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Sample records for ablatively accelerated targets

  1. Ion acceleration enhanced by target ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, S.; Lin, C. Wang, H. Y.; Lu, H. Y.; He, X. T.; Yan, X. Q.; Chen, J. E.; Cowan, T. E.

    2015-07-15

    Laser proton acceleration can be enhanced by using target ablation, due to the energetic electrons generated in the ablation preplasma. When the ablation pulse matches main pulse, the enhancement gets optimized because the electrons' energy density is highest. A scaling law between the ablation pulse and main pulse is confirmed by the simulation, showing that for given CPA pulse and target, proton energy improvement can be achieved several times by adjusting the target ablation.

  2. Multiple target laser ablation system

    DOEpatents

    Mashburn, Douglas N.

    1996-01-01

    A laser ablation apparatus and method are provided in which multiple targets consisting of material to be ablated are mounted on a movable support. The material transfer rate is determined for each target material, and these rates are stored in a controller. A position detector determines which target material is in a position to be ablated, and then the controller controls the beam trigger timing and energy level to achieve a desired proportion of each constituent material in the resulting film.

  3. Multiple target laser ablation system

    DOEpatents

    Mashburn, D.N.

    1996-01-09

    A laser ablation apparatus and method are provided in which multiple targets consisting of material to be ablated are mounted on a movable support. The material transfer rate is determined for each target material, and these rates are stored in a controller. A position detector determines which target material is in a position to be ablated, and then the controller controls the beam trigger timing and energy level to achieve a desired proportion of each constituent material in the resulting film. 3 figs.

  4. Accelerator target

    DOEpatents

    Schlyer, D.J.; Ferrieri, R.A.; Koehler, C.

    1999-06-29

    A target includes a body having a depression in a front side for holding a sample for irradiation by a particle beam to produce a radioisotope. Cooling fins are disposed on a backside of the body opposite the depression. A foil is joined to the body front side to cover the depression and sample therein. A perforate grid is joined to the body atop the foil for supporting the foil and for transmitting the particle beam therethrough. A coolant is circulated over the fins to cool the body during the particle beam irradiation of the sample in the depression. 5 figs.

  5. Accelerator target

    DOEpatents

    Schlyer, David J.; Ferrieri, Richard A.; Koehler, Conrad

    1999-01-01

    A target includes a body having a depression in a front side for holding a sample for irradiation by a particle beam to produce a radioisotope. Cooling fins are disposed on a backside of the body opposite the depression. A foil is joined to the body front side to cover the depression and sample therein. A perforate grid is joined to the body atop the foil for supporting the foil and for transmitting the particle beam therethrough. A coolant is circulated over the fins to cool the body during the particle beam irradiation of the sample in the depression.

  6. Guiding and Ionization Blueshift in Ablative Capillary Waveguide Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    McGuffey, Chris; Matsuoka, Takeshi; Bulanov, Stepan; Chvykov, Vladimir; Kalintchenko, Galina; Rousseau, Pascal; Yanovsky, Victor; Maksimchuk, Anatoly; Krushelnick, Karl; Levin, Michael; Zigler, Arie

    2009-01-22

    Laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) in plasmas has been demonstrated with gradients which are orders of magnitude greater than the limit on conventional Radio Frequency accelerators. However, the acceleration length is limited by two factors, the dephasing length and the Rayleigh range of the laser pulse. Dephasing length is the distance in which electrons overtake the laser pulse and can be increased by decreasing plasma density. Alternatively the interaction length can be extended by orders of magnitude by using ablative wall discharge capillary targets, in which a plasma is preformed with a transverse density profile capable of guiding the focused laser. We have demonstrated guiding of high intensity laser pulses from the HERCULES laser over 3 cm for powers up to 35 TW. The quality of the laser spot can be retained and the intensity remains high even at the exit of the capillary. The transmitted laser spectrum shows blueshifting due to field ionization by the laser pulse. This ionization might enhance electron injection at low electron density for LWFA GeV accelerators. The field ionization affects carbon atoms and ions from the ablated capillary, which are not present in hydrogen-filled capillaries. This creates an additional challenge to guiding compared to hydrogen-filled capillaries. However, the setup and materials are easier to come by. The use of these capillary targets may also be of interest to other high intensity laser-plasma interactions requiring long interaction lengths such as high harmonic generation from gases and plasmas, or x-ray lasing in underdense plasmas.

  7. Flyer Acceleration by Pulsed Ion Beam Ablation and Application for Space Propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Harada, Nobuhiro; Buttapeng, Chainarong; Yazawa, Masaru; Kashine, Kenji; Jiang Weihua; Yatsui, Kiyoshi

    2004-02-04

    Flyer acceleration by ablation plasma pressure produced by irradiation of intense pulsed ion beam has been studied. Acceleration process including expansion of ablation plasma was simulated based on fluid model. And interaction between incident pulsed ion beam and a flyer target was considered as accounting stopping power of it. In experiments, we used ETIGO-II intense pulsed ion beam generator with two kinds of diodes; 1) Magnetically Insulated Diode (MID, power densities of <100 J/cm2) and 2) Spherical-focused Plasma Focus Diode (SPFD, power densities of up to 4.3 kJ/cm2). Numerical results of accelerated flyer velocity agreed well with measured one over wide range of incident ion beam energy density. Flyer velocity of 5.6 km/s and ablation plasma pressure of 15 GPa was demonstrated by the present experiments. Acceleration of double-layer target consists of gold/aluminum was studied. For adequate layer thickness, such a flyer target could be much more accelerated than a single layer. Effect of waveform of ion beam was also examined. Parabolic waveform could accelerate more efficiently than rectangular waveform. Applicability of ablation propulsion was discussed. Specific impulse of 7000{approx}8000 seconds and time averaged thrust of up to 5000{approx}6000N can be expected. Their values can be controllable by changing power density of incident ion beam and pulse duration.

  8. Plasma acceleration processes in an ablative pulsed plasma thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Koizumi, Hiroyuki; Noji, Ryosuke; Komurasaki, Kimiya; Arakawa, Yoshihiro

    2007-03-15

    Plasma acceleration processes in an ablative pulsed plasma thruster (APPT) were investigated. APPTs are space propulsion options suitable for microspacecraft, and have recently attracted much attention because of their low electric power requirements and simple, compact propellant system. The plasma acceleration mechanism, however, has not been well understood. In the present work, emission spectroscopy, high speed photography, and magnetic field measurements are conducted inside the electrode channel of an APPT with rectangular geometry. The successive images of neutral particles and ions give us a comprehensive understanding of their behavior under electromagnetic acceleration. The magnetic field profile clarifies the location where the electromagnetic force takes effect. As a result, it is shown that high density, ablated neutral gas stays near the propellant surface, and only a fraction of the neutrals is converted into plasma and electromagnetically accelerated, leaving the residual neutrals behind.

  9. Cooled particle accelerator target

    DOEpatents

    Degtiarenko, Pavel V.

    2005-06-14

    A novel particle beam target comprising: a rotating target disc mounted on a retainer and thermally coupled to a first array of spaced-apart parallel plate fins that extend radially inwardly from the retainer and mesh without physical contact with a second array of spaced-apart parallel plate fins that extend radially outwardly from and are thermally coupled to a cooling mechanism capable of removing heat from said second array of spaced-apart fins and located within the first array of spaced-apart parallel fins. Radiant thermal exchange between the two arrays of parallel plate fins provides removal of heat from the rotating disc. A method of cooling the rotating target is also described.

  10. Automated planning of ablation targets in atrial fibrillation treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keustermans, Johannes; De Buck, Stijn; Heidbüchel, Hein; Suetens, Paul

    2011-03-01

    Catheter based radio-frequency ablation is used as an invasive treatment of atrial fibrillation. This procedure is often guided by the use of 3D anatomical models obtained from CT, MRI or rotational angiography. During the intervention the operator accurately guides the catheter to prespecified target ablation lines. The planning stage, however, can be time consuming and operator dependent which is suboptimal both from a cost and health perspective. Therefore, we present a novel statistical model-based algorithm for locating ablation targets from 3D rotational angiography images. Based on a training data set of 20 patients, consisting of 3D rotational angiography images with 30 manually indicated ablation points, a statistical local appearance and shape model is built. The local appearance model is based on local image descriptors to capture the intensity patterns around each ablation point. The local shape model is constructed by embedding the ablation points in an undirected graph and imposing that each ablation point only interacts with its neighbors. Identifying the ablation points on a new 3D rotational angiography image is performed by proposing a set of possible candidate locations for each ablation point, as such, converting the problem into a labeling problem. The algorithm is validated using a leave-one-out-approach on the training data set, by computing the distance between the ablation lines obtained by the algorithm and the manually identified ablation points. The distance error is equal to 3.8+/-2.9 mm. As ablation lesion size is around 5-7 mm, automated planning of ablation targets by the presented approach is sufficiently accurate.

  11. Cascaded target normal sheath acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, W. P.; Shen, B. F.; Zhang, X. M.; Wang, X. F.; Xu, J. C.; Zhao, X. Y.; Yu, Y. H.; Yi, L. Q.; Shi, Y.; Zhang, L. G.; Xu, T. J.; Xu, Z. Z.

    2013-11-15

    A cascaded target normal sheath acceleration (TNSA) scheme is proposed to simultaneously increase energy and improve energy spread of a laser-produced mono-energetic proton beam. An optimum condition that uses the maximum sheath field to accelerate the center of the proton beam is theoretically found and verified by two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. An initial 10 MeV proton beam is accelerated to 21 MeV with energy spread decreased from 5% to 2% under the optimum condition during the process of the cascaded TNSA. The scheme opens a way to scale proton energy lineally with laser energy.

  12. Ultrafast laser ablation for targeted atherosclerotic plaque removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanvin, Thomas; Conkey, Donald B.; Descloux, Laurent; Frobert, Aurelien; Valentin, Jeremy; Goy, Jean-Jacques; Cook, Stéphane; Giraud, Marie-Noelle; Psaltis, Demetri

    2015-07-01

    Coronary artery disease, the main cause of heart disease, develops as immune cells and lipids accumulate into plaques within the coronary arterial wall. As a plaque grows, the tissue layer (fibrous cap) separating it from the blood flow becomes thinner and increasingly susceptible to rupturing and causing a potentially lethal thrombosis. The stabilization and/or treatment of atherosclerotic plaque is required to prevent rupturing and remains an unsolved medical problem. Here we show for the first time targeted, subsurface ablation of atherosclerotic plaque using ultrafast laser pulses. Excised atherosclerotic mouse aortas were ablated with ultrafast near-infrared (NIR) laser pulses. The physical damage was characterized with histological sections of the ablated atherosclerotic arteries from six different mice. The ultrafast ablation system was integrated with optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging for plaque-specific targeting and monitoring of the resulting ablation volume. We find that ultrafast ablation of plaque just below the surface is possible without causing damage to the fibrous cap, which indicates the potential use of ultrafast ablation for subsurface atherosclerotic plaque removal. We further demonstrate ex vivo subsurface ablation of a plaque volume through a catheter device with the high-energy ultrafast pulse delivered via hollow-core photonic crystal fiber.

  13. Laser ablation of a platinum target in water. I. Ablation mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, William T.; Sasaki, Takeshi; Koshizaki, Naoto

    2006-12-01

    This is the first in a series of three papers aimed at better understanding the processes that lead to nanomaterial formation during laser ablation of solid targets in liquids. Here we study the variation of the target surface morphology versus laser fluence and wavelength in order to suggest an ablation mechanism. A key finding is that an explosive ablation mechanism is prominent for a wide range of laser fluences for all wavelengths tested. Interestingly, however, ultraviolet (355 nm) and infrared (1064 nm) wavelengths show characteristically different explosive behaviors. In the infrared case, numerous large craters with diameters around 20 {mu}m form at localized points within the laser irradiated area. In contrast, ultraviolet ablation results in a striking transition to nanoscale surface roughness across the entire irradiated area. This texture is attributed to spinodal decomposition at the molten target surface. We propose that the wavelength and fluence dependence of the ablation craters can be explained by the amount of energy absorbed in the target. The consequences of the ablation mechanism for nanomaterial synthesis are discussed.

  14. Materials considerations in accelerator targets

    SciTech Connect

    Peacock, H.B. Jr.; Iyer, N.C.; Louthan, M.R. Jr.

    1994-08-01

    Future nuclear materials production and/or the burn-up of long lived radioisotopes may be accomplished through the capture of spallation produced neutrons in accelerators. Aluminum clad-lead and/or lead alloys has been proposed as a spallation target. Aluminum was the cladding choice because of the low neutron absorption cross section, fast radioactivity decay, high thermal conductivity, and excellent fabricability. Metallic lead and lead oxide powders were considered for the target core with the fabrication options being casting or powder metallurgy (PM). Scoping tests to evaluate gravity casting, squeeze casting, and casting and swaging processes showed that, based on fabricability and heat transfer considerations, squeeze casting was the preferred option for manufacture of targets with initial core cladding contact. Thousands of aluminum clad aluminum-lithium alloy core targets and control rods for tritium production have been fabricated by coextrusion processes and successfully irradiated in the SRS reactors. Tritium retention in, and release from the coextruded product was modeled from experimental and operational data. Newly produced tritium atoms were trapped by lithium atoms to form a lithium tritide. The effective tritium pressure required for trap or tritide stability was the equilibrium decomposition pressure of tritium over a lithium tritide-aluminum mixture. The temperature dependence of tritium release was determined by the permeability of the cladding to tritium and the local equilibrium at the trap sites. The model can be used to calculate tritium release from aluminum clad, aluminum-lithium alloy targets during postulated accelerator operational and accident conditions. This paper describes the manufacturing technologies evaluated and presents the model for tritium retention in aluminum clad, aluminum-lithium alloy tritium production targets.

  15. A novel laser ablation plasma thruster with electromagnetic acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Daixian; Wu, Jianjun; He, Zhen; Zhang, Hua

    2016-10-01

    A novel laser ablation plasma thruster accelerated by electromagnetic means was proposed and investigated. The discharge characteristics and thrust performance were tested with different charged energy, structural parameters and propellants. The thrust performance was proven to be improved by electromagnetic acceleration. In contrast with the pure laser propulsion mode, the thrust performance in electromagnetic acceleration modes was much better. The effects of electrodes distance and the off-axis distance between ceramic tube and cathode were tested, and it's found that there were optimal structural parameters for achieving optimal thrust performance. It's indicated that the impulse bit and specific impulse increased with increasing charged energy. In our experiments, the thrust performance of the thruster was optimal in large charged energy modes. With the charged energy 25 J and the use of metal aluminum, a maximal impulse bit of 600 μNs, a specific impulse of approximate 8000 s and thrust efficiency of about 90% were obtained. For the PTFE propellant, a maximal impulse bit of about 350 μNs, a specific impulse of about 2400 s, and thrust efficiency of about 16% were obtained. Besides, the metal aluminum was proven to be the better propellant than PTFE for the thruster.

  16. Laboratory Measurements of Micrometeoroid Impacts into Solid Ice and Gas Ablation Targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munsat, T. L.; Britt, D. T.; Dee, R.; Gudipati, M. S.; Horanyi, M.; James, D.; Janches, D.; Kempf, S.; Nelson, A. O.; Plane, J. M. C.; Shu, A. J.; Sternovsky, Z.; Thomas, E.; Ulibarri, Z.

    2015-12-01

    The dust accelerator facility at the SSERVI Institute for Modeling Plasma, Atmospheres, and Cosmic Dust (IMPACT) has recently implemented two major target upgrades: a cryogenic ice target and a high-pressure gas target. Each target can be exposed to micron and submicron particles accelerated to speeds up to 100 km/s. The ice target consists of a LN2 cryogenic system connected to both a water-ice deposition system and a movable freezer/holder for a pre-mixed liquid cartridge. Impact products and chemistry are assessed with an integrated time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Such a system enables a program of research into the evolution of ice under micrometeoroid bombardment and the synthesis of complex organic molecules through micrometeoroid impacts. We present the early results from studies of hypervelocity iron particle impacts into frozen mixtures of H2O, NH3, and olivine grains which contain nanophase Fe, a possible catalyst for organic chemical reactions, under conditions of low-pressure background CO or CO2 gas. The gas target consists of a differentially pumped chamber kept at pressures up to 0.5 Torr, such that high-velocity (~10-60 km/s) micrometeoroids are completely ablated within the 40 cm long measurement region. The chamber is configured with segmented electrodes to perform temporally- and spatially-resolved measurements of charge production during ablation, and localized light-collection optics enable an assessment of the light production. We present the latest results of experiments to determine the ionization efficiency of Fe particles ablating in N2, air, CO2, and He gas, and modifications to standard ablation models made possible from these experimental results. Such studies are critical for the interpretation of remote sensing measurements, including radar and lidar, which in turn make possible the assessment of the interplanetary dust particle flux.

  17. Ice Target and Gas Target Experiments in the IMPACT Dust Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munsat, T. L.; Collette, A.; Dee, R.; Gruen, E.; Horanyi, M.; James, D.; Janches, D.; Kempf, S.; Plane, J. M. C.; Shu, A. J.; Simolka, J.; Sternovsky, Z.; Thomas, E.

    2014-12-01

    The dust accelerator facility at the SSERVI Institute for Modeling Plasma, Atmospheres, and Cosmic Dust (IMPACT) is presently implementing two major target upgrades: a cryogenic ice target and a high-pressure gas target. The ice target consists of a LN2 cryogenic system connected to both a water-ice deposition system as well as a movable freezer/holder for a pre-mixed liquid cartridge. Planned experiments include the bombardment of a variety of frozen targets and simulated ice/regolith mixtures, and the assessment of all impact products (solid ejecta, gas, plasma) as well as spectroscopy of both the impact-produced light flashes and the reflected spectra (UV, visible, IR). Such measurements are highly relevant to both physical and chemical surface modification of airless bodies due to micrometeoroid impacts. The gas target consists of a differentially pumped chamber kept at moderate background pressures, such that high-velocity (~10 km/s) micrometeoroids are completely ablated within 10's of cm (i.e. within the measurement chamber). The chamber is configured with segmented electrodes to perform a spatially-resolved measurement of charge production during ablation, and localized light-collection optics enable an assessment of the light production (luminous efficiency). Such studies are critical to the understanding of past and future ground-based measurements of meteor ablation in Earth's atmosphere, which in turn can potentially provide the best estimates of the interplanetary dust particle flux.

  18. Tritium target manufacturing for use in accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bach, P.; Monnin, C.; Van Rompay, M.; Ballanger, A.

    2001-07-01

    As a neutron tube manufacturer, SODERN is now in charge of manufacturing tritium targets for accelerators, in cooperation with CEA/DAM/DTMN in Valduc. Specific deuterium and tritium targets are manufactured on request, according to the requirements of the users, starting from titanium target on copper substrate, and going to more sophisticated devices. A wide range of possible uses is covered, including thin targets for neutron calibration, thick targets with controlled loading of deuterium and tritium, rotating targets for higher lifetimes, or large size rotating targets for accelerators used in boron neutron therapy. Activity of targets lies in the 1 to 1000 Curie, diameter of targets being up to 30 cm. Special targets are also considered, including surface layer targets for lowering tritium desorption under irradiation, or those made from different kinds of occluders such as titanium, zirconium, erbium, scandium, with different substrates. It is then possible to optimize either neutron output, or lifetime and stability, or thermal behavior.

  19. Surface Modification of ICF Target Capsules by Pulsed Laser Ablation

    DOE PAGES

    Carlson, Lane C.; Johnson, Michael A.; Bunn, Thomas L.

    2016-06-30

    Topographical modifications of spherical surfaces are imprinted on National Ignition Facility (NIF) target capsules by extending the capabilities of a recently developed full surface (4π) laser ablation and mapping apparatus. The laser ablation method combines the precision, energy density and long reach of a focused laser beam to pre-impose sinusoidal modulations on the outside surface of High Density Carbon (HDC) capsules and the inside surface of Glow Discharge Polymer (GDP) capsules. Sinusoidal modulations described in this paper have sub-micron to 10’s of microns vertical scale and wavelengths as small as 30 μm and as large as 200 μm. The modulatedmore » patterns are created by rastering a focused laser fired at discrete capsule surface locations for a specified number of pulses. The computer program developed to create these raster patterns uses inputs such as laser beam intensity profile, the material removal function, the starting surface figure and the desired surface figure. The patterns are optimized to minimize surface roughness. Lastly, in this paper, simulated surfaces are compared with actual ablated surfaces measured using confocal microscopy.« less

  20. Features of the synthesis of nanocolloid oxides by laser ablation of bulk metal targets in solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapin, Ivan N.; Svetlichnyi, Valery A.

    2015-12-01

    Laser ablation of bulk targets in a fluid -- a promising new method for the synthesis of "pure" nanocolloids. Nanocrystalline materials produced by laser ablation are widely used in biology, medicine, and catalysis. High local temperature during ablation and large surface area of the particles promote chemical reactions and the formation of a complex composition of nanoparticles. In this paper the characteristics of the process of ablation and the obtaining of nanoparticles in a liquid by laser ablation of active materials (Zn, Ce, Ti, Si) were studied. Ways of increasing the productivity of laser ablation were discussed. Characterization of nanocolloids and nanocrystalline powders were performed.

  1. Enhancing proton acceleration by using composite targets

    SciTech Connect

    Bulanov, S. S.; Esarey, E.; Schroeder, C. B.; Bulanov, S. V.; Esirkepov, T. Zh.; Kando, M.; Pegoraro, F.; Leemans, W. P.

    2015-07-10

    Efficient laser ion acceleration requires high laser intensities, which can only be obtained by tightly focusing laser radiation. In the radiation pressure acceleration regime, where the tightly focused laser driver leads to the appearance of the fundamental limit for the maximum attainable ion energy, this limit corresponds to the laser pulse group velocity as well as to another limit connected with the transverse expansion of the accelerated foil and consequent onset of the foil transparency. These limits can be relaxed by using composite targets, consisting of a thin foil followed by a near critical density slab. Such targets provide guiding of a laser pulse inside a self-generated channel and background electrons, being snowplowed by the pulse, compensate for the transverse expansion. The use of composite targets results in a significant increase in maximum ion energy, compared to a single foil target case.

  2. Numerical investigation on target implosions driven by radiation ablation and shock compression in dynamic hohlraums

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Delong; Sun, Shunkai; Zhao, Yingkui; Ding, Ning; Wu, Jiming; Dai, Zihuan; Yin, Li; Zhang, Yang; Xue, Chuang

    2015-05-15

    In a dynamic hohlraum driven inertial confinement fusion (ICF) configuration, the target may experience two different kinds of implosions. One is driven by hohlraum radiation ablation, which is approximately symmetric at the equator and poles. The second is caused by the radiating shock produced in Z-pinch dynamic hohlraums, only taking place at the equator. To gain a symmetrical target implosion driven by radiation ablation and avoid asymmetric shock compression is a crucial issue in driving ICF using dynamic hohlraums. It is known that when the target is heated by hohlraum radiation, the ablated plasma will expand outward. The pressure in the shocked converter plasma qualitatively varies linearly with the material temperature. However, the ablation pressure in the ablated plasma varies with 3.5 power of the hohlraum radiation temperature. Therefore, as the hohlraum temperature increases, the ablation pressure will eventually exceed the shock pressure, and the expansion of the ablated plasma will obviously weaken the shock propagation and decrease its velocity after propagating into the ablator plasma. Consequently, longer time duration is provided for the symmetrical target implosion driven by radiation ablation. In this paper these processes are numerically investigated by changing drive currents or varying load parameters. The simulation results show that a critical hohlraum radiation temperature is needed to provide a high enough ablation pressure to decelerate the shock, thus providing long enough time duration for the symmetric fuel compression driven by radiation ablation.

  3. ACCELERATOR TARGET POSITIONER AND CONTROL CIRCUIT THEREFOR

    DOEpatents

    Stone, K.F.; Force, R.J.; Olson, W.W.; Cagle, D.S.

    1959-12-15

    An apparatus is described for inserting and retracting a target material with respect to the internal beam of a charged particle accelerator and to circuitry for controlling the timing and motion of the target placement. Two drive coils are mounted on the shaft of a target holder arm and disposed within the accelerator magnetic field with one coil at right angles to the other. Control circuitry alternately connects each coil to a current source and to a varying shorting resistance whereby the coils interchangeably produce driving and braking forces which swing the target arm within a ninety degree arc. The target is thus moved into the beam and away from it at high speeds and is brought to rest after each movement without whiplash or vibration.

  4. Targeted p120-catenin ablation disrupts dental enamel development.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, John D; Dobeck, Justine M; Tye, Coralee E; Perez-Moreno, Mirna; Stokes, Nicole; Reynolds, Albert B; Fuchs, Elaine; Skobe, Ziedonis

    2010-09-16

    Dental enamel development occurs in stages. The ameloblast cell layer is adjacent to, and is responsible for, enamel formation. When rodent pre-ameloblasts become tall columnar secretory-stage ameloblasts, they secrete enamel matrix proteins, and the ameloblasts start moving in rows that slide by one another. This movement is necessary to form the characteristic decussating enamel prism pattern. Thus, a dynamic system of intercellular interactions is required for proper enamel development. Cadherins are components of the adherens junction (AJ), and they span the cell membrane to mediate attachment to adjacent cells. p120 stabilizes cadherins by preventing their internalization and degradation. So, we asked if p120-mediated cadherin stability is important for dental enamel formation. Targeted p120 ablation in the mouse enamel organ had a striking effect. Secretory stage ameloblasts detached from surrounding tissues, lost polarity, flattened, and ameloblast E- and N-cadherin expression became undetectable by immunostaining. The enamel itself was poorly mineralized and appeared to be composed of a thin layer of merged spheres that abraded from the tooth. Significantly, p120 mosaic mouse teeth were capable of forming normal enamel demonstrating that the enamel defects were not a secondary effect of p120 ablation. Surprisingly, blood-filled sinusoids developed in random locations around the developing teeth. This has not been observed in other p120-ablated tissues and may be due to altered p120-mediated cell signaling. These data reveal a critical role for p120 in tooth and dental enamel development and are consistent with p120 directing the attachment and detachment of the secretory stage ameloblasts as they move in rows.

  5. Amphetamine accelerates recovery of locomotor function following bilateral frontal cortex ablation in cats.

    PubMed

    Sutton, R L; Hovda, D A; Feeney, D M

    1989-08-01

    Prior work has demonstrated that d-amphetamine hastens recovery of beam-walking ability following unilateral sensorimotor or frontal cortex ablation (Hovda & Feeney, 1984). In this study, after bilateral frontal cortex ablation, cats given injections of d-amphetamine showed an enduring acceleration of recovery of beam-walking ability relative to saline controls. In general, rates of spontaneous and drug-induced recovery in cats with bilateral lesions were similar to those previously reported for cats with unilateral ablations. These results indicate that the bilateral corticostriate and corticothalamic projections from the contralateral homotopic cortex do not mediate the beneficial effects of d-amphetamine on locomotor recovery after unilateral cortical ablation. PMID:2765187

  6. Investigation of ultrashort pulse laser ablation of solid targets by measuring the ablation-generated momentum using a torsion pendulum.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Nan; Wang, Wentao; Zhu, Xiaonong; Liu, Jiansheng; Xu, Kuanhong; Huang, Peng; Zhao, Jiefeng; Li, Ruxin; Wang, Mingwei

    2011-04-25

    50 fs - 12 ps laser pulses are employed to ablate aluminum, copper, iron, and graphite targets. The ablation-generated momentum is measured with a torsion pendulum. Corresponding time-resolved shadowgraphic measurements show that the ablation process at the optimal laser fluence achieving the maximal momentum is primarily dominated by the photomechanical mechanism. When laser pulses with specific laser fluence are used and the pulse duration is tuned from 50 fs to 12 ps, the generated momentum firstly increases and then remains almost constant, which could be attributed to the change of the ablation mechanism involved from atomization to phase explosion. The investigation of the ablation-generated momentum also reveals a nonlinear momentum-energy conversion scaling law, namely, as the pulse energy increases, the momentum obtained by the target increases nonlinearly. This may be caused by the effective reduction of the dissipated energy into the surrounding of the ablation zone as the pulse energy increases, which indicates that for femtosecond laser the dissipated energy into the surrounding target is still significant.

  7. Neutral atomic jet generation by laser ablation of copper targets

    SciTech Connect

    Matos, J. B. de; Rodrigues, N. A. S.

    2014-08-15

    This work aimed the obtainment of a neutral atomic jet departing from a plume generated by laser ablation of copper targets. A pair of electrodes together with a transducer pressure sensor was used to study the ablated plume charge composition and also to measure the ion extraction from the plasma plume. The neutral beam was produced with this setup and the relative abundance of neutrals in the plasma was measured, it decreases from 30% to 8% when the laser fluence is varied from 20 J/cm{sup 2} to 32 J/cm{sup 2}. The necessary voltage to completely remove the ions from the plume varied from 10 V to 230 V in the same fluence range. TOF analysis resulted in center of mass velocities between 3.4 and 4.6 km/s, longitudinal temperature in the range from 1 × 10{sup 4} K to 2.4 × 10{sup 4} K and a Mach number of M = 2.36, calculated using purely hydrodynamic expansion approximation.

  8. Feasibility of Image-Based Simulation to Estimate Ablation Target in Human Ventricular Arrhythmia

    PubMed Central

    Ashikaga, Hiroshi; Arevalo, Hermenegild; Vadakkumpadan, Fijoy; Blake, Robert C.; Bayer, Jason D.; Nazarian, Saman; Zviman, M. Muz; Tandri, Harikrishna; Berger, Ronald D.; Calkins, Hugh; Herzka, Daniel A.; Trayanova, Natalia A.; Halperin, Henry R.

    2013-01-01

    Background Previous studies suggest that MRI with late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) may identify slowly conducting tissues in scar-related ventricular tachycardia (VT). Objective We tested the feasibility of image-based simulation based on LGE to estimate ablation targets in VT. Methods We conducted a retrospective study in 13 patients who had pre-ablation MRI for scar-related VT ablation. We used image-based simulation to induce VT and estimate target regions according to the simulated VT circuit. The estimated target regions were co-registered with the LGE scar map and the ablation sites from the electroanatomical map in the standard ablation approach. Results In image-based simulation, VT was inducible in 12 patients (92.3%). All VTs showed macro-reentrant propagation patterns, and the narrowest width of estimated target region that an ablation line should span to prevent VT recurrence was 5.0 ± 3.4 mm. Out of 11 patients who underwent ablation, the results of image-based simulation and the standard approach were consistent in 9 patients (82%), where ablation within the estimated target region was associated with acute success (n=8) and ablation outside the estimated target region was associated with failure (n=1). In one case (9%), the results of image-based simulation and the standard approach were inconsistent, where ablation outside the estimated target region was associated with acute success. Conclusions The image-based simulation can be used to estimate potential ablation targets of scar-related VT. The image-based simulation may be a powerful noninvasive tool for pre-procedural planning of ablation procedures to potentially reduce the procedure time and complication rates. PMID:23608593

  9. Targeted cellular ablation based on the morphology of malignant cells.

    PubMed

    Ivey, Jill W; Latouche, Eduardo L; Sano, Michael B; Rossmeisl, John H; Davalos, Rafael V; Verbridge, Scott S

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is especially challenging due to a shortage of methods to preferentially target diffuse infiltrative cells, and therapy-resistant glioma stem cell populations. Here we report a physical treatment method based on electrical disruption of cells, whose action depends strongly on cellular morphology. Interestingly, numerical modeling suggests that while outer lipid bilayer disruption induced by long pulses (~100 μs) is enhanced for larger cells, short pulses (~1 μs) preferentially result in high fields within the cell interior, which scale in magnitude with nucleus size. Because enlarged nuclei represent a reliable indicator of malignancy, this suggested a means of preferentially targeting malignant cells. While we demonstrate killing of both normal and malignant cells using pulsed electric fields (PEFs) to treat spontaneous canine GBM, we proposed that properly tuned PEFs might provide targeted ablation based on nuclear size. Using 3D hydrogel models of normal and malignant brain tissues, which permit high-resolution interrogation during treatment testing, we confirmed that PEFs could be tuned to preferentially kill cancerous cells. Finally, we estimated the nuclear envelope electric potential disruption needed for cell death from PEFs. Our results may be useful in safely targeting the therapy-resistant cell niches that cause recurrence of GBM tumors. PMID:26596248

  10. Targeted cellular ablation based on the morphology of malignant cells

    PubMed Central

    Ivey, Jill W.; Latouche, Eduardo L.; Sano, Michael B.; Rossmeisl, John H.; Davalos, Rafael V.; Verbridge, Scott S.

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is especially challenging due to a shortage of methods to preferentially target diffuse infiltrative cells, and therapy-resistant glioma stem cell populations. Here we report a physical treatment method based on electrical disruption of cells, whose action depends strongly on cellular morphology. Interestingly, numerical modeling suggests that while outer lipid bilayer disruption induced by long pulses (~100 μs) is enhanced for larger cells, short pulses (~1 μs) preferentially result in high fields within the cell interior, which scale in magnitude with nucleus size. Because enlarged nuclei represent a reliable indicator of malignancy, this suggested a means of preferentially targeting malignant cells. While we demonstrate killing of both normal and malignant cells using pulsed electric fields (PEFs) to treat spontaneous canine GBM, we proposed that properly tuned PEFs might provide targeted ablation based on nuclear size. Using 3D hydrogel models of normal and malignant brain tissues, which permit high-resolution interrogation during treatment testing, we confirmed that PEFs could be tuned to preferentially kill cancerous cells. Finally, we estimated the nuclear envelope electric potential disruption needed for cell death from PEFs. Our results may be useful in safely targeting the therapy-resistant cell niches that cause recurrence of GBM tumors. PMID:26596248

  11. Targeted cellular ablation based on the morphology of malignant cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivey, Jill W.; Latouche, Eduardo L.; Sano, Michael B.; Rossmeisl, John H.; Davalos, Rafael V.; Verbridge, Scott S.

    2015-11-01

    Treatment of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is especially challenging due to a shortage of methods to preferentially target diffuse infiltrative cells, and therapy-resistant glioma stem cell populations. Here we report a physical treatment method based on electrical disruption of cells, whose action depends strongly on cellular morphology. Interestingly, numerical modeling suggests that while outer lipid bilayer disruption induced by long pulses (~100 μs) is enhanced for larger cells, short pulses (~1 μs) preferentially result in high fields within the cell interior, which scale in magnitude with nucleus size. Because enlarged nuclei represent a reliable indicator of malignancy, this suggested a means of preferentially targeting malignant cells. While we demonstrate killing of both normal and malignant cells using pulsed electric fields (PEFs) to treat spontaneous canine GBM, we proposed that properly tuned PEFs might provide targeted ablation based on nuclear size. Using 3D hydrogel models of normal and malignant brain tissues, which permit high-resolution interrogation during treatment testing, we confirmed that PEFs could be tuned to preferentially kill cancerous cells. Finally, we estimated the nuclear envelope electric potential disruption needed for cell death from PEFs. Our results may be useful in safely targeting the therapy-resistant cell niches that cause recurrence of GBM tumors.

  12. Three-dimensional simulations of ablative hydrodynamic instabilities in indirectly driven targets

    SciTech Connect

    Marinak, M.M.; Tipton, R.E.; Remington, B.A.

    1996-06-01

    To model ignition in a National Ignition Facility (NIF) capsule implosion, the authors must understand the behavior of instabilities that can cause breakup of the pellet shell. During a capsule implosion, shocks that transit the shell cause growth of perturbations at the surface or at an interface because of a Richtmyer-Meshkov type of instability. Following shock breakout, or earlier for a shaped pulse, the low-density ablated plasma accelerates the pusher, and the ablation front is Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) unstable. Ablation and finite density gradients have the effect of stabilizing the short wavelength modes. Unstable modes present on the outer surface grow and feed through to the inner surface. Once the shell encounters the rebounding shock from the capsule center, it decelerates and the inner surface becomes RT unstable. If perturbations grow large enough, pusher material mixes into the core, degrading implosion performance. Capsule designs for the NIF depend on ablative stabilization and saturation to prevent perturbations initially present on the capsule surface from growing large enough to quench ignition. Here, the authors examine the first simulations and experiments to study the effect of 3-D perturbation shape on instability growth and saturation in indirectly driven targets. The first section discusses HYDRA, the radiation hydrodynamics code developed for these simulations. The subsequent section examines 3-D shape effects in single-mode perturbations in planar foil simulations and experiments. A discussion of the evolution of multimode perturbations on planar foils is followed by a discussion of 3-D simulations of instability growth in Nova capsule implosions.

  13. Gas-dynamic acceleration of laser-ablation plumes: Hyperthermal particle energies under thermal vaporization

    SciTech Connect

    Morozov, A. A.; Evtushenko, A. B.; Bulgakov, A. V.

    2015-02-02

    The expansion of a plume produced by low-fluence laser ablation of graphite in vacuum is investigated experimentally and by direct Monte Carlo simulations in an attempt to explain hyperthermal particle energies for thermally vaporized materials. We demonstrate that the translation energy of neutral particles, ∼2 times higher than classical expectations, is due to two effects, hydrodynamic plume acceleration into the forward direction and kinetic selection of fast particles in the on-axis region. Both effects depend on the collision number within the plume and on the particles internal degrees of freedom. The simulations allow ablation properties to be evaluated, such as ablation rate and surface temperature, based on time-of-flight measurements. Available experimental data on kinetic energies of various laser-produced particles are well described by the presented model.

  14. Accelerator breeder with uranium, thorium target

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, H.; Powell, J.; Kouts, H.

    1983-01-01

    An accelerator breeder, that uses a low-enriched fuel as the target material, can produce substantial amounts of fissile material and electric power. A study of H/sub 2/O- and D/sub 2/O-cooled, UO/sub 2/, U, (depleted U), or thorium indicates that U-metal fuel produces a good fissile production rate and electrical power of about 60% higher than UO/sub 2/ fuel. Thorium fuel has the same order of magnitude as UO/sub 2/ fuel for fissile-fuel production, but the generating electric power is substantially lower than in a UO/sub 2/ reactor. Enriched UO/sub 2/ fuel increases the generating electric power but not the fissile-material production rate. The Na-cooled breeder target has many advantages over the H/sub 2/O-cooled breeder target.

  15. Sputter-deposited Be ablators for NIF target capsules

    SciTech Connect

    McEachern, R.; Clford, C.; Cook, R.; Makowiecki, E.; Wallace, R.

    1997-03-26

    We have performed a series of preliminary experiments to determine whether sputter deposition of doped Be is a practical route to producing NIF target capsules with Be ablators. Films ranging in thickness from 7 to {approximately} 120 {micro}m have been deposited on spherical polymer mandrels using a bounce pan to ensure uniform coating. With no voltage bias applied to the pan, relatively porous coatings were formed that were highly permeable to hydrogen. The surface finish of these films ranged from {approximately}250 nm rms for 13-{micro}m-thick films to a minimum of {approximately}75 nm rms for an 80-{micro}m-thick film. Application of a voltage bias was found to significantly modify the film morphology. At a bias of 120 V, 7-{micro}m-thick films with a dense, fine-grained microstructure were produced. These capsules had a reflective surface with a 50 nm rms roughness. Finally, to demonstrate the ability to produce a graded dopant profile, a coating was produced in which the concentration of added Cu was varied from 2.5 atom % at the beginning to zero after 40 {micro}m of deposition.

  16. Targeted Vessel Ablation for More Efficient Magnetic Resonance-Guided High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound Ablation of Uterine Fibroids

    SciTech Connect

    Voogt, Marianne J.; Stralen, Marijn van; Ikink, Marlijne E.; Deckers, Roel; Vincken, Koen L.; Bartels, Lambertus W.; Mali, Willem P. Th. M.; Bosch, Maurice A. A. J. van den

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: To report the first clinical experience with targeted vessel ablation during magnetic resonance-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (MR-HIFU) treatment of symptomatic uterine fibroids. Methods: Pretreatment T1-weighted contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography was used to create a detailed map of the uterine arteries and feeding branches to the fibroids. A three-dimensional overlay of the magnetic resonance angiography images was registered on 3D T2-weighted pretreatment imaging data. Treatment was focused primarily on locations where supplying vessels entered the fibroid. Patients were followed 6 months after treatment with a questionnaire to assess symptoms and quality of life (Uterine Fibroid Symptom and Quality of Life) and magnetic resonance imaging to quantify shrinkage of fibroid volumes. Results: In two patients, three fibroids were treated with targeted vessel ablation during MR-HIFU. The treatments resulted in almost total fibroid devascularization with nonperfused volume to total fibroid volume ratios of 84, 68, and 86%, respectively, of treated fibroids. The predicted ablated volumes during MR-HIFU in patients 1 and 2 were 45, 40, and 82 ml, respectively, while the nonperfused volumes determined immediately after treatment were 195, 92, and 190 ml respectively, which is 4.3 (patient 1) and 2.3 (patient 2) times higher than expected based on the thermal dose distribution. Fibroid-related symptoms reduced after treatment, and quality of life improved. Fibroid volume reduction ranged 31-59% at 6 months after treatment. Conclusion: Targeted vessel ablation during MR-HIFU allowed nearly complete fibroid ablation in both patients. This technique may enhance the use of MR-HIFU for fibroid treatment in clinical practice.

  17. Highly efficient optogenetic cell ablation in C. elegans using membrane-targeted miniSOG

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Suhong; Chisholm, Andrew D.

    2016-01-01

    The genetically encoded photosensitizer miniSOG (mini Singlet Oxygen Generator) can be used to kill cells in C. elegans. miniSOG generates the reactive oxygen species (ROS) singlet oxygen after illumination with blue light. Illumination of neurons expressing miniSOG targeted to the outer mitochondrial membrane (mito-miniSOG) causes neuronal death. To enhance miniSOG’s efficiency as an ablation tool in multiple cell types we tested alternative targeting signals. We find that membrane targeted miniSOG allows highly efficient cell killing. When combined with a point mutation that increases miniSOG’s ROS generation, membrane targeted miniSOG can ablate neurons in less than one tenth the time of mito-miniSOG. We extend the miniSOG ablation technique to non-neuronal tissues, revealing an essential role for the epidermis in locomotion. These improvements expand the utility and throughput of optogenetic cell ablation in C. elegans. PMID:26861262

  18. Fabrication of nanostructured targets for improved laser-driven proton acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barberio, M.; Scisciò, M.; Veltri, S.; Antici, P.

    2016-07-01

    In this work, we present a novel realization of nanostructured targets suitable for improving laser-driven proton acceleration experiments, in particular with regard to the Target-Normal-Sheath Acceleration (TNSA) acceleration mechanism. The nanostructured targets, produced as films, are realized by a simpler and cheaper method than using conventional lithographic techniques. The growth process includes a two step approach for the production of the gold nanoparticle layers: 1) Laser Ablation in Solution and 2) spray-dry technique using a colloidal solution on target surfaces (Aluminum, Mylar and Multi Walled Carbon Nanotube). The obtained nanostructured films appear, at morphological and chemical analysis, uniformly nanostructured and the nanostructure distributed on the target surfaces without presence of oxides or external contaminants. The obtained targets show a broad optical absorption in all the visible region and a surface roughness that is two times greater than non-nanostructured targets, enabling a greater laser energy absorption during the laser-matter interaction experiments producing the laser-driven proton acceleration.

  19. Formation of periodic structures upon laser ablation of metal targets in liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Kazakevich, Pavel V; Simakin, Aleksandr V; Shafeev, Georgii A

    2005-09-30

    Experimental data on the formation of ordered microstructures produced upon ablation of metal targets in liquids irradiated by a copper vapour laser or a pulsed Nd:YAG laser are presented. The structures were obtained on brass, bronze, copper, and tungsten substrates immersed in distilled water or ethanol. As a result of multiple-pulse laser ablation by a scanning beam, ordered microcones with pointed vertexes are formed on the target surface. The structures are separated by deep narrow channels. The structure period was experimentally shown to increase linearly with diameter of the laser spot on the target surface. (interaction of laser radiation with matter)

  20. Investigations of the Cavitation and Damage Thresholds of Histotripsy and Applications in Targeted Tissue Ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlaisavljevich, Eli

    Histotripsy is a noninvasive ultrasound therapy that controls acoustic cavitation to mechanically fractionate soft tissue. This dissertation investigates the physical thresholds to initiate cavitation and produce tissue damage in histotripsy and factors affecting these thresholds in order to develop novel strategies for targeted tissue ablation. In the first part of this dissertation, the effects of tissue properties on histotripsy cavitation thresholds and damage thresholds were investigated. Results demonstrated that the histotripsy shock scattering threshold using multi-cycle pulses increases in stiffer tissues, while the histotripsy intrinsic threshold using single-cycle pulses is independent of tissue stiffness. Further, the intrinsic threshold slightly decreases with lower frequencies and significantly decreases with increasing temperature. The effects of tissue properties on the susceptibility to histotripsy-induced tissue damage were also investigated, demonstrating that stiffer tissues are more resistant to histotripsy. Two strategies were investigated for increasing the effectiveness of histotripsy for the treatment of stiffer tissues, with results showing that thermal preconditioning may be used to alter tissue susceptibility to histotripsy and that lower frequency treatments may increase the efficiency of histotripsy tissue ablation due to enhanced bubble expansion. In the second part of this dissertation, the feasibility of using histotripsy for targeted liver ablation was investigated in an intact in vivo porcine model, with results demonstrating that histotripsy was capable of non-invasively creating precise lesions throughout the entire liver. Additionally, a tissue selective ablation approach was developed, where histotripsy completely fractionated the liver tissue surrounding the major hepatic vessels and gallbladder while being self-limited at the boundaries of these critical structures. Finally, the long-term effects of histotripsy liver

  1. Laser ablation of copper followed by an accelerating potential: a TOF analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matos, Juliana B.; Riva, Rudimar; Rodrigues, Nicolau A. S.

    2012-01-01

    It was performed a Time of Flight (TOF) study for the plume produced by laser ablation of cooper by 355 nm, 23 ns duration laser pulses, in vacuum. The plume sensor was made of a piezoelectric PVDF film associated with a pair of electrodes. By varying the electrodes polarization we evaluated the fraction of neutral atoms, which ranged from 8 to 30 % of the plume. By adjusting a TOF function to the PVDF electric signal we obtained the center of mass velocity and the translational temperature. It was observed that product vCM × Tz remains constant with the electrodes potential and that the accelerating potential to which the plume is submitted has practical limits.

  2. Ablation of cardiac myosin–binding protein-C accelerates contractile kinetics in engineered cardiac tissue

    PubMed Central

    de Lange, Willem J.; Grimes, Adrian C.; Hegge, Laura F.

    2013-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) caused by mutations in cardiac myosin–binding protein-C (cMyBP-C) is a heterogenous disease in which the phenotypic presentation is influenced by genetic, environmental, and developmental factors. Though mouse models have been used extensively to study the contractile effects of cMyBP-C ablation, early postnatal hypertrophic and dilatory remodeling may overshadow primary contractile defects. The use of a murine engineered cardiac tissue (mECT) model of cMyBP-C ablation in the present study permits delineation of the primary contractile kinetic abnormalities in an intact tissue model under mechanical loading conditions in the absence of confounding remodeling events. We generated mechanically integrated mECT using isolated postnatal day 1 mouse cardiac cells from both wild-type (WT) and cMyBP-C–null hearts. After culturing for 1 wk to establish coordinated spontaneous contraction, we measured twitch force and Ca2+ transients at 37°C during pacing at 6 and 9 Hz, with and without dobutamine. Compared with WT, the cMyBP-C–null mECT demonstrated faster late contraction kinetics and significantly faster early relaxation kinetics with no difference in Ca2+ transient kinetics. Strikingly, the ability of cMyBP-C–null mECT to increase contractile kinetics in response to adrenergic stimulation and increased pacing frequency were severely impaired. We conclude that cMyBP-C ablation results in constitutively accelerated contractile kinetics with preserved peak force with minimal contractile kinetic reserve. These functional abnormalities precede the development of the hypertrophic phenotype and do not result from alterations in Ca2+ transient kinetics, suggesting that alterations in contractile velocity may serve as the primary functional trigger for the development of hypertrophy in this model of HCM. Our findings strongly support a mechanism in which cMyBP-C functions as a physiological brake on contraction by positioning myosin

  3. Beamed Energy Propulsion by Means of Target Ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenberg, Benjamin A.

    2004-03-01

    This paper describes hundreds of pendulum tests examining the beamed energy conversion efficiency of different metal targets coated with multiple liquid enhancers. Preliminary testing used a local laser with photographic paper targets, with no liquid, water, canola oil, or methanol additives. Laboratory experimentation was completed at Wright-Patterson AFB using a high-powered laser, and ballistic pendulums of aluminum, titanium, or copper. Dry targets, and those coated with water, methanol and oil were repeatedly tested in laboratory conditions. Results were recorded on several high-speed digital video cameras, and the conversion efficiency was calculated. Paper airplanes successfully launched using BEP were likewise recorded.

  4. Beamed Energy Propulsion by Means of Target Ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, Benjamin A.

    2004-03-30

    This paper describes hundreds of pendulum tests examining the beamed energy conversion efficiency of different metal targets coated with multiple liquid enhancers. Preliminary testing used a local laser with photographic paper targets, with no liquid, water, canola oil, or methanol additives. Laboratory experimentation was completed at Wright-Patterson AFB using a high-powered laser, and ballistic pendulums of aluminum, titanium, or copper. Dry targets, and those coated with water, methanol and oil were repeatedly tested in laboratory conditions. Results were recorded on several high-speed digital video cameras, and the conversion efficiency was calculated. Paper airplanes successfully launched using BEP were likewise recorded.

  5. Mass transfer in ablation process with large angle of laser ray incidence on target and small distance between target and substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozovan, A. A.; Prishepov, S. V.; Frangulov, S. V.; Aleksandrova, S. S.; Rizakhanov, R. N.; Sigalayev, S. K.

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents the results of research of laser ablation, carried out at 85° incidence angle of the laser ray to the normal to surface of target with simultaneous spatial restriction of plasma torch. It is shown that laser radiation reflected from the target falls on the substrate and produces ablation. Consequently ablated material of the substrate is transferred to the target. It is found, that direct and reflected from the target laser radiation form periodic wave-shaped structures on the surface of target and substrate.

  6. Ablation dynamics of Co/ZnS targets under double pulse femtosecond laser irradiation.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Quintas, Ignacio; Loriot, Vincent; Ávila, David; Izquierdo, Jesus G; Rebollar, Esther; Bañares, Luis; Castillejo, Marta; de Nalda, Rebeca; Martin, Margarita

    2016-02-01

    Femtosecond lasers, used as tools to investigate the ablation dynamics of solids, can help to develop strategies to control the deposition of nanomaterials by pulsed laser ablation. In this work, Co/ZnS targets, potential candidates for the synthesis of diluted magnetic semiconductor materials, are irradiated by sequences of two femtosecond laser pulses delayed in the picosecond time scale. The ionic composition of the ablation plasma and the dependence of the ion signals on the interpulse delay and relative fluence are determined by time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The results show that, when pulses of different fluence are used, highly asymmetric ion yields are obtained, with more intense ion signals detected when the lower fluence pulse is temporally ahead. The comparison between asymmetric and equal fluence double pulse ablation dynamics provides some understanding of the different processes that modify the properties of the layer irradiated by the first pulse and of the mechanisms affecting the coupling of the delayed pulse into the material. The final outcome of the double pulse irradiation is characterized through the analysis of the deposits produced upon ablation. PMID:26751831

  7. Wall ablation, gas dynamics, and the history of wall stresses in ICF target chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Orth, C.D. )

    1989-09-30

    We calculate the history of wall stresses for spherical aluminum LMF-type ICF target chambers 10 cm thick with 1400-MJ pellets using a simple computer program called CHAMBER that incorporates the physics of first-wall ablation and chamber gas dynamics, including dissociation, ionization, and gas reverberations. By considering the time dependence of the wall stresses, we calculate peak stresses that are higher or lower than previous estimates based on the dynamic formula {sigma}{sub dyn} {approx}Pr/{Delta}R, depending on the radius of the chamber. Here P is the interior pressure, R is the chamber radius, and {Delta}R is the wall thickness. In particular, the previous estimates are too small for chambers with radii R > 4 m or R < 0.5 m, because the ablation impulse dominates the stress for R > 4 m, and the post-ablation pressure impulse dominates for R < 0.5 cm. CHAMER also shows that considerably more wall mass can be ablated after the x-ray-vaporized mass fills the chamber if the thermalized vapor radiates more energy to the wall than the wall can conduct away by heat condition, as in small chambers. Venting of a chamber can reduce the wall stress only to that caused by the ablation impulse, and only for vents with radii comparable to the radius of the chamber. 1 ref., 2 figs.

  8. Optimizing laser-driven proton acceleration from overdense targets.

    PubMed

    Stockem Novo, A; Kaluza, M C; Fonseca, R A; Silva, L O

    2016-07-20

    We demonstrate how to tune the main ion acceleration mechanism in laser-plasma interactions to collisionless shock acceleration, thus achieving control over the final ion beam properties (e. g. maximum energy, divergence, number of accelerated ions). We investigate this technique with three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations and illustrate a possible experimental realisation. The setup consists of an isolated solid density target, which is preheated by a first laser pulse to initiate target expansion, and a second one to trigger acceleration. The timing between the two laser pulses allows to access all ion acceleration regimes, ranging from target normal sheath acceleration, to hole boring and collisionless shock acceleration. We further demonstrate that the most energetic ions are produced by collisionless shock acceleration, if the target density is near-critical, ne ≈ 0.5 ncr. A scaling of the laser power shows that 100 MeV protons may be achieved in the PW range.

  9. Optimizing laser-driven proton acceleration from overdense targets

    PubMed Central

    Stockem Novo, A.; Kaluza, M. C.; Fonseca, R. A.; Silva, L. O.

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate how to tune the main ion acceleration mechanism in laser-plasma interactions to collisionless shock acceleration, thus achieving control over the final ion beam properties (e. g. maximum energy, divergence, number of accelerated ions). We investigate this technique with three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations and illustrate a possible experimental realisation. The setup consists of an isolated solid density target, which is preheated by a first laser pulse to initiate target expansion, and a second one to trigger acceleration. The timing between the two laser pulses allows to access all ion acceleration regimes, ranging from target normal sheath acceleration, to hole boring and collisionless shock acceleration. We further demonstrate that the most energetic ions are produced by collisionless shock acceleration, if the target density is near-critical, ne ≈ 0.5 ncr. A scaling of the laser power shows that 100 MeV protons may be achieved in the PW range. PMID:27435449

  10. Optimizing laser-driven proton acceleration from overdense targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockem Novo, A.; Kaluza, M. C.; Fonseca, R. A.; Silva, L. O.

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrate how to tune the main ion acceleration mechanism in laser-plasma interactions to collisionless shock acceleration, thus achieving control over the final ion beam properties (e. g. maximum energy, divergence, number of accelerated ions). We investigate this technique with three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations and illustrate a possible experimental realisation. The setup consists of an isolated solid density target, which is preheated by a first laser pulse to initiate target expansion, and a second one to trigger acceleration. The timing between the two laser pulses allows to access all ion acceleration regimes, ranging from target normal sheath acceleration, to hole boring and collisionless shock acceleration. We further demonstrate that the most energetic ions are produced by collisionless shock acceleration, if the target density is near-critical, ne ≈ 0.5 ncr. A scaling of the laser power shows that 100 MeV protons may be achieved in the PW range.

  11. Cavitation-enhanced nonthermal ablation in deep brain targets: feasibility in a large animal model.

    PubMed

    Arvanitis, Costas D; Vykhodtseva, Natalia; Jolesz, Ferenc; Livingstone, Margaret; McDannold, Nathan

    2016-05-01

    OBJECT Transcranial MRI-guided focused ultrasound (TcMRgFUS) is an emerging noninvasive alternative to surgery and radiosurgery that is undergoing testing for tumor ablation and functional neurosurgery. The method is currently limited to central brain targets due to skull heating and other factors. An alternative ablative approach combines very low intensity ultrasound bursts and an intravenously administered microbubble agent to locally destroy the vasculature. The objective of this work was to investigate whether it is feasible to use this approach at deep brain targets near the skull base in nonhuman primates. METHODS In 4 rhesus macaques, targets near the skull base were ablated using a clinical TcMRgFUS system operating at 220 kHz. Low-duty-cycle ultrasound exposures (sonications) were applied for 5 minutes in conjunction with the ultrasound contrast agent Definity, which was administered as a bolus injection or continuous infusion. The acoustic power level was set to be near the inertial cavitation threshold, which was measured using passive monitoring of the acoustic emissions. The resulting tissue effects were investigated with MRI and with histological analysis performed 3 hours to 1 week after sonication. RESULTS Thirteen targets were sonicated in regions next to the optic tract in the 4 animals. Inertial cavitation, indicated by broadband acoustic emissions, occurred at acoustic pressure amplitudes ranging from 340 to 540 kPa. MRI analysis suggested that the lesions had a central region containing red blood cell extravasations that was surrounded by edema. Blood-brain barrier disruption was observed on contrast-enhanced MRI in the lesions and in a surrounding region corresponding to the prefocal area of the FUS system. In histology, lesions consisting of tissue undergoing ischemic necrosis were found in all regions that were sonicated above the inertial cavitation threshold. Tissue damage in prefocal areas was found in several cases, suggesting that in

  12. Endometrial ablation

    MedlinePlus

    Hysteroscopy-endometrial ablation; Laser thermal ablation; Endometrial ablation-radiofrequency; Endometrial ablation-thermal balloon ablation; Rollerball ablation; Hydrothermal ablation; Novasure ablation

  13. Development of the C{sup 6+} laser ablation ion source for the KEK digital accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Munemoto, Naoya; Takayama, Ken; Takano, Susumu; Okamura, Masahiro; Kumaki, Masahumi

    2014-02-15

    A laser ion source that provides a fully ionized carbon ion beam is under joint development at the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization and Brookhaven National Laboratory. Long-pulse (6 ns) and short-pulse (500 ps) laser systems were tested by using them to irradiate a graphite target. Notable differences between the systems were observed in these experiments. Preliminary experimental results, such as the charge-state spectrum, beam intensity, and stability, are discussed.

  14. Influence of the embryonic preplate on the organization of the cerebral cortex: a targeted ablation model.

    PubMed

    Xie, Y; Skinner, E; Landry, C; Handley, V; Schonmann, V; Jacobs, E; Fisher, R; Campagnoni, A

    2002-10-15

    Transgenic mice were generated to permit the targeted ablation of cortical preplate cells at the time they are born. In these mice, the 1.3 kb golli promoter of the myelin basic protein gene was used to drive the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (TK) transgene in cortical preplate cells. Heterozygous transgenic pairs were bred, and pregnant dams were treated with ganciclovir at embryonic days 11-12 to ablate preplate cells at the time the preplate was forming. This paradigm exposed control (TK-) and experimental (TK+) littermates to exactly the same conditions. Embryological ablation of preplate cells led to an early disruption of the radial glial framework and subplate structure in the developing cortex and dramatically altered the cellular lamination and connectivity of the cortical plate. The disturbed radial glial network contributed to an impaired radial migration of neurons into the cortical plate from the ventricular zone. The cortical plate became dyslaminated, and there was a substantial reduction in short- and long-range cortical projections within the cortex and to subcortical regions. Cell death within the cortical plate and the proliferative zones was substantially increased in the ablated animals. After birth, a cortical lesion developed, which became exacerbated with the secondary onset of hydrocephaly in the second postnatal week. The results underscore the critical importance of the preplate in cortex formation, mediated through its guidance of the formation of radial glial scaffolding, subsequent neuronal migration into the incipient cortical plate, and the final arrangement of its vertical organization and cellular connectivity.

  15. Immunonanoshells for targeted photothermal ablation of tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Lowery, Amanda R; Gobin, André M; Day, Emily S; Halas, Naomi J; West, Jennifer L

    2006-01-01

    Consisting of a silica core surrounded by a thin gold shell, nanoshells possess an optical tunability that spans the visible to the near infrared (NIR) region, a region where light penetrates tissues deeply. Conjugated with tumor-specific antibodies, NIR-absorbing immunonanoshells can preferentially bind to tumor cells. NIR light then heats the bound nanoshells, thus destroying the targeted cells. Antibodies can be consistently bound to the nanoshells via a bifunctional polyethylene glycol (PEG) linker at a density of ~150 antibodies per nanoshell. In vitro studies have confirmed the ability to selectively induce cell death with the photothermal interaction of immunonanoshells and NIR light. Prior to incubation with anti-human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER2) immunonanoshells, HER2-expressing SK-BR-3 breast carcinoma cells were seeded alone or adjacent to human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs). Anti-HER2 immunonanoshells bound to HER2-expressing cells resulted in the death of SK-BR-3 cells after NIR exposure only within the irradiated area, while HDFs remained viable after similar treatment since the immunonanoshells did not bind to these cells at high levels. Control nanoshells, conjugated with nonspecific anti-IgG or PEG, did not bind to either cell type, and cells continued to be viable after treatment with these control nanoshells and NIR irradiation. PMID:17722530

  16. The target laboratory of the Pelletron Accelerator's facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Ueta, Nobuko; Pereira Engel, Wanda Gabriel

    2013-05-06

    A short report on the activities developed in the Target Laboratory, since 1970, will be presented. Basic target laboratory facilities were provided to produce the necessary nuclear targets as well as the ion beam stripper foils. Vacuum evaporation units, a roller, a press and an analytical balance were installed in the Oscar Sala building. A brief historical report will be presented in commemoration of the 40{sup th} year of the Pelletron Accelerator.

  17. Modification of the argon stripping target of the tandem accelerator.

    PubMed

    Makarov, A; Ostreinov, Yu; Taskaev, S; Vobly, P

    2015-12-01

    The tandem accelerator with vacuum insulation has been proposed and developed in Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics. Negative hydrogen ions are accelerated by the positive 1MV potential of the high-voltage electrode, converted into protons in the gas stripping target inside the electrode, and then protons are accelerated again by the same potential. A stationary proton beam with 2 MeV energy, 1.6 mA current, 0.1% energy monochromaticity, and 0.5% current stability is obtained now. To conduct Boron Neutron Capture Therapy it is planned to increase the proton beam current to at least 3 mA. The paper presents the results of experimental studies clarifying the reasons for limiting the current, and gives suggestions for modifying the gas stripping target in order to increase the proton beam current along with the stability of the accelerator.

  18. Modification of the argon stripping target of the tandem accelerator.

    PubMed

    Makarov, A; Ostreinov, Yu; Taskaev, S; Vobly, P

    2015-12-01

    The tandem accelerator with vacuum insulation has been proposed and developed in Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics. Negative hydrogen ions are accelerated by the positive 1MV potential of the high-voltage electrode, converted into protons in the gas stripping target inside the electrode, and then protons are accelerated again by the same potential. A stationary proton beam with 2 MeV energy, 1.6 mA current, 0.1% energy monochromaticity, and 0.5% current stability is obtained now. To conduct Boron Neutron Capture Therapy it is planned to increase the proton beam current to at least 3 mA. The paper presents the results of experimental studies clarifying the reasons for limiting the current, and gives suggestions for modifying the gas stripping target in order to increase the proton beam current along with the stability of the accelerator. PMID:26242555

  19. Ultrashort laser ablation of bulk copper targets: Dynamics and size distribution of the generated nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Tsakiris, N.; Gill-Comeau, M.; Lewis, L. J.; Anoop, K. K.; Ausanio, G.; Bruzzese, R.; Amoruso, S.

    2014-06-28

    We address the role of laser pulse fluence on expansion dynamics and size distribution of the nanoparticles produced by irradiating a metallic target with an ultrashort laser pulse in a vacuum, an issue for which contrasting indications are present in the literature. To this end, we have carried out a combined theoretical and experimental analysis of laser ablation of a bulk copper target with ≈50 fs, 800 nm pulses, in an interval of laser fluencies going from few to several times the ablation threshold. On one side, molecular dynamics simulations, with two-temperature model, describe the decomposition of the material through the analysis of the evolution of thermodynamic trajectories in the material phase diagram, and allow estimating the size distribution of the generated nano-aggregates. On the other side, atomic force microscopy of less than one layer nanoparticles deposits on witness plates, and fast imaging of the nanoparticles broadband optical emission provide the corresponding experimental characterization. Both experimental and numerical findings agree on a size distribution characterized by a significant fraction (≈90%) of small nanoparticles, and a residual part (≈10%) spanning over a rather large size interval, evidencing a weak dependence of the nanoparticles sizes on the laser pulse fluence. Numerical and experimental findings show a good degree of consistency, thus suggesting that modeling can realistically support the search for experimental methods leading to an improved control over the generation of nanoparticles by ultrashort laser ablation.

  20. Solid hydrogen target for laser driven proton acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perin, J. P.; Garcia, S.; Chatain, D.; Margarone, D.

    2015-05-01

    The development of very high power lasers opens up new horizons in various fields, such as laser plasma acceleration in Physics and innovative approaches for proton therapy in Medicine. Laser driven proton acceleration is commonly based on the so-called Target Normal Sheath Acceleration (TNSA) mechanisms: a high power laser is focused onto a solid target (thin metallic or plastic foil) and interact with matter at very high intensity, thus generating a plasma; as a consequence "hot" electrons are produced and move into the forward direction through the target. Protons are generated at the target rear side, electrons try to escape from the target and an ultra-strong quasi-electrostatic field (~1TV/m) is generated. Such a field can accelerate protons with a wide energy spectrum (1-200 MeV) in a few tens of micrometers. The proton beam characteristics depend on the laser parameters and on the target geometry and nature. This technique has been validated experimentally in several high power laser facilities by accelerating protons coming from hydrogenated contaminant (mainly water) at the rear of metallic target, however, several research groups are investigating the possibility to perform experiments by using "pure" hydrogen targets. In this context, the low temperature laboratory at CEA-Grenoble has developed a cryostat able to continuously produce a thin hydrogen ribbon (from 40 to 100 microns thick). A new extrusion concept, without any moving part has been carried out, using only the thermodynamic properties of the fluid. First results and perspectives are presented in this paper.

  1. SERS detection and targeted ablation of lymphoma cells using functionalized Ag nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Qian; Cao, Fei; Feng, Chao; Zhao, Yan; Wang, Xiuhong

    2016-03-01

    Lymphoma is a heterogeneous group of malignancies of the lymphoid tissue, and is prevalent worldwide affecting both children and adults with a high mortality rate. There is in dire need of accurate and noninvasive approaches for early detection of the disease. Herein, we report a facile way to fabricate silver nanoparticle based nanoprobe by incorporating the corner-stone immunotherapeutic drug Rituxan for simultaneous detection and ablation of lymphoma cells in vitro. The fabricated nanoprobe can detect CD20 positive single lymphoma cell by surface enhanced Raman scattering technique with high specificity. The engineered nanoprobe retains the same antibody property as intact drug via Antibody-Dependent Cell-mediated Cytotoxicity (ADCC) analysis. The nanoprobe efficiently eradicates lymphoma cells in vitro. By integrating the advantages of sensitive SERS detection with targeted ablation capabilities of immunotherapeutic drug through site specificity, this nanoprobe can be applied as outstanding tools in living imaging, cancer diagnosis and treatment.

  2. Formation of nanoparticles during laser ablation of an iron target in a liquid

    SciTech Connect

    Sukhov, I A; Simakin, Aleksandr V; Shafeev, Georgii A; Viau, G; Garcia, C

    2012-05-31

    Formation of nanoparticles during laser ablation of a bulk iron target in water and isopropyl alcohol by pulsed near-IR laser radiation has been experimentally investigated. The experiments were performed using a 3-ns neodymium laser and a 100-ns ytterbium fibre laser. A size distribution function is obtained for the nanoparticles, which is peaking near 15 nm. The diffraction patterns of the nanoparticles exhibit pronounced peaks of metallic iron. An analysis of the nanoparticles by transmission electron microscopy shows that in some cases they have a core - shell structure. The nanoparticles formed by laser ablation have pronounced magnetic properties. The absorption spectra of colloids with iron nanoparticles contain peaks, which presumably correspond to the electron plasmon resonance in these particles.

  3. Formation of nanoparticles during laser ablation of an iron target in a liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhov, I. A.; Simakin, Aleksandr V.; Shafeev, Georgii A.; Viau, G.; Garcia, C.

    2012-05-01

    Formation of nanoparticles during laser ablation of a bulk iron target in water and isopropyl alcohol by pulsed near-IR laser radiation has been experimentally investigated. The experiments were performed using a 3-ns neodymium laser and a 100-ns ytterbium fibre laser. A size distribution function is obtained for the nanoparticles, which is peaking near 15 nm. The diffraction patterns of the nanoparticles exhibit pronounced peaks of metallic iron. An analysis of the nanoparticles by transmission electron microscopy shows that in some cases they have a core — shell structure. The nanoparticles formed by laser ablation have pronounced magnetic properties. The absorption spectra of colloids with iron nanoparticles contain peaks, which presumably correspond to the electron plasmon resonance in these particles.

  4. Acceleration of Ions from a near critical density gaseous target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helle, Michael; Gordon, Daniel; Kaganovich, Dmitri; Ting, Antonio

    2013-10-01

    Efficient acceleration of ions by means of high power laser radiation requires electron plasma densities at or in excess of the critical density. For optical wavelengths where most of the world's high intensity lasers operate, the critical density is nCRIT ~ 2*1021 cm-3. This value lies between gaseous and solid like densities making it difficult to obtain. In order to reach these densities a ``gas foil'' target has been developed at the Naval Research Laboratory. The target is created by igniting an optically driven hydrodynamic shock into the gas flow of a gas jet in vacuum. Experiments have shown that a laser-ignited shock is capable of producing <10 μm gradients, thicknesses ~ 100 μm, and peak densities >4 times ambient. 3D PIC simulations of the interaction of an intense laser pulse with this type of thin, near critical density target have shown characteristics of the recently purposed Magnetic Vortex Acceleration mechanism. This mechanism takes advantage of an inductive accelerating field at the rear of the target. This field is generated by the strong azimuthal magnetic field produced by electrons accelerating through the target. Simulations and preliminary experimental results using the TFL laser system at NRL will be discussed. This work is supported by the Department of Energy and the Naval Research Laboratory Base Program.

  5. Stability of a Shock-Decelerated Ablation Front

    SciTech Connect

    Aglitskiy, Y.; Karasik, M.; Velikovich, A. L.; Serlin, V.; Weaver, J. L.; Schmitt, A. J.; Obenschain, S. P.; Metzler, N.; Zalesak, S. T.; Gardner, J. H.; Oh, J.; Harding, E. C.

    2009-08-21

    Experimental study of a shock-decelerated ablation front is reported. A planar solid plastic target is accelerated by a laser across a vacuum gap and collides with a lower-density plastic foam layer. While the target is accelerated, a fast Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) growth of the seeded single-mode perturbation at the ablation front is observed. After the collision, the velocity of the ablation front is seen to remain constant. The reshock quenches the RT growth but does not trigger any Richtmyer-Meshkov growth at the ablation front, which is shown to be consistent with both theory and simulations.

  6. Design of a deuterium and tritium-ablator shock ignition target for the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Terry, Matthew R.; Perkins, L. John; Sepke, Scott M.

    2012-11-15

    Shock ignition presents a viable path to ignition and high gain on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). In this paper, we describe the development of the 1D design of 0.5 MJ class, all-deuterium and tritium (fuel and ablator) shock ignition target that should be reasonably robust to Rayleigh-Taylor fluid instabilities, mistiming, and hot electron preheat. The target assumes 'day one' NIF hardware and produces a yield of 31 MJ with reasonable allowances for laser backscatter, absorption efficiency, and polar drive power variation. The energetics of polar drive laser absorption require a beam configuration with half of the NIF quads dedicated to launching the ignitor shock, while the remaining quads drive the target compression. Hydrodynamic scaling of the target suggests that gains of 75 and yields 70 MJ may be possible.

