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Sample records for abnormal bone metabolism

  1. [Clinical evaluation for abnormalities of bone and mineral metabolism in ESKD].

    PubMed

    Yano, Shozo

    2016-09-01

    In patients with end-stage kidney disease(ESKD), bone disorders are characterized by cortical porosity and by abnormal turnover of bone metabolism:adynamic(low turnover)bone disease and high turnover bone due to various degrees of secondary hyperparathyroidism. Abnormalities of bone metabolism are generally assessed by interview, X-ray, bone mineral density(BMD), serum phosphorus, calcium, and parathyroid hormone levels, and bone metabolic markers. Recent clinical studies have demonstrated that high turnover bone representing elevated bone metabolic markers and low BMD are independent risks of bone fractures as well as mortality among this population. Treatment of bone disorders in ESKD patients should be aiming at the normalization of mineral metabolism and the maintenance and/or improvement of BMD. PMID:27561341

  2. Abnormalities in biomarkers of mineral and bone metabolism in kidney donors.

    PubMed

    Kasiske, Bertram L; Kumar, Rajiv; Kimmel, Paul L; Pesavento, Todd E; Kalil, Roberto S; Kraus, Edward S; Rabb, Hamid; Posselt, Andrew M; Anderson-Haag, Teresa L; Steffes, Michael W; Israni, Ajay K; Snyder, Jon J; Singh, Ravinder J; Weir, Matthew R

    2016-10-01

    Previous studies have suggested that kidney donors may have abnormalities of mineral and bone metabolism typically seen in chronic kidney disease. This may have important implications for the skeletal health of living kidney donors and for our understanding of the pathogenesis of long-term mineral and bone disorders in chronic kidney disease. In this prospective study, 182 of 203 kidney donors and 173 of 201 paired normal controls had markers of mineral and bone metabolism measured before and at 6 and 36 months after donation (ALTOLD Study). Donors had significantly higher serum concentrations of intact parathyroid hormone (24.6% and 19.5%) and fibroblast growth factor-23 (9.5% and 8.4%) at 6 and 36 months, respectively, as compared to healthy controls, and significantly reduced tubular phosphate reabsorption (-7.0% and -5.0%) and serum phosphate concentrations (-6.4% and -2.3%). Serum 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 concentrations were significantly lower (-17.1% and -12.6%), while 25-hydroxyvitamin D (21.4% and 19.4%) concentrations were significantly higher in donors compared to controls. Moreover, significantly higher concentrations of the bone resorption markers, carboxyterminal cross-linking telopeptide of bone collagen (30.1% and 13.8%) and aminoterminal cross-linking telopeptide of bone collagen (14.2% and 13.0%), and the bone formation markers, osteocalcin (26.3% and 2.7%) and procollagen type I N-terminal propeptide (24.3% and 8.9%), were observed in donors. Thus, kidney donation alters serum markers of bone metabolism that could reflect impaired bone health. Additional long-term studies that include assessment of skeletal architecture and integrity are warranted in kidney donors.

  3. [Musculoskeletal rehabilitation and bone. Abnormal bone metabolism in female elite athletes].

    PubMed

    Enatsu, Akiko

    2010-04-01

    Recently, female athletes are particularly well, the other hand, many athletes suffer from amenorrhea due to excessive training. Especially, in sports with weight restrictions, they suffer from "Female athlete triad" , eating disorders, amenorrhea and osteoporosis. Amenorrhea is nothing else than a lack of estrogen, action on bone resorption and promote bone formation, by neglect this, it lead to osteoporosis and a stress fracture, and they would often give up their career as elite athletes. So we should consider it as serious sports injury. The problems of amenorrhea is should be recognized as a deficiency of estrogen. A Case of amenorrhea in female athletes, it is necessary to consider the hormone replacement therapy based on the appropriate diagnosis. However, it is important to start the management of body fat and body weight and strength of exercises since adolescent for the prevention the amenorrhea. PMID:20354328

  4. Chronic kidney disease and bone metabolism.

    PubMed

    Kazama, Junichiro James; Matsuo, Koji; Iwasaki, Yoshiko; Fukagawa, Masafumi

    2015-05-01

    Chronic kidney disease-related mineral and bone disease (CKD-MBD) is a syndrome defined as a systemic mineral metabolic disorder associated with CKD, and the term renal osteodystrophy indicates a pathomorphological concept of bone lesions associated with CKD-MBD. Cortical bone thinning, abnormalities in bone turnover and primary/secondary mineralization, elevated levels of circulating sclerostin, increased apoptosis in osteoblasts and osteocytes, disturbance of the coupling phenomenon, iatrogenic factors, accumulated micro-crackles, crystal/collagen disorientation, and chemical modification of collagen crosslinks are all possible candidates found in CKD that could promote osteopenia and/or bone fragility. Some of above factors are the consequences of abnormal systemic mineral metabolism but for others it seem unlikely. We have used the term uremic osteoporosis to describe the uremia-induced bone fragility which is not derived from abnormal systemic mineral metabolism. Interestingly, the disease aspect of uremic osteoporosis appears to be similar to that of senile osteoporosis. PMID:25653092

  5. Diagnosis of metabolic bone disease

    SciTech Connect

    Grech, P.; Martin, T.J.; Barrington, N.A.; Ell, P.J.

    1986-01-01

    This book presents a reference on the radiologic evaluation, features, and differential diagnosis of metabolic diseases involving the whole skeleton, calcium deficiencies resulting from pharmacologic agents, and bone changes related to endocrine disturbances. It also stresses how radiology, nuclear medicine, and biochemistry - either alone or in concert - contribute to clinical diagnosis. It covers renal bone disease, Paget's disease, hyperphosphatasia, extraskeletal mineralization, metabolic bone disorders related to malnutrition, tumors, plus radionuclide studies including materials and methods.

  6. Glucocorticoids, bone and energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Mark S; Seibel, Markus J; Zhou, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Prolonged exposure to excessive levels of endogenous or exogenous glucocorticoids is associated with serious clinical features including altered body composition and the development of insulin resistance, impaired glucose tolerance and diabetes. It had been assumed that these adverse effects were mediated by direct effects of glucocorticoids on tissues such as adipose or liver. Recent studies have however indicated that these effects are, at least in part, mediated through the actions of glucocorticoids on bone and specifically the osteoblast. In mice, targeted abrogation of glucocorticoid signalling in osteoblasts significantly attenuated the changes in body composition and systemic fuel metabolism seen during glucocorticoid treatment. Heterotopic expression of osteocalcin in the liver of normal mice was also able to protect against the metabolic changes induced by glucocorticoids indicating that osteocalcin was the likely factor connecting bone osteoblasts to systemic fuel metabolism. Studies are now needed in humans to determine the extent to which glucocorticoid induced changes in body composition and systemic fuel metabolism are mediated through bone. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Bone and diabetes. PMID:26051468

  7. Dental and bone abnormalities in patients with familial polyposis coli.

    PubMed

    Carl, W; Herrera, L

    1987-01-01

    Dental and bone abnormalities of the maxilla and mandible are present in approximately 80% of patients with familial polyposis coli. The dental abnormalities include impacted teeth (other than third molars), supernumerary teeth, congenitally missing teeth, fused roots of first and second molars, and unusually long and tapered roots of posterior teeth. The bone lesions consist mostly of osteomas, either isolated or in clusters, in the maxilla and mandible or of exostoses with lateral and/or lingual extensions. Since dental and bone abnormalities are already present early in life there is a strong suggestion that they may be used as diagnostic features in the recognition of familial polyposis coli.

  8. Bone Metabolism after Bariatric Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Elaine W.

    2014-01-01

    Bariatric surgery is a popular and effective treatment for severe obesity, but may have negative effects on the skeleton. This review summarizes changes in bone density and bone metabolism from animal and clinical studies of bariatric surgery, with specific attention to Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB), adjustable gastric banding (AGB), and sleeve gastrectomy (SG). Skeletal imaging artifacts from obesity and weight loss are also considered. Despite challenges in bone density imaging, the preponderance of evidence suggests that bariatric surgery procedures have negative skeletal effects that persist beyond the first year of surgery, and that these effects vary by surgical type. The long-term clinical implications and current clinical recommendations are presented. Further study is required to determine mechanisms of bone loss after bariatric surgery. Although early studies focused on calcium/vitamin D metabolism and mechanical unloading of the skeleton, it seems likely that surgically-induced changes in the hormonal and metabolic profile may be responsible for the skeletal phenotypes observed after bariatric surgery. PMID:24677277

  9. Gamma images in benign and metabolic bone diseases: volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Sy, W.M.

    1981-01-01

    Volume 1 of ''Gamma images in benign and metabolic bone diseases'' comprises chapters devoted to: general remarks and considerations, radiopharmaceuticals, Paget disease, osteomyelitis, trauma, benign bone tumors, chronic renal dialysis, acute renal failure, osteomalacia and rickets, and osteoporosis. Although published in 1981, the most recent references in the book were 1978 and most are 1977 or earlier. One of the strongest aspects of the volume are tables which categorize diseases, pathophysiology of disease, and image abnormalities. (JMT)

  10. Triple-phase bone image abnormalities in Lyme arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, S.J.; Dadparvar, S.; Slizofski, W.J.; Glab, L.B.; Burger, M. )

    1989-10-01

    Arthritis is a frequent manifestation of Lyme disease. Limited triple-phase Tc-99m MDP bone imaging of the wrists and hands with delayed whole-body images was performed in a patient with Lyme arthritis. This demonstrated abnormal joint uptake in the wrists and hands in all three phases, with increased activity seen in other affected joints on delayed whole-body images. These findings are nonspecific and have been previously described in a variety of rheumatologic conditions, but not in Lyme disease. Lyme disease should be considered in the differential diagnosis of articular and periarticular bone scan abnormalities.

  11. Effects of thirty elements on bone metabolism.

    PubMed

    Dermience, Michael; Lognay, Georges; Mathieu, Françoise; Goyens, Philippe

    2015-10-01

    The human skeleton, made of 206 bones, plays vital roles including supporting the body, protecting organs, enabling movement, and storing minerals. Bones are made of organic structures, intimately connected with an inorganic matrix produced by bone cells. Many elements are ubiquitous in our environment, and many impact bone metabolism. Most elements have antagonistic actions depending on concentration. Indeed, some elements are essential, others are deleterious, and many can be both. Several pathways mediate effects of element deficiencies or excesses on bone metabolism. This paper aims to identify all elements that impact bone health and explore the mechanisms by which they act. To date, this is the first time that the effects of thirty minerals on bone metabolism have been summarized. PMID:26302917

  12. Effects of thirty elements on bone metabolism.

    PubMed

    Dermience, Michael; Lognay, Georges; Mathieu, Françoise; Goyens, Philippe

    2015-10-01

    The human skeleton, made of 206 bones, plays vital roles including supporting the body, protecting organs, enabling movement, and storing minerals. Bones are made of organic structures, intimately connected with an inorganic matrix produced by bone cells. Many elements are ubiquitous in our environment, and many impact bone metabolism. Most elements have antagonistic actions depending on concentration. Indeed, some elements are essential, others are deleterious, and many can be both. Several pathways mediate effects of element deficiencies or excesses on bone metabolism. This paper aims to identify all elements that impact bone health and explore the mechanisms by which they act. To date, this is the first time that the effects of thirty minerals on bone metabolism have been summarized.

  13. Metabolic bone diseases in kidney transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rubin; Chouhan, Kanwaljit K

    2012-10-01

    Metabolic bone disease after kidney transplantation has a complex pathophysiology and heterogeneous histology. Pre-existing renal osteodystrophy may not resolve completely, but continue or evolve into a different osteodystrophy. Rapid bone loss immediately after transplant can persist, at a lower rate, for years to come. These greatly increase the risk of bone fracture and vertebral collapse. Each patient may have multiple risk factors of bone loss, such as steroids usage, hypogonadism, persistent hyperparathyroidism (HPT), poor allograft function, metabolic acidosis, hypophosphatemia, vitamin D deficiency, aging, immobility and chronic disease. Clinical management requires a comprehensive approach to address the underlying and ongoing disease processes. Successful prevention of bone loss has been shown with vitamin D, bisphosphonates, calcitonin as well as treatment of hypogonadism and HPT. Novel approach to restore the normal bone remodeling and improve the bone quality may be needed in order to effectively decrease bone fracture rate in kidney transplant recipients. PMID:24175250

  14. Abnormal Canine Bone Development Associated with Hypergravity Exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, J. P.; Fisher, G. L.; McNeill, K. L.; Oyama, J.

    1979-01-01

    Chronic centrifugation of 85- to 92-day-old Beagles at 2.0 x g and 2.6 x g for 26 weeks during the time of active skeletal growth caused skeletal abnormalities in the radius and the ulna of ten of 11 dogs. The pattern of change mimicked that found in naturally occurring and experimentally induced premature distal ulnar physeal closure or delayed growth at this physis. Minimal changes in bone density were detected by sensitive photon absorptiometric techniques. Skeletal abnormalities also were found in five of the six cage-control dogs, although the run-control dogs were radiographically normal.

  15. Abnormal folate metabolism in foetuses affected by neural tube defects.

    PubMed

    Dunlevy, Louisa P E; Chitty, Lyn S; Burren, Katie A; Doudney, Kit; Stojilkovic-Mikic, Taita; Stanier, Philip; Scott, Rosemary; Copp, Andrew J; Greene, Nicholas D E

    2007-04-01

    Folic acid supplementation can prevent many cases of neural tube defects (NTDs), whereas suboptimal maternal folate status is a risk factor, suggesting that folate metabolism is a key determinant of susceptibility to NTDs. Despite extensive genetic analysis of folate cycle enzymes, and quantification of metabolites in maternal blood, neither the protective mechanism nor the relationship between maternal folate status and susceptibility are understood in most cases. In order to investigate potential abnormalities in folate metabolism in the embryo itself, we derived primary fibroblastic cell lines from foetuses affected by NTDs and subjected them to the dU suppression test, a sensitive metabolic test of folate metabolism. Significantly, a subset of NTD cases exhibited low scores in this test, indicative of abnormalities in folate cycling that may be causally linked to the defect. Susceptibility to NTDs may be increased by suppression of the methylation cycle, which is interlinked with the folate cycle. However, reduced efficacy in the dU suppression test was not associated with altered abundance of the methylation cycle intermediates, s-adenosylmethionine and s-adenosylhomocysteine, suggesting that a methylation cycle defect is unlikely to be responsible for the observed abnormality of folate metabolism. Genotyping of samples for known polymorphisms in genes encoding folate-associated enzymes did not reveal any correlation between specific genotypes and the observed abnormalities in folate metabolism. These data suggest that as yet unrecognized genetic variants result in embryonic abnormalities of folate cycling that may be causally related to NTDs. PMID:17438019

  16. Lipid abnormalities in the metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Brinton, Eliot A

    2003-02-01

    The metabolic syndrome is the constellation of adverse metabolic and clinical effects of insulin resistance. Its high and increasing prevalence and its profound impact on the major diseases of the western world require that clinicians consider its diagnosis and management on a routine basis. Recently published guidelines on its definition now make convenient and reliable diagnosis possible. Also, there is new and better understanding of the complex dyslipidemias and other risk factors strongly associated with the metabolic syndrome, which greatly increase the risk of clinical atherosclerotic events. Comprehensive clinical evaluation of these dyslipidemias and associated atherosclerosis risk factors can lead to their aggressive treatment, customized according to the circumstances of each patient. These steps are now more feasible and more clearly desirable than ever before. Statins alone greatly reduce atherosclerosis risk, but combination lipid therapy is often required for optimal dyslipidemia management and atheroprevention. PMID:12643148

  17. Anorexia nervosa and bone metabolism.

    PubMed

    Fazeli, Pouneh K; Klibanski, Anne

    2014-09-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a psychiatric disorder characterized by self-induced starvation with a lifetime prevalence of 2.2% in women. The most common medical co-morbidity in women with AN is bone loss, with over 85% of women having bone mineral density values more than one standard deviation below an age comparable mean. The low bone mass in AN is due to multiple hormonal adaptations to under nutrition, including hypothalamic amenorrhea and growth hormone resistance. Importantly, this low bone mass is also associated with a seven-fold increased risk of fracture. Therefore, strategies to effectively prevent bone loss and increase bone mass are critical. We will review hormonal adaptations that contribute to bone loss in this population as well as promising new therapies that may increase bone mass and reduce fracture risk in AN.

  18. [Serum sclerostin levels and metabolic bone diseases].

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, Mika; Sugimoto, Toshitsugu

    2013-06-01

    Serum sclerostin levels are being investigated in various metabolic bone diseases. Since serum sclerostin levels are decreased in primary hyperparathyroidism and elevated in hypoparathyroidism, parathyroid hormone (PTH) is thought to be a regulatory factor for sclerostin. Serum sclerostin levels exhibit a significant positive correlation with bone mineral density. On the other hand, a couple of studies on postmenopausal women have shown that high serum sclerostin levels are a risk factor for fracture. Although glucocorticoid induced osteoporosis and diabetes are both diseases that reduce bone formation, serum sclerostin levels have been reported to be decreased in the former and elevated in the latter, suggesting differences in the effects of sclerostin in the two diseases. Serum sclerostin levels are correlated with renal function, and increase with reduction in renal function. Serum sclerostin level may be a new index of bone assessment that differs from bone mineral density and bone metabolic markers.

  19. Metabolic abnormalities: triglyceride and low-density lipoprotein.

    PubMed

    Krauss, Ronald M; Siri, Patty W

    2004-06-01

    Increased plasma triglyceride and reduced high-density lipoprotein cholesterol are key features of the metabolic syndrome. Although elevated low-density lipoprotein cholesterol is not an integral characteristic of this syndrome, there is commonly an increase in the proportion of small, dense low-density lipoprotein particles. Together, these abnormalities constitute the atherogenic dyslipidemia of the metabolic syndrome. This article reviews the pathophysiology of altered triglyceride and low-density lipoprotein metabolism in the metabolic syndrome, outlines the relationship of these lipoprotein abnormalities to increased risk of coronary heart disease,and highlights the application of this information to clinical practice. The role of reduced high-density lipoprotein in the metabolic syndrome is discussed elsewhere in this issue.

  20. Calcium and bone metabolism during space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Scott M.; Heer, Martina

    2002-01-01

    Weightlessness induces bone loss. Understanding the nature of this loss and developing means to counteract it are significant challenges to potential human exploration missions. This article reviews the existing information from studies of bone and calcium metabolism conducted during space flight. It also highlights areas where nutrition may play a specific role in this bone loss, and where countermeasures may be developed to mitigate that loss.

  1. Bone metabolism in anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Fazeli, Pouneh K; Klibanski, Anne

    2014-03-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN), a psychiatric disorder predominantly affecting young women, is characterized by self-imposed, chronic nutritional deprivation and distorted body image. AN is associated with a number of medical comorbidities including low bone mass. The low bone mass in AN is due to an uncoupling of bone formation and bone resorption, which is the result of hormonal adaptations aimed at decreasing energy expenditure during periods of low energy intake. Importantly, the low bone mass in AN is associated with a significant risk of fractures and therefore treatments to prevent bone loss are critical. In this review, we discuss the hormonal determinants of low bone mass in AN and treatments that have been investigated in this population.

  2. Roles of leptin in bone metabolism and bone diseases.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xu Xu; Yang, Tianfu

    2015-09-01

    Adipose tissue has been more accepted as an active contributor to whole body homeostasis, rather than just a fat depot, since leptin, a 16 kDa protein, was discovered as the product of the obese gene in 1994. With more and more studies conducted on this hormone, it has been shown that there is a close relationship between adipose tissue and bone, which have important effects on each other. Bone is the source of many hormones, such as osteocalcin, that can affect energy metabolism and then the anabolism or catabolism of fat tissue. In contrast, the adipose tissue synthesizes and releases a series of adipokines, which are involved in bone metabolism through direct or indirect effects on bone formation and resorption. Interestingly, leptin, one of the most important cytokines derived from fat tissue, seems to account for the largest part of effects on bone, through direct or indirect involvement in bone remodeling and by playing a significant role in many bone diseases, such as osteoporosis, osteoarthritis, rheumatic arthritis, bone tumors and even fractures. In this review, we will discuss the progress in leptin research, particularly focusing on the roles of leptin in bone diseases.

  3. Metabolic bone disease in children : etiology and treatment options.

    PubMed

    Skowrońska-Jóźwiak, Elzbieta; Lorenc, Roman S

    2006-01-01

    Metabolic bone disease in children includes many hereditary and acquired conditions of diverse etiology that lead to disturbed metabolism of the bone tissue. Some of these processes primarily affect bone; others are secondary to nutritional deficiencies, a variety of chronic disorders, and/or treatment with some drugs. Some of these disorders are rare, but some present public health concerns (for instance, rickets) that have been well known for many years but still persist. The most important clinical consequences of bone metabolic diseases in the pediatric population include reduced linear growth, bone deformations, and non-traumatic fractures leading to bone pain, deterioration of motor development and disability. In this article, we analyze primary and secondary osteoporosis, rickets, osteomalacia (nutritional and hereditary vitamin D-dependent, hypophosphatemic and that due to renal tubular abnormalities), renal osteodystrophy, sclerosing bony disorders, and some genetic bone diseases (hypophosphatasia, fibrous dysplasia, skeletal dysplasia, juvenile Paget disease, familial expansile osteolysis, and osteoporosis pseudoglioma syndrome). Early identification and treatment of potential risk factors is essential for skeletal health in adulthood. In most conditions it is necessary to ensure an appropriate diet, with calcium and vitamin D, and an adequate amount of physical activity as a means of prevention. In secondary bone diseases, treatment of the primary disorder is crucial. Most genetic disorders await prospective gene therapies, while bone marrow transplantation has been attempted in other disorders. At present, affected patients are treated symptomatically, frequently by interdisciplinary teams. The role of exercise and pharmacologic therapy with calcium, vitamin D, phosphate, bisphosphonates, calcitonin, sex hormones, growth hormone, and thiazides is discussed. The perspectives on future therapy with insulin-like growth factor-1, new analogs of vitamin D

  4. Bone Metabolism on ISS Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, S. M.; Heer, M. A.; Shackelford, L. C.; Zwart, S. R.

    2014-01-01

    Spaceflight-induced bone loss is associated with increased bone resorption (1, 2), and either unchanged or decreased rates of bone formation. Resistive exercise had been proposed as a countermeasure, and data from bed rest supported this concept (3). An interim resistive exercise device (iRED) was flown for early ISS crews. Unfortunately, the iRED provided no greater bone protection than on missions where only aerobic and muscular endurance exercises were available (4, 5). In 2008, the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED), a more robust device with much greater resistance capability, (6, 7) was launched to the ISS. Astronauts who had access to ARED, coupled with adequate energy intake and vitamin D status, returned from ISS missions with bone mineral densities virtually unchanged from preflight (7). Bone biochemical markers showed that while the resistive exercise and adequate energy consumption did not mitigate the increased bone resorption, bone formation was increased (7, 8). The typical drop in circulating parathyroid hormone did not occur in ARED crewmembers. In 2014, an updated look at the densitometry data was published. This study confirmed the initial findings with a much larger set of data. In 42 astronauts (33 male, 9 female), the bone mineral density response to flight was the same for men and women (9), and those with access to the ARED did not have the typical decrease in bone mineral density that was observed in early ISS crewmembers with access to the iRED (Figure 1) (7). Biochemical markers of bone formation and resorption responded similarly in men and women. These data are encouraging, and represent the first in-flight evidence in the history of human space flight that diet and exercise can maintain bone mineral density on long-duration missions. However, the maintenance of bone mineral density through bone remodeling, that is, increases in both resorption and formation, may yield a bone with strength characteristics different from those

  5. Anorexia Nervosa, Obesity and Bone Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Misra, Madhusmita; Klibanski, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa and obesity are conditions at the extreme ends of the nutritional spectrum, associated with marked reductions versus increases respectively in body fat content. Both conditions are also associated with an increased risk for fractures. In anorexia nervosa, body composition and hormones secreted or regulated by body fat content are important determinants of low bone density, impaired bone structure and reduced bone strength. In addition, anorexia nervosa is characterized by increases in marrow adiposity and decreases in cold activated brown adipose tissue, both of which are related to low bone density. In obese individuals, greater visceral adiposity is associated with greater marrow fat, lower bone density and impaired bone structure. In this review, we discuss bone metabolism in anorexia nervosa and obesity in relation to adipose tissue distribution and hormones secreted or regulated by body fat content. PMID:24079076

  6. Calcium and Bone Metabolism During Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Scott M.

    2002-01-01

    The ability to understand and counteract weightlessness-induced bone loss will be critical for crew health and safety during and after space station or exploration missions lasting months or years, respectively. Until its deorbit in 2001 , the Mir Space Station provided a valuable platform for long-duration space missions and life sciences research. Long-duration flights are critical for studying bone loss, as the 2- to 3-week Space Shuttle flights are not long enough to detect changes in bone mass. This review will describe human spaceflight data, focusing on biochemical surrogates of bone and calcium metabolism. This subject has been reviewed previously. 1-

  7. Green tea and bone metabolism.

    PubMed

    Shen, Chwan-Li; Yeh, James K; Cao, Jay J; Wang, Jia-Sheng

    2009-07-01

    Osteoporosis is a major health problem in both elderly women and men. Epidemiological evidence has shown an association between tea consumption and the prevention of age-related bone loss in elderly women and men. Ingestion of green tea and green tea bioactive compounds may be beneficial in mitigating bone loss of this population and decreasing their risk of osteoporotic fractures. This review describes the effect of green tea or its bioactive components on bone health, with an emphasis on (i) the prevalence and etiology of osteoporosis; (ii) the role of oxidative stress and antioxidants in osteoporosis; (iii) green tea composition and bioavailability; (iv) the effects of green tea and its active components on osteogenesis, osteoblastogenesis, and osteoclastogenesis from human epidemiological, animal, as well as cell culture studies; (v) possible mechanisms explaining the osteoprotective effects of green tea bioactive compounds; (vi) other bioactive components in tea that benefit bone health; and (vii) a summary and future direction of green tea and bone health research and the translational aspects. In general, tea and its bioactive components might decrease the risk of fracture by improving bone mineral density and supporting osteoblastic activities while suppressing osteoclastic activities.

  8. Biochemical and morphological changes associated with long bone abnormalities in silicon deficiency.

    PubMed

    Carlisle, E M

    1980-05-01

    The purpose of this paper was to investigate long bone changes in silicon deficiency more extensively and under a new set of conditions. Long bone abnormalities have been produced in silicon-deficient chicks fed a casein-based rather than amino acid-based diet and under an entirely new set of conditions. As demonstrated previously feeding amino acid diets, the long bones of cockerels fed a silicon-supplemented basal diet and sacrificed at 4 weeks had a significantly greater amount of articular cartilage and water content as compared with the silicon-deficient group. Biochemical analyses of tibia for bone mineral, non-collagenous protein, hexosamine and collagen demonstrated that tibia from supplemented chicks had a significantly greater percentage and total amount of hexosamine and greater percentage of collagen than deficient chicks, the difference being greater for hexosamines than collagen. Tibia from silicon-deficient chicks also showed marked lesions, profound changes being demonstrated in epiphyseal cartilage, especially striking in the proliferative zone. The disturbed epiphyseal cartilage sequences resulted in defective endochondral bone growth indicating that silicon is involved in the metabolic chain of events required for the normal growth of bone.

  9. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells are abnormal in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Corre, J; Mahtouk, K; Attal, M; Gadelorge, M; Huynh, A; Fleury-Cappellesso, S; Danho, C; Laharrague, P; Klein, B; Rème, T; Bourin, P

    2007-05-01

    Recent literature suggested that cells of the microenvironment of tumors could be abnormal as well. To address this hypothesis in multiple myeloma (MM), we studied bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs), the only long-lived cells of the bone marrow microenvironment, by gene expression profiling and phenotypic and functional studies in three groups of individuals: patients with MM, patients with monoclonal gamopathy of undefined significance (MGUS) and healthy age-matched subjects. Gene expression profile independently classified the BMMSCs of these individuals in a normal and in an MM group. MGUS BMMSCs were interspersed between these two groups. Among the 145 distinct genes differentially expressed in MM and normal BMMSCs, 46% may account for a tumor-microenvironment cross-talk. Known soluble factors implicated in MM pathophysiologic features (i.e. IL (interleukin)-6, DKK1) were revealed and new ones were found which are involved in angiogenesis, osteogenic differentiation or tumor growth. In particular, GDF15 was found to induce dose-dependent growth of MOLP-6, a stromal cell-dependent myeloma cell line. Functionally, MM BMMSCs induced an overgrowth of MOLP-6, and their capacity to differentiate into an osteoblastic lineage was impaired. Thus, MM BMMSCs are abnormal and could create a very efficient niche to support the survival and proliferation of the myeloma cells.

  10. Bone and metabolic complications of urinary diversions.

    PubMed

    Cano Megías, Marta; Muñoz Delgado, Eva Golmayo

    2015-02-01

    Hyperchloremic metabolic acidosis is a complication of urinary diversion using ileum or colon. Its prevalence ranges from 25% and 46% depending on the procedure used and renal function of the patient. It is a consequence of intestinal fluid and electrolyte exchange between intestinal mucosa and urine. The main mechanism is absorption of ammonium and chloride from urine. Long-term chronic metabolic acidosis in these patients may lead to impaired bone metabolism and osteomalacia. Regular monitoring of pH, chlorine, bicarbonate, and calcium-phosphorus metabolism is therefore essential for early diagnosis and treatment.

  11. Affective Disorders, Bone Metabolism, and Osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Mezuk, Briana

    2008-12-01

    The nature of the relationship between affective disorders, bone mineral density (BMD), and bone metabolism is unresolved, although there is growing evidence that many medications used to treat affective disorders are associated with low BMD or alterations in neuroendocrine systems that influence bone turnover. The objective of this review is to describe the current evidence regarding the association of unipolar and bipolar depression with BMD and indicators of bone metabolism, and to explore potential mediating and confounding influences of those relationships. The majority of studies of unipolar depression and BMD indicate that depressive symptoms are associated with low BMD. In contrast, evidence regarding the relationship between bipolar depression and BMD is inconsistent. There is limited but suggestive evidence to support an association between affective disorders and some markers of bone turnover. Many medications used to treat affective disorders have effects on physiologic systems that influence bone metabolism, and these conditions are also associated with a range of health behaviors that can influence osteoporosis risk. Future research should focus on disentangling the pathways linking psychotropic medications and their clinical indications with BMD and fracture risk.

  12. Affective Disorders, Bone Metabolism, and Osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The nature of the relationship between affective disorders, bone mineral density (BMD), and bone metabolism is unresolved, although there is growing evidence that many medications used to treat affective disorders are associated with low BMD or alterations in neuroendocrine systems that influence bone turnover. The objective of this review is to describe the current evidence regarding the association of unipolar and bipolar depression with BMD and indicators of bone metabolism, and to explore potential mediating and confounding influences of those relationships. The majority of studies of unipolar depression and BMD indicate that depressive symptoms are associated with low BMD. In contrast, evidence regarding the relationship between bipolar depression and BMD is inconsistent. There is limited but suggestive evidence to support an association between affective disorders and some markers of bone turnover. Many medications used to treat affective disorders have effects on physiologic systems that influence bone metabolism, and these conditions are also associated with a range of health behaviors that can influence osteoporosis risk. Future research should focus on disentangling the pathways linking psychotropic medications and their clinical indications with BMD and fracture risk. PMID:23874147

  13. Inborn errors of metabolism: a cause of abnormal brain development.

    PubMed

    Nissenkorn, A; Michelson, M; Ben-Zeev, B; Lerman-Sagie, T

    2001-05-22

    Brain malformations are caused by a disruption in the sequence of normal development by various environmental or genetic factors. By modifying the intrauterine milieu, inborn errors of metabolism may cause brain dysgenesis. However, this association is typically described in single case reports. The authors review the relationship between brain dysgenesis and specific inborn errors of metabolism. Peroxisomal disorders and fatty acid oxidation defects can produce migration defects. Pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency, nonketotic hyperglycinemia, and maternal phenylketonuria preferentially cause a dysgenetic corpus callosum. Abnormal metabolism of folic acid causes neural tube defects, whereas defects in cholesterol metabolism may produce holoprosencephaly. Various mechanisms have been proposed to explain abnormal brain development in inborn errors of metabolism: production of a toxic or energy-deficient intrauterine milieu, modification of the content and function of membranes, or disturbance of the normal expression of intrauterine genes responsible for morphogenesis. The recognition of a metabolic disorder as the cause of the brain malformation has implications for both the care of the patient and for genetic counseling to prevent recurrence in subsequent pregnancies. PMID:11383558

  14. HIV infection, bone metabolism, and fractures.

    PubMed

    Güerri-Fernández, Robert; Villar-García, Judit; Díez-Pérez, Adolfo; Prieto-Alhambra, Daniel

    2014-07-01

    With the advent of high active antiretroviral therapy there was a significant improvement on HIV subjects survival. Thus, bone changes related to HIV became an important aspect of these individuals. HIV affects bone remodeling causing bone fragility. In addition, antiretroviral therapy may also negatively affect bone metabolism. Several studies describe an increased incidence of fractures in these patients when compared with controls without the disease. The European Society of AIDS (EACS), and other societies, have included guidance on management of osteoporosis in HIV-infected patients emphasizing the identification of patients with low bone mass. Supplementation of calcium and vitamin D and the use of alendronate in these individuals should be recommended on a case base. PMID:25166038

  15. Bone and Calcium Metabolism During Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Scott M.

    2004-01-01

    Understanding bone loss during space flight is one of the most critical challenges for maintaining astronaut health on space exploration missions. Flight and ground-based studies have been conducted to better understand the nature and mechanisms of weightlessness-induced bone loss, and to identify a means to counteract the loss. Maintenance of bone health requires a balance between bone formation and bone resorption. Early space research identified bone loss as a critical health issue, but could not provide a distinction between the bone formation and breakdown processes. The recent identification of collagen crosslinks as markers of bone resorption has made possible a clear understanding that a decrease in bone resorption is an important effect of space flight, with bone formation being unchanged or only slightly decreased. Calcium regulatory factors have also been studied, in an attempt to understand their role in bone loss. The lack of ultraviolet light exposure and insufficient dietary sources of vitamin D often lead to reduced vitamin D stores on long-duration flights. Serum parathyroid hormone (PTH) concentrations are decreased during flight compared to before flight, although small subject numbers often make this hard to document statistically. As expected, reduced PTH concentrations are accompanied by reduced 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D concentrations. Calcium kinetic studies during space flight confirm and extend the information gained from biochemical markers of bone metabolism. Calcium kinetic studies demonstrate that bone resorption is increased, bone formation is unchanged or decreased, and dietary calcium absorption is reduced during space flight. Evaluations have also been conducted of countermeasures, including dietary, exercise, and pharmacological treatments. In recent studies, many potential countermeasures show promise at mitigating bone loss in ground-based analogs of weightlessness (e.g., bed rest), but require further ground and flight testing to

  16. Cardiovascular Disease Risk of Abdominal Obesity versus Metabolic Abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Wildman, Rachel P.; McGinn, Aileen P.; Lin, Juan; Wang, Dan; Muntner, Paul; Cohen, Hillel W.; Reynolds, Kristi; Fonseca, Vivian; Sowers, MaryFran R.

    2011-01-01

    It remains unclear whether abdominal obesity increases cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk independent of the metabolic abnormalities which often accompany it. Therefore, the objective of the current study was to evaluate the independent effects of abdominal obesity versus metabolic syndrome and diabetes on the risk for incident coronary heart disease and stroke. The Framingham Offspring, Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities, and Cardiovascular Health studies were pooled to assess the independent effects of abdominal obesity (waist circumference >102 cm for men and >88 cm for women) versus metabolic syndrome (excluding the waist circumference criterion) and diabetes on risk for incident coronary heart disease and stroke in 20,298 men and women aged ≥45 years. The average follow-up was 8.3 (standard deviation 1.9) years. There were 1,766 CVD events. After adjustment for demographic factors, smoking, alcohol intake, number of metabolic syndrome components and diabetes, abdominal obesity was not significantly associated with an increased risk of CVD (hazard ratio [95% confidence interval] 1.09 [0.98, 1.20]). However, after adjustment for demographics, smoking, alcohol intake, and abdominal obesity, having 1–2 metabolic syndrome components, the metabolic syndrome, and diabetes were each associated with a significantly increased risk of CVD (2.12 [1.80, 2.50], 2.82 [1.92, 4.12] and 5.33 [3.37, 8.41], respectively). Although abdominal obesity is an important clinical tool for identification of individuals likely to possess metabolic abnormalities, these data suggest that the metabolic syndrome and diabetes are considerably more important prognostic indicators of CVD risk. PMID:20725064

  17. Is cancer a disease of abnormal cellular metabolism?

    PubMed Central

    DeBerardinis, Ralph J.

    2009-01-01

    In the 1920s, Otto Warburg observed that tumor cells consume a large amount of glucose, much more than normal cells, and convert most of it to lactic acid. This phenomenon, now known as the ‘Warburg effect,’ is the foundation of one of the earliest general concepts of cancer: that a fundamental disturbance of cellular metabolic activity is at the root of tumor formation and growth. In the ensuing decades, as it became apparent that abnormalities in chromosomes and eventually individual genes caused cancer, the ‘metabolic’ model of cancer lost a good deal of its appeal, even as emerging technologies were exploiting the Warburg effect clinically to detect tumors in vivo. We now know that tumor suppressors and proto-oncogenes influence metabolism, and that mutations in these genes can promote a metabolic phenotype supporting cell growth and proliferation. Thus, these advances have unified aspects of the metabolic and genetic models of cancer, and have stimulated a renewed interest in the role of cellular metabolism in tumorigenesis. This review reappraises the notion that dysregulated cellular metabolism is a key feature of cancer, and discusses some metabolic issues that have escaped scrutiny over the years and now deserve closer attention. PMID:18941420

  18. Conditional expression of human bone Gla protein in osteoblasts causes skeletal abnormality in mice.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Kazuhiro; Tsukui, Tohru; Tanaka, Daisuke; Maruyama, Yojiro; Horie-Inoue, Kuniko; Inoue, Satoshi

    2012-07-20

    Bone Gla protein (BGP), also known as osteocalcin, is one of the most abundant γ-carboxylated noncollagenous protein in bone matrix and plays important roles in mineralization and calcium ion homeostasis. BGP is synthesized specifically in osteoblasts; however, its precise function in bone metabolism has not been fully elucidated. To investigate the in vivo function of human BGP (hBGP), we generated CAG-GFP(floxed)-hBGP transgenic mice carrying a transgene cassette composed of the promoter and a floxed GFP linked to hBGP cDNA. The mice were crossed with ColI-Cre mice, which express the Cre recombinase driven by the mouse collagen type 1a1 gene promoter, to obtain hBGP(ColI) conditional transgenic mice that expressed human BGP in osteoblasts. The hBGP(ColI) mice did not survive more than 2days after birth. The analysis of the 18.5-day post coitum fetuses of the hBGP(ColI) mice revealed that they displayed abnormal skeletal growth such as deformity of the rib and short femur and cranium lengths. Moreover, increased BGP levels were detected in the serum of the neonates. These findings indicate that hBGP expression in osteoblasts resulted in the abnormal skeletal growth in the mice. Our study provides a valuable model for understanding the fundamental role of BGP in vivo.

  19. Metabolic bone disease in home total parenteral nutrition.

    PubMed

    McCullough, M L; Hsu, N

    1987-07-01

    Home total parenteral nutrition (HTPN) is in its infancy but has proved to be lifesaving for patients unable to manage on enteral nutrition alone. However, this mode of nutrition therapy is not without problems. Aside from mechanical and other metabolic complications, a peculiar metabolic bone disease has been reported to occur in some HTPN recipients. The disease, characterized by abnormalities in calcium and phosphorus homeostasis, often results in osteomalacia, bone pain, and fractures. Reports of approximately 50 cases of metabolic bone disease have been published by centers in the United States and Canada. Factors that have been implicated as possible causes include infusion of excess vitamin D, aluminum, calcium, protein, or glucose; cyclic vs. continuous TPN administration; and the patient's previous nutritional state. Although removal of vitamin D or aluminum from the TPN solution and discontinuation of TPN altogether have been associated with improvement in symptoms, histology, and laboratory values, no single factor has been identified as the cause of this troubling phenomenon. PMID:3110249

  20. The brain in bone and fuel metabolism.

    PubMed

    Wee, Natalie K Y; Kulkarni, Rishikesh N; Horsnell, Harry; Baldock, Paul A

    2016-01-01

    Obesity and osteoporosis have become major public health challenges worldwide. The brain is well established as a pivotal regulator of energy homeostasis, appetite and fuel metabolism. However, there is now clear evidence for regulation between the brain and bone. Similarly, evidence also indicates that the involvement of the brain in bone and adipose regulation is both related and interdependent. The hypothalamus, with its semi-permeable blood brain barrier, is one of the most powerful regulatory regions within the body, integrating and relaying signals not only from peripheral tissues but also from within the brain itself. Two main neuronal populations within the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus regulate energy homeostasis: The orexigenic, appetite-stimulating neurons that co-express neuropeptide Y and agouti-related peptide and the anorexigenic, appetite-suppressing neurons that co-express proopiomelanocortin and cocaine- and amphetamine related transcript. From within the arcuate, these four neuropeptides encompass some of the most powerful control of energy homeostasis in the entire body. Moreover, they also regulate skeletal homeostasis, identifying a co-ordination network linking the processes of bone and energy homeostasis. Excitingly, the number of central neuropeptides and neural factors known to regulate bone and energy homeostasis continues to grow, with cannabinoid receptors and semaphorins also involved in bone homeostasis. These neuronal pathways represent a growing area of research that is identifying novel regulatory axes between the brain and the bone, and links with other homeostatic networks; thereby revealing a far more complex, and interdependent bone biology than previously envisioned. This review examines the current understanding of the central regulation of bone and energy metabolism. PMID:26545334

  1. Association of periodontal status with liver abnormalities and metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Aisyah; Furuta, Michiko; Shinagawa, Takashi; Takeuchi, Kenji; Takeshita, Toru; Shimazaki, Yoshihiro; Yamashita, Yoshihisa

    2015-01-01

    Although an association between periodontal status and liver abnormalities has been reported, it has not been described in relation to metabolic syndrome (MetS), which often coexists with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. We examined the association of a combination of liver abnormality and MetS with periodontal condition in Japanese adults, based on the level of alcohol consumption. In 2008, 4,207 males aged 45.4 ± 8.9 years and 1,270 females aged 45.9 ± 9.7 years had annual workplace health check-ups at a company in Japan. Periodontal status was represented as periodontal pocket depth at the mesio-buccal and mid-buccal sites for all teeth. Alanine aminotransferase (ALT), and metabolic components were examined. Multiple linear regression analysis showed a significant association between deep pocket depth and the coexistence of elevated ALT and MetS in males with low alcohol consumption. Females showed no such relationship. In conclusion, the association between periodontal condition and the combination of elevated ALT and MetS was confirmed in males. That is, a clear association between liver abnormalities and periodontal condition was seen in male subjects with no or low alcohol consumption and MetS, providing new insights into the connection between liver function and periodontal health. PMID:26666857

  2. Abnormal bone mineral density and bone turnover marker expression profiles in patients with primary spontaneous pneumothorax

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Lixin; Hou, Shengcai; Hu, Bin; Zhao, Liqiang; Miao, Jinbai; Wang, Yang; Li, Tong; Zhang, Zhenkui; You, Bin; Pang, Baosen; Liang, Yufang; Zhao, Yi; Hao, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Background To examine the bone mineral density (BMD) and the role of bone biomarkers, including bone formation marker procollagen type I aminoterminal propeptide (PINP) and N-terminal midmolecule fragment osteocalcin (N-MID), bone resorption marker b-C-telopeptides of type I collagen (b-CTX) and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5b (TRACP5b) in the pathogenesis of PSP. Methods Eighty-three consecutive primary spontaneous pneumothorax (PSP) patients (PSP group) and 87 healthy individuals (control group) were enrolled in this study. General data, including gender, age, height, weight, and body mass index (BMI), were recorded. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, electrochemiluminescence immunoassay (ECLIA), and ELISA were used to evaluate bone mineral density and expression levels of bone metabolism markers, including PINP, b-CTX, TRACP5b, N-MID, and 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-OH VD). Results Mean height was significantly greater in the PSP group compared with the control group, whereas weight and BMI were lower. Patients in the PSP group had significantly lower average bone mineral density, which mainly manifested as osteopenia (11/12, 91.7%); however, only one patient (8.3%) developed osteoporosis. Serum overexpression of PINP, b-CTX, TRACP5b, and N-MID were found in PSP patients. Expression of 25-OH VD was low in PSP patients. Bone resorption markers showed positive linear relationships with bone formation markers in all participants; whereas only TRACP5b expression negatively correlated with 25-OH VD. Expression levels of all bone turnover markers negatively correlated with BMI. Regression analysis identified risk factors of PSP as age, height, weight, and TRACP5b and 25-OH VD expression levels; whereas gender and PINP, b-CTX, and N-MID expression levels were not significantly associated with the onset of PSP. Conclusions It had lower bone mineral density in PSP patients. Bone formation marker PINP, N-MID and bone resorption marker b-CTX, TRACP5b were upregulated in

  3. Abnormal Bone Mechanical and Structural Properties in Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis: A Study with Finite Element Analysis and Structural Model Index.

    PubMed

    Cheuk, K Y; Zhu, T Y; Yu, F W P; Hung, V W Y; Lee, K M; Qin, L; Cheng, J C Y; Lam, T P

    2015-10-01

    Previous studies found adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) is associated with low bone mineral density (BMD) and abnormal bone quality, whilst the association between AIS and their bone strength is unknown. From high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography-generated images, bone mechanical properties can be evaluated with finite element analysis (FEA), and trabecular rod-plate configuration related to trabecular bone strength can be quantified by structure model index (SMI). This study aimed to compare trabecular configuration and bone mechanical properties between AIS and the controls. 95 AIS girls aged 12-14 years and 97 age- and gender-matched normal controls were recruited. Bilateral femoral necks and non-dominant distal radius were scanned by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry for areal BMD and HR-pQCT for SMI and FEA, respectively. Subjects were further classified into osteopenic and non-osteopenic group based on their areal BMD. Bone mechanical properties (stiffness, failure load and apparent modulus) were calculated using FEA. Linear regression model was used for controlling age, physical activity and calcium intake. AIS was associated with lower failure load and apparent modulus after adjusting for age, whereas AIS was associated with lower apparent modulus after adjusting for all confounders. Osteopenic AIS was associated with more rod-like trabeculae when compared with non-osteopenic AIS, whereas no difference was detected between osteopenic and non-osteopenic controls. This might be the result of abnormal regulation and modulation of bone metabolism and bone modelling and remodelling in AIS which will warrant future studies with a longitudinal design to determine the significance of micro-architectural abnormalities in AIS.

  4. Metabolic bone disease associated with total parenteral nutrition.

    PubMed

    Klein, G L; Coburn, J W

    1984-01-01

    Patients receiving long-term treatment with total parenteral nutrition often develop bony abnormalities characterized by patchy osteomalacia and low bone turnover. The patients present evidence of physiologic hypoparathyroidism, although low levels of iPTH cannot entirely explain the osteomalacia. Abnormally low serum levels of 1,25(OH)2-vitamin D have been demonstrated, but the significance of these reduced levels in the pathogenesis of the bone lesions is not defined. Aluminum has been detected in large quantities in the plasma, urine, and bone of some patients treated with TPN, and there is mounting evidence that aluminum may be associated with skeletal pathology, particularly osteomalacia. There is, however, no clear documentation that aluminum accumulation produces the skeletal lesions observed, although it could be a contributing factor. There has been the unusual empiric observation that the removal of vitamin D2 from the infusate is associated with a decrease in the quantity of unmineralized osteoid in TPN patients. A possible role of vitamin D2 in producing osteomalacia is not easy to understand since normal serum levels of 25(OH)-D2, the circulating form of vitamin D2, have been reported. The long-term consequences of intravenous nutritional support for many aspects of metabolism remain unknown. Administration into the systemic circulation of predetermined quantities of calcium and phosphorus via a route that bypasses their passage across the intestinal mucosa, the portal system and the liver may have adverse consequences. It is possible that bypassing homeostatic mechanisms may affect bone formation and metabolism or lead to alterations in vitamin D sterols. Alternatively, a deficiency of an essential trace metal or the accumulation of a toxic trace substance could be responsible for the bony abnormalities. Much remains to be clarified concerning calcium homeostasis and bone disease during total parenteral nutrition. Among various possible factors, it

  5. Potential Metabolic Biomarkers to Identify Interstitial Lung Abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Yong; Jia, Dongmei; Lin, Zhang; Guo, Baosheng; He, Bing; Lu, Cheng; Xiao, Cheng; Liu, Zhongdi; Zhao, Ning; Bian, Zhaoxiang; Zhang, Ge; Zhang, Weidong; Liu, Xinru; Lu, Aiping

    2016-01-01

    Determining sensitive biomarkers in the peripheral blood to identify interstitial lung abnormalities (ILAs) is essential for the simple early diagnosis of ILAs. This study aimed to determine serum metabolic biomarkers of ILAs and the corresponding pathogenesis. Three groups of subjects undergoing health screening, including healthy subjects, subjects with ILAs, and subjects who were healthy initially and with ILAs one year later (Healthy→ILAs), were recruited for this study. The metabolic profiles of all of the subjects’ serum were analyzed by liquid chromatography quadruple time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The metabolic characteristics of the ILAs subjects were discovered, and the corresponding biomarkers were predicted. The metabolomic data from the Healthy→ILAs subjects were collected for further verification. The results indicated that five serum metabolite alterations (up-regulated phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidic acid, betaine aldehyde and phosphatidylethanolamine, as well as down-regulated 1-acylglycerophosphocholine) were sensitive and reliable biomarkers for identifying ILAs. Perturbation of the corresponding biological pathways (RhoA signaling, mTOR/P70S6K signaling and phospholipase C signaling) might be at least partially responsible for the pathogenesis of ILAs. This study may provide a good template for determining the early diagnostic markers of subclinical disease status and for obtaining a better understanding of their pathogenesis. PMID:27438829

  6. Heritability of markers of bone metabolism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Scott M.; Zwart, S. R.; Hargens, A. R.

    2005-01-01

    Several classic twin studies show genetic effects on markers of bone health, including bone mineral density and parathyroid hormone (PTH). This study was performed to assess the relative contribution of genetics to biochemical markers of bone metabolism. Fifteen sets of identical twins (8 male, 7 female) were housed in a clinical research center where diet was controlled (15% protein, 55% carbohydrate, 30% fat) for 3 consecutive days. Each day, 24-h urine pools were collected and N-telopeptide (NTX), deoxypyridinoline (DPD), calcium, and serum PTH were measured. The broad-sense heritability factor (H2) is an estimation of the portion of the total variance of a given phenotype that is attributable to genetic variance. H2 was estimated from the correlation coefficient of the phenotype data. H2 for NTX was 94% for males and 80% for females, DPD was 88% for males and 97% for females, urinary calcium excretion was 97% for males and 90% for females, and PTH was 92% for males and 79% for females. Since environmental variability was minimized for the 3 days of data collection, these heritability factors are likely overestimated. Nonetheless, the data support the concept that PTH is a predominantly heritable trait, and suggest that NTX, DPD, and calcium excretion are as well. These biochemical data support the previously documented heritability of bone health.

  7. Bone mass and bone metabolic indices in male master rowers.

    PubMed

    Śliwicka, Ewa; Nowak, Alicja; Zep, Wojciech; Leszczyński, Piotr; Pilaczyńska-Szcześniak, Łucja

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess bone mass and bone metabolic indices in master athletes who regularly perform rowing exercises. The study was performed in 29 men: 14 master rowers and 15 non-athletic, body mass index-matched controls. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry measurements of the areal bone mineral density (aBMD) were performed for the total body, regional areas (arms, total forearms, trunk, thoracic spine, pelvis, and legs), lumbar spine (L1-L4), left hip (total hip and femoral neck), and forearm (33 % radius of the dominant and nondominant forearm). Serum concentrations of osteocalcin, collagen type I cross-linked C-telopeptide, visfatin, resistin, insulin, and glucose were determined. Comparative analyses showed significantly lower levels of body fat and higher lean body mass values in the rowers compared to the control group. The rowers also had significantly higher values of total and regional (left arm, trunk, thoracic spine, pelvis, and leg) BMD, as well as higher BMD values for the lumbar spine and the left hip. There were significant differences between the groups with respect to insulin, glucose, and the index of homeostasis model assessment insulin resistance. In conclusion, the systematic training of master rowers has beneficial effects on total and regional BMD and may be recommended for preventing osteoporosis. PMID:25224128

  8. Low bone density and abnormal bone turnover in patients with atherosclerosis of peripheral vessels.

    PubMed

    Pennisi, P; Signorelli, S S; Riccobene, S; Celotta, G; Di Pino, L; La Malfa, T; Fiore, C E

    2004-05-01

    Patients with vascular calcifications often have low bone mineral density (BMD), but it is still uncertain if osteoporosis and peripheral vascular disease (VD) are interrelated and linked by a common pathomechanism. Moreover, data on bone turnover in patients with advanced atherosclerosis are lacking. We measured BMD by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and quantitative bone ultrasound (QUS), as well as the serum levels of osteocalcin (OC), bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (BAP), osteoprotegerin (OPG) and its ligand RANKL, and the urinary concentration of the C-terminal telopeptides of type I collagen (CrossLaps), in 36 patient (20 male and 16 female) with serious atherosclerotic involvement of the carotid and/or femoral artery to investigate the underlying mechanism of vascular and osseous disorders. Thirty age-matched and gender matched healthy individuals served as controls. After adjustment for age, BMD was significantly reduced at the lumbar spine in 23/36 (63%) patients (mean T score -1.71+/-1.42) and at the proximal femur in 34/36 (93%) patients (neck mean T score -2.5+/-0.88). Ten patients (27%) had abnormal QUS parameters. Gender and diabetes had no effect on the relationship between vascular calcification and bone density at any site measured. VD subjects had OC and BAP serum levels lower than controls (13.3+/-3.1 vs 27.7+/-3.3 ng/ml, P<0.01, and 8.4+/-2.3 vs 12.5+/-1.4 microg/l, P<0.01, respectively). Urinary CrossLaps excretion was not significantly different in patients with VD and in controls (257.9+/-138.9 vs 272.2+/-79.4 micro g/mmol Cr, respectively). Serum OPG and RANKL levels were similar in patients and in controls (3.5+/-1.07 vs 3.4+/-1.05 pmol/l, and 0.37+/-0.07 vs 0.36+/-0.06 pmol/l, respectively). We proved high occurrence of osteoporosis in VD, with evidence of age and gender independence. Negative bone remodelling balance would be a consequence of reduced bone formation, with no apparent increased activation of the OPG-RANKL system

  9. Sudden infant death syndrome and abnormal metabolism of thiamin.

    PubMed

    Lonsdale, Derrick

    2015-12-01

    Although it has been generally accepted that moving the infant from the prone to the supine position has solved the problem of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), it has been hypothesized that this is an insufficient explanation and that a mixture of genetic risk, some form of stressful incident and marginal brain metabolism is proportionately required. It is suggested that each of these three variables, with dominance in one or more of them, act together in the common etiology. Much has been written about the association of thiamin and magnesium but the finding of extremely high concentrations of serum thiamin in SIDs victims has largely caused rejection of thiamin as being involved in the etiology. The publication of abnormal brainstem auditory evoked potentials strongly suggests that there are electrochemical changes in the brainstem affecting the mechanisms of automatic breathing and the control of cardiac rhythm. The brainstem, cerebellum and limbic system of the brain are known to be highly sensitive to thiamin deficiency (pseudo-hypoxia) and the pathophysiology is similar to a mild continued deprivation of oxygen. Little attention has been paid to the complex metabolism of thiamin. Dietary thiamin requires the cooperation of the SLC19 family of thiamin transporters for its absorption into cells and recent information has shown that transporter SNPs may be relatively common and can be expected to increase genetic risk. Thiamin must be phosphorylated to synthesize thiamin pyrophosphate (TPP), well established in its vital action in glucose metabolism. TPP is also a cofactor for the enzyme 2-hydroxyacyl-CoA lyase (HACL1) in the peroxisome, emphasizing its importance in alpha oxidation and plasmalogen synthesis in cell membrane physiology. The importance of thiamine triphosphate (TTP) in energy metabolism is still largely unknown. Thiamin metabolism has been implicated in hyperemesis gravidarum and iatrogenic Wernicke encephalopathy has been reported when the

  10. Recent developments in metabolic bone diseases: a gnathic perspective.

    PubMed

    Raubenheimer, Erich J; Noffke, Claudia E; Hendrik, Hilde D

    2014-12-01

    Metabolic bone diseases often are asymptomatic and progress sub clinically. Many patients present at a late stage with catastrophic skeletal and extra skeletal complications. In this article, we provide an overview of normal bone remodeling and a synopsis of recent developments in the following conditions: osteoporosis, rickets/osteomalacia, endocrine-induced bone disease, chronic kidney disease-mineral bone disorder and Paget's disease of bone. Our discussion will emphasize the clinical and microscopic manifestations of these diseases in the jaws.

  11. Hypertriglyceridemic Waist and Metabolic Abnormalities in Brazilian Schoolchildren

    PubMed Central

    Guilherme, Flávio Ricardo; Molena-Fernandes, Carlos Alexandre; Hintze, Luzia Jaeger; Fávero, Maria Teresa Martins; Cuman, Roberto Kenji Nakamura; Rinaldi, Wilson

    2014-01-01

    Objective To identify the prevalence of hypertriglyceridemic waist (HTW) phenotype and its association with metabolic abnormalities in schoolchildren. Methods A cross-sectional study, with a sample of 241 students aged 10 to 14 years from public schools (4 schools) and private (2 schools) from Paranavai town, in Parana State, Brazil. Anthropometric variables (weight, height, waist circumference) and levels of triglycerides, total cholesterol, HDL-C, non-HDL and LDL-C were analyzed. In statistical tests of Pearson partial correlation and multivariate logistic regression, considering p<0,05. Results The prevalence of HTW was 20,7% among schoolchildren, 14,1% in males and 6,6% among females with higher proportions aged 10–12 years old. Multivariate analysis indicated that the students who attended private schools were nearly three times more likely (95% CI: 1,2–5,6), to be diagnosed with HTW compared with those who attended public schools (p = 0,006), and LDL-C was the only metabolic variable positively associated with the outcome (p = 0,001), where the students categorized with elevated serum levels had odds 4,2 times (95% CI: 1,6–10,9) having the HTW compared to students in appropriate levels. Conclusion This study showed higher prevalence of hypertriglyceridemic waist phenotype in students when compared to prospective studies in Brazil and worldwide. It also showed that the only metabolic alteration associated with HTW phenotype was LDL-C (low density lipoprotein). PMID:25397885

  12. Periodontal and alveolar bone abnormalities associated with pachydermoperiostosis.

    PubMed

    Akdeniz, B G; Seçkin, T

    2001-01-01

    Pachydermoperiostosis (PDP) is an unusual syndrome manifested clinically by finger clubbing, extremity enlargement, hypertrophic skin changes, and periosteal bone formation. A rare case of pachydermoperiostosis (primary hypertrophic osteoarthropathy) with oral manifestations in a 47-year-old man is presented. The possible correlation between physiological mechanisms of this disease and their influence on oral periodontal tissues and alveolar bone is discussed.

  13. Diphosphonates in the evaluation of metabolic bone disease.

    PubMed

    Fogelman, I; Smith, M L

    1982-03-01

    The bone scan may be of value in the assessment of patients with metabolic bone disease. However the superiority of the bone scan when compared to radiology in conditions such as renal osteodystrophy, osteomalacia, primary hyperparathyroidism, and osteoporosis requires substantiation with the newer radiopharmaceuticals which have a higher affinity for bone. Two methods of quantitating skeletal uptake of tracer have been assessed to try to remove the subjective aspect of bone scan evaluation. Measurements of bone to soft tissue ratios have proved clinically disappointing, but 24 hour whole body retention of diphosphonate appears to provide a sensitive index of increased bone turnover.

  14. Redox metabolism abnormalities in autistic children associated with mitochondrial disease.

    PubMed

    Frye, R E; Delatorre, R; Taylor, H; Slattery, J; Melnyk, S; Chowdhury, N; James, S J

    2013-06-18

    Research studies have uncovered several metabolic abnormalities associated with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), including mitochondrial disease (MD) and abnormal redox metabolism. Despite the close connection between mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress, the relation between MD and oxidative stress in children with ASD has not been studied. Plasma markers of oxidative stress and measures of cognitive and language development and ASD behavior were obtained from 18 children diagnosed with ASD who met criteria for probable or definite MD per the Morava et al. criteria (ASD/MD) and 18 age and gender-matched ASD children without any biological markers or symptoms of MD (ASD/NoMD). Plasma measures of redox metabolism included reduced free glutathione (fGSH), oxidized glutathione (GSSG), the fGSH/GSSG ratio and 3-nitrotyrosine (3NT). In addition, a plasma measure of chronic immune activation, 3-chlorotyrosine (3CT), was also measured. Language was measured using the preschool language scale or the expressive one-word vocabulary test (depending on the age), adaptive behaviour was measured using the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scale (VABS) and core autism symptoms were measured using the Autism Symptoms Questionnaire and the Social Responsiveness Scale. Children with ASD/MD were found to have lower scores on the communication and daily living skill subscales of the VABS despite having similar language and ASD symptoms. Children with ASD/MD demonstrated significantly higher levels of fGSH/GSSG and lower levels of GSSG as compared with children with ASD/NoMD, suggesting an overall more favourable glutathione redox status in the ASD/MD group. However, compare with controls, both ASD groups demonstrated lower fGSH and fGSH/GSSG, demonstrating that both groups suffer from redox abnormalities. Younger ASD/MD children had higher levels of 3CT than younger ASD/NoMD children because of an age-related effect in the ASD/MD group. Both ASD groups demonstrated significantly

  15. Skeleton and glucose metabolism: a bone-pancreas loop.

    PubMed

    Faienza, Maria Felicia; Luce, Vincenza; Ventura, Annamaria; Colaianni, Graziana; Colucci, Silvia; Cavallo, Luciano; Grano, Maria; Brunetti, Giacomina

    2015-01-01

    Bone has been considered a structure essential for mobility, calcium homeostasis, and hematopoietic function. Recent advances in bone biology have highlighted the importance of skeleton as an endocrine organ which regulates some metabolic pathways, in particular, insulin signaling and glucose tolerance. This review will point out the role of bone as an endocrine "gland" and, specifically, of bone-specific proteins, as the osteocalcin (Ocn), and proteins involved in bone remodeling, as osteoprotegerin, in the regulation of insulin function and glucose metabolism. PMID:25873957

  16. The consequences of chronic kidney disease on bone metabolism and growth in children

    PubMed Central

    Bacchetta, Justine; Harambat, Jérôme; Cochat, Pierre; Salusky, Isidro B.; Wesseling-Perry, Katherine

    2012-01-01

    Growth retardation, decreased final height and renal osteodystrophy (ROD) are common complications of childhood chronic kidney disease (CKD), resulting from a combination of abnormalities in the growth hormone (GH) axis, vitamin D deficiency, hyperparathyroidism, hypogonadism, inadequate nutrition, cachexia and drug toxicity. The impact of CKD-associated bone and mineral disorders (CKD–MBD) may be immediate (serum phosphate/calcium disequilibrium) or delayed (poor growth, ROD, fractures, vascular calcifications, increased morbidity and mortality). In 2012, the clinical management of CKD–MBD in children needs to focus on three main objectives: (i) to provide an optimal growth in order to maximize the final height with an early management with recombinant GH therapy when required, (ii) to equilibrate calcium/phosphate metabolism so as to obtain acceptable bone quality and cardiovascular status and (iii) to correct all metabolic and clinical abnormalities that can worsen bone disease, growth and cardiovascular disease, i.e. metabolic acidosis, anaemia, malnutrition and 25(OH)vitamin D deficiency. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the mineral, bone and vascular abnormalities associated with CKD in children in terms of pathophysiology, diagnosis and clinical management. PMID:22851629

  17. The Impact of Anti-Epileptic Drugs on Growth and Bone Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Hueng-Chuen; Lee, Herng-Shen; Chang, Kai-Ping; Lee, Yi-Yen; Lai, Hsin-Chuan; Hung, Pi-Lien; Lee, Hsiu-Fen; Chi, Ching-Shiang

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy is a common neurological disorder worldwide and anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs) are always the first choice for treatment. However, more than 50% of patients with epilepsy who take AEDs have reported bone abnormalities. Cytochrome P450 (CYP450) isoenzymes are induced by AEDs, especially the classical AEDs, such as benzodiazepines (BZDs), carbamazepine (CBZ), phenytoin (PT), phenobarbital (PB), and valproic acid (VPA). The induction of CYP450 isoenzymes may cause vitamin D deficiency, hypocalcemia, increased fracture risks, and altered bone turnover, leading to impaired bone mineral density (BMD). Newer AEDs, such as levetiracetam (LEV), oxcarbazepine (OXC), lamotrigine (LTG), topiramate (TPM), gabapentin (GP), and vigabatrin (VB) have broader spectra, and are safer and better tolerated than the classical AEDs. The effects of AEDs on bone health are controversial. This review focuses on the impact of AEDs on growth and bone metabolism and emphasizes the need for caution and timely withdrawal of these medications to avoid serious disabilities. PMID:27490534

  18. The Impact of Anti-Epileptic Drugs on Growth and Bone Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Fan, Hueng-Chuen; Lee, Herng-Shen; Chang, Kai-Ping; Lee, Yi-Yen; Lai, Hsin-Chuan; Hung, Pi-Lien; Lee, Hsiu-Fen; Chi, Ching-Shiang

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy is a common neurological disorder worldwide and anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs) are always the first choice for treatment. However, more than 50% of patients with epilepsy who take AEDs have reported bone abnormalities. Cytochrome P450 (CYP450) isoenzymes are induced by AEDs, especially the classical AEDs, such as benzodiazepines (BZDs), carbamazepine (CBZ), phenytoin (PT), phenobarbital (PB), and valproic acid (VPA). The induction of CYP450 isoenzymes may cause vitamin D deficiency, hypocalcemia, increased fracture risks, and altered bone turnover, leading to impaired bone mineral density (BMD). Newer AEDs, such as levetiracetam (LEV), oxcarbazepine (OXC), lamotrigine (LTG), topiramate (TPM), gabapentin (GP), and vigabatrin (VB) have broader spectra, and are safer and better tolerated than the classical AEDs. The effects of AEDs on bone health are controversial. This review focuses on the impact of AEDs on growth and bone metabolism and emphasizes the need for caution and timely withdrawal of these medications to avoid serious disabilities. PMID:27490534

  19. Serum metabolic profiling of abnormal savda by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yin, Peiyuan; Mohemaiti, Patamu; Chen, Jing; Zhao, Xinjie; Lu, Xin; Yimiti, Adilijiang; Upur, Halmurat; Xu, Guowang

    2008-08-15

    Abnormal savda is a special symptom in Uigur medicine. The understanding of its metabolic origins is of great importance for the subsequent treatment. Here, a metabonomic study of this symptom was carried out using LC-MS based human serum metabolic profiling. Orthogonal signal correction partial least-squares discriminant analysis (OSC-PLS-DA) was used for the classification and prediction of abnormal savda. Potential biomarkers from metabonomics were also identified for a metabolic understanding of abnormal savda. As a result, our OSC-PLS-DA model had a satisfactory ability for separation and prediction of abnormal savda. The potential biomarkers including bilirubin, bile acids, tryptophan, phenylalanine and lyso-phosphatidylcholines indicated that abnormal savda could be related to some abnormal metabolisms within the body, including energy metabolism, absorption of nutrition, metabolism of lecithin on cell membrane, etc. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study of abnormal savda based on serum metabolic profiling. The LC/MS-based metabonomic platform could be a powerful tool for the classification of symptoms and for the development of this traditional medicine into an evidence-based one.

  20. Peripheral Blood and Bone Marrow Abnormalities in the Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Frontiera, Michael; Myers, Adam M.

    1987-01-01

    In reviewing the peripheral hematologic manifestations, bone marrow changes and clinical course in 41 consecutive patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), frequent findings included anemia (95%), leukopenia (76%), bone marrow hypercellularity (73%) and pancytopenia (41%). These hematologic abnormalities were not clearly associated with specific clinical manifestations of AIDS, but support the conclusion that the hematopoietic system is a target organ in AIDS. The mechanisms of these abnormalities still need to be evaluated. Clinicians should be aware of these commonly encountered changes. Images PMID:3660772

  1. Sympathetic neural influence on bone metabolism in microgravity (Review).

    PubMed

    Mano, Tadaaki; Nishimura, N; Iwase, S

    2010-12-01

    Bone loss is one of the most important complications for astronauts who are exposed to long-term microgravity in space and also for bedridden elderly people. Recent studies have indicated that the sympathetic nervous system plays a role in bone metabolism. This paper reviews findings concerning with sympathetic influences on bone metabolism to hypothesize the mechanism how sympathetic neural functions are related to bone loss in microgravity. Animal studies have suggested that leptin stimulates hypothalamus increasing sympathetic outflow to bone and enhances bone resorption through noradrenaline and β-adrenoreceptors in bone. In humans, even though there have been some controversial findings, use of β-adrenoblockers has been reported to be beneficial for prevention of osteoporosis and bone fracture. On the other hand, microneurographically-recorded sympathetic nerve activity was enhanced by exposure to microgravity in space as well as dry immersion or long-term bed rest to simulate microgravity. The same sympathetic activity became higher in elderly people whose bone mass becomes generally reduced. Our recent findings indicated a significant correlation between muscle sympathetic nerve activity and urinary deoxypyridinoline as a specific marker measuring bone resorption. Based on these findings we would like to propose a following hypothesis concerning the sympathetic involvement in the mechanism of bone loss in microgravity: An exposure to prolonged microgravity may enhance sympathetic neural traffic not only to muscle but also to bone. This sympathetic enhancement increases plasma noradrenaline level and inhibits osteogenesis and facilitates bone resorption through β-adrenoreceptors in bone to facilitate bone resorption to reduce bone mass. The use of β-adrenoblockers to prevent bone loss in microgravity may be reasonable.

  2. [Bone metabolism and cardiovascular function update. Nerve system and mutual interaction between bone and blood vessel].

    PubMed

    Ochi, Hiroki; Takeda, Shu

    2014-07-01

    The identification that nervous system controls bone metabolism through leptin deficient mice studies opened a new field in bone biology. Notably, sympathetic and parasympathetic nerve system regulate bone metabolism. In addition, sensory nerve system also has been shown to be involved in the regulation of bone homeostasis. On the other hand, traditionally, it is well known that invasion of vessels into cartilage during the skeletal development is important for normal bone formation. And, the decrease of angiogenesis with aging leads to low bone mass and delaying of fracture healing. Although these indicate that blood vessel activity is closely related to bone remodeling, its molecular mechanism is still unknown. Most recently, the mechanism of coupling of angiogenesis and osteogenesis by a specific vessel subtype in bone was reported.

  3. Collagen synthesis and carbohydrate metabolism of rachitic bone

    PubMed Central

    Paterson, C. R.; Fourman, P.

    1968-01-01

    1. This paper reports studies on the metabolism of bone from normal chicks and from chicks with vitamin D-deficiency rickets. Both in vitro and in vivo there was an increased incorporation of [14C]proline into collagen hydroxyproline by rachitic bone. The proportion of the collagen that was soluble in cold salt solutions was greater with the rachitic bone. These results show that in rickets there is an increased synthesis of bone collagen, but they do not provide any evidence of a defect in the maturation of collagen. 2. Rachitic bone incubated aerobically in vitro consumed more glucose and released more lactate than normal bone. Bone from rachitic chicks treated with vitamin D 48hr. previously had rates of glycolysis that were nearly normal. Though we were unable to show any direct action of vitamin D in vitro, we consider that vitamin D probably has a direct action on bone, possibly related to matrix biosynthesis. PMID:5669840

  4. Metabolic bone disease in chronic renal failure. I. Dialyzed uremics.

    PubMed Central

    Huffer, W. E.; Kuzela, D.; Popovtzer, M. M.

    1975-01-01

    Garner and ball's point counting technic was used to compare metabolic bone disease in dialyzed and nondialyzed uremic patients. Histologic measurements of bone from dialyzed and nondialyzed uremic patients dying between 1966 and 1971 showed that dialyzed patients have quantitatively more severe bone resorption, distortion of trabecular architecture and mineralization defects. Mineralization defects become more severe as the duration of dialysis increases but are not related to serum calcium and phosphorus levels. Bone volume in both groups is normal or increased and in dialysis patients increases in proportion to the elevation of serum phosphorus. Mean serum phosphorus and calcium levels, bone volume, and volume: surface ratios all decreased in dialysis patients between 1966 and 1971, while bone resorption and mineralization defects did not change. These results suggest that lowering of serum phosphorus without increasing serum calcium may aggrevate the uremic bone disease by reducing bone volume without improvement of mineralization and resorption defects. Images Fig 1 PMID:1119535

  5. Linking chronic tryptophan deficiency with impaired bone metabolism and reduced bone accrual in growing rats.

    PubMed

    Sibilia, Valeria; Pagani, Francesca; Lattuada, Norma; Greco, Antonella; Guidobono, Francesca

    2009-08-01

    There is increasing evidence that serotonin may regulate bone metabolism. However, its role remains to be clarified. Serotonin seems to be either beneficial or detrimental for bone tissues depending on the pharmacological manipulation used. In this study we evaluated the impact of a reduction of serotonergic stores induced by chronic tryptophan (TRP) depletion on various bone parameters in growing rats. For this purpose rats received a TRP-free diet for 60 days. Bone mass, mineral content and density were measured by DXA and by pQCT in the appendicular skeleton. Bone metabolic markers included urinary deoxypyridinoline and serum osteocalcin measurements. IGF-I levels were also evaluated. In TRP-free diet rats, we found a decrease in body weight, a delayed femoral bone growth and bone mineral content as measured by DXA. pQCT analysis showed that these effects were related to a reduction of both cortical and trabecular bone and are associated with a reduction of bone strength. These effects are due to a negative shift in the balance between bone formation and resorption with a significant decrease in bone formation as evidenced by a reduction both in osteocalcin and IGF-I levels. The present data extend our overall knowledge on the participation of serotonin in the regulation of growing bone and could be of interest in studying the impairment of bone growth in depressed subjects under particular condition of rapid bone accrual such as childhood and adolescence.

  6. Influence of physical activity to bone metabolism.

    PubMed

    Drenjančević, Ines; Davidović Cvetko, Erna

    2013-02-01

    Bone remodeling is a lifetime process. Peak bone mass is achieved in the twenties, and that value is very important for skeleton health in older years of life. Modern life style with its diet poor in nutrients, and very low intensity of physical activity negatively influences health in general, and bone health as well. Bones are adapting to changes in load, so applying mechanical strain to bones results in greater bone mass and hardness. That makes physical activity important in maintaining skeleton health. Numerous studies confirm good influence of regular exercising to bone health, and connection of physical activity in youth to better bone density in older age. To activate bone remodeling mechanisms, it is necessary to apply mechanical strain to bones by exercise. Considering global problem of bone loss and osteoporosis new ways of activating young people to practice sports and active stile of life are necessary to maintain skeleton health and health in general. This paper aims to review physiological mechanisms of bone remodeling that are influenced by physical exercise. PMID:23348155

  7. Levels of adipocytokines and vitamin D in a biracial sample of young metabolically healthy obese and metabolically abnormal obese women

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Purpose: Adipocytokines and vitamin D (vitD) concentrations may contribute to cardiometabolic risk profiles in obese populations. The purpose was to determine if levels of adipocytokines and vitD differ between young metabolically healthy obese (MHO) and metabolically abnormal obese (MAO) black and ...

  8. Absence of the lysophosphatidic acid receptor LPA1 results in abnormal bone development and decreased bone mass.

    PubMed

    Gennero, Isabelle; Laurencin-Dalicieux, Sara; Conte-Auriol, Françoise; Briand-Mésange, Fabienne; Laurencin, Danielle; Rue, Jackie; Beton, Nicolas; Malet, Nicole; Mus, Marianne; Tokumura, Akira; Bourin, Philippe; Vico, Laurence; Brunel, Gérard; Oreffo, Richard O C; Chun, Jerold; Salles, Jean Pierre

    2011-09-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a lipid mediator that acts in paracrine systems via interaction with a subset of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). LPA promotes cell growth and differentiation, and has been shown to be implicated in a variety of developmental and pathophysiological processes. At least 6 LPA GPCRs have been identified to date: LPA1-LPA6. Several studies have suggested that local production of LPA by tissues and cells contributes to paracrine regulation, and a complex interplay between LPA and its receptors, LPA1 and LPA4, is believed to be involved in the regulation of bone cell activity. In particular, LPA1 may activate both osteoblasts and osteoclasts. However, its role has not as yet been examined with regard to the overall status of bone in vivo. We attempted to clarify this role by defining the bone phenotype of LPA1((-/-)) mice. These mice demonstrated significant bone defects and low bone mass, indicating that LPA1 plays an important role in osteogenesis. The LPA1((-/-)) mice also presented growth and sternal and costal abnormalities, which highlights the specific roles of LPA1 during bone development. Microcomputed tomography and histological analysis demonstrated osteoporosis in the trabecular and cortical bone of LPA1((-/-)) mice. Finally, bone marrow mesenchymal progenitors from these mice displayed decreased osteoblastic differentiation. These results suggest that LPA1 strongly influences bone development both qualitatively and quantitatively and that, in vivo, its absence results in decreased osteogenesis with no clear modification of osteoclasis. They open perspectives for a better understanding of the role of the LPA/LPA1 paracrine pathway in bone pathophysiology.

