The primary endpoint will be the complete ablation rate at 1 month after treatment. PMID:27549680

  5. Radiofrequency thermal ablation of renal tumors.

    PubMed

    De Filippo, Massimo; Bozzetti, Francesca; Martora, Rosa; Zagaria, Raffaella; Ferretti, Stefania; Macarini, Luca; Brunese, Luca; Rotondo, Antonio; Rossi, Cristina

    2014-07-01

    Percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (PRFA) of renal malignancies is currently a therapeutic option for patients who are not able to undergo surgery. Some authors consider PRFA as the therapeutic standard in the treatment of renal neoplasms in non-operable patients due to comorbid conditions and in patients with mild-moderate renal failure, to preserve residual renal functionality. The use of PRFA has become more and more widespread due to a rise in the incidental detection of renal cell carcinomas with the ever-increasing use of Imaging for the study of abdominal diseases. Clinical studies indicate that RF ablation is an effective therapy with a low level of risk of complications, which provides good results in selected patients over short and medium term periods of time, however up to now few long-term studies have been carried out which can confirm the effectiveness of PRFA. PMID:25024061

  6. Ablation techniques for primary and metastatic liver tumors.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Michael J; Willatt, Jonathon; Majdalany, Bill S; Kielar, Ania Z; Chong, Suzanne; Ruma, Julie A; Pandya, Amit

    2016-01-28

    Ablative treatment methods have emerged as safe and effective therapies for patients with primary and secondary liver tumors who are not surgical candidates at the time of diagnosis. This article reviews the current literature and describes the techniques, complications and results for radiofrequency ablation, microwave ablation, cryoablation, and irreversible electroporation. PMID:26839642

  7. Ablation techniques for primary and metastatic liver tumors

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Michael J; Willatt, Jonathon; Majdalany, Bill S; Kielar, Ania Z; Chong, Suzanne; Ruma, Julie A; Pandya, Amit

    2016-01-01

    Ablative treatment methods have emerged as safe and effective therapies for patients with primary and secondary liver tumors who are not surgical candidates at the time of diagnosis. This article reviews the current literature and describes the techniques, complications and results for radiofrequency ablation, microwave ablation, cryoablation, and irreversible electroporation. PMID:26839642

  8. Comparison of procedure costs of various percutaneous tumor ablation modalities.

    PubMed

    Astani, Seyed A; Brown, Manuel L; Steusloff, Kay

    2014-01-01

    Microwave ablation, radiofrequency ablation, cryoablation, and irreversible electroporation are percutaneous ablation modalities commonly employed to treat tumors. The procedure cost of treating the same lesion with each of the four modalities is compared. A cost model was created for each ablation modality estimating the cost of treating a tumor based on the number of probes required, which is estimated by the tumor size.Total cost of treating a 3 cm kidney lesion with each modality was individually calculated. There was a strongly positive and statistically significant relationship between estimated cost based on the cost modules and actual cost for all procedures. The number of required probes is the dominant factor in determining the cost of an ablation procedure. The most expensive ablation modalities in decreasing order are irreversible electroporation, cryoablation, and microwave and radiofrequency ablations. PMID:25174139

  9. Factors Limiting Complete Tumor Ablation by Radiofrequency Ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Paulet, Erwan Aube, Christophe; Pessaux, Patrick; Lebigot, Jerome; Lhermitte, Emilie; Oberti, Frederic; Ponthieux, Anne; Cales, Paul; Ridereau-Zins, Catherine; Pereira, Philippe L.

    2008-01-15

    The purpose of this study was to determine radiological or physical factors to predict the risk of residual mass or local recurrence of primary and secondary hepatic tumors treated by radiofrequency ablation (RFA). Eighty-two patients, with 146 lesions (80 hepatocellular carcinomas, 66 metastases), were treated by RFA. Morphological parameters of the lesions included size, location, number, ultrasound echogenicity, computed tomography density, and magnetic resonance signal intensity were obtained before and after treatment. Parameters of the generator were recorded during radiofrequency application. The recurrence-free group was statistically compared to the recurrence and residual mass groups on all these parameters. Twenty residual masses were detected. Twenty-nine lesions recurred after a mean follow-up of 18 months. Size was a predictive parameter. Patients' sex and age and the echogenicity and density of lesions were significantly different for the recurrence and residual mass groups compared to the recurrence-free group (p < 0.05). The presence of an enhanced ring on the magnetic resonance control was more frequent in the recurrence and residual mass groups. In the group of patients with residual lesions, analysis of physical parameters showed a significant increase (p < 0.05) in the time necessary for the temperature to rise. In conclusion, this study confirms risk factors of recurrence such as the size of the tumor and emphasizes other factors such as a posttreatment enhanced ring and an increase in the time necessary for the rise in temperature. These factors should be taken into consideration when performing RFA and during follow-up.

  10. Interferometric analysis of the ablation profile in refractive surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Rodríguez, M. I.; López-Olazagasti, E.; Rosales, M. A.; Ramírez-Zavaleta, G.; Cantú, R.; Tepichín, E.

    2008-08-01

    In ophthalmology, the laser excimer corneal surface ablation used to correct the refractive eye defects, such as myopia, astigmatism and hyperopia and, more recently, presbyopia is known as refractive surgery. Typically, the characterization of the corresponding technique, as well as the laser accuracy, is performed by analyzing standard ablation profiles made on PMMA (polymethylmethacrylate) plates. A drawback of this technique is that those plates do not necessarily represent the dimensions of the cornea during the ablation. On the other hand, due to the time varying process of the eye aberrations, the direct eye refractometric measurements can produce some errors. We report in this work the interferometric analysis of the ablation profile obtained with refractive surgery, applied directly on a contact lens. In this case, the resultant ablation profile might be closer to the real profile as well as time invariant. We use, as a reference, a similar contact lens without ablation. The preliminary results of the characterization of the corresponding ablation profile are also presented.

  11. Canine ocular tumors following ciliary body ablation with intravitreal gentamicin.

    PubMed

    Duke, Felicia D; Strong, Travis D; Bentley, Ellison; Dubielzig, Richard R

    2013-03-01

    Iridociliary tumors are the second most common primary ocular tumor in dogs and are usually benign. A review of the Comparative Ocular Pathology Laboratory of Wisconsin (COPLOW) database in 2009 suggested a potential correlation between malignant iridociliary epithelial tumors and ciliary body ablation by intravitreal gentamicin injection for the treatment of glaucoma. The purpose of this case series was to determine whether there is evidence of such a correlation in the COPLOW collection. Mining of the COPLOW database revealed that a significant number (39.5%) of canine globes with a history of ciliary body ablation were subsequently diagnosed with primary ocular tumors at enucleation, most commonly iridociliary epithelial tumors and melanocytic tumors. It is possible that neoplasia was present but unrecognized at the time of ciliary body ablation. These tumors had a higher than expected incidence of malignancy. These cases underscore the importance of reserving ciliary body ablation with gentamicin for disease-free eyes. PMID:22812389

  12. Recent Advances in Tumor Ablation for Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Tae Wook; Rhim, Hyunchul

    2015-01-01

    Image-guided tumor ablation for early stage hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is an accepted non-surgical treatment that provides excellent local tumor control and favorable survival benefit. This review summarizes the recent advances in tumor ablation for HCC. Diagnostic imaging and molecular biology of HCC has recently undergone marked improvements. Second-generation ultrasonography (US) contrast agents, new computed tomography (CT) techniques, and liver-specific contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have enabled the early detection of smaller and inconspicuous HCC lesions. Various imaging-guidance tools that incorporate imaging-fusion between real-time US and CT/MRI, that are now common for percutaneous tumor ablation, have increased operator confidence in the accurate targeting of technically difficult tumors. In addition to radiofrequency ablation (RFA), various therapeutic modalities including microwave ablation, irreversible electroporation, and high-intensity focused ultrasound ablation have attracted attention as alternative energy sources for effective locoregional treatment of HCC. In addition, combined treatment with RFA and chemoembolization or molecular agents may be able to overcome the limitation of advanced or large tumors. Finally, understanding of the biological mechanisms and advances in therapy associated with tumor ablation will be important for successful tumor control. All these advances in tumor ablation for HCC will result in significant improvement in the prognosis of HCC patients. In this review, we primarily focus on recent advances in molecular tumor biology, diagnosis, imaging-guidance tools, and therapeutic modalities, and refer to the current status and future perspectives for tumor ablation for HCC. PMID:26674766

  13. Recent Advances in Tumor Ablation for Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kang, Tae Wook; Rhim, Hyunchul

    2015-09-01

    Image-guided tumor ablation for early stage hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is an accepted non-surgical treatment that provides excellent local tumor control and favorable survival benefit. This review summarizes the recent advances in tumor ablation for HCC. Diagnostic imaging and molecular biology of HCC has recently undergone marked improvements. Second-generation ultrasonography (US) contrast agents, new computed tomography (CT) techniques, and liver-specific contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have enabled the early detection of smaller and inconspicuous HCC lesions. Various imaging-guidance tools that incorporate imaging-fusion between real-time US and CT/MRI, that are now common for percutaneous tumor ablation, have increased operator confidence in the accurate targeting of technically difficult tumors. In addition to radiofrequency ablation (RFA), various therapeutic modalities including microwave ablation, irreversible electroporation, and high-intensity focused ultrasound ablation have attracted attention as alternative energy sources for effective locoregional treatment of HCC. In addition, combined treatment with RFA and chemoembolization or molecular agents may be able to overcome the limitation of advanced or large tumors. Finally, understanding of the biological mechanisms and advances in therapy associated with tumor ablation will be important for successful tumor control. All these advances in tumor ablation for HCC will result in significant improvement in the prognosis of HCC patients. In this review, we primarily focus on recent advances in molecular tumor biology, diagnosis, imaging-guidance tools, and therapeutic modalities, and refer to the current status and future perspectives for tumor ablation for HCC. PMID:26674766

  14. Semi-autonomous Simulated Brain Tumor Ablation with RavenII Surgical Robot using Behavior Tree

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Danying; Gong, Yuanzheng; Hannaford, Blake; Seibel, Eric J.

    2015-01-01

    Medical robots have been widely used to assist surgeons to carry out dexterous surgical tasks via various ways. Most of the tasks require surgeon’s operation directly or indirectly. Certain level of autonomy in robotic surgery could not only free the surgeon from some tedious repetitive tasks, but also utilize the advantages of robot: high dexterity and accuracy. This paper presents a semi-autonomous neurosurgical procedure of brain tumor ablation using RAVEN Surgical Robot and stereo visual feedback. By integrating with the behavior tree framework, the whole surgical task is modeled flexibly and intelligently as nodes and leaves of a behavior tree. This paper provides three contributions mainly: (1) describing the brain tumor ablation as an ideal candidate for autonomous robotic surgery, (2) modeling and implementing the semi-autonomous surgical task using behavior tree framework, and (3) designing an experimental simulated ablation task for feasibility study and robot performance analysis. PMID:26405563

  15. Heat-Based Tumor Ablation: Role of the Immune Response.

    PubMed

    Wu, Feng

    2016-01-01

    The ideal cancer therapy not only induces the death of all localized tumor cells with less damage to surrounding normal tissue, but also activates a systemic antitumor immunity. Heat-based tumor ablation has the potential to be such a treatment as it can minimal-invasively ablate a targeted tumor below the skin surface, and may subsequently augment host antitumor immunity. This chapter primarily introduces increasing pre-clinical and clinical evidence linking antitumor immune response to thermal tumor ablation, and then discusses the potential mechanisms involved in ablation-enhanced host antitumor immunity. The seminal studies performed so far indicate that although it is not possible to make definite conclusions on the connection between thermal ablation and antitumor immune response, it is nonetheless important to conduct extensive studies on the subject in order to elucidate the processes involved. PMID:26486336

  16. Surgical Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation during Mitral-Valve Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Gillinov, A. Marc; Gelijns, Annetine C.; Parides, Michael K.; DeRose, Joseph J.; Moskowitz, Alan J.; Voisine, Pierre; Ailawadi, Gorav; Bouchard, Denis; Smith, Peter K.; Mack, Michael J.; Acker, Michael A.; Mullen, John C.; Rose, Eric A.; Chang, Helena L.; Puskas, John D.; Couderc, Jean-Philippe; Gardner, Timothy J.; Varghese, Robin; Horvath, Keith A.; Bolling, Steven F.; Michler, Robert E.; Geller, Nancy L.; Ascheim, Deborah D.; Miller, Marissa A.; Bagiella, Emilia; Moquete, Ellen G.; Williams, Paula; Taddei-Peters, Wendy C.; O’Gara, Patrick T.; Blackstone, Eugene H.; Argenziano, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Background Among patients undergoing mitral-valve surgery, 30 to 50% present with atrial fibrillation, which is associated with reduced survival and increased risk of stroke. Surgical ablation of atrial fibrillation has been widely adopted, but evidence regarding its safety and effectiveness is limited. Methods We randomly assigned 260 patients with persistent or long-standing persistent atrial fibrillation who required mitral-valve surgery to undergo either surgical ablation (ablation group) or no ablation (control group) during the mitral-valve operation. Patients in the ablation group underwent further randomization to pulmonary-vein isolation or a biatrial maze procedure. All patients underwent closure of the left atrial appendage. The primary end point was freedom from atrial fibrillation at both 6 months and 12 months (as assessed by means of 3-day Holter monitoring). Results More patients in the ablation group than in the control group were free from atrial fibrillation at both 6 and 12 months (63.2% vs. 29.4%, P<0.001). There was no significant difference in the rate of freedom from atrial fibrillation between patients who underwent pulmonary-vein isolation and those who underwent the biatrial maze procedure (61.0% and 66.0%, respectively; P = 0.60). One-year mortality was 6.8% in the ablation group and 8.7% in the control group (hazard ratio with ablation, 0.76; 95% confidence interval, 0.32 to 1.84; P = 0.55). Ablation was associated with more implantations of a permanent pacemaker than was no ablation (21.5 vs. 8.1 per 100 patient-years, P = 0.01). There were no significant between-group differences in major cardiac or cerebrovascular adverse events, overall serious adverse events, or hospital readmissions. Conclusions The addition of atrial fibrillation ablation to mitral-valve surgery significantly increased the rate of freedom from atrial fibrillation at 1 year among patients with persistent or long-standing persistent atrial fibrillation, but the

  17. Management of the Temporomandibular Joint after Ablative Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Bredell, Marius; Grätz, Klaus; Obwegeser, Joachim; Gujer, Astrid Kruse

    2014-01-01

    Management of the temporomandibular joint in ablative head and neck surgery is controversial with no standardized approach. The aim of the study was to establish risk-based guidelines for the management of the temporomandibular joint after ablative surgery. Analysis of all patients' records receiving ablative surgery involving the temporomandibular joint in the Department of Cranio-Maxillofacial and Oral Surgery, University Hospital of Zürich, from 2001 to 2012, was performed, identifying 15 patients and 14 reconstructive procedures. A literature search was done identifying all relevant literature on current approaches. Applicable cohorts were constructed, and relevant risks were extrapolated. Evaluated studies are not uniform in their reporting with nonhomogeneous patient groups. A diverse approach is used in the management of these patients with complications such as infection, ankylosis, limited mouth opening, plate penetration in the skull base, and plate loosening. Risk factors for complications appear to be radiation, costochondral graft, disk loss, and plate use alone. Clinical data suggest use of a plate with metal condyle reconstructions and previous radiation therapy as potential risks factors. Employing literature evidence and cumulated clinical data, a risk-based flowchart was developed to assist surgical decision making. Risk factors such as radiation, disk preservation, and soft tissue conditions are important complication-associated factors when planning surgery. Free vascularized fibula grafts appear to have the least complications that must be weighed against donor site morbidity. PMID:25379124

  18. Clinical Experience with Cone Beam CT Navigation for Tumor Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Abi-Jaoudeh, Nadine; Venkatesan, Aradhana M.; Van der Sterren, William; Radaelli, Alessandro; Carelsen, Bart; Wood, Bradford J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To describe clinical use and potential benefits of Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) navigation to perform image guided percutaneous tumor ablations. Materials and Methods All ablations performed between February 2011 and February 2013 using CBCT navigation, were included. Sixteen patients underwent 20 ablations for 29 lesions. CBCT ablation planning capabilities include multimodality image fusion and tumor segmentation for visualization, depiction of the predicted ablation zones for intra-procedural planning and segmentation of the ablated area for immediate post-treatment verification. Number and purpose of CBCT were examined. The initial ablation plan defined as number of probes and duration of energy delivery was recorded for 20/29 lesions. Technical success and local recurrences were recorded. Primary and secondary effectiveness rates were calculated. Results Image fusion was utilized for 16 lesions and intra-procedural ultrasound for 4. Of the 20/29 lesions, where the ablation plans were recorded, there was no deviation from the plan in 14. In the remaining 6/20, iterative planning was needed for complete tumor coverage. An average of 8.7 ± 3.2 CBCT were performed per procedure, including 1.3 ± 0.5 for tumor segmentation and planning, 1.7 ± 0.7 for probe position confirmation, 3.9 ± 2 to ensure complete coverage. Mean follow-up was 18.6 ± 6.5 months. 28/29 ablations were technically successful (96.5%). Of ablations performed with curative intent, technical effectiveness at one-month was 25/26 (96.1%) and 22/26 (84.6%) at last follow-up. Local tumor progression was observed in 11.5% (3/26). Conclusion CBCT navigation may add information to assist and improve ablation guidance and monitoring. PMID:25645409

  19. MRI-guided laser ablation of neuroendocrine tumor hepatic metastases

    PubMed Central

    Perälä, Jukka; Klemola, Rauli; Kallio, Raija; Li, Chengli; Vihriälä, Ilkka; Salmela, Pasi I; Tervonen, Osmo

    2014-01-01

    Background Neuroendocrine tumors (NET) represent a therapeutically challenging and heterogeneous group of malignancies occurring throughout the body, but mainly in the gastrointestinal system. Purpose To describe magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided laser ablation of NET liver metastases and assess its role within the current treatment options and methods. Material and Methods Two patients with NET tumor hepatic metastases were treated with MRI-guided interstitial laser ablation (LITT). Three tumors were treated. Clinical follow-up time was 10 years. Results Both patients were successfully treated. There were no local recurrences at the ablation site during the follow-up. Both patients had survived at 10-year follow-up. One patient is disease-free. Conclusion MRI-guided laser ablation can be used to treat NET tumor liver metastases but combination therapy and a rigorous follow-up schedule are recommended. PMID:24778794

  20. Feline ocular tumors following ciliary body ablation with intravitreal gentamicin.

    PubMed

    Duke, Felicia D; Strong, Travis D; Bentley, Ellison; Dubielzig, Richard R

    2013-07-01

    Practitioners approach chemical ciliary body ablation (CBA) in cats with caution. In 1994, an academic letter proposed a potential link between intraocular gentamicin injections for glaucoma and the appearance of ocular tumors in cats (Veterinary and Comparative Ophthalmology, 4, 1994, 166). There is an historic perceived risk for the development of feline ocular post-traumatic sarcoma following gentamicin ciliary body ablation, and many clinicians refrain from chemical ablation in cats for this reason. A recent study discussed the possibility of a correlation between intravitreal gentamicin and tumor promotion in dogs (Veterinary Ophthalmology, 16, 2013, 159). We searched the Comparative Ocular Pathology Laboratory of Wisconsin (COPLOW) database for cases of cats diagnosed with ocular tumors following ciliary body ablation. Of eight cases with historic gentamicin injection, five had malignant tumors: three post-traumatic sarcomas and two melanomas. PMID:23701585

  1. Quantification and controllability study of minimally invasive exothermic chemo-ablation therapy for tumor ablation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ran; Huang, Yu; Liu, Jing

    2009-01-01

    The recently proposed exothermic chemical reaction based tumor hyperthermia method presented a new way of realizing truly minimally invasive treatment for tumor. This method utilizes heat generated from the reaction between acid and alkali solutions to allow for tumor ablation. Successful clinical implementation of this method requires a clearer understanding and quantification of the ablation area such that a more controllable operation can be made. A number of in-vitro and in-vivo experiments are designed to examine the features of thermal chemo-ablation therapy which include micro and macro characteristics of ablated tissue and temperature change during the ablation process. A Quantitative study on the relationship between velocity and ablation volume as well as a Graphical User Interface in Matlab for computerized ablation area analysis are also presented in this article. We present in here two instrument designs for thermal chemo-ablation and have completed the prototype design for the injection pump which has been tested and successfully applied in ex-vivo and vivo experiments. PMID:19963802

  2. First noninvasive thermal ablation of a brain tumor with MR-guided focused ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Coluccia, Daniel; Fandino, Javier; Schwyzer, Lucia; O'Gorman, Ruth; Remonda, Luca; Anon, Javier; Martin, Ernst; Werner, Beat

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound surgery (MRgFUS) allows for precise thermal ablation of target tissues. While this emerging modality is increasingly used for the treatment of various types of extracranial soft tissue tumors, it has only recently been acknowledged as a modality for noninvasive neurosurgery. MRgFUS has been particularly successful for functional neurosurgery, whereas its clinical application for tumor neurosurgery has been delayed for various technical and procedural reasons. Here, we report the case of a 63-year-old patient presenting with a centrally located recurrent glioblastoma who was included in our ongoing clinical phase I study aimed at evaluating the feasibility and safety of transcranial MRgFUS for brain tumor ablation. Applying 25 high-power sonications under MR imaging guidance, partial tumor ablation could be achieved without provoking neurological deficits or other adverse effects in the patient. This proves, for the first time, the feasibility of using transcranial MR-guided focused ultrasound to safely ablate substantial volumes of brain tumor tissue. PMID:25671132

  3. First noninvasive thermal ablation of a brain tumor with MR-guided focused ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound surgery (MRgFUS) allows for precise thermal ablation of target tissues. While this emerging modality is increasingly used for the treatment of various types of extracranial soft tissue tumors, it has only recently been acknowledged as a modality for noninvasive neurosurgery. MRgFUS has been particularly successful for functional neurosurgery, whereas its clinical application for tumor neurosurgery has been delayed for various technical and procedural reasons. Here, we report the case of a 63-year-old patient presenting with a centrally located recurrent glioblastoma who was included in our ongoing clinical phase I study aimed at evaluating the feasibility and safety of transcranial MRgFUS for brain tumor ablation. Applying 25 high-power sonications under MR imaging guidance, partial tumor ablation could be achieved without provoking neurological deficits or other adverse effects in the patient. This proves, for the first time, the feasibility of using transcranial MR-guided focused ultrasound to safely ablate substantial volumes of brain tumor tissue. PMID:25671132

  4. Lung Tumor Radiofrequency Ablation: Where Do We Stand?

    SciTech Connect

    Baere, Thierry de

    2011-04-15

    Today, radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of primary and metastatic lung tumor is increasingly used. Because RFA is most often used with curative intent, preablation workup must be a preoperative workup. General anesthesia provides higher feasibility than conscious sedation. The electrode positioning must be performed under computed tomography for sake of accuracy. The delivery of RFA must be adapted to tumor location, with different impedances used when treating tumors with or without pleural contact. The estimated rate of incomplete local treatment at 18 months was 7% (95% confidence interval, 3-14) per tumor, with incomplete treatment depicted at 4 months (n = 1), 6 months (n = 2), 9 months (n = 2), and 12 months (n = 2). Overall survival and lung disease-free survival at 18 months were, respectively, 71 and 34%. Size is a key point for tumor selection because large size is predictive of incomplete local treatment and poor survival. The ratio of ablation volume relative to tumor volume is predictive of complete ablation. Follow-up computed tomography that relies on the size of the ablation zone demonstrates the presence of incomplete ablation. Positron emission tomography might be an interesting option. Chest tube placement for pneumothorax is reported in 8 to 12%. Alveolar hemorrhage and postprocedure hemoptysis occurred in approximately 10% of procedures and rarely required specific treatment. Death was mostly related to single-lung patients and hilar tumors. No modification of forced expiratory volume in the first second between pre- and post-RFA at 2 months was found. RFA in the lung provides a high local efficacy rate. The use of RFA as a palliative tool in combination with chemotherapy remains to be explored.

  5. Frequency and Risk Factors of Various Complications After Computed Tomography-Guided Radiofrequency Ablation of Lung Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Okuma, Tomohisa Matsuoka, Toshiyuki; Yamamoto, Akira; Oyama, Yoshimasa; Toyoshima, Masami; Nakamura, Kenji; Inoue, Yuichi

    2008-01-15

    Objective. To retrospectively determine the frequency and risk factors of various side effects and complications after percutaneous computed tomography-guided radiofrequency (RF) ablation of lung tumors. Methods. We reviewed and analyzed records of 112 treatment sessions in 57 of our patients (45 men and 12 women) with unresectable lung tumors treated by ablation. Risk factors, including sex, age, tumor diameter, tumor location, history of surgery, presence of pulmonary emphysema, electrode gauge, array diameter, patient position, maximum power output, ablation time, and minimum impedance during ablation, were analyzed using univariate and multivariate analyses. Results. Total rates of side effects and minor and major complications occurred in 17%, 50%, and 8% of treatment sessions, respectively. Side effects, including pain during ablation (46% of sessions) and pleural effusion (13% of sessions), occurred with RF ablation. Minor complications, including pneumothorax not requiring chest tube drainage (30% of sessions), subcutaneous emphysema (16% of sessions), and hemoptysis (9% of sessions) also occurred after the procedure. Regarding major complications, three patients developed fever >38.5 deg. C; three patients developed abscesses; two patients developed pneumothorax requiring chest tube insertion; and one patient had air embolism and was discharged without neurologic deficit. Univariate and multivariate analyses suggested that a lesion located {<=}1 cm of the chest wall was significantly related to pain (p < 0.01, hazard index 5.76). Risk factors for pneumothorax increased significantly with previous pulmonary surgery (p < 0.05, hazard index 6.1) and presence of emphysema (p <0.01, hazard index 13.6). Conclusion. The total complication rate for all treatment sessions was 58%, and 25% of patients did not have any complications after RF ablation. Although major complications can occur, RF ablation of lung tumors can be considered a safe and minimally invasive

  6. Percutaneous radiofrequency ablation of primary intraosseous spinal glomus tumor.

    PubMed

    Becce, Fabio; Richarme, Delphine; Letovanec, Igor; Gilgien, Willy; Theumann, Nicolas

    2012-04-01

    The glomus tumor is a rare, benign, but painful vascular neoplasm arising from the neuromyoarterial glomus. Primary intraosseous glomus tumor is even rarer, with only about 20 cases reported in the literature so far, 5 of which involved the spine. Surgical resection is currently considered the treatment of choice. We herewith present an uncommon case of primary intraosseous spinal glomus tumor involving the right pedicle of the eleventh thoracic vertebra (T11). To our knowledge, this is the first case of primary intraosseous spinal glomus tumor successfully treated by percutaneous CT-guided radiofrequency ablation (RFA). PMID:22072240

  7. How intraoperative navigation is changing musculoskeletal tumor surgery.

    PubMed

    Satcher, Robert L

    2013-10-01

    Computer-assisted orthopedic surgery (CAOS) was introduced, developed, and implemented in musculoskeletal tumor surgery recently to enhance surgical precision in resecting malignant and benign tumors. The origins of computer-assisted surgery were in other subspecialties including maxillofacial surgery, spine surgery, and arthroplasty. Early studies have shown that CAOS can also be used safely for bone tumor resection surgery. Additional technological improvements may allow use of CAOS in soft tissue tumor surgery. It has the potential to improve surgical precision and accuracy, but more study is needed to evaluate clinical efficacy and long term results. PMID:24095079

  8. Use of Semiflexible Applicators for Radiofrequency Ablation of Liver Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Gaffke, G. Gebauer, B.; Knollmann, F.D.; Helmberger, T.; Ricke, J.; Oettle, H.; Felix, R.; Stroszczynski, C.

    2006-04-15

    Purpose. To evaluate the feasibility and potential advantages of the radiofrequency ablation of liver tumors using new MRI-compatible semiflexible applicators in a closed-bore high-field MRI scanner. Methods. We treated 8 patients with 12 malignant liver tumors of different origin (5 colorectal carcinoma, 2 cholangiocellular carcinoma, 1 breast cancer) under MRI guidance. Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) was performed using 5 cm Rita Starburst Semi-Flex applicators (Rita Medical Systems, Milwaukee, WI, USA) which are suitable for MR- and CT-guided interventions and a 150 W RF generator. All interventions were performed in a closed-bore 1.5 T high-field MRI scanner for MRI-guided RFA using fast T1-weighted gradient echo sequences and T2-weighted ultra-turbo spin echo sequences. Control and follow-up MRI examinations were performed on the next day, at 6 weeks, and every 3 months after RFA. Control MRI were performed as double-contrast MRI examinations (enhancement with iron oxide and gadopentetate dimeglumine). All interventions were performed with the patient under local anesthesia and analgo-sedation. Results. The mean diameter of the treated hepatic tumors was 2.4 cm ({+-}0.6 cm, range 1.0-3.2 cm). The mean diameter of induced necrosis was 3.1 cm ({+-}0.4 cm). We achieved complete ablation in all patients. Follow-up examinations over a duration of 7 months ({+-}1.3 months, range 4-9 month) showed a local control rate of 100% in this group of patients. All interventions were performed without major complications; only 2 subcapsular hematomas were documented. Conclusion. RFA of liver tumors using semiflexible applicators in closed-bore 1.5 T scanner systems is feasible. These applicators might simplify the RFA of liver tumors under MRI control. The stiff distal part of the applicator facilitates its repositioning.

  9. [Surgical therapy of liver tumors: resection vs. ablation].

    PubMed

    Hübner, M; McCormack, L; Clavien, P A

    2005-08-17

    A few years ago surgical resection was the only treatment modality for primary and metastatic liver tumors. However, most of the liver tumors are diagnosed at advanced stage and are unresectable. Criteria for unresectability are: uncontrolled extrahepatic disease, extensive intrahepatic tumor growth, insufficient remnant liver volume and severe co-morbid disease. Several therapeutic strategies have been developed to deal with primarily unresectable tumors. A downstaging ("downsizing") of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) can be reached by transarterial chemoembolisation (TACE) or local tumor ablation using ethanol injection, cryosurgery and radiofrequency. Preoperative unilateral portal vein embolization resulting in hypertrophy of the remnant liver volume permits to resect some patients with former unresectable liver tumors. Furthermore, liver transplantation is an option for patients with early stage HCC and liver cirrhosis. Preoperative downstaging of colorectal metastases can be achieved with neoadjuvant chemotherapy, whereas TACE, ethanol injection and liver transplantation are no established options for these patients. So far, there are no standardized guidelines for the treatment of patients with unresectable primary or metastatic liver tumors. In this review we aim to describe the different approaches suggested in the literature and to present our algorithms for the management of patients with liver tumors. PMID:16138770

  10. Comparison of percutaneous ablation technologies in the treatment of malignant liver tumors.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hyeon; Burke, Charles T

    2014-06-01

    Tumor ablation is a minimally invasive technique used to deliver chemical, thermal, electrical, or ultrasonic damage to a specific focal tumor in an attempt to achieve substantial tumor destruction or complete eradication. As the technology continues to advance, several image-guided tumor ablations have emerged to effectively manage primary and secondary malignancies in the liver. Percutaneous chemical ablation is one of the oldest and most established techniques for treating small hepatocellular carcinomas. However, this technique has been largely replaced by newer modalities including radiofrequency ablation, microwave ablation, laser-induced interstitial thermotherapy, cryoablation, high-intensity-focused ultrasound ablation, and irreversible electroporation. Because there exist significant differences in underlying technological bases, understanding each mechanism of action is essential for achieving desirable outcomes. In this article, the authors review the current state of each ablation method including technological and clinical considerations. PMID:25071303

  11. Comparison of Percutaneous Ablation Technologies in the Treatment of Malignant Liver Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hyeon; Burke, Charles T.

    2014-01-01

    Tumor ablation is a minimally invasive technique used to deliver chemical, thermal, electrical, or ultrasonic damage to a specific focal tumor in an attempt to achieve substantial tumor destruction or complete eradication. As the technology continues to advance, several image-guided tumor ablations have emerged to effectively manage primary and secondary malignancies in the liver. Percutaneous chemical ablation is one of the oldest and most established techniques for treating small hepatocellular carcinomas. However, this technique has been largely replaced by newer modalities including radiofrequency ablation, microwave ablation, laser-induced interstitial thermotherapy, cryoablation, high-intensity–focused ultrasound ablation, and irreversible electroporation. Because there exist significant differences in underlying technological bases, understanding each mechanism of action is essential for achieving desirable outcomes. In this article, the authors review the current state of each ablation method including technological and clinical considerations. PMID:25071303

  12. Dynamic Lung Tumor Tracking for Stereotactic Ablative Body Radiation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kunos, Charles A.; Fabien, Jeffrey M.; Shanahan, John P.; Collen, Christine; Gevaert, Thierry; Poels, Kenneth; Van den Begin, Robbe; Engels, Benedikt; De Ridder, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Physicians considering stereotactic ablative body radiation therapy (SBRT) for the treatment of extracranial cancer targets must be aware of the sizeable risks for normal tissue injury and the hazards of physical tumor miss. A first-of-its-kind SBRT platform achieves high-precision ablative radiation treatment through a combination of versatile real-time imaging solutions and sophisticated tumor tracking capabilities. It uses dual-diagnostic kV x-ray units for stereoscopic open-loop feedback of cancer target intrafraction movement occurring as a consequence of respiratory motions and heartbeat. Image-guided feedback drives a gimbaled radiation accelerator (maximum 15 x 15 cm field size) capable of real-time ±4 cm pan-and-tilt action. Robot-driven ±60° pivots of an integrated ±185° rotational gantry allow for coplanar and non-coplanar accelerator beam set-up angles, ultimately permitting unique treatment degrees of freedom. State-of-the-art software aids real-time six dimensional positioning, ensuring irradiation of cancer targets with sub-millimeter accuracy (0.4 mm at isocenter). Use of these features enables treating physicians to steer radiation dose to cancer tumor targets while simultaneously reducing radiation dose to normal tissues. By adding respiration correlated computed tomography (CT) and 2-[18F] fluoro-2-deoxy-ᴅ-glucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) images into the planning system for enhanced tumor target contouring, the likelihood of physical tumor miss becomes substantially less1. In this article, we describe new radiation plans for the treatment of moving lung tumors. PMID:26131774

  13. [Skin tumors in facial plastic surgery].

    PubMed

    Heppt, W

    2009-04-01

    As the incidence of facial skin tumors is rising, otorhinolaryngologists are becoming more and more involved in the field of facial plastic surgery. The most common tumor locations on the head are the sun-exposed areas such as the nose, forehead, cheek, and auricle. The most common histologic findings are actinic keratosis and basal cell carcinoma. In planning tumor resection and defect repair, many factors, including histology, size, and localization of the tumor as well as conditions of the adjacent skin, must be considered. The key to defect repair after tumor resection is to choose the most appropriate technique from a range of possibilities. Because of skin laxity, most small and midsize facial defects can be closed directly or with high-tension sutures under skin expansion. More extensive defects and those located in critical areas require pedicled flaps or free grafts transferring skin from adjacent or distant areas. In patients with recurrent or deeply infiltrative tumors, reconstructive procedures of the facial nerve, parotid duct, and lacrimal duct might be needed. This is also true for reconstruction of the anatomic framework of the eyelids, the nose, and the pinna. PMID:19347378

  14. Variation of tumoral marker after radiofrequency ablation of pancreatic adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Barbi, Emilio; Girelli, Roberto; Tinazzi Martini, Paolo; De Robertis, Riccardo; Ciaravino, Valentina; Salvia, Roberto; Butturini, Giovanni; Frigerio, Isabella; Milazzo, Teresa; Crosara, Stefano; Paiella, Salvatore; Pederzoli, Paolo; Bassi, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Background To evaluate the correlation between variations of CA 19.9 blood levels and the entity of necrosis at CT after radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of unresectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Methods In this study, from June 2010 to February 2014, patients with diagnosis of unresectable and not metastatic pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, expressing tumor marker CA 19.9, treated with RFA procedure were included. All these patients underwent RFA. CT study was performed 1 week after RFA. The dosage of CA 19.9 levels was performed 1 month after RFA. Features of necrosis at CT, as mean entity, density and necrosis percentages compared to the original lesion, were evaluated and compared by using t-test with CA 19.9 blood levels variations after RFA procedure. Results In this study were included 51 patients with diagnosis of unresectable and not metastatic pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, expressing tumor marker CA 19.9, treated with RFA procedure and with CT study and CA 19.9 available for analysis. After the procedure, CA 19.9 blood levels reduced in 24/51 (47%), remained stable in 10/51 (20%) and increased in 17/51 (33%). In patients with CA 19.9 levels reduced, the tumor marker were reduced less than 20% in 4/24 (17%) and more than 20% in 20/24 (83%); instead the tumor marker were reduced less than 30% in 8/24 (33%) and more than 30% in 16/24 (67%). At CT scan necrotic area density difference was not statistically significant. Also there was no statistically significant difference among the mean area, the mean volume and the mean ablation volume in percentage related to the treated tumor among the three different groups of patients divided depending on the CA 19.9 blood levels. But a tendency to a statistically significant difference was found in comparing the mean percentage of ablation volume between two subgroups of patients with a decrease of CA 19.9 levels with less or more than 20% reduction of tumor markers and between two subgroups with less or more than

  15. Management of Renal Tumors by Image-Guided Radiofrequency Ablation: Experience in 105 Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Breen, David J. Rutherford, Elizabeth E.; Stedman, Brian; Roy-Choudhury, Shuvro H.; Cast, James E. I.; Hayes, Matthew C.; Smart, Christopher J.

    2007-09-15

    Aims. In this article we present our experience with radiofrequency ablation (RFA) in the treatment of 105 renal tumors. Materials and Methods. RFA was performed on 105 renal tumors in 97 patients, with a mean tumor size of 32 mm (11-68 mm). The mean patient age was 71.7 years (range, 36-89 years). The ablations were carried out under ultrasound (n = 43) or CT (n = 62) guidance. Imaging follow-up was by contrast-enhanced CT within 10 days and then at 6-monthly intervals. Multivariate analysis was performed to determine variables associated with procedural outcome. Results. Eighty-three tumors were completely treated at a single sitting (79%). Twelve of the remaining tumors were successfully re-treated and a clinical decision was made not to re-treat seven patients. A patient with a small residual crescent of tumor is under follow-up and may require further treatment. In another patient, re-treatment was abandoned due to complicating pneumothorax and difficult access. One patient is awaiting further re-treatment. The overall technical success rate was 90.5%. Multivariate analysis revealed tumor size to be the only significant variable affecting procedural outcome. (p = 0.007, Pearson {chi}{sup 2}) Five patients had complications. There have been no local recurrences. Conclusion. Our experience to date suggests that RFA is a safe and effective, minimally invasive treatment for small renal tumors.

  16. Image guided thermal ablation of tumors increases the plasma level of IL-6 and IL-10

    PubMed Central

    Erinjeri, Joseph P; Thomas, Contessa T; Samoila, Alaiksandra; Fleisher, Martin; Gonen, Mithat; Sofocleous, Constantinos T.; Thornton, Raymond H; Siegelbaum, Robert H.; Covey, Anne M.; Brody, Lynn A.; Alago, William; Maybody, Majid; Brown, Karen T.; Getrajdman, George; Solomon, Stephen B.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE To identify changes in plasma cytokine levels following image-guided thermal ablation of human tumors and to identify the factors that independently predict changes in plasma cytokine levels. MATERIALS AND METHODS Whole blood samples were collected from 36 patients at 3 time points: pre-ablation, post-ablation (within 48 hours), and in follow-up (1–5 weeks after ablation). Plasma levels of IL-1a, IL-2, IL-6, IL-10 and TNFa were measured using a multiplex immunoassay. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed using cytokine level as the dependent variable and sample collection, time, age, sex, primary diagnosis, metastatic status, ablation site, and ablation type as the independent variables. RESULTS There was a significant increase in the plasma level of IL-6 post-ablation when compared to pre-ablation (9.6+/−31 fold, p<0.002). IL-10 also showed a significant increase postablation (1.9 +/−2.8 fold, p<0.02). Plasma levels of IL-1a, IL-2, and TNFa were not significantly changed after ablation. Cryoablation resulted in the largest change in IL-6 level (>54 fold), while radiofrequency and microwave ablation showed 3.6 and 3.4-fold changes, respectively. Ablation of melanomas showed the largest change in IL-6 48 hours after ablation (92×), followed by ablation of kidney (26×), liver (8×), and lung (6×) cancers. Multivariate analysis revealed that ablation type (p<0.0003), and primary diagnosis (p<0.03) were independent predictors of changes to IL-6 following ablation. Age was the only independent predictor of IL-10 levels following ablation (p<0.019). CONCLUSION Image guided thermal ablation of tumors increases the plasma level of IL-6 and IL-10, without increasing the plasma level of IL-1a, IL-2, or TNFa. PMID:23582441

  17. Technologies Enhance Tumor Surgery: Helping Surgeons Spot and Remove Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... External link, please review our exit disclaimer . Subscribe Technologies Enhance Tumor Surgery Helping Surgeons Spot and Remove ... over time. NIH-funded researchers are developing new technologies to help surgeons determine exactly where tumors end ...

  18. Preparing the anatomical model for ablation of unresectable liver tumor

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Nowadays the best treatment of the primary and secondary hepatic tumor is surgical resection, but only 5–15% of all patient with hepatocellular carcinoma and 20–25% of all patients with liver metastases are indicated for resection. In these cases some kind of ablation and other technique could be used. Aim To present the methodology of preparing the anatomical model for ablation of unresectable liver tumor. Material and methods The presented method is based on abdomen computed tomography (CT) dynamic examination. Three methods of segmentation are used: rolling vector for liver volume, modified Frangi filter for liver vessels, and fuzzy expert system with initial region-of-interest anisotropic filtration for liver metastases. Segmentation results are the input data for creating 3D anatomical models in the form of B-spline curves and surfaces performing the surface global interpolation algorithm. A graphical user interface for presentation and evaluation of models, presented in color against DICOM images in grayscale, is designed and implemented. Results The proposed approach was tested on 20 abdominal CT obtained from the Department of Clinical Radiology of Silesian Medical University. The lack of a “gold standard” provides for the correction of the results. Conclusions Preparation of the anatomical model is one of the important early stages of the use of image-based navigation systems. This process could not take place in a fully automatic manner and verification of the results obtained is performed by the radiologist. Using the above anatomical model in surgical workflow is presented. PMID:25097694

  19. Efficacy of MR-guided Focused Ultrasound Thermal Ablation of Rabbit VX2 Tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Xiangtao; Zhang, Yongzhi; Tam, Karen; McDannold, Nathan; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2006-05-01

    This animal study addresses the treatment efficacy of the MR-guided thermal ablation technique and temperature monitoring in rabbit tumors. Specifically, the relationship between the thermal dose coverage in the tumors and the rabbit survival rate was investigated. Two groups of rabbits (14 in back tumor group and 12 in thigh tumor group) were treated with the ExAblate-2000 MR-guided focused ultrasound thermal ablation system one week after being injected VX2 tumor cells into their back muscle or thigh muscle. Sonication was repeated twice in a planned location in the tumor region and monitored in the coronal and sagittal planes respectively to ensure volumetric thermal dose monitoring. MR T1 Gad-enhanced contrast images of the tumors were obtained immediately after treatment and post-treatment at 2, 4, 8 and 12 weeks (or before sacrificing the rabbits). In the thigh tumor rabbits group, tumor recurrence was observed for only one and the other eleven rabbits survived without tumor recurrence at 4 weeks. Aiming at a longer survival time, the rabbits with back tumors had up to 12 weeks survival time. Three rabbits survived to 12 weeks without tumor recurrence in the back tumor group, yielding less promising survival rate than that of the thigh tumor group survival test. Successful thermal ablation (i.e. lack of recurrence) was demonstrated when the tumors received full thermal dose coverage.

  20. Treatment Planning and Image Guidance for Radiofrequency Ablations of Large Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Hongliang; Campos-Nanez, Enrique; Yaniv, Ziv; Banovac, Filip; Abeledo, Hernan; Hata, Nobuhiko; Cleary, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    This article addresses the two key challenges in computer-assisted percutaneous tumor ablation: planning multiple overlapping ablations for large tumors while avoiding critical structures, and executing the prescribed plan. Towards semi-automatic treatment planning for image-guided surgical interventions, we develop a systematic approach to the needle-based ablation placement task, ranging from pre-operative planning algorithms to an intra-operative execution platform. The planning system incorporates clinical constraints on ablations and trajectories using a multiple objective optimization formulation, which consists of optimal path selection and ablation coverage optimization based on integer programming. The system implementation is presented and validated in phantom studies and on an animal model. The presented system can potentially be further extended for other ablation techniques such as cryotherapy. PMID:24235279

  1. Tumor Volume-Adapted Dosing in Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy of Lung Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Trakul, Nicholas; Chang, Christine N.; Harris, Jeremy; Chapman, Christopher; Rao, Aarti; Shen, John; Quinlan-Davidson, Sean; Filion, Edith J.; Wakelee, Heather A.; Colevas, A. Dimitrios; Whyte, Richard I.; and others

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: Current stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) protocols for lung tumors prescribe a uniform dose regimen irrespective of tumor size. We report the outcomes of a lung tumor volume-adapted SABR dosing strategy. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed the outcomes in 111 patients with a total of 138 primary or metastatic lung tumors treated by SABR, including local control, regional control, distant metastasis, overall survival, and treatment toxicity. We also performed subset analysis on 83 patients with 97 tumors treated with a volume-adapted dosing strategy in which small tumors (gross tumor volume <12 mL) received single-fraction regimens with biologically effective doses (BED) <100 Gy (total dose, 18-25 Gy) (Group 1), and larger tumors (gross tumor volume {>=}12 mL) received multifraction regimens with BED {>=}100 Gy (total dose, 50-60 Gy in three to four fractions) (Group 2). Results: The median follow-up time was 13.5 months. Local control for Groups 1 and 2 was 91.4% and 92.5%, respectively (p = 0.24) at 12 months. For primary lung tumors only (excluding metastases), local control was 92.6% and 91.7%, respectively (p = 0.58). Regional control, freedom from distant metastasis, and overall survival did not differ significantly between Groups 1 and 2. Rates of radiation pneumonitis, chest wall toxicity, and esophagitis were low in both groups, but all Grade 3 toxicities developed in Group 2 (p = 0.02). Conclusion: A volume-adapted dosing approach for SABR of lung tumors seems to provide excellent local control for both small- and large-volume tumors and may reduce toxicity.

  2. Ethanol Ablation of a Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor Presenting as a Small Bowel Obstruction.

    PubMed

    Chin, Matthew; Chen, Chien-Lin; Chang, Kenneth; Lee, John; Samarasena, Jason

    2015-10-01

    Ethanol has historically been used as an ablative agent for a variety of lesions. One of the more common applications of this technique is celiac plexus neurolysis; however, recent reports have suggested a role for the endoscopic alcohol ablation of a variety of solid and cystic lesions. We report a novel case of endoscopic ethanol ablation of a peripheral nerve sheath tumor presenting as a small bowel obstruction. PMID:26504873

  3. SwiftLase: a new technology for char-free ablation in rectal surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, David A.

    1995-05-01

    We describe layer-by-layer char-free ablation of hemorrhoids and other rectal lesions at very low CO2 laser power levels with a miniature `SwiftLaser' optomechanical flashscanner. Increased speed with excellent control, very shallow thermal damage, and less postoperative pain are the main advantages of the flashscan technology in rectal surgery.

  4. Dual thermal ablation modality of solid tumors in a mouse model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafirstein, Gal; Barnes, Klressa; Hennings, Leah; Webber, Jessica; Moros, Eduardo G.; Przybyla, Beata; Griffin, Robert J.

    2011-03-01

    Purpose: Develop a new combination therapy consisting of cryoablation and conductive high-temperature ablation for enhanced thermal ablation of solid tumors. Methods: We have constructed an invasive probe that can be used for consecutive cryoablation and hightemperature ablation (C/HTA), with a single insertion. The C/HTA probe was tested, in Balb/c mice bearing solid 4T1 tumors, in comparison to cryoablation and high temperature ablation, only. Three days after ablation, the diameter of the ablated zone was evaluated with pathological examination. Results: The C/HTA device can be used to induce larger ablation zones, in comparison to high temperature or cryoablation alone, and at lower thermal doses and temperatures than either modality alone. Conclusions: The relatively high thermal conductivity of ice, in comparison to water and native tissue, enables rapid heating of the ice-ball that result in improved conductive high temperature ablation. The new dual thermal modality improves ablation outcomes at lower thermal doses in comparison to a single ablation modality.

  5. Hepatic tumor ablation with clustered microwave antennae: the US Phase II Trial

    PubMed Central

    Iannitti, David A.; Martin, Robert C.G.; Simon, Caroline J.; Hope, William W.; Newcomb, William L.; McMasters, Kelly M.; Dupuy, Damian

    2007-01-01

    Background: Thermal ablation techniques have become important treatment options for patients with unresectable hepatic malignancies. Microwave ablation (MWA) is a new thermal ablative technique that uses electromagnetic energy to produce coagulation necrosis. We report outcomes from the first clinical trial in the United States using MWA and a 915 MHz generator. Patients and methods: Patients with unresectable primary or metastatic liver cancer were enrolled in a multi-institutional trial from March 2004 through May 2006. Demographic information, diagnosis, treatment, and outcomes were documented. Results: Eighty-seven patients underwent 94 ablation procedures for 224 hepatic tumors. Forty-two ablations (45%) were performed open, 7 (7%) laparoscopically, and 45 (48%) percutaneously. The average tumor size was 3.6 cm (range 0.5–9.0 cm). Single antenna ablation volumes were 10.0 ml (range 7.8–14.0 ml), and clustered antennae ablation volumes were 50.5 ml (range 21.1–146.5 ml). Outcome variables were measured with a mean follow-up of 19 months. Local recurrence at the ablation site occurred in 6 (2.7%) tumors, and regional recurrence occurred in 37 (43%) patients. With a mean follow-up of 19 months, 41 (47%) patients were alive with no evidence of disease. There were no procedure-related deaths. The overall mortality rate was 2.3%. Conclusions: Microwave ablation is a safe and effective technology for hepatic tumor ablation. In our study, clustered antennae resulted in larger ablation volumes. Further studies with histological confirmation are needed to verify clinical results. PMID:18333126

  6. Preclinical Assessment of a 980-nm Diode Laser Ablation System in a Large Animal Tumor Model

    PubMed Central

    Ahrar, Kamran; Gowda, Ashok; Javadi, Sanaz; Borne, Agatha; Fox, Matthew; McNichols, Roger; Ahrar, Judy U.; Stephens, Clifton; Stafford, R. Jason

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To characterize the performance of a 980-nm diode laser ablation system in an in vivo tumor model. Materials and Methods This study was approved by the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee. The ablation system consisted of a 15-W, 980-nm diode laser, flexible diffusing tipped fiber optic, and 17-gauge internally cooled catheter. Ten immunosuppressed dogs were inoculated subcutaneously with canine transmissible venereal tumor fragments in eight dorsal locations. Laser ablations were performed at 79 sites where inoculations were successful (99%) using powers of 10 W, 12.5 W, and 15 W, with exposure times between 60 and 180 seconds. In 20 cases, multiple overlapping ablations were performed. After the dogs were euthanized, the tumors were harvested, sectioned along the applicator track, measured and photographed. Measurements of ablation zone were performed on gross specimen. Histopathology and viability staining was performed using hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide hydrogen (NADH) staining. Results Gross pathology confirmed well-circumscribed ablation zone with sharp boundaries between thermally ablated tumor in the center surrounded by viable tumor tissue. When a single applicator was used, the greatest ablation diameters ranged from 12 mm at the lowest dose (10 W, 60 sec) to 26 mm at the highest dose (15 W, 180 sec). Multiple applicators created ablation zones of up to 42 mm in greatest diameter (with the lasers operating at 15 W for 120 sec). Conclusions The new 980-nm diode laser and internally cooled applicator effectively creates large ellipsoid thermal ablations in less than 3 minutes. PMID:20346883

  7. Use of Hydrodissection to Prevent Nerve and Muscular Damage during Radiofrequency Ablation of Kidney Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Lee, S. Justin; Choyke, Lynda T.; Locklin, Julia K.; Wood, Bradford J.

    2008-01-01

    Muscular complications are uncommon but have been reported after radiofrequency (RF) ablation of renal tumors. Ablation of renal lesions near the psoas muscle may result in paresthesia in the distribution of the genitofemoral nerve. The present report describes a case of sensory and muscular dysfunction after RF ablation of a renal lesion lying on top of the psoas muscle that was treated without hydrodissection. To prevent this complication, hydrodissection was effectively used in two other patients during RF ablation of lesions abutting or in close proximity to the psoas muscle. PMID:17185695

  8. Ultrasound-Guided Percutaneous Radiofrequency Ablation of Liver Tumors: How We Do It Safely and Completely.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin Woong; Shin, Sang Soo; Heo, Suk Hee; Hong, Jun Hyung; Lim, Hyo Soon; Seon, Hyun Ju; Hur, Young Hoe; Park, Chang Hwan; Jeong, Yong Yeon; Kang, Heoung Keun

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound-guided percutaneous radiofrequency (RF) ablation has become one of the most promising local cancer therapies for both resectable and nonresectable hepatic tumors. Although RF ablation is a safe and effective technique for the treatment of liver tumors, the outcome of treatment can be closely related to the location and shape of the tumors. There may be difficulties with RF ablation of tumors that are adjacent to large vessels or extrahepatic heat-vulnerable organs and tumors in the caudate lobe, possibly resulting in major complications or treatment failure. Thus, a number of strategies have been developed to overcome these challenges, which include artificial ascites, needle track ablation, fusion imaging guidance, parallel targeting, bypass targeting, etc. Operators need to use the right strategy in the right situation to avoid the possibility of complications and incomplete thermal tissue destruction; with the right strategy, RF ablation can be performed successfully, even for hepatic tumors in high-risk locations. This article offers technical strategies that can be used to effectively perform RF ablation as well as to minimize possible complications related to the procedure with representative cases and schematic illustrations. PMID:26576111

  9. Combined ablation of atrial fibrillation and minimally invasive mitral valve surgery: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    A partial lower inverted J sternotomy and an extended transseptal incision provide excellent exposure for minimally invasive mitral valve surgery. However, the extended trasnsseptal incision causes dividing the sinus node artery, which may result in conduction system disturbance and need for permanent pacemaker implantation. Therefore, there is a challenge in the patient who requires concomitant ablation for atrial fibrillation because of possible conduction system disturbance caused by extended transseptal incision. We describe a new strategy for combined ablation of atrial fibrillation with minimally invasive cardiac surgery by a transseptal approach to the mitral valve through a partial lower sternotomy incision. Cryoablation was performed using a T-shaped cryoprobe with a lesion set of pulmonary vein isolation and ablation of the left and right isthmus in performing mitral annuloplasty, tricuspid annuloplasty, and atrial septal defect closure through a limited sternotomy incision. This technique might minimize possible conduction system disturbance and provide good surgical result for the patients who undergo mitral valve surgery and ablation of atrial fibrillation. PMID:20937138

  10. Transcatheter Arterial Embolization for Tumor Seeding in the Chest Wall After Radiofrequency Ablation for Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Shibata, Toshiya Shibata, Toyomichi; Maetani, Yoji; Kubo, Takeshi; Nishida, Naoshi; Itoh, Kyo

    2006-06-15

    Tumor seeding in the chest wall was depicted at follow-up CT obtained 9 months after radiofrequency ablation for hepatocellular carcinoma. Transcatheter arterial embolization was successfully performed, injecting emulsion of 10 mg of epirubicin and 1 ml of iodized oil followed by gelatin sponge particles via the microcatheter placed in the right eleventh intercostal artery. The patient died of tumor growth in the liver one year after the embolization, but no progression of the tumor seeding was noted during the follow-up period. We conclude that transcatheter arterial embolization was effective for the control of tumor seeding after radiofrequency ablation for hepatocellular carcinoma.

  11. Sequential activation of multiple grounding pads reduces skin heating during radiofrequency tumor ablation

    PubMed Central

    HAEMMERICH, DIETER; SCHUTT, DAVID JAMES

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Radiofrequency (RF) tumor ablation has become an accepted treatment modality for tumors not amenable to surgery. Skin burns due to ground pad heating may become a limiting factor for further increase in ablation zone dimensions and generator power. We investigated a method were groups of ground pads are sequentially activated to reduce skin heating. Methods We compared conventional operation (i.e. simultaneous connection of all pads) to sequentially switched activation of the pads where different pad combinations are active for periods of ∼0.3 − 8 s. The timing during sequential activation was adjusted to keep the leading edge temperature equal between the pads. We created Finite Element Method computer models of three pads (5 × 5 cm, 1 cm apart) placed in line with the RF electrode on a human thigh to determine differences in tissue heating during simultaneous and sequential ground pad activation. We performed experiments with three ground pads (5 × 10 cm, 4 cm apart) placed on a tissue phantom (1.5 A, 12 min) and measured pad surface and leading edge temperatures. Results Temperature rise below the leading edge for proximal, middle and distal ground pad in relation to active electrode location was 5.9°C ± 0.1°C, 0.8°C ± 0.1°C and 0.3°C ± 0.1°C for conventional operation, and 3.3°C ± 0.1°C, 3.4°C ± 0.2°C and 3.4°C ± 0.2°C for sequentially activated operation in the experiments (p < 0.001). Conclusion Sequential activation of multiple ground pads resulted in reduced maximum tissue temperature. This may reduce the incidence of ground pad burns and may allow higher power RF generators. PMID:18038286

  12. Percutaneous Tumor Ablation Tools: Microwave, Radiofrequency, or Cryoablation—What Should You Use and Why?

    PubMed Central

    Lubner, Meghan G.; Ziemlewicz, Timothy J.; Lee, Fred T.; Brace, Christopher L.

    2014-01-01

    Image-guided thermal ablation is an evolving and growing treatment option for patients with malignant disease of multiple organ systems. Treatment indications have been expanding to include benign tumors as well. Specifically, the most prevalent indications to date have been in the liver (primary and metastatic disease, as well as benign tumors such as hemangiomas and adenomas), kidney (primarily renal cell carcinoma, but also benign tumors such as angiomyolipomas and oncocytomas), lung (primary and metastatic disease), and soft tissue and/or bone (primarily metastatic disease and osteoid osteomas). Each organ system has different underlying tissue characteristics, which can have profound effects on the resulting thermal changes and ablation zone. Understanding these issues is important for optimizing clinical results. In addition, thermal ablation technology has evolved rapidly during the past several decades, with substantial technical and procedural improvements that can help improve clinical outcomes and safety profiles. Staying up to date on these developments is challenging but critical because the physical properties underlying the different ablation modalities and the appropriate use of adjuncts will have a tremendous effect on treatment results. Ultimately, combining an understanding of the physical properties of the ablation modalities with an understanding of the thermal kinetics in tissue and using the most appropriate ablation modality for each patient are key to optimizing clinical outcomes. Suggested algorithms are described that will help physicians choose among the various ablation modalities for individual patients. ©RSNA, 2014 PMID:25208284

  13. Radiofrequency ablation for lung tumors: outcomes, effects on survival, and prognostic factors

    PubMed Central

    Akhan, Okan; Güler, Ezgi; Akıncı, Devrim; Çiftçi, Türkmen; Köse, Ilgaz Çağatay

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE We aimed to evaluate the survival benefit achieved with radiofrequency (RF) ablation of primary and metastatic lung tumors and determine significant prognostic factors for recurrence-free survival. METHODS Forty-nine patients with lung cancer (10 primary and 39 metastatic) underwent computed tomography-guided percutaneous RF ablation between June 2005 and October 2013. A total of 112 tumors (101 metastatic and 11 primary non-small cell lung cancer) were treated with RF ablation. Tumor diameter ranged from 0.6 to 4 cm (median 1.5 cm). Effectiveness of treatment, complications, and survival were analyzed. RESULTS Primary success rate was 79.5% and local tumor progression occurred in 23 tumors. Among tumors showing progression, 10 were re-treated with RF ablation and secondary success rate was 87.5%. One-, two-, and three-year overall survival rates of 10 patients with primary lung cancer were 100%, 86%, and 43%, respectively. One-, two-, three-, four-, and five-year overall survival rates for 39 patients with metastatic lung tumors were 90%, 73%, 59%, 55%, and 38%, respectively. One-, two-, three-, and four-year overall survival rates for 16 patients with colorectal pulmonary metastases were 94%, 80%, 68%, and 23%, respectively. Complications occurred in 30 sessions (24.6%). Pneumothorax occurred in 19 sessions with seven requiring image-guided percutaneous chest tube drainage. Tumor status (solitary or multiple) and presence of extrapulmonary metastasis at initial RF ablation were significant prognostic factors in terms of recurrence-free survival. CONCLUSION RF ablation is a safe and effective treatment with a survival benefit for selected patients with primary and secondary lung tumors. PMID:26611111

  14. Remote Postoperative Epidural Hematoma after Brain Tumor Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Ho-Jung; Park, Jae-Sung; Jeun, Sin-Soo

    2015-01-01

    A postoperative epidural hematoma (EDH) is a serious and embarrassing complication, which usually occurs at the site of operation after intracranial surgery. However, remote EDH is relatively rare. We report three cases of remote EDH after brain tumor surgery. All three cases seemed to have different causes of remote postoperative EDH; however, all patients were managed promptly and showed excellent outcomes. Although the exact mechanism of remote postoperative EDH is unknown, surgeons should be cautious of the speed of lowering intracranial pressure and implement basic procedures to prevent this hazardous complication of brain tumor surgery. PMID:26605271

  15. In Vivo Evaluation of Lung Microwave Ablation in a Porcine Tumor Mimic Model

    SciTech Connect

    Planche, Olivier; Teriitehau, Christophe; Boudabous, Sana; Robinson, Joey Marie; Rao, Pramod; Deschamps, Frederic; Farouil, Geoffroy; Baere, Thierry de

    2013-02-15

    To evaluate the microwave ablation of created tumor mimics in the lung of a large animal model (pigs), with examination of the ablative synergy of multiple antennas. Fifty-six tumor-mimic models of various sizes were created in 15 pigs by using barium-enriched minced collected thigh muscle injected into the lung of the same animal. Tumors were ablated under fluoroscopic guidance by single-antenna and multiple-antenna microwaves. Thirty-five tumor models were treated in 11 pigs with a single antenna at 75 W for 15 min, with 15 measuring 20 mm in diameter, 10 measuring 30 mm, and 10 measuring 40 mm. Mean circularity of the single-antenna ablation zones measured 0.64 {+-} 0.12, with a diameter of 35.7 {+-} 8.7 mm along the axis of the antenna and 32.7 {+-} 12.8 mm perpendicular to the feeding point. Multiple-antenna delivery of 75 W for 15 min caused intraprocedural death of 2 animals; modified protocol to 60 W for 10 min resulted in an ablation zone with a diameter of 43.0 {+-} 7.7 along the axis of the antenna and 54.8 {+-} 8.5 mm perpendicular to the feeding point; circularity was 0.70 {+-} 0.10. A single microwave antenna can create ablation zones large enough to cover lung tumor mimic models of {<=}4 cm with no heat sink effect from vessels of {<=}6 mm. Synergic use of 3 antennas allows ablation of larger volumes than single-antenna or radiofrequency ablation, but great caution must be taken when 3 antennas are used simultaneously in the lung in clinical practice.

  16. Ablative stereotactic surgery improves manual performance time in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Balás, I; Llumiguano, C; Dóczi, T P

    2006-05-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the influence of stereotactic ablative surgical interventions on the time required for the performance of manual tasks (i.e. performance time) in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). We studied 28 patients after pallidotomy and pallido-thalamotomy who were evaluated at four time: before the operation, and 2 days, 3 and 6 months postoperatively. The speed of performance of handwriting and drawing were assessed by means of a chronometer using certain parts of an international standard scale (modified by Fahn). The patients were also assessed according to the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) part III. The patients were divided into two groups. Those in group A had relief of all main Parkinsonian symptoms after pallidotomy including tremor. The patients in group B had no relief of tremor straight after pallidotomy. For them the pallidotomy was completed with thalamotomy in the same sitting, which had resulted in cessation of tremor. The time of performance of the manual tasks diminished significantly in all cases in both groups (Student's t-test: p<0.0001). No complications developed following pallidotomy. Pallido-thalamotomy caused transient adverse effects in two patients, and one patient developed permanent adverse effects such as dysarthria and dysequilibrium. Significant improvements were observed in the speed of handwriting and drawing in both groups, but pallido-thalamotomy was accompanied with complications. PMID:16549384

  17. Nanobubble Ultrasound Contrast Agents for Enhanced Delivery of Thermal Sensitizer to Tumors Undergoing Radiofrequency Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Perera, Reshani H.; Solorio, Luis; Wu, Hanping; Gangolli, Mihika; Silverman, Eric; Hernandez, Christopher; Peiris, Pubudu M.; Broome, Ann-Marie

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Pluronic has been shown to sensitize various tumor cell lines to chemotherapy and hyperthermia by altering the membrane fluidity, depleting ATP, and modulating the heat shock protein 70 expression. In our prior work, Pluronic was also used to formulate nanosized ultrasound contrast agents. In the current study we evaluate the use of these contrast agents as vehicles for image-guided delivery of Pluronic to improve outcomes of tumor radiofrequency (RF) ablation. Methods Lipid-shelled Pluronic nanobubbles were prepared and examined for size distribution, zeta potential, stability, biodistribution, accumulation of nanobubbles in the tumor, and treatment efficacy. LS174-T xenograft tumor-bearing mice were used to evaluate tumor growth suppression and measure treatment efficacy after RF ablation. Results The average diameter of Pluronic bubbles was 230 nm, and initial bubble echogenicity was 16 dB. In vitro, cells exposed to Pluronic nanobubbles exhibited low cytotoxicity in the absence of ultrasound, even if heat (43°C) was applied. When the cells were exposed to Pluronic nanobubbles, heat, and ultrasound; viability was significantly reduced. In vivo, tumors treated with ultrasound-modulated nanobubbles prior to RF ablation showed a significant reduction in growth compared to the RF alone (P<0.05). Conclusion Lipid and Pluronic-shelled, echogenic nanobubbles combined with ultrasound modulation can serve as an effective theranostic method for sensitization of tumors to RF ablation. PMID:23943542

  18. Lattice Boltzmann method for fast patient-specific simulation of liver tumor ablation from CT images.

    PubMed

    Audigier, Chloé; Mansi, Tommaso; Delingette, Hervé; Rapaka, Saikiran; Mihalef, Viorel; Sharma, Puneet; Carnegie, Daniel; Boctor, Emad; Choti, Michael; Kamen, Ali; Comaniciu, Dorin; Ayache, Nicholas

    2013-01-01

    Radio-frequency ablation (RFA), the most widely used minimally invasive ablative therapy of liver cancer, is challenged by a lack of patient-specific planning. In particular, the presence of blood vessels and time-varying thermal diffusivity makes the prediction of the extent of the ablated tissue difficult. This may result in incomplete treatments and increased risk of recurrence. We propose a new model of the physical mechanisms involved in RFA of abdominal tumors based on Lattice Boltzmann Method to predict the extent of ablation given the probe location and the biological parameters. Our method relies on patient images, from which level set representations of liver geometry, tumor shape and vessels are extracted. Then a computational model of heat diffusion, cellular necrosis and blood flow through vessels and liver is solved to estimate the extent of ablated tissue. After quantitative verifications against an analytical solution, we apply our framework to 5 patients datasets which include pre- and post-operative CT images, yielding promising correlation between predicted and actual ablation extent (mean point to mesh errors of 8.7 mm). Implemented on graphics processing units, our method may enable RFA planning in clinical settings as it leads to near real-time computation: 1 minute of ablation is simulated in 1.14 minutes, which is almost 60x faster than standard finite element method. PMID:24505777

  19. Lung Volume Reduction After Stereotactic Ablative Radiation Therapy of Lung Tumors: Potential Application to Emphysema

    SciTech Connect

    Binkley, Michael S.; Shrager, Joseph B.; Leung, Ann N.; Popat, Rita; Trakul, Nicholas; Atwood, Todd F.; Chaudhuri, Aadel; Maxim, Peter G.; Diehn, Maximilian; Loo, Billy W.

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: Lung volume reduction surgery (LVRS) improves dyspnea and other outcomes in selected patients with severe emphysema, but many have excessive surgical risk for LVRS. We analyzed the dose-volume relationship for lobar volume reduction after stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR) of lung tumors, hypothesizing that SABR could achieve therapeutic volume reduction if applied in emphysema. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively identified patients treated from 2007 to 2011 who had SABR for 1 lung tumor, pre-SABR pulmonary function testing, and ≥6 months computed tomographic (CT) imaging follow-up. We contoured the treated lobe and untreated adjacent lobe(s) on CT before and after SABR and calculated their volume changes relative to the contoured total (bilateral) lung volume (TLV). We correlated lobar volume reduction with the volume receiving high biologically effective doses (BED, α/β = 3). Results: 27 patients met the inclusion criteria, with a median CT follow-up time of 14 months. There was no grade ≥3 toxicity. The median volume reduction of the treated lobe was 4.4% of TLV (range, −0.4%-10.8%); the median expansion of the untreated adjacent lobe was 2.6% of TLV (range, −3.9%-11.6%). The volume reduction of the treated lobe was positively correlated with the volume receiving BED ≥60 Gy (r{sup 2}=0.45, P=.0001). This persisted in subgroups determined by high versus low pre-SABR forced expiratory volume in 1 second, treated lobe CT emphysema score, number of fractions, follow-up CT time, central versus peripheral location, and upper versus lower lobe location, with no significant differences in effect size between subgroups. Volume expansion of the untreated adjacent lobe(s) was positively correlated with volume reduction of the treated lobe (r{sup 2}=0.47, P<.0001). Conclusions: We identified a dose-volume response for treated lobe volume reduction and adjacent lobe compensatory expansion after lung tumor SABR, consistent across

  20. Trends in cognitive dysfunction following surgery for intracranial tumors

    PubMed Central

    Dhandapani, Manju; Gupta, Sandhya; Mohanty, Manju; Gupta, Sunil Kumar; Dhandapani, Sivashanmugam

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study was conducted to prospectively assess the cognitive function of patients with intracranial tumors. Methods: The cognitive status of patients with intracranial tumors were prospectively studied before surgery, and later at 1 and 6 months following surgery, on purposive sampling, using validated post graduate institute (PGI) battery for brain dysfunction (score 0–30) with a higher dysfunction rating score indicating poor cognitive status. Results: Out of 23 patients enrolled, 20 could complete the study. They had substantial cognitive dysfunction before surgery (score 17.1 ± 9.4). Though there was no significant improvement (16.9 ± 9.0) at 1 month, the score improved significantly (10.3 ± 9.2) at 6 months following surgery (P = 0.008). The improvement was relatively subdued in intra-axial, malignant, and radiated tumors. Overall, there was a significant improvement in mental balance (P = 0.048), verbal retention of dissimilar pairs (P = 0.01), and recognition (P = 0.01), while dysfunction persisted in the domains of memory, verbal retention to similar pairs, and visual retention. Conclusion: Patients with intracranial tumors have substantial cognitive dysfunction, which tend to show significant improvement beyond 6 months following surgery, especially among tumors, which were extra-axial, benign, and nonirradiated. PMID:27114854

  1. CTS Trials Network: Surgical ablation of atrial fibrillation during mitral valve surgery - many questions unanswered

    PubMed Central

    Afifi, Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    A disease that is associated with stroke and mortality, atrial fibrillation (AF) complicates 30 to 50% of mitral valve disease patients admitted for surgery.1 Since the introduction of the Cox maze III procedure in 1992 many efforts have been made to come up with modified lesion sets and/or energy sources to surgically treat AF. This lead to the recently published American Heart Association (AHA)– American College of Cardiology (ACC)–Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) guidelines2 stating that it is reasonable to perform atrial fibrillation ablation in selected patients undergoing other types of cardiac surgery. The effectiveness of different techniques in conversion to sinus rhythm and the clinical impact of freedom from AF remain a question. The CTS Trials Network have undertaken a trial to answer these questions. The first year results of their randomized trial comparing AF ablation at the time of mitral valve surgery with mitral valve surgery alone were published recently in The New England Journal of Medicine.3 PMID:26566527

  2. More Than Just Tumor Destruction: Immunomodulation by Thermal Ablation of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Haen, Sebastian P.; Pereira, Philippe L.; Salih, Helmut R.; Rammensee, Hans-Georg; Gouttefangeas, Cécile

    2011-01-01

    Over the past decades, thermoablative techniques for the therapy of localized tumors have gained importance in the treatment of patients not eligible for surgical resection. Anecdotal reports have described spontaneous distant tumor regression after thermal ablation, indicating a possible involvement of the immune system, hence an induction of antitumor immunity after thermoinduced therapy. In recent years, a growing body of evidence for modulation of both adaptive and innate immunity, as well as for the induction of danger signals through thermoablation, has emerged. Induced immune responses, however, are mostly weak and not sufficient for the complete eradication of established tumors or durable prevention of disease progression, and combination therapies with immunomodulating drugs are being evaluated with promising results. This article aims to summarize published findings on immune modulation through radiofrequency ablation, cryoablation, microwave ablation therapy, high-intensity focused ultrasound, and laser-induced thermotherapy. PMID:22242035

  3. Photoacoustic monitoring of clot formation during surgery and tumor surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juratli, Mazen A.; Galanzha, Ekaterina I.; Sarimollaoglu, Mustafa; Nedosekin, Dmitry A.; Suen, James Y.; Zharov, Vladimir P.

    2013-03-01

    When a blood vessel is injured, the normal physiological response of the body is to form a clot (thrombus) to prevent blood loss. Alternatively, even without injury to the blood vessel, the pathological condition called thromboembolism may lead to the formation of circulating blood clots (CBCs), also called emboli, which can clog blood vessels throughout the body. Veins of the extremities (venous thromboembolism), lungs (pulmonary embolism ), brain (embolic stroke), heart (myocardial infarction), kidneys, and gastrointestinal tract are often affected. Emboli are also common complications of infection, inflammation, cancer, surgery, radiation and coronary artery bypass grafts. Despite the clear medical significance of CBCs, however, little progress has been made in the development of methods for real-time detection and identification of CBCs. To overcome these limitations, we developed a new modification of in vivo photoacoustic (PA) flow cytometry (PAFC) for real-time detection of white, red, and mixed clots through a transient decrease, increase or fluctuation of PA signal amplitude, respectively. In this work, using PAFC and mouse models, we present for the first time direct evidence that some medical procedures, such as conventional or cancer surgery may initiate the formation of CBCs. In conclusion, the PA diagnostic platform can be used in real-time to define risk factors for cardiovascular diseases, assist in the prognosis and potential prevention of stroke by using a well-timed therapy or as a clot count as a marker of therapy efficacy.

