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Sample records for abnormal cardiac development

  1. Disruption of Ah Receptor Signaling during Mouse Development Leads to Abnormal Cardiac Structure and Function in the Adult

    PubMed Central

    Carreira, Vinicius S.; Fan, Yunxia; Kurita, Hisaka; Wang, Qin; Ko, Chia-I; Naticchioni, Mindi; Jiang, Min; Koch, Sheryl; Zhang, Xiang; Biesiada, Jacek; Medvedovic, Mario; Xia, Ying; Rubinstein, Jack; Puga, Alvaro

    2015-01-01

    The Developmental Origins of Health and Disease (DOHaD) Theory proposes that the environment encountered during fetal life and infancy permanently shapes tissue physiology and homeostasis such that damage resulting from maternal stress, poor nutrition or exposure to environmental agents may be at the heart of adult onset disease. Interference with endogenous developmental functions of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR), either by gene ablation or by exposure in utero to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), a potent AHR ligand, causes structural, molecular and functional cardiac abnormalities and altered heart physiology in mouse embryos. To test if embryonic effects progress into an adult phenotype, we investigated whether Ahr ablation or TCDD exposure in utero resulted in cardiac abnormalities in adult mice long after removal of the agent. Ten-months old adult Ahr-/- and in utero TCDD-exposed Ahr+/+ mice showed sexually dimorphic abnormal cardiovascular phenotypes characterized by echocardiographic findings of hypertrophy, ventricular dilation and increased heart weight, resting heart rate and systolic and mean blood pressure, and decreased exercise tolerance. Underlying these effects, genes in signaling networks related to cardiac hypertrophy and mitochondrial function were differentially expressed. Cardiac dysfunction in mouse embryos resulting from AHR signaling disruption seems to progress into abnormal cardiac structure and function that predispose adults to cardiac disease, but while embryonic dysfunction is equally robust in males and females, the adult abnormalities are more prevalent in females, with the highest severity in Ahr-/- females. The findings reported here underscore the conclusion that AHR signaling in the developing heart is one potential target of environmental factors associated with cardiovascular disease. PMID:26555816

  2. Cardiac abnormalities and sudden infant death syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sweeting, Joanna; Semsarian, Christopher

    2014-12-01

    Many factors have been implicated in SIDS cases including environmental influences such as sleeping arrangements and smoking. Most recently, cardiac abnormalities have been hypothesised to play a role in some cases, particularly the primary genetic arrhythmogenic disorders such as familial long QT syndrome (LQTS). Both post-mortem and clinical studies of SIDS cases have provided supporting evidence for the involvement of cardiac genetic disorders in SIDS. This review provides a summary of this evidence focussing particularly on the primary hypothesis related to underlying familial LQTS. In addition, the current literature relating to other cardiac genetic conditions such as Brugada syndrome (BrS) and structural heart diseases such as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is briefly presented. Finally, the implications of a possible cardiac genetic cause of SIDS is discussed with reference to the need for genetic testing in SIDS cases and subsequent clinical and genetic testing in family members.

  3. AKAP13 Rho-GEF and PKD-Binding Domain Deficient Mice Develop Normally but Have an Abnormal Response to β-Adrenergic-Induced Cardiac Hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Spindler, Matthew J.; Burmeister, Brian T.; Huang, Yu; Hsiao, Edward C.; Salomonis, Nathan; Scott, Mark J.; Srivastava, Deepak; Carnegie, Graeme K.; Conklin, Bruce R.

    2013-01-01

    Background A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs) are scaffolding molecules that coordinate and integrate G-protein signaling events to regulate development, physiology, and disease. One family member, AKAP13, encodes for multiple protein isoforms that contain binding sites for protein kinase A (PKA) and D (PKD) and an active Rho-guanine nucleotide exchange factor (Rho-GEF) domain. In mice, AKAP13 is required for development as null embryos die by embryonic day 10.5 with cardiovascular phenotypes. Additionally, the AKAP13 Rho-GEF and PKD-binding domains mediate cardiomyocyte hypertrophy in cell culture. However, the requirements for the Rho-GEF and PKD-binding domains during development and cardiac hypertrophy are unknown. Methodology/Principal Findings To determine if these AKAP13 protein domains are required for development, we used gene-trap events to create mutant mice that lacked the Rho-GEF and/or the protein kinase D-binding domains. Surprisingly, heterozygous matings produced mutant mice at Mendelian ratios that had normal viability and fertility. The adult mutant mice also had normal cardiac structure and electrocardiograms. To determine the role of these domains during β-adrenergic-induced cardiac hypertrophy, we stressed the mice with isoproterenol. We found that heart size was increased similarly in mice lacking the Rho-GEF and PKD-binding domains and wild-type controls. However, the mutant hearts had abnormal cardiac contractility as measured by fractional shortening and ejection fraction. Conclusions These results indicate that the Rho-GEF and PKD-binding domains of AKAP13 are not required for mouse development, normal cardiac architecture, or β-adrenergic-induced cardiac hypertrophic remodeling. However, these domains regulate aspects of β-adrenergic-induced cardiac hypertrophy. PMID:23658642

  4. Robust algorithmic detection of the developed cardiac pathologies and emerging or transient abnormalities from short periods of RR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrishchaka, Valeriy V.; Senyukova, Olga

    2011-06-01

    Numerous research efforts and clinical testing have confirmed validity of heart rate variability (HRV) analysis as one of the cardiac diagnostics modalities. The majority of HRV analysis tools currently used in practice are based on linear indicators. Methods from nonlinear dynamics (NLD) provide more natural modeling framework for adaptive biological systems with multiple feedback loops. Compared to linear indicators, many NLD-based measures are much less sensitive to data artifacts and non-stationarity. However, majority of NLD measures require long time series for stable calculation. Similar restrictions also apply for linear indicators. Such requirements could drastically limit practical usability of HRV analysis in many applications, including express diagnostics, early indication of subtle directional changes during personalization of medical treatment, and robust detection of emerging or transient abnormalities. Recently we have illustrated that these challenges could be overcome by using classification framework based on boosting-like ensemble learning techniques that are capable of discovering robust meta-indicators from existing HRV measures and other incomplete empirical knowledge. In this paper we demonstrate universality of such meta-indicators and discuss operational details of their practical usage. Using such pathology examples as congestive heart failure (CHF) and arrhythmias, we show that classifiers trained on short RR segments (down to several minutes) could achieve reasonable classification accuracy (˜80-85% and higher). These indicators calculated from longer RR segments could be applicable for accurate diagnostics with classification accuracy approaching 100%. In addition, it is feasible to discover single "normal-abnormal" meta-classifier capable of detecting multiple abnormalities.

  5. Cardiac Arrhythmias and Abnormal Electrocardiograms After Acute Stroke.

    PubMed

    Ruthirago, Doungporn; Julayanont, Parunyou; Tantrachoti, Pakpoom; Kim, Jongyeol; Nugent, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac arrhythmias and electrocardiogram (ECG) abnormalities occur frequently but are often underrecognized after strokes. Acute ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes in some particular area of brain can disrupt central autonomic control of the heart, precipitating cardiac arrhythmias, ECG abnormalities, myocardial injury and sometimes sudden death. Identification of high-risk patients after acute stroke is important to arrange appropriate cardiac monitoring and effective management of arrhythmias, and to prevent cardiac morbidity and mortality. More studies are needed to better clarify pathogenesis, localization of areas associated with arrhythmias and practical management of arrhythmias and abnormal ECGs after acute stroke.

  6. Electrocardiographic abnormalities and cardiac arrhythmias in structural brain lesions.

    PubMed

    Katsanos, Aristeidis H; Korantzopoulos, Panagiotis; Tsivgoulis, Georgios; Kyritsis, Athanassios P; Kosmidou, Maria; Giannopoulos, Sotirios

    2013-07-31

    Cardiac arrhythmias and electrocardiographic abnormalities are frequently observed after acute cerebrovascular events. The precise mechanism that leads to the development of these arrhythmias is still uncertain, though increasing evidence suggests that it is mainly due to autonomic nervous system dysregulation. In massive brain lesions sympathetic predominance and parasympathetic withdrawal during the first 72 h are associated with the occurrence of severe secondary complications in the first week. Right insular cortex lesions are also related with sympathetic overactivation and with a higher incidence of electrocardiographic abnormalities, mostly QT prolongation, in patients with ischemic stroke. Additionally, female sex and hypokalemia are independent risk factors for severe prolongation of the QT interval which subsequently results in malignant arrhythmias and poor outcome. The prognostic value of repolarization changes commonly seen after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage, such as ST segment, T wave, and U wave abnormalities, still remains controversial. In patients with traumatic brain injury both intracranial hypertension and cerebral hypoperfusion correlate with low heart rate variability and increased mortality. Given that there are no firm guidelines for the prevention or treatment of the arrhythmias that appear after cerebral incidents this review aims to highlight important issues on this topic. Selected patients with the aforementioned risk factors could benefit from electrocardiographic monitoring, reassessment of the medications that prolong QTc interval, and administration of antiadrenergic agents. Further research is required in order to validate these assumptions and to establish specific therapeutic strategies.

  7. Resolution of abnormal cardiac MRI T2 signal following immune suppression for cardiac sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Crouser, Elliott D; Ruden, Emily; Julian, Mark W; Raman, Subha V

    2016-08-01

    Cardiac MR (CMR) with late gadolinium enhancement is commonly used to detect cardiac damage in the setting of cardiac sarcoidosis. The addition of T2 mapping to CMR was recently shown to enhance cardiac sarcoidosis detection and correlates with increased cardiac arrhythmia risk. This study was conducted to determine if CMR T2 abnormalities and related arrhythmias are reversible following immune suppression therapy. A retrospective study of subjects with cardiac sarcoidosis with abnormal T2 signal on baseline CMR and a follow-up CMR study at least 4 months later was conducted at The Ohio State University from 2011 to 2015. Immune suppression treated participants had a significant reduction in peak myocardial T2 value (70.0±5.5 vs 59.2±6.1 ms, pretreatment vs post-treatment; p=0.017), and 83% of immune suppression treated subjects had objective improvement in cardiac arrhythmias. Two subjects who had received inadequate immune suppression treatment experienced progression of cardiac sarcoidosis. This report indicates that abnormal CMR T2 signal represents an acute inflammatory manifestation of cardiac sarcoidosis that is potentially reversible with adequate immune suppression therapy.

  8. Cardiac and Non-Cardiac Abnormalities in Heterotaxy Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Smita

    2015-12-01

    Thoraco-abdominal viscera have unique morphological asymmetry, unlike the body's external organs. Heterotaxy syndrome is a disorder in which there is a loss of normal left to right asymmetry of thoraco-abdominal viscera and their naturally proscribed spatial relationship. It has multiple anatomical alterations, culminating into physiological and hemodynamic consequences. It is divided into two groups on the basis of morphology of the two atrial appendages. These subgroups are - 1) Isomerism of right atrial appendage (asplenia syndrome); 2) Isomerism of left atrial appendage (polysplenia syndrome); Patients from group I, usually have severe cardiac malformations and present early. They may have duct dependent lesions and eventually may undergo Fontan surgery. However, extracardiac anomalies are more common in group II. All the patients must be evaluated in detail to rule out anomalies like gut-malrotation. Patients must be provided with special care for their susceptibility to infection due to absence of spleen or presence of splenic malfunction. Majority of these patients may have genetic link and may present in families. Hence, genetic evaluation is necessary before assuming long term outcome.

  9. Electrocardiographic abnormalities and cardiac arrhythmias in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Goudis, Christos A; Konstantinidis, Athanasios K; Ntalas, Ioannis V; Korantzopoulos, Panagiotis

    2015-11-15

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is independently associated with an increased burden of cardiovascular disease. Besides coronary artery disease (CAD) and congestive heart failure (CHF), specific electrocardiographic (ECG) abnormalities and cardiac arrhythmias seem to have a significant impact on cardiovascular prognosis of COPD patients. Disturbances of heart rhythm include premature atrial contractions (PACs), premature ventricular contractions (PVCs), atrial fibrillation (AF), atrial flutter (AFL), multifocal atrial tachycardia (MAT), and ventricular tachycardia (VT). Of note, the identification of ECG abnormalities and the evaluation of the arrhythmic risk may have significant implications in the management and outcome of patients with COPD. This article provides a concise overview of the available data regarding ECG abnormalities and arrhythmias in these patients, including an elaborated description of the underlying arrhythmogenic mechanisms. The clinical impact and prognostic significance of ECG abnormalities and arrhythmias in COPD as well as the appropriate antiarrhythmic therapy and interventions in this setting are also discussed.

  10. Liver Abnormalities in Cardiac Diseases and Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, Alicia M.; Mukherjee, Debabrata

    2011-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is characterized by the inability of systemic perfusion to meet the body's metabolic demands and is usually caused by cardiac pump dysfunction and may occasionally present with symptoms of a noncardiac disorder such as hepatic dysfunction. The primary pathophysiology involved in hepatic dysfunction from HF is either passive congestion from increased filling pressures or low cardiac output and the consequences of impaired perfusion. Passive hepatic congestion due to increased central venous pressure may cause elevations of liver enzymes and both direct and indirect serum bilirubin. Impaired perfusion from decreased cardiac output may be associated with acute hepatocellular necrosis with marked elevations in serum aminotransferases. Cardiogenic ischemic hepatitis (“shock liver”) may ensue following an episode of profound hypotension in patients with acute HF. We discuss pathophysiology and identification of liver abnormalities that are commonly seen in patients with HF. PMID:22942628

  11. Detection of Cardiac Function Abnormality from MRI Images Using Normalized Wall Thickness Temporal Patterns.

    PubMed

    Wael, Mai; Ibrahim, El-Sayed H; Fahmy, Ahmed S

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To develop a method for identifying abnormal myocardial function based on studying the normalized wall motion pattern during the cardiac cycle. Methods. The temporal pattern of the normalized myocardial wall thickness is used as a feature vector to assess the cardiac wall motion abnormality. Principal component analysis is used to reduce the feature dimensionality and the maximum likelihood method is used to differentiate between normal and abnormal features. The proposed method was applied on a dataset of 27 cases from normal subjects and patients. Results. The developed method achieved 81.5%, 85%, and 88.5% accuracy for identifying abnormal contractility in the basal, midventricular, and apical slices, respectively. Conclusions. A novel feature vector, namely, the normalized wall thickness, has been introduced for detecting myocardial regional wall motion abnormality. The proposed method provides assessment of the regional myocardial contractility for each cardiac segment and slice; therefore, it could be a valuable tool for automatic and fast determination of regional wall motion abnormality from conventional cine MRI images.

  12. Cardiac abnormalities in young women with anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed Central

    de Simone, G.; Scalfi, L.; Galderisi, M.; Celentano, A.; Di Biase, G.; Tammaro, P.; Garofalo, M.; Mureddu, G. F.; de Divitiis, O.; Contaldo, F.

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To identify the characteristics of cardiac involvement in the self-induced starvation phase of anorexia nervosa. METHODS--Doppler echocardiographic indices of left ventricular geometry, function, and filling were examined in 21 white women (mean (SD) 22 (5) years) with anorexia nervosa according to the DSMIII (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders) criteria, 19 women (23 (2) years) of normal weight, and 22 constitutionally thin women (21 (4) years) with body mass index < 20. RESULTS--13 patients (62%) had abnormalities of mitral valve motion compared with one normal weight woman and two thin women (p < 0.001) v both control groups). Left ventricular chamber dimension and mass were significantly less in women with anorexia nervosa than in either the women of normal weight or the thin women, even after standardisation for body size or after controlling for blood pressure. There were no substantial changes in left ventricular shape. Midwall shortening as a percentage of the values predicted from end systolic stress was significantly lower in the starving patients than in women of normal weight: when endocardial shortening was used as the index this difference was overestimated. The cardiac index was also significantly reduced in anorexia nervosa because of a low stroke index and heart rate. The total peripheral resistance was significantly higher in starving patients than in both control groups. The left atrial dimension was significantly smaller in anorexia than in the women of normal weight and the thin women, independently of body size. The transmitral flow velocity E/A ratio was significantly higher in anorexia than in both the control groups because of the reduction of peak velocity A. When data from all three groups were pooled the flow velocity E/A ratio was inversely related to left atrial dimension (r = -0.43, p < 0.0001) and cardiac output (r = -0.64, p < 0.0001) independently of body size. CONCLUSIONS--Anorexia nervosa caused

  13. Improving the performance of cardiac abnormality detection from PCG signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sujit, N. R.; Kumar, C. Santhosh; Rajesh, C. B.

    2016-03-01

    The Phonocardiogram (PCG) signal contains important information about the condition of heart. Using PCG signal analysis prior recognition of coronary illness can be done. In this work, we developed a biomedical system for the detection of abnormality in heart and methods to enhance the performance of the system using SMOTE and AdaBoost technique have been presented. Time and frequency domain features extracted from the PCG signal is input to the system. The back-end classifier to the system developed is Decision Tree using CART (Classification and Regression Tree), with an overall classification accuracy of 78.33% and sensitivity (alarm accuracy) of 40%. Here sensitivity implies the precision obtained from classifying the abnormal heart sound, which is an essential parameter for a system. We further improve the performance of baseline system using SMOTE and AdaBoost algorithm. The proposed approach outperforms the baseline system by an absolute improvement in overall accuracy of 5% and sensitivity of 44.92%.

  14. Abnormal cardiac enzymes in systemic sclerosis: a report of four patients and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Vasta, B; Flower, V; Bucciarelli-Ducci, C; Brown, S; Korendowych, E; McHugh, N J; Pauling, J D

    2014-03-01

    Cardiac involvement in systemic sclerosis (SSc) is heterogeneous and can include primary involvement of the myocardium, pericardium and coronary arteries or be secondary to cardiac complications of pulmonary and renal disease. Primary cardiac involvement in SSc is uncommon but can result in ventricular dysfunction, organ failure, arrhythmias and death. It can remain clinically silent and the prevalence is likely to be under-reported. We report four cases of SSc associated with a raised serum troponin T (TnT), in a proportion of whom cardiac MRI myocardial abnormalities were detected. These cases highlight the heterogeneity of cardiac involvement in SSc, the role of cardiac MRI and promising biochemical responses to immunosuppression. Cardiac biomarkers such as TnT may be useful screening tools to identify subclinical cardiac disease and assess response to therapeutic intervention.

  15. New Developments in Cardiac Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Le, Thi Yen Loan; Thavapalachandran, Sujitha; Kizana, Eddy; Chong, James Jh

    2017-04-01

    Numerous pharmacological and device therapies have improved adverse cardiac remodelling and mortality in heart failure. However, none are able to regenerate damaged cardiac tissue. Stem cell based therapies using multipotent (adult) stem cells and pluripotent stem cells are new approaches that could potentially achieve the elusive goal of true cardiac regeneration. Over the past two decades, various stem cell based approaches have been shown to improve left ventricular function in pre-clinical animal models. Promising results rapidly led to clinical trials, initially using bone marrow-derived mononuclear cells, then mesenchymal stromal cell populations and, more recently, progenitor cells from the adult heart itself. These have been shown to be safe and have advanced our understanding of potential suitable recipients, cell delivery routes, and possible mechanisms of action. However, efficacy in these trials has been inconsistent. Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) are another potential source of stem cells for cardiac regeneration. They could theoretically provide an unlimited source of cardiomyocytes or cardiac progenitors. Pre-clinical studies in both small and large animal models have shown robust engraftment and improvements in cardiac function. The first clinical trial using hPSC-derived cardiac derivatives has now commenced and others are imminent. In this brief review article, we summarise recent developments in stem cell therapies aimed at cardiac regeneration, including discussion of types of cell and non-cell-based strategies being explored.

  16. Cardiac Repolarization Abnormalities and Potential Evidence for Loss of Cardiac Sodium Currents on ECGs of Patients with Chagas' Heart Disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlegel, T. T.; Medina, R.; Jugo, D.; Nunez, T. J.; Borrego, A.; Arellano, E.; Arenare, B.; DePalma, J. L.; Greco, E. C.; Starc, V.

    2007-01-01

    Some individuals with Chagas disease develop right precordial lead ST segment elevation in response to an ajmaline challenge test, and the prevalence of right bundle branch block (RBBB) is also high in Chagas disease. Because these same electrocardiographic abnormalities occur in the Brugada syndrome, which involves genetically defective cardiac sodium channels, acquired damage to cardiac sodium channels may also occur in Chagas disease. We studied several conventional and advanced resting 12-lead/derived Frank-lead ECG parameters in 34 patients with Chagas -related heart disease (mean age 39 14 years) and in 34 age-/gender-matched healthy controls. All ECG recordings were of 5-10 min duration, obtained in the supine position using high fidelity hardware/software (CardioSoft, Houston, TX). Even after excluding those Chagas patients who had resting BBBs, tachycardia and/or pathologic arrhythmia (n=8), significant differences remained in multiple conventional and advanced ECG parameters between the Chagas and control groups (n=26/group), especially in their respective QT interval variability indices, maximal spatial QRS-T angles and low frequency HRV powers (p=0.0006, p=0.0015 and p=0.0314 respectively). In relation to the issue of potential damage to cardiac sodium channels, the Chagas patients had: 1) greater than or equal to twice the incidence of resting ST segment elevation in leads V1-V3 (n=10/26 vs. n=5/26) and of both leftward (n=5/26 versus n=0/26) and rightward (n=7/26 versus n=3/26) QRS axis deviation than controls; 2) significantly increased filtered (40-250 Hz) QRS interval durations (92.1 8.5 versus 85.3 plus or minus 9.0 ms, p=0.022) versus controls; and 3) significantly decreased QT and especially JT interval durations versus controls (QT interval: 387.5 plus or minus 26.4 versus 408.9 plus or minus 34.6 ms, p=0.013; JT interval: 290.5 plus or minus 26.3 versus 314.8 plus or minus 31.3 ms; p=0.0029). Heart rates and Bazett-corrected QTc/JTc intervals

  17. Abnormal left ventricular torsion and cardiac autonomic dysfunction in subjects with type 1 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Piya, Milan K.; Shivu, Ganesh Nallur; Tahrani, Abd; Dubb, Kiran; Abozguia, Khalid; Phan, T.T.; Narendran, Parth; Pop-Busui, Rodica; Frenneaux, Michael; Stevens, Martin J.

    2011-01-01

    Left ventricular torsion is increased and cardiac energetics are reduced in uncomplicated type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Our aim was to determine the relationships of these abnormalities to cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (CAN) in subjects with T1DM. A cross-sectional study was conducted in 20 subjects with T1DM free of known coronary heart disease attending an outpatient clinic. Cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy was assessed using heart rate variability studies and the continuous wavelet transform method. Left ventricular function was determined by speckle tracking echocardiography. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy and stress magnetic resonance imaging were used to measure cardiac energetics and myocardial perfusion reserve index, respectively. Twenty subjects (age, 35 ± 8 years; diabetes duration, 16 ± 9 years; hemoglobin A1c, 8.0% ± 1.1%) were recruited. Forty percent of the subjects exhibited definite or borderline CAN. Log peak radial strain was significantly increased in subjects with CAN compared with those without (1.56 ± 0.06 vs 1.43 ± 0.14, respectively; P = .011). Data were adjusted for log duration of diabetes, and log left ventricular torsion correlated (r = 0.593, P = .01) with log low-frequency to high-frequency ratio during the Valsalva maneuver. Log isovolumic relaxation time correlated significantly with log Valsalva ratio and log proportion of differences in consecutive RR intervals of normal beats greater than 50 milliseconds during deep breathing. However, CAN did not correlate with cardiac energetics or myocardial perfusion reserve index. Spectral analysis of low-frequency to high-frequency ratio power during the Valsalva maneuver is associated with altered left ventricular torsion in subjects with T1DM. Parasympathetic dysfunction is closely associated with diastolic deficits. Cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy is not however the principal cause of impaired cardiac energetics. The role of CAN in the development of cardiomyopathy

  18. Cardiac, skeletal, and ocular abnormalities in patients with Marfan's syndrome and in their relatives. Comparison with the cardiac abnormalities in patients with kyphoscoliosis.

    PubMed Central

    Bruno, L; Tredici, S; Mangiavacchi, M; Colombo, V; Mazzotta, G F; Sirtori, C R

    1984-01-01

    Polygraphic (including apexcardiograms and carotid pulse tracings) and M mode echocardiographic examinations were carried out in 34 symptomatic patients with Marfan's syndrome; similar studies were performed in 32 relatives and in 34 young patients with kyphoscoliotic disease. The purpose of these investigations was to determine the association between cardiac and oculoskeletal abnormalities and to identify specific patterns of disease with a poor prognosis. Polygraphic tests showed significant changes in all patients with Marfan's syndrome: 74% showed the apical systolic click and murmur of mitral valve prolapse; 48% had the diastolic murmur of aortic regurgitation; isolated mitral valve prolapse was found in 52%, 26% had isolated aortic regurgitation, and 22% had a combination of the two. Echocardiographic changes were also found in all patients: 79% had aortic root dilatation; 48% fluttering of the anterior mitral leaflet; 79% mitral valve prolapse, mostly pansystolic; 34% both mitral prolapse and aortic root dilatation; and 34% left ventricular dilatation. The severities of the cardiac and oculoskeletal abnormalities were not correlated. The high prevalence of mitral valve prolapse found in these patients, which did not vary with age or sex, was also present in their relatives: mitral prolapse was present in 38% and aortic dilatation, with or without regurgitation, in 14%. Four of the relatives had clearcut Marfan's syndrome, and at least four others a forme fruste. The metacarpal index was abnormal in 41% of the relatives; ocular abnormalities were rare. In kyphoscoliotic patients only an increase in the prevalence of mitral prolapse (18.2% in women, none in men) was found. These findings underline a complex pattern of association between cardiac, ocular, and skeletal abnormalities in patients with Marfan's syndrome and confirm an appreciable inheritability of several of the markers of the disease. Images PMID:6691872

  19. Pattern recognition of abnormal left ventricle wall motion in cardiac MR.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yingli; Radau, Perry; Connelly, Kim; Dick, Alexander; Wright, Graham

    2009-01-01

    There are four main problems that limit application of pattern recognition techniques for recognition of abnormal cardiac left ventricle (LV) wall motion: (1) Normalization of the LV's size, shape, intensity level and position; (2) defining a spatial correspondence between phases and subjects; (3) extracting features; (4) and discriminating abnormal from normal wall motion. Solving these four problems is required for application of pattern recognition techniques to classify the normal and abnormal LV wall motion. In this work, we introduce a normalization scheme to solve the first and second problems. With this scheme, LVs are normalized to the same position, size, and intensity level. Using the normalized images, we proposed an intra-segment classification criterion based on a correlation measure to solve the third and fourth problems. Application of the method to recognition of abnormal cardiac MR LV wall motion showed promising results.

  20. Correlation between abnormal cardiac physical examination and echocardiographic findings in neonates with Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    McElhinney, Doff B; Straka, Michele; Goldmuntz, Elizabeth; Zackai, Elaine H

    2002-12-01

    Congenital heart disease is present in 40-50% of individuals with Down syndrome. Although cardiovascular evaluation is a standard component of the diagnostic work-up in patients with Down syndrome, the value of routine neonatal echocardiography in this population is debated. We studied 114 neonates with Down syndrome who underwent both cardiac physical examination and echocardiography in the neonatal period to assess the accuracy of physical examination for identifying cardiovascular anomalies in this population. We retrospectively reviewed physical examination records and echocardiogram reports in 114 neonates with Down syndrome and trisomy 21. A patient was considered to have an abnormal cardiac physical examination if there was a pathologic cardiac murmur and/or cyanosis or an abnormal systemic arterial oxygen saturation. The median age at the time of physical examination was 2 days (1-30 days). Physical examination findings suggestive of cardiovascular pathology were noted in 77 patients (68%), with an abnormal cardiac murmur in 34 (30%), cyanosis and/or a pulse oximeter reading of < or = 92% in 35 (31%), and both in 7 (6%). The echocardiogram was abnormal in 75 patients (66%), with an atrioventricular septal defect in 33, tetralogy of Fallot in 13, both of these anomalies in 2, a ventricular septal defect in 17, a patent ductus arteriosus beyond 7 days of age in 7, and other anomalies in 2. The sensitivity of physical examination findings for detection of cardiovascular anomalies was 80% and the specificity was 56%. The positive predictive value of an abnormal physical examination was 78% and the negative predictive value of a normal physical examination was 59%. Fifteen patients had a normal physical examination but an abnormal echocardiogram, nine of whom eventually required surgery. Physical examination alone is not sufficient to identify cardiovascular anomalies in neonates with Down syndrome. In the newborn with Down syndrome, the potential benefits of

  1. Detection of Cardiac Abnormalities from Multilead ECG using Multiscale Phase Alternation Features.

    PubMed

    Tripathy, R K; Dandapat, S

    2016-06-01

    The cardiac activities such as the depolarization and the relaxation of atria and ventricles are observed in electrocardiogram (ECG). The changes in the morphological features of ECG are the symptoms of particular heart pathology. It is a cumbersome task for medical experts to visually identify any subtle changes in the morphological features during 24 hours of ECG recording. Therefore, the automated analysis of ECG signal is a need for accurate detection of cardiac abnormalities. In this paper, a novel method for automated detection of cardiac abnormalities from multilead ECG is proposed. The method uses multiscale phase alternation (PA) features of multilead ECG and two classifiers, k-nearest neighbor (KNN) and fuzzy KNN for classification of bundle branch block (BBB), myocardial infarction (MI), heart muscle defect (HMD) and healthy control (HC). The dual tree complex wavelet transform (DTCWT) is used to decompose the ECG signal of each lead into complex wavelet coefficients at different scales. The phase of the complex wavelet coefficients is computed and the PA values at each wavelet scale are used as features for detection and classification of cardiac abnormalities. A publicly available multilead ECG database (PTB database) is used for testing of the proposed method. The experimental results show that, the proposed multiscale PA features and the fuzzy KNN classifier have better performance for detection of cardiac abnormalities with sensitivity values of 78.12 %, 80.90 % and 94.31 % for BBB, HMD and MI classes. The sensitivity value of proposed method for MI class is compared with the state-of-art techniques from multilead ECG.

  2. Autophagy is essential for cardiac morphogenesis during vertebrate development.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eunmyong; Koo, Yeon; Ng, Aylwin; Wei, Yongjie; Luby-Phelps, Kate; Juraszek, Amy; Xavier, Ramnik J; Cleaver, Ondine; Levine, Beth; Amatruda, James F

    2014-04-01

    Genetic analyses indicate that autophagy, an evolutionarily conserved lysosomal degradation pathway, is essential for eukaryotic differentiation and development. However, little is known about whether autophagy contributes to morphogenesis during embryogenesis. To address this question, we examined the role of autophagy in the early development of zebrafish, a model organism for studying vertebrate tissue and organ morphogenesis. Using zebrafish that transgenically express the fluorescent autophagy reporter protein, GFP-LC3, we found that autophagy is active in multiple tissues, including the heart, during the embryonic period. Inhibition of autophagy by morpholino knockdown of essential autophagy genes (including atg5, atg7, and becn1) resulted in defects in morphogenesis, increased numbers of dead cells, abnormal heart structure, and reduced organismal survival. Further analyses of cardiac development in autophagy-deficient zebrafish revealed defects in cardiac looping, abnormal chamber morphology, aberrant valve development, and ectopic expression of critical transcription factors including foxn4, tbx5, and tbx2. Consistent with these results, Atg5-deficient mice displayed abnormal Tbx2 expression and defects in valve development and chamber septation. Thus, autophagy plays an essential, conserved role in cardiac morphogenesis during vertebrate development.

  3. Subclinical Cardiac Abnormalities and Kidney Function Decline: The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Shlipak, Michael G.; Katz, Ronit; Agarwal, Subhashish; Ix, Joachim H.; Hsu, Chi-yuan; Peralta, Carmen A.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives Clinical heart failure (HF) is associated with CKD and faster rates of kidney function decline. Whether subclinical abnormalities of cardiac structure are associated with faster kidney function decline is not known. The association between cardiac concentricity and kidney function decline was evaluated. Design, setting, participants, & measurements This is a longitudinal study of 3866 individuals from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (2000–2007) who were free of clinical cardiovascular disease, with an estimated GFR (eGFR) ≥60 ml/min per 1.73 m2 at baseline and 5 years of follow-up. Concentricity, a measurement of abnormal cardiac size, was assessed by magnetic resonance imaging and evaluated as a continuous measurement and in quartiles. GFR was estimated by creatinine (eGFRcr) and cystatin C (eGFRcys). The association of concentricity with annual eGFR decline, incident CKD, and rapid kidney function decline (>5% per year) was investigated using linear mixed models as well as Poisson and logistic regression, respectively. Analyses adjusted for demographics, BP, diabetes, and inflammatory markers. Results Median decline was −0.8 (interquartile range, −3.1, −0.5) by eGFRcr. Compared with the lowest quartile of concentricity, persons in the highest quartile had an additional 21% (9%–32%) decline in mean eGFRcr in fully adjusted models. Concentricity was also associated with incident CKD and with rapid kidney function decline after adjustment. Conclusions Subclinical abnormalities in cardiac structure are associated with longitudinal kidney function decline independent of diabetes and hypertension. Future studies should examine mechanisms to explain these associations. PMID:22580783

  4. Cardiac conduction abnormalities in patients with breast cancer undergoing high-dose chemotherapy and stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ando, M; Yokozawa, T; Sawada, J; Takaue, Y; Togitani, K; Kawahigashi, N; Narabayashi, M; Takeyama, K; Tanosaki, R; Mineishi, S; Kobayashi, Y; Watanabe, T; Adachi, I; Tobinai, K

    2000-01-01

    Cardiac toxicities in 39 consecutive patients with breast cancer receiving high-dose chemotherapy (HDC) with stem cell transplantation were reviewed. All 39 patients received various anthracycline-containing regimens in adjuvant settings and/or for metastatic disease before HDC. As a cytoreductive regimen, all received cyclophosphamide 2000 mg/m2 and thiotepa 200 mg/m2 for 3 consecutive days. No immediate fatal toxicities were observed, but one patient developed chronic congestive heart failure and two had transient left ventricular dysfunction. Pericardial effusion was observed in another three patients. ST-T abnormalities during HDC were observed in two patients and arrhythmias were observed in nine, four of which occurred during stem cell infusion (SCI). There were three atrial arrhythmias, two ventricular arrhythmias, and four atrioventricular (AV)-block episodes. Two patients developed advanced and complete AV-block with an asystolic pause. Notably, three patients experienced AV-block with uncontrolled vomiting. No relationship was observed between the cumulative dose of anthracycline and cardiac toxicities during HDC. These results suggest that abnormalities in the conduction system during HDC may be more frequent than previously reported. Vagal reflex secondary to emesis may play an important role in the development of AV-block. Bone Marrow Transplantation (2000) 25, 185-189.

  5. Cardiac and skeletal muscle abnormality in taurine transporter-knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Ito, Takashi; Oishi, Shohei; Takai, Mika; Kimura, Yasushi; Uozumi, Yoriko; Fujio, Yasushi; Schaffer, Stephen W; Azuma, Junichi

    2010-08-24

    Taurine, a sulfur-containing beta-amino acid, is highly contained in heart and skeletal muscle. Taurine has a variety of biological actions, such as ion movement, calcium handling and cytoprotection in the cardiac and skeletal muscles. Meanwhile, taurine deficiency leads various pathologies, including dilated cardiomyopathy, in cat and fox. However, the essential role of taurine depletion on pathogenesis has not been fully clarified. To address the physiological role of taurine in mammalian tissues, taurine transporter-(TauT-) knockout models were recently generated. TauTKO mice exhibited loss of body weight, abnormal cardiac function and the reduced exercise capacity with tissue taurine depletion. In this chapter, we summarize pathological profile and histological feature of heart and skeletal muscle in TauTKO mice.

  6. Do thallium myocardial perfusion scan abnormalities predict survival in sarcoid patients without cardiac symptoms

    SciTech Connect

    Kinney, E.L.; Caldwell, J.W. )

    1990-07-01

    Whereas the total mortality rate for sarcoidosis is 0.2 per 100,000, the prognosis, when the heart is involved, is very much worse. The authors used the difference in mortality rate to infer whether thallium 201 myocardial perfusion scan abnormalities correspond to myocardial sarcoid by making the simplifying assumption that if they do, then patients with abnormal scans will be found to have a death rate similar to patients with sarcoid heart disease. The authors therefore analyzed complete survival data on 52 sarcoid patients without cardiac symptoms an average of eighty-nine months after they had been scanned as part of a protocol. By use of survival analysis (the Cox proportional hazards model), the only variable that was significantly associated with survival was age. The patients' scan pattern, treatment status, gender, and race were not significantly related to survival. The authors conclude that thallium myocardial perfusion scans cannot reliably be used to diagnose sarcoid heart disease in sarcoid patients without cardiac symptoms.

  7. The association between anger-related personality trait and cardiac autonomic response abnormalities in elderly subjects.

    PubMed

    Narita, Kosuke; Murata, Tetsuhito; Takahashi, Tetsuya; Hamada, Toshihiko; Kosaka, Hirotaka; Yoshida, Haruyoshi; Wada, Yuji

    2007-09-01

    Cardiac autonomic response abnormality associated with trait anger has been recognized to elevate blood pressure in daily life, leading to atherosclerotic progression and cardiovascular disease. To clarify the relationship between anger-related personality traits and cardiac autonomic response in healthy elderly subjects, 54 volunteers consisting of 30 male (mean age 62.2+/-5.4) and 24 female (mean age 58.4+/-4.6) subjects underwent testing of heart rate variability (HRV) with head-up tilt. For the evaluation of trait anger, we used a questionnaire corresponding to the trait anger score taken from the State and Trait Anger Expression Inventory. Furthermore, we measured carotid intima-medial thickness (IMT) to evaluate atherosclerotic progression in subjects with anger trait. In female subjects, higher trait anger was positively associated with elevated carotid IMT and the suppression of HRV vagal attenuation from the supine to head-up position, and negatively associated with the HRV sympathetic activity in the head-up position and also with the HRV sympathetic response from the supine to head-up position. In male subjects, trait anger was not significantly associated with carotid IMT or any HRV component with or without head-up tilt testing. We conclude that a simple noninvasive measure, short-term HRV with head-up tilt testing, could be a useful method to investigate the association between cardiac autonomic imbalance and increased risk of atherosclerosis associated with trait anger in healthy elderly subjects.

  8. Relation of cardiac abnormalities and CTG-repeat size in myotonic dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Finsterer, J; Gharehbaghi-Schnell, E; Stöllberger, C; Fheodoroff, K; Seiser, A

    2001-05-01

    It is unclear if the severity of cardiac involvement in patients with myotonic dystrophy (MD) is related to the size of the CTG-repeat expansion. This open, uncontrolled, observational, prospective study aimed to find out if there is a relation between the severity of cardiac involvement in MD and the CTG-repeat size. In 21 patients with MD, (8 women, 13 men, aged 11-88 years) a detailed cardiologic examination, including history, clinical examination, electrocardiography (ECG), transthoracic echocardiography and ambulatory 24-h ECG, was carried out and cardiac involvement was assessed according to a previously described scoring system. Additionally, the CTG-repeat size was determined from nuclear DNA of blood leukocytes. The correlation between the CTG-repeat size and the mean heart rate, PQ-interval, QTc-interval, fractional shortening, left ventricular enddiastolic diameter, septal thickness, posterior wall thickness, mean heart rate on 24-h ECG and cardiac involvement score was r=0.47, r=0.086, r=0.11, r=-0.27, r=-0.34, r=-0.06, r=-0.12, r=0.16 and r=0.09 (all p>0.05), respectively. In patients 21-30, 31-40 and 41-50 years of age, cardiac involvement increased with increasing CTG-repeat size. In younger patients, the number of CTG-repeats needed to develop a reasonable cardiac involvement was higher than in older patients. Depending on age, cardiac involvement increases with increasing CTG-repeat size obtained from blood leukocytes in patients with MD.

  9. Sodium sulfide prevents water diffusion abnormality in the brain and improves long term outcome after cardiac arrest in mice

    PubMed Central

    Kida, Kotaro; Minamishima, Shizuka; Wang, Huifang; Ren, JiaQian; Yigitkanli, Kazim; Nozari, Ala; Mandeville, Joseph B.; Liu, Philip K.; Liu, Christina H.; Ichinose, Fumito

    2012-01-01

    Aim of the study Sudden cardiac arrest (CA) is one of the leading causes of death worldwide. Previously we demonstrated that administration of sodium sulfide (Na2S), a hydrogen sulfide (H2S) donor, markedly improved the neurological outcome and survival rate at 24h after CA and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in mice. In this study, we sought to elucidate the mechanism responsible for the neuroprotective effects of Na2S and its impact on the long-term survival after CA/CPR in mice. Methods Adult male mice were subjected to potassium-induced CA for 7.5 min at 37°C whereupon CPR was performed with chest compression and mechanical ventilation. Mice received Na2S (0.55 mg/kg i.v.) or vehicle 1 min before CPR. Results Mice that were subjected to CA/CPR and received vehicle exhibited a poor 10-day survival rate (4/12) and depressed neurological function. Cardiac arrest and CPR induced abnormal water diffusion in the vulnerable regions of the brain, as demonstrated by hyperintense diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) 24h after CA/CPR. Extent of hyperintense DWI was associated with matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) activation, worse neurological outcomes, and poor survival rate at 10 days after CA/CPR. Administration of Na2S prevented the development of abnormal water diffusion and MMP-9 activation and markedly improved neurological function and long-term survival (9/12, P<0.05 vs. vehicle) after CA/CPR. Conclusion These results suggest that administration of Na2S 1 min before CPR improves neurological function and survival rate at 10 days after CA/CPR by preventing water diffusion abnormality in the brain potentially via inhibiting MMP-9 activation early after resuscitation. PMID:22370005

  10. Autonomic cardiac innervation: development and adult plasticity.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Wohaib

    2013-01-01

    Autonomic cardiac neurons have a common origin in the neural crest but undergo distinct developmental differentiation as they mature toward their adult phenotype. Progenitor cells respond to repulsive cues during migration, followed by differentiation cues from paracrine sources that promote neurochemistry and differentiation. When autonomic axons start to innervate cardiac tissue, neurotrophic factors from vascular tissue are essential for maintenance of neurons before they reach their targets, upon which target-derived trophic factors take over final maturation, synaptic strength and postnatal survival. Although target-derived neurotrophins have a central role to play in development, alternative sources of neurotrophins may also modulate innervation. Both developing and adult sympathetic neurons express proNGF, and adult parasympathetic cardiac ganglion neurons also synthesize and release NGF. The physiological function of these "non-classical" cardiac sources of neurotrophins remains to be determined, especially in relation to autocrine/paracrine sustenance during development.   Cardiac autonomic nerves are closely spatially associated in cardiac plexuses, ganglia and pacemaker regions and so are sensitive to release of neurotransmitter, neuropeptides and trophic factors from adjacent nerves. As such, in many cardiac pathologies, it is an imbalance within the two arms of the autonomic system that is critical for disease progression. Although this crosstalk between sympathetic and parasympathetic nerves has been well established for adult nerves, it is unclear whether a degree of paracrine regulation occurs across the autonomic limbs during development. Aberrant nerve remodeling is a common occurrence in many adult cardiovascular pathologies, and the mechanisms regulating outgrowth or denervation are disparate. However, autonomic neurons display considerable plasticity in this regard with neurotrophins and inflammatory cytokines having a central regulatory

  11. Abnormal sodium current properties contribute to cardiac electrical and contractile dysfunction in a mouse model of myotonic dystrophy type 1.

    PubMed

    Algalarrondo, Vincent; Wahbi, Karim; Sebag, Frédéric; Gourdon, Geneviève; Beldjord, Chérif; Azibi, Kamel; Balse, Elise; Coulombe, Alain; Fischmeister, Rodolphe; Eymard, Bruno; Duboc, Denis; Hatem, Stéphane N

    2015-04-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is the most common neuromuscular disorder and is associated with cardiac conduction defects. However, the mechanisms of cardiac arrhythmias in DM1 are unknown. We tested the hypothesis that abnormalities in the cardiac sodium current (INa) are involved, and used a transgenic mouse model reproducing the expression of triplet expansion observed in DM1 (DMSXL mouse). The injection of the class-I antiarrhythmic agent flecainide induced prominent conduction abnormalities and significantly lowered the radial tissular velocities and strain rate in DMSXL mice compared to WT. These abnormalities were more pronounced in 8-month-old mice than in 3-month-old mice. Ventricular action potentials recorded by standard glass microelectrode technique exhibited a lower maximum upstroke velocity [dV/dt](max) in DMSXL. This decreased [dV/dt](max) was associated with a 1.7 fold faster inactivation of INa in DMSXL myocytes measured by the whole-cell patch-clamp technique. Finally in the DMSXL mouse, no mutation in the Scn5a gene was detected and neither cardiac fibrosis nor abnormalities of expression of the sodium channel protein were observed. Therefore, alterations in the sodium current markedly contributed to electrical conduction block in DM1. This result should guide pharmaceutical and clinical research toward better therapy for the cardiac arrhythmias associated with DM1.

  12. The Effect of Sorafenib, Tadalafil and Macitentan Treatments on Thyroxin-Induced Hemodynamic Changes and Cardiac Abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Saad, Nancy S.; Floyd, Kyle; Ahmed, Amany A. E.; Mohler, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    Multikinase inhibitors (e.g. Sorafenib), phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors (e.g. Tadalafil), and endothelin-1 receptor blockers (e.g. Macitentan) exert influential protection in a variety of animal models of cardiomyopathy; however, their effects on thyroxin-induced cardiomyopathy have never been investigated. The goal of the present study was to assess the functional impact of these drugs on thyroxin-induced hemodynamic changes, cardiac hypertrophy and associated altered responses of the contractile myocardium both in-vivo at the whole heart level and ex-vivo at the cardiac tissue level. Control and thyroxin (500 μg/kg/day)-treated mice with or without 2-week treatments of sorafenib (10 mg/kg/day; I.P), tadalafil (1 mg/kg/day; I.P or 4 mg/kg/day; oral), macitentan (30 and 100 mg/kg/day; oral), and their vehicles were studied. Blood pressure, echocardiography and electrocardiogram were non-invasively evaluated, followed by ex-vivo assessments of isolated multicellular cardiac preparations. Thyroxin increased blood pressure, resulted in cardiac hypertrophy and left ventricular dysfunction in-vivo. Also, it caused contractile abnormalities in right ventricular papillary muscles ex-vivo. None of the drug treatments were able to significantly attenuate theses hemodynamic changes or cardiac abnormalities in thyroxin-treated mice. We show here for the first time that multikinase (raf1/b, VEGFR, PDGFR), phosphodiesterase-5, and endothelin-1 pathways have no major role in thyroxin-induced hemodynamic changes and cardiac abnormalities. In particular, our data show that the involvement of endothelin-1 pathway in thyroxine-induced cardiac hypertrophy/dysfunction seems to be model-dependent and should be carefully interpreted. PMID:27082116

  13. [Serum/tissue interleukin-6 concentrations and constitutional abnormalities in 4 patients with cardiac myxoma].

    PubMed

    Saji, T; Matsuo, N; Shiono, N; Yokomuro, H; Watanabe, Y; Takanashi, Y; Komatsu, H

    1993-09-01

    Immunological features and the production of interleukin-6 (IL-6) in 4 patients with cardiac myxoma were studied. The patients' age ranged from 11 years old to 57 years old; all 4 patients were female. Case 1, an 11-year-old female patient with myxoma located in the right ventricle, was considered to be a familial case. Her mother had myxomas in the right and left atrium, and had undergone removal of both tumors 3 years before. Peripheral blood examination revealed various inflammatory parameters in all of these patients. White blood cell (WBC) count was over 8,000/cmm in 3 of the 4 patients, positive CRP was found in 2 patients, IgG was higher than 1,500 mg/dl in 3 patients, positive anti-nuclear antibody was seen in 1 patient, and positive rheumatoid factor was identified in 1 patient. The OKT 4/8 ratio of lymphocyte subpopulation was 4.65 in one patient. The lymphocyte mitogenic response to PHA was increased in 2 patients. Serum IL-6 increased in 3 of 4 patients, and returned to normal within 3 to 4 weeks after operation. The IL-6 concentration in the homogenized sample remarkably increased in all 4 patients. Tumors larger than 4 cm contained higher tissue IL-6 concentrations than those smaller than 2 cm. The cultured myxoma cells produced abundant IL-6 in the culture medium supernatant. We conclude that inflammatory signs and immunological abnormalities are common in patients with large cardiac myxoma, and, in addition, serum IL-6 levels may increase in such patients.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Dexamethasone-induced cardiac deterioration is associated with both calcium handling abnormalities and calcineurin signaling pathway activation.

    PubMed

    de Salvi Guimarães, Fabiana; de Moraes, Wilson Max Almeida Monteiro; Bozi, Luis Henrique Marchesi; Souza, Pâmela R; Antonio, Ednei Luiz; Bocalini, Danilo Sales; Tucci, Paulo José Ferreira; Ribeiro, Daniel Araki; Brum, Patricia Chakur; Medeiros, Alessandra

    2017-01-01

    Dexamethasone is a potent and widely used anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive drug. However, recent evidences suggest that dexamethasone cause pathologic cardiac remodeling, which later impairs cardiac function. The mechanism behind the cardiotoxic effect of dexamethasone is elusive. The present study aimed to verify if dexamethasone-induced cardiotoxicity would be associated with changes in the cardiac net balance of calcium handling protein and calcineurin signaling pathway activation. Wistar rats (~400 g) were treated with dexamethasone (35 µg/g) in drinking water for 15 days. After dexamethasone treatment, we analyzed cardiac function, cardiomyocyte diameter, cardiac fibrosis, and the expression of proteins involved in calcium handling and calcineurin signaling pathway. Dexamethasone-treated rats showed several cardiovascular abnormalities, including elevated blood pressure, diastolic dysfunction, cardiac fibrosis, and cardiomyocyte apoptosis. Regarding the expression of proteins involved in calcium handling, dexamethasone increased phosphorylation of phospholamban at threonine 17, reduced protein levels of Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger, and had no effect on protein expression of Serca2a. Protein levels of NFAT and GATA-4 were increased in both cytoplasmic and nuclear faction. In addition, dexamethasone increased nuclear protein levels of calcineurin. Altogether our findings suggest that dexamethasone causes pathologic cardiac remodeling and diastolic dysfunction, which is associated with impaired calcium handling and calcineurin signaling pathway activation.

  15. The Cardiac Electrophysiologic Substrate Underlying the ECG Phenotype and Electrogram Abnormalities in Brugada Syndrome Patients

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Junjie; Sacher, Frédéric; Hoffmayer, Kurt; O’Hara, Thomas; Strom, Maria; Cuculich, Phillip; Silva, Jennifer; Cooper, Daniel; Faddis, Mitchell; Hocini, Mélèze; Haïssaguerre, Michel; Scheinman, Melvin; Rudy, Yoram

    2015-01-01

    Background Brugada syndrome (BrS) is a highly arrhythmogenic cardiac disorder, associated with an increased incidence of sudden death. Its arrhythmogenic substrate in the intact human heart remains ill-defined. Methods and Results Using noninvasive ECG imaging (ECGI), we studied 25 BrS patients to characterize the electrophysiologic substrate, and 6 patients with right bundle branch block (RBBB) for comparison. Seven normal subjects provided control data. Abnormal substrate was observed exclusively in the right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT) with the following properties (compared to normal controls; p<0.005): (1)ST-segment elevation (STE) and inverted T-wave of unipolar electrograms (EGMs) (2.21±0.67 vs. 0 mV); (2)delayed RVOT activation (82±18 vs. 37±11 ms); (3)low amplitude (0.47±0.16 vs. 3.74±1.60 mV) and fractionated EGMs, suggesting slow discontinuous conduction; (4)prolonged recovery time (RT; 381±30 vs. 311±34 ms) and activation-recovery intervals (ARIs; 318±32 vs. 241±27 ms), indicating delayed repolarization; (5)steep repolarization gradients (ΔRT/Δx= 96±28 vs. 7±6 ms/cm, ΔARI/Δx= 105±24 vs. 7±5 ms/cm) at RVOT borders. With increased heart rate in 6 BrS patients, reduced STE and increased fractionation were observed. Unlike BrS, RBBB had delayed activation in the entire RV, without STE, fractionation, or repolarization abnormalities on EGMs. Conclusions The results indicate that both, slow discontinuous conduction and steep dispersion of repolarization are present in the RVOT of BrS patients. ECGI could differentiate between BrS and RBBB. PMID:25810336

  16. Toxic effects of polychlorinated biphenyls on cardiac development in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Li, Mengmeng; Wang, Xuejie; Zhu, Jingai; Zhu, Shasha; Hu, Xiaoshan; Zhu, Chun; Guo, Xirong; Yu, Zhangbin; Han, Shuping

    2014-12-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are ubiquitous environmental pollutants that may pose significant health-risks to various organisms including humans. Although the mixed PCB Aroclor 1254 is widespread in the environment, its potential toxic effect on heart development and the mechanism underlying its developmental toxicity have not been previously studied. Here, we used the zebrafish as a toxicogenomic model to examine the effects of Aroclor 1254 on heart development. We found that PCB exposure during zebrafish development induced heart abnormalities including pericardial edema and cardiac looping defects. Further malformations of the zebrafish embryo were observed and death of the larvae occurred in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Our mechanistic studies revealed that abnormalities in the arylhydrocarbon receptor, Wnt and retinoic acid signaling pathways may underlie the effects of PCBs on zebrafish heart development. Interestingly, co-administration of Aroclor 1254 and diethylaminobenzaldehyde, an inhibitor of retinaldehyde dehydrogenase, partially rescued the toxic effects of PCBs on zebrafish heart development. In conclusion, PCBs can induce developmental defects in the zebrafish heart, which may be mediated by abnormal RA signaling.

  17. Abnormal amounts of intracellular calcium regulatory proteins in SHRSP.Z-Lepr(fa)/IzmDmcr rats with metabolic syndrome and cardiac dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Kagota, Satomi; Maruyama, Kana; Tada, Yukari; Wakuda, Hirokazu; Nakamura, Kazuki; Kunitomo, Masaru; Shinozuka, Kazumasa

    2013-02-01

    Metabolic syndrome is known to increase the risk of abnormal cardiac structure and function, which are considered to contribute to increased incidence of cardiovascular disease and mortality. We previously demonstrated that ventricular hypertrophy and diastolic dysfunction occur in SHRSP.Z-Lepr(fa)/IzmDmcr (SHRSP fatty) rats with metabolic syndrome. The aim of this study was to investigate the possible mechanisms underlying abnormal heart function in SHRSP fatty rats. The amount of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA) 2a, phospholamban (PLB) protein, and Ser(16)-phosphorylated PLB was decreased in cardiomyocytes from SHRSP fatty rats compared with those from control Wistar-Kyoto rats at 18 weeks of age, and the PLB-to-SERCA2a ratio was increased. Left ventricular developed pressure was unchanged, and coronary flow rate and maximum rate of left ventricular pressure decline (-dP/dt) was decreased in SHRSP fatty rats. Treatment with telmisartan reversed the abnormalities of PLB amount, coronary flow rate, and -dP/dt in SHRSP fatty rats. These results indicate that abnormal amounts of intracellular Ca(2+) regulatory proteins in cardiomyocytes, leading to reduced intracellular Ca(2+) reuptake into the sarcoplasmic reticulum, may play a role in the diastolic dysfunction in SHRSP fatty rats and that these effects are partially related to decreased coronary circulation. Telmisartan may be beneficial in protecting against disturbances in cardiac function associated with metabolic syndrome.

  18. Autonomic, locomotor and cardiac abnormalities in a mouse model of muscular dystrophy: targeting the renin-angiotensin system.

    PubMed

    Sabharwal, Rasna; Chapleau, Mark W

    2014-04-01

    New Findings What is the topic of this review? This symposium report summarizes autonomic, cardiac and skeletal muscle abnormalities in sarcoglycan-δ-deficient mice (Sgcd-/-), a mouse model of limb girdle muscular dystrophy, with emphasis on the roles of autonomic dysregulation and activation of the renin-angiotensin system at a young age. What advances does it highlight? The contributions of the autonomic nervous system and the renin-angiotensin system to the pathogenesis of muscular dystrophy are highlighted. Results demonstrate that autonomic dysregulation precedes and predicts later development of cardiac dysfunction in Sgcd-/- mice and that treatment of young Sgcd-/- mice with the angiotensin type 1 receptor antagonist losartan or with angiotensin-(1-7) abrogates the autonomic dysregulation, attenuates skeletal muscle pathology and increases spontaneous locomotor activity. Muscular dystrophies are a heterogeneous group of genetic muscle diseases characterized by muscle weakness and atrophy. Mutations in sarcoglycans and other subunits of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex cause muscular dystrophy and dilated cardiomyopathy in animals and humans. Aberrant autonomic signalling is recognized in a variety of neuromuscular disorders. We hypothesized that activation of the renin-angiotensin system contributes to skeletal muscle and autonomic dysfunction in mice deficient in the sarcoglycan-δ (Sgcd) gene at a young age and that this early autonomic dysfunction contributes to the later development of left ventricular (LV) dysfunction and increased mortality. We demonstrated that young Sgcd-/- mice exhibit histopathological features of skeletal muscle dystrophy, decreased locomotor activity and severe autonomic dysregulation, but normal LV function. Autonomic regulation continued to deteriorate in Sgcd-/- mice with age and was accompanied by LV dysfunction and dilated cardiomyopathy at older ages. Autonomic dysregulation at a young age predicted later development of

  19. Association Between Tangential Beam Treatment Parameters and Cardiac Abnormalities After Definitive Radiation Treatment for Left-Sided Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Correa, Candace R.; Das, Indra J. Litt, Harold I.; Ferrari, Victor; Hwang, W.-T.; Solin, Lawrence J.; Harris, Eleanor E.

    2008-10-01

    Purpose: To examine the association between radiation treatment (RT) parameters, cardiac diagnostic test abnormalities, and clinical cardiovascular diagnoses among patients with left-sided breast cancer after breast conservation treatment with tangential beam RT. Methods and Materials: The medical records of 416 patients treated between 1977 and 1995 with RT for primary left-sided breast cancer were reviewed for myocardial perfusion imaging and echocardiograms. Sixty-two patients (62/416, 15%) underwent these cardiac diagnostic tests for cardiovascular symptoms and were selected for further study. Central lung distance and maximum heart width and length in the treatment field were determined for each patient. Medical records were reviewed for cardiovascular diagnoses and evaluation of cardiac risk factors. Results: At a median of 12 years post-RT the incidence of cardiac diagnostic test abnormalities among symptomatic left-sided irradiated women was significantly higher than the predicted incidence of cardiovascular disease in the patient population, 6/62 (9%) predicted vs. 24/62 (39%) observed, p 0.001. As compared with patients with normal tests, patients with cardiac diagnostic test abnormalities had a larger median central lung distance (2.6 cm vs. 2.2 cm, p = 0.01). Similarly, patients with vs. without congestive heart failure had a larger median central lung distance (2.8 cm vs. 2.3 cm, p = 0.008). Conclusions: Contemporary RT for early breast cancer may be associated with a small, but potentially avoidable, risk of cardiovascular morbidity that is associated with treatment technique.

  20. MiRiad Roles for MicroRNAs in Cardiac Development and Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Fuller, Ashley M.; Qian, Li

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac development is an exquisitely regulated process that is sensitive to perturbations in transcriptional activity and gene dosage. Accordingly, congenital heart abnormalities are prevalent worldwide, and are estimated to occur in approximately 1% of live births. Recently, small non-coding RNAs, known as microRNAs, have emerged as critical components of the cardiogenic regulatory network, and have been shown to play numerous roles in the growth, differentiation, and morphogenesis of the developing heart. Moreover, the importance of miRNA function in cardiac development has facilitated the identification of prospective therapeutic targets for patients with congenital and acquired cardiac diseases. Here, we discuss findings attesting to the critical role of miRNAs in cardiogenesis and cardiac regeneration, and present evidence regarding the therapeutic potential of miRNAs for cardiovascular diseases. PMID:25055156

  1. Predicting the development of cardiac allograft vasculopathy.

    PubMed

    Seki, Atsuko; Fishbein, Michael C

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac transplantation is a lifesaving therapy for patients with end-stage cardiovascular disease. There has been remarkable progress in controlling acute rejection, and the early survival rate after the heart transplantation has significantly improved. Cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV) is one of the common causes of death and a major limiting factor for long-term graft survival years after heart transplantation. CAV is a progressive occlusion of arteries and veins of the transplanted heart. CAV is often clinically silent because of the denervation of the transplanted heart. CAV tends to be found at an advanced stage of disease, including myocardial infarction (MI), congestive heart failure, arrhythmia, and/or sudden cardiac death. Because of the serious sequelae of CAV, risk factors, prevention, and prediction of CAV have been investigated. Despite the effort by many researchers, the pathogenesis is not yet completely understood. There are a number of both immune and nonimmune factors in the donor and recipient that are related to the development of CAV. In addition, several biomarkers in blood and tissue are found to correlate with the presence of CAV, and that may be able to predict CAV. Here, we review the pathology, pathogenesis, risk factors, diagnosis, and the potential for prediction of CAV.

  2. Gross Motor Development, Movement Abnormalities, and Early Identification of Autism

    PubMed Central

    Young, Gregory S.; Goldring, Stacy; Greiss-Hess, Laura; Herrera, Adriana M.; Steele, Joel; Macari, Suzanne; Hepburn, Susan; Rogers, Sally J.

    2015-01-01

    Gross motor development (supine, prone, rolling, sitting, crawling, walking) and movement abnormalities were examined in the home videos of infants later diagnosed with autism (regression and no regression subgroups), developmental delays (DD), or typical development. Group differences in maturity were found for walking, prone, and supine, with the DD and Autism-No Regression groups both showing later developing motor maturity than typical children. The only statistically significant differences in movement abnormalities were in the DD group; the two autism groups did not differ from the typical group in rates of movement abnormalities or lack of protective responses. These findings do not replicate previous investigations suggesting that early motor abnormalities seen on home video can assist in early identification of autism. PMID:17805956

  3. The role of interleukin-6 in cases of cardiac myxoma. Clinical features, immunologic abnormalities, and a possible role in recurrence.

    PubMed

    Mendoza, C E; Rosado, M F; Bernal, L

    2001-01-01

    We performed this prospective study to evaluate the correlation of interleukin-6 serum levels with preoperative constitutional symptoms and immunologic abnormalities, and the possible role played by this cytokine in tumor recurrence. Eight patients with atrial myxoma were evaluated at our institution from July 1993 to November 1998. We measured their interleukin-6 serum levels by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method preoperatively and 1 and 6 months after surgery. Two of the cases involved recurrent tumor, 1 patient had undergone his 1st surgery at a different institution and died during the 2nd procedure, so his data were incomplete. Preoperatively the whole group of patients had elevated interleukin-6 serum levels. Although patients with a 1st occurrence of tumor demonstrated a positive correlation between interleukin-6 serum level and tumor size, the 2 patients with recurrent tumors appeared to have higher interleukin-6 levels regardless of tumor size. Once the tumor was surgically removed, interleukin-6 levels returned to normal values, and this was associated with regression of clinical manifestations and immunologic features. According to our study, the overproduction of interleukin-6 by cardiac myxomas is responsible for the constitutional symptoms and immunologic abnormalities observed in patients with such tumors and might also play a role as a marker of recurrence. This study also suggests that recurrent cardiac myxomas form a subgroup of cardiac myxomas with a highly intrinsic aggressiveness, as implied by their greater interleukin-6 production despite their smaller size. Further studies are needed to confirm these results.

  4. Architecture design of the multi-functional wavelet-based ECG microprocessor for realtime detection of abnormal cardiac events.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Li-Fang; Chen, Tung-Chien; Chen, Liang-Gee

    2012-01-01

    Most of the abnormal cardiac events such as myocardial ischemia, acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and fatal arrhythmia can be diagnosed through continuous electrocardiogram (ECG) analysis. According to recent clinical research, early detection and alarming of such cardiac events can reduce the time delay to the hospital, and the clinical outcomes of these individuals can be greatly improved. Therefore, it would be helpful if there is a long-term ECG monitoring system with the ability to identify abnormal cardiac events and provide realtime warning for the users. The combination of the wireless body area sensor network (BASN) and the on-sensor ECG processor is a possible solution for this application. In this paper, we aim to design and implement a digital signal processor that is suitable for continuous ECG monitoring and alarming based on the continuous wavelet transform (CWT) through the proposed architectures--using both programmable RISC processor and application specific integrated circuits (ASIC) for performance optimization. According to the implementation results, the power consumption of the proposed processor integrated with an ASIC for CWT computation is only 79.4 mW. Compared with the single-RISC processor, about 91.6% of the power reduction is achieved.

  5. The Role of Interleukin-6 in Cases of Cardiac Myxoma: Clinical Features, Immunologic Abnormalities, and a Possible Role in Recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza, Cesar Emilio; Rosado, Manuel Francisco; Bernal, Leon

    2001-01-01

    We performed this prospective study to evaluate the correlation of interleukin-6 serum levels with preoperative constitutional symptoms and immunologic abnormalities, and the possible role played by this cytokine in tumor recurrence. Eight patients with atrial myxoma were evaluated at our institution from July 1993 to November 1998. We measured their interleukin-6 serum levels by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method preoperatively and 1 and 6 months after surgery. Two of the cases involved recurrent tumor; 1 patient had undergone his 1st surgery at a different institution and died during the 2nd procedure, so his data were incomplete. Preoperatively, the whole group of patients had elevated interleukin-6 serum levels. Although patients with a 1st occurrence of tumor demonstrated a positive correlation between interleukin-6 serum level and tumor size, the 2 patients with recurrent tumors appeared to have higher interleukin-6 levels regardless of tumor size. Once the tumor was surgically removed, interleukin-6 levels returned to normal values, and this was associated with regression of clinical manifestations and immunologic features. According to our study, the overproduction of interleukin-6 by cardiac myxomas is responsible for the constitutional symptoms and immunologic abnormalities observed in patients with such tumors and might also play a role as a marker of recurrence. This study also suggests that recurrent cardiac myxomas form a subgroup of cardiac myxomas with a highly intrinsic aggressiveness, as implied by their greater interleukin-6 production despite their smaller size. Further studies are needed to confirm these results. PMID:11330738

  6. Development of Models for Regional Cardiac Surgery Centers

    PubMed Central

    Park, Choon Seon; Park, Nam Hee; Sim, Sung Bo; Yun, Sang Cheol; Ahn, Hye Mi; Kim, Myunghwa; Choi, Ji Suk; Kim, Myo Jeong; Kim, Hyunsu; Chee, Hyun Keun; Oh, Sanggi; Kang, Shinkwang; Lee, Sok-Goo; Shin, Jun Ho; Kim, Keonyeop; Lee, Kun Sei

    2016-01-01

    Background This study aimed to develop the models for regional cardiac surgery centers, which take regional characteristics into consideration, as a policy measure that could alleviate the concentration of cardiac surgery in the metropolitan area and enhance the accessibility for patients who reside in the regions. Methods To develop the models and set standards for the necessary personnel and facilities for the initial management plan, we held workshops, debates, and conference meetings with various experts. Results After partitioning the plan into two parts (the operational autonomy and the functional comprehensiveness), three models were developed: the ‘independent regional cardiac surgery center’ model, the ‘satellite cardiac surgery center within hospitals’ model, and the ‘extended cardiac surgery department within hospitals’ model. Proposals on personnel and facility management for each of the models were also presented. A regional cardiac surgery center model that could be applied to each treatment area was proposed, which was developed based on the anticipated demand for cardiac surgery. The independent model or the satellite model was proposed for Chungcheong, Jeolla, North Gyeongsang, and South Gyeongsang area, where more than 500 cardiac surgeries are performed annually. The extended model was proposed as most effective for the Gangwon and Jeju area, where more than 200 cardiac surgeries are performed annually. Conclusion The operation of regional cardiac surgery centers with high caliber professionals and quality resources such as optimal equipment and facility size, should enhance regional healthcare accessibility and the quality of cardiac surgery in South Korea. PMID:28035295

  7. CAP2 in cardiac conduction, sudden cardiac death and eye development.

    PubMed

    Field, Jeffrey; Ye, Diana Z; Shinde, Manasi; Liu, Fang; Schillinger, Kurt J; Lu, MinMin; Wang, Tao; Skettini, Michelle; Xiong, Yao; Brice, Angela K; Chung, Daniel C; Patel, Vickas V

    2015-11-30

    Sudden cardiac death kills 180,000 to 450,000 Americans annually, predominantly males. A locus that confers a risk for sudden cardiac death, cardiac conduction disease, and a newly described developmental disorder (6p22 syndrome) is located at 6p22. One gene at 6p22 is CAP2, which encodes a cytoskeletal protein that regulates actin dynamics. To determine the role of CAP2 in vivo, we generated knockout (KO) mice. cap2(-)/cap2(-) males were underrepresented at weaning and ~70% died by 12 weeks of age, but cap2(-)/cap2(-) females survived at close to the expected levels and lived normal life spans. CAP2 knockouts resembled patients with 6p22 syndrome in that mice were smaller and they developed microphthalmia and cardiac disease. The cardiac disease included cardiac conduction disease (CCD) and, after six months of age, dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), most noticeably in the males. To address the mechanisms underlying these phenotypes, we used Cre-mediated recombination to knock out CAP2 in cardiomyocytes. We found that the mice developed CCD, leading to sudden cardiac death from complete heart block, but no longer developed DCM or the other phenotypes, including sex bias. These studies establish a direct role for CAP2 and actin dynamics in sudden cardiac death and cardiac conduction disease.

  8. CAP2 in cardiac conduction, sudden cardiac death and eye development

    PubMed Central

    Field, Jeffrey; Ye, Diana Z.; Shinde, Manasi; Liu, Fang; Schillinger, Kurt J.; Lu, MinMin; Wang, Tao; Skettini, Michelle; Xiong, Yao; Brice, Angela K.; Chung, Daniel C.; Patel, Vickas V.

    2015-01-01

    Sudden cardiac death kills 180,000 to 450,000 Americans annually, predominantly males. A locus that confers a risk for sudden cardiac death, cardiac conduction disease, and a newly described developmental disorder (6p22 syndrome) is located at 6p22. One gene at 6p22 is CAP2, which encodes a cytoskeletal protein that regulates actin dynamics. To determine the role of CAP2 in vivo, we generated knockout (KO) mice. cap2−/cap2− males were underrepresented at weaning and ~70% died by 12 weeks of age, but cap2−/cap2− females survived at close to the expected levels and lived normal life spans. CAP2 knockouts resembled patients with 6p22 syndrome in that mice were smaller and they developed microphthalmia and cardiac disease. The cardiac disease included cardiac conduction disease (CCD) and, after six months of age, dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), most noticeably in the males. To address the mechanisms underlying these phenotypes, we used Cre-mediated recombination to knock out CAP2 in cardiomyocytes. We found that the mice developed CCD, leading to sudden cardiac death from complete heart block, but no longer developed DCM or the other phenotypes, including sex bias. These studies establish a direct role for CAP2 and actin dynamics in sudden cardiac death and cardiac conduction disease. PMID:26616005

  9. Abnormalities occurring during female gametophyte development result in the diversity of abnormal embryo sacs and leads to abnormal fertilization in indica/japonica hybrids in rice.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Yu-Xiang; Hu, Chao-Yue; Lu, Yong-Gen; Li, Jin-Quan; Liu, Xiang-Dong

    2009-01-01

    Embryo sac abortion is one of the major reasons for sterility in indica/japonica hybrids in rice. To clarify the causal mechanism of embryo sac abortion, we studied the female gametophyte development in two indica/japonica hybrids via an eosin B staining procedure for embryo sac scanning using confocal laser scanning microscope. Different types of abnormalities occurred during megasporogenesis and megagametogenesis were demonstrated. The earliest abnormality was observed in the megasporocyte. A lot of the chalazal-most megaspores were degenerated before the mono-nucleate embryo sac stage. Disordered positioning of nucleus and abnormal nucellus tissue were characteristics of the abnormal female gametes from the mono-nucleate to four-nucleate embryo sac stages. The abnormalities that occurred from the early stage of the eight-nucleate embryo sac development to the mature embryo sac stage were characterized by smaller sizes and wrinkled antipodals. Asynchronous nuclear migration, abnormal positioning of nucleus, and degeneration of egg apparatus were also found at the eight-nucleate embryo sac stage. The abnormalities that occurred during female gametophyte development resulted in five major types of abnormal embryo sacs. These abnormal embryo sacs led to abnormal fertilization. Hand pollination using normal pollens on the spikelets during anthesis showed that normal pollens could not exclude the effect of abnormal embryo sac on seed setting.

  10. Ultrastructural and cellular basis for the development of abnormal myocardial mechanics during the transition from hypertension to heart failure.

    PubMed

    Shah, Sanjiv J; Aistrup, Gary L; Gupta, Deepak K; O'Toole, Matthew J; Nahhas, Amanda F; Schuster, Daniel; Chirayil, Nimi; Bassi, Nikhil; Ramakrishna, Satvik; Beussink, Lauren; Misener, Sol; Kane, Bonnie; Wang, David; Randolph, Blake; Ito, Aiko; Wu, Megan; Akintilo, Lisa; Mongkolrattanothai, Thitipong; Reddy, Mahendra; Kumar, Manvinder; Arora, Rishi; Ng, Jason; Wasserstrom, J Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Although the development of abnormal myocardial mechanics represents a key step during the transition from hypertension to overt heart failure (HF), the underlying ultrastructural and cellular basis of abnormal myocardial mechanics remains unclear. We therefore investigated how changes in transverse (T)-tubule organization and the resulting altered intracellular Ca(2+) cycling in large cell populations underlie the development of abnormal myocardial mechanics in a model of chronic hypertension. Hearts from spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs; n = 72) were studied at different ages and stages of hypertensive heart disease and early HF and were compared with age-matched control (Wistar-Kyoto) rats (n = 34). Echocardiography, including tissue Doppler and speckle-tracking analysis, was performed just before euthanization, after which T-tubule organization and Ca(2+) transients were studied using confocal microscopy. In SHRs, abnormalities in myocardial mechanics occurred early in response to hypertension, before the development of overt systolic dysfunction and HF. Reduced longitudinal, circumferential, and radial strain as well as reduced tissue Doppler early diastolic tissue velocities occurred in concert with T-tubule disorganization and impaired Ca(2+) cycling, all of which preceded the development of cardiac fibrosis. The time to peak of intracellular Ca(2+) transients was slowed due to T-tubule disruption, providing a link between declining cell ultrastructure and abnormal myocardial mechanics. In conclusion, subclinical abnormalities in myocardial mechanics occur early in response to hypertension and coincide with the development of T-tubule disorganization and impaired intracellular Ca(2+) cycling. These changes occur before the development of significant cardiac fibrosis and precede the development of overt cardiac dysfunction and HF.

  11. Defining myocardial tissue abnormalities in end-stage renal failure with cardiac magnetic resonance imaging using native T1 mapping.

