Science.gov

Sample records for abnormal cerebral glucose

  1. The effects of abnormalities of glucose homeostasis on the expression and binding of muscarinic receptors in cerebral cortex of rats.

    PubMed

    Sherin, Antony; Peeyush, Kumar T; Naijil, George; Nandhu, Mohan Sobhana; Jayanarayanan, Sadanandan; Jes, Paul; Paulose, Cheramadathikudiyil Skaria

    2011-01-25

    Glucose homeostasis in humans is an important factor for the functioning of nervous system. Both hypo and hyperglycemia contributes to neuronal functional deficit. In the present study, effect of insulin induced hypoglycemia and streptozotocin induced diabetes on muscarinic receptor binding, cholinergic enzymes; AChE, ChAT expression and GLUT3 in the cerebral cortex of experimental rats were analysed. Total muscarinic, muscarinic M(1) receptor showed a significant decrease and muscarinic M(3) receptor subtype showed a significant increased binding in the cerebral cortex of hypoglycemic rats compared to diabetic and control. Real-Time PCR analysis of muscarinic M(1), M(3) receptor subtypes confirmed the receptor binding studies. Immunohistochemistry of muscarinic M(1), M(3) receptors using specific antibodies were also carried out. AChE and GLUT3 expression up regulated and ChAT expression down regulated in hypoglycemic rats compared to diabetic and control rats. Our results showed that hypo/hyperglycemia caused impaired glucose transport in neuronal cells as shown by altered expression of GLUT3. Increased AChE and decreased ChAT expression is suggested to alter cortical acetylcholine metabolism in experimental rats along with altered muscarinic receptor binding in hypo/hyperglycemic rats, impair cholinergic transmission, which subsequently lead to cholinergic dysfunction thereby causing learning and memory deficits. We observed a prominent cholinergic functional disturbance in hypoglycemic condition than in hyperglycemia. Hypoglycemia exacerbated the neurochemical changes in cerebral cortex induced by hyperglycemia. These findings have implications for both therapy and identification of causes contributing to neuronal dysfunction in diabetes. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Regional cerebral glucose metabolic abnormality in Prader-Willi syndrome: A 18F-FDG PET study under sedation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang Eun; Jin, Dong-Kyu; Cho, Sang Soo; Kim, Ji-Hae; Hong, Sungdo David; Paik, Kyung Hoon; Oh, Yoo Joung; Kim, An Hee; Kwon, Eun Kyung; Choe, Yon Ho

    2006-07-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is a genetic disorder caused by the nonexpression of paternal genes in the PWS region of chromosome 15q11-13 and is the most common cause of human syndromic obesity. We investigated regional brain metabolic impairment in children with PWS by 18F-FDG PET. Sixteen children with PWS (9 males, 7 females; mean age +/- SD, 4.2 +/- 1.1 y) and 7 healthy children (4 males, 3 females; mean age +/- SD, 4.0 +/- 1.7 y) underwent brain 18F-FDG PET in the resting state. The images of PWS children were compared using statistical parametric mapping analysis with those of healthy children in a voxelwise manner. Group comparison showed that children with PWS had decreased glucose metabolism in the right superior temporal gyrus and left cerebellar vermis, regions that are associated with taste perception/food reward and cognitive and emotional function, respectively. Metabolism was increased in the right orbitofrontal, bilateral middle frontal, right inferior frontal, left superior frontal, and bilateral anterior cingulate gyri, right temporal pole, and left uncus, regions that are involved in cognitive functions related to eating or obsessive-compulsive behavior. Interestingly, no significant metabolic abnormality was found in the hypothalamus, the brain region believed to be most involved in energy intake and expenditure. This study describes the neural substrate underlying the abnormal eating behavior and psychobehavioral problems of PWS.

  3. Cholangiocarcinoma associated with limbic encephalitis and early cerebral abnormalities detected by 2-deoxy-2-[fluorine-18]fluoro-D-glucose integrated with computed tomography-positron emission tomography: a case report.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Sergio L; Schmidt, Juliana J; Tolentino, Julio C; Ferreira, Carlos G; de Almeida, Sergio A; Alvarenga, Regina P; Simoes, Eunice N; Schmidt, Guilherme J; Canedo, Nathalie H S; Chimelli, Leila

    2016-07-20

    Limbic encephalitis was originally described as a rare clinical neuropathological entity involving seizures and neuropsychological disturbances. In this report, we describe cerebral patterns visualized by positron emission tomography in a patient with limbic encephalitis and cholangiocarcinoma. To our knowledge, there is no other description in the literature of cerebral positron emission tomography findings in the setting of limbic encephalitis and subsequent diagnosis of cholangiocarcinoma. We describe a case of a 77-year-old Caucasian man who exhibited persistent cognitive changes 2 years before his death. A cerebral scan obtained at that time by 2-deoxy-2-[fluorine-18]fluoro- D -glucose integrated with computed tomography-positron emission tomography showed low radiotracer uptake in the frontal and temporal lobes. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis indicated the presence of voltage-gated potassium channel antibodies. Three months before the patient's death, a lymph node biopsy indicated a cholangiocarcinoma, and a new cerebral scan obtained by 2-deoxy-2-[fluorine-18]fluoro-D-glucose integrated with computed tomography-positron emission tomography showed an increment in the severity of metabolic deficit in the frontal and parietal lobes, as well as hypometabolism involving the temporal lobes. Two months before the patient's death, cerebral metastases were detected on a contrast-enhanced computed tomographic scan. Postmortem examination revealed a cholangiocarcinoma with multiple metastases including the lungs and lymph nodes. The patient's brain weighed 1300 g, and mild cortical atrophy, ex vacuo dilation of the ventricles, and mild focal thickening of the cerebellar leptomeninges, which were infiltrated by neoplastic epithelial cells, were observed. These findings support the need for continued vigilance in malignancy surveillance in patients with limbic encephalitis and early cerebral positron emission tomographic scan abnormalities. The difficulty in early

  4. Cerebral glucose deficiency versus oxygen deficiency in neonatal encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Rudolph, A M

    2018-04-24

    Hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) in newborn infants is generally considered to result from decreased arterial oxygen content or cerebral blood flow. Cerebral injury similar to that of HIE has been noted with hypoglycemia. Studies in fetal lambs have shown that ventilation with 3% oxygen did not change cerebral blood flow, but ventilation with 100% oxygen resulted in marked reduction in cerebral blood flow, glucose delivery and glucose consumption. Blood glucose concentration falls markedly after birth; this, associated with the fall in cerebral blood flow, greatly reduces glucose supply to the brain. In preterm infants, blood glucose levels tend to be very low. Also persistent patency of the ductus arteriosus may reduce cerebral flow in diastole, thus exaggerating the decrease in glucose supply. I propose that glycopenic-ischemic encephalopathy is a more appropriate term for the cerebral insult. We should consider more aggressive management of the low blood glucose concentrations in the neonate, and particularly in preterm infants. Administration of high levels of oxygen in inspired air should be avoided to reduce the enhancement of cerebral vasoconstriction and decreased flow that normally occurs after birth.

  5. Patterns of human local cerebral glucose metabolism during epileptic seizures

    SciTech Connect

    Engel, J. Jr.; Kuhl, D.E.; Phelps, M.E.

    1982-10-01

    Ictal patterns of local cerebral metabolic rate have been studied in epileptic patients by positron computed tomography with /sup 18/F-labeled 2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose. Partial seizures were associated with activation of anatomic structures unique to each patient studied. Ictal increases and decreases in local cerebral metabolism were observed. Scans performed during generalized convulsions induced by electroshock demonstrated a diffuse ictal increase and postictal decrease in cerebral metabolism. Petit mal absences were associated with a diffuse increase in cerebral metabolic rate. The ictal fluorodeoxyglucose patterns obtained from patients do not resemble autoradiographic patterns obtained from common experimental animal models of epilepsy.

  6. Epileptiform abnormalities predict delayed cerebral ischemia in subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Kim, J A; Rosenthal, E S; Biswal, S; Zafar, S; Shenoy, A V; O'Connor, K L; Bechek, S C; Valdery Moura, J; Shafi, M M; Patel, A B; Cash, S S; Westover, M B

    2017-06-01

    To identify whether abnormal neural activity, in the form of epileptiform discharges and rhythmic or periodic activity, which we term here ictal-interictal continuum abnormalities (IICAs), are associated with delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI). Retrospective analysis of continuous electroencephalography (cEEG) reports and medical records from 124 patients with moderate to severe grade subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). We identified daily occurrence of seizures and IICAs. Using survival analysis methods, we estimated the cumulative probability of IICA onset time for patients with and without delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI). Our data suggest the presence of IICAs indeed increases the risk of developing DCI, especially when they begin several days after the onset of SAH. We found that all IICA types except generalized rhythmic delta activity occur more commonly in patients who develop DCI. In particular, IICAs that begin later in hospitalization correlate with increased risk of DCI. IICAs represent a new marker for identifying early patients at increased risk for DCI. Moreover, IICAs might contribute mechanistically to DCI and therefore represent a new potential target for intervention to prevent secondary cerebral injury following SAH. These findings imply that IICAs may be a novel marker for predicting those at higher risk for DCI development. Copyright © 2017 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Tissue signature characterisation of diffusion tensor abnormalities in cerebral gliomas.

    PubMed

    Price, Stephen J; Peña, Alonso; Burnet, Neil G; Jena, Raj; Green, Hadrian A L; Carpenter, T Adrian; Pickard, John D; Gillard, Jonathan H

    2004-10-01

    The inherent invasiveness of malignant cells is a major determinant of the poor prognosis of cerebral gliomas. Diffusion tensor MRI (DTI) can identify white matter abnormalities in gliomas that are not seen on conventional imaging. By breaking down DTI into its isotropic (p) and anisotropic (q) components, we can determine tissue diffusion "signatures". In this study we have characterised these abnormalities in peritumoural white matter tracts. Thirty-five patients with cerebral gliomas and seven normal volunteers were imaged with DTI and T2-weighted sequences at 3 T. Displaced, infiltrated and disrupted white matter tracts were identified using fractional anisotropy (FA) maps and directionally encoded colour maps and characterised using tissue signatures. The diffusion tissue signatures were normal in ROIs where the white matter was displaced. Infiltrated white matter was characterised by an increase in the isotropic component of the tensor (p) and a less marked reduction of the anisotropic component (q). In disrupted white matter tracts, there was a marked reduction in q and increase in p. The direction of water diffusion was grossly abnormal in these cases. Diffusion tissue signatures may be a useful method of assessing occult white matter infiltration. Copyright 2004 Springer-Verlag

  8. Glucose abnormalities in Asian patients with chronic hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Bo, Qingyan; Orsenigo, Roberto; Wang, Junyi; Griffel, Louis; Brass, Clifford

    2015-01-01

    Many studies have demonstrated a potential association between type 2 diabetes (T2D) and hepatitis C virus infection in Western countries, while similar evidence is limited in Asia. We compared the prevalence of glucose abnormalities (impaired fasting glucose [IFG] and T2D) and their risk factors between Asian and non-Asian chronic hepatitis C (CHC) patients, and evaluated whether glucose abnormalities impacted the viral responses to peginterferon plus ribavirin treatment (current standard of care in most Asian countries). This study retrospectively analyzed data of 1,887 CHC patients from three Phase II/III studies with alisporivir (DEB025) as treatment for CHC. The chi-square test was used to compare the prevalence of IFG/T2D between Asian and non-Asian CHC patients, and logistic regression was used to adjust for sex, age, and cirrhosis status. Risk factors for IFG/T2D were evaluated using univariate and multivariate analysis. Our results indicated that the prevalence of IFG/T2D was high in both Asian and non-Asian CHC patients (23.0% vs 20.9%), and no significant difference was found between these two populations (adjusted odds ratio: 1.3, 95% confidence interval: 0.97, 1.7; P=0.08). Age, sex, and cirrhosis status were risk factors for IFG/T2D in both populations, while body mass index was positively associated with IFG/T2D in non-Asian but not in Asian participants. No significant differences in sustained virological response rates were seen between patients with normal fasting glucose and patients with IFG/T2D for both populations. These results demonstrate that the prevalence of glucose abnormalities in Asian CHC patients was similar to that in non-Asians, and glucose abnormalities had no impact on viral response to peginterferon plus ribavirin.

  9. Glucose abnormalities in Asian patients with chronic hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Bo, Qingyan; Orsenigo, Roberto; Wang, Junyi; Griffel, Louis; Brass, Clifford

    2015-01-01

    Many studies have demonstrated a potential association between type 2 diabetes (T2D) and hepatitis C virus infection in Western countries, while similar evidence is limited in Asia. We compared the prevalence of glucose abnormalities (impaired fasting glucose [IFG] and T2D) and their risk factors between Asian and non-Asian chronic hepatitis C (CHC) patients, and evaluated whether glucose abnormalities impacted the viral responses to peginterferon plus ribavirin treatment (current standard of care in most Asian countries). This study retrospectively analyzed data of 1,887 CHC patients from three Phase II/III studies with alisporivir (DEB025) as treatment for CHC. The chi-square test was used to compare the prevalence of IFG/T2D between Asian and non-Asian CHC patients, and logistic regression was used to adjust for sex, age, and cirrhosis status. Risk factors for IFG/T2D were evaluated using univariate and multivariate analysis. Our results indicated that the prevalence of IFG/T2D was high in both Asian and non-Asian CHC patients (23.0% vs 20.9%), and no significant difference was found between these two populations (adjusted odds ratio: 1.3, 95% confidence interval: 0.97, 1.7; P=0.08). Age, sex, and cirrhosis status were risk factors for IFG/T2D in both populations, while body mass index was positively associated with IFG/T2D in non-Asian but not in Asian participants. No significant differences in sustained virological response rates were seen between patients with normal fasting glucose and patients with IFG/T2D for both populations. These results demonstrate that the prevalence of glucose abnormalities in Asian CHC patients was similar to that in non-Asians, and glucose abnormalities had no impact on viral response to peginterferon plus ribavirin. PMID:26609222

  10. Correlations between cerebral glucose metabolism and neuropsychological test performance in nonalcoholic cirrhotics.

    PubMed

    Lockwood, Alan H; Weissenborn, Karin; Bokemeyer, Martin; Tietge, U; Burchert, Wolfgang

    2002-03-01

    Many cirrhotics have abnormal neuropsychological test scores. To define the anatomical-physiological basis for encephalopathy in nonalcoholic cirrhotics, we performed resting-state fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomographic scans and administered a neuropsychological test battery to 18 patients and 10 controls. Statistical parametric mapping correlated changes in regional glucose metabolism with performance on the individual tests and a composite battery score. In patients without overt encephalopathy, poor performance correlated with reductions in metabolism in the anterior cingulate. In all patients, poor performance on the battery was positively correlated (p < 0.001) with glucose metabolism in bifrontal and biparietal regions of the cerebral cortex and negatively correlated with metabolism in hippocampal, lingual, and fusiform gyri and the posterior putamen. Similar patterns of abnormal metabolism were found when comparing the patients to 10 controls. Metabolic abnormalities in the anterior attention system and association cortices mediating executive and integrative function form the pathophysiological basis for mild hepatic encephalopathy.

  11. Abnormal oral glucose tolerance and glucose malabsorption after vagotomy and pyloroplasty. A tracer method for measuring glucose absorption rates

    SciTech Connect

    Radziuk, J.; Bondy, D.C.

    1982-11-01

    The mechanisms underlying the abnormal glucose tolerance in patients who had undergone vagotomy and pyloroplasty were investigated by measuring the rates of absorption of ingested glucose and the clearance rate of glucose using tracer methods. These methods are based on labeling a 100-g oral glucose load with (1-/sup 14/C)glucose and measuring glucose clearance using plasma levels of infused (3-/sup 3/H)glucose. The rate of appearance of both ingested and total glucose is then calculated continuously using a two-compartment model of glucose kinetics. It was found that about 30% of the ingested glucose (100 g) failed to appear in the systemic circulation.more » That this was due to malabsorption was confirmed using breath-hydrogen analysis. The absorption period is short (101 +/- 11 min) compared with normal values but the clearance of glucose is identical to that in control subjects, and it peaks 132 +/- 7 min after glucose loading. The peak plasma insulin values were more than four times higher in patients than in normal subjects, and this may afford an explanation of rates of glucose clearance that are inappropriate for the short absorption period. The combination of glucose malabsorption and this clearance pattern could yield the hypoglycemia that may be observed in patients after gastric surgery.« less

  12. Abnormal regional cerebral blood flow in childhood autism.

    PubMed

    Ohnishi, T; Matsuda, H; Hashimoto, T; Kunihiro, T; Nishikawa, M; Uema, T; Sasaki, M

    2000-09-01

    Neuroimaging studies of autism have shown abnormalities in the limbic system and cerebellar circuits and additional sites. These findings are not, however, specific or consistent enough to build up a coherent theory of the origin and nature of the brain abnormality in autistic patients. Twenty-three children with infantile autism and 26 non-autistic controls matched for IQ and age were examined using brain-perfusion single photon emission computed tomography with technetium-99m ethyl cysteinate dimer. In autistic subjects, we assessed the relationship between regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and symptom profiles. Images were anatomically normalized, and voxel-by-voxel analyses were performed. Decreases in rCBF in autistic patients compared with the control group were identified in the bilateral insula, superior temporal gyri and left prefrontal cortices. Analysis of the correlations between syndrome scores and rCBF revealed that each syndrome was associated with a specific pattern of perfusion in the limbic system and the medial prefrontal cortex. The results confirmed the associations of (i) impairments in communication and social interaction that are thought to be related to deficits in the theory of mind (ToM) with altered perfusion in the medial prefrontal cortex and anterior cingulate gyrus, and (ii) the obsessive desire for sameness with altered perfusion in the right medial temporal lobe. The perfusion abnormalities seem to be related to the cognitive dysfunction observed in autism, such as deficits in ToM, abnormal responses to sensory stimuli, and the obsessive desire for sameness. The perfusion patterns suggest possible locations of abnormalities of brain function underlying abnormal behaviour patterns in autistic individuals.

  13. Selective cerebral perfusion prevents abnormalities in glutamate cycling and neuronal apoptosis in a model of infant deep hypothermic circulatory arrest and reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Kajimoto, Masaki; Ledee, Dolena R; Olson, Aaron K; Isern, Nancy G; Robillard-Frayne, Isabelle; Des Rosiers, Christine; Portman, Michael A

    2016-11-01

    Deep hypothermic circulatory arrest is often required for the repair of complex congenital cardiac defects in infants. However, deep hypothermic circulatory arrest induces neuroapoptosis associated with later development of neurocognitive abnormalities. Selective cerebral perfusion theoretically provides superior neural protection possibly through modifications in cerebral substrate oxidation and closely integrated glutamate cycling. We tested the hypothesis that selective cerebral perfusion modulates glucose utilization, and ameliorates abnormalities in glutamate flux, which occur in association with neuroapoptosis during deep hypothermic circulatory arrest. Eighteen infant male Yorkshire piglets were assigned randomly to two groups of seven (deep hypothermic circulatory arrest or deep hypothermic circulatory arrest with selective cerebral perfusion for 60 minutes at 18℃) and four control pigs without cardiopulmonary bypass support. Carbon-13-labeled glucose as a metabolic tracer was infused, and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance were used for metabolic analysis in the frontal cortex. Following 2.5 h of cerebral reperfusion, we observed similar cerebral adenosine triphosphate levels, absolute levels of lactate and citric acid cycle intermediates, and carbon-13 enrichment among three groups. However, deep hypothermic circulatory arrest induced significant abnormalities in glutamate cycling resulting in reduced glutamate/glutamine and elevated γ-aminobutyric acid/glutamate along with neuroapoptosis, which were all prevented by selective cerebral perfusion. The data suggest that selective cerebral perfusion prevents these modifications in glutamate/glutamine/γ-aminobutyric acid cycling and protects the cerebral cortex from apoptosis. © The Author(s) 2016.

  14. Local cerebral glucose utilization during status epilepticus in newborn primates

    SciTech Connect

    Fujikawa, D.G.; Dwyer, B.E.; Lake, R.R.

    1989-06-01

    The effect of bicuculline-induced status epilepticus (SE) on local cerebral metabolic rates for glucose (LCMRglc) was studied in 2-wk-old ketamine-anesthetized marmoset monkeys, using the 2-(/sup 14/C)-deoxy-D-glucose autoradiographical technique. To estimate LCMRglc in cerebral cortex and thalamus during SE, the lumped constant (LC) for 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG) and the rate constants for 2-DG and glucose were calculated for these regions. The control LC was 0.43 in frontoparietal cortex, 0.51 in temporal cortex, and 0.50 in thalamus; it increased to 1.07 in frontoparietal cortex, 1.13 in temporal cortex, and 1.25 in thalamus after 30 min of seizures. With control LC values, LCMRglc inmore » frontoparietal cortex, temporal cortex, and dorsomedial thalamus appeared to increase four to sixfold. With seizure LC values, LCMRglc increased 1.5- to 2-fold and only in cortex. During 45-min seizures, LCMRglc in cortex and thalamus probably increases 4- to 6-fold initially and later falls to the 1.5- to 2-fold level as tissue glucose concentrations decrease. Together with our previous results demonstrating depletion of high-energy phosphates and glucose in these regions, the data suggest that energy demands exceed glucose supply. The long-term effects of these metabolic changes on the developing brain remain to be determined.« less

  15. Sodium transport through the cerebral sodium-glucose transporter exacerbates neuron damage during cerebral ischaemia.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Yui; Harada, Shinichi; Wada, Tetsuyuki; Yoshida, Shigeru; Tokuyama, Shogo

    2016-07-01

    We recently demonstrated that the cerebral sodium-glucose transporter (SGLT) is involved in postischaemic hyperglycaemia-induced exacerbation of cerebral ischaemia. However, the associated SGLT-mediated mechanisms remain unclear. Thus, we examined the involvement of cerebral SGLT-induced excessive sodium ion influx in the development of cerebral ischaemic neuronal damage. [Na+]i was estimated according to sodium-binding benzofuran isophthalate fluorescence. In the in vitro study, primary cortical neurons were prepared from fetuses of ddY mice. Primary cortical neurons were cultured for 5 days before each treatment with reagents, and these survival rates were assessed using biochemical assays. In in vivo study, a mouse model of focal ischaemia was generated using middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). In these experiments, treatment with high concentrations of glucose induced increment in [Na+]i, and this phenomenon was suppressed by the SGLT-specific inhibitor phlorizin. SGLT-specific sodium ion influx was induced using a-methyl-D-glucopyranoside (a-MG) treatments, which led to significant concentration-dependent declines in neuronal survival rates and exacerbated hydrogen peroxide-induced neuronal cell death. Moreover, phlorizin ameliorated these effects. Finally, intracerebroventricular administration of a-MG exacerbated the development of neuronal damage induced by MCAO, and these effects were ameliorated by the administration of phlorizin. Hence, excessive influx of sodium ions into neuronal cells through cerebral SGLT may exacerbate the development of cerebral ischaemic neuronal damage. © 2016 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  16. Allocation of systemic glucose output to cerebral utilization as a function of fetal canine growth.

    PubMed

    Huang, M M; Kliegman, R M; Trindade, C; Kall, D; Voelker, K

    1988-05-01

    To determine whether the neonatal canine brain consumes a major proportion of the systemic glucose production, we investigated the cerebral glucose requirement and hepatic glucose production in beagle pups. Sixteen pups received D-[6-3H]-glucose to determine systemic glucose production. Cerebral blood flow was measured by [N-methyl-14C]antipyrine, and the brain uptake index (BUI) of glucose was determined using 2-[14C]deoxy-D-glucose. Glucose production was 49.6 +/- 11.0 mumol.kg-1.min-1. Cerebral blood flow was 0.83 ml.g-1.min-1; cerebral uptake of glucose was 0.60 +/- 0.15 mumol.g-1.min-1. Of the total glucose production 36.6 +/- 7.9% was accounted for by the cerebral uptake of glucose. Brain-to-body weight and brain-to-liver weight ratios were the greatest in the smallest pups, suggesting brain sparing. The effect of growth status on cerebral substrate availability could not be correlated with cerebral uptake of glucose or oxygen or with systemic glucose production. However, the percentage of systemic glucose production allotted to the cerebral cortex increased with increasing body weight (r = 0.50, P less than 0.05). Cerebral glucose entry measured by BUI was demonstrated to be 0.108 +/- 0.014; BUI inversely correlated with canine birth weight (r = -0.832, P less than 0.001). We conclude that the percentage of glucose production utilized by the neonatal canine brain is not proportionately larger in the smaller pups despite a proportionately larger brain. Because the absolute cerebral glucose utilization may be static, we speculate that BUI (glucose entry) may be less of a rate-limiting factor for cerebral glucose entry in the smallest pups.

  17. Psychosocial stress predicts abnormal glucose metabolism: the Australian Diabetes, Obesity and Lifestyle (AusDiab) study.

    PubMed

    Williams, Emily D; Magliano, Dianna J; Tapp, Robyn J; Oldenburg, Brian F; Shaw, Jonathan E

    2013-08-01

    The evidence supporting a relationship between stress and diabetes has been inconsistent. This study examined the effects of stress on abnormal glucose metabolism, using a population-based sample of 3,759, with normoglycemia at baseline, from the Australian Diabetes, Obesity and Lifestyle study. Perceived stress and stressful life events were measured at baseline, with health behavior and anthropometric information also collected. Oral glucose tolerance tests were undertaken at baseline and 5-year follow-up. The primary outcome was the development of abnormal glucose metabolism (impaired fasting glucose, impaired glucose tolerance, and type 2 diabetes), according to WHO 1999 criteria. Perceived stress predicted incident abnormal glucose metabolism in women but not men, after multivariate adjustment. Life events showed an inconsistent relationship with abnormal glucose metabolism. Perceived stress predicted abnormal glucose metabolism in women. Healthcare professionals should consider psychosocial adversity when assessing risk factor profiles for the development of diabetes.

  18. Mood disturbances and regional cerebral metabolic abnormalities in recently abstinent methamphetamine abusers.

    PubMed

    London, Edythe D; Simon, Sara L; Berman, Steven M; Mandelkern, Mark A; Lichtman, Aaron M; Bramen, Jennifer; Shinn, Ann K; Miotto, Karen; Learn, Jennifer; Dong, Yun; Matochik, John A; Kurian, Varughese; Newton, Thomas; Woods, Roger; Rawson, Richard; Ling, Walter

    2004-01-01

    Mood disturbances in methamphetamine (MA) abusers likely influence drug use, but the neurobiological bases for these problems are poorly understood. To assess regional brain function and its possible relationships with negative affect in newly abstinent MA abusers. Two groups were compared by measures of mood and cerebral glucose metabolism ([18F]fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography) during performance of a vigilance task. Participants were recruited from the general community to a research center. Seventeen abstaining (4-7 days) MA abusers (6 women) were compared with 18 control subjects (8 women). Self-reports of depressive symptoms and anxiety were measured, as were global and relative glucose metabolism in the orbitofrontal, cingulate, lateral prefrontal, and insular cortices and the amygdala, striatum, and cerebellum. Abusers of MA provided higher self-ratings of depression and anxiety than control subjects and differed significantly in relative regional glucose metabolism: lower in the anterior cingulate and insula and higher in the lateral orbitofrontal area, middle and posterior cingulate, amygdala, ventral striatum, and cerebellum. In MA abusers, self-reports of depressive symptoms covaried positively with relative glucose metabolism in limbic regions (eg, perigenual anterior cingulate gyrus and amygdala) and ratings of state and trait anxiety covaried negatively with relative activity in the anterior cingulate cortex and left insula. Trait anxiety also covaried negatively with relative activity in the orbitofrontal cortex and positively with amygdala activity. Abusers of MA have abnormalities in brain regions implicated in mood disorders. Relationships between relative glucose metabolism in limbic and paralimbic regions and self-reports of depression and anxiety in MA abusers suggest that these regions are involved in affective dysregulation and may be an important target of intervention for MA dependence.

  19. Assessment of Specific Characteristics of Abnormal General Movements: Does It Enhance the Prediction of Cerebral Palsy?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamer, Elisa G.; Bos, Arend F.; Hadders-Algra, Mijna

    2011-01-01

    Aim: Abnormal general movements at around 3 months corrected age indicate a high risk of cerebral palsy (CP). We aimed to determine whether specific movement characteristics can improve the predictive power of definitely abnormal general movements. Method: Video recordings of 46 infants with definitely abnormal general movements at 9 to 13 weeks…

  20. Serotonin Modulation of Cerebral Glucose Metabolism in Depressed Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Gwenn S.; Kramer, Elisse; Hermann, Carol.; Ma, Yilong; Dhawan, Vijay; Chaly, Thomas; Eidelberg, David

    2009-01-01

    Background Monoamine dysfunction, particularly of the serotonin system, has been the dominant hypothesis guiding research and treatment development in affective disorders. The majority of research has been performed in mid-life depressed adults. The importance of understanding the neurobiology of depression in older adults is underscored by increased rates of mortality and completed suicide and an increased risk of Alzheimer's dementia. To evaluate the dynamic response of the serotonin system, the acute effects of citalopram infusion on cerebral glucose metabolism was measured in depressed older adults and control subjects. The hypothesis was tested that smaller decreases in metabolism would be observed in cortical and limbic regions in depressed older adults relative to controls. Methods Sixteen depressed older adults and thirteen controls underwent two resting Positron Emission Tomography (PET) studies with the radiotracer [18F]-2-deoxy-2-fluoro-D-glucose after placebo and citalopram infusions. Results In controls compared to depressed older adults, greater citalopram induced decreases in cerebral metabolism were observed in the right anterior cingulate, middle temporal (bilaterally), left precuneus, and left parahippocampal gyri. Greater decreases in the depressed older adults than controls was observed in left superior and left middle frontal gyri and increases in left inferior parietal lobule, left cuneus, left thalamus and right putamen. Conclusion In depressed older adults relative to controls, the cerebral metabolic response to citalopram is blunted in cortico-cortico and cortico-limbic pathways and increased in the left hemisphere (greater decrease interiorly and increases posterior). These findings suggest both blunted and compensatory cerebral metabolic responses to citalopram in depressed older adults. PMID:19368900

  1. Exenatide Regulates Cerebral Glucose Metabolism in Brain Areas Associated With Glucose Homeostasis and Reward System.

    PubMed

    Daniele, Giuseppe; Iozzo, Patricia; Molina-Carrion, Marjorie; Lancaster, Jack; Ciociaro, Demetrio; Cersosimo, Eugenio; Tripathy, Devjit; Triplitt, Curtis; Fox, Peter; Musi, Nicolas; DeFronzo, Ralph; Gastaldelli, Amalia

    2015-10-01

    Glucagon-like peptide 1 receptors (GLP-1Rs) have been found in the brain, but whether GLP-1R agonists (GLP-1RAs) influence brain glucose metabolism is currently unknown. The study aim was to evaluate the effects of a single injection of the GLP-1RA exenatide on cerebral and peripheral glucose metabolism in response to a glucose load. In 15 male subjects with HbA1c of 5.7 ± 0.1%, fasting glucose of 114 ± 3 mg/dL, and 2-h glucose of 177 ± 11 mg/dL, exenatide (5 μg) or placebo was injected in double-blind, randomized fashion subcutaneously 30 min before an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). The cerebral glucose metabolic rate (CMRglu) was measured by positron emission tomography after an injection of [(18)F]2-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose before the OGTT, and the rate of glucose absorption (RaO) and disposal was assessed using stable isotope tracers. Exenatide reduced RaO0-60 min (4.6 ± 1.4 vs. 13.1 ± 1.7 μmol/min ⋅ kg) and decreased the rise in mean glucose0-60 min (107 ± 6 vs. 138 ± 8 mg/dL) and insulin0-60 min (17.3 ± 3.1 vs. 24.7 ± 3.8 mU/L). Exenatide increased CMRglu in areas of the brain related to glucose homeostasis, appetite, and food reward, despite lower plasma insulin concentrations, but reduced glucose uptake in the hypothalamus. Decreased RaO0-60 min after exenatide was inversely correlated to CMRglu. In conclusion, these results demonstrate, for the first time in man, a major effect of a GLP-1RA on regulation of brain glucose metabolism in the absorptive state. © 2015 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  2. Self-reported fatigue common among optimally treated HIV patients: no correlation with cerebral FDG-PET scanning abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Ase B; Law, Ian; Ostrowski, Sisse R; Lebech, Anne Mette; Høyer-Hansen, Gunilla; Højgaard, Liselotte; Gerstoft, Jan; Ullum, Henrik; Kjaer, Andreas

    2006-01-01

    It was the aim of this study to determine the prevalence and severity of fatigue among optimally treated HIV patients and to investigate the potential association with systemic inflammation and abnormalities of the distribution of cerebral glucose metabolism. A cohort of HIV patients (n = 95), known to be HIV positive for 5 years, on anti-retroviral therapy for a minimum of 3 years and with CD4 counts above 0.2 x 10(9) cells/l, completed a validated fatigue inventory, and plasma was analysed for pro-inflammatory markers including tumour necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin 6 and soluble urokinase receptor (suPAR) levels. The distribution of the regional cerebral metabolic rate of glucose was measured in a sub-group of patients suffering from severe fatigue (n = 9) and a group with no fatigue (n = 7) using fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) scanning. Fifteen percent suffered from severe fatigue, but no association with pro-inflammatory markers was found. About 50% of the FDG-PET-scanned patients showed minor abnormalities in the relative cerebral metabolic rate of glucose. These abnormalities were not associated with fatigue but tended to correlate with a short HIV history (p = 0.058), a low CD4 nadir (p = 0.082) and elevated tumour necrosis factor-alpha levels (p = 0.074). Fatigue is common among optimally treated HIV patients. FDG-PET-described signs of imminent neurodegeneration among HIV patients who had a low CD4 nadir may illustrate an aspect of HIV neuropathogenicity.

