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Sample records for abnormal ankle brachial

  1. Ankle-Brachial Index

    MedlinePlus

    ... in which the arteries in your legs or arms are narrowed or blocked. People with peripheral artery ... ankle with your blood pressure measured at your arm. A low ankle-brachial index number can indicate ...

  2. Usefulness of an abnormal ankle-brachial index for detecting multivessel coronary disease in patients with acute coronary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Núñez, Daniel; Morillas, Pedro; Quiles, Juan; Cordero, Alberto; Guindo, Josep; Soria, Federico; Mazón, Pilar; Lekuona, Iñaki; Rodríguez-Padial, Luis; Llácer, Angel; González-Juanatey, José Ramón; Bertomeu, Vicente

    2010-01-01

    The presence of peripheral arterial disease in patients with coronary artery disease is associated with a poor cardiovascular outcome. However, the majority of affected patients are asymptomatic and the condition is underdiagnosed. The ankle-brachial index (ABI) provides a simple method of diagnosis. The aim of this study was to assess the usefulness of an abnormal ABI for identifying multivessel coronary artery disease in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). We analyzed data on all ACS patients included in the PAMISCA multicenter study (with 94 participating hospitals) who underwent catheterization during admission. Patients were diagnosed with multivessel coronary disease if two or more major epicardial vessels or the left main coronary artery, or both, were affected. An ABI 1.4 was considered abnormal. The study included 1031 patients with a mean age of 67.7 years. Of these, 542 had multivessel disease (52.6%). Compare with those without multivessel disease, these patients were older (66.6 years vs. 62.6 years; P< .001), had higher prevalences of hypertension (65.9% vs. 56.2%; P< .005), diabetes mellitus (40.6% vs. 26.0%; P< .001) and hypercholesterolemia (89.1% vs. 80.4%; P< .001), and were more likely to have a history of cardiovascular disease (30.1% vs. 13.9%; P< .001) or an abnormal ABI (45.4% vs. 30.3%; P< .001). Multivariate analysis showed that the presence of an abnormal ABI was associated with an increased risk of multivessel disease (odds ratio=1.58; 95% confidence interval, 1.16-2.15; P< .05). In patients with ACS, an abnormal ABI was independently associated with the risk of multivessel coronary artery disease.

  3. Prevalence and variables associated with an abnormal ankle-brachial index among patients with human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hinojosa, Carlos A; Nunez-Salgado, Ana E; Anaya-Ayala, Javier E; Laparra-Escareno, Hugo; Ortiz-Lopez, Laura J; Herrera-Caceres, Jaime O; Crabtree-Ramirez, Brenda E; Sierra-Madero, Juan G

    2018-01-01

    Objectives The longer survival of patients with human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and the introduction of the highly active antiretroviral therapy have increased the number of chronic conditions; among these, cardiovascular diseases. The aim of this study is to determine patient, disease, and factors associated with peripheral arterial disease in a population of patients with human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Methods A prospective nested case-control study of a cohort of patients with human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome was conducted in a tertiary medical center in Mexico City. A sample size of 206 patients was calculated. Medical history, relevant laboratory data, peripheral arterial exam, and screening ankle-brachial index tests were obtained. Results The prevalence of abnormal ankle-brachial indexes was 20% (42 patients). Patient's mean age was 44 years ±13. The majority (98.5%) were actively receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy; active smoking was reported in 55 (27%), arterial hypertension and type 2 diabetes mellitus were found in 24 (12%) and 22 (11%) patients. Median time from the human immunodeficiency virus diagnosis was eight years (Interquartile range ±11); the mean CD4 count was 481, with a mean viral load of 13,557 copies (SD ± 69025.27) and 1889.18 (SD ± 9052.77) for patients with normal and abnormal ankle-brachial index and a median of 40 (IQ ± 2). Viral load ( p = 0.04) and number of years with human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome ( p = 0.04) were significantly associated with abnormal ankle-brachial indexes. Conclusions Abnormal ankle-brachial index seems to be more frequent in Mexican patients with human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome when compared with the general population at the same age. The most important factors associated with arterial disease were the viral

  4. The Prevalence and Predictors of an Abnormal Ankle-Brachial Index in the Bypass Angioplasty Revascularization Investigation 2 Diabetes (BARI 2D) Trial

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Premranjan P.; Abbott, J. Dawn; Lombardero, Manuel S.; Sutton-Tyrrell, Kim; Woodhead, Gail; Venkitachalam, Lakshmi; Tsapatsaris, Nicholas P.; Piemonte, Thomas C.; Lago, Rodrigo M.; Rutter, Martin K.; Nesto, Richard W.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine ankle-brachial index (ABI) abnormalities in patients with type 2 diabetes and coronary artery disease (CAD). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS An ABI was obtained in 2,240 patients in the Bypass Angioplasty Revascularization Investigation 2 Diabetes (BARI 2D) Trial. ABIs were classified as: normal, 0.91–1.3; low, ≤0.9; high, >1.3; or noncompressible artery (NC). Baseline characteristics were examined according to ABI and by multivariate analysis. RESULTS ABI was normal in 66%, low in 19%, and high in 8% of patients, and 6% of patients had NC. Of the low ABI patients, 68% were asymptomatic. Using normal ABI as referent, low ABI was independently associated with smoking, female sex, black race, hypertension, age, C-reactive protein, diabetes duration, and lower BMI. High ABI was associated with male sex, nonblack race, and higher BMI; and NC artery was associated with diabetes duration, higher BMI, and hypertension. CONCLUSIONS ABI abnormalities are common and often asymptomatic in patients with type 2 diabetes and CAD. PMID:21270200

  5. The prevalence and predictors of an abnormal ankle-brachial index in the Bypass Angioplasty Revascularization Investigation 2 Diabetes (BARI 2D) trial.

    PubMed

    Singh, Premranjan P; Abbott, J Dawn; Lombardero, Manuel S; Sutton-Tyrrell, Kim; Woodhead, Gail; Venkitachalam, Lakshmi; Tsapatsaris, Nicholas P; Piemonte, Thomas C; Lago, Rodrigo M; Rutter, Martin K; Nesto, Richard W

    2011-02-01

    To examine ankle-brachial index (ABI) abnormalities in patients with type 2 diabetes and coronary artery disease (CAD). An ABI was obtained in 2,240 patients in the Bypass Angioplasty Revascularization Investigation 2 Diabetes (BARI 2D) Trial. ABIs were classified as: normal, 0.91-1.3; low, ≤ 0.9; high, >1.3; or noncompressible artery (NC). Baseline characteristics were examined according to ABI and by multivariate analysis. RESULTS ABI was normal in 66%, low in 19%, and high in 8% of patients, and 6% of patients had NC. Of the low ABI patients, 68% were asymptomatic. Using normal ABI as referent, low ABI was independently associated with smoking, female sex, black race, hypertension, age, C-reactive protein, diabetes duration, and lower BMI. High ABI was associated with male sex, nonblack race, and higher BMI; and NC artery was associated with diabetes duration, higher BMI, and hypertension. ABI abnormalities are common and often asymptomatic in patients with type 2 diabetes and CAD.

  6. Ankle-Brachial Index, Toe-Brachial Index, and Pulse Volume Recording in Healthy Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Masaki, Hisao; Yunoki, Yasuhiro; Tabuchi, Atushi; Morita, Ichiro; Mohri, Satoshi; Tanemoto, Kazuo

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To clarify the characteristics of ankle-brachial index (ABI), toe-brachial index (TBI), and pulse volume recording (PVR) of the ankle with brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) in healthy young adults. Material and Methods: We analyzed ABI, TBI, baPWV, and PVR in the ankle of healthy adults aged 20 to 25 years (median, 20 years) using an automatic oscillometric device between 2002 and 2013. The ABI, baPWV, and PVR in 1282 legs of 641 subjects (301 men and 340 women) and the TBI in 474 toes of 237 subjects (117 men and 120 women) were evaluated. Results: The measured values showed no bilateral differences. ABI and baPWV were higher in men than in women, but TBI was similar in both sexes. ABI <1.0 was observed in 18.1% of the legs in men and in 25.6% in women. TBI <0.7 was observed in 16.2% of the toes in men and 19.1% in women. For ankle PVR, the % mean arterial pressure was higher in women than in men. The upstroke time was <180 ms in most subjects. Conclusions: For young people, ABI <1.0 or TBI <0.7 may not always indicate vascular abnormalities. When evaluating circulatory indexes, age and sex should be considered. PMID:26421072

  7. The association between changes in urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio and risk of abnormal ankle-brachial index in a community-based Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Niu, Fukun; Zhang, Luxia; Wang, Xingyu; Liu, Lisheng; Wang, Haiyan

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the prospective association between changes in the urinary albumin-creatinine ratio (ACR) and abnormal ankle-brachial index (ABI) in a community-based Chinese population. This prospective cohort study included 799 residents aged 58.3±9.2 years and without a history of cardiovascular disease from an urban district of Beijing, China. Urinary ACR was measured at baseline, and at 4 and 6 years of follow-up. The 75th percentile of the baseline urinary ACR (5.82 mg/g) was used to define "high" ACR. The changes in urinary ACR were categorized as consistently low urinary ACR, intermittent high urinary ACR, and consistently high urinary ACR. ABI was measured at 6 years of follow-up. Multinomial logistic regression was used to evaluate the associations of changes in urinary ACR categories with the ABI categories. During 6 years of follow-up, 16.1% of participants (n= 128) had low ABI and 13.9% of participants (n= 111) had high ABI. After adjusting for potential confounders including baseline albuminuria, individuals who had consistently high urinary ACR or intermittent high urinary ACR had a significantly higher risk for low ABI than individuals who had consistently low urinary ACR, with odds ratios (OR) of 2.75 (95%CI, 1.37-5.52) and 2.06 (95%CI, 1.18-3.57), respectively. No independent association was observed between changes in urinary ACR and high ABI among participants. Changes in urinary ACR below the definition for albuminuria predict low ABI among this community-based population without a history of cardiovascular disease.

  8. Screening for Peripheral Artery Disease and Cardiovascular Disease Risk Assessment with Ankle Brachial Index in Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... Force Recommendations Screening for Peripheral Artery Disease and Cardiovascular Disease Risk Assessment with Ankle Brachial Index in Adults ... on Screening for Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD) and Cardiovascular Disease (CVD) Risk Assessment with Ankle Brachial Index (ABI) ...

  9. Impact of weight loss on ankle-brachial index and interartery blood pressures.

    PubMed

    Espeland, Mark A; Lewis, Cora E; Bahnson, Judy; Knowler, William C; Regensteiner, Judith G; Gaussoin, Sarah A; Beavers, Daniel; Johnson, Karen C

    2014-04-01

    To assess whether weight loss improves markers of peripheral artery disease and vascular stenosis. The Action for Health in Diabetes randomized clinical trial compared intensive lifestyle intervention (ILI) for weight loss to a control condition of diabetes support and education (DSE) in overweight or obese adults with type 2 diabetes. Annual ankle and brachial blood pressures over four years were used to compute ankle-brachial indices (ABIs) and to assess interartery blood pressure differences in 5018 participants. ILI, compared to DSE, produced 7.8% (Year 1) to 3.6% (Year 4) greater weight losses. These did not affect prevalence of low (<0.90) ABI (3.60% in DSE versus 3.14% in ILI; P = 0.20) or elevated (>1.40) ABI (7.52% in DSE versus 7.59% in ILI: P = 0.90), but produced smaller mean (SE) maximum interartery systolic blood pressure differences among ankle sites [19.7 (0.2) mmHg for ILI versus 20.6 (0.2) mmHg for DSE (P < 0.001)] and between arms [5.8 (0.1) mmHg for ILI versus 6.1 (0.1) mmHg for DSE (P = 0.01)]. Four years of intensive behavioral weight loss intervention did not significantly alter prevalence of abnormal ABI, however, it did reduce differences in systolic blood pressures among arterial sites. Copyright © 2013 The Obesity Society.

  10. Association of Brachial-Ankle Pulse Wave Velocity with Asymptomatic Intracranial Arterial Stenosis in Hypertension Patients.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Zhang, Jin; Qain, Yuesheng; Tang, Xiaofeng; Ling, Huawei; Chen, Kemin; Li, Yan; Gao, Pingjin; Zhu, Dingliang

    2016-08-01

    Intracranial arterial stenosis is a common cause of ischemic stroke in Asians. We therefore sought to explore the relationship of brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity and intracranial arterial stenosis in 834 stroke-free hypertensive patients. Intracranial arterial stenosis was evaluated through computerized tomographic angiography. Brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity was measured by an automated cuff device. The top decile of brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity was significantly associated with intracranial arterial stenosis (P = .027, odds ratio = 1.82; 95% confidence interval: 1.07-3.10). The patients with the top decile of brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity showed 56% higher risk for the presence of intracranial arterial stenosis to the whole population, which was more significant in patients younger than 65 years old. We also found that brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity related to both intracranial arterial stenosis and homocysteine. Our study showed the association of brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity with asymptomatic intracranial arterial stenosis in hypertension patients, especially in relative younger subjects. Brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity might be a relatively simple and repeatable measurement to detect hypertension patients in high risk of intracranial arterial stenosis. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Ankle brachial index values, leg symptoms, and functional performance among community-dwelling older men and women in the lifestyle interventions and independence for elders study

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The prevalence and significance of low normal and abnormal ankle brachial index (ABI) values in a community dwelling population of sedentary, older individuals is unknown. We describe the prevalence of categories of definite peripheral artery disease (PAD), borderline ABI, low-normal ABI and no PAD...

  12. The clinical applicability of an automated plethysmographic determination of the ankle-brachial index after vascular surgery.

    PubMed

    van der Slegt, Jasper; Verbogt, Nathalie Pa; Mulder, Paul Gh; Steunenberg, Stijn L; Steunenberg, Bastiaan E; van der Laan, Lijckle

    2016-10-01

    An automated ankle-brachial index device could lead to potential time savings and more accuracy in ankle-brachial index-determination after vascular surgery. This prospective cross-sectional study compared postprocedural ankle-brachial indices measured by a manual method with ankle-brachial indices of an automated plethysmographic method. Forty-two patients were included. No significant difference in time performing a measurement was observed (1.1 min, 95% CI: -0.2 to +2.4; P = 0.095). Mean ankle-brachial index with the automated method was 0.105 higher (95% CI: 0.017 to 0.193; P = 0.020) than with the manual method, with limits of agreement of -0.376 and +0.587. Total variance amounted to 0.0759 and the correlation between both methods was 0.60. Reliability expressed as maximum absolute difference (95% level) between duplicate ankle-brachial index-measurements under identical conditions was 0.350 (manual) and 0.152 (automated), although not significant (p = 0.053). Finally, the automated method had 34% points higher failure rate than the manual method. In conclusion based on this study, the automated ankle-brachial index-method seems not to be clinically applicable for measuring ankle-brachial index postoperatively in patients with vascular disease. © The Author(s) 2016.

  13. Bilateral transit time assessment of upper and lower limbs as a surrogate ankle brachial index marker.

    PubMed

    Foo, Jong Yong Abdiel

    2008-01-01

    Ankle brachial index is useful in monitoring the pathogenesis of peripheral arterial occlusive diseases. Sphygmomanometer is the standard instrument widely used but frequent prolonged monitoring can be less comfortable for patients. Pulse transit time is known to be inversely correlated with blood pressure and a ratio-based pulse transit time measurement has been proposed as a surrogate ankle brachial index marker. In this study, 17 normotensive adults (9 men; aged 25.4 +/- 3.9 years) were recruited. Two postural change test activities were performed to induce changes in the stiffness of the arterial wall of the moved periphery. Results showed that only readings from the limbs that adopted a new posture registered significant blood pressure and pulse transit time changes (P < .05). Furthermore, there was significant correlation between the ankle brachial index and pulse transit time ratio measure for both test activities (R(2) > or = 0.704). The findings herein suggest that pulse transit time ratio is a surrogate and accommodating ankle brachial index marker.

  14. Brachial-Ankle PWV: Current Status and Future Directions as a Useful Marker in the Management of Cardiovascular Disease and/or Cardiovascular Risk Factors.

    PubMed

    Tomiyama, Hirofumi; Matsumoto, Chisa; Shiina, Kazuki; Yamashina, Akira

    2016-01-01

    Since 2001, brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (brachial-ankle PWV) measurement has been applied for risk stratification of patients with atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease and/or its risk factors in Japan. Measurement of the brachial-ankle PWV is simple and well standardized, and its reproducibility and accuracy are acceptable. Several cross-sectional studies have demonstrated a significant correlation between the brachial-ankle PWV and known risk factors for cardiovascular disease; the correlation is stronger in subjects with cardiovascular disease than in those without cardiovascular disease. We conducted a meta-analysis, which demonstrated that the brachial-ankle PWV is an independent predictor of future cardiovascular events. Furthermore, the treatment of cardiovascular risk factors and lifestyle modifications have been shown to improve the brachial-ankle PWV. Thus, at present, brachial-ankle PWV is close to being considered as a useful marker in the management of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease and/or its risk factors.

  15. Airflow obstruction was associated with elevation of brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity but not ankle-brachial index in aged patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Chen, Rui; He, Wanbing; Zhang, Kun; Zheng, Houzhen; Lin, Lin; Nie, Ruqiong; Wang, Jingfeng; Huang, Hui

    2015-09-01

    Both brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) and ankle-brachial index (ABI) are important predictors for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are at high risk of CVD. But the association between airflow obstruction and baPWV or ABI was still unclear. The study was aimed to investigate the influencing factors on arterial stiffness in aged COPD patients. 67 aged patients with COPD and 67 age- and sex-matched controls without COPD were enrolled in this study. COPD patients were grouped into four groups according to the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease Guidelines (GOLD). Both baPWV and ABI were evaluated. Spirometry indices, blood pressure, smoking history and related laboratory parameters were also collected. Comparing with controls, all COPD patients had significantly higher baPWV (1933 ± 355 cm/s versus 1515 ± 256 cm/s, P < 0.001) but not ABI (P = 0.196). And baPWV values were significantly highest at GOLD stage 4. Forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) was the most significant factor influencing baPWV, after adjusting for age, systolic blood pressure and other traditional cardiovascular risk factors (β = -0.463, P = 0.014). Arterial stiffness was serious in aged patients with COPD. Spirometry index FEV1 was a possible important predictor for the severity of arterial stiffness of COPD patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Ankle-brachial index and cardiovascular outcomes in the Bypass Angioplasty Revascularization Investigation 2 Diabetes trial.

    PubMed

    Abbott, J Dawn; Lombardero, Manuel S; Barsness, Gregory W; Pena-Sing, Ivan; Buitrón, L Virginia; Singh, Premranjan; Woodhead, Gail; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Kelsey, Sheryl F

    2012-10-01

    Peripheral arterial disease increases cardiovascular risk in many patient populations. The risks associated with an abnormal ankle-brachial index (ABI) in patients with type 2 diabetes and stable coronary artery disease have not been well described with respect to thresholds and types of cardiovascular events. We examined 2,368 patients in the BARI 2D trial who underwent ABI assessment at baseline. Death and major cardiovascular events (death, myocardial infarction and stroke) during follow-up (average 4.3 years) were assessed across the ABI spectrum and by categorized ABI: low (≤0.90), normal (0.91-1.3), high (>1.3), or noncompressible. A total of 12,568 person-years were available for mortality analysis. During follow-up, 316 patients died, and 549 had major cardiovascular events. After adjustment for potential confounders, with normal ABI as the referent group, a low ABI conferred an increased risk of death (relative risk [RR] 1.6, CI 1.2-2.2, P = .0005) and major cardiovascular events (RR 1.4, CI 1.1-1.7, P = .004). Patients with a high ABI had similar outcomes as patients with a normal ABI, but risk again increased in patients with a noncompressible ABI with a risk of death (RR 1.9, CI 1.3-2.8, P = .001) and major cardiovascular event (RR 1.5, CI 1.1-2.1, P = .01). In patients with coronary artery disease and type 2 diabetes, ABI screening and identification of ABI abnormalities including a low ABI (<1.0) or noncompressible artery provide incremental prognostic information. Copyright © 2012 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Association between different measurements of blood pressure variability by ABP monitoring and ankle-brachial index.

    PubMed

    Wittke, Estefânia; Fuchs, Sandra C; Fuchs, Flávio D; Moreira, Leila B; Ferlin, Elton; Cichelero, Fábio T; Moreira, Carolina M; Neyeloff, Jeruza; Moreira, Marina B; Gus, Miguel

    2010-11-05

    Blood pressure (BP) variability has been associated with cardiovascular outcomes, but there is no consensus about the more effective method to measure it by ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM). We evaluated the association between three different methods to estimate BP variability by ABPM and the ankle brachial index (ABI). In a cross-sectional study of patients with hypertension, BP variability was estimated by the time rate index (the first derivative of SBP over time), standard deviation (SD) of 24-hour SBP; and coefficient of variability of 24-hour SBP. ABI was measured with a doppler probe. The sample included 425 patients with a mean age of 57 ± 12 years, being 69.2% women, 26.1% current smokers and 22.1% diabetics. Abnormal ABI (≤ 0.90 or ≥ 1.40) was present in 58 patients. The time rate index was 0.516 ± 0.146 mmHg/min in patients with abnormal ABI versus 0.476 ± 0.124 mmHg/min in patients with normal ABI (P = 0.007). In a logistic regression model the time rate index was associated with ABI, regardless of age (OR = 6.9, 95% CI = 1.1- 42.1; P = 0.04). In a multiple linear regression model, adjusting for age, SBP and diabetes, the time rate index was strongly associated with ABI (P < 0.01). None of the other indexes of BP variability were associated with ABI in univariate and multivariate analyses. Time rate index is a sensible method to measure BP variability by ABPM. Its performance for risk stratification of patients with hypertension should be explored in longitudinal studies.

  18. Quantification of the Interrelationship between Brachial-Ankle and Carotid-Femoral Pulse Wave Velocity in a Workplace Population

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yi-Bang; Li, Yan; Sheng, Chang-Sheng; Huang, Qi-Fang; Wang, Ji-Guang

    2016-01-01

    Background Brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (PWV) is increasingly used for the measurement of arterial stiffness. In the present study, we quantified the interrelationship between brachial-ankle and carotid-femoral PWV in a workplace population, and investigated the associations with cardiovascular risk factors and carotid intima-media thickness (IMT). Methods Brachial-ankle and carotid-femoral PWV were measured using the Omron-Colin VP1000 and SphygmoCor devices, respectively. We investigated the interrelationship by the Pearson's correlation analysis and Bland-Altman plot, and performed sensitivity and specificity analyses. Results The 954 participants (mean ± standard deviation age 42.6 ± 14.2 years) included 630 (66.0%) men and 203 (21.3%) hypertensive patients. Brachial-ankle (13.4 ± 2.7 m/s) and carotid-femoral PWV (7.3 ± 1.6 m/s) were significantly correlated in all subjects (r = 0.75) as well as in men (r = 0.72) and women (r = 0.80) separately. For arterial stiffness defined as a carotid-femoral PWV of 10 m/s or higher, the sensitivity and specificity of brachial-ankle PWV of 16.7 m/s or higher were 72 and 94%, respectively. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.953. In multiple stepwise regression, brachial-ankle and carotid-femoral PWV were significantly (p < 0.001) associated with age (partial r = 0.33 and 0.34, respectively) and systolic blood pressure (partial r = 0.71 and 0.66, respectively). In addition, brachial-ankle and carotid-femoral PWV were significantly (p < 0.001) associated with carotid IMT (r = 0.57 and 0.55, respectively) in unadjusted analysis, but not in analysis adjusted for cardiovascular risk factors (p ≥ 0.08). Conclusions Brachial-ankle and carotid-femoral PWV were closely correlated, and had similar determinants. Brachial-ankle PWV can behave as an ease-of-use alternative measure of arterial stiffness for assessing cardiovascular risk. PMID:27195246

  19. Quantification of the Interrelationship between Brachial-Ankle and Carotid-Femoral Pulse Wave Velocity in a Workplace Population.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yi-Bang; Li, Yan; Sheng, Chang-Sheng; Huang, Qi-Fang; Wang, Ji-Guang

    2016-04-01

    Brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (PWV) is increasingly used for the measurement of arterial stiffness. In the present study, we quantified the interrelationship between brachial-ankle and carotid-femoral PWV in a workplace population, and investigated the associations with cardiovascular risk factors and carotid intima-media thickness (IMT). Brachial-ankle and carotid-femoral PWV were measured using the Omron-Colin VP1000 and SphygmoCor devices, respectively. We investigated the interrelationship by the Pearson's correlation analysis and Bland-Altman plot, and performed sensitivity and specificity analyses. The 954 participants (mean ± standard deviation age 42.6 ± 14.2 years) included 630 (66.0%) men and 203 (21.3%) hypertensive patients. Brachial-ankle (13.4 ± 2.7 m/s) and carotid-femoral PWV (7.3 ± 1.6 m/s) were significantly correlated in all subjects (r = 0.75) as well as in men (r = 0.72) and women (r = 0.80) separately. For arterial stiffness defined as a carotid-femoral PWV of 10 m/s or higher, the sensitivity and specificity of brachial-ankle PWV of 16.7 m/s or higher were 72 and 94%, respectively. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.953. In multiple stepwise regression, brachial-ankle and carotid-femoral PWV were significantly (p < 0.001) associated with age (partial r = 0.33 and 0.34, respectively) and systolic blood pressure (partial r = 0.71 and 0.66, respectively). In addition, brachial-ankle and carotid-femoral PWV were significantly (p < 0.001) associated with carotid IMT (r = 0.57 and 0.55, respectively) in unadjusted analysis, but not in analysis adjusted for cardiovascular risk factors (p ≥ 0.08). Brachial-ankle and carotid-femoral PWV were closely correlated, and had similar determinants. Brachial-ankle PWV can behave as an ease-of-use alternative measure of arterial stiffness for assessing cardiovascular risk.

  20. [Effect of blood lipid on the change of brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity among prehypertensive population].

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin; Shuai, Ping; Liu, Yuping; Cheng, Youfu; Yang, Hua; Li, Tingxin; Gong, Lirong; Ren, Jiaojiao; Wang, Hongjia

    2014-09-01

    To explore the effect of blood lipid and lipoprotein ratios on the change of brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) among prehypertensive subjects. 11 611 subjects with normal blood pressure (BP) were divided into two groups, which was one with optimal blood pressure (BP<120/80 mmHg) and the other with prehypertension (BP:120-139/80-89 mmHg). Height, weight, baPWV, fasting blood-glucose, TC, TG, LDL-C and HDL-C were detected. The abnormal rate of baPWV in prehypertension group was obviously higher than that in the optimal blood pressure group. For optimal blood pressure group, the abnormality of TG, TC, LDL-C, TC/HDL-C as well as LDL-C/HDL-C, caused the increase of baPWV significantly (P < 0.001). For prehypertensive group, the abnormality of TC and LDL-C caused the significant increase of baPWV (P < 0.001). Results from logistic regression analysis showed that except for age, BMI and fasting blood-glucose, TC/HDL-C increasing was the independent risk factor in optimal blood pressure group, while TG increasing was for the prehypertension group. With different normal BP level, both abnormality of blood lipid and lipoprotein ratio were the independent risk factors for baPWV increasing.

  1. Ankle Brachial Index: simple non-invasive estimation of peripheral artery disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pieniak, Marcin; Cieślicki, Krzysztof; Żyliński, Marek; Górski, Piotr; Murgrabia, Agnieszka; Cybulski, Gerard

    2014-11-01

    According to international guidelines, patients with Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD) are burdened with high cardiovascular risk. One of the simplest, non-invasive methods for PAD detection is the ankle-brachial index (ABI) measurement. The ABI is calculated as the ratio of systolic blood pressure at the ankle (pressure in the posterior tibial artery or the dorsal artery) to the systolic pressure in the arm (in the brachial artery) when the body is in a horizontal position. The physiological value of the ABI is assumed to be between 1 and 1.3; however, these limits vary from study to study. A value less than 0.9 indicates PAD. Some authors propose also measuring the ABI on both sides of the body to highlight possible differences in blood pressure between the opposite arterial segments. The aim of this study was to perform a meta-analysis of the ABI diagnostic criteria used in different publications. Additionally, ABI measurements were performed on 19 healthy patients in age ranged from 20 to 63 years. The results showed a slight dependence between age and the differences between the values obtained from left and right sides of the body.

  2. Associations between ankle-brachial index and cognitive function: results from the Lifestyle Interventions and Independence for Elders trial

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to evaluate cross-sectional and longitudinal associations between ankle-brachial index (ABI) and indicators of cognitive function. DESIGN: Randomized clinical trial (Lifestyle Interventions and Independence for Elders Trial). SETTING: Eight US academic ce...

  3. The variability of ankle-arm blood pressure difference and ankle-brachial index in treated hypertensive patients.

    PubMed

    Cao, Kaiwu; Xu, Jinsong; Sun, Hanjun; Li, Ping; Li, Juxiang; Cheng, Xiaoshu; Su, Hai

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether ankle-arm blood pressure (BP) difference (An-a) and ankle-brachial index (ABI) are consistent in treated hypertensive patients with obvious BP variation. This study enrolled 414 hypertensive patients (200 males; mean age, 61.3 ± 13.3 years) admitted to our hospital. BP of four limbs was simultaneously measured using four automatic BP measurement devices on the day of admission, and three and six day after admission. The An-a differences on systolic BP (SBP), diastolic BP (DBP), mean artery pressure (MAP), and pulse pressure (PP) in both sides were calculated, respectively. The relative decrease amplitude (RDA) of BP was calculated using the formula: RDA = (BP1 - BPn)/BP1. The ABI of the right side was calculated. From the first to the third measurement, arm SBP and DBP levels of both arms significantly decreased (right arm: SBP: 163.7 ± 18.4, 147.7 ± 15.3 vs. 135.4 ± 11.7 mm Hg; P < .05; DBP: 86.6 ± 13.4, 79.9 ± 11.6 vs. 74.5 ± 9.6 mm Hg; P < .05); at the same time, the ankle SBP (right ankle: 182.1 ± 22.1, 147.7 ± 15.3 vs. 153.4 ± 16.6 mm Hg; P < .05) and DBP (84.8 ± 13.4, 79.9 ± 11.6 vs. 75.8 ± 9.8 mm Hg; P < .05) of both sides also significantly decreased. The mean An-a of three measurements of both sides was consistent at the levels of about 20 mm Hg on SBP and PP, 7 mm Hg on MAP, and 0 mm Hg on DBP. However, sABI gradually increased from the first to the third measurement.In treated hypertensive patients, the An-a differences on SBP, DBP, PP, and MAP are generally consistent, but sABI is associated with underlying SBP levels.

  4. Ankle brachial index for the diagnosis of lower limb peripheral arterial disease.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Fay; Welch, Karen; Andras, Alina; Chappell, Francesca M

    2016-09-14

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) of the lower limb is common, with prevalence of both symptomatic and asymptomatic disease estimated at 13% in the over 50 age group. Symptomatic PAD affects about 5% of individuals in Western populations between the ages of 55 and 74 years. The most common initial symptom of PAD is muscle pain on exercise that is relieved by rest and is attributed to reduced lower limb blood flow due to atherosclerotic disease (intermittent claudication). The ankle brachial index (ABI) is widely used by a variety of healthcare professionals, including specialist nurses, physicians, surgeons and podiatrists working in primary and secondary care settings, to assess signs and symptoms of PAD. As the ABI test is non-invasive and inexpensive and is in widespread clinical use, a systematic review of its diagnostic accuracy in people presenting with leg pain suggestive of PAD is highly relevant to routine clinical practice. To estimate the diagnostic accuracy of the ankle brachial index (ABI) - also known as the ankle brachial pressure index (ABPI) - for the diagnosis of peripheral arterial disease in people who experience leg pain on walking that is alleviated by rest. We carried out searches of the following databases in August 2013: MEDLINE (Ovid SP),Embase (Ovid SP), the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) (EBSCO), Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences (LILACS) (Bireme), Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects and the Health Technology Assessment Database in The Cochrane Library, the Institute for Scientific Information (ISI) Conference Proceedings Citation Index - Science, the British Library Zetoc Conference search and Medion. We included cross-sectional studies of ABI in which duplex ultrasonography or angiography was used as the reference standard. We also included cross-sectional or diagnostic test accuracy (DTA) cohort studies consisting of both prospective and retrospective studies.Participants were

  5. Non-invasive assessment of peripheral arterial disease: Automated ankle brachial index measurement and pulse volume analysis compared to duplex scan.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Jane Ea; Williams, Paul; Davies, Jane H

    2016-01-01

    This cross-sectional study aimed to individually and cumulatively compare sensitivity and specificity of the (1) ankle brachial index and (2) pulse volume waveform analysis recorded by the same automated device, with the presence or absence of peripheral arterial disease being verified by ultrasound duplex scan. Patients (n=205) referred for lower limb arterial assessment underwent ankle brachial index measurement and pulse volume waveform recording using volume plethysmography, followed by ultrasound duplex scan. The presence of peripheral arterial disease was recorded if ankle brachial index <0.9; pulse volume waveform was graded as 2, 3 or 4; or if haemodynamically significant stenosis >50% was evident with ultrasound duplex scan. Outcome measure was agreement between the measured ankle brachial index and interpretation of pulse volume waveform for peripheral arterial disease diagnosis, using ultrasound duplex scan as the reference standard. Sensitivity of ankle brachial index was 79%, specificity 91% and overall accuracy 88%. Pulse volume waveform sensitivity was 97%, specificity 81% and overall accuracy 85%. The combined sensitivity of ankle brachial index and pulse volume waveform was 100%, specificity 76% and overall accuracy 85%. Combining these two diagnostic modalities within one device provided a highly accurate method of ruling out peripheral arterial disease, which could be utilised in primary care to safely reduce unnecessary secondary care referrals.

  6. Ankle-Brachial Index and Cardiovascular Outcomes in the Bypass Angioplasty Revascularization Investigation 2 Diabetes (BARI 2D) Trial

    PubMed Central

    Abbott, J. Dawn; Lombardero, Manuel S.; Barsness, Gregory W.; Pena-Sing, Ivan; Buitrón, L. Virginia; Singh, Premranjan; Woodhead, Gail; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Kelsey, Sheryl F.

    2012-01-01

    Background Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) increases cardiovascular risk in many patient populations. The risks associated with an abnormal ankle-brachial index (ABI) in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) and stable coronary artery disease (CAD) have not been well described with respect to thresholds and types of cardiovascular events. Methods We examined 2368 patients in the Bypass Angioplasty Revascularization Investigation 2 Diabetes (BARI 2D) trial that underwent ABIassessment at baseline. Death and major cardiovascular events (death, myocardial infarction (MI) and stroke) during follow-up (average 4.3 years) were assessed across the ABI spectrum and by categorizedABI: low (≤0.90), normal (0.91–1.3), high (>1.3), or non-compressible. Results A total of 12,568 person-years were available for mortality analysis. During follow-up, 316 patients died and 549 suffered major cardiovascular events. After adjustment for potential confounders, with normal ABI as the referent group, a low ABI conferred an increased risk of death (relative risk (RR) 1.6; C.I. 1.2, 2.2; p=.0005) and major cardiovascular events (RR 1.4; C.I. 1.1, 1.7; p=.004). Patients with a high ABI had similar outcomes as patients with a normal ABI, but risk again increased in patients with a non-compressible ABI with a risk of death (RR1.9; C.I. 1.3, 2.8; p=.001) and major cardiovascular event (RR 1.5, C.I. 1.1, 2.1; p=.01). Conclusions In patients with CAD and T2D ABI screening and identification of ABI abnormalities including a low ABI (<1.0) or non-compressible artery provide incremental prognostic information. PMID:23067918

  7. Elevated Levels of Adhesion Proteins Are Associated With Low Ankle-Brachial Index.

    PubMed

    Berardi, Cecilia; Wassel, Christine L; Decker, Paul A; Larson, Nicholas B; Kirsch, Phillip S; Andrade, Mariza de; Tsai, Michael Y; Pankow, James S; Sale, Michele M; Sicotte, Hugues; Tang, Weihong; Hanson, Naomi Q; McDermott, Mary M; Criqui, Michael H; Allison, Michael A; Bielinski, Suzette J

    2017-04-01

    Inflammation plays a pivotal role in peripheral artery disease (PAD). Cellular adhesion proteins mediate the interaction of leukocytes with endothelial cells during inflammation. To determine the association of cellular adhesion molecules with ankle-brachial index (ABI) and ABI category (≤1.0 vs >1.0) in a diverse population, 15 adhesion proteins were measured in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA). To assess multivariable associations of each protein with ABI and ABI category, linear and logistic regression was used, respectively. Among 2364 participants, 23 presented with poorly compressible arteries (ABI > 1.4) and were excluded and 261 had ABI ≤ 1.0. Adjusting for traditional risk factors, elevated levels of soluble P-selectin, hepatocyte growth factor, and secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor were associated with lower ABI ( P = .0004, .001, and .002, respectively). Per each standard deviation of protein, we found 26%, 20%, and 19% greater odds of lower ABI category ( P = .001, .01, and .02, respectively). Further investigation into the adhesion pathway may shed new light on biological mechanisms implicated in PAD.

  8. Training to Perform Ankle-Brachial Index: Systematic Review and Perspectives to Improve Teaching and Learning.

    PubMed

    Chaudru, S; de Müllenheim, P-Y; Le Faucheur, A; Kaladji, A; Jaquinandi, V; Mahé, G

    2016-02-01

    To conduct a systematic review focusing on the impact of training programs on ankle-brachial index (ABI) performance by medical students, doctors and primary care providers. Lower extremity peripheral artery disease (PAD) is a highly prevalent disease affecting ∼202 million people worldwide. ABI is an essential component of medical education because of its ability to diagnose PAD, and as it is a powerful prognostic marker for overall and cardiovascular related mortality. A systematic search was conducted (up to May 2015) using Medline, Embase, and Web of Science databases. Five studies have addressed the impact of a training program on ABI performance by either medical students, doctors or primary care providers. All were assigned a low GRADE system quality. The components of the training vary greatly either in substance (what was taught) or in form (duration of the training, and type of support which was used). No consistency was found in the outcome measures. According to this systematic review, only few studies, with a low quality rating, have addressed which training program should be performed to provide the best way of teaching how to perform ABI. Future high quality researches are required to define objectively the best training program to facilitate ABI teaching and learning. Copyright © 2015 European Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Brachial-ankle PWV for predicting clinical outcomes in patients with acute stroke.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Kye Taek; Jeong, Jin-Ok; Jin, Seon-Ah; Kim, Mijoo; Oh, Jin Kyung; Choi, Ung-Lim; Seong, Seok-Woo; Kim, Jun Hyung; Choi, Si Wan; Jeong, Hye Seon; Song, Hee-Jung; Kim, Jei; Seong, In-Whan

    2017-08-01

    Although brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) is well-known for predicting the cardiovascular mortality and morbidity, its anticipated value is not demonstrated well concerning acute stroke. Total 1557 patients with acute stroke who performed baPWV were enrolled. We evaluated the prognostic value of baPWV predicting all-cause death and vascular death in patients with acute stroke Results: Highest quartile of baPWV was ≥23.64 m/s. All-caused deaths (including vascular death; 71) were 109 patients during follow-up periods (median 905 days). Multivariate Cox regression analysis revealed that patients with the highest quartile of baPWV had higher risk for vascular death when they are compared with patients with all other three quartiles of baPWV (Hazard ratio with 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.879 [1.022-3.456], p = .042 for vascular death). High baPWV was a strong prognostic value of vascular death in patients with acute stroke.

  10. Aging Index using Photoplethysmography for a Healthcare Device: Comparison with Brachial-Ankle Pulse Wave Velocity.

    PubMed

    Hong, Kyung Soon; Park, Kyu Tae; Ahn, Jae Mok

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have emphasized the potential information embedded in peripheral fingertip photoplethysmogram (PPG) signals for the assessment of arterial wall stiffening during aging. For the discrimination of arterial stiffness with age, the brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) has been widely used in clinical applications. The second derivative of the PPG (acceleration photoplethysmogram [APG]) has been reported to correlate with the presence of atherosclerotic disorders. In this study, we investigated the association among age, the baPWV, and the APG and found a new aging index reflecting arterial stiffness for a healthcare device. The APG and the baPWV were simultaneously applied to assess the accuracy of the APG in measuring arterial stiffness in association with age. A preamplifier and motion artifact removal algorithm were newly developed to obtain a high quality PPG signal. In total, 168 subjects with a mean ± SD age of 58.1 ± 12.6 years were followed for two months to obtain a set of complete data using baPWV and APG analysis. The baPWV and the B ratio of the APG indices were correlated significantly with age (r = 0.6685, p < 0.0001 and r = -0.4025, p < 0.0001, respectively). A regression analysis revealed that the c and d peaks were independent of age (r = -0.3553, p < 0.0001 and r = -0.3191, p < 0.0001, respectively). We determined the B ratio, which represents an improved aging index and suggest that the APG may provide qualitatively similar information for arterial stiffness.

  11. Peripheral artery questionnaire improves ankle brachial index screening in symptomatic patients with peripheral artery disease.

    PubMed

    Kim, B-H; Cho, K-I; Spertus, J; Park, Y-H; Je, H-G; Shin, M-S; Lee, J-H; Jang, J-S

    2014-12-01

    The peripheral artery questionnaire (PAQ) is a disease-specific health status measure of patients with peripheral artery disease (PAD). Whether the PAQ scores are associated with a PAD diagnosis among patients with symptoms suspicious for PAD is unknown and could help increase the pretest probability of ankle brachial index (ABI) screening among patients with suspicious symptoms. The PAQ was completed by 567 patients evaluated for potential intermittent claudication at six tertiary centres. Demographics, medical history, physical examination findings and the PAQ domain scores were compared with ABI. A diagnostic threshold < 0.90 for a PAD diagnosis was assessed with a ROC of PAQ scores. The correlation between the PAQ Summary Score and ABI was also calculated. The PAQ Summary Score was significantly lower in patients with low ABI as compared with those having a normal ABI (37.6 ± 19.0 vs. 70.1 ± 22.7, p < 0.001). The PAQ Summary Score and ABI were highly correlated (r = 0.56, p < 0.001) and the optimal PAQ Summary Score for predicting low ABI was 50.3 (AUC = 0.86, sensitivity 80.3%, specificity 78.3%). The PAQ Summary Score was associated with an increased likelihood of PAD in patients with suspected PAD symptoms, and a low summary score (≤ 50.3) was an optimal threshold for predicting PAD among patients referred for ABI. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Ankle brachial index, MRI markers and cognition: The Epidemiology of Dementia in Singapore study.

    PubMed

    Shaik, Muhammad Amin; Venketasubramanian, Narayanaswamy; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Wong, Tien Yin; Vrooman, Henri; Ikram, Mohammad Kamran; Hilal, Saima; Chen, Christopher

    2017-08-01

    Previous studies showed an independent association of low ankle-brachial index (ABI) with cognitive impairment. However, the association between low ABI and cognition in the presence of both cerebrovascular disease (CeVD) and neurodegeneration is lacking. We aimed at investigating a) the association of low ABI with markers of CeVD and cortical thickness, and b) whether the association of low ABI with cognition is influenced by these markers. Data was drawn from the Epidemiology of Dementia In Singapore (EDIS) study where all participants (n = 832) underwent neuropsychological tests and 3T brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to assess CeVD markers as well as cortical thicknesses. Cognitive function was expressed as a global composite z-score and domain-specific z-scores of a comprehensive neuropsychological battery. Multivariate analyses showed low ABI to be independently associated with intracranial stenosis [odds ratios (OR): 1.51; 95% confidence interval (CI):1.23-1.87] and lacunar infarcts [OR: 1.29; 95% CI: 1.06-1.57]. A low ABI was also independently associated with smaller cortical thickness globally [β: 0.09; 95% CI: 0.27-0.16] as well as with the limbic [β: 0.10; 95% CI: 0.03-0.17], temporal [β: 0.09; 95% CI: 0.02-0.15], parietal [β: 0.08; 95% CI: 0.02-0.15], and occipital [β: 0.09; 95% CI: 0.03-0.16] lobes. Low ABI was associated with worse performance in verbal memory [β: 0.06; 95% CI: 0.01-0.12], which became attenuated in the presence of MRI markers. A low ABI is associated with MRI markers, and affects cognition in the presence of CeVD and neurodegeneration. Atherosclerosis should be targeted as a potentially modifiable risk factor to prevent cognitive disorders. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Prognostic value of low and high ankle-brachial index in hospitalized medical patients.

    PubMed

    Pasqualini, Leonella; Schillaci, Giuseppe; Pirro, Matteo; Vaudo, Gaetano; Leli, Christian; Colella, Renato; Innocente, Salvatore; Ciuffetti, Giovanni; Mannarino, Elmo

    2012-04-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is frequently underdiagnosed in the clinical practice, leading to a lack of opportunity to detect subjects at a high risk for cardiovascular (CV) death. The ankle-brachial pressure index (ABI) represents a noninvasive, objective tool to diagnose PAD and to predict adverse outcome. ABI was determined by means of Doppler velocimetry, in 707 patients, aged 50 years or older, consecutively hospitalized in an internal medicine ward, who were followed-up for at least 12 months in order to assess all-cause and CV mortality. Symptomatic PAD affected 8% of the population while the prevalence of PAD, defined as ABI <0.90, was 29%; high ABI (>1.40) was found in 8% of the patients. After a mean follow-up period of 1.6 years, both low and high ABI were independently associated with CV mortality with a hazard ratio of 1.99 (p=0.016) for low and 2.13 (p=0.04) for high ABI, compared with normal ABI (0.90-1.40). High ABI also independently predicted all-cause mortality with a hazard ratio of 1.77 (p=0.04). ABI measurement reveals a large number of individuals with asymptomatic PAD among those hospitalized in an internal medicine department. An increased mortality was observed in patients with both low and high ABI. Hospital admission for any reason may serve as an opportunity to detect PAD and start appropriate preventive actions. Copyright © 2011 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Can we measure the ankle-brachial index using only a stethoscope? A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Carmo, G A L; Mandil, A; Nascimento, B R; Arantes, B D; Bittencourt, J C; Falqueto, E B; Ribeiro, A L

    2009-02-01

    Ankle-brachial index (ABI) is an excellent method for the diagnosis of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) when it is performed with Doppler. However, this device is not always available for primary care physicians. The ABI measured with stethoscope is an easy alternative approach, but have not been proved to be useful. To assess the accuracy of the ABI measured using a stethoscope comparatively to that of the current eligible method for the diagnosis of PAD, the Doppler ABI, and describe the characteristics of this new approach. We conducted a diagnostic study of ABI measured with a stethoscope and a Doppler probe and compared the results. Eighty-eight patients were accessed by both methods. Mean stethoscope ABI, 1.01 +/- 0.15, and mean Doppler ABI, 1.03 +/- 0.20, (P = 0.047) displayed a good correlation. Measurements of stethoscope ABI diagnostic accuracy in recognizing a Doppler ABI are described. The comparison of this data with the current gold standard method results gave a sensitivity of 71.4% [95% confidence interval (CI), 41.9-91.6] and specificity of 91.0% (95% CI, 81.5-96.6), with predictive positive value of 62.5% (95% CI, 38.6-81.5) and negative predictive value of 93.8% (95% CI, 85.2-97.6). The study accuracy was 87.7%. The area under the ROC curve was 0.895 (95% CI, 0.804-0.986, P < 0.0001). According to our study, the stethoscope ABI is a useful method to detect PAD and it may be suitable for its screening in the primary care setting.

  15. Aging Index using Photoplethysmography for a Healthcare Device: Comparison with Brachial-Ankle Pulse Wave Velocity

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Kyung Soon; Park, Kyu Tae

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Recent studies have emphasized the potential information embedded in peripheral fingertip photoplethysmogram (PPG) signals for the assessment of arterial wall stiffening during aging. For the discrimination of arterial stiffness with age, the brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) has been widely used in clinical applications. The second derivative of the PPG (acceleration photoplethysmogram [APG]) has been reported to correlate with the presence of atherosclerotic disorders. In this study, we investigated the association among age, the baPWV, and the APG and found a new aging index reflecting arterial stiffness for a healthcare device. Methods The APG and the baPWV were simultaneously applied to assess the accuracy of the APG in measuring arterial stiffness in association with age. A preamplifier and motion artifact removal algorithm were newly developed to obtain a high quality PPG signal. In total, 168 subjects with a mean ± SD age of 58.1 ± 12.6 years were followed for two months to obtain a set of complete data using baPWV and APG analysis. Results The baPWV and the B ratio of the APG indices were correlated significantly with age (r = 0.6685, p < 0.0001 and r = -0.4025, p < 0.0001, respectively). A regression analysis revealed that the c and d peaks were independent of age (r = -0.3553, p < 0.0001 and r = -0.3191, p < 0.0001, respectively). Conclusions We determined the B ratio, which represents an improved aging index and suggest that the APG may provide qualitatively similar information for arterial stiffness. PMID:25705555

  16. Association of sex and height with a lower ankle brachial index in the general population.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Ridhima; Ayers, Colby; Visotcky, Alexis; Mason, Peter; Kulinski, Jacquelyn

    2018-06-01

    The ankle-brachial index (ABI) is a predictor of cardiovascular events, mortality and functional status. Some studies have noted a higher prevalence of peripheral artery disease in females compared to males. Differences in height might account for these observed sex differences, but findings are conflicting. The 2003-2004 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) cohort includes participants from 15 geographic locations, selected annually to represent the general population. Sample-weighted multivariable linear and logistic regression modeling was performed with ABI as the dependent variable and height and sex as primary exposure variables of interest. There were 3052 participants with ABI data (mean age 57 years, 51% female). The mean (±SE) ABI was 1.09 (±0.006) and 1.13 (±0.005) for females and males, respectively ( p < 0.0001). Shorter height was associated with a low ABI (OR 0.91 per 4 cm, 95% CI: 0.86-0.96; p=0.001). In a fully adjusted model, female sex was associated with a low ABI (OR 1.34, 95% CI: 1.04-1.72; p=0.025) independent of height and traditional cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors. Age, diabetes, tobacco use, known CVD, hypertension and race were associated with a low ABI (all p < 0.001). The ABI was 0.03 lower in females than in males in the general population and in a healthy cohort. Lower ABI values in healthy females do not appear to be due to occult vascular disease but rather a normal phenomenon with some contribution from height. Therefore, population sex-specific ABI thresholds should be utilized in the diagnosis of peripheral artery disease to account for these intrinsic differences.

  17. Diet quality, inflammation, and the ankle brachial index in adults with or without cardiometabolic conditions.

    PubMed

    Mattei, Josiemer; Sotres-Alvarez, Daniela; Gellman, Marc; Castañeda, Sheila F; Hu, Frank B; Tucker, Katherine L; Siega-Riz, Anna Maria; Kaplan, Robert C

    2018-08-01

    Diet quality may influence non-traditional cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors - namely, C-reactive protein (CRP) and the ankle-brachial index (ABI). Pre-existing traditional cardiometabolic conditions may confound this association. We aimed to determine whether diet quality was associated with high-risk CRP or ABI, independently from traditional cardiometabolic risk factors. Baseline data were analyzed from US-Hispanics/Latinos aged 18-74 y without previously-diagnosed CVD participating in the population-based Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos cohort. Included were 14,623 participants with CRP data, and 7892 participants (≥45 y) with ABI data. Diet quality was measured with the Alternate Healthy Eating Index (AHEI). Nearly 35% of Hispanics/Latinos had high-risk CRP concentration and 6.3% had high-risk ABI (peripheral artery disease (PAD): 4.2%; arterial stiffness: 2.1%). After adjusting for sociodemographic and lifestyle factors, diabetes, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, and obesity, the odds (95% confidence interval) of having high-risk ABI were 37% (5, 44%) lower per 10-unit increase in AHEI (p = 0.018). The association was marginally significant for PAD (0.77 (0.58, 1.00); p = 0.05), and non-significant for arterial stiffness (p = 0.16). Each 10-unit increase in AHEI was associated with 21% (10, 30%) lower odds of high-risk CRP (p = 0.0002) after similar adjustments. There were no significant interactions between AHEI and age, sex, ethnicity, smoking, or pre-existing cardiometabolic conditions for associations with ABI. The association between AHEI and high-risk CRP was stronger for those with diabetes (p-interaction < 0.0001), obesity (p-interaction = 0.005), or ages 45-74 y (p-interaction = 0.011). Higher diet quality is associated with lower inflammation and less adverse ABI among Hispanics/Latinos, independently from traditional cardiometabolic risk factors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for

  18. Low Ankle Brachial Index and the Development of Rapid Estimated GFR Decline and CKD

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Meredith C.; Ghuman, Nimrta; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Murabito, Joanne M.; Fox, Caroline S.

    2012-01-01

    Background Low ankle brachial index (ABI) is associated with increases in serum creatinine. Whether low ABI is associated with the development of rapid estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) decline, stage 3 chronic kidney disease (CKD), or microalbuminuria is uncertain. Study Design Prospective cohort study. Setting & Participants Framingham Offspring cohort participants who attended the sixth (1995-98) and eighth (2005-08) exams. Predictor ABI, categorized as normal (>1.1 to <1.4), low-normal (>0.9 to 1.1), and low (≤0.9). Outcomes Rapid eGFR decline (eGFR decline ≥3mL/min/1.73m2 per year), incident stage 3 CKD (eGFR<60mL/min/1.73m2), incident microalbuminuria. Measurements GFR was estimated using the serum creatinine-based CKD-EPI (CKD Epidemiology Collaboration) equation. Urinary albumin-creatinine ratio (UACR) was determined based on spot urine samples. Results Over 9.5 years, 9.0% (232 of 2592) experienced rapid eGFR decline and 11.1% (270 of 2426) developed stage 3 CKD. Compared to a normal ABI, low ABI was associated with a 5.73-fold increased odds of rapid eGFR decline (95% CI, 2.77-11.85; p<0.001) after age, sex, and baseline eGFR adjustment; this persisted after multivariable adjustment for standard CKD risk factors (OR, 3.60; 95% CI, 1.65-7.87; p=0.001). After adjustment for age, sex, and baseline eGFR, low ABI was associated with a 2.51-fold increased odds of stage 3 CKD (OR, 2.51; 95% CI, 1.16-5.44; p=0.02), although this was attenuated after multivariable adjustment (OR, 1.68; 95% CI, 0.75-3.76; p=0.2). Among 1902 free of baseline microalbuminuria, low ABI was associated with an increased odds of microalbuminuria after adjustment for age, sex, and baseline UACR (OR, 2.81; 95% CI, 1.07-7.37; p=0.04), with attenuation upon further adjustment (OR, 1.88; p=0.1). Limitations Limited number of events with a low ABI. Outcomes based on single serum creatinine and UACR measurements at each exam. Conclusions Low ABI is associated with an increased

  19. Outcome of patients with reduced ankle brachial index undergoing open heart surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass.

    PubMed

    Meyborg, Matthias; Abdi-Tabari, Zila; Hoffmeier, Andreas; Engelbertz, Christiane; Lüders, Florian; Freisinger, Eva; Malyar, Nasser M; Martens, Sven; Reinecke, Holger

    2016-05-01

    In open heart surgery using cardiopulmonary bypass, perfusion of the lower extremities is markedly reduced which may induce critical ischaemia in patients with pre-existing peripheral artery disease. Whether these patients have an increased risk for amputation and should better undergo peripheral revascularization prior to surgery remains unclear. From 1 January 2009 to 31 December 2010, 785 consecutive patients undergoing open heart surgery were retrospectively included. In 443 of these patients, preoperative ankle brachial index (ABI) measurements were available. The cohort was divided into four groups: (i) ABI < 0.5, (ii) ABI 0.5-0.69, (iii) ABI 0.7-0.89 or (iv) ABI ≥ 0.9. Follow-up data of 413 (93.2%) patients were analysed with regard to mortality and amputations. The groups differed significantly in terms of age, cardiac risk factors, performed cardiac surgery and renal function. Postoperative delayed wound healing was significantly associated with lower ABI (25.9, 15.2, 27.0 and 9.6% in Groups I-IV, respectively, P = 0.003), whereas 30-day mortality was not significantly higher in patients with lower ABI (0, 4.3, 8.1 and 3.9%, respectively, P = 0.4). Kaplan-Meier models showed a significantly lower long-term survival over 4 years in patients with reduced ABI (P = 0.001, long-rank test) while amputations occurred rarely with only one minor amputation in Group II (P = 0.023). Patients with reduced ABIs undergoing heart surgery showed more wound-healing disturbances, and higher long-term mortality compared with those with normal ABIs. However, no perioperative ischaemia requiring amputation occurred. Thus, reduced ABIs were not associated with increased peripheral risks in open heart surgery but ABI may be helpful in selecting the site for saphenectomy to potentially avoid delayed healing of related wounds in legs with severely impaired arterial perfusion. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for

  20. Association of the ankle-brachial index with history of myocardial infarction and stroke.

    PubMed

    Jones, W Schuyler; Patel, Manesh R; Rockman, Caron B; Guo, Yu; Adelman, Mark; Riles, Thomas; Berger, Jeffrey S

    2014-04-01

    Ankle-brachial index (ABI) testing is a simple, noninvasive method to diagnose peripheral artery disease (PAD) and is associated with all-cause mortality. The association of ABI levels and myocardial infarction (MI) and stroke is less certain. We sought to further characterize the association between ABI levels and history of MI and stroke. Using data from the Life Line Screening program, 3.6 million self-referred participants from 2003 to 2008 completed a medical questionnaire and had bilateral ABIs performed. Logistic regression was used to estimate the association between ABI cutoff points (ABI <0.90 and ABI >1.40) and ABI levels with history of MI, stroke, and MI or stroke (MI/stroke). Models were adjusted for age, sex, race/ethnicity, smoking, diabetes, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, physical activity, and family history of cardiovascular disease. Separate sex-specific models were performed. Overall, 155,552 (4.5%) had an ABI <0.90, and 42,890 (1.2%) had an ABI >1.40. An ABI <0.90 was associated with higher odds of MI (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 1.67, 95% CI 1.63-1.71), stroke (OR 1.77, 95% CI 1.72-1.82), and MI/stroke (OR 1.71, 95% CI 1.67-1.74), all P < .001. An ABI >1.40 was also associated with higher odds of MI (OR 1.19, 95% CI 1.14-1.24), stroke (OR 1.30, 95% CI 1.22-1.38), and MI/stroke (OR 1.22, 95% CI 1.17-1.27), all P < .001. The ORs for MI/stroke for different ABI levels formed a reverse J-shaped curve in both women and men. In a large national screening database, there is a strong, consistent relationship between ABI levels and a history of prevalent MI, stroke, and MI/stroke. Copyright © 2014 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Center effect on ankle-brachial index measurement when using the reference method (Doppler and manometer): results from a large cohort study.

    PubMed

    Vierron, Emilie; Halimi, Jean-Michel; Tichet, Jean; Balkau, Beverley; Cogneau, Joel; Giraudeau, Bruno

    2009-07-01

    The ankle-brachial index (ABI) is a simple and noninvasive tool used to detect peripheral arterial disease (PAD). We aimed to assess, in a French multicenter cohort, the center effect associated with arterial pressure (AP) and ABI measurements using the reference method and using a semiautomatic device. This study included baseline and 9-year follow-up data from 3,664 volunteers of 10 health examination centers of the DESIR (Data from an Epidemiological Study on the Insulin Resistance) syndrome French cohort. Ankle and brachial AP were measured at inclusion by the reference method (a mercury sphygmomanometer coupled with a Doppler probe for ankle measurements) and at 9 years by a semiautomatic device (Omron HEM-705CP). The center effect was assessed by the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), ratio of the between-center variance to the total variance of the measurement. At inclusion, the sample mean age was 47.5 (s.d. 9.9) years; 49.3% were men. Although ICCs were smaller than 0.05 for brachial AP measurements, they were close to 0.18 and 0.20 for ankle systolic AP (SAP) and ABI measurements, respectively, when the reference method was used. No center effect for measures other than ankle SAP was detected. With the semiautomatic device method, all ICCs, including those for ankle SAP and ABI measurements, were between 0.005 and 0.04. We found an important center effect on ABI measured with a sphygmomanometer and a Doppler probe but not a semiautomatic device. A center effect should be taken into account when planning any multicenter study on ABI measurement.

  2. Reliability of Doppler and stethoscope methods of determining systolic blood pressures: considerations for calculating an ankle-brachial index.

    PubMed

    Chesbro, Steven B; Asongwed, Elmira T; Brown, Jamesha; John, Emmanuel B

    2011-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to: (1) identify the interrater and intrarater reliability of systolic blood pressures using a stethoscope and Doppler to determine an ankle-brachial index (ABI), and (2) to determine the correlation between the 2 methods. Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) affects approximately 8 to 12 million people in the United States, and nearly half of those with this disease are asymptomatic. Early detection and prompt treatment of PAD will improve health outcomes. It is important that clinicians perform tests that determine the presence of PAD. Two individual raters trained in ABI procedure measured the systolic blood pressures of 20 individuals' upper and lower extremities. Standard ABI measurement protocols were observed. Raters individually recorded the systolic blood pressures of each extremity using a stethoscope and a Doppler, for a total of 640 independent measures. Interrater reliability of Doppler measurements to determine SBP at the ankle was very strong (intraclass correlation coefficient [ICC], 0.93-0.99) compared to moderate to strong reliability using a stethoscope (ICC, 0.64-0.87). Agreement between the 2 devices to determine SBP was moderate to very weak (ICC, 0.13-0.61). Comparisons of the use of Doppler and stethoscope to determine ABI showed weak to very weak intrarater correlation (ICC, 0.17-0.35). Linear regression analysis of the 2 methods to determine ABI showed positive but weak to very weak correlations (r2 = .013, P = .184). A Doppler ultrasound is recommended over a stethoscope for accuracy in systolic pressure readings for ABI measurements.

  3. Brain functional network abnormality extends beyond the sensorimotor network in brachial plexus injury patients.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jun-Tao; Liu, Han-Qiu; Hua, Xu-Yun; Gu, Yu-Dong; Xu, Jian-Guang; Xu, Wen-Dong

    2016-12-01

    Brachial plexus injury (BPI) is a type of severe peripheral nerve trauma that leads to central remodeling in the brain, as revealed by functional MRI analysis. However, previously reported remodeling is mostly restricted to sensorimotor areas of the brain. Whether this disturbance in the sensorimotor network leads to larger-scale functional remodeling remains unknown. We sought to explore the higher-level brain functional abnormality pattern of BPI patients from a large-scale network function connectivity dimension in 15 right-handed BPI patients. Resting-state functional MRI data were collected and analyzed using independent component analysis methods. Five components of interest were recognized and compared between patients and healthy subjects. Patients showed significantly altered brain local functional activities in the bilateral fronto-parietal network (FPN), sensorimotor network (SMN), and executive-control network (ECN) compared with healthy subjects. Moreover, functional connectivity between SMN and ECN were significantly less in patients compared with healthy subjects, and connectivity strength between ECN and SMN was negatively correlated with patients' residual function of the affected limb. Functional connectivity between SMN and right FPN were also significantly less than in controls, although connectivity between ECN and default mode network (DMN) was greater than in controls. These data suggested that brain functional disturbance in BPI patients extends beyond the sensorimotor network and cascades serial remodeling in the brain, which significantly correlates with residual hand function of the paralyzed limb. Furthermore, functional remodeling in these higher-level functional networks may lead to cognitive alterations in complex tasks.

  4. Genetically elevated levels of circulating triglycerides and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity in a Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Yao, W-M; Zhang, H-F; Zhu, Z-Y; Zhou, Y-L; Liang, N-X; Xu, D-J; Zhou, F; Sheng, Y-H; Yang, R; Gong, L; Yin, Z-J; Chen, F-K; Cao, K-J; Li, X-L

    2013-04-01

    Elevated levels of circulating triglycerides and increased arterial stiffness are associated with cardiovascular disease. Numerous studies have reported an association between levels of circulating triglycerides and arterial stiffness. We used Mendelian randomization to test whether this association is causal. We investigated the association between circulating triglyceride levels, the apolipoprotein A-V (ApoA5) -1131T>C single nucleotide polymorphism and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) by examining data from 4421 subjects aged 18-74 years who were recruited from the Chinese population. baPWV was significantly associated with the levels of circulating triglycerides after adjusting for age, sex, body mass index (BMI), systolic blood pressure, heart rate, waist-to-hip ratio, antihypertensive treatment and diabetes mellitus status. The -1131C allele was associated with a 5% (95% confidence interval 3-8%) increase in circulating triglycerides (adjusted for age, sex, BMI, waist-to-hip ratio, diabetes mellitus and antihypertensive treatment). Instrumental variable analysis showed that genetically elevated levels of circulating triglycerides were not associated with increased baPWV. These results do not support the hypothesis that levels of circulating triglycerides have a causal role in the development of arterial stiffness.

  5. Effects of the ankle-brachial blood pressure index and skin perfusion pressure on mortality in hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Otani, Yumi; Otsubo, Shigeru; Kimata, Naoki; Takano, Mari; Abe, Takayuki; Okajima, Tomoki; Miwa, Naoko; Tsuchiya, Ken; Nitta, Kosaku; Akiba, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    Clinically, the ankle-brachial blood pressure index (ABI) and skin perfusion pressure (SPP) are used to screen for subclinical peripheral artery disease. However, the association between the SPP and mortality in hemodialysis patients has not been previously reported. We investigated these factors and compared the ABI and SPP in patients receiving hemodialysis. A total of 102 patients receiving maintenance hemodialysis were enrolled in this study. The ABI was determined using an ABI-form (Colin, Japan). The SPP was measured using a SensiLase(TM) PAD3000 (Kaneka, Osaka, Japan). The mean follow-up period was 3.2 ± 1.4 years. A multivariate Cox analysis identified a low ABI (p=0.019) and a low SPP (p=0.047) as being independent predictors of mortality. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis of the ABI revealed a cutoff point of 1.1 and an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.79, with a sensitivity of 90% and a specificity of 62%. A ROC analysis of the SPP revealed a cutoff point of 54.0 mmHg and an AUC of 0.71, with a sensitivity of 55% and a specificity of 84%. Both low ABI and SPP values were found to be independent risk factors for mortality among hemodialysis patients. The cutoff point for ABI as a predictor of mortality was 1.1, while that for SPP was 54.0 mmHg.

  6. Correlation between Patient-Reported Symptoms and Ankle-Brachial Index after Revascularization for Peripheral Arterial Disease.

    PubMed

    Je, Hyung Gon; Kim, Bo Hyun; Cho, Kyoung Im; Jang, Jae Sik; Park, Yong Hyun; Spertus, John

    2015-05-18

    Improvement in quality of life (QoL) is a primary treatment goal for patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD). The current study aimed to quantify improvement in the health status of PAD patients following peripheral revascularization using the peripheral artery questionnaire (PAQ) and ankle-brachial index (ABI), and to evaluate possible correlation between the two methods. The PAQ and ABI were assessed in 149 symptomatic PAD patients before, and three months after peripheral revascularization. Mean PAQ summary scores improved significantly three months after revascularization (+49.3 ± 15 points, p < 0.001). PAQ scores relating to patient symptoms showed the largest improvement following revascularization. The smallest increases were seen in reported treatment satisfaction (all p's < 0.001). As expected the ABI of treated limbs showed significant improvement post-revascularization (p < 0.001). ABI after revascularization correlated with patient-reported changes in the physical function and QoL domains of the PAQ. Twenty-two percent of PAD patients were identified as having a poor response to revascularization (increase in ABI < 0.15). Interestingly, poor responders reported improvement in symptoms on the PAQ, although this was less marked than in patients with an increase in ABI > 0.15 following revascularization. In conclusion, data from the current study suggest a significant correlation between improvement in patient-reported outcomes assessed by PAQ and ABI in symptomatic PAD patients undergoing peripheral revascularization.

  7. Correlation between Patient-Reported Symptoms and Ankle-Brachial Index after Revascularization for Peripheral Arterial Disease

    PubMed Central

    Je, Hyung Gon; Kim, Bo Hyun; Cho, Kyoung Im; Jang, Jae Sik; Park, Yong Hyun; Spertus, John

    2015-01-01

    Improvement in quality of life (QoL) is a primary treatment goal for patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD). The current study aimed to quantify improvement in the health status of PAD patients following peripheral revascularization using the peripheral artery questionnaire (PAQ) and ankle-brachial index (ABI), and to evaluate possible correlation between the two methods. The PAQ and ABI were assessed in 149 symptomatic PAD patients before, and three months after peripheral revascularization. Mean PAQ summary scores improved significantly three months after revascularization (+49.3 ± 15 points, p < 0.001). PAQ scores relating to patient symptoms showed the largest improvement following revascularization. The smallest increases were seen in reported treatment satisfaction (all p’s < 0.001). As expected the ABI of treated limbs showed significant improvement post-revascularization (p < 0.001). ABI after revascularization correlated with patient-reported changes in the physical function and QoL domains of the PAQ. Twenty-two percent of PAD patients were identified as having a poor response to revascularization (increase in ABI < 0.15). Interestingly, poor responders reported improvement in symptoms on the PAQ, although this was less marked than in patients with an increase in ABI > 0.15 following revascularization. In conclusion, data from the current study suggest a significant correlation between improvement in patient-reported outcomes assessed by PAQ and ABI in symptomatic PAD patients undergoing peripheral revascularization. PMID:25993299

  8. Using ankle-brachial index to detect peripheral arterial disease: prevalence and associated risk factors in a random population sample.

    PubMed

    Carbayo, Julio A; Divisón, Juan A; Escribano, Julio; López-Abril, Juan; López de Coca, Enrique; Artigao, Luis M; Martínez, Esperanza; Sanchis, Carlos; Massó, Javier; Carrión, Lucinio

    2007-01-01

    The ankle-brachial index (ABI) is being used increasingly to diagnose peripheral arterial disease (PAD) that predicts cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study is to determine the prevalence of PAD and associated risk factors in a Spanish random population sample of age > or =40. PAD is defined as an ABI<0.9 in either leg. 784 participants of age > or =40 were randomly selected in a Spanish province. 55.4% of them were female. The prevalence of PAD in this sample was 10.5% (95% confidence interval (CI) 8.4-12.8); 9.7% in females and 11.4% in males. In logistic regression analyses, adjusted for age and gender, smoking per 10 pack-years (odds ratio (OR) 1.40, 95% CI 1.23-1.58), hypertension (OR 1.85, 95% CI 1.05-3.28), hypercholesterolemia (OR 1.76, 95% CI 1.04-2.98), and diabetes (OR 1.80, 95% CI 1.04-3.11) were positively associated with prevalent PAD. More than 91% of persons with PAD had one or more cardiovascular disease risk factors. We conclude that in our study hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, diabetes mellitus and smoking are associated with PAD. The majority of individuals with PAD had at least one important cardiovascular risk factor advanced enough to be considered eligible for an aggressive treatment.

  9. Cross-sectional study of the ankle-brachial index and cardiovascular risk factors in postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Wierzchowski, Paweł; Dereziński, Tadeusz; Migdalski, Arkadiusz; Woda, Łukasz; Wąsikowska, Beata; Jakubowski, Grzegorz; Jawień, Arkadiusz

    2017-01-01

    The incidence of peripheral artery disease (PAD) and cardiovascular (CV) events in the female population has been on the increase. To analyse the risk factors of a CV event and PAD in women and to assess the usefulness of the ankle-brachial index (ABI). Evaluation of selected parameters in a cohort of 365 women living in the same district. The following data were prospectively recorded: weight, height, waist size, hip circumference, smoking, the intima-media complex, ABI value, and laboratory results. PAD symptoms, CV events and neurological events were noted. ABI was analysed assuming pathology for values: ≤ 0.9 or ≤ 1.0. Age, plasma glucose level, atrial fibrillation, and nicotine addiction were correlated independently with CV disease and stroke (p < 0.001). The high-density lipoprotein cholesterol level, height, and systolic blood pressure were correlated independently with ABI values (p < 0.05). There was no correlation between the occurrence of a CV event in the past and the ABI, irrespective of the cut-off point for the reference value (p = NS). There is no evidence that stricter criteria for the assessment of ABI better represent the vascular status in the female population.

  10. Brachial-Ankle Pulse Wave Velocity as a Screen for Arterial Stiffness: A Comparison with Cardiac Magnetic Resonance

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun Kyoung; Chang, Sung-A; Jang, Shin Yi; Choi, Ki Hong; Huh, Eun Hee; Kim, Jung Hyun; Kim, Sung Mok; Choe, Yeon Hyeon

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Despite technical simplicity and the low cost of brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (BA-PWV), its use has been hampered by a lack of data supporting its usefulness and reliability. The aim of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of BA-PWV to measure aortic stiffness in comparison to using cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR). Materials and Methods A total of 124 participants without cardiovascular risk factors volunteered for this study. BA-PWV was measured using a vascular testing device. On the same day, using CMR, cross-sectional areas for distensibility and average blood flow were measured at four aortic levels: the ascending, upper thoracic descending, lower thoracic descending, and abdominal aorta. Results Compared to PWV measured by CMR, BA-PWV values were significantly higher and the differences therein were similar in all age groups (all p<0.001). There was a significant correlation between BA-PWV and PWV by CMR (r=0.697, p<0.001). Both BA-PWV and PWV by CMR were significantly and positively associated with age (r=0.652 and 0.724, p<0.001). The reciprocal of aortic distensibility also demonstrated a statistically significant positive correlation with BA-PWV (r=0.583 to 0.673, all p<0.001). Conclusion BA-PWV was well correlated with central aortic PWV and distensibility, as measured by CMR, regardless of age and sex. PMID:25837165

  11. Ankle brachial index and cognitive function among Hispanics/Latinos: Results from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos.

    PubMed

    Tarraf, Wassim; Criqui, Michael H; Allison, Matthew A; Wright, Clinton B; Fornage, Myriam; Daviglus, Martha; Kaplan, Robert C; Davis, Sonia; Conceicao, Alan S; González, Hector M

    2018-04-01

    The Ankle-Brachial index (ABI) is a well-accepted measure of peripheral artery disease (arterial stenosis and stiffness) and has been shown to be associated with cognitive function and disorders; however, these associations have not been examined in Hispanics/Latinos. Therefore, we sought to examine relationships between ABI and cognitive function among diverse middle-age and older Hispanics/Latinos. We used cross-sectional data on n = 7991 participants aged 45-74 years, without stroke or coronary heart disease, from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos. Our primary outcome, global cognition (GC), was a continuous composite score of four cognitive domains (verbal learning and memory, verbal fluency, executive function, and mental status). Secondary outcomes were the individual tests representing these domains. The ABI was analyzed continuously and categorically with standard clinical cut-points. We tested associations using generalized survey regression models incrementally adjusting for confounding factors. Age, sex, hypertension, diabetes, and dyslipidemia moderations were examined through interactions with the primary exposure. In age, sex, and education adjusted models, continuous ABI had an inverse u-shape association with worse GC. We found similar associations with measures of verbal learning and memory, verbal fluency, executive function, but not with low mental status. The associations were attenuated, but not completely explained, by accounting for the confounders and not modified by age, sex, education, and vascular disease risks. In addition to being a robust indicator of arterial compromise, our study suggests that abnormal ABI readings may also be useful for early signaling of subtle cognitive deficits. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Association of left ventricular structural and functional abnormalities with aortic and brachial blood pressure variability in hypertensive patients: the SAFAR study.