  7. Enhanced Ion Acceleration from Micro-tube Structured Targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, Joseph; Ji, Liangliang; Akli, Kramer

    2015-11-01

    We present an enhanced ion acceleration method that leverages recent advancements in 3D printing for target fabrication. Using the three-dimensional Particle-in-Cell simulation code Virtual Laser-Plasma Lab (VLPL), we model the interaction of a short pulse, high intensity laser with a micro-tube plasma (MTP) structured target. When compared to flat foils, the MTP target enhances the maximum proton energy by a factor of about 4. The ion enhancement is attributed to two main factors: high energy electrons extracted from the tube structure enhancing the accelerating field and light intensification within the MTP target increasing the laser intensity at the location of the foil. We also present results on ion energy scaling with micro-tube diameter and incident laser pulse intensity. This work was supported by the AFOSR under contract No. FA9550-14-1-0085.

  8. Influence of real gas effects on ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instability in plastic target

    SciTech Connect

    Fan Zhengfeng; Xue Chuang; Ye Wenhua; Zhu Shaoping; Wang Lifeng

    2011-06-15

    In this research, real gas effects on ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instability are investigated in a plastic target. The real gas effects are included by adopting the quotidian equation of state (QEOS) model. Theoretical solutions for both QEOS and ideal gas EOS are obtained and compared, based on a same set of ablation parameters. It is found that when real gas effects are considered, the density gradient becomes less steep than that of ideal gas assumption, even though this cannot be used directly to draw a stabilization conclusion for the real gas effects. Further analysis shows that when real gas effects are considered, lower {partial_derivative}p/{partial_derivative}T in the dense shell region has the effect of stabilization, whereas the dependence of the internal energy on the density, lower specific heat (at constant volume) in the dense shell region, and higher specific heat in the low-density ablation region contribute to stronger destabilization effects. Overall, when real gas effects are considered, the destabilization effects are dominant for long wavelength perturbations, and the growth rates become much higher than the results of ideal gas assumption. In our specific case, the maximum relative error reaches 18%.

  9. Thermal infrared images to quantify thermal ablation effects of acid and base on target tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ran; Wang, Jia; Liu, Jing

    2015-07-01

    Hyperthermia (42-46°C), treatment of tumor tissue through elevated temperature, offers several advantages including high cost-effectiveness, highly targeted ablation and fewer side effects and hence higher safety level over traditional therapies such as chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Recently, hyperthermia using heat release through exothermic acid-base neutralization comes into view owing to its relatively safe products of salt and water and highly confined ablation. However, lack of quantitative understanding of the spatial and temporal temperature profiles that are produced by simultaneous diffusion of liquid chemical and its chemical reaction within tumor tissue impedes the application of this method. This article is dedicated to quantify thermal ablation effects of acid and base both individually and as in neutralization via infrared captured thermal images. A theoretical model is used to approximate specific heat absorption rate (SAR) based on experimental measurements that contrast two types of tissue, normal pork and pig liver. According to the computation, both pork and liver tissue has a higher ability in absorbing hydrochloric acid (HCl) than sodium hydroxide, hence suggesting that a reduced dosage for HCl is appropriate in a surgery. The heating effect depends heavily on the properties of tissue types and amount of chemical reagents administered. Given thermal parameters such as SAR for different tissues, a computational model can be made in predicting temperature transitions which will be helpful in planning and optimizing surgical hyperthermia procedures.

  10. Thermal infrared images to quantify thermal ablation effects of acid and base on target tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Ran E-mail: liuran@tsinghua.edu.cn; Liu, Jing E-mail: liuran@tsinghua.edu.cn; Wang, Jia

    2015-07-15

    Hyperthermia (42-46°C), treatment of tumor tissue through elevated temperature, offers several advantages including high cost-effectiveness, highly targeted ablation and fewer side effects and hence higher safety level over traditional therapies such as chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Recently, hyperthermia using heat release through exothermic acid-base neutralization comes into view owing to its relatively safe products of salt and water and highly confined ablation. However, lack of quantitative understanding of the spatial and temporal temperature profiles that are produced by simultaneous diffusion of liquid chemical and its chemical reaction within tumor tissue impedes the application of this method. This article is dedicated to quantify thermal ablation effects of acid and base both individually and as in neutralization via infrared captured thermal images. A theoretical model is used to approximate specific heat absorption rate (SAR) based on experimental measurements that contrast two types of tissue, normal pork and pig liver. According to the computation, both pork and liver tissue has a higher ability in absorbing hydrochloric acid (HCl) than sodium hydroxide, hence suggesting that a reduced dosage for HCl is appropriate in a surgery. The heating effect depends heavily on the properties of tissue types and amount of chemical reagents administered. Given thermal parameters such as SAR for different tissues, a computational model can be made in predicting temperature transitions which will be helpful in planning and optimizing surgical hyperthermia procedures.

  11. Target Material Irradiation Studies for High-Intensity Accelerator Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Simos, N.; Kirk, H.; Ludewig, H.; Thieberger, P.; Weng, W.T.; McDonald, K.; Sheppard, J.; Evangelakis, G.; Yoshimura, K.; /KEK, Tsukuba

    2005-08-16

    This paper presents results of recent experimental studies focusing on the behavior of special materials and composites under irradiation conditions and their potential use as accelerator targets. The paper also discusses the approach and goals of on-going investigations on an expanded material matrix geared toward the neutrino superbeam and muon collider initiatives.

  12. Ablation and transmission of thin solid targets irradiated by intense extreme ultraviolet laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aslanyan, V.; Kuznetsov, I.; Bravo, H.; Woolston, M. R.; Rossall, A. K.; Menoni, C. S.; Rocca, J. J.; Tallents, G. J.

    2016-09-01

    The interaction of an extreme ultraviolet (EUV) laser beam with a parylene foil was studied by experiments and simulation. A single EUV laser pulse of nanosecond duration focused to an intensity of 3 × 1010 W cm-2 perforated micrometer thick targets. The same laser pulse was simultaneously used to diagnose the interaction by a transmission measurement. A combination of 2-dimensional radiation-hydrodynamic and diffraction calculations was used to model the ablation, leading to good agreement with experiment. This theoretical approach allows predictive modelling of the interaction with matter of intense EUV beams over a broad range of parameters.

  13. Mitigation of Laser Imprinting with Diamond Ablator for Direct-Drive Inertial Confinement Fusion Targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shigemori, K.; Kato, H.; Nakai, M.; Hosogi, R.; Sakaiya, T.; Terasaki, H.; Fujioka, S.; Sunahara, A.; Azechi, H.

    2016-03-01

    We propose a novel scheme to mitigate the initial perturbation imprinting due to irradiation non-uniformity. Diamond was potential candidate for the ablator material for ICF targets due to its stiffness. The stiffness is very important parameter for imprint mitigation because the laser imprint is primary as a function of pressure perturbation due to lase irradiation non-uniformity. We measured the imprint amplitude of diamond foils and plastic (CH) foils. The experimental data suggest the initial imprinting is drastically mitigated for the diamond foils.

  14. Tbx18 targets dermal condensates for labeling, isolation, and gene ablation during embryonic hair follicle formation.

    PubMed

    Grisanti, Laura; Clavel, Carlos; Cai, Xiaoqiang; Rezza, Amelie; Tsai, Su-Yi; Sennett, Rachel; Mumau, Melanie; Cai, Chen-Leng; Rendl, Michael

    2013-02-01

    How cell fate decisions of stem and progenitor cells are regulated by their microenvironment or niche is a central question in stem cell and regenerative biology. Although functional analysis of hair follicle epithelial stem cells by gene targeting is well established, the molecular and genetic characterization of the dermal counterpart during embryonic morphogenesis has been lacking because of the absence of cell type-specific drivers. Here, we report that T-box transcription factor Tbx18 specifically marks dermal papilla (DP) precursor cells during embryonic hair follicle morphogenesis. With Tbx18(LacZ), Tbx18(H2BGFP), and Tbx18(Cre) knock-in mouse models, we demonstrate LacZ and H2BGFP (nuclear green fluorescent protein) expression and Cre activity in dermal condensates of nascent first-wave hair follicles at E14.5. As Tbx18 expression becomes more widespread throughout the dermis at later developmental stages, we use tamoxifen-inducible Cre-expressing mice, Tbx18(MerCreMer), to exclusively target DP precursor cells and their progeny. Finally, we ablate Tbx18 in full knockout mice, but find no perturbations in hair follicle formation, suggesting that Tbx18 is dispensable for normal DP function. In summary, our study establishes Tbx18 as a genetic driver to target for the first time embryonic DP precursors for labeling, isolation, and gene ablation that will greatly enhance investigations into their molecular functions during hair follicle morphogenesis. PMID:22992803

  15. Tbx18 targets dermal condensates for labeling, isolation, and gene ablation during embryonic hair follicle formation.

    PubMed

    Grisanti, Laura; Clavel, Carlos; Cai, Xiaoqiang; Rezza, Amelie; Tsai, Su-Yi; Sennett, Rachel; Mumau, Melanie; Cai, Chen-Leng; Rendl, Michael

    2013-02-01

    How cell fate decisions of stem and progenitor cells are regulated by their microenvironment or niche is a central question in stem cell and regenerative biology. Although functional analysis of hair follicle epithelial stem cells by gene targeting is well established, the molecular and genetic characterization of the dermal counterpart during embryonic morphogenesis has been lacking because of the absence of cell type-specific drivers. Here, we report that T-box transcription factor Tbx18 specifically marks dermal papilla (DP) precursor cells during embryonic hair follicle morphogenesis. With Tbx18(LacZ), Tbx18(H2BGFP), and Tbx18(Cre) knock-in mouse models, we demonstrate LacZ and H2BGFP (nuclear green fluorescent protein) expression and Cre activity in dermal condensates of nascent first-wave hair follicles at E14.5. As Tbx18 expression becomes more widespread throughout the dermis at later developmental stages, we use tamoxifen-inducible Cre-expressing mice, Tbx18(MerCreMer), to exclusively target DP precursor cells and their progeny. Finally, we ablate Tbx18 in full knockout mice, but find no perturbations in hair follicle formation, suggesting that Tbx18 is dispensable for normal DP function. In summary, our study establishes Tbx18 as a genetic driver to target for the first time embryonic DP precursors for labeling, isolation, and gene ablation that will greatly enhance investigations into their molecular functions during hair follicle morphogenesis.

  16. Experiments on Dynamic Overpressure Stabilization of Ablative Richtmyer--Meshkov Growth in ICF Targets on OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gotchev, O. V.; Goncharov, V. N.; Jaanimagi, P. A.; Knauer, J. P.; Meyerhofer, D. D.

    2002-11-01

    Dynamic overpressure sets the growth rate of the ablative Richtmyer--Meshkov (RM) instability and the late-time imprint levels in directly driven ICF targets. It leads to temporal oscillations of the perturbed ablation front, which have been predicted analytically and observed experimentally,(Y. Aglitskiy et al.), Phys. Plasmas 9, 2264 (2002). and in 2-D ORCHID simulations. These predictions were verified on OMEGA by measuring the perturbation amplitudes and frequencies directly with an x-ray framing camera through face-on x-ray radiography. Planar plastic targets with variable thickness (20 to 60 μm) and single-mode (λ = 10 to 30 μm) ripples on the front surface were irradiated with 1.5-ns square UV laser pulses at maximum energy. Results clearly indicate a phase reversal in the evolution of the target areal density perturbations, in good agreement with theory and simulation. Nonlinearity in the evolution of the preimposed mode, resulting in an enriched spectrum, was observed for initial amplitudes previously believed to develop linearly with time. Upcoming experiments with a high-resolution, streaked imager, will allow for the detailed recording of the evolution of the RM instability and the competing stabilization effect. This work was supported by the U.S. DOE Office of Inertial Confinement Fusion under Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC03-92SF19460.

  17. Nonthermal ablation of deep brain targets: A simulation study on a large animal model

    PubMed Central

    Top, Can Barış; White, P. Jason; McDannold, Nathan J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Thermal ablation with transcranial MRI-guided focused ultrasound (FUS) is currently limited to central brain targets because of heating and other beam effects caused by the presence of the skull. Recently, it was shown that it is possible to ablate tissues without depositing thermal energy by driving intravenously administered microbubbles to inertial cavitation using low-duty-cycle burst sonications. A recent study demonstrated that this ablation method could ablate tissue volumes near the skull base in nonhuman primates without thermally damaging the nearby bone. However, blood–brain disruption was observed in the prefocal region, and in some cases, this region contained small areas of tissue damage. The objective of this study was to analyze the experimental model with simulations and to interpret the cause of these effects. Methods: The authors simulated prior experiments where nonthermal ablation was performed in the brain in anesthetized rhesus macaques using a 220 kHz clinical prototype transcranial MRI-guided FUS system. Low-duty-cycle sonications were applied at deep brain targets with the ultrasound contrast agent Definity. For simulations, a 3D pseudospectral finite difference time domain tool was used. The effects of shear mode conversion, focal steering, skull aberrations, nonlinear propagation, and the presence of skull base on the pressure field were investigated using acoustic and elastic wave propagation models. Results: The simulation results were in agreement with the experimental findings in the prefocal region. In the postfocal region, however, side lobes were predicted by the simulations, but no effects were evident in the experiments. The main beam was not affected by the different simulated scenarios except for a shift of about 1 mm in peak position due to skull aberrations. However, the authors observed differences in the volume, amplitude, and distribution of the side lobes. In the experiments, a single element passive

  18. Laser-driven proton acceleration using a conical nanobrush target

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Jinqing; Zhao Zongqing; Yan Yonghong; Zhou Weimin; Cao Leifeng; Gu Yuqiu; Jin Xiaolin; Li Bin; Wu Fengjuan

    2012-05-15

    A conical nanobrush target is proposed to improve the total proton energy-conversion efficiency in proton beam acceleration and investigated by two-dimensional particle-in-cell (2D-PIC) simulations. Results indicate a significant enhancement of the number and energies of hot electrons through the target rear side of the conical nanobrush target. Compared with the plain target, the field increases several times. We observe enhancements of the average proton energy and total laser-proton energy conversion efficiency of 105%. This enhancement is attributed to both nanobrush and conical configurations. The proton beam is well collimated with a divergence angle less than 28{sup Degree-Sign }. The proposed target may serve as a new method for increasing laser to proton energy-conversion efficiency.

  19. Laser ablation of Drosophila embryonic motoneurons causes ectopic innervation of target muscle fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, T. N.; Keshishian, H.

    1996-01-01

    We have tested the effects of neuromuscular denervation in Drosophila by laser-ablating the RP motoneurons in intact embryos before synaptogenesis. We examined the consequences of this ablation on local synaptic connectivity in both 1st and 3rd instar larvae. We find that the partial or complete loss of native innervation correlates with the appearance of alternate inputs from neighboring motor endings and axons. These collateral inputs are found at ectopic sites on the denervated target muscle fibers. The foreign motor endings are electrophysiologically functional and are observed on the denervated muscle fibers by the 1st instar larval stage. Our data are consistent with the existence of a local signal from the target environment, which is regulated by innervation and influences synaptic connectivity. Our results show that, despite the stereotypy of Drosophila neuromuscular connections, denervation can induce local changes in connectivity in wild-type Drosophila, suggesting that mechanisms of synaptic plasticity may also be involved in normal Drosophila neuromuscular development.

  20. Pulsed laser ablation of borax target in vacuum and hydrogen DC glow discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kale, A. N.; Miotello, A.; Mosaner, P.

    2006-09-01

    The aim of our experiment was to produce a material with B sbnd H bonds for applications in hydrogen storage and generation. By using KrF excimer laser ( λ = 248 nm) ablation of borax (Na 2B 4O 7) target, thin films were deposited on KBr and silicon substrates. Ablation was performed both in vacuum and in hydrogen atmosphere. DC glow discharge technique was utilized to enhance hydrogen gas ionization. Experiments were performed using laser fluence from 5 to 20 J/cm 2. Films were deposited under gas pressure of 1 × 10 -5 to 5 × 10 -2 mbar and substrate temperatures of 130-450 °C. Scanning electron microscopy analysis of films showed presence of circular particulates. Film thickness, roughness and particulates number increased with increase in laser fluence. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis shows that sodium content in the particulates is higher than in the target. This effect is discussed in terms of atomic arrangements (both at surface and bulk) in systems where ionic and covalent bonds are present and by looking at the increased surface/bulk ratio of the particulates with respect to the deposited films. The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy measurements showed presence of B sbnd O stretching and B sbnd O sbnd B bending bonds. Possible reasons for absence of B sbnd H bonds are attributed to binding enthalpy of the competing molecules.

  1. Cation Engineering of Cu-ferrite Films Deposited by Alternating Target Laser Ablation Deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Yang,A.; Chen, Z.; Islam, S.; Vittoria, C.; Harris, V.

    2008-01-01

    Epitaxial copper ferrite thin films were deposited on MgO substrates by the alternating target laser ablation deposition method. A series of films was studied to explore the impact of oxygen operating pressure, substrate temperature, and the ratio of laser shots incident on each target upon the magnetic, structural, and atomic structural properties. The highest saturation magnetization, 2800?G, was achieved at a 90?mTorr oxygen pressure and at 650? C for the substrate temperature. This value is 65% higher than the room temperature magnetization for bulk equilibrium samples. The inversion parameter was measured by extended x-ray absorption fine structure analysis. The sample having the highest saturation magnetization had a corresponding inversion parameter (percentage of Cu ion octahedral site occupancy) of 51.5% compared with the bulk value of 85%.

  2. Rare Isotope Accelerator - Conceptual Design of Target Areas

    SciTech Connect

    Bollen, Georg; Baek, Inseok; Blideanu, Valentin; Lawton, Don; Mantica, Paul F.; Morrissey, David J.; Ronningen, Reginald M.; Sherrill, Bradley S.; Zeller, Albert; Beene, James R; Burgess, Tom; Carter, Kenneth; Carrol, Adam; Conner, David; Gabriel, Tony A; Mansur, Louis K; Remec, Igor; Rennich, Mark J; Stracener, Daniel W; Wendel, Mark W; Ahle, Larry; Boles, Jason; Reyes, Susana; Stein, Werner; Heilbronn, Lawrence

    2006-01-01

    The planned rare isotope accelerator facility RIA in the US would become the most powerful radioactive beam facility in the world. RIA s driver accelerator will be a device capable of providing beams from protons to uranium at energies of at least 400MeV per nucleon, with beam power up to 400 kW. Radioactive beam production relies on both the in-flight separation of fast beam fragments and on the ISOL technique. In both cases the high beam power poses major challenges for target technology and handling and on the design of the beam production areas. This paper will give a brief overview of RIA and discuss aspects of ongoing conceptual design work for the RIA target areas.

  3. Streaked Imaging of Ablative Richtmyer--Meshkov Growth in ICF Targets on OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gotchev, O. V.; Goncharov, V. N.; Jaanimagi, P. A.; Knauer, J. P.; Meyerhofer, D. D.

    2003-10-01

    Dynamic overpressure sets the growth rate of the ablative Richtmyer--Meshkov (RM) instability and the seeds for subsequent growth of perturbations due to the Rayleigh--Taylor instability in directly driven ICF targets. It leads to temporal oscillations of the perturbed ablation front, which have been predicted analytically,(V.N. Goncharov, Phys. Rev. Lett. 82), 2091 (1999). observed in 2-D ORCHID hydrodynamic simulations, and measured experimentally.(Y. Aglitskiy et al.), Phys. Plasmas 9, 2264 (2002). These predictions were verified on OMEGA by measuring the perturbation amplitudes and frequencies directly, through face-on x-ray radiography. Experiments with a high-resolution, Ir-coated Kirkpatrick--Baez microscope, coupled to a high-current streak tube, provided a continuous record of the target areal density during shock transit, while it was dominated by the evolution of the RM instability. Planar plastic targets with variable thicknesses (30 to 60 μm) and single-mode (λ = 10 to 30 μm) ripples on the front surface were irradiated with 1.5-ns square UV laser pulses with intensities---ranging from 5 × 10^13 W/cm^2 to 4 × 10^14 W/cm^2. Results clearly indicate a phase reversal in the evolution of the target areal density perturbations, in good agreement with theory and simulation. The predicted dependence of the oscillation period on laser intensity and modulation wavelength was quantified. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inertial Confinement Fusion under Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC03-92SF19460.

  4. Powder Metallurgy Fabrication of Molybdenum Accelerator Target Disks

    SciTech Connect

    Lowden, Richard Andrew; Kiggans Jr., James O.; Nunn, Stephen D.; Parten, Randy J.

    2015-12-01

    Powder metallurgy approaches for the fabrication of accelerator target disks are being examined to support the development of Mo-99 production by NorthStar Medical Technologies, LLC. An advantage of powder metallurgy is that very little material is wasted and at present, dense, quality parts are routinely produced from molybdenum powder. The proposed targets, however, are thin wafers, 29 mm in diameter with a thickness of 0.5 mm, with very stringent dimensional tolerances. Although tooling can be machined to very high tolerance levels, the operations of powder feed, pressing and sintering involve complicated mechanisms, each of which affects green density and shrinkage, and therefore the dimensions and shape of the final product. Combinations of powder morphology, lubricants and pressing technique have been explored to produce target disks with minimal variations in thickness and little or no distortion. In addition, sintering conditions that produce densities for optimum target dissolvability are being determined.

  5. The importance of cellular internalization of antibody-targeted carbon nanotubes in the photothermal ablation of breast cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marches, Radu; Mikoryak, Carole; Wang, Ru-Hung; Pantano, Paul; Draper, Rockford K.; Vitetta, Ellen S.

    2011-03-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) convert absorbed near infrared (NIR) light into heat. The use of CNTs in the NIR-mediated photothermal ablation of tumor cells is attractive because the penetration of NIR light through normal tissues is optimal and the side effects are minimal. Targeted thermal ablation with minimal collateral damage can be achieved by using CNTs attached to tumor-specific monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). However, the role that the cellular internalization of CNTs plays in the subsequent sensitivity of the target cells to NIR-mediated photothermal ablation remains undefined. To address this issue, we used CNTs covalently coupled to an anti-Her2 or a control MAb and tested their ability to bind, internalize, and photothermally ablate Her2 + but not Her2 - breast cancer cell lines. Using flow cytometry, immunofluorescence, and confocal Raman microscopy, we observed the gradual time-dependent receptor-mediated endocytosis of anti-Her2-CNTs whereas a control MAb-CNT conjugate did not bind to the cells. Most importantly, the Her2 + cells that internalized the MAb-CNTs were more sensitive to NIR-mediated photothermal damage than cells that could bind to, but not internalize the MAb-CNTs. These results suggest that both the targeting and internalization of MAb-CNTs might result in the most effective thermal ablation of tumor cells following their exposure to NIR light.

  6. Accelerator-based fusion with a low temperature target

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, R. E.; Ordonez, C. A.

    2013-04-19

    Neutron generators are in use in a number of scientific and commercial endeavors. They function by triggering fusion reactions between accelerated ions (usually deuterons) and a stationary cold target (e.g., containing tritium). This setup has the potential to generate energy. It has been shown that if the energy transfer between injected ions and target electrons is sufficiently small, net energy gain can be achieved. Three possible avenues are: (a) a hot target with high electron temperature, (b) a cold non-neutral target with an electron deficiency, or (c) a cold target with a high Fermi energy. A study of the third possibility is reported in light of recent research that points to a new phase of hydrogen, which is hypothesized to be related to metallic hydrogen. As such, the target is considered to be composed of nuclei and delocalized electrons. The electrons are treated as conduction electrons, with the average minimum excitation energy being approximately equal to 40% of the Fermi energy. The Fermi energy is directly related to the electron density. Preliminary results indicate that if the claimed electron densities in the new phase of hydrogen were achieved in a target, the energy transfer to electrons would be small enough to allow net energy gain.

  7. Accelerator-based fusion with a low temperature target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, R. E.; Ordonez, C. A.

    2013-04-01

    Neutron generators are in use in a number of scientific and commercial endeavors. They function by triggering fusion reactions between accelerated ions (usually deuterons) and a stationary cold target (e.g., containing tritium). This setup has the potential to generate energy. It has been shown that if the energy transfer between injected ions and target electrons is sufficiently small, net energy gain can be achieved. Three possible avenues are: (a) a hot target with high electron temperature, (b) a cold non-neutral target with an electron deficiency, or (c) a cold target with a high Fermi energy. A study of the third possibility is reported in light of recent research that points to a new phase of hydrogen, which is hypothesized to be related to metallic hydrogen. As such, the target is considered to be composed of nuclei and delocalized electrons. The electrons are treated as conduction electrons, with the average minimum excitation energy being approximately equal to 40% of the Fermi energy. The Fermi energy is directly related to the electron density. Preliminary results indicate that if the claimed electron densities in the new phase of hydrogen were achieved in a target, the energy transfer to electrons would be small enough to allow net energy gain.

  8. Laser-ablated loading of solid target through foams of overcritical density

    SciTech Connect

    De Angelis, R. Consoli, F.; Andreoli, P.; Cristofari, G.; Di Giorgio, G.; Gus'kov, S. Yu.; Rupasov, A. A.

    2015-07-15

    The main objective of the work is to study the conversion of the laser pulse energy into the energy of the hydrodynamic motion of matter in a solid target following the initial absorption of laser radiation in a layer of porous material. Results of experiments on plane massive aluminum targets, coated with a layer of porous plastic with density greater than the critical density of the plasma created, are presented. Experiments were carried out on the laser installation ABC of the Research Center ENEA-Frascati; the targets were irradiated by a beam of the fundamental harmonic of Nd-laser radiation with an energy of about 50 kJ, intensity of 10{sup 13 }W/cm{sup 2}, and 3 ns duration. The experimental method consisted in measuring the volume of the craters created on the aluminum surface behind various thicknesses and densities of the porous absorber of laser radiation. On the basis of these measurements and of an advanced analytical model, quantitative conclusions are made on how the efficiency of laser energy transfer to the solid part of the target (laser-ablated loading) depends on thickness and density of the porous absorber.

  9. Laser-ablated loading of solid target through foams of overcritical density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Angelis, R.; Consoli, F.; Gus'kov, S. Yu.; Rupasov, A. A.; Andreoli, P.; Cristofari, G.; Di Giorgio, G.

    2015-07-01

    The main objective of the work is to study the conversion of the laser pulse energy into the energy of the hydrodynamic motion of matter in a solid target following the initial absorption of laser radiation in a layer of porous material. Results of experiments on plane massive aluminum targets, coated with a layer of porous plastic with density greater than the critical density of the plasma created, are presented. Experiments were carried out on the laser installation ABC of the Research Center ENEA-Frascati; the targets were irradiated by a beam of the fundamental harmonic of Nd-laser radiation with an energy of about 50 kJ, intensity of 1013 W/cm2, and 3 ns duration. The experimental method consisted in measuring the volume of the craters created on the aluminum surface behind various thicknesses and densities of the porous absorber of laser radiation. On the basis of these measurements and of an advanced analytical model, quantitative conclusions are made on how the efficiency of laser energy transfer to the solid part of the target (laser-ablated loading) depends on thickness and density of the porous absorber.

  10. Target studies for accelerator-based boron neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, J.R.; Ludewig, H.; Todosow, M.; Reich, M.

    1996-03-01

    Two new concepts, NIFTI and DISCOS, are described. These concepts enable the efficient production of epithermal neutrons for BNCT (Boron Neutron Capture Therapy) medical treatment, utilizing a low current, low energy proton beam impacting on a lithium target. The NIFTI concept uses an iron layer that strongly impedes the transmission of neutrons with energies above 24 KeV. Lower energy neutrons readily pass through this iron ``filter``, which has a deep ``window`` in its scattering cross section at 24 KeV. The DISCOS concept uses a rapidly rotating, high g disc to create a series of thin ({approximately} 1 micron thickness) liquid lithium targets in the form of continuous films through which the proton beam passes. The average energy lost by a proton as it passes through a single target is small, approximately 10 KeV. Between the targets, the proton beam is reaccelerated by an applied DC electric field. The DISCOS approach enables the accelerator -- target facility to operate with a beam energy only slightly above the threshold value for neutron production -- resulting in an output beam of low-energy epithermal neutrons -- while achieving a high yield of neutrons per milliamp of proton beam current.

  11. MUC1-Targeted Cancer Cell Photothermal Ablation Using Bioinspired Gold Nanorods

    PubMed Central

    Zelasko-Leon, Daria C.; Fuentes, Christina M.; Messersmith, Phillip B.

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have highlighted the overexpression of mucin 1 (MUC1) in various epithelial carcinomas and its role in tumorigenesis. These mucins present a novel targeting opportunity for nanoparticle-mediated photothermal cancer treatments due to their unique antenna-like extracellular extension. In this study, MUC1 antibodies and albumin were immobilized onto the surface of gold nanorods using a “primer” of polydopamine (PD), a molecular mimic of catechol- and amine-rich mussel adhesive proteins. PD forms an adhesive platform for the deposition of albumin and MUC1 antibodies, achieving a surface that is stable, bioinert and biofunctional. Two-photon luminescence confocal and darkfield scattering imaging revealed targeting of MUC1-BSA-PD-NRs to MUC1+ MCF-7 breast cancer and SCC-15 squamous cell carcinoma cells lines. Treated cells were exposed to a laser encompassing the near-infrared AuNR longitudinal surface plasmon and assessed for photothermal ablation. MUC1-BSA-PD-NRs substantially decreased cell viability in photoirradiated MCF-7 cell lines vs. MUC1- MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells (p < 0.005). Agents exhibited no cytotoxicity in the absence of photothermal treatment. The facile nature of the coating method, combined with targeting and photoablation efficacy, are attractive features of these candidate cancer nanotherapeutics. PMID:26147830

  12. MUC1-Targeted Cancer Cell Photothermal Ablation Using Bioinspired Gold Nanorods.

    PubMed

    Zelasko-Leon, Daria C; Fuentes, Christina M; Messersmith, Phillip B

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have highlighted the overexpression of mucin 1 (MUC1) in various epithelial carcinomas and its role in tumorigenesis. These mucins present a novel targeting opportunity for nanoparticle-mediated photothermal cancer treatments due to their unique antenna-like extracellular extension. In this study, MUC1 antibodies and albumin were immobilized onto the surface of gold nanorods using a "primer" of polydopamine (PD), a molecular mimic of catechol- and amine-rich mussel adhesive proteins. PD forms an adhesive platform for the deposition of albumin and MUC1 antibodies, achieving a surface that is stable, bioinert and biofunctional. Two-photon luminescence confocal and darkfield scattering imaging revealed targeting of MUC1-BSA-PD-NRs to MUC1+ MCF-7 breast cancer and SCC-15 squamous cell carcinoma cells lines. Treated cells were exposed to a laser encompassing the near-infrared AuNR longitudinal surface plasmon and assessed for photothermal ablation. MUC1-BSA-PD-NRs substantially decreased cell viability in photoirradiated MCF-7 cell lines vs. MUC1- MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells (p < 0.005). Agents exhibited no cytotoxicity in the absence of photothermal treatment. The facile nature of the coating method, combined with targeting and photoablation efficacy, are attractive features of these candidate cancer nanotherapeutics. PMID:26147830

  13. Laser Ablation - Accelerator Mass Spectrometry: An Approach for Rapid Radiocarbon Analyses of Carbonate Archives at High Spatial Resolution.

    PubMed

    Welte, Caroline; Wacker, Lukas; Hattendorf, Bodo; Christl, Marcus; Fohlmeister, Jens; Breitenbach, Sebastian F M; Robinson, Laura F; Andrews, Allen H; Freiwald, André; Farmer, Jesse R; Yeman, Christiane; Synal, Hans-Arno; Günther, Detlef

    2016-09-01

    A new instrumental setup, combining laser ablation (LA) with accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), has been investigated for the online radiocarbon ((14)C) analysis of carbonate records. Samples were placed in an in-house designed LA-cell, and CO2 gas was produced by ablation using a 193 nm ArF excimer laser. The (14)C/(12)C abundance ratio of the gas was then analyzed by gas ion source AMS. This configuration allows flexible and time-resolved acquisition of (14)C profiles in contrast to conventional measurements, where only the bulk composition of discrete samples can be obtained. Three different measurement modes, i.e. discrete layer analysis, survey scans, and precision scans, were investigated and compared using a stalagmite sample and, subsequently, applied to terrestrial and marine carbonates. Depending on the measurement mode, a precision of typically 1-5% combined with a spatial resolution of 100 μm can be obtained. Prominent (14)C features, such as the atomic bomb (14)C peak, can be resolved by scanning several cm of a sample within 1 h. Stalagmite, deep-sea coral, and mollusk shell samples yielded comparable signal intensities, which again were comparable to those of conventional gas measurements. The novel LA-AMS setup allowed rapid scans on a variety of sample materials with high spatial resolution. PMID:27396439

  14. Laser Ablation - Accelerator Mass Spectrometry: An Approach for Rapid Radiocarbon Analyses of Carbonate Archives at High Spatial Resolution.

    PubMed

    Welte, Caroline; Wacker, Lukas; Hattendorf, Bodo; Christl, Marcus; Fohlmeister, Jens; Breitenbach, Sebastian F M; Robinson, Laura F; Andrews, Allen H; Freiwald, André; Farmer, Jesse R; Yeman, Christiane; Synal, Hans-Arno; Günther, Detlef

    2016-09-01

    A new instrumental setup, combining laser ablation (LA) with accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), has been investigated for the online radiocarbon ((14)C) analysis of carbonate records. Samples were placed in an in-house designed LA-cell, and CO2 gas was produced by ablation using a 193 nm ArF excimer laser. The (14)C/(12)C abundance ratio of the gas was then analyzed by gas ion source AMS. This configuration allows flexible and time-resolved acquisition of (14)C profiles in contrast to conventional measurements, where only the bulk composition of discrete samples can be obtained. Three different measurement modes, i.e. discrete layer analysis, survey scans, and precision scans, were investigated and compared using a stalagmite sample and, subsequently, applied to terrestrial and marine carbonates. Depending on the measurement mode, a precision of typically 1-5% combined with a spatial resolution of 100 μm can be obtained. Prominent (14)C features, such as the atomic bomb (14)C peak, can be resolved by scanning several cm of a sample within 1 h. Stalagmite, deep-sea coral, and mollusk shell samples yielded comparable signal intensities, which again were comparable to those of conventional gas measurements. The novel LA-AMS setup allowed rapid scans on a variety of sample materials with high spatial resolution.

  15. Laser wakefield acceleration of electron beams beyond 1 GeV from an ablative capillary discharge waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Haiyang; Liu, Mingwei; Wang, Wentao; Wang, Cheng; Liu, Jiansheng; Deng, Aihua; Xu, Jiancai; Xia, Changquan; Li, Wentao; Zhang, Hui; Lu, Xiaoming; Wang, Cheng; Wang, Jianzhou; Liang, Xiaoyan; Leng, Yuxin; Shen, Baifei; Nakajima, Kazuhisa; Li, Ruxin; Xu, Zhizhan

    2011-08-01

    Laser wakefield acceleration of electrons well beyond 1 GeV and optical guiding of ultraintense laser pulses of peak powers up to 160 TW over a 4-cm long ablative capillary discharge plasma channel were experimentally demonstrated. Electron beams, with energies up to 1.8 GeV, were generated by using the 130 TW, 55 fs driving laser pulses. A comparison of oxygen-containing acrylic resin (C:O:H = 4:2:7) capillary and no oxygen-containing polyethylene (C:O:H = 1:0:2) capillary measurements suggests that the injection of electron into the laser wakefield is assisted by the ionization of oxygen K-shell electrons.

  16. Laser wakefield acceleration of electron beams beyond 1 GeV from an ablative capillary discharge waveguide

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Haiyang; Liu Mingwei; Wang Wentao; Wang Cheng; Liu Jiansheng; Deng Aihua; Xu Jiancai; Xia Changquan; Li Wentao; Zhang Hui; Lu Xiaoming; Wang Cheng; Wang Jianzhou; Liang Xiaoyan; Leng Yuxin; Shen Baifei; Li Ruxin; Xu Zhizhan; Nakajima, Kazuhisa

    2011-08-29

    Laser wakefield acceleration of electrons well beyond 1 GeV and optical guiding of ultraintense laser pulses of peak powers up to 160 TW over a 4-cm long ablative capillary discharge plasma channel were experimentally demonstrated. Electron beams, with energies up to 1.8 GeV, were generated by using the 130 TW, 55 fs driving laser pulses. A comparison of oxygen-containing acrylic resin (C:O:H = 4:2:7) capillary and no oxygen-containing polyethylene (C:O:H = 1:0:2) capillary measurements suggests that the injection of electron into the laser wakefield is assisted by the ionization of oxygen K-shell electrons.

  17. Quadrupole mass spectrometry and time-of-flight analysis of ions resulting from 532 nm pulsed laser ablation of Ni, Al, and ZnO targets

    SciTech Connect

    Sage, Rebecca S.; Cappel, Ute B.; Ashfold, Michael N. R.; Walker, Nicholas R.

    2008-05-01

    This work describes the design and validation of an instrument to measure the kinetic energies of ions ejected by the pulsed laser ablation (PLA) of a solid target. Mass spectra show that the PLA of Ni, Al, and ZnO targets, in vacuum, using the second harmonic of a Nd:YAG laser (532 nm, pulse duration {approx}10 ns) generates abundant X{sup n+} ions (n{<=}3 for Ni, {<=}2 for Al, {<=}3 and {<=}2 for Zn and O respectively from ZnO). Ions are selected by their mass/charge (m/z) ratio prior to the determination of their times of flight. PLA of Ni has been studied in most detail. The mean velocities of ablated Ni{sup n+} ions are shown to follow the trend v(Ni{sup 3+})>v(Ni{sup 2+})>v(Ni{sup +}). Data from Ni{sup 2+} and Ni{sup 3+} are fitted to shifted Maxwellian functions and agree well with a model which assumes both thermal and Coulombic contributions to ion velocities. The dependence of ion velocities on laser pulse energy (and fluence) is investigated, and the high energy data are shown to be consistent with an effective accelerating voltage of {approx}90 V within the plume. The distribution of velocities associated with Ni{sup 3+} indicates a population at cooler temperature than Ni{sup 2+}.

  18. ns or fs pulsed laser ablation of a bulk InSb target in liquids for nanoparticles synthesis.

    PubMed

    Semaltianos, N G; Hendry, E; Chang, H; Wears, M L; Monteil, G; Assoul, M; Malkhasyan, V; Blondeau-Patissier, V; Gauthier-Manuel, B; Moutarlier, V

    2016-05-01

    Laser ablation of bulk target materials in liquids has been established as an alternative method for the synthesis of nanoparticles colloidal solutions mainly due to the fact that the synthesized nanoparticles have bare, ligand-free surfaces since no chemical precursors are used for their synthesis. InSb is a narrow band gap semiconductor which has the highest carrier mobility of any known semiconductor and nanoparticles of this material are useful in optoelectronic device fabrication. In this paper a bulk InSb target was ablated in deionized (DI) water or ethanol using a nanosecond (20 ns) or a femtosecond (90 fs) pulsed laser source, for nanoparticles synthesis. In all four cases the largest percentage of the nanoparticles are of InSb in the zincblende crystal structure with fcc lattice. Oxides of either In or Sb are also formed in the nanoparticles ensembles in the case of ns or fs ablation, respectively. Formation of an oxide of either element from the two elements of the binary bulk alloy is explained based on the difference in the ablation mechanism of the material in the case of ns or fs pulsed laser irradiation in which the slow or fast deposition of energy into the material results to mainly melting or vaporization, respectively under the present conditions of ablation, in combination with the lower melting point but higher vaporization enthalpy of In as compared to Sb. InSb in the metastable phase with orthorhombic lattice is also formed in the nanoparticles ensembles in the case of fs ablation in DI water (as well as oxide of InSb) which indicates that the synthesized nanoparticles exhibit polymorphism controlled by the type of the laser source used for their synthesis. The nanoparticles exhibit absorption which is observed to be extended in the infrared region of the spectrum.

  19. Synthesis of Bimetallic Nanoalloy Layer using Simultaneous Laser Ablation of Monometallic Targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganjali, Mansoureh; Ganjali, Monireh; Sangpour, Parvaneh

    2014-01-01

    It is proposed to synthesize silver-gold alloy nanoparticles by direct pulsed laser ablation of joined Ag and Au monometallic targets. To avoid utilizing a high-vacuum chamber, this pulsed laser-assisted technique is performed in an isolated beaker containing pure helium gas at atmospheric pressure. The structure and formation mechanism of the homogeneous Ag-Au nanoalloy particles on the Si substrate surface are discussed. Here, as in other works, the formation of the Ag-Au alloy nanoparticles was verified by the appearance of a surface plasmon absorption maximum at 442 nm between the surface plasmon resonance peaks of the corresponding monometallic particles, and by results of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Based on data of UV-visible spectroscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis, the atomic contents of Ag and Au are determined in the nanoalloy particles. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed the synthesized semispherical nanoalloy particles, 5-35 nm in diameter, with a narrow particle size distribution. The related morphology, structure, and chemical composition are also investigated using atomic force microscopy, lateral force microscopy, and X-ray diffraction. The suggested approach is affordable, fast, and inexpensive.

  20. Targeted ablation of the abcc6 gene results in ectopic mineralization of connective tissues.

    PubMed

    Klement, John F; Matsuzaki, Yasushi; Jiang, Qiu-Jie; Terlizzi, Joseph; Choi, Hae Young; Fujimoto, Norihiro; Li, Kehua; Pulkkinen, Leena; Birk, David E; Sundberg, John P; Uitto, Jouni

    2005-09-01

    Pseudoxanthoma elasticum (PXE), characterized by connective tissue mineralization of the skin, eyes, and cardiovascular system, is caused by mutations in the ABCC6 gene. ABCC6 encodes multidrug resistance-associated protein 6 (MRP6), which is expressed primarily in the liver and kidneys. Mechanisms producing ectopic mineralization as a result of these mutations remain unclear. To elucidate this complex disease, a transgenic mouse was generated by targeted ablation of the mouse Abcc6 gene. Abcc6 null mice were negative for Mrp6 expression in the liver, and complete necropsies revealed profound mineralization of several tissues, including skin, arterial blood vessels, and retina, while heterozygous animals were indistinguishable from the wild-type mice. Particularly striking was the mineralization of vibrissae, as confirmed by von Kossa and alizarin red stains. Electron microscopy revealed mineralization affecting both elastic structures and collagen fibers. Mineralization of vibrissae was noted as early as 5 weeks of age and was progressive with age in Abcc6(-/-) mice but was not observed in Abcc6(+/-) or Abcc6(+/+) mice up to 2 years of age. A total body computerized tomography scan of Abcc6(-/-) mice revealed mineralization in skin and subcutaneous tissue as well as in the kidneys. These data demonstrate aberrant mineralization of soft tissues in PXE-affected organs, and, consequently, these mice recapitulate features of this complex disease.

  1. Ultra-High-Contrast Laser Acceleration of Relativistic Electrons in Solid Targets

    SciTech Connect

    Higginson, Drew Pitney

    2013-01-01

    The cone-guided fast ignition approach to Inertial Con nement Fusion requires laser-accelerated relativistic electrons to deposit kilojoules of energy within an imploded fuel core to initiate fusion burn. One obstacle to coupling electron energy into the core is the ablation of material, known as preplasma, by laser energy proceeding nanoseconds prior to the main pulse. This causes the laser-absorption surface to be pushed back hundreds of microns from the initial target surface; thus increasing the distance that electrons must travel to reach the imploded core. Previous experiments have shown an order of magnitude decrease in coupling into surrogate targets when intentionally increasing the amount of preplasma. Additionally, for electrons to deposit energy within the core, they should have kinetic energies on the order of a few MeV, as less energetic electrons will be stopped prior to the core and more energetic electrons will pass through the core without depositing much energy. Thus a quantitative understanding of the electron energy spectrum and how it responds to varied laser parameters is paramount for fast ignition. For the rst time, this dissertation quantitatively investigates the acceleration of electrons using an ultra-high-contrast laser. Ultra-high-contrast lasers reduce the laser energy that reaches the target prior to the main pulse; drastically reducing the amount of preplasma. Experiments were performed in a cone-wire geometry relevant to fast ignition. These experiments irradiated the inner-tip of a Au cone with the laser and observed electrons that passed through a Cu wire attached to the outer-tip of the cone. The total emission of K x-rays is used as a diagnostic to infer the electron energy coupled into the wire. Imaging the x-ray emission allowed an e ective path-length of electrons within the wire to be determined, which constrained the electron energy spectrum. Experiments were carried out on the ultra-high-contrast Trident laser at Los

  2. A unified model to determine the energy partitioning between target and plasma in nanosecond laser ablation of silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Galasso, G.; Kaltenbacher, M.; Tomaselli, A.; Scarpa, D.

    2015-03-28

    In semiconductor industry, pulsed nanosecond lasers are widely applied for the separation of silicon wafers. Here, the high intensities employed activate a cascade of complex multi-physical and multi-phase mechanisms, which finally result in the formation of a laser induced plasma, shielding the target from the incoming laser beam. Such induced plasma plume, by preventing the laser to effectively reach the target, reduces the overall efficiency and controllability of the ablation process. Modelling can be a useful tool in the optimization of industrial laser applications, allowing a deeper understanding of the way the laser energy distributes between target and induced plasma. Nevertheless, the highly multi-physical character of laser ablation poses serious challenges on the implementation of the various mechanisms underlying the process within a common modelling framework. A novel strategy is here proposed in order to simulate in a simplified, yet physically consistent way, a typical industrial application as laser ablation of silicon wafers. Reasonable agreement with experimental findings is obtained. Three fundamental mechanisms have been identified as the main factors influencing the accuracy of the numerical predictions: the transition from evaporative to volumetric mass removal occurring at critical temperature, the collisional and radiative processes underlying the initial plasma formation stage and the increased impact of the liquid ejection mechanism when a sub-millimeter laser footprint is used.

  3. Bioavailable nanoparticles obtained in laser ablation of a selenium target in water

    SciTech Connect

    Kuzmin, P G; Shafeev, Georgii A; Voronov, Valerii V; Raspopov, R V; Arianova, E A; Trushina, E N; Gmoshinskii, I V; Khotimchenko, S A

    2012-11-30

    The process of producing colloidal solutions of selenium nanoparticles in water using the laser ablation method is described. The prospects of using nanoparticles of elementary selenium as a nutrition source of this microelement are discussed. (nanoparticles)

  4. Correlation between laser accelerated MeV proton and electron beams using simple fluid model for target normal sheath acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Tampo, M.; Awano, S.; Nakamura, H.; Nakatsutsumi, M.; Tanimoto, T.; Yabuuchi, T.; Bolton, P. R.; Kondo, K.; Mima, K.; Mori, Y.; Stephens, R. B.; Tanaka, K. A.; Kodama, R.

    2010-07-15

    High density energetic electrons that are created by intense laser plasma interactions drive MeV proton acceleration. The correlation between accelerated MeV protons and escaped electrons is experimentally investigated at laser intensities in the range of 10{sup 18}-10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2} with S-polarization. Observed proton maximum energies are linearly proportional to escaped electron slope temperatures with a scaling coefficient of about 10. In the context of the simple analytical fluid model for transverse normal sheath acceleration, hot electron sheath density near the target rear surface can be estimated if an empirical acceleration time is assumed.

  5. Role of laser contrast and foil thickness in target normal sheath acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gizzi, L. A.; Altana, C.; Brandi, F.; Cirrone, P.; Cristoforetti, G.; Fazzi, A.; Ferrara, P.; Fulgentini, L.; Giove, D.; Koester, P.; Labate, L.; Lanzalone, G.; Londrillo, P.; Mascali, D.; Muoio, A.; Palla, D.; Schillaci, F.; Sinigardi, S.; Tudisco, S.; Turchetti, G.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper we present an experimental investigation of laser driven light-ion acceleration using the ILIL laser at an intensity of 2×1019 W/cm2. In the experiment we focused our attention on the identification of the role of target thickness and resistivity in the fast electron transport and in the acceleration process. Here we describe the experimental results concerning the effect of laser contrast in the laser-target interaction regime. We also show preliminary results on ion acceleration which provide information about the role of bulk target ions and surface ions and target dielectric properties in the acceleration process.

  6. Accelerated search for materials with targeted properties by adaptive design

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Dezhen; Balachandran, Prasanna V.; Hogden, John; Theiler, James; Xue, Deqing; Lookman, Turab

    2016-01-01

    Finding new materials with targeted properties has traditionally been guided by intuition, and trial and error. With increasing chemical complexity, the combinatorial possibilities are too large for an Edisonian approach to be practical. Here we show how an adaptive design strategy, tightly coupled with experiments, can accelerate the discovery process by sequentially identifying the next experiments or calculations, to effectively navigate the complex search space. Our strategy uses inference and global optimization to balance the trade-off between exploitation and exploration of the search space. We demonstrate this by finding very low thermal hysteresis (ΔT) NiTi-based shape memory alloys, with Ti50.0Ni46.7Cu0.8Fe2.3Pd0.2 possessing the smallest ΔT (1.84 K). We synthesize and characterize 36 predicted compositions (9 feedback loops) from a potential space of ∼800,000 compositions. Of these, 14 had smaller ΔT than any of the 22 in the original data set. PMID:27079901

  7. Accelerated search for materials with targeted properties by adaptive design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Dezhen; Balachandran, Prasanna V.; Hogden, John; Theiler, James; Xue, Deqing; Lookman, Turab

    2016-04-01

    Finding new materials with targeted properties has traditionally been guided by intuition, and trial and error. With increasing chemical complexity, the combinatorial possibilities are too large for an Edisonian approach to be practical. Here we show how an adaptive design strategy, tightly coupled with experiments, can accelerate the discovery process by sequentially identifying the next experiments or calculations, to effectively navigate the complex search space. Our strategy uses inference and global optimization to balance the trade-off between exploitation and exploration of the search space. We demonstrate this by finding very low thermal hysteresis (ΔT) NiTi-based shape memory alloys, with Ti50.0Ni46.7Cu0.8Fe2.3Pd0.2 possessing the smallest ΔT (1.84 K). We synthesize and characterize 36 predicted compositions (9 feedback loops) from a potential space of ~800,000 compositions. Of these, 14 had smaller ΔT than any of the 22 in the original data set.

  8. Accelerated search for materials with targeted properties by adaptive design.

    PubMed

    Xue, Dezhen; Balachandran, Prasanna V; Hogden, John; Theiler, James; Xue, Deqing; Lookman, Turab

    2016-01-01

    Finding new materials with targeted properties has traditionally been guided by intuition, and trial and error. With increasing chemical complexity, the combinatorial possibilities are too large for an Edisonian approach to be practical. Here we show how an adaptive design strategy, tightly coupled with experiments, can accelerate the discovery process by sequentially identifying the next experiments or calculations, to effectively navigate the complex search space. Our strategy uses inference and global optimization to balance the trade-off between exploitation and exploration of the search space. We demonstrate this by finding very low thermal hysteresis (ΔT) NiTi-based shape memory alloys, with Ti50.0Ni46.7Cu0.8Fe2.3Pd0.2 possessing the smallest ΔT (1.84 K). We synthesize and characterize 36 predicted compositions (9 feedback loops) from a potential space of ∼800,000 compositions. Of these, 14 had smaller ΔT than any of the 22 in the original data set. PMID:27079901

  9. Accelerated search for materials with targeted properties by adaptive design.

    PubMed

    Xue, Dezhen; Balachandran, Prasanna V; Hogden, John; Theiler, James; Xue, Deqing; Lookman, Turab

    2016-04-15

    Finding new materials with targeted properties has traditionally been guided by intuition, and trial and error. With increasing chemical complexity, the combinatorial possibilities are too large for an Edisonian approach to be practical. Here we show how an adaptive design strategy, tightly coupled with experiments, can accelerate the discovery process by sequentially identifying the next experiments or calculations, to effectively navigate the complex search space. Our strategy uses inference and global optimization to balance the trade-off between exploitation and exploration of the search space. We demonstrate this by finding very low thermal hysteresis (ΔT) NiTi-based shape memory alloys, with Ti50.0Ni46.7Cu0.8Fe2.3Pd0.2 possessing the smallest ΔT (1.84 K). We synthesize and characterize 36 predicted compositions (9 feedback loops) from a potential space of ∼800,000 compositions. Of these, 14 had smaller ΔT than any of the 22 in the original data set.

  10. Interaction of a converging laser beam with a Ag colloidal solution during the ablation of a Ag target in water.

    PubMed

    Resano-Garcia, Amandine; Battie, Yann; Naciri, Aotmane En; Chaoui, Nouari

    2016-05-27

    We studied the nanosecond laser-induced shape modifications of Ag colloids exposed to a converging laser beam during the ablation of a Ag target in water. To this end, we performed a series of laser ablation experiments in which the laser energy was varied while all other parameters were kept constant. In addition to transmission electron microscopy (TEM), the shape distribution of the Ag nanoparticles was determined by modelling the extinction spectra of the final colloidal solutions using theoretical calculations based on shape distributed effective medium theory (SDEMT). From these calculations, two physical parameters named sphericity and dispersity were introduced and used to gauge the evolution of the shape distribution of the particles. As the laser energy on the target was increased from 5 to 20 mJ/pulse, an apparently abrupt modification of the shape distribution of the particles was evidenced by both TEM and SDEMT calculations. This change is explained in terms of competitive fragmentation, growth and reshaping processes. On the basis the heating-melting-vaporization model, we demonstrate how the competition between these processes, occurring at different locations of the converging beam, determines the shape distribution of the final product. We highlight the relevance of the fluence gradient along the beam path and the laser interaction volume on the laser-induced modifications of the suspended particles during the ablation process. PMID:27095289

  11. Interaction of a converging laser beam with a Ag colloidal solution during the ablation of a Ag target in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resano-Garcia, Amandine; Battie, Yann; Naciri, Aotmane En; Chaoui, Nouari

    2016-05-01

    We studied the nanosecond laser-induced shape modifications of Ag colloids exposed to a converging laser beam during the ablation of a Ag target in water. To this end, we performed a series of laser ablation experiments in which the laser energy was varied while all other parameters were kept constant. In addition to transmission electron microscopy (TEM), the shape distribution of the Ag nanoparticles was determined by modelling the extinction spectra of the final colloidal solutions using theoretical calculations based on shape distributed effective medium theory (SDEMT). From these calculations, two physical parameters named sphericity and dispersity were introduced and used to gauge the evolution of the shape distribution of the particles. As the laser energy on the target was increased from 5 to 20 mJ/pulse, an apparently abrupt modification of the shape distribution of the particles was evidenced by both TEM and SDEMT calculations. This change is explained in terms of competitive fragmentation, growth and reshaping processes. On the basis the heating–melting–vaporization model, we demonstrate how the competition between these processes, occurring at different locations of the converging beam, determines the shape distribution of the final product. We highlight the relevance of the fluence gradient along the beam path and the laser interaction volume on the laser-induced modifications of the suspended particles during the ablation process.

  12. Production of CeO2 Nanoparticles by Method of Laser Ablation of Bulk Metallic Cerium Targets in Liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svetlichnyi, V. A.; Lapin, I. N.

    2016-03-01

    The method of pulsed laser ablation in liquid was used to synthesize dispersions of cerium oxide nanoparticles when subjecting a metallic cerium target in water and alcohol to basic frequency radiation of the nanosecond Nd:YAG laser (1064 nm, 7 ns, 20 Hz). Researchers have studied the effect of laser radiation parameters, duration of impact, and optical scheme of experiment on the ablation process. The average rate of nanoparticle production was 50 mg/h in water and 25 mg/h in alcohol. Researchers have studied the size characteristics and crystalline structure of the nanoparticles produced. The particles have bimodal size distribution with 6 nm and 25 nm maximums. The average crystallite size is 17-19 nm. The crystalline structure of nanoparticles, namely cubic cerium oxide (fluorite structure), space group Fm-3m, is confirmed by the X-ray diffraction data, as well as optical absorption spectra and Raman spectroscopy.

  13. Planarization of Isolated Defects on ICF Target Capsule Surfaces by Pulsed Laser Ablation

    DOE PAGES

    Alfonso, Noel; Carlson, Lane C.; Bunn, Thomas L.

    2016-08-09

    Demanding surface quality requirements for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) capsules motivated the development of a pulsed laser ablation method to reduce or eliminate undesirable surface defects. The pulsed laser ablation technique takes advantage of a full surface (4π) capsule manipulation system working in combination with an optical profiling (confocal) microscope. Based on the defect topography, the material removal rate, the laser pulse energy and its beam profile, a customized laser raster pattern is derived to remove the defect. The pattern is a table of coordinates and number of pulses that dictate how the defect will be vaporized until its heightmore » is level with the capsule surface. This paper explains how the raster patterns are optimized to minimize surface roughness and how surface roughness after laser ablation is simulated. The simulated surfaces are compared with actual ablated surfaces. Large defects are reduced to a size regime where a tumble finishing process produces very high quality surfaces devoid of high mode defects. The combined polishing processes of laser ablation and tumble finishing have become routine fabrication steps for National Ignition Facility capsule production.« less

  14. Radiofrequency ablation of drug-resistant cancer cells using molecularly targeted carboxyl-functionalized biodegradable graphene.

    PubMed

    Sasidharan, Abhilash; Sivaram, Amal J; Retnakumari, Archana P; Chandran, Parwathy; Malarvizhi, Giridharan Loghanathan; Nair, Shantikumar; Koyakutty, Manzoor

    2015-04-01

    Under ultralow radiofrequency (RF) power, transferrin-conjugated graphene nanoparticles can thermally ablate drug- or radiation-resistant cancer cells very effectively. The results suggest that graphene-based RF hyperthermia can be an efficient method to manage drug-/radiation-resistant cancers. PMID:25586821

  15. Sleep-disordered breathing after targeted ablation of preBötzinger complex neurons.

    PubMed

    McKay, Leanne C; Janczewski, Wiktor A; Feldman, Jack L

    2005-09-01

    Ablation of preBötzinger complex (preBötC) neurons, critical for respiratory rhythm generation, resulted in a progressive, increasingly severe disruption of respiratory pattern, initially during sleep and then also during wakefulness in adult rats. Sleep-disordered breathing is highly prevalent in elderly humans and in some patients with neurodegenerative disease. We propose that sleep-disordered breathing results from loss of preBötC neurons and could underlie death during sleep in these populations.

  16. Targeted multifunctional gold-based nanoshells for magnetic resonance-guided laser ablation of head and neck cancer

    PubMed Central

    Melancon, Marites P.; Lu, Wei; Zhong, Meng; Zhou, Min; Liang, Gan; Elliott, Andrew M.; Hazle, John D.; Myers, Jeffrey N.; Li, Chun; Stafford, R. Jason

    2011-01-01

    Image-guided thermal ablation of tumors is becoming a more widely accepted minimally invasive alternative to surgery for patients who are not good surgical candidates, such as patients with advanced head and neck cancer. In this study, multifunctional superparamagnetic iron oxide coated with gold nanoshell (SPIO@Au NS) that have both optical and magnetic properties was conjugated with the targeting agent, C225 monoclonal antibody, against epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). C225-SPIO@Au NS have an average a diameter of 82±4.4 nm, contain 142±15 antibodies per nanoshell, have an absorption peak in the near infrared (~800 nm), and have transverse relaxivity (r2) of 193 and 353 mM−1s−1 versus Feridex of 171 and 300 mM−1s−1, using 1.5T and 7T MR scanners, respectively. Specific targeting of the synthesized C225-SPIO@Au NS was tested in vitro using A431 cells and oral cancer cells, FaDu, OSC-19, and HN5, all of which overexpress EGFR. Selective binding was achieved using C225-SPIO@Au NS but not with the non-targeting PEG-SPIO@Au NS and blocking group (excess of C225 + C225-SPIO@Au NS). In vivo biodistribution on mice bearing A431 tumors also showed selective targeting of C225-SPIO@Au NS compared with the non-targeting and blocking groups. The selective photothermal ablation of the nanoshells shows that without laser treatment there were no cell death and among the groups that were treated with laser at a power of 36 W/cm2 for 3 minutes, only the cells treated with C225-SPIO@Au NS had cell killing (p < 0.001). In summary, successful synthesis and characterization of targeted C225-SPIO@Au NS demonstrating both superparamagnetic and optical properties has been achieved. We have shown both in vitro and in vivo that these nanoshells are MR-active and can be selectively heated up for simultaneous imaging and photothermal ablation therapy. PMID:21745689

  17. Targeted multifunctional gold-based nanoshells for magnetic resonance-guided laser ablation of head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Melancon, Marites P; Lu, Wei; Zhong, Meng; Zhou, Min; Liang, Gan; Elliott, Andrew M; Hazle, John D; Myers, Jeffrey N; Li, Chun; Stafford, R Jason

    2011-10-01

    Image-guided thermal ablation of tumors is becoming a more widely accepted minimally invasive alternative to surgery for patients who are not good surgical candidates, such as patients with advanced head and neck cancer. In this study, multifunctional superparamagnetic iron oxide coated with gold nanoshell (SPIO@Au NS) that have both optical and magnetic properties was conjugated with the targeting agent, C225 monoclonal antibody, against epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). C225-SPIO@Au NS have an average a diameter of 82 ± 4.4 nm, contain 142 ± 15 antibodies per nanoshell, have an absorption peak in the near infrared (~800 nm), and have transverse relaxivity (r(2)) of 193 and 353 mM(-1) s(-1) versus Feridex™ of 171 and 300 mM(-1) s(-1), using 1.5 T and 7 T MR scanners, respectively. Specific targeting of the synthesized C225-SPIO@Au NS was tested in vitro using A431 cells and oral cancer cells, FaDu, OSC19, and HN5, all of which overexpress EGFR. Selective binding was achieved using C225-SPIO@Au NS but not with the non-targeting PEG-SPIO@Au NS and blocking group (excess of C225 + C225-SPIO@Au NS). In vivo biodistribution on mice bearing A431 tumors also showed selective targeting of C225-SPIO@Au NS compared with the non-targeting and blocking groups. The selective photothermal ablation of the nanoshells shows that without laser treatment there were no cell death and among the groups that were treated with laser at a power of 36 W/cm(2) for 3 min, only the cells treated with C225-SPIO@Au NS had cell killing (p < 0.001). In summary, successful synthesis and characterization of targeted C225-SPIO@Au NS demonstrating both superparamagnetic and optical properties has been achieved. We have shown both in vitro and in vivo that these nanoshells are MR-active and can be selectively heated up for simultaneous imaging and photothermal ablation therapy. PMID:21745689

  18. Generation of heavy ion beams using femtosecond laser pulses in the target normal sheath acceleration and radiation pressure acceleration regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, G. M.; McGuffey, C.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Krushelnick, K.; Beg, F. N.

    2016-06-01

    Theoretical study of heavy ion acceleration from sub-micron gold foils irradiated by a short pulse laser is presented. Using two dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, the time history of the laser pulse is examined in order to get insight into the laser energy deposition and ion acceleration process. For laser pulses with intensity 3 × 10 21 W / cm 2 , duration 32 fs, focal spot size 5 μm, and energy 27 J, the calculated reflection, transmission, and coupling coefficients from a 20 nm foil are 80%, 5%, and 15%, respectively. The conversion efficiency into gold ions is 8%. Two highly collimated counter-propagating ion beams have been identified. The forward accelerated gold ions have average and maximum charge-to-mass ratio of 0.25 and 0.3, respectively, maximum normalized energy 25 MeV/nucleon, and flux 2 × 10 11 ions / sr . An analytical model was used to determine a range of foil thicknesses suitable for acceleration of gold ions in the radiation pressure acceleration regime and the onset of the target normal sheath acceleration regime. The numerical simulations and analytical model point to at least four technical challenges hindering the heavy ion acceleration: low charge-to-mass ratio, limited number of ions amenable to acceleration, delayed acceleration, and high reflectivity of the plasma. Finally, a regime suitable for heavy ion acceleration has been identified in an alternative approach by analyzing the energy absorption and distribution among participating species and scaling of conversion efficiency, maximum energy, and flux with laser intensity.

  19. Near monochromatic 20 Me V proton acceleration using fs laser irradiating Au foils in target normal sheath acceleration regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torrisi, L.; Cutroneo, M.; Ceccio, G.; Cannavò, A.; Batani, D.; Boutoux, G.; Jakubowska, K.; Ducret, J. E.

    2016-04-01

    A 200 mJ laser pulse energy, 39 fs-pulse duration, 10 μm focal spot, p-polarized radiation has been employed to irradiate thin Au foils to produce proton acceleration in the forward direction. Gold foils were employed to produce high density relativistic electrons emission in the forward direction to generate a high electric field driving the ion acceleration. Measurements were performed by changing the focal position in respect of the target surface. Proton acceleration was monitored using fast SiC detectors in time-of-flight configuration. A high proton energy, up to about 20 Me V, with a narrow energy distribution, was obtained in particular conditions depending on the laser parameters, the irradiation conditions, and a target optimization.

  20. Combined proton acceleration from foil targets by ultraintense short laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Yuan; Yu, Tongpu; Ge, Xulei; Yang, Su; Wei, Wenqing; Yuan, Tao; Liu, Feng; Chen, Min; Liu, Jingquan; Li, Yutong; Yuan, Xiaohui; Sheng, Zhengming; Zhang, Jie

    2016-04-01

    Proton emission from solid foil targets irradiated by relativistically intense femtosecond laser pulses is studied experimentally. Broad plateaus in energy spectra are measured from micron-thick targets when the incident laser pulses have relatively low intensity contrasts. It is proposed that such proton spectra can be attributed to the combined processes of laser-driven collisionless shock acceleration and target normal sheath acceleration. Simple analytic estimation and two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations are performed, which support our interpretation. The obtained plateau-shape spectrum may also serve as an effective tool to diagnose the plasma state and verify the ion acceleration mechanisms in laser-solid interactions.

  1. Streaked X-Ray Imager for Observation of Oscillations of Perturbed Ablation Fronts in Planar ICF Targets During Shock Transit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gotchev, O. V.; Goncharov, V. N.; Jaanimagi, P. A.; Knauer, J. P.; Meyerhofer, D. D.

    2001-10-01

    The dynamic overpressure effect sets the growth rate of the ablative Richtmyer-Meshkov instability and the late imprint levels in directly driven targets. It leads to temporal oscillations of the perturbed ablation front that have been predicted analytically and observed in 2-D ORCHID simulations. These predictions will be verified on OMEGA by measuring the perturbation amplitudes and frequencies directly with a high-resolution, IR-coated Kirkpatrick-Baez (KB) microscope, coupled to a high-current streak tube. The construction and characterization of this new diagnostic tool are described. The optic has up to three-orders-of-magnitude-higher throughput than conventional pinhole arrays, mainly due to the single-layer IR coating and an optimized grazing angle of 2.1^o. Resolution is 3-μm over a 120-μm field of view, as determined by ray tracing. Signal-level calculations for competing theoretical models treating these phenomena were performed to optimize target design, laser pulse shape, and backlighter. Preliminary experimental results may be shown. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inertial Confinement Fusion under Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC03-92SF19460.

  2. Spallation Target Design for Accelerator-Driven Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gohar, Yousry

    2010-06-01

    A design methodology for the lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) spallation target has been developed and applied. This methodology includes the target interface with the subcritical assembly and the different engineering aspects of the target design, physics, heat-transfer, hydraulics, structural, radiological, and safety analyses. Several design constrains were defined and utilized for the target design process to satisfy different engineering requirements and to minimize the time and the cost of the design development. Target interface requirements with the subcritical assembly were defined based on performance parameters and material damage issues to enhance the lifetime of the target structure. Different structural materials were considered to define the most promising candidate based on the current database including radiation effects.

  3. Enhanced target normal sheath acceleration of protons from intense laser interaction with a cone-tube target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, K. D.; Huang, T. W.; Zhou, C. T.; Qiao, B.; Wu, S. Z.; Ruan, S. C.; He, X. T.

    2016-01-01

    Laser driven proton acceleration is proposed to be greatly enhanced by using a cone-tube target, which can be easily manufactured by current 3D-print technology. It is observed that energetic electron bunches are generated along the tube and accelerated to a much higher temperature by the combination of ponderomotive force and longitudinal electric field which is induced by the optical confinement of the laser field. As a result, a localized and enhanced sheath field is produced at the rear of the target and the maximum proton energy is about three-fold increased based on the two-dimentional particle-in-cell simulation results. It is demonstrated that by employing this advanced target scheme, the scaling of the proton energy versus the laser intensity is much beyond the normal target normal sheath acceleration (TNSA) case.

  4. Multicolor Time-lapse Imaging of Transgenic Zebrafish: Visualizing Retinal Stem Cells Activated by Targeted Neuronal Cell Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Mumm, Jeff S.

    2010-01-01

    High-resolution time-lapse imaging of living zebrafish larvae can be utilized to visualize how biological processes unfold (for review see 1). Compound transgenic fish which express different fluorescent reporters in neighboring cell types provide a means of following cellular interactions 2 and/or tissue-level responses to experimental manipulations over time. In this video, we demonstrate methods that can be used for imaging multiple transgenically labeled cell types serially in individual fish over time courses that can span from minutes to several days. The techniques described are applicable to any study seeking to correlate the "behavior" of neighboring cells types over time, including: 1) serial 'catch and release' methods for imaging a large number of fish over successive days, 2) simplified approaches for separating fluorophores with overlapping excitation/emission profiles (e.g., GFP and YFP), 3) use of hypopigmented mutant lines to extend the time window available for high-resolution imaging into late larval stages of development, 4) use of membrane targeted fluorescent reporters to reveal fine morphological detail of individual cells as well as cellular details in larger populations of cells, and 5) a previously described method for chemically-induced ablation of transgenically targeted cell types; i.e., nitroreductase (NTR) mediated conversion of prodrug substrates, such as metronidazole (MTZ), to cytotoxic derivatives 3,5. As an example of these approaches, we will visualize the ablation and regeneration of a subtype of retinal bipolar neuron within individual fish over several days. Simultaneously we will monitor several other retinal cell types, including neighboring non-targeted bipolar cells and potential degeneration-stimulated retinal stem cells (i.e., Mϋller glia). This strategy is being applied in our lab to characterize cell- and tissue-level (e.g., stem cell niche) responses to the selective loss and regeneration of targeted neuronal cell

  5. SATIF-2 shielding aspects of accelerators, targets and irradiation facilities

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    Particle accelerators have evolved over the last 50 years from simple devices to powerful machines, and will continue to have an important impact on research, technology and lifestyle. Today they cover a wide range of applications, from television and computer displays in households to the investigation of the origin and structure of matter. It has become common practice to use them for material science and medical applications. In recent years, requirements from new technological and research applications have emerged, such as increased particle beams intensities, higher flexibility, etc., giving rise to new radiation shielding aspects and problems. These proceedings review recent progress in radiation shielding of accelerator facilities, and evaluate advancements with respect to international co-operation in this field.

  6. Laser proton acceleration in a water spray target

    SciTech Connect

    Ter-Avetisyan, S.; Schnuerer, M.; Nickles, P. V.; Sandner, W.; Smirnov, M. B.; Andreev, A.; Platonov, K.; Psikal, J.; Tikhonchuk, V.

    2008-08-15

    Studies of interaction of a cloud of submicrometer water droplets with ultrashort (40 fs) and intense ({approx}2x10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}) laser pulses demonstrate an efficient acceleration of protons and oxygen ions. Due to a high ratio of the volume to the enveloping surface of a single droplet and a large number of droplets in a focal volume, efficient laser pulse absorption is enabled, which provides high electron temperatures and ion acceleration to high energies. The generation of ions with energies more than 1 MeV per nucleon is demonstrated. The observed quasi-monoenergetic feature in the proton spectrum is discussed with the thermal expansion-Coulomb explosion model and numerical simulations.

  7. Closed loop spray cooling apparatus. [for particle accelerator targets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alger, D. L.; Schwab, W. B.; Furman, E. R. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A closed loop apparatus for spraying coolant against the back of a radiation target is described. The coolant was circulated through a closed loop with a bubble of inert gas being maintained around the spray. Mesh material was disposed between the bubble and the surface of the liquid coolant which was below the bubble at a predetermined level. In a second embodiment, no inert gas was used, the bubble consisting of a vapor produced when the coolant was sprayed against the target.