  4. Combined MRI and Fluoroscopic Guided Radiofrequency Ablation of a Renal Tumor

    SciTech Connect

    Fotiadis, Nikolas I.; Sabharwal, Tarun; Gangi, Afshin; Adam, Andreas

    2009-01-15

    Percutaneous CT- and ultrasound-guided radiofrequency ablation of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has been shown to have very promising medium-term results. We present a unique case of recurrent RCC after partial nephrectomy in a patient with a single kidney and impaired renal function. This tumor could not be visualized either with CT or with ultrasound. A combination of magnetic resonance imaging and fluoroscopic guidance was used, to the best of our knowledge for the first time, to ablate the tumor with radiofrequency. The patient was cancer-free and off dialysis at 30-month follow up.

  5. The carbon dioxide laser: an alternative surgery technique for the treatment of common cutaneous tumors in dogs

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Tumors of the skin and subcutaneous tissue are the largest group of canine neoplasms. Total excision is still the most effective method for treatment of these skin tumors. For its universal properties the carbon dioxide (CO2) laser appears to be an excellent surgical instrument in veterinary surgery. Laser techniques are alternatives to traditional methods for the surgical management of tumors. The aim of this study was to compare various types of laser techniques in skin oncologic surgery: excision, ablation and mixed technique and to suggest which technique of CO2 laser procedure is the most useful in particular case of tumors in dogs. Findings The study was performed on 38 privately-owned dogs with total number of 40 skin tumors of different type removed by various CO2 laser operation techniques from 2010–2013. The treatment effect was based on the surgical wound evaluation, the relative time of healing and possible local recurrence of the tumor after 3 months post surgery. Local recurrence was observed in two cases. The study showed that in 30 cases time needed for complete resection of lesions was less than 10 minutes. Time of healing was longer than 12 days in 6 cases (42.8%) with tumor excision and in 14 cases (87.5%) where excision with ablation technique was performed. Conclusions The advantages of the CO2 laser surgery were better hemostasis, precision of working, non-contact dissection, less instruments at the site of operation and minimum traumatization of the surrounding tissues. PMID:24393628

  6. Radiofrequency Ablation Compared to Surgery for the Treatment of Benign Thyroid Nodules

    PubMed Central

    Bernardi, Stella; Dobrinja, Chiara; Fabris, Bruno; Bazzocchi, Gabriele; Sabato, Nicoletta; Ulcigrai, Veronica; Giacca, Massimo; Barro, Enrica; De Manzini, Nicolò; Stacul, Fulvio

    2014-01-01

    Objective. Benign thyroid nodules are a common occurrence whose only remedy, in case of symptoms, has always been surgery until the advent of new techniques, such as radiofrequency ablation (RFA). This study aimed at evaluating RFA efficacy, tolerability, and costs and comparing them to hemithyroidectomy for the treatment of benign thyroid nodules. Design and Methods. 37 patients who underwent RFA were retrospectively compared to 74 patients surgically treated, either in a standard inpatient or in a short-stay surgical regimen. Efficacy, tolerability, and costs were compared. The contribution of final pathology was also taken into account. Results. RFA reduced nodular volume by 70% after 12 months and it was an effective method for treating nodule-related clinical problems, but it was not as effective as surgery for the treatment of hot nodules. RFA and surgery were both safe, although RFA had less complications and pain was rare. RFA costed €1,661.50, surgery costed €4,556.30, and short-stay surgery costed €4,139.40 per patient. RFA, however, did not allow for any pathologic analysis of the nodules, which, in 6 patients who had undergone surgery (8%), revealed that the nodules harboured malignant cells. Conclusions. RFA might transform our approach to benign thyroid nodules. PMID:25045352

  7. Correction factor for ablation algorithms used in corneal refractive surgery with gaussian-profile beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimenez, Jose Ramón; González Anera, Rosario; Jiménez del Barco, Luis; Hita, Enrique; Pérez-Ocón, Francisco

    2005-01-01

    We provide a correction factor to be added in ablation algorithms when a Gaussian beam is used in photorefractive laser surgery. This factor, which quantifies the effect of pulse overlapping, depends on beam radius and spot size. We also deduce the expected post-surgical corneal radius and asphericity when considering this factor. Data on 141 eyes operated on LASIK (laser in situ keratomileusis) with a Gaussian profile show that the discrepancy between experimental and expected data on corneal power is significantly lower when using the correction factor. For an effective improvement of post-surgical visual quality, this factor should be applied in ablation algorithms that do not consider the effects of pulse overlapping with a Gaussian beam.

  8. Endovenous laser ablation for persistent and recurrent venous ulcers after varicose vein surgery.

    PubMed

    Kambal, A A; De'Ath, H D; Albon, H; Watson, A; Shandall, A; Greenstein, D

    2008-01-01

    A 75-year-old woman presented with painful recurrent venous ulcers (VU) continuously for the past 33 months on a background of frequent intermittent problems for the last 16 years. She had previously been treated with varicose vein surgery and trials of compression bandaging. Subsequently, she underwent endovenous laser ablation (EVLA) targeting the distal incompetent remnant of her great and small saphenous veins. This resulted in complete healing of her ulcers within four weeks. The dramatic response demonstrated in this case suggests that EVLA may represent an effective intervention in the management of postsurgery refractory VU. PMID:18663120

  9. Transoral robotic surgery: role in the management of upper aerodigestive tract tumors.

    PubMed

    Genden, Eric M; O'Malley, Bert W; Weinstein, Gregory S; Stucken, Chaz L; Selber, Jesse C; Rinaldo, Alessandra; Hockstein, Neil G; Ozer, Enver; Mallet, Yann; Satava, Richard M; Moore, Eric J; Silver, Carl E; Ferlito, Alfio

    2012-06-01

    The toxicity associated with concomitant chemoradiation for the management of laryngeal and pharyngeal carcinoma has been well documented. Minimally invasive surgical techniques offer the potential to extirpate the malignancy as a single-modality therapy and provide essential information that may direct subsequent treatment. In selected patients, radiation doses may be reduced and systemic chemotherapy may be withheld after tumor extirpation. Transoral laser microsurgery has proven effective, although inability to manipulate and suture tissue by this modality limits ablation and reconstruction of extensive defects. Transoral robotic surgery is a relatively new technique that provides several unique advantages, which include a 3-dimensional magnified view, ability to see and work around curves or angles, and the availability of 2 or 3 robotic arms that can be used to reconstruct extensive defects using either local, regional, or free flaps. Preliminary data suggest that transoral robotic surgery may provide a technique for ablation and reconstruction of pharyngeal defects that may be superior to other transoral techniques. It may also provide a means for personalizing therapy for oropharyngeal and supraglottic carcinoma. PMID:22610591

  10. Is outpatient brain tumor surgery feasible in India?

    PubMed

    Turel, Mazda K; Bernstein, Mark

    2016-01-01

    The current trend in all fields of surgery is towards less invasive procedures with shorter hospital stays. The reasons for this change include convenience to patients, optimal resource utilization, and cost saving. Technological advances in neurosurgery, aided by improvements in anesthesia, have resulted in surgery that is faster, simpler, and safer with excellent perioperative recovery. As a result of improved outcomes, some centers are performing brain tumor surgery on an outpatient basis, wherein patients arrive at the hospital the morning of their procedure and leave the hospital the same evening, thus avoiding an overnight stay in the hospital. In addition to the medical benefits of the outpatient procedure, its impact on patient satisfaction is substantial. The economic benefits are extremely favorable for the patient, physician, as well as the hospital. In high volume centers, a day surgery program can exist alongside those for elective and emergency surgeries, providing another pathway for patient care. However, due to skepticism surrounding the medicolegal aspects, and how radical the concept at first sounds, these procedures have not gained widespread popularity. We provide an overview of outpatient brain tumor surgery in the western world, discussing the socioeconomic, medicolegal, and ethical issues related to its adaptability in a developing nation. PMID:27625225

  11. Evaluation of laser ablation of knee cartilage as an alternative to microfracture surgery: pilot investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Erica; Wong, Brian J. F.; Sun, Hui; Juhasz, Tibor

    2010-02-01

    An emerging clinical treatment option for articular cartilage injury includes bone marrow stimulation techniques, such as microfracture, which has grown increasingly popular among athletes. During the microfracture procedure, the surgeon penetrates the subchondral bone with an awl and creates "microholes" deep enough to ensure bleeding from the bone marrow. This procedure triggers a spontaneous repair response that results in the formation of fibrocartilaginous repair tissue. This preliminary study aimed to evaluate the potential use of femtosecond lasers and Erbium:YAG lasers as alternatives to microfracture surgery of the knee by assessing the effects of ablation on bovine femoral condyles. Bovine femoral condyles were obtained and 8mm cube blocks were extracted. The specimen were ablated with various laser dosimetry parameters and observed using a high power dissecting microscope to examine the effects of the lasers. Further imaging with conventional histology (hematoxylin and eosin staining) was done to provide more accurate information. Preliminary results show some carbonization but demonstrate little thermal damage to surrounding tissues. The femtosecond laser offers a more precise and efficient ablation than the Erbium:YAG laser, but both are demonstrated to be possible alternatives to the surgical-skill dependent microfracture procedure.

  12. Creation of a Tumor-Mimic Model Using a Muscle Paste for Radiofrequency Ablation of the Lung

    SciTech Connect

    Kawai, T. Kaminou, T.; Sugiura, K.; Hashimoto, M.; Ohuchi, Y.; Adachi, A.; Fujioka, S.; Ito, H.; Nakamura, K.; Ogawa, T.

    2009-03-15

    The purpose of this study was to develop an easily created tumor-mimic model and evaluate its efficacy for radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of the lung. The bilateral lungs of eight living adult swine were used. A tumor-mimic model was made by percutaneous injection of 1.0 ml muscle paste through the bone biopsy needle into the lung. An RFA probe was then inserted into the tumor mimics immediately after tumor creation. Ablation time, tissue impedance, and temperature were recorded. The tumor mimics and their coagulated regions were evaluated microscopically and macroscopically. The muscle paste was easily injected into the lung parenchyma through the bone biopsy needle and well visualized under fluoroscopy. In 10 of 12 sites the tumor mimics were oval shaped, localized, and homogeneous on gross specimens. Ten tumor mimics were successfully ablated, and four locations were ablated in the normal lung parenchyma as controls. In the tumor and normal lung parenchyma, ablation times were 8.9 {+-} 3.5 and 4.4 {+-} 1.6 min, respectively; tissue impedances at the start of ablation were 100.6 {+-} 16.6 and 145.8 {+-} 26.8 {Omega}, respectively; and temperatures at the end of ablation were 66.0 {+-} 7.9 and 57.5 {+-} 7.6{sup o}C, respectively. The mean size of tumor mimics was 13.9 x 8.2 mm, and their coagulated area was 18.8 x 13.1 mm. In the lung parenchyma, the coagulated area was 15.3 x 12.0 mm. In conclusion, our tumor-mimic model using muscle paste can be easily and safely created and can be ablated using the ablation algorithm in the clinical setting.

  13. Chinese expert consensus workshop report: Guidelines for thermal ablation of primary and metastatic lung tumors.

    PubMed

    Ye, Xin; Fan, Weijun; Chen, Jun-Hui; Feng, Wei-Jian; Gu, Shan-Zhi; Han, Yue; Huang, Guang-Hui; Lei, Guang-Yan; Li, Xiao-Guang; Li, Yu-Liang; Li, Zhen-Jia; Lin, Zheng-Yu; Liu, Bao-Dong; Liu, Ying; Peng, Zhong-Min; Wang, Hui; Yang, Wu-Wei; Yang, Xia; Zhai, Bo; Zhang, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Although surgical resection is the primary means of curing both primary and metastatic lung cancers, about 80% of lung cancers cannot be removed by surgery. As most patients with unresectable lung cancer receive only limited benefits from traditional radiotherapy and chemotherapy, many new local treatment methods have emerged, including local ablation therapy. The Minimally Invasive and Comprehensive Treatment of Lung Cancer Branch, Professional Committee of Minimally Invasive Treatment of Cancer of the Chinese Anti-Cancer Association has organized multidisciplinary experts to develop guidelines for this treatment modality. These guidelines aim at standardizing thermal ablation procedures and criteria for selecting treatment candidates and assessing outcomes; and for preventing and managing post-ablation complications. PMID:26273346

  14. Chinese expert consensus workshop report: Guidelines for thermal ablation of primary and metastatic lung tumors

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Xin; Fan, Weijun; Chen, Jun-hui; Feng, Wei-jian; Gu, Shan-zhi; Han, Yue; Huang, Guang-hui; Lei, Guang-yan; Li, Xiao-guang; Li, Yu-liang; Li, Zhen-jia; Lin, Zheng-yu; Liu, Bao-dong; Liu, Ying; Peng, Zhong-min; Wang, Hui; Yang, Wu-wei; Yang, Xia; Zhai, Bo; Zhang, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Although surgical resection is the primary means of curing both primary and metastatic lung cancers, about 80% of lung cancers cannot be removed by surgery. As most patients with unresectable lung cancer receive only limited benefits from traditional radiotherapy and chemotherapy, many new local treatment methods have emerged, including local ablation therapy. The Minimally Invasive and Comprehensive Treatment of Lung Cancer Branch, Professional Committee of Minimally Invasive Treatment of Cancer of the Chinese Anti-Cancer Association has organized multidisciplinary experts to develop guidelines for this treatment modality. These guidelines aim at standardizing thermal ablation procedures and criteria for selecting treatment candidates and assessing outcomes; and for preventing and managing post-ablation complications. PMID:26273346

  15. Laser autofluorescent spectroscopy in adrenal tumor surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vetshev, Petr S.; Ippolitov, Leonid I.; Loschenov, Victor B.; Kazaryan, Airazat M.; Minnibaev, Marat T.; Vetshev, Sergei P.

    1999-12-01

    Determination of a histological type of adrenal lesion at the preoperative or intraoperative stage allows to choose the optimal volume of surgery and in the short time effectively correct the postoperative hormonal therapy. 12 patients with different adrenal tumours (3 - lightcellular adenoma, 3 - mixedcellular adenoma, 1 - darkcellular adenoma, 1 - trabecular adenoma, 1 - malignant lymphoma, 3 - aldosteroma, 1 - pheochromocytoma, including the chance of combination of mixedcellular adenoma and aldosteroma of left adrenal) were operated on. The patients' aged varied from 33 to 62 years. For the first time we made intraoperative laser autofluorescent spectroscopy (IOLAS). The laser ve1ength was 632.8 nm. We defined a autofluorescent intensity. Portable equipment was used. The duration of the procedure did not exceed 2mm. The autofluorescent peak of adrenal tissue was 1.33+/-0.05 relativistic unit (RU) at 685 nm. The autofiurescent peaks of adrenal adenomas were 1 .07 RU, 0.9-1 .15 RU, 1.7-1 .9 RU, 3.4 RU accordingly for trabecular adenoma, lightcellular adenoma, mixedcellular adenoma, darkcellular adenoma Besides greater contribution of longwave component to auflurescence is characteristic for mixecellular adenoma and especially for darkcellular adenoma. The autofiurescent peaks of aldosteroma and pheochromocytoma were accordingly 1.2-1.4 RU and 2.2 RU. Spectral distribution of intensity was like mixedcellular adenoma's one. In the case of malignant lymphoma the autofiurescence peak was 2,3 RU and we also noted displacement of maximum of autoflurescence (-15 nm, from 685 nm to 670 nm).The results of IOLAS application as a adjuvant diagnosticmethod point to promise for intraoperative rapid diagnostics of adrenal tumours.

  16. Role of surgery and transplantation in the treatment of hepatic metastases from neuroendocrine tumor

    PubMed Central

    Alagusundaramoorthy, Sayee Sundar; Gedaly, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors (NET) are a heterogeneous group of cancers, with indolent behavior. The most common primary origin is the gastro-intestinal tract but can also appear in the lungs, kidneys, adrenals, ovaries and other organs. In general, NET is usually discovered in the metastatic phase (40%-80%). The liver is the most common organ involved when metastases occur (40%-93%), followed by bone (12%-20%) and lung (8%-10%).A number of different therapeutic options are available for the treatment of hepatic metastases including surgical resection, transplantation, ablation, trans-arterial chemoembolization, chemotherapy and somatostatin analogues. Recently, molecular targeted therapies have been used, usually in combination with other treatment options, to improve outcomes in patients with metastases. This article emphasizes on the role of surgery in the treatment of liver metastases from NET. PMID:25339822

  17. Nephron-sparing surgery for multifocal and hereditary renal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Metwalli, Adam R.; Linehan, W. Marston

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of the Review Despite the controversy surrounding the benefits of nephron sparing surgery (NSS), multiple absolute indications for NSS still exist including the classic indications of hereditary and bilateral kidney tumors. Recent Findings Multiple genetic mutations have been identified that lead to hereditary kidney cancer conditions. These are briefly reviewed because the surgical management of hereditary kidney tumors depends on the genetic and histologic subtypes involved. Clear understanding of these hereditary conditions is crucial for proper surgical management of these tumors. Summary Complex partial nephrectomy for multiple renal tumors, or multiplex partial nephrectomy, requires not only exceptional surgical skill but expertise of numerous non-surgical methodologies such as hands-on intraoperative ultrasonography and interpretation of multiple imaging modalities. In addition, multi-disciplinary management is crucial for optimal outcomes in patient care. This review evaluates the most advanced surgical techniques and peri-operative management required to successfully care for these challenging cases. PMID:25014245

  18. Stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy (SABR): an alternative to surgery in stage I-II non-small-cell cancer of the lung?

    PubMed

    Mirimanoff, René-Olivier

    2015-12-01

    For decades, surgery was considered to be the only standard therapy for early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy (SABR) has been used in a growing number of patients and institutions since the early 2000's. Initially this technique was intended mainly for patients who were deemed to be medically inoperable due to co-morbidities or who refused surgery, but more recently it has been applied to operable patients as well. Strict criteria for treatment planning, the use of high-technology equipment and the appropriate selection of dose based on tumor size and location are of paramount importance for a proper application of SABR. Under these conditions, SABR offers high control rates with a moderate risk of severe toxicity, quite comparable to those of modern surgery. This article reviews the basic principles of SABR, its practical aspects, the definition of biologically equivalent doses, the results in terms of tumor control, survival and toxicity and an attempt will be made to compare the results of SABR with those of surgery. PMID:26730754

  19. Conditional ablation of Ikkb inhibits melanoma tumor development in mice

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jinming; Splittgerber, Ryan; Yull, Fiona E.; Kantrow, Sara; Ayers, Gregory D.; Karin, Michael; Richmond, Ann

    2010-01-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that tumor cells show elevated activity of the NF-κB transcription factor, a phenomenon often resulting from constitutive activity of IκB kinase β (IKKβ). However, others have found that loss of NF-κB activity or IKKβ is tumor promoting. The role of NF-κB in tumor progression is therefore controversial and varies with tumor type. We sought to more extensively investigate the role IKKβ in melanoma tumor development by specifically disrupting Ikkb in melanocytes in an established mouse model of spontaneous melanoma, whereby HRasV12 is expressed in a melanocyte-specific, doxycycline-inducible manner in mice null for the gene encoding the tumor suppressor inhibitor cyclin-dependent kinase 4/alternative reading frame (Ink4a/Arf). Our results show that Ink4a/Arf–/– mice with melanocyte-specific deletion of Ikkb were protected from HRasV12-initiated melanoma only when p53 was expressed. This protection was accompanied by cell cycle arrest, with reduced cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (Cdk2), Cdk4, Aurora kinase A, and Aurora kinase B expression. Increased p53-mediated apoptosis was also observed, with decreased expression of the antiapoptotic proteins Bcl2 and survivin. Enhanced stabilization of p53 involved increased phosphorylation at Ser15 and reduced phosphorylation of double minute 2 (Mdm2) at Ser166. Together, our findings provide genetic and mechanistic evidence that mutant HRas initiation of tumorigenesis requires Ikkβ-mediated NF-κB activity. PMID:20530876

  20. Evaluation of high intensity focused ultrasound ablation of prostate tumor with hyperpolarized 13C imaging biomarkers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jessie E.; Diederich, Chris J.; Salgaonkar, Vasant A.; Bok, Robert; Taylor, Andrew G.; Kurhanewicz, John

    2015-03-01

    Real-time hyperpolarized (HP) 13C MR can be utilized during high-intensity focal ultrasound (HIFU) therapy to improve treatment delivery strategies, provide treatment verification, and thus reduce the need for more radical therapies for lowand intermediate-risk prostate cancers. The goal is to develop imaging biomarkers specific to thermal therapies of prostate cancer using HIFU, and to predict the success of thermal coagulation and identify tissues potentially sensitized to adjuvant treatment by sub-ablative hyperthermic heat doses. Mice with solid prostate tumors received HIFU treatment (5.6 MHz, 160W/cm2, 60 s), and the MR imaging follow-ups were performed on a wide-bore 14T microimaging system. 13C-labeled pyruvate and urea were used to monitor tumor metabolism and perfusion accordingly. After treatment, the ablated tumor tissue had a loss in metabolism and perfusion. In the regions receiving sub-ablative heat dose, a timedependent change in metabolism and perfusion was observed. The untreated regions behaved as a normal untreated TRAMP prostate tumor would. This promising preliminary study shows the potential of using 13C MR imaging as biomarkers of HIFU/thermal therapies.

  1. Magnetic Hyperthermia Ablation of Tumors Using Injectable Fe₃O₄/Calcium Phosphate Cement.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chunyan; Zheng, Yuanyi; Gao, Wei; Xu, Jinshun; Zuo, Guoqing; Chen, Yu; Zhao, Minzhu; Li, Jianbo; Song, Jinlin; Zhang, Nan; Wang, Zhigang; Zhao, Hongyun; Mei, Zhechuan

    2015-07-01

    In this work, we have developed an injectable and biodegradable material using CPC containing Fe3O4 nanoparticles for minimally invasive and efficiently magnetic hyperthermia ablation of tumors. When exposed to an alternating magnetic field, the MCPC could quickly generate heat. The temperature of PBS and the excised bovine liver increased with the MCPC weight, iron content, and time. The ablated liver tissue volume for 0.36 g of 10% MCPC was 0.2 ± 0.03, 1.01 ± 0.07, and 1.96 ± 0.19 cm(3), respectively, at the time point of 60, 180, and 300 s. In our in vivo experiment, the MCPC could be directly injected into the center of the tumors under the guidance of ultrasound imaging. The formed MCPC was well-restricted within the tumor tissues without leakage, and the tumors were completely ablated by 0.36 g of 10% injectable MCPC after 180 s of induction heating. PMID:26065316

  2. Radiofrequency interstitial tumor ablation (RITA) is a possible new modality for treatment of renal cancer: ex vivo and in vivo experience.

    PubMed

    Zlotta, A R; Wildschutz, T; Raviv, G; Peny, M O; van Gansbeke, D; Noel, J C; Schulman, C C

    1997-08-01

    Small renal tumors are increasingly diagnosed and are frequently treated by nephron-sparing surgery. Tumors can be ablated by radiofrequency (RF) energy, which allows the operator to create very localized necrotic lesions. Radiofrequency interstitial tumor ablation (RITA) has been used in human kidneys in an ex vivo experiment to assess the necrotic lesions produced in a model close to physiologic conditions and then in three patients with localized renal cancer prior to radical nephrectomy. In the ex vivo model, four freshly removed kidneys were treated. Bipolar RF energy was delivered by a generator connected to two needles introduced parallel to each other into the renal parenchyma. A thermocouple was inserted between the two active electrodes. The renal artery at physiologic conditions was maintained at a constant temperature of perfusion of 37 degrees C by a computer-assisted Hot-line monitor. Two lesions were produced in each pole of each kidney including the cortex and the medulla. In an initial human study focusing on safety, feasibility, and pathology, three patients were treated by RITA with bipolar and monopolar energy. One patient with a peripheral 2-cm upper-pole tumor was treated percutaneously under ultrasound guidance with local anesthesia only 1 week prior to surgery. The other patients, with 3- and 5-cm tumors, were treated during surgery under general anesthesia just before nephrectomy. Ex vivo, the maximum temperature at the active needles ranged from 84 degrees C to 130 degrees C with 10 to 14 W applied during 10 to 14 minutes. Lesions were on average 2.2 x 3 x 2.5 cm.3 Microscopic examination showed stromal edema with intensive pyknosis. No damage was seen to adjacent untreated tissue. In the in vivo procedure, tolerance of RTA as an anesthesia-free procedure was excellent. The size of the observed lesions was comparable to the forecast size depending on the needle deployment. No side effects were noted, and no adjacent structures were

  3. Image-guided Tumor Ablation: Standardization of Terminology and Reporting Criteria—A 10-Year Update

    PubMed Central

    Solbiati, Luigi; Brace, Christopher L.; Breen, David J.; Callstrom, Matthew R.; Charboneau, J. William; Chen, Min-Hua; Choi, Byung Ihn; de Baère, Thierry; Dodd, Gerald D.; Dupuy, Damian E.; Gervais, Debra A.; Gianfelice, David; Gillams, Alice R.; Lee, Fred T.; Leen, Edward; Lencioni, Riccardo; Littrup, Peter J.; Livraghi, Tito; Lu, David S.; McGahan, John P.; Meloni, Maria Franca; Nikolic, Boris; Pereira, Philippe L.; Liang, Ping; Rhim, Hyunchul; Rose, Steven C.; Salem, Riad; Sofocleous, Constantinos T.; Solomon, Stephen B.; Soulen, Michael C.; Tanaka, Masatoshi; Vogl, Thomas J.; Wood, Bradford J.; Goldberg, S. Nahum

    2014-01-01

    Image-guided tumor ablation has become a well-established hallmark of local cancer therapy. The breadth of options available in this growing field increases the need for standardization of terminology and reporting criteria to facilitate effective communication of ideas and appropriate comparison among treatments that use different technologies, such as chemical (eg, ethanol or acetic acid) ablation, thermal therapies (eg, radiofrequency, laser, microwave, focused ultrasound, and cryoablation) and newer ablative modalities such as irreversible electroporation. This updated consensus document provides a framework that will facilitate the clearest communication among investigators regarding ablative technologies. An appropriate vehicle is proposed for reporting the various aspects of image-guided ablation therapy including classification of therapies, procedure terms, descriptors of imaging guidance, and terminology for imaging and pathologic findings. Methods are addressed for standardizing reporting of technique, follow-up, complications, and clinical results. As noted in the original document from 2003, adherence to the recommendations will improve the precision of communications in this field, leading to more accurate comparison of technologies and results, and ultimately to improved patient outcomes. © RSNA, 2014 Online supplemental material is available for this article. PMID:24927329

  4. Image-guided tumor ablation: standardization of terminology and reporting criteria--a 10-year update.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Muneeb; Solbiati, Luigi; Brace, Christopher L; Breen, David J; Callstrom, Matthew R; Charboneau, J William; Chen, Min-Hua; Choi, Byung Ihn; de Baère, Thierry; Dodd, Gerald D; Dupuy, Damian E; Gervais, Debra A; Gianfelice, David; Gillams, Alice R; Lee, Fred T; Leen, Edward; Lencioni, Riccardo; Littrup, Peter J; Livraghi, Tito; Lu, David S; McGahan, John P; Meloni, Maria Franca; Nikolic, Boris; Pereira, Philippe L; Liang, Ping; Rhim, Hyunchul; Rose, Steven C; Salem, Riad; Sofocleous, Constantinos T; Solomon, Stephen B; Soulen, Michael C; Tanaka, Masatoshi; Vogl, Thomas J; Wood, Bradford J; Goldberg, S Nahum

    2014-10-01

    Image-guided tumor ablation has become a well-established hallmark of local cancer therapy. The breadth of options available in this growing field increases the need for standardization of terminology and reporting criteria to facilitate effective communication of ideas and appropriate comparison among treatments that use different technologies, such as chemical (eg, ethanol or acetic acid) ablation, thermal therapies (eg, radiofrequency, laser, microwave, focused ultrasound, and cryoablation) and newer ablative modalities such as irreversible electroporation. This updated consensus document provides a framework that will facilitate the clearest communication among investigators regarding ablative technologies. An appropriate vehicle is proposed for reporting the various aspects of image-guided ablation therapy including classification of therapies, procedure terms, descriptors of imaging guidance, and terminology for imaging and pathologic findings. Methods are addressed for standardizing reporting of technique, follow-up, complications, and clinical results. As noted in the original document from 2003, adherence to the recommendations will improve the precision of communications in this field, leading to more accurate comparison of technologies and results, and ultimately to improved patient outcomes. Online supplemental material is available for this article . PMID:24927329

  5. Image-guided tumor ablation: standardization of terminology and reporting criteria--a 10-year update.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Muneeb; Solbiati, Luigi; Brace, Christopher L; Breen, David J; Callstrom, Matthew R; Charboneau, J William; Chen, Min-Hua; Choi, Byung Ihn; de Baère, Thierry; Dodd, Gerald D; Dupuy, Damian E; Gervais, Debra A; Gianfelice, David; Gillams, Alice R; Lee, Fred T; Leen, Edward; Lencioni, Riccardo; Littrup, Peter J; Livraghi, Tito; Lu, David S; McGahan, John P; Meloni, Maria Franca; Nikolic, Boris; Pereira, Philippe L; Liang, Ping; Rhim, Hyunchul; Rose, Steven C; Salem, Riad; Sofocleous, Constantinos T; Solomon, Stephen B; Soulen, Michael C; Tanaka, Masatoshi; Vogl, Thomas J; Wood, Bradford J; Goldberg, S Nahum

    2014-11-01

    Image-guided tumor ablation has become a well-established hallmark of local cancer therapy. The breadth of options available in this growing field increases the need for standardization of terminology and reporting criteria to facilitate effective communication of ideas and appropriate comparison among treatments that use different technologies, such as chemical (eg, ethanol or acetic acid) ablation, thermal therapies (eg, radiofrequency, laser, microwave, focused ultrasound, and cryoablation) and newer ablative modalities such as irreversible electroporation. This updated consensus document provides a framework that will facilitate the clearest communication among investigators regarding ablative technologies. An appropriate vehicle is proposed for reporting the various aspects of image-guided ablation therapy including classification of therapies, procedure terms, descriptors of imaging guidance, and terminology for imaging and pathologic findings. Methods are addressed for standardizing reporting of technique, follow-up, complications, and clinical results. As noted in the original document from 2003, adherence to the recommendations will improve the precision of communications in this field, leading to more accurate comparison of technologies and results, and ultimately to improved patient outcomes. PMID:25442132

  6. Supercomputer Simulation of Radio-frequency Hepatic Tumor Ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosturski, N.; Margenov, S.

    2010-11-01

    We simulate the thermal and electrical processes, involved in the radio-frequency (RF) ablation procedure. The mathematical model consists of two parts—electrical and thermal. The energy from the applied AC voltage is determined first, by solving the Laplace equation to find the potential distribution. After that, the electric field intensity and the current density are directly calculated. Finally, the heat transfer equation is solved to determine the temperature distribution. Heat loss due to blood perfusion is also accounted for. The representation of the computational domain is based on a voxel mesh. Both partial differential equations are discretized in space via linear conforming FEM. After the space discretization, the backward Euler scheme is used for the time stepping. Large-scale linear systems arise from the FEM discretization. Moreover, they are ill-conditioned, due to the strong coefficient jumps and the complex geometry of the problem. Therefore, efficient parallel solution methods are required. The developed parallel solver is based on the preconditioned conjugate gradient (PCG) method. As a preconditioner, we use BoomerAMG—a parallel algebraic multigrid implementation from the package Hypre, developed in LLNL, Livermore. Parallel numerical tests, performed on the IBM Blue Gene/P massively parallel computer are presented.

  7. Angled Cool-Tip Electrode for Radiofrequency Ablation of Small Superficial Subcapsular Tumors in the Liver: A Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Il Jung; Lee, Shin Jae; Shin, Min Woo; Shin, Won Sun; Chung, Yong Eun; Kim, Gyoung Min; Kim, Man Deuk; Won, Jong Yun; Lee, Do Yun; Choi, Jin Sub; Han, Kwang-Hyub

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the feasibility of angled cool-tip electrode for radiofrequency ablation of small superficial subcapsular liver tumors abutting abdominal wall, in order to traverse normal liver parenchyma, and thereby, obtain favorable configuration of ablation margin. Materials and Methods In this study, we retrospectively analyzed 15 small superficial subcapsular liver tumors abutting abdominal wall in 15 patients, treated with radiofrequency ablation from March 2013 to June 2015 using a cool-tip electrode manually modified to create 25–35° angle at the junction between exposed and insulated segments. The tumors were hepatocellular carcinoma (n = 13) and metastases (n = 2: cholangiocellular carcinoma and rectosigmoid cancer), with maximum diameter of 10–26 mm (mean, 15.68 ± 5.29 mm). Under ultrasonographic guidance, the electrode tip was advanced to the depth of the tumors' epicenter about 1 cm from the margin. The tip was re-directed to penetrate the tumor for radiofrequency ablation. Minimal ablation margin was measured at immediate post-treatment CT. Radiological images and medical records were evaluated for success rate, length of minimal ablation margin and complications. Results Technical success rate of obtaining complete necrosis of the tumors was 100%, with no procedure-related complication. Minimal ablation margin ranged from 3–12 mm (mean, 7.07 ± 2.23 mm). CT/MRI follow-up at 21–1022 days (mean, 519.47 ± 304.51 days) revealed no local recurrence, but distant recurrence in 9 patients. Conclusion Using an angled cool-tip electrode for radiofrequency ablation of small superficial subcapsular tumors abutting abdominal wall may be a feasible technique for obtaining adequate ablation margin and lower complication rate. PMID:27587963

  8. Photothermal ablation of malignant brain tumors by nanoparticle loaded macrophages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirschberg, Henry; Baek, Seung-Kuk; Kwon, Young Jik; Sun, Chung-Ho; Madsen, Steen J.

    2011-03-01

    Nanoshells are a new class of optically tunable nanoparticles composed of a dielectric core (silica) coated with an ultrathin metallic layer (gold). Since nanoshells are roughly one million times more efficient at converting NIR light into heat than conventional dyes when exposed to NIR light, they can generate sufficient heat to induce cell death. Macrophages are frequently found in and around glioblastomas in both experimental animals and patient biopsies. Inflammatory cells loaded with nanoparticles could therefore be used to target tumors.

  9. Enhanced Ablation of High Intensity Focused Ultrasound with Microbubbles: An Experimental Study on Rabbit Hepatic VX2 Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    He Wei; Wang Wei Zhou Ping; Wang, Yixiang J.; Zhou Peng; Li Ruizhen; Wang Jinsheng; Ahuja, Anil T.

    2011-10-15

    Purpose: This study was designed to assess the enhanced effect of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) ablation with microbubbles on rabbit hepatic VX2 tumors and to compare the detection sensitivity of CEUS and CECT to determine the residual viable tissue after ablation of HIFU. Methods: Forty rabbits with hepatic VX2 tumors were randomly separated into two groups (20 animals per group) before HIFU ablation. A bolus of 0.2 mL of saline or a microbubble-based ultrasound (US) contrast agent was injected intravenously to group I rabbits and group II rabbits, respectively. The HIFU ablation procedure was started 15 s after the injection. Tumors were examined with grayscale contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) and contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CECT) immediately before and after HIFU ablation. Histopathologic assessment was performed immediately after treatment imaging. Results: Before ablation, intense contrast enhancement during arterial phase was observed at the whole tumors or the periphery of the tumors by CEUS and CECT. Lower HIFU energy was used in group II than in group I (P < 0.001). Histopathologic assessment revealed local residual viable tumor tissues due to incomplete ablation in 47.4% (9/19) of tumors in group I and 10% (2/20) of tumors in group II (P < 0.05). The concordance rate of CEUS (90.9%) with histopathology on residual tumor detection was higher than that of CECT (27.3%, P < 0.05). Conclusions: Introduction of the microbubble agent enhances HIFU therapeutic efficacy. CEUS proves to have high sensitivity in assessment of residual viable rabbit VX2 tumor after HIFU.

  10. Use of High-Frequency Jet Ventilation for Percutaneous Tumor Ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Denys, Alban Lachenal, Yann; Duran, Rafael; Chollet-Rivier, Madeleine; Bize, Pierre

    2013-05-02

    PurposeTo report feasibility and potential benefits of high-frequency jet ventilation (HFJV) in tumor ablations techniques in liver, kidney, and lung lesions.MethodsThis prospective study included 51 patients (14 women, mean age 66 years) bearing 66 tumors (56 hepatic, 5 pulmonary, 5 renal tumors) with a median size of 16 ± 8.7 mm, referred for tumor ablation in an intention-to-treat fashion before preoperative anesthesiology visit. Cancellation and complications of HFJV were prospectively recorded. Anesthesia and procedure duration, as well as mean CO{sub 2} capnea, were recorded. When computed tomography guidance was used, 3D spacial coordinates of an anatomical target <2 mm in diameter on 8 slabs of 4 slices of 3.75-mm slice thickness were registered.ResultsHFJV was used in 41 of 51 patients. Of the ten patients who were not candidate for HFJV, two patients had contraindication to HFJV (severe COPD), three had lesions invisible under HFJV requiring deep inspiration apnea for tumor targeting, and five patients could not have HFJV because of unavailability of a trained anesthetic team. No specific complication or hypercapnia related to HFJV were observed despite a mean anesthetic duration of 2 h and ventilation performed in procubitus (n = 4) or lateral decubitus (n = 6). Measured internal target movement was 0.3 mm in x- and y-axis and below the slice thickness of 3.75 mm in the z-axis in 11 patients.ConclusionsHFJV is feasible in 80 % of patients allowing for near immobility of internal organs during liver, kidney, and lung tumor ablation.

  11. Nanoparticle-assisted photothermal ablation of brain tumor in an orthotopic canine model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, Jon A.; Shetty, Anil M.; Price, Roger E.; Stafford, R. Jason; Wang, James C.; Uthamanthil, Rajesh K.; Pham, Kevin; McNichols, Roger J.; Coleman, Chris L.; Payne, J. Donald

    2009-02-01

    We report on a pilot study demonstrating a proof of concept for the passive delivery of nanoshells to an orthotopic tumor where they induce a local, confined therapeutic response distinct from that of normal brain resulting in the photo-thermal ablation of canine Transmissible Venereal Tumor (cTVT) in a canine brain model. cTVT fragments grown in SCID mice were successfully inoculated in the parietal lobe of immuno-suppressed, mixed-breed hound dogs. A single dose of near-infrared absorbing, 150 nm nanoshells was infused intravenously and allowed time to passively accumulate in the intracranial tumors which served as a proxy for an orthotopic brain metastasis. The nanoshells accumulated within the intracranial cTVT suggesting that its neo-vasculature represented an interruption of the normal blood-brain barrier. Tumors were thermally ablated by percutaneous, optical fiber-delivered, near-infrared radiation using a 3.5 W average, 3-minute laser dose at 808 nm that selectively elevated the temperature of tumor tissue to 65.8+/-4.1ºC. Identical laser doses applied to normal white and gray matter on the contralateral side of the brain yielded sub-lethal temperatures of 48.6+/-1.1ºC. The laser dose was designed to minimize thermal damage to normal brain tissue in the absence of nanoshells and compensate for variability in the accumulation of nanoshells in tumor. Post-mortem histopathology of treated brain sections demonstrated the effectiveness and selectivity of the nanoshell-assisted thermal ablation.

  12. Feasibility of Respiratory Triggering for MR-Guided Microwave Ablation of Liver Tumors Under General Anesthesia

    SciTech Connect

    Morikawa, Shigehiro Inubushi, Toshiro; Kurumi, Yoshimasa; Naka, Shigeyuki; Sato, Koichiro; Demura, Koichi; Tani, Tohru; Haque, Hasnine A

    2004-08-15

    We obtained clear and reproducible MR fluoroscopic images and temperature maps for MR image-guided microwave ablation of liver tumors under general anesthesia without suspending the artificial ventilation. Respiratory information was directly obtained from air-way pressure without a sensor on the chest wall. The trigger signal started scanning of one whole image with a spoiled gradient echo sequence. The delay time before the start of scanning was adjusted to acquire the data corresponding to the k-space center at the maximal expiratory phase. The triggered images were apparently clearer than the nontriggered ones and the location of the liver was consistent, which made targeting of the tumor easy. MR temperature images, which were highly susceptible to the movement of the liver, during microwave ablation using a proton resonance frequency method, could be obtained without suspending the artificial ventilation. Respiratory triggering technique was found to be useful for MR fluoroscopic images and MR temperature monitoring in MR-guided microwave ablation of liver tumors under general anesthesia.

  13. Vasculature segmentation for radio frequency ablation of non-resectable hepatic tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemler, Paul F.; McCreedy, Evan S.; Cheng, Ruida; Wood, Brad; McAuliffe, Matthew J.

    2006-03-01

    In Radio Frequency Ablation (RFA) procedures, hepatic tumor tissue is heated to a temperature where necrosis is insured. Unfortunately, recent results suggest that heating tumor tissue to necrosis is complicated because nearby major blood vessels provide a cooling effect. Therefore, it is fundamentally important for physicians to perform a careful analysis of the spatial relationship of diseased tissue to larger liver blood vessels. The liver contains many of these large vessels, which affect the RFA ablation shape and size. There are many sophisticated vasculature detection and segmentation techniques reported in the literature that identify continuous vessels as the diameter changes size and it transgresses through many bifurcation levels. However, the larger blood vessels near the treatment area are the only vessels required for proper RFA treatment plan formulation and analysis. With physician guidance and interaction, our system can segment those vessels which are most likely to affect the RFA ablations. We have found that our system provides the physician with therapeutic, geometric and spatial information necessary to accurately plan treatment of tumors near large blood vessels. The segmented liver vessels near the treatment region are also necessary for computing isolevel heating profiles used to evaluate different proposed treatment configurations.

  14. Immunonanoshells for targeted photothermal ablation of tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Lowery, Amanda R; Gobin, André M; Day, Emily S; Halas, Naomi J; West, Jennifer L

    2006-01-01

    Consisting of a silica core surrounded by a thin gold shell, nanoshells possess an optical tunability that spans the visible to the near infrared (NIR) region, a region where light penetrates tissues deeply. Conjugated with tumor-specific antibodies, NIR-absorbing immunonanoshells can preferentially bind to tumor cells. NIR light then heats the bound nanoshells, thus destroying the targeted cells. Antibodies can be consistently bound to the nanoshells via a bifunctional polyethylene glycol (PEG) linker at a density of ~150 antibodies per nanoshell. In vitro studies have confirmed the ability to selectively induce cell death with the photothermal interaction of immunonanoshells and NIR light. Prior to incubation with anti-human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER2) immunonanoshells, HER2-expressing SK-BR-3 breast carcinoma cells were seeded alone or adjacent to human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs). Anti-HER2 immunonanoshells bound to HER2-expressing cells resulted in the death of SK-BR-3 cells after NIR exposure only within the irradiated area, while HDFs remained viable after similar treatment since the immunonanoshells did not bind to these cells at high levels. Control nanoshells, conjugated with nonspecific anti-IgG or PEG, did not bind to either cell type, and cells continued to be viable after treatment with these control nanoshells and NIR irradiation. PMID:17722530

  15. Three-dimensional analysis for radio-frequency ablation of liver tumor with blood perfusion effect.

    PubMed

    Sheu, Tony W H; Chou, C W; Tsai, S F; Liang, P C

    2005-08-01

    Increase of temperature above 50 approximately 60 degrees C for few minutes by the emitted radio-frequency (RF) energy has been shown to be able to denaturate the intracellular proteins and destruct membranes of tumor cells. To improve the efficacy of this thermal therapy, it is important to investigate factors that may affect the RF heating characteristics for the hepatocellular carcinoma and metastatic liver tumors. In order to make sure the applied RF energy is adequate to ablate the target tumor, a 3D thermoelectric analysis for the system consisting of liver, liver arteries and 4 mm diameter tumor is conducted. The effect of blood perfusion is addressed in this study. PMID:16298845

  16. Sentinel node navigation surgery for gastroduodenal neuroendocrine tumors

    PubMed Central

    Arigami, Takaaki; Uenosono, Yoshikazu; Yanagita, Shigehiro; Okubo, Keishi; Kijima, Takashi; Matsushita, Daisuke; Amatatsu, Masahiko; Hagihara, Takahiko; Haraguchi, Naoto; Mataki, Yuko; Ehi, Katsuhiko; Ishigami, Sumiya; Natsugoe, Shoji

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The percentage of gastroduodenal neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) among all gastroenteropancreatic (GEP) NETs has gradually increased worldwide. Sentinel node navigation surgery (SNNS) has been developed as a personalized approach in the surgical strategy for early gastrointestinal tract cancers. We herein report 2 cases of gastroduodenal NETs treated with SNNS. 99m Technetium-tin colloid including indocyanine green was endoscopically injected into the submucosa around a tumor the day before surgery. Basin dissection including the sentinel nodes (SNs), which were identified by Navigator GPS and near-infrared fluorescence imaging, was performed during laparoscopic surgery. SNs were intraoperatively examined using hematoxylin–eosin (HE) staining. SNs were detected in 2 patients. Lymph node metastasis was intraoperatively identified in 1 of the 2 patients. Consequently, 1 patient with metastatic SNs underwent laparoscopic gastrectomy with lymphadenectomy. Pathological findings identified submucosal NET measuring 6.0 mm × 5.0 mm. Our results suggest that SNNS is a promising surgical tool for detecting subclinical lymph node metastasis in patients with gastroduodenal NETs. PMID:27368046

  17. Lung Tumors Treated With Percutaneous Radiofrequency Ablation: Computed Tomography Imaging Follow-Up

    SciTech Connect

    Palussiere, Jean Marcet, Benjamin; Descat, Edouard; Deschamps, Frederic; Rao, Pramod; Ravaud, Alain; Brouste, Veronique; Baere, Thierry de

    2011-10-15

    Purpose: To describe the morphologic evolution of lung tumors treated with radiofrequency ablation (RFA) by way of computed tomography (CT) images and to investigate patterns of incomplete RFA at the site of ablation. Materials and Methods: One hundred eighty-nine patients with 350 lung tumors treated with RFA underwent CT imaging at 2, 4, 6, and 12 months. CT findings were interpreted separately by two reviewers with consensus. Five different radiologic patterns were predefined: fibrosis, cavitation, nodule, atelectasis, and disappearance. The appearance of the treated area was evaluated at each follow-up CT using the predefined patterns. Results: At 1 year after treatment, the most common evolutions were fibrosis (50.5%) or nodules (44.8%). Differences were noted depending on the initial size of the tumor, with fibrosis occurring more frequently for tumors <2 cm (58.6% vs. 22.9%, P = 1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5}). Cavitation and atelectasis were less frequent patterns (2.4% and 1.4%, respectively, at 1 year). Tumor location (intraparenchymatous, with pleural contact <50% or >50%) was not significantly correlated with follow-up image pattern. Local tumor progressions were observed with each type of evolution. At 1 year, 12 local recurrences were noted: 2 cavitations, which represented 40% of the cavitations noted at 1 year; 2 fibroses (1.9%); 7 nodules (7.4%); and 1 atelectasis (33.3%). Conclusion: After RFA of lung tumors, follow-up CT scans show that the shape of the treatment zone can evolve in five different patterns. None of these patterns, however, can confirm the absence of further local tumor progression at subsequent follow-up.

  18. Non-Rigid Registration of Liver CT Images for CT-Guided Ablation of Liver Tumors.

    PubMed

    Luu, Ha Manh; Klink, Camiel; Niessen, Wiro; Moelker, Adriaan; Walsum, Theo van

    2016-01-01

    CT-guided percutaneous ablation for liver cancer treatment is a relevant technique for patients not eligible for surgery and with tumors that are inconspicuous on US imaging. The lack of real-time imaging and the use of a limited amount of CT contrast agent make targeting the tumor with the needle challenging. In this study, we evaluate a registration framework that allows the integration of diagnostic pre-operative contrast enhanced CT images and intra-operative non-contrast enhanced CT images to improve image guidance in the intervention. The liver and tumor are segmented in the pre-operative contrast enhanced CT images. Next, the contrast enhanced image is registered to the intra-operative CT images in a two-stage approach. First, the contrast-enhanced diagnostic image is non-rigidly registered to a non-contrast enhanced image that is conventionally acquired at the start of the intervention. In case the initial registration is not sufficiently accurate, a refinement step is applied using non-rigid registration method with a local rigidity term. In the second stage, the intra-operative CT-images that are used to check the needle position, which often consist of only a few slices, are registered rigidly to the intra-operative image that was acquired at the start of the intervention. Subsequently, the diagnostic image is registered to the current intra-operative image, using both transformations, this allows the visualization of the tumor region extracted from pre-operative data in the intra-operative CT images containing needle. The method is evaluated on imaging data of 19 patients at the Erasmus MC. Quantitative evaluation is performed using the Dice metric, mean surface distance of the liver border and corresponding landmarks in the diagnostic and the intra-operative images. The registration of the diagnostic CT image to the initial intra-operative CT image did not require a refinement step in 13 cases. For those cases, the resulting registration had a Dice

  19. Incidence and types of complications after ablative oral cancer surgery with primary microvascular free flap reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Lodders, Johannes N.; Parmar, Satyesh; Stienen, Niki LM.; Martin, Timothy J.; Karagozoglu, K. Hakki; Heymans, Martijn W.; Nandra, Baljeet

    2015-01-01

    Background The aims of the study were 1) to evaluate the incidence and types of postoperative complications after ablative oral cancer surgery with primary free flap reconstruction and 2) identify prognostic variables for postoperative complications. Material and Methods Desired data was retrieved from a computer database at the department of Oral and Maxillofacial Department, Queen Elisabeth hospital Birmingham, United Kingdom, between June 2007 and October 2012. Logistic regression was used to study relationships between preoperative variables and postoperative outcomes. Results The study population consisted 184 patients, comprising 189 composite resections with reconstruction. Complications developed in 40.2% of the patients. Three patients (1.6%) died, 11.1% returned to the operating room, 5.3% developed donor site complications and 6.9% flap complications of which 3.2% total flap failure. In the multivariable analysis systemic complications were associated with anaesthesia time and hospital stay with red cell transfusion. Conclusions A significant proportion of the patients with primary free flap reconstructions after oral cancer surgery develops postoperative complications. Prolonged anaesthesia time and red cell transfusion are possible predictors for systemic complications and hospital stay respectively. Preoperative screening for risk factors is advocated for patient selection and to have realistic information and expectations. Key words:Free flap, complications, oral cancer, risk factors, reconstruction. PMID:26116846

  20. Resection of Posterior Mediastinal Tumors by Video Assisted Thoracic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Ali, Taimur Asif; Fatimi, Saulat Hasnain; Naeem, Syed Saad

    2015-07-01

    This case report illustrates successful Video Assisted Thoracic Surgery (VATS) performed on a 45-year-old woman and 52-year-old man presenting with a mass in left and right paravertebral space on the CT scan respectively. VATS has many benefits over traditional open operation (thoracotomy), resulting in less pain and shorten recovery time. However, VATS has higher equipment cost but when an experienced surgeon performs the surgery, better outcomes are achieved. VATS is not common in Pakistan's surgical setup as it is an expensive method of eradicating mediastinal pathologies and not every patient undergoes VATS. The primary objective of presenting these cases is to promote the use of VATS specifically for removal of posterior mediastinal tumors and improve the surgical outcomes. PMID:26208561

  1. Etiology of postoperative hyponatremia following pediatric intracranial tumor surgery.

    PubMed

    Williams, Cydni N; Riva-Cambrin, Jay; Bratton, Susan L

    2016-03-01

    OBJECT Cerebral salt wasting (CSW) and the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH) cause postoperative hyponatremia in neurosurgery patients, can be difficult to distinguish clinically, and are associated with increased morbidity. The authors aimed to determine risk factors associated with CSW and SIADH among children undergoing surgery for intracranial tumors. METHODS This retrospective cohort study included children 0-19 years of age who underwent a first intracranial tumor surgery with postoperative hyponatremia (sodium ≤ 130 mEq/L). CSW was differentiated from SIADH by urine output and fluid balance, exclusive of other causes of hyponatremia. The CSW and SIADH groups were compared with basic bivariate analysis and recursive partitioning. RESULTS Of 39 hyponatremic patients, 17 (44%) had CSW and 10 (26%) had SIADH. Patients with CSW had significantly greater natriuresis compared with those with SIADH (median urine sodium 211 vs 28 mEq/L, p = 0.01). Age ≤ 7 years and female sex were significant risk factors for CSW (p = 0.03 and 0.04, respectively). Both patient groups had hyponatremia onset within the first postoperative week. Children with CSW had trends toward increased sodium variability and symptomatic hyponatremia compared with those with SIADH. Most received treatment, but inappropriate treatment was noted to worsen hyponatremia. CONCLUSIONS The authors found that CSW was more common following intracranial tumor surgery and was associated with younger age and female sex. Careful assessment of fluid balance and urine output can separate patients with CSW from those who have SIADH, and high urine sodium concentrations (> 100 mEq/L) support a CSW diagnosis. Patients with CSW and SIADH had similar clinical courses, but responded to different interventions, making appropriate diagnosis and treatment imperative to prevent morbidity. PMID:26613271

  2. Ultrasound-directed robotic system for thermal ablation of liver tumors: a preliminary report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jian; Tian, Jie; Dai, Yakang; Zhang, Xing; Dong, Di; Xu, Min

    2010-03-01

    Thermal ablation has been proved safe and effective as the treatment for liver tumors that are not suitable for resection. Currently, manually performed thermal ablation is greatly dependent on the surgeon's acupuncture manipulation against hand tremor. Besides that, inaccurate or inappropriate placement of the applicator will also directly decrease the final treatment effect. In order to reduce the influence of hand tremor, and provide an accurate and appropriate guidance for a better treatment, we develop an ultrasound-directed robotic system for thermal ablation of liver tumors. In this paper, we will give a brief preliminary report of our system. Especially, three innovative techniques are proposed to solve the critical problems in our system: accurate ultrasound calibration when met with artifacts, realtime reconstruction with visualization using Graphic Processing Unit (GPU) acceleration and 2D-3D ultrasound image registration. To reduce the error of point extraction with artifacts, we propose a novel point extraction method by minimizing an error function which is defined based on the geometric property of our N-fiducial phantom. Then realtime reconstruction with visualization using GPU acceleration is provided for fast 3D ultrasound volume acquisition with dynamic display of reconstruction progress. After that, coarse 2D-3D ultrasound image registration is performed based on landmark points correspondences, followed by accurate 2D-3D ultrasound image registration based on Euclidean distance transform (EDT). The effectiveness of our proposed techniques is demonstrated in phantom experiments.

  3. Robotic surgery for rectosigmoid junction tumor with ovarian metastases

    PubMed Central

    Bedirli, Abdulkadir; Salman, Bulent

    2015-01-01

    Isolated ovarian metastases from colorectal cancer (CRC) are rare disease presenting in approximately 3% of all patients undergoing colorectal resection. Most reports describe an open approach to the disease, but we report a case isolated ovarian metastases from CRC managed completely by robotic technique. A 54-year-old female, with a family history of CRC, was admitted for rectosigmoid junction cancer. Computed tomography scan demonstrated in rectosigmoid tumor and pelvic mass, presumed as teratoma. Robotic surgery discovered a 10-cm encapsulated tumor, attached to the left ovary, with no macroscopic peritoneal involvement. The pathologic diagnosis of the resected pelvic mass, ovarian metastases from CRC. Robotic anterior resection was performed. Operative time was lasted 165 min, considering 25 min for robotic system set up. This is the first report to describe robot-assisted anterior resection and oophorectomy in patient with isolated ovarian metastases from rectosigmoid junction cancer. PMID:25598608

  4. Imaging Intratumoral Nanoparticle Uptake After Combining Nanoembolization with Various Ablative Therapies in Hepatic VX2 Rabbit Tumors.

    PubMed

    Tam, Alda L; Melancon, Marites P; Abdelsalam, Mohamed; Figueira, Tomas Appleton; Dixon, Katherine; McWatters, Amanda; Zhou, Min; Huang, Qian; Mawlawi, Osama; Dunner, Kenneth; Li, Chun; Gupta, Sanjay

    2016-02-01

    Combining image-guided therapy techniques for the treatment of liver cancers is a strategy that is being used to improve local tumor control rates. Here, we evaluate the intratumoral uptake of nanoparticles used in combination with radiofrequency ablation (RFA), irreversible electroporation (IRE), or laser induced thermal therapy (LITT). Eight rabbits with VX2 tumor in the liver underwent one of four treatments: (i) nanoembolization (NE) with radiolabeled, hollow gold nanoparticles loaded with doxorubicin (⁶⁴Cu-PEG-HAuNS-DOX); (ii) NE + RFA; (iii) NE + IRE; (iv) NE +LITT. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) imaging was obtained 1-hr or 18-hrs after intervention. Tissue samples were collected for autoradiography and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis. PET/CT imaging at 1-hr showed focal deposition of oil and nanoparticles in the tumor only after NE+ RFA but at 18-hrs, all animals had focal accumulation of oil and nanoparticles in the tumor region. Autoradiograph analysis demonstrated nanoparticle deposition in the tumor and in the ablated tissues adjacent to the tumor when NE was combined with ablation. TEM results showed the intracellular uptake of nanoparticles in tumor only after NE + IRE. Nanoparticles demonstrated a structural change, suggesting direct interaction, potentially leading to drug release, only after NE + LITT. The findings demonstrate that a combined NE and ablation treatment technique for liver tumors is feasible, resulting in deposition of nanoparticles in and around the tumor. Depending on the ablative energy applied, different effects are seen on nanoparticle localization and structure. These effects should be considered when designing nanoparticles for use in combination with ablation technologies. PMID:27305763

  5. Novel Percutaneous Radiofrequency Ablation of Portal Vein Tumor Thrombus: Safety and Feasibility

    SciTech Connect

    Mizandari, Malkhaz; Ao, Guokun; Zhang Yaojun; Feng Xi; Shen Qiang; Chen Minshan; Lau, Wan Yee; Nicholls, Joanna; Jiao Long; Habib, Nagy

    2013-02-15

    We report our experience of the safety of partial recanalization of the portal vein using a novel endovascular radiofrequency (RF) catheter for portal vein tumor thrombosis. Six patients with liver cancer and tumor thrombus in the portal vein underwent percutaneous intravascular radiofrequency ablation (RFA) using an endovascular bipolar RF device. A 0.035-inch guidewire was introduced into a tributary of the portal vein and through which a 5G guide catheter was introduced into the main portal vein. After manipulation of the guide catheter over the thrombus under digital subtraction angiography, the endovascular RF device was inserted and activated around the thrombus. There were no observed technique specific complications, such as hemorrhage, vessel perforation, or infection. Post-RFA portography showed partial recanalization of portal vein. RFA of portal vein tumor thrombus in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma is technically feasible and warrants further investigation to assess efficacy compared with current recanalization techniques.

  6. Radiofrequency thermal ablation of breast tumors combined with intralesional administration of IL-7 and IL-15 augments anti-tumor immune responses and inhibits tumor development and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Habibi, Mehran; Kmieciak, Maciej; Graham, Laura; Morales, Johanna K; Bear, Harry D; Manjili, Masoud H

    2008-01-01

    Tumor development or recurrence is always a matter of concern following radiofrequency thermal ablation (RFA) of tumors. To determine whether combining RFA with immunologically active cytokines might induce tumor-specific immune responses against mammary carcinoma and inhibit tumor development or metastasis, we evaluated intralesional injection of IL-7 and IL-15 in RFA-treated murine tumors. We used two different breast carcinoma models: neu-overexpressing mouse mammary carcinoma (MMC) in FVBN202 transgenic mouse and 4T1 tumors in Balb/c mouse. MMC tend to relapse even in the presence of neu-specific immune responses, and 4T1 is a weakly immunogenic, aggressive and highly metastatic transplantable tumor. In vivo growth of both of these tumors is also associated with increased numbers of CD11b+Gr1+ myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC). We showed for the first time that unlike RFA alone, RFA combined with the administration of intralesional IL-7 and IL-15 (after RFA), induced immune responses to tumors, inhibited tumor development and lung metastasis, and reduced MDSC. PMID:18425677

  7. Histotripsy Focal Ablation of Implanted Prostate Tumor in an ACE-1 Canine Cancer Model

    PubMed Central

    Schade, George R.; Keller, Jill; Ives, Kim; Cheng, Xu; Rosol, Thomas J.; Keller, Evan; Roberts, William W.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Histotripsy is a nonthermal ablative focused ultrasound technology with possible future applications for prostate cancer focal therapy. We used the ACE-1 prostate tumor model and evaluated the feasibility of treating prostate tumors with histotripsy. Materials and Methods A total of 10 immunosuppressed (cyclosporine treated) canine subjects received transrectal ultrasound guided percutaneous intraprostatic injection of ACE-1 canine prostate cancer cells. Prostates were serially imaged with transrectal ultrasound to monitor tumor growth. Subjects were sham treated (3) or underwent transabdominal histotripsy of the prostate, which targeted implanted tumor and adjacent parenchyma using a 750 kHz piezoelectric ultrasound therapy transducer. Prostates were examined histologically to confirm tumor and the histotripsy treatment effect. Results ACE-1 tumors were visualized on transrectal ultrasound in all 10 subjects within 2 weeks of tumor injection. Lesions demonstrated growth in the prostatic capsule, glandular lobules, fibrous septa and periurethral stroma with significant desmoplastic reaction and areas of central necrosis on histology. Lymph node and/or pulmonary metastases developed in 4 subjects. Ultrasound tumor localization and initiation of cavitation during histotripsy therapy were feasible in all treated subjects. Histologically there was evidence of homogenization of tumor and prostatic parenchyma in all 4 acute subjects with necrosis and hemorrhage in the 3 chronic subjects. Conclusions This study shows the feasibility of histotripsy destruction of prostate tumors in a canine ACE-1 model. It suggests a potential role for histotripsy based focal therapy for prostate cancer. Further studies are needed to better characterize the effects of histotripsy on malignant tissues. PMID:22999534

  8. Molecular changes in bone marrow, tumor and serum after conductive ablation of murine 4T1 breast carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Przybyla, Beata D; Shafirstein, Gal; Vishal, Sagar J; Dennis, Richard A; Griffin, Robert J

    2014-02-01

    Thermal ablation of solid tumors using conductive interstitial thermal therapy (CITT) produces coagulative necrosis in the center of ablation. Local changes in homeostasis for surviving tumor and systemic changes in circulation and distant organs must be understood and monitored in order to prevent tumor re-growth and metastasis. The purpose of this study was to use a mouse carcinoma model to evaluate molecular changes in the bone marrow and surviving tumor after CITT treatment by quantification of transcripts associated with cancer progression and hyperthermia, serum cytokines, stress proteins and the marrow/tumor cross-talk regulator stromal-derived factor 1. Analysis of 27 genes and 22 proteins with quantitative PCR, ELISA, immunoblotting and multiplex antibody assays revealed that the gene and protein expression in tissue and serum was significantly different between ablated and control mice. The transcripts of four genes (Cxcl12, Sele, Fgf2, Lifr) were significantly higher in the bone marrow of treated mice. Tumors surviving ablation showed significantly lower levels of the Lifr and Sele transcripts. Similarly, the majority of transcripts measured in tumors decreased with treatment. Surviving tumors also contained lower levels of SDF-1α and HIF-1α proteins whereas HSP27 and HSP70 were higher. Of 16 serum chemokines, IFNγ and GM-CSF levels were lower with treatment. These results indicate that CITT ablation causes molecular changes which may slow cancer cell proliferation. However, inhibition of HSP27 may be necessary to control aggressiveness of surviving cancer stem cells. The changes in bone marrow are suggestive of possible increased recruitment of circulatory cancer cells. Therefore, the possibility of heightened bone metastasis after thermal ablation needs to be further investigated and inhibition strategies developed, if warranted. PMID:24270800

  9. Factors related to sinus rhythm at discharge after radiofrequency ablation of permanent atrial fibrillation in patients undergoing mitral valve surgery.

    PubMed

    Rostagno, Carlo; Gelsomino, Sandro; Capecchi, Irene; Rossi, Alessandra; Montesi, Gian Franco; Stefàno, Pier Luigi

    2016-04-01

    Late recovery of sinus rhythm is unusual in patients with permanent AF treated by (radiofrequency) RF maze procedure during mitral valve surgery. Identification of clinical and instrumental preoperative factors predictive of early success of RF ablation in patients with permanent AF undergoing mitral valve surgery may improve selection of subjects to obtain long-term results. Hundred and thirty consecutive patients with permanent AF and mitral valve disease underwent modified RF maze procedure during concomitant mitral valve surgery. Rheumatic valve disease (61 pts) and mitral valve prolapse (41 pts) were the more common aetiology of valve abnormalities. Mitral valve replacement was performed in 54 % of patients and mitral valve repair in the remaining 46 %. Four patients died after surgery. At discharge, 87 patients (69 %) were in sinus rhythm (group 1) and 43 patients in AF persisted (group 2). At an average 24-month follow-up, sinus rhythm was present in 67 % of patients, and 33 % were in atrial fibrillation. In this period, late recovery of sinus rhythm was observed only in five patients, while eight discharged in sinus rhythm developed again atrial fibrillation. Among preoperative parameters at univariate analysis female sex, atrial fibrillation >24 months, left atrial diameter >54 mm, left atrial area >24 cm(2), rheumatic valve disease and NYHA class were associated with persistence of AF. At Cox regression multivariate analysis, increased left atrial area (OR 1.07 per unit increase-95 % CI 1.01-1.131) and rheumatic aetiology of valve disease (OR 4.52, 95 % CI 1.65-12.4) were associated with persistence of AF at hospital discharge. Persistence of AF after RF ablation in patients undergoing mitral valve surgery is related to aetiology, e.g. rheumatic valve disease, and to increasing left atrial diameter. Due to low rate of late recovery of sinus rhythm, indication to RF ablation associated with MV surgery should be carefully considered in patients with large

  10. Image-Guided Percutaneous Ablation of Hepatic Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Foltz, Gretchen

    2014-01-01

    The liver is a common site of primary and secondary malignancies, often resulting in significant morbidity and mortality. Evaluating these patients in a multidisciplinary setting allows for optimal utilization of all oncologic therapies including surgery, radiation, systemic chemotherapy, transarterial therapies, and ablation. While surgical intervention often provides the best outcomes when treating most hepatic tumors, many patients are not surgical candidates due to extensive tumor burden, underlying liver disease, or other comorbid conditions. The evolution of imaging and ablation devices has allowed for the increased utilization of percutaneous ablation as definitive and palliative treatment of primary and metastatic hepatic malignancies. Ablation induces tumor necrosis by injection of chemicals (chemical ablation) or temperature modification (thermal ablation). The goal of this review is to provide an overview of different ablation techniques commonly used for hepatic malignancies, discuss the oncologic outcomes of these interventions, and outline the current indications, contraindications, and reported complications of these therapies. PMID:25071304

  11. Endoscopic Ultrasonography-Guided Ethanol Ablation for Small Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors: Results of a Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jun-Ho; Oh, Dongwook; Lee, Sang Soo; Seo, Dong-Wan; Lee, Sung Koo; Kim, Myung-Hwan

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims Endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS)-guided ethanol ablation is gaining popularity for the treatment of focal pancreatic lesions. The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety, feasibility, and treatment response after EUS-guided ethanol injection for small pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (p-NETs). Methods This was a retrospective analysis of a prospectively collected database including 11 consecutive patients with p-NETs who underwent EUS-guided ethanol injection. Results EUS-guided ethanol injection was successfully performed in 11 patients with 14 tumors. The final diagnosis was based on histology and clinical signs as follows: 10 non-functioning neuroendocrine tumors and four insulinomas. During follow-up (median, 370 days; range, 152 to 730 days), 10 patients underwent clinical follow-up after treatment, and one patient was excluded because of loss to follow-up. A single treatment session with an injection of 0.5 to 3.8 mL of ethanol resulted in complete responses (CRs) at the 3-month radiologic imaging for seven of 13 tumors (response rate, 53.8%). Multiple treatment sessions performed in three tumors with residual viable enhancing tissue increased the number of tumors with CRs to eight of 13 (response rate, 61.5%). Mild pancreatitis occurred in three of 11 patients. Conclusions EUS-guided ethanol injection appears to be a safe, feasible, and potentially effective method for treating small p-NETs in patients who are poor surgical candidates. PMID:25844345

  12. Artificial pleural effusion in percutaneous microwave ablation of hepatic tumors near the diaphragm under the guidance of ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Gang; Sun, Yao; Cong, Lin; Jing, Xuehong; Yu, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the feasibility, safety and efficacy of artificial pleural effusion in percutaneous microwave ablation of hepatic tumors near the diaphragm under ultrasound guidance. Methods: For localization and navigation of tumors near the dome of the diaphragm by ultrasound during microwave ablation in 14 tumors of 11 cases, artificial pleural effusion was performed in the volume of 1000~1500 ml of Normal saline or 5% Glucose injection solution via the right thoracic cavity. The tumor marker, AFP was monitored before and after operation in 6 times in a period of 2 years. We analyzed the successful rate and effectiveness of artificial pleural effusion. Results: The successful rate of artificial pleural effusion was 100% without complications. Artificial hydrothorax on the right eliminated the interference of intrapulmonary gas to the visualization of hepatic tumors near the diaphragm on ultrasound. In the follow-up of 2 years, the ablation rate reached to 92.9% with no serious complications. The AFP value before operation was in significant statistical difference with the others after operation (P = 0.000). Conclusions: Artificial pleural effusion aids the visualization of hepatic tumors near the diaphragm on ultrasound. A good therapeutic effectiveness can be reached in percutaneous microwave ablation of tumors in the hepatic dome under the guidance of ultrasound. PMID:26629218

  13. Development of a 3D ultrasound-guided system for thermal ablation of liver tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neshat, Hamid R. S.; Cool, Derek W.; Barker, Kevin; Gardi, Lori; Kakani, Nirmal; Fenster, Aaron

    2013-03-01

    Two-dimensional ultrasound (2D US) imaging is commonly used for diagnostic and intraoperative guidance of interventional abdominal procedures including percutaneous thermal ablation of focal liver tumors with radiofrequency (RF) or microwave (MW) induced energy. However, in many situations 2D US may not provide enough anatomical detail and guidance information. Therefore, intra-procedural CT or MR imaging are used in many centers for guidance purposes. These modalities are costly and are mainly utilized to confirm tool placement rather than guiding the insertion. Three-dimensional ultrasound (3D US) has been introduced to address these issues. In this paper, we present our integrated solution to provide 3D US images using a newly developed mechanical transducer with a large field-ofview and without the need for external tracking devices to combine diagnostic and planning information of different modalities for intraoperative guidance. The system provides tools to segment the target(s), plan the treatment, and detect the ablation applicators during the procedure for guiding purposes. We present experimental results used to ensure that our system generates accurate measurements and our early clinical evaluation results. The results suggest that 3D US used for focal liver ablation can provide a more reliable planning and guidance tool compared to 2D US only, and in many cases offers comparable measurements to other alternatives at significantly lower cost, faster time and with no harmful radiation.

  14. Microwave-activated nanodroplet vaporization for highly efficient tumor ablation with real-time monitoring performance.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jinshun; Chen, Yu; Deng, Liming; Liu, Jianxin; Cao, Yang; Li, Pan; Ran, Haitao; Zheng, Yuanyi; Wang, Zhigang

    2016-11-01

    The fast development of nanotechnology has provided a new efficient strategy for enhancing the therapeutic efficiency of various treatment modalities against cancer. However, the improvement of minimally invasive microwave therapy based on nanomaterials has not been realized. In this work, we successfully designed and synthesized a novel folate-targeted nanodroplet (TPN) with a composite mixture of perfluorocarbons as the core and lipid as the shell, which exerts the distinctive dual functions as the adjuvant for highly efficient percutaneous ultrasound imaging-guided microwave ablation (MWA) of tumors. Based on the unique phase-changeable performance of TPN nanosystem, a novel microwave-droplet vaporization (MWDV) strategy was proposed, for the first time, to overcome the critical issues of traditional acoustic-droplet vaporization (ADV) and optical-droplet vaporization (ODV) for cancer theranostics. Especially, the elaborately designed TPN can overcome the challenges of indistinct imaging of ablation margin and the limited ablation zone of MWA modality against cancer. The high efficiency of this new MWDV strategy has been systematically elucidated in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo. Therefore, such a successful demonstration of the role of nanomaterials (TPN in this case) in ultrasound imaging-guided MWA therapy against cancer provides a highly feasible strategy to effectively enhance the MWA outcome with the specific features of high efficiency and biosafety. PMID:27573134

  15. Therapeutic effects of ablative radiation on local tumor require CD8+ T cells: changing strategies for cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Youjin; Auh, Sogyong L.; Wang, Yugang; Burnette, Byron; Wang, Yang; Meng, Yuru; Beckett, Michael; Sharma, Rohit; Chin, Robert; Tu, Tony

    2009-01-01

    Patients with locally advanced cancer or distant metastasis frequently receive prolonged treatment with chemotherapy and/or fractionated radiotherapy (RT). Despite the initial clinical response, treatment resistance frequently develops and cure in these patients is uncommon. Developments in RT technology allow for the use of high-dose (or ablative) RT to target local tumors, with limited damage to the surrounding normal tissue. We report that reduction of tumor burden after ablative RT depends largely on T-cell responses. Ablative RT dramatically increases T-cell priming in draining lymphoid tissues, leading to reduction/eradication of the primary tumor or distant metastasis in a CD8+ T cell–dependent fashion. We further demonstrate that ablative RT-initiated immune responses and tumor reduction are abrogated by conventional fractionated RT or adjuvant chemotherapy but greatly amplified by local immunotherapy. Our study challenges the rationale for current RT/chemotherapy strategies and highlights the importance of immune activation in preventing tumor relapse. Our findings emphasize the need for new strategies that not only reduce tumor burden but also enhance the role of antitumor immunity. PMID:19349616

  16. Surgical complications of carotid body tumors surgery: a review.

    PubMed

    Amato, B; Serra, R; Fappiano, F; Rossi, R; Danzi, M; Milone, M; Quarto, G; Benassai, G; Bianco, T; Amato, M; Furino, E; Compagna, R

    2015-12-01

    Carotid body tumor (CBT) is a rare neoplasm, although it represents about 65% of head and neck paragangliomas. Surgical excision is considered the appropriate therapy for CBTs. The aim of this study was to evaluate surgical outcomes on a large scale. We reviewed 19 studies between 2004 to 2014 with a total of 625 procedures. We observed a higher number of cases in women (62%). Only 3 (0,48%) deaths were reported as surgical complication. Total cranial nerve injuries were 302 (48,32%) of which 194 (31,04%) were transient and 108 (17,28%) were permanent. We found a total of 174 (27,84%) arterial injuries, most of which are external carotid artery (ECA) injuries. Cerebrovascular accident due to surgery were 15 (2,4%). We concluded that surgical resection remains the treatment of choice for these disease despite the related morbidity. PMID:26498887

  17. Fast simulation of solid tumors thermal ablation treatments with a 3D reaction diffusion model.

    PubMed

    Bertaccini, Daniele; Calvetti, Daniela

    2007-08-01

    An efficient computational method for near real-time simulation of thermal ablation of tumors via radio frequencies is proposed. Model simulations of the temperature field in a 3D portion of tissue containing the tumoral mass for different patterns of source heating can be used to design the ablation procedure. The availability of a very efficient computational scheme makes it possible to update the predicted outcome of the procedure in real time. In the algorithms proposed here a discretization in space of the governing equations is followed by an adaptive time integration based on implicit multistep formulas. A modification of the ode15s MATLAB function which uses Krylov space iterative methods for the solution of the linear systems arising at each integration step makes it possible to perform the simulations on standard desktop for much finer grids than using the built-in ode15s. The proposed algorithm can be applied to a wide class of nonlinear parabolic differential equations. PMID:17173888

  18. FAST SIMULATION OF SOLID TUMORS THERMAL ABLATION TREATMENTS WITH A 3D REACTION DIFFUSION MODEL *

    PubMed Central

    BERTACCINI, DANIELE; CALVETTI, DANIELA

    2007-01-01

    An efficient computational method for near real-time simulation of thermal ablation of tumors via radio frequencies is proposed. Model simulations of the temperature field in a 3D portion of tissue containing the tumoral mass for different patterns of source heating can be used to design the ablation procedure. The availability of a very efficient computational scheme makes it possible update the predicted outcome of the procedure in real time. In the algorithms proposed here a discretization in space of the governing equations is followed by an adaptive time integration based on implicit multistep formulas. A modification of the ode15s MATLAB function which uses Krylov space iterative methods for the solution of for the linear systems arising at each integration step makes it possible to perform the simulations on standard desktop for much finer grids than using the built-in ode15s. The proposed algorithm can be applied to a wide class of nonlinear parabolic differential equations. PMID:17173888

  19. Does Thermosensitive Liposomal Vinorelbine Improve End-Point Survival after Percutaneous Radiofrequency Ablation of Liver Tumors in a Mouse Model?

