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Sample records for abnormal binocular vision

  1. Binocular Vision

    PubMed Central

    Blake, Randolph; Wilson, Hugh

    2010-01-01

    This essay reviews major developments –empirical and theoretical –in the field of binocular vision during the last 25 years. We limit our survey primarily to work on human stereopsis, binocular rivalry and binocular contrast summation, with discussion where relevant of single-unit neurophysiology and human brain imaging. We identify several key controversies that have stimulated important work on these problems. In the case of stereopsis those controversies include position versus phase encoding of disparity, dependence of disparity limits on spatial scale, role of occlusion in binocular depth and surface perception, and motion in 3D. In the case of binocular rivalry, controversies include eye versus stimulus rivalry, role of “top-down” influences on rivalry dynamics, and the interaction of binocular rivalry and stereopsis. Concerning binocular contrast summation, the essay focuses on two representative models that highlight the evolving complexity in this field of study. PMID:20951722

  2. Binocular vision and abnormal head posture in children when watching television

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Di; Zhang, Wei-Hong; Dai, Shu-Zhen; Peng, Hai-Ying; Wang, Li-Ya

    2016-01-01

    AIM To determine the association between the binocular vision and an abnormal head posture (AHP) when watching television (TV) in children 7-14y of age. METHODS Fifty normal children in the normal group and 52 children with an AHP when watching TV in the AHP group were tested for spherical equivalents, far and near fusional convergence (FC) and fusional divergence (FD) amplitudes, near point of convergence, far and near heterophoria, accommodative convergence/ accommodation ratio and stereoacuity. The values of these tests were compared between the two groups. The independent t test was applied at a confidence level of 95%. RESULTS The far and near FC amplitudes and far FD amplitudes were lower in the AHP group (the far FC amplitudes: break point 13.6±5.4Δ, recovery point 8.7±5.4Δ. The near FC amplitudes: break point 14.5±7.3Δ, recovery point 10.3±5.1Δ. The far FD amplitudes: break point 3.9±2.7Δ, recovery point 2.6±2.3Δ) compared with those in the normal group (the far FC amplitudes: break point 19.1±6.2Δ, recovery point 12.4±4.5Δ. The near FC amplitudes: break point 22.3±8.0Δ, recovery point 16.1±5.7Δ. The far FD amplitudes: break point 7.0±2.1Δ, recovery point 4.6±1.9Δ). Other tests presented no statistically significant differences. CONCLUSION An association between the reduced FC and FD amplitudes and the AHP in children when watching TV is proposed in the study. This kind of AHP is considered to be an anomalous manifestation which appears in a part of puerile patients of fusional vergence dysfunction. PMID:27275434

  3. Amblyopia and Binocular Vision

    PubMed Central

    Birch, Eileen E.

    2012-01-01

    Amblyopia is the most common cause of monocular visual loss in children, affecting 1.3% to 3.6% of children. Current treatments are effective in reducing the visual acuity deficit but many amblyopic individuals are left with residual visual acuity deficits, ocular motor abnormalities, deficient fine motor skills, and risk for recurrent amblyopia. Using a combination of psychophysical, electrophysiological, imaging, risk factor analysis, and fine motor skill assessment, the primary role of binocular dysfunction in the genesis of amblyopia and the constellation of visual and motor deficits that accompany the visual acuity deficit has been identified. These findings motivated us to evaluate a new, binocular approach to amblyopia treatment with the goals of reducing or eliminating residual and recurrent amblyopia and of improving the deficient ocular motor function and fine motor skills that accompany amblyopia. PMID:23201436

  4. Bion and binocular vision.

    PubMed

    Mason, A

    2000-10-01

    The author describes his contact with Bion over a twenty-year period, from Bion's supervision of his control case in London in 1960 to the period from 1968 to 1978 when they were both working in Los Angeles. He outlines Bion's views on the use of 'instinct' and intuition in patient observation, the depressive position in patient and analyst, and memory and desire as impediments to knowledge of 'ultimate reality'. Some case material is presented, illustrating how Bion's ideas, particularly concerning attacks on linking, informed the course of the treatment. The author then discusses Freud's, Klein's and Bion's approaches to the problem of resistance, Bion's expansion of some of Klein's ideas, his definitions of psychosis and his formulation concerning thoughts that develop before thinking. The author then argues how essential it is for the analyst to differentiate between primitive projections from the patient that are pre-verbal attempts to communicate a state of mind and those that are an expression of hostility or control. He then discusses the importance of understanding idealizing projections and differentiating these from a healthy positive transference. He concludes by characterising Bion's way of working in terms of his humility, his courage and, fundamentally, his use of his intuitive binocular mind. PMID:11109580

  5. Neuroimaging of amblyopia and binocular vision: a review

    PubMed Central

    Joly, Olivier; Frankó, Edit

    2014-01-01

    Amblyopia is a cerebral visual impairment considered to derive from abnormal visual experience (e.g., strabismus, anisometropia). Amblyopia, first considered as a monocular disorder, is now often seen as a primarily binocular disorder resulting in more and more studies examining the binocular deficits in the patients. The neural mechanisms of amblyopia are not completely understood even though they have been investigated with electrophysiological recordings in animal models and more recently with neuroimaging techniques in humans. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge about the brain regions that underlie the visual deficits associated with amblyopia with a focus on binocular vision using functional magnetic resonance imaging. The first studies focused on abnormal responses in the primary and secondary visual areas whereas recent evidence shows that there are also deficits at higher levels of the visual pathways within the parieto-occipital and temporal cortices. These higher level areas are part of the cortical network involved in 3D vision from binocular cues. Therefore, reduced responses in these areas could be related to the impaired binocular vision in amblyopic patients. Promising new binocular treatments might at least partially correct the activation in these areas. Future neuroimaging experiments could help to characterize the brain response changes associated with these treatments and help devise them. PMID:25147511

  6. Night myopia is reduced in binocular vision.

    PubMed

    Chirre, Emmanuel; Prieto, Pedro M; Schwarz, Christina; Artal, Pablo

    2016-06-01

    Night myopia, which is a shift in refraction with light level, has been widely studied but still lacks a complete understanding. We used a new infrared open-view binocular Hartmann-Shack wave front sensor to quantify night myopia under monocular and natural binocular viewing conditions. Both eyes' accommodative response, aberrations, pupil diameter, and convergence were simultaneously measured at light levels ranging from photopic to scotopic conditions to total darkness. For monocular vision, reducing the stimulus luminance resulted in a progression of the accommodative state that tends toward the subject's dark focus or tonic accommodation and a change in convergence following the induced accommodative error. Most subjects presented a myopic shift of accommodation that was mitigated in binocular vision. The impact of spherical aberration on the focus shift was relatively small. Our results in monocular conditions support the hypothesis that night myopia has an accommodative origin as the eye progressively changes its accommodation state with decreasing luminance toward its resting state in total darkness. On the other hand, binocularity restrains night myopia, possibly by using fusional convergence as an additional accommodative cue, thus reducing the potential impact of night myopia on vision at low light levels. PMID:27333457

  7. Precise calibration of binocular vision system used for vision measurement.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yi; Zhou, Fuqiang; Wang, Yexin; Liu, Liu; Gao, He

    2014-04-21

    Binocular vision calibration is of great importance in 3D machine vision measurement. With respect to binocular vision calibration, the nonlinear optimization technique is a crucial step to improve the accuracy. The existing optimization methods mostly aim at minimizing the sum of reprojection errors for two cameras based on respective 2D image pixels coordinate. However, the subsequent measurement process is conducted in 3D coordinate system which is not consistent with the optimization coordinate system. Moreover, the error criterion with respect to optimization and measurement is different. The equal pixel distance error in 2D image plane leads to diverse 3D metric distance error at different position before the camera. To address these issues, we propose a precise calibration method for binocular vision system which is devoted to minimizing the metric distance error between the reconstructed point through optimal triangulation and the ground truth in 3D measurement coordinate system. In addition, the inherent epipolar constraint and constant distance constraint are combined to enhance the optimization process. To evaluate the performance of the proposed method, both simulative and real experiments have been carried out and the results show that the proposed method is reliable and efficient to improve measurement accuracy compared with conventional method. PMID:24787804

  8. Miniaturized haploscope for testing binocular vision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, T. A.

    1973-01-01

    Device can reproduce virtually all binocular stimulus conditions (target configuration, vergence angle, and accommodative distance) used to test binocular performance. All subsystems of electronic controls are open-loop and solid-state-controlled and, with the exception of vergence angle drive, utilize dc stepping motors as prime movers. Arrangement is also made for readouts of each variable.

  9. Origins of strabismus and loss of binocular vision

    PubMed Central

    Bui Quoc, Emmanuel; Milleret, Chantal

    2014-01-01

    Strabismus is a frequent ocular disorder that develops early in life in humans. As a general rule, it is characterized by a misalignment of the visual axes which most often appears during the critical period of visual development. However other characteristics of strabismus may vary greatly among subjects, for example, being convergent or divergent, horizontal or vertical, with variable angles of deviation. Binocular vision may also vary greatly. Our main goal here is to develop the idea that such “polymorphy” reflects a wide variety in the possible origins of strabismus. We propose that strabismus must be considered as possibly resulting from abnormal genetic and/or acquired factors, anatomical and/or functional abnormalities, in the sensory and/or the motor systems, both peripherally and/or in the brain itself. We shall particularly develop the possible “central” origins of strabismus. Indeed, we are convinced that it is time now to open this “black box” in order to move forward. All of this will be developed on the basis of both presently available data in literature (including most recent data) and our own experience. Both data in biology and medicine will be referred to. Our conclusions will hopefully help ophthalmologists to better understand strabismus and to develop new therapeutic strategies in the future. Presently, physicians eliminate or limit the negative effects of such pathology both on the development of the visual system and visual perception through the use of optical correction and, in some cases, extraocular muscle surgery. To better circumscribe the problem of the origins of strabismus, including at a cerebral level, may improve its management, in particular with respect to binocular vision, through innovating tools by treating the pathology at the source. PMID:25309358

  10. A stereo model based upon mechanisms of human binocular vision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griswold, N. C.; Yeh, C. P.

    1986-01-01

    A model for stereo vision, which is based on the human-binocular vision system, is proposed. Data collected from studies of neurophysiology of the human binocular system are discussed. An algorithm for the implementation of this stereo vision model is derived. The algorithm is tested on computer-generated and real scene images. Examples of a computer-generated image and a grey-level image are presented. It is noted that the proposed method is computationally efficient for depth perception, and the results indicate accuracies that are noise tolerant.

  11. Ptolemy's contributions to the geometry of binocular vision.

    PubMed

    Howard, I P; Wade, N J

    1996-01-01

    Ptolemy's Optics which was written in about the year 150 AD contains an account of the geometry of binocular vision which has been almost totally neglected in the vision literature. An English translation of the relevant passages from the Latin text in Lejeune (1956) is presented together with commentaries and a brief introduction. PMID:9027922

  12. Binocular vision measurement using Dammann grating.

    PubMed

    Wei, Shengbin; Wang, Shaoqing; Zhou, Changhe; Liu, Kun; Fan, Xin

    2015-04-10

    In this paper, we propose a novel three-dimensional (3D) profilometry using a binocular camera and a 64 × 64 Dammann grating for generation of a regular square laser array. A new constraint called a "ray constraint," taking advantage of the splitting characteristic of Dammann grating, is proposed for binocular matching. Binocular matching is realized by using ray constraint and precalibration of a laser array. Point clouds without outliers are obtained with binocular matching results according to triangulation. The experimental apparatus weighs less than 170 g with a width of less than 14 cm. We used this apparatus to scan a statue of Apollo under indoor illumination (at 450 lux). Its 3D model with complex profile was reconstructed by more than 150,000 points. This 3D profilometry has advantages of low cost, low power, and small size and should be useful for practical applications. PMID:25967310

  13. Visual fatigue induced by optical misalignment in binocular devices: application to night vision binocular devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrilescu, Maria; Battista, Josephine; Ibbotson, Michael R.; Gibbs, Peter

    2015-05-01

    The additional and perhaps unnatural eye-movements required to fuse misaligned binocular images can lead to visual fatigue and decreased task performance. The eyes have some tolerance to optical misalignment. However, a survey of the scientific literature reveals a wide range of recommended tolerances but offers little supporting experimental evidence. Most experimental studies are based on small numbers of participants exposed to brief periods of optical misalignment. Therefore, these published tolerance limits might have limited relevance for long-duration exposure to misaligned binocular devices. Prolonged use of binocular devices may cause visual fatigue irrespective of binocular alignment especially for complex tasks such as night vision flying. This study attempts to identify measures most sensitive to misalignment in order to establish relevant tolerance limits for in-service binocular night vision devices. Firstly, we developed a rugged and deployable test bench that can measure binocular alignment with a reproducibility error of less than 1 arcmin. The bench was used to identify and investigate major factors affecting the stability of the optical misalignment over time. Our results indicated that the optical misalignment of a given device changed over time as a function of the in-service usage and thermal history of the device. Secondly, participants were exposed to experimentally controlled levels of optical misalignment typical of those measured on in-service binocular night vision devices. The visual fatigue of each participant was assessed via a set of oculomotor parameters. The oculomotor parameters showing high sensitivity to optical misalignment were compared for subjects exposed to extended periods of misalignment in a baseline reading task and a task using an actual night vision device.

  14. Attention in dichoptic and binocular vision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimchi, Ruth; Rubin, Yifat; Gopher, Daniel; Raij, David

    1989-01-01

    The ability of human subjected to mobilize attention and cope with task requirements under dichoptic and binocular viewing was investigated in an experiment employing a target search task. Subjects were required to search for a target at either the global level, the local level, or at both levels of a compound stimulus. The tasks were performed in a focused attention condition in which subjects had to attend to the stimulus presented to one eye/field (under dichoptic and binocular viewings, respectively) and to ignore the stimulus presented to the irrelevant eye/field, and in a divided attention condition in which subjects had to attend to the stimuli presented to both eyes/fields. Subjects' performance was affected mainly by attention conditions which interacted with task requirements, rather than by viewing situation. An interesting effect of viewing was found for the local-directed search task in which the cost of dividing attention was higher under binocular than under dichoptic viewing.

  15. Binocular stereo vision system design for lunar rover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Jun; Jiao, Chunlin; Guo, Hang; Zhang, Xiaoyu

    2007-11-01

    In this paper, we integrate a pair of CCD cameras and a digital pan/title of two degrees of freedom into a binocular stereo vision system, which simulates the panoramic cameras system of the lunar rover. The constraints for placement and parameters choice of the stereo cameras pair are proposed based on science objective of Chang'e-IImission. And then these constraints are applied to our binocular stereo vision system and analyzed the location precise of it. Simulation and experimental result confirm the constraints proposed and the analysis of the location precise.

  16. What is binocular vision for? A birds' eye view.

    PubMed

    Martin, Graham R

    2009-01-01

    It is proposed that with the possible exception of owls, binocularity in birds does not have a higher order function that results in the perception of solidity and relative depth. Rather, binocularity is a consequence of the requirement of having a portion of the visual field that looks in the direction of travel; hence, each eye must have a contralateral projection that gives rise to binocularity. This contralateral projection is necessary to gain a symmetrically expanding optic flow-field about the bill. This specifies direction of travel and time to contact a target during feeding or when provisioning chicks. In birds that do not need such control of their bill, binocular field widths are very small, suggesting that binocular vision plays only a minor role in the control of locomotion. In the majority of birds, the function of binocularity would seem to lie in what each eye does independently rather than in what the two eyes might be able to do together. The wider binocular fields of owls may be the product of an interaction between enlarged eyes and enlarged outer ears, which may simply prevent more lateral placement of the eyes. PMID:20053077

  17. [On a binocular vision testing in concomitant strabismus].

    PubMed

    Seleznev, A V; Vakurin, E A; Kashchenko, T P

    2011-01-01

    Character of vision in 105 children with strabismus (with regular eye position) was tested using four dot test on different distance (5.0, 2.5, 1.0 m) and "Phorbis" device comprising phoropter and a set of light filters, that let us perform examination in the conditions of colour, polaroid and bitmapped division of visual fields. Stereoscopic vision was examined using original method based on anaglyph haploscopy. Binocular vision in strabismus was found to become more frequent as the distance and dissociating effect of light-filters decrease, and turned to be maximal in near testing in conditions of bitmapped haploscopy. Visual stereoscopic acuity in children with concomitant strabismus even on reaching regular eye position and binocular vision is significantly lower compared with healthy children of the same age. PMID:21800722

  18. Symptomatology associated with accommodative and binocular vision anomalies

    PubMed Central

    García-Muñoz, Ángel; Carbonell-Bonete, Stela; Cacho-Martínez, Pilar

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To determine the symptoms associated with accommodative and non-strabismic binocular dysfunctions and to assess the methods used to obtain the subjects’ symptoms. Methods We conducted a scoping review of articles published between 1988 and 2012 that analysed any aspect of the symptomatology associated with accommodative and non-strabismic binocular dysfunctions. The literature search was performed in Medline (PubMed), CINAHL, PsycINFO and FRANCIS. A total of 657 articles were identified, and 56 met the inclusion criteria. Results We found 267 different ways of naming the symptoms related to these anomalies, which we grouped into 34 symptom categories. Of the 56 studies, 35 employed questionnaires and 21 obtained the symptoms from clinical histories. We found 11 questionnaires, of which only 3 had been validated: the convergence insufficiency symptom survey (CISS V-15) and CIRS parent version, both specific for convergence insufficiency, and the Conlon survey, developed for visual anomalies in general. The most widely used questionnaire (21 studies) was the CISS V-15. Of the 34 categories of symptoms, the most frequently mentioned were: headache, blurred vision, diplopia, visual fatigue, and movement or flicker of words at near vision, which were fundamentally related to near vision and binocular anomalies. Conclusions There is a wide disparity of symptoms related to accommodative and binocular dysfunctions in the scientific literature, most of which are associated with near vision and binocular dysfunctions. The only psychometrically validated questionnaires that we found (n=3) were related to convergence insufficiency and to visual dysfunctions in general and there no specific questionnaires for other anomalies. PMID:25323640

  19. Effect of firefighter masks on monocular and binocular peripheral vision.

    PubMed

    Samo, Daniel G; Bahk, Jane K; Gerkin, Richard D

    2003-04-01

    Peripheral vision can impact essential job functions of firefighters and other workers who use Self-Contained Breathing Apparatus and other full face masks. It is important for physicians to know how these masks alter peripheral vision. Also, one must understand the effect of monocular vision on peripheral vision. Using the Goldman Perimeter Machine we measured peripheral vision in the monocular and binocular state, with and without two different types of masks. The results show that monocularity causes an average loss of 23 degrees in the nasal meridian. The use of the masks did not affect this difference. Also, the masks caused an average loss of 28 degrees of peripheral vision in the inferior meridian. How these losses affect the ability of the users of the masks to perform their essential job functions still needs to be researched. PMID:12708146

  20. [A Meridian Visualization System Based on Impedance and Binocular Vision].

    PubMed

    Su, Qiyan; Chen, Xin

    2015-03-01

    To ensure the meridian can be measured and displayed correctly on the human body surface, a visualization method based on impedance and binocular vision is proposed. First of all, using alternating constant current source to inject current signal into the human skin surface, then according to the low impedance characteristics of meridian, the multi-channel detecting instrument detects voltage of each pair of electrodes, thereby obtaining the channel of the meridian location, through the serial port communication, data is transmitted to the host computer. Secondly, intrinsic and extrinsic parameters of cameras are obtained by Zhang's camera calibration method, and 3D information of meridian location is got by corner selection and matching of the optical target, and then transform coordinate of 3D information according to the binocular vision principle. Finally, using curve fitting and image fusion technology realizes the meridian visualization. The test results show that the system can realize real-time detection and accurate display of meridian. PMID:26524777

  1. Extracting depth by binocular stereo in a robot vision system

    SciTech Connect

    Marapane, S.B.; Trivedi, M.M.

    1988-01-01

    New generation of robotic systems will operate in complex, unstructured environments utilizing sophisticated sensory mechanisms. Vision and range will be two of the most important sensory modalities such a system will utilize to sense their operating environment. Measurement of depth is critical for the success of many robotic tasks such as: object recognition and location; obstacle avoidance and navigation; and object inspection. In this paper we consider the development of a binocular stereo technique for extracting depth information in a robot vision system for inspection and manipulation tasks. Ability to produce precise depth measurements over a wide range of distances and the passivity of the approach make binocular stereo techniques attractive and appropriate for range finding in a robotic environment. This paper describes work in progress towards the development of a region-based binocular stereo technique for a robot vision system designed for inspection and manipulation and presents preliminary experiments designed to evaluate performance of the approach. Results of these studies show promise for the region-based stereo matching approach. 16 refs., 1 fig.

  2. Vanishing feature constraints calibration method for binocular vision sensor.

    PubMed

    Wei, Zhenzhong; Liu, Xiaokun

    2015-07-27

    Based on analyzing the measurement model of binocular vision sensor, we proposed a new flexible calibration method for binocular vision sensor using a planar target with several parallel lines. It only requires the sensor to observe the planar target at a few (at least two) different orientations. Relying on vanishing feature constraints and spacing constraints of parallel lines, linear method and nonlinear optimization are combined to estimate the structure parameters of binocular vision sensor. Linear method achieves the separation of the rotation matrix and translation vector which reduces the complexity of computation; Nonlinear algorithm ensures the calibration results for the global optimization. Towards the factors that affect the accuracy of the calibration, theoretical analysis and computer simulation are carried out respectively consequence in qualitative analysis and quantitative result. Real data shows that the accuracy of the proposed calibration method is about 0.040mm with the working distance of 800mm and the view field of 300 × 300mm. The comparison with Bougust toolbox and the method based on known length indicates that the proposed calibration method is precise and is efficient and convenient as its simple calculation and easy operation, especially for onsite calibration and self-calibration. PMID:26367553

  3. Vision development in the monocular individual: implications for the mechanisms of normal binocular vision development and the treatment of infantile esotropia.

    PubMed Central

    Day, S

    1995-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this research is to study the vision development in monocular individuals so as to better understand normal binocular vision development and to refine the treatment of infants with infantile esotropia. METHODS: Thirty-six subjects with one clinically normal eye and one eye with no vision (no light perception or history of enucleation) are studied. In addition to measurement of standard parameters of development such as visual acuity, measurement of motion processing is made by both optokinetic and electrophysiologic techniques. A comparison is made of vision development among three populations: the monocular population, the normal population, and patients with a history of infantile esotropia. Such comparison is made to study the relative effects of interruption of binocularity and binocular competition. The monocular population represents individuals who have interruption of binocularity, whereas the infantile esotropia population has both interruption of binocularity and binocular competition. RESULTS: The OKN data suggest that the monucular population is more similar to the normal population than the esotropia population. The electrophysiologic data shows a statistically significant difference in the three populations. Motion processing is more fully developed in the monocular population than in the infantile esotropia population when compared to the normal population. CONCLUSIONS: 1. The development of motion processing appears to be particularly vulnerable to abnormal experience during the first year of life. 2. Monocular subjects have a less abnormal motion processing system when compared to patients with infantile esotropia even when monocularity is congenital. 3. The results indirectly support the premise that prealignment alternate occlusion is of benefit to the patient with infantile esotropia prior to realignment. 4. Development of the motion processing system does not necessarily parallel the development of other binocular

  4. The Effects of Sports Vision Training on Binocular Vision Function in Female University Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Zwierko, Teresa; Puchalska-Niedbał, Lidia; Krzepota, Justyna; Markiewicz, Mikołaj; Woźniak, Jarosław; Lubiński, Wojciech

    2015-01-01

    Binocular vision is the most important visual cue for spatial orientation in many sports. In this study, we investigated how binocular vision was influenced by an eye training program that may be used to improve individual's oculomotor function. The experiment involved twenty-four female student athletes from team ball sports (soccer, basketball, handball). After an initial testing session, 12 participants were randomly allocated to the experimental group. Optometric investigation which included synoptophore testing and a test of dissociated horizontal phoria based on the Maddox method was performed three times: before the experiment, after eight weeks of eye training (3 times a week for 20 minutes), and four weeks after the experiment was terminated. Eye exercise methodology was based on orthoptic, sport and psychological aspects of performance. The phoria screening examination showed that exophoria was the most frequent disorder of binocular vision. Low fusional vergence range was also observed. Following the training period, 3 of the 6 oculomotor variables improved. The greatest effect was observed in near dissociated phoria (χ2 =14.56, p=0.001 for the right eye; χ2 =14.757, p=0.001 for the left eye) and fusional convergence (χ2 =8.522, p=0.014). The results of the retention test conducted four weeks after the experiment confirmed the effectiveness of the vision training program. The results of the study suggest that binocular functions are trainable and can be improved by means of appropriate visual training. PMID:26925183

  5. The Effects of Sports Vision Training on Binocular Vision Function in Female University Athletes.

    PubMed

    Zwierko, Teresa; Puchalska-Niedbał, Lidia; Krzepota, Justyna; Markiewicz, Mikołaj; Woźniak, Jarosław; Lubiński, Wojciech

    2015-12-22

    Binocular vision is the most important visual cue for spatial orientation in many sports. In this study, we investigated how binocular vision was influenced by an eye training program that may be used to improve individual's oculomotor function. The experiment involved twenty-four female student athletes from team ball sports (soccer, basketball, handball). After an initial testing session, 12 participants were randomly allocated to the experimental group. Optometric investigation which included synoptophore testing and a test of dissociated horizontal phoria based on the Maddox method was performed three times: before the experiment, after eight weeks of eye training (3 times a week for 20 minutes), and four weeks after the experiment was terminated. Eye exercise methodology was based on orthoptic, sport and psychological aspects of performance. The phoria screening examination showed that exophoria was the most frequent disorder of binocular vision. Low fusional vergence range was also observed. Following the training period, 3 of the 6 oculomotor variables improved. The greatest effect was observed in near dissociated phoria (χ(2) =14.56, p=0.001 for the right eye; χ(2) =14.757, p=0.001 for the left eye) and fusional convergence (χ(2) =8.522, p=0.014). The results of the retention test conducted four weeks after the experiment confirmed the effectiveness of the vision training program. The results of the study suggest that binocular functions are trainable and can be improved by means of appropriate visual training. PMID:26925183

  6. Functional binocular vision is not dependent on visual experience in the praying mantis.

    PubMed

    Mathis, U; Eschbach, S; Rossel, S

    1992-08-01

    In vertebrates, it has been shown that binocular visual experience is necessary to develop normal spatial vision. We have investigated whether this is also true for an invertebrate, the praying mantis. The praying mantis is a predatory insect in which prey localization involves the use of binocular disparities. We raised mantids which had one eye occluded throughout development and tested monocular visual fixation and binocular distance estimation in the adult animals. The results revealed that both fixation and prey catching behavior were normally functional in the monocularly reared animals. Thus we conclude that, in mantids, binocular vision is based on a fixed mode of development. PMID:1504028

  7. An ancient explanation of presbyopia based on binocular vision.

    PubMed

    Barbero, Sergio

    2014-06-01

    Presbyopia, understood as the age-related loss of ability to clearly see near objects, was known to ancient Greeks. However, few references to it can be found in ancient manuscripts. A relevant discussion on presbyopia appears in a book called Symposiacs written by Lucius Mestrius Plutarchus around 100 A.C. In this work, Plutarch provided four explanations of presbyopia, associated with different theories of vision. One of the explanations is particularly interesting as it is based on a binocular theory of vision. In this theory, vision is produced when visual rays, emanating from the eyes, form visual cones that impinge on the objects to be seen. Visual rays coming from old people's eyes, it was supposed, are weaker than those from younger people's eyes; so the theory, to be logically coherent, implies that this effect is compensated by the increase in light intensity due to the overlapping, at a certain distance, of the visual cones coming from both eyes. Thus, it benefits the reader to move the reading text further away from the eyes in order to increase the fusion area of both visual cones. The historical hypothesis taking into consideration that the astronomer Hipparchus of Nicaea was the source of Plutarch's explanation of the theory is discussed. PMID:23773258

  8. Some neural connections subserving binocular vision in ungulates.

    PubMed

    Pettigrew, J D; Ramachandran, V S; Bravo, H

    1984-01-01

    Using a combination of anatomical and physiological techniques we have studied some of the neural connections subserving binocular vision in two species of artiodactyl ungulates (the sheep, Ovis sp., and the goat, Capra hircus). After monocular injections of tritiated proline, transsynaptic transport was observed bilaterally in layers 4 and 6 of visual cortical areas V1 and V2, but there were no sharply defined ocular dominance columns of the kind seen in cats and rhesus monkeys. In coronal sections there was a discontinuity in density of labelling between areas V1 and V2 corresponding to a point in the visuotopic map about azimuth - 15 degrees in the ipsilateral visual field. This discontinuity was most pronounced in the hemisphere ipsilateral to the injected eye. We conclude, therefore, that while the cortical representation of ipsilateral visual space can be explained by the retino-geniculo-cortical input pathway from the contralateral eye, the physiologically demonstrated cortical contribution to ipsilateral visual space from the ipsilateral eye cannot be explained in this way. This conclusion was reinforced by experiments using retrograde transport of horseradish peroxidase from the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) and medial interlaminar nucleus (MIN) to retinal ganglion cells in flattened whole mounts. These experiments revealed a sharp nasotemporal decussation in the ipsilateral retina, which could not thereby subserve any significant representation of the ipsilateral visual field. In contrast the contralateral nasotemporal decussation was smeared, with many labelled ganglion cells in the temporal retina which could subserve visual input from the ipsilateral hemifield. When we estimated the projection of the nasotemporal decussation line into visual space, we found that it was tilted from vertical by about 5 degrees in each eye, in a similar way to that already reported in the cat. Neurophysiological recordings from binocular neurons in area V1 with

  9. Vertical disparity and binocular vision in the praying mantis.

    PubMed

    Rossel, S; Mathis, U; Collett, T

    1992-02-01

    We have investigated how the binocular control of prey capture in the praying mantis is affected by abnormally large vertical disparities, which were introduced by prisms placed in front of the eyes. The position of a target on the two retinae determines both the magnitude of head saccades made to fixate a target and its perceived distance. Over the whole range of vertical disparities tested (up to at least 30 deg), the frequency of fixating saccades is normal while the amplitude of their vertical component is a compromise between the saccades specified by each eye individually. Distance measurements are not affected by imposed vertical disparities. But the larger the vertical disparity, the more reluctant the mantid is to strike at the target until disparities exceed 15 deg when no strikes are elicited at all. PMID:1558828

  10. Robust active binocular vision through intrinsically motivated learning

    PubMed Central

    Lonini, Luca; Forestier, Sébastien; Teulière, Céline; Zhao, Yu; Shi, Bertram E.; Triesch, Jochen

    2013-01-01

    The efficient coding hypothesis posits that sensory systems of animals strive to encode sensory signals efficiently by taking into account the redundancies in them. This principle has been very successful in explaining response properties of visual sensory neurons as adaptations to the statistics of natural images. Recently, we have begun to extend the efficient coding hypothesis to active perception through a form of intrinsically motivated learning: a sensory model learns an efficient code for the sensory signals while a reinforcement learner generates movements of the sense organs to improve the encoding of the signals. To this end, it receives an intrinsically generated reinforcement signal indicating how well the sensory model encodes the data. This approach has been tested in the context of binocular vison, leading to the autonomous development of disparity tuning and vergence control. Here we systematically investigate the robustness of the new approach in the context of a binocular vision system implemented on a robot. Robustness is an important aspect that reflects the ability of the system to deal with unmodeled disturbances or events, such as insults to the system that displace the stereo cameras. To demonstrate the robustness of our method and its ability to self-calibrate, we introduce various perturbations and test if and how the system recovers from them. We find that (1) the system can fully recover from a perturbation that can be compensated through the system's motor degrees of freedom, (2) performance degrades gracefully if the system cannot use its motor degrees of freedom to compensate for the perturbation, and (3) recovery from a perturbation is improved if both the sensory encoding and the behavior policy can adapt to the perturbation. Overall, this work demonstrates that our intrinsically motivated learning approach for efficient coding in active perception gives rise to a self-calibrating perceptual system of high robustness. PMID:24223552

  11. Robust active binocular vision through intrinsically motivated learning.

    PubMed

    Lonini, Luca; Forestier, Sébastien; Teulière, Céline; Zhao, Yu; Shi, Bertram E; Triesch, Jochen

    2013-01-01

    The efficient coding hypothesis posits that sensory systems of animals strive to encode sensory signals efficiently by taking into account the redundancies in them. This principle has been very successful in explaining response properties of visual sensory neurons as adaptations to the statistics of natural images. Recently, we have begun to extend the efficient coding hypothesis to active perception through a form of intrinsically motivated learning: a sensory model learns an efficient code for the sensory signals while a reinforcement learner generates movements of the sense organs to improve the encoding of the signals. To this end, it receives an intrinsically generated reinforcement signal indicating how well the sensory model encodes the data. This approach has been tested in the context of binocular vison, leading to the autonomous development of disparity tuning and vergence control. Here we systematically investigate the robustness of the new approach in the context of a binocular vision system implemented on a robot. Robustness is an important aspect that reflects the ability of the system to deal with unmodeled disturbances or events, such as insults to the system that displace the stereo cameras. To demonstrate the robustness of our method and its ability to self-calibrate, we introduce various perturbations and test if and how the system recovers from them. We find that (1) the system can fully recover from a perturbation that can be compensated through the system's motor degrees of freedom, (2) performance degrades gracefully if the system cannot use its motor degrees of freedom to compensate for the perturbation, and (3) recovery from a perturbation is improved if both the sensory encoding and the behavior policy can adapt to the perturbation. Overall, this work demonstrates that our intrinsically motivated learning approach for efficient coding in active perception gives rise to a self-calibrating perceptual system of high robustness. PMID:24223552

  12. The Effect of Unilateral Mean Luminance on Binocular Combination in normal and amblyopic vision

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jiawei; Jia, Wuli; Huang, Chang-Bing; Hess, Robert F.

    2013-01-01

    Luminance plays a modulating role in the processes of several visual tasks, which in turn provides significant information for the understanding of visual processing. Here, using a binocular phase combination paradigm, we studied the effect of unilateral changes in mean luminance on binocular combination in both normal and amblyopic vision. We found, in normal observers, attenuation of one eye's stimulus luminance with neutral density filters produces binocular phase combination similar to those of amblyopic subjects. Correspondingly, in amblyopic observers, reduction of the fellow eye's stimulus luminance produces binocular phase combination similar to those of normal subjects. These phenomena could be explained by an attenuated contribution of the filtered eye to the binocular phase percept due to reduced gain-control. The findings have major implications both for the study of binocular combination and for amblyopia treatment. PMID:23774670

  13. Vision-based registration for augmented reality system using monocular and binocular vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallerand, Steve; Kanbara, Masayuki; Yokoya, Naokazu

    2003-05-01

    In vision-based augmented reality systems, the relation between the real and virtual worlds needs to be estimated to perform the registration of virtual objects. This paper suggests a vision-based registration method for video see-through augmented reality systems using binocular cameras which increases the quality of the registration performed using three points of a known marker. The originality of this work is the use of both monocular vision-based and stereoscopic vision-based techniques in order to complete the registration. Also, a method that performs a correction of the 2D positions in the images of the marker points is proposed. The correction improves the registration stability and accuracy of the system. The stability of the registration obtained with the proposed registration method combined or not with the correction method is compared to the registration obtained with standard stereoscopic registration.

  14. Contribution of binocular vision to the performance of complex manipulation tasks in 5-13years old visually-normal children.

    PubMed

    Alramis, Fatimah; Roy, Eric; Christian, Lisa; Niechwiej-Szwedo, Ewa

    2016-04-01

    Individual studies have shown that visuomotor coordination and aspects of binocular vision, such as stereoacuity and dynamic vergence control, continue to improve in normally developing children between birth and early teenage years. However, no study has systematically addressed the relationship between the development of binocular vision and fine manipulation skills. Thus, the aim of this cross-sectional study was to characterize performance of complex manipulation tasks during binocular and monocular viewing. Fifty-two children, between 5 and 13years old, performed 2 manipulation tasks: peg-board and bead-threading under randomized viewing conditions. Results showed that binocular viewing was associated with a significantly greater improvement in performance on the bead-threading task in comparison to the peg-board task and the youngest children showed the greatest decrement in task performance under the monocular viewing condition when performing the bead-threading task. Thus, the role of binocular vision in performance of fine manipulation skills is both task- and age-dependent. These findings have implications for assessment of visuomotor skills in children with abnormal binocular vision, which occurs in 2-3% of otherwise typically developing children. PMID:26722986

  15. Binocular Rivalry in Vision: Nucleation and Dynamics of Domain Walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kröger, H.; Lajeunesse, F.; van Ee, R.

    2010-06-01

    This work addresses percept switches in binocular rivalry caused by visual stimuli. We discuss binocular rivalry in 1D in the framework of the Wilson-Blake-Lee model. We show that the onset of oscillations shows critical behavior with a second order phase transition. We also address binocular rivalry in 2D, discuss some recent experimental results and ask the question, what can be learnt from comparison of such experiments with modeling predictions.

  16. Pediatric vision screening using binocular retinal birefringencr scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nassif, Deborah S.; Gramatikov, Boris; Guyton, David L.; Hunter, David G.

    2003-07-01

    Amblyopia, a leading cause of vision loss in childhood, is responsive to treatment if detected early in life. Risk factors for amblyopia, such as refractive error and strabismus, may be difficult to identify clinically in young children. Our laboratory has developed retinal birefringence scanning (RBS), in which a small spot of polarized light is scanned in a circle on the retina, and the returning light is measured for changes in polarization caused by the pattern of birefringent fibers that comprise the fovea. Binocular RBS (BRBS) detects the fixation of both eyes simultaneously and thus screens for strabismus, one of the risk factors of amblyopia. We have also developed a technique to automatically detect when the eye is in focus without measuring refractive error. This focus detection system utilizes a bull's eye photodetector optically conjugate to a point fixation source. Reflected light is focused back to the point source by the optical system of the eye, and if the subject focuses on the fixation source, the returning light will be focused on the detector. We have constructed a hand-held prototype combining BRBS and focus detection measurements in one quick (< 0.5 second) and accurate (theoretically detecting +/-1 of misalignment) measurement. This approach has the potential to reliably identify children at risk for amblyopia.

  17. Risk of Musculoskeletal Injuries, Fractures, and Falls in Medicare Beneficiaries With Disorders of Binocular Vision

    PubMed Central

    Pineles, Stacy L.; Repka, Michael X.; Yu, Fei; Lum, Flora; Coleman, Anne L.

    2015-01-01

    Importance Disorders of binocular vision are increasingly prevalent among fee-for-service Medicare beneficiaries 65 years or older. Visual impairment is a recognized risk factor for fractures. Despite the association of visual impairment and fracture risk, to our knowledge, no study has examined the influence that disorders of binocular vision (strabismus, amblyopia, diplopia, and nystagmus) may have on musculoskeletal injury and fracture risk in the elderly population. Objective To evaluate associations between disorders of binocular vision and musculoskeletal injury, fracture, and falls in the elderly. Design, Setting, and Participants A retrospective study of 10-year (2002-2011) musculoskeletal injury, fracture, or fall prevalence in a 5% random sample of Medicare Part B fee-for-service claims for beneficiaries with disorders of binocular vision. Participants included Medicare beneficiaries living in the general community who were 65 years or older with at least 1 year of Medicare Part B enrollment. Exposures Diagnosis of a disorder of binocular vision. Main outcomes and measures Ten-year prevalence of musculoskeletal injury, fracture, or fall in individuals with and without disorders of binocular vision. Analyses were adjusted for age, sex, race/ethnicity, region of residence, systemic and ocular comorbidities, and duration of follow-up. Results There were 2 196 881 Medicare beneficiaries identified. Of these, 99 525 (4.5%) had at least 1 reported disorder of binocular vision (strabismus, 2.3%; diplopia, 2.2%; amblyopia, 0.9%; and nystagmus, 0.2%). During the 10-year study period, there were 1 272 948 (57.9%) patients with documented musculoskeletal injury, fracture, or fall. The unadjusted odds ratio (OR) for the association between disorders of binocular vision and any of the 3 injury types was 2.23 (95% CI, 2.20-2.27; P < .001). The adjusted OR was 1.27 (95% CI, 1.25-1.29; P < .001). Conclusions and Relevance Medicare beneficiaries with a disorder of

  18. Binocular adaptive optics visual simulator: understanding the impact of aberrations on actual vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, Enrique J.; Prieto, Pedro M.; Artal, Pablo

    2010-02-01

    A novel adaptive optics system is presented for the study of vision. The apparatus is capable for binocular operation. The binocular adaptive optics visual simulator permits measuring and manipulating ocular aberrations of the two eyes simultaneously. Aberrations can be corrected, or modified, while the subject performs visual testing under binocular vision. One of the most remarkable features of the apparatus consists on the use of a single correcting device, and a single wavefront sensor (Hartmann-Shack). Both the operation and the total cost of the instrument largely benefit from this attribute. The correcting device is a liquid-crystal-on-silicon (LCOS) spatial light modulator. The basic performance of the visual simulator consists in the simultaneous projection of the two eyes' pupils onto both the corrector and sensor. Examples of the potential of the apparatus for the study of the impact of the aberrations under binocular vision are presented. Measurements of contrast sensitivity with modified combinations of spherical aberration through focus are shown. Special attention was paid on the simulation of monovision, where one eye is corrected for far vision while the other is focused at near distance. The results suggest complex binocular interactions. The apparatus can be dedicated to the better understanding of the vision mechanism, which might have an important impact in developing new protocols and treatments for presbyopia. The technique and the instrument might contribute to search optimized ophthalmic corrections.

  19. Graphical and Normative Analysis of Binocular Vision by Mini Computer: A Teaching Aid and Clinical Tool.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kees, Martin; Schor, Clifton

    1981-01-01

    An inexpensive computer graphics systems (Commodore PET), used as a video aid for teaching students advanced case analysis, is described. The course provides students with the analytical tools for evaluating with graphical and statistical techniques and treating with lenses, prisms, and orthoptics various anomalies of binocular vision. (MLW)

  20. Binocular depth acuity research to support the modular multi-spectral stereoscopic night vision goggle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merritt, John O.; CuQlock-Knopp, V. Grayson; Paicopolis, Peter; Smoot, Jennifer; Kregel, Mark; Corona, Bernard

    2006-05-01

    This paper discusses the depth acuity research conducted in support of the development of a Modular Multi-Spectral Stereoscopic (M2S2) night vision goggle (NVG), a customizable goggle that lets the user select one of five goggle configurations: monocular thermal, monocular image intensifier (I2), binocular I2, binocular thermal, and binocular dual-waveband (thermal imagery to one eye and I2 imagery to the other eye). The motives for the development of this type of customizable goggle were (1) the need for an NVG that allows the simultaneous use of two wavebands, (2) the need for an alternative sensor fusion method to avoid the potential image degradation that may accompany digitally fused images, (3) a requirement to provide the observer with stereoscopic, dual spectrum views of a scene, and (4) the need to handle individual user preferences for sensor types and ocular configurations employed in various military operations. Among the increases in functionality that the user will have with this system is the ability to convert from a binocular I2 device (needed for detailed terrain analysis during off-road mobility) to a monocular thermal device (for increased situational awareness in the unaided eye during nights with full moon illumination). Results of the present research revealed potential depth acuity advantages that may apply to off-road terrain hazard detection for the binocular thermal configuration. The results also indicated that additional studies are needed to address ways to minimize binocular incompatibility for the dual waveband configuration.

  1. Does Nocturnality Drive Binocular Vision? Octodontine Rodents as a Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Vega-Zuniga, Tomas; Medina, Felipe S.; Fredes, Felipe; Zuniga, Claudio; Severín, Daniel; Palacios, Adrián G.; Karten, Harvey J.; Mpodozis, Jorge

    2013-01-01

    Binocular vision is a visual property that allows fine discrimination of in-depth distance (stereopsis), as well as enhanced light and contrast sensitivity. In mammals enhanced binocular vision is structurally associated with a large degree of frontal binocular overlap, the presence of a corresponding retinal specialization containing a fovea or an area centralis, and well-developed ipsilateral retinal projections to the lateral thalamus (GLd). We compared these visual traits in two visually active species of the genus Octodon that exhibit contrasting visual habits: the diurnal Octodon degus, and the nocturnal Octodon lunatus. The O. lunatus visual field has a prominent 100° frontal binocular overlap, much larger than the 50° of overlap found in O. degus. Cells in the retinal ganglion cell layer were 40% fewer in O. lunatus (180,000) than in O. degus (300,000). O. lunatus has a poorly developed visual streak, but a well developed area centralis, located centrally near the optic disk (peak density of 4,352 cells/mm2). O. degus has a highly developed visual streak, and an area centralis located more temporally (peak density of 6,384 cells/mm2). The volumes of the contralateral GLd and superior colliculus (SC) are 15% larger in O. degus compared to O. lunatus. However, the ipsilateral projections to GLd and SC are 500% larger in O. lunatus than in O. degus. Other retinorecipient structures related to ocular movements and circadian activity showed no statistical differences between species. Our findings strongly suggest that nocturnal visual behavior leads to an enhancement of the structures associated with binocular vision, at least in the case of these rodents. Expansion of the binocular visual field in nocturnal species may have a beneficial effect in light and contrast sensitivity, but not necessarily in stereopsis. We discuss whether these conclusions can be extended to other mammalian and non-mammalian amniotes. PMID:24391911

  2. Camera calibration method of binocular stereo vision based on OpenCV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Wanzhen; Dong, Xiaona

    2015-10-01

    Camera calibration, an important part of the binocular stereo vision research, is the essential foundation of 3D reconstruction of the spatial object. In this paper, the camera calibration method based on OpenCV (open source computer vision library) is submitted to make the process better as a result of obtaining higher precision and efficiency. First, the camera model in OpenCV and an algorithm of camera calibration are presented, especially considering the influence of camera lens radial distortion and decentering distortion. Then, camera calibration procedure is designed to compute those parameters of camera and calculate calibration errors. High-accurate profile extraction algorithm and a checkboard with 48 corners have also been used in this part. Finally, results of calibration program are presented, demonstrating the high efficiency and accuracy of the proposed approach. The results can reach the requirement of robot binocular stereo vision.

  3. Loss of binocular vision as direct cause for misrouting of temporal retinal fibers in albinism.

    PubMed

    Banihani, Saleh M

    2015-10-01

    In humans, the nasal retina projects to the contralateral hemisphere, whereas the temporal retina projects ipsilaterally. The nasotemporal line that divides the retina into crossed and uncrossed parts coincides with the vertical meridian through the fovea. This normal projection of the retina is severely altered in albinism, in which the nasotemporal line shifted into the temporal retina with temporal retinal fibers cross the midline at the optic chiasm. This study proposes the loss of binocular vision as direct cause for misrouting of temporal retinal fibers and shifting of the nasotemporal line temporally in albinism. It is supported by many observations that clearly indicate that loss of binocular vision causes uncrossed retinal fibers to cross the midline. This hypothesis may alert scientists and clinicians to find ways to prevent or minimize the loss of binocular vision that may occur in some diseases such as albinism and early squint. Hopefully, this will minimize the misrouting of temporal fibers and improve vision in such diseases. PMID:26163060

  4. The wavelet transform and the suppression theory of binocular vision for stereo image compression

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, W.D. Jr; Kenyon, R.V.

    1996-08-01

    In this paper a method for compression of stereo images. The proposed scheme is a frequency domain approach based on the suppression theory of binocular vision. By using the information in the frequency domain, complex disparity estimation techniques can be avoided. The wavelet transform is used to obtain a multiresolution analysis of the stereo pair by which the subbands convey the necessary frequency domain information.

  5. A binocular machine vision system for three-dimensional surface measurement of small objects.

    PubMed

    Gorpas, Dimitris; Politopoulos, Kostas; Yova, Dido

    2007-12-01

    Rendering three-dimensional information of a scene from optical measurements is very important for a wide variety of applications. However, computer vision advancements have not yet achieved the accurate three-dimensional reconstruction of objects smaller than 1 cm diameter. This paper describes the development of a novel volumetric method for small objects, using a binocular machine vision system. The achieved precision is high, providing a standard deviation of 0.04 mm. The robustness, of the system, issues from the lab prototype imaging system with the crucial z-axis movement without the need of further calibration and the fully automated volumetric algorithms. PMID:17881188

  6. Self-calibration of a binocular vision system based on a one-dimensional target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yu; Li, Weimin

    2014-10-01

    This paper proposes a method of self-calibration of a binocular vision system based on a one-dimensional (1D) target. This method only needs a 1D target with two feature points and the distance between the two points is unknown. During the process of computation, the distance value can be set an arbitrary value which is near the actual distance value. Using the method proposed in this paper, we can get the parameters of the binocular vision system including internal parameters of the two cameras and the external parameters (but there exists a non-zero scale factor in the translation vector which is connected to the initial distance value we set), the distortion parameters of cameras and the three-dimensional coordinates of the two points in different positions. In this paper, we determine theoretically that the initial distance value will not influence the results, and also the results of numerical simulation and experiment example are shown to demonstrate the method. Most importantly, this method is insensitive to the initial distance value, and it is the biggest advantage. In a practical application, we can use a 1D target with unknown distance to calibrate the binocular system conveniently; also we can use this method to calibrate the camera in a large field of view with a small 1D target.

  7. Optoelectronic stereoscopic device for diagnostics, treatment, and developing of binocular vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pautova, Larisa; Elkhov, Victor A.; Ovechkis, Yuri N.

    2003-08-01

    Operation of the device is based on alternative generation of pictures for left and right eyes on the monitor screen. Controller gives pulses on LCG so that shutter for left or right eye opens synchronously with pictures. The device provides frequency of switching more than 100 Hz, and that is why the flickering is absent. Thus, a separate demonstration of images to the left eye or to the right one in turn is obtained for patients being unaware and creates the conditions of binocular perception clsoe to natural ones without any additional separation of vision fields. LC-cell transfer characteristic coodination with time parameters of monitor screen has enabled to improve stereo image quality. Complicated problem of computer stereo images with LC-glasses is so called 'ghosts' - noise images that come to blocked eye. We reduced its influence by adapting stereo images to phosphor and LC-cells characteristics. The device is intended for diagnostics and treatment of stabismus, amblyopia and other binocular and stereoscopic vision impairments, for cultivating, training and developing of stereoscopic vision, for measurements of horizontal and vertical phoria, phusion reserves, the stereovision acuity and some else, for fixing central scotoma borders, as well as suppression scotoma in strabismus too.

  8. Auditory and tactile signals combine to influence vision during binocular rivalry.

    PubMed

    Lunghi, Claudia; Morrone, Maria Concetta; Alais, David

    2014-01-15

    Resolution of perceptual ambiguity is one function of cross-modal interactions. Here we investigate whether auditory and tactile stimuli can influence binocular rivalry generated by interocular temporal conflict in human subjects. Using dichoptic visual stimuli modulating at different temporal frequencies, we added modulating sounds or vibrations congruent with one or the other visual temporal frequency. Auditory and tactile stimulation both interacted with binocular rivalry by promoting dominance of the congruent visual stimulus. This effect depended on the cross-modal modulation strength and was absent when modulation depth declined to 33%. However, when auditory and tactile stimuli that were too weak on their own to bias binocular rivalry were combined, their influence over vision was very strong, suggesting the auditory and tactile temporal signals combined to influence vision. Similarly, interleaving discrete pulses of auditory and tactile stimuli also promoted dominance of the visual stimulus congruent with the supramodal frequency. When auditory and tactile stimuli were presented at maximum strength, but in antiphase, they had no influence over vision for low temporal frequencies, a null effect again suggesting audio-tactile combination. We also found that the cross-modal interaction was frequency-sensitive at low temporal frequencies, when information about temporal phase alignment can be perceptually tracked. These results show that auditory and tactile temporal processing is functionally linked, suggesting a common neural substrate for the two sensory modalities and that at low temporal frequencies visual activity can be synchronized by a congruent cross-modal signal in a frequency-selective way, suggesting the existence of a supramodal temporal binding mechanism. PMID:24431437

  9. Perceptual quality measurement of 3D images based on binocular vision.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wujie; Yu, Lu

    2015-07-20

    Three-dimensional (3D) technology has become immensely popular in recent years and widely adopted in various applications. Hence, perceptual quality measurement of symmetrically and asymmetrically distorted 3D images has become an important, fundamental, and challenging issue in 3D imaging research. In this paper, we propose a binocular-vision-based 3D image-quality measurement (IQM) metric. Consideration of the 3D perceptual properties of the primary visual cortex (V1) and the higher visual areas (V2) for 3D-IQM is the major technical contribution to this research. To be more specific, first, the metric simulates the receptive fields of complex cells (V1) using binocular energy response and binocular rivalry response and the higher visual areas (V2) using local binary patterns features. Then, three similarity scores of 3D perceptual properties between the reference and distorted 3D images are measured. Finally, by using support vector regression, three similarity scores are integrated into an overall 3D quality score. Experimental results for two public benchmark databases demonstrate that, in comparison with most current 2D and 3D metrics, the proposed metric achieves significantly higher consistency in alignment with subjective fidelity ratings. PMID:26367842

  10. Ecomorphology of orbit orientation and the adaptive significance of binocular vision in primates and other mammals.

    PubMed

    Heesy, Christopher P

    2008-01-01

    Primates are characterized by forward-facing, or convergent, orbits and associated binocular field overlap. Hypotheses explaining the adaptive significance of these traits often relate to ecological factors, such as arboreality, nocturnal visual predation, or saltatory locomotion in a complex nocturnal, arboreal environment. This study re-examines the ecological factors that are associated with high orbit convergence in mammals. Orbit orientation data were collected for 321 extant taxa from sixteen orders of metatherian (marsupial) and eutherian mammals. These taxa were coded for activity pattern, degree of faunivory, and substrate preference. Results demonstrate that nocturnal and cathemeral mammals have significantly more convergent orbits than diurnal taxa, both within and across orders. Faunivorous eutherians (both nocturnal and diurnal) have higher mean orbit convergence than opportunistically foraging or non-faunivorous taxa. However, substrate preference is not associated with higher orbit convergence and, by extension, greater binocular visual field overlap. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that mammalian predators evolved higher orbit convergence, binocular vision, and stereopsis to counter camouflage in prey inhabiting a nocturnal environment. Strepsirhine primates have a range of orbit convergence values similar to nocturnal or cathemeral predatory non-primate mammals. These data are entirely consistent with the nocturnal visual predation hypothesis of primate origins. PMID:17878718

  11. The lost direction in binocular vision: the neglected signs posted by Wells, Towne, and LeConte.

    PubMed

    Wade, Nicholas J; Ono, Hiroshi; Mapp, Alistair P

    2006-01-01

    Studies of vision have informed theories first in philosophy and then in psychology. Over the centuries, an increasing number of phenomena have been enlisted to refute or reinforce particular theories. Nowhere has this been more evident than in binocular vision. How we see a single world with two eyes is one of the oldest and most consistently studied topics in vision research. It has been discussed at least since the time of Aristotle and it has been examined experimentally since the second century, when Ptolemy defined lines of visual correspondence for the two eyes. Prior to Wheatstone's invention of the stereoscope in the 1830s, binocular vision had been studied in terms of visual directions. The stereoscope established distance (or depth) as well as direction as dimensions of binocular vision. Subsequently, depth rather than direction has been the principal concern of students of vision, and texts in English devoted to analyses of direction rather than depth have been neglected. We examine the experiments on binocular visual direction conducted by Wells before Wheatstone, and by Towne and LeConte after him, and discuss the reasons for their neglect. PMID:16345004

  12. Improved camera calibration method based on perpendicularity compensation for binocular stereo vision measurement system.

    PubMed

    Jia, Zhenyuan; Yang, Jinghao; Liu, Wei; Wang, Fuji; Liu, Yang; Wang, Lingli; Fan, Chaonan; Zhao, Kai

    2015-06-15

    High-precision calibration of binocular vision systems plays an important role in accurate dimensional measurements. In this paper, an improved camera calibration method is proposed. First, an accurate intrinsic parameters calibration method based on active vision with perpendicularity compensation is developed. Compared to the previous work, this method eliminates the effect of non-perpendicularity of the camera motion on calibration accuracy. The principal point, scale factors, and distortion factors are calculated independently in this method, thereby allowing the strong coupling of these parameters to be eliminated. Second, an accurate global optimization method with only 5 images is presented. The results of calibration experiments show that the accuracy of the calibration method can reach 99.91%. PMID:26193503

  13. Measurement error analysis of three dimensional coordinates of tomatoes acquired using the binocular stereo vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Rong

    2014-09-01

    This study analyzes the measurement errors of three dimensional coordinates of binocular stereo vision for tomatoes based on three stereo matching methods, centroid-based matching, area-based matching, and combination matching to improve the localization accuracy of the binocular stereo vision system of tomato harvesting robots. Centroid-based matching was realized through the matching of the feature points of centroids of tomato regions. Area-based matching was realized based on the gray similarity between two neighborhoods of two pixels to be matched in stereo images. Combination matching was realized using the rough disparity acquired through centroid-based matching as the center of the dynamic disparity range which was used in area-based matching. After stereo matching, three dimensional coordinates of tomatoes were acquired using the triangle range finding principle. Test results based on 225 stereo images captured at the distances from 300 to 1000 mm of 3 tomatoes showed that the measurement errors of x coordinates were small, and can meet the need of harvesting robots. However, the measurement biases of y coordinates and depth values were large, and the measurement variation of depth values was also large. Therefore, the measurement biases of y coordinates and depth values, and the measurement variation of depth values should be corrected in the future researches.

  14. Simulating binocular vision for no-reference 3D visual quality measurement.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wu-Jie; Yu, Lu; Wu, Ming-Wei

    2015-09-01

    Perceptual quality measurement of three-dimensional (3D) visual signals has become a fundamental challenge in 3D imaging fields. This paper proposes a novel no-reference (NR) 3D visual quality measurement (VQM) metric that uses simulations of the primary visual cortex (V1) of binocular vision. As the major technical contribution of this study, perceptual properties of simple and complex cells are considered for NR 3D-VQM. More specifically, the metric simulates the receptive fields of simple cells (one class of V1 neurons) using Gaussian derivative functions, and the receptive fields of complex cells (the other class of V1 neurons) using disparity energy responses and binocular rivalry responses. Subsequently, various quality-aware features are extracted from the primary visual cortex; these will change in the presence of distortions. Finally, those features are mapped to the subjective quality score of the distorted 3D visual signal by using support vector regression (SVR). Experiments on two publicly available 3D databases confirm the effectiveness of our proposed metric, compared to the relevant full-reference (FR) and NR metrics. PMID:26368467

  15. Enhancement display of veins distribution based on binocular vision and image fusion technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Peng; Di, Si; Jin, Jian; Bai, Liping

    2014-11-01

    The capture and display of veins distribution is an important issue for some applications, such as medical diagnosis and identification. Therefore, it has become a popular topic in the field of biomedical imaging. Usually, people capture the veins distribution by infrared imaging, but the display result is similar with that of a gray picture and the color and details of skin cannot be remained. To some degree, it is unreal for doctors. In this paper, we develop a binocular vision system to carry out the enhancement display of veins under the condition of keeping actual skin color. The binocular system is consisted of two adjacent cameras. A visible band filter and an infrared band filter are placed in front of the two lenses, respectively. Therefore, the pictures of visible band and infrared band can be captured simultaneously. After that, a new fusion process is applied to the two pictures, which related to histogram mapping, principal component analysis (PCA) and modified bilateral filter fusion. The final results show that both the veins distribution and the actual skin color of the back of the hand can be clearly displayed. Besides, correlation coefficient, average gradient and average distortion are selected as the parameters to evaluate the image quality. By comparing the parameters, it is evident that our novel fusion method is prior to some popular fusion methods such as Gauss filter fusion, Intensity-hue-saturation (HIS) fusion and bilateral filter fusion.