    PubMed

    Chi, C; Yu, S-K; Auckle, R; Argyris, A A; Nasothimiou, E; Tountas, C; Aissopou, E; Blacher, J; Safar, M E; Sfikakis, P P; Zhang, Y; Protogerou, A D

    2017-10-01

    Both brachial blood pressure (BP) level and its variability (BPV) significantly associate with left ventricular (LV) structure and function. Recent studies indicate that aortic BP is superior to brachial BP in the association with LV abnormalities. However, it remains unknown whether aortic BPV better associate with LV structural and functional abnormalities. We therefore aimed to investigate and compare aortic versus brachial BPV, in terms of the identification of LV abnormalities. Two hundred and three participants who underwent echocardiography were included in this study. Twenty-four-hour aortic and brachial ambulatory BP was measured simultaneously by a validated BP monitor (Mobil-O-Graph, Stolberg, Germany) and BPV was calculated with validated formulae. LV mass and LV diastolic dysfunction (LVDD) were evaluated by echocardiography. The prevalence of LV hypertrophy (LVH) and LVDD increased significantly with BPV indices (P⩽0.04) in trend tests. After adjustment to potential confounders, only aortic average real variability (ARV), but not brachial ARV or weighted s.d. (wSD, neither aortic nor brachial) significantly associated with LV mass index (P=0.02). Similar results were observed in logistic regression. After adjustment, only aortic ARV significantly associated with LVH (odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI): 2.28 (1.08, 4.82)). As for LVDD, neither the brachial nor the aortic 24-hour wSD, but the aortic and brachial ARV, associated with LVDD significantly, with OR=2.28 (95% CI: (1.03, 5.02)) and OR=2.36 (95% CI: (1.10, 5.05)), respectively. In summary, aortic BPV, especially aortic ARV, seems to be superior to brachial BPV in the association of LV structural and functional abnormalities.

  13. The Impact of Perioperative Ankle-Brachial Index and Clinical Status on Outcomes Following Lower Extremity Bypass.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, Thomas F X; Deery, Sarah E; Schermerhorn, Marc L; Siracuse, Jeffrey J; Bertges, Daniel J; Farber, Alik; Lancaster, Robert T; Patel, Virendra I

    2018-06-06

    Ankle-brachial index (ABI) is a common method of graft surveillance after infrainguinal bypass surgery (LEB), and is recommended by the Society for Vascular Surgery (SVS). Several studies failed to show benefit of ABI surveillance, but were limited by sample size, and the practice remains variable. We identified all patients who underwent LEB for occlusive disease from the Vascular Study Group of New England Registry (VSGNE) between 2003-2016. Postoperative changes were defined as: improvement for ABI >0.15 at discharge or clinical status improved (i.e. symptoms improved from rest pain to asymptomatic, etc), no change if ABI was within 0.15 or no change in clinical status, or worsened if ABI decreased > 0.15 or clinical status deteriorated. We determined the independent effect of these changes on rates of mortality, reintervention, patency loss, amputation and Major Adverse Limb Events (MALE-above ankle amputation, revision, thrombectomy or lysis). Additionally, we compared the practice of perioperative ABI to follow-up without ABI using propensity scores with inverse probability weights. We identified 7,994 patients undergoing their first intervention in the VSGNE, 2,251 of whom (29%) had both preoperative and discharge ABIs. Overall, 5,369 (67%) of the bypasses used vein, and 4,539 (57%) were femoropopliteal, with no difference in the rate of vein use or bypass type between those who had discharge ABIs and those who did not (P > .05). The majority of bypasses were performed for chronic limb-threatening ischemia (59% in the ABI group, 65% in those without ABI data, P < .01 for difference). At discharge, ABI remained stable in 22%, improved in 69% and worsened in 9%, while clinical status remained stable in 12%, improved in 77% and worsened in 12%. In univariate analysis, clinical status was associated with mortality, amputation and MALE, but ABI change was only associated with mortality (all P < .01). After multivariable adjustment, ABI change was no longer

  14. Ankle-brachial index and physical function in older individuals: The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study

    PubMed Central

    Matsushita, Kunihiro; Ballew, Shoshana H.; Sang, Yingying; Kalbaugh, Corey; Loehr, Laura; Hirsch, Alan T.; Tanaka, Hirofumi; Heiss, Gerardo; Windham, B. Gwen; Selvin, Elizabeth; Coresh, Josef

    2017-01-01

    Background and aims Most prior studies investigating the association of lower extremity peripheral artery disease (PAD) with physical function were small or analyzed selected populations (e.g., patients at vascular clinics or persons with reduced function), leaving particular uncertainty regarding the association in the general community. Methods Among 5,262 ARIC participants (age 71-90 years during 2011-2013), we assessed the cross-sectional association of ankle-brachial index (ABI) with the Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB) score (0-12), its individual components (chair stands, standing balance, and gait speed) (0-4 points each), and grip strength after accounting for potential confounders, including a history of coronary disease, stroke, or heart failure. Results There were 411 participants (7.8%) with low ABI ≤0.90 and 469 (8.9%) participants with borderline low ABI 0.91-1.00. Both ABI ≤0.90 and 0.91-1.00 were independently associated with poor physical function (SPPB score ≤6) compared to ABI 1.11-1.20 (adjusted odds ratio 2.10 [95% CI 1.55-2.84] and 1.86 [1.38-2.51], respectively). The patterns were largely consistent across subgroups by clinical conditions (e.g., leg pain or other cardiovascular diseases), in every SPPB component, and for grip strength. ABI >1.3 (472 participants [9.0%]), indicative of non-compressible pedal arteries, was related to lower physical function as well but did not necessarily reach significance. Conclusions In community-dwelling older adults, low and borderline low ABI suggestive of PAD were independently associated with poorer systemic physical function compared to those with normal ABI. Clinical attention to PAD as a potential contributor to poor physical function is warranted in community-dwelling older adults. PMID:28012644

  15. Associations Between Ankle-Brachial Index and Cognitive Function: Results From the Lifestyle Interventions and Independence for Elders Trial.

    PubMed

    Espeland, Mark A; Newman, Anne B; Sink, Kaycee; Gill, Thomas M; King, Abby C; Miller, Michael E; Guralnik, Jack; Katula, Jeff; Church, Timothy; Manini, Todd; Reid, Kieran F; McDermott, Mary M

    2015-08-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate cross-sectional and longitudinal associations between ankle-brachial index (ABI) and indicators of cognitive function. Randomized clinical trial (Lifestyle Interventions and Independence for Elders Trial). Eight US academic centers. A total of 1601 adults ages 70-89 years, sedentary, without dementia, and with functional limitations. Baseline ABI and interviewer- and computer-administered cognitive function assessments were obtained. These assessments were used to compare a physical activity intervention with a health education control. Cognitive function was reassessed 24 months later (interviewer-administered) and 18 or 30 months later (computer-administered) and central adjudication was used to classify individuals as having mild cognitive impairment, probable dementia, or neither. Lower ABI had a modest independent association with poorer cognitive functioning at baseline (partial r = 0.09; P < .001). Although lower baseline ABI was not associated with overall changes in cognitive function test scores, it was associated with higher odds for 2-year progression to a composite of either mild cognitive impairment or probable dementia (odds ratio 2.60 per unit lower ABI; 95% confidence interval 1.06-6.37). Across 2 years, changes in ABI were not associated with changes in cognitive function. In an older cohort sedentary individuals with dementia and with functional limitations, lower baseline ABI was independently correlated with cognitive function and associated with greater 2-year risk for progression to mild cognitive impairment or probable dementia. Copyright © 2015 AMDA – The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Relation between respiratory function and arterial stiffness assessed using brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity in healthy workers.

    PubMed

    Inomoto, Atsushi; Fukuda, Rika; Deguchi, Junko; Toyonaga, Toshihiro

    2017-09-01

    [Purpose] Current studies report that patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) may also have arteriosclerosis. This study aimed to investigate the relationship between respiratory function and arterial stiffness in healthy workers using the brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV). [Subjects and Methods] This study included 104 male Japanese workers without COPD. We collected participant information and measured hemodynamics, body composition, and respiratory function. [Results] In the correlation analysis, baPWV showed a significant positive correlation with age, smoking index, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, and heart rate, and a significant negative correlation with height, fat free mass, lower limb muscle mass, forced vital capacity (FVC), and forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1). In multiple regression analysis using factors other than baPWV and respiratory function as adjustment variables, both FVC and FEV1 showed a significant negative relationship with baPWV (p=0.009 and p=0.027, respectively). FEV1/FVC was not significantly related to baPWV (p=0.704). [Conclusion] The results of this study indicated that FEV1/FVC and the proportion of FEV1 predicted, which are indicators of airflow limitation, are not predictors of baPWV in workers without airflow limitation. However, since baPWV showed a significant negative relationship with FVC and FEV 1, the reduction in respiratory function that does not cause airflow limitation, such as FVC or FEV1 decline, may be related to an increase in the risk of arterial stiffness.

  17. Ankle-brachial index and physical function in older individuals: The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study.

    PubMed

    Matsushita, Kunihiro; Ballew, Shoshana H; Sang, Yingying; Kalbaugh, Corey; Loehr, Laura R; Hirsch, Alan T; Tanaka, Hirofumi; Heiss, Gerardo; Windham, B Gwen; Selvin, Elizabeth; Coresh, Josef

    2017-02-01

    Most prior studies investigating the association of lower extremity peripheral artery disease (PAD) with physical function were small or analyzed selected populations (e.g., patients at vascular clinics or persons with reduced function), leaving particular uncertainty regarding the association in the general community. Among 5262 ARIC participants (age 71-90 years during 2011-2013), we assessed the cross-sectional association of ankle-brachial index (ABI) with the Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB) score (0-12), its individual components (chair stands, standing balance, and gait speed) (0-4 points each), and grip strength after accounting for potential confounders, including a history of coronary disease, stroke, or heart failure. There were 411 participants (7.8%) with low ABI ≤0.90 and 469 (8.9%) participants with borderline low ABI 0.91-1.00. Both ABI ≤0.90 and 0.91-1.00 were independently associated with poor physical function (SPPB score ≤6) compared to ABI 1.11-1.20 (adjusted odds ratio 2.10 [95% CI 1.55-2.84] and 1.86 [1.38-2.51], respectively). The patterns were largely consistent across subgroups by clinical conditions (e.g., leg pain or other cardiovascular diseases), in every SPPB component, and for grip strength. ABI >1.3 (472 participants [9.0%]), indicative of non-compressible pedal arteries, was related to lower physical function as well but did not necessarily reach significance. In community-dwelling older adults, low and borderline low ABI suggestive of PAD were independently associated with poorer systemic physical function compared to those with normal ABI. Clinical attention to PAD as a potential contributor to poor physical function is warranted in community-dwelling older adults. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Reference values of brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity according to age and blood pressure in a central Asia population.

    PubMed

    Yiming, Gulinuer; Zhou, Xianhui; Lv, Wenkui; Peng, Yi; Zhang, Wenhui; Cheng, Xinchun; Li, Yaodong; Xing, Qiang; Zhang, Jianghua; Zhou, Qina; Zhang, Ling; Lu, Yanmei; Wang, Hongli; Tang, Baopeng

    2017-01-01

    Brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV), a direct measure of aortic stiffness, has increasingly become an important assessment for cardiovascular risk. The present study established the reference and normal values of baPWV in a Central Asia population in Xinjiang, China. We recruited participants from a central Asia population in Xinjiang, China. We performed multiple regression analysis to investigate the determinants of baPWV. The median and 10th-90th percentiles were calculated to establish the reference and normal values based on these categories. In total, 5,757 Han participants aged 15-88 years were included in the present study. Spearman correlation analysis showed that age (r = 0.587, p < 0.001) and mean blood pressure (MBP, r = 0.599, p <0.001) were the major factors influencing the values of baPWV in the reference population. Furthermore, in the multiple linear regression analysis, the standardized regression coefficients of age (0.445) and MBP (0.460) were much higher than those of body mass index, triglyceride, and glycemia (-0.054, 0.035, and 0.033, respectively). In the covariance analysis, after adjustment for age and MBP, only diabetes was the significant independent determinant of baPWV (p = 0.009). Thus, participants with diabetes were excluded from the reference value population. The reference values ranged from 14.3 to 25.2 m/s, and the normal values ranged from 13.9 to 21.2 m/s. This is the first study that has established the reference and normal values for baPWV according to age and blood pressure in a Central Asia population.

  19. Reproducibility and reliability of the ankle-brachial index as assessed by vascular experts, family physicians and nurses.

    PubMed

    Holland-Letz, Tim; Endres, Heinz G; Biedermann, Stefanie; Mahn, Matthias; Kunert, Joachim; Groh, Sabine; Pittrow, David; von Bilderling, Peter; Sternitzky, Reinhardt; Diehm, Curt

    2007-05-01

    The reliability of ankle-brachial index (ABI) measurements performed by different observer groups in primary care has not yet been determined. The aims of the study were to provide precise estimates for all effects influencing the variability of the ABI (patients' individual variability, intra- and inter-observer variability), with particular focus on the performance of different observer groups. Using a partially balanced incomplete block design, 144 unselected individuals aged > or = 65 years underwent double ABI measurements by one vascular surgeon or vascular physician, one family physician and one nurse with training in Doppler sonography. Three groups comprising a total of 108 individuals were analyzed (only two with ABI < 0.90). Errors for two repeated measurements for all three observer groups did not differ (experts 8.5%, family physicians 7.7%, and nurses 7.5%, p = 0.39). There was no relevant bias among observer groups. Intra-observer variability expressed as standard deviation divided by the mean was 8%, and inter-observer variability was 9%. In conclusion, reproducibility of the ABI measurement was good in this cohort of elderly patients who almost all had values in the normal range. The mean error of 8-9% within or between observers is smaller than with established screening measures. Since there were no differences among observers with different training backgrounds, our study confirms the appropriateness of ABI assessment for screening peripheral arterial disease (PAD) and generalized atherosclerosis in the primary case setting. Given the importance of the early detection and management of PAD, this diagnostic tool should be used routinely as a standard for PAD screening. Additional studies will be required to confirm our observations in patients with PAD of various severities.

  20. Prognostic value of a low post-exercise ankle brachial index as assessed by primary care physicians.

    PubMed

    Diehm, Curt; Darius, Harald; Pittrow, David; Schwertfeger, Markus; Tepohl, Gerhart; Haberl, Roman L; Allenberg, Jens Rainer; Burghaus, Ina; Trampisch, Hans Joachim

    2011-02-01

    We aimed to investigate whether the post-exercise ankle brachial index (ABI) performed by primary care physicians offers useful information for the prediction of death or cardiovascular events, beyond the traditional resting ABI. An additional focus was on patients with intermittent claudication and normal resting ABI. Using data from the 5-year follow-up of 6468 elderly patients in the primary care setting in Germany (getABI study) we used multivariate Cox regression models adjusted for age, gender and conventional risk factors to determine the association of resting ABI and/or post-exercise ABI and all-cause mortality/morbidity. Mean post-exercise ABI in the total cohort was 0.977 and resting ABI was 1.034. For post-exercise ABI, a threshold value of 0.825 had nearly the same sensitivity (28.6%) and specificity (85.7%) as the conventionally used resting ABI with a cut-off value of 0.9 to predict death. Compared to patients with normal post-exercise ABI, a low post-exercise ABI was associated with an almost identical risk increase for mortality (hazard ratio [HR] 1.56, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.30-1.86) as a low resting ABI (HR 1.65; CI 1.39-1.97) and/or myocardial infarction/stroke. Slight differences were observed for coronary/carotid revascularisation and peripheral revascularisation/amputation. In combined models it could not be shown that post-exercise ABI yielded relevant additional information for the prognosis of mortality and/or myocardial infarction/stroke, not even in the subgroup analysis of patients with intermittent claudication and normal resting ABI. It could not be shown that the post-exercise ABI is a useful tool for the prognosis of mortality and/or myocardial infarction/stroke beyond the resting ABI. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The predictive value of the borderline ankle-brachial index for long-term clinical outcomes: An observational cohort study.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Shingo; Kaneko, Hidehiro; Kano, Hiroto; Matsuno, Shunsuke; Suzuki, Shinya; Takai, Hideaki; Otsuka, Takayuki; Uejima, Tokuhisa; Oikawa, Yuji; Nagashima, Kazuyuki; Kirigaya, Hajime; Sagara, Koichi; Yajima, Junji; Sawada, Hitoshi; Aizawa, Tadanori; Yamashita, Takeshi

    2016-07-01

    Low ankle-brachial index (ABI) is associated with increased mortality and an increased incidence of cardiovascular events. The purpose of this study was to investigate the value of borderline ABI in predicting clinical outcomes. The data were derived from the Shinken Database 2004-2012, from a single hospital-based cohort study (N = 19,994). ABI was measured in 5205 subjects; 4756 subjects whose ABI was 0.91-1.39 and having no history of peripheral artery disease were enrolled. The subjects were classified into two groups as follows: borderline ABI (0.91-1.00; n = 324) and normal ABI (1.01-1.39; n = 4432). Subjects in the borderline ABI group had more comorbidities, including diabetes mellitus, aortic disease, and stroke. Moreover, the borderline ABI group was associated with higher levels of hemoglobin A1c and brain natriuretic peptide, larger diameters of left atrium and left ventricle, and lower levels of estimated glomerular filtration rate and left ventricular ejection fraction. All-cause death and cardiovascular death occurred in 9.3% and 4.6% of subjects in the borderline ABI group, and in 2.0% and 0.8% of subjects in the normal ABI group, respectively. An adjusted Cox regression model showed that borderline ABI was associated with a higher incidence of all-cause death (hazard ratio [HR] 2.27, p = 0.005) and cardiovascular death (HR 3.47, p = 0.003). A borderline ABI was independently associated with worse clinical outcomes in relatively high risk population. Our data should be confirmed in larger populations including those with low risk profiles. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. [Association between urinary microalbumin-to-creatinine ratio and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity in hypertensive patients].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hang; Xue, Hao; Wang, Guangyi; Fu, Zhenhong; Liu, Jie; Shi, Yajun

    2015-04-01

    To explore the association between urinary microalbumin-to-creatinine ratio (ACR) and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) in hypertensive patients. A total of 877 primary hypertension patients were enrolled in this trial from September 2009 to December 2012, and were randomly recruited and patients were divided into normal ACR group (ACR < 30 mg/g, n = 723), micro-albuminuria group (30 mg/g ≤ ACR < 300 mg/g, n = 136) and macro-albuminuria group (ACR ≥ 300 mg/g, n = 18). baPWV was measure by automatic pulse wave velocity measuring system. The baPWV values in patients of micro-albuminuria group and macro-albuminuria group were significantly higher than in the normal ACR group (all P < 0.05). The baPWV value of macro-albuminuria group was significantly higher than in the micro-albuminuria group (P < 0.05). Linear correlation analysis revealed that ACR was positively correlated with baPWV (r = 0.413, P < 0.01). Multiple linear regression analysis showed that ACR independently correlated with baPWV in patients with primary hypertension (β = 0.29, R(2) = 0.112, P < 0.01) after adjusting for age, sex, body mass index, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, blood glucose, total cholesterol, low density lipoprotein, high density lipoprotein and triglyceride. Using ACR < 30 mg/g and ACR ≥ 30 mg/g as dichotomous variable, binary logistic regression analysis showed that ACR ≥ 30 mg/g was also a risk factor of the ascending baPWV in primary hypertension patients (OR: 1.73, 95% CI: 1.62-2.98) after adjusting the traditional cardiovascular risk factors. ACR is positively correlated to baPWV in primary hypertension patients, and the ascending baPWV is a risk factor of early renal dysfunction in primary hypertension patients.

  3. Measurement of the ankle brachial index with a non-mercury sphygmomanometer in diabetic patients: a concordance study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The removal of mercury sphygmomanometers from health centers requires the validation of other instruments to measure blood pressure in the limbs to calculate the ankle-brachial index (ABI). Methods Descriptive cross-sectional study of agreement between two measurement methods in type 2 diabetes patients from three urban primary healthcare centres in the Barcelonès Nord i Maresme area (Catalonia, Spain). ABI was determined with Doppler and mercury sphygmomanometer and Doppler and the “hybrid” sphygmomanometer OMRON HEM-907 model. Agreement was evaluated using the weighted kappa index. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) were calculated using the mercury sphygmomanometer as the gold standard. Results 211 patients were included, from these, 421 limbs were available for study. The mean age of the participants was 67 years (SD = 10), 51.7% were women. The index of agreement between ABI measured with a mercury sphygmomanometer and with the OMRON HEM-907 blood pressure monitor was good (weighted kappa index = 0.68; CI 95%: [0.55–0.79]) and improved when the ABI cut-off value was set at ≤0.70 (weighted kappa index = 0.92; CI 95%: [0.81–1.00]). Sensitivity and specificity were 77.5% and 98.2%, respectively. PPV was 83.8% and NPV was 97.3%. With the ABI cut-off value ≤0.70, sensitivity and specificity increased to 85.7% and 100%, respectively, PPV to 100% and NPV to 99.4%. Conclusion The combination of a Doppler device with the hybrid sphygmomanometer is a simple and reliable method to measure ABI showing that hybrid sphygmomanometer is a good alternative to the use of mercury sphygmomanometers. PMID:23497339

  4. Ankle-Brachial index by oscillometry: A very useful method to assess peripheral arterial disease in diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Premanath, M.; Raghunath, M.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Peripheral Arterial Disease (PAD) remains the least recognized form of atherosclerosis. The Ankle-Brachial Index (ABI) has emerged as one of the potent markers of diffuse atherosclerosis, cardiovascular (CV) risk, and overall survival in general public, especially in diabetics. The important reason for the lack of early diagnosis is the non-availability of a test that is easy to perform and less expensive, with no training required. Objectives: To evaluate the osillometric method of performing ABI with regard to its usefulness in detecting PAD cases and to correlate the signs and symptoms with ABI. Materials and Methods: Two hundred diabetics of varying duration attending the clinic for a period of eight months, from August 2006 to April 2007, were evaluated for signs, symptoms, and risk factors. ABI was performed using the oscillometric method. The positives were confirmed by Doppler evaluation. An equal number of age- and sex-matched controls, which were ABI negative, were also assessed by Doppler. Sensitivity and Specificity were determined. Results: There were 120 males and 80 females. Twelve males (10%) and six females (7.5%) were ABI positive. On Doppler, eleven males (91.5%) and three females (50%) were true positives. There were six false negatives from the controls (three each). The Sensitivity was 70% and Specificity was 75%. Symptoms and signs correlated well with ABI positives. Hypertension was the most important risk factor. Conclusions: In spite of the limitations, the oscillometric method of performing ABI is a simple procedure, easy to perform, does not require training and can be performed as an outpatient procedure not only by doctors, but also by the paramedical staff to detect more PAD cases. PMID:20535314

  5. Low ankle brachial index is associated with the magnitude of impaired walking endurance in patients with heart failure.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Shinya; Kamiya, Kentaro; Masuda, Takashi; Hamazaki, Nobuaki; Matsuzawa, Ryota; Nozaki, Kohei; Maekawa, Emi; Noda, Chiharu; Yamaoka-Tojo, Minako; Matsunaga, Atsuhiko; Ako, Junya

    2016-12-01

    Measurement of the ankle brachial index (ABI) is a simple, noninvasive means of diagnosing peripheral arterial disease, and has been shown to be associated with mortality rate. Here, we examined the association between ABI and physical function in patients with heart failure (HF). The study population consisted of 524 admitted patients (67.2±13.9years, 343 males) with HF. Blood pressure and the ABI were determined by oscillometry. Prior to hospital discharge, ABI, 6-minute walking distance, walking velocity, handgrip strength, quadriceps isometric strength, and standing balance were determined. The 524 patients were divided according to ABI as follows: ABI≤0.90 (low ABI), ABI 0.91 to 0.99 (borderline ABI), and ABI 1.00 to 1.40 (normal ABI). Lower ABI values were associated with shorter 6-minute walking distance (p trend=0.001), slower walking velocity (p trend=0.023), and poorer standing balance (p trend=0.048). There were no significant associations between ABI and handgrip strength or quadriceps isometric strength. After adjusting for potential confounders, patients with ABI≤0.90 had shorter 6-minute walking distance compared to those with ABI 1.00 to 1.40 (adjusted mean value: 344m vs. 395m, respectively, p<0.001). There were no significant differences in any of the other physical function parameters examined. In patients with HF, low ABI is associated with the magnitude of impairment in walking endurance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. [Relationship between brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity and glycemic control of type 2 diabetes mellitus patients in Beijing community population].

    PubMed

    Sun, Ke-xin; Liu, Zhi-ke; Cao, Ya-ying; Juan, Juan; Xiang, Xiao; Yang, Cheng; Huang, Shao-ping; Liu, Xiao-fen; Li, Na; Tang, Xun; Li, Jin; Wu, Tao; Chen, Da-fang; Hu, Yong-hua

    2015-06-18

    To explore the correlation between glycemic control of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients and brachial-ankle pulse velocity (baPWV). A community-based cross-sectional study was conducted in Beijing, China. Every subject underwent physical examinations, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), blood lipid and baPWV measurements and completed a standardized questionnaire. T2DM patients were divided into well controlled and poorly controlled groups according to HbA1c levels. The correlation between glycemic control of T2DM patients and baPWV was analyzed. In this study, 1 341 subjects were recruited, including 733 T2DM patients and 608 non-diabetes subjects. Compared with non-diabetes subjects, abnormal baPWV (baPWV≥1 700 cm/s) rate for T2DM patients was higher (40.8% vs. 26.8%, P<0.001). With HbA1c<6.5% or <7.0% as the aim of glycemic control in T2DM patients, the abnormal baPWV rates for non-diabetes subjects, well controlled and poorly controlled T2DM patients were significantly different (non-diabetes vs. HbA1c<6.5% T2DM vs. HbA1c≥6.5% T2DM: 26.8% vs. 32.8% vs. 42.6%, P<0.001; non-diabetes vs. HbA1c<7.0% T2DM vs. HbA1c≥7.0% T2DM: 26.8% vs. 36.1% vs. 43.4%, P<0.001). After being adjusted for gender, age, smoking status, diabetes mellitus family history, T2DM duration, cardiovascular diseases (CVD), waist hip ratio (WHR), systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), total triglycerides (TG), high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), and low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), the Logistic regression models suggested that glycemic control status of T2DM patients was associated with abnormal baPWV. Compared with non-diabetes subjects, the ORs for abnormal baPWV in HbA1c<6.5% T2DM patients and HbA1c≥6.5% T2DM patients were 0.927(95%CI 0.560-1.537) and 1.826 (95%CI 1.287-2.591). Compared with non-diabetes subjects, the ORs for abnormal baPWV in HbA1c<7.0% T2DM patients and HbA1c≥7.0% T2DM patients were 1.210 (95%CI 0.808-1.811) and 1

  7. Impaired left ventricular systolic function and increased brachial-ankle pulse-wave velocity are independently associated with rapid renal function progression.

    PubMed

    Chen, Szu-Chia; Lin, Tsung-Hsien; Hsu, Po-Chao; Chang, Jer-Ming; Lee, Chee-Siong; Tsai, Wei-Chung; Su, Ho-Ming; Voon, Wen-Chol; Chen, Hung-Chun

    2011-09-01

    Heart failure and increased arterial stiffness are associated with declining renal function. Few studies have evaluated the association between left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and brachial-ankle pulse-wave velocity (baPWV) and renal function progression. The aim of this study was to assess whether LVEF<40% and baPWV are associated with a decline in the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and the progression to a renal end point of ≥25% decline in eGFR. This longitudinal study included 167 patients. The baPWV was measured with an ankle-brachial index-form device. The change in renal function was estimated by eGFR slope. The renal end point was defined as ≥25% decline in eGFR. Clinical and echocardiographic parameters were compared and analyzed. After a multivariate analysis, serum hematocrit was positively associated with eGFR slope, and diabetes mellitus, baPWV (P=0.031) and LVEF<40% (P=0.001) were negatively associated with eGFR slope. Forty patients reached the renal end point. Multivariate, forward Cox regression analysis found that lower serum albumin and hematocrit levels, higher triglyceride levels, higher baPWV (P=0.039) and LVEF<40% (P<0.001) were independently associated with progression to the renal end point. Our results show that LVEF<40% and increased baPWV are independently associated with renal function decline and progression to the renal end point.

  8. Association between the severity of coronary artery stenosis and the combination of the difference in blood pressure between arms and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity.

    PubMed

    Miyase, Yuiko; Miura, Shin-Ichiro; Shiga, Yuhei; Yano, Masaya; Suematsu, Yasunori; Adachi, Sen; Norimatsu, Kenji; Nakamura, Ayumi; Saku, Keijiro

    2016-01-01

    A difference in systolic blood pressure (SBP) ≥10 mmHg between the arms is associated with an increased risk of coronary artery disease (CAD) and mortality in high-risk patients. Four hundred and fourteen patients were divided into three groups according to the percent most severe luminal narrowing of a coronary artery as diagnosed by coronary computed tomography angiography: no or mild coronary stenosis (0-49%), moderate stenosis (50-69%) and severe stenosis (≥70%) groups. The relative difference in SBP between arms in the severe group was significantly lower than those in the no or mild and moderate groups. The brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) significantly increased as the severity of coronary stenosis increased. We confirmed that severe coronary stenosis was independently associated with both the relative difference in SBP between arms and baPWV, in addition to age, gender, hypertension, dyslipidemia, diabetes mellitus and ankle-brachial index by a logistic regression analysis. The group with a relative difference in SBP between arms of <1 mmHg and baPWV ≥ 1613 cm/s showed a higher percentage of patients with severe coronary stenosis than groups that met neither or only one of these criteria. The combination of the relative difference in SBP between arms and baPWV may be a more effective approach for the non-invasive assessment of the severity of CAD.

  9. Peripheral Arterial Disease and Ankle-Brachial Pressure Index as Predictors of Mortality in Residents of Metlika County, Slovenia

    PubMed Central

    Mlačak, Blaž; Blinc, Aleš; Pohar, Maja; Stare, Janez

    2006-01-01

    Aim To test how the presence of peripheral arterial disease predicted mortality of middle-aged and elderly residents of Metlika county, a rural area in southeastern Slovenia. Methods In 1987, we interviewed and examined a representative cohort of 646 subjects aged 45-80 years at inclusion without overt coronary or cerebrovascular disease, for cardiovascular risk factors and measured the ankle-brachial pressure index (ABPI). Peripheral arterial disease was defined as ABPI<0.90. The subjects were followed up 15 years or until death. All-cause mortality and cardiovascular mortality were assessed and compared between subjects with and without peripheral arterial disease in a multivariate model. Results There were 580 subjects with normal ABPI and 66 subjects with peripheral arterial disease, among which 49 were asymptomatic and 17 had intermittent claudication. Because subjects with peripheral arterial disease were on average 10 years older than those without peripheral arterial disease, the mere presence of peripheral arterial disease was not an independent predictor of mortality. However, there was a significant interaction of peripheral arterial disease with age, with a more pronounced adverse prognostic effect of peripheral arterial disease in younger than in older age groups. For a 55-year-old subject with peripheral arterial disease, the hazard ratio of dying from any cause in the follow-up period was 2.44 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.15-4.96) in comparison to an age-matched subject without peripheral arterial disease, but at 75 years of age, the hazard ratio decreased to only 0.71 (95% CI, 0.46-1.09). For cardiovascular mortality, the hazard ratio in the presence of peripheral arterial disease was 6.05 (95% CI, 1.87-16.27) at 55 years and 0.92 (95% CI, 0.54-1.52) at 75 years. Among patients with peripheral arterial disease, each decrement of ABPI at inclusion by 0.10 significantly increased the cardiovascular mortality after 15 years by 30% (P = 0

  10. The ankle brachial index and change in lower extremity functioning over time: the Women's Health and Aging Study.

    PubMed

    McDermott, Mary McGrae; Ferrucci, Luigi; Simonsick, Eleanor M; Balfour, Jennifer; Fried, Linda; Ling, Shari; Gibson, Daniel; Guralnik, Jack M

    2002-02-01

    To define the association between baseline ankle brachial index (ABI) level and subsequent onset of severe disability. Prospective cohort study. Baltimore community. Eight hundred forty-seven disabled women aged 65 and older participating in the Women's Health and Aging Study. At baseline, participants underwent measurement of ABI and lower extremity functioning. Measures of lower extremity functioning included patient's report of their ability to walk one-quarter of a mile, number of city blocks walked last week, number of stair flights climbed last week, and performance-based measures including walking speed over 4 meters, five repeated chair stands, and a summary performance score. Functioning was remeasured every 6 months for 3 years. Definitions of severe disability were developed a priori, and participants who met these definitions at baseline were excluded from subsequent analyses. Participants with an ABI of less than 0.60 at baseline had significantly higher cumulative probabilities of developing severe disability than participants with a baseline ABI of 0.90 to 1.50 for walking-specific outcomes (ability to walk a quarter of a mile, number of city blocks walked last week, and walking velocity) but not for the remaining functional outcomes. In age-adjusted Cox proportional hazards analyses, hazard ratios for participants with a baseline ABI of less than 0.60 were 1.63 for becoming unable to walk a quarter of a mile (P = .044), 2.00 for developing severe disability in the number of blocks walked last week (P = .004), and 1.61 for developing severe disability in walking speed (P = .041), compared with participants with a baseline ABI of 0.90 to 1.50. Adjusting for age, race, baseline performance, and comorbidities, an ABI of less than 0.60 remained associated with becoming severely disabled in the number of blocks walked last week (hazard ratio = 1.97, P = .009) and nearly significantly associated with becoming unable to walk a quarter of a mile (hazard

  11. [Ankle brachial index: motivations, training, and practices among 165 general practitioners in Île-de-France].

    PubMed

    Meyer, D; Bureau, J-M; Vu Tri, D

    2014-02-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is under-diagnosed despite its predictive value for cardiovascular mortality. The ankle brachial index (ABI), a simple reliable measure recommended by the French health authorities to detect and evaluate the severity of PAD, is used by too few general practitioners (GPs). This study aimed at identifying motivations and barriers for using ABI in general practice. A representative, descriptive, cross-sectional survey was conducted amongst 165 GPs practicing in Île-de-France who were interviewed using stratified quotas. Although 1 out of 5 GPs considered ABI to be an irrelevant indicator, most had a favorable opinion about its use (OR: 4.9 [CI 95 %: 4.2-5.7]). Only 42 % (CI 95 %: 34 %-49 %) of GPs knew ABI was recommended by the health authorities. This information had a critical impact on the acceptance of ABI relevancy (OR: 3.7 [CI 95 %: 3.2-4.2]). Training reinforced acceptance (OR: 5.0 [CI 95 %: 4.4-5.6]) and pre-residency education provided a better understanding of ABI (OR: 2.8 [CI 95 %: 2.3-3.4]). Time needed to measure ABI was the main barrier (OR: 0.6 [CI 95 %: 0.6-0.7]). A Doppler-calculation kit (OR: 11.8 [CI 95 %: 8.9-15.6]), equipment cost≤300Euros (OR: 3.4 [CI 99 %: 3.0-3.9]), a specific fee in addition to the regular consultation fee (OR: 2.6 [CI 95 %: 2.3-3.0]) and inclusion of ABI in the GP's evaluation scheme (OR: 2.6 [CI 95 %: 2.3-2.9]) would motivate more GPs. Seven out of 10 GPs agreed that ABI has a positive impact on patient adherence to treatment and follow-up, but ABI remained underexploited for symptomatic patients (OR: 0.4 [CI 95 %: 0.3-0.4]). Better communication and training together with an upgraded status for ABI would provide motivation for GPs to measure ABI. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Weight-bearing computed tomography findings in varus ankle osteoarthritis: abnormal internal rotation of the talus in the axial plane.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji-Beom; Yi, Young; Kim, Jae-Young; Cho, Jae-Ho; Kwon, Min-Soo; Choi, Seung-Hyuk; Lee, Woo-Chun

    2017-08-01

    To assess the incidence of abnormal internal rotation of the talus in the axial plane in patients with varus ankle osteoarthritis, and to determine whether this incidence differs from the severity of varus ankle osteoarthritis (moderate versus severe). We retrospectively evaluated weight-bearing computed tomography (CT) and plain radiographs of 52 ankles with no abnormalities (control group) and 96 ankles with varus osteoarthritis (varus-OA group), which were further stratified into a moderate-OA subgroup (50 ankles) and a severe-OA subgroup (46 ankles). A new radiographic parameter on weight-bearing CT, the talus rotation ratio, was used to assess the rotation of the talus in the axial plane. The normal range of the talus rotation ratio was defined as the 95% prediction interval for talus rotation ratio values in the control group. Abnormal internal rotation of the talus was defined for talus rotation ratio values above the normal range. We determined the incidence of abnormal internal rotation of the talus in the varus-OA group, moderate-OA subgroup, and severe-OA subgroup. In the varus-OA group, the incidence of abnormal internal rotation of the talus was 45% (43 ankles), which corresponded to an incidence of 32% (16 ankles) in the moderate-OA subgroup and 59% (27 ankles) in the severe-OA subgroup (p = 0.013). Our study demonstrates that abnormal internal rotation of the talus occurs in patients with varus ankle osteoarthritis, and is more frequently noted in severe than in moderate varus ankle osteoarthritis.

  13. [Efficacy of a massage and exercise programme on the ankle-brachial index and blood pressure in patients with diabetes mellitus type 2 and peripheral arterial disease: a randomized clinical trial].

    PubMed

    Castro-Sánchez, Adelaida María; Moreno-Lorenzo, Carmen; Matarán-Peñarrocha, Guillermo A; Feriche-Fernández-Castanys, Belén; Sánchez Labraca, Nuria; Sánchez Joya, María del Mar

    2010-02-06

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a highly prevalent disease that can favour the development of peripheral arterial disease. The objective of this study was to analyse the efficacy of a massage and exercise programme on the ankle-brachial index and arterial pressure of patients with diabetes mellitus type 2 and peripheral arterial disease. An experimental study with placebo control group was performed. Sixty-six type 2 diabetes patients with Leriche-Fontaine stage II peripheral arterial disease were randomly assigned to an intervention (exercise and massage) or placebo control (simulated magnetotherapy) group. Study variables were arterial pressure and ankle-brachial index. After 10 weeks of treatment, significant (P<0.05) differences between the intervention and placebo groups were found in right and left ankle-brachial index values and in systolic and diastolic pressures in right and left lower extremities. A combined programme of exercise and massage improves arterial blood pressure and ankle brachial index values in type 2 diabetics with peripheral arterial disease. Copyright 2009 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  14. Ankle-brachial index predicts change over time in functional status in the San Diego Population Study.

    PubMed

    Wassel, Christina L; Allison, Matthew A; Ix, Joachim H; Rifkin, Dena E; Forbang, Nketi I; Denenberg, Julie O; Criqui, Michael H

    2016-09-01

    Peripheral artery disease (PAD) affects millions of people, both in the U.S. and worldwide. Even when asymptomatic, PAD and the ankle-brachial index (ABI), the major clinical diagnostic criterion for PAD, are associated with decreased functional status and quality of life, as well as mobility impairment. Whether the ABI or change in the ABI predicts decline in functional status over time has not been previously assessed in a population-based setting. Participants were 812 non-Hispanic white, African American, Hispanic, and Asian men and women from the San Diego Population Study (SDPS) who attended a baseline examination (1994-1998), and follow-up clinic examination approximately 11 years later. The Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short Form (SF-36) was obtained at both the baseline and follow-up examinations, and the summary performance score (SPS) at the follow-up examination. Associations of the baseline ABI and clinically relevant change in the ABI (<-0.15 vs ≥-0.15) with change in SF-36 scores over time were assessed using growth curve models, a type of mixed model that accounts for within participant correlation of measurements over time, and using linear regression for SPS. Models were adjusted for baseline age, sex, race/ethnicity, body mass index, ever smoking, physical activity, hypertension, diabetes, and dyslipidemia. Mean ± standard deviation (SD) for the baseline ABI was 1.11 ± 0.10, and 50.8 ± 9.0 for the baseline Physical Component Score (PCS), 50.1 ± 9.5 for the baseline Mental Component Score (MCS), and 11.2 ± 1.9 for the SPS at the follow-up examination. In fully adjusted models, each SD lower of the baseline ABI was significantly associated with an average decrease over time of 0.6 (95% confidence interval [CI], -1.1 to -0.1; P = .02) units on SF-36 PCS. Each SD lower of the baseline ABI was also significantly associated with an average decrease over time of 1.2 units (95% CI, -2.3 to -0.2; P = .02) on the SF-36 physical

  15. Impact of a systolic parameter, defined as the ratio of right brachial pre-ejection period to ejection time, on the relationship between brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity and left ventricular diastolic function.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Po-Chao; Lin, Tsung-Hsien; Lee, Chee-Siong; Chu, Chun-Yuan; Su, Ho-Ming; Voon, Wen-Chol; Lai, Wen-Ter; Sheu, Sheng-Hsiung

    2011-04-01

    Arterial stiffness is correlated with left ventricular (LV) diastolic function as well as susceptibility to LV systolic function. Therefore, if LV systolic function is not known, the relationship between arterial stiffness and LV diastolic function is difficult to determine. A total of 260 patients were included in the study. The brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) and the ratio of right brachial pre-ejection period to ejection time (rbPEP/rbET) were measured using an ABI-form device. Patients were classified into four groups. Groups 1, 2, 3 and 4 were patients with rbPEP/rbET and baPWV below the median, rbPEP/rbET above but baPWV below the median, rbPET/rbET below but baPWV above the median, and rbPET/rbET and baPWV above the median, respectively. The LV ejection fractions in groups 1 and 3 were higher than those in groups 2 and 4 (P<0.001 for all). Patients in group 1 had a lower left atrial volume index (LAVI) and higher early diastolic mitral annular velocity (Ea) than patients in the other groups (P≤0.002). Patients in group 2 had a LAVI and ratio of transmitral E wave velocity to Ea that were comparable to those in groups 3 and 4. In conclusion, rbPEP/rbET had an impact on the relationship between baPWV and LV diastolic function. In patients with high rbPEP/rbET but low baPWV, low baPWV may not indicate good LV diastolic function but implies that cardiac dysfunction may precede vascular dysfunction in such patients. When interpreting the relationship between baPWV and LV diastolic function, the rbPEP/rbET value obtained from the same examination should be considered.

  16. [The relationship between physical activity in leasure time and the ankle-brachial index in a general Spanish population: The ARTPER study].

    PubMed

    Ruiz Comellas, Anna; Pera, Guillem; Baena Díez, José Miguel; Heras, Antonio; Alzamora Sas, Maria Teresa; Forés Raurell, Rosa; Torán Monserrat, Pere; Mundet Tudurí, Xavier

    2015-11-20

    High levels of daily physical activity have been shown to be linked to decreased functional impairment in peripheral artery disease (PAD) patients and positively related to the ankle brachial index (ABI) in subjects without PAD. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between leisure time physical activity (LTPA) and the ABI in a general population. Baseline data from the ARTPER study cohort corresponding to 2,840 subjects>49 years from Barcelona were analyzed. The LTPA variable was obtained through the validated Spanish short version of the Minnesota Leisure Time Physical Activity Questionnaire. ABI<0.9 was taken to indicate PAD. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to evaluate the independent association between LTPA and PAD. Subjects with more LTPA were younger, female, less smokers, and suffered fewer PAD. Total activity, measured in metabolic energy turnover (MET) and the LTPA hours, was significantly higher in subjects without PAD (P<.001). There was an inverse relationship between LTPA and the risk of suffering PAD (odds ratio 0.56, 95% confidence interval 0.38-0.81 for those who expended 2,700 METs or more in 14 days) adjusting for confounding factors. In our study, LTPA was positively related to the ABI, with those with PAD being the ones with less LTPA. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Structural abnormalities and persistent complaints after an ankle sprain are not associated: an observational case control study in primary care.

    PubMed

    van Ochten, John M; Mos, Marinka C E; van Putte-Katier, Nienke; Oei, Edwin H G; Bindels, Patrick J E; Bierma-Zeinstra, Sita M A; van Middelkoop, Marienke

    2014-09-01

    Persistent complaints are very common after a lateral ankle sprain. To investigate possible associations between structural abnormalities on radiography and MRI, and persistent complaints after a lateral ankle sprain. Observational case control study on primary care patients in general practice. Patients were selected who had visited their GP with an ankle sprain 6-12 months before the study; all received a standardised questionnaire, underwent a physical examination, and radiography and MRI of the ankle. Patients with and without persistent complaints were compared regarding structural abnormalities found on radiography and MRI; analyses were adjusted for age, sex, and body mass index. Of the 206 included patients, 98 had persistent complaints and 108 did not. No significant differences were found in structural abnormalities between patients with and without persistent complaints. In both groups, however, many structural abnormalities were found on radiography in the talocrural joint (47.2% osteophytes and 45.1% osteoarthritis) and the talonavicular joint (36.5% sclerosis). On MRI, a high prevalence was found of bone oedema (33.8%) and osteophytes (39.5) in the talocrural joint; osteophytes (54.4%), sclerosis (47.2%), and osteoarthritis (55.4%, Kellgren and Lawrence grade >1) in the talonavicular joint, as well as ligament damage (16.4%) in the anterior talofibular ligament. The prevalence of structural abnormalities is high on radiography and MRI in patients presenting in general practice with a previous ankle sprain. There is no difference in structural abnormalities, however, between patients with and without persistent complaints. Using imaging only will not lead to diagnosis of the explicit reason for the persistent complaint. © British Journal of General Practice 2014.

  18. Structural abnormalities and persistent complaints after an ankle sprain are not associated: an observational case control study in primary care

    PubMed Central

    van Ochten, John M; Mos, Marinka CE; van Putte-Katier, Nienke; Oei, Edwin HG; Bindels, Patrick JE; Bierma-Zeinstra, Sita MA; van Middelkoop, Marienke

    2014-01-01

    Background Persistent complaints are very common after a lateral ankle sprain. Aim To investigate possible associations between structural abnormalities on radiography and MRI, and persistent complaints after a lateral ankle sprain. Design and setting Observational case control study on primary care patients in general practice. Method Patients were selected who had visited their GP with an ankle sprain 6–12 months before the study; all received a standardised questionnaire, underwent a physical examination, and radiography and MRI of the ankle. Patients with and without persistent complaints were compared regarding structural abnormalities found on radiography and MRI; analyses were adjusted for age, sex, and body mass index. Results Of the 206 included patients, 98 had persistent complaints and 108 did not. No significant differences were found in structural abnormalities between patients with and without persistent complaints. In both groups, however, many structural abnormalities were found on radiography in the talocrural joint (47.2% osteophytes and 45.1% osteoarthritis) and the talonavicular joint (36.5% sclerosis). On MRI, a high prevalence was found of bone oedema (33.8%) and osteophytes (39.5) in the talocrural joint; osteophytes (54.4%), sclerosis (47.2%), and osteoarthritis (55.4%, Kellgren and Lawrence grade >1) in the talonavicular joint, as well as ligament damage (16.4%) in the anterior talofibular ligament. Conclusion The prevalence of structural abnormalities is high on radiography and MRI in patients presenting in general practice with a previous ankle sprain. There is no difference in structural abnormalities, however, between patients with and without persistent complaints. Using imaging only will not lead to diagnosis of the explicit reason for the persistent complaint. PMID:25179068

  19. [The relevance of the ankle-arm index to the reclassification of cardiovascular risk in asymptomatic hypertensive middle-aged males].

    PubMed

    Oliveras, Víctor; Martín-Baranera, Montserrat; Gracia, Maya; Del Val, José Luís; Plans, Miquel; Pujol-Moix, Núria

    2015-05-21

    The ankle-brachial index allows for the detection of subclinical cardiovascular disease and risk, by diagnosing peripheral arterial disease and arterial calcification. Asymptomatic hypertensive men, between 45-55 years and with the suspicion of low risk, could be an important population group to benefit from this technique. The aim of the study was to compare the frequency of abnormal ankle-brachial index (subclinical peripheral arterial disease and arterial calcification) between asymptomatic hypertensive and non-hypertensive men, of the same age and suspicion of low risk. Two hundred and forty-four asymptomatic men (122 hypertensive and 122 non-hypertensive), between 45 and 55 years and an REGICOR index<10, were voluntarily recruited using consecutive sampling. Complete anamnesis, physical examination, laboratory tests and ankle-brachial index determination were carried out on all patients. We detected abnormal ankle-brachial index values in 9.8% (12 cases) of the hypertensive subjects and in 1.6% (2 cases) of non-hypertensive subjects (P=.006). In the multivariate analysis, hypertension was significantly associated with an abnormal ankle-brachial index (P<.026) (odds ratio [OR] 5.9, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 1.2-28.3), smoking (P=.018) (OR 2.7; 95% CI 1.2-6.2) and abdominal obesity (P=.005) (OR 2.8; 95% CI 1.3-5.9). The population group analyzed in this study might be considered as an overriding segment for detecting subclinical cardiovascular disease and risk with the ankle-brachial index. Further studies are needed to establish the prevalence of abnormal ankle-brachial index in this population in order to assess its efficiency. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. Brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity is associated with coronary calcium in young and middle-aged asymptomatic adults: The Kangbuk Samsung Health Study.

    PubMed

    Cainzos-Achirica, Miguel; Rampal, Sanjay; Chang, Yoosoo; Ryu, Seungho; Zhang, Yiyi; Zhao, Di; Cho, Juhee; Choi, Yuni; Pastor-Barriuso, Roberto; Lim, So Yeon; Bruguera, Jordi; Elosua, Roberto; Lima, Joao A C; Shin, Hocheol; Guallar, Eliseo

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate the association between brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV), a convenient, non-radiating, readily available measurement of arterial stiffness, and coronary artery calcium (CAC), a reliable marker of coronary atherosclerosis, in a large sample of young and middle-aged asymptomatic adults; and to assess the incremental value of baPWV for detecting prevalent CAC beyond traditional risk factors. Cross-sectional study of 15,185 asymptomatic Korean adults who voluntarily underwent a comprehensive health screening program including measurement of baPWV and CAC. BaPWV was measured using an oscillometric method with cuffs placed on both arms and ankles. CAC burden was assessed using a multi-detector CT scan and scored following Agatston's method. The prevalence of CAC > 0 and CAC > 100 increased across baPWV quintiles. The multivariable-adjusted odds ratios (95% CI) for CAC > 0 comparing baPWV quintiles 2-5 versus quintile 1 were 1.06 (0.87-1.30), 1.24 (1.02-1.50), 1.39 (1.15-1.69) and 1.60 (1.31-1.96), respectively (P trend < 0.001). Similarly, the relative prevalence ratios for CAC > 100 were 1.30 (0.74-2.26), 1.59 (0.93-2.71), 1.74 (1.03-2.94) and 2.59 (1.54-4.36), respectively (P trend < 0.001). For CAC > 100, the area under the ROC curve for baPWV alone was 0.71 (0.68-0.74), and the addition of baPWV to traditional risk factors significantly improved the discrimination and calibration of models for detecting prevalent CAC > 0 and CAC > 100. BaPWV was independently associated with the presence and severity of CAC in a large sample of young and middle-aged asymptomatic adults. BaPWV may be a valuable tool for identifying apparently low-risk individuals with increased burden of coronary atherosclerosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Different methods of calculating ankle-brachial index in mid-elderly men and women: the Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brasil).

    PubMed

    Miname, M; Bensenor, I M; Lotufo, P A

    2016-01-01

    The ankle-brachial index (ABI) is a marker of subclinical atherosclerosis related to health-adverse outcomes. ABI is inexpensive compared to other indexes, such as coronary calcium score and determination of carotid artery intima-media thickness (IMT). Our objective was to identify how the ABI can be applied to primary care. Three different methods of calculating the ABI were compared among 13,921 men and women aged 35 to 74 years who were free of cardiovascular diseases and enrolled in the Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brasil). The ABI ratio had the same denominator for the three categories created (the highest value for arm systolic blood pressure), and the numerator was based on the four readings for leg systolic blood pressure: the highest (ABI-HIGH), the mean (ABI-MEAN), and the lowest (ABI-LOW). The cut-off for analysis was ABI<1.0. All determinations of blood pressure were done with an oscillometric device. The prevalence of ABI<1% was 0.5, 0.9, and 2.7 for the categories HIGH, MEAN and LOW, respectively. All methods were associated with a high burden of cardiovascular risk factors. The association with IMT was stronger for ABI-HIGH than for the other categories. The proportion of participants with a 10-year Framingham Risk Score of coronary heart disease >20% without the inclusion of ABI<1.0 was 4.9%. For ABI-HIGH, ABI-MEAN and ABI-LOW, the increase in percentage points was 0.3, 0.7, and 2.3%, respectively, and the relative increment was 6.1, 14.3, and 46.9%. In conclusion, all methods were acceptable, but ABI-LOW was more suitable for prevention purposes.

  2. The relationship of brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity to future cardiovascular disease events in the general Japanese population: the Takashima Study.

    PubMed

    Takashima, N; Turin, T C; Matsui, K; Rumana, N; Nakamura, Y; Kadota, A; Saito, Y; Sugihara, H; Morita, Y; Ichikawa, M; Hirose, K; Kawakani, K; Hamajima, N; Miura, K; Ueshima, H; Kita, Y

    2014-05-01

    Brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) is a non-invasive measure of arterial stiffness obtained using an automated system. Although baPWVs have been widely used as a non-invasive marker for evaluation of arterial stiffness, evidence for the prognostic value of baPWV in the general population is scarce. In this study, we assessed the association between baPWV and future cardiovascular disease (CVD) incidence in a Japanese population. From 2002 to 2009, baPWV was measured in a total of 4164 men and women without a history of CVD, and they were followed up until the end of 2009 with a median follow-up period of 6.5 years. Hazard ratios (HRs) for CVD incidence according to baPWV levels were calculated using a Cox proportional hazards model adjusted for potential confounding factors, including seated or supine blood pressure (BP). During the follow-up period, we observed 40 incident cases of CVD. In multivariable-adjusted model, baPWV as a continuous variable was not significantly associated with future CVD risk after adjustment for supine BP. However, compared with lower baPWV category (<18 m s(-1)), higher baPWV (< or = 18.0 m s(-1)) was significantly associated with an increased CVD risk (HR: 2.70, 95% confidence interval: 1.18-6.19). Higher baPWV (< or = 18.0 m s(-1)) would be an independent predictor of future CVD event in the general Japanese population.

  3. Fatigability and functional performance among older adults with low-normal ankle-brachial index: Cross-sectional findings from the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Amezcua, Pablo; Matsushita, Kunihiro; Simonsick, Eleanor M; Ferrucci, Luigi; Schrack, Jennifer A

    2018-05-01

    Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is associated with poor mobility and fatigue, but the relationship between preclinical ankle-brachial index (ABI) and early markers of fatigue and functional decline has not been defined. 570 adults, 50 and older, from the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging (N = 570), with normal values of ABI (1-1.39), were classified into ABI tertiles. Perceived fatigability was assessed after a 5-min, treadmill walk (1.5 mph) using the Borg rating of perceived exertion (RPE, range 6-20). Functional evaluation included the Health, Aging and Body Composition Physical Performance Battery (HABC PPB), time to complete a 400-m corridor walk (LDCW), and VO 2 peak (ml/kg/min). High RPE and poor walking endurance (PWE) were defined as RPE≥10 and taking >5 min for the LDCW, respectively. Differences between tertiles in fatigability and functional measures were tested adjusting for demographics, behavioral characteristics, self-reported fatigue, and medical history. Mean LDCW time and RPE were greater for participants in the lowest tertile compared to those in the highest; mean VO 2 peak and HABC PPB scores were lower, suggesting hierarchical associations between fatigability, functional performance, and ABI (p < 0.05 for all). Odds of PWE were greater for those in the lowest ABI tertile compared to the highest; odds of reporting high RPE were greater for those in the middle tertile. Lower ABI is associated with poorer physical function and increased fatigability, suggesting that early changes in ABI may infer greater risk of functional decline, even among those who may not progress to PAD. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Plasma Renalase is Not Associated with Blood Pressure and Brachial-Ankle Pulse Wave Velocity in Chinese Adults With Normal Renal Function.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Lv, Yong-Bo; Chu, Chao; Wang, Man; Xie, Bing-Qing; Wang, Lan; Yang, Fan; Yan, Ding-Yi; Yang, Rui-Hai; Yang, Jun; Ren, Yong; Yuan, Zu-Yi; Mu, Jian-Jun

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the association of renalase with blood pressure (BP) and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) in order to better understand the role of renalase in the pathogenesis of hypertension and atherosclerosis. A total of 344 subjects with normal kidney function were recruited from our previously established cohort in Shaanxi Province, China. They were divided into the normotensive (NT) and hypertensive (HT) groups or high baPWV and normal baPWV on the basis of BP levels or baPWV measured with an automatic waveform analyzer. Plasma renalase was determined through an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Plasma renalase did not significantly differ between HT and NT groups (3.71 ± 0.69 µg/mL vs. 3.72 ± 0.73 μg/mL, P = 0.905) and between subjects with and without high baPWV (3.67 ± 0.66 µg/mL vs. 3.73 ± 0.74 µg/mL, P = 0.505). However, baPWV was significantly higher in the HT group than in the NT group (1460.4 ± 236.7 vs. 1240.7 ± 174.5 cm/s, P < 0.001). Plasma renalase was not correlated with BP levels and baPWV in the entire group. Linear and logistic regression analysis revealed that plasma renalase was not significantly associated with hypertension and high baPWV. Plasma renalase may not be associated with BP and baPWV in Chinese subjects with normal renal function. © 2016 The Author(s) Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity predicts decline in renal function and cardiovascular events in early stages of chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Hye Eun; Shin, Dong Il; Kim, Sung Jun; Koh, Eun Sil; Hwang, Hyeon Seok; Chung, Sungjin; Shin, Seok Joon

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the predictive capacity of the brachial-ankle aortic pulse wave velocity (baPWV), a marker of arterial stiffness, for the decline in renal function and for cardiovascular events in the early stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Two hundred forty-one patients who underwent a comprehensive check-up were included and were divided into two groups according to their estimated glomerular filtration rates (eGFR): patients with CKD categories G2, G3a and G3b (30 ≤ eGFR < 90 ml/min/1.73m(2), eGFR < 90 group; n=117) and those with eGFR ≥ 90 ml/min/1.73 m(2) (eGFR ≥ 90 group; n=124). The change in renal function, the eGFR change, was determined by the slope of eGFR against time. We analysed whether baPWV was associated with eGFR change or predicted cardiovascular events. baPWV was independently associated with eGFR change in a multivariate analysis of the total patients (β=-0.011, p=0.011) and remained significantly associated with eGFR change in a subgroup analysis of the eGFR < 90 group (β=-0.015, p=0.035). baPWV was independently associated with cardiovascular events (odds ratio=1.002, p=0.048) in the eGFR < 90 group, but not in the eGFR ≥ 90 group. The receiver operative characteristic curve analysis showed that 1,568 cm/sec was the cut-off value of baPWV for predicting CV events in the eGFR < 90 group (area under curve=0.691, p=0.03) CONCLUSIONS: In patients with early stages of CKD, baPWV was independently associated with the decline in renal function and short-term cardiovascular events.

  6. Independent Factors of Changes of Ankle-Brachial Index in Peripheral Arterial Occlusive Disease in Elderly Patients with or without Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Bąk, Ewelina; Marcisz, Czesław; Kadłubowska, Monika; Michalik, Anna; Krawczyk, Bożena; Dobrzyń-Matusiak, Dorota; Krzemińska, Sylwia; Fiałkowski, Tomasz; Glądys, Elżbieta; Drosdzol-Cop, Agnieszka

    2016-11-08

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) belongs to the commonly-occurring pathologies associated with elderly age. A simple tool for defining the severity of PAD is the ankle-brachial index (ABI). The purpose of this research was to determine independent factors of changes of ABI in elderly patients with occlusive PAD disease (PAOD) with and without diabetes. The research was carried out on 49 elderly patients with PAOD, including 29 patients with type 2 diabetes, and 20 patients without diabetes. The concentration of interleukin-6 (IL-6), E-selectin, fibrinogen, and C-reactive protein (CRP) in the blood serum was marked. In all patients, the independent factors of changes of ABI were determined with the use of the multiple logistic regression analysis. Our results show that in the group of patients with PAOD suffering from diabetes, it was demonstrated that the ABI was related to age, the duration of the symptoms of PAD, body mass index (BMI), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, fibrinogen, and sex (determination coefficient R² = 0.699). In patients with PAOD without diabetes, the ABI was related to age, the duration of the symptoms of PAD, the levels of CRP, E-selectin, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and the glomerular filtration rate(determination coefficient R² = 0.844). We conclude that in elderly patients with PAOD with and without diabetes, the participation of independent factors related to the ABI is diversified; in patients with diabetes, the concentration of IL-6 and fibrinogen is lower, and the concentration of E-selectin is higher than in patients without diabetes.

  7. Association of Far-Infrared Radiation Therapy and Ankle-Brachial Index of Patients on Hemodialysis with Peripheral Artery Occlusive Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Szu-Chia; Lee, Mei-Yueh; Huang, Jiun-Chi; Kuo, I-Ching; Mai, Hsiu-Chin; Kuo, Po-Lin; Chang, Jer-Ming; Hwang, Shang-Jyh; Chen, Hung-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aim: The ankle-brachial index (ABI) is recognized to be a good marker for atherosclerosis, and is useful in the diagnosis of peripheral artery occlusive disease (PAOD) which is prevalent among patients on hemodialysis (HD). Methods: This randomized trial aimed to evaluate the effect of far-infrared radiation (FIR) therapy on ABI in HD patients with PAOD. PAOD was defined as patients with ABI < 0.95. One hundred and eight HD patients were enrolled, including 50 in the control group and 58 in the FIR group. A WS TY101 FIR emitter was applied for 40 minutes during each HD session, three times per week for six months. The ABI was measured before and after the FIR therapy. Results: Regardless of FIR therapy, the bilateral ABI decreased (in the FIR group, left: 0.88±0.22 to 0.85±0.24, p = 0.188; right: 0.92±0.20 to 0.90±0.23, p = 0.372; in control group, left: 0.91±0.23 to 0.88±0.21, p = 0144; right: 0.93±0.17 to 0.89±0.21, p = 0.082). Multivariate logistic analysis of the FIR group revealed that high uric acid (odds ratio [OR]: 2.335; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.117-4.882; p=0.024) and aspirin use (OR: 16.463; 95% CI: 1.787-151.638; p=0.013) were independently associated with increased bilateral ABI after FIR therapy. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that ABI is not increased after FIR therapy in HD patients with PAOD. However, in the FIR group, patients with higher uric acid level or those who used aspirin have increased bilateral ABI after FIR therapy. PMID:27994503

  8. Independent and Joint Effect of Brachial-Ankle Pulse Wave Velocity and Blood Pressure Control on Incident Stroke in Hypertensive Adults.

    PubMed

    Song, Yun; Xu, Benjamin; Xu, Richard; Tung, Renee; Frank, Eric; Tromble, Wayne; Fu, Tong; Zhang, Weiyi; Yu, Tao; Zhang, Chunyan; Fan, Fangfang; Zhang, Yan; Li, Jianping; Bao, Huihui; Cheng, Xiaoshu; Qin, Xianhui; Tang, Genfu; Chen, Yundai; Yang, Tianlun; Sun, Ningling; Li, Xiaoying; Zhao, Lianyou; Hou, Fan Fan; Ge, Junbo; Dong, Qiang; Wang, Binyan; Xu, Xiping; Huo, Yong

    2016-07-01

    Pulse wave velocity (PWV) has been shown to influence the effects of antihypertensive drugs in the prevention of cardiovascular diseases. Data are limited on whether PWV is an independent predictor of stroke above and beyond hypertension control. This longitudinal analysis examined the independent and joint effect of brachial-ankle PWV (baPWV) with hypertension control on the risk of first stroke. This report included 3310 hypertensive adults, a subset of the China Stroke Primary Prevention Trial (CSPPT) with baseline measurements for baPWV. During a median follow-up of 4.5 years, 111 participants developed first stroke. The risk of stroke was higher among participants with baPWV in the highest quartile than among those in the lower quartiles (6.3% versus 2.4%; hazard ratio, 1.66; 95% confidence interval, 1.06-2.60). Similarly, the participants with inadequate hypertension control had a higher risk of stroke than those with adequate control (5.1% versus 1.8%; hazard ratio, 2.32; 95% confidence interval, 1.49-3.61). When baPWV and hypertension control were examined jointly, participants in the highest baPWV quartile and with inadequate hypertension control had the highest risk of stroke compared with their counterparts (7.5% versus 1.3%; hazard ratio, 3.57; 95% confidence interval, 1.88-6.77). There was a significant and independent effect of high baPWV on stroke as shown among participants with adequate hypertension control (4.2% versus 1.3%; hazard ratio, 2.29, 95% confidence interval, 1.09-4.81). In summary, among hypertensive patients, baPWV and hypertension control were found to independently and jointly affect the risk of first stroke. Participants with high baPWV and inadequate hypertension control had the highest risk of stroke compared with other groups. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  9. Independent Factors of Changes of Ankle-Brachial Index in Peripheral Arterial Occlusive Disease in Elderly Patients with or without Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Bąk, Ewelina; Marcisz, Czesław; Kadłubowska, Monika; Michalik, Anna; Krawczyk, Bożena; Dobrzyń-Matusiak, Dorota; Krzemińska, Sylwia; Fiałkowski, Tomasz; Glądys, Elżbieta; Drosdzol-Cop, Agnieszka

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) belongs to the commonly-occurring pathologies associated with elderly age. A simple tool for defining the severity of PAD is the ankle-brachial index (ABI). The purpose of this research was to determine independent factors of changes of ABI in elderly patients with occlusive PAD disease (PAOD) with and without diabetes. The research was carried out on 49 elderly patients with PAOD, including 29 patients with type 2 diabetes, and 20 patients without diabetes. The concentration of interleukin-6 (IL-6), E-selectin, fibrinogen, and C-reactive protein (CRP) in the blood serum was marked. In all patients, the independent factors of changes of ABI were determined with the use of the multiple logistic regression analysis. Our results show that in the group of patients with PAOD suffering from diabetes, it was demonstrated that the ABI was related to age, the duration of the symptoms of PAD, body mass index (BMI), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, fibrinogen, and sex (determination coefficient R2 = 0.699). In patients with PAOD without diabetes, the ABI was related to age, the duration of the symptoms of PAD, the levels of CRP, E-selectin, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and the glomerular filtration rate(determination coefficient R2 = 0.844). We conclude that in elderly patients with PAOD with and without diabetes, the participation of independent factors related to the ABI is diversified; in patients with diabetes, the concentration of IL-6 and fibrinogen is lower, and the concentration of E-selectin is higher than in patients without diabetes. PMID:27834825

  10. Ankle brachial index is equally predictive of exercise-induced limb ischemia in diabetic and non-diabetic patients with walking limitation.

    PubMed

    Henni, Samir; Ammi, Myriam; Gourdier, Anne-Sophie; Besnier, Louis; Signolet, Isabelle; Colas-Ribas, Christophe; Picquet, Jean; Abraham, Pierre

    2018-03-29

    In diabetic patients, arterial stiffness may impair compressibility of vessels and result in higher ankle to brachial index (ABI) than in non-diabetic subjects. We studied 1972 non-diabetic and 601 diabetic patients, with suspected peripheral artery disease, Exercise transcutaneous oxygen pressure (Ex-tcpO2), expressed in DROP index (limb tcpO2 change minus chest tcpO2 change), is insensitive to arterial stiffness and can estimate exercise-induced regional blood flow impairment (RBFI). A minimal DROP <-15 mm Hg indicates the presence of RBFI (positive test). ABI was simplified to a category variable (ABIc) by rounding ABI to the closest first decimal. In the ABIc range 0.4 to 1.1 linear regression for mean DROP values were: y = 34 x - 53; (R 2  = 0.211) and y = 33 x - 52; (R 2  = 0.186) in diabetic and Non-diabetic patients, respectively. Both Db and non-D patients showed a high proportion of positive Ex-tcpO2 tests for ABIc in the normal range (ABIc: 1.0 and over) from 27.1 to up to 58%. More than half of patients with borderline ABI (ABIc = 0.9) had RBFI during exercise. it was 65.6% in diabetic and 58.5% non-diabetic patients. Resting ABI was not a better predictor of exercise-induced RBFI in non-Db than in Diabetic patients. Our results highlights the interest of still measuring resting-ABI in diabetic patients to argue for the vascular origin of exertional limb pain, but also of performing exercise tests in patients with walking impairment. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Heel blood flow during loading and off-loading in bedridden older adults with low and normal ankle-brachial pressure index: a quasi-experimental study.

    PubMed

    Masaki, Nami; Sugama, Junko; Okuwa, Mayumi; Inagaki, Misako; Matsuo, Junko; Nakatani, Tosio; Sanada, Hiromi

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the differences in heel blood flow during loading and off-loading in bedridden adults older than 65 years. The patients were divided into three groups based on ankle-brachial pressure index (ABI) and transcutaneous oxygen tension (tcPO₂): (1) patients with an ABI ≥ 0.8 (Group A); (2) patients with an ABI < 0.8 and heel tcPO₂ ≥ 10 mmHg (Group B); and (3) patients with an ABI < 0.8 and heel tcPO₂ < 10 mmHg (Group C). Heel blood flow was monitored using tcPO₂ sensors. Data were collected with the heel (1) suspended above the bed surface (preload), (2) on the bed surface for 30 min (loading), and (3) again suspended above the bed surface for 60 min (off-loading). Heel blood flow during off-loading was assessed using three parameters: oxygen recovery index (ORI), total tcPO₂ for the first 10 min, and change in tcPO₂ after 60 min of off-loading. ORI in Group C (n = 8) was significantly shorter than in Groups A (n = 22) and B (n = 15). Total tcPO₂ for the first 10 min of off-loading in Group C was significantly less than that in Groups A and B. Change in tcPO₂ after 60 min of off-loading in Group C was less than in Group A. Based on these findings, additional preventive care against heel blood flow decrease in older adults with an ABI < 0.8 and heel tcPO₂ < 10 mmHg might be necessary after loading.

  12. Associations of Work Hours with Carotid Intima Media Thickness and Ankle-Brachial Index: The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA)

    PubMed Central

    Charles, Luenda E.; Fekedulegn, Desta; Burchfiel, Cecil M.; Fujishiro, Kaori; Landsbergis, Paul; Roux, Ana V. Diez; MacDonald, Leslie; Foy, Capri G.; Andrew, Michael E.; Stukovsky, Karen Hinckley; Baron, Sherry

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Long working hours may be associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD). The objective was to investigate cross-sectional associations of work hours with carotid intima media thickness (CIMT) and ankle brachial index (ABI). Methods Participants were 1,694 women and 1,868 men from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis. CIMT and ABI were measured using standard protocols. Information on work hours was obtained from questionnaires. Mean values of CIMT and ABI were examined across five categories of hours worked per week (≤20, 21-39, 40, 41-50, >50) using ANOVA/ANCOVA. P-values for trend were obtained from linear regression models. Results Mean age of participants was 56.9±8.4 years; 52.4% were men. Distinct patterns of association between work hours and the subclinical CVD biomarkers were found for women and men, although this heterogeneity by gender was not statistically significant. Among women only, work hours were positively associated with common (but not internal) CIMT (p=0.073) after full risk factor adjustment. Compared to women working 40 hours, those working >50 hours were more likely to have an ABI <1 (vs. 1-1.4) (OR=1.85, 95% CI=1.01-3.38). In men, work hours and ABI were inversely associated (p=0.046). There was some evidence that the association between work hours and ABI was modified by occupational category (interaction p=0.061). Among persons classified as Management/Professionals, longer work hours was associated with lower ABI (p=0.015). No significant associations were observed among other occupational groups. Conclusion Working longer hours may be associated with subclinical CVD. These associations should be investigated using longitudinal studies. PMID:22767870

  13. Associations of work hours with carotid intima-media thickness and ankle-brachial index: the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA).

    PubMed

    Charles, Luenda E; Fekedulegn, Desta; Burchfiel, Cecil M; Fujishiro, Kaori; Landsbergis, Paul; Diez Roux, Ana V; Macdonald, Leslie; Foy, Capri G; Andrew, Michael E; Stukovsky, Karen H; Baron, Sherry

    2012-10-01

    Long working hours may be associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD). The objective was to investigate cross-sectional associations of work hours with carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT) and ankle-brachial index (ABI). Participants were 1694 women and 1868 men from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis. CIMT and ABI were measured using standard protocols. Information on work hours was obtained from questionnaires. Mean values of CIMT and ABI were examined across five categories of hours worked per week (≤20, 21-39, 40, 41-50 and >50) using analysis of variance/analysis of covariance. p Values for trend were obtained from linear regression models. Mean age of participants was 56.9±8.4 years; 52.4% were men. Distinct patterns of association between work hours and the subclinical CVD biomarkers were found for women and men, although this heterogeneity by gender was not statistically significant. Among women only, work hours were positively associated with common (but not internal) CIMT (p=0.073) after full risk factor adjustment. Compared with women working 40 h, those working >50 h were more likely to have an ABI <1 (vs 1-1.4) (OR=1.85, 95% CI 1.01 to 3.38). In men, work hours and ABI were inversely associated (p=0.046). There was some evidence that the association between work hours and ABI was modified by occupational category (interaction p=0.061). Among persons classified as management/professionals, longer work hours was associated with lower ABI (p=0.015). No significant associations were observed among other occupational groups. Working longer hours may be associated with subclinical CVD. These associations should be investigated using longitudinal studies.

  14. Brachial-Ankle Pulse Wave Velocity is Associated with the Risk of New Carotid Plaque Formation: Data from a Chinese Community-based Cohort.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yao; Fan, Fangfang; Kou, Minghao; Yang, Ying; Cheng, Guanliang; Jia, Jia; Gao, Lan; Zhou, Zechen; Chen, Dafang; Zhang, Yan; Huo, Yong

    2018-05-04

    Artery stiffness is an independent marker for atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases. However, whether the brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (ba-PWV) is related to new carotid plaque formation is unresolved. This study aimed to investigate the association between baseline ba-PWV and new carotid plaque formation in a Chinese community-based population without carotid plaques at baseline. This study population consisted of a total of 738 participants from an atherosclerosis cohort in Beijing, China. After a mean 2.3-year follow-up, the incidence of carotid plaques were 21.2% and 36.5% in the groups with ba-PWV < 1,400 cm/s and ≥1,400 cm/s, respectively. Compared with baseline ba-PWV < 1,400 cm/s group, ba-PWV ≥ 1,400 cm/s group was significantly associated with the incidence of new carotid plaque formation (odds ratio [OR] = 2.14, 95% CI: 1.50-3.03, P < 0.01), even after adjusting for common risk factors (OR = 1.52, 95% CI: 1.02-2.25, P = 0.04). Furthermore, there was a strong relationship between baseline ba-PWV and carotid plaque formation in subjects with ba-PWV < 1,400 cm/s, but no such relationship was found in subjects with baseline ba-PWV ≥ 1,400 cm/s. In conclusion, this study suggests that baseline ba-PWV is independently associated with the risk of carotid plaque formation in a Chinese community-based population.