    PubMed

    Rutherford, Elaine; Talle, Mohammed A; Mangion, Kenneth; Bell, Elizabeth; Rauhalammi, Samuli M; Roditi, Giles; McComb, Christie; Radjenovic, Aleksandra; Welsh, Paul; Woodward, Rosemary; Struthers, Allan D; Jardine, Alan G; Patel, Rajan K; Berry, Colin; Mark, Patrick B

    2016-10-01

    Noninvasive quantification of myocardial fibrosis in end-stage renal disease is challenging. Gadolinium contrast agents previously used for cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are contraindicated because of an association with nephrogenic systemic fibrosis. In other populations, increased myocardial native T1 times on cardiac MRI have been shown to be a surrogate marker of myocardial fibrosis. We applied this method to 33 incident hemodialysis patients and 28 age- and sex-matched healthy volunteers who underwent MRI at 3.0T. Native T1 relaxation times and feature tracking-derived global longitudinal strain as potential markers of fibrosis were compared and associated with cardiac biomarkers. Left ventricular mass indices were higher in the hemodialysis than the control group. Global, Septal and midseptal T1 times were all significantly higher in the hemodialysis group (global T1 hemodialysis 1171 ± 27 ms vs. 1154 ± 32 ms; septal T1 hemodialysis 1184 ± 29 ms vs. 1163 ± 30 ms; and midseptal T1 hemodialysis 1184 ± 34 ms vs. 1161 ± 29 ms). In the hemodialysis group, T1 times correlated with left ventricular mass indices. Septal T1 times correlated with troponin and electrocardiogram-corrected QT interval. The peak global longitudinal strain was significantly reduced in the hemodialysis group (hemodialysis -17.7±5.3% vs. -21.8±6.2%). For hemodialysis patients, the peak global longitudinal strain significantly correlated with left ventricular mass indices (R = 0.426), and a trend was seen for correlation with galectin-3, a biomarker of cardiac fibrosis. Thus, cardiac tissue properties of hemodialysis patients consistent with myocardial fibrosis can be determined noninvasively and associated with multiple structural and functional abnormalities.

  12. Gross Motor Development, Movement Abnormalities, and Early Identification of Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozonoff, Sally; Young, Gregory S.; Goldring, Stacy; Greiss-Hess, Laura; Herrera, Adriana M.; Steele, Joel; Macari, Suzanne; Hepburn, Susan; Rogers, Sally J.

    2008-01-01

    Gross motor development (supine, prone, rolling, sitting, crawling, walking) and movement abnormalities were examined in the home videos of infants later diagnosed with autism (regression and no regression subgroups), developmental delays (DD), or typical development. Group differences in maturity were found for walking, prone, and supine, with…

  13. Epigenetic regulation of cardiac myofibril gene expression during heart development.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Weian; Liu, Lingjuan; Pan, Bo; Xu, Yang; Zhu, Jing; Nan, Changlong; Huang, Xupei; Tian, Jie

    2015-07-01

    Cardiac gene expression regulation is controlled not only by genetic factors but also by environmental, i.e., epigenetic factors. Several environmental toxic effects such as oxidative stress and ischemia can result in abnormal myofibril gene expression during heart development. Troponin, one of the regulatory myofibril proteins in the heart, is a well-known model in study of cardiac gene regulation during the development. In our previous studies, we have demonstrated that fetal form troponin I (ssTnI) expression in the heart is partially regulated by hormones, such as thyroid hormone. In the present study, we have explored the epigenetic role of histone modification in the regulation of ssTnI expression. Mouse hearts were collected at different time of heart development, i.e., embryonic day 15.5, postnatal day 1, day 7, day 14 and day 21. Levels of histone H3 acetylation (acH3) and histone H3 lysine 9 trimethylation (H3K9me(3)) were detected using chromatin immunoprecipitation assays in slow upstream regulatory element (SURE) domain (TnI slow upstream regulatory element), 300-bp proximal upstream domain and the first intron of ssTnI gene, which are recognized as critical regions for ssTnI regulation. We found that the levels of acH3 on the SURE region were gradually decreased, corresponding to a similar decrease of ssTnI expression in the heart, whereas the levels of H3K9me(3) in the first intron of ssTnI gene were gradually increased. Our results indicate that both histone acetylation and methylation are involved in the epigenetic regulation of ssTnI expression in the heart during the development, which are the targets for environmental factors.

  14. Crude oil exposures reveal roles for intracellular calcium cycling in haddock craniofacial and cardiac development

    PubMed Central

    Sørhus, Elin; Incardona, John P.; Karlsen, Ørjan; Linbo, Tiffany; Sørensen, Lisbet; Nordtug, Trond; van der Meeren, Terje; Thorsen, Anders; Thorbjørnsen, Maja; Jentoft, Sissel; Edvardsen, Rolf B.; Meier, Sonnich

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that crude oil exposure affects cardiac development in fish by disrupting excitation-contraction (EC) coupling. We previously found that eggs of Atlantic haddock (Melanogrammus aeglefinus) bind dispersed oil droplets, potentially leading to more profound toxic effects from uptake of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Using lower concentrations of dispersed crude oil (0.7–7 μg/L ∑PAH), here we exposed a broader range of developmental stages over both short and prolonged durations. We quantified effects on cardiac function and morphogenesis, characterized novel craniofacial defects, and examined the expression of genes encoding potential targets underlying cardiac and craniofacial defects. Because of oil droplet binding, a 24-hr exposure was sufficient to create severe cardiac and craniofacial abnormalities. The specific nature of the craniofacial abnormalities suggests that crude oil may target common craniofacial and cardiac precursor cells either directly or indirectly by affecting ion channels and intracellular calcium in particular. Furthermore, down-regulation of genes encoding specific components of the EC coupling machinery suggests that crude oil disrupts excitation-transcription coupling or normal feedback regulation of ion channels blocked by PAHs. These data support a unifying hypothesis whereby depletion of intracellular calcium pools by crude oil-derived PAHs disrupts several pathways critical for organogenesis in fish. PMID:27506155

  15. Crude oil exposures reveal roles for intracellular calcium cycling in haddock craniofacial and cardiac development.

    PubMed

    Sørhus, Elin; Incardona, John P; Karlsen, Ørjan; Linbo, Tiffany; Sørensen, Lisbet; Nordtug, Trond; van der Meeren, Terje; Thorsen, Anders; Thorbjørnsen, Maja; Jentoft, Sissel; Edvardsen, Rolf B; Meier, Sonnich

    2016-08-10

    Recent studies have shown that crude oil exposure affects cardiac development in fish by disrupting excitation-contraction (EC) coupling. We previously found that eggs of Atlantic haddock (Melanogrammus aeglefinus) bind dispersed oil droplets, potentially leading to more profound toxic effects from uptake of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Using lower concentrations of dispersed crude oil (0.7-7 μg/L ∑PAH), here we exposed a broader range of developmental stages over both short and prolonged durations. We quantified effects on cardiac function and morphogenesis, characterized novel craniofacial defects, and examined the expression of genes encoding potential targets underlying cardiac and craniofacial defects. Because of oil droplet binding, a 24-hr exposure was sufficient to create severe cardiac and craniofacial abnormalities. The specific nature of the craniofacial abnormalities suggests that crude oil may target common craniofacial and cardiac precursor cells either directly or indirectly by affecting ion channels and intracellular calcium in particular. Furthermore, down-regulation of genes encoding specific components of the EC coupling machinery suggests that crude oil disrupts excitation-transcription coupling or normal feedback regulation of ion channels blocked by PAHs. These data support a unifying hypothesis whereby depletion of intracellular calcium pools by crude oil-derived PAHs disrupts several pathways critical for organogenesis in fish.

  16. Crude oil exposures reveal roles for intracellular calcium cycling in haddock craniofacial and cardiac development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sørhus, Elin; Incardona, John P.; Karlsen, Ørjan; Linbo, Tiffany; Sørensen, Lisbet; Nordtug, Trond; van der Meeren, Terje; Thorsen, Anders; Thorbjørnsen, Maja; Jentoft, Sissel; Edvardsen, Rolf B.; Meier, Sonnich

    2016-08-01

    Recent studies have shown that crude oil exposure affects cardiac development in fish by disrupting excitation-contraction (EC) coupling. We previously found that eggs of Atlantic haddock (Melanogrammus aeglefinus) bind dispersed oil droplets, potentially leading to more profound toxic effects from uptake of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Using lower concentrations of dispersed crude oil (0.7–7 μg/L ∑PAH), here we exposed a broader range of developmental stages over both short and prolonged durations. We quantified effects on cardiac function and morphogenesis, characterized novel craniofacial defects, and examined the expression of genes encoding potential targets underlying cardiac and craniofacial defects. Because of oil droplet binding, a 24-hr exposure was sufficient to create severe cardiac and craniofacial abnormalities. The specific nature of the craniofacial abnormalities suggests that crude oil may target common craniofacial and cardiac precursor cells either directly or indirectly by affecting ion channels and intracellular calcium in particular. Furthermore, down-regulation of genes encoding specific components of the EC coupling machinery suggests that crude oil disrupts excitation-transcription coupling or normal feedback regulation of ion channels blocked by PAHs. These data support a unifying hypothesis whereby depletion of intracellular calcium pools by crude oil-derived PAHs disrupts several pathways critical for organogenesis in fish.

  17. Pretreatment with human serum butyrylcholinesterase alone prevents cardiac abnormalities, seizures, and death in Göttingen minipigs exposed to sarin vapor.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Ashima; Sun, Wei; Dabisch, Paul A; Hulet, Stanley W; Hastings, Nicholas B; Jakubowski, Edward M; Mioduszewski, Robert J; Doctor, Bhupendra P

    2011-12-15

    Human serum butyrylcholinesterase (Hu BChE) is a stoichiometric bioscavenger that is being developed as a prophylactic countermeasure against organophosphorus nerve agents. This study was designed to evaluate the efficacy of Hu BChE against whole-body inhalation exposure to a lethal dose of sarin (GB) vapor. Male Göttingen minipigs were subjected to: air exposure, GB vapor exposure, or pretreatment with Hu BChE followed by GB vapor exposure. Hu BChE was administered by i.m. injection 24 h prior to exposure to 4.1 mg/m(3) of GB vapor for 60 min. Electrocardiograms (ECG), electroencephalograms (EEG), and pupil size were recorded throughout exposure. Blood drawn before and throughout exposure was analyzed for blood gases, electrolytes, metabolites, acetylcholinesterase and BChE activities, and amount of GB present. Untreated animals exposed to GB vapor exhibited cardiac abnormalities and generalized seizures, ultimately succumbing to respiratory failure. Pretreatment with 3.0 or 6.5 mg/kg of Hu BChE delayed blood gas and acid-base disturbances and the onset of cardiac and neural toxic signs, but failed to increase survivability. Pretreatment with 7.5 mg/kg of Hu BChE, however, completely prevented toxic signs, with blood chemistry and ECG and EEG parameters indistinguishable from control during and after GB exposure. GB bound in plasma was 200-fold higher than plasma from pigs that did not receive Hu BChE, suggesting that Hu BChE scavenged GB in blood and prevented it from reaching other tissues. Thus, prophylaxis with Hu BChE alone not only increased survivability, but also prevented cardiac abnormalities and neural toxicity in minipigs exposed to a lethal dose of GB vapor.

  18. Anderson's disease (chylomicron retention disease): a new mutation in the SARA2 gene associated with muscular and cardiac abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Silvain, M; Bligny, D; Aparicio, T; Laforêt, P; Grodet, A; Peretti, N; Ménard, D; Djouadi, F; Jardel, C; Bégué, J M; Walker, F; Schmitz, J; Lachaux, A; Aggerbeck, L P; Samson-Bouma, M E

    2008-12-01

    Anderson's disease (AD) or chylomicron retention disease (CMRD) is a rare hereditary lipid malabsorption syndrome linked to SARA2 gene mutations. We report in this study a novel mutation in two sisters for which the Sar1b protein is predicted to be truncated by 32 amino acids at its carboxyl-terminus. Because the SARA2 gene is also expressed in the muscle, heart, liver and placenta, extraintestinal clinical manifestations may exist. For the first time, we describe in this study in the two sisters muscular as well as cardiac abnormalities that could be related to the reported expression of SARA2 in these tissues. We also evaluated six other patients for potential manifestations of the SARA2 mutation. The creatine phosphokinase levels were increased in all patients [1.5-9.4 x normal (N)] and transaminases were moderately elevated in five of the eight patients (1.2-2.6 x N), probably related to muscle disease rather than to liver dysfunction. A decreased ejection fraction occurred in one patient (40%, N: 60%). The muscle, liver and placental tissues that were examined had no specific abnormalities and, in particular, no lipid accumulation. These results suggest that myolysis and other extraintestinal abnormalities can occur in AD/CMRD and that the clinical evaluation of patients should reflect this.

  19. Short-term inhalation of particulate transition metals has little effect on the electrocardiograms of dogs having preexisting cardiac abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Muggenburg, B A; Benson, J M; Barr, E B; Kubatko, J; Tilley, L P

    2003-04-11

    There is growing epidemiological evidence for statistical associations between increases in air pollution, especially particulate matter, and increases in cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Laboratory studies have shown that transition metals contribute strongly to the effects of high lung doses of model particles on changes in the electrocardiograms of animals. The present study evaluated the effects of short-term inhalation exposure to respirable particles of specific oxide and sulfate forms of transition metals on heart rate and the electrocardiogram of old dogs having preexisting cardiac abnormalities. Conscious beagle dogs were exposed by oral inhalation for 3 h on each of 3 successive days to aerosols of manganese, nickel, vanadium, iron, and copper oxides, and nickel and vanadium sulfates as single compounds at concentrations of 0.05 mg/m(3). Electrocardiograms were recorded and evaluated for exposure-related changes in heart rate, heart rate variability, and abnormalities of waveforms. Although the electrocardiograms of this population of dogs having potential age and cardiovascular susceptibility factors reflected their underlying clinical abnormalities, no significant effect of exposure to the transition metal aerosols was observed.

  20. Cardiac remodeling in the mouse model of Marfan syndrome develops into two distinctive phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Tae, Hyun-Jin; Petrashevskaya, Natalia; Marshall, Shannon; Krawczyk, Melissa; Talan, Mark

    2016-01-15

    Marfan syndrome (MFS) is a systemic disorder of connective tissue caused by mutations in fibrillin-1. Cardiac dysfunction in MFS has not been characterized halting the development of therapies of cardiac complication in MFS. We aimed to study the age-dependent cardiac remodeling in the mouse model of MFS FbnC1039G+/- mouse [Marfan heterozygous (HT) mouse] and its association with valvular regurgitation. Marfan HT mice of 2-4 mo demonstrated a mild hypertrophic cardiac remodeling with predominant decline of diastolic function and increased transforming growth factor-β canonical (p-SMAD2/3) and noncanonical (p-ERK1/2 and p-p38 MAPK) signaling and upregulation of hypertrophic markers natriuretic peptides atrium natriuretic peptide and brain natriuretic peptide. Among older HT mice (6-14 mo), cardiac remodeling was associated with two distinct phenotypes, manifesting either dilated or constricted left ventricular chamber. Dilatation of left ventricular chamber was accompanied by biochemical evidence of greater mechanical stress, including elevated ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK phosphorylation and higher brain natriuretic peptide expression. The aortic valve regurgitation was registered in 20% of the constricted group and 60% of the dilated group, whereas mitral insufficiency was observed in 40% of the constricted group and 100% of the dilated group. Cardiac dysfunction was not associated with the increase of interstitial fibrosis and nonmyocyte proliferation. In the mouse model fibrillin-1, haploinsufficiency results in the early onset of nonfibrotic hypertrophic cardiac remodeling and dysfunction, independently from valvular abnormalities. MFS heart is vulnerable to stress-induced cardiac dilatation in the face of valvular regurgitation, and stress-activated MAPK signals represent a potential target for cardiac management in MFS.

  1. Development of optical biosensor technologies for cardiac troponin recognition.

    PubMed

    Abdolrahim, Mojgan; Rabiee, Mohammad; Alhosseini, Sanaz Naghavi; Tahriri, Mohammadreza; Yazdanpanah, Sara; Tayebi, Lobat

    2015-09-15

    Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is the leading cause of death among cardiovascular diseases. Among the numerous attempts to develop coronary marker concepts into clinical strategies, cardiac troponin is known as a specific marker for coronary events. The cardiac troponin concentration level in blood has been shown to rise rapidly for 4-10 days after onset of AMI, making it an attractive approach for a long diagnosis window for detection. The extremely low clinical sensing range of cardiac troponin levels consequently makes the methods of detection highly sensitive. In this review, by taking into consideration optical methods applied for cardiac troponin detection, we discuss the most commonly used methods of optical immunosensing and provide an overview of the various diagnostic cardiac troponin immunosensors that have been employed for determination of cardiac troponin over the last several years.

  2. Removal of Abnormal Myofilament O-GlcNAcylation Restores Ca2+ Sensitivity in Diabetic Cardiac Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Junfeng; Slawson, Chad; Zeidan, Quira; Lugo-Fagundo, Nahyr S.; Xu, Mingguo; Shen, Xiaoxu; Gao, Wei Dong; Caceres, Viviane; Chakir, Khalid; DeVine, Lauren; Cole, Robert N.; Marchionni, Luigi; Paolocci, Nazareno; Hart, Gerald W.; Murphy, Anne M.

    2015-01-01

    Contractile dysfunction and increased deposition of O-linked β-N-acetyl-d-glucosamine (O-GlcNAc) in cardiac proteins are a hallmark of the diabetic heart. However, whether and how this posttranslational alteration contributes to lower cardiac function remains unclear. Using a refined β-elimination/Michael addition with tandem mass tags (TMT)–labeling proteomic technique, we show that CpOGA, a bacterial analog of O-GlcNAcase (OGA) that cleaves O-GlcNAc in vivo, removes site-specific O-GlcNAcylation from myofilaments, restoring Ca2+ sensitivity in streptozotocin (STZ) diabetic cardiac muscles. We report that in control rat hearts, O-GlcNAc and O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT) are mainly localized at the Z-line, whereas OGA is at the A-band. Conversely, in diabetic hearts O-GlcNAc levels are increased and OGT and OGA delocalized. Consistent changes were found in human diabetic hearts. STZ diabetic hearts display increased physical interactions of OGA with α-actin, tropomyosin, and myosin light chain 1, along with reduced OGT and increased OGA activities. Our study is the first to reveal that specific removal of O-GlcNAcylation restores myofilament response to Ca2+ in diabetic hearts and that altered O-GlcNAcylation is due to the subcellular redistribution of OGT and OGA rather than to changes in their overall activities. Thus, preventing sarcomeric OGT and OGA displacement represents a new possible strategy for treating diabetic cardiomyopathy. PMID:26109417

  3. Pulmonary vascular development goes awry in congenital lung abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Kool, Heleen; Mous, Daphne; Tibboel, Dick; de Klein, Annelies; Rottier, Robbert J

    2014-12-01

    Pulmonary vascular diseases of the newborn comprise a wide range of pathological conditions with developmental abnormalities in the pulmonary vasculature. Clinically, pulmonary arterial hypertension (PH) is characterized by persistent increased resistance of the vasculature and abnormal vascular response. The classification of PH is primarily based on clinical parameters instead of morphology and distinguishes five groups of PH. Congenital lung anomalies, such as alveolar capillary dysplasia (ACD) and PH associated with congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH), but also bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), are classified in group three. Clearly, tight and correct regulation of pulmonary vascular development is crucial for normal lung development. Human and animal model systems have increased our knowledge and make it possible to identify and characterize affected pathways and study pivotal genes. Understanding of the normal development of the pulmonary vasculature will give new insights in the origin of the spectrum of rare diseases, such as CDH, ACD, and BPD, which render a significant clinical problem in neonatal intensive care units around the world. In this review, we describe normal pulmonary vascular development, and focus on four diseases of the newborn in which abnormal pulmonary vascular development play a critical role in morbidity and mortality. In the future perspective, we indicate the lines of research that seem to be very promising for elucidating the molecular pathways involved in the origin of congenital pulmonary vascular disease.

  4. Abnormal retinal development associated with FRMD7 mutations

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Mervyn G.; Crosier, Moira; Lindsay, Susan; Kumar, Anil; Araki, Masasuke; Leroy, Bart P.; McLean, Rebecca J.; Sheth, Viral; Maconachie, Gail; Thomas, Shery; Moore, Anthony T.; Gottlob, Irene

    2014-01-01

    Idiopathic infantile nystagmus (IIN) is a genetically heterogeneous disorder, often associated with FRMD7 mutations. As the appearance of the retina is reported to be normal based on conventional fundus photography, IIN is postulated to arise from abnormal cortical development. To determine whether the afferent visual system is involved in FRMD7 mutations, we performed in situ hybridization studies in human embryonic and fetal stages (35 days post-ovulation to 9 weeks post-conception). We show a dynamic retinal expression pattern of FRMD7 during development. We observe expression within the outer neuroblastic layer, then in the inner neuroblastic layer and at 9 weeks post-conception a bilaminar expression pattern. Expression was also noted within the developing optic stalk and optic disk. We identified a large cohort of IIN patients (n = 100), and performed sequence analysis which revealed 45 patients with FRMD7 mutations. Patients with FRMD7 mutations underwent detailed retinal imaging studies using ultrahigh-resolution optical coherence tomography. The tomograms were compared with a control cohort (n = 60). The foveal pit was significantly shallower in FRMD7 patients (P < 0.0001). The optic nerve head morphology was abnormal with significantly decreased optic disk area, retinal nerve fiber layer thickness, cup area and cup depth in FRMD7 patients (P < 0.0001). This study shows for the first time that abnormal afferent system development is associated with FRMD7 mutations and could be an important etiological factor in the development of nystagmus. PMID:24688117

  5. Abnormal retinal development associated with FRMD7 mutations.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Mervyn G; Crosier, Moira; Lindsay, Susan; Kumar, Anil; Araki, Masasuke; Leroy, Bart P; McLean, Rebecca J; Sheth, Viral; Maconachie, Gail; Thomas, Shery; Moore, Anthony T; Gottlob, Irene

    2014-08-01

    Idiopathic infantile nystagmus (IIN) is a genetically heterogeneous disorder, often associated with FRMD7 mutations. As the appearance of the retina is reported to be normal based on conventional fundus photography, IIN is postulated to arise from abnormal cortical development. To determine whether the afferent visual system is involved in FRMD7 mutations, we performed in situ hybridization studies in human embryonic and fetal stages (35 days post-ovulation to 9 weeks post-conception). We show a dynamic retinal expression pattern of FRMD7 during development. We observe expression within the outer neuroblastic layer, then in the inner neuroblastic layer and at 9 weeks post-conception a bilaminar expression pattern. Expression was also noted within the developing optic stalk and optic disk. We identified a large cohort of IIN patients (n = 100), and performed sequence analysis which revealed 45 patients with FRMD7 mutations. Patients with FRMD7 mutations underwent detailed retinal imaging studies using ultrahigh-resolution optical coherence tomography. The tomograms were compared with a control cohort (n = 60). The foveal pit was significantly shallower in FRMD7 patients (P < 0.0001). The optic nerve head morphology was abnormal with significantly decreased optic disk area, retinal nerve fiber layer thickness, cup area and cup depth in FRMD7 patients (P < 0.0001). This study shows for the first time that abnormal afferent system development is associated with FRMD7 mutations and could be an important etiological factor in the development of nystagmus.

  6. Abnormal megakaryocyte development and platelet function in Nbeal2(-/-) mice.

    PubMed

    Kahr, Walter H A; Lo, Richard W; Li, Ling; Pluthero, Fred G; Christensen, Hilary; Ni, Ran; Vaezzadeh, Nima; Hawkins, Cynthia E; Weyrich, Andrew S; Di Paola, Jorge; Landolt-Marticorena, Carolina; Gross, Peter L

    2013-11-07

    Gray platelet syndrome (GPS) is an inherited bleeding disorder associated with macrothrombocytopenia and α-granule-deficient platelets. GPS has been linked to loss of function mutations in NEABL2 (neurobeachin-like 2), and we describe here a murine GPS model, the Nbeal2(-/-) mouse. As in GPS, Nbeal2(-/-) mice exhibit splenomegaly, macrothrombocytopenia, and a deficiency of platelet α-granules and their cargo, including von Willebrand factor (VWF), thrombospondin-1, and platelet factor 4. The platelet α-granule membrane protein P-selectin is expressed at 48% of wild-type levels and externalized upon platelet activation. The presence of P-selectin and normal levels of VPS33B and VPS16B in Nbeal2(-/-) platelets suggests that NBEAL2 acts independently of VPS33B/VPS16B at a later stage of α-granule biogenesis. Impaired Nbeal2(-/-) platelet function was shown by flow cytometry, platelet aggregometry, bleeding assays, and intravital imaging of laser-induced arterial thrombus formation. Microscopic analysis detected marked abnormalities in Nbeal2(-/-) bone marrow megakaryocytes, which when cultured showed delayed maturation, decreased survival, decreased ploidy, and developmental abnormalities, including abnormal extracellular distribution of VWF. Our results confirm that α-granule secretion plays a significant role in platelet function, and they also indicate that abnormal α-granule formation in Nbeal2(-/-) mice has deleterious effects on megakaryocyte survival, development, and platelet production.

  7. Congenital partial absence of the pericardium presenting with a rare concurrent abnormality of vascular ring diagnosed by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Sani, Zahra Alizadeh; Savand-Roomi, Zahra; Vojdanparast, Mohammad; Sarafan, Shadi; Seifi, Azin; Nezafati, Pouya

    2016-01-01

    Congenital absence of the pericardium is a rare abnormality that can be diagnosed by cardiac imaging procedures. A 49-year-old male needed medical attention due to the appearance of palpitation with a systolic murmur, and a notable aortic arch deviation was seen in the chest X-ray. In the echocardiogram, a poor echo window was detected. A cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a rare concomitant anomaly of partial absence of the pericardium including a rare defect of the right-sided aortic arch. Using cardiac MRI, the pericardium can be easily visualized, and thus, its absence more easily detected, aiding appropriate clinical decision-making. PMID:28217641

  8. Relationship between pulmonary and cardiac abnormalities in sickle cell disease: implications for the management of patients

    PubMed Central

    Maioli, Maria Christina Paixão; Soares, Andrea Ribeiro; Bedirian, Ricardo; Alves, Ursula David; de Lima Marinho, Cirlene; Lopes, Agnaldo José

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the association between clinical, pulmonary, and cardiovascular findings in patients with sickle cell disease and, secondarily, to compare these findings between sickle cell anemia patients and those with other sickle cell diseases. Methods Fifty-nine adults were included in this cross-sectional study; 47 had sickle cell anemia, and 12 had other sickle cell diseases. All patients underwent pulmonary function tests, chest computed tomography, and echocardiography. Results Abnormalities on computed tomography, echocardiography, and pulmonary function tests were observed in 93.5%, 75.0%; and 70.2% of patients, respectively. A higher frequency of restrictive abnormalities was observed in patients with a history of acute chest syndrome (85% vs. 21.6%; p-value < 0.0001) and among patients with increased left ventricle size (48.2% vs. 22.2%; p-value = 0.036), and a higher frequency of reduced respiratory muscle strength was observed in patients with a ground-glass pattern (33.3% vs. 4.3%; p-value = 0.016). Moreover, a higher frequency of mosaic attenuation was observed in patients with elevated tricuspid regurgitation velocity (61.1% vs. 24%; p-value = 0.014). Compared to patients with other sickle cell diseases, sickle cell anemia patients had suffered increased frequencies of acute pain episodes, and acute chest syndrome, and exhibited mosaic attenuation on computed tomography, and abnormalities on echocardiography. Conclusion A significant interrelation between abnormalities of the pulmonary and cardiovascular systems was observed in sickle cell disease patients. Furthermore, the severity of the cardiopulmonary parameters among patients with sickle cell anemia was greater than that of patients with other sickle cell diseases. PMID:26969771

  9. Cardiac troponin I is abnormally expressed in non-small cell lung cancer tissues and human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chao; Liu, Jia-Bao; Bian, Zhi-Ping; Xu, Jin-Dan; Wu, Heng-Fang; Gu, Chun-Rong; Shi, Yi; Zhang, Ji-Nan; Chen, Xiang-Jian; Yang, Di

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac troponin I (cTnI) is the only sarcomeric protein identified to date that is expressed exclusively in cardiac muscle. Its expression in cancer tissues has not been reported. Herein, we examined cTnI expression in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) tissues, human adenocarcinoma cells SPCA-1 (lung) and BGC 823 (gastric) by immunohistochemistry, western blot analysis and real-time PCR. Immunopositivity for cTnI was demonstrated in 69.4% (34/49) NSCLC tissues evaluated, and was strong intensity in 35.3% (6/17) lung squamous cell carcinoma cases. The non-cancer-bearing lung tissues except tuberculosis (9/9, 100%) showed negative staining for cTnI. Seven monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against human cTnI were applied in immunofluorescence. The result showed that the staining pattern within SPCA-1 and BGC 823 was dependent on the epitope of the cTnI mAbs. The membrane and nucleus of cancer cells were stained by mAbs against N-terminal peptides of cTnI, and cytoplasm was stained by mAbs against the middle and C-terminal peptides of cTnI. A ~25 kD band was identified by anti-cTnI mAb in SPCA-1 and BGC 823 extracts by western blot, as well as in cardiomyocyte extracts. The cTnI mRNA expressions in SPCA-1 and BGC 823 cells were about ten thousand times less than that in cardiomyocytes. Our study shows for the first time that cTnI protein and mRNA were abnormally expressed in NSCLC tissues, SPCA-1 and BGC 823 cells. These findings challenge the conventional view of cTnI as a cardiac-specific protein, enabling the potential use of cTnI as a diagnostic marker or targeted therapy for cancer.

  10. PGC-1 coactivators in cardiac development and disease

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Glenn C.; Jiang, Aihua; Arany, Zolt

    2010-01-01

    The beating heart requires a constant flux of ATP to maintain contractile function, and there is increasing evidence that energetic defects contribute to the development of heart failure. The last ten years have seen a resurgent interest in cardiac intermediary metabolism, and a dramatic increase in our understanding of transcriptional networks that regulate cardiac energetics. The PPAR-gamma coactivator (PGC)-1 family of proteins plays a central role in these pathways. The mechanisms by which PGC-1 proteins regulate transcriptional networks and are regulated by physiological cues, and the roles they play in cardiac development and disease, are reviewed here. PMID:20884884

  11. Emotion processes in normal and abnormal development and preventive intervention.

    PubMed

    Izard, Carroll E; Fine, Sarah; Mostow, Allison; Trentacosta, Christopher; Campbell, Jan

    2002-01-01

    We present an analysis of the role of emotions in normal and abnormal development and preventive intervention. The conceptual framework stems from three tenets of differential emotions theory (DET). These principles concern the constructs of emotion utilization; intersystem connections among modular emotion systems, cognition, and action; and the organizational and motivational functions of discrete emotions. Particular emotions and patterns of emotions function differentially in different periods of development and in influencing the cognition and behavior associated with different forms of psychopathology. Established prevention programs have not emphasized the concept of emotion as motivation. It is even more critical that they have generally neglected the idea of modulating emotions, not simply to achieve self-regulation, but also to utilize their inherently adaptive functions as a means of facilitating the development of social competence and preventing psychopathology. The paper includes a brief description of a theory-based prevention program and suggestions for complementary targeted interventions to address specific externalizing and internalizing problems. In the final section, we describe ways in which emotion-centered preventions can provide excellent opportunities for research on the development of normal and abnormal behavior.

  12. Lessons for cardiac regeneration and repair through development.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Jeffrey M; Bruneau, Benoit G

    2010-09-01

    Cell-based regenerative strategies have the potential to revolutionize the way cardiovascular injury is treated, but successful therapies will require a precise understanding of the mechanisms that dictate cell fate, survival and differentiation. Recent advances in the study of cardiac development hold promise for unlocking the keys for successful therapies. Using mouse models and embryonic stem cells, researchers are uncovering cardiac progenitor cells in both embryonic and adult contexts. Furthermore, the signaling molecules and transcriptional regulators that govern these cells and their behavior are being revealed. Here, we focus on the recent advances in these areas of cardiac developmental research and their impact on the expanding field of regenerative medicine.

  13. Development of a postgraduate interventional cardiac nursing curriculum.

    PubMed

    Currey, Judy; White, Kevin; Rolley, John; Oldland, Elizabeth; Driscoll, Andrea

    2015-11-01

    Interventional cardiology practices have advanced immensely in the last two decades, but the educational preparation of the workforce in cardiac catheter laboratories has not seen commensurate changes. Although on-the-job training has sufficed in the past, recognition of this workforce as a specialty practice domain now demands specialist educational preparation. The aim of this paper is to present the development of an interventional cardiac nursing curriculum nested within a Master of Nursing Practice in Australia. International and national health educational principles, teaching and learning theories and professional frameworks and philosophies are foundational to the program designed for interventional cardiac specialist nurses. These broader health, educational and professional underpinnings will be described to illustrate their application to the program's theoretical and clinical components. Situating interventional cardiac nursing within a Master's degree program at University provides nurses with the opportunities to develop high level critical thinking and problem solving knowledge and skills.

  14. Ah Receptor Signaling Controls the Expression of Cardiac Development and Homeostasis Genes

    PubMed Central

    Carreira, Vinicius S.; Fan, Yunxia; Wang, Qing; Zhang, Xiang; Kurita, Hisaka; Ko, Chia-I.; Naticchioni, Mindi; Jiang, Min; Koch, Sheryl; Medvedovic, Mario; Xia, Ying; Rubinstein, Jack; Puga, Alvaro

    2015-01-01

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) is the most common congenital abnormality and one of the leading causes of newborn death throughout the world. Despite much emerging scientific information, the precise etiology of this disease remains elusive. Here, we show that the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) regulates the expression of crucial cardiogenesis genes and that interference with endogenous AHR functions, either by gene ablation or by agonist exposure during early development, causes overlapping structural and functional cardiac abnormalities that lead to altered fetal heart physiology, including higher heart rates, right and left ventricle dilation, higher stroke volume, and reduced ejection fraction. With striking similarity between AHR knockout (Ahr−/−) and agonist-exposed wild type (Ahr+/+) embryos, in utero disruption of endogenous AHR functions converge into dysregulation of molecular mechanisms needed for attainment and maintenance of cardiac differentiation, including the pivotal signals regulated by the cardiogenic transcription factor NKH2.5, energy balance via oxidative phosphorylation and TCA cycle and global mitochondrial function and homeostasis. Our findings suggest that AHR signaling in the developing mammalian heart is central to the regulation of pathways crucial for cellular metabolism, cardiogenesis, and cardiac function, which are potential targets of environmental factors associated with CHD. PMID:26139165

  15. CHRONIC PERCHLORATE EXPOSURE CAUSES MORPHOLOGICAL ABNORMALITIES IN DEVELOPING STICKLEBACK

    PubMed Central

    Bernhardt, Richard R.; Von Hippel, Frank A.; O’Hara, Todd M.

    2011-01-01

    Few studies have examined the effects of chronic perchlorate exposure during growth and development, and fewer still have analyzed the effects of perchlorate over multiple generations. We describe morphological and developmental characteristics for threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) that were spawned and raised to sexual maturity in perchlorate-treated water (G1,2003) and for their offspring (G2,2004) that were not directly treated with perchlorate. The G1,2003 displayed a variety of abnormalities, including impaired formation of calcified traits, slower growth rates, aberrant sexual development, poor survivorship, and reduced pigmentation that allowed internal organs to be visible. Yet these conditions were absent when the offspring of contaminated fish (G2,2004) were raised in untreated water, suggesting a lack of transgenerational effects and that surviving populations may be able to recover following remediation of perchlorate-contaminated sites PMID:21465539

  16. Mitochondria-targeted ROS scavenger improves post-ischemic recovery of cardiac function and attenuates mitochondrial abnormalities in aged rats.

    PubMed

    Escobales, Nelson; Nuñez, Rebeca E; Jang, Sehwan; Parodi-Rullan, Rebecca; Ayala-Peña, Sylvette; Sacher, Joshua R; Skoda, Erin M; Wipf, Peter; Frontera, Walter; Javadov, Sabzali

    2014-12-01

    Mitochondria-generated reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of aging and age-associated diseases. In this study, we evaluated the effects of XJB-5-131 (XJB), a mitochondria-targeted ROS and electron scavenger, on cardiac resistance to ischemia-reperfusion (IR)-induced oxidative stress in aged rats. Male adult (5-month old, n=17) and aged (29-month old, n=19) Fischer Brown Norway (F344/BN) rats were randomly assigned to the following groups: adult (A), adult+XJB (AX), aged (O), and aged+XJB (OX). XJB was administered 3 times per week (3mg/kg body weight, IP) for four weeks. At the end of the treatment period, cardiac function was continuously monitored in excised hearts using the Langendorff technique for 30 min, followed by 20 min of global ischemia, and 60-min reperfusion. XJB improved post-ischemic recovery of aged hearts, as evidenced by greater left ventricular developed-pressures and rate-pressure products than the untreated, aged-matched group. The state 3 respiration rates at complexes I, II and IV of mitochondria isolated from XJB-treated aged hearts were 57% (P<0.05), 25% (P<0.05) and 28% (P<0.05), respectively, higher than controls. Ca(2+)-induced swelling, an indicator of permeability transition pore opening, was reduced in the mitochondria of XJB-treated aged rats. In addition, XJB significantly attenuated the H2O2-induced depolarization of the mitochondrial inner membrane as well as the total and mitochondrial ROS levels in cultured cardiomyocytes. This study underlines the importance of mitochondrial ROS in aging-induced cardiac dysfunction and suggests that targeting mitochondrial ROS may be an effective therapeutic approach to protect the aged heart against IR injury.

  17. Hierarchical approaches for systems modeling in cardiac development.

    PubMed

    Gould, Russell A; Aboulmouna, Lina M; Varner, Jeffrey D; Butcher, Jonathan T

    2013-01-01

    Ordered cardiac morphogenesis and function are essential for all vertebrate life. The heart begins as a simple contractile tube, but quickly grows and morphs into a multichambered pumping organ complete with valves, while maintaining regulation of blood flow and nutrient distribution. Though not identical, cardiac morphogenesis shares many molecular and morphological processes across vertebrate species. Quantitative data across multiple time and length scales have been gathered through decades of reductionist single variable analyses. These range from detailed molecular signaling pathways at the cellular levels to cardiac function at the tissue/organ levels. However, none of these components act in true isolation from others, and each, in turn, exhibits short- and long-range effects in both time and space. With the absence of a gene, entire signaling cascades and genetic profiles may be shifted, resulting in complex feedback mechanisms. Also taking into account local microenvironmental changes throughout development, it is apparent that a systems level approach is an essential resource to accelerate information generation concerning the functional relationships across multiple length scales (molecular data vs physiological function) and structural development. In this review, we discuss relevant in vivo and in vitro experimental approaches, compare different computational frameworks for systems modeling, and the latest information about systems modeling of cardiac development. Finally, we conclude with some important future directions for cardiac systems modeling.

  18. Parapagus conjoined twin calf: a case study - focused on CT and cardiac abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Schneevoigt, J; Bahramsoltani, M; Gerlach, K; Gericke, A; Fersterra, M; Brehm, W; Seeger, J

    2014-02-01

    Congenital duplication anomalies occasionally occur in both humans and animals. Although various forms of classification of these conjoined twins exist, each case should be considered as an individual. In the case study presented a Holstein Frisian calf, born alive after 281 days of normal gravidity was investigated by computed tomography (CT) and subsequent dissection. The calf could be classified as a parapagus dicephalus tetrabrachius. It exhibited two heads each of them with a complete cervical spine leading to a complete thoracic and lumbar spine and separate tails. Looking at the point of fusion, the twin was conjoined in the ventrolateral thoracic part of the body. The calf had two thoraces with four forelimbs and two pelvic limbs on a single pelvis. As two heads and thoraces were present, beginning at the oral cavity, two intestinal systems were observable leading to a fusion point at the ascending part of the duodenum been continued caudally as a single system. Within each thorax, two lungs and a heart were present. However, only the heart in the left thorax was normal shape, exhibiting a strong myocardium and increased size. In contrast, the heart within the right thorax was considerably smaller, round shaped, and it appeared to be spongy and not fully developed during the foetal period. Commonly, classification of conjoined twins is only based on the appearance of the skeletal system. However, in the case presented, the point of fusion of the skeletal system did not allow conclusions regarding the intestinal or cardiovascular system.

  19. Abnormal cingulum bundle development in autism: a probabilistic tractography study.

    PubMed

    Ikuta, Toshikazu; Shafritz, Keith M; Bregman, Joel; Peters, Bart D; Gruner, Patricia; Malhotra, Anil K; Szeszko, Philip R

    2014-01-30

    There is now considerable evidence that white matter abnormalities play a role in the neurobiology of autism. Little research has been directed, however, at understanding (a) typical white matter development in autism and how this relates to neurocognitive impairments observed in the disorder. In this study we used probabilistic tractography to identify the cingulum bundle in 21 adolescents and young adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), and 21 age- and sex-matched healthy volunteers. We investigated group differences in the relationships between age and fractional anisotropy, a putative measure of white matter integrity, within the cingulum bundle. Moreover, in a preliminary investigation, we examined the relationship between cingulum fractional anisotropy and executive functioning using the Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function (BRIEF). The ASD participants demonstrated significantly lower fractional anisotropy within the cingulum bundle compared to the typically developing volunteers. There was a significant group-by-age interaction such that the ASD group did not show the typical age-associated increases in fractional anisotropy observed among healthy individuals. Moreover, lower fractional anisotropy within the cingulum bundle was associated with worse BRIEF behavioral regulation index scores in the ASD group. The current findings implicate a dysregulation in cingulum bundle white matter development occurring in late adolescence and early adulthood in ASD, and suggest that greater disturbances in this trajectory are associated with executive dysfunction in ASD.

  20. Cardiac dysfunction and development of heart failure.

    PubMed

    Ertl, G; Gaudron, P; Neubauer, S; Bauer, B; Horn, M; Hu, K; Tian, R

    1993-07-01

    A major consequence of chronic cardiac dysfunction is chronic overload of contractile myocardium. Various aetiologies, in reaction to this, may induce compensatory mechanisms consisting of excentric (dilatation) and concentric hypertrophy. Chronic left ventricular dysfunction is caused most frequently by myocardial infarction. Left ventricular dilatation and hypertrophy occurs in patients with extensive infarction. Dilatation may at first be compensatory, restoring stroke volume within 4 weeks of the infarct. However, as dilatation progresses, left ventricular ejection fraction and stroke volume deteriorate during exercise and at rest, and finally pulmonary capillary wedge pressure increases and patients become symptomatic 1.5-3 years after the infarct. Major determinants of progressive left ventricular dilatation and deterioration of haemodynamics are a depressed left ventricular ejection fraction, angiographically determined infarct size, stroke volume early (4 days) after myocardial infarction, infarct location (anterior/inferior) and the grade (TIMI) of perfusion of the infarct-associated coronary artery. Chronic loading and unloading may accelerate or decelerate this process. Efficiency and energy reserve (phosphocreatine) of the dilated ventricles is reduced. Further intrinsic changes in surviving myocardium include morphological and functional disturbance of coronary microcirculation.

  1. CXCR4 Antagonism Attenuates the Development of Diabetic Cardiac Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Chu, Po-Yin; Walder, Ken; Horlock, Duncan; Williams, David; Nelson, Erin; Byrne, Melissa; Jandeleit-Dahm, Karin; Zimmet, Paul; Kaye, David M

    2015-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is an increasingly recognized complication of diabetes. Cardiac fibrosis is an important causative mechanism of HF associated with diabetes. Recent data indicate that inflammation may be particularly important in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular fibrosis. We sought to determine the mechanism by which cardiac fibrosis develops and to specifically investigate the role of the CXCR4 axis in this process. Animals with type I diabetes (streptozotocin treated mice) or type II diabetes (Israeli Sand-rats) and controls were randomized to treatment with a CXCR4 antagonist, candesartan or vehicle control. Additional groups of mice also underwent bone marrow transplantation (GFP+ donor marrow) to investigate the potential role of bone marrow derived cell mobilization in the pathogenesis of cardiac fibrosis. Both type I and II models of diabetes were accompanied by the development of significant cardiac fibrosis. CXCR4 antagonism markedly reduced cardiac fibrosis in both models of diabetes, similar in magnitude to that seen with candesartan. In contrast to candesartan, the anti-fibrotic actions of CXCR4 antagonism occurred in a blood pressure independent manner. Whilst the induction of diabetes did not increase the overall myocardial burden of GFP+ cells, it was accompanied by an increase in GFP+ cells expressing the fibroblast marker alpha-smooth muscle actin and this was attenuated by CXCR4 antagonism. CXCR4 antagonism was also accompanied by increased levels of circulating regulatory T cells. Taken together the current data indicate that pharmacological inhibition of CXCR4 significantly reduces diabetes induced cardiac fibrosis, providing a potentially important therapeutic approach.

  2. Protective effect of oleanolic acid on oxidative injury and cellular abnormalities in doxorubicin induced cardiac toxicity in rats

    PubMed Central

    Goyal, Sameer N; Mahajan, Umesh B; Chandrayan, Govind; Kumawat, Vivek S; Kamble, Sarika; Patil, Pradip; Agrawal, Yogeeta O; Patil, Chandragouda R; Ojha, Shreesh

    2016-01-01

    The prevention of doxorubicin (Dox) induced cardiotoxicity may be co-operative to recover future Dox treatment. The aim of this study was to explore the cardioprotective effects of oleanolic acid (OA), an antioxidant agent, on Dox induced cardiotoxicity. OA is a triterpenoid compound, which exist widely in plant kingdom in free acid form or as a glycosidic triterpenoids saponins. Cardiotoxicity was induced in Wistar rats with single intravenous injection of doxorubicin at dose of 67.75 mg/kg i.v for 48 hrs. At 12 hrs of interval following Dox administration the cardioprotective effect of OA (1.5 mg/kg, i.v.) and Amifostine (AMF) (90 mg/kg i.v., single dose prior 30 min) were evaluated. Induction of cardiotoxicity was confirmed by increase in systolic, diastolic, mean arterial pressures, maximal positive rate of developed left ventricular pressure (+LVdP/dtmax, an indicator of myocardial contraction), maximal negative rate of developed left ventricular pressure (-LVdP/dtmax, a meter of myocardial relaxation) and an increase in left ventricular end-diastolic pressure (LVEDP, a marker of pre-load). Cardiac markers in such as CK-MB, LDH and alterations in ECG. Dox administration showed alteration in Biochemical parameters and endogenous antioxidants. Administration of OA Showed maximal protection against Dox induced cardiac toxicity as observed by reduction in blood pressure, prevention of left ventricular function and attenuation of biochemical and antioxidant parameters. Based on the findings, its concluded that OA can be used as an adjuvant with Dox therapy in treating cancers. PMID:27069540

  3. Complex patterns of abnormal heartbeats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulte-Frohlinde, Verena; Ashkenazy, Yosef; Goldberger, Ary L.; Ivanov, Plamen Ch; Costa, Madalena; Morley-Davies, Adrian; Stanley, H. Eugene; Glass, Leon

    2002-01-01

    Individuals having frequent abnormal heartbeats interspersed with normal heartbeats may be at an increased risk of sudden cardiac death. However, mechanistic understanding of such cardiac arrhythmias is limited. We present a visual and qualitative method to display statistical properties of abnormal heartbeats. We introduce dynamical "heartprints" which reveal characteristic patterns in long clinical records encompassing approximately 10(5) heartbeats and may provide information about underlying mechanisms. We test if these dynamics can be reproduced by model simulations in which abnormal heartbeats are generated (i) randomly, (ii) at a fixed time interval following a preceding normal heartbeat, or (iii) by an independent oscillator that may or may not interact with the normal heartbeat. We compare the results of these three models and test their limitations to comprehensively simulate the statistical features of selected clinical records. This work introduces methods that can be used to test mathematical models of arrhythmogenesis and to develop a new understanding of underlying electrophysiologic mechanisms of cardiac arrhythmia.

  4. Deletion of Pr130 Interrupts Cardiac Development in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jie; Li, Zuhua; Gan, Xuedong; Zhai, Gang; Gao, Jiajia; Xiong, Chenling; Qiu, Xueping; Wang, Xuebin; Yin, Zhan; Zheng, Fang

    2016-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 2 regulatory subunit B, alpha (PPP2R3A), a regulatory subunit of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), is a major serine/threonine phosphatase that regulates crucial function in development and growth. Previous research has implied that PPP2R3A was involved in heart failure, and PR130, the largest transcription of PPP2R3A, functioning in the calcium release of sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR), plays an important role in the excitation-contraction (EC) coupling. To obtain a better understanding of PR130 functions in myocardium and cardiac development, two pr130-deletion zebrafish lines were generated using clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated proteins (Cas) system. Pr130-knockout zebrafish exhibited cardiac looping defects and decreased cardiac function (decreased fractional area and fractional shortening). Hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining demonstrated reduced cardiomyocytes. Subsequent transmission electron microscopy revealed that the bright and dark bands were narrowed and blurred, the Z- and M-lines were fogged, and the gaps between longitudinal myocardial fibers were increased. Additionally, increased apoptosis was observed in cardiomyocyte in pr130-knockout zebrafish compared to wild-type (WT). Taken together, our results suggest that pr130 is required for normal myocardium formation and efficient cardiac contractile function. PMID:27845735

  5. Cardiovascular Development and the Colonizing Cardiac Neural Crest Lineage

    PubMed Central

    Snider, Paige; Olaopa, Michael; Firulli, Anthony B.

    2008-01-01

    Although it is well established that transgenic manipulation of mammalian neural crest-related gene expression and microsurgical removal of premigratory chicken and Xenopus embryonic cardiac neural crest progenitors results in a wide spectrum of both structural and functional congenital heart defects, the actual functional mechanism of the cardiac neural crest cells within the heart is poorly understood. Neural crest cell migration and appropriate colonization of the pharyngeal arches and outflow tract septum is thought to be highly dependent on genes that regulate cell-autonomous polarized movement (i.e., gap junctions, cadherins, and noncanonical Wnt1 pathway regulators). Once the migratory cardiac neural crest subpopulation finally reaches the heart, they have traditionally been thought to participate in septation of the common outflow tract into separate aortic and pulmonary arteries. However, several studies have suggested these colonizing neural crest cells may also play additional unexpected roles during cardiovascular development and may even contribute to a crest-derived stem cell population. Studies in both mice and chick suggest they can also enter the heart from the venous inflow as well as the usual arterial outflow region, and may contribute to the adult semilunar and atrioventricular valves as well as part of the cardiac conduction system. Furthermore, although they are not usually thought to give rise to the cardiomyocyte lineage, neural crest cells in the zebrafish (Danio rerio) can contribute to the myocardium and may have different functions in a species-dependent context. Intriguingly, both ablation of chick and Xenopus premigratory neural crest cells, and a transgenic deletion of mouse neural crest cell migration or disruption of the normal mammalian neural crest gene expression profiles, disrupts ventral myocardial function and/or cardiomyocyte proliferation. Combined, this suggests that either the cardiac neural crest secrete factor/s that

  6. X Chromosome Abnormalities and Cognitive Development: Implications for Understanding Normal Human Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walzer, Stanley

    1985-01-01

    Argues that knowledge from studies of individuals with sex chromosome abnormalities can further understanding of aspects of normal human development. Studies of XO girls, XXY boys, XXX girls, and males with a fragile X chromosome are summarized to demonstrate how results contribute to knowledge about normal cognitive development and about…

  7. Abnormal Canine Bone Development Associated with Hypergravity Exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, J. P.; Fisher, G. L.; McNeill, K. L.; Oyama, J.

    1979-01-01

    Chronic centrifugation of 85- to 92-day-old Beagles at 2.0 x g and 2.6 x g for 26 weeks during the time of active skeletal growth caused skeletal abnormalities in the radius and the ulna of ten of 11 dogs. The pattern of change mimicked that found in naturally occurring and experimentally induced premature distal ulnar physeal closure or delayed growth at this physis. Minimal changes in bone density were detected by sensitive photon absorptiometric techniques. Skeletal abnormalities also were found in five of the six cage-control dogs, although the run-control dogs were radiographically normal.

  8. The Role of Late INa in Development of Cardiac Arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Antzelevitch, Charles; Nesterenko, Vladislav; Shryock, John C.; Rajamani, Sridharan; Song, Yejia; Belardinelli, Luiz

    2014-01-01

    Late INa is an integral part of the sodium current, which persists long after the fast-inactivating component. The magnitude of the late INa is relatively small in all species and in all types of cardiomyocytes as compared with the amplitude of the fast sodium current, but it contributes significantly to the shape and duration of the action potential. This late component had been shown to increase in several acquired or congenital conditions, including hypoxia, oxidative stress, and heart failure, or due to mutations in SCN5A, which encodes the α-subunit of the sodium channel, as well as in channel-interacting proteins, including multiple β subunits and anchoring proteins. Patients with enhanced late INa exhibit the type-3 long QT syndrome (LQT3) characterized by high propensity for the life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias, such as Torsade de Pointes (TdP), as well as for atrial fibrillation. There are several distinct mechanisms of arrhythmogenesis due to abnormal late INa, including abnormal automaticity, early and delayed afterdepolarization-induced triggered activity, and dramatic increase of ventricular dispersion of repolarization. Many local anesthetic and antiarrhythmic agents have a higher potency to block late INa as compared with fast INa. Several novel compounds, including ranolazine, GS-458967, and F15845, appear to be the most selective inhibitors of cardiac late INa reported to date. Selective inhibition of late INa is expected to be an effective strategy for correcting these acquired and congenital channelopathies. PMID:24737235

  9. Development of Abnormality Detection System for Bathers using Ultrasonic Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohnishi, Yosuke; Abe, Takehiko; Nambo, Hidetaka; Kimura, Haruhiko; Ogoshi, Yasuhiro

    This paper proposes an abnormality detection system for bather sitting in bathtub. Increasing number of in-bathtub drowning accidents in Japan draws attention. Behind this large number of bathing accidents, Japan's unique social and cultural background come surface. For majority of people in Japan, bathing serves purpose in deep warming up of body, relax and enjoyable time. Therefore it is the custom for the Japanese to soak in bathtub. However overexposure to hot water may cause dizziness or fainting, which is possible to cause in-bathtub drowning. For drowning prevention, the system detects bather's abnormal state using an ultrasonic sensor array. The array, which has many ultrasonic sensors, is installed on the ceiling of bathroom above bathtub. The abnormality detection system uses the following two methods: posture detection and behavior detection. The function of posture detection is to estimate the risk of drowning by monitoring bather's posture. Meanwhile, the function of behavior detection is to estimate the risk of drowning by monitoring bather's behavior. By using these methods, the system detects bathers' different state from normal. As a result of experiment with a subject in the bathtub, the system was possible to detect abnormal state using subject's posture and behavior. Therefore the system is useful for monitoring bather to prevent drowning in bathtub.

  10. Cardiac expression of ms1/STARS, a novel gene involved in cardiac development and disease, is regulated by GATA4.

    PubMed

    Ounzain, Samir; Kobayashi, Satoru; Peterson, Richard E; He, Aibin; Motterle, Anna; Samani, Nilesh J; Menick, Donald R; Pu, William T; Liang, Qiangrong; Chong, Nelson W

    2012-05-01

    Ms1/STARS is a novel muscle-specific actin-binding protein that specifically modulates the myocardin-related transcription factor (MRTF)-serum response factor (SRF) regulatory axis within striated muscle. This ms1/STARS-dependent regulatory axis is of central importance within the cardiac gene regulatory network and has been implicated in cardiac development and postnatal cardiac function/homeostasis. The dysregulation of ms1/STARS is associated with and causative of pathological cardiac phenotypes, including cardiac hypertrophy and cardiomyopathy. In order to gain an understanding of the mechanisms governing ms1/STARS expression in the heart, we have coupled a comparative genomic in silico analysis with reporter, gain-of-function, and loss-of-function approaches. Through this integrated analysis, we have identified three evolutionarily conserved regions (ECRs), α, SINA, and DINA, that act as cis-regulatory modules and confer differential cardiac cell-specific activity. Two of these ECRs, α and DINA, displayed distinct regulatory sensitivity to the core cardiac transcription factor GATA4. Overall, our results demonstrate that within embryonic, neonatal, and adult hearts, GATA4 represses ms1/STARS expression with the pathologically associated depletion of GATA4 (type 1/type 2 diabetic models), resulting in ms1/STARS upregulation. This GATA4-dependent repression of ms1/STARS expression has major implications for MRTF-SRF signaling in the context of cardiac development and disease.

  11. The Function of the MEF2 Family of Transcription Factors in Cardiac Development, Cardiogenomics, and Direct Reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Desjardins, Cody A.; Naya, Francisco J.

    2016-01-01

    Proper formation of the mammalian heart requires precise spatiotemporal transcriptional regulation of gene programs in cardiomyocytes. Sophisticated regulatory networks have evolved to not only integrate the activities of distinct transcription factors to control tissue-specific gene programs but also, in many instances, to incorporate multiple members within these transcription factor families to ensure accuracy and specificity in the system. Unsurprisingly, perturbations in this elaborate transcriptional circuitry can lead to severe cardiac abnormalities. Myocyte enhancer factor–2 (MEF2) transcription factor belongs to the evolutionarily conserved cardiac gene regulatory network. Given its central role in muscle gene regulation and its evolutionary conservation, MEF2 is considered one of only a few core cardiac transcription factors. In addition to its firmly established role as a differentiation factor, MEF2 regulates wide variety of, sometimes antagonistic, cellular processes such as cell survival and death. Vertebrate genomes encode multiple MEF2 family members thereby expanding the transcriptional potential of this core transcription factor in the heart. This review highlights the requirement of the MEF2 family and their orthologs in cardiac development in diverse animal model systems. Furthermore, we describe the recently characterized role of MEF2 in direct reprogramming and genome-wide cardiomyocyte gene regulation. A thorough understanding of the regulatory functions of the MEF2 family in cardiac development and cardiogenomics is required in order to develop effective therapeutic strategies to repair the diseased heart. PMID:27630998

  12. Elastogenesis at the onset of human cardiac valve development

    PubMed Central

    Votteler, Miriam; Berrio, Daniel A. Carvajal; Horke, Alexander; Sabatier, Laetitia; Reinhardt, Dieter P.; Nsair, Ali; Aikawa, Elena; Schenke-Layland, Katja

    2013-01-01

    Semilunar valve leaflets have a well-described trilaminar histoarchitecture, with a sophisticated elastic fiber network. It was previously proposed that elastin-containing fibers play a subordinate role in early human cardiac valve development; however, this assumption was based on data obtained from mouse models and human second and third trimester tissues. Here, we systematically analyzed tissues from human fetal first (4-12 weeks) and second (13-18 weeks) trimester, adolescent (14-19 years) and adult (50-55 years) hearts to monitor the temporal and spatial distribution of elastic fibers, focusing on semilunar valves. Global expression analyses revealed that the transcription of genes essential for elastic fiber formation starts early within the first trimester. These data were confirmed by quantitative PCR and immunohistochemistry employing antibodies that recognize fibronectin, fibrillin 1, 2 and 3, EMILIN1 and fibulin 4 and 5, which were all expressed at the onset of cardiac cushion formation (~week 4 of development). Tropoelastin/elastin protein expression was first detectable in leaflets of 7-week hearts. We revealed that immature elastic fibers are organized in early human cardiovascular development and that mature elastin-containing fibers first evolve in semilunar valves when blood pressure and heartbeat accelerate. Our findings provide a conceptual framework with the potential to offer novel insights into human cardiac valve development and disease. PMID:23637335

  13. Early cardiac development: a view from stem cells to embryos

    PubMed Central

    Van Vliet, Patrick; Wu, Sean M.; Zaffran, Stéphane; Pucéat, Michel

    2012-01-01

    From the 1920s, early cardiac development has been studied in chick and, later, in mouse embryos in order to understand the first cell fate decisions that drive specification and determination of the endocardium, myocardium, and epicardium. More recently, mouse and human embryonic stem cells (ESCs) have demonstrated faithful recapitulation of early cardiogenesis and have contributed significantly to this research over the past few decades. Derived almost 15 years ago, human ESCs have provided a unique developmental model for understanding the genetic and epigenetic regulation of early human cardiogenesis. Here, we review the biological concepts underlying cell fate decisions during early cardiogenesis in model organisms and ESCs. We draw upon both pioneering and recent studies and highlight the continued role for in vitro stem cells in cardiac developmental biology. PMID:22893679

  14. Abnormal cardiac function in the streptozotocin-diabetic rat. Changes in active and passive properties of the left ventricle.

    PubMed Central

    Litwin, S E; Raya, T E; Anderson, P G; Daugherty, S; Goldman, S

    1990-01-01

    To provide an integrated assessment of changes in systolic and diastolic function in diabetic rats, we measured conscious hemodynamics and performed ex vivo analysis of left ventricular passive-elastic properties. Rats given streptozotocin (STZ) 65 mg/kg i.v. (n = 14) were compared with untreated age-matched controls (n = 15) and rats treated with insulin after administration of STZ (n = 11). After 7 d, diabetic rats exhibited decreases in heart rate and peak developed left ventricular (LV) pressure during aortic occlusion. After 26 d of diabetes there were significant decreases in resting LV systolic pressure, developed pressure, and maximal +dP/dt, whereas LV end-diastolic pressure increased and the time constant of LV relaxation was prolonged. The passive LV pressure-volume relationship was progressively shifted away from the pressure axis, and the overall chamber stiffness constant was decreased. However, "operating chamber stiffness" calculated at end-diastolic pressure was increased at 7 d, and unchanged at 26 d. LV cavity/wall volume and end-diastolic volume were increased after 26 d of diabetes. Myocardial stiffness was unchanged at both time intervals. All of the above abnormalities were reversed by the administration of insulin. We conclude that the hemodynamic and passive-elastic changes that occur in diabetic rats represent an early dilated cardiomyopathy which is reversible with insulin. Images PMID:2200804

  15. Role of microRNAs in cardiac development and disease

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Jing; An, Xinjiang; Niu, Ling

    2017-01-01

    Heart disease-related deaths are the highest in most societies and congenital heart diseases account for approximately 40% of prenatal deaths and over 20% of mortality in the first few months after birth. Congenital heart disease affects approximately 1% of all newborns and is the causative factor for more deaths within the first year of life as compared to all other genetic defects. Advances in treatment approaches increased life expectancy and led to an expansion of adult population with clinical manifestation of congenital heart defects in up to 90% of the children born with congenital heart diseases. Regulation of cardiac gene expression involves multiple independent enhancers that play a critical role in maintaining a restricted and specific pattern of gene expression in the heart. Cardiac transcriptional pathways are intimately regulated by microRNAs (miRNAs), which are small, regulatory RNAs, approximately 22 nucleotides in length, also coded by specific genes. These miRNAs act as suppressors of gene expression by inhibiting translation and/or promoting degradation of target protein-coding mRNAs. There are several miRNAs involved in the development of heart and dysregulation of specific miRNAs is associated with congenital and other cardiac defects. Stress responsive cardiac hypertrophy is orchestrated among other factors, by specific miRNAs. miRNAs such as miR-499 are considered useful as biomarkers of a given heart disease. Therapeutic application of miRNAs is also envisaged considering the small size and specific effects of these molecules. In this review, we addressed different roles of miRNAs in the development and diseases of the heart. PMID:28123459

  16. [Development of the theory of cardiac innervation during ontogenesis in health and disease].

    PubMed

    Shvalev, V N

    2010-01-01

    The paper describes the mediatory stage of prenatal development of cardiac innervation and the phenomenon of early involution of sympathetic nerve plexuses in postnatality, which has been established while analyzing early autopsies by neurohistochemical studies. lmmunocytochemical, luminescence, and ultrastructural techniques have defined changes in the stages of their formation and development of the above early involution. Complex (neurohistochemical and electrophysiological) studies quantified groups of age-related cardiac innervation changes in health. Cardiac rhythm variability was electrophysiologically studied in 43 subjects aged 18-71 years. Cardiac desympathization is shown to develop after 40 years of age. Age-related changes in cardiac regulatory mechanisms should be taken into account on studying visceral systems in coronary heart disease, atherosclerosis, and sudden cardiac death, and during cardiac transplantation. Immunohistochemical study has revealed an increase in nitric oxide expression in the human cardiac nervous apparatus.

  17. Abnormal splicing in the N‐terminal variable region of cardiac troponin T impairs systolic function of the heart with preserved Frank‐Starling compensation

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Han‐Zhong; Chen, Guozhen; Nan, Changlong; Huang, Xupei; Jin, Jian‐Ping

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Abnormal splice‐out of the exon 7‐encoded segment in the N‐terminal variable region of cardiac troponin T (cTnT‐ΔE7) was found in turkeys and, together with the inclusion of embryonic exon (eTnT), in adult dogs with a correlation with dilated cardiomyopathy. Overexpression of these cTnT variants in transgenic mouse hearts significantly decreased cardiac function. To further investigate the functional effect of cTnT‐ΔE7 or ΔE7+eTnT in vivo under systemic regulation, echocardiography was carried out in single and double‐transgenic mice. No atrial enlargement, ventricular hypertrophy or dilation was detected in the hearts of 2‐month‐old cTnT‐ΔE7 and ΔE7+eTnT mice in comparison to wild‐type controls, indicating a compensated state. However, left ventricular fractional shortening and ejection fraction were decreased in ΔE7 and ΔE7+eTnT mice, and the response to isoproterenol was lower in ΔE7+eTnT mice. Left ventricular outflow tract velocity and gradient were decreased in the transgenic mouse hearts, indicating decreased systolic function. Ex vivo working heart function showed that high afterload or low preload resulted in more severe decreases in the systolic function and energetic efficiency of cTnT‐ΔE7 and ΔE7+eTnT hearts. On the other hand, increases in preload demonstrated preserved Frank‐Starling responses and minimized the loss of cardiac function and efficiency. The data demonstrate that the N‐terminal variable region of cardiac TnT regulates systolic function of the heart. PMID:25194024

  18. Abnormal splicing in the N-terminal variable region of cardiac troponin T impairs systolic function of the heart with preserved Frank-Starling compensation.

    PubMed

    Feng, Han-Zhong; Chen, Guozhen; Nan, Changlong; Huang, Xupei; Jin, Jian-Ping

    2014-09-01

    Abnormal splice-out of the exon 7-encoded segment in the N-terminal variable region of cardiac troponin T (cTnT-ΔE7) was found in turkeys and, together with the inclusion of embryonic exon (eTnT), in adult dogs with a correlation with dilated cardiomyopathy. Overexpression of these cTnT variants in transgenic mouse hearts significantly decreased cardiac function. To further investigate the functional effect of cTnT-ΔE7 or ΔE7+eTnT in vivo under systemic regulation, echocardiography was carried out in single and double-transgenic mice. No atrial enlargement, ventricular hypertrophy or dilation was detected in the hearts of 2-month-old cTnT-ΔE7 and ΔE7+eTnT mice in comparison to wild-type controls, indicating a compensated state. However, left ventricular fractional shortening and ejection fraction were decreased in ΔE7 and ΔE7+eTnT mice, and the response to isoproterenol was lower in ΔE7+eTnT mice. Left ventricular outflow tract velocity and gradient were decreased in the transgenic mouse hearts, indicating decreased systolic function. Ex vivo working heart function showed that high afterload or low preload resulted in more severe decreases in the systolic function and energetic efficiency of cTnT-ΔE7 and ΔE7+eTnT hearts. On the other hand, increases in preload demonstrated preserved Frank-Starling responses and minimized the loss of cardiac function and efficiency. The data demonstrate that the N-terminal variable region of cardiac TnT regulates systolic function of the heart.

  19. Smyd3 is required for the development of cardiac and skeletal muscle in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Tomoaki; Tsunesumi, Shin-ichiro; Yamaguchi, Kiyoshi; Watanabe, Sumiko; Furukawa, Yoichi

    2011-01-01

    Modifications of histone tails are involved in the regulation of a wide range of biological processes including cell cycle, cell survival, cell division, and cell differentiation. Among the modifications, histone methylation plays a critical role in cardiac and skeletal muscle differentiation. In our earlier studies, we found that SMYD3 has methyltransferase activity to histone H3 lysine 4, and that its up-regulation is involved in the tumorigenesis of human colon, liver, and breast. To clarify the role of Smyd3 in development, we have studied its expression patterns in zebrafish embryos and the effect of its suppression on development using Smyd3-specific antisense morpholino-oligonucleotides. We here show that transcripts of smyd3 were expressed in zebrafish embryos at all developmental stages examined and that knockdown of smyd3 in embryos resulted in pericardial edema and defects in the trunk structure. In addition, these phenotypes were associated with abnormal expression of three heart-chamber markers including cmlc2, amhc and vmhc, and abnormal expression of myogenic regulatory factors including myod and myog. These data suggest that Smyd3 plays an important role in the development of heart and skeletal muscle.

  20. Abnormal ventricular development in preterm neonates with visually normal MRIs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Jie; Wang, Yalin; Lao, Yi; Ceschin, Rafael; Mi, Liang; Nelson, Marvin D.; Panigrahy, Ashok; Leporé, Natasha

    2015-12-01

    Children born preterm are at risk for a wide range of neurocognitive and neurobehavioral disorders. Some of these may stem from early brain abnormalities at the neonatal age. Hence, a precise characterization of neonatal neuroanatomy may help inform treatment strategies. In particular, the ventricles are often enlarged in neurocognitive disorders, due to atrophy of surrounding tissues. Here we present a new pipeline for the detection of morphological and relative pose differences in the ventricles of premature neonates compared to controls. To this end, we use a new hyperbolic Ricci flow based mapping of the ventricular surfaces of each subjects to the Poincaré disk. Resulting surfaces are then registered to a template, and a between group comparison is performed using multivariate tensor-based morphometry. We also statistically compare the relative pose of the ventricles within the brain between the two groups, by performing a Procrustes alignment between each subject's ventricles and an average shape. For both types of analyses, differences were found in the left ventricles between the two groups.

  1. Developing cardiac and skeletal muscle share fast-skeletal myosin heavy chain and cardiac troponin-I expression.

    PubMed

    Clause, Kelly C; Tchao, Jason; Powell, Mary C; Liu, Li J; Huard, Johnny; Keller, Bradley B; Tobita, Kimimasa

    2012-01-01

    Skeletal muscle derived stem cells (MDSCs) transplanted into injured myocardium can differentiate into fast skeletal muscle specific myosin heavy chain (sk-fMHC) and cardiac specific troponin-I (cTn-I) positive cells sustaining recipient myocardial function. We have recently found that MDSCs differentiate into a cardiomyocyte phenotype within a three-dimensional gel bioreactor. It is generally accepted that terminally differentiated myocardium or skeletal muscle only express cTn-I or sk-fMHC, respectively. Studies have shown the presence of non-cardiac muscle proteins in the developing myocardium or cardiac proteins in pathological skeletal muscle. In the current study, we tested the hypothesis that normal developing myocardium and skeletal muscle transiently share both sk-fMHC and cTn-I proteins. Immunohistochemistry, western blot, and RT-PCR analyses were carried out in embryonic day 13 (ED13) and 20 (ED20), neonatal day 0 (ND0) and 4 (ND4), postnatal day 10 (PND10), and 8 week-old adult female Lewis rat ventricular myocardium and gastrocnemius muscle. Confocal laser microscopy revealed that sk-fMHC was expressed as a typical striated muscle pattern within ED13 ventricular myocardium, and the striated sk-fMHC expression was lost by ND4 and became negative in adult myocardium. cTn-I was not expressed as a typical striated muscle pattern throughout the myocardium until PND10. Western blot and RT-PCR analyses revealed that gene and protein expression patterns of cardiac and skeletal muscle transcription factors and sk-fMHC within ventricular myocardium and skeletal muscle were similar at ED20, and the expression patterns became cardiac or skeletal muscle specific during postnatal development. These findings provide new insight into cardiac muscle development and highlight previously unknown common developmental features of cardiac and skeletal muscle.

  2. Constitutive phosphorylation of cardiac myosin regulatory light chain prevents development of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Chen-Ching; Muthu, Priya; Kazmierczak, Katarzyna; Liang, Jingsheng; Huang, Wenrui; Irving, Thomas C.; Kanashiro-Takeuchi, Rosemeire M.; Hare, Joshua M.; Szczesna-Cordary, Danuta

    2015-06-29

    Myosin light chain kinase (MLCK)-dependent phosphorylation of the regulatory light chain (RLC) of cardiac myosin is known to play a beneficial role in heart disease, but the idea of a phosphorylation-mediated reversal of a hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) phenotype is novel. Our previous studies on transgenic (Tg) HCM-RLC mice revealed that the D166V (Aspartate166 →Valine) mutation-induced changes in heart morphology and function coincided with largely reduced RLC phosphorylation in situ. In this paper, we hypothesized that the introduction of a constitutively phosphorylated Serine15 (S15D) into the hearts of D166V mice would prevent the development of a deleterious HCM phenotype. In support of this notion, MLCK-induced phosphorylation of D166V-mutated hearts was found to rescue some of their abnormal contractile properties. Tg-S15D-D166V mice were generated with the human cardiac RLC-S15D-D166V construct substituted for mouse cardiac RLC and were subjected to functional, structural, and morphological assessments. The results were compared with Tg-WT and Tg-D166V mice expressing the human ventricular RLC-WT or its D166V mutant, respectively. Echocardiography and invasive hemodynamic studies demonstrated significant improvements of intact heart function in S15D-D166V mice compared with D166V, with the systolic and diastolic indices reaching those monitored in WT mice. A largely reduced maximal tension and abnormally high myofilament Ca2+ sensitivity observed in D166V-mutated hearts were reversed in S15D-D166V mice. Low-angle X-ray diffraction study revealed that altered myofilament structures present in HCM-D166V mice were mitigated in S15D-D166V rescue mice. Finally, our collective results suggest that expression of pseudophosphorylated RLC in the hearts of HCM mice is sufficient to prevent the development of the pathological HCM phenotype.

  3. Constitutive phosphorylation of cardiac myosin regulatory light chain prevents development of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in mice

    DOE PAGES

    Yuan, Chen-Ching; Muthu, Priya; Kazmierczak, Katarzyna; ...

    2015-06-29

    Myosin light chain kinase (MLCK)-dependent phosphorylation of the regulatory light chain (RLC) of cardiac myosin is known to play a beneficial role in heart disease, but the idea of a phosphorylation-mediated reversal of a hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) phenotype is novel. Our previous studies on transgenic (Tg) HCM-RLC mice revealed that the D166V (Aspartate166 →Valine) mutation-induced changes in heart morphology and function coincided with largely reduced RLC phosphorylation in situ. In this paper, we hypothesized that the introduction of a constitutively phosphorylated Serine15 (S15D) into the hearts of D166V mice would prevent the development of a deleterious HCM phenotype. In supportmore » of this notion, MLCK-induced phosphorylation of D166V-mutated hearts was found to rescue some of their abnormal contractile properties. Tg-S15D-D166V mice were generated with the human cardiac RLC-S15D-D166V construct substituted for mouse cardiac RLC and were subjected to functional, structural, and morphological assessments. The results were compared with Tg-WT and Tg-D166V mice expressing the human ventricular RLC-WT or its D166V mutant, respectively. Echocardiography and invasive hemodynamic studies demonstrated significant improvements of intact heart function in S15D-D166V mice compared with D166V, with the systolic and diastolic indices reaching those monitored in WT mice. A largely reduced maximal tension and abnormally high myofilament Ca2+ sensitivity observed in D166V-mutated hearts were reversed in S15D-D166V mice. Low-angle X-ray diffraction study revealed that altered myofilament structures present in HCM-D166V mice were mitigated in S15D-D166V rescue mice. Finally, our collective results suggest that expression of pseudophosphorylated RLC in the hearts of HCM mice is sufficient to prevent the development of the pathological HCM phenotype.« less

  4. The role of cardiac fibroblasts in extracellular matrix-mediated signaling during normal and pathological cardiac development.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Kelly Elizabeth; Black, Lauren Deems

    2013-07-01

    The extracellular matrix is no longer considered a static support structure for cells but a dynamic signaling network with the power to influence cell, tissue, and whole organ physiology. In the myocardium, cardiac fibroblasts are the primary cell type responsible for the synthesis, deposition, and degradation of matrix proteins, and they therefore play a critical role in the development and maintenance of functional heart tissue. This review will summarize the extensive research conducted in vivo and in vitro, demonstrating the influence of both physical and chemical stimuli on cardiac fibroblasts and how these interactions impact both the extracellular matrix and, by extension, cardiomyocytes. This work is of considerable significance, given that cardiovascular diseases are marked by extensive remodeling of the extracellular matrix, which ultimately impairs the functional capacity of the heart. We seek to summarize the unique role of cardiac fibroblasts in normal cardiac development and the most prevalent cardiac pathologies, including congenital heart defects, hypertension, hypertrophy, and the remodeled heart following myocardial infarction. We will conclude by identifying existing holes in the research that, if answered, have the potential to dramatically improve current therapeutic strategies for the repair and regeneration of damaged myocardium via mechanotransductive signaling.