  16. Precise positioning method for multi-process connecting based on binocular vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wei; Ding, Lichao; Zhao, Kai; Li, Xiao; Wang, Ling; Jia, Zhenyuan

    2016-01-01

    With the rapid development of aviation and aerospace, the demand for metal coating parts such as antenna reflector, eddy-current sensor and signal transmitter, etc. is more and more urgent. Such parts with varied feature dimensions, complex three-dimensional structures, and high geometric accuracy are generally fabricated by the combination of different manufacturing technology. However, it is difficult to ensure the machining precision because of the connection error between different processing methods. Therefore, a precise positioning method is proposed based on binocular micro stereo vision in this paper. Firstly, a novel and efficient camera calibration method for stereoscopic microscope is presented to solve the problems of narrow view field, small depth of focus and too many nonlinear distortions. Secondly, the extraction algorithms for law curve and free curve are given, and the spatial position relationship between the micro vision system and the machining system is determined accurately. Thirdly, a precise positioning system based on micro stereovision is set up and then embedded in a CNC machining experiment platform. Finally, the verification experiment of the positioning accuracy is conducted and the experimental results indicated that the average errors of the proposed method in the X and Y directions are 2.250 μm and 1.777 μm, respectively.

  17. Structural Parameters Calibration for Binocular Stereo Vision Sensors Using a Double-Sphere Target.

    PubMed

    Wei, Zhenzhong; Zhao, Kai

    2016-01-01

    Structural parameter calibration for the binocular stereo vision sensor (BSVS) is an important guarantee for high-precision measurements. We propose a method to calibrate the structural parameters of BSVS based on a double-sphere target. The target, consisting of two identical spheres with a known fixed distance, is freely placed in different positions and orientations. Any three non-collinear sphere centres determine a spatial plane whose normal vector under the two camera-coordinate-frames is obtained by means of an intermediate parallel plane calculated by the image points of sphere centres and the depth-scale factors. Hence, the rotation matrix R is solved. The translation vector T is determined using a linear method derived from the epipolar geometry. Furthermore, R and T are refined by nonlinear optimization. We also provide theoretical analysis on the error propagation related to the positional deviation of the sphere image and an approach to mitigate its effect. Computer simulations are conducted to test the performance of the proposed method with respect to the image noise level, target placement times and the depth-scale factor. Experimental results on real data show that the accuracy of measurement is higher than 0.9‰, with a distance of 800 mm and a view field of 250 × 200 mm². PMID:27420063

  18. Field calibration of binocular stereo vision based on fast reconstruction of 3D control field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Haijun; Liu, Changjie; Fu, Luhua; Guo, Yin

    2015-08-01

    Construction of high-speed railway in China has entered a period of rapid growth. To accurately and quickly obtain the dynamic envelope curve of high-speed vehicle is an important guarantee for safe driving. The measuring system is based on binocular stereo vision. Considering the difficulties in field calibration such as environmental changes and time limits, carried out a field calibration method based on fast reconstruction of three-dimensional control field. With the rapid assembly of pre-calibrated three-dimensional control field, whose coordinate accuracy is guaranteed by manufacture accuracy and calibrated by V-STARS, two cameras take a quick shot of it at the same time. The field calibration parameters are then solved by the method combining linear solution with nonlinear optimization. Experimental results showed that the measurement accuracy can reach up to +/- 0.5mm, and more importantly, in the premise of guaranteeing accuracy, the speed of the calibration and the portability of the devices have been improved considerably.

  19. Fundamental matrix estimation for binocular vision measuring system used in wild field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Nian; Wang, Xiangjun; Liu, Feng

    2014-11-01

    A method has been proposed to estimate the fundamental matrix of a positing and monitoring binocular vision system with a long working distance and a large field of view. Because of the long working distance and large field of view, images grabbed by this system are seriously blurred, leading to a lack of local features. The edge points are acquired using the Canny algorithm firstly, then the pre-matched points are obtained by the GMM-based points sets registration algorithm, and eventually the fundamental matrix are estimated using the RANSAC algorithm. In actual application, two cameras are 2km away from the object, the fundamental matrix are figured out, and the distance between each point and the corresponding epipolar line is less than 0.8 pixel. Repeated experiments indicate that the average distances between the points and the corresponding epipolar lines are all within 0.3 pixel and the deviations of the distances are all within 0.3 pixel too. This method takes full advantage of the edges in the environment and does not need extra control points, whats more, it can work well in low SNR images.

  20. Three-dimensional infrared imaging method based on binocular stereo vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Junhua; Ma, Haining; Zeng, Debing

    2015-10-01

    The infrared imaging technique is characterized as high-precision and noncontact and provides the temperature information of the object, leading to its broad application in civil and military fields. Currently, the research on infrared thermography is mainly focused on two-dimensional images, lacking the information in depth orientation. To extend the range of application and provide spatial information, a three-dimensional (3-D) infrared imaging system based on binocular stereo vision is presented. The system is composed of two visible-light cameras, an infrared camera, and a digital projector. The proposed system fuses the metric information and the infrared information to acquire the 3-D surface temperature distribution by combining the 3-D reconstruction technique with infrared thermography. The registration of the metric information and the infrared image is accomplished according to the properties of three-view geometry. Experiments have been undertaken with a storage box, a rudder model, and a person's stretching arm, respectively, and the results demonstrated the good performance of the proposed method.

  1. Structural Parameters Calibration for Binocular Stereo Vision Sensors Using a Double-Sphere Target

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Zhenzhong; Zhao, Kai

    2016-01-01

    Structural parameter calibration for the binocular stereo vision sensor (BSVS) is an important guarantee for high-precision measurements. We propose a method to calibrate the structural parameters of BSVS based on a double-sphere target. The target, consisting of two identical spheres with a known fixed distance, is freely placed in different positions and orientations. Any three non-collinear sphere centres determine a spatial plane whose normal vector under the two camera-coordinate-frames is obtained by means of an intermediate parallel plane calculated by the image points of sphere centres and the depth-scale factors. Hence, the rotation matrix R is solved. The translation vector T is determined using a linear method derived from the epipolar geometry. Furthermore, R and T are refined by nonlinear optimization. We also provide theoretical analysis on the error propagation related to the positional deviation of the sphere image and an approach to mitigate its effect. Computer simulations are conducted to test the performance of the proposed method with respect to the image noise level, target placement times and the depth-scale factor. Experimental results on real data show that the accuracy of measurement is higher than 0.9‰, with a distance of 800 mm and a view field of 250 × 200 mm2. PMID:27420063

  2. Landing performance by low-time private pilots after the sudden loss of binocular vision - Cyclops II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, C. E., Jr.; Swaroop, R.; Mcmurty, T. C.; Blakeley, W. R.; Masters, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    Study of low-time general aviation pilots, who, in a series of spot landings, were suddenly deprived of binocular vision by patching either eye on the downwind leg of a standard, closed traffic pattern. Data collected during these landings were compared with control data from landings flown with normal vision during the same flight. The sequence of patching and the mix of control and monocular landings were randomized to minimize the effect of learning. No decrease in performance was observed during landings with vision restricted to one eye, in fact, performance improved. This observation is reported at a high level of confidence (p less than 0.001). These findings confirm the previous work of Lewis and Krier and have important implications with regard to aeromedical certification standards.

  3. Age- and Stereovision-Dependent Eye–Hand Coordination Deficits in Children With Amblyopia and Abnormal Binocularity

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Simon; Suttle, Catherine; Melmoth, Dean R.; Conway, Miriam L.; Sloper, John J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To examine factors contributing to eye–hand coordination deficits in children with amblyopia and impaired stereovision. Methods. Participants were 55 anisometropic or strabismic children aged 5.0 to 9.25 years with different degrees of amblyopia and abnormal binocularity, along with 28 age-matched visually-normal controls. Pilot data were obtained from four additional patients studied longitudinally at different treatment stages. Movements of the preferred hand were recorded using a 3D motion-capture system while subjects reached-to-precision grasp objects (two sizes, three locations) under binocular, dominant eye, and amblyopic/nonsighting eye conditions. Kinematic and “error” performance measures were quantified and compared by viewing condition and subject group using ANOVA, stepwise regression, and correlation analyses. Results. Movements of the younger amblyopes (age 5–6 years; n = 30) were much slower, particularly in the final approach to the objects, and contained more spatial errors in reaching (∼×1.25–1.75) and grasping (∼×1.75–2.25) under all three views (P < 0.05) than their age-matched controls (n = 13). Amblyopia severity was the main contributor to their slower movements with absent stereovision a secondary factor and the unique determinant of their increased error-rates. Older amblyopes (age 7–9 years; n = 25) spent longer contacting the objects before lifting them (P = 0.015) compared with their matched controls (n = 15), with absence of stereovision still solely related to increases in reach and grasp errors, although these occurred less frequently than in younger patients. Pilot prospective data supported these findings by showing positive treatment-related associations between improved stereovision and reach-to-grasp performance. Conclusions. Strategies that children with amblyopia and abnormal binocularity use for reach-to-precision grasping change with age, from emphasis on visual feedback during the

  4. A verification and errors analysis of the model for object positioning based on binocular stereo vision for airport surface surveillance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Huan-huan; Wang, Jian; Liu, Feng; Cao, Hai-juan; Wang, Xiang-jun

    2014-12-01

    A test environment is established to obtain experimental data for verifying the positioning model which was derived previously based on the pinhole imaging model and the theory of binocular stereo vision measurement. The model requires that the optical axes of the two cameras meet at one point which is defined as the origin of the world coordinate system, thus simplifying and optimizing the positioning model. The experimental data are processed and tables and charts are given for comparing the positions of objects measured with DGPS with a measurement accuracy of 10 centimeters as the reference and those measured with the positioning model. Sources of visual measurement model are analyzed, and the effects of the errors of camera and system parameters on the accuracy of positioning model were probed, based on the error transfer and synthesis rules. A conclusion is made that measurement accuracy of surface surveillances based on binocular stereo vision measurement is better than surface movement radars, ADS-B (Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast) and MLAT (Multilateration).

  5. Assessing Binocular Interaction in Amblyopia and Its Clinical Feasibility

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, MiYoung; Lu, Zhong-Lin; Miller, Alexandra; Kazlas, Melanie; Hunter, David G.; Bex, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To measure binocular interaction in amblyopes using a rapid and patient-friendly computer-based method, and to test the feasibility of the assessment in the clinic. Methods Binocular interaction was assessed in subjects with strabismic amblyopia (n = 7), anisometropic amblyopia (n = 6), strabismus without amblyopia (n = 15) and normal vision (n = 40). Binocular interaction was measured with a dichoptic phase matching task in which subjects matched the position of a binocular probe to the cyclopean perceived phase of a dichoptic pair of gratings whose contrast ratios were systematically varied. The resulting effective contrast ratio of the weak eye was taken as an indicator of interocular imbalance. Testing was performed in an ophthalmology clinic under 8 mins. We examined the relationships between our binocular interaction measure and standard clinical measures indicating abnormal binocularity such as interocular acuity difference and stereoacuity. The test-retest reliability of the testing method was also evaluated. Results Compared to normally-sighted controls, amblyopes exhibited significantly reduced effective contrast (∼20%) of the weak eye, suggesting a higher contrast requirement for the amblyopic eye compared to the fellow eye. We found that the effective contrast ratio of the weak eye covaried with standard clincal measures of binocular vision. Our results showed that there was a high correlation between the 1st and 2nd measurements (r = 0.94, p<0.001) but without any significant bias between the two. Conclusions Our findings demonstrate that abnormal binocular interaction can be reliably captured by measuring the effective contrast ratio of the weak eye and quantitative assessment of binocular interaction is a quick and simple test that can be performed in the clinic. We believe that reliable and timely assessment of deficits in a binocular interaction may improve detection and treatment of amblyopia. PMID:24959842

  6. Interocular suppression patterns in binocularly abnormal observers using luminance- and contrast-modulated noise stimuli.

    PubMed

    Chima, Akash S; Formankiewicz, Monika A; Waugh, Sarah J

    2016-08-01

    In binocular viewing, images presented to the amblyopic eye are suppressed in the cortex to prevent confusion or diplopia. The present study measures depth and extent of interocular suppression across the central circular 24° visual field in observers with strabismus and microstrabismus. Visual stimuli were concentric rings of alternating polarity, each divided into sectors. Rings were defined by luminance (L), luminance-modulated noise (LM), or contrast-modulated noise (CM). They were viewed binocularly except for the tested ring, which was viewed dichoptically, so that the modulation of one sector presented to the weaker or amblyopic eye was adjusted to perceptually match the surrounding ring presented to the preferred eye. A two alternative forced-choice paradigm combined with a staircase procedure allowed for measurement of the point of subjective equality, or perceptual match. Depth of suppression was calculated as the difference between physical modulations presented to the two eyes at this point. Strabismic participants showed suppression deeper centrally than peripherally, and in one hemifield of the visual field more than the other. Suppression was deeper for L than LM, and CM than LM stimuli. Microstrabismic suppression was weaker than that of strabismics, central for L and LM stimuli, with suppression of CM stimuli being broader, deeper and more in one hemifield. Suppression depth was positively correlated with interocular visual acuity difference and stereoacuity reduction. Clinically, LM stimuli could be used for assessment of deeper amblyopes to assess suppression patterns, while more sensitive detection of mild suppression would be possible using CM stimuli. PMID:27580040

  7. [The role of rotary prisms and dynamic color stimuli in binocular vision recovery in children with squint].

    PubMed

    Seleznev, A V; Vakurin, E A; Kashchenko, T P; Vakurina, A E; Abramova, T F

    2010-01-01

    A modified procedure for diploid treatment is proposed to disinhibit a functional scotoma and to develop binocular vision (BV) in children with squint. The procedure is to examine a special test object through rotary prisms and polaroid filters inserted into a modernized spectacle frame. During treatment there is an opportunity of simultaneously changing the color of the test object and the position of its image on the retina. The study enrolled children in whom previous traditional methods for BV recovery had failed. Treatment using the proposed procedure could recover bifoveal fusion in 88.3% of cases (as evidenced by synoptophore examination) and BY in 73.3% (as shown by scanning haploscopy). PMID:20608198

  8. Size character optimization for measurement system with binocular vision and optical elements based on local particle swarm method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Guan; Lu, Xue; Li, Xiaotao; Su, Jian; Tian, Guangdong; Sun, Lina

    2015-02-01

    The size character, which represents the relationship of the size variables of a binocular vision model, is studied to determine the optimal structure of the measurement system. An optimal objective function is constructed to minimize the system area. The optimal solution with the constraint of the virtual baseline distance is obtained from the particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm. A case study shows that when the virtual baseline is 1300 mm, the optimal parameters are: the real baseline distance is 600 mm, the bottom distance between the two smaller mirrors is 120 mm, the distance from a smaller mirror to the camera is 600 mm, the distance from a larger mirror to the camera is 700 mm, the angle between the smaller mirror and baseline is 15°, the angle between the large mirror and baseline is 30°, larger mirror is 500 mm long, then the optimal system area is 0.838 m2.

  9. Technique for positioning moving binocular vision measurement system and data registration with ball target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Fei-fei; Zhao, Hong; Zhao, Zinxin; Zhang, Lu

    2013-04-01

    A ball-based intermediary target technique is presented to position moving machine vision measurement system and to realize data registration under different positions. Large-sized work-piece measurement based on machine vision faces several problems: limited viewing angle, range and accuracy of measurement inversely proportional. To measure the whole work-piece conveniently and precisely, the idea that using balls as registration target is proposed in this paper. Only a single image of the ball target is required from each camera then the vision system is fully calibrated (intrinsic and extrinsic camera parameters). When the vision system has to be moved to measure the whole work-piece, one snapshot of the ball target in the common view can position the system. Then data registration can be fulfilled. To achieve more accurate position of ball's center, an error correction model is established.

  10. Investigating binocular summation in human vision using complementary fused external noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, Christopher L.; Olson, Jeffrey T.

    2016-05-01

    The impact noise has on the processing of visual information at various stages within the human visual system (HVS) is still an open research area. To gain additional insight, twelve experiments were administered to human observers using sine wave targets to determine their contrast thresholds. A single frame of additive white Gaussian noise (AWGN) and its complement were used to investigate the effect of noise on the summation of visual information within the HVS. A standard contrast threshold experiment served as the baseline for comparisons. In the standard experiment, a range of sine wave targets are shown to the observers and their ability to detect the targets at varying contrast levels were recorded. The remaining experiments added some form of noise (noise image or its complement) and/or an additional sine wave target separated between one to three octaves to the test target. All of these experiments were tested using either a single monitor for viewing the targets or with a dual monitor presentation method for comparison. In the dual monitor experiments, a ninety degree mirror was used to direct each target to a different eye, allowing for the information to be fused binocularly. The experiments in this study present different approaches for delivering external noise to the HVS, and should allow for an improved understanding regarding how noise enters the HVS and what impact noise has on the processing of visual information.

  11. Vibration studies of simply supported beam based on binocular stereo vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Chaojia; Deng, Huaxia; Zhang, Jin; Yu, Liandong

    2015-02-01

    That sensors are used to collect experimental data is still prevalent nowadays. A common way to analyze the mode of vibration of a structure, lots of sensors may required to be installed on the structure in order to ensure completeness of data. However, if these data can be obtained based on machine vision, the effects caused by sensors on the beam would be removed. A new kind of non-contact method will be used to measure the mode of vibration of simply supported beam. In this paper, the basic theory of the simply supported beam and machine vision will be introduced. It is different from traditional way that is based on a large number of sensors to collect experimental data. Two cameras record the vibration process of simply supported beam while the beam is vibrating caused by an exciter. After those images that have recorded the vibration process of simply supported beam are processed, calibration and registration included, those data collected by sensors also are reconstructed by traditional modal test method for comparison. Through comparing the machine vision method and sensor based method, errors caused by the process of reconstruction might be analyzed. The first order modal vibration modes by using two ways and combining with finite element method to produce can also be analyzed what their differences are.

  12. Lightweight camera head for robotic-based binocular stereo vision: an integrated engineering approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pretlove, John R. G.; Parker, Graham A.

    1992-03-01

    This paper presents the design and development of a real-time eye-in-hand stereo-vision system to aid robot guidance in a manufacturing environment. The stereo vision head comprises a novel camera arrangement with servo-vergence, focus, and aperture that continuously provides high-quality images to a dedicated image processing system and parallel processing array. The stereo head has four degrees of freedom but it relies on the robot end- effector for all remaining movement. This provides the robot with exploratory sensing abilities allowing it to undertake a wider variety of less constrained tasks. Unlike other stereo vision research heads, the overriding factor in the Surrey head has been a truly integrated engineering approach in an attempt to solve an extremely complex problem. The head is low cost, low weight, employs state-of-the-art motor technology, is highly controllable and occupies a small size envelope. Its intended applications include high-accuracy metrology, 3-D path following, object recognition and tracking, parts manipulation, and component inspection for the manufacturing industry.

  13. Device for diagnosis and treatment of impairments on binocular vision and stereopsis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahn, Jieun; Choi, Yong-Jin; Son, Jung-Young; Kodratiev, N. V.; Elkhov, Victor A.; Ovechkis, Yuri N.; Chung, Chan-sup

    2001-06-01

    Strabismus and amblyopia are two main impairments of our visual system, which are responsible for the loss of stereovision. A device is developed for diagnosis and treatment of strabismus and amblyopia, and for training and developing stereopsis. This device is composed of a liquid crystal glasses (LCG), electronics for driving LCG and synchronizing with an IBM PC, and a special software. The software contains specially designed patterns and graphics for enabling to train and develop stereopsis, and do objective measurement of some stereoscopic vision parameters such as horizontal and vertical phoria, fusion, fixation disparity, and stereoscopic visual threshold.

  14. Psychophysical measurement of night vision goggle noise using a binocular display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reis, George A.; Marasco, Peter L.; Havig, Paul R.; Heft, Eric L.

    2004-09-01

    Users of night vision goggles (NVGs) have reported differences in perceived noise across various NVGs. To understand these differences, we need to measure NVG noise in a psychophysical context. In the precursory study, subjects attempted to characterize NVG noise by examining choices across different parameters of filtered white noise generated on a computer monitor. Subjects adjusted parameters of the filtered noise to match the noise for each combination of two goggles and two luminance levels. Significant differences were found between luminance levels, NVG type, and parameter relationships. Concerns from the previous experiment have yielded this study to better understand if this characterization process has merit. In the previous study, the parameter sequence was constant across trials. We increased the number of trials and subjects, and we included an accounting for parameter sequence. In addition, we used a modified Wheatstone stereoscope to simulate NVG tube independence. We discuss our results in terms of luminance levels, parameter sequence, subject variability, and relationships between parameters.

  15. Parallel algorithm for dominant points correspondences in robot binocular stereo vision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Al-Tammami, A.; Singh, B.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents an algorithm to find the correspondences of points representing dominant feature in robot stereo vision. The algorithm consists of two main steps: dominant point extraction and dominant point matching. In the feature extraction phase, the algorithm utilizes the widely used Moravec Interest Operator and two other operators: the Prewitt Operator and a new operator called Gradient Angle Variance Operator. The Interest Operator in the Moravec algorithm was used to exclude featureless areas and simple edges which are oriented in the vertical, horizontal, and two diagonals. It was incorrectly detecting points on edges which are not on the four main directions (vertical, horizontal, and two diagonals). The new algorithm uses the Prewitt operator to exclude featureless areas, so that the Interest Operator is applied only on the edges to exclude simple edges and to leave interesting points. This modification speeds-up the extraction process by approximately 5 times. The Gradient Angle Variance (GAV), an operator which calculates the variance of the gradient angle in a window around the point under concern, is then applied on the interesting points to exclude the redundant ones and leave the actual dominant ones. The matching phase is performed after the extraction of the dominant points in both stereo images. The matching starts with dominant points in the left image and does a local search, looking for corresponding dominant points in the right image. The search is geometrically constrained the epipolar line of the parallel-axes stereo geometry and the maximum disparity of the application environment. If one dominant point in the right image lies in the search areas, then it is the corresponding point of the reference dominant point in the left image. A parameter provided by the GAV is thresholded and used as a rough similarity measure to select the corresponding dominant point if there is more than one point the search area. The correlation is used as

  16. Binocular advantages in reading.

    PubMed

    Jainta, Stephanie; Blythe, Hazel I; Liversedge, Simon P

    2014-03-01

    Reading, an essential skill for successful function in today's society, is a complex psychological process involving vision, memory, and language comprehension. Variability in fixation durations during reading reflects the ease of text comprehension, and increased word frequency results in reduced fixation times. Critically, readers not only process the fixated foveal word but also preprocess the parafoveal word to its right, thereby facilitating subsequent foveal processing. Typically, text is presented binocularly, and the oculomotor control system precisely coordinates the two frontally positioned eyes online. Binocular, compared to monocular, visual processing typically leads to superior performance, termed the "binocular advantage"; few studies have investigated the binocular advantage in reading. We used saccade-contingent display change methodology to demonstrate the benefit of binocular relative to monocular text presentation for both parafoveal and foveal lexical processing during reading. Our results demonstrate that denial of a unified visual signal derived from binocular inputs provides a cost to the efficiency of reading, particularly in relation to high-frequency words. Our findings fit neatly with current computational models of eye movement control during reading, wherein successful word identification is a primary determinant of saccade initiation. PMID:24530062

  17. What is binocular disparity?

    PubMed Central

    Lappin, Joseph S.

    2014-01-01

    What are the geometric primitives of binocular disparity? The Venetian blind effect and other converging lines of evidence indicate that stereoscopic depth perception derives from disparities of higher-order structure in images of surfaces. Image structure entails spatial variations of intensity, texture, and motion, jointly structured by observed surfaces. The spatial structure of binocular disparity corresponds to the spatial structure of surfaces. Independent spatial coordinates are not necessary for stereoscopic vision. Stereopsis is highly sensitive to structural disparities associated with local surface shape. Disparate positions on retinal anatomy are neither necessary nor sufficient for stereopsis. PMID:25161634

  18. A binocular iPad treatment for amblyopic children

    PubMed Central

    Li, S L; Jost, R M; Morale, S E; Stager, D R; Dao, L; Stager, D; Birch, E E

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Monocular amblyopia treatment (patching or penalization) does not always result in 6/6 vision and amblyopia often recurs. As amblyopia arises from abnormal binocular visual experience, we evaluated the effectiveness of a novel home-based binocular amblyopia treatment. Methods Children (4–12 y) wore anaglyphic glasses to play binocular games on an iPad platform for 4 h/w for 4 weeks. The first 25 children were assigned to sham games and then 50 children to binocular games. Children in the binocular group had the option of participating for an additional 4 weeks. Compliance was monitored with calendars and tracking fellow eye contrast settings. About half of the children in each group were also treated with patching at a different time of day. Best-corrected visual acuity, suppression, and stereoacuity were measured at baseline, at the 4- and 8-week outcome visits, and 3 months after cessation of treatment. Results Mean (±SE) visual acuity improved in the binocular group from 0.47±0.03 logMAR at baseline to 0.39±0.03 logMAR at 4 weeks (P<0.001); there was no significant change for the sham group. The effect of binocular games on visual acuity did not differ for children who were patched vs those who were not. The median stereoacuity remained unchanged in both groups. An additional 4 weeks of treatment did not yield additional visual acuity improvement. Visual acuity improvements were maintained for 3 months after the cessation of treatment. Conclusions Binocular iPad treatment rapidly improved visual acuity, and visual acuity was stable for at least 3 months following the cessation of treatment. PMID:25060850

  19. Binocular Fixation in the Newborn Baby

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slater, Alan M.; Findlay, John M.

    1975-01-01

    Three experiments are reported in which 15 babies were presented with visual stimuli which varied in shape and distance from the eye. Results indicated that the majority of subjects binocularly fixated all three stimuli and it was concluded that the newborn baby has the basic requirements for binocular vision. (Author/GO)

  20. Discrete Gabor Filters For Binocular Disparity Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiman, Carl F. R.

    1995-01-01

    Discrete Gabor filters proposed for use in determining binocular disparity - difference between positions of same feature or object depicted in stereoscopic images produced by two side-by-side cameras aimed in parallel. Magnitude of binocular disparity used to estimate distance from cameras to feature or object. In one potential application, cameras charge-coupled-device video cameras in robotic vision system, and binocular disparities and distance estimates used as control inputs - for example, to control approaches to objects manipulated or to maintain safe distances from obstacles. Binocular disparities determined from phases of discretized Gabor transforms.

  1. Federal regulation of vision enhancement devices for normal and abnormal vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drum, Bruce

    2006-09-01

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) evaluates the safety and effectiveness of medical devices and biological products as well as food and drugs. The FDA defines a device as a product that is intended, by physical means, to diagnose, treat, or prevent disease, or to affect the structure or function of the body. All vision enhancement devices fulfill this definition because they are intended to affect a function (vision) of the body. In practice, however, FDA historically has drawn a distinction between devices that are intended to enhance low vision as opposed to normal vision. Most low vision aids are therapeutic devices intended to compensate for visual impairment, and are actively regulated according to their level of risk to the patient. The risk level is usually low (e.g. Class I, exempt from 510(k) submission requirements for magnifiers that do not touch the eye), but can be as high as Class III (requiring a clinical trial and Premarket Approval (PMA) application) for certain implanted and prosthetic devices (e.g. intraocular telescopes and prosthetic retinal implants). In contrast, the FDA usually does not actively enforce its regulations for devices that are intended to enhance normal vision, are low risk, and do not have a medical intended use. However, if an implanted or prosthetic device were developed for enhancing normal vision, the FDA would likely decide to regulate it actively, because its intended use would entail a substantial medical risk to the user. Companies developing such devices should contact the FDA at an early stage to clarify their regulatory status.

  2. Method of curved surface abnormal holes vision measurement based on high precision turntable

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyu, Laipeng; Bi, Chao; Fang, Jianguo; Zhu, Yong; Wang, Liping

    2015-10-01

    For solving the difficult problem that there is no effective way to measure abnormal holes located at blade erection loop of aero-engine case, an image measurement system based on high precision air-bearing turntable is established in this paper. The issue that monocular vision can't measure curved surface has overcome by using high precision turntable to make sure high positioning accuracy of the surface abnormal holes and high-resolution microscope lens which is used to image local tiny features. Besides, an algorithm of determining the boundary points of a trailing edge on the contour of abnormal hole is proposed to achieve a rapid fitting and accuracy. After experiments and analysis, results show that the system can be used to measure local tiny features on curved surfaces validly and efficiently.

  3. Binocular Vision for Communication Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubin, Donald L.

    2002-01-01

    Suggests that focusing on communication in education reveals how communication studies and educational studies might better inform each other. Discusses teacher immediacy research, classroom discourse analyses, and research that synthesizes the best of both of those. Concludes that the richest programs of research may be those drawing upon both…

  4. Vision in Children and Adolescents with Autistic Spectrum Disorder: Evidence for Reduced Convergence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milne, Elizabeth; Griffiths, Helen; Buckley, David; Scope, Alison

    2009-01-01

    Evidence of atypical perception in individuals with ASD is mainly based on self report, parental questionnaires or psychophysical/cognitive paradigms. There have been relatively few attempts to establish whether binocular vision is enhanced, intact or abnormal in those with ASD. To address this, we screened visual function in 51 individuals with…

  5. Diagnosis of Normal and Abnormal Color Vision with Cone-Specific VEPs

    PubMed Central

    Rabin, Jeff C.; Kryder, Andrew C.; Lam, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Normal color vision depends on normal long wavelength (L), middle wavelength (M), and short wavelength sensitive (S) cones. Hereditary “red-green” color vision deficiency (CVD) is due to a shift in peak sensitivity or lack of L or M cones. Hereditary S cone CVD is rare but can be acquired as an early sign of disease. Current tests detect CVD but few diagnose type or severity, critical for linking performance to real-world demands. The anomaloscope and newer subjective tests quantify CVD but are not applicable to infants or cognitively impaired patients. Our purpose was to develop an objective test of CVD with sensitivity and specificity comparable to current tests. Methods A calibrated visual-evoked potential (VEP) display and Food and Drug Administration-approved system was used to record L, M, and S cone-specific pattern-onset VEPs from 18 color vision normals (CVNs) and 13 hereditary CVDs. VEP amplitudes and latencies were compared between groups to establish VEP sensitivity and specificity. Results Cone VEPs show 100% sensitivity for diagnosis of CVD and 94% specificity for confirming CVN. L cone (protan) CVDs showed a significant increase in L cone latency (53.1 msec, P < 0.003) and decreased amplitude (10.8 uV, P < 0.0000005) but normal M and S cone VEPs (P > 0.31). M cone (deutan) CVDs showed a significant increase in M cone latency (31.0 msec, P < 0.000004) and decreased amplitude (8.4 uV, P < 0.006) but normal L and S cone VEPs (P > 0.29). Conclusions Cone-specific VEPs offer a rapid, objective test to diagnose hereditary CVD and show potential for detecting acquired CVD in various diseases. Translational Relevance This paper describes the efficacy of cone-specific color VEPs for quantification of normal and abnormal color vision. The rapid, objective nature of this approach makes it suitable for detecting color sensitivity loss in infants and the cognitively impaired. PMID:27226932

  6. Performance of the CellaVision® DM96 system for detecting red blood cell morphologic abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Horn, Christopher L.; Mansoor, Adnan; Wood, Brenda; Nelson, Heather; Higa, Diane; Lee, Lik Hang; Naugler, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Background: Red blood cell (RBC) analysis is a key feature in the evaluation of hematological disorders. The gold standard light microscopy technique has high sensitivity, but is a relativity time-consuming and labor intensive procedure. This study tested the sensitivity and specificity of gold standard light microscopy manual differential to the CellaVision® DM96 (CCS; CellaVision, Lund, Sweden) automated image analysis system, which takes digital images of samples at high magnification and compares these images with an artificial neural network based on a database of cells and preclassified according to RBC morphology. Methods: In this study, 212 abnormal peripheral blood smears within the Calgary Laboratory Services network of hospital laboratories were selected and assessed for 15 different RBC morphologic abnormalities by manual microscopy. The same samples were reassessed as a manual addition from the instrument screen using the CellaVision® DM96 system with 8 microscope high power fields (×100 objective and a 22 mm ocular). The results of the investigation were then used to calculate the sensitivity and specificity of the CellaVision® DM96 system in reference to light microscopy. Results: The sensitivity ranged from a low of 33% (RBC agglutination) to a high of 100% (sickle cells, stomatocytes). The remainder of the RBC abnormalities tested somewhere between these two extremes. The specificity ranged from 84% (schistocytes) to 99.5% (sickle cells, stomatocytes). Conclusions: Our results showed generally high specificities but variable sensitivities for RBC morphologic abnormalities. PMID:25774322

  7. Automated Detection of Ocular Alignment with Binocular Retinal Birefringence Scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunter, David G.; Shah, Ankoor S.; Sau, Soma; Nassif, Deborah; Guyton, David L.

    2003-06-01

    We previously developed a retinal birefringence scanning (RBS) device to detect eye fixation. The purpose of this study was to determine whether a new binocular RBS (BRBS) instrument can detect simultaneous fixation of both eyes. Control (nonmyopic and myopic) and strabismic subjects were studied by use of BRBS at a fixation distance of 45 cm. Binocularity (the percentage of measurements with bilateral fixation) was determined from the BRBS output. All nonstrabismic subjects with good quality signals had binocularity >75%. Binocularity averaged 5% in four subjects with strabismus (range of 0 -20%). BRBS may potentially be used to screen individuals for abnormal eye alignment.

  8. Spatial-frequency dependent binocular imbalance in amblyopia

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, MiYoung; Wiecek, Emily; Dakin, Steven C.; Bex, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    While amblyopia involves both binocular imbalance and deficits in processing high spatial frequency information, little is known about the spatial-frequency dependence of binocular imbalance. Here we examined binocular imbalance as a function of spatial frequency in amblyopia using a novel computer-based method. Binocular imbalance at four spatial frequencies was measured with a novel dichoptic letter chart in individuals with amblyopia, or normal vision. Our dichoptic letter chart was composed of band-pass filtered letters arranged in a layout similar to the ETDRS acuity chart. A different chart was presented to each eye of the observer via stereo-shutter glasses. The relative contrast of the corresponding letter in each eye was adjusted by a computer staircase to determine a binocular Balance Point at which the observer reports the letter presented to either eye with equal probability. Amblyopes showed pronounced binocular imbalance across all spatial frequencies, with greater imbalance at high compared to low spatial frequencies (an average increase of 19%, p < 0.01). Good test-retest reliability of the method was demonstrated by the Bland-Altman plot. Our findings suggest that spatial-frequency dependent binocular imbalance may be useful for diagnosing amblyopia and as an outcome measure for recovery of binocular vision following therapy. PMID:26603125

  9. Spatial-frequency dependent binocular imbalance in amblyopia.

    PubMed

    Kwon, MiYoung; Wiecek, Emily; Dakin, Steven C; Bex, Peter J

    2015-01-01

    While amblyopia involves both binocular imbalance and deficits in processing high spatial frequency information, little is known about the spatial-frequency dependence of binocular imbalance. Here we examined binocular imbalance as a function of spatial frequency in amblyopia using a novel computer-based method. Binocular imbalance at four spatial frequencies was measured with a novel dichoptic letter chart in individuals with amblyopia, or normal vision. Our dichoptic letter chart was composed of band-pass filtered letters arranged in a layout similar to the ETDRS acuity chart. A different chart was presented to each eye of the observer via stereo-shutter glasses. The relative contrast of the corresponding letter in each eye was adjusted by a computer staircase to determine a binocular Balance Point at which the observer reports the letter presented to either eye with equal probability. Amblyopes showed pronounced binocular imbalance across all spatial frequencies, with greater imbalance at high compared to low spatial frequencies (an average increase of 19%, p < 0.01). Good test-retest reliability of the method was demonstrated by the Bland-Altman plot. Our findings suggest that spatial-frequency dependent binocular imbalance may be useful for diagnosing amblyopia and as an outcome measure for recovery of binocular vision following therapy. PMID:26603125

  10. Improvement in Binocular Summation After Strabismus Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Pineles, Stacy L.; Demer, Joseph L.; Isenberg, Sherwin J.; Birch, Eileen E.; Velez, Federico G.

    2015-01-01

    Importance Binocular summation (BiS), or improvement in visual acuity using binocular vision compared with the better eye alone, is diminished in patients with strabismus. However, it is still not known how strabismus surgery affects BiS. Objective To determine whether BiS improves after strabismus surgery. Design, Setting, and Participants Prospective study of 97 patients undergoing strabismus surgery between September 1, 2011, and January 31, 2014, comparing preoperative and postoperative measures of BiS. Patients were recruited within 1 month before undergoing strabismus surgery. The study took place at an academic pediatric ophthalmology and strabismus practice. Intervention Strabismus surgery. Main Outcomes and Measures All patients underwent high- and low-contrast visual acuity testing binocularly and monocularly at preoperative and 2-month postoperative visits. Binocular summation was calculated for high-contrast Early Treatment of Diabetic Retinopathy Study charts and Sloan low-contrast acuity charts at 2.5% and 1.25% contrast as the difference between the binocular score and that of the better eye. Preoperative and postoperative values were compared. Results There was an improvement in BiS at the 2 low-contrast levels for all patients and for all contrast levels in the 75 patients in whom surgery successfully restored binocular alignment. For low-contrast acuity, the proportion of patients with a BiS score of at least 5 letters postoperatively was almost twice that of preoperatively (21% to 30% and 13% to 26% for 2.5% contrast and 1.25% contrast, respectively). Similarly, the proportion of patients with binocular inhibition (BiS score worse by at least 5 letters than the better eye score) was decreased postoperatively at all contrast levels (from 22% to 14% for 1.25% contrast). Thirty-one percent of patients experienced improvement in BiS scores postoperatively at the lowest contrast level. Conclusions and Relevance Binocular summation scores improved

  11. Binocular eye movements in health and disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyler, Christopher W.

    2013-03-01

    Binocular eye movements form a finely-tuned system that requires accurate coordination of the oculomotor dynamics and supports the vergence movements for tracking the fine binocular disparities required for 3D vision, and are particularly susceptible to disruption by brain injury and other neural dysfunctions. Saccadic dynamics for a population of 84 diverse participants show tight coefficients of variation of 2-10% of the mean value of each parameter. Significantly slower dynamics were seen for vertical upward saccades. Binocular coordination of saccades was accurate to within 1-4%, implying the operation of brainstem coordination mechanisms rather than independent cortical control of the two eyes. A new principle of oculomotor control - reciprocal binocular inhibition - is introduced to complement Sherrington's and Hering's Laws. This new law accounts for the fact that symmetrical vergence responses are about five times slower than saccades of the same amplitude, although a comprehensive analysis of asymmetrical vergence responses revealed unexpected variety in vergence dynamics. This analysis of the variety of human vergence responses thus contributes substantially to the understanding of the oculomotor control mechanisms underlying the generation of vergence movements and of the deficits in the oculomotor control resulting from mild traumatic brain injury.

  12. Ideal Binocular Disparity Detectors Learned Using Independent Subspace Analysis on Binocular Natural Image Pairs

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, David W.; Hibbard, Paul B.

    2016-01-01

    An influential theory of mammalian vision, known as the efficient coding hypothesis, holds that early stages in the visual cortex attempts to form an efficient coding of ecologically valid stimuli. Although numerous authors have successfully modelled some aspects of early vision mathematically, closer inspection has found substantial discrepancies between the predictions of some of these models and observations of neurons in the visual cortex. In particular analysis of linear-non-linear models of simple-cells using Independent Component Analysis has found a strong bias towards features on the horoptor. In order to investigate the link between the information content of binocular images, mathematical models of complex cells and physiological recordings, we applied Independent Subspace Analysis to binocular image patches in order to learn a set of complex-cell-like models. We found that these complex-cell-like models exhibited a wide range of binocular disparity-discriminability, although only a minority exhibited high binocular discrimination scores. However, in common with the linear-non-linear model case we found that feature detection was limited to the horoptor suggesting that current mathematical models are limited in their ability to explain the functionality of the visual cortex. PMID:26982184

  13. Toward a General Theory of Stereopsis: Binocular Matching, Occluding Contours, and Fusion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Barton L.; Nakayama, Ken

    1994-01-01

    The role of occlusion configurations in binocular vision was studied in 4 experiments with 10 adult observers. Results reveal that occlusion relationships are sensed during the earliest stages of binocular processing. A simple theoretical framework that unifies fusion, stereopsis, and occlusion is advanced. (SLD)

  14. Multipurpose binocular scanning apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlain, F. R.; Parker, G. L.

    1969-01-01

    Optical gimballing apparatus directs narrow fields of view throughout solid angle approaching 4 pi steradians. Image rotation produced by scanning can be eliminated or altered by gear trains directly linked to the scanning drive assembly. It provides the basis for a binocular scanning capability.

  15. Augmented Reality Binoculars.

    PubMed

    Oskiper, Taragay; Sizintsev, Mikhail; Branzoi, Vlad; Samarasekera, Supun; Kumar, Rakesh

    2015-05-01

    In this paper we present an augmented reality binocular system to allow long range high precision augmentation of live telescopic imagery with aerial and terrain based synthetic objects, vehicles, people and effects. The inserted objects must appear stable in the display and must not jitter and drift as the user pans around and examines the scene with the binoculars. The design of the system is based on using two different cameras with wide field of view and narrow field of view lenses enclosed in a binocular shaped shell. Using the wide field of view gives us context and enables us to recover the 3D location and orientation of the binoculars much more robustly, whereas the narrow field of view is used for the actual augmentation as well as to increase precision in tracking. We present our navigation algorithm that uses the two cameras in combination with an inertial measurement unit and global positioning system in an extended Kalman filter and provides jitter free, robust and real-time pose estimation for precise augmentation. We have demonstrated successful use of our system as part of information sharing example as well as a live simulated training system for observer training, in which fixed and rotary wing aircrafts, ground vehicles, and weapon effects are combined with real world scenes. PMID:26357208

  16. A new form of rapid binocular plasticity in adult with amblyopia

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jiawei; Thompson, Benjamin; Hess, Robert F.

    2013-01-01

    Amblyopia is a neurological disorder of binocular vision affecting up to 3% of the population resulting from a disrupted period of early visual development. Recently, it has been shown that vision can be partially restored by intensive monocular or dichoptic training (4–6 weeks). This can occur even in adults owing to a residual degree of brain plasticity initiated by repetitive and successive sensory stimulation. Here we show that the binocular imbalance that characterizes amblyopia can be reduced by occluding the amblyopic eye with a translucent patch for as little as 2.5 hours, suggesting a degree of rapid binocular plasticity in adults resulting from a lack of sensory stimulation. The integrated binocular benefit is larger in our amblyopic group than in our normal control group. We propose that this rapid improvement in function, as a result of reduced sensory stimulation, represents a new form of plasticity operating at a binocular site. PMID:24026421

  17. Curriculum Model for Oculomotor. Binocular, and Visual Perception Dysfunctions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Optometric Education, 1988

    1988-01-01

    A curriculum for disorders of oculomotor control, binocular vision, and visual perception, adopted by the Association of Schools and Colleges of Optometry, is outlined. The curriculum's 14 objectives in physiology, perceptual and cognitive development, epidemiology, public health, diagnosis and management, environmental influences, care delivery,…

  18. Vision in albinism.

    PubMed Central

    Summers, C G

    1996-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this investigation was to study vision in albinism from 3 perspectives: first, to determine the characteristics of grating acuity development in children with albinism; second, to study the effect of illumination on grating acuity; and third, to define the effect of melanin pigment in the macula on visual acuity. METHODS: I. Binocular and monocular grating acuity was measured with the acuity card procedure in 40 children with albinism during the first 3 years of life. Recognition acuity was eventually measured in 27 of these patients. Ocular pigment was documented by a previously established method of grading iris transillumination and macular transparency. II. Grating acuity under standard and increased illumination levels was measured in 20 adults with albinism (group I) compared with that in 20 adults with nystagmus due to conditions other than albinism (group II) and 20 adults without ocular abnormalities (group III). Recognition acuity measured with the ETDRS charts was also recorded for each group. III. Best-corrected binocular acuity was measured in 29 patients with albinism who were identified with melanin pigment in their maculas by direct ophthalmoscopy. RESULTS: I. Both binocular and monocular grating acuity was reduced 2 to 3 octaves below the norm for ages 6 months to 3 years. Limited data available in the first 6 months of life did not show failure of vision to develop. Grating acuity measurements overestimated eventual recognition acuity. Mean recognition acuity was 20/111. A relationship between grating acuity development and presence or absence of ocular pigment was not found. II. Grating acuity was significantly better for groups I and II under the condition of increased illumination (P < .03). For patients with albinism, grating acuity under standard illumination was significantly better than recognition acuity (P < .001). For all groups, grating acuity under increased illumination was significantly better than recognition

  19. Binocular vision: defining the historical directions.

    PubMed

    Ono, Hiroshi; Wade, Nicholas J; Lillakas, Linda

    2009-01-01

    Ever since Kepler described the image-forming properties of the eye (400 years ago) there has been a widespread belief, which remains to this day, that an object seen with one eye is always seen where it is. Predictions made by Ptolemy in the first century, Alhazen in the eleventh, and Wells in the eighteenth, and supported by Towne, Hering, and LeConte in the nineteenth century, however, are contrary to this claimed veridicality. We discuss how among eighteenth- and nineteenth-century British researchers, particularly Porterfield, Brewster, and Wheatstone, the erroneous idea continued and also why observations made by Wells were neither understood nor appreciated. Finally, we discuss recent data, obtained with a new method, that further support Wells's predictions and which show that a distinction between headcentric and relative direction tasks is needed to appreciate the predictions. PMID:19522319

  20. The research on binocular stereo video imaging and display system based on low-light CMOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Ruobing; Li, Li; Jin, Weiqi; Guo, Hong

    2015-10-01

    It is prevalent for the low-light night-vision helmet to equip the binocular viewer with image intensifiers. Such equipment can not only acquire night vision ability, but also obtain the sense of stereo vision to achieve better perception and understanding of the visual field. However, since the image intensifier is for direct-observation, it is difficult to apply the modern image processing technology. As a result, developing digital video technology in night vision is of great significance. In this paper, we design a low-light night-vision helmet with digital imaging device. It consists of three parts: a set of two low-illumination CMOS cameras, a binocular OLED micro display and an image processing PCB. Stereopsis is achieved through the binocular OLED micro display. We choose Speed-Up Robust Feature (SURF) algorithm for image registration. Based on the image matching information and the cameras' calibration parameters, disparity can be calculated in real-time. We then elaborately derive the constraints of binocular stereo display. The sense of stereo vision can be obtained by dynamically adjusting the content of the binocular OLED micro display. There is sufficient space for function extensions in our system. The performance of this low-light night-vision helmet can be further enhanced in combination with The HDR technology and image fusion technology, etc.

  1. ‘Proto-rivalry’: how the binocular brain identifies gloss

    PubMed Central

    Muryy, Alexander A.; Welchman, Andrew E.

    2016-01-01

    Visually identifying glossy surfaces can be crucial for survival (e.g. ice patches on a road), yet estimating gloss is computationally challenging for both human and machine vision. Here, we demonstrate that human gloss perception exploits some surprisingly simple binocular fusion signals, which are likely available early in the visual cortex. In particular, we show that the unusual disparity gradients and vertical offsets produced by reflections create distinctive ‘proto-rivalrous’ (barely fusible) image regions that are a critical indicator of gloss. We find that manipulating the gradients and vertical components of binocular disparities yields predictable changes in material appearance. Removing or occluding proto-rivalrous signals makes surfaces look matte, while artificially adding such signals to images makes them appear glossy. This suggests that the human visual system has internalized the idiosyncratic binocular fusion characteristics of glossy surfaces, providing a straightforward means of estimating surface attributes using low-level image signals. PMID:27170713

  2. 'Proto-rivalry': how the binocular brain identifies gloss.

    PubMed

    Muryy, Alexander A; Fleming, Roland W; Welchman, Andrew E

    2016-05-11

    Visually identifying glossy surfaces can be crucial for survival (e.g. ice patches on a road), yet estimating gloss is computationally challenging for both human and machine vision. Here, we demonstrate that human gloss perception exploits some surprisingly simple binocular fusion signals, which are likely available early in the visual cortex. In particular, we show that the unusual disparity gradients and vertical offsets produced by reflections create distinctive 'proto-rivalrous' (barely fusible) image regions that are a critical indicator of gloss. We find that manipulating the gradients and vertical components of binocular disparities yields predictable changes in material appearance. Removing or occluding proto-rivalrous signals makes surfaces look matte, while artificially adding such signals to images makes them appear glossy. This suggests that the human visual system has internalized the idiosyncratic binocular fusion characteristics of glossy surfaces, providing a straightforward means of estimating surface attributes using low-level image signals. PMID:27170713

  3. An automated miniaturized Haploscope for testing binocular visual function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, T. A.; Williams, R. E.; Kuether, C. L.; Wyman-Cornsweet, D.

    1976-01-01

    A computer-controlled binocular vision testing device has been developed as one part of a system designed for NASA to test the vision of astronauts during spaceflight. The device, called the Mark III Haploscope, utilizes semi-automated psychophysical test procedures to measure visual acuity, stereopsis, phorias, fixation disparity and accommodation/convergence relationships. All tests are self-administered, yield quantitative data and may be used repeatedly without subject memorization. Future applications of this programmable, compact device include its use as a clinical instrument to perform routine eye examinations or vision screening, and as a research tool to examine the effects of environment or work-cycle upon visual function.

  4. Glossiness representation using binocular color difference.

    PubMed

    Jung, Woo-Soon; Moon, Young-Gyu; Park, Jae-Hyun; Song, Jang-Kun

    2013-07-15

    We demonstrate that a binocular color difference can be used to express the surface glossiness of an object on 3D display devices without being accompanied by a specular reflection pattern. A simple image with a binocular color difference provides a similar surface appearance impression to a real object that has the same binocular color difference. It is found that human binocular perception is likely to interpret binocular color difference as spectral reflectance rather than as transparency. Binocular glossiness is caused not only by a binocular lightness difference but also by a chromatic or hue difference. PMID:23939119

  5. Large Binocular Telescope Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, John M.; Salinari, Piero

    1998-08-01

    The Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) Project is a collaboration between institutions in Arizona, Germany, Italy, and Ohio. With the addition of the partners from Ohio State and Germany in February 1997, the Large Binocular Telescope Corporation has the funding required to build the full telescope populated with both 8.4 meter optical trans. The first of two 8.4 meter borosilicate honeycomb primary mirrors for LBT was cast at the Steward Observatory Mirror Lab in 1997. The baseline optical configuration of LBT includes adaptive infrared secondaries of a Gregorian design. The F/15 secondaries are undersized to provide a low thermal background focal plane. The interferometric focus combining the light from the two 8.4 meter primaries will reimage the two folded Gregorian focal planes to three central locations. The telescope elevation structure accommodates swing arms which allow rapid interchange of the various secondary and tertiary mirrors. Maximum stiffness and minimal thermal disturbance were important drivers for the design of the telescope in order to provide the best possible images for interferometric observations. The telescope structure accommodates installation of a vacuum bell jar for aluminizing the primary mirrors in-situ on the telescope. The detailed design of the telescope structure was completed in 1997 by ADS Italia (Lecco) and European Industrial Engineering (Mestre). A series of contracts for the fabrication and machining of the telescope structure had been placed at the end of 1997. The final enclosure design was completed at M3 Engineering & Technology (Tucson), EIE and ADS Italia. During 1997, the telescope pier and the concrete ring wall for the rotating enclosure were completed along with the steel structure of the fixed portion of the enclosure. The erection of the steel structure for the rotating portion of the enclosure will begin in the Spring of 1998.

  6. Large Binocular Telescope Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, John M.

    1997-03-01

    The large binocular telescope (LBT) project have evolved from concepts first proposed in 1985. The present partners involved in the design and construction of this 2 by 8.4 meter binocular telescope are the University of Arizona, Italy represented by the Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri and the Research Corporation based in Tucson, Arizona. These three partners have committed sufficient funds to build the enclosure and the telescope populated with a single 8.4 meter optical train -- approximately 40 million dollars (1989). Based on this commitment, design and construction activities are now moving forward. Additional partners are being sought. The next mirror to be cast at the Steward Observatory Mirror Lab in the fall of 1996 will be the first borosilicate honeycomb primary for LBT. The baseline optical configuration of LBT includes wide field Cassegrain secondaries with optical foci above the primaries to provide a corrected one degree field at F/4. The infrared F/15 secondaries are a Gregorian design to allow maximum flexibility for adaptive optics. The F/15 secondaries are undersized to provide a low thermal background focal plane which is unvignetted over a 4 arcminute diameter field-of-view. The interferometric focus combining the light from the two 8.4 meter primaries will reimage two folded Gregorian focal planes to a central location. The telescope elevation structure accommodates swing arms which allow rapid interchange of the various secondary and tertiary mirrors. Maximum stiffness and minimal thermal disturbance continue to be important drivers for the detailed design of the telescope. The telescope structure accommodates installation of a vacuum bell jar for aluminizing the primary mirrors in-situ on the telescope. The detailed design of the telescope structure will be completed in 1996 by ADS Italia (Lecco) and European Industrial Engineering (Mestre). The final enclosure design is now in progress at M3 Engineering (Tucson), EIE and ADS Italia

  7. Binocular Camera for cockpit visibility of general aviation aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barile, A. J.

    1981-04-01

    A history of cockpit visibility studies and requirements with regard to aircraft safety, human factors, collision avoidance, and accident investigations is presented. The Federal Aviation Administration's development of the Binocular Camera is reviewed, and the technical details of a new and improved camera are discussed. The Binocular Camera uses two 65 mm wide angle F6.8 lenses and covers an 88 1/2 deg field of vision. The camera produces images, representative of what the human eyes see before the brain integrates them into one, thus making it possible to analyze the effect of obstruction to vision. The improvements, applications, and uses of the camera in the research, development, and operations of general aviation aircraft are discussed.

  8. Network symmetry and binocular rivalry experiments.

    PubMed

    Diekman, Casey O; Golubitsky, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Hugh Wilson has proposed a class of models that treat higher-level decision making as a competition between patterns coded as levels of a set of attributes in an appropriately defined network (Cortical Mechanisms of Vision, pp. 399-417, 2009; The Constitution of Visual Consciousness: Lessons from Binocular Rivalry, pp. 281-304, 2013). In this paper, we propose that symmetry-breaking Hopf bifurcation from fusion states in suitably modified Wilson networks, which we call rivalry networks, can be used in an algorithmic way to explain the surprising percepts that have been observed in a number of binocular rivalry experiments. These rivalry networks modify and extend Wilson networks by permitting different kinds of attributes and different types of coupling. We apply this algorithm to psychophysics experiments discussed by Kovács et al. (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 93:15508-15511, 1996), Shevell and Hong (Vis. Neurosci. 23:561-566, 2006; Vis. Neurosci. 25:355-360, 2008), and Suzuki and Grabowecky (Neuron 36:143-157, 2002). We also analyze an experiment with four colored dots (a simplified version of a 24-dot experiment performed by Kovács), and a three-dot analog of the four-dot experiment. Our algorithm predicts surprising differences between the three- and four-dot experiments. PMID:24872926

  9. The large binocular telescope.

    PubMed

    Hill, John M

    2010-06-01

    The Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) Observatory is a collaboration among institutions in Arizona, Germany, Italy, Indiana, Minnesota, Ohio, and Virginia. The telescope on Mount Graham in Southeastern Arizona uses two 8.4 m diameter primary mirrors mounted side by side. A unique feature of the LBT is that the light from the two Gregorian telescope sides can be combined to produce phased-array imaging of an extended field. This cophased imaging along with adaptive optics gives the telescope the diffraction-limited resolution of a 22.65 m aperture and a collecting area equivalent to an 11.8 m circular aperture. This paper describes the design, construction, and commissioning of this unique telescope. We report some sample astronomical results with the prime focus cameras. We comment on some of the technical challenges and solutions. The telescope uses two F/15 adaptive secondaries to correct atmospheric turbulence. The first of these adaptive mirrors has completed final system testing in Firenze, Italy, and is planned to be at the telescope by Spring 2010. PMID:20517352

  10. Binocular interaction fields of single units in the cat striate cortex

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, P. O.; Henry, G. H.; Smith, C. J.

    1971-01-01

    1. Based on average response histograms to an optimal stimulus, binocular interaction field plots were obtained from twenty-five simple neurones in the striate cortex of the cat. Each binocularly activated cell has two interaction fields, one for each eye. The binocular interaction field for one eye plots the changes in the amplitude of the response from the other eye as the two receptive fields of the binocularly activated cell are moved across one another, first into and then out of alignment in the plane of the optimal stimulus (tangent screen). 2. The binocular interaction field provides an important clue to the nature of the spatial organization of the excitatory and inhibitory regions of the monocular receptive field. The commonest type of receptive field organization has regions of inhibition (inhibitory side bands) to either side of the discharge centre in the direction at right angles to the optimal stimulus orientation. As well as inhibition, there are subliminal excitatory effects. 3. Binocular interaction fields differ with the various cell types, i.e. cells that are discharged only from the one eye, cells binocularly discharged with very weak or absent monocular responses and cells showing binocularly opposite direction selectivity. 4. Marked facilitation to an optimal stimulus occurs when the two receptive fields of a binocularly activated neurone are in accurate alignment. Facilitation switches to depression for very small degrees of receptive field misalignment in a direction at right angles to the optimal stimulus orientation. These observations are of importance in relation to mechanisms for binocular single vision and depth discrimination. PMID:4934209

  11. Orientation tuning of binocular summation: a comparison of colour to achromatic contrast

    PubMed Central

    Gheiratmand, Mina; Cherniawsky, Avital S.; Mullen, Kathy T.

    2016-01-01

    A key function of the primary visual cortex is to combine the input from the two eyes into a unified binocular percept. At low, near threshold, contrasts a process of summation occurs if the visual inputs from the two eyes are similar. Here we measure the orientation tuning of binocular summation for chromatic and equivalent achromatic contrast. We derive estimates of orientation tuning by measuring binocular summation as a function of the orientation difference between two sinusoidal gratings presented dichoptically to different eyes. We then use a model to estimate the orientation bandwidth of the neural detectors underlying the binocular combination. We find that orientation bandwidths are similar for chromatic and achromatic stimuli at both low (0.375 c/deg) and mid (1.5 c/deg) spatial frequencies, with an overall average of 29 ± 3 degs (HWHH, s.e.m). This effect occurs despite the overall greater binocular summation found for the low spatial frequency chromatic stimuli. These results suggest that similar, oriented processes underlie both chromatic and achromatic binocular contrast combination. The non-oriented detection process found in colour vision at low spatial frequencies under monocular viewing is not evident at the binocular combination stage. PMID:27168119

  12. Orientation tuning of binocular summation: a comparison of colour to achromatic contrast.

    PubMed

    Gheiratmand, Mina; Cherniawsky, Avital S; Mullen, Kathy T

    2016-01-01

    A key function of the primary visual cortex is to combine the input from the two eyes into a unified binocular percept. At low, near threshold, contrasts a process of summation occurs if the visual inputs from the two eyes are similar. Here we measure the orientation tuning of binocular summation for chromatic and equivalent achromatic contrast. We derive estimates of orientation tuning by measuring binocular summation as a function of the orientation difference between two sinusoidal gratings presented dichoptically to different eyes. We then use a model to estimate the orientation bandwidth of the neural detectors underlying the binocular combination. We find that orientation bandwidths are similar for chromatic and achromatic stimuli at both low (0.375 c/deg) and mid (1.5 c/deg) spatial frequencies, with an overall average of 29 ± 3 degs (HWHH, s.e.m). This effect occurs despite the overall greater binocular summation found for the low spatial frequency chromatic stimuli. These results suggest that similar, oriented processes underlie both chromatic and achromatic binocular contrast combination. The non-oriented detection process found in colour vision at low spatial frequencies under monocular viewing is not evident at the binocular combination stage. PMID:27168119

  13. The 300-year quest for binoculars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greivenkamp, John E.; Steed, David

    2010-08-01

    The modern form of the refracting telescope advanced rapidly following its invention in 1608, but almost 300 years elapsed before practical prismatic binoculars became available. The evolution of binoculars and the associated manufacturing issues are discussed.