  3. Selective cerebral perfusion prevents abnormalities in glutamate cycling and neuronal apoptosis in a model of infant deep hypothermic circulatory arrest and reperfusion

    SciTech Connect

    Kajimoto, Masaki; Ledee, Dolena R.; Olson, Aaron K.

    Rationale: Deep hypothermic circulatory arrest (DHCA) is often required for the repair of complex congenital cardiac defects in infants. However, DHCA induces neuroapoptosis associated with later development of neurocognitive abnormalities. Selective cerebral perfusion (SCP) theoretically provides superior neural protection possibly through modifications in cerebral substrate oxidation and closely integrated glutamate cycling. Objectives: We tested the hypothesis that SCP modulates glucose entry into the citric acid cycle, and ameliorates abnormalities in glutamate flux which occur in association neuroapoptosis during DHCA. Methods and Results: Eighteen male Yorkshire piglets (age 34-44 days) were assigned randomly to 2 groups of 7 (DHCA or DHCAmore » with SCP for 60 minutes at 18 °C) and 4 control pigs without cardiopulmonary bypass support. After the completion of rewarming from DHCA, 13-Carbon-labeled (13C) glucose as a metabolic tracer was infused. We used gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GCMS) and nuclear magnetic resonance for metabolic analysis in the frontal cortex. Following 2.5 hours of cerebral reperfusion, we observed similar cerebral ATP levels, absolute levels of lactate and citric acid cycle intermediates, and 13C-enrichment. However, DHCA induced significant abnormalities in glutamate cycling resulting in reduced glutamate/glutamine and elevated γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)/glutamate along with neuroapoptosis (TUNEL), which were all prevented by SCP. Conclusions: DHCA alone induces abnormalities in cycling of the major neurotransmitters in association with neuroapoptosis, but does not alter cerebral glucose utilization during reperfusion. The data suggest that SCP prevents these modifications in glutamate/glutamine/GABA cycling and protects the cerebral cortex from neuroapoptosis.« less

  4. Hypertonic Lactate to Improve Cerebral Perfusion and Glucose Availability After Acute Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Carteron, Laurent; Solari, Daria; Patet, Camille; Quintard, Hervé; Miroz, John-Paul; Bloch, Jocelyne; Daniel, Roy T; Hirt, Lorenz; Eckert, Philippe; Magistretti, Pierre J; Oddo, Mauro

    2018-06-19

    Lactate promotes cerebral blood flow and is an efficient substrate for the brain, particularly at times of glucose shortage. Hypertonic lactate is neuroprotective after experimental brain injury; however, human data are limited. Prospective study (clinicaltrials.gov NCT01573507). Academic ICU. Twenty-three brain-injured subjects (13 traumatic brain injury/10 subarachnoid hemorrhage; median age, 59 yr [41-65 yr]; median Glasgow Coma Scale, 6 [3-7]). Three-hour IV infusion of hypertonic lactate (sodium lactate, 1,000 mmol/L; concentration, 30 µmol/kg/min) administered 39 hours (26-49 hr) from injury. We examined the effect of hypertonic lactate on cerebral perfusion (using transcranial Doppler) and brain energy metabolism (using cerebral microdialysis). The majority of subjects (13/23 = 57%) had reduced brain glucose availability (baseline pretreatment cerebral microdialysis glucose, < 1 mmol/L) despite normal baseline intracranial pressure (10 [7-15] mm Hg). Hypertonic lactate was associated with increased cerebral microdialysis lactate (+55% [31-80%]) that was paralleled by an increase in middle cerebral artery mean cerebral blood flow velocities (+36% [21-66%]) and a decrease in pulsatility index (-21% [13-26%]; all p < 0.001). Cerebral microdialysis glucose increased above normal range during hypertonic lactate (+42% [30-78%]; p < 0.05); reduced brain glucose availability correlated with a greater improvement of cerebral microdialysis glucose (Spearman r = -0.53; p = 0.009). No significant changes in cerebral perfusion pressure, mean arterial pressure, systemic carbon dioxide, and blood glucose were observed during hypertonic lactate (all p > 0.1). This is the first clinical demonstration that hypertonic lactate resuscitation improves both cerebral perfusion and brain glucose availability after brain injury. These cerebral vascular and metabolic effects appeared related to brain lactate supplementation rather than to systemic effects.

  5. Functional imaging of cerebral blood flow and glucose metabolism in Parkinson's disease and Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yilong; Eidelberg, David

    2007-01-01

    Brain imaging of cerebral blood flow and glucose metabolism has been playing key roles in describing pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease (PD) and Huntington's disease (HD), respectively. Many biomarkers have been developed in recent years to investigate the abnormality in molecular substrate, track the time course of disease progression, and evaluate the efficacy of novel experimental therapeutics. A growing body of literature has emerged on neurobiology of these two movement disorders in resting states and in response to brain activation tasks. In this paper, we review the latest applications of these approaches in patients and normal volunteers at rest conditions. The discussions focus on brain mapping studies with univariate and multivariate statistical analyses on a voxel basis. In particular, we present data to validate the reproducibility and reliability of unique spatial covariance patterns related with PD and HD.

  6. Alternative indices of glucose homeostasis as biochemical diagnostic tests for abnormal glucose tolerance in an African setting.

    PubMed

    Kengne, Andre Pascal; Erasmus, Rajiv T; Levitt, Naomi S; Matsha, Tandi E

    2017-04-01

    Accurate diabetes diagnosis is important in Africa, where rates are increasing, and the disease largely undiagnosed. The cumbersome oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) remains the reference standard, while alternative diagnostic methods are not yet established in Africans. We assessed the ability of fasting plasma glucose (FPG), HbA1c and fructosamine, to diagnose OGTT-based abnormal glucose tolerance in mixed-ancestry South Africans. Mixed-ancestry adults, residing in Cape Town were examined between February and November 2015. OGTT values were used to classify glucose tolerance status as: screen-detected diabetes, prediabetes, dysglycaemia (combination of diabetes and prediabetes) and normal glucose tolerance. Of the 793 participants included, 65 (8.2%) had screen-detected diabetes, 157 (19.8%) prediabetes and 571 (72.0%) normal glucose tolerance. Correlations of FPG and 2-h glucose with HbA1c (r=0.51 and 0.52) were higher than those with fructosamine (0.34 and 0.30), both p<0.0001. The highest c-statistic for the prediction of abnormal glucose tolerance was recorded with 2-h glucose [c-statistic=0.997 (screen-detected diabetes), 0.979 (prediabetes) and 0.984 (dysglycaemia)] and the lowest with fructosamine (0.865, 0.596 and 0.677). At recommended or data-specific optimal cut-offs, no combination of FPG, HbA1c and fructosamine did better than 2-h glucose, while FPG was better than HbA1c and fructosamine on a range of performance measures. Abnormal glucose tolerance in this population is overwhelmingly expressed through 2-h glucose's abnormalities; and no combination of FPG, HbA1c and fructosamine was effective at accurately discriminating OGTT-defined abnormal glucose tolerance. Tested non-glucose based strategies are unreliable alternatives to OGTT for dysglycaemia diagnosis in this population. Copyright © 2017 Primary Care Diabetes Europe. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Diabetic patients have abnormal cerebral autoregulation during cardiopulmonary bypass

    SciTech Connect

    Croughwell, N.; Lyth, M.; Quill, T.J.

    1990-11-01

    We tested the hypothesis that insulin-dependent diabetic patients with coronary artery bypass graft surgery experience altered coupling of cerebral blood flow and oxygen consumption. In a study of 23 patients (11 diabetics and 12 age-matched controls), cerebral blood flow was measured using 133Xe clearance during nonpulsatile, alpha-stat blood gas managed cardiopulmonary bypass at the conditions of hypothermia and normothermia. In diabetic patients, the cerebral blood flow at 26.6 +/- 2.42 degrees C was 25.3 +/- 14.34 ml/100 g/min and at 36.9 +/- 0.58 degrees C it was 27.3 +/- 7.40 ml/100 g/min (p = NS). The control patients increased cerebralmore » blood flow from 20.7 +/- 6.78 ml/100 g/min at 28.4 +/- 2.81 degrees C to 37.6 +/- 8.81 ml/100 g/min at 36.5 +/- 0.45 degrees C (p less than or equal to 0.005). The oxygen consumption was calculated from jugular bulb effluent and increased from hypothermic values of 0.52 +/- 0.20 ml/100 g/min in diabetics to 1.26 +/- 0.28 ml/100 g/min (p = 0.001) at normothermia and rose from 0.60 +/- 0.27 to 1.49 +/- 0.35 ml/100 g/min (p = 0.0005) in the controls. Thus, despite temperature-mediated changes in oxygen consumption, diabetic patients did not increase cerebral blood flow as metabolism increased. Arteriovenous oxygen saturation gradients and oxygen extraction across the brain were calculated from arterial and jugular bulb blood samples. The increase in arteriovenous oxygen difference between temperature conditions in diabetic patients and controls was significantly different (p = 0.01). These data reveal that diabetic patients lose cerebral autoregulation during cardiopulmonary bypass and compensate for an imbalance in adequate oxygen delivery by increasing oxygen extraction.« less

  8. The importance of sensitive screening for abnormal glucose metabolism in patients with IgA nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Jia, Xiaoyuan; Pan, Xiaoxia; Xie, Jingyuan; Shen, Pingyan; Wang, Zhaohui; Li, Ya; Wang, Weiming; Chen, Nan

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the prevalence of abnormal glucose metabolism, insulin resistance (IR) and the related risk factors in IgA nephropathy (IgAN) patients. We analyzed oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and clinical data of 107 IgAN patients and 106 healthy controls. Glucose metabolism, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and the insulin sensitivity index (ISI) of both groups were evaluated. The prevalence of abnormal glucose metabolism was significantly higher in the IgAN group than in the control group (41.12% vs. 9.43%, p < 0.001), while the prevalence of IR between the two groups was not significantly different. IgAN patients have significantly higher fasting blood glucose, fasting insulin, OGTT 2-hour blood glucose, OGTT 2-hour insulin, HOMA-IR, and lower ISI than healthy controls. Triglyceride (OR = 2.55), 24-hour urine protein excretion (OR = 1.39), and age (OR = 1.06) were independent risk factors for abnormal glucose metabolism in IgAN patients. BMI, eGFR, 24-hour urine protein excretion, triglyceride, fasting blood glucose, fasting insulin, OGTT 2-hour blood glucose, and OGTT 2-hour insulin were significantly higher in IgAN patients with IR than in IgAN patients without IR, while HDL and ISI were significantly lower. BMI, serum albumin, and 24-hour urine protein excretion were correlated factors of IR in IgAN patients. Our study highlighted that abnormal glucose metabolism was common in IgAN patients. Triglyceride and 24-hour urine protein excretion were significant risk factors for abnormal glucose metabolism. Therefore, sensitive screening for glucose metabolism status and timely intervention should be carried out in clinical work.

  9. Abnormal glucose levels found in transportation accidents : final report.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2000-06-01

    Purpose. The Federal Aviation Administration's Office of Aviation Medicine (OAM) is responsible for the certification of pilots with diabetic conditions. Therefore, it is essential for OAM to monitor pilots involved in fatal accidents for abnormal gl...

  10. Cerebral blood flow in normal and abnormal sleep and dreaming

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, J.S.; Ishikawa, Y.; Hata, T.

    Measurements of regional or local cerebral blood flow (CBF) by the xenon-133 inhalation method and stable xenon computerized tomography CBF (CTCBF) method were made during relaxed wakefulness and different stages of REM and non-REM sleep in normal age-matched volunteers, narcoleptics, and sleep apneics. In the awake state, CBF values were reduced in both narcoleptics and sleep apneics in the brainstem and cerebellar regions. During sleep onset, whether REM or stage I-II, CBF values were paradoxically increased in narcoleptics but decreased severely in sleep apneics, while in normal volunteers they became diffusely but more moderately decreased. In REM sleep and dreamingmore » CBF values greatly increased, particularly in right temporo-parietal regions in subjects experiencing both visual and auditory dreaming.« less

  11. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor inhibits glucose intolerance after cerebral ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Xiaoliang; Zhang, Yongsheng; Xu, Han; Kang, Kai; Cai, Donglian

    2013-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor is associated with the insulin signaling pathway and glucose tabolism. We hypothesized that expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and its receptor may be involved in glucose intolerance following ischemic stress. To verify this hypothesis, this study aimed to observe the changes in brain-derived neurotrophic factor and tyrosine kinase B receptor expression in glucose metabolism-associated regions following cerebral ischemic stress in mice. At day 1 after middle cerebral artery occlusion, the expression levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor were significantly decreased in the ischemic cortex, hypothalamus, liver, skeletal muscle, and pancreas. The expression levels of tyrosine kinase B receptor were decreased in the hypothalamus and liver, and increased in the skeletal muscle and pancreas, but remained unchanged in the cortex. Intrahypothalamic administration of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (40 ng) suppressed the decrease in insulin receptor and tyrosine-phosphorylated insulin receptor expression in the liver and skeletal muscle, and inhibited the overexpression of gluconeogenesis-associated phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and glucose-6-phosphatase in the liver of cerebral ischemic mice. However, serum insulin levels remained unchanged. Our experimental findings indicate that brain-derived neurotrophic factor can promote glucose metabolism, reduce gluconeogenesis, and decrease blood glucose levels after cerebral ischemic stress. The low expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor following cerebral ischemia may be involved in the development of glucose intolerance. PMID:25206547

  12. Sonographic assessment of normal and abnormal patterns of fetal cerebral lamination.

    PubMed

    Pugash, D; Hendson, G; Dunham, C P; Dewar, K; Money, D M; Prayer, D

    2012-12-01

    Prenatal development of the brain is characterized by gestational age-specific changes in the laminar structure of the brain parenchyma before 30 gestational weeks. Cerebral lamination patterns of normal fetal brain development have been described histologically, by postmortem in-vitro magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and by in-vivo fetal MRI. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the sonographic appearance of laminar organization of the cerebral wall in normal and abnormal brain development. This was a retrospective study of ultrasound findings in 92 normal fetuses and 68 fetuses with abnormal cerebral lamination patterns for gestational age, at 17-38 weeks' gestation. We investigated the visibility of the subplate zone relative to the intermediate zone and correlated characteristic sonographic findings of cerebral lamination with gestational age in order to evaluate transient structures. In the normal cohort, the subplate zone-intermediate zone interface was identified as early as 17 weeks, and in all 57 fetuses examined up to 28 weeks. In all of these fetuses, the subplate zone appeared anechoic and the intermediate zone appeared homogeneously more echogenic than did the subplate zone. In the 22 fetuses between 28 and 34 weeks, there was a transition period when lamination disappeared in a variable fashion. The subplate zone-intermediate zone interface was not identified in any fetus after 34 weeks (n=13). There were three patterns of abnormal cerebral lamination: (1) no normal laminar pattern before 28 weeks (n=32), in association with severe ventriculomegaly, diffuse ischemia, microcephaly, teratogen exposure or lissencephaly; (2) focal disruption of lamination before 28 weeks (n=24), associated with hemorrhage, porencephaly, stroke, migrational abnormalities, thanatophoric dysplasia, meningomyelocele or encephalocele; (3) increased prominence and echogenicity of the intermediate zone before 28 weeks and/or persistence of a laminar pattern beyond 33 weeks

  13. Glucose Metabolism during Resting State Reveals Abnormal Brain Networks Organization in the Alzheimer’s Disease and Mild Cognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Montes, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    This paper aims to study the abnormal patterns of brain glucose metabolism co-variations in Alzheimer disease (AD) and Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) patients compared to Normal healthy controls (NC) using the Alzheimer Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) database. The local cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (CMRgl) in a set of 90 structures belonging to the AAL atlas was obtained from Fluro-Deoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography data in resting state. It is assumed that brain regions whose CMRgl values are significantly correlated are functionally associated; therefore, when metabolism is altered in a single region, the alteration will affect the metabolism of other brain areas with which it interrelates. The glucose metabolism network (represented by the matrix of the CMRgl co-variations among all pairs of structures) was studied using the graph theory framework. The highest concurrent fluctuations in CMRgl were basically identified between homologous cortical regions in all groups. Significant differences in CMRgl co-variations in AD and MCI groups as compared to NC were found. The AD and MCI patients showed aberrant patterns in comparison to NC subjects, as detected by global and local network properties (global and local efficiency, clustering index, and others). MCI network’s attributes showed an intermediate position between NC and AD, corroborating it as a transitional stage from normal aging to Alzheimer disease. Our study is an attempt at exploring the complex association between glucose metabolism, CMRgl covariations and the attributes of the brain network organization in AD and MCI. PMID:23894356

  14. Fasting glucose measurement as a potential first step screening for glucose metabolism abnormalities in women with anovulatory polycystic ovary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Veltman-Verhulst, Susanne M; Goverde, Angelique J; van Haeften, Timon W; Fauser, Bart C J M

    2013-08-01

    Is routine screening by oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) needed for all women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS)? Screening for glucose metabolism abnormalities of PCOS patients by an OGTT could potentially be limited to patients who present with a fasting glucose concentration between 6.1 and 7.0 mmol/l only. Women with PCOS are at increased risk of developing diabetes. This study proposes a stepwise screening strategy for (pre)diabetes for PCOS patients based on risk stratification by fasting plasma glucose. A cross-sectional study of 226 women diagnosed with anovulatory PCOS. A consecutive series of 226 patients, diagnosed with PCOS at the University Medical Centre Utrecht, the Netherlands, were screened for glucose metabolism abnormalities by OGTT (75 g glucose load). The majority of the 226 women (mean age: 29.6 ± 4.3 years; BMI: 27.3 ± 6.7 kg/m(2); 81% Caucasian) presented with a normal OGTT (169 women (75%)). Of the 57 (25%) women presenting with mild to moderate glucose abnormalities, 53 (93%) could be identified by fasting glucose concentrations only. Diabetes was diagnosed in a total of eight women (3.5%). In six women, the diagnosis was based on fasting glucose >7.0 mmol/l. The other two cases of diabetes initially presented with fasting glucose between 6.1 and 7.0 mmol/l and were diagnosed by OGTT assessment. No women diagnosed with diabetes presented with fasting glucose levels below 6.1 mmol/l. We therefore conclude that all diabetes patients could potentially be found by initial fasting glucose assessment followed by OGTT only in patients with fasting glucose between 6.1 and 7.0 mmol/l. Before general implementation can be advised, this screening algorithm should be validated in a prospective study of a similar or greater number of PCOS women. Our study comprised of a mostly Caucasian (81%) population, therefore generalization to other ethnic populations should be done with caution. No external finance was involved in this study. B

  15. Reduced brain/serum glucose ratios predict cerebral metabolic distress and mortality after severe brain injury.

    PubMed

    Kurtz, Pedro; Claassen, Jan; Schmidt, J Michael; Helbok, Raimund; Hanafy, Khalid A; Presciutti, Mary; Lantigua, Hector; Connolly, E Sander; Lee, Kiwon; Badjatia, Neeraj; Mayer, Stephan A

    2013-12-01

    The brain is dependent on glucose to meet its energy demands. We sought to evaluate the potential importance of impaired glucose transport by assessing the relationship between brain/serum glucose ratios, cerebral metabolic distress, and mortality after severe brain injury. We studied 46 consecutive comatose patients with subarachnoid or intracerebral hemorrhage, traumatic brain injury, or cardiac arrest who underwent cerebral microdialysis and intracranial pressure monitoring. Continuous insulin infusion was used to maintain target serum glucose levels of 80-120 mg/dL (4.4-6.7 mmol/L). General linear models of logistic function utilizing generalized estimating equations were used to relate predictors of cerebral metabolic distress (defined as a lactate/pyruvate ratio [LPR] ≥ 40) and mortality. A total of 5,187 neuromonitoring hours over 300 days were analyzed. Mean serum glucose was 133 mg/dL (7.4 mmol/L). The median brain/serum glucose ratio, calculated hourly, was substantially lower (0.12) than the expected normal ratio of 0.40 (brain 2.0 and serum 5.0 mmol/L). In addition to low cerebral perfusion pressure (P = 0.05) and baseline Glasgow Coma Scale score (P < 0.0001), brain/serum glucose ratios below the median of 0.12 were independently associated with an increased risk of metabolic distress (adjusted OR = 1.4 [1.2-1.7], P < 0.001). Low brain/serum glucose ratios were also independently associated with in-hospital mortality (adjusted OR = 6.7 [1.2-38.9], P < 0.03) in addition to Glasgow Coma Scale scores (P = 0.029). Reduced brain/serum glucose ratios, consistent with impaired glucose transport across the blood brain barrier, are associated with cerebral metabolic distress and increased mortality after severe brain injury.

  16. Effects of Ginkgo biloba extract on cerebral oxygen and glucose metabolism in elderly patients with pre-existing cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lili; Hu, Zhiyong; Shen, Jianjun; McQuillan, Patrick M

    2015-04-01

    Cerebral injury caused by hypoperfusion during the perioperative period is one of the main causes of disability and death in patients after major surgery. No effective protective or preventative strategies have been identified. This study was designed to evaluate the effects of Ginkgo biloba extract on cerebral oxygen and glucose metabolism in elderly patients with known, pre-existing cerebral ischemia. Sixty ASA (American Society of Anesthesiologists) II-III patients, diagnosed with vertebral artery ischemia by transcranial Doppler ultrasonography (TCD), and scheduled for elective total hip replacement surgery, were enrolled in the study. They were randomly allocated to receive either 1mg/kg Ginkgo biloba extract (G group n=30) or normal saline (D group n=30) after induction of anesthesia. Blood samples were collected from radial artery and jugular venous bulb catheters for blood gas analysis and determination of glucose and lactate concentrations preoperatively, before surgical incision, at the end of surgery, and on post-op day 1. Arterial O2 content (CaO2), jugular venous O2 content (CjvO2), arteriovenous O2 content difference (Da-jvO2), cerebral oxygen extraction rate (CEO2), and arteriovenous glucose and lactate content differences (Da-jvGlu and Da-jvLac) were calculated. There were no significant differences in CaO2 or Da-jvGlu during surgery between groups (p>0.05). However, the Ginkgo group had higher CjvO2, internal jugular venous oxygen saturation (SjvO2) and lower CEO2, Da-jvO2 and Da-jvLac at the end of surgery (T2) and on post-op day 1 (T3) than those in the control group (p<0.05). Ginkgo biloba extract can improve cerebral oxygen supply, decrease cerebral oxygen extraction rate and consumption, and help maintain the balance between cerebral oxygen supply and consumption. It has no effect, however, on cerebral glucose metabolism in elderly patients with known, pre-existing cerebral ischemia. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Alterations of local cerebral glucose utilization in lean and obese fa/fa rats after acute adrenalectomy.

    PubMed

    Doyle, P; Rohner-Jeanrenaud, F; Jeanrenaud, B

    1994-08-29

    An animal model often used to investigate the aetiology of obesity is the genetically obese fa/fa rat. It has many abnormalities, including hyperphagia, hyper-insulinemia, insulin resistance, low cerebral glucose utilization and an overactive hypothalamo-pituitary adrenal (HPA) axis with resulting hypercorticism. Due to the latter consideration, the aim of this work was to study the impact of acute adrenalectomy (ADX) on the local cerebral glucose utilization (LCGU) of lean and obese fa/fa rats. ADX resulted in discrete increases in LCGU of regions common to both lean and obese rats. These common regions were found to belong to be related to the limbic system. Within this system, the LCGU of the brain of obese rats was either normalized to lean sham operated values or increased by ADX to a similar degree in both groups on a percentage basis. It was concluded that the LCGU of both lean and obese animals appears to be negatively regulated, albeit to different extents, by glucocorticoids. Such negative regulation is particularly salient within the limbic system of the lean rat and even more so in the fa/fa rat. It is suggested that the long-term hypercorticism of obese fa/fa rats due to abnormal regulation of the HPA axis may result in a decreased LCGU in limbic and related regions of the brain of fa/fa rats and contribute to the expression of the obese phenotype.

  18. The relationship between fasting serum glucose and cerebral glucose metabolism in late-life depression and normal aging

    PubMed Central

    Marano, Christopher M.; Workman, Clifford I.; Lyman, Christopher H.; Kramer, Elisse; Hermann, Carol R.; Ma, Yilong; Dhawan, Vijay; Chaly, Thomas; Eidelberg, David; Smith, Gwenn S.

    2015-01-01

    Evidence exists for late-life depression (LLD) as both a prodrome of and risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease (AD). The underlying neurobiological mechanisms are poorly understood. Impaired peripheral glucose metabolism may explain the association between depression and AD given the connection between type 2 diabetes mellitus with both depression and AD. Positron emission tomography (PET) measures of cerebral glucose metabolism are sensitive to detecting changes in neural circuitry in LLD and AD. Fasting serum glucose (FSG) in non-diabetic young (YC; n=20) and elderly controls (EC; n=12) and LLD patients (n=16) was correlated with PET scans of cerebral glucose metabolism on a voxel-wise basis. The negative correlations were more extensive in EC versus YC and in LLD patients versus EC. Increased FSG correlated with decreased cerebral glucose metabolism in LLD patients to a greater extent than in EC in heteromodal association cortices involved in mood symptoms and cognitive deficits observed in LLD and dementia. Negative correlations in YC were observed in sensory and motor regions. Understanding the neurobiological consequences of diabetes and associated conditions will have substantial public health significance given that this is a modifiable risk factor for which prevention strategies could have an important impact on lowering dementia risk. PMID:24650451

  19. Acute effect of glucose on cerebral blood flow, blood oxygenation, and oxidative metabolism.

    PubMed

    Xu, Feng; Liu, Peiying; Pascual, Juan M; Xiao, Guanghua; Huang, Hao; Lu, Hanzhang

    2015-02-01

    While it is known that specific nuclei of the brain, for example hypothalamus, contain glucose-sensing neurons thus their activity is affected by blood glucose level, the effect of glucose modulation on whole-brain metabolism is not completely understood. Several recent reports have elucidated the long-term impact of caloric restriction on the brain, showing that animals under caloric restriction had enhanced rate of tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA) cycle flux accompanied by extended life span. However, acute effect of postprandial blood glucose increase has not been addressed in detail, partly due to a scarcity and complexity of measurement techniques. In this study, using a recently developed noninvasive MR technique, we measured dynamic changes in global cerebral metabolic rate of O2 (CMRO2 ) following a 50 g glucose ingestion (N = 10). A time dependent decrease in CMRO2 was observed, which was accompanied by a reduction in oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) with unaltered cerebral blood flow (CBF). At 40 min post-ingestion, the amount of CMRO2 reduction was 7.8 ± 1.6%. A control study without glucose ingestion was performed (N = 10), which revealed no changes in CMRO2 , CBF, or OEF, suggesting that the observations in the glucose study was not due to subject drowsiness or fatigue after staying inside the scanner. These findings suggest that ingestion of glucose may alter the rate of cerebral metabolism of oxygen in an acute setting. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Cerebral metabolic abnormalities in congestive heart failure detected by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lee, C W; Lee, J H; Kim, J J; Park, S W; Hong, M K; Kim, S T; Lim, T H; Park, S J

    1999-04-01

    Using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy, we investigated cerebral metabolism and its determinants in congestive heart failure (CHF), and the effects of cardiac transplantation on these measurements. Few data are available about cerebral metabolism in CHF. Fifty patients with CHF (ejection fraction < or = 35%) and 20 healthy volunteers were included for this study. Of the patients, 10 patients underwent heart transplantation. All subjects performed symptom-limited bicycle exercise test. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H MRS) was obtained from localized regions (8 to 10 ml) of occipital gray matter (OGM) and parietal white matter (PWM). Absolute levels of the metabolites (N-acetylaspartate, creatine, choline, myo-inositol) were calculated. In PWM only creatine level was significantly lower in CHF than in control subjects, but in OGM all four metabolite levels were decreased in CHF. The creatine level was independently correlated with half-recovery time and duration of heart failure symptoms in PWM (r = -0.56, p < 0.05), and with peak oxygen consumption and serum sodium concentration in OGM (r = 0.58, p < 0.05). Cerebral metabolic abnormalities were improved after successful cardiac transplantation. This study shows that cerebral metabolism is abnormally deranged in advanced CHF and it may serve as a potential marker of the disease severity.

  1. Personality traits and abnormal glucose regulation in middle-aged Swedish men and women.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, Anna-Karin; Gustavsson, J Petter; Hilding, Agneta; Granath, Fredrik; Ekbom, Anders; Ostenson, Claes-Göran

    2012-01-01

    To examine associations between personality and abnormal glucose regulation. This cross-sectional study comprised 2152 men and 3143 women (43-66 years). Oral glucose tolerance test identified 316 men and 213 women with previously unknown impaired fasting glucose (IFG), impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), IFG+IGT, or type 2 diabetes. Personality traits antagonism (low agreeableness), impulsivity (low conscientiousness), hedonic capacity (high extraversion), negative affectivity (high neuroticism) and alexithymia (low openness) were measured by a self-report inventory. Based on distribution of scores, responses were divided into "low" (<1 SD), "middle" (±1 SD) and "high" (>1 SD). Middle groups were considered reference groups. Prevalence odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated. In men, OR for low antagonism was 0.3 (CI 0.2-0.6) (age- and multi-adjusted models) while in women, neither high nor low antagonism was associated to abnormal glucose regulation. Men and women with high hedonic capacity had ORs 0.5 (0.3-0.9) and 0.6 (0.4-1.0), respectively (age- and multi-adjusted models). The other scales illustrated no significant associations. No elevated risk of abnormal glucose regulation was observed for deviating scores on personality scales. Instead, reduced risks were indicated in men with low antagonism, and in men and women with high hedonic capacity. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The GLP-1 response to glucose does not mediate beta and alpha cell dysfunction in Hispanics with abnormal glucose metabolism.