  5. Anatomy and development of the cardiac lymphatic vasculature: Its role in injury and disease.

    PubMed

    Norman, Sophie; Riley, Paul R

    2016-04-01

    Lymphatic vessels are present throughout the entire body in all mammals and function to regulate tissue fluid balance, lipid transport and survey the immune system. Despite the presence of an extensive lymphatic plexus within the heart, until recently the importance of the cardiac lymphatic vasculature and its origins were unknown. Several studies have described the basic anatomy of the developing cardiac lymphatic vasculature and more recently the detailed development of the murine cardiac lymphatics has been documented, with important insight into their cellular sources during embryogenesis. In this review we initially describe the development of systemic lymphatic vasculature, to provide the background for a comparative description of the spatiotemporal development of the cardiac lymphatic vessels, including detail of both canonical, typically venous, and noncanonical (hemogenic endothelium) cellular sources. Subsequently, we address the response of the cardiac lymphatic network to myocardial infarction (heart attack) and the therapeutic potential of targeting cardiac lymphangiogenesis.

  6. Cardiac tissue development for delivery of embryonic stem cell-derived endothelial and cardiac cells in natural matrices.

    PubMed

    Turner, William S; Wang, Xiaoling; Johnson, Scott; Medberry, Christopher; Mendez, Jose; Badylak, Stephen F; McCord, Marian G; McCloskey, Kara E

    2012-11-01

    The packaging and delivery of cells for cardiac regeneration has been explored using a variety biomaterials and delivery methods, but these studies often ignore one or more important design factors critical for rebuilding cardiac tissue. These include the biomaterial architecture, strength and stiffness, cell alignment, and/or incorporation of multiple cell types. In this article, we explore the combinatorial use of decellularized tissues, moldable hydrogels, patterned cell-seeding, and cell-sheet engineering and find that a combination of these methods is optimal in the recreation of transplantable cardiac-like tissue in vivo. We show that decellularized urinary bladder matrix (UBM), that is compliant and suturable, supports the survival of cell cultures but does not allow maintenance of cell-to-cell contacts of transferred cell-sheets (presumably, due to its rough surface). Moreover, the UBM material must be filled with hyaluronan (HA) hydrogels for smoothing rough surfaces and allowing the delivery of greater cell numbers. We additionally incorporated our previously developed "wrinkled" microchip for inducing alignment of cardiac cells with a laser-etched mask for co-seeding patterned "channels" of cells. This article also introduces a novel method of plasma coating for cell-sheet engineering that compares well with electron bean irradiation methods and may be combined with our "wrinkled" surfaces to facilitate the alignment of cardiac cells into sheets. Our data shows that an optimal design for generating cardiac tissue would include (1) decellularized matrix seeded with endothelial cells in a HA layered with (2) prealigned cardiac cell-sheets fabricated using our "wrinkled" microchips and thermo-responsive polymer [poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)] cell sheet transfer system.

  7. [Heritability and environment in normal and abnormal development].

    PubMed

    Lejarraga, Horacio

    2010-12-01

    The environmental influence on human development can be studied by assessing similarities and discrepancies in developmental traits between biological and adopted siblings and twins, reared together and reared apart. Approximately 50% of total variance of general cognitive ability in a given population can be explained by the environment. This influence gradually decreases with age, from infancy to adulthood. Two types of environments can be distinguished: shared and non shared. The former one, acts predominantly in childhood, and the non shared environment becomes more important in adulthood. Paradoxically, quantitative genetics can make a significant contribution to knowledge on the influence of environment on human development.

  8. Association of interatrial septal abnormalities with cardiac impulse conduction disorders in adult patients: experience from a tertiary center in Kosovo

    PubMed Central

    Bakalli, Aurora; Pllana, Ejup; Koçinaj, Dardan; Bekteshi, Tefik; Dragusha, Gani; Gashi, Masar; Musliu, Nebih; Gashi, Zaim

    2011-01-01

    Interatrial septal disorders, which include: atrial septal defect, patent foramen ovale and atrial septal aneurysm, are frequent congenital anomalies found in adult patients. Early detection of these anomalies is important to prevent their hemodynamic and/or thromboembolic consequences. The aims of this study were: to assess the association between impulse conduction disorders and anomalies of interatrial septum; to determine the prevalence of different types of interatrial septum abnormalities; to assess anatomic, hemodynamic, and clinical consequences of interatrial septal pathologies. Fifty-three adult patients with impulse conduction disorders and patients without ECG changes but with signs of interatrial septal abnormalities, who were referred to our center for echocardiography, were included in a prospective transesophageal echocardiography study. Interatrial septal anomalies were detected in around 85% of the examined patients. Patent foramen ovale was encountered in 32% of the patients, and in combination with atrial septal aneurysm in an additional 11.3% of cases. Atrial septal aneurysm and atrial septal defect were diagnosed with equal frequency in 20.7% of our study population. Impulse conduction disorders were significantly more suggestive of interatrial septal anomalies than clinical signs and symptoms observed in our patients (84.91% vs 30.19%, P=0.002). Right bundle branch block was the most frequent impulse conduction disorder, found in 41 (77.36%) cases. We conclude that interatrial septal anomalies are highly associated with impulse conduction disorders, particularly with right bundle branch block. Impulse conduction disorders are more indicative of interatrial septal abnormalities in earlier stages than can be understood from the patient’s clinical condition. PMID:21977304

  9. [Development and importance of outpatient cardiac rehabilitation in German-speaking countries].

    PubMed

    Benzer, W

    2014-07-01

    competition between inpatient and outpatient programs but provide answers to the question "which patient needs which program?" Future cardiac rehabilitation will offer patient-tailored programs. In German-speaking countries inpatient cardiac rehabilitation has long been well established whereas treatment potential of outpatient programs have increased. Outpatient cardiac rehabilitation is more flexible, close to home and it can be done part-time. Furhtermore, outpatient cardiac rehabilitation programs can take on important tasks in long-term cardiac care and thus provide relief to inpatient programs. The initiation of such programs is a challenge and can add to better future development of comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation.

  10. HCG stimulation test in children with abnormal sexual development.

    PubMed Central

    Grant, D B; Laurance, B M; Atherden, S M; Ryness, J

    1976-01-01

    Plasma testosterone was estimated by radioimmunoassay in 60 children with disorders of sexual development before and after stimulation with human chorionic gonadotrophin (HCG). In 21 children the testosterone levels after 3 and 5 daily injections of 1000 units HCG were compared and good correlation was found between the paired results (r =0-93), suggesting that the 5-day HCG test has no advantage over the 3-day test. In 7 boys with apparently normal genital development the increments in plasma testosterone ranged from 2-0 to 8-5 nmol/1 after 3 injections of HCG. 10 boys with anorchia showed little response to HCG stimulation, but in patients with other disorders, such as micropenis (10), cryptorchidism (8), hermaphroditism (3), male pseudohermaphroditism (13), hypospadias (3), and sex chromosome anomalies (6), there was considerable variation in the plasma testosterone level after HCG. In 2 boys with suspected anorchia the results suggested that testes were present and this was confirmed at operation. PMID:9030

  11. Severe asthma with markedly increased asbestos of 2 types & TXB2, and markedly reduced acetylcholine, DHEA & drug uptake in parts of upper lungs, & similar abnormalities at respiratory & cardiac center of medulla oblongata: complete elimination of this asthma within 15 days using one optimal dose of astragalus & application of strong red light & EMF neutralizer on respiratory centers of abnormal medulla oblongata.

    PubMed

    Omura, Yoshiaki; Henoch, Avraham; Shimotsuura, Yasuhira; Duvvi, Harsha; Kawashima, Hiroshi; Ohki, Motomu

    2009-01-01

    When the window of an Asbestos-contaminated room from a broken ceiling was opened wide, A 73 year-old male physician of Oriental origin, who was sitting in the next room, suddenly developed a severe asthma attack, which did not stop by the use of a hand-held Albuterol inhaler. Temporary relief was obtained only by using a Compressor-Nebulizer (Inspiration 626 with Albuterol Sulfate Inhalation Solution 0.083%). During the attack, abnormal areas were discovered at the upper lobes of both lungs, where Thromboxane B2 (TXB2) was markedly increased to 500 ng (BDORT units) (the rest of the lung had about 2.5 ng), 2 types of Asbestos (Chrysotile and Crocidolite) were abnormally increased to 0.120-0.135 mg, (BDORT units) Acetylcholine was markedly reduced to 0.5 ng (the rest of the lung was low, about 100 ng), DHEA was extremely reduced to 1 ng (the rest of the lung had about 52 ng), and telomere was less than 1 yg (= 10(-24) g). Bacterial & viral infections were also present in these abnormal areas, but no antibiotics entered the abnormal parts of the lungs. Therefore, one optimal dose of Astragalus was given once, which resulted in a rapid continuous excretion of large amounts of the above 2 types of Asbestos & TXB2 in urine & sputum, and Asthma symptoms reduced slightly in severity. Additional acupuncture & shiatsu given on all the known acupuncture points for lung disease only created slight, temporary improvement. Then, the respiratory & cardiac center of the Medulla Oblongata was found to have similar abnormalities as the lungs. Therefore, 100 mW output of Light Emitting Diode of red spectra (650 nm center spectrum) was projected on the abnormal area of the medulla oblongata on the back of the head. This resulted drug uptake of on and off and significantly reduced difficulty of breathing. Additional application of the EMF Neutralizer on the abnormal area of the Medulla Oblongata for 3 hours resulted in continuous drug uptake and complete disappearance of asthma. As a

  12. Molecular and immunohistochemical analyses of cardiac troponin T during cardiac development in the Mexican axolotl, Ambystoma mexicanum.

    PubMed

    Zhang, C; Pietras, K M; Sferrazza, G F; Jia, P; Athauda, G; Rueda-de-Leon, E; Rveda-de-Leon, E; Maier, J A; Dube, D K; Lemanski, S L; Lemanski, L F

    2007-01-01

    The Mexican axolotl, Ambystoma mexicanum, is an excellent animal model for studying heart development because it carries a naturally occurring recessive genetic mutation, designated gene c, for cardiac nonfunction. The double recessive mutants (c/c) fail to form organized myofibrils in the cardiac myoblasts resulting in hearts that fail to beat. Tropomyosin expression patterns have been studied in detail and show dramatically decreased expression in the hearts of homozygous mutant embryos. Because of the direct interaction between tropomyosin and troponin T (TnT), and the crucial functions of TnT in the regulation of striated muscle contraction, we have expanded our studies on this animal model to characterize the expression of the TnT gene in cardiac muscle throughout normal axolotl development as well as in mutant axolotls. In addition, we have succeeded in cloning the full-length cardiac troponin T (cTnT) cDNA from axolotl hearts. Confocal microscopy has shown a substantial, but reduced, expression of TnT protein in the mutant hearts when compared to normal during embryonic development.

  13. Gene Coexpression Network Topology of Cardiac Development, Hypertrophy, and Failure

    PubMed Central

    Dewey, Frederick E.; Perez, Marco V.; Wheeler, Matthew T.; Watt, Clifton; Spin, Joshua; Langfelder, Peter; Horvath, Stephen; Hannenhalli, Sridhar; Cappola, Thomas P.; Ashley, Euan A.

    2011-01-01

    Background Network analysis techniques allow a more accurate reflection of underlying systems biology to be realized than traditional unidimensional molecular biology approaches. Here, using gene coexpression network analysis, we define the gene expression network topology of cardiac hypertrophy and failure and the extent of recapitulation of fetal gene expression programs in failing and hypertrophied adult myocardium. Methods and Results We assembled all myocardial transcript data in the Gene Expression Omnibus (n = 1617). Since hierarchical analysis revealed species had primacy over disease clustering, we focused this analysis on the most complete (murine) dataset (n = 478). Using gene coexpression network analysis, we derived functional modules, regulatory mediators and higher order topological relationships between genes and identified 50 gene co-expression modules in developing myocardium that were not present in normal adult tissue. We found that known gene expression markers of myocardial adaptation were members of upregulated modules but not hub genes. We identified ZIC2 as a novel transcription factor associated with coexpression modules common to developing and failing myocardium. Of 50 fetal gene co-expression modules, three (6%) were reproduced in hypertrophied myocardium and seven (14%) were reproduced in failing myocardium. One fetal module was common to both failing and hypertrophied myocardium. Conclusions Network modeling allows systems analysis of cardiovascular development and disease. While we did not find evidence for a global coordinated program of fetal gene expression in adult myocardial adaptation, our analysis revealed specific gene expression modules active during both development and disease and specific candidates for their regulation. PMID:21127201

  14. Cardiac Sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Birnie, David; Ha, Andrew C T; Gula, Lorne J; Chakrabarti, Santabhanu; Beanlands, Rob S B; Nery, Pablo

    2015-12-01

    Studies suggest clinically manifest cardiac involvement occurs in 5% of patients with pulmonary/systemic sarcoidosis. The principal manifestations of cardiac sarcoidosis (CS) are conduction abnormalities, ventricular arrhythmias, and heart failure. Data indicate that an 20% to 25% of patients with pulmonary/systemic sarcoidosis have asymptomatic (clinically silent) cardiac involvement. An international guideline for the diagnosis and management of CS recommends that patients be screened for cardiac involvement. Most studies suggest a benign prognosis for patients with clinically silent CS. Immunosuppression therapy is advocated for clinically manifest CS. Device therapy, with implantable cardioverter defibrillators, is recommended for some patients.

  15. A Brief History of the Development of Abnormal Psychology: A Training Guide. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phelps, William R.

    Presented for practitioners is a history of the development of abnormal psychology. Areas covered include the following: Early medical concepts, ideas carried over from literature, early treatment of the mentally ill, development of the psychological viewpoint, Freud's psychoanalytic theory, Jung's analytic theory, the individual psychology of…

  16. Pharmacotherapy in the cardiac catheterization laboratory: evolution and recent developments

    PubMed Central

    Thind, Guramrinder S; Parida, Raunak; Gupta, Nishant

    2014-01-01

    Many recent innovations have been made in developing new antiplatelet and anticoagulant drugs in the last few years, with a total of nine new antithrombotic drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration after the year 2000. This has revolutionized the medical therapy given to manage acute coronary syndrome and support cardiac catheterization. The concept of dual antiplatelet therapy has been emphasized, and clopidogrel has emerged as the most-popular second antiplatelet drug after aspirin. Newer P2Y12 inhibitors like prasugrel and ticagrelor have been extensively studied and compared to clopidogrel. The role of glycoprotein (Gp) IIb/IIIa inhibitors is being redefined. Other alternatives to unfractionated heparin have become available, of which enoxaparin and bivalirudin have been studied the most. Apart from these, many more drugs with novel therapeutic targets are being studied and are currently under development. In this review, current evidence on these drugs is presented and analyzed in a way that would facilitate decision making for the clinician. For this analysis, various high-impact clinical trials, pharmacological studies, meta-analyses, and reviews were accessed through the MEDLINE database. Adopting a unique interdisciplinary approach, an attempt has been made to integrate pharmacological and clinical evidence to better understand and appreciate the pros and cons of each of these classes of drugs. PMID:25364258

  17. Disorders of sexual development and abnormal early development in domestic food-producing mammals: the role of chromosome abnormalities, environment and stress factors.

    PubMed

    Favetta, L A; Villagómez, D A F; Iannuzzi, L; Di Meo, G; Webb, A; Crain, S; King, W A

    2012-01-01

    The management of disorders of sexual development (DSD) in humans and domestic animals has been the subject of intense interest for decades. The association between abnormal chromosome constitutions and DSDs in domestic animals has been recorded since the beginnings of conventional cytogenetic analysis. Deviated karyotypes consisting of abnormal sex chromosome sets and/or the coexistence of cells with different sex chromosome constitutions in an individual seem to be the main causes of anomalies of sex determination and sex differentiation. In recent years, a growing interest has developed around the environmental insults, such as endocrine-disrupting compounds (EDC) and heat stressors, which affect fertility, early embryonic development and, in some instances, directly the sex ratio and/or the development of 1 specific sex versus the other. A variety of chemical compounds present in the environment at low doses has been shown to have major effects on the reproductive functions in human and domestic animals following prolonged exposure. In this review, we present an overview of congenital/chromosomal factors that are responsible for the DSDs and link them and the lack of proper embryonic development to environmental factors that are becoming a major global concern.

  18. Postnatal lethality and abnormal development of foregut and spleen in Ndrg4 mutant mice

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Xianghu; Li, Jing; Baldwin, H. Scott

    2016-01-01

    NDRG4 is a member of the NDRG family (N-myc downstream-regulated gene), which is highly expressed in brain and heart. Previous studies showed that Ndrg1-deficient mice exhibited a progressive demyelinating disorder of peripheral nerves and Ndrg4-deficient mice had spatial learning deficits and vulnerabilities to cerebral ischemia. Here, we report generation of Ndrg4 mutant alleles that exhibit several development defects different from those previously reported. Our homozygous mice showed growth retardation and postnatal lethality. Spleen and thymuses of Ndrg4−/− mice are considerably reduced in size from 3 weeks of age. Histological analysis revealed abnormal hyperkeratosis in the squamous foregut and abnormal loss of erythrocytes in the spleen of Ndrg4−/− mice. In addition, we observed an abnormal hind limb clasping phenotype upon tail suspension suggesting neurological abnormalities. Consistent to these abnormalities, Ndrg4 is expressed in smooth muscle cells of the stomach, macrophages of the spleen and neurons. Availability of the conditional allele for Ndrg4 should facilitate further detailed analyses of the potential roles of Ndrg4 in gut development, nervous system and immune system. PMID:26801554

  19. Abnormal development of the lesser wing of the sphenoid with microphthalmos and microcephaly.

    PubMed

    Jacquemin, C; Mullaney, P; Bosley, T M

    2001-02-01

    We report two patients with abnormal development of the lesser wing of the sphenoid bone, globe, optic nerve and cerebral hemisphere without stigmata of neurofibromatosis type 1. The lesser wing of the sphenoid bone was abnormally formed and was not ossified ipsilateral to the dysmorphic eye and underdeveloped cerebral hemisphere. Maldevelopment of the sphenoid wing may interfere with the normal closure of the optic vesicle and normal growth of encephalic structures, possibly by disturbing developmental tissue interactions. These patients may exhibit a type of restricted primary sphenoid dysplasia, while the sphenoid dysplasia of neurofibromatosis type 1 may be secondary to orbital or ocular neurofibromas and other factors associated with that disease.

  20. Disturbance in Maternal Environment Leads to Abnormal Synaptic Instability during Neuronal Circuitry Development

    PubMed Central

    Hatanaka, Yusuke; Kabuta, Tomohiro; Wada, Keiji

    2017-01-01

    Adverse maternal environment during gestation and lactation can have negative effects on the developing brain that persist into adulthood and result in behavioral impairment. Recent studies of human and animal models suggest epidemiological and experimental association between disturbances in maternal environments during brain development and the occurrence of neuropsychiatric disorders, including autism spectrum disorder, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, schizophrenia, anxiety, depression, and neurodegenerative diseases. In this review, we summarize recent advances in understanding the effects of maternal metabolic and hormonal abnormalities on the developing brain by focusing on the dynamics of dendritic spine, an excitatory postsynaptic structure. We discuss the abnormal instability of dendritic spines that is common to developmental disorders and neurological diseases. We also introduce our recent studies that demonstrate how maternal obesity and hyperandrogenism leads to abnormal development of neuronal circuitry and persistent synaptic instability, which results in the loss of synapses. The aim of this review is to highlight the links between abnormal maternal environment, behavioral impairment in offspring, and the dendiric spine pathology of neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:28220059

  1. Disturbance in Maternal Environment Leads to Abnormal Synaptic Instability during Neuronal Circuitry Development.

    PubMed

    Hatanaka, Yusuke; Kabuta, Tomohiro; Wada, Keiji

    2017-01-01

    Adverse maternal environment during gestation and lactation can have negative effects on the developing brain that persist into adulthood and result in behavioral impairment. Recent studies of human and animal models suggest epidemiological and experimental association between disturbances in maternal environments during brain development and the occurrence of neuropsychiatric disorders, including autism spectrum disorder, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, schizophrenia, anxiety, depression, and neurodegenerative diseases. In this review, we summarize recent advances in understanding the effects of maternal metabolic and hormonal abnormalities on the developing brain by focusing on the dynamics of dendritic spine, an excitatory postsynaptic structure. We discuss the abnormal instability of dendritic spines that is common to developmental disorders and neurological diseases. We also introduce our recent studies that demonstrate how maternal obesity and hyperandrogenism leads to abnormal development of neuronal circuitry and persistent synaptic instability, which results in the loss of synapses. The aim of this review is to highlight the links between abnormal maternal environment, behavioral impairment in offspring, and the dendiric spine pathology of neuropsychiatric disorders.

  2. Abnormal development of the cerebral cortex and cerebellum in the setting of lamin B2 deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Coffinier, Catherine; Chang, Sandy Y.; Nobumori, Chika; Tu, Yiping; Farber, Emily A.; Toth, Julia I.; Fong, Loren G.; Young, Stephen G.

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear lamins are components of the nuclear lamina, a structural scaffolding for the cell nucleus. Defects in lamins A and C cause an array of human diseases, including muscular dystrophy, lipodystrophy, and progeria, but no diseases have been linked to the loss of lamins B1 or B2. To explore the functional relevance of lamin B2, we generated lamin B2-deficient mice and found that they have severe brain abnormalities resembling lissencephaly, with abnormal layering of neurons in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum. This neuronal layering abnormality is due to defective neuronal migration, a process that is dependent on the organized movement of the nucleus within the cell. These studies establish an essential function for lamin B2 in neuronal migration and brain development. PMID:20145110

  3. The abnormal phosphorylation of tau protein at Ser-202 in Alzheimer disease recapitulates phosphorylation during development.

    PubMed

    Goedert, M; Jakes, R; Crowther, R A; Six, J; Lübke, U; Vandermeeren, M; Cras, P; Trojanowski, J Q; Lee, V M

    1993-06-01

    Tau is a neuronal phosphoprotein whose expression is developmentally regulated. A single tau isoform is expressed in fetal human brain but six isoforms are expressed in adult brain, with the fetal isoform corresponding to the shortest of the adult isoforms. Phosphorylation of tau is also developmentally regulated, as fetal tau is phosphorylated at more sites than adult tau. In Alzheimer disease, the six adult tau isoforms become abnormally phosphorylated and form the paired helical filament, the major fibrous component of the characteristic neurofibrillary lesions. We show here that Ser-202 (in the numbering of the longest human brain tau isoform) is a phosphorylation site that distinguishes fetal from adult tau and we identify it as one of the abnormal phosphorylation sites in Alzheimer disease. The abnormal phosphorylation of tau at Ser-202 in Alzheimer disease thus recapitulates normal phosphorylation during development.

  4. Understanding normal and abnormal development of the Wolffian/epididymal duct by using transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    Murashima, Aki; Xu, Bingfang; Hinton, Barry T

    2015-01-01

    The development of the Wolffian/epididymal duct is crucial for proper function and, therefore, male fertility. The development of the epididymis is complex; the initial stages form as a transient embryonic kidney; then the mesonephros is formed, which in turn undergoes extensive morphogenesis under the influence of androgens and growth factors. Thus, understanding of its full development requires a wide and multidisciplinary view. This review focuses on mouse models that display abnormalities of the Wolffian duct and mesonephric development, the importance of these mouse models toward understanding male reproductive tract development, and how these models contribute to our understanding of clinical abnormalities in humans such as congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT). PMID:26112482

  5. Cardiac thrombus developing after an accidental high-voltage electric shock in a child.

    PubMed

    Akın, Alper; Bilici, Meki; Demir, Fikri; Gözü Pirinççioğlu, Ayfer; Yavuz, Celal

    2015-01-01

    Electric shock is a condition that may affect various organ systems and potentially cause death. Cardiac findings vary from asymptomatic mild injury to fatal myocardial involvement. Herein we present a five-year-old boy with a cardiac thrombus developing after an accidental electrical shock. Cardiac arrhythmias and evidence of ischemia have been reported after electric shock; we were, however, unable to identify an earlier case report of intracardiac thrombosis related to electric shock. Findings such as elevated cardiac enzymes and systolic dysfunction, which indicate myocardial damage following electric shock, were present in our patient. We think that the cardiac thrombus might have resulted from the myocardial damage and the slowed intracardiac blood flow related to systolic dysfunction. As the thrombus was thought to have been formed through known mechanisms, it was treated traditionally. However, further data regarding the etiology and management of such thrombi is needed.

  6. Development of new anatomy reconstruction software to localize cardiac isochrones to the cardiac surface from the 12 lead ECG.

    PubMed

    van Dam, Peter M; Gordon, Jeffrey P; Laks, Michael M; Boyle, Noel G

    2015-01-01

    Non-invasive electrocardiographic imaging (ECGI) of the cardiac muscle can help the pre-procedure planning of the ablation of ventricular arrhythmias by reducing the time to localize the origin. Our non-invasive ECGI system, the cardiac isochrone positioning system (CIPS), requires non-intersecting meshes of the heart, lungs and torso. However, software to reconstruct the meshes of the heart, lungs and torso with the capability to check and prevent these intersections is currently lacking. Consequently the reconstruction of a patient specific model with realistic atrial and ventricular wall thickness and incorporating blood cavities, lungs and torso usually requires additional several days of manual work. Therefore new software was developed that checks and prevents any intersections, and thus enables the use of accurate reconstructed anatomical models within CIPS. In this preliminary study we investigated the accuracy of the created patient specific anatomical models from MRI or CT. During the manual segmentation of the MRI data the boundaries of the relevant tissues are determined. The resulting contour lines are used to automatically morph reference meshes of the heart, lungs or torso to match the boundaries of the morphed tissue. Five patients were included in the study; models of the heart, lungs and torso were reconstructed from standard cardiac MRI images. The accuracy was determined by computing the distance between the segmentation contours and the morphed meshes. The average accuracy of the reconstructed cardiac geometry was within 2mm with respect to the manual segmentation contours on the MRI images. Derived wall volumes and left ventricular wall thickness were within the range reported in literature. For each reconstructed heart model the anatomical heart axis was computed using the automatically determined anatomical landmarks of the left apex and the mitral valve. The accuracy of the reconstructed heart models was well within the accuracy of the used

  7. New developments in paediatric cardiac functional ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    de Korte, Chris L; Nillesen, Maartje M; Saris, Anne E C M; Lopata, Richard G P; Thijssen, Johan M; Kapusta, Livia

    2014-07-01

    Ultrasound imaging can be used to estimate the morphology as well as the motion and deformation of tissues. If the interrogated tissue is actively deforming, this deformation is directly related to its function and quantification of this deformation is normally referred as 'strain imaging'. Tissue can also be deformed by applying an internal or external force and the resulting, induced deformation is a function of the mechanical tissue characteristics. In combination with the load applied, these strain maps can be used to estimate or reconstruct the mechanical properties of tissue. This technique was named 'elastography' by Ophir et al. in 1991. Elastography can be used for atherosclerotic plaque characterisation, while the contractility of the heart or skeletal muscles can be assessed with strain imaging. Rather than using the conventional video format (DICOM) image information, radio frequency (RF)-based ultrasound methods enable estimation of the deformation at higher resolution and with higher precision than commercial methods using Doppler (tissue Doppler imaging) or video image data (2D speckle tracking methods). However, the improvement in accuracy is mainly achieved when measuring strain along the ultrasound beam direction, so it has to be considered a 1D technique. Recently, this method has been extended to multiple directions and precision further improved by using spatial compounding of data acquired at multiple beam steered angles. Using similar techniques, the blood velocity and flow can be determined. RF-based techniques are also beneficial for automated segmentation of the ventricular cavities. In this paper, new developments in different techniques of quantifying cardiac function by strain imaging, automated segmentation, and methods of performing blood flow imaging are reviewed and their application in paediatric cardiology is discussed.

  8. Autoantibodies and Cardiac Arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hon-Chi; Huang, Kristin T. L.; Wang, Xiao-Li; Shen, Win-Kuang

    2013-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases are associated with significant morbidity and mortality, afflicting about 5% of the population of the United States. They encompass a wide range of disorders that affect all organs of the human body and have a predilection for women. In the past, autoimmune pathogenesis was not thought to be a major mechanism for cardiovascular disorders, and potential relationships remain understudied. However, accumulating evidence suggests that a number of vascular and cardiac conditions are autoimmune-mediated. Recent studies indicate that autoantibodies play an important role in the development of cardiac arrhythmias, including atrial fibrillation, modulation of autonomic influences on heart rate and rhythm, conduction system abnormalities, and ventricular arrhythmias. This manuscript will review the current evidence for the role of autoantibodies in the development of cardiac arrhythmias. PMID:21740882

  9. Normal and abnormal development of pulmonary veins: state of the art and correlation with clinical entities.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Yvonne L; Jongbloed, Monique R M; Deruiter, Marco C; Gittenberger-de Groot, Adriana C

    2011-02-17

    Interest for the pulmonary veins has increased in the past decade after the potential arrhythmogenicity of the myocardial sleeve surrounding these structures has been recognized. Furthermore, there are several clinical entities, such as anomalous connection pattern and pulmonary vein stenosis, that are related to abnormal pulmonary vein development. In this review, we will describe current literature and aim to elucidate and reorganize current opinions on normal and abnormal pulmonary vein development in relation to clinical (management of) diseases. Several unresolved questions will be addressed, as well as current conceptual controversies. First, a general overview of development of structures at the venous pole of the heart, including normal development of the pulmonary vein from a primitive Anlage, will be provided. Recent insights indicate an important contributory role of the mesoderm behind the heart, the so-called second heart field, to this area. Subsequently, the formation of a myocardial and smooth muscle vascular wall of the pulmonary veins and the left atrium is described, as well as current insights in the mechanisms involved in the differentiation of these different cell types in this area. Next, developmental concepts of normal pulmonary venous drainage patterns are reviewed, and an overview is provided of clinical entities related to abnormal development at several anatomical levels. Lastly, attention is paid to arrhythmogenesis in relation to pulmonary vein development, as well the consequences for clinical management.

  10. Serum Levels of Tissue Inhibitors of Metalloproteinase 2 in Patients With Systemic Sclerosis With Duration More Than 2 Years: Correlation With Cardiac and Pulmonary Abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Shahin, Amira; Elsawaf, Amani; Ramadan, Shahira; Shaker, Olfat; Amin, Mona; Taha, Mohamed

    2006-01-01

    In this study, we measured the serum concentration of TIMP-2 in patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc) and explored its possible correlation with cardiac and pulmonary lesions. We studied 42 patients with SSc, with duration equal to or more than 2 years. CT chest, ECG, echocardiography, and serum TIMP-2 concentration measurement using ELISA technique were performed in all patients and in 25 normal controls. The mean serum levels of TIMP-2 in patients was higher than in controls (P = .005). The mean CT score of dSSc patients with elevated TIMP-2 levels was significantly higher than dSSc patients with normal levels (P = .013). Four patients out of five with elevated TIMP-2 levels showed diastolic dysfunction (80%), compared to 2 out of 15 lSSc patients with normal levels (13.3%), with P = .014. Our research, though involving a small group of patients, points to the probable role of TIMP-2 in the development of pulmonary lesions in dSSc patients and cardiac lesions in lSSc patients with duration equal to or more than 2 years. PMID:17392585

  11. Radiofrequency Coils and Pulse Sequences for Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Applications: New Perspectives and Future Developments.

    PubMed

    Giovannetti, Giulio; De Marchi, Daniele; Pingitore, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) is a relevant diagnostic tool for the evaluation of cardiac morphology, function, and mass. The assessment of myocardial tissue content through the measurement of longitudinal (T1) and transversal (T2) relaxation properties and the development of different technical advances are important clinical novelties of CMR. Recently, magnetic resonance spectroscopy has been explored for the assessment of the metabolic state of tissue for cardiac function evaluation by using nuclei other than protons, such as (13)C and (23)Na, expanding our knowledge of the kinetics of metabolic processes. The design and development of dedicated radiofrequency coils and pulse sequences are fundamental to maximizing signal-to-noise ratio data while achieving faster cardiac examination. This review highlights the new technical developments in CMR sequences and coils.

  12. Cranial index of children with normal and abnormal brain development in Sokoto, Nigeria: A comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Musa, Muhammad Awwal; Zagga, Abdullahi Daudu; Danfulani, Mohammed; Tadros, Aziz Abdo; Ahmed, Hamid

    2014-01-01

    Background: Abnormal brain development due to neurodevelopmental disorders in children has always been an important concern, but yet has to be considered as a significant public health problem, especially in the low- and middle-income countries including Nigeria. Aims: The aim of this study is to determine whether abnormal brain development in the form of neurodevelopmental disorders causes any deviation in the cranial index of affected children. Materials and Methods: This is a comparative study on the head length, head width, and cranial index of 112 children (72 males and 40 females) diagnosed with at least one abnormal problem in brain development, in the form of a neurodevelopmental disorder (NDD), in comparison with that of 218 normal growing children without any form of NDD (121 males and 97 females), aged 0-18 years old seen at the Usmanu Danfodiyo University Teaching Hospital, Sokoto, over a period of six months, June to December, 2012. The head length and head width of the children was measured using standard anatomical landmarks and cranial index calculated. The data obtained was entered into the Microsoft excel worksheet and analyzed using SPSS version 17. Results: The mean Cephalic Index for normal growing children with normal brain development was 79.82 ± 3.35 and that of the children with abnormal brain development was 77.78 ± 2.95 and the difference between the two groups was not statistically significant (P > 0.05). Conclusion: It can be deduced from this present study that the cranial index does not change in children with neurodevelopmental disorders. PMID:24966551

  13. The development of Akabane virus-induced congenital abnormalities in cattle.

    PubMed

    Kirkland, P D; Barry, R D; Harper, P A; Zelski, R Z

    1988-06-11

    A prospective study of the incidence and severity of congenital deformities of calves, attributable to maternal infection by Akabane virus, was carried out on a population of 174 susceptible animals that were between one and nine months pregnant at the time of infection. The study was carried out in the Hunter Valley of New South Wales during 1983, after an epidemic of Akabane virus infection in late February to early March 1983. The incidence of virus-induced abnormalities in calves and fetuses was 17.8 per cent (31/174). The highest incidence of abnormalities occurred during the third and sixth months of gestation (27 to 29 per cent). The earliest abnormality was observed after infection at 76 days of gestation, and the last after infection at 249 days. The development of the pathological entities of hydranencephaly/porencephaly and arthrogryposis were found to be quite distinct. Cases of hydranencephaly and porencephaly developed after infection between 76 and 104 days of gestation whereas arthrogryposis developed after infection between 103 and 174 days of infection. It was concluded that the type of congenital deformity produced by maternal infection with Akabane virus was dependent on the stage of fetal development at the time of infection. The data suggest that the infection was transplacental and that fetuses of less than two months of age were protected from infection.

  14. mTOR signaling and its roles in normal and abnormal brain development.

    PubMed

    Takei, Nobuyuki; Nawa, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    Target of rapamycin (TOR) was first identified in yeast as a target molecule of rapamycin, an anti-fugal and immunosuppressant macrolide compound. In mammals, its orthologue is called mammalian TOR (mTOR). mTOR is a serine/threonine kinase that converges different extracellular stimuli, such as nutrients and growth factors, and diverges into several biochemical reactions, including translation, autophagy, transcription, and lipid synthesis among others. These biochemical reactions govern cell growth and cause cells to attain an anabolic state. Thus, the disruption of mTOR signaling is implicated in a wide array of diseases such as cancer, diabetes, and obesity. In the central nervous system, the mTOR signaling cascade is activated by nutrients, neurotrophic factors, and neurotransmitters that enhances protein (and possibly lipid) synthesis and suppresses autophagy. These processes contribute to normal neuronal growth by promoting their differentiation, neurite elongation and branching, and synaptic formation during development. Therefore, disruption of mTOR signaling may cause neuronal degeneration and abnormal neural development. While reduced mTOR signaling is associated with neurodegeneration, excess activation of mTOR signaling causes abnormal development of neurons and glia, leading to brain malformation. In this review, we first introduce the current state of molecular knowledge of mTOR complexes and signaling in general. We then describe mTOR activation in neurons, which leads to translational enhancement, and finally discuss the link between mTOR and normal/abnormal neuronal growth during development.

  15. Targeted deletion of Hand2 in cardiac neural crest-derived cells influences cardiac gene expression and outflow tract development

    PubMed Central

    Holler, Kristen L.; Hendershot, Tyler J.; Troy, Sophia E.; Vincentz, Joshua W.; Firulli, Anthony B.; Howard, Marthe J.

    2010-01-01

    The basic helix-loop-helix DNA binding protein Hand2 has critical functions in cardiac development both in neural crest-derived and mesoderm-derived structures. Targeted deletion of Hand2 in the neural crest has allowed us to genetically dissect Hand2-dependent defects specifically in outflow tract and cardiac cushion independent of Hand2 functions in mesoderm-derived structures. Targeted deletion of Hand2 in the neural crest results in misalignment of the aortic arch arteries and outflow tract, contributing to development of double outlet right ventricle (DORV) and ventricular septal defects (VSD). These neural crest-derived developmental anomalies are associated with altered expression of Hand2-target genes we have identified by gene profiling. A number of Hand2 direct target genes have been identified using ChIP and ChIP-on-chip analyses. We have identified and validated a number of genes related to cell migration, proliferation/cell cycle and intracellular signaling whose expression is affected by Hand2 deletion in the neural crest and which are associated with development of VSD and DORV. Our data suggest that Hand2 is a multifunctional DNA binding protein affecting expression of target genes associated with a number of functional interactions in neural crest-derived cells required for proper patterning of the outflow tract, generation of the appropriate number of neural crest-derived cells for elongation of the conotruncus and cardiac cushion organization. Our genetic model has made it possible to investigate the molecular genetics of neural crest contributions to outflow tract morphogenesis and cell differentiation. PMID:20144608

  16. Development of Bipotent Cardiac/Skeletal Myogenic Progenitors from MESP1+ Mesoderm.

    PubMed

    Chan, Sunny Sun-Kin; Hagen, Hannah R; Swanson, Scott A; Stewart, Ron; Boll, Karly A; Aho, Joy; Thomson, James A; Kyba, Michael

    2016-01-12

    The branchiomeric skeletal muscles co-evolved with new chambers of the heart to enable predatory feeding in chordates. These co-evolved tissues develop from a common population in anterior splanchnic mesoderm, referred to as cardiopharyngeal mesoderm (CPM). The regulation and development of CPM are poorly understood. We describe an embryonic stem cell-based system in which MESP1 drives a PDGFRA+ population with dual cardiac and skeletal muscle differentiation potential, and gene expression resembling CPM. Using this system, we investigate the regulation of these bipotent progenitors, and find that cardiac specification is governed by an antagonistic TGFβ-BMP axis, while skeletal muscle specification is enhanced by Rho kinase inhibition. We define transcriptional signatures of the first committed CPM-derived cardiac and skeletal myogenic progenitors, and discover surface markers to distinguish cardiac (PODXL+) from the skeletal muscle (CDH4+) CPM derivatives. These tools open an accessible window on this developmentally and evolutionarily important population.

  17. Functional importance of cardiac enhancer-associated noncoding RNAs in heart development and disease

    SciTech Connect

    Ounzain, Samir; Pezzuto, Iole; Micheletti, Rudi; Burdet, Frédéric; Sheta, Razan; Nemir, Mohamed; Gonzales, Christine; Sarre, Alexandre; Alexanian, Michael; Blow, Matthew J.; May, Dalit; Johnson, Rory; Dauvillier, Jérôme; Pennacchio, Len A.; Pedrazzini, Thierry

    2014-08-19

    We report here that the key information processing units within gene regulatory networks are enhancers. Enhancer activity is associated with the production of tissue-specific noncoding RNAs, yet the existence of such transcripts during cardiac development has not been established. Using an integrated genomic approach, we demonstrate that fetal cardiac enhancers generate long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) during cardiac differentiation and morphogenesis. Enhancer expression correlates with the emergence of active enhancer chromatin states, the initiation of RNA polymerase II at enhancer loci and expression of target genes. Orthologous human sequences are also transcribed in fetal human hearts and cardiac progenitor cells. Through a systematic bioinformatic analysis, we identified and characterized, for the first time, a catalog of lncRNAs that are expressed during embryonic stem cell differentiation into cardiomyocytes and associated with active cardiac enhancer sequences. RNA-sequencing demonstrates that many of these transcripts are polyadenylated, multi-exonic long noncoding RNAs. Moreover, knockdown of two enhancer-associated lncRNAs resulted in the specific downregulation of their predicted target genes. Interestingly, the reactivation of the fetal gene program, a hallmark of the stress response in the adult heart, is accompanied by increased expression of fetal cardiac enhancer transcripts. Altogether, these findings demonstrate that the activity of cardiac enhancers and expression of their target genes are associated with the production of enhancer-derived lncRNAs.

  18. Functional importance of cardiac enhancer-associated noncoding RNAs in heart development and disease

    DOE PAGES

    Ounzain, Samir; Pezzuto, Iole; Micheletti, Rudi; ...

    2014-08-19

    We report here that the key information processing units within gene regulatory networks are enhancers. Enhancer activity is associated with the production of tissue-specific noncoding RNAs, yet the existence of such transcripts during cardiac development has not been established. Using an integrated genomic approach, we demonstrate that fetal cardiac enhancers generate long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) during cardiac differentiation and morphogenesis. Enhancer expression correlates with the emergence of active enhancer chromatin states, the initiation of RNA polymerase II at enhancer loci and expression of target genes. Orthologous human sequences are also transcribed in fetal human hearts and cardiac progenitor cells. Throughmore » a systematic bioinformatic analysis, we identified and characterized, for the first time, a catalog of lncRNAs that are expressed during embryonic stem cell differentiation into cardiomyocytes and associated with active cardiac enhancer sequences. RNA-sequencing demonstrates that many of these transcripts are polyadenylated, multi-exonic long noncoding RNAs. Moreover, knockdown of two enhancer-associated lncRNAs resulted in the specific downregulation of their predicted target genes. Interestingly, the reactivation of the fetal gene program, a hallmark of the stress response in the adult heart, is accompanied by increased expression of fetal cardiac enhancer transcripts. Altogether, these findings demonstrate that the activity of cardiac enhancers and expression of their target genes are associated with the production of enhancer-derived lncRNAs.« less

  19. 42 CFR 37.54 - Notification of abnormal radiographic findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., abnormality of cardiac shape or size, tuberculosis, lung cancer, or any other significant abnormal findings... shape or size, tuberculosis, cancer, complicated pneumoconiosis, and any other significant...

  20. Abnormal development of Purkinje cells and lymphocytes in Atm mutant mice

    PubMed Central

    Borghesani, Paul R.; Alt, Frederick W.; Bottaro, Andrea; Davidson, Laurie; Aksoy, Saime; Rathbun, Gary A.; Roberts, Thomas M.; Swat, Wojciech; Segal, Rosalind A.; Gu, Yansong

    2000-01-01

    Motor incoordination, immune deficiencies, and an increased risk of cancer are the characteristic features of the hereditary disease ataxia–telangiectasia (A-T), which is caused by mutations in the ATM gene. Through gene targeting, we have generated a line of Atm mutant mice, Atmy/y mice. In contrast to other Atm mutant mice, Atmy/y mice show a lower incidence of thymic lymphoma and survive beyond a few months of age. Atmy/y mice exhibit deficits in motor learning indicative of cerebellar dysfunction. Even though we found no gross cerebellar degeneration in older Atmy/y animals, ectopic and abnormally differentiated Purkinje cells were apparent in mutant mice of all ages. These findings establish that some neuropathological abnormalities seen in A-T patients also are present in Atm mutant mice. In addition, we report a previously unrecognized effect of Atm deficiency on development or maintenance of CD4+8+ thymocytes. We discuss these findings in the context of the hypothesis that abnormal development of Purkinje cells and lymphocytes contributes to the pathogenesis of A-T. PMID:10716718

  1. Mild hypothermia during global cardiac ischemia opens a window of opportunity to develop heart donation after cardiac death.

    PubMed

    Stadelmann, Mathieu; Dornbierer, Monika; Clément, David; Gahl, Brigitta; Dick, Florian; Carrel, Thierry P; Tevaearai, Hendrik T; Longnus, Sarah

    2013-03-01

    Although heart donation after cardiac death (DCD) could greatly improve graft availability, concerns regarding warm ischemic damage typically preclude transplantation. Improving tolerance to warm ischemia may thus open a window of opportunity for DCD hearts. We investigated the hypothesis that, compared with normothermia, mild hypothermia (32° C) initiated after ischemic onset improves cardiac functional recovery upon reperfusion. Isolated, working hearts from adult, male Wistar rats underwent global, no-flow ischemia, and reperfusion (n = 28). After ischemic onset, temperature was maintained at either 37° C for 20 or 30 min or reduced to 32° C for 40, 50, or 60 min. Recovery was measured after 60-min reperfusion. Following normothermic ischemia, recovery of rate-pressure product (RPP; per cent of preischemic value) was almost complete after 20-min ischemia (97 ± 9%), whereas no recovery was detectable after 30-min ischemia. After mildly hypothermic ischemia (32° C), RPP also recovered well after 40 min (86 ± 4%). Markers of metabolism and necrosis were similar in 37° C/20 min and 32° C/40 min groups. Simple reduction in cardiac temperature by a few degrees after the onset of global ischemia dramatically prolongs the interval during which the heart remains resistant to functional deterioration. Preservation of hemodynamic function is associated with improved metabolic recovery and reduced necrosis. The application of mild hypothermia may be a simple first step towards development of clinical protocols for DCD heart recovery.

  2. The development of hepatic stellate cells in normal and abnormal human fetuses – an immunohistochemical study

    PubMed Central

    Loo, Christine K C; Pereira, Tamara N; Pozniak, Katarzyna N; Ramsing, Mette; Vogel, Ida; Ramm, Grant A

    2015-01-01

    The precise embryological origin and development of hepatic stellate cells is not established. Animal studies and observations on human fetuses suggest that they derive from posterior mesodermal cells that migrate via the septum transversum and developing diaphragm to form submesothelial cells beneath the liver capsule, which give rise to mesenchymal cells including hepatic stellate cells. However, it is unclear if these are similar to hepatic stellate cells in adults or if this is the only source of stellate cells. We have studied hepatic stellate cells by immunohistochemistry, in developing human liver from autopsies of fetuses with and without malformations and growth restriction, using cellular Retinol Binding Protein-1 (cRBP-1), Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein (GFAP), and α-Smooth Muscle Actin (αSMA) antibodies, to identify factors that influence their development. We found that hepatic stellate cells expressing cRBP-1 are present from the end of the first trimester of gestation and reduce in density throughout gestation. They appear abnormally formed and variably reduced in number in fetuses with abnormal mesothelial Wilms Tumor 1 (WT1) function, diaphragmatic hernia and in ectopic liver nodules without mesothelium. Stellate cells showed similarities to intravascular cells and their presence in a fetus with diaphragm agenesis suggests they may be derived from circulating stem cells. Our observations suggest circulating stem cells as well as mesothelium can give rise to hepatic stellate cells, and that they require normal mesothelial function for their development. PMID:26265759

  3. Mechanoregulation of cardiac myofibroblast differentiation: implications for cardiac fibrosis and therapy.

    PubMed

    Yong, Kar Wey; Li, YuHui; Huang, GuoYou; Lu, Tian Jian; Safwani, Wan Kamarul Zaman Wan; Pingguan-Murphy, Belinda; Xu, Feng

    2015-08-15

    Cardiac myofibroblast differentiation, as one of the most important cellular responses to heart injury, plays a critical role in cardiac remodeling and failure. While biochemical cues for this have been extensively investigated, the role of mechanical cues, e.g., extracellular matrix stiffness and mechanical strain, has also been found to mediate cardiac myofibroblast differentiation. Cardiac fibroblasts in vivo are typically subjected to a specific spatiotemporally changed mechanical microenvironment. When exposed to abnormal mechanical conditions (e.g., increased extracellular matrix stiffness or strain), cardiac fibroblasts can undergo myofibroblast differentiation. To date, the impact of mechanical cues on cardiac myofibroblast differentiation has been studied both in vitro and in vivo. Most of the related in vitro research into this has been mainly undertaken in two-dimensional cell culture systems, although a few three-dimensional studies that exist revealed an important role of dimensionality. However, despite remarkable advances, the comprehensive mechanisms for mechanoregulation of cardiac myofibroblast differentiation remain elusive. In this review, we introduce important parameters for evaluating cardiac myofibroblast differentiation and then discuss the development of both in vitro (two and three dimensional) and in vivo studies on mechanoregulation of cardiac myofibroblast differentiation. An understanding of the development of cardiac myofibroblast differentiation in response to changing mechanical microenvironment will underlie potential targets for future therapy of cardiac fibrosis and failure.

  4. Induction of antibodies reactive to cardiac myosin and development of heart alterations in cruzipain-immunized mice and their offspring.

    PubMed

    Giordanengo, L; Maldonado, C; Rivarola, H W; Iosa, D; Girones, N; Fresno, M; Gea, S

    2000-11-01

    Human and murine infection with Trypanosoma cruzi parasite is usually accompanied by strong humoral and cellular immune response to cruzipain, a parasite immunodominant antigen. In the present study we report that the immunization of mice with cruzipain devoid of enzymatic activity, was able to induce antibodies which bind to a 223-kDa antigen from a mouse heart extract. We identified this protein as the mouse cardiac myosin heavy chain by sequencing analysis. The study of IgG isotype profile revealed the occurrence of all IgG isotypes against cruzipain and myosin. IgG1 showed the strongest reactivity against cruzipain, whereas IgG2a was the main isotype against myosin. Anti-cruzipain antibodies purified by immunoabsorption recognized the cardiac myosin heavy chain, suggesting cross-reactive epitopes between cruzipain and myosin. Autoimmune response in mice immunized with cruzipain was associated to heart conduction disturbances. In addition, ultrastructural findings revealed severe alterations of cardiomyocytes and IgG deposit on heart tissue of immunized mice. We investigated whether antibodies induced by cruzipain transferred from immunized mothers to their offsprings could alter the heart function in the pups. All IgG isotypes against cruzipain derived from transplacental crossing were detected in pups' sera. Electrocardiographic studies performed in the offsprings born to immunized mothers revealed conduction abnormalities. These results provide strong evidence for a pathogenic role of autoimmune response induced by a purified T. cruzi antigen in the development of experimental Chagas' disease.

  5. [Cardiac manifestations of mitochondrial diseases].

    PubMed

    Ritzenthaler, Thomas; Luis, David; Hullin, Thomas; Fayssoil, Abdallah

    2015-05-01

    Mitochondrial diseases are multi-system disorders in relation with mitochondrial DNA and/or nuclear DNA abnormalities. Clinical pictures are heterogeneous, involving endocrine, cardiac, neurologic or sensory systems. Cardiac involvements are morphological and electrical disturbances. Prognosis is worsened in case of cardiac impairment. Treatments are related to the type of cardiac dysfunction including medication or pacemaker implantation.

  6. A mechanical model predicts morphological abnormalities in the developing human brain.

    PubMed

    Budday, Silvia; Raybaud, Charles; Kuhl, Ellen

    2014-07-10

    The developing human brain remains one of the few unsolved mysteries of science. Advancements in developmental biology, neuroscience, and medical imaging have brought us closer than ever to understand brain development in health and disease. However, the precise role of mechanics throughout this process remains underestimated and poorly understood. Here we show that mechanical stretch plays a crucial role in brain development. Using the nonlinear field theories of mechanics supplemented by the theory of finite growth, we model the human brain as a living system with a morphogenetically growing outer surface and a stretch-driven growing inner core. This approach seamlessly integrates the two popular but competing hypotheses for cortical folding: axonal tension and differential growth. We calibrate our model using magnetic resonance images from very preterm neonates. Our model predicts that deviations in cortical growth and thickness induce morphological abnormalities. Using the gyrification index, the ratio between the total and exposed surface area, we demonstrate that these abnormalities agree with the classical pathologies of lissencephaly and polymicrogyria. Understanding the mechanisms of cortical folding in the developing human brain has direct implications in the diagnostics and treatment of neurological disorders, including epilepsy, schizophrenia, and autism.

  7. A mechanical model predicts morphological abnormalities in the developing human brain

    PubMed Central

    Budday, Silvia; Raybaud, Charles; Kuhl, Ellen

    2014-01-01

    The developing human brain remains one of the few unsolved mysteries of science. Advancements in developmental biology, neuroscience, and medical imaging have brought us closer than ever to understand brain development in health and disease. However, the precise role of mechanics throughout this process remains underestimated and poorly understood. Here we show that mechanical stretch plays a crucial role in brain development. Using the nonlinear field theories of mechanics supplemented by the theory of finite growth, we model the human brain as a living system with a morphogenetically growing outer surface and a stretch-driven growing inner core. This approach seamlessly integrates the two popular but competing hypotheses for cortical folding: axonal tension and differential growth. We calibrate our model using magnetic resonance images from very preterm neonates. Our model predicts that deviations in cortical growth and thickness induce morphological abnormalities. Using the gyrification index, the ratio between the total and exposed surface area, we demonstrate that these abnormalities agree with the classical pathologies of lissencephaly and polymicrogyria. Understanding the mechanisms of cortical folding in the developing human brain has direct implications in the diagnostics and treatment of neurological disorders, including epilepsy, schizophrenia, and autism. PMID:25008163

  8. Genetic analysis of abnormal male sexual development in Aedes aegypti and Ae. mascarensis backcross progeny.

    PubMed

    Hilburn, L R; Rai, K S

    1982-01-01

    When male hybrids of Aedes aegypti females and A. mascarensis males were backcrossed to A. aegypti females, 32.8 percent of the male progeny exhibited abnormal sexual development, including failure of the terminalia to rotate, a split sternite of the eighth abdominal segment with partially duplicated telomeres, or feminization that gives rise to sterile intersexes. Observations made on three morphological marker loci and five isozyme loci with characteristic electromorphs in the two parental species suggested that when the sex-determining M locus is derived from A. mascarensis and the chromosome regions including s, LDH, and lDH2 on chromosome 2 and blt and 6PGD on chromosome 3 are homozygous for genes from A. aegypti, the frequency of abnormal sexual development is increased. An even greater percentage of males suffer aberrant development if recombination also occurs between the M and re locus of chromosome 1. The data suggest that genes on chromosome 2 control normal development of the male terminalia, genes on chromosome 3 control sexual differentiation, and the entire process is controlled by genes on chromosome 1 that are linked to, but not identical with, the M locus.

  9. A mechanical model predicts morphological abnormalities in the developing human brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budday, Silvia; Raybaud, Charles; Kuhl, Ellen

    2014-07-01

    The developing human brain remains one of the few unsolved mysteries of science. Advancements in developmental biology, neuroscience, and medical imaging have brought us closer than ever to understand brain development in health and disease. However, the precise role of mechanics throughout this process remains underestimated and poorly understood. Here we show that mechanical stretch plays a crucial role in brain development. Using the nonlinear field theories of mechanics supplemented by the theory of finite growth, we model the human brain as a living system with a morphogenetically growing outer surface and a stretch-driven growing inner core. This approach seamlessly integrates the two popular but competing hypotheses for cortical folding: axonal tension and differential growth. We calibrate our model using magnetic resonance images from very preterm neonates. Our model predicts that deviations in cortical growth and thickness induce morphological abnormalities. Using the gyrification index, the ratio between the total and exposed surface area, we demonstrate that these abnormalities agree with the classical pathologies of lissencephaly and polymicrogyria. Understanding the mechanisms of cortical folding in the developing human brain has direct implications in the diagnostics and treatment of neurological disorders, including epilepsy, schizophrenia, and autism.

  10. Myocardin marks the earliest cardiac gene expression and plays an important role in heart development.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian-Fu; Wang, Shusheng; Wu, Qiulian; Cao, Dongsun; Nguyen, Thiha; Chen, Yiping; Wang, Da-Zhi

    2008-10-01

    Myocardin belongs to the SAP domain family of transcription factors and is expressed specifically in cardiac and smooth muscle during embryogenesis and in adulthood. Myocardin functions as a transcriptional coactivator of SRF and is sufficient and necessary for smooth muscle gene expression. However, the in vivo function of myocardin during cardiogenesis is not completely understood. Here we clone myocardin from chick embryonic hearts and show that myocardin protein sequences are highly conserved cross species. Detailed studies of chick myocardin expression reveal that myocardin is expressed in cardiac and smooth muscle lineage during early embryogenesis, similar to that found in mouse. Interestingly, the expression of myocardin in the heart was found enriched in the outflow tract and the sinoatrial segments shortly after the formation of linear heart tube. Such expression pattern is also maintained in later developing embryos, suggesting that myocardin may play a unique role in the formation of those cardiac modules. Similar to its mouse counterpart, chick myocardin is able to activate cardiac and smooth muscle promoter reporter genes and induce smooth muscle gene expression in nonmuscle cells. Ectopic overexpression of myocardin enlarged the embryonic chick heart. Conversely, repression of the endogenous chick myocardin using antisense oligonucleotides or a dominant negative mutant form of myocardin inhibited cardiogenesis. Together, our data place myocardin as one of the earliest cardiac marker genes for cardiogenesis and support the idea that myocardin plays an essential role in cardiac gene expression and cardiogenesis.

  11. Cardiac GR and MR: From Development to Pathology.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Rachel V; Batchen, Emma J; Denvir, Martin A; Gray, Gillian A; Chapman, Karen E

    2016-01-01

    The efficacy of mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonism in the treatment of certain patients with heart failure has highlighted the pivotal role of aldosterone and MR in heart disease. The glucocorticoid (GC) receptor (GR) is also expressed in heart, but the role of cardiac GR had received much less attention until recently. GR and MR are highly homologous in both structure and function, although not in cellular readout. Recent evidence in animal models has uncovered a tonic role for GC action via GR in cardiomyocytes in prevention of heart disease. Here, we review this evidence and the implications for a balance between GR and MR activation in the early life maturation of the heart and its subsequent health and disease.

  12. Should what we know about neurobehavioral development, complex congenital heart disease, and brain maturation affect the timing of corrective cardiac surgery?

    PubMed

    DiNardo, James A

    2011-07-01

    Despite remarkable improvements in perioperative care, adverse neurobehavioral outcomes following neonatal and infant cardiac surgery are commonplace and are associated with substantial morbidity. It is becoming increasingly clear that complex congenital heart disease is associated with both abnormalities in neuroanatomic development and a delay in fetal brain maturation. Substantial cerebral ischemic/hypoxic injury has been detected in neonates with complex congenital heart disease both prior to and following corrective cardiac surgery. The brain of the neonate with complex congenital heart disease appears to be uniquely vulnerable to the types of ischemic/hypoxic injury associated with perioperative care. It remains to be determined whether delaying surgical correction to allow for brain maturation will be associated with improvements in neurobehavioral outcomes.

  13. Knockout of G protein β5 impairs brain development and causes multiple neurologic abnormalities in mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jian-Hua; Pandey, Mritunjay; Seigneur, Erica M.; Panicker, Leelamma M.; Koo, Lily; Schwartz, Owen M.; Chen, Weiping; Chen, Ching-Kang; Simonds, William F.

    2011-01-01

    Gβ5 is a divergent member of the signal-transducing G protein β subunit family encoded by GNB5 and expressed principally in brain and neuronal tissue. Among heterotrimeric Gβ isoforms, Gβ5 is unique in its ability to heterodimerize with members of the R7 subfamily of the regulator of G protein signaling (RGS) proteins that contain G protein-γ like domains. Previous studies employing Gnb5 knockout (KO) mice have shown that Gβ5 is an essential stabilizer of such RGS proteins and regulates the deactivation of retinal phototransduction and the proper functioning of retinal bipolar cells. However, little is known of the function of Gβ5 in the brain outside the visual system. We show here that mice lacking Gβ5 have a markedly abnormal neurologic phenotype that includes impaired development, tiptoe-walking, motor learning and coordination deficiencies, and hyperactivity. We further show that Gβ5-deficient mice have abnormalities of neuronal development in cerebellum and hippocampus. We find that the expression of both mRNA and protein from multiple neuronal genes is dysregulated in Gnb5 KO mice. Taken together with previous observations from Gnb5 KO mice, our findings suggest a model in which Gβ5 regulates dendritic arborization and/or synapse formation during development, in part by effects on gene expression. PMID:21883221

  14. Transcriptome Analysis for Abnormal Spike Development of the Wheat Mutant dms

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xin-Xin; Li, Qiao-Yun; Shen, Chun-Cai; Duan, Zong-Biao; Yu, Dong-Yan; Niu, Ji-Shan; Ni, Yong-Jing; Jiang, Yu-Mei

    2016-01-01

    Background Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) spike development is the foundation for grain yield. We obtained a novel wheat mutant, dms, characterized as dwarf, multi-pistil and sterility. Although the genetic changes are not clear, the heredity of traits suggests that a recessive gene locus controls the two traits of multi-pistil and sterility in self-pollinating populations of the medium plants (M), such that the dwarf genotype (D) and tall genotype (T) in the progeny of the mutant are ideal lines for studies regarding wheat spike development. The objective of this study was to explore the molecular basis for spike abnormalities of dwarf genotype. Results Four unigene libraries were assembled by sequencing the mRNAs of the super-bulked differentiating spikes and stem tips of the D and T plants. Using integrative analysis, we identified 419 genes highly expressed in spikes, including nine typical homeotic genes of the MADS-box family and the genes TaAP2, TaFL and TaDL. We also identified 143 genes that were significantly different between young spikes of T and D, and 26 genes that were putatively involved in spike differentiation. The result showed that the expression levels of TaAP1-2, TaAP2, and other genes involved in the majority of biological processes such as transcription, translation, cell division, photosynthesis, carbohydrate transport and metabolism, and energy production and conversion were significantly lower in D than in T. Conclusions We identified a set of genes related to wheat floral organ differentiation, including typical homeotic genes. Our results showed that the major causal factors resulting in the spike abnormalities of dms were the lower expression homeotic genes, hormonal imbalance, repressed biological processes, and deficiency of construction materials and energy. We performed a series of studies on the homeotic genes, however the other three causal factors for spike abnormal phenotype of dms need further study. PMID:26982202

  15. 6:2 Chlorinated polyfluorinated ether sulfonate, a PFOS alternative, induces embryotoxicity and disrupts cardiac development in zebrafish embryos.

    PubMed

    Shi, Guohui; Cui, Qianqian; Pan, Yitao; Sheng, Nan; Sun, Sujie; Guo, Yong; Dai, Jiayin

    2017-04-01

    As an alternative to perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS), 6:2 chlorinated polyfluorinated ether sulfonate (commercial name: F-53B) has been used as a mist suppressant in Chinese electroplating industries for over 30 years. It has been found in the environment and fish, and one acute assay indicated F-53B was moderately toxic. However, the toxicological information on this compound was incomplete and insufficient for assessment of their environment impact. The object of this study was to examine the developmental toxicity of F-53B using zebrafish embryos. Zebrafish embryos were incubated in 6-well plates with various concentrations of F-53B (1.5, 3, 6, and 12mg/L) from 6 to 132h post fertilization (hpf). Results showed that F-53B exposure induced developmental toxicity, including delayed hatching, increased occurrence of malformations, and reduced survival. Malformations, including pericardial and yolk sac edemas, abnormal spines, bent tails, and uninflated swim bladders, appeared at 84 hpf, and increased with time course and dose. A decrease in survival percentages was noted in the 6 and 12mg/L F-53B-treated groups at 132 hpf. Continuous exposure to 3mg/L F-53B resulted in high accumulation levels in zebrafish embryos, suggesting an inability for embryos to eliminate this compound and a high cumulative risk to fish. We also examined the cardiac function of embryos at specific developmental stages following exposure to different concentrations, and found that F-53B induced cardiac toxicity and reduced heart rate. Even under low F-53B concentration, o-dianisidine staining results showed significant decrease of relative erythrocyte number at 72 hpf before the appearance of observed effects of F-53B on the heart. To elucidate the underlying molecular changes, genes involved in normal cardiac development were analyzed using real-time qPCR in the whole-body of zebrafish embryos. F-53B inhibited the mRNA expression of β-catenin (ctnnb2) and wnt3a. The mRNA levels of

  16. Congenital Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Congenital Abnormalities Page Content Article Body About 3% to 4% ... of congenital abnormalities earlier. 5 Categories of Congenital Abnormalities Chromosome Abnormalities Chromosomes are structures that carry genetic ...

  17. In vivo imaging of cardiac development and function in zebrafish using light sheet microscopy.

    PubMed

    Weber, Michael; Huisken, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Detailed studies of heart development and function are crucial for our understanding of cardiac failures and pave the way for better diagnostics and treatment. However, the constant motion and close incorporation into the cardiovascular system prevent in vivo studies of the living, unperturbed heart. The complementary strengths of the zebrafish model and light sheet microscopy provide a useful platform to fill this gap. High-resolution images of the embryonic vertebrate heart are now recorded from within the living animal: deep inside the unperturbed heart we can follow cardiac contractions and measure action potentials and calcium transients. Three-dimensional reconstructions of the entire beating heart with cellular resolution give new insights into its ever-changing morphology and facilitate studies into how individual cells form the complex cardiac network. In addition, cardiac dynamics and robustness are now examined with targeted optical manipulation. Overall, the combination of zebrafish and light sheet microscopy represents a promising addition for cardiac research and opens the door to a better understanding of heart function and development.

  18. Mortality from congenital abnormality in Malaysia 1991-1997: the effect of economic development on death due to congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Ho, J J

    2001-06-01

    An analysis was done of available data from the Department of Statistics Malaysia, on the type of congenital abnormality contributing to death, to determine whether progress in health care over recent years was associated with any decline in mortality from congenital abnormality. A significant decline in death due to congenital abnormality was observed between 1991 and 1996. This was attributable to a decline in deaths due to congenital heart disease occurring because of improvements in cardiac surgical services for infants. In 1997 death due to congenital heart disease increased significantly. This could be attributed to improvements in the diagnosis of congenital heart disease in the neonate.

  19. Cardiac catheterization

    MedlinePlus

    Catheterization - cardiac; Heart catheterization; Angina - cardiac catheterization; CAD - cardiac catheterization; Coronary artery disease - cardiac catheterization; Heart valve - cardiac catheterization; Heart failure - ...

  20. Common and unusual dental development abnormalities in a patient with bicuspid aortic valve.

    PubMed

    Răducanu, Anca Maria; Feraru, Ion Victor; Suciu, Ioana; Teodorescu, Elina; Didilescu, Andreea Cristiana; Ionescu, Ileana; Ionescu, Ecaterina

    2016-01-01

    Bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) is the most common congenital abnormality of the heart. In this condition, instead of three cusps, the aortic valve has two cusps. Children with congenital heart diseases are at increased risk of developing oral diseases, such as: higher number of decayed teeth, developmental anomalies, periodontal disease, malocclusion, dental crowding, as well as susceptibility to develop infective endocarditis from bacteremia caused by chronic poor oral health. However, little information is available regarding oral manifestations and their management in patients with congenital heart defects, despite the importance of these diseases. This paper presents oral manifestations associated with BAV in a young patient, alongside the general features of the condition. The presented case with BAV brings together features of a complex pathology and multidisciplinary treatment, which was conducted over a long period of time and still continues nowadays.

  1. The abnormal distribution of development: policies for southern women and children.

    PubMed

    Burman, E

    1995-03-01

    This paper offers a feminist critique of the relationships between gender and development by exploring the intersections between three sets of debates: firstly, the relations between interventions for women and for children through the anomalous position accorded to 'the girl child' in aid and development policies; secondly, the relations between psychological and economic models of development; and thirdly, the gendered and geographical allocation of attributes and opportunities. Drawing on analyses of the 'psychological complex' the author suggests that the cultural resources that inform developmental psychological models are highly cultural and class-specific (white, middle class, of the northern hemisphere), giving rise to a globalization of development that is reinscribed within international aid and development policies. In homogenizing difference to its norms, this globalization paradoxically reproduces the north-south opposition as an expression of cultural and political imperialism. While northern children 'develop', dominant discourses of children of the South are preoccupied with 'survival'. By such means the cultural hegemony of a unitary psychology remains intact. This paper discusses the 'abnormal distribution' of development to draw attention to the ways cultural and gender inequalities flow from the norms and generalized descriptions central to the current practice of developmental psychology and to urge that this is an important site of intervention for feminists addressing gender and development issues.

  2. Abnormal vascular development in zebrafish models for fukutin and FKRP deficiency.

    PubMed

    Wood, Alasdair J; Müller, Juliane S; Jepson, Catherine D; Laval, Steve H; Lochmüller, Hanns; Bushby, Kate; Barresi, Rita; Straub, Volker

    2011-12-15

    Fukutin and fukutin-related protein (FKRP) are involved in the glycosylation of α-dystroglycan, a key receptor for basement membrane proteins. Aberrant α-dystroglycan glycosylation leads to a broad spectrum of disorders, ranging from limb girdle muscular dystrophy to Walker-Warburg syndrome. This is the first study investigating a role of fukutin and FKRP-mediated glycosylation in angiogenesis. Transgenic zebrafish expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein in blood vessels were treated with morpholino antisense oligonucleotides that blocked the expression of fukutin, FKRP and dystroglycan. All morphant fish showed muscle damage and vascular abnormalities at day 1 post-fertilization. Intersegmental vessels of somites failed to reach the dorsal longitudinal anastomosis and in more severe phenotypes retracted further or were in some cases even completely missing. In contrast, the eye vasculature was distorted in both fukutin and FKRP morphants, but not in dystroglycan morphants or control fish. The eye size was also smaller in the fukutin and FKRP morphants when compared with dystroglycan knockdown fish and controls. In general, the fukutin morphant fish had the most severe skeletal muscle and eye phenotype. Our findings suggest that fukutin and FKRP have functions that affect ocular development in zebrafish independently of dystroglycan. Despite anecdotal reports about vascular abnormalities in patients affected by dystroglycanopathies, the clinical relevance of such lesions remains unclear and should be subject to further review and investigations.

  3. The character of abnormalities found in eye development of quail embruos exposed under space flight conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoryan, E.; Dadheva, O.; Polinskaya, V.; Guryeva, T.

    The avian embryonic eye is used as a model system for studies on the environmental effects on central nervous system development. Here we present results of qualitative investigation of the eye development in quail embryos incubated in micro-"g" environment. In this study we used eyes of Japanese quail (Coturnix coturnix Japonica) embryos "flown" onboard biosatellite Kosmos-1129 and on Mir station within the framework of Mir-NASA Program. Eyes obtained from embryos ranging in age from 3-12 days (E3-E12) were prepared histologically and compared with those of the synchronous and laboratory gound controls. Ther most careful consideration was given to finding and analysis of eye developmental abnormalities. Then they were compared with those already described by experimental teratology for birds and mammals. At the stage of the "eye cup" (E3) we found the case of invalid formation of the inner retina. The latter was represented by disorganized neuroblasts occupying whole posterior chamber of the eye. On the 7th day of quail eye development, at the period of cellular growth activation some cases of small eyes with many folds of overgrowing neural and pigmented retinal layers were detected. In retinal folds of these eyes the normal layering was disturbed as well as the formation of aqueous body and pecten oculi. At this time point the changes were also found in the anterior part of the eye. The peculiarities came out of the bigger width of the cornea and separation of its layers, but were found in synchronous control as well. Few embryos of E10 had also eyes with the abnormities described for E7 but this time they were more vivid because of the completion of eye tissue differentiation. At the stage E12 we found the case evaluated as microphthalmia attending by overgrowth of anterior pigmented tissues - iris and ciliary body attached with the cornea. Most, but not all, of abnormalities we found in eye morphogeneses belonged to the birds "flown" aboard Kosmos- 1129 and

  4. Endothelial Jarid2/Jumonji is required for normal cardiac development and proper Notch1 expression.

    PubMed

    Mysliwiec, Matthew R; Bresnick, Emery H; Lee, Youngsook

    2011-05-13

    Jarid2/Jumonji critically regulates developmental processes including cardiovascular development. Jarid2 knock-out mice exhibit cardiac defects including hypertrabeculation with noncompaction of the ventricular wall. However, molecular mechanisms underlying Jarid2-mediated cardiac development remain unknown. To determine the cardiac lineage-specific roles of Jarid2, we generated myocardial, epicardial, cardiac neural crest, or endothelial conditional Jarid2 knock-out mice using Cre-loxP technology. Only mice with an endothelial deletion of Jarid2 recapitulate phenotypic defects observed in whole body mutants including hypertrabeculation and noncompaction of the ventricle. To identify potential targets of Jarid2, combinatorial approaches using microarray and candidate gene analyses were employed on Jarid2 knock-out embryonic hearts. Whole body or endothelial deletion of Jarid2 leads to increased endocardial Notch1 expression in the developing ventricle, resulting in increased Notch1-dependent signaling to the adjacent myocardium. Using quantitative chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis, Jarid2 was found to occupy a specific region on the endogenous Notch1 locus. We propose that failure to properly regulate Notch signaling in Jarid2 mutants likely leads to the defects in the developing ventricular chamber. The identification of Jarid2 as a potential regulator of Notch1 signaling has broad implications for many cellular processes including development, stem cell maintenance, and tumor formation.

  5. A four-compartment PBPK heart model accounting for cardiac metabolism - model development and application.

    PubMed

    Tylutki, Zofia; Polak, Sebastian

    2017-01-04

    In the field of cardiac drug efficacy and safety assessment, information on drug concentration in heart tissue is desirable. Because measuring drug concentrations in human cardiac tissue is challenging in healthy volunteers, mathematical models are used to cope with such limitations. With a goal of predicting drug concentration in cardiac tissue, we have developed a whole-body PBPK model consisting of seventeen perfusion-limited compartments. The proposed PBPK heart model consisted of four compartments: the epicardium, midmyocardium, endocardium, and pericardial fluid, and accounted for cardiac metabolism using CYP450. The model was written in R. The plasma:tissues partition coefficients (Kp) were calculated in Simcyp Simulator. The model was fitted to the concentrations of amitriptyline in plasma and the heart. The estimated parameters were as follows: 0.80 for the absorption rate [h(-1)], 52.6 for Kprest, 0.01 for the blood flow through the pericardial fluid [L/h], and 0.78 for the P-parameter describing the diffusion between the pericardial fluid and epicardium [L/h]. The total cardiac clearance of amitriptyline was calculated as 0.316 L/h. Although the model needs further improvement, the results support its feasibility, and it is a first attempt to provide an active drug concentration in various locations within heart tissue using a PBPK approach.