  14. Abnormal visual experience during development alters the early stages of visual-tactile integration.

    PubMed

    Niechwiej-Szwedo, Ewa; Chin, Jessica; Wolfe, Paul J; Popovich, Christina; Staines, W Richard

    2016-05-01

    Visual experience during the critical periods in early postnatal life is necessary for the normal development of the visual system. Disruption of visual input during this period results in amblyopia, which is associated with reduced activation of the striate and extrastriate cortices. It is well known that visual input converges with other sensory signals and exerts a significant influence on cortical processing in multiple association areas. Recent work in healthy adults has also shown that task-relevant visual input can modulate neural excitability at very early stages of information processing in the primary somatosensory cortex. Here we used electroencephalography to investigate visual-tactile interactions in adults with abnormal binocular vision due to amblyopia and strabismus. Results showed three main findings. First, in comparison to a visually normal control group, participants with abnormal vision had a significantly lower amplitude of the P50 somatosensory event related potential (ERP) when visual and tactile stimuli were presented concurrently. Second, the amplitude of the P100 somatosensory ERP was significantly greater in participants with abnormal vision. These results indicate that task relevant visual input does not significantly influence the excitability of the primary somatosensory cortex, instead, the excitability of the secondary somatosensory cortex is increased. Third, participants with abnormal vision had a higher amplitude of the P1 visual ERP when a tactile stimulus was presented concurrently. Importantly, these results were not modulated by viewing condition, which indicates that the impact of amblyopia on crossmodal interactions is not simply related to the reduced visual acuity as it was evident when viewing with the unaffected eye and binocularly. These results indicate that the consequences of abnormal visual experience on neurophysiological processing extend beyond the primary and secondary visual areas to other modality

  15. Effects of cortical damage on binocular depth perception

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Stereoscopic depth perception requires considerable neural computation, including the initial correspondence of the two retinal images, comparison across the local regions of the visual field and integration with other cues to depth. The most common cause for loss of stereoscopic vision is amblyopia, in which one eye has failed to form an adequate input to the visual cortex, usually due to strabismus (deviating eye) or anisometropia. However, the significant cortical processing required to produce the percept of depth means that, even when the retinal input is intact from both eyes, brain damage or dysfunction can interfere with stereoscopic vision. In this review, I examine the evidence for impairment of binocular vision and depth perception that can result from insults to the brain, including both discrete damage, temporal lobectomy and more systemic diseases such as posterior cortical atrophy. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Vision in our three-dimensional world’. PMID:27269597

  16. Effects of cortical damage on binocular depth perception.

    PubMed

    Bridge, Holly

    2016-06-19

    Stereoscopic depth perception requires considerable neural computation, including the initial correspondence of the two retinal images, comparison across the local regions of the visual field and integration with other cues to depth. The most common cause for loss of stereoscopic vision is amblyopia, in which one eye has failed to form an adequate input to the visual cortex, usually due to strabismus (deviating eye) or anisometropia. However, the significant cortical processing required to produce the percept of depth means that, even when the retinal input is intact from both eyes, brain damage or dysfunction can interfere with stereoscopic vision. In this review, I examine the evidence for impairment of binocular vision and depth perception that can result from insults to the brain, including both discrete damage, temporal lobectomy and more systemic diseases such as posterior cortical atrophy.This article is part of the themed issue 'Vision in our three-dimensional world'. PMID:27269597

  17. The evaluation of partial binocular overlap on car maneuverability: A pilot study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsou, Brian H.; Rogers-Adams, Beth M.; Goodyear, Charles D.

    1992-01-01

    An engineering approach to enlarge the helmet mounted display (HMD) field of view (FOV) and maintain resolution and weight by partially overlapping the binocular FOV has received renewed interest among human factors scientists. It is evident, based on the brief literature review, that any panoramic display with a binocular overlap, less than a minimum amount, annoys the viewer, degrades performance, and elicits undesirable behavior. The major finding is that across the 60 deg conditions, subjects moved their heads a greater distance (by about 5 degs on each side) than in the 180 deg condition, presumably to compensate for the lack of FOV. It is quite clear that the study, based on simple car maneuverability and two subjects, reveals differences in FOV, but nothing significant between binocular overlap levels and configurations. This tentatively indicates that some tradeoffs of binocular vision for a larger overall display FOV are acceptable.

  18. Binocular self-calibration performed via adaptive genetic algorithm based on laser line imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apolinar Muñoz Rodríguez, J.; Mejía Alanís, Francisco Carlos

    2016-07-01

    An accurate technique to perform binocular self-calibration by means of an adaptive genetic algorithm based on a laser line is presented. In this calibration, the genetic algorithm computes the vision parameters through simulated binary crossover (SBX). To carry it out, the genetic algorithm constructs an objective function from the binocular geometry of the laser line projection. Then, the SBX minimizes the objective function via chromosomes recombination. In this algorithm, the adaptive procedure determines the search space via line position to obtain the minimum convergence. Thus, the chromosomes of vision parameters provide the minimization. The approach of the proposed adaptive genetic algorithm is to calibrate and recalibrate the binocular setup without references and physical measurements. This procedure leads to improve the traditional genetic algorithms, which calibrate the vision parameters by means of references and an unknown search space. It is because the proposed adaptive algorithm avoids errors produced by the missing of references. Additionally, the three-dimensional vision is carried out based on the laser line position and vision parameters. The contribution of the proposed algorithm is corroborated by an evaluation of accuracy of binocular calibration, which is performed via traditional genetic algorithms.

  19. Binocular collimation vs conditional alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, William J.

    2012-10-01

    As binocular enthusiasts share their passion, topics related to collimation abound. Typically, we find how observers, armed only with a jeweler's screwdriver, can "perfectly collimate" his or her binocular, make it "spot on," or other verbiage of similar connotation. Unfortunately, what most are addressing is a form of pseudo-collimation I have referred to since the mid-1970s as "Conditional Alignment." Ignoring the importance of the mechanical axis (hinge) in the alignment process, this "condition," while having the potential to make alignment serviceable, or even outstanding—within a small range of IPD (Interpupillary Distance) settings relative to the user's spatial accommodation (the ability to accept small errors in parallelism of the optical axes)—may take the instrument farther from the 3-axis collimation conscientious manufacturers seek to implement. Becoming more optically savvy—and especially with so many mechanically inferior binoculars entering the marketplace— the consumer contemplating self-repair and alignment has a need to understand the difference between clinical, 3-axis "collimation" (meaning both optical axes are parallel with the axis of the hinge) and "conditional alignment," as differentiated in this paper. Furthermore, I believe there has been a long-standing need for the term "Conditional Alignment," or some equivalent, to be accepted as part of the vernacular of those who use binoculars extensively, whether for professional or recreational activities. Achieving that acceptance is the aim of this paper.

  20. A binocular stereo approach to AR/C at the Johnson Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, Timothy E.; Smith, Alan T.

    1991-01-01

    Automated Rendezvous and Capture requires the determination of the 6 DOF relating two free bodies. Sensor systems that can provide such information have varying sizes, weights, power requirements, complexities, and accuracies. One type of sensor system that can provide several key advantages is a binocular stereo vision system.

  1. Stereo vision and strabismus

    PubMed Central

    Read, J C A

    2015-01-01

    Binocular stereopsis, or stereo vision, is the ability to derive information about how far away objects are, based solely on the relative positions of the object in the two eyes. It depends on both sensory and motor abilities. In this review, I briefly outline some of the neuronal mechanisms supporting stereo vision, and discuss how these are disrupted in strabismus. I explain, in some detail, current methods of assessing stereo vision and their pros and cons. Finally, I review the evidence supporting the clinical importance of such measurements. PMID:25475234

  2. Stereo vision and strabismus.

    PubMed

    Read, J C A

    2015-02-01

    Binocular stereopsis, or stereo vision, is the ability to derive information about how far away objects are, based solely on the relative positions of the object in the two eyes. It depends on both sensory and motor abilities. In this review, I briefly outline some of the neuronal mechanisms supporting stereo vision, and discuss how these are disrupted in strabismus. I explain, in some detail, current methods of assessing stereo vision and their pros and cons. Finally, I review the evidence supporting the clinical importance of such measurements. PMID:25475234

  3. Development and matching of binocular orientation preference in mouse V1

    PubMed Central

    Bhaumik, Basabi; Shah, Nishal P.

    2014-01-01

    Eye-specific thalamic inputs converge in the primary visual cortex (V1) and form the basis of binocular vision. For normal binocular perceptions, such as depth and stereopsis, binocularly matched orientation preference between the two eyes is required. A critical period of binocular matching of orientation preference in mice during normal development is reported in literature. Using a reaction diffusion model we present the development of RF and orientation selectivity in mouse V1 and investigate the binocular orientation preference matching during the critical period. At the onset of the critical period the preferred orientations of the modeled cells are mostly mismatched in the two eyes and the mismatch decreases and reaches levels reported in juvenile mouse by the end of the critical period. At the end of critical period 39% of cells in binocular zone in our model cortex is orientation selective. In literature around 40% cortical cells are reported as orientation selective in mouse V1. The starting and the closing time for critical period determine the orientation preference alignment between the two eyes and orientation tuning in cortical cells. The absence of near neighbor interaction among cortical cells during the development of thalamo-cortical wiring causes a salt and pepper organization in the orientation preference map in mice. It also results in much lower % of orientation selective cells in mice as compared to ferrets and cats having organized orientation maps with pinwheels. PMID:25104927

  4. Effects of generalized pooling on binocular disparity selectivity of neurons in the early visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Kato, Daisuke; Baba, Mika; Sasaki, Kota S; Ohzawa, Izumi

    2016-06-19

    The key problem of stereoscopic vision is traditionally defined as accurately finding the positional shifts of corresponding object features between left and right images. Here, we demonstrate that the problem must be considered in a four-dimensional parameter space; with respect not only to shifts in space (X, Y), but also spatial frequency (SF) and orientation (OR). The proposed model sums outputs of binocular energy units linearly over the multi-dimensional V1 parameter space (X, Y, SF, OR). Theoretical analyses and physiological experiments show that many binocular neurons achieve sharp binocular tuning properties by pooling the output of multiple neurons with relatively broad tuning. Pooling in the space domain sharpens disparity-selective responses in the SF domain so that the responses to combinations of unmatched left-right SFs are attenuated. Conversely, pooling in the SF domain sharpens disparity selectivity in the space domain, reducing the possibility of false matches. Analogous effects are observed for the OR domain in that the spatial pooling sharpens the binocular tuning in the OR domain. Such neurons become selective to relative OR disparity. Therefore, pooling allows the visual system to refine binocular information into a form more desirable for stereopsis.This article is part of the themed issue 'Vision in our three-dimensional world'. PMID:27269609

  5. Head-centric disparity and epipolar geometry estimation from a population of binocular energy neurons.

    PubMed

    Pauwels, Karl; VAN Hulle, Marc M

    2012-06-01

    We present a hybrid neural network architecture that supports the estimation of binocular disparity in a cyclopean, head-centric coordinate system without explicitly establishing retinal correspondences. Instead the responses of binocular energy neurons are gain-modulated by oculomotor signals. The network can handle the full six degrees of freedom of binocular gaze and operates directly on image pairs of possibly varying contrast. Furthermore, we show that in the absence of an oculomotor signal the same architecture is capable of estimating the epipolar geometry directly from the population response. The increased complexity of the scenarios considered in this work provides an important step towards the application of computational models centered on gain modulation mechanisms in real-world robotic applications. The proposed network is shown to outperform a standard computer vision technique on a disparity estimation task involving real-world stereo images. PMID:23627623

  6. Degradation of Binocular Coordination during Sleep Deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Jianliang; Maruta, Jun; Heaton, Kristin J.; Maule, Alexis L.; Rajashekar, Umesh; Spielman, Lisa A.; Ghajar, Jamshid

    2016-01-01

    To aid a clear and unified visual perception while tracking a moving target, both eyes must be coordinated, so the image of the target falls on approximately corresponding areas of the fovea of each eye. The movements of the two eyes are decoupled during sleep, suggesting a role of arousal in regulating binocular coordination. While the absence of visual input during sleep may also contribute to binocular decoupling, sleepiness is a state of reduced arousal that still allows for visual input, providing a context within which the role of arousal in binocular coordination can be studied. We examined the effects of sleep deprivation on binocular coordination using a test paradigm that we previously showed to be sensitive to sleep deprivation. We quantified binocular coordination with the SD of the distance between left and right gaze positions on the screen. We also quantified the stability of conjugate gaze on the target, i.e., gaze–target synchronization, with the SD of the distance between the binocular average gaze and the target. Sleep deprivation degraded the stability of both binocular coordination and gaze–target synchronization, but between these two forms of gaze control the horizontal and vertical components were affected differently, suggesting that disconjugate and conjugate eye movements are under different regulation of attentional arousal. The prominent association found between sleep deprivation and degradation of binocular coordination in the horizontal direction may be used for a fit-for-duty assessment. PMID:27379009

  7. Degradation of Binocular Coordination during Sleep Deprivation.

    PubMed

    Tong, Jianliang; Maruta, Jun; Heaton, Kristin J; Maule, Alexis L; Rajashekar, Umesh; Spielman, Lisa A; Ghajar, Jamshid

    2016-01-01

    To aid a clear and unified visual perception while tracking a moving target, both eyes must be coordinated, so the image of the target falls on approximately corresponding areas of the fovea of each eye. The movements of the two eyes are decoupled during sleep, suggesting a role of arousal in regulating binocular coordination. While the absence of visual input during sleep may also contribute to binocular decoupling, sleepiness is a state of reduced arousal that still allows for visual input, providing a context within which the role of arousal in binocular coordination can be studied. We examined the effects of sleep deprivation on binocular coordination using a test paradigm that we previously showed to be sensitive to sleep deprivation. We quantified binocular coordination with the SD of the distance between left and right gaze positions on the screen. We also quantified the stability of conjugate gaze on the target, i.e., gaze-target synchronization, with the SD of the distance between the binocular average gaze and the target. Sleep deprivation degraded the stability of both binocular coordination and gaze-target synchronization, but between these two forms of gaze control the horizontal and vertical components were affected differently, suggesting that disconjugate and conjugate eye movements are under different regulation of attentional arousal. The prominent association found between sleep deprivation and degradation of binocular coordination in the horizontal direction may be used for a fit-for-duty assessment. PMID:27379009

  8. Binocular rivalry from invisible patterns.

    PubMed

    Zou, Jinyou; He, Sheng; Zhang, Peng

    2016-07-26

    Binocular rivalry arises when incompatible images are presented to the two eyes. If the two eyes' conflicting features are invisible, leading to identical perceptual interpretations, does rivalry competition still occur? Here we investigated whether binocular rivalry can be induced from conflicting but invisible spatial patterns. A chromatic grating counterphase flickering at 30 Hz appeared uniform, but produced significant tilt aftereffect and orientation-selective adaptation. The invisible pattern also generated significant BOLD activities in the early visual cortex, with minimal response in the parietal and frontal cortical areas. Compared with perceptually matched uniform stimuli, a monocularly presented invisible chromatic grating enhanced the rivalry competition with a low-contrast visible grating presented to the other eye. Furthermore, switching from a uniform field to a perceptually matched invisible chromatic grating produced interocular suppression at approximately 200 ms after onset of the invisible grating. Experiments using briefly presented monocular probes revealed evidence for sustained rivalry competition between two invisible gratings during continuous dichoptic presentations. These findings indicate that even without visible interocular conflict, and with minimal engagement of frontoparietal cortex and consciousness related top-down feedback, perceptually identical patterns with invisible conflict features produce rivalry competition in the early visual cortex. PMID:27354535

  9. Fast perception of binocular disparity.

    PubMed

    Caziot, Baptiste; Valsecchi, Matteo; Gegenfurtner, Karl R; Backus, Benjamin T

    2015-08-01

    Is depth perception from binocular disparities-stereopsis-slow or fast? Many of the temporal properties of stereopsis are known. For example, rapidly changing disparities are perceptually difficult to track, which suggests that stereopsis is generally slow. But, remarkably, this basic question has not yet been addressed. We compared speed-accuracy trade-off functions between 2 forced-choice discriminations: 1 based on stereoscopic depth and 1 based on luminance. Unexpectedly, both speed-accuracy trade-off functions deviated from chance levels of accuracy at the same response time-approximately 200 ms-with stereo accuracy increasing, on average, more slowly than luminance accuracy after this initial delay. Thus, the initial processing of disparity for perceived depth took no longer than the initial processing of luminance for perceived brightness. This finding, that binocular disparities are available early during visual processing, means that depth is perceived quickly, and, intriguingly, that disparities may be more important for everyday visual function than previously thought. PMID:26121497

  10. Experience-Dependent and Independent Binocular Correspondence of Receptive Field Subregions in Mouse Visual Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Sarnaik, Rashmi; Wang, Bor-Shuen; Cang, Jianhua

    2014-01-01

    The convergence of eye-specific thalamic inputs to visual cortical neurons forms the basis of binocular vision. Inputs from the same eye that signal light increment (On) and decrement (Off) are spatially segregated into subregions, giving rise to cortical receptive fields (RFs) that are selective for stimulus orientation. Here we map RFs of binocular neurons in the mouse primary visual cortex using spike-triggered average. We find that subregions of the same sign (On–On and Off–Off) preferentially overlap between the 2 monocular RFs, leading to binocularly matched orientation tuning. We further demonstrate that such subregion correspondence and the consequent matching of RF orientation are disrupted in mice reared in darkness during development. Surprisingly, despite the lack of all postnatal visual experience, a substantial degree of subregion correspondence still remains. In addition, dark-reared mice show normal monocular RF structures and binocular overlap. These results thus reveal the specific roles of experience-dependent and -independent processes in binocular convergence and refinement of On and Off inputs onto single cortical neurons. PMID:23389996

  11. Binocular fusion, suppression and diplopia for blurred edges

    PubMed Central

    Georgeson, Mark A; Wallis, Stuart A

    2014-01-01

    Purpose (1) To devise a model-based method for estimating the probabilities of binocular fusion, interocular suppression and diplopia from psychophysical judgements, (2) To map out the way fusion, suppression and diplopia vary with binocular disparity and blur of single edges shown to each eye, (3) To compare the binocular interactions found for edges of the same vs opposite contrast polarity. Methods Test images were single, horizontal, Gaussian-blurred edges, with blur B = 1–32 min arc, and vertical disparity 0–8.B, shown for 200 ms. In the main experiment, observers reported whether they saw one central edge, one offset edge, or two edges. We argue that the relation between these three response categories and the three perceptual states (fusion, suppression, diplopia) is indirect and likely to be distorted by positional noise and criterion effects, and so we developed a descriptive, probabilistic model to estimate both the perceptual states and the noise/criterion parameters from the data. Results (1) Using simulated data, we validated the model-based method by showing that it recovered fairly accurately the disparity ranges for fusion and suppression, (2) The disparity range for fusion (Panum's limit) increased greatly with blur, in line with previous studies. The disparity range for suppression was similar to the fusion limit at large blurs, but two or three times the fusion limit at small blurs. This meant that diplopia was much more prevalent at larger blurs, (3) Diplopia was much more frequent when the two edges had opposite contrast polarity. A formal comparison of models indicated that fusion occurs for same, but not opposite, polarities. Probability of suppression was greater for unequal contrasts, and it was always the lower-contrast edge that was suppressed. Conclusions Our model-based data analysis offers a useful tool for probing binocular fusion and suppression psychophysically. The disparity range for fusion increased with edge blur but

  12. Protein Kinase C Activation as a Potential Therapeutic Strategy in Alzheimer's Disease: Is there a Role for Embryonic Lethal Abnormal Vision-like Proteins?

    PubMed

    Talman, Virpi; Pascale, Alessia; Jäntti, Maria; Amadio, Marialaura; Tuominen, Raimo K

    2016-08-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD), the most common cause of dementia, is an irreversible and progressive neurodegenerative disorder. It affects predominantly brain areas that are critical for memory and learning and is characterized by two main pathological hallmarks: extracellular amyloid plaques and intracellular neurofibrillary tangles. Protein kinase C (PKC) has been classified as one of the cognitive kinases controlling memory and learning. By regulating several signalling pathways involved in amyloid and tau pathologies, it also plays an inhibitory role in AD pathophysiology. Among downstream targets of PKC are the embryonic lethal abnormal vision (ELAV)-like RNA-binding proteins that modulate the stability and the translation of specific target mRNAs involved in synaptic remodelling linked to cognitive processes. This MiniReview summarizes the current evidence on the role of PKC and ELAV-like proteins in learning and memory, highlighting how their derangement can contribute to AD pathophysiology. This last aspect emphasizes the potential of pharmacological activation of PKC as a promising therapeutic strategy for the treatment of AD. PMID:27001133

  13. Binocular Combination of Second-Order Stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jiawei; Liu, Rong; Zhou, Yifeng; Hess, Robert F.

    2014-01-01

    Phase information is a fundamental aspect of visual stimuli. However, the nature of the binocular combination of stimuli defined by modulations in contrast, so-called second-order stimuli, is presently not clear. To address this issue, we measured binocular combination for first- (luminance modulated) and second-order (contrast modulated) stimuli using a binocular phase combination paradigm in seven normal adults. We found that the binocular perceived phase of second-order gratings depends on the interocular signal ratio as has been previously shown for their first order counterparts; the interocular signal ratios when the two eyes were balanced was close to 1 in both first- and second-order phase combinations. However, second-order combination is more linear than previously found for first-order combination. Furthermore, binocular combination of second-order stimuli was similar regardless of whether the carriers in the two eyes were correlated, anti-correlated, or uncorrelated. This suggests that, in normal adults, the binocular phase combination of second-order stimuli occurs after the monocular extracting of the second-order modulations. The sensory balance associated with this second-order combination can be obtained from binocular phase combination measurements. PMID:24404180

  14. Binocular combination of second-order stimuli.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jiawei; Liu, Rong; Zhou, Yifeng; Hess, Robert F

    2014-01-01

    Phase information is a fundamental aspect of visual stimuli. However, the nature of the binocular combination of stimuli defined by modulations in contrast, so-called second-order stimuli, is presently not clear. To address this issue, we measured binocular combination for first- (luminance modulated) and second-order (contrast modulated) stimuli using a binocular phase combination paradigm in seven normal adults. We found that the binocular perceived phase of second-order gratings depends on the interocular signal ratio as has been previously shown for their first order counterparts; the interocular signal ratios when the two eyes were balanced was close to 1 in both first- and second-order phase combinations. However, second-order combination is more linear than previously found for first-order combination. Furthermore, binocular combination of second-order stimuli was similar regardless of whether the carriers in the two eyes were correlated, anti-correlated, or uncorrelated. This suggests that, in normal adults, the binocular phase combination of second-order stimuli occurs after the monocular extracting of the second-order modulations. The sensory balance associated with this second-order combination can be obtained from binocular phase combination measurements. PMID:24404180

  15. Acceptance of different multifocal contact lenses depending on the binocular findings.

    PubMed

    Cagnolati, W

    1993-04-01

    In a clinical study the subjective acceptance as well as the quality of different visual functions was examined during the wearing of three multifocal lenses (Ciba Spectrum Bifocal, Allergan Echelon, and Essilor Variations). Ten subjects wore each of the 3 contact lens types for a period of 12 to 21 days after the binocular finding (bicentral or disparate vision within the Panum's area); further functions such as contrast or scotopic vision were qualified and/or quantified in a basic examination. All subjects (N = 5) with the binocular finding orthophoria/motorcompensated heterophoria preferred the Ciba Spectrum Bifocal. Furthermore, all visual functions of the 10 test persons were clearly reduced with all 3 multifocal contact lenses. A correlation between the "preferred contact lens and the detailed subjective acceptance" and/or the "subjective acceptance and the functional measurements" could not be proven as statistically significant. PMID:8502460

  16. Binocular summation and peripheral visual response time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilliland, K.; Haines, R. F.

    1975-01-01

    Six males were administered a peripheral visual response time test to the onset of brief small stimuli imaged in 10-deg arc separation intervals across the dark adapted horizontal retinal meridian under both binocular and monocular viewing conditions. This was done in an attempt to verify the existence of peripheral binocular summation using a response time measure. The results indicated that from 50-deg arc right to 50-deg arc left of the line of sight binocular summation is a reasonable explanation for the significantly faster binocular data. The stimulus position by viewing eye interaction was also significant. A discussion of these and other analyses is presented along with a review of related literature.

  17. Training of binocular rivalry suppression suggests stimulus-specific plasticity in monocular and binocular visual areas

    PubMed Central

    Vergeer, Mark; Wagemans, Johan; van Ee, Raymond

    2016-01-01

    The plasticity of the human brain, as shown in perceptual learning, is generally reflected by improved task performance after training. Here, we show that perceptual suppression can be increased through training. In the first experiment, binocular rivalry suppression of a specific orientation was trained, leading to a relative reduction in sensitivity to the trained orientation. In a second experiment, two orthogonal orientations were suppressed in alternating training blocks, in the left and right eye, respectively. This double-training procedure lead to reduced sensitivity for the orientation that was suppression-trained in each specific eye, implying that training of feature suppression is specific for the eye in which the oriented grating was presented during training. Results of a control experiment indicate that the obtained effects are indeed due to suppression during training, instead of being merely due to the repetitive presentation of the oriented gratings. Visual plasticity is essential for a person’s visual development. The finding that plasticity can result in increased perceptual suppression reported here may prove to be significant in understanding human visual development. It emphasizes that for stable vision, not only the enhancement of relevant signals is crucial, but also the reliable and stable suppression of (task) irrelevant signals. PMID:27160838

  18. Training of binocular rivalry suppression suggests stimulus-specific plasticity in monocular and binocular visual areas.

    PubMed

    Vergeer, Mark; Wagemans, Johan; van Ee, Raymond

    2016-01-01

    The plasticity of the human brain, as shown in perceptual learning, is generally reflected by improved task performance after training. Here, we show that perceptual suppression can be increased through training. In the first experiment, binocular rivalry suppression of a specific orientation was trained, leading to a relative reduction in sensitivity to the trained orientation. In a second experiment, two orthogonal orientations were suppressed in alternating training blocks, in the left and right eye, respectively. This double-training procedure lead to reduced sensitivity for the orientation that was suppression-trained in each specific eye, implying that training of feature suppression is specific for the eye in which the oriented grating was presented during training. Results of a control experiment indicate that the obtained effects are indeed due to suppression during training, instead of being merely due to the repetitive presentation of the oriented gratings. Visual plasticity is essential for a person's visual development. The finding that plasticity can result in increased perceptual suppression reported here may prove to be significant in understanding human visual development. It emphasizes that for stable vision, not only the enhancement of relevant signals is crucial, but also the reliable and stable suppression of (task) irrelevant signals. PMID:27160838

  19. Binocular contrast discrimination needs monocular multiplicative noise

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Jian; Levi, Dennis M.

    2016-01-01

    The effects of signal and noise on contrast discrimination are difficult to separate because of a singularity in the signal-detection-theory model of two-alternative forced-choice contrast discrimination (Katkov, Tsodyks, & Sagi, 2006). In this article, we show that it is possible to eliminate the singularity by combining that model with a binocular combination model to fit monocular, dichoptic, and binocular contrast discrimination. We performed three experiments using identical stimuli to measure the perceived phase, perceived contrast, and contrast discrimination of a cyclopean sine wave. In the absence of a fixation point, we found a binocular advantage in contrast discrimination both at low contrasts (<4%), consistent with previous studies, and at high contrasts (≥34%), which has not been previously reported. However, control experiments showed no binocular advantage at high contrasts in the presence of a fixation point or for observers without accommodation. We evaluated two putative contrast-discrimination mechanisms: a nonlinear contrast transducer and multiplicative noise (MN). A binocular combination model (the DSKL model; Ding, Klein, & Levi, 2013b) was first fitted to both the perceived-phase and the perceived-contrast data sets, then combined with either the nonlinear contrast transducer or the MN mechanism to fit the contrast-discrimination data. We found that the best model combined the DSKL model with early MN. Model simulations showed that, after going through interocular suppression, the uncorrelated noise in the two eyes became anticorrelated, resulting in less binocular noise and therefore a binocular advantage in the discrimination task. Combining a nonlinear contrast transducer or MN with a binocular combination model (DSKL) provides a powerful method for evaluating the two putative contrast-discrimination mechanisms. PMID:26982370

  20. Binocular contrast discrimination needs monocular multiplicative noise.

    PubMed

    Ding, Jian; Levi, Dennis M

    2016-01-01

    The effects of signal and noise on contrast discrimination are difficult to separate because of a singularity in the signal-detection-theory model of two-alternative forced-choice contrast discrimination (Katkov, Tsodyks, & Sagi, 2006). In this article, we show that it is possible to eliminate the singularity by combining that model with a binocular combination model to fit monocular, dichoptic, and binocular contrast discrimination. We performed three experiments using identical stimuli to measure the perceived phase, perceived contrast, and contrast discrimination of a cyclopean sine wave. In the absence of a fixation point, we found a binocular advantage in contrast discrimination both at low contrasts (<4%), consistent with previous studies, and at high contrasts (≥34%), which has not been previously reported. However, control experiments showed no binocular advantage at high contrasts in the presence of a fixation point or for observers without accommodation. We evaluated two putative contrast-discrimination mechanisms: a nonlinear contrast transducer and multiplicative noise (MN). A binocular combination model (the DSKL model; Ding, Klein, & Levi, 2013b) was first fitted to both the perceived-phase and the perceived-contrast data sets, then combined with either the nonlinear contrast transducer or the MN mechanism to fit the contrast-discrimination data. We found that the best model combined the DSKL model with early MN. Model simulations showed that, after going through interocular suppression, the uncorrelated noise in the two eyes became anticorrelated, resulting in less binocular noise and therefore a binocular advantage in the discrimination task. Combining a nonlinear contrast transducer or MN with a binocular combination model (DSKL) provides a powerful method for evaluating the two putative contrast-discrimination mechanisms. PMID:26982370

  1. Measurement of suprathreshold binocular interactions in amblyopia.

    PubMed

    Mansouri, B; Thompson, B; Hess, R F

    2008-12-01

    It has been established that in amblyopia, information from the amblyopic eye (AME) is not combined with that from the fellow fixing eye (FFE) under conditions of binocular viewing. However, recent evidence suggests that mechanisms that combine information between the eyes are intact in amblyopia. The lack of binocular function is most likely due to the imbalanced inputs from the two eyes under binocular conditions [Baker, D. H., Meese, T. S., Mansouri, B., & Hess, R. F. (2007b). Binocular summation of contrast remains intact in strabismic amblyopia. Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science, 48(11), 5332-5338]. We have measured the extent to which the information presented to each eye needs to differ for binocular combination to occur and in doing so we quantify the influence of interocular suppression. We quantify these suppressive effects for suprathreshold processing of global stimuli for both motion and spatial tasks. The results confirm the general importance of these suppressive effects in rendering the structurally binocular visual system of a strabismic amblyope, functionally monocular. PMID:18809424

  2. Comparison of binocular through-focus visual acuity with monovision and a small aperture inlay.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Christina; Manzanera, Silvestre; Prieto, Pedro M; Fernández, Enrique J; Artal, Pablo

    2014-10-01

    Corneal small aperture inlays provide extended depth of focus as a solution to presbyopia. As this procedure is becoming more popular, it is interesting to compare its performance with traditional approaches, such as monovision. Here, binocular visual acuity was measured as a function of object vergence in three subjects by using a binocular adaptive optics vision analyzer. Visual acuity was measured at two luminance levels (photopic and mesopic) under several optical conditions: 1) natural vision (4 mm pupils, best corrected distance vision), 2) pure-defocus monovision ( + 1.25 D add in the nondominant eye), 3) small aperture monovision (1.6 mm pupil in the nondominant eye), and 4) combined small aperture and defocus monovision (1.6 mm pupil and a + 0.75 D add in the nondominant eye). Visual simulations of a small aperture corneal inlay suggest that the device extends DOF as effectively as traditional monovision in photopic light, in both cases at the cost of binocular summation. However, individual factors, such as aperture centration or sensitivity to mesopic conditions should be considered to assure adequate visual outcomes. PMID:25360355

  3. Comparison of binocular through-focus visual acuity with monovision and a small aperture inlay

    PubMed Central

    Schwarz, Christina; Manzanera, Silvestre; Prieto, Pedro M.; Fernández, Enrique J.; Artal, Pablo

    2014-01-01

    Corneal small aperture inlays provide extended depth of focus as a solution to presbyopia. As this procedure is becoming more popular, it is interesting to compare its performance with traditional approaches, such as monovision. Here, binocular visual acuity was measured as a function of object vergence in three subjects by using a binocular adaptive optics vision analyzer. Visual acuity was measured at two luminance levels (photopic and mesopic) under several optical conditions: 1) natural vision (4 mm pupils, best corrected distance vision), 2) pure-defocus monovision ( + 1.25 D add in the nondominant eye), 3) small aperture monovision (1.6 mm pupil in the nondominant eye), and 4) combined small aperture and defocus monovision (1.6 mm pupil and a + 0.75 D add in the nondominant eye). Visual simulations of a small aperture corneal inlay suggest that the device extends DOF as effectively as traditional monovision in photopic light, in both cases at the cost of binocular summation. However, individual factors, such as aperture centration or sensitivity to mesopic conditions should be considered to assure adequate visual outcomes. PMID:25360355

  4. Early-onset binocularity in preterm infants reveals experience-dependent visual development in humans

    PubMed Central

    Jandó, Gábor; Mikó-Baráth, Eszter; Markó, Katalin; Hollódy, Katalin; Török, Béla; Kovacs, Ilona

    2012-01-01

    Although there is a great deal of knowledge regarding the phylo- and ontogenetic plasticity of the neocortex, the precise nature of environmental impact on the newborn human brain is still one of the most controversial issues of neuroscience. The leading model–system of experience-dependent brain development is binocular vision, also called stereopsis. Here, we show that extra postnatal visual experience in preterm human neonates leads to a change in the developmental timing of binocular vision. The onset age of binocular function, as measured by the visual evoked response to dynamic random dot correlograms (DRDC-VEP), appears to be at around the same time after birth in preterm (4.07 mo) and full-term (3.78 mo) infants. To assess the integrity of the visual pathway in the studied infants, we also measured the latency of the visual-evoked response to pattern reversal stimuli (PR-VEP). PR-VEP latency is not affected by premature birth, demonstrating that the maturation of the visual pathway follows a preprogrammed developmental course. Despite the immaturity of the visual pathway, clearly demonstrated by the PR-VEP latencies, our DRCD-VEP data show that the visual cortex is remarkably ready to accept environmental stimulation right after birth. This early plasticity makes full use of the available extra stimulation time in preterm human infants and results in an early onset of cortical binocularity. According to our data, the developmental processes preceding the onset of binocular function are not preprogrammed, and the mechanisms turning on stereopsis are extremely experience-dependent in humans. PMID:22711824

  5. Correlation Between Stereoacuity and Experimentally Induced Graded Monocular and Binocular Astigmatism

    PubMed Central

    Puthran, Neelam; Gagal, Bhavna

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Stereopsis, the highest grade of binocular single vision, is affected by various factors, such as mis-alignment of visual axes, refractive errors especially anisometropia and astigmatism, both of which may result in amblyopia. There are very few studies in literature regarding the relationship between stereoacuity and refractive errors, especially astigmatism. Aim The present study was conducted to determine the correlation between stereoacuity and experimentally induced graded astigmatism in emmetropes. Materials and Methods A randomized study was conducted on 2000 individuals of either gender, between the ages of 8-35 years, at tertiary care centre attached to a medical college during the period of August 2012 to August 2014, All subjects were emmetropic with normal binocular single vision. Participants were randomly divided into four groups of 500 individuals each. Two groups were subjected to induced myopic astigmatism, either uni-ocularly or binocularly, using + 1.0 D and + 2.0 D cylinders at varying axes i.e., 450, 900 and 1800. Similarily, the remaining two groups were subjected to induced hypermetropic astigmatism, using - 1.0 D and - 2.0D cylinders at varying axes i.e. 450, 900 and 1800. Near stereoacuity was determined by the Titmus Fly Stereo Test, both before and after induction of astigmatism. Statistical analysis was done using paired t-test and ANOVA. Results The mean stereoacuity in emmetropes was 28.81±4.97 seconds of arc. There was a decrease in stereoacuity with increase in dioptric power of astigmatism (p<0.001). Oblique astigmatism reduced the stereoacuity maximally, while stereoacuity was least affected at 180o axis. Hypermetropic astigmatism caused more deterioration in stereoacuity than myopic astigmatism. A gross reduction in stereoacuity was noted in induced monocular astigmatism as against binocular astigmatism. Conclusion This study suggests that stereoacuity is significantly affected by even minor degrees of monocular or

  6. Neural architectures for stereo vision.

    PubMed

    Parker, Andrew J; Smith, Jackson E T; Krug, Kristine

    2016-06-19

    Stereoscopic vision delivers a sense of depth based on binocular information but additionally acts as a mechanism for achieving correspondence between patterns arriving at the left and right eyes. We analyse quantitatively the cortical architecture for stereoscopic vision in two areas of macaque visual cortex. For primary visual cortex V1, the result is consistent with a module that is isotropic in cortical space with a diameter of at least 3 mm in surface extent. This implies that the module for stereo is larger than the repeat distance between ocular dominance columns in V1. By contrast, in the extrastriate cortical area V5/MT, which has a specialized architecture for stereo depth, the module for representation of stereo is about 1 mm in surface extent, so the representation of stereo in V5/MT is more compressed than V1 in terms of neural wiring of the neocortex. The surface extent estimated for stereo in V5/MT is consistent with measurements of its specialized domains for binocular disparity. Within V1, we suggest that long-range horizontal, anatomical connections form functional modules that serve both binocular and monocular pattern recognition: this common function may explain the distortion and disruption of monocular pattern vision observed in amblyopia.This article is part of the themed issue 'Vision in our three-dimensional world'. PMID:27269604

  7. Neural architectures for stereo vision

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Stereoscopic vision delivers a sense of depth based on binocular information but additionally acts as a mechanism for achieving correspondence between patterns arriving at the left and right eyes. We analyse quantitatively the cortical architecture for stereoscopic vision in two areas of macaque visual cortex. For primary visual cortex V1, the result is consistent with a module that is isotropic in cortical space with a diameter of at least 3 mm in surface extent. This implies that the module for stereo is larger than the repeat distance between ocular dominance columns in V1. By contrast, in the extrastriate cortical area V5/MT, which has a specialized architecture for stereo depth, the module for representation of stereo is about 1 mm in surface extent, so the representation of stereo in V5/MT is more compressed than V1 in terms of neural wiring of the neocortex. The surface extent estimated for stereo in V5/MT is consistent with measurements of its specialized domains for binocular disparity. Within V1, we suggest that long-range horizontal, anatomical connections form functional modules that serve both binocular and monocular pattern recognition: this common function may explain the distortion and disruption of monocular pattern vision observed in amblyopia. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Vision in our three-dimensional world’. PMID:27269604

  8. Bitemporal hemianopia; its unique binocular complexities and a novel remedy

    PubMed Central

    Peli, Eli; Satgunam, PremNandhini

    2014-01-01

    Bitemporal hemianopic visual field impairment frequently leads to binocular vision difficulties. Patients with bitemporal hemianopia with pre-existing exophoria complain of horizontal diplopia, sometimes combined with vertical deviation (with pre-existing hyperphoria). The symptoms are a result of the phoria decompensating into a tropia (hemi-slide) due to the lack of retinal correspondence between the remaining nasal fields of both eyes. We measured these effects using a dichoptic perimeter. We showed that aligning the eyes with prisms could prevent diplopia if the bitemporal hemianopia is incomplete. We also describe the successful use of a novel fusion aid – the ‘stereo-typoscope’ – that utilizes midline stereopsis to prevent diplopia resulting from hemi-sliding in patients with complete bitemporal hemianopia. PMID:24588535

  9. [Impact of a surgical treatment stage on the accommodability and binocular functions in patients with concomitant strabismus].

    PubMed

    Maglakelidze, N M

    2008-01-01

    The surgical stage of treatment for concomitant strabismus was studied for its impact on accommodability and inocular functions. Thirty-four patients were examined. The author used the laser stroboscopic technique, estimated the accommodation convergence/accommodation (AC/A) ratio, and evaluated binocular functions at different working distances (in the color, polaroid, and scanning separation of the fields of vision) and on a synoptophore. Surgical treatment was shown to reduce the AC/A ratio, to normalize accommodation tone, and to improve or to restore binocular functions, which suggest their close relationship. PMID:18488468

  10. The scotogenic contact lens: a novel device for treating binocular diplopia

    PubMed Central

    Robert, Matthieu P; Bonci, Fabrizio; Pandit, Anand; Ferguson, Veronica; Nachev, Parashkev

    2015-01-01

    Binocular diplopia is a debilitating visual symptom requiring immediate intervention for symptomatic control, whether or not definitive treatment is eventually possible. Where prismatic correction is infeasible, the current standard is occlusion, either by a patch or an opaque contact lens. In eliminating one problem—diplopia—occlusive techniques invariably create another: reduced peripheral vision. Crucially, this is often unnecessary, for the reduced spatial resolution in the periphery limits its contribution to the perception of diplopia. Here, we therefore introduce a novel soft contact lens device that instead creates a monocular central scotoma inversely mirroring the physiological variation in spatial acuity across the monocular visual field, thereby suppressing the diplopia with minimal impact on the periphery. We compared the device against standard eye patching in 12 normal subjects with prism-induced binocular diplopia and 12 patients with binocular diplopia of diverse causes. Indexed by self-reported scores and binocular perimetry, the scotogenic contact lens was comparably effective in eliminating the diplopia while significantly superior in acceptability and its impact on the peripheral visual field. This simple, inexpensive, non-invasive device may thus be an effective new tool in the treatment of a familiar but still troublesome clinical problem. PMID:25680615

  11. Moirés maintained internally by binocular vision.

    PubMed

    Piggins, D

    1978-01-01

    Moiré patterns in depth are reported when spatially periodic stimuli are viewed stereoscopically. Near-vertical square-wave gratings with horizontal disparity effected by orientation difference produce a 'venetian blind' effect. A single grating is observed divided into horizontal layers, the number of layers being a direct function of orientation difference. Lines within each layer are slanted with respect to the frontoparallel plane, becoming more so with increasing orientation difference. Subjects with stereo deficits report a decreased effect. Quantitative reports implicate stereoscopic mechanisms responsible for this unique, internal preservation of moiré patterns. PMID:740508

  12. Binocular vision in infancy: Responsiveness to uncrossed horizontal disparity.

    PubMed

    Kavšek, Michael; Braun, Stephanie K

    2016-08-01

    This research explored the onset of stereopsis, the ability to perceive depth from the different views provided by the two eyes. In a longitudinal study, infants were tested weekly from 6 to 20 weeks of age. The primary goal of the study was to establish the onset and the early development of sensitivity to uncrossed horizontal disparity. The infant participants were shown dynamic random dot stereograms displaying two squares, one with uncrossed horizontal disparity (0.5°) and one with vertical disparity (0.5°). The stimuli were presented on an autostereoscopic monitor. We used two methods, the forced-choice preferential looking (FPL) method and the classical natural preference (CNP) method, to measure whether the infants preferred the uncrossed over the vertical disparity display. According to the FPL data, the mean relative preferences for horizontal over vertical disparity were significantly greater than chance probability (0.50) from 13 weeks of age onward. With the CNP method we found significant preferences for uncrossed horizontal disparity from 15 weeks onward. The FPL method was hence more sensitive than the CNP method as it indicated an earlier onset of responsiveness to stereoscopic information. PMID:27454245

  13. [Binocular movements during pursuit and reading: eye tracking study].

    PubMed

    Boussand, F

    2012-09-01

    Detailed analysis of fine, slow ocular movements has not been the object of recent studies. With this in mind, special hardware and a simple testing protocol were developed, along with software for recording and analysis. The study of these movements, using this hardware adapted to follow both eyes, allowed the inclusion of binocularity in the precise analysis of ocular pursuit and reading. Recording the eye movements of 166 children and adults permitted identification of the main features of oculomotor development from age five years. These movements were studied during calibrated pursuit and reading. The persistence of oculomotor abnormalities during development can help to define an array of "visual immaturity" or "visual inefficiency". The study of these anomalies during reading explains some learning difficulties. PMID:22421034

  14. Disparity vergence responses before versus after repetitive vergence therapy in binocularly normal controls.

    PubMed

    Talasan, Henry; Scheiman, Mitchell; Li, Xiaobo; Alvarez, Tara L

    2016-01-01

    This study sought to determine whether significant changes would be observed between vergence eye movements before and after 12 hr of repetitive vergence therapy (1 hr per day on different days) in subjects with normal binocular vision compared to controls. Disparity vergence responses from 23 subjects were studied. An assessment protocol that minimized the influence of the near dissociated phoria on the disparity vergence system was designed. The following parameters were quantified for the responses: latency, time to peak velocity, settling time, peak velocity, and accuracy (difference between the response and stimulus amplitudes). The following outcomes were observed when comparing the results after vergence therapy to the baseline measurements: (a) near point of convergence and near dissociated phoria did not significantly change (p > 0.15); (b) latency, time to peak velocity, and settling time significantly decreased (p ≤ 0.01); and (c) accuracy significantly improved (p < 0.01). Results support that vergence peak velocity is dependent on the subject's near dissociated phoria. The accuracy and temporal properties of vergence eye movement responses from subjects with normal binocular vision can be improved after vergence therapy. These methods can be utilized within future studies to quantitatively assess vergence therapy techniques for patients with binocular dysfunction. PMID:26762276

  15. Disparity vergence responses before versus after repetitive vergence therapy in binocularly normal controls

    PubMed Central

    Talasan, Henry; Scheiman, Mitchell; Li, Xiaobo; Alvarez, Tara L.

    2016-01-01

    This study sought to determine whether significant changes would be observed between vergence eye movements before and after 12 hr of repetitive vergence therapy (1 hr per day on different days) in subjects with normal binocular vision compared to controls. Disparity vergence responses from 23 subjects were studied. An assessment protocol that minimized the influence of the near dissociated phoria on the disparity vergence system was designed. The following parameters were quantified for the responses: latency, time to peak velocity, settling time, peak velocity, and accuracy (difference between the response and stimulus amplitudes). The following outcomes were observed when comparing the results after vergence therapy to the baseline measurements: (a) near point of convergence and near dissociated phoria did not significantly change (p > 0.15); (b) latency, time to peak velocity, and settling time significantly decreased (p ≤ 0.01); and (c) accuracy significantly improved (p < 0.01). Results support that vergence peak velocity is dependent on the subject's near dissociated phoria. The accuracy and temporal properties of vergence eye movement responses from subjects with normal binocular vision can be improved after vergence therapy. These methods can be utilized within future studies to quantitatively assess vergence therapy techniques for patients with binocular dysfunction. PMID:26762276

  16. Discrimination of binocular color mixtures in dichromacy: evaluation of the Maxwell-Cornsweet conjecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knoblauch, Kenneth; McMahon, Matthew J.

    1995-10-01

    We tested the Maxwell-Cornsweet conjecture that differential spectral filtering of the two eyes can increase the dimensionality of a dichromat's color vision. Sex-linked dichromats wore filters that differentially passed long- and middle-wavelength regions of the spectrum to each eye. Monocularly, temporal modulation thresholds (1.5 Hz) for color mixtures from the Rayleigh region of the spectrum were accounted for by a single, univariant mechanism. Binocularly, univariance was rejected because, as in monocular viewing by trichromats, in no color direction could silent substitution of the color mixtures be obtained. Despite the filter-aided increase in dimension, estimated wavelength discrimination was quite poor in this spectral region, suggesting a limit to the effectiveness of this technique. binocular summation.

  17. Slower rate of binocular rivalry in autism.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Caroline E; Kravitz, Dwight J; Freyberg, Jan; Baron-Cohen, Simon; Baker, Chris I

    2013-10-23

    An imbalance between cortical excitation and inhibition is a central component of many models of autistic neurobiology. We tested a potential behavioral footprint of this proposed imbalance using binocular rivalry, a visual phenomenon in which perceptual experience is thought to mirror the push and pull of excitatory and inhibitory cortical dynamics. In binocular rivalry, two monocularly presented images compete, leading to a percept that alternates between them. In a series of trials, we presented separate images of objects (e.g., a baseball and a broccoli) to each eye using a mirror stereoscope and asked human participants with autism and matched control subjects to continuously report which object they perceived, or whether they perceived a mixed percept. Individuals with autism demonstrated a slower rate of binocular rivalry alternations than matched control subjects, with longer durations of mixed percepts and an increased likelihood to revert to the previously perceived object when exiting a mixed percept. Critically, each of these findings was highly predictive of clinical measures of autistic symptomatology. Control "playback" experiments demonstrated that differences in neither response latencies nor response criteria could account for the atypical dynamics of binocular rivalry we observed in autistic spectrum conditions. Overall, these results may provide an index of atypical cortical dynamics that may underlie both the social and nonsocial symptoms of autism. PMID:24155303

  18. Development of Binocular Fixation in Human Infants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aslin, Richard N.

    1977-01-01

    Two experiments measured changes in binocular eye alignment from 1- to 6-month-old infants. Experiment 1 recorded these changes from 1-, 2-, and 3-month-olds, using corneal photography. Experiment 2 measured responses of 3-, 4 1/2-, and 6-month-olds as a wedge prism was placed alternately before each eye. (MS)

  19. Binocular interaction in the cat's superior colliculus.

    PubMed Central

    Berman, N; Blakemore, C; Cynader, M

    1975-01-01

    1. Binocularly driven neurones with small receptive fields near the area centralis were recorded in the cat's superior colliculus. 2. Binocular interaction was tested by stimulating both eyes simultaneously with a single moving stimulus at various retinal disparities. 3. Collicular cells in general showed strong summation or even facilitation when the images of the stimulus were in exact correspondence on the receptive fields, sometimes with occlusion when they were out of register. The range of retinal disparity over which there was additive interaction could be as little as 1 or 2 deg, almost as narrow as for the most precisely tuned neurones in the visual cortex. Even cells with large receptive fields sometimes showed a narrow range of binocular interaction. 4. Non-directional cells generally exhibited weaker summation and broader disparity selectivity than did direction-selective cells. 5. Some neurones with virtually no response to a stimulus in one of the eyes can exhibit marked binocular interaction. Other apparently monocular cells show little or no binocular interaction. 6. The disparity of the centres of the receptive fields was measured after correcting for small eye movements, which were assessed by two different techniques. For 132 cells the measured distribution of horizontal disparity (range 4.5 deg; S.D. 0.93 deg) was significantly broader than that of vertical disparity (range 2.2 deg; S.D. 0.52 deg). Sources of error in these measurements are considered. 7. The results are discussed in relation to the known connexions between visual cortex and superior colliculus and the possible role of the latter in the regulation of eye movements. PMID:1133788

  20. Flight testing of a binocular bisensor HMD for helicopter: some human factors aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leger, Alain; Roumes, Corinne; Bergeaud, J. M.; Dareoux, P.; Gardelle, C.

    1998-08-01

    The need for night vision system in military helicopter has been recognized for many years now. Besides fixed FLIR and night vision goggles, helmet-mounted systems coupled with head-slaved IR sensor have been introduced during the last decade in modern attack helicopters. Monocular HMDs have been fielded on the AH-64 and used in operation. Human factors aspects pertaining to such night vision devices has been extensively reviewed and published. Though, full scale flight tests of binocular HMDs with integrated I2 and head coupled IR sensors have rarely been reported. A binocular helmet, with a 40 degree full overlap FOV has been developed under a contract of the French DGA. Two image intensifiers tubes located on each side of the head are integrated on the helmet, which also has full raster and stroke capacity. Both images are projected on the visor of the helmet and collimated to infinity. IR sensor imagery and navigation system are coupled to the helmet using an electro-magnetic head-tracker. Test flight of the helmet have been conducted by the French Flight Test Center on specially equipped Puma test-bed aircraft. Approximately 150 flight hours have been devoted to testing of the helmet, either with I2 and IR sensors.

  1. The neural mechanism of binocular depth discrimination

    PubMed Central

    Barlow, H. B.; Blakemore, C.; Pettigrew, J. D.

    1967-01-01

    1. Binocularly driven units were investigated in the cat's primary visual cortex. 2. It was found that a stimulus located correctly in the visual fields of both eyes was more effective in driving the units than a monocular stimulus, and much more effective than a binocular stimulus which was correctly positioned in only one eye: the response to the correctly located image in one eye is vetoed if the image is incorrectly located in the other eye. 3. The vertical and horizontal disparities of the paired retinal images that yielded the maximum response were measured in 87 units from seven cats: the range of horizontal disparities was 6·6°, of vertical disparities 2·2°. 4. With fixed convergence, different units will be optimally excited by objects lying at different distances. This may be the basic mechanism underlying depth discrimination in the cat. PMID:6065881

  2. Mechanical structure of the Large Binocular Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    del Vecchio, Ciro; Davison, Warren B.; Gallieni, Walter W.; Rigato, Gianfranco; Miglietta, Luciano

    1997-03-01

    We present the final design of the alt/az structure of the large binocular telescope. As a final report of the structural performances of the telescope, this paper describes how the azimuth platform and the primary mirror cells have been modeled. Furthermore, a definition of the simulation of the various structural interfaces is given. Finally, the static and dynamic responses at various zenith angles are reported.

  3. When can attention influence binocular rivalry?

    PubMed

    Dieter, Kevin C; Melnick, Michael D; Tadin, Duje

    2015-08-01

    Attentional influence over perception is particularly pronounced when sensory stimulation is ambiguous, where attention can reduce stimulus uncertainty and promote a stable interpretation of the world. However, binocular rivalry, an extensively studied visual ambiguity, has proved to be comparatively resistant to attentional modulation. We hypothesize that this apparent inconsistency reflects fluctuations in the degree of unresolved competition during binocular rivalry. Namely, attentional influence over rivalry dynamics should be limited to phases of relatively unresolved stimulus competition, such as ends of individual dominance periods. We found that transient, feature-based cues congruent with the dominant stimulus prolonged dominance durations, while cues matching the suppressed stimulus hastened its return to dominance. Notably, the effect of cues depended on when the cues are presented. Cues presented late, but not early, during a given episode of perceptual dominance influenced rivalry dynamics. This temporal pattern mirrors known changes in the relative competitive dynamics of rival stimuli, revealing that selective effects occur only during temporal windows containing weak resolution of visual competition. In conclusion, these findings reveal that unresolved competition, which gates attention across a variety of domains, is also crucial in determining the susceptibility of binocular rivalry to selective influences. PMID:25898898

  4. Binocular depth perception in the pigeon.

    PubMed Central

    McFadden, S A; Wild, J M

    1986-01-01

    By means of a discrete-trial simultaneous discrimination procedure, pigeons were trained to respond differentially to visual arrays that were identical except that one of them contained a circle displaced in depth when viewed stereoscopically. Performance was severely disrupted when one eye was occluded. The monocular deficit was peculiar to the depth task, inasmuch as no such decrement was seen on a pattern discrimination. The results imply that presence of the displaced circle was discriminated on the basis of a binocular cue. It was also found that pigeons could discriminate the direction of the displacement. Discrimination of depth was independent of the global form and still occurred when elements of the array were randomly displaced in depth. Performance was not disrupted when the absolute convergence angle of the depth stimulus was changed. The cue that consistently accounted for the behavior seen was the detection of the relative angles of convergence--that is, the retinal disparity of the two planes in depth. Thus, despite the lateral position of the eyes of the pigeon, a small binocular field mediates the binocular discrimination of near objects in depth. PMID:3958661

  5. Monocular and binocular mechanisms mediating flicker adaptation.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Xiaohua; Shevell, Steven K

    2015-12-01

    Flicker adaptation reduces subsequent temporal contrast sensitivity. Recent studies show that this adaptation likely results from neural changes in the magnocellular visual pathway, but whether this adaptation occurs at a monocular or a binocular level, or both, is unclear. Here, two experiments address this question. The first experiment exploits the observation that flicker adaptation is stronger at higher than lower temporal frequencies. Observers' two eyes adapted to 3Hz flicker with an incremental pulse at 1/4 duty cycle, either in-phase or out-of-phase in the two eyes. At the binocular level, the flicker rate was 6Hz in the out-of-phase condition if the two eyes' pulse trains sum. Similar sensitivity reduction was found in both phase conditions, as expected for independent monocular adapting mechanisms. The second experiment tested for interocular transfer of adaptation between eyes. Results showed that (1) flicker adaptation was strongest with adapting and test fields in only the same eye, (2) adaptation can be partially transferred interocularly with adaptation in only the opposite eye, and (3) adaptation was weakened when both eyes were adapted simultaneously at different contrasts, compared to test-eye adaptation alone. Taken together, the findings are consistent with mechanisms of flicker adaptation at both the monocular and binocular level. PMID:26505684

  6. Quantum formalism to describe binocular rivalry.

    PubMed

    Manousakis, Efstratios

    2009-11-01

    On the basis of the general character and operation of the process of perception, a formalism is sought to mathematically describe the subjective or abstract/mental process of perception. It is shown that the formalism of orthodox quantum theory of measurement, where the observer plays a key role, is a broader mathematical foundation which can be adopted to describe the dynamics of the subjective experience. The mathematical formalism describes the psychophysical dynamics of the subjective or cognitive experience as communicated to us by the subject. Subsequently, the formalism is used to describe simple perception processes and, in particular, to describe the probability distribution of dominance duration obtained from the testimony of subjects experiencing binocular rivalry. Using this theory and parameters based on known values of neuronal oscillation frequencies and firing rates, the calculated probability distribution of dominance duration of rival states in binocular rivalry under various conditions is found to be in good agreement with available experimental data. This theory naturally explains an observed marked increase in dominance duration in binocular rivalry upon periodic interruption of stimulus and yields testable predictions for the distribution of perceptual alteration in time. PMID:19520143

  7. Congruent tactile stimulation reduces the strength of visual suppression during binocular rivalry

    PubMed Central

    Lunghi, Claudia; Alais, David

    2015-01-01

    Presenting different images to each eye triggers ‘binocular rivalry’ in which one image is visible and the other suppressed, with the visible image alternating every second or so. We previously showed that binocular rivalry between cross-oriented gratings is altered when the fingertip explores a grooved stimulus aligned with one of the rivaling gratings: the matching visual grating's dominance duration was lengthened and its suppression duration shortened. In a more robust test, we here measure visual contrast sensitivity during rivalry dominance and suppression, with and without exploration of the grooved surface, to determine if rivalry suppression strength is modulated by touch. We find that a visual grating undergoes 45% less suppression when observers touch an aligned grating, compared to a cross-oriented one. Touching an aligned grating also improved visual detection thresholds for the ‘invisible’ suppressed grating by 2.4 dB, relative to a vision-only condition. These results show that congruent haptic stimulation prevents a visual stimulus from becoming deeply suppressed in binocular rivalry. Moreover, because congruent touch acted on the phenomenally invisible grating, this visuo-haptic interaction must precede awareness and likely occurs early in visual processing. PMID:25797534

  8. Congruent tactile stimulation reduces the strength of visual suppression during binocular rivalry.

    PubMed

    Lunghi, Claudia; Alais, David

    2015-01-01

    Presenting different images to each eye triggers 'binocular rivalry' in which one image is visible and the other suppressed, with the visible image alternating every second or so. We previously showed that binocular rivalry between cross-oriented gratings is altered when the fingertip explores a grooved stimulus aligned with one of the rivaling gratings: the matching visual grating's dominance duration was lengthened and its suppression duration shortened. In a more robust test, we here measure visual contrast sensitivity during rivalry dominance and suppression, with and without exploration of the grooved surface, to determine if rivalry suppression strength is modulated by touch. We find that a visual grating undergoes 45% less suppression when observers touch an aligned grating, compared to a cross-oriented one. Touching an aligned grating also improved visual detection thresholds for the 'invisible' suppressed grating by 2.4 dB, relative to a vision-only condition. These results show that congruent haptic stimulation prevents a visual stimulus from becoming deeply suppressed in binocular rivalry. Moreover, because congruent touch acted on the phenomenally invisible grating, this visuo-haptic interaction must precede awareness and likely occurs early in visual processing. PMID:25797534

  9. Maintaining a suite of binocular facility instruments at the Large Binocular Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, Robert O.; Morris, John; Power, Jennifer; Howard, James; Riedl, James; Solheid, Elliott; Wagner, R. M.; Veillet, Christian

    2014-08-01

    Facility Instruments at the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) include the Large Binocular Camera (LBC), a pair of wide-field imagers at the prime focus, the LUCIFER (or LUCI) near-infrared imager and spectrograph pair, and the Multi-Object Double Spectrograph (MODS), a pair of long-slit spectrographs. The disciplines involved in instrument support are reviewed, as well as scheduling of support personnel. A computerized system for instrument maintenance scheduling and spare parts inventory is described. Instrument problems are tracked via an online reporting system, and statistics on types of instrument problems are discussed, as well as applicability of the system to troubleshooting.