  8. Ultra-High-Contrast Laser Acceleration of Relativistic Electrons in Solid Targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higginson, Drew Pitney

    The cone-guided fast ignition approach to Inertial Confinement Fusion requires laser-accelerated relativistic electrons to deposit kilojoules of energy within an imploded fuel core to initiate fusion burn. One obstacle to coupling electron energy into the core is the ablation of material, known as preplasma, by laser energy proceeding nanoseconds prior to the main pulse. This causes the laser-absorption surface to be pushed back hundreds of microns from the initial target surface; thus increasing the distance that electrons must travel to reach the imploded core. Previous experiments have shown an order of magnitude decrease in coupling into surrogate targets when intentionally increasing the amount of preplasma. Additionally, for electrons to deposit energy within the core, they should have kinetic energies on the order of a few MeV, as less energetic electrons will be stopped prior to the core and more energetic electrons will pass through the core without depositing much energy. Thus a quantitative understanding of the electron energy spectrum and how it responds to varied laser parameters is paramount for fast ignition. For the first time, this dissertation quantitatively investigates the acceleration of electrons using an ultra-high-contrast laser. Ultra-high-contrast lasers reduce the laser energy that reaches the target prior to the main pulse; drastically reducing the amount of preplasma. Experiments were performed in a cone-wire geometry relevant to fast ignition. These experiments irradiated the inner-tip of a Au cone with the laser and observed electrons that passed through a Cu wire attached to the outer-tip of the cone. The total emission of Kalpha x-rays is used as a diagnostic to infer the electron energy coupled into the wire. Imaging the x-ray emission allowed an effective path-length of electrons within the wire to be determined, which constrained the electron energy spectrum. Experiments were carried out on the ultra-high-contrast Trident laser

  9. Proton acceleration in the interaction of high power laser and cryogenic hydrogen targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Rohini; Fiuza, Frederico; Glenzer, Siegfried

    2014-10-01

    High intensity laser driven ion acceleration has attracted great interest due to many prospective applications ranging from inertial confinement fusion, cancer therapy, particle accelerators. Particle-in-Cell (PIC) simulations are performed to model and design experiments at MEC for high power laser interaction with cryogenic hydrogen targets of tunable density and thickness. Preliminary 1D and 2D simulations, using fully relativistic particle-in-cell code PICLS, show a unique regime of proton acceleration, e.g. ~ 300 MeV peak energy protons are observed in the 1D run for interaction of ~1020 W/cm2, 110 fs intense laser with 6nc dense (nc = 1021 cm-3) and 2 micron thin target. The target is relativistically under-dense for the laser and we observe that a strong (multi-terawatt) shock electric field is produced and protons are reflected to high velocities by this field. Further, the shock field and the laser field keep propagating through the hydrogen target and meets up with target normal sheath acceleration (TNSA) electric field produced at the target rear edge and vacuum interface and this superposition amplifies the TNSA fields resulting in higher proton energy. In addition, the electrons present at the rear edge of the target continue to gain energy via strong interaction with laser that crosses the target and these accelerated electrons maintains higher electric sheath fields which further provides acceleration to protons. We will also present detailed investigation with 2D PICLS simulations to gain a better insight of such physical processes to characterize multidimensional effects and establish analytical scaling between laser and target conditions for the optimization of proton acceleration.

  10. Proton acceleration with high intensity lasers interacting on micro-cone targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Humieres, Emmanuel; Cowan, Tom; Gaillard, Sandrine; Le Galloudec, Nathalie; Rassuchine, Jennifer; Sentoku, Yasuhiko

    2006-10-01

    In the last few years, intense research has been conducted on laser-accelerated ion sources and their applications [1,2]. Proton beams accelerated from solid planar targets have exceptional properties that open new opportunities for ion beam generation and control. Experiments conducted at LANL and LULI have shown that high intensity lasers interacting on micro-cone targets can produce proton beams more collimated and more energetic than with planar targets. These micro-cone targets are composed of a curved cone attached to a micro-table. 2D PIC simulations were performed to understand the experiments and separate the effect of the cone from the effect of the micro-table. These new targets could help increase the laser-accelerated protons maximum energy to the 100 MeV range. [1] J. Fuchs et al., Nature Physics 2, 48 (2006). [2] T.Toncian et al., Science Vol. 312, 21 April 2006, p.410-413.

  11. Generation of quasi-monoenergetic carbon ions accelerated parallel to the plane of a sandwich target

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J. W.; Murakami, M.; Weng, S. M.; Xu, H.; Ju, J. J.; Luan, S. X.; Yu, W.

    2014-12-15

    A new ion acceleration scheme, namely, target parallel Coulomb acceleration, is proposed in which a carbon plate sandwiched between gold layers is irradiated with intense linearly polarized laser pulses. The high electrostatic field generated by the gold ions efficiently accelerates the embedded carbon ions parallel to the plane of the target. The ion beam is found to be collimated by the concave-shaped Coulomb potential. As a result, a quasi-monoenergetic and collimated C{sup 6+}-ion beam with an energy exceeding 10 MeV/nucleon is produced at a laser intensity of 5 × 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}.

  12. Acceleration and guiding of fast electrons by a nanobrush target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zongqing; Cao, Lihua; Cao, Leifeng; Wang, Jian; Huang, Wenzhong; Jiang, Wei; He, Yingling; Wu, Yuchi; Zhu, Bin; Dong, Kegong; Ding, Yongkun; Zhang, Baohan; Gu, Yuqiu; Yu, M. Y.; He, X. T.

    2010-12-01

    Laser interaction with a nanobrush target plasma is investigated at the SILEX-I laser facility [X. F. Wei et al., J. Phys. Conf. Ser. 112, 032010 (2008)] with a laser of intensity 7.9×1018 W/cm2. Highly collimated fast electron beams with yields of more than three times higher than that from the planar target can be produced. Two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation confirms that a layered surface structure can increase the efficiency of laser energy absorption, and the resulting fast electrons are tightly collimated and guided by the plasma layers to a cross section of about the laser spot size.

  13. Enhancement of proton acceleration field in laser double-layer target interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Y. J.; Kong, Q.; Kawata, S.; Izumiyama, T.; Li, X. F.; Yu, Q.; Wang, P. X.; Ma, Y. Y.

    2013-07-01

    A mechanism is proposed to enhance a proton acceleration field in laser plasma interaction. A double-layer plasma with different densities is illuminated by an intense short pulse. Electrons are accelerated to a high energy in the first layer by the wakefield. The electrons accelerated by the laser wakefield induce the enhanced target normal sheath (TNSA) and breakout afterburner (BOA) accelerations through the second layer. The maximum proton energy reaches about 1 GeV, and the total charge with an energy higher than 100 MeV is about several tens of μC/μm. Both the acceleration gradient and laser energy transfer efficiency are higher than those in single-target-based TNSA or BOA. The model has been verified by 2.5D-PIC simulations.

  14. Enhancement of proton acceleration field in laser double-layer target interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, Y. J.; Kong, Q.; Li, X. F.; Yu, Q.; Wang, P. X.; Kawata, S.; Izumiyama, T.; Ma, Y. Y.

    2013-07-15

    A mechanism is proposed to enhance a proton acceleration field in laser plasma interaction. A double-layer plasma with different densities is illuminated by an intense short pulse. Electrons are accelerated to a high energy in the first layer by the wakefield. The electrons accelerated by the laser wakefield induce the enhanced target normal sheath (TNSA) and breakout afterburner (BOA) accelerations through the second layer. The maximum proton energy reaches about 1 GeV, and the total charge with an energy higher than 100 MeV is about several tens of μC/μm. Both the acceleration gradient and laser energy transfer efficiency are higher than those in single-target-based TNSA or BOA. The model has been verified by 2.5D-PIC simulations.

  15. HIGH POWER BEAM DUMP AND TARGET / ACCELERATOR INTERFACE PROCEDURES

    SciTech Connect

    Blokland, Willem; Plum, Michael A; Peters, Charles C; Brown, David L; Galambos, John D

    2013-01-01

    Satisfying operational procedures and limits for the beam target interface is a critical concern for high power operation at spallation neutron sources. At the Oak Ridge Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) a number of protective measures are instituted to ensure that the beam position, beam size and peak intensity are within acceptable limits at the target and high power Ring Injection Dump (RID). The high power beam dump typically handles up to 50 100 kW of beam power and its setup is complicated by the fact that there are two separate beam components simultaneously directed to the dump. The beam on target is typically in the 800-1000 kW average power level, delivered in sub- s 60 Hz pulses. Setup techniques using beam measurements to quantify the beam parameters at the target and dump will be described. However, not all the instrumentation used for the setup and initial qualification is available during high power operation. Additional techniques are used to monitor the beam during high power operation to ensure the setup conditions are maintained, and these are also described.

  16. MR Imaging to Assess Immediate Response to Irreversible Electroporation for Targeted Ablation of Liver Tissues: Preclinical Feasibility Studies in a Rodent Model1

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yue; Guo, Yang; Ragin, Ann B.; Lewandowski, Robert J.; Yang, Guang-Yu; Nijm, Grace M.; Sahakian, Alan V.; Omary, Reed A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To test the hypothesis that magnetic resonance (MR) imaging measurements can be used to immediately detect treated tissue regions after irreversible electroporation (IRE) ablation procedures in rodent liver tissues. Materials and Methods: All experiments received institutional animal care and use committee approval. In four rats for preliminary studies and 18 rats for formal assessment, MR imaging–compatible electrodes were inserted into the liver and MR imaging–monitored IRE procedures were performed at one of three electrode voltages (1000, 1500, or 2500 V), with T1- and T2-weighted images acquired before and immediately after application of the IRE pulses. MR imaging measurements were compared with both finite element modeling (FEM)-anticipated ablation zones and histologically confirmed ablation zones at necropsy. Intraclass and Spearman correlation coefficients were calculated for statistical comparisons. Results: MR imaging measurements permitted immediate depiction of IRE ablation zones that were hypointense on T1-weighted images and hyperintense on T2-weighted images. MR imaging–based measurements demonstrated excellent consistency with FEM-anticipated ablation zones (r > 0.90 and P < .001 for both T1- and T2-weighted images). MR imaging measurements were also highly correlated with histologically confirmed ablation zone measurements (ρ > 0.90 and P < .001 for both T1- and T2-weighted images). Conclusion: MR imaging permits immediate depiction of ablated tissue zones for monitoring of IRE ablation procedures. These measurements could potentially be used during treatment to elicit repeat application of IRE pulses or adjustments to electrode positions to ensure complete treatment of targeted lesions. © RSNA, 2010 PMID:20656834

  17. Laser ion acceleration by a near-critical density target

    SciTech Connect

    Yogo, A.; Daido, H.; Bulanov, S. V.; Esirkepov, T. Zh.; Ogura, K.; Orimo, S.; Sagisaka, A.; Ma, J.-L.; Mori, M.; Nishiuchi, M.; Pirozhkov, A. S.; Nemoto, K.; Oishi, Y.; Nayuki, T.; Fujii, T.; Nakamura, S.; Noda, A.; Nagatomo, H.

    2008-06-24

    Protons having energies up to 3.8 MeV are experimentally generated by the p-polarized, 45 fs, {approx}10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2} laser pulse interacting with a near-critical plasma cloud produced by the irradiation of the amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) pedestal at an intensity of {approx}10{sup 13} W/cm{sup 2} onto a 7.5-{mu}m-thick polyimide foil target. The emission angle of the high-energy protons is shifted away from the target normal toward the laser-propagation direction of 45 deg. The mechanism which explains the proton generation from the near-critical plasma cloud is discussed using the two-dimensional (2D) particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation.

  18. Targeted ablation and reorganization of the principal preplate neurons and their neuroblasts identified by golli promoter transgene expression in the neocortex of mice

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Yuan-Yun; Jacobs, Erin; Fisher, Robin

    2009-01-01

    The present study delineates the cellular responses of dorsal pallium to targeted genetic ablation of the principal preplate neurons of the neocortex. Ganciclovir treatment during prenatal development (E11–E13; where E is embryonic day) of mice selectively killed cells with shared S-phase vulnerability and targeted expression of a GPT [golli promoter transgene, linked to HSV-TK (herpes simplex virus-thymidine kinase), τ-eGFP (τ-enhanced green fluorescent protein) and lacZ (lacZ galactosidase) reporters] localized in preplate neurons. Morphogenetic fates of attacked neurons and neuroblasts, and their successors, were assessed by multiple labelling in time-series comparisons between ablated (HSV-TK+/0) and control (HSV-TK0/0) littermates. During ablation generation, neocortical growth was suppressed, and compensatory reorganization of non-GPT ventricular zone progenitors of dorsal pallium produced replacements for killed GPT neuroblasts. Replacement and surviving GPT neuroblasts then produced replacements for killed GPT neurons. Near-normal restoration of their complement delayed the settlement of GPT neurons into the reconstituted preplate, which curtailed the outgrowth of pioneer corticofugal axons. Based on this evidence, we conclude that specific cell killing in ablated mice can eliminate a major fraction of GPT neurons, with insignificant bystander killing. Also, replacement GPT neurons in ablated mice originate exclusively by proliferation from intermediate progenitor GPT neuroblasts, whose complement is maintained by non-GPT progenitors for inductive regulation of the total complement of GPT neurons. Finally, GPT neurons in both normal and ablated mice meet all morphogenetic criteria, including the ‘outside-in’ vertical gradient of settlement, presently used to identify principal preplate neurons. In ablated mice, delayed organization of these neurons desynchronizes and isolates developing neocortex from the rest of the brain, and permanently impairs

  19. Graphics processing unit-accelerated non-rigid registration of MR images to CT images during CT-guided percutaneous liver tumor ablations

    PubMed Central

    Tokuda, Junichi; Plishker, William; Torabi, Meysam; Olubiyi, Olutayo I; Zaki, George; Tatli, Servet; Silverman, Stuart G.; Shekhar, Raj; Hata, Nobuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Rationale and Objectives Accuracy and speed are essential for the intraprocedural nonrigid MR-to-CT image registration in the assessment of tumor margins during CT-guided liver tumor ablations. While both accuracy and speed can be improved by limiting the registration to a region of interest (ROI), manual contouring of the ROI prolongs the registration process substantially. To achieve accurate and fast registration without the use of an ROI, we combined a nonrigid registration technique based on volume subdivision with hardware acceleration using a graphical processing unit (GPU). We compared the registration accuracy and processing time of GPU-accelerated volume subdivision-based nonrigid registration technique to the conventional nonrigid B-spline registration technique. Materials and Methods Fourteen image data sets of preprocedural MR and intraprocedural CT images for percutaneous CT-guided liver tumor ablations were obtained. Each set of images was registered using the GPU-accelerated volume subdivision technique and the B-spline technique. Manual contouring of ROI was used only for the B-spline technique. Registration accuracies (Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC) and 95% Hausdorff Distance (HD)), and total processing time including contouring of ROIs and computation were compared using a paired Student’s t-test. Results Accuracy of the GPU-accelerated registrations and B-spline registrations, respectively were 88.3 ± 3.7% vs 89.3 ± 4.9% (p = 0.41) for DSC and 13.1 ± 5.2 mm vs 11.4 ± 6.3 mm (p = 0.15) for HD. Total processing time of the GPU-accelerated registration and B-spline registration techniques was 88 ± 14 s vs 557 ± 116 s (p < 0.000000002), respectively; there was no significant difference in computation time despite the difference in the complexity of the algorithms (p = 0.71). Conclusion The GPU-accelerated volume subdivision technique was as accurate as the B-spline technique and required significantly less processing time. The GPU-accelerated

  20. Resistively enhanced proton acceleration via high-intensity laser interactions with cold foil targets

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbon, Paul

    2005-08-01

    The acceleration of MeV protons by high-intensity laser interaction with foil targets is studied using a recently developed plasma simulation technique. Based on a hierarchical N-body tree algorithm, this method provides a natural means of treating three-dimensional, collisional transport effects hitherto neglected in conventional explicit particle-in-cell simulations. For targets with finite resistivity, hot electron transport is strongly inhibited, even at temperatures in the MeV range. This leads to suppression of ion acceleration from the rear of the target and an enhancement in energies and numbers of protons originating from the front.

  1. Sequence heterogeneity accelerates protein search for targets on DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shvets, Alexey A.; Kolomeisky, Anatoly B.

    2015-12-01

    The process of protein search for specific binding sites on DNA is fundamentally important since it marks the beginning of all major biological processes. We present a theoretical investigation that probes the role of DNA sequence symmetry, heterogeneity, and chemical composition in the protein search dynamics. Using a discrete-state stochastic approach with a first-passage events analysis, which takes into account the most relevant physical-chemical processes, a full analytical description of the search dynamics is obtained. It is found that, contrary to existing views, the protein search is generally faster on DNA with more heterogeneous sequences. In addition, the search dynamics might be affected by the chemical composition near the target site. The physical origins of these phenomena are discussed. Our results suggest that biological processes might be effectively regulated by modifying chemical composition, symmetry, and heterogeneity of a genome.

  2. Sequence heterogeneity accelerates protein search for targets on DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Shvets, Alexey A.; Kolomeisky, Anatoly B.

    2015-12-28

    The process of protein search for specific binding sites on DNA is fundamentally important since it marks the beginning of all major biological processes. We present a theoretical investigation that probes the role of DNA sequence symmetry, heterogeneity, and chemical composition in the protein search dynamics. Using a discrete-state stochastic approach with a first-passage events analysis, which takes into account the most relevant physical-chemical processes, a full analytical description of the search dynamics is obtained. It is found that, contrary to existing views, the protein search is generally faster on DNA with more heterogeneous sequences. In addition, the search dynamics might be affected by the chemical composition near the target site. The physical origins of these phenomena are discussed. Our results suggest that biological processes might be effectively regulated by modifying chemical composition, symmetry, and heterogeneity of a genome.

  3. Highly collimated monoenergetic target-surface electron acceleration in near-critical-density plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, J. Y.; Chen, L. M.; Huang, K.; Ma, Y.; Zhao, J. R.; Yan, W. C.; Ma, J. L.; Wei, Z. Y.; Li, D. Z.; Aeschlimann, M.; Zhang, J.

    2015-03-30

    Optimized-quality monoenergetic target surface electron beams at MeV level with low normalized emittance (0.03π mm mrad) and high charge (30 pC) per shot have been obtained from 3 TW laser-solid interactions at a grazing incidence. The 2-Dimension particle-in-cell simulations suggest that electrons are wake-field accelerated in a large-scale, near-critical-density preplasma. It reveals that a bubble-like structure as an accelerating cavity appears in the near-critical-density plasma region and travels along the target surface. A bunch of electrons are pinched transversely and accelerated longitudinally by the wake field in the bubble. The outstanding normalized emittance and monochromaticity of such highly collimated surface electron beams could make it an ideal beam for fast ignition or may serve as an injector in traditional accelerators.

  4. Highly collimated monoenergetic target-surface electron acceleration in near-critical-density plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, J. Y.; Chen, L. M.; Huang, K.; Ma, Y.; Zhao, J. R.; Li, D. Z.; Yan, W. C.; Ma, J. L.; Aeschlimann, M.; Wei, Z. Y.; Zhang, J.

    2015-03-01

    Optimized-quality monoenergetic target surface electron beams at MeV level with low normalized emittance (0.03π mm mrad) and high charge (30 pC) per shot have been obtained from 3 TW laser-solid interactions at a grazing incidence. The 2-Dimension particle-in-cell simulations suggest that electrons are wake-field accelerated in a large-scale, near-critical-density preplasma. It reveals that a bubble-like structure as an accelerating cavity appears in the near-critical-density plasma region and travels along the target surface. A bunch of electrons are pinched transversely and accelerated longitudinally by the wake field in the bubble. The outstanding normalized emittance and monochromaticity of such highly collimated surface electron beams could make it an ideal beam for fast ignition or may serve as an injector in traditional accelerators.

  5. L-DOPS-Accelerated recovery of locomotor function in rats subjected to sensorimotor cortex ablation injury: pharmacobehavioral studies.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, K; Nishino, K; Ohyu, H

    1999-07-01

    Central norepinephrine (NE) has been shown to play a beneficial role in amphetamine-facilitated recovery of behavior. To give insight into understanding the mechanism, the present studies were conducted to examine (a) the effects of L-threo-3,4-dihydroxyphenylserine (L-DOPS) combined with benserazide (BSZ; a peripheral aromatic amino acid decarboxylase inhibitor) and L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA), precursors of NE and dopamine (DA), respectively, on the recovery from beam-walking performance deficits in rats subjected to unilateral sensorimotor cortex ablation injury, and (b) the relationships between the behavioral recovery and the frequency of postoperative training and the size of ablation injury. It was found that the combined treatments with L-DOPS and BSZ promoted the recovery of locomotor function as early as 24 hours after injury. L-DOPA alone, however, did not facilitate behavioral recovery. The results of assay for the tissue levels of NE and its major metabolite (3-methoxy-4-hydoxyphenylethylene glycol; MHPG) in the brain using high-pressure liquid chromotography showed MHPG, but not NE, significantly increased in the cerebellum and the hippocampus. The behavioral recovery was also significantly correlated with the frequency of training subsequent to injury, but inversely with the size of cortex ablation. These results suggest that NE is likely to modulate functional recovery in this rodent model. PMID:10587012

  6. Sequence Heterogeneity Accelerates Protein Search for Targets on DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shvets, Alexey; Kolomeisky, Anatoly

    The process of protein search for specific binding sites on DNA is fundamentally important since it marks the beginning of all major biological processes. We present a theoretical investigation that probes the role of DNA sequence symmetry, heterogeneity and chemical composition in the protein search dynamics. Using a discrete-state stochastic approach with a first-passage events analysis, which takes into account the most relevant physical-chemical processes, a full analytical description of the search dynamics is obtained. It is found that, contrary to existing views, the protein search is generally faster on DNA with more heterogeneous sequences. In addition, the search dynamics might be affected by the chemical composition near the target site. The physical origins of these phenomena are discussed. Our results suggest that biological processes might be effectively regulated by modifying chemical composition, symmetry and heterogeneity of a genome. The work was supported by the Welch Foundation (Grant C-1559), by the NSF (Grant CHE-1360979), and by the Center for Theoretical Biological Physics sponsored by the NSF (Grant PHY-1427654).

  7. Stability analysis of unsteady ablation fronts

    SciTech Connect

    Betti, R.; McCrory, R.L.; Verdon, C.P. )

    1993-11-08

    The linear stability analysis of unsteady ablation fronts is carried out for a semi-infinite uniform medium. For a laser accelerated target, it is shown that a properly selected modulation of the laser intensity can lead to the dynamic stabilization or growth-rate reduction of a large portion of the unstable spectrum. The theory is in qualitative agreement with the numerical results obtained by using the two-dimensional hydrodynamic code ORCHID.

  8. Stability analysis of unsteady ablation fronts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betti, R.; McCrory, R. L.; Verdon, C. P.

    1993-08-01

    The linear stability analysis of unsteady ablation fronts is carried out for a semi-infinite uniform medium. For a laser accelerated target, it is shown that a properly selected modulation of the laser intensity can lead to the dynamic stabilization or growth-rate reduction of a large portion of the unstable spectrum. The theory is in qualitative agreement with the numerical results obtained by using the two-dimensional hydrodynamic code ORCHID.

  9. Stability analysis of unsteady ablation fronts

    SciTech Connect

    Betti, R.; McCrory, R.L.; Verdon, C.P.

    1993-08-01

    The linear stability analysis of unsteady ablation fronts, is carried out for a semi-infinite uniform medium. For a laser accelerated target, it is shown that a properly selected modulation of the laser intensity can lead to the dynamic stabilization or growth-rate reduction of a large portion of the unstable spectrum. The theory is in qualitative agreement with the numerical results obtained by using the two-dimensional hydrodynamic code ORCHID.

  10. Stability analysis of unsteady ablation fronts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betti, R.; McCrory, R. L.; Verdon, C. P.

    1993-11-01

    The linear stability analysis of unsteady ablation fronts is carried out for a semi-infinite uniform medium. For a laser accelerated target, it is shown that a properly selected modulation of the laser intensity can lead to the dynamic stabilization or growth-rate reduction of a large portion of the unstable spectrum. The theory is in qualitative agreement with the numerical results obtained by using the two-dimensional hydrodynamic code orchid.

  11. The impact of subcellular location on the near infrared-mediated thermal ablation of cells by targeted carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murali, Vasanth S.; Wang, Ruhung; Mikoryak, Carole A.; Pantano, Paul; Draper, Rockford K.

    2016-10-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are used in the near infrared (NIR)-mediated thermal ablation of tumor cells because they efficiently convert absorbed NIR light into heat. Despite the therapeutic potential of SWNTs, there have been no published studies that directly quantify how many SWNTs need be associated with a cell to achieve a desired efficiency of killing, or what is the most efficient subcellular location of SWNTs for killing cells. Herein we measured dose response curves for the efficiency of killing correlated to the measured amounts of folate-targeted SWNTs that were either on the surface or within the vacuolar compartment of normal rat kidney cells. Folate-targeted SWNTs on the cell surface were measured after different concentrations of SWNTs in medium were incubated with cells for 30 min at 4 °C. Folate-targeted SWNTs within the vacuolar compartments were measured after cells were incubated with different concentrations of SWNTs in medium for 6 h at 37 °C. It was observed that a SWNT load of ∼13 pg/cell when internalized was sufficient to kill 90% of the cells under standardized conditions of NIR light irradiation. When ∼3.5 pg/cell of SWNTs were internalized within the endosomal/lysosomal compartments, ∼50% of the cells were killed, but when ∼3.5 pg/cell of SWNTs were confined to the cell surface only ∼5% of the cells were killed under the same NIR irradiation conditions. The SWNT subcellular locations were verified using Raman imaging of SWNTs merged with fluorescence images of known subcellular markers. To our knowledge, this is the first time that SWNT amounts at known subcellular locations have been correlated with a dose-normalized efficacy of thermal ablation and the results support the idea that SWNTs confined to the plasma membrane are not as effective in NIR-mediated cell killing as an equivalent amount of SWNTs when internalized within the endosomal/lysosomal vesicles.

  12. The impact of subcellular location on the near infrared-mediated thermal ablation of cells by targeted carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Murali, Vasanth S; Wang, Ruhung; Mikoryak, Carole A; Pantano, Paul; Draper, Rockford K

    2016-10-21

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are used in the near infrared (NIR)-mediated thermal ablation of tumor cells because they efficiently convert absorbed NIR light into heat. Despite the therapeutic potential of SWNTs, there have been no published studies that directly quantify how many SWNTs need be associated with a cell to achieve a desired efficiency of killing, or what is the most efficient subcellular location of SWNTs for killing cells. Herein we measured dose response curves for the efficiency of killing correlated to the measured amounts of folate-targeted SWNTs that were either on the surface or within the vacuolar compartment of normal rat kidney cells. Folate-targeted SWNTs on the cell surface were measured after different concentrations of SWNTs in medium were incubated with cells for 30 min at 4 °C. Folate-targeted SWNTs within the vacuolar compartments were measured after cells were incubated with different concentrations of SWNTs in medium for 6 h at 37 °C. It was observed that a SWNT load of ∼13 pg/cell when internalized was sufficient to kill 90% of the cells under standardized conditions of NIR light irradiation. When ∼3.5 pg/cell of SWNTs were internalized within the endosomal/lysosomal compartments, ∼50% of the cells were killed, but when ∼3.5 pg/cell of SWNTs were confined to the cell surface only ∼5% of the cells were killed under the same NIR irradiation conditions. The SWNT subcellular locations were verified using Raman imaging of SWNTs merged with fluorescence images of known subcellular markers. To our knowledge, this is the first time that SWNT amounts at known subcellular locations have been correlated with a dose-normalized efficacy of thermal ablation and the results support the idea that SWNTs confined to the plasma membrane are not as effective in NIR-mediated cell killing as an equivalent amount of SWNTs when internalized within the endosomal/lysosomal vesicles. PMID:27632056

  13. The impact of subcellular location on the near infrared-mediated thermal ablation of cells by targeted carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Murali, Vasanth S; Wang, Ruhung; Mikoryak, Carole A; Pantano, Paul; Draper, Rockford K

    2016-10-21

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are used in the near infrared (NIR)-mediated thermal ablation of tumor cells because they efficiently convert absorbed NIR light into heat. Despite the therapeutic potential of SWNTs, there have been no published studies that directly quantify how many SWNTs need be associated with a cell to achieve a desired efficiency of killing, or what is the most efficient subcellular location of SWNTs for killing cells. Herein we measured dose response curves for the efficiency of killing correlated to the measured amounts of folate-targeted SWNTs that were either on the surface or within the vacuolar compartment of normal rat kidney cells. Folate-targeted SWNTs on the cell surface were measured after different concentrations of SWNTs in medium were incubated with cells for 30 min at 4 °C. Folate-targeted SWNTs within the vacuolar compartments were measured after cells were incubated with different concentrations of SWNTs in medium for 6 h at 37 °C. It was observed that a SWNT load of ∼13 pg/cell when internalized was sufficient to kill 90% of the cells under standardized conditions of NIR light irradiation. When ∼3.5 pg/cell of SWNTs were internalized within the endosomal/lysosomal compartments, ∼50% of the cells were killed, but when ∼3.5 pg/cell of SWNTs were confined to the cell surface only ∼5% of the cells were killed under the same NIR irradiation conditions. The SWNT subcellular locations were verified using Raman imaging of SWNTs merged with fluorescence images of known subcellular markers. To our knowledge, this is the first time that SWNT amounts at known subcellular locations have been correlated with a dose-normalized efficacy of thermal ablation and the results support the idea that SWNTs confined to the plasma membrane are not as effective in NIR-mediated cell killing as an equivalent amount of SWNTs when internalized within the endosomal/lysosomal vesicles.

  14. Measurements of ablation-front hydrodynamic instability growth in high-density carbon (HDC) ignition targets at the National Ignition Facility (NIF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casey, D.; Smalyuk, V.; Peterson, L.; Berzak Hopkins, L.; Bunn, T.; Carlson, L.; Haan, S.; Ho, D.; Hoover, D.; Kroll, J.; Landen, O.; Le Pape, S.; MacKinnon, A.; Macphee, A.; Meezan, N.; Milovich, J.; Nikroo, A.; Remington, B.; Robey, H.; Ross, S.

    2014-10-01

    High-density carbon (HDC) has emerged as a promising ablator for ignition experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) partly because of its efficient coupling of the drive energy to fuel. Experiments during the National Ignition Campaign using a CH plastic ablator have shown that instability growth and the resultant mix of plastic into the hotspot was a significant source of overall the observed performance degradation. Likewise, mix of HDC ablator into the hotspot may also be a concern, as growth rates for HDC are comparable to CH and ablator/dopant is higher Z than CH ablators making the consequences potentially more severe. To help understand this issue, we plan to perform the first instability growth measurements of W-doped HDC implosions with preimposed mode 60 and mode 90 perturbations in convergent geometry using actual ignition targets and drives. These results will be presented and compared to ignition design simulations. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  15. Investigation of laser ion acceleration inside irradiated solid targets by neutron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Youssef, A.; Kodama, R.; Tampo, M.

    2006-03-15

    Origins and acceleration directions of accelerated ions inside solid LiF, CH-LiF, and LiF-CH targets irradiated by a 450 fs, 20 J, 1053 nm laser at an intensity of 3x10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2} have been investigated by neutron spectroscopy. The irradiated targets generate neutrons through the reaction {sup 7}Li (p,n){sup 7}Be between accelerated protons and background {sup 7}Li ions inside the target. The produced neutron spectra observed from two different observation angles 20 deg. and 120 deg. to the target rear-side normal. From the measured and calculated spectra, by three-dimensional Monte Carlo code, the maximum energy, the total number, and the slope temperature of the accelerated ions are investigated. The results indicate that ions are not only accelerated from the front surface toward the rear surface, but also from the rear surface toward the front surface with comparable maximum energy and higher number.

  16. Nanostructured europium oxide thin films deposited by pulsed laser ablation of a metallic target in a He buffer atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Luna, H.; Franceschini, D. F.; Prioli, R.; Guimaraes, R. B.; Sanchez, C. M.; Canal, G. P.; Barbosa, M. D. L.; Galvao, R. M. O.

    2010-09-15

    Nanostrucured europium oxide and hydroxide films were obtained by pulsed Nd:YAG (532 nm) laser ablation of a europium metallic target, in the presence of a 1 mbar helium buffer atmosphere. Both the produced film and the ambient plasma were characterized. The plasma was monitored by an electrostatic probe, for plume expansion in vacuum or in the presence of the buffer atmosphere. The time evolution of the ion saturation current was obtained for several probe to substrate distances. The results show the splitting of the plume into two velocity groups, being the lower velocity profile associated with metal cluster formation within the plume. The films were obtained in the presence of helium atmosphere, for several target-to-substrate distances. They were analyzed by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, x-ray diffraction, and atomic force microscopy, for as-deposited and 600 deg. C treated-in-air samples. The results show that the as-deposited samples are amorphous and have chemical composition compatible with europium hydroxide. The thermally treated samples show x-ray diffraction peaks of Eu{sub 2}O{sub 3}, with chemical composition showing excess oxygen. Film nanostructuring was shown to be strongly correlated with cluster formation, as shown by velocity splitting in probe current versus time plots.

  17. Effective Targeted Photothermal Ablation of Multidrug Resistant Bacteria and Their Biofilms with NIR-Absorbing Gold Nanocrosses.

    PubMed

    Teng, Choon Peng; Zhou, Tielin; Ye, Enyi; Liu, Shuhua; Koh, Leng Duei; Low, Michelle; Loh, Xian Jun; Win, Khin Yin; Zhang, Lianhui; Han, Ming-Yong

    2016-08-01

    With the rapid evolution of antibiotic resistance in bacteria, antibiotic-resistant bacteria (in particular, multidrug-resistant bacteria) and their biofilms have been becoming more and more difficult to be effectively treated with conventional antibiotics. As such, there is a great demand to develop a nonantibiotic approach in efficiently eliminating such bacteria. Here, multibranched gold nanocrosses with strong near-infrared absorption falling in the biological window, which heat up quickly under near-infrared-light irradiation are presented. The gold nanocrosses are conjugated to secondary and primary antibodies for targeting PcrV, a type III secretion protein, which is uniquely expressed on the bacteria superbug, Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The conjugated gold nanocrosses are capable of completely destroying P. aeruginosa and its biofilms upon near-infrared-light irradiation for 5 min with an 800 nm laser at a low power density of ≈3.0 W cm(-2) . No bacterial activity is detected after 48 h postirradiation, which indicates that the heat generated from the irradiated plasmonic gold nanocrosses attached to bacteria is effective in eliminating and preventing the re-growth of the bacteria. Overall, the conjugated gold nanocrosses allow targeted and effective photothermal ablation of multidrug-resistant bacteria and their biofilms in the localized region with reduced nonspecific damage to normal tissue. PMID:27336752

  18. Laser acceleration of protons using multi-ion plasma gaseous targets

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Tung -Chang; Shao, Xi; Liu, Chuan -Sheng; Eliasson, Bengt; W. T. Hill, III; Wang, Jyhpyng; Chen, Shih -Hung

    2015-02-01

    We present a theoretical and numerical study of a novel acceleration scheme by applying a combination of laser radiation pressure and shielded Coulomb repulsion in laser acceleration of protons in multi-species gaseous targets. By using a circularly polarized CO₂ laser pulse with a wavelength of 10 μm—much greater than that of a Ti: Sapphire laser—the critical density is significantly reduced, and a high-pressure gaseous target can be used to achieve an overdense plasma. This gives us a larger degree of freedom in selecting the target compounds or mixtures, as well as their density and thickness profiles. By impinging such a laser beam on a carbon–hydrogen target, the gaseous target is first compressed and accelerated by radiation pressure until the electron layer disrupts, after which the protons are further accelerated by the electron-shielded carbon ion layer. An 80 MeV quasi-monoenergetic proton beam can be generated using a half-sine shaped laser beam with a peak power of 70 TW and a pulse duration of 150 wave periods.

  19. Laser acceleration of protons using multi-ion plasma gaseous targets

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Tung -Chang; Shao, Xi; Liu, Chuan -Sheng; Eliasson, Bengt; W. T. Hill, III; Wang, Jyhpyng; Chen, Shih -Hung

    2015-02-01

    We present a theoretical and numerical study of a novel acceleration scheme by applying a combination of laser radiation pressure and shielded Coulomb repulsion in laser acceleration of protons in multi-species gaseous targets. By using a circularly polarized CO₂ laser pulse with a wavelength of 10 μm—much greater than that of a Ti: Sapphire laser—the critical density is significantly reduced, and a high-pressure gaseous target can be used to achieve an overdense plasma. This gives us a larger degree of freedom in selecting the target compounds or mixtures, as well as their density and thickness profiles. By impinging such amore » laser beam on a carbon–hydrogen target, the gaseous target is first compressed and accelerated by radiation pressure until the electron layer disrupts, after which the protons are further accelerated by the electron-shielded carbon ion layer. An 80 MeV quasi-monoenergetic proton beam can be generated using a half-sine shaped laser beam with a peak power of 70 TW and a pulse duration of 150 wave periods.« less

  20. Microstructured snow targets for high energy quasi-monoenergetic proton acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schleifer, E.; Nahum, E.; Eisenmann, S.; Botton, M.; Baspaly, A.; Pomerantz, I.; Abricht, F.; Branzel, J.; Priebe, G.; Steinke, S.; Andreev, A.; Schnuerer, M.; Sandner, W.; Gordon, D.; Sprangle, P.; Ledingham, K. W. D.; Zigler, A.

    2013-05-01

    Compact size sources of high energy protons (50-200MeV) are expected to be key technology in a wide range of scientific applications 1-8. One promising approach is the Target Normal Sheath Acceleration (TNSA) scheme 9,10, holding record level of 67MeV protons generated by a peta-Watt laser 11. In general, laser intensity exceeding 1018 W/cm2 is required to produce MeV level protons. Another approach is the Break-Out Afterburner (BOA) scheme which is a more efficient acceleration scheme but requires an extremely clean pulse with contrast ratio of above 10-10. Increasing the energy of the accelerated protons using modest energy laser sources is a very attractive task nowadays. Recently, nano-scale targets were used to accelerate ions 12,13 but no significant enhancement of the accelerated proton energy was measured. Here we report on the generation of up to 20MeV by a modest (5TW) laser system interacting with a microstructured snow target deposited on a Sapphire substrate. This scheme relax also the requirement of high contrast ratio between the pulse and the pre-pulse, where the latter produces the highly structured plasma essential for the interaction process. The plasma near the tip of the snow target is subject to locally enhanced laser intensity with high spatial gradients, and enhanced charge separation is obtained. Electrostatic fields of extremely high intensities are produced, and protons are accelerated to MeV-level energies. PIC simulations of this targets reproduce the experimentally measured energy scaling and predict the generation of 150 MeV protons from laser power of 100TW laser system18.

  1. Direct-drive–ignition designs with mid-Z ablators

    SciTech Connect

    Lafon, M.; Betti, R.; Anderson, K. S.; Collins, T. J. B.; Epstein, R.; McKenty, P. W.; Myatt, J. F.; Shvydky, A.; Skupsky, S.

    2015-03-15

    Achieving thermonuclear ignition using direct laser illumination relies on the capability to accelerate spherical shells to high implosion velocities while maintaining shell integrity. Ablator materials of moderate atomic number Z reduce the detrimental effects of laser–plasma instabilities in direct-drive implosions. To validate the physics of moderate-Z ablator materials for ignition target designs on the National Ignition Facility (NIF), hydro-equivalent targets are designed using pure plastic (CH), high-density carbon, and glass (SiO{sub 2}) ablators. The hydrodynamic stability of these targets is investigated through two-dimensional (2D) single-mode and multimode simulations. The overall stability of these targets to laser-imprint perturbations and low-mode asymmetries makes it possible to design high-gain targets. Designs using polar-drive illumination are developed within the NIF laser system specifications. Mid-Z ablator targets are an attractive candidate for direct-drive ignition since they present better overall performance than plastic ablator targets through reduced laser–plasma instabilities and a similar hydrodynamic stability.

  2. Direct-drive–ignition designs with mid-Z ablators

    SciTech Connect

    Lafon, M.; Betti, R.; Anderson, K. S.; Collins, T. J. B.; Epstein, R.; McKenty, P. W.; Myatt, J. F.; Shvydky, A.; Skupsky, S.

    2015-03-01

    Achieving thermonuclear ignition using direct laser illumination relies on the capability to accelerate spherical shells to high implosion velocities while maintaining shell integrity. Ablator materials of moderate atomic number Z reduce the detrimental effects of laser–plasma instabilities in direct-drive implosions. To validate the physics of moderate-Z ablator materials for ignition target designs on the National Ignition Facility (NIF), hydro-equivalent targets are designed using pure plastic (CH), high-density carbon, and glass (SiO2) ablators. The hydrodynamic stability of these targets is investigated through two-dimensional (2D) single-mode and multimode simulations. The overall stability of these targets to laser-imprint perturbations and low-mode asymmetries makes it possible to design high-gain targets. Designs using polar-drive illumination are developed within the NIF laser system specifications. Mid-Z ablator targets are an attractive candidate for direct-drive ignition since they present better overall performance than plastic ablator targets through reduced laser–plasma instabilities and a similar hydrodynamic stability.

  3. Deep brain stimulation and ablation for obsessive compulsive disorder: evolution of contemporary indications, targets and techniques.

    PubMed

    Tierney, Travis S; Abd-El-Barr, Muhammad M; Stanford, Arielle D; Foote, Kelly D; Okun, Michael S

    2014-06-01

    Surgical therapy for treatment-resistant obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) remains an effective option for well-selected patients managed within a multidisciplinary setting. Historically, lesions within the limbic system have been used to control both obsessive thoughts and repetitive compulsions associated with this disease. We discuss classical targets as well as contemporary neuromodulatory approaches that have been shown to provide symptomatic relief. Recently, deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the anterior limb of the internal capsule/ventral striatum received Conformité Européene (CE) mark and Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approvals for treatment of intractable OCD. Remarkably, this is the first such approval for neurosurgical intervention in a strictly psychiatric indication in modern times. This target is discussed in detail along with alternative targets currently being proposed. We close with a discussion of gamma knife capsulotomy, a modality with deep historical roots. Further directions in the surgical treatment of OCD will require better preoperative predictors of postoperative responses, optimal selection of individualized targets, and rigorous reporting of adverse events and standardized outcomes. To meet these challenges, centers must be equipped with a multidisciplinary team and patient-centered approach to ensure adequate screening and follow up of patients with this difficult-to-treat condition. PMID:24099662

  4. Influence of laser parameters in generating the NiTi nanoparticles with a rotating target using underwater solid state Nd: YAG laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagrani, Rohit; Patra, Nandini; Rajagopalan, P.; Singh, Vipul; Palani, I. A.

    2016-09-01

    The great effort that the scientific community has put in the last decade in the study of nanoscience and nanotechnology has been leading the research toward the development of new methodologies of nanostructures synthesis. Among them, Pulsed Laser Ablation in Liquid, PLAL, is gaining an increasing interest thanks to several promising advantages, which include: environmental sustainability, easy experimental set-up (which does not require extreme conditions of the ambient of synthesis), long-lasting stability of the nanoparticles, which are produced completely free of undesired contaminants or dangerous synthesis reactants. In this work, a drop wise flow of deionized water on the periphery of NiTi rotating target was tested as a procedure for the significant production of NiTi nanoparticles. This is a novel technique to improve the ablation efficiency of nanoparticles than the existing techniques of laser ablation. The influence of varying external parameters like laser wavelengths and laser fluences on the size distribution of nanoparticle was investigated. Second harmonic and third harmonics of Nd: YAG nanosecond laser with three different laser fluences of 30 J/cm2, 40 J/cm2 and 50 J/cm2 was used to ablate the nitinol (Ni-55%, Ti-45%) target. The average particle size and redistribution was characterized by dynamic light scattering (DLS) and the crystalline formation of NiTi nanoparticles were analyzed by X-ray diffraction, where it confirms the alloy formation of NiTi nanoparticles.

  5. Preparation of liposomal amiodarone and investigation of its cardiomyocyte-targeting ability in cardiac radiofrequency ablation rat model.

    PubMed

    Zhuge, Ying; Zheng, Zhi-Feng; Xie, Mu-Qing; Li, Lin; Wang, Fang; Gao, Feng

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop an amiodarone hydrochloride (ADHC)-loaded liposome (ADHC-L) formulation and investigate its potential for cardiomyocyte targeting after cardiac radiofrequency ablation (CA) in vivo. The ADHC-L was prepared by thin-film method combined with ultrasonication and extrusion. The preparation process was optimized by Box-Behnken design with encapsulation efficiency as the main evaluation index. The optimum formulation was quantitatively obtained with a diameter of 99.9±0.4 nm, a zeta potential of 35.1±10.9 mV, and an encapsulation efficiency of 99.5%±13.3%. Transmission electron microscopy showed that the liposomes were spherical particles with integrated bilayers and well dispersed with high colloidal stability. Pharmacokinetic studies were investigated in rats after intravenous administration, which revealed that compared with free ADHC treatment, ADHC-L treatment showed a 5.1-fold increase in the area under the plasma drug concentration-time curve over a period of 24 hours (AUC0-24 h) and an 8.5-fold increase in mean residence time, suggesting that ADHC-L could facilitate drug release in a more stable and sustained manner while increasing the circulation time of ADHC, especially in the blood. Biodistribution studies of ADHC-L demonstrated that ADHC concentration in the heart was 4.1 times higher after ADHC-L treatment in CA rat model compared with ADHC-L sham-operated treatment at 20 minutes postinjection. Fluorescence imaging studies further proved that the heart-targeting ability of ADHC-L was mainly due to the CA in rats. These results strongly support that ADHC-L could be exploited as a potential heart-targeting drug delivery system with enhanced bioavailability and reduced side effects for arrhythmia treatment after CA. PMID:27313453

  6. Preparation of liposomal amiodarone and investigation of its cardiomyocyte-targeting ability in cardiac radiofrequency ablation rat model

    PubMed Central

    Zhuge, Ying; Zheng, Zhi-Feng; Xie, Mu-Qing; Li, Lin; Wang, Fang; Gao, Feng

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop an amiodarone hydrochloride (ADHC)-loaded liposome (ADHC-L) formulation and investigate its potential for cardiomyocyte targeting after cardiac radiofrequency ablation (CA) in vivo. The ADHC-L was prepared by thin-film method combined with ultrasonication and extrusion. The preparation process was optimized by Box–Behnken design with encapsulation efficiency as the main evaluation index. The optimum formulation was quantitatively obtained with a diameter of 99.9±0.4 nm, a zeta potential of 35.1±10.9 mV, and an encapsulation efficiency of 99.5%±13.3%. Transmission electron microscopy showed that the liposomes were spherical particles with integrated bilayers and well dispersed with high colloidal stability. Pharmacokinetic studies were investigated in rats after intravenous administration, which revealed that compared with free ADHC treatment, ADHC-L treatment showed a 5.1-fold increase in the area under the plasma drug concentration–time curve over a period of 24 hours (AUC0–24 h) and an 8.5-fold increase in mean residence time, suggesting that ADHC-L could facilitate drug release in a more stable and sustained manner while increasing the circulation time of ADHC, especially in the blood. Biodistribution studies of ADHC-L demonstrated that ADHC concentration in the heart was 4.1 times higher after ADHC-L treatment in CA rat model compared with ADHC-L sham-operated treatment at 20 minutes postinjection. Fluorescence imaging studies further proved that the heart-targeting ability of ADHC-L was mainly due to the CA in rats. These results strongly support that ADHC-L could be exploited as a potential heart-targeting drug delivery system with enhanced bioavailability and reduced side effects for arrhythmia treatment after CA. PMID:27313453

  7. Simulation of photon acceleration upon irradiation of a mylar target by femtosecond laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Andreev, Stepan N; Rukhadze, Anri A; Tarakanov, V P; Yakutov, B P

    2010-01-31

    Acceleration of protons is simulated by the particle-in-cell (PIC) method upon irradiation of mylar targets of different thicknesses by femtosecond plane-polarised pulsed laser radiation and at different angles of radiation incidence on the target. The comparison of the results of calculations with the experimental data obtained in recent experiments shows their good agreement. The optimal angle of incidence (458) at which the proton energy achieves its absolute maximum is obtained. (effects of laser radiation on matter)

  8. Ultraintense laser interaction with nanoscale target: a simple model for layer expansion and ion acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Albright, Brian J; Yin, Lin; Hegelich, Bjoorn M; Bowers, Kevin J; Huang, Chengkun; Fernandez, Juan C; Flippo, Kirk A; Gaillard, Sandrine; Kwan, Thomas J T; Henig, Andreas; Yan, Xue Q; Tajima, Toshi; Habs, Dieter

    2009-01-01

    A simple model has been derived for the expansion of a thin (up to 100s of nm thickness), solid-density target driven by an u.ltraintense laser. In this regime, new ion acceleration mechanisms, such as the Break-Out Afterburner (BOA) [1], emerge with the potential to dramatically improve energy, efficiency, and energy spread of laser-driven ion beams. Such beams have been proposed [2] as drivers for fast ignition inertial confinement fusion [3]. Analysis of kinetic simulations of the BOA shows two dislinct times that bound the period of enhanced acceleration: t{sub 1}, when the target becomes relativistically transparent to the laser, and t{sub 2}, when the target becomes classically underdense and the enhanced acceleration terminates. A silllple dynamical model for target expansion has been derived that contains both the early, one-dimensional (lD) expansion of the target as well as three-dimensional (3D) expansion of the plasma at late times, The model assumes that expansion is slab-like at the instantaneous ion sound speed and requires as input target composition, laser intensity, laser spot area, and the efficiency of laser absorption into electron thermal energy.

  9. Radiological assessment of target materials for accelerator transmutation of waste (ATW) applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vickers, Linda Diane

    This dissertation issues the first published document of the radiation absorbed dose rate (rad-h-1) to tissue from radioactive spallation products in Ta, W, Pb, Bi, and LBE target materials used in Accelerator Transmutation of Waste (ATW) applications. No previous works have provided an estimate of the absorbed dose rate (rad-h-1) from activated targets for ATW applications. The results of this dissertation are useful for planning the radiological safety assessment to personnel, and for the design, construction, maintenance, and disposition of target materials of high-energy particle accelerators for ATW applications (Charlton, 1996). In addition, this dissertation provides the characterization of target materials of high-energy particle accelerators for the parameters of: (1) spallation neutron yield (neutrons/proton), (2) spallation products yield (nuclides/proton), (3) energy-dependent spallation neutron fluence distribution, (4) spallation neutron flux, (5) identification of radioactive spallation products for consideration in safety of personnel to high radiation dose rates, and (6) identification of the optimum geometrical dimensions for the target applicable to the maximum radial spallation neutron leakage from the target. Pb and Bi target materials yielded the lowest absorbed dose rates (rad-h -1) for a 10-year irradiation/50-year decay scheme, and would be the preferred target materials for consideration of the radiological safety of personnel during ATW operations. A beneficial characteristic of these target materials is that they do not produce radioactive transuranic isotopes, which have very long half-lives and require special handling and disposition requirements. Furthermore, the targets are not considered High-Level Waste (HLW) such as reactor spent fuel for disposal purposes. It is a basic ATW system requirement that the spallation target after it has been expended should be disposable as Class C low-level radioactive waste. Therefore, the disposal

  10. Stability and nonlinear optical properties of Cu nanoparticles prepared by femtosecond laser ablation of Cu target in alcohol and water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Guanghua; Ren, Shoutian; Qu, Shiliang; Wang, Qiang; Gao, Renxi; Han, Min

    2014-11-01

    By using PVP of different concentrations as the protective agent, Cu nanoparticles (NPs) of different mean sizes are fabricated through laser ablation of Cu target in alcohol, water, and their mixtures. As-grown Cu NPs show good stability in alcohol. The nonlinear absorptions of Cu NPs with different mean sizes are investigated. With the increase of laser intensity, the nonlinear absorption of small NPs changes from saturable absorption (SA) to reverse saturable absorption (RSA) and two-photon absorption (TPA), whereas SA dominates the nonlinear absorption of the large NPs. The modulations of occupied and unoccupied density of states (DOS) in conduction band are proposed to be the key factors for the size-dependence of the nonlinear absorption. For the large Cu NPs, there are sufficiently occupied DOS in the ground state and unoccupied DOS in the first excited state to sustain the increase of SA, whereas for the small Cu NPs, the corresponding DOS is insufficient, so the SA is surpassed by the RSA and TPA at high laser excitation intensity.

  11. Improve beam quality of laser proton acceleration with funnel-shaped-hole target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Peng; Fan, Da Peng; Li, Yu Xiao

    2016-03-01

    Improve beam quality of laser proton acceleration using a funnel-shaped-hole target is demonstrated through particle simulations. When an intense short pulse laser illuminates a thin foil target with a hole at the rear surface, the proton beam divergence is suppressed compared with that obtained in a traditional flat target. In this paper, a funnel-shaped-hole target is proposed to improve the proton beam quality. Using two-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations, three different shapes of target (funnel-shaped-hole target, cylinder-shaped-hole target and flat target) are simulated and compared. The funnel-shaped hole in the rear surface of the target helps to focus the electron cloud significantly and improve the maximum proton energy and suppress the proton beam divergence. Different thicknesses of the new target are also simulated, and the effects of thickness on the divergence angle and proton spectra are investigated. The optimal size of the new target is obtained and the quality of the proton beam is improved significantly. The funnel-shaped-hole target serves as a new method to improve the proton beam quality in laser-plasma interactions.

  12. Heat Transfer And Vapor Dynamics Induced By Nanosecond Laser Ablation Of Titanium Target

    SciTech Connect

    Hamadi, F.; Amara, E. H.; Mezaoui, D.

    2008-09-23

    A numerical modelling describing a pulsed nanosecond laser interaction with a titanium target is presented, resulting in the study of the plume expansion in vacuum or in background gas, using the species transport model available in Fluent computational fluid dynamics code. The heat transfers in the solid target and the molten material are modeled using an enthalpy formulation for the solid-liquid phase changing. The effect of laser fluences is investigated, and results are presented as a function of time. Moreover, the plasma or the vapour dynamics is calculated by solving a set of Navier-Stokes equations. The plasma absorption by inverse Bremsstrahlung, the ionization states and the density profiles of the Titanium ions and electrons in the plume are interactively included in the Fluent calculation process by the mean of User Defined Functions (UDFs) used in order to take into account the specificity of our problem. The ionization is computed by solving the Saha-Eggert equation assuming local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) conditions.

  13. CO{sub 2} laser pulse shortening by laser ablation of a metal target

    SciTech Connect

    Donnelly, T.; Mazoyer, M.; Lynch, A.; O'Sullivan, G.; O'Reilly, F.; Dunne, P.; Cummins, T.

    2012-03-15

    A repeatable and flexible technique for pulse shortening of laser pulses has been applied to transversely excited atmospheric (TEA) CO{sub 2} laser pulses. The technique involves focusing the laser output onto a highly reflective metal target so that plasma is formed, which then operates as a shutter due to strong laser absorption and scattering. Precise control of the focused laser intensity allows for timing of the shutter so that different temporal portions of the pulse can be reflected from the target surface before plasma formation occurs. This type of shutter enables one to reduce the pulse duration down to {approx}2 ns and to remove the low power, long duration tails that are present in TEA CO{sub 2} pulses. The transmitted energy is reduced as the pulse duration is decreased but the reflected power is {approx}10 MW for all pulse durations. A simple laser heating model verifies that the pulse shortening depends directly on the plasma formation time, which in turn is dependent on the applied laser intensity. It is envisaged that this plasma shutter will be used as a tool for pulse shaping in the search for laser pulse conditions to optimize conversion efficiency from laser energy to useable extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation for EUV source development.

  14. Control of target-normal-sheath-accelerated protons from a guiding cone

    SciTech Connect

    Zou, D. B.; Zhuo, H. B.; Yang, X. H.; Yu, T. P.; Shao, F. Q.; Pukhov, A.

    2015-06-15

    It is demonstrated through particle-in-cell simulations that target-normal-sheath-accelerated protons can be well controlled by using a guiding cone. Compared to a conventional planar target, both the collimation and number density of proton beams are substantially improved, giving a high-quality proton beam which maintained for a longer distance without degradation. The effect is attributed to the radial electric field resulting from the charge due to the hot target electrons propagating along the cone surface. This electric field can effectively suppress the spatial spread of the protons after the expansion of the hot electrons.

  15. Investigation of efficient shock acceleration of ions using high energy lasers in low density targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antici, P.; Gauthier, M.; D'Humieres, E.; Albertazzi, B.; Beaucourt, C.; Böker, J.; Chen, S.; Dervieux, V.; Feugeas, J. L.; Glesser, M.; Levy, A.; Nicolai, P.; Romagnani, L.; Tikhonchuk, V.; Pepin, H.; Fuchs, J.

    2012-10-01

    Intense research is being conducted on sources of laser-accelerated ions and their applications that have the potential of becoming novel particle sources. In most experiments, a high intensity and short laser pulse interacts with a solid density target. It was recently shown that a promising way to accelerate ions to higher energies and in a collimated beam is to use under-dense or near-critical density targets instead of solid ones. In these conditions, simulations have revealed that protons are predicted to be accelerated by a collisionless shock mechanism that significantly increases their energy. We present recent experiments performed on the 100 TW LULI laser (France) and the TITAN facility at LLNL, USA. The near critical density plasma was prepared by exploding thin solid foils by a long laser pulse. The plasma density profile was controlled by varying the target thickness and the delay between the long and the short laser pulse. When exploding the target, we obtained proton energies that are comparable if not higher than what was obtained under similar laser conditions, but with solid targets which make them a promising candidate for an efficient proton source.

  16. On the feasibility of increasing the energy of laser-accelerated protons by using low-density targets

    SciTech Connect

    Brantov, A. V. Bychenkov, V. Yu.

    2015-06-15

    Optimal regimes of proton acceleration in the interaction of short high-power laser pulses with thin foils and low-density targets are determined by means of 3D numerical simulation. It is demonstrated that the maximum proton energy can be increased by using low-density targets in which ions from the front surface of the target are accelerated most efficiently. It is shown using a particular example that, for the same laser pulse, the energy of protons accelerated from a low-density target can be increased by one-third as compared to a solid-state target.

  17. Monoenergetic and GeV ion acceleration from the laser breakout afterburner using ultrathin targets

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, L.; Albright, B. J.; Hegelich, B. M.; Bowers, K. J.; Flippo, K. A.; Kwan, T. J. T.; Fernandez, J. C.

    2007-05-15

    A new laser-driven ion acceleration mechanism using ultrathin targets has been identified from particle-in-cell simulations. After a brief period of target normal sheath acceleration (TNSA) [S. P. Hatchett et al., Phys. Plasmas 7, 2076 (2000)], two distinct stages follow: first, a period of enhanced TNSA during which the cold electron background converts entirely to hot electrons, and second, the ''laser breakout afterburner'' (BOA) when the laser penetrates to the rear of the target where a localized longitudinal electric field is generated with the location of the peak field co-moving with the ions. During this process, a relativistic electron beam is produced by the ponderomotive drive of the laser. This beam is unstable to a relativistic Buneman instability, which rapidly converts the electron energy into ion energy. This mechanism accelerates ions to much higher energies using laser intensities comparable to earlier TNSA experiments. At a laser intensity of 10{sup 21} W/cm{sup 2}, the carbon ions accelerate as a quasimonoenergetic bunch to 100 s of MeV in the early stages of the BOA with conversion efficiency of order a few percent. Both are an order of magnitude higher than those realized from TNSA in recent experiments [Hegelich et al., Nature 441, 439 (2006)]. The laser-plasma interaction then evolves to produce a quasithermal energy distribution with maximum energy of {approx}2 GeV.

  18. Targeted ablation of IKK2 improves skeletal muscle strength, maintains mass, and promotes regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Mourkioti, Foteini; Kratsios, Paschalis; Luedde, Tom; Song, Yao-Hua; Delafontaine, Patrick; Adami, Raffaella; Parente, Valeria; Bottinelli, Roberto; Pasparakis, Manolis; Rosenthal, Nadia

    2006-01-01

    NF-κB is a major pleiotropic transcription factor modulating immune, inflammatory, cell survival, and proliferative responses, yet the relevance of NF-κB signaling in muscle physiology and disease is less well documented. Here we show that muscle-restricted NF-κB inhibition in mice, through targeted deletion of the activating kinase inhibitor of NF-κB kinase 2 (IKK2), shifted muscle fiber distribution and improved muscle force. In response to denervation, IKK2 depletion protected against atrophy, maintaining fiber type, size, and strength, increasing protein synthesis, and decreasing protein degradation. IKK2-depleted mice with a muscle-specific transgene expressing a local Igf-1 isoform (mIgf-1) showed enhanced protection against muscle atrophy. In response to muscle damage, IKK2 depletion facilitated skeletal muscle regeneration through enhanced satellite cell activation and reduced fibrosis. Our results establish IKK2/NF-κB signaling as an important modulator of muscle homeostasis and suggest a combined role for IKK inhibitors and growth factors in the therapy of muscle diseases. PMID:17080195

  19. Flyer Target Acceleration and Energy Transfer at its Collision with Massive Targets

    SciTech Connect

    Borodziuk, S.; Kasperczuk, A.; Pisarczyk, T.; Demchenko, N. N.; Gus'kov, S. Yu.; Jungwirth, K.; Kralikova, B.; Krousky, E.; Masek, K.; Pfeifer, M.; Rohlena, K.; Rozanov, V. B.; Skala, J.; Ullschmied, J.; Kalal, M.; Limpouch, J.; Pisarczyk, P.

    2006-01-15

    Numerical modelling was aimed at simulation of successive events resulting from interaction of laser beam-single and double targets. It was performed by means of the 2D Lagrangian hydrodynamics code ATLANT-HE. This code is based on one-fluid and two-temperature model of plasma with electron and ion heat conductivity considerations. The code has an advanced treatment of laser light propagation and absorption. This numerical modelling corresponds to the experiment, which was carried out with the use of the PALS facility. Two types of planar solid targets, i.e. single massive Al slabs and double targets consisting of 6 {mu}m thick Al foil and Al slab were applied. The targets were irradiated by the iodine laser pulses of two wavelengths: 1.315 and 0.438 {mu}m. A pulse duration of 0.4 ns and a focal spot diameter of 250 {mu}m at a laser energy of 130 J were used. The numerical modelling allowed us to obtain a more detailed description of shock wave propagation and crater formation.

  20. Creation of Pure Frozen Gas Targets for Ion Acceleration using Short Pulse Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCary, Edward; Stehr, Florian; Jiao, Xuejing; Quevedo, Hernan; Franke, Philip; Agustsson, Ronald; Oshea, Finn; Berry, Robert; Chao, Dennis; Woods, Kayley; Gautier, Donald; Letzring, Sam; Hegelich, Bjorn

    2015-11-01

    A system for shooting interchangeable frozen gas targets was developed at the University of Texas and will be tested at Los Alamos National Lab. A target holder which can hold up to five substrates used for target growing was cryogenically cooled to temperatures below 14 K. The target substrates consist of holes with diameters ranging from 15 μm-500 μm and TEM grids with micron scale spacing, across which films of ice are frozen by releasing small amounts of pure gas molecules directly into the vacuum target chamber. Frozen gas targets comprised of simple molecules like methane and single element gasses like hydrogen and deuterium will provide novel target configuations that will be compared with laser plasma interaction simulations. The targets will be shot with the ultra-intense short-pulse Trident laser. Accelerated ion spectra will be characterized using a Thomson Parabola with magnetic field strength of 0.92T and electric field strength of 30kV. Hydrogen targets will be additionally characterized using stacks of copper which become activated upon exposure to energetic protons resulting in a beta decay signal which be imaged on electron sensitive imaging plates to provide an energy spectrum and spacial profile of the proton beam. Details of target creation and pre-shot characterization will be presented.

  1. Magnetic-optical nanohybrids for targeted detection, separation, and photothermal ablation of drug-resistant pathogens.

    PubMed

    Ondera, Thomas J; Hamme, Ashton T

    2015-12-01

    A rapid, sensitive and quantitative immunoassay for the targeted detection and decontamination of E. coli based on Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) and plasmonic popcorn-shaped gold nanostructure attached single-walled carbon nanotubes (AuNP@SWCNT) is presented. The MNPs were synthesized as the support for a monoclonal antibody (mAb@MNP). E. coli (49979) was captured and rapidly preconcentrated from the sample with the mAb@MNP, followed by binding with Raman-tagged concanavalin A-AuNP@SWCNTs (Con A-AuNP@SWCNTs) as detector nanoprobes. A Raman tag 5,5'-dithiobis-(2-nitrobenzoic acid) (DTNB) generated a Raman signal upon 670 nm laser excitation enabling the detection and quantification of E. coli concentration with a limit of detection of 10(2) CFU mL(-1) and a linear logarithmic response range of 1.0 × 10(2) to 1.0 × 10(7) CFU mL(-1). The mAb@MNP could remove more than 98% of E. coli (initial concentration of 1.3 × 10(4) CFU mL(-1)) from water. The potential of the immunoassay to detect E. coli bacteria in real water samples was investigated and the results were compared with the experimental results from the classical count method. There was no statistically significant difference between the two methods (p > 0.05). Furthermore, the MNP/AuNP@SWCNT hybrid system exhibits an enhanced photothermal killing effect. The sandwich-like immunoassay possesses potential for rapid bioanalysis and the simultaneous biosensing of multiple pathogenic agents. PMID:26469636

  2. Magnetic-optical nanohybrids for targeted detection, separation, and photothermal ablation of drug-resistant pathogens.

    PubMed

    Ondera, Thomas J; Hamme, Ashton T

    2015-12-01

    A rapid, sensitive and quantitative immunoassay for the targeted detection and decontamination of E. coli based on Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) and plasmonic popcorn-shaped gold nanostructure attached single-walled carbon nanotubes (AuNP@SWCNT) is presented. The MNPs were synthesized as the support for a monoclonal antibody (mAb@MNP). E. coli (49979) was captured and rapidly preconcentrated from the sample with the mAb@MNP, followed by binding with Raman-tagged concanavalin A-AuNP@SWCNTs (Con A-AuNP@SWCNTs) as detector nanoprobes. A Raman tag 5,5'-dithiobis-(2-nitrobenzoic acid) (DTNB) generated a Raman signal upon 670 nm laser excitation enabling the detection and quantification of E. coli concentration with a limit of detection of 10(2) CFU mL(-1) and a linear logarithmic response range of 1.0 × 10(2) to 1.0 × 10(7) CFU mL(-1). The mAb@MNP could remove more than 98% of E. coli (initial concentration of 1.3 × 10(4) CFU mL(-1)) from water. The potential of the immunoassay to detect E. coli bacteria in real water samples was investigated and the results were compared with the experimental results from the classical count method. There was no statistically significant difference between the two methods (p > 0.05). Furthermore, the MNP/AuNP@SWCNT hybrid system exhibits an enhanced photothermal killing effect. The sandwich-like immunoassay possesses potential for rapid bioanalysis and the simultaneous biosensing of multiple pathogenic agents.

  3. Optimized ion acceleration using high repetition rate, variable thickness liquid crystal targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poole, Patrick; Willis, Christopher; Cochran, Ginevra; Andereck, C. David; Schumacher, Douglass

    2015-11-01

    Laser-based ion acceleration is a widely studied plasma physics topic for its applications to secondary radiation sources, advanced imaging, and cancer therapy. Recent work has centered on investigating new acceleration mechanisms that promise improved ion energy and spectrum. While the physics of these mechanisms is not yet fully understood, it has been observed to dominate for certain ranges of target thickness, where the optimum thickness depends on laser conditions including energy, pulse width, and contrast. The study of these phenomena is uniquely facilitated by the use of variable-thickness liquid crystal films, first introduced in P. L. Poole et al. PoP21, 063109 (2014). Control of the formation parameters of these freely suspended films such as volume, temperature, and draw speed allows on-demand thickness variability between 10 nanometers and several 10s of microns, fully encompassing the currently studied thickness regimes with a single target material. The low vapor pressure of liquid crystal enables in-situ film formation and unlimited vacuum use of these targets. Details on the selection and optimization of ion acceleration mechanism with target thickness will be presented, including recent experiments on the Scarlet laser facility and others. This work was performed with support from the DARPA PULSE program through a grant from AMRDEC and by the NNSA under contract DE-NA0001976.

  4. Acceleration of electrons under the action of petawatt-class laser pulses onto foam targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pugachev, L. P.; Andreev, N. E.; Levashov, P. R.; Rosmej, O. N.

    2016-09-01

    Optimization study for future experiments on interaction of petawatt laser pulses with foam targets was done by 3D PIC simulations. Densities in the range 0.5nc-nc and thicknesses in the range 100 - 500 μm of the targets were considered corresponding to those which are currently available. It is shown that heating of electrons mainly occurs under the action of the ponderomotive force of a laser pulse in which amplitude increases up to three times because of self-focusing effect in underdense plasma. Accelerated electrons gain additional energy directly from the high-frequency laser field at the betatron resonance in the emerging plasma density channels. For thicker targets a higher number of electrons with higher energies are obtained. The narrowing of the angular distribution of electrons for thicker targets is explained by acceleration in multiple narrow filaments. Obtained energies of accelerated electrons can be approximated by Maxwell distribution with the temperature 8.5 MeV. The charge carried by electrons with energies higher than 30 MeV is about 30 nC, that is 3-4 order of magnitude higher than the charge predicted by the ponderomotive scaling for the incident laser amplitude.

  5. Laser Acceleration of Protons Using Multi-Ion Plasma Gaseous Targets and Its Medical Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Xi; Liu, Tung-Chang; Liu, Chuan-Sheng; Eliasson, Bengt; Hill, Wendell; Wang, Jyhpyng; Chen, Shih-Hung

    2014-10-01

    We present an acceleration scheme by applying a combination of laser radiation pressure and shielded Coulomb repulsion in laser acceleration of protons in multi-species gaseous targets. By using a circularly polarized CO2 laser pulse with a wavelength of 10 μm, the critical density is significantly reduced, and a high-pressure gaseous target can be used to achieve an overdense plasma. This gives us a larger degree of freedom in selecting the foil compounds or mixtures, as well as their density and thickness profiles. An 80 MeV quasi-monoenergetic proton beam can be generated using a half-sine shaped laser beam with peak power 70 TW and pulse duration of 150 wave periods. We compared the effects of modifying the thickness and density of the gaseous targets and showed that the compression of the gaseous target affects significantly in the quasi-monoenergetic property of the proton beams. To assess the feasibility of laser-proton cancer therapy with such a proton accelerator, simulations are carried out to model the interaction of protons with water and determine the depth and lateral dose distribution for particle beams produced from PIC simulation. Comparison between the dosage maps of the proton beams produced with different foil densities and thicknesses is also presented. This work was supported by US DoE Grant DE-SC0008391.

  6. Tomographic characterisation of gas-jet targets for laser wakefield acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couperus, J. P.; Köhler, A.; Wolterink, T. A. W.; Jochmann, A.; Zarini, O.; Bastiaens, H. M. J.; Boller, K. J.; Irman, A.; Schramm, U.

    2016-09-01

    Laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) has emerged as a promising concept for the next generation of high energy electron accelerators. The acceleration medium is provided by a target that creates a local well-defined gas-density profile inside a vacuum vessel. Target development and analysis of the resulting gas-density profiles is an important aspect in the further development of LWFA. Gas-jet targets are widely used in regimes where relatively high electron densities over short interaction lengths are required (up to several millimetres interaction length, plasma densities down to ~1018cm-3). In this paper we report a precise characterisation of such gas-jet targets by a laser interferometry technique. We show that phase shifts down to 4 mrad can be resolved. Tomographic phase reconstruction enables detection of non-axisymmetrical gas-density profiles which indicates defects in cylindrical nozzles, analysis of slit-nozzles and nozzles with an induced shock-wave density step. In a direct comparison between argon and helium jets we show that it cannot automatically be assumed, as is often done, that a nozzle measured with argon will provide the same gas density with helium.