  15. Ankle-brachial index and its link to automated carotid ultrasound measurement of intima-media thickness variability in 500 Japanese coronary artery disease patients.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Nobutaka; Araki, Tadashi; Sugi, Kaoru; Nakamura, Masatako; Deidda, Martino; Molinari, Filippo; Meiburger, Kristen M; Acharya, U Rajendra; Saba, Luca; Bassareo, Pier Paolo; Di Martino, Michele; Nagashima, Yoshinori; Mercuro, Giuseppe; Nakano, Masataka; Nicolaides, Andrew; Suri, Jasjit S

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether the carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT) and intima-media thickness variability (IMTV) along the artery are correlated to the ankle-brachial index (ABI) in Japanese coronary artery disease patients. Five hundred consecutive patients (312 males; median age 69 ± 11 years) who underwent carotid ultrasonography and first coronary angiography were prospectively analyzed. By using automated software (AtheroEdge™, AtheroPoint, Roseville, CA, USA), we obtained the cIMT and IMTV. Pearson correlation analysis was performed to calculate the association between ABI, automatically measured cIMT, automatically measured IMTV, and the SYNTAX score. The mean cIMT was 0.881 ± 0.334 mm and the mean IMTV was 0.141 ± 0.112. IMTV was negatively and significantly correlated to ABI (ρ = -0.147; p = 0.001), whereas cIMT was not (ρ = -0.075; p = 0.097). IMTV and cIMT had the same significant correlation with the SYNTAX score. When we considered patients with a higher risk factor (ABI ≤ 0.9), we found higher values of IMTV and the SYNTAX score, but not higher values of cIMT. Logistic regression analysis showed that IMTV was independently associated with the complexity of the coronary artery disease (as assessed by the SYNTAX score). In conclusion, we show that IMTV automatically measured using AtheroEdge™ was correlated with ABI, whereas cIMT was not. IMTV could be integrated with cIMT measurement to improve the assessment of cardiovascular disease.

  16. The association of very-low-density lipoprotein with ankle-brachial index in peritoneal dialysis patients with controlled serum low-density lipoprotein cholesterol level

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Peripheral artery disease (PAD) represents atherosclerotic disease and is a risk factor for death in peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients, who tend to show an atherogenic lipid profile. In this study, we investigated the relationship between lipid profile and ankle-brachial index (ABI) as an index of atherosclerosis in PD patients with controlled serum low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol level. Methods Thirty-five PD patients, whose serum LDL cholesterol level was controlled at less than 120mg/dl, were enrolled in this cross-sectional study in Japan. The proportions of cholesterol level to total cholesterol level (cholesterol proportion) in 20 lipoprotein fractions and the mean size of lipoprotein particles were measured using an improved method, namely, high-performance gel permeation chromatography. Multivariate linear regression analysis was adjusted for diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular and/or cerebrovascular diseases. Results The mean (standard deviation) age was 61.6 (10.5) years; PD vintage, 38.5 (28.1) months; ABI, 1.07 (0.22). A low ABI (0.9 or lower) was observed in 7 patients (low-ABI group). The low-ABI group showed significantly higher cholesterol proportions in the chylomicron fraction and large very-low-density lipoproteins (VLDLs) (Fractions 3–5) than the high-ABI group (ABI>0.9). Adjusted multivariate linear regression analysis showed that ABI was negatively associated with serum VLDL cholesterol level (parameter estimate=-0.00566, p=0.0074); the cholesterol proportions in large VLDLs (Fraction 4, parameter estimate=-3.82, p=0.038; Fraction 5, parameter estimate=-3.62, p=0.0039) and medium VLDL (Fraction 6, parameter estimate=-3.25, p=0.014); and the size of VLDL particles (parameter estimate=-0.0352, p=0.032). Conclusions This study showed that the characteristics of VLDL particles were associated with ABI among PD patients. Lowering serum VLDL level may be an effective therapy against atherosclerosis in PD patients after the

  17. The Independent and Joint Association of Blood Pressure, Serum Total Homocysteine, and Fasting Serum Glucose Levels With Brachial-Ankle Pulse Wave Velocity in Chinese Hypertensive Adults.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoyun; Sun, Ningling; Yu, Tao; Fan, Fangfang; Zheng, Meili; Qian, Geng; Wang, Binyan; Wang, Yu; Tang, Genfu; Li, Jianping; Qin, Xianhui; Hou, Fanfan; Xu, Xiping; Yang, Xinchun; Chen, Yundai; Wang, Xiaobin; Huo, Yong

    2016-09-28

    This study aimed to investigate the independent and joint association of blood pressure (BP), homocysteine (Hcy), and fasting blood glucose (FBG) levels with brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV, a measure of arterial stiffness) in Chinese hypertensive adults.The analyses included 3967 participants whose BP, Hcy, FBG, and baPWV were measured along with other covariates. Systolic BP (SBP) was analyzed as 3 categories (SBP < 160 mmHg; 160 to 179 mmHg; ≥ 180 mmHg); Hcy as 3 categories (< 10 μmol/L; 10 to 14.9 μmol/L; ≥ 15.0 μmol/L) and FBG: normal (FBG < 5.6 mmol/L), impaired (5.6 mmol/L ≤ FBG < 7.0 mmol/L), and diabetes mellitus (FBG ≥ 7.0 mmol/L). We performed linear regression analyses to evaluate their associations with baPWV with adjustment for covariables.When analyzed individually, BP, Hcy, and FBG were each associated with baPWV. When BP and FBG were analyzed jointly, the highest baPWV value (mean ± SD: 2227 ± 466 cm/s) was observed in participants with FBG ≥ 7.0 mmol/L and SBP ≥ 180 mmHg (β = 432.5, P < 0.001), and the lowest baPWV value (mean ± SD: 1692 ± 289 cm/s) was seen in participants with NFG and SBP < 160 mmHg. When Hcy and FBG were analyzed jointly, the highest baPWV value (2072 ± 480 cm/s) was observed in participants with FBG ≥ 7.0 mmol/L and Hcy ≥ 15.0 μmol/L (β = 167.6, P < 0.001), while the lowest baPWV value (mean ± SD: 1773 ± 334 cm/s) was observed in participants with NFG and Hcy < 10 μmol/L.In Chinese hypertensive adults, SBP, Hcy, and FBG are individually and jointly associated with baPWV.Our findings underscore the importance of identifying individuals with multiple risk factors of baPWV including high SBP, FBG, and Hcy.

  18. Brachial-to-ankle pulse wave velocity as an independent prognostic factor for ovulatory response to clomiphene citrate in women with polycystic ovary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) has a risk for cardiovascular disease. Increased arterial stiffness has been observed in women with PCOS. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether the brachial-to-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) is a prognostic factor for ovulatory response to clomiphene citrate (CC) in women with PCOS. Methods This study was a retrospective cohort study of 62 women with PCOS conducted from January 2009 to December 2012 at the university hospital, Yamagata, Japan. We analyzed 62 infertile PCOS patients who received CC. Ovulation was induced by 100 mg CC for 5 days. CC non-responder was defined as failure to ovulate for at least 2 consecutive CC-treatment cycles. The endocrine, metabolic, and cardiovascular parameters between CC responder (38 patients) and non-responder (24 patients) groups were analyzed. Results In univariate analysis, waist-to-hip ratio, level of free testosterone, percentages of patients with dyslipidemia, impaired glucose tolerance, and diabetes mellitus, blood glucose and insulin levels at 60 min and 120 min, the area under the curve of glucose and insulin after 75-g oral glucose intolerance test, and baPWV were significantly higher in CC non-responders compared with responders. In multivariate logistic regression analysis, both waist-to-hip ratio (odds ratio, 1.77; 95% confidence interval, 2.2–14.1; P = 0.04) and baPWV (odds ratio, 1.71; 95% confidence interval, 1.1–2.8; P = 0.03) were independent predictors of ovulation induction by CC in PCOS patients. The predictive values of waist-to-hip ratio and baPWV for the CC resistance in PCOS patients were determined by the receiver operating characteristic curves. The area under the curves for waist-to-hip ratio and baPWV were 0.76 and 0.77, respectively. Setting the threshold at 0.83 for waist-to-hip ratio offered the best compromise between specificity (0.65) and sensitivity (0.84), while the setting the threshold at 1,182 cm/s for

  19. Brachial-to-ankle pulse wave velocity as an independent prognostic factor for ovulatory response to clomiphene citrate in women with polycystic ovary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Toshifumi; Igarashi, Hideki; Hara, Shuichiro; Amita, Mitsuyoshi; Matsuo, Koki; Hasegawa, Ayumi; Kurachi, Hirohisa

    2014-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) has a risk for cardiovascular disease. Increased arterial stiffness has been observed in women with PCOS. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether the brachial-to-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) is a prognostic factor for ovulatory response to clomiphene citrate (CC) in women with PCOS. This study was a retrospective cohort study of 62 women with PCOS conducted from January 2009 to December 2012 at the university hospital, Yamagata, Japan. We analyzed 62 infertile PCOS patients who received CC. Ovulation was induced by 100 mg CC for 5 days. CC non-responder was defined as failure to ovulate for at least 2 consecutive CC-treatment cycles. The endocrine, metabolic, and cardiovascular parameters between CC responder (38 patients) and non-responder (24 patients) groups were analyzed. In univariate analysis, waist-to-hip ratio, level of free testosterone, percentages of patients with dyslipidemia, impaired glucose tolerance, and diabetes mellitus, blood glucose and insulin levels at 60 min and 120 min, the area under the curve of glucose and insulin after 75-g oral glucose intolerance test, and baPWV were significantly higher in CC non-responders compared with responders. In multivariate logistic regression analysis, both waist-to-hip ratio (odds ratio, 1.77; 95% confidence interval, 2.2-14.1; P=0.04) and baPWV (odds ratio, 1.71; 95% confidence interval, 1.1-2.8; P=0.03) were independent predictors of ovulation induction by CC in PCOS patients. The predictive values of waist-to-hip ratio and baPWV for the CC resistance in PCOS patients were determined by the receiver operating characteristic curves. The area under the curves for waist-to-hip ratio and baPWV were 0.76 and 0.77, respectively. Setting the threshold at 0.83 for waist-to-hip ratio offered the best compromise between specificity (0.65) and sensitivity (0.84), while the setting the threshold at 1,182 cm/s for baPWV offered the best compromise between

  20. Femoral Artery Atherosclerosis Is Associated With Physical Function Across the Spectrum of the Ankle-Brachial Index: The San Diego Population Study.

    PubMed

    Wassel, Christina L; Ellis, Alicia M; Suder, Natalie C; Barinas-Mitchell, Emma; Rifkin, Dena E; Forbang, Nketi I; Denenberg, Julie O; Marasco, Antoinette M; McQuaide, Belinda J; Jenny, Nancy S; Allison, Matthew A; Ix, Joachim H; Criqui, Michael H

    2017-07-20

    The ankle-brachial index (ABI) is inadequate to detect early-stage atherosclerotic disease, when interventions to prevent functional decline may be the most effective. We determined associations of femoral artery atherosclerosis with physical functioning, across the spectrum of the ABI, and within the normal ABI range. In 2007-2011, 1103 multiethnic men and women participated in the San Diego Population Study, and completed all components of the summary performance score. Using Doppler ultrasound, superficial and common femoral intima media thickness and plaques were ascertained. Logistic regression was used to assess associations of femoral atherosclerosis with the summary performance score and its individual components. Models were adjusted for demographics, lifestyle factors, comorbidities, lipids, and kidney function. In adjusted models, among participants with a normal-range ABI (1.00-1.30), the highest tertile of superficial intima media thickness was associated with lower odds of a perfect summary performance score of 12 (odds ratio=0.56 [0.36, 0.87], P =0.009), and lower odds of a 4-m walk score of 4 (0.34 [0.16, 0.73], P =0.006) and chair rise score of 4 (0.56 [0.34, 0.94], P =0.03). Plaque presence (0.53 [0.29, 0.99], P =0.04) and greater total plaque burden (0.61 [0.43, 0.87], P =0.006) were associated with worse 4-m walk performance in the normal-range ABI group. Higher superficial intima media thickness was associated with lower summary performance score in all individuals ( P =0.02). Findings suggest that use of femoral artery atherosclerosis measures may be effective in individuals with a normal-range ABI, especially, for example, those with diabetes mellitus or a family history of peripheral artery disease, when detection can lead to earlier intervention to prevent functional declines and improve quality of life. © 2017 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley.

  1. Association of albumin-creatinine ratio and cystatin C with change in ankle-brachial index: the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA).

    PubMed

    Garimella, Pranav S; Ix, Joachim H; Katz, Ronit; Shlipak, Michael G; Criqui, Michael H; Siscovick, David S; Kramer, Holly; Sibley, Christopher T; Sarnak, Mark J

    2015-01-01

    Low ankle-brachial index (ABI) is a reflection of atherosclerotic disease, and high ABI is an indicator of calcified vessels. The associations of albuminuria and cystatin C level with incidence of either low or high ABI are unknown. Prospective longitudinal cohort study. MESA (Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis) enrolled community-dwelling adults (N=6,814) aged 45-84 years who were free of clinical cardiovascular disease at baseline. Baseline albumin-creatinine ratio (ACR) and serum cystatin C level. Development of low (<0.90), and high (>1.40) ABI using multinomial regression among persons with ABI of 0.90-1.40 at baseline. During 9.8 years of follow-up, 221 and 89 participants progressed to low and high ABIs, respectively. Baseline ACR and cystatin C level were higher among progressors compared with nonprogressors. In multivariable analyses, doubling of ACR was associated with increased risk of progression to low (OR, 1.08; 95% CI, 0.99-1.20) and high (OR, 1.16; 95% CI, 1.01-1.32) ABIs. Compared to the lowest quintile, the highest quintile of ACR had a significantly increased risk of progression to low (OR, 1.79; 95% CI, 1.03-3.12) and high (OR, 2.76; 95% CI, 1.32-5.77) ABIs. Higher cystatin C levels were associated with progression to low (OR per 1-SD greater, 1.12; 95% CI, 1.00-1.26) but not high (OR per 1-SD greater, 1.01; 95% CI, 0.81-1.25) ABI, but the highest quintile of cystatin C was not associated independently with either outcome. Single measure of albuminuria and low number of progressors to high ABI. In adults free of clinical cardiovascular disease, albuminuria was a strong independent risk factor for the development of both high and low ABIs, important and different measures of peripheral artery disease. Copyright © 2014 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Association Between Chromosome 9p21 Variants and the Ankle-Brachial Index Identified by a Meta-Analysis of 21 Genome-Wide Association Studies

    PubMed Central

    Murabito, Joanne M.; White, Charles C.; Kavousi, Maryam; Sun, Yan V.; Feitosa, Mary F.; Nambi, Vijay; Lamina, Claudia; Schillert, Arne; Coassin, Stefan; Bis, Joshua C.; Broer, Linda; Crawford, Dana C.; Franceschini, Nora; Frikke-Schmidt, Ruth; Haun, Margot; Holewijn, Suzanne; Huffman, Jennifer E.; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Kiechl, Stefan; Kollerits, Barbara; Montasser, May E.; Nolte, Ilja M.; Rudock, Megan E.; Senft, Andrea; Teumer, Alexander; van der Harst, Pim; Vitart, Veronique; Waite, Lindsay L.; Wood, Andrew R.; Wassel, Christina L.; Absher, Devin M.; Allison, Matthew A.; Amin, Najaf; Arnold, Alice; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Aulchenko, Yurii; Bandinelli, Stefania; Barbalic, Maja; Boban, Mladen; Brown-Gentry, Kristin; Couper, David J.; Criqui, Michael H.; Dehghan, Abbas; Heijer, Martin den; Dieplinger, Benjamin; Ding, Jingzhong; Dörr, Marcus; Espinola-Klein, Christine; Felix, Stephan B.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Folsom, Aaron R.; Fraedrich, Gustav; Gibson, Quince; Goodloe, Robert; Gunjaca, Grgo; Haltmayer, Meinhard; Heiss, Gerardo; Hofman, Albert; Kieback, Arne; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Kolcic, Ivana; Kullo, Iftikhar J.; Kritchevsky, Stephen B.; Lackner, Karl J.; Li, Xiaohui; Lieb, Wolfgang; Lohman, Kurt; Meisinger, Christa; Melzer, David; Mohler, Emile R; Mudnic, Ivana; Mueller, Thomas; Navis, Gerjan; Oberhollenzer, Friedrich; Olin, Jeffrey W.; O’Connell, Jeff; O’Donnell, Christopher J.; Palmas, Walter; Penninx, Brenda W.; Petersmann, Astrid; Polasek, Ozren; Psaty, Bruce M.; Rantner, Barbara; Rice, Ken; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Rotter, Jerome I.; Seldenrijk, Adrie; Stadler, Marietta; Summerer, Monika; Tanaka, Toshiko; Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; van Gilst, Wiek H.; Vermeulen, Sita H.; Wild, Sarah H.; Wild, Philipp S.; Willeit, Johann; Zeller, Tanja; Zemunik, Tatijana; Zgaga, Lina; Assimes, Themistocles L.; Blankenberg, Stefan; Boerwinkle, Eric; Campbell, Harry; Cooke, John P.; de Graaf, Jacqueline; Herrington, David; Kardia, Sharon L. R.; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Murray, Anna; Münzel, Thomas; Newman, Anne; Oostra, Ben A.; Rudan, Igor; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Snieder, Harold; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Völker, Uwe; Wright, Alan F.; Wichmann, H.-Erich; Wilson, James F.; Witteman, Jacqueline C.M.; Liu, Yongmei; Hayward, Caroline; Borecki, Ingrid B.; Ziegler, Andreas; North, Kari E.; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Kronenberg, Florian

    2012-01-01

    Background Genetic determinants of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) remain largely unknown. To identify genetic variants associated with the ankle-brachial index (ABI), a noninvasive measure of PAD, we conducted a meta-analysis of genome-wide association study data from 21 population-based cohorts. Methods and Results Continuous ABI and PAD (ABI≤0.9) phenotypes adjusted for age and sex were examined. Each study conducted genotyping and imputed data to the ~2.5 million SNPs in HapMap. Linear and logistic regression models were used to test each SNP for association with ABI and PAD using additive genetic models. Study-specific data were combined using fixed-effects inverse variance weighted meta-analyses. There were a total of 41,692 participants of European ancestry (~60% women, mean ABI 1.02 to 1.19), including 3,409 participants with PAD and with GWAS data available. In the discovery meta-analysis, rs10757269 on chromosome 9 near CDKN2B had the strongest association with ABI (β= −0.006, p=2.46x10−8). We sought replication of the 6 strongest SNP associations in 5 population-based studies and 3 clinical samples (n=16,717). The association for rs10757269 strengthened in the combined discovery and replication analysis (p=2.65x10−9). No other SNP associations for ABI or PAD achieved genome-wide significance. However, two previously reported candidate genes for PAD and one SNP associated with coronary artery disease (CAD) were associated with ABI : DAB21P (rs13290547, p=3.6x10−5); CYBA (rs3794624, p=6.3x10−5); and rs1122608 (LDLR, p=0.0026). Conclusions GWAS in more than 40,000 individuals identified one genome-wide significant association on chromosome 9p21 with ABI. Two candidate genes for PAD and 1 SNP for CAD are associated with ABI. PMID:22199011

  3. Brachial plexopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... problems are more common in certain groups. For example, young men more often have inflammatory or post-viral brachial plexus disease called Parsonage-Turner syndrome. Tests that may be done to diagnose this condition ...

  4. Accuracy of Physical Examination, Ankle-Brachial Index, and Ultrasonography in the Diagnosis of Arterial Injury in Patients With Penetrating Extremity Trauma: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    deSouza, Ian S; Benabbas, Roshanak; McKee, Sean; Zangbar, Bardiya; Jain, Ashika; Paladino, Lorenzo; Boudourakis, Leon; Sinert, Richard

    2017-08-01

    Penetrating Extremity Trauma (PET) may result in arterial injury, a rare but limb- and life-threatening surgical emergency. Timely, accurate diagnosis is essential for potential intervention in order to prevent significant morbidity. Using a systematic review/meta-analytic approach, we determined the utility of physical examination, Ankle-Brachial Index (ABI), and Ultrasonography (US) in the diagnosis of arterial injury in emergency department (ED) patients who have sustained PET. We applied a test-treatment threshold model to determine which evaluations may obviate CT Angiography (CTA). We searched PubMed, Embase, and Scopus from inception to November 2016 for studies of ED patients with PET. We included studies on adult and pediatric subjects. We defined the reference standard to include CTA, catheter angiography, or surgical exploration. When low-risk patients did not undergo the reference standard, trials must have specified that patients were observed for at least 24 hours. We used the Quality Assessment Tool for Diagnostic Accuracy Studies (QUADAS-2) to evaluate bias and applicability of the included studies. We calculated positive and negative likelihood ratios (LR+ and LR-) of physical examination ("hard signs" of vascular injury), US, and ABI. Using established CTA test characteristics (sensitivity = 96.2%, specificity = 99.2%) and applying the Pauker-Kassirer method, we developed a test-treatment threshold model (testing threshold = 0.14%, treatment threshold = 72.9%). We included eight studies (n = 2,161, arterial injury prevalence = 15.5%). Studies had variable quality with most at high risk for partial and double verification bias. Some studies investigated multiple index tests: physical examination (hard signs) in three studies (n = 1,170), ABI in five studies (n = 1,040), and US in four studies (n = 173). Due to high heterogeneity (I 2  > 75%) of the results, we could not calculate LR+ or LR- for hard signs or LR+ for ABI. The weighted

  5. Ankle-brachial index and inter-artery blood pressure differences as predictors of cognitive function in overweight and obese older adults with diabetes: results from the Action for Health in Diabetes movement and memory study.

    PubMed

    Espeland, Mark A; Beavers, Kristen M; Gibbs, Bethany Barone; Johnson, Karen C; Hughes, Timothy M; Baker, Laura D; Jakicic, John; Korytkowski, Mary; Miller, Marsha; Bray, George A

    2015-10-01

    Ankle-brachial index (ABI) and interartery systolic blood pressure differences, as markers of vascular disease, are plausible risk factors for deficits in cognitive function among overweight and obese adults with type 2 diabetes. The ABI and maximum interartery differences (MIAD) in systolic blood pressures were assessed annually for five years among 479 participants assigned to the control condition in a randomized clinical trial of a behavioral weight loss intervention. A battery of standardized cognitive function tests was administered 4 to 5 years later. Analyses of covariance were used to assess relationships that ABI, MIAD, and progression of ABI and MIAD had with cognitive function. There was a curvilinear relationship between ABI and a composite index of cognitive function (p = 0.03), with lower ABI being associated with poorer function. In graded fashions, both greater MIAD and increases in MIAD over time also had modest relationships with poorer verbal memory (both p ≤ 0.05), processing speed (both p ≤ 0.05), and composite cognitive function (both p < 0.04). These relationships were independent of each other and remained evident after extensive covariate adjustment. In overweight and obese adults with type 2 diabetes, lower ABI and larger interartery systolic blood pressure differences have modest, independent, graded relationships with poorer cognitive function 4-5 years later. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Association between work-related psychological stress and arterial stiffness measured by brachial-ankle pulse-wave velocity in young Japanese males from an information service company.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Kyoko; Nakao, Mutsuhiro; Karita, Kanae; Nishikitani, Mariko; Yano, Eiji

    2005-10-01

    This study examined the relationship between work-related psychological stress and arterial stiffness in young Japanese workers. A cross-sectional study was conducted on 396 Japanese male workers, aged 24 to 39 years, employed in a Japanese information service company. Work-related psychological stress was measured by the Job Content Questionnaire based on the job demand-control model. The job-strain index was defined as the ratio of job demand to job-control scores. The outcome of the study was the degree of arteriosclerosis as assessed by brachial pulse-wave velocity (baPWV). The cardiovascular risk factors analyzed were age, heart rate, blood pressure, body mass index, serum lipid, blood sugar levels, catecholamine levels, ethanol consumption, smoking, and overtime. In addition, psychological responses were assessed by tension-anxiety and anger-hostility scales in the Profile of Mood States (POMS). The baPWV was positively (P<0.05) associated with physiological variables including age, heart rate, body mass index, and serum levels of total cholesterol, fasting glucose, and noradrenaline, but negatively (P<0.01) associated with the job-strain index. Significant associations were not found on the POMS tension-anxiety and anger-hostility scale scores. The negative correlation between baPWV and the job-strain index was consistent even after control for the effects of significant physiological variables. The association between job stress and baPWV was found to be inconsistent with the results of previous western studies, and it may require further investigation while taking into account occupation, cardiovascular risk factors, and Japanese culture.

  7. Early intervention of long-acting nifedipine GITS reduces brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity and improves arterial stiffness in Chinese patients with mild hypertension: a 24-week, single-arm, open-label, prospective study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jidong; Wang, Yan; Hu, Haijuan; Yang, Xiaohong; Tian, Zejun; Liu, Demin; Gu, Guoqiang; Zheng, Hongmei; Xie, Ruiqin; Cui, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Nifedipine gastrointestinal therapeutic system (GITS) is used to treat angina and hypertension. The authors aimed to study the early intervention impact on arterial stiffness and pulse wave velocity (PWV) independent of its blood-pressure-(BP) lowering effect in mild hypertensive patients. This single-center, single-arm, open-label, prospective, Phase IV study recruited patients with mild hypertension and increased PWV from December 2013 to December 2014 (N=138; age, 18-75 years; systolic blood pressure, 140-160 mmHg; diastolic BP, 90-100 mmHg; increased brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity [baPWV, ≥12 m/s]). Nifedipine GITS (30 mg/d) was administered for 24 weeks to achieve target BP of <140/90 mmHg. The dose was uptitrated at 60 mg/d in case of unsatisfactory BP reduction after 4 weeks. Primary study end point was the change in baPWV after nifedipine GITS treatment. Hemodynamic parameters (office BP, 24-hour ambulatory BP monitoring, and heart rate and adverse events) were evaluated at baseline and followed-up at 2, 4, 8, 12, 18, and 24 weeks. Majority of patients (n=117; 84.8%) completed the study. baPWV decreased significantly at 4 weeks compared with baseline (1,598.87±239.82 vs 1,500.89±241.15 cm/s, P <0.001), was stable at 12 weeks (1,482.24±215.14 cm/s, P <0.001), and remained steady through 24 weeks (1,472.58±205.01 cm/s, P <0.001). Office BP reduced from baseline to week 4 (154/95 vs 136/85 mmHg) and remained steady until 24 weeks. Nifedipine GITS significantly decreased 24-hour ambulatory BP monitoring ( P <0.001) after 24 weeks from baseline. Mean arterial pressure and pulse pressure were lowered significantly after 4, 12, and 24 weeks of treatment ( P <0.001). These changes in baPWV were significantly correlated with changes in systolic blood pressure, diastolic BP, and mean arterial pressure ( P <0.05), but not with changes in pulse pressure ( P >0.05). There were no other drug-related serious adverse events. Nifedipine GITS was considerably

  8. Comparison of Carotid-Femoral and Brachial-Ankle Pulse-Wave Velocity in Association With Target Organ Damage in the Community-Dwelling Elderly Chinese: The Northern Shanghai Study.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yuyan; Zhu, Mengyun; Bai, Bin; Chi, Chen; Yu, Shikai; Teliewubai, Jiadela; Xu, Henry; Wang, Kai; Xiong, Jing; Zhou, Yiwu; Ji, Hongwei; Fan, Ximin; Yu, Xuejing; Li, Jue; Blacher, Jacques; Zhang, Yi; Xu, Yawei

    2017-02-20

    Carotid-femoral pulse-wave velocity (cf-PWV) and brachial-ankle PWV (ba-PWV) are the 2 most frequently applied PWV measurements. However, little is known about the comparison of hypertensive target organ damage (TOD) with cf-PWV and ba-PWV. A total of 1599 community-dwelling elderly subjects (age >65 years) in northern Shanghai were recruited from June 2014 to August 2015. Both cf-PWV and ba-PWV were measured using SphygmoCor and VP1000 systems, respectively. Within the framework of comprehensive cardiovascular examinations, risk factors were assessed, and asymptomatic TOD, including left ventricular mass index, peak transmitral pulsed Doppler velocity/early diastolic tissue Doppler velocity (E/Ea), carotid intima-media thickness, arterial plaque, creatinine clearance rate, and urinary albumin-creatinine ratio were all evaluated. Both PWVs were significantly associated with male sex, age, waist/hip circumference, fasting plasma glucose, and systolic blood pressure, and ba-PWV was also significantly related to body mass index. Both PWVs were significantly correlated with most TOD. When cf-PWV and ba-PWV were both or separately put into the stepwise linear regression model together with cardiovascular risk factors and treatment, only cf-PWV, but not ba-PWV, was significantly associated with carotid intima-media thickness and creatinine clearance rate ( P <0.05). When cf-PWV and ba-PWV were both or separately put into the same full-mode model after adjustment for confounders, only cf-PWV, but not ba-PWV, showed significant association with carotid intima-media thickness and creatinine clearance rate ( P <0.05). Similar results were observed in logistic regression analysis. Taken together, in the community-dwelling elderly Chinese, cf-PWV seems to be more closely associated with hypertensive TOD, especially vascular and renal TOD, as compared with ba-PWV. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT02368938. © 2017 The Authors. Published on behalf of

  9. Brachial Plexus Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... inflammation. There is a rare syndrome called Parsonage-Turner Syndrome, or brachial plexitis , which causes inflammation of the ... inflammation. There is a rare syndrome called Parsonage-Turner Syndrome, or brachial plexitis , which causes inflammation of the ...

  10. Can Chronic Ankle Instability be Prevented? Rethinking Management of Lateral Ankle Sprains.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denegar, Craig R.; Miller, Sayers J., III

    2002-01-01

    Investigates whether chronic ankle instability can be prevented, discussing: the relationship between mechanical and functional instability; normal ankle mechanics, sequelae to lateral ankle sprains, and abnormal ankle mechanics; and tissue healing, joint dysfunction, and acute lateral ankle sprain management. The paper describes a treatment model…

  11. Ankle instability.

    PubMed

    Ferran, Nicholas A; Oliva, Francesco; Maffulli, Nicola

    2009-06-01

    Acute ankle sprains are common, and if inadequately treated may result in chronic instability. Lateral ankle injuries are most common, with deltoid injuries rare and associated with ankle fractures/dislocation. Medial ankle instability is rare. Functional management of acute lateral ankle sprains is the treatment of choice, with acute ligament repair reserved for athletes. Chronic lateral ankle instability is initially managed conservatively, however, failure of rehabilitation is an indication for surgical management. Nonanatomic tenodesis reconstructions have poor long-term results, sacrifice peroneal tendons, and disrupt normal ankle and hindfoot biomechanics. Anatomic repair of the anterior talofibular and calcaneofibular ligaments is recommended when the quality of the ruptured ligaments permits. Anatomic reconstruction with autograft or allograft should be performed when ligaments are attenuated. The role of arthroscopic reconstruction is evolving. Ankle arthroscopy should be performed at the time of repair or reconstruction and should address any other intra-articular causes of pain.

  12. Ankle sprain - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    Lateral ankle sprain - aftercare; Medial ankle sprain - aftercare; Medial ankle injury - aftercare; Ankle syndesmosis sprain - aftercare; Syndesmosis injury - aftercare; ATFL injury - aftercare; CFL injury - ...

  13. Perinatal brachial plexus palsy

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, John; Watt, Joe; Olson, Jaret; Van Aerde, John

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND Perinatal brachial plexus palsy (PBPP) is a flaccid paralysis of the arm at birth that affects different nerves of the brachial plexus supplied by C5 to T1 in 0.42 to 5.1 infants per 1000 live births. OBJECTIVES To identify antenatal factors associated with PBPP and possible preventive measures, and to review the natural history as compared with the outcome after primary or secondary surgical interventions. METHODS A literature search on randomized controlled trials, systematic reviews and meta-analyses on the prevention and treatment of PBPP was performed. EMBASE, Medline, CINAHL and the Cochrane Library were searched until June 2005. Key words for searches included ‘brachial plexus’, ‘brachial plexus neuropathy’, ‘brachial plexus injury’, ‘birth injury’ and ‘paralysis, obstetric’. RESULTS There were no prospective studies on the cause or prevention of PBPP. Whereas birth trauma is said to be the most common cause, there is some evidence that PBPP may occur before delivery. Shoulder dystocia and PBPP are largely unpredictable, although associations of PBPP with shoulder dystocia, infants who are large for gestational age, maternal diabetes and instrumental delivery have been reported. The various forms of PBPP, clinical findings and diagnostic measures are described. Recent evidence suggests that the natural history of PBPP is not all favourable, and residual deficits are estimated at 20% to 30%, in contrast with the previous optimistic view of full recovery in greater than 90% of affected children. There were no randomized controlled trials on nonoperative management. There was no conclusive evidence that primary surgical exploration of the brachial plexus supercedes conservative management for improved outcome. However, results from nonrandomized studies indicated that children with severe injuries do better with surgical repair. Secondary surgical reconstructions were inferior to primary intervention, but could still improve arm

  14. Obstetric brachial plexus injury

    PubMed Central

    Thatte, Mukund R.; Mehta, Rujuta

    2011-01-01

    Obstetric brachial plexus injury (OBPI), also known as birth brachial plexus injury (BBPI), is unfortunately a rather common injury in newborn children. Incidence varies between 0.15 and 3 per 1000 live births in various series and countries. Although spontaneous recovery is known, there is a large subset which does not recover and needs primary or secondary surgical intervention. An extensive review of peer-reviewed publications has been done in this study, including clinical papers, review articles and systematic review of the subject. In addition, the authors’ experience of several hundred cases over the last 15 years has been added and has influenced the ultimate text. Causes of OBPI, indications of primary nerve surgery and secondary reconstruction of shoulder, etc. are discussed in detail. Although all affected children do not require surgery in infancy, a substantial proportion of them, however, require it and are better off for it. Secondary surgery is needed for shoulder elbow and hand problems. Results of nerve surgery are very encouraging. Children with OBPI should be seen early by a hand surgeon dealing with brachial plexus injuries. Good results are possible with early and appropriate intervention even in severe cases. PMID:22279269

  15. Ankle sprain (image)

    MedlinePlus

    An ankle sprain is a common injury to the ankle. The most common way the ankle is injured is when ... swelling, inflammation, and bruising around the ankle. An ankle sprain injury may take a few weeks to many ...

  16. Sprained Ankles

    MedlinePlus

    ... away before the ligament is injured. Types of Sprains In young children, the ankle is the most commonly sprained joint, followed by ... A walking cast may be necessary if the ankle or foot injury has been severe. Most grade 1 sprains will heal within two weeks without subsequent complications. ...

  17. Ultrasound of the Brachial Plexus.

    PubMed

    Griffith, James F

    2018-07-01

    Examination of the brachial plexus with ultrasound is efficient because it allows many parts of the brachial plexus as well as the surrounding soft tissues to be assessed with high spatial resolution. The key to performing good ultrasound of the brachial plexus is being familiar with the anatomy and the common variants. That makes it possible to concentrate solely on the ultrasound appearances free of simultaneously wondering about the anatomy. Ultrasound of the brachial plexus is particularly good for assessing nerve sheath tumor, perineural fibrosis, metastases, some inflammatory neuropathies, neuralgic amyotrophy, and posttraumatic sequalae. It is limited in the assessment of thoracic outlet syndrome and in the acute/subacute trauma setting. This review addresses the anatomy, ultrasound technique, as well as pathology of the brachial plexus from the cervical foramina to the axilla. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  18. Ankle replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... C, Anderson PA, eds. Skeletal Trauma: Basic Science, Management, and Reconstruction . 5th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap 68. Murphy GA. Total ankle arthroplasty. In: Azar FM, Beaty JH, Canale ...

  19. Ankle Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... Long-term Abdominal Pain (Stomach Pain), Short-term Ankle Problems Breast Problems in Men Breast Problems in Women Chest Pain in Infants and Children Chest Pain, Acute Chest Pain, Chronic Cold and Flu Cough Diarrhea ...

  20. Syndesmotic ankle sprain.

    PubMed

    Childs, Sharon G

    2012-01-01

    Ankle sprain injuries are the most common type of joint sprain. The prevalence of ankle joint sprains accounts for 21% of joint injuries in the body. Although somewhat rare, high-ankle or syndesmotic ankle sprains occur in up to 15% of ankle trauma. This article will present the pathomechanics of the high-ankle or syndesmotic sprain.

  1. Three-tesla magnetic resonance neurography of the brachial plexus in cervical radiculopathy.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Takeshi; Sueyoshi, Takeshi; Suwazono, Shugo; Suehara, Masahito

    2015-09-01

    There have been no reports of the use of 3-Tesla magnetic resonance neurography (3T MRN) to characterize cervical radiculopathy. In particular, there are no reports of MRN of brachial plexus involvement in patients with cervical radiculopathy. We reviewed retrospectively 12 consecutive patients with cervical radiculopathy who underwent 3T MRN. The median age was 54.5 years. Eleven of 12 patients were men. The distribution of nerve-root signal abnormality was correlated with intervertebral foraminal stenosis and the presence of muscles that exhibited weakness and/or signs of denervation on electromyography. MRN abnormalities were found to extend into the distal part of the brachial plexus in 10 patients. This study demonstrates that MRN is potentially useful for diagnosis in patients with suspected cervical radiculopathy. Moreover, the finding of brachial plexus involvement on MRN may indicate a possible pathophysiological relationship between cervical radiculopathy and brachial plexopathy. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Avulsion of the brachial plexus in a great horned owl (Bubo virginaus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, M.P.; Stauber, E.; Thomas, N.J.

    1989-01-01

    Avulsion of the brachial plexus was documented in a Great Horned Owl (Bubo virginianus). A fractured scapula was also present. Cause of these injuries was not known but was thought to be due to trauma. Differentiation of musculoskeletal injury from peripheral nerve damage can be difficult in raptors. Use of electromyography and motor nerve conduction velocity was helpful in demonstrating peripheral nerve involvement. A brachial plexus avulsion was suspected on the basis of clinical signs, presence of electromyographic abnormalities in all muscles supplied by the nerves of the brachial plexus and absence of median-ulnar motor nerve conduction velocities.

  3. Ankle arthroscopy

    MedlinePlus

    ... you very sleepy during the operation. During the procedure, the surgeon does the following: Inserts the arthroscope into your ankle through a small incision. The scope is connected to a video monitor in the operating room. This allows the surgeon to view the ...

  4. Ankle Sprains

    MedlinePlus

    ... sports, exercising, or doing any other kind of physical activity. Watch your step when you're walking or running on uneven ... doing, or take extra care to watch your step when you're tired. If you've had ... physical activities. Using tape, ankle braces, or high-top shoes ...

  5. [Complications in brachial plexus surgery].

    PubMed

    Martínez, Fernando; Pinazzo, Samantha; Moragues, Rodrigo; Suarez, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Although traumatic brachial plexus injuries are relatively rare in trauma patients, their effects on the functionality of the upper limb can be very disabling. The authors' objective was to assess the complications in a series of patients operated for brachial plexus injuries. This was a retrospective evaluation of patients operated on by the authors between August 2009 and March 2013. We performed 36 surgeries on 33 patients. The incidence of complications was 27.7%. Of these, only 1 (2.7%) was considered serious and associated with the procedure (iatrogenic injury of brachial artery). There was another serious complication (hypoxia in patients with airway injury) but it was not directly related to the surgical procedure. All other complications were considered minor (wound dehiscence, hematoma, infection). There was no mortality in our series. The complications in our series are similar to those reported in the literature. Serious complications (vascular, neural) are rare and represent less than 5% in all the different series. Given the rate of surgical complications and the poor functional perspective for a brachial plexus injury without surgery, we believe that surgery should be the treatment of choice. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  6. Ankle pain and peroneal tendon pathology.

    PubMed

    Baumhauer, Judith F; Nawoczenski, Deborah A; DiGiovanni, Benedict F; Flemister, A Samuel

    2004-01-01

    Chronic ankle pain can be due to multiple causes. A thorough review of the patient's history with a physical examination concentrating on anatomic structures surrounding the ankle is imperative. The most common of causes have been presented. The addition of provocative testing and radiographic examinations can aid in elucidating the pathology. After treatment of the injury, attention to training technique, shoe and insert usage as well as individual gait abnormalities are integrated into global patient education to decrease the incidence of injury recurrence.

  7. Ankle sprain.

    PubMed

    Struijs, Peter Aa; Kerkhoffs, Gino Mmj

    2010-05-13

    Injury of the lateral ligament complex of the ankle joint occurs in about one in 10,000 people a day, accounting for a quarter of all sports injuries. We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of treatment strategies for acute ankle ligament ruptures? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to November 2009 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). We found 38 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: cold treatment, diathermy, functional treatment, homeopathic ointment, immobilisation, physiotherapy, surgery, and ultrasound.

  8. Ankle sprain

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Injury of the lateral ligament complex of the ankle joint occurs in about one in 10,000 people a day, accounting for a quarter of all sports injuries. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of treatment strategies for acute ankle ligament ruptures? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to November 2009 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 38 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: cold treatment, diathermy, functional treatment, homeopathic ointment, immobilisation, physiotherapy, surgery, and ultrasound. PMID:21718566

  9. [Brachial plexus. Anesthesia and analgesia].

    PubMed

    Schulz-Stübner, S

    2003-07-01

    This review explains the different approaches to the brachial plexus (posterior cervical, interscalene, supra- and infraclavicular, and axillary) and their advantages and disadvantages (indications, contraindications, and complications) for surgery and postoperative or chronic pain management. One of the focussed areas of this review is the use of continuous catheter techniques. Information about the most commonly used local anesthetics as well as adjuncts suggested in the literature is summarized. As essential components for the success of those techniques, organizational and documentation requirements are described. In summary, regional techniques for single shot or continuous block of the brachial plexus are an efficient and safe way of providing anesthesia and analgesia for surgery or pain in the region of the shoulder, arm, or hand.

  10. Management of Shoulder Problems Following Obstetric Brachial Plexus Injury

    PubMed Central

    Nixon, Matthew; Trail, Ian

    2013-01-01

    Obstetric brachial plexus injuries are common, with an incidence of 0.42 per 1000 live births in the UK, and with 25% of patients being left with permanent disability without intervention. The shoulder is the most commonly affected joint and, as a result of the subsequent imbalance of musculature, the abnormal deforming forces cause dysplasia of the glenohumeral joint. In the growing child, this presents with changing pattern of pathology, which requires a multidisciplinary approach and a broad range of treatment modalities to optimize function. PMID:27582903

  11. Chronic Ankle Instability

    MedlinePlus

    ... top of the talus is dome-shaped and... Softball Injuries to the Foot and Ankle Your feet ... ankles take a beating when you are playing softball. Softball players should be aware of the following ...

  12. Assessment of Ankle Injuries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mai, Nicholas; Cooper, Leslie

    2009-01-01

    School nurses are faced with the challenge of identifying and treating ankle injuries in the school setting. There is little information guiding the assessment and treatment of these children when an injury occurs. It is essential for school nurses to understand ankle anatomy, pathophysiology of the acute ankle injury, general and orthopedic…

  13. Anterior ankle impingement syndromes.

    PubMed

    Umans, Hilary R; Cerezal, Luiz

    2008-06-01

    Ankle impingement syndromes are painful conditions that may complicate ankle trauma and are characterized by chronic, progressive pain, swelling, and limitation of movement. These disorders are subclassified according to anatomical location about the tibiotalar joint. This article reviews the various forms of anterior ankle impingement, detailing the unique clinical features, anatomical considerations, pathoetiology, and imaging findings for each.

  14. Ball and Socket Ankle: Mechanism and Computational Evidence of Concept.

    PubMed

    Jastifer, James R; Gustafson, Peter A; Labomascus, Aaron; Snoap, Tyler

    The ball and socket ankle joint is a morphologically abnormal joint characterized by rounding of the articular surface of the talus. Other than anecdotal observation, little evidence has been presented to describe the development of this deformity. The purpose of the present study was to review ankle and subtalar joint mechanics and to kinematically examine the functional combination of these joints as a mechanism of the ball and socket ankle deformity. We reviewed functional representations of the ankle joint, subtalar joint, and ball and socket ankle deformity. A computational study of joint kinematics was then performed using a 3-dimensional model derived from a computed tomography scan of a ball and socket deformity. The joint kinematics were captured by creating a "virtual map" of the combined kinematics of the ankle and subtalar joints in the respective models. The ball and socket ankle deformity produces functionally similar kinematics to a combination of the ankle and subtalar joints. The findings of the present study support the notion that a possible cause of the ball and socket deformity is bony adaptation that compensates for a functional deficit of the ankle and subtalar joints. Copyright © 2017 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The leather ankle lacer.

    PubMed Central

    Saltzman, C. L.; Shurr, D.; Kamp, J.; Cook, T. A.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of a leather ankle lacer for treating painful problems of the ankle and hindfoot. The evaluation involved patient self assessment, clinical examination and radiographic determination of the effectiveness of the ankle lacer. Overall, patients had moderate pain relief with significant but not complete restriction of motion. Based on this study and our clinical experience, we find the leather ankle lacer to be a compliant and comfortable treatment strategy for patients with painful ankle and hindfoot problems who desire some retained motion. Images Figure 1A & B Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:7634034

  16. In Vivo Talocrural Joint Contact Mechanics With Functional Ankle Instability.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Takumi; Suzuki, Eiichi; Yamazaki, Naohito; Suzukawa, Makoto; Akaike, Atsushi; Shimizu, Kuniaki; Gamada, Kazuyoshi

    2015-12-01

    Functional ankle instability (FAI) may involve abnormal kinematics and contact mechanics during ankle internal rotation. Understanding of these abnormalities is important to prevent secondary problems in patients with FAI. However, there are no in vivo studies that have investigated talocrural joint contact mechanics during weightbearing ankle internal rotation. The objective of this study to determine talocrural contact mechanics during weightbearing ankle internal rotation in patients with FAI. Twelve male subjects with unilateral FAI (age range, 18-26 years) were enrolled. Computed tomography and fluoroscopic imaging of both lower extremities were obtained during weightbearing passive ankle joint complex rotation. Three-dimensional bone models created from the computed tomographic images were matched to the fluoroscopic images to compute 6 degrees of freedom for talocrural joint kinematics. The closest contact area in the talocrural joint in ankle neutral rotation and maximum internal rotation during either dorsiflexion or plantar flexion was determined using geometric bone models and talocrural joint kinematics data. The closest contact area in the talus shifted anteromedially during ankle dorsiflexion-internal rotation, whereas it shifted posteromedially during ankle plantar flexion-internal rotation. The closest contact area in FAI joints was significantly more medial than that in healthy joints during maximum ankle internal rotation and was associated with excessive talocrural internal rotation or inversion. This study demonstrated abnormal talocrural kinematics and contact mechanics in FAI subjects. Such abnormal kinematics may contribute to abnormal contact mechanics and may increase cartilage stress in FAI joints. Therapeutic, Level IV: cross-sectional case-control study. © 2015 The Author(s).

  17. Isolated syndesmosis ankle injury.

    PubMed

    Valkering, Kars P; Vergroesen, Diederik A; Nolte, Peter A

    2012-12-01

    Isolated syndesmosis injuries often go unrecognized and are diagnosed as lateral ankle sprains; however, they are more disabling than lateral ankle sprains. The reported incidence of isolated syndesmosis injuries in acute ankle sprains ranges between 1% and 16%. When ankle disability lasts for more than 2 months after an ankle sprain, the incidence increases to 23.6%. Diagnostic workup may include stress radiographs, magnetic resonance imaging, or diagnostic arthroscopy. A simple stress test radiograph may reveal an unstable grade III syndesmosis sprain that may go unrecognized on plain anteroposterior and mortise or lateral radiographs of the ankle. The duration of symptoms in isolated syndesmosis injury is longer and more severe, often leading to chronic symptoms or ankle instability requiring operative stabilization.This article describes the clinical presentation, injury classification, and operative stabilization techniques of isolated syndesmosis injuries. The authors performed their preferred operative stabilization technique for isolated syndesmosis injury-arthroscopic debridement of the ankle with syndesmotic stabilization with a syndesmotic screw-in 4 patients. All patients were evaluated 1 year postoperatively with subjective and objective assessment scales. Three of 4 patients showed good improvement of general subjective ankle symptoms and subjective ankle instability rating and a high Sports Ankle Rating System score after 1 year. Copyright 2012, SLACK Incorporated.

  18. Management of birth brachial plexus palsy.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Donncha F; Park, T S; Noetzel, Michael J; Weatherly, Trisha

    2006-02-01

    The indications for surgical repair of congenital brachial plexus palsy are controversial. Our objective was to determine the results of early brachial plexus surgery following obstetric-induced brachial plexus palsy. We performed a retrospective analysis of the outcome of 58 cases of brachial plexus surgery. The indication for operation consisted of the presence of less than antigravity strength in the biceps, triceps, and deltoid muscle groups at 6 months of age. Data gathered prospectively, previously, showed the likelihood of improvement with less than antigravity strength in these cases to be poor. Follow-up data were obtained on 52 of the 58 cases. Overall mean follow-up was 2 years. Twelve patients had more than 3 years follow-up (mean 5.5 years, range 3-11.5 years). Significant improvement was seen in all injury patterns i.e., C5-C6, C5-C7, and C5-C8, T1. Greater than antigravity strength in the biceps, triceps, and deltoid muscle groups was seen in the majority of cases at follow-up. Repair of obstetrical brachial plexus palsy in children at 6 months of age that is based on less than antigravity strength in the biceps, triceps, and deltoid muscle groups produces improvement in functional capabilities. Children with obstetrical brachial plexus palsy should be referred soon after birth to a center that specializes in the treatment of this type of palsy.

  19. Ankle Fusion Combined With Calcaneal Sliding Osteotomy for Severe Arthritic Ball and Socket Ankle Deformity.

    PubMed

    Cho, Byung-Ki; Park, Kyoung-Jin; Choi, Seung-Myung; Kang, Sang-Woo; Lee, Hyung-Ki

    2016-12-01

    Although a ball and socket ankle deformity is usually congenital and asymptomatic, abnormal inversion and eversion mobility can result in recurrent ankle sprain and osteoarthritis. This retrospective study was performed to evaluate the clinical and radiologic outcomes of ankle fusion combined with calcaneal sliding osteotomy for severe arthritic ball and socket ankle deformity. Fourteen patients with severe arthritic ball and socket ankle deformity were followed for more than 3 years after operation. The clinical evaluation consisted of American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society (AOFAS) score, Foot and Ankle Ability Measure (FAAM), visual analog scale (VAS) for pain, and subjective satisfaction score. The period to fusion and union of osteotomy, the change of hindfoot alignment angle, and complications were evaluated radiologically. AOFAS and FAAM scores were significantly improved from an average of 37.4 and 34.5 points to 74.6 and 78.5 points, respectively. VAS for pain with walking over 20 minutes was significantly improved from an average of 8.4 points to 1.9 points. The average satisfaction score of patients was 88.9 points. The difference in heel alignment angle (compared to contralateral side) was significantly improved from an average of 34.8 to 5.4 degrees. There were 2 cases of progressive arthritis in an adjacent joint and 1 case of failed fusion. Ankle fusion combined with calcaneal sliding osteotomy can be an effective operative option for ball and socket ankle deformity with advanced arthritis. In spite of increased complication rate, reliable pain relief, and restoration of gait ability through correcting hindfoot malalignment could improve the quality of life. Level IV, retrospective case series. © The Author(s) 2016.

  20. Brachial plexus injury mimicking a spinal-cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Macyszyn, Luke J.; Gonzalez-Giraldo, Ernesto; Aversano, Michael; Heuer, Gregory G.; Zager, Eric L.; Schuster, James M.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: High-energy impact to the head, neck, and shoulder can result in cervical spine as well as brachial plexus injuries. Because cervical spine injuries are more common, this tends to be the initial focus for management. We present a case in which the initial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was somewhat misleading and a detailed neurological exam lead to the correct diagnosis. Clinical presentation: A 19-year-old man presented to the hospital following a shoulder injury during football practice. The patient immediately complained of significant pain in his neck, shoulder, and right arm and the inability to move his right arm. He was stabilized in the field for a presumed cervical-spine injury and transported to the emergency department. Intervention: Initial radiographic assessment (C-spine CT, right shoulder x-ray) showed no bony abnormality. MRI of the cervical-spine showed T2 signal change and cord swelling thought to be consistent with a cord contusion. With adequate pain control, a detailed neurological examination was possible and was consistent with an upper brachial plexus avulsion injury that was confirmed by CT myelogram. The patient failed to make significant neurological recovery and he underwent spinal accessory nerve grafting to the suprascapular nerve to restore shoulder abduction and external rotation, while the phrenic nerve was grafted to the musculocutaneous nerve to restore elbow flexion. Conclusion: Cervical spinal-cord injuries and brachial plexus injuries can occur by the same high energy mechanisms and can occur simultaneously. As in this case, MRI findings can be misleading and a detailed physical examination is the key to diagnosis. However, this can be difficult in polytrauma patients with upper extremity injuries, head injuries or concomitant spinal-cord injury. Finally, prompt diagnosis and early surgical renerveration have been associated with better long-term recovery with certain types of injury. PMID:22956928

  1. Ankle Sprains. A Round Table.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Physician and Sportsmedicine, 1986

    1986-01-01

    Types of ankle sprains, surgical versus nonsurgical treatment, tape versus brace for support, rehabilitation, exercise, and prevention of ankle sprains are discussed by a panel of experts. An acute ankle taping technique is illustrated. (MT)

  2. An uncommon ankle sprain

    PubMed Central

    van Zoest, Wart J F; Janssen, Rob P A; Tseng, Carroll M E S

    2007-01-01

    Objective Ankle sprain is the most frequently occurring acute injury in tennis, accounting for 20–25% of all injuries. In the current paper, we assess the cause of ankle sprain and suggest possibilities to be considered during diagnosis. Methods We assessed a professional tennis player with a partial tear of the long peroneal tendon after an ankle sprain by physical exam, X‐ray and MRI. Results Conservative treatment by means of soft cast and propriocepsis training led to full recovery. Conclusion Peroneal tendon disorders must be part of the differential diagnosis after ankle sprain in the professional athlete. PMID:17957026

  3. An uncommon ankle sprain.

    PubMed

    van Zoest, Wart J F; Janssen, Rob P A; Tseng, Carroll M E S

    2007-11-01

    Ankle sprain is the most frequently occurring acute injury in tennis, accounting for 20-25% of all injuries. In the current paper, we assess the cause of ankle sprain and suggest possibilities to be considered during diagnosis. We assessed a professional tennis player with a partial tear of the long peroneal tendon after an ankle sprain by physical exam, X-ray and MRI. Conservative treatment by means of soft cast and propriocepsis training led to full recovery. Peroneal tendon disorders must be part of the differential diagnosis after ankle sprain in the professional athlete.

  4. Minor or occult ankle instability as a cause of anterolateral pain after ankle sprain.

    PubMed

    Vega, Jordi; Peña, Fernando; Golanó, Pau

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine which intra-articular injuries are associated with chronic anterolateral pain and functional instability after an ankle sprain. From 2008 to 2010, records of all patients who underwent ankle joint arthroscopy with anterolateral pain and functional instability after an ankle sprain were reviewed. A systematic arthroscopic examination of the intra-articular structures of the ankle joint was performed. Location and characteristics of the injuries were identified and recorded. A total of 36 ankle arthroscopic procedures were reviewed. A soft-tissue occupying mass over the lateral recess was present in 18 patients (50%). A partial injury of the anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL) was observed in 24 patients (66.6%). Cartilage abrasion due to the distal fascicle of the anteroinferior tibiofibular ligament coming into contact with the talus was seen in 21 patients (58.3%), but no thickening of the ligament was observed. Injury to the intra-articular posterior structures, including the transverse ligament in 19 patients (52.7%) and the posterior surface of the distal tibia in 21 patients (58.3%), was observed. Intra-articular pathological findings have been observed in patients affected by anterolateral pain after an ankle sprain. Despite no demonstrable abnormal lateral laxity, morphologic ATFL abnormality has been observed on arthroscopic evaluation. An injury of the ATFL is present in patients with chronic anterolateral pain and functional instability after an ankle sprain. A degree of microinstability due to a deficiency of the ATFL could explain the intra-articular pathological findings and the patients' complaints. IV.

  5. Chronic ankle instability: Current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Al-Mohrej, Omar A.; Al-Kenani, Nader S.

    2016-01-01

    Ankle sprain is reported to be among the most common recurrent injuries. About 20% of acute ankle sprain patients develop chronic ankle instability. The failure of functional rehabilitation after acute ankle sprain leads to the development of chronic ankle instability. Differentiation between functional and anatomical ankle instability is very essential to guide the proper treatment. Stability testing by varus stress test and anterior drawer test should be carried out. Subtalar instability is an important pathology that is commonly by passed during the assessment of chronic ankle instability. Unlike acute ankle sprain, chronic ankle instability might require surgical intervention. The surgical and conservative management options can be very much developed by in-depth knowledge of the ankle anatomy, biomechanics, and pathology. Anatomical repair, augmentation by tendon, or both are the basic methods of surgical intervention. Arthroscopy is becoming more popular in the management of chronic ankle instability. PMID:27843798

  6. [Microsurgical treatment of brachial plexus injuries].

    PubMed

    Päzolt, H J

    1986-01-01

    Injuries of the brachial plexus are found to occur primarily to juvenile patients as a consequence of motorcycle accidents. While it is a severe injury, its prognosis has been substantively improved by the availability of microsurgical treatment, using long nerve transplants. Further improvement of results will be possible by early operation, a desirable objective. 44 patients with brachial palsy received treatment, including surgery in 41 cases. An account is given in this paper of intraoperative findings, surgical techniques, and results from follow-up checks. The need is underlined for long-term intensive after-care for the purpose of occupational reintegration.

  7. Ankle Sprain Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... strengthening exercise"). Resume low-impact aerobic training; maintain general fitness. III Phase III treatment focuses on restoring ankle proprioception (balance and position awareness) as well as agility and ...

  8. Ankle injuries in athletes.

    PubMed

    Wilkerson, L A

    1992-06-01

    Ankle injuries are the most frequent cause of physician evaluation in a sports-oriented environment. The lateral ligaments are most commonly injured. With a detailed history, physical and radiographic examination to avoid missing underlying pathology, the primary care physician can diagnose and treat the majority of ankle injuries. Occasionally, stress radiographs, arthograms, or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is needed. The vast majority of ankle sprains can be treated with adhesive tape strapping or semirigid orthotics and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medication followed by rehabilitation. Key points of rehabilitation are control of pain and swelling acutely with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatories and RICE (rest, ice, compression, and elevation), then restoring normal range of motion, strengthening muscle groups, and retraining proprioception of the ankle joint.

  9. Relationship between viscosity of the ankle joint complex and functional ankle instability for inversion ankle sprain patients.

    PubMed

    Lin, Che-Yu; Kang, Jiunn-Horng; Wang, Chung-Li; Shau, Yio-Wha

    2015-03-01

    Measurement of viscosity of the ankle joint complex is a novel method to assess mechanical ankle instability. In order to further investigate the clinical significance of the method, this study intended to investigate the relationship between ankle viscosity and severity of functional ankle instability. Cross-sectional study. 15 participants with unilateral inversion ankle sprain and 15 controls were recruited. Their ankles were further classified into stable and unstable ankles. Ankle viscosity was measured by an instrumental anterior drawer test. Severity of functional ankle instability was measured by the Cumberland Ankle Instability Tool. Unstable ankles were compared with stable ankles. Injured ankles were compared with uninjured ankles of both groups. The spearman's rank correlation coefficient was applied to determine the relationship between ankle viscosity and severity of functional ankle instability in unstable ankles. There was a moderate relationship between ankle viscosity and severity of functional ankle instability (r=-0.64, p<0.0001). Unstable ankles exhibited significantly lower viscosity (p<0.005) and more severe functional ankle instability (p<0.0001) than stable ankles. Injured ankles exhibited significantly lower viscosity and more severe functional ankle instability than uninjured ankles (p<0.0001). There was a moderate relationship between ankle viscosity and severity of functional ankle instability. This finding suggested that, severity of functional ankle instability may be partially attributed to mechanical insufficiencies such as the degenerative changes in ankle viscosity following the inversion ankle sprain. In clinical application, measurement of ankle viscosity could be a useful tool to evaluate severity of chronic ankle instability. Copyright © 2014 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. What Is a Foot and Ankle Surgeon?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Foot & Ankle Surgeon? A A A | Print | Share What is a Foot & Ankle Surgeon? Foot and ankle ... of conditions that affect people of every age. What education has a foot and ankle surgeon received? ...

  11. Anterior ankle arthrodesis

    PubMed Central

    Slater, Gordon L; Sayres, Stephanie C; O’Malley, Martin J

    2014-01-01

    Ankle arthrodesis is a common procedure that resolves many conditions of the foot and ankle; however, complications following this procedure are often reported and vary depending on the fixation technique. Various techniques have been described in the attempt to achieve ankle arthrodesis and there is much debate as to the efficiency of each one. This study aims to evaluate the efficiency of anterior plating in ankle arthrodesis using customised and Synthes TomoFix plates. We present the outcomes of 28 ankle arthrodeses between 2005 and 2012, specifically examining rate of union, patient-reported outcomes scores, and complications. All 28 patients achieved radiographic union at an average of 36 wk; the majority of patients (92.86%) at or before 16 wk, the exceptions being two patients with Charcot joints who were noted to have bony union at a three year review. Patient-reported outcomes scores significantly increased (P < 0.05). Complications included two delayed unions as previously mentioned, infection, and extended postoperative pain. With multiple points for fixation and coaxial screw entry points, the contoured customised plate offers added compression and provides a rigid fixation for arthrodesis stabilization. PMID:24649408

  12. Peculiarities in Ankle Cartilage.

    PubMed

    Kraeutler, Matthew J; Kaenkumchorn, Tanyaporn; Pascual-Garrido, Cecilia; Wimmer, Markus A; Chubinskaya, Susanna

    2017-01-01

    Posttraumatic osteoarthritis (PTOA) is the most common form of osteoarthritis (OA) of the ankle joint. PTOA occurs as a result of several factors, including the poor regenerative capacity of hyaline articular cartilage as well as increased contact stresses following trauma. The purpose of this article is to review the epidemiology, pathogenesis, and potential targets for treatment of PTOA in the ankle joint. Previous reviews primarily addressed clinical approaches to ankle PTOA, while the focus of the current article will be specifically on the newly acquired knowledge of the cellular mechanisms that drive PTOA in the ankle joint and means for potential targeted therapeutics that might halt the progression of cartilage degeneration and/or improve the outcome of surgical interventions. Three experimental treatment strategies are discussed in this review: (1) increasing the anabolic potential of chondrocytes through treatment with growth factors such as bone morphogenetic protein-7; (2) limiting chondrocyte cell death either through the protection of cell membrane with poloxamer 188 or inhibiting activity of intracellular proteases, caspases, which are responsible for cell death by apoptosis; and (3) inhibiting catabolic/inflammatory responses of chondrocytes by treating them with anti-inflammatory agents such as tumor necrosis factor-α antagonists. Future studies should focus on identifying the appropriate timing for treatment and an appropriate combination of anti-inflammatory, chondro- and matrix-protective biologics to limit the progression of trauma-induced cartilage degeneration and prevent the development of PTOA in the ankle joint.

  13. Ankle syndesmotic injury.

    PubMed

    Zalavras, Charalampos; Thordarson, David

    2007-06-01

    Ankle syndesmotic injury does not necessarily lead to ankle instability; however, the coexistence of deltoid ligament injury critically destabilizes the ankle joint. Syndesmotic injury may occur in isolation or may be associated with ankle fracture. In the absence of fracture, physical examination findings suggestive of injury include ankle tenderness over the anterior aspect of the syndesmosis and a positive squeeze or external rotation test. Radiographic findings usually include increased tibiofibular clear space decreased tibiofibular overlap, and increased medial clear space. However, syndesmotic injury may not be apparent radiographically; thus, routine stress testing is necessary for detecting syndesmotic instability. The goals of management are to restore and maintain the normal tibiofibular relationship to allow for healing of the ligamentous structures of the syndesmosis. Fixation of the syndesmosis is indicated when evidence of a diastasis is present. This may be detected preoperatively, in the absence of fracture, or intraoperatively, after rigid fixation of the medial malleolus and fibula fractures. Failure to diagnose and stabilize syndesmotic disruption adversely affects outcome.

  14. Ankle Fractures Often Not Diagnosed

    MedlinePlus

    ... top of the talus is dome-shaped and... Softball Injuries to the Foot and Ankle Your feet ... ankles take a beating when you are playing softball. Softball players should be aware of the following ...

  15. The Effect of Modified Brostrom-Gould Repair for Lateral Ankle Instability on In Vivo Tibiotalar Kinematics

    PubMed Central

    Wainright, William B; Spritzer, Charles E.; Lee, Jun Young; Easley, Mark E.; DeOrio, James K.; Nunley, James A.; DeFrate, Louis E.

    2012-01-01

    Background Lateral ankle instability leads to an increased risk of tibiotalar joint osteoarthritis. Previous studies have found abnormal tibiotalar joint motions with lateral ankle instability that may contribute to this increased incidence of osteoarthritis, including increased anterior translation and internal rotation of the talus under weight-bearing loading. Surgical repairs for lateral ankle instability have shown good clinical results, but the effects of repair on in vivo ankle motion are not well understood. Hypothesis The modified Broström-Gould lateral ligament reconstruction decreases anterior translation and internal rotation of the talus under in vivo weight-bearing loading conditions. Study Design Controlled laboratory study. Methods Seven patients underwent modified Brostöm-Gould repair for unilateral lateral ankle instability. Ankle joint kinematics as a function of increasing body weight were studied with magnetic resonance imaging and biplanar fluoroscopy. Tibiotalar kinematics were measured in unstable ankles preoperatively and postoperatively at a mean follow-up of 12 months, as well as in the uninjured contralateral ankles of the same individuals. Results Surgical repair resulted in statistically significant decreases in anterior translation of the talus (0.9±0.3mm, p=0.018) at 100% bodyweight and internal rotation of the talus at 75% (2.6±0.8°, p=0.019) and 100% (2.7±0.8°, p=0.013) bodyweight compared to ankle kinematics measured before repair. No statistically significant differences were detected between repaired ankles and contralateral normal ankles. Conclusion The modified Broström-Gould repair improved the abnormal joint motion observed in patients with lateral ankle instability, decreasing anterior translation and internal rotation of the talus. Clinical Relevance Altered kinematics may contribute to the tibiotalar joint degeneration that occurs with chronic lateral ankle instability. The findings of the current study support

  16. X-Ray Exam: Ankle

    MedlinePlus

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español X-Ray Exam: Ankle KidsHealth / For Parents / X-Ray Exam: Ankle What's in this article? What ... Have Questions Print What It Is An ankle X-ray is a safe and painless test that ...

  17. Ankle impingement syndromes.

    PubMed

    Umans, Hilary

    2002-06-01

    The term "ankle impingement" encompasses a broad range of conditions that are typically post-traumatic and often chronic. Various forms of mechanical impingement can result from synovial proliferation, bone spur formation, or ligamentous scarring and hypertrophy. Since symptoms and physical findings can mimic a variety of disorders, accurate diagnosis may remain elusive, and proper effective therapy may be delayed. The objective of this article is to define and elucidate the etiology of the various forms of ankle impingement, clarify the range of associated osseous and soft-tissue pathology, and describe the imaging features and therapeutic options.

  18. A systematic review of the sensitivity and specificity of the toe-brachial index for detecting peripheral artery disease.

    PubMed

    Tehan, Peta Ellen; Santos, Derek; Chuter, Vivienne Helaine

    2016-08-01

    The toe-brachial index (TBI) is used as an adjunct to the ankle-brachial index (ABI) for non-invasive lower limb vascular screening. With increasing evidence suggesting limitations of the ABI for diagnosis of vascular complications, particularly in specific populations including diabetes cohorts, the TBI is being used more widely. The aim of this review was to determine the sensitivity and specificity of the TBI for detecting peripheral artery disease (PAD) in populations at risk of this disease. A database search was conducted to identify current work relating to the sensitivity and specificity of toe-brachial indices up to July 2015. Only studies using valid diagnostic imaging as a reference standard were included. The QUADAS-2 tool was used to critically appraise included articles. Seven studies met the inclusion criteria. Sensitivity of the TBI for PAD was reported in all seven studies and ranged from 45% to 100%; specificity was reported by five studies only and ranged from 16% to 100%. In conclusion, this review suggests that the TBI has variable diagnostic accuracy for the presence of PAD in specific populations at risk of developing the disease. There was a notable lack of large-scale diagnostic accuracy studies determining the diagnostic accuracy of the TBI in detecting PAD in different at-risk cohorts. However, standardised normal values need to be established for the TBI to conclusively determine the diagnostic accuracy of this test. © The Author(s) 2016.

  19. Ankle Arthroscopic Reconstruction of Lateral Ligaments (Ankle Anti-ROLL)

    PubMed Central

    Takao, Masato; Glazebrook, Mark; Stone, James; Guillo, Stéphane

    2015-01-01

    Ankle instability is a condition that often requires surgery to stabilize the ankle joint that will improve pain and function if nonoperative treatments fail. Ankle stabilization surgery may be performed as a repair in which the native existing anterior talofibular ligament or calcaneofibular ligament (or both) is imbricated or reattached. Alternatively, when native ankle ligaments are insufficient for repair, a reconstruction of the ligaments may be performed in which an autologous or allograft tendon is used to reconstruct the anterior talofibular ligament or calcaneofibular ligament (or both). Currently, ankle stabilization surgery is most commonly performed through an open incision, but arthroscopic ankle stabilization using repair techniques has been described and is being used more often. We present our technique for anatomic ankle arthroscopic reconstruction of the lateral ligaments (anti-ROLL) performed in an all–inside-out manner that is likely safe for patients and minimally invasive. PMID:26900560

  20. Aortic-Brachial Pulse Wave Velocity Ratio: A Measure of Arterial Stiffness Gradient Not Affected by Mean Arterial Pressure.

    PubMed

    Fortier, Catherine; Desjardins, Marie-Pier; Agharazii, Mohsen

    2018-03-01

    Aortic stiffness, measured by carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cf-PWV), is used for the prediction of cardiovascular risk. This mini-review describes the nonlinear relationship between cf-PWV and operational blood pressure, presents the proposed methods to adjust for this relationship, and discusses a potential place for aortic-brachial PWV ratio (a measure of arterial stiffness gradient) as a blood pressure-independent measure of vascular aging. PWV is inherently dependent on the operational blood pressure. In cross-sectional studies, PWV adjustment for mean arterial pressure (MAP) is preferred, but still remains a nonoptimal approach, as the relationship between PWV and blood pressure is nonlinear and varies considerably among individuals due to heterogeneity in genetic background, vascular tone, and vascular remodeling. Extrapolations from the blood pressure-independent stiffness parameter β (β 0 ) have led to the creation of stiffness index β, which can be used for local stiffness. A similar approach has been used for cardio-ankle PWV to generate a blood pressure-independent cardio-ankle vascular index (CAVI). It was recently demonstrated that stiffness index β and CAVI remain slightly blood pressure-dependent, and a more appropriate formula has been proposed to make the proper adjustments. On the other hand, the negative impact of aortic stiffness on clinical outcomes is thought to be mediated through attenuation or reversal of the arterial stiffness gradient, which can also be influenced by a reduction in peripheral medium-sized muscular arteries in conditions that predispose to accelerate vascular aging. Arterial stiffness gradient, assessed by aortic-brachial PWV ratio, is emerging to be at least as good as cf-PWV for risk prediction, but has the advantage of not being affected by operating MAP. The negative impacts of aortic stiffness on clinical outcomes are proposed to be mediated through attenuation or reversal of arterial stiffness gradient

  1. [Posterior ankle impingement syndrome].

    PubMed

    Bojanić, Ivan; Janjić, Tamara; Dimnjaković, Damjan; Križan, Sanja; Smoljanović, Tomislav

    2015-01-01

    Posterior ankle impingement syndrome (PAIS) is a clinical syndrome characterized by posterior ankle pain which occurs in maximal forced plantar flexion of the foot. PAIS can be the result of an acute injury of the ankle, which is more often in general population, or it can be the result of the overuse syndrome, which is more often in athletes and ballet dancers. The etiology of PAIS may involve bony structures or soft tissue structures, or, more often, the combination of both. The diagnosis of PAIS is based on patient's clinical history and physical examination with the hyperplantarflexion test as a very important part of it. Physical examination should be completed with imaging techniques, which most often include magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or computed tomography (CT) to confirm the diagnosis of PAIS. Conservative treatment is recommended as the primary treatment strategy. In those cases where 3 to 6 months of conservative treatment fails, open or, more often, arthroscopic/endoscopic surgery may be recommended. Nowadays, a 2-portal endoscopic approach introduced by van Dijk et al. in 2000 is the method of choice for the treatment of posterior ankle impingement syndrome.

  2. Ankle ligament injuries.

    PubMed

    Abbassian, Ali; Thomas, Rhidian

    2008-06-01

    Ankle ligament injuries in the presence or in the absence of fractures are common. They often present a diagnostic challenge, and their management is poorly understood and subject to debate. This article reviews and discusses the current literature on the management and diagnosis of these injuries.

  3. Ankle joint distraction arthroplasty for severe ankle arthritis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yang; Zhu, Yuan; Xu, Xiang-Yang

    2017-02-28

    Ankle distraction arthroplasty is one option for the treatment of severe ankle arthritis in young patients. The outcomes and factors predicting success in distraction arthroplasty are poorly understood. From January 2011 to May 2015, 16 patients who had undergone ankle distraction arthroplasty for ankle arthritis were operated, including six males and ten females. All patients were available for analysis. The main outcome measurements included joint space on weight bearing radiographs, AOFAS-AH scores (American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society ankle-hindfoot score), VAS scores and SF-36 scores. All 16 patients were followed for a mean follow-up of 40.9 ± 14.7 months (range, 17-67 months). Fourteen of the 16 patients still had their native ankle joints. One patient had undergone ankle arthrodesis 1 year after the operation and one patient had converted to spontaneous ankle fusion at the 3 years follow-up postoperative. The VAS score improved from 5.9 ± 0.8 to 3.7 ± 2.2 (p = 0.0028). The mean AOFAS-AH score improved from 41.9 ± 7.2 preoperatively to 68.1 ± 20.0 postoperatively (p = 0.001). The mean SF-36 score improved from 43.1 ± 7.6 preoperatively to 62.7 ± 18.8 postoperatively (p = 0.002). A weight-bearing ankle space larger than 3 mm at 1 year following distraction is a positive predictive factor. In this study, the treatment of ankle motion distraction for end stage ankle arthritis showed benefit in 9/16 (56.25%) patients at 41 months. It is a promising method for young patients with severe ankle arthritis.

  4. Brachial artery stiffness estimation using ARTSENS.

    PubMed

    Kiran, V Raj; Nabeel, P M; Joseph, Jayaraj; Sivaprakasam, Mohanasankar

    2017-07-01

    Central and peripheral arteries stiffening prominently affect hemodynamics thus increasing the risk of coronary heart disease, chronic kidney disease and end stage renal disease. There are several commercially available non-invasive measurement technologies for the evaluation of stiffness that are expensive, demand dedicated expertise and fall short for mass screening. Considering this, we have developed ARTSENS ® , a highly compact and portable image-free ultrasound device for evaluation of arterial stiffness. The capability of the device to perform accurate measurements of carotid artery stiffness has been validated through extensive in-vivo studies. In this paper we demonstrate the feasibility of using ARTSENS ® for measuring brachial artery stiffness. An inter-operator repeatability study was done based on in-vivo experiments on 9 young healthy subjects. The study included measurement of distension, end diastolic lumen diameter, arterial compliance and stiffness index performed both on carotid artery and brachial artery by two operators successively. The degree of agreement between the measurements made by operators has been investigated based on Bland-Altman plots and paired t-test. The measurements were populated within the limits of agreement. No statistically significant difference (p-values from paired t-test for end-diastolic diameter, distension, stiffness index, arterial compliance were 0.36, 0.24, 0.47 and 0.11 respectively) was seen for the brachial artery measurements performed by the two operators. The correlation between the measurement made by the operators was highly significant (r=0.86, p-value=0.003).