  10. The effect of contrast on monocular versus binocular reading performance.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Jan; Pansell, Tony; Ygge, Jan; Seimyr, Gustaf Öqvist

    2014-01-01

    The binocular advantage in reading performance is typically small. On the other hand research shows binocular reading to be remarkably robust to degraded stimulus properties. We hypothesized that this robustness may stem from an increasing binocular contribution. The main objective was to compare monocular and binocular performance at different stimulus contrasts and assess the level of binocular superiority. A secondary objective was to assess any asymmetry in performance related to ocular dominance. In a balanced repeated measures experiment 18 subjects read texts at three levels of contrast monocularly and binocularly while their eye movements were recorded. The binocular advantage increased with reduced contrast producing a 7% slower monocular reading at 40% contrast, 9% slower at 20% contrast, and 21% slower at 10% contrast. A statistically significant interaction effect was found in fixation duration displaying a more adverse effect in the monocular condition at lowest contrast. No significant effects of ocular dominance were observed. The outcome suggests that binocularity contributes increasingly to reading performance as stimulus contrast decreases. The strongest difference between monocular and binocular performance was due to fixation duration. The findings may pose a clinical point that it may be necessary to consider tests at different contrast levels when estimating reading performance. PMID:24829225

  11. Binocular three-dimensional measurement system using a Dammann grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kun; Zhou, Changhe; Wei, Shengbin; Wang, Shaoqing; Li, Shubin; Li, Yanyang; Wang, Jin; Lu, Yancong

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, we develop a binocular three-dimensional measurement system using a Dammann grating. A laser diode and a Dammann grating are employed to generate a regular and square laser spot array. Dammann array illuminator is placed between two cameras and narrowband-pass filters are embedded in the project lens to eliminate the interference of background light. During the measurement, a series of laser spot arrays are projected toward the target object and captured by two cameras simultaneously. Similar to stereo vision of human eyes, stereo matching will be performed to search the homologous spot which is a pair of image points resulting from the same object point. At first, the sub-pixel coordinates of the laser spots are extracted from the stereo images. Then stereo matching is easily performed based on a fact that laser spots with the same diffraction order are homologous ones. Because the system has been calibrated before measurement, single frame three-dimensional point cloud can be obtained using the disparity of homologous points by triangulation methods. Finally, three-dimensional point clouds belong to different frame which represent different view of the object will be registered to build up an integral three-dimensional object using ICP algorithm. On one hand, this setup is small enough to meet the portable outdoor applications. On the other hand, measurement accuracy of this system is better than 0.3 mm which can meet the measurement accuracy requirements in most situations.

  12. Binocular depth processing in the ventral visual pathway.

    PubMed

    Verhoef, Bram-Ernst; Vogels, Rufin; Janssen, Peter

    2016-06-19

    One of the most powerful forms of depth perception capitalizes on the small relative displacements, or binocular disparities, in the images projected onto each eye. The brain employs these disparities to facilitate various computations, including sensori-motor transformations (reaching, grasping), scene segmentation and object recognition. In accordance with these different functions, disparity activates a large number of regions in the brain of both humans and monkeys. Here, we review how disparity processing evolves along different regions of the ventral visual pathway of macaques, emphasizing research based on both correlational and causal techniques. We will discuss the progression in the ventral pathway from a basic absolute disparity representation to a more complex three-dimensional shape code. We will show that, in the course of this evolution, the underlying neuronal activity becomes progressively more bound to the global perceptual experience. We argue that these observations most probably extend beyond disparity processing per se, and pertain to object processing in the ventral pathway in general. We conclude by posing some important unresolved questions whose answers may significantly advance the field, and broaden its scope.This article is part of the themed issue 'Vision in our three-dimensional world'. PMID:27269602

  13. Subcortical binocular suppression affects the development of latent and optokinetic nystagmus.

    PubMed

    Schor, C M

    1983-06-01

    Comparative studies provide a model describing how abnormal binocular interactions in the cortex and midbrain could disturb the development of optokinetic nystagmus (OKN) and control of fixational eye movements in amblyopia and strabismus. Cortical projections to the pretectum that mediate the control of temporal OKN for the ipsilateral eye are functionally suppressed by a subcortical projection to the pretectum mediating nasal OKN for the contralateral eye. The reduced cortical projection to the pretectal nucleus of the optic tract (NOT) causes a marked attenuation of the OKN response to temporal target motion and a smaller reduction of the OKN response to nasal movement during monocular stimulation. Subcortical binocular suppression may occur in clinical patients with amblyopia and account for their permanent reduction of the slow phase gain of OKN when either the amblyopic or nonamblyopic eye is stimulated. Reduced cortical projections to the NOT may also cause slow drifts of both eyes during attempted steady monocular fixation to occur to the side of the covered eye (latent nystagmus). The horizontal directional drift bias subsequently interacts with monocular pursuit tracking eye movements by adding to nasal and subtracting from temporal eye movements. Similar disturbances of eye fixation, OKN, and pursuit tracking in the vertical meridian suggest an analogous scheme for direct (subcortical) and indirect (cortical) projections to subcortical nuclei controlling downward and upward eye movements, respectively. These anomalies are primarily of the optokinetic and not the pursuit system because amblyopic eyes do not have an abnormally long build-up of optokinetic slow phase velocity which would be symptomatic of a pursuit anomaly. These disturbances of OKN are permanent and appear to result from abnormal binocular stimulation during a critical period for visuo-motor development. PMID:6881279

  14. Predictive Coding Explains Binocular Rivalry: An Epistemological Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hohwy, Jakob; Roepstorff, Andreas; Friston, Karl

    2008-01-01

    Binocular rivalry occurs when the eyes are presented with different stimuli and subjective perception alternates between them. Though recent years have seen a number of models of this phenomenon, the mechanisms behind binocular rivalry are still debated and we still lack a principled understanding of why a cognitive system such as the brain should…

  15. Binoculars: A Long-Ignored Aid for the Partially Sighted.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Genesky, S. M.

    Defined in the booklet is the visually handicapped population that could benefit from use of binoculars, and described with photographs are uses of binoculars and additional equipment. Categories of the visually handicapped and concomitant population sizes are examined to stress the point that approximately 1.64 million Americans are partially…

  16. Bilateral vision loss associated with radiofrequency exposure

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Dianna; Cruz, Franz Marie; Subramanian, Prem S

    2012-01-01

    A 57-year-old otherwise healthy woman presented with painless binocular vision loss 1 week after direct application of radiofrequency energy to her orbits. She had no light perception bilaterally. Pupils were dilated and not reactive to light. Fundoscopic exam initially showed optic disc swelling in the right eye and a normal-appearing disc in the left eye. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain and orbits showed gadolinium enhancement of both intraorbital optic nerves. She underwent a course of high-dose steroid treatment without recovery of vision. Optic discs were pale 11 weeks after injury. With exclusion of other possible causes, this represents a unique case of irreversible binocular optic nerve damage and blindness secondary to radiofrequency exposure. PMID:23271888

  17. In vivo near-infrared fluorescence three-dimensional positioning system with binocular stereovision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Bofan; Jin, Wei; Wang, Ying; Jin, Qinhan; Mu, Ying

    2014-11-01

    Fluorescence is a powerful tool for in-vivo imaging in living animals. The traditional in-vivo fluorescence imaging equipment is based on single-view two-dimensional imaging systems. However, they cannot meet the needs for accurate positioning during modern scientific research. A near-infrared in-vivo fluorescence imaging system is demonstrated, which has the capability of deep source signal detecting and three-dimensional positioning. A three-dimensional coordinates computing (TDCP) method including a preprocess algorithm is presented based on binocular stereo vision theory, to figure out the solution for diffusive nature of light in tissue and the emission spectra overlap of fluorescent labels. This algorithm is validated to be efficient to extract targets from multispectral images and determine the spot center of biological interests. Further data analysis indicates that this TDCP method could be used in three-dimensional positioning of the fluorescent target in small animals. The study also suggests that the combination of a large power laser and deep cooling charge-coupled device will provide an attractive approach for fluorescent detection from deep sources. This work demonstrates the potential of binocular stereo vision theory for three-dimensional positioning for living animal in-vivo imaging.

  18. Measurement of the geometric parameters of power contact wire based on binocular stereovision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Xue-Tao; Zhang, Ya-feng; Meng, Fei

    2010-10-01

    In the electrified railway power supply system, electric locomotive obtains power from the catenary's wire through the pantograph. Under the action of the pantograph, combined with various factors such as vibration, touch current, relative sliding speed, load, etc, the contact wire will produce mechanical wear and electrical wear. Thus, in electrified railway construction and daily operations, the geometric parameters such as line height, pull value, the width of wear surface must be under real-timely and non-contact detection. On the one hand, the safe operation of electric railways will be guaranteed; on the other hand, the wire endurance will be extended, and operating costs reduced. Based on the characteristics of the worn wires' image signal, the binocular stereo vision technology was applied for measurement of contact wire geometry parameters, a mathematical model of measurement of geometric parameters was derived, and the boundaries of the wound wire abrasion-point value were extracted by means of sub-pixel edge detection method based on the LOG operator with the least-squares fitting, thus measurements of the wire geometry parameters were realized. Principles were demonstrated through simulation experiments, and the experimental results show that the detection methods presented in this paper for measuring the accuracy, efficiency and convenience, etc. are close to or superior to the traditional measurements, which has laid a good foundation for the measurement system of geometric parameters for the contact wire of the development of binocular vision.

  19. Emergence of binocular functional properties in a monocular neural circuit

    PubMed Central

    Ramdya, Pavan; Engert, Florian

    2010-01-01

    Sensory circuits frequently integrate converging inputs while maintaining precise functional relationships between them. For example, in mammals with stereopsis, neurons at the first stages of binocular visual processing show a close alignment of receptive-field properties for each eye. Still, basic questions about the global wiring mechanisms that enable this functional alignment remain unanswered, including whether the addition of a second retinal input to an otherwise monocular neural circuit is sufficient for the emergence of these binocular properties. We addressed this question by inducing a de novo binocular retinal projection to the larval zebrafish optic tectum and examining recipient neuronal populations using in vivo two-photon calcium imaging. Notably, neurons in rewired tecta were predominantly binocular and showed matching direction selectivity for each eye. We found that a model based on local inhibitory circuitry that computes direction selectivity using the topographic structure of both retinal inputs can account for the emergence of this binocular feature. PMID:19160507

  20. Binocular rivalry: spreading dominance through complex images.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Derek H; James, Bridie; Roseboom, Warrick

    2009-01-01

    When different images are presented to the two eyes, each can intermittently disappear, leaving the other to dominate perception. This is called binocular rivalry. When using radial gratings, focal contrast increments can trigger a traveling wave of perceptual dominance change, originating at the locus of the contrast increment and circling the stimulus. This has been linked to a sweep of activity through V1 that can be traced via fMRI. The dominance of more complex images, like human faces, has been linked to higher level processing structures characterized by more holistic object centered properties. We therefore decided to assess how dominance would spread through more complex images. Using Kanisza squares and human faces we found that dominance tended to spread gradually away from the locus of the contrast increment, often along real or illusory contours. We also found that perceptual dominance was slow to spread between facial regions encoded by different monocular channels. These data are consistent with low-level monocular mechanisms, like those found in V1, playing a determinant role in the spread of perceptual dominance through complex images during binocular rivalry. PMID:20055537

  1. Night Mobility Instruction for Child with Low Vision.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tapp, Kenneth L.

    1985-01-01

    The challenges of after-dark travel for low vision children are examined in terms of physical effects of low light on normal and abnormal vision and consequences for low vision travel and orientation skills. Techniques for efficient vision use are suggested along with night travel aids and considerations in night driver vision. (CL)

  2. A population study of binocular function.

    PubMed

    Bosten, J M; Goodbourn, P T; Lawrance-Owen, A J; Bargary, G; Hogg, R E; Mollon, J D

    2015-05-01

    As part of a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of perceptual traits in healthy adults, we measured stereo acuity, the duration of alternative percepts in binocular rivalry and the extent of dichoptic masking in 1060 participants. We present the distributions of the measures, the correlations between measures, and their relationships to other psychophysical traits. We report sex differences, and correlations with age, interpupillary distance, eye dominance, phorias, visual acuity and personality. The GWAS, using data from 988 participants, yielded one genetic association that passed a permutation test for significance: The variant rs1022907 in the gene VTI1A was associated with self-reported ability to see autostereograms. We list a number of other suggestive genetic associations (p<10(-5)). PMID:25771401

  3. Practical considerations for pointing a binocular telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De La Peña, Michele D.; Terrett, David L.; Thompson, David; Biddick, Christopher J.

    2010-07-01

    The Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) consists of two 8.4-meter primary mirrors on a common mount. When the telescope is complete, to complement the two primaries there will be two 0.9-meter adaptive secondaries and two tertiary mirror flats that all work to support a variety of Gregorian focal stations, as well as prime focus. A fundamental goal of the telescope is to perform interferometric observations, and therefore, there is a critical need for the ability to co-point the individual telescopes to high precision. Further, a unique aspect of the LBT is the comparatively large range over which the optics can be adjusted which provides flexibility for the acquisition of targets. In the most general case, an observer could be performing an observation using different targets, within constraints, with different instruments on each of the two telescope sides, with different observing duty cycles. As a consequence of the binocular nature of the telescope and the number of possible observing combinations, there are unique requirements imposed on the Telescope Control System (TCS), and in particular, on the Pointing Control Subsystem (PCS). It is the responsibility of the PCS to arbitrate the pointing requests made on the two sides of the telescope by the observers, incorporate guide updates, and generate tracking trajectories for the mount and the rotators, in conjunction with providing tip/tilt demands on the subsystem controlling the optical elements, and ensure each target remains on the specified location (i.e., pointing origin) in the focal plane during an active observation. This paper describes the current design and implementation of the LBT PCS.

  4. Vision problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... which nothing can be seen) Vision loss and blindness are the most severe vision problems. Causes Vision ... that look faded. The most common cause of blindness in people over age 60. Eye infection, inflammation, ...

  5. Research on imaging ranging algorithm base on constraint matching of trinocular vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Pan; Li, Li; Jin, Wei-Qi; Jiang, Yu-tong

    2014-11-01

    Binocular stereo vision is a common passive ranging method, which directly simulates the approach of human visual. It can flexibly measure the stereo information in a complex condition. However there is a problem that binocular vision ranging accuracy is not high , one of the reasons is the low precision of the stereo image pairs matching . In this paper, based on trinocular vision imaging ranging algorithm of constraint matching, we use trinocular visual ranging system which is composed of three parallel placed cameras to image and achieve distance measurement of the target. we use calibration method of Zhang to calibrate the cameras, firstly, the three cameras are calibrated respectively, then using the results to get three groups binocular calibration. Thereby the relative position information of each camera are obtained. The using of the information obtained by the third camera can reduce ambiguity of corresponding points matching in a Binocular camera system. limiting search space by the epipolar constraint and improve the matching speed, filtering the distance information , eliminate interference information which brings by the feature points on the prospect and background to obtain a more accurate distance result of target. Experimental results show that, this method can overcome the limitations of binocular vision ranging , effectively improving the range accuracy.

  6. Binocular device for displaying numerical information in field of view

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuller, H. V. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    An apparatus is described for superimposing numerical information on the field of view of binoculars. The invention has application in the flying of radio-controlled model airplanes. Information such as airspeed and angle of attack are sensed on a model airplane and transmitted back to earth where this information is changed into numerical form. Optical means are attached to the binoculars that a pilot is using to track the model air plane for displaying the numerical information in the field of view of the binoculars. The device includes means for focusing the numerical information at infinity whereby the user of the binoculars can see both the field of view and the numerical information without refocusing his eyes.

  7. The history of telescopes and binoculars: an engineering perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greivenkamp, John E.; Steed, David L.

    2011-10-01

    The design of the refracting telescope advanced rapidly following its invention in 1608, reaching its modern configuration in about a century. Even though the development of binoculars began almost simultaneously, nearly three hundred years elapsed before practical prismatic binoculars became available. The impediments to practical binoculars were not only in optical design, but in mechanical design, manufacturing, and materials. This paper will document the history of telescopes and binoculars from an engineering perspective looking at the evolution of basic optical system layout as well as some of the mechanical issues faced. This development will be illuminated using examples from the Museum of Optics at the College of Optical Sciences at the University of Arizona.

  8. Evaluation of visual acuity with Gen 3 night vision goggles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, Arthur; Kaiser, Mary K.

    1994-01-01

    Using laboratory simulations, visual performance was measured at luminance and night vision imaging system (NVIS) radiance levels typically encountered in the natural nocturnal environment. Comparisons were made between visual performance with unaided vision and that observed with subjects using image intensification. An Amplified Night Vision Imaging System (ANVIS6) binocular image intensifier was used. Light levels available in the experiments (using video display technology and filters) were matched to those of reflecting objects illuminated by representative night-sky conditions (e.g., full moon, starlight). Results show that as expected, the precipitous decline in foveal acuity experienced with decreasing mesopic luminance levels is effectively shifted to much lower light levels by use of an image intensification system. The benefits of intensification are most pronounced foveally, but still observable at 20 deg eccentricity. Binocularity provides a small improvement in visual acuity under both intensified and unintensified conditions.

  9. Vision screening in school children in Strzelin County

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zając, Marek

    2007-04-01

    Investigation of children vision is one of the most important tasks in pediatric medical care. According to World Health Organization screening done with rapid and simple tests should be considered as initial step of such care. Thanks to simple screening tests it is possible to identify children who probably are burden with eye problems and to distinguish them from the children with correct vision. Typical test for screening 6-years-old children (beginning their school education) includes, among others, evaluation of visual acuity for far and/or near and evaluation of binocular vision. This contribution describes the methods and results of screening program covering 21 elementary schools and 450 children in Strzelin County (Lower Silesia). Visual acuity was measured with help of SCOLATEST TM and binocular vision with RANDOM DOT E STEREOTEST. Additionally color recognition was tested with Ishihara Children Plates. The results suggest that almost 29% of investigated children have refraction error (9% being myopes and 20% being hyperopes), and 9% has problems with binocular vision.

  10. Advanced helmet vision system (AHVS) integrated night vision helmet mounted display (HMD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashcraft, Todd W.; Atac, Robert

    2012-06-01

    Gentex Corporation, under contract to Naval Air Systems Command (AIR 4.0T), designed the Advanced Helmet Vision System to provide aircrew with 24-hour, visor-projected binocular night vision and HMD capability. AHVS integrates numerous key technologies, including high brightness Light Emitting Diode (LED)-based digital light engines, advanced lightweight optical materials and manufacturing processes, and innovations in graphics processing software. This paper reviews the current status of miniaturization and integration with the latest two-part Gentex modular helmet, highlights the lessons learned from previous AHVS phases, and discusses plans for qualification and flight testing.

  11. An active system for visually-guided reaching in 3D across binocular fixations.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Martin, Ester; del Pobil, Angel P; Chessa, Manuela; Solari, Fabio; Sabatini, Silvio P

    2014-01-01

    Based on the importance of relative disparity between objects for accurate hand-eye coordination, this paper presents a biological approach inspired by the cortical neural architecture. So, the motor information is coded in egocentric coordinates obtained from the allocentric representation of the space (in terms of disparity) generated from the egocentric representation of the visual information (image coordinates). In that way, the different aspects of the visuomotor coordination are integrated: an active vision system, composed of two vergent cameras; a module for the 2D binocular disparity estimation based on a local estimation of phase differences performed through a bank of Gabor filters; and a robotic actuator to perform the corresponding tasks (visually-guided reaching). The approach's performance is evaluated through experiments on both simulated and real data. PMID:24672295

  12. An Active System for Visually-Guided Reaching in 3D across Binocular Fixations

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Based on the importance of relative disparity between objects for accurate hand-eye coordination, this paper presents a biological approach inspired by the cortical neural architecture. So, the motor information is coded in egocentric coordinates obtained from the allocentric representation of the space (in terms of disparity) generated from the egocentric representation of the visual information (image coordinates). In that way, the different aspects of the visuomotor coordination are integrated: an active vision system, composed of two vergent cameras; a module for the 2D binocular disparity estimation based on a local estimation of phase differences performed through a bank of Gabor filters; and a robotic actuator to perform the corresponding tasks (visually-guided reaching). The approach's performance is evaluated through experiments on both simulated and real data. PMID:24672295

  13. Monocular and Binocular Contributions to Oculomotor Plasticity.

    PubMed

    Maiello, Guido; Harrison, William J; Bex, Peter J

    2016-01-01

    Most eye movements in the real-world redirect the foveae to objects at a new depth and thus require the co-ordination of monocular saccade amplitudes and binocular vergence eye movements. Additionally to maintain the accuracy of these oculomotor control processes across the lifespan, ongoing calibration is required to compensate for errors in foveal landing positions. Such oculomotor plasticity has generally been studied under conditions in which both eyes receive a common error signal, which cannot resolve the long-standing debate regarding whether both eyes are innervated by a common cortical signal or by a separate signal for each eye. Here we examine oculomotor plasticity when error signals are independently manipulated in each eye, which can occur naturally owing to aging changes in each eye's orbit and extra-ocular muscles, or in oculomotor dysfunctions. We find that both rapid saccades and slow vergence eye movements are continuously recalibrated independently of one another and corrections can occur in opposite directions in each eye. Whereas existing models assume a single cortical representation of space employed for the control of both eyes, our findings provide evidence for independent monoculomotor and binoculomotor plasticities and dissociable spatial mapping for each eye. PMID:27535336

  14. Reward modulates perception in binocular rivalry.

    PubMed

    Marx, Svenja; Einhäuser, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Our perception does not provide us with an exact imprint of the outside world, but is continuously adapted to our internal expectations, task sets, and behavioral goals. Although effects of reward-or value in general-on perception therefore seem likely, how valuation modulates perception and how such modulation relates to attention is largely unknown. We probed effects of reward on perception by using a binocular-rivalry paradigm. Distinct gratings drifting in opposite directions were presented to each observer's eyes. To objectify their subjective perceptual experience, the optokinetic nystagmus was used as measure of current perceptual dominance. In a first experiment, one of the percepts was either rewarded or attended. We found that reward and attention similarly biased perception. In a second experiment, observers performed an attentionally demanding task either on the rewarded stimulus, the other stimulus, or both. We found that-on top of an attentional effect on perception-at each level of attentional load, reward still modulated perception by increasing the dominance of the rewarded percept. Similarly, penalizing one percept increased dominance of the other at each level of attentional load. In turn, rewarding-and similarly nonpunishing-a percept yielded performance benefits that are typically associated with selective attention. In conclusion, our data show that value modulates perception in a similar way as the volitional deployment of attention, even though the relative effect of value is largely unaffected by an attention task. PMID:25589295

  15. Monocular and Binocular Contributions to Oculomotor Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Maiello, Guido; Harrison, William J.; Bex, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    Most eye movements in the real-world redirect the foveae to objects at a new depth and thus require the co-ordination of monocular saccade amplitudes and binocular vergence eye movements. Additionally to maintain the accuracy of these oculomotor control processes across the lifespan, ongoing calibration is required to compensate for errors in foveal landing positions. Such oculomotor plasticity has generally been studied under conditions in which both eyes receive a common error signal, which cannot resolve the long-standing debate regarding whether both eyes are innervated by a common cortical signal or by a separate signal for each eye. Here we examine oculomotor plasticity when error signals are independently manipulated in each eye, which can occur naturally owing to aging changes in each eye’s orbit and extra-ocular muscles, or in oculomotor dysfunctions. We find that both rapid saccades and slow vergence eye movements are continuously recalibrated independently of one another and corrections can occur in opposite directions in each eye. Whereas existing models assume a single cortical representation of space employed for the control of both eyes, our findings provide evidence for independent monoculomotor and binoculomotor plasticities and dissociable spatial mapping for each eye. PMID:27535336

  16. Binocular iPad treatment for amblyopia in preschool children

    PubMed Central

    Birch, Eileen E.; Li, Simone L.; Jost, Reed M.; Morale, Sarah E.; De La Cruz, Angie; Stager, David; Dao, Lori; Stager, David R.

    2014-01-01

    Background Recent experimental evidence supports a role for binocular visual experience in the treatment of amblyopia. The purpose of this study was to determine whether repeated binocular visual experience with dichoptic iPad games could effectively treat amblyopia in preschool children. Methods A total of 50 consecutive amblyopic preschool children 3–6.9 years of age were assigned to play sham iPad games (first 5 children) or binocular iPad games (n = 45) for at least 4 hours per week for 4 weeks. Thirty (67%) children in the binocular iPad group and 4 (80%) in the sham iPad group were also treated with patching at a different time of day. Visual acuity and stereoacuity were assessed at baseline, at 4 weeks, and at 3 months after the cessation of game play. Results The sham iPad group had no significant improvement in visual acuity (t4 = 0.34, P = 0.75). In the binocular iPad group, mean visual acuity (plus or minus standard error) improved from 0.43 ± 0.03 at baseline to 0.34 ± 0.03 logMAR at 4 weeks (n = 45; paired t44 = 4.93; P < 0.0001). Stereoacuity did not significantly improve (t44 = 1.35, P = 0.18). Children who played the binocular iPad games for ≥8 hours (≥50% compliance) had significantly more visual acuity improvement than children who played 0–4 hours (t43 = 4.21, P = 0.0001). Conclusions Repeated binocular experience, provided by dichoptic iPad game play, was more effective than sham iPad game play as a treatment for amblyopia in preschool children. PMID:25727578

  17. Embryonic Lethal Abnormal Vision-like HuR-dependent mRNA Stability Regulates Post-transcriptional Expression of Cyclin-dependent Kinase Inhibitor p27Kip1

    PubMed Central

    Ziegeler, Gudrun; Ming, Jie; Koseki, Jana C.; Sevinc, Sema; Chen, Ting; Ergun, Suleyman; Qin, Xuebin; Aktas, Bertal H.

    2010-01-01

    The cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27Kip1 plays a critical role in regulating entry into and exit from the cell cycle. Post-transcriptional regulation of p27Kip1 expression is of significant interest. The embryonic lethal abnormal vision (ELAV)-like RNA-binding protein HuR is thought be important for the translation of p27Kip1, however, different reports attributed diametrically opposite roles to HuR. We report here an alternative mechanism wherein HuR regulates stability of the p27Kip1 mRNA. Specifically, human and mouse p27Kip1 mRNAs interact with HuR protein through multiple U-rich elements in both 5′ and 3′ untranslated regions (UTR). These interactions, which occur in vitro and in vivo, stabilize p27Kip1 mRNA and play a critical role in its accumulation. Deleting HuR binding sites or knocking down HuR expression destabilizes p27Kip1 mRNA and reduces its accumulation. We also identified a CT repeat in the 5′ UTR of full-length p27Kip1 mRNA isoforms that interact with a ∼41-kDa protein and represses p27Kip1 expression. This CT-rich element and diffuse elements in the 3′ UTR regulate post-transcriptional expression of p27Kip1 at the level of translation. This is the first demonstration that HuR-dependent mRNA stability and HuR-independent mRNA translation plays a critical role in the regulation of post-transcriptional p27Kip1 expression. PMID:20332085

  18. Difference in the binocular rivalry rate between depressive episodes and remission.

    PubMed

    Jia, Ting; Ye, Xing; Wei, Qiang; Xie, Wen; Cai, Chunlan; Mu, Jingjing; Dong, Yi; Hu, Panpan; Hu, Xinglong; Tian, Yanghua; Wang, Kai

    2015-11-01

    Binocular rivalry refers to a phenomenon in which, when different images are presented to each eye simultaneously, perception alternates spontaneously between monocular views rather than being a superposition of the two images. Recently, the involvement of serotonin systems has been reported to be related to the phenomenon. There is abundant evidence for abnormalities of the serotonin systems in depression and the antidepressants that enhance 5-HT transmission, which in turn improves mood and behavior. However, the available data with respect to rivalry rates in depression are less clear. Therefore, we aimed to explore whether perceptual rivalry was affected by a dysfunctional serotonin system in patients with depression and whether there was a rivalry rate difference between episode and remission states in depression patients. Twenty-eight patients with depression and 30 healthy controls were recruited in the study. We assessed the rivalry rate and the 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD) in patients with depression during clinical episode and remission states. The results suggested that alternation rates for patients during episodes were significantly slower than during remission and than in healthy controls. Also, alternation rates for patients during remission were slower than in healthy controls. These results may provide further clues to serotonergic neural systems contributing to the dynamics of perception rivalry and may foster enlightenment regarding the field of binocular rivalry in psychiatric disorders other than bipolar disorder. PMID:26247392

  19. On the Role of Attention in Binocular Rivalry: Electrophysiological Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Schröger, Erich; O'Shea, Robert P.

    2011-01-01

    During binocular rivalry visual consciousness fluctuates between two dissimilar monocular images. We investigated the role of attention in this phenomenon by comparing event-related potentials (ERPs) when binocular-rivalry stimuli were attended with when they were unattended. Stimuli were dichoptic, orthogonal gratings that yielded binocular rivalry and dioptic, identically oriented gratings that yielded binocular fusion. Events were all possible orthogonal changes in orientation of one or both gratings. We had two attention conditions: In the attend-to-grating condition, participants had to report changes in perceived orientation, focussing their attention on the gratings. In the attend-to-fixation condition participants had to report changes in a central fixation target, taking attention away from the gratings. We found, surprisingly, that attending to rival gratings yielded a smaller ERP component (the N1, from 160–210 ms) than attending to the fixation target. To explain this paradoxical effect of attention, we propose that rivalry occurs in the attend-to-fixation condition (we found an ERP signature of rivalry in the form of a sustained negativity from 210–300 ms) but that the mechanism processing the stimulus changes is more adapted in the attend-to-grating condition than in the attend-to-fixation condition. This is consistent with the theory that adaptation gives rise to changes of visual consciousness during binocular rivalry. PMID:21799918

  20. Handling qualities comparison of panoramic night vision goggles and 46-deg. night vision goggles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craig, Gregory; Jennings, Sion; Thorndycraft, David

    2003-09-01

    Night Vision Goggles allow the user to see in extremely low illumination levels but the visual information provided by Night Vision Goggles has a limited field-of-view that diminishes handling-qualities in the night flying environment. Panoramic Night Vision Goggles were designed to correct this problem by providing a 100° horizontal field-of-view which is larger than currently used Night Vision Goggles. However, in the first generation Panoramic Night Vision Goggle, the improved field of view came at the cost of diminished resolution, contrast and central overlap area when compared to conventional Night Vision Goggles. This paper describes an evaluation that was conducted in the variable stability NRC Bell-205 helicopter to examine the influence on system handling qualities of the Panoramic Night Vision Goggles and a 46° field-of-view UK Night Vision Goggle. Five pilots flew the ADS-33D hover, sidestep and pirouette manoeuvres in simulated night conditions with the UK Night Vision Goggle and the Panoramic Night Vision Goggle. Both subjective and objective measures of task performance were obtained. Handling-qualities ratings showed the pirouette was performed better with the Panoramic Night Vision Goggles. This was the only manoeuvre where there was a clear-cut handling qualities improvement when using the Panoramic Night Vision Goggles. Other manoeuvres such as the sidestep and hover did not show definitive handling qualities rating differences between the two Night Vision Goggle types. The flight test results were interpreted in terms of the design trade-offs of the two night vision systems, with regard to the different acuity, binocular overlaps and fields-of-view.

  1. Low Vision

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cases of Low Vision (in thousands) by Age, Gender, and Race/Ethnicity Table for 2010 U.S. Prevalent ... Cases of Low Vision (in thousands) by Age, Gender, and Race/Ethnicity Table for 2000 U.S. Prevalent ...

  2. Meiotic abnormalities

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 19, describes meiotic abnormalities. These include nondisjunction of autosomes and sex chromosomes, genetic and environmental causes of nondisjunction, misdivision of the centromere, chromosomally abnormal human sperm, male infertility, parental age, and origin of diploid gametes. 57 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Flexible dynamic measurement method of three-dimensional surface profilometry based on multiple vision sensors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhen; Li, Xiaojing; Li, Fengjiao; Zhang, Guangjun

    2015-01-12

    Single vision sensor cannot measure an entire object because of their limited field of view. Meanwhile, multiple rigidly-fixed vision sensors for the dynamic vision measurement of three-dimensional (3D) surface profilometry are complex and sensitive to strong environmental vibrations. To overcome these problems, a novel flexible dynamic measurement method for 3D surface profilometry based on multiple vision sensors is presented in this paper. A raster binocular stereo vision sensor is combined with a wide-field camera to produce a 3D optical probe. Multiple 3D optical probes are arranged around the object being measured, then many planar targets are set up. These planar targets function as the mediator to integrate the local 3D data measured by the raster binocular stereo vision sensors into the coordinate system. The proposed method is not sensitive to strong environmental vibrations, and the positions of these 3D optical probes need not be rigidly-fixed during the measurement. The validity of the proposed method is verified in a physical experiment with two 3D optical probes. When the measuring range of raster binocular stereo vision sensor is about 0.5 m × 0.38 m × 0.4 m and the size of the measured object is about 0.7 m, the accuracy of the proposed method could reach 0.12 mm. Meanwhile, the effectiveness of the proposed method in dynamic measurement is confirmed by measuring the rotating fan blades. PMID:25835684

  4. Acute Alcohol Drinking Promotes Piecemeal Percepts during Binocular Rivalry.

    PubMed

    Cao, Dingcai; Zhuang, Xiaohua; Kang, Para; Hong, Sang W; King, Andrea C

    2016-01-01

    Binocular rivalry refers to perceptual alternation when two eyes view different images. One of the potential percepts during binocular rivalry is a spatial mosaic of left- and right-eye images, known as piecemeal percepts, which may result from localized rivalries between small regions in the left- and right-eye images. It is known that alcohol increases inhibitory neurotransmission, which may reduce the number of alternations during binocular rivalry. However, it is unclear whether alcohol affects rivalry dynamics in the same manner for both coherent percepts (i.e., percepts of complete left or right images) and piecemeal percepts. To address this question, the present study measured the dynamics of binocular rivalry before and after 15 moderate-to-heavy social drinkers consumed an intoxicating dose of alcohol versus a placebo beverage. Both simple rivalrous stimuli consisting of gratings with different orientations, and complex stimuli consisting of a face or a house were tested to examine alcohol effects on rivalry as a function of stimulus complexity. Results showed that for both simple and complex stimuli, alcohol affects coherent and piecemeal percepts differently. More specifically, alcohol reduced the number of coherent percepts but not the mean dominance duration of coherent percepts. In contrast, for piecemeal percepts, alcohol increased the mean dominance duration but not the number of piecemeal percepts. These results suggested that alcohol drinking may selectively affect the dynamics of transitional period of binocular rivalry by increasing the duration of piecemeal percepts, leading to a reduction in the number of coherent percepts. The differential effect of alcohol on the dynamics of coherent and piecemeal percepts cannot be accounted for by alcohol's effect on a common inhibitory mechanism. Other mechanisms, such as increasing neural noise, are needed to explain alcohol's effect on the dynamics of binocular rivalry. PMID:27092096

  5. Acute Alcohol Drinking Promotes Piecemeal Percepts during Binocular Rivalry

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Dingcai; Zhuang, Xiaohua; Kang, Para; Hong, Sang W.; King, Andrea C.

    2016-01-01

    Binocular rivalry refers to perceptual alternation when two eyes view different images. One of the potential percepts during binocular rivalry is a spatial mosaic of left- and right-eye images, known as piecemeal percepts, which may result from localized rivalries between small regions in the left- and right-eye images. It is known that alcohol increases inhibitory neurotransmission, which may reduce the number of alternations during binocular rivalry. However, it is unclear whether alcohol affects rivalry dynamics in the same manner for both coherent percepts (i.e., percepts of complete left or right images) and piecemeal percepts. To address this question, the present study measured the dynamics of binocular rivalry before and after 15 moderate-to-heavy social drinkers consumed an intoxicating dose of alcohol versus a placebo beverage. Both simple rivalrous stimuli consisting of gratings with different orientations, and complex stimuli consisting of a face or a house were tested to examine alcohol effects on rivalry as a function of stimulus complexity. Results showed that for both simple and complex stimuli, alcohol affects coherent and piecemeal percepts differently. More specifically, alcohol reduced the number of coherent percepts but not the mean dominance duration of coherent percepts. In contrast, for piecemeal percepts, alcohol increased the mean dominance duration but not the number of piecemeal percepts. These results suggested that alcohol drinking may selectively affect the dynamics of transitional period of binocular rivalry by increasing the duration of piecemeal percepts, leading to a reduction in the number of coherent percepts. The differential effect of alcohol on the dynamics of coherent and piecemeal percepts cannot be accounted for by alcohol’s effect on a common inhibitory mechanism. Other mechanisms, such as increasing neural noise, are needed to explain alcohol’s effect on the dynamics of binocular rivalry. PMID:27092096

  6. Infant Face Preferences after Binocular Visual Deprivation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mondloch, Catherine J.; Lewis, Terri L.; Levin, Alex V.; Maurer, Daphne

    2013-01-01

    Early visual deprivation impairs some, but not all, aspects of face perception. We investigated the possible developmental roots of later abnormalities by using a face detection task to test infants treated for bilateral congenital cataract within 1 hour of their first focused visual input. The seven patients were between 5 and 12 weeks old…

  7. Why Cyclops could not compete with Ulysses: monocular vision and mental images.

    PubMed

    Vecchi, Tomaso; Cattaneo, Zaira; Monegato, Maura; Pece, Alfredo; Cornoldi, Cesare; Pietrini, Pietro

    2006-05-15

    The present research demonstrates that the limitations of congenitally blind people in tasks requiring the processing of mental images are specifically related to the absence of binocular vision and not to the absence of vision per se. We contrasted three different groups of participants: sighted; visually impaired, with reduced binocular vision; monocular, with a normal visual acuity although in one eye only. Visually impaired participants (i.e. blurred vision) show a pattern of performance comparable to that of the sighted. In contrast, monocular participants show a similar pattern of performance to congenitally blind individuals despite being able to see perfectly well. These results shed new light on the relationship between perception and imagery and on the characteristics of sequential and simultaneous processes in the human brain. PMID:16641676

  8. VISION AND COLLEGE READING - A REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE AND REPORT OF A SURVEY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MAXWELL, MARTHA J.

    THE AMERICAN OPTICAL (AO) COMPANY'S SIGHT SCREENER, A PORTABLE BINOCULAR INSTRUMENT DESIGNED FOR MASS VISION TESTING, WAS EVALUATED AT THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND READING AND STUDY SKILLS LABORATORY TO DETERMINE ITS CAPACITY TO IDENTIFY STUDENTS NEEDING PROFESSIONAL EYE EXAMINATIONS PRIOR TO READING INSTRUCTION. DATA FROM 106 PROBATIONARY FRESHMEN,…

  9. Composition of a Vision Screen for Servicemembers With Traumatic Brain Injury: Consensus Using a Modified Nominal Group Technique

    PubMed Central

    Finkelstein, Marsha; Llanos, Imelda; Scheiman, Mitchell; Wagener, Sharon Gowdy

    2014-01-01

    Vision impairment is common in the first year after traumatic brain injury (TBI), including among service members whose brain injuries occurred during deployment in Iraq and Afghanistan. Occupational therapy practitioners provide routine vision screening to inform treatment planning and referral to vision specialists, but existing methods are lacking because many tests were developed for children and do not screen for vision dysfunction typical of TBI. An expert panel was charged with specifying the composition of a vision screening protocol for servicemembers with TBI. A modified nominal group technique fostered discussion and objective determinations of consensus. After considering 29 vision tests, the panel recommended a nine-test vision screening that examines functional performance, self-reported problems, far–near acuity, reading, accommodation, convergence, eye alignment and binocular vision, saccades, pursuits, and visual fields. Research is needed to develop reliable, valid, and clinically feasible vision screening protocols to identify TBI-related vision disorders in adults. PMID:25005505

  10. Congenital Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... serious health problems (e.g. Down syndrome ). Single-Gene Abnormalities Sometimes the chromosomes are normal in number, ... blood flow to the fetus impair fetal growth. Alcohol consumption and certain drugs during pregnancy significantly increase ...

  11. Craniofacial Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the skull and face. Craniofacial abnormalities are birth defects of the face or head. Some, like cleft ... palate, are among the most common of all birth defects. Others are very rare. Most of them affect ...

  12. Walking abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... include: Arthritis of the leg or foot joints Conversion disorder (a psychological disorder) Foot problems (such as a ... injuries. For an abnormal gait that occurs with conversion disorder, counseling and support from family members are strongly ...

  13. Chromosome Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... decade, newer techniques have been developed that allow scientists and doctors to screen for chromosomal abnormalities without using a microscope. These newer methods compare the patient's DNA to a normal DNA ...

  14. Nail abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    Nail abnormalities are problems with the color, shape, texture, or thickness of the fingernails or toenails. ... Fungus or yeast cause changes in the color, texture, and shape of the nails. Bacterial infection may ...

  15. Asynchronous event-based binocular stereo matching.

    PubMed

    Rogister, Paul; Benosman, Ryad; Ieng, Sio-Hoi; Lichtsteiner, Patrick; Delbruck, Tobi

    2012-02-01

    We present a novel event-based stereo matching algorithm that exploits the asynchronous visual events from a pair of silicon retinas. Unlike conventional frame-based cameras, recent artificial retinas transmit their outputs as a continuous stream of asynchronous temporal events, in a manner similar to the output cells of the biological retina. Our algorithm uses the timing information carried by this representation in addressing the stereo-matching problem on moving objects. Using the high temporal resolution of the acquired data stream for the dynamic vision sensor, we show that matching on the timing of the visual events provides a new solution to the real-time computation of 3-D objects when combined with geometric constraints using the distance to the epipolar lines. The proposed algorithm is able to filter out incorrect matches and to accurately reconstruct the depth of moving objects despite the low spatial resolution of the sensor. This brief sets up the principles for further event-based vision processing and demonstrates the importance of dynamic information and spike timing in processing asynchronous streams of visual events. PMID:24808513

  16. [Endonasal paranasal sinus surgery with the binocular magnifier].

    PubMed

    Tolsdorff, P

    1992-11-01

    The Keeler panoramic magnifiers can be worn in connection with a well-focussed head lamp system and permit stereoscopic surgery of the paranasal sinuses with 3 x 0 magnification. Operations under panoramic magnifier control are time-sparing and economical. Operations on the paranasal sinuses under binocular magnifiers are a useful alternative to microscopic surgery. PMID:1463561

  17. The 'laws' of binocular rivalry: 50 years of Levelt's propositions.

    PubMed

    Brascamp, J W; Klink, P C; Levelt, W J M

    2015-04-01

    It has been fifty years since Levelt's monograph On Binocular Rivalry (1965) was published, but its four propositions that describe the relation between stimulus strength and the phenomenology of binocular rivalry remain a benchmark for theorists and experimentalists even today. In this review, we will revisit the original conception of the four propositions and the scientific landscape in which this happened. We will also provide a brief update concerning distributions of dominance durations, another aspect of Levelt's monograph that has maintained a prominent presence in the field. In a critical evaluation of Levelt's propositions against current knowledge of binocular rivalry we will then demonstrate that the original propositions are not completely compatible with what is known today, but that they can, in a straightforward way, be modified to encapsulate the progress that has been made over the past fifty years. The resulting modified, propositions are shown to apply to a broad range of bistable perceptual phenomena, not just binocular rivalry, and they allow important inferences about the underlying neural systems. We argue that these inferences reflect canonical neural properties that play a role in visual perception in general, and we discuss ways in which future research can build on the work reviewed here to attain a better understanding of these properties. PMID:25749677

  18. Frontoparietal activity and its structural connectivity in binocular rivalry.

    PubMed

    Wilcke, Juliane C; O'Shea, Robert P; Watts, Richard

    2009-12-11

    To understand the brain areas associated with visual awareness and their anatomical interconnections, we studied binocular rivalry with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Binocular rivalry occurs when one image is viewed by one eye and a different image by the other; it is experienced as perceptual alternations between the two images. Our first experiment addressed problems with a popular comparison condition, namely permanent suppression, by comparing rivalry with binocular fusion instead. We found an increased fMRI signal in right frontal, parietal, and occipital regions during rivalry viewing. The pattern of neural activity differed from findings of permanent suppression comparisons, except for adjacent activity in the right superior parietal lobule. This location was near fMRI signal changes related to reported rivalry alternations in our second experiment, indicating that neighbouring areas in the right parietal cortex may be involved in different components of rivalry. In our second experiment, we used probabilistic tractography to detect white matter fibres between right-hemispheric areas that showed event-related fMRI signal changes time-locked to reported perceptual alternations during rivalry viewing. Most of these functionally defined areas were linked by probabilistic fibre tracts, some of which followed long-distance connections such as the inferior occipitofrontal fasciculus. Corresponding anatomical pathways might mediate communication within the functional network associated with changes in conscious perception during binocular rivalry. PMID:19782667

  19. Distortion of binoculars revisited: does the sweet spot exist?

    PubMed

    Merlitz, Holger

    2010-01-01

    Sixty years ago, August Sonnefeld of Zeiss reported on observations with experimental telescopes. The goal of his investigation was to determine the ideal amount of distortion applied to optical instruments that are used in combination with the human eye. His studies were inconclusive and partially contradictory. We have picked up this problem once again, adopting a modern point of view about the human imaging process, and supported by computer graphics. Based on experiments with Helmholtz checkerboards, we argue that human imaging introduces a certain amount of barrel distortion, which has to be counterbalanced through the implementation of an equally strong pincushion distortion into the binocular design. We discuss in detail how this approach is capable of eliminating the globe effect of the panning binocular and how the residual pincushion distortion affects the image when the eye is pointing off-center. Our results support the binocular designer in optimizing his instrument for its intended mode of application, and may help binocular users and astronomers better understand their tools. PMID:20035302

  20. Symbolic Magnitude Modulates Perceptual Strength in Binocular Rivalry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paffen, Chris L. E.; Plukaard, Sarah; Kanai, Ryota

    2011-01-01

    Basic aspects of magnitude (such as luminance contrast) are directly represented by sensory representations in early visual areas. However, it is unclear how symbolic magnitudes (such as Arabic numerals) are represented in the brain. Here we show that symbolic magnitude affects binocular rivalry: perceptual dominance of numbers and objects of…

  1. Commanding and Error Recovery of a Binocular Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De La Peña, M. D.; Biddick, C.; Thompson, D.

    2014-05-01

    The Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) consists of two 8.4-meter primary mirrors on a common mount. Each primary is complemented by an adaptive secondary, as well as a tertiary mirror. Since the LBT was designed to perform interferometric measurements, there is a critical need for the ability to control the optics of the two sides of the telescope to high precision. A unique aspect of the LBT is the comparatively large range over which the optics can be adjusted: the optics provide the flexibility for the deliberate acquisition of different targets on each side of the telescope. Designing a Telescope Control System (TCS) which allows for the efficient commanding of both telescope sides viewing the same target (co-pointed), having both telescope sides viewing different targets, and retaining the ability to perform as a single-eyed telescope (monocular mode) is challenging. Error status, particularly in the binocular context, must provide very clear and specific information with respect to the problem in order to enable efficient recovery. This paper describes the high-level flow of the telescope commanding, the binocular observation rules and the recovery strategy for the observer. As the observatory and astronomers gain more experience working within the binocular context, it is anticipated that new strategies may be developed.

  2. The advantages of stereo vision in a face recognition system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yufeng; Blasch, Erik

    2014-06-01

    Humans can recognize a face with binocular vision, while computers typically use a single face image. It is known that the performance of face recognition (by a computer) can be improved using the score fusion of multimodal images and multiple algorithms. A question is: Can we apply stereo vision to a face recognition system? We know that human binocular vision has many advantages such as stereopsis (3D vision), binocular summation, and singleness of vision including fusion of binocular images (cyclopean image). For face recognition, a 3D face or 3D facial features are typically computed from a pair of stereo images. In human visual processes, the binocular summation and singleness of vision are similar as image fusion processes. In this paper, we propose an advanced face recognition system with stereo imaging capability, which is comprised of two 2-in-1 multispectral (visible and thermal) cameras and three recognition algorithms (circular Gaussian filter, face pattern byte, and linear discriminant analysis [LDA]). Specifically, we present and compare stereo fusion at three levels (images, features, and scores) by using stereo images (from left camera and right camera). Image fusion is achieved with three methods (Laplacian pyramid, wavelet transform, average); feature fusion is done with three logical operations (AND, OR, XOR); and score fusion is implemented with four classifiers (LDA, k-nearest neighbor, support vector machine, binomial logical regression). The system performance is measured by probability of correct classification (PCC) rate (reported as accuracy rate in this paper) and false accept rate (FAR). The proposed approaches were validated with a multispectral stereo face dataset from 105 subjects. Experimental results show that any type of stereo fusion can improve the PCC, meanwhile reduce the FAR. It seems that stereo image/feature fusion is superior to stereo score fusion in terms of recognition performance. Further score fusion after image

  3. Monocular perceptual learning of contrast detection facilitates binocular combination in adults with anisometropic amblyopia

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zidong; Li, Jinrong; Liu, Jing; Cai, Xiaoxiao; Yuan, Junpeng; Deng, Daming; Yu, Minbin

    2016-01-01

    Perceptual learning in contrast detection improves monocular visual function in adults with anisometropic amblyopia; however, its effect on binocular combination remains unknown. Given that the amblyopic visual system suffers from pronounced binocular functional loss, it is important to address how the amblyopic visual system responds to such training strategies under binocular viewing conditions. Anisometropic amblyopes (n = 13) were asked to complete two psychophysical supra-threshold binocular summation tasks: (1) binocular phase combination and (2) dichoptic global motion coherence before and after monocular training to investigate this question. We showed that these participants benefited from monocular training in terms of binocular combination. More importantly, the improvements observed with the area under log CSF (AULCSF) were found to be correlated with the improvements in binocular phase combination. PMID:26829898

  4. All Vision Impairment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Jobs Home > Statistics and Data > All Vision Impairment All Vision Impairment Vision Impairment Defined Vision impairment is ... being blind by the U.S. definition.) The category “All Vision Impairment” includes both low vision and blindness. ...

  5. Low Vision FAQs

    MedlinePlus

    ... Jobs Home > Low Vision > Low Vision FAQs Healthy Vision Diabetes Diabetes Home How Much Do You Know? ... los Ojos Cómo hablarle a su oculista Low Vision FAQs What is low vision? Low vision is ...

  6. Living with vision loss

    MedlinePlus

    Diabetes - vision loss; Retinopathy - vision loss; Low vision; Blindness - vision loss ... Low vision is a visual disability. Wearing regular glasses or contacts does not help. People with low vision have ...

  7. A micro-architecture for binocular disparity and ocular dominance in visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Kara, Prakash; Boyd, Jamie D

    2009-04-01

    In invertebrate predators such as the praying mantis and vertebrate predators such as wild cats the ability to detect small differences in inter-ocular retinal disparities is a critical means for accurately determining the depth of moving objects such as prey. In mammals, the first neurons along the visual pathway that encode binocular disparities are found in the visual cortex. However, a precise functional architecture for binocular disparity has never been demonstrated in any species, and coarse maps for disparity have been found in only one primate species. Moreover, the dominant approach for assaying the developmental plasticity of binocular cortical neurons used monocular tests of ocular dominance to infer binocular function. The few studies that examined the relationship between ocular dominance and binocular disparity of individual cells used single-unit recordings and have provided conflicting results regarding whether ocular dominance can predict the selectivity or sensitivity to binocular disparity. We used two-photon calcium imaging to sample the response to monocular and binocular visual stimuli from nearly every adjacent neuron in a small region of the cat visual cortex, area 18. Here we show that local circuits for ocular dominance always have smooth and graded transitions from one apparently monocular functional domain to an adjacent binocular region. Most unexpectedly, we discovered a new map in the cat visual cortex that had a precise functional micro-architecture for binocular disparity selectivity. At the level of single cells, ocular dominance was unrelated to binocular disparity selectivity or sensitivity. When the local maps for ocular dominance and binocular disparity both had measurable gradients at a given cortical site, the two gradient directions were orthogonal to each other. Together, these results indicate that, from the perspective of the spiking activity of individual neurons, ocular dominance cannot predict binocular disparity

  8. Visual memory for objects following foveal vision loss.

    PubMed

    Geringswald, Franziska; Herbik, Anne; Hofmüller, Wolfram; Hoffmann, Michael B; Pollmann, Stefan

    2015-09-01

    Allocation of visual attention is crucial for encoding items into visual long-term memory. In free vision, attention is closely linked to the center of gaze, raising the question whether foveal vision loss entails suboptimal deployment of attention and subsequent impairment of object encoding. To investigate this question, we examined visual long-term memory for objects in patients suffering from foveal vision loss due to age-related macular degeneration. We measured patients' change detection sensitivity after a period of free scene exploration monocularly with their worse eye when possible, and under binocular vision, comparing sensitivity and eye movements to matched normal-sighted controls. A highly salient cue was used to capture attention to a nontarget location before a target change occurred in half of the trials, ensuring that change detection relied on memory. Patients' monocular and binocular sensitivity to object change was comparable to controls, even after more than 4 intervening fixations, and not significantly correlated with visual impairment. We conclude that extrafoveal vision suffices for efficient encoding into visual long-term memory. PMID:25893842

  9. Leading Vision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fawcett, Gay

    2004-01-01

    The current educational landscape makes it imperative that a vision statement become more than a fine-sounding statement that is laminated, hung on the wall, and quickly forgotten. If educators do not have a clear image of the future they wish to create, then someone will be ready to create it for them. But with a clear vision of the future, a…

  10. Learning Visions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phelps, Margaret S.; And Others

    This paper describes LEARNing Visions, a K-12 intervention program for at-risk youth in Jackson County, Tennessee, involving a partnership between the schools, local businesses, Tennessee Technological University, and Visions Five (a private company). Jackson County is characterized by an undereducated population, a high employment rate, and a low…

  11. Unwanted reflections during slit lamp assisted binocular indirect ophthalmoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheehan, Matthew; Goncharov, Alexander

    2011-11-01

    Binocular indirect ophthalmoscopy is a routine ophthalmic examination procedure. Two different apparatus setups are commonly employed; the head/spectacle mounted designs of Schepens and slit lamp assisted ophthalmoscopy, both typically performed through a fundus lens of high positive power. It can be difficult for clinicians to avoid unwanted back reflections primarily emanating from the fundus lens and the pre-corneal tear film, particularly when initially learning the skills required to perform the examination. In this investigation the illumination system of a slit lamp was modified to include a variety of obscuration designs optically conjugate to surfaces responsible for creating unwanted reflections. The modified apparatus was then used to perform binocular indirect ophthalmoscopy on an artificial eye and on real eyes. Clinicians used questionnaires to score the appearance of reflections. The mean scores were similar across all trials, including the control unmodified trial, indicating general consensus that the modified illumination system provided no substantial effect on the perception of these unwanted reflections.

  12. Functional MRI activity in the thalamus and occipital cortex of anesthetized dogs induced by monocular and binocular stimulation.

    PubMed

    Willis, C K; Quinn, R P; McDonell, W M; Gati, J; Partlow, G; Vilis, T

    2001-07-01

    The neuroanatomy of the mammalian visual system has received considerable attention through electrophysiological study of cats and non-human primates, and through neuroimaging of humans. Canine neuroanatomy, however, has received much less attention, limiting our understanding of canine vision and visual pathways. As an early step in applying blood oxygenation level dependant (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) for veterinary use, we compared visual activity in the thalamus and occipital cortex of anesthetized dogs presented with binocular and monocular visual stimuli. Activity in the left and right thalamus and occipital cortex during monocular stimulation was also compared. Six beagles were presented with a vertical grating visual stimulus and scanned at 4 Tesla. Each dog was scanned twice under each of 3 anesthetic protocols (isoflurane, propofol, and fentanyl/midazolam). We found: 1) significant BOLD activation in the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) of the thalamus and the occipital cortex; 2) a significantly larger area of activation in the LGN during monocular stimulation than during binocular stimulation; and 3) that activity in the hemisphere contralateral to the stimulus was not significantly greater than that ipsilateral to it. PMID:11480525

  13. Looking above the prairie: localized and upward acute vision in a native grassland bird

    PubMed Central

    Tyrrell, Luke P.; Moore, Bret A.; Loftis, Christopher; Fernández-Juricic, Esteban

    2013-01-01

    Visual systems of open habitat vertebrates are predicted to have a band of acute vision across the retina (visual streak) and wide visual coverage to gather information along the horizon. We tested whether the eastern meadowlark (Sturnella magna) had this visual configuration given that it inhabits open grasslands. Contrary to our expectations, the meadowlark retina has a localized spot of acute vision (fovea) and relatively narrow visual coverage. The fovea projects above rather than towards the horizon with the head at rest, and individuals modify their body posture in tall grass to maintain a similar foveal projection. Meadowlarks have relatively large binocular fields and can see their bill tips, which may help with their probe-foraging technique. Overall, meadowlark vision does not fit the profile of vertebrates living in open habitats. The binocular field may control foraging while the fovea may be used for detecting and tracking aerial stimuli (predators, conspecifics). PMID:24292817

  14. Binocular interaction of visually evoked cortical potentials elicited by dichoptic binocular stimulation.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Celso Soiti; Nakagomi, Ryota; Matsumoto, Harue; Minoda, Haruka; Shinoda, Kei; Iwata, Takeshi; Mizota, Atsushi

    2014-01-01

    To analyze the interaction of cortical potentials elicited by dichoptic stimulation of the dominant and fellow eyes at different frequencies, a pair of programmed power supply units were used to drive a light emitting diode (LED) mounted in the right and left eyes of light-proof goggles to elicit the visually evoked cortical responses (VECPs). The right eye was stimulated at 11.5 Hz and the left eye at 11.0 Hz. Then the stimulation was repeated with the frequency of stimulation switched to the other eyes. The stimulus duration was 5 ms. The sampling rate was 1.0 Hz, and the duration of collection was 200 ms. The VECP of each eye was extracted separately. Individual VECPs could be recorded separately after simultaneous dichoptic stimulation of each eye. The amplitudes of the VECPs were not significantly different after stimulating the dominant eye and the fellow eye separately. The implicit times of negative peak (N-2) and the second positive peak (P-2) were shorter after stimulation of the dominant eye than after stimulation of the fellow eye, but the difference was not significant. However, the implicit time of N-2 elicited by stimulating the dominant eye was significantly shorter when the stimulation rate was 11.5 Hz. The VECPs elicited by stimulating the two eyes can be recorded separately by simultaneous dichoptic stimulation. Dichoptic simultaneous stimulation required a shorter time and may be a more sensitive method of analyzing binocular interactions compared to the classic VECPs using monocular stimulation. PMID:25194016

  15. Robot vision.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutro, L. L.; Lerman, J. B.

    1973-01-01

    The work reported had been undertaken to develop hardware that would guide an automatic vehicle in the exploration of the surface of Mars, recognize objects, and report the findings to earth. Approaches for automatically determining the range and shape of objects are discussed, giving attention to the automatic comparison of one scan line of the left with one scan line of the right TV image. Methods of mapping binocular space into match space are considered together with the use of a model in match space, rules for processing random-dot stereograms, the elimination of spurious matches, random-square stereograms, questions of the processing of a real scene, and aspects of range accuracy. Methods of computation for extracting other features are also discussed along with stereo TV cameras and approaches for reconstructing the appearance of a scene.