  7. Hydrodynamic Efficiency of Ablation Propulsion with Pulsed Ion Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Buttapeng, Chainarong; Yazawa, Masaru; Harada, Nobuhiro; Suematsu, Hisayuki; Jiang Weihua; Yatsui, Kiyoshi

    2006-05-02

    This paper presents the hydrodynamic efficiency of ablation plasma produced by pulsed ion beam on the basis of the ion beam-target interaction. We used a one-dimensional hydrodynamic fluid compressible to study the physics involved namely an ablation acceleration behavior and analyzed it as a rocketlike model in order to investigate its hydrodynamic variables for propulsion applications. These variables were estimated by the concept of ablation driven implosion in terms of ablated mass fraction, implosion efficiency, and hydrodynamic energy conversion. Herein, the energy conversion efficiency of 17.5% was achieved. In addition, the results show maximum energy efficiency of the ablation process (ablation efficiency) of 67% meaning the efficiency with which pulsed ion beam energy-ablation plasma conversion. The effects of ion beam energy deposition depth to hydrodynamic efficiency were briefly discussed. Further, an evaluation of propulsive force with high specific impulse of 4000s, total impulse of 34mN and momentum to energy ratio in the range of {mu}N/W was also analyzed.

  8. Spectral Modification of Shock Accelerated Ions Using a Hydrodynamically Shaped Gas Target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tresca, O.; Dover, N. P.; Cook, N.; Maharjan, C.; Polyanskiy, M. N.; Najmudin, Z.; Shkolnikov, P.; Pogorelsky, I.

    2015-08-01

    We report on reproducible shock acceleration from irradiation of a λ =10 μ m CO2 laser on optically shaped H2 and He gas targets. A low energy laser prepulse (I ≲1014 W cm-2 ) is used to drive a blast wave inside the gas target, creating a steepened, variable density gradient. This is followed, after 25 ns, by a high intensity laser pulse (I >1016 W cm-2 ) that produces an electrostatic collisionless shock. Upstream ions are accelerated for a narrow range of prepulse energies. For long density gradients (≳40 μ m ), broadband beams of He+ and H+ are routinely produced, while for shorter gradients (≲20 μ m ), quasimonoenergetic acceleration of protons is observed. These measurements indicate that the properties of the accelerating shock and the resultant ion energy distribution, in particular the production of narrow energy spread beams, is highly dependent on the plasma density profile. These findings are corroborated by 2D particle-in-cell simulations.

  9. Spectral modification of shock accelerated ions using a hydrodynamically shaped gas target

    SciTech Connect

    Tresca, O.; Polyanskiy, M. N.; Dover, N. P.; Cook, N.; Maharjan, C.; Najmudin, Z.; Shkolnikov, P.; Pogorelsky, I.

    2015-08-28

    We report on reproducible shock acceleration from irradiation of a λ=10 μm CO2 laser on optically shaped H2 and He gas targets. A low energy laser prepulse (I≲1014 W cm–2) is used to drive a blast wave inside the gas target, creating a steepened, variable density gradient. This is followed, after 25 ns, by a high intensity laser pulse (I>1016 W cm–2) that produces an electrostatic collisionless shock. Upstream ions are accelerated for a narrow range of prepulse energies. For long density gradients (≳40 μm), broadband beams of He+ and H+ were routinely produced, whilst for shorter gradients (≲20 μm), quasimonoenergetic acceleration of protons is observed. These measurements indicate that the properties of the accelerating shock and the resultant ion energy distribution, in particular the production of narrow energy spread beams, is highly dependent on the plasma density profile. These findings are corroborated by 2D particle-in-cell simulations.

  10. Spectral modification of shock accelerated ions using a hydrodynamically shaped gas target

    DOE PAGES

    Tresca, O.; Polyanskiy, M. N.; Dover, N. P.; Cook, N.; Maharjan, C.; Najmudin, Z.; Shkolnikov, P.; Pogorelsky, I.

    2015-08-28

    We report on reproducible shock acceleration from irradiation of a λ=10 μm CO2 laser on optically shaped H2 and He gas targets. A low energy laser prepulse (I≲1014 W cm–2) is used to drive a blast wave inside the gas target, creating a steepened, variable density gradient. This is followed, after 25 ns, by a high intensity laser pulse (I>1016 W cm–2) that produces an electrostatic collisionless shock. Upstream ions are accelerated for a narrow range of prepulse energies. For long density gradients (≳40 μm), broadband beams of He+ and H+ were routinely produced, whilst for shorter gradients (≲20 μm),more » quasimonoenergetic acceleration of protons is observed. These measurements indicate that the properties of the accelerating shock and the resultant ion energy distribution, in particular the production of narrow energy spread beams, is highly dependent on the plasma density profile. These findings are corroborated by 2D particle-in-cell simulations.« less

  11. Spectral Modification of Shock Accelerated Ions Using a Hydrodynamically Shaped Gas Target.

    PubMed

    Tresca, O; Dover, N P; Cook, N; Maharjan, C; Polyanskiy, M N; Najmudin, Z; Shkolnikov, P; Pogorelsky, I

    2015-08-28

    We report on reproducible shock acceleration from irradiation of a λ=10  μm CO_{2} laser on optically shaped H_{2} and He gas targets. A low energy laser prepulse (I≲10^{14}  W cm^{-2}) is used to drive a blast wave inside the gas target, creating a steepened, variable density gradient. This is followed, after 25 ns, by a high intensity laser pulse (I>10^{16}  W cm^{-2}) that produces an electrostatic collisionless shock. Upstream ions are accelerated for a narrow range of prepulse energies. For long density gradients (≳40  μm), broadband beams of He^{+} and H^{+} are routinely produced, while for shorter gradients (≲20  μm), quasimonoenergetic acceleration of protons is observed. These measurements indicate that the properties of the accelerating shock and the resultant ion energy distribution, in particular the production of narrow energy spread beams, is highly dependent on the plasma density profile. These findings are corroborated by 2D particle-in-cell simulations. PMID:26371658

  12. Target designs for Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) utilizing lithium-aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Todosow, M.; Van Tuyle, G.J.

    1996-03-01

    A number of accelerator-driven spallation neutron-source target/blanket systems have been developed for production of tritium under the APT Program. The two systems described in this paper employ a proton linear accelerator, and a target which contains a heavy-metal(s) for the production of neutrons via spallation, and solid lithium-aluminum for the production of tritium via neutron capture. lie lithium-aluminum technology is based on that employed at Savannah River for tritium production since the 1950`s. In the APT concept tritium is produced without the presence of fissionable materials; therefore, no high-level waste is produced, and the ES&H concerns are significantly reduced compared to reactor systems.

  13. Investigation of Lead Target Nuclei Used on Accelerator-Driven Systems for Tritium Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tel, E.; Aydin, A.

    2012-02-01

    High-current proton accelerators are being researched at Los Alamos National Laboratory and other laboratories for accelerator production of tritium, transmuting long-lived radioactive waste into shorter-lived products, converting excess plutonium, and producing energy. These technologies make use of spallation neutrons produced in ( p,xn) and ( n,xn) nuclear reactions on high-Z targets. Through ( p,xn) and ( n,xn) nuclear reactions, neutrons are produced and are moderated by heavy water. These moderated neutrons are subsequently captured on 3He to produce tritium via the ( n,p) reaction. Tritium self-sufficiency must be maintained for a commercial fusion power plant. Rubbia succeeded in a proposal of a full scale demonstration plant of the Energy Amplifier. This plant is to be known the accelerator-driven system (ADS). The ADS can be used for production of neutrons in spallation neutron source and they can act as an intense neutron source in accelerator-driven subcritical reactors, capable of incinerating nuclear waste and of producing energy. Thorium and Uranium are nuclear fuels and Lead, Bismuth, Tungsten are the target nuclei in these reactor systems. The spallation targets can be Pb, Bi, W, etc. isotopes and these target material can be liquid or solid. Naturally Lead includes the 204Pb (%1.42), 206Pb (%24.1), 207Pb (%22.1) and 208Pb (%52.3) isotopes. The design of ADS systems and also a fusion-fission hybrid reactor systems require the knowledge of a wide range of better data. In this study, by using Hartree-Fock method with an effective nucleon-nucleon Skyrme interactions rms nuclear charge radii, rms nuclear mass radii, rms nuclear proton, neutron radii and neutron skin thickness were calculated for the 204, 206, 208Pb isotopes . The calculated results have been compared with those of the compiled experimental and theoretical values of other studies.

  14. Nonlinear surface plasma wave induced target normal sheath acceleration of protons

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C. S.; Tripathi, V. K. Shao, Xi; Liu, T. C.

    2015-02-15

    The mode structure of a large amplitude surface plasma wave (SPW) over a vacuum–plasma interface, including relativistic and ponderomotive nonlinearities, is deduced. It is shown that the SPW excited by a p-polarized laser on a rippled thin foil target can have larger amplitude than the transmitted laser amplitude and cause stronger target normal sheath acceleration of protons as reported in a recent experiment. Substantial enhancement in proton number also occurs due to the larger surface area covered by the SPW.

  15. Size of lethality target in mouse immature oocytes determined with accelerated heavy ions.

    PubMed

    Straume, T; Dobson, R L; Kwan, T C

    1989-01-01

    Mouse immature oocytes were irradiated in vivo with highly charged, heavy ions from the Bevalac accelerator at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. The particles used were 670-MeV/nucleon Si14+, 570-MeV/nucleon Ar18+, and 450-MeV/nucleon Fe26+. The cross-sectional area of the lethality target in these extremely radiosensitive cells was determined from fluence-response curves and information on energy deposition by delta rays. Results indicate a target cross-section larger than that of the nucleus, one which closely approximates the cross-sectional area of the entire oocyte. For 450-MeV/nucleon Fe26+ particles, the predicted target cross-sectional area is 120 +/- 16 microns2, comparing well with the microscopically determined cross-sectional area of 111 +/- 12 microns2 for these cells. The present results are in agreement with our previous target studies which implicate the oocyte plasma membrane.

  16. High-intensity laser-driven proton acceleration enhancement from hydrogen containing ultrathin targets

    SciTech Connect

    Dollar, F.; Reed, S. A.; Matsuoka, T.; Bulanov, S. S.; Chvykov, V.; Kalintchenko, G.; McGuffey, C.; Rousseau, P.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Willingale, L.; Yanovsky, V.; Krushelnick, K.; Maksimchuk, A.; Litzenberg, D. W.

    2013-09-30

    Laser driven proton acceleration experiments from micron and submicron thick targets using high intensity (2 × 10{sup 21} W/cm{sup 2}), high contrast (10{sup −15}) laser pulses show an enhancement of maximum energy when hydrogen containing targets were used instead of non-hydrogen containing. In our experiments, using thin (<1μm) plastic foil targets resulted in maximum proton energies that were consistently 20%–100% higher than when equivalent thickness inorganic targets, including Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} and Al, were used. Proton energies up to 20 MeV were measured with a flux of 10{sup 7} protons/MeV/sr.

  17. Generation of a rectangular beam distribution for irradiation of the accelerator production of tritium target

    SciTech Connect

    Blind, B.

    1990-01-01

    A scheme has been developed to produce a well-confined rectangular beam-intensity distribution of greatly enhanced uniformity from initially-peaked intensity distributions such as Gaussian or parabolic distributions without beam scraping. This scheme employs a system of linear and nonlinear transport-line elements. The linear elements prepare the beam for the nonlinear focusing and govern the beam size at the target. Uniformity is achieved with octupoles, and beam confinement is assured with duodecapoles. The scheme was applied to the target focus for the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) system. An initially Gaussian-distributed beam of 1.6-GeV protons was shaped into a rectangular 4 m by 2 m beam spot of acceptably uniform intensity at the tritium-production target. The scheme eliminates the need for sweeping the beam in a raster pattern to produce uniform target illumination. Details of the scheme are discussed.

  18. Design of photon converter and photoneutron target for High power electron accelerator based BNCT.

    PubMed

    Rahmani, Faezeh; Seifi, Samaneh; Anbaran, Hossein Tavakoli; Ghasemi, Farshad

    2015-12-01

    An electron accelerator, ILU-14, with current of 10 mA and 100 kW in power has been considered as one of the options for neutron source in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). The final design of neutron target has been obtained using MCNPX to optimize the neutron production. Tungsten in strip shape and D2O in cylindrical form have been proposed as the photon converter and the photoneutron target, respectively. In addition calculation of heat deposition in the photon target design has been considered to ensure mechanical stability of target. The results show that about 8.37×10(12) photoneutron/s with average energy of 615 keV can be produced by this neutron source design. In addition, using an appropriate beam shaping assembly an epithermal neutron flux of the order of 1.24×10(8) cm(-2) s(-1) can be obtained for BNCT applications.

  19. Overview of progress on the improvement projects for the LANSCE accelerator and target facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Macek, R.J.; Browne, J.; Brun, T.; Donahue, J.B.; Fitzgerald, D.H.; Hoffman, E.; Pynn, R.; Schriber, S.; Weinacht, D.

    1997-06-01

    Three projects have been initiated since 1994 to improve the performance of the accelerator and target facilities for the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). The LANSCE Reliability Improvement Project (LRIP) was separated into two phases. Phase 1, completed in 1995, targeted near-term improvements to beam reliability and availability that could be completed in one-year`s time. Phase 2, now underway and scheduled for completion in May 1998, consists of two projects: (a) implementation of direct H-injection for the Proton Storage Ring (PSR) and (b) an upgrade of the target/moderator system for the short pulse spallation neutron (SPSS) source. The latter will reduce the target change-out time from about 10 months to about three weeks. The third project, the SPSS Enhancement Project, is aimed at increasing the PSR output beam current to 200 {micro}A at 30 Hz and providing up to seven new neutron scattering instruments.

  20. Size of lethality target in mouse immature oocytes determined with accelerated heavy ions.

    PubMed

    Straume, T; Dobson, R L; Kwan, T C

    1989-01-01

    Mouse immature oocytes were irradiated in vivo with highly charged, heavy ions from the Bevalac accelerator at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. The particles used were 670-MeV/nucleon Si14+, 570-MeV/nucleon Ar18+, and 450-MeV/nucleon Fe26+. The cross-sectional area of the lethality target in these extremely radiosensitive cells was determined from fluence-response curves and information on energy deposition by delta rays. Results indicate a target cross-section larger than that of the nucleus, one which closely approximates the cross-sectional area of the entire oocyte. For 450-MeV/nucleon Fe26+ particles, the predicted target cross-sectional area is 120 +/- 16 microns2, comparing well with the microscopically determined cross-sectional area of 111 +/- 12 microns2 for these cells. The present results are in agreement with our previous target studies which implicate the oocyte plasma membrane. PMID:2657842

  1. Design of photon converter and photoneutron target for High power electron accelerator based BNCT.

    PubMed

    Rahmani, Faezeh; Seifi, Samaneh; Anbaran, Hossein Tavakoli; Ghasemi, Farshad

    2015-12-01

    An electron accelerator, ILU-14, with current of 10 mA and 100 kW in power has been considered as one of the options for neutron source in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). The final design of neutron target has been obtained using MCNPX to optimize the neutron production. Tungsten in strip shape and D2O in cylindrical form have been proposed as the photon converter and the photoneutron target, respectively. In addition calculation of heat deposition in the photon target design has been considered to ensure mechanical stability of target. The results show that about 8.37×10(12) photoneutron/s with average energy of 615 keV can be produced by this neutron source design. In addition, using an appropriate beam shaping assembly an epithermal neutron flux of the order of 1.24×10(8) cm(-2) s(-1) can be obtained for BNCT applications. PMID:26278347

  2. PIC Simulations of Proton Acceleration with High Intensity Lasers: the Transparency Regime, and Interaction with Underdense Targets

    SciTech Connect

    D'Humieres, Emmanuel; Fuchs, Julien; Antici, Patrizio; Audebert, Patrick; Brambrink, Erik; Lefebvre, Erik; Malka, Victor; Mora, Patrick; Sentoku, Yasuhiko

    2006-11-27

    Laser-accelerated ion sources open new opportunities for ion beam generation and control, and could stimulate development of compact ion accelerators for many applications. The mechanisms of proton acceleration with solid targets have been intensively studied over the past years, and new target or laser setups are now needed to obtain even higher maximum proton energies. PIC simulations have shown that using ultra thin targets, the maximum proton energy can be greatly increased. The laser can pass through the target and heat target electrons more efficiently. Experiments were conducted to test the feasibility of ultra thin targets laser interaction. PIC simulations were performed and successfully compared to the experimental results. Recently, experiments have shown that a gaseous target can produce proton beams with characteristics comparable to those obtained with solid targets. PIC simulations were also used to study proton acceleration with an underdense target. The optimum thickness obtained corresponds to the thickness where the laser absorption and transmission are equal, and depends greatly on laser and target parameters. The plasma hot electron temperature has also been found to depend on both laser and target parameters. We developed a simple model for the scaling of the optimum thickness for proton acceleration on target and laser parameters.

  3. Implementation of the Polarized HD target at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Chaden Djalali; David Tedeschi

    2007-01-30

    The original goal of this proposal was to study frozen spin polarized targets (HD target and other technologies) and produce a conceptual design report for the implementation of such a target in the HALL B detector of the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab). During the first two years of the proposal, we came to the conclusion that the best suited target for JLab was a frozen spin target and helped with the design of such a target. We have not only achieved our original goal but have exceeded it by being involved in the actual building and testing of parts the target. The main reason for this success has been the hiring of a senior research associate, Dr. Oleksandr Dzyubak, who had more than 10 years of experience in the field of frozen spin polarized targets. The current grant has allowed the USC nuclear physics group to strengthen its role in the JLab collaboration and make important contribution to both the detector development and the scientific program.

  4. Targeted Ablation Reveals a Novel Role of FKBP52 in Gene-Specific Regulation of Glucocorticoid Receptor Transcriptional Activity

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Irene M.; Periyasamy, Sumudra; Hinds, Terry; Yong, Weidong; Shou, Weinian; Sanchez, Edwin R.

    2009-01-01

    FKBP52 is a tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) protein with peptidyl-prolyl isomerase activity and is found in steroid receptor complexes, including glucocorticoid receptor (GR). It is generally accepted that FKBP52 has a stimulatory effect on GR transcriptional activity. However, the mechanism by which FKBP52 controls GR is not yet clear, with reports showing effects on GR hormone-binding affinity and/or hormone-induced nuclear translocation. To address this issue, we have generated mice with targeted ablation of the FKBP52 gene. To date, no overt defects of GR-regulated physiology have been found in these animals, demonstrating that FKBP52 is not an essential regulator of global GR activity. To better assess the impact of FKBP52 on GR, mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) were generated from wild-type (WT) and FKBP52-deficient (KO) animals. Analysis of GR activity at reporter genes showed an approximate 70% reduction of activity in 52KO MEF cells, with no effect of FKBP52 loss on thyroid receptor. Interestingly, GR activity at endogenous genes was not globally affected in 52KO cells, with reduced activity at GILZ and FKBP51, but not at SGK and p21. Thus, FKBP52 appears to be a gene-specific modulator of GR. To investigate the mechanism of this action, analyses of GR heterocomplex composition, hormone-binding affinity, and ability to undergo hormone-induced nuclear translocation and DNA-binding were performed. Interestingly, no effect of FKBP52 loss was found for any of these GR properties, suggesting that the main function of FKBP52 is a heretofore-unknown ability to control GR activity at target genes. Lastly, loss of FKBP52 did not affect the ability of GR to undergo hormone-induced autologous down-regulation, showing that FKBP52 does not contribute to all branches of GR signaling. The implications of these results to the potential actions of FKBP52 on GR activity in vivo are discussed. PMID:19073255

  5. High neutronic efficiency, low current targets for accelerator-based BNCT applications

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, J.R.; Ludewig, H.; Todosow, M.

    1998-08-01

    The neutronic efficiency of target/filters for accelerator-based BNCT applications is measured by the proton current required to achieve a desirable neutron current at the treatment port (10{sup 9} n/cm{sup 2}/s). In this paper the authors describe two possible targeyt/filter concepts wihch minimize the required current. Both concepts are based on the Li-7 (p,n)Be-7 reaction. Targets that operate near the threshold energy generate neutrons that are close tothe desired energy for BNCT treatment. Thus, the filter can be extremely thin ({approximately} 5 cm iron). However, this approach has an extremely low neutron yield (n/p {approximately} 1.0({minus}6)), thus requiring a high proton current. The proposed solutino is to design a target consisting of multiple extremely thin targets (proton energy loss per target {approximately} 10 keV), and re-accelerate the protons between each target. Targets operating at ihgher proton energies ({approximately} 2.5 MeV) have a much higher yield (n/p {approximately} 1.0({minus}4)). However, at these energies the maximum neutron energy is approximately 800 keV, and thus a neutron filter is required to degrade the average neutron energy to the range of interest for BNCT (10--20 keV). A neutron filter consisting of fluorine compounds and iron has been investigated for this case. Typically a proton current of approximately 5 mA is required to generate the desired neutron current at the treatment port. The efficiency of these filter designs can be further increased by incorporating neutron reflectors that are co-axial with the neutron source. These reflectors are made of materials which have high scattering cross sections in the range 0.1--1.0 MeV.

  6. High field plasmonics and laser-plasma acceleration in solid targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sgattoni, A.; Fedeli, L.; Cantono, G.; Ceccotti, T.; Macchi, A.

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of low intensity laser pulses with metal nano-structures is at the basis of plasmonics and the excitation of surface plasmon polaritons (SP) is one of its building blocks. Some of the configurations adopted in classical plasmonics can be explored considering high intensity lasers interacting with properly structured targets. SP excitation at intensities such that the electrons quiver at relativistic velocities, poses new questions and might open new frontiers for manipulation and amplification of high power laser pulses. Here we discuss two configurations which show evidence of the resonant coupling between relativistically intense laser pulses with the SPs on plasma targets with surface modulations. Evidences of SP excitation were observed in a recent experiment when a high contrast (1012), high intensity laser pulse (I=5\\centerdot {{10}19} W cm-2) was focussed on a grating target (engraved surface at sub-micron scale); a strong emission of multi-MeV electron bunches accelerated by SPs was observed only in conditions for the resonant SP excitation. Theoretical and numerical analysis of the Light-Sail (LS) Radiation Pressure Acceleration (RPA) regime show how the plasmonic resonant coupling of the laser light with the target rippling, affects the growth of Rayleigh Taylor Instability (RTI) driven by the radiation pressure.

  7. Navigation Systems for Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Wood, B. J.; Kruecker, J.; Abi-Jaoudeh, N; Locklin, J.; Levy, E.; Xu, S.; Solbiati, L.; Kapoor, A.; Amalou, H.; Venkatesan, A.

    2010-01-01

    Navigation systems, devices and intra-procedural software are changing the way we practice interventional oncology. Prior to the development of precision navigation tools integrated with imaging systems, thermal ablation of hard-to-image lesions was highly dependent upon operator experience, spatial skills, and estimation of positron emission tomography-avid or arterial-phase targets. Numerous navigation systems for ablation bring the opportunity for standardization and accuracy that extends our ability to use imaging feedback during procedures. Existing systems and techniques are reviewed, and specific clinical applications for ablation are discussed to better define how these novel technologies address specific clinical needs, and fit into clinical practice. PMID:20656236

  8. Acceleration Mechanism Of Pulsed Laser-Electromagnetic Hybrid Thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horisawa, Hideyuki; Mashima, Yuki; Yamada, Osamu

    2011-11-01

    A fundamental study of a newly developed rectangular pulsed laser-electromagnetic hybrid thruster was conducted. Laser-ablation plasma in the thruster was induced through laser beam irradiation onto a solid target and accelerated by electrical means instead of direct acceleration only by using a laser beam. The performance of the thrusters was evaluated by measuring the ablated mass per pulse and impulse bit. As results, significantly high specific impulses up to 7,200 s were obtained at charge energies of 8.6 J. Moreover, from the Faraday cup measurement, it was confirmed that the speed of ions was accelerated with addition of electric energy.

  9. High-intensity laser-accelerated ion beam produced from cryogenic micro-jet target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauthier, M.; Kim, J. B.; Curry, C. B.; Aurand, B.; Gamboa, E. J.; Göde, S.; Goyon, C.; Hazi, A.; Kerr, S.; Pak, A.; Propp, A.; Ramakrishna, B.; Ruby, J.; Willi, O.; Williams, G. J.; Rödel, C.; Glenzer, S. H.

    2016-11-01

    We report on the successful operation of a newly developed cryogenic jet target at high intensity laser-irradiation. Using the frequency-doubled Titan short pulse laser system at Jupiter Laser Facility, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, we demonstrate the generation of a pure proton beam a with maximum energy of 2 MeV. Furthermore, we record a quasi-monoenergetic peak at 1.1 MeV in the proton spectrum emitted in the laser forward direction suggesting an alternative acceleration mechanism. Using a solid-density mixed hydrogen-deuterium target, we are also able to produce pure proton-deuteron ion beams. With its high purity, limited size, near-critical density, and high-repetition rate capability, this target is promising for future applications.

  10. ACCELERATOR SYSTEMS MODIFICATIONS FOR A SECOND TARGET STATION AT THE OAK RIDGE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE

    SciTech Connect

    Galambos, John D; Kim, Sang-Ho; Plum, Michael A

    2014-01-01

    A second target station is planned for the Oak Ridge Spallation Neutron Source. The ion source will be upgraded to increase the peak current from 38 to 49 mA, additional superconducting RF cavities will be added to the linac to increase the H beam energy from 938 to 1300 MeV, and the accumulator ring will receive modifications to the injection and extraction systems to accommodate the higher beam energy. After pulse compression in the storage ring one sixth of the beam pulses (10 out of 60 Hz) will be diverted to the second target by kicker and septum magnets added to the existing Ring to Target Beam Transport (RTBT) line. No further modifications will be made to the RTBT so that when the kicker and septum magnets are turned off the original beam transport lattice will be unaffected. In this paper we will discuss these and other planned modifications and upgrades to the accelerator facility.

  11. Simulations of ion acceleration from ultrathin targets with the VEGA petawatt laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockhausen, Luca C.; Torres, Ricardo; Conejero Jarque, Enrique

    2015-05-01

    The Spanish Pulsed Laser Centre (CLPU) is a new high-power laser facility for users. Its main system, VEGA, is a CPA Ti:Sapphire laser which, in its final phase, will be able to reach petawatt peak powers in pulses of 30 fs with a pulse contrast of 1 : 1010 at 1 ps. The extremely low level of pre-pulse intensity makes this system ideally suited for studying the laser interaction with ultrathin targets. We have used the particle-in-cell (PIC) code OSIRIS to carry out 2D simulations of the acceleration of ions from ultrathin solid targets under the unique conditions provided by VEGA, with laser intensities up to 1022Wcm-2 impinging normally on 5 - 40 nm thick overdense plasmas, with different polarizations and pre-plasma scale lengths. We show how signatures of the radiation pressure dominated regime, such as layer compression and bunch formation, are only present with circular polarization. By passively shaping the density gradient of the plasma, we demonstrate an enhancement in peak energy up to tens of MeV and monoenergetic features. On the contrary linear polarization at the same intensity level causes the target to blow up, resulting in much lower energies and broader spectra. One limiting factor of Radiation Pressure Acceleration is the development of Rayleigh-Taylor like instabilities at the interface of the plasma and photon fluid. This results in the formation of bubbles in the spatial profile of laser-accelerated proton beams. These structures were previously evidenced both experimentally and theoretically. We have performed 2D simulations to characterize this bubble-like structure and report on the dependency on laser and target parameters.

  12. Measurement of Neutrons Produced by Beam-Target Interactions via a Coaxial Plasma Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cauble, Scott; Poehlmann, Flavio; Rieker, Gregory; Cappelli, Mark

    2011-10-01

    This poster presents a method to measure neutron yield from a coaxial plasma accelerator. Stored electrical energies between 1 and 19 kJ are discharged within a few microseconds across the electrodes of the coaxial gun, accelerating deuterium gas samples to plasma beam energies well beyond the keV energy range. The focus of this study is to examine the interaction of the plasma beam with a deuterated target by designing and fabricating a detector to measure neutron yield. Given the strong electromagnetic pulse associated with our accelerator, indirect measurement of neutrons via threshold-dependent nuclear activation serves as both a reliable and definitive indicator of high-energy particles for our application. Upon bombardment with neutrons, discs or stacks of metal foils placed near the deuterated target undergo nuclear activation reactions, yielding gamma-emitting isotopes whose decay is measured by a scintillation detector system. By collecting gamma ray spectra over time and considering nuclear cross sections, the magnitude of the original neutron pulse is inferred.

  13. High-power liquid-lithium target prototype for accelerator-based boron neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Halfon, S; Paul, M; Arenshtam, A; Berkovits, D; Bisyakoev, M; Eliyahu, I; Feinberg, G; Hazenshprung, N; Kijel, D; Nagler, A; Silverman, I

    2011-12-01

    A prototype of a compact Liquid-Lithium Target (LiLiT), which will possibly constitute an accelerator-based intense neutron source for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) in hospitals, was built. The LiLiT setup is presently being commissioned at Soreq Nuclear Research Center (SNRC). The liquid-lithium target will produce neutrons through the (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be reaction and it will overcome the major problem of removing the thermal power generated using a high-intensity proton beam (>10 kW), necessary for sufficient neutron flux. In off-line circulation tests, the liquid-lithium loop generated a stable lithium jet at high velocity, on a concave supporting wall; the concept will first be tested using a high-power electron beam impinging on the lithium jet. High intensity proton beam irradiation (1.91-2.5 MeV, 2-4 mA) will take place at Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility (SARAF) superconducting linear accelerator currently in construction at SNRC. Radiological risks due to the (7)Be produced in the reaction were studied and will be handled through a proper design, including a cold trap and appropriate shielding. A moderator/reflector assembly is planned according to a Monte Carlo simulation, to create a neutron spectrum and intensity maximally effective to the treatment and to reduce prompt gamma radiation dose risks.

  14. Production of 64Cu and 67Cu radiopharmaceuticals using zinc target irradiated with accelerator neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawabata, Masako; Hashimoto, Kazuyuki; Saeki, Hideya; Sato, Nozomi; Motoishi, Shoji; Nagai, Yasuki

    2014-09-01

    Copper radioisotopes have gained a lot of attention in radiopharmaceuticals owing to their unique decay characteristics. The longest half-life β emitter, 67Cu, is thought to be suitable for targeted radio-immunotherapy. Adequate production of 67Cu to meet the demands of clinical studies has not been fully established. Another attractive copper isotope, 64Cu has possible applications as a diagnostic imaging tracer combined with a therapeutic effect. This work proposes a production method using accelerator neutrons in which two copper radioisotopes can be produced: 1) 68Zn(n,x)67Cu and 2) 64Zn(n,p)64Cu using ~14 MeV neutrons generated by natC(d, n) reaction, both from natural or enriched zinc oxides. The generated 64,67Cu were separated from the target zinc oxide using a chelating and an anion exchange columns and were labelled with two widely studied chelators where the labelling efficiency was found to be acceptably good. The major advantage of this method is that a significant amount of 64,67Cu with a very few impurity radionuclides are produced which also makes the separation procedure simple. Provided an accelerator supplying an Ed = ~ 40 MeV, a wide application of 64,67Cu based drugs in nuclear medicine is feasible in the near future. We will present the characteristics of this production method using accelerator neutrons including the chemical separation processes.

  15. A Fast, Electromagnetically Driven Supersonic Gas Jet Target For Laser Wakefield Acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnan, Mahadevan; Wright, Jason; Ma, Timothy

    2009-01-22

    Laser-Wakefield acceleration (LWFA) promises electron accelerators with unprecedented electric field gradients. Gas jets and gas-filled capillary discharge waveguides are two primary targets of choice for LWFA. Present gas jets have lengths of only 2-4 mm at densities of 1-4x10{sup 19} /cm{sup 3}, sufficient for self-trapping and acceleration to energies up to {approx}150 MeV. While 3 cm capillary structures have been used to accelerate beams up to 1 GeV, gas jets require a well-collimated beam that is {>=}10 mm in length and <500 {mu}m in width, with a tunable gas density profile to optimize the LWFA process. This paper describes the design of an electromagnetically driven, fast supersonic gas valve that opens in <100 {mu}s, closes in <500 {mu}s and can operate at pressures beyond 1000 psia. The motion of the valve seat (flyer plate) is measured using a laser probe and compared with predictions of a model. The valve design is based on an optimization of many parameters: flyer plate mass and durability, driver bank speed and stored energy for high rep-rate (>10 Hz) operation, return spring non-linearity and materials selection for various components. Optimization of the valve dynamics and preliminary designs of the supersonic flow patterns are described.

  16. Collimated proton acceleration in light sail regime with a tailored pinhole target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H. Y.; Yan, X. Q.; Zepf, M.

    2014-06-01

    A scheme for producing collimated protons from laser interactions with a diamond-like-carbon + pinhole target is proposed. The process is based on radiation pressure acceleration in the multi-species light-sail regime [B. Qiao et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 155002 (2010); T. P. Yu et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 065002 (2010)]. Particle-in-cell simulations demonstrate that transverse quasistatic electric field at TV/m level can be generated in the pinhole. The transverse electric field suppresses the transverse expansion of protons effectively, resulting in a higher density and more collimated proton beam compared with a single foil target. The dependence of the proton beam divergence on the parameters of the pinhole is also investigated.

  17. New concepts for compact accelerator/target for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, J.R.; Ludewig, H.; Todosow, M.; Reich, M.

    1996-12-31

    Two new target concepts, NIFTI and DISCOS, that enable a large reduction in the proton beam current needed to produce epithermal neutrons for BNCT (Boron Neutron Capture Therapy) are described. In the NIFTI concept, high energy neutrons produced by (p, n) reactions of 2.5 MeV protons on Li are down scattered to treatment energies ({approximately} 20 keV) by relatively thin layers of PbF{sub 2} and iron. In the DISCOS concept, treatment energy neutrons are produced directly in a succession of thin ({approximately} 1 micron) liquid Li films on rotating Be foils. These foils interact with a proton beam that operates just above threshold for the (p, n) reaction, with an applied DC field to re-accelerate the proton beam between the target foils.

  18. Collimated proton acceleration in light sail regime with a tailored pinhole target

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, H. Y.; Zepf, M.; Yan, X. Q.

    2014-06-15

    A scheme for producing collimated protons from laser interactions with a diamond-like-carbon + pinhole target is proposed. The process is based on radiation pressure acceleration in the multi-species light-sail regime [B. Qiao et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 155002 (2010); T. P. Yu et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 065002 (2010)]. Particle-in-cell simulations demonstrate that transverse quasistatic electric field at TV/m level can be generated in the pinhole. The transverse electric field suppresses the transverse expansion of protons effectively, resulting in a higher density and more collimated proton beam compared with a single foil target. The dependence of the proton beam divergence on the parameters of the pinhole is also investigated.

  19. Target/Blanket Design for the Accelerator Production of Tritium Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Cappiello, M. W.

    1997-12-31

    The Accelerator Production of Tritium Target/Blanket (T/B) system is comprised of the T/B assembly and the attendant heat removal systems. The T/B assembly produces tritium using a high energy proton beam, and a spallation neutron source. The supporting heat removal systems safely remove the heat deposited by the proton beam during both normal and off-normal conditions. All systems reside within the T/B building, which is located at the end of a linear accelerator. Protons are accelerated to an energy of 1700 MeV at a current of 100 mA and are directed onto the T/B assembly. The protons interact with tungsten and lead nuclei to produce neutrons through the process of nuclear spallation. Neutron capture in {sup 3}He gas produces tritium which is removed on a continual basis in an adjacent Tritium Separation Facility (TSF). The T/B assembly is modular to allow for replacement of spent components and minimization of waste. Systems and components are designed with safety as a primary consideration to minimize risk to the workers and the public.

  20. Saturated ablation in metal hydrides and acceleration of protons and deuterons to keV energies with a soft-x-ray laser

    SciTech Connect

    Andreasson, J.; Iwan, B.; Abreu, E.; Seibert, M. M.; Hajdu, J.; Timneanu, N.; Andrejczuk, A.; Bergh, M.; Caleman, C.; Nelson, A. J.; Bajt, S.; Faeustlin, R. R.; Singer, W.; Toleikis, S.; Tschentscher, T.; Chalupsky, J.; Hajkova, V.; Juha, L.; Chapman, H. N.; Heimann, P. A.

    2011-01-15

    Studies of materials under extreme conditions have relevance to a broad area of research, including planetary physics, fusion research, materials science, and structural biology with x-ray lasers. We study such extreme conditions and experimentally probe the interaction between ultrashort soft x-ray pulses and solid targets (metals and their deuterides) at the FLASH free-electron laser where power densities exceeding 10{sup 17} W/cm{sup 2} were reached. Time-of-flight ion spectrometry and crater analysis were used to characterize the interaction. The results show the onset of saturation in the ablation process at power densities above 10{sup 16} W/cm{sup 2}. This effect can be linked to a transiently induced x-ray transparency in the solid by the femtosecond x-ray pulse at high power densities. The measured kinetic energies of protons and deuterons ejected from the surface reach several keV and concur with predictions from plasma-expansion models. Simulations of the interactions were performed with a nonlocal thermodynamic equilibrium code with radiation transfer. These calculations return critical depths similar to the observed crater depths and capture the transient surface transparency at higher power densities.

  1. Reduction of time-averaged irradiation speckle nonuniformity in laser-driven plasmas due to target ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epstein, R.

    1997-09-01

    In inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments, irradiation uniformity is improved by passing laser beams through distributed phase plates (DPPs), which produce focused intensity profiles with well-controlled, reproducible envelopes modulated by fine random speckle. [C. B. Burckhardt, Appl. Opt. 9, 695 (1970); Y. Kato and K. Mima, Appl. Phys. B 29, 186 (1982); Y. Kato et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 53, 1057 (1984); Laboratory for Laser Energetics LLE Review 33, NTIS Document No. DOE/DP/40200-65, 1987 (unpublished), p. 1; Laboratory for Laser Energetics LLE Review 63, NTIS Document No. DOE/SF/19460-91, 1995 (unpublished), p. 1.] A uniformly ablating plasma atmosphere acts to reduce the contribution of the speckle to the time-averaged irradiation nonuniformity by causing the intensity distribution to move relative to the absorption layer of the plasma. This occurs most directly as the absorption layer in the plasma moves with the ablation-driven flow, but it is shown that the effect of the accumulating ablated plasma on the phase of the laser light also makes a quantitatively significant contribution. Analytical results are obtained using the paraxial approximation applied to the beam propagation, and a simple statistical model is assumed for the properties of DPPs. The reduction in the time-averaged spatial spectrum of the speckle due to these effects is shown to be quantitatively significant within time intervals characteristic of atmospheric hydrodynamics under typical ICF irradiation intensities.

  2. Acceleration of thin flyer foils with a 1 MA pulsed power device for shock-wave experiments in clumpy foam targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neff, Stephan; Ford, Jessica; Martinez, David; Plechaty, Christopher; Wright, Sandra; Presura, Radu

    2007-11-01

    The dynamics of shock waves in clumpy media are important for understanding many astrophysical processes, including the triggering of star formation in interstellar gas clouds by passing shock waves. This phenomena can be studied in the laboratory by launching a flyer plate into a low density foam with clumps. Low density foams offer the advantage of relative low sound speeds (a few hundred meters per second) compared to normal solids, thus reducing the flyer speed required to create shock waves. In first experiments aluminum foils with thicknesses between 20 micrometer and 130 micrometer were accelerated to speeds up to 2.3 km/s. In addition, the impact of the flyers on plexiglas targets was studied. Additional measurements will focus on optimizing the flyer properties (thicker flyers, higher velocities) and on characterizing the flyer in more detail (temperature of the flyer and plasma ablation from the flyer). The results of these measurements will be used to design an experiment studying the dynamics of shock waves in clumpy foams, using the 100 TW laser system Leopard for back-lighting the foam target.

  3. Very-high-growth-factor Planar Ablative Rayleigh Taylor Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, D K; Braun, D G; Glendinning, S G; Edwards, M J; Milovich, J L; Sorce, C M; Collins, G W; Haan, S W; Page, R H

    2006-10-30

    The Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability is an important factor in bounding the performance envelope of ignition targets. This paper describes an experiment for ablative RT instability that for the first time achieves growth factors close to those expected to occur in ignition targets at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The large growth allows small seed perturbations to be detected and can be used to place an upper bound on perturbation growth at the ablation front resulting from microstructure in the preferred Be ablator. The experiments were performed on the Omega laser using a halfraum 1.2 mm long by 2 mm diameter with a 75% laser entrance hole. The halfraum was filled with {approx} 1 atm of neopentane to delay gold plasma from closing the diagnostic line of sight down the axis of the halfraum. The ablator was mounted at the base of the halfraum, and was accelerated by a two stepped X-ray pulse consisting of an early time section {approx} 100 eV to emulate the NIF foot followed by an approximately constant {approx} 150 eV drive sustained over an additional 5-7ns. It is this long pulse duration and late time observation that distinguishes the present work from previous experiments, and is responsible for the large growth that is achieved. The growth of a 2D sinusoidal perturbation machined on the drive side of the ablator was measured using face-on radiography. The diagnostic view remained open until {approx} 11 ns with maximum growth factors measured to be {approx} 200. The trajectory of the ablator was measured using streaked backlit radiography. The design and analysis of the experiments is described, and implications for experiments on ignition target ablators are discussed.

  4. Target normal sheath acceleration sheath fields for arbitrary electron energy distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitz, Holger

    2012-08-15

    Relativistic electrons, generated by ultraintense laser pulses, travel through the target and form a space charge sheath at the rear surface which can be used to accelerate ions to high energies. If the laser pulse duration is comparable or shorter than the time needed for the electrons to travel through the target, the electrons will not have the chance to form an equilibrium distribution but must be described by a non-equilibrium distribution. We present a kinetic theory of the rear sheath for arbitrary electron distribution function f(E), where E is the electron energy, and evaluate it for different shapes of f(E). We find that the far field is mainly determined by the high energy tail of the distribution, a steep decay of f(E) for high energies results in a small electric field and vice versa. The model is extended to account for electrons escaping the sheath region thereby allowing a finite potential drop over the sheath. The consequences of the model for the acceleration of ions are discussed.

  5. AGS SUPER NEUTRINO BEAM FACILITY ACCELERATOR AND TARGET SYSTEM DESIGN (NEUTRINO WORKING GROUP REPORT-II).

    SciTech Connect

    DIWAN,M.; MARCIANO,W.; WENG,W.; RAPARIA,D.

    2003-04-21

    This document describes the design of the accelerator and target systems for the AGS Super Neutrino Beam Facility. Under the direction of the Associate Laboratory Director Tom Kirk, BNL has established a Neutrino Working Group to explore the scientific case and facility requirements for a very long baseline neutrino experiment. Results of a study of the physics merit and detector performance was published in BNL-69395 in October 2002, where it was shown that a wide-band neutrino beam generated by a 1 MW proton beam from the AGS, coupled with a half megaton water Cerenkov detector located deep underground in the former Homestake mine in South Dakota would be able to measure the complete set of neutrino oscillation parameters: (1) precise determination of the oscillation parameters {Delta}m{sub 32}{sup 2} and sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 32}; (2) detection of the oscillation of {nu}{sub {mu}}-{nu}{sub e} and measurement of sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 13}; (3) measurement of {Delta}m{sub 21}{sup 2} sin 2{theta}{sub 12} in a {nu}{sub {mu}} {yields} {nu}{sub e} appearance mode, independent of the value of {theta}{sub 13}; (4) verification of matter enhancement and the sign of {Delta}m{sub 32}{sup 2}; and (5) determination of the CP-violation parameter {delta}{sub CP} in the neutrino sector. This report details the performance requirements and conceptual design of the accelerator and the target systems for the production of a neutrino beam by a 1.0 MW proton beam from the AGS. The major components of this facility include a new 1.2 GeV superconducting linac, ramping the AGS at 2.5 Hz, and the new target station for 1.0 MW beam. It also calls for moderate increase, about 30%, of the AGS intensity per pulse. Special care is taken to account for all sources of proton beam loss plus shielding and collimation of stray beam halo particles to ensure equipment reliability and personal safety. A preliminary cost estimate and schedule for the accelerator upgrade and target system are also

  6. Target design optimization for an electron accelerator driven subcritical facility with circular and square beam profiles.

    SciTech Connect

    Gohar, M. Y. A; Sofu, T.; Zhong, Z.; Belch, H.; Naberezhnev, D.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2008-10-30

    A subcritical facility driven by an electron accelerator is planned at the Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology (KIPT) in Ukraine for medical isotope production, materials research, training, and education. The conceptual design of the facility is being pursued through collaborations between ANL and KIPT. As part of the design effort, the high-fidelity analyses of various target options are performed with formulations to reflect the realistic configuration and the three dimensional geometry of each design. This report summarizes the results of target design optimization studies for electron beams with two different beam profiles. The target design optimization is performed via the sequential neutronic, thermal-hydraulic, and structural analyses for a comprehensive assessment of each configuration. First, a target CAD model is developed with proper emphasis on manufacturability to provide a basis for separate but consistent models for subsequent neutronic, thermal-hydraulic, and structural analyses. The optimizations are pursued for maximizing the neutron yield, streamlining the flow field to avoid hotspots, and minimizing the thermal stresses to increase the durability. In addition to general geometric modifications, the inlet/outlet channel configurations, target plate partitioning schemes, flow manipulations and rates, electron beam diameter/width options, and cladding material choices are included in the design optimizations. The electron beam interactions with the target assembly and the neutronic response of the subcritical facility are evaluated using the MCNPX code. the results for the electron beam energy deposition, neutron generation, and utilization in the subcritical pile are then used to characterize the axisymmetric heat generation profiles in the target assembly with explicit simulations of the beam tube, the coolant, the clad, and the target materials. Both tungsten and uranium are considered as target materials. Neutron spectra from tungsten

  7. Selection of flowing liquid lead target structural materials for accelerator driven transmutation applications

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J.J.; Buksa, J.J.

    1994-08-01

    The beam entry window and container for a liquid lead spallation target will be exposed to high fluxes of protons and neutrons that are both higher in magnitude and energy than have been experienced in proton accelerators and fission reactors, as well as in a corrosive environment. The structural material of the target should have a good compatibility with liquid lead, a sufficient mechanical strength at elevated temperatures, a good performance under an intense irradiation environment, and a low neutron absorption cross section; these factors have been used to rank the applicability of a wide range of materials for structural containment Nb-1Zr has been selected for use as the structural container for the LANL ABC/ATW molten lead target. Corrosion and mass transfer behavior for various candidate structural materials in liquid lead are reviewed, together with the beneficial effects of inhibitors and various coatings to protect substrate against liquid lead corrosion. Mechanical properties of some candidate materials at elevated temperatures and the property changes resulting from 800 MeV proton irradiation are also reviewed.

  8. Target normal sheath acceleration of foil ions by laser-trapped hot electrons from a long subcritical-density preplasma

    SciTech Connect

    Luan, S. X.; Yu, Wei; Shen, B. F.; Xu, Z. Z.; Yu, M. Y.; Zhuo, H. B.; Xu, Han; Wong, A. Y.; Wang, J. W.

    2014-12-15

    In a long subcritical density plasma, an ultrashort ultraintense laser pulse can self-organize into a fast but sub-relativistic propagating structure consisting of the modulated laser light and a large number of trapped electrons from the plasma. Upon impact of the structure with a solid foil target placed in the latter, the remaining laser light is reflected, but the dense and hot trapped electrons pass through the foil, together with the impact-generated target-frontsurface electrons to form a dense hot electron cloud at the back of the target suitable for enhancing target normal sheath acceleration of the target-backsurface ions. The accelerated ions are well collimated and of high charge and energy densities, with peak energies a full order of magnitude higher than that from target normal sheath acceleration without the subcritical density plasma. In the latter case, the space-charge field accelerating the ions is limited since they are formed only by the target-frontsurface electrons during the very short instant of laser reflection.

  9. Micro-sphere layered targets efficiency in laser driven proton acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Floquet, V.; Martin, Ph.; Ceccotti, T.; Klimo, O.; Psikal, J.; Limpouch, J.; Proska, J.; Novotny, F.; Stolcova, L.; Velyhan, A.; Macchi, A.; Sgattoni, A.; Vassura, L.; Labate, L.; Baffigi, F.; Gizzi, L. A.

    2013-08-28

    Proton acceleration from the interaction of high contrast, 25 fs laser pulses at >10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2} intensity with plastic foils covered with a single layer of regularly packed micro-spheres has been investigated experimentally. The proton cut-off energy has been measured as a function of the micro-sphere size and laser incidence angle for different substrate thickness, and for both P and S polarization. The presence of micro-spheres with a size comparable to the laser wavelength allows to increase the proton cut-off energy for both polarizations at small angles of incidence (10∘). For large angles of incidence, however, proton energy enhancement with respect to flat targets is absent. Analysis of electron trajectories in particle-in-cell simulations highlights the role of the surface geometry in the heating of electrons.

  10. Oxide or carbide nanoparticles synthesized by laser ablation of a bulk Hf target in liquids and their structural, optical, and dielectric properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semaltianos, N. G.; Friedt, J.-M.; Chassagnon, R.; Moutarlier, V.; Blondeau-Patissier, V.; Combe, G.; Assoul, M.; Monteil, G.

    2016-05-01

    Laser ablation of a bulk Hf target in deionized (DI) water, ethanol, or toluene was carried out for the production of nanoparticles' colloidal solutions. Due to the interaction of the ablation plasma plume species with the species which are produced by the liquid decomposition at the plume-liquid interface, hafnia (HfO2) nanoparticles are synthesized in DI water, hafnium carbide (HfC) nanoparticles in toluene, and a mixture of these in ethanol. The hafnia nanoparticles are in the monoclinic low temperature phase and in the tetragonal and fcc high temperature phases. Their size distribution follows log-normal function with a median diameter in the range of 4.3-5.3 nm. Nanoparticles synthesized in DI water have band gaps of 5.6 and 5.4 eV, in ethanol 5.72 and 5.65 eV (using low and high pulse energy), and in toluene 3 eV. The values for the relative permittivity in the range of 7.74-8.90 were measured for hafnia nanoparticles' thin films deposited on substrates by drop-casting (self-assembled layers) in parallel plate capacitor structures.

  11. Suppression of instability by double ablation in tungsten doped polyvinyl alcohol foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peedikakkandy, Leshma; Chaurasia, S.

    2012-07-01

    In Inertial fusion Energy (IFE) research stable acceleration of fusion targets is a significant problem due to hydrodynamic instabilities. This paper presents the results of the experiments done to investigate the effects of doping 20% of Tungsten (W) (by weight) in Polyvinyl Alcohol (PVA) polymer foils for suppression of instability during laser ablative acceleration. A 20J, 1.060μm, 900ps, Nd: Glass laser system with a focusable intensity of 3 to 9.6×1013W/cm2 was used in the experiment. It is observed that the doped PVA targets yielded stable and enhanced foil acceleration as compared to the undoped PVA foils.

  12. Study of proton acceleration at the target front surface in laser-solid interactions by neutron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Youssef, A.; Kodama, R.; Tampo, M.

    2006-03-15

    Proton acceleration inside solid LiF and CH-LiF targets irradiated by a 450-fs, 20-J, 1053-nm laser at an intensity of 3x10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2} has been studied via neutron spectroscopy. Neutron spectra produced through the {sup 7}Li(p,n){sup 7}Be reaction that occurs between accelerated protons, at the front surface, and background {sup 7}Li ions inside the target. From measured and calculated spectra, by three-dimensional Monte Carlo code, the maximum energy, total number, and slope temperature of the accelerated protons are investigated. The study indicates that protons originate at the front surface and are accelerated to a maximum energy that is reasonably consistent with the calculated one due to the ponderomotive force.

  13. Skeletal Adaptation to Intramedullary Pressure-Induced Interstitial Fluid Flow Is Enhanced in Mice Subjected to Targeted Osteocyte Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Ronald Y.; Meays, Diana R.; Meilan, Alexander S.; Jones, Jeremiah; Miramontes, Rosa; Kardos, Natalie; Yeh, Jiunn-Chern; Frangos, John A.

    2012-01-01

    Interstitial fluid flow (IFF) is a potent regulatory signal in bone. During mechanical loading, IFF is generated through two distinct mechanisms that result in spatially distinct flow profiles: poroelastic interactions within the lacunar-canalicular system, and intramedullary pressurization. While the former generates IFF primarily within the lacunar-canalicular network, the latter generates significant flow at the endosteal surface as well as within the tissue. This gives rise to the intriguing possibility that loading-induced IFF may differentially activate osteocytes or surface-residing cells depending on the generating mechanism, and that sensation of IFF generated via intramedullary pressurization may be mediated by a non-osteocytic bone cell population. To begin to explore this possibility, we used the Dmp1-HBEGF inducible osteocyte ablation mouse model and a microfluidic system for modulating intramedullary pressure (ImP) to assess whether structural adaptation to ImP-driven IFF is altered by partial osteocyte depletion. Canalicular convective velocities during pressurization were estimated through the use of fluorescence recovery after photobleaching and computational modeling. Following osteocyte ablation, transgenic mice exhibited severe losses in bone structure and altered responses to hindlimb suspension in a compartment-specific manner. In pressure-loaded limbs, transgenic mice displayed similar or significantly enhanced structural adaptation to Imp-driven IFF, particularly in the trabecular compartment, despite up to ∼50% of trabecular lacunae being uninhabited following ablation. Interestingly, regression analysis revealed relative gains in bone structure in pressure-loaded limbs were correlated with reductions in bone structure in unpressurized control limbs, suggesting that adaptation to ImP-driven IFF was potentiated by increases in osteoclastic activity and/or reductions in osteoblastic activity incurred independently of pressure loading

  14. Comparative study of ion acceleration by linearly polarized laser pulses from optimized targets of solid and near-critical density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bychenkov, V. Yu; Brantov, A. V.; Govras, E. A.

    2016-03-01

    The results of a 3D optimization study of ion acceleration from ultrathin solid density foils (Brantov et al 2015 Phys. Rev. Spec. Top. Accel. Beams 18 021301) are complemented with an improved analytic model of the directed Coulomb explosion. Similarly to optimizing overdense targets, we also optimize low-density targets to obtain maximum ion energy, motivated by progress in producing a new generation of low-density slab targets whose density can be very homogeneous and as low as the relativistic critical density. Using 3D simulations, we show that for the same laser pulse, the ion energy can be significantly increased with low-density targets. A new acceleration mechanism is responsible for such an increase. This mechanism is described qualitatively, and it explains an advantage of low-density targets for high-energy ion production by lasers.

  15. Characterization of MeV proton acceleration from double pulse irradiation of foil targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerr, S.; Mo, M. Z.; Masud, R.; Tiedje, H. F.; Tsui, Y.; Fedosejevs, R.; Link, A.; Patel, P.; McLean, H. S.; Hazi, A.; Chen, H.; Ceurvorst, L.; Norreys, P.

    2014-10-01

    We report on the experimental characterization of proton acceleration from double-pulse irradiation of um-scale foil targets. Temporally separated sub-picosecond pulses have been shown to increase the conversion efficiency of laser energy to MeV protons. Here, two 700 fs, 1 ω pulses were separated by 1 to 5 ps; total beam energy was 100 J, with 5-20% of the total energy contained within the first pulse. In contrast to the ultraclean beams used in previous experiments, prepulse energies on the order of 10 mJ were present in the current experiments which appear to have a moderating effect on the enhancement. Proton beam measurements were made with radiochromic film stacks, as well as magnetic spectrometers. The effect on electron generation was measured using Kα emission from buried Cu tracer layers, while specular light diagnostics (FROG, reflection spectralon) indicated the laser coupling efficiency into the target. The results obtained will be presented and compared to PIC simulations. Work by LLNL was performed under the auspices of U.S. DOE under contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  16. Motor and behavioral phenotype in conditional mutants with targeted ablation of cortical D1 dopamine receptor-expressing cells.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Luning; O'Leary, Claire; Kim, Hyun Ah; Parish, Clare L; Massalas, Jim; Waddington, John L; Ehrlich, Michelle E; Schütz, Günter; Gantois, Ilse; Lawrence, Andrew J; Drago, John

    2015-04-01

    D1-dopamine receptors (Drd1a) are highly expressed in the deep layers of the cerebral cortex and the striatum. A number of human diseases such as Huntington disease and schizophrenia are known to have cortical pathology involving dopamine receptor expressing neurons. To illuminate their functional role, we exploited a Cre/Lox molecular paradigm to generate Emx-1(tox) MUT mice, a transgenic line in which cortical Drd1a-expressing pyramidal neurons were selectively ablated. Emx-1(tox) MUT mice displayed prominent forelimb dystonia, hyperkinesia, ataxia on rotarod testing, heightened anxiety-like behavior, and age-dependent abnormalities in a test of social interaction. The latter occurred in the context of normal working memory on testing in the Y-maze and for novel object recognition. Some motor and behavioral abnormalities in Emx-1(tox) MUT mice overlapped with those in CamKIIα(tox) MUT transgenic mice, a line in which both striatal and cortical Drd1a-expressing cells were ablated. Although Emx-1(tox) MUT mice had normal striatal anatomy, both Emx-1(tox) MUT and CamKIIα(tox) MUT mice displayed selective neuronal loss in cortical layers V and VI. This study shows that loss of cortical Drd1a-expressing cells is sufficient to produce deficits in multiple motor and behavioral domains, independent of striatal mechanisms. Primary cortical changes in the D1 dopamine receptor compartment are therefore likely to model a number of core clinical features in disorders such as Huntington disease and schizophrenia. PMID:25684539

  17. Motor and behavioral phenotype in conditional mutants with targeted ablation of cortical D1 dopamine receptor-expressing cells.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Luning; O'Leary, Claire; Kim, Hyun Ah; Parish, Clare L; Massalas, Jim; Waddington, John L; Ehrlich, Michelle E; Schütz, Günter; Gantois, Ilse; Lawrence, Andrew J; Drago, John

    2015-04-01

    D1-dopamine receptors (Drd1a) are highly expressed in the deep layers of the cerebral cortex and the striatum. A number of human diseases such as Huntington disease and schizophrenia are known to have cortical pathology involving dopamine receptor expressing neurons. To illuminate their functional role, we exploited a Cre/Lox molecular paradigm to generate Emx-1(tox) MUT mice, a transgenic line in which cortical Drd1a-expressing pyramidal neurons were selectively ablated. Emx-1(tox) MUT mice displayed prominent forelimb dystonia, hyperkinesia, ataxia on rotarod testing, heightened anxiety-like behavior, and age-dependent abnormalities in a test of social interaction. The latter occurred in the context of normal working memory on testing in the Y-maze and for novel object recognition. Some motor and behavioral abnormalities in Emx-1(tox) MUT mice overlapped with those in CamKIIα(tox) MUT transgenic mice, a line in which both striatal and cortical Drd1a-expressing cells were ablated. Although Emx-1(tox) MUT mice had normal striatal anatomy, both Emx-1(tox) MUT and CamKIIα(tox) MUT mice displayed selective neuronal loss in cortical layers V and VI. This study shows that loss of cortical Drd1a-expressing cells is sufficient to produce deficits in multiple motor and behavioral domains, independent of striatal mechanisms. Primary cortical changes in the D1 dopamine receptor compartment are therefore likely to model a number of core clinical features in disorders such as Huntington disease and schizophrenia.

  18. Designs for highly nonlinear ablative Rayleigh-Taylor experiments on the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casner, A.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Masse, L.; Igumenshchev, I.; Liberatore, S.; Jacquet, L.; Chicanne, C.; Loiseau, P.; Poujade, O.; Bradley, D. K.; Park, H. S.; Remington, B. A.

    2012-08-01

    We present two designs relevant to ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instability in transition from weakly nonlinear to highly nonlinear regimes at the National Ignition Facility [E. I. Moses, J. Phys.: Conf. Ser. 112, 012003 (2008)]. The sensitivity of nonlinear Rayleigh-Taylor instability physics to ablation velocity is addressed with targets driven by indirect drive, with stronger ablative stabilization, and by direct drive, with weaker ablative stabilization. The indirect drive design demonstrates the potential to reach a two-dimensional bubble-merger regime with a 20 ns duration drive at moderate radiation temperature. The direct drive design achieves a 3 to 5 times increased acceleration distance for the sample in comparison to previous experiments allowing at least 2 more bubble generations when starting from a three-dimensional broadband spectrum.

  19. Efficient proton acceleration and focusing by an ultraintense laser interacting with a parabolic double concave target with an extended rear

    SciTech Connect

    Bake, Muhammad Ali; Xie, Bai-Song; Aimidula, Aimierding; Wang, Hong-Yu

    2013-07-15

    A new scheme for acceleration and focusing of protons via an improved parabolic double concave target irradiated by an ultraintense laser pulse is proposed. When an intense laser pulse illuminates a concave target, the hot electrons are concentrated on the focal region of the rear cavity and they form a strong space-charge-separation field, which accelerates the protons. For a simple concave target, the proton energy spectrum becomes very broad outside the rear cavity because of transverse divergence of the electromagnetic fields. However, particle-in-cell simulations show that, when the concave target has an extended rear, the hot electrons along the wall surface induce a transverse focusing sheath field, resulting in a clear enhancement of proton focusing, which makes the lower proton energy spread, while, leads to a little reduction of the proton bunch peak energy.

  20. Theoretical Modeling for Hepatic Microwave Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Punit

    2010-01-01

    Thermal tissue ablation is an interventional procedure increasingly being used for treatment of diverse medical conditions. Microwave ablation is emerging as an attractive modality for thermal therapy of large soft tissue targets in short periods of time, making it particularly suitable for ablation of hepatic and other tumors. Theoretical models of the ablation process are a powerful tool for predicting the temperature profile in tissue and resultant tissue damage created by ablation devices. These models play an important role in the design and optimization of devices for microwave tissue ablation. Furthermore, they are a useful tool for exploring and planning treatment delivery strategies. This review describes the status of theoretical models developed for microwave tissue ablation. It also reviews current challenges, research trends and progress towards development of accurate models for high temperature microwave tissue ablation. PMID:20309393

  1. EFFECTS OF LASER RADIATION ON MATTER: Simulation of photon acceleration upon irradiation of a mylar target by femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreev, Stepan N.; Rukhadze, Anri A.; Tarakanov, V. P.; Yakutov, B. P.

    2010-01-01

    Acceleration of protons is simulated by the particle-in-cell (PIC) method upon irradiation of mylar targets of different thicknesses by femtosecond plane-polarised pulsed laser radiation and at different angles of radiation incidence on the target. The comparison of the results of calculations with the experimental data obtained in recent experiments shows their good agreement. The optimal angle of incidence (458) at which the proton energy achieves its absolute maximum is obtained.

  2. Current hot potatoes in atrial fibrillation ablation.

    PubMed

    Roten, Laurent; Derval, Nicolas; Pascale, Patrizio; Scherr, Daniel; Komatsu, Yuki; Shah, Ashok; Ramoul, Khaled; Denis, Arnaud; Sacher, Frédéric; Hocini, Mélèze; Haïssaguerre, Michel; Jaïs, Pierre

    2012-11-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) ablation has evolved to the treatment of choice for patients with drug-resistant and symptomatic AF. Pulmonary vein isolation at the ostial or antral level usually is sufficient for treatment of true paroxysmal AF. For persistent AF ablation, drivers and perpetuators outside of the pulmonary veins are responsible for AF maintenance and have to be targeted to achieve satisfying arrhythmia-free success rate. Both complex fractionated atrial electrogram (CFAE) ablation and linear ablation are added to pulmonary vein isolation for persistent AF ablation. Nevertheless, ablation failure and necessity of repeat ablations are still frequent, especially after persistent AF ablation. Pulmonary vein reconduction is the main reason for arrhythmia recurrence after paroxysmal and to a lesser extent after persistent AF ablation. Failure of persistent AF ablation mostly is a consequence of inadequate trigger ablation, substrate modification or incompletely ablated or reconducting linear lesions. In this review we will discuss these points responsible for AF recurrence after ablation and review current possibilities on how to overcome these limitations. PMID:22920482

  3. Low- and high-order harmonic generation in the extended plasmas produced by laser ablation of zinc and manganese targets

    SciTech Connect

    Ganeev, R. A.; Baba, M.; Suzuki, M.; Yoneya, S.; Kuroda, H.

    2014-12-28

    The systematic studies of the harmonic generation of ultrashort laser pulses in the 5-mm-long Zn and Mn plasmas (i.e., application of nanosecond, picosecond, and femtosecond pulses for ablation, comparison of harmonic generation from atomic, ionic, and cluster-contained species of plasma, variation of plasma length, two-color pump of plasmas, etc.) are presented. The conversion efficiency of the 11th–19th harmonics generated in the Zn plasma was ∼5 × 10{sup −5}. The role of the ionic resonances of Zn near the 9th and 10th harmonics on the enhancement of harmonics is discussed. The enhancement of harmonics was also analyzed using the two-color pump of extended plasmas, which showed similar intensities of the odd and even harmonics along the whole range of generation. The harmonics up to the 107th order were demonstrated in the case of manganese plasma. The comparison of harmonic generation in the 5-mm-long and commonly used short (≤0.5 mm) plasma plumes showed the advanced properties of extended media.

  4. Intrafractional Target Motions and Uncertainties of Treatment Setup Reference Systems in Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Yue, Ning J.; Goyal, Sharad; Zhou Jinghao; Khan, Atif J.; Haffty, Bruce G.

    2011-04-01

    Purpose: This study investigated the magnitude of intrafractional motion and level of accuracy of various setup strategies in accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) using three-dimensional conformal external beam radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: At lumpectomy, gold fiducial markers were strategically sutured to the surrounding walls of the cavity. Weekly fluoroscopy imaging was conducted at treatment to investigate the respiration-induced target motions. Daily pre- and post-RT kV imaging was performed, and images were matched to digitally reconstructed radiographs based on bony anatomy and fiducial markers, respectively, to determine the intrafractional motion magnitudes over the course of treatment. The positioning differences of the laser tattoo- and the bony anatomy-based setups compared with those of the marker-based setup (benchmark) were also determined. The study included 21 patients. Results: Although lung exhibited significant motion, the average marker motion amplitude on the fluoroscopic image was about 1 mm. Over a typical treatment time period, average intrafractional motion magnitude was 4.2 mm and 2.6 mm based on the marker and bony anatomy matching, respectively. The bony anatomy- and laser tattoo-based interfractional setup errors, with respect to the fiducial marker-based setup, were 7.1 and 9.0 mm, respectively. Conclusions: Respiration has limited effects on the target motion during APBI. Bony anatomy-based treatment setup improves the accuracy relative to that of the laser tattoo-based setup approach. Since fiducial markers are sutured directly to the surgical cavity, the marker-based approach can further improve the interfractional setup accuracy. On average, a seroma cavity exhibits intrafractional motion of more than 4 mm, a magnitude that is larger than that which is otherwise derived based on bony anatomy matching. A seroma-specific marker-based approach has the potential to improve treatment accuracy by taking the true inter

  5. Acceleration of protons to above 6 MeV using H{sub 2}O 'snow' nanowire targets

    SciTech Connect

    Pomerantz, I.; Schleifer, E.; Nahum, E.; Eisenmann, S.; Botton, M.; Gordon, D.; Sprangel, P.; Zigler, A.

    2012-07-09

    A scheme is presented for using H{sub 2}O 'snow' nanowire targets for the generation of fast protons. This novel method may relax the requirements for very high laser intensities, thus reducing the size and cost of laser based ion acceleration system.

  6. Targeted expression of IGF-1 transgene to skeletal muscle accelerates muscle and motor neuron regeneration.

    PubMed

    Rabinovsky, Eric D; Gelir, Ethem; Gelir, Seda; Lui, Hui; Kattash, Maan; DeMayo, Francesco J; Shenaq, Saleh M; Schwartz, Robert J

    2003-01-01

    Currently, there is no known medical treatment that hastens the repair of damaged nerve and muscle. Using IGF-1 transgenic mice that specifically express human recombinant IGF-1 in skeletal muscle, we test the hypotheses that targeted gene expression of IGF-1 in skeletal muscle enhances motor nerve regeneration after a nerve crush injury. The IGF-1 transgene affects the initiation of the muscle repair process after nerve injury as shown by increased activation of SCA-1positive myogenic stem cells. Increased satellite cell differentiation and proliferation are observed in IGF-1 transgenic mice, shown by increased expression of Cyclin D1, MyoD, and myogenin. Expression of myogenin and nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunits, initially increased in both wild-type and IGF-1 transgenic mice, are restored to normal levels at a faster rate in IGF-1 transgenic mice, which indicates a rescue of nerve-evoked muscle activity. Expression of the IGF-1 transgene in skeletal muscle results in accelerated recovery of saltatory nerve conduction, increased innervation as detected by neurofilament expression, and faster recovery of muscle mass. These studies demonstrate that local expression of IGF-1 augments the repair of injured nerve and muscle.

  7. Resolving pathobiological mechanisms relating to Huntington disease: gait, balance, and involuntary movements in mice with targeted ablation of striatal D1 dopamine receptor cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun Ah; Jiang, Luning; Madsen, Heather; Parish, Clare L; Massalas, Jim; Smardencas, Arthur; O'Leary, Claire; Gantois, Ilse; O'Tuathaigh, Colm; Waddington, John L; Ehrlich, Michelle E; Lawrence, Andrew J; Drago, John

    2014-02-01

    Progressive cell loss is observed in the striatum, cerebral cortex, thalamus, hypothalamus, subthalamic nucleus and hippocampus in Huntington disease. In the striatum, dopamine-responsive medium spiny neurons are preferentially lost. Clinical features include involuntary movements, gait and orofacial impairments in addition to cognitive deficits and psychosis, anxiety and mood disorders. We utilized the Cre-LoxP system to generate mutant mice with selective postnatal ablation of D1 dopamine receptor-expressing striatal neurons to determine which elements of the complex Huntington disease phenotype relate to loss of this neuronal subpopulation. Mutant mice had reduced body weight, locomotor slowing, reduced rearing, ataxia, a short stride length wide-based erratic gait, impairment in orofacial movements and displayed haloperidol-suppressible tic-like movements. The mutation was associated with an anxiolytic profile. Mutant mice had significant striatal-specific atrophy and astrogliosis. D1-expressing cell number was reduced throughout the rostrocaudal extent of the dorsal striatum consistent with partial destruction of the striatonigral pathway. Additional striatal changes included up-regulated D2 and enkephalin mRNA, and an increased density of D2 and preproenkephalin-expressing projection neurons, and striatal neuropeptide Y and cholinergic interneurons. These data suggest that striatal D1-cell-ablation alone may account for the involuntary movements and locomotor, balance and orofacial deficits seen not only in HD but also in HD phenocopy syndromes with striatal atrophy. Therapeutic strategies would therefore need to target striatal D1 cells to ameliorate deficits especially when the clinical presentation is dominated by a bradykinetic/ataxic phenotype with involuntary movements.