    PubMed

    Adams, Elizabeth; Genter, Pauline; Keefe, Emma; Sandow, Kevin; Gray, Virginia; Rotter, Jerome I; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Ipp, Eli

    2018-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) contributes to insulin secretion after meals. Though Hispanics have increased risk for type 2 diabetes mellitus, it is unknown if impaired GLP-1 secretion contributes to this risk. We therefore studied plasma GLP-1 secretion and action in Hispanic adults. Hispanic (H; n = 31) and non-Hispanic (nH; n = 15) participants underwent an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). All participants were categorized by glucose tolerance into four groups: normal glucose tolerant non-Hispanic (NGT-nH; n = 15), normal glucose tolerant Hispanic (NGT-H; n = 12), impaired glucose tolerant Hispanic (IGT-H; n = 11), or newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes mellitus, Hispanic (T2D-H; n = 8). Glucose-induced increments in plasma GLP-1 (Δ-GLP-1) were not different in NGT-H and NGT-nH (p = .38), nor amongst Hispanic subgroups with varying degrees of glucose homeostasis (p = .6). In contrast, the insulinogenic index in T2D-H group was lower than the other groups (p = .016). Subjects with abnormal glucose homeostasis (AGH), i.e., T2D-H plus IGT-H, had a diminished glucagon suppression index compared to patients with normal glucose homeostasis (NGT-H plus NGT-nH) (p = .035). GLP-1 responses to glucose were similar in Hispanic and Non-Hispanic NGT. Despite similar glucose-induced Δ-GLP-1, insulin and glucagon responses were abnormal in T2D-H and AGH, respectively. Thus, impaired GLP-1 secretion is unlikely to play a role in islet dysfunction in T2D. Although GLP-1 therapeutics enhance insulin secretion and glucagon suppression, it is likely due to pharmacological amplification of the GLP-1 pathways rather than treatment of hormonal deficiency. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Structural cerebral abnormalities and neurodevelopmental status in single ventricle congenital heart disease before Fontan procedure.

    PubMed

    Knirsch, Walter; Mayer, Kristina Nadine; Scheer, Ianina; Tuura, Ruth; Schranz, Dietmar; Hahn, Andreas; Wetterling, Kristina; Beck, Ingrid; Latal, Beatrice; Reich, Bettina

    2017-04-01

    Neonates with single ventricle congenital heart disease are at risk for structural cerebral abnormalities. Little is known about the further evolution of cerebral abnormalities until Fontan procedure. Between August 2012 and July 2015, we conducted a prospective cross-sectional two centre study using cerebral magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and neuro-developmental outcome assessed by the Bayley-III. Forty-seven children (31 male) were evaluated at a mean age of 25.9 ± 3.4 months with hypoplastic left heart syndrome (25) or other single ventricle (22). Cerebral MRI was abnormal in 17 patients (36.2%) including liquor space enlargements (10), small grey (9) and minimal white (5) matter injuries. Eight of 17 individuals had combined lesions. Median (range) cognitive composite score (CCS) (100, 65-120) and motor composite score (MCS) (97, 55-124) were comparable to the reference data, while language composite score (LCS) (97, 68-124) was significantly lower ( P  = 0.040). Liquor space enlargement was associated with poorer performance on all Bayley-III subscores (CCS: P  = 0.02; LCS: P  = 0.002; MCS: P  = 0.013). The number of re-operations [odds ratio (OR) 2.2, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.1-4.3] ( P  = 0.03) and re-interventions (OR 2.1, 95% CI 1.1-3.8) ( P  = 0.03) was associated with a higher rate of overall MRI abnormalities. Cerebral MRI abnormalities occur in more than one third of children with single ventricle, while the neuro-developmental status is less severely affected before Fontan procedure. Liquor space enlargement is the predominant MRI finding associated with poorer neuro-developmental status, warranting further studies to determine aetiology and further evolution until school-age. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  4. Predictors of Abnormal Glucose Tolerance in the Early Postpartum Period in Patients with Gestational Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Shigeru; Shinagawa, Takaaki; Horinouchi, Takashi; Kozuma, Yutaka; Yonemoto, Koji; Hori, Daizo; Ushijima, Kimio

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the clinical predictors of abnormal glucose tolerance 5-7 weeks after delivery. Subjects were 155 women diagnosed with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) between October 2005 and September 2013 whose pregnancy and delivery were managed at our center. Subjects were divided into a normal glucose tolerance group (NGT; n = 113), or abnormal glucose tolerance group (AGT; n = 42) with borderline or overt diabetes mellitus, based on 75-g oral glucose tolerance test (75 gOGTT) results 5-7 weeks after delivery. We extracted profiles by which abnormal glucose tolerance levels 5-7 weeks after delivery were predicted using a classification and regression tree (CART) from parameters measured at the time of GDM diagnosis. Logistic regression analysis was used to determine prediction accuracy. Subjects with fasting plasma glucose (FPG) ≥92 mg/dL and immuno-reactive insulin level <100 μU/mL 60 min after load (IRI60min) at time of diagnosis showed a significantly higher risk of developing abnormal glucose tolerance 5-7 weeks after delivery than subjects with FPG <92 mg/dL (p < 0.0001). Subjects with FPG ≥92 mg/dL and IRI60min ≥ 100 μU/mL had the same risk as those with FPG of <92 mg/dL. Patients with gestational diabetes who met the criteria specified above at diagnosis were at a higher risk of developing diabetes mellitus in the future. By explaining this issue to patients, we expect to improve the rate of postpartum follow-up. This should facilitate early detection of diabetes, and help prevent associated complications.

  5. Nature and prognostic importance of abnormal glucose tolerance and diabetes in acute heart failure.

    PubMed

    Berry, C; Brett, M; Stevenson, K; McMurray, J J V; Norrie, J

    2008-03-01

    To investigate the nature and importance of blood glucose abnormalities in an unselected heart failure (HF) population. Cohort study. Urban University hospital. All index emergency HF admissions to one University hospital during the year 2000 were studied. 454 consecutive index admissions had blood chemistry, diabetic status and follow-up information recorded. 390 (86%) patients had an echocardiogram, of whom 117 (30%) had preserved left ventricular systolic function and 110 (24%) had diabetes. Sixty (13%) patients had abnormal glucose tolerance (8.0-10.99 mmol/l), and 284 (63%) patients had a normal admission blood glucose (<8 mmol/l). 51 (11.2%) patients died in hospital. After adjustment for other prognostic attributes, abnormal glucose tolerance (Cox hazard ratio HR, 95% CI: 5.920, 1.03 to 34.00; p = 0.046) but not diabetes (HR 3.46, 0.75 to 16.02; p = 0.112) predicted in-hospital mortality. During follow-up (median 812 (range 632-978) days), 104 (36.6%), 30 (50.0%) and 55 (50%) patients with a normal admission blood glucose concentration, abnormal glucose tolerance and diabetes, respectively, died (log rank test p = 0.0037, adjusted p = 0.075). Compared with patients with normal admission blood glucose, abnormal glucose tolerance (adjusted HR: 1.41 (0.92 to 2.16); p = 0.12) and diabetes (adjusted HR: 2.02 (1.41 to 2.88); p = 0.0001) predicted mortality. Considering glucose on admission as a continuous covariate, a 2 mmol/l increase was associated with a HR of 1.08 (1.03 to 1.13), p = 0.0010, which after adjustment for the above covariates became 1.08 (1.03 to 1.13), p = 0.0023. Admission blood glucose concentration and diabetes are prognostically important in HF and could help target some patients for more intensive therapy.

  6. Neurologic Correlates of Gait Abnormalities in Cerebral Palsy: Implications for Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Joanne; Butler, Erin E.; Rose, Jessica

    2017-01-01

    Cerebral palsy (CP) is the most common movement disorder in children. A diagnosis of CP is often made based on abnormal muscle tone or posture, a delay in reaching motor milestones, or the presence of gait abnormalities in young children. Neuroimaging of high-risk neonates and of children diagnosed with CP have identified patterns of neurologic injury associated with CP, however, the neural underpinnings of common gait abnormalities remain largely uncharacterized. Here, we review the nature of the brain injury in CP, as well as the neuromuscular deficits and subsequent gait abnormalities common among children with CP. We first discuss brain injury in terms of mechanism, pattern, and time of injury during the prenatal, perinatal, or postnatal period in preterm and term-born children. Second, we outline neuromuscular deficits of CP with a focus on spastic CP, characterized by muscle weakness, shortened muscle-tendon unit, spasticity, and impaired selective motor control, on both a microscopic and functional level. Third, we examine the influence of neuromuscular deficits on gait abnormalities in CP, while considering emerging information on neural correlates of gait abnormalities and the implications for strategic treatment. This review of the neural basis of gait abnormalities in CP discusses what is known about links between the location and extent of brain injury and the type and severity of CP, in relation to the associated neuromuscular deficits, and subsequent gait abnormalities. Targeted treatment opportunities are identified that may improve functional outcomes for children with CP. By providing this context on the neural basis of gait abnormalities in CP, we hope to highlight areas of further research that can reduce the long-term, debilitating effects of CP. PMID:28367118

  7. Brain Size and Cerebral Glucose Metabolic Rate in Nonspecific Retardation and Down Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haier, Richard J.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Brain size and cerebral glucose metabolic rate were determined for 10 individuals with mild mental retardation (MR), 7 individuals with Down syndrome (DS), and 10 matched controls. MR and DS groups both had brain volumes of about 80% compared to controls, with variance greatest within the MR group. (SLD)

  8. Application of positron emission tomography to determine cerebral glucose utilization in conscious infant monkeys.

    PubMed

    Moore, A H; Cherry, S R; Pollack, D B; Hovda, D A; Phelps, M E

    1999-05-01

    Cerebral glucose metabolism has been used as a marker of cerebral maturation and neuroplasticity. In studies addressing these issues in young non-human primates, investigators have used positron emission tomography (PET) and [18F]2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) to calculate local cerebral metabolic rates of glucose (1CMRG1c). Unfortunately, these values were influenced by anesthesia. In order to avoid this confounding factor, we have established a method that permits reliable measurements in young conscious vervet monkeys using FDG-PET. Immature animals remained in a conscious, resting state during the initial 42 min of FDG uptake as they were allowed to cling to their anesthetized mothers. After FDG uptake, animals were anesthetized and placed in the PET scanner with data acquisition beginning at 60 min post-FDG injection. FDG image sets consisted of 30 planes separated by 1.69 mm, parameters sufficient to image the entire monkey brain. Our method of region-of-interest (ROI) analysis was assessed within and between raters and demonstrated high reliability (P < 0.001). To illustrate that our method was sensitive to developmental changes in cerebral glucose metabolism, quantitative studies of young conscious monkeys revealed that infant monkeys 6-8 months of age exhibited significantly higher 1CMRG1c values (P < 0.05) in all regions examined, except sensorimotor cortex and thalamus, compared to monkeys younger than 4 months of age. This method provided high resolution images and 1CMRG1c values that were reliable within age group. These results support the application of FDG-PET to investigate questions related to cerebral glucose metabolism in young conscious non-human primates.

  9. Neuroenergetic Response to Prolonged Cerebral Glucose Depletion after Severe Brain Injury and the Role of Lactate.

    PubMed

    Patet, Camille; Quintard, Hervé; Suys, Tamarah; Bloch, Jocelyne; Daniel, Roy T; Pellerin, Luc; Magistretti, Pierre J; Oddo, Mauro

    2015-10-15

    Lactate may represent a supplemental fuel for the brain. We examined cerebral lactate metabolism during prolonged brain glucose depletion (GD) in acute brain injury (ABI) patients monitored with cerebral microdialysis (CMD). Sixty episodes of GD (defined as spontaneous decreases of CMD glucose from normal to low [<1.0 mmol/L] for at least 2 h) were identified among 26 patients. During GD, we found a significant increase of CMD lactate (from 4 ± 2.3 to 5.4 ± 2.9 mmol/L), pyruvate (126.9 ± 65.1 to 172.3 ± 74.1 μmol/L), and lactate/pyruvate ratio (LPR; 27 ± 6 to 35 ± 9; all, p < 0.005), while brain oxygen and blood lactate remained normal. Dynamics of lactate and glucose supply during GD were further studied by analyzing the relationships between blood and CMD samples. There was a strong correlation between blood and brain lactate when LPR was normal (r = 0.56; p < 0.0001), while an inverse correlation (r = -0.11; p = 0.04) was observed at elevated LPR >25. The correlation between blood and brain glucose also decreased from r = 0.62 to r = 0.45. These findings in ABI patients suggest increased cerebral lactate delivery in the absence of brain hypoxia when glucose availability is limited and support the concept that lactate acts as alternative fuel.

  10. Effect of x-radiation to brain on cerebral glucose utilization in the rat.

    PubMed

    D'Aquino, S; Cicciarello, R; D'Avella, D; Mesiti, M; Albiero, F; Princi, P; Gagliardi, M E; Russi, E; D'Aquino, A

    1990-01-01

    We assessed, by means of the [14C]-2-deoxy-D-glucose autoradiography method, the effect of whole-brain x-radiation on local cerebral glucose utilization in the rat brain. Animals were exposed to conventional fractionation (200 +/- cGy/day given 5 days a week) to a total dose of 4000 cGy. Metabolic experiments were made 2 weeks after completion of the radiation exposure. In comparison with control and sham-irradiated animals, cerebral metabolic activity was diffusely decreased following irradiation. Statistically significant decreases in metabolic activity were observed in 13 of 27 brain regions studied. In general, brain areas with the highest basal metabolic rates showed the greatest percentage drop of glucose utilization. Post-irradiation metabolic alterations possibly provide an explanation for the syndrome of early delayed deterioration observed in humans after whole-brain radiotherapy.

  11. Impaired cerebral development in fetuses with congenital cardiovascular malformations: Is it the result of inadequate glucose supply?

    PubMed

    Rudolph, Abraham M

    2016-08-01

    Cerebral development may be impaired in fetuses with congenital cardiovascular malformations, particularly hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS) and aortopulmonary transposition (APT). The decreased cerebral arterial pusatility index observed in some of these fetuses led to the belief that cerebral vascular resistance was reduced as a result of arterial hypoxemia and cerebral hypoxia is thought to be responsible for impaired cerebral growth. However, other hemodynamic factors could affect pulsatility index. I propose that cerebral blood flow is reduced in fetuses with HLHS and that reduced glucose, rather than oxygen, delivery interferes with cerebral development. This is based on the fact that most of these fetuses do not have lactate accumulation in the brain.In fetuses with APT, umbilical venous blood, containing oxygen and glucose derived across the placenta, is distributed to the lungs and lower body; venous blood, with low oxygen and glucose content, is delivered to the ascending aorta and brain. Oxygen and glucose delivery may further be reduced by decreased cerebral blood flow resulting from run-off of aortic blood through the ductus arteriosus to the pulmonary circulation during diastole. In APT fetuses, lack of lactate in the brain also supports my proposal that glucose deficiency interferes with cerebral development.

  12. Glucose administration after traumatic brain injury improves cerebral metabolism and reduces secondary neuronal injury.

    PubMed

    Moro, Nobuhiro; Ghavim, Sima; Harris, Neil G; Hovda, David A; Sutton, Richard L

    2013-10-16

    Clinical studies have indicated an association between acute hyperglycemia and poor outcomes in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI), although optimal blood glucose levels needed to maximize outcomes for these patients' remain under investigation. Previous results from experimental animal models suggest that post-TBI hyperglycemia may be harmful, neutral, or beneficial. The current studies determined the effects of single or multiple episodes of acute hyperglycemia on cerebral glucose metabolism and neuronal injury in a rodent model of unilateral controlled cortical impact (CCI) injury. In Experiment 1, a single episode of hyperglycemia (50% glucose at 2 g/kg, i.p.) initiated immediately after CCI was found to significantly attenuate a TBI-induced depression of glucose metabolism in cerebral cortex (4 of 6 regions) and subcortical regions (2 of 7) as well as to significantly reduce the number of dead/dying neurons in cortex and hippocampus at 24 h post-CCI. Experiment 2 examined effects of more prolonged and intermittent hyperglycemia induced by glucose administrations (2 g/kg, i.p.) at 0, 1, 3 and 6h post-CCI. The latter study also found significantly improved cerebral metabolism (in 3 of 6 cortical and 3 of 7 subcortical regions) and significant neuroprotection in cortex and hippocampus 1 day after CCI and glucose administration. These results indicate that acute episodes of post-TBI hyperglycemia can be beneficial and are consistent with other recent studies showing benefits of providing exogenous energy substrates during periods of increased cerebral metabolic demand. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Glucose administration after traumatic brain injury improves cerebral metabolism and reduces secondary neuronal injury

    PubMed Central

    Moro, Nobuhiro; Ghavim, Sima; Harris, Neil G.; Hovda, David A.; Sutton, Richard L.

    2013-01-01

    Clinical studies have indicated an association between acute hyperglycemia and poor outcomes in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI), although optimal blood glucose levels needed to maximize outcomes for these patients’ remains under investigation. Previous results from experimental animal models suggest that post-TBI hyperglycemia may be harmful, neutral, or beneficial. The current studies determined the effects of single or multiple episodes of acute hyperglycemia on cerebral glucose metabolism and neuronal injury in a rodent model of unilateral controlled cortical impact (CCI) injury. In Experiment 1, a single episode of hyperglycemia (50% glucose at 2 g/kg, i.p.) initiated immediately after CCI was found to significantly attenuate a TBI-induced depression of glucose metabolism in cerebral cortex (4 of 6 regions) and subcortical regions (2 of 7) as well as to significantly reduce the number of dead/dying neurons in cortex and hippocampus at 24 h post-CCI. Experiment 2 examined effects of more prolonged and intermittent hyperglycemia induced by glucose administrations (2 g/kg, i.p.) at 0, 1, 3 and 6 h post-CCI. The latter study also found significantly improved cerebral metabolism (in 3 of 6 cortical and 3 of 7 subcortical regions) and significant neuroprotection in cortex and hippocampus 1 day after CCI and glucose administration. These results indicate that acute episodes of post-TBI hyperglycemia can be beneficial and are consistent with other recent studies showing benefits of providing exogenous energy substrates during periods of increased cerebral metabolic demand. PMID:23994447

  14. Cerebral metabolism of amino acids and glucose in fed and fasted sheep.

    PubMed

    Pell, J M; Bergman, E N

    1983-03-01

    Net cerebral uptake from or release into whole blood of oxygen, carbon dioxide, glucose, amino acids, lactate, pyruvate, ketone bodies, and acetate was estimated in fed, 3-day-fasted, and 6-day-fasted sheep. The respiratory quotient was similar in all three groups of sheep (approximately 0.95). Glucose uptake (35 mumol X min-1 X 100 g-1) was maintained during fasting, and about 94% of the cerebral oxygen consumption could have been accounted for by glucose oxidation in all sheep. A cerebral uptake of the branched-chain amino acids (leucine, isoleucine, and valine) and proline also was observed with a concomitant production of glutamine and asparagine. The brains of fed and 3-day-fasted sheep were in nitrogen balance, but a small net release of nitrogen occurred in 6-day-fasted sheep (2 mumol N. min-1 X 100 g-1). A small amount of pyruvate was always released (1.4 mumol X min-1 X 100 g-1) into the blood, whereas lactate was released (6 mumol X min-1 X 100 g-1) only in 6-day-fasted sheep. Ketone body and acetate utilization always was negligible when compared with that for glucose. The total cerebral nonglucose carbon release found for 6-day-fasted sheep was equivalent to 23% of the glucose carbon taken up, although only 8% could have been derived directly from glucose. Thus, metabolism by the ovine brain seems resistant to prolonged periods of hypoglycemia with only small adaptations occurring after a 6-day fast.

  15. Increasing ICA512 autoantibody titers predict development of abnormal oral glucose tolerance tests.

    PubMed

    Sanda, Srinath

    2018-03-01

    Determine if autoantibody titer magnitude and variability predict glucose abnormalities in subjects at risk for type 1 diabetes. Demographic information, longitudinal autoantibody titers, and oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) data were obtained from the TrialNet Pathway to Prevention study. Subjects (first and second degree relatives of individuals with type 1 diabetes) with at least 2 diabetes autoantibodies were selected for analysis. Autoantibody titer means were calculated for each subject for the duration of study participation and the relationship between titer tertiles and glucose value tertiles from OGTTs (normal, impaired, and diabetes) was assessed with a proportional odds ordinal regression model. A matched pairs analysis was used to examine the relationship between changes in individual autoantibody titers and 120-minute glucose values. Titer variability was quantified using cumulative titer standard deviations. We studied 778 subjects recruited in the TrialNet Pathway to Prevention study between 2006 and 2014. Increased cumulative mean titer values for both ICA512 and GAD65 (estimated increase in proportional odds = 1.61, 95% CI = 1.39, 1.87, P < 1 × 10 -9 and 1.17, 95% CI = 1.03, 1.32, P = .016, respectively) were associated with peak 120-minute glucose values. While fluctuating titer levels were observed in some subjects, no significant relationship between titer standard deviation and glucose values was observed. ICA512 autoantibody titers associate with progressive abnormalities in glucose metabolism in subjects at risk for type 1 diabetes. Fluctuations in autoantibody titers do not correlate with lower rates of progression to clinical disease. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Regional cerebral glucose metabolism in systemic lupus erythematosus patients with major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Saito, Tomoyuki; Tamura, Maasa; Chiba, Yuhei; Katsuse, Omi; Suda, Akira; Kamada, Ayuko; Ikura, Takahiro; Abe, Kie; Ogawa, Matsuyoshi; Minegishi, Kaoru; Yoshimi, Ryusuke; Kirino, Yohei; Ihata, Atsushi; Hirayasu, Yoshio

    2017-08-15

    Depression is frequently observed in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Neuropsychiatric SLE (NPSLE) patients often exhibit cerebral hypometabolism, but the association between cerebral metabolism and depression remains unclear. To elucidate the features of cerebral metabolism in SLE patients with depression, we performed brain 18F-fluoro-d-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) on SLE patients with and without major depressive disorder. We performed brain FDG-PET on 20 SLE subjects (5 male, 15 female). The subjects were divided into two groups: subjects with major depressive disorder (DSLE) and subjects without major depressive disorder (non-DSLE). Cerebral glucose metabolism was analyzed using the three-dimensional stereotactic surface projection (3D-SSP) program. Regional metabolism was evaluated by stereotactic extraction estimation (SEE), in which the whole brain was divided into segments. Every SLE subject exhibited cerebral hypometabolism, in contrast to the normal healthy subjects. Regional analysis revealed a significantly lower ER in the left medial frontal gyrus (p=0.0055) and the right medial frontal gyrus (p=0.0022) in the DSLE group than in the non-DSLE group. Hypometabolism in the medial frontal gyrus may be related to major depressive disorder in SLE. Larger studies are needed to clarify this relationship. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Effects of treatment for tobacco dependence on resting cerebral glucose metabolism.

    PubMed

    Costello, Matthew R; Mandelkern, Mark A; Shoptaw, Stephen; Shulenberger, Stephanie; Baker, Stephanie K; Abrams, Anna L; Xia, Catherine; London, Edythe D; Brody, Arthur L

    2010-02-01

    While bupropion HCl and practical group counseling (PGC) are commonly used treatments for tobacco dependence, the effects of these treatments on brain function are not well established. For this study, 54 tobacco-dependent cigarette smokers underwent resting (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) scanning before and after 8 weeks of treatment with bupropion HCl, PGC, or pill placebo. Using Statistical Parametric Mapping (SPM 2), changes in cerebral glucose metabolism from before to after treatment were compared between treatment groups and correlations were determined between amount of daily cigarette usage and cerebral glucose metabolism. Compared with placebo, the two active treatments (bupropion HCl and PGC) had reductions in glucose metabolism in the posterior cingulate gyrus. Further analysis suggested that PGC had a greater effect than bupropion HCl on glucose metabolism in this region. We also found positive correlations between daily cigarette use and glucose metabolism in the left occipital gyrus and parietal-temporal junction. There were no significant negative correlations between daily cigarette use and glucose metabolism. Our findings suggest that bupropion HCl and PGC reduce neural activity much as the performance of a goal-oriented task does in the default mode network of the brain, including the posterior cingulate gyrus. Thus, this study supports the theory that active treatments for tobacco dependence move the brain into a more goal-oriented state.

  18. Abnormal excitability and episodic low-frequency oscillations in the cerebral cortex of the tottering mouse.

    PubMed

    Cramer, Samuel W; Popa, Laurentiu S; Carter, Russell E; Chen, Gang; Ebner, Timothy J

    2015-04-08

    The Ca(2+) channelopathies caused by mutations of the CACNA1A gene that encodes the pore-forming subunit of the human Cav2.1 (P/Q-type) voltage-gated Ca(2+) channel include episodic ataxia type 2 (EA2). Although, in EA2 the emphasis has been on cerebellar dysfunction, patients also exhibit episodic, nonmotoric abnormalities involving the cerebral cortex. This study demonstrates episodic, low-frequency oscillations (LFOs) throughout the cerebral cortex of tottering (tg/tg) mice, a widely used model of EA2. Ranging between 0.035 and 0.11 Hz, the LFOs in tg/tg mice can spontaneously develop very high power, referred to as a high-power state. The LFOs in tg/tg mice are mediated in part by neuronal activity as tetrodotoxin decreases the oscillations and cortical neuron discharge contain the same low frequencies. The high-power state involves compensatory mechanisms because acutely decreasing P/Q-type Ca(2+) channel function in either wild-type (WT) or tg/tg mice does not induce the high-power state. In contrast, blocking l-type Ca(2+) channels, known to be upregulated in tg/tg mice, reduces the high-power state. Intriguingly, basal excitatory glutamatergic neurotransmission constrains the high-power state because blocking ionotropic or metabotropic glutamate receptors results in high-power LFOs in tg/tg but not WT mice. The high-power LFOs are decreased markedly by acetazolamide and 4-aminopyridine, the primary treatments for EA2, suggesting disease relevance. Together, these results demonstrate that the high-power LFOs in the tg/tg cerebral cortex represent a highly abnormal excitability state that may underlie noncerebellar symptoms that characterize CACNA1A mutations. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/355664-16$15.00/0.

  19. Pathogenesis and neuroimaging of cerebral large and small vessel disease in type 2 diabetes: A possible link between cerebral and retinal microvascular abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Umemura, Toshitaka; Kawamura, Takahiko; Hotta, Nigishi

    2017-03-01

    Diabetes patients have more than double the risk of ischemic stroke compared with non-diabetic individuals, and its neuroimaging characteristics have important clinical implications. To understand the pathophysiology of ischemic stroke in diabetes, it is important to focus not only on the stroke subtype, but also on the size and location of the occlusive vessels. Specifically, ischemic stroke in diabetes patients might be attributed to both large and small vessels, and intracranial internal carotid artery disease and small infarcts of the posterior circulation often occur. An additional feature is that asymptomatic lacunar infarctions are often seen in the basal ganglia and brain stem on brain magnetic resonance imaging. In particular, cerebral small vessel disease (SVD), including lacunar infarctions, white matter lesions and cerebral microbleeds, has been shown to be associated not only with stroke incidence, but also with the development and progression of dementia and diabetic microangiopathy. However, the pathogenesis of cerebral SVD is not fully understood. In addition, data on the association between neuroimaging findings of the cerebral SVD and diabetes are limited. Recently, the clinical importance of the link between cerebral SVD and retinal microvascular abnormalities has been a topic of considerable interest. Several clinical studies have shown that retinal microvascular abnormalities are closely related to cerebral SVD, suggesting that retinal microvascular abnormalities might be pathophysiologically linked to ischemic cerebral SVD. We review the literature relating to the pathophysiology and neuroimaging of cerebrovascular disease in diabetes, and discuss the problems based on the concept of cerebral large and small vessel disease. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Diabetes Investigation published by Asian Association for the Study of Diabetes (AASD) and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  20. [Joint effect of birth weight and obesity measures on abnormal glucose metabolism at adulthood].

    PubMed

    Xi, Bo; Cheng, Hong; Chen, Fangfang; Zhao, Xiaoyuan; Mi, Jie

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the joint effect of birth weight and each of obesity measures (body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC)) on abnormal glucose metabolism (including diabetes) at adulthood. Using the historical cohort study design and the convenience sampling method, 1 921 infants who were born in Beijing Union Medical College Hospital from June 1948 to December 1954 were selected to do the follow-up in 1995 and 2001 respectively. Through Beijing Household Registration and Management System, they were invited to participate in this study. A total of 972 subjects (627 were followed up in 1995 and 345 were followed up in 2001) with complete information on genders, age, birth weight, family history of diabetes, BMI, WC, fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and 2-hour plasma glucose (2 h PG) met the study inclusion criteria at the follow-up visits. In the data analysis, they were divided into low, normal, and high birth weight, respectively. The ANOVA and Chi-squared tests were used to compare the differences in their characteristics by birth weight group. In addition, multiple binary Logistic regression model was used to investigate the single effect of birth weight, BMI, and waist circumference on abnormal glucose metabolism at adulthood. Stratification analysis was used to investigate the joint effect of birth weight and each of obesity measures (BMI and WC) on abnormal glucose metabolism. There were 972 subjects (males: 50.7%, mean age: (46.0±2.2) years) included in the final data analysis. The 2 h PG in low birth weight group was (7.6±3.2) mmol/L , which was higher than that in normal birth weight group (6.9±2.1) mmol/L and high birth weight group (6.4±1.3) mmol/L (F=3.88, P=0.021). After adjustment for genders, age, body length, gestation age, family history of diabetes, physical activity, smoking and alcohol consumption, and duration of follow-up, subjects with overweight and obesity at adulthood had 2.73 (95% confidence interval (CI) =2.06- 3.62) times risk

  1. High prevalence of abnormal glucose homeostasis secondary to decreased insulin secretion in individuals with hereditary haemochromatosis.

    PubMed

    McClain, D A; Abraham, D; Rogers, J; Brady, R; Gault, P; Ajioka, R; Kushner, J P

    2006-07-01

    The prevalence and mechanisms of diabetes in hereditary haemochromatosis are not known. We therefore measured glucose tolerance, insulin secretory capacity and insulin sensitivity in adults with haemochromatosis. Subjects recruited from referrals to a haemochromatosis clinic underwent OGTT and frequently sampled IVGTT. A chart review of former clinic patients was also performed. The prevalence of diabetes (23%) and IGT (30%) was increased in haemochromatosis compared with matched control subjects (0% diabetes and 14% IGT). Subjects with haemochromatosis and diabetes were overweight (14%) or obese (86%). The prevalence of diabetes, as determined by chart review of fasting glucose values, in subjects who had haemochromatosis and were in the 40-79 years age range was 26%. Overall, patients with haemochromatosis and control subjects had similar values for acute insulin response to glucose and insulin sensitivity. However, patients with haemochromatosis and IGT had a 68% decrease in acute insulin response to glucose (p<0.02) compared with those with NGT. They were not insulin-resistant, exhibiting instead a 62% increase in insulin sensitivity (NS). Haemochromatosis subjects with diabetes exhibited further declines in acute insulin response to glucose, insulin resistance, or both. Diabetes and IGT are common in haemochromatosis, justifying screening for diabetes and therapeutic phlebotomy. The major abnormality associated with IGT is decreased insulin secretory capacity. Diabetes is usually associated with obesity and concomitant insulin resistance.

  2. Sindbis virus glycoproteins are abnormally glycosylated in Chinese hamster ovary cells deprived of glucose.

    PubMed

    Davidson, S K; Hunt, L A

    1985-07-01

    We have previously demonstrated that Sindbis virus infection of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells altered the protein glycosylation machinery of the cell, so that both normal, full-size (nine mannose-containing) oligosaccharides and abnormal, "truncated' (five mannose-containing) oligosaccharides are transferred from lipid-linked precursors to newly synthesized viral membrane glycoproteins. In the present studies, we have examined the precursor oligosaccharides on viral glycoproteins that were pulse-labelled with [3H]mannose in the presence or absence of glucose, since glucose starvation of uninfected CHO cells has been reported to induce synthesis of truncated precursor oligosaccharides. Pulse-labelling in the absence of glucose led to a greater than 10-fold increase in the relative amount of the truncated precursor oligosaccharides being transferred to the newly synthesized viral glycoproteins and to an apparent underglycosylation of some precursor viral polypeptides, with some asparaginyl sites not acquiring covalently linked oligosaccharides. The mature virion glycoproteins from CHO cells which were pulse-labelled in the absence of glucose and then 'chased' in the presence of glucose contained proportionately more unusual Man3GlcNAc2-size oligosaccharides. These small neutral-type oligosaccharides were apparently not as good a substrate for further processing into complex acidic-type oligosaccharides as the normal Man5GlcNAc2 intermediate that results from the full-size precursor oligosaccharides.