  9. Absence of the lysophosphatidic acid receptor LPA1 results in abnormal bone development and decreased bone mass☆,☆☆

    PubMed Central

    Gennero, Isabelle; Laurencin-Dalicieux, Sara; Conte-Auriol, Françoise; Briand-Mésange, Fabienne; Laurencin, Danielle; Rue, Jackie; Beton, Nicolas; Malet, Nicole; Mus, Marianne; Tokumura, Akira; Bourin, Philippe; Vico, Laurence; Brunel, Gérard; Oreffo, Richard O. C.; Chun, Jerold; Salles, Jean Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a lipid mediator that acts in paracrine systems via interaction with a subset of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). LPA promotes cell growth and differentiation, and has been shown to be implicated in a variety of developmental and pathophysiological processes. At least 6 LPA GPCRs have been identified to date: LPA1–LPA6. Several studies have suggested that local production of LPA by tissues and cells contributes to paracrine regulation, and a complex interplay between LPA and its receptors, LPA1 and LPA4, is believed to be involved in the regulation of bone cell activity. In particular, LPA1may activate both osteoblasts and osteoclasts. However, its role has not as yet been examined with regard to the overall status of bone in vivo. We attempted to clarify this role by defining the bone phenotype of LPA1(−/−) mice. These mice demonstrated significant bone defects and low bone mass, indicating that LPA1 plays an important role in osteogenesis. The LPA1(−/−) mice also presented growth and sternal and costal abnormalities, which highlights the specific roles of LPA1 during bone development. Microcomputed tomography and histological analysis demonstrated osteoporosis in the trabecular and cortical bone of LPA1(−/−) mice. Finally, bone marrow mesenchymal progenitors from these mice displayed decreased osteoblastic differentiation. These results suggest that LPA1 strongly influences bone development both qualitatively and quantitatively and that, in vivo, its absence results in decreased osteogenesis with no clear modification of osteoclasis. They open perspectives for a better understanding of the role of the LPA/LPA1 paracrine pathway in bone pathophysiology. PMID:21569876

  10. NHANES III: influence of race on GFR thresholds and detection of metabolic abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Foley, Robert N; Wang, Changchun; Ishani, Areef; Collins, Allan J

    2007-09-01

    Whether the creatinine-based glomerular filtration rate (GFR) thresholds used to define chronic kidney disease (CKD) identify metabolic abnormalities similarly in minority and nonminority populations is unknown. We addressed this question among adult participants in the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III) (n = 15,837). GFR was estimated from serum creatinine values and metabolic abnormalities were defined by 5th or 95th percentile values. After adjustment for age, demographic characteristics, and GFR, black participants were significantly more likely than white participants to have abnormal levels of systolic and diastolic blood pressure, hemoglobin, phosphorus, and uric acid. Hispanic subjects were significantly more likely to have abnormal levels of systolic blood pressure, hemoglobin, bicarbonate, and phosphorus. Among participants with GFR < 60 mL/min per 1.73 m(2), black participants were significantly more likely to have abnormal levels of systolic and diastolic blood pressure, hemoglobin, and uric acid; Hispanic subjects were significantly more likely to have abnormal systolic blood pressure levels. Metabolic abnormalities were more common in minority populations, and low GFR appeared to have a multiplicative effect. Defining CKD using a single GFR threshold may be disadvantageous for minority populations because metabolic abnormalities are present at higher levels of GFR.

  11. Metabolic bone disease in gut diseases.

    PubMed

    Lipkin, E W

    1998-06-01

    A wide spectrum of gastrointestinal illnesses impairs bone health and can result in bone pain, demineralization, and fracture. This article summarizes current knowledge of the skeletal pathology exhibited in patients with diseases of the liver, biliary tree, pancreas, and bowel. Mechanisms responsible for these syndromes and treatment options are discussed. This article enhances the practicing gastroenterologist's knowledge of the implications of gastrointestinal illness for bone. PMID:9650030

  12. Long-Term Administration of High-Fat Diet Corrects Abnormal Bone Remodeling in the Tibiae of Interleukin-6-Deficient Mice.

    PubMed

    Feng, Wei; Liu, Bo; Liu, Di; Hasegawa, Tomoka; Wang, Wei; Han, Xiuchun; Cui, Jian; Yimin; Oda, Kimimitsu; Amizuka, Norio; Li, Minqi

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to evaluate the influence of diet-induced obesity on IL-6 deficiency-induced bone remodeling abnormality. Seven-week-old IL-6(-/-) mice and their wild type (WT) littermates were fed a standard diet (SD) or high-fat diet (HFD) for 25 weeks. Lipid formation and bone metabolism in mice tibiae were investigated by histochemical analysis. Both IL-6(-/-) and WT mice fed the HFD showed notable body weight gain, thickened cortical bones, and adipose accumulation in the bone marrow. Notably, the HFD normalized the bone phenotype of IL-6(-/-) mice to that of their WT counterpart, as characterized by a decrease in bone mass and the presence of an obliquely arranged, plate-like morphology in the trabecular bone. Alkaline phosphatase and osteocalcin expressions were attenuated in both genotypes after HFD feeding, especially for the IL-6(-/-) mice. Meanwhile, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase staining was inhibited, osteoclast apoptosis rate down-regulated (revealed by TUNEL assay), and the proportion of cathepsin K (CK)-positive osteoclasts significantly increased in IL-6(-/-) mice on a HFD as compared with IL-6(-/-) mice on standard chow. Our results demonstrate that HFD-induced obesity reverses IL-6 deficiency-associated bone metabolic disorders by suppressing osteoblast activity, upregulating osteoclastic activity, and inhibiting osteoclast apoptosis. PMID:26416243

  13. Insulin signaling in osteoblasts integrates bone remodeling and energy metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Ferron, Mathieu; Wei, Jianwen; Yoshizawa, Tatsuya; Fattore, Andrea Del; DePinho, Ronald A.; Teti, Anna; Ducy, Patricia; Karsenty, Gerard

    2010-01-01

    The broad expression of the insulin receptor suggests that the spectrum of insulin function has not been fully described. A cell type expressing this receptor is the osteoblast, a bone-specific cell favoring glucose metabolism through a hormone, osteocalcin, that becomes active once uncarboxylated. We show here that insulin signaling in osteoblasts is necessary for whole-body glucose homeostasis because it increases osteocalcin activity. To achieve this function insulin signaling in osteoblasts takes advantage of the regulation of osteoclastic bone resorption exerted by osteoblasts. Indeed, since bone resorption occurs at a pH acid enough to decarboxylate proteins, osteoclasts determine the carboxylation status and function of osteocalcin. Accordingly, increasing or decreasing insulin signaling in osteoblasts promotes or hampers glucose metabolism in a bone resorption-dependent manner in mice and humans. Hence, in a feed-forward loop, insulin signals in osteoblasts to activate a hormone, osteocalcin, that promotes glucose metabolism. PMID:20655470

  14. Sugar-Sweetened Beverages and Prevalence of the Metabolically Abnormal Phenotype in the Framingham Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    Green, Angela K.; Jacques, Paul F.; Rogers, Gail; Fox, Caroline S.; Meigs, James B.; McKeown, Nicola M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between usual sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) consumption and prevalence of abnormal metabolic health across body mass index (BMI) categories. Design and Methods The metabolic health of 6,842 non-diabetic adults was classified using cross-sectional data from the Framingham Heart Study Offspring (1998–2001) and Third Generation (2002–2005) cohorts. Adults were classified as normal weight, overweight or obese and, within these categories, metabolic health was defined based on five criteria – hypertension, elevated fasting glucose, elevated triglycerides, low HDL cholesterol, and insulin resistance. Individuals without metabolic abnormalities were considered metabolically healthy. Logistic regression was used to examine the associations between categories of SSB consumption and risk of metabolic health after stratification by BMI. Results Comparing the highest category of SSB consumers (median of 7 SSB per week) to the lowest category (non-consumers), odds ratios (95% confidence intervals) for metabolically abnormal phenotypes, compared to the metabolically normal, were 1.9 (1.1–3.4) among the obese, 2.0 (1.4–2.9) among the overweight, and 1.9 (1.4–2.6) among the normal weight individuals. Conclusions In this cross-sectional analysis, it is observed that, irrespective of weight status, consumers of SSB were more likely to display metabolic abnormalities compared to non-consumers in a dose-dependent manner. PMID:24550031

  15. Effect of Microgravity on Bone Tissue and Calcium Metabolism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Session TA4 includes short reports concerning: (1) Human Bone Tissue Changes after Long-Term Space Flight: Phenomenology and Possible Mechanics; (2) Prediction of Femoral Neck Bone Mineral Density Change in Space; (3) Dietary Calcium in Space; (4) Calcium Metabolism During Extended-Duration Space Flight; (5) External Impact Loads on the Lower Extremity During Jumping in Simulated Microgravity and the Relationship to Internal Bone Strain; and (6) Bone Loss During Long Term Space Flight is Prevented by the Application of a Short Term Impulsive Mechanical Stimulus.

  16. Metabolic abnormalities in adult and geriatric major depression with and without comorbid dementia.

    PubMed

    Blank, Karen; Szarek, Bonnie L; Goethe, John W

    2010-06-01

    Metabolic abnormalities and metabolic syndrome (MetS) increasingly have been linked to depression. The authors studied examined inpatients 35 years and older with major depressive disorder (MDD) to determine the prevalence of component metabolic abnormalities and the full MetS with age, treatment, and comorbid dementia. Data analysis involved retrospective cross-sectional review from a nonprofit psychiatry inpatient service of all discharges 35 years and older with a diagnosis of MDD during a 3 year period (April 1, 2003 to March 31, 2006) (N=1718). Metabolic measures included waist circumference, lipid measurements, glucose, and hypertension diagnosis. Abnormal metabolic measures and MetS were highly prevalent in both young and old patients with MDD: one or more component was present in 87.6% of older (65-99 years old) and 79.9% of younger patients. Full MetS was present in 31.5% of older and 28.9% of younger patients (not significant, P=0.85). Metabolic abnormalities were not associated with atypical antipsychotics after controlling other variables. One-quarter (n=79, 24.9%) of older inpatients had a dementia co-diagnosis. Older patients with MDD and dementia had greater risk of elevated glucose while younger patients were more often hypertensive. Longitudinal studies are needed to determine the relationships of MDD with or without dementia with these highly prevalent abnormal metabolic measures and MetS.

  17. Relationships among maxillofacial morphologies, bone properties, and bone metabolic markers in patients with jaw deformities.

    PubMed

    Saito, D; Mikami, T; Oda, Y; Hasebe, D; Nishiyama, H; Saito, I; Kobayashi, T

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the relationships among bone properties, bone metabolic markers, and types of jaw deformity. The subjects were 55 female patients with jaw deformities. Skeletal morphology was examined using lateral cephalograms, and the patients were divided into three groups according to the type of anteroposterior skeletal pattern. Serum osteocalcin, bone alkaline phosphatase, and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase isoform 5b, as well as deoxypyridinoline in urine, were measured as bone metabolic markers. Quantitative ultrasound (QUS) measurements were used to assess bone properties at the calcaneal bone. The bone volume and bone density of the condylar process were measured in 43 patients by computed tomography. There were no significant differences in bone metabolic markers and QUS parameters between the groups, although bone formation and resorption markers tended to be higher in patients with a protrusive mandible. On the other hand, patients with mandibular retrusion had a higher tendency to have small and dense condylar processes. In conclusion, the results suggest that growth depression or a degenerative change in the mandibular condyle is involved in the pathogenesis of mandibular retrusion, although risk factors for progressive condylar resorption were not determined. PMID:26972158

  18. Effect of simulated weightlessness and chronic 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D administration on bone metabolism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halloran, B. P.; Bikle, D. D.; Globus, R. K.; Levens, M. J.; Wronski, T. J.; Morey-Holton, E.

    1985-01-01

    Weightlessness, as experienced during space flight, and simulated weightlessness induce osteopenia. Using the suspended rat model to simulate weightlessness, a reduction in total tibia Ca and bone formation rate at the tibiofibular junction as well as an inhibition of Ca-45 and H-3-proline uptake by bone within 5-7 days of skeletal unloading was observed. Between days 7 and 15 of unloading, uptake of Ca-45 and H-3-proline, and bone formation rate return to normal, although total bone Ca remains abnormally low. To examine the relationship between these characteristic changes in bone metabolism induced by skeletal unloading and vitamin D metabolism, the serum concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-OH-D), 24, 25-dihydroxyvitamin D (24,25(OH)2D) and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25(OH)2D) at various times after skeletal unloading were measured. The effect of chronic infusion of 1,25(OH)2D3 on the bone changes associated with unloading was also determined.

  19. Melatonin: Bone Metabolism in Oral Cavity

    PubMed Central

    López-Martínez, Fanny; Olivares Ponce, Patricia N.; Guerra Rodríguez, Miriam; Martínez Pedraza, Ricardo

    2012-01-01

    Throughout life, bone tissue undergoes a continuous process of resorption and formation. Melatonin, with its antioxidant properties and its ability to detoxify free radicals, as suggested by Conconi et al. (2000) may interfere in the osteoclast function and thereby inhibit bone resorption, as suggested by Schroeder et al. (1981). Inhibition of bone resorption may be enhanced by a reaction of indoleamine in osteoclastogenesis. That it has been observed melatonin, at pharmacological doses, decrease bone mass resorption by suppressing through down regulation of the RANK-L, as suggested by Penarrocha Diago et al. (2005) and Steflik et al. (1994). These data point an osteogenic effect towards that may be of melatonin of clinical importance, as it could be used as a therapeutic agent in situations in which would be advantageous bone formation, such as in the treatment of fractures or osteoporosis or their use as, a bioactive surface on implant as suggested by Lissoni et al. (1991). PMID:22927853

  20. Sugar-sweetened beverages and prevalence of the metabolically abnormal phenotype in the Framingham Heart Study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between usual sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) consumption and prevalence of abnormal metabolic health across body mass index (BMI) categories. The metabolic health of 6,842 non-diabetic adults was classified using cross-sectional data from the...

  1. [Bone and tooth in calcium and phosphate metabolism].

    PubMed

    Tamamura, Yoshihiro; Yamaguchi, Akira

    2012-01-01

    Tight regulation of serum concentrations of calcium and phosphate is indispensable for maintaining normal physiological condition. Imbalance of this regulation leads to pathophysiological disorders including heart disease, chronic kidney disease, and ectopic calcification. Formation and mineralization of bone and tooth are greatly influenced by calcium and phosphate metabolism since both organs are mainly consist of calcium-phosphate. Calcium and phosphate homeostasis is under hormonal control on its target organs such as kidney, bone and intestine. Calcium and phosphate are absorbed in intestine and reabsorbed and excreted in kidney. Bone store and release them in response to changing physiological demand by osteoblastic bone formation and osteoclastic bone resorption. Bone is also important as an endocrine organ that releases FGF23 from osteocytes, a novel hormone that targets the kidney to inhibit phosphate reabsorption and 1α, 25 (OH) (2)D(3) production. PMID:22201094

  2. Contralateral subtraction technique for detection of asymmetric abnormalities on whole-body bone scintigrams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiraishi, Junji; Li, Qiang; Appelbaum, Daniel; Pu, Yonglin; Doi, Kunio

    2007-03-01

    We developed a computer-aided diagnostic (CAD) scheme for assisting radiologists in the detection of asymmetric abnormalities on a single whole-body bone scintigram by applying a contralateral subtraction (CS) technique. Twenty whole-body bone scans including 107 abnormal lesions in anterior and/or posterior images (the number of lesions per case ranged from 1 to 16, mean 5.4) were used in this study. In our scheme, the original bone scan image was flipped horizontally to provide a mirror image. The mirror image was first rotated and shifted globally to match the original image approximately, and then was nonlinearly warped by use of an elastic matching technique in order to match the original image accurately. We applied a nonlinear lookup table to convert the difference in pixel values between the original and the warped images to new pixel values for a CS image, in order to enhance dark shadows at the locations of abnormal lesions where uptake of radioisotope was asymmetrically high, and to suppress light shadows of the lesions on the contralateral side. In addition, we applied a CAD scheme for the detection of asymmetric abnormalities by use of rule-based tests and sequential application of artificial neural networks with 25 image features extracted from the original and CS images. The performance of the CAD scheme, which was evaluated by a leave-one-case-out method, indicated an average sensitivity of 80.4 % with 3.8 false positives per case. This CAD scheme with the contralateral subtraction technique has the potential to improve radiologists' diagnostic accuracy and could be used for computerized identification of asymmetric abnormalities on whole-body bone scans.

  3. The Mediterranean diet adoption improves metabolic, oxidative, and inflammatory abnormalities in Algerian metabolic syndrome patients.

    PubMed

    Bekkouche, L; Bouchenak, M; Malaisse, W J; Yahia, D Ait

    2014-04-01

    This study was aimed to explore the effects of Mediterranean diet (MD) adoption on insulin resistance, oxidative, and inflammatory status in metabolic syndrome (MS) patients. Eighty four patients with MS were randomly recruited in the medical centers of Oran, Algeria. Eighteen healthy participants were selected as a control group. Among these 84 patients, only 36 patients completed the nutritional advices for 3 months. Patients were instructed to follow a Mediterranean-style diet and received some other selected nutritional and physical activity instructions. Anthropometric measurements were performed and a questionnaire was used to assess dietary intake. Blood samples were drawn at baseline and after 3 months of nutritional intervention from all subjects. At baseline, the MS patients were obese and had altered anthropometric parameters, higher systolic and diastolic blood pressure, plasma lipids, glucose, insulin, HOMA-IR, HbA1c, urea, creatinine, uric acid, and lower albumin compared to healthy subjects. A decrease in plasma, erythrocyte, and platelet antioxidant enzymes, and a rise in lipid and protein oxidation, plasma CRP, and fibrinogen were noted in the MS patients. Moreover, they had an unbalanced dietary pattern when compared to Mediterranean recommendations. Patients following the Mediterranean-style diet had significantly reduced weight, BMI, waist circumference, waist/hip circumference ratio, decreased systolic and diastolic blood pressure, plasma glucose, insulin, HOMA-IR, HbA1c, cholesterol, triacylglycerols, CRP, urea, creatinine, creatinine clearance, lipid and protein oxidation, and higher plasma, erythrocyte, and platelet antioxidant enzymes. In conclusion, a lifestyle intervention based mainly on nutritional advices improves metabolic, oxidative, and inflammatory abnormalities of metabolic syndrome.

  4. [Updates on Lifestyle-Related Diseases and Bone Metabolism. Bidirectional relationship between lifestyle-related diseases and bone metabolism].

    PubMed

    Sato, Shingo; Takeda, Shu

    2014-11-01

    Lifestyle-related diseases such as diabetes mellitus, chronic kidney disease, and hypertension were previously considered to be unrelated to osteoporosis. However, recent investigations have demonstrated that lifestyle-related diseases have a significant effect on the regulation of bone metabolism. In addition, it has been also revealed that osteocalcin or fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) , which is produced by osteoblasts, has an important role in glucose metabolism, fat metabolism, or calcium homeostasis. These findings suggest that bone is not only a target organ of hormones but also involved in regulating other organs as an endocrine organ. This review introduces such a bidirectional relationship between several lifestyle-related diseases and bone metabolism. PMID:25355142

  5. [Updates on Lifestyle-Related Diseases and Bone Metabolism. Bidirectional relationship between lifestyle-related diseases and bone metabolism].

    PubMed

    Sato, Shingo; Takeda, Shu

    2014-11-01

    Lifestyle-related diseases such as diabetes mellitus, chronic kidney disease, and hypertension were previously considered to be unrelated to osteoporosis. However, recent investigations have demonstrated that lifestyle-related diseases have a significant effect on the regulation of bone metabolism. In addition, it has been also revealed that osteocalcin or fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) , which is produced by osteoblasts, has an important role in glucose metabolism, fat metabolism, or calcium homeostasis. These findings suggest that bone is not only a target organ of hormones but also involved in regulating other organs as an endocrine organ. This review introduces such a bidirectional relationship between several lifestyle-related diseases and bone metabolism.

  6. Dietary patterns in men and women are simultaneously determinants of altered glucose metabolism and bone metabolism.

    PubMed

    Langsetmo, Lisa; Barr, Susan I; Dasgupta, Kaberi; Berger, Claudie; Kovacs, Christopher S; Josse, Robert G; Adachi, Jonathan D; Hanley, David A; Prior, Jerilynn C; Brown, Jacques P; Morin, Suzanne N; Davison, Kenneth S; Goltzman, David; Kreiger, Nancy

    2016-04-01

    We hypothesized that diet would have direct effects on glucose metabolism with direct and indirect effects on bone metabolism in a cohort of Canadian adults. We assessed dietary patterns (Prudent [fruit, vegetables, whole grains, fish, and legumes] and Western [soft drinks, potato chips, French fries, meats, and desserts]) from a semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire. We used fasting blood samples to measure glucose, insulin, homeostatic model assessment insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD), parathyroid hormone, bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (a bone formation marker), and serum C-terminal telopeptide (CTX; a bone resorption marker). We used multivariate regression models adjusted for confounders and including/excluding body mass index. In a secondary analysis, we examined relationships through structural equations models. The Prudent diet was associated with favorable effects on glucose metabolism (lower insulin and HOMA-IR) and bone metabolism (lower CTX in women; higher 25OHD and lower parathyroid hormone in men). The Western diet was associated with deleterious effects on glucose metabolism (higher glucose, insulin, and HOMA-IR) and bone metabolism (higher bone-specific alkaline phosphatase and lower 25OHD in women; higher CTX in men). Body mass index adjustment moved point estimates toward the null, indicating partial mediation. The structural equation model confirmed the hypothesized linkage with strong effects of Prudent and Western diet on metabolic risk, and both direct and indirect effects of a Prudent diet on bone turnover. In summary, a Prudent diet was associated with lower metabolic risk with both primary and mediated effects on bone turnover, suggesting that it is a potential target for reducing fracture risk. PMID:27001278

  7. Dietary patterns in men and women are simultaneously determinants of altered glucose metabolism and bone metabolism.

    PubMed

    Langsetmo, Lisa; Barr, Susan I; Dasgupta, Kaberi; Berger, Claudie; Kovacs, Christopher S; Josse, Robert G; Adachi, Jonathan D; Hanley, David A; Prior, Jerilynn C; Brown, Jacques P; Morin, Suzanne N; Davison, Kenneth S; Goltzman, David; Kreiger, Nancy

    2016-04-01

    We hypothesized that diet would have direct effects on glucose metabolism with direct and indirect effects on bone metabolism in a cohort of Canadian adults. We assessed dietary patterns (Prudent [fruit, vegetables, whole grains, fish, and legumes] and Western [soft drinks, potato chips, French fries, meats, and desserts]) from a semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire. We used fasting blood samples to measure glucose, insulin, homeostatic model assessment insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD), parathyroid hormone, bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (a bone formation marker), and serum C-terminal telopeptide (CTX; a bone resorption marker). We used multivariate regression models adjusted for confounders and including/excluding body mass index. In a secondary analysis, we examined relationships through structural equations models. The Prudent diet was associated with favorable effects on glucose metabolism (lower insulin and HOMA-IR) and bone metabolism (lower CTX in women; higher 25OHD and lower parathyroid hormone in men). The Western diet was associated with deleterious effects on glucose metabolism (higher glucose, insulin, and HOMA-IR) and bone metabolism (higher bone-specific alkaline phosphatase and lower 25OHD in women; higher CTX in men). Body mass index adjustment moved point estimates toward the null, indicating partial mediation. The structural equation model confirmed the hypothesized linkage with strong effects of Prudent and Western diet on metabolic risk, and both direct and indirect effects of a Prudent diet on bone turnover. In summary, a Prudent diet was associated with lower metabolic risk with both primary and mediated effects on bone turnover, suggesting that it is a potential target for reducing fracture risk.

  8. Kinetic aspects of bone mineral metabolism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, H. E.

    1973-01-01

    Two techniques were studied for measuring changes in bone mass in rats. One technique measures the Ar-37 produced from calcium during neutron irradiation and the other measures the changes in the Na-22 content which has been incorporated within the rat bone. Both methods are performed in VIVO and cause no significant physiological damage. The Ar-37 leaves the body of a rat within an hour after being produced, and it can be quantitatively collected and measured with a precision of - or + 2% on the same rat. With appropriate irradiation conditions it appears that the absolute quantity of calcuim in any rat can be determined within - or + 3% regardless of animal size. The Na-22 when uniformly distributed in bone, can be used to monitor bone mineral turnover and this has been demonstrated in conditions of calcium deficiency during growth and also pregnancy coupled with calcium deficiency.

  9. Primary hypertension is a disease of premature vascular aging associated with neuro-immuno-metabolic abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Litwin, Mieczysław; Feber, Janusz; Niemirska, Anna; Michałkiewicz, Jacek

    2016-02-01

    There is an increasing amount of data indicating that primary hypertension (PH) is not only a hemodynamic phenomenon but also a complex syndrome involving abnormal fat tissue distribution, over-activity of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS), metabolic abnormalities, and activation of the immune system. In children, PH usually presents with a typical phenotype of disturbed body composition, accelerated biological maturity, and subtle immunological and metabolic abnormalities. This stage of the disease is potentially reversible. However, long-lasting over-activity of the SNS and immuno-metabolic alterations usually lead to an irreversible stage of cardiovascular disease. We describe an intermediate phenotype of children with PH, showing that PH is associated with accelerated development, i.e., early premature aging of the immune, metabolic, and vascular systems. The associations and determinants of hypertensive organ damage, the principles of treatment, and the possibility of rejuvenation of the cardiovascular system are discussed. PMID:25724169

  10. High phosphate feeding promotes mineral and bone abnormalities in mice with chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Wei Ling; Linnes, Michael; Chu, Emily Y.; Foster, Brian L.; Bartley, Bryan A.; Somerman, Martha J.; Giachelli, Cecilia M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic kidney disease-mineral bone disorder (CKD-MBD) is a systemic syndrome characterized by imbalances in mineral homeostasis, renal osteodystrophy (ROD) and ectopic calcification. The mechanisms underlying this syndrome in individuals with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are not yet clear. Methods We examined the effect of normal phosphate (NP) or high phosphate (HP) feeding in the setting of CKD on bone pathology, serum biochemistry and vascular calcification in calcification-prone dilute brown non-agouti (DBA/2) mice. Results In both NP and HP-fed CKD mice, elevated serum parathyroid hormone and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) levels were observed, but serum phosphorus levels were equivalent compared with sham controls. CKD mice on NP diet showed trabecular alterations in the long bone consistent with high–turnover ROD, including increased trabecular number with abundant osteoblasts and osteoclasts. Despite trabecular bone and serum biochemical changes, CKD/NP mice did not develop vascular calcification. In contrast, CKD/HP mice developed arterial medial calcification (AMC), more severe trabecular bone alterations and cortical bone abnormalities that included decreased cortical thickness and density, and increased cortical porosity. Cortical bone porosity and trabecular number strongly correlated with the degree of aortic calcification. Conclusions HP feeding was required to induce the full spectrum of CKD-MBD symptoms in CKD mice. PMID:23045434

  11. Metabolic abnormalities in pituitary adenoma patients: a novel therapeutic target and prognostic factor

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xin; Li, Song; Zhang, Wei-hua; Yang, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic abnormalities are common in cancers, and targeting metabolism is emerging as a novel therapeutic approach to cancer management. Pituitary adenoma (PA) is a type of benign tumor. Impairment of tumor cells’ metabolism in PA seems not to be as apparent as that of other malignant tumor cells; however, aberrant hormone secretion is conspicuous in most PAs. Hormones have direct impacts on systemic metabolism, which in turn, may affect the progression of PA. Nowadays, conventional therapeutic strategies for PA do not include modalities of adjusting whole-body metabolism, which is most likely due to the current consideration of the aberrant whole-body metabolism of PA patients as a passive associated symptom and not involved in PA progression. Because systemic metabolic abnormalities are presented by 22.3%–52.5% PA patients and are closely correlated with disease progression and prognosis, we propose that assessment of metabolic status should be emphasized during the treatment of PA and that control of metabolic abnormalities should be added into the current therapies for PA. PMID:26347444

  12. Bone endocrine regulation of energy metabolism and male reproduction.

    PubMed

    Karsenty, Gerard

    2011-10-01

    Usually vertebrate physiology is studied within the confined limits of a given organ, if not cell type. This approach has progressively changed with the emergence of mouse genetics that has rejuvenated the concept of a whole body study of physiology. A vivid example of how mouse genetics has profoundly affected our understanding of physiology is skeleton physiology. A genetic approach to bone physiology revealed that bone via osteocalcin, an osteoblast-secreted molecule, is a true endocrine organ regulating energy metabolism and male reproduction. This ongoing body of work that takes bone out of its traditional roles is connecting it to a growing number of peripheral organs. These novel important hormonal connections between bone, energy metabolism and reproduction underscore the concept of functional dependence in physiology and the importance of genetic approaches to identify novel endocrine regulations.

  13. Effect of chronic metabolic acidosis on bone density and bone architecture in vivo in rats.

    PubMed

    Gasser, Jürg A; Hulter, Henry N; Imboden, Peter; Krapf, Reto

    2014-03-01

    Chronic metabolic acidosis (CMA) might result in a decrease in vivo in bone mass based on its reported in vitro inhibition of bone mineralization, bone formation, or stimulation of bone resorption, but such data, in the absence of other disorders, have not been reported. CMA also results in negative nitrogen balance, which might decrease skeletal muscle mass. This study analyzed the net in vivo effects of CMA's cellular and physicochemical processes on bone turnover, trabecular and cortical bone density, and bone microarchitecture using both peripheral quantitative computed tomography and μCT. CMA induced by NH4Cl administration (15 mEq/kg body wt/day) in intact and ovariectomized (OVX) rats resulted in stable CMA (mean Δ[HCO3(-)]p = 10 mmol/l). CMA decreased plasma osteocalcin and increased TRAP5b in intact and OVX animals. CMA decreased total volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD) after 6 and 10 wk (week 10: intact normal +2.1 ± 0.9% vs. intact acidosis -3.6 ± 1.2%, P < 0.001), an effect attributable to a decrease in cortical thickness and, thus, cortical bone mass (no significant effect on cancellous vBMD, week 10) attributed to an increase in endosteal bone resorption (nominally increased endosteal circumference). Trabecular bone volume (BV/TV) decreased significantly in both CMA groups at 6 and 10 wk, associated with a decrease in trabecular number. CMA significantly decreased muscle cross-sectional area in the proximal hindlimb at 6 and 10 wk. In conclusion, chronic metabolic acidosis induces a large decrease in cortical bone mass (a prime determinant of bone fragility) in intact and OVX rats and impairs bone microarchitecture characterized by a decrease in trabecular number. PMID:24352505

  14. Bone metabolism of male rats chronically exposed to cadmium.

    PubMed

    Brzóska, Malgorzata M; Moniuszko-Jakoniuk, Janina

    2005-09-15

    Recently, based on a female rat model of human exposure, we have reported that low-level chronic exposure to cadmium (Cd) has an injurious effect on the skeleton. The purpose of the current study was to investigate whether the exposure may also affect bone metabolism in a male rat model and to estimate the gender-related differences in the bone effect of Cd. Young male Wistar rats received drinking water containing 0, 1, 5, or 50 mg Cd/l for 12 months. The bone effect of Cd was evaluated using bone densitometry and biochemical markers of bone turnover. Renal handling of calcium (Ca) and phosphate, and serum concentrations of vitamin D metabolites, calcitonin, and parathormone were estimated as well. At treatment with 1 mg Cd/l, corresponding to the low environmental exposure in non-Cd-polluted areas, the bone mineral content (BMC) and density (BMD) at the femur and lumbar spine (L1-L5) and the total skeleton BMD did not differ compared to control. However, from the 6th month of the exposure, the Z score BMD indicated osteopenia in some animals and after 12 months the bone resorption very clearly tended to an increase. The rats' exposure corresponding to human moderate (5 mg Cd/l) and especially relatively high (50 mg Cd/l) exposure dose- and duration-dependently disturbed the processes of bone turnover and bone mass accumulation leading to formation of less dense than normal bone tissue. The effects were accompanied by changes in the serum concentration of calciotropic hormones and disorders in Ca and phosphate metabolism. It can be concluded that low environmental exposure to Cd may be only a subtle risk factor for skeletal demineralization in men. The results together with our previous findings based on an analogous model using female rats give clear evidence that males are less vulnerable to the bone effects of Cd compared to females.

  15. Pathogenesis of permeability barrier abnormalities in the ichthyoses: inherited disorders of lipid metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Elias, Peter M.; Williams, Mary L.; Holleran, Walter M.; Jiang, Yan J.; Schmuth, Matthias

    2010-01-01

    Many of the ichthyoses are associated with inherited disorders of lipid metabolism. These disorders have provided unique models to dissect physiologic processes in normal epidermis and the pathophysiology of more common scaling conditions. In most of these disorders, a permeability barrier abnormality “drives” pathophysiology through stimulation of epidermal hyperplasia. Among primary abnormalities of nonpolar lipid metabolism, triglyceride accumulation in neutral lipid storage disease as a result of a lipase mutation provokes a barrier abnormality via lamellar/nonlamellar phase separation within the extracellular matrix of the stratum corneum (SC). Similar mechanisms account for the barrier abnormalities (and subsequent ichthyosis) in inherited disorders of polar lipid metabolism. For example, in recessive X-linked ichthyosis (RXLI), cholesterol sulfate (CSO4) accumulation also produces a permeability barrier defect through lamellar/nonlamellar phase separation. However, in RXLI, the desquamation abnormality is in part attributable to the plurifunctional roles of CSO4 as a regulator of both epidermal differentiation and corneodesmosome degradation. Phase separation also occurs in type II Gaucher disease (GD; from accumulation of glucosylceramides as a result of to β-glucocerebrosidase deficiency). Finally, failure to assemble both lipids and desquamatory enzymes into nascent epidermal lamellar bodies (LBs) accounts for both the permeability barrier and desquamation abnormalities in Harlequin ichthyosis (HI). The barrier abnormality provokes the clinical phenotype in these disorders not only by stimulating epidermal proliferation, but also by inducing inflammation. PMID:18245815

  16. [Bone diseases caused by impaired glucose and lipid metabolism].

    PubMed

    Kanazawa, Ippei; Sugimoto, Toshitsugu

    2013-11-01

    The number of patients with lifestyle-related diseases is rapidly increasing in Japan. Metabolic syndrome caused by abdominal fat accumulation induces diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, and hypertension, resulting in an increase in cardiovascular diseases. On the other hand, recent studies have shown that the lifestyle-related diseases are risk factors of osteoporotic fractures. Although it remains still unclear how metabolic disorders affect bone tissue, oxidative stress and/or glycation stress might directly have negative impacts on bone tissue and increase the risk of fractures. In this review, we describe the association of diabetes mellitus and dyslipidemia with the fracture risk through oxidative stress and glycation stress.

  17. Alveolar bone grafting in association with polyostotic fibrous dysplasia and bisphosphonate-induced abnormal bone turnover in a bilateral cleft lip and palate patient: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kodama, Yasumitsu; Ogose, Akira; Oguri, Yoshimitsu; Ubaidus, Sobhan; Iizuka, Tateyuki; Takagi, Ritsuo

    2012-09-01

    A case is presented of extensive alveolar bone grafting in a patient with bilateral cleft lip and palate and polyostotic fibrous dysplasia. The patient previously underwent bisphosphonate therapy. Because of an abnormal and often decreased bone turnover caused by the fibrous dysplasia and the bisphosphonate therapy, bone grafting in such a patient poses several potential difficulties. In addition, the histomorphometric analysis of the bone grafts showed markedly decreased bone turnover. However, alveolar bone grafting using the iliac crest was performed successfully. Sufficient occlusion was achieved by postoperative low-loading orthodontic treatment.

  18. Association of hypertension with coexistence of abnormal metabolism and inflammation and endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mingzhi; Wang, Guiyan; Wang, Aili; Tong, Weijun; Zhang, Yonghong

    2013-06-01

    To explore association of hypertension with coexistence of inflammation and endothelial dysfunction and abnormal metabolism, a community-based study was conducted among Mongolian people in China. Demographic characteristics and lifestyle risk factors were investigated, blood pressure, body weight and waist circumference were measured, fasting blood samples were obtained to measure blood lipids, fasting plasma glucose and the biomarkers of inflammation and endothelial dysfunction, C-reactive protein (CRP), soluble intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1), soluble E-selectin (sE-selectin) and angiotensin II. Rates of abnormal metabolism, elevated CRP, elevated sICAM-1, elevated sE-selectin and elevated angiotensin II as well as coexistence of abnormal metabolism with the elevated biomarkers were all higher in hypertensives than these in normotensives (all p < 0.01). Compared with subjects with normal metabolism and without any elevated biomarker, multivariate adjusted odds ratio (95% confidence interval) of hypertension associated with abnormal metabolism, elevated CRP, elevated sICAM-1, elevated sE-selectin, elevated angiotensin II, coexistences of abnormal metabolism with elevated CRP, elevated sICAM-1,elevated sE-selectin and elevated angiotensin II were 2.209 (1.594-3.062), 2.820 (1.992-3.992), 2.370 (1.665-3.374), 1.893 (1.331-2.691), 2.545 (1.793-3.612), 2.990 (2.102-4.252), 2.551 (1.775-3.667), 2.223 (1.544-3.220), 3.135 (2.185-4.519), respectively. In conclusion, this study indicated that inflammation and endothelial dysfunction was associated with hypertension and abnormal metabolism, and individuals with co-existence of abnormal metabolism with inflammation and endothelial dysfunction had higher risk of prevalent hypertension among Mongolian population. This study suggests that further study on treatment for hypertension patients with coexistence of abnormal metabolism with inflammation and endothelial dysfunction should be conducted in the near

  19. The effects of acute hyperinsulinemia on bone metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Ivaska, Kaisa K; Heliövaara, Maikki K; Ebeling, Pertti; Bucci, Marco; Huovinen, Ville; Väänänen, H Kalervo; Nuutila, Pirjo; Koistinen, Heikki A

    2015-01-01

    Insulin signaling in bone-forming osteoblasts stimulates bone formation and promotes the release of osteocalcin (OC) in mice. Only a few studies have assessed the direct effect of insulin on bone metabolism in humans. Here, we studied markers of bone metabolism in response to acute hyperinsulinemia in men and women. Thirty-three subjects from three separate cohorts (n=8, n=12 and n=13) participated in a euglycaemic hyperinsulinemic clamp study. Blood samples were collected before and at the end of infusions to determine the markers of bone formation (PINP, total OC, uncarboxylated form of OC (ucOC)) and resorption (CTX, TRAcP5b). During 4 h insulin infusion (40 mU/m2 per min, low insulin), CTX level decreased by 11% (P<0.05). High insulin infusion rate (72 mU/m2 per min) for 4 h resulted in more pronounced decrease (−32%, P<0.01) whereas shorter insulin exposure (40 mU/m2 per min for 2 h) had no effect (P=0.61). Markers of osteoblast activity remained unchanged during 4 h insulin, but the ratio of uncarboxylated-to-total OC decreased in response to insulin (P<0.05 and P<0.01 for low and high insulin for 4 h respectively). During 2 h low insulin infusion, both total OC and ucOC decreased significantly (P<0.01 for both). In conclusion, insulin decreases bone resorption and circulating levels of total OC and ucOC. Insulin has direct effects on bone metabolism in humans and changes in the circulating levels of bone markers can be seen within a few hours after administration of insulin. PMID:26047829

  20. Epiphyseal abnormalities, trabecular bone loss and articular chondrocyte hypertrophy develop in the long bones of postnatal Ext1-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Sgariglia, Federica; Candela, Maria Elena; Huegel, Julianne; Jacenko, Olena; Koyama, Eiki; Yamaguchi, Yu; Pacifici, Maurizio; Enomoto-Iwamoto, Motomi

    2013-11-01

    Long bones are integral components of the limb skeleton. Recent studies have indicated that embryonic long bone development is altered by mutations in Ext genes and consequent heparan sulfate (HS) deficiency, possibly due to changes in activity and distribution of HS-binding/growth plate-associated signaling proteins. Here we asked whether Ext function is continuously required after birth to sustain growth plate function and long bone growth and organization. Compound transgenic Ext1(f/f);Col2CreERT mice were injected with tamoxifen at postnatal day 5 (P5) to ablate Ext1 in cartilage and monitored over time. The Ext1-deficient mice exhibited growth retardation already by 2weeks post-injection, as did their long bones. Mutant growth plates displayed a severe disorganization of chondrocyte columnar organization, a shortened hypertrophic zone with low expression of collagen X and MMP-13, and reduced primary spongiosa accompanied, however, by increased numbers of TRAP-positive osteoclasts at the chondro-osseous border. The mutant epiphyses were abnormal as well. Formation of a secondary ossification center was significantly delayed but interestingly, hypertrophic-like chondrocytes emerged within articular cartilage, similar to those often seen in osteoarthritic joints. Indeed, the cells displayed a large size and round shape, expressed collagen X and MMP-13 and were surrounded by an abundant Perlecan-rich pericellular matrix not seen in control articular chondrocytes. In addition, ectopic cartilaginous outgrowths developed on the lateral side of mutant growth plates over time that resembled exostotic characteristic of children with Hereditary Multiple Exostoses, a syndrome caused by Ext mutations and HS deficiency. In sum, the data do show that Ext1 is continuously required for postnatal growth and organization of long bones as well as their adjacent joints. Ext1 deficiency elicits defects that can occur in human skeletal conditions including trabecular bone loss

  1. Effect of melatonin on bone metabolism in ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Ladizesky, M G; Cutrera, R A; Boggio, V; Somoza, J; Centrella, J M; Mautalen, C; Cardinali, D P

    2001-12-21

    To assess the effect of pharmacological dose of melatonin on bone metabolism in ovariectomized rats, urinary deoxypyridinoline (a marker of bone resorption) and calcium excretion, circulating levels of calcium, phosphorus and bone alkaline phosphatase activity (a marker of bone formation), and bone mineral density (BMD), mineral content (BMC) and bone area (BA) of total body, were measured in adult rats for up to 60 days after surgery. Rats received melatonin in the drinking water (25 microg/ml water) or drinking water alone. Urinary deoxypyridinoline increased significantly after ovariectomy by 51% (30 days after surgery) and by 47% (60 days after surgery). The increase in urinary deoxypyridinoline found 30 days after ovariectomy was not observed in melatonin-treated rats. Urinary calcium concentration was similar in the 4 experimental groups studied, as was the circulating calcium concentration at every time interval examined. Fifteen days after surgery, a significant increase in serum phosphorus and bone alkaline phosphatase levels occurred in ovariectomized rats receiving melatonin as compared to their controls. Sixty days after surgery BMD, BMC and BA decreased significantly in ovariectomized rats, an effect not modified by melatonin. Serum estradiol decreased significantly by 30 days after ovariectomy to attain values close to the limit of detection of the assay by 60 days after ovariectomy. The results support the conclusion that a pharmacological amount of melatonin modifies bone remodeling after ovariectomy and that the effect may need adequate concentrations of estradiol.

  2. Myocardial metabolic, hemodynamic, and electrocardiographic significance of reversible thallium-201 abnormalities in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Cannon, R.O. 3d.; Dilsizian, V.; O'Gara, P.T.; Udelson, J.E.; Schenke, W.H.; Quyyumi, A.; Fananapazir, L.; Bonow, R.O. )

    1991-05-01

    Exercise-induced abnormalities during thallium-201 scintigraphy that normalize at rest frequently occur in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. However, it is not known whether these abnormalities are indicative of myocardial ischemia. Fifty patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy underwent exercise {sup 201}Tl scintigraphy and, during the same week, measurement of myocardial lactate metabolism and hemodynamics during pacing stress. Thirty-seven patients (74%) had one or more {sup 201}Tl abnormalities that completely normalized after 3 hours of rest; 26 had regional myocardial {sup 201}Tl defects, and 26 had apparent left ventricular cavity dilatation with exercise, with 15 having coexistence of these abnormal findings. Of the 37 patients with reversible {sup 201}Tl abnormalities, 27 (73%) had metabolic evidence of myocardial ischemia during rapid atrial pacing compared with four of 13 patients (31%) with normal {sup 201}Tl scans (p less than 0.01). Eleven patients had apparent cavity dilatation as their only {sup 201}Tl abnormality; their mean postpacing left ventricular end-diastolic pressure was significantly higher than that of the 13 patients with normal {sup 201}Tl studies (33 +/- 5 versus 21 +/- 10 mm Hg, p less than 0.001). There was no correlation between the angiographic presence of systolic septal or epicardial coronary arterial compression and the presence or distribution of {sup 201}Tl abnormalities. Patients with ischemic ST segment responses to exercise had an 80% prevalence rate of reversible {sup 201}Tl abnormalities and a 70% prevalence rate of pacing-induced ischemia. However, 69% of patients with nonischemic ST segment responses had reversible {sup 201}Tl abnormalities, and 55% had pacing-induced ischemia. Reversible {sup 201}Tl abnormalities during exercise stress are markers of myocardial ischemia in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and most likely identify relatively underperfused myocardium.

  3. Serum markers of bone metabolism show bone loss in hibernating bears

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Donahue, S.W.; Vaughan, M.R.; Demers, L.M.; Donahue, H.J.

    2003-01-01

    Disuse osteopenia was studied in hibernating black bears (Ursus americanus) using serum markers of bone metabolism. Blood samples were collected from male and female, wild black bears during winter denning and active summer periods. Radioimmunoassays were done to determine serum concentrations of cortisol, the carboxy-terminal cross-linked telopeptide, and the carboxy-terminal propeptide of Type I procollagen, which are markers of hone resorption and formation, respectively. The bone resorption marker was significantly higher during winter hibernation than it was in the active summer months, but the bone formation marker was unchanged, suggesting an imbalance in bone remodeling and a net bone loss during disuse. Serum cortisol was significantly correlated with the bone resorption marker, but not with the bone formation marker. The bone formation marker was four- to fivefold higher in an adolescent and a 17-year-old bear early in the remobilization period compared with the later summer months. These findings raise the possibility that hibernating black bears may minimize bone loss during disuse by maintaining osteoblastic function and have a more efficient compensatory mechanism for recovering immobilization-induced bone loss than that of humans or other animals.

  4. [Osteoporosis - inflammatory effects on bone metabolism and fracture risk].

    PubMed

    Dischereit, G; Lange, U

    2014-04-01

    There is a large body of evidence that proinflammatory cytokines, particularly interleukin-1, interleukin-6, and tumour necrosis factor-α, play an important role in bone metabolism. Moreover, it is suspected that proinflammatory cytokines are also important in the pathogenesis of age- and estrogen deficiency-related bone loss. Although an accelerated decrease in bone mass is observed in patients with chronic inflammatory disorders, the definite meaning of proinflammatory cytokines in the aetiology of osteoporosis is still unclear. Some studies suggest a relationship between increased concentrations of proinflammatory cytokines and a decrease in bone mineral density, as well as an increased risk of fracture. In sum, the evidence is rather scarce and does not permit any clear conclusions about the effects of single cytokines in bone metabolism. To be able to define more exactly at which stage of the pathogenesis of osteoporosis parameters of a systemic inflammation take effect, further studies will be necessary, particularly for developing suitable diagnostic markers for clinicians. These diagnostic markers may be able to identify patients at risk for osteoporosis and therefore predict fracture risks. Thus, early interventions to preserve bone health, for example, by anti-cytokine therapy, could be more effective and efficient.

  5. Changes in Bone Metabolism in Young Castrated Male Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Seong-Jun; Ryu, Dal-Sung; Kim, Jong-Yeol; Park, Jeong-Yoon; Kim, Kyung-Hyun; Chin, Dong-Kyu; Kim, Keun-Su; Cho, Yong-Eun

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To determine the window of time during which osteoporosis affects the management of spinal surgery and the mechanism of bone metabolism changes in males with osteoporosis by examining changes in bone metabolism in young castrated male rats. Materials and Methods A total of 30 Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly allocated into two study groups. Group 1 (control) received a sham surgery and Group 2 received bilateral orchiectomy to change bone mineral density (BMD). Serum osteocalcin, alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and collagen type 1 cross-linked C-telopeptide (CTX) were analyzed at postoperative date (POD) 8, 10, and 12 weeks. BMDs were measured using micro computed tomography scans. Results Femoral and lumbar BMDs were decreased in the orchiectomy groups. BMDs in the sham and orchiectomy groups showed statistically differences at POD 8, 10, and 12 weeks for the femur (p=0.032, 0.008, 0.008) and lumbar spine (p=0.151, 0.008, 0.008, respectively). Serum osteocalcin, ALP, and CTX decreased gradually; however, N-terminal type 1 procollagen (P1NP) showed a slight increase yet no significant change. Conclusion In young castrated male rats, a significant decrease in BMD was observed after orchiectomy due to the mixture of two detrimental factors. Young castrated male rats did not reach peak BMD. Increased bone turnover causes bone resorption to exceed bone formation. This study may contribute to the creation of a valuable model for studies of male osteoporosis and the spinal surgery field. PMID:27593866

  6. Focal spinal abnormalities on bone scans in ankylosing spondylitis: a clue to the presence of fracture or pseudarthrosis.

    PubMed

    Resnick, D; Williamson, S; Alazraki, N

    1981-05-01

    Four cases of ankylosing spondylitis are presented in which radionuclide bone studies indicated focal abnormalities of the spine. In three patients, the area of abnormal nuclide uptake corresponded to a site of pseudarthrosis, and in the fourth an acute fracture was present. As such focal lesions on bone scans are unusual in cases of chronic ankylosing spondylitis in which a complication is not apparent, their presence can be a useful finding. PMID:6262000

  7. Focal spinal abnormalities on bone scans in ankylosing spondylitis: a clue to the presence of fracture or pseudarthrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Resnick, D.; Williamson, S.; Alazraki, N.

    1981-05-01

    Four cases of ankylosing spondylitis are presented in which radionuclide bone studies indicated focal abnormalities of the spine. In three patients, the area of abnormal nuclide uptake corresponded to a site of pseudarthrosis, and in the fourth an acute fracture was present. As such focal lesions on bone scans are unusual in cases of chronic ankylosing spondylitis in which a complication is not apparent, their presence can be a useful finding.

  8. Bone Regulates Glucose Metabolism as an Endocrine Organ through Osteocalcin.

    PubMed

    Shao, Jin; Wang, Zhi; Yang, Tieyi; Ying, Hui; Zhang, Yan; Liu, Shuyi

    2015-01-01

    Skeleton was considered as a dynamic connective tissue, which was essential for mobility, calcium homeostasis, and hematopoietic niche. However more and more evidences indicate that skeleton works not only as a structural scaffold but also as an endocrine organ, which regulates several metabolic processes. Besides osteoprotegerin (OPG), sclerostin (SOST), and Dickopf (DKK) which play essential roles in bone formation, modelling, remodelling, and homeostasis, bone can also secret hormones, such as osteocalcin (OCN), which promotes proliferation of β cells, insulin secretion, and insulin sensitivity. Additionally OCN can also regulate the fat cells and male gonad endocrine activity and be regulated by insulin and the neural system. In summary, skeleton has endocrine function via OCN and plays an important role in energy metabolism, especially in glucose metabolism. PMID:25873961

  9. Neonatal iron deficiency causes abnormal phosphate metabolism by elevating FGF23 in normal and ADHR mice.

    PubMed

    Clinkenbeard, Erica L; Farrow, Emily G; Summers, Lelia J; Cass, Taryn A; Roberts, Jessica L; Bayt, Christine A; Lahm, Tim; Albrecht, Marjorie; Allen, Matthew R; Peacock, Munro; White, Kenneth E

    2014-02-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) gain of function mutations can lead to autosomal dominant hypophosphatemic rickets (ADHR) disease onset at birth, or delayed onset following puberty or pregnancy. We previously demonstrated that the combination of iron deficiency and a knock-in R176Q FGF23 mutation in mature mice induced FGF23 expression and hypophosphatemia that paralleled the late-onset ADHR phenotype. Because anemia in pregnancy and in premature infants is common, the goal of this study was to test whether iron deficiency alters phosphate handling in neonatal life. Wild-type (WT) and ADHR female breeder mice were provided control or iron-deficient diets during pregnancy and nursing. Iron-deficient breeders were also made iron replete. Iron-deficient WT and ADHR pups were hypophosphatemic, with ADHR pups having significantly lower serum phosphate (p < 0.01) and widened growth plates. Both genotypes increased bone FGF23 mRNA (>50 fold; p < 0.01). WT and ADHR pups receiving low iron had elevated intact serum FGF23; ADHR mice were affected to a greater degree (p < 0.01). Iron-deficient mice also showed increased Cyp24a1 and reduced Cyp27b1, and low serum 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25D). Iron repletion normalized most abnormalities. Because iron deficiency can induce tissue hypoxia, oxygen deprivation was tested as a regulator of FGF23, and was shown to stimulate FGF23 mRNA in vitro and serum C-terminal FGF23 in normal rats in vivo. These studies demonstrate that FGF23 is modulated by iron status in young WT and ADHR mice and that hypoxia independently controls FGF23 expression in situations of normal iron. Therefore, disturbed iron and oxygen metabolism in neonatal life may have important effects on skeletal function and structure through FGF23 activity on phosphate regulation.

  10. Bone and Metabolic Markers in Women With Recurrent Calcium Stones

    PubMed Central

    Arrabal-Martin, Miguel; Arias-Santiago, Salvador

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The target of our work was to study several biochemical parameters in phospho-calcic and bone metabolism in blood and urine and the bone mineral density of women with recurrent calcium nephrolithiasis. Materials and Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study with a control group of 85 women divided into 3 groups: group 1 consisted of 25 women without a history of nephrolithiasis, group 2 consisted of 35 women with only one episode of calcium nephrolithiasis, and group 3 consisted of 25 women with a history of recurrent calcium nephrolithiasis. Blood and urine biochemical study was performed, including markers related to lithiasis, and a bone mineral density study was done by use of bone densitometry. Results Patients in group 3 showed statistically significantly elevated calciuria (15.4 mg/dL), fasting calcium/creatinine ratio (0.14), and 24-hour calcium/creatinine ratio (0.21) compared with groups 1 and 2. Moreover, this group of women with recurrent calcium nephrolithiasis had significantly elevated values of beta-crosslaps, a bone resorption marker, compared with groups 1 and 2 (p=0.000) and showed more bone mineral density loss than did these groups. Conclusions Recurrent calcium nephrolithiasis in women has a significant association with bone mineral density loss and with values of calciuria, both fasting and 24-hour. PMID:23526577

  11. Abnormal Transmethylation/Transsulfuration Metabolism and DNA Hypomethylation among Parents of Children with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, S. Jill; Melnyk, Stepan; Jernigan, Stefanie; Hubanks, Amanda; Rose, Shannon; Gaylor, David W.

    2008-01-01

    An integrated metabolic profile reflects the combined influence of genetic, epigenetic, and environmental factors that affect the candidate pathway of interest. Recent evidence suggests that some autistic children may have reduced detoxification capacity and may be under chronic oxidative stress. Based on reports of abnormal methionine and…

  12. The prevalence of hematologic and metabolic abnormalities during chronic kidney disease stages in different ethnic groups.

    PubMed

    Barbour, S J; Er, L; Djurdjev, O; Karim, M A; Levin, A

    2008-07-01

    We conducted an observational cross-sectional study to determine if the prevalence of hematologic and metabolic abnormalities in chronic kidney disease (CKD) varied in different ethnic groups. We used a CKD provincial database where a complete data set at the time of registration was available as well as an estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), which showed using the abbreviated MDRD formula that the patients had CKD of stages 3-5. We included patients with self-reported race of Caucasian, Oriental Asian, or South Asian. Primary outcomes were the prevalence of at least one of the following: anemia, hypocalcemia, hyperphosphatemia, hyperparathyroidism, hypoalbuminemia, and three or more laboratory abnormalities. All definitions were consistent with K/DOQI guidelines. When compared with Caucasians, Oriental Asians and South Asians had a higher prevalence of many of the metabolic abnormalities during most stages of CKD and were more likely to have any abnormality at all levels of eGFR. The prevalence of three or more laboratory abnormalities was higher in Oriental Asians at all stages and in South Asians at some levels of eGFR. These results were unchanged or exaggerated when controlled for age, gender, diabetes, and a primary diagnosis of renal disease. Hence, it appears that South Asians and Oriental Asians have more laboratory abnormalities compared with Caucasians at most levels of eGFR.

  13. Animal model for medication-related osteonecrosis of the jaw with precedent metabolic bone disease.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin-Woo; Tatad, Jacquiline Czar I; Landayan, Maria Erika A; Kim, Sun-Jong; Kim, Myung-Rae

    2015-12-01

    Despite the fact that the medications used to treat abnormal bone conditions often induce osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ), previous attempts to establish an animal model for ONJ have shown insufficient consideration for this important prerequisite for the development of the disease. The purpose of this study was to establish an animal model with the most common metabolic bone disease, osteoporosis. Ninty-six rats were randomly divided into ovariectomy (Ov) group (n=48) and sham-operated group (n=48). Six weeks after Ov or sham surgery, rats in each group were subdivided into bisphosphonate group (n=36 each) and control group (n=12 each) and injected with zoledronic acid and normal saline, respectively, once a week. After additional 6weeks, surgical intervention was performed, and the injections were continued for 8 more weeks. The animals were then sacrificed for further macroscopic, histological, histomorphometric, radiological, and bone biomarker investigations. As histologically determined, the Ov group (77.8%) showed higher ONJ prevalence compared to the sham group (47.2%; P<0.05). Micro-structural and histomorphometric assessments revealed that rats with ONJ (ONJ group) presented with deteriorated bone architectures with higher necrotic bone fraction and lower number of osteoclasts (P<0.05). Compared to the sham-operated ONJ group, the Ov ONJ group showed significantly lower values of Tb.N, Tb.Sp, Conn.D, N.Oc/T.Ar, and TRACP 5b and CTX/TRACP (P<0.05). The ovariectomized rat model in this study successfully mimicked human ONJ lesions with an underlying bone disease and showed different bone characteristics than that of the previous ONJ model. Based on the differences, further researches for investigating pathophysiology of ONJ, including various pharmacological responses for deteriorated bone environment, are required.

  14. Loss of polyubiquitin gene Ubb leads to metabolic and sleep abnormalities in mice

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, K.-Y.; Fujiki, N.; Kazantzis, M.; Garza, J. C.; Bouley, D. M.; Stahl, A.; Lu, X.-Y.; Nishino, S.; Kopito, R. R.

    2010-01-01

    Aims Ubiquitin performs essential roles in a myriad of signalling pathways required for cellular function and survival. Recently, we reported that disruption of the stress-inducible ubiquitin-encoding gene Ubb reduces ubiquitin content in the hypothalamus and leads to adult-onset obesity coupled with a loss of arcuate nucleus neurones and disrupted energy homeostasis in mice. Neuropeptides expressed in the hypothalamus control both metabolic and sleep behaviours. In order to demonstrate that the loss of Ubb results in broad hypothalamic abnormalities, we attempted to determine whether metabolic and sleep behaviours were altered in Ubb knockout mice. Methods Metabolic rate and energy expenditure were measured in a metabolic chamber, and sleep stage was monitored via electroencephalographic/electromyographic recording. The presence of neurodegeneration and increased reactive gliosis in the hypothalamus were also evaluated. Results We found that Ubb disruption leads to early-onset reduced activity and metabolic rate. Additionally, we have demonstrated that sleep behaviour is altered and sleep homeostasis is disrupted in Ubb knockout mice. These early metabolic and sleep abnormalities are accompanied by persistent reactive gliosis and the loss of arcuate nucleus neurones, but are independent of neurodegeneration in the lateral hypothalamus. Conclusions Ubb knockout mice exhibit phenotypes consistent with hypothalamic dysfunction. Our data also indicate that Ubb is essential for the maintenance of the ubiquitin levels required for proper regulation of metabolic and sleep behaviours in mice. PMID:20002312

  15. Altered Clock and Lipid Metabolism-Related Genes in Atherosclerotic Mice Kept with Abnormal Lighting Condition

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Zhu; Hua, Bingxuan; Shang, Zhanxian; Yuan, Gongsheng; Xu, Lirong; Li, Ermin; Li, Xiaobo; Yan, Zuoqin; Qian, Ruizhe

    2016-01-01

    Background. The risk of atherosclerosis is elevated in abnormal lipid metabolism and circadian rhythm disorder. We investigated whether abnormal lighting condition would have influenced the circadian expression of clock genes and clock-controlled lipid metabolism-related genes in ApoE-KO mice. Methods. A mouse model of atherosclerosis with circadian clock genes expression disorder was established using ApoE-KO mice (ApoE-KO LD/DL mice) by altering exposure to light. C57 BL/6J mice (C57 mice) and ApoE-KO mice (ApoE-KO mice) exposed to normal day and night and normal diet served as control mice. According to zeitgeber time samples were acquired, to test atheromatous plaque formation, serum lipids levels and rhythmicity, clock genes, and lipid metabolism-related genes along with Sirtuin 1 (Sirt1) levels and rhythmicity. Results. Atherosclerosis plaques were formed in the aortic arch of ApoE-KO LD/DL mice. The serum lipids levels and oscillations in ApoE-KO LD/DL mice were altered, along with the levels and diurnal oscillations of circadian genes, lipid metabolism-associated genes, and Sirt1 compared with the control mice. Conclusions. Abnormal exposure to light aggravated plaque formation and exacerbated disorders of serum lipids and clock genes, lipid metabolism genes and Sirt1 levels, and circadian oscillation. PMID:27631008

  16. Altered Clock and Lipid Metabolism-Related Genes in Atherosclerotic Mice Kept with Abnormal Lighting Condition

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Zhu; Hua, Bingxuan; Shang, Zhanxian; Yuan, Gongsheng; Xu, Lirong; Li, Ermin; Li, Xiaobo; Yan, Zuoqin; Qian, Ruizhe

    2016-01-01

    Background. The risk of atherosclerosis is elevated in abnormal lipid metabolism and circadian rhythm disorder. We investigated whether abnormal lighting condition would have influenced the circadian expression of clock genes and clock-controlled lipid metabolism-related genes in ApoE-KO mice. Methods. A mouse model of atherosclerosis with circadian clock genes expression disorder was established using ApoE-KO mice (ApoE-KO LD/DL mice) by altering exposure to light. C57 BL/6J mice (C57 mice) and ApoE-KO mice (ApoE-KO mice) exposed to normal day and night and normal diet served as control mice. According to zeitgeber time samples were acquired, to test atheromatous plaque formation, serum lipids levels and rhythmicity, clock genes, and lipid metabolism-related genes along with Sirtuin 1 (Sirt1) levels and rhythmicity. Results. Atherosclerosis plaques were formed in the aortic arch of ApoE-KO LD/DL mice. The serum lipids levels and oscillations in ApoE-KO LD/DL mice were altered, along with the levels and diurnal oscillations of circadian genes, lipid metabolism-associated genes, and Sirt1 compared with the control mice. Conclusions. Abnormal exposure to light aggravated plaque formation and exacerbated disorders of serum lipids and clock genes, lipid metabolism genes and Sirt1 levels, and circadian oscillation.

  17. Altered Clock and Lipid Metabolism-Related Genes in Atherosclerotic Mice Kept with Abnormal Lighting Condition.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhu; Hua, Bingxuan; Shang, Zhanxian; Yuan, Gongsheng; Xu, Lirong; Li, Ermin; Li, Xiaobo; Sun, Ning; Yan, Zuoqin; Qian, Ruizhe; Lu, Chao

    2016-01-01

    Background. The risk of atherosclerosis is elevated in abnormal lipid metabolism and circadian rhythm disorder. We investigated whether abnormal lighting condition would have influenced the circadian expression of clock genes and clock-controlled lipid metabolism-related genes in ApoE-KO mice. Methods. A mouse model of atherosclerosis with circadian clock genes expression disorder was established using ApoE-KO mice (ApoE-KO LD/DL mice) by altering exposure to light. C57 BL/6J mice (C57 mice) and ApoE-KO mice (ApoE-KO mice) exposed to normal day and night and normal diet served as control mice. According to zeitgeber time samples were acquired, to test atheromatous plaque formation, serum lipids levels and rhythmicity, clock genes, and lipid metabolism-related genes along with Sirtuin 1 (Sirt1) levels and rhythmicity. Results. Atherosclerosis plaques were formed in the aortic arch of ApoE-KO LD/DL mice. The serum lipids levels and oscillations in ApoE-KO LD/DL mice were altered, along with the levels and diurnal oscillations of circadian genes, lipid metabolism-associated genes, and Sirt1 compared with the control mice. Conclusions. Abnormal exposure to light aggravated plaque formation and exacerbated disorders of serum lipids and clock genes, lipid metabolism genes and Sirt1 levels, and circadian oscillation.

  18. Altered Clock and Lipid Metabolism-Related Genes in Atherosclerotic Mice Kept with Abnormal Lighting Condition.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhu; Hua, Bingxuan; Shang, Zhanxian; Yuan, Gongsheng; Xu, Lirong; Li, Ermin; Li, Xiaobo; Sun, Ning; Yan, Zuoqin; Qian, Ruizhe; Lu, Chao

    2016-01-01

    Background. The risk of atherosclerosis is elevated in abnormal lipid metabolism and circadian rhythm disorder. We investigated whether abnormal lighting condition would have influenced the circadian expression of clock genes and clock-controlled lipid metabolism-related genes in ApoE-KO mice. Methods. A mouse model of atherosclerosis with circadian clock genes expression disorder was established using ApoE-KO mice (ApoE-KO LD/DL mice) by altering exposure to light. C57 BL/6J mice (C57 mice) and ApoE-KO mice (ApoE-KO mice) exposed to normal day and night and normal diet served as control mice. According to zeitgeber time samples were acquired, to test atheromatous plaque formation, serum lipids levels and rhythmicity, clock genes, and lipid metabolism-related genes along with Sirtuin 1 (Sirt1) levels and rhythmicity. Results. Atherosclerosis plaques were formed in the aortic arch of ApoE-KO LD/DL mice. The serum lipids levels and oscillations in ApoE-KO LD/DL mice were altered, along with the levels and diurnal oscillations of circadian genes, lipid metabolism-associated genes, and Sirt1 compared with the control mice. Conclusions. Abnormal exposure to light aggravated plaque formation and exacerbated disorders of serum lipids and clock genes, lipid metabolism genes and Sirt1 levels, and circadian oscillation. PMID:27631008

  19. Parathyroid hormone: a double-edged sword for bone metabolism.

    PubMed

    Qin, Ling; Raggatt, Liza J; Partridge, Nicola C

    2004-03-01

    Parathyroid hormone (PTH) is the major hormone regulating calcium metabolism. It is also the only FDA-approved drug for osteoporosis treatment that stimulates bone formation when injected daily. However, continuous infusion of PTH causes severe bone loss in line with its known catabolic effects. Many studies to understand the dual effects of PTH have been carried out, and in recent years a growing number of molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying these effects have emerged. Here, we outline the present knowledge and conclude that the kinetics of administration and subsequent signaling probably account for the divergent actions of the hormone. PMID:15036251

  20. Abnormal WT1 expression in the CD34-negative compartment in myelodysplastic bone marrow.

    PubMed

    Van Dijk, Jeroen P; Knops, Gertrudis H J N; Van De Locht, Louis T F; Menke, Aswin L; Jansen, Joop H; Mensink, Ewald J B M; Raymakers, Reinier A P; De Witte, Theo

    2002-09-01

    In normal bone marrow, WT1 expression is restricted to CD34+ cells. We assessed WT1 mRNA expression levels with quantitative, real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction in normal, myelodysplastic (MDS) and secondary acute myeloid leukaemia (sAML) bone marrow subfractions, based on differentiation status. The highest WT1 expression was observed in the primitive CD34+ rhodamine-123 (rho) dull cells, both in healthy donors and MDS or sAML patients. In contrast to normal CD34-negative bone marrow cells, WT1 was present in CD34-negative bone marrow cells in 12 out of 13 MDS patients and two sAML samples. Further analysis of this aberrant WT1 expression was performed in the CD34-negative subfractions of three MDS patients. In one of these, WT1 expression was found exclusively in the erythroid cells. This patient was completely transfusion dependent and showed morphological dyserythropoiesis. In another MDS patient, WT1 expression was found in a non-erythroid compartment. We conclude that abnormal WT1 expression may contribute to the disturbed differentiation of haematopoietic cells in MDS patients.

  1. Biochemical markers of bone metabolism in children with cow's milk allergy

    PubMed Central

    Rowicka, Grażyna; Chelchowska, Magdalena; Gajewska, Joanna; Strucińska, Małgorzata; Laskowska-Klita, Teresa

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Patients with cow's milk allergy (CMA) and following a cow milk protein-free diet for a long time are potentially at risk of developing bone abnormalities. To assess the balance between bone formation and resorption processes, we determined serum concentrations of osteocalcin (OC), bone alkaline phosphatase (BALP), C-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen (CTX), fetuin-A, osteoprotegerin (OPG) and receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL) in children with CMA. Material and methods The study included 50 prepubertal children with diagnosed cow's milk allergy, who were under systematic medical and nutritional care at the Institute of Mother and Child and 40 healthy counterparts as a control group. The concentrations of bone metabolism markers were determined by immunoenzymatic assays. Results The diets of all investigated children were correct in terms of phosphorus and magnesium contents but deficient in terms of calcium and vitamin D. Serum OC and CTX as well as fetuin-A concentrations were similar in both studied groups. The BALP activity was significantly (p < 0.05) higher in children with cow's milk allergy than in the controls. Serum OPG concentration was comparable in both groups, but the RANKL level was higher (p < 0.05) in CMA children than in healthy ones. Hence, the ratio of OPG/RANKL was lower in children with CMA. Conclusions Our study demonstrates slight disturbances in the profile of bone metabolism markers in growing children with CMA. The increase in RANKL level and decrease in OPG/RANKL ratio may contribute to intensification of bone resorption in these patients. PMID:25624850

  2. Evaluation of bone metabolism and bone mass in patients with type-2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed Central

    Oz, S. Gul; Guven, Gulay Sain; Kilicarslan, Alpaslan; Calik, Nursel; Beyazit, Yavuz; Sozen, Tumay

    2006-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine whether type-2 diabetes was associated with a higher bone mineral density (BMD) in men and women and to evaluate the differences in mineral metabolism between diabetic and normal subjects by using biochemical bone turnover markers. In this study, 52 patients (37 females/15 males) aged 41-64 with type-2 diabetes mellitus and 48 nondiabetic control subjects (34 females/14 males) were evaluated. In men, BMD was significantly higher in diabetics at the forearm (p <0.05), whereas in women tended to be higher at the hip (p=0.002). Serum osteocalcin (p<0.0001), bone alkaline phosphatase (BAP) (p<0.05) and carboxyterminal telopeptide (CTx) (p<0.05) were higher in the control group than in diabetics. In men, serum osteocalcin (p<0.05) and CTx (p<0.005) and, in women, serum osteocalcin (p<0.0001) and BAP (p<0.05) were lower in diabetic subjects. In conclusion, our findings suggest that although bone formation is decreased in type-2 diabetes, diabetic patients are not susceptible to bone resorption. This low bone turnover can slow the rate of bone loss and cause a higher bone density than expected for their age. PMID:17052049

  3. [Pathological and metabolic bone diseases: Clinical importance for fracture treatment].

    PubMed

    Oheim, R

    2015-12-01

    Pathological and metabolic bone diseases are common and relevant occurrences in orthopedics and trauma surgery; however, fractures are often treated as being the illness itself and not seen as the symptom of an underlying bone disease. This is why further diagnostics and systemic treatment options are often insufficiently considered in the routine treatment of fractures. This review focuses on osteoporosis, osteopetrosis, hypophosphatasia and Paget's disease of bone.In patients with osteoporotic vertebral or proximal femur fractures, pharmaceutical treatment to prevent subsequent fractures is an integral part of fracture therapy together with surgical treatment. Osteopetrosis is caused by compromised osteoclastic bone resorption; therefore, even in the face of an elevated bone mass, vitamin D3 supplementation is crucial to avoid clinically relevant hypocalcemia. Unspecific symptoms of the musculoskeletal system, especially together with stress fractures, are typically found in patients suffering from hypophosphatasia. In these patients measurement of alkaline phosphatase shows reduced enzyme activity. Elevated levels of alkaline phosphatase are found in Paget's disease of bone where bisphosphonates are still the treatment of choice.

  4. [SSRI AND BONE METABOLISM IN HIV + PATIENTS WITH ANTIRETROVIRAL THERAPY].

    PubMed

    Mazzoglio y Nabar, Martín J; Muñiz, Milagros María; Mejías Delamano, Alexis A; Muñoz, Santiago; Magrath Guimet, Nahuel

    2015-01-01

    We report a series of 9 male HIV + patients, average age of 41.2 years, viral load negative (<50 copies RNA/ml), treated with antiretroviral (nucleoside and non-nucleoside inhibitors of reverse transcriptase) without systemic infections, the CNS diseases or marker or corticoidoterapia in progress. Were evaluated and supported by their infectologists interconsultation during the period October 2008-October 2013 by depressive syndrome. Psychotherapeutic and psychiatric treatment was initiated with SSRIs and clonazepam; Neuroimaging control and biochemical laboratory studies at baseline and 2 months of treatment were conducted. In the course of psychopharmacological treatment not suffer fractures due to falls and alterations were detected in bone metabolism markers and images. He studied with endocrinology and interdisciplinary medical clinic, decided to withdraw the SSRIs with normalization of biochemical values and psychotherapeutic treatment was continued. We will raise the associations between the use of SSRIs, disturbances of bone metabolism with clinical correlation and possible drug interactions between antidepressants and antiretroviral. PMID:26650557

  5. [Osteoporosis, estrogens, and bone metabolism. Implications for chronic renal insufficiency].

    PubMed

    Díaz López, J B; Rodríguez Rodríguez, A; Ramos, B; Caramelo, C; Rodríguez García, M; Cannata Andía, J B

    2003-01-01

    The relationship between estrogens, bone metabolism and osteoporosis is well known. Chronic renal failure in women is associated with menstrual disorders, lower bone mineral density and increased risk of fractures. However, most studies on renal osteodystrophy have not taken into account the role of oestrogen deficiency, its interaction, and the possible benefits of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) in uremic women. According to these limitations and the actual evidence of benefits and risks of HRT, we conclude that: a) Osteoporosis must be evaluated as a part of renal osteodystrophy; b) HRT would be considered in women with climateric symptoms and osteoporosis, and should not be used for prevention of cardiovascular disease, and c) Clearly we need to do more studies related to osteoporosis and estrogens in CRF, but right now we have to try to optimize bone turnover in our uremic patients.

  6. Mineral and bone disorders in kidney transplant recipients: reversible, irreversible, and de novo abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Hirukawa, Takashi; Kakuta, Takatoshi; Nakamura, Michio; Fukagawa, Masafumi

    2015-08-01

    Given the advances in medical technologies related to kidney transplantation, the post-transplant graft survival rate and quality of life have improved dramatically. Nevertheless, post-transplant mortality rate still remains high as compared to the general population due to the development of cardiovascular events. It has recently been widely recognized that chronic kidney disease-mineral and bone disorders (CKD-MBD) significantly contribute to such poor prognosis at least in part. In the majority of kidney recipients, abnormal serum parameters for mineral and bone disorder (MBD), such as phosphorus, calcium, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D, parathyroid hormone and fibroblast growth factor 23, gradually return toward acceptable levels following the re-establishment of kidney function after transplantation; however, some irreversible abnormalities, developed as the result of long-term dialysis, persist, require treatment, or even progress after kidney transplantation. Thus, better management of CKD-MBD during pre-dialysis and dialysis period as well as after kidney transplantation is highly appreciated. PMID:25931403

  7. One carbon metabolism and bone homeostasis and remodeling: A review of experimental research and population studies.

    PubMed

    Feigerlova, Eva; Demarquet, Lea; Guéant, Jean-Louis

    2016-07-01

    Homocysteine (HCY) is a degradation product of the methionine pathway. The B vitamins, in particular vitamin B12 and folate, are the primary nutritional determinant of HCY levels and therefore their deficiencies result in hyperhomocysteinaemia (HHCY). Prevalence of hyperhomocysteinemia (HHCY) and related dietary deficiencies in B vitamins and folate increase with age and have been related to osteoporosis and abnormal development of epiphyseal cartilage and bone in rodents. Here we provide a review of experimental and population studies. The negative effects of HHCY and/or B vitamins and folate deficiencies on bone formation and remodeling are documented by cell models, including primary osteoblasts, osteoclast and bone progenitor cells as well as by animal and human studies. However, underlying pathophysiological mechanisms are complex and remain poorly understood. Whether these associations are the direct consequences of impaired one carbon metabolism is not clarified and more studies are still needed to translate these findings to human population. To date, the evidence is limited and somewhat conflicting, however further trials in groups most vulnerable to impaired one carbon metabolism are required.

  8. Serum bone gla protein (BGP) and other markers of bone mineral metabolism in postmenopausal osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Ismail, F; Epstein, S; Pacifici, R; Droke, D; Thomas, S B; Avioli, L V

    1986-10-01

    Bone gla protein, the vitamin K-dependent protein synthesized by osteoblasts and measured in blood by radioimmunoassay, has been used as an index of the rate of bone turnover. The relationship of bone gla protein with other markers of bone mineral metabolism was determined in 31 untreated postmenopausal women with the osteoporotic syndrome. In addition to serum osteocalcin (BGP) we measured parathyroid hormone (PTH) (carboxyl and mid-molecule fragments), 25(OH)D, alkaline phosphatase, estradiol (E2), estrone (E1), dietary calcium intake, 24 hour urinary calcium excretion, and bone mineral density by CT scan of the lumbar vertebrae. Significant osteopenia was present on CT in untreated postmenopausal osteoporotic women (bone density in 18 out of 31 was below the critical value of 60 mg/cm3). Serum BGP correlated positively with CT scan (r + 0.647, P less than 0.001). CT and age were negatively correlated (r - 0.661, P less than 0.001) while CT and E2 showed a positive correlation (r + 0.554, P less than 0.01). Unexpectedly, BGP and age revealed a significant negative correlation (r - 0.421, P less than 0.05). These findings suggest a state of low bone turnover in this group with untreated postmenopausal osteoporosis.

  9. Immune Dysfunction Associated with Abnormal Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stroma Cells in Senescence Accelerated Mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ming; Guo, Kequan; Adachi, Yasushi; Ikehara, Susumu

    2016-01-01

    Senescence accelerated mice (SAM) are a group of mice that show aging-related diseases, and SAM prone 10 (SAMP10) show spontaneous brain atrophy and defects in learning and memory. Our previous report showed that the thymus and the percentage of T lymphocytes are abnormal in the SAMP10, but it was unclear whether the bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stroma cells (BMMSCs) were abnormal, and whether they played an important role in regenerative medicine. We thus compared BMMSCs from SAMP10 and their control, SAM-resistant (SAMR1), in terms of cell cycle, oxidative stress, and the expression of PI3K and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). Our cell cycle analysis showed that cell cycle arrest occurred in the G0/G1 phase in the SAMP10. We also found increased reactive oxygen stress and decreased PI3K and MAPK on the BMMSCs. These results suggested the BMMSCs were abnormal in SAMP10, and that this might be related to the immune system dysfunction in these mice. PMID:26840301

  10. Persistence of cerebral metabolic abnormalities in chronic schizophrenia as determined by positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Wolkin, A.; Jaeger, J.; Brodie, J.D.; Wolf, A.P.; Fowler, J.; Rotrosen, J.; Gomez-Mont, F.; Cancro, R.