    PubMed

    Wang, Song; Mei, Xing-Guo; Goldberg, S Nahum; Ahmed, Muneeb; Lee, Jung-Chieh; Gong, Wei; Han, Hai-Bo; Yan, Kun; Yang, Wei

    2016-06-01

    Purpose To investigate the role of thermosensitive liposome-encapsulated vinorelbine (Thermo-Vin) in combined radiofrequency (RF) ablation of liver tumors. Materials and Methods Approval from the institutional animal care and use committee was obtained before this study. First, the anticancer efficacy of Thermo-Vin was assessed in vitro (H22 cells) for 72 hours at 37°C or 42°C. Next, 203 H22 liver adenocarcinomas were implanted in 191 mice for in vivo study. Tumors were randomized into seven groups: (a) no treatment, (b) treatment with RF ablation alone, (c) treatment with RF ablation followed by free vinorelbine (Free-Vin) at 30 minutes, (d) treatment with RF ablation followed by empty liposomes (Empty-Lip+RF), (e) treatment with RF ablation followed by Thermo-Vin (5 mg/kg), (f) treatment with RF ablation followed by Thermo-Vin (10 mg/kg), and (g) treatment with RF ablation followed by Thermo-Vin (20 mg/kg). Tumor destruction areas and pathologic changes were compared for different groups at 24 and 72 hours after treatment. Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to compare end-point survival (tumor < 30 mm in diameter). Additionally, the effect of initial tumor size on long-term outcome was analyzed. Results In vitro, both Free-Vin and Thermo-Vin dramatically inhibited H22 cell viability at 24 hours. Likewise, in vivo, 10 mg/kg Thermo-Vin+RF ablation increased tumor destruction compared with RF ablation (P = .001). Intratumoral vinorelbine accumulation with Thermo-Vin+RF increased 15-fold compared with Free-Vin alone. Thermo-Vin substantially increased apoptosis at the coagulation margin and suppressed cellular proliferation in the residual tumor (P < .001). The Thermo-Vin+RF study arm also had better survival than the arm treated with RF ablation alone (mean, 37.6 days ± 20.1 vs 23.4 days ± 5.0; P = .001), the arm treated with Free-Vin+RF (23.3 days ± 1.2, P = .002), or the arm treated with Empty-Lip+RF (20.8 days ± 0.4, P < .001) in animals with medium-sized (10

  20. Plasma-mediated ablation: An optical tool for submicrometer surgery on neuronal and vascular systems

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Philbert S.; Blinder, Pablo; Migliori, Benjamin J.; Neev, Joseph; Jin, Yishi; Squier, Jeffrey A.; Kleinfeld, David

    2009-01-01

    Plasma-mediated ablation makes use of high energy laser pulses to ionize molecules within the first few femtoseconds of the pulse. This process leads to a submicrometer-sized bubble of plasma that can ablate tissue with negligible heat transfer and collateral damage to neighboring tissue. We review the physics of plasma-mediated ablation and its use as a tool to generate targeted insults at the subcellular level to neurons and blood vessels deep within nervous tissue. Illustrative examples from axon regeneration and microvascular research illustrate the utility of this tool. We further discuss the use of ablation as an integral part of automated histology. PMID:19269159

  1. Surgery versus stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) for early-stage non-small cell lung cancer: less is not more.

    PubMed

    White, Abby; Swanson, Scott J

    2016-04-01

    High level evidence from randomized studies comparing surgery to stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) is lacking and available retrospective cohort and case control studies are highly variable in how thoroughly they define and stage lung cancer, in how they determine operability, and in the offered surgical approaches to operable lung cancer (open vs. video-assisted). This makes it difficult to compare best radiotherapy and best surgery approaches to treatment and to be confident in conclusions of equipoise between the two modalities. What has become clear from the controversy surrounding surgery versus SABR for early stage lung cancer is the desire to optimize treatment efficacy while minimizing invasiveness and morbidity. This review highlights the ongoing debate in light of these goals. PMID:27195137

  2. Surgery versus stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) for early-stage non-small cell lung cancer: less is not more

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, Scott J.

    2016-01-01

    High level evidence from randomized studies comparing surgery to stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) is lacking and available retrospective cohort and case control studies are highly variable in how thoroughly they define and stage lung cancer, in how they determine operability, and in the offered surgical approaches to operable lung cancer (open vs. video-assisted). This makes it difficult to compare best radiotherapy and best surgery approaches to treatment and to be confident in conclusions of equipoise between the two modalities. What has become clear from the controversy surrounding surgery versus SABR for early stage lung cancer is the desire to optimize treatment efficacy while minimizing invasiveness and morbidity. This review highlights the ongoing debate in light of these goals. PMID:27195137

  3. Multipronged Design of Light-Triggered Nanoparticles To Overcome Cisplatin Resistance for Efficient Ablation of Resistant Tumor.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanli; Deng, Yibin; Tian, Xin; Ke, Hengte; Guo, Miao; Zhu, Aijun; Yang, Tao; Guo, Zhengqing; Ge, Zhishen; Yang, Xiangliang; Chen, Huabing

    2015-10-27

    Chemotherapeutic drugs frequently encounter multiple drug resistance in the field of cancer therapy. The strategy has been explored with limited success for the ablation of drug-resistant tumor via intravenous administration. In this work, the rationally designed light-triggered nanoparticles with multipronged physicochemical and biological features are developed to overcome cisplatin resistance via the assembly of Pt(IV) prodrug and cyanine dye (Cypate) within the copolymer for efficient ablation of cisplatin-resistant tumor. The micelles exhibit good photostability, sustained release, preferable tumor accumulation, and enhanced cellular uptake with reduced efflux on both A549 cells and resistant A549R cells. Moreover, near-infrared light not only triggers the photothermal effect of the micelles for remarkable photothermal cytotoxicity, but also leads to the intracellular translocation of the micelles and reduction-activable Pt(IV) prodrug into cytoplasm through the lysosomal disruption, as well as the remarkable inhibition on the expression of a drug-efflux transporter, multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1) for further reversal of drug resistance of A549R cells. Consequently, the multipronged effects of light-triggered micelles cause synergistic cytotoxicity against both A549 cells and A549R cells, and thus efficient ablation of cisplatin-resistant tumor without regrowth. The multipronged features of light-triggered micelles represent a versatile synergistic approach for the ablation of resistant tumor in the field of cancer therapy. PMID:26365698

  4. Terminology and Reporting Criteria for Radiofrequency Ablation of Tumors in the Scientific Literature: Systematic Review of Compliance with Reporting Standards

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Tae Wook; Lee, Min Woo; Kim, Young-sun; Choi, Dongil; Lim, Hyo Keun

    2014-01-01

    Objective To perform a systematic review of compliance with standardized terminology and reporting criteria for radiofrequency (RF) tumor ablation, proposed by the International Working Group on Image-Guided Tumor Ablation in 2003, in the published reports. Materials and Methods Literature search in the PubMed database was performed using index keywords, PubMed limit system, and eligibility criteria. The entire content of each article was reviewed to assess the terminology used for procedure terms, imaging findings, therapeutic efficacy, follow-up, and complications. Accuracy of the terminology and the use of alternative terms instead of standard terminology were analyzed. In addition, disparities in accuracy of terminology in articles according to the medical specialty and the type of radiology journal were evaluated. Results Among the articles (n = 308) included in this study, the accuracy of the terms 'procedure or session', 'treatment', 'index tumor', 'ablation zone', 'technical success', 'primary technique effectiveness rate', 'secondary technique effectiveness rate', 'local tumor progression', 'major complication', and 'minor complication' was 97% (298/307), 97% (291/300), 8% (25/307), 65% (103/159), 55% (52/94), 33% (42/129), 94% (17/18), 45% (88/195), 99% (79/80), and 100% (77/77), respectively. The overall accuracy of each term showed a tendency to improve over the years. The most commonly used alternative terms for 'technical success' and 'local tumor progression' were 'complete ablation' and 'local (tumor) recurrence', respectively. The accuracy of terminology in articles published in radiology journals was significantly greater than that of terminology in articles published in non-radiology journals, especially in Radiology and The Journal of Vascular and Interventional Radiology. Conclusion The proposal for standardization of terminology and reporting criteria for RF tumor ablation has been gaining support according to the recently published scientific

  5. Preclinical investigations of articular cartilage ablation with femtosecond and pulsed infrared lasers as an alternative to microfracture surgery

    PubMed Central

    Su, Erica; Sun, Hui; Juhasz, Tibor; Wong, Brian J. F.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Microfracture surgery is a bone marrow stimulation technique for treating cartilage defects and injuries in the knee. Current methods rely on surgical skill and instrumentation. This study investigates the potential use of laser technology as an alternate means to create the microfracture holes. Lasers investigated in this study include an erbium:YAG laser (λ=2.94  μm), titanium:sapphire femtosecond laser system (λ=1700  nm), and Nd:glass femtosecond laser (λ=1053  nm). Bovine samples were ablated at fluences of 8 to 18  J/cm2 with the erbium:YAG laser, at a power of 300±15  mW with the titanium:sapphire femtosecond system, and at an energy of 3  μJ/pulse with the Nd:glass laser. Samples were digitally photographed and histological sections were taken for analysis. The erbium:YAG laser is capable of fast and efficient ablation; specimen treated with fluences of 12 and 18  J/cm2 experienced significant amounts of bone removal and minimal carbonization with saline hydration. The femtosecond laser systems successfully removed cartilage but not clinically significant amounts of bone. Precise tissue removal was possible but not to substantial depths due to limitations of the systems. With additional studies and development, the use of femtosecond laser systems to ablate bone may be achieved at clinically valuable ablation rates. PMID:25200394

  6. Preclinical investigations of articular cartilage ablation with femtosecond and pulsed infrared lasers as an alternative to microfracture surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Erica; Sun, Hui; Juhasz, Tibor; Wong, Brian J. F.

    2014-09-01

    Microfracture surgery is a bone marrow stimulation technique for treating cartilage defects and injuries in the knee. Current methods rely on surgical skill and instrumentation. This study investigates the potential use of laser technology as an alternate means to create the microfracture holes. Lasers investigated in this study include an erbium:YAG laser (λ=2.94 μm), titanium:sapphire femtosecond laser system (λ=1700 nm), and Nd:glass femtosecond laser (λ=1053 nm). Bovine samples were ablated at fluences of 8 to 18 J/cm2 with the erbium:YAG laser, at a power of 300±15 mW with the titanium:sapphire femtosecond system, and at an energy of 3 μJ/pulse with the Nd:glass laser. Samples were digitally photographed and histological sections were taken for analysis. The erbium:YAG laser is capable of fast and efficient ablation; specimen treated with fluences of 12 and 18 J/cm2 experienced significant amounts of bone removal and minimal carbonization with saline hydration. The femtosecond laser systems successfully removed cartilage but not clinically significant amounts of bone. Precise tissue removal was possible but not to substantial depths due to limitations of the systems. With additional studies and development, the use of femtosecond laser systems to ablate bone may be achieved at clinically valuable ablation rates.

  7. Experiences in US-Guided Percutaneous Radiofrequency Ablation of 44 Renal Tumors in 31 Patients: Analysis of Predictors for Complications and Technical Success

    SciTech Connect

    Veltri, Andrea Calvo, Amedeo; Tosetti, Irene; Pagano, Eva; Genovesio, Andrea; Virzi, Valentina; Ferrando, Ugo; Fontana, Dario; Gandini, Giovanni

    2006-10-15

    Purpose. Preliminary clinical studies have shown the feasibility, safety, and efficacy of radiofrequency thermal ablation (RFA) of renal tumors, but only a few have analyzed the prognostic factors for technical success and there are no long-term results. Our objective was to statistically evaluate our mid-term results of percutaneous US-guided RFA in order to define predictors for complications and technical success. Methods. We selected for treatment 44 tumors in 31 patients (24 with renal cell carcinoma, 7 with hereditary tumors, 15 with a solitary kidney), up to 5 cm in diameter. Results. Eight adverse events occurred; 3 (6.8%) were major complications, successfully treated with interventional radiology procedures in 2 cases. Exophytic extension of the tumor was protective against complications (p 0.040). Technical success was obtained in 38 lesions after one RFA session and in 39 (89%) after one more session, when possible. At the end of treatment, central extension was the only negative predictor for technical success (p = 0.007), while neither size >3 cm (p = 0.091) nor other prognostic factors were statistically significant. Conclusion. US-guided percutaneous RFA can be proposed for non-central renal tumors up to 5 cm, also in patients without surgical contraindications, thanks to a low incidence of complications and a high success rate. Randomized controlled trials versus surgery are now needed to investigate long-term comparative results.

  8. Anatomical model-based finite element analysis of the combined cryosurgical and hyperthermic ablation for knee bone tumor.

    PubMed

    He, Zhi Zhu; Xue, Xu; Xiao, Jian; Liu, Jing

    2013-12-01

    This paper is aimed at investigating the capacity of using combined cryosurgical and hyperthermic modality for treating knee bone tumor with complex shape. An anatomical model for human knee was constructed and a three-dimensional (3D) finite element analysis was developed to determine temperature distribution of the tissues subject to single freezing (SF), single heating (SH) and alternate freezing-heating (AFH), respectively. The heat fluxes of the probes wall and the ablation volume are particularly tracked to comparatively evaluate the ablation ability of different probe configurations with varied diameter, number and active working length. As example, an effective conformal treatment strategy via one time's insertion while cyclic freezing-heating using multiple probes is designed for a predefined knee bone tumor ablation. Both SF and SH could create large enough ablation volume, while it is hard for them to perform a conformal treatment on irregular and slender knee tumor. As an alternative, AFH could form a flexible and controlled shape and volume of the ablation by changing the size and number of the probes and adjusting their insertion depth. In addition, a thermal protection method is considered to reduce cryoinjury of the health tissue. PMID:24070544

  9. Endometrial ablation

    MedlinePlus

    Hysteroscopy-endometrial ablation; Laser thermal ablation; Endometrial ablation-radiofrequency; Endometrial ablation-thermal balloon ablation; Rollerball ablation; Hydrothermal ablation; Novasure ablation

  10. Failure of low doses of /sup 131/I to ablate residual thyroid tissue following surgery for thyroid cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kuni, C.C.; Klingensmith, W.C. III

    1980-12-01

    Thirteen patients received an initial dose of 25-29.9 mCi (925-1106 MBq) of /sup 131/I following partial thyroidectomy for papillary, follicular, or mixed carcinoma. Administration of thyroxine (T/sub 4/) or triiodothyronine (T/sub 3/) was stopped 3-12 weeks and 1-6 weeks, respectively, before therapy or imaging. Patients remained on normal diets and did not receive thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) or diuretics. Follow-up 3 months to 2 years after therapy demonstrated that ablation of thyroid bed activity was successful in only one patient, who still had metastases. This suggests that administration of 25-29.9 mCi of /sup 131/I following surgery is unreliable for ablation of residual thyroid bed activity.

  11. Perioperative and long-term operative outcomes after surgery for trigeminal neuralgia: microvascular decompression vs percutaneous balloon ablation

    PubMed Central

    Jellish, W Scott; Benedict, William; Owen, Kevin; Anderson, Douglas; Fluder, Elaine; Shea, John F

    2008-01-01

    Objectives Numerous medical and surgical therapies have been utilized to treat the symptoms of trigeminal neuralgia (TN). This retrospective study compares patients undergoing either microvascular decompression or balloon ablation of the trigeminal ganglion and determines which produces the best long-term outcomes. Methods A 10-year retrospective chart review was performed on patients who underwent microvascular decompression (MVD) or percutaneous balloon ablation (BA) surgery for TN. Demographic data, intraoperative variables, length of hospitalization and symptom improvement were assessed along with complications and recurrences of symptoms after surgery. Appropriate statistical comparisons were utilized to assess differences between the two surgical techniques. Results MVD patients were younger but were otherwise similar to BA patients. Intraoperatively, twice as many BA patients developed bradycardia compared to MVD patients. 75% of BA patients with bradycardia had an improvement of symptoms. Hospital stay was shorter in BA patients but overall improvement of symptoms was better with MVD. Postoperative complication rates were similar (21% vs 26%) between the BA and MVD groups. Discussion MVD produced better overall outcomes compared to BA and may be the procedure of choice for surgery to treat TN. PMID:18597696

  12. Stereotactic Ablative Radiation Therapy for Subcentimeter Lung Tumors: Clinical, Dosimetric, and Image Guidance Considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Louie, Alexander V.; Senan, Suresh; Dahele, Max; Slotman, Ben J.; Verbakel, Wilko F.A.R.

    2014-11-15

    Purpose: Use of stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR) for subcentimeter lung tumors is controversial. We report our outcomes for tumors with diameter ≤1 cm and their visibility on cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans and retrospectively evaluate the planned dose using a deterministic dose calculation algorithm (Acuros XB [AXB]). Methods and Materials: We identified subcentimeter tumors from our institutional SABR database. Tumor size was remeasured on an artifact-free phase of the planning 4-dimensional (4D)-CT. Clinical plan doses were generated using either a pencil beam convolution or an anisotropic analytic algorithm (AAA). All AAA plans were recalculated using AXB, and differences among D95 and mean dose for internal target volume (ITV) and planning target volume (PTV) on the average intensity CT dataset, as well as for gross tumor volume (GTV) on the end respiratory phases were reported. For all AAA patients, CBCT scans acquired during each treatment fraction were evaluated for target visibility. Progression-free and overall survival rates were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: Thirty-five patients with 37 subcentimeter tumors were eligible for analysis. For the 22 AAA plans recalculated using AXB, Mean D95 ± SD values were 2.2 ± 4.4% (ITV) and 2.5 ± 4.8% (PTV) lower using AXB; whereas mean doses were 2.9 ± 4.9% (ITV) and 3.7 ± 5.1% (PTV) lower. Calculated AXB doses were significantly lower in one patient (difference in mean ITV and PTV doses, as well as in mean ITV and PTV D95 ranged from 22%-24%). However, the end respiratory phase GTV received at least 95% of the prescription dose. Review of 92 CBCT scans from all AAA patients revealed that the tumor was visualized in 82 images, and its position could be inferred in other images. The 2-year local progression-free survival was 100%. Conclusions: Patients with subcentimeter lung tumors are good candidates for SABR, given the dosimetry, ability to localize

  13. Image-Guided Radiofrequency Ablation of a Pancreatic Tumor with a New Triple Spiral-Shaped Electrode

    SciTech Connect

    Thanos, Loukas; Poulou, Loukia S.; Mailli, Lito; Pomoni, Maria; Kelekis, Dimitrios A.

    2010-02-15

    Image-guided, minimally invasive treatment modalities have become an area of considerable interest and research during the last few years for the treatment of primary and secondary liver tumors. We report our experience with an unresectable pancreatic tumor, treated with application of radiofrequency ablation under CT guidance that even though a complication occurred during the procedure, had excellent results on follow-up CT scans.

  14. Complications of Microwave Ablation for Liver Tumors: Results of a Multicenter Study

    SciTech Connect

    Livraghi, Tito; Meloni, Franca; Solbiati, Luigi; Zanus, Giorgio; Collaboration: For the Collaborative Italian Group using AMICA system

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: New technologies for microwave ablation (MWA) have been conceived, designed to achieve larger areas of necrosis compared with radiofrequency ablation (RFA). The purpose of this study was to report complications by using this technique in patients with focal liver cancer. Methods: Members of 14 Italian centers used a 2.45-GMHz generator delivering energy through a cooled miniature-choke MW antenna and a standardized protocol for follow-up. They completed a questionnaire regarding number and type of deaths, major and minor complications and side effects, and likelihood of their relationship to the procedure. Enrollment included 736 patients with 1.037 lesions: 522 had hepatocellular carcinoma with cirrhosis, 187 had metastases predominantly from colorectal cancer, and 27 had cholangiocellular carcinoma. Tumor size ranged from 0.5 to 10 cm. In 13 centers, the approach used was percutaneous, in 4 videolaparoscopic, and in 3 laparotomic. Results: No deaths were reported. Major complications occurred in 22 cases (2.9%), and minor complications in 54 patients (7.3%). Complications of MWA do not differ from those RFA, both being based on the heat damage. Conclusion: Results of this multicenter study confirmed those of single-center experiences, indicating that MWA is a safe procedure, with no mortality and a low rate of major complications. The low rate of complications was probably due to precautions adopted, knowing in advance possible risk conditions, on the basis of prior RFA experience.

  15. Acute effects of surgery on emotion and personality of brain tumor patients: surgery impact, histological aspects, and recovery

    PubMed Central

    Campanella, Fabio; Fabbro, Franco; Ius, Tamara; Shallice, Tim; Skrap, Miran

    2015-01-01

    Background Cognitive effects of brain surgery for the removal of intracranial tumors are still under investigation. For many basic sensory/motor or language-based functions, focal, albeit transient, cognitive deficits have been reported low-grade gliomas (LGGs); however, the effects of surgery on higher-level cognitive functions are still largely unknown. It has recently been shown that, following brain tumors, damage to different brain regions causes a variety of deficits at different levels in the perception and interpretation of emotions and intentions. However, the effects of different tumor histologies and, more importantly, the effects of surgery on these functions have not been examined. Methods The performance of 66 patients affected by high-grade glioma (HGG), LGG, and meningioma on 4 tasks tapping different levels of perception and interpretations of emotion and intentions was assessed before, immediately after, and (for LGG patients) 4 months following surgery. Results Results showed that HGG patients were generally already impaired in the more perceptual tasks before surgery and did not show surgery effects. Conversely, LGG patients, who were unimpaired before surgery, showed a significant deficit in perceptual tasks immediately after surgery that was recovered within few months. Meningioma patients were substantially unimpaired in all tasks. Conclusions These results show that surgery can be relatively safe for LGG patients with regard to the higher-level, more complex cognitive functions and can provide further useful information to the neurosurgeon and improve communication with both the patient and the relatives about possible changes that can occur immediately after surgery. PMID:25921022

  16. One minute, sub-one-watt photothermal tumor ablation using porphysomes, intrinsic multifunctional nanovesicles.

    PubMed

    Jin, Cheng S; Lovell, Jonathan F; Zheng, Gang

    2013-01-01

    We recently developed porphysomes as intrinsically multifunctional nanovesicles. A photosensitizer, pyropheophorbide α, was conjugated to a phospholipid and then self-assembled to liposome-like spherical vesicles. Due to the extremely high density of porphyrin in the porphyrin-lipid bilayer, porphysomes generated large extinction coefficients, structure-dependent fluorescence self-quenching, and excellent photothermal efficacy. In our formulation, porphysomes were synthesized using high pressure extrusion, and displayed a mean particle size around 120 nm. Twenty-four hr post-intravenous injection of porphysomes, the local temperature of the tumor increased from 30 °C to 62 °C rapidly upon one minute exposure of 750 mW (1.18 W/cm(2)), 671 nm laser irradiation. Following the complete thermal ablation of the tumor, eschars formed and healed within 2 weeks, while in the control groups the tumors continued to grow and all reached the defined end point within 3 weeks. These data show how porphysomes can be used as potent photothermal therapy (PTT) agents. PMID:24084712

  17. Feasibility of noninvasive ultrasound delivery for tumor ablation and targeted drug delivery in the brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hynynen, Kullervo; McDannold, Nathan; Clement, Greg; White, Jason; Treat, Lisa; Yin, Xiangtao; Jolesz, Ferenc; Sheikov, Nickolai; Vykhodtseva, Natalia

    2005-04-01

    The objective of our research during the past few years has been to develop multichannel ultrasound phased arrays for noninvasive brain interventions. We have been successful in developing methods for correcting the skull induced beam distortions and thus, are able to produce sharp focusing through human skulls. This method is now being tested for thermal ablation of tumors, with results from animal studies demonstrating feasibility. In addition, the ability of ultrasound to open the blood-brain barrier (BBB) locally has been explored in animal models. The results suggest that the transcranial ultrasound exposures can induce BBB opening such that therapeutic agents can be localized in the brain. This tool is especially powerful since the beam can be guided by MR images, thus providing anatomical or functional targeting. This talk will review our current status in this research, which ultimately aims for the clinical use of this methodology.

  18. Polypyrrole Hollow Microspheres as Echogenic Photothermal Agent for Ultrasound Imaging Guided Tumor Ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zha, Zhengbao; Wang, Jinrui; Qu, Enze; Zhang, Shuhai; Jin, Yushen; Wang, Shumin; Dai, Zhifei

    2013-08-01

    Ultrasound (US) imaging provides a valuable opportunity to administer photothermal therapy (PTT) of cancer with real-time guidance to ensure proper targeting, but only a few theranostic agents were developed by physically grafting near infrared (NIR)-absorbing inorganic nanomaterials to ready-made ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) for US imaging guided PTT. In this paper, NIR absorbing hollow microspheres were generated from polypyrrole merely using a facile one-step microemulsion method. It was found that the obtained polypyrrole hollow microspheres (PPyHMs) can act as an efficient theranostic agent not only to enhance US imaging greatly, but also exhibit excellent photohyperthermic effects. The contrast consistently sustained the echo signals for no less than 5 min and the NIR laser light ablated the tumor completely within two weeks in the presence of PPyHMs. More importantly, no use of additional NIR absorber substantially minimizes an onetime dose of the theranostic agent.

  19. Polypyrrole Hollow Microspheres as Echogenic Photothermal Agent for Ultrasound Imaging Guided Tumor Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Zha, Zhengbao; Wang, Jinrui; Qu, Enze; Zhang, Shuhai; Jin, Yushen; Wang, Shumin; Dai, Zhifei

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasound (US) imaging provides a valuable opportunity to administer photothermal therapy (PTT) of cancer with real-time guidance to ensure proper targeting, but only a few theranostic agents were developed by physically grafting near infrared (NIR)-absorbing inorganic nanomaterials to ready-made ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) for US imaging guided PTT. In this paper, NIR absorbing hollow microspheres were generated from polypyrrole merely using a facile one-step microemulsion method. It was found that the obtained polypyrrole hollow microspheres (PPyHMs) can act as an efficient theranostic agent not only to enhance US imaging greatly, but also exhibit excellent photohyperthermic effects. The contrast consistently sustained the echo signals for no less than 5 min and the NIR laser light ablated the tumor completely within two weeks in the presence of PPyHMs. More importantly, no use of additional NIR absorber substantially minimizes an onetime dose of the theranostic agent. PMID:23912977

  20. Long-Term Outcome of a Hepatocellular Carcinoma 71/2 Years After Surgery and Repeated Radiofrequency Ablation: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    SciTech Connect

    Thanos, L. Mylona, S.; Nikita, A.; Ptohis, N.; Kelekis, D.A.

    2007-04-15

    An interesting case is presented of a 78-year-old patient with cirrhosis who was managed with combined treatment (surgery and radiofrequency (RF) ablation) for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and has survived for 71/2 years. Elevation of the {alpha}-FP (alpha-fetoprotein) levels was noted 2 years after surgery. CT demonstrated two lesions: one central at the remaining right liver lobe, and the other at the excision site. Biopsy of the lesions confirmed the diagnosis of HCC for both of them. RF ablation of these two lesions was performed in one session with technical success. Four and a half years after the first RF ablation a new recurrence was demonstrated at the CT follow-up control. RF ablation was again applied successfully. The imaging findings and the therapeutic percutaneous management of this patient along with the natural course of HCC and its recurrence are discussed, and the literature concerning risk factors is reviewed.

  1. Performance analysis of a dedicated breast MR-HIFU system for tumor ablation in breast cancer patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deckers, R.; Merckel, L. G.; de Senneville, B. Denis; Schubert, G.; Köhler, M.; Knuttel, F. M.; Mali, W. P. Th M.; Moonen, C. T. W.; van den Bosch, M. A. A. J.; Bartels, L. W.

    2015-07-01

    MR-guided HIFU ablation is a promising technique for the non-invasive treatment of breast cancer. A phase I study was performed to assess the safety and treatment accuracy and precision of MR-HIFU ablation in breast cancer patients (n=10 ) using a newly developed MR-HIFU platform dedicated to applications in the breast. In this paper a technical analysis of the performance of the dedicated breast MR-HIFU system during breast tumors ablation is described. The main points of investigation were the spatial targeting accuracy and precision of the system and the performance of real-time respiration-corrected MR thermometry. The mean targeting accuracy was in the range of 2.4-2.6 mm, whereas the mean targeting precision was in the range of 1.5-1.8 mm. To correct for respiration-induced magnetic field fluctuations during MR temperature mapping a look-up-table (LUT)-based correction method was used. An optimized procedural sedation protocol in combination with the LUT-based correction method allowed for precise MR thermometry during the ablation procedure (temperature standard deviation <3 °C). No unwanted heating in the near field (i.e. skin) nor in the far field (pectoral muscle) was detected. The newly developed dedicated breast MR-HIFU system allows for safe, accurate and precise ablation of breast tumors.

  2. Tumor Regression in HCC Patient with Portal Vein Tumor Thrombosis after Intraportal Radiofrequency Thermal Ablation

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the third leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Portal vein tumor thrombosis (PVTT) is a frequent entity in HCC, which strictly limits the gold standard treatment options such as surgical resection and transarterial chemoembolization. Therefore, the prognosis of patients with PVTT is extremely poor and an emergence of seeking an alternative option for intervention is inevitable. We present a case of a 60-year-old male patient with HCC induced PVTT who was subjected to the intraportal RFA and stenting-VesOpen procedure. No additional medical intervention was performed. The repeated CT performed 5 months after the VesOpen procedure revealed significant decrease of the tumor size, patent right, and main portal vein and a recanalization of the left portal vein, which was not processed. At this time point, liver functional tests, appetite, and general condition of the patient were improved evidently. This report designates the RFA as an instrumental option of therapeutic intervention for HCC patients with PVTT. PMID:27579192

  3. Tumor Regression in HCC Patient with Portal Vein Tumor Thrombosis after Intraportal Radiofrequency Thermal Ablation.

    PubMed

    Mizandari, Malkhaz; Azrumelashvili, Tamta; Paksashvili, Natela; Kikodze, Nino; Pantsulaia, Ia; Janikashvili, Nona; Chikovani, Tinatin

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the third leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Portal vein tumor thrombosis (PVTT) is a frequent entity in HCC, which strictly limits the gold standard treatment options such as surgical resection and transarterial chemoembolization. Therefore, the prognosis of patients with PVTT is extremely poor and an emergence of seeking an alternative option for intervention is inevitable. We present a case of a 60-year-old male patient with HCC induced PVTT who was subjected to the intraportal RFA and stenting-VesOpen procedure. No additional medical intervention was performed. The repeated CT performed 5 months after the VesOpen procedure revealed significant decrease of the tumor size, patent right, and main portal vein and a recanalization of the left portal vein, which was not processed. At this time point, liver functional tests, appetite, and general condition of the patient were improved evidently. This report designates the RFA as an instrumental option of therapeutic intervention for HCC patients with PVTT. PMID:27579192

  4. Percutaneous Radiofrequency Ablation of Lung Tumors in Contact with the Aorta: Dangerous and Difficult but Efficient: A Report of Two Cases

    SciTech Connect

    Thanos, Loukas; Mylona, Sofia; Giannoulakos, Nikolaos; Ptohis, Nikolaos; Galani, Panagiota; Pomoni, Maria

    2008-11-15

    Percutaneous imaging-guided tumor ablation is a widely accepted method for the treatment of primary and secondary lung tumors. Although it is generally feasible and effective for local tumor control, some conditions may affect its feasibility and effectiveness. Herein the authors report their experience with two patients with lung malignancies contiguous to the aorta who were successfully treated with radiofrequency ablation, even though it initially appeared highly risky due to the possible fatal complications.

  5. Correlation between Ultrasound Reflection Intensity and Tumor Ablation Ratio of Late-Stage Pancreatic Carcinoma in HIFU Therapy: Dynamic Observation on Ultrasound Reflection Intensity

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Hui-Yu; Miao, Li-Ying; Wang, Jin-Rui; Xiong, Liu-Lin; Yan, Fang; Zheng, Cui-Shan; Jia, Jian-Wen; Cui, Li-Gang; Chen, Wen

    2013-01-01

    The minimally invasive high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapy is thermal ablation treatment for late-stage pancreatic carcinoma with widely recognized safety and effectiveness, but there are currently no instant assessment methods for its ablation effect. It is vital to find a real-time high-sensitive assessment method. This research aims to dynamically observe the variation rules of ultrasound reflection intensity, analyze the correlation between ultrasound reflection intensity and tumor ablation ratio, and find out the value of ultrasound reflection intensity in prognosis of HIFU ablation effect. HIFU intermittent therapies were retrospectively analyzed for 31 subjects with late-stage pancreatic carcinoma from March 2007 to December 2009 in the study. The variation rules of the ultrasound reflection intensity during HIFU therapy were summarized and the correlation between ultrasound reflection intensity and tumor ablation ratio was analyzed based on the tumor ablation ratio indicated by CT scanning. The conclusion is that variation of ultrasound reflection intensity can be used for initial assessment of tumor ablation in HIFU therapy and early prognosis of overall HIFU ablation, providing important clinical basis for improving safety and effectiveness of HIFU therapy. Ultrasound can work as a real-time imaging instrument for observation of HIFU ablation effect in treating late-stage pancreatic carcinoma. PMID:24453916

  6. Margin Size is an Independent Predictor of Local Tumor Progression After Ablation of Colon Cancer Liver Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Xiaodong; Sofocleous, Constantinos T. Erinjeri, Joseph P.; Petre, Elena N.; Gonen, Mithat; Do, Kinh G.; Brown, Karen T.; Covey, Anne M.; Brody, Lynn A.; Alago, William; Thornton, Raymond H.; Kemeny, Nancy E.; Solomon, Stephen B.

    2013-02-15

    This study was designed to evaluate the relationship between the minimal margin size and local tumor progression (LTP) following CT-guided radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of colorectal cancer liver metastases (CLM). An institutional review board-approved, HIPPA-compliant review identified 73 patients with 94 previously untreated CLM that underwent RFA between March 2003 and May 2010, resulting in an ablation zone completely covering the tumor 4-8 weeks after RFA dynamic CT. Comparing the pre- with the post-RFA CT, the minimal margin size was categorized to 0, 1-5, 6-10, and 11-15 mm. Follow-up included CT every 2-4 months. Kaplan-Meier methodology and Cox regression analysis were used to evaluate the effect of the minimal margin size, tumor location, size, and proximity to a vessel on LTP. Forty-five of 94 (47.9 %) CLM progressed locally. Median LTP-free survival (LPFS) was 16 months. Two-year LPFS rates for ablated CLM with minimal margin of 0, 1-5 mm, 6-10 mm, 11-15 mm were 26, 46, 74, and 80 % (p < 0.011). Minimal margin (p = 0.002) and tumor size (p = 0.028) were independent risk factors for LTP. The risk for LTP decreased by 46 % for each 5-mm increase in minimal margin size, whereas each additional 5-mm increase in tumor size increased the risk of LTP by 22 %. An ablation zone with a minimal margin uniformly larger than 5 mm 4-8 weeks postablation CT is associated with the best local tumor control.

  7. Interforaminal implant placement in oral cancer patients: during ablative surgery or delayed? A 5-year retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Mizbah, K; Dings, J P; Kaanders, J H A M; van den Hoogen, F J A; Koole, R; Meijer, G J; Merkx, M A W

    2013-05-01

    In a retrospective study, two mandibular prosthetic rehabilitation strategies supported by implants in oral cancer patients were evaluated: implants placed in the non-resected edentulous symphyseal area during ablative surgery (DAS implants); or at a later stage (postponed (P) implants). Medical files of patients from two head-neck oncology groups from 2000 to 2005 were screened for study inclusion. DAS protocol was used in one group and P protocol in the other. After a 5 year follow-up of 261 edentulous patients with oral cancer in the second group, P implants were placed in 27 patients to support an overdenture. Of the 249 edentulous patients in the first group, 82 patients were given an implant supported overdenture using the DAS implant protocol. Regarding implant loss, no statistically significant differences were seen between the DAS and P implants. In the DAS group, more patients benefited from an implant-supported lower overdenture (39 versus 11%, respectively), and they received their overdenture on average 20.0 months sooner (sd=11.01, p<0.001) after ablative surgery. 17.1% of DAS implants and 4.6% of P implants were never loaded due to tumour and patient related factors including unfavourable implant soft tissue, tumour recurrence near the implant, or radiotherapy induced trismus. PMID:23102901

  8. Science to Practice: Systemic Implications of Ablative Tumor Therapies-Reality Uncovered and Myths Exposed?

    PubMed

    Chapiro, Julius; Geschwind, Jean-François

    2016-08-01

    In their effort to characterize the systemic "off-target" effects of radiofrequency (RF) ablation and irreversible electroporation (IRE), Bulvik et al demonstrated substantial differences in physiologic, tumorigenic, and immunologic responses between the two ablative modalities. By establishing that IRE may in fact stimulate more robust inflammatory and systemic reactions than RF at liver ablation, the authors conclude that the selection of a given ablation energy source may alter the clinical outcome depending on the circumstance-both favorably and unfavorably. PMID:27429140

  9. Rehabilitation of the nose using CAD/CAM and rapid prototyping technology after ablative surgery of squamous cell carcinoma: a pilot clinical report.

    PubMed

    Ciocca, Leonardo; De Crescenzio, Francesca; Fantini, Massimiliano; Scotti, Roberto

    2010-01-01

    Restoration of a nasal defect after ablative surgery for squamous cell carcinoma necessitates replacing the missing volume and anchoring a prosthesis to the patient's face. This report describes the failure of plastic reconstructive surgery after ablation of a squamous cell cancer of the nose and the esthetic and functional restoration of the patient with a nasal prosthesis. The process of making an implant-supported prosthesis using digital technology, including digitized anatomic models from a "nose library," and the rapid prototyping of the mesiostructure for bar anchorage and of the mold for silicone processing are presented. PMID:20657878

  10. Transnasal Endoscopic Surgery for Skull-Based Tumors

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... kind of -- any kind of tumor resection or cancer resection, what's important is tissue plane. And you ... re able to see the normal tumor or cancer interface. And so here we're actually working ...

  11. Sequential Activation of a Segmented Ground Pad Reduces Skin Heating During Radiofrequency Tumor Ablation: Optimization via Computational Models

    PubMed Central

    Schutt, David J.; Haemmerich, Dieter

    2009-01-01

    Radiofrequency (RF) ablation has become an accepted treatment modality for unresectable tumors. The need for larger ablation zones has resulted in increased RF generator power. Skin burns due to ground pad heating are increasingly limiting further increases in generator power, and thus, ablation zone size. We investigated a method for reducing ground pad heating in which a commercial ground pad is segmented into multiple ground electrodes, with sequential activation of ground electrode subsets. We created finite-element method computer models of a commercial ground pad (14 × 23 cm) and compared normal operation of a standard pad to sequential activation of a segmented pad (two to five separate ground electrode segments). A constant current of 1 A was applied for 12 min in all simulations. Time periods during sequential activation simulations were adjusted to keep the leading edge temperatures at each ground electrode equal. The maximum temperature using standard activation of the commercial pad was 41.7 °C. For sequential activation of a segmented pad, the maximum temperature ranged from 39.3 °C (five segments) to 40.9 °C (two segments). Sequential activation of a segmented ground pad resulted in lower tissue temperatures. This method may reduce the incidence of ground pad burns and enable the use of higher power generators during RF tumor ablation. PMID:18595807

  12. Endoscopic ultrasound guided radiofrequency ablation, for pancreatic cystic neoplasms and neuroendocrine tumors

    PubMed Central

    Pai, Madhava; Habib, Nagy; Senturk, Hakan; Lakhtakia, Sundeep; Reddy, Nageshwar; Cicinnati, Vito R; Kaba, Iyad; Beckebaum, Susanne; Drymousis, Panagiotis; Kahaleh, Michel; Brugge, William

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To outline the feasibility, safety, adverse events and early results of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-radiofrequency ablation (RFA) in pancreatic neoplasms using a novel probe. METHODS: This is a multi-center, pilot safety feasibility study. The intervention described was radiofrequency ablation (RF) which was applied with an innovative monopolar RF probe (1.2 mm Habib EUS-RFA catheter) placed through a 19 or 22 gauge fine needle aspiration (FNA) needle once FNA was performed in patients with a tumor in the head of the pancreas. The Habib™ EUS-RFA is a 1 Fr wire (0.33 mm, 0.013”) with a working length of 190 cm, which can be inserted through the biopsy channel of an echoendoscope. RF power is applied to the electrode at the end of the wire to coagulate tissue in the liver and pancreas. RESULTS: Eight patients [median age of 65 (range 27-82) years; 7 female and 1 male] were recruited in a prospective multicenter trial. Six had a pancreatic cystic neoplasm (four a mucinous cyst, one had intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm and one a microcystic adenoma) and two had a neuroendocrine tumors (NET) in the head of pancreas. The mean size of the cystic neoplasm and NET were 36.5 mm (SD ± 17.9 mm) and 27.5 mm (SD ± 17.7 mm) respectively. The EUS-RFA was successfully completed in all cases. Among the 6 patients with a cystic neoplasm, post procedure imaging in 3-6 mo showed complete resolution of the cysts in 2 cases, whilst in three more there was a 48.4% reduction [mean pre RF 38.8 mm (SD ± 21.7 mm) vs mean post RF 20 mm (SD ± 17.1 mm)] in size. In regards to the NET patients, there was a change in vascularity and central necrosis after EUS-RFA. No major complications were observed within 48 h of the procedure. Two patients had mild abdominal pain that resolved within 3 d. CONCLUSION: EUS-RFA of pancreatic neoplasms with a novel monopolar RF probe was well tolerated in all cases. Our preliminary data suggest that the procedure is straightforward and safe. The

  13. Bipolar radiofrequency ablation for liver tumors: comparison of contrast-enhanced ultrasound with contrast-enhanced MRI/CT in the posttreatment imaging evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Bo, Xiao-Wan; Xu, Hui-Xiong; Sun, Li-Ping; Zheng, Shu-Guang; Guo, Le-Hang; Lu, Feng; Wu, Jian; Xu, Xiao-Hong

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the study was to assess the role of contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) in treatment response evaluation after percutaneous bipolar radiofrequency ablation (BRFA) for liver tumors. Methods: From May 2012 to May 2014, 39 patients with 73 tumors were treated by BRFA. One month after the treatment, CEUS and CEMRI/CECT were conducted to evaluate the treatment response. The results of CEUS were compared with CEMRI/CECT. Results: Of the 73 tumors ablated, eight (11.0%) were found to have residual viable tumor tissue and 65 (89.0%) were successfully ablated based on CEMRI/CECT within 1-month after ablation. CEUS detected seven of the eight residual tumors and 63 of 65 completely ablated tumors. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value and accuracy of CEUS were 87.5% (7/8), 96.9% (63/65), 77.8% (7/9), 98.4% (63/64) and 95.9% (70/73), respectively. The complete ablation (CR) rates for the tumors ≤3.0 cm, 3.1-5.0 cm, and >5.0 cm were 96.6% (58/60), 63.6% (7/11), and 0% (0/2), respectively (P<0.001). CR rates were 94.7% (36/38) for primary liver tumors and 82.9% (29/35) for metastatic liver tumors (P=0.212), and were 97.4% (38/39) for the tumors with curative treatment intention and 79.4% (27/34) for those with palliative treatment intention (P=0.037). Major complication was not encountered in this series. Conclusions: BRFA is an effective technique of percutaneous ablation for liver tumors and CEUS can be used to assess its therapeutic effect accurately. PMID:25337258

  14. Tumor regrowth between surgery and initiation of adjuvant therapy in patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Pirzkall, Andrea; McGue, Colleen; Saraswathy, Suja; Cha, Soonmee; Liu, Raymond; Vandenberg, Scott; Lamborn, Kathleen R; Berger, Mitchel S; Chang, Susan M; Nelson, Sarah J

    2009-12-01

    To assess incidence and degree of regrowth in glioblastoma between surgery and radiation therapy (RT) and to correlate regrowth with presurgical imaging and survival, we examined images of 32 patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma who underwent MR spectroscopic imaging (MRSI), perfusion-weighted imaging (PWI), and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) prior to surgery, after surgery, and prior to RT/temozolomide. Contrast enhancement (CE) in the pre-RT MR image was compared with postsurgical DWI to differentiate tumor growth from postsurgical infarct. MRSI and PWI parameters were analyzed prior to surgery and pre-RT. Postsurgical MRI indicated that 18 patients had gross total and 14 subtotal resections. Twenty-one patients showed reduced diffusion, and 25 patients showed new or increased CE. In eight patients (25%), the new CE was confined to areas of postsurgical reduced diffusion. In the other 17 patients (53%), new CE was found to be indicative of tumor growth or a combination of tumor growth and surgical injury. Higher perfusion and creatine within nonenhancing tumor in the presurgery MR were associated with subsequent tumor growth. High levels of choline and reduced diffusion in pre-RT CE suggested active metabolism and tumor cell proliferation. Median survival was 14.6 months in patients with interim tumor growth and 24 months in patients with no growth. Increased volume or new onset of CE between surgery and RT was attributed to tumor growth in 53% of patients and was associated with shorter survival. This suggests that reducing the time between surgery and adjuvant therapy may be important. The acquisition of metabolic and physiologic imaging data prior to adjuvant therapy may also be valuable in assessing regions of new CE and nonenhancing tumor. PMID:19229057

  15. Tumor regrowth between surgery and initiation of adjuvant therapy in patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Pirzkall, Andrea; McGue, Colleen; Saraswathy, Suja; Cha, Soonmee; Liu, Raymond; Vandenberg, Scott; Lamborn, Kathleen R.; Berger, Mitchel S.; Chang, Susan M.; Nelson, Sarah J.

    2009-01-01

    To assess incidence and degree of regrowth in glioblastoma between surgery and radiation therapy (RT) and to correlate regrowth with presurgical imaging and survival, we examined images of 32 patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma who underwent MR spectroscopic imaging (MRSI), perfusion-weighted imaging (PWI), and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) prior to surgery, after surgery, and prior to RT/temozolomide. Contrast enhancement (CE) in the pre-RT MR image was compared with postsurgical DWI to differentiate tumor growth from postsurgical infarct. MRSI and PWI parameters were analyzed prior to surgery and pre-RT. Postsurgical MRI indicated that 18 patients had gross total and 14 subtotal resections. Twenty-one patients showed reduced diffusion, and 25 patients showed new or increased CE. In eight patients (25%), the new CE was confined to areas of postsurgical reduced diffusion. In the other 17 patients (53%), new CE was found to be indicative of tumor growth or a combination of tumor growth and surgical injury. Higher perfusion and creatine within nonenhancing tumor in the presurgery MR were associated with subsequent tumor growth. High levels of choline and reduced diffusion in pre-RT CE suggested active metabolism and tumor cell proliferation. Median survival was 14.6 months in patients with interim tumor growth and 24 months in patients with no growth. Increased volume or new onset of CE between surgery and RT was attributed to tumor growth in 53% of patients and was associated with shorter survival. This suggests that reducing the time between surgery and adjuvant therapy may be important. The acquisition of metabolic and physiologic imaging data prior to adjuvant therapy may also be valuable in assessing regions of new CE and nonenhancing tumor. PMID:19229057

  16. Effect of laser immunotherapy and surgery on the treatment of mouse mammary tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Vivian A.; Le, Henry; Li, Xiaosong; Wolf, Roman F.; Ferguson, Halie; Sarkar, Akhee; Liu, Hong; Nordquist, Robert E.; Chen, Wei R.

    2010-02-01

    Laser immunotherapy using laser photothermal therapy and immunological stimulation could achieve tumor-specific immune responses, as indicated by our previous pre-clinical and preliminary clinical studies. To further study the effect of laser immunotherapy, we conducted an investigation combining laser immunotherapy and surgery. After laser immunotherapy, treated tumors were surgically removed at different time points. The survival rates of treated mice were compared among different groups. Furthermore, the cured mice were rechallenged to test the immunity induced by laser immunotherapy. Our results showed that the mice treated with surgical removal one week after laser immunotherapy had the highest survival rate (77%). When the tumors were removed immediately after laser immunotherapy treatment, the survival rate was 57%. Most cured mice withstood tumor rechallenges, indicating an induction of tumor immunity by laser immunotherapy. The differentiations between different surgery groups indicate that the treated tumors have contributed to the immunological responses of the hosts.

  17. Clinical Implementation of Intrafraction Cone Beam Computed Tomography Imaging During Lung Tumor Stereotactic Ablative Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Ruijiang; Han, Bin; Meng, Bowen; Maxim, Peter G.; Xing, Lei; Koong, Albert C.; Diehn, Maximilian; Loo, Billy W.

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To develop and clinically evaluate a volumetric imaging technique for assessing intrafraction geometric and dosimetric accuracy of stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR). Methods and Materials: Twenty patients received SABR for lung tumors using volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). At the beginning of each fraction, pretreatment cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) was used to align the soft-tissue tumor position with that in the planning CT. Concurrent with dose delivery, we acquired fluoroscopic radiograph projections during VMAT using the Varian on-board imaging system. Those kilovolt projections acquired during millivolt beam-on were automatically extracted, and intrafraction CBCT images were reconstructed using the filtered backprojection technique. We determined the time-averaged target shift during VMAT by calculating the center of mass of the tumor target in the intrafraction CBCT relative to the planning CT. To estimate the dosimetric impact of the target shift during treatment, we recalculated the dose to the GTV after shifting the entire patient anatomy according to the time-averaged target shift determined earlier. Results: The mean target shift from intrafraction CBCT to planning CT was 1.6, 1.0, and 1.5 mm; the 95th percentile shift was 5.2, 3.1, 3.6 mm; and the maximum shift was 5.7, 3.6, and 4.9 mm along the anterior-posterior, left-right, and superior-inferior directions. Thus, the time-averaged intrafraction gross tumor volume (GTV) position was always within the planning target volume. We observed some degree of target blurring in the intrafraction CBCT, indicating imperfect breath-hold reproducibility or residual motion of the GTV during treatment. By our estimated dose recalculation, the GTV was consistently covered by the prescription dose (PD), that is, V100% above 0.97 for all patients, and minimum dose to GTV >100% PD for 18 patients and >95% PD for all patients. Conclusions: Intrafraction CBCT during VMAT can provide

  18. Clinical Implementation of Intrafraction Cone Beam Computed Tomography Imaging During Lung Tumor Stereotactic Ablative Radiation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ruijiang; Han, Bin; Meng, Bowen; Maxim, Peter G.; Xing, Lei; Koong, Albert C.; Diehn, Maximilian; Loo, Billy W.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To develop and clinically evaluate a volumetric imaging technique for assessing intrafraction geometric and dosimetric accuracy of stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR). Methods and Materials Twenty patients received SABR for lung tumors using volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). At the beginning of each fraction, pretreatment cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) was used to align the soft-tissue tumor position with that in the planning CT. Concurrent with dose delivery, we acquired fluoroscopic radiograph projections during VMAT using the Varian on-board imaging system. Those kilovolt projections acquired during megavolt beam-on were automatically extracted, and intrafraction CBCT images were reconstructed using the filtered backprojection technique. We determined the time-averaged target shift during VMAT by calculating the center of mass of the tumor target in the intrafraction CBCT relative to the planning CT. To estimate the dosimetric impact of the target shift during treatment, we recalculated the dose to the GTV after shifting the entire patient anatomy according to the time-averaged target shift determined earlier. Results The mean target shift from intrafraction CBCT to planning CT was 1.6, 1.0, and 1.5 mm; the 95th percentile shift was 5.2, 3.1, 3.6 mm; and the maximum shift was 5.7, 3.6, and 4.9 mm along the anterior-posterior, left-right, and superior-inferior directions. Thus, the time-averaged intrafraction gross tumor volume (GTV) position was always within the planning target volume. We observed some degree of target blurring in the intrafraction CBCT, indicating imperfect breath-hold reproducibility or residual motion of the GTV during treatment. By our estimated dose recalculation, the GTV was consistently covered by the prescription dose (PD), that is, V100% above 0.97 for all patients, and minimum dose to GTV >100% PD for 18 patients and >95% PD for all patients. Conclusions Intrafraction CBCT during VMAT can provide

  19. [Calcified amorphous tumor of the right atrium after open heart surgery; report of a case].

    PubMed

    Sakao, Toshihiko; Ishida, Naoki; Kajiwara, Shinsuke; Okada, Kengo; Kiyochi, Hidenori; Nakamura, Taro; Imai, Yoshinori; Yamauchi, Tatsuo; Okada, Michiaki; Nakagawa, Yusuke; Nakanishi, Mamoru; Matsukage, Shoichi

    2014-12-01

    A 37-year-old woman, who had undergone surgery of atrial septal defect (ASD) at 12-year-old, developed bradycardia and referred to our hospital. Transthoracic echocardiography revealed high echoic tumor in the right atrium. The image of the tumor was of low intensity by T2 weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and floating mass with a stalk to the right atrium in cine MRI. She underwent tumor resection under cardiopulmonary bypass. Histopathologilal examination of the tumor was calcified amorphous tumor. The postoperative course was uneventful. PMID:25434547

  20. Toward realistic radiofrequency ablation of hepatic tumors 3D simulation and planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villard, Caroline; Soler, Luc; Gangi, Afshin; Mutter, Didier; Marescaux, Jacques

    2004-05-01

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) has become an increasingly used technique in the treatment of patients with unresectable hepatic tumors. Evaluation of vascular architecture, post-RFA tissue necrosis prediction, and the choice of a suitable needle placement strategy using conventional radiological techniques remain difficult. In an attempt to enhance the safety of RFA, a 3D simulator and treatment planning tool, that simulates the necrosis of the treated area, and proposes an optimal placement for the needle, has been developed. From enhanced spiral CT scans with 2 mm cuts, 3D reconstructions of patients with liver metastases are automatically generated. Virtual needles can be added to the 3D scene, together with their corresponding zones of necrosis that are displayed as a meshed spheroids representing the 60° C isosurface. The simulator takes into account the cooling effect of local vessels greater than 3mm in diameter, making necrosis shapes more realistic. Using a voxel-based algorithm, RFA spheroids are deformed following the shape of the vessels, extended by an additional cooled area. This operation is performed in real-time, allowing updates while needle is adjusted. This allows to observe whether the considered needle placement strategy would burn the whole cancerous zone or not. Planned needle positioning can also be automatically generated by the software to produce complete destruction of the tumor with a 1 cm margin, with maximum respect of the healthy liver and of all major extrahepatic and intrahepatic structures to avoid. If he wishes, the radiologist can select on the skin an insertion window for the needle, focusing the research of the trajectory.

  1. FDG-MicroPET and Diffusion-Weighted MR Image Evaluation of Early Changes After Radiofrequency Ablation in Implanted VX2 Tumors in Rabbits

    SciTech Connect

    Ohira, Tomohiro Okuma, Tomohisa; Matsuoka, Toshiyuki; Wada, Yasuhiro; Nakamura, Kenji; Watanabe, Yasuyoshi; Inoue, Yuichi

    2009-01-15

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the early changes after radiofrequency ablation (RFA) in VX2 rabbit tumors implanted into the back muscles by diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and {sup 18}F-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography ({sup 18}F-FDG PET). Percutaneous CT-guided RFA was conducted in seven rabbits with implanted VX2 tumors. VX2 tumors on the other side were untreated and served as the control. MR imaging was performed with a clinical 1.5-T instrument 2 days after RFA, and FDG-PET, using a high-resolution PET scanner for small animals, was obtained 3 days after the procedure. The mean apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values and radioactivity count of untreated and ablated tumors were calculated. Untreated VX2 tumors showed hyperintensity on T1-, T2-, and diffusion-weighted MR images, ring-enhanced on contrast-enhanced T1-weighted imaging, and ring-shaped FDG accumulation on FDG-PET. Ablated VX2 tumors showed slight hyperintensity on T1-, T2-, and diffusion-weighed images, slight enhancement on contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images, and low accumulation on FDG-PET. The ADC value of ablated VX2 tumors (1.52 {+-} 0.24 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s) was significantly higher than that of untreated tumors (1.09 {+-} 0.12 x 10{sup -3}; p < 0.05). The tumor/muscle ratio of ablated tumors (0.5 {+-} 0.3) was significantly lower than that of untreated tumors (11.6 {+-} 3.2; p < 0.05). Histopathological examination confirmed the lack of viable tumor cells in the ablated lesions. The results indicate that both ADC value and FDG-PET are potentially useful markers for monitoring the early effects of RFA.

  2. Methotrexate-loaded PLGA nanobubbles for ultrasound imaging and Synergistic Targeted therapy of residual tumor during HIFU ablation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuemei; Zheng, Yuanyi; Wang, Zhigang; Huang, Shuai; Chen, Yu; Jiang, Wei; Zhang, Hua; Ding, Mingxia; Li, Qingshu; Xiao, Xiaoqiu; Luo, Xin; Wang, Zhibiao; Qi, Hongbo

    2014-06-01

    High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) has attracted the great attention in tumor ablation due to its non-invasive, efficient and economic features. However, HIFU ablation has its intrinsic limitations for removing the residual tumor cells, thus the tumor recurrence and metastasis cannot be avoided in this case. Herein, we developed a multifunctional targeted poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanobubbles (NBs), which not only function as an efficient ultrasound contrast agent for tumor imaging, but also a targeted anticancer drug carrier and excellent synergistic agent for enhancing the therapeutic efficiency of HIFU ablation. Methotrexate (MTX)-loaded NBs were synthesized and filled with perfluorocarbon gas subsequently using a facile but general double emulsion evaporation method. The active tumor-targeting monoclonal anti-HLA-G antibodies (mAbHLA-G) were further conjugated onto the surface of nanobubbles. The mAbHLA-G/MTX/PLGA NBs could enhance the ultrasound imaging both in vitro and in vivo, and the targeting efficiency to HLA-G overexpressing JEG-3 cells has been demonstrated. The elaborately designed mAbHLA-G/MTX/PLGA NBs can specifically target to the tumor cells both in vitro and in vivo, and their blood circulation time in vivo was much longer than non-targeted MTX/PLGA NBs. Further therapeutic evaluations showed that the targeted NBs as a synergistic agent can significantly improve the efficiency of HIFU ablation by changing the acoustic environment, and the focused ultrasound can promote the on-demand MTX release both in vitro and in vivo. The in vivo histopathology test and immunohistochemical analysis showed that the mAbHLA-G/MTX/PLGA NBs plus HIFU group presented most serious coagulative necrosis, the lowest proliferation index and the highest apoptotic index. Therefore, the successful introduction of targeted mAbHLA-G/MTX/PLGA NBs provides an excellent platform for the highly efficient, imaging-guided and non-invasive HIFU synergistic therapy

  3. Real-Time US-CT/MRI Image Fusion for Guidance of Thermal Ablation of Liver Tumors Undetectable with US: Results in 295 Cases

    SciTech Connect

    Mauri, Giovanni Cova, Luca; Beni, Stefano De; Ierace, Tiziana Tondolo, Tania Cerri, Anna; Goldberg, S. Nahum; Solbiati, Luigi

    2015-02-15

    PurposeThis study was designed to assess feasibility of US-CT/MRI fusion-guided ablation in liver tumors undetectable with US.MethodsFrom 2002 to 2012, 295 tumors (162 HCCs and 133 metastases; mean diameter 1.3 ± 0.6 cm, range 0.5–2.5 cm) detectable on contrast-enhanced CT/MRI, but completely undetectable with unenhanced US and either totally undetectable or incompletely conspicuous with contrast-enhanced US (CEUS), were treated in 215 sessions using either internally cooled radiofrequency or microwave with standard ablation protocols, guided by an image fusion system (Virtual Navigation System, Esaote S.p.A., Genova, Italy) that combines US with CT/ MRI images. Correct targeting and successful ablation of tumor were verified after 24 hours with CT or MRI.ResultsA total of 282 of 295 (95.6 %) tumors were correctly targeted with successful ablation achieved in 266 of 295 (90.2 %). Sixteen of 295 (5.4 %) tumors were correctly targeted, but unsuccessfully ablated, and 13 of 295 (4.4 %) tumors were unsuccessfully ablated due to inaccurate targeting. There were no perioperative deaths. Major complications were observed in 2 of the 215 treatments sessions (0.9 %).ConclusionsReal-time virtual navigation system with US-CT/MRI fusion imaging is precise for targeting and achieving successful ablation of target tumors undetectable with US alone. Therefore, a larger population could benefit from ultrasound guided ablation procedures.

  4. Does preoperative transarterial embolization decrease blood loss during spine tumor surgery?

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Zhihong; He, Qian

    2015-01-01

    This paper aimed to evaluate the effect of preoperative transarterial embolization (TAE) on estimated blood loss (EBL) during surgical excision of the vertebral tumors. Three hundred and forty-eight patients with spinal tumors were retrospectively analyzed. The preoperative TAE group consisted of 190 patients and the control group consisted of 158 patients. Gelatin sponge particles mixed withy contrast agent were used in the TAE group to embolize the tumor-feeding artery. The factors evaluated included: the time interval between embolism and surgery; the number of vertebrae involved by the tumor; pathological type of tumor; surgical approach; extent of excision and instrumental fixation. The time interval (P = 0.4669)between embolism and surgery had no significant correlation with EBL during surgery. The pathological diagnosis of vertebral tumor such as plasma cell myeloma, giant cell tumor, chondrosarcoma, hemangioma and metastasis had no significant correlation with EBL between the TAE group and control group during surgery, while the EBL of chordoma in the TAE group was significantly higher than that in the control group (p = 0.0254). The number of vertebrae involved (p = 0.4669, 0.6804, 0.6677), posterior approach (p = 0.3015), anterior approach (p = 0.2446), partial excision (p = 0.1911) and instrumental fixation (p = 0.1789) had no significant correlation with EBL during surgery between the TAE group and the control group. This study showed that preoperative TAE of the spinal tumor had no significant effect on intra-operative blood loss during surgical excision of the spinal tumor. In view of the risk of embolism, this method should be carefully considered. PMID:25934787

  5. Radiofrequency Ablation of Renal Tumors with an Expandable Multitined Electrode: Results, Complications, and Pilot Evaluation of Cooled Pyeloperfusion for Collecting System Protection

    SciTech Connect

    Rouviere, Olivier Badet, Lionel; Murat, Francois Joseph; Marechal, Jean Marie; Colombel, Marc; Martin, Xavier; Lyonnet, Denis; Gelet, Albert

    2008-05-15

    The objective of this study was to retrospectively evaluate the results of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of renal tumors with an impedance-based system using an expandable multitined electrode. Twenty-two patients (30 tumors) were treated with RFA over a 7-year period, percutaneously (16 tumors) or intraoperatively (14 tumors). Follow-up imaging was performed at 1-3, 6, and 12 months and yearly thereafter. Twenty-seven of 30 tumors (19/22 patients) showed no residual tumor on the first imaging control. Two residual tumors were successfully ablated by a second RFA procedure. Our mean follow-up period was 35 months (range, 3-84 months). Two tumors that had been completely ablated based on imaging criteria recurred 11 and 48 months after RFA. One was treated by partial nephrectomy. The other one was not treated because the patient developed bone metastases. One patient had nephrectomy because of an RFA-induced ureteropelvic junction stricture. Nine patients (11 sessions) had a pyeloperfusion of cooled saline during RFA. None developed symptomatic complications, even though in three patients the ablation zone extended to the closest calyx (3-5 mm from the tumor). We conclude that RFA of renal tumors is promising, but serious complications to the collecting system must be taken into consideration. Prophylactic per-procedural cooling of the collecting system is feasible but needs further assessment.

  6. The Role of Surgery for Asymptomatic Primary Tumors in Unresectable Stage IV Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young Wan

    2013-01-01

    There are still debates regarding the appropriate primary treatment policy for asymptomatic primary colorectal lesions in cases of unresectable metastatic colorectal cancer. Even though there are patients with asymptomatic primary tumors when starting chemotherapy, those patients may still undergo surgery due to complications related to primary tumors in the middle of chemotherapy; therefore, controversy exists regarding surgical resection of primary colorectal lesions in cases where symptoms are absent when making a diagnosis. Thus, based on the published literature, we discuss opinions that prefer first-line surgery for primary tumors as well as opinions favoring first-line chemotherapy for treating unresectable synchronous metastatic colorectal cancer. Although the upfront chemotherapy including targeted agents is suggested as an effective treatment in recent years, the first line surgery has been a preferred treatment for decades. The first line surgery is beneficial to prolong the survival duration given the retrospective analysis of randomized trial data. So far, no prospective comparison study has only focused on the first-line treatment modality; thus, future clinical studies focusing on the survival duration and the quality of life should be performed as soon as possible. Furthermore, at this point, multidisciplinary team approaches would be helpful in finding the appropriate therapy. Regardless of symptoms, the performance status and the tumor burden should be taken into consideration as well. In case of surgical resection, minimally invasive surgery, such as laparoscopic surgery, is recommended. PMID:23700570

  7. Complex permittivities of breast tumor tissues obtained from cancer surgeries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugitani, Takumi; Kubota, Shin-ichi; Kuroki, Shin-ichiro; Sogo, Kenta; Arihiro, Koji; Okada, Morihito; Kadoya, Takayuki; Hide, Michihiro; Oda, Miyo; Kikkawa, Takamaro

    2014-06-01

    The variability in measurements of complex permittivities of tumor tissues between multiple samples could be attributed to the volume fraction of cancer cells in the excised tumor tissue. By the use of a digital photomicrograph image and hematoxylin-eosin staining, it was found that the malignant tumor tissue was not fully occupied by the cancer cells, but the cells were distributed locally in the stroma cells depending on the growth of cancer. The results showed that the volume fraction of cancer cells in the tumor tissue had a correlation to the measured conductivity and dielectric constant in the frequency range from 1 GHz to 6 GHz. It introduces a method to understand and gauge variability in measurements between different tumors.

  8. Transcatheter arterial embolization combined with radiofrequency ablation activates CD8+ T-cell infiltration surrounding residual tumors in the rabbit VX2 liver tumors

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Xu-Hua; Li, Teng-Fei; Zhou, Guo-Feng; Han, Xin-Wei; Zheng, Chuan-Sheng; Chen, Peng-fei; Feng, Gan-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the effect of transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) combined with radiofrequency ablation (RFA) treatment (TAE + RFA) on the expression of heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) in residual tumors and explore the relationship between the HSP70 and CD8+ T-cell infiltrate surrounding residual tumors in the rabbit VX2 liver tumor model. Materials and methods Animals with VX2 liver tumors were randomized into four groups (control, TAE, RFA, and TAE + RFA) with 15 rabbits in each group. Five rabbits in each group were sacrificed on days 1, 3, and 7 after treatment. HSP70 expression and infiltration of CD8+ T-cells in the liver and residual tumors surrounding the necrosis zone were detected by immunohistochemistry staining. The maximal diameters of tumor necrosis, numbers of metastases, and tumor growth rate were compared on day 7 after treatment. Results TAE + RFA achieved larger maximal diameter of tumor necrosis, lower tumor growth rate, and fewer metastatic lesions, compared with other treatments on day 7. The number of CD8+ T-cells in the TAE + RFA group was significantly higher than in other groups on days 1, 3, and 7. There was a positive correlation between HSP70 expression level and infiltration of CD8+ T-cells surrounding the residual tumor on day 1 (r=0.9782, P=0.012), day 3 (r=0.93, P=0.021), and day 7 (r=0.8934, P=0.034). Conclusion In the rabbit VX2 liver tumor model, TAE + RFA activated the highest number of CD8+ T-cells surrounding residual tumors. TAE + RFA appears to be a beneficial therapeutic modality for tumor control and antitumor immune response in this model. PMID:27274279

  9. Neurovascular free-muscle transfer for the treatment of established facial paralysis following ablative surgery in the parotid region.

    PubMed

    Takushima, Akihiko; Harii, Kiyonori; Asato, Hirotaka; Ueda, Kazuki; Yamada, Atsushi

    2004-05-01

    Neurovascular free-muscle transfer for facial reanimation was performed as a secondary reconstructive procedure for 45 patients with facial paralysis resulting from ablative surgery in the parotid region. This intervention differs from neurovascular free-muscle transfer for treatment of established facial paralysis resulting from conditions such as congenital dysfunction, unresolved Bell palsy, Hunt syndrome, or intracranial morbidity, with difficulties including selection of recipient vessels and nerves, and requirements for soft-tissue augmentation. This article describes the authors' operative procedure for neurovascular free-muscle transfer after ablative surgery in the parotid region. Gracilis muscle (n = 24) or latissimus dorsi muscle (n = 21) was used for transfer. With gracilis transfer, recipient vessels comprised the superficial temporal vessels in 12 patients and the facial vessels in 12. For latissimus dorsi transfer, recipient vessels comprised the facial vessels in 16 patients and the superior thyroid artery and superior thyroid or internal jugular vein in four. Facial vessels on the contralateral side were used with interpositional graft of radial vessels in the remaining patient with latissimus dorsi transfer. Cross-face nerve grafting was performed before muscle transfer in 22 patients undergoing gracilis transfer. In the remaining two gracilis patients, the ipsilateral facial nerve stump was used as the primary recipient nerve. Dermal fat flap overlying the gracilis muscle was used for cheek augmentation in one patient. In the other 23 patients, only the gracilis muscle was used. With latissimus dorsi transfer, the ipsilateral facial nerve stump was used as the recipient nerve in three patients, and a cross-face nerve graft was selected as the recipient nerve in six. The contralateral facial nerve was selected as the recipient nerve in 12 patients, and a thoracodorsal nerve from the latissimus dorsi muscle segment was crossed through the upper lip

  10. An intermediate term benefits and complications of gamma knife surgery in management of glomus jugulare tumor.

    PubMed

    Hafez, Raef F A; Morgan, Magad S; Fahmy, Osama M

    2016-01-01

    Glomus tumors are rare skull base slow-growing, hypervascular neoplasms that frequently involve critical neurovascular structures, and delay in diagnosis is frequent. Surgical removal is rarely radical and is usually associated with morbidity or mortality. Gamma knife surgery (GKS) has gained an increasing dependable role in the management of glomus jugulare tumors, with high rate of tumor growth control, preserving or improving clinical status and with limited complications. This study aims to evaluate intermediate term benefits and complications of gamma knife surgery in management of twenty-two patients bearing growing glomus jugulare tumors at the International Medical Center (IMC), Cairo, Egypt, between 2005 and 2011. The mean follow-up period was 56 months (range 36-108 months); there were 3 males, 19 females; mean age was 43.6 years; 15 patients had GKS as the primary treatment; 2 patients had surgical residuals; 2 had previous radiation therapy; and 3 previously underwent endovascular embolization. The average tumor volume was 7.26 cm3, and the mean marginal dose was 14.7 Gy. Post gamma knife surgery through the follow-up period neurological status was improved in 12 patients, 7 showed stable clinical condition and 3 patients developed new moderate deficits. Tumor volume post GKS was unchanged in 13 patients, decreased in 8, and showed tumor regrowth in 1 patient. Tumor progression-free survival in our studied patients was 95.5% at 5 and 7 years of the follow-up period post GKS. Gamma knife surgery could be used safely and effectively with limited complications as a primary management tool in the treatment of glomus jugulare tumors controlling tumor growth with preserving or improving clinical status especially those who do not have significant cranial or cervical extension, elderly, and surgically unfit patients; moreover, it is safe and highly effective as adjuvant therapy as well. PMID:26879488

  11. The impact of laser ablation on optical soft tissue differentiation for tissue specific laser surgery-an experimental ex vivo study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Optical diffuse reflectance can remotely differentiate various bio tissues. To implement this technique in an optical feedback system to guide laser surgery in a tissue-specific way, the alteration of optical tissue properties by laser ablation has to be taken into account. It was the aim of this study to evaluate the general feasibility of optical soft tissue differentiation by diffuse reflectance spectroscopy under the influence of laser ablation, comparing the tissue differentiation results before and after laser intervention. Methods A total of 70 ex vivo tissue samples (5 tissue types) were taken from 14 bisected pig heads. Diffuse reflectance spectra were recorded before and after Er:YAG-laser ablation. The spectra were analyzed and differentiated using principal component analysis (PCA), followed by linear discriminant analysis (LDA). To assess the potential of tissue differentiation, area under the curve (AUC), sensitivity and specificity was computed for each pair of tissue types before and after laser ablation, and compared to each other. Results Optical tissue differentiation showed good results before laser exposure (total classification error 13.51%). However, the tissue pair nerve and fat yielded lower AUC results of only 0.75. After laser ablation slightly reduced differentiation results were found with a total classification error of 16.83%. The tissue pair nerve and fat showed enhanced differentiation (AUC: 0.85). Laser ablation reduced the sensitivity in 50% and specificity in 80% of the cases of tissue pair comparison. The sensitivity of nerve–fat differentiation was enhanced by 35%. Conclusions The observed results show the general feasibility of tissue differentiation by diffuse reflectance spectroscopy even under conditions of tissue alteration by laser ablation. The contrast enhancement for the differentiation between nerve and fat tissue after ablation is assumed to be due to laser removal of the surrounding lipid-rich nerve

  12. Cavitation-enhanced MR-guided focused ultrasound ablation of rabbit tumors in vivo using phase shift nanoemulsions

    PubMed Central

    Kopechek, Jonathan A; Park, Eun-Joo; Zhang, Yong-Zhi; Vykhodtseva, Natalia I; McDannold, Nathan J; Porter, Tyrone M

    2014-01-01

    Advanced tumors are often inoperable due to their size and proximity to critical vascular structures. High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) has been developed to non-invasively thermally ablate inoperable solid tumors. However, the clinical feasibility of HIFU ablation therapy has been limited by the long treatment times (on the order of hours) and high acoustic intensities required. Studies have shown that inertial cavitation can enhance HIFU-mediated heating by generating broadband acoustic emissions that increase tissue absorption and accelerate HIFU-induced heating. Unfortunately, initiating inertial cavitation in tumors requires high intensities and can be unpredictable. To address this need, phase-shift nanoemulsions (PSNE) have been developed. PSNE consist of lipid-coated liquid perfluorocarbon droplets that are less than 200 nm in diameter, thereby allowing passive accumulation in tumors through leaky tumor vasculature. PSNE can be vaporized into microbubbles in tumors in order to nucleate cavitation activity and enhance HIFU-mediated heating. In this study, MR-guided HIFU treatments were performed on intramuscular rabbit VX2 tumors in vivo to assess the effect of vaporized PSNE on acoustic cavitation and HIFU-mediated heating. HIFU pulses were delivered for 30 seconds using a 1.5 MHz, MR-compatible transducer, and cavitation emissions were recorded with a 650-kHz ring hydrophone while temperature was monitored using MR thermometry. Cavitation emissions were significantly higher (P<0.05) after PSNE injection and this was well correlated with enhanced HIFU-mediated heating in tumors. The peak temperature rise induced by sonication was significantly higher (P<0.05) after PSNE injection. For example, the mean percent change in temperature achieved at 5.2 W of acoustic power was 46 ± 22% with PSNE injection. The results indicate that PSNE nucleates cavitation which correlates with enhanced HIFU-mediated heating in tumors. This suggests that PSNE could

  13. Cavitation-enhanced MR-guided focused ultrasound ablation of rabbit tumors in vivo using phase shift nanoemulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopechek, Jonathan A.; Park, Eun-Joo; Zhang, Yong-Zhi; Vykhodtseva, Natalia I.; McDannold, Nathan J.; Porter, Tyrone M.