  16. AI And Early Vision - Part II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Julesz, Bela

    1989-08-01

    A quarter of a century ago I introduced two paradigms into psychology which in the intervening years have had a direct impact on the psychobiology of early vision and an indirect one on artificial intelligence (AI or machine vision). The first, the computer-generated random-dot stereogram (RDS) paradigm (Julesz, 1960) at its very inception posed a strategic question both for AI and neurophysiology. The finding that stereoscopic depth perception (stereopsis) is possible without the many enigmatic cues of monocular form recognition - as assumed previously - demonstrated that stereopsis with its basic problem of finding matches between corresponding random aggregates of dots in the left and right visual fields became ripe for modeling. Indeed, the binocular matching problem of stereopsis opened up an entire field of study, eventually leading to the computational models of David Marr (1982) and his coworkers. The fusion of RDS had an even greater impact on neurophysiologists - including Hubel and Wiesel (1962) - who realized that stereopsis must occur at an early stage, and can be studied easier than form perception. This insight recently culminated in the studies by Gian Poggio (1984) who found binocular-disparity - tuned neurons in the input stage to the visual cortex (layer IVB in V1) in the monkey that were selectively triggered by dynamic RDS. Thus the first paradigm led to a strategic insight: that with stereoscopic vision there is no camouflage, and as such was advantageous for our primate ancestors to evolve the cortical machinery of stereoscopic vision to capture camouflaged prey (insects) at a standstill. Amazingly, although stereopsis evolved relatively late in primates, it captured the very input stages of the visual cortex. (For a detailed review, see Julesz, 1986a)

  17. Generic motion platform for active vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiman, Carl F. R.; Vincze, Markus

    1996-10-01

    The term 'active vision' was first used by Bajcsy at a NATO workshop in 1982 to describe an emerging field of robot vision which departed sharply from traditional paradigms of image understanding and machine vision. The new approach embeds a moving camera platform as an in-the-loop component of robotic navigation or hand-eye coordination. Visually served steering of the focus of attention supercedes the traditional functions of recognition and gaging. Custom active vision platforms soon proliferated in research laboratories in Europe and North America. In 1990 the National Science Foundation funded the design of a common platform to promote cooperation and reduce cost in active vision research. This paper describes the resulting platform. The design was driven by payload requirements for binocular motorized C-mount lenses on a platform whose performance and articulation emulate those of the human eye- head system. The result was a 4-DOF mechanisms driven by servo controlled DC brush motors. A crossbeam supports two independent worm-gear driven camera vergence mounts at speeds up to 1,000 degrees per second over a range of +/- 90 degrees from dead ahead. This crossbeam is supported by a pan-tilt mount whose horizontal axis intersects the vergence axes for translation-free camera rotation about these axes at speeds up to 500 degrees per second.

  18. Simulated disparity and peripheral blur interact during binocular fusion.

    PubMed

    Maiello, Guido; Chessa, Manuela; Solari, Fabio; Bex, Peter J

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a low-cost, practical gaze-contingent display in which natural images are presented to the observer with dioptric blur and stereoscopic disparity that are dependent on the three-dimensional structure of natural scenes. Our system simulates a distribution of retinal blur and depth similar to that experienced in real-world viewing conditions by emmetropic observers. We implemented the system using light-field photographs taken with a plenoptic camera which supports digital refocusing anywhere in the images. We coupled this capability with an eye-tracking system and stereoscopic rendering. With this display, we examine how the time course of binocular fusion depends on depth cues from blur and stereoscopic disparity in naturalistic images. Our results show that disparity and peripheral blur interact to modify eye-movement behavior and facilitate binocular fusion, and the greatest benefit was gained by observers who struggled most to achieve fusion. Even though plenoptic images do not replicate an individual’s aberrations, the results demonstrate that a naturalistic distribution of depth-dependent blur may improve 3-D virtual reality, and that interruptions of this pattern (e.g., with intraocular lenses) which flatten the distribution of retinal blur may adversely affect binocular fusion. PMID:25034260

  19. Binocular interactions underlying the classic optomotor responses of flying flies.

    PubMed

    Duistermars, Brian J; Care, Rachel A; Frye, Mark A

    2012-01-01

    In response to imposed course deviations, the optomotor reactions of animals reduce motion blur and facilitate the maintenance of stable body posture. In flies, many anatomical and electrophysiological studies suggest that disparate motion cues stimulating the left and right eyes are not processed in isolation but rather are integrated in the brain to produce a cohesive panoramic percept. To investigate the strength of such inter-ocular interactions and their role in compensatory sensory-motor transformations, we utilize a virtual reality flight simulator to record wing and head optomotor reactions by tethered flying flies in response to imposed binocular rotation and monocular front-to-back and back-to-front motion. Within a narrow range of stimulus parameters that generates large contrast insensitive optomotor responses to binocular rotation, we find that responses to monocular front-to-back motion are larger than those to panoramic rotation, but are contrast sensitive. Conversely, responses to monocular back-to-front motion are slower than those to rotation and peak at the lowest tested contrast. Together our results suggest that optomotor responses to binocular rotation result from the influence of non-additive contralateral inhibitory as well as excitatory circuit interactions that serve to confer contrast insensitivity to flight behaviors influenced by rotatory optic flow. PMID:22375108

  20. Binocular Interactions Underlying the Classic Optomotor Responses of Flying Flies

    PubMed Central

    Duistermars, Brian J.; Care, Rachel A.; Frye, Mark A.

    2012-01-01

    In response to imposed course deviations, the optomotor reactions of animals reduce motion blur and facilitate the maintenance of stable body posture. In flies, many anatomical and electrophysiological studies suggest that disparate motion cues stimulating the left and right eyes are not processed in isolation but rather are integrated in the brain to produce a cohesive panoramic percept. To investigate the strength of such inter-ocular interactions and their role in compensatory sensory–motor transformations, we utilize a virtual reality flight simulator to record wing and head optomotor reactions by tethered flying flies in response to imposed binocular rotation and monocular front-to-back and back-to-front motion. Within a narrow range of stimulus parameters that generates large contrast insensitive optomotor responses to binocular rotation, we find that responses to monocular front-to-back motion are larger than those to panoramic rotation, but are contrast sensitive. Conversely, responses to monocular back-to-front motion are slower than those to rotation and peak at the lowest tested contrast. Together our results suggest that optomotor responses to binocular rotation result from the influence of non-additive contralateral inhibitory as well as excitatory circuit interactions that serve to confer contrast insensitivity to flight behaviors influenced by rotatory optic flow. PMID:22375108

  1. Computational vision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrow, H. G.; Tenenbaum, J. M.

    1981-01-01

    The range of fundamental computational principles underlying human vision that equally apply to artificial and natural systems is surveyed. There emerges from research a view of the structuring of vision systems as a sequence of levels of representation, with the initial levels being primarily iconic (edges, regions, gradients) and the highest symbolic (surfaces, objects, scenes). Intermediate levels are constrained by information made available by preceding levels and information required by subsequent levels. In particular, it appears that physical and three-dimensional surface characteristics provide a critical transition from iconic to symbolic representations. A plausible vision system design incorporating these principles is outlined, and its key computational processes are elaborated.

  2. Computer vision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gennery, D.; Cunningham, R.; Saund, E.; High, J.; Ruoff, C.

    1981-01-01

    The field of computer vision is surveyed and assessed, key research issues are identified, and possibilities for a future vision system are discussed. The problems of descriptions of two and three dimensional worlds are discussed. The representation of such features as texture, edges, curves, and corners are detailed. Recognition methods are described in which cross correlation coefficients are maximized or numerical values for a set of features are measured. Object tracking is discussed in terms of the robust matching algorithms that must be devised. Stereo vision, camera control and calibration, and the hardware and systems architecture are discussed.

  3. Resource Letter CCV-1: Color and Color Vision.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuewer, Roger H., Ed.; Pease, Paul L.

    1980-01-01

    Listed are selected resource materials on color vision and the measurement and specification of the stimulus for vision, photometry, and colorimetry. The author's purpose is to equip teachers and students with an understanding of normal and abnormal color vision. References are categorized relative to content level. (Author/DS)

  4. Binocular visual acuity for the correction of spherical aberration in polychromatic and monochromatic light.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Christina; Cánovas, Carmen; Manzanera, Silvestre; Weeber, Henk; Prieto, Pedro M; Piers, Patricia; Artal, Pablo

    2014-01-01

    Correction of spherical (SA) and longitudinal chromatic aberrations (LCA) significantly improves monocular visual acuity (VA). In this work, the visual effect of SA correction in polychromatic and monochromatic light on binocular visual performance is investigated. A liquid crystal based binocular adaptive optics visual analyzer capable of operating in polychromatic light is employed in this study. Binocular VA improves when SA is corrected and LCA effects are reduced separately and in combination, resulting in the highest value for SA correction in monochromatic light. However, the binocular summation ratio is highest for the baseline condition of uncorrected SA in polychromatic light. Although SA correction in monochromatic light has a greater impact monocularly than binocularly, bilateral correction of both SA and LCA may further improve binocular spatial visual acuity which may support the use of aspheric-achromatic ophthalmic devices, in particular, intraocular lenses (IOLs). PMID:24520150

  5. A binocular contribution to the production of optokinetic nystagmus in normal and stereoblind subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfe, J. M.; Held, R.; Bauer, J. A., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Viewing a large patterned field moving in one direction produces a regular pattern of eye movements known as optokinetic nystagmus (OKN). Fox et al. (1978) showed that the mechanism producing OKN can utilize purely binocular or 'cyclopean' input. Experiments reported confirm that finding and extend it to demonstrate that the binocularity of this mechanism is not disrupted in subjects who lack stereopsis. This result indicates that there exists more than one binocular process in the visual system.

  6. Improving Vision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Many people are familiar with the popular science fiction series Star Trek: The Next Generation, a show featuring a blind character named Geordi La Forge, whose visor-like glasses enable him to see. What many people do not know is that a product very similar to Geordi's glasses is available to assist people with vision conditions, and a NASA engineer's expertise contributed to its development. The JORDY(trademark) (Joint Optical Reflective Display) device, designed and manufactured by a privately-held medical device company known as Enhanced Vision, enables people with low vision to read, write, and watch television. Low vision, which includes macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, and glaucoma, describes eyesight that is 20/70 or worse, and cannot be fully corrected with conventional glasses.

  7. Vision problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... in dealing with eye emergencies if: You experience partial or complete blindness in one or both eyes, ... a family history of diabetes Eye itching or discharge Vision changes that seem related to medication (DO ...

  8. Vision Underwater.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Joseph S.

    1980-01-01

    Provides information regarding underwater vision. Includes a discussion of optically important interfaces, increased eye size of organisms at greater depths, visual peculiarities regarding the habitat of the coastal environment, and various pigment visual systems. (CS)

  9. Transient vision loss at depth due to presumed barotraumatic optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Hexdall, Eric J; Butler, Frank K

    2012-01-01

    Pressure-related vision loss has been reported during ascent to altitude. We report the case of an otherwise healthy diver who suffered painless, sudden-onset binocular vision loss at depth, followed by complete recovery immediately upon surfacing. We examine the dive and briefly discuss the differential diagnosis of transient vision loss in the setting of ambient pressure changes. We conclude that the diver likely suffered from sphenoid sinus barotrauma, possibly in association with dehiscence of the bony canals of the optic nerves as they travel in close proximity to the walls of the sphenoid sinus. PMID:23045919

  10. Weighted parallel contributions of binocular correlation and match signals to conscious perception of depth.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Ichiro; Doi, Takahiro

    2016-06-19

    Binocular disparity is detected in the primary visual cortex by a process similar to calculation of local cross-correlation between left and right retinal images. As a consequence, correlation-based neural signals convey information about false disparities as well as the true disparity. The false responses in the initial disparity detectors are eliminated at later stages in order to encode only disparities of the features correctly matched between the two eyes. For a simple stimulus configuration, a feed-forward nonlinear process can transform the correlation signal into the match signal. For human observers, depth judgement is determined by a weighted sum of the correlation and match signals rather than depending solely on the latter. The relative weight changes with spatial and temporal parameters of the stimuli, allowing adaptive recruitment of the two computations under different visual circumstances. A full transformation from correlation-based to match-based representation occurs at the neuronal population level in cortical area V4 and manifests in single-neuron responses of inferior temporal and posterior parietal cortices. Neurons in area V5/MT represent disparity in a manner intermediate between the correlation and match signals. We propose that the correlation and match signals in these areas contribute to depth perception in a weighted, parallel manner.This article is part of the themed issue 'Vision in our three-dimensional world'. PMID:27269600

  11. Nostril-specific olfactory modulation of visual perception in binocular rivalry.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wen; Zhang, Xiaomeng; Chen, Jennifer; Wang, Li; Chen, Denise

    2012-11-28

    It is known that olfaction and vision can work in tandem to represent object identities. What is yet unclear is the stage of the sensory processing hierarchy at which the two types of inputs converge. Here we study this issue through a well established visual phenomenon termed binocular rivalry. We show that smelling an odor from one nostril significantly enhances the dominance time of the congruent visual image in the contralateral visual field, relative to that in the ipsilateral visual field. Moreover, such lateralization-based enhancement extends to category selective regions so that when two images of words and human body, respectively, are engaged in rivalry in the central visual field, smelling natural human body odor from the right nostril increases the dominance time of the body image compared with smelling it from the left nostril. Semantic congruency alone failed to produce this effect in a similar setting. These results, taking advantage of the anatomical and functional lateralizations in the olfactory and visual systems, highlight the functional dissociation of the two nostrils and provide strong evidence for an object-based early convergence of olfactory and visual inputs in sensory representations. PMID:23197714

  12. Impaired perceptual processing and conceptual cognition in patients with anxiety disorders: a pilot study with the binocular depth inversion paradigm.

    PubMed

    Passie, Torsten; Schneider, Udo; Borsutzky, Mathias; Breyer, Roger; Emrich, Hinderk M; Bandelow, Borwin; Schmid-Ott, Gerhard

    2013-01-01

    The binocular depth inversion test (BDIT) measures a common illusion of visual perception whereby implausible objects are seen as normal, e.g., a hollow face is perceived as a normal, convex face. Such inversion is frequent, especially for objects with a high degree of familiarity. Under normal conditions, cognitive factors apparently override the binocular disparity cues of stereopsis. This internal mechanism of "censorship" of perception, which balances "top-down" and "bottom-up" processes of perception to come to a cognitive coherence, which is congruent to previous experience and concepts, appears to be disturbed in (pro-)psychotic states. The BDIT has been shown to be a sensitive measure of impaired higher visual processing and conceptual cognition common to conditions including schizophrenia, cannabinoid-intoxication, and sleep deprivation but not depression. In this pilot study, we tested the performance of patients with anxiety disorders (ICD-10 F40 and F41) compared to matched controls using the BDIT paradigm. Anxiety patients scored significantly higher on the BDIT than controls, in a range comparable to propsychotic conditions. The findings suggest that anxiety patients could have abnormalities in central perceptual processing, top-down processing (conceptual cognition), and reality testing similar to (pro-)psychotic conditions. Implications of these findings are discussed in relation to therapeutic interventions with anxiety disorders. PMID:23186162

  13. Accuracy aspects of stereo side-looking radar. [analysis of its visual perception and binocular vision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leberl, F. W.

    1979-01-01

    The geometry of the radar stereo model and factors affecting visual radar stereo perception are reviewed. Limits to the vertical exaggeration factor of stereo radar are defined. Radar stereo model accuracies are analyzed with respect to coordinate errors caused by errors of radar sensor position and of range, and with respect to errors of coordinate differences, i.e., cross-track distances and height differences.

  14. Dyslexic Children Are Confronted with Unstable Binocular Fixation while Reading

    PubMed Central

    Jainta, Stephanie; Kapoula, Zoï

    2011-01-01

    Reading requires three-dimensional motor control: saccades bring the eyes from left to right, fixating word after word; and oblique saccades bring the eyes to the next line of the text. The angle of vergence of the two optic axes should be adjusted to the depth of the book or screen and - most importantly - should be maintained in a sustained manner during saccades and fixations. Maintenance of vergence is important as it is a prerequisite for a single clear image of each word to be projected onto the fovea of the eyes. Deficits in the binocular control of saccades and of vergence in dyslexics have been reported previously but only for tasks using single targets. This study examines saccades and vergence control during real text reading. Thirteen dyslexic and seven non-dyslexic children read the French text “L'Allouette” in two viewing distances (40 cm vs. 100 cm), while binocular eye movements were measured with the Chronos Eye-tracking system. We found that the binocular yoking of reading saccades was poor in dyslexic children (relative to non-dyslexics) resulting in vergence errors; their disconjugate drift during fixations was not correlated with the disconjugacy during their saccades, causing considerable variability of vergence angle from fixation to fixation. Due to such poor oculomotor adjustments during reading, the overall fixation disparity was larger for dyslexic children, putting larger demand on their sensory fusion processes. Moreover, for dyslexics the standard deviation of fixation disparity was larger particularly when reading at near distance. We conclude that besides documented phoneme processing disorders, visual/ocular motor imperfections may exist in dyslexics that lead to fixation instability and thus, to instability of the letters or words during reading; such instability may perturb fusional processes and might – in part - complicate letter/word identification. PMID:21494641

  15. Performance of the Large Binocular Telescope's hydrostatic bearing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, James; Ashby, David; Kern, Jonathan

    2010-07-01

    The Large Binocular Telescope's hydrostatic bearing system is operational, and tuning for optimal performance is currently underway. This low friction system allows for the precise control of the 700 ton telescope at temperatures ranging from -20°C to +25°C. It was a challenge to meet the performance requirements on such a massive telescope with a wide range of operating temperatures. This required changes to the original design, including significantly improving oil temperature control, and adding variable capillary resistors to allow for precise flow control to each pocket on each bearing. We will present a system description and report on lessons learned.

  16. Surface Boundary Contour Strengthens Image Dominance in Binocular Competition

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jingping P

    2009-01-01

    We used a binocular rivalry stimulus with one half-image having a vertical grating disc surrounded by horizontal grating, and the other half-image having a horizontal grating disc with a variable spatial phase relative to the surrounding horizontal grating. We found that increasing the phase-shift of the horizontal grating disc, which strengthens the boundary contour, progressively increases its predominance. But the predominance is little affected when a constant gray ring (boundary contour) is added onto the rim of the incrementally phase-shifted horizontal grating. This suggests the influence of boundary contour supersede that of the center-surround-interaction caused by the phase-shift. PMID:19913047

  17. Reducing Binocular Rivalry in the Use of Monocular Head-Mounted Display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazoe, Takashi; Kishi, Shinsuke; Shibata, Takashi; Kawai, Takashi; Otsuki, Masaki

    2007-03-01

    Monocular head-mounted displays (HMDs) can be used with wearable computers. However, such displays can cause binocular rivalry, a phenomenon in which the left and right images alternate, and is unstable. Binocular rivalry, when using HMD, causes the image of the environment to alternate with the HMD image, or even the total loss of perception of the image from the HMD. Binocular rivalry can occur with displays of any resolution.In this study, we used optokinetic nystagmus (OKN) to reduce binocular rivalry. A special stimulus synchronized to the occurrence of binocular rivalry was used to trigger OKN. The subject was asked to observe a visual stimulus and press a trigger button whenever binocular rivalry occurred. This initiated the presentation of a specific spatial frequency stimulus that broke up the rivalry. Electro-oculogram (EOG) electrodes recorded the observer's possible loss of perception of the HMD image, helping to confirm the occurrence of binocular rivalry. Sixteen subjects participated in the experiments. The results indicate that synchronizing special stimuli to the viewers' responses in order to induce OKN can reduce binocular rivalry.

  18. A Comparison of Monocular and Binocular Depth Perception in 5- and 7-Month-Old Infants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Granrud, Carl E.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Compares monocular depth perception with binocular depth perception in five- to seven-month-old infants. Reaching preferences (dependent measure) observed in the monocular condition indicated sensitivity to monocular depth information. Binocular viewing resulted in a far more consistent tendency to reach for the nearer object. (Author)

  19. Multi-view stereo image synthesis using binocular symmetry-based global optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hak Gu; Jung, Yong Ju; Yoon, Soo Sung; Ro, Yong Man

    2015-03-01

    This paper presents a new multi-view stereo image synthesis using binocular symmetric hole filling. In autostereoscopic displays, multi-view synthesis is needed to provide multiple perspectives of the same scene, as viewed from multiple viewing positions. In the warped image at a distant virtual viewpoint, it is difficult to generate visually plausible multi-view stereo images in multi-view synthesis since very large hole regions (i.e., disoccluded regions) could be induced. Also, binocular asymmetry between the synthesized left-eye and right-eye images is one of the critical factors, which leads to a visual discomfort in stereoscopic viewing. In this paper, we maintain the binocular symmetry using the already filled regions in an adjacent view. The proposed method introduces a binocular symmetric hole filling based on the global optimization for binocular symmetry in the synthesized multi-view stereo images. The experimental results showed that the proposed method outperformed those of the existing methods.

  20. Presidential Visions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallin, Alice, Ed.

    1992-01-01

    This journal issue is devoted to the theme of university presidents and their visions of the future. It presents the inaugural addresses and speeches of 16 Catholic college and university presidents focusing on their goals, ambitions, and reasons for choosing to become higher education leaders at this particular time in the history of education in…

  1. Visions 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rivero, Victor; Norman, Michele

    2001-01-01

    Reports on the views of 18 educational leaders regarding their vision on the future of education in an information age. Topics include people's diverse needs; relationships between morality, ethics, values, and technology; leadership; parental involvement; online courses from multiple higher education institutions; teachers' role; technology…

  2. Training Visions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Training, 2011

    2011-01-01

    In this article, "Training" asks the 2011 winners to give their predictions for what training--either in general or specifically at their companies--will look like in the next five to 10 years. Perhaps their "training visions" will spark some ideas in one's organization--or at least help prepare for what might be coming in the next decade or so.

  3. Agrarian Visions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Theobald, Paul

    A new feature in "Country Teacher,""Agrarian Visions" reminds rural teachers that they can do something about rural decline. Like to populism of the 1890s, the "new populism" advocates rural living. Current attempts to address rural decline are contrary to agrarianism because: (1) telecommunications experts seek to solve problems of rural…

  4. Principles of modern low vision rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Markowitz, Samuel N

    2006-06-01

    Low vision rehabilitation is a new emerging subspecialty drawing from the traditional fields of ophthalmology, optometry, occupational therapy, and sociology, with an ever-increasing impact on our customary concepts of research, education, and services for the visually impaired patient. A multidisciplinary approach and coordinated effort are necessary to take advantage of new scientific advances and achieve optimal results for the patient. Accordingly, the intent of this paper is to outline the principles and details of a modern low vision rehabilitation service. All rehabilitation attempts must start with a first hand interview (the intake) for assessing functionality and priority tasks for rehabilitation, as well as assessing the patient's all-important cognitive skills. The assessment of residual visual functions follows the intake and offers a unique opportunity to measure, evaluate, and document accurately the extent of functional loss sustained by the patient from disease. An accurate assessment of residual visual functions includes assessment of visual acuity, contrast sensitivity, binocularity, refractive errors, perimetry, oculomotor functions, cortical visual integration, and light characteristics affecting visual functions. Functional vision assessment in low vision rehabilitation measures how well one uses residual visual functions to perform routine tasks, using different items under various conditions, throughout the day. Of the many functional vision skills known, reading skills is an obligatory item for all low vision rehabilitation assessments. Results of assessment guide rehabilitation professionals in developing rehabilitation plans for the individual and recommending appropriate low vision devices. The outcome from assessing residual visual functions is detection of visual functions that can be improved with the use of optical devices. Methods for prescribing devices such as image relocation with prisms to a preferred retinal locus, field

  5. A wearable infrared video pupillography with multi-stimulation of consistent illumination for binocular pupil response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mang, Ou-Yang; Ko, Mei Lan; Tsai, Yi-Chun; Chiou, Jin-Chern; Huang, Ting-Wei

    2016-03-01

    The pupil response to light can reflect various kinds of diseases which are related to physiological health. Pupillary abnormalities may be influenced on people by autonomic neuropathy, glaucoma, diabetes, genetic diseases, and high myopia. In the early stage of neuropathy, it is often asymptomatic and difficulty detectable by ophthalmologists. In addition, the position of injured nerve can lead to unsynchronized pupil response for human eyes. In our study, we design the pupilometer to measure the binocular pupil response simultaneously. It uses the different wavelength of LEDs such as white, red, green and blue light to stimulate the pupil and record the process. Therefore, the pupilometer mainly contains two systems. One is the image acquisition system, it use the two cameras modules with the same external triggered signal to capture the images of the pupil simultaneously. The other one is the illumination system. It use the boost converter ICs and LED driver ICs to supply the constant current for LED to maintain the consistent luminance in each experiments for reduced experimental error. Furthermore, the four infrared LEDs are arranged nearby the stimulating LEDs to illuminate eyes and increase contrast of image for image processing. In our design, we success to implement the function of synchronized image acquisition with the sample speed in 30 fps and the stable illumination system for precise measurement of experiment.

  6. Computer vision syndrome: a review.

    PubMed

    Blehm, Clayton; Vishnu, Seema; Khattak, Ashbala; Mitra, Shrabanee; Yee, Richard W

    2005-01-01

    As computers become part of our everyday life, more and more people are experiencing a variety of ocular symptoms related to computer use. These include eyestrain, tired eyes, irritation, redness, blurred vision, and double vision, collectively referred to as computer vision syndrome. This article describes both the characteristics and treatment modalities that are available at this time. Computer vision syndrome symptoms may be the cause of ocular (ocular-surface abnormalities or accommodative spasms) and/or extraocular (ergonomic) etiologies. However, the major contributor to computer vision syndrome symptoms by far appears to be dry eye. The visual effects of various display characteristics such as lighting, glare, display quality, refresh rates, and radiation are also discussed. Treatment requires a multidirectional approach combining ocular therapy with adjustment of the workstation. Proper lighting, anti-glare filters, ergonomic positioning of computer monitor and regular work breaks may help improve visual comfort. Lubricating eye drops and special computer glasses help relieve ocular surface-related symptoms. More work needs to be done to specifically define the processes that cause computer vision syndrome and to develop and improve effective treatments that successfully address these causes. PMID:15850814

  7. Vision Loss, Sudden

    MedlinePlus

    ... of age-related macular degeneration. Spotlight on Aging: Vision Loss in Older People Most commonly, vision loss ... Some Causes and Features of Sudden Loss of Vision Cause Common Features* Tests Sudden loss of vision ...

  8. Blindness and vision loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... eye ( chemical burns or sports injuries) Diabetes Glaucoma Macular degeneration The type of partial vision loss may differ, ... tunnel vision and missing areas of vision With macular degeneration, the side vision is normal but the central ...

  9. Motion dominance in binocular rivalry depends on extraretinal motions.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Ryohei; Motoyoshi, Isamu; Sato, Takao

    2016-01-01

    In binocular rivalry, moving stimulus is dominant over stationary stimulus. This is called motion dominance. The motion here is usually a motion defined on the retina (retinal motion). However, motion can be defined in several different coordinates. It can be defined with respect to objects in the background (object-based motion) or to observers' head or body (spatiotopic motion), as well as to the retinal coordinate. In this study, we examined the role of motions defined by these three coordinates. A dichoptic pair of gratings was presented to create a binocular rivalry, one of which was moving and the other stationary. A fixation point and a reference background were either moving with the grating or stationary, depending on the condition. Different combinations of the three types of motions were created by having the observer track the fixation point or the background when they are moving. It was found that the retinal motion does not necessarily yield motion dominance, and that the motion dominance is determined by the combination of motions defined by different coordinate systems. PMID:26943347

  10. Optimal integration of shading and binocular disparity for depth perception.

    PubMed

    Lovell, Paul G; Bloj, Marina; Harris, Julie M

    2012-01-01

    We explore the relative utility of shape from shading and binocular disparity for depth perception. Ray-traced images either featured a smooth surface illuminated from above (shading-only) or were defined by small dots (disparity-only). Observers judged which of a pair of smoothly curved convex objects had most depth. The shading cue was around half as reliable as the rich disparity information for depth discrimination. Shading- and disparity-defined cues where combined by placing dots in the stimulus image, superimposed upon the shaded surface, resulting in veridical shading and binocular disparity. Independently varying the depth delivered by each channel allowed creation of conflicting disparity-defined and shading-defined depth. We manipulated the reliability of the disparity information by adding disparity noise. As noise levels in the disparity channel were increased, perceived depths and variances shifted toward those of the now more reliable shading cue. Several different models of cue combination were applied to the data. Perceived depths and variances were well predicted by a classic maximum likelihood estimator (MLE) model of cue integration, for all but one observer. We discuss the extent to which MLE is the most parsimonious model to account for observer performance. PMID:22214563

  11. Separating monocular and binocular neural mechanisms mediating chromatic contextual interactions.

    PubMed

    D'Antona, Anthony D; Christiansen, Jens H; Shevell, Steven K

    2014-01-01

    When seen in isolation, a light that varies in chromaticity over time is perceived to oscillate in color. Perception of that same time-varying light may be altered by a surrounding light that is also temporally varying in chromaticity. The neural mechanisms that mediate these contextual interactions are the focus of this article. Observers viewed a central test stimulus that varied in chromaticity over time within a larger surround that also varied in chromaticity at the same temporal frequency. Center and surround were presented either to the same eye (monocular condition) or to opposite eyes (dichoptic condition) at the same frequency (3.125, 6.25, or 9.375 Hz). Relative phase between center and surround modulation was varied. In both the monocular and dichoptic conditions, the perceived modulation depth of the central light depended on the relative phase of the surround. A simple model implementing a linear combination of center and surround modulation fit the measurements well. At the lowest temporal frequency (3.125 Hz), the surround's influence was virtually identical for monocular and dichoptic conditions, suggesting that at this frequency, the surround's influence is mediated primarily by a binocular neural mechanism. At higher frequencies, the surround's influence was greater for the monocular condition than for the dichoptic condition, and this difference increased with temporal frequency. Our findings show that two separate neural mechanisms mediate chromatic contextual interactions: one binocular and dominant at lower temporal frequencies and the other monocular and dominant at higher frequencies (6-10 Hz). PMID:24744449

  12. Status and Plans for the Large Binocular Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, R. F.

    2006-08-01

    The Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) is in commissioning, with the initiation of science operations planned for 2007. The telescope contains two 8.4-m diameter borosilicate honeycomb primary mirrors, supported actively to control bending modes. The secondary mirrors will provide adaptive optics correction through rapid modulation of the surface of a Zerodur face sheet 91 cm in diameter and 1.5 mm thick. The initial complement of facility instruments comprises capabilities used in pairs on common fields of view. The Large Binocular Cameras are wide-field 36 Mpix mosaics at prime focus optimized for blue and for red performance. The Multi-Object Double Spectrographs will be fed at straight-through Gregorian foci through custom cut focal plane masks. The ambitious LUCIFER near-IR spectrographs at bent Gregorian will have exchangeable cold focal plan masks. Ultimately, two instruments will combine the two beams through Fizeau interferometry. One, LBTI, is optimized for mid-IR, and will have a nulling capability for coronagraphic work. The other, LINC-NIRVANA, will employ three levels of adaptive correction to achieve interferometric resolution down to 1 micron. The 23-m tip-to-tip dimension affords resolution as good as 10 mas. LBTO is supported by a consortium of institutions from Arizona, Italy, Germany, and the U.S. It is truly an international project and the first of the next generation of large ground-based telescopes.

  13. Applied machine vision

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at a conference on robot vision. Topics considered at the conference included the link between fixed and flexible automation, general applications of machine vision, the development of a specification for a machine vision system, machine vision technology, machine vision non-contact gaging, and vision in electronics manufacturing.

  14. Present Vision--Future Vision.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitterman, L. Jeffrey

    This paper addresses issues of current and future technology use for and by individuals with visual impairments and blindness in Florida. Present technology applications used in vision programs in Florida are individually described, including video enlarging, speech output, large inkprint, braille print, paperless braille, and tactual output…

  15. Vector Disparity Sensor with Vergence Control for Active Vision Systems

    PubMed Central

    Barranco, Francisco; Diaz, Javier; Gibaldi, Agostino; Sabatini, Silvio P.; Ros, Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents an architecture for computing vector disparity for active vision systems as used on robotics applications. The control of the vergence angle of a binocular system allows us to efficiently explore dynamic environments, but requires a generalization of the disparity computation with respect to a static camera setup, where the disparity is strictly 1-D after the image rectification. The interaction between vision and motor control allows us to develop an active sensor that achieves high accuracy of the disparity computation around the fixation point, and fast reaction time for the vergence control. In this contribution, we address the development of a real-time architecture for vector disparity computation using an FPGA device. We implement the disparity unit and the control module for vergence, version, and tilt to determine the fixation point. In addition, two on-chip different alternatives for the vector disparity engines are discussed based on the luminance (gradient-based) and phase information of the binocular images. The multiscale versions of these engines are able to estimate the vector disparity up to 32 fps on VGA resolution images with very good accuracy as shown using benchmark sequences with known ground-truth. The performances in terms of frame-rate, resource utilization, and accuracy of the presented approaches are discussed. On the basis of these results, our study indicates that the gradient-based approach leads to the best trade-off choice for the integration with the active vision system. PMID:22438737

  16. Computer vision

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    This paper discusses material from areas such as artificial intelligence, psychology, computer graphics, and image processing. The intent is to assemble a selection of this material in a form that will serve both as a senior/graduate-level academic text and as a useful reference to those building vision systems. This book has a strong artificial intelligence flavour, emphasising the belief that both the intrinsic image information and the internal model of the world are important in successful vision systems. The book is organised into four parts, based on descriptions of objects at four different levels of abstraction. These are: generalised images-images and image-like entities; segmented images-images organised into subimages that are likely to correspond to interesting objects; geometric structures-quantitative models of image and world structures; relational structures-complex symbolic descriptions of image and world structures. The book contains author and subject indexes.

  17. Pleiades Visions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitehouse, M.

    2016-01-01

    Pleiades Visions (2012) is my new musical composition for organ that takes inspiration from traditional lore and music associated with the Pleiades (Seven Sisters) star cluster from Australian Aboriginal, Native American, and Native Hawaiian cultures. It is based on my doctoral dissertation research incorporating techniques from the fields of ethnomusicology and cultural astronomy; this research likely represents a new area of inquiry for both fields. This large-scale work employs the organ's vast sonic resources to evoke the majesty of the night sky and the expansive landscapes of the homelands of the above-mentioned peoples. Other important themes in Pleiades Visions are those of place, origins, cosmology, and the creation of the world.

  18. Lambda Vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czajkowski, Michael

    2014-06-01

    There is an explosion in the quantity and quality of IMINT data being captured in Intelligence Surveillance and Reconnaissance (ISR) today. While automated exploitation techniques involving computer vision are arriving, only a few architectures can manage both the storage and bandwidth of large volumes of IMINT data and also present results to analysts quickly. Lockheed Martin Advanced Technology Laboratories (ATL) has been actively researching in the area of applying Big Data cloud computing techniques to computer vision applications. This paper presents the results of this work in adopting a Lambda Architecture to process and disseminate IMINT data using computer vision algorithms. The approach embodies an end-to-end solution by processing IMINT data from sensors to serving information products quickly to analysts, independent of the size of the data. The solution lies in dividing up the architecture into a speed layer for low-latent processing and a batch layer for higher quality answers at the expense of time, but in a robust and fault-tolerant way. This approach was evaluated using a large corpus of IMINT data collected by a C-130 Shadow Harvest sensor over Afghanistan from 2010 through 2012. The evaluation data corpus included full motion video from both narrow and wide area field-of-views. The evaluation was done on a scaled-out cloud infrastructure that is similar in composition to those found in the Intelligence Community. The paper shows experimental results to prove the scalability of the architecture and precision of its results using a computer vision algorithm designed to identify man-made objects in sparse data terrain.

  19. Objective and automated measurement of dynamic vision functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flom, M. C.; Adams, A. J.

    1976-01-01

    A phoria stimulus array and electro-oculographic (EOG) arrangements for measuring motor and sensory responses of subjects subjected to stress or drug conditions are described, along with experimental procedures. Heterophoria (as oculomotor function) and glare recovery time (time required for photochemical and neural recovery after exposure to a flash stimulus) are measured, in research aimed at developing automated objective measurement of dynamic vision functions. Onset of involuntary optokinetic nystagmus in subjects attempting to track moving stripes (while viewing through head-mounted binocular eyepieces) after exposure to glare serves as an objective measure of glare recovery time.

  20. Night vision goggle luminance disparity and the Pulfrich phenomenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinkus, Alan; Task, Harry L.

    2004-09-01

    When night vision goggle (NVG) image intensifier tubes (I2Ts) are replaced during maintenance, the output luminances of the two channels must not exceed a ratio of 1.5 (brighter channel luminance divided by the dimmer channel luminance) in order to meet the current allowed binocular luminance disparity specification. Two studies were performed to investigate the validity of this requirement. The first study estimated thresholds of binocular luminance disparity detection for observers looking through NVGs. For eight observers, the 25% corrected-for-chance probability of detecting an ocular luminance difference, yielded an average ratio of 1.43 indicating that the current 1.5 specification is perhaps too loose. The second study investigated the Pulfrich phenomenon, a pseudo-stereo effect that can be induced by presenting luminance imbalances to the eyes. This study created NVG luminance imbalances using neutral density (ND) filters and then investigated whether or not the various imbalance levels were sufficient to cause the Pulfrich phenomenon to be perceived. Results indicated an imbalance ratio of 1.10 was insufficient to cause the effect to be seen, but a ratio of 1.26 was sufficient (p <= 0.0003) for the effect to be seen, at least part of the time. Based on these results, it is apparent the allowed binocular luminance disparity ratio should probably be tightened to at least 1.3 with a goal of 1.2.

  1. Comparison of Subjective Refraction under Binocular and Monocular Conditions in Myopic Subjects.

    PubMed

    Kobashi, Hidenaga; Kamiya, Kazutaka; Handa, Tomoya; Ando, Wakako; Kawamorita, Takushi; Igarashi, Akihito; Shimizu, Kimiya

    2015-01-01

    To compare subjective refraction under binocular and monocular conditions, and to investigate the clinical factors affecting the difference in spherical refraction between the two conditions. We examined thirty eyes of 30 healthy subjects. Binocular and monocular refraction without cycloplegia was measured through circular polarizing lenses in both eyes, using the Landolt-C chart of the 3D visual function trainer-ORTe. Stepwise multiple regression analysis was used to assess the relations among several pairs of variables and the difference in spherical refraction in binocular and monocular conditions. Subjective spherical refraction in the monocular condition was significantly more myopic than that in the binocular condition (p < 0.001), whereas no significant differences were seen in subjective cylindrical refraction (p = 0.99). The explanatory variable relevant to the difference in spherical refraction between binocular and monocular conditions was the binocular spherical refraction (p = 0.032, partial regression coefficient B = 0.029) (adjusted R(2) = 0.230). No significant correlation was seen with other clinical factors. Subjective spherical refraction in the monocular condition was significantly more myopic than that in the binocular condition. Eyes with higher degrees of myopia are more predisposed to show the large difference in spherical refraction between these two conditions. PMID:26218972

  2. Comparison of Subjective Refraction under Binocular and Monocular Conditions in Myopic Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Kobashi, Hidenaga; Kamiya, Kazutaka; Handa, Tomoya; Ando, Wakako; Kawamorita, Takushi; Igarashi, Akihito; Shimizu, Kimiya

    2015-01-01

    To compare subjective refraction under binocular and monocular conditions, and to investigate the clinical factors affecting the difference in spherical refraction between the two conditions. We examined thirty eyes of 30 healthy subjects. Binocular and monocular refraction without cycloplegia was measured through circular polarizing lenses in both eyes, using the Landolt-C chart of the 3D visual function trainer-ORTe. Stepwise multiple regression analysis was used to assess the relations among several pairs of variables and the difference in spherical refraction in binocular and monocular conditions. Subjective spherical refraction in the monocular condition was significantly more myopic than that in the binocular condition (p < 0.001), whereas no significant differences were seen in subjective cylindrical refraction (p = 0.99). The explanatory variable relevant to the difference in spherical refraction between binocular and monocular conditions was the binocular spherical refraction (p = 0.032, partial regression coefficient B = 0.029) (adjusted R2 = 0.230). No significant correlation was seen with other clinical factors. Subjective spherical refraction in the monocular condition was significantly more myopic than that in the binocular condition. Eyes with higher degrees of myopia are more predisposed to show the large difference in spherical refraction between these two conditions. PMID:26218972

  3. Stereo vision based automated grasp planning

    SciTech Connect

    Wilhelmsen, K.; Huber, L.; Silva, D.; Grasz, E.; Cadapan, L.

    1995-02-01

    The Department of Energy has a need for treating existing nuclear waste. Hazardous waste stored in old warehouses needs to be sorted and treated to meet environmental regulations. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is currently experimenting with automated manipulations of unknown objects for sorting, treating, and detailed inspection. To accomplish these tasks, three existing technologies were expanded to meet the increasing requirements. First, a binocular vision range sensor was combined with a surface modeling system to make virtual images of unknown objects. Then, using the surface model information, stable grasp of the unknown shaped objects were planned algorithmically utilizing a limited set of robotic grippers. This paper is an expansion of previous work and will discuss the grasp planning algorithm.

  4. Binocular fusion and invariant category learning due to predictive remapping during scanning of a depthful scene with eye movements

    PubMed Central

    Grossberg, Stephen; Srinivasan, Karthik; Yazdanbakhsh, Arash

    2015-01-01

    How does the brain maintain stable fusion of 3D scenes when the eyes move? Every eye movement causes each retinal position to process a different set of scenic features, and thus the brain needs to binocularly fuse new combinations of features at each position after an eye movement. Despite these breaks in retinotopic fusion due to each movement, previously fused representations of a scene in depth often appear stable. The 3D ARTSCAN neural model proposes how the brain does this by unifying concepts about how multiple cortical areas in the What and Where cortical streams interact to coordinate processes of 3D boundary and surface perception, spatial attention, invariant object category learning, predictive remapping, eye movement control, and learned coordinate transformations. The model explains data from single neuron and psychophysical studies of covert visual attention shifts prior to eye movements. The model further clarifies how perceptual, attentional, and cognitive interactions among multiple brain regions (LGN, V1, V2, V3A, V4, MT, MST, PPC, LIP, ITp, ITa, SC) may accomplish predictive remapping as part of the process whereby view-invariant object categories are learned. These results build upon earlier neural models of 3D vision and figure-ground separation and the learning of invariant object categories as the eyes freely scan a scene. A key process concerns how an object's surface representation generates a form-fitting distribution of spatial attention, or attentional shroud, in parietal cortex that helps maintain the stability of multiple perceptual and cognitive processes. Predictive eye movement signals maintain the stability of the shroud, as well as of binocularly fused perceptual boundaries and surface representations. PMID:25642198

  5. Binocular Neurons in Parastriate Cortex: Interocular ‘Matching’ of Receptive Field Properties, Eye Dominance and Strength of Silent Suppression

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chun; Dreher, Bogdan

    2014-01-01

    Spike-responses of single binocular neurons were recorded from a distinct part of primary visual cortex, the parastriate cortex (cytoarchitectonic area 18) of anaesthetized and immobilized domestic cats. Functional identification of neurons was based on the ratios of phase-variant (F1) component to the mean firing rate (F0) of their spike-responses to optimized (orientation, direction, spatial and temporal frequencies and size) sine-wave-luminance-modulated drifting grating patches presented separately via each eye. In over 95% of neurons, the interocular differences in the phase-sensitivities (differences in F1/F0 spike-response ratios) were small (≤0.3) and in over 80% of neurons, the interocular differences in preferred orientations were ≤10°. The interocular correlations of the direction selectivity indices and optimal spatial frequencies, like those of the phase sensitivies and optimal orientations, were also strong (coefficients of correlation r ≥0.7005). By contrast, the interocular correlations of the optimal temporal frequencies, the diameters of summation areas of the excitatory responses and suppression indices were weak (coefficients of correlation r ≤0.4585). In cells with high eye dominance indices (HEDI cells), the mean magnitudes of suppressions evoked by stimulation of silent, extra-classical receptive fields via the non-dominant eyes, were significantly greater than those when the stimuli were presented via the dominant eyes. We argue that the well documented ‘eye-origin specific’ segregation of the lateral geniculate inputs underpinning distinct eye dominance columns in primary visual cortices of mammals with frontally positioned eyes (distinct eye dominance columns), combined with significant interocular differences in the strength of silent suppressive fields, putatively contribute to binocular stereoscopic vision. PMID:24927276

  6. Vision Examination Protocol for Archery Athletes Along With an Introduction to Sports Vision

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi, Seyed Farzad; Aghazade Amiri, Mohammad; Naderifar, Homa; Rakhshi, Elham; Vakilian, Banafsheh; Ashrafi, Elham; Behesht-Nejad, Amir-Houshang

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Visual skills are one of the main pillars of intangible faculties of athletes that can influence their performance. Great number of vision tests used to assess the visual skills and it will be irrational to perform all vision tests for every sport. Objectives: The purpose of this protocol article is to present a relatively comprehensive battery of tests and assessments on static and dynamic aspects of sight which seems relevant to sports vision and introduce the most useful ones for archery. Materials and Methods: Through extensive review of the literature, visual skills and respective tests were listed; such as ‘visual acuity, ‘contrast sensitivity’, ‘stereo-acuity’, ‘ocular alignment’, and ‘eye dominance’. Athletes were defined as “elite” and “non-elite” category based on their past performance. Dominance was considered for eye and hand; binocular or monocular aiming was planned to be recorded. Illumination condition was defined as to simulate the real archery condition to the extent possible. The full cycle of examinations and their order for each athlete was sketched (and estimated to take 40 minutes). Protocol was piloted in an eye hospital. Female and male archers aged 18 - 38 years who practiced compound and recurve archery with a history of more than 6 months were included. Conclusions: We managed to select and design a customized examination protocol for archery (a sight-intensive and aiming type of sports), serving skill assessment and research purposes. Our definition for elite and non-elite athletes can help to define sports talent and devise skill development methods as we compare the performance of these two groups. In our pilot, we identified 8 “archery figures” (by hand dominance, eye dominance and binocularity) and highlighted the concept “congruence” (dominant hand and eye in the same side) in archery performance. PMID:27217923

  7. Binocular luminence interactions due to near responses at suprathreshold conditions: psychophysical evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medina, J. M.; Jimenez, J. R.; Del Barco, L. J.; Hita, Enrique

    2001-08-01

    Binocular and monocular finger reaction times were measured for circular broad-band stimuli for natural and artificial pupils. Luminance polarity changes were presented at the fovea respect to a reference stimulus under suprathreshold conditions. As in previous studies, binocular reaction times were shorter than monocular with both pupil types. Nevertheless, this binocular summation effect was less marked with the artificial case, becoming more pronounced for dark variations. These result suggest that the near- responses mechanism at the peristriate area of the occipital and at the inferior parietal lobe could support an important role on luminance interactions within the visuomotor pathway.

  8. Natural Tendency towards Beauty in Humans: Evidence from Binocular Rivalry

    PubMed Central

    Mo, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Although human preference for beauty is common and compelling in daily life, it remains unknown whether such preference is essentially subserved by social cognitive demands or natural tendency towards beauty encoded in the human mind intrinsically. Here we demonstrate experimentally that humans automatically exhibit preference for visual and moral beauty without explicit cognitive efforts. Using a binocular rivalry paradigm, we identified enhanced gender-independent perceptual dominance for physically attractive persons, and the results suggested universal preference for visual beauty based on perceivable forms. Moreover, we also identified perceptual dominance enhancement for characters associated with virtuous descriptions after controlling for facial attractiveness and vigilance-related attention effects, which suggested a similar implicit preference for moral beauty conveyed in prosocial behaviours. Our findings show that behavioural preference for beauty is driven by an inherent natural tendency towards beauty in humans rather than explicit social cognitive processes. PMID:26930202

  9. Natural Tendency towards Beauty in Humans: Evidence from Binocular Rivalry.

    PubMed

    Mo, Ce; Xia, Tiansheng; Qin, Kaixin; Mo, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Although human preference for beauty is common and compelling in daily life, it remains unknown whether such preference is essentially subserved by social cognitive demands or natural tendency towards beauty encoded in the human mind intrinsically. Here we demonstrate experimentally that humans automatically exhibit preference for visual and moral beauty without explicit cognitive efforts. Using a binocular rivalry paradigm, we identified enhanced gender-independent perceptual dominance for physically attractive persons, and the results suggested universal preference for visual beauty based on perceivable forms. Moreover, we also identified perceptual dominance enhancement for characters associated with virtuous descriptions after controlling for facial attractiveness and vigilance-related attention effects, which suggested a similar implicit preference for moral beauty conveyed in prosocial behaviours. Our findings show that behavioural preference for beauty is driven by an inherent natural tendency towards beauty in humans rather than explicit social cognitive processes. PMID:26930202

  10. Optimization of the elevation structure of the Large Binocular Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    del Vecchio, Ciro

    1997-03-01

    We describe the procedure and the results of the final optimization of the elevation structure of the large binocular telescope. The aim of such a process was to achieve the highest structural rigidity with the lowest total mass, taking into account the basic geometry and center-of-gravity constraints. Based on the method of the 'modal strains,' the optimization process took into account the first three resonant frequencies at seven equally spaced zenith angles, for two different restraint cases. The free parameters of the optimization were cross sections of the truss elements and thicknesses of the membrane elements. The telescope structure was divided into many groups. For each group, the mass was varied in proportion to the maximum strain experienced in the above mentioned 42 modes of vibration.

  11. Overview of instrumentation for the large binocular telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Robert M.

    2003-03-01

    An overview of the 3 facility instruments and 2 strategic interferometric instruments under construction for the Large Binocular Telescope is presented. Planned optical instrumentation includes the Large Binocular Camera (LBC), a pair of wide-field (25' x 25') UB/VRI optimized mosaic CCD imagers at the prime focus, and the MultiObject Double Spectrograph (MODS), a pair of dual-beam blue-red optimized longslit spectrographs mounted at the straight-through F/15 Gregorian focus incorporating multiple slit masks for multi-object spectroscopy over a 5' field and spectral resolutions of 2000-8000. Infrared instrumentation includes the LBT Near-IR Spectroscopic Utility with Camera and Integral Field Unit for Extragalactic Research (LUCIFER), a modular near-infrared (0.9-2.5 μm) imager and spectrograph pair mounted at a bent interior focal station and designed for seeing limited (FOV: 4' x 4') and diffraction limited (FOV: 0.5' x 0.5') imaging and longslit spectroscopy, seeing limited multiobject spectroscopy utilizing cooled slit masks, and optional diffraction limited integral field spectroscopy. Strategic instruments under development for the remaining two combined focal stations include an interferometric cryogenic beam combiner with NIR and thermal IR instruments for Fizeau imaging and nulling interferometry and an optical bench beam combiner with visible and NIR imagers utilizing in the future multi-conjugate adaptive optics for angular resolutions as high as 5 mas at a wavelength of 0.5 μm. The availability of all these instruments mounted simultaneously on the LBT permits flexible scheduling and improved operational support.

  12. An overview of instrumentation for the Large Binocular Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, R. Mark

    2008-07-01

    An overview of instrumentation for the Large Binocular Telescope is presented. Optical instrumentation includes the Large Binocular Camera (LBC), a pair of wide-field (27' × 27') mosaic CCD imagers at the prime focus, and the Multi-Object Double Spectrograph (MODS), a pair of dual-beam blue-red optimized long-slit spectrographs mounted at the straight-through F/15 Gregorian focus incorporating multiple slit masks for multi-object spectroscopy over a 6 field and spectral resolutions of up to 8000. Infrared instrumentation includes the LBT Near-IR Spectroscopic Utility with Camera and Integral Field Unit for Extragalactic Research (LUCIFER), a modular near-infrared (0.9-2.5 μm) imager and spectrograph pair mounted at a bent interior focal station and designed for seeing-limited (FOV: 4' × 4') imaging, long-slit spectroscopy, and multi-object spectroscopy utilizing cooled slit masks and diffraction limited (FOV: 0.5' × 0.5') imaging and long-slit spectroscopy. Strategic instruments under development for the remaining two combined focal stations include an interferometric cryogenic beam combiner with near-infrared and thermal-infrared instruments for Fizeau imaging and nulling interferometry (LBTI) and an optical bench near-infrared beam combiner utilizing multi-conjugate adaptive optics for high angular resolution and sensitivity (LINC-NIRVANA). In addition, a fiber-fed bench spectrograph (PEPSI) capable of ultra high resolution spectroscopy and spectropolarimetry (R = 40,000-300,000) will be available as a principal investigator instrument. The availability of all these instruments mounted simultaneously on the LBT permits unique science, flexible scheduling, and improved operational support.

  13. An overview of instrumentation for the Large Binocular Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, R. Mark

    2010-07-01

    An overview of instrumentation for the Large Binocular Telescope is presented. Optical instrumentation includes the Large Binocular Camera (LBC), a pair of wide-field (27 × 27) mosaic CCD imagers at the prime focus, and the Multi-Object Double Spectrograph (MODS), a pair of dual-beam blue-red optimized long-slit spectrographs mounted at the straight-through F/15 Gregorian focus incorporating multiple slit masks for multi-object spectroscopy over a 6 field and spectral resolutions of up to 8000. Infrared instrumentation includes the LBT Near-IR Spectroscopic Utility with Camera and Integral Field Unit for Extragalactic Research (LUCIFER), a modular near-infrared (0.9-2.5 μm) imager and spectrograph pair mounted at a bent interior focal station and designed for seeing-limited (FOV: 4 × 4) imaging, long-slit spectroscopy, and multi-object spectroscopy utilizing cooled slit masks and diffraction limited (FOV: 0.5 × 0.5) imaging and long-slit spectroscopy. Strategic instruments under development for the remaining two combined focal stations include an interferometric cryogenic beam combiner with near-infrared and thermal-infrared instruments for Fizeau imaging and nulling interferometry (LBTI) and an optical bench near-infrared beam combiner utilizing multi-conjugate adaptive optics for high angular resolution and sensitivity (LINC-NIRVANA). In addition, a fiber-fed bench spectrograph (PEPSI) capable of ultra high resolution spectroscopy and spectropolarimetry (R = 40,000-300,000) will be available as a principal investigator instrument. The availability of all these instruments mounted simultaneously on the LBT permits unique science, flexible scheduling, and improved operational support. Over the past two years the LBC and the first LUCIFER instrument have been brought into routine scientific operation and MODS1 commissioning is set to begin in the fall of 2010.

  14. An overview of instrumentation for the Large Binocular Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, R. Mark

    2004-09-01

    An overview of instrumentation for the Large Binocular Telescope is presented. Optical instrumentation includes the Large Binocular Camera (LBC), a pair of wide-field (27'x 27') UB/VRI optimized mosaic CCD imagers at the prime focus, and the Multi-Object Double Spectrograph (MODS), a pair of dual-beam blue-red optimized long-slit spectrographs mounted at the straight-through F/15 Gregorian focus incorporating multiple slit masks for multi-object spectroscopy over a 6\\arcmin\\ field and spectral resolutions of up to 8000. Infrared instrumentation includes the LBT Near-IR Spectroscopic Utility with Camera and Integral Field Unit for Extragalactic Research (LUCIFER), a modular near-infrared (0.9-2.5 μm) imager and spectrograph pair mounted at a bent interior focal station and designed for seeing-limited (FOV: 4'x 4') imaging, long-slit spectroscopy, and multi-object spectroscopy utilizing cooled slit masks and diffraction limited (FOV: 0'.5 x 0'.5) imaging and long-slit spectroscopy. Strategic instruments under development for the remaining two combined focal stations include an interferometric cryogenic beam combiner with near-infrared and thermal-infrared instruments for Fizeau imaging and nulling interferometry (LBTI) and an optical bench beam combiner with visible and near-infrared imagers utilizing multi-conjugate adaptive optics for high angular resolution and sensitivity (LINC/NIRVANA). In addition, a fiber-fed bench spectrograph (PEPSI) capable of ultra high resolution spectroscopy and spectropolarimetry (R = 40,000-300,000) will be available as a principal investigator instrument. The availability of all these instruments mounted simultaneously on the LBT permits unique science, flexible scheduling, and improved operational support.

  15. An overview of instrumentation for the Large Binocular Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, R. Mark

    2006-06-01

    An overview of instrumentation for the Large Binocular Telescope is presented. Optical instrumentation includes the Large Binocular Camera (LBC), a pair of wide-field (27' × 27') mosaic CCD imagers at the prime focus, and the Multi-Object Double Spectrograph (MODS), a pair of dual-beam blue-red optimized long-slit spectrographs mounted at the straight-through F/15 Gregorian focus incorporating multiple slit masks for multi-object spectroscopy over a 6' field and spectral resolutions of up to 8000. Infrared instrumentation includes the LBT Near-IR Spectroscopic Utility with Camera and Integral Field Unit for Extragalactic Research (LUCIFER), a modular near-infrared (0.9-2.5 μm) imager and spectrograph pair mounted at a bent interior focal station and designed for seeing-limited (FOV: 4' × 4') imaging, long-slit spectroscopy, and multi-object spectroscopy utilizing cooled slit masks and diffraction limited (FOV: 0'.5 × 0'.5) imaging and long-slit spectroscopy. Strategic instruments under development for the remaining two combined focal stations include an interferometric cryogenic beam combiner with near-infrared and thermal-infrared instruments for Fizeau imaging and nulling interferometry (LBTI) and an optical bench near-infrared beam combiner utilizing multi-conjugate adaptive optics for high angular resolution and sensitivity (LINC-NIRVANA). In addition, a fiber-fed bench spectrograph (PEPSI) capable of ultra high resolution spectroscopy and spectropolarimetry (R = 40,000-300,000) will be available as a principal investigator instrument. The availability of all these instruments mounted simultaneously on the LBT permits unique science, flexible scheduling, and improved operational support.

  16. Pediatric Low Vision

    MedlinePlus

    ... Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Pediatric Low Vision What is Low Vision? Partial vision loss that cannot be corrected causes ... and play. What are the signs of Low Vision? Some signs of low vision include difficulty recognizing ...

  17. Vision Therapy News Backgrounder.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Optometric Association, St. Louis, MO.