  5. A comparative study of brachial plexus sonography and magnetic resonance imaging in chronic inflammatory demyelinating neuropathy and multifocal motor neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Goedee, H S; Jongbloed, B A; van Asseldonk, J-T H; Hendrikse, J; Vrancken, A F J E; Franssen, H; Nikolakopoulos, S; Visser, L H; van der Pol, W L; van den Berg, L H

    2017-10-01

    To compare the performance of neuroimaging techniques, i.e. high-resolution ultrasound (HRUS) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), when applied to the brachial plexus, as part of the diagnostic work-up of chronic inflammatory demyelinating neuropathy (CIDP) and multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN). Fifty-one incident, treatment-naive patients with CIDP (n = 23) or MMN (n = 28) underwent imaging of the brachial plexus using (i) a standardized MRI protocol to assess enlargement or T2 hyperintensity and (ii) bilateral HRUS to determine the extent of nerve (root) enlargement. We found enlargement of the brachial plexus in 19/51 (37%) and T2 hyperintensity in 29/51 (57%) patients with MRI and enlargement in 37/51 (73%) patients with HRUS. Abnormal results were only found in 6/51 (12%) patients with MRI and 12/51 (24%) patients with HRUS. A combination of the two imaging techniques identified 42/51 (83%) patients. We found no association between age, disease duration or Medical Research Council sum-score and sonographic nerve size, MRI enlargement or presence of T2 hyperintensity. Brachial plexus sonography could complement MRI in the diagnostic work-up of patients with suspected CIDP and MMN. Our results indicate that combined imaging studies may add value to the current diagnostic consensus criteria for chronic inflammatory neuropathies. © 2017 EAN.

  6. Acute ankle sprain in dancers.

    PubMed

    Russell, Jeffrey A

    2010-01-01

    Ankle sprain is a common injury in dancers. Because of the relative frequency of this injury and its wide acceptance as a likely part of an active lifestyle, in many individuals it may not receive the careful attention it deserves. An extreme ankle range of motion and excellent ankle stability are fundamental to success in dance. Hence, following a proper treatment protocol is crucial for allowing a dancer who suffers an ankle sprain to return to dance as soon as possible without impaired function. This article reviews the basic principles of the etiology and management of ankle sprain in dancers. Key concepts are on-site examination and treatment, early restoration, dance-specific rehabilitation, and a carefully administered safe return to dance. Additionally, injuries that may occur in conjunction with ankle sprain are highlighted, and practical, clinically relevant summary concepts for dance healthcare professionals, dance scientists, dance teachers, and dancers are provided.

  7. Validity of the Foot and Ankle Ability Measure in athletes with chronic ankle instability.

    PubMed

    Carcia, Christopher R; Martin, RobRoy L; Drouin, Joshua M

    2008-01-01

    The Foot and Ankle Ability Measure (FAAM) is a region-specific, non-disease-specific outcome instrument that possesses many of the clinimetric qualities recommended for an outcome instrument. Evidence of validity to support the use of the FAAM is available in individuals with a wide array of ankle and foot disorders. However, additional evidence to support the use of the FAAM for those with chronic ankle instability (CAI) is needed. To provide evidence of construct validity for the FAAM based on hypothesis testing in athletes with CAI. Between-groups comparison. Athletic training room. Thirty National Collegiate Athletic Association Division II athletes (16 men, 14 women) from one university. The FAAM including activities of daily living (ADL) and sports subscales and the global and categorical ratings of function. For both the ADL and sports subscales, FAAM scores were greater in healthy participants (100 +/- 0.0 and 99 +/- 3.5, respectively) than in subjects with CAI (88 +/- 7.7 and 76 +/- 12.7, respectively; P < .001). Similarly, for both ADL and sports subscales, FAAM scores were greater in athletes who indicated that their ankles were normal (98 +/- 6.3 and 96 +/- 6.9, respectively) than in those who classified their ankles as either nearly normal or abnormal (87 +/- 6.6 and 71 +/- 11.1, respectively; P < .001). We found relationships between FAAM scores and self-reported global ratings of function for both ADL and sports subscales. Relationships were stronger when all athletes, rather than just those with CAI, were included in the analyses. The FAAM may be used to detect self-reported functional deficits related to CAI.

  8. Validity of the Foot and Ankle Ability Measure in Athletes With Chronic Ankle Instability

    PubMed Central

    Carcia, Christopher R; Martin, RobRoy L; Drouin, Joshua M

    2008-01-01

    Context: The Foot and Ankle Ability Measure (FAAM) is a region-specific, non–disease-specific outcome instrument that possesses many of the clinimetric qualities recommended for an outcome instrument. Evidence of validity to support the use of the FAAM is available in individuals with a wide array of ankle and foot disorders. However, additional evidence to support the use of the FAAM for those with chronic ankle instability (CAI) is needed. Objective: To provide evidence of construct validity for the FAAM based on hypothesis testing in athletes with CAI. Design: Between-groups comparison. Setting: Athletic training room. Patients or Other Participants: Thirty National Collegiate Athletic Association Division II athletes (16 men, 14 women) from one university. Main Outcome Measure(s): The FAAM including activities of daily living (ADL) and sports subscales and the global and categorical ratings of function. Results: For both the ADL and sports subscales, FAAM scores were greater in healthy participants (100 ± 0.0 and 99 ± 3.5, respectively) than in subjects with CAI (88 ± 7.7 and 76 ± 12.7, respectively; P < .001). Similarly, for both ADL and sports subscales, FAAM scores were greater in athletes who indicated that their ankles were normal (98 ± 6.3 and 96 ± 6.9, respectively) than in those who classified their ankles as either nearly normal or abnormal (87 ± 6.6 and 71 ± 11.1, respectively; P < .001). We found relationships between FAAM scores and self-reported global ratings of function for both ADL and sports subscales. Relationships were stronger when all athletes, rather than just those with CAI, were included in the analyses. Conclusions: The FAAM may be used to detect self-reported functional deficits related to CAI. PMID:18345343

  9. Effects of Botulinum Toxin on Reducing the Co-contraction of Antagonists in Birth Brachial Plexus Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Yong Beom; Chang, Jae Hyeok; Cha, Young Sun; Ko, Hyun-Yoon

    2014-01-01

    Birth brachial plexus palsy (BBPP) is usually caused by plexus traction during difficult delivery. Although the possibility of complete recovery is relatively high, 5% to 25% of BBPP cases result in prolonged and persistent disability. In particular, muscle imbalance and co-contraction around the shoulder and elbow cause abnormal motor performance, osseous deformities, and joint contracture. Physical and occupational therapies have most commonly been used, but these conventional therapeutic strategies have often been inadequate, in managing the residual muscle imbalance and muscle co-contraction. Therefore, we attempted to improve the functional movements, by using botulinum toxin type A, to reduce the abnormal co-contraction of the antagonist muscles. PMID:24639937

  10. Impact of weight loss on ankle-brachial index and interartery blood pressures

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Objective: To assess whether weight loss improves markers of peripheral artery disease and vascular stenosis. Methods: The Action for Health in Diabetes randomized clinical trial compared intensive lifestyle intervention (ILI) for weight loss to a control condition of diabetes support and education...

  11. Mobile ankle and knee perturbator.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Jacob Buus; Sinkjaer, Thomas

    2003-10-01

    A mobile ankle and knee perturbator has been developed. It consists of a functional joint with an integrated clutch. Four Bowden wires connect the joint to a powerful motor and a double pneumatic cylinder. When needed during any time of the gait cycle, it is possible to impose an ankle rotation by engaging the clutch and rotating the ankle or knee joint with a predefined displacement. The system is designed to investigate electrophysiological and biomechanical features of the human ankle or knee joint during gait.

  12. Cuff-Based Oscillometric Central and Brachial Blood Pressures Obtained Through ABPM are Similarly Associated with Renal Organ Damage in Arterial Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Llama, Patricia; Pareja, Júlia; Yun, Sergi; Vázquez, Susana; Oliveras, Anna; Armario, Pedro; Blanch, Pedro; Calero, Francesca; Sierra, Cristina; de la Sierra, Alejandro

    2017-01-01

    Central blood pressure (BP) has been suggested to be a better estimator of hypertension-associated risks. We aimed to evaluate the association of 24-hour central BP, in comparison with 24-hour peripheral BP, with the presence of renal organ damage in hypertensive patients. Brachial and central (calculated by an oscillometric system through brachial pulse wave analysis) office BP and ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM) data and aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV) were measured in 208 hypertensive patients. Renal organ damage was evaluated by means of the albumin to creatinine ratio and the estimated glomerular filtration rate. Fifty-four patients (25.9%) were affected by renal organ damage, displaying either microalbuminuria (urinary albumin excretion ≥30 mg/g creatinine) or an estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) <60 ml/min/1.73 m2. Compared to those without renal abnormalities, hypertensive patients with kidney damage had higher values of office brachial systolic BP (SBP) and pulse pressure (PP), and 24-h, daytime, and nighttime central and brachial SBP and PP. They also had a blunted nocturnal decrease in both central and brachial BP, and higher values of aortic PWV. After adjustment for age, gender, and antihypertensive treatment, only ABPM-derived BP estimates (both central and brachial) showed significant associations with the presence of renal damage. Odds ratios for central BP estimates were not significantly higher than those obtained for brachial BP. Compared with peripheral ABPM, cuff-based oscillometric central ABPM does not show a closer association with presence of renal organ damage in hypertensive patients. More studies, however, need to be done to better identify the role of central BP in clinical practice. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. Brachial Plexus Injuries in Adults: Evaluation and Diagnostic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Sakellariou, Vasileios I.; Badilas, Nikolaos K.; Mazis, George A.; Stavropoulos, Nikolaos A.; Kotoulas, Helias K.; Kyriakopoulos, Stamatios; Tagkalegkas, Ioannis; Sofianos, Ioannis P.

    2014-01-01

    The increased incidence of motor vehicle accidents during the past century has been associated with a significant increase in brachial plexus injuries. New imaging studies are currently available for the evaluation of brachial plexus injuries. Myelography, CT myelography, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are indicated in the evaluation of brachial plexus. Moreover, a series of specialized electrodiagnostic and nerve conduction studies in association with the clinical findings during the neurologic examination can provide information regarding the location of the lesion, the severity of trauma, and expected clinical outcome. Improvements in diagnostic approaches and microsurgical techniques have dramatically changed the prognosis and functional outcome of these types of injuries. PMID:24967130

  14. Neurotization of elements of the brachial plexus.

    PubMed

    Friedman, A H

    1991-01-01

    Satisfactory therapy for an avulsion injury of the brachial plexus has yet to be described. Dorsal root entry zone lesions will usually mitigate the searing pain which is so disabling in some of these patients. Neurotization procedures are effective in restoring limited function to these patients. The most useful isolated movement of the upper extremity is elbow flexion, which is thus the primary target of neurotization procedures. Intercostal nerves and elements of the cervical plexus are the most commonly used donor nerves for neurotization procedures. From our experience and from a review of the literature, it appears that these procedures will be successful in approximately 50% of cases. It must be stressed that before performing a nerve transfer, the surgeon must be certain that the patient is not a candidate for a simple nerve graft.

  15. Meiotic abnormalities

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 19, describes meiotic abnormalities. These include nondisjunction of autosomes and sex chromosomes, genetic and environmental causes of nondisjunction, misdivision of the centromere, chromosomally abnormal human sperm, male infertility, parental age, and origin of diploid gametes. 57 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  16. The effect of selective tibial neurotomy and rehabilitation in a quadriplegic patient with ankle spasticity following traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Jang, Sung Ho; Park, Sung-Min; Kim, Seong Ho; Ahn, Sang Ho; Cho, Yun Woo; Ahn, Mi Ok

    2004-08-31

    Ankle spasticity following brain injury leads to abnormal posture and joint contracture; making standing or walking impossible. This study investigates the efficacy of selective tibial neurotomy (STN) and intensive rehabilitation in a patient who suffered ankle spasticity after brain injury. This case describes a 37-year-old man whose traumatic brain injury (TBI) resulted in severe right ankle spasticity and contracture. He was unable to stand due to severe right ankle spasticity and contracture. Intensive rehabilitation and STN allowed him to walk without brace at 6 months and run at 12 months after STN. STN is an effective procedure to resolve localized spasticity of the ankle and it may be considered as a management strategy after local injection to alleviate ankle spasticity and/or contracture prior to orthopaedic surgery.

  17. Arthroscopic and magnetic resonance image appearance and reconstruction of the anterior talofibular ligament in cases of apparent functional ankle instability.

    PubMed

    Takao, Masato; Innami, Ken; Matsushita, Takashi; Uchio, Yuji; Ochi, Mitsuo

    2008-08-01

    Many patients report feeling functional ankle instability, despite having no clinically demonstrable lateral instability. Some patients who experience functional instability of the ankle have substantial abnormalities of the anterior talofibular ligament despite having apparently normal lateral laxity in clinical examination. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Fourteen patients who had functional ankle instability after sprain, despite having no clinically demonstrable lateral instability, were included in this study. All subjects underwent standard stress radiography, magnetic resonance imaging, and ankle arthroscopy. These patients were treated with anatomical reconstruction of the anterior talofibular ligament. Arthroscopic assessment revealed 3 cases with no ligamentous structure with scar tissue, 9 cases with partial ligament tears and scar tissue on the disrupted anterior talofibular ligament fiber, and 2 cases of abnormal course of the ligament at the fibular or talar attachment. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed the following: 5 cases of discontinuity of the anterior talofibular ligament, 2 cases of narrowing of the anterior talofibular ligament, 4 cases of high-intensity lesion in the anterior talofibular ligament, and 3 normal cases. The mean American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society Ankle Hindfoot scale score was 66.2 +/- 3.2 points at preoperation and 92.3 +/- 4.4 points 2 years after surgery. All patients in this study with functional ankle instability, despite their having no demonstrable abnormal lateral laxity, had morphologic ligamentous abnormality on arthroscopic assessment.

  18. Sonographic Findings of Chondral Avulsion Fractures of the Lateral Ankle Ligaments in Children.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Manabu; Maeda, Nana; Takaoka, Takanori; Tanaka, Yasuhito

    2017-02-01

    In this series, we aimed to describe the sonographic findings of chondral avulsion fractures that develop concomitant with lateral ankle ligament injury in children. We performed stress sonography during a manual anterior drawer stress procedure of the ankle in 9 skeletally immature patients who had recently had a lateral ankle sprain. Echo videos were obtained through the course of treatment, and all videos were reviewed. We elucidated the common features of chondral avulsion fractures of the lateral ankle ligaments in the children. The features of avulsion fractures on conventional sonography included absence of a fracture with hyperechoic spots (sonographic occult fracture type), cortical discontinuity with hyperechoic spots (cortical disruption fracture type), fracture line in the cortical bone (double-line fracture type), and a step-off deformity of the cortical bone with cartilage (displaced fracture type). In contrast, the features of chondral fractures on stress sonography included abnormal motion of the chondral lesions and mobility/fluidity of hyperechoic spots along the chondral fracture site. The presence of hyperechoic spots around the chondral lesion is an important sonographic sign for diagnosing chondral fractures concomitant with ankle lateral ligament injury. Hence, we believe that stress sonography should be considered for the detection of chondral fractures concomitant with radiographically negative ankle lateral ligament injuries in skeletally immature patients with lateral ankle pain and ankle sprains, if hyperechoic spots are present in the cartilage of the distal fibula. © 2017 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  19. [Surgical treatment of children with brachial plexus paralysis].

    PubMed

    Grossman, J A; Ramos, L E; Tidwell, M; Price, A; Papazian, O; Alfonso, I

    1998-08-01

    A variety of surgical procedures exist for early repair of the nerve injury in obstetrical brachial plexus palsy, including neuroma excision and nerve grafting, neurolysis and neurotization. Secondary deformities of the shoulder, forearm, and hand can similarly be reconstructed using soft tissue and skeletal procedures. This review describes our surgical approach to maximize the ultimate functional outcome in infants and children with obstetrical brachial plexus palsy.

  20. Risk factors for clavicle fracture concurrent with brachial plexus injury.

    PubMed

    Karahanoglu, Ertugrul; Kasapoglu, Taner; Ozdemirci, Safak; Fadıloglu, Erdem; Akyol, Aysegul; Demirdag, Erhan; Yalvac, E Serdar; Kandemir, N Omer

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the risk factors for clavicle fracture concurrent with brachial plexus injuries. A retrospective study was conducted at a tertiary centre. The hospital records of 62,288 vaginal deliveries were evaluated retrospectively. There were 35 cases of brachial plexus injury. Of these patients, nine had brachial plexus injuries with clavicle fracture and 26 without clavicle fracture. The analysed risk factors for clavicle fracture concurrent with brachial plexus injury were gestational diabetes, labour induction and augmentation, prolonged second stage of labour, estimated foetal weight above 4000 g, birth weight above 4000 g, risky working hours, and the requirement of manoeuvres to free the impacted shoulder from behind the symphysis pubis. Labour augmentation with oxytocin increased the risk of clavicle fracture in cases of brachial plexus injury (OR 6.67; 95% CI 1.26-35.03). A birth weight higher than 4000 g also increased the risk of clavicle fracture. Risky working hours, gestational diabetes, estimated foetal weight higher than 4000 g, and requirement of shoulder dystocia manoeuvres did not increase the risk of clavicle fracture. Labour augmentation and actual birth weight higher than 4000 g were identified as risk factors for clavicle fracture in cases of brachial plexus injury.

  1. Valuation of Normal Range of Ankle Systolic Blood Pressure in Subjects with Normal Arm Systolic Blood Pressure.

    PubMed

    Gong, Yi; Cao, Kai-wu; Xu, Jin-song; Li, Ju-xiang; Hong, Kui; Cheng, Xiao-shu; Su, Hai

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to establish a normal range for ankle systolic blood pressure (SBP). A total of 948 subjects who had normal brachial SBP (90-139 mmHg) at investigation were enrolled. Supine BP of four limbs was simultaneously measured using four automatic BP measurement devices. The ankle-arm difference (An-a) on SBP of both sides was calculated. Two methods were used for establishing normal range of ankle SBP: the 99% method was decided on the 99% reference range of actual ankle BP, and the An-a method was the sum of An-a and the low or up limits of normal arm SBP (90-139 mmHg). Whether in the right or left side, the ankle SBP was significantly higher than the arm SBP (right: 137.1 ± 16.9 vs 119.7 ± 11.4 mmHg, P<0.05). Based on the 99% method, the normal range of ankle SBP was 94~181 mmHg for the total population, 84~166 mmHg for the young (18-44 y), 107~176 mmHg for the middle-aged(45-59 y) and 113~179 mmHg for the elderly (≥ 60 y) group. As the An-a on SBP was 13 mmHg in the young group and 20 mmHg in both middle-aged and elderly groups, the normal range of ankle SBP on the An-a method was 103-153 mmHg for young and 110-160 mmHg for middle-elderly subjects. A primary reference for normal ankle SBP was suggested as 100-165 mmHg in the young and 110-170 mmHg in the middle-elderly subjects.

  2. Ankle sprain complications: MRI evaluation.

    PubMed

    Martin, Barney

    2008-04-01

    Sprains are disruptions of the ligamentous anatomy about a joint. The ankle sprain is one of the most common injuries seen in podiatric and orthopedic practice. It usually is incurred from an inversion force on the ankle, but eversion forces also can traumatize the ankle. Many times, this injury is taken for granted because of the frequency of its presentation. The patient usually is given appropriate initial care, but the patient can experience continued or residual pain. Podiatrists have found this problem is common and have come to recognize that secondary or accessory injuries occur that slow the natural recovery of this injury.

  3. Osteoligamentous injuries of the medial ankle joint.

    PubMed

    Lötscher, P; Lang, T H; Zwicky, L; Hintermann, B; Knupp, M

    2015-12-01

    Injuries of the ankle joint have a high incidence in daily life and sports, thus, playing an important socioeconomic role. Therefore, proper diagnosis and adequate treatment are mandatory. While most of the ligament injuries around the ankle joint are treated conservatively, great controversy exists on how to treat deltoid ligament injuries in ankle fractures. Missed injuries and inadequate treatment of the medial ankle lead to inferior outcome with instability, progressive deformity, and ankle joint osteoarthritis.

  4. Risk Factors for Brachial Plexus Birth Injury

    PubMed Central

    Louden, Emily; Marcotte, Michael; Mehlman, Charles; Lippert, William; Huang, Bin; Paulson, Andrea

    2018-01-01

    Over the course of decades, the incidence of brachial plexus birth injury (BPBI) has increased despite advances in healthcare which would seem to assist in decreasing the rate. The aim of this study is to identify previously unknown risk factors for BPBI and the risk factors with potential to guide preventative measures. A case control study of 52 mothers who had delivered a child with a BPBI injury and 132 mothers who had delivered without BPBI injury was conducted. Univariate, multivariable and logistic regressions identified risk factors and their combinations. The odds of BPBI were 2.5 times higher when oxytocin was used and 3.7 times higher when tachysystole occurred. The odds of BPBI injury are increased when tachysystole and oxytocin occur during the mother’s labor. Logistic regression identified a higher risk for BPBI when more than three of the following variables (>30 lbs gained during the pregnancy, stage 2 labor >61.5 min, mother’s age >26.4 years, tachysystole, or fetal malpresentation) were present in any combination. PMID:29596309

  5. Automated analysis of brachial ultrasound time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Weidong; Browning, Roger L.; Lauer, Ronald M.; Sonka, Milan

    1998-07-01

    Atherosclerosis begins in childhood with the accumulation of lipid in the intima of arteries to form fatty streaks, advances through adult life when occlusive vascular disease may result in coronary heart disease, stroke and peripheral vascular disease. Non-invasive B-mode ultrasound has been found useful in studying risk factors in the symptom-free population. Large amount of data is acquired from continuous imaging of the vessels in a large study population. A high quality brachial vessel diameter measurement method is necessary such that accurate diameters can be measured consistently in all frames in a sequence, across different observers. Though human expert has the advantage over automated computer methods in recognizing noise during diameter measurement, manual measurement suffers from inter- and intra-observer variability. It is also time-consuming. An automated measurement method is presented in this paper which utilizes quality assurance approaches to adapt to specific image features, to recognize and minimize the noise effect. Experimental results showed the method's potential for clinical usage in the epidemiological studies.

  6. Early abnormalities of cardiovascular structure and function in middle-aged Korean adults with prehypertension: The Korean Genome Epidemiology study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seong Hwan; Cho, Goo-Yeong; Baik, Inkyung; Lim, Sang Yup; Choi, Cheol Ung; Lim, Hong Euy; Kim, Eung Ju; Park, Chang Gyu; Park, Juri; Kim, Jinyoung; Shin, Chol

    2011-02-01

    Prehypertension is associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. However, there are few population-based studies on the changes of cardiovascular structure and function that characterize prehypertension. The aim of this study was to assess whether prehypertension is associated with abnormalities of cardiovascular structure and function in the general Korean population. We analyzed the cross-sectional relationships between prehypertension and cardiovascular structure and function in a sample from the Korean Genome Epidemiology Study. A total of 1,671 individuals (54.5% women; mean age: 53 ± 6 years) without hypertension and diabetes mellitus were enrolled. Cardiovascular structure and function were assessed by conventional echocardiography, tissue Doppler imaging (TDI), carotid ultrasonography, and pulse wave velocity (PWV). The left ventricular (LV) mass index was significantly higher in subjects with prehypertension than in those with normotension (41 ± 8 g/m²·⁷ vs. 38 ± 7 g/m²·⁷, P < 0.001). LV diastolic parameters, such as the E/A ratio, TDI E(a) velocity, and E/E(a) ratio, were also impaired in subjects with prehypertension (all P < 0.001). Compared with normotension, prehypertension was characterized by a significantly higher common carotid artery intima-media thickness and a higher brachial-ankle PWV (all P < 0.001). These abnormalities of cardiovascular structure and function remained significant after adjustment for covariates. In this population-based cohort, we found that subtle alterations in cardiovascular structure and function were already present at the prehypertensive stage. Whether such subtle alterations convey an increased risk of cardiovascular events and whether the changes are reversible with treatment warrant further study.

  7. Foot, leg, and ankle swelling

    MedlinePlus

    ... feet - legs; Ankle swelling; Foot swelling; Leg swelling; Edema - peripheral; Peripheral edema ... 31. Trayes KP, Studdiford JS, Pickle S, Tully AS. Edema: diagnosis and management. Am Fam Physician . 2013;88( ...

  8. Parachute Ankle Brace Effectiveness Evaluation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-01

    increase in the risk of other injuries (2, 7, 11). There were no differences in risk of ankle injury comparing periods when brace use was not...2006. The exclusions based on age and missing data were thought to represent coding errors . (Figure 2.1) 5 Figure 2.1 PAS Extens ion Project...similar to the referent (data not shown). Rate ratios were similar after adjustment for age at start of training, rank, duration of service, ankle

  9. Congenital Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... tube defects. However, there is also a genetic influence to this type of congenital anomaly. Unknown Causes The vast majority of congenital abnormalities have no known cause. This is particularly troubling for parents who plan to have more children, because there is no way to predict if ...

  10. Static ankle joint equinus: toward a standard definition and diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Charles, James; Scutter, Sheila D; Buckley, Jonathan

    2010-01-01

    Equinus is characterized by reduced dorsiflexion of the ankle joint, but there is a lack of consensus regarding criteria for definition and diagnosis. This review examines the literature relating to the definition, assessment, diagnosis, prevalence, and complications of equinus. Articles on equinus and assessment of ankle joint range of motion were identified by searching the EMBASE, Medline, PubMed, EBSCOhost, Cinahl, and Cochrane databases and by examining the reference lists of the articles found. There is inconsistency regarding the magnitude of reduction in dorsiflexion required to constitute a diagnosis of equinus and no standard method for assessment; hence, the prevalence of equinus is unknown. Goniometric assessment of ankle joint range of motion was shown to be unreliable, whereas purpose-built tools demonstrated good reliability. Reduced dorsiflexion is associated with alterations in gait, increased forefoot pressure, and ankle injury, the magnitude of reduction in range of motion required to predispose to foot or lower-limb abnormalities is not known. In the absence of definitive data, we propose a two-stage definition of equinus: the first stage would reflect dorsiflexion of less than 10 degrees with minor compensation and a minor increase in forefoot pressure, and the second stage would reflect dorsiflexion of less than 5 degrees with major compensation and a major increase in forefoot pressure. This proposed definition of equinus will assist with standardizing the diagnosis and will provide a basis for future studies of the prevalence, causes, and complications of this condition.

  11. Chronic musculoskeletal ankle disorders in Sri Lanka.

    PubMed

    Weerasekara, Ishanka; Hiller, Claire E

    2017-05-25

    Musculoskeletal disorders of the lower extremities are commonly affected by chronicity and disability. One of the most commonly affected areas is the ankle. Epidemiological information is limited for chronic musculoskeletal ankle disorders in the general community, particularly in the developing world. This study aimed to determine the prevalence and impact of chronic musculoskeletal ankle disorders in the Sri Lankan community. A cross-sectional stratified random sample of people (n = 1000) aged 18 to 85 years in Sri Lanka was undertaken by questionnaire in the general community setting. Of those questionnaires, 827 participants provided data. Point prevalence for no history of ankle injury or ankle disorders, history of ankle injuries without chronic ankle disorders, and chronic ankle disorders were obtained. Point prevalence of chronic musculoskeletal disorders and causes for chronicity was evaluated. There were 448 (54.2%) participants with no ankle disorders, 164 (19.8%) with a history of ankle injury but no chronic disorders, and 215 (26.0%) with chronic ankle disorders. The major component of chronic ankle disorders was musculoskeletal disorders (n = 113, 13.7% of the total sample), most of which were due to ankle injury (n = 80, 9.7% of the total). Sprains were responsible for 17.7% of the total ankle injuries. Arthritis was the other main cause for chronicity of ankle disorders with 4% of total participants (n = 33). Almost 14% of the Sri Lankan community was affected by chronic musculoskeletal ankle disorders. The majority were due to a previous ankle injury, and arthritis. Most people had to limit or change their physical activity because of the chronic ankle disorder. A very low utility of physiotherapy services was observed.

  12. Arthroscopic assessment for intra-articular disorders in residual ankle disability after sprain.

    PubMed

    Takao, Masato; Uchio, Yuji; Naito, Kohei; Fukazawa, Ikuo; Ochi, Mitsuo

    2005-05-01

    After ankle sprain, there can be many causes of disability, the origins of which cannot be determined using standard diagnostic tools. Ankle arthroscopy is a useful tool in identifying intra-articular disorders of the talocrural joint in cases of residual ankle disability after sprain. Cohort study (diagnosis); Level of evidence, 2. The authors gathered the independent diagnostic results of physical examination, standard mortise and lateral radiography, stress radiography of the talocrural joint, and magnetic resonance imaging for 72 patients with residual ankle disability lasting more than 2 months after injury (mean, 7 months after injury). They performed arthroscopic procedures and compared the double-blind results. In all cases, the arthroscopic results matched those of other means of diagnosis. In 14 cases, the arthroscopic approach exceeded the capabilities of the other methods. Including duplications, 39 patients (54.2%) had anterior talofibular ligament injuries, 17 patients (23.6%) had distal tibiofibular ligament injuries, 29 patients (40.3%) had osteochondral lesions, 13 patients (18%) had symptomatic os subfibulare, 3 patients (4.2%) had anterior impingement exostosis, and 3 patients (4.2%) had impingement due to abnormally fibrous bands. There were only 2 cases in which the cause of symptoms could not be detected by ankle arthroscopy, compared with 16 cases in which the cause of disability could not be detected using standard methods. In 3 cases (17.6%) of distal tibiofibular ligament injuries, 8 cases (27.6%) of osteochondral lesions, and all 3 cases (100%) of impingement of an abnormal fibrous band, ankle arthroscopy was the only method capable of diagnosing the cause of residual ankle pain after a sprain. The present results suggest that arthroscopy can be used to diagnose the cause of residual pain after an ankle sprain in most cases that are otherwise undiagnosable by clinical examination and imaging study.

  13. MRI of injury to the lateral collateral ligamentous complex of the ankle.

    PubMed

    Cardone, B W; Erickson, S J; Den Hartog, B D; Carrera, G F

    1993-01-01

    We retrospectively evaluated the lateral collateral ligamentous complex of 43 patients who had complained of ankle pain following ankle sprain. The MR signs of ligamentous abnormality included discontinuity or absence, increased signal within the ligament, and ligamentous irregularity or waviness with normal thickness and signal intensity. Using these criteria, 30 anterior talofibular, 20 calcaneofibular, and no posterior talofibular ligament injuries were diagnosed. Compared with surgery (nine patients), MRI demonstrated six of seven anterior talofibular ligament injuries and six of six calcaneofibular ligament injuries. Magnetic resonance showed ligamentous abnormalities in 12 of 23 cases with normal stress radiography. Magnetic resonance imaging provides useful information for the evaluation of patients presenting with chronic pain after ankle sprain.

  14. Influence of ankle joint plantarflexion and dorsiflexion on lateral ankle sprain: A computational study.

    PubMed

    Purevsuren, Tserenchimed; Kim, Kyungsoo; Batbaatar, Myagmarbayar; Lee, SuKyoung; Kim, Yoon Hyuk

    2018-05-01

    Understanding the mechanism of injury involved in lateral ankle sprain is essential to prevent injury, to establish surgical repair and reconstruction, and to plan reliable rehabilitation protocols. Most studies for lateral ankle sprain posit that ankle inversion, internal rotation, and plantarflexion are involved in the mechanism of injury. However, recent studies indicated that ankle dorsiflexion also plays an important role in the lateral ankle sprain mechanism. In this study, the contributions of ankle plantarflexion and dorsiflexion on the ankle joint were evaluated under complex combinations of internal and inversion moments. A multibody ankle joint model including 24 ligaments was developed and validated against two experimental cadaveric studies. The effects of ankle plantarflexion (up to 60°) and dorsiflexion (up to 30°) on the lateral ankle sprain mechanism under ankle inversion moment coupled with internal rotational moment were investigated using the validated model. Lateral ankle sprain injuries can occur during ankle dorsiflexion, in which the calcaneofibular ligament and anterior talofibular ligament tears may occur associated with excessive inversion and internal rotational moment, respectively. Various combinations of inversion and internal moment may lead to anterior talofibular ligament injuries at early ankle plantarflexion, while the inversion moment acts as a primary factor to tear the anterior talofibular ligament in early plantarflexion. It is better to consider inversion and internal rotation as primary factors of the lateral ankle sprain mechanism, while plantarflexion or dorsiflexion can be secondary factor. This information will help to clarify the lateral ankle sprain mechanism of injury.

  15. A Survey of Parachute Ankle Brace Breakages

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-10

    experience an ankle fracture , and 1.75 times more likely to experience an ankle injury of any type. Injuries to other parts of the lower body...A SURVEY OF PARACHUTE ANKLE BRACE BREAKAGES USACHPPM REPORT NO. 12-MA01Q2A-08 REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE Form Approved OMB No. 0704...CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE A Survey of Parachute Ankle Brace Breakages 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 5d. PROJECT NUMBER

  16. Sports Medicine and Arthroscopic Treatment of the Foot and Ankle: What Is New and Current in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Ho, Sean Wei Loong; Thevendran, Gowreeson

    2016-06-01

    Foot and ankle abnormalities are common in Singapore because of the compulsory conscription, the slipper-wearing culture, and the promotion of healthy living through exercise. The rapidly aging population, lack of elite sportsmen, and social and cultural norms pose unique challenges to foot and ankle surgery. Orthopedic surgery in Singapore has progressed because of the good infrastructure and modern practices executed by fellowship-trained surgeons. Evolving local practices are polarized by practice trends emulated from North America and Europe. The small community of foot and ankle surgeons currently practicing in Singapore allows for easier communication, corroborative educational events, and research initiatives. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The Incidence of Ankle Sprains in Orienteering.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ekstrand, Jan; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Investigates relationship between ankle sprains and participation time in competitive orienteering. Examined 15,474 competitors in races in the Swedish O-ringen 5-day event in 1987. Injuries requiring medical attention were analyzed, showing 137 (23.9 percent) ankle sprains. Injury incidence was 8.4/10,000 hours. Incidence of ankle sprains was…

  18. [Interposition arthrodesis of the ankle].

    PubMed

    Vienne, Patrick

    2005-10-01

    Bony fusion of the ankle in a functionally favorable position for restitution of a painless weight bearing while avoiding a leg length discrepancy. Disabling, painful osteoarthritis of the ankle with extensive bone defect secondary to trauma, infection, or serious deformities such as congenital malformations or diabetic osteoarthropathies. Acute joint infection. Severe arterial occlusive disease of the involved limb. Lateral approach to the distal fibula. Fibular osteotomy 7 cm proximal to the tip of the lateral malleolus and posterior flipping of the distal fibula. Exposure of the ankle. Removal of all articular cartilage and debridement of the bone defect. Determination of the size of the defect and harvesting of a corresponding tricortical bone graft from the iliac crest. Also harvesting of autogenous cancellous bone either from the iliac crest or from the lateral part of the proximal tibia. Insertion of the tricortical bone graft and filling of the remaining defect with cancellous bone. Fixation with three 6.5-mm titanium lag screws. Depending on the extent of the defect additional stabilization of the bone graft with a titanium plate. Fixation of the lateral fibula on talus and tibia with two 3.5-mm titanium screws for additional support. Wound closure in layers. Split below-knee cast with the ankle in neutral position. Between January 2002 and January 2004 this technique was used in five patients with extensive bone defects (four women, one man, average age 57 years [42-77 years]). No intra- or early postoperative complications. The AOFAS (American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society) Score was improved from 23 points preoperatively to 76 points postoperatively (average follow-up time of 25 months). Two patients developed a nonunion and underwent a revision with an ankle arthrodesis nail. A valgus malposition after arthrodesis in one patient was corrected with a supramalleolar osteotomy.

  19. Osteochondral lesions about the ankle.

    PubMed

    Naran, Ketan N; Zoga, Adam C

    2008-11-01

    Osteochondral lesions (OCLs) about the foot and ankle often manifest clinically as prolonged joint pain after trauma, often an ankle sprain, which is refractory to conventional, conservative therapeutic treatment. Noncontrast MR imaging is the standard of care imaging modality for diagnosing and classifying osteochondral lesions, but equivocal or difficult lesions can be assessed more specifically with direct MR arthrography or in conjunction with multidetector CT. Once an OCL has been identified, the imager should make every effort to determine whether it is stable or potentially unstable.

  20. Abnormal placentation.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Samuel T; Bonanno, Clarissa

    2009-04-01

    Abnormal placentation poses a diagnostic and treatment challenge for all providers caring for pregnant women. As one of the leading causes of postpartum hemorrhage, abnormal placentation involves the attachment of placental villi directly to the myometrium with potentially deeper invasion into the uterine wall or surrounding organs. Surgical procedures that disrupt the integrity of uterus, including cesarean section, dilatation and curettage, and myomectomy, have been implicated as key risk factors for placenta accreta. The diagnosis is typically made by gray-scale ultrasound and confirmed with magnetic resonance imaging, which may better delineate the extent of placental invasion. It is critical to make the diagnosis before delivery because preoperative planning can significantly decrease blood loss and avoid substantial morbidity associated with placenta accreta. Aggressive management of hemorrhage through the use of uterotonics, fluid resuscitation, blood products, planned hysterectomy, and surgical hemostatic agents can be life-saving for these patients. Conservative management, including the use of uterine and placental preservation and subsequent methotrexate therapy or pelvic artery embolization, may be considered when a focal accreta is suspected; however, surgical management remains the current standard of care.

  1. Current Concept in Adult Peripheral Nerve and Brachial Plexus Surgery.

    PubMed

    Rasulic, Lukas

    2017-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injuries and brachial plexus injuries are relatively frequent. Significance of these injuries lies in the fact that the majority of patients with these types of injuries constitute working population. Since these injuries may create disability, they present substantial socioeconomic problem nowadays. This article will present current state-of-the-art achievements of minimal invasive brachial plexus and peripheral nerve surgery. It is considered that the age of the patient, the mechanism of the injury, and the associated vascular and soft-tissue injuries are factors that primarily influence the extent of recovery of the injured nerve. The majority of patients are treated using classical open surgical approach. However, new minimally invasive open and endoscopic approaches are being developed in recent years-endoscopic carpal and cubital tunnel release, targeted minimally invasive approaches in brachial plexus surgery, endoscopic single-incision sural nerve harvesting, and there were even attempts to perform endoscopic brachial plexus surgery. The use of the commercially available nerve conduits for bridging short nerve gap has shown promising results. Multidisciplinary approach individually designed for every patient is of the utmost importance for the successful treatment of these injuries. In the future, integration of biology and nanotechnology may fabricate a new generation of nerve conduits that will allow nerve regeneration over longer nerve gaps and start new chapter in peripheral nerve surgery.

  2. The natural history and management of brachial plexus birth palsy.

    PubMed

    Buterbaugh, Kristin L; Shah, Apurva S

    2016-12-01

    Brachial plexus birth palsy (BPBP) is an upper extremity paralysis that occurs due to traction injury of the brachial plexus during childbirth. Approximately 20 % of children with brachial plexus birth palsy will have residual neurologic deficits. These permanent and significant impacts on upper limb function continue to spur interest in optimizing the management of a problem with a highly variable natural history. BPBP is generally diagnosed on clinical examination and does not typically require cross-sectional imaging. Physical examination is also the best modality to determine candidates for microsurgical reconstruction of the brachial plexus. The key finding on physical examination that determines need for microsurgery is recovery of antigravity elbow flexion by 3-6 months of age. When indicated, both microsurgery and secondary shoulder and elbow procedures are effective and can substantially improve functional outcomes. These procedures include nerve transfers and nerve grafting in infants and secondary procedures in children, such as botulinum toxin injection, shoulder tendon transfers, and humeral derotational osteotomy.

  3. Axillary Brachial Plexus Blockade for the Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ribbers, G. M.; Geurts, A. C. H.; Rijken, R. A. J.; Kerkkamp, H. E. M.

    1997-01-01

    Reflex sympathetic dystrophy syndrome (RSD) is a neurogenic pain syndrome characterized by pain, vasomotor and dystrophic changes, and often motor impairments. This study evaluated the effectiveness of brachial plexus blockade with local anaesthetic drugs as a treatment for this condition. Three patients responded well; three did not. (DB)

  4. Posterior subscapular dissection: An improved approach to the brachial plexus for human anatomy students.

    PubMed

    Hager, Shaun; Backus, Timothy Charles; Futterman, Bennett; Solounias, Nikos; Mihlbachler, Matthew C

    2014-05-01

    Students of human anatomy are required to understand the brachial plexus, from the proximal roots extending from spinal nerves C5 through T1, to the distal-most branches that innervate the shoulder and upper limb. However, in human cadaver dissection labs, students are often instructed to dissect the brachial plexus using an antero-axillary approach that incompletely exposes the brachial plexus. This approach readily exposes the distal segments of the brachial plexus but exposure of proximal and posterior segments require extensive dissection of neck and shoulder structures. Therefore, the proximal and posterior segments of the brachial plexus, including the roots, trunks, divisions, posterior cord and proximally branching peripheral nerves often remain unobserved during study of the cadaveric shoulder and brachial plexus. Here we introduce a subscapular approach that exposes the entire brachial plexus, with minimal amount of dissection or destruction of surrounding structures. Lateral retraction of the scapula reveals the entire length of the brachial plexus in the subscapular space, exposing the brachial plexus roots and other proximal segments. Combining the subscapular approach with the traditional antero-axillary approach allows students to observe the cadaveric brachial plexus in its entirety. Exposure of the brachial dissection in the subscapular space requires little time and is easily incorporated into a preexisting anatomy lab curriculum without scheduling additional time for dissection. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  5. Role of Ankle Arthroscopy in Management of Acute Ankle Fracture.

    PubMed

    Chan, Kwok Bill; Lui, Tun Hing

    2016-11-01

    To report the operative findings of ankle arthroscopy during open reduction and internal fixation of acute ankle fractures. This was a retrospective review of 254 consecutive patients with acute ankle fractures who were treated with open reduction and internal fixation of the fractures, and ankle arthroscopy was performed at the same time. The accuracy of fracture reduction, the presence of syndesmosis disruption and its reduction, and the presence of ligamentous injuries and osteochondral lesions were documented. Second-look ankle arthroscopy was performed during syndesmosis screw removal 6 weeks after the key operation. There were 6 patients with Weber A, 177 patients with Weber B, 51 patients with Weber C, and 20 patients with isolated medial malleolar fractures. Syndesmosis disruption was present in 0% of patients with Weber A fracture, 52% of patients with Weber B fracture, 92% of patients with Weber C fracture, and 20% of the patients with isolated medial malleolar fracture. Three patients with Weber B and one patient with Weber C fracture have occult syndesmosis instability after screw removal. Osteochondral lesion was present in no patient with Weber A fracture, 26% of the Weber B cases, 24% of the Weber C cases, and 20% of isolated medial malleolar fracture cases. The association between the presence of deep deltoid ligament tear and syndesmosis disruption (warranting syndesmosis screw fixation) in Weber B cases was statistically significant but not in Weber C cases. There was no statistically significant association between the presence of posterior malleolar fracture and syndesmosis instability that warrant screw fixation. Ankle arthroscopy is a useful adjuvant tool to understand the severity and complexity of acute ankle fracture. Direct arthroscopic visualization ensures detection and evaluation of intra-articular fractures, syndesmosis disruption, and associated osteochondral lesions and ligamentous injuries. Level IV, case series

  6. Anterior ankle arthroscopy, distraction or dorsiflexion?

    PubMed

    de Leeuw, Peter A J; Golanó, Pau; Clavero, Joan A; van Dijk, C Niek

    2010-05-01

    Anterior ankle arthroscopy can basically be performed by two different methods; the dorsiflexion- or distraction method. The objective of this study was to determine the size of the anterior working area for both the dorsiflexion and distraction method. The anterior working area is anteriorly limited by the overlying anatomy which includes the neurovascular bundle. We hypothesize that in ankle dorsiflexion the anterior neurovascular bundle will move away anteriorly from the ankle joint, whereas in ankle distraction the anterior neurovascular bundle is pulled tight towards the joint, thereby decreasing the safe anterior working area. Six fresh frozen ankle specimens, amputated above the knee, were scanned with computed tomography. Prior to scanning the anterior tibial artery was injected with contrast fluid and subsequently each ankle was scanned both in ankle dorsiflexion and in distraction. A special device was developed to reproducibly obtain ankle dorsiflexion and distraction in the computed tomography scanner. The distance between the anterior border of the inferior tibial articular facet and the posterior border of the anterior tibial artery was measured. The median distance from the anterior border of the inferior tibial articular facet to the posterior border of the anterior tibial artery in ankle dorsiflexion and distraction was 0.9 cm (range 0.7-1.5) and 0.7 cm (range 0.5-0.8), respectively. The distance in ankle dorsiflexion significantly exceeded the distance in ankle distraction (P = 0.03). The current study shows a significantly increased distance between the anterior distal tibia and the overlying anterior neurovascular bundle with the ankle in a slightly dorsiflexed position as compared to the distracted ankle position. We thereby conclude that the distracted ankle position puts the neurovascular structures more at risk for iatrogenic damage when performing anterior ankle arthroscopy.

  7. Anterior ankle arthroscopy, distraction or dorsiflexion?

    PubMed Central

    Golanó, Pau; Clavero, Joan A.; van Dijk, C. Niek

    2010-01-01

    Anterior ankle arthroscopy can basically be performed by two different methods; the dorsiflexion- or distraction method. The objective of this study was to determine the size of the anterior working area for both the dorsiflexion and distraction method. The anterior working area is anteriorly limited by the overlying anatomy which includes the neurovascular bundle. We hypothesize that in ankle dorsiflexion the anterior neurovascular bundle will move away anteriorly from the ankle joint, whereas in ankle distraction the anterior neurovascular bundle is pulled tight towards the joint, thereby decreasing the safe anterior working area. Six fresh frozen ankle specimens, amputated above the knee, were scanned with computed tomography. Prior to scanning the anterior tibial artery was injected with contrast fluid and subsequently each ankle was scanned both in ankle dorsiflexion and in distraction. A special device was developed to reproducibly obtain ankle dorsiflexion and distraction in the computed tomography scanner. The distance between the anterior border of the inferior tibial articular facet and the posterior border of the anterior tibial artery was measured. The median distance from the anterior border of the inferior tibial articular facet to the posterior border of the anterior tibial artery in ankle dorsiflexion and distraction was 0.9 cm (range 0.7–1.5) and 0.7 cm (range 0.5–0.8), respectively. The distance in ankle dorsiflexion significantly exceeded the distance in ankle distraction (P = 0.03). The current study shows a significantly increased distance between the anterior distal tibia and the overlying anterior neurovascular bundle with the ankle in a slightly dorsiflexed position as compared to the distracted ankle position. We thereby conclude that the distracted ankle position puts the neurovascular structures more at risk for iatrogenic damage when performing anterior ankle arthroscopy. PMID:20217392

  8. Expecting ankle tilts and wearing an ankle brace influence joint control in an imitated ankle sprain mechanism during walking.

    PubMed

    Gehring, Dominic; Wissler, Sabrina; Lohrer, Heinz; Nauck, Tanja; Gollhofer, Albert

    2014-03-01

    A thorough understanding of the functional aspects of ankle joint control is essential to developing effective injury prevention. It is of special interest to understand how neuromuscular control mechanisms and mechanical constraints stabilize the ankle joint. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to determine how expecting ankle tilts and the application of an ankle brace influence ankle joint control when imitating the ankle sprain mechanism during walking. Ankle kinematics and muscle activity were assessed in 17 healthy men. During gait rapid perturbations were applied using a trapdoor (tilting with 24° inversion and 15° plantarflexion). The subjects either knew that a perturbation would definitely occur (expected tilts) or there was only the possibility that a perturbation would occur (potential tilts). Both conditions were conducted with and without a semi-rigid ankle brace. Expecting perturbations led to an increased ankle eversion at foot contact, which was mediated by an altered muscle preactivation pattern. Moreover, the maximal inversion angle (-7%) and velocity (-4%), as well as the reactive muscle response were significantly reduced when the perturbation was expected. While wearing an ankle brace did not influence muscle preactivation nor the ankle kinematics before ground contact, it significantly reduced the maximal ankle inversion angle (-14%) and velocity (-11%) as well as reactive neuromuscular responses. The present findings reveal that expecting ankle inversion modifies neuromuscular joint control prior to landing. Although such motor control strategies are weaker in their magnitude compared with braces, they seem to assist ankle joint stabilization in a close-to-injury situation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Ankle surgery: focus on arthroscopy.

    PubMed

    Cavallo, M; Natali, S; Ruffilli, A; Buda, R; Vannini, F; Castagnini, F; Ferranti, E; Giannini, S

    2013-12-01

    The ankle joint can be affected by several diseases, with clinical presentation varying from mild pain or swelling to inability, becoming in some cases a serious problem in daily life activities. Arthroscopy is a widely performed procedure in orthopedic surgery, due to the low invasivity compared to the more traditional open field surgery. The ankle joint presents anatomical specificities, like small space and tangential view that make arthroscopy more difficult. From 2000 more than 600 ankle arthroscopies were performed at our institution. The treated pathologies were mostly impingement syndrome and osteochondral lesions, and in lower percentage instabilities and ankle fractures. In the impingement, the AOFAS scores at FU showed an increase compared to scores collected preoperatively, with improvement of symptoms in most of the cases, good or excellent results in 80 % of cases. In ligament injuries, AOFAS score significatively improved at the maximum follow-up. In fractures all patients had an excellent AOFAS score at maximum follow-up, with complete return to their pre-injury activities. In osteochondral injuries, the clinical results showed a progressive improvement over time with  the different performed procedures. Control MRI and bioptic samples showed a good regeneration of the cartilage and bone tissue in the lesion site. The encouraging obtained clinical results, in line with the literature, show how the arthroscopic technique, after an adequate learning curve, may represent a precious aid for the orthopedic surgeon and for the patient's outcome. Case series, Level IV.

  10. Anatomy of the ankle ligaments: a pictorial essay.

    PubMed

    Golanó, Pau; Vega, Jordi; de Leeuw, Peter A J; Malagelada, Francesc; Manzanares, M Cristina; Götzens, Víctor; van Dijk, C Niek

    2016-04-01

    Understanding the anatomy of the ankle ligaments is important for correct diagnosis and treatment. Ankle ligament injury is the most frequent cause of acute ankle pain. Chronic ankle pain often finds its cause in laxity of one of the ankle ligaments. In this pictorial essay, the ligaments around the ankle are grouped, depending on their anatomic orientation, and each of the ankle ligaments is discussed in detail.

  11. Anatomy of the ankle ligaments: a pictorial essay

    PubMed Central

    Vega, Jordi; de Leeuw, Peter A. J.; Malagelada, Francesc; Manzanares, M. Cristina; Götzens, Víctor; van Dijk, C. Niek

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the anatomy of the ankle ligaments is important for correct diagnosis and treatment. Ankle ligament injury is the most frequent cause of acute ankle pain. Chronic ankle pain often finds its cause in laxity of one of the ankle ligaments. In this pictorial essay, the ligaments around the ankle are grouped, depending on their anatomic orientation, and each of the ankle ligaments is discussed in detail. PMID:20309522

  12. Ankle Training With a Robotic Device Improves Hemiparetic Gait After a Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Forrester, Larry W.; Roy, Anindo; Krebs, Hermano Igo; Macko, Richard F.

    2013-01-01

    Background Task-oriented therapies such as treadmill exercise can improve gait velocity after stroke, but slow velocities and abnormal gait patterns often persist, suggesting a need for additional strategies to improve walking. Objectives To determine the effects of a 6-week visually guided, impedance controlled, ankle robotics intervention on paretic ankle motor control and gait function in chronic stroke. Methods This was a single-arm pilot study with a convenience sample of 8 stroke survivors with chronic hemiparetic gait, trained and tested in a laboratory. Subjects trained in dorsiflexion–plantarflexion by playing video games with the robot during three 1-hour training sessions weekly, totaling 560 repetitions per session. Assessments included paretic ankle ranges of motion, strength, motor control, and overground gait function. Results Improved paretic ankle motor control was seen as increased target success, along with faster and smoother movements. Walking velocity also increased significantly, whereas durations of paretic single support increased and double support decreased. Conclusions Robotic feedback training improved paretic ankle motor control with improvements in floor walking. Increased walking speeds were comparable with reports from other task-oriented, locomotor training approaches used in stroke, suggesting that a focus on ankle motor control may provide a valuable adjunct to locomotor therapies. PMID:21115945

  13. Acute ankle sprain: conservative or surgical approach?

    PubMed Central

    Al-Mohrej, Omar A.; Al-Kenani, Nader S.

    2016-01-01

    Ankle sprains fall into two main categories: acute ankle sprains and chronic ankle instability, which are among the most common recurrent injuries during occupational activities, athletic events, training and army service. Acute ankle sprain is usually managed conservatively and functional rehabilitation failure by conservative treatment leads to development of chronic ankle instability, which most often requires surgical intervention. Enhancing the in-depth knowledge of the ankle anatomy, biomechanics and pathology helps greatly in deciding the management options. Cite this article: Al-Mohrej OA, Al-Kenani NS. Acute ankle sprain: conservative or surgical approach? EFORT Open Rev 2016;1:34-44. DOI: 10.1302/2058-5241.1.000010. PMID:28461926

  14. Ankle Distraction Arthroplasty: Indications, Technique, and Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, Mitchell; Reidler, Jay; Fragomen, Austin; Rozbruch, S Robert

    2017-02-01

    Ankle distraction is an alternative to ankle arthrodesis or total ankle arthroplasty in younger patients with arthritis. Ankle distraction involves the use of external fixation to mechanically unload the ankle joint, which allows for stable, congruent range of motion in the setting of decreased mechanical loading, potentially promoting cartilage repair. Adjunct surgical procedures are frequently done to address lower-extremity malalignment, ankle equinus contractures, and impinging tibiotalar osteophytes. Patients can bear full weight during the treatment course. The distraction frame frequently uses a hinge, and patients are encouraged to do daily range-of-motion exercises. Although the initial goal of the procedure is to delay arthrodesis, many patients achieve lasting clinical benefits, obviating the need for total ankle arthroplasty or fusion. Complications associated with external fixation are common, and patients should be counseled that clinical improvements occur slowly and often are not achieved until at least 1 year after frame removal.

  15. Impaired control of weight bearing ankle inversion in subjects with chronic ankle instability.

    PubMed

    Terrier, R; Rose-Dulcina, K; Toschi, B; Forestier, N

    2014-04-01

    Previous studies have proposed that evertor muscle weakness represents an important factor affecting chronic ankle instability. For research purposes, ankle evertor strength is assessed by means of isokinetic evaluations. However, this methodology is constraining for daily clinical use. The present study proposes to assess ankle evertor muscle weakness using a new procedure, one that is easily accessible for rehabilitation specialists. To do so, we compared weight bearing ankle inversion control between patients suffering from chronic ankle instability and healthy subjects. 12 healthy subjects and 11 patients suffering from chronic ankle instability conducted repetitions of one leg weight bearing ankle inversion on a specific ankle destabilization device equipped with a gyroscope. Ankle inversion control was performed by means of an eccentric recruitment of evertor muscles. Instructions were to perform, as slow as possible, the ankle inversion while resisting against full body weight applied on the tested ankle. Data clearly showed higher angular inversion velocity peaks in patients suffering from chronic ankle instability. This illustrates an impaired control of weight bearing ankle inversion and, by extension, an eccentric weakness of evertor muscles. The present study supports the hypothesis of a link between the decrease of ankle joint stability and evertor muscle weakness. Moreover, it appears that the new parameter is of use in a clinical setting. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Foot and Ankle Osteoid Osteomas.

    PubMed

    Gurkan, Volkan; Erdogan, Ozgur

    2018-03-02

    Foot and ankle osteoid osteomas (OOs) are often cancellous or subperiosteal and rarely present with a periosteal reaction. Additionally, the large number of disorders included in the differential diagnosis and the nonspecific findings on radiographs complicate the diagnosis. We performed a manual search of the senior surgeon's hospitals' operating room records for the terms "benign bone tumor," "foot," "ankle," and "osteoid osteoma" from January 2003 until December 2014. Of 87 surgically treated patients with lower extremity OOs, 9 patients (11%) with foot or ankle OOs were included. The mean age at presentation was 21 (range 6 to 30) years; all 9 (11%) patients were male. The patients were evaluated for swelling, pain, trauma history, night pain, response to pain relievers, duration of complaints, and interval to diagnosis. The mean follow-up period was 48 ± 24 months, and no recurrences had developed. The mean American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society scale score was 59.04 ± 11 before surgery and 91.56 ± 6 after surgery. The difference was statistically significant at p ≤ .0003. Most previous studies have been limited to case reports. The need for findings from a case series was an essential determinant of our decision to report our results. Patients usually have been treated conservatively, often for a long period. However, delays in treatment cause social, economic, and psychological damage. In conclusion, the presence of atypical findings on radiographs has resulted in a preference for magnetic resonance imaging instead of computed tomography; however, the diffuse soft tissue edema observed on MRI can lead to the use of long-term immobilization and a delay in the diagnosis. Copyright © 2017 The American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Distraction systems for ankle arthroscopy.

    PubMed

    Palladino, S J

    1994-07-01

    It is clear that for most of the routine pathology addressed with ankle arthroscopy, including most talar dome transchondral fractures, manual distraction (or none at all) is all that is necessary to successfully complete the procedure. There is little need to add the expense and potential complications associated with some distraction systems. However, some cases involve pathology or surgical techniques that either would be better addressed with distraction or absolutely demand distraction. It is recommended that invasive ankle distraction be reserved for (1) cases in which noninvasive distraction has not yielded adequate field visualization or instrument maneuvering room, (2) cases of preoperatively documented pathology involving the posterior talar dome (including some medial talar dome fractures) or inferior tibial surface, or (3) arthroscopic ankle fusion. Consideration should be given to providing 6 to 12 weeks of protected function of the extremity to avoid delayed fracture presentation. In general, the invasive distraction system should be reserved for those cases that would not ordinarily be managed with aggressive rehabilitation and early return to activities. For those cases where the benefits of distraction are desired (some dome fractures, meniscoid lesions, gutter pathology, and adhesive capsulitis) and aggressive rehabilitation with early return to activities may be planned, noninvasive distraction systems are now available that offer a sustainable joint separation of good magnitude. With the growing availability and effectiveness of the commercial noninvasive ankle distractors, I do not disagree with Stone and Guhl98 when they advocate the use of noninvasive distraction for routine arthroscopic procedures, with conversion to invasive distraction should there be insufficient joint separation. In summary, providing optimal field visualization and maneuvering room for instrumentation is essential for the successful performance of arthroscopic ankle

  18. Functional ankle instability as a risk factor for osteoarthritis: using T2-mapping to analyze early cartilage degeneration in the ankle joint of young athletes.

    PubMed

    Golditz, T; Steib, S; Pfeifer, K; Uder, M; Gelse, K; Janka, R; Hennig, F F; Welsch, G H

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate, using T2-mapping, the impact of functional instability in the ankle joint on the development of early cartilage damage. Ethical approval for this study was provided. Thirty-six volunteers from the university sports program were divided into three groups according to their ankle status: functional ankle instability (FAI, initial ankle sprain with residual instability); ankle sprain Copers (initial sprain, without residual instability); and controls (without a history of ankle injuries). Quantitative T2-mapping magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed at the beginning ('early-unloading') and at the end ('late-unloading') of the MR-examination, with a mean time span of 27 min. Zonal region-of-interest T2-mapping was performed on the talar and tibial cartilage in the deep and superficial layers. The inter-group comparisons of T2-values were analyzed using paired and unpaired t-tests. Statistical analysis of variance was performed. T2-values showed significant to highly significant differences in 11 of 12 regions throughout the groups. In early-unloading, the FAI-group showed a significant increase in quantitative T2-values in the medial, talar regions (P = 0.008, P = 0.027), whereas the Coper-group showed this enhancement in the central-lateral regions (P = 0.05). Especially the comparison of early-loading to late-unloading values revealed significantly decreasing T2-values over time laterally and significantly increasing T2-values medially in the FAI-group, which were not present in the Coper- or control-group. Functional instability causes unbalanced loading in the ankle joint, resulting in cartilage alterations as assessed by quantitative T2-mapping. This approach can visualize and localize early cartilage abnormalities, possibly enabling specific treatment options to prevent osteoarthritis in young athletes. Copyright © 2014 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Compensatory strategies during walking in response to excessive muscle co-contraction at the ankle joint.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ruoli; Gutierrez-Farewik, Elena M

    2014-03-01

    Excessive co-contraction causes inefficient or abnormal movement in several neuromuscular pathologies. How synergistic muscles spanning the ankle, knee and hip adapt to co-contraction of ankle muscles is not well understood. This study aimed to identify the compensation strategies required to retain normal walking with excessive antagonistic ankle muscle co-contraction. Muscle-actuated simulations of normal walking were performed to quantify compensatory mechanisms of ankle and knee muscles during stance in the presence of normal, medium and high levels of co-contraction of antagonistic pairs gastrocnemius+tibialis anterior and soleus+tibialis anterior. The study showed that if co-contraction increases, the synergistic ankle muscles can compensate; with gastrocmemius+tibialis anterior co-contraction, the soleus will increase its contribution to ankle plantarflexion acceleration. At the knee, however, almost all muscles spanning the knee and hip are involved in compensation. We also found that ankle and knee muscles alone can provide sufficient compensation at the ankle joint, but hip muscles must be involved to generate sufficient knee moment. Our findings imply that subjects with a rather high level of dorsiflexor+plantarflexor co-contraction can still perform normal walking. This also suggests that capacity of other lower limb muscles to compensate is important to retain normal walking in co-contracted persons. The compensatory mechanisms can be useful in clinical interpretation of motion analyses, when secondary muscle co-contraction or other deficits may present simultaneously in subjects with motion disorders. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. [F-waves in brachial plexus palsy correlated to the prognosis of intrinsic paralysis].

    PubMed

    Nobuta, S

    1995-04-01

    F-waves were examined in 80 nerves of 40 brachial plexus palsies in 37 cases. The electrical responses were evoked by 30 consecutive supramaximal electric stimuli to the median and ulnar nerves at the wrist and elbow, and recorded from the abductor pollicis brevis and abductor digiti minimi muscles. Three parameters in the F-waves were analyzed--conduction velocity, the difference between the maximal and minimal latencies, and the amplitude. In all cases, examinations were done repeatedly to detect changes in these parameters, and the results were compared with the clinical course of the intrinsic muscle function. Twenty-seven cases were investigated before and after explorative surgery. The findings were divided into four groups. The 1st group consisted of 12 nerves in which F-waves were not recorded. The intrinsic muscle power in this group was zero, and did not show any restoration. The 2nd group consisted of 10 nerves in which the conduction velocity was delayed. The muscle power in this group was fair, poor or trace, and there was no change in conduction velocity and muscle function. The 3rd group consisted of 18 nerves in which parameters other than the conduction velocity were abnormal, and the intrinsic muscle power in this group was fair, good or normal. In 7 of these nerves, the large latency difference decreased to normal at the 2nd, 3rd or 4th test with functional recovery in the intrinsic muscle. The high amplitude also changed to normal at the 2nd test with functional recovery. The 4th group consisted of 40 nerves in which all the parameters were normal and had full intrinsic muscle power. In conclusion, an examination of the F-waves was valuable to indicate the prognosis of the intrinsic muscle in the hand in brachial plexus palsy.

  1. Tolerance of the Brachial Plexus to High-Dose Reirradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Allen M., E-mail: achen5@kumc.edu; Yoshizaki, Taeko; Velez, Maria A.

    Purpose: To study the tolerance of the brachial plexus to high doses of radiation exceeding historically accepted limits by analyzing human subjects treated with reirradiation for recurrent tumors of the head and neck. Methods and Materials: Data from 43 patients who were confirmed to have received overlapping dose to the brachial plexus after review of radiation treatment plans from the initial and reirradiation courses were used to model the tolerance of this normal tissue structure. A standardized instrument for symptoms of neuropathy believed to be related to brachial plexus injury was utilized to screen for toxicity. Cumulative dose was calculatedmore » by fusing the initial dose distributions onto the reirradiation plan, thereby creating a composite plan via deformable image registration. The median elapsed time from the initial course of radiation therapy to reirradiation was 24 months (range, 3-144 months). Results: The dominant complaints among patients with symptoms were ipsilateral pain (54%), numbness/tingling (31%), and motor weakness and/or difficulty with manual dexterity (15%). The cumulative maximum dose (Dmax) received by the brachial plexus ranged from 60.5 Gy to 150.1 Gy (median, 95.0 Gy). The cumulative mean (Dmean) dose ranged from 20.2 Gy to 111.5 Gy (median, 63.8 Gy). The 1-year freedom from brachial plexus–related neuropathy was 67% and 86% for subjects with a cumulative Dmax greater than and less than 95.0 Gy, respectively (P=.05). The 1-year complication-free rate was 66% and 87%, for those reirradiated within and after 2 years from the initial course, respectively (P=.06). Conclusion: The development of brachial plexus–related symptoms was less than expected owing to repair kinetics and to the relatively short survival of the subject population. Time-dose factors were demonstrated to be predictive of complications.« less

  2. Podiatry Ankle Duplex Scan: Readily Learned and Accurate in Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Normahani, Pasha; Powezka, Katarzyna; Aslam, Mohammed; Standfield, Nigel J; Jaffer, Usman

    2018-03-01

    We aimed to train podiatrists to perform a focused duplex ultrasound scan (DUS) of the tibial vessels at the ankle in diabetic patients; podiatry ankle (PodAnk) duplex scan. Thirteen podiatrists underwent an intensive 3-hour long simulation training session. Participants were then assessed performing bilateral PodAnk duplex scans of 3 diabetic patients with peripheral arterial disease. Participants were assessed using the duplex ultrasound objective structured assessment of technical skills (DUOSATS) tool and an "Imaging Score". A total of 156 vessel assessments were performed. All patients had abnormal waveforms with a loss of triphasic flow. Loss of triphasic flow was accurately detected in 145 (92.9%) vessels; the correct waveform was identified in 139 (89.1%) cases. Participants achieved excellent DUOSATS scores (median 24 [interquartile range: 23-25], max attainable score of 26) as well as "Imaging Scores" (8 [8-8], max attainable score of 8) indicating proficiency in technical skills. The mean time taken for each bilateral ankle assessment was 20.4 minutes (standard deviation ±6.7). We have demonstrated that a focused DUS for the purpose of vascular assessment of the diabetic foot is readily learned using intensive simulation training.

  3. Comparison of Multisegmental Foot and Ankle Motion Between Total Ankle Replacement and Ankle Arthrodesis in Adults.

    PubMed

    Seo, Sang Gyo; Kim, Eo Jin; Lee, Doo Jae; Bae, Kee Jeong; Lee, Kyoung Min; Lee, Dong Yeon

    2017-09-01

    Total ankle replacement (TAR) and ankle arthrodesis (AA) are usually performed for severe ankle arthritis. We compared postoperative foot segmental motion during gait in patients treated with TAR and AA. Gait analysis was performed in 17 and 7 patients undergoing TAR and AA, respectively. Subjects were evaluated using a 3-dimensional multisegmental foot model with 15 markers. Temporal gait parameters were calculated. The maximum and minimum values and the differences in hallux, forefoot, hindfoot, and arch in 3 planes (sagittal, coronal, transverse) were compared between the 2 groups. One hundred healthy adults were evaluated as a control. Gait speed was faster in the TAR ( P = .028). On analysis of foot and ankle segmental motion, the range of hindfoot sagittal motion was significantly greater in the TAR (15.1 vs 10.2 degrees in AA; P = .004). The main component of motion increase was hindfoot dorsiflexion (12.3 and 8.6 degrees). The range of forefoot sagittal motion was greater in the TAR (9.3 vs 5.8 degrees in AA; P = .004). Maximum ankle power in the TAR (1.16) was significantly higher than 0.32 in AA; P = .008). However, the range of hindfoot and forefoot sagittal motion was decreased in both TAR and AA compared with the control group ( P = .000). Although biomechanical results of TAR and AA were not similar to those in the normal controls, joint motions in the TAR more closely matched normal values. Treatment decision making should involve considerations of the effect of surgery on the adjacent joints. Level III, case-control study.

  4. The effect of combined mechanism ankle support on postural control of patients with chronic ankle instability.

    PubMed

    Hadadi, Mohammad; Ebrahimi, Ismaeil; Mousavi, Mohammad Ebrahim; Aminian, Gholamreza; Esteki, Ali; Rahgozar, Mehdi

    2017-02-01

    Chronic ankle instability is associated with neuromechanical changes and poor postural stability. Despite variety of mechanisms of foot and ankle orthoses, almost none apply comprehensive mechanisms to improve postural control in all subgroups of chronic ankle instability patients. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of an ankle support implementing combined mechanisms to improve postural control in chronic ankle instability patients. Cross-sectional study. An ankle support with combined mechanism was designed based on most effective action mechanisms of foot and ankle orthoses. The effect of this orthosis on postural control was evaluated in 20 participants with chronic ankle instability and 20 matched healthy participants. The single-limb stance balance test was measured in both groups with and without the new orthosis using a force platform. The results showed that application of combined mechanism ankle support significantly improved all postural sway parameters in chronic ankle instability patients. There were no differences in means of investigated parameters with and without the orthosis in the healthy group. No statistically significant differences were found in postural sway between chronic ankle instability patients and healthy participants after applying the combined mechanism ankle support. The combined mechanism ankle support is effective in improving static postural control of chronic ankle instability patients to close to the postural sway of healthy individual. the orthosis had no adverse effects on balance performance of healthy individuals. Clinical relevance Application of the combined mechanism ankle support for patients with chronic ankle instability is effective in improving static balance. This may be helpful in reduction of recurrence of ankle sprain although further research about dynamic conditions is needed.

  5. Musculoskeletal modelling of human ankle complex: Estimation of ankle joint moments.

    PubMed

    Jamwal, Prashant K; Hussain, Shahid; Tsoi, Yun Ho; Ghayesh, Mergen H; Xie, Sheng Quan

    2017-05-01

    A musculoskeletal model for the ankle complex is vital in order to enhance the understanding of neuro-mechanical control of ankle motions, diagnose ankle disorders and assess subsequent treatments. Motions at the human ankle and foot, however, are complex due to simultaneous movements at the two joints namely, the ankle joint and the subtalar joint. The musculoskeletal elements at the ankle complex, such as ligaments, muscles and tendons, have intricate arrangements and exhibit transient and nonlinear behaviour. This paper develops a musculoskeletal model of the ankle complex considering the biaxial ankle structure. The model provides estimates of overall mechanical characteristics (motion and moments) of ankle complex through consideration of forces applied along ligaments and muscle-tendon units. The dynamics of the ankle complex and its surrounding ligaments and muscle-tendon units is modelled and formulated into a state space model to facilitate simulations. A graphical user interface is also developed during this research in order to include the visual anatomical information by converting it to quantitative information on coordinates. Validation of the ankle model was carried out by comparing its outputs with those published in literature as well as with experimental data obtained from an existing parallel ankle rehabilitation robot. Qualitative agreement was observed between the model and measured data for both, the passive and active ankle motions during trials in terms of displacements and moments. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Occupational therapy intervention with radiation-induced brachial plexopathy.

    PubMed

    Cooper, J

    1998-06-01

    Occupational therapy intervention minimizes disability and facilitates optimum functional independence. The range of dysfunction experienced by patients with radiation-induced brachial plexopathy includes physical, psychological, emotional and social difficulties. The occupational therapist works as part of the multiprofessional team to use a client-centred, problem-solving approach to address the problems and enable the patient to adapt to the altered body image and disabilities.

  7. Rhabdomyolysis resulting in concurrent Horner's syndrome and brachial plexopathy: a case report.

    PubMed

    Lee, Susan C; Geannette, Christian; Wolfe, Scott W; Feinberg, Joseph H; Sneag, Darryl B

    2017-08-01

    This case report describes a 29-year-old male who presented with immediate onset of Horner's syndrome and ipsilateral brachial plexopathy after sleeping with his arm dangling outside a car window for 8 h. Outside workup and imaging revealed rhabdomyolysis of the left neck musculature. Subsequent electrodiagnostic testing and high-resolution brachial plexus magnetic resonance imaging at the authors' institution attributed the Horner's syndrome and concurrent brachial plexopathy to rhabdomyolysis of the longus colli and scalene musculature, which had compressed-and consequently scar tethered-the cervical sympathetic trunk and brachial plexus. This case of co-existent Horner's syndrome and brachial plexopathy demonstrates the role of high-resolution brachial plexus MRI in diagnosing plexopathy and the importance of being familiar with plexus and paravertebral muscle anatomy.

  8. A novel technique for teaching the brachial plexus.

    PubMed

    Lefroy, Henrietta; Burdon-Bailey, Victoria; Bhangu, Aneel; Abrahams, Peter

    2011-09-01

    The brachial plexus has posed problems for both students and teachers throughout generations of medical education. The anatomy is intricate, and traditional pictorial representations can be difficult to understand and learn. Few innovative teaching methods have been reported. The basic anatomy of the brachial plexus is core knowledge required by medical students to aid clinical examination and diagnosis. A more detailed understanding is necessary for a variety of specialists, including surgeons, anaesthetists and radiologists. Here, we present a novel, cheap and interactive method of teaching the brachial plexus. Using coloured pipe cleaners, teachers and students can construct three-dimensional models using different colours to denote the origin and outflow of each nerve. The three-dimensional nature of the model also allows for a better understanding of certain intricacies of the plexus. Students may use these models as adjuncts for self study, didactic lectures and tutorials. Compared with traditional textbooks and whiteboards, the pipe-cleaner model was preferred by medical students, and provided a higher level of student satisfaction. This was demonstrated and analysed using student feedback forms. Our model could be incorporated into current curricula to provide an effective and enjoyable way of rapidly teaching a difficult concept. Other such novel methods for teaching complex anatomical principles should be encouraged and explored. © Blackwell Publishing Ltd 2011.

  9. Neonatal brachial plexus palsy--management and prognostic factors.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lynda J-S

    2014-06-01

    Successful treatment of patients with neonatal brachial plexus palsy (NBPP) begins with a thorough understanding of the anatomy of the brachial plexus and of the pathophysiology of nerve injury via which the brachial plexus nerves stretched in the perinatal period manifest as a weak or paralyzed upper extremity in the newborn. NBPP can be classified by systems that can guide the prognosis and the management as these systems are based on the extent and severity of nerve injury, anatomy of nerve injury, and clinical presentation. Serial physical examinations, supplemented by a thorough maternal and perinatal history, are critical to the formulation of the treatment plan that relies upon occupational/physical therapy and rehabilitation management but may include nerve reconstruction and secondary musculoskeletal surgeries. Adjunctive imaging and electrodiagnostic studies provide additional information to guide prognosis and treatment. As research improves not only the technical aspects of NBPP treatment but also the ability to assess the activity and participation as well as body structure and function of NBPP patients, the functional outcomes for affected infants have an overall optimistic prognosis, with the majority recovering adequate functional use of the affected arm. Of importance are (i) early referral to interdisciplinary specialty clinics that can provide up-to-date advances in clinical care and (ii) increasing research/awareness of the psychosocial and patient-reported quality-of-life issues that surround the chronic disablement of NBPP. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Presence of time-dependent diffusion in the brachial plexus.