    2014-07-01

    Advanced tumors are often inoperable due to their size and proximity to critical vascular structures. High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) has been developed to non-invasively thermally ablate inoperable solid tumors. However, the clinical feasibility of HIFU ablation therapy has been limited by the long treatment times (on the order of hours) and high acoustic intensities required. Studies have shown that inertial cavitation can enhance HIFU-mediated heating by generating broadband acoustic emissions that increase tissue absorption and accelerate HIFU-induced heating. Unfortunately, initiating inertial cavitation in tumors requires high intensities and can be unpredictable. To address this need, phase-shift nanoemulsions (PSNE) have been developed. PSNE consist of lipid-coated liquid perfluorocarbon droplets that are less than 200 nm in diameter, thereby allowing passive accumulation in tumors through leaky tumor vasculature. PSNE can be vaporized into microbubbles in tumors in order to nucleate cavitation activity and enhance HIFU-mediated heating. In this study, MR-guided HIFU treatments were performed on intramuscular rabbit VX2 tumors in vivo to assess the effect of vaporized PSNE on acoustic cavitation and HIFU-mediated heating. HIFU pulses were delivered for 30 s using a 1.5 MHz, MR-compatible transducer, and cavitation emissions were recorded with a 650 kHz ring hydrophone while temperature was monitored using MR thermometry. Cavitation emissions were significantly higher (P < 0.05) after PSNE injection and this was well correlated with enhanced HIFU-mediated heating in tumors. The peak temperature rise induced by sonication was significantly higher (P < 0.05) after PSNE injection. For example, the mean per cent change in temperature achieved at 5.2 W of acoustic power was 46 ± 22% with PSNE injection. The results indicate that PSNE nucleates cavitation which correlates with enhanced HIFU-mediated heating in tumors. This suggests that PSNE could

  14. Femtosecond laser corneal surgery with in situ determination of the laser attenuation and ablation threshold by second harmonic generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plamann, Karsten; Nuzzo, Valeria; Albert, Olivier; Mourou, Gérard A.; Savoldelli, Michèle; Dagonet, Françoise; Donate, David; Legeais, Jean-Marc

    2007-02-01

    Femtosecond lasers start to be routinely used in refractive eye surgery. Current research focuses on their application to glaucoma and cataract surgery as well as cornea transplant procedures. To avoid unwanted tissue damage during the surgical intervention it is of utmost importance to maintain a working energy just above the ablation threshold and maintain the laser energy at this working point independently of the local and global tissue properties. To quantify the attenuation of the laser power density in the tissue by absorption, scattering and modification of the point spread function we monitor the second harmonic radiation generated in the collagen matrix of the cornea when exposed to ultrashort laser pulses. We use a CPA system with a regenerative amplifier delivering pulses at a wavelength of 1.06 μm, pulse durations of 400 fs and a maximum energy of 60 μJ. The repetition rate is adjustable from single shot up to 10 kHz. The experiments are performed on human corneas provided by the French Eye bank. To capture the SHG radiation we use a photomultiplier tube connected to a lockin amplifier tuned to the laser repetition rate. The measured data indicates an exponential decay of the laser beam intensity in the volume of the sample and allows for the quantification of the attenuation coefficient and its correlation with the optical properties of the cornea. Complementary analyses were performed on the samples by ultrastructural histology.

  15. Percutaneous RF Thermal Ablation of Renal Tumors: Is US Guidance Really Less Favorable Than Other Imaging Guidance Techniques?

    SciTech Connect

    Veltri, Andrea Garetto, Irene; Pagano, Eva; Tosetti, Irene; Sacchetto, Paola Fava, Cesare

    2009-01-15

    The purpose of this study was to compare our experience with ultrasound (US)-guided percutaneous radiofrequency thermal ablation (RFA) of renal tumors with results of CT-guided and MRI-guided series in the current literature. Of 90 consecutive renal tumors treated with RFA in 71 patients, 87 lesions were ablated under US guidance. We performed a retrospective analysis of clinical outcome and safety. Results were then compared to published case series where CT and MRI guidances were used exclusively. In our series we had a major complication rate of 4.6%, whereas in CT- and MRI-based series it was 0-12% (mean, 2.2%) and 0-8.3% (mean, 4.1%), respectively. During follow-up (1-68 months; mean, 24 months) technical effectiveness was 89.7%, while it was between 89.5% and 96% in CT-guided series and between 91.7% and 100% in MRI-guided series. The size of successfully treated lesions (28 mm) was lower than that of partially-ablated lesions (36 mm; p = 0.004) and only central lesion location proved to be a negative prognostic factor (p = 0.009); in CT-guided series, positive prognostic factors were exophytic growth and size {<=}3 cm. 'Tumor-specific' 2-year survival was 92% in our series, 90-96% in CT-guided series, and not reported in MRI-guided series. In conclusion, despite common beliefs, US guidance in RFA of renal tumors is not less favorable than other guidance techniques. Thus the interventional radiologist can choose his or her preferred technique taking into account personal experience and available equipment.

  16. Macrophage Ablation Reduces M2-Like Populations and Jeopardizes Tumor Growth in a MAFIA-Based Glioma Model.

    PubMed

    Gabrusiewicz, Konrad; Hossain, Mohammad B; Cortes-Santiago, Nahir; Fan, Xuejun; Kaminska, Bozena; Marini, Frank C; Fueyo, Juan; Gomez-Manzano, Candelaria

    2015-04-01

    Monocytes/macrophages are an influential component of the glioma microenvironment. However, understanding their diversity and plasticity constitute one of the most challenging areas of research due to the paucity of models to study these cells' inherent complexity. Herein, we analyzed the role of monocytes/macrophages in glioma growth by using a transgenic model that allows for conditional ablation of this cell population. We modeled glioma using intracranial GL261-bearing CSF-1R-GFP(+) macrophage Fas-induced apoptosis (MAFIA) transgenic mice. Conditional macrophage ablation was achieved by exposure to the dimerizer AP20187. Double immunofluorescence was used to characterize M1- and M2-like monocytes/macrophages during tumor growth and after conditional ablation. During glioma growth, the monocyte/macrophage population consisted predominantly of M2 macrophages. Conditional temporal depletion of macrophages reduced the number of GFP(+) cells, targeting mainly the repopulation of M2-polarized cells, and altered the appearance of M1-like monocytes/macrophages, which suggested a shift in the M1/M2 macrophage balance. Of interest, compared with control-treated mice, macrophage-depleted mice had a lower tumor mitotic index, microvascular density, and reduced tumor growth. These results demonstrated the possibility of studying in vivo the role and phenotype of macrophages in gliomas and suggested that transitory depletion of CSF-1R(+) population influences the reconstitutive phenotypic pool of these cells, ultimately suppressing tumor growth. The MAFIA model provides a much needed advance in defining the role of macrophages in gliomas. PMID:25925380

  17. Macrophage Ablation Reduces M2-Like Populations and Jeopardizes Tumor Growth in a MAFIA-Based Glioma Model12

    PubMed Central

    Gabrusiewicz, Konrad; Hossain, Mohammad B.; Cortes-Santiago, Nahir; Fan, Xuejun; Kaminska, Bozena; Marini, Frank C.; Fueyo, Juan; Gomez-Manzano, Candelaria

    2015-01-01

    Monocytes/macrophages are an influential component of the glioma microenvironment. However, understanding their diversity and plasticity constitute one of the most challenging areas of research due to the paucity of models to study these cells' inherent complexity. Herein, we analyzed the role of monocytes/macrophages in glioma growth by using a transgenic model that allows for conditional ablation of this cell population. We modeled glioma using intracranial GL261-bearing CSF-1R–GFP+ macrophage Fas-induced apoptosis (MAFIA) transgenic mice. Conditional macrophage ablation was achieved by exposure to the dimerizer AP20187. Double immunofluorescence was used to characterize M1- and M2-like monocytes/macrophages during tumor growth and after conditional ablation. During glioma growth, the monocyte/macrophage population consisted predominantly of M2 macrophages. Conditional temporal depletion of macrophages reduced the number of GFP+ cells, targeting mainly the repopulation of M2-polarized cells, and altered the appearance of M1-like monocytes/macrophages, which suggested a shift in the M1/M2 macrophage balance. Of interest, compared with control-treated mice, macrophage-depleted mice had a lower tumor mitotic index, microvascular density, and reduced tumor growth. These results demonstrated the possibility of studying in vivo the role and phenotype of macrophages in gliomas and suggested that transitory depletion of CSF-1R+ population influences the reconstitutive phenotypic pool of these cells, ultimately suppressing tumor growth. The MAFIA model provides a much needed advance in defining the role of macrophages in gliomas. PMID:25925380

  18. Is breast conservative surgery a reasonable option in multifocal or multicentric tumors?

    PubMed Central

    Houvenaeghel, Gilles; Tallet, Agnès; Jalaguier-Coudray, Aurélie; Cohen, Monique; Bannier, Marie; Jauffret-Fara, Camille; Lambaudie, Eric

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of multifocal (MF) and multicentric (MC) carcinomas varies widely among clinical studies, depending on definitions and methods for pathological sampling. Magnetic resonance imaging is increasingly used because it can help identify additional and conventionally occult tumors with high sensitivity. However, false positive lesions might incorrectly influence treatment decisions. Therefore, preoperative biopsies must be performed to avoid unnecessary surgery. Most studies have shown higher lymph node involvement rates in MF/MC tumors than in unifocal tumors. However, the rate of local recurrences is usually low after breast conservative treatment (BCT) of MC/MF tumors. It has been suggested that BCT is a reasonable option for MC/MF tumors in women aged 50-69 years, with small tumors and absence of extensive ductal carcinoma in situ. A meta-analysis showed an apparent decreased overall survival in MC/MF tumors but data are controversial. Surgery should achieve both acceptable cosmetic results and negative margins, which requires thorough preoperative radiological workup and localization of lesions. Boost radiotherapy techniques must be evaluated since double boosts might result in increased toxicity, namely fibrosis. In conclusion, BCT is feasible in selected patients with MC/MF but the choice of surgery must be discussed in a multidisciplinary team comprising at least radiologists, surgeons and radiotherapists. PMID:27081646

  19. Is breast conservative surgery a reasonable option in multifocal or multicentric tumors?

    PubMed

    Houvenaeghel, Gilles; Tallet, Agnès; Jalaguier-Coudray, Aurélie; Cohen, Monique; Bannier, Marie; Jauffret-Fara, Camille; Lambaudie, Eric

    2016-04-10

    The incidence of multifocal (MF) and multicentric (MC) carcinomas varies widely among clinical studies, depending on definitions and methods for pathological sampling. Magnetic resonance imaging is increasingly used because it can help identify additional and conventionally occult tumors with high sensitivity. However, false positive lesions might incorrectly influence treatment decisions. Therefore, preoperative biopsies must be performed to avoid unnecessary surgery. Most studies have shown higher lymph node involvement rates in MF/MC tumors than in unifocal tumors. However, the rate of local recurrences is usually low after breast conservative treatment (BCT) of MC/MF tumors. It has been suggested that BCT is a reasonable option for MC/MF tumors in women aged 50-69 years, with small tumors and absence of extensive ductal carcinoma in situ. A meta-analysis showed an apparent decreased overall survival in MC/MF tumors but data are controversial. Surgery should achieve both acceptable cosmetic results and negative margins, which requires thorough preoperative radiological workup and localization of lesions. Boost radiotherapy techniques must be evaluated since double boosts might result in increased toxicity, namely fibrosis. In conclusion, BCT is feasible in selected patients with MC/MF but the choice of surgery must be discussed in a multidisciplinary team comprising at least radiologists, surgeons and radiotherapists. PMID:27081646

  20. Percutaneous Tumor Ablation: Cryoablation Facilitates Targeting of Free Epirubicin-Ethanol-Ioversol Solution Interstitially Coinjected in a Rabbit VX2 Tumor Model.

    PubMed

    He, Xiaofeng; Xiao, Yueyong; Zhang, Xiao; Du, Peng; Zhang, Xin; Li, Jie; An, Yunxia; Le Pivert, Patrick

    2016-08-01

    This acute study was aimed at exploring the ability of a cryoablative lesion to drive the distribution of a concomitant in situ injection of a free epirubicin-ethanol-ethiodol-methylene blue mixture. We report the feasibility and safety of this new percutaneous computed tomography-guided combinatorial ablative procedure on VX2 tumors. Eight New Zealand white rabbits bearing 16 tumors on both side of the back muscle were randomly selected and treated on the same day with the following procedures: (1) 8 concomitant cryoablation and interstitial chemotherapy and (2) 8 intratumor marginal chemotherapy. For the latter, an injection needle was positioned at the inner distal margin of a first selected tumor side, where the chemotherapy was delivered during 5 serial sequences. For the concomitant therapy, a single cryoneedle maintained the ice front at the tumor margin, where a needle delivered the drug dose during 5 freeze-injection-thaw sequences. Enhanced computed tomography scans on days 3, 7, and 10 assessed the tumor contours and the tracer localization. Two rabbits were killed on days 0, 3, 7, and 10 for gross and histopathological analyses. During the concomitant therapy, ioversol was distributed at the tumor and iceball margins along with the methylene blue. Enhanced computed tomography on days 3, 7, and 10 showed a focal enlarging defect of the tumor marginal enhancing rim. The rim coincided with focal necrosis at histopathology. During the intratumor chemotherapy procedure, computed tomography showed that the tracers distributed mostly over the tumor mass. No marginal necrosis was detected at histopathology. On day 10, the tumor size for the intratumor chemotherapy group was twice that of the concomitant therapy group. No adverse events were observed. In this VX2 tumor model, our image-guided concomitant therapy is feasible and may enhance the effectiveness of a free epirubicin tracer mixture at the tumor margin. PMID:26206769

  1. Radiofrequency ablation for neuroendocrine liver metastases: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Helen; Nicholson, Patrick; Winter, Des C; O'Shea, Donal; O'Toole, Dermot; Geoghegan, Justin; Maguire, Donal; Hoti, Emir; Traynor, Oscar; Cantwell, Colin P

    2015-07-01

    To determine the efficacy of radiofrequency (RF) ablation in neuroendocrine tumor (NET) liver metastases. A systematic review was performed following Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines. Eight studies were included (N = 301). Twenty-six percent of RF ablation procedures were percutaneous (n = 156), with the remainder conducted at surgery. Forty-eight percent of patients had a concomitant liver resection. Fifty-four percent of patients presented with symptoms, with 92% reporting symptom improvement following RF ablation (alone or in combination with surgery). The median duration of symptom improvement was 14-27 months. However, recurrence was common (63%-87%). RF ablation can provide symptomatic relief in NET liver metastases alone or in combination with surgery. PMID:25840836

  2. A phase I/pilot study of radiofrequency ablation for the treatment of recurrent pediatric solid tumors

    PubMed Central

    Hoffer, Fredric A.; Daw, Najat C.; Xiong, Xiaoping; Anghelescu, Doralina; Krasin, Matthew; Yan, Xiaowei; Davidoff, Andrew M.; Furman, Wayne L.; Rodriguez-Galindo, Carlos; Spunt, Sheri L.

    2010-01-01

    Background This prospective study was designed to be the first to evaluate the toxicity of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) in patients with recurrent pediatric solid tumors. Methods From 2003 through 2008, we conducted a phase I/pilot study of RFA for recurrent pediatric solid tumors. A multidisciplinary cancer management team selected appropriate candidates for the study. Imaging-guided RFA was performed percutaneously. Repeat RFA was performed for recurrences when appropriate. Toxicity and imaging response was assessed at 1 and 3 months prospectively. Accrual stopped in 2006 and data collection stopped in 2008. Results Sixteen patients (age 4 – 33 years, median 15 years) and 56 tumor sites were treated in 37 RFA sessions including 38 pulmonary, 11 musculoskeletal, and 7 hepatic lesions (82 lesion-treatments). Post-procedural pain was moderate (median 5 on a scale from 1 to 10) and lasted a median of 9 days. Prolonged hospitalization (beyond 1 day) occurred 17 times (range 2–25 days, median 3 days). Hypoxia supported by supplemental oxygen occurred in 8 of 16 patients and resolved within one month after each RFA. No patient had tumor lysis syndrome but myoglobinuria/hemoglobinuria occurred in 6 of 16 patients all without renal damage. Serious complications from pulmonary RFA included two diaphragmatic hernias. Twenty-four of 82 (29%) lesions imaged remained ablated at the end of the study. Conclusion The toxicity from RFA of recurrent pediatric solid tumors is real but limited and RFA may offer a local tumor control alternative in carefully selected cases. PMID:19180637

  3. Radiofrequency Ablation of Liver Tumors in Combination with Local OK-432 Injection Prolongs Survival and Suppresses Distant Tumor Growth in the Rabbit Model with Intra- and Extrahepatic VX2 Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Kageyama, Ken Yamamoto, Akira Okuma, Tomohisa Hamamoto, Shinichi Takeshita, Toru Sakai, Yukimasa Nishida, Norifumi Matsuoka, Toshiyuki Miki, Yukio

    2013-10-15

    Purpose: To evaluate survival and distant tumor growth after radiofrequency ablation (RFA) and local OK-432 injection at a single tumor site in a rabbit model with intra- and extrahepatic VX2 tumors and to examine the effect of this combination therapy, which we termed immuno-radiofrequency ablation (immunoRFA), on systemic antitumor immunity in a rechallenge test. Methods: Our institutional animal care committee approved all experiments. VX2 tumors were implanted to three sites: two in the liver and one in the left ear. Rabbits were randomized into four groups of seven to receive control, RFA alone, OK-432 alone, and immunoRFA treatments at a single liver tumor at 1 week after implantation. Untreated liver and ear tumor volumes were measured after the treatment. As the rechallenge test, tumors were reimplanted into the right ear of rabbits, which survived the 35 weeks and were followed up without additional treatment. Statistical significance was examined by log-rank test for survival and Student's t test for tumor volume. Results: Survival was significantly prolonged in the immunoRFA group compared to the other three groups (P < 0.05). Untreated liver and ear tumor sizes became significantly smaller after immunoRFA compared to controls (P < 0.05). In the rechallenge test, the reimplanted tumors regressed without further therapy compared to the ear tumors of the control group (P < 0.05). Conclusion: ImmunoRFA led to improved survival and suppression of distant untreated tumor growth. Decreases in size of the distant untreated tumors and reimplanted tumors suggested that systemic antitumor immunity was enhanced by immunoRFA.

  4. Improving the accuracy of brain tumor surgery via Raman-based technology.

    PubMed

    Hollon, Todd; Lewis, Spencer; Freudiger, Christian W; Sunney Xie, X; Orringer, Daniel A

    2016-03-01

    Despite advances in the surgical management of brain tumors, achieving optimal surgical results and identification of tumor remains a challenge. Raman spectroscopy, a laser-based technique that can be used to nondestructively differentiate molecules based on the inelastic scattering of light, is being applied toward improving the accuracy of brain tumor surgery. Here, the authors systematically review the application of Raman spectroscopy for guidance during brain tumor surgery. Raman spectroscopy can differentiate normal brain from necrotic and vital glioma tissue in human specimens based on chemical differences, and has recently been shown to differentiate tumor-infiltrated tissues from noninfiltrated tissues during surgery. Raman spectroscopy also forms the basis for coherent Raman scattering (CRS) microscopy, a technique that amplifies spontaneous Raman signals by 10,000-fold, enabling real-time histological imaging without the need for tissue processing, sectioning, or staining. The authors review the relevant basic and translational studies on CRS microscopy as a means of providing real-time intraoperative guidance. Recent studies have demonstrated how CRS can be used to differentiate tumor-infiltrated tissues from noninfiltrated tissues and that it has excellent agreement with traditional histology. Under simulated operative conditions, CRS has been shown to identify tumor margins that would be undetectable using standard bright-field microscopy. In addition, CRS microscopy has been shown to detect tumor in human surgical specimens with near-perfect agreement to standard H & E microscopy. The authors suggest that as the intraoperative application and instrumentation for Raman spectroscopy and imaging matures, it will become an essential component in the neurosurgical armamentarium for identifying residual tumor and improving the surgical management of brain tumors. PMID:26926067

  5. Improving the accuracy of brain tumor surgery via Raman-based technology

    PubMed Central

    Hollon, Todd; Lewis, Spencer; Freudiger, Christian W.; Xie, X. Sunney; Orringer, Daniel A.

    2016-01-01

    Despite advances in the surgical management of brain tumors, achieving optimal surgical results and identification of tumor remains a challenge. Raman spectroscopy, a laser-based technique that can be used to nondestructively differentiate molecules based on the inelastic scattering of light, is being applied toward improving the accuracy of brain tumor surgery. Here, the authors systematically review the application of Raman spectroscopy for guidance during brain tumor surgery. Raman spectroscopy can differentiate normal brain from necrotic and vital glioma tissue in human specimens based on chemical differences, and has recently been shown to differentiate tumor-infiltrated tissues from noninfiltrated tissues during surgery. Raman spectroscopy also forms the basis for coherent Raman scattering (CRS) microscopy, a technique that amplifies spontaneous Raman signals by 10,000-fold, enabling real-time histological imaging without the need for tissue processing, sectioning, or staining. The authors review the relevant basic and translational studies on CRS microscopy as a means of providing real-time intraoperative guidance. Recent studies have demonstrated how CRS can be used to differentiate tumor-infiltrated tissues from noninfiltrated tissues and that it has excellent agreement with traditional histology. Under simulated operative conditions, CRS has been shown to identify tumor margins that would be undetectable using standard bright-field microscopy. In addition, CRS microscopy has been shown to detect tumor in human surgical specimens with near-perfect agreement to standard H & E microscopy. The authors suggest that as the intraoperative application and instrumentation for Raman spectroscopy and imaging matures, it will become an essential component in the neurosurgical armamentarium for identifying residual tumor and improving the surgical management of brain tumors. PMID:26926067

  6. Automatic Tracking Algorithm in Coaxial Near-Infrared Laser Ablation Endoscope for Fetus Surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yan; Yamanaka, Noriaki; Masamune, Ken

    2014-07-01

    This article reports a stable vessel object tracking method for the treatment of twin-to-twin transfusion syndrome based on our previous 2 DOF endoscope. During the treatment of laser coagulation, it is necessary to focus on the exact position of the target object, however it moves by the mother's respiratory motion and still remains a challenge to obtain and track the position precisely. In this article, an algorithm which uses features from accelerated segment test (FAST) to extract the features and optical flow as the object tracking method, is proposed to deal with above problem. Further, we experimentally simulate the movement due to the mother's respiration, and the results of position errors and similarity verify the effectiveness of the proposed tracking algorithm for laser ablation endoscopy in-vitro and under water considering two influential factors. At average, the errors are about 10 pixels and the similarity over 0.92 are obtained in the experiments.

  7. A case of a glomus tumor of the stomach resected by laparoscopy endoscopy cooperative surgery.

    PubMed

    Nakajo, Keiichiro; Chonan, Akimichi; Tsuboi, Rumiko; Nihei, Kousuke; Iwaki, Tomoyuki; Yamaoka, Hajime; Sato, Shun; Matsuda, Tomomi; Nakahori, Masato; Endo, Mareyuki

    2016-09-01

    A 56-year-old woman who was found to have a submucosal tumor (SMT) of the stomach in a medical check-up was admitted to our hospital for a detailed investigation of the SMT. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy revealed an SMT of 20mm at the anterior wall of the antrum of the stomach. Endoscopic ultrasonography showed a hyperechoic tumor in the fourth layer of the stomach wall. CT examination showed a strongly enhancing tumor on arterial phase images and persistent enhancement on portal venous phase images. Laparoscopy endoscopy cooperative surgery was performed with a diagnosis of SMT of the stomach highly suspicious of a glomus tumor. Immunohistochemistry revealed expression of α-SMA but no expression of desmin, c-kit, CD34, or S-100. The tumor was finally diagnosed as a glomus tumor of the stomach. PMID:27593365

  8. MRI-Based Assessment of Safe Margins in Tumor Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Bellanova, Laura; Schubert, Thomas; Cartiaux, Olivier; Lecouvet, Frédéric; Galant, Christine; Banse, Xavier; Docquier, Pierre-Louis

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. In surgical oncology, histological analysis of excised tumor specimen is the conventional method to assess the safety of the resection margins. We tested the feasibility of using MRI to assess the resection margins of freshly explanted tumor specimens in rats. Materials and Methods. Fourteen specimen of sarcoma were resected in rats and analysed both with MRI and histologically. Slicing of the specimen was identical for the two methods and corresponding slices were paired. 498 margins were measured in length and classified using the UICC classification (R0, R1, and R2). Results. The mean difference between the 498 margins measured both with histology and MRI was 0.3 mm (SD 1.0 mm). The agreement interval of the two measurement methods was [−1.7 mm; 2.2 mm]. In terms of the UICC classification, a strict correlation was observed between MRI- and histology-based classifications (κ = 0.84, P < 0.05). Discussion. This experimental study showed the feasibility to use MRI images of excised tumor specimen to assess the resection margins with the same degree of accuracy as the conventional histopathological analysis. When completed, MRI acquisition of resected tumors may alert the surgeon in case of inadequate margin and help advantageously the histopathological analysis. PMID:24701131

  9. MRI-Based Assessment of Safe Margins in Tumor Surgery.

    PubMed

    Bellanova, Laura; Schubert, Thomas; Cartiaux, Olivier; Lecouvet, Frédéric; Galant, Christine; Banse, Xavier; Docquier, Pierre-Louis

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. In surgical oncology, histological analysis of excised tumor specimen is the conventional method to assess the safety of the resection margins. We tested the feasibility of using MRI to assess the resection margins of freshly explanted tumor specimens in rats. Materials and Methods. Fourteen specimen of sarcoma were resected in rats and analysed both with MRI and histologically. Slicing of the specimen was identical for the two methods and corresponding slices were paired. 498 margins were measured in length and classified using the UICC classification (R0, R1, and R2). Results. The mean difference between the 498 margins measured both with histology and MRI was 0.3 mm (SD 1.0 mm). The agreement interval of the two measurement methods was [-1.7 mm; 2.2 mm]. In terms of the UICC classification, a strict correlation was observed between MRI- and histology-based classifications (κ = 0.84, P < 0.05). Discussion. This experimental study showed the feasibility to use MRI images of excised tumor specimen to assess the resection margins with the same degree of accuracy as the conventional histopathological analysis. When completed, MRI acquisition of resected tumors may alert the surgeon in case of inadequate margin and help advantageously the histopathological analysis. PMID:24701131

  10. Indocyanine Green-Loaded Nanoparticles for Image-Guided Tumor Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Tanner K.; Abdulahad, Asem; Kelkar, Sneha S.; Marini, Frank C.; Long, Timothy E.; Provenzale, James M.; Mohs, Aaron M.

    2015-01-01

    Detecting positive tumor margins and local malignant masses during surgery is critical for long-term patient survival. The use of image-guided surgery for tumor removal, particularly with near-infrared fluorescent imaging, is a potential method to facilitate removing all neoplastic tissue at the surgical site. In this study we demonstrate a series of hyaluronic acid (HLA)-derived nanoparticles that entrap the near-infrared dye indocyanine green, termed NanoICG, for improved delivery of the dye to tumors. Self-assembly of the nanoparticles was driven by conjugation of one of three hydrophobic moieties: aminopropyl-1-pyrenebutanamide (PBA), aminopropyl-5β-cholanamide (5βCA), or octadecylamine (ODA). Nanoparticle self-assembly, dye loading, and optical properties were characterized. NanoICG exhibited quenched fluorescence that could be activated by disassembly in a mixed solvent. NanoICG was found to be nontoxic at physiologically relevant concentrations and exposure was not found to inhibit cell growth. Using an MDA-MB-231 tumor xenograft model in mice, strong fluorescence enhancement in tumors was observed with NanoICG using a fluorescence image-guided surgery system and a whole-animal imaging system. Tumor contrast with NanoICG was significantly higher than with ICG alone. PMID:25565445

  11. Bone and Soft Tissue Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Ryan C.B.; Stavas, Joseph M.

    2014-01-01

    Bone and soft tissue tumor ablation has reached widespread acceptance in the locoregional treatment of various benign and malignant musculoskeletal (MSK) lesions. Many principles of ablation learned elsewhere in the body are easily adapted to the MSK system, particularly the various technical aspects of probe/antenna design, tumoricidal effects, selection of image guidance, and methods to reduce complications. Despite the common use of thermal and chemical ablation procedures in bone and soft tissues, there are few large clinical series that show longitudinal benefit and cost-effectiveness compared with conventional methods, namely, surgery, external beam radiation, and chemotherapy. Percutaneous radiofrequency ablation of osteoid osteomas has been evaluated the most and is considered a first-line treatment choice for many lesions. Palliation of painful metastatic bone disease with thermal ablation is considered safe and has been shown to reduce pain and analgesic use while improving quality of life for cancer patients. Procedure-related complications are rare and are typically easily managed. Similar to all interventional procedures, bone and soft tissue lesions require an integrated approach to disease management to determine the optimum type of and timing for ablation techniques within the context of the patient care plan. PMID:25053865

  12. Bone and soft tissue ablation.

    PubMed

    Foster, Ryan C B; Stavas, Joseph M

    2014-06-01

    Bone and soft tissue tumor ablation has reached widespread acceptance in the locoregional treatment of various benign and malignant musculoskeletal (MSK) lesions. Many principles of ablation learned elsewhere in the body are easily adapted to the MSK system, particularly the various technical aspects of probe/antenna design, tumoricidal effects, selection of image guidance, and methods to reduce complications. Despite the common use of thermal and chemical ablation procedures in bone and soft tissues, there are few large clinical series that show longitudinal benefit and cost-effectiveness compared with conventional methods, namely, surgery, external beam radiation, and chemotherapy. Percutaneous radiofrequency ablation of osteoid osteomas has been evaluated the most and is considered a first-line treatment choice for many lesions. Palliation of painful metastatic bone disease with thermal ablation is considered safe and has been shown to reduce pain and analgesic use while improving quality of life for cancer patients. Procedure-related complications are rare and are typically easily managed. Similar to all interventional procedures, bone and soft tissue lesions require an integrated approach to disease management to determine the optimum type of and timing for ablation techniques within the context of the patient care plan. PMID:25053865

  13. Surgery for intramedullary spinal cord tumors: the role of intraoperative (neurophysiological) monitoring.

    PubMed

    Sala, Francesco; Bricolo, Albino; Faccioli, Franco; Lanteri, Paola; Gerosa, Massimo

    2007-11-01

    In spite of advancements in neuro-imaging and microsurgical techniques, surgery for intramedullary spinal cord tumors (ISCT) remains a challenging task. The rationale for using intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring (IOM) is in keeping with the goal of maximizing tumor resection and minimizing neurological morbidity. For many years, before the advent of motor evoked potentials (MEPs), only somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs) were monitored. However, SEPs are not aimed to reflect the functional integrity of motor pathways and, nowadays, the combined used of SEPs and MEPs in ISCT surgery is almost mandatory because of the possibility to selectively injury either the somatosensory or the motor pathways. This paper is aimed to review our perspective in the field of IOM during ISCT surgery and to discuss it in the light of other intraoperative neurophysiologic strategies that have recently appeared in the literature with regards to ISCT surgery. Besides standard cortical SEP monitoring after peripheral stimulation, both muscle (mMEPs) and epidural MEPs (D-wave) are monitored after transcranial electrical stimulation (TES). Given the dorsal approach to the spinal cord, SEPs must be monitored continuously during the incision of the dorsal midline. When the surgeon starts to work on the cleavage plane between tumor and spinal cord, attention must be paid to MEPs. During tumor removal, we alternatively monitor D-wave and mMEPs, sustaining the stimulation during the most critical steps of the procedure. D-waves, obtained through a single pulse TES technique, allow a semi-quantitative assessment of the functional integrity of the cortico-spinal tracts and represent the strongest predictor of motor outcome. Whenever evoked potentials deteriorate, temporarily stop surgery, warm saline irrigation and improved blood perfusion have proved useful for promoting recovery, Most of intraoperative neurophysiological derangements are reversible and therefore IOM is able to

  14. Tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... be removed because of their location or harmful effect on the surrounding normal brain tissue. If a tumor is cancer , possible treatments may include: Chemotherapy Radiation Surgery Targeted cancer therapy Biologic therapy Other treatment options

  15. A comparison of clinical and surgical outcomes between laparo-endoscopic single-site surgery and traditional multiport laparoscopic surgery for adnexal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Lee, In Ok; Yoon, Jung Won; Chung, Dawn; Yim, Ga Won; Nam, Eun Ji; Kim, Sunghoon; Kim, Sang Wun

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to compare clinical and surgical outcomes between laparo-endoscopic single-site (LESS) surgery and traditional multiport laparoscopic (TML) surgery for treatment of adnexal tumors. Methods Medical records were reviewed for patients undergoing surgery for benign adnexal tumors between January 2008 and April 2012 at our institution. All procedures were performed by the same surgeon. Clinical and surgical outcomes for patients undergoing LESS surgery using Glove port were compared with those patients undergoing TML surgery. Results A review of 129 patient cases undergoing LESS surgery using Glove port and 100 patient cases undergoing TML surgery revealed no significant differences in the baseline characteristics of the two groups. The median operative time was shorter in the LESS group using Glove port at 44 minutes (range, 19-126 minutes) than the TML group at 49 minutes (range, 20-196 minutes) (P=0.0007). There were no significant differences between in the duration of postoperative hospital stay, change in hemoglobin levels, pain score or the rate of complications between the LESS and TML groups. Conclusion LESS surgery showed comparable clinical and surgical outcomes to TML surgery, and required less operative time. Future prospective trials are warranted to further define the benefits of LESS surgery for adnexal tumor treatment. PMID:25264529

  16. Harmonic Motion Imaging for Abdominal Tumor Detection and High-intensity Focused Ultrasound Ablation Monitoring: A Feasibility Study in a Transgenic Mouse Model of Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hong; Hou, Gary Y.; Han, Yang; Payen, Thomas; Palermo, Carmine F.; Olive, Kenneth P.; Konofagou, Elisa E.

    2015-01-01

    Harmonic motion imaging (HMI) is a radiation force-based elasticity imaging technique that tracks oscillatory tissue displacements induced by sinusoidal ultrasonic radiation force to assess relative tissue stiffness. The objective of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of HMI in pancreatic tumor detection and high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment monitoring. The HMI system consisted of a focused ultrasound transducer, which generated sinusoidal radiation force to induce oscillatory tissue motion at 50 Hz, and a diagnostic ultrasound transducer, which detected the axial tissue displacements based on acquired radiofrequency signals using a 1D cross-correlation algorithm. For pancreatic tumor detection, HMI images were generated for pancreatic tumors in transgenic mice and normal pancreases in wild-type mice. The obtained HMI images showed a high contrast between normal and malignant pancreases with an average peak-to-peak HMI displacement ratio of 3.2. Histological analysis showed that no tissue damage was associated with HMI when it was used for the sole purpose of elasticity imaging. For pancreatic tumor ablation monitoring, the focused ultrasound transducer was operated with a higher acoustic power and longer pulse length than that used in tumor detection to simultaneously induce HIFU thermal ablation and oscillatory tissue displacements, allowing HMI monitoring without interrupting tumor ablation. HMI monitoring of HIFU ablation found significant decreases in the peak-to-peak HMI displacements before and after HIFU ablation with a reduction rate ranging from 15.8% to 57.0%. The formation of thermal lesions after HIFU exposure was confirmed by histological analysis. This study demonstrated the feasibility of HMI in abdominal tumor detection and HIFU ablation monitoring. PMID:26415128

  17. Harmonic motion imaging for abdominal tumor detection and high-intensity focused ultrasound ablation monitoring: an in vivo feasibility study in a transgenic mouse model of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong; Hou, Gary Y; Han, Yang; Payen, Thomas; Palermo, Carmine F; Olive, Kenneth P; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2015-09-01

    Harmonic motion imaging (HMI) is a radiationforce- based elasticity imaging technique that tracks oscillatory tissue displacements induced by sinusoidal ultrasonic radiation force to assess the resulting oscillatory displacement denoting the underlying tissue stiffness. The objective of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of HMI in pancreatic tumor detection and high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment monitoring. The HMI system consisted of a focused ultrasound transducer, which generated sinusoidal radiation force to induce oscillatory tissue motion at 50 Hz, and a diagnostic ultrasound transducer, which detected the axial tissue displacements based on acquired radio-frequency signals using a 1-D cross-correlation algorithm. For pancreatic tumor detection, HMI images were generated for pancreatic tumors in transgenic mice and normal pancreases in wild-type mice. The obtained HMI images showed a high contrast between normal and malignant pancreases with an average peak-to-peak HMI displacement ratio of 3.2. Histological analysis showed that no tissue damage was associated with HMI when it was used for the sole purpose of elasticity imaging. For pancreatic tumor ablation monitoring, the focused ultrasound transducer was operated at a higher acoustic power and longer pulse length than that used in tumor detection to simultaneously induce HIFU thermal ablation and oscillatory tissue displacements, allowing HMI monitoring without interrupting tumor ablation. HMI monitoring of HIFU ablation found significant decreases in the peak-to-peak HMI displacements before and after HIFU ablation with a reduction rate ranging from 15.8% to 57.0%. The formation of thermal lesions after HIFU exposure was confirmed by histological analysis. This study demonstrated the feasibility of HMI in abdominal tumor detection and HIFU ablation monitoring. PMID:26415128

  18. Effects of surgery, immunization, and laser immunotherapy on a non-immunogenic metastic tumor model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei R.; Huang, Zheng; Andrienko, Kirill; Stefanov, Stefan; Wolf, Roman F.; Liu, Hong

    2006-08-01

    Traditional local cancer treatment modalities include surgery and radiation, which has the immediate tumor response due to tumor removal or radiation induced cell death. However, such therapeutic approaches usually do not result in eradiation of tumors, particularly when treating metastatic tumors. In fact, local treatment of primary tumors may stimulate the growth and spread of remote metastasis. Commonly used systemic therapies include chemotherapy and immunotherapy, which target the dividing cells or the immune systems. However, in addition to the severe side effects, chemotherapy often suppresses the immune systems, hence lessening the host's ability to fight the disease. Immunotherapy, on the other hand, aims at educating and stimulating immune systems using either general immune enhancements or antigen-oriented specific immune stimulation. However, so far, the traditional immunotherapy has yielded only limited success in treating cancer patients. A different approach is needed. To combine the advantages of both local therapies for acute and targeted treatment responses and the systemic therapies for stimulation of the immune systems, laser immunotherapy was proposed to use selective photothermal therapy as the local treatment modality and the adjuvant-assisted immunotherapy for systemic control. Laser immunotherapy has show positive results in treating metastatic tumors. In this study, we conducted a comparative study using surgery, freeze-thaw immunization and laser immunotherapy in the treatment of metastatic rat mammary tumors. Our results showed that removal of the primary tumors was unsuccessful at changing the course of tumor progression. The tumor cell lysate immunization delayed the emergence of metastases but did not provide immunity against the tumor challenge. Laser immunotherapy, on the other hand, resulted in regression and eradication.

  19. [The Current Role of Salvage-Surgery of Recurrent Tumors in the Larynx and Pharynx].

    PubMed

    Stuck, B A; Rothmeier, N; Mattheis, S; Dominas, N; Lang, S

    2016-05-01

    Over the past 20 years, the therapeutic concepts for the treatment of head and neck cancer have evolved and non-surgical treatment strategies have gained in importance. However, despite improved organ preservation protocols and primary chemoradiation, tumor recurrence is still frequent. Under these conditions, salvage surgery if often the only remaining curative treatment option. Over the past 30 years, advancements in plastic-reconstructive surgery have broadened the surgical spectrum in the head and neck area, offering new treatment options for salvage surgery in recurrent cancer of the pharynx and larynx. Survival after salvage surgery mainly depends on the primary treatment modality as well as the localization and tumor stage at the time of initial diagnosis and local recurrence. For the reconstruction of defects after salvage surgery, pedicled flaps and microvascular free flaps may be utilized. The most frequently used flaps in these situations are the pectoralis major island- or the myocutaneous latissimus dorsi island flap. The radial forearm and the ALT-flap are potentially applicable free flaps. With the use of these flaps, vital tissue is transferred into the previously irradiated area, hereby allowing for reconstruction and functional preservation of the resected area and preventing complications such as fistulas. The expected morbidity and the likelihood of surgical success must be assessed thoroughly in every individual case prior to performing salvage surgery. This review aims to support decision making in these situations. PMID:27135424

  20. Image-Guided Ablation of Malignant Liver Tumors: Recommendations for Clinical Validation of Novel Thermal and Non-Thermal Technologies – A Western Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Lencioni, Riccardo; de Baere, Thierry; Martin, Robert C.; Nutting, Charles W.; Narayanan, Govindarajan

    2015-01-01

    Background Image-guided ablation is used to treat patients with unresectable malignant hepatic tumors that are limited in number and size, especially hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and colorectal hepatic metastases. While radiofrequency ablation (RFA) has been the most popular technique, several alternate options for focal tissue destruction have recently attracted attention. These technologies appear to be able to overcome some specific limitations of RFA. Currently, there is no accepted algorithm for the use of the different techniques for image-guided ablation. Summary A panel of physicians practicing in North America or Europe met to develop a set of recommendations aimed at providing directions for clinical validation of energy-based, thermal and non-thermal image-guided ablation technologies in the treatment of malignant liver tumors. The recommendations were developed through a critical appraisal of potential advantages and disadvantages of each ablation technology, based on experimental findings and available data, as well as on critical considerations for their clinical validation in hepatic tumor treatment from a Western perspective. Key Messages Significant variability appears to exist among the different equipment and devices within each type of technology. A comprehensive understanding of the data and a critical appraisal of the efficacy and safety profile of each ablation system is required. Clinical practice guidelines should include specific information of the recommended techniques and protocols instead of a generic indication of the technology. PMID:26734576

  1. SN-38-loaded nanofiber matrices for local control of pediatric solid tumors after subtotal resection surgery.

    PubMed

    Monterrubio, Carles; Pascual-Pasto, Guillem; Cano, Francisco; Vila-Ubach, Monica; Manzanares, Alejandro; Schaiquevich, Paula; Tornero, Jose A; Sosnik, Alejandro; Mora, Jaume; Carcaboso, Angel M

    2016-02-01

    In addition to surgery, local tumor control in pediatric oncology requires new treatments as an alternative to radiotherapy. SN-38 is an anticancer drug with proved activity against several pediatric solid tumors including neuroblastoma, rhabdomyosarcoma and Ewing sarcoma. Taking advantage of the extremely low aqueous solubility of SN-38, we have developed a novel drug delivery system (DDS) consisting of matrices made of poly(lactic acid) electrospun polymer nanofibers loaded with SN-38 microcrystals for local release in difficult-to-treat pediatric solid tumors. To model the clinical scenario, we conducted extensive preclinical experiments to characterize the biodistribution of the released SN-38 using microdialysis sampling in vivo. We observed that the drug achieves high concentrations in the virtual space of the surgical bed and penetrates a maximum distance of 2 mm within the tumor bulk. Subsequently, we developed a model of subtotal tumor resection in clinically relevant pediatric patient-derived xenografts and used such models to provide evidence of the activity of the SN-38 DDS to inhibit tumor regrowth. We propose that this novel DDS could represent a potential future strategy to avoid harmful radiation therapy as a primary tumor control together with surgery. PMID:26695118

  2. Localized Ablation of Thyroid Tissue by High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound: an Alternative to Surgery?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esnault, Olivier; Franc, Brigitte; Chapelon, Jean-Yves; Lacoste, Francois

    2006-05-01

    PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of using a High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) device to obtain a localised destruction of the thyroid with no damage to adjacent tissues. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The ewe model was used because its thyroid gland is easily accessible with ultrasound. The animals were anaesthetised with 10 mg / kg IV injection of Penthothal. The HIFU pulses were generated by a 3-MHz spherical transducer under ultrasound guidance. Macroscopic and microscopic tissue lesions were identified after formalin fixation of the anterior part of the ewe's neck. RESULTS: After determining the optimal instrument settings to obtain localized thyroid ablation, the repeatability of the method was evaluated using a HIFU prototype designed specifically for human use: in 13 ewes (26 treated lobes), an average of 20 (range: 14-27) ultrasound pulses (pulse duration: 3 s) per lobe covering a mean volume of 0.5 cm3 (range: 0.3-0.7 cm3) were delivered. The ewes were sacrificed 2-5 weeks after treatment delivery. No damage to the nerves, trachea, esophagus or muscle was observed. Only 3 ewes suffered superficial skin burns. The desired thyroid lesions were obtained in 25/26 treated lobes, as demonstrated by fibrotic tissues, which replaced necrotic areas. CONCLUSION: These results obtained in the ewe model show that thyroid lesions of defined volume can be induced safely and suggest that the HIFU device is now ready for human trials.

  3. Final Report for completed IPP Project:"Development of Plasma Ablation for Soft Tissue and Bone Surgery"

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Ian

    2009-09-01

    ArthroCare is a medical device company that develops, manufactures, and markets an advanced surgical tool, a plasma electro-surgical system for cutting and removing tissue. The hand-held electrical discharge device produces plasma in a biocompatible conductive fluid and tissue to which it is applied during surgery. Its products allow surgeons to operate with increased precision and accuracy, limiting damage to surrounding tissue thereby reducing pain and speeding recovery for the patient. In the past, the design of ArthfoCare's plasma wands has been an empirical undertaking. One goal of this R&D program was to put the phenomena involved on a sound scientific footing, allowing optimization of existing plasma based electro-surgery system technology, and the design and manufacture of new and improved kinds of scalpels, in particular for the surgical cutting of bone. Another important related goal of the program was to develop, through an experimental approach, new plasma wand approaches to the cutting ('shaving') of hard bone tissue. The goals of the CRADA were accomplished - computer models were used to predict important parameters of the plasma discharge and the bone environment, and several different approaches to bone-shaving were developed and demonstrated. The primary goal of the project was to develop and demonstrate an atmospheric-pressure plasma tool that is suitable for surgical use for shaving bone in humans. This goal was accomplished, in fact with several different alternative plasma approaches. High bone ablation speeds were measured. The use of probes ('plasma wand' - the surgical tool) with moving active electrodes was also explored, and there are advantages to this method. Another important feature is that the newly-exposed bone surface have only a very thin necrosis layer; this feature was demonstrated. This CRADA has greatly advanced our understanding of bone removal by atmospheric pressure plasmas in liquid, and puts ArthroCare in a good position

  4. [Emergency surgery of tumors of the small intestine].

    PubMed

    Meo, G; Aghemo, B; Laguzzi, B; Borello, M

    1978-09-15

    Ten cases of serious complications requiring emergency surgery in patients with tumours of the small intestine are presented: 3 cases of peritonitis due to perforation of a fibroleiomyoma, a jejunal adenocarcinoma, and an ileal lymphosarcoma; 3 invaginations (1 ileocolic due to an ileal polyp, and 2 ileoileal due to lymphoma and polypoid metastasis of melanoma; 3 stenosis (ileal owing to metastasis of melanoma, and duodenal and of the duodenojejunal flexure due to histologically unascertained neoplasias); 1 massive enterorrhagia from ileal anaplastic carcinoma. The frequency of such pictures is not negligible when assessed in terms of emergency surgical pathology and compared with other emergency situations arising in patients with tumours. Preoperative diagnosis is difficult even from the clinical history. Tumours of the small intestine appear to give rise to such complications in their initial stages. PMID:581225

  5. Evaluation of the results of surgery treatment in patients with benign lung tumors

    PubMed Central

    Bagheri, Reza; Haghi, Seyed Ziaollah; Dalouee, Marziyeh Nouri; Nasiri, Zakiyeh; Rajabnejad, Ata’ollah

    2015-01-01

    Background: Lung tumors are among the common tumors and can be benign or malignant. Benign lung tumors are less common compared to the malignant types. Recognition of the clinical symptoms, types of tumors, paraclinical findings, and treatment approaches can bring better therapeutic results. The present study aims to evaluate the characteristics, diagnosis methods, and therapeutic approaches of different benign lung tumors. Materials and Methods: In this retrospective study, 32 patients with a diagnosis of benign lung tumor, who had been referred to the Mashhad University of Medical Sciences between 1981 and 2009, were studied. Some of the studied variables were symptoms, the pulmonary location involved, surgery technique, pathology findings, recurrence, and surgery complications. Data were analyzed by SPSS package version 16. Results: The average age of the patients was 51.69 ± 20.5 years. Prevalence of benign lung tumors was equal in both genders. The most common symptom was cough (31.2%); right lung involvement was more common (71.9%), and the most common sampling technique was transbronchial lung biopsy (TBLB) (62.5%); 53.1% of the patients were operated on by thoracotomy and the wedge resection technique. In 78.1% of the patients, no complications occurred after surgery. There was no recurrence. Most operations were performed in one month after the start of the symptoms (68.8%). Conclusions: Benign lung tumors are commonly diagnosed by routine radiography because most of them are asymptomatic. The most common finding in radiography is the presence of mass in the lungs. Transbronchial lung biopsy is a valuable technique to be used for diagnosis. We chose thoracotomy and wedge resection for the treatment of patients. We recommend this approach as a useful method. PMID:25624593

  6. Ablation of Hypoxic Tumors with Dose-Equivalent Photothermal, but Not Photodynamic, Therapy Using a Nanostructured Porphyrin Assembly

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Tumor hypoxia is increasingly being recognized as a characteristic feature of solid tumors and significantly complicates many treatments based on radio-, chemo-, and phototherapies. While photodynamic therapy (PDT) is based on photosensitizer interactions with diffused oxygen, photothermal therapy (PTT) has emerged as a new phototherapy that is predicted to be independent of oxygen levels within tumors. It has been challenging to meaningfully compare these two modalities due to differences in contrast agents and irradiation parameters, and no comparative in vivo studies have been performed until now. Here, by making use of recently developed nanostructured self-quenched porphysome nanoparticles, we were able to directly compare PDT and PTT using matched light doses and matched porphyrin photosensitizer doses (with the photosensitizer being effective for either PTT or PDT based on the existence of nanostructure or not). Therefore, we demonstrated the nanostructure-driven conversion from the PDT singlet oxygen generating mechanism of porphyrin to a completely thermal mechanism, ideal for PTT enhancement. Using a novel hypoxia tumor model, we determined that nanostructured porphyrin PTT enhancers are advantageous to overcome hypoxic conditions to achieve effective ablation of solid tumors. PMID:23394589

  7. Ablation for atrial fibrillation during mitral valve surgery: 1-year results through continuous subcutaneous monitoring.

    PubMed

    Bogachev-Prokophiev, Alexandr; Zheleznev, Sergey; Romanov, Alexander; Pokushalov, Evgeny; Pivkin, Alexey; Corbucci, Giorgio; Karaskov, Alexander

    2012-07-01

    Continuous monitoring of cardiac rhythm may play an important role in measuring the true symptomatic/asymptomatic atrial fibrillation (AF) burden and improve the management of anti-arrhythmic and anti-thrombotic therapies. Forty-seven patients with mitral valve disease and longstanding persistent AF (LSPAF) underwent a left atrial maze procedure with bipolar radiofrequency and valve surgery. The follow-up data recorded by an implanted loop recorder were analysed after 3, 6 and 12 months. On discharge, 40 (85.1%) patients were in stable sinus rhythm, as documented by in-office electrocardiography (ECG), 4 (8.5%) were in pacemaker rhythm and 3 (6.4%) were in AF. One (2.1%) patient died after 7 months. On 12-month follow-up examination, 30 (65.2%) patients had an AF burden <0.5% and were classified as responders. Three (6.5%) of the 16 non-responders had atrial flutter and 13 (27.7%) had documented AF recurrences with an AF burden >0.5%. Two (4.3%) patients with AF recurrences were completely asymptomatic. Among the symptomatic events stored by the patients, only 27.6% was confirmed as genuine AF recurrences according to the concomitant ECG recorded by the implanted loop recorder. A concomitant bipolar maze procedure during mitral valve surgery is effective in treating AF, as proved by detailed 1-year continuous monitoring. PMID:22514258

  8. Evaluation of Tumor Response after Short-Course Radiotherapy and Delayed Surgery for Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rega, Daniela; Pecori, Biagio; Scala, Dario; Avallone, Antonio; Pace, Ugo; Petrillo, Antonella; Aloj, Luigi; Tatangelo, Fabiana; Delrio, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Neoadjuvant therapy is able to reduce local recurrence in rectal cancer. Immediate surgery after short course radiotherapy allows only for minimal downstaging. We investigated the effect of delayed surgery after short-course radiotherapy at different time intervals before surgery, in patients affected by rectal cancer. Methods From January 2003 to December 2013 sixty-seven patients with the following characteristics have been selected: clinical (c) stage T3N0 ≤ 12 cm from the anal verge and with circumferential resection margin > 5 mm (by magnetic resonance imaging); cT2, any N, < 5 cm from anal verge; and patients facing tumors with enlarged nodes and/or CRM+ve who resulted unfit for chemo-radiation, were also included. Patients underwent preoperative short-course radiotherapy with different interval to surgery were divided in three groups: A (within 6 weeks), B (between 6 and 8 weeks) and C (after more than 8 weeks). Hystopatolgical response to radiotherapy was measured by Mandard’s modified tumor regression grade (TRG). Results All patients completed the scheduled treatment. Sixty-six patients underwent surgery. Fifty-three of which (80.3%) received a sphincter saving procedure. Downstaging occurred in 41 cases (62.1%). The analysis of subgroups showed an increasing prevalence of TRG 1–2 prolonging the interval to surgery (group A—16.7%, group B—36.8% and 54.3% in group C; p value 0.023). Conclusions Preoperative short-course radiotherapy is able to downstage rectal cancer if surgery is delayed. A higher rate of TRG 1–2 can be obtained if interval to surgery is prolonged to more than 8 weeks. PMID:27548058

  9. Approaches for modeling interstitial ultrasound ablation of tumors within or adjacent to bone: Theoretical and experimental evaluations

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Serena J.; Prakash, Punit; Salgaonkar, Vasant; Jones, Peter D.; Cam, Richard N.; Han, Misung; Rieke, Viola; Burdette, E. Clif; Diederich, Chris J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The objectives of this study were to develop numerical models of interstitial ultrasound ablation of tumors within or adjacent to bone, to evaluate model performance through theoretical analysis, and to validate the models and approximations used through comparison to experiments. Methods 3D transient biothermal and acoustic finite element models were developed, employing four approximations of 7 MHz ultrasound propagation at bone/soft tissue interfaces. The various approximations considered or excluded reflection, refraction, angle-dependence of transmission coefficients, shear mode conversion, and volumetric heat deposition. Simulations were performed for parametric and comparative studies. Experiments within ex vivo tissues and phantoms were performed to validate the models by comparison to simulations. Temperature measurements were conducted using needle thermocouples or MR temperature imaging (MRTI). Finite element models representing heterogeneous tissue geometries were created based on segmented MR images. Results High ultrasound absorption at bone/soft tissue interfaces increased the volumes of target tissue that could be ablated. Models using simplified approximations produced temperature profiles closely matching both more comprehensive models and experimental results, with good agreement between 3D calculations and MRTI. The correlation coefficients between simulated and measured temperature profiles in phantoms ranged from 0.852 to 0.967 (p-value < 0.01) for the four models. Conclusions Models using approximations of interstitial ultrasound energy deposition around bone/soft tissue interfaces produced temperature distributions in close agreement with comprehensive simulations and experimental measurements. These models may be applied to accurately predict temperatures produced by interstitial ultrasound ablation of tumors near and within bone, with applications toward treatment planning. PMID:24102393

  10. Gold Nanoshelled Liquid Perfluorocarbon Magnetic Nanocapsules: a Nanotheranostic Platform for Bimodal Ultrasound/Magnetic Resonance Imaging Guided Photothermal Tumor Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Hengte; Wang, Jinrui; Tong, Sheng; Jin, Yushen; Wang, Shumin; Qu, Enze; Bao, Gang; Dai, Zhifei

    2014-01-01

    Imaging guided ablation therapy has been applied in both biomedical research and clinical trials and turned out to be one of the most promising approaches for cancer treatment. Herein, the multifunctional nanocapsules were fabricated through loading perfluorooctylbromide (PFOB) and superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIOs) into poly(lactic acid) (PLA) nanocapsules (NCs), followed by the formation of PEGylated gold nanoshell on the surface. The resulting multi-component NCs were proved to be able to act as nanotheranostic agent to achieve successful bimodal ultrasound (US)/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) guided photothermal ablation in human tumor xenograft models non-invasively. Such a single theranostic agent with the combination of real-time US and high-resolution MR imaging would be of great value to offer more comprehensive diagnostic information and dynamics of disease progression for the accurate location of therapeutic focusing spot in the targeted tumor tissue, showing great potential as an effective nanoplatform for contrast imaging guided photothermal therapy. PMID:24396512

  11. Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Radiofrequency Ablation of the Pancreatic Tumors: A Promising Tool in Management of Pancreatic Tumors

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Radiofrequency ablation is a well-established antitumor treatment and is recognized as one of the least invasive therapeutic modalities for pancreatic neoplasm. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided radiofrequency ablation (EUS-RFA) delivery can be used to treat both pancreatic cancer and asymptomatic premalignant pancreatic neoplasms and may serve as a less invasive alternative to surgical resection. This is an appealing option that may result in less morbidity and mortality. The aim of this review was to summarize and evaluate the clinical and technical effectiveness of EUS-guided RFA of pancreatic neoplasms. Methods. A through literature review was performed to identify the studies describing this novel technique. In this review article, we have summarized human case series. The indications, techniques, limitations, and complications reported are discussed. Results. A total of six studies were included. Overall, a 100% technical success rate was reported in human studies. Complications related to endoscopic ultrasound-guided radiofrequency ablation delivery have been described; however, few cases have presented life-threatening outcomes. Conclusion. We believe that this novel technique can be a safe and effective alternative approach in the management of selected patients. PMID:27478820

  12. Intraoperative mass spectrometry mapping of an onco-metabolite to guide brain tumor surgery

    PubMed Central

    Santagata, Sandro; Eberlin, Livia S.; Norton, Isaiah; Calligaris, David; Feldman, Daniel R.; Ide, Jennifer L.; Liu, Xiaohui; Wiley, Joshua S.; Vestal, Matthew L.; Ramkissoon, Shakti H.; Orringer, Daniel A.; Gill, Kristen K.; Dunn, Ian F.; Dias-Santagata, Dora; Ligon, Keith L.; Jolesz, Ferenc A.; Golby, Alexandra J.; Cooks, R. Graham; Agar, Nathalie Y. R.

    2014-01-01

    For many intraoperative decisions surgeons depend on frozen section pathology, a technique developed over 150 y ago. Technical innovations that permit rapid molecular characterization of tissue samples at the time of surgery are needed. Here, using desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) MS, we rapidly detect the tumor metabolite 2-hydroxyglutarate (2-HG) from tissue sections of surgically resected gliomas, under ambient conditions and without complex or time-consuming preparation. With DESI MS, we identify isocitrate dehydrogenase 1-mutant tumors with both high sensitivity and specificity within minutes, immediately providing critical diagnostic, prognostic, and predictive information. Imaging tissue sections with DESI MS shows that the 2-HG signal overlaps with areas of tumor and that 2-HG levels correlate with tumor content, thereby indicating tumor margins. Mapping the 2-HG signal onto 3D MRI reconstructions of tumors allows the integration of molecular and radiologic information for enhanced clinical decision making. We also validate the methodology and its deployment in the operating room: We have installed a mass spectrometer in our Advanced Multimodality Image Guided Operating (AMIGO) suite and demonstrate the molecular analysis of surgical tissue during brain surgery. This work indicates that metabolite-imaging MS could transform many aspects of surgical care. PMID:24982150

  13. Utility of Early Post-operative High Resolution Volumetric MR Imaging after Transsphenoidal Pituitary Tumor Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Kunal S.; Kazam, Jacob; Tsiouris, Apostolos J.; Anand, Vijay K.; Schwartz, Theodore H.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Controversy exists over the utility of early post-operative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) after transsphenoidal pituitary surgery for macroadenomas. We investigate whether valuable information can be derived from current higher resolution scans. Methods Volumetric MRI scans were obtained in the early (<10 days) and late (>30 days) post-operative periods in a series of patients undergoing transsphenoidal pituitary surgery. The volume of the residual tumor, resection cavity, and corresponding visual field tests were recorded at each time point. Statistical analyses of changes in tumor volume and cavity size were calculated using the late MRI as the gold standard. Results 40 patients met the inclusion criteria. Pre-operative tumor volume averaged 8.8 cm3. Early postoperative assessment of average residual tumor volume (1.18 cm3) was quite accurate and did not differ statistically from late post-operative volume (1.23 cm3, p=.64), indicating the utility of early scans to measure residual tumor. Early scans were 100% sensitive and 91% specific for predicting ≥ 98% resection (p<.001, Fisher’s exact test). The average percent decrease in cavity volume from pre-operative MRI (tumor volume) to early post-operative imaging was 45% with decreases in all but 3 patients. There was no correlation between the size of the early cavity and the visual outcome. Conclusions Early high resolution volumetric MRI is valuable in determining the presence or absence of residual tumor. Cavity volume almost always decreases after surgery and a lack of decrease should alert the surgeon to possible persistent compression of the optic apparatus that may warrant re-operation. PMID:25045791

  14. Cooperative laparoscopic endoscopic and hybrid laparoscopic surgery for upper gastrointestinal tumors: Current status

    PubMed Central

    Ntourakis, Dimitrios; Mavrogenis, Georgios

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the cooperative laparoscopic and endoscopic techniques used for the resection of upper gastrointestinal tumors. METHODS: A systematic research of the literature was performed in PubMed for English and French language articles about laparoscopic and endoscopic cooperative, combined, hybrid and rendezvous techniques. Only original studies using these techniques for the resection of early gastric cancer, benign tumors and gastrointestinal stromal tumors of the stomach and the duodenum were included. By excluding case series of less than 10 patients, 25 studies were identified. The study design, number of cases, tumor pathology size and location, the operative technique name, the endoscopy team and surgical team role, operative time, type of closure of visceral wall defect, blood loss, complications and length of hospital stay of these studies were evaluated. Additionally all cooperative techniques found were classified and are presented in a systematic approach. RESULTS: The studies identified were case series and retrospective cohort studies. A total of 706 patients were operated on with a cooperative technique. The tumors resected were only gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) in 4 studies, GIST and various benign submucosal tumors in 22 studies, early gastric cancer (pT1a and pT1b) in 6 studies and early duodenal cancer in 1 study. There was important heterogeneity between the studies. The operative techniques identified were: laparoscopic assisted endoscopic resection, endoscopic assisted wedge resection, endoscopic assisted transgastric and intragastric surgery, laparoscopic endoscopic cooperative surgery (LECS), laparoscopic assisted endoscopic full thickness resection (LAEFR), clean non exposure technique and non-exposed endoscopic wall-inversion surgery (NEWS). Each technique is illustrated with the roles of the endoscopic and laparoscopic teams; the indications, characteristics and short term results are described. CONCLUSION: Along with

  15. Con_A-carbone nanotube conjugate with short wave near-infrared laser ablation for tumor therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Huan-Yao; Peng, Ching-An; Tang, Ming-Jer; Reindhart, Kit; Szu, Harold H.

    2009-04-01

    Using the characteristics of T cell mitogen called lectin protein from the jack-beam Canavalia ensiformis Concanavalin A (Con_A) with dual activities, cytotoxicity and immunomodulation, we have shown it has a therapeutic effect on hepatoma. Injection of Con_A can eradicate the established malign tumor, because Con_A can induce tumor cell autophagic, cell-programmed death, as well as activate the effector T cells. Combined, in this paper, with the absorption exceeding the Carbon NanoTube (CNT) band-gap (ɛbg=~1/CNT diameter) with an active short wave near-infrared (SWIR) (1.2~1.5 micron wavelengths), which happened to be translucent to the irradiation upon animal skin, similar to that used in hospital fingertip-clamped Pulse Oxymetry. Once the Con_ACNT is guided to hepatoma cells, it is bonded and internalized into the mitochondria (MC) compartment, the cellular energy factory. Con_A has the higher specificity for tumor cells useful for targeting because of the abnormal glycosylation on tumor cells. When CNT hitch hike with Con_A, they can t together like a laser-denotable chemical missile surgically targeting at the tumor cells precisely by Con_A-guidance. We switch on SWIR laser, when the Con_A-CNT conjugated complex has been bonded and internalized to MC of malign cells and already commenced cellular programmed death. Thus, it might appear to casual readers that we have initiated an overkill, chemical drugged autophage followed with physical laser ablation, but what if we can eradicate hepatoma totally if no blue print is left behind inadvertently in case of a partial failure. We conclude that using Con_A-CNT conjugated complex targeting specifically at malign tumor cells is a novel targeted-laser-radiation therapy for tumors in mice.

  16. Stress (Tako-Tsubo) Cardiomyopathy Following Radiofrequency Ablation of a Liver Tumor: A Case Report

    SciTech Connect

    Joo, Ijin; Lee, Jeong Min Han, Joon Koo; Choi, Byung Ihn; Park, Eun-Ah

    2011-02-15

    Stress cardiomyopathy is characterized by transient left ventricular dysfunction occurring in the absence of obstructive coronary disease. It is precipitated by acute emotional or physical stress. We present a case of stress cardiomyopathy which developed during hepatic radiofrequency ablation of hepatocellular carcinoma.

  17. Solitary Fibrous Tumor of the Stomach Treated with Laparoscopic and Endoscopic Cooperative Surgery.

    PubMed

    Nabeshima, Kazuhito; Tomioku, Mifuji; Nakamura, Kenji; Yasuda, Seiei

    2015-09-01

    A 43-year-old Japanese woman with melena underwent an upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and was preoperatively diagnosed with sarcoma of the stomach. Physical examination revealed no abnormalities. Findings on the upper gastrointestinal endoscopy showed a pedunculated submucosal tumor measuring 17 mm in the antrum. An enhanced computed tomography showed wall thickening in the gastric antrum. The patient underwent a laparoscopic and endoscopic cooperative surgery (LECS) for wedge resection of the stomach. The excised tumor measured 27 × 20 × 15 mm in size. Histopathology showed spindle-shaped cells in the submucosal layer. Immunohistochemistry showed that the tumor was positive for CD34, bcl-2, and MIC-2. The final diagnosis was solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) of the stomach. The postoperative course was uneventful, and no evidence of recurrence was observed at the 8-month follow-up. We report a case of SFT arising from the stomach that was treated with wedge resection by LECS. PMID:26369266

  18. Nanodrug-Enhanced Radiofrequency Tumor Ablation: Effect of Micellar or Liposomal Carrier on Drug Delivery and Treatment Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Moussa, Marwan; Goldberg, S. Nahum; Kumar, Gaurav; Sawant, Rupa R.; Levchenko, Tatyana; Torchilin, Vladimir P.; Ahmed, Muneeb

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To determine the effect of different drug-loaded nanocarriers (micelles and liposomes) on delivery and treatment efficacy for radiofrequency ablation (RFA) combined with nanodrugs. Materials/Methods Fischer 344 rats were used (n = 196). First, single subcutaneous R3230 tumors or normal liver underwent RFA followed by immediate administration of IV fluorescent beads (20, 100, and 500 nm), with fluorescent intensity measured at 4–24 hr. Next, to study carrier type on drug efficiency, RFA was combined with micellar (20 nm) or liposomal (100 nm) preparations of doxorubicin (Dox; targeting HIF-1α) or quercetin (Qu; targeting HSP70). Animals received RFA alone, RFA with Lipo-Dox or Mic-Dox (1 mg IV, 15 min post-RFA), and RFA with Lipo-Qu or Mic-Qu given 24 hr pre- or 15 min post-RFA (0.3 mg IV). Tumor coagulation and HIF-1α orHSP70 expression were assessed 24 hr post-RFA. Third, the effect of RFA combined with IV Lipo-Dox, Mic-Dox, Lipo-Qu, or Mic-Qu (15 min post-RFA) compared to RFA alone on tumor growth and animal endpoint survival was evaluated. Finally, drug uptake was compared between RFA/Lipo-Dox and RFA/Mic-Dox at 4–72 hr. Results Smaller 20 nm beads had greater deposition and deeper tissue penetration in both tumor (100 nm/500 nm) and liver (100 nm) (p<0.05). Mic-Dox and Mic-Qu suppressed periablational HIF-1α or HSP70 rim thickness more than liposomal preparations (p<0.05). RFA/Mic-Dox had greater early (4 hr) intratumoral doxorubicin, but RFA/Lipo-Dox had progressively higher intratumoral doxorubicin at 24–72 hr post-RFA (p<0.04). No difference in tumor growth and survival was seen between RFA/Lipo-Qu and RFA/Mic-Qu. Yet, RFA/Lipo-Dox led to greater animal endpoint survival compared to RFA/Mic-Dox (p<0.03). Conclusion With RF ablation, smaller particle micelles have superior penetration and more effective local molecular modulation. However, larger long-circulating liposomal carriers can result in greater intratumoral drug accumulation over

  19. Intraoperative neurophysiological mapping and monitoring in spinal tumor surgery: sirens or indispensable tools?

    PubMed

    Scibilia, Antonino; Terranova, Carmen; Rizzo, Vincenzo; Raffa, Giovanni; Morelli, Adolfo; Esposito, Felice; Mallamace, Raffaella; Buda, Gaetano; Conti, Alfredo; Quartarone, Angelo; Germanò, Antonino

    2016-08-01

    Spinal tumor (ST) surgery carries the risk of new neurological deficits in the postoperative period. Intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring and mapping (IONM) represents an effective method of identifying and monitoring in real time the functional integrity of both the spinal cord (SC) and the nerve roots (NRs). Despite consensus favoring the use of IONM in ST surgery, in this era of evidence-based medicine, there is still a need to demonstrate the effective role of IONM in ST surgery in achieving an oncological cure, optimizing patient safety, and considering medicolegal aspects. Thus, neurosurgeons are asked to establish which techniques are considered indispensable. In the present study, the authors focused on the rationale for and the accuracy (sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values) of IONM in ST surgery in light of more recent evidence in the literature, with specific emphasis on the role of IONM in reducing the incidence of postoperative neurological deficits. This review confirms the role of IONM as a useful tool in the workup for ST surgery. Individual monitoring and mapping techniques are clearly not sufficient to account for the complex function of the SC and NRs. Conversely, multimodal IONM is highly sensitive and specific for anticipating neurological injury during ST surgery and represents an important tool for preserving neuronal structures and achieving an optimal postoperative functional outcome. PMID:27476842

  20. Laparoscopic endoscopic cooperative surgery as a minimally invasive treatment for gastric submucosal tumor.

    PubMed

    Namikawa, Tsutomu; Hanazaki, Kazuhiro

    2015-10-10

    Laparoscopic wedge resection is a useful procedure for treating patients with submucosal tumor (SMT) including gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) of the stomach. However, resection of intragastric-type SMTs can be problematic due to the difficulty in accurately judging the location of endoluminal tumor growth, and often excessive amounts of healthy mucosa are removed; thus, full-thickness local excision using laparoscopic and endoscopic cooperative surgery (LECS) is a promising procedure for these cases. Our experience with LECS has confirmed this procedure to be a safe, feasible, and minimally invasive treatment method for gastric GISTs less than 5 cm in diameter, with outcomes similar to conventional laparoscopic wedge resection. The important advantage of LECS is the reduction in the resected area of the gastric wall compared to that in conventional laparoscopic wedge resection using a linear stapler. Early gastric cancer fits the criteria for endoscopic resection; however, if performing endoscopic submucosal dissection is difficult, the LECS procedure might be a good alternative. In the future, LECS is also likely to be indicated for duodenal tumors, as well as gastric tumors. Furthermore, developments in endoscopic and laparoscopic technology have generated various modified LECS techniques, leading to even less invasive surgery. PMID:26468339

  1. Minimally invasive keyhole approaches in spinal intradural tumor surgery: report of two cases and conceptual considerations.

    PubMed

    Reisch, Robert; Koechlin, Nicolas O; Marcus, Hani J

    2016-09-01

    Despite their predominantly histologically benign nature, intradural tumors may become symptomatic by virtue of their space-occupying effect, causing severe neurological deficits. The gold standard treatment is total excision of the lesion; however, extended dorsal and dorsolateral approaches may cause late complications due to iatrogenic destruction of the posterolateral elements of the spine. In this article, we describe our concept of minimally invasive spinal tumor surgery. Two illustrative cases demonstrate the feasibility and safety of keyhole fenestrations exposing the spinal canal. PMID:25336048

  2. [Dental feats 1. An implant-supported orbital prosthesis after ablative tumor surgery].