  6. A four-compartment PBPK heart model accounting for cardiac metabolism - model development and application

    PubMed Central

    Tylutki, Zofia; Polak, Sebastian

    2017-01-01

    In the field of cardiac drug efficacy and safety assessment, information on drug concentration in heart tissue is desirable. Because measuring drug concentrations in human cardiac tissue is challenging in healthy volunteers, mathematical models are used to cope with such limitations. With a goal of predicting drug concentration in cardiac tissue, we have developed a whole-body PBPK model consisting of seventeen perfusion-limited compartments. The proposed PBPK heart model consisted of four compartments: the epicardium, midmyocardium, endocardium, and pericardial fluid, and accounted for cardiac metabolism using CYP450. The model was written in R. The plasma:tissues partition coefficients (Kp) were calculated in Simcyp Simulator. The model was fitted to the concentrations of amitriptyline in plasma and the heart. The estimated parameters were as follows: 0.80 for the absorption rate [h−1], 52.6 for Kprest, 0.01 for the blood flow through the pericardial fluid [L/h], and 0.78 for the P-parameter describing the diffusion between the pericardial fluid and epicardium [L/h]. The total cardiac clearance of amitriptyline was calculated as 0.316 L/h. Although the model needs further improvement, the results support its feasibility, and it is a first attempt to provide an active drug concentration in various locations within heart tissue using a PBPK approach. PMID:28051093

  7. Abnormal Mammary Development in 129:STAT1-Null Mice is Stroma-Dependent.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jane Q; Mori, Hidetoshi; Cardiff, Robert D; Trott, Josephine F; Hovey, Russell C; Hubbard, Neil E; Engelberg, Jesse A; Tepper, Clifford G; Willis, Brandon J; Khan, Imran H; Ravindran, Resmi K; Chan, Szeman R; Schreiber, Robert D; Borowsky, Alexander D

    2015-01-01

    Female 129:Stat1-null mice (129S6/SvEvTac-Stat1(tm1Rds) homozygous) uniquely develop estrogen-receptor (ER)-positive mammary tumors. Herein we report that the mammary glands (MG) of these mice have altered growth and development with abnormal terminal end buds alongside defective branching morphogenesis and ductal elongation. We also find that the 129:Stat1-null mammary fat pad (MFP) fails to sustain the growth of 129S6/SvEv wild-type and Stat1-null epithelium. These abnormalities are partially reversed by elevated serum progesterone and prolactin whereas transplantation of wild-type bone marrow into 129:Stat1-null mice does not reverse the MG developmental defects. Medium conditioned by 129:Stat1-null epithelium-cleared MFP does not stimulate epithelial proliferation, whereas it is stimulated by medium conditioned by epithelium-cleared MFP from either wild-type or 129:Stat1-null females having elevated progesterone and prolactin. Microarrays and multiplexed cytokine assays reveal that the MG of 129:Stat1-null mice has lower levels of growth factors that have been implicated in normal MG growth and development. Transplanted 129:Stat1-null tumors and their isolated cells also grow slower in 129:Stat1-null MG compared to wild-type recipient MG. These studies demonstrate that growth of normal and neoplastic 129:Stat1-null epithelium is dependent on the hormonal milieu and on factors from the mammary stroma such as cytokines. While the individual or combined effects of these factors remains to be resolved, our data supports the role of STAT1 in maintaining a tumor-suppressive MG microenvironment.

  8. Abnormal Mammary Development in 129:STAT1-Null Mice is Stroma-Dependent

    PubMed Central

    Cardiff, Robert D.; Trott, Josephine F.; Hovey, Russell C.; Hubbard, Neil E.; Engelberg, Jesse A.; Tepper, Clifford G.; Willis, Brandon J.; Khan, Imran H.; Ravindran, Resmi K.; Chan, Szeman R.; Schreiber, Robert D.; Borowsky, Alexander D.

    2015-01-01

    Female 129:Stat1-null mice (129S6/SvEvTac-Stat1tm1Rds homozygous) uniquely develop estrogen-receptor (ER)-positive mammary tumors. Herein we report that the mammary glands (MG) of these mice have altered growth and development with abnormal terminal end buds alongside defective branching morphogenesis and ductal elongation. We also find that the 129:Stat1-null mammary fat pad (MFP) fails to sustain the growth of 129S6/SvEv wild-type and Stat1-null epithelium. These abnormalities are partially reversed by elevated serum progesterone and prolactin whereas transplantation of wild-type bone marrow into 129:Stat1-null mice does not reverse the MG developmental defects. Medium conditioned by 129:Stat1-null epithelium-cleared MFP does not stimulate epithelial proliferation, whereas it is stimulated by medium conditioned by epithelium-cleared MFP from either wild-type or 129:Stat1-null females having elevated progesterone and prolactin. Microarrays and multiplexed cytokine assays reveal that the MG of 129:Stat1-null mice has lower levels of growth factors that have been implicated in normal MG growth and development. Transplanted 129:Stat1-null tumors and their isolated cells also grow slower in 129:Stat1-null MG compared to wild-type recipient MG. These studies demonstrate that growth of normal and neoplastic 129:Stat1-null epithelium is dependent on the hormonal milieu and on factors from the mammary stroma such as cytokines. While the individual or combined effects of these factors remains to be resolved, our data supports the role of STAT1 in maintaining a tumor-suppressive MG microenvironment. PMID:26075897

  9. Development and Validation of Predictive Models of Cardiac Mortality and Transplantation in Resynchronization Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Eduardo Arrais; Pereira, Francisca Tatiana Moreira; Abreu, José Sebastião; Lima, José Wellington O.; Monteiro, Marcelo de Paula Martins; Rocha Neto, Almino Cavalcante; Goés, Camilla Viana Arrais; Farias, Ana Gardênia P.; Rodrigues Sobrinho, Carlos Roberto Martins; Quidute, Ana Rosa Pinto; Scanavacca, Maurício Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    Background 30-40% of cardiac resynchronization therapy cases do not achieve favorable outcomes. Objective This study aimed to develop predictive models for the combined endpoint of cardiac death and transplantation (Tx) at different stages of cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT). Methods Prospective observational study of 116 patients aged 64.8 ± 11.1 years, 68.1% of whom had functional class (FC) III and 31.9% had ambulatory class IV. Clinical, electrocardiographic and echocardiographic variables were assessed by using Cox regression and Kaplan-Meier curves. Results The cardiac mortality/Tx rate was 16.3% during the follow-up period of 34.0 ± 17.9 months. Prior to implantation, right ventricular dysfunction (RVD), ejection fraction < 25% and use of high doses of diuretics (HDD) increased the risk of cardiac death and Tx by 3.9-, 4.8-, and 5.9-fold, respectively. In the first year after CRT, RVD, HDD and hospitalization due to congestive heart failure increased the risk of death at hazard ratios of 3.5, 5.3, and 12.5, respectively. In the second year after CRT, RVD and FC III/IV were significant risk factors of mortality in the multivariate Cox model. The accuracy rates of the models were 84.6% at preimplantation, 93% in the first year after CRT, and 90.5% in the second year after CRT. The models were validated by bootstrapping. Conclusion We developed predictive models of cardiac death and Tx at different stages of CRT based on the analysis of simple and easily obtainable clinical and echocardiographic variables. The models showed good accuracy and adjustment, were validated internally, and are useful in the selection, monitoring and counseling of patients indicated for CRT. PMID:26559987

  10. Normal susceptibility to visual illusions in abnormal development: evidence from Williams syndrome.

    PubMed

    Palomares, Melanie; Ogbonna, Chinyere; Landau, Barbara; Egeth, Howard

    2009-01-01

    The perception of visual illusions is a powerful diagnostic of implicit integration of global information. Many illusions occur when length, size, orientation, or luminance are misjudged because neighboring visuospatial information cannot be ignored. We asked if people with Williams syndrome (WS), a rare genetic disorder that results in severely impaired global visuospatial construction abilities, are also susceptible to the context of visual illusions. Remarkably, we found that illusions influenced WS individuals to the same degree as normal adults, although size discrimination was somewhat impaired in WS. Our results are evidence that illusions are a consequence of the brain's bias to implicitly integrate visual information, even in a population known to have difficulty in explicitly representing spatial relationships among objects. Moreover, these results suggest that implicit and non-implicit integration of spatial information have different vulnerabilities in abnormal development.

  11. Development of abnormal fluid pressures beneath a ramping thrust sheet: Where's the evidence

    SciTech Connect

    Wiltschko, D.V.; Smith, R.E. . Dept. of Geology and Center for Tectonophysics)

    1992-01-01

    Many models for the mechanics of fold and thrust belts hold that fluid pressure is locally, or even everywhere, abnormal, thus aiding both internal deformation and motion along the base. Recent support comes from studies of accretionary prisms where drill-stem measurements of both fluid flow in fault zones and formation pressure are pointed to as evidence for a hydrodynamic system characterized by wide-spread excess fluid pressure. However, despite the general acceptance of high fluid pressure (Pf) as a potentially important controlling mechanism for thrust motion, and despite nearly 30 years of looking, direct evidence for abnormal fluid pressure in ancient continental thrust belts is either rare or ambiguous. The authors have developed a two-dimensional model for the evolution of fluid pressure within and beneath a ramping thrust sheet. In the model, the fluid and heat flow equations are solved and applied at each time step. The model accounts for porosity compaction, thermal pressuring, and fluid flow. Results of this model show, first, that high fluid pressure can be developed during deposition, before thrust motion. The authors used typical rates of deposition, duration of deposition, and a simplified three-layer stratigraphy for North American thrust belts. Second, the models show that high Pf can be maintained and/or further enhanced during thrusting depending upon the permeabilities assigned to the model hydrostratigraphic section. Of the rock properties studied in detail, modes are most sensitive to permeability. Nevertheless, the models show that for best guesses of the relevant rock properties it should be possible to find evidence for high fluid pressure in, (1) the crests of ramp anticlines and, (2) the toe region, especially in the lower plate.

  12. Mimicking isovolumic contraction with combined electromechanical stimulation improves the development of engineered cardiac constructs.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Kathy Ye; Black, Lauren Deems

    2014-06-01

    Electrical and mechanical stimulation have both been used extensively to improve the function of cardiac engineered tissue as each of these stimuli is present in the physical environment during normal development in vivo. However, to date, there has been no direct comparison between electrical and mechanical stimulation and current published data are difficult to compare due to the different systems used to create the engineered cardiac tissue and the different measures of functionality studied as outcomes. The goals of this study were twofold. First, we sought to directly compare the effects of mechanical and electrical stimulation on engineered cardiac tissue. Second, we aimed to determine the importance of the timing of the two stimuli in relation to each other in combined electromechanical stimulation. We hypothesized that delaying electrical stimulation after the beginning of mechanical stimulation to mimic the biophysical environment present during isovolumic contraction would improve construct function by improving proteins responsible for cell-cell communication and contractility. To test this hypothesis, we created a bioreactor system that would allow us to electromechanically stimulate engineered tissue created from neonatal rat cardiac cells entrapped in fibrin gel during 2 weeks in culture. Contraction force was higher for all stimulation groups as compared with the static controls, with the delayed combined stimulation constructs having the highest forces. Mechanical stimulation alone displayed increased final cell numbers but there were no other differences between electrical and mechanical stimulation alone. Delayed combined stimulation resulted in an increase in SERCA2a and troponin T expression levels, which did not happen with synchronous combined stimulation, indicating that the timing of combined stimulation is important to maximize the beneficial effect. Increases in Akt protein expression levels suggest that the improvements are at least in

  13. Mimicking Isovolumic Contraction with Combined Electromechanical Stimulation Improves the Development of Engineered Cardiac Constructs

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Kathy Ye

    2014-01-01

    Electrical and mechanical stimulation have both been used extensively to improve the function of cardiac engineered tissue as each of these stimuli is present in the physical environment during normal development in vivo. However, to date, there has been no direct comparison between electrical and mechanical stimulation and current published data are difficult to compare due to the different systems used to create the engineered cardiac tissue and the different measures of functionality studied as outcomes. The goals of this study were twofold. First, we sought to directly compare the effects of mechanical and electrical stimulation on engineered cardiac tissue. Second, we aimed to determine the importance of the timing of the two stimuli in relation to each other in combined electromechanical stimulation. We hypothesized that delaying electrical stimulation after the beginning of mechanical stimulation to mimic the biophysical environment present during isovolumic contraction would improve construct function by improving proteins responsible for cell–cell communication and contractility. To test this hypothesis, we created a bioreactor system that would allow us to electromechanically stimulate engineered tissue created from neonatal rat cardiac cells entrapped in fibrin gel during 2 weeks in culture. Contraction force was higher for all stimulation groups as compared with the static controls, with the delayed combined stimulation constructs having the highest forces. Mechanical stimulation alone displayed increased final cell numbers but there were no other differences between electrical and mechanical stimulation alone. Delayed combined stimulation resulted in an increase in SERCA2a and troponin T expression levels, which did not happen with synchronous combined stimulation, indicating that the timing of combined stimulation is important to maximize the beneficial effect. Increases in Akt protein expression levels suggest that the improvements are at least in

  14. Maternal and zygotic Zfp57 modulate NOTCH signaling in cardiac development

    PubMed Central

    Shamis, Yulia; Cullen, Dana E.; Liu, Lizhi; Yang, Guan; Ng, Sheau-Fang; Xiao, Lijuan; Bell, Fong T.; Ray, Chelsea; Takikawa, Sachiko; Moskowitz, Ivan P.; Cai, Chen-Leng; Yang, Xiao; Li, Xiajun

    2015-01-01

    Zfp57 is a maternal–zygotic effect gene that maintains genomic imprinting. Here we report that Zfp57 mutants exhibited a variety of cardiac defects including atrial septal defect (ASD), ventricular septal defect (VSD), thin myocardium, and reduced trabeculation. Zfp57 maternal-zygotic mutant embryos displayed more severe phenotypes with higher penetrance than the zygotic ones. Cardiac progenitor cells exhibited proliferation and differentiation defects in Zfp57 mutants. ZFP57 is a master regulator of genomic imprinting, so the DNA methylation imprint was lost in embryonic heart without ZFP57. Interestingly, the presence of imprinted DLK1, a target of ZFP57, correlated with NOTCH1 activation in cardiac cells. These results suggest that ZFP57 may modulate NOTCH signaling during cardiac development. Indeed, loss of ZFP57 caused loss of NOTCH1 activation in embryonic heart with more severe loss observed in the maternal-zygotic mutant. Maternal and zygotic functions of Zfp57 appear to play redundant roles in NOTCH1 activation and cardiomyocyte differentiation. This serves as an example of a maternal effect that can influence mammalian organ development. It also links genomic imprinting to NOTCH signaling and particular developmental functions. PMID:25848000

  15. Hepato-cardiac disorders

    PubMed Central

    Fouad, Yasser Mahrous; Yehia, Reem

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the mutual relationship between the liver and the heart is important for both hepatologists and cardiologists. Hepato-cardiac diseases can be classified into heart diseases affecting the liver, liver diseases affecting the heart, and conditions affecting the heart and the liver at the same time. Differential diagnoses of liver injury are extremely important in a cardiologist’s clinical practice calling for collaboration between cardiologists and hepatologists due to the many other diseases that can affect the liver and mimic haemodynamic injury. Acute and chronic heart failure may lead to acute ischemic hepatitis or chronic congestive hepatopathy. Treatment in these cases should be directed to the primary heart disease. In patients with advanced liver disease, cirrhotic cardiomyopathy may develop including hemodynamic changes, diastolic and systolic dysfunctions, reduced cardiac performance and electrophysiological abnormalities. Cardiac evaluation is important for patients with liver diseases especially before and after liver transplantation. Liver transplantation may lead to the improvement of all cardiac changes and the reversal of cirrhotic cardiomyopathy. There are systemic diseases that may affect both the liver and the heart concomitantly including congenital, metabolic and inflammatory diseases as well as alcoholism. This review highlights these hepatocardiac diseases PMID:24653793

  16. Normal and Abnormal Development of Motor Behavior: Lessons From Experiments in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Gramsbergen, Albert

    2001-01-01

    In this essay a few relevant aspects of the neural and behavioral development of the brain in the human and in the rat are reviewed and related to the consequences of lesions in the central and peripheral nervous system at early and later age. Movements initially are generated by local circuits in the spinal cord and without the involvement of descending projections. After birth, both in humans and in rats it seems that the devlopment of postural control is the limiting factor for several motor behaviors to mature. Strong indications exist that the cerebellum is significantly involved in this control. Lesions in the CNS at early stages interfere with fundamental processes of neural development, such as the establishment of fiber connections and cell death patterns. Consequently, the functional effects are strongly dependent on the stage of development. The young and undisturbed CNS, on the other hand, has a much greater capacity than the adult nervous system for compensating abnormal reinnervation in the peripheral nervous system. Animal experiments indicated that the cerebellar cortex might play an important part in this compensation. This possibility should be investigated further as it might offer important perspectives for treatment in the human. PMID:11530886

  17. Serotonin transporter variant drives preventable gastrointestinal abnormalities in development and function

    PubMed Central

    Margolis, Kara Gross; Li, Zhishan; Stevanovic, Korey; Saurman, Virginia; Anderson, George M.; Snyder, Isaac; Blakely, Randy D.; Gershon, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is an increasingly common behavioral condition that frequently presents with gastrointestinal (GI) disturbances. It is not clear, however, how gut dysfunction relates to core ASD features. Multiple, rare hyperfunctional coding variants of the serotonin (5-HT) transporter (SERT, encoded by SLC6A4) have been identified in ASD. Expression of the most common SERT variant (Ala56) in mice increases 5-HT clearance and causes ASD-like behaviors. Here, we demonstrated that Ala56-expressing mice display GI defects that resemble those seen in mice lacking neuronal 5-HT. These defects included enteric nervous system hypoplasia, slow GI transit, diminished peristaltic reflex activity, and proliferation of crypt epithelial cells. An opposite phenotype was seen in SERT-deficient mice and in progeny of WT dams given the SERT antagonist fluoxetine. The reciprocal phenotypes that resulted from increased or decreased SERT activity support the idea that 5-HT signaling regulates enteric neuronal development and can, when disturbed, cause long-lasting abnormalities of GI function. Administration of a 5-HT4 agonist to Ala56 mice during development prevented Ala56-associated GI perturbations, suggesting that excessive SERT activity leads to inadequate 5-HT4–mediated neurogenesis. We propose that deficient 5-HT signaling during development may contribute to GI and behavioral features of ASD. The consequences of therapies targeting SERT during pregnancy warrant further evaluation. PMID:27111230

  18. Signaling through retinoic acid receptors in cardiac development: Doing the right things at the right times.

    PubMed

    Xavier-Neto, José; Sousa Costa, Ângela M; Figueira, Ana Carolina M; Caiaffa, Carlo Donato; Amaral, Fabio Neves do; Peres, Lara Maldanis Cerqueira; da Silva, Bárbara Santos Pires; Santos, Luana Nunes; Moise, Alexander R; Castillo, Hozana Andrade

    2015-02-01

    Retinoic acid (RA) is a terpenoid that is synthesized from vitamin A/retinol (ROL) and binds to the nuclear receptors retinoic acid receptor (RAR)/retinoid X receptor (RXR) to control multiple developmental processes in vertebrates. The available clinical and experimental data provide uncontested evidence for the pleiotropic roles of RA signaling in development of multiple embryonic structures and organs such eyes, central nervous system, gonads, lungs and heart. The development of any of these above-mentioned embryonic organ systems can be effectively utilized to showcase the many strategies utilized by RA signaling. However, it is very likely that the strategies employed to transfer RA signals during cardiac development comprise the majority of the relevant and sophisticated ways through which retinoid signals can be conveyed in a complex biological system. Here, we provide the reader with arguments indicating that RA signaling is exquisitely regulated according to specific phases of cardiac development and that RA signaling itself is one of the major regulators of the timing of cardiac morphogenesis and differentiation. We will focus on the role of signaling by RA receptors (RARs) in early phases of heart development. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Nuclear receptors in animal development.

  19. ECG of the month. Cardiac failure and stroke in a 43-year-old woman. Coarse atrial fibrillation indicating left atrial enlargement and left ventricular hypertrophy with repolarization abnormality.

    PubMed

    Glancy, D Luke; Atluri, Prashanthi; Heck, Herman; Duet, Jess; Ehsan, Kian; Jaligam, Vijayendra; Helmcke, Frederick

    2012-01-01

    A 43-year-old woman with a long history of heavy cigarette smoking was in good health until she developed fatigue, dyspnea on exertion, and paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea approximately three months before admission to our hospital. Four weeks before admission, she was admitted to another hospital for the sudden onset of a right hemiparesis. She was noted to be in atrial fibrillation, and cardiac catheterization and angiocardiography revealed triple-vessel coronary arterial disease and moderately severe mitral regurgitation. Because of repeated episodes of paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea, she was referred to our hospital for cardiac surgery. On admission, an electrocardiogram was recorded (Figure).

  20. O-GlcNAcylation, enemy or ally during cardiac hypertrophy development?

    PubMed

    Mailleux, Florence; Gélinas, Roselle; Beauloye, Christophe; Horman, Sandrine; Bertrand, Luc

    2016-12-01

    O-linked attachment of the monosaccharide β-N-acetyl-glucosamine (O-GlcNAcylation) is a post-translational modification occurring on serine and threonine residues, which is evolving as an important mechanism for the regulation of various cellular processes. The present review will, first, provide a general background on the molecular regulation of protein O-GlcNAcylation and will summarize the role of this post-translational modification in various acute cardiac pathologies including ischemia-reperfusion. Then, we will focus on research studies examining protein O-GlcNAcylation in the context of cardiac hypertrophy. A particular emphasis will be laid on the convergent but also divergent actions of O-GlcNAcylation according to the type of hypertrophy investigated, including physiological, pressure overload-induced and diabetes-linked cardiac hypertrophy. In an attempt to distinguish whether O-GlcNAcylation is detrimental or beneficial, this review will present the different O-GlcNAcylated targets involved in hypertrophy development. We will finally argue on potential interest to target O-GlcNAc processes to treat cardiac hypertrophy. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: The role of post-translational protein modifications on heart and vascular metabolism edited by Jason R.B. Dyck & Jan F.C. Glatz.

  1. Development of a high frame rate ultrasonic system for cardiac imaging in small animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Lei; Cannata, Jonathan M.; Johnson, Jeffrey A.; Yen, Jesse T.; Feng, Ching; Shung, K. Kirk

    2006-03-01

    Ultrasound imaging is a well established technology for echocardiography on humans. For cardiac imaging in small animals whose hearts beat at a rate higher than 300 beats per minute, the spatial and temporal resolution of current clinical ultrasonic scanners are far from ideal and simply inadequate for such applications. In this research, a real-time high frequency ultrasound imaging system was developed with a frame rate higher than 80 frames per second (fps) for cardiac applications in small animals. The device has a mechanical sector scanner using magnetic drive mechanism to reduce moving parts and ensure longevity. A very lightweight (< 0.28 g) single element transducer was specially designed and constructed for this research to achieve a frame rate of at least 80 fps. The 30-50 MHz transducers swept through an arc at the end of a pendulum for imaging the heart of small animals. The imaging electronics consisted of a low noise pulser/receiver, a high-speed data acquisition board, and digital signal processing algorithms. In vivo results on mouse embryos showed that real time ultrasound imaging at frame rate exceeding 80 fps could demonstrate detailed depiction of cardiac function with a spatial resolution of around 50 microns, which allows researchers to fully examine and monitor small animal cardiac functions.

  2. Cardiac expression patterns of endothelin-converting enzyme (ECE): implications for conduction system development.

    PubMed

    Sedmera, David; Harris, Brett S; Grant, Elizabeth; Zhang, Ning; Jourdan, Jane; Kurkova, Dana; Gourdie, Robert G

    2008-06-01

    The spatiotemporal distribution of the endothelin-converting enzyme (ECE) protein in the embryonic chick heart and the association of this polypeptide with the developing cardiac conduction system is described here for the first time. Further, we show how cardiac hemodynamic load directly affects ECE level and distribution. Endothelin (ET) is a cytokine involved in the inductive recruitment of Purkinje fibers. ET is produced by proteolytic cleavage of Big-ET by ECE. We generated an antibody against chick ECE recognizing a single band at approximately 70 kD to correlate the cardiac expression of this protein with that reported previously for its mRNA. ECE protein expression was more widespread compared to its mRNA, being present in endothelial cells, mesenchymal cells, and myocytes, and particularly enriched in the trabeculae and nascent ventricular conduction system. The myocardial expression was significantly modified under experimentally altered hemodynamic loading. In vivo, ET receptor blockade with bosentan delayed activation sequence maturation. These data support a role for ECE in avian cardiac conduction system differentiation and maturation.

  3. The role of late I Na in development of cardiac arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Antzelevitch, Charles; Nesterenko, Vladislav; Shryock, John C; Rajamani, Sridharan; Song, Yejia; Belardinelli, Luiz

    2014-01-01

    Late I Na is an integral part of the sodium current, which persists long after the fast-inactivating component. The magnitude of the late I Na is relatively small in all species and in all types of cardiomyocytes as compared with the amplitude of the fast sodium current, but it contributes significantly to the shape and duration of the action potential. This late component had been shown to increase in several acquired or congenital conditions, including hypoxia, oxidative stress, and heart failure, or due to mutations in SCN5A, which encodes the α-subunit of the sodium channel, as well as in channel-interacting proteins, including multiple β subunits and anchoring proteins. Patients with enhanced late I Na exhibit the type-3 long QT syndrome (LQT3) characterized by high propensity for the life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias, such as Torsade de Pointes (TdP), as well as for atrial fibrillation. There are several distinct mechanisms of arrhythmogenesis due to abnormal late I Na, including abnormal automaticity, early and delayed after depolarization-induced triggered activity, and dramatic increase of ventricular dispersion of repolarization. Many local anesthetic and antiarrhythmic agents have a higher potency to block late I Na as compared with fast I Na. Several novel compounds, including ranolazine, GS-458967, and F15845, appear to be the most selective inhibitors of cardiac late I Na reported to date. Selective inhibition of late I Na is expected to be an effective strategy for correcting these acquired and congenital channelopathies.

  4. A Temporal Chromatin Signature in Human Embryonic Stem Cells Identifies Regulators of Cardiac Development

    PubMed Central

    Paige, Sharon L.; Thomas, Sean; Stoick-Cooper, Cristi L.; Wang, Hao; Maves, Lisa; Sandstrom, Richard; Pabon, Lil; Reinecke, Hans; Pratt, Gabriel; Keller, Gordon; Moon, Randall T.; Stamatoyannopoulos, John; Murry, Charles E.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Directed differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (ESCs) into cardiovascular cells provides a model for studying molecular mechanisms of human cardiovascular development. Though it is known that chromatin modification patterns in ESCs differ markedly from those in lineage-committed progenitors and differentiated cells, the temporal dynamics of chromatin alterations during differentiation along a defined lineage have not been studied. We show that differentiation of human ESCs into cardiovascular cells is accompanied by programmed temporal alterations in chromatin structure that distinguish key regulators of cardiovascular development from other genes. We used this temporal chromatin signature to identify regulators of cardiac development, including the homeobox gene MEIS2. We demonstrate using the zebrafish model that MEIS2 is critical for proper heart tube formation and subsequent cardiac looping. Temporal chromatin signatures should be broadly applicable to other models of stem cell differentiation to identify regulators and provide key insights into major developmental decisions. PMID:22981225

  5. Collaborating with cardiac sonographers to develop work-related musculoskeletal disorder interventions

    PubMed Central

    Sommerich, Carolyn M.; Lavender, Steven A.; Evans, Kevin; Sanders, Elizabeth; Joines, Sharon; Lamar, Sabrina; Umar, Radin Zaid Radin; Yen, Wei-Ting; Li, Jing; Nagavarapu, Shasank; Dickerson, Jennifer A.

    2016-01-01

    For more than two decades, surveys of imaging technologists, including cardiac sonographers, diagnostic medical sonographers, and vascular technologists, have consistently reported high prevalence of work-related musculoskeletal discomfort (WRMSD). Yet, intervention research involving sonographers is limited. In this study, we used a participatory approach to identifying needs and opportunities for developing interventions to reduce sonographers’ exposures to WMSD risk factors. In this paper, we present some of those needs. We include descriptions of two interventions, targeted for cardiac sonographers, that were developed, through an iterative process, into functional prototypes that were evaluated in pilot tests by practicing sonographers. One of these interventions is now in daily use. We would like other engineers and ergonomists to recognize this area of opportunity to apply their knowledge of biomechanics and design in order to begin to address the high prevalence of WRMSDs in sonographers, by working with sonographers to develop useful and usable interventions. PMID:26642863

  6. Deficiency of the Chromatin Regulator Brpf1 Causes Abnormal Brain Development*

    PubMed Central

    You, Linya; Zou, Jinfeng; Zhao, Hong; Bertos, Nicholas R.; Park, Morag; Wang, Edwin; Yang, Xiang-Jiao

    2015-01-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms are important in different neurological disorders, and one such mechanism is histone acetylation. The multivalent chromatin regulator BRPF1 (bromodomain- and plant homeodomain-linked (PHD) zinc finger-containing protein 1) recognizes different epigenetic marks and activates three histone acetyltransferases, so it is both a reader and a co-writer of the epigenetic language. The three histone acetyltransferases are MOZ, MORF, and HBO1, which are also known as lysine acetyltransferase 6A (KAT6A), KAT6B, and KAT7, respectively. The MORF gene is mutated in four neurodevelopmental disorders sharing the characteristic of intellectual disability and frequently displaying callosal agenesis. Here, we report that forebrain-specific inactivation of the mouse Brpf1 gene caused early postnatal lethality, neocortical abnormalities, and partial callosal agenesis. With respect to the control, the mutant forebrain contained fewer Tbr2-positive intermediate neuronal progenitors and displayed aberrant neurogenesis. Molecularly, Brpf1 loss led to decreased transcription of multiple genes, such as Robo3 and Otx1, important for neocortical development. Surprisingly, elevated expression of different Hox genes and various other transcription factors, such as Lhx4, Foxa1, Tbx5, and Twist1, was also observed. These results thus identify an important role of Brpf1 in regulating forebrain development and suggest that it acts as both an activator and a silencer of gene expression in vivo. PMID:25568313

  7. Deficiency of the chromatin regulator BRPF1 causes abnormal brain development.

    PubMed

    You, Linya; Zou, Jinfeng; Zhao, Hong; Bertos, Nicholas R; Park, Morag; Wang, Edwin; Yang, Xiang-Jiao

    2015-03-13

    Epigenetic mechanisms are important in different neurological disorders, and one such mechanism is histone acetylation. The multivalent chromatin regulator BRPF1 (bromodomain- and plant homeodomain-linked (PHD) zinc finger-containing protein 1) recognizes different epigenetic marks and activates three histone acetyltransferases, so it is both a reader and a co-writer of the epigenetic language. The three histone acetyltransferases are MOZ, MORF, and HBO1, which are also known as lysine acetyltransferase 6A (KAT6A), KAT6B, and KAT7, respectively. The MORF gene is mutated in four neurodevelopmental disorders sharing the characteristic of intellectual disability and frequently displaying callosal agenesis. Here, we report that forebrain-specific inactivation of the mouse Brpf1 gene caused early postnatal lethality, neocortical abnormalities, and partial callosal agenesis. With respect to the control, the mutant forebrain contained fewer Tbr2-positive intermediate neuronal progenitors and displayed aberrant neurogenesis. Molecularly, Brpf1 loss led to decreased transcription of multiple genes, such as Robo3 and Otx1, important for neocortical development. Surprisingly, elevated expression of different Hox genes and various other transcription factors, such as Lhx4, Foxa1, Tbx5, and Twist1, was also observed. These results thus identify an important role of Brpf1 in regulating forebrain development and suggest that it acts as both an activator and a silencer of gene expression in vivo.

  8. Prenatal ketamine exposure causes abnormal development of prefrontal cortex in rat

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Tianyun; Li, Chuanxiang; Wei, Wei; Zhang, Haixing; Ma, Daqing; Song, Xingrong; Zhou, Libing

    2016-01-01

    Ketamine is commonly used for anesthesia and as a recreational drug. In pregnant users, a potential neurotoxicity in offspring has been noted. Our previous work demonstrated that ketamine exposure of pregnant rats induces affective disorders and cognitive impairments in offspring. As the prefrontal cortex (PFC) is critically involved in emotional and cognitive processes, here we studied whether maternal ketamine exposure influences the development of the PFC in offspring. Pregnant rats on gestational day 14 were treated with ketamine at a sedative dose for 2 hrs, and pups were studied at postnatal day 0 (P0) or P30. We found that maternal ketamine exposure resulted in cell apoptosis and neuronal loss in fetal brain. Upon ketamine exposure in utero, PFC neurons at P30 showed more dendritic branching, while cultured neurons from P0 PFC extended shorter neurites than controls. In addition, maternal ketamine exposure postponed the switch of NR2B/2A expression, and perturbed pre- and postsynaptic protein expression in the PFC. These data suggest that prenatal ketamine exposure impairs neuronal development of the PFC, which may be associated with abnormal behavior in offsprings. PMID:27226073

  9. SIGNALLING THROUGH RETINOIC ACID RECEPTORS IN CARDIAC DEVELOPMENT: DOING THE RIGHT THINGS AT THE RIGHT TIMES

    PubMed Central

    Xavier-Neto, José; Costa, Ângela M. Sousa; Figueira, Ana Carolina M.; Caiaffa, Carlo Donato; do Amaral, Fabio Neves; Peres, Lara Maldanis Cerqueira; da Silva, Bárbara Santos Pires; Santos, Luana Nunes; Moise, Alexander R.; Castillo, Hozana Andrade

    2015-01-01

    Retinoic acid (RA) is a terpenoid that is synthesized from Vitamin A/retinol (ROL) and binds to the nuclear receptors retinoic acid receptor (RAR)/retinoid X receptor (RXR) to control multiple developmental processes in vertebrates. The available clinic and experimental data provide uncontested evidence for the pleiotropic roles of RA signalling in development of multiple embryonic structures and organs such eyes, central nervous system, gonads, lungs and heart. The development of any of these above-mentioned embryonic organ systems can be effectively utilized to showcase the many strategies utilized by RA signalling. However, it is very likely that the strategies employed to transfer RA signals during cardiac development comprise the majority of the relevant and sophisticated ways through which retinoid signals can be conveyed in a complex biological system. Here, we provide the reader with arguments indicating that RA signalling is exquisitely regulated according to specific phases of cardiac development and that RA signalling itself is one of the major regulators of the timing of cardiac morphogenesis and differentiation. We will focus on the role of signalling by RA receptors (RARs) in early phases of heart development. PMID:25134739

  10. Acquired and congenital coronary artery abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Young, Ming-Lon; McLeary, Michael; Chan, Kak-Chen

    2017-01-01

    Sudden unexpected cardiac deaths in approximately 20% of young athletes are due to acquired or congenital coronary artery abnormalities. Kawasaki disease is the leading cause for acquired coronary artery abnormalities, which can cause late coronary artery sequelae including aneurysms, stenosis, and thrombosis, leading to myocardial ischaemia and ventricular fibrillation. Patients with anomalous left coronary artery from the pulmonary artery can develop adequate collateral circulation from the right coronary artery in the newborn period, which remains asymptomatic only to manifest in adulthood with myocardial ischaemia, ventricular arrhythmias, and sudden death. Anomalous origin of coronary artery from the opposite sinus occurs in 0.7% of the young general population aged between 11 and 15 years. If the anomalous coronary artery courses between the pulmonary artery and the aorta, sudden cardiac death may occur during or shortly after vigorous exercise, especially in patients where the anomalous left coronary artery originates from the right sinus of Valsalva. Symptomatic patients with evidence of ischaemia should have surgical correction. No treatment is needed for asymptomatic patients with an anomalous right coronary artery from the left sinus of Valsalva. At present, there is no consensus regarding how to manage asymptomatic patients with anomalous left coronary artery from the right sinus of Valsalva and interarterial course. Myocardial bridging is commonly observed in cardiac catheterisation and it rarely causes exercise-induced coronary syndrome or cardiac death. In symptomatic patients, refractory or β-blocker treatment and surgical un-bridging may be considered.

  11. Development of Dilated Cardiomyopathy and Impaired Calcium Homeostasis with Cardiac-Specific Deletion of ESRRβ.

    PubMed

    Rowe, Glenn C; Asimaki, Angeliki; Graham, Evan L; Martin, Kimberly D; Margulies, Kenneth B; Das, Saumya; Saffitz, Jeffrey E; Arany, Zoltan

    2017-01-27

    Mechanisms underlying the development of Idiopathic Dilated Cardiomyopathy (DCM) remain poorly understood. Using transcription factor expression profiling, we identified estrogen-related receptor beta (ESRRβ), a member of the nuclear receptor family of transcription factors, as highly expressed in murine hearts and other highly oxidative striated muscle beds. Mice bearing cardiac-specific deletion of ESRRβ (MHC-ERRB KO) develop dilated cardiomyopathy and sudden death at approximately 10 months of age. Isolated adult cardiomyocytes from the MHC-ERRB KO mice showed an increase in calcium sensitivity and impaired cardiomyocyte contractility, which preceded echocardiographic cardiac remodeling and dysfunction by several months. Histological analyses of myocardial biopsies from patients with various cardiomyopathies revealed that ESRRβ protein is absent from the nucleus of cardiomyocytes from patients with DCM, but not other forms of cardiomyopathy (ischemic, hypertrophic and arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy). Taken together these observations suggest that ESRRβ is a critical component in the onset of dilated cardiomyopathy by affecting contractility and calcium balance.

  12. Recent developments in the science of proarrhythmic cardiac safety of new drugs.

    PubMed

    Turner, J Rick; Karnad, Dilip R; Cabell, Christopher H; Kothari, Snehal

    2017-04-01

    Following marketing withdrawals of several drugs due to proarrhythmic safety concerns, the ICH Guidelines S7B and E14 were released in 2005 and have guided pre-approval cardiac safety assessments in multiple regulatory jurisdictions. While this S7B-E14 paradigm has successfully prevented drugs with unanticipated potential for inducing Torsades de Pointes entering the market, it has unintentionally resulted in the termination of development programs for potentially important compounds that could have exhibited a favourable benefit-risk balance. The Comprehensive In vitro Proarrhythmia Assay paradigm is currently attracting considerable attention as a solution to this problem. While much evaluative work in this new paradigm will be conducted in the non-clinical domain, human electrocardiographic assessments will remain an important component of the overall investigational strategy, possibly being conducted in Phase I trials employing exposure-response modelling. This article reviews recent developments in proarrhythmic cardiac safety assessments of new drugs, their rationales, and current limitations.

  13. Abnormal Sperm Development in pcd3J-/- Mice: the Importance of Agtpbp1 in Spermatogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Nameun; Xiao, Rui; Choi, Hojun; Kim, Jin-Hoi; Sang-Jun, Uhm; Chankyu, Park

    2011-01-01

    Homozygous Purkinje cell degeneration (pcd) mutant males exhibit abnormal sperm development. Microscopic examination of the testes from pcd3J-/- mice at postnatal days 12, 15, 18 and 60 revealed histological differences, in comparison to wild-type mice, which were evident by day 18. Greatly reduced numbers of spermatocytes and spermatids were found in the adult testes, and apoptotic cells were identified among the differentiating germ cells after day 15. Our immunohistological analysis using an antihuman AGTPBP1 antibody showed that AGTPBP1 was expressed in spermatogenic cells between late stage primary spermatocytes and round spermatids. A global gene expression analysis from the testes of pcd3J-/- mice showed that expression of cyclin B3 and de-ubiquitinating enzymes USP2 and USP9y was altered by >1.5-fold compared to the expression levels in the wild-type. Our results suggest that the pcd mutant mice have defects in spermatogenesis that begin with the pachytene spermatocyte stage and continue through subsequent stages. Thus, Agtpbp1, the gene responsible for the pcd phenotype, plays an important role in spermatogenesis and is important for survival of germ cells at spermatocytes stage onward. PMID:21110128

  14. Backdoor pathway for dihydrotestosterone biosynthesis: implications for normal and abnormal human sex development.

    PubMed

    Fukami, Maki; Homma, Keiko; Hasegawa, Tomonobu; Ogata, Tsutomu

    2013-04-01

    We review the current knowledge about the "backdoor" pathway for the biosynthesis of dihydrotestosterone (DHT). While DHT is produced from cholesterol through the conventional "frontdoor" pathway via testosterone, recent studies have provided compelling evidence for the presence of an alternative "backdoor" pathway to DHT without testosterone intermediacy. This backdoor pathway is known to exist in the tammar wallaby pouch young testis and the immature mouse testis, and has been suggested to be present in the human as well. Indeed, molecular analysis has identified pathologic mutations of genes involved in the backdoor pathway in genetic male patients with undermasculinized external genitalia, and urine steroid profile analysis has argued for the relevance of the activated backdoor pathway to abnormal virilization in genetic females with cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase deficiency and 21-hydroxylase deficiency. It is likely that the backdoor pathway is primarily operating in the fetal testis in a physiological condition to produce a sufficient amount of DHT for male sex development, and that the backdoor pathway is driven with a possible interaction between fetal and permanent adrenals in pathologic conditions with increased 17-hydroxyprogesterone levels. These findings provide novel insights into androgen biosynthesis in both physiological and pathological conditions.

  15. Cardiac-specific activation of Cre expression at late fetal development

    SciTech Connect

    Opherk, Jan P.; Yampolsky, Peter; Hardt, Stefan E.; Schoels, Wolfgang; Katus, Hugo A.; Koenen, Michael . E-mail: koenen@mpimf-heidelberg.mpg.de; Zehelein, Joerg

    2007-07-27

    In a first step towards dissecting molecular mechanisms that contribute to the development of cardiac diseases, we have generated transgenic mice that express a Cre-GFP fusion protein under the transcriptional control of a 4.3 kb murine cardiac Troponin I gene (cTnI) promoter. Cre-GFP expression, similar in three transgenic lines, is described in one line. In mouse embryos, transgenic for the Cre-GFP and ROSA lacZ reporter allele, first Cre-mediated recombination appeared at 16.5 dpc selectively at the heart. Like the endogenous cTnI gene, transgenic Cre expression showed a slow rise through fetal development that increased neonatally. Bitransgenic hearts, stained at 30 days of age, showed intense signals in ventricular and atrial myocytes while no recombination occurred in other tissues. The delayed onset of Cre activity in cTnI-Cre mice could provide a useful genetic tool to evaluate the function of loxP targeted cardiac genes without interference of recombination during early heart development.

  16. Continuous exposure to bisphenol A during in vitro follicular development induces meiotic abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Lenie, Sandy; Cortvrindt, Rita; Eichenlaub-Ritter, Ursula; Smitz, Johan

    2008-03-12

    Bisphenol A (BPA), a widely used environmental contaminant, may exert weak estrogenic, anti-androgenic and anti-thyroidic activities. BPA is suspected to possess aneugenic properties that may affect somatic cells and mammalian oocytes. Oocyte growth and maturation depend upon a complex bi-directional signaling between the oocyte and its companion somatic cells. Consequently, disturbances in oocyte maturation may originate either from direct effects of BPA at the level of the oocyte or from indirect influences at the follicular level, such as alterations in hormonal homeostasis. This study aimed to analyze the effects of chronic BPA exposure (3 nM to 30 microM) on follicle-enclosed growth and maturation of mouse oocytes in vitro. Oocytes were cultured and their spindle and chromosomes were stained by alpha-tubulin immunofluorescence and ethidium homodimer-2, respectively. Confocal microscopy was utilized for subsequent analysis. Only follicles that were exposed to 30 microM BPA during follicular development showed a slightly reduced granulosa cell proliferation and a lower total estrogen production, but they still developed and formed antral-like cavities. However, 18% of oocytes were unable to resume meiosis after stimulation of oocyte maturation, and 37% arrested after germinal vesicle breakdown, significantly different from controls (p<0.05). Only 45% of the oocytes extruded a first polar body (p < 0.05). 30 microM BPA led also to a significant increase in meiosis I-arrested oocytes with unaligned chromosomes and spindle aberrations. Oocytes that were able to progress beyond meiosis I, frequently arrested at an abnormal telophase I. Additionally, in many oocytes exposed to low chronic BPA that matured to meiosis II chromosomes failed to congress at the spindle equator. In conclusion, mouse follicle culture reveals non-linear dose-dependent effects of BPA on the meiotic spindle in mouse oocytes when exposure was chronic throughout oocyte growth and maturation.

  17. Development of a force-reflecting robotic platform for cardiac catheter navigation.

    PubMed

    Park, Jun Woo; Choi, Jaesoon; Pak, Hui-Nam; Song, Seung Joon; Lee, Jung Chan; Park, Yongdoo; Shin, Seung Min; Sun, Kyung

    2010-11-01

    Electrophysiological catheters are used for both diagnostics and clinical intervention. To facilitate more accurate and precise catheter navigation, robotic cardiac catheter navigation systems have been developed and commercialized. The authors have developed a novel force-reflecting robotic catheter navigation system. The system is a network-based master-slave configuration having a 3-degree of freedom robotic manipulator for operation with a conventional cardiac ablation catheter. The master manipulator implements a haptic user interface device with force feedback using a force or torque signal either measured with a sensor or estimated from the motor current signal in the slave manipulator. The slave manipulator is a robotic motion control platform on which the cardiac ablation catheter is mounted. The catheter motions-forward and backward movements, rolling, and catheter tip bending-are controlled by electromechanical actuators located in the slave manipulator. The control software runs on a real-time operating system-based workstation and implements the master/slave motion synchronization control of the robot system. The master/slave motion synchronization response was assessed with step, sinusoidal, and arbitrarily varying motion commands, and showed satisfactory performance with insignificant steady-state motion error. The current system successfully implemented the motion control function and will undergo safety and performance evaluation by means of animal experiments. Further studies on the force feedback control algorithm and on an active motion catheter with an embedded actuation mechanism are underway.

  18. Non-coding RNA in control of gene regulatory programs in cardiac development and disease.

    PubMed

    Philippen, Leonne E; Dirkx, Ellen; da Costa-Martins, Paula A; De Windt, Leon J

    2015-12-01

    Organogenesis of the vertebrate heart is a highly specialized process involving progressive specification and differentiation of distinct embryonic cardiac progenitor cell populations driven by specialized gene programming events. Likewise, the onset of pathologies in the adult heart, including cardiac hypertrophy, involves the reactivation of embryonic gene programs. In both cases, these intricate genomic events are temporally and spatially regulated by complex signaling networks and gene regulatory networks. Apart from well-established transcriptional mechanisms, increasing evidence indicates that gene programming in both the developing and the diseased myocardium are under epigenetic control by non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs). MicroRNAs regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level, and numerous studies have now established critical roles for this species of tiny RNAs in a broad range of aspects from cardiogenesis towards adult heart failure. Recent reports now also implicate the larger family of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) in these processes as well. Here we discuss the involvement of these two ncRNA classes in proper cardiac development and hypertrophic disease processes of the adult myocardium. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Non-coding RNAs.

  19. Small Leucine Rich Proteoglycans Exhibit Unique Spatiotemporal Expression Profiles During Cardiac Valve Development

    PubMed Central

    Dupuis, Loren E.; Kern, Christine B.

    2015-01-01

    Background Small Leucine Rich Proteoglycans (SLRPs) play a role in collagen fiber formation and also function as signaling molecules. Given the importance of collagen synthesis to the cardiovascular extracellular matrix (ECM), we examined the spatiotemporal expression of SLRPs, not previously investigated in the murine heart. Results Cardiac expression using antibodies specific for biglycan (BGN), decorin (DCN), fibromodulin (FMOD) and lumican (LUM) revealed distinct patterns among the SLRPs in mesenchymal-derived tissues. DCN showed the most intense localization within the developing valve cusps, while LUM was evident primarily in the hinge region of postnatal cardiac valves. BGN, DCN and FMOD were immunolocalized to regions where cardiac valves anchor into adjacent tissues. Medial (BGN), and adventitial (BGN, DCN, FMOD and LUM) layers of the pulmonary and aortic arteries also showed intense staining of SLRPs but this spatiotemporal expression varied with developmental age. Conclusions The unique expression patterns of SLRPs suggest they have adapted to specialized roles in the cardiovascular ECM. SLRP expression patterns overlap with areas where TGFβ signaling is critical to the developing heart. Therefore we speculate that SLRPs may not only be required to facilitate collagen fiber formation but may also regulate TGFβ signaling in the murine heart. PMID:24272803

  20. The TGFβ type II receptor plays a critical role in the endothelial cells during cardiac development.

    PubMed

    Robson, Andrew; Allinson, Kathleen R; Anderson, Robert H; Henderson, Deborah J; Arthur, Helen M

    2010-09-01

    TGFβ signalling is required for normal cardiac development. To investigate which cell types are involved, we used mice carrying a floxed Type II TGFβ receptor (Tgfbr2fl) allele and Cre-lox genetics to deplete this receptor in different regions of the heart. The three target tissues and corresponding Cre transgenic lines were atrioventricular myocardium (using cGata6-Cre), ventricular myocardium (using Mlc2v-Cre), and vascular endothelium (using tamoxifen-activated Cdh5(PAC)-CreERT2). Spatio-temporal Cre activity in each case was tracked via lacZ activation from the Rosa26R locus. Atrioventricular-myocardial-specific Tgfbr2 knockout (KO) embryos had short septal leaflets of the tricuspid valve, whereas ventricular myocardial-specific KO embryos mainly exhibited a normal cardiac phenotype. Inactivation of Tgfbr2 in endothelial cells from E11.5 resulted in deficient ventricular septation, accompanied by haemorrhage from cerebral blood vessels. We conclude that TGFβ signalling through the Tgfbr2 receptor, in endothelial cells, plays an important role in cardiac development, and is essential for cerebral vascular integrity.

  1. The role of acute hyperinsulinemia in the development of cardiac arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Drimba, László; Döbrönte, Róbert; Hegedüs, Csaba; Sári, Réka; Di, Yin; Németh, Joseph; Szilvássy, Zoltán; Peitl, Barna

    2013-05-01

    Patients with perturbed metabolic control are more prone to develop cardiac rhythm disturbances. The main purpose of the present preclinical study was to investigate the possible role of euglycemic hyperinsulinemia in development of cardiac arrhythmias. Euglycemic hyperinsulinemia was induced in conscious rabbits equipped with a right ventricular pacemaker electrode catheter by hyperinsulinemic euglycemic glucose clamp (HEGC) applying two different rates of insulin infusion (5 and 10 mIU/kg/min) and variable rate of glucose infusion to maintain euglycemia (5.5 ± 0.5 mmol/l). The effect of hyperinsulinemia on cardiac electrophysiological parameters was continuously monitored by means of 12-lead surface ECG recording. Arrhythmia incidence was determined by means of programmed electrical stimulation (PES). The possible role of adrenergic activation was investigated by determination of plasma catecholamine levels and intravenous administration of a beta adrenergic blocking agent, metoprolol. All of the measurements were performed during the steady-state period of HEGC and subsequent to metoprolol administration. Both 5 and 10 mIU/kg/min insulin infusion prolonged significantly QTend, QTc, and Tpeak-Tend intervals. The incidence of ventricular arrhythmias generated by PES was increased significantly by euglycemic hyperinsulinemia and exhibited linear relationship to plasma levels of insulin. No alteration on plasma catecholamine levels could be observed; however, metoprolol treatment restored the prolonged QTend, QTc, and Tpeak-Tend intervals and significantly reduced the hyperinsulinemia-induced increase of arrhythmia incidence. Euglycemic hyperinsulinemia can exert proarrhythmic effect presumably due to the enhancement of transmural dispersion of repolarization. Metoprolol treatment may be of benefit in hyperinsulinemia associated with increased incidence of cardiac arrhythmias.

  2. Developing patient-specific anatomic models for validation of cardiac ablation guidance procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, David, III; Rettmann, Maryam; Cameron, Bruce; Camp, Jon; Robb, Richard

    2008-03-01

    Image-guided cardiac ablation has the potential to decrease procedure times and improve clinical outcome for patients with cardiac arrhythmias. There are several proposed methods for integrating patient-specific anatomy into the cardiac ablation procedure; however, these methods require thorough validation. One of the primary challenges in validation is determining ground truth as a standard for comparison. Some validation protocols have been developed for animals models and even in patients; however, these methods can be costly to implement and may increase the risk to patients. We have developed an approach to building realistic patient-specific anatomic models at a low-cost in order to validate the guidance procedure without introducing additional risk to the patients. Using a pre-procedural cardiac computed tomography scan, the blood pool of the left and right atria of a patient are segmented semi-manually. In addition, several anatomical landmarks are identified in the image data. The segmented atria and landmarks are converted into a polygonalized model which is used to build a thin-walled patient-specific blood pool model in a stereo-lithography system. Thumbscrews are inserted into the model at the landmarks. The entire model is embedded in a platinum silicone material which has been shown to have tissue-mimicking properties relative to ultrasound. Once the pliable mold has set, the blood pool model is extracted by dissolving the rigid material. The resulting physical model correctly mimics a specific patient anatomy with embedded fiducals which can be used for validation experiments. The patient-specific anatomic model approach may also be used for pre-surgical practice and training of new interventionalists.

  3. Cardiac manifestations of Pallister-Killian syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tilton, Richard K; Wilkens, Alisha; Krantz, Ian D; Izumi, Kosuke

    2014-05-01

    Pallister-Killian syndrome (PKS) is a sporadic multisystem genetic diagnosis characterized by facial dysmorphia, variable developmental delay and intellectual impairment, hypotonia, hearing loss, seizures, differences in skin pigmentation, temporal alopecia, diaphragmatic hernia, congenital heart defects, and other systemic abnormalities. Although congenital heart defects have been described in association with PKS, the full spectrum of heart disease is still not entirely known. Here, we describe the pattern of cardiac findings of 81 probands with PKS who have had at least one cardiac evaluation, demonstrating structural heart difference in 37% of our cohort (n = 30). Septal defects such as atrial or ventricular septal defects (n = 12) were the most commonly seen congenital heart differences. Additional findings included the occasional occurrence of bicuspid aortic valve, aortic dilatation, and cardiac hypertrophy/cardiomyopathy. We suggest cardiac evaluation for all individuals with PKS at the time of diagnosis as well as subsequent longitudinal follow-up to monitor for the development of cardiomyopathy and aortic dilatation.

  4. [Abnormal cardiac index measured by means of systolic time intervals and the effect of co-enzyme Q10 in thyroid disorders].

    PubMed

    Naito, T

    1986-05-20

    By using the pre-ejection period (PEP), the left ventricular ejection time (LVET) and LVET/PEP ratio, cardiac function was investigated in 35 patients with Graves' disease (mild and severe), 13 patients with primary hypothyroidism and 35 normal subjects. The effect of treatment with antithyroid drugs, T4 or Co-Q10 was also evaluated. Before treatment, PEP was significantly shorter and the LVET/PEP ratio was greater in mild thyrotoxic patients than in the control subjects. PEP and LVET/PEP ratio returned to control levels after the euthyroid state was maintained with antithyroid drugs. In severe thyrotoxic patients, PEP and LVET/PEP ratio did not show any significant change compared with the control subjects, although LVET was significantly shorter. In hypothyroid patients, marked prolongation of PEP, shortening of LVET and decrease in LVET/PEP ratio were shown and returned to control levels after the euthyroid state was maintained with T4. PEP correlated curvilinearly with serum T3 and T4 concentrations. However, LVET/PEP ratio increased linearly from hypothyroid to mild thyrotoxic patients and decreased gradually in severe thyrotoxic patients. The inverse correlations between serum Co-Q10 and T3 and T4 concentrations were shown in patients suffering from hypothyroidism to mild thyrotoxicosis. After the administration of 120 mg Co-Q10 for 7 days in mild untreated thyrotoxic patients, a significant shortening of PEP and an increase in LVET/PEP ratio and stroke volume were shown. These data indicate that cardiac function in terms of PEP and LVET/PEP ratio is markedly influenced by serum thyroid hormone concentrations and Co-Q10 modulates it.

  5. Alveolar abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001093.htm Alveolar abnormalities To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Alveolar abnormalities are changes in the tiny air sacs in ...

  6. Nail abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    Beau's lines; Fingernail abnormalities; Spoon nails; Onycholysis; Leukonychia; Koilonychia; Brittle nails ... 2012:chap 71. Zaiac MN, Walker A. Nail abnormalities associated with systemic pathologies. Clin Dermatol . 2013;31: ...

  7. Cardiomyocyte proliferation in cardiac development and regeneration: a guide to methodologies and interpretations.

    PubMed

    Leone, Marina; Magadum, Ajit; Engel, Felix B

    2015-10-01

    The newt and the zebrafish have the ability to regenerate many of their tissues and organs including the heart. Thus, a major goal in experimental medicine is to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying the regenerative capacity of these species. A wide variety of experiments have demonstrated that naturally occurring heart regeneration relies on cardiomyocyte proliferation. Thus, major efforts have been invested to induce proliferation of mammalian cardiomyocytes in order to improve cardiac function after injury or to protect the heart from further functional deterioration. In this review, we describe and analyze methods currently used to evaluate cardiomyocyte proliferation. In addition, we summarize the literature on naturally occurring heart regeneration. Our analysis highlights that newt and zebrafish heart regeneration relies on factors that are also utilized in cardiomyocyte proliferation during mammalian fetal development. Most of these factors have, however, failed to induce adult mammalian cardiomyocyte proliferation. Finally, our analysis of mammalian neonatal heart regeneration indicates experiments that could resolve conflicting results in the literature, such as binucleation assays and clonal analysis. Collectively, cardiac regeneration based on cardiomyocyte proliferation is a promising approach for improving adult human cardiac function after injury, but it is important to elucidate the mechanisms arresting mammalian cardiomyocyte proliferation after birth and to utilize better assays to determine formation of new muscle mass.

  8. Development of the hearts of lizards and snakes and perspectives to cardiac evolution.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Bjarke; van den Berg, Gert; van den Doel, Rick; Oostra, Roelof-Jan; Wang, Tobias; Moorman, Antoon F M

    2013-01-01

    Birds and mammals both developed high performance hearts from a heart that must have been reptile-like and the hearts of extant reptiles have an unmatched variability in design. Yet, studies on cardiac development in reptiles are largely old and further studies are much needed as reptiles are starting to become used in molecular studies. We studied the growth of cardiac compartments and changes in morphology principally in the model organism corn snake (Pantherophis guttatus), but also in the genotyped anole (Anolis carolinenis and A. sagrei) and the Philippine sailfin lizard (Hydrosaurus pustulatus). Structures and chambers of the formed heart were traced back in development and annotated in interactive 3D pdfs. In the corn snake, we found that the ventricle and atria grow exponentially, whereas the myocardial volumes of the atrioventricular canal and the muscular outflow tract are stable. Ventricular development occurs, as in other amniotes, by an early growth at the outer curvature and later, and in parallel, by incorporation of the muscular outflow tract. With the exception of the late completion of the atrial septum, the adult design of the squamate heart is essentially reached halfway through development. This design strongly resembles the developing hearts of human, mouse and chicken around the time of initial ventricular septation. Subsequent to this stage, and in contrast to the squamates, hearts of endothermic vertebrates completely septate their ventricles, develop an insulating atrioventricular plane, shift and expand their atrioventricular canal toward the right and incorporate the systemic and pulmonary venous myocardium into the atria.

  9. Development of the Hearts of Lizards and Snakes and Perspectives to Cardiac Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Bjarke; van den Berg, Gert; van den Doel, Rick; Oostra, Roelof-Jan; Wang, Tobias; Moorman, Antoon F. M.

    2013-01-01

    Birds and mammals both developed high performance hearts from a heart that must have been reptile-like and the hearts of extant reptiles have an unmatched variability in design. Yet, studies on cardiac development in reptiles are largely old and further studies are much needed as reptiles are starting to become used in molecular studies. We studied the growth of cardiac compartments and changes in morphology principally in the model organism corn snake (Pantherophis guttatus), but also in the genotyped anole (Anolis carolinenis and A. sagrei) and the Philippine sailfin lizard (Hydrosaurus pustulatus). Structures and chambers of the formed heart were traced back in development and annotated in interactive 3D pdfs. In the corn snake, we found that the ventricle and atria grow exponentially, whereas the myocardial volumes of the atrioventricular canal and the muscular outflow tract are stable. Ventricular development occurs, as in other amniotes, by an early growth at the outer curvature and later, and in parallel, by incorporation of the muscular outflow tract. With the exception of the late completion of the atrial septum, the adult design of the squamate heart is essentially reached halfway through development. This design strongly resembles the developing hearts of human, mouse and chicken around the time of initial ventricular septation. Subsequent to this stage, and in contrast to the squamates, hearts of endothermic vertebrates completely septate their ventricles, develop an insulating atrioventricular plane, shift and expand their atrioventricular canal toward the right and incorporate the systemic and pulmonary venous myocardium into the atria. PMID:23755108

  10. SU-E-J-129: Atlas Development for Cardiac Automatic Contouring Using Multi-Atlas Segmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, R; Yang, J; Pan, T; Milgrom, S; Pinnix, C; Shi, A; Yang, J; Liu, Y; Nguyen, Q; Gomez, D; Dabaja, B; Balter, P; Court, L; Liao, Z

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a set of atlases for automatic contouring of cardiac structures to determine heart radiation dose and the associated toxicity. Methods: Six thoracic cancer patients with both contrast and non-contrast CT images were acquired for this study. Eight radiation oncologists manually and independently delineated cardiac contours on the non-contrast CT by referring to the fused contrast CT and following the RTOG 1106 atlas contouring guideline. Fifteen regions of interest (ROIs) were delineated, including heart, four chambers, four coronary arteries, pulmonary artery and vein, inferior and superior vena cava, and ascending and descending aorta. Individual expert contours were fused using the simultaneous truth and performance level estimation (STAPLE) algorithm for each ROI and each patient. The fused contours became atlases for an in-house multi-atlas segmentation. Using leave-one-out test, we generated auto-segmented contours for each ROI and each patient. The auto-segmented contours were compared with the fused contours using the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) and the mean surface distance (MSD). Results: Inter-observer variability was not obvious for heart, chambers, and aorta but was large for other structures that were not clearly distinguishable on CT image. The average DSC between individual expert contours and the fused contours were less than 50% for coronary arteries and pulmonary vein, and the average MSD were greater than 4.0 mm. The largest MSD of expert contours deviating from the fused contours was 2.5 cm. The mean DSC and MSD of auto-segmented contours were within one standard deviation of expert contouring variability except the right coronary artery. The coronary arteries, vena cava, and pulmonary vein had DSC<70% and MSD>3.0 mm. Conclusion: A set of cardiac atlases was created for cardiac automatic contouring, the accuracy of which was comparable to the variability in expert contouring. However, substantial modification may need

  11. Cardiac Arrest-Induced Global Brain Hypoxia-Ischemia during Development Affects Spontaneous Activity Organization in Rat Sensory and Motor Thalamocortical Circuits during Adulthood.

    PubMed

    Shoykhet, Michael; Middleton, Jason W

    2016-01-01

    Normal maturation of sensory information processing in the cortex requires patterned synaptic activity during developmentally regulated critical periods. During early development, spontaneous synaptic activity establishes required patterns of synaptic input, and during later development it influences patterns of sensory experience-dependent neuronal firing. Thalamocortical neurons occupy a critical position in regulating the flow of patterned sensory information from the periphery to the cortex. Abnormal thalamocortical inputs may permanently affect the organization and function of cortical neuronal circuits, especially if they occur during a critical developmental window. We examined the effect of cardiac arrest (CA)-associated global brain hypoxia-ischemia in developing rats on spontaneous and evoked firing of somatosensory thalamocortical neurons and on large-scale correlations in the motor thalamocortical circuit. The mean spontaneous and sensory-evoked firing rate activity and variability were higher in CA injured rats. Furthermore, spontaneous and sensory-evoked activity and variability were correlated in uninjured rats, but not correlated in neurons from CA rats. Abnormal activity patterns of ventroposterior medial nucleus (VPm) neurons persisted into adulthood. Additionally, we found that neurons in the entopeduncular nucleus (EPN) in the basal ganglia had lower firing rates yet had higher variability and higher levels of burst firing after injury. Correlated levels of power in local field potentials (LFPs) between the EPN and the motor cortex (MCx) were also disrupted by injury. Our findings indicate that hypoxic-ischemic injury during development leads to abnormal spontaneous and sensory stimulus-evoked input patterns from thalamus to cortex. Abnormal thalamic inputs likely permanently and detrimentally affect the organization of cortical circuitry and processing of sensory information. Hypoxic-ischemic injury also leads to abnormal single neuron and

  12. Cardiac Arrest-Induced Global Brain Hypoxia-Ischemia during Development Affects Spontaneous Activity Organization in Rat Sensory and Motor Thalamocortical Circuits during Adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Shoykhet, Michael; Middleton, Jason W.

    2016-01-01

    Normal maturation of sensory information processing in the cortex requires patterned synaptic activity during developmentally regulated critical periods. During early development, spontaneous synaptic activity establishes required patterns of synaptic input, and during later development it influences patterns of sensory experience-dependent neuronal firing. Thalamocortical neurons occupy a critical position in regulating the flow of patterned sensory information from the periphery to the cortex. Abnormal thalamocortical inputs may permanently affect the organization and function of cortical neuronal circuits, especially if they occur during a critical developmental window. We examined the effect of cardiac arrest (CA)-associated global brain hypoxia-ischemia in developing rats on spontaneous and evoked firing of somatosensory thalamocortical neurons and on large-scale correlations in the motor thalamocortical circuit. The mean spontaneous and sensory-evoked firing rate activity and variability were higher in CA injured rats. Furthermore, spontaneous and sensory-evoked activity and variability were correlated in uninjured rats, but not correlated in neurons from CA rats. Abnormal activity patterns of ventroposterior medial nucleus (VPm) neurons persisted into adulthood. Additionally, we found that neurons in the entopeduncular nucleus (EPN) in the basal ganglia had lower firing rates yet had higher variability and higher levels of burst firing after injury. Correlated levels of power in local field potentials (LFPs) between the EPN and the motor cortex (MCx) were also disrupted by injury. Our findings indicate that hypoxic-ischemic injury during development leads to abnormal spontaneous and sensory stimulus-evoked input patterns from thalamus to cortex. Abnormal thalamic inputs likely permanently and detrimentally affect the organization of cortical circuitry and processing of sensory information. Hypoxic-ischemic injury also leads to abnormal single neuron and

  13. Development and Validation of a Heart Atlas to Study Cardiac Exposure to Radiation Following Treatment for Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Mary; Moran, Jean M.; Koelling, Todd; Chughtai, Aamer; Chan, June L.; Freedman, Laura; Hayman, James A.; Jagsi, Reshma; Jolly, Shruti; Larouere, Janice; Soriano, Julie; Marsh, Robin; Pierce, Lori J.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Cardiac toxicity is an important sequela of breast radiotherapy. However, the relationship between dose to cardiac structures and subsequent toxicity has not been well defined, partially due to variations in substructure delineation, which can lead to inconsistent dose reporting and the failure to detect potential correlations. Here we have developed a heart atlas and evaluated its effect on contour accuracy and concordance. Methods and Materials: A detailed cardiac computed tomography scan atlas was developed jointly by cardiology, cardiac radiology, and radiation oncology. Seven radiation oncologists were recruited to delineate the whole heart, left main and left anterior descending interventricular branches, and right coronary arteries on four cases before and after studying the atlas. Contour accuracy was assessed by percent overlap with gold standard atlas volumes. The concordance index was also calculated. Standard radiation fields were applied. Doses to observer-contoured cardiac structures were calculated and compared with gold standard contour doses. Pre- and post-atlas values were analyzed using a paired t test. Results: The cardiac atlas significantly improved contour accuracy and concordance. Percent overlap and concordance index of observer-contoured cardiac and gold standard volumes were 2.3-fold improved for all structures (p < 0.002). After application of the atlas, reported mean doses to the whole heart, left main artery, left anterior descending interventricular branch, and right coronary artery were within 0.1, 0.9, 2.6, and 0.6 Gy, respectively, of gold standard doses. Conclusions: This validated University of Michigan cardiac atlas may serve as a useful tool in future studies assessing cardiac toxicity and in clinical trials which include dose volume constraints to the heart.

  14. Overexpression of Sarcoendoplasmic Reticulum Calcium ATPase 2a Promotes Cardiac Sympathetic Neurotransmission via Abnormal Endoplasmic Reticulum and Mitochondria Ca2+ Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Shanks, Julia; Herring, Neil; Johnson, Errin; Liu, Kun; Li, Dan

    2017-01-01

    Reduced cardiomyocyte excitation–contraction coupling and downregulation of the SERCA2a (sarcoendoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase 2a) is associated with heart failure. This has led to viral transgene upregulation of SERCA2a in cardiomyocytes as a treatment. We hypothesized that SERCA2a gene therapy expressed under a similar promiscuous cytomegalovirus promoter could also affect the cardiac sympathetic neural axis and promote sympathoexcitation. Stellate neurons were isolated from 90 to 120 g male, Sprague–Dawley, Wistar Kyoto, and spontaneously hypertensive rats. Neurons were infected with Ad-mCherry or Ad-mCherry-hATP2Aa (SERCA2a). Intracellular Ca2+ changes were measured using fura-2AM in response to KCl, caffeine, thapsigargin, and carbonylcyanide-p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazine to mobilize intracellular Ca2+ stores. The effect of SERCA2a on neurotransmitter release was measured using [3H]-norepinephrine overflow from 340 to 360 g Sprague–Dawley rat atria in response to right stellate ganglia stimulation. Upregulation of SERCA2a resulted in greater neurotransmitter release in response to stellate stimulation compared with control (empty: 98.7±20.5 cpm, n=7; SERCA: 186.5±28.41 cpm, n=8; P<0.05). In isolated Sprague–Dawley rat stellate neurons, SERCA2a overexpression facilitated greater depolarization-induced Ca2+ transients (empty: 0.64±0.03 au, n=57; SERCA: 0.75±0.03 au, n=68; P<0.05), along with increased endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria Ca2+ load. Similar results were observed in Wistar Kyoto and age-matched spontaneously hypertensive rats, despite no further increase in endoplasmic reticulum load being observed in the spontaneously hypertensive rat (spontaneously hypertensive rats: empty, 0.16±0.04 au, n=18; SERCA: 0.17±0.02 au, n=25). In conclusion, SERCA2a upregulation in cardiac sympathetic neurons resulted in increased neurotransmission and increased Ca2+ loading into intracellular stores. Whether the increased Ca2+ transient and

  15. Role of echocardiography before cardiac resynchronization therapy: new advances and current developments.

    PubMed

    Marechaux, Sylvestre; Menet, Aymeric; Guyomar, Yves; Ennezat, Pierre-Vladimir; Guerbaai, Raphaëlle Ashley; Graux, Pierre; Tribouilloy, Christophe

    2016-11-01

    The role of echocardiography in improving the selection of patients who will benefit from cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) remains a source of debate. Although previous landmark reports have demonstrated a link between mechanical dyssynchrony, assessed by delays between left ventricle (LV) walls and response to CRT, the predictive value of these findings has not yet been confirmed in multicenter trials. Indeed, recent studies demonstrated that the classical assessment of LV mechanical dyssynchrony using delay between walls by echocardiography depends not only on LV electrical activation delay (electrical dyssynchrony), but also on abnormalities in regional contractility of the LV and/or loading conditions, which do not represent an appropriate target for CRT. Recent reports highlighted the value of new indices of electromechanical dyssynchrony obtained by echocardiography, to predict LV response and outcome after CRT including septal flash, left bundle branch block-typical pattern by longitudinal strain, apical rocking, septal strain patterns, and systolic stretch index. This was achieved using a mechanistic approach, based on the contractile consequences of electrical dyssynchrony. These indices are rarely found in patients with narrow QRS (<120 ms), whereas their frequency rises in patients with an increase in QRS duration (>120 ms). Theses indices should improve candidate selection for CRT in clinical practice, especially for patients in whom the benefit of CRT remains uncertain, for example, patients with intermediate QRS width (120-150 ms).

  16. Cardiac cameras.

    PubMed

    Travin, Mark I

    2011-05-01

    Cardiac imaging with radiotracers plays an important role in patient evaluation, and the development of suitable imaging instruments has been crucial. While initially performed with the rectilinear scanner that slowly transmitted, in a row-by-row fashion, cardiac count distributions onto various printing media, the Anger scintillation camera allowed electronic determination of tracer energies and of the distribution of radioactive counts in 2D space. Increased sophistication of cardiac cameras and development of powerful computers to analyze, display, and quantify data has been essential to making radionuclide cardiac imaging a key component of the cardiac work-up. Newer processing algorithms and solid state cameras, fundamentally different from the Anger camera, show promise to provide higher counting efficiency and resolution, leading to better image quality, more patient comfort and potentially lower radiation exposure. While the focus has been on myocardial perfusion imaging with single-photon emission computed tomography, increased use of positron emission tomography is broadening the field to include molecular imaging of the myocardium and of the coronary vasculature. Further advances may require integrating cardiac nuclear cameras with other imaging devices, ie, hybrid imaging cameras. The goal is to image the heart and its physiological processes as accurately as possible, to prevent and cure disease processes.

  17. Gene regulation, alternative splicing, and posttranslational modification of troponin subunits in cardiac development and adaptation: a focused review.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Juan-Juan; Jin, Jian-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Troponin plays a central role in regulating the contraction and relaxation of vertebrate striated muscles. This review focuses on the isoform gene regulation, alternative RNA splicing, and posttranslational modifications of troponin subunits in cardiac development and adaptation. Transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulations such as phosphorylation and proteolysis modifications, and structure-function relationships of troponin subunit proteins are summarized. The physiological and pathophysiological significances are discussed for impacts on cardiac muscle contractility, heart function, and adaptations in health and diseases.

  18. Cardiomyogenesis in the Developing Heart Is Regulated by c-kit-Positive Cardiac Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira-Martins, João; Ogórek, Barbara; Cappetta, Donato; Matsuda, Alex; Signore, Sergio; D'Amario, Domenico; Kostyla, James; Steadman, Elisabeth; Ide-Iwata, Noriko; Sanada, Fumihiro; Iaffaldano, Grazia; Ottolenghi, Sergio; Hosoda, Toru; Leri, Annarosa; Kajstura, Jan; Anversa, Piero; Rota, Marcello

    2012-01-01

    Rationale Embryonic and fetal myocardial growth is characterized by a dramatic increase in myocyte number, but whether the expansion of the myocyte compartment is dictated by activation and commitment of resident cardiac stem cells (CSCs), division of immature myocytes or both is currently unknown. Objectives In this study, we tested whether prenatal cardiac development is controlled by activation and differentiation of CSCs and whether division of c-kit-positive CSCs in the mouse heart is triggered by spontaneous Ca2+ oscillations. Results We report that embryonic-fetal c-kit-positive CSCs are self-renewing, clonogenic and multipotent in vitro and in vivo. The growth and commitment of c-kit-positive CSCs is responsible for the generation of the myocyte progeny of the developing heart. The close correspondence between values computed by mathematical modeling and direct measurements of myocyte number at E9, E14, E19 and one day after birth strongly suggests that the organogenesis of the embryonic heart is dependent on a hierarchical model of cell differentiation regulated by resident CSCs. The growth promoting effects of c-kit-positive CSCs are triggered by spontaneous oscillations in intracellular Ca2+, mediated by IP3 receptor activation, which condition asymmetric stem cell division and myocyte lineage specification. Conclusions Myocyte formation derived from CSC differentiation is the major determinant of cardiac growth during development. Division of c-kit-positive CSCs in the mouse is promoted by spontaneous Ca2+ spikes, which dictate the pattern of stem cell replication and the generation of a myocyte progeny at all phases of prenatal life and up to one day after birth. PMID:22275487

  19. Sex differences in abnormal white matter development associated with conduct disorder in children

    PubMed Central

    Decety, Jean; Yoder, Keith J.; Lahey, Benjamin B.