  3. Cerebral Metabolism and the Role of Glucose Control in Acute Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Buitrago Blanco, Manuel M; Prashant, Giyarpuram N; Vespa, Paul M

    2016-10-01

    This article reviews key concepts of cerebral glucose metabolism, neurologic outcomes in clinical trials, the biology of the neurovascular unit and its involvement in secondary brain injury after traumatic brain insults, and current scientific and clinical data that demonstrate a better understanding of the biology of metabolic dysfunction in the brain, a concept now known as cerebral metabolic energy crisis. The use of neuromonitoring techniques to better understand the pathophysiology of the metabolic crisis is reviewed and a model that summarizes the triphasic view of cerebral metabolic disturbance supported by existing scientific data is outlined. The evidence is summarized and a template for future research provided. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Voxel-based statistical analysis of cerebral glucose metabolism in patients with permanent vegetative state after acquired brain injury.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong Wook; Kim, Hyoung Seop; An, Young-Sil; Im, Sang Hee

    2010-10-01

    Permanent vegetative state is defined as the impaired level of consciousness longer than 12 months after traumatic causes and 3 months after non-traumatic causes of brain injury. Although many studies assessed the cerebral metabolism in patients with acute and persistent vegetative state after brain injury, few studies investigated the cerebral metabolism in patients with permanent vegetative state. In this study, we performed the voxel-based analysis of cerebral glucose metabolism and investigated the relationship between regional cerebral glucose metabolism and the severity of impaired consciousness in patients with permanent vegetative state after acquired brain injury. We compared the regional cerebral glucose metabolism as demonstrated by F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography from 12 patients with permanent vegetative state after acquired brain injury with those from 12 control subjects. Additionally, covariance analysis was performed to identify regions where decreased changes in regional cerebral glucose metabolism significantly correlated with a decrease of level of consciousness measured by JFK-coma recovery scale. Statistical analysis was performed using statistical parametric mapping. Compared with controls, patients with permanent vegetative state demonstrated decreased cerebral glucose metabolism in the left precuneus, both posterior cingulate cortices, the left superior parietal lobule (P(corrected) < 0.001), and increased cerebral glucose metabolism in the both cerebellum and the right supramarginal cortices (P(corrected) < 0.001). In the covariance analysis, a decrease in the level of consciousness was significantly correlated with decreased cerebral glucose metabolism in the both posterior cingulate cortices (P(uncorrected) < 0.005). Our findings suggest that the posteromedial parietal cortex, which are part of neural network for consciousness, may be relevant structure for pathophysiological mechanism in patients with permanent

  5. Exercise-induced changes in local cerebral glucose utilization in the rat.

    PubMed

    Vissing, J; Andersen, M; Diemer, N H

    1996-07-01

    In exercise, little is known about local cerebral glucose utilization (LCGU), which is an index of functional neurogenic activity. We measured LCGU in resting and running (approximately 85% of maximum O2 uptake) rats (n = 7 in both groups) previously equipped with a tail artery catheter. LCGU was measured quantitatively from 2-deoxy-D-[1-14C]glucose autoradiographs. During exercise, total cerebral glucose utilization (TCGU) increased by 38% (p < 0.005). LCGU increased (p < 0.05) in areas involved in motor function (motor cortex 39%, cerebellum approximately 110%, basal ganglia approximately 30%, substantia nigra approximately 37%, and in the following nuclei: subthalamic 47%, posterior hypothalamic 74%, red 61%, ambiguous 43%, pontine 61%), areas involved in sensory function (somatosensory 27%, auditory 32%, and visual cortex 42%, thalamus approximately 75%, and in the following nuclei: Darkschewitsch 22%, cochlear 51%, vestibular 30%, superior olive 23%, cuneate 115%), areas involved in autonomic function (dorsal raphe nucleus 30%, and areas in the hypothalamus approximately 35%, amygdala approximately 35%, and hippocampus 29%), and in white matter of the corpus callosum (36%) and cerebellum (52%). LCGU did not change with exercise in prefrontal and frontal cortex, cingulum, inferior olive, nucleus of solitary tract and median raphe, lateral septal and interpenduncular nuclei, or in areas of the hippocampus, amygdala, and hypothalamus. Glucose utilization did not decrease during exercise in any of the studied cerebral regions. In summary, heavy dynamic exercise increases TCGU and evokes marked differential changes in LCGU. The findings provide clues to the cerebral areas that participate in the large motor, sensory, and autonomic adaptation occurring in exercise.

  6. Cerebral glucose metabolic differences in patients with panic disorder

    SciTech Connect

    Nordahl, T.E.; Semple, W.E.; Gross, M.

    Regional glucose metabolic rates were measured in patients with panic disorder during the performance of auditory discrimination. Those regions examined by Reiman and colleagues in their blood flow study of panic disorder were examined with a higher resolution positron emission tomography (PET) scanner and with the tracer (F-18)-2-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose (FDG). In contrast to the blood flow findings of Reiman et al., we did not find global gray metabolic differences between patients with panic disorder and normal controls. Consistent with the findings of Reiman et al., we found hippocampal region asymmetry. We also found metabolic decreases in the left inferior parietal lobulemore » and in the anterior cingulate (trend), as well as an increase in the metabolic rate of the medial orbital frontal cortex (trend) of panic disorder patients. It is unclear whether the continuous performance task (CPT) enhanced or diminished findings that would have been noted in a study performed without task.« less

  7. The lipid accumulation product as a useful index for identifying abnormal glucose regulation in young Korean women.

    PubMed

    Oh, J-Y; Sung, Y-A; Lee, H J

    2013-04-01

    The lipid accumulation product, a combination of waist circumference and triglycerides concentration, has been suggested as a better marker for abnormal glucose regulation than BMI. We aimed to compare the lipid accumulation product and BMI as useful markers for abnormal glucose regulation in young Korean women. The lipid accumulation product was calculated using the formula [waist circumference (cm) - 58] × triglycerides (mmol/l). Glucose tolerance status was determined using a 75-g oral glucose tolerance test in 2810 Korean women aged 18-39 years from the general population. The prevalence of abnormal glucose regulation was 6.8% (isolated impaired fasting glucose 1.8%, isolated impaired glucose tolerance 4.0%; impaired fasting glucose + impaired glucose tolerance 0.4% and diabetes mellitus 0.6%). According to the quintile distributions of the lipid accumulation product and BMI, women with a lipid accumulation product quintile greater than their BMI quintile exhibited significantly greater areas under the curve and higher levels of 2-h post-load glucose, insulin, homeostasis model analysis of insulin resistance and lipid profiles than did women with a BMI quintile greater than their lipid accumulation product quintile. Multiple logistic regression revealed that the lipid accumulation product exhibited a higher odds ratio for abnormal glucose regulation than did BMI after adjusting for age, systolic blood pressure, HDL cholesterol, previous history of gestational diabetes and family history of diabetes (odds ratios 3.5 and 2.6 of the highest vs. the lowest quintiles of lipid accumulation product and BMI, respectively). The lipid accumulation product could be useful for identifying the young Korean women with abnormal glucose regulation. © 2012 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine © 2012 Diabetes UK.

  8. Positive affect predicts cerebral glucose metabolism in late middle-aged adults

    PubMed Central

    Nicholas, Christopher R.; Hoscheidt, Siobhan M.; Clark, Lindsay R.; Racine, Annie M.; Berman, Sara E.; Koscik, Rebecca L.; Maritza Dowling, N.; Asthana, Sanjay; Christian, Bradley T.; Sager, Mark A.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Positive affect is associated with a number of health benefits; however, few studies have examined the relationship between positive affect and cerebral glucose metabolism, a key energy source for neuronal function and a possible index of brain health. We sought to determine if positive affect was associated with cerebral glucose metabolism in late middle-aged adults (n = 133). Participants completed the positive affect subscale of the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale at two time points over a two-year period and underwent 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography scanning. After controlling for age, sex, perceived health status, depressive symptoms, anti-depressant use, family history of Alzheimer’s disease, APOE ε4 status and interval between visits, positive affect was associated with greater cerebral glucose metabolism across para-/limbic, frontal, temporal and parietal regions. Our findings provide evidence that positive affect in late midlife is associated with greater brain health in regions involved in affective processing and also known to be susceptible to early neuropathological processes. The current findings may have implications for interventions aimed at increasing positive affect to attenuate early neuropathological changes in at-risk individuals. PMID:28402542

  9. Arterial spin labelling reveals an abnormal cerebral perfusion pattern in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Melzer, Tracy R; Watts, Richard; MacAskill, Michael R; Pearson, John F; Rüeger, Sina; Pitcher, Toni L; Livingston, Leslie; Graham, Charlotte; Keenan, Ross; Shankaranarayanan, Ajit; Alsop, David C; Dalrymple-Alford, John C; Anderson, Tim J

    2011-03-01

    There is a need for objective imaging markers of Parkinson's disease status and progression. Positron emission tomography and single photon emission computed tomography studies have suggested patterns of abnormal cerebral perfusion in Parkinson's disease as potential functional biomarkers. This study aimed to identify an arterial spin labelling magnetic resonance-derived perfusion network as an accessible, non-invasive alternative. We used pseudo-continuous arterial spin labelling to measure cerebral grey matter perfusion in 61 subjects with Parkinson's disease with a range of motor and cognitive impairment, including patients with dementia and 29 age- and sex-matched controls. Principal component analysis was used to derive a Parkinson's disease-related perfusion network via logistic regression. Region of interest analysis of absolute perfusion values revealed that the Parkinson's disease pattern was characterized by decreased perfusion in posterior parieto-occipital cortex, precuneus and cuneus, and middle frontal gyri compared with healthy controls. Perfusion was preserved in globus pallidus, putamen, anterior cingulate and post- and pre-central gyri. Both motor and cognitive statuses were significant factors related to network score. A network approach, supported by arterial spin labelling-derived absolute perfusion values may provide a readily accessible neuroimaging method to characterize and track progression of both motor and cognitive status in Parkinson's disease.

  10. Abnormal cerebral functional connectivity in esophageal cancer patients with theory of mind deficits in resting state.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yin; Xiang, JianBo; Qian, Nong; Sun, SuPing; Hu, LiJun; Yuan, YongGui

    2015-01-01

    To explore the function of the default mode network (DMN) in the psychopathological mechanisms of theory of mind deficits in patients with an esophageal cancer concomitant with depression in resting the state. Twenty-five cases of esophageal cancer with theory of mind deficits (test group) that meet the diagnostic criteria of esophageal cancer and neuropsychological tests, including Beck depression inventory, reading the mind in the eyes, and Faux pas, were included, Another 25 cases of esophageal cancer patients but without theory of mind deficits (control group) were enrolled. Each patient completed a resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging. The functional connectivity intensities within the cerebral regions in the DMN of all the enrolled patients were analyzed. The results of each group were compared. The functional connectivity of the bilateral prefrontal central region with the precuneus, bilateral posterior cingulate gyrus and bilateral ventral anterior cingulate gyrus in the patients of the test group were all reduced significantly (P < 0.05). In the resting state, the functional connectivity is abnormal in the cerebral regions in the DMN of esophageal cancer patients with theory of mind deficits. The theory of mind deficits might have an important function in the pathogenesis of esophageal cancer.

  11. The relationship between sleep and glucagon-like peptide 1 in patients with abnormal glucose tolerance.

    PubMed

    Reutrakul, Sirimon; Sumritsopak, Rungtip; Saetung, Sunee; Chanprasertyothin, Suwannee; Anothaisintawee, Thunyarat

    2017-12-01

    Glucagon-like peptide 1 plays a role in glucose regulation. Sleep disturbances (obstructive sleep apnea, insufficient or poor sleep quality) have been shown to adversely affect glucose metabolism. This study aimed to explore the relationship between sleep and glucagon-like peptide 1 regulation in patients with abnormal glucose tolerance. Seventy-one adults with haemoglobin A1c levels between 5.7% and < 6.5% and no history of diabetes participated. Habitual sleep duration and efficiency were obtained from 7-day actigraphy recordings. Obstructive sleep apnea was assessed using an overnight home monitor. Glucagon-like peptide 1 levels were measured during a 75-g glucose tolerance. The area under the curve of glucagon-like peptide 1 was calculated. The mean age (SD) was 55.1 (8.3) years and median (interquartile range) haemoglobin A1c was 5.97% (5.86, 6.23). There was no relationship between sleep duration or efficiency and fasting or area under the curve glucagon-like peptide 1. Glucagon-like peptide 1 levels did not differ among those sleeping ≤ 5.75, > 5.75-< 6.5 or ≥ 6.5 h per night. Increasing apnea-hypopnea index, an indicator of obstructive sleep apnea severity, correlated with lower area under the curve glucagon-like peptide 1 (B -0.242, P = 0.045), but not with fasting glucagon-like peptide 1 (B -0.213, P = 0.079). After adjusting for sex, haemoglobin A1c and body mass index, increasing apnea-hypopnea index was negatively associated with having area under the curve glucagon-like peptide 1 in the highest quartile (odds ratio 0.581, P = 0.028, 95% CI 0.359, 0.942). This study demonstrated that increasing obstructive sleep apnea severity was associated with lower glucagon-like peptide 1 response to glucose challenge. This could possibly be an additional mechanism by which obstructive sleep apnea affects glucose metabolism. Whether raising glucagon-like peptide 1 levels in patients with abnormal glucose tolerance with more severe obstructive sleep

  12. Effect of whole brain radiation on local cerebral glucose utilization in the rat.

    PubMed

    d'Avella, D; Cicciarello, R; Albiero, F; Mesiti, M; Gagliardi, M E; Russi, E; d'Aquino, A; Princi, P; d'Aquino, S

    1991-04-01

    We assessed, by means of the [14C]-2-deoxy-D-glucose autoradiography method, the effect of whole-brain x-radiation on local cerebral glucose utilization in the rat brain. Animals were exposed to conventional fractionation (200 +/- 4 cGy/day, 5 days/week; total dose, 4000 cGy). Metabolic experiments were made 2 to 3 weeks after completion of the radiation exposure. In comparison with control and sham-irradiated animals, cerebral metabolic activity was diffusely decreased after irradiation. Statistically significant decreases in metabolic activity were observed in 13 of 27 brain regions studied. In general, the brain areas with the highest basal metabolic rates showed the greatest percentage of decrease in glucose utilization. The concept that radiation suppresses glucose utilization before any morphological change takes place in the cell structures was the basis of this study. Metabolic alterations after irradiation may explain the syndrome of early delayed deterioration observed in humans after whole-brain radiotherapy. These studies have applications to observations made with the [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose method in conjunction with positron emission tomographic scans in patients receiving radiation therapy for intracranial malignancies. The data reported here also have potential clinical implications for the evaluation of a risk/benefit ratio for radiotherapy in patients with benign neurosurgical diseases or children undergoing prophylactic treatment of the central nervous system.

  13. High glucose, glucose fluctuation and carbonyl stress enhance brain microvascular endothelial barrier dysfunction: Implications for diabetic cerebral microvasculature

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei; Maloney, Ronald E.; Aw, Tak Yee

    2015-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that in normal glucose (5 mM), methylglyoxal (MG, a model of carbonyl stress) induced brain microvascular endothelial cell (IHEC) dysfunction that was associated with occludin glycation and prevented by N-acetylcysteine (NAC). Herein, we investigated the impact of high glucose and low GSH, conditions that mimicked the diabetic state, on MG-induced IHEC dysfunction. MG-induced loss of transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER) was potentiated in IHECs cultured for 7 or 12 days in 25 mM glucose (hyperglycemia); moreover, barrier function remained disrupted 6 h after cell transfer to normal glucose media (acute glycemic fluctuation). Notably, basal occludin glycation was elevated under these glycemic states. TEER loss was exaggerated by inhibition of glutathione (GSH) synthesis and abrogated by NAC, which corresponded to GSH decreases and increases, respectively. Significantly, glyoxalase II activity was attenuated in hyperglycemic cells. Moreover, hyperglycemia and GSH inhibition increased MG accumulation, consistent with a compromised capacity for MG elimination. α-Oxoaldehydes (MG plus glyoxal) levels were elevated in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rat plasma. Immunohistochemistry revealed a prevalence of MG-positive, but fewer occludin-positive microvessels in the diabetic brain in vivo, and Western analysis confirmed an increase in MG–occludin adducts. These results provide the first evidence that hyperglycemia and acute glucose fluctuation promote MG–occludin formation and exacerbate brain microvascular endothelial dysfunction. Low occludin expression and high glycated-occludin contents in diabetic brain in vivo are factors that would contribute to the dysfunction of the cerebral microvasculature during diabetes. PMID:25867911

  14. High glucose, glucose fluctuation and carbonyl stress enhance brain microvascular endothelial barrier dysfunction: Implications for diabetic cerebral microvasculature.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Maloney, Ronald E; Aw, Tak Yee

    2015-08-01

    We previously demonstrated that in normal glucose (5mM), methylglyoxal (MG, a model of carbonyl stress) induced brain microvascular endothelial cell (IHEC) dysfunction that was associated with occludin glycation and prevented by N-acetylcysteine (NAC). Herein, we investigated the impact of high glucose and low GSH, conditions that mimicked the diabetic state, on MG-induced IHEC dysfunction. MG-induced loss of transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER) was potentiated in IHECs cultured for 7 or 12 days in 25 mM glucose (hyperglycemia); moreover, barrier function remained disrupted 6h after cell transfer to normal glucose media (acute glycemic fluctuation). Notably, basal occludin glycation was elevated under these glycemic states. TEER loss was exaggerated by inhibition of glutathione (GSH) synthesis and abrogated by NAC, which corresponded to GSH decreases and increases, respectively. Significantly, glyoxalase II activity was attenuated in hyperglycemic cells. Moreover, hyperglycemia and GSH inhibition increased MG accumulation, consistent with a compromised capacity for MG elimination. α-Oxoaldehydes (MG plus glyoxal) levels were elevated in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rat plasma. Immunohistochemistry revealed a prevalence of MG-positive, but fewer occludin-positive microvessels in the diabetic brain in vivo, and Western analysis confirmed an increase in MG-occludin adducts. These results provide the first evidence that hyperglycemia and acute glucose fluctuation promote MG-occludin formation and exacerbate brain microvascular endothelial dysfunction. Low occludin expression and high glycated-occludin contents in diabetic brain in vivo are factors that would contribute to the dysfunction of the cerebral microvasculature during diabetes. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Brain metabolism in autism. Resting cerebral glucose utilization rates as measured with positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Rumsey, J.M.; Duara, R.; Grady, C.

    The cerebral metabolic rate for glucose was studied in ten men (mean age = 26 years) with well-documented histories of infantile autism and in 15 age-matched normal male controls using positron emission tomography and (F-18) 2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose. Positron emission tomography was completed during rest, with reduced visual and auditory stimulation. While the autistic group as a whole showed significantly elevated glucose utilization in widespread regions of the brain, there was considerable overlap between the two groups. No brain region showed a reduced metabolic rate in the autistic group. Significantly more autistic, as compared with control, subjects showed extreme relative metabolic ratesmore » (ratios of regional metabolic rates to whole brain rates and asymmetries) in one or more brain regions.« less

  16. Higher serum glucose levels are associated with cerebral hypometabolism in Alzheimer regions.

    PubMed

    Burns, Christine M; Chen, Kewei; Kaszniak, Alfred W; Lee, Wendy; Alexander, Gene E; Bandy, Daniel; Fleisher, Adam S; Caselli, Richard J; Reiman, Eric M

    2013-04-23

    To investigate whether higher fasting serum glucose levels in cognitively normal, nondiabetic adults were associated with lower regional cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (rCMRgl) in brain regions preferentially affected by Alzheimer disease (AD). This is a cross-sectional study of 124 cognitively normal persons aged 64 ± 6 years with a first-degree family history of AD, including 61 APOEε4 noncarriers and 63 carriers. An automated brain mapping algorithm characterized and compared correlations between higher fasting serum glucose levels and lower [(18)F]-fluorodeoxyglucose-PET rCMRgl measurements. As predicted, higher fasting serum glucose levels were significantly correlated with lower rCMRgl and were confined to the vicinity of brain regions preferentially affected by AD. A similar pattern of regional correlations occurred in the APOEε4 noncarriers and carriers. Higher fasting serum glucose levels in cognitively normal, nondiabetic adults may be associated with AD pathophysiology. Findings suggest that the risk imparted by higher serum glucose levels may be independent of APOEε4 status. This study raises additional questions about the role of the metabolic process in the predisposition to AD and supports the possibility of targeting these processes in presymptomatic AD trials.

  17. Morphological and Glucose Metabolism Abnormalities in Alcoholic Korsakoff's Syndrome: Group Comparisons and Individual Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Pitel, Anne-Lise; Aupée, Anne-Marie; Chételat, Gaël; Mézenge, Florence; Beaunieux, Hélène; de la Sayette, Vincent; Viader, Fausto; Baron, Jean-Claude; Eustache, Francis; Desgranges, Béatrice

    2009-01-01

    Background Gray matter volume studies have been limited to few brain regions of interest, and white matter and glucose metabolism have received limited research attention in Korsakoff's syndrome (KS). Because of the lack of brain biomarkers, KS was found to be underdiagnosed in postmortem studies. Methodology/Principal Findings Nine consecutively selected patients with KS and 22 matched controls underwent both structural magnetic resonance imaging and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography examinations. Using a whole-brain analysis, the between-group comparisons of gray matter and white matter density and relative glucose uptake between patients with KS and controls showed the involvement of both the frontocerebellar and the Papez circuits, including morphological abnormalities in their nodes and connection tracts and probably resulting hypometabolism. The direct comparison of the regional distribution and degree of gray matter hypodensity and hypometabolism within the KS group indicated very consistent gray matter distribution of both abnormalities, with a single area of significant difference in the middle cingulate cortex showing greater hypometabolism than hypodensity. Finally, the analysis of the variability in the individual patterns of brain abnormalities within our sample of KS patients revealed that the middle cingulate cortex was the only brain region showing significant GM hypodensity and hypometabolism in each of our 9 KS patients. Conclusions/Significance These results indicate widespread brain abnormalities in KS including both gray and white matter damage mainly involving two brain networks, namely, the fronto-cerebellar circuit and the Papez circuit. Furthermore, our findings suggest that the middle cingulate cortex may play a key role in the pathophysiology of KS and could be considered as a potential in vivo brain biomarker. PMID:19936229

  18. [Characteristics of cerebral glucose metabolism in patients with cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Homenko, Ju G; Susin, D S; Kataeva, G V; Irishina, Ju A; Zavolokov, I G

    To study the relationship between early cognitive impairment symptoms and cerebral glucose metabolism in different brain regions (according to the positron emission tomography (PET) data) in Parkinson's disease (PD) in order to increase the diagnostic and treatment efficacy. Two groups of patients with PD (stage I-III), including 11 patients without cognitive disorders and 13 with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), were examined. The control group included 10 age-matched people with normal cognition. To evaluate cognitive state, the Mini mental state examination (MMSE), the Frontal assessment battery (FAB) and the 'clock drawing test' were used. The regional cerebral glucose metabolism rate (CMRglu) was assessed using PET with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG). In PD patients, CMRglu were decreased in the frontal (Brodmann areas (BA) 9, 10, 11, 46, 47), occipital (BA 19) and parietal (BA 39), temporal (BA 20, 37), and cingulate cortex (BA 32) compared to the control group. Cerebral glucose metabolism was decreased in the frontal (BA 8, 9, 10, 45, 46, 47), parietal (BA 7, 39, 40) and cingulate cortex (BA 23, 24, 31, 32) in the group of PD patients with MCI compared to PD patients with normal cognition. Hypometabolism in BA 7, 8, 23, 24, 31, 40 was revealed only in comparison of PD and PD-MCI groups, and did not appear in case of comparison of cognitively normal PD patients with the control group. It is possible to suggest that the mentioned above brain areas were associated with cognitive impairment. The revealed glucose hypometabolism pattern possibly has the diagnostic value for the early and preclinical diagnosis of MCI in PD and control of treatment efficacy.

  19. Abnormal Glucose Metabolism and High-Energy Expenditure in Idiopathic Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Malin, Steven K.; Barnes, Jarrod W.; Tian, Liping; Kirwan, John P.; Dweik, Raed A.

    2017-01-01

    Rationale: Insulin resistance has emerged as a potential mechanism related to the pathogenesis of idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH). However, direct measurements of insulin and glucose metabolism have not been performed in patients with IPAH to date. Objectives: To perform comprehensive metabolic phenotyping of humans with IPAH. Methods: We assessed plasma insulin and glucose, using an oral glucose tolerance test and estimated insulin resistance, and β-cell function in 14 patients with IPAH and 14 control subjects matched for age, sex, blood pressure, and body mass index. Body composition (dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry), inflammation (CXC chemokine ligand 10, endothelin-1), physical fitness (6-min walk test), and energy expenditure (indirect calorimetry) were also assessed. Measurements and Main Results: Patients with IPAH had a higher rate of impaired glucose tolerance (57 vs. 14%; P < 0.05) and reduced glucose-stimulated insulin secretion compared with matched control subjects (IPAH: 1.31 ± 0.76 μU/ml⋅mg/dl vs. control subjects: 2.21 ± 1.27 μU/ml⋅mg/dl; P < 0.05). Pancreatic β-cell function was associated with circulating endothelin-1 (r = –0.71, P < 0.01) and CXC chemokine ligand 10 (r = –0.56, P < 0.05). Resting energy expenditure was elevated in IPAH (IPAH: 32 ± 3.4 vs. control subjects: 28.8 ± 2.9 kcal/d/kg fat-free mass; P < 0.05) and correlated with the plasma glucose response (r = 0.51, P < 0.01). Greater insulin resistance was associated with reduced 6-minute walk distance (r = 0.55, P < 0.05). Conclusions: Independent of age, sex, blood pressure, and body mass index, patients with IPAH have glucose intolerance, decreased insulin secretion in response to glucose, and elevated resting energy expenditure. These abnormalities are associated with circulating markers of inflammation and vascular dysfunction. PMID:27922752

  20. AP4M1 is abnormally expressed in oxygen-glucose deprived hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J; Cheng, X Y; Sheng, G Y

    2014-03-20

    AP4M1 mutations have been suggested to be associated with autosomal recessive cerebral palsy syndrome. But the pathogenic mechanism remains uncertain. The purpose of this study is to investigate whether and how AP4M1 expression is changed in injured neurons. Primary cultured hippocampal neurons were prepared for this experiment. They were subjected to oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) leading to apoptosis, mimicking brain ischemia. Neuron-specific enolase (NSE) was labeled immunofluorescently to confirm that the purity of neuron was higher than 90%. Real-time PCR and western blotting were performed to measure the gene expression. AP4M1 was labeled with MAP2 or Tau-1 to observe the distribution. We found that the AP4M1 protein levels immediately after the procedure were similar between the OGD group and the sham group. However, down-regulation was observed 12h after the reperfusion, and became more notable at 24h. The real-time PCR showed similar results, except that the down-regulation of mRNA was able to be detected immediately after the OGD. Immunofluorescent labeling revealed AP4M1 distributed in the dendrites of normal neurons, but it redistributed to the axons after the OGD procedure. In conclusion, AP4M1 is not only down-regulated at both the mRNA and protein levels, but also redistributed from dendrites to axons in oxygen-glucose deprived hippocampal neurons. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Increased prevalence of abnormal glucose tolerance among obese siblings of children with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Magge, Sheela N; Stettler, Nicolas; Jawad, Abbas F; Levitt Katz, Lorraine E

    2009-04-01

    To test the hypothesis that overweight siblings of children with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) have a higher prevalence of abnormal glucose tolerance (AGT) compared with other overweight children. This was a cross-sectional study of overweight (body mass index [BMI] >or= 95(th) percentile) subjects, age 8 to 17 years, with at least 1 sibling age >or= 12 years. The primary outcome was AGT, as assessed by the oral glucose tolerance test (2-hour glucose >or= 140 mg/dL). The secondary outcome was insulin resistance by homeostasis model assessment (HOMA). The sibling (n=20) and control (n=42) groups were similar in terms of age, sex, racial distribution (largely African American), pubertal status, and BMI. The prevalence of AGT in the sibling group was 40.0% (n=8), compared with 14.3% (n=6) in controls (P= .048, Fisher exact test; unadjusted odds ratio=4.0; 95% confidence interval=1.2 to 13.5). Univariate analysis did not identify confounders for either outcome. There were no significant differences in HOMA or hemoglobin A1c between the 2 groups. Overweight siblings of children with T2DM had 4 times greater odds of having AGT compared with other overweight children. This group may represent a particularly high-risk population to target for screening and pediatric T2DM prevention.

  2. Assessment of specific characteristics of abnormal general movements: does it enhance the prediction of cerebral palsy?

    PubMed

    Hamer, Elisa G; Bos, Arend F; Hadders-Algra, Mijna

    2011-08-01

    Abnormal general movements at around 3 months corrected age indicate a high risk of cerebral palsy (CP). We aimed to determine whether specific movement characteristics can improve the predictive power of definitely abnormal general movements. Video recordings of 46 infants with definitely abnormal general movements at 9 to 13 weeks corrected age (20 males; 26 females; median gestational age 30wks; median birthweight 1200g) were analysed for the following characteristics: presence of fidgety, cramped synchronized, stiff, or jerky movements and asymmetrical tonic neck reflex pattern. Neurological condition (presence or absence of CP), gross motor development (Alberta Infant Motor Scales), quality of motor behaviour (Infant Motor Profile), functional mobility (Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory), and Mental Developmental Index (Bayley Scales) were assessed at 18 months corrected age. Infants were excluded from participating in the study if they had severe congenital anomalies or if their caregivers had an insufficient knowledge of the Dutch language. Of the 46 assessed infants, 10 developed spastic CP (Gross Motor Function Classification System levels I to V; eight bilateral spastic CP, two unilateral spastic CP). The absence of fidgety movements and the presence of predominantly stiff movements were associated with CP (Fisher's exact test, p=0.018 and p=0.007 respectively) and lower Infant Motor Profile scores (Mann-Whitney U test, p=0.015 and p=0.022 respectively); stiff and predominantly stiff movements were associated with lower Alberta Infant Motor Scales scores (Mann-Whitney U test, p=0.01 and p=0.004 respectively). Cramped synchronized movements and the asymmetrical tonic neck reflex pattern were not related to outcome. None of the movement characteristics were associated with Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory scores or the Mental Developmental Index. The assessment of fidgety movements and movement stiffness may improve the predictive

  3. Cerebral Developmental Abnormalities in a Mouse with Systemic Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Pliss, Lioudmila; Hausknecht, Kathryn A.; Stachowiak, Michal K.; Dlugos, Cynthia A.; Richards, Jerry B.; Patel, Mulchand S.