    PubMed

    Cune, M S; Bogie, L B; van Es, R J; Verhoeven, J W; Steijvers, M P; Rutges, P J

    2003-07-01

    Extraoral implants are used with increasing frequency, in order to provide retention for facial prostheses. Facial prostheses can replace lost extraoral hard and soft tissues using acrylic or silicone materials. The surgeon, maxillofacial prosthodontist and dental technician are facing particular treatment considerations and practical problems. Some of these are demonstrated and discussed in this article by means of a case-report. A patient received an orbital prosthesis which obtains its retention from implants, placed in the lateral orbital rim. PMID:12891887

  3. Evaluation of image quality of MRI data for brain tumor surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heckel, Frank; Arlt, Felix; Geisler, Benjamin; Zidowitz, Stephan; Neumuth, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    3D medical images are important components of modern medicine. Their usefulness for the physician depends on their quality, though. Only high-quality images allow accurate and reproducible diagnosis and appropriate support during treatment. We have analyzed 202 MRI images for brain tumor surgery in a retrospective study. Both an experienced neurosurgeon and an experienced neuroradiologist rated each available image with respect to its role in the clinical workflow, its suitability for this specific role, various image quality characteristics, and imaging artifacts. Our results show that MRI data acquired for brain tumor surgery does not always fulfill the required quality standards and that there is a significant disagreement between the surgeon and the radiologist, with the surgeon being more critical. Noise, resolution, as well as the coverage of anatomical structures were the most important criteria for the surgeon, while the radiologist was mainly disturbed by motion artifacts.

  4. Surgery Followed by Radiotherapy Versus Radiotherapy Alone for Metastatic Spinal Cord Compression From Unfavorable Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Rades, Dirk; Huttenlocher, Stefan; Bajrovic, Amira; Karstens, Johann H.; Adamietz, Irenaeus A.; Kazic, Nadja; Rudat, Volker; Schild, Steven E.

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: Despite a previously published randomized trial, controversy exists regarding the benefit of adding surgery to radiotherapy for metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC). It is thought that patients with MSCC from relatively radioresistant tumors or tumors associated with poor functional outcome after radiotherapy alone may benefit from surgery. This study focuses on these tumors. Methods and Materials: Data from 67 patients receiving surgery plus radiotherapy (S+RT) were matched to 134 patients (1:2) receiving radiotherapy alone (RT). Groups were matched for 10 factors and compared for motor function, ambulatory status, local control, and survival. Additional separate matched-pair analyses were performed for patients receiving direct decompressive surgery plus stabilization of involved vertebrae (DDSS) and patients receiving laminectomy (LE). Results: Improvement of motor function occurred in 22% of patients after S+RT and 16% after RT (p = 0.25). Posttreatment ambulatory rates were 67% and 61%, respectively (p = 0.68). Of nonambulatory patients, 29% and 19% (p = 0.53) regained ambulatory status. One-year local control rates were 85% and 89% (p = 0.87). One-year survival rates were 38% and 24% (p = 0.20). The matched-pair analysis of patients receiving LE showed no significant differences between both therapies. In the matched-pair analysis of patients receiving DDSS, improvement of motor function occurred more often after DDSS+RT than RT (28% vs. 19%, p = 0.024). Posttreatment ambulatory rates were 86% and 67% (p = 0.30); 45% and 18% of patients regained ambulatory status (p = 0.29). Conclusions: Patients with MSCC from an unfavorable primary tumor appeared to benefit from DDSS but not LE when added to radiotherapy in terms of improved functional outcome.

  5. Discussion: 'Tumor diameter as a predictor in endometrial cancer surgery' by Yanazume et al.

    PubMed

    Van Le, Linda; Ko, Emily; Gehrig, Paola; DiFurio, Megan; Bae-Jump, Vicki; Rossi, Emma

    2011-06-01

    In the roundtable that follows, clinicians discuss a study published in this issue of the Journal in light of its methodology, relevance to practice, and implications for future research. Article discussed: Yanazume S, Saito T, Eto T, et al. Reassessment of the utility of frozen sections in endometrial cancer surgery using tumor diameter as an additional factor. Am J Obstet Gynecol 2011;204:531.e1-7. PMID:21752746

  6. Heat Sink Effect on Tumor Ablation Characteristics as Observed in Monopolar Radiofrequency, Bipolar Radiofrequency, and Microwave, Using Ex Vivo Calf Liver Model

    PubMed Central

    Pillai, Krishna; Akhter, Javid; Chua, Terence C.; Shehata, Mena; Alzahrani, Nayef; Al-Alem, Issan; Morris, David L.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Thermal ablation of liver tumors near large blood vessels is affected by the cooling effect of blood flow, leading to incomplete ablation. Hence, we conducted a comparative investigation of heat sink effect in monopolar (MP) and bipolar (BP) radiofrequency ablation (RFA), and microwave (MW) ablation devices. With a perfused calf liver, the ablative performances (volume, mass, density, dimensions), with and without heat sink, were measured. Heat sink was present when the ablative tip of the probes were 8.0 mm close to a major hepatic vein and absent when >30 mm away. Temperatures (T1 and T2) on either side of the hepatic vein near the tip of the probes, heating probe temperature (T3), outlet perfusate temperature (T4), and ablation time were monitored. With or without heat sink, BP radiofrequency ablated a larger volume and mass, compared with MP RFA or MW ablation, with latter device producing the highest density of tissue ablated. MW ablation produced an ellipsoidal shape while radiofrequency devices produced spheres. Percentage heat sink effect in Bipolar radiofrequency : Mono-polar radiofrequency : Microwave was (Volume) 33:41:22; (mass) 23:56:34; (density) 9.0:26:18; and (relative elipscity) 5.8:12.9:1.3, indicating that BP and MW devices were less affected. Percentage heat sink effect on time (minutes) to reach maximum temperature (W) = 13.28:9.2:29.8; time at maximum temperature (X) is 87:66:16.66; temperature difference (Y) between the thermal probes (T3) and the temperature (T1 + T2)/2 on either side of the hepatic vessel was 100:87:20; and temperature difference between the (T1 + T2)/2 and temperature of outlet circulating solution (T4), Z was 20.33:30.23:37.5. MW and BP radiofrequencies were less affected by heat sink while MP RFA was the most affected. With a single ablation, BP radiofrequency ablated a larger volume and mass regardless of heat sink. PMID:25738477

  7. Heat sink effect on tumor ablation characteristics as observed in monopolar radiofrequency, bipolar radiofrequency, and microwave, using ex vivo calf liver model.

    PubMed

    Pillai, Krishna; Akhter, Javid; Chua, Terence C; Shehata, Mena; Alzahrani, Nayef; Al-Alem, Issan; Morris, David L

    2015-03-01

    Thermal ablation of liver tumors near large blood vessels is affected by the cooling effect of blood flow, leading to incomplete ablation. Hence, we conducted a comparative investigation of heat sink effect in monopolar (MP) and bipolar (BP) radiofrequency ablation (RFA), and microwave (MW) ablation devices.With a perfused calf liver, the ablative performances (volume, mass, density, dimensions), with and without heat sink, were measured. Heat sink was present when the ablative tip of the probes were 8.0 mm close to a major hepatic vein and absent when >30 mm away. Temperatures (T1 and T2) on either side of the hepatic vein near the tip of the probes, heating probe temperature (T3), outlet perfusate temperature (T4), and ablation time were monitored.With or without heat sink, BP radiofrequency ablated a larger volume and mass, compared with MP RFA or MW ablation, with latter device producing the highest density of tissue ablated. MW ablation produced an ellipsoidal shape while radiofrequency devices produced spheres.Percentage heat sink effect in Bipolar radiofrequency : Mono-polar radiofrequency : Microwave was (Volume) 33:41:22; (mass) 23:56:34; (density) 9.0:26:18; and (relative elipscity) 5.8:12.9:1.3, indicating that BP and MW devices were less affected.Percentage heat sink effect on time (minutes) to reach maximum temperature (W) = 13.28:9.2:29.8; time at maximum temperature (X) is 87:66:16.66; temperature difference (Y) between the thermal probes (T3) and the temperature (T1 + T2)/2 on either side of the hepatic vessel was 100:87:20; and temperature difference between the (T1 + T2)/2 and temperature of outlet circulating solution (T4), Z was 20.33:30.23:37.5.MW and BP radiofrequencies were less affected by heat sink while MP RFA was the most affected. With a single ablation, BP radiofrequency ablated a larger volume and mass regardless of heat sink. PMID:25738477

  8. Comparison of the synergistic effect of lipid nanobubbles and SonoVue microbubbles for high intensity focused ultrasound thermal ablation of tumors

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Yuanzhi; Yang, Ke; Cao, Yang; Zhou, Xuan; Xu, Jinshun; Liu, Jianxin; Wang, Qi

    2016-01-01

    Microbubbles (MBs) are considered as an important enhancer for high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment of benign or malignant tumors. Recently, different sizes of gas-filled bubbles have been investigated to improve the therapeutic efficiency of HIFU thermal ablation and reduce side effects associated with ultrasound power and irradiation time. However, nanobubbles (NBs) as an ultrasound contrast agent for synergistic therapy of HIFU thermal ablation remain controversial due to their small nano-size in diameter. In this study, phospholipid-shell and gas-core NBs with a narrow size range of 500–600 nm were developed. The synergistic effect of NBs for HIFU thermal ablation was carefully studied both in excised bovine livers and in breast tumor models of rabbits, and made a critical comparison with that of commercial SonoVue microbubbles (SonoVue MBs). In addition, the pathological changes of the targeted area in tumor tissue after HIFU ablation were further investigated. Phosphate buffer saline (PBS) was used as the control. Under the same HIFU parameters, the quantitative echo intensity of B-mode ultrasound image and the volume of coagulative necrosis in lipid NBs groups were significantly higher and larger than that in PBS groups, but could not be demonstrated a difference to that in SonoVue MBs groups both ex vivo and in vivo. These results showed that the synergistic effect of lipid NBs for HIFU thermal ablation were similar with that of SonoVue MBs, and further indicate that lipid NBs could potentially become an enhancer for HIFU thermal ablation of tumors. PMID:26925336

  9. Comparison of the synergistic effect of lipid nanobubbles and SonoVue microbubbles for high intensity focused ultrasound thermal ablation of tumors.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yuanzhi; Yang, Ke; Cao, Yang; Zhou, Xuan; Xu, Jinshun; Liu, Jianxin; Wang, Qi; Wang, Zhigang; Wang, Dong

    2016-01-01

    Microbubbles (MBs) are considered as an important enhancer for high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment of benign or malignant tumors. Recently, different sizes of gas-filled bubbles have been investigated to improve the therapeutic efficiency of HIFU thermal ablation and reduce side effects associated with ultrasound power and irradiation time. However, nanobubbles (NBs) as an ultrasound contrast agent for synergistic therapy of HIFU thermal ablation remain controversial due to their small nano-size in diameter. In this study, phospholipid-shell and gas-core NBs with a narrow size range of 500-600 nm were developed. The synergistic effect of NBs for HIFU thermal ablation was carefully studied both in excised bovine livers and in breast tumor models of rabbits, and made a critical comparison with that of commercial SonoVue microbubbles (SonoVue MBs). In addition, the pathological changes of the targeted area in tumor tissue after HIFU ablation were further investigated. Phosphate buffer saline (PBS) was used as the control. Under the same HIFU parameters, the quantitative echo intensity of B-mode ultrasound image and the volume of coagulative necrosis in lipid NBs groups were significantly higher and larger than that in PBS groups, but could not be demonstrated a difference to that in SonoVue MBs groups both ex vivo and in vivo. These results showed that the synergistic effect of lipid NBs for HIFU thermal ablation were similar with that of SonoVue MBs, and further indicate that lipid NBs could potentially become an enhancer for HIFU thermal ablation of tumors. PMID:26925336

  10. Lung Ablation: Whats New?

    PubMed

    Xiong, Lillian; Dupuy, Damian E

    2016-07-01

    Lung cancer had an estimated incidence of 221,200 in 2015, making up 13% of all cancer diagnoses. Tumor ablation is an important treatment option for nonsurgical lung cancer and pulmonary metastatic patients. Radiofrequency ablation has been used for over a decade with newer modalities, microwave ablation, cryoablation, and irreversible electroporation presenting as additional and possibly improved treatment options for patients. This minimally invasive therapy is best for small primary lesions or favorably located metastatic tumors. These technologies can offer palliation and sometimes cure of thoracic malignancies. This article discusses the current available technologies and techniques available for tumor ablation. PMID:27050331

  11. Reconstructive kidney surgery for organ-preserving therapy of renal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Hamza, Amir; Günther, Manuel; Behrendt, Wolf; Tietze, Stefan; Beige, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    Background: The objective of this study was to evaluate differences in various clinical endpoints in patients with reconstructive surgery by renal partial nephrectomy for tumors up to 4 cm compared to tumors larger than 4 cm. Material and methods: A total of 170 partial renal resection patients that presented malignant tumors were included in the retrospective study. Data was analyzed retrospectively based on internal clinic files, as well as a questionnaire to enhance the follow-up clinical outcomes data obtained. The most important outcomes determined included post-operative renal function, intra- and post-operative complications, local recurrence rate and total survival time. Results: The local recurrence rate was 6.1% for tumors up to 4 cm in size, compared to 14.9% for tumors that were larger than 4 cm. Compared to results for partial resection of T1a tumors, results for partial resection of tumors larger than 4 cm are worse in terms of post-operative renal function (p=0.007), as well as in terms of a total complications rate (p=0.048). It is important to note that there was not only a higher risk of post-operative bleeding that required transfusions (p=0.012), but also a higher risk of a hypertensive episode during the post-operative period reviewed (p=0.022). In addition, the total survival time for patients presenting tumors of up to 4 cm in size was significantly better (p=0.003). Conclusion: The results of our retrospective study of 170 patients that underwent partial renal resection after the diagnosis of malignant tumors, is that partial renal resection presents an oncologicaly safe surgical solution with low local recurrence rates. Additionally, partial resection in case of tumors that are larger than 4 cm showed worse post-operative renal function, a higher complications rate and a worse survival rate. PMID:26605133

  12. The timing of surgery after neoadjuvant radiotherapy influences tumor dissemination in a preclinical model

    PubMed Central

    Leroi, Natacha; Sounni, Nor Eddine; Van Overmeire, Eva; Blacher, Silvia; Marée, Raphael; Van Ginderachter, Jo; Lallemand, François; Lenaerts, Eric; Coucke, Philippe; Noel, Agnès; Martinive, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Neoadjuvant radiotherapy (neoRT) used in cancer treatments aims at improving local tumor control and patient overall survival. The neoRT schedule and the timing of the surgical treatment (ST) are empirically based and influenced by the clinician's experience. The current study examines how the sequencing of neoRT and ST affects metastatic dissemination. In a breast carcinoma model, tumors were exposed to different neoRT schedules (2x5Gy or 5x2Gy) followed by surgery at day 4 or 11 post-RT. The impact on the tumor microenvironment and lung metastases was evaluated through immunohistochemical and flow cytometry analyses. After 2x5Gy, early ST (at day 4 post-RT) led to increased size and number of lung metastases as compared to ST performed at day 11. Inversely, after 5x2Gy neoRT, early ST protected the mice against lung metastases. This intriguing relationship between tumor aggressiveness and ST timing could not be explained by differences in classical parameters studied such as hypoxia, vessel density and matrix remodeling. The study of tumor-related inflammation and immunity reveals an increased circulating NK cell percentage following neoRT as compared to non irradiated mice. Then, radiation treatment and surgery were applied to tumor-bearing NOD/SCID mice. In the absence of NK cells, neoRT appears to increase lung metastatic dissemination as compared to non irradiated tumor-bearing mice. Altogether our data demonstrate that the neoRT schedule and the ST timing affect metastasis formation in a pre-clinical model and points out the potential role of NK cells. These findings highlight the importance to cautiously tailor the optimal window for ST following RT. PMID:26440148

  13. Genetic ablation of SOX18 function suppresses tumor lymphangiogenesis and metastasis of melanoma in mice.

    PubMed

    Duong, Tam; Proulx, Steven T; Luciani, Paola; Leroux, Jean-Christophe; Detmar, Michael; Koopman, Peter; Francois, Mathias

    2012-06-15

    The lymphatic vasculature provides a major route for tumor metastasis and inhibiting neolymphangiogenesis induced by tumors can reduce metastasis in animal models. Developmental biology studies have identified the transcription factor SOX18 as a critical switch for lymphangiogenesis in the mouse embryo. Here, we show that SOX18 is also critical for tumor-induced lymphangiogenesis, and we show that suppressing SOX18 function is sufficient to impede tumor metastasis. Immunofluorescence analysis of murine tumor xenografts showed that SOX18 is reexpressed during tumor-induced neolymphangiogenesis. Tumors generated by implantation of firefly luciferase-expressing B16-F10 melanoma cells exhibited a reduced rate of metastasis to the regional draining lymph node in Sox18-deficient mice, as assessed by live bioluminescence imaging. Lower metastatic rates correlated with reduced tumoral lymphatic vessel density and diameter and with impaired drainage of peritumoral injected liposomes specific for lymph vessels from the sentinel lymph nodes. Overall, our findings suggested that SOX18 induction is a key step in mediating tumor lymphangiogenesis and metastasis, and they identify SOX18 as a potential therapeutic target for metastatic blockade. PMID:22523034

  14. Enhancing tumor apparent diffusion coefficient histogram skewness stratifies the postoperative survival in recurrent glioblastoma multiforme patients undergoing salvage surgery.

    PubMed

    Zolal, Amir; Juratli, Tareq A; Linn, Jennifer; Podlesek, Dino; Sitoci Ficici, Kerim Hakan; Kitzler, Hagen H; Schackert, Gabriele; Sobottka, Stephan B; Rieger, Bernhard; Krex, Dietmar

    2016-05-01

    Objective To determine the value of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) histogram parameters for the prediction of individual survival in patients undergoing surgery for recurrent glioblastoma (GBM) in a retrospective cohort study. Methods Thirty-one patients who underwent surgery for first recurrence of a known GBM between 2008 and 2012 were included. The following parameters were collected: age, sex, enhancing tumor size, mean ADC, median ADC, ADC skewness, ADC kurtosis and fifth percentile of the ADC histogram, initial progression free survival (PFS), extent of second resection and further adjuvant treatment. The association of these parameters with survival and PFS after second surgery was analyzed using log-rank test and Cox regression. Results Using log-rank test, ADC histogram skewness of the enhancing tumor was significantly associated with both survival (p = 0.001) and PFS after second surgery (p = 0.005). Further parameters associated with prolonged survival after second surgery were: gross total resection at second surgery (p = 0.026), tumor size (0.040) and third surgery (p = 0.003). In the multivariate Cox analysis, ADC histogram skewness was shown to be an independent prognostic factor for survival after second surgery. Conclusion ADC histogram skewness of the enhancing lesion, enhancing lesion size, third surgery, as well as gross total resection have been shown to be associated with survival following the second surgery. ADC histogram skewness was an independent prognostic factor for survival in the multivariate analysis. PMID:26830088

  15. Towards intraoperative assessment of tumor margins in breast surgery using optical coherence elastography (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, Brendan F.; Wijesinghe, Philip; Allen, Wes M.; Chin, Lixin; Latham, Bruce; Saunders, Christobel M.; Sampson, David D.

    2016-03-01

    Surgical excision of tumor is a critical factor in the management of breast cancer. The most common surgical procedure is breast-conserving surgery. The surgeon's goal is to remove the tumor and a rim of healthy tissue surrounding the tumor: the surgical margin. A major issue in breast-conserving surgery is the absence of a reliable tool to guide the surgeon in intraoperatively assessing the margin. A number of techniques have been proposed; however, the re-excision rate remains high and has been reported to be in the range 30-60%. New tools are needed to address this issue. Optical coherence elastography (OCE) shows promise as a tool for intraoperative tumor margin assessment in breast-conserving surgery. Further advances towards clinical translation are limited by long scan times and small fields of view. In particular, scanning over sufficient areas to assess the entire margin in an intraoperative timeframe has not been shown to be feasible. Here, we present a protocol allowing ~75% of the surgical margins to be assessed within 30 minutes. To achieve this, we have incorporated a 65 mm-diameter (internal), wide-aperture annular piezoelectric transducer, allowing the entire surface of the excised tumor mass to be automatically imaged in an OCT mosaic comprised of 10 × 10 mm tiles. As OCT is effective in identifying adipose tissue, our protocol uses the wide-field OCT to selectively guide subsequent local OCE scanning to regions of solid tissue which often present low contrast in OCT images. We present promising examples from freshly excised human breast tissue.

  16. Dually pH/Reduction-Responsive Vesicles for Ultrahigh-Contrast Fluorescence Imaging and Thermo-Chemotherapy-Synergized Tumor Ablation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Aijun; Miao, Ke; Deng, Yibin; Ke, Hengte; He, Hui; Yang, Tao; Guo, Miao; Li, Yanli; Guo, Zhengqing; Wang, Yangyun; Yang, Xiangliang; Zhao, Youliang; Chen, Huabing

    2015-08-25

    Smart nanocarriers are of particular interest as nanoscale vehicles of imaging and therapeutic agents in the field of theranostics. Herein, we report dually pH/reduction-responsive terpolymeric vesicles with monodispersive size distribution, which are constructed by assembling acetal- and disulfide-functionalized star terpolymer with near-infrared cyanine dye and anticancer drug. The vesicular nanostructure exhibits multiple theranostic features including on-demand drug releases responding to pH/reduction stimuli, enhanced photothermal conversion efficiency of cyanine dye, and efficient drug translocation from lysosomes to cytoplasma, as well as preferable cellular uptakes and biodistribution. These multiple theranostic features result in ultrahigh-contrast fluorescence imaging and thermo-chemotherapy-synergized tumor ablation. The dually stimuli-responsive vesicles represent a versatile theranostic approach for enhanced cancer imaging and therapy. PMID:26181349

  17. Radiofrequency Ablation Before Intratumoral Injection of 131I-chTNT Improves the Tumor-to-Normal Tissue Ratio in Solid VX2 Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Shu-Guang; Lu, Ming-De; Yue, Dian-Chao; Xie, Xiao-Yan; Liu, Guang-Jian

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Purpose This study was aimed to investigate whether the tumor necrosis induced by radiofrequency ablation (RFA) can improve the ratio of tumor-to-normal tissue (T/NT) after intratumoral injection of 131I-chTNT. Materials and Method Eighteen New Zealand rabbits bearing VX2 tumor on the thigh were randomly divided into two treatment groups (control group: intratumoral injection of 131I-chTNT alone; RFA group: RFA + intratumoral injection of 131I-chTNT 3 days after RFA) and each group was further divided into three subgroups I, II, and III (1–2 cm, 2–3 cm, and 3–4 cm in maximum diameter, respectively), by the tumor size. SPECT was performed to evaluate the T/NT on days 1, 8, and 15 after 131I-chTNT injection. Results After treatment, all rabbits underwent the SPECT whole-body scan and the T/NT was analyzed. The results showed that T/NT in the RFA group (55.45±41.83) was significantly higher compared with the control group (7.23±5.61) (F=18.89, p=0.001). Meanwhile, a linear ascending trend was found for T/NT in the RFA group along with the follow-up time (r=0.47, p=0.01). The tumor size or the dose of 131I-TNT injection had no significant effect on the variation of T/NT in both groups (p>0.05). Conclusion RFA before intratumoral injection of 131I-chTNT can dramatically improve T/NT, demonstrating the potential application of this combination therapy. PMID:23964639

  18. Imaging of Cu, Zn, Pb and U in human brain tumor resections by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoriy, M. V.; Dehnhardt, M.; Reifenberger, G.; Zilles, K.; Becker, J. S.

    2006-11-01

    Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) was used to produce images of element distribution in 20 [mu]m thin tissue sections of primary human brain tumors (glioblastoma multiforme--GBM) and adjacent non-neoplastic brain tissue. The sample surface was scanned (raster area ~1 cm2) with a focused laser beam (wavelength 266 nm, diameter of laser crater 50 [mu]m, and laser power density 1 x 109 W cm-2). The laser ablation system was coupled to a double-focusing sector field ICP-SFMS. Ion intensities of 63Cu+, 64Zn+, 208Pb+, and 238U+ were measured by LA-ICP-MS within the tumor area and the surrounding region invaded by GBM as well as in control tissue. The quantitative determination of copper, zinc, lead and uranium distribution in brain tissues by LA-ICP-MS was performed using prepared matrix-matched laboratory standards doped with these elements of interest. The limits of detection (LODs) obtained for Cu and Zn were 0.34 and 0.14 [mu]g g-1, respectively, while LODs of 12.5 and 6.9 ng g-1 were determined for Pb and U. The concentration and distribution of selected elements are compared between the control tissues and regions affected by GBM. A correlation was found between LA-ICP-MS and receptor-autoradiographic results. As receptor-autoradiographic techniques, a labeling for A1AR and the pBR was employed. Regarding the A1AR, we used the specific A1 adenosine receptor (A1AR)-ligand, 3H-CPFPX [3H-cyclopentyl-3-(3-fluoropropyl)-1-propylxanthine], which has been shown to specifically label the invasive zone around GBMs. The peripheral benzodiazepine receptor was labeled with 3H-Pk11195 [3H-1-(2-chlorphenyl)-N-methyl-N-(1-methylpropyl)-3-isoquinoline-carboxamide].

  19. Is Antibiotic Prophylaxis for Percutaneous Radiofrequency Ablation (RFA) of Primary Liver Tumors Necessary? Results From a Single-Center Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Bhatia, Shivank S.; Echenique, Ana Froud, Tatiana Suthar, Rekha Lawson, Ivy Dalal, Ravi; Yrizarry, Jose Narayanan, Govindarajan

    2015-08-15

    PurposeThe purpose of this study was to evaluate need for antibiotic prophylaxis for radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of liver tumors in patients with no significant co-existing risk factors for infection.Materials and MethodsFrom January 2004 to September 2013, 83 patients underwent 123 percutaneous RFA procedures for total of 152 hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) lesions. None of the patients had pre-existing biliary enteric anastomosis (BEA) or any biliary tract abnormality predisposing to ascending biliary infection or uncontrolled diabetes mellitus. No pre- or post-procedure antibiotic prophylaxis was provided for 121 procedures. Data for potential risk factors were reviewed retrospectively and analyzed for the frequency of infectious complications, including abscess formation.ResultsOne patient (1/121 (0.8 %) RFA sessions) developed a large segment 5 liver abscess/infected biloma communicating with the gallbladder 7 weeks after the procedure, successfully treated over 10 weeks with IV and PO antibiotic therapy and percutaneous catheter drainage. This patient did not receive any antibiotics prior to RFA. During the procedure, there was inadvertent placement of RFA probe tines into the gallbladder. No other infectious complications were documented.ConclusionThese data suggest that the routine use of prophylactic antibiotics for liver RFA is not necessary in majority of the patients undergoing liver ablation for HCC and could be limited to patients with high-risk factors such as the presence of BEA or other biliary abnormalities, uncontrolled diabetes mellitus, and large centrally located tumors in close proximity to central bile ducts. Larger randomized studies are needed to confirm this hypothesis.

  20. Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) with or without surgery for primary and metastatic liver tumors

    PubMed Central

    Kirichenko, Alexander; Gayou, Olivier; Parda, David; Kudithipudi, Vijay; Tom, Kusum; Khan, Akhtar; Abrams, Peter; Szramowski, Molly; Oliva, Jose; Monga, Dulabh; Raj, Moses; Thai, Ngoc

    2015-01-01

    Objectives We report single center experience on the outcome and toxicity of SBRT alone or in combination with surgery for inoperable primary and metastatic liver tumors between 2007 and 2014. Patients and methods Patients with 1–4 hepatic lesions and tumor diameter ≤9 cm received SBRT at 46.8Gy ± 3.7 in 4–6 fractions. The primary end point was local control with at least 6 months of radiographic followup, and secondary end points were toxicity and survival. Results Eighty-seven assessable patients (114 lesions) completed liver SBRT for hepatoma (39) or isolated metastases (48) with a median followup of 20.3 months (range 1.9–64.1). Fourteen patients underwent liver transplant with SBRT as a bridging treatment or for tumor downsizing. Eight patients completed hepatic resections in combination with planned SBRT for unresectable tumors. Two-year local control was 96% for hepatoma and 93.8% for metastases; it was 100% for lesions ≤4 cm. Two-year overall survival was 82.3% (hepatoma) and 64.3% (metastases). No incidence of grade >2 treatment toxicity was observed. Conclusion In this retrospective analysis we demonstrate that liver SBRT alone or in combination with surgery is safe and effective for the treatment of isolated inoperable hepatic malignancies and provides excellent local control rates. PMID:26776856

  1. Intraoperative vascular DIVA surgery reveals angiogenic hotspots in tumor zones of malignant gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Eyüpoglu, Ilker Y.; Hore, Nirjhar; Fan, Zheng; Buslei, Rolf; Merkel, Andreas; Buchfelder, Michael; Savaskan, Nicolai E.

    2015-01-01

    Malignant gliomas belong to the most threatening tumor entities and are hallmarked by rapid proliferation, hypervascularization and an invasive growth pattern. The primary obstacle in surgical treatment lies in differentiation between healthy and pathological tissue at the tumor margins, where current visualization methods reach their limits. Here, we report on a novel technique (vascular dual intraoperative visualization approach - vDIVA) enabling visualization of different tumor zones (TZ I–III) on the basis of angiogenic hotspots. We investigated glioblastoma patients who underwent 5-ALA fluorescence-guided surgery with simultaneous intraoperative ICG fluorescence angiography. This vDIVA technique revealed hypervascularized areas which were further histologically investigated. Neuropathological assessments revealed tissue areas at the resection margins corresponding to TZ II, and postoperative CD34- and Map2 immunostaining confirmed these angiogenic hotspots to be occupied by glioma cells. Hence, the vascular architecture in this transitional zone could be well differentiated from both primary tumor bulk and healthy brain parenchyma. These data demonstrate that ICG fluorescence angiography improves state-of-the-art glioma surgery techniques and facilitates the future characterization of polyclonal attributes of malignant gliomas. PMID:25609379

  2. The Osteosarcoradionecrosis as an Unfavorable Result Following Head and Neck Tumor Ablation and Microsurgical Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Al Deek, Nidal Farhan; Wei, Fu-Chan

    2016-10-01

    Osteoradionecrosis is preferably called osteosarcoradionecrosis to adequately cover the scope of the problem: multitissue necrosis. The changes following radiotherapy and leading to necrosis are further classified into 2 phases based on improved understanding of the underlying mechanisms. The reversible-damage phase could respond to the medical treatment, while the irreversible damage phase or osteosarcoradionecrosis may benefit from complete resection and free flap reconstruction. The role of ablation and reconstruction in paving the road for the development of osteosarcoradionecrosis is discussed, a case study provided, and a refined reconstructive approach proposed. PMID:27601399

  3. Analysis and experimental validation of a triaxial antenna for microwave tumor ablation.

    PubMed

    Brace, Christopher L; van der Weide, Daniel W; Lee, Fred T; Laeseke, Paul F; Sampson, Lisa

    2004-06-01

    We apply a new triaxial antenna for microwave ablation procedures. The antenna consists of a coaxial monopole inserted through an 18-gauge biopsy needle positioned one quarter-wavelength from the antenna base. The biopsy needle creates a triaxial structure, which enhances return loss by more than 10 dB, thus limiting return currents along the feed line. Numerical simulations are used to optimize the antenna design. Numerical and ex-vivo experimental results are presented to quantify the field distribution, heating pattern and return loss of the antenna. PMID:18079982

  4. The validity of multimodal intraoperative monitoring (MIOM) in surgery of 109 spine and spinal cord tumors

    PubMed Central

    Eggspuehler, Andreas; Grob, Dieter; Jeszenszky, Dezsö; Benini, Arnaldo; Porchet, Francois; Mueller, Alfred; Dvorak, Jiri

    2007-01-01

    In a prospective study of 109 patients with tumor of the spine MIOM was performed during the surgical procedure between March 2000 and December 2005. To determine the sensitivity and specificity of MIOM techniques used to monitor spinal cord and nerve root function during surgical procedure of spinal tumors. MIOM become an integrated procedure during surgical approach to intramedullar and extramedullar spine tumors. The combination of monitoring ascending and descending pathways may provide more sensitive and specific results than SEP alone giving immediate feedback information regarding any neurological deficit during the operation. Intraoperative sensory spinal and cerebral evoked potential combined with EMG recordings and motor evoked potential of the spinal cord and muscles were evaluated and compared with postoperative clinical neurological changes. One hundred and nine consecutive patients with spinal tumors of different aetiologies were monitored by the means of MIOM during the entire surgical procedure. Eighty-two patients presented true negative findings while two patients monitored false negative, one false positive and 24 patients true positive findings where neurological deficits after the operation were present. All patients with neurological deficit recovered completely or to pre-existing neurological situation. The sensitivity of MIOM applied during surgery of spinal tumors has been calculated of 92% and specificity 99%. Based upon the results of the study MIOM is an effective method of monitoring the spinal cord and nerve root function during surgical approach of spinal tumors and consequently can reduce or prevent the occurrence of postoperative neurological deficit. PMID:17661095

  5. Comparison of Survival Rate in Primary Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Among Elderly Patients Treated With Radiofrequency Ablation, Surgery, or Chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Heon; Jin, Gong Yong Han, Young Min; Chung, Gyung Ho; Lee, Yong Chul; Kwon, Keun Sang; Lynch, David

    2012-04-15

    Purpose: We retrospectively compared the survival rate in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with radiofrequency ablation (RFA), surgery, or chemotherapy according to lung cancer staging. Materials and Methods: From 2000 to 2004, 77 NSCLC patients, all of whom had WHO performance status 0-2 and were >60 years old, were enrolled in a cancer registry and retrospectively evaluated. RFA was performed on patients who had medical contraindications to surgery/unsuitability for surgery, such as advanced lung cancer or refusal of surgery. In the RFA group, 40 patients with inoperable NSCLC underwent RFA under computed tomography (CT) guidance. These included 16 patients with stage I to II cancer and 24 patients with stage III to IV cancer who underwent RFA in an adjuvant setting. In the comparison group (n = 37), 13 patients with stage I to II cancer underwent surgery; 18 patients with stage III to IV cancer underwent chemotherapy; and 6 patients with stage III to IV cancer were not actively treated. The survival curves for RFA, surgery, and chemotherapy in these patients were calculated using Kaplan-Meier method. Results: Median survival times for patients treated with (1) surgery alone and (2) RFA alone for stage I to II lung cancer were 33.8 and 28.2 months, respectively (P = 0.426). Median survival times for patients treated with (1) chemotherapy alone and (2) RFA with chemotherapy for stage III to IV cancer were 29 and 42 months, respectively (P = 0.03). Conclusion: RFA can be used as an alternative treatment to surgery for older NSCLC patients with stage I to II inoperable cancer and can play a role as adjuvant therapy with chemotherapy for patients with stage III to IV lung cancer.

  6. Immediate functional loading of an implant-supported fixed prosthesis at the time of ablative surgery and mandibular reconstruction for squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Odin, Guillaume; Balaguer, Thierry; Savoldelli, Charles; Scortecci, Gérard

    2010-01-01

    The authors describe a case of squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity managed by ablative surgery, mandibular reconstruction with a fibula free flap, and implant placement during the same session. Immediate functional implant loading, respecting the principles of basal implantology, was performed 48 hours later using a highly rigid, screw-secured fixed prosthesis that served as an external fixator for the implants and grafted bone. Implant loading before external beam radiotherapy improves flap stability, bone consolidation, and quality of life. Functional and esthetic outcomes were evaluated 2 years after radiotherapy was completed. PMID:20553177

  7. New Experiences of Treatment in Multiple Tumors with HIFU Ablation and Whole Body Hyperthermia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, Akira; Gondo, Hideki; Iijima, Norio; Xia, Yuantian; Takeuchi, Takashi

    2007-05-01

    We have performed some 5000 whole body hyperthermia (WBH) treatments using far-infrared equipment (RHD 7500: Enthermics medical systems, USA) in 1000 cancer patients since 1991 at Luke Hospital & Clinic (Nakano, Japan). Hyperthermia is a natural treatment whereby patients are heated within the fever temperature range of 41-42 C. However, this therapy alone is poorly suited to advanced cancer patients, where regional tumor control is needed. The potential of HIFU therapy for theses cases deserves further investigation. We have treated 20 times in 12 advanced cancer patients, since importing a new HIFU device (Sonic CZ901: Mianyang some electronic Ltd: China) last December and are able to report some interesting results of combination treatment with HIFU and WBH. Our first experience was a 20-year old female pharyngeal cancer patient with lung and multiple liver metastases. Her lung tumor reduced following WBH (given weekly, 4 times in total) and her liver tumor clearly reduced following HIFU treatment. Our second experience of combinative treatment was in a 65-year old male suffering from a neck tumor with bone metastasis. He received WBH after HIFU treatment into 7th lib bone metastasis. After 10 days, his neck tumor grew with evidence of internal necrosis, and finally ruptured. CT images showed necrotic changes in the focus of the neck tumor and also lib bone metastasis. We believe that this new thermal combinative therapy shows great promise.

  8. Sentinel node navigation surgery for gastroduodenal neuroendocrine tumors: Two case reports.

    PubMed

    Arigami, Takaaki; Uenosono, Yoshikazu; Yanagita, Shigehiro; Okubo, Keishi; Kijima, Takashi; Matsushita, Daisuke; Amatatsu, Masahiko; Hagihara, Takahiko; Haraguchi, Naoto; Mataki, Yuko; Ehi, Katsuhiko; Ishigami, Sumiya; Natsugoe, Shoji

    2016-06-01

    The percentage of gastroduodenal neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) among all gastroenteropancreatic (GEP) NETs has gradually increased worldwide. Sentinel node navigation surgery (SNNS) has been developed as a personalized approach in the surgical strategy for early gastrointestinal tract cancers. We herein report 2 cases of gastroduodenal NETs treated with SNNS. Technetium-tin colloid including indocyanine green was endoscopically injected into the submucosa around a tumor the day before surgery. Basin dissection including the sentinel nodes (SNs), which were identified by Navigator GPS and near-infrared fluorescence imaging, was performed during laparoscopic surgery. SNs were intraoperatively examined using hematoxylin-eosin (HE) staining.SNs were detected in 2 patients. Lymph node metastasis was intraoperatively identified in 1 of the 2 patients. Consequently, 1 patient with metastatic SNs underwent laparoscopic gastrectomy with lymphadenectomy. Pathological findings identified submucosal NET measuring 6.0 mm × 5.0 mm.Our results suggest that SNNS is a promising surgical tool for detecting subclinical lymph node metastasis in patients with gastroduodenal NETs. PMID:27368046

  9. Framework for hyperspectral image processing and quantification for cancer detection during animal tumor surgery.

    PubMed

    Lu, Guolan; Wang, Dongsheng; Qin, Xulei; Halig, Luma; Muller, Susan; Zhang, Hongzheng; Chen, Amy; Pogue, Brian W; Chen, Zhuo Georgia; Fei, Baowei

    2015-01-01

    Hyperspectral imaging (HSI) is an imaging modality that holds strong potential for rapid cancer detection during image-guided surgery. But the data from HSI often needs to be processed appropriately in order to extract the maximum useful information that differentiates cancer from normal tissue. We proposed a framework for hyperspectral image processing and quantification, which includes a set of steps including image preprocessing, glare removal, feature extraction, and ultimately image classification. The framework has been tested on images from mice with head and neck cancer, using spectra from 450- to 900-nm wavelength. The image analysis computed Fourier coefficients, normalized reflectance, mean, and spectral derivatives for improved accuracy. The experimental results demonstrated the feasibility of the hyperspectral image processing and quantification framework for cancer detection during animal tumor surgery, in a challenging setting where sensitivity can be low due to a modest number of features present, but potential for fast image classification can be high. This HSI approach may have potential application in tumor margin assessment during image-guided surgery, where speed of assessment may be the dominant factor. PMID:26720879

  10. Framework for hyperspectral image processing and quantification for cancer detection during animal tumor surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Guolan; Wang, Dongsheng; Qin, Xulei; Halig, Luma; Muller, Susan; Zhang, Hongzheng; Chen, Amy; Pogue, Brian W.; Chen, Zhuo Georgia; Fei, Baowei

    2015-12-01

    Hyperspectral imaging (HSI) is an imaging modality that holds strong potential for rapid cancer detection during image-guided surgery. But the data from HSI often needs to be processed appropriately in order to extract the maximum useful information that differentiates cancer from normal tissue. We proposed a framework for hyperspectral image processing and quantification, which includes a set of steps including image preprocessing, glare removal, feature extraction, and ultimately image classification. The framework has been tested on images from mice with head and neck cancer, using spectra from 450- to 900-nm wavelength. The image analysis computed Fourier coefficients, normalized reflectance, mean, and spectral derivatives for improved accuracy. The experimental results demonstrated the feasibility of the hyperspectral image processing and quantification framework for cancer detection during animal tumor surgery, in a challenging setting where sensitivity can be low due to a modest number of features present, but potential for fast image classification can be high. This HSI approach may have potential application in tumor margin assessment during image-guided surgery, where speed of assessment may be the dominant factor.

  11. Microwave tumor ablation: cooperative academic-industry development of a high-power gas-cooled system with early clinical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brace, Christopher L.; Ziemlewicz, Timothy J.; Schefelker, Rick; Hinshaw, J. L.; Lubner, Meghan G.; Lee, Fred T.

    2013-02-01

    Microwave tumor ablation continues to evolve into a viable treatment option for many cancers. Current systems are poised to supplant radiofrequency ablation as the dominant percutaneous thermal therapy. Here is provided an overview of technical details and early clinical results with a high-powered, gas-cooled microwave ablation system. The system was developed with academic-industry collaboration using federal and private funding. The generator comprises three synchronous channels that each produce up to 140W at 2.45GHz. A mountable power distribution module facilitates CT imaging guidance and monitoring and reduces clutter in the sterile field. Cryogenic carbon-dioxide cools the coaxial applicator, permitting a thin applicator profile (~1.5 mm diameter) and high power delivery. A total of 106 liver tumors were treated (96 malignant, 10 benign) from December 2010 to June 2012 at a single academic institution. Mean tumor size +/- standard deviation was 2.5+/-1.3cm (range 0.5-13.9cm). Treatment time was 5.4+/-3.3min (range 1-20min). Median follow-up was 6 months (range 1-16 months). Technical success was reported in 100% of cases. Local tumor progression was noted in 4/96 (4.3%) of malignancies. The only major complication was a pleural effusion that was treated with thoracentesis. Microwave ablation with this system is an effective treatment for liver cancer. Compared to previous data from the same institution, these results suggest an increased efficacy and equivalent safety to RF ablation. Additional data from the lung and kidney support this conclusion.

  12. Comparison of Two Techniques for Radio-frequency Hepatic Tumor Ablation through Numerical Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosturski, N.; Margenov, S.; Vutov, Y.

    2011-11-01

    We simulate the thermal and electrical processes, involved in the radio-frequency ablation procedure. In this study, we take into account the observed fact, that the electrical conductivity of the hepatic tissue varies during the procedure. With the increase of the tissue temperature to a certain level, a sudden drop of the electrical conductivity is observed. This variation was neglected in some previous studies. The mathematical model consists of two parts—electrical and thermal. The energy from the applied AC voltage is determined first, by solving the Laplace equation to find the potential distribution. After that, the electric field intensity and the current density are directly calculated. Finally, the heat transfer equation is solved to determine the temperature distribution. Heat loss due to blood perfusion is also accounted for. The simulations were performed on the IBM Blue Gene/P massively parallel computer.

  13. The influence of myeloid-derived suppressor cells on angiogenesis and tumor growth after cancer surgery.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; Su, Xiaosan; Yang, Liu; Qiao, Fei; Fang, Yu; Yu, Lu; Yang, Qian; Wang, Yiyin; Yin, Yanfeng; Chen, Rui; Hong, Zhipeng

    2016-06-01

    While myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) have been reported to participate in the promotion of angiogenesis and tumor growth, little is known about their presence and function during perioperative period. Here, we demonstrated that human MDSCs expressing CD11b(+), CD33(+) and HLA-DR(-) significantly increased in lung cancer patients after thoracotomy. CD11b(+) CD33(+) HLA-DR(-) MDSCs isolated 24 hr after surgery from lung cancer patients were more efficient in promoting angiogenesis and tumor growth than MDSCs isolated before surgical operation in allograft tumor model. In addition, CD11b(+) CD33(+) HLA-DR(-) MDSCs produced high levels of MMP-9. Using an experimental lung metastasis mouse model, we demonstrated that the numbers of metastases on lung surface and Gr-1(+) CD11b(+) MDSCs at postoperative period were enhanced in proportion to the degree of surgical manipulation. We also examined that syngeneic bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) significantly inhibited the induction and proliferation of Gr-1(+) CD11b(+) MDSCs and further prevented lung metastasis formation in the mice undergoing laparotomy. Taken together, our results suggest that postoperatively induced MDSCs were qualified with potent proangiogenic and tumor-promotive ability and this cell population should be considered as a target for preventing postoperative tumor metastasis. PMID:26756887

  14. [A case of esophageal cancer with sigmoid colon tumor treated by laparoscopic surgery].

    PubMed

    Arita, Tomohiro; Shiozaki, Atsushi; Fujiwara, Hitoshi; Kokuba, Yukihito; Kuriu, Yoshiaki; Kubota, Takeshi; Ichikawa, Daisuke; Okamoto, Kazuma; Ishii, Hiromichi; Ikoma, Hisashi; Nakanishi, Masayoshi; Ochiai, Toshiya; Sakakura, Chohei; Sonoyama, Teruhisa; Otsuji, Eigo

    2010-11-01

    We performed a subtotal esophagectomy with gastric tube reconstruction by hand assisted laparoscopic surgery and laparoscopic sigmoidectomy simultaneously for the patient with middle thoracic esophageal cancer and lateral spreading tumor in the sigmoid colon. Upper abdominal and transumbilical incisions were made and Lap Discs (regular, mini) were set respectively. Two 12 mm ports were inserted in the right flank and lower quadrant, and two 5 mm ports were inserted in the left flank and lower quadrant. First, by using video-scope from upper Lap Disc, laparoscopic sigmoidectomy was performed. Anastomosis was performed via lower Lap Disc. For the gastric tube reconstruction, upper Lap Disc was used for hand assistance, and video-scope was inserted from lower Lap Disc. The patient was discharged at 26 days after surgery without complications. In conclusion, our surgical procedure provided a good surgical view and decreased a surgical stress. PMID:21224582

  15. RF tumor ablation with internally cooled electrodes and saline infusion: what is the optimal location of the saline infusion?

    PubMed Central

    Burdío, Fernando; Berjano, Enrique J; Navarro, Ana; Burdío, José M; Güemes, Antonio; Grande, Luis; Sousa, Ramón; Subiró, Jorge; Gonzalez, Ana; Cruz, Ignacio; Castiella, Tomás; Tejero, Eloy; Lozano, Ricardo; de Gregorio, Miguel A

    2007-01-01

    Background Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of tumors by means of internally cooled electrodes (ICE) combined with interstitial infusion of saline may improve clinical results. To date, infusion has been conducted through outlets placed on the surface of the cooled electrode. However, the effect of infusion at a distance from the electrode surface is unknown. Our aim was to assess the effect of perfusion distance (PD) on the coagulation geometry and deposited power during RFA using ICE. Methods Experiments were performed on excised bovine livers. Perfusion distance (PD) was defined as the shortest distance between the infusion outlet and the surface of the ICE. We considered three values of PD: 0, 2 and 4 mm. Two sets of experiments were considered: 1) 15 ablations of 10 minutes (n ≥ 4 for each PD), in order to evaluate the effect of PD on volume and diameters of coagulation; and 2) 20 additional ablations of 20 minutes. The effect of PD on deposited power and relative frequency of uncontrolled impedance rises (roll-off) was evaluated using the results from the two sets of experiments (n ≥ 7 for each PD). Comparisons between PD were performed by analysis of variance or Kruskal-Wallis test. Additionally, non-linear regression models were performed to elucidate the best PD in terms of coagulation volume and diameter, and the occurrence of uncontrolled impedance rises. Results The best-fit least square functions were always obtained with quadratic curves where volume and diameters of coagulation were maximum for a PD of 2 mm. A thirty per cent increase in volume coagulation was observed for this PD value compared to other values (P < 0.05). Likewise, the short coagulation diameter was nearly twenty five per cent larger for a 2 mm PD than for 0 mm. Regarding deposited power, the best-fit least square function was obtained by a quadratic curve with a 2 mm PD peak. This matched well with the higher relative frequency of uncontrolled impedance rises for PD of 0 and 4 mm

  16. Biocompatible Hollow Polydopamine Nanoparticles Loaded Ionic Liquid Enhanced Tumor Microwave Thermal Ablation in Vivo.

    PubMed

    Tan, Longfei; Tang, Wenting; Liu, Tianlong; Ren, Xiangling; Fu, Changhui; Liu, Bo; Ren, Jun; Meng, Xianwei

    2016-05-11

    Tumor microwave thermal therapy (MWTT) has attracted more attention because of the minimal damage to body function, convenient manipulation and low complications. Herein, a novel polydopamine (PDA) nanoparticle loading ionic liquids (ILs/PDA) as microwave susceptible agent is introduced for enhancing the selectivity and targeting of MWTT. ILs/PDA nanocomposites have an excellent microwave heating efficiency under an ultralow microwave power irradiation. Encouraging antitumor effect was observed when tumor bearing mice received ILs/PDA nanoparticles by intravenous injection and only single microwave irradiation. PDA nanoparticles with gold nanoparticles in core were constructed for tumor targeting study by ICP-MS and about 15% PDA nanoparticles were founded in tumor. Furthermore, the cytotoxicity and acute toxicity study in vivo of PDA showed the excellent biocompatibility of ILs/PDA nanocomposites. In addition, the degradation of ILs/PDA nanocomposites in simulated body fluid illustrated the low potential hazard when they entered the blood. The emergence of PDA as a novel and feasible platform for cancer thermal therapy will promote the rapid development of microwave therapy in clinics. PMID:27089478

  17. The Use Fibrin Sealant after Spinal Intradural Tumor Surgery: Is It Necessary?

    PubMed Central

    Won, Young Il; Chung, Chun Kee; Jahng, Tae-Ahn; Park, Sung Bae

    2016-01-01

    Objective A fibrin sealant is commonly applied after closure of an incidental or intended durotomy to reduce the complications associated with the leakage of cerebrospinal fluid. Routine usage might not be essential after closure of an intended durotomy, which has clear cut-margins. We investigated the efficacy of fibrin sealants for primary intradural spinal cord tumor surgery. Methods A retrospective review was performed for 231 consecutive surgically treated patients with primary intradural spinal cord tumors without extradural extension. Fibrin sealants were not used for 47 patients (group I: age, 51.57±16.75 years) and were applied to 184 patients (group II: age, 48.8±14.7 years). The surgical procedures were identical except for the use of a fibrin sealant after closure of the durotomy. The primary outcome was the occurrence of complications (wound problems, hematoma collection, infection, and neurological deterioration). The covariates were age, sex, body mass index, operation time, pre-/postoperative ambulation, number of laminectomies, and type of tumor. Results Schwannoma was the most common pathology (n=134), followed by meningioma (n=35) and ependymoma (n=31). Complications occurred in 13 patients (3 in group I and 10 in group II, p=0.73). The postoperative ambulation status (p<0.01; odds ratio, 28.8; 95% confidence interval, 6.9-120.0) and operation time (p=0.04; cutoff, 229 minutes; sensitivity, 62%; specificity, 72%) were significant factors, whereas the use of a fibrin glue was not (p=0.47). Conclusion The use of a fibrin sealant might not be essential to reduce complications after surgery for primary spinal intradural tumor. PMID:27123027

  18. Improved tumor identification using dual tracer molecular imaging in fluorescence guided brain surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiaochun; Torres, Veronica; Straus, David; Brey, Eric M.; Byrne, Richard W.; Tichauer, Kenneth M.

    2015-03-01

    Brain tumors represent a leading cause of cancer death for people under the age of 40 and the probability complete surgical resection of brain tumors remains low owing to the invasive nature of these tumors and the consequences of damaging healthy brain tissue. Molecular imaging is an emerging approach that has the potential to improve the ability for surgeons to correctly discriminate between healthy and cancerous tissue; however, conventional molecular imaging approaches in brain suffer from significant background signal in healthy tissue or an inability target more invasive sections of the tumor. This work presents initial studies investigating the ability of novel dual-tracer molecular imaging strategies to be used to overcome the major limitations of conventional "single-tracer" molecular imaging. The approach is evaluated in simulations and in an in vivo mice study with animals inoculated orthotopically using fluorescent human glioma cells. An epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) targeted Affibody-fluorescent marker was employed as a targeted imaging agent, and the suitability of various FDA approved untargeted fluorescent tracers (e.g. fluorescein & indocyanine green) were evaluated in terms of their ability to account for nonspecific uptake and retention of the targeted imaging agent. Signal-to-background ratio was used to measure and compare the amount of reporter in the tissue between targeted and untargeted tracer. The initial findings suggest that FDA-approved fluorescent imaging agents are ill-suited to act as untargeted imaging agents for dual-tracer fluorescent guided brain surgery as they suffer from poor delivery to the healthy brain tissue and therefore cannot be used to identify nonspecific vs. specific uptake of the targeted imaging agent where current surgery is most limited.

  19. Focused Ultrasound Surgery Control Using Local Harmonic Motion: VX2 Tumor Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curiel, Laura; Chopra, Rajiv; Goertz, David; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2009-04-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a real-time method for controlling focused ultrasound surgery using ultrasound imaging. The approach uses measurements of localized harmonic motion (LHM) in order to perform controlled FUS exposures by detecting changes in the elastic properties of tissues during coagulation. Methods: Nine New Zealand rabbits with VX2 tumors implanted in the thigh were used for this study. LHM was generated within the tumors by periodic induction of radiation force using a FUS transducer (80-mm focal length, 100-mm diameter, 20-mm central hole, 1.485-MHz). Tissue motion was tracked by collecting and cross-correlating RF signals during the motion using a separate diagnostic transducer (3-kHz PRF, 5-MHz). After locating the tumor in MR images, a series of sonications were performed to treat the tumors using a reduction in LHM amplitude to control the exposure. Results: LHM was successfully used to control the sonications. A LHM amplitude threshold value was determined at which changes were considered significant and then the exposure was started and stopped when the LHM amplitude dropped below the threshold. The appearance of a lesion was then verified by MRI. The feasibility of LHM measurements to control FUS exposure was validated.

  20. Focused Ultrasound Surgery Control Using Local Harmonic Motion: VX2 Tumor Study

    SciTech Connect

    Curiel, Laura; Chopra, Rajiv; Goertz, David; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2009-04-14

    The objective of this study was to develop a real-time method for controlling focused ultrasound surgery using ultrasound imaging. The approach uses measurements of localized harmonic motion (LHM) in order to perform controlled FUS exposures by detecting changes in the elastic properties of tissues during coagulation. Methods: Nine New Zealand rabbits with VX2 tumors implanted in the thigh were used for this study. LHM was generated within the tumors by periodic induction of radiation force using a FUS transducer (80-mm focal length, 100-mm diameter, 20-mm central hole, 1.485-MHz). Tissue motion was tracked by collecting and cross-correlating RF signals during the motion using a separate diagnostic transducer (3-kHz PRF, 5-MHz). After locating the tumor in MR images, a series of sonications were performed to treat the tumors using a reduction in LHM amplitude to control the exposure. Results: LHM was successfully used to control the sonications. A LHM amplitude threshold value was determined at which changes were considered significant and then the exposure was started and stopped when the LHM amplitude dropped below the threshold. The appearance of a lesion was then verified by MRI. The feasibility of LHM measurements to control FUS exposure was validated.

  1. Intraoperative Gastroscopy for Tumor Localization in Laparoscopic Surgery for Gastric Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hur, Hoon; Son, Sang-Yong; Cho, Yong Kwan; Han, Sang-Uk

    2016-01-01

    Determining resection margins for gastric cancer, which are not exposed to the serosal surface of the stomach, is the most important procedure during totally laparoscopic gastrectomy (TLG). The aim of this protocol is to introduce a procedure for intraoperative gastroscopy, in order to directly mark tumors during TLG for gastric cancer in the middle third of the stomach. Patients who were diagnosed with adenocarcinoma in the middle third of the stomach were enrolled in this case series. Before surgery, additional gastroscopy for tumor localization is not performed. Under general anesthesia, laparoscopic mobilization of the stomach is performed first. After the first portion of the duodenum is mobilized from the pancreas and clamped, the surgeon moves to the other side for the gastroscopic procedure. On the insertion of a gastroscope through the oral cavity into the stomach, 2 - 3 cc of indigo carmine is administered via an endoscopic injector into the gastric muscle layer at the proximal margin of the stomach. The location of stained serosa in the laparoscopic view is used to guide distal subtotal gastrectomy, however, total gastrectomy is performed if the tumor is too close to the esophagogastric junction. A specimen is sampled after distal gastrectomy to confirm sufficient length from resection margin to tumor before reconstruction. In our case series, all patients had tumor-free margins and required no additional resection. There was no morbidity related to the gastroscopic procedure, and the time required for the procedure has gradually decreased to about five minutes. Intraoperative gastroscopy for tumor localization is an accurate and tolerated method for gastric cancer patients undergoing totally laparoscopic distal gastrectomy. PMID:27584713

  2. Solutions that enable ablative radiotherapy for large liver tumors: Fractionated dose painting, simultaneous integrated protection, motion management, and computed tomography image guidance.

    PubMed

    Crane, Christopher H; Koay, Eugene J

    2016-07-01

    The emergence and success of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for the treatment of lung cancer have led to its rapid adoption for liver cancers. SBRT can achieve excellent results for small liver tumors. However, the vast majority of physicians interpret SBRT as meaning doses of radiation (range, 4-20 Gray [Gy]) that may not be ablative but are delivered within about 1 week (ie, in 3-6 fractions). Adherence to this approach has limited the effectiveness of SBRT for large liver tumors (>7 cm) because of the need to reduce doses to meet organ constraints. The prognosis for patients who present with large liver tumors is poor, with a median survival ≤12 months, and most of these patients die from tumor-related liver failure. Herein, the authors present a comprehensive solution to achieve ablative SBRT doses for patients with large liver tumors by using a combination of classic, modern, and novel concepts of radiotherapy: fractionation, dose painting, motion management, image guidance, and simultaneous integrated protection. The authors discuss these concepts in the context of large, inoperable liver tumors and review how this approach can substantially prolong survival for patients, most of whom otherwise have a very poor prognosis and few effective treatment options. Cancer 2016;122:1974-86. © 2016 American Cancer Society. PMID:26950735

  3. Dendrimer-Templated Ultrasmall and Multifunctional Photothermal Agents for Efficient Tumor Ablation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhengjie; Wang, Yitong; Yan, Yang; Zhang, Qiang; Cheng, Yiyun

    2016-04-26

    Ultrasmall and multifunctional nanoparticles are highly desirable for photothermal cancer therapy, but the synthesis of these nanoparticles remains a huge challenge. Here, we used a dendrimer as a template to synthesize ultrasmall photothermal agents and further modified them with multifunctional groups. Dendrimer-encapsulated nanoparticles (DENPs) including copper sulfide, platinum, and palladium nanoparticles possessed a sub-5 nm size and exhibited an excellent photothermal effect. DENPs were further modified with TAT or RGD peptides to facilitate their cellular uptake and targeting delivery to tumors. They were also decorated with fluorescent probes for real-time imaging and tracking of the particles' distribution. The in vivo study revealed RGD-modified DENPs efficiently reduced the tumor growth upon near-infrared irradiation. In all, our study provides a facile and flexible scaffold to prepare ultrasmall and multifunctional photothermal agents. PMID:27054555

  4. Ablation of Neuropilin 1 from glioma-associated microglia and macrophages slows tumor progression.

    PubMed

    Miyauchi, Jeremy T; Chen, Danling; Choi, Matthew; Nissen, Jillian C; Shroyer, Kenneth R; Djordevic, Snezana; Zachary, Ian C; Selwood, David; Tsirka, Stella E

    2016-03-01

    Gliomas are the most commonly diagnosed primary tumors of the central nervous system (CNS). Median times of survival are dismal regardless of the treatment approach, underlying the need to develop more effective therapies. Modulation of the immune system is a promising strategy as innate and adaptive immunity play important roles in cancer progression. Glioma associated microglia and macrophages (GAMs) can comprise over 30% of the cells in glioma biopsies. Gliomas secrete cytokines that suppress the anti-tumorigenic properties of GAMs, causing them to secrete factors that support the tumor's spread and growth. Neuropilin 1 (Nrp1) is a transmembrane receptor that in mice both amplifies pro-angiogenic signaling in the tumor microenvironment and affects behavior of innate immune cells. Using a Cre-lox system, we generated mice that lack expression of Nrp1 in GAMs. We demonstrate, using an in vivo orthotopic glioma model, that tumors in mice with Nrp1-deficient GAMs exhibit less vascularity, grow at a slower pace, and are populated by increased numbers of anti-tumorigenic GAMs. Moreover, glioma survival times in mice with Nrp1-deficient GAMs were significantly longer. Treating wild-type mice with a small molecule inhibitor of Nrp1's b1 domain, EG00229, which we show here is selective for Nrp1 over Nrp2, yielded an identical outcome. Nrp1-deficient or EG00229-treated wild-type microglia exhibited a shift towards anti-tumorigenicity as evident by altered inflammatory marker profiles in vivo and decreased SMAD2/3 activation when conditioned in the presence of glioma-derived factors. These results provide support for the proposal that pharmacological inhibition of Nrp1 constitutes a potential strategy for suppressing glioma progression. PMID:26755653

  5. Ablation of Neuropilin 1 from glioma-associated microglia and macrophages slows tumor progression

    PubMed Central

    Miyauchi, Jeremy T.; Chen, Danling; Choi, Matthew; Nissen, Jillian C.; Shroyer, Kenneth R.; Djordevic, Snezana; Zachary, Ian C.; Selwood, David; Tsirka, Stella E.

    2016-01-01

    Gliomas are the most commonly diagnosed primary tumors of the central nervous system (CNS). Median times of survival are dismal regardless of the treatment approach, underlying the need to develop more effective therapies. Modulation of the immune system is a promising strategy as innate and adaptive immunity play important roles in cancer progression. Glioma associated microglia and macrophages (GAMs) can comprise over 30% of the cells in glioma biopsies. Gliomas secrete cytokines that suppress the anti-tumorigenic properties of GAMs, causing them to secrete factors that support the tumor's spread and growth. Neuropilin 1 (Nrp1) is a transmembrane receptor that in mice both amplifies pro-angiogenic signaling in the tumor microenvironment and affects behavior of innate immune cells. Using a Cre-lox system, we generated mice that lack expression of Nrp1 in GAMs. We demonstrate, using an in vivo orthotopic glioma model, that tumors in mice with Nrp1-deficient GAMs exhibit less vascularity, grow at a slower pace, and are populated by increased numbers of anti-tumorigenic GAMs. Moreover, glioma survival times in mice with Nrp1-deficient GAMs were significantly longer. Treating wild-type mice with a small molecule inhibitor of Nrp1's b1 domain, EG00229, which we show here is selective for Nrp1 over Nrp2, yielded an identical outcome. Nrp1-deficient or EG00229-treated wild-type microglia exhibited a shift towards anti-tumorigenicity as evident by altered inflammatory marker profiles in vivo and decreased SMAD2/3 activation when conditioned in the presence of glioma-derived factors. These results provide support for the proposal that pharmacological inhibition of Nrp1 constitutes a potential strategy for suppressing glioma progression. PMID:26755653

  6. [Funcion sparing surgery in uro-oncology: germ cell tumors of the testis].

    PubMed

    Catanzaro, Mario; Piva, Luigi; Torelli, Tullio; Biasoni, Davide; Stagni, Silvia; Milani, Angelo; Necchi, Andrea; Giannatempo, Patrizia; Nicolai, A; Salvioni, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    Surgery in germ cell tumors of the testis (TGT) may result in andrological disorders, both after orchiectomy and after retroperitoneal lymphadenectomy (RPLND). Bilateral orchiectomy suppresses both testicular functions: exocrine and endocrine. In selected cases with bilateral TGT (metachronous/synchronous), or in the case of TGT in monorchid patients, partial orchiectomy (enucleation of the tumor) can preserve both functions with a low risk of relapse in residual testicular parenchyma, in the absence of intraepithelial neoplasia (TIN). In cases of TIN and normal testosterone levels (80%), the fertility is maintained in 50% of patients. In these cases the use of radiotherapy on the residual testicular parenchyma can prevent the future development of invasive cancer, though compromising the hormonal function. The RPLND (open or laparoscopic) can produce major side effects, such as retrograde ejaculation. Knowledge of the adrenergic fiber retroperitoneal neuroanatomy enables to implement a "nerve sparing" surgery with an almost total reduction of this serious side effect, but that option is only available in few centers of excellence. Semen cryopreservation has become a common practice performed before any treatment that might impact on the andrological function of patients. PMID:23371266

  7. Surgery Versus Radiotherapy for Early Oropharyngeal Tumors: a Never-Ending Debate.

    PubMed

    Monnier, Yan; Simon, Christian

    2015-09-01

    Therapeutic options for early stage oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) include both surgery and radiotherapy as single treatment modality. Retrospective data reporting on locoregional control and survival rates in early stage OPSCC have shown equivalent efficacy, although no prospective randomized trials are available to confirm these results. Given the assumed comparable oncologic results in both groups, complication rates and functional outcomes associated with each modality play a major role when making treatment decisions. Radiotherapy is used preferentially in many centers because few trials have reported higher complication rates in surgical patients. However, these adverse effects were mainly due to traditional invasive open surgical approaches used for access to the oropharynx. In order to decrease the morbidity of these techniques, transoral surgical (TOS) approaches have been developed progressively. They include transoral laser microsurgery (TLM), transoral robotic surgery (TORS), and conventional transoral techniques. Meta-analysis comparing these new approaches with radiotherapy showed equivalent efficacy in terms of oncologic results. Furthermore, studies reporting on functional outcomes in patients undergoing TOS for OPSCC did not show major long-term functional impairment following treatment. Given the abovementioned statements, it is our practice to treat early stage OPSCC as follows: whenever a single modality treatment seems feasible (T1-2 and N0-1), we advocate TOS resection of the primary tumor associated with selective neck dissection, as indicated. In our opinion, the advantage of this approach relies on the possibility to stratify the risk of disease progression based on the pathological features of the tumor. Depending on the results, adjuvant radiation treatment or chemoradiotherapy can be chosen for high-risk patients. For tumors without adverse features, no adjuvant treatment is given. This approach also allows prevention of

  8. Radiofrequency Ablation of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Marc; Mikityansky, Igor; Kam, Anthony; Libutti, Steven K.; Walther, McClellan M.; Neeman, Ziv; Locklin, Julia K.; Wood, Bradford J.

    2008-01-01

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) has been used for over 18 years for treatment of nerve-related chronic pain and cardiac arrhythmias. In the last 10 years, technical developments have increased ablation volumes in a controllable, versatile, and relatively inexpensive manner. The host of clinical applications for RFA have similarly expanded. Current RFA equipment, techniques, applications, results, complications, and research avenues for local tumor ablation are summarized. PMID:15383844

  9. Radiofrequency Ablation of Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, Marc; Mikityansky, Igor; Kam, Anthony; Libutti, Steven K.; Walther, McClellan M.; Neeman, Ziv; Locklin, Julia K.; Wood, Bradford J.

    2004-09-15

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) has been used for over 18 years for treatment of nerve-related chronic pain and cardiac arrhythmias. In the last 10 years, technical developments have increased ablation volumes in a controllable, versatile, and relatively inexpensive manner. The host of clinical applications for RFA have similarly expanded. Current RFA equipment, techniques, applications, results, complications, and research avenues for local tumor ablation are summarized.

  10. Genes Associated With Prognosis After Surgery For Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma Promote Tumor Cell Survival In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Mesothelioma is an aggressive neoplasm with few effective treatments, one being cytoreductive surgery. We previously described a test, based on differential expression levels of four genes, to predict clinical outcome in prospectively consented mesothelioma patients after surgery. In this study, we determined whether any of these four genes could be linked to a cancer relevant phenotype. Methods We conducted a high-throughput RNA inhibition screen to knockdown gene expression levels of the four genes comprising the test (ARHGDIA, COBLL1, PKM2, TM4SF1) in both a human lung-derived normal and a tumor cell line using three different small inhibitory RNA molecules per gene. Successful knockdown was confirmed using quantitative RT-PCR. Detection of statistically significant changes in apoptosis and mitosis was performed using immunological assays and quantified using video-assisted microscopy at a single time-point. Changes in nuclear shape, size, and numbers were used to provide additional support of initial findings. Each experiment was conducted in triplicate. Specificity was assured by requiring that at least 2 different siRNAs produced the observed change in each cell line/time-point/gene/assay combination. Results Knockdown of ARHGDIA, COBLL1, and TM4SF1 resulted in 2- to 4-fold increased levels of apoptosis in normal cells (ARHGDIA only) and tumor cells (all three genes). No statistically significant changes were observed in apoptosis after knockdown of PKM2 or for mitosis after knockdown of any gene. Conclusions We provide evidence that ARHGDIA, COBLL1, and TM4SF1 are negative regulators of apoptosis in cultured tumor cells. These genes, and their related intracellular signaling pathways, may represent potential therapeutic targets in mesothelioma. PMID:21569526

  11. Treatment of Giant Fibroadenoma in Young Women: Results after Tumor Excision without Reconstructive Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Hille-Betz, U.; Klapdor, R.; Henseler, H.; Soergel, P.; Länger, F.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Giant fibroadenoma (GFA) of the breast is defined as fibroadenoma larger than 5 cm, usually presenting unilaterally and manifesting as breast asymmetry or deformity of the breast. Material and Methods: A retrospective database search was done of all patients with giant fibroadenoma who underwent surgery for GFA in the breast center of Hanover Medical School between 2007 and 2014; all patients with GFA were followed up. Data were analyzed with regard to tumor and patient characteristics and esthetic outcome. Results: A total of 13 patients with symptomatic GFA underwent surgery between 2007 and 2014. Mean patient age was 21.2 years (range 14–31 years). In 8 of 13 patients the tumor had resulted in breast deformity and/or breast asymmetry. Average size of the mass was 10.2 cm (range 8.5–12 cm) and average weight was 203.6 g (range 151.2–323.5 g). Initial clinical suspicion of GFA was confirmed by ultrasound examination. Preoperative core biopsy revealed fibroadenoma in 8/13 cases, cellular fibroepithelial lesions with a differential diagnosis of benign phyllodes tumor in 3 cases and unspecific histological findings in the remaining 2 cases. Conclusion: Excision was done using an inframammary or periareolar approach without reconstructive plasty. The cosmetic results were good, as were the outcomes on follow-up. We therefore favor this surgical technique to treat giant fibroadenoma of similar size to those described above. PMID:26500369

  12. Surgery and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Children With Extracranial Germ Cell Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-06

    Childhood Embryonal Tumor; Childhood Extracranial Germ Cell Tumor; Childhood Extragonadal Germ Cell Tumor; Childhood Malignant Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Childhood Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Childhood Teratoma; Ovarian Embryonal Carcinoma; Ovarian Yolk Sac Tumor; Stage II Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage III Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Testicular Choriocarcinoma and Yolk Sac Tumor; Testicular Embryonal Carcinoma

  13. Evaluation of Clinical Results and Complications of Structural Allograft Reconstruction after Bone Tumor Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Gharedaghi, Mohammad; Peivandi, Mohammad Taghi; Mazloomi, Mehdi; Shoorin, Hasan Rahimi; Hasani, Mohammad; Seyf, Parham; Khazaee, Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Massive bone allograft is an option in cases of limb preservation and reconstruction after massive benign and malignant bone tumor resection. The purpose of this study was to analyze the outcome of these procedures at Imam Reza Hospital, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences. Methods: In this study, 113 cases have been presented. Eleven cases were excluded (patients has a traumatic defect or they passed away before the completion of the study’s two-year follow up period). Each patient completed a questionnaire, went through a physical examination and, if indicated, X-ray information was collected. The patients were divided into three groups: chemotherapy, chemotherapy plus radiation therapy, and no-adjuvant-therapy. Results: Fifty-four cases were male and the mean age was 24.5±5.39. The number of cases and indications for surgery were: 33 cases of aggressive benign tumors or low grade malignant bone tumors (large bone defects) including 16 germ cell tumors, eight aneurysmal bone cysts, five low grade osteosarcomas, and four chondrosarcomas. Another 69 cases were high-grade malignant bone tumors including 42 osteosarcomas, 21 Ewing’s sarcoma, and six other high grade osteosarcomas. Patients were divided into three groups: the first group received no adjuvant therapy, the second group received chemotherapy, and the third group received chemotherapy plus radiotherapy. The location of tumors were as follows: eight cases in the pelvic bone, 12 in the proximal femur, 18 in the femoral shaft, 36 in the distal femur, 12 in the proximal tibia, and 16 in the humeral bone. The 12 cases of proximal femoral defects were reconstructed by allograft composite prosthesis, 18 diaphyseal defects with intercalary allograft, and 36 distal femoral defects were reconstructed using osteoarticular allograft. The rate of deep infection was 7:8% (eight patients) and in this regard, we found a significant difference among the three groups, such that most cases of infection

  14. Clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of foam sclerotherapy, endovenous laser ablation and surgery for varicose veins: results from the Comparison of LAser, Surgery and foam Sclerotherapy (CLASS) randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed Central

    Brittenden, Julie; Cotton, Seonaidh C; Elders, Andrew; Tassie, Emma; Scotland, Graham; Ramsay, Craig R; Norrie, John; Burr, Jennifer; Francis, Jill; Wileman, Samantha; Campbell, Bruce; Bachoo, Paul; Chetter, Ian; Gough, Michael; Earnshaw, Jonothan; Lees, Tim; Scott, Julian; Baker, Sara A; MacLennan, Graeme; Prior, Maria; Bolsover, Denise; Campbell, Marion K

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Foam sclerotherapy (foam) and endovenous laser ablation (EVLA) have emerged as alternative treatments to surgery for patients with varicose veins, but uncertainty exists regarding their effectiveness in the medium to longer term. OBJECTIVES To assess the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of foam, EVLA and surgery for the treatment of varicose veins. DESIGN A parallel-group randomised controlled trial (RCT) without blinding, and economic modelling evaluation. SETTING Eleven UK specialist vascular centres. PARTICIPANTS Seven hundred and ninety-eight patients with primary varicose veins (foam, n = 292; surgery, n = 294; EVLA, n = 212). INTERVENTIONS Patients were randomised between all three treatment options (eight centres) or between foam and surgery (three centres). PRIMARY OUTCOME MEASURES Disease-specific [Aberdeen Varicose Vein Questionnaire (AVVQ)] and generic [European Quality of Life-5 Dimensions (EQ-5D), Short Form questionnaire-36 items (SF-36) physical and mental component scores] quality of life (QoL) at 6 months. Cost-effectiveness as cost per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) gained. SECONDARY OUTCOME MEASURES Quality of life at 6 weeks; residual varicose veins; Venous Clinical Severity Score (VCSS); complication rates; return to normal activity; truncal vein ablation rates; and costs. RESULTS The results appear generalisable in that participants' baseline characteristics (apart from a lower-than-expected proportion of females) and post-treatment improvement in outcomes were comparable with those in other RCTs. The health gain achieved in the AVVQ with foam was significantly lower than with surgery at 6 months [effect size -1.74, 95% confidence interval (CI) -2.97 to -0.50; p = 0.006], but was similar to that achieved with EVLA. The health gain in SF-36 mental component score for foam was worse than that for EVLA (effect size 1.54, 95% CI 0.01 to 3.06; p = 0.048) but similar to that for surgery. There were no

  15. [Three procedures of transanal minimally invasive surgery (TAMIS) for advanced mid-low rectal tumor].