    2015-01-01

    Associations between white matter pathway abnormalities and antisocial personality disorder in adults are well replicated, and there is some evidence for an association of white matter abnormalities with conduct disorder (CD) in adolescents. In this study, white matter maturation using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) was examined in 110 children aged 10.0 ± 0.8 years selected to vary widely in their numbers of CD symptoms. The results replicated age-related increases in fractional anisotropy (FA) found in previous studies. There was not a significant association between the number of CD symptoms and FA, but CD symptoms were found to be significantly associated with greater axial and radial diffusivity in a broad range of white matter tracts, particularly in girls. In complementary analyses, there were similar significant differences in axial and radial diffusivity between children who met diagnostic criteria for CD and healthy children with no symptoms of CD, particularly in girls. Brain structural abnormalities may contribute to the emergence of CD in childhood, perhaps playing a greater role in girls. PMID:26195297

  20. Sex differences in abnormal white matter development associated with conduct disorder in children.

    PubMed

    Decety, Jean; Yoder, Keith J; Lahey, Benjamin B

    2015-08-30

    Associations between white matter pathway abnormalities and antisocial personality disorder in adults are well replicated, and there is some evidence for an association of white matter abnormalities with conduct disorder (CD) in adolescents. In this study, white matter maturation using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) was examined in 110 children aged 10.0 ± 0.8 years selected to vary widely in their numbers of CD symptoms. The results replicated age-related increases in fractional anisotropy (FA) found in previous studies. There was not a significant association between the number of CD symptoms and FA, but CD symptoms were found to be significantly associated with greater axial and radial diffusivity in a broad range of white matter tracts, particularly in girls. In complementary analyses, there were similar significant differences in axial and radial diffusivity between children who met diagnostic criteria for CD and healthy children with no symptoms of CD, particularly in girls. Brain structural abnormalities may contribute to the emergence of CD in childhood, perhaps playing a greater role in girls.

  1. Terrestrial apnoeas and the development of cardiac control in Australian fur seal (Arctocephalus pusillus doriferus) pups.

    PubMed

    Deacon, N L; Arnould, J P Y

    2009-04-01

    The development of cardiac control in association with terrestrial respiration patterns was examined throughout the period of maternal dependence in Australian fur seal pups. Resting eupnoic heart rate and respiration rate were significantly correlated (r (2) = 0.49) and both decreased with age (P < 0.05 in both cases). From an early age (1 month), pups displayed terrestrial apnoeas (18.1 +/- 0.5 s) accompanied by substantial bradycardia (127 beats min(-1), a 13% decrease from eupnoic HR). Terrestrial apnoea duration increased significantly with age reaching a mean of 41 s just prior to weaning, slightly lower than the mean dive duration (52 s) previously recorded for pups of the same age. Correspondingly, mean apnoic heart rate decreased with age to 74 beats min(-1) just prior to weaning, representing a 25% decrease on eupnoic heart rate. Importantly, concomitant with the decrease in mean apnoic heart rate with age, an increase in the control of bradycardia was evident with the variability in instantaneous apnoic heart decreasing such that older pups were able to maintain a low steady heart rate for the duration of the apnoea. The changes seen in these parameters are similar to those reported during postnatal development in elephant seals (Mirounga spp.) and harbour seals (Phoca vitulina), and are considered indicative of the development of cardiac control. These findings suggest a common strategy for the development of bradycardia control in both otariid and phocid seals.

  2. The functional diversity of essential genes required for mammalian cardiac development.

    PubMed

    Clowes, Christopher; Boylan, Michael G S; Ridge, Liam A; Barnes, Emma; Wright, Jayne A; Hentges, Kathryn E

    2014-08-01

    Genes required for an organism to develop to maturity (for which no other gene can compensate) are considered essential. The continuing functional annotation of the mouse genome has enabled the identification of many essential genes required for specific developmental processes including cardiac development. Patterns are now emerging regarding the functional nature of genes required at specific points throughout gestation. Essential genes required for development beyond cardiac progenitor cell migration and induction include a small and functionally homogenous group encoding transcription factors, ligands and receptors. Actions of core cardiogenic transcription factors from the Gata, Nkx, Mef, Hand, and Tbx families trigger a marked expansion in the functional diversity of essential genes from midgestation onwards. As the embryo grows in size and complexity, genes required to maintain a functional heartbeat and to provide muscular strength and regulate blood flow are well represented. These essential genes regulate further specialization and polarization of cell types along with proliferative, migratory, adhesive, contractile, and structural processes. The identification of patterns regarding the functional nature of essential genes across numerous developmental systems may aid prediction of further essential genes and those important to development and/or progression of disease.

  3. Gender-based differences in cardiac diseases

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Pei-Chi; Clancy, Colleen E.

    2011-01-01

    It has been observed that the incidence of heart failure and Brugada syndrome are higher in men, while women are more likely to have QT interval prolongation and develop torsades de pointes (TdP). Over the past decade, new studies have improved our understanding of the mechanisms of abnormal repolarization and the relationship between gender differences in cardiac repolarization and presentation of clinical syndromes. Nevertheless, the causes of gender-based differences in cardiac disease are still not completely clear. This review paper briefly summarized what is currently known about gender differences in heart failure, Brugada syndrome and long QT syndrome from molecular mechanisms to clinical presentations. PMID:23554675

  4. Development and validation of a heart atlas to study cardiac exposure to radiation following treatment for breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Mary; Moran, Jean M.; Koelling, Todd; Chughtai, Aamer; Chan, June L.; Freedman, Laura; Hayman, James A.; Jagsi, Reshma; Jolly, Shruti; Larouere, Janice; Soriano, Julie; Marsh, Robin; Pierce, Lori J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Cardiac toxicity is an important sequela of breast radiotherapy. However, the relationship between dose to cardiac structures and subsequent toxicity has not been well defined, partially due to variation in substructure delineation, which can lead to inconsistent dose reporting and the failure to detect potential correlations. Here we have developed a heart atlas and evaluated its effect on contour accuracy and concordance. Methods and Materials A detailed cardiac CT atlas was developed jointly by cardiology, cardiac radiology, and radiation oncology. Seven radiation oncologists were recruited to delineate the whole heart (WH), left main (LM), left anterior descending interventricular branch (LAD), and right coronary arteries (RCA) on four cases before and after studying the atlas. Contour accuracy was assessed by percent overlap with gold standard (GS) atlas volumes. The concordance index (CI) was also calculated. Standard radiation fields were applied. Doses to observer-contoured cardiac (OC) structures were calculated, and compared with GS contour doses. Pre- and post- atlas values were analyzed using a paired t-test. Results The cardiac atlas significantly improved contour accuracy and concordance. Percent overlap and CI of OC and GS volumes improved for all structures, by up to 2.3-fold (p<0.002). After application of the atlas, reported WH, LM, LAD, and RCA mean doses were within 0.1, 0.9, 2.6, and 0.6 Gy of GS doses. Conclusions This validated University of Michigan cardiac atlas may serve as a useful tool in future studies assessing cardiac toxicity and in clinical trials which include dose volume constraints to the heart. PMID:20421148

  5. Introduction: December 2015 HeartWeek Issue of Cardiology in the Young - Highlights of HeartWeek 2015: Challenges and Dilemmas of Pediatric Cardiac Care including Heart Failure in Children and Congenital Abnormalities of the Coronary Arteries.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Jeffrey P

    2015-12-01

    This December Issue of Cardiology in the Young represents the 13th annual publication in Cardiology in the Young generated from the two meetings that composed "HeartWeek in Florida". "HeartWeek in Florida", the joint collaborative project sponsored by the Cardiac Centre at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, together with Johns Hopkins All Children's Heart Institute of Saint Petersburg, Florida, averages over 1000 attendees every year and is now recognised as one of the major planks of continuing medical and nursing education for those working in the fields of diagnosis and treatment of cardiac disease in the foetus, neonate, infant, child, and adult. "HeartWeek in Florida" combines the International Symposium on Congenital Heart Disease, organised by All Children's Hospital and Johns Hopkins Medicine, and entering its 16th year, with the Annual Postgraduate Course in Paediatric Cardiovascular Disease, organised by The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia entering its 19th year. This December 2015 Issue of Cardiology in the Young features highlights of the two meetings that compose HeartWeek. Johns Hopkins All Children's Heart Institute's 15th Annual International Symposium on Congenital Heart Disease was held at the Renaissance Vinoy Resort & Golf Club, Saint Petersburg, Florida, from Friday, 6 February, 2015, to Monday, 9 February, 2015. This Symposium was co-sponsored by The American Association for Thoracic Surgery and its special focus was "Congenital Abnormalities of the Coronary Arteries". The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia's annual meeting - Cardiology 2015, the 18th Annual Update on Paediatric and Congenital Cardiovascular Disease: "Challenges and Dilemmas" - was held at the Hyatt Regency Scottsdale Resort and Spa at Gainey Ranch, Scottsdale, Arizona, from Wednesday, 11 February, 2015, to Sunday, 15 February, 2015. We would like to acknowledge the tremendous contributions made to paediatric and congenital cardiac care

  6. Enabling microscale and nanoscale approaches for bioengineered cardiac tissue.

    PubMed

    Chan, Vincent; Raman, Ritu; Cvetkovic, Caroline; Bashir, Rashid

    2013-03-26

    In this issue of ACS Nano, Shin et al. present their finding that the addition of carbon nanotubes (CNT) in gelatin methacrylate (GelMA) results in improved functionality of bioengineered cardiac tissue. These CNT-GelMA hybrid materials demonstrate cardiac tissue with enhanced electrophysiological performance; improved mechanical integrity; better cell adhesion, viability, uniformity, and organization; increased beating rate and lowered excitation threshold; and protective effects against cardio-inhibitory and cardio-toxic drugs. In this Perspective, we outline recent progress in cardiac tissue engineering and prospects for future development. Bioengineered cardiac tissues can be used to build "heart-on-a-chip" devices for drug safety and efficacy testing, fabricate bioactuators for biointegrated robotics and reverse-engineered life forms, treat abnormal cardiac rhythms, and perhaps one day cure heart disease with tissue and organ transplants.

  7. [Sudden cardiac death in individuals with normal hearts: an update].

    PubMed

    González-Melchor, Laila; Villarreal-Molina, Teresa; Iturralde-Torres, Pedro; Medeiros-Domingo, Argelia

    2014-01-01

    Sudden death (SD) is a tragic event and a world-wide health problem. Every year, near 4-5 million people experience SD. SD is defined as the death occurred in 1h after the onset of symptoms in a person without previous signs of fatality. It can be named "recovered SD" when the case received medical attention, cardiac reanimation effective defibrillation or both, surviving the fatal arrhythmia. Cardiac channelopathies are a group of diseases characterized by abnormal ion channel function due to genetic mutations in ion channel genes, providing increased susceptibility to develop cardiac arrhythmias and SD. Usually the death occurs before 40 years of age and in the autopsy the heart is normal. In this review we discuss the main cardiac channelopathies involved in sudden cardiac death along with current management of cases and family members that have experienced such tragic event.

  8. Micro-perfusion for cardiac tissue engineering: development of a bench-top system for the culture of primary cardiac cells.

    PubMed

    Khait, Luda; Hecker, Louise; Radnoti, Desmond; Birla, Ravi K

    2008-05-01

    Tissue-engineered constructs have high metabolic requirements during in vitro culture necessitating the development of micro-perfusion systems to maintain high functional performance. In this study, we describe the design, fabrication, and testing of a novel micro-perfusion system to support the culture of primary cardiac cells. Our system consists of a micro-incubator with independent stages for 35-mm tissue culture plates with inflow/outflow manifolds for fluid delivery and aspiration. A peristaltic pump is utilized for fluid delivery and vacuum for fluid aspiration. Oxygen saturation, pH, and temperature are regulated for the media while temperature is regulated within the micro-incubator, fluid reservoir, and oxygenation chamber. Validation of the perfusion system was carried out using primary cardiac myocytes, isolated from 2- to 3-day-old neonatal rat hearts, plated on collagen-coated tissue culture plates. Two million cells/plate were used and the perfusion system was run for 1 h (without the need for a cell culture incubator) while controls were maintained in a standard cell culture incubator. We evaluated the cell viability, cell adhesion, total protein, total RNA, and changes in the expression of SERCA2 and phospholamban using RT-PCR, with N = 6 for each group. We found that there was no significant change in any variable during the 1-h run in the perfusion system. These studies served to demonstrate the compatibility of the perfusion system to support short-term culture of primary cardiac cells.

  9. Developing competence in cardiac care through the use of blended learning: course members' and mentors' accounts.

    PubMed

    Iley, Karen; McInulty, Lorna; Jones, Ian; Yorke, Janelle; Johnson, Martin

    2011-05-01

    The use of blended learning to develop the clinical knowledge and skills of healthcare professionals is increasing. This paper reports the qualitative findings from an evaluation of a blended learning course designed to equip registered nurses with the knowledge and skills required to practice competently in cardiac nursing. The aims of the study were to explore whether a cardiac care course could be successfully delivered mainly online and it had any impact on the students' clinical practice. The sample consisted of course members and their mentors. Data were obtained through focus groups and interviews and analysed using thematic analysis. All students felt they had benefited from undertaking the course. Mentors identified higher levels of confidence and greater depth of knowledge and skills amongst their students. Areas identified for further development by both groups were firstly, the preparation of mentors for their role in supporting the students undertaking an online course and secondly, the expected level of competence that students needed to display in practice. This study indicates online learning is useful in enhancing student competence but may be wrongly seen as requiring less time commitment for both course members and mentors when compared to taught courses.

  10. Development and characterization of novel electrically conductive PANI-PGS composites for cardiac tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Qazi, Taimoor H; Rai, Ranjana; Dippold, Dirk; Roether, Judith E; Schubert, Dirk W; Rosellini, Elisabetta; Barbani, Niccoletta; Boccaccini, Aldo R

    2014-06-01

    Cardiovascular diseases, especially myocardial infarction, are the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the world, also resulting in huge economic burdens on national economies. A cardiac patch strategy aims at regenerating an infarcted heart by providing healthy functional cells to the injured region via a carrier substrate, and providing mechanical support, thereby preventing deleterious ventricular remodeling. In the present work, polyaniline (PANI) was doped with camphorsulfonic acid and blended with poly(glycerol-sebacate) at ratios of 10, 20 and 30vol.% PANI content to produce electrically conductive composite cardiac patches via the solvent casting method. The composites were characterized in terms of their electrical, mechanical and physicochemical properties. The in vitro biodegradability of the composites was also evaluated. Electrical conductivity increased from 0Scm(-1) for pure PGS to 0.018Scm(-1) for 30vol.% PANI-PGS samples. Moreover, the conductivities were preserved for at least 100h post fabrication. Tensile tests revealed an improvement in the elastic modulus, tensile strength and elasticity with increasing PANI content. The degradation products caused a local drop in pH, which was higher in all composite samples compared with pure PGS, hinting at a buffering effect due to the presence of PANI. Finally, the cytocompatibility of the composites was confirmed when C2C12 cells attached and proliferated on samples with varying PANI content. Furthermore, leaching of acid dopants from the developed composites did not have any deleterious effect on the viability of C2C12 cells. Taken together, these results confirm the potential of PANI-PGS composites for use as substrates to modulate cellular behavior via electrical stimulation, and as biocompatible scaffolds for cardiac tissue engineering applications.

  11. Prenatal nicotine exposure in rhesus monkeys compromises development of brainstem and cardiac monoamine pathways involved in perinatal adaptation and sudden infant death syndrome: amelioration by vitamin C.

    PubMed

    Slotkin, Theodore A; Seidler, Frederic J; Spindel, Eliot R

    2011-01-01

    Maternal smoking during pregnancy greatly enhances perinatal morbidity/mortality and is the major risk factor for Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS). Studies in developing rodents indicate that nicotine is a neuroteratogen that targets monoamine pathways involved in the responses to hypoxia that are in turn, hypothesized to contribute to these adverse events. We administered nicotine to pregnant Rhesus monkeys from gestational day 30 through 160 by continuous infusion, achieving maternal plasma levels comparable to those in smokers; we examined neurochemical parameters immediately after Cesarean delivery at the end of the exposure period. Nicotine evoked elevations in brainstem serotonin levels and serotonin turnover, indicating hyperactivity of these pathways. The same treatment evoked a deficit in cardiac norepinephrine levels. Both effects were offset by coadministration of the antioxidant, Vitamin C. Brainstem serotonin hyperinnervation is a hallmark of SIDS, and the hyperactivity seen here can also account for the downregulation of serotonin receptors noted in this disorder. Deficient cardiac sympathetic innervation is also consistent with increased vulnerability to hypoxia during delivery or in the agonal event in SIDS. Our results thus indicate that nicotine exposure in a primate model produces brainstem and autonomic abnormalities of the key monoamine systems that govern the response to hypoxia, indicate an important role of oxidative stress in the adverse effects, and point to potential amelioration strategies that could offset these particular effects of nicotine.

  12. microRNA-10a Targets T-box 5 to Inhibit the Development of Cardiac Hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dan; Zhai, Guanqun; Ji, Yangfei; Jing, Haiyun

    2017-02-07

    The mechanism of cardiac hypertrophy involving microRNAs (miRNAs) is attracting increasing attention. Our study aimed to investigate the role of miR-10a in cardiac hypertrophy development and the underlying regulatory mechanism.Transverse abdominal aortic constriction (TAAC) surgery was performed to establish a cardiac hypertrophy rat model, and angiotensin II (AngII) was used to induce cardiac hypertrophy in cultured neonatal rat cardiomyocytes. Expression of T-box 5 (TBX5) and miR-10a was altered by cell transfection of siRNA or miRNA mimic/inhibitor. Leucine incorporation assay, histological and cytological examination, quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR), and Western blot were performed to detect the effects of miR-10a and TBX5 on cardiac hypertrophy. Dual-luciferase reporter assay was conducted to verify the regulation of TBX5 by miR-10a.miR-10a was down-regulated, and TBX5 was up-regulated in the rat model and AngII-stimulated cardiomyocytes. miR-10a inhibited TBX5 expression by directly targeting the binding site in Tbx5 3'UTR. Overexpression of miR-10a in AngII-treated cardiomyocytes decreased relative cell area, and significantly reduced the mRNA levels of natriuretic peptide A (Nppa), myosin heavy chain 7 cardiac muscle beta (Myh7), and leucine incorporation (P < 0.01 or P < 0.001). Knockdown of Tbx5 had similar effects on AngII-induced cardiomyocytes.Our findings indicate that miR-10a may inhibit cardiac hypertrophy via targeting Tbx5. Thus, miR-10a provides promising therapeutic strategies for the treatment of cardiac hypertrophy.

  13. Meiotic abnormalities

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 19, describes meiotic abnormalities. These include nondisjunction of autosomes and sex chromosomes, genetic and environmental causes of nondisjunction, misdivision of the centromere, chromosomally abnormal human sperm, male infertility, parental age, and origin of diploid gametes. 57 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Bardoxolone methyl prevents the development and progression of cardiac and renal pathophysiologies in mice fed a high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Camer, Danielle; Yu, Yinghua; Szabo, Alexander; Wang, Hongqin; Dinh, Chi H L; Huang, Xu-Feng

    2016-01-05

    Obesity caused by the consumption of a high-fat (HF) diet is a major risk factor for the development of associated complications, such as heart and kidney failure. A semi-synthetic triterpenoid, bardoxolone methyl (BM) was administrated to mice fed a HF diet for 21 weeks to determine if it would prevent the development of obesity-associated cardiac and renal pathophysiologies. Twelve week old male C57BL/6J mice were fed a lab chow (LC), HF (40% fat), or a HF diet supplemented with 10 mg/kg/day BM in drinking water. After 21 weeks, the left ventricles of hearts and cortex of kidneys of mice were collected for analysis. Histological analysis revealed that BM prevented HF diet-induced development of structural changes in the heart and kidneys. BM prevented HF diet-induced decreases in myocyte number in cardiac tissue, although this treatment also elevated cardiac endothelin signalling molecules. In the kidneys, BM administration prevented HF diet-induced renal corpuscle hypertrophy and attenuated endothelin signalling. Furthermore, in both the hearts and kidneys of mice fed a HF diet, BM administration prevented HF diet-induced increases in fat accumulation, macrophage infiltration and tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) gene expression. These findings suggest that BM prevents HF diet-induced developments of cardiac and renal pathophysiologies in mice fed a chronic HF diet by preventing inflammation. Moreover, these results suggest that BM has the potential as a therapeutic for preventing obesity-induced cardiac and renal pathophysiologies.

  15. Skeletal development and abnormalities of the vertebral column and of the fins in hatchery-reared turbot Scophthalmus maximus.

    PubMed

    Tong, X H; Liu, Q H; Xu, S H; Ma, D Y; Xiao, Z Z; Xiao, Y S; Li, J

    2012-03-01

    To describe the skeletal development and abnormalities in turbot Scophthalmus maximus, samples were collected every day from hatching to 60 days after hatching (DAH). A whole-mount cartilage and bone-staining technique was used. Vertebral ontogeny started with the formation of anterior haemal arches at 5·1 mm standard length (L(S) ) c. 11 DAH, and was completed by the full attainment of parapophyses at 16·9 mm L(S) c. 31 DAH. Vertebral centra started to develop at 6·3 mm L(S) c. 16 DAH and ossification in all centra was visible at 11·0 mm L(S) c. 25 DAH. The caudal fin appeared at 5·1 mm L(S) c. 11 DAH and ossification was visible at 20·6 mm L(S) c. 37 DAH. The onset of dorsal and anal fin elements appeared at 5·8 mm L(S) c. 15 DAH and 6·3 mm L(S) c. 16 DAH, respectively. Ossifications of both dorsal fin and anal fin were visible at 20·6 mm L(S) c. 37 DAH. The pectorals were the only fins present before first feeding, their ossifications were completed at 23·5 mm L(S) c. 48 DAH. Pelvic fins began forming at 7·2 mm L(S) c. 19 DAH and calcification of the whole structure was visible at 19·8 mm L(S) c. 36 DAH. In the present study, 24 types of skeletal abnormalities were observed. About 51% of individuals presented skeletal abnormalities, and the highest occurrence was found in the haemal region of the vertebral column. As for each developmental stage, the most common abnormalities were in the dorsal fin during early metamorphic period (stage 2), vertebral fusion during climax metamorphosis (stage 3) and caudal fin abnormality during both late-metamorphic period (stage 4) and post-metamorphic period (stage 5). Such research will be useful for early detection of skeletal malformations during different growth periods of reared S. maximus.

  16. Signaling molecules, transcription growth factors and other regulators revealed from in-vivo and in-vitro models for the regulation of cardiac development.

    PubMed

    Meganathan, Kesavan; Sotiriadou, Isaia; Natarajan, Karthick; Hescheler, Jürgen; Sachinidis, Agapios

    2015-03-15

    Several in-vivo heart developmental models have been applied to decipher the cardiac developmental patterning encompassing early, dorsal, cardiac and visceral mesoderm as well as various transcription factors such as Gata, Hand, Tin, Dpp, Pnr. The expression of cardiac specific transcription factors, such as Gata4, Tbx5, Tbx20, Tbx2, Tbx3, Mef2c, Hey1 and Hand1 are of fundamental significance for the in-vivo cardiac development. Not only the transcription factors, but also the signaling molecules involved in cardiac development were conserved among various species. Enrichment of the bone morphogenic proteins (BMPs) in the anterior lateral plate mesoderm is essential for the initiation of myocardial differentiation and the cardiac developmental process. Moreover, the expression of a number of cardiac transcription factors and structural genes initiate cardiac differentiation in the medial mesoderm. Other signaling molecules such as TGF-beta, IGF-1/2 and the fibroblast growth factor (FGF) play a significant role in cardiac repair/regeneration, ventricular heart development and specification of early cardiac mesoderm, respectively. The role of the Wnt signaling in cardiac development is still controversial discussed, as in-vitro results differ dramatically in relation to the animal models. Embryonic stem cells (ESC) were utilized as an important in-vitro model for the elucidation of the cardiac developmental processes since they can be easily manipulated by numerous signaling molecules, growth factors, small molecules and genetic manipulation. Finally, in the present review the dynamic role of the long noncoding RNA and miRNAs in the regulation of cardiac development are summarized and discussed.

  17. The developing role of Neuregulin1 in cardiac regenerative stem cell therapy.

    PubMed

    P Blomberg, Christopher; Lee, Juyong; P Morgan, James

    2014-01-01

    Myocardial infarction, heart failure, and chronic ischemic heart disease account for the majority of the cardiovascular burden. The current treatment strategies focus on limiting the progression of disease and preserving cardiac myocardium. The goal of stem cell therapy, on the other hand, is to reverse or replace damaged cardiac tissue. Over the past two decades many studies have been conducted to understand stem cell performance, survival, and the potential for cardiac repair. Neuregulin1, an epidermal growth factor family member, promotes embryonic stem cell differentiation into the cardiac lineage and improves survival in bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell and embryonic endothelial progenitor cells. Current clinical trials are actively pursuing Neuregulin1's therapeutic potential in the areas of heart failure and cardiac ischemia. It is the intent of this paper to review the current knowledge of Neuregulin1 in stem cell biology and discuss the potential of using Neuregulin1 to improve stem cell therapy for cardiac repair.

  18. Long-term increase in coherence between the basal ganglia and motor cortex after asphyxial cardiac arrest and resuscitation in developing rats

    PubMed Central

    Aravamuthan, Bhooma R.; Shoykhet, Michael

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The basal ganglia are vulnerable to injury during cardiac arrest. Movement disorders are a common morbidity in survivors. Yet, neuronal motor network changes post-arrest remain poorly understood. METHODS We compared function of the motor network in adult rats that, during postnatal week 3, underwent 9.5 min of asphyxial cardiac arrest (n = 9) or sham intervention (n = 8). Six months after injury, we simultaneously recorded local field potentials (LFP) from the primary motor cortex (MCx) and single neuron firing and LFP from the rat entopeduncular nucleus (EPN), which corresponds to the primate globus pallidus pars interna. Data were analyzed for firing rates, power, and coherence between MCx and EPN spike and LFP activity. RESULTS Cardiac arrest survivors display chronic motor deficits. EPN firing rate is lower in cardiac arrest survivors (19.5 ± 2.4 Hz) compared with controls (27.4 ± 2.7 Hz; P < 0.05). Cardiac arrest survivors also demonstrate greater coherence between EPN single neurons and MCx LFP (3—100 Hz; P < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS This increased coherence indicates abnormal synchrony in the neuronal motor network after cardiac arrest. Increased motor network synchrony is thought to be antikinetic in primary movement disorders. Characterization of motor network synchrony after cardiac arrest may help guide management of post-hypoxic movement disorders. PMID:26083760

  19. Abnormal gene expression in cerebellum of Npc1-/- mice during postnatal development

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Guanghong; Wen, Zhining; Irizarry, Kristopher; Huang, Ying; Mitsouras, Katherine; Darmani, Mariam; Leon, Terry; Shi, Leming; Bi, Xiaoning

    2010-01-01

    Niemann-Pick Type C disease is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder with abnormal lipid storage as the major cellular pathologic hallmark. Genetic analyses have identified mutations in NPC1 gene in the great majority of cases, while mutations in NPC2 account for the remainders. Yet, little is known regarding the cellular mechanisms responsible for NPC pathogenesis, especially for neurodegeneration, which is the usual cause of death. To identify critical steps that could account for the pathological manifestations of the disease in one of the most affected brain structures, we performed global gene expression analysis in the cerebellum from three-week old Npc1+/+ and Npc1-/- mice with two different microarray platforms (Agilent and Illumina). Differentially-expressed genes identified by both microarray platforms were then subjected to KEGG pathway analysis. Expression of genes in six pathways was significantly altered in Npc1-/- mice; functionally, these signaling pathways belong to the following three categories: 1) steroid and terpenoid biosynthesis, 2) immune response, and 3) cell adhesion/motility. In addition, the expression of several proteins involved in lipid transport was significantly altered in Npc1-/- mice. Our results provide novel molecular insight regarding the mechanisms of pathogenesis in NPC disease and reveal potential new therapeutic targets. PMID:20153740

  20. The Philadelphia Neurodevelopmental Cohort: A publicly available resource for the study of normal and abnormal brain development in youth.

    PubMed

    Satterthwaite, Theodore D; Connolly, John J; Ruparel, Kosha; Calkins, Monica E; Jackson, Chad; Elliott, Mark A; Roalf, David R; Ryan Hopsona, Karthik Prabhakaran; Behr, Meckenzie; Qiu, Haijun; Mentch, Frank D; Chiavacci, Rosetta; Sleiman, Patrick M A; Gur, Ruben C; Hakonarson, Hakon; Gur, Raquel E

    2016-01-01

    The Philadelphia Neurodevelopmental Cohort (PNC) is a large-scale study of child development that combines neuroimaging, diverse clinical and cognitive phenotypes, and genomics. Data from this rich resource is now publicly available through the Database of Genotypes and Phenotypes (dbGaP). Here we focus on the data from the PNC that is available through dbGaP and describe how users can access this data, which is evolving to be a significant resource for the broader neuroscience community for studies of normal and abnormal neurodevelopment.

  1. Development and clinical study of mobile 12-lead electrocardiography based on cloud computing for cardiac emergency.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Hideo; Uchimura, Yuji; Waki, Kayo; Omae, Koji; Takeuchi, Ichiro; Ohe, Kazuhiko

    2013-01-01

    To improve emergency services for accurate diagnosis of cardiac emergency, we developed a low-cost new mobile electrocardiography system "Cloud Cardiology®" based upon cloud computing for prehospital diagnosis. This comprises a compact 12-lead ECG unit equipped with Bluetooth and Android Smartphone with an application for transmission. Cloud server enables us to share ECG simultaneously inside and outside the hospital. We evaluated the clinical effectiveness by conducting a clinical trial with historical comparison to evaluate this system in a rapid response car in the real emergency service settings. We found that this system has an ability to shorten the onset to balloon time of patients with acute myocardial infarction, resulting in better clinical outcome. Here we propose that cloud-computing based simultaneous data sharing could be powerful solution for emergency service for cardiology, along with its significant clinical outcome.

  2. The Neural Crest in Cardiac Congenital Anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Keyte, Anna; Hutson, Mary Redmond

    2012-01-01

    This review discusses the function of neural crest as they relate to cardiovascular defects. The cardiac neural crest cells are a subpopulation of cranial neural crest discovered nearly 30 years ago by ablation of premigratory neural crest. The cardiac neural crest cells are necessary for normal cardiovascular development. We begin with a description of the crest cells in normal development, including their function in remodeling the pharyngeal arch arteries, outflow tract septation, valvulogenesis, and development of the cardiac conduction system. The cells are also responsible for modulating signaling in the caudal pharynx, including the second heart field. Many of the molecular pathways that are known to influence specification, migration, patterning and final targeting of the cardiac neural crest cells are reviewed. The cardiac neural crest cells play a critical role in the pathogenesis of various human cardiocraniofacial syndromes such as DiGeorge, Velocardiofacial, CHARGE, Fetal Alcohol, Alagille, LEOPARD, and Noonan syndromes, as well as Retinoic Acid Embryopathy. The loss of neural crest cells or their dysfunction may not always directly cause abnormal cardiovascular development, but are involved secondarily because crest cells represent a major component in the complex tissue interactions in the head, pharynx and outflow tract. Thus many of the human syndromes linking defects in the heart, face and brain can be better understood when considered within the context of a single cardiocraniofacial developmental module with the neural crest being a key cell type that interconnects the regions. PMID:22595346

  3. Murine Dishevelled 3 Functions in Redundant Pathways with Dishevelled 1 and 2 in Normal Cardiac Outflow Tract, Cochlea, and Neural Tube Development

    PubMed Central

    Etheridge, S. Leah; Ray, Saugata; Li, Shuangding; Hamblet, Natasha S.; Lijam, Nardos; Tsang, Michael; Greer, Joy; Kardos, Natalie; Wang, Jianbo; Sussman, Daniel J.; Chen, Ping; Wynshaw-Boris, Anthony

    2008-01-01

    Dishevelled (Dvl) proteins are important signaling components of both the canonical β-catenin/Wnt pathway, which controls cell proliferation and patterning, and the planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway, which coordinates cell polarity within a sheet of cells and also directs convergent extension cell (CE) movements that produce narrowing and elongation of the tissue. Three mammalian Dvl genes have been identified and the developmental roles of Dvl1 and Dvl2 were previously determined. Here, we identify the functions of Dvl3 in development and provide evidence of functional redundancy among the three murine Dvls. Dvl3 −/− mice died perinatally with cardiac outflow tract abnormalities, including double outlet right ventricle and persistent truncus arteriosis. These mutants also displayed a misorientated stereocilia in the organ of Corti, a phenotype that was enhanced with the additional loss of a single allele of the PCP component Vangl2/Ltap (LtapLp/+). Although neurulation appeared normal in both Dvl3 −/− and LtapLp/+ mutants, Dvl3 +/−;LtapLp/+ combined mutants displayed incomplete neural tube closure. Importantly, we show that many of the roles of Dvl3 are also shared by Dvl1 and Dvl2. More severe phenotypes were observed in Dvl3 mutants with the deficiency of another Dvl, and increasing Dvl dosage genetically with Dvl transgenes demonstrated the ability of Dvls to compensate for each other to enable normal development. Interestingly, global canonical Wnt signaling appeared largely unaffected in the double Dvl mutants, suggesting that low Dvl levels are sufficient for functional canonical Wnt signals. In summary, we demonstrate that Dvl3 is required for cardiac outflow tract development and describe its importance in the PCP pathway during neurulation and cochlea development. Finally, we establish several developmental processes in which the three Dvls are functionally redundant. PMID:19008950

  4. Reversal of abnormal cardiac parameters following mitral valve replacement for severe mitral stenosis in relation to pulmonary artery pressure: A retrospective study of noninvasive parameters – Early and late pattern

    PubMed Central

    Parvathy, Usha T.; Rajan, Rajesh; Faybushevich, Alexander Georgevich

    2016-01-01

    Background and objectives Although the regression of pulmonary hypertension (PH) in mitral stenosis (MS) has been studied over varying periods postintervention, corresponding studies on the cardiac chamber alterations after surgery are very limited. We sought to determine the degree of reversal of these and the clinical status in connection with that of pulmonary artery pressures (PAPs) in the early and late postoperative periods. Methods The preoperative, early, and 1-year postoperative data – functional class (FC), cardiothoracic ratio (CTR) in chest X-ray (CXR), and echocardiographically left atrium (LA), right atrium (RA), right ventricle (RV), left ventricle (LV), and pulmonary artery (PA) dimensions, PAP, tricuspid regurgitation (TR) – of 50 patients who had mitral valve replacement (MVR) for MS with PH were retrospectively analyzed for correlations with PAP (Pearson’s), and their change (t-test), in relation to that in PAP. PH group-based [Group (Gp)-I PAP ≤60 mmHg, Gp-II PAP >60 mmHg] analysis highlighted the differences. Results All parameters significantly correlated with the baseline PAP (p < 0.05), except LA (r = 0.081, p = 0.577). Postoperatively, there was significant reduction in all parameters (p < 0.001) and increase in LV (p < 0.003). The PAP regression was 39.42%; with the decrease in CTR, LA, and RA related to it, the early changes being significant (p < 0.01). The RV and PA showed lesser reduction (8.61% and 9.42%), late reduction being more conspicuous. The changes were greater and significant in Gp-II (especially PAP, RV, and PA). At 1 year, PAP normalized in only 19 (38%). Residual PH and chamber enlargement prevailed more in Gp-II. Conclusions This study emphasizes the importance of the baseline PAP in MS to which was proportionate the functional disability and the cardiac chamber alterations (except LA). Their postoperative improvement accompanying the PAP regression differed in degree and time frame

  5. Cardiac ion channels

    PubMed Central

    Priest, Birgit T; McDermott, Jeff S

    2015-01-01

    Ion channels are critical for all aspects of cardiac function, including rhythmicity and contractility. Consequently, ion channels are key targets for therapeutics aimed at cardiac pathophysiologies such as atrial fibrillation or angina. At the same time, off-target interactions of drugs with cardiac ion channels can be the cause of unwanted side effects. This manuscript aims to review the physiology and pharmacology of key cardiac ion channels. The intent is to highlight recent developments for therapeutic development, as well as elucidate potential mechanisms for drug-induced cardiac side effects, rather than present an in-depth review of each channel subtype. PMID:26556552

  6. Using mouse models to understand normal and abnormal urogenital tract development.

    PubMed

    Mendelsohn, Cathy

    2009-01-01

    Removal of toxic substances from the blood depends on patent connections between the kidneys, ureters and bladder that are established when the ureter is transposed from its original insertion site in the Wolffian duct, to the bladder, its final insertion site. The Ureteral Bud Theory of Mackie and Stephens suggests that repositioning of the ureter orifice occurs as the trigone forms from the common nephric duct (CND), the caudal-most Wolffian duct segment. According to this model, insertion of the CND into the bladder and its expansion into the trigone both repositions the ureter in the bladder and enables it to separate from the Wolffian duct. The availability of new mouse models has enabled to re-examine this hypothesis using morphological analysis and lineage studies to follow the fate of the ureter and CND during the maturation process. We find that in contrast to what has been previously thought, the CND does not differentiate into the trigone but instead, undergoes apoptosis, a step that enables the ureter to separate from the Wolffian duct. Apoptosis occurs as the CND and ureter merge with the urogenital sinus positioning the ureter orifice at a site close to the Wolffian duct. Finally, expansion of the bladder moves the ureter orifice which is now fused with epithelium to its final position which is at the bladder neck. Interestingly, CND apoptosis appears to depend on close proximity to the bladder, suggesting that the bladder may be a source of signals that induce cell death. Together, these studies provide new insights into the normal process of ureter maturation, and shed light on possible causes of obstruction and reflux, ureteral abnormalities that affect 1-2% of the human population.

  7. DLX4 is associated with orofacial clefting and abnormal jaw development

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Di; Mandal, Shyamali; Choi, Alex; Anderson, August; Prochazkova, Michaela; Perry, Hazel; Gil-Da-Silva-Lopes, Vera L.; Lao, Richard; Wan, Eunice; Tang, Paul Ling-Fung; Kwok, Pui-yan; Klein, Ophir; Zhuan, Bian; Slavotinek, Anne M.

    2015-01-01

    Cleft lip and/or palate (CL/P) are common structural birth defects in humans. We used exome sequencing to study a patient with bilateral CL/P and identified a single nucleotide deletion in the patient and her similarly affected son—c.546_546delG, predicting p.Gln183Argfs*57 in the Distal-less 4 (DLX4) gene. The sequence variant was absent from databases, predicted to be deleterious and was verified by Sanger sequencing. In mammals, there are three Dlx homeobox clusters with closely located gene pairs (Dlx1/Dlx2, Dlx3/Dlx4, Dlx5/Dlx6). In situ hybridization showed that Dlx4 was expressed in the mesenchyme of the murine palatal shelves at E12.5, prior to palate closure. Wild-type human DLX4, but not mutant DLX4_c.546delG, could activate two murine Dlx conserved regulatory elements, implying that the mutation caused haploinsufficiency. We showed that reduced DLX4 expression after short interfering RNA treatment in a human cell line resulted in significant up-regulation of DLX3, DLX5 and DLX6, with reduced expression of DLX2 and significant up-regulation of BMP4, although the increased BMP4 expression was demonstrated only in HeLa cells. We used antisense morpholino oligonucleotides to target the orthologous Danio rerio gene, dlx4b, and found reduced cranial size and abnormal cartilaginous elements. We sequenced DLX4 in 155 patients with non-syndromic CL/P and CP, but observed no sequence variants. From the published literature, Dlx1/Dlx2 double homozygous null mice and Dlx5 homozygous null mice both have clefts of the secondary palate. This first finding of a DLX4 mutation in a family with CL/P establishes DLX4 as a potential cause of human clefts. PMID:25954033

  8. Development and application of human virtual excitable tissues and organs: from premature birth to sudden cardiac death.

    PubMed

    Holden, Arun V

    2010-12-01

    The electrical activity of cardiac and uterine tissues has been reconstructed by detailed computer models in the form of virtual tissues. Virtual tissues are biophysically and anatomically detailed, and represent quantitatively predictive models of the physiological and pathophysiological behaviours of tissue within an isolated organ. The cell excitation properties are quantitatively reproduced by equations that describe the kinetics of a few dozen proteins. These equations are derived from experimental measurements of membrane potentials, ionic currents, fluxes, and concentrations. Some of the measurements were taken from human cells and human ion channel proteins expressed in non-human cells, but they were mostly taken from cells of other animal species. Data on tissue geometry and architecture are obtained from the diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging of ex vivo or post mortem tissue, and are used to compute the spread of current in the tissue. Cardiac virtual tissues are well established and reproduce normal and pathological patterns of cardiac excitation within the atria or ventricles of the human heart. They have been applied to increase the understanding of normal cardiac electrophysiology, to evaluate the candidate mechanisms for re-entrant arrhythmias that lead to sudden cardiac death, and to predict the tissue level effects of mutant or pharmacologically-modified ion channels. The human full-term virtual uterus is still in development. This virtual tissue reproduces the in vitro behaviour of uterine tissue biopsies, and provides possible mechanisms for premature labour.

  9. Development of a Web GIS Application for Visualizing and Analyzing Community Out of Hospital Cardiac Arrest Patterns.

    PubMed

    Semple, Hugh; Qin, Han; Sasson, Comilla

    2013-01-01

    Improving survival rates at the neighborhood level is increasingly seen as a priority for reducing overall rates of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) in the United States. Since wide disparities exist in OHCA rates at the neighborhood level, it is important for public health officials and residents to be able to quickly locate neighborhoods where people are at elevated risk for cardiac arrest and to target these areas for educational outreach and other mitigation strategies. This paper describes an OHCA web mapping application that was developed to provide users with interactive maps and data for them to quickly visualize and analyze the geographic pattern of cardiac arrest rates, bystander CPR rates, and survival rates at the neighborhood level in different U.S. cities. The data comes from the CARES Registry and is provided over a period spanning several years so users can visualize trends in neighborhood out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patterns. Users can also visualize areas that are statistical hot and cold spots for cardiac arrest and compare OHCA and bystander CPR rates in the hot and cold spots. Although not designed as a public participation GIS (PPGIS), this application seeks to provide a forum around which data and maps about local patterns of OHCA can be shared, analyzed and discussed with a view of empowering local communities to take action to address the high rates of OHCA in their vicinity.

  10. Regional Microstructural and Volumetric Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Abnormalities in the Corpus Callosum of Neonates With Congenital Heart Defect Undergoing Cardiac Surgery.

    PubMed

    Hagmann, Cornelia; Singer, Jitka; Latal, Beatrice; Knirsch, Walter; Makki, Malek

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of the study is to investigate the structural development of the corpus callosum in term neonates with congenital heart defect before and after surgery using diffusion tensor imaging and 3-dimensional T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We compared parallel and radial diffusions, apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), fractional anisotropy, and volume of 5 substructures of the corpus callosum: genu, rostral body, body, isthmus, and splenium. Compared to healthy controls, we found a significantly lower volume of the splenium and total corpus callosum and a higher radial diffusion and lower fractional anisotropy in the splenium of patients presurgery; a lower volume in all substructures in the postsurgery group; higher radial diffusion in the rostral body, body, and splenium; and a higher apparent diffusion coefficient in the splenium of postsurgery patients. Similar fractional anisotropy changes in congenital heart defect patients were reported in preterm infants. Our findings in apparent diffusion coefficient in the splenium of these patients (pre and postsurgery) are comparable to findings in preterm neonates with psychomotor delay. Delayed maturation of the isthmus was also reported in preterm infants.

  11. The influence of motor activity on the development of cardiac arrhythmias during experimental emotional stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulyaninskiy, L. S.; Urmancheyeva, T. G.; Stepanyan, Y. P.; Fufacheva, A. A.; Gritsak, A. V.; Kuznetsova, B. A.; Kvitka, A. A.

    1982-01-01

    Experimental emotional stress which can produce various disorders of cardiac rhythm: sinus tachycardia, atrial fibrillation, ventricular, extrasystoles and paroxysmal ventricular tachysystoles was studied. In these conditions the adrenalin content in the blood and myocardium is increased 3 to 4 times. It is found that moderate motor activity leads to a relative decrease of adrenalin in the myocardium and arrest of cardiac arrhythmias.

  12. Hypertension-induced remodeling of cardiac excitation-contraction coupling in ventricular myocytes occurs prior to hypertrophy development.

    PubMed

    Chen-Izu, Ye; Chen, Ling; Bányász, Tamás; McCulle, Stacey L; Norton, Byron; Scharf, Steven M; Agarwal, Anuj; Patwardhan, Abhijit; Izu, Leighton T; Balke, C William

    2007-12-01

    Hypertension is a major risk factor for developing cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure. Previous studies show that hypertrophied and failing hearts display alterations in excitation-contraction (E-C) coupling. However, it is unclear whether remodeling of the E-C coupling system occurs before or after heart disease development. We hypothesized that hypertension might cause changes in the E-C coupling system that, in turn, induce hypertrophy. Here we tested this hypothesis by utilizing the progressive development of hypertensive heart disease in the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) to identify a window period when SHR had just developed hypertension but had not yet developed hypertrophy. We found the following major changes in cardiac E-C coupling during this window period. 1) Using echocardiography and hemodynamics measurements, we found a decrease of left ventricular ejection fraction and cardiac output after the onset of hypertension. 2) Studies in isolated ventricular myocytes showed that myocardial contraction was also enhanced at the same time. 3) The action potential became prolonged. 4) The E-C coupling gain was increased. 5) The systolic Ca(2+) transient was augmented. These data show that profound changes in E-C coupling already occur at the onset of hypertension and precede hypertrophy development. Prolonged action potential and increased E-C coupling gain synergistically increase the Ca(2+) transient. Functionally, augmented Ca(2+) transient causes enhancement of myocardial contraction that can partially compensate for the greater workload to maintain cardiac output. The increased Ca(2+) signaling cascade as a molecular mechanism linking hypertension to cardiac hypertrophy development is also discussed.

  13. Overlap of abnormal photoreceptor development and progressive degeneration in Leber congenital amaurosis caused by NPHP5 mutation.

    PubMed

    Downs, Louise M; Scott, Erin M; Cideciyan, Artur V; Iwabe, Simone; Dufour, Valerie; Gardiner, Kristin L; Genini, Sem; Marinho, Luis Felipe; Sumaroka, Alexander; Kosyk, Mychajlo S; Swider, Malgorzata; Aguirre, Geoffrey K; Jacobson, Samuel G; Beltran, William A; Aguirre, Gustavo D

    2016-10-01

    Ciliary defects can result in severe disorders called ciliopathies. Mutations in NPHP5 cause a ciliopathy characterized by severe childhood onset retinal blindness, Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA), and renal disease. Using the canine NPHP5-LCA model we compared human and canine retinal phenotypes, and examined the early stages of photoreceptor development and degeneration, the kinetics of photoreceptor loss, the progression of degeneration and the expression profiles of selected genes. NPHP5-mutant dogs recapitulate the human phenotype of very early loss of rods, and relative retention of the central retinal cone photoreceptors that lack function. In mutant dogs, rod and cone photoreceptors have a sensory cilium, but develop and function abnormally and then rapidly degenerate; L/M cones are more severely affected than S-cones. The lack of outer segments in mutant cones indicates a ciliary dysfunction. Genes expressed in mutant rod or both rod and cone photoreceptors show significant downregulation, while those expressed only in cones are unchanged. Many genes in cell-death and -survival pathways also are downregulated. The canine disease is a non-syndromic LCA-ciliopathy, with normal renal structures and no CNS abnormalities. Our results identify the critical time points in the pathogenesis of the photoreceptor disease, and bring us closer to defining a potential time window for testing novel therapies for translation to patients.

  14. Developing a Cardiac Rehabilitation Education Resource for Rural Health Workers in Queensland: Reviewing the Process and Outcomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Elizabeth; O'Connor-Fleming, M.; Tooth, L.; Humphries, R. J.

    2002-01-01

    A resource manual on cardiac rehabilitation education was developed for health workers providing patient education in rural and remote Queensland (Australia). A process evaluation of the manual received feedback from 5 key informants and 31 rural health care workers following a 3-month trial. Overall, feedback was positive. Recommended content…

  15. Common arterial trunk and ventricular non-compaction in Lrp2 knockout mice indicate a crucial role of LRP2 in cardiac development

    PubMed Central

    Baardman, Maria E.; Zwier, Mathijs V.; Wisse, Lambertus J.; Gittenberger-de Groot, Adriana C.; Kerstjens-Frederikse, Wilhelmina S.; Hofstra, Robert M. W.; Jurdzinski, Angelika; Hierck, Beerend P.; Jongbloed, Monique R. M.; Berger, Rolf M. F.; Plösch, Torsten; DeRuiter, Marco C.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Lipoprotein-related receptor protein 2 (LRP2) is important for development of the embryonic neural crest and brain in both mice and humans. Although a role in cardiovascular development can be expected, the hearts of Lrp2 knockout (KO) mice have not yet been investigated. We studied the cardiovascular development of Lrp2 KO mice between embryonic day 10.5 (E10.5) and E15.5, applying morphometry and immunohistochemistry, using antibodies against Tfap2α (neural crest cells), Nkx2.5 (second heart field), WT1 (epicardium derived cells), tropomyosin (myocardium) and LRP2. The Lrp2 KO mice display a range of severe cardiovascular abnormalities, including aortic arch anomalies, common arterial trunk (persistent truncus arteriosus) with coronary artery anomalies, ventricular septal defects, overriding of the tricuspid valve and marked thinning of the ventricular myocardium. Both the neural crest cells and second heart field, which are essential for the lengthening and growth of the right ventricular outflow tract, are abnormally positioned in the Lrp2 KO. This explains the absence of the aorto-pulmonary septum, which leads to common arterial trunk and ventricular septal defects. Severe blebbing of the epicardial cells covering the ventricles is seen. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition does occur; however, there are fewer WT1-positive epicardium-derived cells in the ventricular wall as compared to normal, coinciding with the myocardial thinning and deep intertrabecular spaces. LRP2 plays a crucial role in cardiovascular development in mice. This corroborates findings of cardiac anomalies in humans with LRP2 mutations. Future studies should reveal the underlying signaling mechanisms in which LRP2 is involved during cardiogenesis. PMID:26822476

  16. Common arterial trunk and ventricular non-compaction in Lrp2 knockout mice indicate a crucial role of LRP2 in cardiac development.

    PubMed

    Baardman, Maria E; Zwier, Mathijs V; Wisse, Lambertus J; Gittenberger-de Groot, Adriana C; Kerstjens-Frederikse, Wilhelmina S; Hofstra, Robert M W; Jurdzinski, Angelika; Hierck, Beerend P; Jongbloed, Monique R M; Berger, Rolf M F; Plösch, Torsten; DeRuiter, Marco C

    2016-04-01

    Lipoprotein-related receptor protein 2 (LRP2) is important for development of the embryonic neural crest and brain in both mice and humans. Although a role in cardiovascular development can be expected, the hearts ofLrp2knockout (KO) mice have not yet been investigated. We studied the cardiovascular development ofLrp2KO mice between embryonic day 10.5 (E10.5) and E15.5, applying morphometry and immunohistochemistry, using antibodies against Tfap2α (neural crest cells), Nkx2.5 (second heart field), WT1 (epicardium derived cells), tropomyosin (myocardium) and LRP2. TheLrp2KO mice display a range of severe cardiovascular abnormalities, including aortic arch anomalies, common arterial trunk (persistent truncus arteriosus) with coronary artery anomalies, ventricular septal defects, overriding of the tricuspid valve and marked thinning of the ventricular myocardium. Both the neural crest cells and second heart field, which are essential for the lengthening and growth of the right ventricular outflow tract, are abnormally positioned in theLrp2KO. This explains the absence of the aorto-pulmonary septum, which leads to common arterial trunk and ventricular septal defects. Severe blebbing of the epicardial cells covering the ventricles is seen. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition does occur; however, there are fewer WT1-positive epicardium-derived cells in the ventricular wall as compared to normal, coinciding with the myocardial thinning and deep intertrabecular spaces. LRP2 plays a crucial role in cardiovascular development in mice. This corroborates findings of cardiac anomalies in humans withLRP2mutations. Future studies should reveal the underlying signaling mechanisms in which LRP2 is involved during cardiogenesis.

  17. Cerebellar cortex development in the weaver condition presents regional and age-dependent abnormalities without differences in Purkinje cells neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Martí, Joaquín; Santa-Cruz, María C; Hervás, José P; Bayer, Shirley A; Villegas, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Ataxias are neurological disorders associated with the degeneration of Purkinje cells (PCs). Homozygous weaver mice (wv/wv) have been proposed as a model for hereditary cerebellar ataxia because they present motor abnormalities and PC loss. To ascertain the physiopathology of the weaver condition, the development of the cerebellar cortex lobes was examined at postnatal day (P): P8, P20 and P90. Three approaches were used: 1) quantitative determination of several cerebellar features; 2) qualitative evaluation of the developmental changes occurring in the cortical lobes; and 3) autoradiographic analyses of PC generation and placement. Our results revealed a reduction in the size of the wv/wv cerebellum as a whole, confirming previous results. However, as distinguished from these reports, we observed that quantified parameters contribute differently to the abnormal growth of the wv/wv cerebellar lobes. Qualitative analysis showed anomalies in wv/wv cerebellar cytoarchitecture, depending on the age and lobe analyzed. Such abnormalities included the presence of the external granular layer after P20 and, at P90, ectopic cells located in the molecular layer following several placement patterns. Finally, we obtained autoradiographic evidence that wild-type and wv/wv PCs presented similar neurogenetic timetables, as reported. However, the innovative character of this current work lies in the fact that the neurogenetic gradients of wv/wv PCs were not modified from P8 to P90. A tendency for the accumulation of late-formed PCs in the anterior and posterior lobes was found, whereas early-generated PCs were concentrated in the central and inferior lobes. These data suggested that wv/wv PCs may migrate properly to their final destinations. The extrapolation of our results to patients affected with cerebellar ataxias suggests that all cerebellar cortex lobes are affected with several age-dependent alterations in cytoarchitectonics. We also propose that PC loss may be regionally

  18. Analysis of the Sonic Hedgehog signaling pathway in normal and abnormal bladder development.

    PubMed

    DeSouza, Kristin R; Saha, Monalee; Carpenter, Ashley R; Scott, Melissa; McHugh, Kirk M

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we examined the expression of Sonic Hedgehog, Patched, Gli1, Gli2, Gli3 and Myocardin in the developing bladders of male and female normal and megabladder (mgb-/-) mutant mice at embryonic days 12 through 16 by in situ hybridization. This analysis indicated that each member of the Sonic Hedgehog signaling pathway as well as Myocardin displayed distinct temporal and spatial patterns of expression during normal bladder development. In contrast, mgb-/- bladders showed both temporal and spatial changes in the expression of Patched, Gli1 and Gli3 as well as a complete lack of Myocardin expression. These changes occurred primarily in the outer mesenchyme of developing mgb-/- bladders consistent with the development of an amuscular bladder phenotype in these animals. These results provide the first comprehensive analysis of the Sonic Hedgehog signaling pathway during normal bladder development and provide strong evidence that this key signaling cascade is critical in establishing radial patterning in the developing bladder. In addition, the lack of detrusor smooth muscle development observed in mgb-/- mice is associated with bladder-specific temporospatial changes in Sonic Hedgehog signaling coupled with a lack of Myocardin expression that appears to result in altered patterning of the outer mesenchyme and poor initiation and differentiation of smooth muscle cells within this region of the developing bladder.

  19. Improving pediatric cardiac surgical care in developing countries: matching resources to needs.

    PubMed

    Dearani, Joseph A; Neirotti, Rodolfo; Kohnke, Emily J; Sinha, Kingshuk K; Cabalka, Allison K; Barnes, Roxann D; Jacobs, Jeffrey P; Stellin, Giovanni; Tchervenkov, Christo I; Cushing, John C

    2010-01-01

    This article reviews a systematic approach to the design and support of pediatric cardiac surgery programs in the developing world with the guidance and strategies of Children's HeartLink, an experienced non-government organization for more than 40 years. An algorithm with criteria for the selection of a partner site is outlined. A comprehensive education strategy from the physician to the allied health care provider is the mainstay for successful program development. In a partner program, the road to successful advancement and change depends on many factors, such as government support, hospital administration support, medical staff leadership, and a committed and motivated faculty with requisite skills, incentives, and resources. In addition to these factors, it is essential that the development effort includes considerations of environment (eg, governmental support, regulatory environment, and social structure) and health system (elements related to affordability, access, and awareness of care) that impact success. Partner programs should be willing to initiate a clinical database with the intent to analyze and critique their results to optimize quality assurance and improve outcomes.

  20. Abnormal Development of the Femoral Head Epiphysis in an Infant with no Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip Apparent on Ultrasonography

    PubMed Central

    Atalar, Hakan; Gunay, Cuneyd; Aytekin, Mahmut Nedim

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: In the investigation of hip development in newborns and infants, ultrasonography and radiography are widely used, but their optimal roles in this setting remain controversial. Case Report: Here we describe an 8.5-month-old infant who had undergone hip radiography at a primary care facility and was referred to our hospital to be evaluated for developmental dysplasia of the hip. Ultrasonography showed no developmental dysplasia of the hip according to standard criteria, but developmental retardation of the femoral head was apparent on the radiograph. Conclusion: This patient's findings demonstrate that abnormalities in femoral head epiphysis development can go undetected during routine ultrasonographic evaluations for developmental dysplasia of the hip. PMID:27298982

  1. Development and Feasibility of a Smartphone, ECG and GPS Based System for Remotely Monitoring Exercise in Cardiac Rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Worringham, Charles; Rojek, Amanda; Stewart, Ian

    2011-01-01

    Background Despite its efficacy and cost-effectiveness, exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation is undertaken by less than one-third of clinically eligible cardiac patients in every country for which data is available. Reasons for non-participation include the unavailability of hospital-based rehabilitation programs, or excessive travel time and distance. For this reason, there have been calls for the development of more flexible alternatives. Methodology and Principal Findings We developed a system to enable walking-based cardiac rehabilitation in which the patient's single-lead ECG, heart rate, GPS-based speed and location are transmitted by a programmed smartphone to a secure server for real-time monitoring by a qualified exercise scientist. The feasibility of this approach was evaluated in 134 remotely-monitored exercise assessment and exercise sessions in cardiac patients unable to undertake hospital-based rehabilitation. Completion rates, rates of technical problems, detection of ECG changes, pre- and post-intervention six minute walk test (6 MWT), cardiac depression and Quality of Life (QOL) were key measures. The system was rated as easy and quick to use. It allowed participants to complete six weeks of exercise-based rehabilitation near their homes, worksites, or when travelling. The majority of sessions were completed without any technical problems, although periodic signal loss in areas of poor coverage was an occasional limitation. Several exercise and post-exercise ECG changes were detected. Participants showed improvements comparable to those reported for hospital-based programs, walking significantly further on the post-intervention 6 MWT, 637 m (95% CI: 565–726), than on the pre-test, 524 m (95% CI: 420–655), and reporting significantly reduced levels of cardiac depression and significantly improved physical health-related QOL. Conclusions and Significance The system provided a feasible and very flexible alternative form of supervised cardiac

  2. Recent developments in the management of patients resuscitated from cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Jentzer, Jacob C; Clements, Casey M; Murphy, Joseph G; Wright, R Scott

    2017-02-16

    Cardiac arrest is the leading cause of death in Europe and the United States. Many patients who are initially resuscitated die in the hospital, and hospital survivors often have substantial neurologic dysfunction. Most cardiac arrests are caused by coronary artery disease; patients with coronary artery disease likely benefit from early coronary angiography and intervention. After resuscitation, cardiac arrest patients remain critically ill and frequently suffer cardiogenic shock and multiorgan failure. Early cardiopulmonary stabilization is important to prevent worsening organ injury. To achieve best patient outcomes, comprehensive critical care management is needed, with primary goals of stabilizing hemodynamics and preventing progressive brain injury. Targeted temperature management is frequently recommended for comatose survivors of cardiac arrest to mitigate the neurologic injury that drives outcomes. Accurate neurologic assessment is central to managing care of cardiac arrest survivors and should combine physical examination with objective neurologic testing, with the caveat that delaying neurologic prognosis is essential to avoid premature withdrawal of supportive care. A combination of clinical findings and diagnostic results should be used to estimate the likelihood of functional recovery. This review focuses on recent advances in care and specific cardiac intensive care strategies that may improve morbidity and mortality for patients after cardiac arrest.

  3. White-matter tract abnormalities and antisocial behavior: A systematic review of diffusion tensor imaging studies across development.

    PubMed

    Waller, Rebecca; Dotterer, Hailey L; Murray, Laura; Maxwell, Andrea M; Hyde, Luke W

    2017-01-01

    Antisocial behavior (AB), including aggression, violence, and theft, is thought be underpinned by abnormal functioning in networks of the brain critical to emotion processing, behavioral control, and reward-related learning. To better understand the abnormal functioning of these networks, research has begun to investigate the structural connections between brain regions implicated in AB using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), which assesses white-matter tract microstructure. This systematic review integrates findings from 22 studies that examined the relationship between white-matter microstructure and AB across development. In contrast to a prior hypothesis that AB is associated with greater diffusivity specifically in the uncinate fasciculus, findings suggest that adult AB is associated with greater diffusivity across a range of white-matter tracts, including the uncinate fasciculus, inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, cingulum, corticospinal tract, thalamic radiations, and corpus callosum. The pattern of findings among youth studies was inconclusive with both higher and lower diffusivity found across association, commissural, and projection and thalamic tracts.

  4. Steroid abnormalities and the developing brain: Declarative memory for emotionally arousing and neutral material in children with congenital adrenal hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Maheu, Françoise S.; Merke, Deborah P.; Schroth, Elizabeth A.; Keil, Margaret F.; Hardin, Julie; Poeth, Kaitlin; Pine, Daniel S.; Ernst, Monique

    2008-01-01

    Summary Steroid hormones modulate memory in animals and human adults. Little is known on the developmental effect of these hormones on the neural networks underlying memory. Using Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia (CAH) as a naturalistic model of early steroid abnormalities, this study examines the consequences of CAH on memory and its neural correlates for emotionally arousing and neutral material in children. Seventeen patients with CAH and 17 age- and sex-matched healthy children (ages 12 to 14 years) completed the study. Subjects were presented positive, negative and neutral pictures. Memory recall occurred about 30 minutes after viewing the pictures. Children with CAH showed memory deficits for negative pictures compared to healthy children (p < 0.01). There were no group differences on memory performance for either positive or neutral pictures (p’s >0.1). In patients, 24h urinary-free cortisol levels (reflecting glucocorticoid replacement therapy) and testosterone levels were not associated with memory performance. These findings suggest that early steroid imbalances affect memory for negative material in children with CAH. Such memory impairments may result from abnormal brain organization and function following hormonal dysfunction during critical periods of development. PMID:18162329

  5. Structural abnormalities develop in the brain after ablation of the gene encoding nonmuscle myosin II-B heavy chain.

    PubMed

    Tullio, A N; Bridgman, P C; Tresser, N J; Chan, C C; Conti, M A; Adelstein, R S; Hara, Y

    2001-04-23

    Ablation of nonmuscle myosin heavy chain II-B (NMHC-B) in mice results in severe hydrocephalus with enlargement of the lateral and third ventricles. All B(-)/B(-) mice died either during embryonic development or on the day of birth (PO). Neurons cultured from superior cervical ganglia of B(-)/B(-) mice between embryonic day (E) 18 and P0 showed decreased rates of neurite outgrowth, and their growth cones had a distinctive narrow morphology compared with those from normal mice. Serial sections of E12.5, E13.5, and E15 mouse brains identified developmental defects in the ventricular neuroepithelium. On E12.5, disruption of the coherent ventricular surface and disordered cell migration of neuroepithelial and differentiated cells were seen at various points in the ventricular walls. These abnormalities resulted in the formation of rosettes in various regions of the brain and spinal cord. On E13.5 and E15, disruption of the ventricular surface and aberrant protrusions of neural cells into the ventricles became more prominent. By E18.5 and P0, the defects in cells lining the ventricular wall resulted in an obstructive hydrocephalus due to stenosis or occlusion of the third ventricle and cerebral aqueduct. These defects may be caused by abnormalities in the cell adhesive properties of neuroepithelial cells and suggest that NMHC-B is essential for both early and late developmental processes in the mammalian brain.

  6. Steroid abnormalities and the developing brain: declarative memory for emotionally arousing and neutral material in children with congenital adrenal hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Maheu, Françoise S; Merke, Deborah P; Schroth, Elizabeth A; Keil, Margaret F; Hardin, Julie; Poeth, Kaitlin; Pine, Daniel S; Ernst, Monique

    2008-02-01

    Steroid hormones modulate memory in animals and human adults. Little is known on the developmental effects of these hormones on the neural networks underlying memory. Using Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) as a naturalistic model of early steroid abnormalities, this study examines the consequences of CAH on memory and its neural correlates for emotionally arousing and neutral material in children. Seventeen patients with CAH and 17 age- and sex-matched healthy children (ages 12-14 years) completed the study. Subjects were presented positive, negative and neutral pictures. Memory recall occurred about 30min after viewing the pictures. Children with CAH showed memory deficits for negative pictures compared to healthy children (p<0.01). There were no group differences on memory performance for either positive or neutral pictures (p>0.1). In patients, 24h urinary-free cortisol levels (reflecting glucocorticoid replacement therapy) and testosterone levels were not associated with memory performance. These findings suggest that early steroid imbalances affect memory for negative material in children with CAH. Such memory impairments may result from abnormal brain organization and function following hormonal dysfunction during critical periods of development.

  7. Genetic disorders with both hearing loss and cardiovascular abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Belmont, John W; Craigen, William; Martinez, Hugo; Jefferies, John Lynn

    2011-01-01

    There has been a growing appreciation for conditions that affect hearing and which are accompanied by significant cardiovascular disorders. In this chapter we consider several broad classes of conditions including deafness due to abnormal structural development of the inner ear, those with physiological abnormalities in the inner ear sensory apparatus, and conditions with progressive loss of function of sensory cells or middle ear functions. Because of shared developmental controls, inner ear malformations are often associated with congenital heart defects and can be part of complex syndromes that affect other organs and neurodevelopmental outcome. Physiological disorders of the hair cells can lead to hearing loss and can be associated with cardiac arrhythmias, especially long QT syndrome. In addition, cellular energy defects such as mitochondrial disorders can affect maintenance of hair cells and are often associated with cardiomyopathy. Lysosomal storage diseases and other disorders affecting connective tissue can lead to chronic middle ear disease, with conductive hearing loss and also cause cardiac valve disease and/or cardiomyopathy. The genetic basis for these conditions is heterogeneous and includes chromosomal/genomic disorders, de novo dominant mutations, and familial dominant, autosomal-recessive, and mitochondrial (matrilineal) inheritance. Taken together, there are more than 100 individual genes implicated in genetic hearing impairment that are also associated with congenital and/or progressive cardiac abnormalities. These genes encode transcription factors, chromatin remodeling factors, components of signal transduction pathways, ion channels, mitochondrial proteins and assembly factors, extracellular matrix proteins, and enzymes involved in lysosomal functions.

  8. Redox Abnormalities as a Vulnerability Phenotype for Autism and Related Alterations in CNS Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-01

    involved in autism pathogenesis also occur in many children that do not develop ASD. This suggests there is an underlying vulnerability phenotype that...involved in autism pathogenesis occur in many more children than those that develop ASD. This suggests that there is an underlying vulnerability phenotype...hypothesis to explain the observations that the multiple environmental insults that have been suggested to be involved in autism pathogenesis occur in

  9. Abnormal pressures as hydrodynamic phenomena

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neuzil, C.E.

    1995-01-01

    So-called abnormal pressures, subsurface fluid pressures significantly higher or lower than hydrostatic, have excited speculation about their origin since subsurface exploration first encountered them. Two distinct conceptual models for abnormal pressures have gained currency among earth scientists. The static model sees abnormal pressures generally as relict features preserved by a virtual absence of fluid flow over geologic time. The hydrodynamic model instead envisions abnormal pressures as phenomena in which flow usually plays an important role. This paper develops the theoretical framework for abnormal pressures as hydrodynamic phenomena, shows that it explains the manifold occurrences of abnormal pressures, and examines the implications of this approach. -from Author

  10. Leukocyte abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Gabig, T G

    1980-07-01

    Certain qualitative abnormalities in neutrophils and blood monocytes are associated with frequent, severe, and recurrent bacterial infections leading to fatal sepsis, while other qualitative defects demonstrated in vitro may have few or no clinical sequelae. These qualitative defects are discussed in terms of the specific functions of locomotion, phagocytosis, degranulation, and bacterial killing.

  11. Raf-mediated cardiac hypertrophy in adult Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lin; Daniels, Joseph; Glaser, Alex E; Wolf, Matthew J

    2013-07-01

    In response to stress and extracellular signals, the heart undergoes a process called cardiac hypertrophy during which cardiomyocytes increase in size. If untreated, cardiac hypertrophy can progress to overt heart failure that causes significant morbidity and mortality. The identification of molecular signals that cause or modify cardiomyopathies is necessary to understand how the normal heart progresses to cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure. Receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) signaling is essential for normal human cardiac function, and the inhibition of RTKs can cause dilated cardiomyopathies. However, neither investigations of activated RTK signaling pathways nor the characterization of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in the adult fly heart has been previously described. Therefore, we developed strategies using Drosophila as a model to circumvent some of the complexities associated with mammalian models of cardiovascular disease. Transgenes encoding activated EGFR(A887T), Ras85D(V12) and Ras85D(V12S35), which preferentially signal to Raf, or constitutively active human or fly Raf caused hypertrophic cardiomyopathy as determined by decreased end diastolic lumen dimensions, abnormal cardiomyocyte fiber morphology and increased heart wall thicknesses. There were no changes in cardiomyocyte cell numbers. Additionally, activated Raf also induced an increase in cardiomyocyte ploidy compared with control hearts. However, preventing increases in cardiomyocyte ploidy using fizzy-related (Fzr) RNAi did not rescue Raf-mediated cardiac hypertrophy, suggesting that Raf-mediated polyploidization is not required for cardiac hypertrophy. Similar to mammals, the cardiac-specific expression of RNAi directed against MEK or ERK rescued Raf-mediated cardiac hypertrophy. However, the cardiac-specific expression of activated ERK(D334N), which promotes hyperplasia in non-cardiac tissues, did not cause myocyte hypertrophy. These results suggest that ERK is necessary, but not sufficient, for

  12. Developing new predictive alarms based on ECG metrics for bradyasystolic cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Ding, Quan; Bai, Yong; Tinoco, Adelita; Mortara, David; Do, Duc; Boyle, Noel G; Pelter, Michele M; Hu, Xiao

    2015-12-01

    We investigated 17 metrics derived from four leads of electrocardiographic (ECG) signals from hospital patient monitors to develop new ECG alarms for predicting adult bradyasystolic cardiac arrest events.A retrospective case-control study was designed to analyze 17 ECG metrics from 27 adult bradyasystolic and 304 control patients. The 17 metrics consisted of PR interval (PR), P-wave duration (Pdur), QRS duration (QRSdur), RR interval (RR), QT interval (QT), estimate of serum K  +  using only frontal leads (SerumK2), T-wave complexity (T Complex), ST segment levels for leads I, II, V (ST I, ST II, ST V), and 7 heart rate variability (HRV) metrics. These 7 HRV metrics were standard deviation of normal to normal intervals (SDNN), total power, very low frequency power, low frequency power, high frequency power, normalized low frequency power, and normalized high frequency power. Controls were matched by gender, age (±5 years), admission to the same hospital unit within the same month, and the same major diagnostic category. A research ECG analysis software program developed by co-author D M was used to automatically extract the metrics. The absolute value for each ECG metric, and the duration, terminal value, and slope of the dominant trend for each ECG metric, were derived and tested as the alarm conditions. The maximal true positive rate (TPR) of detecting cardiac arrest at a prescribed maximal false positive rate (FPR) based on the trending conditions was reported. Lead time was also recorded as the time between the first time alarm condition was triggered and the event of cardiac arrest.While conditions based on the absolute values of ECG metrics do not provide discriminative information to predict bradyasystolic cardiac arrest, the trending conditions can be useful. For example, with a max FPR  =  5.0%, some derived alarms conditions are: trend duration of PR  >  2.8 h (TPR  =  48.2%, lead time  =  10.0  ±  6.6

  13. Embryonic exposure to thimerosal, an organomercury compound, causes abnormal early development of serotonergic neurons.

    PubMed

    Ida-Eto, Michiru; Oyabu, Akiko; Ohkawara, Takeshi; Tashiro, Yasura; Narita, Naoko; Narita, Masaaki

    2011-11-14

    Even though neuronal toxicity due to organomercury compounds is well known, thimerosal, an organomercury compound, is widely used in pediatric vaccine preservation. In the present study, we examined whether embryonic exposure to thimerosal affects early development of serotonergic neurons. Thimerosal (1mg Hg/kg) was intramuscularly administered to pregnant rats on gestational day 9 (susceptible time window for development of fetal serotonergic system), and fetal serotonergic neurons were assessed at embryonic day 15 using anti-serotonin antibodies. A dramatic increase in the number of serotonergic neurons localized to the lateral portion of the caudal raphe was observed in thimerosal group (1.9-fold increase, p<0.01 compared to control). These results indicate that embryonic exposure to thimerosal affects early development of serotonergic neurons.

  14. Abnormal development of sensory-motor, visual temporal and parahippocampal cortex in children with learning disabilities and borderline intellectual functioning.

    PubMed

    Baglio, Francesca; Cabinio, Monia; Ricci, Cristian; Baglio, Gisella; Lipari, Susanna; Griffanti, Ludovica; Preti, Maria G; Nemni, Raffaello; Clerici, Mario; Zanette, Michela; Blasi, Valeria

    2014-01-01

    Borderline intellectual functioning (BIF) is a condition characterized by an intelligence quotient (IQ) between 70 and 85. BIF children present with cognitive, motor, social, and adaptive limitations that result in learning disabilities and are more likely to develop psychiatric disorders later in life. The aim of this study was to investigate brain morphometry and its relation to IQ level in BIF children. Thirteen children with BIF and 14 age- and sex-matched typically developing (TD) children were enrolled. All children underwent a full IQ assessment (WISC-III scale) and a magnetic resonance (MR) examination including conventional sequences to assess brain structural abnormalities and high resolution 3D images for voxel-based morphometry analysis. To investigate to what extent the group influenced gray matter (GM) volumes, both univariate and multivariate generalized linear model analysis of variance were used, and the varimax factor analysis was used to explore variable correlations and clusters among subjects. Results showed that BIF children, compared to controls have increased regional GM volume in bilateral sensorimotor and right posterior temporal cortices and decreased GM volume in the right parahippocampal gyrus. GM volumes were highly correlated with IQ indices. The present work is a case study of a group of BIF children showing that BIF is associated with abnormal cortical development in brain areas that have a pivotal role in motor, learning, and behavioral processes. Our findings, although allowing for little generalization to the general population, contribute to the very limited knowledge in this field. Future longitudinal MR studies will be useful in verifying whether cortical features can be modified over time even in association with rehabilitative intervention.