    The booklet provides an overview on vision therapy to aid writers, editors, and broadcasters help parents, teachers, older adults, and all consumers learn more about vision therapy. Following a description of vision therapy or vision training, information is provided on how and why vision therapy works. Additional sections address providers of…

  18. Encoding and estimation of first- and second-order binocular disparity in natural images

    PubMed Central

    Hibbard, Paul B.; Goutcher, Ross; Hunter, David W.

    2016-01-01

    The first stage of processing of binocular information in the visual cortex is performed by mechanisms that are bandpass-tuned for spatial frequency and orientation. Psychophysical and physiological evidence have also demonstrated the existence of second-order mechanisms in binocular processing, which can encode disparities that are not directly accessible to first-order mechanisms. We compared the responses of first- and second-order binocular filters to natural images. We found that the responses of the second-order mechanisms are to some extent correlated with the responses of the first-order mechanisms, and that they can contribute to increasing both the accuracy, and depth range, of binocular stereopsis. PMID:26731646

  19. Encoding and estimation of first- and second-order binocular disparity in natural images.

    PubMed

    Hibbard, Paul B; Goutcher, Ross; Hunter, David W

    2016-03-01

    The first stage of processing of binocular information in the visual cortex is performed by mechanisms that are bandpass-tuned for spatial frequency and orientation. Psychophysical and physiological evidence have also demonstrated the existence of second-order mechanisms in binocular processing, which can encode disparities that are not directly accessible to first-order mechanisms. We compared the responses of first- and second-order binocular filters to natural images. We found that the responses of the second-order mechanisms are to some extent correlated with the responses of the first-order mechanisms, and that they can contribute to increasing both the accuracy, and depth range, of binocular stereopsis. PMID:26731646

  20. Full-reference quality assessment of stereoscopic images by learning sparse monocular and binocular features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Kemeng; Shao, Feng; Jiang, Gangyi; Yu, Mei

    2014-11-01

    Perceptual stereoscopic image quality assessment (SIQA) aims to use computational models to measure the image quality in consistent with human visual perception. In this research, we try to simulate monocular and binocular visual perception, and proposed a monocular-binocular feature fidelity (MBFF) induced index for SIQA. To be more specific, in the training stage, we learn monocular and binocular dictionaries from the training database, so that the latent response properties can be represented as a set of basis vectors. In the quality estimation stage, we compute monocular feature fidelity (MFF) and binocular feature fidelity (BFF) indexes based on the estimated sparse coefficient vectors, and compute global energy response similarity (GERS) index by considering energy changes. The final quality score is obtained by incorporating them together. Experimental results on four public 3D image quality assessment databases demonstrate that in comparison with the most related existing methods, the devised algorithm achieves high consistency alignment with subjective assessment.

  1. An Automatic 3d Reconstruction Method Based on Multi-View Stereo Vision for the Mogao Grottoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, J.; Zhong, S.; Zheng, L.

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents an automatic three-dimensional reconstruction method based on multi-view stereo vision for the Mogao Grottoes. 3D digitization technique has been used in cultural heritage conservation and replication over the past decade, especially the methods based on binocular stereo vision. However, mismatched points are inevitable in traditional binocular stereo matching due to repeatable or similar features of binocular images. In order to reduce the probability of mismatching greatly and improve the measure precision, a portable four-camera photographic measurement system is used for 3D modelling of a scene. Four cameras of the measurement system form six binocular systems with baselines of different lengths to add extra matching constraints and offer multiple measurements. Matching error based on epipolar constraint is introduced to remove the mismatched points. Finally, an accurate point cloud can be generated by multi-images matching and sub-pixel interpolation. Delaunay triangulation and texture mapping are performed to obtain the 3D model of a scene. The method has been tested on 3D reconstruction several scenes of the Mogao Grottoes and good results verify the effectiveness of the method.

  2. Eye torsion and visual tilt are mediated by different binocular processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfe, J. M.; Held, R.

    1979-01-01

    Viewing a large, patterned field rotating about the line of sight produces two measurable effects; cyclotorsion of the eyes (torsion) and a perceived displacement of vertical and horizontal (tilt). Experiments examining binocular interaction for these effects show: (1) both effects demonstrate summation in normal individuals and thus both involve a binocular process; (2) the process for tilt is different than for torsion, since summation for torsion is spared in stereodeficient individuals while that for tilt is eliminated.

  3. Differential processing of binocular and monocular gloss cues in human visual cortex

    PubMed Central

    Di Luca, Massimiliano; Ban, Hiroshi; Muryy, Alexander; Fleming, Roland W.

    2016-01-01

    The visual impression of an object's surface reflectance (“gloss”) relies on a range of visual cues, both monocular and binocular. Whereas previous imaging work has identified processing within ventral visual areas as important for monocular cues, little is known about cortical areas involved in processing binocular cues. Here, we used human functional MRI (fMRI) to test for brain areas selectively involved in the processing of binocular cues. We manipulated stereoscopic information to create four conditions that differed in their disparity structure and in the impression of surface gloss that they evoked. We performed multivoxel pattern analysis to find areas whose fMRI responses allow classes of stimuli to be distinguished based on their depth structure vs. material appearance. We show that higher dorsal areas play a role in processing binocular gloss information, in addition to known ventral areas involved in material processing, with ventral area lateral occipital responding to both object shape and surface material properties. Moreover, we tested for similarities between the representation of gloss from binocular cues and monocular cues. Specifically, we tested for transfer in the decoding performance of an algorithm trained on glossy vs. matte objects defined by either binocular or by monocular cues. We found transfer effects from monocular to binocular cues in dorsal visual area V3B/kinetic occipital (KO), suggesting a shared representation of the two cues in this area. These results indicate the involvement of mid- to high-level visual circuitry in the estimation of surface material properties, with V3B/KO potentially playing a role in integrating monocular and binocular cues. PMID:26912596

  4. Differential processing of binocular and monocular gloss cues in human visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hua-Chun; Di Luca, Massimiliano; Ban, Hiroshi; Muryy, Alexander; Fleming, Roland W; Welchman, Andrew E

    2016-06-01

    The visual impression of an object's surface reflectance ("gloss") relies on a range of visual cues, both monocular and binocular. Whereas previous imaging work has identified processing within ventral visual areas as important for monocular cues, little is known about cortical areas involved in processing binocular cues. Here, we used human functional MRI (fMRI) to test for brain areas selectively involved in the processing of binocular cues. We manipulated stereoscopic information to create four conditions that differed in their disparity structure and in the impression of surface gloss that they evoked. We performed multivoxel pattern analysis to find areas whose fMRI responses allow classes of stimuli to be distinguished based on their depth structure vs. material appearance. We show that higher dorsal areas play a role in processing binocular gloss information, in addition to known ventral areas involved in material processing, with ventral area lateral occipital responding to both object shape and surface material properties. Moreover, we tested for similarities between the representation of gloss from binocular cues and monocular cues. Specifically, we tested for transfer in the decoding performance of an algorithm trained on glossy vs. matte objects defined by either binocular or by monocular cues. We found transfer effects from monocular to binocular cues in dorsal visual area V3B/kinetic occipital (KO), suggesting a shared representation of the two cues in this area. These results indicate the involvement of mid- to high-level visual circuitry in the estimation of surface material properties, with V3B/KO potentially playing a role in integrating monocular and binocular cues. PMID:26912596

  5. Impairments to Vision

    MedlinePlus

    ... an external Non-Government web site. Impairments to Vision Normal Vision Diabetic Retinopathy Age-related Macular Degeneration In this ... pictures, fixate on the nose to simulate the vision loss. In diabetic retinopathy, the blood vessels in ...

  6. Retinal Detachment Vision Simulator

    MedlinePlus

    ... Retina Treatment Retinal Detachment Vision Simulator Retinal Detachment Vision Simulator Mar. 01, 2016 How does a detached or torn retina affect your vision? If a retinal tear is occurring, you may ...

  7. Individual differences in the temporal dynamics of binocular rivalry and stimulus rivalry.

    PubMed

    Patel, Vaama; Stuit, Sjoerd; Blake, Randolph

    2015-04-01

    Binocular rivalry and stimulus rivalry are two forms of perceptual instability that arise when the visual system is confronted with conflicting stimulus information. In the case of binocular rivalry, dissimilar monocular stimuli are presented to the two eyes for an extended period of time, whereas for stimulus rivalry the dissimilar monocular stimuli are exchanged rapidly and repetitively between the eyes during extended viewing. With both forms of rivalry, one experiences extended durations of exclusive perceptual dominance that fluctuate between the two stimuli. Whether these two forms of rivalry arise within different stages of visual processing has remained debatable. Using an individual-differences approach, we found that both stimulus rivalry and binocular rivalry exhibited same-shaped distributions of dominance durations among a sample of 30 observers and, moreover, that the dominance durations measured during binocular and stimulus rivalry were significantly correlated among our sample of observers. Furthermore, we found a significant, positive correlation between alternation rate in binocular rivalry and the incidence of stimulus rivalry. These results suggest that the two forms of rivalry may be tapping common neural mechanisms, or at least different mechanisms with comparable time constants. It remains to be learned just why the incidences of binocular rivalry and stimulus rivalry vary so greatly among people. PMID:25092387

  8. Individual Differences in Temporal Dynamics of Binocular Rivalry and of Stimulus Rivalry

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Vaama; Stuit, Sjoerd; Blake, Randolph

    2014-01-01

    Binocular rivalry and stimulus rivalry are two forms of perceptual instability that arise when the visual system is confronted with conflicting stimulus information. In the case of binocular rivalry, dissimilar monocular stimuli are presented to the two eyes for an extended period of time, whereas for stimulus rivalry the dissimilar monocular stimuli are exchanged rapidly and repetitively between the eyes during extended viewing. With both forms of rivalry, one experiences extended durations of exclusive perceptual dominance that fluctuate between the two stimuli. Whether these two forms of rivalry arise within different stages of visual processing remains debatable. Using an individual differences approach, we have found that both stimulus rivalry and binocular rivalry exhibit the same-shaped distribution of dominance durations among a sample of thirty observers and, moreover, that dominance durations measured during binocular and stimulus rivalry are significantly correlated among our sample of observers. Furthermore, we find a significant, positive correlation between alternation rate in binocular rivalry and incidence of stimulus rivalry. These results suggest that the two forms of rivalry may be tapping common neural mechanisms, or at least different mechanisms with comparable time constants. It remains to be learned just why the incidence of binocular rivalry and stimulus rivalry varies so greatly among people. PMID:25092387

  9. Absence of binocular summation, eye dominance, and learning effects in color discrimination.

    PubMed

    Costa, Marcelo Fernandes; Ventura, Dora Fix; Perazzolo, Felipe; Murakoshi, Marcio; Silveira, Luiz Carlos de Lima

    2006-01-01

    We evaluated binocular summation, eye dominance, and learning in the Trivector and Ellipses procedures of the Cambridge Colour Test (CCT). Subjects (n = 36, 18-30 years old) were recruited among students and staff from the University of São Paulo. Inclusion criteria were absence of ophthalmological complaints and best-corrected Snellen VA 20/20 or better. The subjects were tested in three randomly selected eye conditions: binocular, monocular dominant eye, and nondominant eye. Results obtained in the binocular and monocular conditions did not differ statistically for thresholds measured along the protan, deutan, and tritan confusion axes (ANOVA, P > 0.05). No statistical difference was detected among discrimination ellipses obtained in binocular or monocular conditions (ANOVA, P > 0.05), suggesting absence of binocular summation or of an effect of eye dominance. Possible effects of learning were examined by comparing successive thresholds obtained in the three testing conditions. There was no evidence of improvement as a function of testing order (ANCOVA, P > 0.05). We conclude that CCT thresholds are not affected by binocularity, eye dominance, or learning. Our results differ from those found by Verriest et al. (1982) using the Farnsworth-Munsell 100 Hue test and Hovis et al. (2004) using the Farnsworth-Munsell panel D-15 test. PMID:16961981

  10. Vision Screening

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The Visi Screen OSS-C, marketed by Vision Research Corporation, incorporates image processing technology originally developed by Marshall Space Flight Center. Its advantage in eye screening is speed. Because it requires no response from a subject, it can be used to detect eye problems in very young children. An electronic flash from a 35 millimeter camera sends light into a child's eyes, which is reflected back to the camera lens. The photorefractor then analyzes the retinal reflexes generated and produces an image of the child's eyes, which enables a trained observer to identify any defects. The device is used by pediatricians, day care centers and civic organizations that concentrate on children with special needs.

  11. Robot Vision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutro, L. L.; Lerman, J. B.

    1973-01-01

    The operation of a system is described that is built both to model the vision of primate animals, including man, and serve as a pre-prototype of possible object recognition system. It was employed in a series of experiments to determine the practicability of matching left and right images of a scene to determine the range and form of objects. The experiments started with computer generated random-dot stereograms as inputs and progressed through random square stereograms to a real scene. The major problems were the elimination of spurious matches, between the left and right views, and the interpretation of ambiguous regions, on the left side of an object that can be viewed only by the left camera, and on the right side of an object that can be viewed only by the right camera.

  12. Low Vision Aids and Low Vision Rehabilitation

    MedlinePlus

    ... The future will offer even more solutions. Newer technology for low vision aids While low vision devices ... magnifiers have long been the standard in assistive technology, advances in consumer electronics are also improving quality ...

  13. Visually induced self-motion sensation adapts rapidly to left-right reversal of vision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oman, C. M.; Bock, O. L.

    1981-01-01

    Three experiments were conducted using 15 adult volunteers with no overt oculomotor or vestibular disorders. In all experiments, left-right vision reversal was achieved using prism goggles, which permitted a binocular field of vision subtending approximately 45 deg horizontally and 28 deg vertically. In all experiments, circularvection (CV) was tested before and immediately after a period of exposure to reversed vision. After one to three hours of active movement while wearing vision-reversing goggles, 10 of 15 (stationary) human subjects viewing a moving stripe display experienced a self-rotation illusion in the same direction as seen stripe motion, rather than in the opposite (normal) direction, demonstrating that the central neural pathways that process visual self-rotation cues can undergo rapid adaptive modification.

  14. Wide-field-of-view (WFOV) night vision goggle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isbell, Wayne; Estrera, Joseph P.

    2003-09-01

    The United States' armed forces continue to be presented with increased challenges in adverse operational environments with increasing risk and complexity - especially at night. To ensure continued operational success and battlefield superiority during darkness, our armed forces must be equipped with night vision (NV) systems providing increased situational awareness. Doing so will significantly enhance threat detection and engagement, as well as survivability, thus ensuring greater mission success. Northrop Grumman Electro-Optical Systems (EOS) continues to develop its Wide Field of View (WFOV) image intensification (I2) night vision system for ground forces. This system will provide a significant increase in visual coverage enabling US forces to continue "to own the night". Until now, NV systems have typically been limited to a 40-degree field of view (FOV), vertically and horizontally. This limited FOV reduces off-axis detection, restricts an individual soldier's recognition and engagement capabilities and hinders added peripheral vision. To counter this operational deficiency, EOS proposes the Wide Field of View (WFOV) night vision binocular. The WFOV system will have a 70-degree horizontal FOV, with a 55-degree vertical FOV. The increased FOV will result in increased situational awareness of soldiers' surrounding environment (including terrain, hazards, threat, etc) during normal night operations. It will also allow for rapid and safer movement, especially in MOUT operations. Additionally, the increased visual coverage of large areas will enable soldiers to detect and engage targets faster and with greater reliability. The WFOV binocular will significantly enhance survivability, threat detection and engagement, and hence, greater mission success rate.

  15. EXO-ZODI MODELING FOR THE LARGE BINOCULAR TELESCOPE INTERFEROMETER

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, Grant M.; Wyatt, Mark C.; Panić, Olja; Shannon, Andrew; Bailey, Vanessa; Defrère, Denis; Hinz, Philip M.; Rieke, George H.; Skemer, Andrew J.; Su, Katherine Y. L.; Bryden, Geoffrey; Mennesson, Bertrand; Morales, Farisa; Serabyn, Eugene; Danchi, William C.; Roberge, Aki; Stapelfeldt, Karl R.; Haniff, Chris; Lebreton, Jérémy; Millan-Gabet, Rafael; and others

    2015-02-01

    Habitable zone dust levels are a key unknown that must be understood to ensure the success of future space missions to image Earth analogs around nearby stars. Current detection limits are several orders of magnitude above the level of the solar system's zodiacal cloud, so characterization of the brightness distribution of exo-zodi down to much fainter levels is needed. To this end, the Large Binocular Telescope Interferometer (LBTI) will detect thermal emission from habitable zone exo-zodi a few times brighter than solar system levels. Here we present a modeling framework for interpreting LBTI observations, which yields dust levels from detections and upper limits that are then converted into predictions and upper limits for the scattered light surface brightness. We apply this model to the HOSTS survey sample of nearby stars; assuming a null depth uncertainty of 10{sup –4} the LBTI will be sensitive to dust a few times above the solar system level around Sun-like stars, and to even lower dust levels for more massive stars.

  16. The Large Binocular Telescope azimuth and elevation encoder system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashby, David S.; Sargent, Tom; Cox, Dan; Rosato, Jerry; Brynnel, Joar G.

    2008-08-01

    A typical high-resolution encoder interpolator relies on careful mechanical alignment of the encoder read-heads and tight electrical tolerances of the signal processing electronics to ensure linearity. As the interpolation factor increases, maintaining these tight mechanical and electrical tolerances becomes impractical. The Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) is designed to utilize strip-type encoders on the main axes. Because of the very large scale of the telescope, the accumulative length of the azimuth and elevation encoder strips exceeds 80 meters, making optical tape prohibitively expensive. Consequently, the designers of the LBT incorporated the far less expensive Farrand Controls Inductosyn® linear strip encoder to encode the positions of the main axes and the instrument rotators. Since the cycle pitch of these encoders is very large compared to that of optical strip encoders, the interpolation factor must also be large in order to achieve the 0.005 arcsecond encoder resolution as specified. The authors present a description of the innovative DSP-based hardware / software solution that adaptively characterizes and removes common systematic cycle-to-cycle encoder interpolation errors. These errors can be caused by mechanical misalignment, encoder manufacturing flaws, variations in electrical gain, signal offset or cross-coupling of the encoder signals. Simulation data are presented to illustrate the performance of the interpolation algorithm, and telemetry data are presented to demonstrate the actual performance of the LBT main-axis encoder system.

  17. The Large Binocular Telescope mount control system architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashby, David S.; McKenna, Dan; Brynnel, Joar G.; Sargent, Tom; Cox, Dan; Little, John; Powell, Keith; Holmberg, Gene

    2006-06-01

    The Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) features dual 8.4 m diameter mirrors in a common elevation-over-azimuth mount. The LBT moves in elevation on two large crescent-shaped C-rings that are supported by radial hydrostatic bearing pads located near the four corners of the rectangular azimuth frame. The azimuth frame, in turn, is supported by four hydrostatic bearing pads and uses hydrodynamic roller bearings for centering. Each axis is gear driven by four large electric motors. In addition to precision optical motor encoders, each axis is equipped with Farrand Inductosyn strip encoders which yield 0.005 arcsecond resolution. The telescope weighs 580 metric tons and is designed to track with 0.03 arcsecond or better servo precision under wind speeds as high as 24 km/hr. Though the telescope is still under construction, the Mount Control System (MCS) has been routinely exercised to achieve First Light. The authors present a description of the unique, DSP-based synchronous architecture of the MCS and its capabilities.

  18. Exo-zodi Modeling for the Large Binocular Telescope Interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, Grant M.; Wyatt, Mark C.; Bailey, Vanessa; Bryden, Geoffrey; Danchi, William C.; Defrère, Denis; Haniff, Chris; Hinz, Philip M.; Lebreton, Jérémy; Mennesson, Bertrand; Millan-Gabet, Rafael; Morales, Farisa; Panić, Olja; Rieke, George H.; Roberge, Aki; Serabyn, Eugene; Shannon, Andrew; Skemer, Andrew J.; Stapelfeldt, Karl R.; Su, Katherine Y. L.; Weinberger, Alycia J.

    2015-02-01

    Habitable zone dust levels are a key unknown that must be understood to ensure the success of future space missions to image Earth analogs around nearby stars. Current detection limits are several orders of magnitude above the level of the solar system's zodiacal cloud, so characterization of the brightness distribution of exo-zodi down to much fainter levels is needed. To this end, the Large Binocular Telescope Interferometer (LBTI) will detect thermal emission from habitable zone exo-zodi a few times brighter than solar system levels. Here we present a modeling framework for interpreting LBTI observations, which yields dust levels from detections and upper limits that are then converted into predictions and upper limits for the scattered light surface brightness. We apply this model to the HOSTS survey sample of nearby stars; assuming a null depth uncertainty of 10-4 the LBTI will be sensitive to dust a few times above the solar system level around Sun-like stars, and to even lower dust levels for more massive stars.

  19. Simulating aperture masking at the Large Binocular Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stürmer, Julian; Quirrenbach, Andreas

    2012-07-01

    Preliminary investigations for an Aperture Masking Experiment at the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) and its application to stellar surface imaging are presented. An algorithm is implemented which generates non redundant aperture masks for the LBT. These masks are adapted to the special geometrical conditions at the LBT. At the same time, they are optimized to provide a uniform UV-coverage. It is also possible to favor certain baselines to adapt the UV-coverage to observational requirements. The optimization is done by selecting appropriate masks among a large number (order 109) of randomized realizations of non-redundant (NR) masks. Using results of numerical simulations of the surface of red supergiants, interferometric data is generated as it would be available with these masks at the LBT while observing Betelgeuse. An image reconstruction algorithm is used to reconstruct images from Squared Visibility and Closure Phase data. It is shown that a number of about 15 holes per mask is sufficient to retrieve detailed images. Additionally, noise is added to the data in order to simulate the influence of measurement errors e.g. photon noise. Both the position and the shape of surface structures are hardly influenced by this noise. However, the flux of these details changes significantly.

  20. Binocular rivalry waves in a directionally selective neural field model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, Samuel R.; Bressloff, Paul C.

    2014-10-01

    We extend a neural field model of binocular rivalry waves in the visual cortex to incorporate direction selectivity of moving stimuli. For each eye, we consider a one-dimensional network of neurons that respond maximally to a fixed orientation and speed of a grating stimulus. Recurrent connections within each one-dimensional network are taken to be excitatory and asymmetric, where the asymmetry captures the direction and speed of the moving stimuli. Connections between the two networks are taken to be inhibitory (cross-inhibition). As per previous studies, we incorporate slow adaption as a symmetry breaking mechanism that allows waves to propagate. We derive an analytical expression for traveling wave solutions of the neural field equations, as well as an implicit equation for the wave speed as a function of neurophysiological parameters, and analyze their stability. Most importantly, we show that propagation of traveling waves is faster in the direction of stimulus motion than against it, which is in agreement with previous experimental and computational studies.

  1. Binocular eye tracking with the Tracking Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscope.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, S B; Sheehy, C K; Roorda, A

    2016-01-01

    The development of high magnification retinal imaging has brought with it the ability to track eye motion with a precision of less than an arc minute. Previously these systems have provided only monocular records. Here we describe a modification to the Tracking Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscope (Sheehy et al., 2012) that splits the optical path in a way that slows the left and right retinas to be scanned almost simultaneously by a single system. A mirror placed at a retinal conjugate point redirects half of each horizontal scan line to the fellow eye. The collected video is a split image with left and right retinas appearing side by side in each frame. Analysis of the retinal motion in the recorded video provides an eye movement trace with very high temporal and spatial resolution. Results are presented from scans of subjects with normal ocular motility that fixated steadily on a green laser dot. The retinas were scanned at 4° eccentricity with a 2° square field. Eye position was extracted offline from recorded videos with an FFT based image analysis program written in Matlab. The noise level of the tracking was estimated to range from 0.25 to 0.5arcmin SD for three subjects. In the binocular recordings, the left eye/right eye difference was 1-2arcmin SD for vertical motion and 10-15arcmin SD for horizontal motion, in agreement with published values from other tracking techniques. PMID:25676884

  2. DLP™-based dichoptic vision test system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods, Russell L.; Apfelbaum, Henry L.; Peli, Eli

    2010-01-01

    It can be useful to present a different image to each of the two eyes while they cooperatively view the world. Such dichoptic presentation can occur in investigations of stereoscopic and binocular vision (e.g., strabismus, amblyopia) and vision rehabilitation in clinical and research settings. Various techniques have been used to construct dichoptic displays. The most common and most flexible modern technique uses liquid-crystal (LC) shutters. When used in combination with cathode ray tube (CRT) displays, there is often leakage of light from the image intended for one eye into the view of the other eye. Such interocular crosstalk is 14% even in our state of the art CRT-based dichoptic system. While such crosstalk may have minimal impact on stereo movie or video game experiences, it can defeat clinical and research investigations. We use micromirror digital light processing (DLP™) technology to create a novel dichoptic visual display system with substantially lower interocular crosstalk (0.3% remaining crosstalk comes from the LC shutters). The DLP system normally uses a color wheel to display color images. Our approach is to disable the color wheel, synchronize the display directly to the computer's sync signal, allocate each of the three (former) color presentations to one or both eyes, and open and close the LC shutters in synchrony with those color events.

  3. DLP™-based dichoptic vision test system

    PubMed Central

    Woods, Russell L.; Apfelbaum, Henry L.; Peli, Eli

    2010-01-01

    It can be useful to present a different image to each of the two eyes while they cooperatively view the world. Such dichoptic presentation can occur in investigations of stereoscopic and binocular vision (e.g., strabismus, amblyopia) and vision rehabilitation in clinical and research settings. Various techniques have been used to construct dichoptic displays. The most common and most flexible modern technique uses liquid-crystal (LC) shutters. When used in combination with cathode ray tube (CRT) displays, there is often leakage of light from the image intended for one eye into the view of the other eye. Such interocular crosstalk is 14% even in our state of the art CRT-based dichoptic system. While such crosstalk may have minimal impact on stereo movie or video game experiences, it can defeat clinical and research investigations. We use micromirror digital light processing (DLP™) technology to create a novel dichoptic visual display system with substantially lower interocular crosstalk (0.3%; remaining crosstalk comes from the LC shutters). The DLP system normally uses a color wheel to display color images. Our approach is to disable the color wheel, synchronize the display directly to the computer’s sync signal, allocate each of the three (former) color presentations to one or both eyes, and open and close the LC shutters in synchrony with those color events. PMID:20210457

  4. International computer vision directory

    SciTech Connect

    Flora, P.C.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains information on: computerized automation technologies. State-of-the-art computer vision systems for many areas of industrial use are covered. Other topics discussed include the following automated inspection systems; robot/vision systems; vision process control; cameras (vidicon and solid state); vision peripherals and components; and pattern processor.

  5. An Inherited Disorder With Splenomegaly, Cytopenias, and Vision Loss

    PubMed Central

    Tantravahi, Srinivas K.; Williams, Lloyd B.; Digre, Kathleen B.; Creel, Donnell J.; Smock, Kristi J.; DeAngelis, Margaret M.; Clayton, Frederic C.; Vitale, Albert T.; Rodgers, George M.

    2014-01-01

    We describe a novel inherited disorder consisting of idiopathic massive splenomegaly, cytopenias, anhidrosis, chronic optic nerve edema, and vision loss. This disorder involves three affected patients in a single non-consanguineous Caucasian family, a mother and two daughters, who are half-sisters. All three patients have had splenectomies; histopathology revealed congestion of the red pulp, but otherwise no abnormalities. Electron microscopic studies of splenic tissue showed no evidence for a storage disorder or other ultrastructural abnormality. Two of the three patients had bone marrow examinations that were non-diagnostic. All three patients developed progressive vision loss such that the two oldest patients are now blind, possibly due to a cone-rod dystrophy. Characteristics of vision loss in this family include early chronic optic nerve edema, and progressive vision loss, particularly central and color vision. Despite numerous medical and ophthalmic evaluations, no diagnosis has been discovered. PMID:22307799

  6. (Computer vision and robotics)

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, J.P.

    1989-02-13

    The traveler attended the Fourth Aalborg International Symposium on Computer Vision at Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark. The traveler presented three invited lectures entitled, Concurrent Computer Vision on a Hypercube Multicomputer'', The Butterfly Accumulator and its Application in Concurrent Computer Vision on Hypercube Multicomputers'', and Concurrency in Mobile Robotics at ORNL'', and a ten-minute editorial entitled, It Concurrency an Issue in Computer Vision.'' The traveler obtained information on current R D efforts elsewhere in concurrent computer vision.

  7. Environmental Recognition and Guidance Control for Autonomous Vehicles using Dual Vision Sensor and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moriwaki, Katsumi; Koike, Issei; Sano, Tsuyoshi; Fukunaga, Tetsuya; Tanaka, Katsuyuki

    We propose a new method of environmental recognition around an autonomous vehicle using dual vision sensor and navigation control based on binocular images. We consider to develop a guide robot that can play the role of a guide dog as the aid to people such as the visually impaired or the aged, as an application of above-mentioned techniques. This paper presents a recognition algorithm, which finds out the line of a series of Braille blocks and the boundary line between a sidewalk and a roadway where a difference in level exists by binocular images obtained from a pair of parallelarrayed CCD cameras. This paper also presents a tracking algorithm, with which the guide robot traces along a series of Braille blocks and avoids obstacles and unsafe areas which exist in the way of a person with the guide robot.

  8. Visual cortical responses to the input from the amblyopic eye are suppressed during binocular viewing.

    PubMed

    Körtvélyes, Judit; Bankó, Eva M; Andics, A; Rudas, G; Németh, J; Hermann, Petra; Vidnyánszky, Z

    2012-01-01

    Amblyopia is a visual disorder caused by an anomalous early visual experience. It has been suggested that suppression of the visual input from the weaker eye might be a primary underlying mechanism of the amblyopic syndrome. However, it is still an unresolved question to what extent neural responses to the visual information coming from the amblyopic eye are suppressed during binocular viewing. To address this question we measured event-related potentials (ERP) to foveal face stimuli in amblyopic patients, both in monocular and binocular viewing conditions. The results revealed no difference in the amplitude and latency of early components of the ERP responses between the binocular and fellow eye stimulation. On the other hand, early ERP components were reduced and delayed in the case of monocular stimulation of the amblyopic eye as compared to the fellow eye stimulation or to binocular viewing. The magnitude of the amblyopic effect measured on the ERP amplitudes was comparable to that found on the fMRI responses in the fusiform face area using the same face stimuli and task conditions. Our findings showing that the amblyopic effects present on the early ERP components in the case of monocular stimulation are not manifested in the ERP responses during binocular viewing suggest that input from the amblyopic eye is completely suppressed already at the earliest stages of visual cortical processing when stimuli are viewed by both eyes. PMID:22453742

  9. [Binocular photometer for measuring light perception in diseases of the visual pathway].

    PubMed

    Stave, J; Guthoff, R

    1995-04-01

    In patients with a reduction in visual function because of optic nerve neuritis, light sensitivity is tested to detect differences between the right and left eye in combination with the swinging flashlight test and visual evoked potential (VEP). A binocular Zeiss microscope was modified to use integrated photometer-controlled binocular stimulus fields and a central light system for fixation and variation of the contrast (background illumination). For exact binocular measurements of light sensitivity on both eyes, electronically controlled test fields (visual angle 5 degrees-20 degrees) guarantees only macular or overfoveolar stimulation. In addition, splitting the light for each stimulus field from only one halogen lamp guarantees wave-length-independent testing. Patients with various retinal diseases and neuritis nervi optici pathology were examined using pattern VEP, testing of the absolute lower threshold of light sensitivity, and binocular comparison over the range of luminous density. This binocular optical photometer system allowed minimal differences to be identified in the present visual function and after the eye had recovered from optic nerve neuritis. PMID:7780279

  10. Abnormal Head Position

    MedlinePlus

    ... cause. Can a longstanding head turn lead to any permanent problems? Yes, a significant abnormal head posture could cause permanent ... occipitocervical synostosis and unilateral hearing loss. Are there any ... postures? Yes. Abnormal head postures can usually be improved depending ...

  11. Urine - abnormal color

    MedlinePlus

    ... straw-yellow. Abnormally colored urine may be cloudy, dark, or blood-colored. Causes Abnormal urine color may ... red blood cells, or mucus in the urine. Dark brown but clear urine is a sign of ...

  12. Predicting Visual Consciousness Electrophysiologically from Intermittent Binocular Rivalry

    PubMed Central

    O’Shea, Robert P.; Kornmeier, Jürgen; Roeber, Urte

    2013-01-01

    Purpose We sought brain activity that predicts visual consciousness. Methods We used electroencephalography (EEG) to measure brain activity to a 1000-ms display of sine-wave gratings, oriented vertically in one eye and horizontally in the other. This display yields binocular rivalry: irregular alternations in visual consciousness between the images viewed by the eyes. We replaced both gratings with 200 ms of darkness, the gap, before showing a second display of the same rival gratings for another 1000 ms. We followed this by a 1000-ms mask then a 2000-ms inter-trial interval (ITI). Eleven participants pressed keys after the second display in numerous trials to say whether the orientation of the visible grating changed from before to after the gap or not. Each participant also responded to numerous non-rivalry trials in which the gratings had identical orientations for the two eyes and for which the orientation of both either changed physically after the gap or did not. Results We found that greater activity from lateral occipital-parietal-temporal areas about 180 ms after initial onset of rival stimuli predicted a change in visual consciousness more than 1000 ms later, on re-presentation of the rival stimuli. We also found that less activity from parietal, central, and frontal electrodes about 400 ms after initial onset of rival stimuli predicted a change in visual consciousness about 800 ms later, on re-presentation of the rival stimuli. There was no such predictive activity when the change in visual consciousness occurred because the stimuli changed physically. Conclusion We found early EEG activity that predicted later visual consciousness. Predictive activity 180 ms after onset of the first display may reflect adaption of the neurons mediating visual consciousness in our displays. Predictive activity 400 ms after onset of the first display may reflect a less-reliable brain state mediating visual consciousness. PMID:24124536

  13. Retinal abnormalities in β-thalassemia major.

    PubMed

    Bhoiwala, Devang L; Dunaief, Joshua L

    2016-01-01

    Patients with beta (β)-thalassemia (β-TM: β-thalassemia major, β-TI: β-thalassemia intermedia) have a variety of complications that may affect all organs, including the eye. Ocular abnormalities include retinal pigment epithelial degeneration, angioid streaks, venous tortuosity, night blindness, visual field defects, decreased visual acuity, color vision abnormalities, and acute visual loss. Patients with β-thalassemia major are transfusion dependent and require iron chelation therapy to survive. Retinal degeneration may result from either retinal iron accumulation from transfusion-induced iron overload or retinal toxicity induced by iron chelation therapy. Some who were never treated with iron chelation therapy exhibited retinopathy, and others receiving iron chelation therapy had chelator-induced retinopathy. We will focus on retinal abnormalities present in individuals with β-thalassemia major viewed in light of new findings on the mechanisms and manifestations of retinal iron toxicity. PMID:26325202

  14. LINC-NIRVANA for the large binocular telescope: setting up the world's largest near infrared binoculars for astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofferbert, Ralph; Baumeister, Harald; Bertram, Thomas; Berwein, Jürgen; Bizenberger, Peter; Böhm, Armin; Böhm, Michael; Borelli, José Luis; Brangier, Matthieu; Briegel, Florian; Conrad, Albert; De Bonis, Fulvio; Follert, Roman; Herbst, Tom; Huber, Armin; Kittmann, Frank; Kürster, Martin; Laun, Werner; Mall, Ulrich; Meschke, Daniel; Mohr, Lars; Naranjo, Vianak; Pavlov, Aleksei; Pott, Jörg-Uwe; Rix, Hans-Walter; Rohloff, Ralf-Rainer; Schinnerer, Eva; Storz, Clemens; Trowitzsch, Jan; Yan, Zhaojun; Zhang, Xianyu; Eckart, Andreas; Horrobin, Matthew; Rost, Steffen; Straubmeier, Christian; Wank, Imke; Zuther, Jens; Beckmann, Udo; Connot, Claus; Heininger, Matthias; Hofmann, Karl-Heinz; Kröner, Tim; Nussbaum, Eddy; Schertl, Dieter; Weigelt, Gerd; Bergomi, Maria; Brunelli, Alessandro; Dima, Marco; Farinato, Jacopo; Magrin, Demetrio; Marafatto, Luca; Ragazzoni, Roberto; Viotto, Valentina; Arcidiacono, Carmelo; Bregoli, Giovanni; Ciliegi, Paolo; Cosentino, Guiseppe; Diolaiti, Emiliano; Foppiani, Italo; Lombini, Matteo; Schreiber, Laura; D'Alessio, Francesco; Li Causi, Gianluca; Lorenzetti, Dario; Vitali, Fabrizio; Bertero, Mario; Boccacci, Patrizia; La Camera, Andrea

    2013-08-01

    LINC-NIRVANA (LN) is the near-infrared, Fizeau-type imaging interferometer for the large binocular telescope (LBT) on Mt. Graham, Arizona (elevation of 3267 m). The instrument is currently being built by a consortium of German and Italian institutes under the leadership of the Max Planck Institute for Astronomy in Heidelberg, Germany. It will combine the radiation from both 8.4 m primary mirrors of LBT in such a way that the sensitivity of a 11.9 m telescope and the spatial resolution of a 22.8 m telescope will be obtained within a 10.5×10.5 arcsec scientific field of view. Interferometric fringes of the combined beams are tracked in an oval field with diameters of 1 and 1.5 arcmin. In addition, both incoming beams are individually corrected by LN's multiconjugate adaptive optics system to reduce atmospheric image distortion over a circular field of up to 6 arcmin in diameter. A comprehensive technical overview of the instrument is presented, comprising the detailed design of LN's four major systems for interferometric imaging and fringe tracking, both in the near infrared range of 1 to 2.4 μm, as well as atmospheric turbulence correction at two altitudes, both in the visible range of 0.6 to 0.9 μm. The resulting performance capabilities and a short outlook of some of the major science goals will be presented. In addition, the roadmap for the related assembly, integration, and verification process are discussed. To avoid late interface-related risks, strategies for early hardware as well as software interactions with the telescope have been elaborated. The goal is to ship LN to the LBT in 2014.

  15. Vision Based Localization in Urban Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McHenry, Michael; Cheng, Yang; Matthies, Larry

    2005-01-01

    As part of DARPA's MARS2020 program, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory developed a vision-based system for localization in urban environments that requires neither GPS nor active sensors. System hardware consists of a pair of small FireWire cameras and a standard Pentium-based computer. The inputs to the software system consist of: 1) a crude grid-based map describing the positions of buildings, 2) an initial estimate of robot location and 3) the video streams produced by each camera. At each step during the traverse the system: captures new image data, finds image features hypothesized to lie on the outside of a building, computes the range to those features, determines an estimate of the robot's motion since the previous step and combines that data with the map to update a probabilistic representation of the robot's location. This probabilistic representation allows the system to simultaneously represent multiple possible locations, For our testing, we have derived the a priori map manually using non-orthorectified overhead imagery, although this process could be automated. The software system consists of two primary components. The first is the vision system which uses binocular stereo ranging together with a set of heuristics to identify features likely to be part of building exteriors and to compute an estimate of the robot's motion since the previous step. The resulting visual features and the associated range measurements are software component, a particle-filter based localization system. This system uses the map and the then fed to the second primary most recent results from the vision system to update the estimate of the robot's location. This report summarizes the design of both the hardware and software and will include the results of applying the system to the global localization of a robot over an approximately half-kilometer traverse across JPL'S Pasadena campus.

  16. No-reference stereoscopic image quality measurement based on generalized local ternary patterns of binocular energy response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Wujie; Yu, Lu

    2015-09-01

    Perceptual no-reference (NR) quality measurement of stereoscopic images has become a challenging issue in three-dimensional (3D) imaging fields. In this article, we propose an efficient binocular quality-aware features extraction scheme, namely generalized local ternary patterns (GLTP) of binocular energy response, for general-purpose NR stereoscopic image quality measurement (SIQM). More specifically, we first construct the binocular energy response of a distorted stereoscopic image with different stimuli of amplitude and phase shifts. Then, the binocular quality-aware features are generated from the GLTP of the binocular energy response. Finally, these features are mapped to the subjective quality score of the distorted stereoscopic image by using support vector regression. Experiments on two publicly available 3D databases confirm the effectiveness of the proposed metric compared with the state-of-the-art full reference and NR metrics.

  17. Visual response time to colored stimuli in peripheral retina - Evidence for binocular summation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haines, R. F.

    1977-01-01

    Simple onset response time (RT) experiments, previously shown to exhibit binocular summation effects for white stimuli along the horizontal meridian, were performed for red and green stimuli along 5 oblique meridians. Binocular RT was significantly shorter than monocular RT for a 45-min-diameter spot of red, green, or white light within eccentricities of about 50 deg from the fovea. Relatively large meridian differences were noted that appear to be due to the degree to which the images fall on corresponding retinal areas.

  18. Tunnel Vision Prismatic Field Expansion: Challenges and Requirements

    PubMed Central

    Apfelbaum, Henry; Peli, Eli

    2015-01-01

    Purpose No prismatic solution for peripheral field loss (PFL) has gained widespread acceptance. Field extended by prisms has a corresponding optical scotoma at the prism apices. True expansion can be achieved when each eye is given a different view (through visual confusion). We analyze the effects of apical scotomas and binocular visual confusion in different designs to identify constraints on any solution that is likely to meet acceptance. Methods Calculated perimetry diagrams were compared to perimetry with PFL patients wearing InWave channel prisms and Trifield spectacles. Percept diagrams illustrate the binocular visual confusion. Results Channel prisms provide no benefit at primary gaze. Inconsequential extension was provided by InWave prisms, although accessible with moderate gaze shifts. Higher-power prisms provide greater extension, with greater paracentral scotoma loss, but require uncomfortable gaze shifts. Head turns, not eye scans, are needed to see regions lost to the apical scotomas. Trifield prisms provide field expansion at all gaze positions, but acceptance was limited by disturbing effects of central binocular visual confusion. Conclusions Field expansion when at primary gaze (where most time is spent) is needed while still providing unobstructed central vision. Paracentral multiplexing prisms we are developing that superimpose shifted and see-through views may accomplish that. Translational Relevance Use of the analyses and diagramming techniques presented here will be of value when considering prismatic aids for PFL, and could have prevented many unsuccessful designs and the improbable reports we cited from the literature. New designs must likely address the challenges identified here. PMID:26740910

  19. Eyeglasses for Vision Correction

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stories Español Eye Health / Glasses & Contacts Eyeglasses for Vision Correction Dec. 12, 2015 Wearing eyeglasses is an easy way to correct refractive errors. Improving your vision with eyeglasses offers the opportunity to select from ...

  20. Chemicals Industry Vision

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    1996-12-01

    Chemical industry leaders articulated a long-term vision for the industry, its markets, and its technology in the groundbreaking 1996 document Technology Vision 2020 - The U.S. Chemical Industry. (PDF 310 KB).

  1. Color vision test

    MedlinePlus

    ... from birth) color vision problems: Achromatopsia -- complete color blindness , seeing only shades of gray Deuteranopia -- difficulty telling ... test -- color; Ishihara color vision test Images Color blindness tests References Adams AJ, Verdon WA, Spivey BE. ...

  2. Research on the application of single camera stereo vision sensor in three-dimensional point measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Xiao-feng; Pan, Di-fu

    2015-09-01

    A single camera stereo vision sensor model based on planar mirror imaging is proposed for measuring a three-dimensional point. The model consists of a CCD camera and a planar mirror. Using planar mirror reflections of a scene, a picture with parallax is obtained by shooting the target object and its virtual image. This is equivalent to shooting the target object from different angles with the camera and the virtual camera in the planar mirror, so it has the function of binocular stereo vision. In addition, the measurement theory of the three-dimensional point is discussed. The mathematical model of a single camera stereo vision sensor is established, the intrinsic and extrinsic parameters are calibrated, and the corresponding experiment has been done. The experimental results show that the measuring method is convenient and effective; it also has the advantages of simple structure, convenient adjustment, and is especially suitable for short-distance measurement with high precision.

  3. Fast and Flexible Movable Vision Measurement for the Surface of a Large-Sized Object

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhen; Li, Xiaojing; Li, Fengjiao; Wei, Xinguo; Zhang, Guanjun

    2015-01-01

    The presented movable vision measurement for the three-dimensional (3D) surface of a large-sized object has the advantages of system simplicity, low cost, and high accuracy. Aiming at addressing the problems of existing movable vision measurement methods, a more suitable method for large-sized products on industrial sites is introduced in this paper. A raster binocular vision sensor and a wide-field camera are combined to form a 3D scanning sensor. During measurement, several planar targets are placed around the object to be measured. With the planar target as an intermediary, the local 3D data measured by the scanning sensor are integrated into the global coordinate system. The effectiveness of the proposed method is verified through physical experiments. PMID:25723142

  4. Robot Vision Library

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Andrew B.; Ansar, Adnan I.; Litwin, Todd E.; Goldberg, Steven B.

    2009-01-01

    The JPL Robot Vision Library (JPLV) provides real-time robot vision algorithms for developers who are not vision specialists. The package includes algorithms for stereo ranging, visual odometry and unsurveyed camera calibration, and has unique support for very wideangle lenses

  5. Tooth - abnormal shape

    MedlinePlus

    Hutchinson incisors; Abnormal tooth shape; Peg teeth; Mulberry teeth; Conical teeth ... The appearance of normal teeth varies, especially the molars. ... conditions. Specific diseases can affect tooth shape, tooth ...

  6. Tooth - abnormal shape

    MedlinePlus

    Hutchinson incisors; Abnormal tooth shape; Peg teeth; Mulberry teeth; Conical teeth ... from many different conditions. Specific diseases can affect tooth shape, tooth color, time of appearance, or absence ...

  7. Factors affecting the perception of luning in monocular regions of partial binocular overlap displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klymenko, Victor; Verona, Robert W.; Martin, John S.; Beasley, Howard H.; McLean, William E.

    1994-08-01

    Luning is a detrimental visual effect characterized by a subjective darkening of the visual field in the monocular regions of partial binocular overlap displays. The effect of a number of factors on the magnitude of luning was investigated. These factors include: (1) the convergent versus the divergent display modes for presenting a partial binocular overlapping field-of-view; (2) the display luminance level; (3) the placement of either black or white contours versus no (null) contours on the binocular overlap border; and (4) the increasing or decreasing of the luminance of the monocular side regions relative to the binocular overlap region. Eighteen Army student aviators served as subjects in a repeated measures design. The percentage of time luning was seen was the measure of the degree of luning. The results indicated that the divergent display mode systematically induced more luning than the convergent display mode under the null contour condition. Adding black contours reduced luning in both the convergent and divergent display modes, where the convergent mode retained its relatively lower magnitude of luning. The display luminance level had no effect on luning for the null or black contour conditions.

  8. Neurons that detect interocular conflict during binocular rivalry revealed with EEG.

    PubMed

    Katyal, Sucharit; Engel, Stephen A; He, Bin; He, Sheng

    2016-01-01

    When the two eyes view incompatible images, perception alternates between them. What neural computations underlie this binocular rivalry? Perceptual alternations may simply reflect competition between the sets of monocular neurons that respond to each image, with the stronger driving perception. Here, we test an alternative hypothesis, that the computations that resolve rivalry make use of an active signal that reflects interocular conflict. Images presented to each eye were flickered at different frequencies while we measured steady-state visually evoked potentials (SSVEP). Signals at frequencies that are combinations of the two input frequencies can arise only from binocular neurons. In a first experiment, we measured energy at these "intermodulation" frequencies during binocular rivalry and found it to be highest immediately before rivalry restarted following a period of incomplete resolution of rivalry (a "mixed" percept). This suggests that the intermodulation signals may arise from neurons important for resolving the conflict between the two eyes' inputs. In a second experiment, we tested whether the intermodulation signal arose from neurons that measure interocular conflict by parametrically increasing conflict while simultaneously reducing image contrast. The activity of neurons that receive input from both eyes but are not sensitive to conflict should reduce monotonically as contrast decreases. The intermodulation response, however, peaked at intermediate levels of conflict, suggesting that it arises in part from neurons that respond to interocular conflict. Binocular rivalry appears to depend on an active mechanism that detects interocular conflict, whose levels of activity can be measured by the intermodulation frequencies of the SSVEP. PMID:26891825

  9. The Influence of Anxiety on the Initial Selection of Emotional Faces Presented in Binocular Rivalry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Katie L. H.; Adams, Wendy J.; Garner, Matthew

    2009-01-01

    Neurocognitive theories of anxiety predict that threat-related information can be evaluated before attentional selection, and can influence behaviour differentially in high anxious compared to low anxious individuals. We investigate this further by presenting emotional and neutral faces in an adapted binocular rivalry paradigm. We show that the…

  10. Cortical dynamics of three-dimensional form, color, and brightness perception. 2. Binocular theory

    SciTech Connect

    Grossberg, S.

    1987-01-01

    A real-time visual-processing theory is developed to explain how three-dimensional form, color, and brightness precepts are coherently synthesized. The theory describes how several fundamental uncertainty principles that limit the computation of visual information at individual processing stages are resolved through parallel and hierarchical interactions among several processing stages. The theory provides a unified analysis and many predictions of data about stereopsis, binocular, rivalry, hyperacuity, McCollough effect, textural grouping, border distinctness surface perception, monocular and binocular brightness precepts, filling-in, metacontrast, transparency, figural aftereffects, lateral inhibition within spatial frequency channels, proximity-luminance covariance, tissue contrast, motion segmentation, and illusory figures, as well as about reciprocal interactions among the hyper-columns, blobs, and stripes of cortical areas V1, V2, and V4. Monocular and binocular interactions between a Boundary Contour (BC) system and a Feature Contour (FC) System are developed. The BC System, defined by a hierarchy of oriented interactions, synthesizes an emergent and coherent binocular boundary segmentation from combinations of unoriented and oriented scenic elements.

  11. A binocular pupil model for simulation of relative afferent pupil defect, RAPD.

    PubMed

    Privitera, Claudio M; Stark, Lawrence W

    2004-01-01

    The human pupil is an important element studied in many clinical procedures. The binocular pupil model presented has a topology encompassing much of the complexity of the pupil system neurophysiology. The dynamic parameters of the model were matched against pupil experiments under multiple conditions. It simulates responses to the swinging flashlight test for different degrees of relative afferent pupil defects, RAPD. PMID:17271776

  12. Microwave vision for robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewandowski, Leon; Struckman, Keith

    1994-01-01

    Microwave Vision (MV), a concept originally developed in 1985, could play a significant role in the solution to robotic vision problems. Originally our Microwave Vision concept was based on a pattern matching approach employing computer based stored replica correlation processing. Artificial Neural Network (ANN) processor technology offers an attractive alternative to the correlation processing approach, namely the ability to learn and to adapt to changing environments. This paper describes the Microwave Vision concept, some initial ANN-MV experiments, and the design of an ANN-MV system that has led to a second patent disclosure in the robotic vision field.

  13. Programming parallel vision algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, L.G.

    1988-01-01

    Computer vision requires the processing of large volumes of data and requires parallel architectures and algorithms to be useful in real-time, industrial applications. The INSIGHT dataflow language was designed to allow encoding of vision algorithms at all levels of the computer vision paradigm. INSIGHT programs, which are relational in nature, can be translated into a graph structure that represents an architecture for solving a particular vision problem or a configuration of a reconfigurable computational network. The authors consider here INSIGHT programs that produce a parallel net architecture for solving low-, mid-, and high-level vision tasks.

  14. Computational approaches to vision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrow, H. G.; Tenenbaum, J. M.

    1986-01-01

    Vision is examined in terms of a computational process, and the competence, structure, and control of computer vision systems are analyzed. Theoretical and experimental data on the formation of a computer vision system are discussed. Consideration is given to early vision, the recovery of intrinsic surface characteristics, higher levels of interpretation, and system integration and control. A computational visual processing model is proposed and its architecture and operation are described. Examples of state-of-the-art vision systems, which include some of the levels of representation and processing mechanisms, are presented.

  15. Structurally abnormal human autosomes

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 25, discusses structurally abnormal human autosomes. This discussion includes: structurally abnormal chromosomes, chromosomal polymorphisms, pericentric inversions, paracentric inversions, deletions or partial monosomies, cri du chat (cat cry) syndrome, ring chromosomes, insertions, duplication or pure partial trisomy and mosaicism. 71 refs., 8 figs.

  16. GPU-based real-time trinocular stereo vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yuanbin; Linton, R. J.; Padir, Taskin

    2013-01-01

    Most stereovision applications are binocular which uses information from a 2-camera array to perform stereo matching and compute the depth image. Trinocular stereovision with a 3-camera array has been proved to provide higher accuracy in stereo matching which could benefit applications like distance finding, object recognition, and detection. This paper presents a real-time stereovision algorithm implemented on a GPGPU (General-purpose graphics processing unit) using a trinocular stereovision camera array. Algorithm employs a winner-take-all method applied to perform fusion of disparities in different directions following various image processing techniques to obtain the depth information. The goal of the algorithm is to achieve real-time processing speed with the help of a GPGPU involving the use of Open Source Computer Vision Library (OpenCV) in C++ and NVidia CUDA GPGPU Solution. The results are compared in accuracy and speed to verify the improvement.

  17. Improvement of Vergence Movements by Vision Therapy Decreases K-ARS Scores of Symptomatic ADHD Children

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sun Haeng; Moon, Byeong-Yeon; Cho, Hyun Gug

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] To determine whether the improvement of vergence movements by vision therapy can decrease the K-ARS scores of symptomatic ADHD children. [Methods] Eighty-one out of 1,123 children surveyed using the K-ARS, a parents’-reported questionnaire, led to 16 of these 81 children being showed scores of ≥19, and measurement of binocular function diagnosed as having convergence insufficiency. The 16 children were divided equally into a control group and a vision therapy group. [Results] After vision therapy for 12 weeks, near point convergence (4.38±0.69 cm) significantly neared compared to the near point convergence before vision therapy (11.50±2.28 cm), and both the break point (32.38±2.53 Δ) and recovery point (19.75±2.11 Δ) of near positive fusional vergence significantly improved compared to their values before vision therapy (15.88±2.64 Δ, 6.38±6.70 Δ, respectively). Near exophoria after vision therapy (7.81±2.00 Δ BI) significantly decreased compared to its value before vision therapy (12.00±1.16 Δ BI). The K-ARS scores referring to symptomatic ADHD significantly decreased after vision therapy (17.13±2.84) compared to before vision therapy (23.25±1.49). [Conclusions] Convergence insufficiency symptoms are closely related to symptoms screened for ADHD, and vision therapy to improve vergence movements is an effective method of decreasing the K-ARS scores. PMID:24648636

  18. Relationship between absorptive lenses and contrast sensitivity in healthy young subjects with glare under photopic- and mesopic-vision conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanazawa, Masatsugu; Uozato, Hiroshi

    2013-05-01

    We investigated the effect of absorptive lenses on contrast sensitivity under photopic- and mesopic-visions with glare, from the viewpoint of luminous transmittance (LT) and spectral transmittance. The subjects were 24 healthy volunteers. Log contrast sensitivity (logCS) under two luminance conditions with glare was measured with a contrast glare test device. Binocular logCSs with absorptive lenses were compared with those without absorptive lenses (control condition). Furthermore, to investigate the effect of spectral transmittance, we calculated the ratio of stimulus quantity and the correlation between this ratio and logCS. Compared with that in the control, logCS was hardly affected in the case of high-luminous-transmittance absorptive lenses under binocular visions with glare. Middle- and long-wavelength lights effectively contribute to contrast sensitivity under photopic-vision and lights at each wavelength showed almost the same coefficients of correlation under mesopic-vision. Previous studies suggested that absorptive lenses provide users with protection against harmful radiation and glare. Our present results suggested that short-wavelength and high-LT absorptive lenses are particularly useful in daylight.

  19. Trinocular stereo vision method based on mesh candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bin; Xu, Gang; Li, Haibin

    2010-10-01

    One of the most interesting goals of machine vision is 3D structure recovery of the scenes. This recovery has many applications, such as object recognition, reverse engineering, automatic cartography, autonomous robot navigation, etc. To meet the demand of measuring the complex prototypes in reverse engineering, a trinocular stereo vision method based on mesh candidates was proposed. After calibration of the cameras, the joint field of view can be defined in the world coordinate system. Mesh grid is established along the coordinate axes, and the mesh nodes are considered as potential depth data of the object surface. By similarity measure of the correspondence pairs which are projected from a certain group of candidates, the depth data can be obtained readily. With mesh nodes optimization, the interval between the neighboring nodes in depth direction could be designed reasonably. The potential ambiguity can be eliminated efficiently in correspondence matching with the constraint of a third camera. The cameras can be treated as two independent pairs, left-right and left-centre. Due to multiple peaks of the correlation values, the binocular method may not satisfy the accuracy of the measurement. Another image pair is involved if the confidence coefficient is less than the preset threshold. The depth is determined by the highest sum of correlation of both camera pairs. The measurement system was simulated using 3DS MAX and Matlab software for reconstructing the surface of the object. The experimental result proved that the trinocular vision system has good performance in depth measurement.

  20. Mathematical leadership vision.

    PubMed

    Hamburger, Y A

    2000-11-01

    This article is an analysis of a new type of leadership vision, the kind of vision that is becoming increasingly pervasive among leaders in the modern world. This vision appears to offer a new horizon, whereas, in fact it delivers to its target audience a finely tuned version of the already existing ambitions and aspirations of the target audience. The leader, with advisors, has examined the target audience and has used the results of extensive research and statistical methods concerning the group to form a picture of its members' lifestyles and values. On the basis of this information, the leader has built a "vision." The vision is intended to create an impression of a charismatic and transformational leader when, in fact, it is merely a response. The systemic, arithmetic, and statistical methods employed in this operation have led to the coining of the terms mathematical leader and mathematical vision. PMID:11092414

  1. Vision and vision-related outcome measures in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Balcer, Laura J.; Miller, David H.; Reingold, Stephen C.

    2015-01-01

    Visual impairment is a key manifestation of multiple sclerosis. Acute optic neuritis is a common, often presenting manifestation, but visual deficits and structural loss of retinal axonal and neuronal integrity can occur even without a history of optic neuritis. Interest in vision in multiple sclerosis is growing, partially in response to the development of sensitive visual function tests, structural markers such as optical coherence tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, and quality of life measures that give clinical meaning to the structure-function correlations that are unique to the afferent visual pathway. Abnormal eye movements also are common in multiple sclerosis, but quantitative assessment methods that can be applied in practice and clinical trials are not readily available. We summarize here a comprehensive literature search and the discussion at a recent international meeting of investigators involved in the development and study of visual outcomes in multiple sclerosis, which had, as its overriding goals, to review the state of the field and identify areas for future research. We review data and principles to help us understand the importance of vision as a model for outcomes assessment in clinical practice and therapeutic trials in multiple sclerosis. PMID:25433914

  2. Vision and vision-related outcome measures in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Balcer, Laura J; Miller, David H; Reingold, Stephen C; Cohen, Jeffrey A

    2015-01-01

    Visual impairment is a key manifestation of multiple sclerosis. Acute optic neuritis is a common, often presenting manifestation, but visual deficits and structural loss of retinal axonal and neuronal integrity can occur even without a history of optic neuritis. Interest in vision in multiple sclerosis is growing, partially in response to the development of sensitive visual function tests, structural markers such as optical coherence tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, and quality of life measures that give clinical meaning to the structure-function correlations that are unique to the afferent visual pathway. Abnormal eye movements also are common in multiple sclerosis, but quantitative assessment methods that can be applied in practice and clinical trials are not readily available. We summarize here a comprehensive literature search and the discussion at a recent international meeting of investigators involved in the development and study of visual outcomes in multiple sclerosis, which had, as its overriding goals, to review the state of the field and identify areas for future research. We review data and principles to help us understand the importance of vision as a model for outcomes assessment in clinical practice and therapeutic trials in multiple sclerosis. PMID:25433914

  3. FPGA Vision Data Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morfopoulos, Arin C.; Pham, Thang D.

    2013-01-01

    JPL has produced a series of FPGA (field programmable gate array) vision algorithms that were written with custom interfaces to get data in and out of each vision module. Each module has unique requirements on the data interface, and further vision modules are continually being developed, each with their own custom interfaces. Each memory module had also been designed for direct access to memory or to another memory module.