    PubMed

    Shen, Zhanlong; Ye, Yingjiang; Atallah, Sam; Xie, Qiwei; Jiang, Kewei; Wang, Shan

    2015-10-25

    Transanal minimally invasive surgery (TAMIS) is a novel minimally invasive procedure which is performed by normal laparoscopic instruments through the single port transanally. Three kinds of procedures have been performed based on the TAMIS platform by now, including TAMIS-TME(total mesorectal excision), TAMIS-APE(Abdominoperineal excision) and TAMIS-Hartmann. Transanal total mesorectal excision (taTME) with dissection from bottom to up through the platform of TAMIS is also called TAMIS-TME. The greatest advantage of TAMIS-TME is that it increases the quality of specimen and decrease the adverse injury due to the sufficient vision of lower part of mesorectum in the operation. TAMIS-APE and TAMIS-Hartmann procedures emerge after the experience of TAMIS-TME. TAMIS-APE procedure not only firstly make the dissection of perineal phase minimally invasive, but also make the perineal vision more clear, the resection of levator ani muscle more precise, eventually the tailored APE procedure comes true under the laparoscopy of perineal phase. The dissection of mid-low mesorectum for recurrent tumor is usually difficult just from above, TAMIS facilitates the resection through entering the normal anatomical space under the tumor. If the tumor has the risk of recurrence, distal rectum is closed and proximal colostomy is made, we firstly performed this procedure and name it TAMIS-Hartmann. Therefore, TAMIS is not only a platform for taTME, but also it provides a transanal approach and a "button to up" conception for the mid-low rectal tumor. PMID:26499144

  16. Treatment of Neuroendocrine Cancer Metastatic to the Liver: The Role of Ablative Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Atwell, T.D. Charboneau, J.W.; Que, F.G.; Rubin, J.; Lewis, B.D.; Nagorney, D.M.; Callstrom, M.R.; Farrell, M.A.; Pitot, H.C.; Hobday, T.J.

    2005-05-15

    Carcinoid tumors and islet cell neoplasms are neuroendocrine neoplasms with indolent patterns of growth and association with bizarre hormone syndromes. These tumors behave in a relatively protracted and predictable manner, which allows for multiple therapeutic options. Even in the presence of hepatic metastases, the standard of treatment for neuroendocrine malignancy is surgery, either with curative intent or for tumor cytoreduction, i.e., resection of 90% or more of the tumor volume. Image-guided ablation, as either an adjunct to surgery or a primary treatment modality, can be used to treat neuroendocrine cancer metastatic to the liver. Image-guided ablative techniques, including radiofrequency ablation, alcohol injection, and cryoablation, can be used in selected patients to debulk hepatic tumors and improve patient symptoms. Although long-term follow-up data are not available, the surgical literature indicates that significant ablative debulking may improve patient survival. In this review, we discuss metastatic neuroendocrine disease and its treatment options, especially image-guided ablative techniques.

  17. Determinants of Local Progression After Computed Tomography-Guided Percutaneous Radiofrequency Ablation for Unresectable Lung Tumors: 9-Year Experience in a Single Institution

    SciTech Connect

    Okuma, Tomohisa Matsuoka, Toshiyuki; Yamamoto, Akira; Oyama, Yoshimasa; Hamamoto, Shinichi; Toyoshima, Masami; Nakamura, Kenji; Miki, Yukio

    2010-08-15

    The purpose of this study was to retrospectively determine the local control rate and contributing factors to local progression after computed tomography (CT)-guided radiofrequency ablation (RFA) for unresectable lung tumor. This study included 138 lung tumors in 72 patients (56 men and 16 women; age 70.0 {+-} 11.6 years (range 31-94); mean tumor size 2.1 {+-} 1.2 cm [range 0.2-9]) who underwent lung RFA between June 2000 and May 2009. Mean follow-up periods for patients and tumors were 14 and 12 months, respectively. The local progression-free rate and survival rate were calculated to determine the contributing factors to local progression. During follow-up, 44 of 138 (32%) lung tumors showed local progression. The 1-, 2-, 3-, and 5-year overall local control rates were 61, 57, 57, and 38%, respectively. The risk factors for local progression were age ({>=}70 years), tumor size ({>=}2 cm), sex (male), and no achievement of roll-off during RFA (P < 0.05). Multivariate analysis identified tumor size {>=}2 cm as the only independent factor for local progression (P = 0.003). For tumors <2 cm, 17 of 68 (25%) showed local progression, and the 1-, 2-, and 3-year overall local control rates were 77, 73, and 73%, respectively. Multivariate analysis identified that age {>=}70 years was an independent determinant of local progression for tumors <2 cm in diameter (P = 0.011). The present study showed that 32% of lung tumors developed local progression after CT-guided RFA. The significant risk factor for local progression after RFA for lung tumors was tumor size {>=}2 cm.

  18. Nonunion of mandibular midline osteotomy after tumor surgery and radiation repaired by endosseous implants.

    PubMed

    Taub, Daniel; Tursun, Ramzey; Gold, Lionel; Jamal, Basem T

    2010-04-01

    Nonunion of the mandible after microvascular flap reconstruction of defects resulting from tumor surgery is a known but rare complication, occurring in 5% of cases. When nonunion results with the use of microvascular flaps, rigid internal fixation, and radiotherapy, other options to treat the nonunion carry a greater risk of osteomyelitis, osteoradionecrosis, and/or persistent nonunion. Although endosseous implants have been reported to cause mandibular fracture in some cases, our case proposes and supports the use of implants for immobilization and/or prevention of nonunion of the mandible in patients who have a high probability of this complication developing, thereby avoiding plating across the nonunion site with the risk of plate exposure and osteoradionecrosis. This technique permitted a good quality of life in our patient during the healing period. He was able to masticate and phonate properly when compared with other treatment options that would have required external and/or intermaxillary fixation devices. PMID:20044192

  19. Retractorless surgery for a pineal region tumor through an occipital transtentorial approach.

    PubMed

    Nakao, Naoyuki

    2016-01-01

    This video demonstrates surgical techniques of the occipital transtentorial approach to a pineal region tumor without using a fixed brain retractor, which may cause functional impairment or even tissue injury to the occipital visual cortex. There are several ways to facilitate retractorless surgery through this approach. A lateral-semiprone positioning of the patient can induce gravity retraction. The brain is relaxed by draining CSF fluid through lumbar drainage or lateral ventricular tap in the case of obstructive hydrocephalus. Dynamic retraction with handheld instruments after extensive dissection of the deep venous system, including basal veins, can provide a sufficient working space. The video can be found here: https://youtu.be/kQvEHiNcRow . PMID:26722684

  20. Laparoscopic repair of diaphragm perforation with heart patch after microwave ablation

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Qing-Chen; Tian, Yan-Jie; Xiao-Jiang, Ting

    2016-01-01

    Microwave ablation (MWA) is a new technology developed in recent years, which is widely used in various disciplines. Microwave ablation is an alternative to surgery in the management of various tumors, and it has been demonstrated to be effective in the management of primary tumors and metastatic tumors. Microwave ablation is widely used in the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma with an obvious effect and less side effects, and only 2.7% had serious complications. Many studies have confirmed the complications are thermal damage, hemorrhage, pleural effusion, bile leak, tumor seeding, hepatic abscess, cholangitis, and so forth. But diaphragm perforation is rare, and it is probably the first case reported. This article describes diaphragmatic perforation secondary to MWA of the liver with subsequent pleural effusion and diaphragmatic hernia. We also describe its management via the laparoscopic approach. PMID:26905357

  1. Early prediction of tumor recurrence based on CT texture changes after stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) for lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Mattonen, Sarah A.; Palma, David A.; Haasbeek, Cornelis J. A.; Senan, Suresh; Ward, Aaron D.

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: Benign computed tomography (CT) changes due to radiation induced lung injury (RILI) are common following stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) and can be difficult to differentiate from tumor recurrence. The authors measured the ability of CT image texture analysis, compared to more traditional measures of response, to predict eventual cancer recurrence based on CT images acquired within 5 months of treatment. Methods: A total of 24 lesions from 22 patients treated with SABR were selected for this study: 13 with moderate to severe benign RILI, and 11 with recurrence. Three-dimensional (3D) consolidative and ground-glass opacity (GGO) changes were manually delineated on all follow-up CT scans. Two size measures of the consolidation regions (longest axial diameter and 3D volume) and nine appearance features of the GGO were calculated: 2 first-order features [mean density and standard deviation of density (first-order texture)], and 7 second-order texture features [energy, entropy, correlation, inverse difference moment (IDM), inertia, cluster shade, and cluster prominence]. For comparison, the corresponding response evaluation criteria in solid tumors measures were also taken for the consolidation regions. Prediction accuracy was determined using the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) and two-fold cross validation (CV). Results: For this analysis, 46 diagnostic CT scans scheduled for approximately 3 and 6 months post-treatment were binned based on their recorded scan dates into 2–5 month and 5–8 month follow-up time ranges. At 2–5 months post-treatment, first-order texture, energy, and entropy provided AUCs of 0.79–0.81 using a linear classifier. On two-fold CV, first-order texture yielded 73% accuracy versus 76%–77% with the second-order features. The size measures of the consolidative region, longest axial diameter and 3D volume, gave two-fold CV accuracies of 60% and 57%, and AUCs of 0.72 and 0.65, respectively

  2. Irreversible Electroporation for Focal Ablation at the Porta Hepatis

    SciTech Connect

    Kasivisvanathan, Veeru; Thapar, Ankur Oskrochi, Youssof; Picard, John; Leen, Edward L. S.

    2012-12-15

    Patients with chemotherapy-refractory liver metastases who are not candidates for surgery may be treated with focal ablation techniques with established survival benefits. Irreversible electroporation is the newest of these and has the putative advantages of a nonthermal action, preventing damage to adjacent biliary structures and bowel. This report describes the use of irreversible electroporation in a 61-year-old man with a solitary chemoresistant liver metastasis unsuitable for radiofrequency ablation as a result of its proximity to the porta hepatis. At 3 months, tumor size was decreased on computed tomography from 28 Multiplication-Sign 19 to 20 Multiplication-Sign 17 mm, representing stable disease according to the response evaluation criteria in solid tumors. This corresponded to a decrease in tumor volume size from 5.25 to 3.16 cm{sup 3}. There were no early or late complications. Chemoresistant liver metastases in the proximity of the porta hepatis that are considered to be too high a risk for conventional surgery or thermal ablation may be considered for treatment by the novel ablation technique of irreversible electroporation.

  3. Combination Chemotherapy and Surgery in Treating Young Patients With Wilms Tumor

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-07-27

    Adult Renal Wilms Tumor; Beckwith-Wiedemann Syndrome; Childhood Renal Wilms Tumor; Diffuse Hyperplastic Perilobar Nephroblastomatosis; Hemihypertrophy; Stage I Renal Wilms Tumor; Stage II Renal Wilms Tumor; Stage III Renal Wilms Tumor; Stage IV Renal Wilms Tumor; Stage V Renal Wilms Tumor

  4. Prognostic Impact of Time to Ipsilateral Breast Tumor Recurrence after Breast Conserving Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Gosset, Marie; Hamy, Anne-Sophie; Mallon, Peter; Delomenie, Myriam; Mouttet, Delphine; Pierga, Jean-Yves; Lae, Marick; Fourquet, Alain; Rouzier, Roman; Reyal, Fabien; Feron, Jean-Guillaume

    2016-01-01

    Background The poor prognosis of patients who experience ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR) after breast conserving surgery (BCS) is established. A short time between primary cancer and IBTR is a prognostic factor but no clinically relevant threshold was determined. Classification of IBTR may help tailor treatment strategies. Purpose We determined a specific time frame, which differentiates IBTR into early and late recurrence, and identified prognostic factors for patients with IBTR at time of the recurrence. Methods We analyzed 2209 patients with IBTR after BCS. We applied the optimal cut-points method for survival data to determine the cut-off times to IBTR. A subgroup analysis was performed by hormone receptor (HR) status. Survival analyses were performed using a Cox proportional hazard model to determine clinical features associated with distant-disease-free survival (DDFS) after IBTR. We therefor built decision trees. Results On the 828 metastatic events observed, the majority occurred within the first 3 months after IBTR: 157 in the HR positive group, 98 in the HR negative group. We found different prognostic times to IBTR: 49 months in the HR positive group, 33 in the HR negative group. After multivariate analysis, time to IBTR was the first discriminant prognostic factor in both groups (HR 0.65 CI95% [0.54–0.79] and 0.42 [0.30–0.57] respectively). The other following variables were significantly correlated with the DDFS: the initial number of positive lymph nodes for both groups, the initial tumor size and grade for HR positive tumors. Conclusion A short interval time to IBTR is the strongest factor of poor prognosis and reflects occult distant disease. It would appear that prognosis after IBTR depends more on clinical and histological parameters than on surgical treatment. A prospective trial in a low-risk group of patients to validate the safety of salvage BCS instead of mastectomy in IBTR is needed. PMID:27494111

  5. [The use of twist drill craniostomy in stereotactic surgery for brain tumors].

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, K; Tomita, S; Nakagawa, M; Adachi, H; Tada, E; Maeda, Y; Furuta, T; Ohmoto, T

    1995-12-01

    A twist drill craniostomy is a rapid and relatively simple technique for perforating the skull in order to gain access to the epidural and subdural spaces and the brain. Fifty-eight patients underwent 173 twist drill craniostomies in the stereotactic procedures for the diagnosis and the treatment of brain tumors (brain tumor biopsy, implanting radioactive sources and placement of the catheters for navigation surgery) from September, 1992, through to May, 1995, at our institute. The technique was compared with standard burr hole craniostomy used in 42 patients with brain tumor. In the twist drill craniostomy, the scalp was penetrated directly by hand twist drill (2.7 mm in diameter) and scalp bleeding was able to be be controlled by injecting local anesthetic with epinephrine subcutaneously. The safety stop on the drill was set in advance based on the expected thickness of the skull at its penetration point to provide control of penetration depth as it passed through the skull hole and dura. A hole in the skull was made as the drill was advanced until a change in resistance indicated that the inner table of the skull had been penetrated and the dura lacerated. The cannula with stylet was then inserted through the guide tube to assure the penetration of the skull and dura. As the cannula penetrated the dura, a loss of resistance was noted as it proceeded through the dura toward the pial surface, The time needed in this procedure was less than 3 minutes. Associated with this procedure, there were no complications such as bleeding, or infection in 173 twist drill craniostomies in the 58 patients. Our experience with this procedure proved it to be simple, efficient, safe and superior to conventional burr hole craniostomy. PMID:8927216

  6. A Fluorescence-Guided Laser Ablation System for Removal of Residual Cancer in a Mouse Model of Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Lazarides, Alexander L.; Whitley, Melodi J.; Strasfeld, David B.; Cardona, Diana M.; Ferrer, Jorge M.; Mueller, Jenna L.; Fu, Henry L.; DeWitt, Suzanne Bartholf; Brigman, Brian E.; Ramanujam, Nimmi; Kirsch, David G.; Eward, William C.

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of soft tissue sarcoma (STS) generally involves tumor excision with a wide margin. Although advances in fluorescence imaging make real-time detection of cancer possible, removal is limited by the precision of the human eye and hand. Here, we describe a novel pulsed Nd:YAG laser ablation system that, when used in conjunction with a previously described molecular imaging system, can identify and ablate cancer in vivo. Mice with primary STS were injected with the protease-activatable probe LUM015 to label tumors. Resected tissues from the mice were then imaged and treated with the laser using the paired fluorescence-imaging/ laser ablation device, generating ablation clefts with sub-millimeter precision and minimal underlying tissue damage. Laser ablation was guided by fluorescence to target tumor tissues, avoiding normal structures. The selective ablation of tumor implants in vivo improved recurrence-free survival after tumor resection in a cohort of 14 mice compared to 12 mice that received no ablative therapy. This prototype system has the potential to be modified so that it can be used during surgery to improve recurrence-free survival in patients with cancer. PMID:26877775

  7. Single-Incision Laparoscopic Surgery for a Small-Intestinal Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor: Report of a Case

    PubMed Central

    Sakai, Makoto; Wada, Wataru; Kimura, Shintaro; Okada, Akiko; Hirakata, Tomoko; Onozato, Ryoichi; Saito, Kana; Morohara, Koji; Osawa, Hidenobu; Katayama, Kazuhisa; Yasuda, Naokuni; Tanaka, Shigebumi; Kuwano, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    Our report concerns a 64-year-old man with a small-intestinal gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST), which was successfully treated with single-incision laparoscopic surgery (SILS). Small-bowel endoscopy detected a submucosal tumor located approximately 10 cm from the ligament of Treitz in the wall of the proximal jejunum. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography revealed a tumor (diameter, 4 cm) containing high- and low-density areas in the proximal jejunum. On 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron-emission tomography (PET), the tumor demonstrated intense FDG uptake (maximum standard uptake value, 3.82), whereas it displayed high signal intensity on diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance images. No metastatic lesions were observed. The patient was diagnosed with a jejunal GIST. Wedge resection of the jejunum was performed using the SILS procedure. The tumor was histopathologically diagnosed as a low-grade malignant GIST. SILS is a useful resection technique for small-intestinal GIST. PMID:25058785

  8. More Complete Removal of Malignant Brain Tumors by Fluorescence-Guided Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-13

    Benign Neoplasms, Brain; Brain Cancer; Brain Neoplasms, Benign; Brain Neoplasms, Malignant; Brain Tumor, Primary; Brain Tumor, Recurrent; Brain Tumors; Intracranial Neoplasms; Neoplasms, Brain; Neoplasms, Intracranial; Primary Brain Neoplasms; Primary Malignant Brain Neoplasms; Primary Malignant Brain Tumors; Gliomas; Glioblastoma

  9. Percutaneous Radiofrequency Ablation of Painful Spinal Tumors Adjacent to the Spinal Cord with Real-Time Monitoring of Spinal Canal Temperature: A Prospective Study

    SciTech Connect

    Nakatsuka, Atsuhiro Yamakado, Koichiro; Takaki, Haruyuki; Uraki, Junji; Makita, Masashi; Oshima, Fumiyoshi; Takeda, Kan

    2009-01-15

    PurposeTo prospectively evaluate the feasibility, safety, and clinical utility of bone radiofrequency (RF) ablation with real-time monitoring of the spinal canal temperature for the treatment of spinal tumors adjacent to the spinal cord.Materials and MethodsOur Institutional Review Board approved this study. Patients gave informed consent. The inclusion criteria were (a) a painful spinal metastasis and (b) a distance of 1 cm or less between the metastasis and the spinal cord. The thermocouple was placed in the spinal canal under CT fluoroscopic guidance. When the spinal canal temperature reached 45{sup o}C, RF application was immediately stopped. RF ablation was considered technically successful when the procedure was performed without major complications. Clinical success was defined as a fall in the visual analogue scale score of at least 2 points.ResultsTen patients with spinal tumors measuring 3-8 cm (mean, 4.9 {+-} 1.5 cm) were enrolled. The distance between the tumor and the spinal cord was 1-6 mm (mean, 2.4 {+-} 1.6 mm). All procedures were judged technically successful (100%). The spinal canal temperature did not exceed 45{sup o}C in 9 of the 10 patients (90%). In the remaining patient, the temperature rose to 48{sup o}C, resulting in transient neural damage, although RF application was immediately stopped when the temperature reached 45{sup o}C. Clinical success was achieved within 1 week in all patients (100%).ConclusionBone RF ablation with real-time monitoring of the spinal canal temperature is feasible, safe, and clinically useful for the treatment of painful spinal metastases adjacent to the spinal cord.

  10. Semiquantitative Analysis Using Thallium-201 SPECT for Differential Diagnosis Between Tumor Recurrence and Radiation Necrosis After Gamma Knife Surgery for Malignant Brain Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Matsunaga, Shigeo; Shuto, Takashi; Takase, Hajime; Ohtake, Makoto; Tomura, Nagatsuki; Tanaka, Takahiro; Sonoda, Masaki

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Semiquantitative analysis of thallium-201 chloride single photon emission computed tomography ({sup 201}Tl SPECT) was evaluated for the discrimination between recurrent brain tumor and delayed radiation necrosis after gamma knife surgery (GKS) for metastatic brain tumors and high-grade gliomas. Methods and Materials: The medical records were reviewed of 75 patients, including 48 patients with metastatic brain tumor and 27 patients with high-grade glioma who underwent GKS in our institution, and had suspected tumor recurrence or radiation necrosis on follow-up neuroimaging and deteriorating clinical status after GKS. Analysis of {sup 201}Tl SPECT data used the early ratio (ER) and the delayed ratio (DR) calculated as tumor/normal average counts on the early and delayed images, and the retention index (RI) as the ratio of DR to ER. Results: A total of 107 tumors were analyzed with {sup 201}Tl SPECT. Nineteen lesions were removed surgically and histological diagnoses established, and the other lesions were evaluated with follow-up clinical and neuroimaging examinations after GKS. The final diagnosis was considered to be recurrent tumor in 65 lesions and radiation necrosis in 42 lesions. Semiquantitative analysis demonstrated significant differences in DR (P=.002) and RI (P<.0001), but not in ER (P=.372), between the tumor recurrence and radiation necrosis groups, and no significant differences between metastatic brain tumors and high-grade gliomas in all indices (P=.926 for ER, P=.263 for DR, and P=.826 for RI). Receiver operating characteristics analysis indicated that RI was the most informative index with the optimum threshold of 0.775, which provided 82.8% sensitivity, 83.7% specificity, and 82.8% accuracy. Conclusions: Semiquantitative analysis of {sup 201}Tl SPECT provides useful information for the differentiation between tumor recurrence and radiation necrosis in metastatic brain tumors and high-grade gliomas after GKS, and the RI may be the most

  11. Metabolic approach for tumor delineation in glioma surgery: 3D MR spectroscopy image-guided resection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Zhuang, Dong-Xiao; Yao, Cheng-Jun; Lin, Ching-Po; Wang, Tian-Liang; Qin, Zhi-Yong; Wu, Jin-Song

    2016-06-01

    OBJECT The extent of resection is one of the most essential factors that influence the outcomes of glioma resection. However, conventional structural imaging has failed to accurately delineate glioma margins because of tumor cell infiltration. Three-dimensional proton MR spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS) can provide metabolic information and has been used in preoperative tumor differentiation, grading, and radiotherapy planning. Resection based on glioma metabolism information may provide for a more extensive resection and yield better outcomes for glioma patients. In this study, the authors attempt to integrate 3D (1)H-MRS into neuronavigation and assess the feasibility and validity of metabolically based glioma resection. METHODS Choline (Cho)-N-acetylaspartate (NAA) index (CNI) maps were calculated and integrated into neuronavigation. The CNI thresholds were quantitatively analyzed and compared with structural MRI studies. Glioma resections were performed under 3D (1)H-MRS guidance. Volumetric analyses were performed for metabolic and structural images from a low-grade glioma (LGG) group and high-grade glioma (HGG) group. Magnetic resonance imaging and neurological assessments were performed immediately after surgery and 1 year after tumor resection. RESULTS Fifteen eligible patients with primary cerebral gliomas were included in this study. Three-dimensional (1)H-MRS maps were successfully coregistered with structural images and integrated into navigational system. Volumetric analyses showed that the differences between the metabolic volumes with different CNI thresholds were statistically significant (p < 0.05). For the LGG group, the differences between the structural and the metabolic volumes with CNI thresholds of 0.5 and 1.5 were statistically significant (p = 0.0005 and 0.0129, respectively). For the HGG group, the differences between the structural and metabolic volumes with CNI thresholds of 0.5 and 1.0 were statistically significant (p = 0.0027 and 0

  12. Preoperative embolization versus local hemostatic agents in surgery of hypervascular spinal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Ptashnikov, Dmitry; Mikhaylov, Dmitry; Masevnin, Sergei

    2014-01-01

    Background Currently, there is no consensus about how to reduce the intraoperative risk of hemorrhage in spinal decompression surgery of hypervascular spinal tumors, such as aggressive hemangioma, multiple myeloma, plasmacytoma, metastasis of renal cell carcinoma. Methods A retrospective study of 110 patients, operated in our institute was held in the period between 2003 and 2013. There were 69 male and 41 female patients with extradural hypervascular spinal tumor. The study included 61 patients with metastasis of renal cell carcinoma, 27 with multiple myeloma, 15 with plasmacytoma and 7 with aggressive hemangioma. The first group included 57 patients who underwent preoperative tumor embolization. The second group consisted of 53 patients, which were treated surgically using intraoperative local hemostatic agents. We performed 2 types of treatment options: palliative decompression and total spondylectomy. The first group was divided into two subgroups: 30 patients with palliative decompression (1PD) and 27 with total spondylectomy (1TS). In the second group there were: 28 patients with palliative decompression (2PD) and 25 with total spondylectomy (2TS). The parameters under evaluation were the blood loss volume, drainage loss, operation time, hemoglobin level, possible complications and time of hospital stay. Results The average intraoperative blood loss for all embolized patients was slightly less than in subgroups with local hemostatic agents. No significant difference in blood loss volume was found between groups 1PD and 2PD (p > 0.05). In groups 1TS and 2TS, we did get significant difference (p < 0.05). Statistically significant difference in the average drainage loss was found between two methods of hemostasis in both subgroups (p < 0.05). The operation time was not significantly different between groups. Postoperative hemoglobin level reduce is almost equal in both groups of patients. Postoperative complications were also nearly equal in the groups. The

  13. Radiofrequency Ablation Versus Partial Nephrectomy in Treating Small Renal Tumors: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Yin, Xiaotao; Cui, Liang; Li, Fanglong; Qi, Siyong; Yin, Zhaoyang; Gao, Jiangping

    2015-12-01

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) has emerged as an alternative treatment to surgical partial nephrectomy (PN) in the treatment of small renal tumors (SRTs). But its safety and oncological efficacy are still controversial. We conducted this systematic review and meta-analysis to compare the peritoperative and oncological outcomes of RFA and PN in the treatment of SRTs. Pubmed, EMBASE, Cochrane CENTRAL, and Web of Science were searched to identify eligible studies that compared the RFA and PN in the treatment of SRTs. Twelve retrospective studies that compared RFA with PN in the treatment of SRTs met our selection criterion and were included in this meta-analysis. The pooled results indicated that the local recurrence rate (4.14% vs 4.10%, RR: 1.18, 95% CI: 0.68, 2.07, P = 0.550) and distant metastases rate (2.76% vs 1.89%, RR: 1.31, 95% CI: 0.70, 2.46, P = 0.686) were not significantly different between the RFA group and the PN group. In terms of perioperative outcomes, RFA was associated with shorter length of stay (LOS) (WMD: -2.02 days, 95% CI: -2.77, -1.27, P < 0.001), lower eGFR decline after treatment (WMD: -3.90, 95% CI: -6.660, -1.140, P = 0.006). However, the overall perioperative complication rate (7.5% vs 6.2%, RR:1.10, 95% CI: 0.64, 1.87, P = 0.740) and the major complication rate (3.7% vs 4.4%, RR: 0.83, 95% CI: 0.43, 1.60, P = 0.579) were both similar between RFA and PN groups. Compared with PN, RFA achieves an equal oncological outcome for SRTs with similar local recurrence rate and distant metastases rate. Additionally, RFA is associated with a similar perioperative complication rate, lower decline of eGFR, and shorter LOS. Therefore, RFA is an effective option in the treatment of SRTs for selected patients. PMID:26683944

  14. Outcome of patients with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy after percutaneous transluminal septal myocardial ablation and septal myectomy surgery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Qin, J. X.; Shiota, T.; Lever, H. M.; Kapadia, S. R.; Sitges, M.; Rubin, D. N.; Bauer, F.; Greenberg, N. L.; Agler, D. A.; Drinko, J. K.; Martin, M.; Tuzcu, E. M.; Smedira, N. G.; Lytle, B.; Thomas, J. D.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study was conducted to evaluate follow-up results in patients with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy (HOCM) who underwent either percutaneous transluminal septal myocardial ablation (PTSMA) or septal myectomy. BACKGROUND: Controversy exists with regard to these two forms of treatment for patients with HOCM. METHODS: Of 51 patients with HOCM treated, 25 were treated by PTSMA and 26 patients via myectomy. Two-dimensional echocardiograms were performed before both procedures, immediately afterwards and at a three-month follow-up. The New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional class was obtained before the procedures and at follow-up. RESULTS: Interventricular septal thickness was significantly reduced at follow-up in both groups (2.3 +/- 0.4 cm vs. 1.9 +/- 0.4 cm for septal ablation and 2.4 +/- 0.6 cm vs. 1.7 +/- 0.2 cm for myectomy, both p < 0.001). Estimated by continuous-wave Doppler, the resting pressure gradient (PG) across the left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT) significantly decreased immediately after the procedures in both groups (64 +/- 39 mm Hg vs. 28 +/- 29 mm Hg for PTSMA, 62 +/- 43 mm Hg vs. 7 +/- 7 mm Hg for myectomy, both p < 0.0001). At three-month follow-up, the resting PG remained lower in the PTSMA and myectomy groups (24 +/- 19 mm Hg and 11 +/- 6 mm Hg, respectively, vs. those before procedures, both p < 0.0001). The NYHA functional class was also significantly improved in both groups (3.5 +/- 0.5 vs. 1.9 +/- 0.7 for PTSMA, 3.3 +/- 0.5 vs. 1.5 +/- 0.7 for myectomy, both p < 0.0001). CONCLUSIONS: Both myectomy and PTSMA reduce LVOT obstruction and significantly improve NYHA functional class in patients with HOCM. However, there are benefits and drawbacks for each therapeutic method that must be counterbalanced when deciding on treatment for LVOT obstruction.

  15. Relation of surgery, tumor site, and age group to the loss of reality testing in Japanese patients with malignant tumors: a study of a hospital-based sample with a consultation-liaison service.

    PubMed

    Yoshimasu, Kouichi; Tanaka, Kazuhiro; Kiyohara, Chikako

    2005-06-01

    The relation between surgery and the loss of reality testing (LRT) in Japanese patients with malignant tumors were examined, taking into account the influence of the tumor sites and age groups. The patients were comprised of 277 men and 225 women with malignant tumors in Kyushu University Hospital, Fukuoka, Japan, who underwent a check-up at the Department of Neuropsychiatry for the first time using the consultation-liaison system. Those with known schizophrenia, dementia, mental retardation, and paranoid or schizoid (schizotypal) personality disorder were excluded. Surgery was statistically significantly associated with LRT in elderly men (> or =65 years of age), and in men with malignant tumors of the digestive organs (odds ratio [OR], 9.7; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 3.2-29.3). Even after adjusting for tumor site and age, surgery was statistically significantly associated with LRT in men (OR, 2.6; 95% CI, 1.4-4.6) and nearly significantly associated in women (OR, 1.8; 95% CI, 0.9-3.6). There were no material associations between surgery and LRT in patients with malignant tumors of sex-specific organs or the head and neck area. The present study showed a positive relationship between surgery and LRT in Japanese men and women with malignant tumors. The association was stronger in elderly patients. As for tumor site, surgery was most strongly associated with an increased risk of LRT in patients with malignant tumors of the digestive organs. PMID:15896218

  16. Radiofrequency ablation of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma: preliminary experience.

    PubMed

    Carrafiello, Gianpaolo; Laganà, Domenico; Cotta, Elisa; Mangini, Monica; Fontana, Federico; Bandiera, Francesca; Fugazzola, Carlo

    2010-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of percutaneous ultrasound (US)-guided radiofrequency ablation (RFA) in patients with intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICCA) in a small, nonrandomized series. From February 2004 to July 2008, six patients (four men and two women; mean age 69.8 years [range 48 to 83]) with ICCA underwent percutaneous US-guided RFA. Preintervetional transarterial embolization was performed in two cases to decrease heat dispersion during RFA in order to increase the area of ablation. The efficacy of RFA was evaluated using contrast-enhanced dynamic computed tomography (CT) 1 month after treatment and then every 3 months thereafter. Nine RFA sessions were performed for six solid hepatic tumors in six patients. The duration of follow-up ranged from 13 to 21 months (mean 17.5). Posttreatment CT showed total necrosis in four of six tumors after one or two RFA sessions. Residual tumor was observed in two patients with larger tumors (5 and 5.8 cm in diameter). All patients tolerated the procedure, and there with no major complications. Only 1 patient developed post-RFA syndrome (pain, fever, malaise, and leukocytosis), which resolved with oral administration of acetaminophen. Percutaneous RFA is a safe and effective treatment for patients with hepatic tumors: It is ideally suited for those who are not eligible for surgery. Long-term follow-up data regarding local and systemic recurrence and survival are still needed. PMID:20411389

  17. Radiofrequency Ablation of Intrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma: Preliminary Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Carrafiello, Gianpaolo Lagana, Domenico; Cotta, Elisa; Mangini, Monica; Fontana, Federico; Bandiera, Francesca; Fugazzola, Carlo

    2010-08-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of percutaneous ultrasound (US)-guided radiofrequency ablation (RFA) in patients with intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICCA) in a small, nonrandomized series. From February 2004 to July 2008, six patients (four men and two women; mean age 69.8 years [range 48 to 83]) with ICCA underwent percutaneous US-guided RFA. Preintervetional transarterial embolization was performed in two cases to decrease heat dispersion during RFA in order to increase the area of ablation. The efficacy of RFA was evaluated using contrast-enhanced dynamic computed tomography (CT) 1 month after treatment and then every 3 months thereafter. Nine RFA sessions were performed for six solid hepatic tumors in six patients. The duration of follow-up ranged from 13 to 21 months (mean 17.5). Posttreatment CT showed total necrosis in four of six tumors after one or two RFA sessions. Residual tumor was observed in two patients with larger tumors (5 and 5.8 cm in diameter). All patients tolerated the procedure, and there with no major complications. Only 1 patient developed post-RFA syndrome (pain, fever, malaise, and leukocytosis), which resolved with oral administration of acetaminophen. Percutaneous RFA is a safe and effective treatment for patients with hepatic tumors: It is ideally suited for those who are not eligible for surgery. Long-term follow-up data regarding local and systemic recurrence and survival are still needed.

  18. Image-guided tumor surgery: will there be a role for fluorescent nanoparticles?

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Tanner K.; Mohs, Aaron M.

    2016-01-01

    Image-guided surgery (IGS) using fluorescent nanoparticles (NPs) has the potential to substantially impact patient treatment. The use of fluorescence imaging provides surgeons with real-time feedback on the location of diseased tissue using safe, low-cost imaging agents and instrumentation. Fluorescent NPs are likely to play a role as they are capable of taking advantage of the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect and can be modified to avoid clearance, increase circulation time, and specifically target tumors. Clinical trials of IGS using the FDA-approved fluorophores indocyanine green and methylene blue have already shown preliminary successes, and incorporation of fluorescent NPs will likely improve detection by providing higher signal to background ratio and reducing false-positive rates through active targeting. Preclinical development of fluorescent NP formulations is advancing rapidly, with strategies ranging from passive targeting to active targeting of cell surface receptors, creating pH-responsive NPs, and increasing cell uptake through cleavable proteins. This collective effort could lead to clinical trials using fluorescent NPs in the near future. PMID:26585556

  19. Image-guided tumor surgery: will there be a role for fluorescent nanoparticles?

    PubMed

    Hill, Tanner K; Mohs, Aaron M

    2016-07-01

    Image-guided surgery (IGS) using fluorescent nanoparticles (NPs) has the potential to substantially impact patient treatment. The use of fluorescence imaging provides surgeons with real-time feedback on the location of diseased tissue using safe, low-cost imaging agents and instrumentation. Fluorescent NPs are likely to play a role as they are capable of taking advantage of the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect and can be modified to avoid clearance, increase circulation time, and specifically target tumors. Clinical trials of IGS using the FDA-approved fluorophores indocyanine green and methylene blue have already shown preliminary successes, and incorporation of fluorescent NPs will likely improve detection by providing higher signal to background ratio and reducing false-positive rates through active targeting. Preclinical development of fluorescent NP formulations is advancing rapidly, with strategies ranging from passive targeting to active targeting of cell surface receptors, creating pH-responsive NPs, and increasing cell uptake through cleavable proteins. This collective effort could lead to clinical trials using fluorescent NPs in the near future. WIREs Nanomed Nanobiotechnol 2016, 8:498-511. doi: 10.1002/wnan.1381 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:26585556

  20. Improved accuracy with 3D planning and patient-specific instruments during simulated pelvic bone tumor surgery.

    PubMed

    Cartiaux, Olivier; Paul, Laurent; Francq, Bernard G; Banse, Xavier; Docquier, Pierre-Louis

    2014-01-01

    In orthopaedic surgery, resection of pelvic bone tumors can be inaccurate due to complex geometry, limited visibility and restricted working space of the pelvis. The present study investigated accuracy of patient-specific instrumentation (PSI) for bone-cutting during simulated tumor surgery within the pelvis. A synthetic pelvic bone model was imaged using a CT-scanner. The set of images was reconstructed in 3D and resection of a simulated periacetabular tumor was defined with four target planes (ischium, pubis, anterior ilium, and posterior ilium) with a 10-mm desired safe margin. Patient-specific instruments for bone-cutting were designed and manufactured using rapid-prototyping technology. Twenty-four surgeons (10 senior and 14 junior) were asked to perform tumor resection. After cutting, ISO1101 location and flatness parameters, achieved surgical margins and the time were measured. With PSI, the location accuracy of the cut planes with respect to the target planes averaged 1 and 1.2 mm in the anterior and posterior ilium, 2 mm in the pubis and 3.7 mm in the ischium (p < 0.0001). Results in terms of the location of the cut planes and the achieved surgical margins did not reveal any significant difference between senior and junior surgeons (p = 0.2214 and 0.8449, respectively). The maximum differences between the achieved margins and the 10-mm desired safe margin were found in the pubis (3.1 and 5.1 mm for senior and junior surgeons respectively). Of the 24 simulated resection, there was no intralesional tumor cutting. This study demonstrates that using PSI technology during simulated bone cuts of the pelvis can provide good cutting accuracy. Compared to a previous report on computer assistance for pelvic bone cutting, PSI technology clearly demonstrates an equivalent value-added for bone cutting accuracy than navigation technology. When in vivo validated, PSI technology may improve pelvic bone tumor surgery by providing clinically acceptable margins. PMID

  1. Comparative Study of Nanosecond Electric Fields In Vitro and In Vivo on Hepatocellular Carcinoma Indicate Macrophage Infiltration Contribute to Tumor Ablation In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xinmei; Jiang, Kai; Ye, Shuming; Feng, Xiaowen; Fan, Shifeng; Xie, Haiyang; Zhou, Lin; Zheng, Shusen

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aim Recurrence and metastasis are associated with poor prognosis in hepatocellular carcinoma even in the patients who have undergone radical resection. Therefore, effective treatment is urgently needed for improvement of patients' survival. Previously, we reported that nanosecond pulse electric fields (nsPEFs) can ablate melanoma by induction of apoptosis and inhibition of angiogenesis. This study aims to investigate the in vivo ablation strategy by comparing the dose effect of nanosecond electric fields in vitro and in vivo on hepatocellular carcinoma. Materials and Methods Four hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines HepG2, SMMC7721, Hep1-6, and HCCLM3 were pulsed to test the anti-proliferation and anti-migration ability of 100 ns nsPEFs in vitro. The animal model of human subdermal xenograft HCCLM3 cells into BALB/c nude mouse was used to test the anti-tumor growth and macrophage infiltration in vivo. Results In vitro assays showed anti-tumor effect of nsPEFs is dose-dependant. But the in vivo study showed the strategy of low dose and multiple treatments is superior to high dose single treatment. The macrophages infiltration significantly increased in the tumors which were treated by multiple low dose nsPEFs. Conclusion The low dose multiple nsPEFs application is more efficient than high dose single treatment in inhibiting the tumor volume in vivo, which is quite different from the dose-effect relationship in vitro. Beside the electric field strength, the macrophage involvement must be considered to account for effect variability and toxicology in vivo. PMID:24475118

  2. Analysis of laser surgery in non-melanoma skin cancer for optimal tissue removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fanjul-Vélez, Félix; Salas-García, Irene; Arce-Diego, José Luis

    2015-02-01

    Laser surgery is a commonly used technique for tissue ablation or the resection of malignant tumors. It presents advantages over conventional non-optical ablation techniques, like a scalpel or electrosurgery, such as the increased precision of the resected volume, minimization of scars and shorter recovery periods. Laser surgery is employed in medical branches such as ophthalmology or dermatology. The application of laser surgery requires the optimal adjustment of laser beam parameters, taking into account the particular patient and lesion. In this work we present a predictive tool for tissue resection in biological tissue after laser surgery, which allows an a priori knowledge of the tissue ablation volume, area and depth. The model employs a Monte Carlo 3D approach for optical propagation and a rate equation for plasma-induced ablation. The tool takes into account characteristics of the specific lesion to be ablated, mainly the geometric, optical and ablation properties. It also considers the parameters of the laser beam, such as the radius, spatial profile, pulse width, total delivered energy or wavelength. The predictive tool is applied to dermatology tumor resection, particularly to different types of non-melanoma skin cancer tumors: basocellular carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma and infiltrative carcinoma. The ablation volume, area and depth are calculated for healthy skin and for each type of tumor as a function of the laser beam parameters. The tool could be used for laser surgery planning before the clinical application. The laser parameters could be adjusted for optimal resection volume, by personalizing the process to the particular patient and lesion.

  3. Feasibility and Timing of Cytoreduction Surgery in Advanced (Metastatic or Recurrent) Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors During the Era of Imatinib

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Shih-Chun; Liao, Chien-Hung; Wang, Shang-Yu; Tsai, Chun-Yi; Chiang, Kun-Chun; Cheng, Chi-Tung; Yeh, Ta-Sen; Chen, Yen-Yang; MA, Ming-Chun; Liu, Chien-Ting; Yeh, Chun-Nan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The prognosis of advanced gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) was dramatically improved in the era of imatinib. Cytoreduction surgery was advocated as an additional treatment for advanced GISTs, especially when patients having poor response to imatinib or developing resistance to it. However, the efficacy and benefit of cytoreduction were still controversial. Likewise, the sequence between cytoreduction surgery and imatinib still need evaluation. In this study, we tried to assess the feasibility and efficiency of cytoreduction in advanced GISTs. Furthermore, we analyzed the impact of timing of the cytoreduction surgery on the prognosis of advanced GISTs. We conducted a prospective collecting retrospective review of patients with advanced GISTs (metastatic, unresectable, and recurrent GISTs) treated in Chang Gung memorial hospital (CGMH) since 2001 to 2013. We analyzed the impact of cytoreduction surgery to response to imatinib, progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS) in patients with advanced GISTs. Moreover, by the timing of cytoreduction to imatinib, we divided the surgical patients who had surgery before imatinib use into early group and those who had surgery after imatinib into late. We compared the clinical response to imatinib, PFS and OS between early and late cytoreduction surgical groups. Totally, 182 patients were enrolled into this study. Seventy-six patients underwent cytoreduction surgery. The demographic characteristics and tumor presentation were similar between surgical and non-surgical groups. The surgical group showed better complete response rate (P < 0.001) and partial response rate (P = 0.008) than non-surgical group. The 1-year, 3-year, and 5-year PFS were significantly superior in surgical group (P = 0.003). The 1-year, 3-year, and 5-year OS were superior in surgical group, but without statistical significance (P = 0.088). Dividing by cytoreduction surgical timing, the demographic

  4. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided fiducial placement allows localization of small neuroendocrine tumors during parenchymal-sparing pancreatic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Law, Joanna K.; Singh, Vikesh K.; Khashab, Mouen A.; Hruban, Ralph H.; Canto, Marcia Irene; Shin, Eun Ji; Saxena, Payal; Weiss, Matthew J.; Pawlik, Timothy M.; Wolfgang, Christopher L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Parenchymal-sparing pancreatic surgery is ideal for lesions such as small pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PanNET). However, precise localization of these small tumors at surgery can be difficult. The placement of fiducials under endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) guidance (EUS-F) has been used to direct stereotactic radiation therapy for pancreatic adenocarcinoma. This report describes two cases in which placement of fiducials was used to guide surgical resection. This study aimed to assess the feasibility, safety, and efficacy of using EUS-F for intraoperative localization of small PanNETs. Methods A retrospective study analyzed two consecutive patients with small PanNETs who underwent EUS-F followed by enucleation in a tertiary-care referral hospital. The following features were examined: technical success and complication rates of EUS-F, visibility of the fiducial at the time of surgery, and fiducial migration. Results In the study, EUS-F was performed for two female patients with a 7-mm and a 9-mm PanNET respectively in the uncinate process and neck of the pancreas. In both patients, EUS-F was feasible with two Visicoil fiducials (Core Oncology, Santa Barbara, CA, USA) placed either within or adjacent to the tumors using a 22-gauge Cook Echotip needle. At surgery, the fiducials were clearly visible on intraoperative ultrasound, and both the tumor and the fiducials were successfully enucleated in both cases. No complications were associated with EUS-F, and no evidence of pancreatitis was shown either clinically or on surgical pathology. This investigation had the limitations of a small single-center study. Conclusions For patients undergoing enucleation, EUS-F is technically feasible and safe and aids intraoperative localization of small PanNETs. PMID:23636530

  5. Changes in the Secretory Profile of NSCLC-Associated Fibroblasts after Ablative Radiotherapy: Potential Impact on Angiogenesis and Tumor Growth1

    PubMed Central

    Hellevik, Turid; Pettersen, Ingvild; Berg, Vivian; Bruun, Jack; Bartnes, Kristian; Busund, Lill-Tove; Chalmers, Anthony; Bremnes, Roy; Martinez-Zubiaurre, Iñigo

    2013-01-01

    In the context of radiotherapy, collateral effects of ablative doses of ionizing radiation (AIR) on stromal components of tumors remains understudied. In this work, cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) isolated from freshly resected human lung tumors were exposed to AIR (1x 18 Gy) and analyzed for their release of paracrine factors. Inflammatory mediators and regulators of angiogenesis and tumor growth were analyzed by multiplex protein assays in conditioned medium (CM) from irradiated and non-irradiated CAFs. Additionally, the profile of secreted proteins was examined by proteomics. In functional assays, effects of CAF-CM on proliferative and migratory capacity of lung tumor cells (H-520/H-522) and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and their tube-forming capacity were assessed. Our data show that exposure of CAFs to AIR results in 1) downregulated release of angiogenic molecules such as stromal cell-derived factor-1, angiopoietin, and thrombospondin-2 (TSP-2); 2) upregulated release of basic fibroblast growth factor from most donors; and 3) unaffected expression levels of hepatocyte growth factor, interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-8, IL-1β, and tumor necrosis factor-α. CM from irradiated and control CAFs did not affect differently the proliferative or migratory capacity of tumor cells (H-520/H-522), whereas migratory capacity of HUVECs was partially reduced in the presence of irradiated CAF-CM. Overall, we conclude that AIR mediates a transformation on the secretory profile of CAFs that could influence the behavior of other cells in the tumor tissue and hence guide therapeutic outcomes. Downstream consequences of the changes observed in this study merits further investigations. PMID:23418618

  6. Multiple hepatic sclerosing hemangioma mimicking metastatic liver tumor successfully treated by laparoscopic surgery: Report of a case

    PubMed Central

    Wakasugi, Masaki; Ueshima, Shigeyuki; Tei, Mitsuyoshi; Tori, Masayuki; Yoshida, Ken-ichi; Tsujimoto, Masahiko; Akamatsu, Hiroki

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Hepatic sclerosing hemangioma is a very rare benign tumor, characterized by fibrosis and hyalinization occurring in association with degeneration of a hepatic cavernous hemangioma. We report here a rare case of multiple hepatic sclerosing hemangioma mimicking metastatic liver tumor that was successfully treated using laparoscopic surgery. Presentation of case A 67-year-old woman with multiple liver tumors underwent single-incision laparoscopic sigmoidectomy under a diagnosis of advanced sigmoid cancer with multiple liver metastases. Examination of surgical specimens of sigmoid colon revealed moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma invading the serosa, and no lymph node metastases. Serum levels of carcinoembryonic antigen and carbohydrate antigen 19-9 remained within normal limits throughout the course. Two months after sigmoidectomy, the patient underwent laparoscopic partial hepatectomy of S1 and S6 of the liver and cholecystectomy. Histopathological examination showed that the tumors mainly comprised hyalinized tissue and collagen fibers with sporadic vascular spaces on hematoxylin and eosin-stained sections, yielding a diagnosis of multiple hepatic sclerosing hemangioma. No evidence of recurrence has been seen as of 21 months postoperatively. Discussion Differentiating multiple sclerosing hemangiomas from metastatic liver tumors was quite difficult because the radiological findings were closely compatible with liver metastases. Laroscopic hepatectomy provided less blood loss, a shorter duration of hospitalization, and good cosmetic results. Conclusion Sclerosing hemangioma should be included among the differential diagnoses of multiple liver tumors in patients with colorectal cancer. Laparoscopic hepatectomy is useful for diagnostic therapy for undiagnosed multiple liver tumors. PMID:25679307

  7. Structural Brain Alterations in Children an Average of 5 Years after Surgery and Chemotherapy for Brain Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Mary Baron; Macey, Paul M.; Harper, Ronald M.; Jacob, Eufemia; Patel, Sunita K.; Finlay, Jonathan L.; Nelson, Marvin D.; Compton, Peggy

    2014-01-01

    Background Young children with brain tumors are often treated with high-dose chemotherapy after surgery to avoid brain tissue injury associated with irradiation. The effects of systemic chemotherapy on healthy brain tissue in this population, however, are unclear. Our objective was to compare gray and white matter integrity using MRI procedures in children with brain tumors (n=7, mean age 8.3 years), treated with surgery and high-dose chemotherapy followed by autologous hematopoietic cell rescue (AuHCR) an average of 5.4 years earlier, to age- and gender-matched healthy controls (n=9, mean age 9.3 years). Methods Diffusion tensor imaging data were collected to evaluate tissue integrity throughout the brain, as measured by mean diffusivity (MD), a marker of glial, neuronal, and axonal status, and fractional anisotropy (FA), an index of axonal health. Individual MD and FA maps were calculated, normalized, smoothed, and compared between groups using analysis of covariance, with age and sex as covariates. Results Higher mean diffusivity values, indicative of injury, emerged in patients compared with controls (p<0.05, corrected for multiple comparisons), and were especially apparent in the central thalamus, external capsule, putamen, globus pallidus and pons. Reduced FA values in some regions did not reach significance after correction for multiple comparisons. Conclusions Children treated with surgery and high-dose chemotherapy with AuHCR for brain tumors an average of 5.4 years earlier show alterations in white and gray matter in multiple brain areas distant from the tumor site, raising the possibility for long-term consequences of the tumor or treatment. PMID:24830985

  8. Histomorphometric analysis of irradiated recipient vessels and transplant vessels of free flaps in patients undergoing reconstruction after ablative surgery.

    PubMed

    Schultze-Mosgau, S; Erbe, M; Keilholz, L; Radespiel-Tröger, M; Wiltfang, J; Minge, N; Neukam, F W

    2000-04-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate, histomorphometrically, quantitative and qualitative changes in irradiated neck recipient vessels and transplant vessels used for microsurgical anastomoses in free flaps in patients undergoing preoperative radiotherapy and chemotherapy. In 55 patients receiving 42 radial forearm flaps, 6 latissimus dorsi flaps, 6 osteomyocutaneous fibula grafts and 1 lateral arm flap, a total of 220 vessels were obtained from neck recipient vessels and transplant vessels during anastomosis. Three groups were formed: Group 1 (16 patients) treated with no radiotherapy or chemotherapy; Group 2 (20 patients) treated with preoperative irradiation (40-50 Gy) and chemotherapy (800 mg/m2 5-FU and 20 mg/m2 cisplatin) 1.5 months prior to surgery; Group 3 (19 patients) treated with radiotherapy (60-70 Gy) (median interval 78.7 months; IQR 31.3 months) prior to surgery. From each of the 220 vessel specimens, 3 sections each were histomorphometrically investigated, both qualitatively and quantitatively. To evaluate these changes as a function of age, radiation dose and chemotherapy, a statistical analysis was performed using analysis of covariance and chi-square tests. In Group 3, qualitative changes (intima dehiscence, hyalinosis) were found in recipient arteries significantly more frequently (25%, P=0.009) than in Groups 1 and 2. For Group 3 recipient arteries, histomorphometry revealed a significant decrease in the ratio of media area/total vessel area (median 0.53, IQR 0.10) in comparison with Group 1 (P= 0.02) (median 0.60, IQR 0.29) and Group 2 (P=0.046) (median 0.59, IQR 0.10). No significant differences were found between the vessels of Groups 1 and 2 (P= 0.48). Age and chemotherapy did not appear to have a significant influence on vessel changes in this study. PMID:10833147

  9. Whole Abdominopelvic Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy for Desmoplastic Small Round Cell Tumor After Surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Pinnix, Chelsea C.; Fontanilla, Hiral P.; Hayes-Jordan, Andrea; Subbiah, Vivek; Bilton, Stephen D.; Chang, Eric L.; Grosshans, David R.; McAleer, Mary F.; Sulman, Eric P.; Woo, Shiao Y.; Anderson, Peter; Green, Holly L.; Mahajan, Anita

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: Desmoplastic small round cell tumor (DSCRT) is an uncommon pediatric tumor with a poor prognosis. Aggressive multimodality therapy is the current treatment approach; however. treatment toxicity is of concern. We report our results with whole abdominopelvic intensity-modulated radiation therapy (WAP-IMRT) as a component of multimodality therapy for DSCRT at a single institution. Materials/Methods: Medical records of all patients with DSCRT who received WAP-IMRT as part of definitive treatment at MD Anderson (2006-2010) were identified and reviewed. Results: Eight patients with DSRCT received WAP-IMRT with a median follow-up of 15.2 months. All patients received multiple courses of chemotherapy followed by surgical debulking of intra-abdominal disease; seven also had intraoperative hyperthermic cisplatin. WAP-IMRT was delivered to a total dose of 30 Gy postoperatively; four patients received a simultaneous boost (6-10 Gy) to sites of gross residual disease. Seven patients received concurrent chemotherapy during WAP-IMRT. No Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Grade 4 nausea, vomiting, or diarrhea occurred during RT. Red-cell transfusions were given to two patients to maintain hemoglobin levels >10 g/dL. Grade 4 cytopenia requiring growth factor support occurred in only one patient; no other significant cytopenias were noted. WAP-IMRT resulted in 25% lower radiation doses to the lumbosacral vertebral bodies and pelvic bones than conventional RT plans. The median time to local or distant failure after WAP-IMRT was 8.73 months in seven patients. One patient who had completed RT 20 months before the last follow-up remains alive without evidence of disease. Five patients (63%) experienced treatment failure in the abdomen. Distant failure occurred in three patients (37.5%). Conclusions: WAP-IMRT with concurrent radiosensitizing chemotherapy was well tolerated after aggressive surgery for DSCRT. Enhanced bone sparing with IMRT probably accounts for the low hematologic

  10. Evaluation of the Therapeutic Efficacy of Sequential Therapy Involving Percutaneous Microwave Ablation in Combination with 131I-Hypericin Using the VX2 Rabbit Breast Solid Tumor Model

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Miao; Lin, Xiao-An; Zha, Xiao-Ming; Zhou, Wen-Bin; Xia, Tian-Song; Wang, Shui

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Combination of percutaneous microwave ablation (PMWA) and intravenous injection of 131I-hypericin(IIIH) may bear potential as a mini-invasive treatment for tumor. The objective of this study was to assess the effect of PMWA and IIIH in breast tumor growth. Methods Ten New Zealand White rabbits bearing VX2 breast carcinomas were randomly divided into two groups (each 5 examples) and processed using PMWA followed by IIIH and IIIH alone. The IIIH activity was evaluated using planar scintigraphy, autoradiography and biodistribution analysis. The maximum effective safe dose of IIIH was found through 48 rabbits with VX2 breast tumor, which were randomized into six groups (n=8 per group). Subsequently, a further 75 rabbits bearing VX2 breast solid tumors were randomly divided into five groups (each 15 examples) and treated as follows: A, no treatment group; B, PMWA alone; C, IIIH alone; D, PMWA+IIIH×1 (at 8 h post-PMWA); and E, PMWA+IIIH×2 (at 8 h and at 8 days post-PMWA). The therapeutic effect was assessed by measurement of tumor size and performation of positron emission tomography/computed tomograph (PET/CT) scans, liver and renal function tests and Kaplan-Meier survival analysis. Results The planar scintigraphy findings suggested a significant uptake of 131I in necrotic tumor tissue. The autoradiography gray scales indicated higher selective uptake of IIIH by necrotic tissue, with significant differences between the groups with and those without necrotic tumor tissue (P<0.05). The maximum effective safe dose of IIIH was 1mCi/kg. The PET/CT scans and tumor size measurement suggested improvements in treatment groups at all time points (P<0.01). Significant differences were detected among Groups A, B, D and E (P<0.05). Lower levels of lung metastasis were detected in Groups D and E (P<0.05). There were no abnormalities in liver and renal functions tests or other reported side effects. Conclusion IIIH exhibited selective uptake by necrotic tumor tissue

  11. Laser Ablation as Treatment Strategy for Medically Refractory Dominant Insular Epilepsy – Therapeutic and Functional Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Hawasli, Ammar H.; Bandt, S. Kathleen; Hogan, R. Edward; Werner, Nicole; Leuthardt, Eric C.

    2014-01-01

    Since its introduction to neurosurgery in 2008, laser ablative techniques have been largely confined to the management of unresectable tumors. Application of this technology for the management of focal epilepsy in the adult population has not been fully explored. Given that nearly 1,000,000 Americans live with medically refractory epilepsy and current surgical techniques only address a fraction of epileptic pathologies, additional therapeutic options are needed. We report the successful treatment of dominant insular epilepsy in a 53 year-old male with minimally-invasive laser ablation complicated by mild verbal and memory deficits. We also report neuropsychological test data on this patient before surgery and at 8-months after the ablation procedure. This account represents the first reported successful patient outcome of laser ablation as an effective treatment option for medically refractory post-stroke epilepsy in an adult. PMID:25359500

  12. Laser dosimetry planning tool for colonoscopic tumor resection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelayo-Fernández, M. L.; Fanjul-Vélez, F.; Salas-García, I.; Zverev, M.; Arce-Diego, J. L.

    2016-03-01

    Gastrointestinal tumoral pathologies are quite common nowadays. Diseases such as gastric antral vascular ectasia (GAVE) or actinic proctitis may require endoscopic surgery. Argon Plasma Coagulated (APC) or radiofrequency are usually employed. However, they present disadvantages, such as the reduced treated area, magnetic resonance incompatibility, or an uncontrolled ablation depth. Optical surgery could avoid these problems and contribute to a better and controlled treatment result, either ablative or coagulative, in a minimally invasive, non-contact and non-ionizing way. The treatment area could also be increased by adequate optical fiber probe design. In this work laser surgery is analyzed for resection of colonic tumors. A Monte Carlo model is employed to study optical propagation, and an optical ablation approach allows the estimation of the resected volume. The ablation approach is based on plasma-induced ablation, particularly taking into account the freeelectron density generated in the tissue by the pulsed optical source. Several wavelengths, radii and malignant tissue types are considered, either healthy, adenomatous or even coagulated tissues. Optimum source parameters as a function of tumor geometry can be estimated for treatment planning.

  13. Targeting tumors with a killer-reporter adenovirus for curative fluorescence-guided surgery of soft-tissue sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Yano, Shuya; Miwa, Shinji; Kishimoto, Hiroyuki; Uehara, Fuminari; Tazawa, Hiroshi; Toneri, Makoto; Hiroshima, Yukihiko; Yamamoto, Mako; Urata, Yasuo; Kagawa, Shunsuke; Bouvet, Michael; Fujiwara, Toshiyoshi; Hoffman, Robert M

    2015-05-30

    Fluorescence-guided surgery (FGS) of cancer is an area of intense interest. However, FGS of cancer has not yet been shown to be curative due to residual microscopic disease. Human fibrosarcoma HT1080 expressing red fluorescent protein (RFP) was implanted orthotopically in the quadriceps femoris muscle of nude mice. The tumor-bearing mice were injected with high and low-dose telomerase-dependent, green fluorescent protein (GFP)-containing adenovirus OBP-401, which labeled the tumor with GFP. Fluorescence-guided surgery (FGS) or bright light surgery (BLS) was then performed. OBP-401 could label soft-tissue sarcoma (STS) with GFP in situ, concordant with RFP. OBP-401-based FGS resulted in superior resection of STS in the orthotopic model of soft-tissue sarcoma, compared to BLS. High-dose administration of OBP-401 enabled FGS without residual sarcoma cells or local or metastatic recurrence, due to its dual effect of cancer-cell labeling with GFP and killing. High-dose OBP-401 based-FGS improved disease free survival (p = 0.00049) as well as preserved muscle function compared with BLS. High-dose OBP-401-based FGS could cure STS, a presently incurable disease. Since the parent virus of OBP-401, OBP-301, has been previously proven safe in a Phase I clinical trial, it is expected the OBP-401-FGS technology described in the present report should be translatable to the clinic in the near future. PMID:26033451

  14. Intraductal Radiofrequency Ablation Followed by Locoregional Tumor Treatments for Treating Occluded Biliary Stents in Non-Resectable Malignant Biliary Obstruction: A Single-Institution Experience

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Xu-Hua; Wang, Yan-Li; Han, Xin-Wei; Ren, Jian-Zhuang; Li, Teng-Fei; Zhang, Jian-Hao; Zhang, Kai; Chen, Peng-Fei

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To determine the safety and feasibility of intraductal radiofrequency ablation (RFA) followed by locoregional tumor treatments in patients with non-resectable malignant biliary obstruction and stent re-occlusion. Methods Fourteen patients with malignant biliary obstruction and blocked metal stents were studied retrospectively. All had intraductal RFA followed by locoregional tumor treatments and were monitored clinically and radiologically. The practicality, safety, postoperative complications, jaundice remission, stent patency and survival time were analyzed. Results Combination treatment was successful for all patients. There were no severe complications during RFA or local treatments. All patients had stent patency restored, with a decline in serum bilirubin. Three patients had recurrent jaundice by 195, 237 and 357 days; two patients underwent repeat intraductal RFA; and one required an internal-external biliary drain. The average stent patency time was 234 days (range 187-544 days). With a median follow-up of 384 days (range 187-544 days), six patients were alive, while eight had died. There was no mortality at 30 days. The 3, 6, 12 and 18 month survival rates were 100%, 100%, 64.3% and 42.9%, respectively. Conclusion Intraductal RFA followed by locoregional tumor treatments for occluded metal stents is safe and practically feasible and potential increase stent patency and survival times. PMID:26244367

  15. Evaluation of a Carbonic Anhydrase IX-Targeted Near-Infrared Dye for Fluorescence-Guided Surgery of Hypoxic Tumors.

    PubMed

    Lv, Peng-Cheng; Roy, Jyoti; Putt, Karson S; Low, Philip S

    2016-05-01

    Proof-of-principle studies in ovarian, lung, and brain cancer patients have shown that fluorescence-guided surgery can enable removal of otherwise undetectable malignant lesions, decrease the number of cancer-positive margins, and permit identification of disease-containing lymph nodes that would have normally evaded resection. Unfortunately, the current arsenal of tumor-targeted fluorescent dyes does not permit identification of all cancers, raising the need to design new tumor-specific fluorescent dyes to illuminate the currently undetectable cancers. In an effort to design a more universal fluorescent cancer imaging agent, we have undertaken to synthesize a fluorophore that could label all hypoxic regions of tumors. We report here the synthesis, in vitro binding, and in vivo imaging of a near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent dye that is targeted to carbonic anhydrase IX (CA IX), i.e., a widely accepted marker of hypoxic tissues. The low molecular weight NIR probe, named Hypoxyfluor, is shown to bind CA IX with high affinity and accumulate rapidly and selectively in CA IX positive tumors. Because nearly all human cancers contain hypoxic regions that express CA IX abundantly, this NIR probe should facilitate surgical resection of a wide variety of solid tumors. PMID:27043317

  16. Dual-modality in vivo imaging for MRI detection of tumors and NIRF-guided surgery using multi-component nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Key, Jaehong; Kim, Kwangmeyung; Dhawan, Deepika; Knapp, Deborah W.; Kwon, Ick Chan; Choi, Kuiwon; Leary, James F.

    2011-03-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is one of the best imaging modalities for noninvasive cancer detection but MRI does not have enough sensitivity to delineate tumor margins during surgery. Moreover, since most surgical tools contain metal substances, image-guided surgery is hard to perform with a MR machine using magnets. Also, MR imaging is too slow for real-time guided-surgery. On the other hand, near infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging has recently received great interest for in vivo imaging due to its high signal-to-noise ratios and short image-acquisition times. NIRF imaging can be used to delineate tumor margins during surgery, but current NIRF imaging cannot provide the penetration depth to detect early-stage cancer inside body. Thus, we have developed dual-modality in vivo imaging for MRI detection of tumors and NIRF-guided surgery using multi-component nanoparticles. NIRF dye (cyanine 5.5, Cy5.5), conjugated glycol chitosan nanoparticles (HGC) exhibited excellent tumor targeting ability with NIRF imaging. Superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles as a MR contrast agent were loaded into the nanoparticles, resulting in SPIO-HGC-Cy5.5 nanoparticles. SPIO-HGC-Cy5.5 nanoparticles were characterized and evaluated in mice by both NIRF and MR imaging. Our results indicate SPIO-HGC-Cy5.5 nanoparticles have the potential for dual-modality in vivo imaging with MRI detection of tumors and NIRF-guided surgery.

  17. Image-guided ablation for hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lencioni, Riccardo; Crocetti, Laura

    2013-01-01

    Image-guided ablation is accepted as the best therapeutic choice for patients with early-stage hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) when surgical options-including resection and transplantation-are precluded. The term image-guided tumor ablation is defined as the direct application of chemical substances or sources of energy to a focal tumor in an attempt to achieve eradication or substantial tumor destruction. Over the past 25 years, several methods for local tumor destruction have been developed and clinically tested. Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) has shown superior anticancer effect and greater survival benefit with respect to the seminal percutaneous technique, ethanol injection, in meta-analyses of randomized controlled trials, and is currently established as the standard ablative modality. Nevertheless, novel thermal and nonthermal techniques for tumor ablation-including microwave ablation and irreversible electroporation-seem to have potential to improve the efficacy of RFA and are currently undergoing clinical investigation. PMID:22941021

  18. Superior mesenteric artery syndrome caused by surgery and radiation therapy for a brain tumor: A case report

    PubMed Central

    LEI, QIUCHENG; WANG, XINYING; WU, CHAO; BI, JINGCHENG; ZHANG, LI

    2015-01-01

    Superior mesenteric artery syndrome (SMAS) is defined as an obstruction of the third part of duodenum due to compression by the superior mesenteric artery. Although traumatic brain injury is a risk factor for SMAS, few cases of SMAS resulting from brain surgery have been reported. SMAS has been observed to occur following neurosurgical surgery in pediatric patients but, to the best of our knowledge, no such cases have been reported in adults. The present study reports the case of a 21-year-old female patient who developed SMAS after persistent vomiting and prolonged weight loss following cerebellar tumor resection and cranial irradiation. The SMAS was confirmed by computed tomography and resolved following successful nutritional management. PMID:26622529

  19. Laparoscopic and Percutaneous Ablative Techniques in the Treatment of Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Perry, Kent; Zisman, Amnon; Pantuck, Allan J; Janzen, Nicolette; Schulam, Peter; Belldegrun, Arie S

    2002-01-01

    Widespread use of computed tomography, ultrasound, and magnetic resonance imaging has led to an increase in detection of relatively small renal masses, and approaches to managing them have evolved in the last two decades. Indications for nephron-sparing surgery have expanded, and minimally invasive procedures, which can confer advantages over open surgery, are now available. Ablative techniques offer a combination of nephron-sparing and minimally invasive approaches. Ablative techniques include cryoablation, radiofrequency ablation (RFA), and high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU). Cryoablation and RFA have been relatively safe. HIFU has been associated with serious side effects in animal models, and is not yet acceptable for use in humans. Ablative techniques require long-term studies to confirm lasting efficacy. The best modality for tumor targeting, monitoring of therapy, and follow-up is still under investigation. Debate exists regarding the best method for ensuring adequate intraoperative tumor cryoablation. For minimally invasive ablative measures to gain a place as nephron-sparing approaches, they should show both equivalent efficacy and reduced morbidity relative to those of open partial nephrectomy. These techniques should currently be reserved for selected patients and should be compared to the evolving modality of laparoscopic partial nephrectomy. PMID:16985666

  20. Interactive image-guided hepatic surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefansic, James D.; Herline, Alan J.; Bass, W. Andrew; Chapman, William C.; Galloway, Robert L., Jr.

    1999-05-01

    While laparoscopes are used for numerous minimally invasive procedures, minimally invasive liver resection and ablation occur infrequently. the paucity of cases is due to limited field of view and difficulty in determination of tumor location and margins under video guidance. By merging minimally invasive surgery with interactive, image-guided surgery, we hope to make laparoscopic liver procedures feasible. In previous work, we described methods for tracking an endoscope accurately in patient space and registration between endoscopic image space and physical space using the direct linear transformation (DLT). We have now developed a PC-based software system to display up to four 512 Χ 512 images indicating current surgical position using an active optical tracking system. We have used this system in several open liver cases and believe that a surface-based registration technique can be used to register physical space to tomographic space after liver mobilization. For preliminary phantom liver studies, our registration error is approximately 2.0mm. The surface-based registration technique will allow better localization of non-visible liver tumors, more accurate probe placement for ablation procedures, and more accurate margin determination for open surgical liver cases. The surface-based registration technique will allow better localization of non-visible liver tumors, more accurate probe placement for ablation procedures, and more accurate margin determination for open surgical liver cases. The surface-based/DLT registration methods, in combination with the video display and tracked endoscope, will hopefully make laparoscopic liver cryoablation and resection procedures feasible.

  1. Minimally Invasive Treatment of Small Renal Tumors: Trends in Renal Cancer Diagnosis and Management

    SciTech Connect

    Breen, David J. Railton, Nicholas J.

    2010-10-15

    Renal cell carcinoma is a common malignancy causing significant mortality. In recent years abdominal imaging, often for alternate symptomatology, has led the trend toward the detection and confirmation of smaller renal tumors. This has permitted the greater use of localized and nephron-sparing techniques including partial nephrectomy and image-guided ablation. This article aims to review the current role of image-guided biopsy and ablation in the management of small renal tumors. The natural history of renal cell carcinoma, the role of renal biopsy, the principles and procedural considerations of thermal energy ablation, and the oncological outcomes of these minimally invasive treatments are discussed and illustrated with cases from the authors' institution. Image-guided ablation, in particular, has changed the treatment paradigm and, by virtue of its increasingly evident efficacy and low morbidity, now favors the treatment of smaller tumors in patients previously unfit for surgery.

  2. Graphics processing unit-accelerated non-rigid registration of MR images to CT images during CT-guided percutaneous liver tumor ablations

    PubMed Central

    Tokuda, Junichi; Plishker, William; Torabi, Meysam; Olubiyi, Olutayo I; Zaki, George; Tatli, Servet; Silverman, Stuart G.; Shekhar, Raj; Hata, Nobuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Rationale and Objectives Accuracy and speed are essential for the intraprocedural nonrigid MR-to-CT image registration in the assessment of tumor margins during CT-guided liver tumor ablations. While both accuracy and speed can be improved by limiting the registration to a region of interest (ROI), manual contouring of the ROI prolongs the registration process substantially. To achieve accurate and fast registration without the use of an ROI, we combined a nonrigid registration technique based on volume subdivision with hardware acceleration using a graphical processing unit (GPU). We compared the registration accuracy and processing time of GPU-accelerated volume subdivision-based nonrigid registration technique to the conventional nonrigid B-spline registration technique. Materials and Methods Fourteen image data sets of preprocedural MR and intraprocedural CT images for percutaneous CT-guided liver tumor ablations were obtained. Each set of images was registered using the GPU-accelerated volume subdivision technique and the B-spline technique. Manual contouring of ROI was used only for the B-spline technique. Registration accuracies (Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC) and 95% Hausdorff Distance (HD)), and total processing time including contouring of ROIs and computation were compared using a paired Student’s t-test. Results Accuracy of the GPU-accelerated registrations and B-spline registrations, respectively were 88.3 ± 3.7% vs 89.3 ± 4.9% (p = 0.41) for DSC and 13.1 ± 5.2 mm vs 11.4 ± 6.3 mm (p = 0.15) for HD. Total processing time of the GPU-accelerated registration and B-spline registration techniques was 88 ± 14 s vs 557 ± 116 s (p < 0.000000002), respectively; there was no significant difference in computation time despite the difference in the complexity of the algorithms (p = 0.71). Conclusion The GPU-accelerated volume subdivision technique was as accurate as the B-spline technique and required significantly less processing time. The GPU

  3. A case of solitary fibrous tumor in the pelvis presenting massive hemorrhage during surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mi Young; Choi, Seung Do; Nam, Kye Hyun; Sunwoo, Jae Gun; Lee, Ji-Hye

    2015-01-01

    Solitary fibrous tumors (SFTs) are unique soft-tissue tumors of submesothelial origin. These tumors are mainly located in the pleural space but they can be originated within a variety of sites, including the abdomen, the pelvis, the soft tissues and the retroperitoneum. SFTs from all sites are usually benign, and the surgical resection is curative in almost all cases. According to the review of literatures, during the surgical resection, massive hemorrhage could occur due to the hypervascular nature of SFTs. This is a case report on SFT in the pelvis presenting great vessel injury, which resulted in life threatening hemorrhage during the resection of tumor. We wish this paper alerts gynecologists about the risk of massive bleeding during the resection of tumor located at adjacent to great vessels in the pelvis. PMID:25629023

  4. Towards the use of HIFU, in Conjunction with Surgery, in the Treatment of Malignant Brain Tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahl, Elizabeth; Nguyen, Lisa T.; Sparks, Rachel E.; Brayman, Andy A.; Olios, Ryan J.; Silbergeld, Daniel L.; Vaezy, Sarah; Mourad, Pierre D.

    2006-05-01

    The first medical response to the presence of a brain tumor is often its resection, both to alleviate mass effect, and to obtain tissue for diagnosis, itself necessary for guiding adjunctive therapy. Malignant brain tumors typically recur at the tumor resection margin. Most current chemotherapy and radiotherapy strategies target local recurrence with limited success. Here we review a new strategy for delivering chemotherapeutics for brain tumor recurrence. It uses intra-operative high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) to transiently open the blood-brain barrier (BBB) over a significantly large volume of brain at and near the resection margin to enhance the subsequent delivery of systemically delivered chemotherapeutic agents into the region of tumor recurrence.