    1985-05-01

    Local cerebral metabolic rates were determined by positron emission tomography and the deoxyglucose method in a group of 10 chronic schizophrenic subjects before and after somatic treatment and in eight normal subjects. Before treatment, schizophrenic subjects had markedly lower absolute metabolic activity than did normal controls in both frontal and temporal regions and a trend toward relative hyperactivity in the basal ganglia area. After treatment, their metabolic rates approached those seen in normal subjects in nearly all regions except frontal. Persistence of diminished frontal metabolism was manifested as significant relative hypofrontality. These findings suggest specific loci of aberrant cerebral functioning in chronic schizophrenia and the utility of positron emission tomography in characterizing these abnormalities.

  11. Hormonal regulation of medullary bone metabolism in the laying hen

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, J.R.

    1987-01-01

    A new organ culture system for the study of bone formation has been developed using medullary bone, a non-structural, metabolically active form of bone which is found in the marrow cavities of egg-laying birds. In the presence of fetal calf serum, bone explants were viable in culture by morphological criteria, and retained large numbers of osteoblasts and osteoclasts. Incorporation of /sup 3/H-proline into collagenase-digestible protein (CDP) and non-collagen protein (NCP) was determined using purified bacterial collagenase. Collagen accounted for over 10% of the total protein labeled. The calcium-regulating hormones, parathyroid hormone and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3), caused a dose-dependent inhibition of /sup 3/H-proline incorporation into CDP. The effective dose range of 1,25(OH)2D3 was 0.1 nM to 100 nM, while that of PTH was 1.0 nM to 100 nM. The effect of both hormones was specific for collagen, since /sup 3/H-proline incorporation into NCP was unaffected. Hydroxyproline analysis of bone explants and culture medium revealed that both hormones decreased the total hydroxyroline content of the cultures, suggesting that the inhibition of /sup 3/H-proline incorporation into DCP is due to inhibition of collagen synthesis.

  12. Genetically Low Vitamin D Levels, Bone Mineral Density, and Bone Metabolism Markers: a Mendelian Randomisation Study.

    PubMed

    Li, Shan-Shan; Gao, Li-Hong; Zhang, Xiao-Ya; He, Jin-We; Fu, Wen-Zhen; Liu, Yu-Juan; Hu, Yun-Qiu; Zhang, Zhen-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Low serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD) is associated with osteoporosis and osteoporotic fracture, but it remains uncertain whether these associations are causal. We conducted a Mendelian randomization (MR) study of 1,824 postmenopausal Chinese women to examine whether the detected associations between serum 25OHD and bone mineral density (BMD) and bone metabolism markers were causal. In observational analyses, total serum 25OHD was positively associated with BMD at lumbar spine (P = 0.003), femoral neck (P = 0.006) and total hip (P = 0.005), and was inversely associated with intact parathyroid hormone (PTH) (P = 8.18E-09) and procollagen type 1 N-terminal propeptide (P1NP) (P = 0.020). By contract, the associations of bioavailable and free 25OHD with all tested outcomes were negligible (all P > 0.05). The use of four single nucleotide polymorphisms, GC-rs2282679, NADSYN1-rs12785878, CYP2R1-rs10741657 and CYP24A1-rs6013897, as candidate instrumental variables in MR analyses showed that none of the two stage least squares models provided evidence for associations between serum 25OHD and either BMD or bone metabolism markers (all P > 0.05). We suggest that after controlling for unidentified confounding factors in MR analyses, the associations between genetically low serum 25OHD and BMD and bone metabolism markers are unlikely to be causal. PMID:27625044

  13. Genetically Low Vitamin D Levels, Bone Mineral Density, and Bone Metabolism Markers: a Mendelian Randomisation Study

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shan-Shan; Gao, Li-Hong; Zhang, Xiao-Ya; He, Jin-We; Fu, Wen-Zhen; Liu, Yu-Juan; Hu, Yun-Qiu; Zhang, Zhen-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Low serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD) is associated with osteoporosis and osteoporotic fracture, but it remains uncertain whether these associations are causal. We conducted a Mendelian randomization (MR) study of 1,824 postmenopausal Chinese women to examine whether the detected associations between serum 25OHD and bone mineral density (BMD) and bone metabolism markers were causal. In observational analyses, total serum 25OHD was positively associated with BMD at lumbar spine (P = 0.003), femoral neck (P = 0.006) and total hip (P = 0.005), and was inversely associated with intact parathyroid hormone (PTH) (P = 8.18E-09) and procollagen type 1 N-terminal propeptide (P1NP) (P = 0.020). By contract, the associations of bioavailable and free 25OHD with all tested outcomes were negligible (all P > 0.05). The use of four single nucleotide polymorphisms, GC-rs2282679, NADSYN1-rs12785878, CYP2R1-rs10741657 and CYP24A1-rs6013897, as candidate instrumental variables in MR analyses showed that none of the two stage least squares models provided evidence for associations between serum 25OHD and either BMD or bone metabolism markers (all P > 0.05). We suggest that after controlling for unidentified confounding factors in MR analyses, the associations between genetically low serum 25OHD and BMD and bone metabolism markers are unlikely to be causal. PMID:27625044

  14. Amino acid supplementation alters bone metabolism during simulated weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zwart, S. R.; Davis-Street, J. E.; Paddon-Jones, D.; Ferrando, A. A.; Wolfe, R. R.; Smith, S. M.

    2005-01-01

    High-protein and acidogenic diets induce hypercalciuria. Foods or supplements with excess sulfur-containing amino acids increase endogenous sulfuric acid production and therefore have the potential to increase calcium excretion and alter bone metabolism. In this study, effects of an amino acid/carbohydrate supplement on bone resorption were examined during bed rest. Thirteen subjects were divided at random into two groups: a control group (Con, n = 6) and an amino acid-supplemented group (AA, n = 7) who consumed an extra 49.5 g essential amino acids and 90 g carbohydrate per day for 28 days. Urine was collected for n-telopeptide (NTX), deoxypyridinoline (DPD), calcium, and pH determinations. Bone mineral content was determined and potential renal acid load was calculated. Bone-specific alkaline phosphatase was measured in serum samples collected on day 1 (immediately before bed rest) and on day 28. Potential renal acid load was higher in the AA group than in the Con group during bed rest (P < 0.05). For all subjects, during bed rest urinary NTX and DPD concentrations were greater than pre-bed rest levels (P < 0.05). Urinary NTX and DPD tended to be higher in the AA group (P = 0.073 and P = 0.056, respectively). During bed rest, urinary calcium was greater than baseline levels (P < 0.05) in the AA group but not the Con group. Total bone mineral content was lower after bed rest than before bed rest in the AA group but not the Con group (P < 0.05). During bed rest, urinary pH decreased (P < 0.05), and it was lower in the AA group than the Con group. These data suggest that bone resorption increased, without changes in bone formation, in the AA group.

  15. Abnormal humoral immune responses in peripheral blood lymphocyte cultures of bone marrow transplant recipients.

    PubMed Central

    Pahwa, S G; Pahwa, R N; Friedrich, W; O'Reilly, R J; Good, R A

    1982-01-01

    The present study was aimed at investigating recovery of humoral immunity in vitro after bone marrow transplantation in patients with acute leukemia and severe aplastic anemia. Hemolytic plaque assays were utilized to quantitate pokeweed mitogen-stimulated polyclonal immunoglobulin production and sheep erythrocyte antigen-specific antibody responses in cultures of peripheral blood mononuclear cells of 39 patients beginning at 1 month, for variable periods up to a maximum of 4 years after marrow transplantation. Three phases were identified: an early period of primary B cell dysfunction with concomitant immunoregulatory T cell abnormalities--i.e., decreased helper and increased suppressor activities; an intermediate phase in which B cell dysfunction could be attributed in large measure to immunoregulatory T cell abnormalities; and a late phase of normal B and T lymphocyte functions. Patients with graft-versus-host disease differed from those without it in that they often did not manifest increased T cell suppressor activity in the early period, and they were noted to have prolonged and profound B and T cell abnormalities in the chronic phase of their disease. In selected patients, simultaneous assessment of ratios of Leu-2 to Leu-3 antigens on T cells by monoclonal antibodies and of immunoregulatory T cell functions revealed a correlation between the two only late in the post-transplant period. These studies provide an insight into the ontogeny of B cell function in the post-transplant period and indicate that in certain situations phenotypic alterations in T cell subsets cannot reliably be used to predict abnormalities in their function in recipients of marrow transplantation. Images PMID:6211673

  16. Lipid metabolism abnormalities in alcohol-treated rabbits: a morphometric and haematologic study comparing high and low alcohol doses

    PubMed Central

    Ikemura, Satoshi; Yamamoto, Takuaki; Motomura, Goro; Iwasaki, Kenyu; Yamaguchi, Ryosuke; Zhao, Garida; Iwamoto, Yukihide

    2011-01-01

    The pathogenesis of alcohol-induced osteonecrosis remains unclear. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the morphological changes in bone marrow fat cells and the changes in the serum lipid levels in alcohol-treated rabbits. Fifteen rabbits were randomly assigned into three groups: Four rabbits intragastrically received low-dose alcohol (LDA) (15 ml/kg per day) containing 15% ethanol for 4 weeks, five rabbits received high-dose alcohol (HDA) (30 ml/kg per day) for 4 weeks and six rabbits received physiologic saline for 4 weeks as a control group. Six weeks after the initial alcohol administration, all rabbits were sacrificed. The mean size of the bone marrow fat cells in rabbits treated with HDA was significantly larger than that in the control group (P = 0.0001). Haematologically, the levels of triglycerides and free fatty acids in the rabbits treated with both low-dose and HDA were significantly higher than those in the control group (P = 0.001 for both comparisons). The results of this study are that there are lipid metabolism abnormalities, both morphologically and haematologically, after alcohol administration. Also these findings were more apparent in rabbits treated with HDA than those treated with LDA. PMID:21645143

  17. Bone and Mineral Metabolism in Patients with Primary Aldosteronism

    PubMed Central

    Petramala, Luigi; Zinnamosca, Laura; Settevendemmie, Amina; Marinelli, Cristiano; Nardi, Matteo; Concistrè, Antonio; Corpaci, Francesco; Tonnarini, Gianfranco; De Toma, Giorgio; Letizia, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    Primary aldosteronism represents major cause of secondary hypertension, strongly associated with high cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Aldosterone excess may influence mineral homeostasis, through higher urinary calcium excretion inducing secondary increase of parathyroid hormone. Recently, in a cohort of PA patients a significant increase of primary hyperparathyroidism was found, suggesting a bidirectional functional link between the adrenal and parathyroid glands. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of aldosterone excess on mineral metabolism and bone mass density. In 73 PA patients we evaluated anthropometric and biochemical parameters, renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, calcium-phosphorus metabolism, and bone mineral density; control groups were 73 essential hypertension (EH) subjects and 40 healthy subjects. Compared to HS and EH, PA subjects had significantly lower serum calcium levels and higher urinary calcium excretion. Moreover, PA patients showed higher plasma PTH, lower serum 25(OH)-vitamin D levels, higher prevalence of vitamin D deficiency (65% versus 25% and 25%; P < 0.001), and higher prevalence of osteopenia/osteoporosis (38.5 and 10.5%) than EH (28% and 4%) and NS (25% and 5%), respectively. This study supports the hypothesis that bone loss and fracture risk in PA patients are potentially the result of aldosterone mediated hypercalciuria and the consecutive secondary hyperparathyroidism. PMID:24864141

  18. Effect of metabolic acidosis on the potassium content of bone.

    PubMed

    Bushinsky, D A; Gavrilov, K; Chabala, J M; Featherstone, J D; Levi-Setti, R

    1997-10-01

    Metabolic acidosis induces resorption of cultured bone, resulting in a net efflux of calcium (Ca) from the bone and an apparent loss of mineral potassium (K). However, in these organ cultures, there is diffusion of K between the medium and the crystal lattice, causing difficulty in interpretation of the acid-induced changes in mineral ion composition. To determine the effects of acidosis on bone mineral K, we injected 4-day-old neonatal mice with pure stable isotope 41K, equal to approximately 5% of their total body K. Calvariae were dissected 24 h later and then cultured for 24 h in medium without added 41K, either at pH approximately 7.4 (Ctl) or at pH approximately 7.1 (Ac), with or without the osteoclastic inhibitor calcitonin (3 x 10(-9) M, CT). The bone isotopic ion content was determined with a high-resolution scanning ion microprobe utilizing secondary ion mass spectrometry. 41K is present in nature at 6.7% of total K. The injected 41K raised the ratio of bone 41K/(39K+41K) to 9.8+/-0.5% on the surface (ratios of counts per second of detected secondary ions, mean+/-95% confidence interval) but did not alter the ratio in the interior (6.9+/-0.4%), indicating biological incorporation of the 41K into the mineral surface. The ratios of 41K/40Ca on the surface of Ctl calvariae was 14.4+/-1.2, indicating that bone mineral surface is rich in K compared with Ca. Compared with Ctl, Ac caused a marked increase in the net Ca efflux from bone that was blocked by CT. Ac also induced a marked fall in the ratio of 41K/40Ca on the surface of the calvariae (43+/-0.5, p < 0.01 vs. Ctl), which was partially blocked by CT (8.2+/-0.9, p < 0.01 vs. Ctl and vs. Ac), indicating that Ac causes a greater release of bone mineral K than Ca which is partially blocked by CT. Thus, bone mineral surface is rich in K relative to Ca, acidosis induces a greater release of surface mineral K than Ca, and osteoclastic function is necessary to support the enriched levels of surface mineral K in

  19. Ethnic differences in calcium, phosphate and bone metabolism.

    PubMed

    Redmond, J; Jarjou, L M A; Zhou, B; Prentice, A; Schoenmakers, I

    2014-05-01

    The prevalence of osteoporosis and the incidence of age-related fragility fracture vary by ethnicity. There is greater than 10-fold variation in fracture probabilities between countries across the world. Mineral and bone metabolism are intimately interlinked, and both are known to exhibit patterns of daily variation, known as the diurnal rhythm (DR). Ethnic differences are described for Ca and P metabolism. The importance of these differences is described in detail between select ethnic groups, within the USA between African-Americans and White-Americans, between the Gambia and the UK and between China and the UK. Dietary Ca intake is higher in White-Americans compared with African-Americans, and is higher in White-British compared with Gambian and Chinese adults. Differences are observed also for plasma 25-hydroxy vitamin D, related to lifestyle differences, skin pigmentation and skin exposure to UVB-containing sunshine. Higher plasma 1,25-dihydroxy vitamin D and parathyroid hormone are observed in African-American compared with White-American adults. Plasma parathyroid hormone is also higher in Gambian adults and, in winter, in Chinese compared with White-British adults. There may be ethnic differences in the bone resorptive effects of parathyroid hormone, with a relative skeletal resistance to parathyroid hormone observed in some, but not all ethnic groups. Renal mineral excretion is also influenced by ethnicity; urinary Ca (uCa) and urinary P (uP) excretions are lower in African-Americans compared with White-Americans, and in Gambians compared with their White-British counterparts. Little is known about ethnic differences in the DR of Ca and P metabolism, but differences may be expected due to known differences in lifestyle factors, such as dietary intake and sleep/wake pattern. The ethnic-specific DR of Ca and P metabolism may influence the net balance of Ca and P conservation and bone remodelling. These ethnic differences in Ca, P and the bone metabolism may

  20. Calorie Restriction Prevents Metabolic Aging Caused by Abnormal SIRT1 Function in Adipose Tissues.

    PubMed

    Xu, Cheng; Cai, Yu; Fan, Pengcheng; Bai, Bo; Chen, Jie; Deng, Han-Bing; Che, Chi-Ming; Xu, Aimin; Vanhoutte, Paul M; Wang, Yu

    2015-05-01

    Adipose tissue is a pivotal organ determining longevity, due largely to its role in maintaining whole-body energy homeostasis and insulin sensitivity. SIRT1 is a NAD-dependent protein deacetylase possessing antiaging activities in a wide range of organisms. The current study demonstrates that mice with adipose tissue-selective overexpression of hSIRT1(H363Y), a dominant-negative mutant that disrupts endogenous SIRT1 activity, show accelerated development of metabolic aging. These mice, referred to as Adipo-H363Y, exhibit hyperglycemia, dyslipidemia, ectopic lipid deposition, insulin resistance, and glucose intolerance at a much younger age than their wild-type littermates. The metabolic defects of Adipo-H363Y are associated with abnormal epigenetic modifications and chromatin remodeling in their adipose tissues, as a result of excess accumulation of biotin, which inhibits endogenous SIRT1 activity, leading to increased inflammation, cellularity, and collagen deposition. The enzyme acetyl-CoA carboxylase 2 plays an important role in biotin accumulation within adipose tissues of Adipo-H363Y. Calorie restriction prevents biotin accumulation, abolishes abnormal histone biotinylation, and completely restores the metabolic and adipose functions of Adipo-H363Y. The effects are mimicked by short-term restriction of biotin intake, an approach potentially translatable to humans for maintaining the epigenetic and chromatin remodeling capacity of adipose tissues and preventing aging-associated metabolic disorders.

  1. Heterozygous PTCH1 Mutations Impact the Bone Metabolism in Patients With Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome Likely by Regulating SPARC Expression.

    PubMed

    Hong, Yingying; Zhang, Jianyun; Zhang, Heyu; Li, Xuefen; Qu, Jiafei; Zhai, Jiemei; Zhang, Lei; Chen, Feng; Li, Tiejun

    2016-07-01

    Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by bone and skin abnormalities and a predisposition to various tumors. Keratocystic odontogenic tumors (KCOTs), which are common tumors of the jaw that cause extensive damage to the jawbone, are usually accompanied with NBCCS. Germline PTCH1 mutations in NBCCS tumorigenesis have been frequently studied; however, little is known regarding the pathogenesis of bone abnormalities in this disease. This study sought to investigate the mechanism underlying heterozygous PTCH1 mutation-mediated abnormal bone metabolism in patients with NBCCS. Stromal cells were isolated from the fibrous capsules of patients with NBCCS-associated or non-syndromic keratocystic odontogenic tumors and non-syndromic tumor stromal cells without PTCH1 mutations served as controls. Germline PTCH1 heterozygous mutations were confirmed in all NBCCS samples and differential protein expression was identified using tandem mass tag-labeled proteomics analysis. Our findings revealed that osteonectin/SPARC expression was significantly downregulated in syndromic stromal cells compared with non-syndromic stromal cells. SPARC expression was even lower in stromal cells carrying PTCH1 protein truncation mutations. PTCH1 siRNA transfection demonstrated that SPARC downregulation correlates with decreased PTCH1 expression. Furthermore, exogenous SPARC promoted osteogenic differentiation of syndromic stromal cells with enhanced development of calcium nodules. In addition, bone mineral density tests showed that patients with NBCCS exhibit weak bone mass compared with sex- and age-matched controls. This study indicates that germline PTCH1 heterozygous mutations play a major role in bone metabolism in patients with NBCCS, in particular in those with PTCH1 protein truncation mutations. SPARC may represent an important downstream modulator of PTCH1 mediation of bone metabolism. Thus, bone mineral density monitoring is critical

  2. Bone metabolism during antler growth in female reindeer.

    PubMed

    Baksi, S N; Newbrey, J W

    1989-11-01

    Two female reindeer (Rangifer tarandus) were investigated for alterations in skeletal metabolism during the annual antler growth cycle. During July and January, rib samples were obtained by biopsy after double tetracycline labeling for gravimetric, chemical, and histomorphometric analyses. Though antler length increased from 8 to 55 cm between April and September, body weight increased from only 56 to 77 kg. Rib bone density (g/cm3) increased from 1.39 +/- 0.01 (mean +/- SEM) in July to 1.53 +/- 0.01 in January, and Ca content (mg/cm3) increased from 213 +/- 8 to 300 +/- 14, respectively. Histomorphometric data indicated that rib bones were more porous and active in July and had a higher turnover rate than did January samples. Plasma 1,25(OH)2D, parathyroid hormone (PTH), and osteocalcin levels were significantly lower and estradiol levels were significantly higher in the January as opposed to the July samples. The data indicate that during antler growth, female reindeer undergo bone loss that corresponds to the changes in plasma calcemic hormones and estradiol levels. This bone loss is eventually repaired when antler growth stops. PMID:2509019

  3. Brain PET metabolic abnormalities in a case of varicella-zoster virus encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Coiffard, Benjamin; Guedj, Eric; Daumas, Aurélie; Leveque, Pierre; Villani, Patrick

    2014-09-01

    The role of brain 18F-FDG PET in the diagnostic evaluation of encephalitis has been recently suggested, especially in limbic encephalitis, but descriptions are mainly limited to small case reports. However, the evaluation of cerebral metabolism by 18F-FDG PET has never been described for varicella-zoster virus encephalitis. We report the first case of varicella-zoster virus encephalitis in which 18F-FDG PET revealed brain metabolic abnormalities. Brain metabolic PET imaging was analyzed by comparing the patient's brain 18F-FDG PET scans to that of 12 healthy subjects. Compared with healthy subjects, significant hypometabolism and hypermetabolism were found and evolved over time with treatment.

  4. Early and Sustained Changes in Bone Metabolism After Severe Burn Injury.

    PubMed

    Muschitz, Gabriela Katharina; Schwabegger, Elisabeth; Kocijan, Roland; Baierl, Andreas; Moussalli, Hervé; Fochtmann, Alexandra; Nickl, Stefanie; Tinhofer, Ines; Haschka, Judith; Resch, Heinrich; Rath, Thomas; Pietschmann, Peter; Muschitz, Christian

    2016-04-01

    This study investigated serum burnover marker in male patients after severe burn injury. Ongoing changes suggest alterations in bone metabolism with a likely adverse influence on bone quality and structure. PMID:26789778

  5. Food Intake Does Not Differ between Obese Women Who Are Metabolically Healthy or Abnormal1234

    PubMed Central

    Kimokoti, Ruth W; Judd, Suzanne E; Shikany, James M; Newby, PK

    2014-01-01

    Background: Metabolically healthy obesity may confer lower risk of adverse health outcomes compared with abnormal obesity. Diet and race are postulated to influence the phenotype, but their roles and their interrelations on healthy obesity are unclear. Objective: We evaluated food intakes of metabolically healthy obese women in comparison to intakes of their metabolically healthy normal-weight and metabolically abnormal obese counterparts. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study in 6964 women of the REasons for Geographic And Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) study. Participants were aged 45–98 y with a body mass index (BMI; kg/m2) ≥18.5 and free of cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, and cancer. Food intake was collected by using a food-frequency questionnaire. BMI phenotypes were defined by using metabolic syndrome (MetS) and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) criteria. Mean differences in food intakes among BMI phenotypes were compared by using ANCOVA. Results: Approximately one-half of obese women (white: 45%; black: 55%) as defined by MetS criteria and approximately one-quarter of obese women (white: 28%; black: 24%) defined on the basis of HOMA-IR values were metabolically healthy. In age-adjusted analyses, healthy obesity and normal weight as defined by both criteria were associated with lower intakes of sugar-sweetened beverages compared with abnormal obesity among both white and black women (P < 0.05). HOMA-IR–defined healthy obesity and normal weight were also associated with higher fruit and low-fat dairy intakes compared with abnormal obesity in white women (P < 0.05). Results were attenuated and became nonsignificant in multivariable-adjusted models that additionally adjusted for BMI, marital status, residential region, education, annual income, alcohol intake, multivitamin use, cigarette smoking status, physical activity, television viewing, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, menopausal status, hormone therapy

  6. The pleiotropic effects of paricalcitol: Beyond bone-mineral metabolism.

    PubMed

    Egido, Jesús; Martínez-Castelao, Alberto; Bover, Jordi; Praga, Manuel; Torregrosa, José Vicente; Fernández-Giráldez, Elvira; Solozábal, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Secondary hyperparathyroidism (SHPT) is a common complication in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) that is characterised by elevated parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels and a series of bone-mineral metabolism anomalies. In patients with SHPT, treatment with paricalcitol, a selective vitamin D receptor activator, has been shown to reduce PTH levels with minimal serum calcium and phosphorus variations. The classic effect of paricalcitol is that of a mediator in mineral and bone homeostasis. However, recent studies have suggested that the benefits of treatment with paricalcitol go beyond PTH reduction and, for instance, it has a positive effect on cardiovascular disease and survival. The objective of this study is to review the most significant studies on the so-called pleiotropic effects of paricalcitol treatment in patients with CKD. PMID:26705959

  7. The pleiotropic effects of paricalcitol: Beyond bone-mineral metabolism.

    PubMed

    Egido, Jesús; Martínez-Castelao, Alberto; Bover, Jordi; Praga, Manuel; Torregrosa, José Vicente; Fernández-Giráldez, Elvira; Solozábal, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Secondary hyperparathyroidism (SHPT) is a common complication in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) that is characterised by elevated parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels and a series of bone-mineral metabolism anomalies. In patients with SHPT, treatment with paricalcitol, a selective vitamin D receptor activator, has been shown to reduce PTH levels with minimal serum calcium and phosphorus variations. The classic effect of paricalcitol is that of a mediator in mineral and bone homeostasis. However, recent studies have suggested that the benefits of treatment with paricalcitol go beyond PTH reduction and, for instance, it has a positive effect on cardiovascular disease and survival. The objective of this study is to review the most significant studies on the so-called pleiotropic effects of paricalcitol treatment in patients with CKD.

  8. Basic bone radiology

    SciTech Connect

    Griffiths, H.J.

    1987-01-01

    This clinical book surveys the skeletal system as seen through radiological imaging. It emphasizing abnormalities, disease, and trauma, and includes vital information on bones, bone growth, and the cells involved in bone pathology. It covers many bone diseases and injuries which are rarely covered in medical texts, as well as descriptions of radiologic procedures that specifically relate to the skeleton. This edition includes many illustrations, information on MR imaging and CT scanning, and discussions of osteoporosis, dysplasias, and metabolic bone disease.

  9. Effects of cod bone gelatin on bone metabolism and bone microarchitecture in ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Han, XiaoLong; Xu, YaJun; Wang, JunBo; Pei, XinRong; Yang, RuiYue; Li, Ning; Li, Yong

    2009-05-01

    Several animal studies have showed that gelatin may be effective for minimizing bone loss in OVX rats with established osteopenia. To gain insight into how cod bone gelatin administration affects bone loss after ovariectomy, studies were carried out focusing on bone quality and the molecular mechanisms. Eighty-four female rats were ovariectomized, 12 sham-operated, divided into six groups of 12 each and treated one week after ovariectomy either with vehicle or cod bone gelatin (0.375, 0.75, 1.5, 3, 6 mg/kg body weight) for 90 days. Bone densitometry, microCT analysis, real-time PCR analysis and biochemical analysis were used at the end of the study. After 90 days, BMD of proximal tibia and femoral neck decreased in OVX rats, whereas the loss of BMD in those regions was prevented at 3 g/kg (P<0.05). However, the BMD of midshaft femurs showed no significant differences. BV/TV, Tb.N. and Tb.Th. in the 3 g/kg group were, respectively, 30.4% (P<0.05), 145.5% (P<0.05) and 81.5% (P<0.05) higher than in the OVX group. A significant decrease was detected in urine CTX, NTX and DPD, suggesting decreased bone resorption. Treatment with 3 g/kg and 6 g/kg cod bone gelatin attenuated the increase in serum IL-1beta, IL-6 and TNF-alpha observed in the OVX group. Real-time PCR showed significantly decreased levels of mRNA expression for RANKL at the dosage of 6 g/kg and the RANKL/OPG mRNA ratio in the 3 g/kg and 6 g/kg group significantly decreased compared to the OVX group (P<0.05). In conclusion, our data confirmed that the cod bone gelatin treatment at 3 g/kg is effective in the prevention of estrogen deficient bone loss by modulating the expression of RANKL and OPG and suppressing the release of proinflammatory cytokines.

  10. [A study on observation of bone metabolism in middle-aged and senile female Graves' disease].

    PubMed

    Zhu, L Q; Liu, Y H; Zhou, Y B

    1996-08-01

    Sixty-nine cases of middle aged and senile female Graves' desease (GD) patients suffered from abnormal bone metabolism have been studied. They were divided randomly into group A and B, treated separately with antithyroid drugs (Tapazol and inderal, etc.) in group A, and added with Chinese herbal medicine for tonifying Kidney and promoting blood circulation in group B. Before treatment, patients of both groups showed obvious higher blood calcium (Ca) 24-hour urinary Ca, phosphorus (P) and serum clcitonin (CT) levels than that in normal subjects. These patients' serum Ca, moreover, had a parallel relationship with serum T3 levels (r = 0.6142, P < 0.01) and the serum Ca also a paralleled with serum CT levels (r = 0.5714, P < 0.05). After six months of treatment, the serum Ca, 24-hour urinary Ca, P and blood CT values were all reduced in various degree. The decrease of these bone metabolic parameters were more significant in group B than that in group A. PMID:9387746

  11. Tandem mass spectrometry newborn screening for inborn errors of intermediary metabolism: abnormal profile interpretation.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Lainez, C; Aguilar-Lemus, J J; Vela-Amieva, M; Ibarra-González, I

    2012-01-01

    Expanded newborn screening for inherited metabolic disorders using tandem mass spectrometry was introduced in 1990's and is widely used around the world. In contrast to conventional screening methods, tandem mass spectrometry does not measure single analytes but identifies and quantifies metabolite profiles; one single blood spot analyzed provides information of about 60 metabolites including amino acids, acylcarnitines and related ratios that enable the diagnosis of approximately 50 different diseases. However, the interpretation of these profiles can become quite complex. The aim of this work is to present in an easy and practical manner a comprehensive compilation of information needed for tandem mass neonatal screening profile interpretation, and basic actions for immediate follow up of abnormal results, including the tests that are required for confirmatory purposes. Other conditions not attributable to metabolic disorders which can lead to an abnormal profile of these markers are also described as well as a series of general recommendations which would be useful for health professionals who are beginning newborn screening for inborn errors of intermediary metabolism using tandem mass spectrometry.

  12. ACE Reduces Metabolic Abnormalities in a High-Fat Diet Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seong-Jong; Han, Jong-Min; Lee, Jin-Seok; Son, Chang-Gue; Im, Hwi-Jin; Jo, Hyun-Kyung; Yoo, Ho-Ryong; Kim, Yoon-Sik; Seol, In-Chan

    2015-01-01

    The medicinal plants Artemisia iwayomogi (A. iwayomogi) and Curcuma longa (C. longa) radix have been used to treat metabolic abnormalities in traditional Korean medicine and traditional Chinese medicine (TKM and TCM). In this study we evaluated the effect of the water extract of a mixture of A. iwayomogi and C. longa (ACE) on high-fat diet-induced metabolic syndrome in a mouse model. Four groups of C57BL/6N male mice (except for the naive group) were fed a high-fat diet freely for 10 weeks. Among these, three groups (except the control group) were administered a high-fat diet supplemented with ACE (100 or 200 mg/kg) or curcumin (50 mg/kg). Body weight, accumulation of adipose tissues in abdomen and size of adipocytes, serum lipid profiles, hepatic steatosis, and oxidative stress markers were analyzed. ACE significantly reduced the body and peritoneal adipose tissue weights, serum lipid profiles (total cholesterol and triglycerides), glucose levels, hepatic lipid accumulation, and oxidative stress markers. ACE normalized lipid synthesis-associated gene expressions (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma, PPARγ; fatty acid synthase, FAS; sterol regulatory element-binding transcription factor-1c, SREBP-1c; and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha, PPARα). The results from this study suggest that ACE has the pharmaceutical potential reducing the metabolic abnormalities in an animal model. PMID:26508977

  13. Reproductive and metabolic abnormalities associated with bipolar disorder and its treatment.

    PubMed

    Kenna, Heather A; Jiang, Bowen; Rasgon, Natalie L

    2009-01-01

    Women with mood disorders, especially bipolar disorder (BD), have been shown to have high rates of reproductive and metabolic dysfunction. The available data on the functional, anatomic, and clinical neuroendocrine abnormalities in women with BD suggest a two-tiered relationship with mood pathology. First, many of the medications commonly used in the treatment of BD can have deleterious effects on blood levels of reproductive hormones and consequently on the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis and reproductive function. Studies that have specifically addressed the association between psychotropic medications and menstrual abnormalities, polycystic ovary syndrome, and overall reproductive endocrine function in women with BD have found high rates of HPG irregularities in women with BD. Second, there is evidence of reproductive dysfunction in women with BD prior to treatment. In addition, many of the psychotropic medications used in the treatment of BD are associated with weight gain, insulin resistance, and dyslipidemia. These metabolic side effects further compound the neuroendocrine system dysregulation in women with BD. Current understanding of the reproductive and metabolic function in women with BD points to vulnerability, which in turn increases the risk of later-life cardiovascular disease and diabetes, among other morbidities, for women with BD.

  14. Branched-chain amino acid metabolism in rat muscle: abnormal regulation in acidosis

    SciTech Connect

    May, R.C.; Hara, Y.; Kelly, R.A.; Block, K.P.; Buse, M.G.; Mitch, W.E.

    1987-06-01

    Branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) metabolism is frequently abnormal in pathological conditions accompanied by chronic metabolic acidosis. To study how metabolic acidosis affects BCAA metabolism in muscle, rats were gavage fed a 14% protein diet with or without 4 mmol NH/sub 4/Cl x 100 g body wt/sup -1/ x day/sup -1/. Epitrochlearis muscles were incubated with L-(1-/sup 14/C)-valine and L-(1-/sup 14/C)leucine, and rates of decarboxylation, net transamination, and incorporation into muscle protein were measured. Plasma and muscle BCAA levels were lower in acidotic rats. Rates of valine and leucine decarboxylation and net transamination were higher in muscles from acidotic rats; these differences were associated with a 79% increase in the total activity of branched-chain ..cap alpha..-keto acid dehydrogenase and a 146% increase in the activated form of the enzyme. They conclude that acidosis affects the regulation of BCAA metabolism by enhancing flux through the transaminase and by directly stimulating oxidative catabolism through activation of branched-chain ..cap alpha..-keto acid dehydrogenase.

  15. Long-term treatment with lanthanum carbonate reduces mineral and bone abnormalities in rats with chronic renal failure

    PubMed Central

    Damment, Stephen; Secker, Roger; Shen, Victor; Lorenzo, Victor; Rodriguez, Mariano

    2011-01-01

    Background. Lanthanum carbonate (FOSRENOL®, Shire Pharmaceuticals) is an effective non-calcium, non-resin phosphate binder for the treatment of hyperphosphataemia in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). In this study, we used a rat model of chronic renal failure (CRF) to examine the long-term effects of controlling serum phosphorus with lanthanum carbonate treatment on the biochemical and bone abnormalities associated with CKD–mineral and bone disorder (CKD–MBD). Methods. Rats were fed a normal diet (normal renal function, NRF), or a diet containing 0.75% adenine for 3 weeks to induce CRF. NRF rats continued to receive normal diet plus vehicle or normal diet supplemented with 2% (w/w) lanthanum carbonate for 22 weeks. CRF rats received a diet containing 0.1% adenine, with or without 2% (w/w) lanthanum carbonate. Blood and urine biochemistry were assessed, and bone histomorphometry was performed at study completion. Results. Treatment with 0.75% adenine induced severe CRF, as demonstrated by elevated serum creatinine. Hyperphosphataemia, hypocalcaemia, elevated calcium × phosphorus product and secondary hyperparathyroidism were evident in CRF + vehicle animals. Treatment with lanthanum carbonate reduced hyperphosphataemia and secondary hyperparathyroidism in CRF animals (P < 0.05), and had little effect in NRF animals. Bone histomorphometry revealed a severe form of bone disease with fibrosis in CRF + vehicle animals; lanthanum carbonate treatment reduced the severity of the bone abnormalities observed, particularly woven bone formation and fibrosis. Conclusions. Long-term treatment with lanthanum carbonate reduced the biochemical and bone abnormalities of CKD–MBD in a rat model of CRF. PMID:21098011

  16. Vascular calcification, bone and mineral metabolism after kidney transplantation

    PubMed Central

    D’Marco, Luis; Bellasi, Antonio; Mazzaferro, Sandro; Raggi, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    The development of end stage renal failure can be seen as a catastrophic health event and patients with this condition are considered at the highest risk of cardiovascular disease among any other patient groups and risk categories. Although kidney transplantation was hailed as an optimal solution to such devastating disease, many issues related to immune-suppressive drugs soon emerged and it became evident that cardiovascular disease would remain a vexing problem. Progression of chronic kidney disease is accompanied by profound alterations of mineral and bone metabolism that are believed to have an impact on the cardiovascular health of patients with advanced degrees of renal failure. Cardiovascular risk factors remain highly prevalent after kidney transplantation, some immune-suppression drugs worsen the risk profile of graft recipients and the alterations of mineral and bone metabolism seen in end stage renal failure are not completely resolved. Whether this complex situation promotes progression of vascular calcification, a hall-mark of advanced chronic kidney disease, and whether vascular calcifications contribute to the poor cardiovascular outcome of post-transplant patients is reviewed in this article. PMID:26722649

  17. Prevalence and predictors of metabolic abnormalities in Chinese women with PCOS: a cross- sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a common condition estimated to affect 5.61% of Chinese women of reproductive age, but little is known about the prevalence and predictors in Chinese PCOS patients. This study aimed to determine the prevalence and predictors of the metabolic abnormalities in Chinese women with and without PCOS. Methods A large-scale national epidemiological investigation was conducted in reproductive age women (19 to 45 years) across China. 833 reproductive aged PCOS women, who participated in the healthcare screening, were recruited from ten provinces in China. Clinical history, ultrasonographic exam (ovarian follicle), hormonal and metabolic parameters were the main outcome measures. Results The prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MetS) as compared in PCOS and non-PCOS women from community were 18.2% vs 14.7%, and IR (insulin resistance) were 14.2% vs 9.3% (p < 0.001) respectively. After adjusting for age, the indicators (central obesity, hypertension, fasting insulin, SHBG, dyslipinaemia) for metabolic disturbances were significantly higher in PCOS than in non-PCOS groups. Using multivariate logistic regression, central obesity and FAI were risk factors, while SHBG was a protective factor on the occurrence of Mets and IR in PCOS women (OR: 1.132, 1.105 and 0.995). Conclusions The risk factors of the metabolic syndrome and insulin resistance were BMI and FAI for PCOS women, respectively. The decrease of SHBG level was also a risk factor for insulin resistance in both PCOS and metabolic disturbance. PMID:25223276

  18. Bone marrow abnormalities and early bone lesions in multiple myeloma and its precursor disease: a prospective study using functional and morphologic imaging.

    PubMed

    Bhutani, Manisha; Turkbey, Baris; Tan, Esther; Korde, Neha; Kwok, Mary; Manasanch, Elisabet E; Tageja, Nishant; Mailankody, Sham; Roschewski, Mark; Mulquin, Marcia; Carpenter, Ashley; Lamping, Elizabeth; Minter, Alex R; Weiss, Brendan M; Mena, Esther; Lindenberg, Liza; Calvo, Katherine R; Maric, Irina; Usmani, Saad Z; Choyke, Peter L; Kurdziel, Karen; Landgren, Ola

    2016-05-01

    The incidence and importance of bone marrow involvement and/or early bone lesions in multiple myeloma (MM) precursor diseases is largely unknown. This study prospectively compared the sensitivity of several imaging modalities in monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS), smoldering multiple myeloma (SMM) and MM. Thirty patients (10 each with MGUS, SMM and MM) were evaluated with skeletal survey, [18F]FDG-PET/CT, [18F]NaF-PET/CT and morphologic dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE)-MRI. An additional 16 SMM patients had skeletal surveys and FDG-PET/CT. Among MGUS patients, DCE-MRI found only one focal marrow abnormality; other evaluations were negative. Among 26 SMM patients, five (19%) were re-classified as MM based on lytic bone lesions on CT and six had unifocal or diffuse marrow abnormality. Among MM, marrow abnormalities were observed on FDG-PET/CT in 8/10 patients and on DCE-MRI in nine evaluable patients. Abnormal NaF uptake was observed only in MM patients with lytic lesions on CT, providing no additional clinical information. PMID:26690712

  19. Bone mineral density, quantitative ultrasound parameters and bone metabolism in postmenopausal women with depression.

    PubMed

    Atteritano, Marco; Lasco, Antonino; Mazzaferro, Susanna; Macrì, Ida; Catalano, Antonino; Santangelo, Antonino; Bagnato, Gianluca; Bagnato, Gianfilippo; Frisina, Nicola

    2013-09-01

    Low bone mineral density, which increases the risk of stress fragility fractures, is a frequent, often persistent finding in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). The clinical association between major depressive disorder and osteopenia is still unclear, although several factors are associated with a loss of bone mass. The aim of our study, therefore, was to evaluate bone mineral density and bone metabolism in patients with MDD. Bone mineral density was evaluated in fifty postmenopausal women with MDD, and in 50 matched postmenopausal control women by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry of the lumbar spine and femur, and by ultrasonography of the calcaneus and phalanges. Serum levels of 25-hydroxivitamin D, parathyroid hormone, Osteoprotegerin/Receptor Activator for Nuclear Factor κB Ligand ratio, bone turnover markers, serum and urinary cortisol were examined. Bone mineral density of the lumbar spine (BMD: 0.72 ± 0.06 vs. 0.82 ± 0.09 g/cm(2), p < 0.001), femoral neck (BMD: 0.58 ± 0.04 vs. 0.71 ± 0.07 g/cm(2), p < 0.001) and total femur (BMD 0.66 ± 0.09 vs. 0.54 ± 0.06 g/cm(2), p < 0.001); and ultrasound parameters at calcaneus (SI: 81.30 ± 6.10 vs. 93.80 ± 7.10, p < 0.001) and phalanges (AD-SOS: 1915.00 ± 37.70 vs. 2020.88 ± 39.46, p < 0.001; BTT : 1.30 ± 0.8 vs. 1.45 ± 0.9, p < 0.001) are significantly lower in patients with MDD compared with controls. Moreover bone turnover markers, parathyroid hormone levels and Receptor Activator for Nuclear Factor κB Ligand are significantly higher in MDD patients compared with controls, while serum levels of 25-hydroxivitamin D and osteoprotegerin are significantly lower. There are no differences in urinary excretion and serum cortisol between groups. Postmenopausal women with depressive disorder have an elevated risk for osteoporosis. Our data suggest that a high level of parathyroid hormone may play a role in the pathogenetic process underlying osteopenia in these patients.

  20. DNA hypermethylation in hyperhomocysteinemia contributes to abnormal extracellular matrix metabolism in the kidney

    PubMed Central

    Pushpakumar, Sathnur; Kundu, Sourav; Narayanan, Nithya; Sen, Utpal

    2015-01-01

    Hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy) is prevalent in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Emerging studies suggest that epigenetic mechanisms contribute to the development and progression of fibrosis in CKD. HHcy and its intermediates are known to alter the DNA methylation pattern, which is a critical regulator of epigenetic information. In this study, we hypothesized that HHcy causes renovascular remodeling by DNA hypermethylation, leading to glomerulosclerosis. We also evaluated whether the DNA methylation inhibitor, 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine (5-Aza) could modulate extracellular matrix (ECM) metabolism and reduce renovascular fibrosis. C57BL/6J (wild-type) and cystathionine-β-synthase (CBS+/−) mice, treated without or with 5-Aza (0.5 mg/kg body weight, i.p.), were used. CBS+/− mice showed high plasma Hcy levels, hypertension, and significant glomerular and arteriolar injury. 5-Aza treatment normalized blood pressure and reversed renal injury. CBS+/− mice showed global hypermethylation and up-regulation of DNA methyltransferase-1 and -3a. Methylation-specific PCR showed an imbalance between matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP)-1 and -2 and also increased collagen and galectin-3 expression. 5-Aza reduced abnormal DNA methylation and restored the MMP-9/TIMP-1, -2 balance. In conclusion, our data suggest that during HHcy, abnormal DNA methylation and an imbalance between MMP-9 and TIMP-1 and -2 lead to ECM remodeling and renal fibrosis.—Pushpakumar, S., Kundu, S., Narayanan, N., Sen, U. DNA hypermethylation in hyperhomocysteinemia contributes to abnormal extracellular matrix metabolism in the kidney. PMID:26224753

  1. Genetic Regulation of Bone Metabolism in the Chicken: Similarities and Differences to Mammalian Systems

    PubMed Central

    Johnsson, Martin; Jonsson, Kenneth B.; Andersson, Leif; Jensen, Per; Wright, Dominic

    2015-01-01

    Birds have a unique bone physiology, due to the demands placed on them through egg production. In particular their medullary bone serves as a source of calcium for eggshell production during lay and undergoes continuous and rapid remodelling. We take advantage of the fact that bone traits have diverged massively during chicken domestication to map the genetic basis of bone metabolism in the chicken. We performed a quantitative trait locus (QTL) and expression QTL (eQTL) mapping study in an advanced intercross based on Red Junglefowl (the wild progenitor of the modern domestic chicken) and White Leghorn chickens. We measured femoral bone traits in 456 chickens by peripheral computerised tomography and femoral gene expression in a subset of 125 females from the cross with microarrays. This resulted in 25 loci for female bone traits, 26 loci for male bone traits and 6318 local eQTL loci. We then overlapped bone and gene expression loci, before checking for an association between gene expression and trait values to identify candidate quantitative trait genes for bone traits. A handful of our candidates have been previously associated with bone traits in mice, but our results also implicate unexpected and largely unknown genes in bone metabolism. In summary, by utilising the unique bone metabolism of an avian species, we have identified a number of candidate genes affecting bone allocation and metabolism. These findings can have ramifications not only for the understanding of bone metabolism genetics in general, but could also be used as a potential model for osteoporosis as well as revealing new aspects of vertebrate bone regulation or features that distinguish avian and mammalian bone. PMID:26023928

  2. Genetic regulation of bone metabolism in the chicken: similarities and differences to Mammalian systems.

    PubMed

    Johnsson, Martin; Jonsson, Kenneth B; Andersson, Leif; Jensen, Per; Wright, Dominic

    2015-05-01

    Birds have a unique bone physiology, due to the demands placed on them through egg production. In particular their medullary bone serves as a source of calcium for eggshell production during lay and undergoes continuous and rapid remodelling. We take advantage of the fact that bone traits have diverged massively during chicken domestication to map the genetic basis of bone metabolism in the chicken. We performed a quantitative trait locus (QTL) and expression QTL (eQTL) mapping study in an advanced intercross based on Red Junglefowl (the wild progenitor of the modern domestic chicken) and White Leghorn chickens. We measured femoral bone traits in 456 chickens by peripheral computerised tomography and femoral gene expression in a subset of 125 females from the cross with microarrays. This resulted in 25 loci for female bone traits, 26 loci for male bone traits and 6318 local eQTL loci. We then overlapped bone and gene expression loci, before checking for an association between gene expression and trait values to identify candidate quantitative trait genes for bone traits. A handful of our candidates have been previously associated with bone traits in mice, but our results also implicate unexpected and largely unknown genes in bone metabolism. In summary, by utilising the unique bone metabolism of an avian species, we have identified a number of candidate genes affecting bone allocation and metabolism. These findings can have ramifications not only for the understanding of bone metabolism genetics in general, but could also be used as a potential model for osteoporosis as well as revealing new aspects of vertebrate bone regulation or features that distinguish avian and mammalian bone. PMID:26023928

  3. Inhibiting Monoacylglycerol Acyltransferase 1 Ameliorates Hepatic Metabolic Abnormalities but Not Inflammation and Injury in Mice*

    PubMed Central

    Soufi, Nisreen; Hall, Angela M.; Chen, Zhouji; Yoshino, Jun; Collier, Sara L.; Mathews, James C.; Brunt, Elizabeth M.; Albert, Carolyn J.; Graham, Mark J.; Ford, David A.; Finck, Brian N.

    2014-01-01

    Abnormalities in hepatic lipid metabolism and insulin action are believed to play a critical role in the etiology of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. Monoacylglycerol acyltransferase (MGAT) enzymes convert monoacylglycerol to diacylglycerol, which is the penultimate step in one pathway for triacylglycerol synthesis. Hepatic expression of Mogat1, which encodes an MGAT enzyme, is increased in the livers of mice with hepatic steatosis, and knocking down Mogat1 improves glucose metabolism and hepatic insulin signaling, but whether increased MGAT activity plays a role in the etiology of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis is unclear. To examine this issue, mice were placed on a diet containing high levels of trans fatty acids, fructose, and cholesterol (HTF-C diet) or a low fat control diet for 4 weeks. Mice were injected with antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) to knockdown Mogat1 or a scrambled ASO control for 12 weeks while remaining on diet. The HTF-C diet caused glucose intolerance, hepatic steatosis, and induced hepatic gene expression markers of inflammation, macrophage infiltration, and stellate cell activation. Mogat1 ASO treatment, which suppressed Mogat1 expression in liver and adipose tissue, attenuated weight gain, improved glucose tolerance, improved hepatic insulin signaling, and decreased hepatic triacylglycerol content compared with control ASO-treated mice on HTF-C chow. However, Mogat1 ASO treatment did not reduce hepatic diacylglycerol, cholesterol, or free fatty acid content; improve histologic measures of liver injury; or reduce expression of markers of stellate cell activation, liver inflammation, and injury. In conclusion, inhibition of hepatic Mogat1 in HTF-C diet-fed mice improves hepatic metabolic abnormalities without attenuating liver inflammation and injury. PMID:25213859

  4. Inhibiting monoacylglycerol acyltransferase 1 ameliorates hepatic metabolic abnormalities but not inflammation and injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Soufi, Nisreen; Hall, Angela M; Chen, Zhouji; Yoshino, Jun; Collier, Sara L; Mathews, James C; Brunt, Elizabeth M; Albert, Carolyn J; Graham, Mark J; Ford, David A; Finck, Brian N

    2014-10-24

    Abnormalities in hepatic lipid metabolism and insulin action are believed to play a critical role in the etiology of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. Monoacylglycerol acyltransferase (MGAT) enzymes convert monoacylglycerol to diacylglycerol, which is the penultimate step in one pathway for triacylglycerol synthesis. Hepatic expression of Mogat1, which encodes an MGAT enzyme, is increased in the livers of mice with hepatic steatosis, and knocking down Mogat1 improves glucose metabolism and hepatic insulin signaling, but whether increased MGAT activity plays a role in the etiology of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis is unclear. To examine this issue, mice were placed on a diet containing high levels of trans fatty acids, fructose, and cholesterol (HTF-C diet) or a low fat control diet for 4 weeks. Mice were injected with antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) to knockdown Mogat1 or a scrambled ASO control for 12 weeks while remaining on diet. The HTF-C diet caused glucose intolerance, hepatic steatosis, and induced hepatic gene expression markers of inflammation, macrophage infiltration, and stellate cell activation. Mogat1 ASO treatment, which suppressed Mogat1 expression in liver and adipose tissue, attenuated weight gain, improved glucose tolerance, improved hepatic insulin signaling, and decreased hepatic triacylglycerol content compared with control ASO-treated mice on HTF-C chow. However, Mogat1 ASO treatment did not reduce hepatic diacylglycerol, cholesterol, or free fatty acid content; improve histologic measures of liver injury; or reduce expression of markers of stellate cell activation, liver inflammation, and injury. In conclusion, inhibition of hepatic Mogat1 in HTF-C diet-fed mice improves hepatic metabolic abnormalities without attenuating liver inflammation and injury.

  5. Targeting the NLRP3 Inflammasome to Reduce Diet-Induced Metabolic Abnormalities in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chiazza, Fausto; Couturier-Maillard, Aurélie; Benetti, Elisa; Mastrocola, Raffaella; Nigro, Debora; Cutrin, Juan C; Serpe, Loredana; Aragno, Manuela; Fantozzi, Roberto; Ryffel, Bernard; Collino, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Although the molecular links underlying the causative relationship between chronic low-grade inflammation and insulin resistance are not completely understood, compelling evidence suggests a pivotal role of the nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain (NOD)-like receptor pyrin domain containing 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome. Here we tested the hypothesis that either a selective pharmacological inhibition or a genetic downregulation of the NLRP3 inflammasome results in reduction of the diet-induced metabolic alterations. Male C57/BL6 wild-type mice and NLRP3−/− littermates were fed control diet or high-fat, high-fructose diet (HD). A subgroup of HD-fed wild-type mice was treated with the NLRP3 inflammasome inhibitor BAY 11-7082 (3 mg/kg intraperitoneally [IP]). HD feeding increased plasma and hepatic lipids and impaired glucose homeostasis and renal function. Renal and hepatic injury was associated with robust increases in profibrogenic markers, while only minimal fibrosis was recorded. None of these metabolic abnormalities were detected in HD-fed NLRP3−/− mice, and they were dramatically reduced in HD-mice treated with the NLRP3 inflammasome inhibitor. BAY 11-7082 also attenuated the diet-induced increase in NLRP3 inflammasome expression, resulting in inhibition of caspase-1 activation and interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-18 production (in liver and kidney). Interestingly, BAY 11-7082, but not gene silencing, inhibited nuclear factor (NF)-κB nuclear translocation. Overall, these results demonstrate that the selective pharmacological modulation of the NLRP3 inflammasome attenuates the metabolic abnormalities and the related organ injury/dysfunction caused by chronic exposure to HD, with effects similar to those obtained by NLRP3 gene silencing. PMID:26623925

  6. Alleviation of metabolic abnormalities induced by excessive fructose administration in Wistar rats by Spirulina maxima

    PubMed Central

    Jarouliya, Urmila; Anish, Zacharia J.; Kumar, Pravin; Bisen, P.S.; Prasad, G.B.K.S.

    2012-01-01

    Background & objectives: Diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder characterized by hyperglycaemia. Several natural products have been isolated and identified to restore the complications of diabetes. Spirulina maxima is naturally occurring fresh water cyanobacterium, enriched with proteins and essential nutrients. The aim of the study was to determine whether S. maxima could serve as a therapeutic agent to correct metabolic abnormalities induced by excessive fructose administration in Wistar rats. Methods: Oral administration of 10 per cent fructose solution to Wistar rats (n=5 in each group) for 30 days resulted in hyperglycaemia and hyperlipidaemia. Aqueous suspension of S. maxima (5 or 10%) was also administered orally once daily for 30 days. The therapeutic potential of the preparation with reference to metformin (500 mg/kg) was assessed by monitoring various biochemical parameters at 10 day intervals during the course of therapy and at the end of 30 days S. maxima administration. Results: Significant (P<0.001) reductions in blood glucose, lipid profile (triglycerides, cholesterol and LDL, VLDL) and liver function markers (SGPT and SGOT) were recorded along with elevated level of HDL-C at the end of 30 days therapy of 5 or 10 per cent S. maxima aquous extract. Co-administration of S. maxima extract (5 or 10% aqueous) with 10 per cent fructose solution offered a significant protection against fructose induced metabolic abnormalities in Wistar rats. Interpretation & Conclusions: The present findings showed that S. maxima exhibited anti-hyperglycaemic, anti-hyperlipidaemic and hepatoprotective activity in rats fed with fructose. Further studies are needed to understand the mechanisms. PMID:22561632

  7. Bone cysts after osteochondral allograft repair of cartilage defects in goats suggest abnormal interaction between subchondral bone and overlying synovial joint tissues.

    PubMed

    Pallante-Kichura, Andrea L; Cory, Esther; Bugbee, William D; Sah, Robert L

    2013-11-01

    The efficacy of osteochondral allografts (OCAs) may be affected by osseous support of the articular cartilage, and thus affected by bone healing and remodeling in the OCA and surrounding host. Bone cysts, and their communication pathways, may be present in various locations after OCA insertion and reflect distinct pathogenic mechanisms. Previously, we analyzed the effect of OCA storage (FRESH, 4°C/14d, 4°C/28d, FROZEN) on cartilage quality in fifteen adult goats after 12months in vivo. The objectives of this study were to further analyze OCAs and contralateral non-operated (Non-Op) CONTROLS from the medial femoral condyle to (1) determine the effect of OCA storage on local subchondral bone (ScB) and trabecular bone (TB) structure, (2) characterize the location and structure of bone cysts and channels, and (3) assess the relationship between cartilage and bone properties. (1) Overall bone structure after OCAs was altered compared to Non-Op, with OCA samples displaying bone cysts, ScB channels, and ScB roughening. ScB BV/TV in FROZEN OCAs was lower than Non-Op and other OCAs. TB BV/TV in FRESH, 4°C/14d, and 4°C/28d OCAs did not vary compared to Non-Op, but BS/TV was lower. (2) OCAs contained "basal" cysts, localized to deeper regions, some "subchondral" cysts, localized near the bone-cartilage interface, and some ScB channels. TB surrounding basal cysts exhibited higher BV/TV than Non-Op. (3) Basal cysts occurred (a) in isolation, (b) with subchondral cysts and ScB channels, (c) with ScB channels, or (d) with subchondral cysts, ScB channels, and ScB erosion. Deterioration of cartilage gross morphology was strongly associated with abnormal μCT bone structure. Evidence of cartilage-bone communication following OCA repair may favor fluid intrusion as a mechanism for subchondral cyst formation, while bone resorption at the graft-host interface without affecting overall bone and cartilage structure may favor bony contusion mechanism for basal cyst formation. These

  8. Metabolic abnormalities and hypoleptinemia in α-synuclein A53T mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Rothman, Sarah M; Griffioen, Kathleen J; Fishbein, Kenneth W; Spencer, Richard G; Makrogiannis, Sokratis; Cong, Wei-Na; Martin, Bronwen; Mattson, Mark P

    2014-05-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) patients frequently display loss of body fat mass and increased energy expenditure, and several studies have outlined a relationship between these metabolic abnormalities and disease severity, yet energy metabolism is largely unstudied in mouse models of PD. Here we characterize metabolic and physiologic responses to a high calorie diet (HCD) in mice expressing in neurons a mutant form of human α-synuclein (A53T) that causes dominantly inherited familial forms of the disease. A53T (SNCA) and wild type (WT) littermate mice were placed on a HCD for 12 weeks and evaluated for weight gain, food intake, body fat, blood plasma leptin, hunger, glucose tolerance, and energy expenditure. Results were compared with both SNCA and WT mice on a control diet. Despite consuming similar amounts of food, WT mice gained up to 66% of their original body weight on a HCD, whereas SNCA mice gained only 17%. Further, after 12 weeks on a HCD, magnetic resonance imaging analysis revealed that WT mice had significantly greater total and visceral body fat compared with SNCA mice (p < 0.007). At the age of 24 weeks SNCA mice displayed significantly increased hunger compared with WT (p < 0.03). At the age of 36 weeks, SNCA mice displayed significant hypoleptinemia compared with WT, both on a normal diet and a HCD (p < 0.03). The HCD induced insulin insensitivity in WT, but not SNCA mice, as indicated by an oral glucose tolerance test. Finally, SNCA mice displayed greater energy expenditure compared with WT, as measured in a Comprehensive Laboratory Animal Monitoring System, after 12 weeks on a HCD. Thus, SNCA mice are resistant to HCD-induced obesity and insulin resistance and display reduced body fat, increased hunger, hypoleptinemia and increased energy expenditure. Our findings reveal a profile of metabolic dysfunction in a mouse model of PD that is similar to that of human PD patients, thus providing evidence that α-synuclein pathology is sufficient to drive such

  9. Effects of dietary vitamin D on calcium and magnesium levels in mice with abnormal calcium metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Spurlock, B.G.; West, W.L.; Knight, E.M. )

    1991-03-11

    In previous studies vitamin D has been used to induce cardiac calcium overload in laboratory animals. Interrelationships between calcium and magnesium metabolism are also documented. The authors have investigated the effect of varying vitamin D in the diet on calcium and magnesium levels in plasma, kidney and heart of DBA mice which exhibit genetic abnormalities in cardiac calcium metabolism. Weanling DBA mice were maintained for 28 days on an AIN-76 diet containing either 1,000 I.U. of vitamin D{sub 3} per kg of diet (control); 4,000 I.U. of vitamin D{sub 3} per kg of diet; or no vitamin D. When compared to controls, supplemented animals showed significantly higher plasma magnesium, kidney calcium and kidney magnesium levels; animals receiving the vitamin D-deficient diet exhibited increases in cardiac calcium levels. The authors results support previous findings that vitamin D deficiency increases cardiac calcium uptake and suggest a possible role of vitamin D in magnesium metabolism.

  10. Effect of acceleration on osteoblastic and osteoclastic activities: Analysis of bone metabolism using goldfish scale as a model for bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, S.; Kitamura, K.; Nemoto, N.; Shimizu, S.; Wada, W.; Kondo, K.; Tabata, T.; Sodeyama, S.; Ijiri, I.; Hattori, H.

    It is well known that hypo-gravity and hyper-gravity influence bone metabolism However basic data concerning the mechanism are a few because no in vitro model system of human bone is available Human bone consists of osteoblasts osteoclasts and the bone matrix No technique for the co-culture of these components has ever been developed Fish scale is a calcified tissue that contains osteoblasts osteoclasts and bone matrix all of which are similar to those found in human bone Recently we developed a new in vitro model system using goldfish scale This system can simultaneously detect the activities of both scale osteoclasts and osteoblasts with tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase and alkaline phosphatase as the respective markers Using this system we analyzed the bone metabolism under acceleration with a custom-made G-load apparatus Osteoclastic activity in the goldfish scales was suppressed under low-acceleration 0 5-G while osteoblastic activity did not change under this acceleration Under high-acceleration 6-G however the osteoblastic activity of the scales increased In addition the osteoclastic activity of the scales decreased These results suggest that both osteoblastic and osteoclastic activities are regulated by the strength of acceleration Therefore we strongly believe that our in vitro system is useful for analysis of bone metabolism under acceleration

  11. Bone Cysts After Osteochondral Allograft Repair of Cartilage Defects in Goats Suggest Abnormal Interaction Between Subchondral Bone and Overlying Synovial Joint Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Pallante-Kichura, Andrea L.; Cory, Esther; Bugbee, William D.; Sah, Robert L.

    2013-01-01

    The efficacy of osteochondral allografts (OCA) may be affected by osseous support of the articular cartilage, and thus affected by bone healing and remodeling in the OCA and surrounding host. Bone cysts, and their communication pathways, may be present in various locations after OCA insertion and reflect distinct pathogenic mechanisms. Previously, we analyzed the effect of OCA storage (FRESH, 4°C/14d, 4°C/28d, FROZEN) on cartilage quality in fifteen adult goats after 12 months in vivo. The objectives of this study were to further analyze OCA and contralateral non-operated (Non-Op) CONTROLS from the medial femoral condyle to (1) determine the effect of OCA storage on local subchondral (ScB) and trabecular (TB) bone structure, (2) characterize the location and structure of bone cysts and channels, and (3) assess the relationship between cartilage and bone properties. (1) Overall bone structure after OCA was altered compared to Non-Op, with OCA samples displaying bone cysts, ScB channels, and ScB roughening. ScB BV/TV in FROZEN OCA was lower than Non-Op and other OCA. TB BV/TV in FRESH, 4°C/14d, and 4°C/28d OCA did not vary compared to Non-Op, but BS/TV was lower. (2) OCA contained “basal” cysts, localized to deeper regions, some “subchondral” cysts, localized near the bone-cartilage interface, and some ScB channels. TB surrounding basal cysts exhibited higher BV/TV than Non-Op. (3) Basal cysts occurred (a) in isolation, (b) with subchondral cysts and ScB channels, (c) with ScB channels, or (d) with subchondral cysts, ScB channels, and ScB erosion. Deterioration of cartilage gross morphology was strongly associated with abnormal μCT bone structure. Evidence of cartilage-bone communication following OCA repair may favor fluid intrusion as a mechanism for subchondral cyst formation, while bone resorption at the graft-host interface without affecting overall bone and cartilage structure may favor bony contusion mechanism for basal cyst formation. These

  12. Imaging microfractures and other abnormalities of bone using a supercontinuum laser source with wavelengths in the four NIR optical windows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sordillo, Laura A.; Sordillo, Peter P.; Budansky, Yury; Leproux, Philippe; Alfano, R. R.

    2015-02-01

    Many areas of the body such as the tibia have minimal tissue thickness overlying bone. Near-infrared (NIR) optical windows may be used to image more deeply to reveal abnormalities hidden beneath tissue. We report on the potential application of a compact Leukos supercontinuum laser source (model STM-2000-IR) with wavelengths in the four NIR optical windows (from 650 nm to 950 nm, 1,100 nm to 1,350 nm, 1,600 to 1,870, and 2,100 nm to 2,300 nm, respectively) and between 200 - 500 microwatt/nm power, with InGaAs (Goodrich Sensors Inc. SU320- 1.7RT) and InSb detectors (Teledyne Technologies) to image microfractures and abnormalities of bone hidden beneath tissue.

  13. Quantitative Analysis of Metabolic Abnormality Associated with Brain Developmental Venous Anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Timerman, Dmitriy; Thum, Jasmine A

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Abnormal hypometabolism is common in the brain parenchyma surrounding developmental venous anomalies (DVAs), although the degree of DVA-associated hypometabolism (DVAAh) has not been quantitatively analyzed. In this study, we demonstrate a simple method for the measurement of DVAAh and test the hypothesis that DVAs are associated with a quantifiable decrement in metabolic activity. Materials and Methods: Measurements of DVAAh using ratios of standardized uptake values (SUVs) and comparison to a normal database were performed on a cohort of 25 patients (12 male, 13 female), 14 to 76 years old, with a total of 28 DVAs (20 with DVAAh, seven with isometabolic activity, and one with hypermetabolic activity). Results: Qualitative classification of none, mild, moderate, and severe DVAAh corresponded to quantitative measurements of DVAAh of 1 ± 3%, 12 ± 7%, 18 ± 6%, and 37 ± 6%, respectively. A statistically significant linear correlation between DVAAh and age was observed (P = 0.003), with a 3% reduction in metabolic activity per decade. A statistically significant linear correlation between DVAAh and DVA size was observed (P = 0.01), with a 4% reduction in metabolic activity per each 1 cm in the longest dimension. The SUVDVA-based measures of DVAAh correlated (P = 0.001) with measures derived from comparison with a standardized database. Conclusion: We present a simple method for the quantitative measurement of DVAAh using ratios of SUVs, and find that this quantitative analysis is consistent with a qualitative classification. We find that 54% (15 of 28) of DVAs are associated with a greater than 10% decrease in metabolic activity. PMID:27774365

  14. Abnormal bone formation induced by implantation of osteosarcoma-derived bone-inducing substance in the X-linked hypophosphatemic mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshikawa, H.; Masuhara, K.; Takaoka, K.; Ono, K.; Tanaka, H.; Seino, Y.

    1985-01-01

    The X-linked hypophosphatemic mouse (Hyp) has been proposed as a model for the human familial hypophosphatemia (the most common form of vitamin D-resistant rickets). An osteosarcoma-derived bone-inducing substance was subcutaneously implanted into the Hyp mouse. The implant was consistently replaced by cartilage tissue at 2 weeks after implantation. The cartilage matrix seemed to be normal, according to the histological examination, and 35sulphur (TVS) uptake was also normal. Up to 4 weeks after implantation the cartilage matrix was completely replaced by unmineralized bone matrix and hematopoietic bone marrow. Osteoid tissue arising from the implantation of bone inducing substance in the Hyp mouse showed no radiologic or histologic sign of calcification. These findings suggest that the abnormalities of endochondral ossification in the Hyp mouse might be characterized by the failure of mineralization in cartilage and bone matrix. Analysis of the effects of bone-inducing substance on the Hyp mouse may help to give greater insight into the mechanism and treatment of human familial hypophosphatemia.

  15. Metabolic Abnormalities, Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors, and GFR Decline in Children with Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Alison G.; Jerry-Fluker, Judith; Schwartz, George J.; Benfield, Mark; Kaskel, Frederick; Wong, Craig; Mak, Robert H.; Moxey-Mims, Marva; Warady, Bradley A.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives Metabolic abnormalities and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors have rarely been systematically assessed in children with chronic kidney disease (CKD). We examined the prevalence of various CKD sequelae across the GFR spectrum. Design, setting, participants, & measurements Data were used from 586 children participating in the Chronic Kidney Disease in Children (CKiD) study (United States and Canada) with GFR measured by iohexol plasma disappearance. Laboratory values and CVD risk factors were compared across GFR categories and with an age-, gender-, and race-matched community sample. Results CKiD participants were 62% male, 66% Caucasian, 23% African American, and 15% Hispanic with a median age of 11 years and a median GFR of 44 ml/min per 1.73 m2. Compared with those with a GFR ≥ 50 ml/min per 1.73 m2, having a GFR < 30 ml/min per 1.73 m2 was associated with a three-fold higher risk of acidosis and growth failure and a four- to five-fold higher risk of anemia and elevated potassium and phosphate. Median GFR change was −4.3 ml/min per 1.73 m2 and −1.5 ml/min per 1.73 m2 per year in children with glomerular and nonglomerular diagnoses, respectively. Despite medication and access to nephrology care, uncontrolled systolic hypertension was present in 14%, and 16% had left ventricular hypertrophy. Children with CKD frequently were also shorter and had lower birth weight, on average, compared with norms. Conclusions Growth failure, metabolic abnormalities, and CVD risk factors are present at GFR >50 ml/min per 1.73 m2 in children with CKD and, despite therapy, increase in prevalence two- to four-fold with decreasing GFR. PMID:21841064

  16. Kinetic measurements of bone mineral metabolism: The use of Na-22 as a tracer for long-term bone mineral turnover studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, H. E.

    1978-01-01

    Sodium-22 was studied as a tracer for bone mineral metabolism in rats and dogs. When incorporated into bone during growth from birth to adulthood, the bone becomes uniformly tagged with (22)Na which is released through the metabolic turnover of the bone. The (22)Na which is not incorporated in the bone matrix is rapidly excreted within a few days when animals are fed high but nontoxic levels of NaCl. The (22)Na tracer can be used to measure bone mineral loss in animals during space flight and in research on bone disease.

  17. Metabolic Abnormalities in Lobar and Subcortical Brain Regions of Abstinent Polysubstance Users: Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Abé, Christoph; Mon, Anderson; Hoefer, Michael E.; Durazzo, Timothy C.; Pennington, David L.; Schmidt, Thomas P.; Meyerhoff, Dieter J.

    2013-01-01

    Aims: The aim of the study was to explore neurometabolic and associated cognitive characteristics of patients with polysubstance use (PSU) in comparison with patients with predominant alcohol use using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Methods: Brain metabolite concentrations were examined in lobar and subcortical brain regions of three age-matched groups: 1-month-abstinent alcohol-dependent PSU, 1-month-abstinent individuals dependent on alcohol alone (ALC) and light drinking controls (CON). Neuropsychological testing assessed cognitive function. Results: While CON and ALC had similar metabolite levels, persistent metabolic abnormalities (primarily higher myo-inositol) were present in temporal gray matter, cerebellar vermis and lenticular nuclei of PSU. Moreover, lower cortical gray matter concentration of the neuronal marker N-acetylaspartate within PSU correlated with higher cocaine (but not alcohol) use quantities and with a reduced cognitive processing speed. Conclusions: These metabolite group differences reflect cellular/astroglial injury and/or dysfunction in alcohol-dependent PSU. Associations of other metabolite concentrations with neurocognitive performance suggest their functional relevance. The metabolic alterations in PSU may represent polydrug abuse biomarkers and/or potential targets for pharmacological and behavioral PSU-specific treatment. PMID:23797281

  18. Abnormal plasma monoamine metabolism in schizophrenia and its correlation with clinical responses to risperidone treatment.

    PubMed

    Cai, Hua-Lin; Fang, Ping-Fei; Li, Huan-De; Zhang, Xiang-Hui; Hu, Li; Yang, Wen; Ye, Hai-Sen

    2011-07-30

    Abnormalities in plasma monoamine metabolism reflect partly the illness of schizophrenia and sometimes the symptoms. Such studies have been repeatedly reported but have rarely taken both metabolites and parent amines or inter-amine activity ratios into account. In this study, the monoamines, their metabolites, turnovers and between-metabolite ratios in plasma were measured longitudinally in 32 schizophrenic patients treated with risperidone for 6 weeks, to examine possible biochemical alterations in schizophrenia, and to examine the association between treatment responses and psychopathology assessed according to the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS). The results showed lower level of plasma 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) in relapsed versus first-episode schizophrenic patients, higher norepinephrine (NE) turnover rate (TR) in undifferentiated in comparison to paranoid schizophrenic patients and relatively higher metabolic activity of dopamine (DA) to serotonin (5-HT) in first-episode versus relapsed schizophrenic patients. Risperidone treatment induced a decrement of plasma DA levels and increments of plasma DOPAC and DA TR in the total group of schizophrenic patients. The turnover rate of 5-HT was was reduced in undifferentiated and relapsed subgroups of schizophrenic patients. The linkages between 5-HT TR, DA/NE relative activity and clinical symptomatology were also identified. These findings are consistent with an involvement of these systems in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia as well as in the responses to treatment, and the usefulness of certain biochemical indices as markers for subgrouping.

  19. Increased levels of invariant natural killer T lymphocytes worsen metabolic abnormalities and atherosclerosis in obese mice.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Savitha; Turner, Michael S; Ding, Yilei; Goodspeed, Leela; Wang, Shari; Buckner, Jane H; O'Brien, Kevin; Getz, Godfrey S; Reardon, Catherine A; Chait, Alan

    2013-10-01

    Obesity is a chronic inflammatory state characterized by infiltration of adipose tissue by immune cell populations, including T lymphocytes. Natural killer T (NKT) cells, a specialized lymphocyte subset recognizing lipid antigens, can be pro- or anti-inflammatory. Their role in adipose inflammation continues to be inconclusive and contradictory. In obesity, the infiltration of tissues by invariant NKT (iNKT) cells is decreased. We therefore hypothesized that an excess iNKT cell complement might improve metabolic abnormalities in obesity. Vα14 transgenic (Vα14tg) mice, with increased iNKT cell numbers, on a LDL receptor-deficient (Ldlr(-/-)) background and control Ldlr(-/-) mice were placed on an obesogenic diet for 16 weeks. Vα14tg.Ldlr(-/-) mice gained 25% more weight and had increased adiposity than littermate controls. Transgenic mice also developed greater dyslipidemia, hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance, and hepatic triglyceride accumulation. Increased macrophage Mac2 immunostaining and proinflammatory macrophage gene expression suggested worsened adipose inflammation. Concurrently, these mice had increased atherosclerotic lesion area and aortic inflammation. Thus, increasing the complement of iNKT cells surprisingly exacerbated the metabolic, inflammatory, and atherosclerotic features of obesity. These findings suggest that the reduction of iNKT cells normally observed in obesity may represent a physiological attempt to compensate for this inflammatory condition.

  20. Abnormal Glucose Tolerance Is Associated with a Reduced Myocardial Metabolic Flexibility in Patients with Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Tricò, Domenico; Baldi, Simona; Frascerra, Silvia; Venturi, Elena; Marraccini, Paolo; Neglia, Danilo; Natali, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is characterized by a metabolic shift from fat to carbohydrates and failure to increase myocardial glucose uptake in response to workload increments. We verified whether this pattern is influenced by an abnormal glucose tolerance (AGT). In 10 patients with DCM, 5 with normal glucose tolerance (DCM-NGT) and 5 with AGT (DCM-AGT), and 5 non-DCM subjects with AGT (N-AGT), we measured coronary blood flow and arteriovenous differences of oxygen and metabolites during Rest, Pacing (at 130 b/min), and Recovery. Myocardial lactate exchange and oleate oxidation were also measured. At Rest, DCM patients showed a reduced nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA) myocardial uptake, while glucose utilization increased only in DCM-AGT. In response to Pacing, glucose uptake promptly rose in N-AGT (from 72 ± 21 to 234 ± 73 nmol/min/g, p < 0.05), did not change in DCM-AGT, and slowly increased in DCM-NGT. DCM-AGT sustained the extra workload by increasing NEFA oxidation (from 1.3 ± 0.2 to 2.9 ± 0.1 μmol/min/gO2 equivalents, p < 0.05), while DCM-NGT showed a delayed increase in glucose uptake. Substrate oxidation rates paralleled the metabolites data. The presence of AGT in patients with DCM exacerbates both the shift from fat to carbohydrates in resting myocardial metabolism and the reduced myocardial metabolic flexibility in response to an increased workload. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrial.gov NCT02440217. PMID:26798650

  1. Abnormal Glucose Tolerance Is Associated with a Reduced Myocardial Metabolic Flexibility in Patients with Dilated Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Tricò, Domenico; Baldi, Simona; Frascerra, Silvia; Venturi, Elena; Marraccini, Paolo; Neglia, Danilo; Natali, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is characterized by a metabolic shift from fat to carbohydrates and failure to increase myocardial glucose uptake in response to workload increments. We verified whether this pattern is influenced by an abnormal glucose tolerance (AGT). In 10 patients with DCM, 5 with normal glucose tolerance (DCM-NGT) and 5 with AGT (DCM-AGT), and 5 non-DCM subjects with AGT (N-AGT), we measured coronary blood flow and arteriovenous differences of oxygen and metabolites during Rest, Pacing (at 130 b/min), and Recovery. Myocardial lactate exchange and oleate oxidation were also measured. At Rest, DCM patients showed a reduced nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA) myocardial uptake, while glucose utilization increased only in DCM-AGT. In response to Pacing, glucose uptake promptly rose in N-AGT (from 72 ± 21 to 234 ± 73 nmol/min/g, p < 0.05), did not change in DCM-AGT, and slowly increased in DCM-NGT. DCM-AGT sustained the extra workload by increasing NEFA oxidation (from 1.3 ± 0.2 to 2.9 ± 0.1 μmol/min/gO2 equivalents, p < 0.05), while DCM-NGT showed a delayed increase in glucose uptake. Substrate oxidation rates paralleled the metabolites data. The presence of AGT in patients with DCM exacerbates both the shift from fat to carbohydrates in resting myocardial metabolism and the reduced myocardial metabolic flexibility in response to an increased workload. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrial.gov NCT02440217.

  2. Cellular lead toxicity and metabolism in primary and clonal osteoblastic bone cells

    SciTech Connect

    Long, G.J.; Rosen, J.F.; Pounds, J.G. )

    1990-02-01

    A knowledge of bone lead metabolism is critical for understanding the toxicological importance of bone lead, as a toxicant both to bone cells and to soft tissues of the body, as lead is mobilized from large reservoirs in hard tissues. To further understand the processes that mediate metabolism of lead in bone, it is necessary to determine lead metabolism at the cellular level. Experiments were conducted to determine the intracellular steady-state {sup 210}Pb kinetics in cultures of primary and clonal osteoblastic bone cells. Osteoblastic bone cells obtained by sequential collagenase digestion of mouse calvaria or rat osteosarcoma (ROS 17/2.8) cells were labeled with {sup 210}Pb as 5 microM lead acetate for 20 hr, and kinetic parameters were determined by measuring the efflux of {sup 210}Pb from the cells over a {sup 210}-min period. The intracellular metabolism of {sup 210}Pb was characterized by three kinetic pools of {sup 210}Pb in both cell types. Although the values of these parameters differed between the primary osteoblastic cells and ROS cells, the profile of {sup 210}Pb was remarkably similar in both cell types. Both types exhibited one large, slowly exchanging pool (S3), indicative of mitochondrial lead. These data show that primary osteoblastic bone cells and ROS cells exhibit similar steady-state lead kinetics, and intracellular lead distribution. These data also establish a working model of lead kinetics in osteoblastic bone cells and now permit an integrated view of lead kinetics in bone.