    2013-01-01

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) complex (PDC) deficiency is an inborn error of pyruvate metabolism causing a variety of neurologic manifestations. Systematic analyses of development of affected brain structures and the cellular processes responsible for their impairment have not been performed due to the lack of an animal model for PDC deficiency. METHODS: In the present study we investigated a murine model of systemic PDC deficiency by interrupting the X-linked Pdha1 gene encoding the α subunit of PDH to study its role on brain development and behavioral studies. RESULTS: Male embryos died prenatally but heterozygous females were born. PDC activity was reduced in the brain and other tissues in female progeny compared to age-matched control females. Immunohistochemical analysis of several brain regions showed that approximately 40% of cells were PDH−. The oxidation of glucose to CO2 and incorporation of glucose-carbon into fatty acids were reduced in brain slices from 15 day-old PDC-deficient females. Histological analyses showed alterations in several structures in white and gray matters in 35 day-old PDC-deficient females. Reduction in total cell number and reduced dendritic arbors in Purkinje neurons were observed in PDC-deficient females. Furthermore, cell proliferation, migration and differentiation into neurons by newly generated cells were reduced in the affected females during pre- and postnatal periods. PDC-deficient mice had normal locomotor activity in a novel environment but displayed decreased startle responses to loud noises and there was evidence of abnormal pre-pulse inhibition of the startle reflex. CONCLUSIONS: The results show that a reduction in glucose metabolism resulting in deficit in energy production and fatty acid biosynthesis impairs cellular differentiation and brain development in PDC-deficient mice. PMID:23840713

  4. Effect of acute and repeated restraint stress on glucose oxidation to CO2 in hippocampal and cerebral cortex slices.

    PubMed

    Torres, I L; Gamaro, G D; Silveira-Cucco, S N; Michalowski, M B; Corrêa, J B; Perry, M L; Dalmaz, C

    2001-01-01

    It has been suggested that glucocorticoids released during stress might impair neuronal function by decreasing glucose uptake by hippocampal neurons. Previous work has demonstrated that glucose uptake is reduced in hippocampal and cerebral cortex slices 24 h after exposure to acute stress, while no effect was observed after repeated stress. Here, we report the effect of acute and repeated restraint stress on glucose oxidation to CO2 in hippocampal and cerebral cortex slices and on plasma glucose and corticosterone levels. Male adult Wistar rats were exposed to restraint 1 h/day for 50 days in the chronic model. In the acute model there was a single exposure. Immediately or 24 h after stress, the animals were sacrificed and the hippocampus and cerebral cortex were dissected, sliced, and incubated with Krebs buffer, pH 7.4, containing 5 mM glucose and 0.2 microCi D-[U-14C] glucose. CO2 production from glucose was estimated. Trunk blood was also collected, and both corticosterone and glucose were measured. The results showed that corticosterone levels after exposure to acute restraint were increased, but the increase was smaller when the animals were submitted to repeated stress. Blood glucose levels increased after both acute and repeated stress. However, glucose utilization, measured as CO2 production in hippocampal and cerebral cortex slices, was the same in stressed and control groups under conditions of both acute and chronic stress. We conclude that, although stress may induce a decrease in glucose uptake, this effect is not sufficient to affect the energy metabolism of these cells.

  5. Evidence for the absence of cerebral glucose-6-phosphatase activity in glycogen storage disease type I (Von Gierke's disease)

    SciTech Connect

    Phelps, M.E.; Mazziotta, J.C.; Hawkins, R.A.

    1981-01-01

    Glycogen storage disease type I (GSD-I) is characterized by a functional deficit in glucose-6-phosphatase that normally hydrolyzes glucose-6-PO/sub 4/ to glucose. This enzyme is primarily found in liver, kidney, and muscle but it is also present in brain, where it appears to participate in the regulation of cerebral tissue glucose. Since most neurological symptoms in GSD-I patients involve systemic hypoglycemia, previous reports have not examined possible deficiencies in phosphatase activity in the brain. Positron computed tomography, F-18-labeled 2-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and a tracer kinetic model for FDG were used to measure the cortical plasma/tissue forward and reverse transport, phosphorylation and dephosphorylationmore » rate constants, tissue/plasma concentration gradient, tissue concentration turnover rate for this competitive analog of glucose, and the cortical metabolic rates for glucose. Studies were carried out in age-matched normals (N = 13) and a single GSD-I patient. The dephosphorylation rate constant in the GSD-I patient was about one tenth the normal value indicating a low level of cerebral phosphatase activity. The other measured parameters were within normal limits except for the rate of glucose phosphorylation which reflected a cortical glucose metabolic rate one half the normal value. Since glucose transport and tissue glucose concentration was normal, the reduced cortical glucose metabolism probably results from the use of alternative substrates (..beta..-hydroxybutyrate and acetoacetate) which are consistently elevated in the plasma of GSD-I patients.« less

  6. Early primary biliary cholangitis is characterised by brain abnormalities on cerebral magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Grover, V P B; Southern, L; Dyson, J K; Kim, J U; Crossey, M M E; Wylezinska-Arridge, M; Patel, N; Fitzpatrick, J A; Bak-Bol, A; Waldman, A D; Alexander, G J; Mells, G F; Chapman, R W; Jones, D E J; Taylor-Robinson, S D

    2016-11-01

    Brain change can occur in primary biliary cholangitis (PBC), potentially as a result of cholestatic and/or inflammatory processes. This change is linked to systemic symptoms of fatigue and cognitive impairment. To identify whether brain change occurs early in PBC. If the change develops early and is progressive, it may explain the difficulty in treating these symptoms. Early disease brain change was explored in 13 patients with newly diagnosed biopsy-proven precirrhotic PBC using magnetisation transfer, diffusion-weighted imaging and 1 H magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Results were compared to 17 healthy volunteers. Cerebral magnetisation transfer ratios were reduced in early PBC, compared to healthy volunteers, in the thalamus, putamen and head of caudate with no greater reduction in patients with greater symptom severity. Mean apparent diffusion coefficients were increased in the thalamus only. No 1 H magnetic resonance spectroscopy abnormalities were seen. Serum manganese levels were elevated in all PBC patients, but no relationship was seen with imaging or symptom parameters. There were no correlations between neuroimaging data, laboratory data, symptom severity scores or age. This is the first study to be performed in this precirrhotic patient population, and we have highlighted that neuroimaging changes are present at a much earlier stage than previously demonstrated. The neuroimaging abnormalities suggest that the brain changes seen in PBC occur early in the pathological process, even before significant liver damage has occurred. If such changes are linked to symptom pathogenesis, this could have important implications for the timing of second-line-therapy use. © 2016 The Authors. Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Area-Level Socioeconomic Status and Incidence of Abnormal Glucose Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Emily D.; Magliano, Dianna J.; Zimmet, Paul Z.; Kavanagh, Anne M.; Stevenson, Christopher E.; Oldenburg, Brian F.; Shaw, Jonathan E.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine the role of area-level socioeconomic status (SES) on the development of abnormal glucose metabolism (AGM) using national, population-based data. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS The Australian Diabetes, Obesity and Lifestyle (AusDiab) study is a national, population-based, longitudinal study of adults aged ≥25 years. A sample of 4,572 people provided complete baseline (1999 to 2000) and 5-year follow-up (2004 to 2005) data relevant for these analyses. Incident AGM was assessed using fasting plasma glucose and 2-h plasma glucose from oral glucose tolerance tests, and demographic, socioeconomic, and behavioral data were collected by interview and questionnaire. Area SES was defined using the Index of Relative Socioeconomic Disadvantage. Generalized linear mixed models were used to examine the relationship between area SES and incident AGM, with adjustment for covariates and correction for cluster design effects. RESULTS Area SES predicted the development of AGM, after adjustment for age, sex, and individual SES. People living in areas with the most disadvantage were significantly more likely to develop AGM, compared with those living in the least deprived areas (odds ratio 1.53; 95% CI 1.07–2.18). Health behaviors (in particular, physical activity) and central adiposity appeared to partially mediate this relationship. CONCLUSIONS Our findings suggest that characteristics of the physical, social, and economic aspects of local areas influence diabetes risk. Future research should focus on identifying the aspects of local environment that are associated with diabetes risk and how they might be modified. PMID:22619081

  8. Regional cerebral glucose metabolic rate in human sleep assessed by positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Buchsbaum, M.S.; Wu, J.; Hazlett, E.

    The cerebral metabolic rate of glucose was measured during nighttime sleep in 36 normal volunteers using positron emission tomography and fluorine-18-labeled 2-deoxyglucose (FDG). In comparison to waking controls, subjects given FDG during non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep showed about a 23% reduction in metabolic rate across the entire brain. This decrease was greater for the frontal than temporal or occipital lobes, and greater for basal ganglia and thalamus than cortex. Subjects in rapid eye movement (REM) sleep tended to have higher cortical metabolic rates than walking subjects. The cingulate gyrus was the only cortical structure to show a significant increasemore » in glucose metabolic rate in REM sleep in comparison to waking. The basal ganglia were relatively more active on the right in REM sleep and symmetrical in NREM sleep.« less

  9. Increased regional cerebral glucose uptake in an APP/PS1 model of Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Poisnel, Géraldine; Hérard, Anne-Sophie; El Tannir El Tayara, Nadine; Bourrin, Emmanuel; Volk, Andreas; Kober, Frank; Delatour, Benoit; Delzescaux, Thierry; Debeir, Thomas; Rooney, Thomas; Benavides, Jésus; Hantraye, Philippe; Dhenain, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD), the most common age-related neurodegenerative disorder, is characterized by the invariant cerebral accumulation of β-amyloid peptide. This event occurs early in the disease process. In humans, [18F]-Fluoro-2-deoxy-D-Glucose-Positron Emission Tomography ([18F]-FDG-PET) is largely used to follow-up in vivo cerebral glucose utilisation (CGU) and brain metabolism modifications associated to the AD pathology. Here, [18F]-FDG-PET was used to study age-related changes of CGU under resting conditions in 3, 6 and 12-month-old APPSweLon/PS1M146L, a mouse model of amyloidosis. We showed an age-dependent increase of glucose uptake in several brain regions of APP/PS1 mice but not in control animals and a higher [18F]-FDG uptake in the cortex and the hippocampus of 12-month-old APP/PS1 mice as compared to age-matched control mice. We then developed a method of 3D-microscopic autoradiography to evaluate glucose uptake at the level of amyloid plaques and showed an increased glucose uptake close to the plaques rather than in amyloid-free cerebral tissues. These data suggest a macroscopic and microscopic reorganisation of glucose uptake in relation to cerebral amyloidosis. PMID:22079157

  10. The Effects of Capillary Transit Time Heterogeneity (CTH) on the Cerebral Uptake of Glucose and Glucose Analogs: Application to FDG and Comparison to Oxygen Uptake

    PubMed Central

    Angleys, Hugo; Jespersen, Sune N.; Østergaard, Leif

    2016-01-01

    Glucose is the brain's principal source of ATP, but the extent to which cerebral glucose consumption (CMRglc) is coupled with its oxygen consumption (CMRO2) remains unclear. Measurements of the brain's oxygen-glucose index OGI = CMRO2/CMRglc suggest that its oxygen uptake largely suffices for oxidative phosphorylation. Nevertheless, during functional activation and in some disease states, brain tissue seemingly produces lactate although cerebral blood flow (CBF) delivers sufficient oxygen, so-called aerobic glycolysis. OGI measurements, in turn, are method-dependent in that estimates based on glucose analog uptake depend on the so-called lumped constant (LC) to arrive at CMRglc. Capillary transit time heterogeneity (CTH), which is believed to change during functional activation and in some disease states, affects the extraction efficacy of oxygen from blood. We developed a three-compartment model of glucose extraction to examine whether CTH also affects glucose extraction into brain tissue. We then combined this model with our previous model of oxygen extraction to examine whether differential glucose and oxygen extraction might favor non-oxidative glucose metabolism under certain conditions. Our model predicts that glucose uptake is largely unaffected by changes in its plasma concentration, while changes in CBF and CTH affect glucose and oxygen uptake to different extents. Accordingly, functional hyperemia facilitates glucose uptake more than oxygen uptake, favoring aerobic glycolysis during enhanced energy demands. Applying our model to glucose analogs, we observe that LC depends on physiological state, with a risk of overestimating relative increases in CMRglc during functional activation by as much as 50%. PMID:27790110

  11. Mild traumatic brain injury results in depressed cerebral glucose uptake: An (18)FDG PET study.

    PubMed

    Selwyn, Reed; Hockenbury, Nicole; Jaiswal, Shalini; Mathur, Sanjeev; Armstrong, Regina C; Byrnes, Kimberly R

    2013-12-01

    Moderate to severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) in humans and rats induces measurable metabolic changes, including a sustained depression in cerebral glucose uptake. However, the effect of a mild TBI on brain glucose uptake is unclear, particularly in rodent models. This study aimed to determine the glucose uptake pattern in the brain after a mild lateral fluid percussion (LFP) TBI. Briefly, adult male rats were subjected to a mild LFP and positron emission tomography (PET) imaging with (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)FDG), which was performed prior to injury and at 3 and 24 h and 5, 9, and 16 days post-injury. Locomotor function was assessed prior to injury and at 1, 3, 7, 14, and 21 days after injury using modified beam walk tasks to confirm injury severity. Histology was performed at either 10 or 21 days post-injury. Analysis of function revealed a transient impairment in locomotor ability, which corresponds to a mild TBI. Using reference region normalization, PET imaging revealed that mild LFP-induced TBI depresses glucose uptake in both the ipsilateral and contralateral hemispheres in comparison with sham-injured and naïve controls from 3 h to 5 days post-injury. Further, areas of depressed glucose uptake were associated with regions of glial activation and axonal damage, but no measurable change in neuronal loss or gross tissue damage was observed. In conclusion, we show that mild TBI, which is characterized by transient impairments in function, axonal damage, and glial activation, results in an observable depression in overall brain glucose uptake using (18)FDG-PET.

  12. Effects of oxotremorine on local glucose utilization in the rat cerebral cortex

    SciTech Connect

    Dam, M.; Wamsley, J.K.; Rapoport, S.I.

    The (/sup 14/C)2-deoxy-D-glucose technique was used to examine the effects of central muscarinic stimulation on local cerebral glucose utilization (LCGU) in the cerebral cortex of the unanesthetized rat. Systemic administration of the muscarinic agonist oxotremorine (OXO, 0.1 to 1.0 mg/kg, i.p.) increased LCGU in the neocortex, mesocortex, and paleocortex. In the neocortex, OXO was more potent in elevating LCGU of the auditory, frontal, and sensorimotor regions compared with the visual cortex. Within these neocortical regions, OXO effects were greatest in cortical layers IV and V. OXO effects were more dramatic in the neocortex than in the meso- or paleocortex, andmore » no significant effect occurred in the perirhinal and pyriform cortices. OXO-induced LCGU increases were not influenced by methylatropine (1 mg/kg, s.c.) but were antagonized completely by scopolamine (2.5 mg/kg, i.p.). Scopolamine reduced LCGU in layer IV of the auditory cortex and in the retrosplenial cortex. The distribution and magnitude of the cortical LCGU response to OXO apparently were related to the distributions of cholinergic neurochemical markers, especially high affinity muscarinic binding sites.« less

  13. Basal cerebral glucose distribution in long-term post-traumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    Molina, Mario Enrique; Isoardi, Roberto; Prado, Marcela Nathalie; Bentolila, Silvia

    2010-03-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to study basal cerebral glucose absorption patterns associated to long-term post-traumatic stress disorder. Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) and statistic parametric mapping (SPM) were used to compare regional cerebral glucose absorption between 15 war veterans (Hispanic men, aged 39-41 (M = 39.5, SD = 0.84)) diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) based on DSM-IV criteria, and a matching control group of six asymptomatic veterans. This study was conducted 20 years after the traumatic events. PTSD patients presented relatively diminished activity (P<0.005) in: cingulate gyri, precuneus, insula, hippocampus; frontal, pre-frontal and post-central regions; lingual, calcarine, occipital medial and superior gyri, and verbal and paraverbal areas. Relativeley augmented activity (P<0.005) was observed in PTSD patients in: fusiform, temporal superior, medial, and inferior gyri; occipital medial, inferior and lingual gyri; precuneus, and cerebellum. The amygdala and the thalamus showed normal metabolic activity. Various brain regions that showed diminished activity (limbic, frontal and prefrontal cortex, multimodal parieto-occipital areas and verbal and paraverbal areas) have evolved lately, and sub-serve highly complex cognitive and behavioural functions. Metabolic activity patterns are comparable to those observed in personality disorders of the borderline type.

  14. Comparison of differences in respiratory function and pressure as a predominant abnormal movement of children with cerebral palsy

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Hae-Yeon

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to determine differences in respiratory function and pressure among three groups of children with cerebral palsy as a predominant abnormal movement which included spastic type, dyskinetic type, and ataxic type. [Subjects and Methods] Forty-three children with cerebral palsy of 5–13 years of age in I–III levels according to the Gross Motor Function Classification System, the study subjects were divided by stratified random sampling into three groups of spastic type, dyskinetic type, and ataxic type. For reliability of the measurement results, respiratory function and pressure of the children with cerebral palsy were measured by the same inspector using Spirometer Pony FX (Cosmed Ltd., Italy) equipment, and the subject’s guardians (legal representative) was always made to observe. [Results] In the respiratory function, there were significant differences among three groups in all of forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume at one second, and peak expiratory flow. For respiratory pressure, the maximal inspiratory pressure had significant differences among three groups, although the maximal expiratory pressure had no significant difference. [Conclusion] Therefore, pediatric physical therapists could be provided with important clinical information in understanding the differences in respiratory function and pressure for the children with cerebral palsy showing predominantly abnormal movement as a diverse qualitative characteristics of the muscle tone and movement patterns, and in planning intervention programs for improvement of respiratory capacity. PMID:28265153

  15. Abnormal Glucose Metabolism in Alzheimer’s Disease: Relation to Autophagy/Mitophagy and Therapeutic Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Kalpita; Munshi, Soumyabrata; Frank, David E.; Gibson, Gary E.

    2015-01-01

    Diminished glucose metabolism accompanies many neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer’s disease. An understanding of the relation of these metabolic changes to the disease will enable development of novel therapeutic strategies. Following a metabolic challenge, cells generally conserve energy to preserve viability. This requires activation of many cellular repair/regenerative processes such as mitophagy/autophagy and fusion/fission. These responses may diminish cell function in the long term. Prolonged fission induces mitophagy/autophagy which promotes repair but if prolonged progresses to mitochondrial degradation. Abnormal glucose metabolism alters protein signaling including the release of proteins from the mitochondria or migration of proteins from the cytosol to the mitochondria or nucleus. This overview provides an insight into the different mechanisms of autophagy/mitophagy and mitochondrial dynamics in response to the diminished metabolism that occurs with diseases, especially neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease. The review discusses multiple aspects of mitochondrial responses including different signaling proteins and pathways of mitophagy and mitochondrial biogenesis. Improving cellular bioenergetics and mitochondrial dynamics will alter protein signaling and improve cellular/mitochondrial repair and regeneration. An understanding of these changes will suggest new therapeutic strategies. PMID:26077923

  16. Are barriers to physical activity similar for adults with and without abnormal glucose metabolism?

    PubMed

    Hume, Clare; Dunstan, David; Salmon, Jo; Healy, Genevieve; Andrianopoulos, Nick; Owen, Neville

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine perceived barriers to physical activity among adults with and without abnormal glucose metabolism (AGM), and whether barriers varied according to physical activity status. The 1999 to 2000 Australian Diabetes, Obesity, and Lifestyle Study (AusDiab) was a population-based cross-sectional study among adults aged > or =25 years. AGM was identified through an oral glucose tolerance test. The previous week's physical activity and individual, social, and environmental barriers to physical activity were self-reported. Logistic regression analyses examined differences in barriers to physical activity between those with and without AGM, and for those with and without AGM who did and did not meet the minimum recommendation of 150 minutes/week of moderate-to-vigorous intensity physical activity. Of the 7088 participants (47.5 +/- 12.7 years; 46% male), 18.5% had AGM. Approximately 47.5% of those with AGM met the physical activity recommendation, compared to 54.7% of those without AGM (P < .001). Key barriers to physical activity included lack of time, other priorities, and being tired. Following adjustment for sociodemographic and behavioral factors, there were few differences in barriers to physical activity between those with and without AGM, even after stratifying according to physical activity. Adults with AGM report similar barriers to physical activity, as do those without AGM. Programs for those with AGM can therefore focus on the known generic adult-reported barriers to physical activity.

  17. Air Pollution Exposure and Abnormal Glucose Tolerance during Pregnancy: The Project Viva Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Gold, Diane R.; Rifas-Shiman, Sheryl L.; Koutrakis, Petros; Schwartz, Joel D.; Kloog, Itai; Melly, Steven; Coull, Brent A.; Zanobetti, Antonella; Gillman, Matthew W.; Oken, Emily

    2014-01-01

    Background: Exposure to fine particulate matter (PM with diameter ≤ 2.5 μm; PM2.5) has been linked to type 2 diabetes mellitus, but associations with hyperglycemia in pregnancy have not been well studied. Methods: We studied Boston, Massachusetts–area pregnant women without known diabetes. We identified impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) during pregnancy from clinical glucose tolerance tests at median 28.1 weeks gestation. We used residential addresses to estimate second-trimester PM2.5 and black carbon exposure via a central monitoring site and spatiotemporal models. We estimated residential traffic density and roadway proximity as surrogates for exposure to traffic-related air pollution. We performed multinomial logistic regression analyses adjusted for sociodemographic covariates, and used multiple imputation to account for missing data. Results: Of 2,093 women, 65 (3%) had IGT and 118 (6%) had GDM. Second-trimester spatiotemporal exposures ranged from 8.5 to 15.9 μg/m3 for PM2.5 and from 0.1 to 1.7 μg/m3 for black carbon. Traffic density was 0–30,860 vehicles/day × length of road (kilometers) within 100 m; 281 (13%) women lived ≤ 200 m from a major road. The prevalence of IGT was elevated in the highest (vs. lowest) quartile of exposure to spatiotemporal PM2.5 [odds ratio (OR) = 2.63; 95% CI: 1.15, 6.01] and traffic density (OR = 2.66; 95% CI: 1.24, 5.71). IGT also was positively associated with other exposure measures, although associations were not statistically significant. No pollutant exposures were positively associated with GDM. Conclusions: Greater exposure to PM2.5 and other traffic-related pollutants during pregnancy was associated with IGT but not GDM. Air pollution may contribute to abnormal glycemia in pregnancy. Citation: Fleisch AF, Gold DR, Rifas-Shiman SL, Koutrakis P, Schwartz JD, Kloog I, Melly S, Coull BA, Zanobetti A, Gillman MW, Oken E. 2014. Air pollution exposure and abnormal glucose

  18. Changes in cerebral glucose metabolism during early abstinence from chronic methamphetamine abuse.

    PubMed

    Berman, S M; Voytek, B; Mandelkern, M A; Hassid, B D; Isaacson, A; Monterosso, J; Miotto, K; Ling, W; London, E D

    2008-09-01

    Changes in brain function during the initial weeks of abstinence from chronic methamphetamine abuse may substantially affect clinical outcome, but are not well understood. We used positron emission tomography with [F-18]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) to quantify regional cerebral glucose metabolism, an index of brain function, during performance of a vigilance task. A total of 10 methamphetamine-dependent subjects were tested after 5-9 days of abstinence, and after 4 additional weeks of supervised abstinence. A total of 12 healthy control subjects were tested at corresponding times. Global glucose metabolism increased between tests (P=0.01), more in methamphetamine-dependent (10.9%, P=0.02) than control subjects (1.9%, NS). Glucose metabolism did not change in subcortical regions of methamphetamine-dependent subjects, but increased in neocortex, with maximal increase (>20%) in parietal regions. Changes in reaction time and self-reports of negative affect varied more in methamphetamine-dependent than in control subjects, and correlated both with the increase in parietal glucose metabolism, and decrease in relative activity (after scaling to the global mean) in some regions. A robust relationship between change in self-reports of depressive symptoms and relative activity in the ventral striatum may have great relevance to treatment success because of the role of this region in drug abuse-related behaviors. Shifts in cortical-subcortical metabolic balance either reflect new processes that occur during early abstinence, or the unmasking of effects of chronic methamphetamine abuse that are obscured by suppression of cortical glucose metabolism that continues for at least 5-9 days after cessation of methamphetamine self-administration.

  19. Abnormal regional cerebral blood flow in systemic lupus erythematosus patients with psychiatric symptoms.

    PubMed

    Oda, Kenji; Matsushima, Eisuke; Okubo, Yoshiro; Ohta, Katsuya; Murata, Yuji; Koike, Ryuji; Miyasaka, Nobuyuki; Kato, Motoichiro

    2005-07-01

    Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) studies have demonstrated decreased regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients. However, no study has done voxel-based analysis using statistical parametric mapping (SPM) that can evaluate rCBF objectively, and the relationship between rCBF and psychiatric symptoms has not been well investigated. Using L,L-ethyl cysteinate dimer (99mTc ECD) SPECT and SPM, we aimed to clarify the association of rCBF changes with psychiatric symptoms in SLE patients whose magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed no morphological abnormalities. Twenty SLE patients and 19 healthy volunteers underwent 99mTc ECD SPECT. Data were collected from August 2000 to March 2003. SLE was diagnosed according to American College of Rheumatology criteria, and psychiatric symptoms were diagnosed according to ICD-10 criteria. On the basis of the modified Carbotte, Denburg, and Denburg method, the patients were classified into 3 groups: a group with major psychiatric symptoms (hallucinosis, delusional disorder, and mood disorder), a group with minor psychiatric symptoms (anxiety disorder, dissociative disorder, and emotionally labile disorder), and a group without psychiatric symptoms. Gross organic lesions were ruled out by brain MRI. Group comparisons of rCBF were performed with analysis using SPM99. SLE patients without MRI lesions showed decreased rCBF in the posterior cingulate gyrus and thalamus. The reduction in rCBF was overt in patients with major psychiatric symptoms. Our study indicated that SLE patients may have dysfunction in the posterior cingulate gyrus and thalamus and that this may be associated with the severity of psychiatric symptoms.

  20. Regional cerebral blood flow and abnormal eating behavior in Prader-Willi syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ogura, Kaeko; Fujii, Toshikatsu; Abe, Nobuhito; Hosokai, Yoshiyuki; Shinohara, Mayumi; Fukuda, Hiroshi; Mori, Etsuro

    2013-05-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is a genetically determined neurodevelopmental disorder and is generally regarded as a genetic model of obesity. Individuals with PWS exhibit behavioral symptoms including temper tantrums, rigid thinking, and compulsive behavior. The most striking feature of PWS is abnormal eating behavior, including hyperphagia, intense preoccupation with food, and incessant food seeking. To explore brain regions associated with the behavioral symptoms of PWS, we investigated differences in resting-state regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) between individuals with PWS and healthy controls. Correlation analyses were also performed to examine the relationship between rCBF and altered eating behavior in PWS individuals. Twelve adults with PWS and 13 age- and gender-matched controls underwent resting-state single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) with N-isopropyl-p-[(123)I] iodoamphetamine (IMP). The rCBF data were analyzed on a voxel-by-voxel basis using SPM5 software. The results demonstrated that compared with controls, individuals with PWS had significantly lower rCBF in the right thalamus, left insular cortex, bilateral lingual gyrus, and bilateral cerebellum. They had significantly higher rCBF in the right inferior frontal gyrus, left middle/inferior frontal gyrus (anterior and posterior clusters), and bilateral angular gyrus. Additionally, rCBF in the left insula, which was significantly lower in PWS individuals, was negatively correlated with the eating behavior severity score. These results suggest that specific brain regions, particularly the left insula, may be partly responsible for the behavioral symptoms in PWS. Copyright © 2012 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Cerebral glucose utilisation in hepatitis C virus infection-associated encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Heeren, Meike; Weissenborn, Karin; Arvanitis, Dimitrios; Bokemeyer, Martin; Goldbecker, Annemarie; Tountopoulou, Argyro; Peschel, Thomas; Grosskreutz, Julian; Hecker, Hartmut; Buchert, Ralph; Berding, Georg

    2011-11-01

    Patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection frequently show neuropsychiatric symptoms. This study aims to help clarify the neurochemical mechanisms behind these symptoms and to add further proof to the hypothesis that HCV may affect brain function. Therefore, 15 patients who reported increasing chronic fatigue, mood alterations, and/or cognitive decline since their HCV infection underwent neurologic and neuropsychological examination, magnetic resonance imaging, (18)F-fluoro-deoxy-glucose positron emission tomography of the brain, and single photon emission tomography of striatal dopamine and midbrain serotonin transporter (SERT) availability. None of the patients had liver cirrhosis. Patients' data were compared with data of age-matched controls. In addition, regression analysis was performed between cognitive deficits, and mood and fatigue scores as dependent variables, and cerebral glucose metabolism, dopamine, or SERT availability as predictors. Patients showed significant cognitive deficits, significantly decreased striatal dopamine and midbrain SERT availability, and significantly reduced glucose metabolism in the limbic association cortex, and in the frontal, parietal, and superior temporal cortices, all of which correlated with dopamine transporter availability and psychometric results. Thus, the study provides further evidence of central nervous system affection in HCV-afflicted patients with neuropsychiatric symptoms. Data indicate alteration of dopaminergic neurotransmission as a possible mechanism of cognitive decline.

  2. Modest changes in cerebral glucose metabolism in patients with sleep apnea syndrome after continuous positive airway pressure treatment.

    PubMed

    Ju, Gawon; Yoon, In-Young; Lee, Sang Don; Kim, Yu Kyeong; Yoon, Eunjin; Kim, Jeong-Whun

    2012-01-01

    Decreased cerebral glucose metabolism has been reported in patients with sleep apnea syndrome (SAS), but it has yet to be decided whether cerebral glucose metabolism in SAS can be altered by continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment. The aim of this study was to evaluate cerebral glucose metabolism changes in patients with SAS after CPAP treatment. Thirteen middle-aged male patients with severe SAS [mean age 49.3 ± 7.2 years, mean apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) 60.4 ± 21.2] and 13 male controls (mean age 46.0 ± 9.4 years, mean AHI 4.1 ± 3.7) participated in the study. All 26 study subjects underwent fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET), but SAS patients underwent FDG-PET twice, namely before and 3 months after acceptable CPAP usage. Significant hypometabolism was observed in the bilateral prefrontal areas, left cuneus and left cingulate cortex of SAS patients before CPAP, and after CPAP, significant increases in cortical glucose metabolism were observed in the bilateral precentral gyri and left anterior cingulate cortex. However, these improvements in hypometabolism in both areas were insufficient to reach control levels, and hypometabolism in other regions persisted after CPAP treatment. Reduced cerebral glucose metabolism in the precentral gyrus and the cingulate cortex in patients with SAS was modestly improved by acceptable CPAP treatment. The findings of this study suggest that acceptable CPAP usage cannot completely reverse reduced cerebral glucose metabolism in SAS patients. Further studies are required to evaluate the long-term effects of CPAP treatment with total compliance. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Can HbA1c be Used to Screen for Glucose Abnormalities Among Adults with Severe Mental Illness?

    PubMed

    Romain, A J; Letendre, E; Akrass, Z; Avignon, A; Karelis, A D; Sultan, A; Abdel-Baki, A

    2017-04-01

    Aim: Prediabetes and type 2 diabetes are highly prevalent among individuals with serious mental illness and increased by antipsychotic medication. Although widely recommended, many obstacles prevent these patients from obtaining a proper screening for dysglycemia. Currently, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), fasting glucose, and 2-hour glucose levels from the oral glucose tolerance test are used for screening prediabetes and type 2 diabetes. The objective of this study was to investigate if HbA1c could be used as the only screening test among individuals with serious mental illness. Methods: Cross sectional study comparing the sensitivity of HbA1c, fasting glucose, and 2-h oral glucose tolerance test to detect dysglycemias in serious mental illness participants referred for metabolic complications. Results: A total of 84 participants (43 female; aged: 38.5±12.8 years; BMI: 35.0±6.8 kg/m²) was included. Regarding prediabetes, 44, 44 and 76% were identified by HbA1c, fasting glucose, and 2 h- oral glucose tolerance test respectively and for type 2 diabetes, 60, 53 and 66% were identified by HbA1c, fasting glucose and 2 h-oral glucose tolerance test. The overlap between the 3 markers was low (8% of participants for prediabetes and 26% for Type 2 diabetes). Sensitivity of HbA1c were moderate (range 40-62.5%), while its specificity was excellent (92-93%). Conclusion: The present study indicates a low agreement between HbA1c, fasting glucose and 2-h oral glucose tolerance test. It appears that these markers do not identify the same participants. Thus, HbA1c may not be used alone to detect all glucose abnormalities among individuals with serious mental illness. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  4. Association between lung capacity and abnormal glucose metabolism: findings from China and Australia.