    PubMed

    Mahbub, Zaid B; Peters, Andrew M; Gowland, Penny A

    2018-02-01

    This work describes the development of a method to measure the variation of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) with diffusion time (Δ) in the brachial plexus, as a potential method of probing microstructure. Diffusion-weighted MRI with body signal suppression was used to highlight the nerves from surrounding tissues, and sequence parameters were optimized for sensitivity to change with diffusion time. A porous media-restricted diffusion model based on the Latour-Mitra equation was fitted to the diffusion time-dependent ADC data from the brachial plexus nerves and cord. The ADC was observed to reduce at long diffusion times, confirming that diffusion was restricted in the nerves and cord in healthy subjects. T2 of the nerves was measured to be 80 ± 5 ms, the diffusion coefficient was found to vary from (1.5 ± 0.1) × 10 -3 mm 2 /s at a diffusion time of 18.3 ms to (1.0 ± 0.2) × 10 -3 mm 2 /s at a diffusion time of 81.3 ms. A novel method of probing restricted diffusion in the brachial plexus was developed. Resulting parameters were comparable with values obtained previously on biological systems. Magn Reson Med 79:789-795, 2018. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  11. Posterior impingement syndromes of the ankle.

    PubMed

    Lee, Justin C; Calder, James D F; Healy, Jeremiah C

    2008-06-01

    Acute, or repetitive, compression of the posterior structures of the ankle may lead to posterior ankle impingement (PAI) syndrome, posteromedial ankle impingement (PoMI) syndrome, or Haglund's syndrome. The etiology of each of these conditions is quite different. Variations in posterior ankle osseous and soft tissue anatomy contribute to the etiology of PAI and Haglund's syndromes. The presence of an os trigonum or Stieda process is classically associated with PAI syndrome, whereas a prominent posterosuperior tubercle of the os calcis or Haglund's deformity is the osseous predisposing factor in Haglund's syndrome. PoMI has no defined predisposing anatomical variants but typically follows an inversion-supination injury of the ankle joint. This article discusses the biomechanics, clinical features, imaging, and management of each of these conditions. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides the optimal tool in posterior ankle assessment, and this review focuses on the MRI findings of each of the conditions just listed.

  12. Control of acceleration during sudden ankle supination in people with unstable ankles.

    PubMed

    Vaes, P; Van Gheluwe, B; Duquet, W

    2001-12-01

    Comparative study of differences in functional control during ankle supination in the standing position in matched stable and unstable ankles (ex post facto design). To document acceleration and deceleration during ankle supination in the standing position and to determine differences in control of supination perturbation between stable and unstable ankles. Repetitive ankle sprain can be explained by mechanical instability only in a minority of cases. Exercise therapy for ankle instability is based on clinical experience. Joint stability has not yet been measured in dynamic situations that are similar to the situations leading to a traumatic sprain. The process of motor control during accelerating ankle supination has not been adequately addressed in the literature. Patients with complaints of ankle instability (16 unstable ankles) and nonimpaired controls (18 stable ankles) were examined (N = 17 subjects, 10 women and 7 men). The average age was 23.7 +/- 5.0 years (range, 20-41 y). Control of supination speed was studied during 50 degrees of ankle supination in the standing position using accelerometry (total supination time and deceleration times) and electromyography (latency time). Timing of motor response was estimated by measuring electromechanical delay. The presence of an early, sudden, and presumably passive slowdown of ankle supination in the standing position was observed. Peroneal muscle motor response was detected before the end of the supination. Unstable ankles showed significantly shorter total supination time (109.3 ms versus 124.1 ms) and significantly longer latency time (58.9 ms versus 47.7 ms). Functional control in unstable ankles is less efficient in decelerating the ankle during the supination test procedures used in our study. Our conclusions are based on significantly faster total supination and significantly slower electromyogram response in unstable ankles. The results support the hypothesis that both decelerating the total supination

  13. Percutaneous Coil Embolization for the Treatment of a Giant Brachial Artery Pseudoaneurym in a Child.

    PubMed

    Yuksel, Ahmet; Nas, Omer Fatih; Kan, Irem Iris; Tok, Mustafa; Erdogan, Cuneyt

    2017-11-01

    Brachial artery pseudoaneurysm is a rare phenomenon. When a diagnosis of brachial artery pseudoaneurysm is established, early and appropriate treatment should be performed as soon as possible to prevent possible complications, such as hemorrhage, rupture, and upper limb and finger losses. Open surgical repair is usually the cornerstone of treatment; however, we here report a case of giant brachial pseudoaneurysm in a 2-year-old girl, which was successfully treated with percutaneous coil embolization. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Ankle taping can reduce external ankle joint moments during drop landings on a tilted surface.

    PubMed

    Sato, Nahoko; Nunome, Hiroyuki; Hopper, Luke S; Ikegami, Yasuo

    2017-09-20

    Ankle taping is commonly used to prevent ankle sprains. However, kinematic assessments investigating the biomechanical effects of ankle taping have provided inconclusive results. This study aimed to determine the effect of ankle taping on the external ankle joint moments during a drop landing on a tilted surface at 25°. Twenty-five participants performed landings on a tilted force platform that caused ankle inversion with and without ankle taping. Landing kinematics were captured using a motion capture system. External ankle inversion moment, the angular impulse due to the medio-lateral and vertical components of ground reaction force (GRF) and their moment arm lengths about the ankle joint were analysed. The foot plantar inclination relative to the ground was assessed. In the taping condition, the foot plantar inclination and ankle inversion angular impulse were reduced significantly compared to that of the control. The only component of the external inversion moment to change significantly in the taped condition was a shortened medio-lateral GRF moment arm length. It can be assumed that the ankle taping altered the foot plantar inclination relative to the ground, thereby shortening the moment arm of medio-lateral GRF that resulted in the reduced ankle inversion angular impulse.

  15. Functional ankle control of rock climbers

    PubMed Central

    Schweizer, A; Bircher, H; Kaelin, X; Ochsner, P

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate whether rock climbing type exercise would be of value in rehabilitating ankle injuries to improve ankle stability and coordination. Results: The rock climbers showed significantly better results in the stabilometry and greater absolute and relative maximum strength of flexion in the ankle. The soccer players showed greater absolute but not relative strength in extension. Conclusion: Rock climbing, because of its slow and controlled near static movements, may be of value in the treatment of functional ankle instability. However, it has still to be confirmed whether it is superior to the usual rehabilitation exercises such as use of the wobble board. PMID:15976164

  16. Pseudoaneurysm as a complication of ankle arthroscopy.

    PubMed

    Mariani, P P; Mancini, L; Giorgini, T L

    2001-04-01

    We describe a case of pseudoaneurysm of the anterior tibial artery as a complication after arthroscopic ankle synovectomy, in which standard anterolateral and anteromedial portals were used. Pseudoaneurysm has been previously reported as a complication in ankle arthroscopy with the use of the anterocentral portal. Previously described anatomic variations of the tibial artery and its close relationship with the anterior ankle capsule may complicate arthroscopic surgery, especially when aggressive synovectomy is performed. Anterior tibial artery aneurysm is a rare complication of ankle arthroscopy, but its potential catastrophic sequelae must not be underestimated.

  17. Child neurology: Brachial plexus birth injury: what every neurologist needs to know.

    PubMed

    Pham, Christina B; Kratz, Johannes R; Jelin, Angie C; Gelfand, Amy A

    2011-08-16

    While most often transient, brachial plexus birth injury can cause permanent neurologic injury. The major risk factors for brachial plexus birth injury are fetal macrosomia and shoulder dystocia. The degree of injury to the brachial plexus should be determined in the neonatal nursery, as those infants with the most severe injury--root avulsion--should be referred early for surgical evaluation so that microsurgical repair of the plexus can occur by 3 months of life. Microsurgical repair options include nerve grafts and nerve transfers. All children with brachial plexus birth injury require ongoing physical and occupational therapy and close follow-up to monitor progress.

  18. Evaluation of an education day for families of children with obstetrical brachial plexus palsy.

    PubMed

    Ho, Emily S; Ulster, Alissa A

    2011-09-01

    Children with obstetrical brachial plexus palsy may have chronic physical impairment in their affected upper extremity. Affected children and their families may benefit from psychosocial interventions including therapeutic relationships with health professionals, meeting other families living with obstetrical brachial plexus palsy, support groups, and social work. One method of addressing psychosocial needs is through a support and education day. The purpose of this quality improvement project is to evaluate parental perceptions of a support and education day called the "Brachial Plexus Family Day." Families of children with obstetrical brachial plexus palsy who attended the Brachial Plexus Family Day completed a questionnaire to evaluate the different programs offered during the day. The families also ranked the importance of different psychosocial supports offered in the clinic. Sixty-three out of 69 families completed the questionnaire. Each program of the Brachial Plexus Family Day was rated as good or excellent by the respondents. Ninety-seven percent of respondents rated meeting other families and children with obstetrical brachial plexus palsy as helpful supports. Attending a Brachial Plexus Family day event (86%), followed by connecting with a doctor (60%), and physical or occupational therapist (59%) were the highest ranked supports reported by the families. The parents and caregivers that attended the Brachial Plexus Family Day rated the program highly. This group also valued the opportunity to connect with other families and children affected with the same condition.

  19. Static Postural Stability in Chronic Ankle Instability, An Ankle Sprain and Healthy Ankles.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Yong Ung

    2018-05-18

    To identify the single leg balance (SLB) test that discriminates among healthy, coper, and chronic ankle instability (CAI) groups and to determine effects of ankle muscles on the balance error scoring system (BESS) among the three populations. 60 subjects (20 per group) performed the SLB test with eyes open (EO) and eyes closed (EC). Normalized mean amplitude (NMA) of the tibia anterior (TA), fibularis longus (FL), and medial gastrocnemius (MG) muscles and BESS were measured while performing the SLB test. The coper group had a lower error score than the CAI group in the EC. NMA was greater in the CAI group compared to in the healthy and coper groups regardless of muscle type. NMA of the TA was less than the PL and MG regardless of the group in the EO. The CAI group demonstrated greater NMAs of the PL and MG than the healthy and coper groups in the EC. The CAI group demonstrated greater NMA of the PL and MG by compensating their ankle muscles in the EO and EC. BESS suggests that the coper group may have coping mechanisms to stabilize static postural control compared to the CAI group. The EC may be better to detect static postural instability in the CAI or coper group. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  20. Rate of abnormal osteoarticular radiographic findings in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Petit, P; Sapin, C; Henry, G; Dahan, M; Panuel, M; Bourlière-Najean, B; Chaumoitre, K; Devred, P

    2001-04-01

    The objective of our study was to assess the rate of abnormal radiographic findings in the most frequent osteoarticular locations of traumatic injury in a pediatric population. During two periods of 12 weeks each, all patients admitted to the pediatric emergency department for osteoarticular trauma who underwent radiography were prospectively included in this study. A connection was drawn between the rate of abnormal radiographic findings for the seven most frequently radiographed locations and the clinical findings. Of 3128 locations of trauma in 2470 children, only 22% of the radiographic examinations were considered to reveal abnormal findings. In decreasing order, the hand and fingers, the ankle, the wrist, the knee, the elbow, the foot and toes, and the forearm were the most frequently examined locations. The rate of abnormal findings was 25.7% for the hand and fingers, 9.0% for the ankle, 42.5% for the wrist, 9.5% for the knee, 33.3% for the elbow, 18.3% for the foot, and 43.2% for the forearm. When only the direct sign of fracture was taken into account, these rates decreased for the ankle and knee to 2.6% and 1.9%, respectively. There was always a significant link between the degree of clinical suspicion and the rate of abnormal radiographic findings. However, fewer than 50% of the cases with high clinical suspicion of fracture were radiographically confirmed. It appears necessary, especially in cases of lower limb trauma, to evaluate clinical tests, including the implementation of the Ottawa ankle rules, to reduce the number of unnecessary radiographic examinations. This reduction will improve some parameters of children's quality of life and will significantly decrease the cost of emergency care.

  1. Sensory-Targeted Ankle Rehabilitation Strategies for Chronic Ankle Instability.

    PubMed

    McKeon, Patrick O; Wikstrom, Erik A

    2016-05-01

    Deficient sensory input from damaged ankle ligament receptors is thought to contribute to sensorimotor deficits in those with chronic ankle instability (CAI). Targeting other viable sensory receptors may then enhance sensorimotor control in these patients. The purpose of this randomized controlled trial was to evaluate the effects of 2 wk of sensory-targeted ankle rehabilitation strategies (STARS) on patient- and clinician-oriented outcomes in those with CAI. Eighty patients with self-reported CAI participated. All patients completed patient-oriented questionnaires capturing self-reported function as well as the weight-bearing lunge test and an eyes-closed single-limb balance test. After baseline testing, patients were randomly allocated to four STARS groups: joint mobilization, plantar massage, triceps surae stretching, or control. Each patient in the intervention groups received six 5-min treatments of their respective STARS over 2 wk. All subjects were reassessed on patient- and clinician-oriented measures immediately after the intervention and completed a 1-month follow-up that consisted of patient-oriented measures. Change scores of the three STARS groups were compared with the control using independent t-tests and Hedges' g effect sizes with 95% confidence intervals. The joint mobilization group had the greatest weight-bearing lunge test improvement. Plantar massage had the most meaningful single-limb balance improvement. All STARS groups improved patient-oriented outcomes with joint mobilization having the most meaningful effect immediately after the intervention and plantar massage at the 1-month follow-up. Each STARS treatment offers unique contributions to the patient- and clinician-oriented rehabilitation outcomes of those with CAI. Both joint mobilization and plantar massage appear to demonstrate the greatest potential to improve sensorimotor function in those with CAI.

  2. Intra-articular plica causing ankle impingement in a young handball player: a case report.

    PubMed

    Somorjai, Nicolaas; Jong, Bob; Draijer, W F

    2013-01-01

    Ankle sprains are common injuries that respond well to rehabilitation. In the case of persisting symptoms, the differential diagnosis should include osteochondral defects, tendon injury, mechanical instability, and ankle impingement. In the present case report, we describe a 16-year-old male handball player who presented with persisting pain and locking in the right ankle 3 years after having sustained multiple minor inversion trauma. The clinical examination and conventional radiography showed no abnormalities. On magnetic resonance imaging, a flake fracture at the anteromedial talar dome and/or loose body was assumed. Arthroscopic examination revealed an intra-articular plica originating from an osteochondral fossa at the anteromedial tibial plafond. The plica was debrided. Retrospectively, the arthroscopic findings matched the radiographs and magnetic resonance images. The postoperative protocol consisted of early mobilization. At 6 weeks of follow-up, the patient had no pain and had returned to his sports activities. The present case report illustrates, to the best of our knowledge, the first case of ankle impingement due to a, most likely congenital, intra-articular plica arising from an osteochondral fossa at the anteromedial tibial plafond. This rare clinical condition can be diagnosed with magnetic resonance imaging. Arthroscopic debridement will effectively relieve the symptoms. Copyright © 2013 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. MRI appearance of surgically proven abnormal accessory anterior-inferior tibiofibular ligament (Bassett's ligament).

    PubMed

    Subhas, Naveen; Vinson, Emily N; Cothran, R Lee; Santangelo, James R; Nunley, James A; Helms, Clyde A

    2008-01-01

    A thickened accessory anterior-inferior tibiofibular ligament (Bassett's ligament) of the ankle can be a cause of ankle impingement. Its imaging appearance is not well described. The purpose of this study was to determine if the ligament could be identified on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), to determine associated abnormalities, and to determine if MRI could be used to differentiate normal from abnormal. Eighteen patients with a preoperative ankle MRI and an abnormal Bassett's ligament reported at surgery were found retrospectively. A separate cohort of 18 patients was selected as a control population. The presence of Bassett's ligament and its thickness were noted. The integrity and appearance of the lateral ankle ligaments, talar dome cartilage, and anterolateral gutter were also noted. In 34 of the 36 cases (94%), Bassett's ligament was identified on MRI. The ligament was seen in all three imaging planes and most frequently in the axial plane. The mean thickness of the ligament in the surgically abnormal cases was 2.37 mm, compared with 1.87 mm in the control with a p value=0.015 (t test). Nine of the 18 abnormal cases (50%) had talar dome cartilage lesions as a result of contact with the ligament at surgery, with only 3 cases of high-grade defects seen on MRI. Fourteen of the 18 abnormal cases (78%) had of synovitis or scarring in the lateral gutter at surgery, with only 5 cases with scarring seen on MRI. The anterior-inferior tibiofibular ligament was abnormal or torn in 8 of the 18 abnormal cases (44%) by MRI and confirmed in only 3 cases at surgery. Bassett's ligament can be routinely identified on MRI and was significantly thicker in patients who had it resected at surgery. An abnormal Bassett's ligament is often present in the setting of a normal anterior-inferior tibiofibular ligament. The cartilage abnormalities and synovitis associated with an abnormal Bassett's ligament are poorly detected by conventional MRI.

  4. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding FAQ

    MedlinePlus

    ... Abnormal Uterine Bleeding • What is a normal menstrual cycle? • When is bleeding abnormal? • At what ages is ... abnormal bleeding? •Glossary What is a normal menstrual cycle? The normal length of the menstrual cycle is ...

  5. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding

    MedlinePlus

    ... abnormal uterine bleeding? Abnormal uterine bleeding is any heavy or unusual bleeding from the uterus (through your ... one symptom of abnormal uterine bleeding. Having extremely heavy bleeding during your period can also be considered ...

  6. Neuromuscular control and ankle instability.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Gregory M; Kaminski, Thomas W; Douex, Al T

    2009-04-01

    Lateral ankle sprains (LAS) are common injuries in athletics and daily activity. Although most are resolved with conservative treatment, others develop chronic ankle instability (AI)-a condition associated with persistent pain, weakness, and instability-both mechanical (such as ligamentous laxity) and functional (neuromuscular impairment with or without mechanical laxity). The predominant theory in AI is one of articular deafferentation from the injury, affecting closed-loop (feedback/reflexive) neuromuscular control, but recent research has called that theory into question. A considerable amount of attention has been directed toward understanding the underlying causes of this pathology; however, little is known concerning the neuromuscular mechanisms behind the development of AI. The purpose of this review is to summarize the available literature on neuromuscular control in uninjured individuals and individuals with AI. Based on available research and reasonable speculation, it seems that open-loop (feedforward/anticipatory) neuromuscular control may be more important for the maintenance of dynamic joint stability than closed-loop control systems that rely primarily on proprioception. Therefore, incorporating perturbation activities into patient rehabilitation schemes may be of some benefit in enhancing these open-loop control mechanisms. Despite the amount of research conducted in this area, analysis of individuals with AI during dynamic conditions is limited. Future work should aim to evaluate dynamic perturbations in individuals with AI, as well as subjects who have a history of at least one LAS and never experienced recurrent symptoms. These potential findings may help elucidate some compensatory mechanisms, or more appropriate neuromuscular control strategies after an LAS event, thus laying the groundwork for future intervention studies that can attempt to reduce the incidence and severity of acute and chronic lateral ankle injury.

  7. Congenital symmetrical weakness of the upper limbs resembling brachial plexus palsy: a possible sequel of drug toxicity in first trimester of pregnancy?

    PubMed

    Philpot, J; Muntoni, F; Skellett, S; Dubowitz, V

    1995-01-01

    We report a 14-month-old girl with a symmetrical paralysis from birth, limited to the upper limbs and resembling a severe, complete bilateral brachial plexus palsy. The presence of dimples over the wrists, shoulders and scapulae and abnormal palmar dermatoglyphics suggested an early prenatal onset. Previous reports and the course of the disease in our case suggest this sporadic condition is not progressive. Although no definitive causative factor has been identified in previously reported cases, the affection in our case is possibly related to Debendox (Bendectin) and nitrofurantoin taken in early pregnancy for nausea and renal tract infection, respectively.

  8. Assessment of acute foot and ankle sprains.

    PubMed

    Lynam, Louise

    2006-07-01

    Acute ankle and foot trauma is a regular emergency presentation and prompt strategic assessment skills are required to enable nurses to categorise and prioritise these injuries appropriately. This article provides background information on the anatomy and physiology of the lower limb to help nurses to identify various grades of ankle sprain as well as injuries that are limb threatening

  9. Prenatal development of the foot and ankle.

    PubMed

    Bareither, D

    1995-12-01

    The general development of the lower limb and the specific development of the foot and ankle are discussed for each horizon in the embryonic and fetal periods of development. Lower limb general development is discussed only to the extent necessary for the understanding of foot and ankle development.

  10. Two genetic loci associated with ankle injury.

    PubMed

    Kim, Stuart K; Kleimeyer, John P; Ahmed, Marwa A; Avins, Andrew L; Fredericson, Michael; Dragoo, Jason L; Ioannidis, John P A

    2017-01-01

    Ankle injuries, including sprains, strains and other joint derangements and instability, are common, especially for athletes involved in indoor court or jumping sports. Identifying genetic loci associated with these ankle injuries could shed light on their etiologies. A genome-wide association screen was performed using publicly available data from the Research Program in Genes, Environment and Health (RPGEH) including 1,694 cases of ankle injury and 97,646 controls. An indel (chr21:47156779:D) that lies close to a collagen gene, COL18A1, showed an association with ankle injury at genome-wide significance (p = 3.8x10-8; OR = 1.99; 95% CI = 1.75-2.23). A second DNA variant (rs13286037 on chromosome 9) that lies within an intron of the transcription factor gene NFIB showed an association that was nearly genome-wide significant (p = 5.1x10-8; OR = 1.63; 95% CI = 1.46-1.80). The ACTN3 R577X mutation was previously reported to show an association with acute ankle sprains, but did not show an association in this cohort. This study is the first genome-wide screen for ankle injury that yields insights regarding the genetic etiology of ankle injuries and provides DNA markers with the potential to inform athletes about their genetic risk for ankle injury.

  11. Two genetic loci associated with ankle injury

    PubMed Central

    Kleimeyer, John P.; Ahmed, Marwa A.; Avins, Andrew L.; Fredericson, Michael; Dragoo, Jason L.; Ioannidis, John P. A.

    2017-01-01

    Ankle injuries, including sprains, strains and other joint derangements and instability, are common, especially for athletes involved in indoor court or jumping sports. Identifying genetic loci associated with these ankle injuries could shed light on their etiologies. A genome-wide association screen was performed using publicly available data from the Research Program in Genes, Environment and Health (RPGEH) including 1,694 cases of ankle injury and 97,646 controls. An indel (chr21:47156779:D) that lies close to a collagen gene, COL18A1, showed an association with ankle injury at genome-wide significance (p = 3.8x10-8; OR = 1.99; 95% CI = 1.75–2.23). A second DNA variant (rs13286037 on chromosome 9) that lies within an intron of the transcription factor gene NFIB showed an association that was nearly genome-wide significant (p = 5.1x10-8; OR = 1.63; 95% CI = 1.46–1.80). The ACTN3 R577X mutation was previously reported to show an association with acute ankle sprains, but did not show an association in this cohort. This study is the first genome-wide screen for ankle injury that yields insights regarding the genetic etiology of ankle injuries and provides DNA markers with the potential to inform athletes about their genetic risk for ankle injury. PMID:28957384

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of sports injuries of the foot and ankle: a pictorial essay.

    PubMed

    Riley, Geoffrey M

    2007-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging is playing an increasingly important role in evaluation of the injured athlete's foot and ankle. Magnetic resonance imaging allows accurate detection of bony abnormalities, such as stress fractures, and soft-tissue abnormalities, including ligament tears, tendon tears, and tendinopathy. The interpreter of magnetic resonance images should systematically review the images, noting normal structures and accounting for changes in soft-tissue and bony signal.

  13. Comparison of neuromuscular abnormalities between upper and lower extremities in hemiparetic stroke.

    PubMed

    Mirbagheri, M M; AliBiglou, L; Thajchayapong, M; Lilaonitkul, T; Rymer, W Z

    2006-01-01

    We studied the neuromuscular mechanical properties of the elbow and ankle joints in chronic, hemiparetic stroke patients and healthy subjects. System identification techniques were used to characterize the mechanical abnormalities of these joints and to identify the contribution of intrinsic and reflex stiffness to these abnormalities. Modulation of intrinsic and reflex stiffness with the joint angle was studied by applying PRBS perturbations to the joint at different joint angles. The experiments were performed for both spastic (stroke) and contralateral (control) sides of stroke patients and one side of healthy (normal) subjects. We found reflex stiffness gain (GR) was significantly larger in the stroke than the control side for both elbow and ankle joints. GR was also strongly position dependent in both joints. However, the modulation of GR with position was slightly different in two joints. GR was also larger in the control than the normal joints but the differences were significant only for the ankle joint. Intrinsic stiffness gain (K) was also significantly larger in the stroke than the control joint at elbow extended positions and at ankle dorsiflexed positions. Modulation of K with the ankle angle was similar for stroke, control and normal groups. In contrast, the position dependency of the elbow was different. K was larger in the control than normal ankle whereas it was lower in the control than normal elbow. However, the differences were not significant for any joint. The findings demonstrate that both reflex and intrinsic stiffness gain increase abnormally in both upper and lower extremities. However, the major contribution of intrinsic and reflex stiffness to the abnormalities is at the end of ROM and at the middle ROM, respectively. The results also demonstrate that the neuromuscular properties of the contralateral limb are not normal suggesting that it may not be used as a suitable control at least for the ankle study.

  14. Energetic Passivity of the Human Ankle Joint.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyunglae; Hogan, Neville

    2016-12-01

    Understanding the passive or nonpassive behavior of the neuromuscular system is important to design and control robots that physically interact with humans, since it provides quantitative information to secure coupled stability while maximizing performance. This has become more important than ever apace with the increasing demand for robotic technologies in neurorehabilitation. This paper presents a quantitative characterization of passive and nonpassive behavior of the ankle of young healthy subjects, which provides a baseline for future studies in persons with neurological impairments and information for future developments of rehabilitation robots, such as exoskeletal devices and powered prostheses. Measurements using a wearable ankle robot actuating 2 degrees-of-freedom of the ankle combined with curl analysis and passivity analysis enabled characterization of both quasi-static and steady-state dynamic behavior of the ankle, unavailable from single DOF studies. Despite active neuromuscular control over a wide range of muscle activation, in young healthy subjects passive or dissipative ankle behavior predominated.

  15. Management of acute and chronic ankle instability.

    PubMed

    Maffulli, Nicola; Ferran, Nicholas A

    2008-10-01

    Acute lateral ankle ligament injuries are common. If left untreated, they can result in chronic instability. Nonsurgical measures, including functional rehabilitation, are the management methods of choice for acute injuries, with surgical intervention reserved for high-demand athletes. Chronic lateral ankle instability is multifactorial. Failed nonsurgical management after appropriate rehabilitation is an indication for surgery. Of the many surgical options available, anatomic repair of the anterior talofibular and calcaneofibular ligaments is recommended when the quality of the ruptured ligaments permits. Anatomic reconstruction with autograft or allograft should be performed when the ruptured ligaments are attenuated. Ankle arthroscopy is an important adjunct to ligamentous repair and should be performed at the time of repair to identify and address intra-articular conditions associated with chronic ankle instability. Tenodesis procedures are not recommended because they may disturb ankle and hindfoot biomechanics.

  16. [Lateral instability of the upper ankle joint].

    PubMed

    Harrasser, N; Eichelberg, K; Pohlig, F; Waizy, H; Toepfer, A; von Eisenhart-Rothe, R

    2016-11-01

    Because of their frequency, ankle sprains are of major clinical and economic importance. The simple sprain with uneventful healing has to be distinguished from the potentially complicated sprain which is at risk of transition to chronic ankle instability. Conservative treatment is indicated for the acute, simple ankle sprain without accompanying injuries and also in cases of chronic instability. If conservative treatment fails, good results can be achieved by anatomic ligament reconstruction of the lateral ankle ligaments. Arthroscopic techniques offer the advantage of joint inspection and addressing intra-articular pathologies in combination with ligament repair. Accompanying pathologies must be adequately addressed during ligament repair to avoid persistent ankle discomfort. If syndesmotic insufficiency and tibiofibular instability are suspected, the objective should be early diagnosis with MRI and surgical repair.

  17. Finger movement at birth in brachial plexus birth palsy

    PubMed Central

    Nath, Rahul K; Benyahia, Mohamed; Somasundaram, Chandra

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether the finger movement at birth is a better predictor of the brachial plexus birth injury. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective study reviewing pre-surgical records of 87 patients with residual obstetric brachial plexus palsy in study 1. Posterior subluxation of the humeral head (PHHA), and glenoid retroversion were measured from computed tomography or Magnetic resonance imaging, and correlated with the finger movement at birth. The study 2 consisted of 141 obstetric brachial plexus injury patients, who underwent primary surgeries and/or secondary surgery at the Texas Nerve and Paralysis Institute. Information regarding finger movement was obtained from the patient’s parent or guardian during the initial evaluation. RESULTS: Among 87 patients, 9 (10.3%) patients who lacked finger movement at birth had a PHHA > 40%, and glenoid retroversion < -12°, whereas only 1 patient (1.1%) with finger movement had a PHHA > 40%, and retroversion < -8° in study 1. The improvement in glenohumeral deformity (PHHA, 31.8% ± 14.3%; and glenoid retroversion 22.0° ± 15.0°) was significantly higher in patients, who have not had any primary surgeries and had finger movement at birth (group 1), when compared to those patients, who had primary surgeries (nerve and muscle surgeries), and lacked finger movement at birth (group 2), (PHHA 10.7% ± 15.8%; Version -8.0° ± 8.4°, P = 0.005 and P = 0.030, respectively) in study 2. No finger movement at birth was observed in 55% of the patients in this study group. CONCLUSION: Posterior subluxation and glenoid retroversion measurements indicated significantly severe shoulder deformities in children with finger movement at birth, in comparison with those lacked finger movement. However, the improvement after triangle tilt surgery was higher in patients who had finger movement at birth. PMID:23362472

  18. Perineural Spread of Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer to the Brachial Plexus: Identifying Anatomic Pathway(s).

    PubMed

    Marek, Tomas; Howe, B Matthew; Amrami, Kimberly K; Spinner, Robert J

    2018-06-01

    Perineural spread leading to brachial plexopathy has recently been described in cases of melanoma. The occurrence and mechanism for nonmelanoma skin cancer spread to the brachial plexus is poorly understood. A retrospective chart review of the Mayo Clinic database was conducted to identify patients with nonmelanoma skin cancer and brachial plexopathy between 2000 and 2017. Inclusion criteria were a history of nonmelanoma skin cancer, a clinical diagnosis of brachial plexopathy, imaging features of perineural spread, and a positive result of examination of a biopsy specimen showing tumor in a skin nerve. Thirty-seven patients with a history of nonmelanoma skin cancer and brachial plexopathy were identified. Inclusion criteria were fulfilled in 2 cases of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma. One case of recurrent basal cell carcinoma with perineural spread confirmed in the brachial plexus by pathologic examination was excluded because confirmatory evidence of perineural spread from the skin to the brachial plexus was not available. Perineural spread of nonmelanoma skin cancer leading to brachial plexopathy is rare. Our 2 cases and the cases found in the literature demonstrate different entry points to the neural highway resulting in neurologic deficits. The cervical plexus serves as a hub for further spread in certain cases of perineural spread of skin cancer. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Anatomical study of prefixed versus postfixed brachial plexuses in adult human cadaver.

    PubMed

    Guday, Edengenet; Bekele, Asegedech; Muche, Abebe

    2017-05-01

    The brachial plexus is usually formed by the fusion of anterior primary rami of the fifth to eighth cervical and the first thoracic spinal nerves. Variations in the formation of the brachial plexus may occur. Variations in brachial plexus anatomy are important to radiologists, surgeons and anaesthesiologists performing surgical procedures in the neck, axilla and upper limb regions. These variations may lead to deviation from the expected dermatome distribution as well as differences in the motor innervation of muscles of the upper limb. This study is aimed to describe the anatomical variations of brachial plexus in its formation among 20 Ethiopian cadavers. Observational based study was conducted by using 20 cadavers obtained from the Department of Human Anatomy at University of Gondar, Bahir Dar, Addis Ababa, Hawasa, Hayat Medical College and St Paul Hospital Millennium Medical College. Data analysis was conducted using thematic approaches. A total of 20 cadavers examined bilaterally for the formation of brachial plexus. Of the 40 sides, 30 sides (75%) were found normal, seven sides (17.5%) prefixed, three sides (7.5%) postfixed and one side of the cadaver lacks cord formation. The brachial plexus formation in most subjects is found to be normal. Among the variants, the numbers of the prefixed brachial plexuses are greater than the postfixed brachial plexuses. © 2016 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  20. Correlation between ultrasound imaging, cross-sectional anatomy, and histology of the brachial plexus: a review.

    PubMed

    van Geffen, Geert J; Moayeri, Nizar; Bruhn, Jörgen; Scheffer, Gert J; Chan, Vincent W; Groen, Gerbrand J

    2009-01-01

    The anatomy of the brachial plexus is complex. To facilitate the understanding of the ultrasound appearance of the brachial plexus, we present a review of important anatomic considerations. A detailed correlation of reconstructed, cross-sectional gross anatomy and histology with ultrasound sonoanatomy is provided.

  1. Swelling in the upper arm: the presentation and management of an isolated brachial artery aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Alagaratnam, S; Lau, T; Munro, M; Loh, A

    2011-01-01

    True aneurysms of the brachial artery are uncommon. We describe the presentation and surgical management of an isolated, brachial artery aneurysm in a 64-year-old woman. Excision of the aneurysm and long saphenous venous interposition grafting was performed with no postoperative complications and histology demonstrated true aneurysmal degeneration. PMID:21943445

  2. Unusual cause of brachial palsy with diaphragmatic palsy.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Vishal; Pandita, Aakash; Panghal, Astha; Hassan, Neha

    2018-05-12

    We report a preterm neonate born with respiratory distress. The neonate was found to have diaphragmatic palsy and brachial palsy. The neonate was born by caesarean section and there was no history of birth trauma. On examination, there was bilateral congenital talipes equinovarus and a scar was present on the forearm. The mother had a history of chickenpox during the 16 weeks of pregnancy for which no treatment was sought. On investigation, PCR for varicella was found to be positive in the neonate. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  3. Brachial plexus palsy and shoulder dystocia: obstetric risk factors remain elusive.

    PubMed

    Ouzounian, Joseph G; Korst, Lisa M; Miller, David A; Lee, Richard H

    2013-04-01

    Shoulder dystocia (SD) and brachial plexus palsy (BPP) are complications of childbirth that can result in significant long-term sequelae. The purpose of the present study was to analyze risk factors in cases of SD and BPP. We performed a retrospective study of laboring women who delivered a singleton, term, live-born infant at the Los Angeles County + University of Southern California Medical Center from 1995 to 2004. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to analyze risk factors among SD cases with and without BPP. Of the 13,998 deliveries that met inclusion criteria, 221 (1.6%) had SD. Of these, 42 (19.0%) had BPP. After testing for association with multiple potential risk factors, including maternal demographic variables, diabetes, hypertension, prior cesarean delivery, uterine abnormalities, induction of labor, prolonged second stage (adjusted by parity and epidural use), assisted vaginal delivery, and neonatal birth weight, no statistical association of BPP with any specific risk factor was identified. In the present study, we were unable to identify any reliable risk factors for BPP among deliveries with or without SD. SD and BPP remain unpredictable complications of childbirth. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  4. Effects of early nerve repair on experimental brachial plexus injury in neonatal rats.

    PubMed

    Bourke, Gráinne; McGrath, Aleksandra M; Wiberg, Mikael; Novikov, Lev N

    2018-03-01

    Obstetrical brachial plexus injury refers to injury observed at the time of delivery, which may lead to major functional impairment in the upper limb. In this study, the neuroprotective effect of early nerve repair following complete brachial plexus injury in neonatal rats was examined. Brachial plexus injury induced 90% loss of spinal motoneurons and 70% decrease in biceps muscle weight at 28 days after injury. Retrograde degeneration in spinal cord was associated with decreased density of dendritic branches and presynaptic boutons and increased density of astrocytes and macrophages/microglial cells. Early repair of the injured brachial plexus significantly delayed retrograde degeneration of spinal motoneurons and reduced the degree of macrophage/microglial reaction but had no effect on muscle atrophy. The results demonstrate that early nerve repair of neonatal brachial plexus injury could promote survival of injured motoneurons and attenuate neuroinflammation in spinal cord.

  5. High resolution neurography of the brachial plexus by 3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Cejas, C; Rollán, C; Michelin, G; Nogués, M

    2016-01-01

    The study of the structures that make up the brachial plexus has benefited particularly from the high resolution images provided by 3T magnetic resonance scanners. The brachial plexus can have mononeuropathies or polyneuropathies. The mononeuropathies include traumatic injuries and trapping, such as occurs in thoracic outlet syndrome due to cervical ribs, prominent transverse apophyses, or tumors. The polyneuropathies include inflammatory processes, in particular chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, Parsonage-Turner syndrome, granulomatous diseases, and radiation neuropathy. Vascular processes affecting the brachial plexus include diabetic polyneuropathy and the vasculitides. This article reviews the anatomy of the brachial plexus and describes the technique for magnetic resonance neurography and the most common pathologic conditions that can affect the brachial plexus. Copyright © 2016 SERAM. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Clinical tests of ankle plantarflexor strength do not predict ankle power generation during walking.

    PubMed

    Kahn, Michelle; Williams, Gavin

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between a clinical test of ankle plantarflexor strength and ankle power generation (APG) at push-off during walking. This is a prospective cross-sectional study of 102 patients with traumatic brain injury. Handheld dynamometry was used to measure ankle plantarflexor strength. Three-dimensional gait analysis was performed to quantify ankle power generation at push-off during walking. Ankle plantarflexor strength was only moderately correlated with ankle power generation at push-off (r = 0.43, P < 0.001; 95% confidence interval, 0.26-0.58). There was also a moderate correlation between ankle plantarflexor strength and self-selected walking velocity (r = 0.32, P = 0.002; 95% confidence interval, 0.13-0.48). Handheld dynamometry measures of ankle plantarflexor strength are only moderately correlated with ankle power generation during walking. This clinical test of ankle plantarflexor strength is a poor predictor of calf muscle function during gait in people with traumatic brain injury.

  7. Reliability and smallest real difference of the ankle lunge test post ankle fracture.

    PubMed

    Simondson, David; Brock, Kim; Cotton, Susan

    2012-02-01

    This study aimed to determine the reliability and the smallest real difference of the Ankle Lunge test in an ankle fracture patient population. In the post immobilisation stage of ankle fracture, ankle dorsiflexion is an important measure of progress and outcome. The Ankle Lunge test measures weight bearing dorsiflexion, resulting in negative scores (knee to wall distance) and positive scores (toe to wall distance), for which the latter has proven reliability in normal subjects only. A consecutive sample of ankle fracture patients with permission to commence weight bearing, were recruited to the study. Three measurements of the Ankle Lunge Test were performed each by two raters, one senior and one junior physiotherapist. These occurred prior to therapy sessions in the second week after plaster removal. A standardised testing station was utilised and allowed for both knee to wall distance and toe to wall distance measurement. Data was collected from 10 individuals with ankle fracture, with an average age of 36 years (SD 14.8). Seventy seven percent of observations were negative. Intra and inter-rater reliability yielded intra class correlations at or above 0.97, p < .001. There was a significant systematic bias towards improved scores during repeated measurement for one rater (p = .01). The smallest real difference was calculated as 13.8mm. The Ankle Lunge test is a practical and reliable tool for measuring weightbearing dorsiflexion post ankle fracture. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The improvement of postural control in patients with mechanical ankle instability after lateral ankle ligaments reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong-Yun; Zheng, Jie-Jiao; Zhang, Jian; Cai, Ye-Hua; Hua, Ying-Hui; Chen, Shi-Yi

    2016-04-01

    Lateral ankle sprain is the most common injury. A previous study demonstrated that patients with mechanical ankle instability suffered deficits in postural control, indicating that structural damage of the lateral ankle ligaments may produce a balance deficit. The purpose of this study was to confirm that lateral ligaments reconstruction could improve postural control in patients with mechanical ankle instability. A total of 15 patients were included in the study. Each patient had a history of an ankle sprain with persistent symptoms of ankle instability and a positive anterior drawer test and had been treated nonoperatively for at least 3 months. All patients were diagnosed with lateral ankle ligaments tear by ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging. They underwent arthroscopic debridement and open lateral ankle ligaments reconstruction with a modified Broström procedure. One day before and 6 months after the operation, all of the participants underwent single-limb postural sway tests. The anterior drawer test and the American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society scale score were used to evaluate the clinical results in these patients. At 6 months after the operation, with the patients' eyes closed, there was significantly decreased postural sway in the anteroposterior direction, the circumferential area, and the total path length on the operated ankles compared with those measurements before the operation. With eyes open, however, no difference was found in postural sway before and after the operation. Postural control was improved by reconstructing the lateral ligaments. IV.

  9. Clinical research of comprehensive rehabilitation in treating brachial plexus injury patients.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jun-Ming; Gu, Yu-Dong; Xu, Xiao-Jun; Zhang, Shen-Yu; Zhao, Xin

    2012-07-01

    Brachial plexus injury is one of the difficult medical problems in the world. The aim of this study was to observe the clinical therapeutic effect of comprehensive rehabilitation in treating dysfunction after brachial plexus injury. Forty-three cases of dysfunction after brachial plexus injury were divided into two groups randomly. The treatment group, which totaled 21 patients (including 14 cases of total brachial plexus injury and seven cases of branch brachial plexus injury), was treated with comprehensive rehabilitation including transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, mid-frequency electrotherapy, Tuina therapy, and occupational therapy. The control group, which totaled 22 patients (including 16 cases of total brachial plexus injury and six cases of branch brachial plexus injury), was treated with home-based electrical nerve stimulation and occupational therapy. Each course was of 30 days duration and the patients received four courses totally. After four courses, the rehabilitation effect was evaluated according to the brachial plexus function evaluation standard and electromyogram (EMG) assessment. In the treatment group, there was significant difference in the scores of brachial plexus function pre- and post-treatment (P < 0.01) in both "total" and "branch" injury. The scores of two "total injury" groups had statistical differences (P < 0.01), while the scores of two "branch injury" groups had statistical differences (P < 0.05) after four courses. EMG suggested that the appearance of regeneration potentials of the recipient nerves in the treatment group was earlier than the control group and had significant differences (P < 0.05). Comprehensive rehabilitation was more effective in treating dysfunction after brachial plexus injury than nonintegrated rehabilitation.

  10. Footwear and ankle stability in the basketball player.

    PubMed

    Petrov, O; Blocher, K; Bradbury, R L; Saxena, A; Toy, M L

    1988-04-01

    Ankle stability in basketball players is affected by footwear. Athletic shoe manufacturers have introduced specialized lacing systems and high-top performance shoes to improve ankle stability. These performance shoes not only aid in preventing ankle injuries, but also protect injured ankles.

  11. The Impact of Pediatric Brachial Plexus Injury on Families

    PubMed Central

    Allgier, Allison; Overton, Myra; Welge, Jeffrey; Mehlman, Charles T.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine the impact on families of children with brachial plexus injuries in order to best meet their clinical and social needs. Methods Our cross-sectional study included families with children between the ages of 1 and 18 with birth or non-neonatal brachial plexus injuries (BPI). The consenting parent or guardian completed a demographic questionnaire and the validated Impact on Family Scale during a single assessment. Total scores can range from 0-100, with the higher the score indicating a higher impact on the family. Factor analysis and item-total correlations were used to examine structure, individual items, and dimensions of family impact. Results One hundred two caregivers participated. Overall, families perceived various dimensions of impact on having a child with a BPI. Total family impact was 43. The 2 individual items correlating most strongly with the overall total score were from the financial dimension of the Impact on Family Scale. The strongest demographic relationship was traveling nationally for care and treatment of the BPI. Severity of injury was marginally correlated with impact on the family. Parent-child agreement about the severity of the illness was relatively high. Conclusion Caretakers of children with a BPI perceived impact on their families in the form of personal strain, family/social factors, financial stress, and mastery. A multidisciplinary clinical care team should address the various realms of impact on family throughout the course of treatment. Level of Evidence II Prognostic PMID:25936738

  12. Reconstructive operations for the upper limb after brachial plexus palsy.

    PubMed

    Rühmann, Oliver; Schmolke, Stephan; Bohnsack, Michael; Carls, Jörg; Flamme, Christian; Wirth, Carl Joachim

    2004-07-01

    Limited function due to paralysis following brachial plexus lesions can be improved by secondary operations of the bony and soft tissue. Between April 1994 and December 2000, 109 patients suffering from arm-plexus lesions underwent a total of 144 reconstructive operations guided by our concept of integrated therapy. The average age at the time of surgery was 32 years (range: 15-59). The following operations were performed: shoulder arthrodesis (23), trapezius transfer (74), rotation osteotomy of humerus (9), triceps to biceps transposition (9), transposition of forearm flexors or extensors (8), latissimus transfer (7), pectoralis transfer (1), teres major transfer (1), transposition of flexor carpi ulnaris to the tendons of extensor digitorum (10), and wrist arthrodesis (2). Prospectively, in all patients, the grade of muscle power of the affected upper extremity was evaluated prior to surgery. The follow-up period for all 144 operations was, on average, 22 months (range: 6-74). By means of operative measures, almost all patients obtained an improvement of shoulder function (100%) and stability (>90%), elbow flexion (85%), and hand, finger, and thumb (100%). When muscles malfunction after brachial plexus lesions, one should take into account the individual neuromuscular defect, passive joint function, and bony deformities; different procedures such as muscle transpositions, arthrodeses, and corrective osteotomies can then be performed to improve function of the upper extremity. Each form of operative treatment presents patients with certain benefits and all are integrated into a total treatment plan for the affected extremity.

  13. Overuse ankle injuries in professional Irish dancers.

    PubMed

    Walls, R J; Brennan, S A; Hodnett, P; O'Byrne, J M; Eustace, S J; Stephens, M M

    2010-03-01

    Overuse ankle injuries have been described in elite athletes and professional ballet dancers however the spectrum of injuries experienced by professional Irish dancers has not been defined. A troupe of actively performing dancers from an Irish-dance show were recruited (eight male, ten female; mean age, 26 years). The prevalence of overuse injuries in the right ankle was determined from magnetic resonance imaging. Foot and ankle self-report questionnaires were also completed (AOFAS and FAOS). Only three ankles were considered radiologically normal. Achilles tendinopathy, usually insertional, was the most frequent observation (n=14) followed by plantar fasciitis (n=7), bone oedema (n=2) and calcaneocuboid joint degeneration (n=2). There were limited correlations between MRI patterns and clinical scores indicating that many conditions are sub-clinical. Dancers with ankle pain had poor low (p=0.004) and high (p=0.013) level function. Overuse ankle injuries are common in Irish dancers. Incorporating eccentric exercises and plantar fascia stretching into a regular training program may benefit this population. Copyright 2009 European Foot and Ankle Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Predicted percentage dissatisfied with ankle draft.

    PubMed

    Liu, S; Schiavon, S; Kabanshi, A; Nazaroff, W W

    2017-07-01

    Draft is unwanted local convective cooling. The draft risk model of Fanger et al. (Energy and Buildings 12, 21-39, 1988) estimates the percentage of people dissatisfied with air movement due to overcooling at the neck. There is no model for predicting draft at ankles, which is more relevant to stratified air distribution systems such as underfloor air distribution (UFAD) and displacement ventilation (DV). We developed a model for predicted percentage dissatisfied with ankle draft (PPD AD ) based on laboratory experiments with 110 college students. We assessed the effect on ankle draft of various combinations of air speed (nominal range: 0.1-0.6 m/s), temperature (nominal range: 16.5-22.5°C), turbulence intensity (at ankles), sex, and clothing insulation (<0.7 clo; lower legs uncovered and covered). The results show that whole-body thermal sensation and air speed at ankles are the dominant parameters affecting draft. The seated subjects accepted a vertical temperature difference of up to 8°C between ankles (0.1 m) and head (1.1 m) at neutral whole-body thermal sensation, 5°C more than the maximum difference recommended in existing standards. The developed ankle draft model can be implemented in thermal comfort and air diffuser testing standards. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. [Concomitant injuries after upper ankle joint dislocations].

    PubMed

    Dann, K; Wahler, G; Neubauer, N; Steiner, R; Titze, W; Wagner, M

    1996-09-01

    Functional treatment with the Air Stirrup Ankle Brace recommended by C. N. Stover in 1979 can reduce pathological inversion of the ankle joint. In our retrospective study of 109 patients treated by this kind of ankle brace we found 96 patients (88%) with excellent results. Only 13 patients (12%) reported moderate to good results. To detect and characterize their painful conditions of ankles we did a clinical, radiological and MRI-Investigation. In only 2 cases we found a moderate instability after clinical investigation, anterior stress roentgenogram and talar tilt. By using the MRI-investigation 1.0 Tesla with a 512 x 360 Matrix we could find 10 cases with osteochondral lesions of the ankle. In 7 cases there was separated ossicle in the fibulotalar joint, in 1 case we detected a fracture of the processus anterior tali, in another case we could see a posttraumatic lesion of the talus and calcaneus with bone bruise and at least one osteochondral fracture of the distal tibia. The capability of the MRI to detect particularly osteo-chondral lesions of the talus and the tibiofibular joint was shown in 10 of 13 cases. Therefore we recommend to do an MRI-investigation on all patients after ankle sprain if there are painful conditions within the ankle after conservative treatment.

  16. Foot and ankle function after tibial overlengthening.

    PubMed

    Emara, Khaled M; Diab, Ramy Ahmed; El Ghazali, Sherif; Farouk, Amr; El Kersh, Mohamed Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Lengthening the tibia more than 25% of its original length can be indicated for proximal femoral deficiency, poliomyelitis, or femoral infected nonunion. Such lengthening of the tibia can adversely affect the ankle or foot shape and function. The present study aimed to assess the effect of tibial lengthening of more than 25% of its original length on the foot and ankle shape and function compared with the preoperative condition. This was a retrospective study of 13 children with severe proximal focal femoral deficiency, Aitken classification type D, who had undergone limb lengthening from June 2000 to June 2008 using Ilizarov external fixators. The techniques used in tibial lengthening included lengthening without intramedullary rodding and lengthening over a nail. The foot assessment was done preoperatively, at fixator removal, and then annually for 3 years, documenting the range of motion and deformity of the ankle and subtalar joints and big toe and the navicular height, calcaneal pitch angle, and talo-first metatarsal angle. At fixator removal, all cases showed equinocavovarus deformity, with decreased ankle, subtalar, and big toe motion. The mean American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society score was significantly reduced. During follow-up, the range of motion, foot deformity, and American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society score improved, reaching nearly to the preoperative condition by 2 years of follow-up. The results of our study have shown that tibial overlengthening has an adverse effect on foot and ankle function. This effect was reversible in the patients included in the present study. Lengthening of more than 25% can be safely done after careful discussion with the patients and their families about the probable effects of lengthening on foot and ankle function. Copyright © 2014 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Position versus force control: using the 2-DOF robotic ankle trainer to assess ankle's motor control.

    PubMed

    Farjadian, Amir B; Nabian, Mohsen; Hartman, Amber; Corsino, Johnathan; Mavroidis, Constantinos; Holden, Maureen K

    2014-01-01

    An estimated of 2,000,000 acute ankle sprains occur annually in the United States. Furthermore, ankle disabilities are caused by neurological impairments such as traumatic brain injury, cerebral palsy and stroke. The virtually interfaced robotic ankle and balance trainer (vi-RABT) was introduced as a cost-effective platform-based rehabilitation robot to improve overall ankle/balance strength, mobility and control. The system is equipped with 2 degrees of freedom (2-DOF) controlled actuation along with complete means of angle and torque measurement mechanisms. Vi-RABT was used to assess ankle strength, flexibility and motor control in healthy human subjects, while playing interactive virtual reality games on the screen. The results suggest that in the task with 2-DOF, subjects have better control over ankle's position vs. force.

  18. All-inside, anatomical lateral ankle stabilization for revision and complex primary lateral ankle stabilization: a technique guide.

    PubMed

    Prissel, Mark A; Roukis, Thomas S

    2014-12-01

    Lateral ankle instability is a common mechanical problem that often requires surgical management when conservative efforts fail. Historically, myriad open surgical approaches have been proposed. Recently, consideration for arthroscopic management of lateral ankle instability has become popular, with promising results. Unfortunately, recurrent inversion ankle injury following lateral ankle stabilization can occur and require revision surgery. To date, arthroscopic management for revision lateral ankle stabilization has not been described. We present a novel arthroscopic technique combining an arthroscopic lateral ankle stabilization kit with a suture anchor ligament augmentation system for revision as well as complex primary lateral ankle stabilization. © 2014 The Author(s).

  19. Differences in kinematic control of ankle joint motions in people with chronic ankle instability.

    PubMed

    Kipp, Kristof; Palmieri-Smith, Riann M

    2013-06-01

    People with chronic ankle instability display different ankle joint motions compared to healthy people. The purpose of this study was to investigate the strategies used to control ankle joint motions between a group of people with chronic ankle instability and a group of healthy, matched controls. Kinematic data were collected from 11 people with chronic ankle instability and 11 matched control subjects as they performed a single-leg land-and-cut maneuver. Three-dimensional ankle joint angles were calculated from 100 ms before, to 200 ms after landing. Kinematic control of the three rotational ankle joint degrees of freedom was investigated by simultaneously examining the three-dimensional co-variation of plantarflexion/dorsiflexion, toe-in/toe-out rotation, and inversion/eversion motions with principal component analysis. Group differences in the variance proportions of the first two principal components indicated that the angular co-variation between ankle joint motions was more linear in the control group, but more planar in the chronic ankle instability group. Frontal and transverse plane motions, in particular, contributed to the group differences in the linearity and planarity of angular co-variation. People with chronic ankle instability use a different kinematic control strategy to coordinate ankle joint motions during a single-leg landing task. Compared to the healthy group, the chronic ankle instability group's control strategy appeared to be more complex and involved joint-specific contributions that would tend to predispose this group to recurring episodes of instability. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Transfibular ankle arthrodesis: A novel method for ankle fusion – A short term retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Balaji, S Muthukumar; Selvaraj, V; Devadoss, Sathish; Devadoss, Annamalai

    2017-01-01

    Background: Ankle arthrodesis has long been the traditional operative treatment for posttraumatic arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, infection, neuromuscular conditions, and salvage of failed ankle arthroplasty. It remains the treatment of choice for patients in whom heavy and prolonged activity is anticipated. We present our short term followup study of functional outcome of patients who underwent transfibular ankle arthrodesis for arthritis of ankle due to various indications. Materials and Methods: 29 transfibular ankle arthrodesis in 29 patients performed between April 2009 and April 2014 were included in this study. The mean age was 50 years (range 22-75 years). The outcome analysis with a minimum of 1-year postoperative followup were included. All the patients were assessed with the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) Hindfoot scale. Results: All cases of ankle fusions (100%) progressed to solid union in a mean postoperative duration of 3.8 months (range 3–6 months). All patients had sound arthrodesis. The mean followup period was 32.52 months (standard deviation ± 10.34). The mean AOFAS score was 74 (pain score = 32, functional score = 42). We found that twenty patients (68.96%) out of 29, had excellent results, 7 (24.13%) had good, and 2 (6.89%) showed fair results. Conclusion: Transfibular ankle arthrodesis is a simple and effective procedure for ankle arthritis. It achieves a high rate of union and good functional outcome on midterm followup. PMID:28216754

  1. Comparison of custom-moulded ankle orthosis with hinged joints and off-the-shelf ankle braces in preventing ankle sprain in lateral cutting movements.

    PubMed

    Lee, Winson C C; Kobayashi, Toshiki; Choy, Barton T S; Leung, Aaron K L

    2012-06-01

    A custom moulded ankle orthosis with hinged joints potentially offers a better control over the subtalar joint and the ankle joint during lateral cutting movements, due to total contact design and increase in material strength. To test the above hypothesis by comparing it to three other available orthoses. Repeated measures. Eight subjects with a history of ankle sprains (Grade 2), and 11 subjects without such history performed lateral cutting movements in four test conditions: 1) non-orthotic, 2) custom-moulded ankle orthosis with hinges, 3) Sport-Stirrup, and 4) elastic ankle sleeve with plastic support. A VICON motion analysis system was used to study the motions at the ankle and subtalar joints. The custom-moulded ankle orthosis significantly lowered the inversion angle at initial contact (p = 0.006) and the peak inversion angle (p = 0.000) during lateral cutting movements in comparison to non-orthotic condition, while the other two orthoses did not. The three orthoses did not affect the plantarflexion motions, which had been suggested by previous studies to be important in shock wave attenuation. The custom-moulded ankle orthosis with hinges could better control inversion and thus expected to better prevent ankle sprain in lateral cutting movements. Custom-moulded ankle orthoses are not commonly used in preventing ankle sprains. This study raises the awareness of the use of custom-moulded ankle orthoses which are expected to better prevent ankle sprains.

  2. Ankle impingement syndromes: an imaging review

    PubMed Central

    Tafur, Monica; Ahmed, Sonya S; Huang, Brady K; Chang, Eric Y

    2017-01-01

    Ankle impingement syndromes encompass a broad spectrum of post-traumatic and chronic degenerative changes that present with pain on specific movements about the ankle joint. Both amateur and professional athletes are disproportionately affected by these conditions, and while conservative measures can potentially treat an impingement syndrome, definitive therapy is often alleviated surgically. Imaging (including conventional radiography, ultrasound, CT and MRI) plays an invaluable role in the diagnosis and pre-surgical work-up. An anatomically based classification system is useful in these syndromes, as the aetiology, sites of pathology and preferred treatment methods are similarly based on anatomic locations about the ankle. This review focuses on the anatomic locations, pathophysiology, imaging considerations and brief discussion of therapies for each of the major anatomic ankle impingement syndromes. PMID:27885856

  3. How to Care for a Sprained Ankle

    MedlinePlus

    ... gradually returning to straight-ahead activity and doing maintenance exercises, followed later by more cutting sports such ... Society ® Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Foundation 9400 W. Higgins Road, Suite 220, Rosemont, IL 60018 800-235-4855 ...

  4. Treatment of ankle fractures--our results.

    PubMed

    Vranic, Haris; Hadzimehmedagic, Amel; Gavrankapetanovic, Ismet; Zjakic, Amir; Talic, Adnana

    2010-01-01

    Break ankle today is becoming more frequent. There is a dilemma to operate immediately upon receipt or delayed surgical treatment for a day or two. This work aims at showing the importance of the anatomy, mechanism of injury, injury classification, diagnostic and therapeutic methods in treatment of brake ankle from our experience. In the past year in our clinic there were 30 patients treated for all types of ankle fractures, and these patients were divided in two groups. Patients of the first group are those immediately operated, and the second group were with delayed surgery. The results showed that the patients of the first group had better healing, fewer complications, better and faster rehabilitation. Second groups of patients were with complications in terms dehiscence of wounds, bad healing fracture and DVT. Our results showed that better result in the treatment of ankle fractures is achieved by aggressive treatment immediately after trauma, with reconstruction of articular surface and tibiofibular syndesmosis with early rehabilitation.

  5. SPARKy-Spring Ankle with Regenerative Kinematics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    fiber keel. In our design considerations, we kept the passive carbon fiber keel to allow for walking in the event of battery failure. b. Test...used include a motor encoder, ankle encoder, and a heel switch. 7. Energy efficient carbon fiber keel is integrated into the device. Figure 6... Isometric and side views of SPARKy Phase 1 as modeled in SolidWorks. The Robotic Tendon actuator provides a dynamic moment about the ankle joint. Lever

  6. Ankle arthroscopy: outcome in 79 consecutive patients.

    PubMed

    Amendola, A; Petrik, J; Webster-Bogaert, S

    1996-10-01

    Seventy-nine consecutive ankle arthroscopies were analyzed at a minimum 2-year follow-up to evaluate the risks and benefits of the procedure. All arthroscopies were performed over a 2-year period by a single surgeon using the same nonskeletal traction technique. Forty-four arthroscopies were performed for therapeutic reasons only, whereas 35 were performed for both diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. Clinical examination with visual analog scores were used for assessment preoperatively and postoperatively. The diagnoses were osteochondral lesions of the talus in 21; post-ankle fracture scarring in 14, osteoarthritis and chondromalacia in 11, anterior bony impingement in 14; anterolateral soft tissue impingement or synovitis in 15; miscellaneous diagnosis in 4. Overall, 63 of 79 patients benefited in some way from the procedure. There were diagnostic benefits in 27 of 35 (77%) of ankles in which the diagnosis was clarified by the arthroscopy. In those ankles in which the procedure was performed for therapeutic purposes only, 36 of 44 (82%) of the patients benefited. Those patients with an underlying diagnosis of osteoarthritis of the ankle, posttraumatic chondromalacia and arthrofibrosis, or who were on disability and worker's compensation benefits, had poor results, whereas patients with a localized osteochondral lesion of the talus, localized bony or soft tissue impingement, or localized lateral plica had the best results. There were three significant neurological complications from ankle arthroscopy in this series. Two patients developed a postoperative partial deep peroneal nerve neuropraxia, and one patient had superficial peroneal nerve irritation at the site of the anterolateral portal. Ankle arthroscopy appears to be a relatively low-risk procedure with substantial benefits, particularly in localized disease of the ankle joint. Skeletal distraction was not used in any of these cases.

  7. Preparatory co-activation of the ankle muscles may prevent ankle inversion injuries

    PubMed Central

    DeMers, Matthew S.; Hicks, Jennifer L.; Delp, Scott L.

    2018-01-01

    Ankle inversion sprains are the most frequent acute musculoskeletal injuries occurring in physical activity. Interventions that retrain muscle coordination have helped rehabilitate injured ankles, but it is unclear which muscle coordination strategies, if any, can prevent ankle sprains. The purpose of this study was to determine whether coordinated activity of the ankle muscles could prevent excessive ankle inversion during a simulated landing on a 30-degree incline. We used a set of musculoskeletal simulations to evaluate the efficacy of two strategies for coordinating the ankle evertor and invertor muscles during simulated landing scenarios: planned co-activation and stretch reflex activation with physiologic latency (60-millisecond delay). A full-body musculoskeletal model of landing was used to generate simulations of a subject dropping onto an inclined surface with each coordination condition. Within each condition, the intensity of evertor and invertor co-activity or stretch reflexes were varied systematically. The simulations revealed that strong preparatory co-activation of the ankle evertors and invertors prior to ground contact prevented ankle inversion from exceeding injury thresholds by rapidly generating eversion moments after initial contact. Conversely, stretch reflexes were too slow to generate eversion moments before the simulations reached the threshold for inversion injury. These results suggest that training interventions to protect the ankle should focus on stiffening the ankle with muscle co-activation prior to landing. The musculoskeletal models, controllers, software, and simulation results are freely available online at http://simtk.org/home/ankle-sprains, enabling others to reproduce the results and explore new injury scenarios and interventions. PMID:28057351

  8. Test-retest reliability of sudden ankle inversion measurements in subjects with healthy ankle joints.

    PubMed

    Eechaute, Christophe; Vaes, Peter; Duquet, William; Van Gheluwe, Bart

    2007-01-01

    Sudden ankle inversion tests have been used to investigate whether the onset of peroneal muscle activity is delayed in patients with chronically unstable ankle joints. Before interpreting test results of latency times in patients with chronic ankle instability and healthy subjects, the reliability of these measures must be first demonstrated. To investigate the test-retest reliability of variables measured during a sudden ankle inversion movement in standing subjects with healthy ankle joints. Validation study. Research laboratory. 15 subjects with healthy ankle joints (30 ankles). Subjects stood on an ankle inversion platform with both feet tightly fixed to independently moveable trapdoors. An unexpected sudden ankle inversion of 50 degrees was imposed. We measured latency and motor response times and electromechanical delay of the peroneus longus muscle, along with the time and angular position of the first and second decelerating moments, the mean and maximum inversion speed, and the total inversion time. Correlation coefficients and standard error of measurements were calculated. Intraclass correlation coefficients ranged from 0.17 for the electromechanical delay of the peroneus longus muscle (standard error of measurement = 2.7 milliseconds) to 0.89 for the maximum inversion speed (standard error of measurement = 34.8 milliseconds). The reliability of the latency and motor response times of the peroneus longus muscle, the time of the first and second decelerating moments, and the mean and maximum inversion speed was acceptable in subjects with healthy ankle joints and supports the investigation of the reliability of these measures in subjects with chronic ankle instability. The lower reliability of the electromechanical delay of the peroneus longus muscle and the angular positions of both decelerating moments calls the use of these variables into question.

  9. Ottawa Ankle Rules and Subjective Surgeon Perception to Evaluate Radiograph Necessity Following Foot and Ankle Sprain

    PubMed Central

    Pires, RES; Pereira, AA; Abreu-e-Silva, GM; Labronici, PJ; Figueiredo, LB; Godoy-Santos, AL; Kfuri, M

    2014-01-01

    Background: Foot and ankle injuries are frequent in emergency departments. Although only a few patients with foot and ankle sprain present fractures and the fracture patterns are almost always simple, lack of fracture diagnosis can lead to poor functional outcomes. Aim: The present study aims to evaluate the reliability of the Ottawa ankle rules and the orthopedic surgeon subjective perception to assess foot and ankle fractures after sprains. Subjects and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted from July 2012 to December 2012. Ethical approval was granted. Two hundred seventy-four adult patients admitted to the emergency department with foot and/or ankle sprain were evaluated by an orthopedic surgeon who completed a questionnaire prior to radiographic assessment. The Ottawa ankle rules and subjective perception of foot and/or ankle fractures were evaluated on the questionnaire. Results: Thirteen percent (36/274) patients presented fracture. Orthopedic surgeon subjective analysis showed 55.6% sensitivity, 90.1% specificity, 46.5% positive predictive value and 92.9% negative predictive value. The general orthopedic surgeon opinion accuracy was 85.4%. The Ottawa ankle rules presented 97.2% sensitivity, 7.8% specificity, 13.9% positive predictive value, 95% negative predictive value and 19.9% accuracy respectively. Weight-bearing inability was the Ottawa ankle rule item that presented the highest reliability, 69.4% sensitivity, 61.6% specificity, 63.1% accuracy, 21.9% positive predictive value and 93% negative predictive value respectively. Conclusion: The Ottawa ankle rules showed high reliability for deciding when to take radiographs in foot and/or ankle sprains. Weight-bearing inability was the most important isolated item to predict fracture presence. Orthopedic surgeon subjective analysis to predict fracture possibility showed a high specificity rate, representing a confident method to exclude unnecessary radiographic exams. PMID:24971221

  10. Clinical examination results in individuals with functional ankle instability and ankle-sprain copers.

    PubMed

    Wright, Cynthia J; Arnold, Brent L; Ross, Scott E; Ketchum, Jessica; Ericksen, Jeffrey; Pidcoe, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Why some individuals with ankle sprains develop functional ankle instability and others do not (ie, copers) is unknown. Current understanding of the clinical profile of copers is limited. To contrast individuals with functional ankle instability (FAI), copers, and uninjured individuals on both self-reported variables and clinical examination findings. Cross-sectional study. Sports medicine research laboratory. Participants consisted of 23 individuals with a history of 1 or more ankle sprains and at least 2 episodes of giving way in the past year (FAI: Cumberland Ankle Instability Tool [CAIT] score = 20.52 ± 2.94, episodes of giving way = 5.8 ± 8.4 per month), 23 individuals with a history of a single ankle sprain and no subsequent episodes of instability (copers: CAIT score = 27.74 ± 1.69), and 23 individuals with no history of ankle sprain and no instability (uninjured: CAIT score = 28.78 ± 1.78). Self-reported disability was recorded using the CAIT and Foot and Ankle Ability Measure for Activities of Daily Living and for Sports. On clinical examination, ligamentous laxity and tenderness, range of motion (ROM), and pain at end ROM were recorded. Questionnaire scores for the CAIT, Foot and Ankle Ability Measure for Activities of Daily Living and for Sports, ankle inversion and anterior drawer laxity scores, pain with palpation of the lateral ligaments, ankle ROM, and pain at end ROM. Individuals with FAI had greater self-reported disability for all measures (P < .05). On clinical examination, individuals with FAI were more likely to have greater talar tilt laxity, pain with inversion, and limited sagittal-plane ROM than copers (P < .05). Differences in both self-reported disability and clinical examination variables distinguished individuals with FAI from copers at least 1 year after injury. Whether the deficits could be detected immediately postinjury to prospectively identify potential copers is unknown.

  11. The management of failed ankle replacement.

    PubMed

    Kotnis, R; Pasapula, C; Anwar, F; Cooke, P H; Sharp, R J

    2006-08-01

    Advances in the design of the components for total ankle replacement have led to a resurgence of interest in this procedure. Between January 1999 and December 2004, 16 patients with a failed total ankle replacement were referred to our unit. In the presence of infection, a two-stage salvage procedure was planned. The first involved the removal of the components and the insertion of a cement spacer. Definitive treatment options included hindfoot fusion with a circular frame or amputation. When there was no infection, a one-stage salvage procedure was planned. Options included hindfoot fusion with an intramedullary nail or revision total ankle replacement. When there was suspicion of infection, a percutaneous biopsy was performed. The patients were followed up for a minimum of 12 months. Of the 16 patients, 14 had aseptic loosening, five of whom underwent a revision total ankle replacement and nine a hindfoot fusion. Of the two with infection, one underwent fusion and the other a below-knee amputation. There were no cases of wound breakdown, nonunion or malunion. Management of the failed total ankle replacement should be performed by experienced surgeons and ideally in units where multidisciplinary support is available. Currently, a hindfoot fusion appears to be preferable to a revision total ankle replacement.

  12. Complex ankle arthrodesis: Review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Rabinovich, Remy V; Haleem, Amgad M; Rozbruch, S Robert

    2015-01-01

    Complex ankle arthrodesis is defined as an ankle fusion that is at high risk of delayed and nonunion secondary to patient comorbidities and/or local ankle/hindfoot factors. Risk factors that contribute to defining this group of patients can be divided into systemic factors and local factors pertaining to co-existing ankle or hindfoot pathology. Orthopaedic surgeons should be aware of these risk factors and their association with patients’ outcomes after complex ankle fusions. Both external and internal fixations have demonstrated positive outcomes with regards to achieving stable fixation and minimizing infection. Recent innovations in the application of biophysical agents and devices have shown promising results as adjuncts for healing. Both osteoconductive and osteoinductive agents have been effectively utilized as biological adjuncts for bone healing with low complication rates. Devices such as pulsed electromagnetic field bone stimulators, internal direct current stimulators and low-intensity pulsed ultrasound bone stimulators have been associated with faster bone healing and improved outcomes scores when compared with controls. The aim of this review article is to present a comprehensive approach to the management of complex ankle fusions, including the use of biophysical adjuncts for healing and a proposed algorithm for their treatment. PMID:26396936

  13. Acquired Brachial Cutaneous Dyschromatosis in a Middle Aged Male

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Min Jung; Byun, Ji Yeon; Choi, Hae Young

    2018-01-01

    Acquired brachial cutaneous dyschromatosis (ABCD) is an acquired disorder of pigmentary change that presents as chronic, asymptomatic, geographic-shaped, gray-brown patches, consisting of mixed hyper and hypopigmented macules on the dorsal aspect of the forearms. We report a case of a 40-year-old male who presented with asymptomatic, multiple brown-colored macules on the outer aspects of both arms. He had no history of hypertension and had never taken angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors. He also denied chronic sun exposure history. Histologic examination demonstrated epidermal atrophy, increased basal layer pigmentation, and several telangiectatic vessels in the upper dermis. Solar elastosis was not remarkable. The patient's clinical and histopathologic features were consistent with a diagnosis of ABCD. Poikiloderma of Civatte, melasma, acquired bilateral telangiectatic macules and other pigmentary disorders should be considered in the differential diagnosis of ABCD. Herein, we report a case of ABCD in a middle-aged male without hypertension and medication. PMID:29853750

  14. Outcome following nonoperative treatment of brachial plexus birth injuries.

    PubMed

    DiTaranto, Patricia; Campagna, Liliana; Price, Andrew E; Grossman, John A I

    2004-02-01

    Ninety-one infants who sustained a brachial plexus birth injury were treated with only physical and occupational therapy. The children were evaluated at 3-month intervals and followed for a minimum of 2 years. Sixty-three children with an upper or upper-middle plexus injury recovered good to excellent shoulder and hand function. In all of these children, critical marker muscles recovered M4 by 6 months of age. Twelve infants sustained a global palsy, with critical marker muscles remaining at M0-M1 at 6 months, resulting in a useless extremity. Sixteen infants with upper and upper-middle plexus injuries failed to recover greater than M1-M2 deltoid and biceps by 6 months, resulting in a very poor final outcome. These data provide useful guidelines for selection of infants for surgical reconstruction to improve ultimate outcome.

  15. A Review of Brachial Plexus Birth Palsy: Injury and Rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Raducha, Jeremy E; Cohen, Brian; Blood, Travis; Katarincic, Julia

    2017-11-01

    Brachial plexus injuries during the birthing process can leave infants with upper extremity deficits corresponding to the location of the lesion within the complex plexus anatomy. Manifestations can range from mild injuries with complete resolution to severe and permanent disability. Overall, patients have a high rate of spontaneous recovery (66-92%).1,2 Initially, all lesions are managed with passive range motion and observation. Prevention and/or correction of contractures with occupational therapy and serial splinting/casting along with encouraging normal development are the main goals of non-operative treatment. Surgical intervention may be war- ranted, depending on functional recovery. [Full article available at http://rimed.org/rimedicaljournal-2017-11.asp].

  16. Chronic ankle instability and common fibular nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Benchortane, Michaël; Collado, Hervé; Coudreuse, Jean-Marie; Desnuelle, Claude; Viton, Jean-Michel; Delarque, Alain

    2011-03-01

    The lateral collateral ligaments of the ankle are often damaged in ankle inversion injuries. Ankle inversion may also cause injury to other structures located around the ankle or further away, such as the common fibular nerve. Few descriptions exist of common fibular nerve injury associated with ankle sprains and chronic ankle instability. We describe the case of a patient who sustained common fibular nerve injury during each of two ankle sprain recurrences involving the lateral collateral ligaments. Our objectives are to illustrate the links between common fibular nerve and lateral collateral ligament injuries and to emphasize the importance of the neurological evaluation in patients seen for ankle sprains or chronic ankle instability. Copyright © 2010 Société française de rhumatologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Urine - abnormal color

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003139.htm Urine - abnormal color To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The usual color of urine is straw-yellow. Abnormally colored urine ...

  18. OCT/PS-OCT imaging of brachial plexus neurovascular structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raphael, David T.; Zhang, Jun; Zhang, Yaoping; Chen, Zhongping; Miller, Carol; Zhou, Li

    2004-07-01

    Introduction: Optical coherence tomography (OCT) allows high-resolution imaging (less than 10 microns) of tissue structures. A pilot study with OCT and polarization-sensitive OCT (PS-OCT) was undertaken to image ex-vivo neurovascular structures (vessels, nerves) of the canine brachial plexus. Methods: OCT is an interferometry-based optical analog of B-mode ultrasound, which can image through non-transparent biological tissues. With approval of the USC Animal Care and Use Committee, segments of the supra- and infraclavicular brachial plexus were excised from euthanized adult dogs, and the ex-vivo specimens were placed in cold pH-buffered physiologic solution. An OCT beam, in micrometer translational steps, scanned the fixed-position bisected specimens in transverse and longitudinal views. Two-dimensional images were obtained from identified arteries and nerves, with specific sections of interest stained with hematoxylin-eosin for later imaging through a surgical microscope. Results: with the beam scan direction transverse to arteries, the resulting OCT images showed an identifiable arterial lumen and arterial wall tissue layers. By comparison, transverse beam OCT images of nerves revealed a multitude of smaller nerve bundles contained within larger circular-shaped fascicles. PS-OCT imaging was helpful in showing the characteristic birefringence exhibited by arrayed neural structures. Discussion: High-resolution OCT imaging may be useful in the optical identification of neurovascular structures during attempted regional nerve blockade. If incorporated into a needle-shaped catheter endoscope, such a technology could prevent intraneural and intravascular injections immediately prior to local anesthetic injection. The major limitation of OCT is that it can form a coherent image of tissue structures only to a depth of 1.5 - 2 mm.