  8. Resolving pathobiological mechanisms relating to Huntington disease: gait, balance, and involuntary movements in mice with targeted ablation of striatal D1 dopamine receptor cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun Ah; Jiang, Luning; Madsen, Heather; Parish, Clare L; Massalas, Jim; Smardencas, Arthur; O'Leary, Claire; Gantois, Ilse; O'Tuathaigh, Colm; Waddington, John L; Ehrlich, Michelle E; Lawrence, Andrew J; Drago, John

    2014-02-01

    Progressive cell loss is observed in the striatum, cerebral cortex, thalamus, hypothalamus, subthalamic nucleus and hippocampus in Huntington disease. In the striatum, dopamine-responsive medium spiny neurons are preferentially lost. Clinical features include involuntary movements, gait and orofacial impairments in addition to cognitive deficits and psychosis, anxiety and mood disorders. We utilized the Cre-LoxP system to generate mutant mice with selective postnatal ablation of D1 dopamine receptor-expressing striatal neurons to determine which elements of the complex Huntington disease phenotype relate to loss of this neuronal subpopulation. Mutant mice had reduced body weight, locomotor slowing, reduced rearing, ataxia, a short stride length wide-based erratic gait, impairment in orofacial movements and displayed haloperidol-suppressible tic-like movements. The mutation was associated with an anxiolytic profile. Mutant mice had significant striatal-specific atrophy and astrogliosis. D1-expressing cell number was reduced throughout the rostrocaudal extent of the dorsal striatum consistent with partial destruction of the striatonigral pathway. Additional striatal changes included up-regulated D2 and enkephalin mRNA, and an increased density of D2 and preproenkephalin-expressing projection neurons, and striatal neuropeptide Y and cholinergic interneurons. These data suggest that striatal D1-cell-ablation alone may account for the involuntary movements and locomotor, balance and orofacial deficits seen not only in HD but also in HD phenocopy syndromes with striatal atrophy. Therapeutic strategies would therefore need to target striatal D1 cells to ameliorate deficits especially when the clinical presentation is dominated by a bradykinetic/ataxic phenotype with involuntary movements. PMID:24135007

  9. Nitrogen-doped ZnO thin films by use of laser ablation of ZnO(1-x)Nx targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okato, Takeshi; Osada, Takenori; Obara, Minoru

    2005-04-01

    ZnO is inherently a strong n-type semiconductor due to its intrinsic defects. Among the group V elements (N, As, P, Sb), nitrogen is considered as teh most hopeful dopant for p-type ZnO, because substitute N (N0) is a relatively shallow acceptor. However, technical issues of the low solubility for the desirable defect and compensations from undesirable donor-like defects are imposed on the development of high mobility and low resistivity p-type ZnO. Breaking through these issues is accompanied by the optimization of dopant concentration and reduction of intrinsic defects. In this study, we have investigated the dependence of the nitrogen concentration on its electrical properties. Home-made ZnO1-xNx targets were prepared and used for KrF excimer pulsed-laser deposition (PLD) at precisely controlled growth conditions. Thin films were deposited on c-cut sapphire substrates. The nitrogen concentration was tuned by adjusting the amount of nitrogen in the ablation targets. The film properties were characterized by x-ray diffraction (XRD) and x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS). The electrical properties were measured by van der Pauw method. The as-grown ZnO:N films showed n-type conductivity, however, they were converted to p-type upon post-deposition thermal treatment. Further improvement was demonstrated by introducing a ZnO low-temperature buffer layer which realized the lattice mismatch relaxation.

  10. Measurements and effects of backstreaming ions produced at bremsstrahlung converter target in Dragon-I linear induction accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Haijun; Zhu Jun; Chen Nan; Xie Yutong; Jiang Xiaoguo; Jian Cheng

    2010-04-15

    Positive ions released from x-ray converter target impacted by electron beam of millimeter spot size can be trapped and accelerated in the incident beam's potential well. As the ions move upstream, the beam will be pinched first and then defocused at the target. Four Faraday cups are used to collect backstreaming ions produced at the bremsstrahlung converter target in Dragon-I linear induction accelerator (LIA). Experimental and theoretical results show that the backstreaming positive ions density and velocity are about 10{sup 21}/m{sup 3} and 2-3 mm/{mu}s, respectively. The theoretical and experimental results of electron beam envelope with ions and without ions are also presented. The discussions show that the backstreaming positive ions will not affect the electron beam focusing and envelope radius in Dragon-I LIA.

  11. Acceleration of protons in plasma produced from a thin plastic or aluminum target by a femtosecond laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosinski, M.; Badziak, J.; Parys, P.; Zaras-Szydlowska, A.; Ryc, L.; Torrisi, L.; Szydlowski, A.; Malinowska, A.; Kaczmarczyk, B.; Makowski, J.; Torrisi, A.

    2016-05-01

    The acceleration of protons in plasma produced from thin mylar (3.5 μ m) and aluminum (2 μm) targets by a 45-fs laser pulses with the energy of 400 mJ and the intensity of up to 1019 W/cm2 was investigated. Characteristics of forward-accelerated protons were measured by the time-of-flight method. In the measurements, special attention was paid to the dependence of proton beam parameters on the laser focus position (FP) in relation to the target surface which resulted in the intensity change within a factor of ~ 10. It was observed that in the case of using the Mylar target, the dependence of both the maximum (Epmax) and the mean (langleEprangle) proton energy on |Δx| is clearly non-symmetric with regard to the point where FP = 0 (the focal plane on the target surface) and highest proton energies are achieved when the focal plane is situated in front of the target. In particular, for the target with the thickness of 3.5 μ m Epmax reached 2.2 MeV for FP = +50 μm while for FP = 0 and FP = -100 μm the maximum proton energies reached only 1.6 MeV and 1.3 MeV, respectively. For the aluminum target of 2 μm thickness Ep changed only within ~ 40% and the highest proton energies reached 2.4 MeV.

  12. Enhanced filament ablation of metals based on plasma grating in air

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Di; Liu, Fengjiang; Ding, Liangen; Yuan, Shuai; Zeng, Heping

    2015-09-15

    We demonstrate efficient ablation of metals with filamentary plasma grating generated by two intense blue femtosecond filaments and a third focused infrared pulse. This scheme leads to significant promotion of ablation efficiency on metal targets in air in comparison with single infrared or blue filament with equal pulse energy. The reason is that the blue plasma grating firstly provides stronger intensity and a higher density of background electrons, then the delayed infrared pulse accelerates local electrons inside the plasma grating. These two processes finally results in robustly increased electron density and highly ionized metallic atoms.

  13. Three-Dimensional Dynamics of Breakout Afterburner Ion Acceleration Using High-Contrast Short-Pulse Laser and Nanoscale Targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, L.; Albright, B. J.; Bowers, K. J.; Jung, D.; Fernández, J. C.; Hegelich, B. M.

    2011-07-01

    Breakout afterburner (BOA) laser-ion acceleration has been demonstrated for the first time in the laboratory. In the BOA, an initially solid-density target undergoes relativistically induced transparency, initiating a period of enhanced ion acceleration. First-ever kinetic simulations of the BOA in three dimensions show that the ion beam forms lobes in the direction orthogonal to laser polarization and propagation. Analytic theory presented for the electron dynamics in the laser ponderomotive field explains how azimuthal symmetry breaks even for a symmetric laser intensity profile; these results are consistent with recent experiments at the Trident laser facility.

  14. Three-dimensional dynamics of breakout afterburner ion acceleration using high-contrast short-pulse laser and nanoscale targets.

    PubMed

    Yin, L; Albright, B J; Bowers, K J; Jung, D; Fernández, J C; Hegelich, B M

    2011-07-22

    Breakout afterburner (BOA) laser-ion acceleration has been demonstrated for the first time in the laboratory. In the BOA, an initially solid-density target undergoes relativistically induced transparency, initiating a period of enhanced ion acceleration. First-ever kinetic simulations of the BOA in three dimensions show that the ion beam forms lobes in the direction orthogonal to laser polarization and propagation. Analytic theory presented for the electron dynamics in the laser ponderomotive field explains how azimuthal symmetry breaks even for a symmetric laser intensity profile; these results are consistent with recent experiments at the Trident laser facility.

  15. Accelerated Blood Clearance Phenomenon Reduces the Passive Targeting of PEGylated Nanoparticles in Peripheral Arterial Disease.

    PubMed

    Im, Hyung-Jun; England, Christopher G; Feng, Liangzhu; Graves, Stephen A; Hernandez, Reinier; Nickles, Robert J; Liu, Zhuang; Lee, Dong Soo; Cho, Steve Y; Cai, Weibo

    2016-07-20

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is a leading global health concern. Due to limited imaging and therapeutic options, PAD and other ischemia-related diseases may benefit from the use of long circulating nanoparticles as imaging probes and/or drug delivery vehicles. Polyethylene glycol (PEG)-conjugated nanoparticles have shown shortened circulation half-lives in vivo when injected multiple times into a single subject. This phenomenon has become known as the accelerated blood clearance (ABC) effect. The phenomenon is of concern for clinical translation of nanomaterials as it limits the passive accumulation of nanoparticles in many diseases, yet it has not been evaluated using inorganic or organic-inorganic hybrid nanoparticles. Herein, we found that the ABC phenomenon was induced by reinjection of PEGylated long circulating organic-inorganic hybrid nanoparticles, which significantly reduced the passive targeting of (64)Cu-labeled PEGylated reduced graphene oxide-iron oxide nanoparticles ((64)Cu-RGO-IONP-PEG) in a murine model of PAD. Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging was performed at 3, 10, and 17 days postsurgical induction of hindlimb ischemia. At day 3 postsurgery, the nanoparticles displayed a long circulation half-life with enhanced accumulation in the ischemic hindlimb. At days 10 and 17 postsurgery, reinjected mice displayed a short circulation half-life and lower accumulation of the nanoparticles in the ischemic hindlimb, in comparison to the naïve group. Also, reinjected mice showed significantly higher liver uptake than the naïve group, indicating that the nanoparticles experienced higher sequestration by the liver in the reinjected group. Furthermore, photoacoustic (PA) imaging and Prussian blue staining confirmed the enhanced accumulation of the nanoparticles in the liver tissue of reinjected mice. These findings validate the ABC phenomenon using long circulating organic-inorganic hybrid nanoparticles upon multiple administrations to the same

  16. Accelerated Blood Clearance Phenomenon Reduces the Passive Targeting of PEGylated Nanoparticles in Peripheral Arterial Disease.

    PubMed

    Im, Hyung-Jun; England, Christopher G; Feng, Liangzhu; Graves, Stephen A; Hernandez, Reinier; Nickles, Robert J; Liu, Zhuang; Lee, Dong Soo; Cho, Steve Y; Cai, Weibo

    2016-07-20

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is a leading global health concern. Due to limited imaging and therapeutic options, PAD and other ischemia-related diseases may benefit from the use of long circulating nanoparticles as imaging probes and/or drug delivery vehicles. Polyethylene glycol (PEG)-conjugated nanoparticles have shown shortened circulation half-lives in vivo when injected multiple times into a single subject. This phenomenon has become known as the accelerated blood clearance (ABC) effect. The phenomenon is of concern for clinical translation of nanomaterials as it limits the passive accumulation of nanoparticles in many diseases, yet it has not been evaluated using inorganic or organic-inorganic hybrid nanoparticles. Herein, we found that the ABC phenomenon was induced by reinjection of PEGylated long circulating organic-inorganic hybrid nanoparticles, which significantly reduced the passive targeting of (64)Cu-labeled PEGylated reduced graphene oxide-iron oxide nanoparticles ((64)Cu-RGO-IONP-PEG) in a murine model of PAD. Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging was performed at 3, 10, and 17 days postsurgical induction of hindlimb ischemia. At day 3 postsurgery, the nanoparticles displayed a long circulation half-life with enhanced accumulation in the ischemic hindlimb. At days 10 and 17 postsurgery, reinjected mice displayed a short circulation half-life and lower accumulation of the nanoparticles in the ischemic hindlimb, in comparison to the naïve group. Also, reinjected mice showed significantly higher liver uptake than the naïve group, indicating that the nanoparticles experienced higher sequestration by the liver in the reinjected group. Furthermore, photoacoustic (PA) imaging and Prussian blue staining confirmed the enhanced accumulation of the nanoparticles in the liver tissue of reinjected mice. These findings validate the ABC phenomenon using long circulating organic-inorganic hybrid nanoparticles upon multiple administrations to the same

  17. Enhanced x-ray emissions from Au-Gd mixture targets ablated by a high-power nanosecond laser

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Yunsong; Shang, Wanli; Yang, Jiamin Zhang, Lu; Zhang, Wenhai; Li, Zhichao; Guo, Liang; Zhan, Xiayu; Du, Huabing; Deng, Bo; Pu, Yikang

    2014-01-28

    As an important x-ray source, enhancement of x-ray emissions from laser-produced plasmas is imperative for various applications. High-Z Au-Gd mixture targets are proposed to enhance the laser to x-ray conversion efficiency compared to pure Au target. In the experiments, a 1 ns frequency-tripled (351 nm wavelength) laser light was used to obtain an intensity of 3×10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2} on the targets. The x-ray spectra, total absolute x-ray emissions of all space, M-band fraction and backscattering from pure Au and Au-Gd mixture have been measured, respectively. It is shown that the absolute laser to x-ray conversion efficiency for the Au-Gd mixture containing 60% gold by atom is 47.7%, which has a 15% enhancement compared with that of the pure Au target. The experimental results are consistent with the radiation hydrodynamic simulations.

  18. Shock ion acceleration by an ultrashort circularly polarized laser pulse via relativistic transparency in an exploded target.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Kuk; Cho, Myung-Hoon; Song, Hyung Seon; Kang, Teyoun; Park, Hyung Ju; Jung, Moon Youn; Hur, Min Sup

    2015-10-01

    We investigated ion acceleration by an electrostatic shock in an exploded target irradiated by an ultrashort, circularly polarized laser pulse by means of one- and three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. We discovered that the laser field penetrating via relativistic transparency (RT) rapidly heated the upstream electron plasma to enable the formation of a high-speed electrostatic shock. Owing to the RT-based rapid heating and the fast compression of the initial density spike by a circularly polarized pulse, a new regime of the shock ion acceleration driven by an ultrashort (20-40 fs), moderately intense (1-1.4 PW) laser pulse is envisaged. This regime enables more efficient shock ion acceleration under a limited total pulse energy than a linearly polarized pulse with crystal laser systems of λ∼1μm.

  19. Agglomeration in core-shell structure of CuAg nanoparticles synthesized by the laser ablation of Cu target in aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrović, S.; Salatić, B.; Milovanović, D.; Lazović, V.; Živković, Lj; Trtica, M.; Jelenković, B.

    2015-02-01

    Metallic copper Cu and bimetallic copper-silver CuAg nanoparticles (NPs) are generated by the ablation of copper bulk target in water and aqueous Ag colloidal solution, respectively. The experiments were performed using nanosecond Nd:YAG laser operating at 1064 nm. The generated NPs are characterized by UV-vis absorption spectroscopy, laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering and scanning electron microscopy. The conducted investigations can be summarized as follows: (i) CuAg NPs colloidal solution possess the absorption in UV-vis spectral region, which can be attributed to the Cu-component; (ii) the primary bimetallic CuAg NPs have near uniform dimensions with diameter of about 15 nm, and as a rule, they are grouped into larger agglomerates without defined morphology; (iii) the obtained Cu NPs have mainly spherical form with average diameters up to 20 nm. Both types of NPs show a tendency towards the formation of large agglomerates with different morphology. Bimetallic NPs show the plasmon resonance in the vicinity of 640 nm with a good coincidence with formation of the colloidal solution of pure Cu NPs. The results also demonstrate that the core-shell structure (Ag-rich core/Cu-rich shell) is important for the formation of the bimetallic NPs, also agreeing very well with theory.

  20. Role of target-substrate distance on the growth of CuInSe2 thin films by pulsed laser ablation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawat, Kusum; Dhruvashi, Shishodia, P. K.

    2016-05-01

    CuInSe2 thin films have been deposited on corning glass substrates by pulsed laser ablation technique. The chamber pressure and substrate temperature was maintained at 1 × 10-6 torr and 550°C respectively during deposition of the films. The influence of target to substrate (T-S) distance on the structural and optical properties of thin films have been investigated by grazing incidence x-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscope and UV-Vis-NIR spectroscopy. The study reveals that thin films crystallized in a chalcopyrite structure with highly preferential orientation along (112) plane. Optimum T-S distance has been attained for the growth of thin films with large grain size. An intense Raman peak at 174 cm-1 corresponding to dominant A1 vibration mode is gradually shifted to smaller wavenumber with the increase in T-S distance. The optical bandgap energy of the films was evaluated and found to vary with the T-S distance. The bandgap tailing was observed to obey the Urbach rule and the Urbach energy was also calculated for the films. Scanning electron micrographs depicts uniform densely packed grains and EDAX studies revealed the elemental composition of CuInSe2 thin films.

  1. Nucleon-meson transport capability for accelerator-breeder target design. [CALOR

    SciTech Connect

    Gabriel, T.A.; Alsmiller, R.G. Jr.

    1982-01-01

    A state-of-the-art code system for nucleon-meson-lepton transport which has direct applicability to accelerator breeders is presented. Some pertinent data that have been obtained using this system are discussed and compared with experimental data.

  2. Enhanced electron injection in laser-driven bubble acceleration by ultra-intense laser irradiating foil-gas targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guo-Bo; Ma, Yan-Yun; Xu, Han; Hafz, Nasr A. M.; Yang, Xiao-Hu; Chen, Min; Yu, Tong-Pu; Zou, De-Bin; Liu, Jian-Xun; Yan, Jian-Feng; Zhuo, Hong-Bin; Gan, Long-Fei; Tian, Li-Chao; Shao, Fu-Qiu; Yin, Yan; Kawata, S.

    2015-08-01

    A scheme for enhancing the electron injection charge in a laser-driven bubble acceleration is proposed. In this scheme, a thin foil target is placed in front of a gas target. Upon interaction with an ultra-intense laser pulse, the foil emits electrons with large longitudinal momenta, allowing them to be trapped into the transmitted shaped laser-excited bubble in the gaseous plasma target. Two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation is used to demonstrate this scheme, and an electron beam with a total electron number of 4.21 × 10 8 μ m - 1 can be produced, which is twice the number of electrons produced without the foil. Such scheme may be widely used for applications that require high electron yields such as positron and gamma ray generation from relativistic electron beams interacting with solid targets.

  3. Choice reaction time to movement of eccentric visual targets during concurrent rotary acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamerman, J. A.

    1979-01-01

    This study investigates the influence of concurrent rotary acceleration on choice reaction time (RT) to a small, accelerating visual cursor on a cathode-ray tube. Subjects sat in an enclosed rotating device at the center of rotation and observed a 3-mm dot accelerating at different rates across a cathode-ray tube. The dot was viewed at various eccentricities under conditions of visual stimulation alone and with concurrent rotary acceleration. Subjects responded to both vertical and horizontal dot movements. There was a significant inverse relationship between choice RT and level of dot acceleration (p less than .001), and a significant direct relationship between choice RT and eccentricity (p less than .001). There was no significant difference between choice RT to vertical or horizontal dot motion (p greater than .25), and choice RT was not significantly affected by concurrent rotary acceleration (p greater than .10). The results are discussed in terms of the effects of vestibular stimulation on choice RT to visual motion.

  4. Modifications of thick-target model: re-acceleration of electron beams by static and stochastic electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varady, M.; Karlický, M.; Moravec, Z.; Kašparová, J.

    2014-03-01

    Context. The collisional thick-target model (CTTM) of the impulsive phase of solar flares, together with the famous Carmichael, Sturrock, Hirayama, and Kopp-Pneuman (CSHKP) model, presented for many years a "standard" model, which straightforwardly explained many observational aspects of flares. On the other hand, many critical issues appear when the concept is scrutinised theoretically or with the new generation of hard X-ray (HXR) observations. The famous "electron number problem" or problems related to transport of enormous particle fluxes though the corona represent only two of them. To resolve the discrepancies, several modifications of the CTTM appeared. Aims: We study two of them based on the global and local re-acceleration of non-thermal electrons by static and stochastic electric fields during their transport from the coronal acceleration site to the thick-target region in the chromosphere. We concentrate on a comparison of the non-thermal electron distribution functions, chromospheric energy deposits, and HXR spectra obtained for both considered modifications with the CTTM itself. Methods: The results were obtained using a relativistic test-particle approach. We simulated the transport of non-thermal electrons with a power-law spectrum including the influence of scattering, energy losses, magnetic mirroring, and also the effects of the electric fields corresponding to both modifications of the CTTM. Results: We show that both modifications of the CTTM change the outcome of the chromospheric bombardment in several aspects. The modifications lead to an increase in chromospheric energy deposit, change of its spatial distribution, and a substantial increase in the corresponding HXR spectrum intensity. Conclusions: The re-acceleration in both models reduces the demands on the efficiency of the primary coronal accelerator, on the electron fluxes transported from the corona downwards, and on the total number of accelerated coronal electrons during flares.

  5. Targeted Laser Ablation of the Zebrafish Larval Heart Induces Models of Heart Block, Valvular Regurgitation, and Outflow Tract Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Matrone, Gianfranco; Maqsood, Sana; Taylor, Jonathan; Mullins, John J.; Tucker, Carl S.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Mammalian models of cardiac disease have provided unique and important insights into human disease but have become increasingly challenging to produce. The zebrafish could provide inexpensive high-throughput models of cardiac injury and repair. We used a highly targeted laser, synchronized to fire at specific phases of the cardiac cycle, to induce regional injury to the ventricle, atrioventricular (AV) cushion, and bulbus arteriosus (BA). We assessed the impact of laser injury on hearts of zebrafish early larvae at 72 h postfertilization, to different regions, recording the effects on ejection fraction (EF), heart rate (HR), and blood flow at 2 and 24 h postinjury (hpi). Laser injury to the apex, midzone, and outflow regions of the ventricle resulted in reductions of the ventricle EF at 2 hpi with full recovery of function by 24 hpi. Laser injury to the ventricle, close to the AV cushion, was more likely to cause bradycardia and atrial–ventricular dysfunction, suggestive of an electrical conduction block. At 2 hpi, direct injury to the AV cushion resulted in marked regurgitation of blood from the ventricle to the atrium. Laser injury to the BA caused temporary outflow tract obstruction with cessation of ventricle contraction and circulation. Despite such damage, 80% of embryos showed complete recovery of the HR and function within 24 h of laser injury. Precision laser injury to key structures in the zebrafish developing heart provides a range of potentially useful models of hemodynamic overload, injury, and repair. PMID:25272304

  6. Demonstration of the improved rocket efficiency in direct-drive implosions using different ablator materials.

    PubMed

    Michel, D T; Goncharov, V N; Igumenshchev, I V; Epstein, R; Froula, D H

    2013-12-13

    The success of direct-drive implosions depends critically on the ability to create high ablation pressures (∼100  Mbar) and accelerating the imploding shell to ignition-relevant velocities (>3.7×10(7 ) cm/s) using direct laser illumination. This Letter reports on an experimental study of the conversion of absorbed laser energy into kinetic energy of the shell (rocket efficiency) where different ablators were used to vary the ratio of the atomic number to the atomic mass. The implosion velocity of Be shells is increased by 20% compared to C and CH shells in direct-drive implosions when a constant initial target mass is maintained. These measurements are consistent with the predicted increase in the rocket efficiency of 28% for Be and 5% for C compared to a CH ablator.

  7. Non-Invasive Targeted Peripheral Nerve Ablation Using 3D MR Neurography and MRI-Guided High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound (MR-HIFU): Pilot Study in a Swine Model

    PubMed Central

    Huisman, Merel; Staruch, Robert M.; Ladouceur-Wodzak, Michelle; van den Bosch, Maurice A.; Burns, Dennis K.; Chhabra, Avneesh; Chopra, Rajiv

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Ultrasound (US)-guided high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) has been proposed for noninvasive treatment of neuropathic pain and has been investigated in in-vivo studies. However, ultrasound has important limitations regarding treatment guidance and temperature monitoring. Magnetic resonance (MR)-imaging guidance may overcome these limitations and MR-guided HIFU (MR-HIFU) has been used successfully for other clinical indications. The primary purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of utilizing 3D MR neurography to identify and guide ablation of peripheral nerves using a clinical MR-HIFU system. Methods Volumetric MR-HIFU was used to induce lesions in the peripheral nerves of the lower limbs in three pigs. Diffusion-prep MR neurography and T1-weighted images were utilized to identify the target, plan treatment and immediate post-treatment evaluation. For each treatment, one 8 or 12 mm diameter treatment cell was used (sonication duration 20 s and 36 s, power 160–300 W). Peripheral nerves were extracted < 3 hours after treatment. Ablation dimensions were calculated from thermal maps, post-contrast MRI and macroscopy. Histological analysis included standard H&E staining, Masson’s trichrome and toluidine blue staining. Results All targeted peripheral nerves were identifiable on MR neurography and T1-weighted images and could be accurately ablated with a single exposure of focused ultrasound, with peak temperatures of 60.3 to 85.7°C. The lesion dimensions as measured on MR neurography were similar to the lesion dimensions as measured on CE-T1, thermal dose maps, and macroscopy. Histology indicated major hyperacute peripheral nerve damage, mostly confined to the location targeted for ablation. Conclusion Our preliminary results indicate that targeted peripheral nerve ablation is feasible with MR-HIFU. Diffusion-prep 3D MR neurography has potential for guiding therapy procedures where either nerve targeting or avoidance is desired, and may

  8. Analysis of the structure, configuration, and sizing of Cu and Cu oxide nanoparticles generated by fs laser ablation of solid target in liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santillán, J. M. J.; Videla, F. A.; Fernández van Raap, M. B.; Schinca, D. C.; Scaffardi, L. B.

    2013-04-01

    We report on the analysis of structure, configuration, and sizing of Cu and Cu oxide nanoparticles (Nps) produced by femtosecond (fs) laser ablation of solid copper target in liquids. Laser pulse energy ranged between 500 μJ and 50 μJ. Water and acetone were used to produce the colloidal suspensions. The study was performed through optical extinction spectroscopy using Mie theory to fit the full experimental spectra, considering free and bound electrons size dependent contributions to the metal dielectric function. Raman spectroscopy and AFM technique were also used to characterize the sample. Considering the possible oxidation of copper during the fabrication process, two species (Cu and Cu2O) arranged in two structures (bare core or core-shell) and in two configuration types (Cu-Cu2O or Cu2O-Cu) were considered for the fitting depending on the laser pulse energy and the surrounding media. For water at high energy, it can be observed that a Cu-Cu2O configuration fits the experimental spectra of the colloidal suspension, while for decreasing energy and below a certain threshold, a Cu2O-Cu configuration needs to be included for the optimum fit. Both species coexist for energies below 170 μJ for water. On the other hand, for acetone at high energy, optimum fit of the full spectrum suggests the presence a bimodal Cu-Cu2O core-shell Nps distribution while for decreasing energy and below a 70 μJ threshold energy value, Cu2O-Cu core-shell Nps must be included, together with the former configuration, for the fit of the full spectrum. We discuss possible reasons for the changes in the structural configuration of the core-shell Nps.

  9. Analysis of the structure, configuration, and sizing of Cu and Cu oxide nanoparticles generated by fs laser ablation of solid target in liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Santillan, J. M. J.; Videla, F. A.; Schinca, D. C.; Scaffardi, L. B.; Fernandez van Raap, M. B.

    2013-04-07

    We report on the analysis of structure, configuration, and sizing of Cu and Cu oxide nanoparticles (Nps) produced by femtosecond (fs) laser ablation of solid copper target in liquids. Laser pulse energy ranged between 500 {mu}J and 50 {mu}J. Water and acetone were used to produce the colloidal suspensions. The study was performed through optical extinction spectroscopy using Mie theory to fit the full experimental spectra, considering free and bound electrons size dependent contributions to the metal dielectric function. Raman spectroscopy and AFM technique were also used to characterize the sample. Considering the possible oxidation of copper during the fabrication process, two species (Cu and Cu{sub 2}O) arranged in two structures (bare core or core-shell) and in two configuration types (Cu-Cu{sub 2}O or Cu{sub 2}O-Cu) were considered for the fitting depending on the laser pulse energy and the surrounding media. For water at high energy, it can be observed that a Cu-Cu{sub 2}O configuration fits the experimental spectra of the colloidal suspension, while for decreasing energy and below a certain threshold, a Cu{sub 2}O-Cu configuration needs to be included for the optimum fit. Both species coexist for energies below 170 {mu}J for water. On the other hand, for acetone at high energy, optimum fit of the full spectrum suggests the presence a bimodal Cu-Cu{sub 2}O core-shell Nps distribution while for decreasing energy and below a 70 {mu}J threshold energy value, Cu{sub 2}O-Cu core-shell Nps must be included, together with the former configuration, for the fit of the full spectrum. We discuss possible reasons for the changes in the structural configuration of the core-shell Nps.

  10. [Catheter ablation of persistent atrial fibrillation : pulmonary vein isolation, ablation of fractionated electrograms, stepwise approach or rotor ablation?].

    PubMed

    Scherr, D

    2015-02-01

    Catheter ablation is an established treatment option for patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). In paroxysmal AF ablation, pulmonary vein isolation alone is a well-defined procedural endpoint, leading to success rates of up to 80% with multiple procedures over 5 years of follow-up. The success rate in persistent AF ablation is significantly more limited. This is partly due to the rudimentary understanding of the substrate maintaining persistent AF. Three main pathophysiological concepts for this arrhythmia exist: the multiple wavelet hypothesis, the concept of focal triggers, mainly located in the pulmonary veins and the rotor hypothesis. However, the targets and endpoints of persistent AF ablation are ill-defined and there is no consensus on the optimal ablation strategy in these patients. Based on these concepts, several ablation approaches for persistent AF have emerged: pulmonary vein isolation, the stepwise approach (i.e. pulmonary vein isolation, ablation of fractionated electrograms and linear ablation), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and rotor-based approaches. Currently, persistent AF ablation is a second-line therapy option to restore and maintain sinus rhythm. Several factors, such as the presence of structural heart disease, duration of persistent AF and dilatation and possibly also the degree of fibrosis of the left atrium should influence the decision to perform persistent AF ablation. PMID:25687615

  11. The influence of external source intensity in accelerator/target/blanket system on conversion ratio and fuel cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochurov, Boris P.

    1995-09-01

    The analysis of neutron balance relation for a subcritical system with external source shows that a high ratio of neutron utilization (conversion ratio, breeding ratio) much exceeding similar values for nuclear reactors (both thermal or fast spectrum) is reachable in accelerator/target/blanket system with high external neutron source intensity. An accelerator/target/blanket systems with thermal power in blanket about 1850 Mwt and operating during 30 years have been investigated. Continual feed up by plutonium (fissile material) and Tc-99 (transmuted material) was assumed. Accelerator beam intensity differed 6.3 times (16 mA-Case 1, and 100 mA-Case 2). Conversion ratio (CR) was defined as the ratio of Tc-99 nuclei transmuted to the number of Pu nuclei consumed. The results for two cases are as follows: Case 1Case 2CR 0.77 1.66N(LWR) 8.6 19.1Power MWt(el) 512 225 where N(LWR)-number of LWRs(3000 MWt(th)) from which yearly discharge of Tc-99 is transmuted during 30 years. High value of conversion ratio considerably exceeding 1 (CR=1.66) was obtained in the system with high source intensity as compared with low source system (CR=0.77). Net output of electric power of high source intensity system is about twice lower due to consumption of electric power for accelerator feed up. The loss of energy for Tc-99 transmutation is estimated as 40 Mev(el)/nuclei. Yet high conversion ratio (or breeding ratio) achievable in electronuclear installations with high intensity of external source can effectively be used to close fuel cycle (including incineration of wastes) or to develop growing nuclear power production system.

  12. Depth Profiling of Polymer Composites by Ultrafast Laser Ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Christopher; Clayton, Clive; Longtin, Jon

    2009-03-01

    Past work has shown femtosecond laser ablation to be an athermal process at low fluences in polymer systems. The ablation rate in this low fluence regime is very low, allowing for micro-scale removal of material. We have taken advantage of this fact to perform shallow depth profiling ablation on carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites. Neat composite and resin samples were studied to establish reference ablation profiles. These profiles and the effects of the heterogeneous distribution of carbon fibers were observed through confocal laser profilometry and optical and scanning electron microscopy. Weathered materials that have been subjected to accelerated tests in artificial sunlight or water conditions were ablated to determine the correlation between exposure and change in ablation characteristics. Preliminary Raman and micro-ATR analysis performed before and after ablation shows no chemical changes indicative of thermal effects. The low-volume-ablation property was utilized in an attempt to expose the sizing-matrix interphase for analysis.

  13. Enhancement of heat removal using concave liquid metal targets for high-power accelerators.

    SciTech Connect

    Konkashbaev, I.; Fischer, P.; Hassanein, A.; Mokhov, N. V.; Mathematics and Computer Science; FNAL

    2007-01-01

    The need is increasing for development of high-power targets and beam dump areas for the production of intense beams of secondary particles. The severe constraints arising from a megawatt beam deposited on targets and absorbers call for nontrivial procedures to dilute the beam. This study describes the development of targets and absorbers and the advantages of using flowing liquid metal in concave channels first proposed by IFMIF to raise the liquid metal boiling point by increasing the pressure in liquid supported by a centrifugal force. Such flow with a back-wall is subject to Taylor-Couette instability. The instability can play a positive role of increasing the heat transfer from the hottest region in the target/absorber to the back-wall cooled by water. Results of theoretical analysis and numerical modeling of both targets and dump areas for the IFMIF, ILC, and RIA facilities are presented.

  14. Enhanced proton acceleration by intense laser interaction with an inverse cone target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bake, Muhammad Ali; Aimidula, Aimierding; Xiaerding, Fuerkaiti; Rashidin, Reyima

    2016-08-01

    The generation and control of high-quality proton bunches using focused intense laser pulse on an inverse cone target is investigated with a set of particle-in-cell simulations. The inverse cone is a high atomic number conical frustum with a thin solid top and open base, where the laser impinges onto the top surface directly, not down the open end of the cone. Results are compared with a simple planar target, where the proton angular distribution is very broad because of transverse divergence of the electromagnetic fields behind the target. For a conical target, hot electrons along the cone wall surface induce a transverse focusing sheath field. This field can effectively suppress the spatial spreading of the protons, resulting in a high-quality small-emittance, low-divergence proton beam. A slightly lower proton beam peak energy than that of a conventional planar target was also found.

  15. Toward a physics design for NDCX-II, an ion accelerator for warm dense matter and HIF target physics studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, A.; Barnard, J. J.; Briggs, R. J.; Davidson, R. C.; Dorf, M.; Grote, D. P.; Henestroza, E.; Lee, E. P.; Leitner, M. A.; Logan, B. G.; Sefkow, A. B.; Sharp, W. M.; Waldron, W. L.; Welch, D. R.; Yu, S. S.

    2009-07-01

    The Heavy Ion Fusion Science Virtual National Laboratory (HIFS-VNL), a collaboration of LBNL, LLNL, and PPPL, has achieved 60-fold pulse compression of ion beams on the Neutralized Drift Compression eXperiment (NDCX) at LBNL. In NDCX, a ramped voltage pulse from an induction cell imparts a velocity "tilt" to the beam; the beam's tail then catches up with its head in a plasma environment that provides neutralization. The HIFS-VNL's mission is to carry out studies of warm dense matter (WDM) physics using ion beams as the energy source; an emerging thrust is basic target physics for heavy ion-driven inertial fusion energy (IFE). These goals require an improved platform, labeled NDCX-II. Development of NDCX-II at modest cost was recently enabled by the availability of induction cells and associated hardware from the decommissioned advanced test accelerator (ATA) facility at LLNL. Our initial physics design concept accelerates a ˜30 nC pulse of Li+ ions to ˜3 MeV, then compresses it to ˜1 ns while focusing it onto a mm-scale spot. It uses the ATA cells themselves (with waveforms shaped by passive circuits) to impart the final velocity tilt; smart pulsers provide small corrections. The ATA accelerated electrons; acceleration of non-relativistic ions involves more complex beam dynamics both transversely and longitudinally. We are using an interactive one-dimensional kinetic simulation model and multidimensional Warp-code simulations to develop the NDCX-II accelerator section. Both LSP and Warp codes are being applied to the beam dynamics in the neutralized drift and final focus regions, and the plasma injection process. The status of this effort is described.

  16. Radiation-Pressure Acceleration of Ion Beams from Nanofoil Targets: The Leaky Light-Sail Regime

    SciTech Connect

    Qiao, B.; Zepf, M.; Borghesi, M.; Dromey, B.; Geissler, M.; Karmakar, A.; Gibbon, P.

    2010-10-08

    A new ion radiation-pressure acceleration regime, the 'leaky light sail', is proposed which uses sub-skin-depth nanometer foils irradiated by circularly polarized laser pulses. In the regime, the foil is partially transparent, continuously leaking electrons out along with the transmitted laser field. This feature can be exploited by a multispecies nanofoil configuration to stabilize the acceleration of the light ion component, supplementing the latter with an excess of electrons leaked from those associated with the heavy ions to avoid Coulomb explosion. It is shown by 2D particle-in-cell simulations that a monoenergetic proton beam with energy 18 MeV is produced by circularly polarized lasers at intensities of just 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}. 100 MeV proton beams are obtained by increasing the intensities to 2x10{sup 20} W/cm{sup 2}.

  17. Plans and status of the Beryllium ablator campaign on NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kline, J. L.; Yi, S. A.; Simakov, A. N.; Wilson, D. C.; Olson, R. E.; Krasheninnikova, N. S.; Kyrala, G. A.; Perry, T. S.; Batha, S. H.; Dewald, E. L.; Edwards, M. J.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Meezan, N. B.

    2014-10-01

    Beryllium has long been known to have excellent properties for indirectly driven ICF implosions including enhanced ablation pressure, implosion velocity, and mass ablation rate. The high ablation velocity leads to stabilization of ablative hydrodynamic instabilities and higher ablation pressures. Recent ``high foot'' experiments have shown ablative Rayleigh-Taylor to be a leading cause of degraded performance for ICF implosions. While Beryllium ablators have these advantages, there are also risks associated with Beryllium target designs. A campaign is underway to design and to test these advantages for comparison with other ablator options and determine which provides the best path forward for ICF. Experiments using Beryllium ablators are expected to start in the late summer of 2014. This presentation will discuss the status of the experiments and layout the plans/goals for the campaign. This work is supported by the US DOE.

  18. Emittance dependence on anode morphology of an ion beam provided by laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velardi, L.; Delle Side, D.; Nassisi, V.

    2014-07-01

    In this work, we studied the characteristics of ion beams generated by Platone accelerator in different anode configurations. The accelerator is a laser ion source with two gaps which accelerate the ions in cascade. The laser is a ns pulsed KrF able to apply irradiances of 109-1010 W/cm2. The target ablated was pure disk of Cu. The accelerating voltage applied in this work was 60 kV. The emittance evaluation was performed by the pepper pot method utilizing radio-chromic films, EBT Gafchromic, as sensible targets. The study was performed by varying the geometric configuration of the anode (the extracting electrode), modifying the hole morphology, e.g. a plane and curved grid were mounted in order to change the extraction configuration. The results were compared with the ones obtained with the extraction hole without any grid. For the normalized emittance the lowest value was 0.20π mm mrad.

  19. Effect of Laser Wavelength and Ablation Time on Pulsed Laser Ablation Synthesis of AL Nanoparticles in Ethanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baladi, A.; Mamoory, R. Sarraf

    Aluminum nanoparticles were synthesized by pulsed laser ablation of Al targets in ethanol for 5-15 minutes using the 1064 and 533 nm wavelengths of a Nd:YAG laser with energies of 280-320 mJ per pulse. It has been found that higher wavelength leads to significantly higher ablation efficiency, and finer spherical nanoparticles are also synthesized. Besides, it was obvious that higher ablation time resulted in higher ablated mass, while lower ablation rate was observed. Finer nanoparticles, moreover, are synthesized in higher ablation times.

  20. Ablative Thermal Protection: An Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laub, Bernie

    2003-01-01

    Contents include the following: Why ablative thermal protections - TPS. Ablative TPS chronology: strategic reentry systems, solid rocket motor nozzles, space (manned missions and planetary entry probes). Ablation mechanisms. Ablation material testing. Ablative material testing.

  1. Effects of nanosecond-scale prepulse on generation of high-energy protons in target normal sheath acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, W. P.; Shen, B. F.; Zhang, H.; Xu, Y.; Li, Y. Y.; Lu, X. M.; Wang, C.; Liu, Y. Q.; Shi, Y.; Leng, Y. X.; Liang, X. Y.; Li, R. X.; Xu, Z. Z.; Lu, J. X.; Wang, N. Y.

    2013-06-03

    A pulse cleaner based on noncollinear optical-parametric amplification and second-harmonic generation processes is used to improve the contrast of a laser of peak intensity {approx}2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2} to {approx}10{sup 11} at 100 ps before the peak of the main pulse. A 7 MeV proton beam is observed when a 2.5 {mu}m-thick Al foil is irradiated by this high-contrast laser. The maximum proton energy decreases to 2.9 MeV when a low-contrast ({approx}10{sup 8}) laser is used. Two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations combined with MULTI simulations show that the maximum proton energy sensitively relies on the detecting direction. The ns-time-scale prepulse can bend a thin target before the main pulse arrives, which reduces maximum proton energy in the target normal sheath acceleration.

  2. Open Access Target Validation Is a More Efficient Way to Accelerate Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wen Hwa

    2015-01-01

    There is a scarcity of novel treatments to address many unmet medical needs. Industry and academia are finally coming to terms with the fact that the prevalent models and incentives for innovation in early stage drug discovery are failing to promote progress quickly enough. Here we will examine how an open model of precompetitive public–private research partnership is enabling efficient derisking and acceleration in the early stages of drug discovery, whilst also widening the range of communities participating in the process, such as patient and disease foundations. PMID:26042736

  3. Favorable target positions for intense laser acceleration of electrons in hydrogen-like, highly-charged ions

    SciTech Connect

    Pi, Liang-Wen; Starace, Anthony F.; Hu, S. X.

    2015-09-15

    Classical relativistic Monte Carlo simulations of petawatt laser acceleration of electrons bound initially in hydrogen-like, highly-charged ions show that both the angles and energies of the laser-accelerated electrons depend on the initial ion positions with respect to the laser focus. Electrons bound in ions located after the laser focus generally acquire higher (≈GeV) energies and are ejected at smaller angles with respect to the laser beam. Our simulations assume a tightly-focused linearly-polarized laser pulse with intensity approaching 10{sup 22 }W/cm{sup 2}. Up to fifth order corrections to the paraxial approximation of the laser field in the focal region are taken into account. In addition to the laser intensity, the Rayleigh length in the focal region is shown to play a significant role in maximizing the final energy of the accelerated electrons. Results are presented for both Ne{sup 9+} and Ar{sup 17+} target ions.

  4. Monitoring method for neutron flux for a spallation target in an accelerator driven sub-critical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Qiang, He, Zhi-Yong; Yang, Lei; Zhang, Xue-Ying; Cui, Wen-Juan; Chen, Zhi-Qiang; Xu, Hu-Shan

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we study a monitoring method for neutron flux for the spallation target used in an accelerator driven sub-critical (ADS) system, where a spallation target located vertically at the centre of a sub-critical core is bombarded vertically by high-energy protons from an accelerator. First, by considering the characteristics in the spatial variation of neutron flux from the spallation target, we propose a multi-point measurement technique, i.e. the spallation neutron flux should be measured at multiple vertical locations. To explain why the flux should be measured at multiple locations, we have studied neutron production from a tungsten target bombarded by a 250 MeV-proton beam with Geant4-based Monte Carlo simulations. The simulation results indicate that the neutron flux at the central location is up to three orders of magnitude higher than the flux at lower locations. Secondly, we have developed an effective technique in order to measure the spallation neutron flux with a fission chamber (FC), by establishing the relation between the fission rate measured by FC and the spallation neutron flux. Since this relation is linear for a FC, a constant calibration factor is used to derive the neutron flux from the measured fission rate. This calibration factor can be extracted from the energy spectra of spallation neutrons. Finally, we have evaluated the proposed calibration method for a FC in the environment of an ADS system. The results indicate that the proposed method functions very well. Supported by Strategic Priority Research Program of Chinese Academy of Sciences (XDA03010000 and XDA03030000) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China(91426301).

  5. Slow acceleration and deacceleration through a Hopf bifurcation: power ramps, target nucleation, and elliptic bursting.

    PubMed

    Baer, Steven M; Gaekel, Erin M

    2008-09-01

    From the periodicity of regional climate change to sustained oscillations in living cells, the transition between stationary and oscillatory behavior is often through a Hopf bifurcation. When a parameter slowly passes or ramps through a Hopf bifurcation there is a delayed transition to sustained oscillations and an associated memory effect where onset is dependent on the initial state of the system. Most theoretical studies of the delay and memory effect assume constant ramp speeds, overlooking the problem of slow parameter acceleration or deacceleration through the Hopf bifurcation. Using both numerical and analytic methods, we show that slow nonlinear ramps can significantly increase or decrease the onset threshold, changing profoundly our understanding of the associated memory effect. We found that slow parameter acceleration increases the threshold, whereas slow deacceleration decreases the threshold. The theory is applied to the formation of pacemakers in the unstirred Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction and the onset of elliptic bursting in the context of nerve membrane excitability. We show that our results generalize to all systems where slow passage through a Hopf bifurcation is the underlying mechanism for onset.

  6. TRAC analysis of design basis events for the accelerator production of tritium target/blanket

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, J.C.; Elson, J.

    1997-08-01

    A two-loop primary cooling system with a residual heat removal system was designed to mitigate the heat generated in the tungsten neutron source rods inside the rungs of the ladders and the shell of the rungs. The Transient Reactor Analysis Code (TRAC) was used to analyze the thermal-hydraulic behavior of the primary cooling system during a pump coastdown transient; a cold-leg, large-break loss-of-coolant accident (LBLOCA); a hot-leg LBLOCA; and a target downcomer LBLOCA. The TRAC analysis results showed that the heat generated in the tungsten neutron source rods can be mitigated by the primary cooling system for the pump coastdown transient and all the LBLOCAs except the target downcomer LBLOCA. For the target downcomer LBLOCA, a cavity flood system is required to fill the cavity with water at a level above the large fixed headers.

  7. Transient Thermo-Hydraulic Analysis of the Windowless Target System for the Lead Bismuth Eutectic Cooled Accelerator Driven System

    SciTech Connect

    Bianchi, Fosco; Ferri, Roberta; Moreau, Vincent

    2006-07-01

    The target system, whose function is to supply an external neutron source to the ADS sub-critical core to sustain the neutron chain reaction, is the most critical part of an ADS being subject to severe thermo-mechanical loading and material damage due to accelerator protons and fission neutrons. A windowless option was chosen as reference configuration for the target system of the LBE-cooled ADS within the European PDS-XADS project in order to reduce the material damage and to increase its life. This document deals with the thermo-hydraulic results of the calculations performed with STAR-CD and RELAP5 codes for studying the behaviour of the windowless target system during off-normal operating conditions. It also reports a description of modifications properly implemented in the codes needed for this analysis. The windowless target system shows a satisfactory thermo-hydraulic behaviour for the analysed accidents, except for the loss of both pumps without proton beam shut-off and the beam trips lasting more than one second. (authors)

  8. Bright betatronlike x rays from radiation pressure acceleration of a mass-limited foil target.

    PubMed

    Yu, Tong-Pu; Pukhov, Alexander; Sheng, Zheng-Ming; Liu, Feng; Shvets, Gennady

    2013-01-25

    By using multidimensional particle-in-cell simulations, we study the electromagnetic emission from radiation pressure acceleration of ultrathin mass-limited foils. When a circularly polarized laser pulse irradiates the foil, the laser radiation pressure pushes the foil forward as a whole. The outer wings of the pulse continue to propagate and act as a natural undulator. Electrons move together with ions longitudinally but oscillate around the latter transversely, forming a self-organized helical electron bunch. When the electron oscillation frequency coincides with the laser frequency as witnessed by the electron, betatronlike resonance occurs. The emitted x rays by the resonant electrons have high brightness, short durations, and broad band ranges which may have diverse applications.

  9. Commissioning and quality assurance of Calypso four-dimensional target localization system in linear accelerator facility.

    PubMed

    Muralidhar, K R; Komanduri, Krishna; Rout, Birendra Kumar; Ramesh, K K D

    2013-07-01

    Four dimensional (4D) target localization system (Calypso System) was installed at our hospital, which is equipped with Beacon Transponders, Console, Electromagnetic Array, Optical System, Tracking Station, Treatment table overlay, and Calypso kVue Couch top. The objective of this presentation is to describe the results of commissioning measurements carried out on the Calypso System to verify the manufacturer specifications and also to evolve a quality assurance (QA) procedure which can be used to test its performance routinely. The QA program consists of a series of tests (QA for checking the calibration or system accuracy, Camera Calibration with L-frame fixture, Camera Calibration with T-frame fixture, System calibration Fixture targets test, Localization, and Tracking). These tests were found to be useful to assess the performance of the Calypso System.

  10. Commissioning and quality assurance of Calypso four-dimensional target localization system in linear accelerator facility

    PubMed Central

    Muralidhar, K. R.; Komanduri, Krishna; Rout, Birendra Kumar; Ramesh, K. K. D.

    2013-01-01

    Four dimensional (4D) target localization system (Calypso System) was installed at our hospital, which is equipped with Beacon Transponders, Console, Electromagnetic Array, Optical System, Tracking Station, Treatment table overlay, and Calypso kVue Couch top. The objective of this presentation is to describe the results of commissioning measurements carried out on the Calypso System to verify the manufacturer specifications and also to evolve a quality assurance (QA) procedure which can be used to test its performance routinely. The QA program consists of a series of tests (QA for checking the calibration or system accuracy, Camera Calibration with L-frame fixture, Camera Calibration with T-frame fixture, System calibration Fixture targets test, Localization, and Tracking). These tests were found to be useful to assess the performance of the Calypso System. PMID:24049322

  11. Commissioning and quality assurance of Calypso four-dimensional target localization system in linear accelerator facility.

    PubMed

    Muralidhar, K R; Komanduri, Krishna; Rout, Birendra Kumar; Ramesh, K K D

    2013-07-01

    Four dimensional (4D) target localization system (Calypso System) was installed at our hospital, which is equipped with Beacon Transponders, Console, Electromagnetic Array, Optical System, Tracking Station, Treatment table overlay, and Calypso kVue Couch top. The objective of this presentation is to describe the results of commissioning measurements carried out on the Calypso System to verify the manufacturer specifications and also to evolve a quality assurance (QA) procedure which can be used to test its performance routinely. The QA program consists of a series of tests (QA for checking the calibration or system accuracy, Camera Calibration with L-frame fixture, Camera Calibration with T-frame fixture, System calibration Fixture targets test, Localization, and Tracking). These tests were found to be useful to assess the performance of the Calypso System. PMID:24049322

  12. Efficient neutron production from sub-nanosecond laser pulse accelerating deuterons on target front side

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klir, D.; Krasa, J.; Cikhardt, J.; Dudzak, R.; Krousky, E.; Pfeifer, M.; Rezac, K.; Sila, O.; Skala, J.; Ullschmied, J.; Velyhan, A.

    2015-09-01

    Neutron-producing experiments have been carried out on the Prague Asterix Laser System. At the fundamental wavelength of 1.315 μm, the laser pulse of a 600 J energy and 300 ps duration was focused on a thick deuterated-polyethylene target. Neutron yields reached (4.1 ± 0.8) × 108 at the peak intensity of ≈3 × 1016 W/cm2. A more detailed analysis of neutron time-of-flight signals showed that a significant fraction of neutron yields was produced both by the 2H(d,n)3He reaction and by other neutron-producing reactions. Neutron energies together with delayed neutron and gamma emission showed that MeV deuterons escaped from a laser-produced plasma and interacted ≈50 ns later with a borosilicate blast-shield glass. In order to increase DD neutron yields and to characterize deuteron beams via nuclear reactions, a secondary deuterated polyethylene target was used in a pitcher-catcher scheme at the target front side. In this experimental arrangement, the neutron yield reached (2.0 ± 0.5) × 109 with the peak neutron fluence of (2.5 ± 0.5) × 108 n/sr. From the neutron yield, it was calculated that the secondary target was bombarded by 2 × 1014 deuterons in the 0.5-2.0 MeV energy range. The neutron yield of 2 × 109 at the laser energy of 600 J implied the production efficiency of 3 × 106 n/J. A very important result is that the efficient neutron production was achieved with the low contrast, sub-nanosecond laser pulse of the intensity of 1016 W/cm2. The latter parameters can be achieved in a rep-rate mode more easily than ultra-high intensities and contrasts.

  13. An accelerated framework for the classification of biological targets from solid-state micropore data.

    PubMed

    Hanif, Madiha; Hafeez, Abdul; Suleman, Yusuf; Mustafa Rafique, M; Butt, Ali R; Iqbal, Samir M

    2016-10-01

    Micro- and nanoscale systems have provided means to detect biological targets, such as DNA, proteins, and human cells, at ultrahigh sensitivity. However, these devices suffer from noise in the raw data, which continues to be significant as newer and devices that are more sensitive produce an increasing amount of data that needs to be analyzed. An important dimension that is often discounted in these systems is the ability to quickly process the measured data for an instant feedback. Realizing and developing algorithms for the accurate detection and classification of biological targets in realtime is vital. Toward this end, we describe a supervised machine-learning approach that records single cell events (pulses), computes useful pulse features, and classifies the future patterns into their respective types, such as cancerous/non-cancerous cells based on the training data. The approach detects cells with an accuracy of 70% from the raw data followed by an accurate classification when larger training sets are employed. The parallel implementation of the algorithm on graphics processing unit (GPU) demonstrates a speedup of three to four folds as compared to a serial implementation on an Intel Core i7 processor. This incredibly efficient GPU system is an effort to streamline the analysis of pulse data in an academic setting. This paper presents for the first time ever, a non-commercial technique using a GPU system for realtime analysis, paired with biological cluster targeting analysis. PMID:27480732

  14. Simulation of emission molecular spectra by a semi-automatic programme package: the case of C2 and CN diatomic molecules emitting during laser ablation of a graphite target in nitrogen environment.

    PubMed

    Acquaviva, S

    2004-07-01

    Some emission spectra of diatomic molecules were calculated by a semi-automatic programme package in order to infer the rotational and vibrational temperatures in Boltzmann distribution by comparing them with the corresponding experimental ones. The calculation procedure was applied in the case of CN radical and C2 molecule whose optical emission spectra were recorded during pulsed excimer laser ablation of a graphite target in low-pressure nitrogen environment. Computed similar or dissimilar values of rotational and vibrational temperatures let to verify the existence or not of local thermodynamic equilibrium and to hypothesise the temporal range necessary to establish it in such experiments.

  15. Targeted disruption of fibrinogen like protein-1 accelerates hepatocellular carcinoma development

    SciTech Connect

    Nayeb-Hashemi, Hamed; Desai, Anal; Demchev, Valeriy; Bronson, Roderick T.; Hornick, Jason L.; Cohen, David E.; Ukomadu, Chinweike

    2015-09-18

    Fibrinogen like protein-1 (Fgl1) is a predominantly liver expressed protein that has been implicated as both a hepatoprotectant and a hepatocyte mitogen. Fgl1 expression is decreased in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and its loss correlates with a poorly differentiated phenotype. To better elucidate the role of Fgl1 in hepatocarcinogenesis, we treated mice wild type or null for Fgl1 with diethyl nitrosamine and monitored for incidence of hepatocellular cancer. We find that mice lacking Fgl1 develop HCC at more than twice the rate of wild type mice. We show that hepatocellular cancers from Fgl1 null mice are molecularly distinct from those of the wild type mice. In tumors from Fgl1 null mice there is enhanced activation of Akt and downstream targets of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). In addition, there is paradoxical up regulation of putative hepatocellular cancer tumor suppressors; tripartite motif-containing protein 35 (Trim35) and tumor necrosis factor super family 10b (Tnfrsf10b). Taken together, these findings suggest that Fgl1 acts as a tumor suppressor in hepatocellular cancer through an Akt dependent mechanism and supports its role as a potential therapeutic target in HCC. - Highlights: • Fgl1 knockout mice (Fgl1KO) are more prone to carcinogen-induced liver cancer compared to wild type (WT) mates. • Tumors from the Fgl1KO are molecularly distinct with enhanced Akt and mTOR activity in comparison with Fgl1WT tumors. • Tumors from the Fgl1KO have enhanced expression of Trim35 and Tnfrsf10b, putative HCC tumor suppressors.

  16. Targeted radiotherapy enhancement during electronic brachytherapy of accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) using controlled release of gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Cifter, G; Chin, J; Cifter, F; Altundal, Y; Sinha, N; Sajo, E; Ngwa, W

    2015-12-01

    Several studies have demonstrated low rates of local recurrence with brachytherapy-based accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI). However, long-term outcomes on toxicity (e.g. telangiectasia) and cosmesis remain a major concern. The purpose of this study is to investigate the dosimetric feasibility of using targeted non-toxic radiosensitizing gold nanoparticles (GNPs) for localized dose enhancement to the planning target volume (PTV) during electronic brachytherapy APBI while reducing normal tissue toxicity. We propose to incorporate GNPs into a micrometer-thick polymer film on the surface of routinely used lumpectomy balloon applicators and provide subsequent treatment using a 50 kVp Xoft device. An experimentally determined diffusion coefficient was used to determine space-time customizable distribution of GNPs for feasible in-vivo concentrations of 7 mg/g and 43 mg/g. An analytical approach from previously published work was employed to estimate the dose enhancement due to GNPs as a function of distance up to 1 cm from the lumpectomy cavity surface. Clinically significant dose enhancement values of at least 1.2, due to 2 nm GNPs, were found at 1 cm away from the lumpectomy cavity wall when using electronic brachytherapy APBI. Higher customizable dose enhancement was also achieved at other distances as a function of nanoparticle size. Our preliminary results suggest that significant dose enhancement can be achieved to residual tumor cells targeted with GNPs during APBI with electronic brachytherapy.

  17. GAMUT: GPU accelerated microRNA analysis to uncover target genes through CUDA-miRanda

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Non-coding sequences such as microRNAs have important roles in disease processes. Computational microRNA target identification (CMTI) is becoming increasingly important since traditional experimental methods for target identification pose many difficulties. These methods are time-consuming, costly, and often need guidance from computational methods to narrow down candidate genes anyway. However, most CMTI methods are computationally demanding, since they need to handle not only several million query microRNA and reference RNA pairs, but also several million nucleotide comparisons within each given pair. Thus, the need to perform microRNA identification at such large scale has increased the demand for parallel computing. Methods Although most CMTI programs (e.g., the miRanda algorithm) are based on a modified Smith-Waterman (SW) algorithm, the existing parallel SW implementations (e.g., CUDASW++ 2.0/3.0, SWIPE) are unable to meet this demand in CMTI tasks. We present CUDA-miRanda, a fast microRNA target identification algorithm that takes advantage of massively parallel computing on Graphics Processing Units (GPU) using NVIDIA's Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA). CUDA-miRanda specifically focuses on the local alignment of short (i.e., ≤ 32 nucleotides) sequences against longer reference sequences (e.g., 20K nucleotides). Moreover, the proposed algorithm is able to report multiple alignments (up to 191 top scores) and the corresponding traceback sequences for any given (query sequence, reference sequence) pair. Results Speeds over 5.36 Giga Cell Updates Per Second (GCUPs) are achieved on a server with 4 NVIDIA Tesla M2090 GPUs. Compared to the original miRanda algorithm, which is evaluated on an Intel Xeon E5620@2.4 GHz CPU, the experimental results show up to 166 times performance gains in terms of execution time. In addition, we have verified that the exact same targets were predicted in both CUDA-miRanda and the original mi

  18. Improving beam spectral and spatial quality by double-foil target in laser ion acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, C.-K.; Albright, B. J.; Yin, L.; Wu, H.-C.; Bowers, K. J.; Hegelich, B. M.; Fernández, J. C.

    2011-03-01

    Mid-Z ion driven fast ignition inertial fusion requires ion beams of hundreds of MeV energy and <10% energy spread. The break-out afterburner (BOA) is one mechanism proposed to generate such beams; however, the late stages of the BOA tend to produce too large of an energy spread. Here we show how use of a second target foil placed behind a nm-scale foil can substantially reduce the temperature of the comoving electrons and improve the ion beam energy spread, leading to ion beams of energy hundreds of MeV and 6% energy spread.

  19. Efficient neutron production from sub-nanosecond laser pulse accelerating deuterons on target front side

    SciTech Connect

    Klir, D.; Krasa, J.; Velyhan, A.; Cikhardt, J.; Rezac, K.; Dudzak, R.; Krousky, E.; Pfeifer, M.; Skala, J.; Ullschmied, J.; Sila, O.

    2015-09-15

    Neutron-producing experiments have been carried out on the Prague Asterix Laser System. At the fundamental wavelength of 1.315 μm, the laser pulse of a 600 J energy and 300 ps duration was focused on a thick deuterated-polyethylene target. Neutron yields reached (4.1 ± 0.8) × 10{sup 8} at the peak intensity of ≈3 × 10{sup 16 }W/cm{sup 2}. A more detailed analysis of neutron time-of-flight signals showed that a significant fraction of neutron yields was produced both by the {sup 2}H(d,n){sup 3}He reaction and by other neutron-producing reactions. Neutron energies together with delayed neutron and gamma emission showed that MeV deuterons escaped from a laser-produced plasma and interacted ≈50 ns later with a borosilicate blast-shield glass. In order to increase DD neutron yields and to characterize deuteron beams via nuclear reactions, a secondary deuterated polyethylene target was used in a pitcher-catcher scheme at the target front side. In this experimental arrangement, the neutron yield reached (2.0 ± 0.5) × 10{sup 9} with the peak neutron fluence of (2.5 ± 0.5) × 10{sup 8 }n/sr. From the neutron yield, it was calculated that the secondary target was bombarded by 2 × 10{sup 14} deuterons in the 0.5–2.0 MeV energy range. The neutron yield of 2 × 10{sup 9} at the laser energy of 600 J implied the production efficiency of 3 × 10{sup 6 }n/J. A very important result is that the efficient neutron production was achieved with the low contrast, sub-nanosecond laser pulse of the intensity of 10{sup 16 }W/cm{sup 2}. The latter parameters can be achieved in a rep-rate mode more easily than ultra-high intensities and contrasts.

  20. A Targeted Inhibitor of the Alternative Complement Pathway Accelerates Recovery From Smoke-Induced Ocular Injury

    PubMed Central

    Woodell, Alex; Jones, Bryan W.; Williamson, Tucker; Schnabolk, Gloriane; Tomlinson, Stephen; Atkinson, Carl; Rohrer, Bärbel

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Morphologic and genetic evidence exists that an overactive complement system driven by the complement alternative pathway (AP) is involved in pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Smoking is the only modifiable risk factor for AMD. As we have shown that smoke-related ocular pathology can be prevented in mice that lack an essential activator of AP, we ask here whether this pathology can be reversed by increasing inhibition in AP. Methods Mice were exposed to either cigarette smoke (CS) or filtered air (6 hours/day, 5 days/week, 6 months). Smoke-exposed animals were then treated with the AP inhibitor (CR2-fH) or vehicle control (PBS) for the following 3 months. Spatial frequency and contrast sensitivity were assessed by optokinetic response paradigms at 6 and 9 months; additional readouts included assessment of retinal morphology by electron microscopy (EM) and gene expression analysis by quantitative RT-PCR. Results The CS mice treated with CR2-fH showed significant improvement in contrast threshold compared to PBS-treated mice, whereas spatial frequency was unaffected by CS or pharmacologic intervention. Treatment with CR2-fH in CS animals reversed thinning of the retina observed in PBS-treated mice as analyzed by spectral-domain optical coherence tomography, and reversed most morphologic changes in RPE and Bruch's membrane seen in CS animals by EM. Conclusions Taken together, these findings suggest that AP inhibitors not only prevent, but have the potential to accelerate the clearance of complement-mediated ocular injury. Improving our understanding of the regulation of the AP is paramount to developing novel treatment approaches for AMD. PMID:27064393

  1. A small interfering RNA targeting Lnk accelerates bone fracture healing with early neovascularization.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Yohei; Ii, Masaaki; Matsumoto, Tomoyuki; Kawamoto, Atsuhiko; Kuroda, Ryosuke; Akimaru, Hiroshi; Mifune, Yutaka; Shoji, Taro; Fukui, Tomoaki; Asahi, Michio; Kurosaka, Masahiro; Asahara, Takayuki

    2013-09-01

    Lnk, an intracellular adapter protein, is expressed in hematopoietic cell lineages, which has recently been proved as an essential inhibitory signaling molecule for stem cell self-renewal in the stem cell factor-c-Kit signaling pathway with enhanced hematopoietic and osteogenic reconstitution in Lnk-deficient mice. Moreover, the therapeutic potential of hematopoietic stem/endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) for fracture healing has been demonstrated with mechanistic insight into vasculogenesis/angiogenesis and osteogenesis enhancement in the fracture sites. We report here, Lnk siRNA-transfected endothelial commitment of c-kit+/Sca-1+/lineage- subpopulations of bone marrow cells have high EPC colony-forming capacity exhibiting endothelial markers, VE-Cad, VEGF and Ang-1. Lnk siRNA-transfected osteoblasts also show highly osteoblastic capacity. In vivo, locally transfected Lnk siRNA could successfully downregulate the expression of Lnk at the fracture site up to 1 week, and radiological and histological examination showed extremely accelerated fracture healing in Lnk siRNA-transfected mice. Moreover, Lnk siRNA-transfected mice exhibited sufficient therapeutic outcomes with intrinstic enhancement of angiogenesis and osteogenesis, specifically, the mice demonstrated better blood flow recovery in the sites of fracture. In our series of experiments, we clarified that a negatively regulated Lnk system contributed to a favorable circumstance for fracture healing by enhancing vasculogenesis/angiogenesis and osteogenesis. These findings suggest that downregulation of Lnk system may have the clinical potential for faster fracture healing, which contributes to the reduction of delayed unions or non-unions.

  2. Laser ablation studies of concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Savina, M.; Xu, Z.; Wang, Y.; Reed, C.; Pellin, M.

    1999-10-20

    Laser ablation was studied as a means of removing radioactive contaminants from the surface and near-surface regions of concrete. The authors present the results of ablation tests on cement and concrete samples using a 1.6 kW pulsed Nd:YAG laser with fiber optic beam delivery. The laser-surface interaction was studied using cement and high density concrete as targets. Ablation efficiency and material removal rates were determined as functions of irradiance and pulse overlap. Doped samples were also ablated to determine the efficiency with which surface contaminants were removed and captured in the effluent. The results show that the cement phase of the material melts and vaporizes, but the aggregate portion (sand and rock) fragments. The effluent consists of both micron-size aerosol particles and chunks of fragmented aggregate material. Laser-induced optical emission spectroscopy was used to analyze the surface during ablation. Analysis of the effluent showed that contaminants such as cesium and strontium were strongly segregated into different regions of the particle size distribution of the aerosol.

  3. Mice deficient in Rbm38, a target of the p53 family, are susceptible to accelerated aging and spontaneous tumors

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jin; Xu, Enshun; Ren, Cong; Yan, Wensheng; Zhang, Min; Chen, Mingyi; Cardiff, Robert D.; Imai, Denise M.; Wisner, Erik; Chen, Xinbin

    2014-01-01

    RNA-binding motif protein 38 (Rbm38), also called RNPC1 [RNA-binding region (RNP1, RRM) containing 1], is a target of the p53 family and modulates p53 expression via mRNA translation. To investigate the biological function of Rbm38 in vivo, we generated an Rbm38-null mouse model. We showed that mice deficient in Rbm38 exhibit signs of accelerated aging and are prone to hematopoietic defects and spontaneous tumors. To determine the biological significance of the p53-Rbm38 loop, we showed that Rbm38 deficiency enhances accumulation of p53 induced by ionizing radiation (IR) and sensitizes mice to IR-induced lethality in a p53-dependent manner. Most importantly, Rbm38 deficiency markedly decreases the tumor penetrance in mice heterozygous for p53 via enhanced p53 expression. Interestingly, we found that Rbm38 deficiency shortens the life span of, and promotes lymphomagenesis in, mice deficient in p53. These results provide genetic evidence that Rbm38 is necessary for normal hematopoiesis and for suppressing accelerated aging and tumorigenesis. Thus, the p53-Rbm38 axis might be explored for extending longevity and for tumor suppression. PMID:25512531

  4. Target disruption of ribosomal protein pNO40 accelerates aging and impairs osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yen-Ming; Wu, Chih-Ching; Chang, Yu-Chen; Wu, Chu-Han; Ho, Hsien Li; Hu, Ji Wei; Chang, Ren-Chi; Wang, Chung-Ta; Ouyang, Pin

    2016-01-22

    pNO40/PS1D, a novel nucleolar protein, has been characterized as a core protein of eukaryotic 60S ribosome and at least two splicing forms of pNO40 mRNAs with alternative starting sites have been identified. Through production of knockout (ko) mice with either exon 2 (△E2), exon 4 (△E4) or △E2+E4 targeted disruption we identified a cryptic splicing product occurring in the ko tissues examined which in general cannot be observed in regular RT-PCR detection of wild-type (wt) animals. Among ko animals, △E4 null embryos exhibited prominent senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SA-β-gal) staining, a marker for senescent cells, in notochord, forelimbs and heart while bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from △E4 null mice developed accelerated aging and osteogenic differentiation defects compared to those from wt and other isoform mutant mice. Examination of the causal relationship between pNO40 deficiency and MSC-accelerated aging revealed △E4 null disruption in MSCs elicits high levels of ROS and elevated expression levels of p16 and Rb but not p53. Further analysis with iTraq identified CYP1B1, a component of the cytochrome p450 system, as a potential molecule mediating ROS generation in pNO40 deficient MSCs. We herein established a mouse model of MSC aging through pNO40-targeted depletion and demonstrated the effects of loss of pNO40 on bone homeostasis.

  5. Improvements to laser wakefield accelerated electron beam stability, divergence, and energy spread using three-dimensional printed two-stage gas cell targets

    SciTech Connect

    Vargas, M.; Schumaker, W.; He, Z.-H.; Zhao, Z.; Behm, K.; Chvykov, V.; Hou, B.; Krushelnick, K.; Maksimchuk, A.; Yanovsky, V.; Thomas, A. G. R.

    2014-04-28

    High intensity, short pulse lasers can be used to accelerate electrons to ultra-relativistic energies via laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) [T. Tajima and J. M. Dawson, Phys. Rev. Lett. 43, 267 (1979)]. Recently, it was shown that separating the injection and acceleration processes into two distinct stages could prove beneficial in obtaining stable, high energy electron beams [Gonsalves et al., Nat. Phys. 7, 862 (2011); Liu et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 035001 (2011); Pollock et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 045001 (2011)]. Here, we use a stereolithography based 3D printer to produce two-stage gas targets for LWFA experiments on the HERCULES laser system at the University of Michigan. We demonstrate substantial improvements to the divergence, pointing stability, and energy spread of a laser wakefield accelerated electron beam compared with a single-stage gas cell or gas jet target.

  6. Accelerating Genome Editing in CHO Cells Using CRISPR Cas9 and CRISPy, a Web-Based Target Finding Tool

    PubMed Central

    Ronda, Carlotta; Pedersen, Lasse Ebdrup; Hansen, Henning Gram; Kallehauge, Thomas Beuchert; Betenbaugh, Michael J; Nielsen, Alex Toftgaard; Kildegaard, Helene Faustrup

    2014-01-01

    Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells are widely used in the biopharmaceutical industry as a host for the production of complex pharmaceutical proteins. Thus genome engineering of CHO cells for improved product quality and yield is of great interest. Here, we demonstrate for the first time the efficacy of the CRISPR Cas9 technology in CHO cells by generating site-specific gene disruptions in COSMC and FUT8, both of which encode proteins involved in glycosylation. The tested single guide RNAs (sgRNAs) created an indel frequency up to 47.3% in COSMC, while an indel frequency up to 99.7% in FUT8 was achieved by applying lectin selection. All eight sgRNAs examined in this study resulted in relatively high indel frequencies, demonstrating that the Cas9 system is a robust and efficient genome-editing methodology in CHO cells. Deep sequencing revealed that 85% of the indels created by Cas9 resulted in frameshift mutations at the target sites, with a strong preference for single base indels. Finally, we have developed a user-friendly bioinformatics tool, named “CRISPy” for rapid identification of sgRNA target sequences in the CHO-K1 genome. The CRISPy tool identified 1,970,449 CRISPR targets divided into 27,553 genes and lists the number of off-target sites in the genome. In conclusion, the proven functionality of Cas9 to edit CHO genomes combined with our CRISPy database have the potential to accelerate genome editing and synthetic biology efforts in CHO cells. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2014; 111: 1604–1616. © 2014 The Authors. Biotechnology and Bioengineering Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:24827782

  7. Accelerating genome editing in CHO cells using CRISPR Cas9 and CRISPy, a web-based target finding tool.

    PubMed

    Ronda, Carlotta; Pedersen, Lasse Ebdrup; Hansen, Henning Gram; Kallehauge, Thomas Beuchert; Betenbaugh, Michael J; Nielsen, Alex Toftgaard; Kildegaard, Helene Faustrup

    2014-08-01

    Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells are widely used in the biopharmaceutical industry as a host for the production of complex pharmaceutical proteins. Thus genome engineering of CHO cells for improved product quality and yield is of great interest. Here, we demonstrate for the first time the efficacy of the CRISPR Cas9 technology in CHO cells by generating site-specific gene disruptions in COSMC and FUT8, both of which encode proteins involved in glycosylation. The tested single guide RNAs (sgRNAs) created an indel frequency up to 47.3% in COSMC, while an indel frequency up to 99.7% in FUT8 was achieved by applying lectin selection. All eight sgRNAs examined in this study resulted in relatively high indel frequencies, demonstrating that the Cas9 system is a robust and efficient genome-editing methodology in CHO cells. Deep sequencing revealed that 85% of the indels created by Cas9 resulted in frameshift mutations at the target sites, with a strong preference for single base indels. Finally, we have developed a user-friendly bioinformatics tool, named "CRISPy" for rapid identification of sgRNA target sequences in the CHO-K1 genome. The CRISPy tool identified 1,970,449 CRISPR targets divided into 27,553 genes and lists the number of off-target sites in the genome. In conclusion, the proven functionality of Cas9 to edit CHO genomes combined with our CRISPy database have the potential to accelerate genome editing and synthetic biology efforts in CHO cells.