  5. Conditional ablation of TGF-β signaling inhibits tumor progression and invasion in an induced mouse bladder cancer model

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Yu; Zhu, Fengyu; Zhang, Haojie; Chen, Demeng; Zhang, Xiuhong; Gao, Qian; Li, Yang

    2016-01-01

    The role of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) signaling in cancer progression is still under debate. To determine the function of TGF-β signaling in bladder cancer progression, we conditionally knocked out the Tgfbr2 in mouse model after a N-butyl-N-4-hydroxybutyl Nitrosamine induced bladder carcinogenesis. We found the ablation of TGF-β signaling could inhibit the cancer cell proliferation, cancer stem cell population and EMT, hence suppressed the invasive cancer progression, which is similar with the result of TGF-β receptor I inhibitor treatment. These findings recognize the roles and mechanisms of TGF-β signaling in bladder cancer progression in vivo for the first time. PMID:27378170

  6. Fibre tip pH sensor for tumor detection during surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, Matthew R.; Schartner, Erik P.; Callen, David F.; Gill, P. Grantley; Monro, Tanya M.

    2015-05-01

    Surgery on tumours commonly involves a lumpectomy method, where a section of tissue containing the tumour is removed, to improve cosmetic outcomes and quality of life. Following surgery, the margins of the removed section are checked by pathology tests to ensure that the entire tumour has been removed. Unfortunately, approximately 15-20% of margins show incomplete removal and require a subsequent operation to remove the remaining tumour. Tumour detection during surgery could allow the removed section to be enlarged appropriately, reducing the likelihood of requiring subsequent surgery. A change in the extracellular pH in the vicinity of a tumour, when compared to normal tissue, has been shown previously in literature. We have fabricated an optical fibre tip pH sensor by embedding a fluorophore within a photopolymerised acrylamide polymer on the tip of a 200 micron diameter silica fibre. Preliminary measurements of human melanoma samples have shown a significant difference in the measured pH values between tumour and normal tissue. This demonstration paves to way to highly accurate margin detection during surgery.

  7. Transhepatic CT-Guided Radiofrequency Ablation of Adrenal Metastases from Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Kuehl, Hilmar Stattaus, Joerg; Forsting, Michael; Antoch, Gerald

    2008-11-15

    The prognosis of patients with adrenal metastases from hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has been poor, and aggressive treatment of these tumors is mandatory to improve patients' survival. Since adrenalectomy may be difficult to perform after previous surgery of the right liver lobe, other approaches are required to treat the adrenal mass. This report aims at demonstrating the feasibility of CT-guided transhepatic radiofrequency ablation of right adrenal HCC metastases pretreated with chemoembolization in patients unable to undergo surgical resection.

  8. RF Field Visualization of RF Ablation at the Larmor Frequency

    PubMed Central

    Stang, Pascal; Kerr, Adam; Pauly, John; Scott, Greig

    2012-01-01

    Radiofrequency ablation is an effective minimally invasive treatment for tumors. One primary source of difficulty is monitoring and controlling the ablation region. Currently, RF ablation is performed at 460 kHz, for which MRI could play a role given its capability for temperature monitoring and tumor visualization. If instead the ablation were to be performed at the MRI Larmor frequency, then the MR capability for B1 field mapping could be used to directly visualize the RF fields created by the ablation currents. Visualizing the RF fields may enable better control of the ablation currents, enabling better control of lesion shape and size and improving repeatability. We demonstrate the feasibility of performing RF ablations at 64 MHz and show preliminary results from imaging the RF fields from the ablation. The post-ablation RF fields show an increase in current density in the ablated region, consistent with an increase in conductivity of the ablated tissue. PMID:21775256

  9. Interactive Volumetry Of Liver Ablation Zones.

    PubMed

    Egger, Jan; Busse, Harald; Brandmaier, Philipp; Seider, Daniel; Gawlitza, Matthias; Strocka, Steffen; Voglreiter, Philip; Dokter, Mark; Hofmann, Michael; Kainz, Bernhard; Hann, Alexander; Chen, Xiaojun; Alhonnoro, Tuomas; Pollari, Mika; Schmalstieg, Dieter; Moche, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a minimally invasive technique that destroys cancer cells by heat. The heat results from focusing energy in the radiofrequency spectrum through a needle. Amongst others, this can enable the treatment of patients who are not eligible for an open surgery. However, the possibility of recurrent liver cancer due to incomplete ablation of the tumor makes post-interventional monitoring via regular follow-up scans mandatory. These scans have to be carefully inspected for any conspicuousness. Within this study, the RF ablation zones from twelve post-interventional CT acquisitions have been segmented semi-automatically to support the visual inspection. An interactive, graph-based contouring approach, which prefers spherically shaped regions, has been applied. For the quantitative and qualitative analysis of the algorithm's results, manual slice-by-slice segmentations produced by clinical experts have been used as the gold standard (which have also been compared among each other). As evaluation metric for the statistical validation, the Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC) has been calculated. The results show that the proposed tool provides lesion segmentation with sufficient accuracy much faster than manual segmentation. The visual feedback and interactivity make the proposed tool well suitable for the clinical workflow. PMID:26482818

  10. Interactive Volumetry Of Liver Ablation Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egger, Jan; Busse, Harald; Brandmaier, Philipp; Seider, Daniel; Gawlitza, Matthias; Strocka, Steffen; Voglreiter, Philip; Dokter, Mark; Hofmann, Michael; Kainz, Bernhard; Hann, Alexander; Chen, Xiaojun; Alhonnoro, Tuomas; Pollari, Mika; Schmalstieg, Dieter; Moche, Michael

    2015-10-01

    Percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a minimally invasive technique that destroys cancer cells by heat. The heat results from focusing energy in the radiofrequency spectrum through a needle. Amongst others, this can enable the treatment of patients who are not eligible for an open surgery. However, the possibility of recurrent liver cancer due to incomplete ablation of the tumor makes post-interventional monitoring via regular follow-up scans mandatory. These scans have to be carefully inspected for any conspicuousness. Within this study, the RF ablation zones from twelve post-interventional CT acquisitions have been segmented semi-automatically to support the visual inspection. An interactive, graph-based contouring approach, which prefers spherically shaped regions, has been applied. For the quantitative and qualitative analysis of the algorithm’s results, manual slice-by-slice segmentations produced by clinical experts have been used as the gold standard (which have also been compared among each other). As evaluation metric for the statistical validation, the Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC) has been calculated. The results show that the proposed tool provides lesion segmentation with sufficient accuracy much faster than manual segmentation. The visual feedback and interactivity make the proposed tool well suitable for the clinical workflow.

  11. Interactive Volumetry Of Liver Ablation Zones

    PubMed Central

    Egger, Jan; Busse, Harald; Brandmaier, Philipp; Seider, Daniel; Gawlitza, Matthias; Strocka, Steffen; Voglreiter, Philip; Dokter, Mark; Hofmann, Michael; Kainz, Bernhard; Hann, Alexander; Chen, Xiaojun; Alhonnoro, Tuomas; Pollari, Mika; Schmalstieg, Dieter; Moche, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a minimally invasive technique that destroys cancer cells by heat. The heat results from focusing energy in the radiofrequency spectrum through a needle. Amongst others, this can enable the treatment of patients who are not eligible for an open surgery. However, the possibility of recurrent liver cancer due to incomplete ablation of the tumor makes post-interventional monitoring via regular follow-up scans mandatory. These scans have to be carefully inspected for any conspicuousness. Within this study, the RF ablation zones from twelve post-interventional CT acquisitions have been segmented semi-automatically to support the visual inspection. An interactive, graph-based contouring approach, which prefers spherically shaped regions, has been applied. For the quantitative and qualitative analysis of the algorithm’s results, manual slice-by-slice segmentations produced by clinical experts have been used as the gold standard (which have also been compared among each other). As evaluation metric for the statistical validation, the Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC) has been calculated. The results show that the proposed tool provides lesion segmentation with sufficient accuracy much faster than manual segmentation. The visual feedback and interactivity make the proposed tool well suitable for the clinical workflow. PMID:26482818

  12. Eradication of osteosarcoma by fluorescence-guided surgery with tumor labeling by a killer-reporter adenovirus.

    PubMed

    Yano, Shuya; Miwa, Shinji; Kishimoto, Hiroyuki; Urata, Yasuo; Tazawa, Hiroshi; Kagawa, Shunsuke; Bouvet, Michael; Fujiwara, Toshiyoshi; Hoffman, Robert M

    2016-05-01

    In a previous study, we developed fluorescence-guided surgery (FGS) for osteosarcoma using an orthotopic model with 143B human osteosarcoma cells expressing red fluorescent protein (RFP) implanted into the intramedullary cavity of the tibia in nude mice. The FGS-treated mice had a significantly higher disease-free survival (DFS) rate than the bright-light surgery (BLS). However, although FGS significantly reduced the recurrence of the primary tumor, it did not reduce lung metastasis. In the present study, we utilized the OBP-401 telomerase-dependent killer-reporter adenovirus, carrying green fluorescent protein (GFP), to label human osteosarcoma in situ in orthotopic mouse models. OBP-401-illuminated human osteosarcoma cell lines, 143B and MNNG/HOS cells in vitro and in vivo. OBP-401 tumor illumination enabled effective FGS of the 143B-derived orthotopic mouse model of human osteosarcoma model as well as FGS eradication of residual cancer cells after BLS. OBP-401-assisted FGS significantly inhibited local recurrence and lung metastasis after surgery, thereby prolonging DFS and overall survival (OS), achieving a very important improvement of therapeutic outcomes over our previously reported FGS study. These therapeutic benefits of FGS were demonstrated using a clinically-viable methodology of direct labeling of human osteosarcoma in situ with the OBP-401 killer-reporter adenovirus in contrast with previous reports, which used genetically engineered labeled cells or antibody-based fluorescent labels for FGS. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:836-844, 2016. PMID:26479501

  13. Conservative Resectoscopic Surgery, Successful Delivery, and 60 Months of Follow-Up in a Patient with Endometrial Stromal Tumor with Sex-Cord-Like Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    De Franciscis, Pasquale; Grauso, Flavio; Ambrosio, Domenico; Torella, Marco; Messalli, Enrico Michelino; Colacurci, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    Uterine tumors with sex-cord-like differentiation are extremely rare types of uterine stromal neoplasm. These tumors were classified into two groups with considerable practical relevance because clinical behaviour of uterine tumor resembling ovarian sex cord tumor (UTROSCT) differs widely from its closely related endometrial stromal tumors with sex-cord-like elements (ESTSCLE). Treatment and prognosis of these tumors are unresolved issues because of the exiguous number of reported cases. We describe a rare case of endometrial stromal tumor with sex-cord-like differentiation successfully treated by resectoscopic surgery and conservation of the uterus, in an infertile patient affected by metrorrhagia. This procedure resulted in a pregnancy immediately after treatment and in a successful delivery. During 60 months of follow-up no evidence of recurrence was observed. PMID:27213063

  14. Photothermal tumor ablation in mice with repeated therapy sessions using NIR-absorbing micellar hydrogels formed in situ.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Chun-Wen; Chuang, Er-Yuan; Chen, Hsin-Lung; Wan, Dehui; Korupalli, Chiranjeevi; Liao, Zi-Xian; Chiu, Ya-Ling; Chia, Wei-Tso; Lin, Kun-Ju; Sung, Hsing-Wen

    2015-07-01

    Repeated cancer treatments are common, owing to the aggressive and resistant nature of tumors. This work presents a chitosan (CS) derivative that contains self-doped polyaniline (PANI) side chains, capable of self-assembling to form micelles and then transforming into hydrogels driven by a local change in pH. Analysis results of small-angle X-ray scattering indicate that the sol-gel transition of this CS derivative may provide the mechanical integrity to maintain its spatial stability in the microenvironment of solid tumors. The micelles formed in the CS hydrogel function as nanoscaled heating sources upon exposure to near-infrared light, thereby enabling the selective killing of cancer cells in a light-treated area. Additionally, photothermal efficacy of the micellar hydrogel is evaluated using a tumor-bearing mouse model; hollow gold nanospheres (HGNs) are used for comparison. Given the ability of the micellar hydrogel to provide spatial stability within a solid tumor, which prevents its leakage from the injection site, the therapeutic efficacy of this hydrogel, as a photothermal therapeutic agent for repeated treatments, exceeds that of nanosized HGNs. Results of this study demonstrate that this in situ-formed micellar hydrogel is a highly promising modality for repeated cancer treatments, providing a clinically viable, minimally invasive phototherapeutic option for therapeutic treatment. PMID:25934276

  15. Tumor progression locus 2 ablation suppressed hepatocellular carcinoma development by inhibiting hepatic inflammation and steatosis in mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Tumor progression locus 2 (TPL2), a serine threonine kinase, functions as a critical regulator of inflammatory pathways and mediates oncogenic events. The potential role of Tpl2 in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) associated hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) development remains unkn...

  16. Conditional IFNAR1 ablation reveals distinct requirements of Type I IFN signaling for NK cell maturation and tumor surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Mizutani, Tatsuaki; Neugebauer, Nina; Putz, Eva M.; Moritz, Nadine; Simma, Olivia; Zebedin-Brandl, Eva; Gotthardt, Dagmar; Warsch, Wolfgang; Eckelhart, Eva; Kantner, Hans-Peter; Kalinke, Ulrich; Lienenklaus, Stefan; Weiss, Siegfried; Strobl, Birgit; Müller, Mathias; Sexl, Veronika; Stoiber, Dagmar

    2012-01-01

    Mice with an impaired Type I interferon (IFN) signaling (IFNAR1- and IFNβ-deficient mice) display an increased susceptibility toward v-ABL-induced B-cell leukemia/lymphoma. The enhanced leukemogenesis in the absence of an intact Type I IFN signaling is caused by alterations within the tumor environment. Deletion of Ifnar1 in tumor cells (as obtained in Ifnar1f/f CD19-Cre mice) failed to impact on disease latency or type. In line with this observation, the initial transformation and proliferative capacity of tumor cells were unaltered irrespective of whether the cells expressed IFNAR1 or not. v-ABL-induced leukemogenesis is mainly subjected to natural killer (NK) cell-mediated tumor surveillance. Thus, we concentrated on NK cell functions in IFNAR1 deficient animals. Ifnar1-/- NK cells displayed maturation defects as well as an impaired cytolytic activity. When we deleted Ifnar1 selectively in mature NK cells (by crossing Ncr1-iCre mice to Ifnar1f/f animals), maturation was not altered. However, NK cells derived from Ifnar1f/f Ncr1-iCre mice showed a significant cytolytic defect in vitro against the hematopoietic cell lines YAC-1 and RMA-S, but not against the melanoma cell line B16F10. Interestingly, this defect was not related to an in vivo phenotype as v-ABL-induced leukemogenesis was unaltered in Ifnar1f/f Ncr1-iCre compared with Ifnar1f/f control mice. Moreover, the ability of Ifnar1f/f Ncr1-iCre NK cells to kill B16F10 melanoma cells was unaltered, both in vitro and in vivo. Our data reveal that despite the necessity for Type I IFN in NK cell maturation the expression of IFNAR1 on mature murine NK cells is not required for efficient tumor surveillance. PMID:23170251

  17. Thirty-day readmission and reoperation after surgery for spinal tumors: a National Surgical Quality Improvement Program analysis.

    PubMed

    Karhade, Aditya V; Vasudeva, Viren S; Dasenbrock, Hormuzdiyar H; Lu, Yi; Gormley, William B; Groff, Michael W; Chi, John H; Smith, Timothy R

    2016-08-01

    OBJECTIVE The goal of this study was to use a large national registry to evaluate the 30-day cumulative incidence and predictors of adverse events, readmissions, and reoperations after surgery for primary and secondary spinal tumors. METHODS Data from adult patients who underwent surgery for spinal tumors (2011-2014) were extracted from the prospective National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) registry. Multivariable logistic regression was used to evaluate predictors of reoperation, readmission, and major complications (death, neurological, cardiopulmonary, venous thromboembolism [VTE], surgical site infection [SSI], and sepsis). Variables screened included patient age, sex, tumor location, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) physical classification, preoperative functional status, comorbidities, preoperative laboratory values, case urgency, and operative time. Additional variables that were evaluated when analyzing readmission included complications during the surgical hospitalization, hospital length of stay (LOS), and discharge disposition. RESULTS Among the 2207 patients evaluated, 51.4% had extradural tumors, 36.4% had intradural extramedullary tumors, and 12.3% had intramedullary tumors. By spinal level, 20.7% were cervical lesions, 47.4% were thoracic lesions, 29.1% were lumbar lesions, and 2.8% were sacral lesions. Readmission occurred in 10.2% of patients at a median of 18 days (interquartile range [IQR] 12-23 days); the most common reasons for readmission were SSIs (23.7%), systemic infections (17.8%), VTE (12.7%), and CNS complications (11.9%). Predictors of readmission were comorbidities (dyspnea, hypertension, and anemia), disseminated cancer, preoperative steroid use, and an extended hospitalization. Reoperation occurred in 5.3% of patients at a median of 13 days (IQR 8-20 days) postoperatively and was associated with preoperative steroid use and ASA Class 4-5 designation. Major complications occurred in 14.4% of patients: the

  18. Therapeutic stimulation versus ablation.

    PubMed

    Hariz, Marwan I; Hariz, Gun-Marie

    2013-01-01

    The renaissance of functional stereotactic neurosurgery was pioneered in the mid 1980s by Laitinen's introduction of Leksell's posteroventral pallidotomy for Parkinson´s disease (PD). This ablative procedure experienced a worldwide spread in the 1990s, owing to its excellent effect on dyskinesias and other symptoms of post-l-dopa PD. Modern deep brain stimulation (DBS), pioneered by Benabid and Pollak in 1987 for the treatment of tremor, first became popular when it was applied to the subthalamic nucleus (STN) in the mid 1990s, where it demonstrated a striking effect on all cardinal symptoms of advanced PD, and permitted reduced dosages of medication. DBS, as a nondestructive, adaptable, and reversible procedure that is proving safe in bilateral surgery on basal ganglia, has great appeal to clinicians and patients alike, despite the fact that it is expensive, laborious, and relies on very strict patient selection criteria, especially for STN DBS. Psychiatric surgery has experienced the same phenomenon, with DBS supplanting completely stereotactic ablative procedures. This chapter discusses the pros and cons of ablation versus stimulation and investigates the reasons why DBS has overshadowed proven efficient ablative procedures such as pallidotomy for PD, and capsulotomy and cingulotomy for obsessive-compulsive disorder and depression. PMID:24112885

  19. Surgery with computerized virtual reality for the automatic detection of tumors.

    PubMed

    Fernández Fernández de Santo; Nieto Llanos, S; Ortiz Aguilar, M; Sánchez Colodrón, E; Tello López, J; Blasco Delgado, O; Galván Pérez, A; Maestu García, M; Guerra Paredes, E

    1999-07-01

    We present a novel and highly accurate system based on informatics engineering capable of automatic detection of tumors directly in the operating field. The system can identify the outlines of the tumor, determine whether it is malignant or not, detect lymphadenopathy and determine whether nodes are metastasized or not. The highly elaborate system, based on artificial vision, has been used in 30 gastric and 5 pancreatic neoplasms, among other tumor types. Images of the surgical field were recorded with a video camera connected to a computer, which was operated by the engineer. Questions asked by the surgeon during the procedure were processed immediately and sent to the virtual reality helmet worn by the surgeon, to the TV monitor in the operating room, or to both. The system is based on purely physical and mathematical processes that work reliably; in this sense it is free from errors and is self-consistent, operator errors or hardware failure excepted. In all cases tested here the system correctly identified the tumor as benign or malignant, revealed the extension of the tumor, and detected lymph node metastases. In every case these results were confirmed by histological examination. PMID:10477365

  20. [OPIOID-FREE ANESTHESIA, ANALGESIA AND SEDATION IN SURGERY OF HEAD AND NECK TUMOR].

    PubMed

    Balandin, V V; Gorobec, E S

    2015-01-01

    62 adult patients had highly traumatic cancer head and neck surgery under multimodal non-opioid general anesthesia consisted of dexmedetomidine, lidocane, nefopam and sevoflurane. 18 patients had been intubatedwith fiber optic bronchoscope because of II-IV grade trismus. 10 patients with laryngeal stenosis had been tracheotomizedfor intubation. All these 28 patients had been sedated with dexmedetomidine, lidocane and small doses (10-20 mg) ketamine additionally to local anesthesia. All these patients maintained consciousness and breathed spontaneously. Propofol and rocuronium preceded tracheal intubation. I.V. infusion of dexmedetomidine and lidocane proceeded additionally to sevoflurane (1-1.5MAC) .during the main surgery procedure course. All 62 cases went and finished uneventfully. Awakening and spontaneous breathing recovered just after the end of the surgery. During two first postoperative days all the patients had persistent i.v. analgesia with 1% lidocaine, nefopam and tenoxycam. On the day. 3 analgesia proceeded with nefopam and tenoxycam i.m. The quality of analgesia was good, with no complications. Only 3 patients had one promedol (trimeperidine) or tramadol iniection at the start-up of this new method of analgesia. PMID:27025133

  1. Second Tumor Induction Risk in IMRT for Prostate Cancer: An Unbalanced Comparison Between Surgery and Radiotherapy?

    PubMed

    Calandrino, Riccardo; Perna, Lucia; Belli, Maria Luisa; Botti, Andrea; Cattaneo, Mauro; Fiorino, Claudio; Cozzarini, Cesare; Iori, Mauro

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the risk of second tumor induction for prostate patients treated with volumetric modulated arc therapy in age classes 50-70. Based on both age-dependent models and doses to critical organs, the risk of second tumor induction was evaluated simulating the small field (prostate and seminal vesicles) and large field (whole pelvis) for Helical Tomotherapy and Rapid Arc. The doses to the organs closest to the treatment volume were derived from treatment planning system data. Whereas, due to the lack of calculation algorithms where leakage and internal radiation scattering are unreliable at a large distance from target, the doses to the organs outside the treatment volume were measured in an anthropomorphic phantom. Doses from Image Guided Radiotherapy (IGRT) were also assessed on phantom measurements. The Lifetime Attributable Risk (LAR) for second tumor induction increases from 2.2 to 13.7% as irradiated volume increases and age decreases. IGRT could add a non-negligible factor to the risk when daily set-up verification with high-resolution modality is included. As prostate cancer is detected earlier, the probability of an increase in early stage patients rises, and life expectancy thus increases. Radiotherapy has improved its capability in the tailoring of the dose around the target at the cost of a greater dose to surrounding organs, thus increasing the risk of second tumor induction, especially for those patients expected to survive 15 y or more. PMID:26509622

  2. Research of electrosurgical unit with novel antiadhesion composite thin film for tumor ablation: Microstructural characteristics, thermal conduction properties, and biological behaviors.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yun-Dun; Lin, Li-Hsiang; Chiang, Hsi-Jen; Ou, Keng-Liang; Cheng, Han-Yi

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to use surface functionalization to evaluate the antiadhesion property and thermal injury effects on the liver when using a novel electrosurgical unit with nanostructured-doped diamond-like carbon (DLC-Cu) thin films for tumor ablations. The physical and chemical properties of DLC-Cu thin films were characterized by contact angle goniometer, scanning electron microscope, and transmission electron microscope. Three-dimensional (3D) hepatic models were reconstructed using magnetic resonance imaging to simulate a clinical electrosurgical operation. The results indicated a significant increase of the contact angle on the nanostructured DLC-Cu thin films, and the antiadhesion properties were also observed in an animal model. Furthermore, the surgical temperature in the DLC-Cu electrosurgical unit was found to be significantly lower than the untreated unit when analyzed using 3D models and thermal images. In addition, DLC-Cu electrodes caused a relatively small injury area and lateral thermal effect. The results indicated that the nanostructured DLC-Cu thin film coating reduced excessive thermal injury and tissue adherence effect in the liver. PMID:25647366

  3. Ablative system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, V. H. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A carrier liquid containing ablative material bodies is connected to a plenum chamber wall with openings to a high temperature environment. The liquid and bodies pass through the openings of the wall to form a self replacing ablative surface. The wall is composed of honeycomb layers, spheres containing ablative whiskers or wads, and a hardening catalyst for the carrier liquid. The wall also has woven wicks of ablative material fibers that extend through the wall openings and into plenum chamber which contains the liquid.

  4. Correlations between the clinical, histological and neurophysiological examinations in patients before and after parotid gland tumor surgery: verification of facial nerve transmission.

    PubMed

    Wiertel-Krawczuk, Agnieszka; Huber, Juliusz; Wojtysiak, Magdalena; Golusiński, Wojciech; Pieńkowski, Piotr; Golusiński, Paweł

    2015-05-01

    Parotid gland tumor surgery sometimes leads to facial nerve paralysis. Malignant more than benign tumors determine nerve function preoperatively, while postoperative observations based on clinical, histological and neurophysiological studies have not been reported in detail. The aims of this pilot study were evaluation and correlations of histological properties of tumor (its size and location) and clinical and neurophysiological assessment of facial nerve function pre- and post-operatively (1 and 6 months). Comparative studies included 17 patients with benign (n = 13) and malignant (n = 4) tumors. Clinical assessment was based on House-Brackmann scale (H-B), neurophysiological diagnostics included facial electroneurography [ENG, compound muscle action potential (CMAP)], mimetic muscle electromyography (EMG) and blink-reflex examinations (BR). Mainly grade I of H-B was recorded both pre- (n = 13) and post-operatively (n = 12) in patients with small (1.5-2.4 cm) benign tumors located in superficial lobes. Patients with medium size (2.5-3.4 cm) malignant tumors in both lobes were scored at grade I (n = 2) and III (n = 2) pre- and mainly VI (n = 4) post-operatively. CMAP amplitudes after stimulation of mandibular marginal branch were reduced at about 25 % in patients with benign tumors after surgery. In the cases of malignant tumors CMAPs were not recorded following stimulation of any branch. A similar trend was found for BR results. H-B and ENG results revealed positive correlations between the type of tumor and surgery with facial nerve function. Neurophysiological studies detected clinically silent facial nerve neuropathy of mandibular marginal branch in postoperative period. Needle EMG, ENG and BR examinations allow for the evaluation of face muscles reinnervation and facial nerve regeneration. PMID:24740733

  5. The role of surgery in the multidisciplinary management of patients with localized gastrointestinal stromal tumors.

    PubMed

    Bednarski, Brian K; Pisters, Peter W T; Hunt, Kelly K

    2012-08-01

    Surgical resection of localized gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) is associated with recurrence rates of approximately 50% at 5 years of follow-up. The introduction of tyrosine kinase inhibitors, such as imatinib, improved overall survival rates in advanced disease, while in the adjuvant setting, improved recurrence-free survival following resection of high-risk GIST. The demonstration of the clinical benefit of tyrosine kinase inhibitors in both the metastatic and adjuvant settings generated interest in neoadjuvant approaches for patients with operable locally advanced disease, particularly in difficult anatomic locations. The potential impact of tumor downsizing in areas such as the gastroesophageal junction, the duodenum or the rectum, on the extent of surgical resection and morbidity is real. The ongoing research regarding neoadjuvant therapy, the duration of adjuvant therapy and the optimal means by which to risk stratify patients with GIST continues to keep the treatment of this disease at the forefront of personalized cancer care. PMID:23030225

  6. Fluorescein Sodium-Guided Surgery of Malignant Brain Tumors: History, Current Concepts, and Future Project.

    PubMed

    Schebesch, Karl-Michael; Brawanski, Alexander; Hohenberger, Christoph; Hohne, Julius

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescein sodium (FL)-guided resection has become an important and beneficial treatment method for malignant brain tumors. FL-guided resection improves the rate of gross total resection in high-grade gliomas (HGG) and cerebral metastases (CM). FL sensitively visualizes the disruption of the blood-brain barrier in the area surrounding malignant lesions, similar to contrast-enhanced T1-weighted MR sequences. This review of the current literature summarizes the history of FL in neurosurgery from 1946 until today. We discuss the molecular mechanism of FL accumulation in cerebral malignant tumors and provide an overview of the current practice of using FL and applying a dedicated surgical microscope filter. Additionally, we outline and discuss ongoing trials and future projects. PMID:26956810

  7. [Life quality of patients with benign tumors of the anterior and middle part of the skull base after surgery and during follow-up].

    PubMed

    Kadasheva, A B; Cherekaev, V A; Shifrin, M A; Kozlov, A V; Gol'bin, D A; Tsukanova, T V; Galkin, M V; Belov, A I; Radchenkov, N S

    2015-01-01

    The results of surgical and combination therapy of 302 patients with benign tumors of the anterior and middle regions of the skull base with allowance for the functional outcomes (immediately after surgery and during the catamnestic follow-up) are reported. The Karnofsky and Rankin scales and the Anterior Skull Base Questionnaire (ASBQ) were used for the analysis. Radical tumor resection, as compared to partial resection, reduces the quality of life in the early postoperative period but increases it in future; the use of radiation therapy in combination treatment for patients with radically inoperable tumors does not worsen their quality of life in the late postoperative period. PMID:26146043

  8. Chemical ablation of the gallbladder using alcohol in cholecystitis after palliative biliary stenting

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Tae Hoon; Park, Sang-Heum; Kim, Sang Pil; Park, Ji-Young; Lee, Chang Kyun; Chung, Il-Kwun; Kim, Hong Soo; Kim, Sun-Joo

    2009-01-01

    Chemical ablation of the gallbladder is effective in patients at high risk of complications after surgery. Percutaneous gallbladder drainage is an effective treatment for cholecystitis; however, when the drain tube cannot be removed because of recurrent symptoms, retaining it can cause problems. An 82-year-old woman presented with cholecystitis and cholangitis caused by biliary stent occlusion and suspected tumor invasion of the cystic duct. We present successful chemical ablation of the gallbladder using pure alcohol, through a percutaneous gallbladder drainage tube, in a patient who developed intractable cholecystitis with obstruction of the cystic duct after receiving a biliary stent. Our results suggest that chemical ablation therapy is an effective alternative to surgical therapy for intractable cholecystitis. PMID:19399941

  9. High Retention and Safety of Percutaneously Implanted Endovascular Embolization Coils as Fiducial Markers for Image-Guided Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy of Pulmonary Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Julian C.; Yu Yao; Rao, Aarti K.; Dieterich, Sonja; Maxim, Peter G.; Le, Quynh-Thu; Diehn, Maximilian; Sze, Daniel Y.; Kothary, Nishita; Loo, Billy W.

    2011-09-01

    Purpose: To compare the retention rates of two types of implanted fiducial markers for stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) of pulmonary tumors, smooth cylindrical gold 'seed' markers ('seeds') and platinum endovascular embolization coils ('coils'), and to compare the complication rates associated with the respective implantation procedures. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively analyzed the retention of percutaneously implanted markers in 54 consecutive patients between January 2004 and June 2009. A total of 270 markers (129 seeds, 141 coils) were implanted in or around 60 pulmonary tumors over 59 procedures. Markers were implanted using a percutaneous approach under computed tomography (CT) guidance. Postimplantation and follow-up imaging studies were analyzed to score marker retention relative to the number of markers implanted. Markers remaining near the tumor were scored as retained. Markers in a distant location (e.g., pleural space) were scored as lost. CT imaging artifacts near markers were quantified on radiation therapy planning scans. Results: Immediately after implantation, 140 of 141 coils (99.3%) were retained, compared to 110 of 129 seeds (85.3%); the difference was highly significant (p < 0.0001). Of the total number of lost markers, 45% were reported lost during implantation, but 55% were lost immediately afterwards. No additional markers were lost on longer-term follow-up. Implanted lesions were peripherally located for both seeds (mean distance, 0.33 cm from pleural surface) and coils (0.34 cm) (p = 0.96). Incidences of all pneumothorax (including asymptomatic) and pneumothorax requiring chest tube placement were lower in implantation of coils (23% and 3%, respectively) vs. seeds (54% and 29%, respectively; p = 0.02 and 0.01). The degree of CT artifact was similar between marker types. Conclusions: Retention of CT-guided percutaneously implanted coils is significantly better than that of seed markers. Furthermore, implanting coils is at

  10. An innovative radio-guided surgery technique for complete resection of tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russomando, A.; Collamati, F.; Bellini, F.; Bocci, V.; De Lucia, E.; Faccini, R.; Frallicciardi, P. M.; Marafini, M.; Mattei, I.; Morganti, S.; Patera, V.; Piersanti, L.; Pinci, D.; Recchia, L.; Senzacqua, M.; Sarti, A.; Sciubba, A.; Solfaroli Camillocci, E.; Voena, C.

    2014-12-01

    Finding new ways to fight cancer is essential to increase the patients life expectancy. This paper reports the latest results of the project CHIRONE finalized to increase the potential of the Radio Guided Surgery through the use of β- emitting radio-tracers and β- probes. This innovation could overcome the present main limiting factor represented by a diffuse background due to the high penetration power of the gamma radiation used. We created a prototype of β- probe and in this paper we report measures of photon efficiency, acquired with commercial photons sources. Then we estimated the signal and background rates in realistic cases of meningioma through a simulation. The device is able to detect residuals of 0.1 ml in 1 s with an administered activity less than 3 MBq/kg.

  11. [Thoracic tumor-like fungal mycetoma: interest of large surgery with terbinafine].

    PubMed

    Diatta, B A; Ndiaye, M; Sarr, L; Diatta, B J M; Gueye, A B; Diop, A; Bangoura, M; Diouf, A B; Djioumoi, H; Hakim, H; Diallo, M; Sané, A D; Dieng, M T; Kane, A

    2014-12-01

    Fungal mycetoma are inflammatory pseudo-tumors of subcutaneous tissues and possibly bones due to exogenous fungi. They have a chronic course, often poly-fistulated with an emission of fungal grains. We report the case of a 65-year-old farmer with a thoracic fungal mycetoma discovered incidentally, associated with bone involvement. The diagnosis was confirmed by the positive culture to Madurella mycetomatis. The outcome was favorable with terbinafine 1g per day for 12 months associated with complete excision of oncologic type followed by a skin graft. PMID:25467818

  12. BSA-directed synthesis of CuS nanoparticles as a biocompatible photothermal agent for tumor ablation in vivo.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cai; Fu, Yan-Yan; Zhang, Xuejun; Yu, Chunshui; Zhao, Yan; Sun, Shao-Kai

    2015-08-01

    Photothermal therapy as a physical therapeutic approach has greatly attracted research interest due to its negligible systemic effects. Among the various photothermal agents, CuS nanoparticles have been widely used due to their easy preparation, low cost, high stability and strong absorption in the NIR region. However, the ambiguous biotoxicity of CuS nanoparticles limited their bio-application. So it is highly desirable to develop biocompatible CuS photothermal agents with the potential of clinical translation. Herein, we report a novel method to synthesize biocompatible CuS nanoparticles for photothermal therapy using bovine serum albumin (BSA) as a template via mimicking biomaterialization processes. Owing to the inherent biocompatibility of BSA, the toxicity assays in vitro and in vivo showed that BSA-CuS nanoparticles possessed good biocompatibility. In vitro and in vivo photothermal therapies were performed and good results were obtained. The bulk of the HeLa cells treated with BSA-CuS nanoparticles under laser irradiation (808 nm) were killed, and the tumor tissues of mice were also successfully eliminated without causing any obvious systemic damage. In summary, a novel strategy for the synthesis of CuS nanoparticles was developed using BSA as the template, and the excellent biocompatibility and efficient photothermal therapy effects of BSA-CuS nanoparticles show great potential as an ideal photothermal agent for cancer treatment. PMID:26106950

  13. Preliminary oncological results of endosopic laser surgery in advanced head and neck tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker-Schreyer, Antonio; Sadick, Haneen; Juncker, Cathrine; Bergler, Wolfgang; Hoermann, Karl

    1998-01-01

    Lasersurgery has established itself in the treatment of minor tumors (T1 - T2) of the upper aerodigestive tract. However, advanced carcinomas of the head and neck (T3 - T4) are generally treated with conventional surgical procedures which include pharyngolaryngectomy. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the oncological outcome of endoscopic lasersurgery in advanced head and neck tumors and to compare the results with conventional surgical procedures. Between January 1994 to December 1996, 86 patients with advanced squamous cell carcinomas of the larynx and hypopharynx underwent endoscopic lasersurgery instead of pharyngolaryngectomy as a curative measure. Besides the recurrence and survival rate, the necessity of tracheostomy, postoperative complications and the mean duration of hospitalization were documented. The results showed that the recurrence and survival rate were similar or even better after conventional pharyngolaryngectomy, whereas the patients' postoperative rehabilitation was better after lasersurgery. In this contribution the indication for lasersurgical intervention or pharyngolaryngectomy in advanced carcinomas of the head and neck is discussed.

  14. Preliminary fsLIBS study on bone tumors.

    PubMed

    Gill, Ruby K; Smith, Zachary J; Panchal, Ripul R; Bishop, John W; Gandour-Edwards, Regina; Wachsmann-Hogiu, Sebastian

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the capability of femtosecond Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (fsLIBS) to discriminate between normal and cancerous bone, with implications to femtosecond laser surgery procedures. The main advantage of using femtosecond lasers for surgery is that the same laser that is being used to ablate can also be used for a feedback system to prevent ablation of certain tissues. For bone tumor removal, this technique has the potential to reduce the number of repeat surgeries that currently must be performed due to incomplete removal of the tumor mass. In this paper, we performed fsLIBS on primary bone tumor, secondary tumor in bone, and normal bone. These tissues were excised from consenting patients and processed through the UC Davis Cancer Center Biorepository. For comparison, each tumor sample had a matched normal bone sample. fsLIBS was performed to characterize the spectral signatures of each tissue type. A minimum of 20 spectra were acquired for each sample. We did not detect significant differences between the fsLIBS spectra of secondary bone tumors and their matched normal bone samples, likely due to the heterogeneous nature of secondary bone tumors, with normal and cancerous tissue intermingling. However, we did observe an increase in the fsLIBS magnesium peak intensity relative to the calcium peak intensity for the primary bone tumor samples compared to the normal bone samples. These results show the potential of using femtosecond lasers for both ablation and a real-time feedback control system for treatment of primary bone tumors. PMID:26713199

  15. Preliminary fsLIBS study on bone tumors

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Ruby K.; Smith, Zachary J.; Panchal, Ripul R.; Bishop, John W.; Gandour-Edwards, Regina; Wachsmann-Hogiu, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the capability of femtosecond Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (fsLIBS) to discriminate between normal and cancerous bone, with implications to femtosecond laser surgery procedures. The main advantage of using femtosecond lasers for surgery is that the same laser that is being used to ablate can also be used for a feedback system to prevent ablation of certain tissues. For bone tumor removal, this technique has the potential to reduce the number of repeat surgeries that currently must be performed due to incomplete removal of the tumor mass. In this paper, we performed fsLIBS on primary bone tumor, secondary tumor in bone, and normal bone. These tissues were excised from consenting patients and processed through the UC Davis Cancer Center Biorepository. For comparison, each tumor sample had a matched normal bone sample. fsLIBS was performed to characterize the spectral signatures of each tissue type. A minimum of 20 spectra were acquired for each sample. We did not detect significant differences between the fsLIBS spectra of secondary bone tumors and their matched normal bone samples, likely due to the heterogeneous nature of secondary bone tumors, with normal and cancerous tissue intermingling. However, we did observe an increase in the fsLIBS magnesium peak intensity relative to the calcium peak intensity for the primary bone tumor samples compared to the normal bone samples. These results show the potential of using femtosecond lasers for both ablation and a real-time feedback control system for treatment of primary bone tumors. PMID:26713199

  16. Local Ablative Therapies to Metastatic Soft Tissue Sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Gronchi, Alessandro; Guadagnolo, B Ashleigh; Erinjeri, Joseph Patrick

    2016-01-01

    The approach to metastatic soft tissue sarcoma is complex and depends upon several factors, such as the extent of the disease, the histologic subtype of the primary tumor, the disease-free interval, patient status and comorbidities, and previous treatments. The effect of systemic chemotherapy is suboptimal, therefore local ablative therapies are often considered when the disease is limited, especially if confined to a single site/organ. Historically, surgery has been considered the treatment of choice for isolated lung metastases. This approach also has been extended to metastases in the liver, although a formal demonstration of its benefit has never been provided. Radiation therapy instead has been mainly used to obtain pain control and to reduce the risk of bone fracture and cord compression. Advances in techniques, such as the development of more precise conformational modalities and the employment of particles, may change the role of this modality in the strategic approach to metastatic soft tissue sarcoma. Recently, the use of interventional radiology in this scenario has expanded. Ablative approaches, such as radiofrequency ablation and cryoablation, have shown durable eradication of tumors. Catheter-directed therapies, such as hepatic artery embolization, are potential techniques for treating the patient who has multiple unresectable liver metastases. Understanding the timing and role of these three different modalities in the multidisciplinary approach to metastatic soft tissue sarcoma is critical to provide better care and to personalize the approach to the single patient. PMID:27249769

  17. The effect of mannitol on intraoperative brain relaxation in patients undergoing supratentorial tumor surgery: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The risk of brain swelling after dural opening is high in patients with midline shift undergoing supratentorial tumor surgery. Brain swelling may result in increased intracranial pressure, impeded tumor exposure, and adverse outcomes. Mannitol is recommended as a first-line dehydration treatment to reduce brain edema and enable brain relaxation during neurosurgery. Research has indicated that mannitol enhanced brain relaxation in patients undergoing supratentorial tumor surgery; however, these results need further confirmation, and the optimal mannitol dose has not yet been established. We propose to examine whether different doses of 20% mannitol improve brain relaxation in a dose-dependent manner when administered at the time of incision. We will examine patients with preexisting mass effects and midline shift undergoing elective supratentorial brain tumor surgery. Methods This is a single-center, randomized controlled, parallel group trial that will be carried out at Beijing Tiantan Hospital, Capital Medical University. Randomization will be achieved using a computer-generated table. The study will include 220 patients undergoing supratentorial tumor surgery whose preoperative computed tomography/magnetic resonance imaging results indicate a brain midline shift. Patients in group A, group B, and group C will receive dehydration treatment at incision with 20% mannitol solutions of 0.7, 1.0, and 1.4 g/kg, respectively, at a rate of 600 mL/h. The patients in the control group will not receive mannitol. The primary outcome is an improvement in intraoperative brain relaxation and dura tension after dehydration with mannitol. Secondary outcomes are postoperative outcomes and the incidence of mannitol side effects. Discussion The aim of this study is to determine the optimal dose of 20% mannitol for intraoperative infusion. We will examine brain relaxation and outcome in patients undergoing supratentorial tumor surgery. If our results are positive, the study

  18. Endoscopic surgery for tumors of the pineal region via a paramedian infratentorial supracerebellar keyhole approach (PISKA).

    PubMed

    Thaher, Firas; Kurucz, Peter; Fuellbier, Lars; Bittl, Markus; Hopf, Nikolai J

    2014-10-01

    The tumors of the pineal region represent a significant challenge in terms of patient selection and surgical approach. Traditional surgical options were commonly used to approach this area causing considerable surgical morbidity and mortality. We report for the first time on a series of endoscopic procedures for lesions of the pineal region performed via an infratentorial supracerebellar keyhole approach (PISKA) in the prone position using endoscope-assisted and endoscope-controlled technique. A single-institution series of 11 consecutive patients (five male and six female patients [11 total cases]; mean age 21 years, range 1-75 years) treated via the endoscope-assisted and endoscope-controlled PISKA for a pathological entity in the pineal region was retrospectively reviewed. The mean follow-up time was 24 months. The endoscopic PISKA was successfully used to approach a variety of pineal lesions, including pineocytoma (three patients), pineal cysts (four patients), germinoma, lipoma, medulloblastoma, and glioblastoma (one patient each). Gross total resection was achieved in ten cases and subtotal resection in one case. The mean preoperative tumor volumes were approximately 2 × 2 cm. Five patients developed postoperatively transient Parinaud's syndrome. One patient underwent surgical revision for cerebrospinal fluid leak. There was no mortality. Ten patients had an uneventful postoperative course with restitutio ad integrum after a mean follow-up duration of 13.5 months. The endoscopically PISKA is a safe and effective minimally invasive approach that enables endoscopic treatment of different lesions of the pineal region with comparable results to standard microsurgical technique but less morbidity. PMID:25106132

  19. Detection methods and clinical significance of free peritoneal tumor cells found during colorectal cancer surgery

    PubMed Central

    Sibio, Simone; Fiorani, Cristina; Stolfi, Carmine; Divizia, Andrea; Pezzuto, Roberto; Montagnese, Fabrizio; Bagaglini, Giulia; Sammartino, Paolo; Sica, Giuseppe Sigismondo

    2015-01-01

    Peritoneal washing is now part of the standard clinical practice in several abdominal and pelvic neoplasias. However, in colorectal cancer surgery, intra-peritoneal free cancer cells (IFCC) presence is not routinely investigated and their prognostic meaning is still unclear. When peritoneal washing results are positive for the presence of IFCC a worse outcome is usually expected in these colorectal cancer operated patients, but it what is not clear is whether it is associated with an increased risk of local recurrence. It is authors’ belief that one of the main reasons why IFCC are not researched as integral part of the routine staging system for colon cancer is that there still isn’t a diagnostic or detection method with enough sensibility and specificity. However, the potential clinical implications of a routine research for the presence IFCC in colon neoplasias are enormous: not only to obtain a more accurate clinical staging but also to offer different therapy protocols, based on the presence of IFCC. Based on this, adjuvant chemotherapy could be offered to those patients found to be positive for IFCC; also, protocols of proactive intraperitoneal chemotherapy could be applied. Although presence of IFCC appears to have a valid prognostic significance, further studies are needed to standardize detection and examination procedures, to determine if there are and which are the stages more likely to benefit from routine search for IFCC. PMID:26425265

  20. Advantages and disadvantages of intraoperative language tasks in awake surgery: a three-task approach for prefrontal tumors.

    PubMed

    Rofes, A; Spena, G; Miozzo, A; Fontanella, M M; Miceli, G

    2015-12-01

    Multidisciplinary efforts are being made to provide surgical teams with sensitive and specific tasks for language mapping in awake surgery. Researchers and clinicians have elaborated different tasks over time. A fair amount of work has been directed to study the neurofunctional correlates of some of these tasks, and there is recent interest in their standardization. However, little discussion exists on the advantages and disadvantages that each task poses from the perspective of the cognitive neuroscience of language. Such an approach may be a relevant step to assess task validity, to avoid using tasks that tap onto similar processes, and to provide patients with a surgical treatment that ensures maximal tumor resection while avoiding postoperative language deficits. An understanding of the language components that each task entails may also be relevant to improve the current assessments and the ways in which tasks are administered, and to disentangle neurofunctional questions. We reviewed 17 language mapping tasks that have been used in awake surgery. Overt production tasks have been a preferred choice over comprehension tasks. Tasks tapping lexico-semantic processes, particularly object-naming, maintain their role as gold standards. Automated speech tasks are used to detect speech errors and to set the amplitude of the stimulator. Comprehension tasks, reading and writing tasks, and tasks that assess grammatical aspects of language may be regularly administered in the near future. We provide examples of a three-task approach we are administering to patients with prefrontal lesions. We believe that future advances in this area are contingent upon reviewing gold standards and introducing new assessment tools. PMID:26159550

  1. Comprehensive Assessment of Quality of Life and Psychosocial Adjustment in Patients with Renal Tumors Undergoing Open, Laparoscopic, and Nephron-Sparing Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Patricia A.; Swartz, Richard; Fellman, Bryan; Urbauer, Diana; Li, Yisheng; Pisters, Louis L.; Rosser, Charles J.; Wood, Christopher G.; Matin, Surena F.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose We prospectively evaluated the general and cancer-specific quality of life (QOL) and psychosocial adjustment of patients with a renal mass who underwent radical versus partial nephrectomy performed by laparoscopic or open approaches. Materials and Methods 172 patients with renal tumors completed questionnaires before surgery and again at 3 weeks, 2, 3, 6, and 12 months post-surgery. We assessed general QOL (SF-36), cancer-specific-QOL (CARES-SF), intrusive thoughts and avoidance behaviors, and fear of recurrence. We used mixed model regression analyses to compare these measures across surgery types over the course of the study and adjusted for tumor size, histology, stage and renal function. Results The physical component score of the SF-36 different significantly by surgery type over time (p = 0.04). Patients who had laparoscopy improved by month 2 whereas those who had open surgery had poorer QOL until month 3. Better cancer-specific QOL was reported in patients undergoing radical versus partial nephrectomy. Age also had significant effects on outcomes. Conclusions We report on one of the most comprehensive patient-reported prospective QOL studies in RCC patients. There were significant differences in QOL and psychosocial adjustment outcomes over the course of one year among patients who had one of four commonly accepted surgical renal procedures, and we show that these outcomes must be evaluated in the context of tumor characteristics, cancer-specific outcomes and renal function. These QOL issues may be important to consider when choosing surgical procedures for patients with renal tumors. PMID:22245327

  2. Endometrial ablation

    MedlinePlus

    ... can be seen on the video screen. Small tools can be used through the scope to remove abnormal growths or tissue for examination. Ablation uses heat, cold, or electricity to destroy the lining of the womb. The ...

  3. Lung Cancer Ablation: Technologies and Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Erica S.; Dupuy, Damian E.

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of lung cancers in 2012 is estimated to reach 226,160 new cases, with only a third of patients suitable surgical candidates. Tumor ablation has emerged as an important and efficacious treatment option for nonsurgical lung cancer patients. This localized minimally invasive therapy is best suited for small oligonodular lesions or favorably located metastatic tumors. Radiofrequency ablation has been in use for over a decade, and newer modalities including microwave ablation, cryoablation, and irreversible electroporation have emerged as additional treatment options for patients. Ablation therapies can offer patients and clinicians a repeatable and effective therapy for palliation and, in some cases, cure of thoracic malignancies. This article discusses the available technologies and techniques available for tumor ablation of thoracic malignancies including patient selection, basic aspects of procedure technique, imaging follow-up, treatment outcomes, and comparisons between various therapies. PMID:24436530

  4. Ablation article and method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, W. D.; Sullivan, E. M. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    An ablation article, such as a conical heat shield, having an ablating surface is provided with at least one discrete area of at least one seed material, such as aluminum. When subjected to ablation conditions, the seed material is ablated. Radiation emanating from the ablated seed material is detected to analyze ablation effects without disturbing the ablation surface. By providing different seed materials having different radiation characteristics, the ablating effects on various areas of the ablating surface can be analyzed under any prevailing ablation conditions. The ablating article can be provided with means for detecting the radiation characteristics of the ablated seed material to provide a self-contained analysis unit.

  5. [Minimally invasive breast surgery].

    PubMed

    Mátrai, Zoltán; Gulyás, Gusztáv; Kunos, Csaba; Sávolt, Akos; Farkas, Emil; Szollár, András; Kásler, Miklós

    2014-02-01

    Due to the development in medical science and industrial technology, minimally invasive procedures have appeared in the surgery of benign and malignant breast diseases. In general , such interventions result in significantly reduced breast and chest wall scars, shorter hospitalization and less pain, but they require specific, expensive devices, longer surgical time compared to open surgery. Furthermore, indications or oncological safety have not been established yet. It is quite likely, that minimally invasive surgical procedures with high-tech devices - similar to other surgical subspecialties -, will gradually become popular and it may form part of routine breast surgery even. Vacuum-assisted core biopsy with a therapeutic indication is suitable for the removal of benign fibroadenomas leaving behind an almost invisible scar, while endoscopically assisted skin-sparing and nipple-sparing mastectomy, axillary staging and reconstruction with latissimus dorsi muscle flap are all feasible through the same short axillary incision. Endoscopic techniques are also suitable for the diagnostics and treatment of intracapsular complications of implant-based breast reconstructions (intracapsular fluid, implant rupture, capsular contracture) and for the biopsy of intracapsular lesions with uncertain pathology. Perception of the role of radiofrequency ablation of breast tumors requires further hands-on experience, but it is likely that it can serve as a replacement of surgical removal in a portion of primary tumors in the future due to the development in functional imaging and anticancer drugs. With the reduction of the price of ductoscopes routine examination of the ductal branch system, guided microdochectomy and targeted surgical removal of terminal ducto-lobular units or a "sick lobe" as an anatomical unit may become feasible. The paper presents the experience of the authors and provides a literature review, for the first time in Hungarian language on the subject. Orv. Hetil

  6. Combination Chemotherapy, Radiation Therapy, and/or Surgery in Treating Patients With High-Risk Kidney Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-14

    Childhood Renal Cell Carcinoma; Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma; Clear Cell Sarcoma of the Kidney; Papillary Renal Cell Carcinoma; Rhabdoid Tumor of the Kidney; Stage I Renal Cell Cancer; Stage I Renal Wilms Tumor; Stage II Renal Cell Cancer; Stage II Renal Wilms Tumor; Stage III Renal Cell Cancer; Stage III Renal Wilms Tumor; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IV Renal Wilms Tumor

  7. Evaluation of Response to Preoperative Chemotherapy Versus Surgery Alone in Gastroesophageal Cancer: Tumor Resectability, Pathologic Results and Post-Operative Complications.

    PubMed

    Kashefi Marandi, Aref; Shojaiefard, Abolfazl; Soroush, Ahmadreza; Ghorbani Abdegah, Ali; Jafari, Mehdi; Khodadost, Mahmoud; Mahmoudzade, Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Gastroesophageal cancer is one of the most common types of cancer worldwide. Despite significant developments in management, 5-year survival in the developing world is less than 20 percent. Due to restricted research about the impact of preoperative chemotherapy (POC) on tumor resection, pathological response and postoperative complications in Iran, we designed and implemented ‎the present retrospective cross- sectional study on 156 patients with gastroesophageal cancer (GEc) between 2013 and 2015 at Shariati Hospital of Tehran. Two groups were included, the first group had previously received preoperative chemotherapy and the second group had only undergone surgery. All patients were followed for at least one year after the operation in terms of tumor recurrence, relapse free survival and one-year survival. The two groups were eventually compared regarding tumor resection, pathological response, postoperative complications, recurrence rate and survival. The mean age was 66.5± 7.3 years and 78 percent were male. The tumor resectability, pathological response and postoperative complications in the group which received POC were 93.5%, 21.8% and 12.8%, respectively, and in the surgery alone group figures for tumor resection and postoperative complications were 76% and 29.5%, respectively. Also based on our study the 5-year survival in the POC group was better (79.5% vs. 66.5%). Using standard neoadjuvant regimens (preoperative chemotherapy/ chemoradiotherapy) beforesurgery could increase tumor resectability, pathological response, and improve the general status of the patients. Therefore using POC may be recommended over surgery alone. PMID:27165231

  8. A preliminary study of the clinical application of optic pathway diffusion tensor tractography in suprasellar tumor surgery: preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative assessment.

    PubMed

    Hajiabadi, Mohamadreza; Samii, Madjid; Fahlbusch, Rudolf

    2016-09-01

    OBJECT Visual impairments are the most common objective manifestations of suprasellar lesions. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is a noninvasive MRI modality that depicts the subcortical white matter tracts in vivo. In this study the authors tested the value of visual pathway tractography in comparison with visual field and visual acuity analyses. METHODS This prospective study consisted of 25 patients with progressive visual impairment due to suprasellar mass lesions and 6 control patients with normal vision without such lesions. Visual acuity, visual field, and the optic fundus were examined preoperatively and repeated 1 week and 3 months after surgery. Visual pathway DTI tractography was performed preoperatively, intraoperatively immediately after tumor resection, and 1 week and 3 months after surgery. RESULTS In the control group, pre- and postoperative visual status were normal and visual pathway tractography revealed fibers crossing the optic chiasm without any alteration. In patients with suprasellar lesions, vision improved in 24 of 25. The mean distance between optic tracts in tractography decreased after tumor resection and detectable fibers crossing the optic chiasm increased from 12% preoperatively to 72% postoperatively 3 months after tumor resection, and undetectable fibers crossing the optic chiasm decreased from 88% preoperatively to 27% postoperatively 3 months after tumor resection. Visual improvement after tumor removal 1 week and 3 months after surgery was significantly correlated with the distance between optic tracts in intraoperative tractography (p < 0.01). CONCLUSIONS Visual pathway DTI tractography appears to be a promising adjunct to the standard clinical and paraclinical visual examinations in patients with suprasellar mass lesions. The intraoperative findings, in particular the distance between optic tract fibers, can predict visual outcome after tumor resection. Furthermore, postoperative application of this technique may be useful in

  9. Possible Role for Cryoballoon Ablation of Right Atrial Appendage Tachycardia when Conventional Ablation Fails

    PubMed Central

    Kilic, Ayhan

    2015-01-01

    Focal atrial tachycardia arising from the right atrial appendage usually responds well to radiofrequency ablation; however, successful ablation in this anatomic region can be challenging. Surgical excision of the right atrial appendage has sometimes been necessary to eliminate the tachycardia and prevent or reverse the resultant cardiomyopathy. We report the case of a 48-year-old man who had right atrial appendage tachycardia resistant to multiple attempts at ablation with use of conventional radiofrequency energy guided by means of a 3-dimensional mapping system. The condition led to cardiomyopathy in 3 months. The arrhythmia was successfully ablated with use of a 28-mm cryoballoon catheter that had originally been developed for catheter ablation of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. To our knowledge, this is the first report of cryoballoon ablation without isolation of the right atrial appendage. It might also be an alternative to epicardial ablation or surgery when refractory atrial tachycardia originates from the right atrial appendage. PMID:26175651

  10. Prosthodontic rehabilitation of oral function in head-neck cancer patients with dental implants placed simultaneously during ablative tumour surgery: an assessment of treatment outcomes and quality of life.

    PubMed

    Schoen, P J; Raghoebar, G M; Bouma, J; Reintsema, H; Burlage, F R; Roodenburg, J L N; Vissink, A

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this prospective study was to assess treatment outcome and impact on quality of life of prosthodontic rehabilitation with implant-retained prostheses in head-neck cancer patients. Fifty patients were evaluated by standardized questionnaires and clinical assessment. All received the implants during ablative tumour surgery in native bone in the interforaminal area. About two-thirds of the patients (n=31) needed radiotherapy post-surgery. Both in irradiated and non-irradiated bone two implants were lost 18-24 months after installation. Peri-implant tissues had a healthy appearance. No cases of osteoradionecrosis occurred. In 15 patients no functional implant-retained lower dentures could be made for various reasons. The other 35 patients all functioned well, with an improvement in quality of life. Major improvement was observed in the non-irradiated patients. In the irradiated patients, less improvement in many functional items was observed, while items related to the oral sequelae of radiotherapy did not improve. Similar to the quality-of-life assessments, denture satisfaction was improved and tended to be higher in non-irradiated than irradiated patients. Implant-retained lower dentures can substantially improve the quality of life related to oral functioning and denture satisfaction in head-neck cancer patients. This effect is greater in non-irradiated than irradiated cancer patients. PMID:17766084

  11. Percutaneous Radiofrequency Ablation for Treatment of Recurrent Retroperitoneal Liposarcoma

    SciTech Connect

    Keil, Sebastian Bruners, Philipp; Brehmer, Bernhard; Mahnken, Andreas Horst

    2008-07-15

    Percutaneous CT-guided radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is becoming more and more established in the treatment of various neoplasms, including retroperitoneal tumors of the kidneys and the adrenal glands. We report the case of RFA in a patient suffering from the third relapse of a retroperitoneal liposarcoma in the left psoas muscle. After repeated surgical resection and supportive radiation therapy of a primary retroperitoneal liposarcoma and two surgically treated recurrences, including replacement of the ureter by a fraction of the ileum, there was no option for further surgery. Thus, we considered RFA as the most suitable treatment option. Monopolar RFA was performed in a single session with a 2-cm umbrella-shaped LeVeen probe. During a 27-month follow-up period the patient remained free of tumor.

  12. Localization of liver tumors in freehand 3D laparoscopic ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahin, O.; Martens, V.; Besirevic, A.; Kleemann, M.; Schlaefer, A.

    2012-02-01

    The aim of minimally invasive laparoscopic liver interventions is to completely resect or ablate tumors while minimizing the trauma caused by the operation. However, restrictions such as limited field of view and reduced depth perception can hinder the surgeon's capabilities to precisely localize the tumor. Typically, preoperative data is acquired to find the tumor(s) and plan the surgery. Nevertheless, determining the precise position of the tumor is required, not only before but also during the operation. The standard use of ultrasound in hepatic surgery is to explore the liver and identify tumors. Meanwhile, the surgeon mentally builds a 3D context to localize tumors. This work aims to upgrade the use of ultrasound in laparoscopic liver surgery. We propose an approach to segment and localize tumors intra-operatively in 3D ultrasound. We reconstruct a 3D laparoscopic ultrasound volume containing a tumor. The 3D image is then preprocessed and semi-automatically segmented using a level set algorithm. During the surgery, for each subsequent reconstructed volume, a fast update of the tumor position is accomplished via registration using the previously segmented and localized tumor as a prior knowledge. The approach was tested on a liver phantom with artificial tumors. The tumors were localized in approximately two seconds with a mean error of less than 0.5 mm. The strengths of this technique are that it can be performed intra-operatively, it helps the surgeon to accurately determine the location, shape and volume of the tumor, and it is repeatable throughout the operation.

  13. Safety and Efficacy of EUS-Guided Ethanol Ablation for Treating Small Solid Pancreatic Neoplasm.

    PubMed

    Paik, Woo Hyun; Seo, Dong Wan; Dhir, Vinay; Wang, Hsiu-Po

    2016-01-01

    The strategy for treating small borderline malignant pancreatic neoplasms--such as neuroendocrine tumor (NET) and solid pseudopapillary neoplasm (SPN)--is surgical resection. However, pancreatic resection of these lesions still causes significant morbidity. We evaluated the safety and efficacy of EUS-guided ethanol ablation to treat small solid pancreatic neoplasms. A total of 8 patients with small borderline malignant pancreatic neoplasms and co-morbidities who refused surgery were included. We identified 2 cases of nonfunctioning NET, 3 cases of insulinomas, 1 case of gastrinoma, and 2 cases of SPN. EUS-guided ethanol ablation was performed, and treatment outcomes were assessed with clinical symptom, hormone assay, and imaging study. The mean tumor diameter was 15  mm (range, 7-29  mm), and the median volume of injected ethanol was 2.8  mL (range, 1.2-10.5  mL). There was 1 severe acute pancreatitis after EUS-guided ethanol ablation with 20-gauge CPN needle. During follow-up (median 16.5 months), 6 patients achieved treatment success; however, 2 patients (1 nonfunctioning NET and 1 SPN) still had persistent tumors. The patient with persistent SPN underwent surgical resection and the histopathological results showed peripancreatic infiltration with perineural invasion. Among 6 patients who achieved initial treatment success, 1 patient experienced tumor recurrence within 15 months and underwent repeated EUS-guided ethanol ablation. In conclusion, EUS-guided ethanol ablation therapy is a promising option for patients with small solid pancreatic neoplasm. Multiple sessions or surgical interventions may be required if there is a recurrent or persistent mass, and procedure-related adverse events must be carefully monitored. PMID:26825894

  14. Radiofrequency Ablation of Liver Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Other equipment such as needle electrodes, an electrical generator and grounding pads may also be used. Radiofrequency ... retractable electrodes that extend when needed. The radiofrequency generator produces electrical currents in the range of radiofrequency ...

  15. Radiofrequency Ablation of Lung Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... computed tomography (CT) imaging, needle electrodes , an electrical generator and grounding pads are used. There are two ... retractable electrodes that extend when needed. The radiofrequency generator produces electrical currents in the range of radiofrequency ...

  16. MR-guided Neurolytic Celiac Plexus Ablation: An Evaluation of Effect and Injection Spread Pattern in Cancer Patients with Celiac Tumor Infiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Akural, Etem; Ojala, Risto O.; Jaervimaeki, Voitto; Kariniemi, Juho; Tervonen, Osmo A.; Blanco Sequeiros, Roberto

    2013-04-15

    ObjectiveThe purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility, the initial accuracy, and the effects of the MR-guided neurolytic celiac plexus ablation as a method to treat cancer-induced chronic abdominal pain. Thirteen celiac plexus ablations were performed for 12 patients. A 0.23-T open MRI scanner with optical navigation was used for procedural guidance. As an adjunct to the MR-guided needle positioning, the needle location was confirmed with saline injection and consequent MR imaging (STIR sequence). The spread of the ablative injection material (alcohol-lidocaine mix) was observed by repeating this sequence after the therapeutic injection. Pain scores from seven patients (eight ablations) were used to assess the therapy effect. MR guidance allowed adequate needle positioning and visualization of injection material in all cases. The rest pain scores significantly decreased from 4 (median) at baseline to 1 (median) at 2 weeks (p < 0.05). Average and worst pain experienced during the past week were significantly lower at the 2-week time point compared with the baseline (p < 0.05). However, the intervention did not result in reduction of opioid use at 2 weeks.MR guidance is an accurate and safe method for celiac plexus ablation with positive therapeutic effect.

  17. Lung Cancer Ablation: What Is the Evidence?

    PubMed Central

    de Baere, Thierry; Farouil, Geoffroy; Deschamps, Frederic

    2013-01-01

    Percutaneous ablation of small non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) has been demonstrated to be both feasible and safe in nonsurgical candidates. Radiofrequency ablation (RFA), the most commonly used technique for ablation, has a reported rate of complete ablation of ~90%, with best results obtained in tumors <2 to 3 cm in diameter. The best reported 1-, 3-, and 5-year overall survival rates after RFA of NSCLC are 97.7%, 72.9%, and 55.7%, respectively. It is noteworthy that in most studies, cancer-specific survival is greater than overall survival due to severe comorbidities in patients treated with RFA for NSCLC. Aside from tumor size and tumor stage, these comorbidities are predictive of survival. Other ablation techniques such as microwave and irreversible electroporation may in the future prove to overcome some of the limitations of RFA, namely for large tumors or tumors close to large vessels. Stereotactic body radiation therapy has also been demonstrated to be highly efficacious in treating small lung tumors and will need to be compared with percutaneous ablation. This article reviews the current evidence regarding RFA for lung cancer. PMID:24436531

  18. Glioneuronal tumors and medically intractable epilepsy: a clinical study with long-term follow-up of seizure outcome after surgery.

    PubMed

    Aronica, E; Leenstra, S; van Veelen, C W; van Rijen, P C; Hulsebos, T J; Tersmette, A C; Yankaya, B; Troost, D

    2001-03-01

    The present study intends to identify factors that predict postoperative clinical outcome in patients with gangliogliomas (GG) and dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumors (DNT). We evaluated the medical records of 45 patients with GG and 13 patients with DNT, treated surgically between 1985 and 1995. We assessed several clinical and histopathological features and analyzed the data statistically. At 5 years postoperatively, 63% of patients with GG and 58% of patients with DNT were seizure-free (Engel's class I). Younger age at surgery (P<0.01 for GG and P<0.05 for DNT), total resection (P<0.01 for GG), shorter duration of epilepsy (P<0.01), absence of generalized seizures (P<0.01 for GG; P<0.05 for DNT) and absence of epileptiform discharge in the post-operative EEG (P<0.01 for GG; P=0.01 for DNT) predicted a better postoperative seizure outcome. Tumor recurrence with malignant progression occurred in eight histologically benign GG and two anaplastic GG and was associated which older age at surgery (P=0.01) and subtotal resection of the tumor (P<0.01). Our results indicate that a prompt diagnosis, relatively soon after seizure onset, followed by complete resection of glioneuronal tumors provides the best chance for curing epilepsy and preventing their malignant transformation. PMID:11248530

  19. Thermal Ablation for Benign Thyroid Nodules: Radiofrequency and Laser

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jeong Hyun; Valcavi, Roberto; Pacella, Claudio M.; Rhim, Hyunchul; Na, Dong Gyu

    2011-01-01

    Although ethanol ablation has been successfully used to treat cystic thyroid nodules, this procedure is less effective when the thyroid nodules are solid. Radiofrequency (RF) ablation, a newer procedure used to treat malignant liver tumors, has been valuable in the treatment of benign thyroid nodules regardless of the extent of the solid component. This article reviews the basic physics, techniques, applications, results, and complications of thyroid RF ablation, in comparison to laser ablation. PMID:21927553

  20. Ablative therapies in renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Chan, A A; Ahrar, K; Matin, S F

    2011-09-01

    We reviewed the use of ablative therapies in the management of renal cell carcinoma. We performed a PubMed search of the English language literature using the keywords "ablation" and "renal carcinoma." Pertinent articles specific to the technologic advancement of ablative therapy and clinical outcomes were selected for review. Intermediate-term oncologic outcomes of cryoablation and radiofrequency ablation are acceptable but are not quite as good as for surgical excision based nearly all on retrospective studies. No randomized studies have been performed comparing excisional and ablative therapies. Careful selection of patients and tumor characteristics results in improved outcomes. Diagnostic biopsy for tissue confirmation is mandatory and should even be considered post therapy after 6-12 months in patients with a concern about recurrence. Ablative therapies are associated with decreased morbidity, less severe complication rates, and excellent preservation of renal function in comparison with surgical excision. The majority of recurrences occur early, but long-term surveillance is required as delayed recurrences are also possible and the long-term oncologic efficacy is not yet established. Ablation can be delivered percutaneously or laparoscopically, and the superiority of one over the other remains controversial. The percutaneous approach is more cost effective and causes less perinephric desmoplasia. Nearly all data on ablation are retrospective and, with few exceptions, from single institutions. Ablative therapy is an appealing option for the management of small renal tumors shown to be renal cell carcinoma on biopsy in patients who are unsuitable candidates for surgical extirpation. PMID:21993322

  1. Nanoparticle-enhanced synergistic HIFU ablation and transarterial chemoembolization for efficient cancer therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Yufeng; Wang, Zhigang; Ran, Haitao; Zheng, Yuanyi; Wang, Dong; Xu, Jinshun; Wang, Zhibiao; Chen, Yu; Li, Pan

    2016-02-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is being generally explored as a non-invasive therapeutic modality to treat solid tumors. However, the clinical use of HIFU for large and deep tumor-ablation applications such as hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is currently entangled with long treatment duration and high operating energy. This critical issue can be potentially resolved by the introduction of HIFU synergistic agents (SAs). Traditional SAs such as microbubbles and microparticles face the problem of large size, short cycle time, damage to mononuclear phagocytic system and unsatisfactory targeting efficiency. In this work, we have developed a facile and versatile nanoparticle-based HIFU synergistic cancer surgery enhanced by transarterial chemoembolization for high-efficiency HCC treatment based on elaborately designed Fe3O4-PFH/PLGA nanocapsules. Multifunctional Fe3O4-PFH/PLGA nanocapsules were administrated into tumor tissues via transarterial injection combined with Lipiodol to achieve high tumor accumulation because transarterial chemoembolization by Lipiodol could block the blood vessels. The high synergistic HIFU ablation effect was successfully achieved against HCC tumors based on the phase-transformation performance of the perfluorohexane (PFH) inner core in the composite nanocapsules, as systematically demonstrated in VX2 liver tumor xenograft in rabbits. Multifunctional Fe3O4-PFH/PLGA nanocapsules were also demonstrated as efficient contrast agents for ultrasound, magnetic resonance and photoacoustic tri-modality imagings, potentially applicable for imaging-guided HIFU synergistic surgery. Therefore, the elaborate integration of traditional transarterial chemoembolization with recently developed nanoparticle-enhanced HIFU cancer surgery could efficiently enhance the HCC cancer treatment outcome, initiating a new and efficient therapeutic protocol/modality for clinic cancer treatment.

  2. Nanoparticle-enhanced synergistic HIFU ablation and transarterial chemoembolization for efficient cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    You, Yufeng; Wang, Zhigang; Ran, Haitao; Zheng, Yuanyi; Wang, Dong; Xu, Jinshun; Wang, Zhibiao; Chen, Yu; Li, Pan

    2016-02-21

    High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is being generally explored as a non-invasive therapeutic modality to treat solid tumors. However, the clinical use of HIFU for large and deep tumor-ablation applications such as hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is currently entangled with long treatment duration and high operating energy. This critical issue can be potentially resolved by the introduction of HIFU synergistic agents (SAs). Traditional SAs such as microbubbles and microparticles face the problem of large size, short cycle time, damage to mononuclear phagocytic system and unsatisfactory targeting efficiency. In this work, we have developed a facile and versatile nanoparticle-based HIFU synergistic cancer surgery enhanced by transarterial chemoembolization for high-efficiency HCC treatment based on elaborately designed Fe3O4-PFH/PLGA nanocapsules. Multifunctional Fe3O4-PFH/PLGA nanocapsules were administrated into tumor tissues via transarterial injection combined with Lipiodol to achieve high tumor accumulation because transarterial chemoembolization by Lipiodol could block the blood vessels. The high synergistic HIFU ablation effect was successfully achieved against HCC tumors based on the phase-transformation performance of the perfluorohexane (PFH) inner core in the composite nanocapsules, as systematically demonstrated in VX2 liver tumor xenograft in rabbits. Multifunctional Fe3O4-PFH/PLGA nanocapsules were also demonstrated as efficient contrast agents for ultrasound, magnetic resonance and photoacoustic tri-modality imagings, potentially applicable for imaging-guided HIFU synergistic surgery. Therefore, the elaborate integration of traditional transarterial chemoembolization with recently developed nanoparticle-enhanced HIFU cancer surgery could efficiently enhance the HCC cancer treatment outcome, initiating a new and efficient therapeutic protocol/modality for clinic cancer treatment. PMID:26837265

  3. Flat-Panel Cone-Beam Ct-Guided Radiofrequency Ablation of Very Small (≤1.5 cm) Liver Tumors: Technical Note on a Preliminary Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Cazzato, Roberto Luigi Buy, Xavier Alberti, Nicolas Fonck, Mariane; Grasso, Rosario Francesco; Palussière, Jean

    2015-02-15

    PurposeThe aim of the present study was to investigate the technical feasibility of flat-panel cone-beam CT (CBCT)-guided radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of very small (<1.5 cm) liver tumors.Materials and MethodsPatients included were candidates for hepatic percutaneous RFA as they had single biopsy-proven hepatic tumors sized ≤1.5 cm and poorly defined on ultrasonography. Following apnea induction, unenhanced CBCT scans were acquired and used to deploy the RF electrode with the aid of a virtual navigation system. If the tumor was not clearly identified on the unenhanced CBCT scan, a right retrograde arterial femoral access was established to carry out hepatic angiography and localize the tumor. Patients’ lesions and procedural variables were recorded and analyzed.ResultsThree patients (2 male and 1 female), aged 68, 76, and 87 years were included; 3 lesions (2 hepato-cellular carcinoma and 1 metastasis from colorectal cancer) were treated. One patient required hepatic angiography. Cycles of apnea used to acquire CBCT images and to deploy the electrode lasted <120 s. Mean fluoroscopic time needed to deploy the electrode was 36.6 ± 5.7 min. Mean overall procedural time was 66.0 ± 22.9 min. No peri- or post-procedural complications were noted. No cases of incomplete ablation were noted at 1-month follow-up.ConclusionPercutaneous CBCT-guided liver RFA with or without arterial hepatic angiography is technically feasible.