  19. Obstetrical brachial plexus injury (OBPI): Canada's national clinical practice guideline

    PubMed Central

    Coroneos, Christopher J; Voineskos, Sophocles H; Christakis, Marie K; Thoma, Achilleas; Bain, James R; Brouwers, Melissa C

    2017-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to establish an evidence-based clinical practice guideline for the primary management of obstetrical brachial plexus injury (OBPI). This clinical practice guideline addresses 4 existing gaps: (1) historic poor use of evidence, (2) timing of referral to multidisciplinary care, (3) Indications and timing of operative nerve repair and (4) distribution of expertise. Setting The guideline is intended for all healthcare providers treating infants and children, and all specialists treating upper extremity injuries. Participants The evidence interpretation and recommendation consensus team (Canadian OBPI Working Group) was composed of clinicians representing each of Canada's 10 multidisciplinary centres. Outcome measures An electronic modified Delphi approach was used for consensus, with agreement criteria defined a priori. Quality indicators for referral to a multidisciplinary centre were established by consensus. An original meta-analysis of primary nerve repair and review of Canadian epidemiology and burden were previously completed. Results 7 recommendations address clinical gaps and guide identification, referral, treatment and outcome assessment: (1) physically examine for OBPI in newborns with arm asymmetry or risk factors; (2) refer newborns with OBPI to a multidisciplinary centre by 1 month; (3) provide pregnancy/birth history and physical examination findings at birth; (4) multidisciplinary centres should include a therapist and peripheral nerve surgeon experienced with OBPI; (5) physical therapy should be advised by a multidisciplinary team; (6) microsurgical nerve repair is indicated in root avulsion and other OBPI meeting centre operative criteria; (7) the common data set includes the Narakas classification, limb length, Active Movement Scale (AMS) and Brachial Plexus Outcome Measure (BPOM) 2 years after birth/surgery. Conclusions The process established a new network of opinion leaders and researchers for further

  20. Morphometric Atlas Selection for Automatic Brachial Plexus Segmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Van de Velde, Joris, E-mail: joris.vandevelde@ugent.be; Department of Radiotherapy, Ghent University, Ghent; Wouters, Johan

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of atlas selection based on different morphometric parameters, on the accuracy of automatic brachial plexus (BP) segmentation for radiation therapy planning. The segmentation accuracy was measured by comparing all of the generated automatic segmentations with anatomically validated gold standard atlases developed using cadavers. Methods and Materials: Twelve cadaver computed tomography (CT) atlases (3 males, 9 females; mean age: 73 years) were included in the study. One atlas was selected to serve as a patient, and the other 11 atlases were registered separately onto this “patient” using deformable image registration. Thismore » procedure was repeated for every atlas as a patient. Next, the Dice and Jaccard similarity indices and inclusion index were calculated for every registered BP with the original gold standard BP. In parallel, differences in several morphometric parameters that may influence the BP segmentation accuracy were measured for the different atlases. Specific brachial plexus-related CT-visible bony points were used to define the morphometric parameters. Subsequently, correlations between the similarity indices and morphometric parameters were calculated. Results: A clear negative correlation between difference in protraction-retraction distance and the similarity indices was observed (mean Pearson correlation coefficient = −0.546). All of the other investigated Pearson correlation coefficients were weak. Conclusions: Differences in the shoulder protraction-retraction position between the atlas and the patient during planning CT influence the BP autosegmentation accuracy. A greater difference in the protraction-retraction distance between the atlas and the patient reduces the accuracy of the BP automatic segmentation result.« less

  1. Psychometric Evaluation of the Brachial Assessment Tool Part 1: Reproducibility.

    PubMed

    Hill, Bridget; Williams, Gavin; Olver, John; Ferris, Scott; Bialocerkowski, Andrea

    2018-04-01

    To evaluate reproducibility (reliability and agreement) of the Brachial Assessment Tool (BrAT), a new patient-reported outcome measure for adults with traumatic brachial plexus injury (BPI). Prospective repeated-measure design. Outpatient clinics. Adults with confirmed traumatic BPI (N=43; age range, 19-82y). People with BPI completed the 31-item 4-response BrAT twice, 2 weeks apart. Results for the 3 subscales and summed score were compared at time 1 and time 2 to determine reliability, including systematic differences using paired t tests, test retest using intraclass correlation coefficient model 1,1 (ICC 1,1 ), and internal consistency using Cronbach α. Agreement parameters included standard error of measurement, minimal detectable change, and limits of agreement. BrAT. Test-retest reliability was excellent (ICC 1,1 =.90-.97). Internal consistency was high (Cronbach α=.90-.98). Measurement error was relatively low (standard error of measurement range, 3.1-8.8). A change of >4 for subscale 1, >6 for subscale 2, >4 for subscale 3, and >10 for the summed score is indicative of change over and above measurement error. Limits of agreement ranged from ±4.4 (subscale 3) to 11.61 (summed score). These findings support the use of the BrAT as a reproducible patient-reported outcome measure for adults with traumatic BPI with evidence of appropriate reliability and agreement for both individual and group comparisons. Further psychometric testing is required to establish the construct validity and responsiveness of the BrAT. Copyright © 2017 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Effects of the application of ankle functional rehabilitation exercise on the ankle joint functional movement screen and isokinetic muscular function in patients with chronic ankle sprain.

    PubMed

    Ju, Sung-Bum; Park, Gi Duck

    2017-02-01

    [Purpose] This study was conducted to investigate the effects of ankle functional rehabilitation exercise on ankle joint functional movement screen results and isokinetic muscular function in patients with chronic ankle sprain patients. [Subjects and Methods] In this study, 16 patients with chronic ankle sprain were randomized to an ankle functional rehabilitation exercise group (n=8) and a control group (n=8). The ankle functional rehabilitation exercise centered on a proprioceptive sense exercise program, which was applied 12 times for 2 weeks. To verify changes after the application, ankle joint functional movement screen scores and isokinetic muscular function were measured and analyzed. [Results] The ankle functional rehabilitation exercise group showed significant improvements in all items of the ankle joint functional movement screen and in isokinetic muscular function after the exercise, whereas the control group showed no difference after the application. [Conclusion] The ankle functional rehabilitation exercise program can be effectively applied in patients with chronic ankle sprain for the improvement of ankle joint functional movement screen score and isokinetic muscular function.

  3. Effects of the application of ankle functional rehabilitation exercise on the ankle joint functional movement screen and isokinetic muscular function in patients with chronic ankle sprain

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Sung-Bum; Park, Gi Duck

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] This study was conducted to investigate the effects of ankle functional rehabilitation exercise on ankle joint functional movement screen results and isokinetic muscular function in patients with chronic ankle sprain patients. [Subjects and Methods] In this study, 16 patients with chronic ankle sprain were randomized to an ankle functional rehabilitation exercise group (n=8) and a control group (n=8). The ankle functional rehabilitation exercise centered on a proprioceptive sense exercise program, which was applied 12 times for 2 weeks. To verify changes after the application, ankle joint functional movement screen scores and isokinetic muscular function were measured and analyzed. [Results] The ankle functional rehabilitation exercise group showed significant improvements in all items of the ankle joint functional movement screen and in isokinetic muscular function after the exercise, whereas the control group showed no difference after the application. [Conclusion] The ankle functional rehabilitation exercise program can be effectively applied in patients with chronic ankle sprain for the improvement of ankle joint functional movement screen score and isokinetic muscular function. PMID:28265157

  4. Do Ankle Orthoses Improve Ankle Proprioceptive Thresholds or Unipedal Balance in Older Persons with Peripheral Neuropathy?

    PubMed Central

    Son, Jaebum; Ashton-Miller, James A.; Richardson, James K.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To determine whether ankle orthoses that provide medial and lateral support, and have been found to decrease gait variability in older persons with peripheral neuropathy, decrease (improve) frontal plane ankle proprioceptive thresholds or increase unipedal stance time in that same population. Design Observational study in which unipedal stance time was determined with a stopwatch, and frontal plane ankle (inversion and eversion) proprioceptive thresholds were quantified during bipedal stance with and without the ankle orthoses, in 11 older diabetic subjects with peripheral neuropathy (8 men; age 72 ± 7.1 years) using a foot cradle system which presented a series of 100 rotational stimuli. Results The subjects demonstrated no change in combined frontal plane (inversion + eversion) proprioceptive thresholds or unipedal stance time with versus without the orthoses (1.06 ± 0.56 versus 1.13 ± 0.39 degrees, respectively; p = 0.955 and 6.1 ± 6.5 versus 6.2 ± 5.4 seconds, respectively; p = 0.922). Conclusion Ankle orthoses which provide medial-lateral support do not appear to change ankle inversion/eversion proprioceptive thresholds or unipedal stance time in older persons with diabetic peripheral neuropathy. Previously identified improvements in gait variability using orthoses in this population are therefore likely related to an orthotically-induced stiffening of the ankle rather than a change in ankle afferent function. PMID:20407302

  5. Do ankle orthoses improve ankle proprioceptive thresholds or unipedal balance in older persons with peripheral neuropathy?

    PubMed

    Son, Jaebum; Ashton-Miller, James A; Richardson, James K

    2010-05-01

    To determine whether ankle orthoses that provide medial and lateral support, and have been found to decrease gait variability in older persons with peripheral neuropathy, decrease (improve) frontal plane ankle proprioceptive thresholds or increase unipedal stance time in that same population. Observational study in which unipedal stance time was determined with a stopwatch, and frontal plane ankle (inversion and eversion) proprioceptive thresholds were quantified during bipedal stance using a foot cradle system and a series of 100 rotational stimuli, in 11 older neuropathic subjects (8 men; age 72 +/- 7.1 yr) with and without ankle orthoses. The subjects demonstrated no change in combined frontal plane (inversion + eversion) proprioceptive thresholds or unipedal stance time with vs. without the orthoses (1.06 +/- 0.56 vs. 1.13 +/- 0.39 degrees, respectively; P = 0.955 and 6.1 +/- 6.5 vs. 6.2 +/- 5.4 secs, respectively; P = 0.922). Ankle orthoses that provide medial-lateral support do not seem to change ankle inversion/eversion proprioceptive thresholds or unipedal stance time in older persons with diabetic peripheral neuropathy. Previously identified improvements in gait variability using orthoses in this population are therefore likely related to an orthotically induced stiffening of the ankle rather than a change in ankle afferent function.

  6. [EFFECTIVENESS OF ARTHROSCOPY FOR ANKLE IMPINGEMENT SYNDROME].

    PubMed

    Han, Guansheng; Xu, Bin; Geng, Chunhui; Cheng, Xinde

    2014-06-01

    To explore the effectiveness of arthroscopy for ankle impingement syndrome. Between March 2009 and April 2013, 30 patients with ankle impingement syndrome were treated. Among them, there were 22 males and 8 females with an average age of 28.6 years (range, 16-55 years). Twenty-six patients had a history of obvious ankle sprains. The disease duration was 6-62 months (mean, 21.5 months). All cases had ankle pain, limitation of activity, and positive results of ankle impact test. According to Meislin scoring criteria, 5 cases were rated as good, 8 cases as medium, and 17 cases as poor; the excellent and good rate was 16.7%. American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) score was 43.3 ± 5.1. Visual analogue scale (VAS) score was 6.7 ± 2.3. Preoperative X-ray film showed ankle loose bodies and hyperplasia osteophyte in 6 cases, and lateral malleolus old avulsion fracture in 4 cases. MRI showed soft tissue in the ankle joint in the 17 cases, and articular cartilage injury of tibiotalar joint and bone marrow edema in 7 cases. The location, degree, and organization of the impact were observed under arthroscopy. The joint debridement, removal of loose body and osteophyte, plasty of articular cartilage, and plasma radiofrequency ablation of lateral and medial ligaments were performed. All incisions healed primarily. No infection of skin and joint, or neurological and vascular injury was found. All patients were followed up 6-32 months (mean, 19.5 months). According to Meislin scoring criteria at last follow-up, 16 cases were rated as excellent, 11 cases as good, and 3 cases as medium; the excellent and good rate was 90.0%, showing significant difference when compared with preoperative value (Z = 6.045, P = 0.000). AOFAS score was 89.8 ± 4.3, showing significant difference when compared with preoperative score (t = 38.180, P = 0.000). VAS score was 2.8 ± 1.6, showing significant difference when compared with preoperative score (t = 7.624, P = 0.000). A clear

  7. Operative Fixation Options for Elective and Diabetic Ankle Arthrodesis.

    PubMed

    Ramanujam, Crystal L; Stapleton, John J; Zgonis, Thomas

    2017-07-01

    Ankle arthrodesis remains one of the most definitive treatment options for end-stage arthritis, paralysis, posttraumatic and postinfectious conditions, failed total ankle arthroplasty, and severe deformities. The general aims of ankle arthrodesis are to decrease pain and instability, correct the accompanying deformity, and create a stable plantigrade foot. Several surgical approaches have been reported for ankle arthrodesis with internal fixation options. External fixation has also evolved for ankle arthrodesis in certain clinical scenarios. This article provides a comprehensive analysis of midterm to long-term outcomes for ankle arthrodesis using internal and/or external fixation each for elective and diabetic conditions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Effects of circumferential ankle pressure on ankle proprioception, stiffness, and postural stability: a preliminary investigation.

    PubMed

    You, Sung H; Granata, Kevin P; Bunker, Linda K

    2004-08-01

    Cross-sectional repeated-measures design. Determine the effects of circumferential ankle pressure (CAP) intervention on proprioceptive acuity, ankle stiffness, and postural stability. The application of CAP using braces, taping, and adaptive shoes or military boots is widely used to address chronic ankle instability (CAI). An underlying assumption is that the CAP intervention might improve ankle stability through increased proprioceptive acuity and stiffness in the ankle. METHOD AND MEASURES: A convenience sample of 10 subjects was recruited from the local university community and categorized according to proprioceptive acuity (high, low) and ankle stability (normal, CAI). Proprioceptive acuity was measured when blindfolded subjects were asked to accurately reproduce a self-selected target ankle position before and after the application of CAP. Proprioceptive acuity was determined in 5 different ankle joint position sense tests: neutral, inversion, eversion, plantar flexion, and dorsiflexion. Joint position angles were recorded electromechanically using a potentiometer. Passive ankle stiffness was computed from the ratio of applied static moment versus angular displacement. Active ankle stiffness was determined from biomechanical analyses of ankle motion following a mediolateral perturbation. Postural stability was quantified from the center of pressure displacement in the mediolateral and the anteroposterior directions in unipedal stance. All measurements were recorded with and without CAP applied by a pediatric blood pressure cuff. Data were analyzed using a separate mixed-model analysis of variance (ANOVA) for each dependent variable. Post hoc comparison using Tukey's honestly significant difference (HSD) test was performed if significant interactions were obtained. Significance level was set at P<.05 for all analyses. Significant group (high versus low proprioceptive acuity) x CAP interactions were identified for postural stability. Passive ankle stiffness was

  9. Vascular Alterations in Axillary and Brachial Vessels in Patients with Axillary Web Syndrome After Breast Cancer Surgery.

    PubMed

    Furlan, Cintia; Matheus, Carolina Nascimben; Jales, Rodrigo Menezes; Derchain, Sophie; Sarian, Luís Otávio

    2018-06-01

    Surgical manipulations of the axilla may cause a condition known as Axillary Web Syndrome (AWS). The systems compromised and the sequence of events leading to this syndrome remains unknown. This study evaluated clinical, surgical, and vascular factors associated with onset and duration of AWS after breast cancer surgery. In this prospective study, 155 women were included. They were submitted to a physical examination that consisted of ultrasound Doppler of axillary and brachial vessels and the evaluation of AWS in 1, 3, and 6 months after breast cancer surgery. Women with advanced disease had a significantly higher incidence of AWS than those with early stage breast cancer (p = 0.02). In addition, women who underwent mastectomy or axillary lymph node dissection (ALND) had a significantly higher incidence of AWS in the 1-month (p < 0.01; p < 0.01) and 3-months (p < 0.01; p = 0.02) assessment rounds, respectively. The cross-sectional area of brachial artery was significantly smaller (p = 0.04) in women with AWS at the 3-months postoperative visit. The peak systolic velocity and the blood flow of the axillary artery was significantly higher in women with AWS 6 months after surgery (p < 0.03 and p = 0.02 respectively). Our study confirm the combined changes of lymphatic and vascular systems in woman with AWS, since AWS was associated with more extensive dissection of axillary lymph nodes, compromised lymph nodes, and with abnormalities of the vascular parameters.

  10. Primary ankle arthrodesis for neglected open Weber B ankle fracture dislocation.

    PubMed

    Thomason, Katherine; Ramesh, Ashwanth; McGoldrick, Niall; Cove, Richard; Walsh, James C; Stephens, Michael M

    2014-01-01

    Primary ankle arthrodesis used to treat a neglected open ankle fracture dislocation is a unique decision. A 63-year-old man presented to the emergency department with a 5-day-old open fracture dislocation of his right ankle. After thorough soft tissue debridement, primary arthrodesis of the tibiotalar joint was performed using initial Kirschner wire fixation and an external fixator. Definitive soft tissue coverage was later achieved using a latissimus dorsi free flap. The fusion was consolidated to salvage the limb from amputation. The use of primary arthrodesis to treat a compound ankle fracture dislocation has not been previously described. Copyright © 2014 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Investigation of brachial plexus traction lesions by peripheral and spinal somatosensory evoked potentials.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, S J

    1979-01-01

    Peripheral, spinal and cortical somatosensory evoked potentials were recorded in 26 patients with unilateral traction injuries of the brachial plexus ganglia. Of 10 cases explored surgically the recordings correctly anticipated the major site of the lesion in eight. PMID:422958

  12. Brachial Plexus Injury from CT-Guided RF Ablation Under General Anesthesia

    SciTech Connect

    Shankar, Sridhar, E-mail: shankars@ummhc.org; Sonnenberg, Eric van; Silverman, Stuart G.

    2005-06-15

    Brachial plexus injury in a patient under general anesthesia (GA) is not uncommon, despite careful positioning and, particularly, awareness of the possibility. The mechanism of injury is stretching and compression of the brachial plexus over a prolonged period. Positioning the patient within the computed tomography (CT) gantry for abdominal or chest procedures can simulate a surgical procedure, particularly when GA is used. The potential for brachial plexus injury is increased if the case is prolonged and the patient's arms are raised above the head to avoid CT image degradation from streak artifacts. We report a case of profound brachial plexusmore » palsy following a CT-guided radiofrequency ablation procedure under GA. Fortunately, the patient recovered completely. We emphasize the mechanism of injury and detail measures to combat this problem, such that radiologists are aware of this potentially serious complication.« less

  13. Contribution of ankle-foot orthosis moment in regulating ankle and knee motions during gait in individuals post-stroke.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Toshiki; Orendurff, Michael S; Singer, Madeline L; Gao, Fan; Foreman, K Bo

    2017-06-01

    Ankle-foot orthosis moment resisting plantarflexion has systematic effects on ankle and knee joint motion in individuals post-stroke. However, it is not known how much ankle-foot orthosis moment is generated to regulate their motion. The aim of this study was to quantify the contribution of an articulated ankle-foot orthosis moment to regulate ankle and knee joint motion during gait in individuals post-stroke. Gait data were collected from 10 individuals post-stroke using a Bertec split-belt instrumented treadmill and a Vicon 3-dimensional motion analysis system. Each participant wore an articulated ankle-foot orthosis whose moment resisting plantarflexion was adjustable at four levels. Ankle-foot orthosis moment while walking was calculated under the four levels based on angle-moment relationship of the ankle-foot orthosis around the ankle joint measured by bench testing. The ankle-foot orthosis moment and the joint angular position (ankle and knee) relationship in a gait cycle was plotted to quantify the ankle-foot orthosis moment needed to regulate the joint motion. Ankle and knee joint motion were regulated according to the amount of ankle-foot orthosis moment during gait. The ankle-foot orthosis maintained the ankle angular position in dorsiflexion and knee angular position in flexion throughout a gait cycle when it generated moment from -0.029 (0.011) to -0.062 (0.019) Nm/kg (moment resisting plantarflexion was defined as negative). Quantifying the contribution of ankle-foot orthosis moment needed to regulate lower limb joints within a specific range of motion could provide valuable criteria to design an ankle-foot orthosis for individuals post-stroke. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The Relationships between the Differences in the Central Blood Pressure and Brachial Blood Pressure and Other Factors in Patients with Essential Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Ryuzaki, Masaki; Morimoto, Satoshi; Niiyama, Michita; Seki, Yasufumi; Yoshida, Naohiro; Oshima, Yoichi; Mizuguchi, Yuki; Watanabe, Daisuke; Ando, Takashi; Ichihara, Atsuhiro

    2017-01-01

    Objective The management of blood pressure (BP) in hypertensive patients is the key to preventing a progression of organ damage. The brachial BP (bBP) has been used as the representative method for measuring the BP. The central BP (cBP), which is, different from the bBP due to the propagation and the reflection of the pulse wave in the arterial system, has recently received attention because it can now be estimated non-invasively. We examined the relationships between the difference in the central systolic BP (csBP) and the brachial systolic BP (bsBP) (Δ) and other factors in hypertensive patients. Methods The bsBP and csBP were measured in patients with essential hypertension and the relationships between the bsBP, csBP, or Δ and background factors including age, the brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) level, the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), flow-mediated vasodilation (an index of vascular endothelial function), the cardio-ankle vascular index (CAVI, an index of arteriosclerosis), and the carotid intima-media thickness (an index of atherosis) were investigated. Results The data of 191 patients were analyzed. Although there was no significant correlation between the CAVI and the bsBP; positive correlations were observed between the CAVI and the csBP (r=0.249, p=0.001). The Δ value showed significant positive correlations with age, and the BNP, eGFR, and CAVI values. Conclusion The csBP is more strongly associated with arteriosclerosis than the bsBP. Moreover, the Δ value is more strongly associated with cardiac function, renal function, and arteriosclerosis than the bsBP or csBP. These data suggested that the Δ value may have a greater prognostic value than the bsBP or csBP and may be worth calculating in the clinical setting. PMID:28321055

  15. Peroneus quartus and functional ankle instability.

    PubMed

    Lotito, G; Pruvost, J; Collado, H; Coudreuse, J-M; Bensoussan, L; Curvale, G; Viton, J-M; Delarque, A

    2011-07-01

    Physical and rehabilitation medicine physicians commonly see patients with chronic functional ankle instability. The main anatomical structures involved in ankle stability are the peroneus (fibularis) brevis and peroneus longus muscles. Several anatomical muscle-tendon variations have been described in the literature as being sometimes responsible for this instability, the peroneus quartus muscle being the most frequent. The objective of this clinical study is to discuss the implication of the bilateral peroneus quartus muscle in functional ankle instability. This 26-year-old patient was seen in PM&R consultation for recurrent episodes of lateral ankle sprains. The clinical examination found a moderate hyperlaxity on the right side in bilateral ankle varus. We also noted a bilateral weakness of the peroneus muscles. Additional imaging examinations showed a supernumerary bilateral peroneus quartus. The electroneuromyogram of the peroneus muscles was normal. In the literature the incidence of a supernumerary peroneus quartus muscle varies from 0 to 21.7%. Most times this muscle is asymptomatic and is only fortuitously discovered. However some cases of chronic ankle pain or instability have been reported in the literature. It seems relevant to discuss, around the clinical case of this patient, the impact of this muscle on ankle instability especially when faced with lingering weakness of the peroneus brevis and longus muscles in spite of eccentric strength training and in the absence of any neurological impairment. One of the hypotheses, previously described in the literature, would be the overcrowding effect resulting in a true conflict by reducing the available space for the peroneal muscles in the peroneal sheath. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Ankle-Dorsiflexion Range of Motion After Ankle Self-Stretching Using a Strap

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, In-cheol; Kwon, Oh-yun; Yi, Chung-Hwi; Cynn, Heon-Seock; Hwang, Ui-jae

    2015-01-01

    Context  A variety of ankle self-stretching exercises have been recommended to improve ankle-dorsiflexion range of motion (DFROM) in individuals with limited ankle dorsiflexion. A strap can be applied to stabilize the talus and facilitate anterior glide of the distal tibia at the talocrural joint during ankle self-stretching exercises. Novel ankle self-stretching using a strap (SSS) may be a useful method of improving ankle DFROM. Objective  To compare the effects of 2 ankle-stretching techniques (static stretching versus SSS) on ankle DFROM. Design  Randomized controlled clinical trial. Setting  University research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants  Thirty-two participants with limited active dorsiflexion (<20°) while sitting (14 women and 18 men) were recruited. Main Outcome Measure(s)  The participants performed 2 ankle self-stretching techniques (static stretching and SSS) for 3 weeks. Active DFROM (ADFROM), passive DFROM (PDFROM), and the lunge angle were measured. An independent t test was used to compare the improvements in these values before and after the 2 stretching interventions. The level of statistical significance was set at α = .05. Results  Active DFROM and PDFROM were greater in both stretching groups after the 3-week interventions. However, ADFROM, PDFROM, and the lunge angle were greater in the SSS group than in the static-stretching group (P < .05). Conclusions  Ankle SSS is recommended to improve ADFROM, PDFROM, and the lunge angle in individuals with limited DFROM. PMID:26633750

  17. Prospective Computed Tomographic Analysis of Osteochondral Lesions of the Ankle Joint Associated With Ankle Fractures.

    PubMed

    Nosewicz, Tomasz L; Beerekamp, M Suzan H; De Muinck Keizer, Robert-Jan O; Schepers, Tim; Maas, Mario; Niek van Dijk, C; Goslings, J Carel

    2016-08-01

    Osteochondral lesions (OCLs) associated with ankle fracture correlate with unfavorable outcome. The goals of this study were to detect OCLs following ankle fracture, to associate fracture type to OCLs and to investigate whether OCLs affect clinical outcome. 100 ankle fractures requiring operative treatment were prospectively included (46 men, 54 women; mean age 44 ± 14 years, range 20-77). All ankle fractures (conventional radiography; 71 Weber B, 22 Weber C, 1 Weber A, 4 isolated medial malleolus and 2 isolated posterior malleolus fractures) were treated by open reduction and internal fixation. Multidetector computed tomography (CT) was performed postoperatively. For each OCL, the location, size, and Loomer OCL classification (CT modified Berndt and Harty classification) were determined. The subjective Foot and Ankle Outcome Scoring (FAOS) was used for clinical outcome at 1 year. OCLs were found in 10/100 ankle fractures (10.0%). All OCLs were solitary talar lesions. Four OCLs were located posteromedial, 4 posterolateral, 1 anterolateral, and 1 anteromedial. There were 2 type I OCLs (subchondral compression), 6 type II OCLs (partial, nondisplaced fracture) and 2 type IV OCLs (displaced fracture). Mean OCL size (largest diameter) was 4.4 ± 1.7 mm (range, 1.7 mm to 6.2 mm). Chi-square analysis showed no significant association between ankle fracture type and occurrence of OCLs. OCLs did occur only in Lauge-Hansen stage III/IV ankle fractures. There were no significant differences in FAOS outcome between patients with or without OCLs. Ten percent of investigated ankle fractures had associated OCLs on CT. Although no significant association between fracture type and OCL was found, OCLs only occurred in Lauge-Hansen stage III/IV ankle fractures. With the numbers available, OCLs did not significantly affect clinical outcome at 1 year according to FAOS. Level IV, observational study. © The Author(s) 2016.

  18. Total ankle arthroplasty versus ankle arthrodesis. Comparison of sports, recreational activities and functional outcome.

    PubMed

    Schuh, Reinhard; Hofstaetter, Jochen; Krismer, Martin; Bevoni, Roberto; Windhager, Reinhard; Trnka, Hans-Joerg

    2012-06-01

    Ankle arthrodesis (AAD) and total ankle replacement (TAR) are the major surgical treatment options for severe ankle arthritis. There is an ongoing discussion in the orthopaedic community whether ankle arthrodesis or ankle fusion should be the treatment of choice for end stage osteoarthritis. The purpose of this study was to compare the participation in sports and recreational activities in patients who underwent either AAD or TAR for end-stage osteoarthritis of the ankle. A total of 41 patients (21 ankle arthrodesis /20 TAR) were examined at 34.5 (SD18.0) months after surgery. At follow-up, pre- and postoperative participation in sports and recreational activities has been assessed. Activity levels were determined using the ankle activity score according to Halasi et al. and the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) activity scale. Clinical and functional outcome was assessed using the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) hindfoot score. The percentage of patients participating in sports and recreational activities, UCLA score and AOFAS score were compared between both treatment groups. In the AAD group 86% were active in sports preoperatively and in the TAR group this number was 76%. Postoperatively in both groups 76% were active in sports (AAD, p = 0.08). The UCLA score was 7.0 (± 1.9) in the AAD group and 6.8 (± 1.8) in the TAR group (p = 0.78). The AOFAS score reached 75.6 (± 14) in the AAD group and 75.6 (± 16) in the TAR group (p = 0.97). The ankle activity score decrease was statistically significant for both groups (p = 0.047). Our study revealed no significant difference between the groups concerning activity levels, participation in sports activities, UCLA and AOFAS score. After AAD the number of patients participating in sports decreased. However, this change was not statistically significant.

  19. Effects of posture on shear rates in human brachial and superficial femoral arteries

    PubMed Central

    Newcomer, S. C.; Sauder, C. L.; Kuipers, N. T.; Laughlin, M. H.; Ray, C. A.

    2012-01-01

    Shear rate is significantly lower in the superficial femoral compared with the brachial artery in the supine posture. The relative shear rates in these arteries of subjects in the upright posture (seated and/or standing) are unknown. The purpose of this investigation was to test the hypothesis that upright posture (seated and/or standing) would produce greater shear rates in the superficial femoral compared with the brachial artery. To test this hypothesis, Doppler ultrasound was used to measure mean blood velocity (MBV) and diameter in the brachial and superficial femoral arteries of 21 healthy subjects after being in the supine, seated, and standing postures for 10 min. MBV was significantly higher in the brachial compared with the superficial femoral artery during upright postures. Superficial femoral artery diameter was significantly larger than brachial artery diameter. However, posture had no significant effect on either brachial or superficial femoral artery diameter. The calculated shear rate was significantly greater in the brachial (73 ± 5, 91 ± 11, and 97 ± 13 s−1) compared with the superficial femoral (53 ± 4, 39 ± 77, and 44 ± 5 s−1) artery in the supine, seated, and standing postures, respectively. Contrary to our hypothesis, our current findings indicate that mean shear rate is lower in the superficial femoral compared with the brachial artery in the supine, seated, and standing postures. These findings of lower shear rates in the superficial femoral artery may be one mechanism for the higher propensity for atherosclerosis in the arteries of the leg than of the arm. PMID:18245564

  20. Hand Sensorimotor Function in Older Children With Neonatal Brachial Plexus Palsy.

    PubMed

    Brown, Susan H; Wernimont, Cory W; Phillips, Lauren; Kern, Kathy L; Nelson, Virginia S; Yang, Lynda J-S

    2016-03-01

    Routine sensory assessments in neonatal brachial plexus palsy are infrequently performed because it is generally assumed that sensory recovery exceeds motor recovery. However, studies examining sensory function in neonatal brachial plexus palsy have produced equivocal findings. The purpose of this study was to examine hand sensorimotor function in older children with neonatal brachial plexus palsy using standard clinical and research-based measures of tactile sensibility. Seventeen children with neonatal brachial plexus palsy (mean age: 11.6 years) and 19 age-matched controls participated in the study. Functional assessments included grip force, monofilament testing, and hand dexterity (Nine-Hole Peg, Jebsen-Taylor Hand Function). Tactile spatial perception involving the discrimination of pin patterns and movement-enhanced object recognition (stereognosis) were also assessed. In the neonatal brachial plexus palsy group, significant deficits in the affected hand motor function were observed compared with the unaffected hand. Median monofilament scores were considered normal for both hands. In contrast, tactile spatial perception was impaired in the neonatal brachial plexus palsy group. This impairment was seen as deficits in both pin pattern and object recognition accuracy as well as the amount of time required to identify patterns and objects. Tactile pattern discrimination time significantly correlated with performance on both functional assessment tests (P < 0.01). This study provides evidence that tactile perception deficits may accompany motor deficits in neonatal brachial plexus palsy even when measures of tactile registration (i.e., monofilament testing) are normal. These results may reflect impaired processing of somatosensory feedback associated with reductions in goal-directed upper limb use and illustrate the importance of including a broader range of sensory assessments in neonatal brachial plexus palsy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights

  1. Vascular patterns of upper limb: an anatomical study with accent on superficial brachial artery

    PubMed Central

    Kachlik, David; Konarik, Marek; Baca, Vaclav

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the terminal segmentation of the axillary artery and to present four cases of anomalous branching of the axillary artery, the superficial brachial artery (arteria brachialis superficialis), which is defined as the brachial artery that runs superficially to the median nerve. Totally, 130 cadaveric upper arms embalmed by classical formaldehyde technique from collections of the Department of Anatomy, Third Faculty of Medicine, Charles University in Prague, were macroscopically dissected with special focus on the branching arrangement of the axillary artery. The most distal part of the axillary artery (infrapectoral part) terminated in four cases as a bifurcation into two terminal branches: the superficial brachial artery and profunda brachii artery, denominated according to their relation to the median nerve. The profunda brachii artery primarily gave rise to the main branches of the infrapectoral part of the axillary artery. The superficial brachial artery descended to the cubital fossa where it assumed the usual course of the brachial artery in two cases and in the other two cases its branches (the radial and ulnar arteries) passed superficially to the flexors. The incidence of the superficial brachial artery in our study was 5% of cases. The reported incidence is a bit contradictory, from 0.12% to 25% of cases. The anatomical knowledge of the axillary region is of crucial importance for neurosurgeons and specialists using the radiodiagnostic techniques, particularly in cases involving traumatic injuries. The improved knowledge would allow more accurate diagnostic interpretations and surgical treatment. PMID:21342134

  2. Exercise-induced brachial artery vasodilation: effects of antioxidants and exercise training in elderly men

    PubMed Central

    Donato, Anthony J.; Uberoi, Abhimanyu; Bailey, Damian M.; Walter Wray, D.

    2010-01-01

    Aging, vascular function, and exercise are thought to have a common link in oxidative stress. Of the 28 subjects studied (young, 26 ± 2 yr; old, 71 ± 6 yr), 12 took part in a study to validate an antioxidant cocktail (AOC: vitamins C, E, and α-lipoic acid), while the remaining 8 young and 8 old subjects performed submaximal forearm handgrip exercise with placebo or AOC. Old subjects repeated forearm exercise with placebo or AOC following knee-extensor (KE) exercise training. Brachial arterial diameter and blood velocity (Doppler ultrasound) were measured at rest and during exercise. During handgrip exercise, brachial artery vasodilation in the old subjects was attenuated compared with that in young subjects following placebo (maximum = ∼3.0 and ∼6.0%, respectively). In contrast to the previously documented attenuation in exercise-induced brachial artery vasodilation in the young group with AOC, in the old subjects the AOC restored vasodilation (maximum = ∼7.0%) to match the young. KE training also improved exercise-induced brachial artery vasodilation. However, in the trained state, AOC administration no longer augmented brachial artery vasodilation in the elderly, but rather attenuated it. These data reveal an age-related pro-/antioxidant imbalance that impacts vascular function and show that exercise training is capable of restoring equilibrium such that vascular function is improved and the AOC-mediated reduction in free radicals now negatively impacts brachial artery vasodilation, as seen in the young. PMID:19966056

  3. Primary benign brachial plexus tumors: an experience of 115 operated cases.

    PubMed

    Desai, Ketan I

    2012-01-01

    Primary benign brachial plexus tumors are rare. They pose a great challenge to the neurosurgeon, because the majority of patients present with minimal or no neurological deficits. Radical to complete excision of the tumor with preservation of neurological function of the involved nerve is an ideal surgical treatment option with benign primary brachial plexus tumor surgery. We present a review article of our 10-year experience with primary benign brachial plexus tumors surgically treated at King Edward Memorial Hospital and P.D. Hinduja National Hospital from 2000 to 2009. The clinical presentations, radiological features, surgical strategies, and the eventual outcome following surgery are analyzed, discussed, and compared with available series in the world literature. Various difficulties and problems faced in the management of primary benign brachial plexus tumors are analyzed. Irrespective of the tumor size, the indications for surgical intervention are also discussed. The goal of our study was to optimize the treatment of patients with benign brachial plexus tumors with minimal neurological deficits. It is of paramount importance that brachial plexus tumors be managed by a peripheral nerve surgeon with expertise and experience in this field to minimize the neurological insult following surgery.

  4. Concepts of nerve regeneration and repair applied to brachial plexus reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Bertelli, Jayme Augusto; Ghizoni, Marcos Flávio

    2006-01-01

    Brachial plexus injury is a serious condition that usually affects young adults. Progress in brachial plexus repair is intimately related to peripheral nerve surgery, and depends on clinical and experimental studies. We review the rat brachial plexus as an experimental model, together with its behavioral evaluation. Techniques to repair nerves, such as neurolysis, nerve coaptation, nerve grafting, nerve transfer, fascicular transfer, direct muscle neurotization, and end-to-side neurorraphy, are discussed in light of the authors' experimental studies. Intradural repair of the brachial plexus by graft implants into the spinal cord and motor rootlet transfer offer new possibilities in brachial plexus reconstruction. The clinical experience of intradural repair is presented. Surgical planning in root rupture or avulsion is proposed. In total avulsion, the authors are in favor of the reconstruction of thoraco-brachial and abdomino-antebrachial grasping, and on the transfer of the brachialis muscle to the wrist extensors if it is reinnervated. Surgical treatment of painful conditions and new drugs are also discussed.

  5. Prevalence of brachial plexus injuries in patients with scapular fractures: A National Trauma Data Bank review

    PubMed Central

    Chamata, Edward; Mahabir, Raman; Jupiter, Daniel; Weber, Robert A

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Studies investigating the prevalence of brachial plexus injuries associated with scapular fractures are sparse, and are frequently limited by small sample sizes and often restricted to single-centre experience. OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence of brachial plexus injuries associated with scapular fractures; to determine how the prevalence varies with the region of the scapula injured; and to assess which specific nerves of the brachial plexus were involved. METHODS: The present study was a retrospective review of data from the National Trauma Data Bank over a five-year period (2007 to 2011). RESULTS: Of 68,118 patients with scapular fractures, brachial plexus injury was present in 1173 (1.72%). In patients with multiple scapular fractures, the prevalence of brachial plexus injury was 3.12%, and ranged from 1.52% to 2.22% in patients with single scapular fractures depending on the specific anatomical location of the fracture. Of the 426 injuries with detailed information on nerve injury, 208 (49%) involved the radial nerve, 113 (26.5%) the ulnar nerve, 65 (15%) the median nerve, 36 (8.5%) the axillary nerve and four (1%) the musculocutaneous nerve. CONCLUSION: The prevalence of brachial plexus injuries in patients with scapular fractures was 1.72%. The prevalence was similar across anatomical regions for single scapular fracture and was higher with multiple fractures. The largest percentage of nerve injuries were to the radial nerve. PMID:25535462

  6. Three-Dimensional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Glenohumeral Dysplasia in Neonatal Brachial Plexus Palsy.

    PubMed

    Eismann, Emily A; Laor, Tal; Cornwall, Roger

    2016-01-20

    Existing quantitative measurements of glenohumeral dysplasia in children with unresolved neonatal brachial plexus palsy (NBPP) have been mostly limited to the axial plane. The purpose of this study was to describe the three-dimensional (3D) pathoanatomy of glenohumeral dysplasia using 3D magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) reformations. 3D MRI reformations of the scapula, glenoid labrum, and proximal part of the humerus were created from a volume-acquisition proton-density-weighted MRI sequence of both the affected and the unaffected shoulder of seventeen children less than six years of age with unresolved NBPP who had not undergone shoulder surgery. Glenoid retroversion and posterior humeral head displacement were measured on axial 2D images. Humeral head displacement in all planes, labral circumference, glenoid retroversion, glenoid declination, and scapular morphometric values were measured on 3D reformations. Contiguity of the humeral head with the labrum and the shape of the glenoid were classified. Measurements were compared between the affected and unaffected sides. On 3D evaluation, the humeral head was completely posteriorly translated in ten patients but was never outside the glenoid labrum. Instead, in these patients, the humeral head was eccentrically articulating with the dysplastic glenoid and was contained by a posteriorly elongated labrum. Glenoid dysplasia was not limited to the axial plane. Less declination of the glenoid in the coronal plane correlated with greater 3D glenoid retroversion. Glenoid retroversion resulted from underdevelopment of the posterior aspect of the glenoid rather than overdevelopment of the anterior aspect of the glenoid. 3D measurements of greater glenoid retroversion and less declination correlated with 2D measurements of glenoid retroversion and posterior humeral head displacement. Posterior humeral head displacement in NBPP should not be considered a simple "dislocation." Glenohumeral dysplasia is not limited to the axial

  7. Realignment Surgery for Malunited Ankle Fracture.

    PubMed

    Guo, Chang-Jun; Li, Xing-Cheng; Hu, Mu; Xu, Yang; Xu, Xiang-Yang

    2017-02-01

    To investigate the characteristics and the results of realignment surgery for the treatment of malunited ankle fracture. Thirty-three patients with malunited fractures of the ankle who underwent reconstructive surgery at our hospital from January 2010 to January 2014 were reviewed. The tibial anterior surface angle (TAS), the tibiotalar tilt angle (TTA), the malleolar angle (MA), and the tibial lateral surface angle (TLS) were measured. Clinical assessment was performed with use of the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) scale and visual analogue scale (VAS) scores, and the osteoarthritis stage was determined radiographically with the modified Takakura classification system. The Wilcoxon matched-pairs test was used to analyze the difference between the preoperative and the postoperative data. The mean follow-up was 36 months (range, 20-60 months). The mean age at the time of realignment surgery was 37.1 years (range, 18-62 years). Compared with preoperation, the TAS at the last follow-up showed a significant increase (88.50° ± 4.47° vs. 90.80° ± 3.49°, P = 0.0035); similar results were observed in TTA (1.62° ± 1.66° vs. 0.83° ± 0.90°, P < 0.01) and MA (82.30° ± 8.03° vs. 78.70° ± 4.76°, P = 0.005). At the last follow-up, the mean AOFAS score was significantly increased compared with the score at preoperation (44.5 ± 13.7 vs. 78.0 ± 8.9, P < 0.01). Significant differences in VAS scores were found at the last follow-up (6.76 ± 1.03 vs. 2.03 ± 1.21, P < 0.01). There was no significant difference in the Takakura grade between the preoperation and the last follow-up. One patient had increased talar tilt postsurgery; the postoperative talar tilt angle of this patient was 20°. One patient had progressive ankle osteoarthritis, and was treated by ankle joint distraction. Realignment surgery for a malunited ankle fracture can reduce pain, improve function, and delay ankle arthrodesis or total ankle replacement. Postoperative large talar

  8. Paratrooper's Ankle Fracture: Posterior Malleolar Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Young, Ki Won; Cho, Jae Ho; Kim, Hyung Seuk; Cho, Hun Ki; Lee, Kyung Tai

    2015-01-01

    Background We assessed the frequency and types of ankle fractures that frequently occur during parachute landings of special operation unit personnel and analyzed the causes. Methods Fifty-six members of the special force brigade of the military who had sustained ankle fractures during parachute landings between January 2005 and April 2010 were retrospectively analyzed. The injury sites and fracture sites were identified and the fracture types were categorized by the Lauge-Hansen and Weber classifications. Follow-up surveys were performed with respect to the American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society ankle-hindfoot score, patient satisfaction, and return to preinjury activity. Results The patients were all males with a mean age of 23.6 years. There were 28 right and 28 left ankle fractures. Twenty-two patients had simple fractures and 34 patients had comminuted fractures. The average number of injury and fractures sites per person was 2.07 (116 injuries including a syndesmosis injury and a deltoid injury) and 1.75 (98 fracture sites), respectively. Twenty-three cases (41.07%) were accompanied by posterior malleolar fractures. Fifty-five patients underwent surgery; of these, 30 had plate internal fixations. Weber type A, B, and C fractures were found in 4, 38, and 14 cases, respectively. Based on the Lauge-Hansen classification, supination-external rotation injuries were found in 20 cases, supination-adduction injuries in 22 cases, pronation-external rotation injuries in 11 cases, tibiofibular fractures in 2 cases, and simple medial malleolar fractures in 2 cases. The mean follow-up period was 23.8 months, and the average follow-up American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society ankle-hindfoot score was 85.42. Forty-five patients (80.36%) reported excellent or good satisfaction with the outcome. Conclusions Posterior malleolar fractures occurred in 41.07% of ankle fractures sustained in parachute landings. Because most of the ankle fractures in parachute injuries were

  9. Paratrooper's ankle fracture: posterior malleolar fracture.

    PubMed

    Young, Ki Won; Kim, Jin-su; Cho, Jae Ho; Kim, Hyung Seuk; Cho, Hun Ki; Lee, Kyung Tai

    2015-03-01

    We assessed the frequency and types of ankle fractures that frequently occur during parachute landings of special operation unit personnel and analyzed the causes. Fifty-six members of the special force brigade of the military who had sustained ankle fractures during parachute landings between January 2005 and April 2010 were retrospectively analyzed. The injury sites and fracture sites were identified and the fracture types were categorized by the Lauge-Hansen and Weber classifications. Follow-up surveys were performed with respect to the American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society ankle-hindfoot score, patient satisfaction, and return to preinjury activity. The patients were all males with a mean age of 23.6 years. There were 28 right and 28 left ankle fractures. Twenty-two patients had simple fractures and 34 patients had comminuted fractures. The average number of injury and fractures sites per person was 2.07 (116 injuries including a syndesmosis injury and a deltoid injury) and 1.75 (98 fracture sites), respectively. Twenty-three cases (41.07%) were accompanied by posterior malleolar fractures. Fifty-five patients underwent surgery; of these, 30 had plate internal fixations. Weber type A, B, and C fractures were found in 4, 38, and 14 cases, respectively. Based on the Lauge-Hansen classification, supination-external rotation injuries were found in 20 cases, supination-adduction injuries in 22 cases, pronation-external rotation injuries in 11 cases, tibiofibular fractures in 2 cases, and simple medial malleolar fractures in 2 cases. The mean follow-up period was 23.8 months, and the average follow-up American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society ankle-hindfoot score was 85.42. Forty-five patients (80.36%) reported excellent or good satisfaction with the outcome. Posterior malleolar fractures occurred in 41.07% of ankle fractures sustained in parachute landings. Because most of the ankle fractures in parachute injuries were compound fractures, most cases had to

  10. [Acute injuries of lateral ankle joint ligaments].

    PubMed

    Lacko, M; Sidor, Z; Stolfa, S; Cellár, R; Vasko, G

    2010-08-01

    Acute injuries of the lateral ankle ligaments are one of the most common form of injury involving the musculoskeletal apparatus. Treatment usually range from cast immobilisation or acute surgical repair to functional rehabilitation. The aim of our study was to evaluate the incidence of different grades of acute injuries of lateral ligaments of the ankle joint in our patients group and to compare the results of non surgical versus surgical treatment of third grade injuries. 3148 patients were treated for acute lateral ankle sprain in a period of 5 years at our department. Each patient had stress X-ray of the ankle for evaluation of instability at the first visit. From the 234 patients with third grade injury, 39 were enrolled in our study with non surgical treatment and 18 with surgical treatment. Each group was divided regarding to the age in two subgroups. Functional outcome was evaluated 12 and 24 months after injury with AOFAS clinical rating scale and Sports Ankle Rating System--Single Assessment Numeric Evaluation. Statistical analysis was done with Pearson's Chi quadrate test with P < 0.05. First grade injury was present in 62%, second grade in 31% and only 7% of the patients had third grade injury of the lateral ankle ligaments. Further only third grade injuries were studied. Statistically significant better results were seen in patients under the age of 25, in the patient group with surgical treatment compared to patients over 25 years of age. Also statistically significant better results were seen in patient with surgical treatment to non surgical treatment in each age group. No significant difference was observed in the non surgical treatment group regarding to age. Although the injuries of the ankle ligaments belong to the most common injuries of the musculoskeletal system, there is no consensus in the treatment of such disorders. Our experiences and the results of our study show, that surgical treatment in indicated cases provides better results in

  11. [Ankle arthrodesis using the cable technique].

    PubMed

    Labitzke, Reiner

    2005-10-01

    Arthrodesis of the ankle with a cable technique for restitution of pain-free gait with the foot in functional alignment. Painful osteoarthritis of the ankle unresponsive to conservative and surgical treatment or in instances where these treatments do not seem sensible. Osteomyelitis, acute arthritis, neuropathic arthropathy. Exposure of the ankle through bilateral longitudinal incisions. Resection of malleoli and of articular surfaces of tibia and talus correcting at the same time any malalignment. Insertion of two cortical screws into the lateral aspect of the tibia and one each into talar body and neck. All four screws must protrude the opposite cortex. Around the neck of each anterior and posterior pair of screws as well as around the tips of the protruding screws cables are placed, tensioned, and tightened in a crimp. An arthrodesis of the ankle was performed in 25 patients (25 ankles). The goal of surgery was reached in 21 patients at 6-8 weeks postoperatively. Two patients had to undergo a revision using the same method to secure a bony fusion. In another two the failure was due to a wrong indication; in both a bony fusion occurred after external fixation. Using the Mazur Score the patients reached an average of 74 points and with the MHH Score ("Medizinische Hochschule Hannover" [Hanover Medical School]) an average of 78 points, both attesting to a good result.

  12. Rehabilitation of syndesmotic (high) ankle sprains.

    PubMed

    Williams, Glenn N; Allen, Eric J

    2010-11-01

    High ankle sprains are common in athletes who play contact sports. Most high ankle sprains are treated nonsurgically with a rehabilitation program. All years of PUBMED, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, CINAHL PLUS, SPORTDiscuss, Google Scholar, and Web of Science were searched to August 2010, cross-referencing existing publications. Keywords included syndesmosis ankle sprain or high ankle sprain and the following terms: rehabilitation, treatment, cryotherapy, braces, orthosis, therapeutic modalities, joint mobilization, massage, pain, pain medications, TENS (ie, transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation), acupuncture, aquatic therapy, strength, neuromuscular training, perturbation training, and outcomes. Level of evidence, 5. A 3-phase rehabilitation program is described. The acute phase is directed at protecting the joint while minimizing pain, inflammation, muscle weakness, and loss of motion. Most patients are treated with some form of immobilization and have weightbearing restrictions. A range of therapeutic modalities are used to minimize pain and inflammation. Gentle mobilization and resistance exercises are used to gain mobility and maintain muscle size and strength. The subacute phase is directed at normalizing range of motion, strength, and function in activities of daily living. Progressive mobilization and strengthening are hallmarks of this phase. Neuromuscular training is begun and becomes the central component of rehabilitation. The advanced training phase focuses on preparing the patient for return to sports participation. Perturbation of support surfaces, agility drills, plyometrics, and sport-specific training are central components of this phase. The rehabilitation guidelines discussed may assist clinicians in managing syndesmotic ankle sprains.

  13. A Multiple Degree of Freedom Lower Extremity Isometric Device to Simultaneously Quantify Hip, Knee and Ankle Torques

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez, Natalia; Acosta, Ana Maria; Stienen, Arno H.A.

    2015-01-01

    Characterization of the joint torque coupling strategies used in the lower extremity to generate maximal and submaximal levels of torque at either the hip, knee or ankle is lacking. Currently, there are no available isometric devices that quantify all concurrent joint torques in the hip, knee and ankle of a single leg during maximum voluntary torque generation. Thus, joint-torque coupling strategies in the hip, knee and concurrent torques at ankle and/or coupling patterns at the hip and knee driven by the ankle have yet to be quantified. This manuscript describes the design, implementation and validation of a multiple degree of freedom, lower extremity isometric device (the MultiLEIT) that accurately quantifies simultaneous torques at the hip, knee and ankle. The system was mechanically validated and then implemented with two healthy control individuals and two post-stroke individuals to test usability and patient acceptance. Data indicated different joint torque coupling strategies used by both healthy individuals. In contrast, data showed the same torque coupling patterns in both post-stroke individuals, comparable to those described in the clinic. Successful implementation of the MultiLEIT can contribute to the understanding of the underlying mechanisms responsible for abnormal movement patterns and aid in the design of therapeutic interventions. PMID:25163064

  14. Analysis of the Effects of Normal Walking on Ankle Joint Contact Characteristics After Acute Inversion Ankle Sprain.

    PubMed

    Bae, Ji Yong; Park, Kyung Soon; Seon, Jong Keun; Jeon, Insu

    2015-12-01

    To show the causal relationship between normal walking after various lateral ankle ligament (LAL) injuries caused by acute inversion ankle sprains and alterations in ankle joint contact characteristics, finite element simulations of normal walking were carried out using an intact ankle joint model and LAL injury models. A walking experiment using a volunteer with a normal ankle joint was performed to obtain the boundary conditions for the simulations and to support the appropriateness of the simulation results. Contact pressure and strain on the talus articular cartilage and anteroposterior and mediolateral translations of the talus were calculated. Ankles with ruptured anterior talofibular ligaments (ATFLs) had a higher likelihood of experiencing increased ankle joint contact pressures, strains and translations than ATFL-deficient ankles. In particular, ankles with ruptured ATFL + calcaneofibular ligaments and all ruptured ankles had a similar likelihood as the ATFL-ruptured ankles. The push off stance phase was the most likely situation for increased ankle joint contact pressures, strains and translations in LAL-injured ankles.

  15. [Chronic ankle instability in sports -- a review for sports physicians].

    PubMed

    Valderrabano, V; Leumann, A; Pagenstert, G; Frigg, A; Ebneter, L; Hintermann, B

    2006-12-01

    Chronic ankle instability represents a typical sports injury which can mostly be seen in basketball, soccer, orienteering and other high risk sports. 20 to 40 % of the acute ankle sprains develop into chronic ankle instability. From a sports orthopaedic point of view, chronic ankle instability can be subdivided into a lateral, medial or a combination of both so called rotational ankle instability. From a pathophysiological point of view, chronic ankle instability can be either mechanical with a structural ligament lesion or functional with loss of the neuromuscular control. For the sports physician, the chronic ankle instability is a difficult entity as the diagnosis is usually complex and the therapy usually surgical. This review on chronic ankle instability addresses pathomechanism, diagnostics, indications for conservative and surgical treatments, and possible long-term sequelae, as ligamentous osteoarthritis.

  16. Ankle and knee biomechanics during normal walking following ankle plantarflexor fatigue.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Michael A; Hatfield, Gillian L

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the immediate effects of unilateral ankle plantarflexor fatigue on bilateral knee and ankle biomechanics during gait. Lower leg kinematics, kinetics, and muscle activation were assessed before and after an ankle plantarflexor fatiguing protocol in 31 healthy individuals. Fatigue (defined as >10% reduction in maximal isometric ankle plantarflexor torque production and a downward shift in the median power frequency of both heads of the gastrocnemius muscle of the fatigued limb) was achieved in 18 individuals, and only their data were used for analysis purposes. Compared to pre-fatigue walking trials, medial gastrocnemius activity was significantly reduced in the study (fatigued) limb. Other main changes following fatigue included significantly more knee flexion during loading, and an associated larger external knee flexion moment in the study limb. At the ankle joint, participants exhibited significantly less peak plantarflexion (occurring at toe-off) with fatigue. No significant differences were observed in the contralateral (non-fatigued) limb. Findings from this study indicate that fatigue of the ankle plantarflexor muscle does not produce widespread changes in gait biomechanics, suggesting that small to moderate changes in maximal ankle plantarflexor force production capacity (either an increase or decrease) will not have a substantial impact on normal lower limb functioning during gait. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Measurement of passive ankle stiffness in subjects with chronic hemiparesis using a novel ankle robot

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Anindo; Bever, Christopher T.; Forrester, Larry W.; Macko, Richard F.; Hogan, Neville

    2011-01-01

    Our objective in this study was to assess passive mechanical stiffness in the ankle of chronic hemiparetic stroke survivors and to compare it with those of healthy young and older (age-matched) individuals. Given the importance of the ankle during locomotion, an accurate estimate of passive ankle stiffness would be valuable for locomotor rehabilitation, potentially providing a measure of recovery and a quantitative basis to design treatment protocols. Using a novel ankle robot, we characterized passive ankle stiffness both in sagittal and in frontal planes by applying perturbations to the ankle joint over the entire range of motion with subjects in a relaxed state. We found that passive stiffness of the affected ankle joint was significantly higher in chronic stroke survivors than in healthy adults of a similar cohort, both in the sagittal as well as frontal plane of movement, in three out of four directions tested with indistinguishable stiffness values in plantarflexion direction. Our findings are comparable to the literature, thus indicating its plausibility, and, to our knowledge, report for the first time passive stiffness in the frontal plane for persons with chronic stroke and older healthy adults. PMID:21346215

  18. RMI study and clinical correlations of ankle retinacula damage and outcomes of ankle sprain.

    PubMed

    Stecco, Antonio; Stecco, Carla; Macchi, Veronica; Porzionato, Andrea; Ferraro, Claudio; Masiero, Stefano; De Caro, Raffaele

    2011-12-01

    Recent studies reveal the role of the ankle retinacula in proprioception and functional stability of the ankle, but there is no clear evidence of their role in the outcomes of ankle sprain. 25 patients with outcomes of ankle sprain were evaluated by MRI to analyze possible damage to the ankle retinacula. Patients with damage were subdivided into two groups: group A comprised cases with ankle retinacula damage only, and group B those also with anterior talofibular ligament rupture or bone marrow edema. Both groups were examined by VAS, CRTA and static posturography and underwent three treatments of deep connective tissue massage (Fascial Manipulation technique). All evaluations were repeated after the end of treatment and at 1, 3 and 6 months. At MRI, alteration of at least one of the ankle retinacula was evident in 21 subjects, and a further lesion was also identified in 7 subjects. After treatment, VAS and CRTA evaluations showed a statistically significant decrease in values with respect to those before treatment (p < 0.0001). There were also significant improvements (p < 0.05) in stabilometric platform results. No significant difference was found between groups A and B. The initial benefit was generally maintained at follow-up. The alteration of retinacula at MRI clearly corresponds to the proprioceptive damage revealed by static posturography and clinical examination. Treatment focused on the retinacula may improve clinical outcomes and stabilometric data.

  19. Isolated posterior high ankle sprain: a report of three cases.

    PubMed

    Botchu, Rajesh; Allen, Patricia; Rennie, Winston J

    2013-12-01

    High ankle sprains are difficult to diagnose and account for 10% of all ankle sprains. A high index of suspicion is essential for diagnosis. High ankle sprains are managed symptomatically, with prolonged rehabilitation. The posterior inferior tibiofibular ligament is the strongest syndesmotic ligament; isolated injury of it is rare. We present 3 cases of isolated posterior high ankle sprain and discuss the relevant anatomy, mechanism of injury, and management.

  20. [Ankle arthrodesis with interposition graft as a salvage procedure after failed total ankle replacement].

    PubMed

    Schill, Stephan

    2007-12-01

    Restoration of painless function to the lower limb by ankle fusion after failure of total ankle arthroplasty. Loose total ankle replacement. Severe ankle destruction and axial deviation in rheumatoid patients. Severe osteoarthritis in the subtalar and ankle joints. Infected total ankle replacement. Severe arterial occlusive disease of the affected extremity. Transfibular approach to the subtalar and ankle joints. Osteotomy and resection of the distal fibula 7-8 cm proximal to the tip of the lateral malleolus. Removal of the prosthetic components, synovectomy, and revitalization of the remaining bone surface. Removal of any residual articular cartilage from the subtalar joint surfaces. Determination of the extent of bone loss and defect filling with horizontally or vertically placed tricortical and cancellous bone graft from the resected fibula and, if necessary, from the ipsilateral anterior iliac crest. Tibiotalocalcaneal arthrodesis by retrograde insertion of a retrograde locking nail. Wound closure in layers. Split below-knee cast. Mobilization with below-knee cast without weight bearing for 6 weeks. Dynamic locking of the intramedullary nail. Partial weight bearing with a walker up to 20 kg for an additional 6 weeks. Gradual increase in weight bearing in accordance with radiologic evidence of consolidation. Fitted orthopedic shoe with rocker-bottom sole, and made to measure insoles. From January 2003 to September 2006, 15 patients with infected ankle prosthesis loosening (six Thompson-Richards prostheses, eight S.T.A.R. prostheses, and one Salto prosthesis) were treated. All patients underwent tibiotalocalcaneal interposition arthrodesis with femoral nailing in retrograde technique. The average AOFAS (American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society) Score was 57.9 points (35-81 points) postoperatively. One patient developed a nonunion and revision surgery will have to be performed. Another patient with delayed wound healing and skin necrosis needed plastic surgery.

  1. Robotic cadaver testing of a new total ankle prosthesis model (German Ankle System).

    PubMed

    Richter, Martinus; Zech, Stefan; Westphal, Ralf; Klimesch, Yvone; Gosling, Thomas

    2007-12-01

    An investigation was carried out into possible increased forces, torques, and altered motions during load-bearing ankle motion after implantation of two different total ankle prostheses. We hypothesized that the parameters investigated would not differ in relation to the two implants compared. We included two different ankle prostheses (Hintegra, Newdeal, Vienne, France; German Ankle System, R-Innovation, Coburg, Germany). The prostheses were implanted in seven paired cadaver specimens. The specimens were mounted on an industrial robot that enables complex motion under predefined conditions (RX 90, Stäubli, Bayreuth, Germany). The robot detected the load-bearing (30 kg) motion of the 100(th) cycle of the specimens without prostheses as the baseline for the later testing, and mimicked that exact motion during 100 cycles after the prostheses were implanted. The resulting forces, torques, and bone motions were recorded and the differences between the prostheses compared. The Hintegra and German Ankle System, significantly increased the forces and torques in relation to the specimen without a prosthesis with one exception (one-sample-t-test, each p < or = 0.01; exception, parameter lateral force measured with the German Ankle System, p = 0.34). The force, torque, and motion differences between the specimens before and after implantation of the prostheses were lower with the German Ankle System than with the Hintegra (unpaired t-test, each p < or = 0.05). The German Ankle System prosthesis had less of an effect on resulting forces and torques during partial weightbearing passive ankle motion than the Hintegra prosthesis. This might improve function and minimize loosening during the clinical use.

  2. Mechanical instability destabilises the ankle joint directly in the ankle-sprain mechanism.

    PubMed

    Gehring, Dominic; Faschian, Katrin; Lauber, Benedikt; Lohrer, Heinz; Nauck, Tanja; Gollhofer, Albert

    2014-03-01

    Despite massive research efforts, it remains unclear how mechanical ankle instability (MAI) and functional ankle instability (FAI) affect joint control in the situation of ankle sprain. Thus, the purpose of this study was to evaluate whether individuals with MAI have deficits in stabilising their ankle joint in a close-to-injury situation compared with those with FAI and healthy controls. Ankle-joint control was assessed by means of three-dimensional motion analysis and electromyography in participants with FAI and MAI (n=19), in participants with pure FAI (n=9) and in healthy controls (n=18). Close-to-injury situations were simulated during standing, walking and jumping by means of a custom-made tilt platform. Individuals with FAI and MAI displayed significantly greater maximum ankle inversion angles (+5°) and inversion velocities (+50°/s) in the walking and jumping conditions compared to those with pure FAI and controls. Furthermore, individuals in the FAI and MAI group showed a significantly decreased pre-activation of the peroneus longus muscle during jumping compared to those with FAI. No differences between groups were found for plantar flexion and internal rotation, or for muscle activities following tilting of the platform. The present study demonstrates that MAI is characterised by impairments of ankle-joint control in close-to-injury situations. This could make these individuals more prone to recurrent ankle sprains, and suggests the need for additional mechanical support such as braces or even surgery. In addition, the study highlights the fact that dynamic experimental test conditions in the acting participant are needed to further unravel the mystery of chronic ankle instability.

  3. Anterolateral ankle impingement: findings and diagnostic accuracy with ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, C L; Wilson, D J; Coltman, T P

    2008-03-01

    The objective was to evaluate the findings and diagnostic accuracy of ultrasound in antero-lateral ankle impingement (ALI) with clinical and arthroscopic correlation. Seventeen elite footballers with chronic ankle pain were referred for ultrasound with a clinical diagnosis of ALI (n = 8) or a control condition (n = 9; lateral mechanical instability, osteochondral defect, intra-articular bodies and osteoarthritis). Ultrasound examination included the antero-lateral gutter for abnormal synovial tissue (synovitic lesion), lateral ligament integrity, tibiotalar joint and osseous spurs of the distal tibia and talus. Ultrasound findings were correlated with subsequent arthroscopic appearance. Ultrasound examination detected a synovitic mass in the antero-lateral gutter in all 8 footballers with clinical ALI (100%) and in 2 patients with a control diagnosis (22%). Arthroscopic correlation of antero-lateral synovitis and fibrosis was present in all 10 cases (100%). The synovitic lesion was seen at ultrasound as a nodular soft tissue mass of mixed echogenicity within the antero-lateral gutter, which extruded anteriorly with manual compression of the distal fibula against the tibia. Increased blood supply was detected using power Doppler imaging in only 1 patient. The synovitic lesion measured >10 mm in its maximum dimension in 7 footballers with clinical ALI and <10 mm in the control group. Additional ultrasound findings in patients with abnormal antero-lateral synovial tissue included an anterior talofibular ligament injury in all patients (n = 10), a tibiotalar joint effusion (n = 6) and osseous spurs (n = 4). Antero-lateral synovitic tissue was accurately identified at ultrasound in the absence of an effusion (n = 4). No synovitic lesion was detected at ultrasound or arthroscopy in the remaining 7 patients with a control diagnosis. Ultrasound is accurate in detecting synovitic lesions within the antero-lateral gutter, demonstrating associated ligamentous injuries and in

  4. Foot and ankle tendoscopies: current concepts review

    PubMed Central

    Monteagudo, Manuel; Maceira, Ernesto; Martinez de Albornoz, Pilar

    2016-01-01

    Tendoscopy is an apparently safe and reliable procedure to manage some foot and ankle disorders. The most common foot and ankle tendoscopies are: Achilles; peroneal; and posterior tibial tendon. Tendoscopy may be used as an adjacent procedure to other techniques. Caution is recommended to avoid neurovascular injuries. Predominantly level IV and V studies are found in the literature, with no level I studies still available. There are many promising and evolving endoscopic techniques for tendinopathies around the foot and ankle, but studies of higher levels of evidence are needed to strongly recommend these procedures. Cite this article: EFORT Open Rev 2016;1:440-447. DOI: 10.1302/2058-5241.160028 PMID:28461923

  5. Hybrid imaging in foot and ankle disorders.

    PubMed

    García Jiménez, R; García-Gómez, F J; Noriega Álvarez, E; Calvo Morón, C; Martín-Marcuartu, J J

    Disorders of the foot and ankle are some of the most frequent ones affecting the musculoskeletal system and have a great impact on patients' quality of life. Accurate diagnosis is an important clinical challenge because of the complex anatomy and function of the foot, that make it difficult to locate the source of the pain by routine clinical examination. In the study of foot pathology, anatomical imaging (radiography, magnetic resonance imaging [MRI], ultrasound and computed tomography [CT]) and functional imaging (bone scan, positron emission tomography [PET] and MRI) techniques have been used. Hybrid imaging combines the advantages of morphological and functional studies in a synergistic way, helping the clinician manage complex problems. In this article we delve into the anatomy and biomechanics of the foot and ankle and describe the potential indications for the current hybrid techniques available for the study of foot and ankle disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  6. Proprioception and ankle injuries in soccer.

    PubMed

    Ergen, Emin; Ulkar, Bülent

    2008-01-01

    Because soccer attracts many participants and leads to a substantial number of injuries, especially of the lower extremities, it is important to study possibilities for injury prevention and proper rehabilitation to return safely to activities. Ankle sprains can be prevented by external ankle supports and proprioceptive-coordination training, especially in athletes with previous ankle sprains. Proprioception is a broad concept that includes balance and postural control with visual and vestibular contributions, joint kinesthesia, position sense, and muscle reaction time. Proprioceptive feedback is crucial in the conscious and unconscious awareness of a joint or limb in motion. Enhancement of functional joint stability by proprioceptive (or neuromuscular) training is important both in prevention and rehabilitation of athletic injuries.

  7. Fusion in posttraumatic foot and ankle reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Thordarson, David B

    2004-01-01

    Despite appropriate acute treatment, many foot and ankle injuries result in posttraumatic arthritis. Arthrodesis remains the mainstay of treatment of end-stage arthritis of the foot and ankle. An understanding of the biomechanics of the foot and ankle, particularly which joints are most responsible for optimal function of the foot, can help guide reconstructive efforts. A careful history and physical examination, appropriate radiographs, and, when necessary, differential selective anesthetic blocks help limit fusion to only those joints that are causing pain. Compression fixation, when possible, remains the treatment of choice. When bone defects are present, however, neutralization fixation may be necessary to prevent a secondary deformity that could result from impaction into a bone defect.

  8. Cardio-ankle vascular index (CAVI) differentiates pharmacological properties of vasodilators nicardipine and nitroglycerin in anesthetized rabbits.

    PubMed

    Chiba, Tatsuo; Yamanaka, Mari; Takagi, Sachie; Shimizu, Kazuhiro; Takahashi, Mao; Shirai, Kohji; Takahara, Akira

    2015-08-01

    Cardio-ankle vascular index (CAVI) has been developed for measurement of vascular stiffness from the aorta to tibial artery, which is clinically utilized for assessing the progress of arteriosclerosis. In this study, we established measuring system of the CAVI in rabbits, and assessed whether the index could reflect different pharmacological actions of nitroglycerin and nicardipine on the systemic vasculature. Rabbits were anesthetized with halothane, and the CAVI was calculated from the well-established basic equations with variables obtained from brachial and tibial blood pressure and phonocardiogram. Nicardipine (1, 3 and 10 μg/kg, i.v.) decreased the blood pressure, femoral vascular resistance, and heart-ankle pulse wave velocity (haPWV). Meanwhile, no significant change was detected in the CAVI at the low or middle dose, which reflects the defining feature of the CAVI that is independent of blood pressure. The index increased at the high dose. Nitroglycerin (2, 4 and 8 μg/kg, i.v.) decreased the blood pressure, femoral vascular resistance, and haPWV. Meanwhile, the CAVI was decreased during the nitroglycerin infusion, which may reflect its well-known pharmacological action dilating conduit arteries. These results suggest that the CAVI differentiates the properties of these vasodilators in vivo. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. [Anterolateral ankle pain: differential diagnosis and approach. A case report].

    PubMed

    García-Renedo, R J; Pérez-Carro, L; Fernández-Torres, J J; Carranza-Bencano, A; Gómez-del Alamo, G

    2011-01-01

    The ankle soft tissue pathology represents a very painful disorder for patients who, often times, are not precisely diagnosed. Anterolateral ankle impingement is a condition that occurs in young people and athletes due to a plantar flexion-inversion mechanism. We report a case of anterolateral ankle impingement describing the arthroscopic technique and making the differential diagnosis considering other conditions.

  10. Management of Osseous and Soft-Tissue Ankle Equinus During Total Ankle Replacement.

    PubMed

    Roukis, Thomas S; Simonson, Devin C

    2015-10-01

    Obtaining functional alignment of a total ankle replacement, including physiologic sagittal plane range of motion, is paramount for a successful outcome. This article reviews the literature on techniques available for correction of osseous and soft-tissue equinus at the time of index total ankle replacement. These techniques include anterior tibiotalar joint cheilectomy, posterior superficial muscle compartment lengthening, posterior ankle capsule release, and release of the posterior portions of the medial and lateral collateral ligament complexes. The rationale for these procedures and the operative sequence of events for these procedures are presented. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Tooth - abnormal shape

    MedlinePlus

    Hutchinson incisors; Abnormal tooth shape; Peg teeth; Mulberry teeth; Conical teeth ... The appearance of normal teeth varies, especially the molars. ... conditions. Specific diseases can affect tooth shape, tooth ...

  12. Predicting functional recovery after acute ankle sprain.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Sean R; Bleakley, Chris M; Tully, Mark A; McDonough, Suzanne M

    2013-01-01

    Ankle sprains are among the most common acute musculoskeletal conditions presenting to primary care. Their clinical course is variable but there are limited recommendations on prognostic factors. Our primary aim was to identify clinical predictors of short and medium term functional recovery after ankle sprain. A secondary analysis of data from adult participants (N = 85) with an acute ankle sprain, enrolled in a randomized controlled trial was undertaken. The predictive value of variables (age, BMI, gender, injury mechanism, previous injury, weight-bearing status, medial joint line pain, pain during weight-bearing dorsiflexion and lateral hop test) recorded at baseline and at 4 weeks post injury were investigated for their prognostic ability. Recovery was determined from measures of subjective ankle function at short (4 weeks) and medium term (4 months) follow ups. Multivariate stepwise linear regression analyses were undertaken to evaluate the association between the aforementioned variables and functional recovery. Greater age, greater injury grade and weight-bearing status at baseline were associated with lower function at 4 weeks post injury (p<0.01; adjusted R square=0.34). Greater age, weight-bearing status at baseline and non-inversion injury mechanisms were associated with lower function at 4 months (p<0.01; adjusted R square=0.20). Pain on medial palpation and pain on dorsiflexion at 4 weeks were the most valuable prognostic indicators of function at 4 months (p< 0.01; adjusted R square=0.49). The results of the present study provide further evidence that ankle sprains have a variable clinical course. Age, injury grade, mechanism and weight-bearing status at baseline provide some prognostic information for short and medium term recovery. Clinical assessment variables at 4 weeks were the strongest predictors of recovery, explaining 50% of the variance in ankle function at 4 months. Further prospective research is required to highlight the factors that best

  13. Contributing factors to chronic ankle instability.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, Tricia J; Kramer, Lauren C; Denegar, Craig R; Hertel, Jay

    2007-03-01

    The development of repetitive ankle sprains and persistent symptoms after initial ankle sprain has been termed chronic ankle instability (CAI). There is no clear indication of which measures are most important in discriminating between individuals with and without CAI. Thirty subjects with unilateral CAI and controls had measures of ankle laxity and hypomobility, static and dynamic balance, ankle and hip strength, lower extremity alignments, and flexibility taken on both limbs. Based on comparisons of CAI ankles and side-matched limbs in controls, the measures significantly predictive of CAI were increased inversion laxity (r(2) change = 0.203), increased anterior laxity (r(2) change = 0.11), more missed balance trials (r(2) change = 0.094), and lower plantarflexion to dorsiflexion peak torque (r(2) change = 0.052). Symmetry indices comparing the side-to-side differences of each measure also were calculated for each dependent variable and compared between groups. The measures significantly predictive of CAI were decreased anterior reach (r(2) change = 0.185), decreased plantarflexion peak torque (r(2) change = 0.099), decreased posterior medial reach (r(2) change = 0.094), and increased inversion laxity (r(2) change = 0.041). The results of this study elucidate the specific measures that best discriminate between individuals with and without CAI. Both mechanical (anterior and inversion laxity) and functional (strength, dynamic balance) insufficiencies significantly contribute to the etiology of CAI. Prevention of CAI may be possible with proper initial management of the acute injury with rehabilitation aimed at those factors that best discriminate between individuals with and without CAI.