  4. Vision Changes in Space

    NASA Video Gallery

    This Human Research Program 'Research to Outreach' video featuring NASA Clinical Translational Scientist Jennifer Fogarty explains the risk of vision impairment both during and after spaceflight, i...

  5. Artificial human vision camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goudou, J.-F.; Maggio, S.; Fagno, M.

    2014-10-01

    In this paper we present a real-time vision system modeling the human vision system. Our purpose is to inspire from human vision bio-mechanics to improve robotic capabilities for tasks such as objects detection and tracking. This work describes first the bio-mechanical discrepancies between human vision and classic cameras and the retinal processing stage that takes place in the eye, before the optic nerve. The second part describes our implementation of these principles on a 3-camera optical, mechanical and software model of the human eyes and associated bio-inspired attention model.

  6. "Jeopardy" in Abnormal Psychology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keutzer, Carolin S.

    1993-01-01

    Describes the use of the board game, Jeopardy, in a college level abnormal psychology course. Finds increased student interaction and improved application of information. Reports generally favorable student evaluation of the technique. (CFR)

  7. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding

    MedlinePlus

    ... Abnormal uterine bleeding is any bleeding from the uterus (through your vagina) other than your normal monthly ... or fibroids (small and large growths) in the uterus can also cause bleeding. Rarely, a thyroid problem, ...

  8. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding FAQ

    MedlinePlus

    ... as cancer of the uterus, cervix, or vagina • Polycystic ovary syndrome How is abnormal bleeding diagnosed? Your health care ... before the fetus can survive outside the uterus. Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: A condition characterized by two of the following ...

  9. Willpower and Conscious Percept: Volitional Switching in Binocular Rivalry

    PubMed Central

    Hugrass, Laila; Crewther, David

    2012-01-01

    When dissimilar images are presented to the left and right eyes, awareness switches spontaneously between the two images, such that one of the images is suppressed from awareness while the other is perceptually dominant. For over 170 years, it has been accepted that even though the periods of dominance are subject to attentional processes, we have no inherent control over perceptual switching. Here, we revisit this issue in response to evidence that top-down attention can target perceptually suppressed ‘vision for action’ representations in the dorsal stream. We investigated volitional control over rivalry between apparent motion (AM), drifting (DM) and stationary (ST) grating pairs. Observers demonstrated a remarkable ability to generate intentional switches in the AM and D conditions, but not in the ST condition. Corresponding switches in the pursuit direction of optokinetic nystagmus verified this finding objectively. We showed it is unlikely that intentional perceptual switches were triggered by saccadic eye movements, because their frequency was reduced substantially in the volitional condition and did not change around the time of perceptual switches. Hence, we propose that synergy between dorsal and ventral stream representations provides the missing link in establishing volitional control over rivalrous conscious percepts. PMID:22558283

  10. CAUSING AND CURING INFANTILE ESOTROPIA IN PRIMATES: THE ROLE OF DECORRELATED BINOCULAR INPUT (AN AMERICAN OPHTHALMOLOGICAL SOCIETY THESIS)

    PubMed Central

    Tychsen, Lawrence

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Human infants at greatest risk for esotropia are those who suffer cerebral insults that could decorrelate signals from the 2 eyes during an early critical period of binocular, visuomotor development. The author reared normal infant monkeys, under conditions of binocular decorrelation, to determine if this alone was sufficient to cause esotropia and associated behavioral as well as neuroanatomic deficits. Methods: Binocular decorrelation was imposed using prism-goggles for durations of 3 to 24 weeks (in 6 experimental, 2 control monkeys). Behavioral recordings were obtained, followed by neuroanatomic analysis of ocular dominance columns and binocular, horizontal connections in the striate visual cortex (area V1). Results: Concomitant, constant esotropia developed in each monkey exposed to decorrelation for a duration of 12 to 24 weeks. The severity of ocular motor signs (esotropia-angle; dissociated vertical deviation; latent nystagmus; pursuit/optokinetic tracking asymmetry; fusional vergence deficits), and the loss of V1 binocular connections, increased as a function of decorrelation duration. Stereopsis was deficient and motion visual evoked potentials were asymmetric. Monkeys exposed to decorrelation for 3 weeks showed transient esotropia but regained normal visuomotor behaviors and binocular V1 connections. Conclusions: Binocular decorrelation is a sufficient cause of infantile esotropia when imposed during a critical period of visuomotor development. The systematic relationship between severity of visuomotor sign, and severity of V1 connectivity deficit, provides a neuroanatomic mechanism for several of these signs. Restoration of binocular fusion and V1 connections, after short durations of decorrelation, helps explain the benefits of early repair in human strabismus. PMID:18427630

  11. Chromosomal Abnormalities and Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    BASSETT, ANNE S.; CHOW, EVA W.C.; WEKSBERG, ROSANNA

    2011-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a common and serious psychiatric illness with strong evidence for genetic causation, but no specific loci yet identified. Chromosomal abnormalities associated with schizophrenia may help to understand the genetic complexity of the illness. This paper reviews the evidence for associations between chromosomal abnormalities and schizophrenia and related disorders. The results indicate that 22q11.2 microdeletions detected by fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) are significantly associated with schizophrenia. Sex chromosome abnormalities seem to be increased in schizophrenia but insufficient data are available to indicate whether schizophrenia or related disorders are increased in patients with sex chromosome aneuploidies. Other reports of chromosomal abnormalities associated with schizophrenia have the potential to be important adjuncts to linkage studies in gene localization. Advances in molecular cytogenetic techniques (i.e., FISH) have produced significant increases in rates of identified abnormalities in schizophrenia, particularly in patients with very early age at onset, learning difficulties or mental retardation, or dysmorphic features. The results emphasize the importance of considering behavioral phenotypes, including adult onset psychiatric illnesses, in genetic syndromes and the need for clinicians to actively consider identifying chromosomal abnormalities and genetic syndromes in selected psychiatric patients. PMID:10813803

  12. Looking into the water with oblique head tilting: revision of the aerial binocular imaging of underwater objects.

    PubMed

    Horváth, Gábor; Buchta, Krisztián; Varjú, Dezsö

    2003-06-01

    It is a well-known phenomenon that when we look into the water with two aerial eyes, both the apparent position and the apparent shape of underwater objects are different from the real ones because of refraction at the water surface. Earlier studies of the refraction-distorted structure of the underwater binocular visual field of aerial observers were restricted to either vertically or horizontally oriented eyes. We investigate a generalized version of this problem: We calculate the position of the binocular image point of an underwater object point viewed by two arbitrarily positioned aerial eyes, including oblique orientations of the eyes relative to the flat water surface. Assuming that binocular image fusion is performed by appropriate vergent eye movements to bring the object's image onto the foveas, the structure of the underwater binocular visual field is computed and visualized in different ways as a function of the relative positions of the eyes. We show that a revision of certain earlier treatments of the aerial imaging of underwater objects is necessary. We analyze and correct some widespread erroneous or incomplete representations of this classical geometric optical problem that occur in different textbooks. Improving the theory of aerial binocular imaging of underwater objects, we demonstrate that the structure of the underwater binocular visual field of aerial observers distorted by refraction is more complex than has been thought previously. PMID:12801180

  13. Underwater binocular imaging of aerial objects versus the position of eyes relative to the flat water surface.

    PubMed

    Barta, András; Horváth, Gábor

    2003-12-01

    The apparent position, size, and shape of aerial objects viewed binocularly from water change as a result of the refraction of light at the water surface. Earlier studies of the refraction-distorted structure of the aerial binocular visual field of underwater observers were restricted to either vertically or horizontally oriented eyes. Here we calculate the position of the binocular image point of an aerial object point viewed by two arbitrarily positioned underwater eyes when the water surface is flat. Assuming that binocular image fusion is performed by appropriate vergent eye movements to bring the object's image onto the foveae, the structure of the aerial binocular visual field is computed and visualized as a function of the relative positions of the eyes. We also analyze two erroneous representations of the underwater imaging of aerial objects that have occurred in the literature. It is demonstrated that the structure of the aerial binocular visual field of underwater observers distorted by refraction is more complex than has been thought previously. PMID:14686517

  14. Operation of the adaptive optics system at the Large Binocular Telescope Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Douglas L.; Guerra, Juan Carlos; Boutsia, Konstantina; Fini, Luca; Argomedo, Javier; Biddick, Chris; Agapito, Guido; Arcidiacono, Carmelo; Briguglio, Runa; Brusa, Guido; Busoni, Lorenzo; Esposito, Simone; Hill, John; Kulesa, Craig; McCarthy, Don; Pinna, Enrico; Puglisi, Alfio T.; Quiros-Pacheco, Fernando; Riccardi, Armando; Xompero, Marco

    2012-07-01

    The Adaptive Optics System at the Large Binocular Telescope Observatory consists of two Adaptive Secondary (ASM) mirrors and two Pyramid Wavefront sensors. The first ASM/Pyramid pair has been commissioned and is being used for science operation using the NIR camera PISCES on the right side of the binocular telescope. The left side ASM/Pyramid system is currently being commissioned, with completion scheduled for the Fall of 2012. We will discuss the operation of the first Adaptive Optics System at the LBT Observatory including interactions of the AO system with the telescope and its TCS, observational modes, user interfaces, observational scripting language, time requirement for closed loop and offsets and observing efficiency.

  15. Large Binocular Telescope Observations of Europa Occulting Io's Volcanoes at 4.8 μm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skrutskie, Michael F.; Conrad, Albert; Resnick, Aaron; Leisenring, Jarron; Hinz, Phil; de Pater, Imke; de Kleer, Katherine; Spencer, John; Skemer, Andrew; Woodward, Charles E.; Davies, Ashley Gerard; Defrére, Denis

    2015-11-01

    On 8 March 2015 Europa passed nearly centrally in front of Io. The Large Binocular Telescope observed this event in dual-aperture AO-corrected Fizeau interferometric imaging mode using the mid-infrared imager LMIRcam operating behind the Large Binocular Telescope Interferometer (LBTI) at a broadband wavelength of 4.8 μm (M-band). Occultation light curves generated from frames recorded every 123 milliseconds show that both Loki and Pele/Pillan were well resolved. Europa's center shifted by 2 kilometers relative to Io from frame-to-frame. The derived light curve for Loki is consistent with the double-lobed structure reported by Conrad et al. (2015) using direct interferometric imaging with LBTI.

  16. A low-dimensional model of binocular rivalry using winnerless competition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashwin, Peter; Lavric, Aureliu

    2010-05-01

    We discuss a novel minimal model for binocular rivalry (and more generally perceptual dominance) effects. The model has only three state variables, but nonetheless exhibits a wide range of input and noise-dependent switching. The model has two reciprocally inhibiting input variables that represent perceptual processes active during the recognition of one of the two possible states and a third variable that represents the perceived output. Sensory inputs only affect the input variables. We observe, for rivalry-inducing inputs, the appearance of winnerless competition in the perceptual system. This gives rise to a behaviour that conforms to well-known principles describing binocular rivalry (the Levelt propositions, in particular proposition IV: monotonic response of residence time as a function of image contrast) down to very low levels of stimulus intensity.

  17. Perceptual "blankout" of monocular homogeneous fields (Ganzfelder) is prevented with binocular viewing.

    PubMed

    Bolanowski, S J; Doty, R W

    1987-01-01

    The loss of visual perception or "blankout" which occurs when a homogeneous field (Ganzfeld) is presented monocularly is prevented when the same field is viewed binocularly. Thus, blankout cannot be retinal; and contours or transients in time and space are unnecessary for the continuous maintenance of visual perception. Experiments are reported in which blankout ensues only if the two eyes receive luminance disparities ca 0.75 log I. Furthermore, blankout is only marginally affected by stimulus intensity, nor is it dependent on stimulus hue. However, equally luminant but disparate hues presented to the two eyes produce perceptions reminiscent of blankout, with the darkness of blankout replaced with that of color. It is hypothesized that the underlying mechanisms have a commonality in the phenomena of blankout and binocular rivalry but several noncongruent features require explanation. PMID:3660657

  18. An iPod treatment of amblyopia: an updated binocular approach.

    PubMed

    Hess, Robert F; Thompson, B; Black, J M; Machara, G; Zhang, P; Bobier, W R; Cooperstock, J

    2012-02-01

    We describe the successful translation of computerized and space-consuming laboratory equipment for the treatment of suppression to a small handheld iPod device (Apple iPod; Apple Inc., Cupertino, California). A portable and easily obtainable Apple iPod display, using current video technology offers an ideal solution for the clinical treatment of suppression. The following is a description of the iPod device and illustrates how a video game has been adapted to provide the appropriate stimulation to implement our recent antisuppression treatment protocol. One to 2 hours per day of video game playing under controlled conditions for 1 to 3 weeks can improve acuity and restore binocular function, including stereopsis in adults, well beyond the age at which traditional patching is used. This handheld platform provides a convenient and effective platform for implementing the newly proposed binocular treatment of amblyopia in the clinic, home, or elsewhere. PMID:23231369

  19. Spontaneous Retinal Activity Mediates Development of Ocular Dominance Columns and Binocular Receptive Fields in V1

    PubMed Central

    Huberman, Andrew D.; Speer, Colenso M.; Chapman, Barbara

    2008-01-01

    Summary The mechanisms that give rise to ocular dominance columns (ODCs) during development are controversial. Early experiments indicated a key role for retinal activity in ODC formation. However, later studies showed that in those early experiments, the retinal activity perturbation was initiated after ODCs had already formed. Moreover, recent studies concluded that early eye removals do not impact ODC segregation. Here we blocked spontaneous retinal activity during the very early stages of ODC development. This permanently disrupted the anatomical organization of ODCs and led to a dramatic increase in receptive field size for binocular cells in primary visual cortex. Our data suggest that early spontaneous retinal activity conveys crucial information about whether thalamocortical axons represent one or the other eye and that this activity mediates binocular competition important for shaping receptive fields in primary visual cortex. PMID:17046688

  20. Dynamic Assessment of Binocular Eye Movement Coordination: Norms and Functional Implications

    PubMed Central

    Viirre, Erik

    2014-01-01

    Alignment of the two eyes is controlled by a finely tuned, fast acting system with components within the brain. Assessment of binocular alignment has classically been done statically. Eye positions are assessed in primary position and at eccentric angles to interpret the functional status of the oculomotor nerves and muscles. However, assessment of dynamic eye alignment, the coordination of the eyes during eye movements, has been less commonly carried out and has not been formalized with population norms. Clinicians are aware of slow eye movement dynamic alignment changes, such as that clinically observed in Intranuclear Ophthalmoplegia. But assessment of eye alignment during rapid eye movements, such as saccade or pursuit has not been part of neuro-ophthalmologic assessment. With the advent of inexpensive, high resolution recording systems, both eyes can be simultaneously recorded and their coordination during movement compared. Thus, we now have an opportunity to provide a laboratory based objective measurement of a gamut of binocular coordination systems. Recent research in humans has demonstrated increased variability of binocular coordination during divided attention. Variability is an interesting statistic that can be sensitively assessed in the velocity domain without extensive gaze position recalibration procedures during recording over long intervals. Variability can thus be used as a robust, long-term eye movement parameter with minimal intrusiveness to the subject. It is proposed that population studies of binocular coordination during eye movements be carried out to determine neurologic norms so that conditions such as brain injury and others can be assessed with a functional tool with objective parameters. PMID:24804278

  1. Image-Based Grouping during Binocular Rivalry Is Dictated by Eye-Of-Origin

    PubMed Central

    Stuit, Sjoerd M.; Paffen, Chris L. E.; van der Smagt, Maarten J.; Verstraten, Frans A. J.

    2014-01-01

    Prolonged viewing of dichoptically presented images with different content results in perceptual alternations known as binocular rivalry. This phenomenon is thought to be the result of competition at a local level, where local rivalry zones interact to give rise to a single, global dominant percept. Certain perceived combinations that result from this local competition are known to last longer than others, which is referred to as grouping during binocular rivalry. In recent years, the phenomenon has been suggested to be the result of competition at both eye- and image-based processing levels, although the exact contribution from each level remains elusive. Here we use a paradigm designed specifically to quantify the contribution of eye- and image-based processing to grouping during rivalry. In this paradigm we used sine-wave gratings as well as upright and inverted faces, with and without binocular disparity-based occlusion. These stimuli and conditions were used because they are known to result in processing at different stages throughout the visual processing hierarchy. Specifically, more complex images were included in order to maximize the potential contribution of image-based grouping. In spite of this, our results show that increasing image complexity did not lead to an increase in the contribution of image-based processing to grouping during rivalry. In fact, the results show that grouping was primarily affected by the eye-of-origin of the image parts, irrespective of stimulus type. We suggest that image content affects grouping during binocular rivalry at low-level processing stages, where it is intertwined with eye-of-origin information. PMID:24987847

  2. Joint Representation of Depth from Motion Parallax and Binocular Disparity Cues in Macaque Area MT

    PubMed Central

    Nadler, Jacob W.; Barbash, Daniel; Kim, HyungGoo R.; Shimpi, Swati; Angelaki, Dora E.

    2013-01-01

    Perception of depth is based on a variety of cues, with binocular disparity and motion parallax generally providing more precise depth information than pictorial cues. Much is known about how neurons in visual cortex represent depth from binocular disparity or motion parallax, but little is known about the joint neural representation of these depth cues. We recently described neurons in the middle temporal (MT) area that signal depth sign (near vs far) from motion parallax; here, we examine whether and how these neurons also signal depth from binocular disparity. We find that most MT neurons in rhesus monkeys (Macaca Mulatta) are selective for depth sign based on both disparity and motion parallax cues. However, the depth-sign preferences (near or far) are not always aligned: 56% of MT neurons have matched depth-sign preferences (“congruent” cells) whereas the remaining 44% of neurons prefer near depth from motion parallax and far depth from disparity, or vice versa (“opposite” cells). For congruent cells, depth-sign selectivity increases when disparity cues are added to motion parallax, but this enhancement does not occur for opposite cells. This suggests that congruent cells might contribute to perceptual integration of depth cues. We also found that neurons are clustered in MT according to their depth tuning based on motion parallax, similar to the known clustering of MT neurons for binocular disparity. Together, these findings suggest that area MT is involved in constructing a representation of 3D scene structure that takes advantage of multiple depth cues available to mobile observers. PMID:23986242

  3. Color vision deficiencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vannorren, D.

    1982-04-01

    Congenital and acquired color vision defects are described in the context of physiological data. Light sources, photometry, color systems and test methods are described. A list of medicines is also presented. The practical social consequences of color vision deficiencies are discussed.

  4. Home vision tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... peripheral vision. All the lines, both vertical and horizontal, should appear straight and unbroken. They should meet ... You need a well-lit area at least 10 feet long for the distance vision test, and the following: Measuring tape or a ...

  5. Overview of computer vision

    SciTech Connect

    Gevarter, W.B.

    1982-09-01

    An overview of computer vision is provided. Image understanding and scene analysis are emphasized, and pertinent aspects of pattern recognition are treated. The basic approach to computer vision systems, the techniques utilized, applications, the current existing systems and state-of-the-art issues and research requirements, who is doing it and who is funding it, and future trends and expectations are reviewed.

  6. Synthesized night vision goggle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Haixian

    2000-06-01

    A Synthesized Night Vision Goggle that will be described int his paper is a new type of night vision goggle with multiple functions. It consists of three parts: main observing system, picture--superimposed system (or Cathode Ray Tube system) and Charge-Coupled Device system.

  7. INSIGHT: Vision & Leadership, 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGraw, Tammy, Ed.

    2002-01-01

    This publication focuses on promising new and emerging technologies and what they might mean to the future of K-12 schools. Half of the volume contains articles devoted in some way to "Vision," and articles in the other half are under the heading of "Leadership." Contents in the "Vision" section include: "The Future of Reading and Learning To…

  8. New Term, New Vision?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ravenhall, Mark

    2011-01-01

    During the affluent noughties it was sometimes said of government that it had "more visions than Mystic Meg and more pilots than British Airways". In 2011, the pilots, the pathfinders, the new initiatives are largely gone--implementation is the name of the game--but the visions remain. The latest one, as it affects adult learners, is in the…

  9. Characterization of Visual Symptomatology Associated with Refractive, Accommodative, and Binocular Anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Cacho-Martínez, Pilar; Cantó-Cerdán, Mario; Carbonell-Bonete, Stela; García-Muñoz, Ángel

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To characterize the symptomatology of refractive, accommodative, and nonstrabismic binocular dysfunctions and to assess the association between dysfunctions and symptoms. Methods. 175 randomised university students were examined. Subjects were given a subjective visual examination with accommodative and binocular tests, evaluating their symptomatology. Accommodative and binocular dysfunctions (AD, BD) were diagnosed according to the number of existing clinical signs: suspect AD or BD (one fundamental clinical sign), high suspect (one fundamental + 1 complementary clinical sign), and definite (one fundamental + 2 or more complementary clinical signs). A logistic regression was conducted in order to determine whether there was an association between dysfunctions and symptoms. Results. 78 subjects (44.6%) reported any kind of symptoms which were grouped into 18 categories, with “visual fatigue” being the most frequent (20% of the overall complaints). Logistic regression adjusted by the presence of an uncorrected refractive error showed no association between any grade of AD and symptoms. Subjects with BD had more likelihood of having symptoms than without dysfunction group (OR = 3.35), being greater when only definite BD were considered (OR = 8.79). Conclusions. An uncorrected refractive error is a confusion factor when considering AD symptomatology. For BD, the more the number of clinical signs used the greater the likelihood suffering symptoms. PMID:26351575

  10. The task-dependent use of binocular disparity and motion parallax information.

    PubMed

    Bradshaw, M F; Parton, A D; Glennerster, A

    2000-01-01

    Binocular disparity and motion parallax are powerful cues to the relative depth between objects. However to recover absolute depth, either additional scaling parameters are required to calibrate the information provided by each cue, or it can be recovered through the combination of information from both cues (Richards, W. (1985). Structure from stereo and motion. Journal of the Optical Society of America, 2, 343-349). However, not all tasks necessarily require a full specification of the absolute depth structure of a scene and so psychophysical performance may vary depending on the amount of information available, and the degree to which absolute depth structure is required. The experiments reported here used three different tasks that varied in the type of geometric information required in order for them to be completed successfully. These included a depth nulling task, a depth-matching task, and an absolute depth judgement (shape) task. Real world stimuli were viewed (i) monocularly with head movements, (ii) binocularly and static, or (iii) binocularly with head movements. No effect of viewing condition was found whereas there was a large effect of task. Performance was accurate on the matching and nulling tasks and much less accurate on the shape task. The fact that the same perceptual distortions were not evident in all tasks suggests that the visual system can switch strategy according to the demands of the particular task. No evidence was found to suggest that the visual system could exploit the simultaneous presence of disparity and motion parallax. PMID:11090665

  11. Performance under dichoptic versus binocular viewing conditions - Effects of attention and task requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimchi, Ruth; Gopher, Daniel; Rubin, Yifat; Raij, David

    1993-01-01

    Three experiments investigated subjects' ability to allocate attention and cope with task requirements under dichoptic versus binocular viewing conditions. Experiments 1 and 2 employed a target detection task in compound and noncompound stimuli, and Experiment 3 employed a relative-proximity judgment task. The tasks were performed in a focused attention condition in which subjects had to attend to the stimulus presented to one eye or field (under dichoptic and binocular viewing conditions, respectively) while ignoring the stimulus presented to the other eye or field, and in a divided attention condition in which subjects had to attend to the stimuli presented to both eyes or fields. Subjects' performance was affected by the interaction of attention conditions with task requirements, but it was generally the same under dichoptic and binocular viewing conditions. The more dependent the task was on finer discrimination, the more performance was impaired by divided attention. These results suggest that at least with discrete tasks and relatively short exposure durations, performance when each eye is presented with a separate stimulus is the same as when the entire field of stimulation is viewed by both eyes.

  12. Stereopsis and binocular rivalry are based on perceived rather than physical orientations

    PubMed Central

    Mamassian, Pascal; Blake, Randolph

    2012-01-01

    Binocular rivalry is an intriguing phenomenon: when different images are displayed to the two eyes, perception alternates between these two images. What determines whether two monocular images engage in fusion or in rivalry: the physical difference between these images or the difference between the percepts resulting from the images? We investigated that question by measuring the interocular difference of grid orientation needed to produce a transition from fusion to rivalry and by changing those transitions by means of a superimposed tilt illusion. Fusion was attested by a correct stereoscopic slant perception of the grid. The superimposed tilt illusion was achieved in displaying small segments on the grids. We found that the illusion can change the fusion-rivalry transitions indicating that rivalry and fusion are based on the perceived orientations rather than the displayed ones. In a second experiment, we confirmed that the absence of binocular rivalry resulted in fusion and stereoscopic slant perception. We conclude that the superimposed tilt illusion arises at a level of visual processing prior to those stages mediating binocular rivalry and stereoscopic depth extraction. PMID:22609083

  13. Clinical Outcomes after Binocular Implantation of a New Trifocal Diffractive Intraocular Lens

    PubMed Central

    Kretz, Florian T. A.; Breyer, Detlev; Diakonis, Vasilios F.; Klabe, Karsten; Henke, Franziska; Auffarth, Gerd U.; Kaymak, Hakan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate visual, refractive, and contrast sensitivity outcomes, as well as the incidence of pseudophakic photic phenomena and patient satisfaction after bilateral diffractive trifocal intraocular lens (IOL) implantation. Methods. This prospective nonrandomized study included consecutive patients undergoing cataract surgery with bilateral implantation of a diffractive trifocal IOL (AT LISA tri 839MP, Carl Zeiss Meditec). Distance, intermediate, and near visual outcomes were evaluated as well as the defocus curve and the refractive outcomes 3 months after surgery. Photopic and mesopic contrast sensitivity, patient satisfaction, and halo perception were also evaluated. Results. Seventy-six eyes of 38 patients were included; 90% of eyes showed a spherical equivalent within ±0.50 diopters 3 months after surgery. All patients had a binocular uncorrected distance visual acuity of 0.00 LogMAR or better and a binocular uncorrected intermediate visual acuity of 0.10 LogMAR or better, 3 months after surgery. Furthermore, 85% of patients achieved a binocular uncorrected near visual acuity of 0.10 LogMAR or better. Conclusions. Trifocal diffractive IOL implantation seems to provide an effective restoration of visual function for far, intermediate, and near distances, providing high levels of visual quality and patient satisfaction. PMID:26301104

  14. Beam control for LINC-NIRVANA: from the binocular entrance pupil to the combined focal plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertram, T.; Trowitzsch, J.; Herbst, T. M.; Ragazzoni, R.

    2012-07-01

    LINC-NIRVANA is the near-infrared interferometric imaging camera for the Large Binocular Telescope. Once operational, it will provide an unprecedented combination of angular resolution, sensitivity and field of view. To meet the tight requirements that result from long exposure interferometric imaging over a large field of view, active control beyond fringe tracking and adaptive optics has to be in place in the telescope and in the instrument domain. The incoming beams of the binocular telescope have to be controlled along the entire optical path, from the entrance pupil to the combined focal plane. The beams have to coincide in the focal plane of the science detector, their pointing origins, offsets, orientations, plate scales, and distortions have to match each other and must not change during the observation. Non-common path effects between AO and science channel, flexure and thermal effects have to be compensated and offioading requests from the adaptive optics and fringe tracking systems have to be arbitrated without introducing unwanted optical path length differences or changes in the geometry of the binocular entrance pupil. Beam Control aspects include pointing, co-pointing and field derotation, active optics and collimation control. In this presentation, the constraints for coherent imaging over a 1.5 arcminute field of view are discussed together with a concept for a distributed control scheme.

  15. Taking Care of Your Vision

    MedlinePlus

    ... a Friend Who Cuts? Taking Care of Your Vision KidsHealth > For Teens > Taking Care of Your Vision ... are important parts of keeping your peepers perfect. Vision Basics One of the best things you can ...

  16. Clinical Trials in Vision Research

    MedlinePlus

    ... Clinical Trials in Vision Research Clinical Trials in Vision Research Clinical studies depend on people who volunteer. ... about the treatment. How are clinical trials in vision different from other clinical trials? Eyes are one ...

  17. (Computer) Vision without Sight

    PubMed Central

    Manduchi, Roberto; Coughlan, James

    2012-01-01

    Computer vision holds great promise for helping persons with blindness or visual impairments (VI) to interpret and explore the visual world. To this end, it is worthwhile to assess the situation critically by understanding the actual needs of the VI population and which of these needs might be addressed by computer vision. This article reviews the types of assistive technology application areas that have already been developed for VI, and the possible roles that computer vision can play in facilitating these applications. We discuss how appropriate user interfaces are designed to translate the output of computer vision algorithms into information that the user can quickly and safely act upon, and how system-level characteristics affect the overall usability of an assistive technology. Finally, we conclude by highlighting a few novel and intriguing areas of application of computer vision to assistive technology. PMID:22815563

  18. Light Vision Color

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valberg, Arne

    2005-04-01

    Light Vision Color takes a well-balanced, interdisciplinary approach to our most important sensory system. The book successfully combines basics in vision sciences with recent developments from different areas such as neuroscience, biophysics, sensory psychology and philosophy. Originally published in 1998 this edition has been extensively revised and updated to include new chapters on clinical problems and eye diseases, low vision rehabilitation and the basic molecular biology and genetics of colour vision. Takes a broad interdisciplinary approach combining basics in vision sciences with the most recent developments in the area Includes an extensive list of technical terms and explanations to encourage student understanding Successfully brings together the most important areas of the subject in to one volume

  19. (Computer) Vision without Sight.

    PubMed

    Manduchi, Roberto; Coughlan, James

    2012-01-01

    Computer vision holds great promise for helping persons with blindness or visual impairments (VI) to interpret and explore the visual world. To this end, it is worthwhile to assess the situation critically by understanding the actual needs of the VI population and which of these needs might be addressed by computer vision. This article reviews the types of assistive technology application areas that have already been developed for VI, and the possible roles that computer vision can play in facilitating these applications. We discuss how appropriate user interfaces are designed to translate the output of computer vision algorithms into information that the user can quickly and safely act upon, and how system-level characteristics affect the overall usability of an assistive technology. Finally, we conclude by highlighting a few novel and intriguing areas of application of computer vision to assistive technology. PMID:22815563

  20. Panoramic stereo sphere vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Weijia; Zhang, Baofeng; Röning, Juha; Zong, Xiaoning; Yi, Tian

    2013-01-01

    Conventional stereo vision systems have a small field of view (FOV) which limits their usefulness for certain applications. While panorama vision is able to "see" in all directions of the observation space, scene depth information is missed because of the mapping from 3D reference coordinates to 2D panoramic image. In this paper, we present an innovative vision system which builds by a special combined fish-eye lenses module, and is capable of producing 3D coordinate information from the whole global observation space and acquiring no blind area 360°×360° panoramic image simultaneously just using single vision equipment with one time static shooting. It is called Panoramic Stereo Sphere Vision (PSSV). We proposed the geometric model, mathematic model and parameters calibration method in this paper. Specifically, video surveillance, robotic autonomous navigation, virtual reality, driving assistance, multiple maneuvering target tracking, automatic mapping of environments and attitude estimation are some of the applications which will benefit from PSSV.

  1. Corneal Transplantation in Disease Affecting Only One Eye: Does It Make a Difference to Habitual Binocular Viewing?

    PubMed Central

    Bandela, Praveen K.; Satgunam, PremNandhini; Garg, Prashant; Bharadwaj, Shrikant R.

    2016-01-01

    Background Clarity of the transplanted tissue and restoration of visual acuity are the two primary metrics for evaluating the success of corneal transplantation. Participation of the transplanted eye in habitual binocular viewing is seldom evaluated post-operatively. In unilateral corneal disease, the transplanted eye may remain functionally inactive during binocular viewing due to its suboptimal visual acuity and poor image quality, vis-à-vis the healthy fellow eye. Methods and Findings This study prospectively quantified the contribution of the transplanted eye towards habitual binocular viewing in 25 cases with unilateral transplants [40yrs (IQR: 32–42yrs) and 25 age-matched controls [30yrs (25–37yrs)]. Binocular functions including visual field extent, high-contrast logMAR acuity, suppression threshold and stereoacuity were assessed using standard psychophysical paradigms. Optical quality of all eyes was determined from wavefront aberrometry measurements. Binocular visual field expanded by a median 21% (IQR: 18–29%) compared to the monocular field of cases and controls (p = 0.63). Binocular logMAR acuity [0.0 (0.0–0.0)] almost always followed the fellow eye’s acuity [0.00 (0.00 –-0.02)] (r = 0.82), independent of the transplanted eye’s acuity [0.34 (0.2–0.5)] (r = 0.04). Suppression threshold and stereoacuity were poorer in cases [30.1% (13.5–44.3%); 620.8arc sec (370.3–988.2arc sec)] than in controls [79% (63.5–100%); 16.3arc sec (10.6–25.5arc sec)] (p<0.001). Higher-order wavefront aberrations of the transplanted eye [0.34μ (0.21–0.51μ)] were higher than the fellow eye [0.07μ (0.05–0.11μ)] (p<0.001) and their reduction with RGP contact lenses [0.09μ (0.08–0.12μ)] significantly improved the suppression threshold [65% (50–72%)] and stereoacuity [56.6arc sec (47.7–181.6arc sec)] (p<0.001). Conclusions In unilateral corneal disease, the transplanted eye does participate in gross binocular viewing but offers limited support

  2. Machine vision is not computer vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batchelor, Bruce G.; Charlier, Jean-Ray

    1998-10-01

    The identity of Machine Vision as an academic and practical subject of study is asserted. In particular, the distinction between Machine Vision on the one hand and Computer Vision, Digital Image Processing, Pattern Recognition and Artificial Intelligence on the other is emphasized. The article demonstrates through four cases studies that the active involvement of a person who is sensitive to the broad aspects of vision system design can avoid disaster and can often achieve a successful machine that would not otherwise have been possible. This article is a transcript of the key- note address presented at the conference. Since the proceedings are prepared and printed before the conference, it is not possible to include a record of the response to this paper made by the delegates during the round-table discussion. It is hoped to collate and disseminate these via the World Wide Web after the event. (A link will be provided at http://bruce.cs.cf.ac.uk/bruce/index.html.).

  3. The design and realization of a sort of robot vision measure system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Yong-jie; Zhu, Ji-gui; Yang, Xue-you; Ye, Sheng-hua

    2006-06-01

    The robot vision measure system based on stereovision is a very meaningful research realm within the engineering application. In this system, the industry robot is the movable carrier of the stereovision sensor, not only extending the work space of the sensor, but also reserving the characteristics of vision measure technology such as non-contact, quickness, etc. Controlling the pose of the robot in space, the stereovision sensor can arrive at the given point to collect the image signal of the given point one by one, and then obtain the 3D coordinate data after computing the image data. The method based on the technique of binocular stereovision sensor, which uses two transit instruments and one precision drone to carry out the whole calibration, is presented. At the same time, the measurement program of the robot and the computer was written in different program language. In the end, the system was tested carefully, and the feasibility was proved simultaneously.

  4. Design and control of active vision based mechanisms for intelligent robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Liwei; Marefat, Michael M.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a design of an active vision system for intelligent robot application purposes. The system has the degrees of freedom of pan, tilt, vergence, camera height adjustment, and baseline adjustment with a hierarchical control system structure. Based on this vision system, we discuss two problems involved in the binocular gaze stabilization process: fixation point selection and vergence disparity extraction. A hierarchical approach to determining point of fixation from potential gaze targets using evaluation function representing human visual behavior to outside stimuli is suggested. We also characterize different visual tasks in two cameras for vergence control purposes, and a phase-based method based on binarized images to extract vergence disparity for vergence control is presented. A control algorithm for vergence control is discussed.

  5. Near Vision Test for Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... Eyes Education Series Online Training and Certification Patient Education Materials Star Pupils ... Test for Adults Testing Near Vision and Distance Vision Prevent Blindness does NOT recommend that you ...

  6. Recovering stereo vision by squashing virtual bugs in a virtual reality environment.

    PubMed

    Vedamurthy, Indu; Knill, David C; Huang, Samuel J; Yung, Amanda; Ding, Jian; Kwon, Oh-Sang; Bavelier, Daphne; Levi, Dennis M

    2016-06-19

    Stereopsis is the rich impression of three-dimensionality, based on binocular disparity-the differences between the two retinal images of the same world. However, a substantial proportion of the population is stereo-deficient, and relies mostly on monocular cues to judge the relative depth or distance of objects in the environment. Here we trained adults who were stereo blind or stereo-deficient owing to strabismus and/or amblyopia in a natural visuomotor task-a 'bug squashing' game-in a virtual reality environment. The subjects' task was to squash a virtual dichoptic bug on a slanted surface, by hitting it with a physical cylinder they held in their hand. The perceived surface slant was determined by monocular texture and stereoscopic cues, with these cues being either consistent or in conflict, allowing us to track the relative weighting of monocular versus stereoscopic cues as training in the task progressed. Following training most participants showed greater reliance on stereoscopic cues, reduced suppression and improved stereoacuity. Importantly, the training-induced changes in relative stereo weights were significant predictors of the improvements in stereoacuity. We conclude that some adults deprived of normal binocular vision and insensitive to the disparity information can, with appropriate experience, recover access to more reliable stereoscopic information.This article is part of the themed issue 'Vision in our three-dimensional world'. PMID:27269607

  7. Surface Organization Influences Bistable Vision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graf, Erich W.; Adams, Wendy J.

    2008-01-01

    A priority for the visual system is to construct 3-dimensional surfaces from visual primitives. Information is combined across individual cues to form a robust representation of the external world. Here, it is shown that surface completion relying on multiple visual cues influences relative dominance during binocular rivalry. The shape of a…

  8. Helicopter flights with night-vision goggles: Human factors aspects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brickner, Michael S.

    1989-01-01

    Night-vision goggles (NVGs) and, in particular, the advanced, helmet-mounted Aviators Night-Vision-Imaging System (ANVIS) allows helicopter pilots to perform low-level flight at night. It consists of light intensifier tubes which amplify low-intensity ambient illumination (star and moon light) and an optical system which together produce a bright image of the scene. However, these NVGs do not turn night into day, and, while they may often provide significant advantages over unaided night flight, they may also result in visual fatigue, high workload, and safety hazards. These problems reflect both system limitations and human-factors issues. A brief description of the technical characteristics of NVGs and of human night-vision capabilities is followed by a description and analysis of specific perceptual problems which occur with the use of NVGs in flight. Some of the issues addressed include: limitations imposed by a restricted field of view; problems related to binocular rivalry; the consequences of inappropriate focusing of the eye; the effects of ambient illumination levels and of various types of terrain on image quality; difficulties in distance and slope estimation; effects of dazzling; and visual fatigue and superimposed symbology. These issues are described and analyzed in terms of their possible consequences on helicopter pilot performance. The additional influence of individual differences among pilots is emphasized. Thermal imaging systems (forward looking infrared (FLIR)) are described briefly and compared to light intensifier systems (NVGs). Many of the phenomena which are described are not readily understood. More research is required to better understand the human-factors problems created by the use of NVGs and other night-vision aids, to enhance system design, and to improve training methods and simulation techniques.

  9. Vision and Driving

    PubMed Central

    Owsley, Cynthia; McGwin, Gerald

    2010-01-01

    Driving is the primary means of personal travel in many countries and is relies heavily on vision for its successful execution. Research over the past few decades has addressed the role of vision in driver safety (motor vehicle collision involvement) and in driver performance (both on-road and using interactive simulators in the laboratory). Here we critically review what is currently known about the role of various aspects of visual function in driving. We also discuss translational research issues on vision screening for licensure and re-licensure and rehabilitation of visually impaired persons who want to drive. PMID:20580907

  10. Effect of absence of vision on posture.

    PubMed

    Alotaibi, Abdullah Z; Alghadir, Ahmad; Iqbal, Zaheen A; Anwer, Shahnawaz

    2016-04-01

    [Purpose] The visual system is one of the sensory systems that enables the body to assess and process information about the external environment. In the absence of vision, a blind person loses contact with the outside world and develops faulty motor patterns, which results in postural deficiencies. However, literature regarding the development of such deficiencies is limited. The aim of this study was to discuss the effect of absence of vision on posture, the possible biomechanics behind the resulting postural deficiencies, and strategies to correct and prevent them. [Subjects and Methods] Various electronic databases including PubMed, Medline, and Google scholar were examined using the words "body", "posture", "blind" and "absence of vision". References in the retrieved articles were also examined for cross-references. The search was limited to articles in the English language. [Results] A total of 74 papers were shortlisted for this review, most of which dated back to the 1950s and 60s. [Conclusion] Blind people exhibit consistent musculoskeletal deformities. Absence of vision leads to numerous abnormal sensory and motor interactions that often limit blind people in isolation. Rehabilitation of the blind is a multidisciplinary task. Specialists from different fields need to diagnose and treat the deficiencies of the blind together as a team. Before restoring the normal mechanics of posture and gait, the missing link with the external world should be reestablished. PMID:27190486

  11. Artificial Vision: Vision of a Newcomer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujikado, Takashi; Sawai, Hajime; Tano, Yasuo

    The Japanese Consortium for an Artificial Retina has developed a new stimulating method named Suprachoroidal-Transretinal Stimulation (STS). Using STS, electrically evoked potentials (EEPs) were effectively elicited in Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) rats and in rabbits and cats with normal vision, using relatively small stimulus currents, such that the spatial resolution appeared to be adequate for a visual prosthesis. The histological analysis showed no damage to the rabbit retina when electrical currents sufficient to elicit distinct EEPs were applied. It was also shown that transcorneal electrical stimulation (TES) to the retina prevented the death of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). STS, which is less invasive than other retinal prostheses, could be one choice to achieve artificial vision, and the optimal parameters of electrical stimulation may also be effective for the neuroprotection of residual RGCs.

  12. Home vision tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... testing. AMSLER GRID TEST This test helps detect macular degeneration . This is a disease that causes blurred vision, ... eye exam. People who are at risk of macular degeneration may be told by their ophthalmologist to perform ...

  13. Vision Impairment and Blindness

    MedlinePlus

    ... blindness in the United States are age-related eye diseases: macular degeneration, cataract and glaucoma. Other eye disorders, ... and braille books. The sooner vision loss or eye disease is found and treated, the greater your chances ...

  14. Blindness and vision loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... cause: With cataracts , vision may be cloudy or fuzzy, and bright light may cause glare With diabetes, ... used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed ...

  15. Living with vision loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... EH, Katz PR, Malone ML, eds. Practice of Geriatrics . 4th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2007:chap ... Shega JW. Vision loss. In: Wachtel TJ, ed. Geriatric Clinical Advisor: Instant diagnosis and treatment . Philadelphia, PA: ...

  16. Kids' Quest: Vision Impairment

    MedlinePlus

    ... important job. Â Return to Steps World-Wide Web Search Kids Health: What is Vision Impairment What ... for the Blind (AFB) created the Braille Bug web site to teach sighted children about braille, and ...

  17. Vision and Motion Pictures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grambo, Gregory

    1998-01-01

    Presents activities on persistence of vision that involve students in a hands-on approach to the study of early methods of creating motion pictures. Students construct flip books, a Zoetrope, and an early movie machine. (DDR)

  18. Synthetic Vision Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prinzel, L.J.; Kramer, L.J.

    2009-01-01

    A synthetic vision system is an aircraft cockpit display technology that presents the visual environment external to the aircraft using computer-generated imagery in a manner analogous to how it would appear to the pilot if forward visibility were not restricted. The purpose of this chapter is to review the state of synthetic vision systems, and discuss selected human factors issues that should be considered when designing such displays.

  19. Biofeedback for Better Vision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Biofeedtrac, Inc.'s Accommotrac Vision Trainer, invented by Dr. Joseph Trachtman, is based on vision research performed by Ames Research Center and a special optometer developed for the Ames program by Stanford Research Institute. In the United States, about 150 million people are myopes (nearsighted), who tend to overfocus when they look at distant objects causing blurry distant vision, or hyperopes (farsighted), whose vision blurs when they look at close objects because they tend to underfocus. The Accommotrac system is an optical/electronic system used by a doctor as an aid in teaching a patient how to contract and relax the ciliary body, the focusing muscle. The key is biofeedback, wherein the patient learns to control a bodily process or function he is not normally aware of. Trachtman claims a 90 percent success rate for correcting, improving or stopping focusing problems. The Vision Trainer has also proved effective in treating other eye problems such as eye oscillation, cross eyes, and lazy eye and in professional sports to improve athletes' peripheral vision and reaction time.

  20. Agile automated vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fandrich, Juergen; Schmitt, Lorenz A.

    1994-11-01

    The microelectronic industry is a protagonist in driving automated vision to new paradigms. Today semiconductor manufacturers use vision systems quite frequently in their fabs in the front-end process. In fact, the process depends on reliable image processing systems. In the back-end process, where ICs are assembled and packaged, today vision systems are only partly used. But in the next years automated vision will become compulsory for the back-end process as well. Vision will be fully integrated into every IC package production machine to increase yields and reduce costs. Modem high-speed material processing requires dedicated and efficient concepts in image processing. But the integration of various equipment in a production plant leads to unifying handling of data flow and interfaces. Only agile vision systems can act with these contradictions: fast, reliable, adaptable, scalable and comprehensive. A powerful hardware platform is a unneglectable requirement for the use of advanced and reliable, but unfortunately computing intensive image processing algorithms. The massively parallel SIMD hardware product LANTERN/VME supplies a powerful platform for existing and new functionality. LANTERN/VME is used with a new optical sensor for IC package lead inspection. This is done in 3D, including horizontal and coplanarity inspection. The appropriate software is designed for lead inspection, alignment and control tasks in IC package production and handling equipment, like Trim&Form, Tape&Reel and Pick&Place machines.

  1. Vision in two cyprinid fish: implications for collective behavior

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Bret A.; Tyrrell, Luke P.; Fernández-Juricic, Esteban

    2015-01-01

    Many species of fish rely on their visual systems to interact with conspecifics and these interactions can lead to collective behavior. Individual-based models have been used to predict collective interactions; however, these models generally make simplistic assumptions about the sensory systems that are applied without proper empirical testing to different species. This could limit our ability to predict (and test empirically) collective behavior in species with very different sensory requirements. In this study, we characterized components of the visual system in two species of cyprinid fish known to engage in visually dependent collective interactions (zebrafish Danio rerio and golden shiner Notemigonus crysoleucas) and derived quantitative predictions about the positioning of individuals within schools. We found that both species had relatively narrow binocular and blind fields and wide visual coverage. However, golden shiners had more visual coverage in the vertical plane (binocular field extending behind the head) and higher visual acuity than zebrafish. The centers of acute vision (areae) of both species projected in the fronto-dorsal region of the visual field, but those of the zebrafish projected more dorsally than those of the golden shiner. Based on this visual sensory information, we predicted that: (a) predator detection time could be increased by >1,000% in zebrafish and >100% in golden shiners with an increase in nearest neighbor distance, (b) zebrafish schools would have a higher roughness value (surface area/volume ratio) than those of golden shiners, (c) and that nearest neighbor distance would vary from 8 to 20 cm to visually resolve conspecific striping patterns in both species. Overall, considering between-species differences in the sensory system of species exhibiting collective behavior could change the predictions about the positioning of individuals in the group as well as the shape of the school, which can have implications for group

  2. Vision-based localization in urban environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McHenry, Michael; Cheng, Yang; Matthies, Larry

    2005-05-01

    As part of DARPA's MARS2020 program, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory has developed a vision-based system for localization in urban environments that requires neither GPS nor active sensors. System hardware consists of a pair of small FireWire cameras and a standard Pentium-based computer. The inputs to the software system consist of: 1) a crude grid-based map describing the positions of buildings, 2) an initial estimate of robot location and 3) the video streams produced by the stereo pair. At each step during the traverse the system: captures new image data, finds image features hypothesized to lie on the outside of a building, computes the range to those features, determines an estimate of the robot's motion since the previous step and combines that data with the map to update a probabilistic representation of the robot's location. This probabilistic representation allows the system to simultaneously represent multiple possible locations. For our testing, we have derived the a priori map manually using non-orthorectified overhead imagery, although this process could be automated. The software system consists of three primary components. The first is a stereo-based visual odometry system that calculates the 6-degree of freedom camera motion between sequential frames. The second component uses a set of heuristics to identify straight-line segments that are likely to be part of a building exterior. Ranging to these straight-line features is computed using binocular or wide-baseline stereo. The resulting features and the associated range measurements are fed to the third software component, a particle-filter based localization system. This system uses the map and the most recent results from the first two to update the estimate of the robot's location. This report summarizes the design of both the hardware and software and describes the results of applying the system to the global localization of a camera system over an approximately half-kilometer traverse across JPL

  3. Morphological abnormalities in elasmobranchs.

    PubMed

    Moore, A B M

    2015-08-01

    A total of 10 abnormal free-swimming (i.e., post-birth) elasmobranchs are reported from The (Persian-Arabian) Gulf, encompassing five species and including deformed heads, snouts, caudal fins and claspers. The complete absence of pelvic fins in a milk shark Rhizoprionodon acutus may be the first record in any elasmobranch. Possible causes, including the extreme environmental conditions and the high level of anthropogenic pollution particular to The Gulf, are briefly discussed. PMID:25903257

  4. Chromosome abnormalities in glioma

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y.S.; Ramsay, D.A.; Fan, Y.S.

    1994-09-01

    Cytogenetic studies were performed in 25 patients with gliomas. An interesting finding was a seemingly identical abnormality, an extra band on the tip of the short arm of chromosome 1, add(1)(p36), in two cases. The abnormality was present in all cells from a patient with a glioblastoma and in 27% of the tumor cells from a patient with a recurrent irradiated anaplastic astrocytoma; in the latter case, 7 unrelated abnormal clones were identified except 4 of those clones shared a common change, -Y. Three similar cases have been described previously. In a patient with pleomorphic astrocytoma, the band 1q42 in both homologues of chromosome 1 was involved in two different rearrangements. A review of the literature revealed that deletion of the long arm of chromosome 1 including 1q42 often occurs in glioma. This may indicate a possible tumor suppressor gene in this region. Cytogenetic follow-up studies were carried out in two patients and emergence of unrelated clones were noted in both. A total of 124 clonal breakpoints were identified in the 25 patients. The breakpoints which occurred three times or more were: 1p36, 1p22, 1q21, 1q25, 3q21, 7q32, 8q22, 9q22, 16q22, and 22q13.

  5. [Congenital foot abnormalities].

    PubMed

    Delpont, M; Lafosse, T; Bachy, M; Mary, P; Alves, A; Vialle, R

    2015-03-01

    The foot may be the site of birth defects. These abnormalities are sometimes suspected prenatally. Final diagnosis depends on clinical examination at birth. These deformations can be simple malpositions: metatarsus adductus, talipes calcaneovalgus and pes supinatus. The prognosis is excellent spontaneously or with a simple orthopedic treatment. Surgery remains outstanding. The use of a pediatric orthopedist will be considered if malposition does not relax after several weeks. Malformations (clubfoot, vertical talus and skew foot) require specialized care early. Clubfoot is characterized by an equine and varus hindfoot, an adducted and supine forefoot, not reducible. Vertical talus combines equine hindfoot and dorsiflexion of the forefoot, which is performed in the midfoot instead of the ankle. Skew foot is suspected when a metatarsus adductus is resistant to conservative treatment. Early treatment is primarily orthopedic at birth. Surgical treatment begins to be considered after walking age. Keep in mind that an abnormality of the foot may be associated with other conditions: malposition with congenital hip, malformations with syndromes, neurological and genetic abnormalities. PMID:25524290

  6. Very few exclusive percepts for contrast-modulated stimuli during binocular rivalry.

    PubMed

    Skerswetat, Jan; Formankiewicz, Monika A; Waugh, Sarah J

    2016-04-01

    Binocular rivalry properties for contrast-modulated (CM) gratings were examined to gain insight into their locus of processing. Two orthogonally orientated gratings were presented, one to each eye. Perceptual change rates, proportions of exclusivity and mixed percepts, and mean durations were calculated. Stimuli were noiseless luminance-defined (L), luminance-modulated noise (LM) and contrast-modulated noise (CM) gratings with sizes of 1, 2 and 4deg and spatial frequencies of 4, 2 and 1c/deg, respectively. For the LM and CM gratings, binary noise was fully correlated between eyes. Maximum producible modulations were used (1.0 for CM, 0.78 for LM and 0.98 for L stimuli). In a control experiment, contrasts of LM gratings were reduced until the multiples over detection threshold were similar to those of CM stimuli. Trial durations of 120s were analyzed. Exclusive visibility decreased with increasing stimulus size regardless of the stimulus type. Even with visibilities at similar multiples above detection threshold, significantly lower proportions of exclusive percepts and perceptual changes were found for CM, compared to LM gratings. The results obtained with dichoptically presented orthogonal CM gratings are significantly different from those obtained for orthogonal gratings presented to one eye. CM stimuli therefore do engage in binocular rivalry but with different characteristics to those found for LM stimuli. These results suggest that CM stimuli are processed by a mechanism that promotes binocular combination rather than rivalry, and therefore may involve cells in a higher visual area than those that initially process LM information. PMID:26827700

  7. A Neural Network Approach to fMRI Binocular Visual Rivalry Task Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bertolino, Nicola; Ferraro, Stefania; Nigri, Anna; Bruzzone, Maria Grazia; Ghielmetti, Francesco; Leonardi, Matilde; Agostino Parati, Eugenio; Grazia Bruzzone, Maria; Franceschetti, Silvana; Caldiroli, Dario; Sattin, Davide; Giovannetti, Ambra; Pagani, Marco; Covelli, Venusia; Ciaraffa, Francesca; Vela Gomez, Jesus; Reggiori, Barbara; Ferraro, Stefania; Nigri, Anna; D'Incerti, Ludovico; Minati, Ludovico; Andronache, Adrian; Rosazza, Cristina; Fazio, Patrik; Rossi, Davide; Varotto, Giulia; Panzica, Ferruccio; Benti, Riccardo; Marotta, Giorgio; Molteni, Franco

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether artificial neural networks (ANN) are able to decode participants’ conscious experience perception from brain activity alone, using complex and ecological stimuli. To reach the aim we conducted pattern recognition data analysis on fMRI data acquired during the execution of a binocular visual rivalry paradigm (BR). Twelve healthy participants were submitted to fMRI during the execution of a binocular non-rivalry (BNR) and a BR paradigm in which two classes of stimuli (faces and houses) were presented. During the binocular rivalry paradigm, behavioral responses related to the switching between consciously perceived stimuli were also collected. First, we used the BNR paradigm as a functional localizer to identify the brain areas involved the processing of the stimuli. Second, we trained the ANN on the BNR fMRI data restricted to these regions of interest. Third, we applied the trained ANN to the BR data as a ‘brain reading’ tool to discriminate the pattern of neural activity between the two stimuli. Fourth, we verified the consistency of the ANN outputs with the collected behavioral indicators of which stimulus was consciously perceived by the participants. Our main results showed that the trained ANN was able to generalize across the two different tasks (i.e. BNR and BR) and to identify with high accuracy the cognitive state of the participants (i.e. which stimulus was consciously perceived) during the BR condition. The behavioral response, employed as control parameter, was compared with the network output and a statistically significant percentage of correspondences (p-value <0.05) were obtained for all subjects. In conclusion the present study provides a method based on multivariate pattern analysis to investigate the neural basis of visual consciousness during the BR phenomenon when behavioral indicators lack or are inconsistent, like in disorders of consciousness or sedated patients. PMID:25121595

  8. Large Binocular Telescope view of the atmosphere of GJ1214b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nascimbeni, V.; Mallonn, M.; Scandariato, G.; Pagano, I.; Piotto, G.; Micela, G.; Messina, S.; Leto, G.; Strassmeier, K. G.; Bisogni, S.; Speziali, R.

    2015-07-01

    The atmospheric composition and vertical structure of the super-Earth GJ1214b has been a subject of debate since its discovery in 2009. Recent studies have indicated that high-altitude clouds might mask the lower layers. However, some data points that were gathered at different times and facilities do not fit this picture, probably because of a combination of stellar activity and systematic errors. We observed two transits of GJ1214b with the Large Binocular Camera, the dual-channel camera at the Large Binocular Telescope. For the first time, we simultaneously measured the relative planetary radius k = Rp/R⋆ at blue and red optical wavelengths (B + R), thus constraining the Rayleigh scattering on GJ1214b after correcting for stellar activity effects. To the same purpose, a long-term photometric follow-up of the host star was carried out with WiFSIP at STELLA, revealing a rotational period that is significantly longer than previously reported. Our new unbiased estimates of k yield a flat transmission spectrum extending to shorter wavelengths, thus confirming the cloudy atmosphere scenario for GJ1214b. Based on data acquired using the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT). The LBT is an international collaboration among institutions in the United States, Italy, and Germany. LBT Corporation partners are the University of Arizona on behalf of the Arizona university system; Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica, Italy; LBT Beteiligungsgesellschaft, Germany, representing the Max-Planck Society, the Astrophysical Institute Potsdam, and Heidelberg University; the Ohio State University; and the Research Corporation, on behalf of the University of Notre Dame, University of Minnesota and University of Virginia. Partly based on STELLA WiFSIP data (Strassmeier et al. 2004).The data of the light curves are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/579/A113

  9. Abnormal pressures as hydrodynamic phenomena

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neuzil, C.E.

    1995-01-01

    So-called abnormal pressures, subsurface fluid pressures significantly higher or lower than hydrostatic, have excited speculation about their origin since subsurface exploration first encountered them. Two distinct conceptual models for abnormal pressures have gained currency among earth scientists. The static model sees abnormal pressures generally as relict features preserved by a virtual absence of fluid flow over geologic time. The hydrodynamic model instead envisions abnormal pressures as phenomena in which flow usually plays an important role. This paper develops the theoretical framework for abnormal pressures as hydrodynamic phenomena, shows that it explains the manifold occurrences of abnormal pressures, and examines the implications of this approach. -from Author

  10. Feeling Abnormal: Simulation of Deviancy in Abnormal and Exceptionality Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernald, Charles D.

    1980-01-01

    Describes activity in which student in abnormal psychology and psychology of exceptional children classes personally experience being judged abnormal. The experience allows the students to remember relevant research, become sensitized to the feelings of individuals classified as deviant, and use caution in classifying individuals as abnormal.…

  11. Insect vision as model for machine vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osorio, D.; Sobey, Peter J.

    1992-11-01

    The neural architecture, neurophysiology and behavioral abilities of insect vision are described, and compared with that of mammals. Insects have a hardwired neural architecture of highly differentiated neurons, quite different from the cerebral cortex, yet their behavioral abilities are in important respects similar to those of mammals. These observations challenge the view that the key to the power of biological neural computation is distributed processing by a plastic, highly interconnected, network of individually undifferentiated and unreliable neurons that has been a dominant picture of biological computation since Pitts and McCulloch's seminal work in the 1940's.

  12. [Quality system Vision 2000].