  3. Bone metabolism and renal stone risk during International Space Station missions.

    PubMed

    Smith, Scott M; Heer, Martina; Shackelford, Linda C; Sibonga, Jean D; Spatz, Jordan; Pietrzyk, Robert A; Hudson, Edgar K; Zwart, Sara R

    2015-12-01

    Bone loss and renal stone risk are longstanding concerns for astronauts. Bone resorption brought on by spaceflight elevates urinary calcium and the risk of renal stone formation. Loss of bone calcium leads to concerns about fracture risk and increased long-term risk of osteoporosis. Bone metabolism involves many factors and is interconnected with muscle metabolism and diet. We report here bone biochemistry and renal stone risk data from astronauts on 4- to 6-month International Space Station missions. All had access to a type of resistive exercise countermeasure hardware, either the Advanced Resistance Exercise Device (ARED) or the Interim Resistance Exercise Device (iRED). A subset of the ARED group also tested the bisphosphonate alendronate as a potential anti-resorptive countermeasure (Bis+ARED). While some of the basic bone marker data have been published, we provide here a more comprehensive evaluation of bone biochemistry with a larger group of astronauts. Regardless of exercise, the risk of renal stone formation increased during spaceflight. A key factor in this increase was urine volume, which was lower during flight in all groups at all time points. Thus, the easiest way to mitigate renal stone risk is to increase fluid consumption. ARED use increased bone formation without changing bone resorption, and mitigated a drop in parathyroid hormone in iRED astronauts. Sclerostin, an osteocyte-derived negative regulator of bone formation, increased 10-15% in both groups of astronauts who used the ARED (p<0.06). IGF-1, which regulates bone growth and formation, increased during flight in all 3 groups (p<0.001). Our results are consistent with the growing body of literature showing that the hyper-resorptive state of bone that is brought on by spaceflight can be countered pharmacologically or mitigated through an exercise-induced increase in bone formation, with nutritional support. Key questions remain about the effect of exercise-induced alterations in bone

  4. Bone metabolism and renal stone risk during International Space Station missions.

    PubMed

    Smith, Scott M; Heer, Martina; Shackelford, Linda C; Sibonga, Jean D; Spatz, Jordan; Pietrzyk, Robert A; Hudson, Edgar K; Zwart, Sara R

    2015-12-01

    Bone loss and renal stone risk are longstanding concerns for astronauts. Bone resorption brought on by spaceflight elevates urinary calcium and the risk of renal stone formation. Loss of bone calcium leads to concerns about fracture risk and increased long-term risk of osteoporosis. Bone metabolism involves many factors and is interconnected with muscle metabolism and diet. We report here bone biochemistry and renal stone risk data from astronauts on 4- to 6-month International Space Station missions. All had access to a type of resistive exercise countermeasure hardware, either the Advanced Resistance Exercise Device (ARED) or the Interim Resistance Exercise Device (iRED). A subset of the ARED group also tested the bisphosphonate alendronate as a potential anti-resorptive countermeasure (Bis+ARED). While some of the basic bone marker data have been published, we provide here a more comprehensive evaluation of bone biochemistry with a larger group of astronauts. Regardless of exercise, the risk of renal stone formation increased during spaceflight. A key factor in this increase was urine volume, which was lower during flight in all groups at all time points. Thus, the easiest way to mitigate renal stone risk is to increase fluid consumption. ARED use increased bone formation without changing bone resorption, and mitigated a drop in parathyroid hormone in iRED astronauts. Sclerostin, an osteocyte-derived negative regulator of bone formation, increased 10-15% in both groups of astronauts who used the ARED (p<0.06). IGF-1, which regulates bone growth and formation, increased during flight in all 3 groups (p<0.001). Our results are consistent with the growing body of literature showing that the hyper-resorptive state of bone that is brought on by spaceflight can be countered pharmacologically or mitigated through an exercise-induced increase in bone formation, with nutritional support. Key questions remain about the effect of exercise-induced alterations in bone

  5. Sex Differences in Associations Among Obesity, Metabolic Abnormalities, and Chronic Kidney Disease in Japanese Men and Women

    PubMed Central

    Sakurai, Masaru; Kobayashi, Junji; Takeda, Yasuo; Nagasawa, Shin-Ya; Yamakawa, Junichi; Moriya, Junji; Mabuchi, Hiroshi; Nakagawa, Hideaki

    2016-01-01

    Aims The present study aimed to investigate relationships among abdominal obesity, metabolic abnormalities, and the prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in relatively lean Japanese men and women. Participants and methods The participants included 8133 men and 15 934 women between 40 and 75 years of age recruited from the government health check-up center in Kanazawa City, Japan. The prevalence of abdominal obesity, high blood pressure, dyslipidemia, and high fasting plasma glucose levels were assessed according to the Japanese criteria for metabolic syndrome. The estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was calculated using the modified Modification of Diet in Renal Disease equation for the Japanese population, and participants with an eGFR <60 mL/min/1.73 m2 and/or proteinuria were diagnosed with CKD. Results Overall, 23% of males and 14% of females met criteria for CKD. Having more numerous complicated metabolic abnormalities was significantly associated with a higher odds ratio (OR) of CKD for men and women, irrespective of abdominal obesity. However, there was a sex difference in the OR of CKD for obese participants without metabolic abnormalities, such that abdominal obesity without metabolic abnormalities was significantly associated with a higher OR for men (multivariate-adjusted OR 1.63; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.16–2.28) but not for women (OR 1.01; 95% CI, 0.71–1.44). Conclusions The present findings demonstrated that obesity without metabolic abnormalities was associated with a higher risk of CKD in men but not women in a relatively lean Japanese population. PMID:27087606

  6. Imaging Sensitivity of Quiescent Cancer Cells to Metabolic Perturbations in Bone Marrow Spheroids

    PubMed Central

    Cavnar, Stephen P.; Xiao, Annie; Gibbons, Anne E.; Rickelmann, Andrew D.; Neely, Taylor; Luker, Kathryn E.; Takayama, Shuichi; Luker, Gary D.

    2016-01-01

    Malignant cells from breast cancer and other common cancers such as prostate and melanoma may persist in bone marrow as quiescent, non-dividing cells that remain viable for years or even decades before resuming proliferation to cause recurrent disease. This phenomenon, referred to clinically as tumor dormancy, poses tremendous challenges to curing patients with breast cancer. Quiescent tumor cells resist chemotherapy drugs that predominantly target proliferating cells, limiting success of neo-adjuvant and adjuvant therapies. We recently developed a 3D spheroid model of quiescent breast cancer cells in bone marrow for mechanistic and drug testing studies. We combined this model with optical imaging methods for label-free detection of cells preferentially utilizing glycolysis versus oxidative metabolism to investigate the metabolic state of co-culture spheroids with different bone marrow stromal and breast cancer cells. Through imaging and biochemical assays, we identified different metabolic states of bone marrow stromal cells that control metabolic status and flexibilities of co-cultured breast cancer cells. We tested metabolic stresses and targeted inhibition of specific metabolic pathways to identify approaches to preferentially eliminate quiescent breast cancer cells from bone marrow environments. These studies establish an integrated imaging approach to analyze metabolism in complex tissue environments to identify new metabolically-targeted cancer therapies. PMID:27478871

  7. Cardiorespiratory and metabolic responses to exercise in horses with various abnormalities of the upper respiratory tract.

    PubMed

    King, C M; Evans, D L; Rose, R J

    1994-05-01

    A standardised incremental exercise test was performed by 9 racehorses with idiopathic laryngeal hemiplegia (ILH), 1 horse with maxillary sinus cysts, 1 horse with epiglottic entrapment, 1 horse with a lesion on the vocal folds, and 1 horse with pharyngitis. Two of the horses with ILH were retested after laryngoplasty and ventriculectomy. The findings were compared with those from 20 normal racehorses. Heart rate, plasma lactate concentration, arterial blood gases, stride frequency, oxygen uptake (VO2) and carbon dioxide production were assessed during treadmill exercise on a +10% slope. The group of horses with ILH had significantly (P < 0.01) lower peak VO2 values (136 +/- 5 ml/kg/min) than did the normal group (154 +/- 3 ml/klg/min). These values represent mean +/- sem. Horses with ILH also had significantly higher (P < 0.05) arterial carbon dioxide tensions (PaCO2) at 10 m/s and lower speeds at a heart rate of 200 bpm (V200) than the normal group. The horse with maxillary sinus cysts had higher PaCO2 tension at 10 m/s than normal, and abnormal values for several cardiorespiratory and metabolic indices. Horses with vocal fold lesions, aryepiglottic entrapment and pharyngitis had arterial blood gas and cardiorespiratory indices that were similar to those of normal horses. One horse which underwent corrective surgery for ILH showed improvements in arterial blood gases and cardiorespiratory indices during exercise, while the other horse had values which were the same as, or worse than, values before surgery. We conclude that the measurement of arterial blood gases and cardiorespiratory indices during treadmill exercise is useful in determining the effect on exercise capacity of various upper airway abnormalities in racehorses.

  8. Oxidative stress contributes to abnormal glucose metabolism and insulin sensitivity in two hyperlipidemia models

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Jiefei; Zheng, Shuang; Jiang, Dongdong; Han, Tingting; Li, Yangxue; Zhang, Yao; Liu, Wei; Cao, Yunshan; Hu, Yaomin

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Lipid metabolism disturbance can result in insulin resistance and glucose intolerance; however, the features of glucose metabolism are still elusive in different dyslipidemia. Our study intended to explore the characteristics and molecular mechanisms of glucose metabolism abnormal in hypercholesterolemia and hypertriglyceridemia models. Methods: Two mouse models were used in this study, one was lipoprotein lipase gene-deleted (LPL+/-) mice, and the other was high fat dietary (HFD) mice. Levels of total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride (TG), high-density lipoprotein-cholesterin (HDL-c) and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterin (LDL-c) in serum were measured by full-automatic biochemical analyzer. Intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test (IPGTT) was performed to evaluate insulin sensitivity and β-cell function. Malondialdehyde (MDA) and total superoxide dismutase (T-SOD) levels in serum were measured by colorimetric determination. mRNA expression of superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase 1 (Gpx1), nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2a) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator 1 alpha (PGC-1α) in liver, skeletal muscle, visceral fat and subcutaneous fat were measured by Real-Time PCR. Results: Compared with HFD mice, the levels of serum TG were significantly higher in LPL+/- mice, whereas the levels of TC, HDL-c, LDL-c were significantly lower. The plasma glucose levels were increased at each time point of intra-peritoneal glucose tolerance test (IPGTT) in both groups. Furthermore, the level of serum fasting insulin and homeostasis model assessment index-insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) increased with a decreased ISI in both groups. In addition, the plasma MDA of HFD group was higher than that of lipoprotein lipase-deficiency (LPL+/-) group, while the activity of T-SOD in HFD group was lower than that in LPL+/- group. Real-Time PCR revealed that the expressions of SOD1, CAT and Gpx1 in liver and

  9. Changes in bone sodium and carbonate in metabolic acidosis and alkalosis in the dog

    PubMed Central

    Burnell, James M.

    1971-01-01

    Metabolic acidosis and alkalosis were produced in adult dogs over 5- to 10-day periods. Midtibial cortical bone was analyzed for calcium, sodium, phosphorus, and carbonate. In acidosis bone CO3/Ca decreased 9.5% and bone Na/Ca decreased 6.3%. In alkalosis bone CO3/Ca increased 3.1% and bone Na/Ca increased 3.0%. Previous attempts to account for changes in net acid balance by summation of extra- and intracellular acid-base changes have uniformly resulted in about 40-60% of acid gained or lost being “unaccounted for.” If it is assumed that changes in tibial cortex reflect changes in the entire skeletal system, changes in bone CO3= are sufficiently large to account for the “unaccounted for” acid change without postulating changes in cellular metabolic acid production. PMID:5540172

  10. Effect of odanacatib on root resorption and alveolar bone metabolism during orthodontic tooth movement.

    PubMed

    Wei, X X; Chu, J P; Zou, Y Z; Ru, N; Cui, S X; Bai, Y X

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of local administration of odanacatib (ODN) on orthodontic root resorption and the status of alveolar bone metabolism in rat molars. All specimens were scanned using microcomputed tomography and then the raw images were reconstructed. The total volume of the root resorption craters of the 60 g-NS (normal saline) group was higher than in the 60 g-ODN group and the control group. In the 60 g-NS group, the bone volume fraction values of alveolar bone were significantly decreased compared with the other 2 groups. There were no significant differences in the bone volume fraction values of the tibiae among the 3 groups. The results of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase-positive (TRAP+) numbers showed that there was no difference between the 60 g-NS group and the 60 g-ODN group. The expression of cathepsin K was decreased significantly in the 60 g-ODN group. These results indicate that ODN reduces orthodontics-induced external root resorption and increases alveolar bone metabolism. This may be because ODN inhibits the activity of odontoclasts, but maintains the quantity of odontoclasts and enhances bone formation. ODN promotes local alveolar bone metabolism, but does not affect systemic bone metabolism. PMID:26782444

  11. Effect of odanacatib on root resorption and alveolar bone metabolism during orthodontic tooth movement.

    PubMed

    Wei, X X; Chu, J P; Zou, Y Z; Ru, N; Cui, S X; Bai, Y X

    2015-12-22

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of local administration of odanacatib (ODN) on orthodontic root resorption and the status of alveolar bone metabolism in rat molars. All specimens were scanned using microcomputed tomography and then the raw images were reconstructed. The total volume of the root resorption craters of the 60 g-NS (normal saline) group was higher than in the 60 g-ODN group and the control group. In the 60 g-NS group, the bone volume fraction values of alveolar bone were significantly decreased compared with the other 2 groups. There were no significant differences in the bone volume fraction values of the tibiae among the 3 groups. The results of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase-positive (TRAP+) numbers showed that there was no difference between the 60 g-NS group and the 60 g-ODN group. The expression of cathepsin K was decreased significantly in the 60 g-ODN group. These results indicate that ODN reduces orthodontics-induced external root resorption and increases alveolar bone metabolism. This may be because ODN inhibits the activity of odontoclasts, but maintains the quantity of odontoclasts and enhances bone formation. ODN promotes local alveolar bone metabolism, but does not affect systemic bone metabolism.

  12. Exploring correlation between bone metabolism markers and densitometric traits in extended families from Spain.

    PubMed

    Athanasiadis, Georgios; Arranz, Laura; Ziyatdinov, Andrey; Brunel, Helena; Camacho, Mercedes; Malouf, Jorge; Sosa, Nerea Hernandez-de; Vila, Luis; Casademont, Jordi; Soria, Jose Manuel

    2016-09-01

    Osteoporosis is a common multifactorial disorder characterized by low bone mass and reduced bone strength that may cause fragility fractures. In recent years, there have been substantial advancements in the biochemical monitoring of bone metabolism through the measurement of bone turnover markers. Currently, good knowledge of the genetics of such markers has become an indispensable part of osteoporosis research. In this study, we used the Genetic Analysis of Osteoporosis Project to study the genetics of the plasma levels of 12 markers related to bone metabolism and osteoporosis. Plasma phenotypes were determined through biochemical assays and log-transformed values were used together with a set of covariates to model genetic and environmental contributions to phenotypic variation, thus estimating the heritability of each trait. In addition, we studied correlations between the 12 markers and a wide variety of previously described densitometric traits. All of the 12 bone metabolism markers showed significant heritability, ranging from 0.194 for osteocalcin to 0.516 for sclerostin after correcting for covariate effects. Strong genetic correlations were observed between osteocalcin and several bone mineral densitometric traits, a finding with potentially useful diagnostic applications. In addition, suggestive genetic correlations with densitometric traits were observed for leptin and sclerostin. Overall, the few strong and several suggestive genetic correlations point out the existence of a complex underlying genetic architecture for bone metabolism plasma phenotypes and provide a strong motivation for pursuing novel whole-genome gene-mapping strategies. PMID:27241279

  13. Combined intervention of dietary soybean proteins and swim training: effects on bone metabolism in ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Figard, Hélène; Mougin, Fabienne; Gaume, Vincent; Berthelot, Alain

    2006-01-01

    Soybean proteins, a rich source of isoflavones, taken immediately after an ovariectomy prevent bone loss in rats. Exercise-induced stimuli are essential for bone growth. Few studies exist about the combined effects of swim training and soybean protein supplementation on bone metabolism. So, the purpose of this study was to investigate, in 48 female Sprague-Dawley rats (12 weeks old) the effects of an 8-week swim-training regimen (1 h/day, 5 days/week) and dietary soybean proteins (200 g/kg diet) on bone metabolism. Rats were randomly assigned to four groups: (1) ovariectomized fed with a semisynthetic control diet; (2) ovariectomized fed with a soybean protein-enriched semisynthetic diet; (3) ovariectomized trained to exercise and fed with control diet; (4) ovariectomized trained to exercise and fed with a soybean protein diet. Following the treatment period, body weight gain was identical in the four groups. Soybean protein supplementation increased bone calcium content, and reduced plasma osteocalcin values, without significant modification of calcium balance and net calcium absorption. Swim training enhanced plasma and bone calcium content and calcium balance and net calcium absorption. It did not modify either plasma osteocalcin values or urinary deoxypyridinoline excretion. Both exercise and soybean protein intake increased plasma on bone calcium without modifying net calcium absorption or bone markers. In conclusion, we demonstrated, in ovariectomized rats, that swimming exercise and dietary supplementation with soy proteins do not have synergistic effects on calcium metabolism and bone markers.

  14. Disorders in bone metabolism of female rats chronically exposed to cadmium.

    PubMed

    Brzóska, Małgorzata M; Moniuszko-Jakoniuk, Janina

    2005-01-01

    The effect of cadmium (Cd) on bone metabolism during skeletal development and maturity was investigated on a rat model of human exposure. Young female Wistar rats were exposed to 1, 5, or 50 mg Cd/l in drinking water for 3, 6, 9, and 12 months. Total bone mineral density (T-BMD), bone mineral content (BMC), density (BMD), and bone area at the femur and lumbar spine (L1-L5) were measured densitometrically. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and osteocalcin (OC) as bone formation markers, and carboxy-terminal cross-linking telopeptides of type I collagen (CTX) in bone (trabecular and cortical) or serum as bone resorption markers were measured. Renal calcium (Ca) handling and Cd body burden were evaluated as well. At the stage of intensive skeletal development (the first 6 months of the experiment), at all exposure levels, Cd inhibited the processes of bone formation and as a result disturbed the accumulation of bone mass leading to osteopenia (- 1 > Z score/T score BMD > -2.5) and at 5 and 50 mg Cd/l even to more advanced disorders in the BMD. Continuation of the exposure up to skeletal maturity led to high bone turnover with increased resorption enhancing the prevalence of osteopenia or the BMD values having the Z score/T score < -2.5. The results allow for the conclusion that chronic, even low-level exposure to Cd disturbs bone metabolism during skeletal development and maturity by affecting bone turnover most probably through a direct influence on bone formation and resorption, and indirectly via disorders in Ca metabolism. Our findings confirm the hypothesis that environmental exposure to Cd may be a risk factor for low BMD.

  15. Novel, near-infrared spectroscopic, label-free, techniques to assess bone abnormalities such as Paget's disease, osteoporosis and bone fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sordillo, Diana C.; Sordillo, Laura A.; Shi, Lingyan; Budansky, Yury; Sordillo, Peter P.; Alfano, Robert R.

    2015-02-01

    Near- infrared (NIR) light with wavelengths from 650 nm to 950 nm (known as the first NIR window) has conventionally been used as a non-invasive technique that can reach deeper penetration depths through media than light at shorter wavelengths. Recently, several novel, NIR, label-free, techniques have been developed to assess Paget's disease of bone, osteoporosis and bone microfractures. We designed a Bone Optical Analyzer (BOA) which utilizes the first window to measure changes of Hb and HbO2. Paget's disease is marked by an increase in vascularization in bones, and this device can enable easy diagnosis and more frequent monitoring of the patient's condition, without exposing him to a high cumulative dose of radiation. We have also used inverse imaging algorithms to reconstruct 2D and 3D maps of the bone's structure. This device could be used to assess diseases such as osteoporosis. Using 800 nm femtosecond excitation with two-photon (2P) microscopy, we acquired 2PM images of the periosteum and spatial frequency spectra (based on emission of collagen) from the periosteal regions. This technique can provide information on the structure of the periosteum and can detect abnormalities which may be an indication of disease. Most recently, we showed that longer NIR wavelengths in the second and third NIR windows (1100 nm-1350 nm, 1600 nm-1870 nm), could be used to image bone microfractures. Use of NIR light could allow for repeated studies in patients with diseases such as Paget's and osteoporosis quickly and non-invasively, and could impact the current management for these diseases.

  16. The effects of TNF α antagonist therapy on bone metabolism in rheumatoid arthritis: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Sakthiswary, Rajalingham; Das, Srijit

    2013-12-01

    Osteoporosis is a common complication observed in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Accelerated bone loss is always a matter of concern. The pathogenesis of RA may be important for better understanding of the bone loss. The mechanism involved in the bone loss in RA is not well understood although cytokines such as interleukin 1 and tumour necrosis factor α (TNF α) have been strongly implicated. TNF α antagonists have revolutionised the treatment of RA in the recent years. Beyond the control of disease activity in RA, accumulating evidence suggests that this form of therapy may provide beneficial effects to the bone metabolism and remodeling. An extensive search of the literature was performed in the Medline, Scopus and EBSCO databases to evaluate the documented research on the effects of TNF α antagonists in RA on bone mineral density and bone turnover markers. The available data based on our systematic review, depict a significant association between TNF α antagonists treatment and suppression of bone resorption.

  17. Assessment of metabolic bone disease: review of new nuclear medicine procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Wahner, H.W.

    1985-12-01

    In the management of patients with metabolic bone disease, nuclear medicine laboratories offer two nontraumatic procedures of potential clinical importance: bone mineral measurements and bone scintigraphy. Bone mineral measurements from the radius, lumbar spine, and hip obtained with use of absorptiometry or computed tomography can be used to predict the risk of fracture at these skeletal sites, can determine the severity of bone loss for the assessment of a benefit-versus-risk ratio on which appropriate therapy can be based, and can substantiate the effectiveness of therapy over time. Bone scintigraphy with use of labeled diphosphonate allows assessment of focal and, in defined circumstances, of total skeletal bone turnover in patients with normal kidney function. Both of these techniques have been used successfully in studies of population groups for the evaluation of trends. Their application to the management of individual patients is currently being evaluated. 41 references.

  18. An approach to quantifying abnormalities in energy expenditure and lean mass in metabolic disease

    PubMed Central

    Watson, L P E; Raymond-Barker, P; Moran, C; Schoenmakers, N; Mitchell, C; Bluck, L; Chatterjee, V K; Savage, D B; Murgatroyd, P R

    2014-01-01

    Background/objectives: The objective of this study was to develop approaches to expressing resting energy expenditure (REE) and lean body mass (LM) phenotypes of metabolic disorders in terms of Z-scores relative to their predicted healthy values. Subjects/methods: Body composition and REE were measured in 135 healthy participants. Prediction equations for LM and REE were obtained from linear regression and the range of normality by the standard deviation of residuals. Application is demonstrated in patients from three metabolic disorder groups (lipodystrophy, n=7; thyrotoxicosis, n=16; and resistance to thyroid hormone (RTH), n=46) in which altered REE and/or LM were characterised by departure from the predicted healthy values, expressed as a Z-score. Results: REE (kJ/min)=−0.010 × age (years)+0.016 × FM (kg)+0.054 × fat-free mass (kg)+1.736 (R2=0.732, RSD=0.36 kJ/min). LM (kg)=5.30 × bone mineral content (kg)+10.66 × height2 (m)+6.40 (male). LM (kg)=0.20 × fat (kg)+14.08 × height2 (m)−2.93 (female). (male R2=0.55, RSD=3.90 kg; female R2=0.59, RSD=3.85 kg). We found average Z-scores for REE and LM of 1.77 kJ/min and −0.17 kg in the RTH group, 5.82 kJ/min and −1.23 kg in the thyrotoxic group and 2.97 kJ/min and 4.20 kg in the LD group. Conclusion: This approach enables comparison of data from individuals with metabolic disorders with those of healthy individuals, describing their departure from the healthy mean by a Z-score. PMID:24281313

  19. An Abnormal Bone Lesion of the Scapula in a Collegiate Basketball Player: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, Matthew S.; Donnell, Allison; Miller, Jason; Iven, Val Gene; Pascale, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To present the case of a bone lesion of the scapula in a collegiate basketball player. Background: A 19-year-old National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I male basketball player presented with pain in the posterior region of the right shoulder. During practice, he was performing a layup when his arm was forced into hyperflexion by a defender. Evaluation revealed a bone lesion involving the scapular spine and base of the acromion. Differential Diagnosis: Acromioclavicular joint sprain, subacromial bursitis, subscapular bursitis, humeral head contusion, acromial fracture. Treatment: The patient was treated for 2 months with therapeutic modalities and rehabilitation exercises. Because of persistent pain and the risk of a pathologic fracture, open surgical biopsy and bone grafting were then undertaken. Uniqueness: Most simple bone cysts affect the proximal humerus and femur, whereas our patient's lesion was in the acromial complex. Conclusions: Athletic trainers should be alert to the unusual possibility of bone cysts, which are usually identified incidentally when radiographs are obtained for other reasons. Most simple bone cysts are asymptomatic, but a pathologic fracture can occur with trauma. PMID:23725460

  20. SU-E-J-122: Detecting Treatment-Induced Metabolic Abnormalities in Craniopharyngioma Patients Undergoing Surgery and Proton Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Hua, C; Shulkin, B; Li, Y; LI, X; Merchant, T; Indelicato, D; Boop, F

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To identify treatment-induced defects in the brain of children with craniopharyngioma receiving surgery and proton therapy using fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET). Methods: Forty seven patients were enrolled on a clinical trial for craniopharyngioma with serial imaging and functional evaluations. Proton therapy was delivered using the double-scattered beams with a prescribed dose of 54 Cobalt Gray Equivalent. FDG tracer uptake in each of 63 anatomical regions was computed after warping PET images to a 3D reference template in Talairach coordinates. Regional uptake was deemed significantly low or high if exceeding two standard deviations of normal population from the mean. For establishing the normal ranges, 132 children aged 1–20 years with noncentral nervous system related diseases and normal-appearing cerebral PET scans were analyzed. Age- and gender-dependent regional uptake models were developed by linear regression and confidence intervals were calculated. Results: Most common PET abnormality before proton therapy was significantly low uptake in the frontal lobe, the occipital lobe (particularly in cuneus), the medial and ventral temporal lobe, cingulate gyrus, caudate nuclei, and thalamus. They were related to injury from surgical corridors, tumor mass effect, insertion of a ventricular catheter, and the placement of an Ommaya reservoir. Surprisingly a significantly high uptake was observed in temporal gyri and the parietal lobe. In 13 patients who already completed 18-month PET scans, metabolic abnormalities improved in 11 patients from baseline. One patient had persistent abnormalities. Only one revealed new uptake abnormalities in thalamus, brainstem, cerebellum, and insula. Conclusion: Postoperative FDG PET of craniopharyngioma patients revealed metabolic abnormalities in specific regions of the brain. Proton therapy did not appear to exacerbate these surgery- and tumor-induced defects. In patients with persistent and

  1. Effects of rabeprazole on bone metabolic disorders in a gastrectomized rat model

    PubMed Central

    YAMASAKI, YUKI; FUJIMURA, TAKASHI; OYAMA, KATSUNOBU; HIGASHI, YUKI; HIROSE, ATSUSHI; TSUKADA, TOMOYA; OKAMOTO, KOICHI; KINOSHITA, JUN; NAKAMURA, KEISHI; MIYASHITA, TOMOHARU; TAJIMA, HIDEHIRO; TAKAMURA, HIROYUKI; NINOMIYA, ITASU; FUSHIDA, SACHIO; OHTA, TETSUO

    2016-01-01

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are frequently prescribed to patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease; however, the number of bone fractures reportedly increased in these patients. Although PPIs have been shown to inhibit the bone resorption by osteoclasts, the effect of PPIs on skeletal metabolism remains controversial. The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of the PPI rabeprazole on skeletal metabolism using gastrectomized rats. Male Wistar rats were divided into four groups: i) Sham-surgery (n=15); ii) total gastrectomy (TG) control (n=20); iii) TG plus rabeprazole (n=20); and iv) TG plus the bisphosphonate minodronic acid (n=20). Twenty-two weeks after TG, the rats were sacrificed, and bone mineral density (BMD), bone strength and markers for bone metabolism were measured. Compared with the control group (50.0±8.1%), the TG-induced decrease in BMD was significantly ameliorated in the rabeprazole group (56.5±7.5%) and the minodronic acid group (59.0±6.0%). However, rabeprazole did not improve bone strength. In conclusion, rabeprazole does not appear to exacerbate bone metabolic disorders in gastrectomized rats, but rather ameliorates the TG-induced BMD decrease. PMID:27330752

  2. Effects of a prolonged submersion on bone strength and metabolism in young healthy submariners.

    PubMed

    Luria, Tal; Matsliah, Yinnon; Adir, Yochai; Josephy, Noam; Moran, Daniel S; Evans, Rachel K; Abramovich, Amir; Eliakim, Alon; Nemet, Dan

    2010-01-01

    Submariners taking part in prolonged missions are exposed to environmental factors that may adversely affect bone health. Among these, relatively high levels of CO(2), lack of sunlight exposure affecting vitamin D metabolism, limited physical activity, and altered dietary habits. The aims of this study were to examine the effect of a prolonged submersion (30 days) on changes in bone strength using quantitative bone speed of sound and in markers of bone metabolism that include bone turnover (BAP, PINP, TRAP5b, and CTx) and endocrine regulators (serum calcium, PTH, and 25[OH]D) in a group of 32 young healthy male submariners. The prolonged submersion led to increases in body weight and BMI and to a decrease in fitness level. There was a significant decrease in bone strength following the submersion. Speed of sound exhibited continued decline at 4 weeks after return to shore and returned to baseline levels at the 6-month follow-up. There was a significant increase in circulating calcium level. PTH and 25(OH)D levels decreased significantly. Significant decreases were observed in both TRAP5b and CTx levels, markers of bone resorption, as well as in N-terminal propeptide of type I collagen (PINP), a bone formation marker. Prolonged submersion led to a significant decrease in bone strength, accompanied by an overall decrease in bone metabolism. Bone strength was regained only 6 months after return to shore. Prevention and/or rehabilitation programs should be developed following periods of relative disuse even for young submariners. The effects of repeated prolonged submersions on bone health are yet to be determined. PMID:19882096

  3. Calcium regulation and bone mineral metabolism in elderly patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Tejwani, Vickram; Qian, Qi

    2013-05-29

    The elderly chronic kidney disease (CKD) population is growing. Both aging and CKD can disrupt calcium (Ca2+) homeostasis and cause alterations of multiple Ca2+-regulatory mechanisms, including parathyroid hormone, vitamin D, fibroblast growth factor-23/Klotho, calcium-sensing receptor and Ca2+-phosphate product. These alterations can be deleterious to bone mineral metabolism and soft tissue health, leading to metabolic bone disease and vascular calcification and aging, termed CKD-mineral and bone disorder (MBD). CKD-MBD is associated with morbid clinical outcomes, including fracture, cardiovascular events and all-cause mortality. In this paper, we comprehensively review Ca2+ regulation and bone mineral metabolism, with a special emphasis on elderly CKD patients. We also present the current treatment-guidelines and management options for CKD-MBD.

  4. The role of biochemical of bone turnover markers in osteoporosis and metabolic bone disease: a consensus paper of the Belgian Bone Club.

    PubMed

    Cavalier, E; Bergmann, P; Bruyère, O; Delanaye, P; Durnez, A; Devogelaer, J-P; Ferrari, S L; Gielen, E; Goemaere, S; Kaufman, J-M; Toukap, A Nzeusseu; Reginster, J-Y; Rousseau, A-F; Rozenberg, S; Scheen, A J; Body, J-J

    2016-07-01

    The exact role of biochemical markers of bone turnover in the management of metabolic bone diseases remains a topic of controversy. In this consensus paper, the Belgian Bone Club aimed to provide a state of the art on the use of these biomarkers in different clinical or physiological situations like in postmenopausal women, osteoporosis in men, in elderly patients, in patients suffering from bone metastasis, in patients with chronic renal failure, in pregnant or lactating women, in intensive care patients, and in diabetics. We also gave our considerations on the analytical issues linked to the use of these biomarkers, on potential new emerging biomarkers, and on the use of bone turnover biomarkers in the follow-up of patients treated with new drugs for osteoporosis. PMID:27026330

  5. [Bone and Calcium Metabolisms Associated with Dental and Oral-Maxillofacial Diseases. Bone remodeling and alveolar bone homeostasis].

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Tomoki

    2015-08-01

    Bone, which support motile organ and periodontal tissue, is renewing throughout our life. This restructuring process is called "bone remodeling" , and osteoclasts and osteoblasts play a crucial role in this process. Bone remodeling is important not only for normal bone mass and strength, but also for mineral homeostasis. Bone remodeling is stringently regulated by communication between bone component cells such as osteoclasts, osteoblasts and osteocytes. An imbalance of this process is often linked to various bone diseases. Alveolar bone remodeling is directly influenced by occlusal force from the teeth. Thus, the elucidation of the regulatory mechanisms involved in alveolar bone remodeling is critical for a deeper understanding of the maintenance of healthy tooth and dental disease.

  6. Change of urinary fluoride and bone metabolism indicators in the endemic fluorosis areas of southern china after supplying low fluoride public water

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Few studies have evaluated health impacts, especially biomarker changes, following implementation of a new environmental policy. This study examined changes in water fluoride, urinary fluoride (UF), and bone metabolism indicators in children after supplying low fluoride public water in endemic fluorosis areas of Southern China. We also assessed the relationship between UF and serum osteocalcin (BGP), calcitonin (CT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and bone mineral density to identify the most sensitive bone metabolism indicators related to fluoride exposure. Methods Four fluorosis-endemic villages (intervention villages) in Guangdong, China were randomly selected to receive low-fluoride water. One non-endemic fluorosis village with similar socio-economic status, living conditions, and health care access, was selected as the control group. 120 children aged 6-12 years old were randomly chosen from local schools in each village for the study. Water and urinary fluoride content as well as serum BGP, CT, ALP and bone mineral density were measured by the standard methods and compared between the children residing in the intervention villages and the control village. Benchmark dose (BMD) and benchmark dose lower limit (BMDL) were calculated for each bone damage indicator. Results Our study found that after water source change, fluoride concentrations in drinking water in all intervention villages (A-D) were significantly reduced to 0.11 mg/l, similar to that in the control village (E). Except for Village A where water change has only been taken place for 6 years, urinary fluoride concentrations in children of the intervention villages were lower or comparable to those in the control village after 10 years of supplying new public water. The values of almost all bone indicators in children living in Villages B-D and ALP in Village A were either lower or similar to those in the control village after the intervention. CT and BGP are sensitive bone metabolism

  7. Gender- and region-specific alterations in bone metabolism in Scarb1-null female mice.

    PubMed

    Martineau, Corine; Martin-Falstrault, Louise; Brissette, Louise; Moreau, Robert

    2014-08-01

    A positive correlation between plasma levels of HDL and bone mass has been reported by epidemiological studies. As scavenger receptor class B, type I (SR-BI), the gene product of Scarb1, is known to regulate HDL metabolism, we recently characterized bone metabolism in Scarb1-null mice. These mice display high femoral bone mass associated with enhanced bone formation. As gender differences have been reported in HDL metabolism and SR-BI function, we investigated gender-specific bone alterations in Scarb1-null mice by microtomography and histology. We found 16% greater relative bone volume and 39% higher bone formation rate in the vertebrae from 2-month-old Scarb1-null females. No such alteration was seen in males, indicating gender- and region-specific differences in skeletal phenotype. Total and HDL-associated cholesterol levels, as well as ACTH plasma levels, were increased in both Scarb1-null genders, the latter being concurrent to impaired corticosterone response to fasting. Plasma levels of estradiol did not differ between null and WT females, suggesting that the estrogen metabolism alteration is not relevant to the higher vertebral bone mass in female Scarb1-null mice. Constitutively, high plasma levels of leptin along with 2.5-fold increase in its expression in white adipose tissue were measured in female Scarb1-null mice only. In vitro exposure of bone marrow stromal cells to ACTH and leptin promoted osteoblast differentiation as evidenced by increased gene expression of osterix and collagen type I alpha. Our results suggest that hyperleptinemia may account for the gender-specific high bone mass seen in the vertebrae of female Scarb1-null mice.

  8. Effect of low gravity on calcium metabolism and bone formation (L-7)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suda, Tatsuo

    1993-01-01

    Recently, attention has been focused on the disorders of bone and calcium metabolism during space flight. The skeletal system has evolved on the Earth under 1-g. Space flights under low gravity appear to cause substantial changes in bone and calcium homeostasis of the animals adapted to 1-g. A space experiment for the First Materials Processing Test (FMPT) was proposed to examine the effects of low gravity on calcium metabolism and bone formation using chick embryos loaded in a space shuttle. This space experiment was proposed based on the following two experimental findings. First, it has been reported that bone density decreases significantly during prolonged space flight. The data obtained from the US Skylab and the U.S.S.R. Salyut-6 cosmonauts have also documented that the degree of bone loss is related to the duration of space flight. Second, the US-Soviet joints space experiment demonstrated that the decrease in bone density under low gravity appears to be due to the decrease in bone formation rather than the increase in bone resorption. The purpose of our space experiment is, therefore, to investigate further the mechanisms of bone growth under low gravity using fertilized chick embryos.

  9. Bone mineral measurement from Apollo experiment M-078. [derangement of bone mineral metabolism in spacecrews

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vogel, J. M.; Rambaut, P. C.; Smith, M. C., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    Loss of mineral from bone during periods of immobilization, recumbency, or weightlessness is examined. This report describes the instrumentation, technique, and bone mineral changes observed preflight and postflight for the Apollo 14, 15, and 16 missions. The bone mineral changes documented during the Apollo Program are reviewed, and their relevance to future missions is discussed.

  10. Radioimmunoassay of bone morphogenetic protein in serum: a tissue-specific parameter of bone metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Urist, M.R.; Hudak, R.T.

    1984-05-01

    Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP), a paracrine agent inducing cartilage and bone cell differentiation, circulates in the blood and is detectable by BMP radioimmunoassay. Serum BMP levels are higher in growing children and patients with Paget's disease than in normal adults. These observations are interpreted as evidence of a BMP function in the physiology of bone in health and disease.

  11. Abnormal type I collagen metabolism by cultured fibroblasts in lethal perinatal osteogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Bateman, J F; Mascara, T; Chan, D; Cole, W G

    1984-01-01

    Cultured skin fibroblasts from seven consecutive cases of lethal perinatal osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) expressed defects of type I collagen metabolism. The secretion of [14C]proline-labelled collagen by the OI cells was specifically reduced (51-79% of control), and collagen degradation was increased to twice that of control cells in five cases and increased by approx. 30% in the other two cases. Sodium dodecyl sulphate/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis revealed that four of the OI cell lines produced two forms of type I collagen consisting of both normally and slowly migrating forms of the alpha 1(I)- and alpha 2(I)-chains. In the other three OI cell lines only the 'slow' alpha (I)'- and alpha 2(I)'-chains were detected. In both groups inhibition of the post-translational modifications of proline and lysine resulted in the production of a single species of type I collagen with normal electrophoretic migration. Proline hydroxylation was normal, but the hydroxylysine contents of alpha 1(I)'- and alpha 2(I)'-chains purified by h.p.l.c. were greater than in control alpha-chains. The glucosylgalactosylhydroxylysine content was increased approx. 3-fold while the galactosylhydroxylysine content was only slightly increased in the alpha 1(I)'-chains relative to control alpha 1(I)-chains. Peptide mapping of the CNBr-cleavage peptides provided evidence that the increased post-translational modifications were distributed throughout the alpha 1(I)'- and alpha 2(I)'-chains. It is postulated that the greater modification of these chains was due to structural defects of the alpha-chains leading to delayed helix formation. The abnormal charge heterogeneity observed in the alpha 1 CB8 peptide of one patient may reflect such a structural defect in the type I collagen molecule.

  12. Postnatal Changes in Humerus Cortical Bone Thickness Reflect the Development of Metabolic Bone Disease in Preterm Infants

    PubMed Central

    Tokuriki, Shuko; Igarashi, Aiko; Okuno, Takashi; Ohta, Genrei; Kosaka, Takuya; Ohshima, Yusei

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To use cortical bone thickness (CBT) of the humerus to identify risk factors for the development of metabolic bone disease in preterm infants. Methods. Twenty-seven infants born at <32 weeks of gestational age, with a birth weight of <1,500 g, were enrolled. Humeral CBT was measured from chest radiographs at birth and at 27-28, 31-32, and 36–44 weeks of postmenstrual age (PMA). The risk factors for the development of osteomalacia were statistically analyzed. Results. The humeral CBT at 36–44 weeks of PMA was positively correlated with gestational age and birth weight and negatively correlated with the duration of mechanical ventilation. CBT increased with PMA, except in six very early preterm infants in whom it decreased. Based on logistic regression analysis, gestational age and duration of mechanical ventilation were identified as risk factors for cortical bone thinning. Conclusions. Humeral CBT may serve as a radiologic marker of metabolic bone disease at 36–44 weeks of PMA in preterm infants. Cortical bones of extremely preterm infants are fragile, even when age is corrected for term, and require extreme care to lower the risk of fractures. PMID:27194819

  13. A panel of free fatty acid ratios to predict the development of metabolic abnormalities in healthy obese individuals

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Linjing; Ni, Yan; Ma, Xiaojing; Zhao, Aihua; Bao, Yuqian; Liu, Jiajian; Chen, Tianlu; Xie, Guoxiang; Panee, Jun; Su, Mingming; Yu, Herbert; Wang, Congrong; Hu, Cheng; Jia, Weiping; Jia, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidences support that metabolically healthy obese (MHO) is a transient state. However, little is known about the early markers associated with the development of metabolic abnormalities in MHO individuals. Serum free fatty acids (FFAs) profile is highlighted in its association with obesity-related insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and cardiovascular diseases (CVD). To examine the association of endogenous fatty acid metabolism with future development of metabolic abnormalities in MHO individuals, we retrospectively analyzed 24 [product FFA]/[precursor FFA] ratios in fasting sera and clinical data from 481 individuals who participated in three independent studies, including 131 metabolic healthy subjects who completed the 10-year longitudinal Shanghai Diabetes Study (SHDS), 312 subjects cross-sectionally sampled from the Shanghai Obesity Study (SHOS), and 38 subjects who completed an 8-week very low carbohydrate diet (VLCD) intervention study. Results showed that higher baseline level of oleic acid/stearic acid (OA/SA), and lower levels of stearic acid/palmitic acid (SA/PA) and arachidonic acid/dihomo-γ-linolenic acid (AA/DGLA) ratios were associated with higher rate of MHO to MUO conversion in the longitudinal SHDS. Further, the finding was validated in the cross-sectional and interventional studies. This panel of FFA ratios could be used for identification and early intervention of at-risk obese individuals. PMID:27344992

  14. A panel of free fatty acid ratios to predict the development of metabolic abnormalities in healthy obese individuals.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Linjing; Ni, Yan; Ma, Xiaojing; Zhao, Aihua; Bao, Yuqian; Liu, Jiajian; Chen, Tianlu; Xie, Guoxiang; Panee, Jun; Su, Mingming; Yu, Herbert; Wang, Congrong; Hu, Cheng; Jia, Weiping; Jia, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidences support that metabolically healthy obese (MHO) is a transient state. However, little is known about the early markers associated with the development of metabolic abnormalities in MHO individuals. Serum free fatty acids (FFAs) profile is highlighted in its association with obesity-related insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and cardiovascular diseases (CVD). To examine the association of endogenous fatty acid metabolism with future development of metabolic abnormalities in MHO individuals, we retrospectively analyzed 24 [product FFA]/[precursor FFA] ratios in fasting sera and clinical data from 481 individuals who participated in three independent studies, including 131 metabolic healthy subjects who completed the 10-year longitudinal Shanghai Diabetes Study (SHDS), 312 subjects cross-sectionally sampled from the Shanghai Obesity Study (SHOS), and 38 subjects who completed an 8-week very low carbohydrate diet (VLCD) intervention study. Results showed that higher baseline level of oleic acid/stearic acid (OA/SA), and lower levels of stearic acid/palmitic acid (SA/PA) and arachidonic acid/dihomo-γ-linolenic acid (AA/DGLA) ratios were associated with higher rate of MHO to MUO conversion in the longitudinal SHDS. Further, the finding was validated in the cross-sectional and interventional studies. This panel of FFA ratios could be used for identification and early intervention of at-risk obese individuals. PMID:27344992

  15. New mouse models for metabolic bone diseases generated by genome-wide ENU mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Sabrautzki, Sibylle; Rubio-Aliaga, Isabel; Hans, Wolfgang; Fuchs, Helmut; Rathkolb, Birgit; Calzada-Wack, Julia; Cohrs, Christian M; Klaften, Matthias; Seedorf, Hartwig; Eck, Sebastian; Benet-Pagès, Ana; Favor, Jack; Esposito, Irene; Strom, Tim M; Wolf, Eckhard; Lorenz-Depiereux, Bettina; Hrabě de Angelis, Martin

    2012-08-01

    Metabolic bone disorders arise as primary diseases or may be secondary due to a multitude of organ malfunctions. Animal models are required to understand the molecular mechanisms responsible for the imbalances of bone metabolism in disturbed bone mineralization diseases. Here we present the isolation of mutant mouse models for metabolic bone diseases by phenotyping blood parameters that target bone turnover within the large-scale genome-wide Munich ENU Mutagenesis Project. A screening panel of three clinical parameters, also commonly used as biochemical markers in patients with metabolic bone diseases, was chosen. Total alkaline phosphatase activity and total calcium and inorganic phosphate levels in plasma samples of F1 offspring produced from ENU-mutagenized C3HeB/FeJ male mice were measured. Screening of 9,540 mice led to the identification of 257 phenodeviants of which 190 were tested by genetic confirmation crosses. Seventy-one new dominant mutant lines showing alterations of at least one of the biochemical parameters of interest were confirmed. Fifteen mutations among three genes (Phex, Casr, and Alpl) have been identified by positional-candidate gene approaches and one mutation of the Asgr1 gene, which was identified by next-generation sequencing. All new mutant mouse lines are offered as a resource for the scientific community.

  16. Osteochondrosis and epiphyseal bone abnormalities associated with copper deficiency in bison calves.

    PubMed Central

    Woodbury, M R; Feist, M S; Clark, E G; Haigh, J C

    1999-01-01

    Two bison calves were submitted to the Western College of Veterinary Medicine to confirm suspected copper deficiency. In addition to clinical signs, there were pathologic changes in the cartilage and subchondral bone of several joints. Water analysis indicated high levels of sulfate in the drinking water, contributing to a secondary copper deficiency. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. PMID:10646064

  17. The effects of short-term jump training on bone metabolism in females using oral contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Reiger, Jamie; Yingling, Vanessa R

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of oral contraceptive use on bone serum markers following a 3-week jumping protocol. Twenty-three females (18-25 years) were grouped as oral contraceptive users (OC+) or non-users (OC-). Following a 3-week observation period, participants completed a 3-week (15-day) jump protocol. Jump sessions consisting of ten 42 cm drop jumps with a 30 s rest interval between jumps were completed each day, 5 days per week. Peak vertical ground reaction force and loading rate were measured and the osteogenic index was calculated. Serum markers for bone formation, bone alkaline phosphatase (BAP) and bone resorption, C-terminal telopeptides of type I collagen (CTX) were measured at three time points (pre-, mid-, post-jump). BAP and CTX increased significantly (P = 0.0017, 0.0488) in both groups post-jump; however, bone metabolic markers were not different between the OC+ and OC- groups. Osteogenic index, ground reaction force and vertical jump height were similar between groups. Correlations between markers of bone metabolism and participants' age at menarche, weight, loading rate and years on OC were not significant. A 3-week jumping protocol was found to be effective in stimulating bone metabolism in both OC+ and OC- groups. PMID:26008875

  18. Noninvasive markers of bone metabolism in the rhesus monkey: normal effects of age and gender

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cahoon, S.; Boden, S. D.; Gould, K. G.; Vailas, A. C.

    1996-01-01

    Measurement of bone turnover in conditions such as osteoporosis has been limited by the need for invasive iliac bone biopsy to reliably determine parameters of bone metabolism. Recent advances in the area of serum and urinary markers of bone metabolism have raised the possibility for noninvasive measurements; however, little nonhuman primate data exist for these parameters. The purpose of this experiment was to define the normal range and variability of several of the newer noninvasive bone markers which are currently under investigation in humans. The primary intent was to determine age and gender variability, as well as provide some normative data for future experiments in nonhuman primates. Twenty-four rhesus macaques were divided into equal groups of male and female according to the following age groupings: 3 years, 5-10 years, 15-20 years, and > 25 years. Urine was collected three times daily for a four-day period and measured for several markers of bone turnoverm including pyridinoline (PYD), deoxypyrodinoline (DPD), hydroxyproline, and creatinine. Bone mineral density measurements of the lumbar spine were performed at the beginning and end of the study period. Serum was also obtained at the time of bone densitometry for measurement of osteocalcin levels by radioimmunoassay. There were no significant differences in bone mineral density, urine PYD, or urine DPD based on gender. Bone density was lowest in the youngest animals, peaked in the 15-20-year group, but again decreased in the oldest animals. The osteocalcin, PYD, and DPD levels followed an inversely related pattern to bone density. The most important result was the relative age insensitivity of the ratio of PYD:DPD in monkeys up to age 20 years. Since bone density changes take months or years to become measurable and iliac biopsies are invasive, the PYD/DPD marker ratio may have important implications for rapid noninvasive measurement of the effects of potential treatments for osteoporosis in the non

  19. Bone and mineral metabolism in adult celiac disease

    SciTech Connect

    Caraceni, M.P.; Molteni, N.; Bardella, M.T.; Ortolani, S.; Nogara, A.; Bianchi, P.A.

    1988-03-01

    Bone mineral density (/sup 125/I photon absorptiometry) was lower in 20 untreated adult celiac patients than in sex- and age-matched controls (p less than 0.001), and plasma alkaline phosphatase, parathyroid hormone, urinary hydroxyproline/creatinine levels were higher than normal (p less than 0.05, less than 0.001, less than 0.05, respectively). Gluten-free diet was started, and the patients were divided randomly into two treatment groups, one which received oral 25-hydroxyvitamin D 50 micrograms/day and one which did not. After 12 months' treatment, bone turnover markers showed a decrease, which did not reach statistical significance, and bone mineral density did not show significant modifications compared with base line in either group. It was found that a gluten-free diet followed for 1 yr can prevent further bone loss, but no significant differences were detected between the two groups.

  20. Neridronic acid for the treatment of bone metabolic diseases.

    PubMed

    Gatti, Davide; Viapiana, Ombretta; Idolazzi, Luca; Fracassi, Elena; Adami, Silvano

    2009-10-01

    Neridronic acid (6-amino-1-idroxyesilidene-1,1-bisphosphonate) is a nitrogen-containing bisphosphonate licensed in Italy for the treatment of osteogenesis imperfecta and Paget's disease of bone. The pharmacodynamic profile is similar to that of other nitrogen-containing bisphosphonates and is characterized by its high affinity for bone tissue particularly at sites undergoing a process of remodeling. In growing children affected by osteogenesis imperfect, neridronic acid rapidly increases bone mineral density as measured by dual X-ray absortiometry and this is associated with a significant decrease in fracture cumulative number. Similar results have been obtained also in newborns (< 12 month old) and in adult patients. In Paget's disease of bone, 200 mg intravenous neridronic acid is associated with a 65% rate of full remission and a biochemical response (decrease of > 75% of bone turnover markers) in 95% of the patients. Neridronic acid treatment has been reported to be effective also in other skeletal diseases such as osteoporosis, algodystrophy, hypercalcemia of malignancy and bone metastasis. Neridronic acid has been developed only for parenteral use, and it is the only one used as intramuscular injection. This avoids all the limitations of oral bisphosphonates and may be offered for a home treatment with simple nursing assistance. PMID:19761412

  1. Prevalence of Bone Mineral Density Abnormalities and Factors Affecting Bone Density in Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease in a Tertiary Care Hospital in Southern India

    PubMed Central

    Mani, Sathish Kumar; Gopal, Gopinath Kango; Rangasami, Srinivasan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is a disease of wasting with airflow limitation, associated with a variety of systemic manifestations such as reduced Bone Mineral Density (BMD). There is a paucity of Indian studies on the effects of COPD on BMD. Aim This study was conducted to estimate the prevalence of osteopenia and osteoporosis in COPD patients and the correlation between bone density and severity of COPD classified according to GOLD Global initiative for chronic Obstructive Lung Disease guidelines (GOLD). Materials and Methods A prospective study of 60 patients diagnosed to have COPD, was conducted in the outpatient department of Respiratory Medicine, at a tertiary care hospital in Southern India, between September 2012 and September 2013. BMD was measured using ultrasound bone densitometer (ACHILLES GE HEALTH CARE). Patients with a T-score between -1 and -2.5 were considered to be osteopenic while patients with a T score less than -2.5 were considered to be osteoporotic (WHO criteria). Results Overall, 40 (67%) patients had an abnormal bone mineral density. A total of 21 (35%) patients were osteoporotic while 19 (33%) were osteopenic. BMD levels correlated with severity of obstruction (p<0.001), smoking status (p=0.02), age (p=0.05) and number of pack years (p=0.001). Conclusion Patients with COPD are at an increased risk for lower BMD and osteoporotic fractures and the risk appears to increase with disease severity. Further studies are required to assess whether routine BMD measurements in COPD patients is beneficial to diagnose osteoporosis and reduce morbidity. PMID:27790490

  2. Do obese but metabolically normal women differ in intra-abdominal fat and physical activity levels from those with the expected metabolic abnormalities? A cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Obesity remains a major public health problem, associated with a cluster of metabolic abnormalities. However, individuals exist who are very obese but have normal metabolic parameters. The aim of this study was to determine to what extent differences in metabolic health in very obese women are explained by differences in body fat distribution, insulin resistance and level of physical activity. Methods This was a cross-sectional pilot study of 39 obese women (age: 28-64 yrs, BMI: 31-67 kg/m2) recruited from community settings. Women were defined as 'metabolically normal' on the basis of blood glucose, lipids and blood pressure. Magnetic Resonance Imaging was used to determine body fat distribution. Detailed lifestyle and metabolic profiles of participants were obtained. Results Women with a healthy metabolic profile had lower intra-abdominal fat volume (geometric mean 4.78 l [95% CIs 3.99-5.73] vs 6.96 l [5.82-8.32]) and less insulin resistance (HOMA 3.41 [2.62-4.44] vs 6.67 [5.02-8.86]) than those with an abnormality. The groups did not differ in abdominal subcutaneous fat volume (19.6 l [16.9-22.7] vs 20.6 [17.6-23.9]). A higher proportion of those with a healthy compared to a less healthy metabolic profile met current physical activity guidelines (70% [95% CIs 55.8-84.2] vs 25% [11.6-38.4]). Intra-abdominal fat, insulin resistance and physical activity make independent contributions to metabolic status in very obese women, but explain only around a third of the variance. Conclusion A sub-group of women exists who are metabolically normal despite being very obese. Differences in fat distribution, insulin resistance, and physical activity level are associated with metabolic differences in these women, but account only partially for these differences. Future work should focus on strategies to identify those obese individuals most at risk of the negative metabolic consequences of obesity and on identifying other factors that contribute to metabolic status

  3. Eosinophilic fasciitis associated with hypereosinophilia, abnormal bone-marrow karyotype and inversion of chromosome 5.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, J S; Bosworth, J; Min, T; Mercieca, J; Holden, C A

    2014-03-01

    We report the case of a male patient presenting with eosinophilia, pulmonary oedema and eosinophilic fasciitis (EF). He had the classic clinical appearance and magnetic resonance imaging of EF. Cytogenetic analysis of the bone marrow revealed a previously undescribed pericentric inversion of chromosome 5. Overall, the presentation was consistent with a diagnosis of chronic eosinophilic leukaemia, not otherwise specified (CEL-NOS). Dermatologists should consult a haematologist in cases of EF, in order to rule out possible haematological malignancies.

  4. Influence of the parathyroid glands on bone metabolism.

    PubMed

    Malluche, H H; Koszewski, N; Monier-Faugere, M C; Williams, J P; Mawad, H

    2006-08-01

    Bone is a classic target tissue for parathyroid hormone (PTH), whose calciotropic effect is mediated largely via catabolic actions on this tissue. Paradoxically, PTH also exerts anabolic actions, with intermittent injections of PTH or its amino-terminal fragments causing an increase in bone formation and bone mass, actions that form the basis for the use of PTH in the treatment of osteoporosis. Besides vitamin D, PTH is the only other known bone anabolic agent. High-affinity PTH receptors (PTH-1R) have been detected on osteoblasts and osteoclasts (albeit in lower numbers). Bone turnover, which includes activation of osteoclasts and osteoblasts, appears to be best reflected not by absolute concentrations of PTH (which can vary based on the assay and antibody used) but by a balance of circulating full-length PTH-(1-84) and amino-terminally truncated C-PTH fragments. When PTH-(1-84) is predominant, bone turnover is promoted. Among PTH fragments, PTH-(7-84) appears to be the most potent antagonist of PTH-(1-84). The mechanisms involved in these effects are unclear although mediation via unique C-terminal receptors has been suggested. We propose that, within the range of total PTH (100-1000 pg mL(-1)), the ratio of PTH-(1-84)/C-PTH fragment is a valuable tool for diagnosis of bone turnover. Data indicate that at PTH levels < 100-150 pg mL(-1) and > 1000 pg mL(-1), the ratio looses its predictive power. Assay type, patient characteristics (race, underlying renal disease) and treatment attributes (vitamin D, corticosteroids, phosphate binders) have an impact on the PTH ratio, and care should be used in interpreting assay results and making subsequent treatment decisions.

  5. Metabolic effects of pamidronate in patients with metastatic bone disease.

    PubMed Central

    Vinholes, J.; Guo, C. Y.; Purohit, O. P.; Eastell, R.; Coleman, R. E.

    1996-01-01

    We have evaluated the value of specific bone resorption markers in monitoring metastatic bone disease to define the duration of action of a single high-dose pamidronate infusion. Twenty patients received a single infusion of pamidronate 120 mg for painful bone metastases. Ten out of these 20 patients also received a second infusion. They were evaluated at baseline, 2, 4 and 8 weeks after each infusion. A composite pain questionnaire, serum and urine tests were carried out at these time points. Bone resorption markers measured included urinary calcium, hydroxyproline and two new markers: pyridinoline and deoxypyridinoline. Reference values were defined by 20 healthy controls matched by age and sex. Pamidronate induced a profound fall in bone resorption with a maximal effect within the first month after therapy. Changes in urinary calcium levels were confounded by a rise of 100% in the parathyroid hormone levels. Before treatment, pyridinoline and deoxypyridinoline were increased in 70% of patients, while urinary calcium was increased in only 40% of them. Thirteen patients had a > or = 50% fall in deoxypyridinoline levels and were considered as biochemical responders. These patients had a mean reduction in pain score of about 30% of baseline levels, which was significantly higher than the seven non-biochemical responders. In conclusion, urinary calcium is not a precise marker of bone resorption. Deoxypyridinoline seems to be the most specific bone resorption marker in cancer patients. Biochemical responders have the most benefit from pamidronate in terms of pain relief. This suggests that patients may benefit from more potent or repeated infusions of bisphosphonates. PMID:8624269

  6. Do abnormal hemipelvic bone stresses contribute to loosening and migration of screw-threaded cups?

    PubMed

    Learmonth, I D; Spirakis, A

    1994-03-01

    Excellent long-term results have been reported with the Charnley low-friction arthroplasty. Failure of the cemented acetabular component has been identified as a problem in the longer term, while cemented hip replacements in active young patients have exhibited a disconcerting incidence of early clinical or radiological failure. This resulted in the development of the cementless arthroplasty. Bone responds favourably to an optimal stress window and reacts dynamically to metal implants that have a greatly differing modulus of elasticity. This study represents a comparative qualitative analysis of the peri-acetabular hemipelvic stresses after loading two cementless (press-fit and screw-threaded) acetabular components inserted into identical bone models. A simplified model of the artificial hip joint was constructed and the very sensitive stress analysis technique of holographic interferometry was used for the investigation. Peri-acetabular stress concentrations were noted with the screw-threaded cup. This may predispose to bone resorption and it is suggested that these could be implicated in the migration of these cups described in published reports.

  7. Abnormal IGF-Binding Protein Profile in the Bone Marrow of Multiple Myeloma Patients.

    PubMed

    Bieghs, Liesbeth; Brohus, Malene; Kristensen, Ida B; Abildgaard, Niels; Bøgsted, Martin; Johnsen, Hans E; Conover, Cheryl A; De Bruyne, Elke; Vanderkerken, Karin; Overgaard, Michael T; Nyegaard, Mette

    2016-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor (IGF) signalling plays a key role in homing, progression, and treatment resistance in multiple myeloma (MM). In the extracellular environment, the majority of IGF molecules are bound to one of six IGF-binding proteins (IGFBP1-6), leaving a minor fraction of total IGF free and accessible for receptor activation. In MM, high IGF-receptor type 1 expression levels correlate with a poor prognosis, but the status and role of IGF and IGFBPs in the pathobiology of MM is unknown. Here we measured total IGF1, IGF2, and intact IGFBP levels in blood and bone marrow samples from MM (n = 17), monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) (n = 37), and control individuals (n = 15), using ELISA (IGFs) and 125I-IGF1 Western Ligand Blotting (IGFBPs). MGUS and MM patients displayed a significant increase in intact IGFBP-2 (2.5-3.8 fold) and decrease in intact IGFBP-3 (0.6-0.5 fold) in the circulation compared to control individuals. Further, IGFBP-2 as well as total IGFBP levels were significantly lower in bone marrow compared to circulation in MM and MGUS only, whereas IGF1, IGF2, and IGFBP-3 were equally distributed between the two compartments. In conclusion, the profound change in IGFBP profile strongly suggests an increased IGF bioavailability in the bone marrow microenvironment in MGUS and MM, despite no change in growth factor concentration. PMID:27111220

  8. Abnormal IGF-Binding Protein Profile in the Bone Marrow of Multiple Myeloma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Bieghs, Liesbeth; Brohus, Malene; Kristensen, Ida B.; Abildgaard, Niels; Bøgsted, Martin; Johnsen, Hans E.; Conover, Cheryl A.; De Bruyne, Elke; Vanderkerken, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor (IGF) signalling plays a key role in homing, progression, and treatment resistance in multiple myeloma (MM). In the extracellular environment, the majority of IGF molecules are bound to one of six IGF-binding proteins (IGFBP1-6), leaving a minor fraction of total IGF free and accessible for receptor activation. In MM, high IGF-receptor type 1 expression levels correlate with a poor prognosis, but the status and role of IGF and IGFBPs in the pathobiology of MM is unknown. Here we measured total IGF1, IGF2, and intact IGFBP levels in blood and bone marrow samples from MM (n = 17), monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) (n = 37), and control individuals (n = 15), using ELISA (IGFs) and 125I-IGF1 Western Ligand Blotting (IGFBPs). MGUS and MM patients displayed a significant increase in intact IGFBP-2 (2.5–3.8 fold) and decrease in intact IGFBP-3 (0.6–0.5 fold) in the circulation compared to control individuals. Further, IGFBP-2 as well as total IGFBP levels were significantly lower in bone marrow compared to circulation in MM and MGUS only, whereas IGF1, IGF2, and IGFBP-3 were equally distributed between the two compartments. In conclusion, the profound change in IGFBP profile strongly suggests an increased IGF bioavailability in the bone marrow microenvironment in MGUS and MM, despite no change in growth factor concentration. PMID:27111220

  9. Metabolic Abnormalities Are Common among South American Hispanics Subjects with Normal Weight or Excess Body Weight: The CRONICAS Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Benziger, Catherine P.; Bernabé-Ortiz, Antonio; Gilman, Robert H.; Checkley, William; Smeeth, Liam; Málaga, Germán; Miranda, J. Jaime

    2015-01-01

    Objective We aimed to characterize metabolic status by body mass index (BMI) status. Methods The CRONICAS longitudinal study was performed in an age-and-sex stratified random sample of participants aged 35 years or older in four Peruvian settings: Lima (Peru’s capital, costal urban, highly urbanized), urban and rural Puno (both high-altitude), and Tumbes (costal semirural). Data from the baseline study, conducted in 2010, was used. Individuals were classified by BMI as normal weight (18.5–24.9 kg/m2), overweight (25.0–29.9 kg/m2), and obese (≥30 kg/m2), and as metabolically healthy (0–1 metabolic abnormality) or metabolically unhealthy (≥2 abnormalities). Abnormalities included individual components of the metabolic syndrome, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, and insulin resistance. Results A total of 3088 (age 55.6±12.6 years, 51.3% females) had all measurements. Of these, 890 (28.8%), 1361 (44.1%) and 837 (27.1%) were normal weight, overweight and obese, respectively. Overall, 19.0% of normal weight in contrast to 54.9% of overweight and 77.7% of obese individuals had ≥3 risk factors (p<0.001). Among normal weight individuals, 43.1% were metabolically unhealthy, and age ≥65 years, female, and highest socioeconomic groups were more likely to have this pattern. In contrast, only 16.4% of overweight and 3.9% of obese individuals were metabolically healthy and, compared to Lima, the rural and urban sites in Puno were more likely to have a metabolically healthier profile. Conclusions Most Peruvians with overweight and obesity have additional risk factors for cardiovascular disease, as well as a majority of those with a healthy weight. Prevention programs aimed at individuals with a normal BMI, and those who are overweight and obese, are urgently needed, such as screening for elevated fasting cholesterol and glucose. PMID:26599322

  10. Effect of vibration on osteoblastic and osteoclastic activities: Analysis of bone metabolism using goldfish scale as a model for bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, N.; Kitamura, K.; Nemoto, T.; Shimizu, N.; Wada, S.; Kondo, T.; Tabata, M. J.; Sodeyama, F.; Ijiri, K.; Hattori, A.

    In osteoclastic activity during space flight as well as hind limb unloading by tail suspension, inconsistent results have been reported in an in vivo study. The bone matrix plays an important role in the response to physical stress. However, there is no suitable in vitro co-culture system of osteoblasts and osteoclasts including bone matrix. On the other hand, fish scale is a calcified tissue that contains osteoblasts, osteoclasts, and bone matrix, all of which are similar to those found in human bones. Recently, we developed a new in vitro model system using goldfish scale. This system can detect the activities of osteoclasts and osteoblasts with tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase and alkaline phosphatase as the respective markers and precisely analyze the co-relationship between osteoblasts and osteoclasts. Using this system, we analyzed the bone metabolism under various degrees of acceleration (0.5-, 1-, 2-, 4-, and 6-G) by vibration with a G-load apparatus. After loading for 5 and 10 min, the scales were incubated for 6 and 24 h. The osteoblastic and osteoclastic activities were then measured. The osteoblastic activities gradually increased corresponding to 1-G to 6-G acceleration. In addition, ER mRNA expression was the highest under 6-G acceleration. On the other hand, the osteoclastic activity decreased at 24 h of incubation under low acceleration (0.5- and 1-G). This change coincided with TRAP mRNA expression. Under 2-G acceleration, the strength of suppression in osteoclastic activity was the highest. The strength of the inhibitory action under 4- and 6-G acceleration was lower than that under 2-G acceleration. In our co-culture system, osteoblasts and osteoclasts in the scale sensitively responded to several degrees of acceleration. Therefore, we strongly believe that our in vitro co-culture system is useful for the analysis of bone metabolism under loading or unloading.

  11. Metabolic inflexibility of white and brown adipose tissues in abnormal fatty acid partitioning of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Grenier-Larouche, T; Labbé, S M; Noll, C; Richard, D; Carpentier, A C

    2012-12-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is characterized by a general dysregulation of postprandial energy substrate partitioning. Although classically described in regard to glucose metabolism, it is now evident that metabolic inflexibility of plasma lipid fluxes is also present in T2D. The organ that is most importantly involved in the latter metabolic defect is the white adipose tissue (WAT). Both catecholamine-induced nonesterified fatty acid mobilization and insulin-stimulated storage of meal fatty acids are impaired in many WAT depots of insulin-resistant individuals. Novel molecular imaging techniques now demonstrate that these defects are linked to increased dietary fatty acid fluxes toward lean organs and myocardial dysfunction in humans. Recent findings also demonstrate functional abnormalities of brown adipose tissues in T2D, thus suggesting that a generalized adipose tissue dysregulation of energy storage and dissipation may be at play in the development of lean tissue energy overload and lipotoxicity. PMID:27152152

  12. Effect of GH/IGF-1 on Bone Metabolism and Osteoporsosis

    PubMed Central

    Locatelli, Vittorio; Bianchi, Vittorio E.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1) are fundamental in skeletal growth during puberty and bone health throughout life. GH increases tissue formation by acting directly and indirectly on target cells; IGF-1 is a critical mediator of bone growth. Clinical studies reporting the use of GH and IGF-1 in osteoporosis and fracture healing are outlined. Methods. A Pubmed search revealed 39 clinical studies reporting the effects of GH and IGF-1 administration on bone metabolism in osteopenic and osteoporotic human subjects and on bone healing in operated patients with normal GH secretion. Eighteen clinical studies considered the effect with GH treatment, fourteen studies reported the clinical effects with IGF-1 administration, and seven related to the GH/IGF-1 effect on bone healing. Results. Both GH and IGF-1 administration significantly increased bone resorption and bone formation in the most studies. GH/IGF-1 administration in patients with hip or tibial fractures resulted in increased bone healing, rapid clinical improvements. Some conflicting results were evidenced. Conclusions. GH and IGF-1 therapy has a significant anabolic effect. GH administration for the treatment of osteoporosis and bone fractures may greatly improve clinical outcome. GH interacts with sex steroids in the anabolic process. GH resistance process is considered. PMID:25147565

  13. Insulin resistance and endocrine-metabolic abnormalities in polycystic ovarian syndrome: Comparison between obese and non-obese PCOS patients

    PubMed Central

    Layegh, Parvin; Mousavi, Zohreh; Farrokh Tehrani, Donya; Parizadeh, Seyed Mohammad Reza; Khajedaluee, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Background: Insulin resistance has an important role in pathophysiology of polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS). Yet there are certain controversies regarding the presence of insulin resistance in non-obese patients. Objective: The aim was to compare the insulin resistance and various endocrine and metabolic abnormalities in obese and non-obese PCOS women. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study which was performed from 2007-2010, 115 PCOS patients, aged 16-45 years were enrolled. Seventy patients were obese (BMI ≥25) and 45 patients were non-obese (BMI <25). Presence of insulin resistance and endocrine-metabolic abnormalities were compared between two groups. Collected data were analyzed with SPSS version 16.0 and p<0.05 was considered as statistically significant. Results: There was no significant difference in presence of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR >2.3) between two groups (p=0.357). Waist circumference (p<0.001), waist/hip ratio (p<0.001), systolic (p<0.001) and diastolic (p<0.001) blood pressures, fasting blood sugar (p=0.003) and insulin (p=0.011), HOMA-IR (p=0.004), total cholesterol (p=0.001) and triglyceride (p<0.001) were all significantly higher in obese PCOS patients. There was no significant difference in total testosterone (p=0.634) and androstenedione (p=0.736) between groups whereas Dehydroepiandrotendione sulfate (DHEAS) was significantly higher in non-obese PCOS women (p=0.018). There was no case of fatty liver and metabolic syndrome in non-obese patients, whereas they were seen in 31.3% and 39.4% of obese PCOS women, respectively. Conclusion: Our study showed that metabolic abnormalities are more prevalent in obese PCOS women, but adrenal axis activity that is reflected in higher levels of DHEAS was more commonly pronounced in our non-obese PCOS patients. PMID:27351028

  14. Metabolomic analysis of bone morphogenetic protein receptor type 2 mutations in human pulmonary endothelium reveals widespread metabolic reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Fessel, Joshua P; Hamid, Rizwan; Wittmann, Bryan M; Robinson, Linda J; Blackwell, Tom; Tada, Yuji; Tanabe, Nobuhiro; Tatsumi, Koichiro; Hemnes, Anna R; West, James D

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a progressive and fatal disease of the lung vasculature for which the molecular etiologies are unclear. Specific metabolic alterations have been identified in animal models and in PAH patients, though existing data focus mainly on abnormalities of glucose homeostasis. We hypothesized that analysis of the entire metabolome in PAH would reveal multiple other metabolic changes relevant to disease pathogenesis and possible treatment. Layered transcriptomic and metabolomic analyses of human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (hPMVEC) expressing two different disease-causing mutations in the bone morphogenetic protein receptor type 2 (BMPR2) confirmed previously described increases in aerobic glycolysis but also uncovered significant upregulation of the pentose phosphate pathway, increases in nucleotide salvage and polyamine biosynthesis pathways, decreases in carnitine and fatty acid oxidation pathways, and major impairment of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle and failure of anaplerosis. As a proof of principle, we focused on the TCA cycle, predicting that isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) activity would be altered in PAH, and then demonstrating increased IDH activity not only in cultured hPMVEC expressing mutant BMPR2 but also in the serum of PAH patients. These results suggest that widespread metabolic changes are an important part of PAH pathogenesis, and that simultaneous identification and targeting of the multiple involved pathways may be a more fruitful therapeutic approach than targeting of any one individual pathway.

  15. [Bone and Nutrition. The relationship between iron and phosphate metabolism].

    PubMed

    Takashi, Yuichi; Fukumoto, Seiji

    2015-07-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) is an essential hormone for phosphate metabolism. It has been shown that intravenous administration of some iron formulations including saccharated ferric oxide induces hypophosphatemic osteomalacia with high FGF23 levels. On the other hand, iron deficiency promotes FGF23 and induces hypophosphatemia in patients with autosomal dominant hypophosphatemic rickets (ADHR). While iron and phosphate metabolism is connected, the detailed mechanism of this connection remains to be clarified.

  16. Red Blood Cells from Individuals with Abdominal Obesity or Metabolic Abnormalities Exhibit Less Deformability upon Entering a Constriction

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Nancy F.; Mancuso, Jordan E.; Zivkovic, Angela M.; Smilowitz, Jennifer T.; Ristenpart, William D.

    2016-01-01

    Abdominal obesity and metabolic syndrome (MS) are multifactorial conditions associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease and type II diabetes mellitus. Previous work has demonstrated that the hemorheological profile is altered in patients with abdominal obesity and MS, as evidenced for example by increased whole blood viscosity. To date, however, no studies have examined red blood cell (RBC) deformability of blood from individuals with obesity or metabolic abnormalities under typical physiological flow conditions. In this study, we pumped RBCs through a constriction in a microfluidic device and used high speed video to visualize and track the mechanical behavior of ~8,000 RBCs obtained from either healthy individuals (n = 5) or obese participants with metabolic abnormalities (OMA) (n = 4). We demonstrate that the OMA+ cells stretched on average about 25% less than the healthy controls. Furthermore, we examined the effects of ingesting a high-fat meal on RBC mechanical dynamics, and found that the postprandial period has only a weak effect on the stretching dynamics exhibited by OMA+ cells. The results suggest that chronic rigidification of RBCs plays a key role in the increased blood pressure and increased whole blood viscosity observed in OMA individuals and was independent of an acute response triggered by consumption of a high-fat meal. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01803633 PMID:27258098

  17. Pathophysiology of chronic kidney disease-mineral and bone disorder.

    PubMed

    Mac Way, Fabrice; Lessard, Myriam; Lafage-Proust, Marie-Hélène

    2012-12-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) alters the metabolism of several minerals, thereby inducing bone lesions and vessel-wall calcifications that can cause functional impairments and excess mortality. The histological bone abnormalities seen in CKD, known as renal osteodystrophy, consist of alterations in the bone turnover rate, which may be increased (osteitis fibrosa [OF]) or severely decreased (adynamic bone disease [AD]); abnormal mineralization (osteomalacia [OM]), and bone loss. Secondary hyperparathyroidism is related to early phosphate accumulation (responsible for FGF23 overproduction by bone tissue), decreased calcitriol production by the kidneys, and hypocalcemia. Secondary hyperparathyroidism is associated with OF. Other factors that affect bone include acidosis, chronic inflammation, nutritional deficiencies, and iatrogenic complications.

  18. Perspective on the impact of weightlessness on calcium and bone metabolism.

    PubMed

    Holick, M F

    1998-05-01

    As humans venture into space to colonize the moon and travel to distant planets in the 21st century, they will be confronted with a bone disease that could potentially limit their space exploration activities or put them at risk for fracture when they return to earth. It is now recognized that an unloading of the skeleton, either due to strict bed rest or in zero gravity, leads on average to a 1%-2% reduction in bone mineral density at selected skeletal sites each month. The mechanism by which unloading of the skeleton results in rapid mobilization of calcium stores from the skeleton is not fully understood, but it is thought to be related to down regulation in PTH and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 production. Bone modeling and mineralization in chick embryos is not affected by microgravity, suggesting that bone cells adapt and ultimately become addicted to gravity in order to maintain a structurally sound skeleton. Strategies need to be developed to decrease microgravity-induced bone resorption by either mimicking gravity's effect on bone metabolism, or enhancing physically or pharmacologically bone formation in order to preserve astronauts' bone health.

  19. Perspective on the impact of weightlessness on calcium and bone metabolism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holick, M. F.

    1998-01-01

    As humans venture into space to colonize the moon and travel to distant planets in the 21st century, they will be confronted with a bone disease that could potentially limit their space exploration activities or put them at risk for fracture when they return to earth. It is now recognized that an unloading of the skeleton, either due to strict bed rest or in zero gravity, leads on average to a 1%-2% reduction in bone mineral density at selected skeletal sites each month. The mechanism by which unloading of the skeleton results in rapid mobilization of calcium stores from the skeleton is not fully understood, but it is thought to be related to down regulation in PTH and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 production. Bone modeling and mineralization in chick embryos is not affected by microgravity, suggesting that bone cells adapt and ultimately become addicted to gravity in order to maintain a structurally sound skeleton. Strategies need to be developed to decrease microgravity-induced bone resorption by either mimicking gravity's effect on bone metabolism, or enhancing physically or pharmacologically bone formation in order to preserve astronauts' bone health.