  14. Knee and Ankle Arthroplasty in Hemophilia

    PubMed Central

    Solimeno, Luigi Piero; Pasta, Gianluigi

    2017-01-01

    Today, major surgical procedures can be safely performed in hemophilic patients with chronic arthropathy, using available factor concentrates. In this setting, total knee replacement is considered the “gold standard”, while the use of total ankle replacement is still debated. Indeed, the unsatisfactory results obtained with the previous available design of implants did not raise enthusiasm as knee or hip replacement. Recently, the introduction of new implant designs and better reported outcomes have renewed the interest in total ankle replacement in people with hemophilia. In this review, the role of replacement surgery in the treatment of chronic hemophilic arthropathy will be described. PMID:29165342

  15. Ultrasound-Guided Foot and Ankle Procedures.

    PubMed

    Henning, P Troy

    2016-08-01

    This article reviews commonly performed injections about the foot and ankle region. Although not exhaustive in its description of available techniques, general approaches to these procedures are applicable to any injection about the foot and ankle. As much as possible, the procedures described are based on commonly used or published techniques. An in-depth knowledge of the regional anatomy and understanding of different approaches when performing ultrasonography-guided procedures allows clinicians to adapt to any clinical scenario. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Inflammation and neuropathic attacks in hereditary brachial plexus neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Klein, C; Dyck, P; Friedenberg, S; Burns, T; Windebank, A; Dyck, P

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To study the role of mechanical, infectious, and inflammatory factors inducing neuropathic attacks in hereditary brachial plexus neuropathy (HBPN), an autosomal dominant disorder characterised by attacks of pain and weakness, atrophy, and sensory alterations of the shoulder girdle and upper limb muscles. Methods: Four patients from separate kindreds with HBPN were evaluated. Upper extremity nerve biopsies were obtained during attacks from a person of each kindred. In situ hybridisation for common viruses in nerve tissue and genetic testing for a hereditary tendency to pressure palsies (HNPP; tomaculous neuropathy) were undertaken. Two patients treated with intravenous methyl prednisolone had serial clinical and electrophysiological examinations. One patient was followed prospectively through pregnancy and during the development of a stereotypic attack after elective caesarean delivery. Results: Upper extremity nerve biopsies in two patients showed prominent perivascular inflammatory infiltrates with vessel wall disruption. Nerve in situ hybridisation for viruses was negative. There were no tomaculous nerve changes. In two patients intravenous methyl prednisolone ameliorated symptoms (largely pain), but with tapering of steroid dose, signs and symptoms worsened. Elective caesarean delivery did not prevent a typical postpartum attack. Conclusions: Inflammation, probably immune, appears pathogenic for some if not all attacks of HBPN. Immune modulation may be useful in preventing or reducing the neuropathic attacks, although controlled trials are needed to establish efficacy, as correction of the mutant gene is still not possible. The genes involved in immune regulation may be candidates for causing HBPN disorders. PMID:12082044

  17. Cellular Therapy for Chronic Traumatic Brachial Plexus Injury

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Alok; Sane, Hemangi; Gokulchandran, Nandini; Badhe, Prerna; Pai, Suhasini; Kulkarni, Pooja; Yadav, Jayanti; Inamdar, Sanket

    2018-01-01

    Cellular therapy is being actively pursued as a therapeutic modality in many of the neurological diseases. A variety of stem cells from diverse sources have been studied in detail and have been shown to exhibit angiogenetic and immunomodulatory properties in addition to other neuroprotective effects. Published clinical data have shown bone marrow mononuclear cell (BMMNC) injection in neurological disorders is safe and possesses regenerative potential. We illustrate a case of 27-year-old male with traumatic brachial plexus injury, administered with autologous BMMNCs intrathecally and intramuscularly, followed by multidisciplinary rehabilitation. At the follow-up assessment of 3 and 7 months after first cell transplantation, improvements were recorded in muscle strength and movements. Electromyography (EMG) performed after the intervention showed a response in biceps and deltoid muscles suggesting the process of reinnervation at the site of injury. In view of the improvements observed after the treatment, the patient underwent second cell transplantation 8 months after the first transplantation. Muscle wasting had completely stopped with an increase in the muscle girth. No adverse effects were noted. Improvements were maintained for 4 years. A comprehensive randomized study for this type of injury is needed to establish the therapeutic benefits of cellular therapy. PMID:29657936

  18. HDAC inhibition inhibits brachial plexus avulsion induced neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yingbo; Wu, Tianjian

    2018-05-09

    Introduction Neuropathic pain induced by brachial plexus avulsion (BPA) is a pathological condition. We hypothesized that inhibition of histone deacetylase (HDAC) could suppress BPA-induced neuropathic pain through inhibition of transient reception potential (TRP) overexpression and protein kinase B (Akt) mediated mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) activation. Methods We generated a rat BPA model, administered HDAC inhibitor Tricostatin A (TSA) for 7 days post-surgery and assessed the effects on HDAC expression, Akt phosphorylation, neuroinflammation and mTOR activation. Results TSA treatment alleviated BPA induced mechanical hyperalgesia, suppressed Akt phosphorylation and increased HDAC. We found suppressed pro-inflammatory cytokine levels, TRP cation channel subfamily V member 1 (TRPV1) and TRP melastatin 8 (TRPM8) expression and mTOR activity in TSA treated BPA rats. Discussion Our results suggest that altered HDAC and Akt signaling are involved in BPA-induced neuropathic pain and that inhibition of HDAC could be an effective therapeutic approach in reducing neuropathic pain. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Arterial function of carotid and brachial arteries in postmenopausal vegetarians.

    PubMed

    Su, Ta-Chen; Torng, Pao-Ling; Jeng, Jiann-Shing; Chen, Ming-Fong; Liau, Chiau-Suong

    2011-01-01

    Vegetarianism is associated with a lower risk of cardiovascular disease. However, studies of arterial function in vegetarians are limited. This study investigated arterial function in vegetarianism by comparing 49 healthy postmenopausal vegetarians with 41 age-matched omnivores. The arterial function of the common carotid artery was assessed by carotid duplex, while the pulse dynamics method was used to measure brachial artery distensibility (BAD), compliance (BAC), and resistance (BAR). Fasting blood levels of glucose, lipids, lipoprotein (a), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, homocysteine, and vitamin B12 were also measured. Vegetarians had significantly lower serum cholesterol, high-density and low-density lipoprotein, and glucose compared with omnivores. They also had lower vitamin B12 but higher homocysteine levels. Serum levels of lipoprotein (a) and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein were no different between the two groups. There were no significant differences in carotid beta stiffness index, BAC, and BAD between the two groups even after adjustment for associated covariates. However, BAR was significantly lower in vegetarians than in omnivores. Multiple linear regression analysis revealed that age and pulse pressure were two important determinants of carotid beta stiffness index and BAD. Vegetarianism is not associated with better arterial elasticity. Apparently healthy postmenopausal vegetarians are not significantly better in terms of carotid beta stiffness index, BAC, and BAD, but have significantly decreased BAR than omnivores. Prevention of vitamin B12 deficiency might be beneficial for cardiovascular health in vegetarians.

  20. Postfixed brachial plexus radiculopathy due to thoracic disc herniation in a collegiate wrestler: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kuzma, Scott A; Doberstein, Scott T; Rushlow, David R

    2013-01-01

    To present the unique case of a collegiate wrestler with C7 neurologic symptoms due to T1-T2 disc herniation. A 23-year-old male collegiate wrestler injured his neck in a wrestling tournament match and experienced pain, weakness, and numbness in his left upper extremity. He completed that match and 1 additional match that day with mild symptoms. Evaluation by a certified athletic trainer 6 days postinjury showed radiculopathy in the C7 distribution of his left upper extremity. He was evaluated further by the team physician, a primary care physician, and a neurosurgeon. Cervical spine injury, stinger/burner, peripheral nerve injury, spinal cord injury, thoracic outlet syndrome, brachial plexus radiculopathy. The patient initially underwent nonoperative management with ice, heat, massage, electrical stimulation, shortwave diathermy, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs without symptom resolution. Cervical spine radiographs were negative for bony pathologic conditions. Magnetic resonance imaging showed evidence of T1-T2 disc herniation. The patient underwent surgery to resolve the symptoms and enable him to participate for the remainder of the wrestling season. Whereas brachial plexus radiculopathy commonly is seen in collision sports, a postfixed brachial plexus in which the T2 nerve root has substantial contribution to the innervation of the upper extremity is a rare anatomic variation with which many health care providers are unfamiliar. The injury sustained by the wrestler appeared to be C7 radiculopathy due to a brachial plexus traction injury. However, it ultimately was diagnosed as radiculopathy due to a T1-T2 thoracic intervertebral disc herniation causing impingement of a postfixed brachial plexus and required surgical intervention. Athletic trainers and physicians need to be aware of the anatomic variations of the brachial plexus when evaluating and caring for patients with suspected brachial plexus radiculopathies.

  1. Ankle muscle coactivation and its relationship with ankle joint kinematics and kinetics during gait in hemiplegic patients after stroke.

    PubMed

    Kitatani, Ryosuke; Ohata, Koji; Sato, Shuhei; Watanabe, Aki; Hashiguchi, Yu; Yamakami, Natsuki; Sakuma, Kaoru; Yamada, Shigehito

    2016-06-01

    Increased ankle muscle coactivation during gait is a compensation strategy for enhancing postural stability in patients after stroke. However, no previous studies have demonstrated that increased ankle muscle coactivation influenced ankle joint movements during gait in patients after stroke. To investigate the relationship between ankle muscle coactivation and ankle joint movements in hemiplegic patients after stroke. Seventeen patients after stroke participated. The coactivation index (CoI) at the ankle joint was calculated separately for the first and second double support (DS1 and DS2, respectively) and single support (SS) phases on the paretic and non-paretic sides during gait using surface electromyography. Simultaneously, three-dimensional motion analysis was performed to measure the peak values of the ankle joint angle, moment, and power in the sagittal plane. Ground reaction forces (GRFs) of the anterior and posterior components and centers of pressure (COPs) trajectory ranges and velocities were also measured. The CoI during the SS phase on the paretic side was negatively related to ankle dorsiflexion angle, ankle plantarflexion moment, ankle joint power generation, and COP velocity on the paretic side. Furthermore, the CoI during the DS2 phase on both sides was negatively related to anterior GRF amplitude on each side. Increased ankle muscle coactivation is related to decreased ankle joint movement during the SS phase on the paretic side to enhance joint stiffness and compensate for stance limb instability, which may be useful for patients who have paretic instability during the stance phase after stroke.

  2. Total ankle replacement systems available in the United States.

    PubMed

    Coetzee, J Chris; Deorio, James K

    2010-01-01

    Ankle replacement continues to be a viable option for treating patients with ankle arthritis. Over the past 10 years, there has been a significant increase in the number of ankle replacement systems available for use. Current controversy centers on whether fixed- or mobile-bearing devices are most advantageous. Most total ankle systems used outside the United States are mobile-bearing devices, whereas ankle replacement systems used in the United States are all essentially fixed-bearing devices. Not all ankles with degenerative changes are amenable to replacement surgery, and several exclusion criteria are well documented. Ankle replacement is especially complicated because of the ankle's proximity to the foot and the important role that the balance and alignment of the foot play in the success of the ankle replacement. Foot deformities should be treated before or at the time of ankle replacement surgery. Ignoring foot deformities can lead to failure of the ankle replacement. It is also of paramount importance to consider the stability of the ankle ligaments. An unstable ankle with a varus or valgus deformity of more than 20 degrees is probably not amenable to ankle replacement. There are currently no reliable options to predictably reconstruct the lateral or medial ligaments in these severe deformities. It is important to be aware of the ankle replacement systems currently available in the United States and understand the key features of each design. Devices approved by the US Food and Drug Administration, a device that is awaiting approval, and a device that is being evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration in a prospective randomized clinical trial are discussed, along with an objective comparison of fixed- and mobile-bearing devices.

  3. Talofibular interval changes after acute ankle sprain: a stress ultrasonography study of ankle laxity.

    PubMed

    Croy, Theodore; Saliba, Susan; Saliba, Ethan; Anderson, Mark W; Hertel, Jay

    2013-11-01

    Quantifying talocrural joint laxity after ankle sprain is problematic. Stress ultrasonography (US) can image the lateral talocrural joint and allow the measurement of the talofibular interval, which may suggest injury to the anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL). The acute talofibular interval changes after lateral ankle sprain are unknown. Twenty-five participants (9 male, 16 female; age 21.8 ± 3.2 y, height 167.8 ± 34.1 cm, mass 72.7 ± 13.8 kg) with 27 acute, lateral ankle injuries underwent bilateral stress US imaging at baseline (<7 d) and on the affected ankle at 3 wk and 6 wk from injury in 3 ankle conditions: neutral, anterior drawer, and inversion. Talofibular interval (mm) was measured using imaging software and self-reported function (activities of daily living [ADL] and sports) by the Foot and Ankle Ability Measure (FAAM). The talofibular interval increased with anterior-drawer stress in the involved ankle (22.65 ± 3.75 mm; P = .017) over the uninvolved ankle (19.45 ± 2.35 mm; limb × position F1,26 = 4.9, P = .035) at baseline. Inversion stress also resulted in greater interval changes (23.41 ± 2.81 mm) than in the uninvolved ankles (21.13 ± 2.08 mm). A main effect for time was observed for inversion (F2,52 = 4.3, P = .019, 21.93 ± 2.24 mm) but not for anterior drawer (F2,52 = 3.1, P = .055, 21.18 ± 2.34 mm). A significant reduction in the talofibular interval took place between baseline and week 3 inversion measurements only (F1,26 = 5.6, P = .026). FAAM-ADL and sports results increased significantly from baseline to wk 3 (21.9 ± 16.2, P < .0001 and 23.8 ± 16.9, P < .0001) and from wk 3 to wk 6 (2.5 ± 4.4, P = .009 and 10.5 ± 13.2, P = .001). Stress US methods identified increased talofibular interval changes suggestive of talocrural laxity and ATFL injury using anterior drawer and inversion stress that, despite significant improvements in self-reported function, only marginally improved during the 6 wk after ankle sprain. Stress US

  4. [Arthroscopic therapy of ankle joint impingement syndrome after operation of ankle joint fracture dislocation].

    PubMed

    Feng, Zhibin; Mi, Kun; Wei, Renzhi; Liu, Wu; Wang, Bin

    2011-07-01

    To study the operative procedure and the effectiveness of arthroscopic therapy for ankle joint impingement syndrome after operation of ankle joint fracture dislocation. Between March 2008 and April 2010, 38 patients with ankle joint impingement syndrome after operation of ankle joint fracture dislocation were treated. Among them, there were 28 males and 10 females with an average age of 28 years (range, 18 to 42 years). The time from internal fixation to admission was 12-16 months (mean, 13.8 months). There were pressing pain in anterolateral and anterior ankle. The dorsal extension ranged from -20 to -5 degrees (mean, -10.6 degrees), and the palmar flexion was 30-40 degrees (mean, 35.5 degrees). The total score was 48.32 +/- 9.24 and the pain score was 7.26 +/- 1.22 before operation according to American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) ankle and hindfoot score system. The X-ray films showed osteophyte formation in anterior tibia and talus; MRI showed cartilage injury in 22 cases. Arthroscopic intervention included removing osteophytes, debriding fabric scars and synovial membrane tissues, and removing osteochondral fragments. Arthroscopic microfracture technique was used in 22 patients with cartilage injury. All incisions healed primarily. Thirty-eight cases were followed up 10-26 months (mean, 16 months). At last follow-up, 26 patients had normal range of motion (ROM); the dorsal extension was 15-25 degrees (mean, 19.6 degrees) and the palmar flexion was 35-45 degrees (mean, 40.7 degrees). Eight patients had mild limited ROM; the dorsal extension was 5-15 degrees (mean, 7.2 degrees) and the palmar flexion was 35-45 degrees (mean, 39.5 degrees). Four patients had mild limited ROM and pain in posterior portion of the ankle after a long walking (3-4 hours); the dorsal extension was 0-5 degrees (mean, 2.6 degrees) and the palmar flexion was 35-40 degrees (mean, 37.5 degrees). The total score was 89.45 +/- 9.55 and the pain score was 1.42 +/- 1.26 after

  5. Therapeutic Interventions for Increasing Ankle Dorsiflexion After Ankle Sprain: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Terada, Masafumi; Pietrosimone, Brian G.; Gribble, Phillip A.

    2013-01-01

    Context: Clinicians perform therapeutic interventions, such as stretching, manual therapy, electrotherapy, ultrasound, and exercises, to increase ankle dorsiflexion. However, authors of previous studies have not determined which intervention or combination of interventions is most effective. Objective: To determine the magnitude of therapeutic intervention effects on and the most effective therapeutic interventions for restoring normal ankle dorsiflexion after ankle sprain. Data Sources: We performed a comprehensive literature search in Web of Science and EBSCO HOST from 1965 to May 29, 2011, with 19 search terms related to ankle sprain, dorsiflexion, and intervention and by cross-referencing pertinent articles. Study Selection: Eligible studies had to be written in English and include the means and standard deviations of both pretreatment and posttreatment in patients with acute, subacute, or chronic ankle sprains. Outcomes of interest included various joint mobilizations, stretching, local vibration, hyperbaric oxygen therapy, electrical stimulation, and mental-relaxation interventions. Data Extraction: We extracted data on dorsiflexion improvements among various therapeutic applications by calculating Cohen d effect sizes with associated 95% confidence intervals (CIs) and evaluated the methodologic quality using the Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro) scale. Data Synthesis: In total, 9 studies (PEDro score = 5.22 ± 1.92) met the inclusion criteria. Static-stretching interventions with a home exercise program had the strongest effects on increasing dorsiflexion in patients 2 weeks after acute ankle sprains (Cohen d = 1.06; 95% CI = 0.12, 2.42). The range of effect sizes for movement with mobilization on ankle dorsiflexion among individuals with recurrent ankle sprains was small (Cohen d range = 0.14 to 0.39). Conclusions: Static-stretching intervention as a part of standardized care yielded the strongest effects on dorsiflexion after acute ankle sprains. The

  6. Therapeutic interventions for increasing ankle dorsiflexion after ankle sprain: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Terada, Masafumi; Pietrosimone, Brian G; Gribble, Phillip A

    2013-01-01

    Clinicians perform therapeutic interventions, such as stretching, manual therapy, electrotherapy, ultrasound, and exercises, to increase ankle dorsiflexion. However, authors of previous studies have not determined which intervention or combination of interventions is most effective. To determine the magnitude of therapeutic intervention effects on and the most effective therapeutic interventions for restoring normal ankle dorsiflexion after ankle sprain. We performed a comprehensive literature search in Web of Science and EBSCO HOST from 1965 to May 29, 2011, with 19 search terms related to ankle sprain, dorsiflexion, and intervention and by cross-referencing pertinent articles. Eligible studies had to be written in English and include the means and standard deviations of both pretreatment and posttreatment in patients with acute, subacute, or chronic ankle sprains. Outcomes of interest included various joint mobilizations, stretching, local vibration, hyperbaric oxygen therapy, electrical stimulation, and mental-relaxation interventions. We extracted data on dorsiflexion improvements among various therapeutic applications by calculating Cohen d effect sizes with associated 95% confidence intervals (CIs) and evaluated the methodologic quality using the Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro) scale. In total, 9 studies (PEDro score = 5.22 ± 1.92) met the inclusion criteria. Static-stretching interventions with a home exercise program had the strongest effects on increasing dorsiflexion in patients 2 weeks after acute ankle sprains (Cohen d = 1.06; 95% CI = 0.12, 2.42). The range of effect sizes for movement with mobilization on ankle dorsiflexion among individuals with recurrent ankle sprains was small (Cohen d range = 0.14 to 0.39). Static-stretching intervention as a part of standardized care yielded the strongest effects on dorsiflexion after acute ankle sprains. The existing evidence suggests that clinicians need to consider what may be the limiting factor of

  7. Clinical Examination Results in Individuals With Functional Ankle Instability and Ankle-Sprain Copers

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Cynthia J.; Arnold, Brent L.; Ross, Scott E.; Ketchum, Jessica; Ericksen, Jeffrey; Pidcoe, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Context: Why some individuals with ankle sprains develop functional ankle instability and others do not (ie, copers) is unknown. Current understanding of the clinical profile of copers is limited. Objective: To contrast individuals with functional ankle instability (FAI), copers, and uninjured individuals on both self-reported variables and clinical examination findings. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Sports medicine research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Participants consisted of 23 individuals with a history of 1 or more ankle sprains and at least 2 episodes of giving way in the past year (FAI: Cumberland Ankle Instability Tool [CAIT] score = 20.52 ± 2.94, episodes of giving way = 5.8 ± 8.4 per month), 23 individuals with a history of a single ankle sprain and no subsequent episodes of instability (copers: CAIT score = 27.74 ± 1.69), and 23 individuals with no history of ankle sprain and no instability (uninjured: CAIT score = 28.78 ± 1.78). Intervention(s): Self-reported disability was recorded using the CAIT and Foot and Ankle Ability Measure for Activities of Daily Living and for Sports. On clinical examination, ligamentous laxity and tenderness, range of motion (ROM), and pain at end ROM were recorded. Main Outcome Measure(s): Questionnaire scores for the CAIT, Foot and Ankle Ability Measure for Activities of Daily Living and for Sports, ankle inversion and anterior drawer laxity scores, pain with palpation of the lateral ligaments, ankle ROM, and pain at end ROM. Results: Individuals with FAI had greater self-reported disability for all measures (P < .05). On clinical examination, individuals with FAI were more likely to have greater talar tilt laxity, pain with inversion, and limited sagittal-plane ROM than copers (P < .05). Conclusions: Differences in both self-reported disability and clinical examination variables distinguished individuals with FAI from copers at least 1 year after injury. Whether the deficits could be detected

  8. Directing clinical care using lower extremity biomechanics in patients with ankle osteoarthritis and ankle arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Queen, Robin

    2017-11-01

    Ankle osteoarthritis is a debilitating disease with approximately 50,000 new cases per year leading to skeletal deformity, severe and recurrent pain, cartilage breakdown, and gait dysfunction limiting patient mobility and well-being. Although many treatments (total ankle arthroplasty [TAA], ankle fusion [arthrodesis], and ankle distraction arthroplasty) relieve pain, it is not clear that these procedures significantly improve patient mobility. The goal of the research presented here is to summarize what is presently known about lower extremity gait mechanics and outcomes and to quantify the impact of ankle osteoarthritis and TAA have on these measures using an explicitly holistic and mechanistic approach. Our recent studies have explored physical performance and energy recovery and revealed unexpected patterns and sequelae to treatment including incomplete restoration of gait function. These studies demonstrated for the first time the extreme levels and range of gait and balance dysfunction present in ankle osteoarthritis patients as well as quantifying the ways in which the affected joint alters movement and loading patterns not just in the painful joint, but throughout both the ipsilateral and contralateral lower extremity. Through this work, we determined that relieving pain alone through TAA is not enough to restore normal walking mechanics and balance due to underlying causes including limited ankle range of motion and balance deficits leading to long-term disability despite treatment. The results indicate the need to consider additional therapeutic interventions aimed at restoring balance, ankle range of motion, and movement symmetry in order to improve long-term health and function. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 35:2345-2355, 2017. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Ankle fracture spur sign is pathognomonic for a variant ankle fracture.

    PubMed

    Hinds, Richard M; Garner, Matthew R; Lazaro, Lionel E; Warner, Stephen J; Loftus, Michael L; Birnbaum, Jacqueline F; Burket, Jayme C; Lorich, Dean G

    2015-02-01

    The hyperplantarflexion variant ankle fracture is composed of a posterior tibial lip fracture with posterolateral and posteromedial fracture fragments separated by a vertical fracture line. This infrequently reported injury pattern often includes an associated "spur sign" or double cortical density at the inferomedial tibial metaphysis. The objective of this study was to quantitatively establish the association of the ankle fracture spur sign with the hyperplantarflexion variant ankle fracture. Our clinical database of operative ankle fractures was retrospectively reviewed for the incidence of hyperplantarflexion variant and nonvariant ankle fractures as determined by assessment of injury radiographs, preoperative advanced imaging, and intraoperative observation. Injury radiographs were then evaluated for the presence of the spur sign, and association between the spur sign and variant fractures was analyzed. The incidence of the hyperplantarflexion variant fracture among all ankle fractures was 6.7% (43/640). The spur sign was present in 79% (34/43) of variant fractures and absent in all nonvariant fractures, conferring a specificity of 100% in identifying variant fractures. Positive predictive value and negative predictive value were 100% and 99%, respectively. The ankle fracture spur sign was pathognomonic for the hyperplantarflexion variant ankle fracture. It is important to identify variant fractures preoperatively as patient positioning, operative approach, and fixation construct of variant fractures often differ from those employed for osteosynthesis of nonvariant fractures. Identification of the spur sign should prompt acquisition of advanced imaging to formulate an appropriate operative plan to address the variant fracture pattern. Level III, retrospective comparative study. © The Author(s) 2014.

  10. Ankle ligament healing after an acute ankle sprain: an evidence-based approach.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, Tricia J; Hicks-Little, Charlie A

    2008-01-01

    To perform a systematic review to determine the healing time of the lateral ankle ligaments after an acute ankle sprain. We identified English-language research studies from 1964 to 2007 by searching MEDLINE, Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro), SportDiscus, and CINAHL using the terms ankle sprain, ankle rehabilitation, ankle injury, ligament healing, and immobilization. We selected studies that described randomized, controlled clinical trials measuring ligament laxity either objectively or subjectively immediately after injury and at least 1 more time after injury. Two reviewers independently scored the 7 studies that met the inclusion criteria. Because of differences in study designs, a meta-analysis could not be performed. Effect sizes and confidence intervals could be calculated only for 1 study. The percentages of subjective and objective instability were calculated for the remaining studies. Ankle laxity improved over a period of 6 weeks to 1 year. One author showed stress talar tilt values of 16.10 +/- 8.8 degrees immediately after injury and 3.4 +/- 3.6 degrees at 3 months after injury. In 2 articles, the authors reported that positive anterior drawer tests were still present in 3% to 31% of participants at 6 months after injury. Additionally, feelings of instability affected 7% to 42% of participants up to 1 year after injury. In the studies that we examined, it took at least 6 weeks to 3 months before ligament healing occurred. However, at 6 weeks to 1 year after injury, a large percentage of participants still had objective mechanical laxity and subjective ankle instability. Direct comparison among articles is difficult because of differences in methods. More research focusing on more reliable methods of measuring ankle laxity is needed so that clinicians can know how long ligament healing takes after injury. This knowledge will help clinicians to make better decisions during rehabilitation and for return to play.

  11. Clinical assessment of acute lateral ankle sprain injuries (ROAST): 2019 consensus statement and recommendations of the International Ankle Consortium.

    PubMed

    Delahunt, Eamonn; Bleakley, Chris M; Bossard, Daniela S; Caulfield, Brian M; Docherty, Carrie L; Doherty, Cailbhe; Fourchet, François; Fong, Daniel T; Hertel, Jay; Hiller, Claire E; Kaminski, Thomas W; McKeon, Patrick O; Refshauge, Kathryn M; Remus, Alexandria; Verhagen, Evert; Vicenzino, Bill T; Wikstrom, Erik A; Gribble, Phillip A

    2018-06-09

    Lateral ankle sprain injury is the most common musculoskeletal injury incurred by individuals who participate in sports and recreational physical activities. Following initial injury, a high proportion of individuals develop long-term injury-associated symptoms and chronic ankle instability. The development of chronic ankle instability is consequent on the interaction of mechanical and sensorimotor insufficiencies/impairments that manifest following acute lateral ankle sprain injury. To reduce the propensity for developing chronic ankle instability, clinical assessments should evaluate whether patients in the acute phase following lateral ankle sprain injury exhibit any mechanical and/or sensorimotor impairments. This modified Delphi study was undertaken under the auspices of the executive committee of the International Ankle Consortium. The primary aim was to develop recommendations, based on expert (n=14) consensus, for structured clinical assessment of acute lateral ankle sprain injuries. After two modified Delphi rounds, consensus was achieved on the clinical assessment of acute lateral ankle sprain injuries. Consensus was reached on a minimum standard clinical diagnostic assessment. Key components of this clinical diagnostic assessment include: establishing the mechanism of injury, as well as the assessment of ankle joint bones and ligaments. Through consensus, the expert panel also developed the International Ankle Consortium Rehabilitation-Oriented ASsessmenT (ROAST). The International Ankle Consortium ROAST will help clinicians identify mechanical and/or sensorimotor impairments that are associated with chronic ankle instability. This consensus statement from the International Ankle Consortium aims to be a key resource for clinicians who regularly assess individuals with acute lateral ankle sprain injuries. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted

  12. Modelling of human walking to optimise the function of ankle-foot orthosis in Guillan-Barré patients with drop foot.

    PubMed

    Jamshidi, N; Rostami, M; Najarian, S; Menhaj, M B; Saadatnia, M; Firooz, S

    2009-04-01

    This paper deals with the dynamic modelling of human walking. The main focus of this research was to optimise the function of the orthosis in patients with neuropathic feet, based on the kinematics data from different categories of neuropathic patients. The patient's body on the sagittal plane was modelled for calculating the torques generated in joints. The kinematics data required for mathematical modelling of the patients were obtained from the films of patients captured by high speed camera, and then the films were analysed through a motion analysis software. An inverse dynamic model was used for estimating the spring coefficient. In our dynamic model, the role of muscles was substituted by adding a spring-damper between the shank and ankle that could compensate for their weakness by designing ankle-foot orthoses based on the kinematics data obtained from the patients. The torque generated in the ankle was varied by changing the spring constant. Therefore, it was possible to decrease the torque generated in muscles which could lead to the design of more comfortable and efficient orthoses. In this research, unlike previous research activities, instead of studying the abnormal gait or modelling the ankle-foot orthosis separately, the function of the ankle-foot orthosis on the abnormal gait has been quantitatively improved through a correction of the torque.

  13. Charcot Neuroarthropathy of the Foot and Ankle.

    PubMed

    Burson, Lisa K; Schank, Christopher H

    2016-03-01

    Charcot neuropathy is a painless, progressive, degeneration most notably of the ankle or midfoot joints, seen in patients with diabetes and neuropathy. This article will describe the etiology, diagnosis, and treatment of this potentially debilitating joint disease and provide implications for home care clinicians.

  14. Arthroscopic debridement for soft tissue ankle impingement.

    PubMed

    Brennan, S A; Rahim, F; Dowling, J; Kearns, S R

    2012-06-01

    To assess the response to treatment in patients with soft tissue impingement of the ankle managed with arthroscopic debridement. Forty-one ankle arthroscopies were performed for soft tissue impingement between April 2007 and April 2009. There were 26 men and 15 women and the mean age was 30.1 years. Arthroscopy was performed on an average of 21 months after injury. The Visual-Analogue-Scale Foot and Ankle (VASFA) score and Meislin's criteria were used to assess the response to treatment. The mean pre-operative VASFA score was 44.5. This increased to 78.3 postoperatively (p < 0.0001). According to Meislin's criteria, there were 34 good or excellent results, five fair and two poor results. Pre-operative magnetic resonance imaging was useful in detecting tears of the anterior talofibular ligament and excluding osteochondral defects; however, synovitis and soft tissue impingement was under-reported. Arthroscopy is an effective method for the diagnoses and treatment of soft tissue impingement of the ankle joint. This condition is under-reported on MRI.

  15. Musculoskeletal ultrasonography delineates ankle symptoms in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Toyota, Yukihiro; Tamura, Maasa; Kirino, Yohei; Sugiyama, Yumiko; Tsuchida, Naomi; Kunishita, Yosuke; Kishimoto, Daiga; Kamiyama, Reikou; Miura, Yasushi; Minegishi, Kaoru; Yoshimi, Ryusuke; Ueda, Atsuhisa; Nakajima, Hideaki

    2017-05-01

    To clarify the use of musculoskeletal ultrasonography (US) of ankle joints in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Consecutive RA patients with or without ankle symptoms participated in the study. The US, clinical examination (CE), and patients' visual analog scale for pain (pVAS) for ankles were assessed. Prevalence of tibiotalar joint synovitis and tenosynovitis were assessed by grayscale (GS) and power Doppler (PD) US using a semi-quantitative grading (0-3). The positive US and CE findings were defined as GS score ≥2 and/or PD score ≥1, and joint swelling and/or tenderness, respectively. Multivariate analysis with the generalized linear mixed model was performed by assigning ankle pVAS as a dependent variable. Among a total of 120 ankles from 60 RA patients, positive ankle US findings were found in 21 (35.0%) patients. The concordance rate of CE and US was moderate (kappa 0.57). Of the 88 CE negative ankles, US detected positive findings in 9 (10.2%) joints. Multivariate analysis revealed that ankle US, clinical disease activity index, and foot Health Assessment Questionnaire, but not CE, was independently associated with ankle pVAS. US examination is useful to illustrate RA ankle involvement, especially for patients who complain ankle pain but lack CE findings.

  16. Rehabilitation of the Ankle After Acute Sprain or Chronic Instability.

    PubMed

    Mattacola, Carl G; Dwyer, Maureen K

    2002-12-01

    OBJECTIVE: To outline rehabilitation concepts that are applicable to acute and chronic injury of the ankle, to provide evidence for current techniques used in the rehabilitation of the ankle, and to describe a functional rehabilitation program that progresses from basic to advanced, while taking into consideration empirical data from the literature and clinical practice. BACKGROUND: Important considerations in the rehabilitation of ankle injuries include controlling the acute inflammatory process, regaining full ankle range of motion, increasing muscle strength and power, and improving proprioceptive abilities. These goals can be achieved through various modalities, flexibility exercises, and progressive strength- and balance-training exercises. In this article, we discuss the deleterious effects of ankle injury on ankle-joint proprioception and muscular strength and how these variables can be quantifiably measured to follow progress through a rehabilitation program. Evidence to support the effectiveness of applying orthotics and ankle braces during the acute and subacute phases of ankle rehabilitation is provided, along with recommendations for functional rehabilitation of ankle injuries, including a structured progression of exercises. RECOMMENDATIONS: Early functional rehabilitation of the ankle should include range-of-motion exercises and isometric and isotonic strength-training exercises. In the intermediate stage of rehabilitation, a progression of proprioception-training exercises should be incorporated. Advanced rehabilitation should focus on sport-specific activities to prepare the athlete for return to competition. Although it is important to individualize each rehabilitation program, this well-structured template for ankle rehabilitation can be adapted as needed.

  17. Rehabilitation of the Ankle After Acute Sprain or Chronic Instability

    PubMed Central

    Mattacola, Carl G.; Dwyer, Maureen K.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To outline rehabilitation concepts that are applicable to acute and chronic injury of the ankle, to provide evidence for current techniques used in the rehabilitation of the ankle, and to describe a functional rehabilitation program that progresses from basic to advanced, while taking into consideration empirical data from the literature and clinical practice. Background: Important considerations in the rehabilitation of ankle injuries include controlling the acute inflammatory process, regaining full ankle range of motion, increasing muscle strength and power, and improving proprioceptive abilities. These goals can be achieved through various modalities, flexibility exercises, and progressive strength- and balance-training exercises. In this article, we discuss the deleterious effects of ankle injury on ankle-joint proprioception and muscular strength and how these variables can be quantifiably measured to follow progress through a rehabilitation program. Evidence to support the effectiveness of applying orthotics and ankle braces during the acute and subacute phases of ankle rehabilitation is provided, along with recommendations for functional rehabilitation of ankle injuries, including a structured progression of exercises. Recommendations: Early functional rehabilitation of the ankle should include range-of-motion exercises and isometric and isotonic strength-training exercises. In the intermediate stage of rehabilitation, a progression of proprioception-training exercises should be incorporated. Advanced rehabilitation should focus on sport-specific activities to prepare the athlete for return to competition. Although it is important to individualize each rehabilitation program, this well-structured template for ankle rehabilitation can be adapted as needed. PMID:12937563

  18. Invariant ankle moment patterns when walking with and without a robotic ankle exoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Kao, Pei-Chun; Lewis, Cara L; Ferris, Daniel P

    2010-01-19

    To guide development of robotic lower limb exoskeletons, it is necessary to understand how humans adapt to powered assistance. The purposes of this study were to quantify joint moments while healthy subjects adapted to a robotic ankle exoskeleton and to determine if the period of motor adaptation is dependent on the magnitude of robotic assistance. The pneumatically powered ankle exoskeleton provided plantar flexor torque controlled by the wearer's soleus electromyography (EMG). Eleven naïve individuals completed two 30-min sessions walking on a split-belt instrumented treadmill at 1.25m/s while wearing the ankle exoskeleton. After two sessions of practice, subjects reduced their soleus EMG activation by approximately 36% and walked with total ankle moment patterns similar to their unassisted gait (r(2)=0.98+/-0.02, THSD, p>0.05). They had substantially different ankle kinematic patterns compared to their unassisted gait (r(2)=0.79+/-0.12, THSD, p<0.05). Not all of the subjects reached a steady-state gait pattern within the two sessions, in contrast to a previous study using a weaker robotic ankle exoskeleton (Gordon and Ferris, 2007). Our results strongly suggest that humans aim for similar joint moment patterns when walking with robotic assistance rather than similar kinematic patterns. In addition, greater robotic assistance provided during initial use results in a longer adaptation process than lesser robotic assistance. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The very large G-protein-coupled receptor VLGR1: a component of the ankle link complex required for the normal development of auditory hair bundles.

    PubMed

    McGee, Joann; Goodyear, Richard J; McMillan, D Randy; Stauffer, Eric A; Holt, Jeffrey R; Locke, Kirsten G; Birch, David G; Legan, P Kevin; White, Perrin C; Walsh, Edward J; Richardson, Guy P

    2006-06-14

    Sensory hair bundles in the inner ear are composed of stereocilia that can be interconnected by a variety of different link types, including tip links, horizontal top connectors, shaft connectors, and ankle links. The ankle link antigen is an epitope specifically associated with ankle links and the calycal processes of photoreceptors in chicks. Mass spectrometry and immunoblotting were used to identify this antigen as the avian ortholog of the very large G-protein-coupled receptor VLGR1, the product of the Usher syndrome USH2C (Mass1) locus. Like ankle links, Vlgr1 is expressed transiently around the base of developing hair bundles in mice. Ankle links fail to form in the cochleae of mice carrying a targeted mutation in Vlgr1 (Vlgr1/del7TM), and the bundles become disorganized just after birth. FM1-43 [N-(3-triethylammonium)propyl)-4-(4-(dibutylamino)styryl) pyridinium dibromide] dye loading and whole-cell recordings indicate mechanotransduction is impaired in cochlear, but not vestibular, hair cells of early postnatal Vlgr1/del7TM mutant mice. Auditory brainstem recordings and distortion product measurements indicate that these mice are severely deaf by the third week of life. Hair cells from the basal half of the cochlea are lost in 2-month-old Vlgr1/del7TM mice, and retinal function is mildly abnormal in aged mutants. Our results indicate that Vlgr1 is required for formation of the ankle link complex and the normal development of cochlear hair bundles.

  20. The prognostic value of concurrent phrenic nerve palsy in newborn babies with neonatal brachial plexus palsy.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Kiyoshi; Kawabata, Hidehiko

    2015-06-01

    To investigate the prognostic value of concurrent phrenic nerve palsy for predicting spontaneous motor recovery in neonatal brachial plexus palsy. We reviewed the records of 366 neonates with brachial plexus palsy. The clinical and follow-up data of patients with and without phrenic nerve palsy were compared. Of 366 newborn babies with neonatal brachial plexus palsy, 21 (6%) had concurrent phrenic nerve palsy. Sixteen of these neonates had upper-type palsy and 5 had total-type palsy. Poor spontaneous motor recovery was observed in 13 neonates with concurrent phrenic nerve palsy (62%) and in 129 without concurrent phrenic nerve palsy (39%). Among neonates born via vertex delivery, poor motor recovery was observed in 7 of 9 (78%) neonates with concurrent phrenic nerve palsy and 115 of 296 (39%) without concurrent phrenic nerve palsy. Concurrent phrenic nerve palsy in neonates with brachial plexus palsy has prognostic value in predicting poor spontaneous motor recovery of the brachial plexus, particularly after vertex delivery. Therapeutic IV. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Phrenic nerve transfer to the musculocutaneous nerve for the repair of brachial plexus injury: electrophysiological characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ying; Xu, Xun-cheng; Zou, Yi; Li, Su-rong; Zhang, Bin; Wang, Yue

    2015-01-01

    Phrenic nerve transfer is a major dynamic treatment used to repair brachial plexus root avulsion. We analyzed 72 relevant articles on phrenic nerve transfer to repair injured brachial plexus that were indexed by Science Citation Index. The keywords searched were brachial plexus injury, phrenic nerve, repair, surgery, protection, nerve transfer, and nerve graft. In addition, we performed neurophysiological analysis of the preoperative condition and prognosis of 10 patients undergoing ipsilateral phrenic nerve transfer to the musculocutaneous nerve in our hospital from 2008 to 201 3 and observed the electromyograms of the biceps brachii and motor conduction function of the musculocutaneous nerve. Clinically, approximately 28% of patients had brachial plexus injury combined with phrenic nerve injury, and injured phrenic nerve cannot be used as a nerve graft. After phrenic nerve transfer to the musculocutaneous nerve, the regenerated potentials first appeared at 3 months. Recovery of motor unit action potential occurred 6 months later and became more apparent at 12 months. The percent of patients recovering ‘excellent’ and ‘good’ muscle strength in the biceps brachii was 80% after 18 months. At 12 months after surgery, motor nerve conduction potential appeared in the musculocutaneous nerve in seven cases. These data suggest that preoperative evaluation of phrenic nerve function may help identify the most appropriate nerve graft in patients with an injured brachial plexus. The functional recovery of a transplanted nerve can be dynamically observed after the surgery. PMID:25883637

  2. Phrenic nerve transfer to the musculocutaneous nerve for the repair of brachial plexus injury: electrophysiological characteristics.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Xu, Xun-Cheng; Zou, Yi; Li, Su-Rong; Zhang, Bin; Wang, Yue

    2015-02-01

    Phrenic nerve transfer is a major dynamic treatment used to repair brachial plexus root avulsion. We analyzed 72 relevant articles on phrenic nerve transfer to repair injured brachial plexus that were indexed by Science Citation Index. The keywords searched were brachial plexus injury, phrenic nerve, repair, surgery, protection, nerve transfer, and nerve graft. In addition, we performed neurophysiological analysis of the preoperative condition and prognosis of 10 patients undergoing ipsilateral phrenic nerve transfer to the musculocutaneous nerve in our hospital from 2008 to 201 3 and observed the electromyograms of the biceps brachii and motor conduction function of the musculocutaneous nerve. Clinically, approximately 28% of patients had brachial plexus injury combined with phrenic nerve injury, and injured phrenic nerve cannot be used as a nerve graft. After phrenic nerve transfer to the musculocutaneous nerve, the regenerated potentials first appeared at 3 months. Recovery of motor unit action potential occurred 6 months later and became more apparent at 12 months. The percent of patients recovering 'excellent' and 'good' muscle strength in the biceps brachii was 80% after 18 months. At 12 months after surgery, motor nerve conduction potential appeared in the musculocutaneous nerve in seven cases. These data suggest that preoperative evaluation of phrenic nerve function may help identify the most appropriate nerve graft in patients with an injured brachial plexus. The functional recovery of a transplanted nerve can be dynamically observed after the surgery.

  3. True Brachial Artery Aneurysm Presenting as a Non-Pulsatile Mass.

    PubMed

    Pradhananga, A; Chao, X

    2017-01-01

    Brachial artery aneurysms are rare disease that can be encountered. It is divided into true and false. The frequency of true aneurysm of the brachial artery is so much unusual. So, we present a case of a 59 year old male who presented to us with complaint of mass in left upper limb since many years ago. Now, there was sudden onset of progressive pain with coldness, numbness, tingling sensation and blackish discolouration of skin from 8 hours. The left upper limb was pulseless and color Doppler ultrasound showed a non-pulsatile aneurysm at the mid level of left brachial artery associated with arterial occlusion in its distal branch by thrombus. The patient was successfully revascularised by interposing a saphenous vein graft. Thus,this case suggest that the prompt diagnosis of true brachial artery aneurysm by ultrasound or color Doppler ultrasound and the proper treatment by surgical repair can save limb from dangerous sequel Keywords: brachial artery aneurysm; color doppler ultrasound; true aneurysm; ultrasound.

  4. Effects of foot orthoses on patients with chronic ankle instability.

    PubMed

    Richie, Douglas H

    2007-01-01

    Chronic instability of the ankle can be the result of mechanical and functional deficits. An acute ankle sprain can cause mechanical and functional instability, which may or may not respond to standard rehabilitation programs. Chronic instability results when there is persistent joint laxity of the ankle or when one or more components of neuromuscular control of the ankle are compromised. A loss of balance or postural control seems to be the most consistent finding among athletes with chronic instability of the ankle. Recent research in patients with acute and chronic ankle instability has revealed positive effects of foot orthoses on postural control. This article reviews the current research relevant to the use of foot orthoses in patients with chronic ankle instability and clarifies the suggested benefits and the shortcomings of these investigations.

  5. Chronic Ankle Instability: Evolution of the Model

    PubMed Central

    Hiller, Claire E.; Kilbreath, Sharon L.; Refshauge, Kathryn M.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Context: The Hertel model of chronic ankle instability (CAI) is commonly used in research but may not be sufficiently comprehensive. Mechanical instability and functional instability are considered part of a continuum, and recurrent sprain occurs when both conditions are present. A modification of the Hertel model is proposed whereby these 3 components can exist independently or in combination. Objective: To examine the fit of data from people with CAI to 2 CAI models and to explore whether the different subgroups display impairments when compared with a control group. Design: Cross-sectional study. Patients or Other Participants: Community-dwelling adults and adolescent dancers were recruited: 137 ankles with ankle sprain for objective 1 and 81 with CAI and 43 controls for objective 2. Intervention(s): Two balance tasks and time to recover from an inversion perturbation were assessed to determine if the subgroups demonstrated impairments when compared with a control group (objective 2). Main Outcome Measure(s): For objective 1 (fit to the 2 models), outcomes were Cumberland Ankle Instability Tool score, anterior drawer test results, and number of sprains. For objective 2, outcomes were 2 balance tasks (number of foot lifts in 30 seconds, ability to balance on the ball of the foot) and time to recover from an inversion perturbation. The Cohen d was calculated to compare each subgroup with the control group. Results: A total of 56.5% of ankles (n = 61) fit the Hertel model, whereas all ankles (n = 108) fit the proposed model. In the proposed model, 42.6% of ankles were classified as perceived instability, 30.5% as recurrent sprain and perceived instability, and 26.9% as among the remaining groups. All CAI subgroups performed more poorly on the balance and inversion-perturbation tasks than the control group. Subgroups with perceived instability had greater impairment in single-leg stance, whereas participants with recurrent sprain performed more poorly than

  6. Interventions for treating chronic ankle instability.

    PubMed

    de Vries, Jasper S; Krips, Rover; Sierevelt, Inger N; Blankevoort, Leendert; van Dijk, C N

    2011-08-10

    Chronic lateral ankle instability occurs in 10% to 20% of people after an acute ankle sprain. Initial treatment is conservative but if this fails and ligament laxity is present, surgical intervention is considered. To compare different treatments, conservative or surgical, for chronic lateral ankle instability. We searched the Cochrane Bone, Joint and Muscle Trauma Group Specialised Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL and reference lists of articles, all to February 2010. All identified randomised and quasi-randomised controlled trials of interventions for chronic lateral ankle instability were included. Two review authors independently assessed risk of bias and extracted data from each study. Where appropriate, results of comparable studies were pooled. Ten randomised controlled trials were included. Limitations in the design, conduct and reporting of these trials resulted in unclear or high risk of bias assessments relating to allocation concealment, assessor blinding, incomplete and selective outcome reporting. Only limited pooling of the data was possible.Neuromuscular training was the basis of conservative treatment evaluated in four trials. Neuromuscular training compared with no training resulted in better ankle function scores at the end of four weeks training (Ankle Joint Functional Assessment Tool (AJFAT): mean difference (MD) 3.00, 95% CI 0.3 to 5.70; 1 trial, 19 participants; Foot and Ankle Disability Index (FADI) data: MD 8.83, 95% CI 4.46 to 13.20; 2 trials, 56 participants). The fourth trial (19 participants) found no significant difference in the functional outcome after six weeks training programme on a cyclo-ergometer with a bi-directional compared with a traditional uni-directional pedal. Longer-term follow-up data were not available for these four trials.Four studies compared surgical procedures for chronic ankle instability. One trial (40 participants) found more nerve injuries after tenodesis

  7. Effect of External Ankle Support on Ankle and Knee Biomechanics During the Cutting Maneuver in Basketball Players.

    PubMed

    Klem, Nardia-Rose; Wild, Catherine Y; Williams, Sian A; Ng, Leo

    2017-03-01

    Despite the high prevalence of lower extremity injuries in female basketball players as well as a high proportion of athletes who wear ankle braces, there is a paucity of research pertaining to the effects of ankle bracing on ankle and knee biomechanics during basketball-specific tasks. To compare the effects of a lace-up brace (ASO), a hinged brace (Active T2), and no ankle bracing (control) on ankle and knee joint kinematics and joint reaction forces in female basketball athletes during a cutting maneuver. Controlled laboratory study. Twenty healthy, semi-elite female basketball players performed a cutting task under both ankle brace conditions (lace-up ankle brace and hinged ankle brace) and a no-brace condition. The 3-dimensional kinematics of the ankle and knee during the cutting maneuver were measured with an 18-camera motion analysis system (250 Hz), and ground-reaction force data were collected by use of a multichannel force plate (2000 Hz) to quantify ankle and knee joint reaction forces. Conditions were randomized using a block randomization method. Compared with the control condition, the hinged ankle brace significantly restricted peak ankle inversion (mean difference, 1.7°; P = .023). No significant difference was found between the lace-up brace and the control condition ( P = .865). Compared with the lace-up brace, the hinged brace significantly reduced ankle and knee joint compressive forces at the time of peak ankle dorsiflexion (mean difference, 1.5 N/kg [ P = .018] and 1.4 N/kg [ P = .013], respectively). Additionally, the hinged ankle brace significantly reduced knee anterior shear forces compared with the lace-up brace both during the deceleration phase and at peak ankle dorsiflexion (mean difference, 0.8 N/kg [ P = .018] and 0.9 N/kg [ P = .011], respectively). The hinged ankle brace significantly reduced ankle inversion compared with the no-brace condition and reduced ankle and knee joint forces compared with the lace-up brace in a female

  8. Chronic ankle instability: Arthroscopic anatomical repair.

    PubMed

    Arroyo-Hernández, M; Mellado-Romero, M; Páramo-Díaz, P; García-Lamas, L; Vilà-Rico, J

    Ankle sprains are one of the most common injuries. Despite appropriate conservative treatment, approximately 20-40% of patients continue to have chronic ankle instability and pain. In 75-80% of cases there is an isolated rupture of the anterior talofibular ligament. A retrospective observational study was conducted on 21 patients surgically treated for chronic ankle instability by means of an arthroscopic anatomical repair, between May 2012 and January 2013. There were 15 men and 6 women, with a mean age of 30.43 years (range 18-48). The mean follow-up was 29 months (range 25-33). All patients were treated by arthroscopic anatomical repair of anterior talofibular ligament. Four (19%) patients were found to have varus hindfoot deformity. Associated injuries were present in 13 (62%) patients. There were 6 cases of osteochondral lesions, 3 cases of posterior ankle impingement syndrome, and 6 cases of peroneal pathology. All these injuries were surgically treated in the same surgical time. A clinical-functional study was performed using the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) score. The mean score before surgery was 66.12 (range 60-71), and after surgery it increased up to a mean of 96.95 (range 90-100). All patients were able to return to their previous sport activity within a mean of 21.5 weeks (range 17-28). Complications were found in 3 (14%) patients. Arthroscopic anatomical ligament repair technique has excellent clinical-functional results with a low percentage of complications, and enables patients to return to their previous sport activity within a short period of time. Copyright © 2016 SECOT. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Clinical evaluation of a new noninvasive ankle arthrometer.

    PubMed

    Nauck, Tanja; Lohrer, Heinz; Gollhofer, Albert

    2010-06-01

    A nonradiographic arthrometer was developed to objectively quantify anterior talar drawer instability in stable and unstable ankles. Diagnostic validity of this device was previously demonstrated in a cadaver study. The aim of the present study was to validate the ankle arthrometer in an in vivo setting. Twenty-three subjects participated in the study. An orthopedic surgeon first performed a manual anterior talar drawer test to classify the subjects' ankles as stable or unstable. The subjects were then evaluated using the ankle arthrometer, and filled out a validated self-reported questionnaire (German version of the Foot and Ankle Ability Measure [FAAM-G]). Ankle stiffness was calculated from the low linear region (40-60 N) of the load deformation curves obtained from the ankle arthrometer. Reliability testing of these stiffness values was done based on load deformation curves, with 150 and 200 N maximum anterior drawer loads applied in the ankle arthrometer. Using the manual anterior drawer test, 16 ankles were classified as stable and 7 were classified as unstable. Arthrometer stiffness analysis differentiated stable from unstable ankles (P = 0.00 and P = 0.01, respectively). Test-retest demonstrated an accurate reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.80). A significant correlation was found between both FAAM-G subscales and the arthrometer stiffness values (r = 0.43 and 0.54; P = 0.04 and 0.01). Discussion Subjects with and without mechanical ankle instability could be differentiated by ankle arthrometer stiffness analysis and the FAAM-G questionnaire results. This nonradiographic device may be relevant for screening athletes at risk for ankle injuries, for clinical follow-up studies, and implementing preventive strategies. Validity and reliability of the new ankle arthrometer is demonstrated in a small cohort in an in vivo setting.

  10. Cost-effectiveness analysis of total ankle arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    SooHoo, Nelson F; Kominski, Gerald

    2004-11-01

    There is renewed interest in total ankle arthroplasty as an alternative to ankle fusion in the treatment of end-stage ankle arthritis. Despite a lack of long-term data on the clinical outcomes associated with these implants, the use of ankle arthroplasty is expanding. The purpose of this cost-effectiveness analysis was to evaluate whether the currently available literature justifies the emerging use of total ankle arthroplasty. This study also identifies thresholds for the durability and function of ankle prostheses that, if met, would support more widespread dissemination of this new technology. A decision model was created for the treatment of ankle arthritis. The literature was reviewed to identify possible outcomes and their probabilities following ankle fusion and ankle arthroplasty. Each outcome was weighted for quality of life with use of a utility factor, and effectiveness was expressed in units of quality-adjusted life years. Gross costs were estimated from Medicare charge and reimbursement data for the relevant codes. The effect of the uncertainty of estimates of costs and effectiveness was assessed with sensitivity analysis. The reference case of our model assumed a ten-year duration of survival of the prosthesis, resulting in an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio for ankle arthroplasty of $18,419 per quality-adjusted life year gained. This reflects a gain of 0.52 quality-adjusted life years at a cost of $9578 when ankle arthroplasty is chosen over fusion. This ratio compares favorably with the cost-effectiveness of other medical and surgical interventions. Sensitivity analysis determined that the cost per quality-adjusted life year gained with ankle arthroplasty rises above $50,000 if the prosthesis is assumed to fail before seven years. Treatment options with ratios above $50,000 per quality-adjusted life year are commonly considered to have limited cost-effectiveness. This threshold is also crossed when the theoretical functional advantages of ankle

  11. Brachial plexus endoscopic dissection and correlation with open dissection.

    PubMed

    Lafosse, T; Masmejean, E; Bihel, T; Lafosse, L

    2015-12-01

    Shoulder endoscopy is evolving and becoming extra-articular. More and more procedures are taking place in the area of the brachial plexus (BP). We carried out an anatomical study to describe the endoscopic anatomy of the BP and the technique used to dissect and expose the BP endoscopically. Thirteen fresh cadavers were dissected. We first performed an endoscopic dissection of the BP, using classical extra-articular shoulder arthroscopy portals. Through each portal, we dissected as many structures as possible and identified them. We then did an open dissection to corroborate the endoscopic findings and to look for damage to the neighboring structures. In the supraclavicular area, we were able to expose the C5, C6 and C7 roots, and the superior and middle trunks in 11 of 13 specimens through two transtrapezial portals by following the suprascapular nerve. The entire infraclavicular portion of the BP (except the medial cord and its branches) was exposed in 11 of 13 specimens. The approach to the infraclavicular portion of the BP led directly to the lateral and posterior cords, but the axillary artery hid the medial cord. The musculocutaneous nerve was the first nerve encountered when dissecting medially from the anterior aspect of the coracoid process. The axillary nerve was the first nerve encountered when following the anterior border of the subscapularis medially from the posterior aspect of the coracoid process. Knowledge of the endoscopic anatomy of the BP is mandatory to expose and protect this structure while performing advanced arthroscopic shoulder procedures. Copyright © 2015 SFCM. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Exercise-induced brachial artery vasodilation: role of free radicals.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Russell S; Donato, Anthony J; Uberoi, Abhimanyu; Wray, D Walter; Lawrenson, Lesley; Nishiyama, Steven; Bailey, Damian M

    2007-03-01

    Originally thought of as simply damaging or toxic "accidents" of in vivo chemistry, free radicals are becoming increasingly recognized as redox signaling molecules implicit in cellular homeostasis. Indeed, at the vascular level, it is plausible that oxidative stress plays a regulatory role in normal vascular function. Using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy, we sought to document the ability of an oral antioxidant cocktail (vitamins C, E, and alpha-lipoic acid) to reduce circulating free radicals, and we employed Doppler ultrasound to examine the consequence of an antioxidant-mediated reduction in oxidative stress on exercise-induced vasodilation. A total of 25 young (18-31 yr) healthy male subjects partook in these studies. EPR spectroscopy revealed a reduction in circulating free radicals following antioxidant administration at rest ( approximately 98%) and as a consequence of exercise ( approximately 85%). Plasma total antioxidant capacity and vitamin C both increased following the ingestion of the antioxidant cocktail, whereas vitamin E levels were not influenced by the ingestion of the antioxidants. Brachial artery vasodilation during submaximal forearm handgrip exercise was greater with the placebo (7.4 +/- 1.8%) than with the antioxidant cocktail (2.3 +/- 0.7%). These data document the efficacy of an oral antioxidant cocktail in reducing free radicals and suggest that, in a healthy state, the aggressive disruption of the delicate balance between pro- and antioxidant forces can negatively impact vascular function. These findings implicate an exercise-induced reliance upon pro-oxidant-stimulated vasodilation, thereby revealing an important and positive vascular role for free radicals.

  13. Outcome in adolescence of brachial plexus birth palsy

    PubMed Central

    Hulleberg, Gunn; Elvrum, Ann-Kristin G; Brandal, Merethe; Vik, Torstein

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose — The frequency and severity of a permanent lesion after brachial plexus birth palsy (BPBP) and its impact on activities of daily living are not well documented. We therefore investigated the outcome of BPBP in adolescents, regarding arm function and consequences for activity and participation. Participants and methods — Of 30,574 babies born at St. Olavs University Hospital in 1991–2000, 91 had BPBP (prevalence 3 per 1,000), and 69 of these individuals were examined at a median age of 14 (10–20) years. The examination included the modified Mallet classification, range of motion, shoulder rotation and grip strength, Assisting Hand Assessment, and Canadian Occupational Performance Measure. Of the 22 subjects who were not examined, 3 could not be traced and 19 reported having no problems in the affected arm. Results — At follow-up, 17 adolescents had a permanent lesion (i.e. individual Mallet subscore below 4) with a median Mallet total score of 15 (9–19), while 52 had good or normal shoulder function (median Mallet total score 25 (23–25)). All participants with a permanent lesion had reduced active shoulder rotation (≤ 15°), 16 had elbow extension deficit, and 10 had subnormal grip strength. External rotation was considerably weaker in the affected shoulder. In addition, they had ineffective use of the affected arm in bimanual activities. Even so, all except 1 were independent in activities of daily living, although 15 experienced minor difficulties. Interpretation — Every fourth to fifth child with BPBP had a permanent lesion as an adolescent. External rotation was the most impaired movement. Despite ineffective use of the affected arm in bimanual activities, all of the participants except one were independent in activities of daily living. PMID:25238434

  14. Shoulder Arthroplasty for Sequelae of Obstetrical Brachial Plexus Injury.

    PubMed

    Werthel, Jean-David; Schoch, Bradley; Frankle, Mark; Cofield, Robert; Elhassan, Bassem T

    2018-03-29

    Shoulder arthroplasty following obstetrical brachial plexus injury (OBPI) is technically challenging because glenoid morphology, muscle balance, and humeral version are substantially altered compared with the neurologically intact shoulder. The purpose of this study is to report the outcome of shoulder arthroplasty in a group of patients with end-stage arthritis secondary to OBPI. Seven patients with OBPI and secondary glenohumeral arthritis were treated with shoulder arthroplasty between 1976 and 2014. Two underwent hemiarthroplasty (HA), 2 underwent total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA), and 3 underwent reverse shoulder arthroplasty (RSA). One HA was lost to follow-up and was excluded. The remaining 6 patients (mean age, 62.5 years old at the time of surgery) were followed for a minimum of 2 years (mean, 7.5 years; range, 2-13 years) Outcome measures included pain, range of motion, and postoperative modified Neer ratings. Pain improved in all shoulders. Mean forward flexion was unchanged. No shoulders treated with HA/TSA regained forward elevation above 90°, compared with 1 out of the 3 RSAs. External rotation improved from a mean of -10° to 20°. Active internal rotation decreased from L1 to L5. Immediate postoperative radiographs showed either severe posterior or posterosuperior subluxation in all 3 patients treated with nonconstrained implants. Shoulder arthroplasty is an acceptable option to relieve pain in patients with symptomatic shoulder arthritis as a sequel of OBPI. However, range of motion improvements are not expected. Therapeutic V. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy for Children with Obstetric Brachial Plexus Palsy: Two Single-Case Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buesch, Francisca Eugster

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this pilot study was to investigate the feasibility of constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT) in children with obstetric brachial plexus palsy and receive preliminary information about functional improvements. Two patients (age 12 years) with obstetric brachial plexus palsy were included for a 126-h home-based CIMT…

  16. Characteristic features of hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsy (HNPP) presenting with brachial plexopathy in soldiers.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyoung-Eun

    2014-11-15

    A brachial plexus lesion is not common in hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsy (HNPP). We report the clinical and electrodiagnostic features of young soldiers with HNPP presenting with brachial plexopathy. By reviewing 2year medical records from Korean military hospitals, we identified soldiers with brachial plexus lesions. Among them, patients diagnosed with HNPP were determined and clinical and electrophysiological findings were compared between HNPP and non-HNPP patients with a brachial plexus lesion. Thirteen patients (6.8%) were diagnosed with HNPP among 189 patients with a brachial plexus lesion. Push-ups, as either a punishment or an exercise, was the most frequent preceding event in HNPP patients (76.9%), whereas it was rare in non-HNPP patients. The distal motor latency of the median nerve showed the highest sensitivity (90.9%) and specificity (100%) for HNPP in patients with a brachial plexus lesion. In conclusion, HNPP should be suspected in patients with brachial plexopathy if brachial plexopathy develops after push-ups or if the distal motor latency of median nerves is prolonged. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Hand Function in Children with an Upper Brachial Plexus Birth Injury: Results of the Nine-Hole Peg Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Immerman, Igor; Alfonso, Daniel T.; Ramos, Lorna E.; Grossman, Leslie A.; Alfonso, Israel; Ditaranto, Patricia; Grossman, John A. I.

    2012-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate hand function in children with Erb upper brachial plexus palsy. Method: Hand function was evaluated in 25 children (eight males; 17 females) with a diagnosed upper (C5/C6) brachial plexus birth injury. Of these children, 22 had undergone primary nerve reconstruction and 13 of the 25 had undergone…

  18. Estimation of brachial artery volume flow by duplex ultrasound imaging predicts dialysis access maturation.

    PubMed

    Ko, Sae Hee; Bandyk, Dennis F; Hodgkiss-Harlow, Kelley D; Barleben, Andrew; Lane, John

    2015-06-01

    This study validated duplex ultrasound measurement of brachial artery volume flow (VF) as predictor of dialysis access flow maturation and successful hemodialysis. Duplex ultrasound was used to image upper extremity dialysis access anatomy and estimate access VF within 1 to 2 weeks of the procedure. Correlation of brachial artery VF with dialysis access conduit VF was performed using a standardized duplex testing protocol in 75 patients. The hemodynamic data were used to develop brachial artery flow velocity criteria (peak systolic velocity and end-diastolic velocity) predictive of three VF categories: low (<600 mL/min), acceptable (600-800 mL/min), or high (>800 mL/min). Brachial artery VF was then measured in 148 patients after a primary (n = 86) or revised (n = 62) upper extremity dialysis access procedure, and the VF category correlated with access maturation or need for revision before hemodialysis usage. Access maturation was conferred when brachial artery VF was >600 mL/min and conduit imaging indicated successful cannulation based on anatomic criteria of conduit diameter >5 mm and skin depth <6 mm. Measurements of VF from the brachial artery and access conduit demonstrated a high degree of correlation (R(2) = 0.805) for autogenous vein (n = 45; R(2) = 0.87) and bridge graft (n = 30; R(2) = 0.78) dialysis accesses. Access VF of >800 mL/min was predicted when the brachial artery lumen diameter was >4.5 mm, peak systolic velocity was >150 cm/s, and the diastolic-to-systolic velocity ratio was >0.4. Brachial artery velocity spectra indicating VF <800 mL/min was associated (P < .0001) with failure of access maturation. Revision was required in 15 of 21 (71%) accesses with a VF of <600 mL/min, 4 of 40 accesses (10%) with aVF of 600 to 800 mL/min, and 2 of 87 accesses (2.3%) with an initial VF of >800 mL/min. Duplex testing to estimate brachial artery VF and assess the conduit for ease of cannulation can be performed in 5 minutes during the initial postoperative

  19. Brachial artery protected by wrapped latissimus dorsi muscle flap in high voltage electrical injury

    PubMed Central

    Gencel, E.; Eser, C.; Kokacya, O.; Kesiktas, E.; Yavuz, M.

    2016-01-01

    Summary High voltage electrical injury can disrupt the vascular system and lead to extremity amputations. It is important to protect main vessels from progressive burn necrosis in order to salvage a limb. The brachial artery should be totally isolated from the burned area by a muscle flap to prevent vessel disruption. In this study, we report the use of a wrap-around latissimus dorsi muscle flap to protect a skeletonized brachial artery in a high voltage electrical injury in order to salvage the upper extremity and restore function. The flap wrapped around the exposed brachial artery segment and luminal status of the artery was assessed using magnetic resonance angiography. No vascular intervention was required. The flap survived completely with good elbow function. Extremity amputation was not encountered. This method using a latissimus dorsi flap allows the surgeon to protect the main upper extremity artery and reconstruct arm defects, which contributes to restoring arm function in high voltage electrical injury. PMID:28149236

  20. Brachial artery protected by wrapped latissimus dorsi muscle flap in high voltage electrical injury.

    PubMed

    Gencel, E; Eser, C; Kokacya, O; Kesiktas, E; Yavuz, M

    2016-06-30

    High voltage electrical injury can disrupt the vascular system and lead to extremity amputations. It is important to protect main vessels from progressive burn necrosis in order to salvage a limb. The brachial artery should be totally isolated from the burned area by a muscle flap to prevent vessel disruption. In this study, we report the use of a wrap-around latissimus dorsi muscle flap to protect a skeletonized brachial artery in a high voltage electrical injury in order to salvage the upper extremity and restore function. The flap wrapped around the exposed brachial artery segment and luminal status of the artery was assessed using magnetic resonance angiography. No vascular intervention was required. The flap survived completely with good elbow function. Extremity amputation was not encountered. This method using a latissimus dorsi flap allows the surgeon to protect the main upper extremity artery and reconstruct arm defects, which contributes to restoring arm function in high voltage electrical injury.

  1. "Jeopardy" in Abnormal Psychology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keutzer, Carolin S.

    1993-01-01

    Describes the use of the board game, Jeopardy, in a college level abnormal psychology course. Finds increased student interaction and improved application of information. Reports generally favorable student evaluation of the technique. (CFR)

  2. Use and tolerability of a side pole static ankle foot orthosis in children with neurological disorders.

    PubMed

    Delvert, Céline; Rippert, Pascal; Margirier, Françoise; Vadot, Jean-Pierre; Bérard, Carole; Poirot, Isabelle; Vuillerot, Carole

    2017-04-01

    Transverse-plane foot deformities are a frequently encountered issue in children with neurological disorders. They are the source of many symptoms, such as pain and walking difficulties, making their prevention very important. We aim to describe the use and tolerability of a side pole static ankle foot orthosis used to prevent transverse-plane foot deformities in children with neurologic disorders. Monocentric, retrospective, observational study. Medical data were collected from 103 children with transverse-plane foot deformities in one or both feet caused by a neurological impairment. All children were braced between 2001 and 2010. Unilateral orthosis was prescribed for 32 children and bilateral orthosis for 71. Transverse-plane foot deformities were varus in 66% of the cases and an equinus was associated in 59.2% of the cases. Mean age for the first prescription was 8.6 years. For the 23 patients present at the 4-year visit, 84.8% still wore the orthosis daily, and 64.7% wore the orthosis more than 6 h per day. The rate of permanent discontinuation of wearing the orthosis was 14.7%. The side pole static ankle foot orthosis is well tolerated with very few side effects, which promotes regular wearing and observance. Clinical relevance Side pole static ankle foot orthoses are well tolerated and can be safely used for children with foot abnormalities in the frontal plane that have a neurological pathology origin.

  3. Design of a simple, lightweight, passive-elastic ankle exoskeleton supporting ankle joint stiffness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seyoung; Son, Youngsu; Choi, Sangkyu; Ham, Sangyong; Park, Cheolhoon

    2015-09-01

    In this study, a passive-elastic ankle exoskeleton (PEAX) with a one-way clutch mechanism was developed and then pilot-tested with vertical jumping to determine whether the PEAX is sufficiently lightweight and comfortable to be used in further biomechanical studies. The PEAX was designed to supplement the function of the Achilles tendon and ligaments as they passively support the ankle torque with their inherent stiffness. The main frame of the PEAX consists of upper and lower parts connected to each other by tension springs (N = 3) and lubricated hinge joints. The upper part has an offset angle of 5° with respect to the vertical line when the springs are in their resting state. Each spring has a slack length of 8 cm and connects the upper part to the tailrod of the lower part in the neutral position. The tailrod freely rotates with low friction but has a limited range of motion due to the stop pin working as a one-way clutch. Because of the one-way clutch system, the tension springs store the elastic energy only due to an ankle dorsiflexion when triggered by the stop pin. This clutch mechanism also has the advantage of preventing any inconvenience during ankle plantarflexion because it does not limit the ankle joint motion during the plantarflexion phase. In pilot jumping tests, all of the subjects reported that the PEAX was comfortable for jumping due to its lightweight (approximately 1 kg) and compact (firmly integrated with shoes) design, and subjects were able to nearly reach their maximum vertical jump heights while wearing the PEAX. During the countermovement jump, elastic energy was stored during dorsiflexion by spring extension and released during plantarflexion by spring restoration, indicating that the passive spring torque (i.e., supportive torque) generated by the ankle exoskeleton partially supported the ankle joint torque throughout the process.

  4. Design of a simple, lightweight, passive-elastic ankle exoskeleton supporting ankle joint stiffness.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seyoung; Son, Youngsu; Choi, Sangkyu; Ham, Sangyong; Park, Cheolhoon

    2015-09-01

    In this study, a passive-elastic ankle exoskeleton (PEAX) with a one-way clutch mechanism was developed and then pilot-tested with vertical jumping to determine whether the PEAX is sufficiently lightweight and comfortable to be used in further biomechanical studies. The PEAX was designed to supplement the function of the Achilles tendon and ligaments as they passively support the ankle torque with their inherent stiffness. The main frame of the PEAX consists of upper and lower parts connected to each other by tension springs (N = 3) and lubricated hinge joints. The upper part has an offset angle of 5° with respect to the vertical line when the springs are in their resting state. Each spring has a slack length of 8 cm and connects the upper part to the tailrod of the lower part in the neutral position. The tailrod freely rotates with low friction but has a limited range of motion due to the stop pin working as a one-way clutch. Because of the one-way clutch system, the tension springs store the elastic energy only due to an ankle dorsiflexion when triggered by the stop pin. This clutch mechanism also has the advantage of preventing any inconvenience during ankle plantarflexion because it does not limit the ankle joint motion during the plantarflexion phase. In pilot jumping tests, all of the subjects reported that the PEAX was comfortable for jumping due to its lightweight (approximately 1 kg) and compact (firmly integrated with shoes) design, and subjects were able to nearly reach their maximum vertical jump heights while wearing the PEAX. During the countermovement jump, elastic energy was stored during dorsiflexion by spring extension and released during plantarflexion by spring restoration, indicating that the passive spring torque (i.e., supportive torque) generated by the ankle exoskeleton partially supported the ankle joint torque throughout the process.

  5. Importance of Calibration Method in Central Blood Pressure for Cardiac Structural Abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Negishi, Kazuaki; Yang, Hong; Wang, Ying; Nolan, Mark T; Negishi, Tomoko; Pathan, Faraz; Marwick, Thomas H; Sharman, James E

    2016-09-01

    Central blood pressure (CBP) independently predicts cardiovascular risk, but calibration methods may affect accuracy of central systolic blood pressure (CSBP). Standard central systolic blood pressure (Stan-CSBP) from peripheral waveforms is usually derived with calibration using brachial SBP and diastolic BP (DBP). However, calibration using oscillometric mean arterial pressure (MAP) and DBP (MAP-CSBP) is purported to provide more accurate representation of true invasive CSBP. This study sought to determine which derived CSBP could more accurately discriminate cardiac structural abnormalities. A total of 349 community-based patients with risk factors (71±5years, 161 males) had CSBP measured by brachial oscillometry (Mobil-O-Graph, IEM GmbH, Stolberg, Germany) using 2 calibration methods: MAP-CSBP and Stan-CSBP. Left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) and left atrial dilatation (LAD) were measured based on standard guidelines. MAP-CSBP was higher than Stan-CSBP (149±20 vs. 128±15mm Hg, P < 0.0001). Although they were modestly correlated (rho = 0.74, P < 0.001), the Bland-Altman plot demonstrated a large bias (21mm Hg) and limits of agreement (24mm Hg). In receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analyses, MAP-CSBP significantly better discriminated LVH compared with Stan-CSBP (area under the curve (AUC) 0.66 vs. 0.59, P = 0.0063) and brachial SBP (0.62, P = 0.027). Continuous net reclassification improvement (NRI) (P < 0.001) and integrated discrimination improvement (IDI) (P < 0.001) corroborated superior discrimination of LVH by MAP-CSBP. Similarly, MAP-CSBP better distinguished LAD than Stan-CSBP (AUC 0.63 vs. 0.56, P = 0.005) and conventional brachial SBP (0.58, P = 0.006), whereas Stan-CSBP provided no better discrimination than conventional brachial BP (P = 0.09). CSBP is calibration dependent and when oscillometric MAP and DBP are used, the derived CSBP is a better discriminator for cardiac structural abnormalities. © American Journal of Hypertension

  6. Biomechanical response to ankle-foot orthosis stiffness during running.

    PubMed

    Russell Esposito, Elizabeth; Choi, Harmony S; Owens, Johnny G; Blanck, Ryan V; Wilken, Jason M

    2015-12-01

    The Intrepid Dynamic Exoskeletal Orthosis (IDEO) is an ankle-foot orthosis developed to address the high rates of delayed amputation in the military. Its use has enabled many wounded Service Members to run again. During running, stiffness is thought to influence an orthosis' energy storage and return mechanical properties. This study examined the effect of orthosis stiffness on running biomechanics in patients with lower limb impairments who had undergone unilateral limb salvage. Ten patients with lower limb impairments underwent gait analysis at a self-selected running velocity. 1. Nominal (clinically-prescribed), 2. Stiff (20% stiffer than nominal), and 3. Compliant (20% less stiff than nominal) ankle-foot orthosis stiffnesses were tested. Ankle joint stiffness was greatest in the stiffest strut and lowest in the compliant strut, however ankle mechanical work remained unchanged. Speed, stride length, cycle time, joint angles, moments, powers, and ground reaction forces were not significantly different among stiffness conditions. Ankle joint kinematics and ankle, knee and hip kinetics were different between limbs. Ankle power, in particular, was lower in the injured limb. Ankle-foot orthosis stiffness affected ankle joint stiffness but did not influence other biomechanical parameters of running in individuals with unilateral limb salvage. Foot strike asymmetries may have influenced the kinetics of running. Therefore, a range of stiffness may be clinically appropriate when prescribing ankle-foot orthoses for active individuals with limb salvage. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Acute and chronic lateral ankle instability in the athlete.