    PubMed

    Yu, Dahai; Chen, Tao; Qin, Rui; Cai, Yamei; Jiang, Zhixin; Zhao, Zhanzheng; Simmons, David

    2016-07-01

    Restricted pulmonary function is found among people with diabetes. This study aimed to investigate the dose-response relationship between pulmonary function measurements [forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) and forced vital capacity (FVC)] and risk of metabolic syndrome (MS)/type 2 diabetes. A total of 1454 adults in rural Victoria, Australia, and 5824 adults in Nanjing, China, from randomly selected households provided clinical history, oral glucose tolerance test, lipids, anthropometric, blood pressure and spirometric measurements. MS was defined by International Diabetes Federation criteria. Adjusted odds ratios for MS and type 2 diabetes with lung capacity measurements were estimated using logistic regression. Dose-response relationships were explored using the restricted cubic spline models. There was a nonlinear relationship between FEV1 and the risk of type 2 diabetes and MS (both P < 0·0001) in both the Australian and Chinese populations. The FEV1 associated with the lowest risk of type 2 diabetes and MS was above 2·70 l (95%CI: 2·68 to 2·72 l and 2·65 to 2·76 l in Chinese and Australian populations, respectively). The discrimination of the model could be significantly improved using the FEV1 threshold in both the Australian and Chinese populations. In both the Australian and Chinese populations, the risk of type 2 diabetes and MS is lowest with a FEV1 of 2·65-2·76 l. This might be used in clinical practice in different countries as a prompt to screen for type 2 diabetes and MS in patients with obstructive lung disease and to ensure there was no abnormal glucose metabolism before the commencement of steroids if indicated. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Effects of MK-801 upon local cerebral glucose utilization in conscious rats and in rats anaesthetised with halothane

    SciTech Connect

    Kurumaji, A.; McCulloch, J.

    1989-12-01

    The effects of MK-801 (0.5 mg/kg i.v.), a non-competitive N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) antagonist, upon local cerebral glucose utilization were examined in conscious, lightly restrained rats and in rats anaesthetised with halothane in nitrous oxide by means of the quantitative autoradiographic (14C)-2-deoxyglucose technique. In the conscious rats, MK-801 produced a heterogenous pattern of altered cerebral glucose utilization with significant increases being observed in 12 of the 28 regions of gray matter examined and significant decreases in 6 of the 28 regions. Pronounced increases in glucose use were observed after MK-801 in the olfactory areas and in a number of brain areas inmore » the limbic system (e.g., hippocampus molecular layer, dentate gyrus, subicular complex, posterior cingulate cortex, and mammillary body). In the cerebral cortices, large reductions in glucose use were observed after administration of MK-801, whereas in the extrapyramidal and sensory-motor areas, glucose use remained unchanged after MK-801 administration in conscious rats. In the halothane-anaesthetised rats, the pattern of altered glucose use after MK-801 differed qualitatively and quantitatively from that observed in conscious rats. In anaesthetised rats, significant reductions in glucose use were noted after MK-801 in 10 of the 28 regions examined, with no area displaying significantly increased glucose use after administration of the drug. In halothane-anaesthetised rats, MK-801 failed to change the rates of glucose use in the olfactory areas, the hippocampus molecular layer, and the dentate gyrus.« less

  6. Early Pregnancy Cravings, Dietary Intake, and Development of Abnormal Glucose Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Farland, Leslie V; Rifas-Shiman, Sheryl L; Gillman, Matthew W

    2015-12-01

    Little is known about the relationships between pregnancy cravings, maternal diet, and development of abnormal glucose tolerance. We examined relationships of pregnancy cravings with dietary intake and risk of developing isolated hyperglycemia (IH), impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), or gestational diabetes (GDM) later in pregnancy. Among 2,022 mothers in Project Viva, a prospective birth cohort recruited from medical practices in eastern Massachusetts between 1999 and 2002, we assessed type of pregnancy craving based on self-report at mean gestation of 10.9 weeks. The outcomes were cross-sectional dietary intake from a food frequency questionnaire and incident IH, IGT, or GDM determined by glucose tolerance screening at 26 to 28 weeks. We used linear regression to analyze the cross-sectional relationships between pregnancy cravings and dietary intake and multinomial logistic regression to analyze the prospective relationships among pregnancy cravings and development of IH, IGT, or GDM. During the first trimester, 443 (22%) women craved sweets, 225 (11%) craved salty foods, 261 (13%) craved savory foods, and 100 (4.9%) craved starchy foods. Sweet cravings were associated with increased intake of sucrose (1.9 g/day; 95% CI 0.1 to 3.7), total fat (1.5 g/day; 95% CI 0.1 to 2.9), and saturated fat (0.8 g/day; 95% CI 0.2 to 1.4); salty cravings were associated with increased fiber (0.7 servings/day; 95% CI -0.1 to 1.6); savory cravings were associated with increased n-3 fatty acids (0.10 g/day; 95% CI 0.02 to 0.17); and starchy cravings were associated with increased carbohydrates (8.0 g/day; 95% CI 0.3 to 15.7) and decreased total fat (-2.6 g/day; 95% CI -5.2 to -0.1). Salty cravings were associated with lower risk of GDM (adjusted odds ratio 0.34, 95% CI 0.12-0.97). New cravings in the first trimester of pregnancy were associated with dietary intake. Craving salty foods may predict reduced risk of developing GDM, whereas craving sweet food does not appear to alter one

  7. [Investigations on the effect of "ecstasy" on cerebral glucose metabolism: an 18-FDG PET study].

    PubMed

    Schreckenberger, M; Gouzoulis-Mayfrank, E; Sabri, O; Arning, C; Tuttass, T; Schulz, G; Kaiser, H J; Wagenknecht, G; Sass, H; Büll, U

    1998-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the acute effects of the "Ecstasy" analogue MDE (3, 4-methylendioxyethamphetamine) on the cerebral glucose metabolism (rMRGlu) of healthy volunteers. In a randomised double-blind trial, 16 healthy volunteers without a history of drug abuse were examined with 18-FDG PET 110-120 minutes after oral administration of 2 mg/kg MDE (n = 8) or placebo (n = 8). Beginning two minutes prior to radiotracer injection, a constant cognitive stimulation was maintained for 32 minutes using a word repetition paradigm in order to ensure constant and comparable mental conditions during cerebral 18-FDG uptake. Individual brain anatomy was represented using T1-weighted 3D flash MRI, followed by manual regionalisation into 108 regions-of-interest and PFT/MRI overlay. Absolute quantification of rMRGlu and comparison of glucose metabolism under MDE versus placebo were performed using Mann-Whitney U-test. Absolute global MRGlu was not significantly changed under MDE versus placebo (MDE: 41.8 +/- 11.1 mumol/min/100 g, placebo: 50.1 +/- 18.1 mumol/min/100 g, p = 0.298). The normalised regional metabolic data showed a significantly decreased rMRGlu in the bilateral frontal cortex: left frontal posterior (-7.1%, p < 0.05) and right prefrontal superior (-4.6%, p < 0.05). On the other hand, rMRGlu was significantly increased in the bilateral cerebellum (right: +10.1%, p < 0.05; left +7.6%, p < 0.05) and in the right putamen (+6.2%, p < 0.05). The present study revealed acute neurometabolic changes under the "Ecstasy" analogon MDE indicating a fronto-striato-cerebellar dysbalance with parallels to other psychotropic substances and various endogenous psychoses respectively.

  8. Paradoxical Air Microembolism Induces Cerebral Bioelectrical Abnormalities and Occasionally Headache in Patent Foramen Ovale Patients With Migraine

    PubMed Central

    Sevgi, Eser Başak; Erdener, Sefik Evren; Demirci, Mehmet; Topcuoglu, Mehmet Akif; Dalkara, Turgay

    2012-01-01

    Background Although controversial, paradoxical embolism via patent foramen ovale (PFO) may account for some of the migraine attacks in a subset of migraine with aura (MA) patients. Induction of MA attacks with air bubble injection during transcranial Doppler ultrasound in MA patients with PFO supports this view. It is likely that cerebral embolism in patients with right-to-left shunt induces bioelectrical abnormalities to initiate MA under some conditions. Methods and Results We investigated changes in cerebral bioelectrical activity after intravenous microbubble injection in 10 MA patients with large PFO and right-to-left cardiac shunt. Eight PFO patients without migraine but with large right-to-left shunt and 12 MA patients without PFO served as controls. Four MA patients with PFO were reexamined with sham injections of saline without microbubbles. Bioelectrical activity was evaluated using spectral electroencephalography and, passage of microbubbles through cerebral arteries was monitored with transcranial Doppler ultrasound. Microbubble embolism caused significant electroencephalographic power increase in MA+PFO patients but not in control groups including the sham-injected MA+PFO patients. Headache developed in 2 MA with PFO patients after microbubble injection. Conclusions These findings demonstrate that air microembolism through large PFOs may cause cerebral bioelectrical disturbances and, occasionally, headache in MA patients, which may reflect an increased reactivity of their brain to transient subclinical hypoxia–ischemia, and suggest that paradoxical embolism is not a common cause of migraine but may induce headache in the presence of a large PFO and facilitating conditions. PMID:23316313

  9. Dysfunction of the Cerebral Glucose Transporter SLC45A1 in Individuals with Intellectual Disability and Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Srour, Myriam; Shimokawa, Noriaki; Hamdan, Fadi F; Nassif, Christina; Poulin, Chantal; Al Gazali, Lihadh; Rosenfeld, Jill A; Koibuchi, Noriyuki; Rouleau, Guy A; Al Shamsi, Aisha; Michaud, Jacques L

    2017-05-04

    Glucose transport across the blood brain barrier and into neural cells is critical for normal cerebral physiologic function. Dysfunction of the cerebral glucose transporter GLUT1 (encoded by SLC2A1) is known to result in epilepsy, intellectual disability (ID), and movement disorder. Using whole-exome sequencing, we identified rare homozygous missense variants (c.526C>T [p.Arg176Trp] and c.629C>T [p.Ala210Val]) in SLC45A1, encoding another cerebral glucose transporter, in two consanguineous multiplex families with moderate to severe ID, epilepsy, and variable neuropsychiatric features. The variants segregate with the phenotype in these families, affect well-conserved amino acids, and are predicted to be damaging by in silico programs. Intracellular glucose transport activity of the p.Arg176Trp and p.Ala210Val SLC45A1 variants, measured in transfected COS-7 cells, was approximately 50% (p = 0.013) and 33% (p = 0.008) lower, respectively, than that of intact SLC45A1. These results indicate that residues at positions 176 and 210 are critical for the glucose transport activity of SLC45A1. All together, our data strongly suggest that recessive mutations in SLC45A1 cause ID and epilepsy. SLC45A1 thus represents the second cerebral glucose transporter, in addition to GLUT1, to be involved in neurodevelopmental disability. Identification of additional individuals with mutations in SLC45A1 will allow better definition of the associated phenotypic spectrum and the exploration of potential targeted treatment options. Copyright © 2017 American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Decline in cerebral glucose utilisation and cognitive function with aging in Down's syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Schapiro, M B; Haxby, J V; Grady, C L; Duara, R; Schlageter, N L; White, B; Moore, A; Sundaram, M; Larson, S M; Rapoport, S I

    1987-01-01

    The cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (CMRglc) was measured with positron emission tomography and [18F]2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose in 14 healthy subjects with Down's syndrome, 19 to 33 years old, and in six healthy Down's syndrome subjects over 35 years, two of whom were demented. Dementia was diagnosed from a history of mental deterioration, disorientation and hallucinations. All Down's syndrome subjects were trisomy 21 karyotype. CMRglc also was examined in 15 healthy men aged 20-35 years and in 20 healthy men aged 45-64 years. All subjects were at rest with eyes covered and ears plugged. Mean hemispheric CMRglc in the older Down's syndrome subjects was significantly less, by 23%, than in the young Down's syndrome group; statistically significant decreases in regional metabolism (rCMRglc) also were present in all lobar regions. Comparison of the younger control group with the older control group showed no difference in CMRglc or any rCMRglc (p greater than 0.05). Assessment of language, visuospatial ability, attention and memory showed significant reductions in test scores of the old as compared with the young Down's syndrome subjects. These results show that significant age differences in CMRglc and rCMRglc occur in Down's syndrome but not in healthy controls, and that, although only some older Down's syndrome subjects are demented, significant age reductions in neuropsychologic variables occur in all of them. PMID:2956363

  11. Association of Dyslipidemia and Glucose Abnormalities with Antiretroviral Treatment in a Cohort of HIV-infected Latin American Children

    PubMed Central

    Paganella, MP; Cohen, RA; Harris, DR; Kuchenbecker, RS; Sperhacke, RD; Kato, SK; Silva, CLO; Sturzbecher, FT; Oliveira, RHS; Pavía Ruz, N; Hazra, R

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s) To estimate the incidence of lipid and glucose abnormalities and assess their association with exposure to antiretroviral (ARV) regimens among perinatally HIV-infected Latin American children. Design Longitudinal cohort study. Methods Data were analyzed from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) International Site Development Initiative (NISDI) Pediatric Latin American Countries Epidemiologic Study (PLACES). The incidence of dyslipidemia (total cholesterol>200mg/dL, HDL<35mg/dL, LDL≥130mg/dL, triglycerides>110mg/dL [age<10 years] or >150mg/dL [≥10 years]) and fasting glucose abnormalities (homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance >2.5 [Tanner Stage 1] or >4.0 [Tanner Stage>1]; impaired glucose: 110 to <126mg/dL; diabetes: ≥126 mg/dL) was estimated. Proportional hazards regression was used to evaluate the risk of abnormalities associated with ARV regimen, adjusted for covariates. Results There were 385 children eligible for analysis (mean age 6.6 years). Incident cholesterol abnormalities were reported in 18.1% of participants (95% confidence interval [CI] 14.1–22.8%), HDL and LDL cholesterol abnormalities in 19.6% (15.1–24.7%) and 15.0% (11.3–19.5%), respectively, and triglyceride abnormalities in 44.2% (37.7–50.8%). In multivariable analysis, ARV regimen was only associated with triglyceride abnormalities; participants receiving a protease inhibitor-containing (PI) regimen were 3.6 times as likely to experience a triglyceride abnormality as those receiving no ARVs (95% CI: 1.3–10.5; p=0.0167). The cumulative incidence of insulin resistance was 3.8% (1.8–7.1%); there were no incident cases of diabetes and only two of impaired fasting glucose. Conclusions Children receiving PI-containing regimens were at increased risk of developing triglyceride abnormalities. Continued monitoring of lipid levels in children receiving PI-containing regimens appears warranted. PMID:27570910

  12. Impaired fasting blood glucose is associated to cognitive impairment and cerebral atrophy in middle-aged non-human primates

    PubMed Central

    Djelti, Fathia; Dhenain, Marc; Terrien, Jérémy; Picq, Jean-Luc; Hardy, Isabelle; Champeval, Delphine; Perret, Martine; Schenker, Esther; Epelbaum, Jacques; Aujard, Fabienne

    2017-01-01

    Age-associated cognitive impairment is a major health and social issue because of increasing aged population. Cognitive decline is not homogeneous in humans and the determinants leading to differences between subjects are not fully understood. In middle-aged healthy humans, fasting blood glucose levels in the upper normal range are associated with memory impairment and cerebral atrophy. Due to a close evolutional similarity to Man, non-human primates may be useful to investigate the relationships between glucose homeostasis, cognitive deficits and structural brain alterations. In the grey mouse lemur, Microcebus murinus, spatial memory deficits have been associated with age and cerebral atrophy but the origin of these alterations have not been clearly identified. Herein, we showed that, on 28 female grey mouse lemurs (age range 2.4-6.1 years-old), age correlated with impaired fasting blood glucose (rs=0.37) but not with impaired glucose tolerance or insulin resistance. In middle-aged animals (4.1-6.1 years-old), fasting blood glucose was inversely and closely linked with spatial memory performance (rs=0.56) and hippocampus (rs=−0.62) or septum (rs=−0.55) volumes. These findings corroborate observations in humans and further support the grey mouse lemur as a natural model to unravel mechanisms which link impaired glucose homeostasis, brain atrophy and cognitive processes. PMID:28039490

  13. Impaired fasting blood glucose is associated to cognitive impairment and cerebral atrophy in middle-aged non-human primates.

    PubMed

    Djelti, Fathia; Dhenain, Marc; Terrien, Jérémy; Picq, Jean-Luc; Hardy, Isabelle; Champeval, Delphine; Perret, Martine; Schenker, Esther; Epelbaum, Jacques; Aujard, Fabienne

    2016-12-28

    Age-associated cognitive impairment is a major health and social issue because of increasing aged population. Cognitive decline is not homogeneous in humans and the determinants leading to differences between subjects are not fully understood. In middle-aged healthy humans, fasting blood glucose levels in the upper normal range are associated with memory impairment and cerebral atrophy. Due to a close evolutional similarity to Man, non-human primates may be useful to investigate the relationships between glucose homeostasis, cognitive deficits and structural brain alterations. In the grey mouse lemur, Microcebus murinus , spatial memory deficits have been associated with age and cerebral atrophy but the origin of these alterations have not been clearly identified. Herein, we showed that, on 28 female grey mouse lemurs (age range 2.4-6.1 years-old), age correlated with impaired fasting blood glucose (r s =0.37) but not with impaired glucose tolerance or insulin resistance. In middle-aged animals (4.1-6.1 years-old), fasting blood glucose was inversely and closely linked with spatial memory performance (r s =0.56) and hippocampus (r s =-0.62) or septum (r s =-0.55) volumes. These findings corroborate observations in humans and further support the grey mouse lemur as a natural model to unravel mechanisms which link impaired glucose homeostasis, brain atrophy and cognitive processes.

  14. Haptoglobin, alpha-thalassaemia and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase polymorphisms and risk of abnormal transcranial Doppler among patients with sickle cell anaemia in Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Cox, Sharon E; Makani, Julie; Soka, Deogratias; L'Esperence, Veline S; Kija, Edward; Dominguez-Salas, Paula; Newton, Charles R J; Birch, Anthony A; Prentice, Andrew M; Kirkham, Fenella J

    2014-06-01

    Transcranial Doppler ultrasonography measures cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFv) of basal intracranial vessels and is used clinically to detect stroke risk in children with sickle cell anaemia (SCA). Co-inheritance in SCA of alpha-thalassaemia and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) polymorphisms is reported to associate with high CBFv and/or risk of stroke. The effect of a common functional polymorphism of haptoglobin (HP) is unknown. We investigated the effect of co-inheritance of these polymorphisms on CBFv in 601 stroke-free Tanzanian SCA patients aged <24 years. Homozygosity for alpha-thalassaemia 3·7 deletion was significantly associated with reduced mean CBFv compared to wild-type (β-coefficient -16·1 cm/s, P = 0·002) adjusted for age and survey year. Inheritance of 1 or 2 alpha-thalassaemia deletions was associated with decreased risk of abnormally high CBFv, compared to published data from Kenyan healthy control children (Relative risk ratio [RRR] = 0·53 [95% confidence interval (CI):0·35-0·8] & RRR = 0·43 [95% CI:0·23-0·78]), and reduced risk of abnormally low CBFv for 1 deletion only (RRR = 0·38 [95% CI:0·17-0·83]). No effects were observed for G6PD or HP polymorphisms. This is the first report of the effects of co-inheritance of common polymorphisms, including the HP polymorphism, on CBFv in SCA patients resident in Africa and confirms the importance of alpha-thalassaemia in reducing risk of abnormal CBFv. © 2014 The Authors. British Journal of Haematology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Defining the nature of the cerebral abnormalities in the premature infant: a qualitative magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Inder, Terrie E; Wells, Scott J; Mogridge, Nina B; Spencer, Carole; Volpe, Joseph J

    2003-08-01

    The aim of this study was to define qualitatively the nature and extent of white and gray matter abnormalities in a longitudinal population-based study of infants with very low birth weight. Perinatal factors were then related to the presence and severity of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) abnormalities. From November 1998 to December 2000, 100 consecutive premature infants admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit at Christchurch Women's Hospital were recruited (98% eligible) after informed parental consent to undergo an MRI scan at term equivalent. The scans were analyzed by a single neuroradiologist experienced in pediatric MRI, with a second independent scoring of the MRI using a combination of criteria for white matter (cysts, signal abnormality, loss of volume, ventriculomegaly, corpus callosal thinning, myelination) and gray matter (gray matter signal abnormality, gyration, subarachnoid space). Results were analyzed against individual item scores as well as the presence of moderate-severe white matter score, total gray matter score, and total brain score. The mean gestational age was 27.9+/-2.4 weeks (range, 23-32 weeks), and mean birth weight was 1063+/-292 g. The greatest univariate predictors for moderate-severe white matter abnormality were lower gestational age (odds ratio [OR], 1.3; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.1-1.7; P<.01), maternal fever (OR, 2.2; 95% CI, 1.1-4.6; P<.04), proven sepsis in the infant at delivery (OR, 1.8; 95% CI, 1.1-3.6; P=0.03), inotropic support (OR, 2.7; 95% CI, 1.5-4.5; P<.001), patent ductus arteriosus (OR, 2.2; 95% CI, 1.2-3.8; P=.01), grade III/IV intraventricular hemorrhage (P=.015), and the occurrence of a pneumothorax (P=.05). There was a significant protective effect of intrauterine growth restriction (OR, 0.51; 95% CI, 0.23-0.99; P=.04). Gray matter abnormality was highly related to the presence and severity of white matter abnormality. A unique pattern of cerebral abnormality consisting of significant diffuse

  16. SPG3A-linked hereditary spastic paraplegia associated with cerebral glucose hypometabolism.

    PubMed

    Terada, Tatsuhiro; Kono, Satoshi; Ouchi, Yasuomi; Yoshida, Kenichi; Hamaya, Yasushi; Kanaoka, Shigeru; Miyajima, Hiroaki

    2013-04-01

    SPG3A-linked hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) is a rare autosomal dominant motor disorder caused by a mutation in the SPG3A gene, and is characterized by progressive motor weakness and spasticity in the lower limbs, without any other neurological abnormalities. SPG3A-linked HSP caused by a R239C mutation has been reported to present a pure phenotype confined to impairment of the corticospinal tract. However, there is still a debate about the etiology of this motor deficit with regard to whether it is peripheral or central. We herein report two patients who were heterozygous for a R239C mutation in the SPG3A gene. Two middle-aged Japanese sisters had been suffering from a pure phenotype of HSP since their childhood. Both patients had a significant decrease in glucose metabolism in the frontal cortex medially and dorsolaterally in a [(18)F]-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission photography (PET) study and low scores on the Frontal Assessment Battery. A real-time PCR analysis in normal subjects showed the frontal cortex to be the major location where SPG3A mRNA is expressed. The present finding that the frontal glucose hypometabolism was associated with frontal cognitive impairment indicates that widespread neuropathology associated with mutations in the SPG3A gene may be present more centrally than previously assumed.

  17. Cerebral glucose metabolism and the glutamine cycle as detected by in vivo and in vitro 13C NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    García-Espinosa, María A; Rodrigues, Tiago B; Sierra, Alejandra; Benito, Marina; Fonseca, Carla; Gray, Heather L; Bartnik, Brenda L; García-Martín, María L; Ballesteros, Paloma; Cerdán, Sebastián

    2004-01-01

    We review briefly 13C NMR studies of cerebral glucose metabolism with an emphasis on the roles of glial energetics and the glutamine cycle. Mathematical modeling analysis of in vivo 13C turnover experiments from the C4 carbons of glutamate and glutamine are consistent with: (i) the glutamine cycle being the major cerebral metabolic route supporting glutamatergic neurotransmission, (ii) glial glutamine synthesis being stoichiometrically coupled to glycolytic ATP production, (iii) glutamine serving as the main precursor of neurotransmitter glutamate and (iv) glutamatergic neurotransmission being supported by lactate oxidation in the neurons in a process accounting for 60-80% of the energy derived from glucose catabolism. However, more recent experimental approaches using inhibitors of the glial tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle (trifluoroacetic acid, TFA) or of glutamine synthase (methionine sulfoximine, MSO) reveal that a considerable portion of the energy required to support glutamine synthesis is derived from the oxidative metabolism of glucose in the astroglia and that a significant amount of the neurotransmitter glutamate is produced from neuronal glucose or lactate rather than from glial glutamine. Moreover, a redox switch has been proposed that allows the neurons to use either glucose or lactate as substrates for oxidation, depending on the relative availability of these fuels under resting or activation conditions, respectively. Together, these results suggest that the coupling mechanisms between neuronal and glial metabolism are more complex than initially envisioned.

  18. Cerebral glucose metabolism and cognition in newly diagnosed Parkinson's disease: ICICLE-PD study.

    PubMed

    Firbank, M J; Yarnall, A J; Lawson, R A; Duncan, G W; Khoo, T K; Petrides, G S; O'Brien, J T; Barker, R A; Maxwell, R J; Brooks, D J; Burn, D J

    2017-04-01

    To assess reductions of cerebral glucose metabolism in Parkinson's disease (PD) with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET), and their associations with cognitive decline. FDG-PET was performed on a cohort of 79 patients with newly diagnosed PD (mean disease duration 8 months) and 20 unrelated controls. PD participants were scanned while on their usual dopaminergic medication. Cognitive testing was performed at baseline, and after 18 months using the Cognitive Drug Research (CDR) and Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery (CANTAB) computerised batteries, the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), and the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA). We used statistical parametric mapping (SPM V.12) software to compare groups and investigate voxelwise correlations between FDG metabolism and cognitive score at baseline. Linear regression was used to evaluate how levels of cortical FDG metabolism were predictive of subsequent cognitive decline rated with the MMSE and MoCA. PD participants showed reduced glucose metabolism in the occipital and inferior parietal lobes relative to controls. Low performance on memory-based tasks was associated with reduced FDG metabolism in posterior parietal and temporal regions, while attentional performance was associated with more frontal deficits. Baseline parietal to cerebellum FDG metabolism ratios predicted MMSE (β=0.38, p=0.001) and MoCA (β=0.3, p=0.002) at 18 months controlling for baseline score. Reductions in cortical FDG metabolism were present in newly diagnosed PD, and correlated with performance on neuropsychological tests. A reduced baseline parietal metabolism is associated with risk of cognitive decline and may represent a potential biomarker for this state and the development of PD dementia. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  19. β-adrenergic receptor inhibition affects cerebral glucose metabolism, motor performance, and inflammatory response after traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Ley, Eric J; Clond, Morgan A; Bukur, Marko; Park, Ryan; Chervonski, Michael; Dagliyan, Grant; Margulies, Dan R; Lyden, Patrick D; Conti, Peter S; Salim, Ali

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate how β-adrenergic receptor inhibition after traumatic brain injury (TBI) alters changes in early cerebral glucose metabolism and motor performance, as well as cerebral cytokine and heat shock protein (HSP) expression. Mouse cerebral glucose metabolism was measured by microPET fluorodeoxyglucose uptake and converted into standardized uptake values (SUV). Four groups of C57/Bl6 mice (wild type [WT]) were initially evaluated: sham or TBI, followed by tail vein injection of either saline or a nonselective β-adrenergic receptor inhibitor (propranolol, 4 mg/kg). Then motor performance, cerebral cytokine, and HSP70 expression were studied at 12 hours and 24 hours after sham injury or TBI in WT mice treated with saline or propranolol and in β1-adrenergic/β2-adrenergic receptor knockout (BARKO) mice treated with saline. Cerebral glucose metabolism was significantly reduced after TBI (mean SUV TBI, 1.63 vs. sham 1.97, p < 0.01) and propranolol attenuated this reduction (mean SUV propranolol, 1.89 vs. saline 1.63, p < 0.01). Both propranolol and BARKO reduced motor deficits at 24 hours after injury, but only BARKO had an effect at 12 hours after injury. TBI WT mice treated with saline performed worse than propranolol mice at 24 hours after injury on rotarod (23 vs. 44 seconds, p < 0.01) and rearing (130 vs. 338 events, p = 0.01) results. At 24 hours after injury, sham BARKO and TBI BARKO mice were similar on rotarod (21 vs. 19 seconds, p = 0.53), ambulatory testing (2,891 vs. 2,274 events, p = 0.14), and rearing (129 vs. 64 events, p = 0.09) results. Interleukin 1β expression was affected by BARKO and propranolol after TBI; attenuation of interleukin 6 and increased HSP70 expression were noted only with BARKO. β-adrenergic receptor inhibition affects cerebral glucose metabolism, motor performance, as well as cerebral cytokine and HSP expression after TBI.

  20. Cerebral utilization of glucose, ketone bodies and oxygen in starving infant rats and the effect of intrauterine growth retardation.

    PubMed

    Dahlquist, G

    1976-10-01

    Cerebral arteriovenous differences of acetoacetate, D-beta-hydroxybutyrate, glucose, lactate and oxygen and brain DNA content was measured at 20 days of age in intrauterine growth retarded (IUGR) rats and normal littermates after 48 and 72 h of starvation. Cerebral blood flow (CBF) was measured with labeled microspheres in other comparable groups of IUGR and control rats. CBF was similar in IUGR and normal littermates (0.57+/-0.09 and 0.58+/-0.10 ml/min respectively). After 48 h of starvation, arterial glucose was significantly lower in IUGR than control animals but the arterial concentrations of ketone bodies were similar. After 48 h of starvation, cerebral arteriovenous difference of beta-hydroxybutyrate was significantly higher in control than IUGR rats also when expressed per mg brain DNA as was the fractional uptake of D-beta-hydroxybutyrate. After 72 h of starvation, arterial concentrations of ketone bodies were significantly lower in IUGR rats than controls but the fractional uptake of D-beta-hydroxybutyrate was increased compared to IUGR rats starved for 48 h. The average percentage of calculated total substrate uptake (mumol/min) accounted for by ketone bodies increased in control animals from 31.1% after 48 h of starvation to 41.0% after 72 h of starvation. In IUGR rats these percentage values were 26.5 and 25.7 respectively. After 72 h of starvation the fraction of total cerebral uptake of substrates accounted for by ketone bodies was significantly higher in control that IUGR rats. As total cerebral uptake of substrates was similar between IUGR and control animals it is concluded that IUGR rats are more dependent on glucose as a substrate for the brain during starvation.

  1. Neuropsychological function and cerebral glucose utilization in isolated memory impairment and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Berent, S; Giordani, B; Foster, N; Minoshima, S; Lajiness-O'Neill, R; Koeppe, R; Kuhl, D E

    1999-01-01

    We hypothesized that 20 patients with isolated memory impairment (IMI) would demonstrate [18F]-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose utilization and a progression of neuropsychological symptoms consistent with Alzheimer's disease (AD). IMI subjects performed similarly to AD in recall and verbal fluency, but comparable to normal subjects in other areas of cognitive functioning. A positron emission tomography (PET) diagnostic index based on parietal Z-scores categorized IMI patients into normal and abnormal metabolic patterns. Ten of the original 20 IMI patients (50%) reflected PET AD abnormalities. Clinical information was available for IMI patients at three-year follow-up. Ten (50%) had converted to AD, three were found to have pseudodementia and the seven remained IMI. Of the 10 IMI patients with an originally normal PET index, three (30%) were diagnosed with AD at three years. Of the 10 with an abnormal index originally, seven (70%) converted to AD. The finding that memory deficit in IMI was as pronounced as that in AD patients is consistent with the notion that memory is an initial symptom of AD. A substantial number of the IMI patients reflected regional hypometabolism similar to AD, suggesting that IMI is likely an early stage in progressive dementia. A large percentage of IMI patients converted clinically to AD within three years of initial study, though we observed impaired memory functioning well before a clinical diagnosis of AD could be made. In addition to potential clinical utility, IMI and PET represent an opportunity to study dementia in relation to brain chemistry at a time when brain pathology is in the process of development.

  2. Chronic Stress Modulates Regional Cerebral Glucose Transporter Expression in an Age-Specific and Sexually-Dimorphic Manner

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Sean D.; Harrell, Constance S.; Neigh, Gretchen N.

    2014-01-01

    Facilitative glucose transporters (GLUT) mediate glucose uptake across the blood-brain-barrier into neurons and glia. Deficits in specific cerebral GLUT isoforms are linked to developmental and neurological dysfunction, but less is known about the range of variation in cerebral GLUT expression in normal conditions and the effects of environmental influences on cerebral GLUT expression. Knowing that puberty is a time of increased cerebral plasticity, metabolic demand, and shifts in hormonal balance for males and females, we first assessed gene expression of five GLUT subtypes in four brain regions in male and female adolescent and adult Wistar rats. The data indicated that sex differences in GLUT expression were most profound in the hypothalamus, and the transition from adolescence to adulthood had the most profound effect on GLUT expression in the hippocampus. Next, given the substantial energetic demands during adolescence and prior demonstrations of the adverse effects of adolescent stress, we determined the extent to which chronic stress altered GLUT expression in males and females in both adolescence and adulthood. Chronic stress significantly altered cerebral GLUT expression in males and females throughout both developmental stages but in a sexually dimorphic and brain region-specific manner. Collectively, our data demonstrate that cerebral GLUTs are expressed differentially based on brain region, sex, age, and stress exposure. These results suggest that developmental and environmental factors influence GLUT expression in multiple brain regions. Given the importance of appropriate metabolic balance within the brain, further assessment of the functional implications of life stage and environmentally-induced changes in GLUTs are warranted. PMID:24382486

  3. Dexamethasone prevents hypoxia/ischemia-induced reductions in cerebral glucose utilization and high-energy phosphate metabolites in immature brain.