  20. Blood flow to long bones indicates activity metabolism in mammals, reptiles and dinosaurs.

    PubMed

    Seymour, Roger S; Smith, Sarah L; White, Craig R; Henderson, Donald M; Schwarz-Wings, Daniela

    2012-02-01

    The cross-sectional area of a nutrient foramen of a long bone is related to blood flow requirements of the internal bone cells that are essential for dynamic bone remodelling. Foramen area increases with body size in parallel among living mammals and non-varanid reptiles, but is significantly larger in mammals. An index of blood flow rate through the foramina is about 10 times higher in mammals than in reptiles, and even higher if differences in blood pressure are considered. The scaling of foramen size correlates well with maximum whole-body metabolic rate during exercise in mammals and reptiles, but less well with resting metabolic rate. This relates to the role of blood flow associated with bone remodelling during and following activity. Mammals and varanid lizards have much higher aerobic metabolic rates and exercise-induced bone remodelling than non-varanid reptiles. Foramen areas of 10 species of dinosaur from five taxonomic groups are generally larger than from mammals, indicating a routinely highly active and aerobic lifestyle. The simple measurement holds possibilities offers the possibility of assessing other groups of extinct and living vertebrates in relation to body size, behaviour and habitat.

  1. Dietary Sodium Effects on Bone Loss and Calcium Metabolism During Bed Rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Scott M.; Arnaud, Sara B.; Abrams, Steven A.; Paloski, W. H. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The acceleration of age-related bone loss is one of the most detrimental effects of space flight. The ability to understand and counteract this loss will be critical for crew health and safety during and after long-duration missions. Studies in healthy ambulatory individuals have linked high salt (sodium) diets, hypercalciuria, and increased renal stone risk. Dietary salt may modulate bone loss through changes in calcium metabolism and the calcium endocrine system. The research proposed here will determine the role of dietary salt in the loss of bone during simulated space flight. Calcium metabolism will be determined through calcium kinetics studies, endocrine and biochemical measurements; and estimates of the mass, distribution and mechanical properties of bone, in subjects fed low (100 mmol sodium/day) or high (250 mmol sodium/day) levels of dietary salt during 28 days of headdown tilt bedrest. This research addresses the role of dietary salt in the loss of bone and calcium in space flight, and integrates the changes in calcium metabolism with those occurring in other physiologic systems. These data will be critical for both countermeasure development, and in determination of nutritional requirements for extended-duration space flight. The potential countermeasures resulting from this research will reduce health risks due to acceleration of age-related osteoporosis and increased risk of renal stone formation..

  2. Do high blood folate concentrations exacerbate metabolic abnormalities in people with low vitamin B-12 status?123

    PubMed Central

    Mills, James L; Carter, Tonia C; Scott, John M; Troendle, James F; Gibney, Eileen R; Shane, Barry; Kirke, Peadar N; Ueland, Per M; Brody, Lawrence C; Molloy, Anne M

    2011-01-01

    Background: In elderly individuals with low serum vitamin B-12, those who have high serum folate have been reported to have greater abnormalities in the following biomarkers for vitamin B-12 deficiency: low hemoglobin and elevated total homocysteine (tHcy) and methylmalonic acid (MMA). This suggests that folate exacerbates vitamin B-12–related metabolic abnormalities. Objective: We determined whether high serum folate in individuals with low serum vitamin B-12 increases the deleterious effects of low vitamin B-12 on biomarkers of vitamin B-12 cellular function. Design: In this cross-sectional study, 2507 university students provided data on medical history and exposure to folic acid and vitamin B-12 supplements. Blood was collected to measure serum and red blood cell folate (RCF), hemoglobin, plasma tHcy, and MMA, holotranscobalamin, and ferritin in serum. Results: In subjects with low vitamin B-12 concentrations (<148 pmol/L), those who had high folate concentrations (>30 nmol/L; group 1) did not show greater abnormalities in vitamin B-12 cellular function in any area than did those with lower folate concentrations (≤30 nmol/L; group 2). Group 1 had significantly higher holotranscobalamin and RCF, significantly lower tHcy, and nonsignificantly lower (P = 0.057) MMA concentrations than did group 2. The groups did not differ significantly in hemoglobin or ferritin. Compared with group 2, group 1 had significantly higher mean intakes of folic acid and vitamin B-12 from supplements and fortified food. Conclusions: In this young adult population, high folate concentrations did not exacerbate the biochemical abnormalities related to vitamin B-12 deficiency. These results provide reassurance that folic acid in fortified foods and supplements does not interfere with vitamin B-12 metabolism at the cellular level in a healthy population. PMID:21653798

  3. [Epigenetic Regulation by Androgen Receptor and Possible Function in Bone Metabolism].

    PubMed

    Imai, Yuuki

    2016-07-01

    Epigenetic regulation underlying AR(Androgen receptor)mediated transcription is important component to understand pathophysiology of osteoporosis in men. In this commentary, it is reported recent findings related to epigenetic landscape governed by AR and its cofactors including lysine-specific demethylase 1 (LSD1), and possible implication for bone metabolism. PMID:27346313

  4. Cardiovascular diseases in older patients with osteoporotic hip fracture: prevalence, disturbances in mineral and bone metabolism, and bidirectional links

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, A; Srikusalanukul, W; Davis, M; Smith, P

    2013-01-01

    Background Considerable controversy exists regarding the contribution of mineral/bone metabolism abnormalities to the association between cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) and osteoporotic fractures. Aims and methods To determine the relationships between mineral/bone metabolism biomarkers and CVD in 746 older patients with hip fracture, clinical data were recorded and serum concentrations of parathyroid hormone (PTH), 25-hydroxyvitamin D, calcium, phosphate, magnesium, troponin I, parameters of bone turnover, and renal, liver, and thyroid functions were measured. Results CVDs were diagnosed in 472 (63.3%) patients. Vitamin D deficiency was similarly prevalent in patients with (78.0%) and without (82.1%) CVD. The CVD group had significantly higher mean PTH concentrations (7.6 vs 6.0 pmol/L, P < 0.001), a higher prevalence of secondary hyperparathyroidism (SPTH) (PTH > 6.8 pmol/L, 43.0% vs 23.3%, P < 0.001), and excess bone resorption (urinary deoxypyridinoline corrected by creatinine [DPD/Cr] > 7.5 nmol/μmol, 87.9% vs 74.8%, P < 0.001). In multivariate regression analysis, SHPT (odds ratio [OR] 2.6, P = 0.007) and high DPD/Cr (OR 2.8, P = 0.016) were independent indictors of CVD. Compared to those with both PTH and DPD/Cr in the normal range, multivariate-adjusted ORs for the presence of CVD were 17.3 (P = 0.004) in subjects with SHPT and 9.7 (P < 0.001) in patients with high DPD/Cr. CVD was an independent predicator of SHPT (OR 2.8, P = 0.007) and excess DPD/Cr (OR 2.5, P = 0.031). CVD was predictive of postoperative myocardial injury, while SHPT was also an independent predictor of prolonged hospital stay and in-hospital death. Conclusion SHPT and excess bone resorption are independent pathophysiological mediators underlying the bidirectional associations between CVD and hip fracture, and therefore are important diagnostic and therapeutic targets. PMID:23460043

  5. Role of abnormal lipid metabolism in development, progression, diagnosis and therapy of pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Swierczynski, Julian; Hebanowska, Areta; Sledzinski, Tomasz

    2014-01-01

    There is growing evidence that metabolic alterations play an important role in cancer development and progression. The metabolism of cancer cells is reprogrammed in order to support their rapid proliferation. Elevated fatty acid synthesis is one of the most important aberrations of cancer cell metabolism. An enhancement of fatty acids synthesis is required both for carcinogenesis and cancer cell survival, as inhibition of key lipogenic enzymes slows down the growth of tumor cells and impairs their survival. Based on the data that serum fatty acid synthase (FASN), also known as oncoantigen 519, is elevated in patients with certain types of cancer, its serum level was proposed as a marker of neoplasia. This review aims to demonstrate the changes in lipid metabolism and other metabolic processes associated with lipid metabolism in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), the most common pancreatic neoplasm, characterized by high mortality. We also addressed the influence of some oncogenic factors and tumor suppressors on pancreatic cancer cell metabolism. Additionally the review discusses the potential role of elevated lipid synthesis in diagnosis and treatment of pancreatic cancer. In particular, FASN is a viable candidate for indicator of pathologic state, marker of neoplasia, as well as, pharmacological treatment target in pancreatic cancer. Recent research showed that, in addition to lipogenesis, certain cancer cells can use fatty acids from circulation, derived from diet (chylomicrons), synthesized in liver, or released from adipose tissue for their growth. Thus, the interactions between de novo lipogenesis and uptake of fatty acids from circulation by PDAC cells require further investigation. PMID:24605027

  6. TRPV4 deficiency causes sexual dimorphism in bone metabolism and osteoporotic fracture risk.

    PubMed

    van der Eerden, B C J; Oei, L; Roschger, P; Fratzl-Zelman, N; Hoenderop, J G J; van Schoor, N M; Pettersson-Kymmer, U; Schreuders-Koedam, M; Uitterlinden, A G; Hofman, A; Suzuki, M; Klaushofer, K; Ohlsson, C; Lips, P J A; Rivadeneira, F; Bindels, R J M; van Leeuwen, J P T M

    2013-12-01

    We explored the role of transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) in murine bone metabolism and association of TRPV4 gene variants with fractures in humans. Urinary and histomorphometrical analyses demonstrated reduced osteoclast activity and numbers in male Trpv4(-/-) mice, which was confirmed in bone marrow-derived osteoclast cultures. Osteoblasts and bone formation as shown by serum procollagen type 1 amino-terminal propeptide and histomorphometry, including osteoid surface, osteoblast and osteocyte numbers were not affected in vivo. Nevertheless, osteoblast differentiation was enhanced in Trpv4(-/-) bone marrow cultures. Cortical and trabecular bone mass was 20% increased in male Trpv4(-/-) mice, compared to sex-matched wild type (Trpv4(+/+)) mice. However, at the same time intracortical porosity was increased and bone matrix mineralization was reduced. Together, these lead to a maximum load, stiffness and work to failure of the femoral bone, which were not different compared to Trpv4(+/+) mice, while the bone material was less resistant to stress and less elastic. The differential impacts on these determinants of bone strength were likely responsible for the lack of any changes in whole bone strength in the Trpv4(-/-) mice. None of these skeletal parameters were affected in female Trpv4(-/-) mice. The T-allele of rs1861809 SNP in the TRPV4 locus was associated with a 30% increased risk (95% CI: 1.1-1.6; p=0.013) for non-vertebral fracture risk in men, but not in women, in the Rotterdam Study. Meta-analyses with the population-based LASA study confirmed the association with non-vertebral fractures in men. This was lost when the non-population-based studies Mr. OS and UFO were included. In conclusion, TRPV4 is a male-specific regulator of bone metabolism, a determinant of bone strength, and a potential risk predictor for fractures through regulation of bone matrix mineralization and intra-cortical porosity. This identifies TRPV4 as a unique sexually

  7. TRPV4 deficiency causes sexual dimorphism in bone metabolism and osteoporotic fracture risk.

    PubMed

    van der Eerden, B C J; Oei, L; Roschger, P; Fratzl-Zelman, N; Hoenderop, J G J; van Schoor, N M; Pettersson-Kymmer, U; Schreuders-Koedam, M; Uitterlinden, A G; Hofman, A; Suzuki, M; Klaushofer, K; Ohlsson, C; Lips, P J A; Rivadeneira, F; Bindels, R J M; van Leeuwen, J P T M

    2013-12-01

    We explored the role of transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) in murine bone metabolism and association of TRPV4 gene variants with fractures in humans. Urinary and histomorphometrical analyses demonstrated reduced osteoclast activity and numbers in male Trpv4(-/-) mice, which was confirmed in bone marrow-derived osteoclast cultures. Osteoblasts and bone formation as shown by serum procollagen type 1 amino-terminal propeptide and histomorphometry, including osteoid surface, osteoblast and osteocyte numbers were not affected in vivo. Nevertheless, osteoblast differentiation was enhanced in Trpv4(-/-) bone marrow cultures. Cortical and trabecular bone mass was 20% increased in male Trpv4(-/-) mice, compared to sex-matched wild type (Trpv4(+/+)) mice. However, at the same time intracortical porosity was increased and bone matrix mineralization was reduced. Together, these lead to a maximum load, stiffness and work to failure of the femoral bone, which were not different compared to Trpv4(+/+) mice, while the bone material was less resistant to stress and less elastic. The differential impacts on these determinants of bone strength were likely responsible for the lack of any changes in whole bone strength in the Trpv4(-/-) mice. None of these skeletal parameters were affected in female Trpv4(-/-) mice. The T-allele of rs1861809 SNP in the TRPV4 locus was associated with a 30% increased risk (95% CI: 1.1-1.6; p=0.013) for non-vertebral fracture risk in men, but not in women, in the Rotterdam Study. Meta-analyses with the population-based LASA study confirmed the association with non-vertebral fractures in men. This was lost when the non-population-based studies Mr. OS and UFO were included. In conclusion, TRPV4 is a male-specific regulator of bone metabolism, a determinant of bone strength, and a potential risk predictor for fractures through regulation of bone matrix mineralization and intra-cortical porosity. This identifies TRPV4 as a unique sexually

  8. Abnormal vitamin K metabolism in the presence of normal clotting factor activity in factory workers exposed to 4-hydroxycoumarins.

    PubMed

    Park, B K; Choonara, I A; Haynes, B P; Breckenridge, A M; Malia, R G; Preston, F E

    1986-03-01

    The case histories of two patients exposed to the novel anticoagulants brodifacoum and difenacoum are reported. Abnormal vitamin K1 metabolism, as indicated by elevated vitamin K1 2,3-epoxide plasma concentrations after i.v. administration of vitamin K1, could be detected for more than 18 months after exposure to the anticoagulants. There was a marked prolongation of prothrombin time (greater than 50 s) in both cases, at the time of exposure. However, subsequent haematological investigations (prothrombin time and vitamin K-dependent clotting factor activity) have been shown to be normal in both cases for at least 18 months. These cases confirm the long-acting nature of brodifacoum and difenacoum and present an apparent dissociation between the effect of coumarin anticoagulants on vitamin K1 metabolism and clotting factor activity. PMID:3964529

  9. Abnormal vitamin K metabolism in the presence of normal clotting factor activity in factory workers exposed to 4-hydroxycoumarins.

    PubMed Central

    Park, B K; Choonara, I A; Haynes, B P; Breckenridge, A M; Malia, R G; Preston, F E

    1986-01-01

    The case histories of two patients exposed to the novel anticoagulants brodifacoum and difenacoum are reported. Abnormal vitamin K1 metabolism, as indicated by elevated vitamin K1 2,3-epoxide plasma concentrations after i.v. administration of vitamin K1, could be detected for more than 18 months after exposure to the anticoagulants. There was a marked prolongation of prothrombin time (greater than 50 s) in both cases, at the time of exposure. However, subsequent haematological investigations (prothrombin time and vitamin K-dependent clotting factor activity) have been shown to be normal in both cases for at least 18 months. These cases confirm the long-acting nature of brodifacoum and difenacoum and present an apparent dissociation between the effect of coumarin anticoagulants on vitamin K1 metabolism and clotting factor activity. PMID:3964529

  10. Effect of fasting versus feeding on the bone metabolic response to running.

    PubMed

    Scott, Jonathan P R; Sale, Craig; Greeves, Julie P; Casey, Anna; Dutton, John; Fraser, William D

    2012-12-01

    Individuals often perform exercise in the fasted state, but the effects on bone metabolism are not currently known. We compared the effect of an overnight fast with feeding a mixed meal on the bone metabolic response to treadmill running. Ten, physically-active males aged 28 ± 4y (mean ±SD) completed two, counterbalanced, 8d trials. After 3d on a standardised diet, participants performed 60 min of treadmill running at 65% VO(2max) on Day 4 following an overnight fast (FAST) or a standardised breakfast (FED). Blood samples were collected at baseline, before and during exercise, for 3h after exercise, and on four consecutive follow-up days (FU1-FU4). Plasma/serum were analysed for the c-terminal telopeptide region of collagen type 1 (β-CTX), n-terminal propeptides of procollagen type 1 (P1NP), osteocalcin (OC), bone alkaline phosphatase (bone ALP), parathyroid hormone (PTH), albumin-adjusted calcium, phosphate, osteoprotegerin (OPG), cortisol, leptin and ghrelin. Only the β-CTX response was significantly affected by feeding. Pre-exercise concentrations decreased more in FED compared with FAST (47% vs 26%, P<0.001) but increased during exercise in both groups and were not significantly different from baseline at 1h post-exercise. At 3h post-exercise, concentrations were decreased (33%, P<0.001) from baseline in FAST and significantly lower (P<0.001) than in FED. P1NP and PTH increased, and OC decreased during exercise. Bone markers were not significantly different from baseline on FU1-FU4. Fasting had only a minor effect on the bone metabolic response to subsequent acute, endurance exercise, reducing the duration of the increase in β-CTX during early recovery, but having no effect on changes in bone formation markers. The reduced duration of the β-CTX response with fasting was not fully explained by changes in PTH, OPG, leptin or ghrelin. PMID:22960044

  11. Germinated Pigmented Rice (Oryza Sativa L. cv. Superhongmi) Improves Glucose and Bone Metabolisms in Ovariectomized Rats

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Soo Im; Ryu, Su Noh; Kang, Mi Young

    2016-01-01

    The effect of germinated Superhongmi, a reddish brown pigmented rice cultivar, on the glucose profile and bone turnover in the postmenopausal-like model of ovariectomized rats was determined. The ovariectomized Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into three dietary groups (n = 10): normal control diet (NC) and normal diet supplemented with non-germinated Superhongmi (SH) or germinated Superhongmi (GSH) rice powder. After eight weeks, the SH and GSH groups showed significantly lower body weight, glucose and insulin concentrations, levels of bone resorption markers and higher glycogen and 17-β-estradiol contents than the NC group. The glucose metabolism improved through modulation of adipokine production and glucose-regulating enzyme activities. The GSH rats exhibited a greater hypoglycemic effect and lower bone resorption than SH rats. These results demonstrate that germinated Superhongmi rice may potentially be useful in the prevention and management of postmenopausal hyperglycemia and bone turnover imbalance. PMID:27775654

  12. Bone cells, sclerostin, and FGF23: what's bred in the bone will come out in the flesh.

    PubMed

    Ott, Susan M

    2015-03-01

    Bone metabolism is linked to systemic diseases, and new research shows that the bone cells have endocrine functions that affect multiple organs. They secrete sclerostin, FGF23, prostaglandins, and osteocalcin. Pereira et al. examined gene expression of cells grown from bone biopsies of adolescents with renal osteodystrophy, as a first step to understanding how the bone-cell abnormalities contribute to cardiovascular and metabolic problems in these patients. PMID:25723633

  13. Bone and Glucose Metabolism: A Two-Way Street

    PubMed Central

    Motyl, Katherine J.; McCabe, Laura R.; Schwartz, Ann V.

    2010-01-01

    Evidence from rodent models indicates that undercarboxylated osteocalcin (ucOC), a product of osteoblasts, is a hormone affecting insulin production by the pancreas and insulin sensitivity in peripheral tissues, at least in part through enhanced secretion of adiponectin from adipocytes. Clinical research to test whether this relationship is found in humans is just beginning to emerge. Cross-sectional studies confirm associations between total osteocalcin (OC), ucOC and glucose metabolism but cannot distinguish causality. To date, longitudinal studies have not provided a consistent picture of the effects of ucOC or OC on fasting glucose and insulin sensitivity. Further exploration into the physiological and mechanistic effects of ucOC and OC, in rodent models and clinical studies, is necessary to determine to what extent the skeleton regulates energy metabolism in humans. PMID:20682281

  14. Dietary antioxidants: Do they have a role to play in the ongoing fight against abnormal glucose metabolism?

    PubMed

    Avignon, Antoine; Hokayem, Marie; Bisbal, Catherine; Lambert, Karen

    2012-07-01

    Overfeeding, an increased intake of saturated fatty acids, and sugary foods are key dietary changes that have occurred in recent decades in addition to the emergence of the obesity epidemic. In addition to an increase in energy storage as fat, these dietary changes are accompanied by an increase in mitochondrial macronutrient oxidation, leading to an excessive free radical production and, hence, oxidative stress. The latter has long been considered a central mechanism linking nutrient overload, insulin resistance, the metabolic syndrome, and diabetes. However, food, through fruit and vegetable consumption, also can be a great source of antioxidants that protect the body against oxidative damage and insulin resistance and thus help cope with the metabolic backlash of the energy-dense Westernized diet. Experimental data are in favor of the beneficial role conveyed by antioxidants in glucose metabolism, but clinical data in humans remain controversial. This review therefore aimed to sort out any underlying discrepancies and provide an overall clear view of the role of antioxidants in the ongoing fight against abnormal glucose metabolism.

  15. Nutritional and metabolic correlates of cardiovascular and bone disease in HIV-infected patients1234

    PubMed Central

    Fitch, Kathleen

    2011-01-01

    The treatment of HIV infection has dramatically reduced the incidence of AIDS-related illnesses. At the same time, non-AIDS-related illnesses such as cardiovascular and bone disease are becoming more prevalent in this population. The mechanisms of these illnesses are complex and are related in part to the HIV virus, antiretroviral medications prescribed for HIV infection, traditional risk factors exacerbated by HIV, and lifestyle and nutritional factors. Further prospective research is needed to clarify the mechanisms by which HIV, antiretroviral medications, and nutritional abnormalities contribute to bone and cardiovascular disease in the HIV population. Increasingly, it is being recognized that optimizing the treatment of HIV infection to improve immune function and reduce viral load may also benefit the development of non-AIDS-related illnesses such as cardiovascular and bone disease. PMID:22089442

  16. Nutritional and metabolic correlates of cardiovascular and bone disease in HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Fitch, Kathleen; Grinspoon, Steven

    2011-12-01

    The treatment of HIV infection has dramatically reduced the incidence of AIDS-related illnesses. At the same time, non-AIDS-related illnesses such as cardiovascular and bone disease are becoming more prevalent in this population. The mechanisms of these illnesses are complex and are related in part to the HIV virus, antiretroviral medications prescribed for HIV infection, traditional risk factors exacerbated by HIV, and lifestyle and nutritional factors. Further prospective research is needed to clarify the mechanisms by which HIV, antiretroviral medications, and nutritional abnormalities contribute to bone and cardiovascular disease in the HIV population. Increasingly, it is being recognized that optimizing the treatment of HIV infection to improve immune function and reduce viral load may also benefit the development of non-AIDS-related illnesses such as cardiovascular and bone disease.

  17. Holoprosencephaly in RSH/Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome: Does abnormal cholesterol metabolism affect the function of sonic hedgehog?

    SciTech Connect

    Kelley, R.I.; Roessler, E.; Muenke, M.

    1996-12-30

    The RAH/Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome (RAH/SLOS) is an autosomal recessive malformation syndrome associated with increased levels of 7-dehydrocholesterol (7-DHC) and a defect of cholesterol biosynthesis at the level of 3{beta}-hydroxy-steroid-{Delta}{sup 7}-reductase (7-DHC reductase). Because rats exposed to inhibitors of 7-DHC reductase during development have a high frequency of holoprosencephaly (HPE), we have undertaken a search for biochemical evidence of RSH/SLOS and other possible defects of sterol metabolism among patients with various forms of HPE. We describe 4 patients, one with semilobar HPE and three others with less complete forms of the HPE sequence, in whom we have made a biochemical diagnosis of RAH/SLOS. The clinical and biochemical spectrum of these and other patients with RAH/SLOS suggests a role of abnormal sterol metabolism in the pathogenesis of their malformations. The association of HPE and RAH/SLOS is discussed in light of the recent discoveries that mutations in the embryonic patterning gene, Sonic Hedgehog (SHH), can cause HPE in humans and that the sonic hedgehog protein product undergoes autoproteolysis to form a cholesterol-modified active product. These clinical, biochemical, and molecular studies suggest that HPE and other malformations in SLOS may be caused by incomplete or abnormal modification of the sonic hedgehog protein and, possibly, other patterning proteins of the hedgehog class, a hypothesis testable in somatic cell systems. 37 refs., 1 fig.

  18. Endocrine dysfunction in anorexia nervosa and bulimia: comparison with abnormalities in other psychiatric disorders and disturbances due to metabolic factors.

    PubMed

    Hudson, J I; Hudson, M S

    1984-01-01

    The eating disorders of anorexia nervosa and bulimia are associated with marked disturbances in endocrine function. Studies of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal,-thyroid, and -ovarian axes are reviewed, in order to ascertain whether and to what extent alteration in endocrine response is the consequence of abnormal eating, or whether the endocrine abnormalities are primary. Many, if not all, of the disturbances which have been documented can be accounted for the metabolic consequences of disturbed eating behavior, including especially the effects of weight loss. However, it is possible that primary hypothalamic dysfunction may account for or contribute to the following abnormalities: hypercortisolism, blunted TSH response to TRH, and hypogonadism. Given the possibility that primary hypothalamic disturbances are present, the specificity of these disturbances with respect to eating disorders as opposed to other psychiatric disorders, is investigated. It is concluded that, with the possible exception of alterations in the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis, such disturbances appear not to be specific to eating disorders; rather, they are also present in other psychiatric disorders. In particular, the data reviewed are consistent with the hypothesis that the eating disorders have psychobiological features in common with major affective disorder.

  19. Association of neural tube defects in children of mothers with MTHFR 677TT genotype and abnormal carbohydrate metabolism risk: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Cadenas-Benitez, N M; Yanes-Sosa, F; Gonzalez-Meneses, A; Cerrillos, L; Acosta, D; Praena-Fernandez, J M; Neth, O; Gomez de Terreros, I; Ybot-González, P

    2014-03-26

    Abnormalities in maternal folate and carbohydrate metabolism have both been shown to induce neural tube defects (NTD) in humans and animal models. However, the relationship between these two factors in the development of NTDs remains unclear. Data from mothers of children with spina bifida seen at the Unidad de Espina Bífida del Hospital Infantil Virgen del Rocío (case group) were compared to mothers of healthy children with no NTD (control group) who were randomly selected from patients seen at the outpatient ward in the same hospital. There were 25 individuals in the case group and 41 in the control group. Analysis of genotypes for the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) 677CT polymorphism in women with or without risk factors for abnormal carbohydrate metabolism revealed that mothers who were homozygous for the MTHFR 677TT polymorphism and at risk of abnormal carbohydrate metabolism were more likely to have offspring with spina bifida and high levels of homocysteine, compared to the control group. The increased incidence of NTDs in mothers homozygous for the MTHFR 677TT polymorphism and at risk of abnormal carbohydrate metabolism stresses the need for careful metabolic screening in pregnant women, and, if necessary, determination of the MTHFR 677CT genotype in those mothers at risk of developing abnormal carbohydrate metabolism.

  20. Dolomite supplementation improves bone metabolism through modulation of calcium-regulating hormone secretion in ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Mizoguchi, Toshihide; Nagasawa, Sakae; Takahashi, Naoyuki; Yagasaki, Hiroshi; Ito, Michio

    2005-01-01

    Dolomite, a mineral composed of calcium magnesium carbonate (CaMg (CO3)2), is used as a food supplement that supplies calcium and magnesium. However, the effect of magnesium supplementation on bone metabolism in patients with osteoporosis is a matter of controversy. We examined the effects of daily supplementation with dolomite on calcium metabolism in ovariectomized (OVX) rats. Dolomite was administered daily to OVX rats for 9 weeks. The same amount of magnesium chloride as that supplied by the dolomite was given to OVX rats as a positive control. Histological examination revealed that ovariectomy decreased trabecular bone and increased adipose tissues in the femoral metaphysis. Dolomite or magnesium supplementation failed to improve these bone histological features. Calcium content in the femora was decreased in OVX rats. Neither calcium nor magnesium content in the femora in OVX rats was significantly increased by dolomite or magnesium administration. Urinary deoxypyridinoline excretion was significantly increased in OVX rats, and was not affected by the magnesium supplementation. Serum concentrations of magnesium were increased, and those of calcium were decreased, in OVX rats supplemented with dolomite or magnesium. However, there was a tendency toward decreased parathyroid hormone secretion and increased calcitonin secretion in OVX rats supplemented with dolomite or magnesium. Serum 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) and osteocalcin levels were significantly increased in the supplemented OVX rats. These results suggest that increased magnesium intake improves calcium metabolism in favor of increasing bone formation, through the modulation of calcium-regulating hormone secretion.

  1. Dolomite supplementation improves bone metabolism through modulation of calcium-regulating hormone secretion in ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Mizoguchi, Toshihide; Nagasawa, Sakae; Takahashi, Naoyuki; Yagasaki, Hiroshi; Ito, Michio

    2005-01-01

    Dolomite, a mineral composed of calcium magnesium carbonate (CaMg (CO3)2), is used as a food supplement that supplies calcium and magnesium. However, the effect of magnesium supplementation on bone metabolism in patients with osteoporosis is a matter of controversy. We examined the effects of daily supplementation with dolomite on calcium metabolism in ovariectomized (OVX) rats. Dolomite was administered daily to OVX rats for 9 weeks. The same amount of magnesium chloride as that supplied by the dolomite was given to OVX rats as a positive control. Histological examination revealed that ovariectomy decreased trabecular bone and increased adipose tissues in the femoral metaphysis. Dolomite or magnesium supplementation failed to improve these bone histological features. Calcium content in the femora was decreased in OVX rats. Neither calcium nor magnesium content in the femora in OVX rats was significantly increased by dolomite or magnesium administration. Urinary deoxypyridinoline excretion was significantly increased in OVX rats, and was not affected by the magnesium supplementation. Serum concentrations of magnesium were increased, and those of calcium were decreased, in OVX rats supplemented with dolomite or magnesium. However, there was a tendency toward decreased parathyroid hormone secretion and increased calcitonin secretion in OVX rats supplemented with dolomite or magnesium. Serum 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) and osteocalcin levels were significantly increased in the supplemented OVX rats. These results suggest that increased magnesium intake improves calcium metabolism in favor of increasing bone formation, through the modulation of calcium-regulating hormone secretion. PMID:15750692

  2. Regulation of heme metabolism in normal and sideroblastic bone marrow cells in culture

    SciTech Connect

    Ibraham, N.G.; Lutton, J.D.; Hoffman, R.; Levere, R.D.

    1985-05-01

    Heme metabolism was examined in developing in vitro erythroid colonies (CFUE) and in bone marrow samples taken directly from four normal donors and four patients with sideroblastic anemia. Maximum activities of delta-aminolevulinic acid synthase (ALAS), ALA dehydratase (ALAD), and /sup 14/C-ALA incorporation into heme were achieved in normal marrow CFUE after 8 days of culture, whereas heme oxygenase progressively decreased to low levels of activity during the same period. Assays on nucleated bone marrow cells taken directly from patients revealed that ALAS activity was considerably reduced in idiopathic sideroblastic anemia (IASA) and X-linked sideroblastic anemia (X-SA) bone marrow specimens, whereas the activity increased more than twofold (normal levels) when cells were assayed from 8-day CFUE. In all cases, ALAD activity appeared to be within normal levels. Measurement of heme synthesis revealed that normal levels of /sup 14/C-ALA incorporation into heme were achieved in IASA cells but were reduced in X-SA cells. In marked contrast to levels in normal cells, heme oxygenase was found to be significantly elevated (two- to fourfold) in bone marrow cells taken directly from patients with IASA and X-SA. Results from this study demonstrate that IASA and X-SA bone marrow cells have disturbances in ALAS and heme metabolism, and that erythropoiesis (CFUE) can be restored to normal levels when cells are cultured in methylcellulose.

  3. Mineral metabolism in isolated mouse long bones: Opposite effects of microgravity on mineralization and resorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veldhuijzen, Jean Paul; Vanloon, Jack J. W. A.

    1994-01-01

    An experiment using isolated skeletal tissues under microgravity, is reported. Fetal mouse long bones (metatarsals) were cultured for 4 days in the Biorack facility of Spacelab during the IML-1 (International Microgravity Laboratory) mission of the Space Shuttle. Overall growth was not affected, however glucose consumption was significantly reduced under microgravity. Mineralization of the diaphysis was also strongly reduced under microgravity as compared to the on-board 1 g group. In contrast, mineral resorption by osteoclasts was signficantly increased. These results indicate that these fetal mouse long bones are a sensitive and useful model to further study the cellular mechanisms involved in the changed mineral metabolism of skeletal tissues under microgravity.

  4. Aerobic plus resistance training improves bone metabolism and inflammation in adolescents who are obese.

    PubMed

    Campos, Raquel M S; de Mello, Marco T; Tock, Lian; Silva, Patrícia L; Masquio, Deborah C L; de Piano, Aline; Sanches, Priscila L; Carnier, June; Corgosinho, Flávia C; Foschini, Denis; Tufik, Sergio; Dâmaso, Ana R

    2014-03-01

    Obesity is a worldwide epidemic with a high prevalence of comorbidities, including alterations in bone mineral metabolism. The purpose of this yearlong study was to evaluate the role of 2 types of exercise training (aerobic and aerobic plus resistance exercise) on adipokines parameters and bone metabolism in adolescents who are obese. This was a clinical trial study with interdisciplinary weight loss therapy. Forty-two postpubertal adolescents who are obese were subjected to interdisciplinary weight loss therapy with physical exercise, medical monitoring, nutritional intervention, and psychological intervention. Data were collected from serum analyses of leptin, ghrelin, adiponectin, glucose, and insulin. Anthropometric measurements of body composition, bone mineral density, visceral, and subcutaneous fat were also performed. Statistical tests were applied using repeated-measures analysis of variance. Correlations were established using the Pearson test, and dependencies of variables were established using simple linear regression test. Both training types promoted reductions in body mass index, total central, visceral and subcutaneous fat, insulin concentration, and homeostasis model assessment insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) index, but only aerobic plus resistance training showed statistical improvements in the bone mineral content, adiponectin concentration, and lean tissue. Effective reduction in the visceral/subcutaneous ratio, central/peripheral ratio, and leptin concentration was observed. Insulin and the HOMA-IR index were negative predictors of bone mineral content in the combined training group. Moreover, fat distribution was a negative predictor for bone mineral density in both groups. Aerobic plus resistance training promotes a protective role in bone mineral content associated with an improvement in adiponectin and leptin concentrations, favoring the control of the inflammatory state related to obesity in adolescents. Aerobic plus resistance training

  5. Metabolic and structural bone disturbances induced by hyperlipidic diet in mice treated with simvastatin

    PubMed Central

    Soares, Evelise Aline; Novaes, Rômulo Dias; Nakagaki, Wilson Romero; Fernandes, Geraldo José Medeiros; Garcia, José Antônio Dias; Camilli, José Angelo

    2015-01-01

    Simvastatin can modulate lipid and bone metabolism. However, information related to the interaction between diet and simvastatin on bone structure and biomechanics is scarce. Thus, this study evaluated the effects of simvastatin on femoral biomechanics and cortical/trabecular bone structure in wild-type mice nourished with a hyperlipidic diet. Three-month-old male wild-type mice (C57BL6 strain) were divided into four groups: (1) group W, nourished with a standard diet; (2) group WH, fed a hyperlipidic diet; (3) group WS, nourished with a standard diet plus oral simvastatin (20 mg/kg/day); and (4) group WHS, fed a hyperlipidic diet plus oral simvastatin (20 mg/kg/day). All animals received only their specific diet and water for 60 days. Blood samples were collected for the analysis of calcium, triglycerides, total cholesterol (TC) and fraction serum levels. Diet manipulation was able to induce a dyslipidaemic status in mice, characterized by triglyceride and TC rise in WH animals. Simvastatin prevented hypercholesterolaemia and reduced TC and LDL serum levels, but did not prevent hypertriglyceridaemia and HDL serum levels in the WHS group. In the WH mice the hyperlipidaemia was associated with reduction in trabecular bone thickness, femur structural and material property alterations. Simvastatin prevented these morphological alterations and minimized femur biomechanical changes in WHS mice. Taken together, the results indicated that the hyperlipidic diet intake acts as a risk factor for bone integrity, generating bones with reduced resistance and more susceptible to fractures, an effect attenuated by simvastatin that is potentially related to the modulatory action of this drug on lipid and bone metabolism. PMID:26175225

  6. Aerobic plus resistance training improves bone metabolism and inflammation in adolescents who are obese.

    PubMed

    Campos, Raquel M S; de Mello, Marco T; Tock, Lian; Silva, Patrícia L; Masquio, Deborah C L; de Piano, Aline; Sanches, Priscila L; Carnier, June; Corgosinho, Flávia C; Foschini, Denis; Tufik, Sergio; Dâmaso, Ana R

    2014-03-01

    Obesity is a worldwide epidemic with a high prevalence of comorbidities, including alterations in bone mineral metabolism. The purpose of this yearlong study was to evaluate the role of 2 types of exercise training (aerobic and aerobic plus resistance exercise) on adipokines parameters and bone metabolism in adolescents who are obese. This was a clinical trial study with interdisciplinary weight loss therapy. Forty-two postpubertal adolescents who are obese were subjected to interdisciplinary weight loss therapy with physical exercise, medical monitoring, nutritional intervention, and psychological intervention. Data were collected from serum analyses of leptin, ghrelin, adiponectin, glucose, and insulin. Anthropometric measurements of body composition, bone mineral density, visceral, and subcutaneous fat were also performed. Statistical tests were applied using repeated-measures analysis of variance. Correlations were established using the Pearson test, and dependencies of variables were established using simple linear regression test. Both training types promoted reductions in body mass index, total central, visceral and subcutaneous fat, insulin concentration, and homeostasis model assessment insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) index, but only aerobic plus resistance training showed statistical improvements in the bone mineral content, adiponectin concentration, and lean tissue. Effective reduction in the visceral/subcutaneous ratio, central/peripheral ratio, and leptin concentration was observed. Insulin and the HOMA-IR index were negative predictors of bone mineral content in the combined training group. Moreover, fat distribution was a negative predictor for bone mineral density in both groups. Aerobic plus resistance training promotes a protective role in bone mineral content associated with an improvement in adiponectin and leptin concentrations, favoring the control of the inflammatory state related to obesity in adolescents. Aerobic plus resistance training

  7. Metabolic and structural bone disturbances induced by hyperlipidic diet in mice treated with simvastatin.

    PubMed

    Soares, Evelise Aline; Novaes, Rômulo Dias; Nakagaki, Wilson Romero; Fernandes, Geraldo José Medeiros; Garcia, José Antônio Dias; Camilli, José Angelo

    2015-08-01

    Simvastatin can modulate lipid and bone metabolism. However, information related to the interaction between diet and simvastatin on bone structure and biomechanics is scarce. Thus, this study evaluated the effects of simvastatin on femoral biomechanics and cortical/trabecular bone structure in wild-type mice nourished with a hyperlipidic diet. Three-month-old male wild-type mice (C57BL6 strain) were divided into four groups: (1) group W, nourished with a standard diet; (2) group WH, fed a hyperlipidic diet; (3) group WS, nourished with a standard diet plus oral simvastatin (20 mg/kg/day); and (4) group WHS, fed a hyperlipidic diet plus oral simvastatin (20 mg/kg/day). All animals received only their specific diet and water for 60 days. Blood samples were collected for the analysis of calcium, triglycerides, total cholesterol (TC) and fraction serum levels. Diet manipulation was able to induce a dyslipidaemic status in mice, characterized by triglyceride and TC rise in WH animals. Simvastatin prevented hypercholesterolaemia and reduced TC and LDL serum levels, but did not prevent hypertriglyceridaemia and HDL serum levels in the WHS group. In the WH mice the hyperlipidaemia was associated with reduction in trabecular bone thickness, femur structural and material property alterations. Simvastatin prevented these morphological alterations and minimized femur biomechanical changes in WHS mice. Taken together, the results indicated that the hyperlipidic diet intake acts as a risk factor for bone integrity, generating bones with reduced resistance and more susceptible to fractures, an effect attenuated by simvastatin that is potentially related to the modulatory action of this drug on lipid and bone metabolism.

  8. Assessment of metabolic bone diseases by quantitative computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, M.L.; Genant, H.K.; Cann, C.E.; Ettinger, B.; Gordan, G.S.; Kolb, F.O.; Reiser, U.J.

    1985-05-01

    Advances in the radiologic sciences have permitted the development of numerous noninvasive techniques for measuring the mineral content of bone, with varying degrees of precision, accuracy, and sensitivity. The techniques of standard radiography, radiogrammetry, photodensitometry, Compton scattering, neutron activation analysis, single and dual photon absorptiometry, and quantitative computed tomography (QCT) are described and reviewed in depth. Results from previous cross-sectional and longitudinal QCT investigations are given. They then describe a current investigation in which they studied 269 subjects, including 173 normal women, 34 patients with hyperparathyroidism, 24 patients with steroid- induced osteoporosis, and 38 men with idiopathic osteoporosis. Spinal quantitative computed tomography, radiogrammetry, and single photon absorptiometry were performed, and a spinal fracture index was calculated on all patients. The authors found a disproportionate loss of spinal trabecular mineral compared to appendicular mineral in the men with idiopathic osteoporosis and the patients with steroid-induced osteoporosis. They observed roughly equivalent mineral loss in both the appendicular and axial regions in the hyperparathyroid patients. The appendicular cortical measurements correlated moderately well with each other but less well with spinal trabecular QCT. The spinal fracture index correlated well with QCT and less well with the appendicular measurements.

  9. Assessment of the serum levels of bone alkaline phosphatase with a new immunoradiometric assay in patients with metabolic bone disease

    SciTech Connect

    Garnero, P.; Delmas, P.D.

    1993-10-01

    The authors measured serum bone alkaline phosphatase (B-ALP) with a new immunoradiometric assay (IRMA) in a large sample of healthy controls comprising 173 women and 180 men, 20-88 yr of age, and in patients with metabolic bone disease. Using serum samples from patients with liver disease and patients with Paget's disease with elevated total alkaline phosphatase (T-ALP) as a source of, respectively, liver and bone isoenyzmes, they determined a liver cross-reactivity of the IRMA of 16% that was confirmed by electrophoresis of the circulating alkaline phosphatase isoenzymes. The IRMA was linear for serial sample dilutions, the recovery ranged from 89-110%, and the intra- and interassay variations were below 7% and 9%, respectively. B-ALP increased linearly with age in both sexes, and the mean B-ALP serum levels were not significantly different for women and men (11.3 [+-] 4.8 ng/mL for women; 11.0 [+-] 4.0 ng/mL for men). The increase in B-ALP after the menopause was significantly higher than that in T-ALP (+77% vs. +24%; P<0.001). When the values of postmenopausal women were expressed as the SD from the mean of premenopausal women, the mean Z scores were 2.2[+-] 1.8 for B-ALP and 0.9 [+-] 1.3 for T-ALP (P<0.001 between the two).

  10. Effects of the combination of vitamin K and teriparatide on the bone metabolism in ovariectomized rats

    PubMed Central

    NAGURA, NANA; KOMATSU, JUN; IWASE, HIDEAKI; HOSODA, HIROSHI; OHBAYASHI, OSAMU; NAGAOKA, ISAO; KANEKO, KAZUO

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the combined effects of vitamin K (VK) and teriparatide (TPTD) on bone mineral density (BMD), mechanical strength and other parameters for bone metabolism using a rat ovariectomized osteoporosis model. Ovariectomized female Sprague-Dawley rats were administered with VK (an oral dose of 30 mg/kg/day), TPTD (a subcutaneous dose of 30 µg/kg, three times a week) or a combination for 8 weeks. Thereafter, serum levels of γ-carboxylated osteocalcin (Gla-OC) were quantitated by ELISA; BMD and mechanical strength were measured by computed tomography and biomechanical testing, respectively at the femoral metaphysis. Additionally, histomorphometry was performed using the toluidine blue-stained coronal sections of distal femur. The combination of VK and TPTD clearly increased the serum levels of Gla-OC (a specific marker for bone formation) and osteoblast surface (the number of osteoblasts attaching with the surface of cancellous bone), compared to VK or TPTD alone. In addition, the combination of the two agents improved the BMD and bone strength of the femur in the ovariectomized rats, compared to VK or TPTD alone. Taken together, these findings suggest that the treatment with VK and TPTD may have a therapeutic advantage over VK or TPTD monotherapy for postmenopausal osteoporosis, possibly by enhancing the bone formation through the actions on OC and osteoblasts. PMID:26137225

  11. Sex‐specific responses of bone metabolism and renal stone risk during bed rest

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Jennifer L. L.; Heer, Martina; Hargens, Alan R.; Macias, Brandon R.; Hudson, Edgar K.; Shackelford, Linda C.; Zwart, Sara R.; Smith, Scott M.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study was to directly assess sex differences in bone loss, bone biochemistry, and renal stone risk in bed rest. Bed rest simulates some spaceflight effects on human physiology and can be used to address the potential existence of sex‐specific effects on bone metabolism and renal stone risk in space. We combined data from the control subjects in five head‐down‐tilt bed rest studies (combined n = 50 men, 24 women) of differing durations (14–90 days). All subjects were healthy volunteers. Mean age was 35 ± 9 years for women and 33 ± 8 years for men. The main outcome measures were bone density and biochemistry, and renal stone risk chemistry. Before bed rest began, men had higher bone mineral density and content (P < 0.001), and excreted more biomarkers of bone resorption and calcium per day than did women (P < 0.05). These differences remained during bed rest. A number of urine chemistry analytes increased (e.g., calcium) or decreased (e.g., sodium, citrate, and urine volume) significantly for men and women during bed rest. These changes may predispose men to higher stone risk. Men and women do not have substantially different responses to the skeletal unloading of bed rest. PMID:25107989

  12. A systematic review and meta-analysis of bone metabolism in prostate adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Osteoporosis could be associated with the hormone therapy for metastatic prostate carcinoma (PCa) and with PCa per se. The objective of this review is to determine the incidence of bone loss and osteoporosis in patients with PCa who are or are not treated with hormone therapy (ADT). Methods The Medline, Embase, Cancerlit, and American Society of Clinical Oncology Abstract databases were searched for published studies on prostate cancer and bone metabolism. The outcomes assessed were: fracture, osteoporosis and osteopenia. Results Thirty-two articles (116,911 participants) were included in the meta-analysis. PCa patients under ADT had a higher risk of osteoporosis (RR, 1.30; p < 0.00001) and a higher risk of fractures (RR, 1.17; p < 0.00001) as compared to patients not under ADT. The total bone mineral density was lower in patients under ADT when compared with patients not under ADT (p = 0.031) but it was similar to bone mineral density found in healthy controls (p = 0.895). The time of androgen deprivation therapy correlated negatively with lumbar spine and total hip bone mineral density (Spearman's rho = -0.490 and -0.773; p = 0.028 and 0.001, respectively) and with total hip t score (Spearman's rho = -0.900; p = 0.037). Conclusion We found consistent evidence that the use of androgen deprivation therapy in patients with PCa reduces bone mineral density, increasing the risk of fractures in these patients. PMID:20482867

  13. Structural, Metabolic, and Functional Brain Abnormalities as a Result of Prenatal Exposure to Drugs of Abuse: Evidence from Neuroimaging

    PubMed Central

    Roussotte, Florence; Soderberg, Lindsay

    2010-01-01

    Prenatal exposure to alcohol and stimulants negatively affects the developing trajectory of the central nervous system in many ways. Recent advances in neuroimaging methods have allowed researchers to study the structural, metabolic, and functional abnormalities resulting from prenatal exposure to drugs of abuse in living human subjects. Here we review the neuroimaging literature of prenatal exposure to alcohol, cocaine, and methamphetamine. Neuroimaging studies of prenatal alcohol exposure have reported differences in the structure and metabolism of many brain systems, including in frontal, parietal, and temporal regions, in the cerebellum and basal ganglia, as well as in the white matter tracts that connect these brain regions. Functional imaging studies have identified significant differences in brain activation related to various cognitive domains as a result of prenatal alcohol exposure. The published literature of prenatal exposure to cocaine and methamphetamine is much smaller, but evidence is beginning to emerge suggesting that exposure to stimulant drugs in utero may be particularly toxic to dopamine-rich basal ganglia regions. Although the interpretation of such findings is somewhat limited by the problem of polysubstance abuse and by the difficulty of obtaining precise exposure histories in retrospective studies, such investigations provide important insights into the effects of drugs of abuse on the structure, function, and metabolism of the developing human brain. These insights may ultimately help clinicians develop better diagnostic tools and devise appropriate therapeutic interventions to improve the condition of children with prenatal exposure to drugs of abuse. PMID:20978945

  14. Molecular Differences in Hepatic Metabolism between AA Broiler and Big Bone Chickens: A Proteomic Study

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Guohua; Yue, Ying; Li, Jianke; Zhang, Shu; Cai, Huiyi; Yang, Aijun; Chen, Zhimin

    2016-01-01

    Identifying the metabolic differences in the livers of modern broilers and local chicken breeds is important for understanding their biological characteristics, and many proteomic changes in their livers are not well characterized. We therefore analyzed the hepatic protein profiles of a commercial breed, Arbor Acres (AA) broilers, and a local dual purpose breed, Big Bone chickens, using two-dimensional electrophoresis combined with liquid chromatography-chip/electrospray ionization-quadruple time-of-flight/mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). A total of 145 proteins were identified as having differential abundance in the two breeds at three growth stages. Among them, 49, 63 and 54 belonged to 2, 4, and 6 weeks of age, respectively. The higher abundance proteins in AA broilers were related to the energy production pathways suggesting enhanced energy metabolism and lipid biosynthesis. In contrast, the higher abundance proteins in Big Bone chickens showed enhanced lipid degradation, resulting in a reduction in the abdominal fat percentage. Along with the decrease in fat deposition, flavor substance synthesis in the meat of the Big Bone chickens may be improved by enhanced abundance of proteins involved in glycine metabolism. In addition, the identified proteins in nucleotide metabolism, antioxidants, cell structure, protein folding and transporters may be critically important for immune defense, gene transcription and other biological processes in the two breeds. These results indicate that selection pressure may have shaped the two lines differently resulting in different hepatic metabolic capacities and extensive metabolic differences in the liver. The results from this study may help provide the theoretical basis for chicken breeding. PMID:27760160

  15. Hydroxytyrosol prevents diet-induced metabolic syndrome and attenuates mitochondrial abnormalities in obese mice.

    PubMed

    Cao, Ke; Xu, Jie; Zou, Xuan; Li, Yuan; Chen, Cong; Zheng, Adi; Li, Hao; Li, Hua; Szeto, Ignatius Man-Yau; Shi, Yujie; Long, Jiangang; Liu, Jiankang; Feng, Zhihui

    2014-02-01

    A Mediterranean diet rich in olive oil has profound influence on health outcomes including metabolic syndrome. However, the active compound and detailed mechanisms still remain unclear. Hydroxytyrosol (HT), a major polyphenolic compound in virgin olive oil, has received increased attention for its antioxidative activity and regulation of mitochondrial function. Here, we investigated whether HT is the active compound in olive oil exerting a protective effect against metabolic syndrome. In this study, we show that HT could prevent high-fat-diet (HFD)-induced obesity, hyperglycemia, hyperlipidemia, and insulin resistance in C57BL/6J mice after 17 weeks supplementation. Within liver and skeletal muscle tissues, HT could decrease HFD-induced lipid deposits through inhibition of the SREBP-1c/FAS pathway, ameliorate HFD-induced oxidative stress by enhancing antioxidant enzyme activities, normalize expression of mitochondrial complex subunits and mitochondrial fission marker Drp1, and eventually inhibit apoptosis activation. Moreover, in muscle tissue, the levels of mitochondrial carbonyl protein were decreased and mitochondrial complex activities were significantly improved by HT supplementation. In db/db mice, HT significantly decreased fasting glucose, similar to metformin. Notably, HT decreased serum lipid, at which metformin failed. Also, HT was more effective at decreasing the oxidation levels of lipids and proteins in both liver and muscle tissue. Similar to the results in the HFD model, HT decreased muscle mitochondrial carbonyl protein levels and improved mitochondrial complex activities in db/db mice. Our study links the olive oil component HT to diabetes and metabolic disease through changes that are not limited to decreases in oxidative stress, suggesting a potential pharmaceutical or clinical use of HT in metabolic syndrome treatment.

  16. Assessment of metabolic bone diseases by quantitative computed tomography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, M. L.; Genant, H. K.; Cann, C. E.; Ettinger, B.; Gordan, G. S.; Kolb, F. O.; Reiser, U. J.

    1985-01-01

    Advances in the radiologic sciences have permitted the development of numerous noninvasive techniques for measuring the mineral content of bone, with varying degrees of precision, accuracy, and sensitivity. The techniques of standard radiography, radiogrammetry, photodensitometry, Compton scattering, neutron activation analysis, single and dual photon absorptiometry, and quantitative computed tomography (QCT) are described and reviewed in depth. Results from previous cross-sectional and longitudinal QCT investigations are given. They then describe a current investigation in which they studied 269 subjects, including 173 normal women, 34 patients with hyperparathyroidism, 24 patients with steroid-induced osteoporosis, and 38 men with idiopathic osteoporosis. Spinal quantitative computed tomography, radiogrammetry, and single photon absorptiometry were performed, and a spinal fracture index was calculated on all patients. The authors found a disproportionate loss of spinal trabecular mineral compared to appendicular mineral in the men with idiopathic osteoporosis and the patients with steroid-induced osteoporosis. They observed roughly equivalent mineral loss in both the appendicular and axial regions in the hyperparathyroid patients. The appendicular cortical measurements correlated moderately well with each other but less well with spinal trabecular QCT. The spinal fracture index correlated well with QCT and less well with the appendicular measurements. Knowledge of appendicular cortical mineral status is important in its own right but is not a valid predictor of axial trabecular mineral status, which may be disproportionately decreased in certain diseases. Quantitative CT provides a reliable means of assessing the latter region of the skeleton, correlates well with the spinal fracture index (a semiquantitative measurement of end-organ failure), and offers the clinician a sensitive means of following the effects of therapy.

  17. The cellular metabolism of lead and calcium: A kinetic analysis in cultured osteoclastic bone cells

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, J.F.; Pounds, J.G.

    1986-01-01

    Characterization of lead metabolism in bone is necessary to understand the role of skeletal lead, an endogenous source of this toxic metal, in the expression of adverse effects of lead intoxication in concert with external sources. Moreover, it has been postulated that an early manifestation of lead toxicity common to diverse cell types may be pertubations in intracellular calcium homeostasis. Furthermore, it has been suggested that calciotropic hormones may express their actions on bone cells by modulating the messenger functions of intracellular Ca. Before these postulates can be more fully tested, the homeostasis of intracellular Pb and Ca must be understood more clearly. We have designed experiments to characterize the steady-state kinetic distribution and behavior of /sup 210/Pb and /sup 45/Ca in osteoclastic bone cells and to identify biological structures or functions associated with the kinetic pools. Cultures were labeled with /sup 210/Pb or /sup 45/Ca and the kinetic parameters were obtained by analysis of isotope washout curves. Cellular metabolism was defined by three kinetic pools of intracellular Pb and Ca. The largest and slowest exchanging pool was characterized as a mitochondrial compartment for both metals. These data indicate that Pb and Ca share similar intracellular pathways in osteoclastic bone cells and that both metals are readily exchangeable in this in vitro system. The results of other experiments have revealed that lead, at relatively low medium concentrations, produces a marked increase in all three intracellular Ca compartments. 18 refs., 2 figs.

  18. Late Antiretroviral Therapy (ART) Initiation Is Associated with Long-Term Persistence of Systemic Inflammation and Metabolic Abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Ghislain, Mathilde; Bastard, Jean-Philippe; Meyer, Laurence; Capeau, Jacqueline; Fellahi, Soraya; Gérard, Laurence; May, Thierry; Simon, Anne; Vigouroux, Corinne; Goujard, Cécile

    2015-01-01

    Objectives HIV-induced immunodeficiency is associated with metabolic abnormalities and systemic inflammation. We investigated the effect of antiretroviral therapy (ART) on restoration of insulin sensitivity, markers of immune activation and inflammation. Methods Immunological, metabolic and inflammatory status was assessed at antiretroviral therapy initiation and three years later in 208 patients from the ANRS-COPANA cohort. Patients were compared according to their pre-ART CD4+ cell count (group 1: ≤ 200/mm3, n = 66 vs. group 2: > 200/mm3, n = 142). Results Median CD4+ cell count increased in both groups after 3 years of successful ART but remained significantly lower in group 1 than in group 2 (404 vs 572 cells/mm3). Triglyceride and insulin levels were higher or tended to be higher in group 1 than in group 2 at ART initiation (median: 1.32 vs 0.97 mmol/l, p = 0.04 and 7.6 vs 6.8 IU, p = 0.09, respectively) and remained higher after three years of ART (1.42 vs 1.16 mmol/L, p = 0.0009 and 8.9 vs 7.2 IU, p = 0.01). After adjustment for individual characteristics and antiretroviral therapy regimens (protease inhibitor (PI), zidovudine), insulin levels remained significantly higher in patients with low baseline CD4+ cell count. Baseline IL-6, sCD14 and sTNFR2 levels were higher in group 1 than in group 2. Most biomarkers of immune activation/inflammation declined during ART, but IL-6 and hsCRP levels remained higher in patients with low baseline CD4+ cell count than in the other patients (median are respectively 1.4 vs 1.1 pg/ml, p = 0.03 and 2.1 vs 1.3 mg/ml, p = 0.07). Conclusion After three years of successful ART, low pretreatment CD4+ T cell count remained associated with elevated insulin, triglyceride, IL-6 and hsCRP levels. These persistent metabolic and inflammatory abnormalities could contribute to an increased risk of cardiovascular and metabolic disease. PMID:26636578

  19. Novel Metabolic Abnormalities in the Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle in Peripheral Cells From Huntington's Disease Patients.

    PubMed

    Naseri, Nima N; Bonica, Joseph; Xu, Hui; Park, Larry C; Arjomand, Jamshid; Chen, Zhengming; Gibson, Gary E

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic dysfunction is well-documented in Huntington's disease (HD). However, the link between the mutant huntingtin (mHTT) gene and the pathology is unknown. The tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle is the main metabolic pathway for the production of NADH for conversion to ATP via the electron transport chain (ETC). The objective of this study was to test for differences in enzyme activities, mRNAs and protein levels related to the TCA cycle between lymphoblasts from healthy subjects and from patients with HD. The experiments utilize the advantages of lymphoblasts to reveal new insights about HD. The large quantity of homogeneous cell populations permits multiple dynamic measures to be made on exactly comparable tissues. The activities of nine enzymes related to the TCA cycle and the expression of twenty-nine mRNAs encoding for these enzymes and enzyme complexes were measured. Cells were studied under baseline conditions and during metabolic stress. The results support our recent findings that the activities of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHC) and succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) are elevated in HD. The data also show a large unexpected depression in MDH activities. Furthermore, message levels for isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) were markedly increased in in HD lymphoblasts and were responsive to treatments. The use of lymphoblasts allowed us to clarify that the reported decrease in aconitase activity in HD autopsy brains is likely due to secondary hypoxic effects. These results demonstrate the mRNA and enzymes of the TCA cycle are critical therapeutic targets that have been understudied in HD. PMID:27611087

  20. Short-Term Treatment with Bisphenol-A Leads to Metabolic Abnormalities in Adult Male Mice

    PubMed Central

    Batista, Thiago M.; Alonso-Magdalena, Paloma; Vieira, Elaine; Amaral, Maria Esmeria C.; Cederroth, Christopher R.; Nef, Serge; Quesada, Ivan; Carneiro, Everardo M.; Nadal, Angel

    2012-01-01

    Bisphenol-A (BPA) is one of the most widespread endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDC) used as the base compound in the manufacture of polycarbonate plastics. Although evidence points to consider exposure to BPA as a risk factor for insulin resistance, its actions on whole body metabolism and on insulin-sensitive tissues are still unclear. The aim of the present work was to study the effects of low doses of BPA in insulin-sensitive peripheral tissues and whole body metabolism in adult mice. Adult mice were treated with subcutaneous injection of 100 µg/kg BPA or vehicle for 8 days. Whole body energy homeostasis was assessed with in vivo indirect calorimetry. Insulin signaling assays were conducted by western blot analysis. Mice treated with BPA were insulin resistant and had increased glucose-stimulated insulin release. BPA-treated mice had decreased food intake, lower body temperature and locomotor activity compared to control. In skeletal muscle, insulin-stimulated tyrosine phosphorylation of the insulin receptor β subunit was impaired in BPA-treated mice. This impairment was associated with a reduced insulin-stimulated Akt phosphorylation in the Thr308 residue. Both skeletal muscle and liver displayed an upregulation of IRS-1 protein by BPA. The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway was also impaired in the skeletal muscle from BPA-treated mice. In the liver, BPA effects were of lesser intensity with decreased insulin-stimulated tyrosine phosphorylation of the insulin receptor β subunit. In conclusion, short-term treatment with low doses of BPA slows down whole body energy metabolism and disrupts insulin signaling in peripheral tissues. Thus, our findings support the notion that BPA can be considered a risk factor for the development of type 2 diabetes. PMID:22470480

  1. Diabetes mellitus type 2 and abnormal glucose metabolism in the setting of human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Hadigan, Colleen; Kattakuzhy, Sarah

    2014-09-01

    As the modern era of combination antiretroviral therapy has increased life expectancy for individuals infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), type 2 diabetes mellitus and disorders of glucose metabolism have emerged as an important issue in the care of this population. Multiple mechanisms, both specific and nonspecific to HIV, underlie a significant prevalence. Although best-practice diagnostic testing remains unclear, the risks associated with diabetes in the setting of HIV are well characterized, ranging from organ-specific damage to socioeconomic decline. As population-specific treatment data are limited, current guidelines serve as a basis for ongoing management.

  2. Metformin for Weight Gain and Metabolic Abnormalities Associated With Antipsychotic Treatment: Meta-Analysis of Randomized Placebo-Controlled Trials.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Wei; Li, Xian-Bin; Tang, Yi-Lang; Xiang, Ying-Qiang; Wang, Chuan-Yue; de Leon, Jose

    2015-10-01

    This meta-analysis examined the effectiveness and safety of metformin to prevent or treat weight gain and metabolic abnormalities associated with antipsychotic drugs. We systematically searched in both English- and Chinese-language databases for metformin randomized controlled clinical trials (RCTs) using placebo in patients taking antipsychotics. Twenty-one RCTs (11 published in English and 10 in Chinese) involving 1547 subjects (778 on metformin, 769 on placebo) were included in this meta-analysis. Metformin was significantly superior to placebo (standard mean differences, -0.69 to -0.51; P = 0.01-0.0001) in the primary outcome measures (body weight, body mass index, fasting glucose, fasting insulin, triglycerides, and total cholesterol). Metformin was significantly superior to placebo in some secondary outcome measures but not in others. Significantly higher frequencies of nausea/vomiting and diarrhea were found in the metformin group, but no differences were found in other adverse drug reactions. In the metformin group, the frequency of nausea/vomiting was 14%, and of diarrhea, 7%. Subgroup and sensitivity analyses demonstrated that primary outcomes were influenced by ethnicity, treatment style (intervention vs prevention), metformin dose, study duration, and mean age. Body weight standard mean difference was -0.91 (confidence interval [CI], -1.40 to -0.41) in 3 prevention RCTs in naive patients, -0.66 (CI, -1.02 to -0.30) in 5 intervention RCTs during the first year, and -0.50 (CI, -0.73 to -0.27) in 9 intervention RCTs in chronic patients. This meta-analysis suggests that adjunctive metformin is an effective, safe, and reasonable choice for antipsychotic-induced weight gain and metabolic abnormalities.

  3. Abnormal metabolic pattern associated with cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease: a validation study.

    PubMed

    Meles, Sanne K; Tang, Chris C; Teune, Laura K; Dierckx, Rudi A; Dhawan, Vijay; Mattis, Paul J; Leenders, Klaus L; Eidelberg, David

    2015-09-01

    Cognitive deficits in Parkinson's disease (PD) have been associated with a specific metabolic covariance pattern. Although the expression of this PD cognition-related pattern (PDCP) correlates with neuropsychological performance, it is not known whether the PDCP topography is reproducible across PD populations. We therefore sought to identify a PDCP topography in a new sample comprised of 19 Dutch PD subjects. Network analysis of metabolic scans from these individuals revealed a significant PDCP that resembled the original network topography. Expression values for the new PDCP correlated (P=0.001) with executive dysfunction on the Frontal Assessment Battery (FAB). Subject scores for the new PDCP correlated (P<0.001) with corresponding values for the original pattern, which also correlated (P<0.005) with FAB scores in this patient group. For further validation, subject scores for the new PDCP were computed in an independent group of 86 American PD patients. In this cohort, subject scores for the new and original PDCP topographies were closely correlated (P<0.001); significant correlations between pattern expression and cognitive performance (P<0.05) were observed for both PDCP topographies. These findings suggest that the PDCP is a replicable imaging marker of PD cognitive dysfunction. PMID:26058693

  4. Thymic abnormalities and enhanced apoptosis of thymocytes and bone marrow cells in transgenic mice overexpressing Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase: implications for Down syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Peled-Kamar, M; Lotem, J; Okon, E; Sachs, L; Groner, Y

    1995-01-01

    The copper-zinc superoxide dismutase (CuZnSOD) gene resides on chromosome 21 and is overexpressed in Down syndrome (DS) patients. Transgenic CuZnSOD mice with elevated levels of CuZnSOD were used to determine whether, as in DS, overexpression of CuZnSOD was also associated with thymus and bone marrow abnormalities. Three independently derived transgenic CuZnSOD strains had abnormal thymi showing diminution of the cortex and loss of corticomedullary demarcation, resembling thymic defects in children with DS. Transgenic CuZnSOD mice were also more sensitive than control mice to in vivo injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), reflected by an earlier onset and enhanced apoptotic cell death in the thymus. This higher susceptibility to LPS-induced apoptosis was associated with an increased production of hydrogen peroxide and a higher degree of lipid peroxidation. When cultured under suboptimal concentrations of interleukin 3 or in the presence of tumour necrosis factor, bone marrow cells from transgenic CuZnSOD mice produced 2- to 3-fold less granulocyte and macrophage colonies than control. The results indicate that transgenic CuZnSOD mice have certain thymus and bone marrow abnormalities which are similar to those found in DS patients, and that the defects are presumably due to an increased oxidative damage resulting in enhanced cell death by apoptosis. Images PMID:7588627

  5. Metabolic abnormalities associated with weight loss during chemoirradiation of head-and-neck cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Alexander; Jabbari, Siavash; Worden, Francis P.; Chepeha, Douglas B.; Teknos, Theodoros N.; Nyquist, Gurston G.; Tsien, Christina; Schipper, Matthew J.; Urba, Susan . E-mail: eisbruch@umich.edu

    2005-12-01

    Purpose: Weight loss caused by acute mucositis and dysphagia is common during concurrent chemoirradiation (chemo-RT) of head-and-neck (HN) cancer. The metabolic consequences of weight loss during chemo-RT were investigated. Patients and Methods: Ninety-six patients with locally advanced HN cancer were treated from 1995 to 2001 on protocols that consisted of 1 to 2 cycles of induction cisplatin/5-fluorouracil followed by irradiation (70 Gy over 7 weeks) concurrent with cisplatin (100 mg/m{sup 2} every 3 weeks). Body weights and metabolic evaluations were obtained before and during induction chemotherapy and chemo-RT. Greatest percent changes in weight and in the laboratory values were calculated for each phase of therapy. Results: During induction chemotherapy, significant changes were found in BUN, BUN:creatinine ratio, HCO{sub 3}, Mg, and albumin, but not in creatinine, Na, K, or weight. During chemo-RT, significant additional changes were observed in all parameters measured, including increases in BUN, creatinine, BUN: creatinine ratio, and HCO{sub 3} and decreases in Mg, albumin, Na, K, and weight. The magnitude of most of these changes was significantly greater during chemo-RT than during induction chemotherapy. During chemo-RT, 35% of the patients had more than 10% body weight loss and 6 patients had an increase in creatinine of more than 100%, including 5 patients with Grade 2 nephrotoxicity, all of whom had weight loss 10% or more. Significant correlations were found between weight loss and creatinine (p < 0.0001) or BUN (p = 0.0002) rises, but not with BUN:creatinine ratio or other metabolic changes. Age, gender, tobacco history, hypertension, and diabetes mellitus were not significant predictors of nephrotoxicity. Conclusions: Weight loss during cisplatin-containing chemo-RT was found to be associated with reduced kidney function. These findings do not establish cause-effect relationships; however, they highlight the importance of intensive supportive

  6. Abnormal high-energy phosphate molecule metabolism during regional brain activation in patients with bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Yuksel, C; Du, F; Ravichandran, C; Goldbach, J R; Thida, T; Lin, P; Dora, B; Gelda, J; O'Connor, L; Sehovic, S; Gruber, S; Ongur, D; Cohen, B M

    2015-09-01

    Converging evidence suggests bioenergetic abnormalities in bipolar disorder (BD). In the brain, phosphocreatine (PCr) acts a reservoir of high-energy phosphate (HEP) bonds, and creatine kinases (CK) catalyze the transfer of HEP from adenosine triphosphate (ATP) to PCr and from PCr back to ATP, at times of increased need. This study examined the activity of this mechanism in BD by measuring the levels of HEP molecules during a stimulus paradigm that increased local energy demand. Twenty-three patients diagnosed with BD-I and 22 healthy controls (HC) were included. Levels of phosphorus metabolites were measured at baseline and during visual stimulation in the occipital lobe using (31)P magnetic resonance spectroscopy at 4T. Changes in metabolite levels showed different patterns between the groups. During stimulation, HC had significant reductions in PCr but not in ATP, as expected. In contrast, BD patients had significant reductions in ATP but not in PCr. In addition, PCr/ATP ratio was lower at baseline in patients, and there was a higher change in this measure during stimulation. This pattern suggests a disease-related failure to replenish ATP from PCr through CK enzyme catalysis during tissue activation. Further studies measuring the CK flux in BD are required to confirm and extend this finding.

  7. Application of the FICTION technique for the simultaneous detection of immunophenotype and chromosomal abnormalities in routinely fixed, paraffin wax embedded bone marrow trephines.

    PubMed

    Korac, P; Jones, M; Dominis, M; Kusec, R; Mason, D Y; Banham, A H; Ventura, R A

    2005-12-01

    The use of interphase fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) to study cytogenetic abnormalities in routinely fixed paraffin wax embedded tissue has become commonplace over the past decade. However, very few studies have applied FISH to routinely fixed bone marrow trephines (BMTs). This may be because of the acid based decalcification methods that are commonly used during the processing of BMTs, which may adversely affect the suitability of the sample for FISH analysis. For the first time, this report describes the simultaneous application of FISH and immunofluorescent staining (the FICTION technique) to formalin fixed, EDTA decalcified and paraffin wax embedded BMTs. This technique allows the direct correlation of genetic abnormalities to immunophenotype, and therefore will be particularly useful for the identification of genetic abnormalities in specific tumour cells present in BMTs. The application of this to routine clinical practice will assist diagnosis and the detection of minimal residual disease.

  8. Abnormal Collagen Metabolism in Cultured Skin Fibroblasts from Patients with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodemann, H. Peter; Bayreuther, Klaus

    1984-08-01

    Total collagen synthesis is decreased by about 29% (P < 0.01) in skin fibroblasts established in vitro from male patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) as compared with that in normal male skin fibroblasts in vitro. The reduction in collagen synthesis is associated with an approximately 2-fold increase in collagen degradation in DMD fibroblasts. Correlated to these alterations in the metabolism of collagen, DMD fibroblasts express a significantly higher hydroxyproline/proline ratio (DMD: 1.36-1.45; P < 0.01) than do normal fibroblasts (controls: 0.86-0.89). The increased hydroxylation of proline residues of collagen (composed of type I and type III) could be the cause for the enhanced degradation of collagen in DMD fibroblasts.

  9. Influence of abnormally high leptin levels during pregnancy on metabolic phenotypes in progeny mice.

    PubMed

    Makarova, Elena N; Chepeleva, Elena V; Panchenko, Polina E; Bazhan, Nadezhda M

    2013-12-01

    Maternal obesity increases the risk of obesity in offspring, and obesity is accompanied by an increase in blood leptin levels. The "yellow" mutation at the mouse agouti locus (A(y)) increases blood leptin levels in C57BL preobese pregnant mice without affecting other metabolic characteristics. We investigated the influence of the A(y) mutation or leptin injection at the end of pregnancy in C57BL mice on metabolic phenotypes and the susceptibility to diet-induced obesity (DIO) in offspring. In both C57BL-A(y) and leptin-treated mice, the maternal effect was more pronounced in male offspring. Compared with males born to control mothers, males born to A(y) mothers displayed equal food intake (FI) but decreased body weight (BW) gain after weaning, equal glucose tolerance, and enhanced FI-to-BW ratios on the standard diet but the same FI and BW on the high-fat diet. Males born to A(y) mothers were less responsive to the anorectic effect of exogenous leptin and less resistant to fasting (were not hyperphagic and gained less weight during refeeding after food deprivation) compared with males born to control mothers. However, all progeny displayed equal hypothalamic expression of Agouti gene-related protein (AgRP), neuropeptide Y (NPY), and proopiomelanocortin (POMC) and equal plasma leptin and glucose levels after food deprivation. Leptin injections in C57BL mice on day 17 of pregnancy decreased BW in both male and female offspring but inhibited FI and DIO only in male offspring. Our results show that hyperleptinemia during pregnancy has sex-specific long-term effects on energy balance regulation in progeny and does not predispose offspring to developing obesity.

  10. Dysfunctional protection against advanced glycation due to thiamine metabolism abnormalities in gestational diabetes.

    PubMed

    Bartáková, Vendula; Pleskačová, Anna; Kuricová, Katarína; Pácal, Lukáš; Dvořáková, Veronika; Bělobrádková, Jana; Tomandlová, Marie; Tomandl, Josef; Kaňková, Kateřina

    2016-08-01

    While the pathogenic role of dicarbonyl stress and accelerated formation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) to glucose intolerance and to the development of diabetic complications is well established, little is known about these processes in gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), a condition pathogenically quite similar to type 2 diabetes. The aims of the present study were (i) to determine plasma thiamine and erythrocyte thiamine diphosphate (TDP) and transketolase (TKT) activity in pregnant women with and without GDM, (ii) to assess relationships between thiamine metabolism parameters and selected clinical, biochemical and anthropometric characteristics and, finally, (iii) to analyse relationship between variability in the genes involved in the regulation of transmembrane thiamine transport (i.e. SLC19A2 and SLC19A3) and relevant parameters of thiamine metabolism. We found significantly lower plasma BMI adjusted thiamine in women with GDM (P = 0.002, Mann-Whitney) while levels of erythrocyte TDP (an active TKT cofactor) in mid-trimester were significantly higher in GDM compared to controls (P = 0.04, Mann-Whitney). However, mid-gestational TKT activity - reflecting pentose phosphate pathway activity - did not differ between the two groups (P > 0.05, Mann-Whitney). Furthermore, we ascertained significant associations of postpartum TKT activity with SNPs SLC19A2 rs6656822 and SLC19A3 rs7567984 (P = 0.03 and P = 0.007, resp., Kruskal-Wallis). Our findings of increased thiamine delivery to the cells without concomitant increase of TKT activity in women with GDM therefore indicate possible pathogenic role of thiamine mishandling in GDM. Further studies are needed to determine its contribution to maternal and/or neonatal morbidity.

  11. Exposure to cadmium and persistent organochlorine pollutants and its association with bone mineral density and markers of bone metabolism on postmenopausal women

    SciTech Connect

    Rignell-Hydbom, A.; Skerfving, S.; Lundh, T.; Lindh, C.H.; Elmstahl, S.; Bjellerup, P.; Juensson, B.A.G.; Struemberg, U.; Akesson, A.

    2009-11-15

    Environmental contaminants such as cadmium and persistent organochlorine pollutants have been proposed as risk factors of osteoporosis, and women may be at an increased risk. To assess associations between exposure to cadmium and two different POPs (2,2',4,4',5,5'-hexachlorobiphenyl CB-153, 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)-ethylene p,p'-DDE), on one hand, and bone effects, on the other, in a population-based study among postmenopausal (60-70 years) Swedish women with biobanked blood samples. The study included 908 women and was designed to have a large contrast of bone mineral densities, measured with a single photon absorptiometry technique in the non-dominant forearm. Biochemical markers related to bone metabolism were analyzed in serum. Exposure assessment was based on cadmium concentrations in erythrocytes and serum concentrations of CB-153 and p,p'-DDE. Cadmium was negatively associated with bone mineral density and parathyroid hormone, positively with the marker of bone resorption. However, this association disappeared after adjustment for smoking. The major DDT metabolite (p,p'-DDE) was positively associated with bone mineral density, an association which remained after adjustment for confounders, but the effect was weak. There was no evidence that the estrogenic congener (CB-153) was associated with any of the bone markers. In conclusion, no convincing associations were observed between cadmium and POPs, on one hand, and bone metabolism markers and BMD, on the other.

  12. Synthesis and in vitro evaluation of bone-seeking superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles as contrast agents for imaging bone metabolic activity.

    PubMed

    Panahifar, Arash; Mahmoudi, Morteza; Doschak, Michael R

    2013-06-12

    In this article, we report the synthesis and in vitro evaluation of a new class of nonionizing bone-targeting contrast agents based on bisphosphonate-conjugated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs), for use in imaging of bone turnover with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Similar to bone-targeting (99m)Technetium medronate, our novel contrast agent uses bisphosphonates to impart bone-seeking properties, but replaces the former radioisotope with nonionizing SPIONs which enables their subsequent detection using MRI. Our reported method is relatively simple, quick and cost-effective and results in BP-SPIONs with a final nanoparticle size of 17 nm under electron microscopy technique (i.e., TEM). In-vitro binding studies of our novel bone tracer have shown selective binding affinity (around 65%) for hydroxyapatite, the principal mineral of bone. Bone-targeting SPIONs offer the potential for use as nonionizing MRI contrast agents capable of imaging dynamic bone turnover, for use in the diagnosis and monitoring of metabolic bone diseases and related bone pathology.