    PubMed

    Chan, Keith W; Ding, Bryan C; Mroczek, Kenneth J

    2011-01-01

    Ankle sprain injuries are the most common injury sustained during sporting activities. Three-quarters of ankle injuries involve the lateral ligamentous complex, comprised of the anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL), the calcaneofibular ligament (CFL), and the posterior talofibular ligament (PTFL). The most common mechanism of injury in lateral ankle sprains occurs with forced plantar flexion and inversion of the ankle as the body's center of gravity rolls over the ankle. The ATFL followed by the CFL are the most commonly injured ligaments. Eighty percent of acute ankle sprains make a full recovery with conservative management, while 20% of acute ankle sprains develop mechanical or functional instability, resulting in chronic ankle instability. Treatment of acute ankle sprains generally can be successfully managed with a short period of immobilization that is followed by functional rehabilitation. Patients with chronic ankle instability who fail functional rehabilitation are best treated with a Brostrom-Gould anatomic repair or, in those patients with poor tissue quality or undergoing revision surgery, an anatomic reconstruction.

  8. Evidence-based treatment for ankle injuries: a clinical perspective

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chung-Wei Christine; Hiller, Claire E; de Bie, Rob A

    2010-01-01

    The most common ankle injuries are ankle sprain and ankle fracture. This review discusses treatments for ankle sprain (including the management of the acute sprain and chronic instability) and ankle fracture, using evidence from recent systematic reviews and randomized controlled trials. After ankle sprain, there is evidence for the use of functional support and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. There is weak evidence suggesting that the use of manual therapy may lead to positive short-term effects. Electro-physical agents do not appear to enhance outcomes and are not recommended. Exercise may reduce the occurrence of recurrent ankle sprains and may be effective in managing chronic ankle instability. After surgical fixation for ankle fracture, an early introduction of activity, administered via early weight-bearing or exercise during the immobilization period, may lead to better outcomes. However, the use of a brace or orthosis to enable exercise during the immobilization period may also lead to a higher rate of adverse events, suggesting that this treatment regimen needs to be applied judiciously. After the immobilization period, the focus of treatment for ankle fracture should be on a progressive exercise program. PMID:21655420

  9. Active ankle motion may result in changes to the talofibular interval in individuals with chronic ankle instability and ankle sprain copers: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Croy, Theodore; Cosby, Nicole L; Hertel, Jay

    2013-08-01

    Alterations in talocrural joint arthrokinematics related to repositioning of the talus or fibula following ankle sprain have been reported in radiological and clinical studies. It is unclear if these changes can result from normal active ankle motion. The study objective was to determine if active movement created changes in the sagittal plane talofibular interval in ankles with a history of lateral ankle sprain and instability. Three subject groups [control (n = 17), ankle sprain copers (n = 20), and chronic ankle instability (n = 20)] underwent ultrasound imaging of the anterolateral ankle gutter to identify the lateral malleolus and talus over three trials. Between trials, subjects actively plantar and dorsiflexed the ankle three times. The sagittal plane talofibular interval was assessed by measuring the anteroposterior distance (mm) between the lateral malleolus and talus from an ultrasound image. Between group and trial differences were analyzed with repeated measures analysis of variance and post-hoc t-tests. Fifty-seven subjects participated. A significant group-by-trial interaction was observed (F4,108 = 3.5; P = 0.009). The talofibular interval was increased in both copers [2.4±3.6 mm; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.73-4.1; P = 0.007] and chronic ankle instability (4.1±4.6 mm; 95% CI: 1.9-6.2; P = 0.001) at trial 3 while no changes were observed in control ankle talar position (0.06±2.8mm; 95% CI: -1.5-1.4; P = 0.93). The talofibular interval increased only in subjects with a history of lateral ankle sprain with large clinical effect sizes observed. These findings suggest that an alteration in the position of the talus or fibula occurred with non-weight bearing sagittal plane motion. These findings may have diagnostic and therapeutic implications for manual therapists.

  10. Dynamic balance deficits in individuals with chronic ankle instability compared to ankle sprain copers 1 year after a first-time lateral ankle sprain injury.

    PubMed

    Doherty, Cailbhe; Bleakley, Chris; Hertel, Jay; Caulfield, Brian; Ryan, John; Delahunt, Eamonn

    2016-04-01

    To quantify the dynamic balance deficits that characterise a group with chronic ankle instability compared to lateral ankle sprain copers and non-injured controls using kinematic and kinetic outcomes. Forty-two participants with chronic ankle instability and twenty-eight lateral ankle sprain copers were initially recruited within 2 weeks of sustaining a first-time, acute lateral ankle sprain and required to attend our laboratory 1 year later to complete the current study protocol. An additional group of non-injured individuals were also recruited to act as a control group. All participants completed the anterior, posterior-lateral and posterior-medial reach directions of the star excursion balance test. Sagittal plane kinematics of the lower extremity and associated fractal dimension of the centre of pressure path were also acquired. Participants with chronic ankle instability displayed poorer performance in the anterior, posterior-medial and posterior-lateral reach directions compared with controls bilaterally, and in the posterior-lateral direction compared with lateral ankle sprain copers on their 'involved' limb only. These performance deficits in the posterior-lateral and posterior-medial directions were associated with reduced flexion and dorsiflexion displacements at the hip, knee and ankle at the point of maximum reach, and coincided with reduced complexity of the centre of pressure path. In comparison with lateral ankle sprain copers and controls, participants with chronic ankle instability were characterised by dynamic balance deficits as measured using the SEBT. This was attested to reduced sagittal plane motions at the hip, knee and ankle joints, and reduced capacity of the stance limb to avail of its supporting base. III.

  11. [Antegrade catheterization of the brachial artery during treatment of arteriovenous angiodysplasia of the forearm and hand].

    PubMed

    Tsygankov, V N; Varava, A B

    2013-01-01

    The authors share herein their experience with an antegrade brachial access for treatment of patients presenting with arteriovenous angiodysplasia localizing on the distal portions of the upper limbs, also describing the choice of the site for puncture and the technique of antegrade catheterization of the brachial artery. This is followed by reporting the results of successful use of this access in a total of 27 patients. The access is simple to create, making it possible to easily perform the intervention using instruments of standard length. It is also safe, requires no bed rest in the postoperative period, and is well tolerated by the patients.

  12. The blind pushing technique for peripherally inserted central catheter placement through brachial vein puncture.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Myeong; Cho, Young Kwon; Kim, Han Myun; Song, Myung Gyu; Song, Soon-Young; Yeon, Jae Woo; Yoon, Dae Young; Lee, Sam Yeol

    2018-03-01

    The objective of this study was to conduct a prospective clinical trial evaluating the technical feasibility and short-term clinical outcome of the blind pushing technique for placement of pretrimmed peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) through brachial vein access. Patients requiring PICC placement at any of the three participating institutions were prospectively enrolled between January and December 2016. The review boards of all participating institutions approved this study, and informed consent was obtained from all patients. PICC placement was performed using the blind pushing technique and primary brachial vein access. The following data were collected from unified case report forms: access vein, obstacles during PICC advancement, procedure time, and postprocedural complications. During the 12-month study period, 1380 PICCs were placed in 1043 patients. Of these, 1092 PICCs placed in 837 patients were enrolled, with 834 PICCs (76%) and 258 PICCs (34%) placed through brachial vein and nonbrachial vein access, respectively. In both arms, obstacles were most commonly noted in the subclavian veins (n = 220) and axillary veins (n = 94). Successful puncture of the access vein was achieved at first try in 1028 PICCs (94%). The technical success rate was 99%, with 1055 PICCs (97%) placed within 120 seconds of procedure time and 1088 PICCs (99%) having the tip located at the ideal position. Follow-up Doppler ultrasound detected catheter-associated upper extremity deep venous thrombosis (UEDVT) for 18 PICCs in 16 patients and late symptomatic UEDVT for 16 PICCs in 16 patients (3.1%). Catheter-associated UEDVT was noted for 28 PICCs (82%) and 6 PICCs (18%) placed through brachial vein and nonbrachial vein access, respectively. The incidence of obstacles and the procedure time (<120 seconds) differed significantly between brachial vein and nonbrachial vein access (P = .001). There was no statistically significant difference between brachial vein and

  13. Sup-ER orthosis: an innovative treatment for infants with birth related brachial plexus injury.

    PubMed

    Durlacher, Kim M; Bellows, Doria; Verchere, Cynthia

    2014-01-01

    Impairments in active and passive range of upper extremity supination and shoulder external rotation are common sequelae for children with delayed recovery from birth related brachial plexus injury. Orthotic intervention may complement traditional treatment strategies commonly employed in the newborn period. These authors describe their custom fabricated orthosis designed to balance shoulder growth and muscular function, and improve prognosis of long term functional outcomes for children with birth related brachial plexus injury. - Victoria Priganc, PhD, OTR, CHT, CLT, Practice Forum Editor. Copyright © 2014 Hanley & Belfus. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Brachial plexus injury management through upper extremity amputation with immediate postoperative prostheses.

    PubMed

    Malone, J M; Leal, J M; Underwood, J; Childers, S J

    1982-02-01

    Management of patients with brachial plexus injuries requires a team approach so that all aspects of their care are addressed simultaneously. This report examines elective amputation and prosthetic rehabilitation in a patient with brachial plexus avulsion of the left arm. The best possibility for good prosthetic rehabilitation is the early application of prosthetic devices with intensive occupational therapy. Using this type of approach, we have achieved significant improvement in amputation rehabilitation of upper extremity amputees treated with immediate postoperative conventional electric and myoelectric prostheses.

  15. True Brachial Artery Aneurysm in a Patient with Vascular Access for Haemodialysis and Kidney Graft.

    PubMed

    Correia, Mafalda; Marinho, André; Mendes, Carolina; Antunes, Luís; Gonçalves, Óscar

    2017-01-01

    True brachial artery aneurysms are rare and some of them have been described as a late complication in patients with vascular access for haemodialysis and kidney graft. The purpose of this paper is to present a clinical case of a patient with a true brachial artery aneurysm and its following treatment. This case concerns a caucasian male patient with 43 years old who had vesicoureteral reflux at 7 years old, and subsequent end-stage renal disease, and started on haemodialysis at the age of twelve. The patient had homolateral radial and brachiocephalic arteriovenous fistulas (AVF), two sequential kidney grafts and was under immunosuppressant therapy for several years. As part of the medical history he also had bilateral amaurosis, Hepatitis B and C and was submitted to total parathyroidectomy and a following auto-transplant. In the latest years the patient presented with several aneurysms related to the vascular access. After the finding of an anastomotic false aneurysm and venous aneurysms complicating the AVF, the patient had removal of the aneurysms and ligation of the AVF. Later, he was diagnosed, in different times, with two true brachial artery aneurysms. At the time of the diagnosis of the first true aneurysm, the patient presented with local pain and occasional paraesthesias relative to compression symptoms. At physical examination the patient had a brachial pulsatile mass and a palpable radial pulse. The Doppler ultrasound exam revealed a true brachial artery aneurysm with 4,5 cm diameter. After two years, the patient was once again diagnosed with a true brachial artery aneurysm with 3,1 cm diameter. At this time the patient was asymptomatic and had palpable brachial mass and radial pulse. At the time of the diagnosis of the first true brachial aneurysm the patient was submitted to partial aneurysmectomy and brachiobrachial graft with PTFE 8. The patency of the graft persisted until the diagnosis of the second aneurysm. After two years, the patient was

  16. Reliability and discriminative validity of sudden ankle inversion measurements in patients with chronic ankle instability.

    PubMed

    Eechaute, Christophe; Vaes, Peter; Duquet, William; Van Gheluwe, Bart

    2009-07-01

    Studies investigating peroneal muscle reaction times in chronically unstable ankle joints present conflicting results. The degree of reliability and accuracy of these measurements is unknown in patients with chronic ankle instability (CAI). 40 patients with CAI and 30 healthy subjects were tested using a sudden ankle inversion of 50 degrees while standing on a trapdoor device. Sudden ankle inversion measurements were registered using electromyography, accelerometry and electrogoniometry. For reliability testing, intra-class coefficients (ICCs; model 3,1) and standard errors of measurements of the latency time, motor response time and electromechanical delay of the peroneus longus muscle, the time and angular position of onset of decelerations, the mean and maximum inversion speed and the total inversion time were calculated in 15 patients with CAI. To assess between-group differences, t-tests for independent samples (p<.05) were used. ICCs ranged from .20 (angular position of onset of the second deceleration) to .98 (electromechanical delay of the peroneus longus muscle). Significant between-group differences were observed in only 2 of the 12 variables (for the electromechanical delay of the peroneus longus muscle, p=.001; time of onset of the second deceleration, p=.040). The latency time and motor response time of the peroneus longus muscle, the total inversion time and the mean inversion speed demonstrate acceptable reliability in healthy subjects and patients. The latency time and motor response time of the peroneus longus muscle are not delayed in patients with CAI. Ankle inversion measurements are not discriminative for CAI.

  17. Does the subtalar joint compensate for ankle malalignment in end-stage ankle arthritis?

    PubMed

    Wang, Bibo; Saltzman, Charles L; Chalayon, Ornusa; Barg, Alexej

    2015-01-01

    Patients with ankle arthritis often present with concomitant hindfoot deformity, which may involve the tibiotalar and subtalar joints. However, the possible compensatory mechanisms of these two mechanically linked joints are not well known. In this study we sought to (1) compare ankle and hindfoot alignment of our study cohort with end-stage ankle arthritis with that of a control group; (2) explore the frequency of compensated malalignment between the tibiotalar and subtalar joints in our study cohort; and (3) assess the intraobserver and interobserver reliability of classification methods of hindfoot alignment used in this study. Between March 2006 and September 2013, we performed 419 ankle arthrodesis and ankle replacements (380 patients). In this study, we evaluated radiographs for 233 (56%) ankles (226 patients) which met the following inclusion criteria: (1) no prior subtalar arthrodesis; (2) no previously failed total ankle replacement or ankle arthrodesis; (3) with complete conventional radiographs (all three ankle views were required: mortise, lateral, and hindfoot alignment view). Ankle and hindfoot alignment was assessed by measurement of the medial distal tibial angle, tibial talar surface angle, talar tilting angle, tibiocalcaneal axis angle, and moment arm of calcaneus. The obtained values were compared with those observed in the control group of 60 ankles from 60 people. Only those without obvious degenerative changes of the tibiotalar and subtalar joints and without previous surgeries of the ankle or hindfoot were included in the control group. Demographic data for the patients with arthritis and the control group were comparable (sex, p=0.321; age, p=0.087). The frequency of compensated malalignment between the tibiotalar and subtalar joints, defined as tibiocalcaneal angle or moment arm of the calcaneus being greater or smaller than the same 95% CI statistical cutoffs from the control group, was tallied. All ankle radiographs were independently

  18. Effects of Nintendo Wii Fit Plus training on ankle strength with functional ankle instability.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki-Jong; Jun, Hyun-Ju; Heo, Myoung

    2015-11-01

    [Purpose] The objective of this study was to examine the effects of a training program using the Nintendo Wii Fit Plus on the ankle muscle strengths of subjects with functional ankle instability. [Subjects and Methods] This study was conducted using subjects in their 20s who had functional ankle instability. They were randomized to a strengthening training group and a balance training group with 10 subjects in each, and they performed an exercise using Nintendo Wii Fit Plus for 20 minutes. In addition, every participant completed preparation and finishing exercises for 5 minutes, respectively. [Results] The muscle strengths after conducting plantar flexion and dorsiflexion significantly increased at the angular velocities of 60° and 120° in the strengthening training group. Furthermore, the muscle strengths after conducting plantar flexion, dorsiflexion, eversion, and inversion significantly increased at the angular velocities of 60° and 120° in the balance training group. [Conclusion] The balance training group using Nintendo Wii Fit Plus showed better results than the strengthening training group. Consequently, it is recommended to add the balance training program of the Nintendo Wii Fit Plus to conventional exercise programs to improve ankle muscle strength in functional ankle instability at a low cost.

  19. Effects of Nintendo Wii Fit Plus training on ankle strength with functional ankle instability

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ki-Jong; Jun, Hyun-Ju; Heo, Myoung

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The objective of this study was to examine the effects of a training program using the Nintendo Wii Fit Plus on the ankle muscle strengths of subjects with functional ankle instability. [Subjects and Methods] This study was conducted using subjects in their 20s who had functional ankle instability. They were randomized to a strengthening training group and a balance training group with 10 subjects in each, and they performed an exercise using Nintendo Wii Fit Plus for 20 minutes. In addition, every participant completed preparation and finishing exercises for 5 minutes, respectively. [Results] The muscle strengths after conducting plantar flexion and dorsiflexion significantly increased at the angular velocities of 60° and 120° in the strengthening training group. Furthermore, the muscle strengths after conducting plantar flexion, dorsiflexion, eversion, and inversion significantly increased at the angular velocities of 60° and 120° in the balance training group. [Conclusion] The balance training group using Nintendo Wii Fit Plus showed better results than the strengthening training group. Consequently, it is recommended to add the balance training program of the Nintendo Wii Fit Plus to conventional exercise programs to improve ankle muscle strength in functional ankle instability at a low cost. PMID:26696703

  20. Intrinsic ankle stiffness during standing increases with ankle torque and passive stretch of the Achilles tendon

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Jaspret

    2018-01-01

    Individuals may stand with a range of ankle angles. Furthermore, shoes or floor surfaces may elevate or depress their heels. Here we ask how these situations impact ankle stiffness and balance. We performed two studies (each with 10 participants) in which the triceps surae, Achilles tendon and aponeurosis were stretched either passively, by rotating the support surface, or actively by leaning forward. Participants stood freely on footplates which could rotate around the ankle joint axis. Brief, small stiffness-measuring perturbations (<0.7 deg; 140 ms) were applied at intervals of 4–5 s. In study 1, participants stood at selected angles of forward lean. In study 2, normal standing was compared with passive dorsiflexion induced by 15 deg toes-up tilt of the support surface. Smaller perturbations produced higher stiffness estimates, but for all perturbation sizes stiffness increased with active torque or passive stretch. Sway was minimally affected by stretch or lean, suggesting that this did not underlie the alterations in stiffness. In quiet stance, maximum ankle stiffness is limited by the tendon. As tendon strain increases, it becomes stiffer, causing an increase in overall ankle stiffness, which would explain the effects of leaning. However, stiffness also increased considerably with passive stretch, despite a modest torque increase. We discuss possible explanations for this increase. PMID:29558469

  1. Movement Strategies among Groups of Chronic Ankle Instability, Coper, and Control.

    PubMed

    Son, S Jun; Kim, Hyunsoo; Seeley, Matthew K; Hopkins, J Ty

    2017-08-01

    Comprehensive evaluation of movement strategies during functional movement is a difficult undertaking. Because of this challenge, studied movements have been oversimplified. Furthermore, evaluating movement strategies at only a discrete time point(s) provide limited insight into how movement strategies may change or adapt in chronic ankle instability (CAI) patients. This study aimed to identify abnormal movement strategies in individuals with a history of ankle sprain injury during a sports maneuver compared with healthy controls. Sixty-six participants, consisting of 22 CAI patients, 22 ankle sprain copers, and 22 healthy controls, participated in this study. Functional profiles of lower extremity kinematics, kinetics, and EMG activation from initial contact (0% of stance) to toe-off (100% of stance) were collected and analyzed during a jump landing/cutting task using a functional data analysis approach. Compared with copers, CAI patients displayed landing positions of less plantarflexion, less inversion, more knee flexion, more hip flexion, and less hip abduction during the first 25% of stance. However, restricted dorsiflexion angle was observed in both CAI patients and copers relative to controls during the midlanding to mid-side-cutting phase when the ankle and knee reached its peak range of motion (e.g., dorsiflexion and knee flexion). Reduced EMG activation of tibialis anterior, peroneus longus, medial gastrocnemius, and gluteus medius may be due to altered kinematics that reduce muscular demands on the involved muscles. CAI patients displayed altered movement strategies, perhaps in an attempt to avoid perceived positions of risk. Although sagittal joint positions seemed to increase the external torque on the knee and hip extensors, frontal joint positions appeared to reduce the muscular demands on evertor and hip abductor muscles.

  2. Hindfoot arthroscopic surgery for posterior ankle impingement: a systematic surgical approach and case series.

    PubMed

    Smyth, Niall A; Murawski, Christopher D; Levine, David S; Kennedy, John G

    2013-08-01

    Hindfoot arthroscopic surgery has been described as a minimally invasive surgical treatment for posterior ankle impingement syndrome. The current article describes a systematic approach for identifying relevant hindfoot structures as well as the clinical results of a case series. To present a structured systematic surgical approach for identifying relevant anatomic structures and abnormalities during hindfoot arthroscopic surgery. In addition, we report the clinical results of a case series. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. The systematic surgical approach divides the extra-articular structures of the hindfoot into quadrants as defined by the intermalleolar ligament. Twenty-two patients underwent hindfoot arthroscopic surgery for the treatment of posterior ankle impingement syndrome. The mean follow-up time was 25 months (range, 14-35 months). Standard patient-reported outcome questionnaires of the foot and ankle outcome score (FAOS) and Short Form-12 (SF-12) general health survey were administered at standard time points after surgery. Return to sporting activities was also calculated as the time period from the date of surgery until the patient was able to participate at their previous level of activity. The mean FAOS score improved from 59 (range, 22-94) preoperatively to 86 (range, 47-100) postoperatively (P < .01). The mean SF-12 score showed similar improvement with a mean of 66 (range, 42-96) preoperatively to 86 (range, 56-98) postoperatively (P < .01). Nineteen patients reported competing at some level of athletic sport before surgery. All patients returned to their previous level of competition after surgery. The mean time to return to sporting activities was 12 weeks (range, 6-16 weeks). Two complications were reported postoperatively: 1 wound infection and 1 case of dysesthesia of the deep peroneal nerve. Hindfoot arthroscopic surgery is a safe and effective treatment strategy for posterior ankle impingement syndrome. In addition, it allows the

  3. Ankle sprain as a work-related accident: status of proprioception after 2 weeks

    PubMed Central

    González-Iñigo, Salvador; Lafuente-Sotillos, Guillermo

    2017-01-01

    Purpose This study aims at verifying whether proprioception is abnormal or not, two weeks after a grade 1 and 2 ankle sprain in the scope of work-related accident. Methods A descriptive, observation and transversal study was designed to compare speed, movement and oscilation of centre of pressure in employees of companies signed up to a mutual company. Participants’ healthy feet comprised the control group, and feet that had undergone an ankle sprain due to a work-related accident comprised the cases group. The following stability tests were undertaken to both the healthy and injuried feet using a force plate: Monopodal Romberg test with eyes open, Monopodal Romberg test with eyes open on a 30 mm thick foam rubber, Monopodal Romberg test with eyes closed, and Romberg test as monopodal support with eyes closed on a 30 mm thick foam rubber. A multiple logistic regression analysis was performed. From the results of this regression model the COR curve test was performed. Results 71.7% accuracy in the predictions was attained. The equation was as follows: Condition (injured or healthy) = 0.052⋅% RGC AP Movement − 0.81⋅MREO AP Movement. The variable MREO antero-posterior movement was used in the COR curve methodology. The area under the curve was greater than 0.65 and at a 95% confidence interval the 0.75 value was included, which in our case was the injured subject condition. Values for sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value were 0.667, 0.633, 64.5%, and 65.5%, respectively. Conclusion The participants in this study showed a diminished capacity for postural control in an ankle two weeks after an ankle sprain. PMID:29259844

  4. Patient satisfaction and disability after brachial plexus surgery.

    PubMed

    Kretschmer, Thomas; Ihle, Sarah; Antoniadis, Gregor; Seidel, Julia A; Heinen, Christian; Börm, Wolfgang; Richter, Hans-Peter; König, Ralph

    2009-10-01

    Little is known about patient satisfaction and disability after brachial plexus surgery. Would patients undergo the procedure again, if they knew the current result beforehand? How do they rate their result and their disability? Of 319 plexus patients who had undergone surgery between 1995 and 2005, 199 received a 65-item questionnaire. Measurement instruments included a new plexus-specific outcome questionnaire (Ulm Questionnaire) with categories of satisfaction, functionality, pain, comorbidities, and work; and the disability of the arm, shoulder, and hand questionnaire (DASH; scale, 0-100). Of 99 returned questionnaires, 70 were returned in a useful form for evaluation. The results of patients with C5-C6 lesions (21 of 70) are as follows: 90% (19 of 21) would undergo surgery again, 95% (20 of 21) were satisfied with the result, and 86% (18 of 21) subjectively improved. The mean DASH score was 41 (standard deviation [SD], 24). The results of patients with C5-C7 lesions (6 of 70) are as follows: 50% (3 of 6) were satisfied and would undergo surgery again, and 67% (4 of 6) improved. The mean DASH score was 46 (SD, 13). The results of patients with C5-T1 lesions (43 of 70) are as follows: 67% (29 of 43) would undergo surgery again, 81% (35 of 42) were satisfied, and 74% (32 of 43) reported improvement. The mean DASH score was 58 (SD, 26). The overall mean DASH score was 52 (SD, 26). Pain since the injury was prevalent in 86% of patients (60 of 70), back pain in 53%, and depression/anxiety in 21%. Fifty-two percent of those who worked before their injury (27 of 53 patients) remained unemployed or incapacitated for work. Forty-five percent of previous workers (24 of 53) returned to their former occupation. Occupational retraining was successful for 70% of patients (16 of 23). The mean duration until return to work was 9 months overall and 5 months for those who returned to their previous occupation. Eighty-seven percent of patients were satisfied with the results and

  5. Ankle Plantarflexor Spasticity Does Not Restrict the Recovery of Ankle Plantarflexor Strength or Ankle Power Generation for Push-Off During Walking Following Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Williams, Gavin; Banky, Megan; Olver, John

    2016-01-01

    The main aim of this project was to determine the impact of plantarflexor spasticity on muscle performance for ambulant people with traumatic brain injury (TBI). A large metropolitan rehabilitation hospital. Seventy-two ambulant people with TBI who were attending physiotherapy for mobility limitations. Twenty-four participants returned for a 6-month follow-up reassessment. Cross-sectional cohort study. Self-selected walking speed, Tardieu scale, ankle plantarflexor strength, and ankle power generation (APG). Participants with ankle plantarflexor spasticity had significantly lower self-selected walking speed; however, there was no significant difference in ankle plantarflexor strength or APG. Participants with ankle plantarflexor spasticity were not restricted in the recovery of self-selected walking speed, ankle plantarflexor strength, or APG, indicating equivalent ability to improve their mobility over time despite the presence of spasticity. Following TBI, people with ankle plantarflexor spasticity have significantly greater mobility limitations than those without spasticity, yet retain the capacity for recovery of self-selected walking speed, ankle plantarflexor strength, and APG.

  6. Stress fractures of the foot and ankle.

    PubMed

    Welck, M J; Hayes, T; Pastides, P; Khan, W; Rudge, B

    2017-08-01

    Stress fractures occur as a result of microscopic injuries sustained when bone is subjected to repeated submaximal stresses. Overtime, with repeated cycles of loading, accumulation of such injuries can lead to macro-structural failure and frank fracture. There are numerous stress fractures about the foot and ankle of which a trauma and orthopaedic surgeon should be aware. These include: metatarsal, tibia, calcaneus, navicular, fibula, talus, medial malleolus, sesamoid, cuneiform and cuboid. Awareness of these fractures is important as the diagnosis is frequently missed and appropriate treatment delayed. Late identification can be associated with protracted pain and disability, and may predispose to non-union and therefore necessitate operative intervention. This article outlines the epidemiology and risk factors, aetiology, presentation and management of the range of stress fractures in the foot and ankle. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Foot fractures frequently misdiagnosed as ankle sprains.

    PubMed

    Judd, Daniel B; Kim, David H

    2002-09-01

    Most ankle injuries are straightforward ligamentous injuries. However, the clinical presentation of subtle fractures can be similar to that of ankle sprains, and these fractures are frequently missed on initial examination. Fractures of the talar dome may be medial or lateral, and they are usually the result of inversion injuries, although medial injuries may be atraumatic. Lateral talar process fractures are characterized by point tenderness over the lateral process. Posterior talar process fractures are often associated with tenderness to deep palpation anterior to the Achilles tendon over the posterolateral talus, and plantar flexion may exacerbate the pain. These fractures can often be managed nonsurgically with nonweight-bearing status and a short leg cast worn for approximately four weeks. Delays in treatment can result in long-term disability and surgery. Computed tomographic scans or magnetic resonance imaging may be required because these fractures are difficult to detect on plain films.

  8. Pediatric Ankle Fractures: Concepts and Treatment Principles

    PubMed Central

    Su, Alvin W.; Larson, A. Noelle

    2016-01-01

    Synopsis Current clinical concepts are reviewed regarding the epidemiology, anatomy, evaluation and treatment of pediatric ankle fractures. Correct diagnosis and management relies on appropriate exam, imaging, and knowledge of fracture patterns specific to children. Treatment is guided by patient history, physical examination, plain film radiographs and, in some instances, CT. Treatment goals are to restore acceptable limb alignment, physeal anatomy, and joint congruency. For high risk physeal fractures, patients should be monitored for growth disturbance as needed until skeletal maturity. PMID:26589088

  9. Ankle Injuries and Disorders - Multiple Languages

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cantonese dialect) (繁體中文) French (français) Hindi (हिन्दी) Japanese (日本語) Korean (한국어) Nepali (नेपाली) Russian (Русский) ... हिन्दी (Hindi) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Japanese (日本語) Expand Section Ankle Exercises - 日本語 (Japanese) Bilingual ...

  10. Ankle taping: support given by different materials.

    PubMed Central

    Capasso, G; Maffulli, N; Testa, V

    1989-01-01

    Three different adhesive and two non-adhesive tapes were used by three operators to assess the compressive action exerted on the ankle at the moment of strapping, during different phases of gait, and after some days of treatment in ten volunteers. Only the adhesive tapes were still able to prevent swelling after five days. They should be used if a prolonged compressive action is required. Images Figure 1 PMID:2517042

  11. Open ankle arthrodeses via an anterior approach.

    PubMed

    Gordon, David; Zicker, Robyn; Cullen, Nicholas; Singh, Dishan

    2013-03-01

    In open ankle arthrodesis, debate remains as to which surgical approach and fixation devices should be used. The purpose of this study was to identify union, complication, and patient satisfaction rates of ankle fusions performed at our institution, using the plane between extensor hallucis longus and tibialis anterior with medial tibiotalar screw internal fixation. A retrospective review was performed of all isolated primary fusions between 2005 and 2009. Eighty-two ankles were identified in 73 patients. All patient records were reviewed, and 57 patients (65 ankles) attended for clinical evaluation and scoring. Age range at surgery was 18 to 75 years (mean, 56.1 years); 8 patients were smokers. Diagnoses were trauma in 52 patients (63%), osteoarthritis in 17, rheumatoid arthritis in 7, Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease in 3, congenital talipes equinovarus in 2, and talar avascular necrosis in 1. Follow-up range was 7 months to 8.3 years (mean, 4 years). Time to union ranged from 8 to 39 weeks (mean, 13.3) with a union rate of 100%. The AOFAS range was 12 to 93 (mean, 70). Eighty percent were "very satisfied" or "satisfied." Major complication rate was 14.6%: 7 malalignments; 3 wound problems; 2 complex regional pain syndrome; and 2 delayed unions, both smokers. An excellent union rate, high patient satisfaction, and low complication rate were achieved with this technique. Varus malalignment and persistent pain resulted in dissatisfaction. Many patients remained highly active, and bilaterally fused patients functioned as well as unilateral ones. Level IV, retrospective case series.

  12. Osteochondral injuries of the foot and ankle.

    PubMed

    Frost, Andrew; Roach, Richard

    2009-06-01

    Osteochondral injuries commonly affect the ankle joint and involve the dome of the talus. This article describes the etiology and pathogenesis of these injuries. Their clinical presentation is described and advice is given on how to diagnose and investigate suspected osteochondral injuries. The various treatment options currently available are briefly reviewed. There is some attempt made to give consensus on optimal treatment of this condition at the present time.

  13. Biomechanical Evaluation of a Prototype Foot/Ankle Prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Quesada, P. M.; Pitkin, M.; Colvin, J.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we report on our pilot evaluation of a prototype foot/ankle prosthesis. This prototype has been designed and fabricated with the intention of providing decreased ankle joint stiffness during the middle portion of the stance phase of gait, and increased (i.e., more normal) knee range of motion during stance. Our evaluation involved fitting the existing prototype foot/ankle prosthesis, as well as a traditional solid ankle cushioned heel (SACH) foot, to an otherwise healthy volunteer with a below-knee (BK) amputation. We measured this individual’s lower extremity joint kinematics and kinetics during walking using a video motion analysis system and force platform. These measurements permitted direct comparison of prosthetic ankle joint stiffness and involved side knee joint motion, as well as prosthetic ankle joint moment and power. PMID:10779119

  14. Neuromuscular control and rehabilitation of the unstable ankle

    PubMed Central

    Hung, You-jou

    2015-01-01

    Lateral ankle sprain is a common orthopedic injury with a very high recurrence rate in athletes. After decades of research, it is still unclear what contributes to the high recurrence rate of ankle sprain, and what is the most effective intervention to reduce the incident of initial and recurrent injuries. In addition, clinicians often implement balance training as part of the rehabilitation protocol in hopes of enhancing the neuromuscular control and proprioception of the ankle joint. However, there is no consensus on whether the neuromuscular control and proprioception are compromised in unstable ankles. To reduce the prevalence of ankle sprains, the effectiveness of engaging balance training to enhance the neuromuscular control and proprioception of the ankle joint is also questionable. PMID:26085985

  15. Postural steadiness and ankle force variability in peripheral neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Paxton, Roger J.; Feldman-Kothe, Caitlin; Trabert, Megan K.; Hitchcock, Leah N.; Reiser, Raoul F.; Tracy, Brian L.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The purpose was to determine the effect of peripheral neuropathy (PN) on motor output variability for ankle muscles of older adults, and the relation between ankle motor variability and postural stability in PN patients. Methods Older adults with (O-PN) and without PN (O), and young adults (Y) underwent assessment of standing postural stability and ankle muscle force steadiness. Results O-PN displayed impaired ankle muscle force control and postural stability compared with O and Y groups. For O-PN, the amplitude of plantarflexor force fluctuations was moderately correlated with postural stability under no-vision conditions (r = 0.54, P = 0.01). Discussion The correlation of variations in ankle force with postural stability in PN suggests a contribution of ankle muscle dyscontrol to the postural instability that impacts physical function for older adults with PN. PMID:26284897

  16. [Advances on biomechanics and kinematics of sprain of ankle joint].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yong; Wang, Gang

    2015-04-01

    Ankle sprains are orthopedic clinical common disease, accounting for joint ligament sprain of the first place. If treatment is not timely or appropriate, the joint pain and instability maybe develop, and even bone arthritis maybe develop. The mechanism of injury of ankle joint, anatomical basis has been fully study at present, and the diagnostic problem is very clear. Along with the development of science and technology, biological modeling and three-dimensional finite element, three-dimensional motion capture system,digital technology study, electromyographic signal study were used for the basic research of sprain of ankle. Biomechanical and kinematic study of ankle sprain has received adequate attention, combined with the mechanism research of ankle sprain,and to explore the the biomechanics and kinematics research progress of the sprain of ankle joint.

  17. Recent Developments in the Treatment of Ankle and Subtalar Instability

    PubMed Central

    Sugimoto, Kazuya

    2017-01-01

    It was nearly a centenary ago that severe ankle sprain was recognized as an injury of the ankle ligament(s). With the recent technological advances and tools in imaging and surgical procedures, the management of ankle sprains - including subtalar injuries - has drastically improved. The repair or reconstruction of ankle ligaments is getting more anatomical and less invasive than previously. More specifically, ligamentous reconstruction with tendon graft has been the gold standard in the management of severely damaged ligament, however, it does not reproduce the original ultrastructure of the ankle ligaments. The anatomical ligament structure of a ligament comprises a ligament with enthesis at both ends and the structure should also exhibit proprioceptive function. To date, it remains impossible to reconstruct a functionally intact and anatomical ligament. Cooperation of the regenerative medicine and surgical technology in expected to improve reconstructions of the ankle ligament, however, we need more time to develop a technology in reproducing the ideal ligament complex. PMID:28979582

  18. Peroneal nerve palsy after ankle sprain: an update.

    PubMed

    Mitsiokapa, Evanthia; Mavrogenis, Andreas F; Drakopoulos, Dionysis; Mauffrey, Cyril; Scarlat, Marius

    2017-01-01

    Ankle sprains are extremely common in the general population and the most common injuries in athletes. Although rare, peroneal nerve palsy may occur simultaneously with ankle sprain. The exact incidence of nerve injury after ankle sprain is not known; few cases of peroneal nerve palsy associated with ankle sprains have been reported in the literature. The function of the peroneal nerve should be evaluated in all patients with a history of inversion ankle sprain as part of the initial and follow-up evaluation, even if the initial neurological status is normal, because delayed peroneal nerve palsy is possible. This article discusses the incidence, pathophysiology, evaluation, diagnosis and differential diagnosis, and management of the patients with peroneal nerve palsy after ankle sprain aiming to increase the awareness of the treating physicians for this nerve injury.

  19. Radiographic evaluation of the ankle syndesmosis.

    PubMed

    Croft, Stephen; Furey, Andrew; Stone, Craig; Moores, Carl; Wilson, Robert

    2015-02-01

    Radiographic measurements to document ankle anatomy have been suggested in recent literature to be inadequate. Focus has been put on stress views and computed tomography; however, there are also issues with these modalities. An orthogonal view that could be used both statically and dynamically could help determine syndesmotic stability. The purpose of this study was to determine a parameter on a normal lateral ankle radiograph that will increase the reliability of standard radiography in diagnosing syndesmotic integrity. Three orthopedic surgeons reviewed 80 lateral ankle radiographs. Thirty of those radiographs were reviewed on a second occasion. Rotation of the radiographs was determined by evaluating the overlap of the talar dome. Four radiographic parameters were measured 1 cm above the tibial plafond: fibular width, tibial width, and anterior and posterior tibiofibular intervals. Seventy-two radiographs were determined by consensus to be adequate. Means and ratios were documented to determine the relationship of the fibula to the tibia. Interrater reliability ranged from moderate to near-perfect, and the intrarater reliability was documented for each ratio. The anterior tibiofibular ratio was shown to be strong to near-perfect. It demonstrates that 40% of the tibia should be seen anterior to the fibula at 1cm above the tibial plafond. The anterior tibiofibular ratio provides an orthogonal measure for the syndesmosis that, in conjunction with those parameters previously documented, could clinically and economically improve the diagnosis of syndesmotic disruptions.

  20. [Ligamentous injuries to the ankle joint].

    PubMed

    Rammelt, S; Schneiders, W; Grass, R; Rein, S; Zwipp, H

    2011-10-01

    Injuries to the lateral ankle ligaments are the most common sports injuries. Determination of their severity and exclusion of relevant accompanying injuries requires a subtle clinical and a focussed radiological assessment. Treatment is non-operative and functional in the majority of cases. Consequent application of orthoses limiting supination and proprioceptive training are essential to avoid chronic instability. With recurrent ankle sprains one has to distinguish between functional and mechanical instability. The latter can be treated successfully with anatomic reconstruction and ligamentoplasty in more than 80 % of cases. Extraanatomic tenodeses should be reserved for cases of combined ankle and subtalar instability. Isolated injuries to the medial collateral ligaments are rare. Therefore, osseous injuries or underlying deformities have to be excluded. Isolated deltoid ligament ruptures may be treated non-operatively. Unstable injuries to the distal tibiofibular syndesmosis resulting in a manifest or latent diastasis are treated with open reduction and fixation with two tibiofibular set screws. Anatomic reduction of the distal fibula into the tibial groove is of utmost prognostic relevance and therefore should be reliably proved with either intraoperative 3D fluoroscopy or postoperative CT scanning. For chronic syndesmotic instability an anatomic ligamentoplasty using half the peroneus longus tendon is recommended. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  1. Rehabilitation of Ankle and Foot Injuries in Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Chinn, Lisa; Hertel, Jay

    2009-01-01

    Foot and ankle injuries are extremely common among athletes and other physically active individuals. Rehabilitation programs that emphasize the use of therapeutic exercise to restore joint range of motion, muscle strength, neuromuscular coordination, and gait mechanics have been shown to have clinical success for patients suffering various foot and ankle pathologies. Rehabilitation programs are discussed for ankle sprains, plantar fasciitis, Achilles tendonitis, and turf toe. PMID:19945591

  2. Assessment and management of patients with ankle injuries.

    PubMed

    Walker, Jennie

    2014-08-19

    Foot and ankle injuries are common and can have a significant effect on an individual's daily activities. Nurses have an important role in the assessment, management, ongoing care and support of patients with ankle injuries. An understanding of the anatomy and physiology of the ankle enables nurses to identify significant injuries, which may result in serious complications, and communicate effectively with the multidisciplinary team to improve patient care and outcomes.

  3. Design, modelling and simulation aspects of an ankle rehabilitation device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Racu, C. M.; Doroftei, I.

    2016-08-01

    Ankle injuries are amongst the most common injuries of the lower limb. Besides initial treatment, rehabilitation of the patients plays a crucial role for future activities and proper functionality of the foot. Traditionally, ankle injuries are rehabilitated via physiotherapy, using simple equipment like elastic bands and rollers, requiring intensive efforts of therapists and patients. Thus, the need of robotic devices emerges. In this paper, the design concept and some modelling and simulation aspects of a novel ankle rehabilitation device are presented.

  4. Developing a Framework for Ankle Function: A Delphi Study

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Kelli R.; Evans, Todd A.; Neibert, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Addressing clinical outcomes is paramount to providing effective health care, yet there is no consensus regarding the appropriate outcomes to address after ankle injuries. Compounding the problem is the repetitive nature of lateral ankle sprains, referred to as functional (FAI) or chronic (CAI) ankle instability. Although they are commonly used terms in practice and research, FAI and CAI are inconsistently defined and assessed. Objective: To establish definitions of a healthy/normal/noninjured ankle, FAI, and CAI, as well as their characteristics and assessment techniques. Design: Delphi study. Setting: Telephone interviews and electronic surveys. Patients or Other Participants: Sixteen experts representing the fields of ankle function and treatment, ankle research, and outcomes assessment and research were selected as panelists. Data Collection and Analysis: A telephone interview produced feedback regarding the definition of, functional characteristics of, and assessment techniques for a healthy/normal/noninjured ankle, an unhealthy/acutely injured ankle, and FAI/CAI. Those data were compiled, reduced, and returned through electronic surveys and were either included by reaching consensus (80% agreement) or excluded. Results: The definitions of a healthy/normal/noninjured ankle and FAI reached consensus. Experts did not agree on a definition of CAI. Eleven functional characteristics of a healthy/normal/noninjured ankle, 32 functional characteristics of an unhealthy/acutely injured ankle, and 13 characteristics of FAI were agreed upon. Conclusions: Although a consensus was reached regarding the definitions and functional characteristics of a healthy/normal/noninjured ankle and FAI, the experts could only agree on 1 characteristic to include in the FAI definition. Several experts did, however, provide additional comments that reinforced the differences in the interpretation of those concepts. Although the experts could not agree on the definition of CAI, its

  5. Joint mobilization acutely improves landing kinematics in chronic ankle instability.

    PubMed

    Delahunt, Eamonn; Cusack, Kim; Wilson, Laura; Doherty, Cailbhe

    2013-03-01

    The objective of this study is to examine the acute effect of ankle joint mobilizations akin to those performed in everyday clinical practice on sagittal plane ankle joint kinematics during a single-leg drop landing in participants with chronic ankle instability (CAI). Fifteen participants with self-reported CAI (defined as <24 on the Cumberland Ankle Instability Tool) performed three single-leg drop landings under two different conditions: 1) premobilization and, 2) immediately, postmobilization. The mobilizations performed included Mulligan talocrural joint dorsiflexion mobilization with movement, Mulligan inferior tibiofibular joint mobilization, and Maitland anteroposterior talocrural joint mobilization. Three CODA cx1 units (Charnwood Dynamics Ltd., Leicestershire, UK) were used to provide information on ankle joint sagittal plane angular displacement. The dependent variable under investigation was the angle of ankle joint plantarflexion at the point of initial contact during the drop landing. There was a statistically significant acute decrease in the angle of ankle joint plantarflexion from premobilization (34.89° ± 4.18°) to postmobilization (31.90° ± 5.89°), t(14) = 2.62, P < 0.05 (two-tailed). The mean decrease in the angle of ankle joint plantarflexion as a result of the ankle joint mobilization was 2.98° with a 95% confidence interval ranging from 0.54 to 5.43. The eta squared statistic (0.32) indicated a large effect size. These results indicate that mobilization acted to acutely reduce the angle of ankle joint plantarflexion at initial contact during a single-leg drop landing. Mobilization applied to participants with CAI has a mechanical effect on the ankle joint, thus facilitating a more favorable positioning of the ankle joint when landing from a jump.

  6. Developing a framework for ankle function: a delphi study.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Kelli R; Evans, Todd A; Neibert, Peter J

    2014-01-01

    Addressing clinical outcomes is paramount to providing effective health care, yet there is no consensus regarding the appropriate outcomes to address after ankle injuries. Compounding the problem is the repetitive nature of lateral ankle sprains, referred to as functional (FAI) or chronic (CAI) ankle instability. Although they are commonly used terms in practice and research, FAI and CAI are inconsistently defined and assessed. To establish definitions of a healthy/normal/noninjured ankle, FAI, and CAI, as well as their characteristics and assessment techniques. Delphi study. Telephone interviews and electronic surveys. Sixteen experts representing the fields of ankle function and treatment, ankle research, and outcomes assessment and research were selected as panelists. A telephone interview produced feedback regarding the definition of, functional characteristics of, and assessment techniques for a healthy/normal/noninjured ankle, an unhealthy/acutely injured ankle, and FAI/CAI. Those data were compiled, reduced, and returned through electronic surveys and were either included by reaching consensus (80% agreement) or excluded. The definitions of a healthy/normal/noninjured ankle and FAI reached consensus. Experts did not agree on a definition of CAI. Eleven functional characteristics of a healthy/normal/noninjured ankle, 32 functional characteristics of an unhealthy/acutely injured ankle, and 13 characteristics of FAI were agreed upon. Although a consensus was reached regarding the definitions and functional characteristics of a healthy/normal/noninjured ankle and FAI, the experts could only agree on 1 characteristic to include in the FAI definition. Several experts did, however, provide additional comments that reinforced the differences in the interpretation of those concepts. Although the experts could not agree on the definition of CAI, its characteristics, or the preferred use of the terms FAI and CAI, our findings provide progress toward establishing

  7. Control of paraplegic ankle joint stiffness using FES while standing.

    PubMed

    Hunt, K J; Gollee, H; Jaime, R P

    2001-10-01

    The goal of this work was to investigate the feasibility of ankle stiffness control using functional electrical stimulation (FES) while standing, as relevant to the development of feedback systems for balance control in paraplegia. The work was carried out using apparatus in which the subject stands with all joints above the ankles braced, and where ankle moment is provided via FES of the ankle flexor and extensor muscles. A feedback control strategy for ankle stiffness control is proposed in which the ankle moment is controlled to a reference value equal to the product of the desired stiffness and the measured ankle angle. Two subjects participated in the study: one neurologically-intact person, and one paraplegic person with a complete thoracic spinal cord lesion. The results show that during forward-leaning postures, when the plantarflexor muscles are stimulated, relatively high ankle moments of up to 60 Nm can be generated and accurate moment tracking is achieved. As a consequence, ankle stiffness is close to the desired value. During backward lean, on the other hand, the dorsiflexor muscles are stimulated. These muscles are relatively weak and only modest ankle moments of up to around 15 Nm can be produced. As a result, dorsiflexor stimulation readily saturates giving poor stiffness control. It was further observed that when the desired stiffness is higher more external force has to be applied to perturb the body away from the neutral (upright) position. We conclude that: (i) accurate ankle stiffness control, up to the fundamental strength limits of the muscles, can be achieved with controlled FES; (ii) ankle stiffness control using FES in paraplegia has the potential to ease the task of stabilising upright posture by application of additional upper-body forces.

  8. Lateral ankle instability and revision surgery alternatives in the athlete.

    PubMed

    Schenck, Robert C; Coughlin, Michael J

    2009-06-01

    Ankle instability in the athlete is a common problem that is routinely treated non-operatively, with a 90% success rate. With proprioceptive training, preventive equipment (bracing/taping), and closed kinetic chain strengthening, surgery for ankle instability is uncommon. Nonetheless, some athletes present with recurrent ankle instability that, despite work-up and conservative treatment, requires surgical correction. The use of a primary ligament repair (Brostrom procedure) versus augmented (anatomic) reconstructions is discussed in detail in this article.

  9. Changes in active ankle dorsiflexion range of motion after acute inversion ankle sprain.

    PubMed

    Youdas, James W; McLean, Timothy J; Krause, David A; Hollman, John H

    2009-08-01

    Posterior calf stretching is believed to improve active ankle dorsiflexion range of motion (AADFROM) after acute ankle-inversion sprain. To describe AADFROM at baseline (postinjury) and at 2-wk time periods for 6 wk after acute inversion sprain. Randomized trial. Sports clinic. 11 men and 11 women (age range 11-54 y) with acute inversion sprain. Standardized home exercise program for acute inversion sprain. AADFROM with the knee extended. Time main effect on AADFROM was significant (F3,57 = 108, P < .001). At baseline, mean active sagittal-plane motion of the ankle was 6 degrees of plantar flexion, whereas at 2, 4, and 6 wk AADFROM was 7 degrees, 11 degrees, and 11 degrees, respectively. AADFROM increased significantly from baseline to week 2 and from week 2 to week 4. Normal AADFROM was restored within 4 wk after acute inversion sprain.

  10. Lenticular abnormalities in children.

    PubMed

    Khokhar, Sudarshan; Agarwal, Tushar; Kumar, Gaurav; Kushmesh, Rakhi; Tejwani, Lalit Kumar

    2012-01-01

    To study the lenticular problems in children presenting at an apex institute. Retrospective analysis of records (< 14 years) of new lens clinic cases was done. Of 1,047 children, 687 were males. Mean age at presentation was 6.35 ± 4.13 years. Developmental cataract was seen in 45.6% and posttraumatic cataract in 29.7% of patients. Other abnormalities were cataract with retinal detachment, persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous, subluxated lens, micro/spherophakia, cataract secondary to uveitis, intraocular lens complications, cataract with choroidal coloboma, and visual axis opacification. Developmental and posttraumatic cataracts were the most common abnormalities. Delayed presentation is of concern. Copyright 2012, SLACK Incorporated.

  11. Lateral ankle injury. Literature review and report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Pollard, Henry; Sim, Patrick; McHardy, Andrew

    2002-07-01

    Injury to the ankle joint is the most common peripheral joint injury. The sports that most commonly produce high ankle injury rates in their participating athletes include: basketball, netball, and the various codes of football. To provide an up to date understanding of manual therapy relevant to lateral ligament injury of the ankle. A discussion of the types of ligament injury and common complicating factors that present with lateral ankle pain is presented along with a review of relevant anatomy, assessment and treatment. Also included is a discussion of the efficacy of manual therapy in the treatment of ankle sprain. A detailed knowledge of the anatomy of the ankle as well as the early recognition of factors that may delay the rate of healing are important considerations when developing a management plan for inversion sprains of the ankle. This area appears to be under-researched however it was found that movement therapy and its various forms appear to be the most efficient and most effective method of treating uncomplicated ankle injury. Future investigations should involve a study to determine the effect chiropractic treatment (manipulation) may have on the injured ankle.

  12. The effects of tibiofibularis anterior ligaments on ankle joint biomechanics.

    PubMed

    Karakaşlı, Ahmet; Erduran, Mehmet; Baktıroğlu, Lütfü; Büdeyri, Aydın; Yıldız, Didem Venüs; Havıtçıoğlu, Hasan

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the biomechanical behavior of anterior inferior tibiofibularis ligament (AITFL) deficient human ankle under axial loading of ankle at stance phase of gait. In order to investigate the contribution of AITFL to ankle stability, an in vitro sequential experimental setup was simulated. The measurement of posterior displacement of distal tibia and anterior displacement of the foot, in neutral position, secondary to axial compression, was performed by two non-contact video extensometers. Eight freshly frozen, anatomically intact, cadaveric human ankle specimens were included and tested. An axial compression test machine was utilized from 0 to 800 Newtonswith a loading speed of 5 mm/min in order to simulate the axial weight-bearing sequence of the ankle at stance phase of human gait. There was a statistically significant difference between anteroposterior displacement values for AITFL-Intact and AITFL-Dissected specimens (p≤0.05). Mean AITFL-Intact and mean AITFL-Dissected ankle anteroposterior displacement was 1.28±0.47 mm and 2.06±0.7 mm, respectively. This study determined some numerical and quantitative data about the biomechanical properties of AITFL in neutral foot position. In the emergency department, diagnosis and treatment of AITFL injury, due to ankle distortion, is important. In AITFL injuries, ankle biomechanics is affected, and ankle instability occurs.

  13. [Dislocation of the ankle without simoustaneously fracture of the bones].

    PubMed

    Qayyum, Faiza; Qayyum, Abbas Ali; Sahlstrüm, Sven Arne

    2014-09-01

    The ankle is a unique modified saddle joint that, together with the subtalar joint, provides range of motion in several physical planes while maintaining stability. The ankle complex functions as a pivoting structure positioned to bear the entire weight of the body which leaves it vulnerable to injuries. Pure dislocation without associated fracture is rare; however, cases of isolated ankle dislocation without fracture have been reported. We report a case of a closed ankle dislocation without an associated fracture in a 17-year-old boy.

  14. Ankle arthritis: review of diagnosis and operative management.

    PubMed

    Grunfeld, Robert; Aydogan, Umur; Juliano, Paul

    2014-03-01

    The diagnostic and therapeutic options for ankle arthritis are reviewed. The current standard of care for nonoperative options include the use of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, corticosteroid injections, orthotics, and ankle braces. Other modalities lack high-quality research studies to delineate their appropriateness and effectiveness. The gold standard for operative intervention in end-stage degenerative arthritis remains arthrodesis, but evidence for the superiority in functional outcomes of total ankle arthroplasty is increasing. The next few years will enable more informed decisions and, with more prospective high-quality studies, the most appropriate patient population for total ankle arthroplasty can be identified. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Bilateral Proprioceptive Evaluation in Individuals With Unilateral Chronic Ankle Instability

    PubMed Central

    Sousa, Andreia S. P.; Leite, João; Costa, Bianca; Santos, Rubim

    2017-01-01

    Context: Despite extensive research on chronic ankle instability, the findings regarding proprioception have been conflicting and focused only on the injured limb. Also, the different components of proprioception have been evaluated in isolation. Objective: To evaluate bilateral ankle proprioception in individuals with unilateral ankle instability. Design: Cohort study. Setting: Research laboratory center in a university. Patients or Other Participants: Twenty-four individuals with a history of unilateral ankle sprain and chronic ankle instability (mechanical ankle instability group, n = 10; functional ankle instability [FAI] group, n = 14) and 20 controls. Main Outcome Measure(s): Ankle active and passive joint position sense, kinesthesia, and force sense. Results: We observed a significant interaction between the effects of limb and group for kinesthesia (F = 3.27, P = .049). Increased error values were observed in the injured limb of the FAI group compared with the control group (P = .031, Cohen d = 0.47). Differences were also evident for force sense (F = 9.31, P < .001): the FAI group demonstrated increased error versus the control group (injured limb: P < .001, Cohen d = 1.28; uninjured limb: P = .009, Cohen d = 0.89) and the mechanical ankle instability group (uninjured limb: P = .023, Cohen d = 0.76). Conclusions: Individuals with unilateral FAI had increased error ipsilaterally (injured limb) for inversion movement detection (kinesthesia) and evertor force sense and increased error contralaterally (uninjured limb) for evertor force sense. PMID:28318316

  16. Synovial osteochondromatosis involvement in post-traumatic ankle injury.

    PubMed

    Lee, Daniel K; Louk, Louis; Bell, Bryan L

    2008-01-01

    Ankle involvement by synovial chondromatosis is unusual. It is unknown whether a post-traumatic event to the ankle induces the formation and development of these lesions. Synovial osteochondromatosis associated with post-traumatic ankle events are rare but suggest trauma to the synovial tissues as being causative, although this has never been statistically confirmed owing to the lack of reports and frequency. We report a case of primary synovial osteochondromatosis involving the tibiotalar joint with painful symptoms after a history of ankle injury, including magnetic resonance imaging findings of this unusual condition.

  17. Cost analysis of brachial plexus injuries: variability of compensation by insurance companies before and after surgery.

    PubMed

    Felici, N; Zaami, S; Ciancolini, G; Marinelli, E; Tagliente, D; Cannatà, C

    2014-04-01

    Traumatic paralysis of the brachial plexus is an extremely disabling pathology. The type of trauma most frequently suffered by this group of patients is due to motorcycle injuries. It therefore affects a population of young patients. In the majority of cases, these patients receive compensation for permanent damage from insurance companies. Surgery of the brachial plexus enables various forms of functional recovery, depending on the number of roots of the brachial plexus involved in the injury. The aim of this study is to compare the functional deficit and the extent of the related compensation before and after surgical intervention, and to evaluate the saving in economic terms (understood as the cost of compensation paid by insurance companies) obtainable through surgical intervention. The authors analysed the functional recovery obtained through surgery in 134 patients divided into 4 groups on the basis of the number of injured roots. The levels of compensation payable to the patient before surgical intervention, and 3 years after, were then compared. The results showed that the saving obtainable through surgical treatment of brachial plexus injuries may exceed 65% of the economic value of the compensation that would have been attributable to the same patients if they had not undergone surgical treatment. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  18. Intraoperative brachial plexus injury during emergence following movement with arms restrained: a preventable complication?

    PubMed Central

    Chandler, Mark H; DiMatteo, Laura; Hasenboehler, Erik A; Temple, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Background Despite considerable analysis and preventive strategies, brachial plexus injuries remain fairly common in the perioperative setting. These injuries range from brief periods of numbness or discomfort in the immediate postoperative period to, in rare cases, profound, prolonged losses of sensation and function. We present a case of an orthopedic surgery patient who suffered a brachial plexus injury while under anesthesia after trying to sit upright with his arms restrained. Case presentation After the uneventful placement of an intramedullary tibial nail, an 18 year old patient tried to sit upright with his arms restrained while still under the influence of anesthesia. In the immediate postoperative period, the patient complained of a profound loss of sensation in his left arm and an inability to flex his left elbow, suppinate his arm, or abduct and rotate his shoulder. Neurological examination and subsequent studies revealed a C5-6 brachial plexus injury. The patient underwent range of motion physical therapy and, over the next three months, regained the full function and sensation of his left arm. Conclusion Restraining arms during general anesthesia to prevent injury remains a wise practice. However, to avoid injuring the brachial plexus while the arms are restrained, extra caution must be used to prevent unexpected patient movement and to ensure gentle emergence. PMID:18271944

  19. Changes in Spinal Cord Architecture after Brachial Plexus Injury in the Newborn

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Korak, Klaus J.; Tam, Siu Lin; Gordon, Tessa; Frey, Manfred; Aszmann, Oskar C.

    2004-01-01

    Obstetric brachial plexus palsy is a devastating birth injury. While many children recover spontaneously, 20-25% are left with a permanent impairment of the affected limb. So far, concepts of pathology and recovery have focused on the injury of the peripheral nerve. Proximal nerve injury at birth, however, leads to massive injury-induced…

  20. In situ cephalic vein bypasses from axillary to the brachial artery after catheterization injuries.

    PubMed

    Hudorovic, Narcis; Lovricevic, Ivo; Ahel, Zaky

    2010-07-01

    The need to bypass to the brachial artery is rare. Over a five-year period, 16 patients had suffered iatrogenic post-catheterization injuries of the upper extremity. We have performed 16 bypasses, in 16 patients, mean age was 65 years (range 47-75), to the brachial artery originating from an artery proximal to the shoulder joint. In all cases, the axillary artery was the donor artery. All bypasses were created by using the cephalic vein with the in situ technique and distal anastomoses were made to a distance-free section of brachial artery. No operative mortality, neurological complications or major upper-extremity amputation was associated with the procedure. Life-long-conduit analysis showed 75% patency in the five-year period. After iatrogenic post-catheterization trauma of arterial system of upper extremity, bypasses from axillary to brachial artery with the cephalic vein with the in situ technique is a safe operation with satisfactory long-term patency.

  1. Addition of dexmedetomidine to bupivacaine in supraclavicular brachial plexus block.

    PubMed

    Aksu, Recep; Bicer, Cihangir

    2017-06-26

    Research is ongoing to determine the lowest dose of local anesthetics in brachial plexus block that provides adequate anesthesia and postoperative analgesia and reduces complications related to local anesthetics. Patients 18-65 years of age who underwent upper limb surgery and who received ultrasound-guided supraclavicular brachial plexus block at the Erciyes University Faculty of Medicine Hospital between February 2014 and January 2015 were included in the study (n=50). Supraclavicular brachial plexus blocks were performed on Group B cases by adding 30 ml 0.33% bupivacaine and on Group BD cases by adding 15 ml 0.33% bupivacaine and 1 µg / kg dexmedetomidine. Block success was evaluated by the onset and block duration of motor and sensory block and the duration of analgesia. The block success of Group B and Group BD was 92.6% and 89.3%, respectively (P = 1.000). Onset time of sensory block, degree of sensory block, duration of sensory block, onset time of motor block, degree of motor block and duration of motor block were similar in both groups in the intergroup comparison (P > 0.05). Duration of analgesia and the operative conditions of groups were similar (P > 0.05). In the implementation of ultrasound-guided supraclavicular brachial plexus block, block success, sensory and motor block and analgesia duration were similar for patients anaesthetized with 30 ml of bupivacaine in comparison with dexmedetomidine+bupivacaine (when the bupivacaine dose was reduced by 50% by the addition of the adjuvant).

  2. Interventions for treating chronic ankle instability.

    PubMed

    de Vries, J S; Krips, R; Sierevelt, I N; Blankevoort, L

    2006-10-18

    Chronic lateral ankle instability occurs in 10% to 20% of people after an acute ankle sprain. The initial form of treatment is conservative but if this fails and ligament laxity is present, surgical intervention is considered. To compare different treatments, both conservative and surgical, for chronic lateral ankle instability. We searched the Cochrane Bone, Joint and Muscle Trauma Group Specialized Register (to July 2005), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (The Cochrane Library 2005, Issue 3), and MEDLINE (1966 to April 2006), EMBASE (1980 to April 2006), CINAHL (1982 to April 2006) and reference lists of articles. All randomised and quasi-randomised controlled trials of interventions for chronic lateral ankle instability were included. Two review authors independently assessed methodological quality and extracted data. Where appropriate, results of comparable studies were pooled. Seven randomised trials were included and divided into three groups: surgical interventions; rehabilitation programs after surgical interventions; and conservative interventions. None of the studies were methodologically flawless. Only one study described an adequate randomisation procedure. Only two studies, both about rehabilitation programs after surgery, had a moderate risk of bias; all other studies had a high risk of bias. Due to clinical and methodological diversity, extensive pooling of the data was not possible. Surgical interventions (four studies): one study showed more complications after the Chrisman-Snook procedure compared to an anatomical reconstruction, whereas another study showed greater mean talar tilt after an anatomical reconstruction. Subjective instability and hindfoot inversion was greater after a dynamic than after a static tenodesis in a third study. The fourth study showed that the operating time for anatomical reconstructions was shorter for the reinsertion technique than for the imbrication method. Rehabilitation after surgical

  3. Association between Patient History and Physical Examination and Osteoarthritis after Ankle Sprain.

    PubMed

    van Ochten, John M; de Vries, Anja D; van Putte, Nienke; Oei, Edwin H G; Bindels, Patrick J E; Bierma-Zeinstra, Sita M A; van Middelkoop, Marienke

    2017-09-01

    Structural abnormalities on MRI are frequent after an ankle sprain. To determine the association between patient history, physical examination and early osteoarthritis (OA) in patients after a previous ankle sprain, 98 patients with persistent complaints were selected from a cross-sectional study. Patient history taking and physical examination were applied and MRI was taken. Univariate and multivariable analyses were used to test possible associations. Signs of OA (cartilage loss, osteophytes and bone marrow edema) were seen in the talocrural joint (TCJ) in 40% and the talonavicular joint (TNJ) in 49%. Multivariable analysis showed a significant positive association between swelling (OR 3.58, 95%CI 1.13;11.4), a difference in ROM of passive plantar flexion (OR 1.09, 95%CI 1.01;1.18) and bone edema in the TCJ. A difference in ROM of passive plantar flexion (OR 1.07, 95%CI 1.00;1.15) and pain at the end range of dorsiflexion/plantar flexion (OR 5.23, 95%CI 1.88;14.58) were associated with osteophytes in the TNJ. Pain at the end of dorsiflexion/plantar flexion, a difference in ROM of passive plantar flexion and swelling seem to be associated with features of OA (bone marrow edema, osteophytes) in the TCJ and TNJ. Our findings may guide physicians to predict structural joint abnormalities as signs of osteoarthritis. 1b. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging of injuries to the ankle joint: can it predict clinical outcome?

    PubMed

    Zanetti, M; De Simoni, C; Wetz, H H; Zollinger, H; Hodler, J

    1997-02-01

    To predict clinical outcome after ankle sprains on the basis of magnetic resonance (MR) findings. Twenty-nine consecutive patients (mean age 32.9 years, range 13-60 years) were examined clinically and with MR imaging both after trauma and following standardized conservative therapy. Various MR abnormalities were related to a clinical outcome score. There was a tendency for a better clinical outcome in partial, rather than complete, tears of the anterior talofibular ligament and when there was no fluid within the peroneal tendon sheath at the initial MR examination (P = 0.092 for either abnormality). A number of other MR features did not significantly influence clinical outcome, including the presence of a calcaneofibular ligament lesion and a bone bruise of the talar dome. Clinical outcome after ankle sprain cannot consistently be predicted by MR imaging, although MR imaging may be more accurate when the anterior talofibular ligament is only partially torn and there are no signs of injury to the peroneal tendon sheath.

  5. Palpation- and ultrasound-guided brachial plexus blockade in Hispaniolan Amazon parrots (Amazona ventralis).

    PubMed

    da Cunha, Anderson F; Strain, George M; Rademacher, Nathalie; Schnellbacher, Rodney; Tully, Thomas N

    2013-01-01

    To compare palpation-guided with ultrasound-guided brachial plexus blockade in Hispaniolan Amazon parrots. Prospective randomized experimental trial. Eighteen adult Hispaniolan Amazon parrots (Amazona ventralis) weighing 252-295 g. After induction of anesthesia with isoflurane, parrots received an injection of lidocaine (2 mg kg(-1)) in a total volume of 0.3 mL at the axillary region. The birds were randomly assigned to equal groups using either palpation or ultrasound as a guide for the brachial plexus block. Nerve evoked muscle potentials (NEMP) were used to monitor effectiveness of brachial plexus block. The palpation-guided group received the local anesthetic at the space between the pectoral muscle, triceps, and supracoracoideus aticimus muscle, at the insertion of the tendons of the caudal coracobrachial muscle, and the caudal scapulohumeral muscle. For the ultrasound-guided group, the brachial plexus and the adjacent vessels were located with B-mode ultrasonography using a 7-15 MHz linear probe. After location, an 8-5 MHz convex transducer was used to guide injections. General anesthesia was discontinued 20 minutes after lidocaine injection and the birds recovered in a padded cage. Both techniques decreased the amplitude of NEMP. Statistically significant differences in NEMP amplitudes, were observed within the ultrasound-guided group at 5, 10, 15, and 20 minutes after injection and within the palpation-guided group at 10, 15, and 20 minutes after injection. There was no statistically significant difference between the two groups. No effect on motor function, muscle relaxation or wing droop was observed after brachial plexus block. The onset of the brachial plexus block tended to be faster when ultrasonography was used. Brachial plexus injection can be performed in Hispaniolan Amazon parrots and nerve evoked muscle potentials were useful to monitor the effects on nerve conduction in this avian species. Neither technique produced an effective block at the

  6. Incidence of intravenous contrast extravasation: increased risk for patients with deep brachial catheter placement from the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Hardie, Andrew D; Kereshi, Borko

    2014-06-01

    Deep brachial intravenous catheter (IV) placement can be performed in emergency department patients with difficult vascular access, but the safety of deep brachial IV for iodinated contrast administration has not been assessed. This study compares the relative risk for extravasation of deep brachial IV compared with antecubital IV during power injected computed tomography (CT) examinations. A departmental practice quality improvement was performed to assess the rate of IV extravasation for all CT examinations during a 1 year period. De-identified data was analyzed with a waiver of informed consent to identify the rate and relative risk of iodinated contrast extravasation by catheter type. A total of 10,750 injections were performed, with 82 extravasation events (0.8 %). There were 51 extravasations of antecubital IV from approximately 8,599 placed (0.6 %). For 123 deep brachial IV placed, there were eight extravasations (6.5 %). The relative risk of a deep brachial IV extravasation was 9.4 compared to 0.4 for antecubital placement. Deep brachial IV demonstrated a markedly higher rate of contrast extravasation than antecubital IV. For power injected iodinated contrast administration, it is recommended to avoid the use of deep brachial IV whenever possible.

  7. A three-dimensional model to assess the effect of ankle joint axis misalignments in ankle-foot orthoses.

    PubMed

    Fatone, Stefania; Johnson, William Brett; Tucker, Kerice

    2016-04-01

    Misalignment of an articulated ankle-foot orthosis joint axis with the anatomic joint axis may lead to discomfort, alterations in gait, and tissue damage. Theoretical, two-dimensional models describe the consequences of misalignments, but cannot capture the three-dimensional behavior of ankle-foot orthosis use. The purpose of this project was to develop a model to describe the effects of ankle-foot orthosis ankle joint misalignment in three dimensions. Computational simulation. Three-dimensional scans of a leg and ankle-foot orthosis were incorporated into a link segment model where the ankle-foot orthosis joint axis could be misaligned with the anatomic ankle joint axis. The leg/ankle-foot orthosis interface was modeled as a network of nodes connected by springs to estimate interface pressure. Motion between the leg and ankle-foot orthosis was calculated as the ankle joint moved through a gait cycle. While the three-dimensional model corroborated predictions of the previously published two-dimensional model that misalignments in the anterior -posterior direction would result in greater relative motion compared to misalignments in the proximal -distal direction, it provided greater insight showing that misalignments have asymmetrical effects. The three-dimensional model has been incorporated into a freely available computer program to assist others in understanding the consequences of joint misalignments. Models and simulations can be used to gain insight into functioning of systems of interest. We have developed a three-dimensional model to assess the effect of ankle joint axis misalignments in ankle-foot orthoses. The model has been incorporated into a freely available computer program to assist understanding of trainees and others interested in orthotics. © The International Society for Prosthetics and Orthotics 2014.

  8. Retrospective comparison of the Low Risk Ankle Rules and the Ottawa Ankle Rules in a pediatric population.

    PubMed

    Ellenbogen, Amy L; Rice, Amy L; Vyas, Pranav

    2017-09-01

    A recent multicenter prospective Canadian study presented prospective evidence supporting the Low Risk Ankle Rules (LRAR) as a means of reducing the number of ankle radiographs ordered for children presenting with an ankle injury while maintaining nearly 100% sensitivity. This is in contrast to a previous prospective study which showed that this rule yielded only 87% sensitivity. It is important to further investigate the LRAR and compare them with the already validated Ottawa Ankle Rules (OAR) to potentially curb healthcare costs and decrease unnecessary radiation exposure without compromising diagnostic accuracy. We conducted a retrospective chart review of 980 qualifying patients ages 12months to 18years presenting with ankle injury to a commonly staffed 310 bed children's hospital and auxiliary site pediatric emergency department. There were 28 high-risk fractures identified. The Ottawa Ankle Rules had a sensitivity of 100% (95% CI 87.7-100), specificity of 33.1% (95% CI 30.1-36.2), and would have reduced the number of ankle radiographs ordered by 32.1%. The Low Risk Ankle Rules had a sensitivity of 85.7% (95% CI 85.7-96), specificity of 64.9% (95% CI 61.8-68), and would have reduced the number of ankle radiographs ordered by 63.1%. The latter rule missed 4 high-risk fractures. The Low Risk Ankle Rules may not be sensitive enough for use in Pediatric Emergency Departments, while the Ottawa Ankle Rules again demonstrated 100% sensitivity. Further research on ways to implement the Ottawa Ankle Rules and maximize its ability to decrease wait times, healthcare costs, and improve patient satisfaction are needed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Frontal slab composite magnetic resonance neurography of the brachial plexus: implications for infraclavicular block approaches.

    PubMed

    Raphael, David T; McIntee, Diane; Tsuruda, Jay S; Colletti, Patrick; Tatevossian, Ray

    2005-12-01

    Magnetic resonance neurography (MRN) is an imaging method by which nerves can be selectively highlighted. Using commercial software, the authors explored a variety of approaches to develop a three-dimensional volume-rendered MRN image of the entire brachial plexus and used it to evaluate the accuracy of infraclavicular block approaches. With institutional review board approval, MRN of the brachial plexus was performed in 10 volunteer subjects. MRN imaging was performed on a GE 1.5-tesla magnetic resonance scanner (General Electric Healthcare Technologies, Waukesha, WI) using a phased array torso coil. Coronal STIR and T1 oblique sagittal sequences of the brachial plexus were obtained. Multiple software programs were explored for enhanced display and manipulation of the composite magnetic resonance images. The authors developed a frontal slab composite approach that allows single-frame reconstruction of a three-dimensional volume-render