  4. Hand-Held High-Resolution Fluorescence Imaging System for Fluorescence-Guided Surgery of Patient and Cell-Line Pancreatic Tumors Growing Orthotopically in Nude Mice

    PubMed Central

    Hiroshima, Yukihiko; Maawy, Ali; Sato, Sho; Murakami, Takashi; Uehara, Fuminari; Miwa, Shinji; Yano, Shuya; Momiyama, Masashi; Chishima, Takashi; Tanaka, Kuniya; Bouvet, Michael; Endo, Itaru; Hoffman, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    Background In this study, we investigated the advantages for fluorescence-guided surgery (FGS) in mice of a portable hand-sized imaging system compared to a large chamber fluorescing imaging system or a long-working-distance fluorescence microscope. Methods Mouse models of human pancreatic cancer for FGS included (1) MiaPaCa-2-expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP), (2) BxPC3 labeled with anti-CEA antibody conjugated with Alexa 488, (3) patient-derived orhotopic xenograft (PDOX)™ labeled with anti-CA19-9 antibody conjugated with Alexa 488. Results Each device could clearly detect the primary MiaPaCa-2-GFP. tumor and any residual tumor after FGS. In the BxPC3 model labeled with Alexa 488-conjugated anti-CEA, each device could detect the primary tumor, but the MVX10 could not clearly detect the residual tumor remaining after FGS while the other devices could. In the PDOX™ model labeled with Alexa 488 conjugated with anti CA19-9, only the portable hand-held device could distinguish the residual tumor from the background, and complete resection of the residual tumor was achieved under fluorescence navigation. Conclusions The results described in the present report suggest the hand-held mobile imaging system can be able to be applied to the clinic for FGS due to its convenient size and high sensitivity and help make FGS widely-used. PMID:24373959

  5. Relationship Between Tumor Gene Expression and Recurrence in Four Independent Studies of Patients With Stage II/III Colon Cancer Treated With Surgery Alone or Surgery Plus Adjuvant Fluorouracil Plus Leucovorin

    PubMed Central

    O'Connell, Michael J.; Lavery, Ian; Yothers, Greg; Paik, Soonmyung; Clark-Langone, Kim M.; Lopatin, Margarita; Watson, Drew; Baehner, Frederick L.; Shak, Steven; Baker, Joffre; Cowens, J. Wayne; Wolmark, Norman

    2010-01-01

    Purpose These studies were conducted to determine the relationship between quantitative tumor gene expression and risk of cancer recurrence in patients with stage II or III colon cancer treated with surgery alone or surgery plus fluorouracil (FU) and leucovorin (LV) to develop multigene algorithms to quantify the risk of recurrence as well as the likelihood of differential treatment benefit of FU/LV adjuvant chemotherapy for individual patients. Patients and Methods We performed quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) on RNA extracted from fixed, paraffin-embedded (FPE) tumor blocks from patients with stage II or III colon cancer who were treated with surgery alone (n = 270 from National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project [NSABP] C-01/C-02 and n = 765 from Cleveland Clinic [CC]) or surgery plus FU/LV (n = 308 from NSABP C-04 and n = 508 from NSABP C-06). Overall, 761 candidate genes were studied in C-01/C-02 and C-04, and a subset of 375 genes was studied in CC/C-06. Results A combined analysis of the four studies identified 48 genes significantly associated with risk of recurrence and 66 genes significantly associated with FU/LV benefit (with four genes in common). Seven recurrence-risk genes, six FU/LV-benefit genes, and five reference genes were selected, and algorithms were developed to identify groups of patients with low, intermediate, and high likelihood of recurrence and benefit from FU/LV. Conclusion RT-qPCR of FPE colon cancer tissue applied to four large independent populations has been used to develop multigene algorithms for estimating recurrence risk and benefit from FU/LV. These algorithms are being independently validated, and their clinical utility is being evaluated in the Quick and Simple and Reliable (QUASAR) study. PMID:20679606

  6. Positron Emission Tomography Using Fluorine F 18 EF5 to Find Oxygen in Tumor Cells of Patients Who Are Undergoing Surgery or Biopsy for Newly Diagnosed Brain Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-15

    Adult Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Adult Anaplastic Ependymoma; Adult Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Adult Brain Stem Glioma; Adult Central Nervous System Germ Cell Tumor; Adult Choroid Plexus Tumor; Adult Craniopharyngioma; Adult Diffuse Astrocytoma; Adult Ependymoblastoma; Adult Ependymoma; Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Adult Grade I Meningioma; Adult Grade II Meningioma; Adult Grade III Meningioma; Adult Medulloblastoma; Adult Meningeal Hemangiopericytoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Adult Myxopapillary Ependymoma; Adult Oligodendroglioma; Adult Pilocytic Astrocytoma; Adult Pineoblastoma; Adult Pineocytoma; Adult Subependymoma; Adult Supratentorial Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor (PNET); Meningeal Melanocytoma

  7. Propranolol Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Locally Recurrent or Metastatic Solid Tumors That Cannot Be Removed By Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-16

    Male Breast Cancer; Recurrent Melanoma; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Melanoma; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Hepatocellular Carcinoma

  8. Femtosecond laser ablation of the stapes

    PubMed Central

    McCaughey, Ryan G.; Sun, Hui; Rothholtz, Vanessa S.; Juhasz, Tibor; Wong, Brian J. F.

    2014-01-01

    A femtosecond laser, normally used for LASIK eye surgery, is used to perforate cadaveric human stapes. The thermal side effects of bone ablation are measured with a thermocouple in an inner ear model and are found to be within acceptable limits for inner ear surgery. Stress and acoustic events, recorded with piezoelectric film and a microphone, respectively, are found to be negligible. Optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and optical coherence tomography are used to confirm the precision of the ablation craters and lack of damage to the surrounding tissue. Ablation is compared to that from an Er:YAG laser, the current laser of choice for stapedotomy, and is found to be superior. Ultra-short-pulsed lasers offer a precise and efficient ablation of the stapes, with minimal thermal and negligible mechanical and acoustic damage. They are, therefore, ideal for stapedotomy operations. PMID:19405768

  9. Femtosecond laser ablation of the stapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCaughey, Ryan G.; Sun, Hui; Rothholtz, Vanessa S.; Juhasz, Tibor; Wong, Brian J. F.

    2009-03-01

    A femtosecond laser, normally used for LASIK eye surgery, is used to perforate cadaveric human stapes. The thermal side effects of bone ablation are measured with a thermocouple in an inner ear model and are found to be within acceptable limits for inner ear surgery. Stress and acoustic events, recorded with piezoelectric film and a microphone, respectively, are found to be negligible. Optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and optical coherence tomography are used to confirm the precision of the ablation craters and lack of damage to the surrounding tissue. Ablation is compared to that from an Er:YAG laser, the current laser of choice for stapedotomy, and is found to be superior. Ultra-short-pulsed lasers offer a precise and efficient ablation of the stapes, with minimal thermal and negligible mechanical and acoustic damage. They are, therefore, ideal for stapedotomy operations.

  10. Indirect Tumor Cell Death After High-Dose Hypofractionated Irradiation: Implications for Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy and Stereotactic Radiation Surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Chang W.; Lee, Yoon-Jin; Griffin, Robert J.; Park, Inhwan; Koonce, Nathan A.; Hui, Susanta; Kim, Mi-Sook; Dusenbery, Kathryn E.; Sperduto, Paul W.; Cho, L. Chinsoo

    2015-09-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to reveal the biological mechanisms underlying stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and stereotactic radiation surgery (SRS). Methods and Materials: FSaII fibrosarcomas grown subcutaneously in the hind limbs of C3H mice were irradiated with 10 to 30 Gy of X rays in a single fraction, and the clonogenic cell survival was determined with in vivo–in vitro excision assay immediately or 2 to 5 days after irradiation. The effects of radiation on the intratumor microenvironment were studied using immunohistochemical methods. Results: After cells were irradiated with 15 or 20 Gy, cell survival in FSaII tumors declined for 2 to 3 days and began to recover thereafter in some but not all tumors. After irradiation with 30 Gy, cell survival declined continuously for 5 days. Cell survival in some tumors 5 days after 20 to 30 Gy irradiation was 2 to 3 logs less than that immediately after irradiation. Irradiation with 20 Gy markedly reduced blood perfusion, upregulated HIF-1α, and increased carbonic anhydrase-9 expression, indicating that irradiation increased tumor hypoxia. In addition, expression of VEGF also increased in the tumor tissue after 20 Gy irradiation, probably due to the increase in HIF-1α activity. Conclusions: Irradiation of FSaII tumors with 15 to 30 Gy in a single dose caused dose-dependent secondary cell death, most likely by causing vascular damage accompanied by deterioration of intratumor microenvironment. Such indirect tumor cell death may play a crucial role in the control of human tumors with SBRT and SRS.

  11. Plasma levels of tumor necrosis factor-α in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis patients serve as a predictor for the incidence of early postoperative cognitive dysfunction following orthopedic surgery

    PubMed Central

    ZHENG, XU; MA, ZHENGLIANG; GU, XIAOPING

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether the levels of the plasma biomarkers, cortisol, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-10 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, change in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis patients with postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD); thus, may serve as predictive factors for POCD. In total, 75 adolescent scoliosis patients, aged between 11 and 18 years and categorized as American Society of Anesthesiologists classification I or II, were scheduled for orthopedic surgery with general anesthesia. Blood samples were collected on the day of admission and at day 2 following surgery. The plasma levels of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10 and TNF-α were measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, while the concentrations of cortisol were determined using a radioimmunoassay. Cognitive function was assessed one day prior to and at day 7 following the surgery in a quiet room with the guidance of a Chinese version protocol. In total, 66 patients completed the sample collection and neurocognitive tests. According to the criteria for the diagnosis of POCD, 19 patients (28.8%) developed POCD within seven days of surgery. No statistically significant differences were observed in the baseline concentrations of cortisol, TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-10 or IL-6 between the POCD and non-POCD groups. However, the baseline plasma level of TNF-α on day 2 in the POCD group was found to be higher compared with the non-POCD group. In addition, at day 2 after surgery, the concentration of cortisol in the non-POCD group was higher compared with the POCD group. Therefore, the plasma level of TNF-α in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis patients at day 2 following orthopedic surgery may be a predictor for the incidence of early POCD. PMID:25780449

  12. Removal of an intra-abdominal desmoplastic small round cell tumor by repetitive debulking surgery: A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    SHIMAZAKI, JIRO; MOTOHASHI, GYO; NISHIDA, KIYOTAKA; TABUCHI, TAKANOBU; UBUKATA, HIDEYUKI; TABUCHI, TAKAFUMI

    2014-01-01

    In the current study, a case of recurrent desmoplastic small round cell tumor (DSRCT) is presented, which was successfully treated by repetitive debulking surgery. In May 2010, a 39-year-old male, with a history of surgical resection of intra-abdominal DSRCT, visited the Ibaraki Medical Center, Tokyo Medical University Hospital (Ami, Japan) with severe lower abdominal discomfort. Abdominal computed tomography revealed a large tumor in the pouch of Douglas with a small number of nodules in the abdominal cavity. The recurrent DSRCT was diagnosed and removed via lower anterior resection; however, complete resection was impossible due to multiple peritoneal metastases. One year later, the patient developed pain in the right groin due to the growth of metastasized tumor cells in the groin lymph nodes. The affected lymph nodes were removed utilizing an extra-peritoneal approach. At the time of writing, the patient continues to survive without any symptoms 60 months since the initial surgery. In conclusion, surgical debulking is a significant procedure for relieving patient symptoms as well as improving the survival time of patients with metastatic and recurrent DSRCT. PMID:24765157

  13. Magnetoencephalographic study of hand and foot sensorimotor organization in 325 consecutive patients evaluated for tumor or epilepsy surgery

    PubMed Central

    Willemse, Ronald B.; Hillebrand, Arjan; Ronner, Hanneke E.; Peter Vandertop, W.; Stam, Cornelis J.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The presence of intracranial lesions or epilepsy may lead to functional reorganization and hemispheric lateralization. We applied a clinical magnetoencephalography (MEG) protocol for the localization of the contralateral and ipsilateral S1 and M1 of the foot and hand in patients with non-lesional epilepsy, stroke, developmental brain injury, traumatic brain injury and brain tumors. We investigated whether differences in activation patterns could be related to underlying pathology. Methods Using dipole fitting, we localized the sources underlying sensory and motor evoked magnetic fields (SEFs and MEFs) of both hands and feet following unilateral stimulation of the median nerve (MN) and posterior tibial nerve (PTN) in 325 consecutive patients. The primary motor cortex was localized using beamforming following a self-paced repetitive motor task for each hand and foot. Results The success rate for motor and sensory localization for the feet was significantly lower than for the hands (motor_hand 94.6% versus motor_feet 81.8%, p < 0.001; sensory_hand 95.3% versus sensory_feet 76.0%, p < 0.001). MN and PTN stimulation activated 86.6% in the contralateral S1, with ipsilateral activation < 0.5%. Motor cortex activation localized contralaterally in 76.1% (5.2% ipsilateral, 7.6% bilateral and 11.1% failures) of all motor MEG recordings. The ipsilateral motor responses were found in 43 (14%) out of 308 patients with motor recordings (range: 8.3–50%, depending on the underlying pathology), and had a higher occurrence in the foot than in the hand (motor_foot 44.8% versus motor_hand 29.6%, p = 0.031). Ipsilateral motor responses tended to be more frequent in patients with a history of stroke, traumatic brain injury (TBI) or developmental brain lesions (p = 0.063). Conclusions MEG localization of sensorimotor cortex activation was more successful for the hand compared to the foot. In patients with neural lesions, there were signs of brain reorganization as

  14. Cold Atmospheric Plasma for Selectively Ablating Metastatic Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Mian; Holmes, Benjamin; Cheng, Xiaoqian; Zhu, Wei; Keidar, Michael; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2013-01-01

    Traditional breast cancer treatments such as surgery and radiotherapy contain many inherent limitations with regards to incomplete and nonselective tumor ablation. Cold atomospheric plasma (CAP) is an ionized gas where the ion temperature is close to room temperature. It contains electrons, charged particles, radicals, various excited molecules, UV photons and transient electric fields. These various compositional elements have the potential to either enhance and promote cellular activity, or disrupt and destroy them. In particular, based on this unique composition, CAP could offer a minimally-invasive surgical approach allowing for specific cancer cell or tumor tissue removal without influencing healthy cells. Thus, the objective of this research is to investigate a novel CAP-based therapy for selectively bone metastatic breast cancer treatment. For this purpose, human metastatic breast cancer (BrCa) cells and bone marrow derived human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were separately treated with CAP, and behavioral changes were evaluated after 1, 3, and 5 days of culture. With different treatment times, different BrCa and MSC cell responses were observed. Our results showed that BrCa cells were more sensitive to these CAP treatments than MSCs under plasma dose conditions tested. It demonstrated that CAP can selectively ablate metastatic BrCa cells in vitro without damaging healthy MSCs at the metastatic bone site. In addition, our study showed that CAP treatment can significantly inhibit the migration and invasion of BrCa cells. The results suggest the great potential of CAP for breast cancer therapy. PMID:24040051

  15. Novel Molecular Tumor Cell Markers in Regional Lymph Nodes and Blood Samples from Patients Undergoing Surgery for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nordgård, Oddmund; Singh, Gurpartap; Solberg, Steinar; Jørgensen, Lars; Halvorsen, Ann Rita; Smaaland, Rune; Brustugun, Odd Terje; Helland, Åslaug

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Recent evidence suggests that microscopic lymph node metastases and circulating tumor cells may have clinical importance in lung cancer. The purpose of this study was to identify new molecular markers for tumor cells in regional lymph nodes (LNs) and peripheral blood (PB) from patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods Candidate markers were selected based on digital transcript profiling and previous literature. KRT19, CEACAM5, EPCAM, DSG3, SFTPA, SFTPC and SFTPB mRNA levels were initially validated by real-time reverse transcription PCR-based quantification in 16 NSCLC tumors and 22 LNs and 12 PB samples from individuals without known cancer. Five of the candidate markers were selected for secondary validation by quantification in parallel tumor biopsies, regional LNs and PB samples from 55 patients undergoing surgery for NSCLC. LN and PB marker status were compared to clinicopathological patient data. Results All selected markers except DSG3 were present at high levels in the primary tumors and at very low or non-detectable levels in normal LNs and PB in the first round of validation, indicating a potential for detecting tumor cells in NSCLC patients. The expression profiles of KRT19, CEACAM5, DSG3, SFTPA and SFTPC mRNA were confirmed in the larger group during the secondary validation. Using the highest normal LN level of each marker as threshold, 39 (71%) of the 55 patients had elevated levels of at least one marker in regional LNs. Similarly, 26 (47%) patients had elevated levels of at least one marker in PB. A significantly higher number of patients with adenocarcinomas had positive LN status for these markers, compared with other histological types (P = 0.004). Conclusions Several promising molecular tumor cell markers in regional LNs and PB were identified, including the new SFTPA and SFTPC mRNAs. Clinical follow-up in a larger cohort is needed to elucidate their prognostic value. PMID:23671585

  16. Catheter Ablation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Are the Risks Clinical Trials Links Related Topics Arrhythmia Heart Surgery How the Heart Works Sudden Cardiac ... medical procedure used to treat some types of arrhythmia (ah-RITH-me-ah). An arrhythmia is a ...

  17. Role of surgery in colorectal cancer liver metastases

    PubMed Central

    Akgül, Özgür; Çetinkaya, Erdinç; Ersöz, Şiyar; Tez, Mesut

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal carcinoma (CRC) is the third most common cancer, and approximately 35%-55% of patients with CRC will develop hepatic metastases during the course of their disease. Surgical resection represents the only chance of long-term survival. The goal of surgery should be to resect all metastases with negative histological margins while preserving sufficient functional hepatic parenchyma. Although resection remains the only chance of long-term survival, management strategies should be tailored for each case. For patients with extensive metastatic disease who would otherwise be unresectable, the combination of advances in medical therapy, such as systemic chemotherapy (CTX), and the improvement in surgical techniques for metastatic disease, have enhanced prognosis with prolongation of the median survival rate and cure. The use of portal vein embolization and preoperative CTX may also increase the number of patients suitable for surgical treatment. Despite current treatment options, many patients still experience a recurrence after hepatic resection. More active systemic CTX agents are being used increasingly as adjuvant therapy either before or after surgery. Local tumor ablative therapies, such as microwave coagulation therapy and radiofrequency ablation therapy, should be considered as an adjunct to hepatic resection, in which resection cannot deal with all of the tumor lesions. Formulation of an individualized plan, which combines surgery with systemic CTX, is a necessary task of the multidisciplinary team. The aim of this paper is to discuss different approaches for patients that are treated due to CRC liver metastasis. PMID:24876733

  18. Radiofrequency Ablation of Large Renal Angiomyolipoma: Median-Term Follow-Up

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory, S. M. Anderson, C. J.; Patel, U.

    2013-06-15

    Purpose. To study the feasibility of percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of large angiomyolipomas (AMLs) using saline-cooled electrodes. Materials and Methods. Institutional Review Board approval for the study was received. Four patients (all female, age range 33-67 years) with large AMLs (maximal axis 6.1-32.4 cm) not suitable for embolotherapy or surgery consented to a trial of RFA. Procedures were performed under computerized tomographic guidance using 14G saline-infused electrodes. Two ablations (diameter 4-7 cm) were undertaken in each patient. Variables studied were technical success, treatment safety, alteration of tumor consistency, tumor size, effect on renal function, and medium-term freedom from haemorrhage. Results. All four patients underwent successful RFA without any intraprocedural complications. There has been no haemorrhage, or new renal specific symptom, during a minimum 48-month period, and normal renal function has been normal. On follow-up radiological imaging, the tumors have become fattier with involution of the soft-tissue elements (soft tissue-to-total tumor ratio decreased mean [range] of 0.26 [0.14-0.48] to 0.17 [0.04-0.34] U; p = 0.04 [paired Student t test]). Further evidence of treatment effect was the development of a capsule around the ablation zone, but there was no change in overall tumor volume (mean [range] 1,120 [118-2,845] to 1150 [90-3,013] ml; p = 1 [paired Student t test]). Conclusion. RFA of large AMLs is technically feasible using saline-infused electrodes. The soft-tissue elements decreased in volume; the tumors become fattier; and there has been no renal haemorrhage during a 48-month period.

  19. A novel in situ permeation system and its utility in cancer tissue ablation.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Masami

    2015-09-01

    Focal ablation therapy is an emerging treatment modality for localized cancer lesions. It is an attractive strategy for inhibiting tumor progression and preventing morbidity associated with open surgery. As for intratissue drug delivery systems for use in local therapy, the convection-enhanced delivery (CED) of liquid drugs has been utilized, particularly for the treatment of malignant brain tumors. Although the conventional CED system is useful for providing drug/vehicle-based local therapy, there are several reported disadvantages in terms of the ability to control the extent of drug diffusion. We herein developed and validated a novel in situ permeation (ISP)-MW-1 system for achieving intratissue drug diffusion. The ISP system includes a perfusion catheter connected to an injector and aspirator, which enables intratissue perfusion of the solute diluted in the vehicle in the tip-inserted cavity. We subsequently evaluated the utility of the ISP-MW-1 system for in situ permeation in a subcutaneous tumor model in hamsters. Dehydrated ethanol, saline and 50% acetic acid were evaluated as the vehicle, and methylene blue was used as a dissolved substance for evaluating the diffusion of the agent. As a result, almost all of the tumor tissue within the capsule (tumor size: ~3 cm) was permeated with the dehydrated ethanol and 50% acetic acid and partially with the saline. We further demonstrated that ISP treatment with 50% acetic acid completely ablated the subcutaneous tumors in all of the treated hamsters (n=3). Therefore, the ISP-MW-1 system is a promising approach for controlling the intratissue diffusion of therapeutic agents and for providing local ablation therapy for cancer lesions. We believe that this system may be applicable to a broad range of medicinal and industrial fields, such as regenerative medicine, drug delivery systems, biochemistry and material technologies as well as cancer therapy. PMID:26134633

  20. A novel in situ permeation system and its utility in cancer tissue ablation

    PubMed Central

    WATANABE, MASAMI

    2015-01-01

    Focal ablation therapy is an emerging treatment modality for localized cancer lesions. It is an attractive strategy for inhibiting tumor progression and preventing morbidity associated with open surgery. As for intratissue drug delivery systems for use in local therapy, the convection-enhanced delivery (CED) of liquid drugs has been utilized, particularly for the treatment of malignant brain tumors. Although the conventional CED system is useful for providing drug/vehicle-based local therapy, there are several reported disadvantages in terms of the ability to control the extent of drug diffusion. We herein developed and validated a novel in situ permeation (ISP)-MW-1 system for achieving intratissue drug diffusion. The ISP system includes a perfusion catheter connected to an injector and aspirator, which enables intratissue perfusion of the solute diluted in the vehicle in the tip-inserted cavity. We subsequently evaluated the utility of the ISP-MW-1 system for in situ permeation in a subcutaneous tumor model in hamsters. Dehydrated ethanol, saline and 50% acetic acid were evaluated as the vehicle, and methylene blue was used as a dissolved substance for evaluating the diffusion of the agent. As a result, almost all of the tumor tissue within the capsule (tumor size: ~3 cm) was permeated with the dehydrated ethanol and 50% acetic acid and partially with the saline. We further demonstrated that ISP treatment with 50% acetic acid completely ablated the subcutaneous tumors in all of the treated hamsters (n=3). Therefore, the ISP-MW-1 system is a promising approach for controlling the intratissue diffusion of therapeutic agents and for providing local ablation therapy for cancer lesions. We believe that this system may be applicable to a broad range of medicinal and industrial fields, such as regenerative medicine, drug delivery systems, biochemistry and material technologies as well as cancer therapy. PMID:26134633

  1. Radiofrequency Ablation of Unresectable Primary and Metastatic Hepatic Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Curley, Steven A.; Izzo, Francesco; Delrio, Paolo; Ellis, Lee M.; Granchi, Jennifer; Vallone, Paolo; Fiore, Francesco; Pignata, Sandro; Daniele, Bruno; Cremona, Francesco

    1999-01-01

    Objective To describe the safety and efficacy of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) to treat unresectable malignant hepatic tumors in 123 patients. Background The majority of patients with primary or metastatic malignancies confined to the liver are not candidates for resection because of tumor size, location, or multifocality or inadequate functional hepatic reserve. Local application of heat is tumoricidal; therefore, the authors investigated a novel RFA system to treat patients with unresectable hepatic cancer. Patients and Methods Patients with hepatic malignancies were entered into a prospective, nonrandomized trial. The liver tumors were treated percutaneously or during surgery under ultrasound guidance using a novel LeVeen monopolar array needle electrode and an RF 2000 generator. All patients were followed to assess complications, treatment response, and recurrence of malignant disease. Results RFA was used to treat 169 tumors (median diameter 3.4 cm, range 0.5 to 12 cm) in 123 patients. Primary liver cancer was treated in 48 patients (39.1%), and metastatic liver tumors were treated in 75 patients (60.9%). Percutaneous and intraoperative RFA was performed in 31 patients (35.2%) and 92 patients (74.8%), respectively. There were no treatment-related deaths, and the complication rate after RFA was 2.4%. All treated tumors were completely necrotic on imaging studies after completion of RFA treatments. With a median follow-up of 15 months, tumor has recurred in 3 of 169 treated lesions (1.8%), but metastatic disease has developed at other sites in 34 patients (27.6%). Conclusions RFA is a safe, well-tolerated, and effective treatment to achieve tumor destruction in patients with unresectable hepatic malignancies. Because patients are at risk for the development of new metastatic disease after RFA, multimodality treatment approaches that include RFA should be investigated. PMID:10400029

  2. A case of secondary somatosensory epilepsy with a left deep parietal opercular lesion: successful tumor resection using a transsubcentral gyral approach during awake surgery.

    PubMed

    Maesawa, Satoshi; Fujii, Masazumi; Futamura, Miyako; Hayashi, Yuichiro; Iijima, Kentaro; Wakabayashi, Toshihiko

    2016-03-01

    Few studies have examined the clinical characteristics of patients with lesions in the deep parietal operculum facing the sylvian fissure, the region recognized as the secondary somatosensory area (SII). Moreover, surgical approaches in this region are challenging. In this paper the authors report on a patient presenting with SII epilepsy with a tumor in the left deep parietal operculum. The patient was a 24-year-old man who suffered daily partial seizures with extremely uncomfortable dysesthesia and/or occasional pain on his right side. MRI revealed a tumor in the medial aspect of the anterior transverse parietal gyrus, surrounding the posterior insular point. Long-term video electroencephalography monitoring with scalp electrodes failed to show relevant changes to seizures. Resection with cortical and subcortical mapping under awake conditions was performed. A negative response to stimulation was observed at the subcentral gyrus during language and somatosensory tasks; thus, the transcortical approach (specifically, a transsubcentral gyral approach) was used through this region. Subcortical stimulation at the medial aspect of the anterior parietal gyrus and the posterior insula around the posterior insular point elicited strong dysesthesia and pain in his right side, similar to manifestation of his seizure. The tumor was completely removed and pathologically diagnosed as pleomorphic xanthoastrocytoma. His epilepsy disappeared without neurological deterioration postoperatively. In this case study, 3 points are clinically significant. First, the clinical manifestation of this case was quite rare, although still representative of SII epilepsy. Second, the location of the lesion made surgical removal challenging, and the transsubcentral gyral approach was useful when intraoperative mapping was performed during awake surgery. Third, intraoperative mapping demonstrated that the patient experienced pain with electrical stimulation around the posterior insular point

  3. Thermal ablation of stage I non-small cell lung carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ridge, Carol A; Solomon, Stephen B; Thornton, Raymond H

    2014-06-01

    Ablation options for the treatment of localized non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) include radiofrequency ablation, microwave ablation, and cryotherapy. Irreversible electroporation is a novel ablation method with the potential of application to lung tumors in risky locations. This review article describes the established and novel ablation techniques used in the treatment of localized NSCLC, including mechanism of action, indications, potential complications, clinical outcomes, postablation surveillance, and use in combination with other therapies. PMID:25053863

  4. Microwave ablation of hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Poggi, Guido; Tosoratti, Nevio; Montagna, Benedetta; Picchi, Chiara

    2015-01-01

    Although surgical resection is still the optimal treatment option for early-stage hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in patients with well compensated cirrhosis, thermal ablation techniques provide a valid non-surgical treatment alternative, thanks to their minimal invasiveness, excellent tolerability and safety profile, proven efficacy in local disease control, virtually unlimited repeatability and cost-effectiveness. Different energy sources are currently employed in clinics as physical agents for percutaneous or intra-surgical thermal ablation of HCC nodules. Among them, radiofrequency (RF) currents are the most used, while microwave ablations (MWA) are becoming increasingly popular. Starting from the 90s’, RF ablation (RFA) rapidly became the standard of care in ablation, especially in the treatment of small HCC nodules; however, RFA exhibits substantial performance limitations in the treatment of large lesions and/or tumors located near major heat sinks. MWA, first introduced in the Far Eastern clinical practice in the 80s’, showing promising results but also severe limitations in the controllability of the emitted field and in the high amount of power employed for the ablation of large tumors, resulting in a poor coagulative performance and a relatively high complication rate, nowadays shows better results both in terms of treatment controllability and of overall coagulative performance, thanks to the improvement of technology. In this review we provide an extensive and detailed overview of the key physical and technical aspects of MWA and of the currently available systems, and we want to discuss the most relevant published data on MWA treatments of HCC nodules in regard to clinical results and to the type and rate of complications, both in absolute terms and in comparison with RFA. PMID:26557950

  5. Microwave ablation of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Poggi, Guido; Tosoratti, Nevio; Montagna, Benedetta; Picchi, Chiara

    2015-11-01

    Although surgical resection is still the optimal treatment option for early-stage hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in patients with well compensated cirrhosis, thermal ablation techniques provide a valid non-surgical treatment alternative, thanks to their minimal invasiveness, excellent tolerability and safety profile, proven efficacy in local disease control, virtually unlimited repeatability and cost-effectiveness. Different energy sources are currently employed in clinics as physical agents for percutaneous or intra-surgical thermal ablation of HCC nodules. Among them, radiofrequency (RF) currents are the most used, while microwave ablations (MWA) are becoming increasingly popular. Starting from the 90s', RF ablation (RFA) rapidly became the standard of care in ablation, especially in the treatment of small HCC nodules; however, RFA exhibits substantial performance limitations in the treatment of large lesions and/or tumors located near major heat sinks. MWA, first introduced in the Far Eastern clinical practice in the 80s', showing promising results but also severe limitations in the controllability of the emitted field and in the high amount of power employed for the ablation of large tumors, resulting in a poor coagulative performance and a relatively high complication rate, nowadays shows better results both in terms of treatment controllability and of overall coagulative performance, thanks to the improvement of technology. In this review we provide an extensive and detailed overview of the key physical and technical aspects of MWA and of the currently available systems, and we want to discuss the most relevant published data on MWA treatments of HCC nodules in regard to clinical results and to the type and rate of complications, both in absolute terms and in comparison with RFA. PMID:26557950

  6. Percutaneous Local Ablative Therapy for Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lau, W. Y.; Leung, Thomas W. T.; Yu, Simon C. H.; Ho, Stephen K. W.

    2003-01-01

    Objective To review and compare treatment result for percutaneous local ablative therapy (PLAT) with surgical resection in the treatment of small hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Summary Background Data PLAT is indicated for small unresectable HCC localized to the liver. From the use of ethanol to the latest technology of radiofrequency ablation, ablative techniques have been refined and their role in the management of HCC established. This review aims to give an overview of various ablative methods, including their efficacy, indications, and limitations, and also tries to look into the future of clinical trials in PLAT. Methods The authors reviewed recent papers in the English medical literature about the use of local ablative therapy for HCC. Focus was given to the results of treatment in terms of local control, progression-free survival, and overall survival, and to compare treatment results with those of surgery. Results PLAT for small HCC (<5 cm) with thermal ablation (radiofrequency ablation or microwave coagulation) can achieve effective local control of disease and is superior to ethanol injection. Progressive disease in untreated areas is a common reason for failure. Overall progression-free survival is similar to that of surgical resection. Conclusions Thermal ablation gives good local control of small HCC, is superior to ethanol, and may be comparable to surgical resection in long-term outcome. PMID:12560774

  7. Trebananib And Temsirolimus in Treating Patients With Solid Tumors That Are Metastatic or Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-05

    Adult Solid Neoplasm; Lung Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1; Recurrent Renal Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Uterine Corpus Sarcoma; Stage III Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IIIB Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IIIC Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IVA Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IVB Uterine Sarcoma

  8. Assessment of liver ablation using cone beam computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Rehim, Mohamed; Ronot, Maxime; Sibert, Annie; Vilgrain, Valérie

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the feasibility and accuracy of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) in assessing the ablation zone after liver tumor ablation. METHODS: Twenty-three patients (17 men and 6 women, range: 45-85 years old, mean age 65 years) with malignant liver tumors underwent ultrasound-guided percutaneous tumor ablation [radiofrequency (n = 14), microwave (n = 9)] followed by intravenous contrast-enhanced CBCT. Baseline multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) and peri-procedural CBCT images were compared. CBCT image quality was assessed as poor, good, or excellent. Image fusion was performed to assess tumor coverage, and quality of fusion was rated as bad, good, or excellent. Ablation zone volumes on peri-procedural CBCT and post-procedural MDCT were compared using the non-parametric paired Wilcoxon t-test. RESULTS: Rate of primary ablation effectiveness was 100%. There were no complications related to ablation. Local tumor recurrence and new liver tumors were found 3 mo after initial treatment in one patient (4%). The ablation zone was identified in 21/23 (91.3%) patients on CBCT. The fusion of baseline MDCT and peri-procedural CBCT images was feasible in all patients and showed satisfactory tumor coverage (at least 5-mm margin). CBCT image quality was poor, good, and excellent in 2 (9%), 8 (35%), and 13 (56%), patients respectively. Registration quality between peri-procedural CBCT and post-procedural MDCT images was good to excellent in 17/23 (74%) patients. The median ablation volume on peri-procedural CBCT and post-procedural MDCT was 30 cm3 (range: 4-95 cm3) and 30 cm3 (range: 4-124 cm3), respectively (P-value > 0.2). There was a good correlation (r = 0.79) between the volumes of the two techniques. CONCLUSION: Contrast-enhanced CBCT after tumor ablation of the liver allows early assessment of the ablation zone. PMID:25593467

  9. Impact of different sedation protocols and perioperative procedures on patients admitted to the intensive care unit after maxillofacial tumor surgery of the lower jaw: A retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Lebherz-Eichinger, Diana; Tudor, Bianca; Krenn, Claus G; Roth, Georg A; Seemann, Rudolf

    2016-04-01

    Maxillofacial tumor surgery often necessitates prolonged invasive ventilation to prevent blockage of the respiratory tract. To tolerate ventilation, continuously administered sedatives are recommended. Half-time of sedative or analgesic medication is an important characteristic by which narcotic drugs are chosen, due to the fact that weaning period increases with half-time. The aim of our study was to investigate whether a change in sedation regimen would affect the length of invasive ventilation or intensive care unit stay and medical costs. Additionally, the impact of various surgical procedures was analyzed. Data of 157 patients after mandibular surgery were retrospectively analyzed over 5 years in count regression models. Of those patients, 84 received a sedation regimen with sufentanil and midazolam and 73 with remifentanil and propofol. The impact of the surgical procedures (tracheostomy, tumor resection, neck dissection and length of operation) and the patient age and sex were analyzed with respect to length of ventilation and ICU days. Cost savings were calculated. Our data show that patients receiving remifentanil/propofol had fewer ventilation days (2.5 ± 2.5 versus 6.1 ± 4.6 days, P < 0.001) and were discharged earlier from the intensive care unit than patients receiving sufentanil/midazolam (5.1 ± 3.8 versus 9.2 ± 6.2 days, P < 0.001), leading to calculated cost savings of about 8000 Euro per patient. Length of operation negatively influenced length of ICU stay (P < 0.001). In conclusion, short-acting drugs such as remifentanil/propofol, as well as tracheostoma and shortened surgery duration may reduce the postoperative need for invasive ventilation and length of intensive care unit stay. PMID:26874556

  10. Functional and aesthetic rehabilitation with maxillary prosthesis supported by two zygomatic implants for maxillary defect resulting from cancer ablative surgery: a case report/technique article.

    PubMed

    Ozaki, Hisashi; Ishikawa, Shigeo; Kitabatake, Kenichirou; Yusa, Kazuyuki; Sakurai, Hiromasa; Iino, Mitsuyoshi

    2016-05-01

    We report herein a case of functional and aesthetic rehabilitation with maxillary prosthesis supported by only two zygomatic implants for a patient with severe maxillary defect resulting from subtotal maxillectomy for malignant melanoma of the upper gingiva. A 76-year-old woman was referred to our facility with non-painful discoloration of the upper gingiva. After several examinations, a clinical diagnosis of malignant melanoma of the upper gingiva (cT3N1M0 stage IVA, American Joint Committee on Cancer) was made. Subtotal maxillectomy utilizing Le Fort I osteotomy and functional neck dissection were performed. A conventional resection denture was made and employed postoperatively, but was unable to be suitably retained due to insufficient residual maxillary structures. Six months after tumor resection, two zygomatic implants were inserted into bilateral zygomatic bones. Magnetic attachments were applied as a mechanism for attaching the implants and resection denture. After application of these implants, retention and stability of the prosthesis was considerably improved. The patient became able to eat a normal diet. From an aesthetic perspective, the depressed upper lip was also properly restored, leading to an acceptable facial appearance. PMID:26497725

  11. The Role of Virtual Surgical Planning in the Era of Robotic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae-Young; Kim, Won Shik

    2016-01-01

    Among various surgical methods introduced to optimize esthetic results, robotic surgery has gradually expanded in scope. As incision, approach, and operation view in robotic surgery differ from existing surgical methods, we should consider reconstruction from a different perspective. We recently experienced two mandibular reconstruction cases after tumor ablative surgery with robotic neck dissection using the conventional reconstruction method and virtual surgical planning (VSP), respectively. We found that the conventional reconstruction method is inappropriate in modified facelift incision in robotic neck dissection because it provides limited surgical scope, restricts access to the defect area, and therefore, consumes considerable time before anastomosis. For these reasons, the authors consider VSP far more viable in the era of robotic surgery. PMID:26632411

  12. Ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence after breast conservation therapy: Outcomes of salvage mastectomy vs. salvage breast-conserving surgery and prognostic factors for salvage breast preservation

    SciTech Connect

    Alpert, Tracy E.; Kuerer, Henry M.; Arthur, Douglas W.; Lannin, Donald R.; Haffty, Bruce G. . E-mail: hafftybg@umdnj.edu

    2005-11-01

    Purpose: To compare outcomes of salvage mastectomy (SM) and salvage breast-conserving surgery (SBCS) and study the feasibility of SBCS. Methods and Materials: Of 2,038 patients treated with breast-conserving therapy at Yale-New Haven Hospital before 1999, 166 sustained an ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR). Outcomes and prognostic factors of patients treated with SM or SBCS were compared. Patients were considered amenable to SBCS if the recurrence was localized on mammogram and physical examination, and had pathologic size <3 cm, confined to the biopsy site, without skin or lymphovascular invasion, and with {<=}3 positive nodes. Results: Of the 146 patients definitively managed at IBTR, surgery was SM (n = 116) or SBCS (n 30). The median length of follow-up after IBTR was 13.8 years. The SM and SBCS cohorts had no significant differences, except at IBTR the SM cohort had a greater tumor size (p = 0.049). Of the SM cohort, 65.5% were considered appropriate for SBCS, and a localized relapse was predicted by estrogen-receptor positive, diploid, and detection of recurrence by mammogram. Multicentric disease correlated with BRCA1/2 mutation, estrogen-receptor negative, lymph node positive at relapse, and detection of recurrence by physical examination. Survival after IBTR was 64.5% at 10 years, with no significant difference between SM (65.7%) and SBCS (58.0%). Only 2 patients in the SBCS cohort subsequently had a second IBTR, and were salvaged with mastectomy. Conclusions: While mastectomy is considered the standard surgical salvage of IBTR, SBCS is feasible and prognostic factors are related to favorable tumor biology and early detection. Patients with BRCA1/2 germline mutations may be less appropriate for SBCS, as multicentric disease was more prevalent. Patients who underwent SBCS had comparable outcomes as those who underwent SM, but remain at continued risk for IBTR. A prospective trial evaluating repeat lumpectomy and partial breast reirradiation is

  13. Laser Ablation for Small Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Pacella, Claudio Maurizio; Francica, Giampiero; Di Costanzo, Giovanni Giuseppe

    2011-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common malignancies worldwide and is increasingly detected at small size (<5 cm) owing to surveillance programmes in high-risk patients. For these cases, curative therapies such as resection, liver transplantation, or percutaneous ablation have been proposed. When surgical options are precluded, image-guided tumor ablation is recommended as the most appropriate therapeutic choice in terms of tumor local control, safety, and improvement in survival. Laser ablation (LA) represents one of currently available loco-ablative techniques: light is delivered via flexible quartz fibers of diameter from 300 to 600 μm inserted into tumor lesion through either fine needles (21g Chiba needles) or large-bore catheters. The thermal destruction of tissue is achieved through conversion of absorbed light (usually infrared) into heat. A range of different imaging modalities have been used to guide percutaneous laser ablation, but ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging are most widely employed, according to local experience and resource availability. Available clinical data suggest that LA is highly effective in terms of tumoricidal capability with an excellent safety profile; the best results in terms of long-term survival are obtained in early HCC so that LA can be proposed not only in unresectable cases but, not differently from radiofrequency ablation, also as the first-line treatment. PMID:22191028

  14. Can brain thallium 201 SPECT substitute for F-18-FDG PET in detecting recurrent brain tumor in the presence of radiation necrosis; correlation with biopsy/surgery results

    SciTech Connect

    Antar, M.A.; Barnett, G.H.; McIntyre, W.J.

    1994-05-01

    F-18-FDG PET man has been largely successful in differentiating between radiation necrosis and recurrent brain tumors. Because of the expense and unavailability of PET scanners in most clinical centers, Tl-201 SPECT scan may offer an alternative. Therefore, we have evaluated both techniques in 18 patients (13 men and 5 women) whose ages range from 28 to 74 year old. Eleven patients had glioblastoma multiformi and 4 patients high grade astrocytoma and 3 patient meningiosarcoma. All patients received radiation therapy (5500-6000 Rad) and 13 patients received also chemotherapy. PET scan was performed 40-60 min. after 5-10 mCi of F-18 FDG (i.v.) and SPECT 30 min. after 4.6 mCi of Tl-201 chloride (i.v.). Severe FDG hypometabolism was evident in the irradiated regions, in all patients. Evidence of tumor recurrence was seen in 15 patients by both FDG PET and Thallium 201 SPECT. The ratio of peak pixel uptake of suspected tumor to that of normal cortex for FDG ranged from 0.67 to 1.5 with a mean of 1.02. The ratio of peak pixel uptake of thallium 201 in the suspected lesion to that of the contralateral scalp area ranges from 0.8 to 1.9 with mean of 1.1. There was concordance between the findings of PET and SPECT in 16/18 patients. However, the volume of involvement differs in these patients; most likely secondary to different mechanisms of uptake and both studies may complement each other. Subsequent biopsy/surgery in 11 patients confirmed tumor recurrence in 10 out of 11 patients. The findings suggest that thallium 201 brain SPECT scan can provide similar (but not identical) information regarding brain tumor recurrence in these patients.

  15. Thermal infrared images to quantify thermal ablation effects of acid and base on target tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ran; Wang, Jia; Liu, Jing

    2015-07-01

    Hyperthermia (42-46°C), treatment of tumor tissue through elevated temperature, offers several advantages including high cost-effectiveness, highly targeted ablation and fewer side effects and hence higher safety level over traditional therapies such as chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Recently, hyperthermia using heat release through exothermic acid-base neutralization comes into view owing to its relatively safe products of salt and water and highly confined ablation. However, lack of quantitative understanding of the spatial and temporal temperature profiles that are produced by simultaneous diffusion of liquid chemical and its chemical reaction within tumor tissue impedes the application of this method. This article is dedicated to quantify thermal ablation effects of acid and base both individually and as in neutralization via infrared captured thermal images. A theoretical model is used to approximate specific heat absorption rate (SAR) based on experimental measurements that contrast two types of tissue, normal pork and pig liver. According to the computation, both pork and liver tissue has a higher ability in absorbing hydrochloric acid (HCl) than sodium hydroxide, hence suggesting that a reduced dosage for HCl is appropriate in a surgery. The heating effect depends heavily on the properties of tissue types and amount of chemical reagents administered. Given thermal parameters such as SAR for different tissues, a computational model can be made in predicting temperature transitions which will be helpful in planning and optimizing surgical hyperthermia procedures.

  16. Thermal infrared images to quantify thermal ablation effects of acid and base on target tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Ran E-mail: liuran@tsinghua.edu.cn; Liu, Jing E-mail: liuran@tsinghua.edu.cn; Wang, Jia

    2015-07-15

    Hyperthermia (42-46°C), treatment of tumor tissue through elevated temperature, offers several advantages including high cost-effectiveness, highly targeted ablation and fewer side effects and hence higher safety level over traditional therapies such as chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Recently, hyperthermia using heat release through exothermic acid-base neutralization comes into view owing to its relatively safe products of salt and water and highly confined ablation. However, lack of quantitative understanding of the spatial and temporal temperature profiles that are produced by simultaneous diffusion of liquid chemical and its chemical reaction within tumor tissue impedes the application of this method. This article is dedicated to quantify thermal ablation effects of acid and base both individually and as in neutralization via infrared captured thermal images. A theoretical model is used to approximate specific heat absorption rate (SAR) based on experimental measurements that contrast two types of tissue, normal pork and pig liver. According to the computation, both pork and liver tissue has a higher ability in absorbing hydrochloric acid (HCl) than sodium hydroxide, hence suggesting that a reduced dosage for HCl is appropriate in a surgery. The heating effect depends heavily on the properties of tissue types and amount of chemical reagents administered. Given thermal parameters such as SAR for different tissues, a computational model can be made in predicting temperature transitions which will be helpful in planning and optimizing surgical hyperthermia procedures.

  17. [Endoscopic ultrasound-guided ethanol ablation: an alternative option for the treatment of pancreatic insulinoma].

    PubMed

    Bor, Renáta; Farkas, Klaudia; Bálint, Anita; Molnár, Tamás; Nagy, Ferenc; Valkusz, Zsuzsanna; Sepp, Krisztián; Tiszlavicz, László; Hamar, Sándor; Szepes, Zoltán

    2014-10-12

    Endoscopic ultrasound is the most accurate imaging modality for the diagnosis of pancreatic cancer, and endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle injection has already been used for palliative interventions. Surgical resection is currently the standard treatment for pancreatic insulinoma. Medical treatment may be necessary for symptomatic patients with unresectable disease. Case reports have been published about the success of endoscopic ultrasound-guided alcoholic ablation, but it has not been reported previously in Hungarian literature. The authors present the history of an 83-year-old woman who was evaluated because of repeated hypoglycemic coma occurring during the night. Endosonographic image and laboratory findings (elevated serum insulin and chromogranin A) revealed pancreatic insulinoma. Because of severe comorbidities and high risk of surgical resection, the decision was made to ablate the insulinoma by endoscopic ultrasound-guided alcohol injection. A total of 3 mL 95% ethanol was injected into the tumor. Despite the discontinuation of the diazoxide therapy the hypoglycemic episodes disappeared. This case history confirms that endoscopic ultrasound-guided alcoholic ablation is a novel, minimal invasive alternative treatment for patients with pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors in whom surgery is not feasible. PMID:25282110

  18. Local Ablation for Hepatocellular Carcinoma in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shi-Ming

    2013-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the second commonest cancer in Taiwan. The national surveillance program can detect HCC in its early stages, and various curative modalities (including surgical resection, orthotopic liver transplantation, and local ablation) are employed for the treatment of small HCC. Local ablation therapies are currently advocated for early-stage HCC that is unresectable because of co-morbidities, the need to preserve liver function, or refusal of resection. Among the various local ablation therapies, the most commonly used modalities include percutaneous ethanol injection and radiofrequency ablation (RFA); percutaneous acetic acid injection and microwave ablation are used less often. RFA is more commonly employed than other local ablative modalities in Taiwan because the technique is highly effective, minimally invasive, and requires fewer sessions. RFA is therefore advocated in Taiwan as the first-line curative therapy for unresectable HCC or even for resectable HCC. However, current RFA procedures are less effective against tumors that are in high-risk or difficult-to-ablate locations, are poorly visualized on ultrasonography (US), or are large. Recent advancements in RFA in Taiwan can resolve these issues by the creation of artificial ascites or pleural effusion, application of real-time virtual US assistance, use of combination therapy before RFA, or use of switching RF controllers with multiple electrodes. This review article provides updates on the clinical outcomes and advances in local ablative modalities (mostly RFA) for HCC in Taiwan. PMID:24159599

  19. Surgical and Pathological Changes after Radiofrequency Ablation of Thyroid Nodules

    PubMed Central

    Dobrinja, Chiara; Bernardi, Stella; Fabris, Bruno; Eramo, Rita; Makovac, Petra; Bazzocchi, Gabriele; Piscopello, Lanfranco; Barro, Enrica; de Manzini, Nicolò; Bonazza, Deborah; Pinamonti, Maurizio; Zanconati, Fabrizio; Stacul, Fulvio

    2015-01-01

    Background. Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) has been recently advocated as an effective technique for the treatment of symptomatic benign thyroid nodules. It is not known to what extent it may affect any subsequent thyroid surgery and/or histological diagnosis. Materials and Methods. RFA was performed on 64 symptomatic Thy2 nodules (benign nodules) and 6 symptomatic Thy3 nodules (follicular lesions/follicular neoplasms). Two Thy3 nodules regrew after the procedure, and these patients accepted to undergo a total thyroidectomy. Here we present how RFA has affected the operation and the final pathological features of the surgically removed nodules. Results and Conclusions. RFA is effective for the treatment of Thy2 nodules, but it should not be recommended as first-line therapy for the treatment of Thy3 nodules (irrespective of their mutational status), as it delays surgery in case of malignancy. Moreover, it is unknown whether RFA might promote residual tumor progression or neoplastic progression of Thy3 lesions. Nevertheless, here we show for the first time that one session of RFA does not affect subsequent thyroid surgery and/or histological diagnosis. PMID:26265914

  20. Residual Tumor Volume as Best Outcome Predictor in Low Grade Glioma - A Nine-Years Near-Randomized Survey of Surgery vs. Biopsy.

    PubMed

    Roelz, Roland; Strohmaier, David; Jabbarli, Ramazan; Kraeutle, Rainer; Egger, Karl; Coenen, Volker A; Weyerbrock, Astrid; Reinacher, Peter C

    2016-01-01

    Diffuse low grade gliomas (DLGG) are continuously progressive primary brain neoplasms that lead to neurological deficits and death. Treatment strategies are controversial. Randomized trials establishing the prognostic value of surgery do not exist. Here, we report the results of a nine-year near-randomized patient distribution between resection and biopsy. Until 2012, the Department of Neurosurgery and the Department of Stereotactic Neurosurgery at the University Medical Center Freiburg were organized as separate administrative units both coordinating DLGG patient treatment independently. All consecutive adult patients with a new diagnosis of DLGG by either stereotactic biopsy or resection were included. Pre- and post-operative tumor volumetry was performed. 126 patients, 87 men (69%), 39 women (31%), median age 41 years, were included. 77 (61%) were initially managed by biopsy, 49 (39%) by resection. A significant survival benefit was found for patients with an initial management by resection (5-year OS 82% vs. 54%). The survival benefit of patients with initial resection was reserved to patients with a residual tumor volume of less than 15 cm(3). Maximum safe resection is the first therapy of choice in DLGG patients if a near-complete tumor removal can be achieved. Accurate prediction of the extent-of-resection is required for selection of surgical candidates. PMID:27574036

  1. Residual Tumor Volume as Best Outcome Predictor in Low Grade Glioma – A Nine-Years Near-Randomized Survey of Surgery vs. Biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Roelz, Roland; Strohmaier, David; Jabbarli, Ramazan; Kraeutle, Rainer; Egger, Karl; Coenen, Volker A.; Weyerbrock, Astrid; Reinacher, Peter C.

    2016-01-01

    Diffuse low grade gliomas (DLGG) are continuously progressive primary brain neoplasms that lead to neurological deficits and death. Treatment strategies are controversial. Randomized trials establishing the prognostic value of surgery do not exist. Here, we report the results of a nine-year near-randomized patient distribution between resection and biopsy. Until 2012, the Department of Neurosurgery and the Department of Stereotactic Neurosurgery at the University Medical Center Freiburg were organized as separate administrative units both coordinating DLGG patient treatment independently. All consecutive adult patients with a new diagnosis of DLGG by either stereotactic biopsy or resection were included. Pre- and post-operative tumor volumetry was performed. 126 patients, 87 men (69%), 39 women (31%), median age 41 years, were included. 77 (61%) were initially managed by biopsy, 49 (39%) by resection. A significant survival benefit was found for patients with an initial management by resection (5-year OS 82% vs. 54%). The survival benefit of patients with initial resection was reserved to patients with a residual tumor volume of less than 15 cm3. Maximum safe resection is the first therapy of choice in DLGG patients if a near-complete tumor removal can be achieved. Accurate prediction of the extent-of-resection is required for selection of surgical candidates. PMID:27574036

  2. Repeated Radiofrequency Ablation Combined With Ablated Lesion Elimination and Transarterial Chemoembolization Improves the Outcome of Solitary Huge Hepatocellular Carcinomas 10 cm or Larger.

    PubMed

    Ke, Shan; Gao, Jun; Kong, Jian; Ding, Xue-Mei; Niu, Hai-Gang; Xin, Zong-Hai; Ning, Chun-Min; Guo, Shi-Gang; Li, Xiao-Long; Zhang, Long; Dong, Yong-Hong; Sun, Wen-Bing

    2016-04-01

    This study investigated the effectiveness of a new strategy, repeated radiofrequency (RF) ablation combined with ablated lesion elimination following transarterial chemoembolization (TACE)/transarterial embolization (TAE), for solitary huge hepatocellular carcinoma (SHHCC) 10 cm or larger.From July 2008 to October 2015, 39 consecutive patients with SHHCC were screened. Of these, 12 were treated with TACE/TAE and repeated RF ablation (TACE/TAE + RF ablation group) and the remaining 27 patients were treated with the aforementioned new strategy (new strategy group). Local tumor progression (LTP)-free survival, intrahepatic distant recurrence (IDR)-free survival, and overall survival (OS) rates were obtained using the Kaplan-Meier method. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed on several clinicopathological variables to identify factors affecting long-term outcome and intrahepatic recurrence. Correlation analysis was also performed.The 1-, 2-, and 3-year LTP-free survival rates and OS rates were significantly higher in the new strategy group than in the TACE/TAE + RF ablation group (82.9% vs 58.3%, 73.9% vs 29.2%, 18.5% vs 9.7%, P = 0.002; 92.0% vs 75.0%, 84.0% vs 33.3%, 32.7% vs 16.7%, P = 0.025). However, there was no significant difference between the 2 groups in the 1-, 2-, and 3-year IDR-free survival rates (P = 0.108). Using univariate analysis, alpha-fetoprotein (AFP > 200 ng/mL), ablative margin (AM > 1.0 cm), and well-differentiated cells were found to be significant factors for predicting LTP, IDR, and OS. Surgical elimination was found to be a significant factor only for predicting OS. In multivariate analyses, AFP (>200 ng/mL), AM (>1.0 cm), and well-differentiated cells were found to be significant independent factors linked to LTP, IDR, and OS. Correlation analysis indicated that AM > 1.0 cm was strongly associated with surgical elimination (P < 0.001, correlation coefficient = 0.877).For patients with SHHCC

  3. Repeated Radiofrequency Ablation Combined With Ablated Lesion Elimination and Transarterial Chemoembolization Improves the Outcome of Solitary Huge Hepatocellular Carcinomas 10 cm or Larger

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Shan; Gao, Jun; Kong, Jian; Ding, Xue-Mei; Niu, Hai-Gang; Xin, Zong-Hai; Ning, Chun-Min; Guo, Shi-Gang; Li, Xiao-Long; Zhang, Long; Dong, Yong-Hong; Sun, Wen-Bing

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This study investigated the effectiveness of a new strategy, repeated radiofrequency (RF) ablation combined with ablated lesion elimination following transarterial chemoembolization (TACE)/transarterial embolization (TAE), for solitary huge hepatocellular carcinoma (SHHCC) 10 cm or larger. From July 2008 to October 2015, 39 consecutive patients with SHHCC were screened. Of these, 12 were treated with TACE/TAE and repeated RF ablation (TACE/TAE + RF ablation group) and the remaining 27 patients were treated with the aforementioned new strategy (new strategy group). Local tumor progression (LTP)-free survival, intrahepatic distant recurrence (IDR)-free survival, and overall survival (OS) rates were obtained using the Kaplan–Meier method. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed on several clinicopathological variables to identify factors affecting long-term outcome and intrahepatic recurrence. Correlation analysis was also performed. The 1-, 2-, and 3-year LTP-free survival rates and OS rates were significantly higher in the new strategy group than in the TACE/TAE + RF ablation group (82.9% vs 58.3%, 73.9% vs 29.2%, 18.5% vs 9.7%, P = 0.002; 92.0% vs 75.0%, 84.0% vs 33.3%, 32.7% vs 16.7%, P = 0.025). However, there was no significant difference between the 2 groups in the 1-, 2-, and 3-year IDR-free survival rates (P = 0.108). Using univariate analysis, alpha-fetoprotein (AFP > 200 ng/mL), ablative margin (AM > 1.0 cm), and well-differentiated cells were found to be significant factors for predicting LTP, IDR, and OS. Surgical elimination was found to be a significant factor only for predicting OS. In multivariate analyses, AFP (>200 ng/mL), AM (>1.0 cm), and well-differentiated cells were found to be significant independent factors linked to LTP, IDR, and OS. Correlation analysis indicated that AM > 1.0 cm was strongly associated with surgical elimination (P < 0.001, correlation coefficient = 0.877). For patients

  4. Is there a role for neoadjuvant targeted therapy to downsize primary tumors for organ sparing strategies in renal cell carcinoma?

    PubMed

    Bex, A; Kroon, B K; de Bruijn, R

    2012-01-01

    With an increasing number of small renal masses being diagnosed organ-preserving treatment strategies such as nephron-sparing surgery (NSS) or radiofrequency and cryoablation are gaining importance. There is evidence that preserving renal function reduces the risk of death of any cause, cardiovascular events, and hospitalization. Some patients have unfavourable tumor locations or large tumors unsuitable for NSS or ablation which is a clinical problem especially in those with imperative indications to preserve renal function. These patients may benefit from downsizing primary tumors by targeted therapy. This paper provides an overview of the current evidence, safety, controversies, and ongoing trials. PMID:22778936

  5. Anatomic Tumor Location Influences the Success of Contemporary Limb-Sparing Surgery and Radiation Among Adults With Soft Tissue Sarcomas of the Extremities

    SciTech Connect

    Korah, Mariam P.; Deyrup, Andrea T.; Monson, David K.; Oskouei, Shervin V.; Weiss, Sharon W.; Landry, Jerome; Godette, Karen D.

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To examine the influence of anatomic location in the upper extremity (UE) vs. lower extremity (LE) on the presentation and outcomes of adult soft tissue sarcomas (STS). Methods and Materials: From 2001 to 2008, 118 patients underwent limb-sparing surgery (LSS) and external beam radiotherapy (RT) with curative intent for nonrecurrent extremity STS. RT was delivered preoperatively in 96 and postoperatively in 22 patients. Lesions arose in the UE in 28 and in the LE in 90 patients. Patients with UE lesions had smaller tumors (4.5 vs. 9.0 cm, p < 0.01), were more likely to undergo a prior excision (43 vs. 22%, p = 0.03), to have close or positive margins after resection (71 vs. 49%, p = 0.04), and to undergo postoperative RT (32 vs. 14%, p = 0.04). Results: Five-year actuarial local recurrence-free and distant metastasis-free survival rates for the entire group were 85 and 74%, with no difference observed between the UE and LE cohorts. Five-year actuarial probability of wound reoperation rates were 4 vs. 29% (p < 0.01) in the UE and LE respectively. Thigh lesions accounted for 84% of the required wound reoperations. The distribution of tumors within the anterior, medial, and posterior thigh compartments was 51%, 26%, and 23%. Subset analysis by compartment showed no difference in the probability of wound reoperation between the anterior and medial/posterior compartments (29 vs. 30%, p = 0.68). Neurolysis was performed during resection in (15%, 5%, and 67%, p < 0.01) of tumors in the anterior, medial, and posterior compartments. Conclusions: Tumors in the UE and LE differ significantly with respect to size and management details. The anatomy of the UE poses technical impediments to an R0 resection. Thigh tumors are associated with higher wound reoperation rates. Tumor resection in the posterior thigh compartment is more likely to result in nerve injury. A better understanding of the inherent differences between tumors in various extremity sites will assist in

  6. Biological ablation of sentinel lymph node metastasis in submucosally invaded early gastrointestinal cancer.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Satoru; Kishimoto, Hiroyuki; Tazawa, Hiroshi; Hashimoto, Yuuri; Kuroda, Shinji; Nishizaki, Masahiko; Nagasaka, Takeshi; Shirakawa, Yasuhiro; Kagawa, Shunsuke; Urata, Yasuo; Hoffman, Robert M; Fujiwara, Toshiyoshi

    2015-03-01

    Currently, early gastrointestinal cancers are treated endoscopically, as long as there are no lymph node metastases. However, once a gastrointestinal cancer invades the submucosal layer, the lymph node metastatic rate rises to higher than 10%. Therefore, surgery is still the gold standard to remove regional lymph nodes containing possible metastases. Here, to avoid prophylactic surgery, we propose a less-invasive biological ablation of lymph node metastasis in submucosally invaded gastrointestinal cancer patients. We have established an orthotopic early rectal cancer xenograft model with spontaneous lymph node metastasis by implantation of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-labeled human colon cancer cells into the submucosal layer of the murine rectum. A solution containing telomerase-specific oncolytic adenovirus was injected into the peritumoral submucosal space, followed by excision of the primary rectal tumors mimicking the endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) technique. Seven days after treatment, GFP signals had completely disappeared indicating that sentinel lymph node metastasis was selectively eradicated. Moreover, biologically treated mice were confirmed to be relapse-free even 4 weeks after treatment. These results indicate that virus-mediated biological ablation selectively targets lymph node metastasis and provides a potential alternative to surgery for submucosal invasive gastrointestinal cancer patients. PMID:25523761

  7. Biological Ablation of Sentinel Lymph Node Metastasis in Submucosally Invaded Early Gastrointestinal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kikuchi, Satoru; Kishimoto, Hiroyuki; Tazawa, Hiroshi; Hashimoto, Yuuri; Kuroda, Shinji; Nishizaki, Masahiko; Nagasaka, Takeshi; Shirakawa, Yasuhiro; Kagawa, Shunsuke; Urata, Yasuo; Hoffman, Robert M; Fujiwara, Toshiyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Currently, early gastrointestinal cancers are treated endoscopically, as long as there are no lymph node metastases. However, once a gastrointestinal cancer invades the submucosal layer, the lymph node metastatic rate rises to higher than 10%. Therefore, surgery is still the gold standard to remove regional lymph nodes containing possible metastases. Here, to avoid prophylactic surgery, we propose a less-invasive biological ablation of lymph node metastasis in submucosally invaded gastrointestinal cancer patients. We have established an orthotopic early rectal cancer xenograft model with spontaneous lymph node metastasis by implantation of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-labeled human colon cancer cells into the submucosal layer of the murine rectum. A solution containing telomerase-specific oncolytic adenovirus was injected into the peritumoral submucosal space, followed by excision of the primary rectal tumors mimicking the endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) technique. Seven days after treatment, GFP signals had completely disappeared indicating that sentinel lymph node metastasis was selectively eradicated. Moreover, biologically treated mice were confirmed to be relapse-free even 4 weeks after treatment. These results indicate that virus-mediated biological ablation selectively targets lymph node metastasis and provides a potential alternative to surgery for submucosal invasive gastrointestinal cancer patients. PMID:25523761

  8. The Latest in Surgical Management of Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Video-Assisted Thoracic Surgery and Tumor Molecular Profiling.

    PubMed

    Woodard, Gavitt A; Jablons, David M

    2015-01-01

    Stage IIIA non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) remains a treatment challenge and requires a multidisciplinary care team to optimize survival outcomes. Thoracic surgeons play an important role in selecting operative candidates and assisting with pathologic mediastinal staging via cervical mediastinoscopy, endobronchial ultrasound, or esophageal ultrasound with fine needle aspiration. The majority of patients with stage IIIA disease will receive induction therapy followed by repeat staging before undergoing lobectomy or pneumonectomy; occasionally, a patient with an incidentally found, single-station microscopic IIIA tumor will undergo resection as the primary initial therapy. Multiple large clinical trials, including SWOG-8805, EORTC-8941, INT-0139, and ANITA, have shown 5-year overall survival rates of up to 30% to 40% using triple-modality treatments, and the best outcomes repeatedly are seen among patients who respond to induction treatment or who have tumors amenable to lobectomy instead of pneumonectomy. The need for a pneumonectomy is not a reason to deny patients an operation, because current operative mortality and morbidity rates are acceptably low at 5% and 30%, respectively. In select patients with stage IIIA disease, video-assisted thoracic surgery and open resections have been shown to have comparable rates of local recurrence and long-term survival. New developments in genetic profiling and personalized medicine are exciting areas of research, and early data suggest that molecular profiling of stage IIIA NSCLC tumors can accurately stratify patients by risk within this stage and predict survival outcomes. Future advances in treating stage IIIA disease will involve developing better systemic therapies and customizing treatment plans on the basis of an individual tumor's genetic profile. PMID:25993207

  9. Radiofrequency Ablation Complicated by Skin Burn

    PubMed Central

    Huffman, S.D.; Huffman, N.P.; Lewandowski, Robert J.; Brown, Daniel B.

    2011-01-01

    Radiofrequency (RF) ablation has been increasingly utilized as a minimally invasive treatment for primary and metastatic liver tumors, as well as tumors in the kidneys, bones, and adrenal glands. The development of high-current RF ablation has subsequently led to an increased risk of thermal skin injuries at the grounding pad site. The incidence of skin burns in recent studies ranges from 0.1–3.2% for severe skin burns (second-/third-degree), and from 5–33% for first-degree burns.1–3 PMID:22654258

  10. AFP464 in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Refractory Solid Tumors That Cannot Be Removed By Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-02-21

    Male Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Recurrent Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  11. Hypothalamic tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... occur at any age. They are often more aggressive in adults than in children. In adults, tumors ... The treatment depends on how aggressive the tumor is, and whether it is a glioma or another type of cancer. Treatment may involve combinations of surgery, radiation , ...

  12. Loss of the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor correlates with improved outcome in patients with lung adenocarcinoma treated with surgery and chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Cecchini, Matthew J; Ishak, Charles A; Passos, Daniel T; Warner, Andrew; Palma, David A; Howlett, Christopher J; Driman, David K; Dick, Frederick A

    2015-12-01

    The retinoblastoma tumor suppressor pathway is frequently inactivated in human cancer, enabling unrestrained proliferation. Most cancers, however, maintain expression of a wild-type (WT) retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein (pRB). It is generally in a hyperphosphorylated state (ppRB) because of mutations in upstream regulators such as p16 and cyclin D. Hyperphosphorylated ppRB is considered inactive, although data are emerging that suggest it can retain some function. To test the clinical relevance of pRB status, we obtained archival tissue sections from 91 cases of lung adenocarcinoma resected between 2003 and 2008. All cases received platinum doublet chemotherapy, and the median survival was 5.9 years. All cases were assessed for pRB and ppRB using immunohistochemistry and quantified based on intensity of signal and proportion of positive cells. pRB expression was lost in 15% of lung adenocarcinoma cases. In tumors that did not express pRB, the survival rate was significantly improved (hazard ratio, 0.21; 95% confidence interval, 0.06-0.69; P = .01) in comparison to tumors that express pRB. pRB status was found to be an independent predictor of overall survival on multivariate analysis (hazard ratio, 0.22; 95% confidence interval, 0.07-0.73; P = .01) along with increased stage and age. pRB status did not alter baseline levels of apoptotic or proliferative markers in these tumors, but the DNA damage response protein 53BP1 was higher in cancers with high levels of pRB. In summary, loss of pRB expression is associated with improved survival in patients treated with surgical resection and chemotherapy. This may be useful in classifying patients at greatest benefit for aggressive treatment regimes. PMID:26475095

  13. Preoperative Chemoradiotherapy (CRT) Followed by Laparoscopic Surgery for Rectal Cancer: Predictors of the Tumor Response and the Long-Term Oncologic Outcomes

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jong Hoon; Kim, Sung Hwan; Kim, Jun-Gi; Cho, Hyun Min; Shim, Byoung Yong

    2011-10-01

    Purpose: We have evaluated the predictors of a tumor response to chemoradiotherapy (CRT) and the long-term oncologic outcomes of preoperative CRT and laparoscopic surgery for patients who suffer from rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: The study involved 274 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer and who had been treated with preoperative CRT and curative laparoscopic total mesorectal excision between January 2003 and January 2009. We assessed the long-term oncologic outcomes, in terms of recurrence and survival, of the treated patients. Results: Forty-two (15.3%) of the 274 patients had complete pathologic responses (pCR). The pre-CRT carcinoembryonic antigen level was the only significant predictor of a pCR on the multivariate analysis (p = 0.01). The overall survival at 5 years was 73.1%, with a mean survival period of 59.7 months (95% CI, 57.1-62.3). The disease-free survival at 5 years was 67.3% with a mean survival period of 54.7 months (95% CI, 51.7-57.8). The pCR group had a higher rate of overall survival at 5 years than did the non-pCR group, and the difference was significant (86.0% vs. 71.2%; hazard ratio = 0.87; 95% CI, 0.78-0.96; p = 0.03). The cumulative incidences of local and distant recurrences at 5 years were 5.8% and 28.3%, respectively. A total of 84.5% (234 of 274) of the patients had their anal sphincters preserved. Grade 3 or 4 acute and long-term toxic effects occurred in 22.2% and 8.4% of the patients, respectively. Conclusion: Preoperative CRT and laparoscopic surgery seems safe and feasible with favorable long-term outcomes and a high rate of sphincter preservation for the patients with low-lying tumors of the rectum.

  14. Image-guided installation of 3D-printed patient-specific implant and its application in pelvic tumor resection and reconstruction surgery.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaojun; Xu, Lu; Wang, Yiping; Hao, Yongqiang; Wang, Liao

    2016-03-01

    Nowadays, the diagnosis and treatment of pelvic sarcoma pose a major surgical challenge for reconstruction in orthopedics. With the development of manufacturing technology, the metal 3D-printed customized implants have brought revolution for the limb-salvage resection and reconstruction surgery. However, the tumor resection is not without risk and the precise implant placement is very difficult due to the anatomic intricacies of the pelvis. In this study, a surgical navigation system including the implant calibration algorithm has been developed, so that the surgical instruments and the 3D-printed customized implant can be tracked and rendered on the computer screen in real time, minimizing the risks and improving the precision of the surgery. Both the phantom experiment and the pilot clinical case study presented the feasibility of our computer-aided surgical navigation system. According to the accuracy evaluation experiment, the precision of customized implant installation can be improved three to five times (TRE: 0.75±0.18 mm) compared with the non-navigated implant installation after the guided osteotomy (TRE: 3.13±1.28 mm), which means it is sufficient to meet the clinical requirements of the pelvic reconstruction. However, more clinical trials will be conducted in the future work for the validation of the reliability and efficiency of our navigation system. PMID:26652978

  15. Reduced-Port Laparoscopic Surgery for a Tumor-Specific Mesorectal Excision in Patients With Colorectal Cancer: Initial Experience With 20 Consecutive Cases

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Sung Uk; Baek, Se Jin; Min, Byung Soh; Baik, Seung Hyuk; Kim, Nam Kyu

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Single-port plus one-port, reduced-port laparoscopic surgery (RPLS) may decrease collisions between laparoscopic instruments and the camera in a narrow, bony, pelvic cavity while maintaining the cosmetic advantages of single-incision laparoscopic surgery. The aim of this study is to describe our initial experience with and to assess the feasibility and safety of RPLS for tumor-specific mesorectal excisions (TSMEs) in patients with colorectal cancer. Methods Between May 2010 and August 2012, RPLS for TSME was performed in 20 patients with colorectal cancer. A single port with four channels through an umbilical incision and an additional port in the right lower quadrant were used for RPLS. Results The median operation time was 231 minutes (range, 160-347 minutes), and the estimated blood loss was 100 mL (range, 50-500 mL). We transected the rectum with one laparoscopic stapler in 17 cases (85%). The median time to soft diet was 4 days (range, 3-6 days), and the length of hospital stay was 7 days (range, 5-45 days). The median total number of lymph nodes harvested was 16 (range, 7-36), and circumferential resection margin involvement was found in 1 case (5%). Seven patients (35%) developed postoperative complications, and no mortalities occurred within 30 days. During the median follow-up period of 20 months (range, 12-40 months), liver metastasis occurred in 1 patient 10 months after surgery, and local recurrence was nonexistent. Conclusion RPLS for TSME in patients with colorectal cancer is technically feasible and safe without compromising oncologic safety. However, further studies comparing RPLS with a conventional, laparoscopic low-anterior resection are needed to prove the advantages of the RPLS procedure. PMID:25745622

  16. Varicose vein surgery.

    PubMed

    Kendler, Micheal; Fellmer, Peter T; Wetzig, Tino

    2012-03-01

    Venous diseases are common in the general population. After a comprehensive diagnostic evaluation, an individual therapeutic approach should be selected on the basis of the findings, with the aim of treating the diseased vein segments and improving quality of life. Numerous therapeutic options are available for the treatment of varicose veins. In addition to conservative methods such as compression therapy, exercise or drugs, surgical procedures such as traditional surgery, thermal ablation techniques or sclerotherapy can be performed. Recent developments include the use of endoluminal water vapor or mechano-chemical endovenous ablation. PMID:22222053

  17. Endoscopic laser surgery of patients with pretumoral diseases and tumors of the organs of respiration and gastro-intestinal tract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poddubny, Boris K.; Ungiadze, G. V.; Kuvshinov, Yury P.; Efimov, Oleg N.; Mazurov, S. T.

    1996-01-01

    The result of treatment of 566 patients with precancerous diseases, cancer and benign tumors of respiratory and gastro-intestinal tract are presented. The `Raduga-1' as a source of laser radiation has been used. The wavelength of radiation 1060 nm. The maximum of basic radiation at the end of lightguide is 50 W. It is shown that the method of endoscopic laser destruction is a highly effective one and may be recommended for radical treatment.

  18. Robotic surgery<