  13. Evaluation of tributyltin toxicity in Chinese rare minnow larvae by abnormal behavior, energy metabolism and endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhi-Hua; Li, Ping

    2015-02-01

    Tributyltin (TBT) is a ubiquitous contaminant in aquatic environment, but the detailed mechanisms underlying the toxicity of TBT have not been fully understood. In this study, the effects of TBT on behavior, energy metabolism and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress were investigated by using Chinese rare minnow larvae. Fish larvae were exposed at sublethal concentrations of TBT (100, 400 and 800 ng/L) for 7 days. Compared with the control, energy metabolic parameters (RNA/DNA ratio, Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase) were significantly inhibited in fish exposed at highest concentration (800 ng/L), as well as abnormal behaviors observed. Moreover, we found that the PERK (PKR-like ER kinase)-eIF2α (eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2α) pathway, as the main branch was activated by TBT exposure in fish larvae. In short, TBT-induced physiological, biochemical and molecular responses in fish larvae were reflected in parameters measured in this study, which suggest that these biomarkers could be used as potential indicators for monitoring organotin compounds present in aquatic environment.

  14. Sasa quelpaertensis leaf extract improves high fat diet-induced lipid abnormalities and regulation of lipid metabolism genes in rats.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jina; Kim, Yoo-Sun; Lee, Hyun Ah; Lim, Ji Ye; Kim, Mina; Kwon, Oran; Ko, Hee-Chul; Kim, Se-Jae; Shin, Jae-Ho; Kim, Yuri

    2014-05-01

    Sasa quelpaertensis is a bamboo leaf that is only grown on Jeju Island in South Korea. It is used as a bamboo tea that is consumed for therapeutic purposes, particularly for its anti-diabetic, diuretic, and anti-inflammatory effects. This study investigated the effect of S. quelpaertensis leaf extract (SQE) on high fat-induced lipid abnormalities and regulation of lipid metabolism-related gene expressions in rats. SQE supplementation significantly decreased the levels of plasma triglycerides, total cholesterol, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol as well as the atherogenic index. SQE restored levels of plasma high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, which were lowered by a high fat diet. Plasma and cardiac resistin levels were also significantly decreased by SQE supplementation. In adipose tissue, mRNA levels of CAAT/enhancer-binding protein β (C/EBPβ) were suppressed in the SQE group. SQE supplementation decreased the accumulation of lipid droplets, inflammatory cell infiltrations, levels of triglycerides, and total lipids in the liver and effectively down-regulated expression of sterol regulatory element binding protein-1 (SREBP-1), fatty acid synthetase (FAS), and uncoupling protein 2 (UCP-2). These results suggest that SQE may be a potential treatment for high fat-related disorders by improving lipid profiles and modulating lipid metabolism.

  15. Short-term changes in bone and mineral metabolism following gastrectomy in gastric cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Baek, Ki Hyun; Jeon, Hae Myung; Lee, Seong Su; Lim, Dong Jun; Oh, Ki Won; Lee, Won Young; Rhee, Eun Jung; Han, Je Ho; Cha, Bong Yun; Lee, Kwang Woo; Son, Ho Young; Kang, Sung Koo; Kang, Moo Il

    2008-01-01

    Changes in bone and mineral metabolism that occur after gastrectomy have long been recognized. Gastrectomy has been identified as a risk factor for decreased bone mass and the increased fracture incidence. Previous investigations concerning postgastrectomy bone disease have been observational studies. No prospective studies have been reported that quantify the amount of bone loss after gastrectomy within the same patients. This study investigated 46 patients undergoing gastrectomy for gastric adenocarcinoma and analyzed 36 patients (58.1+/-10.8 years, 24 men and 12 women) who had dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) performed before and 1 year after gastrectomy. Systemic adjuvant chemotherapy was administered to 14 patients. Blood was sampled from all patients to determine serum calcium, phosphorous, and bone turnover marker levels before gastrectomy and at 1, 3, 6 and 12 months after surgery and for serum parathyroid hormone (PTH) and 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels before and 12 months after surgery. The mean bone loss in the lumbar spine, total hip, femoral neck, and trochanter, which was calculated as the percentage change from the baseline to the level measured at 12 months, was 5.7% (P<0.01), 5.4% (P<0.01), 6.6% (P<0.01) and 8.7% (P<0.01), respectively. Bone loss was generally greater in the group receiving chemotherapy. The serum calcium and phosphorous levels were not changed significantly and remained within the normal range throughout the observation period. After gastrectomy, the level of ICTP increased and reached a peak at 1 and 3 months, and progressively declined to baseline by 12 months. The osteocalcin levels were not coupled to an increase before 6 months. The level of 25-hydroxyvitamin D at 12 months postgastrectomy was not significantly changed compared to the baseline, however, the PTH levels increased by a mean of 63.6% at 12 months compared to the baseline (P<0.01). Significant correlations were found between the percent change in the BMD at the

  16. Reversal of brain metabolic abnormalities following treatment of AIDS dementia complex with 3'-azido-2',3'-dideoxythymidine (AZT, zidovudine): a PET-FDG study

    SciTech Connect

    Brunetti, A.; Berg, G.; Di Chiro, G.; Cohen, R.M.; Yarchoan, R.; Pizzo, P.A.; Broder, S.; Eddy, J.; Fulham, M.J.; Finn, R.D.

    1989-05-01

    Brain glucose metabolism was evaluated in four patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) dementia complex using (/sup 18/F)fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and positron emission tomography (PET) scans at the beginning of therapy with 3'-azido-2',3'-dideoxythymidine (AZT, zidovudine), and later in the course of therapy. In two patients, baseline, large focal cortical abnormalities of glucose utilization were reversed during the course of therapy. In the other two patients, the initial PET study did not reveal pronounced focal alterations, while the post-treatment scans showed markedly increased cortical glucose metabolism. The improved cortical glucose utilization was accompanied in all patients by immunologic and neurologic improvement. PET-FDG studies can detect cortical metabolic abnormalities associated with AIDS dementia complex, and may be used to monitor the metabolic improvement in response to AZT treatment.

  17. Association between the stress fracture and bone metabolism/quality markers in lacrosse players

    PubMed Central

    Wakamatsu, Kenta; Sakuraba, Keishoku; Suzuki, Yoshio; Maruyama, Asako; Tsuchiya, Yosuke; Shikakura, Jiro; Ochi, Eisuke

    2012-01-01

    Background Overuse injury including stress fracture is a serious problem for athletes. Recently, the importance of bone metabolism and quality as factors preventing overuse injury has been increasingly recognized. Hence, we hypothesized that markers of bone metabolism and quality are related to overuse injuries. Methods The subjects, which were elite university lacrosse players (male, n = 35; age, 19.8 ± 1.1; female, n = 49; age, 20.0 ± 1.0), were divided into a stress fracture group and a control group. We measured the subjects’ physical characteristics (height, weight, body mass index, and body fat) and bone architecture was evaluated using quantitative ultrasound. Bone alkaline phosphatase, N-telopeptide cross-link of type I collagen, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5b (TRAP-5b), homocysteine, and pentosidine were measured from blood samples obtained from all subjects. Results No significant difference was observed between groups with respect to height, weight, body mass index, and body fat, as well as quantitative ultrasound. Further, there were no significant differences in the levels of bone alkaline phosphatase, N-telopeptide cross-link of type I collagen, or TRAP-5b between stress fracture and control groups in all subjects and in male subjects. However, a significant increase in TRAP-5b level was observed in the stress fracture group compared with the control in the female subjects (409.9 ± 209.3 and 318.6 ± 81.6 mU/dL, respectively; P < 0.05). Homocysteine and pentosidine did not differ between groups. Conclusion These results suggest that osteoclast activity of female athletes with stress fractures may be enhanced by TRAP-5b. PMID:24198589

  18. Serum lipids and bone metabolism in Spanish men: the Camargo cohort study.

    PubMed

    Hernández, José L; Olmos, José M; Ramos, Carmen; Martínez, Josefina; de Juan, Julia; Valero, Carmen; Nan, Daniel; González-Macías, Jesus

    2010-01-01

    There is growing evidence of a link between lipid and bone metabolism, although data on this association in European men are scarce. This cross-sectional study from a community-based prospective cohort aims to explore the association of serum lipids with different aspects of bone metabolism in Spanish men. Demographic and anthropometric measurements, biochemical parameters including serum lipids, bone remodelling markers and calciotropic hormones, bone mineral density (BMD) assessed by dual X-ray absorptiometry and heel quantitative ultrasound, and prevalent vertebral and non-vertebral fractures, were evaluated in 289 men. Calciotropic hormones or bone markers were not associated with serum lipids. Serum total (TC) and LDL cholesterol, as well as LDL/HDL ratio were positively correlated to BMD at lumbar spine and hip. No significant correlation was noted for triglycerides or HDL. We observed a positive association between triglycerides, LDL/HDL ratio and BUA, and between TC/HDL ratio and both, QUI and BUA. BMD at the femoral neck and total hip was significantly higher in men with hypercholesterolemia after controlling for all the covariates (p=0.007). We did not observe any association between serum lipids and prevalent vertebral fractures. However, we found that TC (p=0.03) and LDL (p=0.04) were lower in subjects with non-vertebral fractures. In conclusion, we have found that a more unfavorable lipid profile (mainly higher LDL-C levels) is associated with higher BMD at lumbar spine and hip in Spanish men. Moreover, we did not observe any association between hypercholesterolemia and prevalent vertebral fractures, but we found lower serum TC and LDL-C levels in men with prevalent non-vertebral fractures.

  19. Analysis of abnormalities in purine metabolism leading to gout and to neurological dysfunctions in man.

    PubMed Central

    Curto, R; Voit, E O; Cascante, M

    1998-01-01

    A modelling approach is used to analyse diseases associated with purine metabolism in man. The specific focus is on deficiencies in two enzymes, hypoxanthine:guanine phosphoribosyltransferase and adenylosuccinate lyase. These deficiencies can lead to a number of symptoms, including neurological dysfunctions and mental retardation. Although the biochemical mechanisms of dysfunctions associated with adenylosuccinate lyase deficiency are not completely understood, there is at least general agreement in the literature about possible causes. Simulations with our model confirm that accumulation of the two substrates of the enzyme can lead to significant biochemical imbalance. In hypoxanthine:guanine phosphoribosyltransferase deficiency the biochemical mechanisms associated with neurological dysfunctions are less clear. Model analyses support some old hypotheses but also suggest new indicators for possible causes of neurological dysfunctions associated with this deficiency. Hypoxanthine:guanine phosphoribosyltransferase deficiency is known to cause hyperuricaemia and gout. We compare the relative importance of this deficiency with other known causes of gout in humans. The analysis suggests that defects in the excretion of uric acid are more consequential than defects in uric acid synthesis such as hypoxanthine:guanine phosphoribosyltransferase deficiency. PMID:9445373

  20. Correction of metabolic abnormalities in a rodent model of obesity, metabolic syndrome, and type 2 diabetes mellitus by inhibitors of hepatic protein kinase C-ι.

    PubMed

    Sajan, Mini P; Nimal, Sonali; Mastorides, Stephen; Acevedo-Duncan, Mildred; Kahn, C Ronald; Fields, Alan P; Braun, Ursula; Leitges, Michael; Farese, Robert V

    2012-04-01

    Excessive activity of hepatic atypical protein kinase (aPKC) is proposed to play a critical role in mediating lipid and carbohydrate abnormalities in obesity, the metabolic syndrome, and type 2 diabetes mellitus. In previous studies of rodent models of obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus, adenoviral-mediated expression of kinase-inactive aPKC rapidly reversed or markedly improved most if not all metabolic abnormalities. Here, we examined effects of 2 newly developed small-molecule PKC-ι/λ inhibitors. We used the mouse model of heterozygous muscle-specific knockout of PKC-λ, in which partial deficiency of muscle PKC-λ impairs glucose transport in muscle and thereby causes glucose intolerance and hyperinsulinemia, which, via hepatic aPKC activation, leads to abdominal obesity, hepatosteatosis, hypertriglyceridemia, and hypercholesterolemia. One inhibitor, 1H-imidazole-4-carboxamide, 5-amino-1-[2,3-dihydroxy-4-[(phosphonooxy)methyl]cyclopentyl-[1R-(1a,2b,3b,4a)], binds to the substrate-binding site of PKC-λ/ι, but not other PKCs. The other inhibitor, aurothiomalate, binds to cysteine residues in the PB1-binding domains of aPKC-λ/ι/ζ and inhibits scaffolding. Treatment with either inhibitor for 7 days inhibited aPKC, but not Akt, in liver and concomitantly improved insulin signaling to Akt and aPKC in muscle and adipocytes. Moreover, both inhibitors diminished excessive expression of hepatic, aPKC-dependent lipogenic, proinflammatory, and gluconeogenic factors; and this was accompanied by reversal or marked improvements in hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, abdominal obesity, hepatosteatosis, hypertriglyceridemia, and hypercholesterolemia. Our findings highlight the pathogenetic importance of insulin signaling to hepatic PKC-ι in obesity, the metabolic syndrome, and type 2 diabetes mellitus and suggest that 1H-imidazole-4-carboxamide, 5-amino-1-[2,3-dihydroxy-4-[(phosphonooxy)methyl]cyclopentyl-[1R-(1a,2b,3b,4a)] and aurothiomalate or similar agents that

  1. Abnormal insulin metabolism by specific organs from rats with spontaneous hypertension

    SciTech Connect

    Mondon, C.E.; Reaven, G.M.; Azhar, S.; Lee, C.M.; Rabkin, R. )

    1989-10-01

    Spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) have been shown to be both insulin resistant and hyperinsulinemic after oral glucose administration or infusion of exogenous insulin during an insulin suppression test. To determine if this hyperinsulinemia may be due to decreased removal of insulin, the metabolic clearance (k) of insulin was measured in isolated perfused liver, kidney, and hindlimb skeletal muscle from SHR and Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) control rats. The data indicate that the k for insulin removal by liver was similar in SHR and WKY rats, averaging 287 +/- 18 and 271 +/- 10 microliters.min-1.g-1 liver, respectively. In contrast, the k for insulin removal by hindlimbs from SHR was decreased 37% (P less than 0.001) compared with WKY rats (8.6 +/- 0.5 vs. 13.7 +/- 0.7 microliters.min-1.g-1 muscle), and this decrease was not accompanied by decreased binding of insulin to its receptor in plantaris muscle. Although the removal of insulin by glomerular filtration was similar in SHR and WKY rats (653 +/- 64 microliters/min vs. 665 +/- 90 microliters.min-1.kidney-1), total insulin removal by kidney was significantly lower (P less than 0.05) in SHR (710 +/- 78 microliters/min) compared with WKY rats (962 +/- 67 microliters/min), due to decreased peritubular clearance of insulin in SHR (56 +/- 73 vs. 297 +/- 59 microliters/min, P less than 0.05). These findings suggest that the decreased clearance of insulin in SHR rats was possibly not due to impaired hepatic removal of insulin but rather to decreased removal by skeletal muscle and kidneys.

  2. Glycosaminoglycan metabolism and cytokine release in normal and otosclerotic human bone cells interleukin-1 treated.

    PubMed

    Bodo, M; Carinci, P; Venti, G; Giammarioli, M; Donti, E; Stabellini, G; Paludetti, G; Becchetti, E

    1997-01-01

    Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), normal components of the extracellular matrix (ECM), and the glycosidases, that degrade them, play a key role in the bone remodelling process. The effects of interleukin-1 alpha (IL-1 alpha) on GAG metabolism in normal and otosclerotic human bone cells as well as its capacity to modulate IL-1 alpha, IL-1 beta and IL-6 secretion in both populations was analyzed. The amount of radiolabeled GAGs was lower in otosclerotic than in normal bone cells. IL-1 alpha reduced newly synthesized cellular and extracellular GAGs in normal cells, but only those of the cellular compartment in otosclerotic bone cells. It depressed heparan sulphate (HS) more in normal cells and chondroitin sulphate (CS) more in otosclerotic bone cells. The HA/total sulphated GAG ratio was shifted in favour of the latter in otosclerotic cells, whereas the opposite effect was seen after IL-1 alpha treatment. There was little difference in the beta-D-glucuronidase levels of the normal and pathological cells, while beta-N-acetyl-D-glucosaminidase was significantly increased in otosclerotic bone cells. As the activity of neither enzyme was modified by treatment with IL-1 alpha, the cytokine seems to exert its influences on GAG synthesis rather than on the degradation process. IL-1 alpha, IL-1 beta and IL-6 secretion was markedly higher in otosclerotic cells. IL-1 alpha modulated the secretion of each interleukin differently, thus resulting in a cytokine cascade that may act in autocrine/paracrine manner on target cells. The authors suggest that changes in the cytokine network may have a specific, yet still unknown, role during normal and pathological osteogenesis.

  3. Bone metabolism in very preterm infants receiving total parenteral nutrition: do intravenous fat emulsions have an impact?

    PubMed

    Bridges, Kayla M; Pereira-da-Silva, Luis; Tou, Janet C; Ziegler, Jane; Brunetti, Luigi

    2015-12-01

    Very preterm infants (<32 weeks' gestation) are at high risk for impaired skeletal development because of factors that limit the provision of extrauterine nutrients. Cumulative net deficiencies of calcium, phosphorus, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), and arachidonic acid (ARA) are evident in these infants after prolonged administration of total parenteral nutrition (TPN). This is significant because minerals as well as metabolites of DHA and ARA are important modulators of bone cell differentiation, lengthening of bone, and bone matrix deposition. Furthermore, diets containing only precursors of DHA and ARA result in suboptimal skeletal growth. With the emergence of new intravenous lipid emulsions, it is important to understand the impact of fatty acids on bone metabolism in the third trimester in order to optimize the provision of TPN in very preterm infants. The purpose of this review is to evaluate current evidence regarding intravenous lipid emulsions and bone metabolism in very preterm infants receiving prolonged TPN and to identify areas of research needed.

  4. Bone and Energy Metabolism Parameters in Professional Cyclists during the Giro d’Italia 3-Weeks Stage Race

    PubMed Central

    Lombardi, Giovanni; Lanteri, Patrizia; Graziani, Rosa; Colombini, Alessandra; Banfi, Giuseppe; Corsetti, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    Cycling is a not weight-bearing activity and is known to induce bone resorption. Stage races are really strenuous endurance performances affecting the energy homeostasis. The recently highlighted link, in the co-regulation of bone and energy metabolism, demonstrates a central role for the equilibrium between carboxylated and undercarboxylated forms of osteocalcin. Aim of this study was to understand the acute physiological responses to a cycling stage race in terms of bone turnover and energy metabolism and the possible co-regulative mechanisms underlying their relationship. We studied nine professional cyclists engaged in 2011 Giro d’Italia stage race. Pre-analytical and analytical phases tightly followed academic and anti-doping authority’s recommendations. Bone and energy metabolism markers (bone alkaline phosphatase, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5b, total and undercarboxylated osteocalcin, leptin and adiponectin) and related hormones (cortisol and testosterone) were measured, by Sandwich Enzyme Immunoassays, at days -1 (pre-race), 12 and 22 during the race. The power output and the energy expenditure (mean and accumulated) were derived and correlated with the biochemical indexes. During the race, bone metabolism showed that an unbalance in behalf of resorption, which is enhanced, occurred along with a relative increase in the concentration of the undercarboxylated form of osteocalcin that was indirectly related to the enhanced energy expenditure, through adipokines modifications, with leptin decrease (high energy consumption) and adiponectin increase (optimization of energy expenditure). The exertion due to heavy effort induced a decrease of cortisol, while testosterone levels resulted unchanged. In conclusion, during a 3-weeks stage race, bone metabolism is pushed towards resorption. A possible relationship between the bone and the energy metabolisms is suggested by the relative correlations among absolute and relative concentrations trends of

  5. Metabolic syndrome and prostate abnormalities in male subjects of infertile couples.

    PubMed

    Lotti, Francesco; Corona, Giovanni; Vignozzi, Linda; Rossi, Matteo; Maseroli, Elisa; Cipriani, Sarah; Gacci, Mauro; Forti, Gianni; Maggi, Mario

    2014-01-01

    No previous study has evaluated systematically the relationship between metabolic syndrome (MetS) and prostate-related symptoms and signs in young infertile men. We studied 171 (36.5 ± 8.3-years-old) males of infertile couples. MetS was defined based on the National Cholesterol Education Program Third Adult Treatment Panel. All men underwent hormonal (including total testosterone (TT) and insulin), seminal (including interleukin-8 (IL-8), seminal plasma IL-8 (sIL-8)), scrotal and transrectal ultrasound evaluations. Because we have previously assessed correlations between MetS and scrotal parameters in a larger cohort of infertile men, here, we focused on transrectal features. Prostate-related symptoms were assessed using the National Institutes of Health Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index (NIH-CPSI) and the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS). Twenty-two subjects fulfilled MetS criteria. In an age-adjusted logistic ordinal model, insulin levels increased as a function of MetS components (Wald = 29.5, P < 0.0001) and showed an inverse correlation with TT (adjusted r = -0.359, P< 0.0001). No association between MetS and NIH-CPSI or IPSS scores was observed. In an age-, TT-, insulin-adjusted logistic ordinal model, an increase in number of MetS components correlated negatively with normal sperm morphology (Wald = 5.59, P< 0.02) and positively with sIL-8 levels (Wald = 4.32, P < 0.05), which is a marker of prostate inflammation, with prostate total and transitional zone volume assessed using ultrasound (Wald = 17.6 and 12.5, both P < 0.0001), with arterial peak systolic velocity (Wald = 9.57, P = 0.002), with texture nonhomogeneity (hazard ratio (HR) = 1.87 (1.05-3.33), P < 0.05), with calcification size (Wald = 3.11, P< 0.05), but not with parameters of seminal vesicle size or function. In conclusion, in males of infertile couples, MetS is positively associated with prostate enlargement, biochemical (sIL8) and ultrasound-derived signs of prostate inflammation

  6. The correlation between response to oral cyclosporin therapy and systemic inflammation, metabolic abnormality in patients with psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Ohtsuka, Tsutomu

    2008-11-01

    Psoriasis is a disease presenting cutaneous, immunological and vascular abnormalities. Oral cyclosporin therapy has been shown to be effective for the disease. Clinical and laboratory findings affecting the response of oral cyclosporin therapy in patients with psoriasis were studied. Forty-seven patients with psoriasis (male:female = 27:20, age 56.7 + 12.6 years) were studied. The response to oral cyclosporin therapy was categorized as excellent, good, fair and poor according to decrease of PASI score and decrease of cyclosporin dose. Clinical and laboratory findings including cyclosporin trough level and high sensitivity-CRP were statistically analyzed. Nine patients showed excellent response, 17 good response, 19 fair response and 2 poor response. High sensitivity-CRP (0.11 +/- 0.02 mg/dl) in fair response patients to oral cyclosporin therapy was significantly lower than those in excellent response patients (0.42 +/- 0.21 mg/dl) (P < or = 0.05). Body mass index (23.4 +/- 0.6 kg/m(2)), HDL-cholesterol (57.1 +/- 3.6 mg/dl) and fasting plasma glucose (105 +/- 5 mg/dl) in fair response patients to oral cyclosporin therapy was significantly lower, higher and lower than those in excellent response patients (25.7 +/- 0.9 kg/m(2); 43.0 +/- 2.8, 140 +/- 20 mg/dl) (P < 0.05, P < 0.05, P < 0.05), respectively. No other clinical and laboratory findings showed statistical significance among excellent, good and fair response patients. These results showed the correlation between response of oral cyclosporin therapy and systemic inflammation, metabolic abnormality in patients with psoriasis.

  7. R6/2 Huntington’s disease Mice Develop Early and Progressive Abnormal Brain Metabolism and Seizures

    PubMed Central

    Cepeda-Prado, E; Popp, S; Khan, U; Stefanov, D; Rodriguez, J; Menalled, L; Dow-Edwards, D; Small, SA; Moreno, H

    2012-01-01

    A hallmark feature of Huntington's disease pathology is the atrophy of brain regions including, but not limited to, the striatum. Though MRI studies have identified structural CNS changes in several HD mouse models, the functional consequences of HD pathology during the progression of the disease have yet to be investigated using in vivo functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). To address this issue, we first established the structural and functional MRI phenotype of juvenile HD mouse model R6/2 at early and advanced stages of disease. Significantly higher fMRI-signals (relative cerebral blood volumes-rCBV) and atrophy were observed in both age groups in specific brain regions. Next, fMRI results were correlated with electrophysiological analysis, which showed abnormal increases in neuronal activity in affected brain regions- thus identifying a mechanism accounting for the abnormal fMRI findings. [14C] deoxyglucose (2DG) maps to investigate patterns of glucose utilization were also generated. An interesting mismatch between increases in rCBV and decreases in glucose uptake was observed. Finally, we evaluated the sensitivity of this mouse line to audiogenic seizures early in the disease course. We found that R6/2 mice had an increased susceptibility to develop seizures. Together, these findings identified seizure activity in R6/2 mice, and show that neuroimaging measures sensitive to oxygen metabolism can be used as in vivo biomarkers, preceding the onset of an overt behavioral phenotype. Since fMRI-rCBV can also be obtained in patients, we propose that it may serve as a translational tool to evaluate therapeutic responses in humans and HD mouse models. PMID:22573668

  8. Effect of fatty acids on human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell energy metabolism and survival.

    PubMed

    Fillmore, Natasha; Huqi, Alda; Jaswal, Jagdip S; Mori, Jun; Paulin, Roxane; Haromy, Alois; Onay-Besikci, Arzu; Ionescu, Lavinia; Thébaud, Bernard; Michelakis, Evangelos; Lopaschuk, Gary D

    2015-01-01

    Successful stem cell therapy requires the optimal proliferation, engraftment, and differentiation of stem cells into the desired cell lineage of tissues. However, stem cell therapy clinical trials to date have had limited success, suggesting that a better understanding of stem cell biology is needed. This includes a better understanding of stem cell energy metabolism because of the importance of energy metabolism in stem cell proliferation and differentiation. We report here the first direct evidence that human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell (BMMSC) energy metabolism is highly glycolytic with low rates of mitochondrial oxidative metabolism. The contribution of glycolysis to ATP production is greater than 97% in undifferentiated BMMSCs, while glucose and fatty acid oxidation combined only contribute 3% of ATP production. We also assessed the effect of physiological levels of fatty acids on human BMMSC survival and energy metabolism. We found that the saturated fatty acid palmitate induces BMMSC apoptosis and decreases proliferation, an effect prevented by the unsaturated fatty acid oleate. Interestingly, chronic exposure of human BMMSCs to physiological levels of palmitate (for 24 hr) reduces palmitate oxidation rates. This decrease in palmitate oxidation is prevented by chronic exposure of the BMMSCs to oleate. These results suggest that reducing saturated fatty acid oxidation can decrease human BMMSC proliferation and cause cell death. These results also suggest that saturated fatty acids may be involved in the long-term impairment of BMMSC survival in vivo.

  9. Total hip replacement in osteoarthritis: the role of bone metabolism and its complications.

    PubMed

    Bottai, Vanna; Dell'Osso, Giacomo; Celli, Fabio; Bugelli, Giulia; Cazzella, Niki; Cei, Elena; Guido, Giulio; Giannotti, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is one of the most common joint disorder. For treatment of hip symptomatic osteoarthritis, when conservative medical therapy has failed, total hip arthroplasty (THA) is a successful orthopaedic procedures that reduces pain and improves function and quality of life. Incidence of osteoarthritis is constantly increasing with raising life expectancy. This aging process also has led to an increasing number of patients with osteoporosis who need hip replacement for osteoarthritis. Osteoporosis have 3 major potential complications in total hip arthroplasty: perioperative fracture, an increased risk of periprosthetic fracture, and late aseptic loosening. The purpose of the present study was to examine the effects of osteoporosis on total hip replacement procedure outcome and highlight the importance of adequate study of calcium-phosphorus metabolism in patient candidate for hip surgery, and the need to start a suitable therapy to recover the bone mass before surgery. Bone quality of the hip joint has become an important risk factor limiting the durability of THA. PMID:26811704

  10. A Unified Model for Bone-Renal Mineral and Energy Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Peter S N

    2015-01-01

    The beginning of the millennium saw the discovery of a new bone-matrix protein, Matrix Extracellular PhosphogloprotEin (MEPE) and an associated C-terminal motif called ASARM. This motif and other distinguishing features occur in a group of proteins called SIBLINGs. These proteins include dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP1), osteopontin, dentin-sialophosphoprotein (DSPP), statherin, bone sialoprotein (BSP) and MEPE. MEPE, DMP1 and ASARM-motifs regulate expression of a phosphate regulating cytokine FGF23. Further, a trimeric interaction between phosphate regulating endopeptidase homolog X-linked (PHEX), DMP1, and α5β3-integrin that occurs on the plasma-membrane of the osteocyte mediates FGF23 regulation (FAP pathway). ASARM-peptides competitively inhibit the trimeric complex and increase FGF23. A second pathway involves specialized structures, matrix vesicles (MVP pathway). This review will discuss the FAP and MVP pathways and present a unified model for mineral and energy metabolism. PMID:25880364

  11. Metabolic bone disease in the preterm infant: Current state and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Rehman, Moghis Ur; Narchi, Hassib

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal osteopenia is an important area of interest for neonatologists due to continuing increased survival of preterm infants. It can occur in high-risk infants such as preterm infants, infants on long-term diuretics or corticosteroids, and those with neuromuscular disorders. Complications such as rickets, pathological fractures, impaired respiratory function and poor growth in childhood can develop and may be the first clinical evidence of the condition. It is important for neonatologists managing such high-risk patients to regularly monitor biochemical markers for evidence of abnormal bone turnover and inadequate mineral intake in order to detect the early phases of impaired bone mineralization. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry has become an increasingly used research tool for assessing bone mineral density in children and neonates, but more studies are still needed before it can be used as a useful clinical tool. Prevention and early detection of osteopenia are key to the successful management of this condition and oral phosphate supplements should be started as soon as is feasible. PMID:26413483

  12. The Influence of the Type of Continuous Exercise Stress Applied during Growth Periods on Bone Metabolism and Osteogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Takao; Izawa, Hiromi; Satoh, Atsuko

    2016-01-01

    Background In this study, we examined the influence of exercise loading characteristics on bone metabolic responses and bone morphology in the growth phase and adulthood. Methods Running exercise (RUN) and jumping exercise (JUM) were used for the exercise loading in 28-day-old male Wistar rats. Bone metabolism was measured by blood osteocalcin (OC) and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRACP) levels. For bone morphology, the maximum bone length, bone weight, and bone strength of the femur and tibia were measured. Results A pre- and post-exercise loading comparison in the growth phase showed significantly increased OC levels in the RUN and JUM groups and significantly decreased TRACP levels in the JUM group. On the other hand, a pre- and post-exercise loading comparison in adulthood showed significantly decreased TRACP levels in the RUN and JUM groups. Femur lengths were significantly shorter in the RUN and JUM groups than in the control (CON) group, while bone weight was significantly greater in the JUM group than in the CON group. Conclusions Exercise loading activates OC levels in the growth phase and suppresses TRACP levels in adulthood. On the other hand, these results suggest that excessive exercise loading may suppress bone length. PMID:27622180

  13. The Influence of the Type of Continuous Exercise Stress Applied during Growth Periods on Bone Metabolism and Osteogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Takao; Izawa, Hiromi; Satoh, Atsuko

    2016-01-01

    Background In this study, we examined the influence of exercise loading characteristics on bone metabolic responses and bone morphology in the growth phase and adulthood. Methods Running exercise (RUN) and jumping exercise (JUM) were used for the exercise loading in 28-day-old male Wistar rats. Bone metabolism was measured by blood osteocalcin (OC) and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRACP) levels. For bone morphology, the maximum bone length, bone weight, and bone strength of the femur and tibia were measured. Results A pre- and post-exercise loading comparison in the growth phase showed significantly increased OC levels in the RUN and JUM groups and significantly decreased TRACP levels in the JUM group. On the other hand, a pre- and post-exercise loading comparison in adulthood showed significantly decreased TRACP levels in the RUN and JUM groups. Femur lengths were significantly shorter in the RUN and JUM groups than in the control (CON) group, while bone weight was significantly greater in the JUM group than in the CON group. Conclusions Exercise loading activates OC levels in the growth phase and suppresses TRACP levels in adulthood. On the other hand, these results suggest that excessive exercise loading may suppress bone length.

  14. Bone metabolism status and associated risk factors in elderly patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

    PubMed

    Xiaomei, Wang; Hang, Xiao; Lingling, Liu; Xuejun, Li

    2014-09-01

    The prevalence of osteoporosis in older patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is higher than in the age-matched elderly patients, but the exact cause in relation to COPD is not clear. We hypothesized that the underlying causes for this difference are related to bone metabolism with the possible risk factors that include the duration of COPD, GOLD grade, cor pulmonale, the frequencies of acute exacerbations within the past year, smoking and inhaled corticosteroid therapy. We conducted a matched-pair study of 100 patients aged older than 65 years at the Southwest Hospital from May to November 2012. The enrolled patients with COPD were matched to controls for age and gender. Clinical characteristics of cohorts were recorded. Bone mineral density (BMD) was measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and osteoporosis was diagnosed according to the definition of WHO. All cohorts accepted bone metabolism marker measurement, including Procollagen type 1 aminoterminal propeptide (P1NP), β-C-telopeptides of type I collagen (βCTX), and N-terminal midmolecule fragment osteocalcin (N-MID OC). Statistical analysis was calculated using the student's t test, ANOVA and multiple regression analysis at a significance level set at a p < 0.05. Circulating biochemical markers of bone formation (P1NP), resorption (βCTX) and turnover (N-MID OC) were significantly lower in the COPD group than control group, while mean 25-OH Vitamin D was similar in two groups. The P1NP, βCTX, and N-MID OC were still lower in men with COPD, but only P1NP was lower in women with COPD compared to that of controls. Multiple regression analysis in COPD group suggests that age, the frequency of acute exacerbation, and BMD are independent risk factors for P1NP. The frequency of acute exacerbation within the past one year and 25-OH D level are independent risk factors for βCTX; the frequency of acute exacerbation is the only independent risk factor for N-MID OC. These were significant

  15. Potential Adverse Effects of Prolonged Sevoflurane Exposure on Developing Monkey Brain: From Abnormal Lipid Metabolism to Neuronal Damage.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fang; Rainosek, Shuo W; Frisch-Daiello, Jessica L; Patterson, Tucker A; Paule, Merle G; Slikker, William; Wang, Cheng; Han, Xianlin

    2015-10-01

    Sevoflurane is a volatile anesthetic that has been widely used in general anesthesia, yet its safety in pediatric use is a public concern. This study sought to evaluate whether prolonged exposure of infant monkeys to a clinically relevant concentration of sevoflurane is associated with any adverse effects on the developing brain. Infant monkeys were exposed to 2.5% sevoflurane for 9 h, and frontal cortical tissues were harvested for DNA microarray, lipidomics, Luminex protein, and histological assays. DNA microarray analysis showed that sevoflurane exposure resulted in a broad identification of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in the monkey brain. In general, these genes were associated with nervous system development, function, and neural cell viability. Notably, a number of DEGs were closely related to lipid metabolism. Lipidomic analysis demonstrated that critical lipid components, (eg, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylserine, and phosphatidylglycerol) were significantly downregulated by prolonged exposure of sevoflurane. Luminex protein analysis indicated abnormal levels of cytokines in sevoflurane-exposed brains. Consistently, Fluoro-Jade C staining revealed more degenerating neurons after sevoflurane exposure. These data demonstrate that a clinically relevant concentration of sevoflurane (2.5%) is capable of inducing and maintaining an effective surgical plane of anesthesia in the developing nonhuman primate and that a prolonged exposure of 9 h resulted in profound changes in gene expression, cytokine levels, lipid metabolism, and subsequently, neuronal damage. Generally, sevoflurane-induced neuronal damage was also associated with changes in lipid content, composition, or both; and specific lipid changes could provide insights into the molecular mechanism(s) underlying anesthetic-induced neurotoxicity and may be sensitive biomarkers for the early detection of anesthetic-induced neuronal damage.

  16. A fresh look at metabolic bone diseases in reptiles and amphibians.

    PubMed

    Klaphake, Eric

    2010-09-01

    Metabolic bone diseases (MBDs) are a common presenting complaint in reptiles and amphibians to veterinarians; however, understanding of the causes and diagnostic and treatment options is often extrapolated from human or other mammalian medicine models. Although the roles of UV-B, calcium, phosphorus, and cholecalciferol are better understood in some MBDs, there remain many X factors that are not. Likewise, quantitative diagnosis of MBDs has been difficult not only in terms of staging a disease but also regarding whether or not a condition is present. Treatment options also present challenges in corrective husbandry and diet modifications, medication/modality selection, and dosing/regimen parameters. PMID:20682425

  17. Metabolic differentiation and classification of abnormal Savda Munziq's pharmacodynamic role on rat models with different diseases by nuclear magnetic resonance-based metabonomics

    PubMed Central

    Mamtimin, Batur; Xia, Guo; Mijit, Mahmut; Hizbulla, Mawlanjan; Kurbantay, Nazuk; You, Li; Upur, Halmurat

    2015-01-01

    Background: Abnormal Savda Munziq (ASMq) is a traditional Uyghur herbal preparation used as a therapy for abnormal Savda-related diseases. In this study, we investigate ASMq's dynamic effects on abnormal Savda rat models under different disease conditions. Materials and Methods: Abnormal Savda rat models with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), and asthma dosed of ASMq. Serum samples of each animal tested by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and analyzed by orthogonal projection to latent structure with discriminant analysis. Results: Compared with healthy controls, HCC rats had higher concentrations of amino acids, fat-related metabolites, lactate, myoinositol, and citrate, but lower concentrations of α-glucose, β-glucose, and glutamine. Following ASMq treatment, the serum acetone very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL), LDL, unsaturated lipids, acetylcysteine, and pyruvate concentration decreased, but α-glucose, β-glucose, and glutamine concentration increased (P < 0.05). T2DM rats had higher concentrations of α- and β-glucose, but lower concentrations of isoleucine, leucine, valine, glutamine, glycoprotein, lactate, tyrosine, creatine, alanine, carnitine, and phenylalanine. After ASMq treated T2DM groups showed reduced α- and β-glucose and increased creatine levels (P < 0.05). Asthma rats had higher acetate, carnitine, formate, and phenylalanine levels, but lower concentrations of glutamine, glycoprotein, lactate, VLDL, LDL, and unsaturated lipids. ASMq treatment showed increased glutamine and reduced carnitine, glycoprotein, formate, and phenylalanine levels (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Low immune function, decreased oxidative defense, liver function abnormalities, amino acid deficiencies, and energy metabolism disorders are common characteristics of abnormal Savda-related diseases. ASMq may improve the abnormal metabolism and immune function of rat models with different diseases combined abnormal Savda. PMID:26600713

  18. Metformin revisited: Does this regulator of AMP-activated protein kinase secondarily affect bone metabolism and prevent diabetic osteopathy.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Antonio Desmond; Cortizo, Ana María; Sedlinsky, Claudia

    2016-03-25

    Patients with long-term type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) can develop skeletal complications or "diabetic osteopathy". These include osteopenia, osteoporosis and an increased incidence of low-stress fractures. In this context, it is important to evaluate whether current anti-diabetic treatments can secondarily affect bone metabolism. Adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) modulates multiple metabolic pathways and acts as a sensor of the cellular energy status; recent evidence suggests a critical role for AMPK in bone homeostasis. In addition, AMPK activation is believed to mediate most clinical effects of the insulin-sensitizer metformin. Over the past decade, several research groups have investigated the effects of metformin on bone, providing a considerable body of pre-clinical (in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo) as well as clinical evidence for an anabolic action of metformin on bone. However, two caveats should be kept in mind when considering metformin treatment for a patient with type 2 DM at risk for diabetic osteopathy. In the first place, metformin should probably not be considered an anti-osteoporotic drug; it is an insulin sensitizer with proven macrovascular benefits that can secondarily improve bone metabolism in the context of DM. Secondly, we are still awaiting the results of randomized placebo-controlled studies in humans that evaluate the effects of metformin on bone metabolism as a primary endpoint.

  19. Metformin revisited: Does this regulator of AMP-activated protein kinase secondarily affect bone metabolism and prevent diabetic osteopathy

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Antonio Desmond; Cortizo, Ana María; Sedlinsky, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Patients with long-term type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) can develop skeletal complications or “diabetic osteopathy”. These include osteopenia, osteoporosis and an increased incidence of low-stress fractures. In this context, it is important to evaluate whether current anti-diabetic treatments can secondarily affect bone metabolism. Adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) modulates multiple metabolic pathways and acts as a sensor of the cellular energy status; recent evidence suggests a critical role for AMPK in bone homeostasis. In addition, AMPK activation is believed to mediate most clinical effects of the insulin-sensitizer metformin. Over the past decade, several research groups have investigated the effects of metformin on bone, providing a considerable body of pre-clinical (in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo) as well as clinical evidence for an anabolic action of metformin on bone. However, two caveats should be kept in mind when considering metformin treatment for a patient with type 2 DM at risk for diabetic osteopathy. In the first place, metformin should probably not be considered an anti-osteoporotic drug; it is an insulin sensitizer with proven macrovascular benefits that can secondarily improve bone metabolism in the context of DM. Secondly, we are still awaiting the results of randomized placebo-controlled studies in humans that evaluate the effects of metformin on bone metabolism as a primary endpoint. PMID:27022443

  20. Bone metabolism and clinical study of 44 patients with bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaws

    PubMed Central

    Bocanegra-Pérez, María S.; Sosa-Henríquez, Manuel; Rodríguez-Bocanegra, Eduardo; Limiñana-Cañal, José M.; López-Márquez, Ariadna; Pérez-Plasencia, Daniel; Ramos-Macías, Angel

    2012-01-01

    Osteonecrosis of the jaws is a clinical entity described and linked to treatment with bisphosphonates in 2003. Its real incidence is unknown and it could increase due to the large number of patients treated with these drugs, and its cumulative effect on the bone. State of the art knowledge regarding its etiopathogeny, clinical course and suitable treatments is limited. Objectives: To study the clinical characteristics of 44 patients with bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaws and the state of their bone mineral metabolism: bone remodeling state, prevalence of fractures, bone mineral density study, and assessment of the different treatment strategies. Design of the Study: Observational. Information was gathered prospectively through interviews, clinical examinations, additional tests and review of medical records. Results: We studied 16 men and 28 women with a mean age of 64.7 years. Breast cancer was the most frequent underlying disease. Zoledronate was used in 82% of the cases and in the non-oncology group of patients; alendronate was the most frequently used bisphosphonate. The mean duration of the zoledronate and alendronate treatments was 25 months and 88 months respectively. The lower jaw was the most frequent location, and previous exodontias—among the triggering factors known—were the most closely linked to its onset. We found considerable osteoblastic activity in patients suffering from neoplasia, with artifacts present in their bone densitometry and a high percentage of vertebral fractures. Conclusions: According to our results, osteonecrosis of the jaws affects elderly patients. We found a direct relationship between the duration of exposure and the accumulated dose. Other relevant factors are: Poor oral and dental health, corticoids, diabetes and teeth extractions. In essence, it is a clinical diagnosis. Prevention is the best strategy to handle this clinical entity. Key words:Alendronate, bisphosphonate, jaw, maxilla, osteonecrosis

  1. The mandibular cartilage metabolism is altered by damaged subchondral bone from traumatic impact loading.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yu-Yu; Tanaka, Nobuaki; Ohkuma, Satoru; Kamiya, Takashi; Kunimatsu, Ryo; Huang, Yu-Ching; Yoshioka, Motoko; Mitsuyoshi, Tomomi; Tanne, Yuki; Tanimoto, Kotaro; Tanaka, Eiji; Tanne, Kazuo

    2009-07-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a degenerative disease caused by excessive external loading. Recently, it was reported that the damage in the mineralized subchondral bone caused by traumatic impact-loading is responsible for the initiation and progression of cartilage degeneration. Thus far, we have hypothesized that cytokines released from damaged subchondral bone from impact-loading affect the cartilage catabolism under pathological conditions. An impactor of 200 gw was dropped onto the top of a porcine mandibular condyle. After organ culture for 2 days, we investigated the association between the subchondral bone and cartilage using histological and biochemical experiments. The impact-loading induced the expression of IL-1beta immunohistochemically and prominently up-regulated IL-1alpha and IL-1beta mRNA levels in subchondral bone. We confirmed a significant decrease in type II collagen and aggrecan mRNA expressions in chondrocytes by co-culture with osteoblasts after impact-loading, and significant increase in mRNA and protein expressions of IL-1beta in subchondral osteoblasts from impact-loaded subchondral bone. The mRNA expressions of type II collagen, aggrecan, and type X collagen in chondrocytes were decreased significantly by the co-culture with osteoblasts pre-treated by IL-1beta, -6, and TNF-alpha. Among them, osteoblasts pre-treated by IL-1beta affected chondrocytes most strongly. It was also shown that IL-1beta-treated osteoblasts enhanced the MMP-1 mRNA level most markedly in chondrocytes among the four cytokines. These results suggest that the TMJ subjected to impact-loading can increase directly IL-1beta synthesis in the subchondral region, subsequently altering the metabolism of adjacent cartilage and may eventually resulting in the onset and progression of TMJ-OA. PMID:19381811

  2. p.Pro4Arg mutation in LMNA gene: a new atypical progeria phenotype without metabolism abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hong; Luo, Na; Hao, Fei; Bai, Yun

    2014-08-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a typical presenile disorder, with mutation in the LMNA gene. Besides HGPS, mutations in LMNA gene have also been reported in atypical progeroid syndrome (APS). The objective of the study was to investigate the phenotype and molecular basis of APS in a Chinese family. LMNA gene mutations were also reviewed to identify the phenotypic and pathogenic differences among APS. Two siblings in a non-consanguineous Chinese family with atypical progeria were reported. The clinical features were observed, including presenile manifestations such as bird-like facial appearance, generalized lipodystrophy involving the extremities and mottled hyperpigmentation on the trunk and extremities. A heterozygous mutation c.11C>G (p.Pro4Arg) of the LMNA gene was detected in the two patients. 28 different variants of the LMNA gene have been reported in APS families, spreading over almost all the 12 exons of the LMNA gene with some hot-spot regions. This is the first detailed description of an APS family without metabolism abnormalities. APS patients share most of the clinical features, but there may be some distinct features in different ethnic groups.

  3. Excessive ethanol consumption under exposure to lead intensifies disorders in bone metabolism: a study in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Kupraszewicz, Elżbieta; Brzóska, Malgorzata M

    2013-04-25

    It was investigated whether ethanol (Et) modifies the damaging impact of lead (Pb) on bone metabolism in a rat model reflecting excessive alcohol consumption by humans exposed to relatively high levels of this metal. For this purpose, markers of bone formation (osteocalcin, procollagen I, osteoprotegerin, alkaline phosphatase) and resorption (telopeptides of collagen I, soluble receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand), calciotropic hormones (parathormone, calcitonin, 25-hydroxyvitamin D and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D) in the serum, and the femur content of mineral (including calcium - Ca and inorganic phosphorus - P(i)) and organic components were estimated in the rats exposed to 500 mg Pb/l (in drinking water) or/and Et (5 g/kg b.wt./24 h, by oral gavage) for 12 weeks. Moreover, Ca and P(i) in the serum and urine, alkaline phosphatase in the bone tissue and Pb in the blood and femur were determined. The exposure to Pb or/and Et decreased bone formation and increased its resorption resulting in the bone demineralization. These effects were accompanied by destroying the hormonal regulation of mineral metabolism, and Ca and P(i) imbalance. The co-exposure to Pb and Et-induced disorders in bone metabolism were more advanced than those caused by Pb alone. Et co-administration increased Pb concentration in the blood and decreased its accumulation in the bone. This paper is the first report providing evidence that consumption of Et under exposure to Pb intensifies disorders in bone metabolism and that destroying of the receptor activator nuclear factor-κB (RANK)/RANK ligand/osteoprotegerin system is involved in the mechanisms of interactive action of these xenobiotics on the skeleton. The modifying impact of Et may be an effect of its independent osteotropic action and interaction with Pb. Based on the results it can be concluded that alcohol abuse by subjects excessively exposed to Pb considerably increases the risk of bone damage.

  4. Age-associated metabolic dysregulation in bone marrow-derived macrophages stimulated with lipopolysaccharide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fei, Fan; Lee, Keith M.; McCarry, Brian E.; Bowdish, Dawn M. E.

    2016-03-01

    Macrophages are major contributors to age-associated inflammation. Metabolic processes such as oxidative phosphorylation, glycolysis and the urea cycle regulate inflammatory responses by macrophages. Metabolic profiles changes with age; therefore, we hypothesized that dysregulation of metabolic processes could contribute to macrophage hyporesponsiveness to LPS. We examined the intracellular metabolome of bone marrow-derived macrophages from young (6-8 wk) and old (18-22 mo) mice following lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation and tolerance. We discovered known and novel metabolites that were associated with the LPS response of macrophages from young mice, which were not inducible in macrophages from old mice. Macrophages from old mice were largely non-responsive towards LPS stimulation, and we did not observe a shift from oxidative phosphorylation to glycolysis. The critical regulatory metabolites succinate, γ-aminobutyric acid, arginine, ornithine and adenosine were increased in LPS-stimulated macrophages from young mice, but not macrophages from old mice. A shift between glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation was not observed during LPS tolerance in macrophages from either young or old mice. Metabolic bottlenecks may be one of the mechanisms that contribute to the dysregulation of LPS responses with age.

  5. Age-associated metabolic dysregulation in bone marrow-derived macrophages stimulated with lipopolysaccharide

    PubMed Central

    Fei, Fan; Lee, Keith M.; McCarry, Brian E.; Bowdish, Dawn M. E.

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages are major contributors to age-associated inflammation. Metabolic processes such as oxidative phosphorylation, glycolysis and the urea cycle regulate inflammatory responses by macrophages. Metabolic profiles changes with age; therefore, we hypothesized that dysregulation of metabolic processes could contribute to macrophage hyporesponsiveness to LPS. We examined the intracellular metabolome of bone marrow-derived macrophages from young (6–8 wk) and old (18–22 mo) mice following lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation and tolerance. We discovered known and novel metabolites that were associated with the LPS response of macrophages from young mice, which were not inducible in macrophages from old mice. Macrophages from old mice were largely non-responsive towards LPS stimulation, and we did not observe a shift from oxidative phosphorylation to glycolysis. The critical regulatory metabolites succinate, γ-aminobutyric acid, arginine, ornithine and adenosine were increased in LPS-stimulated macrophages from young mice, but not macrophages from old mice. A shift between glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation was not observed during LPS tolerance in macrophages from either young or old mice. Metabolic bottlenecks may be one of the mechanisms that contribute to the dysregulation of LPS responses with age. PMID:26940652

  6. Age-associated metabolic dysregulation in bone marrow-derived macrophages stimulated with lipopolysaccharide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fei, Fan; Lee, Keith M.; McCarry, Brian E.; Bowdish, Dawn M. E.

    2016-03-01

    Macrophages are major contributors to age-associated inflammation. Metabolic processes such as oxidative phosphorylation, glycolysis and the urea cycle regulate inflammatory responses by macrophages. Metabolic profiles changes with age; therefore, we hypothesized that dysregulation of metabolic processes could contribute to macrophage hyporesponsiveness to LPS. We examined the intracellular metabolome of bone marrow-derived macrophages from young (6–8 wk) and old (18–22 mo) mice following lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation and tolerance. We discovered known and novel metabolites that were associated with the LPS response of macrophages from young mice, which were not inducible in macrophages from old mice. Macrophages from old mice were largely non-responsive towards LPS stimulation, and we did not observe a shift from oxidative phosphorylation to glycolysis. The critical regulatory metabolites succinate, γ-aminobutyric acid, arginine, ornithine and adenosine were increased in LPS-stimulated macrophages from young mice, but not macrophages from old mice. A shift between glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation was not observed during LPS tolerance in macrophages from either young or old mice. Metabolic bottlenecks may be one of the mechanisms that contribute to the dysregulation of LPS responses with age.

  7. [Space flight/bedrest immobilization and bone. Bone metabolism in space flight and long-duration bed rest].

    PubMed

    Ohshima, Hiroshi; Matsumoto, Toshio

    2012-12-01

    Bone loss and urolithiasis are inevitable outcome in human space flight and long-duration bet rest. The rate of space flight induced bone loss is 10 times faster than in those with osteoporosis. Significant bone loss at weight bearing bones, elevated urinary calcium excretion, and un-coupling of bone resorption and bone formation are observed during the long-term bed rest study. Improvements of resistive exercise device and vitamin-D supplementation for astronauts in International Space Station can partially maintain bone mass, however, they can not fully supress bone resorption and urinary calcium excretion during space flight. JAXA and NASA are performing joint study to validate the mitigration effects on bone resorption and urolithiasis of bisphosphonate supplement in conjunction with excercise.

  8. Impaired energetic metabolism after central leptin signaling leads to massive appendicular bone loss in hindlimb-suspended rats.

    PubMed

    Martin, Aline; David, Valentin; Vico, Laurence; Thomas, Thierry

    2008-12-01

    We previously showed in rats that the leptin effects on bone were dose dependent. Positive effects were observed when serum leptin concentration was in a physiological range. In contrast, important increases in serum leptin levels led to negative effects on bone formation similar to those reported after intracerebroventricular leptin administration in mice. To clarify whether leptin effects on bone depend on administration route and/or animal model, female rats were hindlimb unloaded or not and treated either with intracerebroventricular infusion of leptin or vehicle for 14 days. By increasing cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leptin concentration, intracerebroventricular infusion of leptin significantly reduced food intake and consequently body weight, abdominal fat, and lean mass of the animals. Leptin infusion inhibited bone elongation over the 14 days and blunted cortical bone thickening at the femoral diaphysis site. Interestingly, leptin effects were site dependent in the cancellous bone envelopes, because tibia metaphysis BMD was lower and lumbar spine BMD was higher under intracerebroventricular leptin. Treated groups showed reduced bone remodeling independently of hindlimb unloading. Multiple downstream pathways were implicated in the mediation of these negative leptin effects on bone including not only stimulation of the sympathetic nervous system but also a decrease in somatotropic axis activity. Therefore, the intracerebroventricular leptin-induced bone loss could be largely related to the concurrent alteration of energetic and metabolic status. In summary, our study supports the hypothesis of a concentration-dependent balance between peripheral and central control of leptin on bone.

  9. Hepatitis B virus X protein (HBx)-induced abnormalities of nucleic acid metabolism revealed by 1H-NMR-based metabonomics

    PubMed Central

    Dan Yue; Zhang, Yuwei; Cheng, Liuliu; Ma, Jinhu; Xi, Yufeng; Yang, Liping; Su, Chao; Shao, Bin; Huang, Anliang; Xiang, Rong; Cheng, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus X protein (HBx) plays an important role in HBV-related hepatocarcinogenesis; however, mechanisms underlying HBx-mediated carcinogenesis remain unclear. In this study, an NMR-based metabolomics approach was applied to systematically investigate the effects of HBx on cell metabolism. EdU incorporation assay was conducted to examine the effects of HBx on DNA synthesis, an important feature of nucleic acid metabolism. The results revealed that HBx disrupted metabolism of glucose, lipids, and amino acids, especially nucleic acids. To understand the potential mechanism of HBx-induced abnormalities of nucleic acid metabolism, gene expression profiles of HepG2 cells expressing HBx were investigated. The results showed that 29 genes involved in DNA damage and DNA repair were differentially expressed in HBx-expressing HepG2 cells. HBx-induced DNA damage was further demonstrated by karyotyping, comet assay, Western blotting, immunofluorescence and immunohistochemistry analyses. Many studies have previously reported that DNA damage can induce abnormalities of nucleic acid metabolism. Thus, our results implied that HBx initially induces DNA damage, and then disrupts nucleic acid metabolism, which in turn blocks DNA repair and induces the occurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). These findings further contribute to our understanding of the occurrence of HCC. PMID:27075403

  10. Exome sequencing identifies a nonsense mutation in Fam46a associated with bone abnormalities in a new mouse model for skeletal dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Diener, Susanne; Bayer, Sieglinde; Sabrautzki, Sibylle; Wieland, Thomas; Mentrup, Birgit; Przemeck, Gerhard K H; Rathkolb, Birgit; Graf, Elisabeth; Hans, Wolfgang; Fuchs, Helmut; Horsch, Marion; Schwarzmayr, Thomas; Wolf, Eckhard; Klopocki, Eva; Jakob, Franz; Strom, Tim M; Hrabě de Angelis, Martin; Lorenz-Depiereux, Bettina

    2016-04-01

    We performed exome sequencing for mutation discovery of an ENU (N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea)-derived mouse model characterized by significant elevated plasma alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activities in female and male mutant mice, originally named BAP014 (bone screen alkaline phosphatase #14). We identified a novel loss-of-function mutation within the Fam46a (family with sequence similarity 46, member A) gene (NM_001160378.1:c.469G>T, NP_001153850.1:p.Glu157*). Heterozygous mice of this mouse line (renamed Fam46a (E157*Mhda)) had significantly high ALP activities and apparently no other differences in morphology compared to wild-type mice. In contrast, homozygous Fam46a (E157*Mhda) mice showed severe morphological and skeletal abnormalities including short stature along with limb, rib, pelvis, and skull deformities with minimal trabecular bone and reduced cortical bone thickness in long bones. ALP activities of homozygous mutants were almost two-fold higher than in heterozygous mice. Fam46a is weakly expressed in most adult and embryonic tissues with a strong expression in mineralized tissues as calvaria and femur. The FAM46A protein is computationally predicted as a new member of the superfamily of nucleotidyltransferase fold proteins, but little is known about its function. Fam46a (E157*Mhda) mice are the first mouse model for a mutation within the Fam46a gene. PMID:26803617

  11. Reduced bone mass and normal calcium metabolism in systemic sclerosis with and without calcinosis.

    PubMed

    Di Munno, O; Mazzantini, M; Massei, P; Ferdeghini, M; Pitaro, N; Latorraca, A; Ferri, C

    1995-07-01

    Forty-three female patients with systemic sclerosis divided into subgroups based on the extent of skin involvement and the presence of calcinosis, and 50 sex and age-matched healthy controls were investigated for bone mineral density (BMD) on the basis of radial (dual photon absorptiometry, Osteograph, NIM), lumbar, and total body measurements (dual energy X-ray absorptiometry, Lunar DPX, Lunar Corp.), and for parameters of calcium metabolism. The patients showed a lower BMD (mean +/- SD; mg/cm2) than the controls at the radial (313 +/- 69 vs 347 +/- 73; p < 0.005), lumbar (974 +/- 143 vs 1081 +/- 154; p < 0.005), and total body (997 +/- 82 vs 1075 +/- 109; p < 0.05) determinations. The patients with the diffuse form of skin involvement had lower values than those with the limited form. There was a negative correlation between BMD and the duration of the disease. The presence of calcinosis was not found to have any effect on BMD. Calcium metabolism was found to be normal in each subgroup. It may be concluded that generalized osteoporosis is a feature of systemic sclerosis, with and without calcinosis. The extent and duration of the disease may play a role in determining bone loss. PMID:7586976

  12. Effect of oestrogen replacement on bone metabolism and cytokines in surgical menopause.

    PubMed

    Cantatore, F P; Loverro, G; Ingrosso, A M; Lacanna, R; Sassanelli, E; Selvaggi, L; Carrozzo, M

    1995-03-01

    The effect of oestrogen replacement on bone metabolism and serum cytokine levels (IL1,IL6) was investigated in surgical menopause. The study included 40 female subjects; 10 healthy premenopausal women underwent total hysterectomy without oophorectomy. Thirty healthy premenopausal women underwent total hysterectomy with bilateral oophorectomy. They were randomly divided into 3 groups of 10 subjects. The first group received natural estradiol (0.05 mg/day) for 6 months; the second group received natural estradiol (0.05 mg/day) and medroxyprogesteron acetate (10 mg/day) for 6 months, the third group received no therapy. Calcium-phosphorus metabolism, inflammatory indices, serum IL1 and IL6 levels were tested before and 6 months after surgery in all patients. A significant increase in serum alkaline phosphatase, urinary cross-links, serum PTH and IL1-IL6 was observed in the untreated women with total hysterectomy and oophorectomy. No significant variation in any of the parameters considered was observed in patients treated with oestrogen, in those treated with oestrogens and medroxyprogesteron nor in patients without oophorectomy. These results in human "in vivo" confirm that ovarian steroids play an important role in regulating the production of IL1 and IL6 which could regulate bone resorption. PMID:7789055

  13. Adiponectin and bone metabolism markers in female rowers: eumenorrheic and oral contraceptive users.

    PubMed

    Jürimäe, J; Vaiksaar, S; Mäestu, J; Purge, P; Jürimäe, T

    2011-12-01

    This study investigated whether adiponectin, bone formation (osteocalcin) and bone resorption [type I carboxyterminal telopeptide (ICTP)] values are influenced by menstrual cycle phase and oral contraceptive use in female rowers. Twenty-four rowers divided into normally cycling athletes (NOC; no.=15) and athletes taking oral contraceptive pills (OC; no.=9) participated in this study. Fasting blood samples, body composition and aerobic capacity measurements were taken during the follicular (FP) and the luteal (LP) phases of the menstrual cycle. Adiponectin, insulin, glucose, insulin resistance, body composition and aerobic capacity did not fluctuate significantly during menstrual cycle in both groups. Osteocalcin and ICTP were lower (p<0.05) in OC compared with NOC, but did not change significantly across menstrual cycle phases in both groups. Estradiol and progesterone were not related to adiponectin, osteocalcin or ICTP (r<0.147; p>0.05). Adiponectin was correlated (p<0.05) with osteocalcin (r=0.452) and fat free mass (r=0.428), and osteocalcin was related (p<0.05) to insulin (r=-0.413), glucose (r=-0.486) and insulin resistance (r=-0.528). In conclusion, adiponectin was not affected by menstrual cycle phase and OC use in female rowers, while bone metabolism markers were lower in OC compared to NOC groups. Adiponectin and osteocalcin were interrelated and may characterise energy homeostasis in female athletes. PMID:21169728

  14. Abnormal bone composition in female juvenile American alligators from a pesticide-polluted lake (Lake Apopka, Florida).

    PubMed Central

    Lind, P Monica; Milnes, Matthew R; Lundberg, Rebecca; Bermudez, Dieldrich; Orberg, Jan A; Guillette, Louis J

    2004-01-01

    Reproductive disorders have been found in pesticide-exposed alligators living in Lake Apopka, Florida (USA). These disorders have been hypothesized to be caused by exposure to endocrine- disruptive estrogen-like contaminants. The aim of this study was to expand our analysis beyond previous studies by investigating whether bone tissue, known to be affected by sex steroid hormones, is a potential target of endocrine disruptors. Long bones from 16 juvenile female alligators from Lake Apopka (pesticide-contaminated lake) and Lake Woodruff (control lake) were evaluated by peripheral quantitative computed tomography. We observed significant differences in bone composition, with female alligators from the contaminated lake having greater trabecular bone mineral density (BMD), total BMD, and trabecular mineral content compared with females from the control lake (p < 0.05). Increased trabecular and total BMD measurements suggest that juvenile female alligators from Lake Apopka were exposed to contaminants that created an internal environment more estrogenic than that normally observed. This estrogenic environment could be caused by both natural and anthropogenic compounds. Effects on BMD indicate interference with bone homeostasis. We hypothesize that contaminants present in the lake inhibit the natural and continuous resorption of bone tissue, resulting in increased bone mass. Although this is the only study performed to date examining effects of environmental estrogenic compounds on alligator bones, it supports previous laboratory-based studies in rodents. Further, this study is important in demonstrating that the alterations in morphology and physiology induced in free-ranging individuals living in environments contaminated with endocrine-active compounds are not limited to a few systems or tissues; rather, effects can be observed in many tissues affected by these hormones. PMID:14998753

  15. Negative Effects of Total Gastrectomy on Bone Tissue Metabolism and Volumetric Bone Mineral Density (vBMD) of Lumbar Spine in 1-Year Study in Men

    PubMed Central

    Krupski, Witold; Tatara, Marcin R.; Bury, Pawel; Szabelska, Anna; Charuta, Anna; Maciejewski, Ryszard; Wallner, Grzegorz; Dabrowski, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Gastrectomy induces severe osteoporosis in humans but its quantitative scale within trabecular and cortical compartments was not estimated. The aim of the study was to determine changes of volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD) in lumbar vertebrae (L1–L4) and biochemical bone metabolism markers in serum of patients 1 year after total gastrectomy. The control group consisted of patients (N = 8) subjected to abdominal surgery due to cardiospasmus. Total gastrectomy was performed in the experimental group (N = 6). Volumetric bone mineral density of trabecular and cortical bone of lumbar spine was measured before (baseline) and 1 year after the gastric surgery using the quantitative computed tomography method. Serum concentrations of insulin, insulin-like growth factor-1, tyroxine, interleukin-6, C-terminal telopeptides of type II collagen and bone formation, and resorption markers were determined at baseline and 1 year later, using ELISA, EIA, and IEMA methods. Total gastrectomy induced significant decrease of vBMD values, up to 16.8% and 10.0%, within the trabecular and cortical bone compartments of lumbar spine (P < 0.05). These negative changes of vBMD were associated with significantly increased serum concentration of bone resorption markers such as deoxypyridinoline, pyridinoline, and C-terminal telopeptides of type I collagen, by 13.5%, 32.2%, and 121.5%, respectively (P < 0.05). Neither vBMD nor biochemical bone turnover markers and hormone concentrations were influenced in the control patients. Dramatic bone loss during the first year in gastrectomized patients has proven dynamic osteoporosis progress indicating an importance of treatment interventions in these patients with emphasis on inhibition of intensive bone resorption processes. PMID:26886633

  16. Supplementation of L-arginine prevents glucocorticoid-induced reduction of bone growth and bone turnover abnormalities in a growing rat model.

    PubMed

    Pennisi, Pietra; D'Alcamo, Maria Antonia; Leonetti, Concetta; Clementi, Anna; Cutuli, Vincenza Maria; Riccobene, Stefania; Parisi, Natalia; Fiore, Carmelo Erio

    2005-01-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate the effects of glucocorticoid (GC) treatment on bone turnover and bone mineral density in the growing rat. Because of the recent evidence that nitric oxide (NO) can counteract prednisolone-induced bone loss in mature rats, we examined the effect on bone of the NO donor L: -arginine in young male rats, in which bone mass is increased by the same biological mechanism as in children and adolescents. Thirty-six 10-week-old Sprague-Dawley male rats were assigned to six groups of six animals each, and treated for 4 weeks with either vehicle (once a week subcutaneous injection of 100 microl of sesame oil); prednisolone sodium succinate, 5 mg/kg, 5 days per week by intramuscular injection (i.m.); L-arginine, 10 mg/kg intraperitoneally (i.p.) once a day; N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methylester (L-NAME), 50 mg/kg subcutaneously once a day; prednisolone sodium succinate 5 mg/kg, 5 days per week i.m. +L-arginine 10 mg/kg i.p. once a day; or prednisolone sodium succinate, 5 mg/kg, 5 days per week i.m. +L-NAME 50 mg/kg subcutaneously once a day. Serum calcium, alkaline phosphatase (ALP), osteocalcin, and the C-terminal telopeptides of type I collagen (RatLaps) were measured at baseline conditions and after 2 and 4 weeks. Prior to treatment, and after 2 and 4 weeks, the whole body, vertebral, pelvic, and femoral bone mineral density (BMD) was measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) scanning. Prednisolone and prednisolone+L-NAME treated rats had significantly lower ALP and osteocalcin levels than controls at 2 and 4 weeks, and significantly higher levels of Rat-Laps than controls at 4 weeks. Prednisolone, L-NAME, and prednisolone+L-NAME produced a significant inhibition of bone accumulation and bone growth at all sites measured. Supplementation with L-arginine appeared to prevent the inhibition of bone growth and increase in bone resorption induced by prednisolone. These data would suggest, for the first time, that supplementation

  17. Bone metabolic activity measured with positron emission tomography and [[sup 18]F] fluoride ion in renal osteodystrophy: Correlation with bone histomorphometry

    SciTech Connect

    Messa, C.; Goodman, W.G.; Hoh, C.K.; Choi, Y.; Nissenson, A.R.; Salusky, I.B.; Phelps, M.E.; Hawkins, R.A. )

    1993-10-01

    The authors evaluated the bone metabolic activity in patients with renal osteodystrophy using positron emission tomography and [[sup 18]F] fluoride ion. Eight patients had secondary hyperparathyroidism (HPT), and three had low-turnover bone disease. Eleven normal subjects were also studied, and three of the eight HPT patients were reevaluated after therapy. A rate constant (K) describing the net transport of [[sup 18]F] fluoride ion into a bound compartment in bone was calculated using both a three-compartment model and Patlak graphical analysis. Values of K were compared with biochemical data and with histomorphometric indices. The results indicate that K is significantly higher (P < 0.01) in HPT patients than in normal subjects and patients with low-turnover bone disease. Values of K correlated with serum alkaline phosphatase (r = 0.81) and PTH (r = 0.93) levels and with histomorphometric indices of bone formation rate (r = 0.84, P < 0.01) and eroded perimeter (r = 0.77, P < 0.05). Values of K decreased by 40 and 30%, respectively, in two patients who underwent parathyroidectomy and medical therapy. Positron emission tomography studies of bone using [[sup 18]F] fluoride ion can differentiate low turnover from high turnover lesions of renal osteodystropy and provide quantitative estimates of bone cell activity that correlate with histomorphometric data.

  18. [Bone metabolism and cardiovascular function update. Inter-communication between bone marrow hematopoiesis and skeletal/vascular network].

    PubMed

    Katayama, Yoshio

    2014-07-01

    The hematopoiesis takes place in the bone marrow. Because bone marrow is the "marrow" of the bone, bone marrow does not exist without bone. The specialized microenvironment for hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) to be appropriately functional is called "niche" . In the recent ten years since the bone-forming osteoblast was identified as a HSC niche, the entire mesenchymal lineage cells from mesenchymal stem cells to end-terminal osteocytes have been recognized as niche cells or niche-modulators. Among these, mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells are located at perivascular area. The very recent study showed the difference between arteriolar and sinusoidal niches. It is likely that the vascular network and the bone tissue are connected by the mesenchymal lineage cells as a complex of bone forming system, and HSCs utilize this complex as a series of niche.

  19. NF1 frameshift mutation (c.6520_6523delGAGA) association with nervous system tumors and bone abnormalities in a Chinese patient with neurofibromatosis type 1.

    PubMed

    Su, S Y; Zhou, X; Pang, X M; Chen, C Y; Li, S H; Liu, J L

    2016-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1, also known as NF1 or von Recklinghausen's disease, is a common neurocutaneous syndrome that presents with multiple café-au-lait patches, skinfold freckling, dermatofibromas, neurofibromas, and Lisch nodules. The mutations of the gene NF1, encoding the protein neurofibromin, have been identified as the cause of this disease. Here, we report a clinical and molecular study of a Chinese patient with multiple café-au-lait skin freckles, dermatofibroma, central and peripheral nervous system tumors, and bone abnormalities attributed to NF1. The patient showed >6 café-au-lait spots on the body and multiple dermatofibromas. A brain glioma and multiple nerve sheath tumors inside and outside the vertebral canal were identified by magnetic resonance imaging, which also showed multiple intercostal nerve schwannomas and hydrocephalies above the cerebellar tentorium. Talipes equinus was also apparent. A mutation analysis of the NF1 gene revealed a novel frameshift mutation in exon 43, consisting of a heterozygous deletion of four nucleotides (GAGA) between positions 6520 and 6523. No NF1 mutations were detected in the patient's parents or younger brother. These results extend the list of known mutations in this gene. The absence of the NF1 mutation in the healthy family members suggests that it is responsible for the NF1 phenotype. To our knowledge, this frameshift mutation represents a novel NF1 case, and may be associated with nervous system tumors and bone abnormalities. PMID:27173220

  20. [Mineral and bone disorder in chronic kidney disease].

    PubMed

    Matuszkiewicz-Rowińska, Joanna; Kulicki, Paweł

    2014-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease-mineral bone disorder (CKD-MBD) is characterized by at least one ofthefollowing: 1. biochemical abnormalities in calcium, phosphate, parathormone (PTH) and vitamin D metabolism; 2. renal osteodystrophy; and 3. cardiovascular or other soft tissue calcifications. All these abnormalities are interrelated and significantly contribute to the increased morbidity and mortality in patients with CKD. PMID:25782203

  1. Cyclin D1 and E2F-1 immunoreactivity in bone marrow biopsy specimens of multiple myeloma: relationship to proliferative activity, cytogenetic abnormalities and DNA ploidy.

    PubMed

    Wilson, C S; Butch, A W; Lai, R; Medeiros, L J; Sawyer, J R; Barlogie, B; McCourty, A; Kelly, K; Brynes, R K

    2001-03-01

    Cyclin D1, encoded by the CCND1 gene, is immunohistochemically detectable in up to one-third of cases of multiple myeloma (MM). To examine the mechanism of cyclin D1 overexpression, we compared cyclin D1 immunoreactivity with the results of conventional cytogenetics to determine if the t(11;14)(q13;q32) or other abnormalities of 11q11-14 explained cyclin D1 overexpression. Karyotypic abnormalities were found in 45 out of 67 (67%) MM cases; the t(11;14) was present in seven cases (10%). Additional 11q11-14 abnormalities were not identified. The t(11;14) correlated with cyclin D1 upregulation in low to intermediately proliferative MM, but was not present in highly proliferative tumours (assessed using bromodeoxyuridine labelling index). Cyclin D1 indirectly activates the transcription factor E2F-1. In the bone marrow biopsy specimens of MM cases, E2F-1 was concurrently expressed with cyclin D1 (P = 0.001), indicating that cyclin D1 is functional. However, as neither E2F-1 nor cyclin D1 expression correlated with proliferative activity, the speculation that t(11;14) upregulates the CCND1 gene to induce higher proliferation and possibly more aggressive disease is not supported. We conclude that in low to intermediately proliferative MM cases, cyclin D1 is probably upregulated by t(11;14), but an alternative mechanism is more probable in highly proliferative MM.

  2. Dietary combination of sucrose and linoleic acid causes skeletal muscle metabolic abnormalities in Zucker fatty rats through specific modification of fatty acid composition

    PubMed Central

    Ohminami, Hirokazu; Amo, Kikuko; Taketani, Yutaka; Sato, Kazusa; Fukaya, Makiko; Uebanso, Takashi; Arai, Hidekazu; Koganei, Megumi; Sasaki, Hajime; Yamanaka-Okumura, Hisami; Yamamoto, Hironori; Takeda, Eiji

    2014-01-01

    A dietary combination of sucrose and linoleic acid strongly contributes to the development of metabolic disorders in Zucker fatty rats. However, the underlying mechanisms of the metabolic disorders are poorly understood. We hypothesized that the metabolic disorders were triggered at a stage earlier than the 8 weeks we had previously reported. In this study, we investigated early molecular events induced by the sucrose and linoleic acid diet in Zucker fatty rats by comparison with other combinations of carbohydrate (sucrose or palatinose) and fat (linoleic acid or oleic acid). Skeletal muscle arachidonic acid levels were significantly increased in the sucrose and linoleic acid group compared to the other dietary groups at 4 weeks, while there were no obvious differences in the metabolic phenotype between the groups. Expression of genes related to arachidonic acid synthesis was induced in skeletal muscle but not in liver and adipose tissue in sucrose and linoleic acid group rats. In addition, the sucrose and linoleic acid group exhibited a rapid induction in endoplasmic reticulum stress and abnormal lipid metabolism in skeletal muscle. We concluded that the dietary combination of sucrose and linoleic acid primarily induces metabolic disorders in skeletal muscle through increases in arachidonic acid and endoplasmic reticulum stress, in advance of systemic metabolic disorders. PMID:25147427

  3. Bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helmberger, Thomas K.; Hoffmann, Ralf-Thorsten

    The typical clinical signs in bone tumours are pain, destruction and destabilization, immobilization, neurologic deficits, and finally functional impairment. Primary malignant bone tumours are a rare entity, accounting for about 0.2% of all malignancies. Also benign primary bone tumours are in total rare and mostly asymptomatic. The most common symptomatic benign bone tumour is osteoid osteoma with an incidence of 1:2000.

  4. A comparative study of the bone metabolic response to dried plum supplementation and PTH treatment in adult, osteopenic ovariectomized rat.

    PubMed

    Smith, Brenda J; Bu, So Young; Wang, Yan; Rendina, Elizabeth; Lim, Yin F; Marlow, Denver; Clarke, Stephen L; Cullen, Diane M; Lucas, Edralin A

    2014-01-01

    Dried plum has been reported to have potent effects on bone in osteopenic animal models, but the mechanisms through which bone metabolism is altered in vivo remain unclear. To address this issue, a study comparing the metabolic response of dried plum to the anabolic agent, parathyroid hormone (PTH), was undertaken. Six month-old female Sprague Dawley rats (n=84) were sham-operated (SHAM) or ovariectomized (OVX) and maintained on a control diet for 6wks until osteopenia was confirmed. Treatments were initiated consisting of a control diet (AIN-93M) supplemented with dried plum (0, 5, 15 or 25%; w/w) or a positive control group receiving PTH. At the end of 6wks of treatment, whole body and femoral bone mineral density (BMD) were restored by the two higher doses of dried plum to the level of the SHAM group. Trabecular bone volume and cortical thickness were also improved with these two doses of dried plum. Dried plum suppressed the OVX-induced increase in bone turnover as indicated by systemic biomarkers of bone metabolism, N-terminal procollagen type 1 (P1NP) and deoxypyridinoline (DPD). Dynamic bone histomorphometric analysis of the tibial metaphysis revealed that dried plum restored the OVX-induced increase in cancellous bone formation rate (BFR) and mineralizing surface (MS/BS) to the SHAM group, but some doses of dried plum increased endocortical mineral apposition rate (MAR). As expected, PTH significantly increased endocortical MAR and BFR, periosteal BFR, and trabecular MAR and BFR beyond that of the OVX and maintained the accelerated rate of bone resorption associated with OVX. Dried plum up-regulated bone morphogenetic protein 4 (Bmp4) and insulin-like growth factor 1 (Igf1) while down-regulating nuclear factor T cell activator 1 (Nfatc1). These findings demonstrate that in the adult osteopenic OVX animal, the effects of dried plum differ from that of PTH in that dried plum primarily suppressed bone turnover with the exception of the indices of bone

  5. The importance of vitamin D in the pathology of bone metabolism in inflammatory bowel diseases.

    PubMed

    Krela-Kaźmierczak, Iwona; Szymczak, Aleksandra; Łykowska-Szuber, Liliana; Eder, Piotr; Stawczyk-Eder, Kamila; Klimczak, Katarzyna; Linke, Krzysztof; Horst-Sikorska, Wanda

    2015-10-12

    Etiological factors of bone metabolism disorders in inflammatory bowel diseases have been the subject of interest of many researchers. One of the questions often raised is vitamin D deficiency. Calcitriol acts on cells, tissues and organs through a vitamin D receptor. The result of this action is the multi-directional effect of vitamin D. The reasons for vitamin D deficiency are: decreased exposure to sunlight, inadequate diet, inflammatory lesions of the intestinal mucosa and post-gastrointestinal resection states. This leads not only to osteomalacia but also to osteoporosis. Of significance may be the effect of vitamin D on the course of the disease itself, through modulation of the inflammatory mechanisms. It is also necessary to pay attention to the role of vitamin D in skeletal pathology in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases and thus take measures aimed at preventing and treating these disorders through the supplementation of vitamin D. PMID:26528347

  6. Dietary Intake Can Predict and Protect Against Changes in Bone Metabolism during Spaceflight and Recovery (Pro K)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Scott M.; Zwart, S. R.; Shackelford, L.; Heer, M.