  8. Accelerating genome editing in CHO cells using CRISPR Cas9 and CRISPy, a web-based target finding tool.

    PubMed

    Ronda, Carlotta; Pedersen, Lasse Ebdrup; Hansen, Henning Gram; Kallehauge, Thomas Beuchert; Betenbaugh, Michael J; Nielsen, Alex Toftgaard; Kildegaard, Helene Faustrup

    2014-08-01

    Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells are widely used in the biopharmaceutical industry as a host for the production of complex pharmaceutical proteins. Thus genome engineering of CHO cells for improved product quality and yield is of great interest. Here, we demonstrate for the first time the efficacy of the CRISPR Cas9 technology in CHO cells by generating site-specific gene disruptions in COSMC and FUT8, both of which encode proteins involved in glycosylation. The tested single guide RNAs (sgRNAs) created an indel frequency up to 47.3% in COSMC, while an indel frequency up to 99.7% in FUT8 was achieved by applying lectin selection. All eight sgRNAs examined in this study resulted in relatively high indel frequencies, demonstrating that the Cas9 system is a robust and efficient genome-editing methodology in CHO cells. Deep sequencing revealed that 85% of the indels created by Cas9 resulted in frameshift mutations at the target sites, with a strong preference for single base indels. Finally, we have developed a user-friendly bioinformatics tool, named "CRISPy" for rapid identification of sgRNA target sequences in the CHO-K1 genome. The CRISPy tool identified 1,970,449 CRISPR targets divided into 27,553 genes and lists the number of off-target sites in the genome. In conclusion, the proven functionality of Cas9 to edit CHO genomes combined with our CRISPy database have the potential to accelerate genome editing and synthetic biology efforts in CHO cells. PMID:24827782

  9. High-contrast laser acceleration of relativistic electrons in solid cone-wire targets

    SciTech Connect

    Higginson, D. P.; Link, A.; Sawada, H.; Wilks, S. C.; Chawla, S. R.; Chen, C. D.; Jarrott, L. C.; Flippo, K. A.; McLean, H. S.; Patel, P. K.; Perez, F.; Beg, F. N.; Bartal, T.; Wei, M. S.

    2015-12-31

    Optimization of electron coupling into small solid angles is of extreme importance to applications, such as Fast Ignition, that require maximum electron energy deposition within a small volume. To optimize this coupling, we use the ultra-high-contrast Trident laser, which remains below intensity of 1011 W/cm2 until < 0.1 ns before the main pulse, while still attaining high-energy, 75 J, and peak intensity of 5 x 1019 W/cm2. Using a cone-wire target, we find that the coupling into the 40 μm diameter wire is increased by a factor of 2.7x over the low-contrast Titan laser at similar peak intensity. Full-scale simulations are used to model the laser interaction and quantitatively reproduce the experimental results. These show that increase in coupling is due to both a closer interaction, as well as the reduction of laser filamentation and self-focusing.

  10. MicroRNA-21 accelerates hepatocyte proliferation in vitro via PI3K/Akt signaling by targeting PTEN

    SciTech Connect

    Yan-nan, Bai; Zhao-yan, Yu; Li-xi, Luo; Jiang, Yi; Qing-jie, Xia

    2014-01-17

    Highlights: •miRNAs-expression patterns of primary hepatocytes under proliferative status. •miR-21 expression level peaked at 12 h after stimulated by EGF. •miR-21 drive rapid S phase entry of primary hepatocytes. •PI3K/Akt signaling was modulated via targeting PTEN by miR-21. -- Abstract: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are involved in controlling hepatocyte proliferation during liver regeneration. In this study, we established the miRNAs-expression patterns of primary hepatocytes in vitro under stimulation of epidermal growth factor (EGF), and found that microRNA-21 (miR-21) was appreciably up-regulated and peaked at 12 h. In addition, we further presented evidences indicating that miR-21 promotes primary hepatocyte proliferation through in vitro transfecting with miR-21 mimics or inhibitor. We further demonstrated that phosphatidylinositol 3′-OH kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling was altered accordingly, it is, by targeting phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome 10, PI3K/Akt signaling is activated by miR-21 to accelerate hepatocyte rapid S-phase entry and proliferation in vitro.

  11. Summary of recent experiments on focusing of target-normal-sheath-accelerated proton beam with a stack of conducting foils

    SciTech Connect

    Ni, P. A.; Alexander, N.; Barnard, J. J.; Lund, S. M.

    2014-05-15

    We present a summary of recent experiments on focusing of laser target-normal-sheath-accelerated (TNSA) proton beam with a stack of thin conducting foils. The experiments were performed using the Phelix laser (GSI-Darmstadt) and the Titan laser, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The phenomena consistent with self-collimation (or weak self-focusing) of TNSA protons were experimentally observed for the first time at the Phelix laser user facility, in a specially engineered structure ('lens') consisting of a stack of 300 thin aluminum foils separated by 50 μm vacuum gaps. Follow up experiments using the Titan laser obtained results consistent with the collimation/focusing observed in the initial experiments using the Phelix. The Titan experiments employed improved, 25 μm- and 50 μm-gap targets and the new fine mesh diagnostic. All the experiments were carried out in a “passive environment,” i.e., no external fields were applied, and no neutralization plasma or injection of secondary charged particles was imposed. A plausible interpretation of the observed phenomena is that the combination of magnetic self-pinch forces generated by the beam current together with the simultaneous reduction of the repulsive electrostatic forces due to the conducting foils inhibits radial expansion of the beam.

  12. 2D hydrodynamic simulations of a variable length gas target for density down-ramp injection of electrons into a laser wakefield accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kononenko, O.; Lopes, N. C.; Cole, J. M.; Kamperidis, C.; Mangles, S. P. D.; Najmudin, Z.; Osterhoff, J.; Poder, K.; Rusby, D.; Symes, D. R.; Warwick, J.; Wood, J. C.; Palmer, C. A. J.

    2016-09-01

    In this work, two-dimensional (2D) hydrodynamic simulations of a variable length gas cell were performed using the open source fluid code OpenFOAM. The gas cell was designed to study controlled injection of electrons into a laser-driven wakefield at the Astra Gemini laser facility. The target consists of two compartments: an accelerator and an injector section connected via an aperture. A sharp transition between the peak and plateau density regions in the injector and accelerator compartments, respectively, was observed in simulations with various inlet pressures. The fluid simulations indicate that the length of the down-ramp connecting the sections depends on the aperture diameter, as does the density drop outside the entrance and the exit cones. Further studies showed, that increasing the inlet pressure leads to turbulence and strong fluctuations in density along the axial profile during target filling, and consequently, is expected to negatively impact the accelerator stability.

  13. Laser driven ion accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Tajima, Toshiki

    2006-04-18

    A system and method of accelerating ions in an accelerator to optimize the energy produced by a light source. Several parameters may be controlled in constructing a target used in the accelerator system to adjust performance of the accelerator system. These parameters include the material, thickness, geometry and surface of the target.

  14. Biological activity, membrane-targeting modification, and crystallization of soluble human decay accelerating factor expressed in E. coli

    PubMed Central

    White, Jennifer; Lukacik, Petra; Esser, Dirk; Steward, Michael; Giddings, Naomi; Bright, Jeremy R.; Fritchley, Sarah J.; Morgan, B. Paul; Lea, Susan M.; Smith, Geoffrey P.; Smith, Richard A.G.

    2004-01-01

    Decay-accelerating factor (DAF, CD55) is a glycophosphatidyl inositol-anchored glycoprotein that regulates the activity of C3 and C5 convertases. In addition to understanding the mechanism of complement inhibition by DAF through structural studies, there is also an interest in the possible therapeutic potential of the molecule. In this report we describe the cloning, expression in Escherichia coli, isolation and membrane-targeting modification of the four short consensus repeat domains of soluble human DAF with an additional C-terminal cysteine residue to permit site-specific modification. The purified refolded recombinant protein was active against both classical and alternative pathway assays of complement activation and had similar biological activity to soluble human DAF expressed in Pichia pastoris. Modification with a membrane-localizing peptide restored cell binding and gave a large increase in antihemolytic potency. These data suggested that the recombinant DAF was correctly folded and suitable for structural studies as well as being the basis for a DAF-derived therapeutic. Crystals of the E. coli-derived protein were obtained and diffracted to 2.2 Å, thus permitting the first detailed X-ray crystallography studies on a functionally active human complement regulator protein with direct therapeutic potential. PMID:15322283

  15. Stellar Ablation of Planetary Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Thomas E.; Horwitz, J. L.

    2007-01-01

    We review observations and theories of the solar ablation of planetary atmospheres, focusing on the terrestrial case where a large magnetosphere holds off the solar wind, so that there is little direct atmospheric impact, but also couples the solar wind electromagnetically to the auroral zones. We consider the photothermal escape flows known as the polar wind or refilling flows, the enhanced mass flux escape flows that result from localized solar wind energy dissipation in the auroral zones, and the resultant enhanced neutral atom escape flows. We term these latter two escape flows the "auroral wind." We review observations and theories of the heating and acceleration of auroral winds, including energy inputs from precipitating particles, electromagnetic energy flux at magnetohydrodynamic and plasma wave frequencies, and acceleration by parallel electric fields and by convection pickup processes also known as "centrifugal acceleration." We consider also the global circulation of ionospheric plasmas within the magnetosphere, their participation in magnetospheric disturbances as absorbers of momentum and energy, and their ultimate loss from the magnetosphere into the downstream solar wind, loading reconnection processes that occur at high altitudes near the magnetospheric boundaries. We consider the role of planetary magnetization and the accumulating evidence of stellar ablation of extrasolar planetary atmospheres. Finally, we suggest and discuss future needs for both the theory and observation of the planetary ionospheres and their role in solar wind interactions, to achieve the generality required for a predictive science of the coupling of stellar and planetary atmospheres over the full range of possible conditions.

  16. Laser ablation of blepharopigmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Tanenbaum, M.; Karas, S.; McCord, C.D. Jr. )

    1988-01-01

    This article discusses laser ablation of blepharopigmentation in four stages: first, experimentally, where pigment vaporization is readily achieved with the argon blue-green laser; second, in the rabbit animal model, where eyelid blepharopigmentation markings are ablated with the laser; third, in human subjects, where the argon blue-green laser is effective in the ablation of implanted eyelid pigment; and fourth, in a case report, where, in a patient with improper pigment placement in the eyelid, the laser is used to safely and effectively ablate the undesired pigment markings. This article describes in detail the new technique of laser ablation of blepharopigmentation. Potential complications associated with the technique are discussed.

  17. Pulsed erbium laser ablation of hard dental tissue: the effects of atomized water spray versus water surface film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freiberg, Robert J.; Cozean, Colette D.

    2002-06-01

    It has been established that the ability of erbium lasers to ablate hard dental tissue is due primarily to the laser- initiated subsurface expansion of the interstitial water trapped within the enamel and that by maintaining a thin film of water on the surface of the tooth, the efficiency of the laser ablation is enhanced. It has recently been suggested that a more aggressive ablative mechanism, designated as a hydrokinetic effect, occurs when atomized water droplets, introduced between the erbium laser and the surface of the tooth, are accelerated in the laser's field and impact the tooth's surface. It is the objective of this study to determine if the proposed hydrokinetic effect exists and to establish its contribution to the dental hard tissue ablation process. Two commercially available dental laser systems were employed in the hard tissue ablation studies. One system employed a water irrigation system in which the water was applied directly to the tooth, forming a thin film of water on the tooth's surface. The other system employed pressurized air and water to create an atomized mist of water droplets between the laser hand piece and the tooth. The ablative properties of the two lasers were studied upon hard inorganic materials, which were void of any water content, as well as dental enamel, which contained interstitial water within its crystalline structure. In each case the erbium laser beam was moved across the surface of the target material at a constant velocity. When exposing material void of any water content, no ablation of the surfaces was observed with either laser system. In contrast, when the irrigated dental enamel was exposed to the laser radiation, a linear groove was formed in the enamel surface. The volume of ablated dental tissue associated with each irrigation method was measured and plotted as a function of the energy within the laser pulse. Both dental laser systems exhibited similar enamel ablation rates and comparable ablated surface

  18. Angular distribution of atoms emitted from a SrZrO{sub 3} target by laser ablation under different laser fluences and oxygen pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Konomi, I.; Motohiro, T.; Azuma, H.; Asaoka, T.; Nakazato, T.; Sato, E.; Shimizu, T.; Fujioka, S.; Sarukura, N.; Nishimura, H.

    2010-05-15

    Angular distributions of atoms emitted by laser ablation of perovskite-type oxide SrZrO{sub 3} have been investigated using electron probe microanalysis with wavelength-dispersive spectroscopy and charge-coupled device photography with an interference filter. Each constituent element has been analyzed as a two-modal distribution composed of a broad cos{sup m} {theta} distribution and a narrow cos{sup n} {theta} distribution. The exponent n characterizes the component of laser ablation while the exponent m characterizes that of thermal evaporation, where a larger n or m means a narrower angular distribution. In vacuum, O (n=6) showed a broader distribution than those of Sr (n=16) and Zr (n=17), and Sr{sup +} exhibited a spatial distribution similar to that of Sr. As the laser fluence was increased from 1.1 to 4.4 J/cm{sup 2}, the angular distribution of Sr became narrower. In the laser fluence range of 1.1-4.4 J/cm{sup 2}, broadening of the angular distribution of Sr was observed only at the fluence of 1.1 J/cm{sup 2} under the oxygen pressure of 10 Pa. Monte Carlo simulations were performed to estimate approximately the energy of emitted atoms, focusing on the broadening of the angular distribution under the oxygen pressure of 10 Pa. The energies of emitted atoms were estimated to be 1-20 eV for the laser fluence of 1.1 J/cm{sup 2}, and more than 100 eV for 2.2 and 4.4 J/cm{sup 2}.

  19. Micrometeoroid ablation simulated in the laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sternovsky, Zoltan; Thomas, Evan W.; DeLuca, Michael; Horanyi, Mihaly; Janches, Diego; Munsat, Tobin L.; Plane, John M. C.

    2016-04-01

    A facility is developed to simulate the ablation of micrometeoroids in laboratory conditions, which also allows measuring the ionization probability of the ablated material. An electrostatic dust accelerator is used to generate iron and meteoric analog particles with velocities 10-50 km/s. The particles are then introduced into a cell filled with nitrogen, air or carbon dioxide gas with pressures adjustable in the 0.02 - 0.5 Torr range, where the partial or complete ablation of the particle occurs over a short distance. An array of biased electrodes is used to collect the ionized products with spatial resolution along the ablating particles' path, allowing thus the study of the temporal resolution of the process. A simple ablation model is used to match the observations. For completely ablated particles the total collected charge directly yields the ionization efficiency for. The measurements using iron particles in N2 and air are in relatively good agreement with earlier data. The measurements with CO2 and He gases, however, are significantly different from the expectations.

  20. Acceleration of multiply charged ions by a high-contrast femtosecond laser pulse of relativistic intensity with the front surface of a solid target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shulyapov, S. A.; Mordvintsev, I. M.; Ivanov, K. A.; Volkov, R. V.; Zarubin, P. I.; Ambrožová, I.; Turek, K.; Savel'ev, A. B.

    2016-05-01

    It is shown that the acceleration efficiency of protons and multiply charged ions (and also the charge composition of the latter) accelerated backwards under irradiation of the front surface of thick solid targets by high-power femtosecond laser radiation with an intensity of 2 × 1018 W cm-2 is determined by the contrast of this radiation. Thus, highly ionised ions up to C6+, Si12+ and Mo14+ are recorded on polyethylene, silicon and molybdenum targets at a contrast of 10-8, the ions with charges up to C5+, Si10+ and Mo10+ possessing an energy of more than 100 keV per unit charge. In the case of a metal target, the acceleration efficiency of protons is significantly reduced, which indicates cleaning of the target surface by a pre-pulse. The measurements performed at a contrast increased by two-to-three orders of magnitude show the presence of fast protons (up to 300–700 keV) on all targets, and also a decrease in the energy and maximum charge of multiply charged ions.

  1. Demonstration of a high-intensity neutron source based on a liquid-lithium target for Accelerator based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy.

    PubMed

    Halfon, S; Arenshtam, A; Kijel, D; Paul, M; Weissman, L; Berkovits, D; Eliyahu, I; Feinberg, G; Kreisel, A; Mardor, I; Shimel, G; Shor, A; Silverman, I; Tessler, M

    2015-12-01

    A free surface liquid-lithium jet target is operating routinely at Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility (SARAF), bombarded with a ~1.91 MeV, ~1.2 mA continuous-wave narrow proton beam. The experiments demonstrate the liquid lithium target (LiLiT) capability to constitute an intense source of epithermal neutrons, for Accelerator based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). The target dissipates extremely high ion beam power densities (>3 kW/cm(2), >0.5 MW/cm(3)) for long periods of time, while maintaining stable conditions and localized residual activity. LiLiT generates ~3×10(10) n/s, which is more than one order of magnitude larger than conventional (7)Li(p,n)-based near threshold neutron sources. A shield and moderator assembly for BNCT, with LiLiT irradiated with protons at 1.91 MeV, was designed based on Monte Carlo (MCNP) simulations of BNCT-doses produced in a phantom. According to these simulations it was found that a ~15 mA near threshold proton current will apply the therapeutic doses in ~1h treatment duration. According to our present results, such high current beams can be dissipated in a liquid-lithium target, hence the target design is readily applicable for accelerator-based BNCT.

  2. Femtosecond laser ablation of brass in air and liquid media

    SciTech Connect

    Shaheen, M. E.; Gagnon, J. E.; Fryer, B. J.

    2013-06-07

    Laser ablation of brass in air, water, and ethanol was investigated using a femtosecond laser system operating at a wavelength of 785 nm and a pulse width less than 130 fs. Scanning electron and optical microscopy were used to study the efficiency and quality of laser ablation in the three ablation media at two different ablation modes. With a liquid layer thickness of 3 mm above the target, ablation rate was found to be higher in water and ethanol than in air. Ablation under water and ethanol showed cleaner surfaces and less debris re-deposition compared to ablation in air. In addition to spherical particles that are normally formed from re-solidified molten material, micro-scale particles with varying morphologies were observed scattered in the ablated structures (craters and grooves) when ablation was conducted under water. The presence of such particles indicates the presence of a non-thermal ablation mechanism that becomes more apparent when ablation is conducted under water.

  3. Longitudinal laser ion acceleration in low density targets: experimental optimization on the Titan laser facility and numerical investigation of the ultra-high intensity limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    d'Humières, E.; Chen, S.; Lobet, Mathieu; Sciscio, M.; Antici, Patrizio; Bailly-Grandvaux, Mathieu; Gangolf, Thomas; Revet, Guilhem; Santos, Joao J.; Schroer, Anna-Marie; Willi, O.; Tikhonchuk, Vladimir T.; Pepin, Henri; Fuchs, Julien

    2015-05-01

    Recent theoretical and experimental studies suggest the possibility of enhancing the efficiency and ease of laser acceleration of protons and ions using underdense or near critical plasmas through electrostatic shocks. Very promising results were recently obtained in this regime. In these experiments, a first ns pulse was focused on a thin target to explode it and a second laser with a high intensity was focused on the exploded foil. The delay between two lasers allowed to control the density gradient seen by the second laser pulse. The transition between various laser ion acceleration regimes depending on the density gradient length was studied. With a laser energy of a few Joules, protons with energies close to the energies of TNSA accelerated protons were obtained for various exploded foils configurations. In the high energy regime (~180 J), protons with energies significantly higher than the ones of TNSA accelerated protons were obtained when exploding the foil while keeping a good beam quality. These results demonstrate that low-density targets are promising candidates for an efficient proton source that can be optimized by choosing appropriate plasma conditions. New experiments were also performed in this regime with gas jets. Scaling shock acceleration in the low density regime to ultra high intensities is a challenge as radiation losses and electron positron pair production change the optimization of the shock process. Using large-scale Particle-In-Cell simulations, the transition to this regime in which intense beams of relativistic ions can be produced is investigated.

  4. Principles of the radiative ablation modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saillard, Yves; Arnault, Philippe; Silvert, Virginie

    2010-12-01

    Indirectly driven inertial confinement fusion (ICF) rests on the setting up of a radiation temperature within a laser cavity and on the optimization of the capsule implosion ablated by this radiation. In both circumstances, the ablation of an optically thick medium is at work. The nonlinear radiation conduction equations that describe this phenomenon admit different kinds of solutions called generically Marshak waves. In this paper, a completely analytic model is proposed to describe the ablation in the subsonic regime relevant to ICF experiments. This model approximates the flow by a deflagrationlike structure where Hugoniot relations are used in the stationary part from the ablation front up to the isothermal sonic Chapman-Jouguet point and where the unstationary expansion from the sonic point up to the external boundary is assumed quasi-isothermal. It uses power law matter properties. It can also accommodate arbitrary boundary conditions provided the ablation wave stays very subsonic and the surface temperature does not vary too quickly. These requirements are often met in realistic situations. Interestingly, the ablated mass rate, the ablation pressure, and the absorbed radiative energy depend on the time history of the surface temperature, not only on the instantaneous temperature values. The results compare very well with self-similar solutions and with numerical simulations obtained by hydrodynamic code. This analytic model gives insight into the physical processes involved in the ablation and is helpful for optimization and sensitivity studies in many situations of interest: radiation temperature within a laser cavity, acceleration of finite size medium, and ICF capsule implosion, for instance.

  5. Principles of the radiative ablation modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Saillard, Yves; Arnault, Philippe; Silvert, Virginie

    2010-12-15

    Indirectly driven inertial confinement fusion (ICF) rests on the setting up of a radiation temperature within a laser cavity and on the optimization of the capsule implosion ablated by this radiation. In both circumstances, the ablation of an optically thick medium is at work. The nonlinear radiation conduction equations that describe this phenomenon admit different kinds of solutions called generically Marshak waves. In this paper, a completely analytic model is proposed to describe the ablation in the subsonic regime relevant to ICF experiments. This model approximates the flow by a deflagrationlike structure where Hugoniot relations are used in the stationary part from the ablation front up to the isothermal sonic Chapman-Jouguet point and where the unstationary expansion from the sonic point up to the external boundary is assumed quasi-isothermal. It uses power law matter properties. It can also accommodate arbitrary boundary conditions provided the ablation wave stays very subsonic and the surface temperature does not vary too quickly. These requirements are often met in realistic situations. Interestingly, the ablated mass rate, the ablation pressure, and the absorbed radiative energy depend on the time history of the surface temperature, not only on the instantaneous temperature values. The results compare very well with self-similar solutions and with numerical simulations obtained by hydrodynamic code. This analytic model gives insight into the physical processes involved in the ablation and is helpful for optimization and sensitivity studies in many situations of interest: radiation temperature within a laser cavity, acceleration of finite size medium, and ICF capsule implosion, for instance.

  6. Nonequilibrium Ablation of Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milos, Frank S.; Chen, Yih K.; Gokcen, Tahir

    2012-01-01

    In previous work, an equilibrium ablation and thermal response model for Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator was developed. In general, over a wide range of test conditions, model predictions compared well with arcjet data for surface recession, surface temperature, in-depth temperature at multiple thermocouples, and char depth. In this work, additional arcjet tests were conducted at stagnation conditions down to 40 W/sq cm and 1.6 kPa. The new data suggest that nonequilibrium effects become important for ablation predictions at heat flux or pressure below about 80 W/sq cm or 10 kPa, respectively. Modifications to the ablation model to account for nonequilibrium effects are investigated. Predictions of the equilibrium and nonequilibrium models are compared with the arcjet data.

  7. STRUCTURAL DESIGN CRITERIA FOR TARGET/BLANKET SYSTEM COMPONENT MATERIALS FOR THE ACCELERATOR PRODUCTION OF TRITIUM PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    W. JOHNSON; R. RYDER; P. RITTENHOUSE

    2001-01-01

    The design of target/blanket system components for the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) plant is dependent on the development of materials properties data specified by the designer. These data are needed to verify that component designs are adequate. The adequacy of the data will be related to safety, performance, and economic considerations, and to other requirements that may be deemed necessary by customers and regulatory bodies. The data required may already be in existence, as in the open technical literature, or may need to be generated, as is often the case for the design of new systems operating under relatively unique conditions. The designers' starting point for design data needs is generally some form of design criteria used in conjunction with a specified set of loading conditions and associated performance requirements. Most criteria are aimed at verifying the structural adequacy of the component, and often take the form of national or international standards such as the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (ASME B and PV Code) or the French Nuclear Structural Requirements (RCC-MR). Whether or not there are specific design data needs associated with the use of these design criteria will largely depend on the uniqueness of the conditions of operation of the component. A component designed in accordance with the ASME B and PV Code, where no unusual environmental conditions exist, will utilize well-documented, statistically-evaluated developed in conjunction with the Code, and will not be likely to have any design data needs. On the other hand, a component to be designed to operate under unique APT conditions, is likely to have significant design data needs. Such a component is also likely to require special design criteria for verification of its structural adequacy, specifically accounting for changes in materials properties which may occur during exposure in the service environment. In such a situation it is common for the design criteria and

  8. Renal Ablation Update

    PubMed Central

    Khiatani, Vishal; Dixon, Robert G.

    2014-01-01

    Thermal ablative technologies have evolved considerably in the recent past and are now an important component of current clinical guidelines for the treatment of small renal masses. Both radiofrequency ablation and cryoablation have intermediate-term oncologic control that rivals surgical options, with favorable complication profiles. Studies comparing cryoablation and radiofrequency ablation show no significant difference in oncologic control or complication profile between the two modalities. Early data from small series with microwave ablation have shown similar promising results. Newer technologies including irreversible electroporation and high-intensity–focused ultrasound have theoretical advantages, but will require further research before becoming a routine part of the ablation armamentarium. The purpose of this review article is to discuss the current ablative technologies available, briefly review their mechanisms of action, discuss technical aspects of each, and provide current data supporting their use. PMID:25049445

  9. Radiofrequency Ablation of Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, Marc; Mikityansky, Igor; Kam, Anthony; Libutti, Steven K.; Walther, McClellan M.; Neeman, Ziv; Locklin, Julia K.; Wood, Bradford J.

    2004-09-15

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) has been used for over 18 years for treatment of nerve-related chronic pain and cardiac arrhythmias. In the last 10 years, technical developments have increased ablation volumes in a controllable, versatile, and relatively inexpensive manner. The host of clinical applications for RFA have similarly expanded. Current RFA equipment, techniques, applications, results, complications, and research avenues for local tumor ablation are summarized.

  10. Dynamics of Laser Ablation in Superfluid ^4He

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buelna, X.; Popov, E.; Eloranta, J.

    2016-10-01

    Pulsed laser ablation of metal targets immersed in superfluid ^4He is visualized by time-resolved shadowgraph photography and the products are analyzed by post-experiment atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements. The expansion dynamics of the gaseous ablation half-bubble on the target surface appears underdamped and follows the predicted behavior for the thermally induced bubble growth mechanism. An inherent instability of the ablation bubble appears near its maximum radius and no tightly focused cavity collapse or rebound events are observed. During the ablation bubble retreat phase, the presence of sharp edges in the target introduces flow patterns that lead to the creation of large classical vortex rings. Furthermore, on the nanometer scale, AFM data reveal that the metal nanoparticles created by laser ablation are trapped in spherical vortex tangles and quantized vortex rings present in the non-equilibrium liquid.

  11. Renaissance of laser interstitial thermal ablation.

    PubMed

    Missios, Symeon; Bekelis, Kimon; Barnett, Gene H

    2015-03-01

    Laser interstitial thermal therapy (LITT) is a minimally invasive technique for treating intracranial tumors, originally introduced in 1983. Its use in neurosurgical procedures was historically limited by early technical difficulties related to the monitoring and control of the extent of thermal damage. The development of magnetic resonance thermography and its application to LITT have allowed for real-time thermal imaging and feedback control during laser energy delivery, allowing for precise and accurate provision of tissue hyperthermia. Improvements in laser probe design, surgical stereotactic targeting hardware, and computer monitoring software have accelerated acceptance and clinical utilization of LITT as a neurosurgical treatment alternative. Current commercially available LITT systems have been used for the treatment of neurosurgical soft-tissue lesions, including difficult to access brain tumors, malignant gliomas, and radiosurgery-resistant metastases, as well as for the ablation of such lesions as epileptogenic foci and radiation necrosis. In this review, the authors aim to critically analyze the literature to describe the advent of LITT as a neurosurgical, laser excision tool, including its development, use, indications, and efficacy as it relates to neurosurgical applications. PMID:25727222

  12. Nanochemical effects in femtosecond laser ablation of metals

    SciTech Connect

    Vorobyev, A. Y.; Guo, Chunlei

    2013-02-18

    We study chemical energy released from the oxidation of aluminum in multipulse femtosecond laser ablation in air and oxygen. Our study shows that the released chemical energy amounts to about 13% of the incident laser energy, and about 50% of the ablated material is oxidized. The ablated material mass per laser pulse is measured to be on the nanogram scale. Our study indicates that femtosecond laser ablation is capable of inducing nanochemical reactions since the femtosecond laser pulse can controllably produce nanoparticles, clusters, and atoms from a solid target.

  13. A novel protocol to accelerate dynamic combinatorial chemistry via isolation of ligand-target adducts from dynamic combinatorial libraries: a case study identifying competitive inhibitors of lysozyme.

    PubMed

    Fang, Zheng; He, Wei; Li, Xin; Li, Zhengjiang; Chen, Beining; Ouyang, Pingkai; Guo, Kai

    2013-09-15

    A novel protocol based on size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) and MS was established to accelerate dynamic combinatorial chemistry (DCC) in this study. By isolating ligand-target adducts from the dynamic combinatorial library (DCL), ligands could be identified directly by MS after denaturation. Three new inhibitors for lysozyme were discovered by this SEC-MS protocol in a case study. Km Data for these new inhibitors was also determined.

  14. Modeling CO{sub 2} Laser Ablative Impulse with Polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Sinko, John E.; Phipps, Claude R.; Sasoh, Akihiro

    2010-10-08

    Laser ablation vaporization models have usually ignored the spatial dependence of the laser beam. Here, we consider effects from modeling using a Gaussian beam for both photochemical and photothermal conditions. The modeling results are compared to experimental and literature data for CO{sub 2} laser ablation of the polymer polyoxymethylene under vacuum, and discussed in terms of the ablated mass areal density and momentum coupling coefficient. Extending the scope of discussion, laser ablative impulse generation research has lacked a cohesive strategy for linking the vaporization and plasma regimes. Existing models, mostly formulated for ultraviolet laser systems or metal targets, appear to be inappropriate or impractical for applications requiring CO{sub 2} laser ablation of polymers. A recently proposed method for linking the vaporization and plasma regimes for analytical modeling is addressed here along with the implications of its use. Key control parameters are considered, along with the major propulsion parameters needed for laser ablation propulsion modeling.

  15. Development of beryllium-based neutron target system with three-layer structure for accelerator-based neutron source for boron neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Kumada, Hiroaki; Kurihara, Toshikazu; Yoshioka, Masakazu; Kobayashi, Hitoshi; Matsumoto, Hiroshi; Sugano, Tomei; Sakurai, Hideyuki; Sakae, Takeji; Matsumura, Akira

    2015-12-01

    The iBNCT project team with University of Tsukuba is developing an accelerator-based neutron source. Regarding neutron target material, our project has applied beryllium. To deal with large heat load and blistering of the target system, we developed a three-layer structure for the target system that includes a blistering mitigation material between the beryllium used as the neutron generator and the copper heat sink. The three materials were bonded through diffusion bonding using a hot isostatic pressing method. Based on several verifications, our project chose palladium as the intermediate layer. A prototype of the neutron target system was produced. We will verify that sufficient neutrons for BNCT treatment are generated by the device in the near future.

  16. Development of beryllium-based neutron target system with three-layer structure for accelerator-based neutron source for boron neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Kumada, Hiroaki; Kurihara, Toshikazu; Yoshioka, Masakazu; Kobayashi, Hitoshi; Matsumoto, Hiroshi; Sugano, Tomei; Sakurai, Hideyuki; Sakae, Takeji; Matsumura, Akira

    2015-12-01

    The iBNCT project team with University of Tsukuba is developing an accelerator-based neutron source. Regarding neutron target material, our project has applied beryllium. To deal with large heat load and blistering of the target system, we developed a three-layer structure for the target system that includes a blistering mitigation material between the beryllium used as the neutron generator and the copper heat sink. The three materials were bonded through diffusion bonding using a hot isostatic pressing method. Based on several verifications, our project chose palladium as the intermediate layer. A prototype of the neutron target system was produced. We will verify that sufficient neutrons for BNCT treatment are generated by the device in the near future. PMID:26260448

  17. Targeted Ablation of the Pde6h Gene in Mice Reveals Cross-species Differences in Cone and Rod Phototransduction Protein Isoform Inventory*

    PubMed Central

    Brennenstuhl, Christina; Tanimoto, Naoyuki; Burkard, Markus; Wagner, Rebecca; Bolz, Sylvia; Trifunovic, Dragana; Kabagema-Bilan, Clement; Paquet-Durand, Francois; Beck, Susanne C.; Huber, Gesine; Seeliger, Mathias W.; Ruth, Peter; Wissinger, Bernd; Lukowski, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Phosphodiesterase-6 (PDE6) is a multisubunit enzyme that plays a key role in the visual transduction cascade in rod and cone photoreceptors. Each type of photoreceptor utilizes discrete catalytic and inhibitory PDE6 subunits to fulfill its physiological tasks, i.e. the degradation of cyclic guanosine-3′,5′-monophosphate at specifically tuned rates and kinetics. Recently, the human PDE6H gene was identified as a novel locus for autosomal recessive (incomplete) color blindness. However, the three different classes of cones were not affected to the same extent. Short wave cone function was more preserved than middle and long wave cone function indicating that some basic regulation of the PDE6 multisubunit enzyme was maintained albeit by a unknown mechanism. To study normal and disease-related functions of cone Pde6h in vivo, we generated Pde6h knock-out (Pde6h−/−) mice. Expression of PDE6H in murine eyes was restricted to both outer segments and synaptic terminals of short and long/middle cone photoreceptors, whereas Pde6h−/− retinae remained PDE6H-negative. Combined in vivo assessment of retinal morphology with histomorphological analyses revealed a normal overall integrity of the retinal organization and an unaltered distribution of the different cone photoreceptor subtypes upon Pde6h ablation. In contrast to human patients, our electroretinographic examinations of Pde6h−/− mice suggest no defects in cone/rod-driven retinal signaling and therefore preserved visual functions. To this end, we were able to demonstrate the presence of rod PDE6G in cones indicating functional substitution of PDE6. The disparities between human and murine phenotypes caused by mutant Pde6h/PDE6H suggest species-to-species differences in the vulnerability of biochemical and neurosensory pathways of the visual signal transduction system. PMID:25739440

  18. Targeted ablation of the Pde6h gene in mice reveals cross-species differences in cone and rod phototransduction protein isoform inventory.

    PubMed

    Brennenstuhl, Christina; Tanimoto, Naoyuki; Burkard, Markus; Wagner, Rebecca; Bolz, Sylvia; Trifunovic, Dragana; Kabagema-Bilan, Clement; Paquet-Durand, Francois; Beck, Susanne C; Huber, Gesine; Seeliger, Mathias W; Ruth, Peter; Wissinger, Bernd; Lukowski, Robert

    2015-04-17

    Phosphodiesterase-6 (PDE6) is a multisubunit enzyme that plays a key role in the visual transduction cascade in rod and cone photoreceptors. Each type of photoreceptor utilizes discrete catalytic and inhibitory PDE6 subunits to fulfill its physiological tasks, i.e. the degradation of cyclic guanosine-3',5'-monophosphate at specifically tuned rates and kinetics. Recently, the human PDE6H gene was identified as a novel locus for autosomal recessive (incomplete) color blindness. However, the three different classes of cones were not affected to the same extent. Short wave cone function was more preserved than middle and long wave cone function indicating that some basic regulation of the PDE6 multisubunit enzyme was maintained albeit by a unknown mechanism. To study normal and disease-related functions of cone Pde6h in vivo, we generated Pde6h knock-out (Pde6h(-/-)) mice. Expression of PDE6H in murine eyes was restricted to both outer segments and synaptic terminals of short and long/middle cone photoreceptors, whereas Pde6h(-/-) retinae remained PDE6H-negative. Combined in vivo assessment of retinal morphology with histomorphological analyses revealed a normal overall integrity of the retinal organization and an unaltered distribution of the different cone photoreceptor subtypes upon Pde6h ablation. In contrast to human patients, our electroretinographic examinations of Pde6h(-/-) mice suggest no defects in cone/rod-driven retinal signaling and therefore preserved visual functions. To this end, we were able to demonstrate the presence of rod PDE6G in cones indicating functional substitution of PDE6. The disparities between human and murine phenotypes caused by mutant Pde6h/PDE6H suggest species-to-species differences in the vulnerability of biochemical and neurosensory pathways of the visual signal transduction system. PMID:25739440

  19. Comparative analysis of the high-order harmonic generation in the laser ablation plasmas prepared on the surfaces of complex and atomic targets

    SciTech Connect

    Ganeev, R. A.; Milosevic, D. B.

    2008-07-15

    We analyzed high-order harmonic generation from the plasma plumes prepared on the surfaces of complex targets. The studies of In-Ag targets showed that the characteristics of the high-order harmonics from the double-target plume were the same as those from the single-target plasmas. For the chromium-tellurium plasma, the enhancements of the 29th and 27th harmonics were obtained, thus indicating the appearance of the enhancement properties from both components of the double-target plasma. These comparative studies also showed higher enhancement of a single harmonic in the case of atomic plasma (Sb) with regard to the molecular one (InSb). The additional component can only decrease the enhancement factor of the medium, due to the change of the oscillator strength and spectral distribution of the transitions involved in the resonance enhancement of the specific harmonic order. The theoretical calculations have shown the enhancement of specific harmonics for the Sb, Te, and Cr plasmas in the double-target configurations.

  20. Laser Ablated Carbon Nanodots for Light Emission.

    PubMed

    Reyes, Delfino; Camacho, Marco; Camacho, Miguel; Mayorga, Miguel; Weathers, Duncan; Salamo, Greg; Wang, Zhiming; Neogi, Arup

    2016-12-01

    The synthesis of fluorescent carbon dots-like nanostructures (CNDs) obtained through the laser ablation of a carbon solid target in liquid environment is reported. The ablation process was induced in acetone with laser pulses of 1064, 532, and 355 nm under different irradiation times. Close-spherical amorphous CNDs with sizes between 5 and 20 nm, whose abundance strongly depends on the ablation parameters were investigated using electron microscopy and was confirmed using absorption and emission spectroscopies. The π- π* electronic transition at 3.76 eV dominates the absorption for all the CNDs species synthesized under different irradiation conditions. The light emission is most efficient due to excitation at 3.54 eV with the photoluminescence intensity centered at 3.23 eV. The light emission from the CNDs is most efficient due to ablation at 355 nm. The emission wavelength of the CNDs can be tuned from the near-UV to the green wavelength region by controlling the ablation time and modifying the ablation and excitation laser wavelength.

  1. Laser Ablated Carbon Nanodots for Light Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyes, Delfino; Camacho, Marco; Camacho, Miguel; Mayorga, Miguel; Weathers, Duncan; Salamo, Greg; Wang, Zhiming; Neogi, Arup

    2016-09-01

    The synthesis of fluorescent carbon dots-like nanostructures (CNDs) obtained through the laser ablation of a carbon solid target in liquid environment is reported. The ablation process was induced in acetone with laser pulses of 1064, 532, and 355 nm under different irradiation times. Close-spherical amorphous CNDs with sizes between 5 and 20 nm, whose abundance strongly depends on the ablation parameters were investigated using electron microscopy and was confirmed using absorption and emission spectroscopies. The π- π* electronic transition at 3.76 eV dominates the absorption for all the CNDs species synthesized under different irradiation conditions. The light emission is most efficient due to excitation at 3.54 eV with the photoluminescence intensity centered at 3.23 eV. The light emission from the CNDs is most efficient due to ablation at 355 nm. The emission wavelength of the CNDs can be tuned from the near-UV to the green wavelength region by controlling the ablation time and modifying the ablation and excitation laser wavelength.

  2. Laser Ablated Carbon Nanodots for Light Emission.

    PubMed

    Reyes, Delfino; Camacho, Marco; Camacho, Miguel; Mayorga, Miguel; Weathers, Duncan; Salamo, Greg; Wang, Zhiming; Neogi, Arup

    2016-12-01

    The synthesis of fluorescent carbon dots-like nanostructures (CNDs) obtained through the laser ablation of a carbon solid target in liquid environment is reported. The ablation process was induced in acetone with laser pulses of 1064, 532, and 355 nm under different irradiation times. Close-spherical amorphous CNDs with sizes between 5 and 20 nm, whose abundance strongly depends on the ablation parameters were investigated using electron microscopy and was confirmed using absorption and emission spectroscopies. The π- π* electronic transition at 3.76 eV dominates the absorption for all the CNDs species synthesized under different irradiation conditions. The light emission is most efficient due to excitation at 3.54 eV with the photoluminescence intensity centered at 3.23 eV. The light emission from the CNDs is most efficient due to ablation at 355 nm. The emission wavelength of the CNDs can be tuned from the near-UV to the green wavelength region by controlling the ablation time and modifying the ablation and excitation laser wavelength. PMID:27659953

  3. Influence of shock waves on laser-driven proton acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Lundh, O.; Lindau, F.; Persson, A.; Wahlstroem, C.-G.; McKenna, P.; Batani, D.

    2007-08-15

    The influence of shock waves, driven by amplified spontaneous emission (ASE), on laser-accelerated proton beams is investigated. A local deformation, produced by a cold shock wave launched by the ablation pressure of the ASE pedestal, can under oblique laser irradiation significantly direct the proton beam toward the laser axis. This can be understood in the frame of target normal sheath acceleration as proton emission from an area of the target where the local target normal is shifted toward the laser axis. Hydrodynamic simulations and experimental data show that there exists a window in laser and target parameter space where the target can be significantly deformed and yet facilitate efficient proton acceleration. The dependence of the magnitude of the deflection on target material, foil thickness, and ASE pedestal intensity and duration is experimentally investigated. The deflection angle is found to increase with increasing ASE intensity and duration and decrease with increasing target thickness. In a comparison between aluminum and copper target foils, aluminum is found to yield a larger proton beam deflection. An analytic model is successfully used to predict the proton emission direction.

  4. Sprayable lightweight ablative coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, William G. (Inventor); Sharpe, Max H. (Inventor); Hill, William E. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    An improved lightweight, ablative coating is disclosed that may be spray applied and cured without the development of appreciable shrinkage cracks. The ablative mixture consists essentially of phenolic microballoons, hollow glass spheres, glass fibers, ground cork, a flexibilized resin binder, and an activated colloidal clay.

  5. Pulsed laser interactions with space debris: Target shape effects

    DOE PAGES

    Liedahl, D. A.; Rubenchik, A.; Libby, S. B.; Nikolaev, S.; Phipps, C. R.

    2013-05-24

    Among the approaches to the proposed mitigation and remediation of the space debris problem is the de-orbiting of objects in low Earth orbit through irradiation by ground-based high-intensity pulsed lasers. Laser ablation of a thin surface layer causes target recoil, resulting in the depletion of orbital angular momentum and accelerated atmospheric re-entry. However, both the magnitude and direction of the recoil are shape dependent, a feature of the laser-based remediation concept that has received little attention. Since the development of a predictive capability is desirable, we have investigated the dynamical response to ablation of objects comprising a variety of shapes.more » We derive and demonstrate a simple analytical technique for calculating the ablation-driven transfer of linear momentum, emphasizing cases for which the recoil is not exclusively parallel to the incident beam. For the purposes of comparison and contrast, we examine one case of momentum transfer in the low-intensity regime, where photon pressure is the dominant momentum transfer mechanism, showing that shape and orientation effects influence the target response in a similar, but not identical, manner. As a result, we address the related problem of target spin and, by way of a few simple examples, show how ablation can alter the spin state of a target, which often has a pronounced effect on the recoil dynamics.« less

  6. Pulsed laser interactions with space debris: Target shape effects

    SciTech Connect

    Liedahl, D. A.; Rubenchik, A.; Libby, S. B.; Nikolaev, S.; Phipps, C. R.

    2013-05-24

    Among the approaches to the proposed mitigation and remediation of the space debris problem is the de-orbiting of objects in low Earth orbit through irradiation by ground-based high-intensity pulsed lasers. Laser ablation of a thin surface layer causes target recoil, resulting in the depletion of orbital angular momentum and accelerated atmospheric re-entry. However, both the magnitude and direction of the recoil are shape dependent, a feature of the laser-based remediation concept that has received little attention. Since the development of a predictive capability is desirable, we have investigated the dynamical response to ablation of objects comprising a variety of shapes. We derive and demonstrate a simple analytical technique for calculating the ablation-driven transfer of linear momentum, emphasizing cases for which the recoil is not exclusively parallel to the incident beam. For the purposes of comparison and contrast, we examine one case of momentum transfer in the low-intensity regime, where photon pressure is the dominant momentum transfer mechanism, showing that shape and orientation effects influence the target response in a similar, but not identical, manner. As a result, we address the related problem of target spin and, by way of a few simple examples, show how ablation can alter the spin state of a target, which often has a pronounced effect on the recoil dynamics.

  7. Science to Practice: Systemic Implications of Ablative Tumor Therapies-Reality Uncovered and Myths Exposed?

    PubMed

    Chapiro, Julius; Geschwind, Jean-François

    2016-08-01

    In their effort to characterize the systemic "off-target" effects of radiofrequency (RF) ablation and irreversible electroporation (IRE), Bulvik et al demonstrated substantial differences in physiologic, tumorigenic, and immunologic responses between the two ablative modalities. By establishing that IRE may in fact stimulate more robust inflammatory and systemic reactions than RF at liver ablation, the authors conclude that the selection of a given ablation energy source may alter the clinical outcome depending on the circumstance-both favorably and unfavorably. PMID:27429140

  8. Ionization and acceleration of heavy ions in high-Z solid target irradiated by high intensity laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawahito, D.; Kishimoto, Y.

    2016-05-01

    In the interaction between high intensity laser and solid film, an ionization dynamics inside the solid is dominated by fast time scale convective propagation of the internal sheath field and the slow one by impact ionization due to heated high energy electrons coupled with nonlocal heat transport. Furthermore, ionization and acceleration due to the localized external sheath field which co- propagates with Al ions constituting the high energy front in the vacuum region. Through this process, the maximum charge state and then q/A increase in the rear side, so that ions near the front are further accelerated to high energy.

  9. Experimental and computational characterization of hydrodynamic expansion of a preformed plasma from thin-foil target for laser-driven proton acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagisaka, Akito; Nagatomo, Hideo; Daido, Hiroyuki; Pirozhkov, Alexander S.; Ogura, Koichi; Orimo, Satoshi; Mori, Michiaki; Nishiuchi, Mamiko; Yogo, Akifumi; Kado, Masataka

    2009-10-01

    We characterize the electron density distributions of preformed plasma for laser-accelerated proton generation. The preformed plasma of a titanium target 3 μm thick is generated by prepulse and amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) of a high-intensity Ti:sapphire laser and is measured with an interferometer using a second harmonic probe beam. High-energy protons are obtained by reducing the size of the preformed plasma by changing the ASE duration before main pulse at the front side (laser incidence side) of the target. Simulation results with two-dimensional radiation hydrodynamic code are close to the experimental results for low-density region ~4 × 1019 cm-3 at the front side. In the high-density region near to the target surface, the interferometry underestimates the density due to the substantial refraction. The characterization of hydrodynamic expansion with the interferometer and simulation is a useful tool for investigation of high-energy proton generation.

  10. Laser ablation of dyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Späth, M.; Stuke, M.

    1992-01-01

    High density 50 μs pulses of the UV dyes PPF, POPOP and BBO and of two dyes in the visible region, Xanthen N92 and Fluorol 7GA were generated by laser ablation. Dye powders were pressed with 7800 kp/cm 2 in round pellets which were ablated by exposure to KrF excimer laser radiation (248 nm) at a fluence of 100 mJ/cm 2. The ablation cloud was optically activated with a XeCl excimer laser. Its fluorescence spectrum was measured and was identified as a dye vapour fluorescence spectrum by comparison to conventional dye solution and dye vapour spectra. The dye cloud is not deflected in an electric field (10 6 V/m). By changing the delay time between the ablation laser and the focused activation laser, the velocity distribution of the ablated dye was measured. Its maximum is at 600 m/s for PPF. Knowing the thickness of the ablated dye layer per shot (300 Å) and the size of the ablation cloud (pictures of a video camera), one can estimate the maximum density of the dye in the gas pulse to be 10 -5 mol/ l in the range of concentration of lasing dyes. However, no lasing was observed up to now.

  11. Tumor Ablation and Nanotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Manthe, Rachel L.; Foy, Susan P.; Krishnamurthy, Nishanth; Sharma, Blanka; Labhasetwar, Vinod

    2010-01-01

    Next to surgical resection, tumor ablation is a commonly used intervention in the treatment of solid tumors. Tumor ablation methods include thermal therapies, photodynamic therapy, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) producing agents. Thermal therapies induce tumor cell death via thermal energy and include radiofrequency, microwave, high intensity focused ultrasound, and cryoablation. Photodynamic therapy and ROS producing agents cause increased oxidative stress in tumor cells leading to apoptosis. While these therapies are safe and viable alternatives when resection of malignancies is not feasible, they do have associated limitations that prevent their widespread use in clinical applications. To improve the efficacy of these treatments, nanoparticles are being studied in combination with nonsurgical ablation regimens. In addition to better thermal effect on tumor ablation, nanoparticles can deliver anticancer therapeutics that show synergistic anti-tumor effect in the presence of heat and can also be imaged to achieve precision in therapy. Understanding the molecular mechanism of nanoparticle-mediated tumor ablation could further help engineer nanoparticles of appropriate composition and properties to synergize the ablation effect. This review aims to explore the various types of nonsurgical tumor ablation methods currently used in cancer treatment and potential improvements by nanotechnology applications. PMID:20866097

  12. Recent Advances in Tumor Ablation for Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kang, Tae Wook; Rhim, Hyunchul

    2015-09-01

    Image-guided tumor ablation for early stage hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is an accepted non-surgical treatment that provides excellent local tumor control and favorable survival benefit. This review summarizes the recent advances in tumor ablation for HCC. Diagnostic imaging and molecular biology of HCC has recently undergone marked improvements. Second-generation ultrasonography (US) contrast agents, new computed tomography (CT) techniques, and liver-specific contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have enabled the early detection of smaller and inconspicuous HCC lesions. Various imaging-guidance tools that incorporate imaging-fusion between real-time US and CT/MRI, that are now common for percutaneous tumor ablation, have increased operator confidence in the accurate targeting of technically difficult tumors. In addition to radiofrequency ablation (RFA), various therapeutic modalities including microwave ablation, irreversible electroporation, and high-intensity focused ultrasound ablation have attracted attention as alternative energy sources for effective locoregional treatment of HCC. In addition, combined treatment with RFA and chemoembolization or molecular agents may be able to overcome the limitation of advanced or large tumors. Finally, understanding of the biological mechanisms and advances in therapy associated with tumor ablation will be important for successful tumor control. All these advances in tumor ablation for HCC will result in significant improvement in the prognosis of HCC patients. In this review, we primarily focus on recent advances in molecular tumor biology, diagnosis, imaging-guidance tools, and therapeutic modalities, and refer to the current status and future perspectives for tumor ablation for HCC.

  13. Generation of ultra-high-pressure shocks by collision of a fast plasma projectile driven in the laser-induced cavity pressure acceleration scheme with a solid target

    SciTech Connect

    Badziak, J.; Rosiński, M.; Krousky, E.; Kucharik, M.; Liska, R.; Ullschmied, J.

    2015-03-15

    A novel, efficient method of generating ultra-high-pressure shocks is proposed and investigated. In this method, the shock is generated by collision of a fast plasma projectile (a macro-particle) driven by laser-induced cavity pressure acceleration (LICPA) with a solid target placed at the LICPA accelerator channel exit. Using the measurements performed at the kilojoule PALS laser facility and two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations, it is shown that the shock pressure ∼ Gbar can be produced with this method at the laser driver energy of only a few hundred joules, by an order of magnitude lower than the energy needed for production of such pressure with other laser-based methods known so far.

  14. Focal Ablation of Prostate Cancer: Four Roles for MRI Guidance

    PubMed Central

    Sommer, Graham; Bouley, Donna; Gill, Harcharan; Daniel, Bruce; Pauly, Kim Butts; Diederich, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Introduction There is currently a great deal of interest in the possible use of focal therapies for prostate cancer, since such treatments offer the prospect for control or cure of the primary disease with minimal side effects. Many forms of thermal therapy have been proposed for focal ablation of prostate cancer, including laser, high intensity ultrasound and cryotherapy. This review will demonstrate the important roles that MRI guidance can offer to such focal ablation, focusing on the use of high intensity ultrasonic applicators as an example of one promising technique. Materials and Methods Transurethral and interstitial high intensity ultrasonic applicators, designed specifically for ablation of prostate tissue were tested extensively in vivo in a canine model. The roles of MRI in positioning the devices, monitoring prostate ablation, and depicting ablated tissue were assessed using appropriate MRI sequences. Results MRI guidance provides a very effective tool for the positioning of ablative devices in the prostate, and thermal monitoring successfully predicted ablation of prostate tissue when a threshold of 52°C was achieved. Contrast enhanced MRI accurately depicted the distribution of ablated prostate tissue, which is resorbed at 30 days. Conclusions Guidance of thermal therapies for focal ablation of prostate cancer will likely prove critically dependent on MRI functioning in four separate roles. Our studies indicate that in 3 roles: device positioning; thermal monitoring of prostate ablation; and depiction of ablated prostate tissue, MR techniques are highly accurate and likely to be of great benefit in focal prostate cancer ablation. A fourth critical role, identification of cancer within the gland for targeting of thermal therapy, is more problematic at present, but will likely become practical with further technological advances. PMID:23587506

  15. Observed transition from Richtmyer-Meshkov jet formation through feedout oscillations to Rayleigh-Taylor instability in a laser target

    SciTech Connect

    Aglitskiy, Y.; Karasik, M.; Velikovich, A. L.; Serlin, V.; Weaver, J. L.; Kessler, T. J.; Schmitt, A. J.; Obenschain, S. P.; Nikitin, S. P.; Oh, J.; Metzler, N.

    2012-10-15

    Experimental study of hydrodynamic perturbation evolution triggered by a laser-driven shock wave breakout at the free rippled rear surface of a plastic target is reported. At sub-megabar shock pressure, planar jets manifesting the development of the Richtmyer-Meshkov-type instability in a non-accelerated target are observed. As the shock pressure exceeds 1 Mbar, an oscillatory rippled expansion wave is observed, followed by the 'feedout' of the rear-surface perturbations to the ablation front and the development of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability, which breaks up the accelerated target.

  16. Dispersive effects in laser ablation plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irimiciuc, Ştefan Andrei; Agop, Maricel; Nica, Petru; Gurlui, Silviu; Mihăileanu, Doina; Toma, Ştefan; Focşa, Cristian

    2014-11-01

    The dynamics of transient plasmas generated by high-fluence nanosecond laser ablation has been investigated by recording the ionic current with a Langmuir probe. Systematic measurements have been carried out on a plasma produced in vacuum by Nd:YAG laser irradiation of a copper target. The temporal evolution of the ionic current for different fluences was investigated, revealing the presence of some periodic oscillations. A theoretical model is proposed in order to describe the nonlinear behavior of the expanding plasma by assuming that the motion curves of the ablated particles are fractals. The behaviors predicted by the proposed theoretical model are in good agreement with the experimental findings.

  17. Development of a non-denaturing 2D gel electrophoresis protocol for screening in vivo uranium-protein targets in Procambarus clarkii with laser ablation ICP MS followed by protein identification by HPLC-Orbitrap MS.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ming; Frelon, Sandrine; Simon, Olivier; Lobinski, Ryszard; Mounicou, Sandra

    2014-10-01

    Limited knowledge about in vivo non-covalent uranium (U)-protein complexes is largely due to the lack of appropriate analytical methodology. Here, a method for screening and identifying the molecular targets of U was developed. The approach was based on non-denaturing 1D and 2D gel electrophoresis (ND-PAGE and ND-2D-PAGE (using ND-IEF as first dimension previously described)) in conjunction with laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP MS) for the detection of U-containing proteins. The proteins were then identified by µbore HPLC-Orbitrap MS/MS. The method was applied to the analysis of cytosol of hepatopancreas (HP) of a model U-bioaccumulating organism (Procambarus clarkii). The imaging of uranium in 2D gels revealed the presence of 11 U-containing protein spots. Six protein candidates (i.e. ferritin, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, triosephosphate isomerase, cytosolic manganese superoxide dismutase (Mn-SOD), glutathione S transferase D1 and H3 histone family protein) were then identified by matching with the data base of crustacea Decapoda species (e.g. crayfish). Among them, ferritin was the most important one. This strategy is expected to provide an insight into U toxicology and metabolism. PMID:25059147

  18. Effective generation of the spread-out-Bragg peak from the laser accelerated proton beams using a carbon-proton mixed target.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Seung Hoon; Cho, Ilsung; Cho, Sungho; Song, Yongkeun; Jung, Won-Gyun; Kim, Dae-Hyun; Shin, Dongho; Lee, Se Byeong; Pae, Ki-Hong; Park, Sung Yong

    2014-12-01

    Conventional laser accelerated proton beam has broad energy spectra. It is not suitable for clinical use directly, so it is necessary for employing energy selection system. However, in the conventional laser accelerated proton system, the intensity of the proton beams in the low energy regime is higher than that in the high energy regime. Thus, to generate spread-out-Bragg peak (SOBP), stronger weighting value to the higher energy proton beams is needed and weaker weighting value to the lower energy proton beams is needed, which results in the wide range of weighting values. The purpose of this research is to investigate a method for efficient generating of the SOBP with varying magnetic field in the energy selection system using a carbon-proton mixture target. Energy spectrum of the laser accelerated proton beams was acquired using Particle-In-Cell simulations. The Geant4 Monte Carlo simulation toolkit was implemented for energy selection, particle transportation, and dosimetric property measurement. The energy selection collimator hole size of the energy selection system was changed from 1 to 5 mm in order to investigate the effect of hole size on the dosimetric properties for Bragg peak and SOBP. To generate SOBP, magnetic field in the energy selection system was changed during beam irradiation with each beam weighting factor. In this study, our results suggest that carbon-proton mixture target based laser accelerated proton beams can generate quasi-monoenergetic energy distribution and result in the efficient generation of SOBP. A further research is needed to optimize SOBP according to each range and modulated width using an optimized weighting algorithm.

  19. Arc-driven rail accelerator research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Pradosh K.

    1987-01-01

    Arc-driven rail accelerator research is analyzed by considering wall ablation and viscous drag in the plasma. Plasma characteristics are evaluated through a simple fluid-mechanical analysis considering only wall ablation. By equating the energy dissipated in the plasma with the radiation heat loss, the average properties of the plasma are determined as a function of time and rate of ablation. Locations of two simultaneously accelerating arcs were determined by optical and magnetic probes and fron streak camera photographs. All three measurements provide consistent results.

  20. Effect of plasma profile on ion acceleration in the interaction of a short laser pulse with a thin overdense target

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, Duck-Hee; Rhee, Yong-Joo; Lee, Sungman; Cha, Hyungki

    2008-06-15

    Energetic ion generation from the interaction of a short laser pulse with a thin overdense plasma accompanied by a preplasma and a rear side plasma gradient is investigated by particle-in-cell simulations. The dynamics of ion acceleration depending on the maximum density of the preplasma in front of the overdense plasma slab with a smooth density gradient at the rear side are presented and discussed by comparing a sharp rear side boundary case.

  1. Moldable cork ablation material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A successful thermal ablative material was manufactured. Moldable cork sheets were tested for density, tensile strength, tensile elongation, thermal conductivity, compression set, and specific heat. A moldable cork sheet, therefore, was established as a realistic product.

  2. Accelerated particle-based target capture--the roles of volume transport and near-surface alignment.

    PubMed

    van Reenen, Alexander; de Jong, Arthur M; Prins, Menno W J

    2013-02-01

    The upcoming generations of high-sensitive and miniaturized biosensing systems need target capture methods that are as efficient and as rapid as possible, with targets ranging from molecules to cells. Capture of the targets can be achieved using particles coated with affinity molecules, but there are still fundamental questions as to the processes that limit the association rates. In this paper we quantify and compare the reaction rates of particle-based target capture with different types of actuation, namely (i) passive thermal transport, (ii) fluid agitation by vortex mixing, and (iii) actively rotating particles. In the experiments, we use fluorescent nanoparticles as targets which are biochemically captured by magnetic microparticles, and the capture efficiency is quantified using fluorescence microscopy with single target resolution. The data unravel the contributions of volume transport, near-surface alignment, and the chemical reaction to the overall rate constant of association. Vortex mixing versus passive transport gives an increase of the reaction rate constant by more than an order of magnitude, implying that the encounter frequency as well as the near-surface alignment probability are increased. The importance of near-surface alignment is underscored by the data of active particle rotation; the binding probability per encounter is 4-fold enhanced on rotating capture particles. We discuss the implications of our results for different biological systems and for the development of novel actuation methods in particle-based target capture. PMID:23297682

  3. Simulation of Double-Pulse Laser Ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Povarnitsyn, Mikhail E.; Khishchenko, Konstantin V.; Levashov, Pavel R.; Itina, Tatian E.

    2010-10-08

    We investigate the physical reasons of a strange decrease in the ablation depth observed in femtosecond double-pulse experiments with increasing delay between the pulses. Two ultrashort pulses of the same energy produce the crater which is less than that created by a single pulse. Hydrodynamic simulation shows that the ablation mechanism is suppressed when the delay between the pulses exceeds the electron-ion relaxation time. In this case, the interaction of the second laser pulse with the expanding target material leads to the formation of the second shock wave suppressing the rarefaction wave created by the first pulse. The modeling of the double-pulse ablation for different delays between pulses confirms this explanation.

  4. Ablation therapy for left atrial autonomic modification.

    PubMed

    Malcolme-Lawes, Louisa; Sandler, Belinda C; Sikkel, Markus B; Lim, Phang Boon; Kanagaratnam, Prapa

    2016-08-01

    The autonomic nervous system is implicated in the multifactorial pathogenesis of atrial fibrillation (AF) but few studies have attempted neural targeting for therapeutic intervention. We have demonstrated that short bursts of stimulation, at specific sites of left atrial ganglionated plexi (GPs), trigger fibrillation-inducing atrial ectopy and importantly continuous stimulation of these sites may not induce AV block, the 'conventional' marker used to locate GPs. We have shown that these ectopy-triggering GP (ET-GP) sites are anatomically stable and can be rendered inactive by either ablation at the site or by ablation between the site and the adjacent pulmonary vein (PV). This may have important implications for planning patient specific strategies for ablation of paroxysmal AF in the future. PMID:27595199

  5. Tumor Ablation: Common Modalities and General Practices

    PubMed Central

    Knavel, Erica M.; Brace, Christopher L.

    2014-01-01

    Tumor ablation is a minimally invasive technique that is commonly used in the treatment of tumors of the liver, kidney, bone, and lung. During tumor ablation, thermal energy is used to heat or cool tissue to cytotoxic levels (less than −40°C or more than 60°C). An additional technique is being developed that targets the permeability of the cell membrane and is ostensibly nonthermal. Within the classification of tumor ablation, there are several modalities used worldwide: radiofrequency, microwave, laser, high-intensity focused ultrasound, cryoablation, and irreversible electroporation. Each technique, although similar in purpose, has specific and optimal indications. This review serves to discuss general principles and technique, reviews each modality, and discusses modality selection. PMID:24238374

  6. Laser ablation of concrete.

    SciTech Connect

    Savina, M.

    1998-10-05

    Laser ablation is effective both as an analytical tool and as a means of removing surface coatings. The elemental composition of surfaces can be determined by either mass spectrometry or atomic emission spectroscopy of the atomized effluent. Paint can be removed from aircraft without damage to the underlying aluminum substrate, and environmentally damaged buildings and sculptures can be restored by ablating away deposited grime. A recent application of laser ablation is the removal of radioactive contaminants from the surface and near-surface regions of concrete. We present the results of ablation tests on concrete samples using a high power pulsed Nd:YAG laser with fiber optic beam delivery. The laser-surface interaction was studied on various model systems consisting of Type I Portland cement with varying amounts of either fine silica or sand in an effort to understand the effect of substrate composition on ablation rates and mechanisms. A sample of non-contaminated concrete from a nuclear power plant was also studied. In addition, cement and concrete samples were doped with non-radioactive isotopes of elements representative of cooling waterspills, such as cesium and strontium, and analyzed by laser-resorption mass spectrometry to determine the contamination pathways. These samples were also ablated at high power to determine the efficiency with which surface contaminants are removed and captured. The results show that the neat cement matrix melts and vaporizes when little or no sand or aggregate is present. Surface flows of liquid material are readily apparent on the ablated surface and the captured aerosol takes the form of glassy beads up to a few tens of microns in diameter. The presence of sand and aggregate particles causes the material to disaggregate on ablation, with intact particles on the millimeter size scale leaving the surface. Laser resorption mass spectrometric analysis showed that cesium and potassium have similar chemical environments in the

  7. Three-dimensional dynamics of break-out afterburner ion acceleration using high-contrast short-pulse laser and nano-scale targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, L.; Albright, B. J.; Jung, D.; Bowers, K. J.; Fernandez, J. C.; Hegelich, B. M.

    2010-11-01

    Ultra-intense laser interaction with solid density carbon targets is examined in 3D VPIC simulations. It is shown that a linearly polarized laser pulse at >10^20 W/cm^2 intensity will turn a solid density, nm-scale target relativistically transparent and begin an epoch of dramatic acceleration of ions. Called the Break-Out-Afterburner (BOA) [L. Yin, et al., Phys. Plasmas 14, 056706 (2007)], this mechanism leads to order-of-magnitude greater ion energy and beam currents. The BOA lasts until the electron density in the expanding target reduces to the non-relativistic critical density. A striking feature of the BOA mechanism is that the ion beam symmetry is broken, with the production of lobes in the direction orthogonal to the laser polarization and propagation directions, along which the highest ion beam energy is observed. These ion beam lobes have been measured on recent Trident experiments. An analytic theory for the production of ion beam lobes has been obtained and has been shown to be in good agreement with simulations. Moreover, other features of the BOA, e.g., the existence of an optimal target thickness for given laser and target density and the propagation of light and heavy ion species at comparable speed have been demonstrated in simulations and experiments.

  8. Laser Surface Preparation of Epoxy Composites for Secondary Bonding: Optimization of Ablation Depth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmieri, Frank L.; Hopkins, John; Wohl, Christopher J.; Lin, Yi; Connell, John W.; Belcher, Marcus A.; Blohowiak, Kay Y.

    2015-01-01

    Surface preparation has been identified as one of the most critical aspects of attaining predictable and reliable adhesive bonds. Energetic processes such as laser ablation or plasma treatment are amenable to automation and are easily monitored and adjusted for controlled surface preparation. A laser ablation process was developed to accurately remove a targeted depth of resin, approximately 0.1 to 20 micrometers, from a carbon fiber reinforced epoxy composite surface while simultaneously changing surface chemistry and creating micro-roughness. This work demonstrates the application of this process to prepare composite surfaces for bonding without exposing or damaging fibers on the surface. Composite panels were prepared in an autoclave and had a resin layer approximately 10 micrometers thick above the fiber reinforcement. These composite panels were laser surface treated using several conditions, fabricated into bonded panels and hygrothermally aged. Bond performance of aged, experimental specimens was compared with grit blast surface treated specimens using a modified double cantilever beam test that enabled accelerated saturation of the specimen with water. Comparison of bonded specimens will be used to determine how ablation depth may affect average fracture energies and failure modes.

  9. Effect of liquid properties on laser ablation of aluminum and titanium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Peixuan; Li, Peijie; Leksina, E. G.; Michurin, S. V.; He, Liangju

    2016-01-01

    In order to study the effect of liquid properties on laser ablation in liquids, aluminum 5A06 and titanium TB5 targets were irradiated by single-pulse infrared laser in isopropanol, distilled water, glycerin and as a comparison, in air, respectively. Craters induced by laser ablation were characterized using scanning electron and white-light interferometric microscopies. The results show that for liquid-mediated ablation, craters with porous surface structures were formed in aluminum target through phase explosion, while no micro-cavities were formed in titanium target owing to high critical temperature of titanium. In addition, ablation rates of aluminum and titanium targets vary with types of ambient media in accordance with such sequence: air < isopropanol < water < glycerin. Further, the influence of liquid properties on material-removal mechanisms for laser ablation in liquid is discussed. It is concluded that the density, thermal conductivity and acoustical impedance of liquid play a dominant role in laser ablation efficiency.

  10. Recent US target-physics-related research in heavy-ion inertial fusion: simulations for tamped targets and for disk experiments in accelerator test facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Mark, J.W.K.

    1982-03-22

    Calculations suggest that experiments relating to disk heating, as well as beam deposition, focusing and transport can be performed within the context of current design proposals for accelerator test-facilities. Since the test-facilities have lower ion kinetic energy and beam pulse power as compared to reactor drivers, we achieve high-beam intensities at the focal spot by using short focal distance and properly designed beam optics. In this regard, the low beam emittance of suggested multi-beam designs are very useful. Possibly even higher focal spot brightness could be obtained by plasma lenses which involve external fields on the beam which is stripped to a higher charge state by passing through a plasma cell. Preliminary results suggest that intensities approx. 10/sup 13/ - 10/sup 14/ W/cm/sup 2/ are achievable. Given these intensities, deposition experiments with heating of disks to greater than a million degrees Kelvin (100 eV) are expected.

  11. Laser-solid interaction and dynamics of laser-ablated materials

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, K.R.; Neboeuf, J.N.; Wood, R.F.; Geohegan, D.B.; Donato, J.M.; Liu, C.L.; Puretzky, A.A.

    1995-09-01

    An annealing model is extended to treat the vaporization process, and a hydrodynamic model describes the ablated material. We find that dynamic source and ionization effects accelerate the expansion front of the ablated plume with thermal vaporization temperature. The vaporization process and plume propagation in high background gas pressure are studied.