  15. Tomoregulin-1 prevents cardiac hypertrophy after pressure overload in mice by inhibiting TAK1-JNK pathways.

    PubMed

    Bao, Dan; Lu, Dan; Liu, Ning; Dong, Wei; Lu, Ying-Dong; Qin, Chuan; Zhang, Lian-Feng

    2015-08-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy is associated with many forms of heart disease, and identifying important modifier genes involved in the pathogenesis of cardiac hypertrophy could lead to the development of new therapeutic strategies. Tomoregulin-1 is a growth factor that is primarily involved in embryonic development and adult central nervous system (CNS) function, and it is expressed abnormally in a variety of CNS pathologies. Tomoregulin-1 is also expressed in the myocardium. However, the effects of tomoregulin-1 on the heart, particularly on cardiac hypertrophy, remains unknown. The aim of the study is to examine whether and by what mechanism tomoregulin-1 regulates the development of cardiac hypertrophy induced by pressure overload. In this study, we found that tomoregulin-1 was significantly upregulated in two cardiac hypertrophy models: cTnT(R92Q) transgenic mice and thoracic aorta constriction (TAC)-induced cardiac hypertrophy mice. The transgenic overexpression of tomoregulin-1 increased the survival rate, improved the cardiac geometry and functional parameters of echocardiography, and decreased the degree of cardiac hypertrophy of the TAC mice, whereas knockdown of tomoregulin-1 expression resulted in an opposite phenotype and exacerbated phenotypes of cardiac hypertrophy induced by TAC. A possible mechanism by which tomoregulin-1 regulates the development of cardiac hypertrophy in TAC-induced cardiac hypertrophy is through inhibiting TGFβ non-canonical (TAK1-JNK) pathways in the myocardium. Tomoregulin-1 plays a protective role in the modulation of adverse cardiac remodeling from pressure overload in mice. Tomoregulin-1 could be a therapeutic target to control the development of cardiac hypertrophy.

  16. MCTP2 is a dosage-sensitive gene required for cardiac outflow tract development

    PubMed Central

    Lalani, Seema R.; Ware, Stephanie M.; Wang, Xueqing; Zapata, Gladys; Tian, Qi; Franco, Luis M.; Jiang, Zhengxin; Bucasas, Kristine; Scott, Daryl A.; Campeau, Philippe M.; Hanchard, Neil; Umaña, Luis; Cast, Ashley; Patel, Ankita; Cheung, Sau W.; McBride, Kim L.; Bray, Molly; Craig Chinault, A.; Boggs, Barbara A.; Huang, Miao; Baker, Mariah R.; Hamilton, Susan; Towbin, Jeff; Jefferies, John L.; Fernbach, Susan D.; Potocki, Lorraine; Belmont, John W.

    2013-01-01

    Coarctation of the aorta (CoA) and hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS) have been reported in rare individuals with large terminal deletions of chromosome 15q26. However, no single gene important for left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT) development has been identified in this region. Using array-comparative genomic hybridization, we identified two half-siblings with CoA with a 2.2 Mb deletion on 15q26.2, inherited from their mother, who was mosaic for this deletion. This interval contains an evolutionary conserved, protein-coding gene, MCTP2 (multiple C2-domains with two transmembrane regions 2). Using gene-specific array screening in 146 individuals with non-syndromic LVOT obstructive defects, another individual with HLHS and CoA was found to have a de novo 41 kb intragenic duplication within MCTP2, predicted to result in premature truncation, p.F697X. Alteration of Mctp2 gene expression in Xenopus laevis embryos by morpholino knockdown and mRNA overexpression resulted in the failure of proper OT development, confirming the functional importance of this dosage-sensitive gene for cardiogenesis. Our results identify MCTP2 as a novel genetic cause of CoA and related cardiac malformations. PMID:23773997

  17. Bifid cardiac apex in a 25-year-old male with sudden cardiac death.

    PubMed

    Wu, Annie; Kay, Deborah; Fishbein, Michael C

    2014-01-01

    Although a bifid cardiac apex is common in certain marine animals, it is an uncommon finding in humans. When present, bifid cardiac apex is usually associated with other congenital heart anomalies. We present a case of bifid cardiac apex that was an incidental finding in a 25-year-old male with sudden cardiac death from combined drug toxicity. On gross examination, there was a bifid cardiac apex with a 2-cm long cleft. There were no other significant gross or microscopic abnormalities. This case represents the very rare occurrence of a bifid cardiac apex as an isolated cardiac anomaly.

  18. Auditory Processing in Infancy: Do Early Abnormalities Predict Disorders of Language and Cognitive Development?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guzzetta, Francesco; Conti, Guido; Mercuri, Eugenio

    2011-01-01

    Increasing attention has been devoted to the maturation of sensory processing in the first year of life. While the development of cortical visual function has been thoroughly studied, much less information is available on auditory processing and its early disorders. The aim of this paper is to provide an overview of the assessment techniques for…

  19. Development and Implementation of Discrete Polymeric Microstructural Cues for Applications in Cardiac Tissue Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinney, James Richardson

    Chronic fibrosis caused by acute myocardial infarction (MI) leads to increased morbidity and mortality due to cardiac dysfunction. Despite care in the acute setting of MI, subsequent development of scar tissue and a lack of treatments for this maladaptive response lead to a poor prognosis. This has increased burdens on the cost of healthcare due to chronic disability. Here a novel therapeutic strategy that aims to mitigate myocardial fibrosis by utilizing injectable polymeric microstructural cues to attenuate the fibrotic response and improve functional outcomes is presented. Additionally, applications of integrated chemical functionalizations into discrete, micro-scale polymer structures are discussed in the realm of tissue engineering in order to impart enhancements in in vivo localization, three-dimensional manipulation and drug delivery. Polymeric microstructures, termed "microrods" and "microcubes", were fabricated using photolithographic techniques and studied in three-dimensional culture models of the fibrotic environment and by direct injection into the infarct zone of adult Sprague-Dawley rats. In vitro gene expression and functional and histological results were analyzed, showing a dose-dependent down-regulation fibrotic indicators and improvement in cardiac function. Furthermore, iron oxide nanoparticles and functionalized fluorocarbons were incorporated into the polymeric microdevices to promote in situ visualization by magnetic resonance imaging as well as to facilitate the manipulation and alignment of microstructural cues in a tissue-realistic environment. Lastly, successful encapsulation of native MGF peptide within microrods is demonstrated with release over two weeks as a proof of concept in the ability to locally deliver myogenic or supportive pharmacotherapeutics to the injured myocardium. This work demonstrates the efficacy and versatility of discrete microtopographical cues to attenuate the fibrotic response after MI and suggests a novel

  20. The effect of fiberoptic bronchoscopy on cardiac rhythm.

    PubMed

    Shrader, D L; Lakshminarayan, S

    1978-06-01

    Cardiac rhythm was monitored in 70 patients prior to, during, and following fiberoptic bronchoscopic procedures. Minor abnormalities in rhythm were frequent. Major cardiac arrhythmias occurred in 11% (8/70) of the patients during the bronchoscopic procedure. All arrhythmias were self-limited and had no hemodynamic consequence. Patients with evidence of coronary arterial disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or previously known premature ventricular contractions were at no higher risk for developing major arrhythmias. Hypoxemia (arterial oxygen pressure less than 60 mm Hg) at the end of the procedure correlated significantly with the development of new major arrhythmias.

  1. Zebrafish as a Vertebrate Model System to Evaluate Effects of Environmental Toxicants on Cardiac Development and Function

    PubMed Central

    Sarmah, Swapnalee; Marrs, James A.

    2016-01-01

    Environmental pollution is a serious problem of the modern world that possesses a major threat to public health. Exposure to environmental pollutants during embryonic development is particularly risky. Although many pollutants have been verified as potential toxicants, there are new chemicals in the environment that need assessment. Heart development is an extremely sensitive process, which can be affected by environmentally toxic molecule exposure during embryonic development. Congenital heart defects are the most common life-threatening global health problems, and the etiology is mostly unknown. The zebrafish has emerged as an invaluable model to examine substance toxicity on vertebrate development, particularly on cardiac development. The zebrafish offers numerous advantages for toxicology research not found in other model systems. Many laboratories have used the zebrafish to study the effects of widespread chemicals in the environment on heart development, including pesticides, nanoparticles, and various organic pollutants. Here, we review the uses of the zebrafish in examining effects of exposure to external molecules during embryonic development in causing cardiac defects, including chemicals ubiquitous in the environment and illicit drugs. Known or potential mechanisms of toxicity and how zebrafish research can be used to provide mechanistic understanding of cardiac defects are discussed. PMID:27999267

  2. Overexpression of the CmACS-3 gene in melon causes abnormal pollen development.

    PubMed

    Zhang, H; Luan, F

    2015-09-08

    Sexual diversity expressed by the Curcurbitaceae family is a primary example of developmental plasticity in plants. Most melon genotypes are andromonoecious, where an initial phase of male flowers is followed by a mixture of bisexual and male flowers. Over-expression of the CmACS-3 gene in melon plants showed an increased number of flower buds, and increased femaleness as demonstrated by a larger number bisexual buds. Transformation of CmACS-3 in melons showed earlier development of and an increased number of bisexual buds that matured to anthesis but also increased the rate of development of the bisexual buds to maturity. Field studies showed that CmACS-3-overexpressing melons had earlier mature bisexual flowers, earlier fruit set, and an increased number of fruits set on closely spaced nodes on the main stem.

  3. Baseline sacroiliac joint magnetic resonance imaging abnormalities and male sex predict the development of radiographic sacroiliitis.

    PubMed

    Akar, Servet; Isik, Sibel; Birlik, Bilge; Solmaz, Dilek; Sari, Ismail; Onen, Fatos; Akkoc, Nurullah

    2013-10-01

    We evaluated the relationship between the baseline sacroiliac joint (SIJ) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings and the development of radiographic sacroiliitis and tested their prognostic significance in cases of ankylosing spondylitis. Patients who had undergone an SIJ MRI at the rheumatology department were identified. Individuals for whom pelvic X-rays were available after at least 1 year of MRI were included in the analysis. All radiographs and MRI examinations were scored by two independent readers. Medical records of the patients were reviewed to obtain potentially relevant demographic and clinical data. We identified 1,069 SIJ MRIs, and 328 fulfilled our inclusion criteria. Reliability analysis revealed moderate to good inter- and intra-observer agreement. On presentation data, 14 cases were excluded because they had unequivocal radiographic sacroiliitis at baseline. After a mean of 34.8 months of follow-up, 24 patients developed radiographic sacroiliitis. The presence of active sacroiliitis (odds ratio (OR) 15.1) and structural lesions on MRI (OR 8.3), male sex (OR 4.7), fulfillment of Calin's inflammatory back pain criteria (P = 0.001), and total MRI activity score (P < 0.001) were found to be related to the development of radiographic sacroiliitis. By regression modeling, the presence of both active inflammatory and structural damage lesions on MRI and male sex were found to be predictive factors for the development of radiographic sacroiliitis. Our present results suggest that the occurrence of both active inflammatory and structural lesions in SIJs revealed by MRI is a significant risk factor for radiographic sacroiliitis, especially in male patients with early inflammatory back pain.

  4. The sequential development of abnormal prion protein accumulation in mice with Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

    PubMed Central

    Muramoto, T.; Kitamoto, T.; Tateishi, J.; Goto, I.

    1992-01-01

    The distribution and sequential development of prion protein (PrP) accumulation in the central nervous system (CNS) and non-neuronal organs of mice infected with Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) were investigated immunohistochemically using a new pretreatment method that greatly enhanced the immunoreactivity of PrP. Prion protein accumulation in the CNS was first detected at 30 days after inoculation and then developed near the inoculation site or periventricular area, and later spread to the whole cerebrum and then to the pons. Its staining took some characteristic forms. Among non-neuronal organs, PrP accumulated in the follicular dendritic cells (FDCs) in spleen, lymph node, Peyer's patch, and thymus. FDCs staining appeared in spleen, lymph node, and Peyer's patch at 21 or 30 days after inoculation, and in thymus at 90 days. Germinal centers developed in the thymus of some CJD-infected mice. No PrP staining was detected in any examined organs of age-matched control mice. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:1376559

  5. Hippocampal neuronal subtypes develop abnormal dendritic arbors in the presence of Fragile X astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, S; Cheng, C; Doering, L C

    2016-06-02

    Astrocytes are now recognized as key players in the neurobiology of neurodevelopmental disorders such as Fragile X syndrome. However, the nature of Fragile X astrocyte-mediated control of dendrite development in subtypes of hippocampal neurons is not yet known. We used a co-culture procedure in which wildtype primary hippocampal neurons were cultured with astrocytes from either a wildtype or Fragile X mouse, for either 7, 14 or 21 days. The neurons were processed for immunocytochemistry with the dendritic marker MAP2, classified by morphological criteria into one of five neuronal subtypes, and subjected to Sholl analyses. Both linear and semi-log methods of Sholl analyses were applied to the neurons in order to provide an in depth analysis of the dendritic arborizations. We found that Fragile X astrocytes affect the development of dendritic arborization of all subtypes of wildtype hippocampal neurons. Furthermore, we show that hippocampal neurons with spiny stellate neuron morphology exhibit the most pervasive developmental delays, with significant dendritic arbor alterations persisting at 21 days in culture. The results further dictate the critical role astrocytes play in governing neuronal morphology including altered dendrite development in Fragile X.

  6. Development of a patch type embedded cardiac function monitoring system using dual microprocessor for arrhythmia detection in heart disease patient.

    PubMed

    Jang, Yongwon; Noh, Hyung Wook; Lee, I B; Jung, Ji-Wook; Song, Yoonseon; Lee, Sooyeul; Kim, Seunghwan

    2012-01-01

    A patch type embedded cardiac function monitoring system was developed to detect arrhythmias such as PVC (Premature Ventricular Contraction), pause, ventricular fibrillation, and tachy/bradycardia. The overall system is composed of a main module including a dual processor and a Bluetooth telecommunication module. The dual microprocessor strategy minimizes power consumption and size, and guarantees the resources of embedded software programs. The developed software was verified with standard DB, and showed good performance.

  7. Human 14-3-3 gamma protein results in abnormal cell proliferation in the developing eye of Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Sophia W; Qi, Wenqing; Brabant, Marc; Bosco, Giovanni; Martinez, Jesse D

    2008-01-01

    Background 14-3-3 proteins are a family of adaptor proteins that participate in a wide variety of cellular processes. Recent evidence indicates that the expression levels of these proteins are elevated in some human tumors providing circumstantial evidence for their involvement in human cancers. However, the mechanism through which these proteins act in tumorigenesis is uncertain. Results To determine whether elevated levels of 14-3-3 proteins may perturb cell growth we overexpressed human 14-3-3 gamma (h14-3-3 gamma) in Drosophila larvae using the heat shock promoter or the GMR-Gal4 driver and then examined the effect that this had on cell proliferation in the eye imaginal discs of third instar larvae. We found that induction of h14-3-3 gamma resulted in the abnormal appearance of replicating cells in the differentiating proneural photoreceptor cells of eye imaginal discs where h14-3-3 gamma was driven by the heat shock promoter. Similarly, we found that driving h14-3-3 gamma expression specifically in developing eye discs with the GMR-Gal4 driver resulted in increased numbers of replicative cells following the morphogenetic furrow. Interestingly, we found that the effects of overexpressing h1433 gamma on eye development were increased in a genetic background where String (cdc25) function was compromised. Conclusion Taken together our results indicate that h14-3-3 gamma can promote abnormal cell proliferation and may act through Cdc25. This has important implications for 14-3-3 gamma as an oncogene as it suggests that elevated levels of 14-3-3 may confer a growth advantage to cells that overexpress it. PMID:18194556

  8. Anesthesia for Children With Craniofacial Abnormalities in the Developing Countries: Challenges and Future Directions.

    PubMed

    Melookaran, Ann M; Rao, Sirisha A; Antony, Sible B; Herrera, Adriana

    2015-06-01

    Interest in global health to provide safer pediatric surgical care in developing countries has increased during the last decade. A collaborative effort between surgeons and anesthesiologists has provided the opportunity to deliver specialized care to children, particularly in the areas of cleft lip and palate repair. However, medical resources, facilities, and adequately trained personnel, especially in pediatric anesthesia, are often limited in these countries. Challenges, educational efforts, and future directions for the globalization of anesthesia are discussed. Involvement of international entities may help raise awareness, channel efforts, expand programs and encourage volunteerism to ultimately provide safer care to pediatric patients, have better outcomes and reduced anesthesia-related morbidity and mortality.

  9. PPAR signaling in the control of cardiac energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Barger, P M; Kelly, D P

    2000-08-01

    Cardiac energy metabolic shifts occur as a normal response to diverse physiologic and dietary conditions and as a component of the pathophysiologic processes which accompany cardiac hypertrophy, heart failure, and myocardial ischemia. The capacity to produce energy via the utilization of fats by the mammalian postnatal heart is controlled in part at the level of expression of nuclear genes encoding enzymes involved in mitochondrial fatty acid beta-oxidation (FAO). The principal transcriptional regulator of FAO enzyme genes is the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha), a member of the ligand-activated nuclear receptor superfamily. Among the ligand activators of PPARalpha are long-chain fatty acids; therefore, increased uptake of fatty acid substrate into the cardiac myocyte induces a transcriptional response leading to increased expression of FAO enzymes. PPARalpha-mediated control of cardiac metabolic gene expression is activated during postnatal development, short-term starvation, and in response to exercise training. In contrast, certain pathophysiologic states, such as pressure overload-induced hypertrophy, result in deactivation of PPARalpha and subsequent dysregulation of FAO enzyme gene expression, which sets the stage for abnormalities in cardiac lipid homeostasis and energy production, some of which are influenced by gender. Thus, PPARalpha not only serves a critical role in normal cardiac metabolic homeostasis, but alterations in PPARalpha signaling likely contribute to the pathogenesis of a variety of disease states. PPARalpha as a ligand-activated transcription factor is a potential target for the development of new therapeutic strategies aimed at the prevention of pathologic cardiac remodeling.

  10. Annual Research Review: Growth connectomics – the organization and reorganization of brain networks during normal and abnormal development

    PubMed Central

    Vértes, Petra E; Bullmore, Edward T

    2015-01-01

    Background We first give a brief introduction to graph theoretical analysis and its application to the study of brain network topology or connectomics. Within this framework, we review the existing empirical data on developmental changes in brain network organization across a range of experimental modalities (including structural and functional MRI, diffusion tensor imaging, magnetoencephalography and electroencephalography in humans). Synthesis We discuss preliminary evidence and current hypotheses for how the emergence of network properties correlates with concomitant cognitive and behavioural changes associated with development. We highlight some of the technical and conceptual challenges to be addressed by future developments in this rapidly moving field. Given the parallels previously discovered between neural systems across species and over a range of spatial scales, we also review some recent advances in developmental network studies at the cellular scale. We highlight the opportunities presented by such studies and how they may complement neuroimaging in advancing our understanding of brain development. Finally, we note that many brain and mind disorders are thought to be neurodevelopmental in origin and that charting the trajectory of brain network changes associated with healthy development also sets the stage for understanding abnormal network development. Conclusions We therefore briefly review the clinical relevance of network metrics as potential diagnostic markers and some recent efforts in computational modelling of brain networks which might contribute to a more mechanistic understanding of neurodevelopmental disorders in future. PMID:25441756

  11. A mitochondrial DNA sequence is associated with abnormal pollen development in cytoplasmic male sterile bean plants.

    PubMed Central

    Johns, C; Lu, M; Lyznik, A; Mackenzie, S

    1992-01-01

    Cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) in common bean is associated with the presence of a 3-kb unique mitochondrial sequence designated pvs. The pvs sequence encodes at least two open reading frames (297 and 720 bp in length) with portions derived from the chloroplast genome. Fertility restoration by the nuclear restorer gene Fr results in the loss of this transcriptionally active unique region. We examined the effect of CMS (pvs present) and fertility restoration by Fr (pvs absent) on the pattern of pollen development in bean. In the CMS line, pollen aborted in the tetrad stage late in microgametogenesis. Microspores maintained cytoplasmic connections throughout pollen development, indicating aberrant or incomplete cytokinesis. Pollen-specific events associated with pollen abortion and fertility restoration imply that a gametophytic factor or event may be involved in CMS. In situ hybridization experiments suggested that significant reduction or complete loss of the mitochondrial sterility-associated sequence occurred in fertile pollen of F2 populations segregating for fertility. These observations support a model of fertility restoration by the loss of a mitochondrial DNA sequence prior to or during microsporogenesis/gametogenesis. PMID:1498602

  12. Abnormal in vitro development of ovarian follicles explanted from mice exposed to tetrachlorvinphos.

    PubMed

    Nayudu, P L; Kiesel, P S; Nowshari, M A; Hodges, J K

    1994-01-01

    A system of mouse ovarian follicle culture in which follicles can be grown from a preantral stage of development through antral formation has been developed and modified recently by Nayudu and colleagues. Follicles have been shown to grow in this culture system at a relatively constant rate and show responsiveness to LH at the end of the culture by ovulation of mature oocytes. Reported here are the distinctly different in vitro growth patterns of follicles explanted from 22- to 24-day-old mice during a period when the colony was being treated for skin parasites with tetrachlorvinphos (TCVP) (Rabond). There is to date no information on the effects of this compound on the mammalian female reproductive system. For follicles from the TCVP treated group, the duration of growth as intact follicles was markedly reduced in comparison to mice of the same strain and source not treated with TCVP. In the treated group, premature termination of follicular growth was also associated with the spontaneous expulsion of oocytes with immature nuclei and without cumulus cells. For those follicles from treated mice that did remain in culture until the day luteinizing hormone was given, the ovulatory response was poor and the maturation response of the oocytes was low in comparison with the follicles from untreated mice. The effect of the treatment on the follicles was further characterized by obvious differences in the patterns of growth. Follicles in the untreated group grew in a linear pattern at around 25 microns/day; a single phase, fast pattern for the whole culture period.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. Cardiac Dysautonomia in Huntington's Disease.

    PubMed

    Abildtrup, Mads; Shattock, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Huntington's disease is a fatal, hereditary, neurodegenerative disorder best known for its clinical triad of progressive motor impairment, cognitive deficits and psychiatric disturbances. Although a disease of the central nervous system, mortality surveys indicate that heart disease is a leading cause of death. The nature of such cardiac abnormalities remains unknown. Clinical findings indicate a high prevalence of autonomic nervous system dysfunction - dysautonomia - which may be a result of pathology of the central autonomic network. Dysautonomia can have profound effects on cardiac health, and pronounced autonomic dysfunction can be associated with neurogenic arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. Significant advances in the knowledge of neural mechanisms in cardiac disease have recently been made which further aid our understanding of cardiac mortality in Huntington's disease. Even so, despite the evidence of aberrant autonomic activity the potential cardiac consequences of autonomic dysfunction have been somewhat ignored. In fact, underlying cardiac abnormalities such as arrhythmias have been part of the exclusion criteria in clinical autonomic Huntington's disease research. A comprehensive analysis of cardiac function in Huntington's disease patients is warranted. Further experimental and clinical studies are needed to clarify how the autonomic nervous system is controlled and regulated in higher, central areas of the brain - and how these regions may be altered in neurological pathology, such as Huntington's disease. Ultimately, research will hopefully result in an improvement of management with the aim of preventing early death in Huntington's disease from cardiac causes.

  14. Early neuromodulation prevents the development of brain and behavioral abnormalities in a rodent model of schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Hadar, R; Bikovski, L; Soto-Montenegro, M L; Schimke, J; Maier, P; Ewing, S; Voget, M; Wieske, F; Götz, T; Desco, M; Hamani, C; Pascau, J; Weiner, I; Winter, C

    2017-04-04

    The notion that schizophrenia is a neurodevelopmental disorder in which neuropathologies evolve gradually over the developmental course indicates a potential therapeutic window during which pathophysiological processes may be modified to halt disease progression or reduce its severity. Here we used a neurodevelopmental maternal immune stimulation (MIS) rat model of schizophrenia to test whether early targeted modulatory intervention would affect schizophrenia's neurodevelopmental course. We applied deep brain stimulation (DBS) or sham stimulation to the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) of adolescent MIS rats and respective controls, and investigated its behavioral, biochemical, brain-structural and -metabolic effects in adulthood. We found that mPFC-DBS successfully prevented the emergence of deficits in sensorimotor gating, attentional selectivity and executive function in adulthood, as well as the enlargement of lateral ventricle volumes and mal-development of dopaminergic and serotonergic transmission. These data suggest that the mPFC may be a valuable target for effective preventive treatments. This may have significant translational value, suggesting that targeting the mPFC before the onset of psychosis via less invasive neuromodulation approaches may be a viable preventive strategy.Molecular Psychiatry advance online publication, 4 April 2017; doi:10.1038/mp.2017.52.

  15. Role of abnormal lipid metabolism in development, progression, diagnosis and therapy of pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Swierczynski, Julian; Hebanowska, Areta; Sledzinski, Tomasz

    2014-01-01

    There is growing evidence that metabolic alterations play an important role in cancer development and progression. The metabolism of cancer cells is reprogrammed in order to support their rapid proliferation. Elevated fatty acid synthesis is one of the most important aberrations of cancer cell metabolism. An enhancement of fatty acids synthesis is required both for carcinogenesis and cancer cell survival, as inhibition of key lipogenic enzymes slows down the growth of tumor cells and impairs their survival. Based on the data that serum fatty acid synthase (FASN), also known as oncoantigen 519, is elevated in patients with certain types of cancer, its serum level was proposed as a marker of neoplasia. This review aims to demonstrate the changes in lipid metabolism and other metabolic processes associated with lipid metabolism in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), the most common pancreatic neoplasm, characterized by high mortality. We also addressed the influence of some oncogenic factors and tumor suppressors on pancreatic cancer cell metabolism. Additionally the review discusses the potential role of elevated lipid synthesis in diagnosis and treatment of pancreatic cancer. In particular, FASN is a viable candidate for indicator of pathologic state, marker of neoplasia, as well as, pharmacological treatment target in pancreatic cancer. Recent research showed that, in addition to lipogenesis, certain cancer cells can use fatty acids from circulation, derived from diet (chylomicrons), synthesized in liver, or released from adipose tissue for their growth. Thus, the interactions between de novo lipogenesis and uptake of fatty acids from circulation by PDAC cells require further investigation. PMID:24605027

  16. Reptilian heart development and the molecular basis of cardiac chamber evolution.

    PubMed

    Koshiba-Takeuchi, Kazuko; Mori, Alessandro D; Kaynak, Bogac L; Cebra-Thomas, Judith; Sukonnik, Tatyana; Georges, Romain O; Latham, Stephany; Beck, Laurel; Beck, Laural; Henkelman, R Mark; Black, Brian L; Olson, Eric N; Wade, Juli; Takeuchi, Jun K; Nemer, Mona; Gilbert, Scott F; Bruneau, Benoit G

    2009-09-03

    The emergence of terrestrial life witnessed the need for more sophisticated circulatory systems. This has evolved in birds, mammals and crocodilians into complete septation of the heart into left and right sides, allowing separate pulmonary and systemic circulatory systems, a key requirement for the evolution of endothermy. However, the evolution of the amniote heart is poorly understood. Reptilian hearts have been the subject of debate in the context of the evolution of cardiac septation: do they possess a single ventricular chamber or two incompletely septated ventricles? Here we examine heart development in the red-eared slider turtle, Trachemys scripta elegans (a chelonian), and the green anole, Anolis carolinensis (a squamate), focusing on gene expression in the developing ventricles. Both reptiles initially form a ventricular chamber that homogenously expresses the T-box transcription factor gene Tbx5. In contrast, in birds and mammals, Tbx5 is restricted to left ventricle precursors. In later stages, Tbx5 expression in the turtle (but not anole) heart is gradually restricted to a distinct left ventricle, forming a left-right gradient. This suggests that Tbx5 expression was refined during evolution to pattern the ventricles. In support of this hypothesis, we show that loss of Tbx5 in the mouse ventricle results in a single chamber lacking distinct identity, indicating a requirement for Tbx5 in septation. Importantly, misexpression of Tbx5 throughout the developing myocardium to mimic the reptilian expression pattern also results in a single mispatterned ventricular chamber lacking septation. Thus ventricular septation is established by a steep and correctly positioned Tbx5 gradient. Our findings provide a molecular mechanism for the evolution of the amniote ventricle, and support the concept that altered expression of developmental regulators is a key mechanism of vertebrate evolution.

  17. Biphasic Allometry of Cardiac Growth in the Developing Kangaroo Macropus fuliginosus.

    PubMed

    Snelling, Edward P; Taggart, David A; Maloney, Shane K; Farrell, Anthony P; Seymour, Roger S

    2015-01-01

    Interspecific studies of adult mammals show that heart mass (M(h), g) increases in direct proportion to body mass (M(b), kg), such that M(h) ∝ M(b)(1.00). However, intraspecific studies on heart mass in mammals at different stages of development reveal considerable variation between species, M(h) ∝ M(b)(0.70-1.00). Part of this variation may arise as a result of the narrow body size range of growing placental mammals, from birth to adulthood. Marsupial mammals are born relatively small and offer an opportunity to examine the ontogeny of heart mass over a much broader body size range. Data from 29 western grey kangaroos Macropus fuliginosus spanning 800-fold in body mass (0.084-67.5 kg) reveal the exponent for heart mass decreases significantly when the joey leaves the pouch (ca. 5-6 kg body mass). In the pouch, the heart mass of joeys scales with hyperallometry, M(h(in-pouch)) = 6.39 M(b)(1.10 ± 0.05), whereas in free-roaming juveniles and adults, heart mass scales with hypoallometry, M(h(postpouch)) = 14.2 Mb(0.77 ± 0.08). Measurements of heart height, width, and depth support this finding. The relatively steep heart growth allometry during in-pouch development is consistent with the increase in relative cardiac demands as joeys develop endothermy and the capacity for hopping locomotion. Once out of the pouch, the exponent decreases sharply, possibly because the energy required for hopping is independent of speed, and the efficiency of energy storage during hopping increases as the kangaroo grows. The right:left ventricular mass ratios (0.30-0.35) do not change over the body mass range and are similar to those of other mammals, reflecting the principle of Laplace for the heart.

  18. The development of the trabecular meshwork and its abnormality in primary infantile glaucoma.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, D R

    1981-01-01

    Tissue from ten eyes with infantile glaucoma and from 40 normal eyes of fetuses and infants without glaucoma were examined by light and electron microscopy. In normal development, the corneoscleral coat grows faster than the uveal tract during the last trimester, leading to a posterior migration of the ciliary body attachment from Schwalbe's line (5th month) to the scleral spur (9th month), and then to a location behind the scleral spur (postnatally). In infantile glaucoma, the insertion of the anterior ciliary body and iris overlaps the trabecular meshwork, similar to the late fetal position. The trabecular sheets are perforated, and there is no membrane over the surface of the trabecular meshwork. The trabecular beams are thicker than in normal infant eyes. There is both histologic and clinical evidence of traction on the iris root exerted by the thickened trabecular beams. These findings suggest that in congenital glaucoma the thickened beams had prevented the normal posterior migration of the ciliary body and iris root. This traction may compact the thickened trabecular beams, obstructing aqueous humor outflow. Release of the traction by an incision (goniotomy or trabeculotomy) of the thickened meshwork may relieve the obstruction. Of uncertain pathological significance is that there are no vacuoles in the endothelium of Schlemm's canal and there is a broad layer of collagen and amorphous material in the juxtacanalicular connective tissue. The ciliary processes are elongated inward, as if they were pulled by zonular traction (perhaps created by an enlarging diameter of the limbus with a fixed lens diameter). Images FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 11 FIGURE 20 A FIGURE 20 B FIGURE 1 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 A FIGURE 4 B FIGURE 5 A FIGURE 5 B FIGURE 6 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 12 FIGURE 13 FIGURE 14 FIGURE 15 FIGURE 16 FIGURE 17 FIGURE 18 FIGURE 19 PMID:7342408

  19. Copy number variants and infantile spasms: evidence for abnormalities in ventral forebrain development and pathways of synaptic function

    PubMed Central

    Paciorkowski, Alex R; Thio, Liu Lin; Rosenfeld, Jill A; Gajecka, Marzena; Gurnett, Christina A; Kulkarni, Shashikant; Chung, Wendy K; Marsh, Eric D; Gentile, Mattia; Reggin, James D; Wheless, James W; Balasubramanian, Sandhya; Kumar, Ravinesh; Christian, Susan L; Marini, Carla; Guerrini, Renzo; Maltsev, Natalia; Shaffer, Lisa G; Dobyns, William B

    2011-01-01

    Infantile spasms (ISS) are an epilepsy disorder frequently associated with severe developmental outcome and have diverse genetic etiologies. We ascertained 11 subjects with ISS and novel copy number variants (CNVs) and combined these with a new cohort with deletion 1p36 and ISS, and additional published patients with ISS and other chromosomal abnormalities. Using bioinformatics tools, we analyzed the gene content of these CNVs for enrichment in pathways of pathogenesis. Several important findings emerged. First, the gene content was enriched for the gene regulatory network involved in ventral forebrain development. Second, genes in pathways of synaptic function were overrepresented, significantly those involved in synaptic vesicle transport. Evidence also suggested roles for GABAergic synapses and the postsynaptic density. Third, we confirm the association of ISS with duplication of 14q12 and maternally inherited duplication of 15q11q13, and report the association with duplication of 21q21. We also present a patient with ISS and deletion 7q11.3 not involving MAGI2. Finally, we provide evidence that ISS in deletion 1p36 may be associated with deletion of KLHL17 and expand the epilepsy phenotype in that syndrome to include early infantile epileptic encephalopathy. Several of the identified pathways share functional links, and abnormalities of forebrain synaptic growth and function may form a common biologic mechanism underlying both ISS and autism. This study demonstrates a novel approach to the study of gene content in subjects with ISS and copy number variation, and contributes further evidence to support specific pathways of pathogenesis. PMID:21694734

  20. Mice with Tak1 deficiency in neural crest lineage exhibit cleft palate associated with abnormal tongue development.

    PubMed

    Song, Zhongchen; Liu, Chao; Iwata, Junichi; Gu, Shuping; Suzuki, Akiko; Sun, Cheng; He, Wei; Shu, Rong; Li, Lu; Chai, Yang; Chen, YiPing

    2013-04-12

    Cleft palate represents one of the most common congenital birth defects in humans. TGFβ signaling, which is mediated by Smad-dependent and Smad-independent pathways, plays a crucial role in regulating craniofacial development and patterning, particularly in palate development. However, it remains largely unknown whether the Smad-independent pathway contributes to TGFβ signaling function during palatogenesis. In this study, we investigated the function of TGFβ activated kinase 1 (Tak1), a key regulator of Smad-independent TGFβ signaling in palate development. We show that Tak1 protein is expressed in both the epithelium and mesenchyme of the developing palatal shelves. Whereas deletion of Tak1 in the palatal epithelium or mesenchyme did not give rise to a cleft palate defect, inactivation of Tak1 in the neural crest lineage using the Wnt1-Cre transgenic allele resulted in failed palate elevation and subsequently the cleft palate formation. The failure in palate elevation in Wnt1-Cre;Tak1(F/F) mice results from a malformed tongue and micrognathia, resembling human Pierre Robin sequence cleft of the secondary palate. We found that the abnormal tongue development is associated with Fgf10 overexpression in the neural crest-derived tongue tissue. The failed palate elevation and cleft palate were recapitulated in an Fgf10-overexpressing mouse model. The repressive effect of the Tak1-mediated noncanonical TGFβ signaling on Fgf10 expression was further confirmed by inhibition of p38, a downstream kinase of Tak1, in the primary cell culture of developing tongue. Tak1 thus functions to regulate tongue development by controlling Fgf10 expression and could represent a candidate gene for mutation in human PRS clefting.

  1. Role of serotonin 5-HT2A receptors in the development of cardiac hypertrophy in response to aortic constriction in mice.

    PubMed

    Lairez, O; Cognet, T; Schaak, S; Calise, D; Guilbeau-Frugier, C; Parini, A; Mialet-Perez, J

    2013-06-01

    Serotonin, in addition to its fundamental role as a neurotransmitter, plays a critical role in the cardiovascular system, where it is thought to be involved in the development of cardiac hypertrophy and failure. Indeed, we recently found that mice with deletion of monoamine oxidase A had enhanced levels of blood and cardiac 5-HT, which contributed to exacerbation of hypertrophy in a model of experimental pressure overload. 5-HT2A receptors are expressed in the heart and mediate a hypertrophic response to 5-HT in cardiac cells. However, their role in cardiac remodeling in vivo and the signaling pathways associated are not well understood. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of a selective 5-HT2A receptor antagonist, M100907, on the development of cardiac hypertrophy induced by transverse aortic constriction (TAC). Cardiac 5-HT2A receptor expression was transiently increased after TAC, and was recapitulated in cardiomyocytes, as observed with 5-HT2A in situ labeling by immunohistochemistry. Selective blockade of 5-HT2A receptors prevented the development of cardiac hypertrophy, as measured by echocardiography, cardiomyocyte area and heart weight-to-body weight ratio. Interestingly, activation of calmodulin kinase (CamKII), which is a core mechanism in cardiac hypertrophy, was reduced in cardiac samples from M100907-treated TAC mice compared to vehicle-treated mice. In addition, phosphorylation of histone deacetylase 4 (HDAC4), a downstream partner of CamKII was significantly diminished in M100907-treated TAC mice. Thus, our results show that selective blockade of 5-HT2A receptors has beneficial effect in the development of cardiac hypertrophy through inhibition of the CamKII/HDAC4 pathway.

  2. Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Weisse, Allen B.

    2011-01-01

    Well into the first decades of the 20th century, medical opinion held that any surgical attempts to treat heart disease were not only misguided, but unethical. Despite such reservations, innovative surgeons showed that heart wounds could be successfully repaired. Then, extracardiac procedures were performed to correct patent ductus arteriosus, coarctation of the aorta, and tetralogy of Fallot. Direct surgery on the heart was accomplished with closed commissurotomy for mitral stenosis. The introduction of the heart-lung machine and cardiopulmonary bypass enabled the surgical treatment of other congenital and acquired heart diseases. Advances in aortic surgery paralleled these successes. The development of coronary artery bypass grafting greatly aided the treatment of coronary heart disease. Cardiac transplantation, attempts to use the total artificial heart, and the application of ventricular assist devices have brought us to the present day. Although progress in the field of cardiovascular surgery appears to have slowed when compared with the halcyon times of the past, substantial challenges still face cardiac surgeons. It can only be hoped that sufficient resources and incentive can carry the triumphs of the 20th century into the 21st. This review covers past developments and future opportunities in cardiac surgery. PMID:22163121

  3. Toxicity and cardiac effects of carbaryl in early developing zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, C.C.; Hui, Michelle N.Y.; Cheng, S.H. E-mail: bhcheng@cityu.edu.hk

    2007-07-15

    Carbaryl, an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, is known to be moderately toxic to adult zebrafish and has been reported to cause heart malformations and irregular heartbeat in medaka. We performed experiments to study the toxicity of carbaryl, specifically its effects on the heart, in early developing zebrafish embryos. LC50 and EC50 values for carbaryl at 28 h post-fertilization were 44.66 {mu}g/ml and 7.52 {mu}g/ml, respectively, and 10 {mu}g/ml carbaryl was used in subsequent experiments. After confirming acetylcholinesterase inhibition by carbaryl using an enzymatic method, we observed red blood cell accumulation, delayed hatching and pericardial edema, but not heart malformation as described in some previous reports. Our chronic exposure data also demonstrated carbaryl-induced bradycardia, which is a common effect of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors due to the accumulation of acetylcholine, in embryos from 1 day post-fertilization (dpf) to 5 dpf. The distance between the sinus venosus, the point where blood enters the atrium, and the bulbus arteriosus, the point where blood leaves the ventricle, indicated normal looping of the heart tube. Immunostaining of myosin heavy chains with the ventricle-specific antibody MF20 and the atrium-specific antibody S46 showed normal development of heart chambers. At the same time, acute exposure resulted in carbaryl-induced bradycardia. Heart rate dropped significantly after a 10-min exposure to 100 {mu}g/ml carbaryl but recovered when carbaryl was removed. The novel observation of carbaryl-induced bradycardia in 1- and 2-dpf embryos suggested that carbaryl affected cardiac function possibly through an alternative mechanism other than acetylcholinesterase inhibition such as inhibition of calcium ion channels, since acetylcholine receptors in zebrafish are not functional until 3 dpf. However, the exact nature of this mechanism is currently unknown, and thus further studies are required.

  4. Developing Indicators of Service Quality Provided for CardiovascularPatients Hospitalized in Cardiac Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Azami-Aghdash, Saber; Ghaffari, Samad; Sadeghi-Bazargani, Homayoun; Tabrizi, Jafar-Sadegh; Yagoubi, Alireza; Naghavi-Behzad, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Introduction:Cardiovascular diseases are among the most prevalent chronic diseases leading to high degrees of mortality and morbidity worldwide and in Iran. The aim of the current study was to determine and develop appropriate indicators for evaluating provided service quality for cardiovascular patients admitted to Cardiac Care Units (CCU) in Iran. Methods:In order to determine the indicators for evaluating provided service quality, a four-stage process including reviewing systematic review articles in premier bibliographic databases, interview, performing two rounds of Delphi technique, and holding experts panel by attendance of experts in different fields was adopted. Finally, after recognizing relevant indicators in resources, these indicators were finalized during various stages using ideas of 27 experts in different fields. Results:Among 2800 found articles in the text reviewing phase, 21 articles, which had completely mentioned relevant indicators, were studied and 48 related indicators were extracted. After two interviews with a cardiologist and an epidemiologist, 32 items of the indicators were omitted and replaced by 27 indicators coping with the conditions of Iranian hospitals. Finally, 43 indicators were added into the Delphi phase and after 2 rounds of Delphi with 18 specialists, 7 cases were excluded due to their low scores of applicability. In the experts’ panel stage, 6 items were also omitted and 10 new indicators were developed to replace them. Eventually, 40 indicators were finalized. Conclusion:In this study, some proper indicators for evaluating provided service quality for CCU admissions in Iran were determined. Considering the informative richness of these indicators, they can be used by managers, policy makers, health service providers, and also insurance agencies in order to improve the quality of services, decisions, and policies. PMID:24251005

  5. Coxsackievirus-adenovirus receptor (CAR) is essential for early embryonic cardiac development.

    PubMed

    Dorner, Armin A; Wegmann, Frank; Butz, Stefan; Wolburg-Buchholz, Karen; Wolburg, Hartwig; Mack, Andreas; Nasdala, Ines; August, Benjamin; Westermann, Jürgen; Rathjen, Fritz G; Vestweber, Dietmar

    2005-08-01

    The coxsackievirus-adenovirus receptor (CAR) is a cell contact protein on various cell types with unknown physiological function. It belongs to a subfamily of the immunoglobulin-superfamily of which some members are junctional adhesion molecules on epithelial and/or endothelial cells. CAR is dominantly expressed in the hearts and brains of mice until the newborne phase after which it becomes mainly restricted to various epithelial cells. To understand more about the physiological function of CAR, we have generated CAR-deficient mice by gene targeting. We found that these mice die between E11.5 and E13.5 of embryonal development. Ultrastructural analysis of cardiomyocytes revealed that the density of myofibrils was reduced and that their orientation and bundling was disorganized. In addition, mitochondria were enlarged and glycogen storage strongly enriched. In line with these defects, we observed pericardial edema formation as a clear sign of insufficient heart function. Developmental abnormalities likely to be secondary effects of gene ablation were the persistent singular cardial atrio-ventricular canal and dilatations of larger blood vessels such as the cardinal veins. The secondary nature of these defects was supported by the fact that CAR was not expressed on vascular cells or on cells of the vascular wall. No obvious signs for alterations of the histological organization of the placenta were observed. We conclude that CAR is required for embryonal heart development, most likely due to its function during the organization of myofibrils in cardiomyocytes.

  6. Computational approaches to understand cardiac electrophysiology and arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Byron N.; Yang, Pei-Chi; Behrens, Steven B.; Moreno, Jonathan D.

    2012-01-01

    Cardiac rhythms arise from electrical activity generated by precisely timed opening and closing of ion channels in individual cardiac myocytes. These impulses spread throughout the cardiac muscle to manifest as electrical waves in the whole heart. Regularity of electrical waves is critically important since they signal the heart muscle to contract, driving the primary function of the heart to act as a pump and deliver blood to the brain and vital organs. When electrical activity goes awry during a cardiac arrhythmia, the pump does not function, the brain does not receive oxygenated blood, and death ensues. For more than 50 years, mathematically based models of cardiac electrical activity have been used to improve understanding of basic mechanisms of normal and abnormal cardiac electrical function. Computer-based modeling approaches to understand cardiac activity are uniquely helpful because they allow for distillation of complex emergent behaviors into the key contributing components underlying them. Here we review the latest advances and novel concepts in the field as they relate to understanding the complex interplay between electrical, mechanical, structural, and genetic mechanisms during arrhythmia development at the level of ion channels, cells, and tissues. We also discuss the latest computational approaches to guiding arrhythmia therapy. PMID:22886409

  7. Development of a cardiac evaluation method using a dynamic flat-panel detector (FPD) system: a feasibility study using a cardiac motion phantom.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Rie; Sanada, Shigeru; Tsujioka, Katsumi; Matsui, Takeshi; Takata, Tadanori; Matsui, Osamu

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the feasibility of cardiac evaluation with a dynamic flat-panel detector (FPD), based on changes in pixel values during cardiac pumping. To investigate the feasibility of cardiac evaluation with a dynamic flat-panel detector (FPD), based on changes in pixel values during cardiac pumping. Sequential radiographs of a cardiac motion phantom and water-equivalent material step were obtained with an FPD system. Various combinations of cardiac output and heart rate were evaluated with and without contrast medium. The ventricular area and summation of pixel values in the ventricles were measured. The ejection fraction (EF) was calculated based on the rate of changes and then compared to EF obtained from computed tomography images. In addition, slight changes in pixel values were visualized by use of inter-frame subtraction and color-mapping. The result of a clinical case was examined according to cardiac physiology. There were strong correlations between EF and our results. There was no significant difference between the findings with and without contrast medium. When the heart rate was greater than 60 bpm, EF obtained with our method were underestimated. It is necessary for a patient to be examined at an imaging rate between 7.5 and 10 fps at least. In addition, a +/-1.2% change in pixel value was equivalent to a +/-10 mm change in the thickness of water. Color-mapping images were supported by cardiac physiology. Evaluating changes in pixel values on dynamic chest radiography with FPD has the potential to demonstrate cardiac function without contrast medium. Inter-frame subtraction and color-mapping are very useful for interpreting changes in pixel value as velocities of blood flow.

  8. Myocardial bioenergetic abnormalities in experimental uremia

    PubMed Central

    Chesser, Alistair MS; Harwood, Steven M; Raftery, Martin J; Yaqoob, Muhammad M

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Cardiac bioenergetics are known to be abnormal in experimental uremia as exemplified by a reduced phosphocreatine (PCr)/adenosine triphosphate (ATP) ratio. However, the progression of these bioenergetic changes during the development of uremia still requires further study and was therefore investigated at baseline, 4 weeks and 8 weeks after partial nephrectomy (PNx). Methods A two-stage PNx uremia model in male Wistar rats was used to explore in vivo cardiac and skeletal muscles’ bioenergetic changes over time. High-energy phosphate nucleotides were determined by phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance (31P-NMR) and capillary zone electrophoresis. Results 31P-NMR spectroscopy revealed lower PCr/ATP ratios in PNx hearts compared to sham (SH)-operated animals 4 weeks after PNx (median values given ± SD, 0.64±0.16 PNx, 1.13±0.31 SH, P<0.02). However, 8 weeks after PNx, the same ratio was more comparable between the two groups (0.84±0.15 PNx, 1.04±0.44 SH, P= not significant), suggestive of an adaptive mechanism. When 8-week hearts were prestressed with dobutamine, the PCr/ATP ratio was again lower in the PNx group (1.08±0.36 PNx, 1.55±0.38 SH, P<0.02), indicating a reduced energy reserve during the progression of uremic heart disease. 31P-NMR data were confirmed by capillary zone electrophoresis, and the changes in myocardial bioenergetics were replicated in the skeletal muscle. Conclusion This study provides evidence of the changes that occur in myocardial energetics in experimental uremia and highlights how skeletal muscle bioenergetics mirror those found in the cardiac tissue and so might potentially serve as a practical surrogate tissue during clinical cardiac NMR investigations. PMID:27307758

  9. Sperm exposure to carbon-based nanomaterials causes abnormalities in early development of purple sea urchin (Paracentrotus lividus).

    PubMed

    Mesarič, Tina; Sepčić, Kristina; Drobne, Damjana; Makovec, Darko; Faimali, Marco; Morgana, Silvia; Falugi, Carla; Gambardella, Chiara

    2015-06-01

    We examined egg fertilisation in purple sea urchin (Paracentrotus lividus) after sperm exposure to carbon-based nanomaterials, carbon black (CB) and graphene oxide (GO), from 0.0001 mg/L to 1.0mg/L. Gastrula stage embryos were investigated for acetylcholinesterase and propionylcholinesterase activities, and their morphological characteristics. Plutei were analysed for morphological abnormalities, with emphasis on skeletal rod formation. Egg fertilisation was significantly affected by CB, at all concentrations tested. Loss of cell adhesion at the gastrula surface was observed in eggs fertilised with sperm treated with CB. However, concentration-dependent morphological anomalies were observed in the gastrulae and plutei formed after sperm exposure to either CB or GO. The activities of both cholinesterases decreased in the gastrulae, although not in a concentration-dependent manner. These effects appear to arise from physical interactions between these carbon-based nanomaterials and the sperm, whereby nanomaterials attached to the sperm surface interfere with fertilisation, which leads to disturbances in the signalling pathways of early embryonic development. Reduced cholinesterase activity in gastrulae from eggs fertilised with nanomaterial-treated sperm confirms involvement of the cholinergic system in early sea urchin development, including skeletogenesis.

  10. Blocking Endogenous Leukemia Inhibitory Factor During Placental Development in Mice Leads to Abnormal Placentation and Pregnancy Loss

    PubMed Central

    Winship, Amy; Correia, Jeanne; Krishnan, Tara; Menkhorst, Ellen; Cuman, Carly; Zhang, Jian-Guo; Nicola, Nicos A.; Dimitriadis, Evdokia

    2015-01-01

    The placenta forms the interface between the maternal and fetal circulation and is critical for the establishment of a healthy pregnancy. Specialized trophoblast cells derived from the embryonic trophectoderm play a pivotal role in the establishment of the placenta. Leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) is one of the predominant cytokines present in the placenta during early pregnancy. LIF has been shown to regulate trophoblast adhesion and invasion in vitro, however its precise role in vivo is unknown. We hypothesized that LIF would be required for normal placental development in mice. LIF and LIFRα were immunolocalized to placental trophoblasts and fetal vessels in mouse implantation sites during mid-gestation. Temporally blocking LIF action during specific periods of placental development via intraperitoneal administration of our specific LIFRα antagonist, PEGLA, resulted in abnormal placental trophoblast and vascular morphology and reduced activated STAT3 but not ERK. Numerous genes regulating angiogenesis and oxidative stress were altered in the placenta in response to LIF inhibition. Pregnancy viability was also significantly compromised in PEGLA treated mice. Our data suggest that LIF plays an important role in placentation in vivo and the maintenance of healthy pregnancy. PMID:26272398

  11. Cardiac catheterization - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Catheterization - cardiac - discharge; Heart catheterization - discharge: Catheterization - cardiac; Heart catheterization; Angina - cardiac catheterization discharge; CAD - cardiac catheterization discharge; Coronary artery disease - cardiac catheterization ...

  12. PDGF-A and PDGF-B induces cardiac fibrosis in transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Gallini, Radiosa; Lindblom, Per; Bondjers, Cecilia; Betsholtz, Christer; Andrae, Johanna

    2016-12-10

    Platelet-derived growth factors (PDGFs) and their receptors (PDGFRs) contribute to normal heart development. Deficient or abnormal expression of Pdgf and Pdgfr genes have a negative impact on cardiac development and function. The cellular effects of PDGFs in the hearts of Pdgf/Pdgfr mutants and the pathogenesis of the resulting abnormalities are poorly understood, but different PDGF isoforms induce varying effects. Here, we generated three new transgenic mouse types which complete a set of studies, where all different PDGF ligands have been expressed under the same heart specific alpha-myosin heavy chain promoter. Transgenic expression of the natural isoforms of Pdgfa and Pdgfb resulted in isoform specific fibrotic reactions and cardiac hypertrophy. Pdgfa overexpression resulted in a severe fibrotic reaction with up to 8-fold increase in cardiac size, leading to lethal cardiac failure within a few weeks after birth. In contrast, Pdgfb overexpression led to focal fibrosis and moderate cardiac hypertrophy. As PDGF-A and PDGF-B have different affinity for the two PDGF receptors, we analyzed the expression of the receptors and the histology of the fibrotic hearts. Our data suggest that the stronger fibrotic effect generated by Pdgfa overexpression was mediated by Pdgfrα in cardiac interstitial mesenchymal cells, i.e. the likely source of extracellular matrix depostion and fibrotic reaction. The apparent sensitivity of the heart to ectopic PDGFRα agonists supports a role for endogenous PDGFRα agonists in the pathogenesis of cardiac fibrosis.

  13. Abnormal immune system development and function in schizophrenia helps reconcile diverse findings and suggests new treatment and prevention strategies.

    PubMed

    Anders, Sherry; Kinney, Dennis K

    2015-08-18

    Extensive research implicates disturbed immune function and development in the etiology and pathology of schizophrenia. In addition to reviewing evidence for immunological factors in schizophrenia, this paper discusses how an emerging model of atypical immune function and development helps explain a wide variety of well-established - but puzzling - findings about schizophrenia. A number of theorists have presented hypotheses that early immune system programming, disrupted by pre- and perinatal adversity, often combines with abnormal brain development to produce schizophrenia. The present paper focuses on the hypothesis that disruption of early immune system development produces a latent immune vulnerability that manifests more fully after puberty, when changes in immune function and the thymus leave individuals more susceptible to infections and immune dysfunctions that contribute to schizophrenia. Complementing neurodevelopmental models, this hypothesis integrates findings on many contributing factors to schizophrenia, including prenatal adversity, genes, climate, migration, infections, and stress, among others. It helps explain, for example, why (a) schizophrenia onset is typically delayed until years after prenatal adversity, (b) individual risk factors alone often do not lead to schizophrenia, and (c) schizophrenia prevalence rates actually tend to be higher in economically advantaged countries. Here we discuss how the hypothesis explains 10 key findings, and suggests new, potentially highly cost-effective, strategies for treatment and prevention of schizophrenia. Moreover, while most human research linking immune factors to schizophrenia has been correlational, these strategies provide ethical ways to experimentally test in humans theories about immune function and schizophrenia. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Neuroimmunology in Health And Disease.

  14. Characterization of the skeletal fusion with sterility (sks) mouse showing axial skeleton abnormalities caused by defects of embryonic skeletal development.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Kouyou; Katayama, Kentaro; Tsuji, Takehito; Kunieda, Tetsuo

    2014-01-01

    The development of the axial skeleton is a complex process, consisting of segmentation and differentiation of somites and ossification of the vertebrae. The autosomal recessive skeletal fusion with sterility (sks) mutation of the mouse causes skeletal malformations due to fusion of the vertebrae and ribs, but the underlying defects of vertebral formation during embryonic development have not yet been elucidated. For the present study, we examined the skeletal phenotypes of sks/sks mice during embryonic development and the chromosomal localization of the sks locus. Multiple defects of the axial skeleton, including fusion of vertebrae and fusion and bifurcation of ribs, were observed in adult and neonatal sks/sks mice. In addition, we also found polydactyly and delayed skull ossification in the sks/sks mice. Morphological defects, including disorganized vertebral arches and fusions and bifurcations of the axial skeletal elements, were observed during embryonic development at embryonic day 12.5 (E12.5) and E14.5. However, no morphological abnormality was observed at E11.5, indicating that defects of the axial skeleton are caused by malformation of the cartilaginous vertebra and ribs at an early developmental stage after formation and segmentation of the somites. By linkage analysis, the sks locus was mapped to an 8-Mb region of chromosome 4 between D4Mit331 and D4Mit199. Since no gene has already been identified as a cause of malformation of the vertebra and ribs in this region, the gene responsible for sks is suggested to be a novel gene essential for the cartilaginous vertebra and ribs.

  15. The systematic development of a nursing intervention aimed at increasing enrollment in cardiac rehabilitation for acute coronary syndrome patients.

    PubMed

    Cossette, Sylvie; D'Aoust, Louis-Xavier; Morin, Magali; Heppell, Sonia; Frasure-Smith, Nancy

    2009-09-01

    Acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is a leading cause of morbidity worldwide. Although cardiac rehabilitation (CR) programs can decrease recurrence of coronary events by as much as 25%, few patients engage in CR after a cardiac event. Current therapeutic procedures for ACS are provided quickly after the onset of symptoms, resulting in briefer hospital stays. Therefore, within this shorter time frame, the education of patients about ACS risk factors and their reduction presents a new nursing challenge. The purpose of this paper is to describe the systematic pathway in the development of a nursing intervention which addresses these new challenges in ACS risk factor reduction. The intervention aims to increase enrollment in CR, and enhance illness perceptions and medication adherence, while decreasing anxiety, risk factors, and emergency revisits.

  16. Identification of cardiac hemo-vascular precursors and their requirement of sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 1 for heart development

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yan; Belyea, Brian C.; Li, Minghong; Göthert, Joachim R.; Gomez, R. Ariel; Sequeira-Lopez, Maria Luisa S.

    2017-01-01

    The cardiac endothelium plays a crucial role in the development of a functional heart. However, the precise identification of the endocardial precursors and the mechanisms they require for their role in heart morphogenesis are not well understood. Using in vivo and in vitro cell fate tracing concomitant with specific cell ablation and embryonic heart transplantation studies, we identified a unique set of precursors which possess hemogenic functions and express the stem cell leukemia (SCL) gene driven by its 5′ enhancer. These hemo-vascular precursors give rise to the endocardium, atrioventricular cushions and coronary vascular endothelium. Furthermore, deletion of the sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 1 (S1P1) in these precursors leads to ventricular non-compaction cardiomyopathy, a poorly understood condition leading to heart failure and early mortality. Thus, we identified a distinctive population of hemo-vascular precursors which require S1P1 to exert their functions and are essential for cardiac morphogenesis. PMID:28338096

  17. Insights into the role of maladaptive hexosamine biosynthesis and O-GlcNAcylation in development of diabetic cardiac complications.

    PubMed

    Qin, Cheng Xue; Sleaby, Rochelle; Davidoff, Amy J; Bell, James R; De Blasio, Miles J; Delbridge, Leanne M; Chatham, John C; Ritchie, Rebecca H

    2017-02-01

    Diabetes mellitus significantly increases the risk of heart failure, independent of coronary artery disease. The mechanisms implicated in the development of diabetic heart disease, commonly termed diabetic cardiomyopathy, are complex, but much of the impact of diabetes on the heart can be attributed to impaired glucose handling. It has been shown that the maladaptive nutrient-sensing hexosamine biosynthesis pathway (HBP) contributes to diabetic complications in many non-cardiac tissues. Glucose metabolism by the HBP leads to enzymatically-regulated, O-linked attachment of a sugar moiety molecule, β-N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc), to proteins, affecting their biological activity (similar to phosphorylation). In normal physiology, transient activation of HBP/O-GlcNAc mechanisms is an adaptive, protective means to enhance cell survival; interventions that acutely suppress this pathway decrease tolerance to stress. Conversely, chronic dysregulation of HBP/O-GlcNAc mechanisms has been shown to be detrimental in certain pathological settings, including diabetes and cancer. Most of our understanding of the impact of sustained maladaptive HBP and O-GlcNAc protein modifications has been derived from adipose tissue, skeletal muscle and other non-cardiac tissues, as a contributing mechanism to insulin resistance and progression of diabetic complications. However, the long-term consequences of persistent activation of cardiac HBP and O-GlcNAc are not well-understood; therefore, the goal of this timely review is to highlight current understanding of the role of the HBP pathway in development of diabetic cardiomyopathy.

  18. Cardiac septic pulmonary embolism

    PubMed Central

    Song, Xin yu; Li, Shan; Cao, Jian; Xu, Kai; Huang, Hui; Xu, Zuo jun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Based on the source of the embolus, septic pulmonary embolism (SPE) can be classified as cardiac, peripheral endogenous, or exogenous. Cardiac SPEs are the most common. We conducted a retrospective analysis of 20 patients with cardiac SPE hospitalized between 1991 and 2013 at a Chinese tertiary referral hospital. The study included 14 males and 6 females with a median age of 38.1 years. Fever (100%), cough (95%), hemoptysis (80%), pleuritic chest pain (80%), heart murmur (80%), and moist rales (75%) were common clinical manifestations. Most patients had a predisposing condition: congenital heart disease (8 patients) and an immunocompromised state (5 patients) were the most common. Staphylococcal (8 patients) and Streptococcal species (4 patients) were the most common causative pathogens. Parenchymal opacities, nodules, cavitations, and pleural effusions were the most common manifestations observed via computed tomography (CT). All patients exhibited significant abnormalities by echocardiography, including 15 patients with right-sided vegetations and 4 with double-sided vegetations. All patients received parenteral antimicrobial therapy as an initial treatment. Fourteen patients received cardiac surgery, and all survived. Among the 6 patients who did not undergo surgery, only 1 survived. Most patients in our cardiac SPE cohort had predisposing conditions. Although most exhibited typical clinical manifestations and radiography, they were nonspecific. For suspected cases of SPE, blood culture, echocardiography, and CT pulmonary angiography (CTPA) are important measures to confirm an early diagnosis. Vigorous early therapy, including appropriate antibiotic treatment and timely cardiac surgery to eradicate the infective source, is critical. PMID:27336870

  19. Vangl2-regulated polarisation of second heart field-derived cells is required for outflow tract lengthening during cardiac development.

    PubMed

    Ramsbottom, Simon A; Sharma, Vipul; Rhee, Hong Jun; Eley, Lorraine; Phillips, Helen M; Rigby, Hannah F; Dean, Charlotte; Chaudhry, Bill; Henderson, Deborah J

    2014-12-01

    Planar cell polarity (PCP) is the mechanism by which cells orient themselves in the plane of an epithelium or during directed cell migration, and is regulated by a highly conserved signalling pathway. Mutations in the PCP gene Vangl2, as well as in other key components of the pathway, cause a spectrum of cardiac outflow tract defects. However, it is unclear why cells within the mesodermal heart tissue require PCP signalling. Using a new conditionally floxed allele we show that Vangl2 is required solely within the second heart field (SHF) to direct normal outflow tract lengthening, a process that is required for septation and normal alignment of the aorta and pulmonary trunk with the ventricular chambers. Analysis of a range of markers of polarised epithelial tissues showed that in the normal heart, undifferentiated SHF cells move from the dorsal pericardial wall into the distal outflow tract where they acquire an epithelial phenotype, before moving proximally where they differentiate into cardiomyocytes. Thus there is a transition zone in the distal outflow tract where SHF cells become more polarised, turn off progenitor markers and start to differentiate to cardiomyocytes. Membrane-bound Vangl2 marks the proximal extent of this transition zone and in the absence of Vangl2, the SHF-derived cells are abnormally polarised and disorganised. The consequent thickening, rather than lengthening, of the outflow wall leads to a shortened outflow tract. Premature down regulation of the SHF-progenitor marker Isl1 in the mutants, and accompanied premature differentiation to cardiomyocytes, suggests that the organisation of the cells within the transition zone is important for maintaining the undifferentiated phenotype. Thus, Vangl2-regulated polarisation and subsequent acquisition of an epithelial phenotype is essential to lengthen the tubular outflow vessel, a process that is essential for on-going cardiac morphogenesis.

  20. Vangl2-Regulated Polarisation of Second Heart Field-Derived Cells Is Required for Outflow Tract Lengthening during Cardiac Development

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Hong Jun; Eley, Lorraine; Phillips, Helen M.; Rigby, Hannah F.; Dean, Charlotte; Chaudhry, Bill; Henderson, Deborah J.

    2014-01-01

    Planar cell polarity (PCP) is the mechanism by which cells orient themselves in the plane of an epithelium or during directed cell migration, and is regulated by a highly conserved signalling pathway. Mutations in the PCP gene Vangl2, as well as in other key components of the pathway, cause a spectrum of cardiac outflow tract defects. However, it is unclear why cells within the mesodermal heart tissue require PCP signalling. Using a new conditionally floxed allele we show that Vangl2 is required solely within the second heart field (SHF) to direct normal outflow tract lengthening, a process that is required for septation and normal alignment of the aorta and pulmonary trunk with the ventricular chambers. Analysis of a range of markers of polarised epithelial tissues showed that in the normal heart, undifferentiated SHF cells move from the dorsal pericardial wall into the distal outflow tract where they acquire an epithelial phenotype, before moving proximally where they differentiate into cardiomyocytes. Thus there is a transition zone in the distal outflow tract where SHF cells become more polarised, turn off progenitor markers and start to differentiate to cardiomyocytes. Membrane-bound Vangl2 marks the proximal extent of this transition zone and in the absence of Vangl2, the SHF-derived cells are abnormally polarised and disorganised. The consequent thickening, rather than lengthening, of the outflow wall leads to a shortened outflow tract. Premature down regulation of the SHF-progenitor marker Isl1 in the mutants, and accompanied premature differentiation to cardiomyocytes, suggests that the organisation of the cells within the transition zone is important for maintaining the undifferentiated phenotype. Thus, Vangl2-regulated polarisation and subsequent acquisition of an epithelial phenotype is essential to lengthen the tubular outflow vessel, a process that is essential for on-going cardiac morphogenesis. PMID:25521757

  1. Excess TSH causes abnormal skeletal development in young mice with hypothyroidism via suppressive effects on the growth plate.

    PubMed

    Endo, Toyoshi; Kobayashi, Tetsuro

    2013-09-01

    Hypothyroidism in the young leads to irreversible growth failure. hyt/hyt Mice have a nonfunctional TSH receptor (TSHR) and are severely hypothyroid, but growth retardation was not observed in adult mice. We found that epiphysial cartilage as well as cultured chondrocytes expressed functional TSHR at levels comparable to that seen in the thyroid, and that addition of TSH to cultured chondrocytes suppressed expression of chondrocyte differentiation marker genes such as Sox-9 and type IIa collagen. Next, we compared the long bone phenotypes of two distinct mouse models of hypothyroidism: thyroidectomized (THYx) mice and hyt/hyt mice. Although both THYx and hyt/hyt mice were severely hypothyroid and had similar serum Ca(2+) and growth hormone levels, the tibia was shorter and the proliferating and hypertrophic zones in the growth plate was significantly narrower in THYx mice than in hyt/hyt mice. Supplementation of hyt/hyt mice thyroid hormone resulted in a wider growth plate compared with that of wild-type mice. Expressions of chondrocyte differentiation marker genes Sox-9 and type IIa collagen in growth plate from THYx mice were 52 and 60% lower than those of hyt/hyt mice, respectively. High serum TSH causes abnormal skeletal development in young mice with hypothyroidism via suppressive effects on the growth plate.

  2. Morphological abnormalities, impaired fetal development and decrease in myostatin expression following somatic cell nuclear transfer in dogs.

    PubMed

    Hong, Il-Hwa; Jeong, Yeon-Woo; Shin, Taeyoung; Hyun, Sang-Hwan; Park, Jin-Kyu; Ki, Mi-Ran; Han, Seon-Young; Park, Se-Il; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Lee, Eun-Mi; Kim, Ah-Young; You, Sang-Young; Hwang, Woo-Suk; Jeong, Kyu-Shik

    2011-05-01

    Several mammals, including dogs, have been successfully cloned using somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT), but the efficiency of generating normal, live offspring is relatively low. Although the high failure rate has been attributed to incomplete reprogramming of the somatic nuclei during the cloning process, the exact cause is not fully known. To elucidate the cause of death in cloned offspring, 12 deceased offspring cloned by SCNT were necropsied. The clones were either stillborn just prior to delivery or died with dyspnea shortly after birth. On gross examination, defects in the anterior abdominal wall and increased heart and liver sizes were found. Notably, a significant increase in muscle mass and macroglossia lesions were observed in deceased SCNT-cloned dogs. Interestingly, the expression of myostatin, a negative regulator of muscle growth during embryogenesis, was down-regulated at the mRNA level in tongues and skeletal muscles of SCNT-cloned dogs compared with a normal dog. Results of the present study suggest that decreased expression of myostatin in SCNT-cloned dogs may be involved in morphological abnormalities such as increased muscle mass and macroglossia, which may contribute to impaired fetal development and poor survival rates.

  3. Potential Adverse Effects of Prolonged Sevoflurane Exposure on Developing Monkey Brain: From Abnormal Lipid Metabolism to Neuronal Damage

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fang; Rainosek, Shuo W.; Frisch-Daiello, Jessica L.; Patterson, Tucker A.; Paule, Merle G.; Slikker, William; Wang, Cheng; Han, Xianlin

    2015-01-01

    Sevoflurane is a volatile anesthetic that has been widely used in general anesthesia, yet its safety in pediatric use is a public concern. This study sought to evaluate whether prolonged exposure of infant monkeys to a clinically relevant concentration of sevoflurane is associated with any adverse effects on the developing brain. Infant monkeys were exposed to 2.5% sevoflurane for 9 h, and frontal cortical tissues were harvested for DNA microarray, lipidomics, Luminex protein, and histological assays. DNA microarray analysis showed that sevoflurane exposure resulted in a broad identification of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in the monkey brain. In general, these genes were associated with nervous system development, function, and neural cell viability. Notably, a number of DEGs were closely related to lipid metabolism. Lipidomic analysis demonstrated that critical lipid components, (eg, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylserine, and phosphatidylglycerol) were significantly downregulated by prolonged exposure of sevoflurane. Luminex protein analysis indicated abnormal levels of cytokines in sevoflurane-exposed brains. Consistently, Fluoro-Jade C staining revealed more degenerating neurons after sevoflurane exposure. These data demonstrate that a clinically relevant concentration of sevoflurane (2.5%) is capable of inducing and maintaining an effective surgical plane of anesthesia in the developing nonhuman primate and that a prolonged exposure of 9 h resulted in profound changes in gene expression, cytokine levels, lipid metabolism, and subsequently, neuronal damage. Generally, sevoflurane-induced neuronal damage was also associated with changes in lipid content, composition, or both; and specific lipid changes could provide insights into the molecular mechanism(s) underlying anesthetic-induced neurotoxicity and may be sensitive biomarkers for the early detection of anesthetic-induced neuronal damage. PMID:26206149

  4. Potential Adverse Effects of Prolonged Sevoflurane Exposure on Developing Monkey Brain: From Abnormal Lipid Metabolism to Neuronal Damage.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fang; Rainosek, Shuo W; Frisch-Daiello, Jessica L; Patterson, Tucker A; Paule, Merle G; Slikker, William; Wang, Cheng; Han, Xianlin

    2015-10-01

    Sevoflurane is a volatile anesthetic that has been widely used in general anesthesia, yet its safety in pediatric use is a public concern. This study sought to evaluate whether prolonged exposure of infant monkeys to a clinically relevant concentration of sevoflurane is associated with any adverse effects on the developing brain. Infant monkeys were exposed to 2.5% sevoflurane for 9 h, and frontal cortical tissues were harvested for DNA microarray, lipidomics, Luminex protein, and histological assays. DNA microarray analysis showed that sevoflurane exposure resulted in a broad identification of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in the monkey brain. In general, these genes were associated with nervous system development, function, and neural cell viability. Notably, a number of DEGs were closely related to lipid metabolism. Lipidomic analysis demonstrated that critical lipid components, (eg, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylserine, and phosphatidylglycerol) were significantly downregulated by prolonged exposure of sevoflurane. Luminex protein analysis indicated abnormal levels of cytokines in sevoflurane-exposed brains. Consistently, Fluoro-Jade C staining revealed more degenerating neurons after sevoflurane exposure. These data demonstrate that a clinically relevant concentration of sevoflurane (2.5%) is capable of inducing and maintaining an effective surgical plane of anesthesia in the developing nonhuman primate and that a prolonged exposure of 9 h resulted in profound changes in gene expression, cytokine levels, lipid metabolism, and subsequently, neuronal damage. Generally, sevoflurane-induced neuronal damage was also associated with changes in lipid content, composition, or both; and specific lipid changes could provide insights into the molecular mechanism(s) underlying anesthetic-induced neurotoxicity and may be sensitive biomarkers for the early detection of anesthetic-induced neuronal damage.

  5. Development and first assessment of a questionnaire for health care utilization and costs for cardiac patients

    PubMed Central

    Schweikert, Bernd; Hahmann, Harry; Leidl, Reiner

    2008-01-01

    Background The valid and reliable measurement of health service utilization, productivity losses and consequently total disease-related costs is a prerequisite for health services research and for health economic analysis. Although administrative data sources are usually considered to be the most accurate, their use is limited as some components of utilization are not systematically captured and, especially in decentralized health care systems, no single source exists for comprehensive utilization and cost data. The aim of this study was to develop and test a questionnaire for the measurement of disease-related costs for patients after an acute cardiac event (ACE). Methods To design the questionnaire, the literature was searched for contributions to the assessment of utilization of health care resources by patient-administered questionnaires. Based on these findings, we developed a retrospective questionnaire appropriate for the measurement of disease-related costs over a period of 3 months in ACE patients. Items were generated by reviewing existing guidelines and by interviewing medical specialists and patients. In this study, the questionnaire was tested on 106 patients, aging 35–65 who were admitted for rehabilitation after ACE. It was compared with prospectively measured data; selected items were compared with administrative data from sickness funds. Results The questionnaire was accepted well (response rate = 88%), and respondents completed the questionnaire in an average time of 27 minutes. Concordance between retrospective and prospective data showed an intraclass correlation (ICC) ranging between 0.57 (cost of medical intake) and 0.9 (hospital days) with the other main items (physician visits, days off work, medication) clustering around 0.7. Comparison between self-reported and administrative data for days off work and hospitalized days were possible for n = 48. Respective ICCs ranged between 0.92 and 0.94, although differences in mean levels were

  6. Genetically induced abnormal cranial development in human trisomy 18 with holoprosencephaly: comparisons with the normal tempo of osteogenic-neural development.

    PubMed

    Reid, Shaina N; Ziermann, Janine M; Gondré-Lewis, Marjorie C

    2015-07-01

    Craniofacial malformations are common congenital defects caused by failed midline inductive signals. These midline defects are associated with exposure of the fetus to exogenous teratogens and with inborn genetic errors such as those found in Down, Patau, Edwards' and Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndromes. Yet, there are no studies that analyze contributions of synchronous neurocranial and neural development in these disorders. Here we present the first in-depth analysis of malformations of the basicranium of a holoprosencephalic (HPE) trisomy 18 (T18; Edwards' syndrome) fetus with synophthalmic cyclopia and alobar HPE. With a combination of traditional gross dissection and state-of-the-art computed tomography, we demonstrate the deleterious effects of T18 caused by a translocation at 18p11.31. Bony features included a single developmentally unseparated frontal bone, and complete dual absence of the anterior cranial fossa and ethmoid bone. From a superior view with the calvarium plates removed, there was direct visual access to the orbital foramen and hard palate. Both the eyes and the pituitary gland, normally protected by bony structures, were exposed in the cranial cavity and in direct contact with the brain. The middle cranial fossa was shifted anteriorly, and foramina were either missing or displaced to an abnormal location due to the absence or misplacement of its respective cranial nerve (CN). When CN development was conserved in its induction and placement, the respective foramen developed in its normal location albeit with abnormal gross anatomical features, as seen in the facial nerve (CNVII) and the internal acoustic meatus. More anteriorly localized CNs and their foramina were absent or heavily disrupted compared with posterior ones. The severe malformations exhibited in the cranial fossae, orbital region, pituitary gland and sella turcica highlight the crucial involvement of transcription factors such as TGIF, which is located on chromosome 18 and contributes

  7. Cardiac effects of noncardiac neoplasms

    SciTech Connect

    Schoen, F.J.; Berger, B.M.; Guerina, N.G.