    2009-01-01

    Bone loss is not only a well-documented effect of spaceflight on astronauts, but also a condition that affects millions of men and women on Earth each year. Many countermeasures aimed at preventing bone loss during spaceflight have been proposed, and many have been evaluated to some degree. To date, those showing potential have focused on either exercise or pharmacological interventions, but none have targeted dietary intake alone as a factor to predict or minimize bone loss during spaceflight. The "Dietary Intake Can Predict and Protect against Changes in Bone Metabolism during Spaceflight and Recovery" investigation ("Pro K") is one of the first inflight evaluations of a dietary countermeasure to lessen bone loss of astronauts. This protocol will test the hypothesis that the ratio of acid precursors to base precursors (specifically animal protein to potassium) in the diet can predict directional changes in bone mineral during spaceflight and recovery. The ratio of animal protein to potassium in the diet will be controlled for multiple short (4-day) periods before and during flight. Based on multiple sets of bed rest data, we hypothesize that a higher ratio of the intake of animal protein to the intake of potassium will yield higher concentrations of markers of bone resorption and urinary calcium excretion during flight and during recovery from bone mineral loss after long-duration spaceflight.

  7. [Age-dependent decrease in plasma androgens, and role of androgens in bone mineral density and bone metabolism].

    PubMed

    Adachi, Masahiro; Takayanagi, Ryoichi

    2006-03-01

    Circulating plasma testosterone decreases by 0.5-1% per year after 40 age in men. Bone mineral density (BMD) in men also decreases by about 1% per year after age 40-60. Due to progression of an aging society, the frequency of osteoporosis in elderly men is gradually increased. Androgens have a major role in the growth and the maintenance of both cancellous and cortical bone mass in men. Androgen receptor is expressed in osteoblasts, osteoclasts and bone marrow stromal cells. Androgens have been shown to control the bone formation and resorption by regulating the expression and the activity of several cytokines and growth factors through androgen receptor. In addition to these direct actions, through the aromatase activity estrogens converted from androgens are converted to estrogens which act on bone tissues through estrogen receptor and play an important role in the homeostasis of cancellous and cortical bones in men. PMID:16508123

  8. Metabolic changes after MRgFUS treatment of a bone metastasis using PET/CT: A case report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Candiano, Giuliana; Russo, Giorgio; Stefano, Alessandro; Marino, Lorenza; Ganguzza, Francesca; Vaccari, Arturo; Tripoli, Vincenzo; Galluzzo, Anna; Pulizzi, Sabina; Messana, Domenico; Borasi, Giovanni; Messa, Cristina; Gilardi, Maria Carla

    2012-11-01

    Aim of the present study is to evaluate the efficacy of the Magnetic Resonance guided Focused Ultrasound (Insightec ExAblate 2000 system) in a clinical case of a pelvic bone metastasis, accessible to the ultrasonic beam. Multiple 18F-FDG PET/CT examinations allowed to follow the metabolic and morphological modification of the cancerous lesion.

  9. Bone Markers, Calcium Metabolism, and Calcium Kinetics During Extended-Duration Space Flight on the Mir Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Scott M.; Wastney, Meryl E.; O'Brien, Kimberly O.; Morukov, Boris V.; Larina, Irina M.; Abrams, Steven A.; Davis-Street, Janis E.; Oganov, Victor; Shackelford, Linda C.

    2005-01-01

    Bone loss is a current limitation for long-term space exploration. Bone markers, calcitropic hormones, and calcium kinetics of crew members on space missions of 4-6 months were evaluated. Spaceflight-induced bone loss was associated with increased bone resorption and decreased calcium absorption. INTRODUCTION: Bone loss is a significant concern for the health of astronauts on long-duration missions. Defining the time course and mechanism of these changes will aid in developing means to counteract these losses during space flight and will have relevance for other clinical situations that impair weight-bearing activity. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We report here results from two studies conducted during the Shuttle-Mir Science Program. Study 1 was an evaluation of bone and calcium biochemical markers of 13 subjects before and after long-duration (4-6 months) space missions. In study 2, stable calcium isotopes were used to evaluate calcium metabolism in six subjects before, during, and after flight. Relationships between measures of bone turnover, biochemical markers, and calcium kinetics were examined. RESULTS: Pre- and postflight study results confirmed that, after landing, bone resorption was increased, as indicated by increases in urinary calcium (p < 0.05) and collagen cross-links (N-telopeptide, pyridinoline, and deoxypyridinoline were all increased >55% above preflight levels, p < 0.001). Parathyroid hormone and vitamin D metabolites were unchanged at landing. Biochemical markers of bone formation were unchanged at landing, but 2-3 weeks later, both bone-specific alkaline phosphatase and osteocalcin were significantly (p < 0.01) increased above preflight levels. In studies conducted during flight, bone resorption markers were also significantly higher than before flight. The calcium kinetic data also validated that bone resorption was increased during flight compared with preflight values (668 +/- 130 versus 427 +/- 153 mg/day; p < 0.001) and clearly documented that

  10. Bone metabolism and nutritional status during 30-day head-down-tilt bed rest.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Jennifer L L; Zwart, Sara R; Heer, Martina; Ploutz-Snyder, Robert; Ericson, Karen; Smith, Scott M

    2012-11-01

    Bed rest studies provide an important tool for modeling physiological changes that occur during spaceflight. Markers of bone metabolism and nutritional status were evaluated in 12 subjects (8 men, 4 women; ages 25-49 yr) who participated in a 30-day -6° head-down-tilt diet-controlled bed rest study. Blood and urine samples were collected twice before, once a week during, and twice after bed rest. Data were analyzed using a mixed-effects linear regression with a priori contrasts comparing all days to the second week of the pre-bed rest acclimation period. During bed rest, all urinary markers of bone resorption increased ~20% (P < 0.001), and serum parathyroid hormone decreased ~25% (P < 0.001). Unlike longer (>60 days) bed rest studies, neither markers of oxidative damage nor iron status indexes changed over the 30 days of bed rest. Urinary oxalate excretion decreased ~20% during bed rest (P < 0.001) and correlated inversely with urinary calcium (R = -0.18, P < 0.02). These data provide a broad overview of the biochemistry associated with short-duration bed rest studies and provide an impetus for using shorter studies to save time and costs wherever possible. For some effects related to bone biochemistry, short-duration bed rest will fulfill the scientific requirements to simulate spaceflight, but other effects (antioxidants/oxidative damage, iron status) do not manifest until subjects are in bed longer, in which case longer studies or other analogs may be needed. Regardless, maximizing research funding and opportunities will be critical to enable the next steps in space exploration. PMID:22995395

  11. Total hip replacement in osteoarthritis: the role of bone metabolism and its complications

    PubMed Central

    Bottai, Vanna; Dell'Osso, Giacomo; Celli, Fabio; Bugelli, Giulia; Cazzella, Niki; Cei, Elena; Guido, Giulio; Giannotti, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Summary Osteoarthritis is one of the most common joint disorder. For treatment of hip symptomatic osteoarthritis, when conservative medical therapy has failed, total hip arthroplasty (THA) is a successful orthopaedic procedures that reduces pain and improves function and quality of life. Incidence of osteoarthritis is constantly increasing with raising life expectancy. This aging process also has led to an increasing number of patients with osteoporosis who need hip replacement for osteoarthritis. Osteoporosis have 3 major potential complications in total hip arthroplasty: perioperative fracture, an increased risk of periprosthetic fracture, and late aseptic loosening. The purpose of the present study was to examine the effects of osteoporosis on total hip replacement procedure outcome and highlight the importance of adequate study of calcium-phosphorus metabolism in patient candidate for hip surgery, and the need to start a suitable therapy to recover the bone mass before surgery. Bone quality of the hip joint has become an important risk factor limiting the durability of THA. PMID:26811704

  12. Bone metabolism compensates for the delayed growth in small for gestational age neonates.

    PubMed

    Tenta, Roxane; Bourgiezi, Ifigeneia; Aliferis, Evangelos; Papadopoulou, Magdalini; Gounaris, Antonis; Skouroliakou, Maria

    2013-01-01

    The goal of the present study is to investigate the relationship between anthropometric and bone metabolism markers in a sample of neonates and their mothers. A sample of 20 SGA (small for the gestational age), AGA (appropriate for the gestational age) and LGA (large for the gestational age) term neonates and their 20 mothers was analyzed at birth and at exit. Elisa method was used to measure the OPG (Osteoprotegerin), RANK (Receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappaB), RANKL (Receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappaB Ligand), IGF-1 (Insulin-like growth factor 1), IGFBP3 (Insulin-like Growth Factor Binding Protein 3) and Leptin levels. Birth weight and length were positively correlated with RANKL, IGF-1 and IGFBP3 and negatively with the ratio OPG/RANKL. SGA neonates presented lower RANKL values and higher OPG/RANKL ratio while LGA neonates had higher RANK levels than AGA neonates. Positive association was shown between neonatal IGFBP3 and maternal IGF-1 values and between neonatal and maternal RANK values at birth and at exit. These results reveal a remarkable upregulation of OPG/RANKL ratio in SGA neonates, pointing out the role of bone turnover in compensating for the delayed neonatal growth.

  13. Short-Term Effects of Kefir-Fermented Milk Consumption on Bone Mineral Density and Bone Metabolism in a Randomized Clinical Trial of Osteoporotic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Tung, Yu-Tang; Kao, Chao-Chih; Hu, Fu-Chang; Chen, Chuan-Mu

    2015-01-01

    Milk products are good sources of calcium that may reduce bone resorption and help prevent bone loss as well as promote bone remodeling and increase bone formation. Kefir is a product made by kefir grains that degrade milk proteins into various peptides with health-promoting effects, including antithrombotic, antimicrobial and calcium-absorption enhancing bioactivities. In a controlled, parallel, double-blind intervention study over 6 months, we investigated the effects of kefir-fermented milk (1,600 mg) supplemented with calcium bicarbonate (CaCO3, 1,500 mg) and bone metabolism in 40 osteoporosis patients, and compared them with CaCO3 alone without kefir supplements. Bone turnover markers were measured in fasting blood samples collected before therapy and at 1, 3, and 6 months. Bone mineral density (BMD) values at the spine, total hip, and hip femoral neck were assessed by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) at baseline and at 6 months. Among patients treated with kefir-fermented milk, the relationships between baseline turnover and 6 months changes in DXA-determined BMD were significantly improved. The serum β C-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen (β-CTX) in those with T-scores > -1 patients significantly decreased after three months treatment. The formation marker serum osteocalcin (OC) turned from negative to positive after 6 months, representing the effect of kefir treatment. Serum parathyroid hormone (PTH) increased significantly after treatment with kefir, but decreased significantly in the control group. PTH may promote bone remodeling after treatment with kefir for 6 months. In this pilot study, we concluded that kefir-fermented milk therapy was associated with short-term changes in turnover and greater 6-month increases in hip BMD among osteoporotic patients. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02361372 PMID:26655888

  14. Experimental studies on the bone metabolism of male rats chronically exposed to cadmium intoxication using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry.

    PubMed

    Yokota, H; Tonami, H

    2008-04-01

    Cadmium (Cd) has been identified as the etiologic agent of itai-itai disease. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether chronic Cd exposure affects bone metabolism in a male rat model and to estimate the bone mineral density (BMD) differences in lumbar and femoral bone because of Cd exposure. Six-week-old male Hos Donryu rats were used in this experiment. Cadmium was administered at a dose of 200 ppm to rats in the diet to produce experimental chronic Cd poisoning. Bone mineral density was measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) with a high-resolution scan collimator (0.25 mm diameter) (Hologic QDR-2000). The Cd content in renal tissue reached a critical concentration of 128.42 +/- 14.38 microg/g 10 months after the administration of the element (Table 3). The average blood urea nitrogen (BUN) value was increased throughout the period of the experiment, and the serum creatinine value of the experimental group showed an increase after 2 months of Cd administration (0.46 +/- 0.09 mg/dL). The concentration of urinary calcium changed in the experimental group after exposure to Cd for 12 months (15.4 +/- 0.13 mg/dL). DEXA showed a greater reduction in the bone mineral density of the 5th vertebral body (L5) in rats that had ingested Cd for 4 months (0.359 +/- 0.013 g/cm2) than in control rats (0.372 +/- 0.012 g/cm2, P < 0.01). On the contrary, the difference in bone mineral content between rats ingesting Cd for 6-8 months and control rats was not significant. However, significant reductions in bone mineral content were again noted in rats that had ingested Cd for 12 months (0.339 +/- 0.023 g/cm2) compared with the control group (0.385 +/- 0.012 g/cm2, P < 0.01). The bone mineral density of the right femoral bone in control rats was 0.328 +/- 0.018 g/cm2 and that in experimental rats was 0.306 +/- 0.012 g/cm2, and a meaningful difference was recognized (P < 0.05). Histological examination of the rats exposed to Cd for 12 months showed that the 5

  15. Calcium metabolism in bone and teeth of rats during exposure to restriction of motor activity and to swimming exercise.

    PubMed

    Zorbas, Y G; Charapakhin, K P; Kuznetsov, N A; Kakurin, V J

    1999-06-01

    The effects of motor activity restriction for 90 days (hypokinesia, HK) and swimming training (T) on calcium metabolism in rat bones and teeth were evaluated. Male Wistar rats were distributed in four groups: untrained vivarium control rats (UVCR), untrained hypokinetic rats (UHKR), trained hypokinetic rats (THKR) and trained vivarium control rats (TVCR). Hypokinesia was obtained keeping the animals for 90 days in small individual cages which restricted their movements in all directions without hindering food and water intakes. Rats of THKR and TVCR were forced to swim for 15 to 90 minutes everyday. On the 1st, 7th, 15th day of a prehypokinetic period and on the 5th, 10th, 20th, 40th, 60th and 90th day of the hypokinetic period, six rats of each group were decapitated. Radioactive calcium was injected to the animals 70 days before autopsy. Calcium and phosphorus in serum, bones (molars, incisors, upper and lower jaws, parietal, scapular, clavicle, pelvic and tibial bones) and in the respective ash residues were measured. Body and bone weights, and radioactive calcium were also determined. Under prolonged exposure to HK (THKR and UHKR groups), bone weights and bone and ash Ca and P concentrations decreased, whereas serum Ca and P and 45Ca resorption increased, in comparison to the respective values in the UVCR and TVCR groups. Swimming exercise apparently did not modify calcium metabolism in the hypokinetic or control rats. PMID:10517263

  16. An Abnormal Nitric Oxide Metabolism Contributes to Brain Oxidative Stress in the Mouse Model for the Fragile X Syndrome, a Possible Role in Intellectual Disability

    PubMed Central

    Lima-Cabello, Elena; Garcia-Guirado, Francisco; Calvo-Medina, Rocio; el Bekay, Rajaa; Perez-Costillas, Lucia; Quintero-Navarro, Carolina; Sanchez-Salido, Lourdes

    2016-01-01

    Background. Fragile X syndrome is the most common genetic cause of mental disability. Although many research has been performed, the mechanism underlying the pathogenesis is unclear and needs further investigation. Oxidative stress played major roles in the syndrome. The aim was to investigate the nitric oxide metabolism, protein nitration level, the expression of NOS isoforms, and furthermore the activation of the nuclear factor NF-κB-p65 subunit in different brain areas on the fragile X mouse model. Methods. This study involved adult male Fmr1-knockout and wild-type mice as controls. We detected nitric oxide metabolism and the activation of the nuclear factor NF-κBp65 subunit, comparing the mRNA expression and protein content of the three NOS isoforms in different brain areas. Results. Fmr1-KO mice showed an abnormal nitric oxide metabolism and increased levels of protein tyrosine nitrosylation. Besides that, nuclear factor NF-κB-p65 and inducible nitric oxide synthase appeared significantly increased in the Fmr1-knockout mice. mRNA and protein levels of the neuronal nitric oxide synthase appeared significantly decreased in the knockout mice. However, the epithelial nitric oxide synthase isoform displayed no significant changes. Conclusions. These data suggest the potential involvement of an abnormal nitric oxide metabolism in the pathogenesis of the fragile X syndrome. PMID:26788253

  17. From "Kidneys Govern Bones" to Chronic Kidney Disease, Diabetes Mellitus, and Metabolic Bone Disorder: A Crosstalk between Traditional Chinese Medicine and Modern Science.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Qin; Zou, Xin-Rong; Zhang, Yuan Clare

    2016-01-01

    Although traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) and Western medicine have evolved on distinct philosophical foundations and reasoning methods, an increasing body of scientific data has begun to reveal commonalities. Emerging scientific evidence has confirmed the validity and identified the molecular mechanisms of many ancient TCM theories. One example is the concept of "Kidneys Govern Bones." Here we discuss the molecular mechanisms supporting this theory and its potential significance in treating complications of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and diabetes mellitus. Two signaling pathways essential for calcium-phosphate metabolism can mediate the effect of kidneys in bone homeostasis, one requiring renal production of bioactive vitamin D and the other involving an endocrine axis based on kidney-expressed Klotho and bone-secreted fibroblast growth factor 23. Disruption of either pathway can lead to calcium-phosphate imbalance and vascular calcification, accelerating metabolic bone disorder. Chinese herbal medicine is an adjunct therapy widely used for treating CKD and diabetes. Our results demonstrate the therapeutic effects and underlying mechanisms of a Chinese herbal formulation, Shen-An extracts, in diabetic nephropathy and renal osteodystrophy. We believe that the smart combination of Eastern and Western concepts holds great promise for inspiring new ideas and therapies for preventing and treating complications of CKD and diabetes.

  18. From "Kidneys Govern Bones" to Chronic Kidney Disease, Diabetes Mellitus, and Metabolic Bone Disorder: A Crosstalk between Traditional Chinese Medicine and Modern Science.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Qin; Zou, Xin-Rong; Zhang, Yuan Clare

    2016-01-01

    Although traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) and Western medicine have evolved on distinct philosophical foundations and reasoning methods, an increasing body of scientific data has begun to reveal commonalities. Emerging scientific evidence has confirmed the validity and identified the molecular mechanisms of many ancient TCM theories. One example is the concept of "Kidneys Govern Bones." Here we discuss the molecular mechanisms supporting this theory and its potential significance in treating complications of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and diabetes mellitus. Two signaling pathways essential for calcium-phosphate metabolism can mediate the effect of kidneys in bone homeostasis, one requiring renal production of bioactive vitamin D and the other involving an endocrine axis based on kidney-expressed Klotho and bone-secreted fibroblast growth factor 23. Disruption of either pathway can lead to calcium-phosphate imbalance and vascular calcification, accelerating metabolic bone disorder. Chinese herbal medicine is an adjunct therapy widely used for treating CKD and diabetes. Our results demonstrate the therapeutic effects and underlying mechanisms of a Chinese herbal formulation, Shen-An extracts, in diabetic nephropathy and renal osteodystrophy. We believe that the smart combination of Eastern and Western concepts holds great promise for inspiring new ideas and therapies for preventing and treating complications of CKD and diabetes. PMID:27668003

  19. Chronic Inhibition of ERK1/2 Signaling Improves Disordered Bone and Mineral Metabolism in Hypophosphatemic (Hyp) Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Martin Y. H.; Ranch, Daniel; Pereira, Renata C.; Armbrecht, Harvey J.; Portale, Anthony A.

    2012-01-01

    The X-linked hypophosphatemic (Hyp) mouse carries a loss-of-function mutation in the phex gene and is characterized by hypophosphatemia due to renal phosphate (Pi) wasting, inappropriately suppressed 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D [1,25(OH)2D] production, and rachitic bone disease. Increased serum fibroblast growth factor-23 concentration is responsible for the disordered metabolism of Pi and 1,25(OH)2D. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that chronic inhibition of fibroblast growth factor-23-induced activation of MAPK signaling in Hyp mice can reverse their metabolic derangements and rachitic bone disease. Hyp mice were administered the MAPK inhibitor, PD0325901 orally for 4 wk. PD0325901 induced a 15-fold and 2-fold increase in renal 1α-hydroxylase mRNA and protein abundance, respectively, and thereby higher serum 1,25(OH)2D concentrations (115 ± 13 vs. 70 ± 16 pg/ml, P < 0.05), compared with values in vehicle-treated Hyp mice. With PD0325901, serum Pi levels were higher (5.1 ± 0.5 vs. 3 ± 0.2 mg/dl, P < 0.05), and the protein abundance of sodium-dependent phosphate cotransporter Npt2a, was greater than in vehicle-treated mice. The rachitic bone disease in Hyp mice is characterized by abundant unmineralized osteoid bone volume, widened epiphyses, and disorganized growth plates. In PD0325901-treated Hyp mice, mineralization of cortical and trabecular bone increased significantly, accompanied by a decrease in unmineralized osteoid volume and thickness, as determined by histomorphometric analysis. The improvement in mineralization in PD0325901-treated Hyp mice was confirmed by microcomputed tomography analysis, which showed an increase in cortical bone volume and thickness. These findings provide evidence that in Hyp mice, chronic MAPK inhibition improves disordered Pi and 1,25(OH)2D metabolism and bone mineralization. PMID:22334725

  20. Chronic inhibition of ERK1/2 signaling improves disordered bone and mineral metabolism in hypophosphatemic (Hyp) mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Martin Y H; Ranch, Daniel; Pereira, Renata C; Armbrecht, Harvey J; Portale, Anthony A; Perwad, Farzana

    2012-04-01

    The X-linked hypophosphatemic (Hyp) mouse carries a loss-of-function mutation in the phex gene and is characterized by hypophosphatemia due to renal phosphate (Pi) wasting, inappropriately suppressed 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D [1,25(OH)₂D] production, and rachitic bone disease. Increased serum fibroblast growth factor-23 concentration is responsible for the disordered metabolism of Pi and 1,25(OH)₂D. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that chronic inhibition of fibroblast growth factor-23-induced activation of MAPK signaling in Hyp mice can reverse their metabolic derangements and rachitic bone disease. Hyp mice were administered the MAPK inhibitor, PD0325901 orally for 4 wk. PD0325901 induced a 15-fold and 2-fold increase in renal 1α-hydroxylase mRNA and protein abundance, respectively, and thereby higher serum 1,25(OH)₂D concentrations (115 ± 13 vs. 70 ± 16 pg/ml, P < 0.05), compared with values in vehicle-treated Hyp mice. With PD0325901, serum Pi levels were higher (5.1 ± 0.5 vs. 3 ± 0.2 mg/dl, P < 0.05), and the protein abundance of sodium-dependent phosphate cotransporter Npt2a, was greater than in vehicle-treated mice. The rachitic bone disease in Hyp mice is characterized by abundant unmineralized osteoid bone volume, widened epiphyses, and disorganized growth plates. In PD0325901-treated Hyp mice, mineralization of cortical and trabecular bone increased significantly, accompanied by a decrease in unmineralized osteoid volume and thickness, as determined by histomorphometric analysis. The improvement in mineralization in PD0325901-treated Hyp mice was confirmed by microcomputed tomography analysis, which showed an increase in cortical bone volume and thickness. These findings provide evidence that in Hyp mice, chronic MAPK inhibition improves disordered Pi and 1,25(OH)₂D metabolism and bone mineralization.

  1. Molecular phenotyping of immune cells from young NOD mice reveals abnormal metabolic pathways in the early induction phase of autoimmune diabetes.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jian; Kakoola, Dorothy N; Lenchik, Nataliya I; Desiderio, Dominic M; Marshall, Dana R; Gerling, Ivan C

    2012-01-01

    Islet leukocytic infiltration (insulitis) is first obvious at around 4 weeks of age in the NOD mouse--a model for human type 1 diabetes (T1D). The molecular events that lead to insulitis and initiate autoimmune diabetes are poorly understood. Since TID is caused by numerous genes, we hypothesized that multiple molecular pathways are altered and interact to initiate this disease. We evaluated the molecular phenotype (mRNA and protein expression) and molecular networks of ex vivo unfractionated spleen leukocytes from 2 and 4 week-old NOD mice in comparison to two control strains. Analysis of the global gene expression profiles and hierarchical clustering revealed that the majority (~90%) of the differentially expressed genes in NOD mice were repressed. Furthermore, analysis using a modern suite of multiple bioinformatics approaches identified abnormal molecular pathways that can be divided broadly into 2 categories: metabolic pathways, which were predominant at 2 weeks, and immune response pathways, which were predominant at 4 weeks. Network analysis by Ingenuity pathway analysis identified key genes/molecules that may play a role in regulating these pathways. These included five that were common to both ages (TNF, HNF4A, IL15, Progesterone, and YWHAZ), and others that were unique to 2 weeks (e.g. MYC/MYCN, TGFB1, and IL2) and to 4 weeks (e.g. IFNG, beta-estradiol, p53, NFKB, AKT, PRKCA, IL12, and HLA-C). Based on the literature, genes that may play a role in regulating metabolic pathways at 2 weeks include Myc and HNF4A, and at 4 weeks, beta-estradiol, p53, Akt, HNF4A and AR. Our data suggest that abnormalities in regulation of metabolic pathways in the immune cells of young NOD mice lead to abnormalities in the immune response pathways and as such may play a role in the initiation of autoimmune diabetes. Thus, targeting metabolism may provide novel approaches to preventing and/or treating autoimmune diabetes.

  2. IL-6 and IGF-1 Signaling Within and Between Muscle and Bone: How Important is the mTOR Pathway for Bone Metabolism?

    PubMed

    Bakker, Astrid D; Jaspers, Richard T

    2015-06-01

    Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) and interleukin 6 (IL-6) play an important role in the adaptation of both muscle and bone to mechanical stimuli. Here, we provide an overview of the functions of IL-6 and IGF-1 in bone and muscle metabolism, and the intracellular signaling pathways that are well known to mediate these functions. In particular, we discuss the Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway which in skeletal muscle is known for its key role in regulating the rate of mRNA translation (protein synthesis). Since the role of the mTOR pathway in bone is explored to a much lesser extent, we discuss what is known about this pathway in bone and the potential role of this pathway in bone remodeling. We will also discuss the possible ways of influencing IGF-1 or IL-6 signaling by osteocytes and the clinical implications of pharmacological or nutritional modulation of the Akt/mTOR pathway.

  3. Cytogenetic abnormalities in multiple myeloma: poor prognosis linked to concomitant detection in random and focal lesion bone marrow samples and associated with high-risk gene expression profile.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yiming; Nair, Bijay; Shaughnessy, John D; Cartron, Marie-Astrid; Haessler, Jeff; Anaissie, Elias; van Rhee, Frits; Crowley, John; Barlogie, Bart

    2009-06-01

    The clinical significance of cytogenetic abnormalities (CA) present in randomly sampled (RS) or focal lesion (FL) bone marrow sites was examined in 419 untreated myeloma patients. Among 290 patients with gene expression profiling (GEP) data generated from RS sites, GEP-defined high-risk was present in 52% of the RS+/FL+ group but in only 9% of the remainder (P < 0.001). The RS+/FL+ constellation (18%) was an independent predictor of poor survival, also after adjusting for GEP-derived risk and TP53 status (Hazard ratio = 2.42, P = 0.004). The prevalence of high-risk myeloma in the RS+/FL+ group may reflect a dissemination-prone condition not shared by the other three groups. PMID:19344415

  4. Bone mass and markers of bone and calcium metabolism in postmenopausal women treated with 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (Calcitriol) for four years.

    PubMed

    Sairanen, S; Kärkkäinen, M; Tähtelä, R; Laitinen, K; Mäkelä, P; Lamberg-Allardt, C; Välimäki, M J

    2000-08-01

    To evaluate the long-term effect of calcitriol treatment on bone mineral density (BMD) of the femoral neck and lumbar spine and the parameters of calcium and bone metabolism in elderly women, 55 healthy, postmenopausal women, all aged 66 years, were enrolled in the study. Eighteen started a 4-year supplementation with 0.5 microg of calcitriol daily and 37 served as controls. Calcium intake of all the subjects was adjusted to 800 mg daily. In 4 years femoral neck BMD increased by 3.0% in the calcitriol group, but decreased by 1.6% in the control group (P = 0.009). The respective changes in lumbar spine BMD were +2.3% and +0.9% (P = 0.067). Two years' treatment with calcitriol increased the intestinal absorption of strontium by 57% (P < 0.001), doubled the urinary excretion of calcium (P < 0. 001), and decreased the mean parathyroid hormone (PTH) level by 32% (P < 0.01). In the calcitriol group the marker of bone formation, serum osteocalcin, decreased by 27% (P < 0.01), and the marker of bone resorption, serum C-telopeptide of type I collagen (CTx), by 33% (P = 0.05) after 2 years. In two subjects the calcitriol dose had to be reduced because of hypercalciuria. We conclude that calcitriol treatment increases bone mass at the femoral neck and lumbar spine, the increases being maintained for up to 4 years. The gain in bone mass results from reduced bone turnover which is partly a consequence of the enhanced intestinal absorption of calcium and suppressed serum PTH levels. PMID:10920216

  5. Use of diphosphonates to correct disorders in calcium metabolism and mineral composition of bone tissue with 60-day hypokinesia in rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morukov, B. V.; Zaychik, V. YE.; Ivanov, V. M.; Orlov, O. I.

    1988-01-01

    Compounds of the diphosphonate group suppress bone resorption and bone tissue metabolism, from which it was assumed that they can be used for the prevention of osteoporosis and disorders of calcium homeostasis in humans during space flight. Two compounds of this group were used for preventive purposes in 60 day hypokinesia in rats. The results showed that diphosphonates have a marked effect on calcium metabolism and the condition of the bone tissues under conditions of long term hypokinesia: they reduce the content of ionized calcium in blood, delay the loss of calcium and phosphorus by the bone tissue, and to a considerable degree prevent reduction of bone density. This confirms the possibility of using compounds of this group for correcting and preventing changes of bone tissue and mineral metabolism during long term hypokinesia.

  6. The effects of a single bout pilates exercise on mRNA expression of bone metabolic cytokines in osteopenia women

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chang Sun; Kim, Ji Yeon; Kim, Hyo Jin

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of a single bout pilates exercise on mRNA expression of bone metabolic cytokines in elderly osteopenia women. [Methods] We selected 11 people of elderly osteopenia women and loaded a single bout pilates exercise about RPE 10-14 level. The blood samples were collected before, immediately after and 60 minute after pilates exercise, then examined calcium metabolic markers in serum and extracted peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) from whole blood and confirmed mRNA expression of bone metabolic cytokines from PBMC. To clarify the changes during exercise, we designed repeated measure ANOVA as the control group to perform blood sampling without exercise. [Results] As a result, serum P showed significant interaction effect between group and time (p<.001), the pilates exercise group decreased about 9% at immediately after exercise and 13% during recovery after exercise (p<.05), while the control group showed a tendency to increase. Serum CK also showed a significant interaction between group and time (p<.05), the pilates group significantly increased at immediately after exercise and during recovery after exercise (p<.05) but the control group didn’t have changes. TNF-α and IL-6 mRNA expression in PBMC was significantly increased in the pilates group (p<.01, p<.05), although INF-γ mRNA expression didn’t show statistically significant difference, it tended to increase in the pilates group (NS). [Conclusion] These results suggested that a single bout pilates exercise of elderly osteopenia women cause hypophosphatemia with temporary muscle damage, and it leading high turnover bone metabolic state with to activate both of bone formation and bone resorption. PMID:25566441

  7. Markers of Bone Metabolism Are Affected by Renal Function and Growth Hormone Therapy in Children with Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Doyon, Anke; Fischer, Dagmar-Christiane; Bayazit, Aysun Karabay; Canpolat, Nur; Duzova, Ali; Sözeri, Betül; Bacchetta, Justine; Balat, Ayse; Büscher, Anja; Candan, Cengiz; Cakar, Nilgun; Donmez, Osman; Dusek, Jiri; Heckel, Martina; Klaus, Günter; Mir, Sevgi; Özcelik, Gül; Sever, Lale; Shroff, Rukshana; Vidal, Enrico; Wühl, Elke; Gondan, Matthias; Melk, Anette; Querfeld, Uwe; Haffner, Dieter; Schaefer, Franz

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The extent and relevance of altered bone metabolism for statural growth in children with chronic kidney disease is controversial. We analyzed the impact of renal dysfunction and recombinant growth hormone therapy on a panel of serum markers of bone metabolism in a large pediatric chronic kidney disease cohort. Methods Bone alkaline phosphatase (BAP), tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5b (TRAP5b), sclerostin and C-terminal FGF-23 (cFGF23) normalized for age and sex were analyzed in 556 children aged 6–18 years with an estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) of 10–60 ml/min/1.73m2. 41 children receiving recombinant growth hormone therapy were compared to an untreated matched control group. Results Standardized levels of BAP, TRAP5b and cFGF-23 were increased whereas sclerostin was reduced. BAP was correlated positively and cFGF-23 inversely with eGFR. Intact serum parathormone was an independent positive predictor of BAP and TRAP5b and negatively associated with sclerostin. BAP and TRAP5B were negatively affected by increased C-reactive protein levels. In children receiving recombinant growth hormone, BAP was higher and TRAP5b lower than in untreated controls. Sclerostin levels were in the normal range and higher than in untreated controls. Serum sclerostin and cFGF-23 independently predicted height standard deviation score, and BAP and TRAP5b the prospective change in height standard deviation score. Conclusion Markers of bone metabolism indicate a high-bone turnover state in children with chronic kidney disease. Growth hormone induces an osteoanabolic pattern and normalizes osteocyte activity. The osteocyte markers cFGF23 and sclerostin are associated with standardized height, and the markers of bone turnover predict height velocity. PMID:25659076

  8. Burden and Socio-Behavioral Correlates of Uncontrolled Abnormal Glucose Metabolism in an Urban Population of India

    PubMed Central

    Mahapatra, Tanmay; Chakraborty, Kaushik; Mahapatra, Sanchita; Mahapatra, Umakanta; Pandey, Naren; Thomson, Peter L.; Musk, Arthur W.; Mitra, Ramendra N.

    2016-01-01

    Background Progressive burden of diabetes mellitus is a major concern in India. Data on the predictors of poor glycemic control among diabetics are scanty. A population-based cross-sectional study nested in an urban cohort was thus conducted in West Bengal, India to determine the burden and correlates of total and uncontrolled abnormalities in glucose metabolism (AGM) in a representative population. Methods From 9046 adult cohort-members, 269 randomly selected consenting subjects (non-response = 7.24%) were interviewed, examined [blood pressure (BP), anthropometry], tested for fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1C). Those having pre-diagnosed diabetes or FPG ≥126 or HbA1c≥6.5 were defined as diabetic. Among non-diabetics, subjects with FPG (mg/dl) = 100–125 or HbA1C(%) = 5.7–6.4 were defined as pre-diabetic. Pre-diagnosed cases with current FPG ≥126 were defined as uncontrolled AGM. Descriptive and regression analyses were conducted using SAS-9.3.2. Results Among participants, 28.62% [95% Confidence Interval (95%CI) = 23.19–34.06)] were overweight [body mass index(BMI) = (25–29.99)kg/meter2], 7.81% (4.58–11.03) were obese(BMI≥30kg/meter2), 20.82% (15.93–25.70) were current smokers, 12.64% (8.64–16.64) were current alcohol-drinkers and 46.32% of responders (39.16–53.47) had family history of diabetes. 17.84% (13.24–22.45) had stage-I [140≤average systolic BP (AvSBP in mm of mercury)<160 or 90≤average diastolic BP (AvDBP)<100] and 12.64% (8.64–16.64) had stage-II (AvSBP≥160 or AvDBP≥160) hypertension. Based on FPG and HbA1c, 10.41% (6.74–14.08) were diabetic and 27.88% (22.49–33.27) were pre-diabetic. Overall prevalence of diabetes was 15.61% (11.25–19.98). Among pre-diagnosed cases, 46.43% (26.74–66.12) had uncontrolled AGM. With one year increase in age [Odds Ratio(OR) = 1.05(1.03–1.07)], retired subjects [OR = 9.14(1.72–48.66)], overweight[OR = 2.78(1.37–5.64)], ex-drinkers [OR = 4

  9. Effects of age on bone mRNA levels of sclerostin and other genes relevant to bone metabolism in humans.

    PubMed

    Roforth, Matthew M; Fujita, Koji; McGregor, Ulrike I; Kirmani, Salman; McCready, Louise K; Peterson, James M; Drake, Matthew T; Monroe, David G; Khosla, Sundeep

    2014-02-01

    Although aging is associated with a decline in bone formation in humans, the molecular pathways contributing to this decline remain unclear. Several previous clinical studies have shown that circulating sclerostin levels increase with age, raising the possibility that increased production of sclerostin by osteocytes leads to the age-related impairment in bone formation. Thus, in the present study, we examined circulating sclerostin levels as well as bone mRNA levels of sclerostin using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (QPCR) analyses in needle bone biopsies from young (mean age, 30.0years) versus old (mean age, 72.9years) women. In addition, we analyzed the expression of genes in a number of pathways known to be altered with skeletal aging, based largely on studies in mice. While serum sclerostin levels were 46% higher (p<0.01) in the old as compared to the young women, bone sclerostin mRNA levels were no different between the two groups (p=0.845). However, genes related to notch signaling were significantly upregulated (p=0.003 when analyzed as a group) in the biopsies from the old women. In an additional analysis of 118 genes including those from genome-wide association studies related to bone density and/or fracture, BMP/TGFβ family genes, selected growth factors and nuclear receptors, and Wnt/Wnt-related genes, we found that mRNA levels of the Wnt inhibitor, SFRP1, were significantly increased (by 1.6-fold, p=0.0004, false discovery rate [q]=0.04) in the biopsies from the old as compared to the young women. Our findings thus indicate that despite increases in circulating sclerostin levels, bone sclerostin mRNA levels do not increase in elderly women. However, aging is associated with alterations in several key pathways and genes in humans that may contribute to the observed impairment in bone formation. These include notch signaling, which represents a potential therapeutic target for increasing bone formation in humans. Our studies further identified m

  10. [Bone and Calcium Metabolisms Associated with Dental and Oral-Maxillofacial Diseases. Destructive bone resorption by osteoclasts and oral disease].

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Midori; Koide, Masanori; Nakamura, Hiroshi; Udagawa, Nobuyuki

    2015-09-01

    Osteoclasts are multinucleated cells that resorb bone, originate from monocyte-macrophage lineage cells. Periodontitis is an inflammatory disease characterized by destruction of periodontal tissues including alveolar bones. Oral implant system is established average dental treatment method. However, peri-implantitis affects the convalescence. Osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ) is also inflammatory disease associated with antiresorptive therapy of bisphosphonates. Diagnosis and management of ONJ is more important issue.

  11. The effects of thyrotropin-suppressing therapy on bone metabolism in patients with well-differentiated thyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mee Kyoung; Yun, Kyung-Jin; Kim, Min-Hee; Lim, Dong-Jun; Kwon, Hyuk-Sang; Song, Ki-Ho; Kang, Moo-Il; Baek, Ki Hyun

    2015-02-01

    Studies on the effects of levothyroxine (LT4) therapy on bone and bone metabolism have yielded conflicting results. This 1-year prospective study examined whether LT4 in patients with well-differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC) is a risk factor for bone mass loss and the subsequent development of osteoporosis. We examined 93 patients with DTC over 12months after initiating LT4 therapy (early postoperative period). We examined another 33 patients on long-term LT4 therapy for DTC (late postoperative period). Dual energy X-ray absorptiometry was performed at baseline and after 1year. The mean bone losses during the early postoperative period in the lumbar spine, femoral neck, and total hip, calculated as the percentage change between levels at baseline and 12months, were -0.88, -1.3 and -0.81%, respectively. Bone loss was more evident in postmenopausal women (lumbar spine -2.1%, femoral neck -2.2%, and hip -2.1%; all P<0.05). We compared the changes in annual bone mineral density (BMD) in postmenopausal women according to calcium/vitamin D supplementation. Bone loss tended to be higher in the postmenopausal women receiving no supplementation. There was no decrease in BMD among patients during the late postoperative period. The mean bone loss was generally greater in the early than in the late postoperative group, and this was significant at the lumbar spine (P=0.041) and femoral neck (P=0.010). TSH-suppressive levothyroxine therapy accelerates bone loss, predominantly in postmenopausal women and exclusively during the early post-thyroidectomy period.

  12. Negative association between metabolic syndrome and bone mineral density in Koreans, especially in men.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ha Young; Choe, Jae Won; Kim, Hong Kyu; Bae, Sung Jin; Kim, Beom Jun; Lee, Seung Hun; Koh, Jung-Min; Han, Ki Ok; Park, Hyoung Moo; Kim, Ghi Su

    2010-05-01

    Cardiovascular disease and osteoporosis are thought to share common risk factors, and metabolic syndrome (MS) is composed of major risk factors for cardiovascular disease. This study was performed to investigate the relationships between specific MS components and bone mineral density (BMD). BMD was measured at the femoral neck of Korean men aged 40 years or more (n = 1,780) and postmenopausal women (n = 1,108) using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. We identified subjects with MS as defined by two criteria, International Diabetes Federation (IDF) and American Heart Association/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (AHA/NHLBI). Body fat and lean mass were measured via bioimpedance analysis. The prevalence of MS was 19.8% and 7.7% in men and 20.8% and 11.6% in postmenopausal women according to the AHA/NHLBI definition and the IDF definition, respectively. After multivariate adjustment, femoral neck BMD was significantly lower in subjects with MS regardless of diagnostic criteria. BMD decreased as the number of MS components increased (P < 0.001 for trends in both sexes). Among MS components, waist circumference was the most important factor in this negative association. When multiple linear regression models were applied to each 5-kg weight stratum to test for a linear trend, waist circumference and fat mass were negatively associated with BMD and lean mass was positively associated with BMD in men but not in women. MS was associated with a lower BMD in Korean men and postmenopausal women, suggesting that visceral fat may lead to bone loss, especially in men. PMID:20354685

  13. Effect of excess dietary salt on calcium metabolism and bone mineral in a spaceflight rat model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Navidi, Meena; Wolinsky, Ira; Fung, Paul; Arnaud, Sara B.

    1995-01-01

    High levels of salt promote urinary calcium (UCa) loss and have the potential to cause bone mineral deficits if intestinal Ca absorption does not compensate for these losses. To determine the effect of excess dietary salt on the osteopenia that follows skeletal unloading, we used a spaceflight model that unloads the hindlimbs of 200-g rats by tail suspension (S). Rats were studied for 2 wk on diets containing high salt (4 and 8%) and normal calcium (0.45%) and for 4 wk on diets containing 8% salt (HiNa) and 0.2% Ca (LoCa). Final body weights were 9-11% lower in S than in control rats (C) in both experiments, reflecting lower growth rates in S than in C during pair feeding. UCa represented 12% of dietary Ca on HiNA diets and was twofold higher in S than in C transiently during unloading. Net intestinal Ca absorption was consistently 11-18% lower in S than in C. Serum 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D was unaffected by either LoCa or HiNa diets in S but was increased by LoCa and HiNa diets in C. Despite depressed intestinal Ca absoption in S and a sluggish response of the Ca endocrine system to HiNa diets, UCa loss did not appear to affect the osteopenia induced by unloading. Although any deficit in bone mineral content from HiNa diets may have been too small to detect or the duration of the study too short to manifest, there were clear differences in Ca metabolism from control levels in the response of the spaceflight model to HiNa diets, indicated by depression of intestinal Ca absorption and its regulatory hormone.

  14. Clinical and biochemical determinants of bone metabolism and bone mass in adolescent female patients with anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Audí, Laura; Vargas, Deisi M; Gussinyé, Miquel; Yeste, Diego; Martí, Gertrudis; Carrascosa, Antonio

    2002-04-01

    Among pathologies prevalent in western societies, anorexia nervosa has increased over the last decade. Its effects on bone mass need to be defined, and prognostic factors, either clinical or biochemical, could aid clinicians in individual patient management. To determine which clinical and/or biochemical parameters could be related to bone mass status in adolescent female anorexia nervosa patients, 73 female patients were classified according to different stages of their illness and studied in terms of clinical and biochemical parameters and bone densitometric mineral content at lumbar spine. Patients (age 17.2 +/- 1.7 y, mean +/- SD) with Tanner pubertal stage 5, regular menstruation for more than 3 mo before the onset of secondary amenorrhea, and diagnosed with anorexia nervosa were consecutively studied and classified in three clinical situations: I) active phase (34 patients): undernourished and amenorrheic; II) weight recovered but still amenorrheic (20 patients); III) fully recovered (19 patients). Clinical data were recorded at the time of bone density measurement, concomitant with blood sample extraction for study of IGF-I, IGF-binding protein 3 (IGFBP-3), IGFBP-1, estradiol, sex hormone-binding globulin, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate, prealbumin, amino-terminal propeptide of procollagen III, osteocalcin, bone alkaline phosphatase, carboxy-terminal propeptide of procollagen I, amino-terminal propeptide of procollagen I, carboxy-terminal telopeptide of collagen I, 25-OH-vitamin D, 1,25(OH)(2)-vitamin D, and parathormone. In addition, a 24-h urine collection was made for cortisol, GH, deoxypyridinoline, amino-terminal telopeptide of collagen I, and calcium and creatinine content analysis. IGF-I, estradiol, and biochemical bone formation markers were higher and IGFBP-1, sex hormone-binding globulin, and biochemical bone resorption markers were lower in the weight-recovered stages (stages II and III) compared with the active phase (stage I). Bone formation

  15. Osteoblast dysfunctions in bone diseases: from cellular and molecular mechanisms to therapeutic strategies.

    PubMed

    Marie, Pierre J

    2015-04-01

    Several metabolic, genetic and oncogenic bone diseases are characterized by defective or excessive bone formation. These abnormalities are caused by dysfunctions in the commitment, differentiation or survival of cells of the osteoblast lineage. During the recent years, significant advances have been made in our understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the osteoblast dysfunctions in osteoporosis, skeletal dysplasias and primary bone tumors. This led to suggest novel therapeutic approaches to correct these abnormalities such as the modulation of WNT signaling, the pharmacological modulation of proteasome-mediated protein degradation, the induction of osteoprogenitor cell differentiation, the repression of cancer cell proliferation and the manipulation of epigenetic mechanisms. This article reviews our current understanding of the major cellular and molecular mechanisms inducing osteoblastic cell abnormalities in age-related bone loss, genetic skeletal dysplasias and primary bone tumors, and discusses emerging therapeutic strategies to counteract the osteoblast abnormalities in these disorders of bone formation.

  16. [Analysis of Musculoskeletal Systems and Their Diseases. Bone metabolism and intercellular network].

    PubMed

    Terashima, Asuka; Takayanagi, Hiroshi

    2015-08-01

    Bone is an active organ under continuous bone remodeling that consists of bone resorption and synthesis. The process requires precise communication among bone cells including osteoclasts, osteoblasts and osteocytes. However, the detailed mechanisms of bone cell interactions have been poorly understood. Technological advances and the accumulating evidence in recent years enabled a better understanding of the communication and coupling mechanisms at the cellular and molecular levels. These studies provide new insights into bone disease pathogenesis and molecular basis for novel therapeutic approaches. PMID:26224669

  17. Prevalence of Sleep Abnormalities and Their Association with Metabolic Syndrome among Asian Indians: Chennai Urban Rural Epidemiology Study (CURES – 67)

    PubMed Central

    Roopa, Mahadevan; Deepa, Mohan; Indulekha, Karunakaran; Mohan, Viswanathan

    2010-01-01

    Objective To estimate the prevalence of sleep abnormalities and their association with glucose intolerance and metabolic syndrome (MS) in the normal-weight urban South Indian population. Methods This population-based, cross-sectional study was carried out in 358 subjects aged 20–76 years randomly selected from the Chennai Urban Rural Epidemiology Study in South India. A validated questionnaire assessing various sleep abnormalities (snoring, daytime sleepiness, lack of refreshing sleep, and number of hours of sleep) was administered. All subjects underwent an oral glucose tolerance test, and anthropometric biochemical measurements were obtained to assess cardiometabolic risk factors including glucose intolerance. Diabetes risk was assessed using a previously validated Indian Diabetes Risk Score (IDRS). Results The overall prevalence of snoring and daytime sleepiness was 40% and 59%, respectively. Snorers were more male, older, smokers, and had higher levels of cardiometabolic risk factors. Subjects with daytime sleepiness had higher body mass index (BMI) and abdominal obesity. Both snoring (50.9% vs 30.2%, p < 0.001) and daytime sleepiness (68% vs 49.7%, p < 0.001) were more prevalent among subjects with impaired glucose metabolism compared to those with normal glucose metabolism. Both sleep measures were associated with higher diabetes risk scores, as assessed by the IDRS (snoring: trend χ2, 11.14, p = 0.001; daytime sleepiness: trend χ2, 5.12, p = 0.024). Metabolic syndrome was significantly associated with snoring even after adjusting for age, sex, family history of diabetes, physical activity, smoking, and alcohol. Conclusion The prevalence of snoring and daytime sleepiness is high among urban South Indians and these two sleep measures are associated with glucose intolerance, MS, and higher diabetes risk scores. PMID:21129351

  18. NMR ({sup 1}H and {sup 13}C) based signatures of abnormal choline metabolism in oral squamous cell carcinoma with no prominent Warburg effect

    SciTech Connect

    Bag, Swarnendu; Banerjee, Deb Ranjan; Basak, Amit; Das, Amit Kumar; Pal, Mousumi; Banerjee, Rita; Paul, Ranjan Rashmi; Chatterjee, Jyotirmoy

    2015-04-17

    At functional levels, besides genes and proteins, changes in metabolome profiles are instructive for a biological system in health and disease including malignancy. It is understood that metabolomic alterations in association with proteomic and transcriptomic aberrations are very fundamental to unravel malignant micro-ambient criticality and oral cancer is no exception. Hence deciphering intricate dimensions of oral cancer metabolism may be contributory both for integrated appreciation of its pathogenesis and to identify any critical but yet unexplored dimension of this malignancy with high mortality rate. Although several methods do exist, NMR provides higher analytical precision in identification of cancer metabolomic signature. Present study explored abnormal signatures in choline metabolism in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) using {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR analysis of serum. It has demonstrated down-regulation of choline with concomitant up-regulation of its break-down product in the form of trimethylamine N-oxide in OSCC compared to normal counterpart. Further, no significant change in lactate profile in OSCC possibly indicated that well-known Warburg effect was not a prominent phenomenon in such malignancy. Amongst other important metabolites, malonate has shown up-regulation but D-glucose, saturated fatty acids, acetate and threonine did not show any significant change. Analyzing these metabolomic findings present study proposed trimethyl amine N-oxide and malonate as important metabolic signature for oral cancer with no prominent Warburg effect. - Highlights: • NMR ({sup 1}H and {sup 13}C) study of Oral Squamous cell Carcinoma Serum. • Abnormal Choline metabolomic signatures. • Up-regulation of Trimethylamine N-oxide. • Unchanged lactate profile indicates no prominent Warburg effect. • Proposed alternative glucose metabolism path through up-regulation of malonate.

  19. Effects of switching from calcium carbonate to lanthanum carbonate on bone mineral metabolism in hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Manabe, Rie; Fukami, Kei; Ando, Ryotaro; Sakai, Kazuko; Kusumoto, Takuo; Hazama, Takuma; Adachi, Takeki; Kaida, Yusuke; Nakayama, Yosuke; Ueda, Seiji; Kohno, Keisuke; Wada, Yoshifumi; Yamagishi, Sho-ichi; Okuda, Seiya

    2013-04-01

    Phosphate binders are useful for the treatment of hyperphosphatemia in hemodialysis (HD) patients. This study was performed to examine the effects of switching from calcium carbonate (CC) to lanthanum carbonate (LC) on bone mineral metabolism and inflammatory markers in HD patients. We conducted 29 stable HD patients receiving CC, which was replaced by LC and followed-up for 12 weeks. Patients underwent determinants of blood chemistries such as serum calcium (Ca), phosphorus, parathyroid hormone (PTH) and vitamin D status, and interleukin-6 (IL-6) mRNA levels in whole blood cells were evaluated by real-time PCR just before and after the treatment with LC. Corrected Ca [corrected] levels were significantly reduced, but serum phosphorus levels (P levels) were unchanged after LC treatment. Switching to LC increased whole-PTH, osteocalcin, 1,25(OH)(2) D(3) levels and 1,25(OH)(2) D(3)/25(OH)D(3) ratio. 1,25(OH)(2) D(3)/25(OH)D(3) ratio was negatively correlated with HD duration. Furthermore, whole blood cell IL-6 mRNA levels were significantly reduced by LC treatment. We provided that the switching from CC to LC improved Ca overload and ameliorated vitamin D and inflammatory status in HD patients. These observations suggest that LC may play a protective role for the progression of atherosclerosis and vascular calcification in these patients.

  20. The unsolved case of “bone-impairing analgesics”: the endocrine effects of opioids on bone metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Coluzzi, Flaminia; Pergolizzi, Joseph; Raffa, Robert B; Mattia, Consalvo

    2015-01-01

    The current literature describes the possible risks for bone fracture in chronic analgesics users. There are three main hypotheses that could explain the increased risk of fracture associated with central analgesics, such as opioids: 1) the increased risk of falls caused by central nervous system effects, including sedation and dizziness; 2) reduced bone mass density caused by the direct opioid effect on osteoblasts; and 3) chronic opioid-induced hypogonadism. The impact of opioids varies by sex and among the type of opioid used (less, for example, for tapentadol and buprenorphine). Opioid-associated androgen deficiency is correlated with an increased risk of osteoporosis; thus, despite that standards have not been established for monitoring and treating opioid-induced hypogonadism or hypoadrenalism, all patients chronically taking opioids (particularly at doses ≥100 mg morphine daily) should be monitored for the early detection of hormonal impairment and low bone mass density. PMID:25848298

  1. Markers of bone resorption and calcium metabolism are related to dietary intake patterns in male and female bed rest subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Scott M.; Zwart, S. R.; Hargens, A. r.

    2006-01-01

    Dietary potassium and protein intakes predict net endogenous acid production in humans. Intracellular buffers, including exchangeable bone mineral, play a crucial role in balancing chronic acid-base perturbations in the body; subsequently, chronic acid loads can potentially contribute to bone loss. Bone is lost during space flight, and a dietary countermeasure would be desirable for many reasons. We studied the ability of diet protein and potassium to predict levels of bone resorption markers in males and females. Identical twin pairs (8 M, 7 F) were assigned to 2 groups: bed rest (sedentary, SED) or bed rest with supine treadmill exercise in a lower body negative pressure chamber (EX). Diet was controlled for 3 d before and 30 d of bed rest (BR). Urinary Ca, N-telopeptide (NTX), and pyridinium crosslinks (PYD) were measured before and on days 5, 12, 19, and 26 of BR. Data were analyzed by Pearson correlation (P<0.05). The ratio of dietary animal protein/potassium intake was not correlated with NTX before BR for males or females, but they were positively correlated in both groups of males during bed rest. Dietary animal protein/potassium and urine Ca were correlated before and during bed rest for the males, and only during bed rest for the females. Conversely, the ratio of dietary vegetable protein/potassium intake was negatively correlated with urinary calcium during bed rest for the females, but there was no relationship between vegetable protein/potassium intake and bone markers for the males. These data suggest that the ratio of animal protein/potassium intake may affect bone, particularly in bed rest subjects. These data show that the type of protein and gender may be additional factors that modulate the effect of diet on bone metabolism during bed rest. Altering this ratio may help prevent bone loss on Earth and during space flight.

  2. Osseointegration of dental implants in 3D-printed synthetic onlay grafts customized according to bone metabolic activity in recipient site.

    PubMed

    Tamimi, Faleh; Torres, Jesus; Al-Abedalla, Khadijeh; Lopez-Cabarcos, Enrique; Alkhraisat, Mohammad H; Bassett, David C; Gbureck, Uwe; Barralet, Jake E

    2014-07-01

    Onlay grafts made of monolithic microporous monetite bioresorbable bioceramics have the capacity to conduct bone augmentation. However, there is heterogeneity in the graft behaviour in vivo that seems to correlate with the host anatomy. In this study, we sought to investigate the metabolic activity of the regenerated bone in monolithic monetite onlays by using positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) in rats. This information was used to optimize the design of monetite onlays with different macroporous architecture that were then fabricated using a 3D-printing technique. In vivo, bone augmentation was attempted with these customized onlays in rabbits. PET-CT findings demonstrated that bone metabolism in the calvarial bone showed higher activity in the inferior and lateral areas of the onlays. Histological observations revealed higher bone volume (up to 47%), less heterogeneity and more implant osseointegration (up to 38%) in the augmented bone with the customized monetite onlays. Our results demonstrated for the first time that it is possible to achieve osseointegration of dental implants in bone augmented with 3D-printed synthetic onlays. It was also observed that designing the macropore geometry according to the bone metabolic activity was a key parameter in increasing the volume of bone augmented within monetite onlays.

  3. Alendronate and Resistive Exercise Countermeasures Against Bed Rest-Induced Bone Loss: Biochemical Markers of Bone and Calcium Metabolism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Scott M.; Nillen, Jeannie L.; Davis-Street, Janis E.; DeKerlegand, Diane E.; LeBlanc, Adrian; Shackelford, Linda C.

    2001-01-01

    Weightlessness-induced bone loss must be counteracted to ensure crew health during extendedduration space missions. Studies were conducted to assess two bone loss countermeasures in a ground-based model: horizontal bed rest. Following a 3-wk ambulatory adaptation period, male and female subjects (aged 21-56 y) completed a 17-wk bed rest protocol. Subjects were assigned to one of three treatments: alendronate (ALEN; 10 mg/d, n=6), resistive exercise (RE; 1.5 h/d, 6 d/wk, n=8), or control (CN; no countermeasure, n=8). Dietary intake was adjusted to maintain body weight. Endocrine and biochemical indices were measured in blood and urine using standard laboratory methods. All data reported are expressed as percent change from individual pre-bedrest data. Serum calcium changed little during bed rest, and tended to decrease (4-8%) in ALEN subjects. In RE subjects, bone alkaline phosphatase and osteocalcin were increased >65 and >30%, respectively, during bed rest, while these were unchanged or decreased in ALEN and CN subjects. Urinary calcium was increased 50% in CN subjects, but was unchanged or decreased in both ALEN and RE groups. Urinary n-telopeptide excretion was increased 40-50% in CN and RE subjects, but decreased 20% in ALEN subjects. Pyridinium crosslink and deoxypyridinoline excretion were increased 20-50% during bed rest. These data suggest that RE countermeasures are effective at increasing markers of bone formation in an analog of weightlessness, while ALEN reduces markers of bone resorption. Counteracting the bone loss of space flight may require both pharmacologic and exercise countermeasures.

  4. Dietary omega-3 fatty acid deficiency and high fructose intake in the development of metabolic syndrome, brain metabolic abnormalities, and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Simopoulos, Artemis P

    2013-08-01

    Western diets are characterized by both dietary omega-3 fatty acid deficiency and increased fructose intake. The latter found in high amounts in added sugars such as sucrose and high fructose corn syrup (HFCS). Both a low intake of omega-3 fatty acids or a high fructose intake contribute to metabolic syndrome, liver steatosis or non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), promote brain insulin resistance, and increase the vulnerability to cognitive dysfunction. Insulin resistance is the core perturbation of metabolic syndrome. Multiple cognitive domains are affected by metabolic syndrome in adults and in obese adolescents, with volume losses in the hippocampus and frontal lobe, affecting executive function. Fish oil supplementation maintains proper insulin signaling in the brain, ameliorates NAFLD and decreases the risk to metabolic syndrome suggesting that adequate levels of omega-3 fatty acids in the diet can cope with the metabolic challenges imposed by high fructose intake in Western diets which is of major public health importance. This review presents the current status of the mechanisms involved in the development of the metabolic syndrome, brain insulin resistance, and NAFLD a most promising area of research in Nutrition for the prevention of these conditions, chronic diseases, and improvement of Public Health. PMID:23896654

  5. Which metabolic imaging, besides bone scan with 99mTc-phosphonates, for detecting and evaluating bone metastases in prostatic cancer patients? An open discussion.

    PubMed

    Bombardieri, E; Setti, L; Kirienko, M; Antunovic, L; Guglielmo, P; Ciocia, G

    2015-12-01

    Prostate cancer bone metastases occur frequently in advanced cancer and this is matter of particular attention, due to the great impact on patient's management and considering that a lot of new emerging therapeutic options have been recently introduced. Imaging bone metastases is essential to localize lesions, to establish their size and number, to study characteristics and changes during therapy. Besides radiological imaging, nuclear medicine modalities can image their features and offer additional information about their metabolic behaviour. They can be classified according to physical characteristics, type of detection, mechanism of uptake, availability for daily use. The physiopathology of metastases formation and the mechanisms of tracer uptake are essential to understand the interpretation of nuclear medicine images. Therefore, radiopharmaceuticals for bone metastases can be classified in agents targeting bone (99mTc-phosphonates, 18F-fluoride) and those targeting prostatic cancer cells (18F-fluoromethylcholine, 11C-choline, 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose). The modalities using the first group of tracers are planar bone scan, SPECT or SPECT/CT with 99mTc-diphosphonates, and 18F-fluoride PET/CT, while the modalities using the second group include 18F/11C-choline derivatives PET/CT, 18F-FDG PET/CT and PET/CT scans with several other radiopharmaceuticals described in the literature, such as 18F/11C-acetate derivatives, 18F-fluoro-5α-dihydrotestosterone (FDHT), 18F-anti-1-amino-3-fluorocyclobutane-1-carboxylic acid (FACBC), 18F-2'-fluoro-5-methyl-1-β-D-arabinofuranosyluracil (FMAU) and 68Ga-labeled-prostate specific membrane antigen (PMSA) PET/TC. However, since data on clinical validation for these last novel modalities are not conclusive and/or are not still sufficient in number, at present they can be still considered as promising tools under evaluation. The present paper considers the nuclear modalities today available for the clinical routine. This overview wants

  6. Evaluation of bone mineral density, bone metabolism, osteoprotegerin and receptor activator of the NFκB ligand serum levels during treatment with infliximab in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Vis, M; Havaardsholm, E A; Haugeberg, G; Uhlig, T; Voskuyl, A E; van de Stadt, R J; Dijkmans, B A C; Woolf, A D; Kvien, T K; Lems, W F

    2006-01-01

    Objectives To examine whether treatment with anti‐tumour necrosis factor (TNF) α prevents loss of bone mineral density (BMD) at the spine and hip (generalised) and in the hands (local) of patients with rheumatoid arthritis, and to study the changes in markers of bone metabolism, including receptor activator of the NFκB ligand (RANKL) and osteoprotegerin (OPG), during anti‐TNF treatment. Patients and methods 102 patients with active rheumatoid arthritis, who were treated with infliximab during 1 year, were included in this open cohort study. The BMD of the spine and hip (dual x ray absorptiometry ) and hands dual x ray radiogrammetry was measured before the start of treatment and after 1 year. Changes in osteocalcin formation, β‐isomerised carboxy terminal telopeptide of type 1 collagen (β‐CTx, resorption), RANKL and OPG were determined at 0, 14, 30 and 46 weeks. Results The BMD of the spine and hip was unchanged during treatment with infliximab, whereas BMD of the hand decreased significantly by 0.8% (p<0.01). The BMD of the hip in patients with a good European League Against Rheumatism response showed a favourable change compared with patients not achieving such a response. Serum β‐CTx and RANKL were both considerably decreased compared with baseline at all time points. The decrease in β‐CTx was associated with the decrease in Disease Activity Score of 28 joints and C reactive protein during the 0–14 weeks interval. Conclusion In patients with rheumatoid arthritis treated with infliximab, spine and hip bone loss is arrested, whereas metacarpal cortical hand bone loss is not stopped. The outcome of the study also supports a relationship between clinical response, in terms of reduced inflammatory activity, and changes in bone loss of the spine, hip and hands. PMID:16606653

  7. Early ALS-type gait abnormalities in AMP-dependent protein kinase-deficient mice suggest a role for this metabolic sensor in early stages of the disease.

    PubMed

    Vergouts, Maxime; Marinangeli, Claudia; Ingelbrecht, Caroline; Genard, Geraldine; Schakman, Olivier; Sternotte, Anthony; Calas, André-Guilhem; Hermans, Emmanuel

    2015-12-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by the selective loss of motoneurons. While the principal cause of the disease remains so far unknown, the onset and progression of the pathology are increasingly associated with alterations in the control of cell metabolism. On the basis of the well-known key roles of 5'-adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in sensing and regulating the intracellular energy status, we hypothesized that mice with a genetic deletion of AMPK would develop locomotor abnormalities that bear similarity with those detected in the very early disease stage of mice carrying the ALS-associated mutated gene hSOD1(G93A). Using an automated gait analysis system (CatWalk), we here show that hSOD1(G93A) mice and age-matched mice lacking the neuronal and skeletal muscle predominant α2 catalytic subunit of AMPK showed an altered gait, clearly different from wild type control mice. Double mutant mice lacking AMPK α2 and carrying hSOD1(G93A) showed the same early gait abnormalities as hSOD1(G93A) mice over an age span of 8 to 16 weeks. Taken together, these data support the concept that altered AMPK function and associated bioenergetic abnormalities could constitute an important component in the early pathogenesis of ALS. Therapeutic interventions acting on metabolic pathways could prove beneficial on early locomotor deficits, which are sensitively detectable in rodent models using the CatWalk system. PMID:26152932

  8. Bone lesion biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    Benign (noncancerous) bone tumors include: Bone cyst Fibroma Osteoblastoma Osteoid osteoma Cancerous tumors include: Ewing sarcoma Multiple myeloma Osteosarcoma Other types of cancer that may have spread to the bone Abnormal ...

  9. Effects of selenium-containing compounds and their metabolism in intact rats and in animals with bone fractures.

    PubMed

    Petrovich, Yu A; Podorozhnaya, R P; Kichenko, S M; Kozlova, M V

    2004-01-01

    Blood content of MDA in rats increased 1 and 2 weeks after mandibular bone fracture at stages of cellular fibrous and chondroid callus and decreased 4 weeks after fracture at the stage of primary bone callus. Treatment with Se (intragastrically and electrophoretically) reduced this increase by activating selenium-containing glutathione peroxidase. In order to clear out the relationship between Se and carbohydrate metabolism in different ages, the distribution of Se between the blood and mandibular bone, diaphysis and metaepiphyseal zone of the femoral bone was studied using the bone/blood relative radioactivity coefficient after intraperitoneal injection of [(75)Se]selenate. In control 1-month-old rats the radioactivity had 2 peaks corresponding to 6 and 48 h. The first peak was presumably caused by Se adsorption on hydroxyapatite, the second by chemosorption on hydroxyapatite and protein binding. Only one peak of relative radioactivity (after 12-48 h) was observed in 3-month-old control rats, and it could be increased by sucrose diet. The relative radioactivity was higher in rats receiving sucrose ration for 2 months starting from the age of 1 month in comparison with the control.

  10. [Effects of weightlessness on phosphorus and calcium metabolism and bone remodeling].

    PubMed

    Alexandre, C; Chappard, D; Vico, L; Minaire, P; Riffat, G

    1986-05-17

    Weightlessness results in negative calcium balance which can only reflect a redistribution of calcium in the body: the loss of calcium in the faeces and/or urine is constant, but an increase in urinary hydroxyproline indicating bone collagen destruction is not always detectable; moreover, a slowing down of collagen maturation may be suspected. Bone analysis by histomorphometry in animals and by indirect, non-invasive methods in man shows a decrease in bone mass. However, this bone tissue atrophy might only reflect excessive ageing of the bone during weightlessness, as suggested by slow bone formation and lack of variation in bone resorption. Since the experimental results obtained in men and animals during simulated weightlessness on earth are not strictly identical with those observed in space- flights, their validity may be questioned. Additional studies (notably histomorphometric studies) are therefore required for a better knowledge, as well as prevention, of the problems raised by human life in space. PMID:2940573

  11. Effects on bone metabolism of new therapeutic strategies with standard chemotherapy and biologic drugs

    PubMed Central

    Ciolli, Stefania

    2013-01-01

    Summary Recent biological advances have provided the framework for novel therapeutic strategies in oncology. Many new treatments are now based on standard cytotoxic drugs plus biologic agents. In Multiple Myeloma, a plasma cell neoplasm characterized by a severe bone disease, biologic drugs such as proteasome inhibitors and immunomodulatory agents, above their antineoplastic efficacy have a beneficial effects on bone disease. Bortezomib, a clinically available proteasome inhibitor active against myeloma, induces the differentiation of mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells into osteoblasts, resulting in new bone formation. Immunomodulatory drugs (e.g., thalidomide and lenalidomide), which are active against myeloma, also block the activity of bone-resorbing osteoclasts. These data reflect the utility of targeting endogenous mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells for the purpose of tissue repair and suggest that combining different classes of agents that are antineoplastic and also inhibit bone destruction and increase bone formation should be very beneficial for myeloma patients suffering from severe bone disease. PMID:24554928

  12. [Ultrasound densitometry of the heel bone in the diagnosis of osseous tissue metabolic abnormalities in patients with rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Iakimenko, E A; Dets', V V; Tbileli, V V

    2001-01-01

    The implication was studied of such factors as occurrence of the affliction, sex, inflammation activity, joint functional inadequacies, intake of steroids in the development of osteopenia and osteoporosis in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Determined in the above patients were RRF, SOS, BUA with the aid of the ultrasonic densitometer UBIS 5000 of the DMS (FRANCIUM) firm. Of the 42 examined patients, osteoporosis was identified in 28.5 percent, osteopenia in 45.3 percent of cases, the degree associated with RA duration, inflammation activity, function disorders of the joints favored by intensification of processes of osteal resorption in rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:11881371

  13. Anesthetic management of a patient with sustained severe metabolic alkalosis and electrolyte abnormalities caused by ingestion of baking soda.

    PubMed

    Soliz, Jose; Lim, Jeffrey; Zheng, Gang

    2014-01-01

    The use of alternative medicine is prevalent worldwide. However, its effect on intraoperative anesthetic care is underreported. We report the anesthetic management of a patient who underwent an extensive head and neck cancer surgery and presented with a severe intraoperative metabolic alkalosis from the long term ingestion of baking soda and other herbal remedies. PMID:25180100

  14. Anesthetic management of a patient with sustained severe metabolic alkalosis and electrolyte abnormalities caused by ingestion of baking soda.

    PubMed

    Soliz, Jose; Lim, Jeffrey; Zheng, Gang

    2014-01-01

    The use of alternative medicine is prevalent worldwide. However, its effect on intraoperative anesthetic care is underreported. We report the anesthetic management of a patient who underwent an extensive head and neck cancer surgery and presented with a severe intraoperative metabolic alkalosis from the long term ingestion of baking soda and other herbal remedies.

  15. Anesthetic Management of a Patient with Sustained Severe Metabolic Alkalosis and Electrolyte Abnormalities Caused by Ingestion of Baking Soda

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    The use of alternative medicine is prevalent worldwide. However, its effect on intraoperative anesthetic care is underreported. We report the anesthetic management of a patient who underwent an extensive head and neck cancer surgery and presented with a severe intraoperative metabolic alkalosis from the long term ingestion of baking soda and other herbal remedies. PMID:25180100

  16. Markers of bone turnover in patients with epilepsy and their relationship to management of bone diseases induced by antiepileptic drugs.

    PubMed

    Hamed, Sherifa A

    2016-01-01

    Data from cross-sectional and prospective studies revealed that patients with epilepsy and on long-term treatment with antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are at increased risk for metabolic bone diseases. Bone diseases were reported in about 50% of patients on AEDs. Low bone mineral density, osteopenia/osteoporosis, osteomalacia, rickets, altered concentration of bone turnover markers and fractures were reported with phenobarbital, phenytoin, carbamazepine, valproate, oxcarbazepine and lamotrigine. The mechanisms for AEDs-induced bone diseases are heterogeneous and include hypovitaminosis D, hypocalcemia and direct acceleration of bone loss and/or reduction of bone formation. This article reviews the evidence, predictors and mechanisms of AEDs-induced bone abnormalities and its clinical implications. For patients on AEDs, regular monitoring of bone health is recommended. Prophylactic administration of calcium and vitamin D is recommended for all patients. Treatment doses of calcium and vitamin D and even anti-resorptive drug therapy are reserved for patients at high risk of pathological fracture.

  17. Effects of Astragalus membranaceus with supplemental calcium on bone mineral density and bone metabolism in calcium-deficient ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Kang, Se-Chan; Kim, Hee Jung; Kim, Mi-Hyun

    2013-01-01

    It has been reported that Astragalus membranaceus, an Asian traditional herb, has an estrogenic effect in vitro. To examine the possible role of A. membranaceus extract with supplemental calcium (Ca) on bone status in calcium-deficient (LCa) ovariectomized (OVX) rats, a total of 48 female rats were divided into six groups: (1) normal control, (2) sham operation with LCa (sham-LCa), (3) OVX with LCa (OVX-LCa), (4) A. membranaceus supplementation with OVX-LCa (OVX-MLCa), (5) Ca supplementation with OVX (OVX-Ca), and (6) A. membranaceus and Ca supplementation with OVX (OVX-MCa). A. membranaceus ethanol extract (500 mg/kg BW) and/or Ca (800 mg/kg BW) were administered orally for 8 weeks along with a Ca-deficient diet. Results revealed that Ca supplementation with or without A. membranaceus extract significantly improved bone mineral density, biomechanical strength, and ash weight of the femur and tibia in OVX rats. High Ca with A. membranaceus combination supplementation significantly increased the ash weight of the femur and tibia and decreased urinary Ca excretion compared with supplementation of Ca alone. Uterine weight was not changed by A. membranaceus administration in OVX rats. These results suggest that A. membranaceus extract combined with supplemental Ca may be more protective against the Ca loss of bone than A. membranaceus or supplementation of Ca alone in calcium-insufficient postmenopausal women.

  18. Metabolic syndrome and the risk of bone fractures: A Meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies.

    PubMed

    Yang, Libo; Lv, Xiaohong; Wei, Dailin; Yue, Feng; Guo, Jinying; Zhang, Tie

    2016-03-01

    Increasing evidence has suggested an association between metabolic syndrome (MetS) and bone fractures. However, because of controversial results it is still not clear whether this effect is protective or detrimental. Therefore, we conducted a meta-analysis of prospective studies to assess the association between them. Pertinent studies were identified by searching PubMed and EMBASE databases until the end of July 2015. Summary relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for associations between MetS and fracture risk were estimated with random effects models. Our meta-analysis included five prospective studies. The summarized RRs of any type of fractures for MetS were 0.76 (95%CI: 0.59-0.97, P = 0.026) with moderate heterogeneity (I(2) = 63.80%, P = 0.064). Notably, subgroup analyses by gender showed that significant inverse associations were observed only in men (summarized RR = 0.66; 95%CI = 0.51-0.86, P = 0.002; I(2) = 27.90%, P = 0.235; n = 5) but not in women (summarized RR = 0.96, 95%CI: 0.60-1.54, P = 0.866; I(2) = 83.40%, P = 0.002; n = 3). However, the difference of the pooled RRs from the two subgroups did not reach statistical significance with a test of interaction (p = 0.179 for the interaction test). When pooling the RRs of non-vertebral fractures, significant inverse associations were similarly observed in men (RR = 0.72, 95%CI: 0.52-0.99, P = 0.048) but not in women (RR = 0.99, 95%CI: 0.60-1.64, P = 0.969). There was no evidence of publication bias. Our findings demonstrated that MetS was significantly associated with a lower fracture risk. There might be gender differences in the relationship of MetS with fractures, but further confirmation is needed.

  19. Maternal Mineral and Bone Metabolism During Pregnancy, Lactation, and Post-Weaning Recovery.

    PubMed

    Kovacs, Christopher S

    2016-04-01

    During pregnancy and lactation, female physiology adapts to meet the added nutritional demands of fetuses and neonates. An average full-term fetus contains ∼30 g calcium, 20 g phosphorus, and 0.8 g magnesium. About 80% of mineral is accreted during the third trimester; calcium transfers at 300-350 mg/day during the final 6 wk. The neonate requires 200 mg calcium daily from milk during the first 6 mo, and 120 mg calcium from milk during the second 6 mo (additional calcium comes from solid foods). Calcium transfers can be more than double and triple these values, respectively, in women who nurse twins and triplets. About 25% of dietary calcium is normally absorbed in healthy adults. Average maternal calcium intakes in American and Canadian women are insufficient to meet the fetal and neonatal calcium requirements if normal efficiency of intestinal calcium absorption is relied upon. However, several adaptations are invoked to meet the fetal and neonatal demands for mineral without requiring increased intakes by the mother. During pregnancy the efficiency of intestinal calcium absorption doubles, whereas during lactation the maternal skeleton is resorbed to provide calcium for milk. This review addresses our current knowledge regarding maternal adaptations in mineral and skeletal homeostasis that occur during pregnancy, lactation, and post-weaning recovery. Also considered are the impacts that these adaptations have on biochemical and hormonal parameters of mineral homeostasis, the consequences for long-term skeletal health, and the presentation and management of disorders of mineral and bone metabolism. PMID:26887676

  20. Effects of linseed oil and palm oil on growth performance, tibia fatty acid and biomarkers of bone metabolism in broilers.

    PubMed

    Zhong, X; Gao, S; Wang, J J; Dong, L; Huang, J; Zhang, L L; Wang, T

    2014-01-01

    1. This study was conducted to determine the effects of different dietary fat sources on growth performance, tibia fatty acids and biomarkers of bone metabolism in broilers. 2. One-d-old commercial Arbor Acres broilers were fed with a maize-soya bean basal diet for 42 d, supplemented with oils according to the following 5 treatments: lard (lard group); linseed oil (linseed oil group); palm oil (palm oil group); linseed oil + palm oil (60:40 or 40:60 w/w, LP-1 group and LP-2 group, respectively). 3. No significant differences in weight gain, feed intake and gain/feed ratio were observed between the lard and linseed oil groups. Birds fed on palm oil had significantly greater weight gain and feed intake than those fed on lard or linseed oil. Growth performance in LP-1 and LP-2 was significantly greater than that of single-oil groups. 4. Tibia growth and bone characteristics were not influenced by supplementation with lard, linseed oil, or palm oil alone, but broilers fed on a mixture of fats had significantly greater tibia weight and length compared to broilers fed on linseed oil. Bone mineral density in tibia was significantly increased in LP-1 and LP-2 groups. 5. Supplementation of linseed oil alone or in combination with palm oil enhanced apparent digestibility of calcium, reduced serum calcium and increased tibia calcium concentrations. Moreover, supplementation with linseed oil alone or in combination with palm oil had a positive effect on biomarkers of bone growth. 6. The combination of linseed and palm oils was beneficial for growth performance, tibia growth and biomarkers of bone metabolism.