    PubMed

    Pasini, Evasio; Pitocchi, Oreste; de Luca, Italo; Ferrari, Roberto

    2002-12-01

    A recent document of the Italian Ministry of Health points out that all structures which provide services to the National Health System should implement a Quality System according to the ISO 9000 standards. Vision 2000 is the new version of the ISO standard. Vision 2000 is less bureaucratic than the old version. The specific requests of the Vision 2000 are: a) to identify, to monitor and to analyze the processes of the structure, b) to measure the results of the processes so as to ensure that they are effective, d) to implement actions necessary to achieve the planned results and the continual improvement of these processes, e) to identify customer requests and to measure customer satisfaction. Specific attention should be also dedicated to the competence and training of the personnel involved in the processes. The principles of the Vision 2000 agree with the principles of total quality management. The present article illustrates the Vision 2000 standard and provides practical examples of the implementation of this standard in cardiological departments. PMID:12611210

  13. Monocular and binocular steady-state flicker VEPs: frequency-response functions to sinusoidal and square-wave luminance modulation.

    PubMed

    Nicol, David S; Hamilton, Ruth; Shahani, Uma; McCulloch, Daphne L

    2011-02-01

    Steady-state VEPs to full-field flicker (FFF) using sinusoidally modulated light were compared with those elicited by square-wave modulated light across a wide range of stimulus frequencies with monocular and binocular FFF stimulation. Binocular and monocular VEPs were elicited in 12 adult volunteers to FFF with two modes of temporal modulation: sinusoidal or square-wave (abrupt onset and offset, 50% duty cycle) at ten temporal frequencies ranging from 2.83 to 58.8 Hz. All stimuli had a mean luminance of 100 cd/m(2) with an 80% modulation depth (20-180 cd/m(2)). Response magnitudes at the stimulus frequency (F1) and at the double and triple harmonics (F2 and F3) were compared. For both sinusoidal and square-wave flicker, the FFF-VEP magnitudes at F1 were maximal for 7.52 Hz flicker. F2 was maximal for 5.29 Hz flicker, and F3 magnitudes are largest for flicker stimulation from 3.75 to 7.52 Hz. Square-wave flicker produced significantly larger F1 and F2 magnitudes for slow flicker rates (up to 5.29 Hz for F1; at 2.83 and 3.75 Hz for F2). The F3 magnitudes were larger overall for square-wave flicker. Binocular FFF-VEP magnitudes are larger than those of monocular FFF-VEPs, and the amount of this binocular enhancement is not dependant on the mode of flicker stimulation (mean binocular: monocular ratio 1.41, 95% CI: 1.2-1.6). Binocular enhancement of F1 for 21.3 Hz flicker was increased to a factor of 2.5 (95% CI: 1.8-3.5). In the healthy adult visual system, FFF-VEP magnitudes can be characterized by the frequency-response functions of F1, F2 and F3. Low-frequency roll-off in the FFF-VEP magnitudes is greater for sinusoidal flicker than for square-wave flicker for rates ≤ 5.29 Hz; magnitudes for higher-frequency flicker are similar for the two types of flicker. Binocular FFF-VEPs are larger overall than those recorded monocularly, and this binocular summation is enhanced at 21.3 Hz in the mid-frequency range. PMID:21279419

  14. Color vision and neuroretinal function in diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Bearse, M. A.; Schneck, M. E.; Dhamdhere, K.; Harrison, W. W.; Barez, S.; Adams, A. J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We investigate how type 2 diabetes (T2DM) and diabetic retinopathy (DR) affect color vision (CV) and mfERG implicit time (IT), whether CV and IT are correlated, and whether CV and IT abnormality classifications agree. Methods Adams desaturated D-15 color test, mfERG, and fundus photographs were examined in 37 controls, 22 T2DM patients without DR (NoRet group), and 25 T2DM patients with DR (Ret group). Color confusion score (CCS) was calculated. ITs were averaged within the central 7 hexagons (central IT; ≥4.5°) and outside this area (peripheral IT; ≤4.5°). DR was within (DRIN) or outside (DROUT) of the central 7 hexagons. Group differences, percentages of abnormalities, correlations, and agreement were determined. Results CCS was greater in the NoRet (P = 0.002) and Ret (P < 0.0001) groups than in control group. CCS was abnormal in 3, 41, and 48 % of eyes in the control, NoRet, and Ret groups, respectively. Ret group CV abnormalities were more frequent in DRIN than in DROUT subgroups (71 vs. 18 %, respectively; P < 0.0001). CCS and IT were correlated only in the Ret group, in both retinal zones (P ≥ 0.028). Only in the Ret group did CCS and peripheral IT abnormality classifications agree (72 %; P < 0.05). Conclusion CV is affected in patients with T2DM, even without DR. Central DR increases the likelihood of a CV deficit compared with non-central DR. mfERG IT averaged across central or peripheral retinal locations is less frequently abnormal than CV in the absence of DR, and these two measures are correlated only when DR is present. PMID:25516428

  15. Abnormal human sex chromosome constitutions

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 22, discusses abnormal human sex chromosome constitution. Aneuploidy of X chromosomes with a female phenotype, sex chromosome aneuploidy with a male phenotype, and various abnormalities in X chromosome behavior are described. 31 refs., 2 figs.

  16. Exercises to Improve Gait Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home About iChip Articles Directories Videos Resources Contact Exercises to Improve Gait Abnormalities Home » Article Categories » Exercise and Fitness Font Size: A A A A Exercises to Improve Gait Abnormalities Next Page The manner ...

  17. Single units and conscious vision.

    PubMed Central

    Logothetis, N K

    1998-01-01

    Figures that can be seen in more than one way are invaluable tools for the study of the neural basis of visual awareness, because such stimuli permit the dissociation of the neural responses that underlie what we perceive at any given time from those forming the sensory representation of a visual pattern. To study the former type of responses, monkeys were subjected to binocular rivalry, and the response of neurons in a number of different visual areas was studied while the animals reported their alternating percepts by pulling levers. Perception-related modulations of neural activity were found to occur to different extents in different cortical visual areas. The cells that were affected by suppression were almost exclusively binocular, and their proportion was found to increase in the higher processing stages of the visual system. The strongest correlations between neural activity and perception were observed in the visual areas of the temporal lobe. A strikingly large number of neurons in the early visual areas remained active during the perceptual suppression of the stimulus, a finding suggesting that conscious visual perception might be mediated by only a subset of the cells exhibiting stimulus selective responses. These physiological findings, together with a number of recent psychophysical studies, offer a new explanation of the phenomenon of binocular rivalry. Indeed, rivalry has long been considered to be closely linked with binocular fusion and stereopsis, and the sequences of dominance and suppression have been viewed as the result of competition between the two monocular channels. The physiological data presented here are incompatible with this interpretation. Rather than reflecting interocular competition, the rivalry is most probably between the two different central neural representations generated by the dichoptically presented stimuli. The mechanisms of rivalry are probably the same as, or very similar to, those underlying multistable perception in

  18. Visual system plasticity in mammals: the story of monocular enucleation-induced vision loss

    PubMed Central

    Nys, Julie; Scheyltjens, Isabelle; Arckens, Lutgarde

    2015-01-01

    The groundbreaking work of Hubel and Wiesel in the 1960’s on ocular dominance plasticity instigated many studies of the visual system of mammals, enriching our understanding of how the development of its structure and function depends on high quality visual input through both eyes. These studies have mainly employed lid suturing, dark rearing and eye patching applied to different species to reduce or impair visual input, and have created extensive knowledge on binocular vision. However, not all aspects and types of plasticity in the visual cortex have been covered in full detail. In that regard, a more drastic deprivation method like enucleation, leading to complete vision loss appears useful as it has more widespread effects on the afferent visual pathway and even on non-visual brain regions. One-eyed vision due to monocular enucleation (ME) profoundly affects the contralateral retinorecipient subcortical and cortical structures thereby creating a powerful means to investigate cortical plasticity phenomena in which binocular competition has no vote.In this review, we will present current knowledge about the specific application of ME as an experimental tool to study visual and cross-modal brain plasticity and compare early postnatal stages up into adulthood. The structural and physiological consequences of this type of extensive sensory loss as documented and studied in several animal species and human patients will be discussed. We will summarize how ME studies have been instrumental to our current understanding of the differentiation of sensory systems and how the structure and function of cortical circuits in mammals are shaped in response to such an extensive alteration in experience. In conclusion, we will highlight future perspectives and the clinical relevance of adding ME to the list of more longstanding deprivation models in visual system research. PMID:25972788

  19. Periodontium bestows vision!!

    PubMed Central

    Gulati, Minkle; Salaria, Sanjeev Kumar; Anand, Vishal; Jain, Nikil; Pandey, Suraj

    2016-01-01

    The role of periodontium in supporting the tooth structures is well-known. However, less is known about its contribution to the field of ophthalmology. Corneal diseases are among major causes of blindness affecting millions of people worldwide, for which synthetic keratoprosthesis was considered the last resort to restore vision. Yet, these synthetic keratoprosthesis suffered from serious limitations, especially the foreign body reactions invoked by them resulting in extrusion of the whole prosthesis from the eye. To overcome these shortcomings, an autologous osteo-odonto keratoprosthesis utilizing intraoral entities was introduced that could positively restore vision even in cases of severely damaged eyes. The successful functioning of this prosthesis, however, predominantly depended on the presence of a healthy periodontium for grafting. Therefore, the following short communication aims to acknowledge this lesser-known role of the periodontium and other oral structures in bestowing vision to the blind patients.

  20. Overview of sports vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Linda A.; Ferreira, Jannie T.

    2003-03-01

    Sports vision encompasses the visual assessment and provision of sports-specific visual performance enhancement and ocular protection for athletes of all ages, genders and levels of participation. In recent years, sports vision has been identified as one of the key performance indicators in sport. It is built on four main cornerstones: corrective eyewear, protective eyewear, visual skills enhancement and performance enhancement. Although clinically well established in the US, it is still a relatively new area of optometric specialisation elsewhere in the world and is gaining increasing popularity with eyecare practitioners and researchers. This research is often multi-disciplinary and involves input from a variety of subject disciplines, mainly those of optometry, medicine, physiology, psychology, physics, chemistry, computer science and engineering. Collaborative research projects are currently underway between staff of the Schools of Physics and Computing (DIT) and the Academy of Sports Vision (RAU).

  1. Periodontium bestows vision!!

    PubMed

    Gulati, Minkle; Salaria, Sanjeev Kumar; Anand, Vishal; Jain, Nikil; Pandey, Suraj

    2016-01-01

    The role of periodontium in supporting the tooth structures is well-known. However, less is known about its contribution to the field of ophthalmology. Corneal diseases are among major causes of blindness affecting millions of people worldwide, for which synthetic keratoprosthesis was considered the last resort to restore vision. Yet, these synthetic keratoprosthesis suffered from serious limitations, especially the foreign body reactions invoked by them resulting in extrusion of the whole prosthesis from the eye. To overcome these shortcomings, an autologous osteo-odonto keratoprosthesis utilizing intraoral entities was introduced that could positively restore vision even in cases of severely damaged eyes. The successful functioning of this prosthesis, however, predominantly depended on the presence of a healthy periodontium for grafting. Therefore, the following short communication aims to acknowledge this lesser-known role of the periodontium and other oral structures in bestowing vision to the blind patients. PMID:27563213

  2. Integrating National Space Visions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherwood, Brent

    2006-01-01

    This paper examines value proposition assumptions for various models nations may use to justify, shape, and guide their space programs. Nations organize major societal investments like space programs to actualize national visions represented by leaders as investments in the public good. The paper defines nine 'vision drivers' that circumscribe the motivations evidently underpinning national space programs. It then describes 19 fundamental space activity objectives (eight extant and eleven prospective) that nations already do or could in the future use to actualize the visions they select. Finally the paper presents four contrasting models of engagement among nations, and compares these models to assess realistic pounds on the pace of human progress in space over the coming decades. The conclusion is that orthogonal engagement, albeit unlikely because it is unprecedented, would yield the most robust and rapid global progress.

  3. Perceptual adaptation in the use of night vision goggles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durgin, Frank H.; Proffitt, Dennis R.

    1992-01-01

    The image intensification (I sup 2) systems studied for this report were the biocular AN/PVS-7(NVG) and the binocular AN/AVS-6(ANVIS). Both are quite impressive for purposes of revealing the structure of the environment in a fairly straightforward way in extremely low-light conditions. But these systems represent an unusual viewing medium. The perceptual information available through I sup 2 systems is different in a variety of ways from the typical input of everyday vision, and extensive training and practice is required for optimal use. Using this sort of system involves a kind of perceptual skill learning, but is may also involve visual adaptations that are not simply an extension of normal vision. For example, the visual noise evident in the goggles in very low-light conditions results in unusual statistical properties in visual input. Because we had recently discovered a strong and enduring aftereffect of perceived texture density which seemed to be sensitive to precisely the sorts of statistical distortions introduced by I sup 2 systems, it occurred to use that visual noise of this sort might be a very adapting stimulus for texture density and produce an aftereffect that extended into normal vision once the goggles were removed. We have not found any experimental evidence that I sup 2 systems produce texture density aftereffects. The nature of the texture density aftereffect is briefly explained, followed by an accounting of our studies of I sup 2 systems and our most recent work on the texture density aftereffect. A test for spatial frequency adaptation after exposure to NVG's is also reported, as is a study of perceived depth from motion (motion parallax) while wearing the biocular goggles. We conclude with a summary of our findings.

  4. Bio-inspired vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posch, C.

    2012-01-01

    Nature still outperforms the most powerful computers in routine functions involving perception, sensing and actuation like vision, audition, and motion control, and is, most strikingly, orders of magnitude more energy-efficient than its artificial competitors. The reasons for the superior performance of biological systems are subject to diverse investigations, but it is clear that the form of hardware and the style of computation in nervous systems are fundamentally different from what is used in artificial synchronous information processing systems. Very generally speaking, biological neural systems rely on a large number of relatively simple, slow and unreliable processing elements and obtain performance and robustness from a massively parallel principle of operation and a high level of redundancy where the failure of single elements usually does not induce any observable system performance degradation. In the late 1980`s, Carver Mead demonstrated that silicon VLSI technology can be employed in implementing ``neuromorphic'' circuits that mimic neural functions and fabricating building blocks that work like their biological role models. Neuromorphic systems, as the biological systems they model, are adaptive, fault-tolerant and scalable, and process information using energy-efficient, asynchronous, event-driven methods. In this paper, some basics of neuromorphic electronic engineering and its impact on recent developments in optical sensing and artificial vision are presented. It is demonstrated that bio-inspired vision systems have the potential to outperform conventional, frame-based vision acquisition and processing systems in many application fields and to establish new benchmarks in terms of redundancy suppression/data compression, dynamic range, temporal resolution and power efficiency to realize advanced functionality like 3D vision, object tracking, motor control, visual feedback loops, etc. in real-time. It is argued that future artificial vision systems

  5. Synchronizing retinal activity in both eyes disrupts binocular map development in the optic tectum.

    PubMed

    Brickley, S G; Dawes, E A; Keating, M J; Grant, S

    1998-02-15

    Spatiotemporal correlations in the pattern of spontaneous and evoked retinal ganglion cell (RGC) activity are believed to influence the topographic organization of connections throughout the developing visual system. We have tested this hypothesis by examining the effects of interfering with these potential activity cues during development on the functional organization of binocular maps in the Xenopus frog optic tectum. Paired recordings combined with cross-correlation analyses demonstrated that exposing normal frogs to a continuous 1 Hz of stroboscopic illumination synchronized the firing of all three classes of RGC projecting to the tectum and induced similar patterns of temporally correlated activity across both lobes of the nucleus. Embryonic and eye-rotated larval animals were reared until early adulthood under equivalent stroboscopic conditions. The maps formed by each RGC class in the contralateral tectum showed normal topography and stratification after strobe rearing, but with consistently enlarged multiunit receptive fields. Maps of the ipsilateral eye, formed by crossed isthmotectal axons, showed significant disorder and misalignment with direct visual input from the retina, and in the eye-rotated animals complete compensatory reorientation of these maps usually induced by this procedure failed to occur. These findings suggest that refinement of retinal arbors in the tectum and the ability of crossed isthmotectal arbors to establish binocular convergence with these retinal afferents are disrupted when they all fire together. Our data thus provide direct experimental evidence that spatiotemporal activity patterns within and between the two eyes regulate the precision of their developing connections. PMID:9454857

  6. Lustrous material appearances: Internal and external constraints on triggering conditions for binocular lustre

    PubMed Central

    Mausfeld, Rainer; Wendt, Gunnar; Golz, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    Lustrous surface appearances can be elicited by simple image configurations with no texture or specular highlights, as most prominently illustrated by Helmholtz' demonstration of stereoscopic lustre. Three types of explanatory framework have been proposed for stereoscopic lustre, which attribute the phenomenon to a binocular luminance conflict, an internalised physical regularity (Helmholtz), or to a disentangling of “essential” and “accidental” attributes in surface representations (Hering). In order to investigate these frameworks, we used haploscopically fused half-images of centre-surround configurations in which the luminances of the test patch were dynamically modulated. Experiment 1 shows that stereoscopic lustre is not specifically tied to situations of a luminance conflict between the eyes. Experiment 2 identifies a novel aspect in the binocular temporal dynamics that provides a physical basis for lustrous appearances, namely the occurrence of a temporal luminance counter-modulation between the eyes. This feature sheds some light on the internal principles underlying a disentangling of “accidental” and “essential” surface attributes. Experiment 3 reveals an asymmetry between a light and a dark reference level for the counter-modulations. This finding again suggests an interpretation in terms of an internalised physical regularity with respect to the dynamics of perceiving illuminated surfaces. PMID:25165513

  7. Surface area of early visual cortex predicts individual speed of traveling waves during binocular rivalry.

    PubMed

    Genç, Erhan; Bergmann, Johanna; Singer, Wolf; Kohler, Axel

    2015-06-01

    Binocular rivalry ensues when different images are presented to the 2 eyes with conscious perception alternating between the possible interpretations. For large rivalry displays, perceptual transitions are initiated at one location and spread to other parts of the visual field, a phenomenon termed "traveling wave." Previous studies investigated the underlying neural mechanisms of the traveling wave and surmised that primary visual cortex might play an important role. We used magnetic resonance imaging and behavioral measures in humans to explore how interindividual differences in observers' subjective experience of the wave are related to anatomical characteristics of cortical regions. We measured wave speed in participants and confirmed the long-term stability of the individual values. Retinotopic mapping was employed to delineate borders of visual areas V1-V3 in order to determine surface area and cortical thickness in those regions. Only the surface areas of V1 and V2, but not V3 showed a correlation with wave speed. For individuals with larger V1/V2 area, the traveling wave needed longer to spread across the same distance in visual space. Our results highlight the role of early visual areas in mediating binocular rivalry and suggest possible mechanisms for the correlation between surface area and the traveling waves. PMID:24334918

  8. Ocular dominance plasticity disrupts binocular inhibition-excitation matching in visual cortex

    PubMed Central

    Saiepour, M. Hadi; Rajendran, Rajeev; Omrani, Azar; Ma, Wen-pei; Tao, Huizhong W.; Heimel, J. Alexander; Levelt, Christiaan N.

    2015-01-01

    Background To ensure that neuronal networks function in a stable fashion, neurons receive balanced inhibitory and excitatory inputs. In various brain regions this balance has been found to change temporarily during plasticity. Whether changes in inhibition have an instructive or permissive role in plasticity remains unclear. Several studies have addressed this question using ocular dominance plasticity in the visual cortex as a model, but so far it remains controversial whether changes in inhibition drive this form of plasticity by directly affecting eye-specific responses or through increasing the plasticity potential of excitatory connections. Results We tested how three major classes of interneurons affect eye-specific responses in normally reared or monocularly deprived mice by optogenetically suppressing their activity. We find that in contrast to somatostatin or vasoactive intestinal polypeptide expressing interneurons, parvalbumin (PV)-expressing interneurons strongly inhibit visual responses. In individual neurons of normal mice, inhibition and excitation driven by either eye are balanced and suppressing PV interneurons does not alter ocular preference. Monocular deprivation disrupts the binocular balance of inhibition and excitation in individual neurons, causing suppression of PV interneurons to change their ocular preference. Importantly however, these changes do not consistently favor responses to one of the eyes at the population level. Conclusion Monocular deprivation disrupts the binocular balance of inhibition and excitation of individual cells. This disbalance does not affect the overall expression of ocular dominance. Our data therefore support a permissive rather than an instructive role of inhibition in ocular dominance plasticity. PMID:25754642

  9. Design of HD binocular stereo display system based on ARM11

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuo, Bin; Shi, Junsheng; Tai, Yonghang; Yun, Lijun

    2014-10-01

    Based on the characteristics of a 0.5'' micro AM-OLED and the binocular parallax principle of human being, a HD stereo display system was designed using hardware platform of ARM11 and embedded Linux as the operating system. System used S3C6410 as the MCU. Side-by-Side or Top-and-Bottom 3D video source, which inputted from the HDMI or SD card, was converted to the Frame Timing Mode and Field Timing Mode video format, which processed through the video coding algorithm. At the same time, the outputting 3D synchronous signal controlled the left and right AM-OLED to receive corresponding parallactic images. HD stereo video sources achieved an improvement effect on the dual AM-OLED after the optical system amplified, which presented an image distance equivalent to the human eyes 2.5 meters, the diagonal dimension of 46 feet natural lifelike scene in front of the user. Combined synchronous signal with Frame Timing Mode and Field Timing Mode, the HD binocular stereo system displayed a preferable result for the customs.

  10. A new computerized diagnostic algorithm for quantitative evaluation of binocular misalignment in patients with strabismus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nam, Kyoung Won; Kim, In Young; Kang, Ho Chul; Yang, Hee Kyung; Yoon, Chang Ki; Hwang, Jeong Min; Kim, Young Jae; Kim, Tae Yun; Kim, Kwang Gi

    2012-10-01

    Accurate measurement of binocular misalignment between both eyes is important for proper preoperative management, surgical planning, and postoperative evaluation of patients with strabismus. In this study, we proposed a new computerized diagnostic algorithm that can calculate the angle of binocular eye misalignment photographically by using a dedicated three-dimensional eye model mimicking the structure of the natural human eye. To evaluate the performance of the proposed algorithm, eight healthy volunteers and eight individuals with strabismus were recruited in this study, the horizontal deviation angle, vertical deviation angle, and angle of eye misalignment were calculated and the angular differences between the healthy and the strabismus groups were evaluated using the nonparametric Mann-Whitney test and the Pearson correlation test. The experimental results demonstrated a statistically significant difference between the healthy and strabismus groups (p = 0.015 < 0.05), but no statistically significant difference between the proposed method and the Krimsky test (p = 0.912 > 0.05). The measurements of the two methods were highly correlated (r = 0.969, p < 0.05). From the experimental results, we believe that the proposed diagnostic method has the potential to be a diagnostic tool that measures the physical disorder of the human eye to diagnose non-invasively the severity of strabismus.

  11. Binocular Convergence and Errors in Judged Distance While Using Head-mounted See-through Displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, Stephen R.; Bucher, Urs J.; Menges, Brian M.; Null, Cynthia H. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Previous observations have shown that optical superposition of a physical backdrops at the judged depth of a stereoscopic virtual image moves the judged depth closer to the observer. This effect was more pronounced for slowly moving physical backdrops and was not enhanced when the virtual image was rendered as a flat shaded solid object rather than a open wire-frame. Since this change in rendering making the virtual image more completely occlude the backdrop did not effect its judged depth and since the motion of the backdrop which would have attracted visual attention and binocular convergence did Increase its perceptual displacement, it was concluded that the change In Judged depth was not due to the perceived occlusion. Rather it was concluded to be due to an increase in binocular convergence. An experimental test of this hypothesis using a unobtrusive nonius technique to detect absolute and relative convergence has confirmed the presence of convergence correlated with the magnitude of the change in judged position of this virtual Image. The practical implications of this cause are demonstrated by a second study using monocular, biocular and stereoscopic viewing conditions and the consequences for the design of head-mounted see-through displays for near work are discussed.

  12. Binocular disparity magnitude affects perceived depth magnitude despite inversion of depth order.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Harold; Hill, Harold; Palmisano, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    The hollow-face illusion involves a misperception of depth order: our perception follows our top-down knowledge that faces are convex, even though bottom-up depth information reflects the actual concave surface structure. While pictorial cues can be ambiguous, stereopsis should unambiguously indicate the actual depth order. We used computer-generated stereo images to investigate how, if at all, the sign and magnitude of binocular disparities affect the perceived depth of the illusory convex face. In experiment 1 participants adjusted the disparity of a convex comparison face until it matched a reference face. The reference face was either convex or hollow and had binocular disparities consistent with an average face or had disparities exaggerated, consistent with a face stretched in depth. We observed that apparent depth increased with disparity magnitude, even when the hollow faces were seen as convex (ie when perceived depth order was inconsistent with disparity sign). As expected, concave faces appeared flatter than convex faces, suggesting that disparity sign also affects perceived depth. In experiment 2, participants were presented with pairs of real and illusory convex faces. In each case, their task was to judge which of the two stimuli appeared to have the greater depth. Hollow faces with exaggerated disparities were again perceived as deeper. PMID:22132512

  13. Aging and the perception of slant from optical texture, motion parallax, and binocular disparity.

    PubMed

    Norman, J Farley; Crabtree, Charles E; Bartholomew, Ashley N; Ferrell, Elizabeth L

    2009-01-01

    The ability of younger and older observers to perceive surface slant was investigated in four experiments. The surfaces possessed slants of 20 degrees, 35 degrees, 50 degrees, and 65 degrees, relative to the frontoparallel plane. The observers judged the slants using either a palm board (Experiments 1, 3, and 4) or magnitude estimation (Experiment 2). In Experiments 1-3, physically slanted surfaces were used (the surfaces possessed marble, granite, pebble, and circle textures), whereas computer-generated 3-D surfaces (defined by motion parallax and binocular disparity) were utilized in Experiment 4. The results showed that the younger and older observers' performance was essentially identical with regard to accuracy. The younger and older age groups, however, differed in terms of precision in Experiments 1 and 2: The judgments of the older observers were more variable across repeated trials. When taken as a whole, the results demonstrate that older observers (at least through the age of 83 years) can effectively extract information about slant in depth from optical patterns containing texture, motion parallax, or binocular disparity. PMID:19304602

  14. SSVEP Signatures of Binocular Rivalry During Simultaneous EEG and fMRI

    PubMed Central

    Jamison, Keith W.; Roy, Abhrajeet V.; He, Sheng; Engel, Stephen A.; He, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Background Binocular rivalry is a perceptual phenomenon that arises when two incompatible images are presented separately, one to each eye, and the observer experiences involuntary perceptual alternations between the two images. If the two images are flickering at two distinct frequencies, electroencephalography (EEG) can be used to track the frequency-tagged steady-state visually evoked potential (SSVEP) driven by each image as they compete for awareness, providing an objective measure of the subjective perceptual state. This spontaneous alternation in perceptual dominance is believed to be driven by neural processes across widespread regions in the brain, but the real-time mechanisms of these processes remain unclear. New Method The goal of this study was to determine the feasibility of investigating binocular rivalry using a simultaneous EEG-fMRI approach in order to leverage the high temporal resolution of EEG with the high spatial resolution of fMRI. Results We have developed novel techniques for artifact removal and signal optimization for the rivalry-related SSVEP data collected simultaneously during fMRI. Comparison with Existing Methods Our methods address several significant technical challenges of recording SSVEP data in the noisy fMRI environment, and enabled us to successfully reconstruct SSVEP signatures of rivalry in a group of healthy human subjects. Conclusion Further development and application of these techniques will enable more comprehensive integration of EEG and fMRI data collected simultaneously and could have significant implications for EEG-fMRI studies of brain activity in general. PMID:25644435

  15. Toward a Blind Deep Quality Evaluator for Stereoscopic Images Based on Monocular and Binocular Interactions.

    PubMed

    Shao, Feng; Tian, Weijun; Lin, Weisi; Jiang, Gangyi; Dai, Qionghai

    2016-05-01

    During recent years, blind image quality assessment (BIQA) has been intensively studied with different machine learning tools. Existing BIQA metrics, however, do not design for stereoscopic images. We believe this problem can be resolved by separating 3D images and capturing the essential attributes of images via deep neural network. In this paper, we propose a blind deep quality evaluator (DQE) for stereoscopic images (denoted by 3D-DQE) based on monocular and binocular interactions. The key technical steps in the proposed 3D-DQE are to train two separate 2D deep neural networks (2D-DNNs) from 2D monocular images and cyclopean images to model the process of monocular and binocular quality predictions, and combine the measured 2D monocular and cyclopean quality scores using different weighting schemes. Experimental results on four public 3D image quality assessment databases demonstrate that in comparison with the existing methods, the devised algorithm achieves high consistent alignment with subjective assessment. PMID:26960225

  16. Full-reference quality assessment of stereoscopic images by learning binocular receptive field properties.

    PubMed

    Shao, Feng; Li, Kemeng; Lin, Weisi; Jiang, Gangyi; Yu, Mei; Dai, Qionghai

    2015-10-01

    Quality assessment of 3D images encounters more challenges than its 2D counterparts. Directly applying 2D image quality metrics is not the solution. In this paper, we propose a new full-reference quality assessment for stereoscopic images by learning binocular receptive field properties to be more in line with human visual perception. To be more specific, in the training phase, we learn a multiscale dictionary from the training database, so that the latent structure of images can be represented as a set of basis vectors. In the quality estimation phase, we compute sparse feature similarity index based on the estimated sparse coefficient vectors by considering their phase difference and amplitude difference, and compute global luminance similarity index by considering luminance changes. The final quality score is obtained by incorporating binocular combination based on sparse energy and sparse complexity. Experimental results on five public 3D image quality assessment databases demonstrate that in comparison with the most related existing methods, the devised algorithm achieves high consistency with subjective assessment. PMID:26011880

  17. Transient Loss of Vision after Coronary Angiogram - A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Pasha, K; Sengupta, P; Alauddin, S; Sheikh, A K; Hossain, M Z; Sumon, S M

    2015-07-01

    A 50-year old, diabetic, hypertensive patient with post-CABG status developed complete loss of vision about one hour after coronary angiogram (CAG). Thorough ophthalmological and neurological examination as well as magnetic resonance imaging of brain especially of the occipital region revealed no abnormality. The patient had complete recovery of vision about 48 hours later. We could not document any specific cause or mechanism for the visual loss, although the selective vulnerability of occipital lobes to contrast agent toxicity (Cortical blindness) was the most likely underlying mechanism. PMID:26329965

  18. Night Vision Camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    PixelVision, Inc. developed the Night Video NV652 Back-illuminated CCD Camera, based on the expertise of a former Jet Propulsion Laboratory employee and a former employee of Scientific Imaging Technologies, Inc. The camera operates without an image intensifier, using back-illuminated and thinned CCD technology to achieve extremely low light level imaging performance. The advantages of PixelVision's system over conventional cameras include greater resolution and better target identification under low light conditions, lower cost and a longer lifetime. It is used commercially for research and aviation.

  19. Telescopic vision contact lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremblay, Eric J.; Beer, R. Dirk; Arianpour, Ashkan; Ford, Joseph E.

    2011-03-01

    We present the concept, optical design, and first proof of principle experimental results for a telescopic contact lens intended to become a visual aid for age-related macular degeneration (AMD), providing magnification to the user without surgery or external head-mounted optics. Our contact lens optical system can provide a combination of telescopic and non-magnified vision through two independent optical paths through the contact lens. The magnified optical path incorporates a telescopic arrangement of positive and negative annular concentric reflectors to achieve 2.8x - 3x magnification on the eye, while light passing through a central clear aperture provides unmagnified vision.

  20. Low Vision Enhancement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    NASA's Technology Transfer Office at Stennis Space Center worked with the Johns Hopkins Wilmer Eye Institute in Baltimore, Md., to incorporate NASA software originally developed by NASA to process satellite images into the Low Vision Enhancement System (LVES). The LVES, referred to as 'ELVIS' by its users, is a portable image processing system that could make it possible to improve a person's vision by enhancing and altering images to compensate for impaired eyesight. The system consists of two orientation cameras, a zoom camera, and a video projection system. The headset and hand-held control weigh about two pounds each. Pictured is Jacob Webb, the first Mississippian to use the LVES.

  1. Spirometric abnormalities among welders

    SciTech Connect

    Rastogi, S.K.; Gupta, B.N.; Husain, T.; Mathur, N.; Srivastava, S. )

    1991-10-01

    A group of manual welders age group 13-60 years having a mean exposure period of 12.4 {plus minus} 1.12 years were subjected to spirometry to evaluate the prevalence of spirometric abnormalities. The welders showed a significantly higher prevalence of respiratory impairment than that observed among the unexposed controls as a result of exposure to welding gases which comprised fine particles of lead, zinc, chromium, and manganese. This occurred despite the lower concentration of the pollutants at the work place. In the expose group, the smoking welders showed a prevalence of respiratory impairment significantly higher than that observed in the nonsmoking welders. The results of the pulmonary function tests showed a predominantly restrictive type of pulmonary impairment followed by a mixed ventilatory defect among the welders. The effect of age on pulmonary impairment was not discernible. Welders exposed for over 10 years showed a prevalence of respiratory abnormalities significantly higher than those exposed for less than 10 years. Smoking also had a contributory role.

  2. Effect of absence of vision on posture

    PubMed Central

    Alotaibi, Abdullah Z.; Alghadir, Ahmad; Iqbal, Zaheen A.; Anwer, Shahnawaz

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The visual system is one of the sensory systems that enables the body to assess and process information about the external environment. In the absence of vision, a blind person loses contact with the outside world and develops faulty motor patterns, which results in postural deficiencies. However, literature regarding the development of such deficiencies is limited. The aim of this study was to discuss the effect of absence of vision on posture, the possible biomechanics behind the resulting postural deficiencies, and strategies to correct and prevent them. [Subjects and Methods] Various electronic databases including PubMed, Medline, and Google scholar were examined using the words “body”, “posture”, “blind” and “absence of vision”. References in the retrieved articles were also examined for cross-references. The search was limited to articles in the English language. [Results] A total of 74 papers were shortlisted for this review, most of which dated back to the 1950s and 60s. [Conclusion] Blind people exhibit consistent musculoskeletal deformities. Absence of vision leads to numerous abnormal sensory and motor interactions that often limit blind people in isolation. Rehabilitation of the blind is a multidisciplinary task. Specialists from different fields need to diagnose and treat the deficiencies of the blind together as a team. Before restoring the normal mechanics of posture and gait, the missing link with the external world should be reestablished. PMID:27190486

  3. Vision Deficits in Adults with Down Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Krinsky-McHale, Sharon J.; Silverman, Wayne; Gordon, James; Devenny, Darlynne A.; Oley, Nancy; Abramov, Israel

    2013-01-01

    Background In individuals with Down syndrome virtually all structures of the eye have some abnormality which likely diminishes vision. We examined basic vision functions in adults with Down syndrome. Materials and Methods Participants completed a battery of psychophysical tests which probed a comprehensive array of visual functions. The performance of adults with Down syndrome was compared to younger and older adults without intellectual disability. Results Adults with Down syndrome had significant vision deficits; reduced sensitivity across spatial frequencies and temporal modulation rates, reduced stereopsis, impaired vernier acuity, and anomalies in colour discrimination. The pattern of deficits observed was similar to those seen by researchers examining adults with Alzheimer’s disease. Conclusions Our findings suggest that a common mechanism may be responsible for the pattern of deficits observed, possibly the presence of Alzheimer’s disease neuropathology in the visual association cortex. We also showed that individuals with mild to moderate intellectual disability are capable of participating in studies employing state-of-the-art psychophysical procedures. This has wider implications in terms of their ability to participate in research that use similar techniques. PMID:23784802

  4. Machine vision - Automated visual inspection and robot vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vernon, David

    The subject of machine vision is treated with emphasis on fundamental tools for image acquisition, processing, and analysis. Topics discussed include an introduction to computer vision, illumination and sensors, image acquisition and representation, fundamentals of digital image processing, the segmentation problem, and image analysis. The book also covers techniques for shape description, robot programming and robot vision, and an introduction to image understanding.

  5. Grounding Our Vision: Brain Research and Strategic Vision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Mike

    2011-01-01

    While recognizing the value of "vision," it could be argued that vision alone--at least in schools--is not enough to rally the financial and emotional support required to translate an idea into reality. A compelling vision needs to reflect substantive, research-based knowledge if it is to spark the kind of strategic thinking and insight capable of…

  6. Object tracking with stereo vision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huber, Eric

    1994-01-01

    A real-time active stereo vision system incorporating gaze control and task directed vision is described. Emphasis is placed on object tracking and object size and shape determination. Techniques include motion-centroid tracking, depth tracking, and contour tracking.

  7. Contact Lenses for Vision Correction

    MedlinePlus

    ... Contact Lenses Colored Contact Lenses Contact Lenses for Vision Correction Written by: Kierstan Boyd Reviewed by: Brenda ... on the surface of the eye. They correct vision like eyeglasses do and are safe when used ...

  8. Do You Have Low Vision?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Education Program Diabetic Eye Disease Education Program Glaucoma Education Program Low Vision Education Program Spanish-language ... FAQ Watch out for your vision! Glossary Resources Glaucoma Glaucoma Home How Much Do You Know? What ...

  9. Low Vision Bicycling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connor, M.

    1992-01-01

    This article considers bicycling as a means of transportation, not recreation, for individuals with low vision. Considered are evaluation of capabilities, watching for child cyclists, central and peripheral field loss, necessary equipment, potential problems, seasonal and weather considerations, night riding, route planning, basic visual skills…

  10. Unconventional colour vision.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Justin; Arikawa, Kentaro

    2014-12-15

    Butterflies and stomatopods are certainly outliers in their unconventional colour sense and despite some similarities at first glance, in fact sample the world of colour very differently. In one way, butterflies are relatively conventional, possessing either tri-or tetrachromatic colour vision, then just adding one or several task-specific sub-mechanisms onto this. It is the stomatopods so far that have really pushed the boat out into a different colour vision mechanism. Over 400 million years of independent evolution they have arrived at a solution with more in common with the way a satellite sensor examines the colours of the earth than other animals. Remember, however, that unconventional colour vision is not just the realm of the serially polychromatic. Apparently waterfleas with four classes of spectral receptors living in ponds operate a task-specific spectral sense with no need, or indeed neural processing power, to construct a complex discriminatory mechanism. It seems they have the butterfly added-extra set without the more complex comparative chromatic mechanisms, although in truth, conclusive behavioural proof is lacking. Behavioural observation of colour vision in the ecological context of each animal is vital before making the distinction between conventional and unconventional. Just counting spectral sensitivities is never enough. PMID:25514002

  11. Two Visions of America

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Capaldi, Nicholas

    2012-01-01

    Since the seventeenth century, there have been two narratives about modernity in general and America in particular. The author uses the term "narrative" to include (a) facts, (b) arguments, and most important, (c) a larger vision of how one sees the world and chooses to engage the world. The first and originalist narrative is the Lockean Liberty…

  12. What Is Low Vision?

    MedlinePlus

    ... clothing? Performing tasks at work or home because lights now seem dimmer ? Reading street and bus signs, or the names of stores? Vision changes like these could be early warning signs of eye disease. Usually, the earlier your problem is diagnosed, ...

  13. VISION AND READING ABILITY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MANGRUM, CHARLES T.

    SIGNIFICANT RESEARCH ON THE PHYSIOLOGICAL AND FUNCTIONAL ASPECTS OF VISION AND READING DISABILITY IS SURVEYED. CONCLUSIONS BASED ON THE LITERATURE IN THE FIELD ARE DISCUSSED. A BIBLIOGRAPHY OF 70 REFERENCES AND A GLOSSARY OF TERMS ARE APPENDED. A TABLE SUMMARIZING REFRACTIVE ERRORS AND EYE DEFECTS CONTRIBUTING TO READING DISABILITY IS INCLUDED.…

  14. Dance: Verities, Values, Visions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boorman, Joyce, Ed.; Harris, Dorothy, Ed.

    The Binational Dance Conference was organized into three focal themes--verities, values, and visions in dance--to emphasize the known and accepted worth and value of dance, and to stimulate through knowledge and idea exchange, imaginative directions for dance in the future of both the United States and Canada. This thematic structure is also the…

  15. Vision - night blindness

    MedlinePlus

    ... symptoms do you have? Do you have unusual stress, anxiety, or a fear of the dark? The eye exam will include: Color vision testing Pupil light reflex Refraction Retinal exam Slit lamp examination Visual acuity Other tests may be done: Electroretinogram ( ...

  16. A Colour Vision Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lovett, David; Hore, Kevin

    1991-01-01

    The model for color vision put forward by Edwin Land is explained. The aspects of the theory that can be demonstrated within the classroom are described. A random arrangement of straight-edged colored areas mounted on a screen, called a Mondrian, projectors, and a computer are used to calculate reflectance. (KR)

  17. Vision for Space Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Bryan K.

    2007-01-01

    Vision tasks include: a) Complete the International Space Station; b) Safely fly the Space Shuttle until 2010; c) Develop and fly the Crew Exploration Vehicle (by 2014); d) Return to the moon (by 2020); e) Sustained and affordable human and robotic program; f) Develop innovative technologies, knowledge, and infrastructures; and g) Promote international and commercial participation.

  18. Vision: The Leadership Difference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Browne, Elise R.

    1986-01-01

    The author states that all types of leaders share four qualities: (1) intensity of vision, (2) ability to communicate agenda, (3) conviction in their beliefs, and (4) positive self-regard. She interviews Warren Bennis, an author on this subject, about the differences between business and volunteer leaders. (CH)

  19. Visions of Mobile Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    T.H.E. Journal, 2011

    2011-01-01

    It is almost a foregone conclusion that the mobile device will become an indispensable tool for learning in the future. That's why "T.H.E. Journal" asked a number of educators to let their imaginations go wild and conjure up visions of the future of the device in the classroom. This paper presents the views of educators who conjure up the mobile…

  20. Vision and the hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Trachtman, Joseph N

    2010-02-01

    For nearly 2 millennia, signs of hypothalamic-related vision disorders have been noticed as illustrated by paintings and drawings of that time of undiagnosed Horner's syndrome. It was not until the 1800s, however, that specific connections between the hypothalamus and the vision system were discovered. With a fuller elaboration of the autonomic nervous system in the early to mid 1900s, many more pathways were discovered. The more recently discovered retinohypothalamic tracts show the extent and influence of light stimulation on hypothalamic function and bodily processes. The hypothalamus maintains its myriad connections via neural pathways, such as with the pituitary and pineal glands; the chemical messengers of the peptides, cytokines, and neurotransmitters; and the nitric oxide mechanism. As a result of these connections, the hypothalamus has involvement in many degenerative diseases. A complete feedback mechanism between the eye and hypothalamus is established by the retinohypothalamic tracts and the ciliary nerves innervating the anterior pole of the eye and the retina. A discussion of hypothalamic-related vision disorders includes neurologic syndromes, the lacrimal system, the retina, and ocular inflammation. Tables and figures have been used to aid in the explanation of the many connections and chemicals controlled by the hypothalamus. The understanding of the functions of the hypothalamus will allow the clinician to gain better insight into the many pathologies associated between the vision system and the hypothalamus. In the future, it may be possible that some ocular disease treatments will be via direct action on hypothalamic function. PMID:20152784

  1. Synthetic Vision Workshop 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kramer, Lynda J. (Compiler)

    1999-01-01

    The second NASA sponsored Workshop on Synthetic/Enhanced Vision (S/EV) Display Systems was conducted January 27-29, 1998 at the NASA Langley Research Center. The purpose of this workshop was to provide a forum for interested parties to discuss topics in the Synthetic Vision (SV) element of the NASA Aviation Safety Program and to encourage those interested parties to participate in the development, prototyping, and implementation of S/EV systems that enhance aviation safety. The SV element addresses the potential safety benefits of synthetic/enhanced vision display systems for low-end general aviation aircraft, high-end general aviation aircraft (business jets), and commercial transports. Attendance at this workshop consisted of about 112 persons including representatives from industry, the FAA, and other government organizations (NOAA, NIMA, etc.). The workshop provided opportunities for interested individuals to give presentations on the state of the art in potentially applicable systems, as well as to discuss areas of research that might be considered for inclusion within the Synthetic Vision Element program to contribute to the reduction of the fatal aircraft accident rate. Panel discussions on topical areas such as databases, displays, certification issues, and sensors were conducted, with time allowed for audience participation.

  2. Giving Machines the Vision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Amherst Systems manufactures foveal machine vision technology and systems commercially available to end-users and system integrators. This technology was initially developed under NASA contracts NAS9-19335 (Johnson Space Center) and NAS1-20841 (Langley Research Center). This technology is currently being delivered to university research facilities and military sites. More information may be found in www.amherst.com.

  3. Vision: Essential Scaffolding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Joseph; Torre, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    Few concepts are more noted in the leadership effects research than vision. It is a cardinal element in the school improvement equation as well. Yet, it remains one of the least well-specified components of that algorithm. Based on a comprehensive review of the research on effective leadership and school improvement from 1995 to 2012, we bring…

  4. Computer Vision Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunasekaran, Sundaram

    Food quality is of paramount consideration for all consumers, and its importance is perhaps only second to food safety. By some definition, food safety is also incorporated into the broad categorization of food quality. Hence, the need for careful and accurate evaluation of food quality is at the forefront of research and development both in the academia and industry. Among the many available methods for food quality evaluation, computer vision has proven to be the most powerful, especially for nondestructively extracting and quantifying many features that have direct relevance to food quality assessment and control. Furthermore, computer vision systems serve to rapidly evaluate the most readily observable foods quality attributes - the external characteristics such as color, shape, size, surface texture etc. In addition, it is now possible, using advanced computer vision technologies, to “see” inside a food product and/or package to examine important quality attributes ordinarily unavailable to human evaluators. With rapid advances in electronic hardware and other associated imaging technologies, the cost-effectiveness and speed of computer vision systems have greatly improved and many practical systems are already in place in the food industry.

  5. Chapter 3: Develop a Vision

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Loretta; Meade, Barbara; Norris, Keith; Lucas-Wright, Aziza; Jones, Felica; Moini, Moraya; Jones, Andrea; Koegel, Paul

    2016-01-01

    The Vision stage is the development of the agreed-upon framework for the study, including identifying the issue, the community, the stakeholders, and major aspects of the approach. Achieving the Vision requires planning through a Framing Committee, agreeing on a vision by sharing perspectives and identifying commonalities or “win-wins” that hold the partnership together for community benefit, and evaluating the emergence of the Vision and the partnership. Here, we review tools and strategies. PMID:20088078

  6. Vision, eye disease, and art: 2015 Keeler Lecture.

    PubMed

    Marmor, M F

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine normal vision and eye disease in relation to art. Ophthalmology cannot explain art, but vision is a tool for artists and its normal and abnormal characteristics may influence what an artist can do. The retina codes for contrast, and the impact of this is evident throughout art history from Asian brush painting, to Renaissance chiaroscuro, to Op Art. Art exists, and can portray day or night, only because of the way retina adjusts to light. Color processing is complex, but artists have exploited it to create shimmer (Seurat, Op Art), or to disconnect color from form (fauvists, expressionists, Andy Warhol). It is hazardous to diagnose eye disease from an artist's work, because artists have license to create as they wish. El Greco was not astigmatic; Monet was not myopic; Turner did not have cataracts. But when eye disease is documented, the effects can be analyzed. Color-blind artists limit their palette to ambers and blues, and avoid greens. Dense brown cataracts destroy color distinctions, and Monet's late canvases (before surgery) showed strange and intense uses of color. Degas had failing vision for 40 years, and his pastels grew coarser and coarser. He may have continued working because his blurred vision smoothed over the rough work. This paper can barely touch upon the complexity of either vision or art. However, it demonstrates some ways in which understanding vision and eye disease give insight into art, and thereby an appreciation of both art and ophthalmology. PMID:26563659

  7. Eye movement abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Moncayo, Jorge; Bogousslavsky, Julien

    2012-01-01

    Generation and control of eye movements requires the participation of the cortex, basal ganglia, cerebellum and brainstem. The signals of this complex neural network finally converge on the ocular motoneurons of the brainstem. Infarct or hemorrhage at any level of the oculomotor system (though more frequent in the brain-stem) may give rise to a broad spectrum of eye movement abnormalities (EMAs). Consequently, neurologists and particularly stroke neurologists are routinely confronted with EMAs, some of which may be overlooked in the acute stroke setting and others that, when recognized, may have a high localizing value. The most complex EMAs are due to midbrain stroke. Horizontal gaze disorders, some of them manifesting unusual patterns, may occur in pontine stroke. Distinct varieties of nystagmus occur in cerebellar and medullary stroke. This review summarizes the most representative EMAs from the supratentorial level to the brainstem. PMID:22377853

  8. Binocular saccade coordination in reading and visual search: a developmental study in typical reader and dyslexic children

    PubMed Central

    Seassau, Magali; Gérard, Christophe Loic; Bui-Quoc, Emmanuel; Bucci, Maria Pia

    2014-01-01

    Studies dealing with developmental aspects of binocular eye movement behavior during reading are scarce. In this study we have explored binocular strategies during reading and visual search tasks in a large population of dyslexic and typical readers. Binocular eye movements were recorded using a video-oculography system in 43 dyslexic children (aged 8–13) and in a group of 42 age-matched typical readers. The main findings are: (i) ocular motor characteristics of dyslexic children are impaired in comparison to those reported in typical children in reading task; (ii) a developmental effect exists in reading in control children, in dyslexic children the effect of development was observed only on fixation durations; and (iii) ocular motor behavior in the visual search tasks is similar for dyslexic children and for typical readers, except for the disconjugacy during and after the saccade: dyslexic children are impaired in comparison to typical children. Data reported here confirms and expands previous studies on children’s reading. Both reading skills and binocular saccades coordination improve with age in typical readers. The atypical eye movement’s patterns observed in dyslexic children suggest a deficiency in the visual attentional processing as well as an impairment of the ocular motor saccade and vergence systems interaction. PMID:25400559

  9. The visible ground surface as a reference frame for scaling binocular depth of a target in midair.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jun; Zhou, Liu; Shi, Pan; He, Zijiang J; Ooi, Teng Leng

    2015-02-01

    The natural ground surface carries texture information that extends continuously from one's feet to the horizon, providing a rich depth resource for accurately locating an object resting on it. Here, we showed that the ground surface's role as a reference frame also aids in locating a target suspended in midair based on relative binocular disparity. Using real world setup in our experiments, we first found that a suspended target is more accurately localized when the ground surface is visible and the observer views the scene binocularly. In addition, the increased accuracy occurs only when the scene is viewed for 5 s rather than 0.15 s, suggesting that the binocular depth process takes time. Second, we found that manipulation of the configurations of the texture-gradient and/or linear-perspective cues on the visible ground surface affects the perceived distance of the suspended target in midair. Third, we found that a suspended target is more accurately localized against a ground texture surface than a ceiling texture surface. This suggests that our visual system uses the ground surface as the preferred reference frame to scale the distance of a suspended target according to its relative binocular disparity. PMID:25384237

  10. A high precision instrument to measure angular and binocular deviation introduced by aircraft windscreens by using a shadow casting technique

    SciTech Connect

    Shivananju, B. N.; Yamdagni, S.; Vasu, R. M.; Asokan, S.

    2012-12-15

    Objects viewed through transparent sheets with residual non-parallelism and irregularity appear shifted and distorted. This distortion is measured in terms of angular and binocular deviation of an object viewed through the transparent sheet. The angular and binocular deviations introduced are particularly important in the context of aircraft windscreens and canopies as they can interfere with decision making of pilots especially while landing, leading to accidents. In this work, we have developed an instrument to measure both the angular and binocular deviations introduced by transparent sheets. This instrument is especially useful in the qualification of aircraft windscreens and canopies. It measures the deviation in the geometrical shadow cast by a periodic dot pattern trans-illuminated by the distorted light beam from the transparent test specimen compared to the reference pattern. Accurate quantification of the shift in the pattern is obtained by cross-correlating the reference shadow pattern with the specimen shadow pattern and measuring the location of the correlation peak. The developed instrument is handy to use and computes both angular and binocular deviation with an accuracy of less than {+-}0.1 mrad ( Almost-Equal-To 0.036 mrad) and has an excellent repeatability with an error of less than 2%.

  11. What You Should Know (Low Vision)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home > Low Vision > What You Should Know Healthy Vision Diabetes Diabetes Home How Much Do You Know? ... Diabetic retinopathy Glaucoma Macular degeneration What is low vision? When you have low vision, eyeglasses, contact lenses, ...

  12. Vision Screening For Head Starters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foley, Celia

    To determine which children in the Head Start program may have vision problems, Head Start teachers and staff do vision "screening." This booklet demonstrates how to do the screening using the Snellen "E Chart." Trouble signs that the test administrator should be aware of are listed, and vision scores are explained simply. Amblyopia is defined,…

  13. Registration of Vision 30 Wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vision 30’ (Reg. No. CV-1062, PI 661153) hard red winter (HRW) wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) was developed and tested as VA06HRW-49 and released by the Virginia Agricultural Experiment Station in March 2010. Vision 30 was derived from the cross 92PAN1#33/VA97W-414. Vision 30 is high yielding, awned,...

  14. Registration of Vision 45 Wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vision 45’ (Reg. No. CV-1110, PI 667642), is a hard red winter (HRW) wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) cultivar that was developed and tested as VA07HRW-45 and released by the Virginia Agricultural Experiment Station in 2012. Vision 45 was derived from the cross ‘Provinciale’/‘Vision 10’ using a modifie...

  15. An overview and the current status of instrumentation at the Large Binocular Telescope Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, R. Mark; Edwards, Michelle L.; Kuhn, Olga; Thompson, David; Veillet, Christian

    2014-07-01

    An overview of instrumentation for the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) is presented. Optical instrumentation includes the Large Binocular Camera (LBC), a pair of wide-field (24' × 24') mosaic CCD imagers at the prime focus, and the Multi-Object Double Spectrograph (MODS), a pair of dual-beam blue-red optimized long-slit spectrographs mounted at the left and right direct F/15 Gregorian foci incorporating multiple slit masks for multi-object spectroscopy over a 6' field and spectral resolutions of up to 2000. Infrared instrumentation includes the LBT Near-IR Spectrometer (LUCI), a modular near-infrared (0.9-2.5 μm) imager and spectrograph pair mounted at the left and right front-bent F/15 Gregorian foci and designed for seeing-limited (FOV: 4' × 4') imaging, long-slit spectroscopy, and multi-object spectroscopy utilizing cooled slit masks and diffraction limited (FOV: 0'.5 x 0'.5) imaging and long-slit spectroscopy. Strategic instruments under development that can utilize the full 23 m baseline of the LBT include an interferometric cryogenic beam combiner with near-infrared and thermal-infrared instruments for Fizeau imaging and nulling interferometry (LBTI) and an optical bench near- infrared beam combiner utilizing multi-conjugate adaptive optics for high angular resolution and sensitivity (LINC-NIRVANA). LBTI is currently undergoing commissioning and performing science observations on the LBT utilizing the installed adaptive secondary mirrors in both single-sided and two-sided beam combination modes. In addition, a fiber-fed bench spectrograph (PEPSI) capable of ultra high resolution spectroscopy and spectropolarimetry (R = 40,000-300,000) will be available as a principal investigator instrument. Installation and testing of the bench spectrograph will begin in July 2014. Over the past four years the LBC pair, LUCI1, and MODS1 have been commissioned and are now scheduled for routine partner science observations. Both LUCI2 and MODS2 passed their laboratory

  16. Vision Therapy in Adults with Convergence Insufficiency: Clinical and Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Measures

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, Tara L.; Vicci, Vincent R.; Alkan, Yelda; Kim, Eun H.; Gohel, Suril; Barrett, Anna M.; Chiaravalloti, Nancy; Biswal, Bharat B.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose This research quantified clinical measurements and functional neural changes associated with vision therapy in subjects with convergence insufficiency (CI). Methods Convergence and divergence 4° step responses were compared between 13 control adult subjects with normal binocular vision and four CI adult subjects. All CI subjects participated in 18 h of vision therapy. Clinical parameters quantified throughout the therapy included: nearpoint of convergence, recovery point of convergence, positive fusional vergence at near, near dissociated phoria, and eye movements that were quantified using peak velocity. Neural correlates of the CI subjects were quantified with functional magnetic resonance imaging scans comparing random vs. predictable vergence movements using a block design before and after vision therapy. Images were quantified by measuring the spatial extent of activation and the average correlation within five regions of interests (ROI). The ROIs were the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, a portion of the frontal lobe, part of the parietal lobe, the cerebellum, and the brain stem. All measurements were repeated 4 months to 1 year post-therapy in three of the CI subjects. Results Convergence average peak velocities to step stimuli were significantly slower (p = 0.016) in CI subjects compared with controls; however, significant differences in average peak velocities were not observed for divergence step responses (p = 0.30). The investigation of CI subjects participating in vision therapy showed that the nearpoint of convergence, recovery point of convergence, and near dissociated phoria significantly decreased. Furthermore, the positive fusional vergence, average peak velocity from 4° convergence steps, and the amount of functional activity within the frontal areas, cerebellum, and brain stem significantly increased. Several clinical and cortical parameters were significantly correlated. Conclusions Convergence peak velocity was significantly slower in

  17. Combined three-dimensional computer vision and epi-illumination fluorescence imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorpas, Dimitris; Yova, Dido; Politopoulos, Kostas

    2012-03-01

    Most of the reported fluorescence imaging methods and systems highlight the need for three-dimensional information of the inspected region surface geometry. The scope of this manuscript is to introduce an epi-illumination fluorescence imaging system, which has been enhanced with a binocular machine vision system for the translation of the inverse problem solution to the global coordinates system. The epi-illumination fluorescence imaging system is consisted of a structured scanning excitation source, which increases the spatial differentiation of the measured data, and a telecentric lens, which increases the angular differentiation. On the other hand, the binocular system is based on the projection of a structured light pattern on the inspected area, for the solution of the correspondence problem between the stereo pair. The functionality of the system has been evaluated on tissue phantoms and calibration objects. The reconstruction accuracy of the fluorophores distribution, as resulted from the root mean square error between the actual distribution and the outcome of the forward solver, was more than 80%. On the other hand, the surface three-dimensional reconstruction of the inspected region presented 0.067+/-0.004 mm accuracy, as resulted from the mean Euclidean distance between the three-dimensional position of the real world points and those reconstructed.

  18. Vision Care and the Nation's Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Optometric Association, St. Louis, MO.

    Aspects of vision and vision care considered are the following: extent and types of vision defects of American children; importance of vision care in pre-school years, elementary, and secondary school and beyond; and manpower resources in vision care today, the extent of vision testing and care, special problem areas, and governmental support.…

  19. Review of night vision metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrzanowski, K.

    2015-06-01

    A review of night vision metrology is presented in this paper. A set of reasons that create a rather chaotic metrologic situation on night vision market is presented. It is shown that there has been made a little progress in night vision metrology during last decades in spite of a big progress in night vision technology at the same period of time. It is concluded that such a big discrep- ancy between metrology development level and technology development can be an obstacle in the further development of night vision technology.

  20. Searching with the Large Binocular Telescope for Accreting Supermassive Black Holes in Bulgeless Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferguson, Jason; Constantin, Anca; Satyapal, Shobita; Rothberg, Barry

    2016-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that supermassive black holes are created and evolve in bulgeless galaxies, revealing pathways for merger free, secular growth. Constraints on the fraction of bulgeless galaxies that host an AGN remain, however, extremely limited. Following the recent discovery of a large population of bulgeless galaxies with red mid-infrared colors, that are highly suggestive of heated dust by powerful accreting massive black holes, we have employed the Large Binocular Telescope to investigate the near-IR spectra of six of these systems. We present here the data and measurements of near-infrared hydrogen molecular and recombination lines. We find no evidence for broad components of the Paschen Alpha emission lines, suggesting the AGNs are either too weak or too absorbed to be detected. Based on new estimates of extinction and comparisons with optical measurements we discuss the likelihood of these systems being heavily obscured AGN or galactic nuclei with vigorous, yet dust embedded star formation.