    PubMed

    Tuor, U I; Yager, J Y; Bascaramurty, S; Del Bigio, M R

    1997-11-01

    We examined the potential importance of dexamethasone-mediated alterations in energy metabolism in providing protection against hypoxic-ischemic brain damage in immature rats. Seven-day-old rats (n = 165) that had been treated with dexamethasone (0.1 mg/kg, i.p.) or vehicle were assigned to control or hypoxic-ischemic groups (unilateral carotid artery occlusion plus 2-3 h of 8% oxygen at normothermia). The systemic availability of alternate fuels such as beta-hydroxybutyrate, lactate, pyruvate, and free fatty acids was not altered by dexamethasone treatment, and, except for glucose, brain levels were also unaffected. At the end of hypoxia, levels of cerebral high-energy phosphates (ATP and phosphocreatine) were decreased in vehicle- but relatively preserved in dexamethasone-treated animals. The local cerebral metabolic rate of glucose utilization (lCMRgl) was decreased modestly under control conditions in dexamethasone-treated animals, whereas cerebral energy use measured in a model of decapitation ischemia did not differ significantly between groups. The lCMRgl increased markedly during hypoxia-ischemia (p < 0.05) and remained elevated throughout ischemia in dexamethasone- but not vehicle-treated groups, indicating an enhanced glycolytic flux with dexamethasone treatment. Thus, dexamethasone likely provides protection against hypoxic-ischemic damage in immature rats by preserving cerebral ATP secondary to a maintenance of glycolytic flux.

  4. Age and sex differences in cerebral glucose consumption measured by pet using (18-F) fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)

    SciTech Connect

    Duara, R.; Barker, W.; Chang, J.

    1985-05-01

    Resting cerebral glucose metabolic rates (CMRglc) were measured in 23 subjects by PET using FDG. Subjects were divided into several groups (mean age +- S.D.) 5 young males (YM) (27 +- 6); 6 young females (YF)(33 +9); 5 elderly males (EM)(73 +- 5); 7 elderly females (EF)(69 +- 7). Additionally, from these groups 4 YM, 3YF, 5EM and 4EF were studied again within 6 weeks under identical conditions. CMRglc in the YF group again was significantly hider than YM (p 0.05). No obvious relationships of CMRglc to the phase of the menstrual cycle was found in this small group. Theremore » was a trend (p=0.06) toward a higher CMRglc in YF than EF. These results support the findings of higher CBF in YF versus YM. The differences between the results of Kuhl et al (J. Cereb. and a reduction of CMRglc with age was found in a mixed group of males and females (58and female), and where no age effect was found the males, are also resolved by these findings. The authors suggest that the apparent age effect, in females in this study, is principally a hormonal one.« less

  5. In vivo dynamic turnover of cerebral 13C isotopomers from [U- 13C]glucose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Su; Shen, Jun

    2006-10-01

    An INEPT-based 13C MRS method and a cost-effective and widely available 11.7 Tesla 89-mm bore vertical magnet were used to detect dynamic 13C isotopomer turnover from intravenously infused [U- 13C]glucose in a 211 μL voxel located in the adult rat brain. The INEPT-based 1H → 13C polarization transfer method is mostly adiabatic and therefore minimizes signal loss due to B 1 inhomogeneity of the surface coils used. High quality and reproducible data were acquired as a result of combined use of outer volume suppression, ISIS, and the single-shot three-dimensional localization scheme built in the INEPT pulse sequence. Isotopomer patterns of both glutamate C4 at 34.00 ppm and glutamine C4 at 31.38 ppm are dominated first by a doublet originated from labeling at C4 and C5 but not at C3 (with 1JC4C5 = 51 Hz) and then by a quartet originated from labeling at C3, C4, and C5 (with 1JC3C4 = 35 Hz). A lag in the transition of glutamine C4 pattern from doublet-dominance to quartet dominance as compared to glutamate C4 was observed, which provides an independent verification of the precursor-product relationship between neuronal glutamate and glial glutamine and a significant intercompartmental cerebral glutamate-glutamine cycle between neurons and glial cells.

  6. Verbal fluency and positron emission tomographic mapping of regional cerebral glucose metabolism.

    PubMed

    Boivin, M J; Giordani, B; Berent, S; Amato, D A; Lehtinen, S; Koeppe, R A; Buchtel, H A; Foster, N L; Kuhl, D E

    1992-06-01

    Impairment in verbal fluency (VF) has been a consistently reported clinical feature of focal cerebral deficits in frontal and temporal regions. More recent behavioral activation studies with healthy control subjects using positron emission tomography (PET), however, have noted a negative correlation between performance on verbal fluency tasks and regional cortical activity. To see if this negative relationship extends to steady-state non-activation PET measures, thirty-three healthy adults were given a VF task within a day of their 18F-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose PET scan. VF was found to correlate positively with left temporal cortical region metabolic activity but to correlate negatively with right and left frontal activity. VF was not correlated significantly with right temporal cortical metabolic activity. Some previous studies with normals using behavioral activation paradigms and PET have reported negative correlations between metabolic activity and cognitive performance similar to that reported here. An explanation for the disparate relationships that were observed between frontal and temporal brain areas and VF might be found in the mediation of different task demands by these separate locations, i.e., task planning and/or initiation by frontal regions and verbal memory by the left temporal area.

  7. Increases in both cerebral glucose utilization and blood flow during execution of a somatosensory task.

    PubMed

    Ginsberg, M D; Chang, J Y; Kelley, R E; Yoshii, F; Barker, W W; Ingenito, G; Boothe, T E

    1988-02-01

    To investigate local metabolic and hemodynamic interrelationships during functional activation of the brain, paired studies of local cerebral glucose utilization (lCMRGlc) and blood flow (lCBF) were carried out in 10 normal subjects (9 right-handed, 1 ambidextrous) at rest and during a unilateral discriminative somatosensory/motor task--palpation and sorting of mah-jongg tiles by engraved design. The extent of activation was assessed on the basis of percentage difference images following normalization to compensate for global shifts. The somatosensory stimulus elevated lCMRGlc by 16.9 +/- 3.5% (mean +/- standard deviation) and lCBF by 26.5 +/- 5.1% in the contralateral sensorimotor cortical focus; smaller increments were noted in the homologous ipsilateral site. The increments of lCMRGlc and lCBF correlated poorly with one another in individual subjects. Stimulation of the right hand resulted in significantly higher contralateral lCMRGlc activation (19.6%) than did stimulation of the left hand (14.1%) (p less than 0.005), whereas the lCBF response was independent of the hand stimulated. Our results indicate that both glycolytic metabolism and blood flow increase locally with the execution of an active sensorimotor task and suggest that both measures may serve as reliable markers of functional activation of the normal brain.

  8. Selective motor control correlates with gait abnormality in children with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Chruscikowski, Emily; Fry, Nicola R D; Noble, Jonathan J; Gough, Martin; Shortland, Adam P

    2017-02-01

    Children with bilateral cerebral palsy (CP) commonly have limited selective motor control (SMC). This affects their ability to complete functional tasks. The impact of impaired SMC on walking has yet to be fully understood. Measures of SMC have been shown to correlate with specific characteristics of gait, however the impact of SMC on overall gait pattern has not been reported. This study explored SMC data collected as part of routine gait analysis in children with bilateral CP. As part of their clinical assessment, SMC was measured with the Selective Control Assessment of the Lower Extremities (SCALE) in 194 patients with bilateral cerebral palsy attending for clinical gait analysis at a single centre. Their summed SCALE score was compared with overall gait impairment, as measured by Gait Profile Score (GPS). Score on SCALE showed a significant negative correlation with GPS (r s =-0.603, p<0.001). Cerebral injuries in CP result in damage to the motor tracts responsible for SMC. Our results indicate that this damage is also associated with changes in the development of walking pattern in children with CP. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Normal adiponectin levels despite abnormal glucose tolerance (or diabetes) and inflammation in adult patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Hammana, I; Malet, A; Costa, M; Brochiero, E; Berthiaume, Y; Potvin, S; Chiasson, J-L; Coderre, L; Rabasa-Lhoret, R

    2007-06-01

    Circulating adiponectin levels are negatively associated with glucose intolerance, inflammation and central adiposity. Since these conditions are common in cystic fibrosis (CF), we examined whether adiponectin values are altered in these patients. To determine if CF patients have altered adiponectin levels and if these levels correlate with glucose tolerance categories (normal, impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and cystic fibrosis-related diabetes (CFRD)), insulin resistance or inflammatory markers such as fibrinogen and C-reactive protein (CRP). Oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTTs) were performed and adiponectin levels were measured in 90 CF patients not known to be diabetic and 15 healthy controls matched for age, sex and body mass index (BMI). Inflammatory markers, serum albumin concentrations and the clinical status of CF patients (i.e. pulmonary function) were also examined. CF pathology was characterized by a high prevalence (43.5%) of glucose tolerance abnormalities: 26.5% of IGT and 17.0% of newly diagnosed CFRD. CF patients also presented systemic inflammation as revealed by a significant increase of fibrinogen (P=0.029) in all patients and higher CRP levels in CFRD patients compared to the controls (P<0.05). On the other hand, CF and control subjects had similar albumin serum concentration. While CF patients and controls had similar serum adiponectin values, women had significantly higher hormone levels than men (P<0.001). Adiponectin levels did not correlate with glucose tolerance, inflammatory markers or insulin resistance. On the other hand, they correlated positively with both total and HDL-cholesterol (P<0.001). CF patients did not show any alterations in adiponectin levels despite insulin resistance, glucose intolerance and sub clinical chronic inflammation. Thus, CF appears to be one of the rare conditions in which discordance between adiponectin values and insulin resistance or inflammation is evident.

  10. Use of a Connected Glucose Meter and Certified Diabetes Educator Coaching to Decrease the Likelihood of Abnormal Blood Glucose Excursions: The Livongo for Diabetes Program.

    PubMed

    Downing, Janelle; Bollyky, Jenna; Schneider, Jennifer

    2017-07-11

    The Livongo for Diabetes Program offers members (1) a cellular technology-enabled, two-way messaging device that measures blood glucose (BG), centrally stores the glucose data, and delivers messages back to the individual in real time; (2) unlimited BG test strips; and (3) access to a diabetes coaching team for questions, goal setting, and automated support for abnormal glucose excursions. The program is sponsored by at-risk self-insured employers, health plans and provider organizations where it is free to members with diabetes or it is available directly to the person with diabetes where they cover the cost. The objective of our study was to evaluate BG data from 4544 individuals with diabetes who were enrolled in the Livongo program from October 2014 through December 2015. Members used the Livongo glucose meter to measure their BG levels an average of 1.8 times per day. We estimated the probability of having a day with a BG reading outside of the normal range (70-180 mg/dL, or 3.9-10.0 mmol/L) in months 2 to 12 compared with month 1 of the program, using individual fixed effects to control for individual characteristics. Livongo members experienced an average 18.4% decrease in the likelihood of having a day with hypoglycemia (BG <70 mg/dL) and an average 16.4% decrease in hyperglycemia (BG >180 mg/dL) in months 2-12 compared with month 1 as the baseline. The biggest impact was seen on hyperglycemia for nonusers of insulin. We do not know all of the contributing factors such as medication or other treatment changes during the study period. These findings suggest that access to a connected glucose meter and certified diabetes educator coaching is associated with a decrease in the likelihood of abnormal glucose excursions, which can lead to diabetes-related health care savings. ©Janelle Downing, Jenna Bollyky, Jennifer Schneider. Originally published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research (http://www.jmir.org), 11.07.2017.

  11. Frequency of Inverted Electrocardiographic T Waves (Cerebral T Waves) in Patients With Acute Strokes and Their Relation to Left Ventricular Wall Motion Abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Stone, Jeremy; Mor-Avi, Victor; Ardelt, Agnieszka; Lang, Roberto M

    2018-01-01

    Transient, symmetric, and deep inverted electrocardiogram (ECG) T waves in the setting of stroke, commonly referred to as cerebral T waves, are rare, and the underlying mechanism is unclear. Our study aimed to test the hypothesis that cerebral T waves are associated with transient cardiac dysfunction. This retrospective study included 800 patients admitted with the primary diagnosis of hemorrhagic or ischemic stroke. ECGs were examined for cerebral T waves, defined as T-wave inversion of ≥5 mm depth in ≥4 contiguous precordial leads. Echocardiograms of those meeting these criteria were examined for the presence of left ventricular (LV) wall motion abnormalities. Follow-up evaluation included both ECG and echocardiogram. Of the 800 patients, 17 had cerebral T waves on ECG (2.1%). All 17 patients had ischemic strokes, of which 11 were in the middle cerebral artery distribution (65%), and 2 were cerebellar (12%), whereas the remaining 4 involved other locations. Follow-up ECG showed resolution of the T-wave changes in all 17 patients. Of these patients, 14 (82%) had normal wall motion, and 3 had transient wall motion abnormalities (18%). Two of these patients had Takotsubo-like cardiomyopathy with apical ballooning, and the third had globally reduced LV function. Coronary angiography showed no significant disease to explain the LV dysfunction. In summary, in our cohort of patients with acute stroke, cerebral T waves were rare and occurred only in ischemic stroke. Eighteen percent of patients with cerebral T waves had significant transient wall motion abnormalities. Patients with stroke with cerebral T waves, especially in those with ischemic strokes, should be assessed for cardiac dysfunction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Effects of Fructose vs Glucose on Regional Cerebral Blood Flow in Brain Regions Involved With Appetite and Reward Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Page, Kathleen A.; Chan, Owen; Arora, Jagriti; Belfort-DeAguiar, Renata; Dzuira, James; Roehmholdt, Brian; Cline, Gary W.; Naik, Sarita; Sinha, Rajita; Constable, R. Todd; Sherwin, Robert S.

    2014-01-01

    Importance Increases in fructose consumption have paralleled the increasing prevalence of obesity, and high-fructose diets are thought to promote weight gain and insulin resistance. Fructose ingestion produces smaller increases in circulating satiety hormones compared with glucose ingestion, and central administration of fructose provokes feeding in rodents, whereas centrally administered glucose promotes satiety. Objective To study neurophysiological factors that might underlie associations between fructose consumption and weight gain. Design, Setting, and Participants Twenty healthy adult volunteers underwent 2 magnetic resonance imaging sessions at Yale University in conjunction with fructose or glucose drink ingestion in a blinded, random-order, crossover design. Main Outcome Measures Relative changes in hypothalamic regional cerebral blood flow (CBF) after glucose or fructose ingestion. Secondary outcomes included whole-brain analyses to explore regional CBF changes, functional connectivity analysis to investigate correlations between the hypothalamus and other brain region responses, and hormone responses to fructose and glucose ingestion. Results There was a significantly greater reduction in hypothalamic CBF after glucose vs fructose ingestion (–5.45 vs 2.84 mL/g per minute, respectively; mean difference, 8.3 mL/g per minute [95% CI of mean difference, 1.87-14.70]; P=.01). Glucose ingestion (compared with baseline) increased functional connectivity between the hypothalamus and the thalamus and striatum. Fructose increased connectivity between the hypothalamus and thalamus but not the striatum. Regional CBF within the hypothalamus, thalamus, insula, anterior cingulate, and striatum (appetite and reward regions) was reduced after glucose ingestion compared with baseline (P<.05 significance threshold, family-wise error [FWE] whole-brain corrected). In contrast, fructose reduced regional CBF in the thalamus, hippocampus, posterior cingulate cortex, fusiform

  13. [Cerebral and ocular abnormalities with anterior pituitary insufficiency of familial nature].

    PubMed

    Weill, J; Boudailliez, B; Piussan, C; Ponte, C

    1985-01-01

    Three families presenting one or several cases of brain or ophthalmic abnormalities and an hypopituitarism at least by one of the members have been observed. In the first family, the mother and one of her sons present bilateral choroidoretineal coloboma with amblyopia; one of these two suffers as well from panhypopituitarism. In the second family two premature twins, a brother and his sister, present a syndrome with hypophyseal dwarfism and ophthalmic abnormalities, consisting in the boy's case in an peripapillary depigmentation with no visible sight trouble whereas girl's is showing an extreme microphthalmia with major mental retardation. In the third family two 2nd degree cousins present a panhypopituitarism but only one of the two reveals through neuroradiological investigations corpus callosum and septum lucidum agenesia. The karyotype is normal in all the cases. An hereditary mechanism appears clearly in the first family. It is possible in the second, probable in the third one.

  14. Identification of abnormal motor cortex activation patterns in children with cerebral palsy by functional near-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Bilal; Tian, Fenghua; Behbehani, Khosrow; Romero, Mario I.; Delgado, Mauricio R.; Clegg, Nancy J.; Smith, Linsley; Reid, Dahlia; Liu, Hanli; Alexandrakis, George

    2010-05-01

    We demonstrate the utility of functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) as a tool for physicians to study cortical plasticity in children with cerebral palsy (CP). Motor cortex activation patterns were studied in five healthy children and five children with CP (8.4+/-2.3 years old in both groups) performing a finger-tapping protocol. Spatial (distance from center and area difference) and temporal (duration and time-to-peak) image metrics are proposed as potential biomarkers for differentiating abnormal cortical activation in children with CP from healthy pediatric controls. In addition, a similarity image-analysis concept is presented that unveils areas that have similar activation patterns as that of the maximum activation area, but are not discernible by visual inspection of standard activation images. Metrics derived from the images presenting areas of similarity are shown to be sensitive identifiers of abnormal activation patterns in children with CP. Importantly, the proposed similarity concept and related metrics may be applicable to other studies for the identification of cortical activation patterns by fNIRS.

  15. Cerebral metabolic abnormalities in A3243G mitochondrial DNA mutation carriers

    PubMed Central

    Weiduschat, Nora; Kaufmann, Petra; Mao, Xiangling; Engelstad, Kristin Marie; Hinton, Veronica; DiMauro, Salvatore; De Vivo, Darryl

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To establish cerebral metabolic features associated with the A3243G mitochondrial DNA mutation with proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (1H MRSI) and to assess their potential as prognostic biomarkers. Methods: In this prospective cohort study, we investigated 135 clinically heterogeneous A3243G mutation carriers and 30 healthy volunteers (HVs) with 1H MRSI. Mutation carriers included 45 patients with mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes (MELAS); 11 participants who would develop the MELAS syndrome during follow-up (converters); and 79 participants who would not develop the MELAS syndrome during follow-up (nonconverters). The groups were compared with respect to MRSI metabolic indices of 1) anaerobic energy metabolism (lactate), 2) neuronal integrity (N-acetyl-l-aspartate [NAA]), 3) mitochondrial function (NAA; lactate), 4) cell energetics (total creatine), and 5) membrane biosynthesis and turnover (total choline [tCho]). Results: Consistent with prior studies, the patients with MELAS had higher lactate (p < 0.001) and lower NAA levels (p = 0.01) than HVs. Unexpectedly, converters showed higher NAA (p = 0.042), tCho (p = 0.004), and total creatine (p = 0.002), in addition to higher lactate levels (p = 0.032), compared with HVs. Compared with nonconverters, converters had higher tCho (p = 0.015). Clinically, converters and nonconverters did not differ at baseline. Lactate and tCho levels were reliable biomarkers for predicting the risk of individual mutation carriers to develop the MELAS phenotype. Conclusions: 1H MRSI assessment of cerebral metabolism in A3243G mutation carriers shows promise in identifying disease biomarkers as well as individuals at risk of developing the MELAS phenotype. PMID:24477106

  16. Prevalence of abnormal glucose tolerance and risk factors in urban and rural Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Mustafa, Norlaila; Kamarudin, Nor Azmi; Ismail, Ab Aziz; Khir, Amir Sharifuddin; Ismail, Ikram Shah; Musa, Kamarul Imran; Kadir, Khalid Abdul; Yaacob, Nor Azwany; Ali, Osman; Isa, Siti Harnida Md; Wan Bebakar, Wan Mohamad; wan Mohamud, Wan Nazaimoon

    2011-06-01

    To determine the prevalence of prediabetes and diabetes among rural and urban Malaysians. This cross-sectional survey was conducted among 3,879 Malaysian adults (1,335 men and 2,544 women). All subjects underwent the 75-g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). The overall prevalence of prediabetes was 22.1% (30.2% in men and 69.8% in women). Isolated impaired fasting glucose (IFG) and impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) were found in 3.4 and 16.1% of the study population, respectively, whereas 2.6% of the subjects had both IFG and IGT. Based on an OGTT, the prevalence of newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes was 12.6% (31.0% in men and 69.0% in women). The prediabetic subjects also had an increased prevalence of cardiovascular disease risk factors. The large proportion of undiagnosed cases of prediabetes and diabetes reflects the lack of public awareness of the disease.

  17. Abnormal glucose tolerance post-gestational diabetes mellitus as defined by the International Association of Diabetes and Pregnancy Study Groups criteria.

    PubMed

    Noctor, Eoin; Crowe, Catherine; Carmody, Louise A; Saunders, Jean A; Kirwan, Breda; O'Dea, Angela; Gillespie, Paddy; Glynn, Liam G; McGuire, Brian E; O'Neill, Ciarán; O'Shea, P M; Dunne, F P

    2016-10-01

    An increase in gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) prevalence has been demonstrated across many countries with adoption of the International Association of the Diabetes and Pregnancy Study Groups (IADPSG) diagnostic criteria. Here, we determine the cumulative incidence of abnormal glucose tolerance among women with previous GDM, and identify clinical risk factors predicting this. Two hundred and seventy women with previous IADPSG-defined GDM were prospectively followed up for 5years (mean 2.6) post-index pregnancy, and compared with 388 women with normal glucose tolerance (NGT) in pregnancy. Cumulative incidence of abnormal glucose tolerance (using American Diabetes Association criteria for impaired fasting glucose, impaired glucose tolerance and diabetes) was determined using the Kaplan-Meier method of survival analysis. Cox regression models were constructed to test for factors predicting abnormal glucose tolerance. Twenty-six percent of women with previous GDM had abnormal glucose tolerance vs 4% with NGT, with the log-rank test demonstrating significantly different survival curves (P<0.001). Women meeting IADPSG, but not the World Health Organization (WHO) 1999 criteria, had a lower cumulative incidence than women meeting both sets of criteria, both in the early post-partum period (4.2% vs 21.7%, P<0.001) and at longer-term follow-up (13.7% vs 32.6%, P<0.001). Predictive factors were glucose levels on the pregnancy oral glucose tolerance test, family history of diabetes, gestational week at testing, and BMI at follow-up. The proportion of women developing abnormal glucose tolerance remains high among those with IADPSG-defined GDM. This demonstrates the need for continued close follow-up, although the optimal frequency and method needs further study. © 2016 European Society of Endocrinology.

  18. The effect of aniracetam on cerebral glucose metabolism in rats after lesioning of the basal forebrain measured by PET.

    PubMed

    Ouchi, Y; Kakiuchi, T; Okada, H; Nishiyama, S; Tsukada, H

    1999-03-15

    To evaluate the effect of aniracetam, a potent modulator of the glutamatergic and cholinergic systems, on the altered cerebral glucose metabolism after lesioning of the basal forebrain, we measured the cerebral metabolic rate of glucose (CMRGlc) with positron emission tomography and the choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) activity in the frontal cortex of the lesioned rats after treating them with aniracetam. Continuous administration of aniracetam for 7 days after the surgery prevented CMRGlc reduction in the frontal cortex ipsilateral to the lesion while the lesioned rats without aniracetam showed significant CMRGlc reduction in the frontal cortex. The level of CMRGlc in the lesion-side basal forebrain was lower in all rats regardless of the aniracetam treatment. Biochemical studies showed that aniracetam did not alter the reduction in the frontal ChAT activity. These results showed that aniracetam prevents glucose metabolic reduction in the cholinergically denervated frontal cortex with little effect on the cortical cholinergic system. The present study suggested that a neurotransmitter system other than the cholinergic system, e.g. the glutamatergic system, plays a central role in the cortical metabolic recovery after lesioning of the basal forebrain.

  19. Pair bond Formation Leads to a Sustained Increase in Global Cerebral Glucose Metabolism in Monogamous Male Titi Monkeys (Callicebus cupreus)

    PubMed Central

    Maninger, Nicole; Hinde, Katie; Mendoza, Sally P.; Mason, William A.; Larke, Rebecca H.; Ragen, Benjamin J; Jarcho, Michael R.; Cherry, Simon R.; Rowland, Douglas J.; Ferrer, Emilio; Bales, Karen L.

    2017-01-01

    Social bonds, especially attachment relationships, are crucial to our health and happiness. However, what we know about the neural substrates of these bonds is almost exclusively limited to rodent models and correlational experiments in humans. Here, we used socially monogamous non-human primates, titi monkeys (Callicebus cupreus) to experimentally examine changes in regional and global cerebral glucose metabolism during the formation and maintenance of pair bonds. Baseline positron emission tomography (PET) scans were taken of thirteen unpaired male titi monkeys. Seven males were then experimentally paired with females, scanned and compared, after one week, to six age-matched control males. Five of the six control males were then also paired and scanned after one week. Scans were repeated on all males after four months of pairing. PET scans were coregistered with structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and region of interest (ROI) analysis was carried out. A primary finding was that paired males showed a significant increase in FDG uptake in whole brain following one week of pairing, which is maintained out to four months. Dopaminergic, “motivational” areas and those involved in social behavior showed the greatest change in glucose uptake. In contrast, control areas changed only marginally more than GCGM. These findings confirm the large effects of social bonds on global cerebral glucose metabolism. They also suggest that more studies should examine how social manipulations affect whole brain FDG uptake, as opposed to assuming that it does not change across condition. PMID:28242440

  20. Peripheral Insulin Resistance and Impaired Insulin Signaling Contribute to Abnormal Glucose Metabolism in Preterm Baboons

    PubMed Central

    McGill-Vargas, Lisa L.; Gastaldelli, Amalia; Seidner, Steven R.; McCurnin, Donald C.; Leland, Michelle M.; Anzueto, Diana G.; Johnson, Marney C.; Liang, Hanyu; DeFronzo, Ralph A.; Musi, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Premature infants develop hyperglycemia shortly after birth, increasing their morbidity and death. Surviving infants have increased incidence of diabetes as young adults. Our understanding of the biological basis for the insulin resistance of prematurity and developmental regulation of glucose production remains fragmentary. The objective of this study was to examine maturational differences in insulin sensitivity and the insulin-signaling pathway in skeletal muscle and adipose tissue of 30 neonatal baboons using the euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp. Preterm baboons (67% gestation) had reduced peripheral insulin sensitivity shortly after birth (M value 12.5 ± 1.5 vs 21.8 ± 4.4 mg/kg · min in term baboons) and at 2 weeks of age (M value 12.8 ± 2.6 vs 16.3 ± 4.2, respectively). Insulin increased Akt phosphorylation, but these responses were significantly lower in preterm baboons during the first week of life (3.2-fold vs 9.8-fold). Preterm baboons had lower glucose transporter-1 protein content throughout the first 2 weeks of life (8%-12% of term). In preterm baboons, serum free fatty acids (FFAs) did not decrease in response to insulin, whereas FFAs decreased by greater than 80% in term baboons; the impaired suppression of FFAs in the preterm animals was paired with a decreased glucose transporter-4 protein content in adipose tissue. In conclusion, peripheral insulin resistance and impaired non-insulin-dependent glucose uptake play an important role in hyperglycemia of prematurity. Impaired insulin signaling (reduced Akt) contributes to the defect in insulin-stimulated glucose disposal. Counterregulatory hormones are not major contributors. PMID:25560831

  1. Peripheral insulin resistance and impaired insulin signaling contribute to abnormal glucose metabolism in preterm baboons.

    PubMed

    Blanco, Cynthia L; McGill-Vargas, Lisa L; Gastaldelli, Amalia; Seidner, Steven R; McCurnin, Donald C; Leland, Michelle M; Anzueto, Diana G; Johnson, Marney C; Liang, Hanyu; DeFronzo, Ralph A; Musi, Nicolas

    2015-03-01

    Premature infants develop hyperglycemia shortly after birth, increasing their morbidity and death. Surviving infants have increased incidence of diabetes as young adults. Our understanding of the biological basis for the insulin resistance of prematurity and developmental regulation of glucose production remains fragmentary. The objective of this study was to examine maturational differences in insulin sensitivity and the insulin-signaling pathway in skeletal muscle and adipose tissue of 30 neonatal baboons using the euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp. Preterm baboons (67% gestation) had reduced peripheral insulin sensitivity shortly after birth (M value 12.5 ± 1.5 vs 21.8 ± 4.4 mg/kg · min in term baboons) and at 2 weeks of age (M value 12.8 ± 2.6 vs 16.3 ± 4.2, respectively). Insulin increased Akt phosphorylation, but these responses were significantly lower in preterm baboons during the first week of life (3.2-fold vs 9.8-fold). Preterm baboons had lower glucose transporter-1 protein content throughout the first 2 weeks of life (8%-12% of term). In preterm baboons, serum free fatty acids (FFAs) did not decrease in response to insulin, whereas FFAs decreased by greater than 80% in term baboons; the impaired suppression of FFAs in the preterm animals was paired with a decreased glucose transporter-4 protein content in adipose tissue. In conclusion, peripheral insulin resistance and impaired non-insulin-dependent glucose uptake play an important role in hyperglycemia of prematurity. Impaired insulin signaling (reduced Akt) contributes to the defect in insulin-stimulated glucose disposal. Counterregulatory hormones are not major contributors.

  2. Association of Insulin Resistance With Cerebral Glucose Uptake in Late Middle-Aged Adults at Risk for Alzheimer Disease.

    PubMed

    Willette, Auriel A; Bendlin, Barbara B; Starks, Erika J; Birdsill, Alex C; Johnson, Sterling C; Christian, Bradley T; Okonkwo, Ozioma C; La Rue, Asenath; Hermann, Bruce P; Koscik, Rebecca L; Jonaitis, Erin M; Sager, Mark A; Asthana, Sanjay

    2015-09-01

    to worse performance on the immediate memory (β = 0.317; t148 = 4.08; P < .001) and delayed memory (β = 0.305; t148 = 3.895; P < .001) factor scores. Our results show that insulin resistance, a prevalent and increasingly common condition in developed countries, is associated with significantly lower regional cerebral glucose metabolism, which in turn may predict worse memory performance. Midlife may be a critical period for initiating treatments to lower peripheral insulin resistance to maintain neural metabolism and cognitive function.

  3. Glucose-6-phosphate transporter gene therapy corrects metabolic and myeloid abnormalities in glycogen storage disease type Ib mice

    PubMed Central

    Yiu, Wai Han; Pan, Chi-Jiunn; Allamarvdasht, Mohammad; Kim, So Youn; Chou, Janice Y.