  1. Effect of kidney-reinforcing and marrow-beneficial Chinese medicine on bone metabolism-related factors following spinal cord injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    ZHOU, DA-AN; DENG, YUE NING; LIU, LEI; LI, JIAN JUN

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the effect of traditional Chinese kidney reinforcing and marrow-beneficial medicine (KRMB) on the prevention and treatment of abnormal bone metabolism and osteoporosis (OP) resulting from spinal cord injury (SCI). Rat models of OP following SCI were surgically established. The rats were randomly divided into five groups: Normal; sham operation + KRMB; normal + KRMB; SCI + KRMB; and SCI model group. Bone mineral density (BMD), and the expression of bone gamma-carboxyglutamic-acid containing protein (BGP), hepcidin mRNA and bone sialoprotein (BSP) were recorded at 1, 2, 4, 6, 8 and 10 weeks after the operation. BMD expression in the SCI model group was significantly lower compared with the normal, sham + KRMB and normal + KRMB groups at 4, 6, 8 and 10 weeks (P<0.01), and was significantly lower than that in the SCI + KRMB group at 6 (P<0.05), 8 and 10 weeks (P<0.01). The level of serum BGP in the SCI model group was significantly higher compared with the normal, sham + KRMB and normal + KRMB groups at each time point (P<0.01), and lower than the SCI + KRMB group (P<0.01). The SCI + KRMB group was significantly higher than the normal, sham operation + KRMB and normal + KRMB groups (P<0.01). Hepcidin mRNA expression in the rat livers in the normal, sham + KRMB and normal + KRMB group was significantly higher than that in the SCI + KRMB group and SCI model group at each time point (P<0.01). Hepcidin mRNA expression in the SCI + KRMB group was significantly higher than that in the SCI model group at 1 week (P<0.01), and significantly higher than the SCI model group at 2, 4, 6, 8 and 10 weeks (P<0.01). BSP expression in the SCI model group was significantly higher than that in the normal, sham + KRMB and normal + KRMB groups at each time point (P<0.01). BSP expression in SCI model group was higher than that in the SCI + KRMB group at 1 (P<0.05), 2, 4, 6, 8 and 10 weeks (P<0.01). In conclusion, KRMB traditional Chinese medicine may

  2. Abnormally activated one-carbon metabolic pathway is associated with mtDNA hypermethylation and mitochondrial malfunction in the oocytes of polycystic gilt ovaries.

    PubMed

    Jia, Longfei; Li, Juan; He, Bin; Jia, Yimin; Niu, Yingjie; Wang, Chenfei; Zhao, Ruqian

    2016-01-01

    Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) is associated with hyperhomocysteinemia and polycystic ovaries (PCO) usually produce oocytes of poor quality. However, the intracellular mechanism linking hyperhomocysteinemia and oocyte quality remains elusive. In this study, the quality of the oocytes isolated from healthy and polycystic gilt ovaries was evaluated in vitro in association with one-carbon metabolism, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) methylation, and mitochondrial function. PCO oocytes demonstrated impaired polar body extrusion, and significantly decreased cleavage and blastocyst rates. The mitochondrial distribution was disrupted in PCO oocytes, together with decreased mitochondrial membrane potential and deformed mitochondrial structure. The mtDNA copy number and the expression of mtDNA-encoded genes were significantly lower in PCO oocytes. Homocysteine concentration in follicular fluid was significantly higher in PCO group, which was associated with significantly up-regulated one-carbon metabolic enzymes betaine homocysteine methyltransferase (BHMT), glycine N-methyltransferase (GNMT) and the DNA methyltransferase DNMT1. Moreover, mtDNA sequences coding for 12S, 16S rRNA and ND4, as well as the D-loop region were significantly hypermethylated in PCO oocytes. These results indicate that an abnormal activation of one-carbon metabolism and hypermethylation of mtDNA may contribute, largely, to the mitochondrial malfunction and decreased quality of PCO-derived oocytes in gilts. PMID:26758245

  3. Abnormally activated one-carbon metabolic pathway is associated with mtDNA hypermethylation and mitochondrial malfunction in the oocytes of polycystic gilt ovaries

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Longfei; Li, Juan; He, Bin; Jia, Yimin; Niu, Yingjie; Wang, Chenfei; Zhao, Ruqian

    2016-01-01

    Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) is associated with hyperhomocysteinemia and polycystic ovaries (PCO) usually produce oocytes of poor quality. However, the intracellular mechanism linking hyperhomocysteinemia and oocyte quality remains elusive. In this study, the quality of the oocytes isolated from healthy and polycystic gilt ovaries was evaluated in vitro in association with one-carbon metabolism, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) methylation, and mitochondrial function. PCO oocytes demonstrated impaired polar body extrusion, and significantly decreased cleavage and blastocyst rates. The mitochondrial distribution was disrupted in PCO oocytes, together with decreased mitochondrial membrane potential and deformed mitochondrial structure. The mtDNA copy number and the expression of mtDNA-encoded genes were significantly lower in PCO oocytes. Homocysteine concentration in follicular fluid was significantly higher in PCO group, which was associated with significantly up-regulated one-carbon metabolic enzymes betaine homocysteine methyltransferase (BHMT), glycine N-methyltransferase (GNMT) and the DNA methyltransferase DNMT1. Moreover, mtDNA sequences coding for 12S, 16S rRNA and ND4, as well as the D-loop region were significantly hypermethylated in PCO oocytes. These results indicate that an abnormal activation of one-carbon metabolism and hypermethylation of mtDNA may contribute, largely, to the mitochondrial malfunction and decreased quality of PCO-derived oocytes in gilts. PMID:26758245

  4. Abnormalities of Thyroid Hormone Metabolism during Systemic Illness: The Low T3 Syndrome in Different Clinical Settings

    PubMed Central

    Zantut-Wittmann, Denise Engelbrecht

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid hormone abnormalities are common in critically ill patients. For over three decades, a mild form of these abnormalities has been described in patients with several diseases under outpatient care. These alterations in thyroid hormone economy are a part of the nonthyroidal illness and keep an important relationship with prognosis in most cases. The main feature of this syndrome is a fall in free triiodothyronine (T3) levels with normal thyrotropin (TSH). Free thyroxin (T4) and reverse T3 levels vary according to the underlying disease. The importance of recognizing this condition in such patients is evident to physicians practicing in a variety of specialties, especially general medicine, to avoid misdiagnosing the much more common primary thyroid dysfunctions and indicating treatments that are often not beneficial. This review focuses on the most common chronic diseases already known to present with alterations in serum thyroid hormone levels. A short review of the common pathophysiology of the nonthyroidal illness is followed by the clinical and laboratorial presentation in each condition. Finally, a clinical case vignette and a brief summary on the evidence about treatment of the nonthyroidal illness and on the future research topics to be addressed are presented. PMID:27803712

  5. [IMPACT OF RADIAL SHOCK-WAVE THERAPY OF A LOW FREQUENCY ON METABOLIC PROCESSES IN THE BONE TISSUE IN TRAUMATIC TIBIAL DEFECTS IN EXPERIMENT].

    PubMed

    Magomedov, A M; Gertsen, G I; Fey, Se; Kuzub, T A; Krinitskaya, O F

    2016-04-01

    Results of investigations on impact of radial shock-wave therapy of low frequency on metabolism of the main protein of the bone tissue (collagen) as well as on the enzymes activity, taking part in a catabolic phase of the protein metabolism, were studied. Changes in content of glycosaminoglycans under impact of the therapy in experimental animals were studied. PMID:27434960

  6. Osteoporotic cytokines and bone metabolism on rats with induced hyperthyroidism; changes as a result of reversal to euthyroidism.

    PubMed

    Simsek, Gönül; Karter, Yesari; Aydin, Seval; Uzun, Hafize

    2003-12-31

    Hyperthyroidism is characterized by increased bone turnover and resorptive activity. Raised levels of serum osteoporotic cytokines, such as interleukin (IL) -1beta, IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha have been demonstrated previously in hyperthyroidism. These elevations are controversial and it is difficult to differentiate the contribution of thyroid hormones to the elevation of cytokines from that of the autoimmune inflammation in Graves' disease (GD) and follicular cell damage in thyroiditis. Therefore, we investigated the effect of thyroid hormones on serum IL-1beta, IL-6, TNF-alpha levels and bone metabolism on L-thyroxine induced hyperthyroid rats and changes in cytokine levels and bone metabolism on the same rats after reversal to euthyroidism. Rats were treated with L-thyroxine for 5 weeks (0.4 mg/ 100 g food). Plasma T3, T4, TSH and serum IL-1beta, IL-6, TNFalpha, Calcium (Ca), phosphorous (P), parathyroid hormone (PTH), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), bone alkaline phosphatase (B-ALP) levels were measured and differential leucocyte counts were made initially, at the 5th week of the experiment (hyperthyroid state) and 5 weeks after quitting the administration of L-thyroxine (euthyroid state). Significant rises in serum IL-1beta, IL-6 and TNFalpha were noted in hyperthyroidism (P < 0.001). In euthyroid state, IL-15, IL-6 and TNFalpha decreased significantly, but IL-beta and TNFalpha were significantly higher than the baseline values (P < 0.05) while IL-6 levels turned back to the baseline values. Plasma T3 and T4 levels were significantly correlated with serum cytokines in hyperthyroid state while there was no correlation in euthyroid states. Ca and P levels did not differ significantly while PTH levels declined significantly in the hyperthyroid state (P < 0.05). After the reversal to the euthyroidism, there was no significant change in Ca, P and PTH levels. ALP and B-ALP increased significantly in hyperthyroidism (P < 0.001, P < 0.01) and they did not

  7. Sequences of Regressions Distinguish Nonmechanical from Mechanical Associations between Metabolic Factors, Body Composition, and Bone in Healthy Postmenopausal Women123

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, Gail R; Prentice, Ann

    2016-01-01

    Background: There is increasing recognition of complex interrelations between the endocrine functions of bone and fat tissues or organs. Objective: The objective was to describe nonmechanical and mechanical links between metabolic factors, body composition, and bone with the use of graphical Markov models. Methods: Seventy postmenopausal women with a mean ± SD age of 62.3 ± 3.7 y and body mass index (in kg/m2) of 24.9 ± 3.8 were recruited. Bone outcomes were peripheral quantitative computed tomography measures of the distal and diaphyseal tibia, cross-sectional area (CSA), volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD), and cortical CSA. Biomarkers of osteoblast and adipocyte function were plasma concentrations of leptin, adiponectin, osteocalcin, undercarboxylated osteocalcin (UCOC), and phylloquinone. Body composition measurements were lean and percent fat mass, which were derived with the use of a 4-compartment model. Sequences of Regressions, a subclass of graphical Markov models, were used to describe the direct (nonmechanical) and indirect (mechanical) interrelations between metabolic factors and bone by simultaneously modeling multiple bone outcomes and their relation with biomarker outcomes with lean mass, percent fat mass, and height as intermediate explanatory variables. Results: The graphical Markov models showed both direct and indirect associations linking plasma leptin and adiponectin concentrations with CSA and vBMD. At the distal tibia, lean mass, height, and adiponectin-UCOC interaction were directly explanatory of CSA (R2 = 0.45); at the diaphysis, lean mass, percent fat mass, leptin, osteocalcin, and age-adiponectin interaction were directly explanatory of CSA (R2 = 0.49). The regression models exploring direct associations for vBMD were much weaker, with R2 = 0.15 and 0.18 at the distal and diaphyseal sites, respectively. Lean mass and UCOC were associated, and the global Markov property of the graph indicated that this association was explained by

  8. Abnormal Brain Iron Metabolism in Irp2 Deficient Mice Is Associated with Mild Neurological and Behavioral Impairments

    PubMed Central

    Zumbrennen-Bullough, Kimberly B.; Becker, Lore; Garrett, Lillian; Hölter, Sabine M.; Calzada-Wack, Julia; Mossbrugger, Ilona; Quintanilla-Fend, Leticia; Racz, Ildiko; Rathkolb, Birgit; Klopstock, Thomas; Wurst, Wolfgang; Zimmer, Andreas; Wolf, Eckhard; Fuchs, Helmut; Gailus-Durner, Valerie; de Angelis, Martin Hrabě; Romney, Steven J.; Leibold, Elizabeth A.

    2014-01-01

    Iron Regulatory Protein 2 (Irp2, Ireb2) is a central regulator of cellular iron homeostasis in vertebrates. Two global knockout mouse models have been generated to explore the role of Irp2 in regulating iron metabolism. While both mouse models show that loss of Irp2 results in microcytic anemia and altered body iron distribution, discrepant results have drawn into question the role of Irp2 in regulating brain iron metabolism. One model shows that aged Irp2 deficient mice develop adult-onset progressive neurodegeneration that is associated with axonal degeneration and loss of Purkinje cells in the central nervous system. These mice show iron deposition in white matter tracts and oligodendrocyte soma throughout the brain. A contrasting model of global Irp2 deficiency shows no overt or pathological signs of neurodegeneration or brain iron accumulation, and display only mild motor coordination and balance deficits when challenged by specific tests. Explanations for conflicting findings in the severity of the clinical phenotype, brain iron accumulation and neuronal degeneration remain unclear. Here, we describe an additional mouse model of global Irp2 deficiency. Our aged Irp2−/− mice show marked iron deposition in white matter and in oligodendrocytes while iron content is significantly reduced in neurons. Ferritin and transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1, Tfrc), expression are increased and decreased, respectively, in the brain from Irp2−/− mice. These mice show impairments in locomotion, exploration, motor coordination/balance and nociception when assessed by neurological and behavioral tests, but lack overt signs of neurodegenerative disease. Ultrastructural studies of specific brain regions show no evidence of neurodegeneration. Our data suggest that Irp2 deficiency dysregulates brain iron metabolism causing cellular dysfunction that ultimately leads to mild neurological, behavioral and nociceptive impairments. PMID:24896637

  9. Sequential relationships between grey matter and white matter atrophy and brain metabolic abnormalities in early Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Villain, Nicolas; Fouquet, Marine; Baron, Jean-Claude; Mézenge, Florence; Landeau, Brigitte; de La Sayette, Vincent; Viader, Fausto; Eustache, Francis; Desgranges, Béatrice; Chételat, Gaël

    2010-11-01

    Hippocampal atrophy, posterior cingulate and frontal glucose hypometabolism, and white-matter tract disruption are well described early macroscopic events in Alzheimer's disease. The relationships between these three types of alterations have been documented in previous studies, but their chronology still remains to be established. The present study used multi-modal fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging longitudinal data to address this question in patients with amnestic mild cognitive impairment. We found unidirectional, specific sequential relationships between: (i) baseline hippocampal atrophy and both cingulum bundle (r = 0.70; P = 3 × 10⁻³) and uncinate fasciculus (r = 0.75; P = 7 × 10⁻⁴) rate of atrophy; (ii) baseline cingulum bundle atrophy and rate of decline of posterior (r = 0.72; P = 2 × 10⁻³); and anterior (r = 0.74; P = 1 × 10⁻³) cingulate metabolism; and (iii) baseline uncinate white matter atrophy and subgenual metabolism rate of change (r = 0.65; P = 6 × 10⁻³). Baseline local grey matter atrophy was not found to contribute to hypometabolism progression within the posterior and anterior cingulate as well as subgenual cortices. These findings suggest that hippocampal atrophy progressively leads to disruption of the cingulum bundle and uncinate fasciculus, which in turn leads to glucose hypometabolism of the cingulate and subgenual cortices, respectively. This study reinforces the relevance of remote mechanisms above local interactions to account for the pattern of metabolic brain alteration observed in amnestic mild cognitive impairment, and provides new avenues to assess the sequence of events in complex diseases characterized by multiple manifestations.

  10. Abnormal brain iron metabolism in Irp2 deficient mice is associated with mild neurological and behavioral impairments.

    PubMed

    Zumbrennen-Bullough, Kimberly B; Becker, Lore; Garrett, Lillian; Hölter, Sabine M; Calzada-Wack, Julia; Mossbrugger, Ilona; Quintanilla-Fend, Leticia; Racz, Ildiko; Rathkolb, Birgit; Klopstock, Thomas; Wurst, Wolfgang; Zimmer, Andreas; Wolf, Eckhard; Fuchs, Helmut; Gailus-Durner, Valerie; de Angelis, Martin Hrabě; Romney, Steven J; Leibold, Elizabeth A

    2014-01-01

    Iron Regulatory Protein 2 (Irp2, Ireb2) is a central regulator of cellular iron homeostasis in vertebrates. Two global knockout mouse models have been generated to explore the role of Irp2 in regulating iron metabolism. While both mouse models show that loss of Irp2 results in microcytic anemia and altered body iron distribution, discrepant results have drawn into question the role of Irp2 in regulating brain iron metabolism. One model shows that aged Irp2 deficient mice develop adult-onset progressive neurodegeneration that is associated with axonal degeneration and loss of Purkinje cells in the central nervous system. These mice show iron deposition in white matter tracts and oligodendrocyte soma throughout the brain. A contrasting model of global Irp2 deficiency shows no overt or pathological signs of neurodegeneration or brain iron accumulation, and display only mild motor coordination and balance deficits when challenged by specific tests. Explanations for conflicting findings in the severity of the clinical phenotype, brain iron accumulation and neuronal degeneration remain unclear. Here, we describe an additional mouse model of global Irp2 deficiency. Our aged Irp2-/- mice show marked iron deposition in white matter and in oligodendrocytes while iron content is significantly reduced in neurons. Ferritin and transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1, Tfrc), expression are increased and decreased, respectively, in the brain from Irp2-/- mice. These mice show impairments in locomotion, exploration, motor coordination/balance and nociception when assessed by neurological and behavioral tests, but lack overt signs of neurodegenerative disease. Ultrastructural studies of specific brain regions show no evidence of neurodegeneration. Our data suggest that Irp2 deficiency dysregulates brain iron metabolism causing cellular dysfunction that ultimately leads to mild neurological, behavioral and nociceptive impairments.

  11. Novel Metabolic Abnormalities in the Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle in Peripheral Cells From Huntington’s Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Naseri, Nima N.; Bonica, Joseph; Xu, Hui; Park, Larry C.; Arjomand, Jamshid; Chen, Zhengming; Gibson, Gary E.

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic dysfunction is well-documented in Huntington’s disease (HD). However, the link between the mutant huntingtin (mHTT) gene and the pathology is unknown. The tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle is the main metabolic pathway for the production of NADH for conversion to ATP via the electron transport chain (ETC). The objective of this study was to test for differences in enzyme activities, mRNAs and protein levels related to the TCA cycle between lymphoblasts from healthy subjects and from patients with HD. The experiments utilize the advantages of lymphoblasts to reveal new insights about HD. The large quantity of homogeneous cell populations permits multiple dynamic measures to be made on exactly comparable tissues. The activities of nine enzymes related to the TCA cycle and the expression of twenty-nine mRNAs encoding for these enzymes and enzyme complexes were measured. Cells were studied under baseline conditions and during metabolic stress. The results support our recent findings that the activities of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHC) and succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) are elevated in HD. The data also show a large unexpected depression in MDH activities. Furthermore, message levels for isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) were markedly increased in in HD lymphoblasts and were responsive to treatments. The use of lymphoblasts allowed us to clarify that the reported decrease in aconitase activity in HD autopsy brains is likely due to secondary hypoxic effects. These results demonstrate the mRNA and enzymes of the TCA cycle are critical therapeutic targets that have been understudied in HD. PMID:27611087

  12. Vescalagin from Pink Wax Apple [Syzygium samarangense (Blume) Merrill and Perry] Alleviates Hepatic Insulin Resistance and Ameliorates Glycemic Metabolism Abnormality in Rats Fed a High-Fructose Diet.

    PubMed

    Huang, Da-Wei; Chang, Wen-Chang; Wu, James Swi-Bea; Shih, Rui-Wen; Shen, Szu-Chuan

    2016-02-10

    This study investigates the ameliorative effect of vescalagin (VES) isolated from Pink wax apple fruit on hepatic insulin resistance and abnormal carbohydrate metabolism in high-fructose diet (HFD)-induced hyperglycemic rats. The results show that in HFD rats, VES significantly reduced the values of the area under the curve for glucose in an oral glucose tolerance test and the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance index. VES significantly enhanced the activity of hepatic antioxidant enzymes while reducing thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances in HFD rats. Western blot assay revealed that VES reduced hepatic protein expression involved in inflammation pathways while up-regulating expression of hepatic insulin signaling-related proteins. Moreover, VES up-regulated the expression of hepatic glycogen synthase and hepatic glycolysis-related proteins while down-regulating hepatic gluconeogenesis-related proteins in HFD rats. This study suggests some therapeutic potential of VES in preventing the progression of diabetes mellitus. PMID:26800576

  13. Vescalagin from Pink Wax Apple [Syzygium samarangense (Blume) Merrill and Perry] Alleviates Hepatic Insulin Resistance and Ameliorates Glycemic Metabolism Abnormality in Rats Fed a High-Fructose Diet.

    PubMed

    Huang, Da-Wei; Chang, Wen-Chang; Wu, James Swi-Bea; Shih, Rui-Wen; Shen, Szu-Chuan

    2016-02-10

    This study investigates the ameliorative effect of vescalagin (VES) isolated from Pink wax apple fruit on hepatic insulin resistance and abnormal carbohydrate metabolism in high-fructose diet (HFD)-induced hyperglycemic rats. The results show that in HFD rats, VES significantly reduced the values of the area under the curve for glucose in an oral glucose tolerance test and the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance index. VES significantly enhanced the activity of hepatic antioxidant enzymes while reducing thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances in HFD rats. Western blot assay revealed that VES reduced hepatic protein expression involved in inflammation pathways while up-regulating expression of hepatic insulin signaling-related proteins. Moreover, VES up-regulated the expression of hepatic glycogen synthase and hepatic glycolysis-related proteins while down-regulating hepatic gluconeogenesis-related proteins in HFD rats. This study suggests some therapeutic potential of VES in preventing the progression of diabetes mellitus.

  14. Serum biomarkers of bone metabolism in castration resistant prostate cancer patients with skeletal metastases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background. Prior studies suggest that elevated markers of bone turnover are prognostic for poor survival in castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). The predictive role of these markers relative to bone-targeted therapy is unknown. We prospectively evaluated the prognostic and predictive value ...

  15. Calcium homeostasis and bone metabolic responses to protein diets and energy restriction: a randomized control trial

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Despite some beneficial effects on bone, high protein diets are conventionally considered a primary dietary risk factor for osteoporosis and bone fracture due to the acid load associated with protein catabolism. To test the hypothesis that high dietary protein diets do not negatively affect calcium ...

  16. Abnormalities in myo-inositol metabolism associated with type 2 diabetes in mice fed a high-fat diet: benefits of a dietary myo-inositol supplementation.

    PubMed

    Croze, Marine L; Géloën, Alain; Soulage, Christophe O

    2015-06-28

    We previously reported that a chronic supplementation with myo-inositol (MI) improved insulin sensitivity and reduced fat accretion in mice. We then tested the potency of such dietary intervention in the prevention of insulin resistance in C57BL/6 male mouse fed a high-fat diet (HFD). In addition, some abnormalities in inositol metabolism were reported to be associated with insulin resistance in several animal and human studies. We then investigated the presence of such anomalies (i.e. inosituria and an inositol intra-tissue depletion) in this diet-induced obesity (DIO) mouse model, as well as the potential benefit of a MI supplementation for inositol intra-tissue deficiency correction. HFD (60 % energy from fat) feeding was associated with inosituria and inositol intra-tissue depletion in the liver and kidneys. MI supplementation (0·58 mg/g per d) restored inositol pools in kidneys (partially) and liver (fully). HFD feeding for 4 months induced ectopic lipid redistribution to liver and muscles, fasting hyperglycaemia and hyperinsulinaemia, insulin resistance and obesity that were not prevented by MI supplementation, despite a significant improvement in insulin sensitivity parameter K insulin tolerance test and a reduction in white adipose tissue (WAT) mass ( - 17 %, P< 0·05). MI supplementation significantly reduced fatty acid synthase activity in epididymal WAT, which might explain its beneficial, but modest, effect on WAT accretion in HFD-fed mice. Finally, we found some abnormalities in inositol metabolism in association with a diabetic phenotype (i.e. insulin resistance and fasting hyperglycaemia) in a DIO mouse model. Dietary MI supplementation was efficient in the prevention of inositol intra-tissue depletion, but did not prevent insulin resistance or obesity efficiently in this mouse model. PMID:25990651

  17. A community-based survey for different abnormal glucose metabolism among pregnant women in a random household study (SAUDI-DM)

    PubMed Central

    Al-Rubeaan, Khalid; Al-Manaa, Hamad A; Khoja, Tawfik A; Youssef, Amira M; Al-Sharqawi, Ahmad H; Siddiqui, Khalid; Ahmad, Najlaa A

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess the prevalence and risk factors of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) in a population known to have a high prevalence of abnormal glucose metabolism. Methods A household random population-based cross-sectional study of 13 627 women in the childbearing age, who were subjected to fasting plasma glucose if they were not known to have been diagnosed before with any type of diabetes. GDM cases were diagnosed using the International Association of Diabetes and Pregnancy Study Group (IAPSG) criteria. Results The overall GDM prevalence was 36.6%, categorised into 32.4% new cases and 4.2% known cases. Another 3.6% had preconception type 1 or 2 diabetes. GDM cases were older and had a significantly higher body mass index, in addition to a higher rate of macrocosmic baby and history of GDM. Monthly income, educational level, living in urban areas and smoking were not found to be significantly different between normal and GDM cases. The most important and significant risk factors for GDM were history of GDM, macrosomic baby, obesity and age >30 years. However, hypertension, low high-density lipoprotein, family history of diabetes and increased triglycerides did not show any significant effect on GDM prevalence in this cohort. Conclusions This society is facing a real burden of abnormal glucose metabolism during pregnancy, where almost half of the pregnant women are subjected to maternal and neonatal complications. Early screening of pregnant women, especially those at a high risk for GDM, is mandatory to identify and manage those cases. PMID:25138813

  18. Abnormalities in myo-inositol metabolism associated with type 2 diabetes in mice fed a high-fat diet: benefits of a dietary myo-inositol supplementation.

    PubMed

    Croze, Marine L; Géloën, Alain; Soulage, Christophe O

    2015-06-28

    We previously reported that a chronic supplementation with myo-inositol (MI) improved insulin sensitivity and reduced fat accretion in mice. We then tested the potency of such dietary intervention in the prevention of insulin resistance in C57BL/6 male mouse fed a high-fat diet (HFD). In addition, some abnormalities in inositol metabolism were reported to be associated with insulin resistance in several animal and human studies. We then investigated the presence of such anomalies (i.e. inosituria and an inositol intra-tissue depletion) in this diet-induced obesity (DIO) mouse model, as well as the potential benefit of a MI supplementation for inositol intra-tissue deficiency correction. HFD (60 % energy from fat) feeding was associated with inosituria and inositol intra-tissue depletion in the liver and kidneys. MI supplementation (0·58 mg/g per d) restored inositol pools in kidneys (partially) and liver (fully). HFD feeding for 4 months induced ectopic lipid redistribution to liver and muscles, fasting hyperglycaemia and hyperinsulinaemia, insulin resistance and obesity that were not prevented by MI supplementation, despite a significant improvement in insulin sensitivity parameter K insulin tolerance test and a reduction in white adipose tissue (WAT) mass ( - 17 %, P< 0·05). MI supplementation significantly reduced fatty acid synthase activity in epididymal WAT, which might explain its beneficial, but modest, effect on WAT accretion in HFD-fed mice. Finally, we found some abnormalities in inositol metabolism in association with a diabetic phenotype (i.e. insulin resistance and fasting hyperglycaemia) in a DIO mouse model. Dietary MI supplementation was efficient in the prevention of inositol intra-tissue depletion, but did not prevent insulin resistance or obesity efficiently in this mouse model.

  19. iTRAQ-based proteomic analysis of plasma reveals abnormalities in lipid metabolism proteins in chronic kidney disease-related atherosclerosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luczak, Magdalena; Formanowicz, Dorota; Marczak, Łukasz; Suszyńska-Zajczyk, Joanna; Pawliczak, Elżbieta; Wanic-Kossowska, Maria; Stobiecki, Maciej

    2016-09-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have a considerably higher risk of death due to cardiovascular causes. Using an iTRAQ MS/MS approach, we investigated the alterations in plasma protein accumulation in patients with CKD and classical cardiovascular disease (CVD) without CKD. The proteomic analysis led to the identification of 130 differentially expressed proteins among CVD and CKD patients and healthy volunteers. Bioinformatics analysis revealed that 29 differentially expressed proteins were involved in lipid metabolism and atherosclerosis, 20 of which were apolipoproteins and constituents of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) and low-density lipoprotein (LDL). Although dyslipidemia is common in CKD patients, we found that significant changes in apolipoproteins were not strictly associated with changes in plasma lipid levels. A lack of correlation between apoB and LDL concentration and an inverse relationship of some proteins with the HDL level were revealed. An increased level of apolipoprotein AIV, adiponectin, or apolipoprotein C, despite their anti-atherogenic properties, was not associated with a decrease in cardiovascular event risk in CKD patients. The presence of the distinctive pattern of apolipoproteins demonstrated in this study may suggest that lipid abnormalities in CKD are characterized by more qualitative abnormalities and may be related to HDL function rather than HDL deficiency.

  20. iTRAQ-based proteomic analysis of plasma reveals abnormalities in lipid metabolism proteins in chronic kidney disease-related atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Luczak, Magdalena; Formanowicz, Dorota; Marczak, Łukasz; Suszyńska-Zajczyk, Joanna; Pawliczak, Elżbieta; Wanic-Kossowska, Maria; Stobiecki, Maciej

    2016-01-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have a considerably higher risk of death due to cardiovascular causes. Using an iTRAQ MS/MS approach, we investigated the alterations in plasma protein accumulation in patients with CKD and classical cardiovascular disease (CVD) without CKD. The proteomic analysis led to the identification of 130 differentially expressed proteins among CVD and CKD patients and healthy volunteers. Bioinformatics analysis revealed that 29 differentially expressed proteins were involved in lipid metabolism and atherosclerosis, 20 of which were apolipoproteins and constituents of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) and low-density lipoprotein (LDL). Although dyslipidemia is common in CKD patients, we found that significant changes in apolipoproteins were not strictly associated with changes in plasma lipid levels. A lack of correlation between apoB and LDL concentration and an inverse relationship of some proteins with the HDL level were revealed. An increased level of apolipoprotein AIV, adiponectin, or apolipoprotein C, despite their anti-atherogenic properties, was not associated with a decrease in cardiovascular event risk in CKD patients. The presence of the distinctive pattern of apolipoproteins demonstrated in this study may suggest that lipid abnormalities in CKD are characterized by more qualitative abnormalities and may be related to HDL function rather than HDL deficiency. PMID:27600335

  1. iTRAQ-based proteomic analysis of plasma reveals abnormalities in lipid metabolism proteins in chronic kidney disease-related atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Luczak, Magdalena; Formanowicz, Dorota; Marczak, Łukasz; Suszyńska-Zajczyk, Joanna; Pawliczak, Elżbieta; Wanic-Kossowska, Maria; Stobiecki, Maciej

    2016-01-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have a considerably higher risk of death due to cardiovascular causes. Using an iTRAQ MS/MS approach, we investigated the alterations in plasma protein accumulation in patients with CKD and classical cardiovascular disease (CVD) without CKD. The proteomic analysis led to the identification of 130 differentially expressed proteins among CVD and CKD patients and healthy volunteers. Bioinformatics analysis revealed that 29 differentially expressed proteins were involved in lipid metabolism and atherosclerosis, 20 of which were apolipoproteins and constituents of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) and low-density lipoprotein (LDL). Although dyslipidemia is common in CKD patients, we found that significant changes in apolipoproteins were not strictly associated with changes in plasma lipid levels. A lack of correlation between apoB and LDL concentration and an inverse relationship of some proteins with the HDL level were revealed. An increased level of apolipoprotein AIV, adiponectin, or apolipoprotein C, despite their anti-atherogenic properties, was not associated with a decrease in cardiovascular event risk in CKD patients. The presence of the distinctive pattern of apolipoproteins demonstrated in this study may suggest that lipid abnormalities in CKD are characterized by more qualitative abnormalities and may be related to HDL function rather than HDL deficiency. PMID:27600335

  2. Involvement of oxidative stress-induced abnormalities in ceramide and cholesterol metabolism in brain aging and Alzheimer's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cutler, Roy G.; Kelly, Jeremiah; Storie, Kristin; Pedersen, Ward A.; Tammara, Anita; Hatanpaa, Kimmo; Troncoso, Juan C.; Mattson, Mark P.

    2004-02-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an age-related disorder characterized by deposition of amyloid -peptide (A) and degeneration of neurons in brain regions such as the hippocampus, resulting in progressive cognitive dysfunction. The pathogenesis of AD is tightly linked to A deposition and oxidative stress, but it remains unclear as to how these factors result in neuronal dysfunction and death. We report alterations in sphingolipid and cholesterol metabolism during normal brain aging and in the brains of AD patients that result in accumulation of long-chain ceramides and cholesterol. Membrane-associated oxidative stress occurs in association with the lipid alterations, and exposure of hippocampal neurons to A induces membrane oxidative stress and the accumulation of ceramide species and cholesterol. Treatment of neurons with -tocopherol or an inhibitor of sphingomyelin synthesis prevents accumulation of ceramides and cholesterol and protects them against death induced by A. Our findings suggest a sequence of events in the pathogenesis of AD in which A induces membrane-associated oxidative stress, resulting in perturbed ceramide and cholesterol metabolism which, in turn, triggers a neurodegenerative cascade that leads to clinical disease. amyloid | apoptosis | hippocampus | lipid peroxidation | sphingomyelin

  3. [Abnormal expression of genes that regulate retinoid metabolism and signaling in non-small-cell lung cancer].

    PubMed

    Kuznetsova, E S; Zinovieva, O L; Oparina, N Yu; Prokofjeva, M M; Spirin, P V; Favorskaya, I A; Zborovskaya, I B; Lisitsyn, N A; Prassolov, V S; Mashkova, T D

    2016-01-01

    Retinoids are signaling molecules that control a wide variety of cellular processes and possess antitumor activity. This work presents a comprehensive description of changes in the expression of 23 genes that regulate retinoid metabolism and signaling in non-small-cell lung cancer tumors compared to adjacent normal tissues obtained using RT-PCR. Even at early stages of malignant transformation, a significant decrease in ADH1B, ADH3, RDHL, and RALDH1 mRNA levels was observed in 82, 79, 73, and 64% of tumor specimens, respectively, and a considerable increase in AKR1B10 mRNA content was observed in 80% of tumors. Dramatic changes in the levels of these mRNAs can impair the synthesis of all-trans retinoic acid, a key natural regulatory retinoid. Apart from that, it was found that mRNA levels of nuclear retinoid receptor genes RXRγ, RARα, RXRα, and gene RDH11 were significantly decreased in 80, 67, 57, and 66% of tumor specimens, respectively. Thus, neoplastic transformation of lung tissue cells is accompanied with deregulated expression of key genes of retinoid metabolism and function.

  4. Safety and efficacy of polycalcium for improving biomarkers of bone metabolism: a 4-week open-label clinical study.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jae-Suk; Park, Mi-Yeon; Kim, Jong-Dae; Cho, Hyung Rae; Choi, In Soon; Kim, Joo-Wan

    2013-03-01

    Polycalcium is a mixture of Polycan and calcium lactate-gluconate 1:9 (w/w) with demonstrated antiosteoporosis activity in vitro and in vivo studies. These studies were a 4-week open-label, single-center trial to evaluate the efficacy of oral Polycalcium on bone metabolism and safety. In total, 30 healthy women (range 40-60 years) were administered 400 mg of Polycalcium for 4 weeks. The primary efficacy parameter was urinary deoxypyridinoline (DPYR) levels, and serum osteocalcin (OSC), bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (BALP), urinary cross-linked C-telopeptide of type-1 collagen (CTx), urinary cross-linked N-telopeptide of type-1 collagen (NTx), calcium (Ca), and phosphorus (P) levels, which were evaluated for comparison before and after administration of Polycalcium. After 4 weeks of Polycalcium administration, 27 subjects completed the test plan. Three subjects withdrew their consent to participate. The values of blood OSC, BALP, serum Ca, and serum P from baseline to 4 weeks of treatment were changed by -28.44%, 14.37%, 6.11%, and 1.42%, respectively. Biomarkers of bone resorption: urinary DPYR, serum CTx, serum NTx, urinary Ca, and urinary P, at baseline after 4 weeks of treatment were changed by -13.40%, 6.67%, -5.13%, -22.43%, and -3.04%, respectively. Additionally, when considering the subjects' adverse effects and the results of the blood and urine tests over the 4-week trial period, the dose of 400  mg Polycalcium showed efficacy for improving bone metabolism and was well tolerated and safe. Polycalcium was apparently safe and efficacious.

  5. The Role of Nutrition in the Changes in Bone and Calcium Metabolism During Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morey-Holton, Emily R.; Arnaud, Sara B.

    1995-01-01

    On Earth, the primary purpose of the skeleton is provide structural support for the body. In space, the support function of the skeleton is reduced since, without gravity, structures have only mass and no weight. The adaptation to space flight is manifested by shifts in mineral distribution, altered bone turnover, and regional mineral deficits in weight-bearing bones. The shifts in mineral distribution appear to be related to the cephalic fluid shift. The redistribution of mineral from one bone to another or to and from areas in the same bone in response to alterations in gravitational loads is more likely to affect skeletal function than quantitative whole body losses and gains. The changes in bone turnover appear dependent upon changes in body weight with weight loss tending to increase bone resorption as well as decrease bone formation. During bedrest, the bone response to unloading varies depending upon the routine activity level of the subjects with more active subjects showing a greater suppression of bone formation in the iliac crest with inactivity. Changes in body composition during space flight are predicted by bedrest studies on Earth which show loss of lean body mass and increase tn body fat in adult males after one month. In ambulatory studies on Earth, exercising adult males of the same age, height, g weight, body mass index, and shoe size show significantly higher whole body mineral and lean body mass. than non-exercising subjects. Nutritional preference appears to change with activity level. Diet histories in exercisers and nonexercisers who maintain identical body weights show no differences in nutrients except for slightly higher carbohydrate intake in the exercisers. The absence of differences in dietary calcium in men with higher total body calcium is noteworthy. In this situation, the increased bone mineral content was facilitated by the calcium endocrine system. This regulatory system can be by-passed by raising dietary calcium. Increased

  6. Metabolic abnormalities and polymorphisms of the vitamin D receptor (VDR) and ZNF365 genes in children with urolithiasis.

    PubMed

    Medina-Escobedo, Martha; González-Herrera, Lizbeth; Villanueva-Jorge, Salha; Martín-Soberanis, Gloria

    2014-10-01

    Composition of urinary stones in children from Yucatán, México, is calcium and uric acid. Polymorphisms in VDR and ZNF365 genes have been associated to calcium and uric acid lithiasis, respectively. We evaluated the association of polymorphisms TaqI and FokI of VDR gene and Ala62Thr of ZNF365 gene with the metabolic disorders (MD) in children with urolithiasis (UL). We included 109 children with UL. Creatinine, calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, uric acid, oxalates and citrates were measured in fresh urine. Urinary indices were calculated for determining the MD. VDR and ZNF365 polymorphisms were determined by PCR-RFLP. Genotype frequencies were compared with the frequency of MD and with the averages of excretion of the analytes, using the statistical package STATA 11.0. The most frequent MD were hypocitraturia (35.8 %) and hyperuricosuria (22.9 %). The comparison of genotype frequencies with the frequency of MD did not show significant differences (p > 0.05). The comparison of the urinary excretion averages of analytes with respect to the genotype showed that GG homozygotes have higher concentrations of uric acid and citrate than AG heterozygotes (p = 0.03), and that fF heterozygotes have lower concentrations of citrate (p = 0.009). Hypocitraturia and hyperuricosuria were the most common metabolic disorders. The frequency of MD is not associated with polymorphisms. However, in children with urolithiasis of Yucatan, GG homozygotes excrete higher concentrations of uric acid and citrates, and fF heterozygotes have lower concentrations of citrates.

  7. Bone Disease after Kidney Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Bouquegneau, Antoine; Salam, Syrazah; Delanaye, Pierre; Eastell, Richard; Khwaja, Arif

    2016-07-01

    Bone and mineral disorders occur frequently in kidney transplant recipients and are associated with a high risk of fracture, morbidity, and mortality. There is a broad spectrum of often overlapping bone diseases seen after transplantation, including osteoporosis as well as persisting high- or low-turnover bone disease. The pathophysiology underlying bone disorders after transplantation results from a complex interplay of factors, including preexisting renal osteodystrophy and bone loss related to a variety of causes, such as immunosuppression and alterations in the parathyroid hormone-vitamin D-fibroblast growth factor 23 axis as well as changes in mineral metabolism. Management is complex, because noninvasive tools, such as imaging and bone biomarkers, do not have sufficient sensitivity and specificity to detect these abnormalities in bone structure and function, whereas bone biopsy is not a widely available diagnostic tool. In this review, we focus on recent data that highlight improvements in our understanding of the prevalence, pathophysiology, and diagnostic and therapeutic strategies of mineral and bone disorders in kidney transplant recipients. PMID:26912549

  8. Zinc enhances bone metabolism in ovariectomized rats and exerts anabolic osteoblastic/adipocytic marrow effects ex vivo.

    PubMed

    Li, Binbin; Liu, Hao; Jia, Shengnan

    2015-02-01

    Investigations of bone mass and marrow adiposity are critical for defining the role of zinc (Zn) in bone metabolism. Rats used for study were grouped as follows: control (sham), ovariectomy (OVX), ovariectomy + estradiol (OVX-E), ovariectomy + Zn treatment (OVX-Zn). Bone mineral density (BMD) was quantified (microCT); serum osteocalcin, adiponectin, RANKL, and TRAP levels were assayed (ELISA); and biochemical determinations of serum alkaline phosphatase (ALP), calcium (Ca), and phosphorus (P) were done. Cells derived from bone mesenchymal stem cell (BMSC) isolates of respective test groups were compared, identifying primary osteoblasts by MTT assay and adipocytes by Oil Red O stain. Osteocalcin and adiponectin levels in culture supernatants were determined by ELISA. Zn supplementation resulted in a modest increase in BMD, but serum osteocalcin and ALP activity increased significantly (P < 0.01, both). Serum levels of RANKL and TRAP were lower in OVX-Zn (vs OVX) rats (P < 0.01), whereas serum concentrations of adiponectin, Ca, and P did not differ by group. Osteocalcin level was significantly upregulated ex vivo (P < 0.01) in the supernatant of cultured OVX-Zn (vs OVX) cells, accompanied by a slight upturn in osteoblastic differentiation. However, Oil Red O uptake and adiponectin level in supernatant were sharply diminished in cultured OVX-Zn (vs OVX) cells (P < 0.01). Overall, we concluded that Zn contributes to bone mass by marginally stimulating differentiation and proliferation of osteoblasts and by effectively inhibiting osteoclastic and adipocytic differentiation of BMSCs.

  9. Sweet Bones: The Pathogenesis of Bone Alteration in Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic patients have increased fracture risk. The pathogenesis underlying the status of bone alterations in diabetes mellitus is not completely understood but is multifactorial. The major deficits appear to be related to a deficit in mineralized surface area, a decrement in the rate of mineral apposition, deceased osteoid surface, depressed osteoblast activity, and decreased numbers of osteoclasts due to abnormal insulin signaling pathway. Other prominent features of diabetes mellitus are an increased urinary excretion of calcium and magnesium, accumulation of advanced glycation end products, and oxidative stress leading to sweet bones (altered bone's strength, metabolism, and structure). Every diabetic patient should be assessed for risk factors for fractures and osteoporosis. The pathogenesis of the bone alterations in diabetes mellitus as well as their molecular mechanisms needs further study. PMID:27777961

  10. Microgravity and bone cell mechanosensitivity.

    PubMed

    Burger, E H; Klein-Nulend, J

    1998-05-01

    Bone cells, in particular osteocytes, are extremely sensitive to mechanical stress, a quality that is probably linked to the process of mechanical adaptation (Wolff's law). The in vivo operating cell stress derived from bone loading is likely a flow of an interstitial fluid along the surface of the osteocytes and lining cells. The response of bone cells in culture to fluid flow includes prostaglandin synthesis and expression of inducible prostaglandin G/H synthase (PGHS-2 or inducible cyclooxygenase, COX-2), an enzyme that mediates the induction of bone formation by mechanical loading in vivo. Disruption of the actin-cytoskeleton abolishes the response to stress, suggesting that the cytoskeleton is involved in cellular mechanotransduction. Microgravity has catabolic effects on the skeleton of astronauts, as well as on mineral metabolism in bone organ cultures. This might be explained simply as resulting from an exceptional form of disuse under weightlessness conditions. However, under microgravity conditions, the assembly of cytoskeletal elements may be altered, as gravity has been shown to determine the pattern of microtubular orientation assembled in vitro. Therefore, it is possible that the mechanosensitivity of bone cells is altered under microgravity conditions, and that this abnormal mechanosensation contributes to the disturbed bone metabolism observed in astronauts. In vitro experiments on the International Space Station should test this hypothesis experimentally.

  11. Bone Mass and Mineral Metabolism Alterations in Adult Celiac Disease: Pathophysiology and Clinical Approach

    PubMed Central

    Di Stefano, Michele; Mengoli, Caterina; Bergonzi, Manuela; Corazza, Gino Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Osteoporosis affects many patients with celiac disease (CD), representing the consequence of calcium malabsorption and persistent activation of mucosal inflammation. A slight increase of fracture risk is evident in this condition, particularly in those with overt malabsorption and in postmenopausal state. The adoption of a correct gluten-free diet (GFD) improves bone derangement, but is not able to normalize bone mass in all the patients. Biomarkers effective in the prediction of bone response to gluten-free diet are not yet available and the indications of guidelines are still imperfect and debated. In this review, the pathophysiology of bone loss is correlated to clinical aspects, defining an alternative proposal of management for this condition. PMID:24284619

  12. Effect of Crohn's disease on bone metabolism in vitro: a role for interleukin-6.

    PubMed

    Sylvester, Francisco A; Wyzga, Nancy; Hyams, Jeffrey S; Gronowicz, Gloria A

    2002-04-01

    Circulating proinflammatory cytokines may be involved in osteopenia associated with Crohn's disease (CD). Therefore, the effect of interleukin (IL)-6, IL-1beta, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) a contained in Crohn's serum on bone formation was examined in a bone organ culture system. Initially, serum levels of IL-6, IL-1beta, and TNF-a were determined by ELISA in newly diagnosed, untreated children with CD and healthy age-matched controls. Serum IL-6 levels were significantly higher in patients with CD than in controls (23.9 +/- 2.8 pg/ml vs. 0.7 pg/ml +/- 0.2; p < 0.001), whereas IL-1beta and TNF-alpha serum levels were not. In the organ culture studies, 20-day-old fetal rat parietal bones were incubated for 96 h with CD or control serum, serum preincubated with a neutralizing antibody to each cytokine or a nonimmune immunoglobulin control, and with IL-6. Bone formation measured by assaying calcium content and dry weight was significantly decreased in bones exposed to Crohn's serum. Light microscopy of the bones treated with CD serum revealed a discontinuous, uneven mineralized bone matrix and disorganized osteoblasts with altered morphology. Incubation with an antibody that neutralized IL-6 activity prevented the change in osteoblast and bone morphology. TNF-a and IL-1beta antibodies had no apparent effects. Collagen synthesis and DNA content were not affected by CD serum. Also, addition of IL-6 to the culture medium decreased mineralization. These results suggest that IL-6 is a mediator of the effects of Crohn's serum on in vitro mineralization and may be a contributing factor to the osteopenia associated with CD.

  13. Gaucher disease: the role of the specialist on metabolic bone diseases.

    PubMed

    Masi, Laura; Brandi, Maria Luisa

    2015-01-01

    According to European legislation, a disease can be considered rare or "orphan" when it affects less than 1 subject of 2000 (1). Often these diseases affecting the pediatric age, are complex diseases and chronically debilitating and for this motive need the intervention of multidisciplinary skills specific. Among the rare disease as affecting the skeleton more than 400 are characterized by dysplastic changes of the skeleton (2). Alongside the disorders affecting the skeleton primitively, many systemic diseases can have a bone involvement. Among these, the Gaucher disease (GD), an heterogeneous lysosomal storage determined by hereditary enzyme deficiency of β-glucosidase. Patients with this disease have skeletal disorders of varying severity (Erlenmeyer flask deformity, lytic lesions and osteonecrosis, pathological fractures) that affects both the bone marrow, both mineralized bone with progressive damage of the tissue. The bone disease is the most debilitating of GD and can have a significant impact on the quality of life of patients. Thorough evaluations by monitoring biochemical markers of bone turnover and instrumental, with a quantitative and qualitative evaluation of the bone, are of fundamental importance to intervene early so they can prevent complications irreversible. PMID:26604943

  14. Gaucher disease: the role of the specialist on metabolic bone diseases

    PubMed Central

    Masi, Laura; Brandi, Maria Luisa

    2015-01-01

    Summary According to European legislation, a disease can be considered rare or “orphan” when it affects less than 1 subject of 2000 (1). Often these diseases affecting the pediatric age, are complex diseases and chronically debilitating and for this motive need the intervention of multidisciplinary skills specific. Among the rare disease as affecting the skeleton more than 400 are characterized by dysplastic changes of the skeleton (2). Alongside the disorders affecting the skeleton primitively, many systemic diseases can have a bone involvement. Among these, the Gaucher disease (GD), an heterogeneous lysosomal storage determined by hereditary enzyme deficiency of β-glucosidase. Patients with this disease have skeletal disorders of varying severity (Erlenmeyer flask deformity, lytic lesions and osteonecrosis, pathological fractures) that affects both the bone marrow, both mineralized bone with progressive damage of the tissue. The bone disease is the most debilitating of GD and can have a significant impact on the quality of life of patients. Thorough evaluations by monitoring biochemical markers of bone turnover and instrumental, with a quantitative and qualitative evaluation of the bone, are of fundamental importance to intervene early so they can prevent complications irreversible. PMID:26604943

  15. Gaucher disease: the role of the specialist on metabolic bone diseases.

    PubMed

    Masi, Laura; Brandi, Maria Luisa

    2015-01-01

    According to European legislation, a disease can be considered rare or "orphan" when it affects less than 1 subject of 2000 (1). Often these diseases affecting the pediatric age, are complex diseases and chronically debilitating and for this motive need the intervention of multidisciplinary skills specific. Among the rare disease as affecting the skeleton more than 400 are characterized by dysplastic changes of the skeleton (2). Alongside the disorders affecting the skeleton primitively, many systemic diseases can have a bone involvement. Among these, the Gaucher disease (GD), an heterogeneous lysosomal storage determined by hereditary enzyme deficiency of β-glucosidase. Patients with this disease have skeletal disorders of varying severity (Erlenmeyer flask deformity, lytic lesions and osteonecrosis, pathological fractures) that affects both the bone marrow, both mineralized bone with progressive damage of the tissue. The bone disease is the most debilitating of GD and can have a significant impact on the quality of life of patients. Thorough evaluations by monitoring biochemical markers of bone turnover and instrumental, with a quantitative and qualitative evaluation of the bone, are of fundamental importance to intervene early so they can prevent complications irreversible.

  16. Decreased expression of ARV1 results in cholesterol retention in the endoplasmic reticulum and abnormal bile acid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Tong, Fumin; Billheimer, Jeffrey; Shechtman, Caryn F; Liu, Ying; Crooke, Roseann; Graham, Mark; Cohen, David E; Sturley, Stephen L; Rader, Daniel J

    2010-10-29

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane cholesterol is maintained at an optimal concentration of ∼5 mol % by the net impact of sterol synthesis, modification, and export. Arv1p was first identified in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a key component of this homeostasis due to its probable role in intracellular sterol transport. Mammalian ARV1, which can fully complement the yeast lesion, encodes a ubiquitously expressed, resident ER protein. Repeated dosing of specific antisense oligonucleotides to ARV1 produced a marked reduction of ARV1 transcripts in liver, adipose, and to a lesser extent, intestine. This resulted in marked hypercholesterolemia, elevated serum bile acids, and activation of the hepatic farnesoid X receptor (FXR) regulatory pathway. Knockdown of ARV1 in murine liver and HepG2 cells was associated with accumulation of cholesterol in the ER at the expense of the plasma membrane and suppression of sterol regulatory element-binding proteins and their targets. These studies indicate a critical role of mammalian Arv1p in sterol movement from the ER and in the ensuing regulation of hepatic cholesterol and bile acid metabolism.

  17. Decreased Expression of ARV1 Results in Cholesterol Retention in the Endoplasmic Reticulum and Abnormal Bile Acid Metabolism*

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Fumin; Billheimer, Jeffrey; Shechtman, Caryn F.; Liu, Ying; Crooke, Roseann; Graham, Mark; Cohen, David E.; Sturley, Stephen L.; Rader, Daniel J.

    2010-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane cholesterol is maintained at an optimal concentration of ∼5 mol % by the net impact of sterol synthesis, modification, and export. Arv1p was first identified in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a key component of this homeostasis due to its probable role in intracellular sterol transport. Mammalian ARV1, which can fully complement the yeast lesion, encodes a ubiquitously expressed, resident ER protein. Repeated dosing of specific antisense oligonucleotides to ARV1 produced a marked reduction of ARV1 transcripts in liver, adipose, and to a lesser extent, intestine. This resulted in marked hypercholesterolemia, elevated serum bile acids, and activation of the hepatic farnesoid X receptor (FXR) regulatory pathway. Knockdown of ARV1 in murine liver and HepG2 cells was associated with accumulation of cholesterol in the ER at the expense of the plasma membrane and suppression of sterol regulatory element-binding proteins and their targets. These studies indicate a critical role of mammalian Arv1p in sterol movement from the ER and in the ensuing regulation of hepatic cholesterol and bile acid metabolism. PMID:20663892

  18. The role of exercise intensity in the bone metabolic response to an acute bout of weight-bearing exercise.

    PubMed

    Scott, Jonathan P R; Sale, Craig; Greeves, Julie P; Casey, Anna; Dutton, John; Fraser, William D

    2011-02-01

    We compared the effects of exercise intensity (EI) on bone metabolism during and for 4 days after acute, weight-bearing endurance exercise. Ten males [mean ± SD maximum oxygen uptake (Vo(2max)): 56.2 ± 8.1 ml·min(-1)·kg(-1)] completed three counterbalanced 8-day trials. Following three control days, on day 4, subjects completed 60 min of running at 55%, 65%, and 75% Vo(2max). Markers of bone resorption [COOH-terminal telopeptide region of collagen type 1 (β-CTX)] and formation [NH(2)-terminal propeptides of procollagen type 1 (P1NP), osteocalcin (OC), bone-alkaline phosphatase (ALP)], osteoprotegerin (OPG), parathyroid hormone (PTH), albumin-adjusted calcium (ACa), phosphate (PO(4)), and cortisol were measured during and for 3 h after exercise and on four follow-up days (FU1-FU4). At 75% Vo(2max), β-CTX was not significantly increased from baseline by exercise but was higher compared with 55% (17-19%, P < 0.01) and 65% (11-13%, P < 0.05) Vo(2max) in the first hour postexercise. Concentrations were decreased from baseline in all three groups by 39-42% (P < 0.001) at 3 h postexercise but not thereafter. P1NP increased (P < 0.001) during exercise only, while bone-ALP was increased (P < 0.01) at FU3 and FU4, but neither were affected by EI. PTH and cortisol increased (P < 0.001) with exercise at 75% Vo(2max) only and were higher (P < 0.05) than at 55% and 65% Vo(2max) during and immediately after exercise. The increases (P < 0.001) in OPG, ACa, and PO(4) with exercise were not affected by EI. Increasing EI from 55% to 75% Vo(2max) during 60 min of running resulted in higher β-CTX concentrations in the first hour postexercise but had no effect on bone formation markers. Increased bone-ALP concentrations at 3 and 4 days postexercise suggest a beneficial effect of this type of exercise on bone mineralization. The increase in OPG was not influenced by exercise intensity, whereas PTH was increased at 75% Vo(2max) only, which cannot be fully explained by changes in

  19. Regulation of bone-renal mineral and energy metabolism: the PHEX, FGF23, DMP1, MEPE ASARM pathway.

    PubMed

    Rowe, Peter S N

    2012-01-01

    More than 300 million years ago, vertebrates emerged from the vast oceans to conquer gravity and the dry land. With this transition, new adaptations occurred that included ingenious changes in reproduction, waste secretion, and bone physiology. One new innovation, the egg shell, contained an ancestral protein (ovocleidin-116) that likely first appeared with the dinosaurs and was preserved through the theropod lineage in modern birds and reptiles. Ovocleidin-116 is an avian homolog of matrix extracellular phosphoglycoprotein (MEPE) and belongs to a group of proteins called short integrin-binding ligand-interacting glycoproteins (SIBLINGs). These proteins are all localized to a defined region on chromosome 5q in mice and chromosome 4q in humans. A unifying feature of SIBLING proteins is an acidic serine aspartate-rich MEPE-associated motif (ASARM). Recent research has shown that the ASARM motif and the released ASARM peptide have regulatory roles in mineralization (bone and teeth), phosphate regulation, vascularization, soft-tissue calcification, osteoclastogenesis, mechanotransduction, and fat energy metabolism. The MEPE ASARM motif and peptide are physiological substrates for PHEX, a zinc metalloendopeptidase. Defects in PHEX are responsible for X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets (HYP). There is evidence that PHEX interacts with another ASARM motif containing SIBLING protein, dentin matrix protein-1 (DMP1). DMP1 mutations cause bone and renal defects that are identical with the defects caused by a loss of PHEX function. This results in autosomal recessive hypophosphatemic rickets (ARHR). In both HYP and ARHR, increased FGF23 expression plays a major role in the disease and in autosomal dominant hypophosphatemic rickets (ADHR), FGF23 half-life is increased by activating mutations. ASARM peptide administration in vitro and in vivo also induces increased FGF23 expression. FGF23 is a member of the fibroblast growth factor (FGF) family of cytokines, which surfaced 500

  20. Regulation of bone-renal mineral and energy metabolism: the PHEX, FGF23, DMP1, MEPE ASARM pathway.

    PubMed

    Rowe, Peter S N

    2012-01-01

    More than 300 million years ago, vertebrates emerged from the vast oceans to conquer gravity and the dry land. With this transition, new adaptations occurred that included ingenious changes in reproduction, waste secretion, and bone physiology. One new innovation, the egg shell, contained an ancestral protein (ovocleidin-116) that likely first appeared with the dinosaurs and was preserved through the theropod lineage in modern birds and reptiles. Ovocleidin-116 is an avian homolog of matrix extracellular phosphoglycoprotein (MEPE) and belongs to a group of proteins called short integrin-binding ligand-interacting glycoproteins (SIBLINGs). These proteins are all localized to a defined region on chromosome 5q in mice and chromosome 4q in humans. A unifying feature of SIBLING proteins is an acidic serine aspartate-rich MEPE-associated motif (ASARM). Recent research has shown that the ASARM motif and the released ASARM peptide have regulatory roles in mineralization (bone and teeth), phosphate regulation, vascularization, soft-tissue calcification, osteoclastogenesis, mechanotransduction, and fat energy metabolism. The MEPE ASARM motif and peptide are physiological substrates for PHEX, a zinc metalloendopeptidase. Defects in PHEX are responsible for X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets (HYP). There is evidence that PHEX interacts with another ASARM motif containing SIBLING protein, dentin matrix protein-1 (DMP1). DMP1 mutations cause bone and renal defects that are identical with the defects caused by a loss of PHEX function. This results in autosomal recessive hypophosphatemic rickets (ARHR). In both HYP and ARHR, increased FGF23 expression plays a major role in the disease and in autosomal dominant hypophosphatemic rickets (ADHR), FGF23 half-life is increased by activating mutations. ASARM peptide administration in vitro and in vivo also induces increased FGF23 expression. FGF23 is a member of the fibroblast growth factor (FGF) family of cytokines, which surfaced 500

  1. Serum levels of immunoglobulins (IgG, IgA, IgM) in a general adult population and their relationship with alcohol consumption, smoking and common metabolic abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Quintela, A; Alende, R; Gude, F; Campos, J; Rey, J; Meijide, L M; Fernandez-Merino, C; Vidal, C

    2008-01-01

    The present study investigated serum immunoglobulin (Ig) concentrations in relation to demographic factors, common habits (alcohol consumption and smoking) and metabolic abnormalities in an adult population-based survey including 460 individuals. Serum levels of interleukin (IL)-6, a marker of inflammation, were also determined. After adjusting for confounders, male sex was associated positively with IgA levels and negatively with IgM levels. Age was associated positively with IgA and IgG levels. Smoking was associated negatively with IgG levels. Heavy drinking was associated positively with IgA levels. Metabolic abnormalities (obesity and metabolic syndrome) were associated positively with IgA levels. Abdominal obesity and hypertriglyceridaemia were the components of metabolic syndrome associated most strongly with serum IgA. Heavy drinkers with metabolic syndrome showed particularly high serum IgA levels. Serum IL-6 levels were correlated positively with IgA and IgG concentrations. It is concluded that sex, age, alcohol consumption, smoking and common metabolic abnormalities should be taken into account when interpreting serum levels of IgA, IgG and IgM. PMID:18005364

  2. Development of a diet-induced murine model of diabetes featuring cardinal metabolic and pathophysiological abnormalities of type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Jodie L.; Bridson, Tahnee L.; Alim, Md Abdul; Rush, Catherine M.; Rudd, Donna M.; Govan, Brenda L.; Ketheesan, Natkunam

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The persistent rise in global incidence of type 2 diabetes (T2D) continues to have significant public health and economic implications. The availability of relevant animal models of T2D is critical to elucidating the complexity of the pathogenic mechanisms underlying this disease and the implications this has on susceptibility to T2D complications. Whilst many high-fat diet-induced rodent models of obesity and diabetes exist, growing appreciation of the contribution of high glycaemic index diets on the development of hyperglycaemia and insulin resistance highlight the requirement for animal models that more closely represent global dietary patterns reflective of modern society. To that end, we sought to develop and validate a murine model of T2D based on consumption of an energy-dense diet containing moderate levels of fat and a high glycaemic index to better reflect the aetiopathogenesis of T2D. Male C57BL/6 mice were fed an energy-dense (ED) diet and the development of pathological features used in the clinical diagnosis of T2D was assessed over a 30-week period. Compared with control mice, 87% of mice fed an ED diet developed pathognomonic signs of T2D including glucose intolerance, hyperglycaemia, glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c) and glycosuria within 30 weeks. Furthermore, dyslipidaemia, chronic inflammation, alterations in circulating leucocytes and renal impairment were also evident in ED diet-fed mice compared with mice receiving standard rodent chow. Longitudinal profiling of metabolic and biochemical parameters provide support of an aetiologically and clinically relevant model of T2D that will serve as a valuable tool for mechanistic and therapeutic studies investigating the pathogenic complications of T2D. PMID:27402965

  3. Abnormal folate metabolism and genetic polymorphism of the folate pathway in a child with Down syndrome and neural tube defect.

    PubMed

    Al-Gazali, L I; Padmanabhan, R; Melnyk, S; Yi, P; Pogribny, I P; Pogribna, M; Bakir, M; Hamid, Z A; Abdulrazzaq, Y; Dawodu, A; James, S J

    2001-10-01

    The association of neural tube defects (NTDs) with Down syndrome (trisomy 21) and altered folate metabolism in both mother and affected offspring provide a unique opportunity for insight into the etiologic role of folate deficiency in these congenital anomalies. We describe here the case of a male child with trisomy 21, cervical meningomyelocele, agenesis of corpus callosum, hydrocephaly, cerebellar herniation into the foramen magnum, and shallow posterior cranial fossa. Molecular analysis of the methylenetetrahydrofolate (MTHFR) gene revealed homozygosity for the mutant 677C-->T polymorphism in both the mother and child. The plasma homocysteine of the mother was highly elevated at 25.0 micromol/L and was associated with a low methionine level of 22.1 micromol/L. Her S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH) level was three times that of reference normal women, resulting in a markedly reduced ratio of S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) to SAH and significant DNA hypomethylation in lymphocytes. The child had low plasma levels of both homocysteine and methionine and a reduced SAM/SAH ratio that was also associated with lymphocyte DNA hypomethylation. In addition, the child had a five-fold increase in cystathionine level relative to normal children, consistent with over-expression of the cystathionine beta synthase gene present on chromosome 21. We suggest that altered folate status plus homozygous mutation in the MTHFR gene in the mother could promote chromosomal instability and meiotic non-disjunction resulting in trisomy 21. Altered folate status and homozygous TT mutation in the MTHFR gene in both mother and child would be expected to increase the risk of neural tube defects. The presence of both trisomy 21 and postclosure NTD in the same child supports the need for an extended periconceptional period of maternal folate supplementation to achieve greater preventive effects for both NTD and trisomy 21. PMID:11568918

  4. Abnormal Cognition, Sleep, EEG and Brain Metabolism in a Novel Knock-In Alzheimer Mouse, PLB1

    PubMed Central

    Platt, Bettina; Drever, Benjamin; Koss, David; Stoppelkamp, Sandra; Jyoti, Amar; Plano, Andrea; Utan, Aneli; Merrick, Georgina; Ryan, Duncan; Melis, Valeria; Wan, Hong; Mingarelli, Marco; Porcu, Emanuele; Scrocchi, Louise; Welch, Andy; Riedel, Gernot

    2011-01-01

    Late-stage neuropathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD) are β-amyloid (βA) and hyperphosphorylated tau peptides, aggregated into plaques and tangles, respectively. Corresponding phenotypes have been mimicked in existing transgenic mice, however, the translational value of aggressive over-expression has recently been questioned. As controlled gene expression may offer animal models with better predictive validity, we set out to design a transgenic mouse model that circumvents complications arising from pronuclear injection and massive over-expression, by targeted insertion of human mutated amyloid and tau transgenes, under the forebrain- and neurone-specific CaMKIIα promoter, termed PLB1Double. Crossing with an existing presenilin 1 line resulted in PLB1Triple mice. PLB1Triple mice presented with stable gene expression and age-related pathology of intra-neuronal amyloid and hyperphosphorylated tau in hippocampus and cortex from 6 months onwards. At this early stage, pre-clinical 18FDG PET/CT imaging revealed cortical hypometabolism with increased metabolic activity in basal forebrain and ventral midbrain. Quantitative EEG analyses yielded heightened delta power during wakefulness and REM sleep, and time in wakefulness was already reliably enhanced at 6 months of age. These anomalies were paralleled by impairments in long-term and short-term hippocampal plasticity and preceded cognitive deficits in recognition memory, spatial learning, and sleep fragmentation all emerging at ∼12 months. These data suggest that prodromal AD phenotypes can be successfully modelled in transgenic mice devoid of fibrillary plaque or tangle development. PLB1Triple mice progress from a mild (MCI-like) state to a more comprehensive AD-relevant phenotype, which are accessible using translational tools such as wireless EEG and microPET/CT. PMID:22096518

  5. Metabolic bone disease in lion cubs at the London Zoo in 1889: the original animal model of rickets.

    PubMed

    Chesney, Russell W; Hedberg, Gail

    2010-08-24

    In 1889 Dr. John Bland-Sutton, a prominent London surgeon, was consulted about fatal rickets in over 20 successive litters of lion cubs born at the London Zoo. He evaluated the diet and found the cause of rickets to be nutritional in origin. He recommended that goat meat with crushed bones and cod-liver oil be added to the lean horsemeat diet of the cubs and their mothers. Rickets were reversed, the cubs survived, and subsequent litters thrived. Thirty years later, in classic controlled studies conducted in puppies and young rats, the definitive role of calcium, phosphate and vitamin D in prevention and therapy of rickets was elucidated. Further studies led to identifying the structural features of vitamin D.Although the Bland-Sutton diet provided calcium and phosphate from bones and vitamins A and D from cod-liver oil, some other benefits of this diet were not recognized. Taurine-conjugated bile salts, necessary for intestinal absorption of fat-soluble vitamins, were provided in the oil cold-pressed from cod liver. Unlike canine and rodent species, felines are unable to synthesize taurine, yet conjugate bile acids exclusively with taurine; hence, it must be provided in the diet. The now famous Bland-Sutton "experiment of nature," fatal rickets in lion cubs, was cured by addition of minerals and vitamin D. Taurine-conjugated bile salts undoubtedly permitted absorption of vitamins A and D, thus preventing the occurrence of metabolic bone disease and rickets.

  6. Metabolic bone disease in lion cubs at the London Zoo in 1889: the original animal model of rickets

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    In 1889 Dr. John Bland-Sutton, a prominent London surgeon, was consulted about fatal rickets in over 20 successive litters of lion cubs born at the London Zoo. He evaluated the diet and found the cause of rickets to be nutritional in origin. He recommended that goat meat with crushed bones and cod-liver oil be added to the lean horsemeat diet of the cubs and their mothers. Rickets were reversed, the cubs survived, and subsequent litters thrived. Thirty years later, in classic controlled studies conducted in puppies and young rats, the definitive role of calcium, phosphate and vitamin D in prevention and therapy of rickets was elucidated. Further studies led to identifying the structural features of vitamin D. Although the Bland-Sutton diet provided calcium and phosphate from bones and vitamins A and D from cod-liver oil, some other benefits of this diet were not recognized. Taurine-conjugated bile salts, necessary for intestinal absorption of fat-soluble vitamins, were provided in the oil cold-pressed from cod liver. Unlike canine and rodent species, felines are unable to synthesize taurine, yet conjugate bile acids exclusively with taurine; hence, it must be provided in the diet. The now famous Bland-Sutton “experiment of nature,” fatal rickets in lion cubs, was cured by addition of minerals and vitamin D. Taurine-conjugated bile salts undoubtedly permitted absorption of vitamins A and D, thus preventing the occurrence of metabolic bone disease and rickets. PMID:20804612

  7. Microgravity and bone cell mechanosensitivity.

    PubMed

    Klein-Nulend, J; Bacabac, R G; Veldhuijzen, J P; Van Loon, J J W A

    2003-01-01

    mechanosensitivity of bone cells is altered under near weightlessness conditions, and that this abnormal mechanosensation contributes to disturbed bone metabolism observed in astronauts. In our current project for the International Space Station, we wish to test this hypothesis experimentally using an in vitro model. The specific aim of our research project is to test whether near weightlessness decreases the sensitivity of bone cells for mechanical stress through a decrease in early signaling molecules (NO, PGs) that are involved in the mechanical loading-induced osteogenic response. Bone cells are cultured with or without gravity prior to and during mechanical loading, using our modified in vitro oscillating fluid flow apparatus. In this "FlowSpace" project we are developing a cell culture module that is used to provide further insight in the mechanism of mechanotransduction in bone.

  8. Microgravity and bone cell mechanosensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein-Nulend, J.; Bacabac, R. G.; Veldhuijzen, J. P.; Van Loon, J. J. W. A.

    2003-10-01

    mechanosensitivity of bone cells is altered under near weightlessness conditions, and that this abnormal mechanosensation contributes to disturbed bone metabolism observed in astronauts. In our current project for the International Space Station, we wish to test this hypothesis experimentally using an in vitro model. The specific aim of our research project is to test whether near weightlessness decreases the sensitivity of bone cells for mechanical stress through a decrease in early signaling molecules (NO, PGs) that are involved in the mechanical loading-induced osteogenic response. Bone cells are cultured with or without gravity prior to and during mechanical loading, using our modified in vitro oscillating fluid flow apparatus. In this "FlowSpace" project we are developing a cell culture module that is used to provide further insight in the mechanism of mechanotransduction in bone.

  9. Utilizing time-lapse micro-CT-correlated bisphosphonate binding kinetics and soft tissue-derived input functions to differentiate site-specific changes in bone metabolism in vivo.

    PubMed

    Tower, R J; Campbell, G M; Müller, M; Glüer, C C; Tiwari, S

    2015-05-01

    The turnover of bone is a tightly regulated process between bone formation and resorption to ensure skeletal homeostasis. This process differs between bone types, with trabecular bone often associated with higher turnover than cortical bone. Analyses of bone by micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) reveal changes in structure and mineral content, but are limited in the study of metabolic activity at a single time point, while analyses of serum markers can reveal changes in bone metabolism, but cannot delineate the origin of any aberrant findings. To obtain a site-specific assessment of bone metabolic status, bisphosphonate binding kinetics were utilized. Using a fluorescently-labeled bisphosphonate, we show that early binding kinetics monitored in vivo using fluorescent molecular tomography (FMT) can monitor changes in bone metabolism in response to bone loss, stimulated by ovariectomy (OVX), or bone gain, resulting from treatment with the anabolic bone agent parathyroid hormone (PTH), and is capable of distinguishing different, metabolically distinct skeletal sites. Using time-lapse micro-CT, longitudinal bone turnover was quantified. The spine showed a significantly greater percent resorbing volume and surface in response to OVX, while mice treated with PTH showed significantly greater resorbing volume per bone surface in the spine and significantly greater forming surfaces in the knee. Correlation studies between binding kinetics and micro-CT suggest that forming surfaces, as assessed by time-lapse micro-CT, are preferentially reflected in the rate constant values while forming and resorbing bone volumes primarily affect plateau values. Additionally, we developed a blood pool correction method which now allows for quantitative multi-compartment analyses to be conducted using FMT. These results further expand our understanding of bisphosphonate binding and the use of bisphosphonate binding kinetics as a tool to monitor site-specific changes in bone metabolism in

  10. The effect of a proton pump inhibitor on bone metabolism in ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Joo, Moon Kyung; Park, Jong-Jae; Lee, Beom Jae; Kim, Ji Hoon; Yeon, Jong Eun; Kim, Jae Seon; Byun, Kwan Soo; Bak, Young-Tae

    2013-04-01

    Recent studies revealed that long-term intake of proton pump inhibitor (PPI) increases the risk of vertebral or hip fracture; however, the exact mechanism for this is not known. To evaluate the effect of long-term PPI therapy on bone turnover, we analyzed the signaling pathway involved in osteoclast differentiation and bone resorption/formation markers using ovariectomized rats. Six-week-old Sprague-Dawley (S-D) rats were ovariectomized, and two weeks later they were divided into four groups (group A, normal diet + placebo; group B, low calcium diet + placebo; group C, normal diet + PPI; and group D, low calcium diet + PPI). Omeprazole, at a concentration of 30 mg/kg, was administered orally for eight weeks and the rats were sacrificed when they were 16 weeks old. The relative expression levels of the receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL)/osteoprotegerin (OPG) ratio, c-Fos, nuclear factor of activated T cells c1 (NFATc1) and osteocalcin in femoral bone marrow cells were compared, and serum C-terminal cross-linking telopeptide of type I (CTX-1) levels were determined. The relative ratio of RANKL/OPG was increased in group D, and gene expression levels of c-Fos and NFATc1 were upregulated in groups B and D, which are involved in differentiation and activation of osteoclasts. Furthermore, expression levels of osteocalcin, a bone formation marker, were decreased and levels of serum CTX-1, a bone resorption marker, were increased in group D. Taken together, a low calcium diet and PPI administration are thought to collaborate in order to alter osteoclast activity and bone resorption signaling.

  11. Biochemical markers of bone metabolism in growing thoroughbreds: a longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Price, J S; Jackson, B F; Gray, J A; Harris, P A; Wright, I M; Pfeiffer, D U; Robins, S P; Eastell, R; Ricketts, S W

    2001-08-01

    This study describes longitudinal changes in serum levels of biochemical markers of bone cell activity in a group of 24 thoroughbred foals from birth to 18 months of age. The markers of bone formation included the type I collagen carboxy-terminal propeptide (PICP), the bone-specific isoenzyme of alkaline phosphatase (BAP), and osteocalcin (OC). Levels of the cross-linked telopeptide of type I collagen (ICTP), a marker of bone resorption, and the N-terminal propeptide of type III collagen (PNIIIP), a marker of soft tissue turnover, were also measured. Levels of all markers fell significantly between birth and 18 months of age (70-80 per cent); this decrease being most marked between 0 and 6 months. However, a transient increase in levels of the markers then occurred between 6 and 14 months of age. The timing of this increase was specific for each parameter. ICTP and OC concentrations increased between October and December. PICP concentrations increased between December and April whereas the increase in PIIINP was coincident with the peak in weight gain between April and June. Changes in BAP concentration were less distinct at this time. Season was shown to have significant effects on the biochemical markers independent from the effect of age. Concentrations of all markers decreased with increasing body weight and at any given age heavier horses had lower marker levels. These results show that biochemical markers of bone cell activity and soft tissue turnover follow characteristic patterns of change in growing thoroughbreds influenced by age, season and bodyweight. The demonstration that the reference ranges for the biochemical markers change from month to month means that single samples from individuals are of little value for monitoring bone cell activity in growing thoroughbreds.

  12. Forebrain deletion of the vesicular acetylcholine transporter results in deficits in executive function, metabolic, and RNA splicing abnormalities in the prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Kolisnyk, Benjamin; Al-Onaizi, Mohammed A; Hirata, Pedro H F; Guzman, Monica S; Nikolova, Simona; Barbash, Shahar; Soreq, Hermona; Bartha, Robert; Prado, Marco A M; Prado, Vania F

    2013-09-11

    One of the key brain regions in cognitive processing and executive function is the prefrontal cortex (PFC), which receives cholinergic input from basal forebrain cholinergic neurons. We evaluated the contribution of synaptically released acetylcholine (ACh) to executive function by genetically targeting the vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT) in the mouse forebrain. Executive function was assessed using a pairwise visual discrimination paradigm and the 5-choice serial reaction time task (5-CSRT). In the pairwise test, VAChT-deficient mice were able to learn, but were impaired in reversal learning, suggesting that these mice present cognitive inflexibility. Interestingly, VAChT-targeted mice took longer to reach criteria in the 5-CSRT. Although their performance was indistinguishable from that of control mice during low attentional demand, increased attentional demand revealed striking deficits in VAChT-deleted mice. Galantamine, a cholinesterase inhibitor used in Alzheimer's disease, significantly improved the performance of control mice, but not of VAChT-deficient mice on the 5-CSRT. In vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy showed altered levels of two neurochemical markers of neuronal function, taurine and lactate, suggesting altered PFC metabolis