  12. Accelerating target discovery using pre-competitive open science—patients need faster innovation more than anyone else

    PubMed Central

    Low, Eric; Bountra, Chas; Lee, Wen Hwa

    2016-01-01

    We are experiencing a new era enabled by unencumbered access to high quality data through the emergence of open science initiatives in the historically challenging area of early stage drug discovery. At the same time, many patient-centric organisations are taking matters into their own hands by participating in, enabling and funding research. Here we present the rationale behind the innovative partnership between the Structural Genomics Consortium (SGC)—an open, pre-competitive pre-clinical research consortium and the research-focused patient organisation Myeloma UK to create a new, comprehensive platform to accelerate the discovery and development of new treatments for multiple myeloma. PMID:27594912

  13. Accelerating target discovery using pre-competitive open science-patients need faster innovation more than anyone else.

    PubMed

    Low, Eric; Bountra, Chas; Lee, Wen Hwa

    2016-01-01

    We are experiencing a new era enabled by unencumbered access to high quality data through the emergence of open science initiatives in the historically challenging area of early stage drug discovery. At the same time, many patient-centric organisations are taking matters into their own hands by participating in, enabling and funding research. Here we present the rationale behind the innovative partnership between the Structural Genomics Consortium (SGC)-an open, pre-competitive pre-clinical research consortium and the research-focused patient organisation Myeloma UK to create a new, comprehensive platform to accelerate the discovery and development of new treatments for multiple myeloma. PMID:27594912

  14. Enhanced laser-radiation-pressure-driven proton acceleration by moving focusing electric-fields in a foil-in-cone target

    SciTech Connect

    Zou, D. B.; Zhuo, H. B. Yu, T. P.; Yang, X. H.; Shao, F. Q.; Ma, Y. Y.; Yin, Y.; Ge, Z. Y.; Wu, H. C.

    2015-02-15

    A foil-in-cone target is proposed to enhance stable laser-radiation-pressure-driven proton acceleration by avoiding the beam degradation in whole stage of acceleration. Two and three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations demonstrate that the guiding cone can substantially improve the spectral and spatial properties of the ion beam and lead to better preservation of the beam quality. This can be attributed to the focusing effect of the radial sheath electric fields formed on the inner walls of the cone, which co-move with the accelerated foil and effectively suppress the undesirable transverse explosion of the foil. It is shown that, by using a transversely Gaussian laser pulse with intensity of ∼2.74 × 10{sup 22 }W∕cm{sup 2}, a quasi-monoenergetic proton beam with a peak energy of ∼1.5 GeV/u, density ∼10n{sub c}, and transverse size ∼1λ{sub 0} can be obtained.

  15. Laboratory Micrometeroid/Dust Ablation Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, E.; Horanyi, M.; Janches, D.; Munsat, T. L.; Plane, J. M. C.; Simolka, J.; Sternovsky, Z.

    2014-12-01

    Each day, somewhere between 5-270 tonnes of meteoric material ablates in Earth's upper atmosphere. Thisenormous range is significant because the Interplanetary Dust Particle (IDP) input has implications in ourunderstanding of meteor transport in the atmosphere, the formation of layers of metal atoms and ions,nucleation of noctilucent clouds, effects on stratospheric aerosols and O3 chemistry, and dust evolution inour solar system. As the dust ablates, it produces light, as well as a plasma trail of ionized atmosphericatoms and electrons. These meteor signatures are detected by photographic means, or by radar, but thereremain uncertainties in the luminous efficiency and ionization coefficient of meteors - two parameters thatare essential to evaluate densities, masses, height distributions and fluxes. Precise measurements of theseparameters would allow for not only an understanding of the layers of metal atoms and ions and meteoricsmoke particles in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere, but also would allow for the Earth's atmosphereto be used as a dust detector to detect and characterize the dust environment in our solar system. This work discusses the preliminary results of the new dust ablation facility at the 3 MV hypervelocity dust accelerator at the Institute for Modeling Plasma, Atmospheres and Cosmic Dust (IMPACT) at the University of Colorado, which aims to characterize the ionization coefficient and luminous efficiency of ablating micrometeroids.

  16. High Current Cathodes Fabricated by KrF Laser Ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Gilgenbach, Ronald M.; Lau, Y. Y.; Jones, M. C.; Johnston, M. D.; Jordan, N. M.; Hoff, B. W.

    2010-10-08

    In this paper we review several high power laser ablation techniques that have been utilized to fabricate high current (1-80 kA) electron beam cathodes for accelerators and microwave sources: 1) Projection Ablation Lithography (PAL) cathodes, 2) Ablation Line Focus (ALF) cathodes, and 3) Metal-Oxide-Junction (MOJ) cathodes. Laser-ablative micromachining techniques (PAL and ALF) have been utilized to generate micron-scale features on metal substrates that provide electric field (beta) enhancement for Fowler-Nordheim emission and plasma cathodes. Since these laser-ablated patterns are directly, laser-written on the substrate metal they exhibit much higher thermal conductivity for higher current capability and increased damage thresholds. Metal-Oxide-Junction (MOJ) cathodes exploit the triple-point electron emission that occurs at the interface between metal, insulator and vacuum.The ablation laser is a KrF excimer laser with a pulse energy of 600 mJ and pulselength of 20 ns. Cathode experiments were performed on the MELBA-C accelerator: V = -300 kV, pulselength = 0.5 microsecond. Data will be presented for PAL, ALF and MOJ cathodes.

  17. Catheter Ablation for Long-Standing Persistent Atrial Fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Romero, Jorge; Gianni, Carola; Di Biase, Luigi; Natale, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained arrhythmia worldwide and represents a major burden to health care systems. Atrial fibrillation is associated with a 4- to 5-fold increased risk of thromboembolic stroke. The pulmonary veins have been identified as major sources of atrial triggers for AF. This is particularly true in patients with paroxysmal AF but not always the case for those with long-standing persistent AF (LSPAF), in which other locations for ectopic beats have been well recognized. Structures with foci triggering AF include the coronary sinus, the left atrial appendage (LAA), the superior vena cava, the crista terminalis, and the ligament of Marshall. More than 30 studies reporting results on radiofrequency ablation of LSPAF have been published to date. Most of these are observational studies with very different methodologies using different strategies. As a result, there has been remarkable variation in short- and long-term success, which suggests that the optimal ablation technique for LSPAF is still to be elucidated. In this review we discuss the different approaches to LSPAF catheter ablation, starting with pulmonary vein isolation (PVI) through ablation lines in different left atrial locations, the role of complex fractionated atrial electrograms, focal impulses and rotor modulation, autonomic modulation (ganglionated plexi), alcohol ablation, and the future of epicardial mapping and ablation for this arrhythmia. A stepwise ablation approach requires several key ablation techniques, such as meticulous PVI, linear ablation at the roof and mitral isthmus, electrogram-targeted ablation with particular attention to triggers in the coronary sinus and LAA, and discretionary right atrial ablation (superior vena cava, intercaval, or cavotricuspid isthmus lines). PMID:26306125

  18. Catheter Ablation for Long-Standing Persistent Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Jorge; Gianni, Carola; Di Biase, Luigi; Natale, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained arrhythmia worldwide and represents a major burden to health care systems. Atrial fibrillation is associated with a 4- to 5-fold increased risk of thromboembolic stroke. The pulmonary veins have been identified as major sources of atrial triggers for AF. This is particularly true in patients with paroxysmal AF but not always the case for those with long-standing persistent AF (LSPAF), in which other locations for ectopic beats have been well recognized. Structures with foci triggering AF include the coronary sinus, the left atrial appendage (LAA), the superior vena cava, the crista terminalis, and the ligament of Marshall. More than 30 studies reporting results on radiofrequency ablation of LSPAF have been published to date. Most of these are observational studies with very different methodologies using different strategies. As a result, there has been remarkable variation in short- and long-term success, which suggests that the optimal ablation technique for LSPAF is still to be elucidated. In this review we discuss the different approaches to LSPAF catheter ablation, starting with pulmonary vein isolation (PVI) through ablation lines in different left atrial locations, the role of complex fractionated atrial electrograms, focal impulses and rotor modulation, autonomic modulation (ganglionated plexi), alcohol ablation, and the future of epicardial mapping and ablation for this arrhythmia. A stepwise ablation approach requires several key ablation techniques, such as meticulous PVI, linear ablation at the roof and mitral isthmus, electrogram-targeted ablation with particular attention to triggers in the coronary sinus and LAA, and discretionary right atrial ablation (superior vena cava, intercaval, or cavotricuspid isthmus lines). PMID:26306125

  19. [Steam ablation of varicose veins].

    PubMed

    van den Bos, Renate R; Malskat, Wendy S J; Neumann, H A M Martino

    2013-01-01

    In many western countries endovenous thermal ablation techniques have largely replaced classical surgery for the treatment of saphenous varicose veins as they are more effective and patient friendly. Because these treatments can be performed under local tumescent anaesthesia, patients can mobilize immediately after the procedure. A new method of thermal ablation is endovenous steam ablation, which is a fast and easy procedure. Steam ablation may cause less pain than laser ablation and it is also cheaper and more flexible than segmental radiofrequency ablation. PMID:23484513

  20. Ablative therapies for renal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Ramanathan, Rajan; Leveillee, Raymond J.

    2010-01-01

    Owing to an increased use of diagnostic imaging for evaluating patients with other abdominal conditions, incidentally discovered kidney masses now account for a majority of renal tumors. Renal ablative therapy is assuming a more important role in patients with borderline renal impairment. Renal ablation uses heat or cold to bring about cell death. Radiofrequency ablation and cryoablation are two such procedures, and 5-year results are now emerging from both modalities. Renal biopsy at the time of ablation is extremely important in order to establish tissue diagnosis. Real-time temperature monitoring at the time of radiofrequency ablation is very useful to ensure adequacy of ablation. PMID:21789083

  1. Self-vapor cooled targets for production of I-123 at high current accelerators. [using Xe-123 production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blue, J. W.; Scholz, K. L.; Sodd, V. J.

    1974-01-01

    The basic elements of the vapor cooled target system are shown. This system can be operated as a heat pipe or as a conventional condenser. The choice of target fluid is based on the specific nuclear reaction chosen to produce Xe-123. The reaction using I-127 was studied and shown to have a significant yield for bombarding energies from 47 to 63 MeV. The Cs-133 reaction is also included. Xenon-123 is applied to I-123 production in a purer form for thyroid studies.

  2. A TPD and AR based comparison of accelerator neutron irradiation fields between (7)Li and W targets for BNCT.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Kenichi; Endo, Satoru; Yonai, Shunsuke; Baba, Mamoru; Hoshi, Masaharu

    2014-06-01

    The characteristics of moderator assembly dimension was investigated for the usage of (7)Li(p,n) neutrons by 2.3-2.8MeV protons and W(p,n) neutrons by 50MeV protons. The indexes were the treatable protocol depth (TPD) and advantage depth (AD). Consequently, a configuration for W target with the Fe filter, Fluental moderator, Pb reflector showed the TPD of 5.8cm and AD of 9.3cm. Comparable indexes were found for the Li target in a geometry with the MgF2 moderator and Teflon reflector.

  3. Co-targeting Deoxyribonucleic Acid–Dependent Protein Kinase and Poly(Adenosine Diphosphate-Ribose) Polymerase-1 Promotes Accelerated Senescence of Irradiated Cancer Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Azad, Arun; Bukczynska, Patricia; Jackson, Susan; Haput, Ygal; Cullinane, Carleen; McArthur, Grant A.; Solomon, Benjamin

    2014-02-01

    Purpose: To examine the effects of combined blockade of DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) and poly(adenosine diphosphate-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) on accelerated senescence in irradiated H460 and A549 non-small cell lung cancer cells. Methods and Materials: The effects of KU5788 and AG014699 (inhibitors of DNA-PK and PARP-1, respectively) on clonogenic survival, DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), apoptosis, mitotic catastrophe, and accelerated senescence in irradiated cells were examined in vitro. For in vivo experiments, H460 xenografts established in athymic nude mice were treated with BEZ235 (a DNA-PK, ATM, and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor) and AG014699 to determine effects on proliferation, DNA DSBs, and accelerated senescence after radiation. Results: Compared with either inhibitor alone, combination treatment with KU57788 and AG014699 reduced postradiation clonogenic survival and significantly increased persistence of Gamma-H2AX (γH2AX) foci in irradiated H460 and A549 cells. Notably, these effects coincided with the induction of accelerated senescence in irradiated cells as reflected by positive β-galactosidase staining, G2-M cell-cycle arrest, enlarged and flattened cellular morphology, increased p21 expression, and senescence-associated cytokine secretion. In irradiated H460 xenografts, concurrent therapy with BEZ235 and AG014699 resulted in sustained Gamma-H2AX (γH2AX) staining and prominent β-galactosidase activity. Conclusion: Combined DNA-PK and PARP-1 blockade increased tumor cell radiosensitivity and enhanced the prosenescent properties of ionizing radiation in vitro and in vivo. These data provide a rationale for further preclinical and clinical testing of this therapeutic combination.

  4. Combining Electrolysis and Electroporation for Tissue Ablation.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Mary; Rubinsky, Liel; Meir, Arie; Raju, Narayan; Rubinsky, Boris

    2015-08-01

    Electrolytic ablation is a method that operates by delivering low magnitude direct current to the target region over long periods of time, generating electrolytic products that destroy cells. This study was designed to explore the hypothesis stating that electrolytic ablation can be made more effective when the electrolysis-producing electric charges are delivered using electric pulses with field strength typical in reversible electroporation protocols. (For brevity we will refer to tissue ablation protocols that combine electroporation and electrolysis as E(2).) The mechanistic explanation of this hypothesis is related to the idea that products of electrolysis generated by E(2) protocols can gain access to the interior of the cell through the electroporation permeabilized cell membrane and therefore cause more effective cell death than from the exterior of an intact cell. The goal of this study is to provide a first-order examination of this hypothesis by comparing the charge dosage required to cause a comparable level of damage to a rat liver, in vivo, when using either conventional electrolysis or E(2) approaches. Our results show that E(2) protocols produce tissue damage that is consistent with electrolytic ablation. Furthermore, E(2) protocols cause damage comparable to that produced by conventional electrolytic protocols while delivering orders of magnitude less charge to the target tissue over much shorter periods of time.

  5. Dominant front-side acceleration of energetic proton beams from plastic targets irradiated by an ultraintense laser pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, K.; Park, S. H.; Cha, Y.-H.; Lee, Y. W.; Jeong, Y. U.; Lee, J. Y.; Kim, K. N.

    2011-01-15

    An experimental observation has been made by using aluminum-coated Mylar foils, which strongly supports that in the case of plastic target, the energetic part of the proton beam originates from the front-side of the target. When a 30 fs laser pulse with an intensity of 1.6x10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2} was irradiated on the 12.5-{mu}m-thick Mylar side of the aluminum-coated Mylar foil, the maximum proton energy was reduced by a factor 5.5 as compared to that of 3.3 MeV observed from the single layer of the Mylar foil. With the help of a two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation, these observations can be interpreted that in the case of plastic target, the energetic proton beam originates from the front-side of the target. In the case of an aluminum-coated 6-{mu}m-thick Mylar foil, more energetic proton beams of 4.7 MeV were also observed when the laser pulse was irradiated on the aluminum side as compared to those of 3.4 MeV from the single Mylar foil.

  6. SU-E-J-207: Assessing the Validity of 4D-CT Based Target Volumes and Free Breathing CBCT Localization in Lung Stereotactic Ablative Radiation Therapy (SABR)

    SciTech Connect

    Badkul, R; Pokhrel, D; Jiang, H; Park, J; Wang, F; Kumar, P

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Four-dimensional-computed-tomography(4D-CT) imaging for target-volume delineation and cone-beam-tomography(CBCT) for treatment localization are widely utilized in lung-SABR.Aim of this study was to perform a quantitative-assessment and inter-comparison of Internal-targetvolumes( ITV) drawn on various phases of breathing-cycle 4D-CT-scans, Maximum-intensity-projection(MIP), average-intensity-projection(AIP)and static CT-scans of lung-motion-phantom to simulate lung-SABR patient geometry. We also analyzed and compared the ITVs drawn on freebreathing- CBCT. Materials and Methods: 4D-CT-scans were acquired on Philips big-bore 16slice CT and Bellows-respiratory monitoring-system using retrospective phase-binning method. Each respiratory cycle divided into 10-phases. Quasar-Phantom with lung-inserts and 3cm-diameter nylonball to simulate tumor and was placed on respiratory-motion-platform for 4D-CT and CBCT-acquisition. Amplitudes of motions: 0.5,1.0,2.0,3.0cm in superior-inferior direction with breathing-cycle time of 6,5,4,6sec, respectively used.4D-CTs with 10-phases(0%to90%)for each excursion-set and 3D-CT for static-phantom exported to iPlan treatment-planningsystem( TPS).Tumor-volumes delineated in all phases of 4D-CT, MIP,AIP,CBCT scans using fixed-HU-threshold(−500to1000)values automatically.For each 4D-dataset ITV obtained by unifying the tumorcontours on all phases.CBCT-ITV-volumes were drawn in Eclipse-TPS. Results: Mean volume of tumor contours for all phases compared with static 3D-CT were 0.62±0.08%, 1.67±0.26%, 4.77±0.54% and 9.27±1.23% for 0.5cm,1cm,2cm,3cm excursions respectively. Differences of mean Union-ITV with MIP-ITV were close(≤2.4%).Mean Union-ITV from expected-theoretical values differed from −4.9% to 3.8%.Union-ITV and MIP-ITV were closer within 2.3%. AIP-ITVs were underestimated from 14 to 32% compared to union-ITV for all motion datasets. Differences of −5.9% to −44% and −5% to 6.7% for CBCT-ITV from MIP-ITV and AIP

  7. Laser ablation for the synthesis of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holloway, Brian C. (Inventor); Eklund, Peter C. (Inventor); Smith, Michael W. (Inventor); Jordan, Kevin C. (Inventor); Shinn, Michelle (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Single walled carbon nanotubes are produced in a novel apparatus by the laser-induced ablation of moving carbon target. The laser used is of high average power and ultra-fast pulsing. According to various preferred embodiments, the laser produces and output above about 50 watts/cm.sup.2 at a repetition rate above about 15 MHz and exhibits a pulse duration below about 10 picoseconds. The carbon, carbon/catalyst target and the laser beam are moved relative to one another and a focused flow of "side pumped", preheated inert gas is introduced near the point of ablation to minimize or eliminate interference by the ablated plume by removal of the plume and introduction of new target area for incidence with the laser beam. When the target is moved relative to the laser beam, rotational or translational movement may be imparted thereto, but rotation of the target is preferred.

  8. Laser ablation for the synthesis of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holloway, Brian C. (Inventor); Eklund, Peter C. (Inventor); Smith, Michael W. (Inventor); Jordan, Kevin C. (Inventor); Shinn, Michelle (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Single walled carbon nanotubes are produced in a novel apparatus by the laser-induced ablation of moving carbon target. The laser used is of high average power and ultra-fast pulsing. According to various preferred embodiments, the laser produces an output above about 50 watts/cm.sup.2 at a repetition rate above about 15 MHz and exhibits a pulse duration below about 10 picoseconds. The carbon, carbon/catalyst target and the laser beam are moved relative to one another and a focused flow of side pumped, preheated inert gas is introduced near the point of ablation to minimize or eliminate interference by the ablated plume by removal of the plume and introduction of new target area for incidence with the laser beam. When the target is moved relative to the laser beam, rotational or translational movement may be imparted thereto, but rotation of the target is preferred.

  9. Laser ablation for the synthesis of carbon nanotubes

    DOEpatents

    Holloway, Brian C.; Eklund, Peter C.; Smith, Michael W.; Jordan, Kevin C.; Shinn, Michelle

    2010-04-06

    Single walled carbon nanotubes are produced in a novel apparatus by the laser-induced ablation of moving carbon target. The laser used is of high average power and ultra-fast pulsing. According to various preferred embodiments, the laser produces an output above about 50 watts/cm.sup.2 at a repetition rate above about 15 MHz and exhibits a pulse duration below about 10 picoseconds. The carbon, carbon/catalyst target and the laser beam are moved relative to one another and a focused flow of "side pumped", preheated inert gas is introduced near the point of ablation to minimize or eliminate interference by the ablated plume by removal of the plume and introduction of new target area for incidence with the laser beam. When the target is moved relative to the laser beam, rotational or translational movement may be imparted thereto, but rotation of the target is preferred.

  10. Laser ablation for the synthesis of carbon nanotubes

    DOEpatents

    Holloway, Brian C; Eklund, Peter C; Smith, Michael W; Jordan, Kevin C; Shinn, Michelle

    2012-11-27

    Single walled carbon nanotubes are produced in a novel apparatus by the laser-induced ablation of moving carbon target. The laser used is of high average power and ultra-fast pulsing. According to various preferred embodiments, the laser produces and output above about 50 watts/cm.sup.2 at a repetition rate above about 15 MHz and exhibits a pulse duration below about 10 picoseconds. The carbon, carbon/catalyst target and the laser beam are moved relative to one another and a focused flow of "side pumped", preheated inert gas is introduced near the point of ablation to minimize or eliminate interference by the ablated plume by removal of the plume and introduction of new target area for incidence with the laser beam. When the target is moved relative to the laser beam, rotational or translational movement may be imparted thereto, but rotation of the target is preferred.

  11. A Monte Carlo investigation of low-Z target image quality generated in a linear accelerator using Varian's VirtuaLinac

    SciTech Connect

    Parsons, David; Robar, James L.; Sawkey, Daren

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: The focus of this work was the demonstration and validation of VirtuaLinac with clinical photon beams and to investigate the implementation of low-Z targets in a TrueBeam linear accelerator (Linac) using Monte Carlo modeling. Methods: VirtuaLinac, a cloud based web application utilizing Geant4 Monte Carlo code, was used to model the Linac treatment head components. Particles were propagated through the lower portion of the treatment head using BEAMnrc. Dose distributions and spectral distributions were calculated using DOSXYZnrc and BEAMdp, respectively. For validation, 6 MV flattened and flattening filter free (FFF) photon beams were generated and compared to measurement for square fields, 10 and 40 cm wide and at d{sub max} for diagonal profiles. Two low-Z targets were investigated: a 2.35 MeV carbon target and the proposed 2.50 MeV commercial imaging target for the TrueBeam platform. A 2.35 MeV carbon target was also simulated in a 2100EX Clinac using BEAMnrc. Contrast simulations were made by scoring the dose in the phosphor layer of an IDU20 aSi detector after propagating through a 4 or 20 cm thick phantom composed of water and ICRP bone. Results: Measured and modeled depth dose curves for 6 MV flattened and FFF beams agree within 1% for 98.3% of points at depths greater than 0.85 cm. Ninety three percent or greater of points analyzed for the diagonal profiles had a gamma value less than one for the criteria of 1.5 mm and 1.5%. The two low-Z target photon spectra produced in TrueBeam are harder than that from the carbon target in the Clinac. Percent dose at depth 10 cm is greater by 3.6% and 8.9%; the fraction of photons in the diagnostic energy range (25–150 keV) is lower by 10% and 28%; and contrasts are lower by factors of 1.1 and 1.4 (4 cm thick phantom) and 1.03 and 1.4 (20 cm thick phantom), for the TrueBeam 2.35 MV/carbon and commercial imaging beams, respectively. Conclusions: VirtuaLinac is a promising new tool for Monte Carlo modeling of

  12. Transient Ablation of Teflon Hemispheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arai, Norio; Karashima, Kei-ichi; Sato, Kiyoshi

    1997-01-01

    For high-speed entry of space vehicles into atmospheric environments, ablation is a practical method for alleviating severe aerodynamic heating. Several studies have been undertaken on steady or quasi-steady ablation. However, ablation is a very complicated phenomenon in which a nonequilibrium chemical process is associated with an aerodynamic process that involves changes in body shape with time. Therefore, it seems realistic to consider that ablation is an unsteady phenomenon. In the design of an ablative heat-shield system, since the ultimate purpose of the heat shield is to keep the internal temperature of the space vehicle at a safe level during entry, the transient heat conduction characteristics of the ablator may be critical in the selection of the material and its thickness. This note presents an experimental study of transient ablation of Teflon, with particular emphasis on the change in body shape, the instantaneous internal temperature distribution, and the effect of thermal expansion on ablation rate.

  13. Advanced Ablative TPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gasch, Matthew J.

    2011-01-01

    Early NASA missions (Gemini, Apollo, Mars Viking) employed new ablative TPS that were tailored for the entry environment. After 40 years, heritage ablative TPS materials using Viking or Pathfinder era materials are at or near their performance limits and will be inadequate for future exploration missions. Significant advances in TPS materials technology are needed in order to enable any subsequent human exploration missions beyond Low Earth Orbit. This poster summarizes some recent progress at NASA in developing families of advanced rigid/conformable and flexible ablators that could potentially be used for thermal protection in planetary entry missions. In particular the effort focuses technologies required to land heavy (approx.40 metric ton) masses on Mars to facilitate future exploration plans.

  14. Control of laser-ablation plasma potential with external electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Isono, Fumika Nakajima, Mitsuo; Hasegawa, Jun; Kawamura, Tohru; Horioka, Kazuhiko

    2015-08-15

    The potential of a laser-ablation plasma was controlled stably up to +2 kV by using external ring electrodes. A stable electron sheath was formed between the plasma and the external electrodes by placing the ring electrodes away from the boundary of the drifting plasma. The plasma kept the potential for a few μs regardless of the flux change of the ablation plasma. We also found that the plasma potential changed with the expansion angle of the plasma from the target. By changing the distance between the plasma boundary and the external electrodes, we succeeded in controlling the potential of laser-ablation plasma.

  15. Shuttle subscale ablative nozzle tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powers, L. B.; Bailey, R. L.

    1980-01-01

    Recent subscale nozzle tests have identified new and promising carbon phenolic nozzle ablatives which utilize staple rayon, PAN, and pitch based carbon cloth. A 4-inch throat diameter submerged test nozzle designed for the 48-inch Jet Propulsion Laboratory char motor was used to evaluate five different designs incorporating 20 candidate ablatives. Test results indicate that several pitch and PAN-based carbon phenolic ablatives can provide erosion and char performance equivalent or superior to the present continuous rayon-based SRM ablative.

  16. Conformal needle-based ultrasound ablation using EM-tracked conebeam CT image guidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burdette, E. Clif; Banovac, Filip; Diederich, Chris J.; Cheng, Patrick; Wilson, Emmanuel; Cleary, Kevin R.

    2011-03-01

    Numerous studies have demonstrated the efficacy of interstitial ablative approaches for the treatment of renal and hepatic tumors. Despite these promising results, current systems remain highly dependent on operator skill, and cannot treat many tumors because there is little control of the size and shape of the zone of necrosis, and no control over ablator trajectory within tissue once insertion has taken place. Additionally, tissue deformation and target motion make it extremely difficult to accurately place the ablator device into the target. Irregularly shaped target volumes typically require multiple insertions and several sequential thermal ablation procedures. This study demonstrated feasibility of spatially tracked image-guided conformal ultrasound (US) ablation for percutaneous directional ablation of diseased tissue. Tissue was prepared by suturing the liver within a pig belly and 1mm BBs placed to serve as needle targets. The image guided system used integrated electromagnetic tracking and cone-beam CT (CBCT) with conformable needlebased high-intensity US ablation in the interventional suite. Tomographic images from cone beam CT were transferred electronically to the image-guided tracking system (IGSTK). Paired-point registration was used to register the target specimen to CT images and enable navigation. Path planning is done by selecting the target BB on the GUI of the realtime tracking system and determining skin entry location until an optimal path is selected. Power was applied to create the desired ablation extent within 7-10 minutes at a thermal dose (>300eqm43). The system was successfully used to place the US ablator in planned target locations within ex-vivo kidney and liver through percutaneous access. Targeting accuracy was 3-4 mm. Sectioned specimens demonstrated uniform ablation within the planned target zone. Subsequent experiments were conducted for multiple ablator positions based upon treatment planning simulations. Ablation zones in

  17. Thermal ablation in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yong; Cao, Cheng-Song; Yu, Yang; Si, Ya-Meng

    2016-01-01

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) and cryoablation are alternative forms of therapy used widely in various pathological states, including treatment of carcinogenesis. The reason is that ablation techniques have ability of modulating the immune system. Furthermore, recent studies have applied this form of therapy on tumor microenvironment and in the systematic circulation. Moreover, RFA and cryoablation result in an inflammatory immune response along with tissue disruption. Evidence has demonstrated that these procedures affect carcinogenesis by causing a significant local inflammatory response leading to an immunogenic gene signature. The present review enlightens the current view of these techniques in cancer. PMID:27703520

  18. Pulsed laser ablation and deposition of niobium carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sansone, M.; De Bonis, A.; Santagata, A.; Rau, J. V.; Galasso, A.; Teghil, R.

    2016-06-01

    NbC crystalline films have been deposited in vacuum by ultra-short pulsed laser deposition technique. The films have been characterized by transmission and scanning electron microscopies and by X-ray diffraction. To clarify the ablation-deposition mechanism, the plasma produced by the ablation process has been characterized by optical emission spectroscopy and fast imaging. A comparison of the results with those obtained by ns pulsed deposition of the same target has been carried out.

  19. Accelerator Mass Spectrometry Analysis of Ultra-Low-Level 129I in Carrier-Free AgI-AgCl Sputter Targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qi; Hou, Xiaolin; Zhou, Weijian; Fu, Yunchong

    2015-05-01

    Separation of carrier-free iodine from low-level iodine samples and accurate measurement of ultra-low-level 129I in microgram iodine target are essential but a bottleneck in geology and environment research using naturally produced 129I. This article presents a detection technique of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) for accurate determination of ultra-low-level 129I in carrier-free AgI-AgCl sputter targets. Copper instead of aluminum was selected as the suitable sample holder material to avoid the reaction of AgI-AgCl powder with aluminum. Niobium powder was selected as thermally and electrically conductive matrix to be mixed with AgI-AgCl powder, in order to obtain and maintain a stable and high iodine ion current intensity, as well as less memory effect and low background level of 129I. The most optimal ratio of the Nb matrix to the AgI-AgCl powder was found to be 5:1 by mass. The typical current of 127I5+ using AgI-AgCl targets with iodine content from 5 to 80 μg was measured to be 5 to 100 nA. Four-year AMS measurements of the 129I/127I ratios in standards of low iodine content and the machine blanks showed a good repeatability and stability.

  20. Accelerator mass spectrometry analysis of ultra-low-level (129)I in carrier-free AgI-AgCl sputter targets.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qi; Hou, Xiaolin; Zhou, Weijian; Fu, Yunchong

    2015-05-01

    Separation of carrier-free iodine from low-level iodine samples and accurate measurement of ultra-low-level (129)I in microgram iodine target are essential but a bottleneck in geology and environment research using naturally produced (129)I. This article presents a detection technique of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) for accurate determination of ultra-low-level (129)I in carrier-free AgI-AgCl sputter targets. Copper instead of aluminum was selected as the suitable sample holder material to avoid the reaction of AgI-AgCl powder with aluminum. Niobium powder was selected as thermally and electrically conductive matrix to be mixed with AgI-AgCl powder, in order to obtain and maintain a stable and high iodine ion current intensity, as well as less memory effect and low background level of (129)I. The most optimal ratio of the Nb matrix to the AgI-AgCl powder was found to be 5:1 by mass. The typical current of (127)I(5+) using AgI-AgCl targets with iodine content from 5 to 80 μg was measured to be 5 to 100 nA. Four-year AMS measurements of the (129)I/(127)I ratios in standards of low iodine content and the machine blanks showed a good repeatability and stability. PMID:25743113

  1. Improving beam spectral and spatial quality by double-foil target in laser ion acceleration for ion-driven fast ignition

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Chengkun; Albright, Brian J

    2010-07-16

    Mid-Z ion driven fast ignition inertial fusion requires ion beams of 100s of MeV energy and < 10% energy spread. An overdense run-scale foil target driven by a high intensity laser pulse can produce an ion beam that has attractive properties for this application. The Break Out Afterburner (BOA) is one laser-ion acceleration mechanism proposed to generate such beams, however the late stages of the BOA tend to produce too large of an energy spread. The spectral and spatial qualities of the beam quickly evolve as the ion beam and co-moving electrons continue to interact with the laser. Here we show how use of a second target foil placed behind a nm-scale foil can substantially reduce the temperature of the co-moving electrons and improve the ion beam energy spread. Particle-In-Cell simulations reveal the dynamics of the ion beam under control. Optimal conditions for improving the spectral and spatial spread of the ion beam is explored for current laser and target parameters, leading to generation of ion beams of energy 100s of MeV and 6% energy spread, a vital step for realizing ion-driven fast ignition.

  2. Fourier-Space Nonlinear Rayleigh-Taylor Growth Measurements of 3D Laser-Imprinted Modulations in Planar Targets

    SciTech Connect

    Smalyuk, V.A.; Sadot, O.; Delettrez, J.A.; Meyerhofer, D.D.; Regan, S.P.; Sangster, T.C.

    2005-12-05

    Nonlinear growth of 3-D broadband nonuniformities was measured near saturation levels using x-ray radiography in planar foils accelerated by laser light. The initial target modulations were seeded by laser nonuniformities and later amplified during acceleration by Rayleigh-Taylor instability. The nonlinear saturation velocities are measured for the first time and are found to be in excellent agreement with Haan predictions. The measured growth of long-wavelength modes is consistent with enhanced, nonlinear, long-wavelength generation in ablatively driven targets.

  3. MicroRNA-203 accelerates apoptosis in LPS-stimulated alveolar epithelial cells by targeting PIK3CA.

    PubMed

    Ke, Xian-Fu; Fang, Jie; Wu, Xiao-Ning; Yu, Chen-Huan

    2014-08-01

    The pathogenesis of endotoxin-induced acute lung injury (ALI) remains obscure and has not been well elucidated hitherto. Recently, microRNAs have distinct expression profiles in innate immunity, inflammation, and infection. However, the functions of microRNAs in ALI remain unknown. In this study, the functions of microRNAs in the development of ALI were investigated to identify potential drug targets. MicroRNA-203 (miR-203) expression in the lung tissues of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-challenged mice was found to be significantly upregulated and peaked 5d post-LPS injection. MiR-203 overexpression in A549 cells significantly promoted cell apoptosis by inducing S-phase cell-cycle arrest. MiR-203 overexpression also inhibited the protein expression of phosphoinositide 3-kinase catalytic subunit alpha (PIK3CA), a direct target of miR-203 identified by bioinformatics, thereby suppressing the PI3K/Akt pathway. Moreover, repressed miR-203 effectively attenuated LPS-induced interstitial pneumonia. Therefore, regulating or inhibiting miR-203 may be of therapeutic potential in pneumonia and ALI.

  4. HIFU Therapy Compared with Other Thermal Ablation Methods in a Perfused Organ Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenne, Jürgen W.; Risse, Frank; Häcker, Axel; Peters, Kristina; Siegler, Peter; Divkovic, Gabriela Wilzbach; Huber, Peter E.

    2007-05-01

    Therapy with high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) has been shown to be both safe and clinically practical in a growing number of patient studies for a variety of different target organs. Especially in cancer therapy there are comparable ablation methods like radio frequency (RFA) or laser (LITT) ablation, which are clinically more accepted. In an ongoing study we compare HIFU with RF- and laser ablation under MRI guidance in a perfused organ model. All evaluated techniques were appropriate to induce defined and localized ablation necrosis in the renal cortex. Our HIFU system and the laser system were completely MRI compatible. The tested RF- system showed local needle artefacts and disturbed the MR images during operation. The ablation rate of HIFU using a spot scanning technique was clearly lower compared to the other ablation techniques. However, advanced HIFU scanning methods might overcome this limitation. In addition HIFU is the only complete non-invasive ablation technique.

  5. Tumor necrosis factor-α accelerates the resolution of established pulmonary fibrosis in mice by targeting profibrotic lung macrophages.

    PubMed

    Redente, Elizabeth F; Keith, Rebecca C; Janssen, William; Henson, Peter M; Ortiz, Luis A; Downey, Gregory P; Bratton, Donna L; Riches, David W H

    2014-04-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a relentless, fibrotic parenchymal lung disease in which alternatively programmed macrophages produce profibrotic molecules that promote myofibroblast survival and collagen synthesis. Effective therapies to treat patients with IPF are lacking, and conventional therapy may be harmful. We tested the hypothesis that therapeutic lung delivery of the proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α into wild-type fibrotic mice would reduce the profibrotic milieu and accelerate the resolution of established pulmonary fibrosis. Fibrosis was assessed in bleomycin-instilled wild-type and TNF-α(-/-) mice by measuring hydroxyproline levels, static compliance, and Masson's trichrome staining. Macrophage infiltration and programming status was assessed by flow cytometry of enzymatically digested lung and in situ immunostaining. Pulmonary delivery of TNF-α to wild-type mice with established pulmonary fibrosis was found to reduce their fibrotic burden, to improve lung function and architecture, and to reduce the number and programming status of profibrotic alternatively programmed macrophages. In contrast, fibrosis and alternative macrophage programming were prolonged in bleomycin-instilled TNF-α(-/-) mice. To address the role of the reduced numbers of alternatively programmed macrophages in the TNF-α-induced resolution of established pulmonary fibrosis, we conditionally depleted macrophages in MAFIA (MAcrophage Fas-Induced Apoptosis) mice. Conditional macrophage depletion phenocopied the resolution of established pulmonary fibrosis observed after therapeutic TNF-α delivery. Taken together, our results show for the first time that TNF-α is involved in the resolution of established pulmonary fibrosis via a mechanism involving reduced numbers and programming status of profibrotic macrophages. We speculate that pulmonary delivery of TNF-α or augmenting its signaling pathway represent a novel therapeutic strategy to resolve

  6. Assessment of americium and curium transmutation in magnesia based targets in different spectral zones of an experimental accelerator driven system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haeck, W.; Malambu, E.; Sobolev, V. P.; Aït Abderrahim, H.

    2006-06-01

    The potential to incinerate minor actinides (MA) in a sub-critical accelerator-driven system (ADS) is a subject of study in several countries where nuclear power plants are present. The performance of the MYRRHA experimental ADS, as to the transmutation of Am and Cm in the inert matrix fuel (IMF) samples consisting of 40 vol.% (Cm0.1Am0.5Pu0.4)O1.88 fuel and 60 vol.% MgO matrix with a density of 6.077 g cm-3 in three various spectrum regions, were analysed at the belgian nuclear research centre SCK · CEN. The irradiation period of 810 effective full power days (EFPD) followed by a storage period of 2 years was considered. The ALEPH code system currently under development at SCK · CEN was used to carry out this study. The total amount of MA is shown to decrease in all three considered cases. For Am, the decrease is the largest in the reflector (89% decrease) but at the cost of a net Cm production (92% increase). In the two other positions (inside the core region), 20-30% of Am has disappeared but with a lower production of Cm (between 7% and 11%). In the reflector, a significant build-up of long-lived 245Cm, 246Cm, 247Cm and 248Cm was also observed while the production of these isotopes is 10-1000 times smaller in the core. The reduction of the Pu content is also the highest in the reflector position (41%). In the other positions the incinerated amount of Pu is much smaller: 1-5%.

  7. Treatment planning for prostate focal laser ablation in the face of needle placement uncertainty

    SciTech Connect

    Cepek, Jeremy Fenster, Aaron; Lindner, Uri; Trachtenberg, John; Davidson, Sean R. H.; Haider, Masoom A.; Ghai, Sangeet

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: To study the effect of needle placement uncertainty on the expected probability of achieving complete focal target destruction in focal laser ablation (FLA) of prostate cancer. Methods: Using a simplified model of prostate cancer focal target, and focal laser ablation region shapes, Monte Carlo simulations of needle placement error were performed to estimate the probability of completely ablating a region of target tissue. Results: Graphs of the probability of complete focal target ablation are presented over clinically relevant ranges of focal target sizes and shapes, ablation region sizes, and levels of needle placement uncertainty. In addition, a table is provided for estimating the maximum target size that is treatable. The results predict that targets whose length is at least 5 mm smaller than the diameter of each ablation region can be confidently ablated using, at most, four laser fibers if the standard deviation in each component of needle placement error is less than 3 mm. However, targets larger than this (i.e., near to or exceeding the diameter of each ablation region) require more careful planning. This process is facilitated by using the table provided. Conclusions: The probability of completely ablating a focal target using FLA is sensitive to the level of needle placement uncertainty, especially as the target length approaches and becomes greater than the diameter of ablated tissue that each individual laser fiber can achieve. The results of this work can be used to help determine individual patient eligibility for prostate FLA, to guide the planning of prostate FLA, and to quantify the clinical benefit of using advanced systems for accurate needle delivery for this treatment modality.

  8. Targeted tissue ablation with nanosecond pulses.

    PubMed

    Long, Gary; Shires, Peter K; Plescia, David; Beebe, Stephen J; Kolb, Juergen F; Schoenbach, Karl H

    2011-08-01

    In-vivo porcine studies on the effect of nanosecond high voltage pulses on liver tissue have shown that cell death can be induced in well-defined tissue volumes without damaging collagen-predominant structures. Comparison of the experimental results with the results of a three-dimensional finite element model allowed us to determine the threshold electric field for cell death. For 30, 100 nanosecond long pulses this was found to be in the range from 12 to 15 kV/cm. Modelling of the temperature distribution in the tissue using Pennes' bioheat equation showed that the lethal effect of nanosecond pulses on cells is non-thermal. Muscle contractions, generally caused by high voltage pulses, were significantly reduced for the 100 nanosecond pulses compared to microsecond long pulses. The results of these studies indicate that high voltage nanosecond pulses reliably kill normal liver cells in vivo and therefore may be useful for liver tumor treatments.

  9. Laser-pump/X-ray-probe experiments with electrons ejected from a Cu(111) target: space-charge acceleration.

    PubMed

    Schiwietz, G; Kühn, D; Föhlisch, A; Holldack, K; Kachel, T; Pontius, N

    2016-09-01

    A comprehensive investigation of the emission characteristics for electrons induced by X-rays of a few hundred eV at grazing-incidence angles on an atomically clean Cu(111) sample during laser excitation is presented. Electron energy spectra due to intense infrared laser irradiation are investigated at the BESSY II slicing facility. Furthermore, the influence of the corresponding high degree of target excitation (high peak current of photoemission) on the properties of Auger and photoelectrons liberated by a probe X-ray beam is investigated in time-resolved pump and probe measurements. Strong electron energy shifts have been found and assigned to space-charge acceleration. The variation of the shift with laser power and electron energy is investigated and discussed on the basis of experimental as well as new theoretical results.

  10. Laser-pump/X-ray-probe experiments with electrons ejected from a Cu(111) target: space-charge acceleration.

    PubMed

    Schiwietz, G; Kühn, D; Föhlisch, A; Holldack, K; Kachel, T; Pontius, N

    2016-09-01

    A comprehensive investigation of the emission characteristics for electrons induced by X-rays of a few hundred eV at grazing-incidence angles on an atomically clean Cu(111) sample during laser excitation is presented. Electron energy spectra due to intense infrared laser irradiation are investigated at the BESSY II slicing facility. Furthermore, the influence of the corresponding high degree of target excitation (high peak current of photoemission) on the properties of Auger and photoelectrons liberated by a probe X-ray beam is investigated in time-resolved pump and probe measurements. Strong electron energy shifts have been found and assigned to space-charge acceleration. The variation of the shift with laser power and electron energy is investigated and discussed on the basis of experimental as well as new theoretical results. PMID:27577771

  11. Plastic ablator ignition capsule design for the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, Daniel S.; Haan, Steven W.; Hammel, Bruce A.; Salmonson, Jay D.; Callahan, Debra A.; Town, Richard P. J.

    2010-05-15

    The National Ignition Campaign, tasked with designing and fielding targets for fusion ignition experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [G. H. Miller, E. I. Moses, and C. R. Wuest, Nucl. Fusion 44, S228 (2004)], has carried forward three complementary target designs for the past several years: a beryllium ablator design, a plastic ablator design, and a high-density carbon or synthetic diamond design. This paper describes current simulations and design optimization to develop the plastic ablator capsule design as a candidate for the first ignition attempt on NIF. The trade-offs in capsule scale and laser energy that must be made to achieve a comparable ignition probability to that with beryllium are emphasized. Large numbers of one-dimensional simulations, meant to assess the statistical behavior of the target design, as well as two-dimensional simulations to assess the target's susceptibility to Rayleigh-Taylor growth are presented.

  12. Plastic ablator ignition capsule design for the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D S; Haan, S W; Hammel, B A; Salmonson, J D; Callahan, D A; Town, R P

    2009-12-01

    The National Ignition Campaign, tasked with designing and fielding targets for fusion ignition experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF), has carried forward three complementary target designs for the past several years: a beryllium ablator design, a plastic ablator design, and a high-density carbon or synthetic diamond design. This paper describes current simulations and design optimization to develop the plastic ablator capsule design as a candidate for the first ignition attempt on NIF. The trade-offs in capsule scale and laser energy that must be made to achieve a comparable ignition probability to that with beryllium are emphasized. Large numbers of 1-D simulations, meant to assess the statistical behavior of the target design, as well as 2-D simulations to assess the target's susceptibility to Rayleigh-Taylor growth are presented.

  13. Acceleration of neutrals in a nanosecond laser produced nickel plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Smijesh, N.; Chandrasekharan, K.; Philip, Reji

    2014-12-15

    Time of flight dynamics of slow neutrals, fast neutrals, and ions from a nanosecond laser produced nickel (Ni) plasma are investigated. Species arrival times confirm the hypothesis that fast neutrals are formed by the recombination of fast ions with free electrons. Both neutrals and ions are found to accelerate for a short interval immediately after ablation, which is attributed to internal Coulomb forces which create electrostatic potentials resulting in the charged particle acceleration. This process is further enhanced by laser-plasma energy coupling. Emission from neutrals could be measured for longer axial distances in the plume compared to that of ions confirming that the ions recombine to form neutrals as they move away from the target surface.

  14. Epigenetic pathway targets for the treatment of disease: accelerating progress in the development of pharmacological tools: IUPHAR Review 11

    PubMed Central

    Tough, David F; Lewis, Huw D; Rioja, Inmaculada; Lindon, Matthew J; Prinjha, Rab K

    2014-01-01

    The properties of a cell are determined both genetically by the DNA sequence of its genes and epigenetically through processes that regulate the pattern, timing and magnitude of expression of its genes. While the genetic basis of disease has been a topic of intense study for decades, recent years have seen a dramatic increase in the understanding of epigenetic regulatory mechanisms and a growing appreciation that epigenetic misregulation makes a significant contribution to human disease. Several large protein families have been identified that act in different ways to control the expression of genes through epigenetic mechanisms. Many of these protein families are finally proving tractable for the development of small molecules that modulate their function and represent new target classes for drug discovery. Here, we provide an overview of some of the key epigenetic regulatory proteins and discuss progress towards the development of pharmacological tools for use in research and therapy. PMID:25060293

  15. In Vitro High-Throughput RNAi Screening to Accelerate the Process of Target Identification and Drug Development.

    PubMed

    Yin, Hongwei; Kassner, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput RNA interference (HT-RNAi) is a powerful tool that can be used to knock down gene expression in order to identify novel genes and pathways involved in many cellular processes. It is a systematic, yet unbiased, approach to identify essential or synthetic lethal genes that promote cell survival in diseased cells as well as genes that confer resistance or sensitivity to drug treatment. This information serves as a foundation for enhancing current treatments for cancer and other diseases by identifying new drug targets, uncovering potential combination therapies, and helping clinicians match patients with the most effective treatment based on genetic information. Here, we describe the method of performing an in vitro HT-RNAi screen using chemically synthesized siRNA. PMID:27581290

  16. Variations in lithium target thickness and proton energy stability for the near-threshold 7Li(p,n)7Be accelerator-based BNCT.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Tooru; Bengua, Gerard; Tanaka, Kenichi; Nakagawa, Yoshinobu

    2007-02-01

    The usable range of thickness for the solid lithium target in the accelerator-based neutron production for BNCT via the near-threshold (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be reaction was investigated. While the feasibility of using a (7)Li-target with thickness equal to that which is required to slow down a mono-energetic 1.900 MeV incident proton to the 1.881 MeV threshold of the (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be reaction (i.e., t(min) = 2.33 microm) has already been demonstrated, dosimetric properties of neutron fields from targets greater than t(min) were assessed as thicker targets would last longer and offer more stable neutron production. Additionally, the characteristics of neutron fields generated by (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be for Gaussian incident protons with mean energy of 1.900 MeV were evaluated at a (7)Li-target thickness t(min). The main evaluation index applied in this study was the treatable protocol depth (TPD) which corresponds to the depth in an irradiated medium that satisfies the requirements of the adapted dose protocol. A maximum TPD (TPD(max)) was obtained for each irradiation condition from the relationship between the TPD and the thickness of boron dose enhancer (BDE) used. For a mono-energetic 1.900 MeV proton beam, the deepest TPD(max) of 3.88 cm was attained at the (7)Li-target thickness of t(min) and a polyethylene BDE of 1.10 cm. When the intended TPD for a BNCT clinical treatment is shallower than the deepest TPD(max), the usable (7)Li-target thickness would be between t(min) and an upper limit t(upper) whose value depends on the BDE thickness used. In terms of the effect of stability of the incident proton energy, Gaussian incident proton energies stable to within +/-10 keV of 1.900 MeV were found to be feasible for the neutron production via the near-threshold (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be reaction for BNCT provided that a suitable BDE is used.

  17. Salvianolic acid B accelerated ABCA1-dependent cholesterol efflux by targeting PPAR-γ and LXRα

    SciTech Connect

    Yue, Jianmei; Li, Bo; Jing, Qingping; Guan, Qingbo

    2015-07-03

    Objectives: Cholesterol efflux has been thought to be the main and basic mechanism by which free cholesterol is transferred from extra hepatic cells to the liver or intestine for excretion. Salvianolic acid B (Sal B) has been widely used for the prevention and treatment of atherosclerotic diseases. Here, we sought to investigate the effects of Sal B on the cholesterol efflux in THP-1 macrophages. Methods: After PMA-stimulated THP-1 cells were exposed to 50 mg/L of oxLDL and [{sup 3}H] cholesterol (1.0 μCi/mL) for another 24 h, the effect of Sal B on cholesterol efflux was evaluated in the presence of apoA-1, HDL{sub 2} or HDL{sub 3}. The expression of ATP binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPAR-γ), and liver X receptor-alpha (LXRα) was detected both at protein and mRNA levels in THP-1 cells after the stimulation of Sal B. Meanwhile, specific inhibition of PPAR-γ and LXRα were performed to investigate the mechanism. Results: The results showed that Sal B significantly accelerated apoA-I- and HDL-mediated cholesterol efflux in both dose- and time-dependent manners. Meanwhile, Sal B treatment also enhanced the expression of ABCA1 at both mRNA and protein levels. Then the data demonstrated that Sal B increased the expression of PPAR-γ and LXRα. And the application of specific agonists and inhibitors of further confirmed that Sal exert the function through PPAR-γ and LXRα. Conclusion: These results demonstrate that Sal B promotes cholesterol efflux in THP-1 macrophages through ABCA1/PPAR-γ/LXRα pathway. - Highlights: • Sal B promotes the expression of ABCA1. • Sal B promotes cholesterol efflux in macrophages. • Sal B promotes the expression of ABCA1 and cholesterol efflux through PPAR-γ/LXRα signaling pathway.

  18. Ablation-cooled material removal with ultrafast bursts of pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerse, Can; Kalaycıoğlu, Hamit; Elahi, Parviz; Çetin, Barbaros; Kesim, Denizhan K.; Akçaalan, Önder; Yavaş, Seydi; Aşık, Mehmet D.; Öktem, Bülent; Hoogland, Heinar; Holzwarth, Ronald; Ilday, Fatih Ömer

    2016-09-01

    The use of femtosecond laser pulses allows precise and thermal-damage-free removal of material (ablation) with wide-ranging scientific, medical and industrial applications. However, its potential is limited by the low speeds at which material can be removed and the complexity of the associated laser technology. The complexity of the laser design arises from the need to overcome the high pulse energy threshold for efficient ablation. However, the use of more powerful lasers to increase the ablation rate results in unwanted effects such as shielding, saturation and collateral damage from heat accumulation at higher laser powers. Here we circumvent this limitation by exploiting ablation cooling, in analogy to a technique routinely used in aerospace engineering. We apply ultrafast successions (bursts) of laser pulses to ablate the target material before the residual heat deposited by previous pulses diffuses away from the processing region. Proof-of-principle experiments on various substrates demonstrate that extremely high repetition rates, which make ablation cooling possible, reduce the laser pulse energies needed for ablation and increase the efficiency of the removal process by an order of magnitude over previously used laser parameters. We also demonstrate the removal of brain tissue at two cubic millimetres per minute and dentine at three cubic millimetres per minute without any thermal damage to the bulk.

  19. Advances in local ablation of malignant liver lesions.

    PubMed

    Eisele, Robert M

    2016-04-21

    Local ablation of liver tumors matured during the recent years and is now proven to be an effective tool in the treatment of malignant liver lesions. Advances focus on the improvement of local tumor control by technical innovations, individual selection of imaging modalities, more accurate needle placement and the free choice of access to the liver. Considering data found in the current literature for conventional local ablative treatment strategies, virtually no single technology is able to demonstrate an unequivocal superiority. Hints at better performance of microwave compared to radiofrequency ablation regarding local tumor control, duration of the procedure and potentially achievable larger size of ablation areas favour the comparably more recent treatment modality; image fusion enables more patients to undergo ultrasound guided local ablation; magnetic resonance guidance may improve primary success rates in selected patients; navigation and robotics accelerate the needle placement and reduces deviation of needle positions; laparoscopic thermoablation results in larger ablation areas and therefore hypothetically better local tumor control under acceptable complication rates, but seems to be limited to patients with no, mild or moderate adhesions following earlier surgical procedures. Apart from that, most techniques appear technically feasible, albeit demanding. Which technology will in the long run become accepted, is subject to future work. PMID:27099433

  20. Advances in local ablation of malignant liver lesions

    PubMed Central

    Eisele, Robert M

    2016-01-01

    Local ablation of liver tumors matured during the recent years and is now proven to be an effective tool in the treatment of malignant liver lesions. Advances focus on the improvement of local tumor control by technical innovations, individual selection of imaging modalities, more accurate needle placement and the free choice of access to the liver. Considering data found in the current literature for conventional local ablative treatment strategies, virtually no single technology is able to demonstrate an unequivocal superiority. Hints at better performance of microwave compared to radiofrequency ablation regarding local tumor control, duration of the procedure and potentially achievable larger size of ablation areas favour the comparably more recent treatment modality; image fusion enables more patients to undergo ultrasound guided local ablation; magnetic resonance guidance may improve primary success rates in selected patients; navigation and robotics accelerate the needle placement and reduces deviation of needle positions; laparoscopic thermoablation results in larger ablation areas and therefore hypothetically better local tumor control under acceptable complication rates, but seems to be limited to patients with no, mild or moderate adhesions following earlier surgical procedures. Apart from that, most techniques appear technically feasible, albeit demanding. Which technology will in the long run become accepted, is subject to future work. PMID:27099433

  1. Beryllium ignition target design for indirect drive NIF experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simakov, A. N.; Wilson, D. C.; Yi, S. A.; Kline, J. L.; Salmonson, J. D.; Clark, D. S.; Milovich, J. L.; Marinak, M. M.

    2016-03-01

    Beryllium (Be) ablator offers multiple advantages over carbon based ablators for indirectly driven NIF ICF ignition targets. These are higher mass ablation rate, ablation pressure and ablation velocity, lower capsule albedo, and higher thermal conductivity at cryogenic temperatures. Such advantages can be used to improve the target robustness and performance. While previous NIF Be target designs exist, they were obtained a long time ago and do not incorporate the latest improved physical understanding and models based upon NIF experiments. Herein, we propose a new NIF Be ignition target design at 1.45 MJ, 430 TW that takes all this knowledge into account.

  2. Controllable Laser Ion Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawata, S.; Kamiyama, D.; Ohtake, Y.; Takano, M.; Barada, D.; Kong, Q.; Wang, P. X.; Gu, Y. J.; Wang, W. M.; Limpouch, J.; Andreev, A.; Bulanov, S. V.; Sheng, Z. M.; Klimo, O.; Psikal, J.; Ma, Y. Y.; Li, X. F.; Yu, Q. S.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper a future laser ion accelerator is discussed to make the laser-based ion accelerator compact and controllable. Especially a collimation device is focused in this paper. The future laser ion accelerator should have an ion source, ion collimators, ion beam bunchers, and ion post acceleration devices [Laser Therapy 22, 103(2013)]: the ion particle energy and the ion energy spectrum are controlled to meet requirements for a future compact laser ion accelerator for ion cancer therapy or for other purposes. The energy efficiency from the laser to ions is improved by using a solid target with a fine sub-wavelength structure or a near-critical density gas plasma. The ion beam collimation is performed by holes behind the solid target or a multi-layered solid target. The control of the ion energy spectrum and the ion particle energy, and the ion beam bunching would be successfully realized by a multistage laser-target interaction.

  3. Improving beam spectral and spatial quality by double-foil target in laser ion acceleration for ion-driven fast ignition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chengkun

    2010-11-01

    Mid-Z ion driven fast ignition inertial fusion [1] requires ion beams of 100s of MeV energy and < 10% energy spread. An overdense nm-scale foil target driven by a high intensity laser pulse can produce an ion beam that has attractive properties for this application. The Break Out Afterburner (BOA) [2] is one laser-ion acceleration mechanism proposed to generate such beams, however the late stages of the BOA tend to produce too large of an energy spread. The spectral and spatial qualities of the beam quickly evolve as the ion beam and co-moving electrons continue to interact with the laser. Here we show how use of a second target foil placed behind a nm-scale foil can substantially reduce the temperature of the co-moving electrons and improve the ion beam energy spread [3]. Particle-In-Cell simulations reveal the dynamics of the ion beam under control. Optimal conditions for improving the spectral and spatial spread of the ion beam is explored for current laser and target parameters, leading to generation of ion beams of energy 100s of MeV and 6% energy spread, a vital step for realizing ion-driven fast ignition. [4pt] [1] M. Roth et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 86, 436 (2001); M. Temporal, J. J. Honrubia, and S. Atzeni, Phys. of Plasmas 9, 3098 (2002). [2] L. Yin, B. J. Albright, B. M. Hegelich, and J. C. Fern'andez, Laser and Part. Beams 24, 291 (2006). [3] C.-K. Huang, B. J. Albright, L. Yin, H.-C. Wu et al., submitted to Phys. Rev. Lett.

  4. Recent Advances in Tumor Ablation for Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kang, Tae Wook; Rhim, Hyunchul

    2015-09-01

    Image-guided tumor ablation for early stage hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is an accepted non-surgical treatment that provides excellent local tumor control and favorable survival benefit. This review summarizes the recent advances in tumor ablation for HCC. Diagnostic imaging and molecular biology of HCC has recently undergone marked improvements. Second-generation ultrasonography (US) contrast agents, new computed tomography (CT) techniques, and liver-specific contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have enabled the early detection of smaller and inconspicuous HCC lesions. Various imaging-guidance tools that incorporate imaging-fusion between real-time US and CT/MRI, that are now common for percutaneous tumor ablation, have increased operator confidence in the accurate targeting of technically difficult tumors. In addition to radiofrequency ablation (RFA), various therapeutic modalities including microwave ablation, irreversible electroporation, and high-intensity focused ultrasound ablation have attracted attention as alternative energy sources for effective locoregional treatment of HCC. In addition, combined treatment with RFA and chemoembolization or molecular agents may be able to overcome the limitation of advanced or large tumors. Finally, understanding of the biological mechanisms and advances in therapy associated with tumor ablation will be important for successful tumor control. All these advances in tumor ablation for HCC will result in significant improvement in the prognosis of HCC patients. In this review, we primarily focus on recent advances in molecular tumor biology, diagnosis, imaging-guidance tools, and therapeutic modalities, and refer to the current status and future perspectives for tumor ablation for HCC. PMID:26674766

  5. Ablation of Martian glaciers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Henry J.; Davis, Philip A.

    1987-01-01

    Glacier like landforms are observed in the fretted terrain of Mars in the latitude belts near + or - 42 deg. It was suggested that sublimation or accumulation-ablation rates could be estimated for these glaciers if their shapes were known. To this end, photoclinometric profiles were obtained of a number of these landforms. On the basis of analyses of these profiles, it was concluded that ice is chiefly ablating from these landforms that either are inactive rock-glaciers or have materials within them that are moving exceedingly slowly at this time. These conclusions are consistent with other geologic information. The analyses were performed using a two-dimensional model of an isothermal glacier.

  6. [Ablative and fractional lasers].

    PubMed

    Beylot, C; Grognard, C; Michaud, T

    2009-10-01

    The use of pulsed or scanning Carbon Dioxide, and pulsed Erbium-YAG lasers allows the programmable and reproducible photocoagulation of thin layers of the epidermis and superficial dermis. Thermal damage depends on the type of laser and is greater with CO(2) lasers. The degree of neocollagenesis is proportional to the thermal damage and is better with CO(2) lasers. Their main indication is the correction of photoaged facial skin but they can also be used for corrective dermatology, e.g. for scars and genodermatosis. Results are highly satisfactory but the technique is invasive and the patient experiences a social hindrance of around two weeks. Fractionated techniques treat 25% of the defective skin area at each session in noncontiguous microzones; four sessions are therefore necessary to treat the entire cutaneous surface. The treatment is given under topical anesthesia and is much less invasive, particularly with nonablative fractional laser treatment in which photothermolysis does not penetrate below the epidermis and/or the effects are slight, with no or very little social isolation. However, the results are much less satisfactory than the results of ablative laser and there is no firming effect. Other zones than the face can be treated. With the fractional CO(2) and Erbium ablative lasers, which have multiplied over the past 2 years, the much wider impacts cause perforation of the epidermis and there is a zone of ablation by laser photovaporization, with a zone of thermal damage below. The results are better in correcting photoaging of the face, without, however, achieving the efficacy of ablative lasers, which remain the reference technique. However, the effects are not insignificant, requiring at least 5 days of social isolation.

  7. Initial experimental evidence of self-collimation of target-normal-sheath-accelerated proton beam in a stack of conducting foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, P. A.; Lund, S. M.; McGuffey, C.; Alexander, N.; Aurand, B.; Barnard, J. J.; Beg, F. N.; Bellei, C.; Bieniosek, F. M.; Brabetz, C.; Cohen, R. H.; Kim, J.; Neumayer, P.; Roth, M.; Logan, B. G.

    2013-08-01

    Phenomena consistent with self-collimation (or weak self-focusing) of laser target-normal-sheath-accelerated protons was experimentally observed for the first time, in a specially engineered structure ("lens") consisting of a stack of 300 thin aluminum foils separated by 50 μm vacuum gaps. The experiments were carried out in a "passive environment," i.e., no external fields applied, neutralization plasma or injection of secondary charged particles was imposed. Experiments were performed at the petawatt "PHELIX" laser user facility (E = 100 J, Δt = 400 fs, λ = 1062 nm) at the "Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung-GSI" in Darmstadt, Germany. The observed rms beam spot reduction depends inversely on energy, with a focusing degree decreasing monotonically from 2 at 5.4 MeV to 1.5 at 18.7 MeV. The physics inside the lens is complex, resulting in a number of different mechanisms that can potentially affect the particle dynamics within the structure. We present a plausible simple interpretation of the experiment in which the combination of magnetic self-pinch forces generated by the beam current together with the simultaneous reduction of the repulsive electrostatic forces due to the foils are the dominant mechanisms responsible for the observed focusing/collimation. This focusing technique could be applied to a wide variety of space-charge dominated proton and heavy ion beams and impact fields and applications, such as HEDP science, inertial confinement fusion in both fast ignition and heavy ion fusion approaches, compact laser-driven injectors for a Linear Accelerator (LINAC) or synchrotron, medical therapy, materials processing, etc.

  8. Initial experimental evidence of self-collimation of target-normal-sheath-accelerated proton beam in a stack of conducting foils

    SciTech Connect

    Ni, P. A.; Bieniosek, F. M.; Logan, B. G.; Lund, S. M.; Barnard, J. J.; Bellei, C.; Cohen, R. H.; McGuffey, C.; Beg, F. N.; Kim, J.; Alexander, N.; Aurand, B.; Brabetz, C.; Neumayer, P.; Roth, M.

    2013-08-15

    Phenomena consistent with self-collimation (or weak self-focusing) of laser target-normal-sheath-accelerated protons was experimentally observed for the first time, in a specially engineered structure (“lens”) consisting of a stack of 300 thin aluminum foils separated by 50 μm vacuum gaps. The experiments were carried out in a “passive environment,” i.e., no external fields applied, neutralization plasma or injection of secondary charged particles was imposed. Experiments were performed at the petawatt “PHELIX” laser user facility (E = 100 J, Δt = 400 fs, λ = 1062 nm) at the “Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung–GSI” in Darmstadt, Germany. The observed rms beam spot reduction depends inversely on energy, with a focusing degree decreasing monotonically from 2 at 5.4 MeV to 1.5 at 18.7 MeV. The physics inside the lens is complex, resulting in a number of different mechanisms that can potentially affect the particle dynamics within the structure. We present a plausible simple interpretation of the experiment in which the combination of magnetic self-pinch forces generated by the beam current together with the simultaneous reduction of the repulsive electrostatic forces due to the foils are the dominant mechanisms responsible for the observed focusing/collimation. This focusing technique could be applied to a wide variety of space-charge dominated proton and heavy ion beams and impact fields and applications, such as HEDP science, inertial confinement fusion in both fast ignition and heavy ion fusion approaches, compact laser-driven injectors for a Linear Accelerator (LINAC) or synchrotron, medical therapy, materials processing, etc.

  9. OCDR guided laser ablation device

    DOEpatents

    Dasilva, Luiz B.; Colston, Jr., Bill W.; James, Dale L.

    2002-01-01

    A guided laser ablation device. The device includes a mulitmode laser ablation fiber that is surrounded by one or more single mode optical fibers that are used to image in the vicinity of the laser ablation area to prevent tissue damage. The laser ablation device is combined with an optical coherence domain reflectometry (OCDR) unit and with a control unit which initializes the OCDR unit and a high power laser of the ablation device. Data from the OCDR unit is analyzed by the control unit and used to control the high power laser. The OCDR images up to about 3 mm ahead of the ablation surface to enable a user to see sensitive tissue such as a nerve or artery before damaging it by the laser.

  10. Automatic Tracking Algorithm in Coaxial Near-Infrared Laser Ablation Endoscope for Fetus Surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yan; Yamanaka, Noriaki; Masamune, Ken

    2014-07-01

    This article reports a stable vessel object tracking method for the treatment of twin-to-twin transfusion syndrome based on our previous 2 DOF endoscope. During the treatment of laser coagulation, it is necessary to focus on the exact position of the target object, however it moves by the mother's respiratory motion and still remains a challenge to obtain and track the position precisely. In this article, an algorithm which uses features from accelerated segment test (FAST) to extract the features and optical flow as the object tracking method, is proposed to deal with above problem. Further, we experimentally simulate the movement due to the mother's respiration, and the results of position errors and similarity verify the effectiveness of the proposed tracking algorithm for laser ablation endoscopy in-vitro and under water considering two influential factors. At average, the errors are about 10 pixels and the similarity over 0.92 are obtained in the experiments.

  11. Linear Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Sidorin, Anatoly

    2010-01-05

    In linear accelerators the particles are accelerated by either electrostatic fields or oscillating Radio Frequency (RF) fields. Accordingly the linear accelerators are divided in three large groups: electrostatic, induction and RF accelerators. Overview of the different types of accelerators is given. Stability of longitudinal and transverse motion in the RF linear accelerators is briefly discussed. The methods of beam focusing in linacs are described.

  12. Mechanisms of Carbon Nanotube Production by Laser Ablation Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, Carl D.; Arepalli, Sivaram; Nikolaev, Pavel; Smalley, Richard E.; Nocholson, Leonard S. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    We will present possible mechanisms for nanotube production by laser oven process. Spectral emission of excited species during laser ablation of a composite graphite target is compared with that of laser irradiated C60 vapor. The similarities in the transient and spectral data suggest that fullerenes are intermediate precursors for nanotube formation. The confinement of the ablation products by means of a 25-mm diameter tube placed upstream of the target seems to improve the production and purity of nanotubes. Repeated laser pulses vaporize the amorphous/graphitic carbon and possibly catalyst particles, and dissociate fullerenes yielding additional feedstock for SWNT growth.

  13. Evaluation of a Thermoprotective Gel for Hydrodissection During Percutaneous Microwave Ablation: In Vivo Results

    SciTech Connect

    Moreland, Anna J. Lubner, Meghan G. Ziemlewicz, Timothy J. Kitchin, Douglas R. Hinshaw, J. Louis Johnson, Alexander D. Lee, Fred T. Brace, Christopher L.

    2015-06-15

    PurposeTo evaluate whether thermoreversible poloxamer 407 15.4 % in water (P407) can protect non-target tissues adjacent to microwave (MW) ablation zones in a porcine model.Materials and MethodsMW ablation antennas were placed percutaneously into peripheral liver, spleen, or kidney (target tissues) under US and CT guidance in five swine such that the expected ablation zones would extend into adjacent diaphragm, body wall, or bowel (non-target tissues). For experimental ablations, P407 (a hydrogel that transitions from liquid at room temperature to semi-solid at body temperature) was injected into the potential space between target and non-target tissues, and the presence of a gel barrier was verified on CT. No barrier was used for controls. MW ablation was performed at 65 W for 5 min. Thermal damage to target and non-target tissues was evaluated at dissection.ResultsAntennas were placed 7 ± 3 mm from the organ surface for both control and gel-protected ablations (p = 0.95). The volume of gel deployed was 49 ± 27 mL, resulting in a barrier thickness of 0.8 ± 0.5 cm. Ablations extended into non-target tissues in 12/14 control ablations (mean surface area = 3.8 cm{sup 2}) but only 4/14 gel-protected ablations (mean surface area = 0.2 cm{sup 2}; p = 0.0005). The gel barrier remained stable at the injection site throughout power delivery.ConclusionWhen used as a hydrodissection material, P407 protected non-targeted tissues and was successfully maintained at the injection site for the duration of power application. Continued investigations to aid clinical translation appear warranted.

  14. Role of debris cover to control specific ablation of adjoining Batal and Sutri Dhaka glaciers in Chandra Basin (Himachal Pradesh) during peak ablation season

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Parmanand; Patel, Lavkush K.; Ravindra, Rasik; Singh, Ajit; K, Mahalinganathan; Thamban, Meloth

    2016-04-01

    As part of the on-going annual mass balance measurements on Batal and Sutri Dhaka glaciers, observations were made during peak ablation (August-September) season in 2013 to understand the response of debris covered and clean-ice (debris free) glacier surface to melting processes. Though, both the Batal and Sutri Dhaka glaciers have almost similar geographical disposition, Batal shows extensive debris cover (90% of the ablation area), while the latter is free from debris (only 5% of the ablation area). The thickness of debris in Batal glacier is inversely proportional to altitude, whereas Sutri Dhaka mostly experienced debris-free zone except snout area. Observation revealed that the vertical gradient of ablation rate in ablation area is contrastingly opposite in these two glaciers, reflecting significant control of debris thickness and their distribution over glacier surface on the ablation rates. While different thickness (2-100 cm) of debris have attenuated melting rates up to 70% of total melting, debris cover of <2 cm thickness has accelerated melting up to 10% of the total melting. Estimated melt ratio reveals that about 90% of the ablation area has experienced inhibited melting in Batal glacier, whereas only less than 5% ablation area of Sutri Dhaka has undergone inhibited melting. Comparison of topographical maps of 1962 with successive satellite images of the area demonstrates a terminus retreat of 373 ± 33.5 m and 579 ± 33.5 m for Batal and Sutri Dhaka glaciers for the period 1962-2013, respectively.

  15. Time Resolved Shadowgraph Images of Silicon during Laser Ablation:Shockwaves and Particle Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C.Y.; Mao, X.L.; Greif, R.; Russo, R.E.