    1984-11-01

    Clinically significant cardiovascular abnormalities may occur as secondary manifestations of noncardiac neoplasms. The principal cardiac effects of noncardiac tumors include the direct results of metastases to the heart or lungs, the indirect effects of circulating tumor products (causing nonbacterial thrombotic endocarditis, myeloma-associated amyloidosis, pheochromocytoma-associated cardiac hypertrophy and myofibrillar degeneration, and carcinoid heart disease), and the undesired cardiotoxicities of chemotherapy and radiotherapy. 89 references.

  8. Development of Electrically Conductive Double-Network Hydrogels via One-Step Facile Strategy for Cardiac Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Yang, Boguang; Yao, Fanglian; Hao, Tong; Fang, Wancai; Ye, Lei; Zhang, Yabin; Wang, Yan; Li, Junjie; Wang, Changyong

    2016-02-18

    Cardiac tissue engineering is an effective method to treat the myocardial infarction. However, the lack of electrical conductivity of biomaterials limits their applications. In this work, a homogeneous electronically conductive double network (HEDN) hydrogel via one-step facile strategy is developed, consisting of a rigid/hydrophobic/conductive network of chemical crosslinked poly(thiophene-3-acetic acid) (PTAA) and a flexible/hydrophilic/biocompatible network of photo-crosslinking methacrylated aminated gelatin (MAAG). Results suggest that the swelling, mechanical, and conductive properties of HEDN hydrogel can be modulated via adjusting the ratio of PTAA network to MAAG network. HEDN hydrogel has Young's moduli ranging from 22.7 to 493.1 kPa, and its conductivity (≈10(-4) S cm(-1)) falls in the range of reported conductivities for native myocardium tissue. To assess their biological activity, the brown adipose-derived stem cells (BADSCs) are seeded on the surface of HEDN hydrogel with or without electrical stimulation. Our data show that the HEDN hydrogel can support the survival and proliferation of BADSCs, and that it can improve the cardiac differentiation efficiency of BADSCs and upregulate the expression of connexin 43. Moreover, electrical stimulation can further improve this effect. Overall, it is concluded that the HEDN hydrogel may represent an ideal scaffold for cardiac tissue engineering.

  9. Calcitriol attenuates cardiac remodeling and dysfunction in a murine model of polycystic ovary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ling; Cao, Jia-Tian; Liang, Yan; Zhao, Yi-Chao; Lin, Xian-Hua; Li, Xiao-Cui; Tan, Ya-Jing; Li, Jing-Yi; Zhou, Cheng-Liang; Xu, Hai-Yan; Sheng, Jian-Zhong; Huang, He-Feng

    2016-05-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a complex reproductive and metabolic disorder affecting 10 % of reproductive-aged women, and is well associated with an increased prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors. However, there are few data concerning the direct association of PCOS with cardiac pathologies. The present study aims to investigate the changes in cardiac structure, function, and cardiomyocyte survival in a PCOS model, and explore the possible effect of calcitriol administration on these changes. PCOS was induced in C57BL/6J female mice by chronic dihydrotestosterone administration, as evidenced by irregular estrous cycles, obesity and dyslipidemia. PCOS mice progressively developed cardiac abnormalities including cardiac hypertrophy, interstitial fibrosis, myocardial apoptosis, and cardiac dysfunction. Conversely, concomitant administration of calcitriol significantly attenuated cardiac remodeling and cardiomyocyte apoptosis, and improved cardiac function. Molecular analysis revealed that the beneficial effect of calcitriol was associated with normalized autophagy function by increasing phosphorylation levels of AMP-activated protein kinase and inhibiting phosphorylation levels of mammalian target of rapamycin complex. Our findings provide the first evidence for the presence of cardiac remodeling in a PCOS model, and vitamin D supplementation may be a potential therapeutic strategy for the prevention and treatment of PCOS-related cardiac remodeling.

  10. Epiphyseal abnormalities, trabecular bone loss and articular chondrocyte hypertrophy develop in the long bones of postnatal Ext1-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Sgariglia, Federica; Candela, Maria Elena; Huegel, Julianne; Jacenko, Olena; Koyama, Eiki; Yamaguchi, Yu; Pacifici, Maurizio; Enomoto-Iwamoto, Motomi

    2013-11-01

    Long bones are integral components of the limb skeleton. Recent studies have indicated that embryonic long bone development is altered by mutations in Ext genes and consequent heparan sulfate (HS) deficiency, possibly due to changes in activity and distribution of HS-binding/growth plate-associated signaling proteins. Here we asked whether Ext function is continuously required after birth to sustain growth plate function and long bone growth and organization. Compound transgenic Ext1(f/f);Col2CreERT mice were injected with tamoxifen at postnatal day 5 (P5) to ablate Ext1 in cartilage and monitored over time. The Ext1-deficient mice exhibited growth retardation already by 2weeks post-injection, as did their long bones. Mutant growth plates displayed a severe disorganization of chondrocyte columnar organization, a shortened hypertrophic zone with low expression of collagen X and MMP-13, and reduced primary spongiosa accompanied, however, by increased numbers of TRAP-positive osteoclasts at the chondro-osseous border. The mutant epiphyses were abnormal as well. Formation of a secondary ossification center was significantly delayed but interestingly, hypertrophic-like chondrocytes emerged within articular cartilage, similar to those often seen in osteoarthritic joints. Indeed, the cells displayed a large size and round shape, expressed collagen X and MMP-13 and were surrounded by an abundant Perlecan-rich pericellular matrix not seen in control articular chondrocytes. In addition, ectopic cartilaginous outgrowths developed on the lateral side of mutant growth plates over time that resembled exostotic characteristic of children with Hereditary Multiple Exostoses, a syndrome caused by Ext mutations and HS deficiency. In sum, the data do show that Ext1 is continuously required for postnatal growth and organization of long bones as well as their adjacent joints. Ext1 deficiency elicits defects that can occur in human skeletal conditions including trabecular bone loss

  11. The trajectory of gray matter development in Broca’s area is abnormal in people who stutter

    PubMed Central

    Beal, Deryk S.; Lerch, Jason P.; Cameron, Brodie; Henderson, Rhaeling; Gracco, Vincent L.; De Nil, Luc F.

    2015-01-01

    The acquisition and mastery of speech-motor control requires years of practice spanning the course of development. People who stutter often perform poorly on speech-motor tasks thereby calling into question their ability to establish the stable neural motor programs required for masterful speech-motor control. There is evidence to support the assertion that these neural motor programs are represented in the posterior part of Broca’s area, specifically the left pars opercularis. Consequently, various theories of stuttering causation posit that the disorder is related to a breakdown in the formation of the neural motor programs for speech early in development and that this breakdown is maintained throughout life. To date, no study has examined the potential neurodevelopmental signatures of the disorder across pediatric and adult populations. The current study aimed to fill this gap in our knowledge. We hypothesized that the developmental trajectory of cortical thickness in people who stutter would differ across the lifespan in the left pars opercularis relative to a group of control participants. We collected structural magnetic resonance images from 116 males (55 people who stutter) ranging in age from 6 to 48 years old. Differences in cortical thickness across ages and between patients and controls were investigated in 30 brain regions previously implicated in speech-motor control. An interaction between age and group was found for the left pars opercularis only. In people who stutter, the pars opercularis did not demonstrate the typical maturational pattern of gradual gray matter thinning with age across the lifespan that we observed in control participants. In contrast, the developmental trajectory of gray matter thickness in other regions of interest within the neural network for speech-motor control was similar for both groups. Our findings indicate that the developmental trajectory of gray matter in left pars opercularis is abnormal in people who stutter

  12. Fetal cardiac scanning today.

    PubMed

    Allan, Lindsey

    2010-07-01

    The ability to examine the structure of the fetal heart in real-time started over 30 years ago now. The field has seen very great advances since then, both in terms of technical improvements in ultrasound equipment and in dissemination of operator skills. A great deal has been learnt about normal cardiac function in the human fetus throughout gestation and how it is affected by pathologies of pregnancy. There is increasing recognition of abnormal heart structure during routine obstetric scanning, allowing referral for specialist diagnosis and counselling. It is now possible to make accurate diagnosis of cardiac malformations as early as 12 weeks of gestation. Early diagnosis of a major cardiac malformation in the fetus can provide the parents with a comprehensive prognosis, enabling them to make the most informed choice about the management of the pregnancy.

  13. Cardiac Hegemony of Senescence

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqi, Sailay; Sussman, Mark A.

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac senescence and age-related disease development have gained general attention and recognition in the past decades due to increased accessibility and quality of health care. The advancement in global civilization is complementary to concerns regarding population aging and development of chronic degenerative diseases. Cardiac degeneration has been rigorously studied. The molecular mechanisms of cardiac senescence are on multiple cellular levels and hold a multilayer complexity level, thereby hampering development of unambiguous treatment protocols. In particular, the synergistic exchange of the senescence phenotype through a senescence secretome between myocytes and stem cells appears complicated and is of great future therapeutic value. The current review article will highlight hallmarks of senescence, cardiac myocyte and stem cell senescence, and the mutual exchange of senescent secretome. Future cardiac cell therapy approaches require a comprehensive understanding of myocardial senescence to improve therapeutic efficiency as well as efficacy. PMID:24349878

  14. Chronic methamphetamine exposure induces cardiac fas-dependent and mitochondria-dependent apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Liou, Cher-Ming; Tsai, Shiow-Chwen; Kuo, Chia-Hua; Williams, Timothy; Ting, Hua; Lee, Shin-Da

    2014-06-01

    Very limited information regarding the influence of chronic methamphetamine exposure on cardiac apoptosis is available. In this study, we evaluate whether chronic methamphetamine exposure will increase cardiac Fas-dependent (type I) and mitochondria-dependent (type II) apoptotic pathways. Thirty-two male Wistar rats at 3-4 months of age were randomly divided into a vehicle-treated group [phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) 0.5 ml SQ per day] and a methamphetamine-treated group (MA 10 mg/kg SQ per day) for 3 months. We report that after 3 months of exposure, abnormal myocardial architecture, more minor cardiac fibrosis and cardiac TUNEL-positive apoptotic cells were observed at greater frequency in the MA group than in the PBS group. Protein levels of TNF-α, Fas ligand, Fas receptor, Fas-associated death domain, activated caspase-8, and activated caspase-3 (Fas-dependent apoptosis) extracted from excised hearts were significantly increased in the MA group, compared to the PBS group. Protein levels of cardiac Bak, t-Bid, Bak to Bcl-xL ratio, activated caspase-9, and activated caspase-3 (mitochondria-dependent apoptosis) were significantly increased in the MA group, compared with the PBS group. The results from this study reveal that chronic methamphetamine exposure will activate cardiac Fas-dependent and mitochondria-dependent apoptotic pathways, which may indicate a possible mechanism for developing cardiac abnormalities in humans with chronic methamphetamine abuse.

  15. The Relationship between Personality Dimensions and Resiliency to Environmental Stress in Orange-Winged Amazon Parrots (Amazona amazonica), as Indicated by the Development of Abnormal Behaviors.

    PubMed

    Cussen, Victoria A; Mench, Joy A

    2015-01-01

    Parrots are popular companion animals, but are frequently relinquished because of behavioral problems, including abnormal repetitive behaviors like feather damaging behavior and stereotypy. In addition to contributing to pet relinquishment, these behaviors are important as potential indicators of diminished psychological well-being. While abnormal behaviors are common in captive animals, their presence and/or severity varies between animals of the same species that are experiencing the same environmental conditions. Personality differences could contribute to this observed individual variation, as they are known risk factors for stress sensitivity and affective disorders in humans. The goal of this study was to assess the relationship between personality and the development and severity of abnormal behaviors in captive-bred orange-winged Amazon parrots (Amazona amazonica). We monitored between-individual behavioral differences in enrichment-reared parrots of known personality types before, during, and after enrichment deprivation. We predicted that parrots with higher scores for neurotic-like personality traits would be more susceptible to enrichment deprivation and develop more abnormal behaviors. Our results partially supported this hypothesis, but also showed that distinct personality dimensions were related to different forms of abnormal behavior. While neuroticism-like traits were linked to feather damaging behavior, extraversion-like traits were negatively related to stereotypic behavior. More extraverted birds showed resiliency to environmental stress, developing fewer stereotypies during enrichment deprivation and showing lower levels of these behaviors following re-enrichment. Our data, together with the results of the few studies conducted on other species, suggest that, as in humans, certain personality types render individual animals more susceptible or resilient to environmental stress. Further, this susceptibility/resiliency can have a long

  16. Cardiovascular Abnormalities in Sickle Cell Disease

    PubMed Central

    Gladwin, Mark T.; Sachdev, Vandana

    2013-01-01

    Sickle cell disease is characterized by recurrent episodes of ischemia-reperfusion injury to multiple vital organ systems and a chronic hemolytic anemia, both contributing to progressive organ dysfunction. The introduction of treatments that induce protective fetal hemoglobin and reduce infectious complications has greatly prolonged survival. However, with increased longevity, cardiovascular complications are increasingly evident, with the notable development of a progressive proliferative systemic vasculopathy, pulmonary hypertension (PH) and left ventricular diastolic dysfunction. Pulmonary hypertension is reported in autopsy studies and numerous clinical studies have shown that increased pulmonary pressures are an important risk marker for mortality in these patients. In epidemiological studies, the development of PH is associated with intravascular hemolysis, cutaneous leg ulceration, renal insufficiency, iron overload and liver dysfunction. Chronic anemia in sickle cell disease results in cardiac chamber dilation and a compensatory increase in left ventricular mass. This is often accompanied by left ventricular diastolic dysfunction which has also been a strong independent predictor of mortality patients with sickle cell disease. Both PH and diastolic dysfunction are associated with marked abnormalities in exercise capacity in these patients. Sudden death is an increasingly recognized problem and further cardiac investigations are necessary to recognize and treat high-risk patients. PMID:22440212

  17. Effects of low-level hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) exposure on cardiac development in zebrafish embryos.

    PubMed

    Wu, Meifang; Zuo, Zhenghong; Li, Bowen; Huang, Lixing; Chen, Meng; Wang, Chonggang

    2013-10-01

    Hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) is one of the most widely used brominated flame retardants. In the present study, zebrafish embryos were exposed to HBCD at the low concentrations of 0, 2, 20 and 200 nM. The results showed HBCD exposure resulted in an increase in heart rate and cardiac arrhythmia after exposure for 72 h, though the survival rate and the whole malformation rate were not significantly affected. These results demonstrated that the heart might be a target of HBCD. Low-level HBCD exposure may not share the same mechanisms as exposure to high concentrations, since no obvious increase of apoptotic cells around the heart was observed in the HBCD-treated groups. It was observed that the expression of Tbx5 and Nkx2.5 was significantly elevated by HBCD treatment in a dose-dependent manner using real-time quantitative PCR, which may be mainly responsible for the alteration of heart rate, given that Tbx5 and Nkx2.5 are two factors regulating ventricle conduction. The mRNA expression of RyR2 and Atp2a2b (SERCA2a) was up-regulated in the exposure group, which may be one of reasons to affect the normal heart rate, since SERCA2a and RyR2 play an important role in calcium ion transport of cadiomyocytes. However, HBCD exposure did not significantly change the expression of Actc1l, Tnnt2, and Myh6, which are mainly muscle contractile genes that play key roles in the formation of cardiac structure. These results were consistent with the lack of effect seen on the other measurements of cardiac function, end diastolic volume, end-systolic volume, stroke volume, and cardiac output.

  18. Non-invasive Mapping of Cardiac Arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Shah, Ashok; Hocini, Meleze; Haissaguerre, Michel; Jaïs, Pierre

    2015-08-01

    Since more than 100 years, 12-lead electrocardiography (ECG) is the standard-of-care tool, which involves measuring electrical potentials from limited sites on the body surface to diagnose cardiac disorder, its possible mechanism, and the likely site of origin. Several decades of research has led to the development of a 252-lead ECG and computed tomography (CT) scan-based three-dimensional electro-imaging modality to non-invasively map abnormal cardiac rhythms including fibrillation. These maps provide guidance towards ablative therapy and thereby help advance the management of complex heart rhythm disorders. Here, we describe the clinical experience obtained using non-invasive technique in mapping the electrical disorder and guide the catheter ablation of atrial arrhythmias (premature atrial beat, atrial tachycardia, atrial fibrillation), ventricular arrhythmias (premature ventricular beats), and ventricular pre-excitation (Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome).

  19. Phospholemman: a novel cardiac stress protein.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Joseph Y; Zhang, Xue-Qian; Song, Jianliang; Gao, Erhe; Rabinowitz, Joseph E; Chan, Tung O; Wang, Jufang

    2010-08-01

    Phospholemman (PLM), a member of the FXYD family of regulators of ion transport, is a major sarcolemmal substrate for protein kinases A and C in cardiac and skeletal muscle. In the heart, PLM co-localizes and co-immunoprecipitates with Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase, Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger, and L-type Ca(2+) channel. Functionally, when phosphorylated at serine(68), PLM stimulates Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase but inhibits Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger in cardiac myocytes. In heterologous expression systems, PLM modulates the gating of cardiac L-type Ca(2+) channel. Therefore, PLM occupies a key modulatory role in intracellular Na(+) and Ca(2+) homeostasis and is intimately involved in regulation of excitation-contraction (EC) coupling. Genetic ablation of PLM results in a slight increase in baseline cardiac contractility and prolongation of action potential duration. When hearts are subjected to catecholamine stress, PLM minimizes the risks of arrhythmogenesis by reducing Na(+) overload and simultaneously preserves inotropy by inhibiting Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger. In heart failure, both expression and phosphorylation state of PLM are altered and may partly account for abnormalities in EC coupling. The unique role of PLM in regulation of Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase, Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger, and potentially L-type Ca(2+) channel in the heart, together with the changes in its expression and phosphorylation in heart failure, make PLM a rational and novel target for development of drugs in our armamentarium against heart failure. Clin Trans Sci 2010; Volume 3: 189-196.

  20. The development and application of a high-sensitivity immunoassay for cardiac myosin–binding protein C

    PubMed Central

    Marjot, Jack; Liebetrau, Christoph; Goodson, Robert J.; Kaier, Thomas; Weber, Ekkehard; Heseltine, Peter; Marber, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac troponins (cTns) are released and cleared slowly after myocardial injury. Cardiac myosin–binding protein C (cMyC) is a similar cardiac-restricted protein that has more rapid release and clearance kinetics. Direct comparisons are hampered by the lack of an assay for cMyC that matches the sensitivity of the contemporary assays for cTnI and cTnT. Using a novel pair of monoclonal antibodies, we generated a sensitive assay for MyC on the Erenna platform (Singulex) and compared serum concentrations with those of cTnI (Abbott) and cTnT (Roche) in stable ambulatory cardiac patients without evidence of acute cardiac injury or significant coronary artery stenoses. The assay for cMyC had a lower limit of detection of 0.4 ng/L, a lower limit of quantification (LLoQ) of 1.2 ng/L (LLoQ at 20% coefficient of variation [CV]) and reasonable recovery (107.1 ± 3.7%; mean ± standard deviation), dilutional linearity (101.0 ± 7.7%), and intraseries precision (CV, 11 ± 3%) and interseries precision (CV, 13 ± 3%). In 360 stable patients, cMyC was quantifiable in 359 patients and compared with cTnT and cTnI measured using contemporary high-sensitivity assays. cMyC concentration (median, 12.2 ng/L; interquartile range [IQR], 7.9–21.2 ng/L) was linearly correlated with those for cTnT (median, <3.0 ng/L; IQR, <3.0–4.9 ng/L; R = 0.56, P < 0.01) and cTnI (median, 2.10 ng/L; IQR, 1.3–4.2 ng/L; R = 0.77, P < 0.01) and showed similar dependencies on age, renal function, and left ventricular function. We have developed a high-sensitivity assay for cMyC. Concentrations of cMyC in clinically stable patients are highly correlated with those of cTnT and cTnI. This high correlation may enable ratiometric comparisons between biomarkers to distinguish clinical instability. PMID:26713894

  1. The development and application of a high-sensitivity immunoassay for cardiac myosin-binding protein C.

    PubMed

    Marjot, Jack; Liebetrau, Christoph; Goodson, Robert J; Kaier, Thomas; Weber, Ekkehard; Heseltine, Peter; Marber, Michael S

    2016-04-01

    Cardiac troponins (cTns) are released and cleared slowly after myocardial injury. Cardiac myosin-binding protein C (cMyC) is a similar cardiac-restricted protein that has more rapid release and clearance kinetics. Direct comparisons are hampered by the lack of an assay for cMyC that matches the sensitivity of the contemporary assays for cTnI and cTnT. Using a novel pair of monoclonal antibodies, we generated a sensitive assay for MyC on the Erenna platform (Singulex) and compared serum concentrations with those of cTnI (Abbott) and cTnT (Roche) in stable ambulatory cardiac patients without evidence of acute cardiac injury or significant coronary artery stenoses. The assay for cMyC had a lower limit of detection of 0.4 ng/L, a lower limit of quantification (LLoQ) of 1.2 ng/L (LLoQ at 20% coefficient of variation [CV]) and reasonable recovery (107.1 ± 3.7%; mean ± standard deviation), dilutional linearity (101.0 ± 7.7%), and intraseries precision (CV, 11 ± 3%) and interseries precision (CV, 13 ± 3%). In 360 stable patients, cMyC was quantifiable in 359 patients and compared with cTnT and cTnI measured using contemporary high-sensitivity assays. cMyC concentration (median, 12.2 ng/L; interquartile range [IQR], 7.9-21.2 ng/L) was linearly correlated with those for cTnT (median, <3.0 ng/L; IQR, <3.0-4.9 ng/L; R = 0.56, P < 0.01) and cTnI (median, 2.10 ng/L; IQR, 1.3-4.2 ng/L; R = 0.77, P < 0.01) and showed similar dependencies on age, renal function, and left ventricular function. We have developed a high-sensitivity assay for cMyC. Concentrations of cMyC in clinically stable patients are highly correlated with those of cTnT and cTnI. This high correlation may enable ratiometric comparisons between biomarkers to distinguish clinical instability.

  2. Do sleep abnormalities and misaligned sleep/circadian rhythm patterns represent early clinical characteristics for developing psychosis in high risk populations?

    PubMed

    Zanini, Marcio; Castro, Juliana; Coelho, Fernando Morgadinho; Bittencourt, Lia; Bressan, Rodrigo A; Tufik, Sergio; Brietzke, Elisa

    2013-12-01

    Sleep architecture changes, such as slow-wave sleep (SWS) percentage variations and reductions in latency and density of rapid eye movement (REM), are found in most patients with schizophrenia and are considered to be an important part of the pathophysiology of the disorder. In addition to these sleep parameters changes, disruptions in sleep homeostasis and the sleep/circadian rhythm also occur in these patients. Sleep/circadian rhythm abnormalities negatively affect neocortical plasticity and cognition and often precede the diagnosis of the illness. Thus, it has been suggested that the sleep/circadian rhythm might be involved in the pathophysiology of psychosis. Recent advances in the identification of individuals at a high risk for developing schizophrenia allow us to investigate several neurobiological processes involved in the development of psychosis. In this article, we review the current evidence of the effects of sleep parameter abnormalities, disruptions in sleep homeostasis and misalignments of sleep circadian rhythm on the early stages of schizophrenia. In addition, we discuss the preliminary evidence of sleep and circadian rhythm abnormalities during the prodromal stages of psychosis and propose that these abnormalities can be explored as potential predictors, as an adjunct to clinical diagnosis, of developing a psychotic disorder in at risk populations.

  3. Concise Review: Cardiac Disease Modeling Using Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chunbo; Al-Aama, Jumana; Stojkovic, Miodrag; Keavney, Bernard; Trafford, Andrew; Lako, Majlinda; Armstrong, Lyle

    2015-09-01

    Genetic cardiac diseases are major causes of morbidity and mortality. Although animal models have been created to provide some useful insights into the pathogenesis of genetic cardiac diseases, the significant species differences and the lack of genetic information for complex genetic diseases markedly attenuate the application values of such data. Generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from patient-specific specimens and subsequent derivation of cardiomyocytes offer novel avenues to study the mechanisms underlying cardiac diseases, to identify new causative genes, and to provide insights into the disease aetiology. In recent years, the list of human iPSC-based models for genetic cardiac diseases has been expanding rapidly, although there are still remaining concerns on the level of functionality of iPSC-derived cardiomyocytes and their ability to be used for modeling complex cardiac diseases in adults. This review focuses on the development of cardiomyocyte induction from pluripotent stem cells, the recent progress in heart disease modeling using iPSC-derived cardiomyocytes, and the challenges associated with understanding complex genetic diseases. To address these issues, we examine the similarity between iPSC-derived cardiomyocytes and their ex vivo counterparts and how this relates to the method used to differentiate the pluripotent stem cells into a cardiomyocyte phenotype. We progress to examine categories of congenital cardiac abnormalities that are suitable for iPSC-based disease modeling.

  4. Diagnosis of traumatic cardiac contusion

    SciTech Connect

    Waxman, K.; Soliman, M.H.; Braunstein, P.; Formosa, P.; Cohen, A.J.; Matsuura, P.; Mason, G.R.

    1986-06-01

    Cardiac contusion following blunt chest trauma remains a diagnostic problem because of a lack of sensitive diagnostic tests. This study evaluated thallous chloride Tl 201 single-photon-emission computed tomography in a series of 48 patients following blunt chest trauma. Of the 48 patients, 23 had normal scans. None of these patients proved to have serious arrhythmias during three days of continuous monitoring. Of 25 patients with abnormal or ambiguous studies, five (20%) developed serious arrhythmias requiring therapy. Single-photon-emission computed tomography scanning thus was sensitive in indicating that group of patients at risk of serious arrhythmias, and may therefore prove to be a useful screening test to determine the need for hospitalization and arrhythmia monitoring following blunt chest trauma.

  5. Regenerative therapy and tissue engineering for the treatment of end-stage cardiac failure: new developments and challenges.

    PubMed

    Finosh, G T; Jayabalan, Muthu

    2012-01-01

    Regeneration of myocardium through regenerative therapy and tissue engineering is appearing as a prospective treatment modality for patients with end-stage heart failure. Focusing on this area, this review highlights the new developments and challenges in the regeneration of myocardial tissue. The role of various cell sources, calcium ion and cytokine on the functional performance of regenerative therapy is discussed. The evolution of tissue engineering and the role of tissue matrix/scaffold, cell adhesion and vascularisation on tissue engineering of cardiac tissue implant are also discussed.

  6. Athletes at Risk for Sudden Cardiac Death

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Subasic, Kim

    2010-01-01

    High school athletes represent the largest group of individuals affected by sudden cardiac death, with an estimated incidence of once or twice per week. Structural cardiovascular abnormalities are the most frequent cause of sudden cardiac death. Athletes participating in basketball, football, track, soccer, baseball, and swimming were found to…

  7. Tissue Doppler imaging in cardiac sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Smedema, J P

    2008-07-01

    A middle-aged African lady, who presented with ventricular tachycardias, mitral valve regurgitation and congestive heart failure, was diagnosed with cardiac sarcoidosis. Tissue Doppler imaging demonstrated abnormalities suggestive of myocardial scar, which was confirmed by contrast-enhanced cardiac magnetic resonance.

  8. Prevalence of Electrocardiographic Abnormalities in a Middle-Aged, Biracial Population: Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) Study

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Joseph A; Prineas, Ronald; Daviglus, Martha L.; Ning, Hongyan; Liu, Kiang; Lewis, Cora E.; Sidney, Steven; Schreiner, Pamela J.; Iribarren, Carlos; Lloyd-Jones, Donald M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Few studies to date have described the prevalence of electrocardiographic (ECG) abnormalities in a biracial middle-aged cohort. Methods and Results Participants underwent measurement of traditional risk factors and 12-lead ECGs coded using both Minnesota Code (MC) and Novacode (NC) criteria. Among 2585 participants, of whom 57% were women and 44% were black (mean age 45 years), the prevalence of major and minor abnormalities were significantly higher (all P<0.001) among black men and women compared to whites. These differences were primarily due to higher QRS voltage and ST/T wave abnormalities among blacks. There was also a higher prevalence of Q waves (MC 1-1, 1-2, 1-3) than described by previous studies. These racial differences remained after multivariate adjustment for traditional cardiovascular (CV) risk factors. Conclusions Black men and women have a significantly higher prevalence of ECG abnormalities, independent of traditional CV risk factors, than whites in a contemporary cohort middle-aged participants. PMID:20374967

  9. Abnormalities of gonadal differentiation.

    PubMed

    Berkovitz, G D; Seeherunvong, T

    1998-04-01

    Gonadal differentiation involves a complex interplay of developmental pathways. The sex determining region Y (SRY) gene plays a key role in testis determination, but its interaction with other genes is less well understood. Abnormalities of gonadal differentiation result in a range of clinical problems. 46,XY complete gonadal dysgenesis is defined by an absence of testis determination. Subjects have female external genitalia and come to clinical attention because of delayed puberty. Individuals with 46,XY partial gonadal dysgenesis usually present in the newborn period for the valuation of ambiguous genitalia. Gonadal histology always shows an abnormality of seminiferous tubule formation. A diagnosis of 46,XY true hermaphroditism is made if the gonads contain well-formed testicular and ovarian elements. Despite the pivotal role of the SRY gene in testis development, mutations of SRY are unusual in subjects with a 46,XY karyotype and abnormal gonadal development. 46,XX maleness is defined by testis determination in an individual with a 46,XX karyotype. Most affected individuals have a phenotype similar to that of Klinefelter syndrome. In contrast, subjects with 46,XX true hermaphroditism usually present with ambiguous genitalia. The majority of subjects with 46,XX maleness have Y sequences including SRY in genomic DNA. However, only rare subjects with 46,XX true hermaphroditism have translocated sequences encoding SRY. Mosaicism and chimaerism involving the Y chromosome can also be associated with abnormal gonadal development. However, the vast majority of subjects with 45,X/46,XY mosaicism have normal testes and normal male external genitalia.

  10. Multiple cardiac anomaly in sheep: a case study and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Balogh, Emese; Sótonyi, P

    2003-01-01

    A multiple cardiac anomaly in sheep is presented to show how complicated the result of abnormal development can be. The heart of a 12-hour-old sheep was fixed in 8% formaldehyde solution and subsequently dissected by an anatomical method, and the abnormalities were recorded on digital pictures. The abnormal anatomy is described and compared with the simple developmental anomalies. Developmental abnormalities were found in the distal portion of the bulbus, the aortic arches and the interatrial septum. A special type of the double-outlet right ventricle was observed, which was not a real double-outlet ventricle because it occurred in combination with pulmonary atresia. Coarctation of the aorta was seen, the ductus arteriosus was absent, and there were five vessels originating from the aortic arch instead of one vessel seen in normal cases, as a result of the abnormal development of the aortic arches.

  11. Effect of in vivo heart irradiation on the development of antioxidant defenses and cardiac functions in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Benderitter, M.; Assem, M.; Maupoil, V.

    1995-10-01

    During radiotherapy of thoracic tumors, the heart is often included in the primary treatment volume, and chronic impairment of myocardial function occurs. The cellular biomolecules are altered directly by radiation or damaged indirectly by free radical production. The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the biochemical and functional response of the rat heart to a single high dose of radiation. The effect of 20 Gy local X irradiation was determined in the heart of Wistar rats under general anesthesia. Mechanical performances were measured in vitro using an isolated perfused working heart model, and cardiac antioxidant defenses were also evaluated. Hearts were studied at 1 and 4 months after irradiation. This single dose of radiation induced a marked drop in the mechanical activity of the rat heart: aortic output was significantly reduced (18% less than control values) at 1 month postirradiation and remained depressed for the rest of the experimental period (21% less than control 4 months after treatment). This suggests the development of myocardial failure after irradiation. The decline of functional parameters was associated with changes in antioxidant defenses. The decrease in cardiac levels of vitamin E (-30%) was associated with an increase in the levels of Mn-SOD and glustathione peroxidase (+45.5% and +32%, respectively, at 4 months postirradiation). However, cardiac vitamin C and catalase levels remained constant. Since these antioxidant defenses were activated relatively long after irradiation, it is suggested that this was probable due to the production of free radical species associated with the development of inflammation. 49 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Precocious appearance of cardiac troponin T pre-mRNAs during early avian embryonic skeletal muscle development in ovo.

    PubMed

    Swiderski, R E; Solursh, M

    1990-07-01

    Cardiac troponin T (cTNT), a component of the muscle contractile apparatus, is transiently expressed in skeletal muscle during avian limb development. While cTNT was first detected immunohistochemically in limb buds undergoing overt myogenic differentiation (Hamburger and Hamilton stage 26, about 5 days in ovo), RNA blot analyses of early, predifferentiated wing buds have revealed the presence of cTNT transcripts in limb buds as early as stage 23 (4 days in ovo). Steady-state cTNT poly(A) RNAs of stage 22 through stage 37 fore- and hindlimbs were compared using both cTNT cDNA and cTNT intron-specific probes. In the predifferentiated state, two incompletely processed RNAs (3.8 and 2.4 kb) were expressed in the absence of the mature cTNT transcript, while a third pre-mRNA (3.5 kb) appeared concomitantly with the mature mRNA as differentiation and development proceeded. In addition, a population of unique cTNT transcripts were expressed in a proximal to distal manner in wing buds which had undergone initial overt myogenic differentiation (stage 26). Some of the cTNT pre-mRNAs observed in premyogenic limbs appeared to accumulate stably in a tissue-specific manner, based on their absence from the cardiac poly(A) RNA population. These results suggest that the appearance of cardiac troponin T mRNA, as well as the polypeptide, may be regulated at multiple levels including RNA processing, stability, and/or translation during early skeletal muscle myogenesis.

  13. Dual Variation in SCN5A and CACNB2b Underlies the Development of Cardiac Conduction Disease without Brugada Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Dan; Barajas-Martinez, Hector; Nesterenko, Vladislav V.; Pfeiffer, Ryan; Guerchicoff, Alejandra; Cordeiro, Jonathan M.; Curtis, Anne B.; Pollevick, Guido D.; Wu, Yuesheng; Burashnikov, Elena; Antzelevitch, Charles

    2010-01-01

    Background Inherited loss of function mutations in SCN5A have been linked to overlapping syndromes including cardiac conduction disease and Brugada syndrome (BrS). The mechanisms responsible for the development of one without the other are poorly understood. Methods Direct sequencing was performed in a family with cardiac conduction disease. Wild-type (WT) and mutant channels were expressed in TSA201 cells for electrophysiological study. Green fluorescent protein (GFP)-fused WT or mutant genes were used to assess channel trafficking. Results A novel SCN5A mutation, P1008S, was identified in all family members displaying 1st degree atrioventricular block, but not in unaffected family members nor in 430 reference alleles. Peak P1008S current was 11.77% of WT (p<0.001). Confocal microscopy showed that WT channels tagged with GFP were localized on the cell surface, whereas GFP-tagged P1008S channels remained trapped in intracellular organelles. Trafficking could be rescued by incubation at room temperature, but not by incubation with mexiletine (300µM) at 37°C. We also identified a novel polymorphism (D601E) in CACNB2b that slowed inactivation of L-type calcium current (ICa), significantly increased total charge. Using the Luo-Rudy action potential model, we show that the reduction in INa can cause loss of the right ventricular epicardial action potential (AP) dome in the absence but not in the presence of the slowed inactivation of ICa. Slowed conduction was present in both cases. Conclusions Our results suggest genetic variations leading to a loss-of-function in INa coupled with a gain of function in ICa may underlie the development of cardiac conduction disease without BrS. PMID:20025708

  14. Global microRNA profiles and signaling pathways in the development of cardiac hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Feng, H.J.; Ouyang, W.; Liu, J.H.; Sun, Y.G.; Hu, R.; Huang, L.H.; Xian, J.L.; Jing, C.F.; Zhou, M.J.

    2014-01-01

    Hypertrophy is a major predictor of progressive heart disease and has an adverse prognosis. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) that accumulate during the course of cardiac hypertrophy may participate in the process. However, the nature of any interaction between a hypertrophy-specific signaling pathway and aberrant expression of miRNAs remains unclear. In this study, Spague Dawley male rats were treated with transverse aortic constriction (TAC) surgery to mimic pathological hypertrophy. Hearts were isolated from TAC and sham operated rats (n=5 for each group at 5, 10, 15, and 20 days after surgery) for miRNA microarray assay. The miRNAs dysexpressed during hypertrophy were further analyzed using a combination of bioinformatics algorithms in order to predict possible targets. Increased expression of the target genes identified in diverse signaling pathways was also analyzed. Two sets of miRNAs were identified, showing different expression patterns during hypertrophy. Bioinformatics analysis suggested the miRNAs may regulate multiple hypertrophy-specific signaling pathways by targeting the member genes and the interaction of miRNA and mRNA might form a network that leads to cardiac hypertrophy. In addition, the multifold changes in several miRNAs suggested that upregulation of rno-miR-331*, rno-miR-3596b, rno-miR-3557-5p and downregulation of rno-miR-10a, miR-221, miR-190, miR-451 could be seen as biomarkers of prognosis in clinical therapy of heart failure. This study described, for the first time, a potential mechanism of cardiac hypertrophy involving multiple signaling pathways that control up- and downregulation of miRNAs. It represents a first step in the systematic discovery of miRNA function in cardiovascular hypertrophy. PMID:24728214

  15. Ductus venosus in the first trimester: contribution to screening of chromosomal, cardiac defects and monochorionic twin complications.

    PubMed

    Maiz, Nerea; Nicolaides, Kypros H

    2010-01-01

    In the first trimester the ductus venosus can be easily identified with color Doppler and a ductus venosus waveform can be obtained by pulsed Doppler. At 11-13 weeks the prevalence of abnormal a-wave in the ductus venosus is inversely related to fetal crown-rump length and maternal serum pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A (PAPP-A), increases with fetal nuchal translucency (NT) thickness and is more common in women of Black racial origin and in fetuses with abnormal karyotype or cardiac defects. Ductus venosus flow provides an independent contribution in the prediction of chromosomal abnormalities when combined with NT and the maternal serum markers of PAPP-A and free beta-hCG, increasing the detection rate to 96% at a false-positive rate of 2.6%. Abnormal ductus venosus flow increases the risk of cardiac defects in fetuses with NT above the 95th centile, and it may increase the risk in fetuses with normal NT. In twin pregnancies, abnormal ductus venosus flow is associated with chromosomal abnormalities and cardiac defects. In monochorionic twins, abnormal flow in the ductus venosus in at least 1 of the fetuses increases the risk of developing twin-to-twin transfusion syndrome.

  16. Data analysis in cardiac arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Rodrigo, Miguel; Pedrón-Torecilla, Jorge; Hernández, Ismael; Liberos, Alejandro; Climent, Andreu M; Guillem, María S

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac arrhythmias are an increasingly present in developed countries and represent a major health and economic burden. The occurrence of cardiac arrhythmias is closely linked to the electrical function of the heart. Consequently, the analysis of the electrical signal generated by the heart tissue, either recorded invasively or noninvasively, provides valuable information for the study of cardiac arrhythmias. In this chapter, novel cardiac signal analysis techniques that allow the study and diagnosis of cardiac arrhythmias are described, with emphasis on cardiac mapping which allows for spatiotemporal analysis of cardiac signals.Cardiac mapping can serve as a diagnostic tool by recording cardiac signals either in close contact to the heart tissue or noninvasively from the body surface, and allows the identification of cardiac sites responsible of the development or maintenance of arrhythmias. Cardiac mapping can also be used for research in cardiac arrhythmias in order to understand their mechanisms. For this purpose, both synthetic signals generated by computer simulations and animal experimental models allow for more controlled physiological conditions and complete access to the organ.

  17. Maternal and Zygotic Sphingosine Kinase 2 Are Indispensable for Cardiac Development in Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Hisano, Yu; Inoue, Asuka; Okudaira, Michiyo; Taimatsu, Kiyohito; Matsumoto, Hirotaka; Kotani, Hirohito; Ohga, Rie; Aoki, Junken; Kawahara, Atsuo

    2015-06-12

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) is synthesized from sphingosine by sphingosine kinases (SPHK1 and SPHK2) in invertebrates and vertebrates, whereas specific receptors for S1P (S1PRs) selectively appear in vertebrates, suggesting that S1P acquires novel functions in vertebrates. Because the developmental functions of SPHK1 and SPHK2 remain obscure in vertebrates, we generated sphk1 or sphk2 gene-disrupted zebrafish by introducing premature stop codons in their coding regions using transcription activator-like effector nucleases. Both zygotic sphk1 and sphk2 zebrafish mutants exhibited no obvious developmental defects and grew to adults. The maternal-zygotic sphk2 mutant (MZsphk2), but not the maternal-zygotic sphk1 mutant and maternal sphk2 mutant, had a defect in the cardiac progenitor migration and a concomitant decrease in S1P level, leading to a two-heart phenotype (cardia bifida). Cardia bifida in MZsphk2, which was rescued by injecting sphk2 mRNA, was a phenotype identical to that of zygotic mutants of the S1P transporter spns2 and S1P receptor s1pr2, indicating that the Sphk2-Spns2-S1pr2 axis regulates the cardiac progenitor migration in zebrafish. The contribution of maternally supplied lipid mediators during vertebrate organogenesis presents as a requirement for maternal-zygotic Sphk2.

  18. Collagen XVIII/endostatin is associated with the epithelial-mesenchymal transformation in the atrioventricular valves during cardiac development.

    PubMed

    Carvalhaes, Lorenza S; Gervásio, Othon L; Guatimosim, Cristina; Heljasvaara, Ritva; Sormunen, Raija; Pihlajaniemi, Taina; Kitten, Gregory T

    2006-01-01

    Type XVIII collagen is a multidomain protein that contains cleavable C-terminal NC1 and endostatin fragments, which have been shown to either induce or inhibit cell migration. Endostatin is being intensely studied because of its anti-angiogenic activity. Three variants of type XVIII collagen have been reported to be distributed in epithelial and endothelial basement membranes in a tissue-specific manner. The single gene encoding collagen XVIII is on chromosome 21 within the region associated with the congenital heart disease phenotype observed in Down's syndrome. In this study, we investigated the expression pattern of collagen XVIII in embryonic mouse hearts during formation of the atrioventricular (AV) valves. We found that collagen XVIII is localized not only in various basement membranes but is also highly expressed throughout the connective tissue core of the endocardial cushions and forming AV valve leaflets. It was closely associated with the epithelial-mesenchymal transformation of endothelial cells into mesenchymal cushion tissue cells and was localized around these cells as they migrated into the cardiac jelly to form the initial connective tissue elements of the valve leaflets. However, after embryonic day 17.5 collagen XVIII expression decreased rapidly in the connective tissue and thereafter remained detectable only in the basement membranes of the endothelial layer covering the leaflets. The staining pattern observed within the AV endocardial cushions suggests that collagen XVIII may have a role in cardiac valve morphogenesis. These results may help us to better understand normal heart development and the aberrant mechanisms that cause cardiac malformations in Down's syndrome.

  19. Development of an automated processing method to detect still timing of cardiac motion for coronary magnetic resonance angiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asou, Hiroya; Ichikawa, Katsuhiro; Imada, Naoyuki; Masuda, Takanori; Satou, Tomoyasu

    2011-03-01

    Whole-heart coronary magnetic resonance angiography (WH-MRA) is useful noninvasive examination. Its signal acquisition is performed during very short still timing in each cardiac motion cycle, and therefore the adequate still timing selection is important to obtain the better image quality. However, since the current available selection method is only manual one using visual comparison of cine MRI images with different phases, the selected timings are often incorrect and their reproducibility is not sufficient. We developed an automated selection method to detect the best still timing for the WH-MRA and compared the automated method with conventional manual one. Cine MRI images were used for the analysis. In order to extract the high-speed cardiac cine image, each phase directional pixel set at each pixel position in all cine images were processed by a high-pass filtering using the Fourie transform. After this process, the cine images with low speed timing became dark, and the optimal timing could be determined by a threshold processing. We took ten volunteers' WH-MRA with the manually and automatically selected timings, and visually assessed image quality of each image on a 5-point scale (1=excellent, 2=very good, 3=good, 4=fair, 5=poor). The mean scores of the manual and automatic methods for right coronary arteries (RCA), LDA left anterior descending arteries (LAD) and LCX left circumflex arteries (LCX) were 4.2+/-0.38, 4.1+/-0.44, 3.9+/-0.52 and 4.1+/-0.42, 4.1+/-0.24, 3.2+/-0.35 respectively. The score were increased by our method in the RCA and LCX, and the LCX was significant (p<0.05). As the results, it was indicated that our automated method could determine the optimal cardiac phase more accurately than or equally to the conventional manual method.

  20. Dipyridamole cardiac imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Iskandrian, A.S.; Heo, J.; Askenase, A.; Segal, B.L.; Auerbach, N.

    1988-02-01

    Dipyridamole cardiac imaging is a useful alternative technique to exercise stress testing in the evaluation of patients with ischemic heart disease. Intravenous dipyridamole is still in the investigational phase, while oral dipyridamole is widely available. The hemodynamic effects of dipyridamole include an increase in coronary blood flow (due to coronary vasodilation) which is in excess of the increase in myocardial oxygen consumption and cardiac output. The disparity in the increase in coronary blood flow relative to the cardiac output results in an increase in myocardial thallium activity and an increase in the myocardial/background activity ratio. The quality of the thallium images is better or similar to that of exercise thallium images. The optimal dose of intravenous dipyridamole is 0.56 mg/kg, and of the oral dose it is 300 to 400 mg, although higher doses may be necessary in some patients. Analysis of the thallium images has been to a large extent based on visual inspection of the planar images. Delayed images are helpful to establish the nature of the perfusion abnormalities (transient or fixed). The process of redistribution is based on disparate rates of washout from the normal and abnormal zones. The sensitivity and specificity of dipyridamole thallium imaging, whether intravenous or oral, have been shown in a number of studies to be quite adequate and comparable to that achieved during exercise thallium imaging. Dipyridamole two-dimensional echocardiography has also been used in the detection of coronary artery disease; transient (new or worsening of preexisting) wall motion abnormalities have been found to be a specific marker of coronary artery disease. Transmural as well as regional coronary steal phenomena have been postulated as the mechanism for dipyridamole-induced regional wall motion abnormalities. 65 references.

  1. [Development of multi-channels cardiac electrophysiological polygraph with LabVIEW as software platform and its clinical application].

    PubMed

    Fan, Shounian; Jiang, Yi; Jiang, Chenxi; Yang, Tianhe; Zhang, Chengyun; Liu, Junshi; Wu, Qiang; Zheng, Yaxi; Liu, Xiaoqiao

    2004-10-01

    Polygraph has become a necessary instrument in interventional cardiology and fundamental research of medicine up to the present. In this study, a LabView development system (DS) (developed by NI in U.S.) used as software platform, a DAQ data acquisition module and universal computer used as hardware platform, were creatively coupled with our self-made low noise multi-channels preamplifier to develop Multi-channels electrocardiograph. The device possessed the functions such as real time display of physiological process, digit highpass and lowpass, 50Hz filtered and gain adjustment, instant storing, random playback and printing, and process control stimulation. Besides, it was small-sized, economically practical and easy to operate. It could advance the spread of cardiac intervention treatment in hospitals.

  2. Virtual cardioscopy: interactive endocardial visualization to guide RF cardiac ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, David R., III; Rettmann, Maryam E.; Cameron, Bruce M.; Camp, Jon J.; Robb, Richard A.

    2006-03-01

    Cardiac arrhythmias are a debilitating, potentially life threatening condition involving aberrant electrical activity in the heart which results in abnormal heart rhythm. Virtual cardioscopy can play an important role in minimally invasive treatment of cardiac arrhythmias. Second and third generation image-guidance systems are now available for the treatment of arrhythmias using RF ablation catheters. While these 3D tools provide useful information to the clinician, additional enhancements to the virtual cardioscopy display paradigm are critical for optimal therapy guidance. Based on input from clinical collaborators, several key visualization techniques have been developed to enhance the use of virtual cardioscopy during cardiac ablation procedures. We have identified, designed and incorporated several visual cues important to successful virtual cardioscopy. These features include the use of global reference maps, parametric mapping, and focused navigation and targeting using abnormal electro-physiologic activity. Our virtual cardioscopy system is designed for real-time use during RF cardiac ablation procedures. Several unique visualizations from our virtual cardioscopy system will be presented. Evaluation of the system with phantom and animal studies will be presented. This research is supported by grant EB002834 from the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, National Institutes of Health.

  3. Relationship between DNA damage in sperm after ex vivo exposure and abnormal embryo development in the progeny of the three-spined stickleback.

    PubMed

    Santos, R; Palos-Ladeiro, M; Besnard, A; Porcher, J M; Bony, S; Sanchez, W; Devaux, A

    2013-04-01

    Many xenobiotics released in the aquatic environment exhibit a genotoxic potential toward organisms. Long term exposure to such compounds is expected to lead to multigenerational reproductive defects, further influencing the recruitment rate and hence, the population dynamics. Paternal exposure to genotoxicants was previously shown to increase abnormal development in the progeny of mammalian or aquatic species. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between DNA damage in sperm of the fish three-spined stickleback and progeny developmental defects. Spermatozoa were exposed ex vivo to an alkylating agent (methyl methanesulfonate) before in vitro fertilization and DNA damage was assessed by the alkaline comet assay. A significant relationship between abnormal development and sperm DNA damage was underlined. This study illustrates the interest to use germ cell DNA damage after ex vivo exposure to evaluate the impact of genotoxic compounds on progeny fitness in aquatic organisms.

  4. How to develop a clinic for sudden cardiac arrest survivors and families of non-survivors.

    PubMed

    Abrams, Dominic J

    2017-01-01

    The investigation of the aetiology of sudden cardiac arrest or death in a young person combines features of a traditional clinical medical examination with those of forensic medicine. Nuances of the immediate peri-event history, when available, can be paramount. New genetic tools have greatly improved the yield of such investigations, but they must be carefully interpreted by genetic specialists. The approach to surviving patients, their family members, and to family members of non-survivors is best achieved in a structured programme that includes all appropriate specialists and support personnel. As an example, this may include all appropriate paediatric and internal medicine specialists, a geneticist, a genetic counsellor, a clinical psychologist, nurse specialist(s), and a programme coordinator. This family-centred strategy affords the patient, if surviving, and all family members the necessary emotional and medical support while at the same time providing the necessary diagnostic and therapeutic approaches.

  5. Development of hairy cell leukemia in a patient after cardiac transplantation.

    PubMed

    Tsao, Lawrence; Chu, Kimberly E; Bhagat, Govind; Alobeid, Bachir

    2006-02-01

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLDs) are well-recognized complications of bone marrow and solid organ transplantation, comprising a heterogenous group of lymphoproliferations with a spectrum of morphologic, phenotypic and molecular features. Although PTLDs are usually Epstein-Barr virus-driven B-cell lymphoproliferations, T/natural killer-cell lymphoproliferations, multiple myeloma, and Hodgkin's lymphoma are also recognized as part of the PTLD spectrum. Hairy cell leukemia, a low-grade B-cell lymphoproliferation, has not been recognized as part of the PTLD spectrum. We report the first case of hairy cell leukemia occurring after cardiac transplantation. It is unclear whether this case, similar to other cases of low-grade B-cell lymphoproliferations reported after transplantation, is related to immunosuppression and therefore part of the spectrum of PTLDs, or merely represents coincidental event occurring in an immunocompromised patient.

  6. 42 CFR 37.53 - Notification of abnormal roentgenographic findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... suggesting, enlarged heart, tuberculosis, lung cancer, or any other significant abnormal findings other than... findings suggesting, abnormality of cardiac shape or size, tuberculosis, lung cancer, or any other... files and the most recent examination was interpreted to show enlarged heart, tuberculosis,...

  7. Development of a mobile HIS/PACS workstation to assist critical cardiac patients in an intensive care unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutierrez, Marco A.; Cestari, Idagene A.; Hamamoto, Gina; Bacht, Simão; Rebelo, Marina S.; Silva, João E. M. M.; Lage, Silvia G.

    2008-03-01

    The current study describes the experience in the implementation of a mobile HIS/PACS workstation to assist critical cardiac patients in an Intensive Care Unit (ICU). Recently, mobile devices connected to a WiFi network were incorporated to the Hospital information System, providing the same functionalities of common desktop counterpart. However, the use of commercially devices like PDAs and Pocket PCs presented a series of problems that are more emphasized in the ICUs 1) low autonomy of the batteries, which need constant recharges; 2) low robustness of the devices; 3) insufficient display area to show medical images and vital signals; 4) data entry remains a major problem and imposes an extra time consumption to the staff; 5) high cost when fully equipped with WiFi connection, optical reader to access bar codes and memory. To address theses problems we developed a mobile workstation (MedKart) that provides access the HIS and PACS systems, with all resources and an ergonomic and practical design to be used by physicians and nurses inside the ICU. The system fulfills the requirements to assist, in the point-of-care, critical cardiac patients in Intensive Care Units.

  8. Cardiac sodium channel regulator MOG1 regulates cardiac morphogenesis and rhythm

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Juan; Wang, Longfei; Zuo, Mengxia; Wang, Xiaojing; Ahmed, Abu Shufian Ishtiaq; Chen, Qiuyun; Wang, Qing K.

    2016-01-01

    MOG1 was initially identified as a protein that interacts with the small GTPase Ran involved in transport of macromolecules into and out of the nucleus. In addition, we have established that MOG1 interacts with the cardiac sodium channel Nav1.5 and regulates cell surface trafficking of Nav1.5. Here we used zebrafish as a model system to study the in vivo physiological role of MOG1. Knockdown of mog1 expression in zebrafish embryos significantly decreased the heart rate (HR). Consistently, the HR increases in embryos with over-expression of human MOG1. Compared with wild type MOG1 or control EGFP, mutant MOG1 with mutation E83D associated with Brugada syndrome significantly decreases the HR. Interestingly, knockdown of mog1 resulted in abnormal cardiac looping during embryogenesis. Mechanistically, knockdown of mog1 decreases expression of hcn4 involved in the regulation of the HR, and reduces expression of nkx2.5, gata4 and hand2 involved in cardiac morphogenesis. These data for the first time revealed a novel role that MOG1, a nucleocytoplasmic transport protein, plays in cardiac physiology and development. PMID:26903377

  9. [Partial abnormal pulmonary venous return. An underestimated and unknown association in Turner-Ullrich syndrome. Presentation of an original case].

    PubMed

    Neel, G; Fournie, J M; Maillard, L; Rioux, P; Desveaux, B; Quilliet, L; Raynaud, P

    1991-11-01

    The authors report the case of a 59-year-old woman with a complex cardiac lesion consisting of degenerative major mitral insufficiency masking partial abnormal pulmonary venous return. These cardiac abnormalities fell within a context of genetic disease since the patient had Turner's syndrome, confirmed at the age of 58 by a 45 x 0 karyotype. They detail the originality of the clinical manifestations of partial abnormal pulmonary venous return and review the literature concerning cardiac malformations in Turner's syndrome.

  10. Compensatory and maladaptive responses to cardiac dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Francis, G S; Chu, C

    1994-05-01

    The past few years have witnessed an extraordinary number of important developments in the study of compensatory and maladaptive responses to cardiac dysfunction. It now seems clear that the process whereby the heart remodels in response to left ventricular injury is of paramount importance in the expression of clinical heart failure. There have been parallel attempts by basic scientists and clinical investigators to understand better the fundamental biologic processes that underlie remodeling and to assess numerous new treatments--especially angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors. A general consensus seems to be emerging that holds that the response of the heart to acute injury includes a number of highly compensatory and adaptive mechanisms that ultimately become maladaptive and contribute to cardiomegaly and severe congestive heart failure. Such mechanisms undoubtedly include local and systemic release of cytokines, peptides, and neurohormones, and altered loading conditions leading to unusual mechanical forces on cardiac myocytes and other cells of the heart. At the organ level there is hypertrophy, dilatation and growth of the interstitium. Preliminary evidence also suggests there may be some "remodeling" at the cardiac myocyte level. Reduction in peripheral vasodilator reserve is seen in experimental animal models of heart failure. Patients with heart failure also develop an endothelial-dependent form of peripheral vascular dysfunction expressed clinically as an attenuated ability to dilate in response to such stimuli as acetylcholine. The transition point whereby these myocardial and peripheral vascular abnormalities become clearly dysfunctional and contribute toward the full clinical expression of heart failure remains to be further investigated.

  11. Symmetry of cardiac function assessment

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Xu-Fang; Ma, Amy X

    2016-01-01

    Both right and left ventricles are developed from two adjacent segments of the primary heart tube. Though they are different with regard to shape and power, they mirror each other in terms of behavior. This is the first level of symmetry in cardiac function assessment. Both cardiac muscle contraction and relaxation are active. This constructs the second level of symmetry in cardiac function assessment. Combination of the two levels will help to find some hidden indexes or approaches to evaluate cardiac function. In this article, four major indexes from echocardiography were analyzed under this principal, another seventeen indexes or measurement approaches came out of the shadow, which is very helpful in the assessment of cardiac function, especially for the right cardiac function and diastolic cardiac function. PMID:27582768

  12. Developing Software to “Track and Catch” Missed Follow-up of Abnormal Test Results in a Complex Sociotechnical Environment

    PubMed Central

    Smith, M.; Murphy, D.; Laxmisan, A.; Sittig, D.; Reis, B.; Esquivel, A.; Singh, H.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background Abnormal test results do not always receive timely follow-up, even when providers are notified through electronic health record (EHR)-based alerts. High workload, alert fatigue, and other demands on attention disrupt a provider’s prospective memory for tasks required to initiate follow-up. Thus, EHR-based tracking and reminding functionalities are needed to improve follow-up. Objectives The purpose of this study was to develop a decision-support software prototype enabling individual and system-wide tracking of abnormal test result alerts lacking follow-up, and to conduct formative evaluations, including usability testing. Methods We developed a working prototype software system, the Alert Watch And Response Engine (AWARE), to detect abnormal test result alerts lacking documented follow-up, and to present context-specific reminders to providers. Development and testing took place within the VA’s EHR and focused on four cancer-related abnormal test results. Design concepts emphasized mitigating the effects of high workload and alert fatigue while being minimally intrusive. We conducted a multifaceted formative evaluation of the software, addressing fit within the larger socio-technical system. Evaluations included usability testing with the prototype and interview questions about organizational and workflow factors. Participants included 23 physicians, 9 clinical information technology specialists, and 8 quality/safety managers. Results Evaluation results indicated that our software prototype fit within the technical environment and clinical workflow, and physicians were able to use it successfully. Quality/safety managers reported that the tool would be useful in future quality assurance activities to detect patients who lack documented follow-up. Additionally, we successfully installed the software on the local facility’s “test” EHR system, thus demonstrating technical compatibility. Conclusion To address the factors involved in missed

  13. Development of a Comprehensive Sequencing Assay for Inherited Cardiac Condition Genes.

    PubMed

    Pua, Chee Jian; Bhalshankar, Jaydutt; Miao, Kui; Walsh, Roddy; John, Shibu; Lim, Shi Qi; Chow, Kingsley; Buchan, Rachel; Soh, Bee Yong; Lio, Pei Min; Lim, Jaclyn; Schafer, Sebastian; Lim, Jing Quan; Tan, Patrick; Whiffin, Nicola; Barton, Paul J; Ware, James S; Cook, Stuart A

    2016-02-01

    Inherited cardiac conditions (ICCs) are characterised by marked genetic and allelic heterogeneity and require extensive sequencing for genetic characterisation. We iteratively optimised a targeted gene capture panel for ICCs that includes disease-causing, putatively pathogenic, research and phenocopy genes (n = 174 genes). We achieved high coverage of the target region on both MiSeq (>99.8% at ≥ 20× read depth, n = 12) and NextSeq (>99.9% at ≥ 20×, n = 48) platforms with 100% sensitivity and precision for single nucleotide variants and indels across the protein-coding target on the MiSeq. In the final assay, 40 out of 43 established ICC genes informative in clinical practice achieved complete coverage (100 % at ≥ 20×). By comparison, whole exome sequencing (WES; ∼ 80×), deep WES (∼ 500×) and whole genome sequencing (WGS; ∼ 70×) had poorer performance (88.1, 99.2 and 99.3% respectively at ≥ 20×) across the ICC target. The assay described here delivers highly accurate and affordable sequencing of ICC genes, complemented by accessible cloud-based computation and informatics. See Editorial in this issue (DOI: 10.1007/s12265-015-9667-8 ).

  14. Evaluation of Cardiac Toxicity Biomarkers in Rats from Different Laboratories.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyuri; Chini, Naseem; Fairchild, David G; Engle, Steven K; Reagan, William J; Summers, Sandra D; Mirsalis, Jon C

    2016-12-01

    There is a great need for improved diagnostic and prognostic accuracy of potential cardiac toxicity in drug development. This study reports the evaluation of several commercially available biomarker kits by 3 institutions (SRI, Eli Lilly, and Pfizer) for the discrimination between myocardial degeneration/necrosis and cardiac hypertrophy as well as the assessment of the interlaboratory and interplatform variation in results. Serum concentrations of natriuretic peptides (N-terminal pro-atrial natriuretic peptide [NT-proANP] and N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide [NT-proBNP]), cardiac and skeletal troponins (cTnI, cTnT, and sTnI), myosin light chain 3 (Myl3), and fatty acid binding protein 3 (FABP3) were assessed in rats treated with minoxidil (MNX) and isoproterenol (ISO). MNX caused increased heart-to-body weight ratios and prominent elevations in NT-proANP and NT-proBNP concentrations detected at 24-hr postdose without elevation in troponins, Myl3, or FABP3 and with no abnormal histopathological findings. ISO caused ventricular leukocyte infiltration, myocyte fibrosis, and necrosis with increased concentrations of the natriuretic peptides, cardiac troponins, and Myl3. These results reinforce the advantages of a multimarker strategy in elucidating the underlying cause of cardiac insult and detecting myocardial tissue damage at 24-hr posttreatment. The interlaboratory and interplatform comparison analyses also showed that the data obtained from different laboratories and platforms are highly correlated and reproducible, making these biomarkers widely applicable in preclinical studies.

  15. Altered mRNA Splicing, Chondrocyte Gene Expression and Abnormal Skeletal Development due to SF3B4 Mutations in Rodriguez Acrofacial Dysostosis

    PubMed Central

    Nevarez, Lisette; Pogue, Robert; Krakow, Deborah; Cohn, Daniel H.

    2016-01-01

    The acrofacial dysostoses (AFD) are a genetically heterogeneous group of inherited disorders with craniofacial and limb abnormalities. Rodriguez syndrome is a severe, usually perinatal lethal AFD, characterized by severe retrognathia, oligodactyly and lower limb abnormalities. Rodriguez syndrome has been proposed to be a severe form of Nager syndrome, a non-lethal AFD that results from mutations in SF3B4, a component of the U2 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particle (U2 snRNP). Furthermore, a case with a phenotype intermediate between Rodriguez and Nager syndromes has been shown to have an SF3B4 mutation. We identified heterozygosity for SF3B4 mutations in Rodriguez syndrome, confirming that the phenotype is a dominant disorder that is allelic with Nager syndrome. The mutations led to reduced SF3B4 synthesis and defects in mRNA splicing, primarily exon skipping. The mutations also led to reduced expression in growth plate chondrocytes of target genes, including the DLX5, DLX6, SOX9, and SOX6 transcription factor genes, which are known to be important for skeletal development. These data provide mechanistic insight toward understanding how SF3B4 mutations lead to the skeletal abnormalities observed in the acrofacial dysostoses. PMID:27622494

  16. Disruption of pdgfra alters endocardial and myocardial fusion during zebrafish cardiac assembly.

    PubMed

    El-Rass, Suzan; Eisa-Beygi, Shahram; Khong, Edbert; Brand-Arzamendi, Koroboshka; Mauro, Antonio; Zhang, Haibo; Clark, Karl J; Ekker, Stephen C; Wen, Xiao-Yan

    2017-03-15

    Cardiac development in vertebrates is a finely tuned process regulated by a set of conserved signaling pathways. Perturbations of these processes are often associated with congenital cardiac malformations. Platelet-derived growth factor receptor α (PDGFRα) is a highly conserved tyrosine kinase receptor, which is essential for development and organogenesis. Disruption of Pdgfrα function in murine models is embryonic lethal due to severe cardiovascular defects, suggesting a role in cardiac development, thus necessitating the use of alternative models to explore its precise function. In this study, we generated a zebrafish pdgfra mutant line by gene trapping, in which the Pdgfra protein is truncated and fused with mRFP (Pdgfra-mRFP). Our results demonstrate that pdgfra mutants have defects in cardiac morphology as a result of abnormal fusion of myocardial precursors. Expression analysis of the developing heart at later stages suggested that Pdgfra-mRFP is expressed in the endocardium. Further examination of the endocardium in pdgfra mutants revealed defective endocardial migration to the midline, where cardiac fusion eventually occurs. Together, our data suggests that pdgfra is required for proper medial migration of both endocardial and myocardial precursors, an essential step required for cardiac assembly and development.

  17. Disruption of pdgfra alters endocardial and myocardial fusion during zebrafish cardiac assembly

    PubMed Central

    El-Rass, Suzan; Eisa-Beygi, Shahram; Khong, Edbert; Brand-Arzamendi, Koroboshka; Mauro, Antonio; Zhang, Haibo; Clark, Karl J.; Ekker, Stephen C.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cardiac development in vertebrates is a finely tuned process regulated by a set of conserved signaling pathways. Perturbations of these processes are often associated with congenital cardiac malformations. Platelet-derived growth factor receptor α (PDGFRα) is a highly conserved tyrosine kinase receptor, which is essential for development and organogenesis. Disruption of Pdgfrα function in murine models is embryonic lethal due to severe cardiovascular defects, suggesting a role in cardiac development, thus necessitating the use of alternative models to explore its precise function. In this study, we generated a zebrafish pdgfra mutant line by gene trapping, in which the Pdgfra protein is truncated and fused with mRFP (Pdgfra-mRFP). Our results demonstrate that pdgfra mutants have defects in cardiac morphology as a result of abnormal fusion of myocardial precursors. Expression analysis of the developing heart at later stages suggested that Pdgfra-mRFP is expressed in the endocardium. Further examination of the endocardium in pdgfra mutants revealed defective endocardial migration to the midline, where cardiac fusion eventually occurs. Together, our data suggests that pdgfra is required for proper medial migration of both endocardial and myocardial precursors, an essential step required for cardiac assembly and development. PMID:28167492

  18. Cardiac-specific elevations in thyroid hormone enhance contractility and prevent pressure overload-induced cardiac dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Trivieri, Maria Giovanna; Oudit, Gavin Y.; Sah, Rajan; Kerfant, Benoit-Gilles; Sun, Hui; Gramolini, Anthony O.; Pan, Yan; Wickenden, Alan D.; Croteau, Walburga; Morreale de Escobar, Gabriella; Pekhletski, Roman; St. Germain, Donald; MacLennan, David H.; Backx, Peter H.

    2006-01-01

    Thyroid hormone (TH) is critical for cardiac development and heart function. In heart disease, TH metabolism is abnormal, and many biochemical and functional alterations mirror hypothyroidism. Although TH therapy has been advocated for treating heart disease, a clear benefit of TH has yet to be established, possibly because of peripheral actions of TH. To assess the potential efficacy of TH in treating heart disease, type 2 deiodinase (D2), which converts the prohormone thyroxine to active triiodothyronine (T3), was expressed transiently in mouse hearts by using the tetracycline transactivator system. Increased cardiac D2 activity led to elevated cardiac T3 levels and to enhanced myocardial contractility, accompanied by increased Ca2+ transients and sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+ uptake. These phenotypic changes were associated with up-regulation of sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum calcium ATPase (SERCA) 2a expression as well as decreased Na+/Ca2+ exchanger, β-myosin heavy chain, and sarcolipin (SLN) expression. In pressure overload, targeted increases in D2 activity could not block hypertrophy but could completely prevent impaired contractility and SR Ca2+ cycling as well as altered expression patterns of SERCA2a, SLN, and other markers of pathological hypertrophy. Our results establish that elevated D2 activity in the heart increases T3 levels and enhances cardiac contractile function while preventing deterioration of cardiac function and altered gene expression after pressure overload. PMID:16595628

  19. An overview on development and application of an experimental platform for quantitative cardiac imaging research in rabbit models of myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Yuanbo; Bogaert, Jan; Oyen, Raymond

    2014-01-01

    To exploit the advantages of using rabbits for cardiac imaging research and to tackle the technical obstacles, efforts have been made under the framework of a doctoral research program. In this overview article, by cross-referencing the current literature, we summarize how we have developed a preclinical cardiac research platform based on modified models of reperfused myocardial infarction (MI) in rabbits; how the in vivo manifestations of cardiac imaging could be closely matched with those ex vivo macro- and microscopic findings; how these imaging outcomes could be quantitatively analyzed, validated and demonstrated; and how we could apply this cardiac imaging platform to provide possible solutions to certain lingering diagnostic and therapeutic problems in experimental cardiology. In particular, tissue components in acute cardiac ischemia have been stratified and characterized, post-infarct lipomatous metaplasia (LM) as a common but hardly illuminated clinical pathology has been identified in rabbit models, and a necrosis avid tracer as well as an anti-ischemic drug have been successfully assessed for their potential utilities in clinical cardiology. These outcomes may interest the researchers in the related fields and help strengthen translational research in cardiovascular diseases. PMID:25392822

  20. Acute emotional stress and cardiac arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Ziegelstein, Roy C

    2007-07-18

    Episodes of acute emotional stress can have significant adverse effects on the heart. Acute emotional stress can produce left ventricular contractile dysfunction, myocardial ischemia, or disturbances of cardiac rhythm. Although these abnormalities are often only transient, their consequences can be gravely damaging and sometimes fatal. Despite the many descriptions of catastrophic cardiovascular events in the setting of acute emotional stress, the anatomical substrate and physiological pathways by which emotional stress triggers cardiovascular events are only now being characterized, aided by the advent of functional neuroimaging. Recent evidence indicates that asymmetric brain activity is particularly important in making the heart more susceptible to ventricular arrhythmias. Lateralization of cerebral activity during emotional stress may stimulate the heart asymmetrically and produce areas of inhomogeneous repolarization that create electrical instability and facilitate the development of cardiac arrhythmias. Patients with ischemic heart disease who survive an episode of sudden cardiac death in the setting of acute emotional stress should receive a beta-blocker. Nonpharmacological approaches to manage emotional stress in patients with and without coronary artery disease, including social support, relaxation therapy, yoga, meditation, controlled slow breathing, and biofeedback, are also appropriate to consider and merit additional investigation in randomized trials.

  1. The influence of FGF2 high molecular weight (HMW) isoforms in the development of cardiac ischemia-reperfusion injury

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Siyun; Bodmer, Janet R.; Azhar, Mohamad; Newman, Gilbert; Coffin, J. Douglas; Doetschman, Thomas; Schultz, Jo El J.

    2010-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) consists of multiple protein isoforms (low [LMW] and high molecular weight [HMW]), which are localized to different cellular compartments, indicating unique biological activity. We previously showed that the LMW isoform is important in protecting the heart from myocardial dysfunction associated with ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury, but the roles of the HMW isoforms remain unknown. To elucidate the role of HMW isoforms in I/R and cardioprotection, hearts from novel mouse models,in which the murine FGF2 HMWs are knocked out (HMWKO) or the human FGF2 24 kDa HMW isoform is overexpressed (HMW Tg) and their wildtype (Wt) or non-transgenic (NTg) cohorts were subjected to an ex vivo work-performing heart model of I/R. There was a significant improvement in post-ischemic recovery of cardiac function in HMWKO hearts (76±5%, p<0.05) compared to Wt hearts (55±5%), with a corresponding decrease in HMW Tg function (line 20: 38±6% and line 28: 33±4%, p<0.05) compared to non-transgenic hearts (68±9%). FGF2 LMW isoform was secreted from Wt and HMWKO hearts during I/R, and a FGF receptor (FGFR) inhibitor, PD173074 caused a decrease in cardiac function when administered in I/R in Wt and FGF2 HMWKO hearts (p<0.05), indicating that FGFR is involved in FGF2 LMW isoform's biological effect in ischemia-reperfusion injury. Moreover, overexpression of HMW isoform reduced FGFR1 phosphorylation/activation with no further decrease in the phosphorylation state in the presence of the FGFR inhibitor. Overall, our data indicate that HMW isoforms have a detrimental role in the development of post-ischemic myocardial dysfunction. PMID:20116383

  2. Cardiac Cephalgia

    PubMed Central

    Wassef, Nancy; Ali, Ali Turab; Katsanevaki, Alexia-Zacharoula; Nishtar, Salman

    2014-01-01

    Although most of the patients presenting with ischemic heart disease have chest pains, there are other rare presenting symptoms like cardiac cephalgia. In this report, we present a case of acute coronary syndrome with an only presentation of exertional headache. It was postulated as acute presentation of coronary artery disease, due to previous history of similar presentation associated with some chest pains with previous left coronary artery stenting. We present an unusual case with cardiac cephalgia in a young patient under the age of 50 which was not reported at that age before. There are four suggested mechanisms for this cardiac presentation. PMID:28352454

  3. Zic3 is required in the extra-cardiac perinodal region of the lateral plate mesoderm for left-right patterning and heart development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mutations in ZIC3 cause human X-linked heterotaxy and isolated cardiovascular malformations. A mouse model with targeted deletion of Zic3 demonstrates an early role for Zic3 in gastrulation, CNS, cardiac and left-right axial development. The observation of multiple malformations in Zic3(null) mice a...

  4. 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin Exposure Prevents Cardiac Valve Formation in Developing Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Vatsal; Peterson, Richard E.; Heideman, Warren

    2008-01-01

    Cardiovascular malformations are one of the most common congenital birth defects observed in humans. Defects in cardiac valves disrupt normal blood flow. Zebrafish are an outstanding experimental model for studying the effects that environmental contaminants have on developmental processes. Previous research has shown that 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) causes blood regurgitation in the heart and reduces peripheral blood flow in embryonic zebrafish, suggesting some form of valve failure. To test this we used video microscopy to examine valve function and structure in developing zebrafish exposed to TCDD. TCDD exposure produced blood regurgitation at both the atrioventricular (AV) and bulboventricular (BV) junctions. In marked contrast to control embryos exposed to the vehicle dimethyl sulfoxide, embryos exposed to TCDD failed to form valve leaflets as the heart matured. In addition, whereas TCDD did not block initial formation of the bulbus arteriosus, we found that TCDD exposure prevented the normal growth and development of this portion of the outflow tract. TCDD altered the localization of endothelial cells at the AV and BV junctions and altered the localized expression of mRNAs bmp4 and notch1b normally associated with the nascent valves. Taken together, our results demonstrate that although TCDD does not prevent the initial specification of the presumptive valve locations, TCDD exposure produces severe alterations in valve development, leading to blood regurgitation and failing circulation in the developing zebrafish. PMID:18477685

  5. 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin exposure prevents cardiac valve formation in developing zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Vatsal; Peterson, Richard E; Heideman, Warren

    2008-08-01

    Cardiovascular malformations are one of the most common congenital birth defects observed in humans. Defects in cardiac valves disrupt normal blood flow. Zebrafish are an outstanding experimental model for studying the effects that environmental contaminants have on developmental processes. Previous research has shown that 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) causes blood regurgitation in the heart and reduces peripheral blood flow in embryonic zebrafish, suggesting some form of valve failure. To test this we used video microscopy to examine valve function and structure in developing zebrafish exposed to TCDD. TCDD exposure produced blood regurgitation at both the atrioventricular (AV) and bulboventricular (BV) junctions. In marked contrast to control embryos exposed to the vehicle dimethyl sulfoxide, embryos exposed to TCDD failed to form valve leaflets as the heart matured. In addition, whereas TCDD did not block initial formation of the bulbus arteriosus, we found that TCDD exposure prevented the normal growth and development of this portion of the outflow tract. TCDD altered the localization of endothelial cells at the AV and BV junctions and altered the localized expression of mRNAs bmp4 and notch1b normally associated with the nascent valves. Taken together, our results demonstrate that although TCDD does not prevent the initial specification of the presumptive valve locations, TCDD exposure produces severe alterations in valve development, leading to blood regurgitation and failing circulation in the developing zebrafish.