    2006-05-06

    Time resolved shadowgraph images were recorded of shockwaves and particle ejection from silicon during laser ablation. Particle ejection and expansion were correlated to an internal shockwave resonating between the shockwave front and the target surface. The number of particles ablated increased with laser energy and was related to the crater volume.

  16. Dependence of the ion energy on the parameters of the laser pulse and target in the radiation-pressure-dominated regime of acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Echkina, E. Yu.; Inovenkov, I. N.; Esirkepov, T. Zh.; Pegoraro, F.; Borghesi, M.; Bulanov, S. V.

    2010-01-15

    When the dominant mechanism for ion acceleration is the laser radiation pressure, the conversion efficiency of the laser energy into the energy of relativistic ions may be very high. Stability analysis of a thin plasma layer accelerated by the radiation pressure shows that Raleigh-Taylor instability may enhance plasma inhomogeneity. In the linear stage of instability, the plasma layer decays into separate bunches, which are accelerated by the radiation pressure similarly to clusters accelerated under the action of an electromagnetic wave. The energy and luminosity of an ion beam accelerated in the radiation-pressure-dominated regime are calculated.

  17. Plasma-mediated ablation: An optical tool for submicrometer surgery on neuronal and vascular systems

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Philbert S.; Blinder, Pablo; Migliori, Benjamin J.; Neev, Joseph; Jin, Yishi; Squier, Jeffrey A.; Kleinfeld, David

    2009-01-01

    Plasma-mediated ablation makes use of high energy laser pulses to ionize molecules within the first few femtoseconds of the pulse. This process leads to a submicrometer-sized bubble of plasma that can ablate tissue with negligible heat transfer and collateral damage to neighboring tissue. We review the physics of plasma-mediated ablation and its use as a tool to generate targeted insults at the subcellular level to neurons and blood vessels deep within nervous tissue. Illustrative examples from axon regeneration and microvascular research illustrate the utility of this tool. We further discuss the use of ablation as an integral part of automated histology. PMID:19269159

  18. Multidiagnostic analysis of ultrafast laser ablation of metals with pulse pair irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amoruso, S.; Bruzzese, R.; Wang, X.; O'Connell, G.; Lunney, J. G.

    2010-12-01

    Copper targets are irradiated in the ablation regime by pairs of equal, time-delayed collinear laser pulses separated on a timescale going from ≈2 ps to ≈2 ns. The ablation plume is characterized by ion probe diagnostic, fast imaging, and temporally and spatially resolved optical emission spectroscopy. The variation in the ablation efficiency with the delay between the pulses is analyzed by measuring the ablation crater profile with a contact profilometer. The second laser pulse modifies the characteristics of the plasma plume produced by the first pulse and the ablation efficiency. The different mechanisms involved in double pulse ultrafast laser ablation are identified and discussed. The experimental findings are interpreted in the frame of a simple model of the interaction of the second pulse with the nascent ablation plume produced by the first pulse. This model yields consistent and quantitative agreement with the experimental findings predicting the observed experimental trends of the ablation depth reduction and ion yield increase with the delay between the pulses, as well as the characteristic timescale of the observed changes. The possibility of controlling the characteristics of the plumes produced during ultrafast laser ablation via an efficient coupling of the energy of the second pulse to the various ablation components produced by the first pulse is of particular interest in ultrafast pulsed laser deposition and microprobe analyses of materials.

  19. Evaluation of catheter ablation of periatrial ganglionic plexi in patients with atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Danik, Stephan; Neuzil, Petr; d'Avila, Andre; Malchano, Zachary J; Kralovec, Stepan; Ruskin, Jeremy N; Reddy, Vivek Y

    2008-09-01

    Recent data suggests that the cardiac autonomic nervous system has an important role in the initiation and maintenance of atrial fibrillation (AF). This study investigated (1) the feasibility of identifying and targeting these autonomic ganglia using endocardial radiofrequency stimulation and ablation, respectively; (2) the efficacy of endocardial ablation to completely eliminate the vagal response elicited from epicardial stimulation; and (3) the effect of autonomic ablation on the acute inducibility of AF. The study included 18 patients referred for catheter ablation of suspected vagal-mediated AF. The endocardial left atrial surface was stimulated at high frequency (20 to 50 Hz) to elicit a vagal response. In selected patients (n = 5), pericardial access was obtained using a subxyphoid puncture to permit epicardial stimulation. Catheter ablation of the putative autonomic ganglionic sites was performed from the left atrial endocardium using irrigated radiofrequency energy. After ablation of all identifiable autonomic ganglia, high-frequency pacing was repeated to induce AF. In all patients, stimulation at certain endocardial sites elicited a vagal response. Endocardial ablation abrogated this vagal responsiveness. Furthermore, for sites accessible from the pericardium, the vagal response elicited using epicardial stimulation was also eliminated. Despite successful ablation of these ganglia, AF was still inducible in 17 of 18 patients. In conclusion, successful ablation of autonomic ganglia from an endocardial approach can be reliably achieved using an irrigated catheter. In addition, ablation of these structures in patients with vagal-mediated AF is insufficient to prevent its acute reinduction with high-frequency atrial stimulation. PMID:18721515

  20. WE-G-BRE-09: Targeted Radiotherapy Enhancement During Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation (ABPI) Using Controlled Release of Gold Nanoparticles (GNPs)

    SciTech Connect

    Cifter, G; Ngwa, W; Chin, J; Cifter, F; Sajo, E; Sinha, N; Bellon, J

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Several studies have demonstrated low rates of local recurrence with brachytherapy-based accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI). However, long-term outcomes on toxicity (e.g. telangiectasia), and cosmesis remain a major concern. The purpose of this study is to investigate the dosimetric feasibility of using targeted non-toxic radiosensitizing gold nanoparticles (GNPs) for localized dose enhancement to the planning target volume (PTV) during APBI while reducing dose to normal tissue. Methods: Two approaches for administering the GNPs were considered. In one approach, GNPs are assumed to be incorporated in a micrometer-thick polymer film on the surface of routinely used mammosite balloon applicators, for sustained controlled in-situ release, and subsequent treatment using 50-kVp Xoft devices. In case two, GNPs are administered directly into the lumpectomy cavity e.g. via injection or using fiducials coated with the GNP-loaded polymer film. Recent studies have validated the use of fiducials for reducing the PTV margin during APBI with 6 MV beams. An experimentally determined diffusion coefficient was used to determine space-time customizable distribution of GNPs for feasible in-vivo concentrations of 43 mg/g. An analytic calculational approach from previously published work was employed to estimate the dose enhancement due to GNPs (2 and 10 nm) as a function of distance up to 1 cm from lumpectomy cavity. Results: Dose enhancement due to GNP was found to be about 130% for 50-kVp x-rays, and 110% for 6-MV external beam radiotherapy, 1 cm away from the lumpectomy cavity wall. Higher customizable dose enhancement could be achieved at other distances as a function of nanoparticle size. Conclusion: Our preliminary results suggest that significant dose enhancement can be achieved to residual tumor cells targeted with GNPs during APBI with electronic brachytherapy or external beam therapy. The findings provide a useful basis for developing nanoparticle

  1. Thermal melting and ablation of silicon by femtosecond laser radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Ionin, A. A.; Kudryashov, S. I. Seleznev, L. V.; Sinitsyn, D. V.; Bunkin, A. F.; Lednev, V. N.; Pershin, S. M.

    2013-03-15

    The space-time dynamics of thermal melting, subsurface cavitation, spallative ablation, and fragmentation ablation of the silicon surface excited by single IR femtosecond laser pulses is studied by timeresolved optical reflection microscopy. This dynamics is revealed by monitoring picosecond and (sub)nanosecond oscillations of probe pulse reflection, which is modulated by picosecond acoustic reverberations in the dynamically growing surface melt subjected to ablation and having another acoustic impedance, and by optical interference between the probe pulse replicas reflected by the spalled layer surface and the layer retained on the target surface. The acoustic reverberation periods change during the growth and ablation of the surface melt film, which makes it possible to quantitatively estimate the contributions of these processes to the thermal dynamics of the material surface. The results on the thermal dynamics of laser excitation are supported by dynamic measurements of the ablation parameters using noncontact ultrasonic diagnostics, scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and optical interference microscopy of the modified regions appearing on the silicon surface after ablation.

  2. Similarities and differences in ablative and non-ablative iron oxide nanoparticle hyperthermia cancer treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petryk, Alicia A.; Misra, Adwiteeya; Kastner, Elliot J.; Mazur, Courtney M.; Petryk, James D.; Hoopes, P. Jack

    2015-03-01

    The use of hyperthermia to treat cancer is well studied and has utilized numerous delivery techniques, including microwaves, radio frequency, focused ultrasound, induction heating, infrared radiation, warmed perfusion liquids (combined with chemotherapy), and recently, metallic nanoparticles (NP) activated by near infrared radiation (NIR) and alternating magnetic field (AMF) based platforms. It has been demonstrated by many research groups that ablative temperatures and cytotoxicity can be produced with locally NP-based hyperthermia. Such ablative NP techniques have demonstrated the potential for success. Much attention has also been given to the fact that NP may be administered systemically, resulting in a broader cancer therapy approach, a lower level of tumor NP content and a different type of NP cancer therapy (most likely in the adjuvant setting). To use NP based hyperthermia successfully as a cancer treatment, the technique and its goal must be understood and utilized in the appropriate clinical context. The parameters include, but are not limited to, NP access to the tumor (large vs. small quantity), cancer cell-specific targeting, drug carrying capacity, potential as an ionizing radiation sensitizer, and the material properties (magnetic characteristics, size and charge). In addition to their potential for cytotoxicity, the material properties of the NP must also be optimized for imaging, detection and direction. In this paper we will discuss the differences between, and potential applications for, ablative and non-ablative magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia.

  3. Study of laser-plasma interaction using a physics-based model for understanding the physical mechanism of double-pulse effect in nanosecond laser ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Benxin; Zhou Yun; Forsman, Andrew

    2009-12-21

    This paper studies the double-pulse effect in high-intensity ({>=}{approx}GW/cm{sup 2}) nanosecond (ns) laser ablation, which refers to the significant material removal rate enhancement for ablation by two ns laser pulses (often separated by a delay time of {approx}10 to 100 ns). The early-stage interaction of the second laser pulse with the plasma plume created by the first pulse is very important for understanding the physical mechanism of the double pulse effect. However, the plasma properties in the early stage (during a laser pulse or within 20 to 30 ns after the completion of the pulse) are very difficult to measure experimentally. In this letter, a physics-based predictive model is used as the investigation tool, which was previously verified based on experiments on plasma properties in the late stage, which are relatively easy to measure. The study shows that the second laser pulse does not directly strike the target condensed phase. Instead, it mainly interacts with the plasma plume created by the first laser pulse, heats and accelerates the ablated material in the plume lingering above the target surface.

  4. Matricectomy and nail ablation.

    PubMed

    Baran, Robert; Haneke, Eckart

    2002-11-01

    Matricectomy refers to the complete extirpation of the nail matrix, resulting in permanent nail loss. Usually however, matricectomy is only partial, restricted to one or both lateral horns of the matrix. Nail ablation is the definitive removal of the entire nail organ. The most important common denominator in the successful matricectomy is the total removal or destruction of the matrix tissue. Matricectomy may be indicated for the management of onychauxis, onychogryphosis, congenital nail dystrophies, and chronic painful nail, such as recalcitrant ingrown toenail or split within the medial or lateral one-third of the nail.

  5. High temperature ablative foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Matthew T. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    An ablative foam composition is formed of approximately 150 to 250 parts by weight polymeric isocyanate having an isocyanate functionality of 2.6 to 3.2; approximately 15 to 30 parts by weight reactive flame retardant having a hydroxyl number range from 200-260; approximately 10 to 40 parts by weight non-reactive flame retardant; approximately 10 to 40 parts by weight nonhydrolyzable silicone copolymer having a hydroxyl number range from 75-205; and approximately 3 to 16 parts by weight amine initiated polyether resin having an isocyanate functionality greater than or equal to 3.0 and a hydroxyl number range from 400-800.

  6. Plasma-mediated ablation for the management of obstructive sleep apnea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puchalski, Robert; Shah, Udayan K.

    2000-05-01

    Plasma-mediated ablation (PMA) removes tissue by developing an electrically induced plasma layer between the instrument and target tissue. Charged particles within the plasma field then accelerate toward the tissue, breaking the molecular bonds within the top layer of tissue. Thermal damage to collateral tissue is minimal, resulting in the moniker, 'cold' ablation, for this method. Recently, instrumentation has been developed to permit application for soft tissue resection in Otolaryngology. Presentation of the theory, as well as the benefits and disadvantages associated with CoblationTM technology will be followed by examples of its use. A brief videotape will demonstrate the application of PMA for UPPP, tonsillectomy and nasal turbinate reduction. Preliminary experience from our institution, including eighteen children treated with tonsillectomy and followed for at least one month post-operatively, has provided an initial cohort for comparing the risks and benefits of the approach. The advantage of CoblationTM technology identified thus far, that of less thermal damage, is balanced against a decreased level of hemostasis (compared to MES) and an increased cost.

  7. Can Accelerators Accelerate Learning?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, A. C. F.; Fonseca, P.; Coelho, L. F. S.

    2009-03-01

    The 'Young Talented' education program developed by the Brazilian State Funding Agency (FAPERJ) [1] makes it possible for high-schools students from public high schools to perform activities in scientific laboratories. In the Atomic and Molecular Physics Laboratory at Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), the students are confronted with modern research tools like the 1.7 MV ion accelerator. Being a user-friendly machine, the accelerator is easily manageable by the students, who can perform simple hands-on activities, stimulating interest in physics, and getting the students close to modern laboratory techniques.

  8. Can Accelerators Accelerate Learning?

    SciTech Connect

    Santos, A. C. F.; Fonseca, P.; Coelho, L. F. S.

    2009-03-10

    The 'Young Talented' education program developed by the Brazilian State Funding Agency (FAPERJ)[1] makes it possible for high-schools students from public high schools to perform activities in scientific laboratories. In the Atomic and Molecular Physics Laboratory at Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), the students are confronted with modern research tools like the 1.7 MV ion accelerator. Being a user-friendly machine, the accelerator is easily manageable by the students, who can perform simple hands-on activities, stimulating interest in physics, and getting the students close to modern laboratory techniques.

  9. Percutaneous Ablation in the Kidney

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Bradford J.; Gervais, Debra A.

    2011-01-01

    Percutaneous ablation in the kidney is now performed as a standard therapeutic nephron-sparing option in patients who are poor candidates for resection. Its increasing use has been largely prompted by the rising incidental detection of renal cell carcinomas with cross-sectional imaging and the need to preserve renal function in patients with comorbid conditions, multiple renal cell carcinomas, and/or heritable renal cancer syndromes. Clinical studies to date indicate that radiofrequency ablation and cryoablation are effective therapies with acceptable short- to intermediate-term outcomes and with a low risk in the appropriate setting, with attention to pre-, peri-, and postprocedural detail. The results following percutaneous radiofrequency ablation and cryoablation in the treatment of renal cell carcinoma are reviewed in this article, including those of several larger scale studies of ablation of T1a tumors. Clinical and technical considerations unique to ablation in the kidney are presented, and potential complications are discussed. © RSNA, 2011 PMID:22012904

  10. Aerospace Laser Ignition/Ablation Variable High Precision Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Jonathan W. (Inventor); Edwards, David L. (Inventor); Campbell, Jason J. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A laser ignition/ablation propulsion system that captures the advantages of both liquid and solid propulsion. A reel system is used to move a propellant tape containing a plurality of propellant material targets through an ignition chamber. When a propellant target is in the ignition chamber, a laser beam from a laser positioned above the ignition chamber strikes the propellant target, igniting the propellant material and resulting in a thrust impulse. The propellant tape is advanced, carrying another propellant target into the ignition chamber. The propellant tape and ignition chamber are designed to ensure that each ignition event is isolated from the remaining propellant targets. Thrust and specific impulse may by precisely controlled by varying the synchronized propellant tape/laser speed. The laser ignition/ablation propulsion system may be scaled for use in small and large applications.

  11. Ablation front rayleigh taylor dispersion curve in indirect drive

    SciTech Connect

    Budil, K S; Lasinski, B; Edwards, M J; Wan, A S; Remington, B A; Weber, S V; Glendinning, S G; Suter, L; Stry, P

    2000-11-17

    The Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability, which occurs when a lower-density fluid accelerates a higher-density layer, is common in nature. At an ablation front a sharp reduction in the growth rate of the instability at short wave-lengths can occur, in marked contrast to the classical case where growth rates are highest at the shortest wavelengths. Theoretical and numerical investigations of the ablative RT instability are numerous and differ considerably on the level of stabilization expected. We present here the results of a series of laser experiments designed to probe the roll-over and cutoff region of the ablation-front RT dispersion curve in indirect drive. Aluminum foils with imposed sinusoidal perturbations ranging in wavelength from 10 to 70 pm were ablatively accelerated with a radiation drive generated in a gold cylindrical hohlraum. A strong shock wave compresses the package followed by an {approx}2 ns period of roughly constant acceleration and the experiment is diagnosed via face-on radiography. Perturbations with wavelengths {ge} 20 {micro}m experienced substantial growth during the acceleration phase while shorter wavelengths showed a sharp drop off in overall growth. These experimental results compared favorably to calculations with a 2-D radiation-hydrodynamics code, however, the growth is significantly affected by the rippled shock launched by the drive. We performed numerical simulations to elucidate the influence of the rippled shock wave on the eventual growth of the perturbations, allowing comparisons to the analytic model developed by Betti et al. This combination of experiments, simulations and analytic modeling illustrates the qualitative simplicity yet quantitative complexity of the compressible RT instability. We have measured the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) dispersion curve for a radiatively-driven sample in a series of experiments on the Nova laser facility. Planar aluminum foils were ablatively-accelerated and the subsequent perturbation growth

  12. T-wave oversensing by an implantable cardioverter defibrillator after successful ablation of idiopathic ventricular fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Strohmer, Bernhard; Schernthaner, Christiana; Pichler, Maximilian

    2006-04-01

    Focal ablation of trigger premature ventricular complexes (PVCs) from the Purkinje system helped to suppress idiopathic ventricular fibrillation (VF) in an athlete who had suffered from frequent appropriate shock therapies. However, only a few days after successful ablation T-wave oversensing occurred during exercise and resulted in repetitive distressing defibrillator shocks. Despite lack of any changes on the surface ECG, the endocardially recorded electrogram revealed an unfavorable ratio of R-to-T-wave amplitude predisposing to double counting with accelerated heart rates. This case illustrates that T-wave oversensing may complicate the clinical course after successful ablation of malignant Purkinje ectopy.

  13. Prediction of back-scatter radiations to a beam monitor chamber of medical linear accelerators by use of the digitized target-current-pulse analysis method.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yusuke; Hayashi, Naoki; Kato, Hideki; Fukuma, Hiroshi; Hirose, Yasujiro; Kawano, Makoto; Nishii, Yoshio; Nakamura, Masaru; Mukouyama, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    In small-field irradiation, the back-scattered radiation (BSR) affects the counts measured with a beam monitor chamber (BMC). In general, the effect of the BSR depends on the opened-jaw size. The effect is significantly large in small-field irradiation. Our purpose in this study was to predict the effect of BSR on LINAC output accurately with an improved target-current-pulse (TCP) technique. The pulse signals were measured with a system consisting of a personal computer and a digitizer. The pulse signals were analyzed with in-house software. The measured parameters were the number of pulses, the change in the waveform and the integrated signal values of the TCPs. The TCPs were measured for various field sizes with four linear accelerators. For comparison, Yu's method in which a universal counter was used was re-examined. The results showed that the variance of the measurements by the new method was reduced to approximately 1/10 of the variance by the previous method. There was no significant variation in the number of pulses due to a change in the field size in the Varian Clinac series. However, a change in the integrated signal value was observed. This tendency was different from the result of other investigations in the past. Our prediction method is able to define the cutoff voltage for the TCP acquired by digitizer. This functionality provides the capability of clearly classifying TCPs into signals and noise. In conclusion, our TCP analysis method can predict the effect of BSR on the BMC even for small-field irradiations.

  14. Acceleration radioisotope production simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Waters, L.S.; Wilson, W.B.

    1996-12-31

    We have identified 96 radionuclides now being used or under consideration for use in medical applications. Previously, we calculated the production of {sup 99}Mo from enriched and depleted uranium targets at the 800-MeV energy used in the LAMPF accelerator at Los Alamos. We now consider the production of isotopes using lower energy beams, which may become available as a result of new high-intensity spallation target accelerators now being planned. The production of four radionuclides ({sup 7}Be, {sup 67}Cu, {sup 99}Mo, and {sup 195m}Pt) in a simplified proton accelerator target design is being examined. The LAHET, MCNP, and CINDER90 codes were used to model the target, transport a beam of protons and secondary produced particles through the system, and compute the nuclide production from spallation and low-energy neutron interactions. Beam energies of 200 and 400 MeV were used, and several targets were considered for each nuclide.

  15. Dynamical modeling of laser ablation processes

    SciTech Connect

    Leboeuf, J.N.; Chen, K.R.; Donato, J.M.; Geohegan, D.B.; Liu, C.L.; Puretzky, A.A.; Wood, R.F.

    1995-09-01

    Several physics and computational approaches have been developed to globally characterize phenomena important for film growth by pulsed laser deposition of materials. These include thermal models of laser-solid target interactions that initiate the vapor plume; plume ionization and heating through laser absorption beyond local thermodynamic equilibrium mechanisms; gas dynamic, hydrodynamic, and collisional descriptions of plume transport; and molecular dynamics models of the interaction of plume particles with the deposition substrate. The complexity of the phenomena involved in the laser ablation process is matched by the diversity of the modeling task, which combines materials science, atomic physics, and plasma physics.

  16. Dopant Distribution in NIF Beryllium Ablator Capsules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, H.; Xu, H. W.; Youngblood, K. P.; Wall, D. R.; Stephens, R. B.; Moreno, K. A.; Nikroo, A.; Salmonson, J. D.; Haan, S. W.; Wu, K. J.; Wang, Y. M.; Hamza, A. V.

    2012-10-01

    Good implosion performance requires capsule ablator material with spherically uniform x-ray opacity, which is controlled by one of several dopants (Cu, Si, Al, etc.) in the Be shell. During production, the dopant concentration is radially stepped. However, the various Be-dopant interactions result in vastly different dopant distribution patterns, some quite inhomogeneous. We have characterized these structures and established the phenomenological basis and the magnitudes of the inhomogeneity both in spatial length scales and in atomic percent. We will discuss the case of inhomogeneous Cu diffusion in detail, followed by discussions of other dopants and the estimate of the impact of these structures on target implosion.

  17. Thermal response and ablation characteristics of light weight ceramic ablators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tran, Huy K.; Rasky, Daniel J.; Esfahani, Lili

    1993-01-01

    An account is given of the thermal performance and ablation characteristics of the NASA-Ames Lightweight Ceramic Ablators (LCAs) in supersonic, high-enthalpy convective environments, which use low density ceramic or carbon fiber matrices as substrates for main structural support, with organic resin fillers. LCA densities are in the 0.224-1.282 g/cu cm range. In-depth temperature data have been obtained to determine thermal penetration depths and conductivity. The addition of SiC and PPMA is noted to significantly improve the ablation performance of LCAs with silica substrates. Carbon-based LCAs are the most mass-efficient at high flux levels.

  18. High-power electron beam tests of a liquid-lithium target and characterization study of (7)Li(p,n) near-threshold neutrons for accelerator-based boron neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Halfon, S; Paul, M; Arenshtam, A; Berkovits, D; Cohen, D; Eliyahu, I; Kijel, D; Mardor, I; Silverman, I

    2014-06-01

    A compact Liquid-Lithium Target (LiLiT) was built and tested with a high-power electron gun at Soreq Nuclear Research Center (SNRC). The target is intended to demonstrate liquid-lithium target capabilities to constitute an accelerator-based intense neutron source for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) in hospitals. The lithium target will produce neutrons through the (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be reaction and it will overcome the major problem of removing the thermal power >5kW generated by high-intensity proton beams, necessary for sufficient therapeutic neutron flux. In preliminary experiments liquid lithium was flown through the target loop and generated a stable jet on the concave supporting wall. Electron beam irradiation demonstrated that the liquid-lithium target can dissipate electron power densities of more than 4kW/cm(2) and volumetric power density around 2MW/cm(3) at a lithium flow of ~4m/s, while maintaining stable temperature and vacuum conditions. These power densities correspond to a narrow (σ=~2mm) 1.91MeV, 3mA proton beam. A high-intensity proton beam irradiation (1.91-2.5MeV, 2mA) is being commissioned at the SARAF (Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility) superconducting linear accelerator. In order to determine the conditions of LiLiT proton irradiation for BNCT and to tailor the neutron energy spectrum, a characterization of near threshold (~1.91MeV) (7)Li(p,n) neutrons is in progress based on Monte-Carlo (MCNP and Geant4) simulation and on low-intensity experiments with solid LiF targets. In-phantom dosimetry measurements are performed using special designed dosimeters based on CR-39 track detectors.

  19. Epicardial Ablation of Ventricular Tachycardia

    PubMed Central

    Tung, Roderick; Shivkumar, Kalyanam

    2015-01-01

    Epicardial mapping and ablation via a percutaneous subxiphoid technique has been instrumental in improving the working understanding of complex myocardial scars in various arrhythmogenic substrates. Endocardial ablation alone may not be sufficient in patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy, dilated cardiomyopathy, arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, and Chagas disease to prevent recurrent ventricular tachycardia. Multiple observational studies have demonstrated greater freedom from recurrence with adjunctive epicardial ablation compared with endocardial ablation alone. While epicardial ablation is performed predominantly at tertiary referral centers, knowledge of the technical approach, clinical indications, and potential complications is imperative to maximizing clinical success and patient safety. In 1996, Sosa and colleagues modified the pericardiocentesis technique to enable percutaneous access to the pericardial space for mapping and catheter ablation of ventricular tachycardia.1 Originally developed for patients with epicardial scarring due to chagasic cardiomyopathy and patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy refractory to endocardial ablationm,2,3 this approach has since become an essential part of the armamentarium for the treatment of ventricular tachycardia. Myocardial scars are three-dimensionally complex with varying degrees of transmurality, and the ability to map and ablate the epicardial surface has contributed to a greater understanding of scar-related VT in postinfarction cardiomyopathy and nonischemic substrates including idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy, arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, and chagasic cardiomyopathy. In this review, we highlight the percutaneous approach and discuss clinical indications and potential complications. PMID:26306131

  20. [New techniques of tumor ablation (microwaves, electroporation)].

    PubMed

    de Baere, T

    2011-09-01

    Since the introduction of radiofrequency tumor ablation of liver tumors in the late 1990s, local destructive therapies have been applied to lung, renal and bone lesions. In addition, new techniques have been introduced to compensate for the limitations of radiofrequency ablation, namely the reduced rate of complete ablation for tumors larger than 3 cm and tumors near vessels larger than 3 mm. Microwave ablation is currently evolving rapidly. While it is a technique based on thermal ablation similar to radiofrequency ablation, there are significant differences between both techniques. Electroporation, of interest because of the non-thermal nature of the ablation process, also is under evaluation.

  1. Ablation of GaAs by Intense, Ultrafast Electronic Excitation from Highly Charged Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schenkel, T.; Hamza, A. V.; Barnes, A. V.; Schneider, D. H.; Banks, J. C.; Doyle, B. L.

    1998-09-01

    We have measured total ablation rates and secondary ion yields from undoped GaAs(100) interacting with slow \\(v = 6.6×105 m/s\\), very highly charged ions. Ablation rates increase strongly as a function of projectile charge. Some 1400 target atoms are removed when a single Th70+ ion deposits a potential energy of 152.6 keV within a few femtoseconds into a nanometer-sized target volume. We discuss models for ablation of semiconductors by intense, ultrafast electronic excitation.

  2. Formation of rubrene nanocrystals by laser ablation in liquids utilizing MAPLE deposited thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Malley, Sean M.; Amin, Mitesh; Borchert, James; Jimenez, Richard; Steiner, Matt; Fitz-Gerald, James M.; Bubb, Daniel M.

    2014-03-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) of the organic semiconductor rubrene were formed utilizing the laser ablation in liquids (LAL) method. Thin-films deposited by Matrix Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation (MAPLE) served as the ablation targets. We note in the case of amorphous films targets, the absorbed energy is below the threshold value needed for ablation; though polycrystalline films irradiated under the same LAL conditions result in ejecta. It is suggested this stems from an increase in the effective absorption through light trapping within crystalline domains. An observed red-shift in the absorption edge is attributed to the polar aqueous environment and to the crystalline phase.

  3. Fundamental Mechanisms of Pulsed Laser Ablation of Biological Tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albagli, Douglas

    The ability to cut and remove biological tissue with short pulsed laser light, a process called laser ablation, has the potential to revolutionize many surgical procedures. Ablation procedures using short pulsed lasers are currently being developed or used in many fields of medicine, including cardiology, ophthalmology, dermatology, dentistry, orthopedics, and urology. Despite this, the underlying physics of the ablation process is not well understood. In fact, there is wide disagreement over whether the fundamental mechanism is primarily photothermal, photomechanical, or photochemical. In this thesis, both experimental and theoretical techniques are developed to explore this issue. The photothermal model postulates that ablation proceeds through vaporization of the target material. The photomechanical model asserts that ablation is initiated when the laser-induced tensile stress exceeds the ultimate tensile strength of the target. I have developed a three dimensional model of the thermoelastic response of tissue to short pulsed laser irradiation which allows the time dependent stress distribution to be calculated given the optical, thermal and mechanical properties of the target. A complimentary experimental technique has been developed to verify this model, measure the needed physical properties of the tissue, and record the thermoelastic response of the tissue at the onset of ablation. The results of this work have been widely disseminated to the international research community and have led to significant findings which support the photomechanical model of ablation of tissue. First, the energy deposited in tissue is an order of magnitude less than that required for vaporization. Second, unlike the one-dimensional thermoelastic model of laser-induced stress generation that has appeared in the literature, the full three-dimensional model predicts the development of significant tensile stresses on the surface of the target, precisely where ablation is observed to

  4. High-gravity-assisted pulsed laser ablation system for the fabrication of functionally graded material thin film.

    PubMed

    Nishiyama, T; Morinaga, S; Nagayama, K

    2009-03-01

    This paper describes a novel method for the fabrication of a thin film deposited on an appropriate substrate having a continuous composition gradient. The composition gradient was achieved by a combination of pulsed laser ablation (PLA) of the target material with a very strong acceleration field generated on a moving disk rotating at a very high speed. The PLA process was used to produce a cloud of high-energy particles of the target material that will be deposited on a substrate placed on the rotating disk. After deposition, the particles will diffuse on the surface of the thin film under a strong acceleration field. The high energy of the particles and their diffusion on the substrate surface in a high-vacuum environment produces a macroscopic composition distribution in the thin film. We have constructed an experimental apparatus consisting of a vacuum chamber in which a circular disk made of titanium is driven by a high-frequency inductive motor. An acceleration field of up to 10,000 G can be generated by this apparatus. Functionally graded material thin films of FeSi(2) with a continuous concentration gradient were successfully fabricated by this method under a gravity field of 5400 G. A significant advantage of this method is that it allows us to fabricate graded thin films with a very smooth surface covered by few droplets.

  5. High-gravity-assisted pulsed laser ablation system for the fabrication of functionally graded material thin film.

    PubMed

    Nishiyama, T; Morinaga, S; Nagayama, K

    2009-03-01

    This paper describes a novel method for the fabrication of a thin film deposited on an appropriate substrate having a continuous composition gradient. The composition gradient was achieved by a combination of pulsed laser ablation (PLA) of the target material with a very strong acceleration field generated on a moving disk rotating at a very high speed. The PLA process was used to produce a cloud of high-energy particles of the target material that will be deposited on a substrate placed on the rotating disk. After deposition, the particles will diffuse on the surface of the thin film under a strong acceleration field. The high energy of the particles and their diffusion on the substrate surface in a high-vacuum environment produces a macroscopic composition distribution in the thin film. We have constructed an experimental apparatus consisting of a vacuum chamber in which a circular disk made of titanium is driven by a high-frequency inductive motor. An acceleration field of up to 10,000 G can be generated by this apparatus. Functionally graded material thin films of FeSi(2) with a continuous concentration gradient were successfully fabricated by this method under a gravity field of 5400 G. A significant advantage of this method is that it allows us to fabricate graded thin films with a very smooth surface covered by few droplets. PMID:19334931

  6. Thermonuclear targets for direct-drive ignition by a megajoule laser pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Bel’kov, S. A.; Bondarenko, S. V.; Vergunova, G. A.; Garanin, S. G.; Gus’kov, S. Yu. Demchenko, N. N.; Doskoch, I. Ya.; Kuchugov, P. A.; Zmitrenko, N. V.; Rozanov, V. B.; Stepanov, R. V.; Yakhin, R. A.

    2015-10-15

    Central ignition of a thin two-layer-shell fusion target that is directly driven by a 2-MJ profiled pulse of Nd laser second-harmonic radiation has been studied. The parameters of the target were selected so as to provide effective acceleration of the shell toward the center, which was sufficient for the onset of ignition under conditions of increased hydrodynamic stability of the ablator acceleration and compression. The aspect ratio of the inner deuterium-tritium layer of the shell does not exceed 15, provided that a major part (above 75%) of the outer layer (plastic ablator) is evaporated by the instant of maximum compression. The investigation is based on two series of numerical calculations that were performed using one-dimensional (1D) hydrodynamic codes. The first 1D code was used to calculate the absorption of the profiled laser-radiation pulse (including calculation of the total absorption coefficient with allowance for the inverse bremsstrahlung and resonance mechanisms) and the spatial distribution of target heating for a real geometry of irradiation using 192 laser beams in a scheme of focusing with a cubo-octahedral symmetry. The second 1D code was used for simulating the total cycle of target evolution under the action of absorbed laser radiation and for determining the thermonuclear gain that was achieved with a given target.

  7. Efficient space propulsion engines based on laser ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Phipps, C.R.

    1993-08-01

    Recent results have shown laser momentum transfer coefficients C{sub m} as large as 700 dynes/J from visible and near-infrared laser pulses with heterogeneous targets. Using inexpensive target materials, it is now possible to deliver a 1-tonne satellite from LEO to GEO in 21 days using a 10-kW onboard laser ablation engine, or to maintain several 1-tonne GEO satellites on station from Earth indefinitely using a laser with 100-W average power.

  8. Successful catheter ablation of a left anterior accessory pathway from the non-coronary cusp of the aortic valve.

    PubMed

    Laranjo, Sérgio; Oliveira, Mário; Trigo, Conceição

    2015-08-01

    Left anterior accessory pathways are considered to be rare findings. Catheter ablation of accessory pathways in this location remains a challenging target, and few reports about successful ablation of these accessory pathways are available. We describe our experience regarding a case of a manifest left anterior accessory pathway ablation using radiofrequency energy at the junction of the left coronary cusp with the non-coronary cusp.

  9. Thermal ablation for the treatment of abdominal tumors.

    PubMed

    Brace, Christopher L; Hinshaw, J Louis; Lubner, Meghan G

    2011-03-07

    Percutaneous thermal ablation is an emerging treatment option for many tumors of the abdomen not amenable to conventional treatments. During a thermal ablation procedure, a thin applicator is guided into the target tumor under imaging guidance. Energy is then applied to the tissue until temperatures rise to cytotoxic levels (50-60 °C). Various energy sources are available to heat biological tissues, including radiofrequency (RF) electrical current, microwaves, laser light and ultrasonic waves. Of these, RF and microwave ablation are most commonly used worldwide. During RF ablation, alternating electrical current (~500 kHz) produces resistive heating around the interstitial electrode. Skin surface electrodes (ground pads) are used to complete the electrical circuit. RF ablation has been in use for nearly 20 years, with good results for local tumor control, extended survival and low complication rates. Recent studies suggest RF ablation may be a first-line treatment option for small hepatocellular carcinoma and renal-cell carcinoma. However, RF heating is hampered by local blood flow and high electrical impedance tissues (eg, lung, bone, desiccated or charred tissue). Microwaves may alleviate some of these problems by producing faster, volumetric heating. To create larger or conformal ablations, multiple microwave antennas can be used simultaneously while RF electrodes require sequential operation, which limits their efficiency. Early experiences with microwave systems suggest efficacy and safety similar to, or better than RF devices. Alternatively, cryoablation freezes the target tissues to lethal levels (-20 to -40 °C). Percutaneous cryoablation has been shown to be effective against RCC and many metastatic tumors, particularly colorectal cancer, in the liver. Cryoablation may also be associated with less post-procedure pain and faster recovery for some indications. Cryoablation is often contraindicated for primary liver cancer due to underlying coagulopathy and

  10. Thermal Ablation for the Treatment of Abdominal Tumors

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Percutaneous thermal ablation is an emerging treatment option for many tumors of the abdomen not amenable to conventional treatments. During a thermal ablation procedure, a thin applicator is guided into the target tumor under imaging guidance. Energy is then applied to the tissue until temperatures rise to cytotoxic levels (50-60 °C). Various energy sources are available to heat biological tissues, including radiofrequency (RF) electrical current, microwaves, laser light and ultrasonic waves. Of these, RF and microwave ablation are most commonly used worldwide. During RF ablation, alternating electrical current (~500 kHz) produces resistive heating around the interstitial electrode. Skin surface electrodes (ground pads) are used to complete the electrical circuit. RF ablation has been in use for nearly 20 years, with good results for local tumor control, extended survival and low complication rates1,2. Recent studies suggest RF ablation may be a first-line treatment option for small hepatocellular carcinoma and renal-cell carcinoma3-5. However, RF heating is hampered by local blood flow and high electrical impedance tissues (eg, lung, bone, desiccated or charred tissue)6,7. Microwaves may alleviate some of these problems by producing faster, volumetric heating8-10. To create larger or conformal ablations, multiple microwave antennas can be used simultaneously while RF electrodes require sequential operation, which limits their efficiency. Early experiences with microwave systems suggest efficacy and safety similar to, or better than RF devices11-13. Alternatively, cryoablation freezes the target tissues to lethal levels (-20 to -40 °C). Percutaneous cryoablation has been shown to be effective against RCC and many metastatic tumors, particularly colorectal cancer, in the liver14-16. Cryoablation may also be associated with less post-procedure pain and faster recovery for some indications17. Cryoablation is often contraindicated for primary liver cancer due to

  11. Saphenous Venous Ablation with Hot Contrast in a Canine Model

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, Amit Qian Zhong; Kirsch, David; Eissa, Marna; Narra, Pavan; Lopera, Jorge; Espinoza, Carmen G.; Castaneda, Wifrido

    2008-01-15

    Purpose. To determine the feasibility, efficacy, and safety of thermal ablation of the saphenous vein with hot contrast medium. Methods. Twelve saphenous veins of 6 dogs were percutaneously ablated with hot contrast medium. In all animals, ablation was performed in the vein of one leg, followed by ablation in the contralateral side 1 month later. An occlusion balloon catheter was placed in the infragenicular segment of the saphenous vein via a jugular access to prevent unwanted thermal effects on the non-target segment of the saphenous vein. After inflation of the balloon, 10 ml of hot contrast medium was injected under fluoroscopic control through a sheath placed in the saphenous vein above the ankle. A second 10 ml injection of hot contrast medium was made after 5 min in each vessel. Venographic follow-up of the ablated veins was performed at 1 month (n = 12) and 2 months (n = 6). Results. Follow-up venograms showed that all ablated venous segments were occluded at 1 month. In 6 veins which were followed up to 2 months, 4 (66%) remained occluded, 1 (16%) was partially patent, and the remaining vein (16%) was completely patent. In these latter 2 cases, an inadequate amount of hot contrast was delivered to the lumen due to a closed balloon catheter downstream which did not allow contrast to displace blood within the vessel. Discussion. Hot contrast medium thermal ablation of the saphenous vein appears feasible, safe, and effective in the canine model, provided an adequate amount of embolization agent is used.

  12. Deposition of fibrous nanostructure by ultrafast laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavangar, Amirhossein; Tan, Bo; Venkatakrishnan, K.

    2010-05-01

    This research work demonstrated that laser-induced reverse transfer (LIRT) can be used for controllable site-specific deposition of fibrous nanostructure. The LIRT method makes it possible to generate and deposit the fibrous nanostructure of a wide variety of materials on a transparent acceptor in a single-step process at an ambient condition. The deposition of fibrous nanostructures was conducted using ultrafast laser ablation of silicon and aluminum targets placed behind a glass acceptor. Femtosecond laser pulses pass through the transparent acceptor and hit the bulk donor. Consequently a mass quantity of nanoparticles ablates from the donor and then aggregates and forms a porous fibrous nanostructure on the transparent acceptor. Our experiments demonstrated that the gap between the target and the glass acceptor was critical in the formation and accumulation of nanofibers and it determines the density of the formed nanostructure. The formation mechanism of the nanostructures can be explained by the well-established theory of vapor condensation within the plume induced by ultrafast laser ablation. Experimental results also show that the length of the nanostructure can be controlled by the gap between the target and glass acceptor. Lastly, energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) analysis shows the oxygen concentration in the nanofibrous structure which is associated with oxidation of ablated material at ambient atmosphere.

  13. Ablative Approaches for Pulmonary Metastases.

    PubMed

    Boyer, Matthew J; Ricardi, Umberto; Ball, David; Salama, Joseph K

    2016-02-01

    Pulmonary metastases are common in patients with cancer for which surgery is considered a standard approach in appropriately selected patients. A number of patients are not candidates for surgery due to a medical comorbidities or the extent of surgery required. For these patients, noninvasive or minimally invasive approaches to ablate pulmonary metastases are potential treatment strategies. This article summarizes the rationale and outcomes for non-surgical treatment approaches, including radiotherapy, radiofrequency and microwave ablation, for pulmonary metastases.

  14. Laser ablation in analytical chemistry.

    PubMed

    Russo, Richard E; Mao, Xianglei; Gonzalez, Jhanis J; Zorba, Vassilia; Yoo, Jong

    2013-07-01

    In 2002, we wrote an Analytical Chemistry feature article describing the Physics of Laser Ablation in Microchemical Analysis. In line with the theme of the 2002 article, this manuscript discusses current issues in fundamental research, applications based on detecting photons at the ablation site (LIBS and LAMIS) and by collecting particles for excitation in a secondary source (ICP), and directions for the technology. PMID:23614661

  15. Solar Wind Ablation of Terrestrial Planet Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Thomas Earle; Fok, Mei-Ching H.; Delcourt, Dominique C.

    2009-01-01

    Internal plasma sources usually arise in planetary magnetospheres as a product of stellar ablation processes. With the ignition of a new star and the onset of its ultraviolet and stellar wind emissions, much of the volatiles in the stellar system undergo a phase transition from gas to plasma. Condensation and accretion into a disk is replaced by radiation and stellar wind ablation of volatile materials from the system- Planets or smaller bodies that harbor intrinsic magnetic fields develop an apparent shield against direct stellar wind impact, but UV radiation still ionizes their gas phases, and the resulting internal plasmas serve to conduct currents to and from the central body along reconnected magnetic field linkages. Photoionization and thermalization of electrons warms the ionospheric topside, enhancing Jeans' escape of super-thermal particles, with ambipolar diffusion and acceleration. Moreover, observations and simulations of auroral processes at Earth indicate that solar wind energy dissipation is concentrated by the geomagnetic field by a factor of 10-100, enhancing heavy species plasma and gas escape from gravity, and providing more current carrying capacity. Thus internal plasmas enable coupling with the plasma, neutral gas and by extension, the entire body. The stellar wind is locally loaded and slowed to develop the required power. The internal source plasma is accelerated and heated, inflating the magnetosphere as it seeks escape, and is ultimately blown away in the stellar wind. Bodies with little sensible atmosphere may still produce an exosphere of sputtered matter when exposed to direct solar wind impact. Bodies with a magnetosphere and internal sources of plasma interact more strongly with the stellar wind owing to the magnetic linkage between the two created by reconnection.

  16. Bone and Soft Tissue Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Ryan C.B.; Stavas, Joseph M.

    2014-01-01

    Bone and soft tissue tumor ablation has reached widespread acceptance in the locoregional treatment of various benign and malignant musculoskeletal (MSK) lesions. Many principles of ablation learned elsewhere in the body are easily adapted to the MSK system, particularly the various technical aspects of probe/antenna design, tumoricidal effects, selection of image guidance, and methods to reduce complications. Despite the common use of thermal and chemical ablation procedures in bone and soft tissues, there are few large clinical series that show longitudinal benefit and cost-effectiveness compared with conventional methods, namely, surgery, external beam radiation, and chemotherapy. Percutaneous radiofrequency ablation of osteoid osteomas has been evaluated the most and is considered a first-line treatment choice for many lesions. Palliation of painful metastatic bone disease with thermal ablation is considered safe and has been shown to reduce pain and analgesic use while improving quality of life for cancer patients. Procedure-related complications are rare and are typically easily managed. Similar to all interventional procedures, bone and soft tissue lesions require an integrated approach to disease management to determine the optimum type of and timing for ablation techniques within the context of the patient care plan. PMID:25053865

  17. Pulsed laser ablation of complex oxides: The role of congruent ablation and preferential scattering for the film stoichiometry

    SciTech Connect

    Wicklein, S.; Koehl, A.; Dittmann, R.; Sambri, A.; Amoruso, S.; Wang, X.; Bruzzese, R.

    2012-09-24

    By combining structural and chemical thin film analysis with detailed plume diagnostics and modeling of the laser plume dynamics, we are able to elucidate the different physical mechanisms determining the stoichiometry of the complex oxides model material SrTiO{sub 3} during pulsed laser deposition. Deviations between thin film and target stoichiometry are basically a result of two effects, namely, incongruent ablation and preferential scattering of lighter ablated species during their motion towards the substrate in the O{sub 2} background gas. On the one hand, a progressive preferential ablation of the Ti species with increasing laser fluence leads to a regime of Ti-rich thin film growth at larger fluences. On the other hand, in the low laser fluence regime, a more effective scattering of the lighter Ti plume species results in Sr rich films.

  18. Experiments to measure ablative Richtmyer-Meshkov growth of Gaussian bumps in plastic capsules

    SciTech Connect

    Loomis, Eric; Batha, Steve; Sedillo, Tom; Evans, Scott; Sorce, Chuck; Landen, Otto; Braun, Dave

    2010-06-02

    Growth of hydrodynamic instabilities at the interfaces of inertial confinement fusion capsules (ICF) due to ablator and fuel non-uniformities have been of primary concern to the ICF program since its inception. To achieve thermonuclear ignition at Megajoule class laser systems such as the NIF, targets must be designed for high implosion velocities, which requires higher in-flight aspect ratios (IFAR) and diminished shell stability. Controlling capsule perturbations is thus of the utmost importance. Recent simulations have shown that features on the outer surface of an ICF capsule as small as 10 microns wide and 100's of nanometers tall such as bumps, divots, or even dust particles can profoundly impact capsule performance by leading to material jetting or mix into the hotspot. Recent x-ray images of implosions on the NIF may be evidence of such mixing. Unfortunately, our ability to accurately predict these effects is uncertain due to disagreement between equation of state (EOS) models. In light of this, we have begun a campaign to measure the growth of isolated defects (Gaussian bumps) due to ablative Richtmyer-Meshkov in CH capsules to validate these models. The platform that has been developed uses halfraums with radiation temperatures near 75 eV (Rev. 4 foot-level) driven by 15-20 beams from the Omega laser (Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, NY), which sends a ~2.5 Mbar shock into a planar CH foil. Gaussian-shaped bumps (20 microns wide, 4-7 microns tall) are deposited onto the ablation side of the target. On-axis radiography with a saran (Cl Heα - 2.8 keV) backlighter is used to measure bump evolution prior to shock breakout. Shock speed measurements will also be made with Omega's active shock breakout (ASBO) and streaked optical pyrometery (SOP) diagnostics in conjunction with filtered x-ray photodiode arrays (DANTE) to determine drive conditions in the target. These data will be used to discriminate between EOS models so

  19. The stepwise multi-photon activation fluorescence guided ablation of melanin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Zhenhua; Gu, Zetong; DiMarzio, Charles

    2015-02-01

    Previous research has shown that the stepwise multi-photon activation fluorescence (SMPAF) of melanin, activated and excited by a continuous-wave (CW) mode near infrared (NIR) laser, is a low-cost and reliable method for detecting melanin. We have developed a device utilizing the melanin SMPAF to guide the ablation of melanin with a 975 nm CW laser. This method provides the ability of targeting individual melanin particles with micrometer resolution, and enables localized melanin ablation to be performed without collateral damage. Compared to the traditional selective photothermolysis, which uses pulsed lasers for melanin ablation, this method demonstrates higher precision and lower cost. Therefore, the SMPAF guided selective ablation of melanin is a promising tool of melanin ablation for both medical and cosmetic purposes.

  20. Atmospheric pressure arc discharge with ablating graphite anode

    SciTech Connect

    Nemchinsky, V. A.; Raitses, Y.

    2015-05-18

    The anodic carbon arc discharge is used to produce carbon nanoparticles. Recent experiments with the carbon arc at atmospheric pressure helium demonstrated the enhanced ablation rate for narrow graphite anodes resulting in high deposition rates of carbonaceous products on the copper cathode (Fetterman et al 2008 Carbon 46 1322–6). The proposed model explains these results with interconnected steady-state models of the cathode and the anode processes. When considering cathode functioning, the model predicts circulation of the particles in the near-cathode region: evaporation of the cathode material, ionization of evaporated atoms and molecules in the near-cathode plasma, return of the resulting ions to the cathode, surface recombination of ions and electrons followed again by cathode evaporation etc. In the case of the low anode ablation rate, the ion acceleration in the cathode sheath provides the major cathode heating mechanism. In the case of an intensive anode ablation, an additional cathode heating is due to latent fusion heat of the atomic species evaporated from the anode and depositing at the cathode. Using the experimental arc voltage as the only input discharge parameter, the model allows us to calculate the anode ablation rate. A comparison of the results of calculations with the available experimental data shows reasonable agreement.

  1. Future accelerators (?)

    SciTech Connect

    John Womersley

    2003-08-21

    I describe the future accelerator facilities that are currently foreseen for electroweak scale physics, neutrino physics, and nuclear structure. I will explore the physics justification for these machines, and suggest how the case for future accelerators can be made.

  2. Femtosecond laser ablation of enamel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Quang-Tri; Bertrand, Caroline; Vilar, Rui

    2016-06-01

    The surface topographical, compositional, and structural modifications induced in human enamel by femtosecond laser ablation is studied. The laser treatments were performed using a Yb:KYW chirped-pulse-regenerative amplification laser system (560 fs and 1030 nm) and fluences up to 14 J/cm2. The ablation surfaces were studied by scanning electron microscopy, grazing incidence x-ray diffraction, and micro-Raman spectroscopy. Regardless of the fluence, the ablation surfaces were covered by a layer of resolidified material, indicating that ablation is accompanied by melting of hydroxyapatite. This layer presented pores and exploded gas bubbles, created by the release of gaseous decomposition products of hydroxyapatite (CO2 and H2O) within the liquid phase. In the specimen treated with 1-kHz repetition frequency and 14 J/cm2, thickness of the resolidified material is in the range of 300 to 900 nm. The micro-Raman analysis revealed that the resolidified material contains amorphous calcium phosphate, while grazing incidence x-ray diffraction analysis allowed detecting traces of a calcium phosphate other than hydroxyapatite, probably β-tricalcium phosphate Ca3), at the surface of this specimen. The present results show that the ablation of enamel involves melting of enamel's hydroxyapatite, but the thickness of the altered layer is very small and thermal damage of the remaining material is negligible.

  3. Femtosecond laser ablation of enamel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Quang-Tri; Bertrand, Caroline; Vilar, Rui

    2016-06-01

    The surface topographical, compositional, and structural modifications induced in human enamel by femtosecond laser ablation is studied. The laser treatments were performed using a Yb:KYW chirped-pulse-regenerative amplification laser system (560 fs and 1030 nm) and fluences up to 14 J/cm2. The ablation surfaces were studied by scanning electron microscopy, grazing incidence x-ray diffraction, and micro-Raman spectroscopy. Regardless of the fluence, the ablation surfaces were covered by a layer of resolidified material, indicating that ablation is accompanied by melting of hydroxyapatite. This layer presented pores and exploded gas bubbles, created by the release of gaseous decomposition products of hydroxyapatite (CO2 and H2O) within the liquid phase. In the specimen treated with 1-kHz repetition frequency and 14 J/cm2, thickness of the resolidified material is in the range of 300 to 900 nm. The micro-Raman analysis revealed that the resolidified material contains amorphous calcium phosphate, while grazing incidence x-ray diffraction analysis allowed detecting traces of a calcium phosphate other than hydroxyapatite, probably β-tricalcium phosphate Ca3), at the surface of this specimen. The present results show that the ablation of enamel involves melting of enamel's hydroxyapatite, but the thickness of the altered layer is very small and thermal damage of the remaining material is negligible.

  4. Fragmentation and ablation during entry

    SciTech Connect

    Canavan, G.H.

    1997-09-01

    This note discusses objects that both fragment and ablate during entry, using the results of previous reports to describe the velocity, pressure, and fragmentation of entering objects. It shows that the mechanisms used there to describe the breakup of non-ablating objects during deceleration remain valid for most ablating objects. It treats coupled fragmentation and ablation during entry, building on earlier models that separately discuss the entry of objects that are hard, whose high heat of ablation permits little erosion, and those who are strong whose strength prevents fragmentation, which are discussed in ``Radiation from Hard Objects,`` ``Deceleration and Radiation of Strong, Hard, Asteroids During Atmospheric Impact,`` and ``Meteor Signature Interpretation.`` This note provides a more detailed treatment of the further breakup and separation of fragments during descent. It replaces the constraint on mass per unit area used earlier to determine the altitude and magnitude of peak power radiation with a detailed analytic solution of deceleration. Model predictions are shown to be in agreement with the key features of numerical calculations of deceleration. The model equations are solved for the altitudes of maximum radiation, which agree with numerical integrations. The model is inverted analytically to infer object size and speed from measurements of peak power and altitude to provide a complete model for the approximate inversion of meteor data.

  5. Pulsed electromagnetic acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahn, R. G.; Vonjaskowsky, W. F.; Clark, K. E.

    1973-01-01

    Direct measurements of the power deposited in the anode of a multimegawatt MPD accelerator using thermocouples attached to a thin shell anode reveal a dramatic decrease in the fractional anode power from 50% at 200 KW input power to less than 10% at 20 MW power. The corresponding local power flux peak at a value of 10,000 W/sq cm at the lip of the anode exhaust orifice, a distribution traced to a corresponding peak in the local current density at the anode. A comparison of voltage-current characteristics and spectral photographs of the MPD discharge using quartz, boron nitride and plexiglas insulators with various mass injection configurations led to the identification of different voltage modes and regions of ablation free operation. The technique of piezoelectric impact pressure measurement in the MPD exhaust flow was refined to account for the effects due to probe yaw angle.

  6. Time-of-flight mass spectrometry of DNA laser-ablated from frozen aqueous solutions: applications to the Human Genome Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Peter W.; Schieltz, David; Nelson, Randall W.; Chou, Chau-Wen; Luo, Cong-Wen; Thomas, Robert

    1993-06-01

    Techniques have been developed to volatilize intact massive DNA molecules using pulsed laser ablation of thin frozen films of aqueous DNA solutions. Electrophoresis assay of the ablated DNA shows that molecules as massive as approximately 400,000 Da can be ablated intact. It has been possible to obtain time-of-flight mass spectra of ablated multicomponent mixtures of single-stranded DNA with masses up to approximately 18,000 Da (a 60-nucleotide DNA oligomer). The possible application of time-of-flight mass spectrometry to the analysis and readout of DNA sequence mixtures, and the potential thereby to accelerate the Human Genome project, are discussed.

  7. A novel cell ablation strategy blocks tobacco anther dehiscence.

    PubMed Central

    Beals, T P; Goldberg, R B

    1997-01-01

    We utilized a new cell ablation strategy to ablate specific anther cell types involved in the dehiscence process. The tobacco TA56 gene promoter is active within the circular cell cluster, stomium, and connective regions of the anther at different developmental stages. We introduced a cytotoxic TA56/barnase gene into tobacco plants together with three different anticytotoxic barstar genes. The anticytotoxic barstar genes were used to protect subsets of anther cell types from the cytotoxic effects of the TA56/barnase gene. The chimeric barstar genes were fused with (1) the tobacco TP12 gene promoter that is active at high levels in most anther cell types; (2) the soybean lectin gene promoter that is active earlier in the connective, and at lower levels in the circular cell cluster and stomium, than is the TA56 promoter; and (3) the tobacco TA20 gene promoter that is active at high levels in most anther cell types but has a different developmental profile than does the TP12 promoter. Normal anther development and dehiscence occurred in plants containing the TA56/barnase and TP12/barstar genes, indicating that barstar protects diverse anther cell types from the cytotoxic effects of barnase. Anthers containing the TA56/barnase and lectin/barstar genes also developed normally but failed to dehisce because of extensive ablation of the circular cell cluster, stomium, and contiguous connective regions. Anthers containing the TA56/barnase and TA20/barstar genes failed to dehisce as well. However, only the stomium region was ablated in these anthers. The connective, circular cell cluster, and adjacent wall regions were protected from ablation by the formation of barnase/barstar complexes. We conclude that anther dehiscence at flower opening depends on the presence of a functional stomium region and that chimeric barnase and barstar genes containing promoters that are active in several overlapping cell types can be used for targeted cell ablation experiments. PMID:9338959

  8. The effect of elastic modulus on ablation catheter contact area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camp, Jon J.; Linte, Cristian A.; Rettmann, Maryam E.; Sun, Deyu; Packer, Douglas L.; Robb, Richard A.; Holmes, David R.

    2015-03-01

    Cardiac ablation consists of navigating a catheter into the heart and delivering RF energy to electrically isolate tissue regions that generate or propagate arrhythmia. Besides the challenges of accurate and precise targeting of the arrhythmic sites within the beating heart, limited information is currently available to the cardiologist regarding intricate electrodetissue contact, which directly impacts the quality of produced lesions. Recent advances in ablation catheter design provide intra-procedural estimates of tissue-catheter contact force, but the most direct indicator of lesion quality for any particular energy level and duration is the tissue-catheter contact area, and that is a function of not only force, but catheter pose and material elasticity as well. In this experiment, we have employed real-time ultrasound (US) imaging to determine the complete interaction between the ablation electrode and tissue to accurately estimate contact, which will help to better understand the effect of catheter pose and position relative to the tissue. By simultaneously recording tracked position, force reading and US image of the ablation catheter, the differing material properties of polyvinyl alcohol cryogel[1] phantoms are shown to produce varying amounts of tissue depression and contact area (implying varying lesion quality) for equivalent force readings. We have shown that the elastic modulus significantly affects the surface-contact area between the catheter and tissue at any level of contact force. Thus we provide evidence that a prescribed level of catheter force may not always provide sufficient contact area to produce an effective ablation lesion in the prescribed ablation time.

  9. Conditional Lineage Ablation to Model Human Diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Paul; Morley, Gregory; Huang, Qian; Fischer, Avi; Seiler, Stephanie; Horner, James W.; Factor, Stephen; Vaidya, Dhananjay; Jalife, Jose; Fishman, Glenn I.

    1998-09-01

    Cell loss contributes to the pathogenesis of many inherited and acquired human diseases. We have developed a system to conditionally ablate cells of any lineage and developmental stage in the mouse by regulated expression of the diphtheria toxin A (DTA) gene by using tetracycline-responsive promoters. As an example of this approach, we targeted expression of DTA to the hearts of adult mice to model structural abnormalities commonly observed in human cardiomyopathies. Induction of DTA expression resulted in cell loss, fibrosis, and chamber dilatation. As in many human cardiomyopathies, transgenic mice developed spontaneous arrhythmias in vivo, and programmed electrical stimulation of isolated-perfused transgenic hearts demonstrated a strikingly high incidence of spontaneous and inducible ventricular tachycardia. Affected mice showed marked perturbations of cardiac gap junction channel expression and localization, including a subset with disorganized epicardial activation patterns as revealed by optical action potential mapping. These studies provide important insights into mechanisms of arrhythmogenesis and suggest that conditional lineage ablation may have wide applicability for studies of disease pathogenesis.

  10. Estrogen sulfotransferase ablation sensitizes mice to sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Xiaojuan; Guo, Yan; Jiang, Mengxi; Hu, Bingfang; Li, Zhigang; Fan, Jie; Deng, Meihong; Billiar, Timothy R.; Kucera, Heidi; Gaikwad, Nilesh W.; Xu, Meishu; Lu, Peipei; Yan, Jiong; Fu, Haiyan; Liu, Youhua; Yu, Lushan; Huang, Min; Zeng, Su; Xie, Wen

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis is the host's deleterious systemic inflammatory response to microbial infections. Here we report an essential role for the estrogen sulfotransferase (EST or SULT1E1), a conjugating enzyme that sulfonates and deactivates estrogens, in sepsis response. Both the cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) and lipopolysacharide (LPS) models of sepsis induce the expression of EST and compromise the activity of estrogen, an anti-inflammatory hormone. Surprisingly, EST ablation sensitizes mice to sepsis-induced death. Mechanistically, EST ablation attenuates sepsis-induced inflammatory responses due to compromised estrogen deactivation, leading to increased sepsis lethality. In contrast, transgenic overexpression of EST promotes estrogen deactivation and sensitizes mice to CLP-induced inflammatory response. The induction of EST by sepsis is NF-κB dependent and EST is a NF-κB target gene. The reciprocal regulation of inflammation and EST may represent a yet to be explored mechanism of endocrine regulation of inflammation, which has an impact on the clinical outcome of sepsis. PMID:26259151

  11. Producing Uniform Lesion Pattern in HIFU Ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yufeng; Kargl, Steven G.; Hwang, Joo Ha

    2009-04-01

    High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is emerging as a modality for treatment of solid tumors. The temperature at the focus can reach over 65° C denaturing cellular proteins resulting in coagulative necrosis. Typically, HIFU parameters are the same for each treated spot in most HIFU control systems. Because of thermal diffusion from nearby spots, the size of lesions will gradually become larger as the HIFU therapy progresses, which may cause insufficient treatment of initial spots, and over-treatment of later ones. It is found that the produced lesion pattern also depends on the scanning pathway. From the viewpoint of the physician creating uniform lesions and minimizing energy exposure are preferred in tumor ablation. An algorithm has been developed to adaptively determine the treatment parameters for every spot in a theoretical model in order to maintain similar lesion size throughout the HIFU therapy. In addition, the exposure energy needed using the traditional raster scanning is compared with those of two other scanning pathways, spiral scanning from the center to the outside and from the outside to the center. The theoretical prediction and proposed algorithm were further evaluated using transparent gel phantoms as a target. Digital images of the lesions were obtained, quantified, and then compared with each other. Altogether, dynamically changing treatment parameters can improve the efficacy and safety of HIFU ablation.

  12. Image-Guided Ablation of Adrenal Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Yamakado, Koichiro

    2014-01-01

    Although laparoscopic adrenalectomy has remained the standard of care for the treatment for adrenal tumors, percutaneous image-guided ablation therapy, such as chemical ablation, radiofrequency ablation, cryoablation, and microwave ablation, has been shown to be clinically useful in many nonsurgical candidates. Ablation therapy has been used to treat both functioning adenomas and malignant tumors, including primary adrenal carcinoma and metastasis. For patients with functioning adenomas, biochemical and symptomatic improvement is achieved in 96 to 100% after ablation; for patients with malignant adrenal neoplasms, however, the survival benefit from ablation therapy remains unclear, though good initial results have been reported. This article outlines the current role of ablation therapy for adrenal lesions, as well as identifying some of the technical considerations for this procedure. PMID:25049444

  13. Femtosecond lasers for machining of transparent, brittle materials: ablative vs. non-ablative femtosecond laser processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendricks, F.; Matylitsky, V. V.

    2016-03-01

    This paper focuses on precision machining of transparent materials by means of ablative and non-ablative femtosecond laser processing. Ablation technology will be compared with a newly developed patent pending non-ablative femtosecond process, ClearShapeTM, using the Spectra-Physics Spirit industrial femtosecond laser.

  14. Ion Induction Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnard, John J.; Horioka, Kazuhiko

    The description of beams in RF and induction accelerators share many common features. Likewise, there is considerable commonality between electron induction accelerators (see Chap. 7) and ion induction accelerators. However, in contrast to electron induction accelerators, there are fewer ion induction accelerators that have been operated as application-driven user facilities. Ion induction accelerators are envisioned for applications (see Chap. 10) such as Heavy Ion Fusion (HIF), High Energy Density Physics (HEDP), and spallation neutron sources. Most ion induction accelerators constructed to date have been limited scale facilities built for feasibility studies for HIF and HEDP where a large numbers of ions are required on target in short pulses. Because ions are typically non-relativistic or weakly relativistic in much of the machine, space-charge effects can be of crucial importance. This contrasts the situation with electron machines, which are usually strongly relativistic leading to weaker transverse space-charge effects and simplified longitudinal dynamics. Similarly, the bunch structure of ion induction accelerators relative to RF machines results in significant differences in the longitudinal physics.

  15. Ablation of GaAs by Intense, Ultrafast Electronic Excitation from Highly Charged Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Schenkel, T.; Hamza, A.V.; Barnes, A.V.; Schneider, D.H.; Banks, J.C.; Doyle, B.L.

    1998-09-01

    We have measured total ablation rates and secondary ion yields from undoped GaAs(100) interacting with slow (v=6.6{times}10{sup 5} m /s) , very highly charged ions. Ablation rates increase strongly as a function of projectile charge. Some 1400thinspthinsptarget atoms are removed when a single Th{sup 70+} ion deposits a potential energy of 152.6thinspthinspkeV within a few femtoseconds into a nanometer-sized target volume. We discuss models for ablation of semiconductors by intense, ultrafast electronic excitation. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  16. Tracing the plasma interactions for pulsed reactive crossed-beam laser ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jikun; Stender, Dieter; Pichler, Markus; Pergolesi, Daniele; Schneider, Christof W.; Wokaun, Alexander; Lippert, Thomas; Döbeli, Max

    2015-10-28

    Pulsed reactive crossed-beam laser ablation is an effective technique to govern the chemical activity of plasma species and background molecules during pulsed laser deposition. Instead of using a constant background pressure, a gas pulse with a reactive gas, synchronized with the laser beam, is injected into vacuum or a low background pressure near the ablated area of the target. It intercepts the initially generated plasma plume, thereby enhancing the physicochemical interactions between the gaseous environment and the plasma species. For this study, kinetic energy resolved mass-spectrometry and time-resolved plasma imaging were used to study the physicochemical processes occurring during the reactive crossed beam laser ablation of a partially {sup 18}O substituted La{sub 0.6}Sr{sub 0.4}MnO{sub 3} target using oxygen as gas pulse. The characteristics of the ablated plasma are compared with those observed during pulsed laser deposition in different oxygen background pressures.

  17. Evaluation of explosive sublimation as the mechanism of nanosecond laser ablation of tungsten under vacuum conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oderji, Hassan Yousefi; Farid, Nazar; Sun, Liying; Fu, Cailong; Ding, Hongbin

    2016-08-01

    A non-equilibrium mechanism for nanosecond laser ablation is suggested herein, and its predictions are compared to the results of W experiments performed under vacuum conditions. A mechanism of particle formation is explained via this model, with partial sublimation of the superheated irradiated zone of the target considered to be the mechanism of laser ablation. In this study, a mixture of vapor and particles was explosively generated and subsequently prevented the rest of a laser pulse from reaching its intended target. This mechanism was found to play an essential role in the ablation of W under vacuum conditions, and it provides a theoretical justification for particle formation. Moreover, special considerations were taken into account for the expansion of plasma into a vacuum. The model was evaluated by measuring the mass of ablated particles using a quartz crystal deposition monitor and time-resolved optical emission spectroscopy. The results of this model were found to be in good agreement with experimental values.

  18. Microwave ablation of hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Poggi, Guido; Tosoratti, Nevio; Montagna, Benedetta; Picchi, Chiara

    2015-01-01

    Although surgical resection is still the optimal treatment option for early-stage hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in patients with well compensated cirrhosis, thermal ablation techniques provide a valid non-surgical treatment alternative, thanks to their minimal invasiveness, excellent tolerability and safety profile, proven efficacy in local disease control, virtually unlimited repeatability and cost-effectiveness. Different energy sources are currently employed in clinics as physical agents for percutaneous or intra-surgical thermal ablation of HCC nodules. Among them, radiofrequency (RF) currents are the most used, while microwave ablations (MWA) are becoming increasingly popular. Starting from the 90s’, RF ablation (RFA) rapidly became the standard of care in ablation, especially in the treatment of small HCC nodules; however, RFA exhibits substantial performance limitations in the treatment of large lesions and/or tumors located near major heat sinks. MWA, first introduced in the Far Eastern clinical practice in the 80s’, showing promising results but also severe limitations in the controllability of the emitted field and in the high amount of power employed for the ablation of large tumors, resulting in a poor coagulative performance and a relatively high complication rate, nowadays shows better results both in terms of treatment controllability and of overall coagulative performance, thanks to the improvement of technology. In this review we provide an extensive and detailed overview of the key physical and technical aspects of MWA and of the currently available systems, and we want to discuss the most relevant published data on MWA treatments of HCC nodules in regard to clinical results and to the type and rate of complications, both in absolute terms and in comparison with RFA. PMID:26557950

  19. Microwave ablation of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Poggi, Guido; Tosoratti, Nevio; Montagna, Benedetta; Picchi, Chiara

    2015-11-01

    Although surgical resection is still the optimal treatment option for early-stage hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in patients with well compensated cirrhosis, thermal ablation techniques provide a valid non-surgical treatment alternative, thanks to their minimal invasiveness, excellent tolerability and safety profile, proven efficacy in local disease control, virtually unlimited repeatability and cost-effectiveness. Different energy sources are currently employed in clinics as physical agents for percutaneous or intra-surgical thermal ablation of HCC nodules. Among them, radiofrequency (RF) currents are the most used, while microwave ablations (MWA) are becoming increasingly popular. Starting from the 90s', RF ablation (RFA) rapidly became the standard of care in ablation, especially in the treatment of small HCC nodules; however, RFA exhibits substantial performance limitations in the treatment of large lesions and/or tumors located near major heat sinks. MWA, first introduced in the Far Eastern clinical practice in the 80s', showing promising results but also severe limitations in the controllability of the emitted field and in the high amount of power employed for the ablation of large tumors, resulting in a poor coagulative performance and a relatively high complication rate, nowadays shows better results both in terms of treatment controllability and of overall coagulative performance, thanks to the improvement of technology. In this review we provide an extensive and detailed overview of the key physical and technical aspects of MWA and of the currently available systems, and we want to discuss the most relevant published data on MWA treatments of HCC nodules in regard to clinical results and to the type and rate of complications, both in absolute terms and in comparison with RFA. PMID:26557950

  20. Topical report on a preconceptual design for the Spallation-Induced Lithium Conversion (SILC) target for the accelerator production of tritium (APT)

    SciTech Connect

    Van Tuyle, G.J.; Cokinos, D.M.; Czajkowski, C.; Franz, E.M.; Kroeger, P.; Todosow, M.; Youngblood, R.; Zucker, M.

    1993-09-30

    The preconceptual design of the APT Li-Al target system, also referred to as the Spallation-Induced Lithium Conversion (SILC), target system, is summarized in this report. The system has been designed to produce a ``3/8 Goal`` quantity of tritium using the 200-mA, 1.0 GeV proton beam emerging from the LANL-designed LINAC. The SILC target system consists of a beam expander, a heavy-water-cooled lead spallation neutron source assembly surrounded by light-water-cooled Li-Al blankets, a target window, heat removal systems, and related safety systems. The preconceptual design of each of these major components is described. Descriptions are also provided for the target fabrication, tritium extraction, and waste-steam processes. Performance characteristics are presented and discussed.