  6. Milk from dams fed an obesogenic diet combined with a high-fat/high-sugar diet induces long-term abnormal mammary gland development in the rabbit.

    PubMed

    Hue-Beauvais, C; Koch, E; Chavatte-Palmer, P; Galio, L; Chat, S; Letheule, M; Rousseau-Ralliard, D; Jaffrezic, F; Laloë, D; Aujean, E; Révillion, F; Lhotellier, V; Gertler, A; Devinoy, E; Charlier, M

    2015-04-01

    Alterations to the metabolic endocrine environment during early life are crucial to mammary gland development. Among these environmental parameters, the initial nutritional event after birth is the consumption of milk, which represents the first maternal support provided to mammalian newborns. Milk is a complex fluid that exerts effects far beyond its immediate nutritional value. The present study, therefore, aimed to determine the effect of the nutritional changes during the neonatal and prepubertal periods on the adult mammary phenotype. Newborn rabbits were suckled by dams fed a high-fat/high-sugar obesogenic (OD) or a control (CON) diet and then subsequently fed either the OD or CON diets from the onset of puberty and throughout early pregnancy. Mammary glands were collected during early pregnancy (Day 8 of pregnancy). Rabbits fed with OD milk and then subjected to an OD diet displayed an abnormal development of the mammary gland: the mammary ducts were markedly enlarged (P < 0.05) and filled with abundant secretory products. Moreover, the alveolar secretory structures were disorganized, with an abnormal aspect characterized by large lumina. Mammary epithelial cells contained numerous large lipid droplets and exhibited fingering of the apical membrane and abnormally enlarged intercellular spaces filled with casein micelles. Leptin has been shown to be involved in modulating several developmental processes. We therefore analyzed its expression in the mammary gland. Mammary leptin mRNA was strongly expressed in rabbits fed with OD milk and subjected to an OD diet by comparison with the CON rabbits. Leptin transcripts and protein were localized in the epithelial cells, indicating that the increase in leptin synthesis occurs in this compartment. Taken together, these findings suggest that early-life nutritional history, in particular through the milking period, can determine subsequent mammary gland development. Moreover, they highlight the potentially important

  7. Nuclear cardiac

    SciTech Connect

    Slutsky, R.; Ashburn, W.L.

    1982-01-01

    The relationship between nuclear medicine and cardiology has continued to produce a surfeit of interesting, illuminating, and important reports involving the analysis of cardiac function, perfusion, and metabolism. To simplify the presentation, this review is broken down into three major subheadings: analysis of myocardial perfusion; imaging of the recent myocardial infarction; and the evaluation of myocardial function. There appears to be an increasingly important relationship between cardiology, particularly cardiac physiology, and nuclear imaging techniques. (KRM)

  8. Mice with cardiac overexpression of PPARγ have impaired repolarization and spontaneous fatal ventricular arrhythmias (Morrow, PPARγ overexpression induces fatal arrhythmias)

    PubMed Central

    Morrow, John P.; Katchman, Alexander; Son, Ni-Huiping; Trent, Chad M.; Khan, Raffay; Shiomi, Takayuki; Huang, Haiyan; Amin, Vaibhav; Lader, Joshua M.; Vasquez, Carolina; Morley, Gregory E.; D'Armiento, Jeanine; Homma, Shunichi; Goldberg, Ira J.; Marx, Steven O.

    2011-01-01

    Background Diabetes and obesity, which confer an increased risk of sudden cardiac death, are associated with cardiomyocyte lipid accumulation and altered cardiac electrical properties, manifested by prolongation of the QRS duration and QT interval. It is difficult to distinguish the contribution of cardiomyocyte lipid accumulation versus the contribution of global metabolic defects to the increased incidence of sudden death and electrical abnormalities. Methods and Results In order to study the effects of metabolic abnormalities on arrhythmias without the complex systemic effects of diabetes and obesity, we studied cardiac-specific transgenic mice expressing PPARγ1 via the cardiac α-myosin heavy-chain promoter. The PPARγ-transgenic mice develop abnormal accumulation of intracellular lipids and die as young adults, prior to a significant reduction in systolic function. Using implantable ECG telemeters, we found that these mice have prolongation of the QRS and QT intervals, and spontaneous ventricular arrhythmias, including polymorphic ventricular tachycardia and ventricular fibrillation. Isolated cardiomyocytes demonstrated prolonged action potential duration caused by reduced expression and function of the potassium channels responsible for repolarization. Short-term exposure to pioglitazone, a PPARγ agonist, had no effect on mortality or rhythm in WT mice, but further exacerbated the arrhythmic phenotype and increased the mortality in the PPARγ TG mice. Conclusions Our findings support an important link between PPARγ activation, cardiomyocyte lipid accumulation, ion channel remodeling and increased cardiac mortality. PMID:22124376

  9. Functional study of TREK-1 potassium channels during rat heart development and cardiac ischemia using RNAi techniques.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaojuan; Guo, Peng; Li, Jiang; Wang, Weiping; Xu, Shaofeng; Wang, Ling; Wang, Xiaoliang

    2014-08-01

    To explore the physiological and pathological significance of the 2-pore domain potassium channel TWIK-related K(+) (TREK)-1 in rat heart, its expression and role during heart development and cardiac ischemia were investigated. In the former study, the ventricles of Sprague Dawley rats were collected from embryo day 19 to postnatal 18 months and examined for mRNA and protein expression of TREK-1. It was found that both increased during development, reached a maximum at postnatal day 28, and remained higher at postnatal day 3 through to postnatal 18 months. In the latter study, protein expression of TREK-1 was examined after initiation of acute heart ischemia by ligation of the left anterior descending coronary artery. TREK-1 expression was found to be increased in the endocardium but unchanged in the epicardium. In primary cultured rat neonatal ventricular myocytes subjected to hypoxia (oxygen-glucose deprivation), TREK-1 expression was increased. In cultured neonatal cardiomyocytes, silencing of the TREK-1 gene by lentivirus delivery of the short-hairpin RNAs, L-sh-492 and L-sh-605, was found to promote their viability and number. In addition, both short-hairpin RNA provided protection against hypoxia-induced injury to cardiomyocytes in vitro. These results suggest that TREK-1 plays an important role in neonatal rat heart development and downregulation of TREK-1 may provide protection against ischemic injury. It seems that TREK-1 is a potential drug target for treatment of acute heart ischemia.

  10. Abnormal cartilage development and altered N-glycosylation in Tmem165-deficient zebrafish mirrors the phenotypes associated with TMEM165-CDG.

    PubMed

    Bammens, Riet; Mehta, Nickita; Race, Valérie; Foulquier, François; Jaeken, Jaak; Tiemeyer, Michael; Steet, Richard; Matthijs, Gert; Flanagan-Steet, Heather

    2015-06-01

    The congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDG), a group of inherited diseases characterized by aberrant glycosylation, encompass a wide range of defects, including glycosyltransferases, glycosidases, nucleotide-sugar transporters as well as proteins involved in maintaining Golgi architecture, pH and vesicular trafficking. Mutations in a previously undescribed protein, TMEM165, were recently shown to cause a new form of CDG, termed TMEM165-CDG. TMEM165-CDG patients exhibit cartilage and bone dysplasia and altered glycosylation of serum glycoproteins. We utilized a morpholino knockdown strategy in zebrafish to investigate the physiologic and pathogenic functions of TMEM165. Inhibition of tmem165 expression in developing zebrafish embryos caused craniofacial abnormalities, largely attributable to fewer chondrocytes. Decreased expression of several markers of cartilage and bone development suggests that Tmem165 deficiency alters both chondrocyte and osteoblast differentiation. Glycomic analysis of tmem165 morphants also revealed altered initiation, processing and extension of N-glycans, paralleling some of the glycosylation changes noted in human patients. Collectively, these findings highlight the utility of zebrafish to elucidate pathogenic mechanisms associated with glycosylation disorders and suggest that the cartilage and bone dysplasia manifested in TMEM165-CDG patients may stem from abnormal development of chondrocytes and osteoblasts.

  11. Abnormal cartilage development and altered N-glycosylation in Tmem165-deficient zebrafish mirrors the phenotypes associated with TMEM165-CDG

    PubMed Central

    Bammens, Riet; Mehta, Nickita; Race, Valérie; Foulquier, François; Jaeken, Jaak; Tiemeyer, Michael; Steet, Richard; Matthijs, Gert; Flanagan-Steet, Heather

    2015-01-01

    The congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDG), a group of inherited diseases characterized by aberrant glycosylation, encompass a wide range of defects, including glycosyltransferases, glycosidases, nucleotide-sugar transporters as well as proteins involved in maintaining Golgi architecture, pH and vesicular trafficking. Mutations in a previously undescribed protein, TMEM165, were recently shown to cause a new form of CDG, termed TMEM165-CDG. TMEM165-CDG patients exhibit cartilage and bone dysplasia and altered glycosylation of serum glycoproteins. We utilized a morpholino knockdown strategy in zebrafish to investigate the physiologic and pathogenic functions of TMEM165. Inhibition of tmem165 expression in developing zebrafish embryos caused craniofacial abnormalities, largely attributable to fewer chondrocytes. Decreased expression of several markers of cartilage and bone development suggests that Tmem165 deficiency alters both chondrocyte and osteoblast differentiation. Glycomic analysis of tmem165 morphants also revealed altered initiation, processing and extension of N-glycans, paralleling some of the glycosylation changes noted in human patients. Collectively, these findings highlight the utility of zebrafish to elucidate pathogenic mechanisms associated with glycosylation disorders and suggest that the cartilage and bone dysplasia manifested in TMEM165-CDG patients may stem from abnormal development of chondrocytes and osteoblasts. PMID:25609749

  12. Potential coverage of circulating HPV types by current and developing vaccines in a group of women in Bosnia and Herzegovina with abnormal Pap smears.

    PubMed

    Salimović-Bešić, I; Hukić, M

    2015-09-01

    The objectives of this study were to identify human papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes in a group of Bosnian-Herzegovinian women with abnormal cytology and to assess their potential coverage by vaccines. HPVs were identified by multiplex real-time PCR test (HPV High Risk Typing Real-TM; Sacace Biotechnologies, Italy) of 105 women with an abnormal cervical Pap smear and positive high-risk (HR) HPV DNA screening test. The most common genotypes in the study were HPV-16 (32·6%, 48/147), HPV-31 (14·3%, 21/147), HPV-51 (9·5%, 14/147) and HPV-18 (7·5%, 11/147). The overall frequency of HR HPV-16 and/or HPV-18, covered by currently available vaccines [Gardasil® (Merck & Co., USA) and Cervarix®; (GlaxoSmithKline, UK)] was lower than the overall frequency of other HPVs detected in the study (40·1%, 59/174, P = 0·017). Group prevalence of HR HPVs targeted by a nine-valent vaccine in development (code-named V503) was higher than total frequency of other HPVs detected (68·0%, 100/147, P < 0·001). Development of cervical cytological abnormalities was independent of the presence of multiple infections (χ 2 = 0·598, P = 0·741). Compared to other HPVs, dependence of cervical diagnosis and HPV-16, -18 (P = 0·008) and HPV-16, -18, -31 (P = 0·008) infections were observed. Vaccines targeting HR HPV-16, -18 and -31 might be an important tool in the prevention of cervical disease in Bosnia and Herzegovina.

  13. Cardiac T-box factor Tbx20 directly interacts with Nkx2-5, GATA4, and GATA5 in regulation of gene expression in the developing heart.

    PubMed

    Stennard, Fiona A; Costa, Mauro W; Elliott, David A; Rankin, Scott; Haast, Saskia J P; Lai, Donna; McDonald, Lachlan P A; Niederreither, Karen; Dolle, Pascal; Bruneau, Benoit G; Zorn, Aaron M; Harvey, Richard P

    2003-10-15

    Tbx20 is a member of the T-box transcription factor family expressed in the forming hearts of vertebrate and invertebrate embryos. We report here analysis of Tbx20 expression during murine cardiac development and assessment of DNA-binding and transcriptional properties of Tbx20 isoforms. Tbx20 was expressed in myocardium and endocardium, including high levels in endocardial cushions. cDNAs generated by alternative splicing encode at least four Tbx20 isoforms, and Tbx20a uniquely carried strong transactivation and transrepression domains in its C terminus. Isoforms with an intact T-box bound specifically to DNA sites resembling the consensus brachyury half site, although with less avidity compared with the related factor, Tbx5. Tbx20 physically interacted with cardiac transcription factors Nkx2-5, GATA4, and GATA5, collaborating to synergistically activate cardiac gene expression. Among cardiac GATA factors, there was preferential synergy with GATA5, implicated in endocardial differentiation. In Xenopus embryos, enforced expression of Tbx20a, but not Tbx20b, led to induction of mesodermal and endodermal lineage markers as well as cell migration, indicating that the long Tbx20a isoform uniquely bears functional domains that can alter gene expression and developmental behaviour in an in vivo context. We propose that Tbx20 plays an integrated role in the ancient myogenic program of the heart, and has been additionally coopted during evolution of vertebrates for endocardial cushion development.

  14. A brief training module improves recognition of echocardiographic wall-motion abnormalities by emergency medicine physicians.

    PubMed

    Kerwin, Chris; Tommaso, Laura; Kulstad, Erik

    2011-01-01

    Objective. Wall-motion abnormality on echocardiogram is more sensitive in detecting cardiac ischemia than the electrocardiogram, but the use of bedside echocardiography by emergency physicians (EPs) for this purpose does not appear to be widespread, apparently due to limited data on proficiency of EPs for this task. We sought to determine the effect of a brief training module on the ability of EPs to recognize wall motion abnormalities on echocardiograms. Methods. We developed a brief training and testing module and presented it to EPs. After baseline testing of 15 echocardiograms, we presented the 30-minute training module, and administered a new test of 15 different echocardiograms. Physicians were asked to interpret the wall motion as normal or abnormal. Results. 35 EPs over two separate sessions showed significant improvement recognition of wall-motion abnormalities after the brief training module. Median score on the baseline test was 67%, interquartile range (IQR) 53% to 80%, while the median score on the posttraining test was 87%, IQR 80% to 87%, P < .001, independent of time in practice or prior training. Conclusion. With only brief training on how to recognize wall motion abnormalities on echocardiograms, EPs showed significant improvement in ability to identify wall motion abnormalities.

  15. [Molecular abnormalities in lymphomas].

    PubMed

    Delsol, G

    2010-11-01

    Numerous molecular abnormalities have been described in lymphomas. They are of diagnostic and prognostic value and are taken into account for the WHO classification of these tumors. They also shed some light on the underlying molecular mechanisms involved in lymphomas. Overall, four types of molecular abnormalities are involved: mutations, translocations, amplifications and deletions of tumor suppressor genes. Several techniques are available to detect these molecular anomalies: conventional cytogenetic analysis, multicolor FISH, CGH array or gene expression profiling using DNA microarrays. In some lymphomas, genetic abnormalities are responsible for the expression of an abnormal protein (e.g. tyrosine-kinase, transcription factor) detectable by immunohistochemistry. In the present review, molecular abnormalities observed in the most frequent B, T or NK cell lymphomas are discussed. In the broad spectrum of diffuse large B-cell lymphomas microarray analysis shows mostly two subgroups of tumors, one with gene expression signature corresponding to germinal center B-cell-like (GCB: CD10+, BCL6 [B-Cell Lymphoma 6]+, centerine+, MUM1-) and a subgroup expressing an activated B-cell-like signature (ABC: CD10-, BCL6-, centerine-, MUM1+). Among other B-cell lymphomas with well characterized molecular abnormalies are follicular lymphoma (BCL2 deregulation), MALT lymphoma (Mucosa Associated Lymphoid Tissue) [API2-MALT1 (mucosa-associated-lymphoid-tissue-lymphoma-translocation-gene1) fusion protein or deregulation BCL10, MALT1, FOXP1. MALT1 transcription factors], mantle cell lymphoma (cycline D1 [CCND1] overexpression) and Burkitt lymphoma (c-Myc expression). Except for ALK (anaplastic lymphoma kinase)-positive anaplastic large cell lymphoma, well characterized molecular anomalies are rare in lymphomas developed from T or NK cells. Peripheral T cell lymphomas not otherwise specified are a heterogeneous group of tumors with frequent but not recurrent molecular abnormalities

  16. Ultrasound in cardiac trauma.

    PubMed

    Saranteas, Theodosios; Mavrogenis, Andreas F; Mandila, Christina; Poularas, John; Panou, Fotios

    2017-04-01

    In the perioperative period, the emergency department or the intensive care unit accurate assessment of variable chest pain requires meticulous knowledge, diagnostic skills, and suitable usage of various diagnostic modalities. In addition, in polytrauma patients, cardiac injury including aortic dissection, pulmonary embolism, acute myocardial infarction, and pericardial effusion should be immediately revealed and treated. In these patients, arrhythmias, mainly tachycardia, cardiac murmurs, or hypotension must alert physicians to suspect cardiovascular trauma, which would potentially be life threatening. Ultrasound of the heart using transthoracic and transesophageal echocardiography are valuable diagnostic tools that can be used interchangeably in conjunction with other modalities such as the electrocardiogram and computed tomography for the diagnosis of cardiovascular abnormalities in trauma patients. Although ultrasound of the heart is often underused in the setting of trauma, it does have the advantages of being easily accessible, noninvasive, and rapid bedside assessment tool. This review article aims to analyze the potential cardiac injuries in trauma patients, and to provide an elaborate description of the role of echocardiography for their accurate diagnosis.

  17. Successful resuscitation of a patient who developed cardiac arrest from pulsed saline bacitracin lavage during thoracic laminectomy and fusion.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, Steven B; Deshur, Mark; Khavkin, Yevgeniy; Karaikovic, Elden; Vender, Jeffery

    2008-06-01

    A patient with a history of T12 burst fracture caused by a fall, and with progressive weakness and sensory loss in the left leg, survived a cardiac arrest after pulsed saline bacitracin lavage irrigation during a posterior spinal fusion.

  18. Urine - abnormal color

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003139.htm Urine - abnormal color To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The usual color of urine is straw-yellow. Abnormally colored urine ...

  19. Tooth - abnormal colors

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003065.htm Tooth - abnormal colors To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Abnormal tooth color is any color other than white to yellowish- ...

  20. Abnormal Head Position

    MedlinePlus

    ... cause. Can a longstanding head turn lead to any permanent problems? Yes, a significant abnormal head posture could cause permanent ... occipitocervical synostosis and unilateral hearing loss. Are there any ... postures? Yes. Abnormal head postures can usually be improved depending ...

  1. Skeletal limb abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003170.htm Skeletal limb abnormalities To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Skeletal limb abnormalities refers to a variety of bone structure problems ...

  2. Pathogenesis of Lethal Cardiac Arrhythmias in Mecp2 Mutant Mice: Implication for Therapy in Rett Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    McCauley, Mark D.; Wang, Tiannan; Mike, Elise; Herrera, Jose; Beavers, David L.; Huang, Teng-Wei; Ward, Christopher S.; Skinner, Steven; Percy, Alan K.; Glaze, Daniel G.; Wehrens, Xander H. T.; Neul, Jeffrey L.

    2013-01-01

    Rett Syndrome is a neurodevelopmental disorder typically caused by mutations in Methyl-CpG-Binding Protein 2 (MECP2) in which 26% of deaths are sudden and of unknown cause. To explore the hypothesis that these deaths may be due to cardiac dysfunction, we characterized the electrocardiograms (ECGs) in 379 people with Rett syndrome and found that 18.5% show prolongation of the corrected QT interval (QTc), indicating a repolarization abnormality that can predispose to the development of an unstable fatal cardiac rhythm. Male mice lacking MeCP2 function, Mecp2Null/Y, also have prolonged QTc and show increased susceptibility to induced ventricular tachycardia. Female heterozygous null mice, Mecp2Null/+, show an age-dependent prolongation of QTc associated with ventricular tachycardia and cardiac-related death. Genetic deletion of MeCP2 function in only the nervous system was sufficient to cause long QTc and ventricular tachycardia, implicating neuronally-mediated changes to cardiac electrical conduction as a potential cause of ventricular tachycardia in Rett syndrome. The standard therapy for prolonged QTc in Rett syndrome, β-adrenergic receptor blockers, did not prevent ventricular tachycardia in Mecp2Null/Y mice. To determine whether an alternative therapy would be more appropriate, we characterized cardiomyocytes from Mecp2Null/Y mice and found increased persistent sodium current, which was normalized when cells were treated with the sodium channel-blocking anti-seizure drug phenytoin. Treatment with phenytoin reduced both QTc and sustained ventricular tachycardia in Mecp2Null/Y mice. These results demonstrate that cardiac abnormalities in Rett syndrome are secondary to abnormal nervous system control, which leads to increased persistent sodium current. Our findings suggest that treatment in people with Rett syndrome would be more effective if it targeted the increased persistent sodium current in order to prevent lethal cardiac arrhythmias. PMID:22174313

  3. Pathogenesis of lethal cardiac arrhythmias in Mecp2 mutant mice: implication for therapy in Rett syndrome.

    PubMed

    McCauley, Mark D; Wang, Tiannan; Mike, Elise; Herrera, Jose; Beavers, David L; Huang, Teng-Wei; Ward, Christopher S; Skinner, Steven; Percy, Alan K; Glaze, Daniel G; Wehrens, Xander H T; Neul, Jeffrey L

    2011-12-14

    Rett syndrome is a neurodevelopmental disorder typically caused by mutations in methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MECP2) in which 26% of deaths are sudden and of unknown cause. To explore the hypothesis that these deaths may be due to cardiac dysfunction, we characterized the electrocardiograms in 379 people with Rett syndrome and found that 18.5% show prolongation of the corrected QT interval (QTc), an indication of a repolarization abnormality that can predispose to the development of an unstable fatal cardiac rhythm. Male mice lacking MeCP2 function, Mecp2(Null/Y), also have prolonged QTc and show increased susceptibility to induced ventricular tachycardia. Female heterozygous null mice, Mecp2(Null/+), show an age-dependent prolongation of QTc associated with ventricular tachycardia and cardiac-related death. Genetic deletion of MeCP2 function in only the nervous system was sufficient to cause long QTc and ventricular tachycardia, implicating neuronally mediated changes to cardiac electrical conduction as a potential cause of ventricular tachycardia in Rett syndrome. The standard therapy for prolonged QTc in Rett syndrome, β-adrenergic receptor blockers, did not prevent ventricular tachycardia in Mecp2(Null/Y) mice. To determine whether an alternative therapy would be more appropriate, we characterized cardiomyocytes from Mecp2(Null/Y) mice and found increased persistent sodium current, which was normalized when cells were treated with the sodium channel-blocking anti-seizure drug phenytoin. Treatment with phenytoin reduced both QTc and sustained ventricular tachycardia in Mecp2(Null/Y) mice. These results demonstrate that cardiac abnormalities in Rett syndrome are secondary to abnormal nervous system control, which leads to increased persistent sodium current. Our findings suggest that treatment in people with Rett syndrome would be more effective if it targeted the increased persistent sodium current to prevent lethal cardiac arrhythmias.

  4. Transgenic overexpression of Hdac3 in the heart produces increased postnatal cardiac myocyte proliferation but does not induce hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Trivedi, Chinmay M; Lu, Min Min; Wang, Qiaohong; Epstein, Jonathan A

    2008-09-26

    Class I and II histone deacetylases (HDACs) play vital roles in regulating cardiac development, morphogenesis, and hypertrophic responses. Although the roles of Hdac1 and Hdac2, class I HDACs, in cardiac hyperplasia, growth, and hypertrophic responsiveness have been reported, the role in the heart of Hdac3, another class I HDAC, has been less well explored. Here we report that myocyte-specific overexpression of Hdac3 in mice results in cardiac abnormalities at birth. Hdac3 overexpression produces thickening of ventricular myocardium, especially the interventricular septum, and reduction of both ventricular cavities in newborn hearts. Our data suggest that increased thickness of myocardium in Hdac3-transgenic (Hdac3-Tg) mice is due to increased cardiomyocyte hyperplasia without hypertrophy. Hdac3 overexpression inhibits several cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors, including Cdkn1a, Cdkn1b, Cdkn1c, Cdkn2b, and Cdkn2c. Hdac3-Tg mice did not develop cardiac hypertrophy at 3 months of age, unlike previously reported Hdac2-Tg mice. Further, Hdac3 overexpression did not augment isoproterenol-induced cardiac hypertrophy when compared with wild-type littermates. These findings identify Hdac3 as a novel regulator of cardiac myocyte proliferation during cardiac development.

  5. Fetal cardiac effects of maternal hyperglycemia during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Corrigan, Niamh; Brazil, Derek P; McAuliffe, Fionnuala

    2009-06-01

    Maternal diabetes mellitus is associated with increased teratogenesis, which can occur in pregestational type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Cardiac defects and with neural tube defects are the most common malformations observed in fetuses of pregestational diabetic mothers. The exact mechanism by which diabetes exerts its teratogenic effects and induces embryonic malformations is unclear. Whereas the sequelae of maternal pregestational diabetes, such as modulating insulin levels, altered fat levels, and increased reactive oxygen species, may play a role in fetal damage during diabetic pregnancy, hyperglycemia is thought to be the primary teratogen, causing particularly adverse effects on cardiovascular development. Fetal cardiac defects are associated with raised maternal glycosylated hemoglobin levels and are up to five times more likely in infants of mothers with pregestational diabetes compared with those without diabetes. The resulting anomalies are varied and include transposition of the great arteries, mitral and pulmonary atresia, double outlet of the right ventricle, tetralogy of Fallot, and fetal cardiomyopathy.A wide variety of rodent models have been used to study diabetic teratogenesis. Both genetic and chemically induced models of type 1 and 2 diabetes have been used to examine the effects of hyperglycemia on fetal development. Factors such as genetic background as well as confounding variables such as obesity appear to influence the severity of fetal abnormalities in mice. In this review, we will summarize recent data on fetal cardiac effects from human pregestational diabetic mothers, as well as the most relevant findings in rodent models of diabetic cardiac teratogenesis.

  6. Cardiac Angiogenic Imbalance Leads to Peri-partum Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Patten, Ian S.; Rana, Sarosh; Shahul, Sajid; Rowe, Glenn C; Jang, Cholsoon; Liu, Laura; Hacker, Michele R.; Rhee, Julie S.; Mitchell, John; Mahmood, Feroze; Hess, Phil; Farrell, Caitlin; Koulisis, Nicole; Khankin, Eliyahu V; Burke, Suzanne D.; Tudorache, Igor; Bauersachs, Johann; del Monte, Federica; Hilfiker-Kleiner, Denise; Karumanchi, S. Ananth; Arany, Zoltan

    2012-01-01

    Peri-partum cardiomyopathy (PPCM) is a frequently fatal disease that affects women near delivery, and occurs more frequently in women with pre-eclampsia and/or multiple gestation. The etiology of PPCM, or why it associates with pre-eclampsia, remains unknown. We show here that PPCM is associated with a systemic angiogenic imbalance, accentuated by pre-eclampsia. Mice that lack cardiac PGC-1α, a powerful regulator of angiogenesis, develop profound PPCM. Importantly, the PPCM is entirely rescued by pro-angiogenic therapies. In humans, the placenta in late gestation secretes VEGF inhibitors like soluble Flt1 (sFlt1), and this is accentuated by multiple gestation and pre-eclampsia. This anti-angiogenic environment is accompanied by sub-clinical cardiac dysfunction, the extent of which correlates with circulating levels of sFlt1. Exogenous sFlt1 alone caused diastolic dysfunction in wildtype mice, and profound systolic dysfunction in mice lacking cardiac PGC-1α. Finally, plasma samples from women with PPCM contained abnormally high levels of sFlt1. These data strongly suggest that PPCM is in large part a vascular disease, caused by excess anti-angiogenic signaling in the peri-partum period. The data also explain how late pregnancy poses a threat to cardiac homeostasis, and why pre-eclampsia and multiple gestation are important risk factors for the development of PPCM. PMID:22596155

  7. Regional Pericarditis Status Post Cardiac Ablation: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Orme, Joseph; Eddin, Moneer; Loli, Akil

    2014-01-01

    Context: Regional pericarditis is elusive and difficult to diagnosis. Healthcare providers should be familiar with post-cardiac ablation complications as this procedure is now widespread and frequently performed. The management of regional pericarditis differs greatly from that of acute myocardial infarction. Case report: A 52 year-old male underwent atrial fibrillation ablation and developed severe mid-sternal chest pain the following day with electrocardiographic findings suggestive of acute myocardial infarction, and underwent coronary angiography, a left ventriculogram, and 2D transthoracic echocardiogram, all of which were unremarkable without evidence of obstructive coronary disease, wall motion abnormalities, or pericardial effusions. Ultimately, the patient was diagnosed with regional pericarditis. After diagnosis, the patient's presenting symptoms resolved with treatment including nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents and colchicine. Conclusion: This is the first reported case study of regional pericarditis status post cardiac ablation. Electrocardiographic findings were classic for an acute myocardial infarction; however, coronary angiography and left ventriculogram demonstrated no acute coronary occlusion or ventricular wall motion abnormalities. Healthcare professionals must remember that the electrocardiographic findings in pericarditis are not always classic and that pericarditis can occur status post cardiac ablation. PMID:25317395

  8. Transcriptome complexity in cardiac development and diseases--an expanding universe between genome and phenome.

    PubMed

    Gao, Chen; Wang, Yibin

    2014-01-01

    With the advancement of transcriptome profiling by micro-arrays and high-throughput RNA-sequencing, transcriptome complexity and its dynamics are revealed at different levels in cardiovascular development and diseases. In this review, we will highlight the recent progress in our knowledge of cardiovascular transcriptome complexity contributed by RNA splicing, RNA editing and noncoding RNAs. The emerging importance of many of these previously under-explored aspects of gene regulation in cardiovascular development and pathology will be discussed.

  9. Cardiac CT Angiography in Congestive Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Levine, Avi; Hecht, Harvey S

    2015-06-01

    Cardiac CT angiography has become an important tool for the diagnosis and treatment of congestive heart failure. Differentiation of ischemic from nonischemic cardiomyopathy; evaluation of myocardial perfusion; characterization of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, left ventricular noncompaction, and arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia; and delineation of congenital heart defects and valvular abnormalities are the primary diagnostic applications. Therapeutic use includes visualization of the coronary venous anatomy for optimal implementation of cardiac resynchronization therapy and evaluation of left ventricular assist devices and transplant vasculopathy.

  10. Mechanisms of Cardiac Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Uygur, Aysu; Lee, Richard T.

    2016-01-01

    Adult humans fail to regenerate their hearts following injury, and this failure to regenerate myocardium is a leading cause of heart failure and death worldwide. Although all adult mammals appear to lack significant cardiac regeneration potential, some vertebrates can regenerate myocardium throughout life. In addition, new studies indicate that mammals have cardiac regeneration potential during development and very soon after birth. The mechanisms of heart regeneration among model organisms, including neonatal mice, appear remarkably similar. Orchestrated waves of inflammation, matrix deposition and remodeling, and cardiomyocyte proliferation are commonly seen in heart regeneration models. Understanding why adult mammals develop extensive scarring instead of regeneration is a crucial goal for regenerative biology. PMID:26906733

  11. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding FAQ

    MedlinePlus

    ... PROBLEMS Abnormal Uterine Bleeding • What is a normal menstrual cycle? • When is bleeding abnormal? • At what ages is ... treat abnormal bleeding? •Glossary What is a normal menstrual cycle? The normal length of the menstrual cycle is ...

  12. Visual data mining of coexpression data to set research priorities in cardiac development research.

    PubMed

    VanBuren, Vincent

    2012-01-01

    Over the past decade, an immense amount of biomedical data have become available in the public domain due to the development of ever-more efficient screening tools such as expression microarrays. To fully leverage this important new resource, it has become imperative to develop new methodologies for mining and visualizing data to make inferences beyond the scope of the original experiments. This need motivated the development of a new freely available web-based application called StarNet ( http://vanburenlab.medicine.tamhsc.edu/starnet2.html ). Here we describe the use of StarNet, which functions primarily as a query tool that draws correlation networks centered about a gene of interest. To support inferences and the development of new hypotheses using the resulting correlation network, StarNet queries all genes in the correlation network against a database of known interactions and displays the results in a second graph and provides a statistical test of Gene Ontology term enrichment (keyword enrichment) to provide tentative summary functional annotations for the correlation network. Finally, StarNet provides additional tools for comparing networks drawn from two different selected data sets, thus providing methods for making inferences and developing new hypotheses about differential wiring for different regulatory domains.

  13. The Use of Virtual World-Based Cardiac Rehabilitation to Encourage Healthy Lifestyle Choices Among Cardiac Patients: Intervention Development and Pilot Study Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Squires, Ray W

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite proven benefits through the secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and reduction of mortality, cardiac rehabilitation (CR) remains underutilized in cardiac patients. Underserved populations most affected by CVD including rural residents, low socioeconomic status patients, and racial/ethnic minorities have the lowest participation rates due to access barriers. Internet-and mobile-based lifestyle interventions have emerged as potential modalities to complement and increase accessibility to CR. An outpatient CR program using virtual world technology may provide an effective alternative to conventional CR by overcoming patient access limitations such as geographics, work schedule constraints, and transportation. Objective The objective of this paper is to describe the research protocol of a two-phased, pilot study that will assess the feasibility (Phase 1) and comparative effectiveness (Phase 2) of a virtual world-based (Second Life) CR program as an extension of a conventional CR program in achieving healthy behavioral change among post-acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and post-percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) patients. We hypothesize that virtual world CR users will improve behaviors (physical activity, diet, and smoking) to a greater degree than conventional CR participants. Methods In Phase 1, we will recruit at least 10 patients enrolled in outpatient CR who were recently hospitalized for an ACS (unstable angina, ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction, non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction) or who recently underwent elective PCI at Mayo Clinic Hospital, Rochester Campus in Rochester, MN with at least one modifiable, lifestyle risk factor target (sedentary lifestyle, unhealthy diet, and current smoking). Recruited patients will participate in a 12-week, virtual world health education program which will provide feedback on the feasibility, usability, and design of the intervention. During Phase 2, we will conduct a

  14. The Scaffold Protein Muscle A-Kinase Anchoring Protein β Orchestrates Cardiac Myocyte Hypertrophic Signaling Required for the Development of Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Kritzer, Michael D.; Li, Jinliang; Passariello, Catherine L.; Gayanilo, Marjorie; Thakur, Hrishikesh; Dayan, Joseph; Dodge-Kafka, Kimberly; Kapiloff, Michael S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Cardiac myocyte hypertrophy is regulated by an extensive intracellular signal transduction network. In vitro evidence suggests that the scaffold protein muscle A-kinase anchoring protein β (mAKAPβ) serves as a nodal organizer of hypertrophic signaling. However, the relevance of mAKAPβ signalosomes to pathological remodeling and heart failure in vivo remains unknown. Methods and Results Using conditional, cardiac myocyte–specific gene deletion, we now demonstrate that mAKAPβ expression in mice is important for the cardiac hypertrophy induced by pressure overload and catecholamine toxicity. mAKAPβ targeting prevented the development of heart failure associated with long-term transverse aortic constriction, conferring a survival benefit. In contrast to 29% of control mice (n=24), only 6% of mAKAPβ knockout mice (n=31) died in the 16 weeks of pressure overload (P=0.02). Accordingly, mAKAPβ knockout inhibited myocardial apoptosis and the development of interstitial fibrosis, left atrial hypertrophy, and pulmonary edema. This improvement in cardiac status correlated with the attenuated activation of signaling pathways coordinated by the mAKAPβ scaffold, including the decreased phosphorylation of protein kinase D1 and histone deacetylase 4 that we reveal to participate in a new mAKAP signaling module. Furthermore, mAKAPβ knockout inhibited pathological gene expression directed by myocyte-enhancer factor-2 and nuclear factor of activated T-cell transcription factors that associate with the scaffold. Conclusions mAKAPβ orchestrates signaling that regulates pathological cardiac remodeling in mice. Targeting of the underlying physical architecture of signaling networks, including mAKAPβ signalosome formation, may constitute an effective therapeutic strategy for the prevention and treatment of pathological remodeling and heart failure. PMID:24812305

  15. Factors affecting the development of adverse drug reactions to β-blockers in hospitalized cardiac patient population.

    PubMed

    Mugoša, Snežana; Djordjević, Nataša; Djukanović, Nina; Protić, Dragana; Bukumirić, Zoran; Radosavljević, Ivan; Bošković, Aneta; Todorović, Zoran

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to undertake a study on the prevalence of cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6) poor metabolizer alleles (*3, *4, *5, and *6) on a Montenegrin population and its impact on developing adverse drug reactions (ADRs) of β-blockers in a hospitalized cardiac patient population. A prospective study was conducted in the Cardiology Center of the Clinical Center of Montenegro and included 138 patients who had received any β-blocker in their therapy. ADRs were collected using a specially designed questionnaire, based on the symptom list and any signs that could point to eventual ADRs. Data from patients' medical charts, laboratory tests, and other available parameters were observed and combined with the data from the questionnaire. ADRs to β-blockers were observed in 15 (10.9%) patients. There was a statistically significant difference in the frequency of ADRs in relation to genetically determined enzymatic activity (P<0.001), with ADRs' occurrence significantly correlating with slower CYP2D6 metabolism. Our study showed that the adverse reactions to β-blockers could be predicted by the length of hospitalization, CYP2D6 poor metabolizer phenotype, and the concomitant use of other CYP2D6-metabolizing drugs. Therefore, in hospitalized patients with polypharmacy CYP2D6 genotyping might be useful in detecting those at risk of ADRs.

  16. Factors affecting the development of adverse drug reactions to β-blockers in hospitalized cardiac patient population

    PubMed Central

    Mugoša, Snežana; Djordjević, Nataša; Djukanović, Nina; Protić, Dragana; Bukumirić, Zoran; Radosavljević, Ivan; Bošković, Aneta; Todorović, Zoran

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to undertake a study on the prevalence of cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6) poor metabolizer alleles (*3, *4, *5, and *6) on a Montenegrin population and its impact on developing adverse drug reactions (ADRs) of β-blockers in a hospitalized cardiac patient population. A prospective study was conducted in the Cardiology Center of the Clinical Center of Montenegro and included 138 patients who had received any β-blocker in their therapy. ADRs were collected using a specially designed questionnaire, based on the symptom list and any signs that could point to eventual ADRs. Data from patients’ medical charts, laboratory tests, and other available parameters were observed and combined with the data from the questionnaire. ADRs to β-blockers were observed in 15 (10.9%) patients. There was a statistically significant difference in the frequency of ADRs in relation to genetically determined enzymatic activity (P<0.001), with ADRs’ occurrence significantly correlating with slower CYP2D6 metabolism. Our study showed that the adverse reactions to β-blockers could be predicted by the length of hospitalization, CYP2D6 poor metabolizer phenotype, and the concomitant use of other CYP2D6-metabolizing drugs. Therefore, in hospitalized patients with polypharmacy CYP2D6 genotyping might be useful in detecting those at risk of ADRs. PMID:27536078

  17. Dystrophic mdx mice develop severe cardiac and respiratory dysfunction following genetic ablation of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10.

    PubMed

    Nitahara-Kasahara, Yuko; Hayashita-Kinoh, Hiromi; Chiyo, Tomoko; Nishiyama, Akiyo; Okada, Hironori; Takeda, Shin'ichi; Okada, Takashi

    2014-08-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a progressive muscle-wasting disease that causes respiratory and cardiac failure. Inflammation is a key pathological characteristic of dystrophic muscle lesion formation, but its role and regulation in the disease time course has not been sufficiently examined. In the present study, we used IL-10(-/-)/mdx mice lacking both dystrophin and the anti-inflammatory cytokine, interleukin-10 (IL-10), to investigate whether a predisposition to inflammation affects the severity of DMD with advancing age. The IL-10 deficiency caused a profound DMD phenotype in the dystrophic heart such as muscle degeneration and extensive myofiber loss, but the limb muscle and diaphragm morphology of IL-10(-/) (-)/mdx mice was similar to that of mdx mice. Extensive infiltrates of pro-inflammatory M1 macrophages in regeneration of cardiotoxin-injured muscle, altered M1/M2 macrophage phenotype and increased pro-inflammatory cytokines/chemokines production were observed in the diaphragm and heart of IL-10(-/-)/mdx mice. We characterized the IL-10(-/-)/mdx mice as a dystrophic model with chronic inflammation and severe cardiorespiratory dysfunction, as evidenced by decreased percent fractional shortening (%FS) and ejection fraction percent (EF%) on echocardiography, reduced lower tidal volume on whole-body plethysmography. This study suggests that a predisposition to inflammation is an important indicator of DMD disease progression. Therefore, the development of anti-inflammatory strategies may help in slowing down the cardiorespiratory dysfunction on DMD.

  18. Human COL2A1-directed SV40 T antigen expression in transgenic and chimeric mice results in abnormal skeletal development

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    The ability of SV40 T antigen to cause abnormalities in cartilage development in transgenic mice and chimeras has been tested. The cis- regulatory elements of the COL2A1 gene were used to target expression of SV40 T antigen to differentiating chondrocytes in transgenic mice and chimeras derived from embryonal stem (ES) cells bearing the same transgene. The major phenotypic consequences of transgenic (pAL21) expression are malformed skeleton, disproportionate dwarfism, and perinatal/neonatal death. Expression of T antigen was tissue specific and in the main characteristic of the mouse alpha 1(II) collagen gene. Chondrocyte densities and levels of alpha 1(II) collagen mRNAs were reduced in the transgenic mice. Islands of cells which express cartilage characteristic genes such as type IIB procollagen, long form alpha 1(IX) collagen, alpha 2(XI) collagen, and aggrecan were found in the articular and growth cartilages of pAL21 chimeric fetuses and neonates. But these cells, which were expressing T antigen, were not properly organized into columns of proliferating chondrocytes. Levels of alpha 1(II) collagen mRNA were reduced in these chondrocytes. In addition, these cells did not express type X collagen, a marker for hypertrophic chondrocytes. The skeletal abnormality in pAL21 mice may therefore be due to a retardation of chondrocyte maturation or an impaired ability of chondrocytes to complete terminal differentiation and an associated paucity of some cartilage matrix components. PMID:7822417

  19. Development of metabolic enzyme activity in locomotor and cardiac muscles of the migratory barnacle goose.

    PubMed

    Bishop, C M; Butler, P J; Egginton, S; el Haj, A J; Gabrielsen, G W

    1995-07-01

    Preflight development of the goslings was typified by rapid increases in the mitochondrial enzymes of the semimembranosus and heart ventricular muscles resulting in near-adult values by 3 wk of age. In contrast, aerobic capacity of the pectoralis muscle initially developed slowly but showed a rapid increase between 5 and 7 wk of age, in preparation for becoming airborne. Activities of glycolytic enzymes in the pectoralis muscle showed similar patterns of development as those found for the aerobic enzymes, except for hexokinase, which was low at all ages, indicating an adaptation for catabolism of both intracellular glycogen and plasma fatty acids in preference to plasma glucose. Muscle mass specific activity of citrate synthase in the pectoralis increased by only 33% from goslings during the first few days of flight, compared with premigratory geese. Activities of anaerobic glycolytic enzymes in the ventricles were low, but values for hexokinase, which is involved in the phosphorylation of plasma glucose, developed rapidly. Values for lactate dehydrogenase were also high, reflecting the capacity of the heart to catabolize plasma lactate. Substrate flux supplied by carnitine palmitoyltransferase and oxoglutarate dehydrogenase (OGD), in the pectoralis muscles of the premigratory geese, appears to have the smallest excess capacities to meet the requirements of sustained aerobic flight. The average maximum oxygen uptake for premigratory geese during flight, as indicated by values for OGD, is calculated to be 484 ml O2/min (or 208 ml O2.min-1.kg-1).

  20. Common cardiac arrhythmias: recognition and treatment.

    PubMed

    Talmers, F N; Kinhal, V; Sabharwal, S; Weissler, A M

    1981-04-01

    Cardiac arrhythmias are commonly seen in the everyday practice of medicine by the physician. Although certain arrhythmias may be suspected clinically, precise diagnosis is made by electrocardiographic recording of the abnormal rhythm. Once the arrhythmia has been recorded, the next steps are proper electrocardiographic diagnosis and selection of proper treatment. The specific mode of therapy and the speed with which it is delivered will depend not only on the type of arrhythmia, but also on the hemodynamic consequences of the rhythm abnormality on the patient's cardiovascular system. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the electrocardiographic criteria of common cardiac arrhythmias as well as current concepts regarding therapy.

  1. Non-invasive quick diagnosis of cardiovascular problems from visible and invisible abnormal changes with increased cardiac troponin I appearing on cardiovascular representation areas of the eyebrows, left upper lip, etc. of the face & hands: beneficial manual stimulation of hands for acute anginal chest pain, and important factors in safe, effective treatment.

    PubMed

    Omura, Yoshiaki; Jones, Marilyn K; Duvvi, Harsha; Shimotsuura, Yasuhiro; Ohki, Motomu; Rodriques, Aaron

    2014-01-01

    Our previous study indicated that there are at least 7 cardiovascular representation areas on the face, including the "Eyebrows", both sides of the "Nose", "Lelt Upper Lip" and the "Outside of the corner of both sides of the mouth," in addition to 2 areas in each hand. When there are cardiovascular problems, some of the heart representation areas of these areas often show the following changes: 1) Most distinctive visible changes such as the initial whitening with or without long white hair, then hair loss and complete disappearance of the hairs of the heart representation area of "Eyebrows" 2) Invisible biochemical changes that happen in heart representation areas at the "Left Upper Lips", 3) "Nose" below eye level as well as 4) "3rd segment of Middle Finger of Hands." Most distinctive visible & invisible changes are found in heart representation areas on the "Eyebrow", located nearest to the midline of face, where the color of the hairs becomes white compared with the rest of the Eyebrow. Then the cardiovascular problem advances, and hair starts disappearing. When there are no hairs at the heart representation areas of the Eyebrow, usually Cardiac Troponin I is increased to a very serious, abnormal high value. Most of the cardiovascular representation areas of the face show, regardless of presence or absence of visible change. When there is a cardiovascular problem, not only simple Bi-Digital O-Ring Test can detect without using any instrument in several minutes but also, corresponding biochemical changes of abnormally increased Cardiac Troponin I level can often be detected non-invasively from these Organ Representation Areas of Face & Hands, although changes in Eyebrows, L-Upper Lip & 3rd segment of middle fingers are clinically the most reliable changes & easy to identify the locations. Manual Stimulation of Hand's heart representation areas often eliminated acute anginal chest pain before medical help became available. Important factors for safe, effective

  2. Mending broken hearts: cardiac development as a basis for adult heart regeneration and repair.

    PubMed

    Xin, Mei; Olson, Eric N; Bassel-Duby, Rhonda

    2013-08-01

    As the adult mammalian heart has limited potential for regeneration and repair, the loss of cardiomyocytes during injury and disease can result in heart failure and death. The cellular processes and regulatory mechanisms involved in heart growth and development can be exploited to repair the injured adult heart through 'reawakening' pathways that are active during embryogenesis. Heart function has been restored in rodents by reprogramming non-myocytes into cardiomyocytes, by expressing transcription factors (GATA4, HAND2, myocyte-specific enhancer factor 2C (MEF2C) and T-box 5 (TBX5)) and microRNAs (miR-1, miR-133, miR-208 and miR-499) that control cardiomyocyte identity. Stimulating cardiomyocyte dedifferentiation and proliferation by activating mitotic signalling pathways involved in embryonic heart growth represents a complementary approach for heart regeneration and repair. Recent advances in understanding the mechanistic basis of heart development offer exciting opportunities for effective therapies for heart failure.

  3. Characterization of Mediators of Cardiac And Renal Development in Response to Increased Prenatal Testosterone

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-08-01

    understand the effects of excess prenatal androgen on fetal development and subsequent adult disease states. Ryan W. Maresh Department of...pathological condition, a common question arises: Is the cause of the disease genetic, due to the environment we have lived in, or simply by chance...adulthood diseases hypertension and type II diabetes. I hypothesized that prenatal exposure to excess testosterone from days 30 to 90 of gestation

  4. Pharmacotherapy of cardiac arrhythmias--basic science for clinicians.

    PubMed

    Shu, Juan; Zhou, Jun; Patel, Chinmay; Yan, Gan-Xin

    2009-11-01

    Cardiac arrhythmias occur in approximately 5.3% of the population and contribute substantially to morbidity and mortality. Pharmacological therapy still remains the major approach in management of patients with nearly every form of cardiac arrhythmia. Effective and safe management of cardiac arrhythmias with antiarrhythmic drugs requires understanding of basic mechanisms for various cardiac arrhythmias, clinical diagnosis of an arrhythmia and identification of underlying cardiac diseases, pharmacokinetics, and antiarrhythmic properties of each individual antiarrhythmic drug. Most cardiac arrhythmias occur via one of the two mechanisms: abnormal impulse formation and reentry or both. Antiarrhythmic drugs primarily work via influencing cardiac automaticity or triggered activity or by their effects on effective refractoriness of cardiac cells. Proarrhythmic effects of antiarrhythmic drugs are also briefly discussed in this review article.

  5. Inactivation of ca10a and ca10b Genes Leads to Abnormal Embryonic Development and Alters Movement Pattern in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Aspatwar, Ashok; Barker, Harlan R.; Saralahti, Anni K.; Bäuerlein, Carina A.; Ortutay, Csaba; Pan, Peiwen; Kuuslahti, Marianne; Parikka, Mataleena; Rämet, Mika; Parkkila, Seppo

    2015-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrase related proteins (CARPs) X and XI are highly conserved across species and are predominantly expressed in neural tissues. The biological role of these proteins is still an enigma. Ray-finned fish have lost the CA11 gene, but instead possess two co-orthologs of CA10. We analyzed the expression pattern of zebrafish ca10a and ca10b genes during embryonic development and in different adult tissues, and studied 61 CARP X/XI-like sequences to evaluate their phylogenetic relationship. Sequence analysis of zebrafish ca10a and ca10b reveals strongly predicted signal peptides, N-glycosylation sites, and a potential disulfide, all of which are conserved, suggesting that all of CARP X and XI are secretory proteins and potentially dimeric. RT-qPCR showed that zebrafish ca10a and ca10b genes are expressed in the brain and several other tissues throughout the development of zebrafish. Antisense morpholino mediated knockdown of ca10a and ca10b showed developmental delay with a high rate of mortality in larvae. Zebrafish morphants showed curved body, pericardial edema, and abnormalities in the head and eye, and there was increased apoptotic cell death in the brain region. Swim pattern showed abnormal movement in morphant zebrafish larvae compared to the wild type larvae. The developmental phenotypes of the ca10a and ca10b morphants were confirmed by inactivating these genes with the CRISPR/Cas9 system. In conclusion, we introduce a novel zebrafish model to investigate the mechanisms of CARP Xa and CARP Xb functions. Our data indicate that CARP Xa and CARP Xb have important roles in zebrafish development and suppression of ca10a and ca10b expression in zebrafish larvae leads to a movement disorder. PMID:26218428

  6. [Cardiac effects of fenibut in development of experimental chronic renal insufficiency].

    PubMed

    Smirnov, A V; Barabanova, T A; Penchul, N A

    2003-01-01

    The effect of fenibut on the mechanical activity of myocardium was studied in vitro and in vivo in rats with experimental chronic renal insufficiency (CRI) in a regime of physiologically alternating load simulating the intact heart function. The administration of fenibut (10 mg/kg) in rats after nephrectomy prevents the development of myocardial hyperfunction (characteristic of the animals with CRI in stage 1). In in vitro experiments on isolated myocardium fenibut also decreased the myocardial hyperfunction and reduced contractility to a control level, which was accompanied by accelerated relaxation in all finite systolic lengths.

  7. Reduced expression of adherens and gap junction proteins can have a fundamental role in the development of heart failure following cardiac hypertrophy in rats.

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Daniele O; Blefari, Valdecir; Prado, Fernanda P; Silva, Carlos A; Fazan, Rubens; Salgado, Helio C; Ramos, Simone G; Prado, Cibele M

    2016-02-01

    Hypertension causes cardiac hypertrophy, cardiac dysfunction and heart failure (HF). The mechanisms implicated in the transition from compensated to decompensated cardiac hypertrophy are not fully understood. This study was aimed to investigate whether alterations in the expression of intercalated disk proteins could contribute to the transition of compensated cardiac hypertrophy to dilated heart development that culminates in HF. Male rats were submitted to abdominal aortic constriction and at 90 days post surgery (dps), three groups were observed: sham-operated animals (controls), animals with hypertrophic hearts (HH) and animals with hypertrophic + dilated hearts (HD). Blood pressure was evaluated. The hearts were collected and Western blot and immunofluorescence were performed to desmoglein-2, desmocollin-2, N-cadherin, plakoglobin, Bcatenin, and connexin-43. Cardiac systolic function was evaluated using the Vevo 2100 ultrasound system. Data were considered significant when p b 0.05. Seventy percent of the animals presented with HH and 30% were HD at 90 dps. The blood pressure increased in both groups. The amount of desmoglein-2 and desmocollin-2 expression was increased in both groups and no difference was observed in either group. The expression of N-cadherin, plakoglobin and B-catenin increased in the HHgroup and decreased in the HDgroup; and connexin-43 decreased only in theHDgroup. Therewas no difference between the ejection fraction and fractional shortening at 30 and 60 dps; however, they were decreased in the HD group at 90 dps. We found that while some proteins have increased expression accompanied by the increase in the cell volume associated with preserved systolic cardiac function in theHHgroup, these same proteins had decreased expression evenwithout significant reduction in the cell volume associated with decreased systolic cardiac function in HD group. The increased expression of desmoglein-2 and desmocollin-2 in both the HH and HD groups could

  8. Reduced heart rate and cardiac output differentially affect angiogenesis, growth, and development in early chicken embryos (Gallus domesticus).

    PubMed

    Branum, Sylvia R; Yamada-Fisher, Miho; Burggren, Warren

    2013-01-01

    An increase in both vascular circumferential tension and shear stress in the developing vasculature of the chicken embryo has been hypothesized to stimulate angiogenesis in the developing peripheral circulation chorioallantoic membrane (CAM). To test this hypothesis, angiogenesis in the CAM, development, and growth were measured in the early chicken embryo, following acute and chronic topical application of the purely bradycardic drug ZD7288. At hour 56, ZD7288 reduced heart rate (f(H)) by ~30% but had no significant effect on stroke volume (~0.19 ± 0.2 μL), collectively resulting in a significant fall in cardiac output (CO) from ~27 ± 3 to 18 ± 2 μL min(-1). Mean f(H) at 72 h of development was similarly significantly lowered by acute ZD7288 treatment (250 μM) to 128 ± 0.3 beats min(-1), compared with 174.5 ± 0.3 and 174.7 ± 0.8 beats min(-1) in control and Pannett-Compton (P-C) saline-treated embryos, respectively. Chronic dosing with ZD7288-and the attendant decreases in f(H) and CO-did not change eye diameter or cervical flexion (key indicators of development rate) at 120 h but significantly reduced overall growth (wet and dry body mass decreased by 20%). CAM vessel density index (reflecting angiogenesis) measured 200-400 μm from the umbilical stalk was not altered, but ZD7288 reduced vessel numbers-and therefore vessel density-by 13%-16% more distally (500-600 μm from umbilical stalk) in the CAM. In the ZD7288-treated embryos, a decrease in vessel length was found within the second branch order (~300-400 μm from the umbilical stock), while a decrease in vessel diameter was found closer to the umbilical stock, beginning in the first branch order (~200-300 μm). Paradoxically, chronic application of P-C saline also reduced peripheral CAM vessel density index at 500 and 600 μm by 13% and 7%, respectively, likely from washout of local angiogenic factors. In summary, decreased f(H) with reduced CO did not slow development rate but reduced embryonic

  9. The Role of Chronic Hypoxia in the Development of Neurocognitive Abnormalities in Preterm Infants with Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raman, Lakshmi; Georgieff, Michael K.; Rao, Raghavendra

    2006-01-01

    Bronchopulmonary dysplasia is the most common pulmonary morbidity in preterm infants and is associated with chronic hypoxia. Animal studies have demonstrated structural, neurochemical and functional alterations due to chronic hypoxia in the developing brain. Long-term impairments in visual-motor, gross and fine motor, articulation, reading,…

  10. Mending broken hearts: cardiac development as a basis for adult heart regeneration and repair

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Mei; Olson, Eric N.; Bassel-Duby, Rhonda

    2013-01-01

    As the adult mammalian heart has limited potential for regeneration and repair, the loss of cardiomyocytes during injury and disease can result in heart failure and death. The cellular processes and regulatory mechanisms involved in heart growth and development can be exploited to repair the injured adult heart through ‘reawakening’ pathways that are active during embryogenesis. Heart function has been restored in rodents by reprogramming non-myocytes into cardiomyocytes, by expressing transcription factors (GATA4, HAND2, myocyte-specific enhancer factor 2C (MEF2C) and T-box 5 (TBX5)) and microRNAs (miR-1, miR-133, miR-208 and miR-499) that control cardiomyocyte identity. Stimulating cardiomyocyte dedifferentiation and proliferation by activating mitotic signalling pathways involved in embryonic heart growth represents a complementary approach for heart regeneration and repair. Recent advances in understanding the mechanistic basis of heart development offer exciting opportunities for effective therapies for heart failure. PMID:23839576

  11. Low Cardiac Index is Associated with Incident Dementia and Alzheimer’s Disease: The Framingham Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    Jefferson, Angela L.; Beiser, Alexa S.; Himali, Jayandra J.; Seshadri, Sudha; O’Donnell, Christopher J.; Manning, Warren J.; Wolf, Philip A.; Au, Rhoda; Benjamin, Emelia J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Cross-sectional epidemiological and clinical research suggest lower cardiac index is associated with abnormal brain aging, including smaller brain volumes, increased white matter hyperintensities, and worse cognitive performances. Lower systemic blood flow may have implications for dementia among older adults. Methods & Results 1039 Framingham Offspring Cohort participants free from clinical stroke, transient ischemic attack, or dementia formed our sample (69±6 years; 53% women). Multivariable-adjusted proportional hazard models adjusting for Framingham Stroke Risk Profile score (age, sex, systolic blood pressure, anti-hypertensive medication, diabetes, cigarette smoking, cardiovascular disease [CVD] history, atrial fibrillation), education, and apolipoprotein E4 status related cardiac MRI-assessed cardiac index (cardiac output/body surface area) to incident all-cause dementia and Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Over the median 7.7 year follow-up period, 32 participants developed dementia, including 26 cases of AD. Each one standard deviation unit decrease in cardiac index increased the relative risk of both dementia (HR=1.66; 95% confidence intervals [CI], 1.11–2.47; p=0.013) and AD (HR=1.65; 95% CI, 1.07–2.54; p=0.022). Compared to normal cardiac index, individuals with clinically low cardiac index had a higher relative risk of dementia (HR=2.07; 95% CI, 1.02–4.19; p=0.044). If participants with clinically prevalent CVD and atrial fibrillation were excluded (n=184), individuals with clinically low cardiac index had a higher relative risk of both dementia (HR=2.92; 95% CI, 1.34–6.36; p=0.007) and AD (HR=2.87; 95% CI, 1.21–6.80; p=0.016) compared to individuals with normal cardiac index. Conclusions Lower cardiac index is associated with an increased risk for the development of dementia and AD. PMID:25700178

  12. Cardiac radiology: centenary review.

    PubMed

    de Roos, Albert; Higgins, Charles B

    2014-11-01

    During the past century, cardiac imaging technologies have revolutionized the diagnosis and treatment of acquired and congenital heart disease. Many important contributions to the field of cardiac imaging were initially reported in Radiology. The field developed from the early stages of cardiac imaging, including the use of coronary x-ray angiography and roentgen kymography, to nowadays the widely used echocardiographic, nuclear medicine, cardiac computed tomographic (CT), and magnetic resonance (MR) applications. It is surprising how many of these techniques were not recognized for their potential during their early inception. Some techniques were described in the literature but required many years to enter the clinical arena and presently continue to expand in terms of clinical application. The application of various CT and MR contrast agents for the diagnosis of myocardial ischemia is a case in point, as the utility of contrast agents continues to expand the noninvasive characterization of myocardium. The history of cardiac imaging has included a continuous process of advances in our understanding of the anatomy and physiology of the cardiovascular system, along with advances in imaging technology that continue to the present day.

  13. Cardiac and non-cardiac malformations produced by Mercury in hamsters. [None

    SciTech Connect

    Gale, T.F.

    1980-11-01

    The susceptibility of the developing mammalian embryo to the adverse effects of mercury is well documented. A variety of organic mercury compounds have been demonstrated to produce embryotoxic effects in experimental animals. HARADA recently summarized the reports of human intrauterine methylmercury poisoning, i.e., congenital Minamata disease, resulting from the ingestion of contaminated food. Ongoing studies in this laboratory have involved several different aspects of the embryotoxicity produced by inorganic mercury in hamsters including a dose response study, the interaction of mercuric acetate with cadmium and zinc, the effect of different routes of administration, the placental permeability of /sup 203/Hg and the embryotoxic response in several different hamster strains. Little is known regarding a human syndrome of congenital malformations characterized by ectopia cordis, internal cardiac defects and abnormalities of the diaphragm and ventral body wall. Most papers regarding this human syndrome are clinical reports describing the characteristics and management of specific cases; only speculative information is provided regarding etiology and possible embryopathic mechanisms. The observation that a similar syndrome, which will be designated CNC for cardiac and non-cardiac malformations, can be produced by mercury in hamsters prompted the present study. The specific goals of this study were 1) to study the effect of treating pregnant hamsters at different times during embryonic organogenesis to determine the time which produces the highest incidence of the CNC syndrome and whether different treatment times modify the morphological characteristics of the inclusive malformations and 2) to study the structural features of all mercury-induced external and internal abnormalities of the CNC syndrome in late gestation fetuses.

  14. Development of a Wearable Cardiac Monitoring System for Behavioral Neurocardiac Training: A Usability Study

    PubMed Central

    Morita, Plinio P; Tallevi, Kevin; Armour, Kevin; Li, John; Nolan, Robert P; Cafazzo, Joseph A

    2016-01-01

    Background Elevated blood pressure is one of the main risk factors for death globally. Behavioral neurocardiac training (BNT) is a complementary approach to blood pressure and stress management that is intended to exercise the autonomic reflexes, improve stress recovery, and lower blood pressure. BNT involves cognitive-behavioral therapy with a paced breathing technique and heart rate variability biofeedback. BNT is limited to in-clinic delivery and faces an accessibility barrier because of the need for clinical oversight and the use of complex monitoring tools. Objective The objective of this project was to design, develop, and evaluate a wearable electrocardiographic (ECG) sensor system for the delivery of BNT in a home setting. Methods The wearable sensor system, Beat, consists of an ECG sensor and a mobile app. It was developed iteratively using the principles of test-driven Agile development and user-centered design. A usability study was conducted at Toronto General Hospital to evaluate feasibility and user experience and identify areas of improvement. Results The Beatsensor was designed as a modular patch to be worn on the user’s chest and uses standard ECG electrodes. It streams a single-lead ECG wirelessly to a mobile phone using Bluetooth Low Energy. The use of small, low-power electronics, a low device profile, and a tapered enclosure allowed for a device that can be unobtrusively worn under clothing. The sensor was designed to operate with a mobile app that guides users through the BNT exercises to train them to a slow-paced breathing technique for stress recovery. The BNT app uses the ECG captured by the sensor to provide heart rate variability biofeedback in the form of a real-time heart rate waveform to complement and reinforce the impact of the training. Usability testing (n=6) indicated that the overall response to the design and user experience of the system was perceived positively. All participants indicated that the system had a positive

  15. Remotely Delivered Exercise-Based Cardiac Rehabilitation: Design and Content Development of a Novel mHealth Platform

    PubMed Central

    Gant, Nicholas; Meads, Andrew; Warren, Ian; Maddison, Ralph

    2016-01-01

    Background Participation in traditional center-based cardiac rehabilitation exercise programs (exCR) is limited by accessibility barriers. Mobile health (mHealth) technologies can overcome these barriers while preserving critical attributes of center-based exCR monitoring and coaching, but these opportunities have not yet been capitalized on. Objective We aimed to design and develop an evidence- and theory-based mHealth platform for remote delivery of exCR to any geographical location. Methods An iterative process was used to design and develop an evidence- and theory-based mHealth platform (REMOTE-CR) that provides real-time remote exercise monitoring and coaching, behavior change education, and social support. Results The REMOTE-CR platform comprises a commercially available smartphone and wearable sensor, custom smartphone and Web-based applications (apps), and a custom middleware. The platform allows exCR specialists to monitor patients’ exercise and provide individualized coaching in real-time, from almost any location, and provide behavior change education and social support. Intervention content incorporates Social Cognitive Theory, Self-determination Theory, and a taxonomy of behavior change techniques. Exercise components are based on guidelines for clinical exercise prescription. Conclusions The REMOTE-CR platform extends the capabilities of previous telehealth exCR platforms and narrows the gap between existing center- and home-based exCR services. REMOTE-CR can complement center-based exCR by providing an alternative option for patients whose needs are not being met. Remotely monitored exCR may be more cost-effective than establishing additional center-based programs. The effectiveness and acceptability of REMOTE-CR are now being evaluated in a noninferiority randomized controlled trial. PMID:27342791

  16. Identification of nickel response genes in abnormal early developments of sea urchin by differential display polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Tae Kwon; Lee, Gunsup; Rhee, Yong; Park, Heung-Sik; Chang, Man; Lee, Sukchan; Lee, Jaean; Lee, Taek-Kyun

    2012-10-01

    Bioassays and biomarkers have been previously developed to assess the effects of heavy metal contaminants on the early life stages of the sea urchin. In this study, malformation in the early developmental processes was observed in sea urchin (Strongylocentrotus intermedius) larvae exposed to 10 ppm Ni for over 30 h. The most critical stage at which the triggering of nickel effects takes place is thought to be the blastula stage, which occurs after fertilization in larval development. To investigate the molecular-level responses of sea urchin exposed to heavy metal stress and to explore the differentially expressed genes that are induced or repressed by nickel, differential display polymerase chain reaction (DD-PCR) was used with sea urchin mRNAs. The malformation-related genes expressed in the early life stages of the sea urchin were cloned from larvae exposed to 10 ppm of nickel for 15 h, and accessed via DD-PCR. Sequence analysis results revealed that each of the genes evidenced high homology with EGF2, PCSK9, serine/threonine protein kinase, apolipophorin precursor protein, and MGC80921 protein/transcript variant 2. This result may prove useful in the development of novel biomarkers for the assessment of heavy metal stresses on sea urchin embryos.

  17. Cardiac Rehabilitation

    MedlinePlus

    ... your risk of future heart problems, and to improve your health and quality of life. Cardiac rehabilitation programs increase ... exercise routine at home or at a local gym. You may also continue to ... health concerns. Education about nutrition, lifestyle and weight loss ...

  18. Choline or CDP-choline attenuates coagulation abnormalities and prevents the development of acute disseminated intravascular coagulation in dogs during endotoxemia.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Zeki; Ozarda, Yesim; Cansev, Mehmet; Eralp, Oya; Kocaturk, Meric; Ulus, Ismail H

    2010-06-01

    Sepsis/endotoxemia causes platelet dysfunctions, abnormalities in coagulation and hemostatic mechanisms leading to organ dysfunctions and mortality. Choline prevents organ injury and improves survival during endotoxemia. The main objective of the present study was to determine the effects of choline or cytidine-5'-diphosphocholine (CDP-choline) on endotoxin-induced activation of coagulation and development of disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). Dogs were treated intravenously (i.v.) with saline, choline (20 mg/kg), or CDP-choline (70 mg/kg) three times with 4-h intervals starting 5 min before i.v. injection of endotoxin (1 mg/kg). Platelet counts and functions, prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT), fibrinogen, coagulation factors, D-dimer and antithrombin (AT) were measured before and at 0.5-96 h after endotoxin. Circulating platelet, fibrinogen, coagulation factors and AT were decreased, whereas PT and aPTT were prolonged and serum D-dimer levels were elevated after endotoxin. Endotoxin-induced reductions in platelet counts and functions, fibrinogen, coagulation factors and AT were attenuated or blocked by choline or CDP-choline. Choline or CDP-choline blocked endotoxin-induced prolongation in PT and aPTT and enhancement in D-dimer. Elevated DIC scores were attenuated by choline and blocked by CDP-choline. Choline administration increased serum choline concentrations and caused bradycardia. Choline also increased choline and acetylcholine contents of circulating mononuclear cells and inhibited radioligand binding to their cholinergic receptors. These data show that choline administration, as choline chloride or CDP-choline, restores the abnormalities in the primary, secondary, and tertiary hemostasis and prevents the development of DIC during experimental endotoxemia in dogs probably by increasing both neuronal and non-neuronal cholinergic activity.

  19. Abnormalities of Endocytosis, Phagocytosis, and Development Process in Dictyostelium Cells That Over-Express Acanthamoeba castellanii Metacaspase Protein

    PubMed Central

    SAHEB, Entsar; TRZYNA, Wendy; MARINGER, Katherine; BUSH, John

    2015-01-01

    Background: Acanthamoeba castellanii forms a resistant cyst that protects the parasite against the host’s immune response. Acanthamoeba Type-I metacaspase (Acmcp) is a caspase-like protein that has been found to be expressed during the encystations. Dictyostelium discoideum is an organism closely related to Acanthamoeba useful for studying the molecular function of this protozoan caspase-like protein. Methods: The full length of Acmcp and a mutated version of the same gene, which lacks the proline rich N-terminal region (Acmcp-dpr), were cloned into the pDneo2a-GFP vector separately. The pDneo2a-GFP-Acmcp and pDneo2a-GFPAcmcp-dpr were electro-transfected into wild type D. discoideum cells to create cell lines that over-expressed Acmcp or Acmcp-dpr. Results: Both cell lines that over-expressed Acmcp and Acmcp-dpr showed a significant increase in the fluid phase internalization and phagocytosis rate compared to the control cells. Additionally, the cells expressing the Acmcp-dpr mutant were unable to initiate early development and failed to aggregate or form fruiting bodies under starvation conditions, whereas Acmcp over-expressing cells showed the opposite phenomena. Quantitative cell death analysis provided additional support for these findings. Conclusion: Acmcp is involved in the processes of endocytosis and phagocytosis. In addition, the proline rich region in Acmcp is important for cellular development in Dictyostelium. Given its important role in the development process, metacaspase protein is proposed as a candidate drug target against infections caused by A. castellanii. PMID:26246819

  20. PCB1254 exposure contributes to the abnormalities of optomotor responses and influence of the photoreceptor cell development in zebrafish larvae.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xin; Hong, Qin; Yang, Lei; Zhang, Min; Guo, Xirong; Chi, Xia; Tong, Meiling

    2015-08-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), a group of highly toxic environmental pollutants, have been report to influence the visual system development in children. However, the underlying mechanism is unclear. The study was aim to investigate the effects of continuous PCBs exposure on optomotor response (OMR) and retinal photoreceptor cell development-related gene expression in zebrafish larvae. The fertilized zebrafish embryos were exposed to PCBs at concentrations of 0.125, 0.25, 0.5, and 1mg/L until 7 days post-fertilization. Control groups with blank and 0.01% methanol were also prepared. OMR test was used to detect the visual behavior. The mRNA expression of the CRX, RHO, SWS1, and SWS2 was assessed by the Quantitative Real-Time PCR. The OMR test showed that the visual behavior of the larvae was most sensitive when the grating spatial frequency was 0.20LP/mm and the moving speed was 25cm/s. Moreover, the proportion of positively swimming fish was significantly reduced in the 0.5 and 1mg/L PCB1254 treatment group (P<0.05) compared with the controls. In addition, the expression of SWS2 was significantly down-regulated in all PCB1254 treatment groups (P<0.05), whereas the decreased expression of the CRX, RHO and SWS1 was found in the 0.5 and 1mg/L PCB1254 groups (P<0.05). This is the first report to demonstrate that continue exposure of zebrafish larvae to PCBs causes photoreceptor cell development-related gene expression changes that lead to OMR behavioral alterations. Analysis of these visual behavioral paradigms may be useful in predicting the adverse effects of toxicants on visual function in fish.

  1. Advanced Cardiac Life Support.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkwood Community Coll., Cedar Rapids, IA.

    This document contains materials for an advanced college course in cardiac life support developed for the State of Iowa. The course syllabus lists the course title, hours, number, description, prerequisites, learning activities, instructional units, required text, six references, evaluation criteria, course objectives by units, course…

  2. Predictors and long-term clinical outcomes of newly developed atrial fibrillation in patients with cardiac implantable electronic devices

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Bum Sung; Chun, Kwang Jin; Hwang, Jin kyung; Park, Seung-Jung; Park, Kyoung-Min; Kim, June Soo; On, Young Keun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To evaluate predictors and long-term prognosis of atrial fibrillation (AF) following cardiac implantable electronic device (CIED) implantation in patients without history of AF. Methods: From May 1994 to April 2014, 1825 patients with CIED were enrolled in a retrospective, single-center registry. A total of 880 patients from the registry without prior documented AF history were included in the final analysis and were placed into either non-detected AF (NDAF) group or CIED-detected AF group according to development of AF over a follow-up period of 7 years. AF development was defined as any paroxysmal atrial tachyarrhythmia (atrial rate ≥ 180 beats/min) lasting at least 5 minutes according to CIED records. Results: Overall, 122 (13.8%) of the 880 patients experienced new development of AF during follow-up period. According to multivariate analysis, the independent predictors for development of AF were prior heart failure (hazard ratio [HR], 2.40; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.50–3.85; P < 0.001), prior sinus node dysfunction (HR, 2.33; 95% CI, 1.62–3.55; P < 0.001), and left atrium volume index of 38.5 mL/m2 or more (HR, 2.01; 95% CI, 1.23–3.30; P = 0.005). In CDAF group, the risk of heart failure readmission (adjusted HR, 3.79; 95% CI, 1.99–7.22; P < 0.001) and stroke readmission (adjusted HR, 5.33; 95% CI, 1.58–17.97; P = 0.007) was higher than in nondetected AF group. Conclusion: In patients with CIED, prior history of heart failure, sinus node dysfunction, and LA volume index ≥38.5 mL/m2 were independent predictors of new AF cases. Newly developed AF was significantly associated with increased risk of HF and stroke readmission, according to long-term follow up. PMID:27428213

  3. N-acetylcysteine attenuates the development of cardiac fibrosis and remodeling in a mouse model of heart failure.

    PubMed

    Giam, Beverly; Chu, Po-Yin; Kuruppu, Sanjaya; Smith, A Ian; Horlock, Duncan; Kiriazis, Helen; Du, Xiao-Jun; Kaye, David M; Rajapakse, Niwanthi W

    2016-04-0