    2008-01-01

    Glycogen storage disease type Ib (GSD-Ib) is caused by a deficiency in the glucose-6-phosphate transporter (G6PT), an endoplasmic reticulum-associated transmembrane protein that is ubiquitously expressed. GSD-Ib patients suffer from disturbed glucose homeostasis and myeloid dysfunctions. To evaluate the feasibility of gene replacement therapy for GSD-Ib, we have infused adenoviral (Ad) vector containing human G6PT (Ad-hG6PT) into G6PT-deficient (G6PT-/-) mice that manifest symptoms characteristics of the human disorder. Ad-hG6PT-infusion restores significant levels of G6PT mRNA expression in the liver, bone marrow, and spleen and corrects metabolic as well as myeloid abnormalities in G6PT-/- mice. The G6PT-/- mice receiving gene therapy exhibit improved growth; normalized serum profiles for glucose, cholesterol, triglyceride, uric acid, and lactic acid; and reduced hepatic glycogen deposition. The therapy also corrects neutropenia and lowers the elevated serum levels of granulocyte colony stimulating factor. The development of bone and spleen in the infused G6PT-/- mice is improved and accompanied by increased cellularity and normalized myeloid progenitor cell frequencies in both tissues. This effective use of gene therapy to correct metabolic imbalances and myeloid dysfunctions in GSD-Ib mice holds promise for the future of gene therapy in humans. PMID:17006547

  4. Cerebral Correlates of Abnormal Emotion Conflict Processing in Euthymic Bipolar Patients: A Functional MRI Study.

    PubMed

    Favre, Pauline; Polosan, Mircea; Pichat, Cédric; Bougerol, Thierry; Baciu, Monica

    2015-01-01

    Patients with bipolar disorder experience cognitive and emotional impairment that may persist even during the euthymic state of the disease. These persistent symptoms in bipolar patients (BP) may be characterized by disturbances of emotion regulation and related fronto-limbic brain circuitry. The present study aims to investigate the modulation of fronto-limbic activity and connectivity in BP by the processing of emotional conflict. Fourteen euthymic BP and 13 matched healthy subjects (HS) underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) while performing a word-face emotional Stroop task designed to dissociate the monitoring/generation of emotional conflict from its resolution. Functional connectivity was determined by means of psychophysiological interaction (PPI) approach. Relative to HS, BP were slower to process incongruent stimuli, reflecting higher amount of behavioral interference during emotional Stroop. Furthermore, BP showed decreased activation of the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) during the monitoring and a lack of bilateral amygdala deactivation during the resolution of the emotional conflict. In addition, during conflict monitoring, BP showed abnormal positive connectivity between the right DLPFC and several regions of the default mode network. Overall, our results highlighted dysfunctional processing of the emotion conflict in euthymic BP that may be subtended by abnormal activity and connectivity of the DLPFC during the conflict monitoring, which, in turn, leads to failure of amygdala deactivation during the resolution of the conflict. Emotional dysregulation in BP may be underpinned by a lack of top-down cognitive control and a difficulty to focus on the task due to persistent self-oriented attention.

  5. PET of serotonin 1A receptors and cerebral glucose metabolism for temporal lobectomy.

    PubMed

    Theodore, William H; Martinez, Ashley R; Khan, Omar I; Liew, Clarissa J; Auh, Sungyoung; Dustin, Irene M; Heiss, John; Sato, Susumu

    2012-09-01

    The objective of this study was to compare 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor 1A (5-HT(1A)) PET with cerebral metabolic rate of glucose (CMRglc) PET for temporal lobectomy planning. We estimated 5-HT(1A) receptor binding preoperatively with (18)F-trans-4-fluoro-N-2-[4-(2-methoxyphenyl) piperazin-1-yl]ethyl-N-(2-pyridyl) cyclohexane carboxamide ((18)F-FCWAY) PET and CMRglc measurement with (18)F-FDG in regions drawn on coregistered MRI after partial-volume correction in 41 patients who had anterior temporal lobectomy with at least a 1-y follow-up. Surgery was tailored to individual preresection evaluations and intraoperative electrocorticography. Mean regional asymmetry values and the number of regions with asymmetry exceeding 2 SDs in 16 healthy volunteers were compared between seizure-free and non-seizure-free patients. (18)F-FCWAY but not (18)F-FDG and MRI data were masked for surgical decisions and outcome assessment. Twenty-six of 41 (63%) patients seizure-free since surgery had significantly different mesial temporal asymmetries, compared with 15 non-seizure-free patients for both (18)F-FCWAY (F(1,39) = 5.87; P = 0.02) and (18)F-FDG PET (F(1,38) = 5.79; P = 0.021). The probability of being seizure-free was explained by both (18)F-FDG and (18)F-FCWAY PET, but not MRI, with a significant additional (18)F-FCWAY effect (chi(2)(2) = 9.8796; P = 0.0072) after the probability of being seizure-free was explained by (18)F-FDG. Although MRI alone was not predictive, any combination of 2 lateralizing imaging studies was highly predictive of seizure freedom. Our study provides class III evidence that both 5-HT(1A) receptor PET and CMRglc PET can contribute to temporal lobectomy planning. Additional studies should explore the potential for temporal lobectomy based on interictal electroencephalography and minimally invasive imaging studies.

  6. Risk factors associated with abnormal glucose tolerance in the early postpartum period among Japanese women with gestational diabetes.

    PubMed

    Kugishima, Yukari; Yasuhi, Ichiro; Yamashita, Hiroshi; Fukuda, Masashi; Kuzume, Akiko; Sugimi, So; Umezaki, Yasushi; Suga, Sachie; Kusuda, Nobuko

    2015-04-01

    To identify the risk factors associated with abnormal glucose tolerance (AGT) on the first postpartum oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) among Japanese women with gestational diabetes (GDM). In a retrospective study, data were analyzed from women with GDM who underwent their first postpartum OGTT 6-8weeks post partum at a center in Omura, Japan, between January 1, 2007, and December 31, 2011. Women with diabetes or impaired glucose tolerance were deemed to have postpartum AGT. The association between postpartum AGT and various risk factors was analyzed. Among 169 women who underwent a postpartum OGTT, 58 (34.3%) had AGT. The significant risk factors associated with postpartum AGT in univariate analysis were pre-pregnancy body mass index (P=0.096), 1-hour plasma glucose (P=0.006), hemoglobin A1c (P<0.001), insulinogenic index (P=0.05), an insulinogenic index of less than 0.4 (P=0.006), and insulin therapy during pregnancy (P<0.001). Independent risk factors identified by multivariate logistic regression models were insulinogenic index (odds ratio [OR] 0.10, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.01-0.74; P=0.002), an insulinogenic index of less than 0.4 (OR 5.70, 95% CI 1.69-21.66; P=0.005), and insulin therapy during pregnancy (OR 3.43, 95% CI 1.03-12.55; P=0.044). Among Japanese women with GDM, a lower insulinogenic index and use of insulin therapy during pregnancy are associated with early postpartum AGT. Copyright © 2014 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Local cerebral glucose metabolism in patients with long-term behavioral and cognitive deficits following mild traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Gross, H; Kling, A; Henry, G; Herndon, C; Lavretsky, H

    1996-01-01

    A retrospective study of 20 patients with mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) examined brain regions of interest by comparing [18F]-2-deoxyglucose PET, neuropsychological test results, and continuing behavioral dysfunction. Abnormal local cerebral metabolic rates (rLCMs) were most prominent in midtemporal, anterior cingulate, precuneus, anterior temporal, frontal white, and corpus callosum brain regions. Abnormal rLCMs were significantly correlated statistically with 1) overall clinical complaints, most specifically with inconsistent attention/concentration and 2) overall neuropsychological test results. The authors conclude that 1) even mild TBI may result in continuing brain behavioral deficits; 2) PET can help elucidate dysfunctional brain circuitry in neurobehavioral disorders; and 3) specific brain areas may correlate with deficits in daily neurobehavioral functioning and neuropsychological test findings.

  8. Cerebral Glucose Metabolism and Sedation in Brain-injured Patients: A Microdialysis Study.

    PubMed

    Hertle, Daniel N; Santos, Edgar; Hagenston, Anna M; Jungk, Christine; Haux, Daniel; Unterberg, Andreas W; Sakowitz, Oliver W

    2015-07-01

    Disturbed brain metabolism is a signature of primary damage and/or precipitates secondary injury processes after severe brain injury. Sedatives and analgesics target electrophysiological functioning and are as such well-known modulators of brain energy metabolism. Still unclear, however, is how sedatives impact glucose metabolism and whether they differentially influence brain metabolism in normally active, healthy brain and critically impaired, injured brain. We therefore examined and compared the effects of anesthetic drugs under both critical (<1 mmol/L) and noncritical (>1 mmol/L) extracellular brain glucose levels. We performed an explorative, retrospective analysis of anesthetic drug administration and brain glucose concentrations, obtained by bedside microdialysis, in 19 brain-injured patients. Our investigations revealed an inverse linear correlation between brain glucose and both the concentration of extracellular glutamate (Pearson r=-0.58, P=0.01) and the lactate/glucose ratio (Pearson r=-0.55, P=0.01). For noncritical brain glucose levels, we observed a positive linear correlation between midazolam dose and brain glucose (P<0.05). For critical brain glucose levels, extracellular brain glucose was unaffected by any type of sedative. These findings suggest that the use of anesthetic drugs may be of limited value in attempts to influence brain glucose metabolism in injured brain tissue.

  9. Impact of long-term potassium supplementation on thiazide diuretic-induced abnormalities of glucose and uric acid metabolisms.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian-Liang; Yu, Hui; Hou, Ying-Wei; Wang, Ke; Bi, Wen-Shan; Zhang, Liang; Wang, Qian; Li, Pan; Yu, Man-Li; Zhao, Xian-Xian

    2018-04-01

    Treatment of hypertension with thiazide diuretics may trigger hypokalemia, hyperglycemia, and hyperuricemia. Some studies suggest simultaneous potassium supplementation in hypertensive patients using thiazide diuretics. However, few clinical studies have reported the impact of long-term potassium supplementation on thiazide diuretic-induced abnormalities in blood glucose and uric acid (UA) metabolisms. One hundred hypertensive patients meeting the inclusion criteria were equally randomized to two groups: IND group receiving indapamide (1.25-2.5 mg daily) alone, and IND/KCI group receiving IND (1.25-2.5 mg daily) plus potassium chloride (40 mmol daily), both for 24 weeks. At the end of 24-week follow-up, serum K + level in IND group decreased from 4.27 ± 0.28 to 3.98 ± 0.46 mmol/L (P < 0.001), and fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and UA increased from 5.11 ± 0.52 to 5.31 ± 0.57 mmol/L (P < 0.05), and from 0.404 ± 0.078 to 0.433 ± 0.072 mmol/L (P < 0.05), respectively. Serum K + level in IND/KCl group decreased from 4.27 ± 0.36 to 3.89 ± 0.28 mmol/L (P < 0.001), and FPB and UA increased from 5.10 ± 0.41 to 5.35 ± 0.55 mmol/L (P < 0.01), and from 0.391 ± 0.073 to 0.457 ± 0.128 mmol/L (P < 0.001), respectively. The difference value between the serum K + level and FPG before and after treatment was not statistically significant between the two groups. However, the difference value in UA in IND/KCl group was significantly higher than that in IND group (0.066 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.041-0.090)  mmol/L vs. 0.029 (95% CI: 0.006-0.058) mmol/L, P < 0.05). The results showed that long-term routine potassium supplementation could not prevent or attenuate thiazide diuretic-induced abnormalities of glucose metabolism in hypertensive patients; rather, it may aggravate the UA metabolic abnormality.

  10. Design of the NL-ENIGMA study: Exploring the effect of Souvenaid on cerebral glucose metabolism in early Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Scheltens, Nienke M E; Kuyper, Ingrid S; Boellaard, Ronald; Barkhof, Frederik; Teunissen, Charlotte E; Broersen, Laus M; Lansbergen, Marieke M; van der Flier, Wiesje M; van Berckel, Bart N M; Scheltens, Philip

    2016-11-01

    Alzheimer's disease is associated with early synaptic loss. Specific nutrients are known to be rate limiting for synapse formation. Studies have shown that administering specific nutrients may improve memory function, possibly by increasing synapse formation. This Dutch study explores the Effect of a specific Nutritional Intervention on cerebral Glucose Metabolism in early Alzheimer's disease (NL-ENIGMA, Dutch Trial Register NTR4718, http://www.trialregister.nl/trialreg/admin/rctview.asp?TC=4718). The NL-ENIGMA study is designed to test whether the specific multinutrient combination Fortasyn Connect present in the medical food Souvenaid influences cerebral glucose metabolism as a marker for improved synapse function. This study is a double-blind, randomized controlled parallel-group single-center trial. Forty drug-naive patients with mild cognitive impairment or mild dementia with evidence of amyloid deposition are 1:1 randomized to receive either the multinutrient combination or placebo once daily. Main exploratory outcome parameters include absolute quantitative positron emission tomography with 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (including arterial sampling) and standard uptake value ratios normalized for the cerebellum or pons after 24 weeks. We expect the NL-ENIGMA study to provide further insight in the potential of this multinutrient combination to improve synapse function.

  11. Study on the relationship between the expression of IGF-1 in umbilical cord blood and abnormal glucose metabolism during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Liu, K; Wu, H-Y; Xu, Y-H

    2017-02-01

    To explore the relationship between the expression of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) in neonatal umbilical cord blood and abnormal glucose metabolism during pregnancy. We have selected 63 cases of delivery randomly, term birth and maternal from January 2015 to January 2016 in our hospital, gestational diabetes mellitus for Group A, abnormal gestational glucose tolerance for Group B and normal for Group C with 21 cases in each group. The venous blood samples were collected from all the pregnant females 2 weeks before delivery, and the levels of HbA1c in serum were detected by Elisa method. During the delivery, the umbilical cord blood was collected and the levels of IGF-1 were measured by double site immune enzyme analysis. The neonatal weight was recorded and the correlation analysis was made in respect of the measurement results. The level of HbA1c in Group A was significantly higher than that in Group C (p < 0.05); IGF-1 level and neonatal weight of Group B were significantly higher than that of Group C (p < 0.05), IGF-1 has a significant correlation with neonatal weight in Group C, and HbA1c and IGF-1 were positively correlated (p < 0.05); IGF-1 was positively correlated with neonatal weight in Group A and Group B (p < 0.05). There was a significant positive correlation between the IGF-1 level of neonatal umbilical cord blood and the neonatal weight (p < 0.05). Also, the level of HbA1c was positively correlated with the level of IGF-1 in neonatal umbilical cord blood at the end of pregnancy (p < 0.05). The expression level of IGF-1 in the final stage of pregnant females can be detected to predict the expression level of IGF-1 in newborn infants and then the growth status of the fetus can be obtained.

  12. A combination of physical activity and computerized brain training improves verbal memory and increases cerebral glucose metabolism in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Shah, T; Verdile, G; Sohrabi, H; Campbell, A; Putland, E; Cheetham, C; Dhaliwal, S; Weinborn, M; Maruff, P; Darby, D; Martins, R N

    2014-12-02

    Physical exercise interventions and cognitive training programs have individually been reported to improve cognition in the healthy elderly population; however, the clinical significance of using a combined approach is currently lacking. This study evaluated whether physical activity (PA), computerized cognitive training and/or a combination of both could improve cognition. In this nonrandomized study, 224 healthy community-dwelling older adults (60-85 years) were assigned to 16 weeks home-based PA (n=64), computerized cognitive stimulation (n=62), a combination of both (combined, n=51) or a control group (n=47). Cognition was assessed using the Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test, Controlled Oral Word Association Test and the CogState computerized battery at baseline, 8 and 16 weeks post intervention. Physical fitness assessments were performed at all time points. A subset (total n=45) of participants underwent [(18)F] fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography scans at 16 weeks (post-intervention). One hundred and ninety-one participants completed the study and the data of 172 participants were included in the final analysis. Compared with the control group, the combined group showed improved verbal episodic memory and significantly higher brain glucose metabolism in the left sensorimotor cortex after controlling for age, sex, premorbid IQ, apolipoprotein E (APOE) status and history of head injury. The higher cerebral glucose metabolism in this brain region was positively associated with improved verbal memory seen in the combined group only. Our study provides evidence that a specific combination of physical and mental exercises for 16 weeks can improve cognition and increase cerebral glucose metabolism in cognitively intact healthy older adults.

  13. A combination of physical activity and computerized brain training improves verbal memory and increases cerebral glucose metabolism in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Shah, T; Verdile, G; Sohrabi, H; Campbell, A; Putland, E; Cheetham, C; Dhaliwal, S; Weinborn, M; Maruff, P; Darby, D; Martins, R N

    2014-01-01

    Physical exercise interventions and cognitive training programs have individually been reported to improve cognition in the healthy elderly population; however, the clinical significance of using a combined approach is currently lacking. This study evaluated whether physical activity (PA), computerized cognitive training and/or a combination of both could improve cognition. In this nonrandomized study, 224 healthy community-dwelling older adults (60–85 years) were assigned to 16 weeks home-based PA (n=64), computerized cognitive stimulation (n=62), a combination of both (combined, n=51) or a control group (n=47). Cognition was assessed using the Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test, Controlled Oral Word Association Test and the CogState computerized battery at baseline, 8 and 16 weeks post intervention. Physical fitness assessments were performed at all time points. A subset (total n=45) of participants underwent [18F] fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography scans at 16 weeks (post-intervention). One hundred and ninety-one participants completed the study and the data of 172 participants were included in the final analysis. Compared with the control group, the combined group showed improved verbal episodic memory and significantly higher brain glucose metabolism in the left sensorimotor cortex after controlling for age, sex, premorbid IQ, apolipoprotein E (APOE) status and history of head injury. The higher cerebral glucose metabolism in this brain region was positively associated with improved verbal memory seen in the combined group only. Our study provides evidence that a specific combination of physical and mental exercises for 16 weeks can improve cognition and increase cerebral glucose metabolism in cognitively intact healthy older adults. PMID:25463973

  14. Direct neuronal glucose uptake heralds activity-dependent increases in cerebral metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Lundgaard, Iben; Li, Baoman; Xie, Lulu; Kang, Hongyi; Sanggaard, Simon; Haswell, John Douglas R; Sun, Wei; Goldman, Siri; Blekot, Solomiya; Nielsen, Michael; Takano, Takahiro; Deane, Rashid; Nedergaard, Maiken

    2015-01-01

    Metabolically, the brain is a highly active organ that relies almost exclusively on glucose as its energy source. According to the astrocyte-to-neuron lactate shuttle hypothesis, glucose is taken up by astrocytes and converted to lactate, which is then oxidized by neurons. Here we show, using 2-photon imaging of a near-infrared 2-deoxyglucose analogue (2DG-IR), that glucose is taken up preferentially by neurons in awake behaving mice. Anesthesia suppressed neuronal 2DG-IR uptake and sensory stimulation was associated with a sharp increase in neuronal, but not astrocytic, 2DG-IR uptake. Moreover, hexokinase, which catalyze the first enzymatic steps in glycolysis, was highly enriched in neurons compared with astrocytes, in mouse as well as in human cortex. These observations suggest that brain activity and neuronal glucose metabolism are directly linked, and identifies the neuron as the principal locus of glucose uptake as visualized by functional brain imaging. PMID:25904018

  15. Direct neuronal glucose uptake heralds activity-dependent increases in cerebral metabolism.

    PubMed

    Lundgaard, Iben; Li, Baoman; Xie, Lulu; Kang, Hongyi; Sanggaard, Simon; Haswell, John D R; Sun, Wei; Goldman, Siri; Blekot, Solomiya; Nielsen, Michael; Takano, Takahiro; Deane, Rashid; Nedergaard, Maiken

    2015-04-23

    Metabolically, the brain is a highly active organ that relies almost exclusively on glucose as its energy source. According to the astrocyte-to-neuron lactate shuttle hypothesis, glucose is taken up by astrocytes and converted to lactate, which is then oxidized by neurons. Here we show, using two-photon imaging of a near-infrared 2-deoxyglucose analogue (2DG-IR), that glucose is taken up preferentially by neurons in awake behaving mice. Anaesthesia suppressed neuronal 2DG-IR uptake and sensory stimulation was associated with a sharp increase in neuronal, but not astrocytic, 2DG-IR uptake. Moreover, hexokinase, which catalyses the first enzymatic steps in glycolysis, was highly enriched in neurons compared with astrocytes, in mouse as well as in human cortex. These observations suggest that brain activity and neuronal glucose metabolism are directly linked, and identify the neuron as the principal locus of glucose uptake as visualized by functional brain imaging.

  16. Decreased brain glucose utilization in patients with Cushing's disease.

    PubMed

    Brunetti, A; Fulham, M J; Aloj, L; De Souza, B; Nieman, L; Oldfield, E H; Di Chiro, G

    1998-05-01

    Glucocorticoid hormones affect glucose use in different tissues, and the results of several experimental studies have suggested that glucocorticoids have a central action on cerebral metabolism. PET, using the radiotracer 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), permits the measurement of cerebral glucose metabolism. To investigate whether cerebral glucose metabolism would be altered in patients with increased plasma glucocorticoid levels, we analyzed the FDG PET studies that were done on 13 patients with Cushing's disease and compared the results with those obtained in 13 age-matched normal control subjects. A second FDG PET scan was performed on 4 patients after surgical removal of the pituitary adenoma. Patients with Cushing's disease had a significant reduction in cerebral glucose metabolism compared with normal controls. In the patients on whom a second PET scan was performed, there was a trend toward increased glucose metabolism on the second scan when comparing pre- and postsurgery values for each patient. We suggest that the decreased cerebral glucose metabolism we observed in Cushing's disease is attributable to increased glucocorticoid levels, and we speculate that abnormal cerebral glucose metabolism might contribute to the cognitive and psychiatric abnormalities that are frequently observed in patients with Cushing's disease.

  17. Obesity and abnormal glucose tolerance in offspring of diabetic mothers: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Kawasaki, Maki; Arata, Naoko; Miyazaki, Celine; Mori, Rintaro; Kikuchi, Toru; Ogawa, Yoshihiro; Ota, Erika

    2018-01-01

    Rising prevalence of childhood obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is an emerging public health issue. To investigate the association of maternal hyperglycemia exposure during pregnancy with obesity and abnormal glucose tolerance in offspring, and the age at occurrence. We searched MEDLINE and EMBASE for observational studies on obesity and diabetes in offspring of diabetic mothers (gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) and T2DM), and those on non-diabetic mothers. We performed fixed effect meta-analysis for all studies except when heterogeneity was detected. The quality of studies was evaluated using the Risk of Bias Assessment Tool for Nonrandomized Studies (RoBANS). Twenty observational studies were included involving a total of 26,509 children. Offspring of GDM mother had higher BMI z-score in childhood (pooled MD: 0.14, 95%CI: 0.04-0.24, seven studies, 21,691children, low quality of evidence). Offspring of T1DM mothers had higher BMI z-score from prepubertal to adolescent (pooled MD: 0.35, 95% CI: 0.13-0.58, three studies, 844 children, low quality of evidence) compared with control. After adjustment for maternal pre-pregnancy BMI, this association remained in offspring of T1DM, but disappeared in those of GDM mothers. Offspring of GDM mother had higher 2-hour plasma glucose from prepubertal to early adulthood (pooled MD: 0.43 mmol/L, 95% CI: 0.18-0.69, five studies, 890 children), while those of T1DM mothers had higher rate of T2DM in 2-5 years old to early adulthood (pooled odds ratio [OR], 6.10: 95% CI: 1.23-30.37, two studies, 448 children, very low quality of evidence) compared with control. As there was only one study with offspring of T2DM mothers, evidence is sparse. Only observational studies were included, with a few adequately adjusted for covariables. Exposure to maternal hyperglycemia was associated with offspring obesity and abnormal glucose tolerance especially in offspring of T1DM mothers, but the evidence

  18. Obesity and abnormal glucose tolerance in offspring of diabetic mothers: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kawasaki, Maki; Miyazaki, Celine; Mori, Rintaro; Kikuchi, Toru; Ogawa, Yoshihiro; Ota, Erika

    2018-01-01

    Background Rising prevalence of childhood obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is an emerging public health issue. Objectives To investigate the association of maternal hyperglycemia exposure during pregnancy with obesity and abnormal glucose tolerance in offspring, and the age at occurrence. Methods We searched MEDLINE and EMBASE for observational studies on obesity and diabetes in offspring of diabetic mothers (gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) and T2DM), and those on non-diabetic mothers. We performed fixed effect meta-analysis for all studies except when heterogeneity was detected. The quality of studies was evaluated using the Risk of Bias Assessment Tool for Nonrandomized Studies (RoBANS) Results Twenty observational studies were included involving a total of 26,509 children. Offspring of GDM mother had higher BMI z-score in childhood (pooled MD: 0.14, 95%CI: 0.04–0.24, seven studies, 21,691children, low quality of evidence). Offspring of T1DM mothers had higher BMI z-score from prepubertal to adolescent (pooled MD: 0.35, 95% CI: 0.13–0.58, three studies, 844 children, low quality of evidence) compared with control. After adjustment for maternal pre-pregnancy BMI, this association remained in offspring of T1DM, but disappeared in those of GDM mothers. Offspring of GDM mother had higher 2-hour plasma glucose from prepubertal to early adulthood (pooled MD: 0.43 mmol/L, 95% CI: 0.18–0.69, five studies, 890 children), while those of T1DM mothers had higher rate of T2DM in 2–5 years old to early adulthood (pooled odds ratio [OR], 6.10: 95% CI: 1.23–30.37, two studies, 448 children, very low quality of evidence) compared with control. As there was only one study with offspring of T2DM mothers, evidence is sparse. Limitations Only observational studies were included, with a few adequately adjusted for covariables. Conclusions Exposure to maternal hyperglycemia was associated with offspring obesity and abnormal

  19. The rate of cerebral utilization of glucose, ketone bodies, and oxygen: a comparative in vivo study of infant and adult rats.

    PubMed

    Dahlquist, G; Persson, B

    1976-11-01

    Cerebral blood flow (CBF) was measured by means of Celabeled microspheres in infant (20-day-old) and adult (3-month-old) rats, anesthetised with Na-5-ethyl-5-(1-methylpropyl)2-thiobarbituric acid. Cerebral arteriovenous differences of acetoacetate, D-beta-hydroxybutyrate, glucose, lactate, and oxygen and brain DNA content were determined in other groups of similarly treated infant and adult animals fed or starved for 48 or 72 hr. The mean CBF values of 0.48+/-0.04 and 0.62+/-0.07 ml/(g X min), +/- SEM, in infant and adult animals, respectively, were not significantly different. CBF was unaffected by starvation. At any given arterial concentration the cerebral arteriovenous difference of acetoacetate was significantly higher in infant than adult rats. The same was true for D-beta-hydroxybutyrate at arterial concentrations above 1 mmol/liter. There was an approximately linear relationship between arterial concentration of acetoacetate and its cerebral arteriovenous difference in both infant and adult rats. A similar relationship was found for D-beta-hydroxybutyrate only in infant animals. In the fed state, the cerebral uptake of glucose and ketone bodies (micromoles per (mg DNA X min)) was not different in infant and adult rats. During starvation, cerebral uptake of ketone bodies expressed as micromoles per (mg DNA X min) was higher in infant than adult rats, indicating a higher rate of utilization of ketone bodies per cell in these animals. For glucose, no such difference was found in either fed or starved groups (Table 3). The average percentage of the total cerebral uptake of substrates (micromoles per min) accounted for by ketone bodies increased in both infant and adult rats during starvation. This percentage value was clearly higher in infant than adult rats during starvation. After 72 hr of starvation the values were 38.8% and 15.2% in infant and adult rats, respectively (Fig. 3). Calculated cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen (CMRO2), assuming complete

  20. Lactate and glutamate dynamics during prolonged stimulation of the rat barrel cortex suggest adaptation of cerebral glucose and oxygen metabolism.

    PubMed

    Sonnay, Sarah; Duarte, João M N; Just, Nathalie

    2017-03-27

    A better understanding of BOLD responses stems from a better characterization of the brain's ability to metabolize glucose and oxygen. Non-invasive techniques such as functional magnetic resonance spectroscopy (fMRS) have thus been developed allowing for the reproducible assessment of metabolic changes during barrel cortex (S1BF) activations in rats. The present study aimed at further exploring the role of neurotransmitters on local and temporal changes in vascular and metabolic function in S1BF. fMRS and fMRI data were acquired sequentially in α-chloralose anesthetized rats during 32-min rest and trigeminal nerve stimulation periods. During stimulation, concentrations of lactate (Lac) and glutamate (Glu) increased in S1BF by 0.23±0.05 and 0.34±0.05μmol/g respectively in S1BF. Dynamic analysis of metabolite concentrations allowed estimating changes in cerebral metabolic rates of glucose (ΔCMR Glc ) and oxygen (ΔCMR O2 ). Findings confirmed a prevalence of oxidative metabolism during prolonged S1BF activation. Habituation led to a significant BOLD magnitude decline as a function of time while both total ΔCMR Glc and ΔCMR O2 remained constant revealing adaptation of glucose and oxygen metabolisms to support ongoing trigeminal nerve stimulation. Copyright © 2017 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. [A prospective study of risk factors in pregnant women with abnormal glucose metabolism].

    PubMed

    Yang, Hui-xia; Zhang, Mei-hua; Sun, Wei-jie; Zhao, Yi

    2005-11-01

    To evaluate the risk factors for gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and gestational impaired glucose tolerance (GIGT). A prospective case-control study was performed in 85 women with GDM, 63 cases with GIGT and 125 cases as control recruited from Feb 2004 to Aug 2004 in Peking University First Hospital. Univariate analysis and multivariate logistic regression were used to identify risk factors of GDM and GIGT. (1) The mean age, and body mass index (BMI) before pregnancy and larger maternal weight gains during pregnancy were significantly different between GDM/GIGT and control group (P < 0.05). (2) More intakes of fruits and carbohydrate per day increased the incidence of GDM and GIGT (P < 0.05). (3) There was a higher proportion of women with family history of diabetes among the GDM (42.2%) and GIGT (36.5%) compared with control group (19.2%). Irregular menses (16.5%, 23.8%), and polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) (5.9%, 3.2%) were more prevalent in the GDM, GIGT groups versus control subjects (6.4%, 0). The incidence of vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC) was significantly higher in pregnant women with GDM and GIGT (15.3% and 17.4%) than in control group (7.2%). (4) Multivariate logistic regression showed that age, irregular menses, BMI before pregnancy, history of spontaneous abortion, educational level and VVC all were independent factors for GDM or GIGT. Maternal age, irregular menses, obesity before gestation, rapid weight gains during pregnancy, history of spontaneous abortion as well as VVC are independent risk factors for GDM or GIGT. PCOS and family history of diabetes increase the incidence of GDM and GIGT but these are not independent risk factors for GDM and GIGT.

  2. Sleep-Wake Differences in Relative Regional Cerebral Metabolic Rate for Glucose among Patients with Insomnia Compared with Good Sleepers

    PubMed Central

    Kay, Daniel B.; Karim, Helmet T.; Soehner, Adriane M.; Hasler, Brant P.; Wilckens, Kristine A.; James, Jeffrey A.; Aizenstein, Howard J.; Price, Julie C.; Rosario, Bedda L.; Kupfer, David J.; Germain, Anne; Hall, Martica H.; Franzen, Peter L.; Nofzinger, Eric A.; Buysse, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: The neurobiological mechanisms of insomnia may involve altered patterns of activation across sleep-wake states in brain regions associated with cognition, self-referential processes, affect, and sleep-wake promotion. The objective of this study was to compare relative regional cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (rCMRglc) in these brain regions across wake and nonrapid eye movement (NREM) sleep states in patients with primary insomnia (PI) and good sleeper controls (GS). Methods: Participants included 44 PI and 40 GS matched for age (mean = 37 y old, range 21–60), sex, and race. We conducted [18F]fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose positron emission tomography scans in PI and GS during both morning wakefulness and NREM sleep at night. Repeated measures analysis of variance was used to test for group (PI vs. GS) by state (wake vs. NREM sleep) interactions in relative rCMRglc. Results: Significant group-by-state interactions in relative rCMRglc were found in the precuneus/posterior cingulate cortex, left middle frontal gyrus, left inferior/superior parietal lobules, left lingual/fusiform/occipital gyri, and right lingual gyrus. All clusters were significant at Pcorrected < 0.05. Conclusions: Insomnia was characterized by regional alterations in relative glucose metabolism across NREM sleep and wakefulness. Significant group-by-state interactions in relative rCMRglc suggest that insomnia is associated with impaired disengagement of brain regions involved in cognition (left frontoparietal), self-referential processes (precuneus/posterior cingulate), and affect (left middle frontal, fusiform/lingual gyri) during NREM sleep, or alternatively, to impaired engagement of these regions during wakefulness. Citation: Kay DB, Karim HT, Soehner AM, Hasler BP, Wilckens KA, James JA, Aizenstein HJ, Price JC, Rosario BL, Kupfer DJ, Germain A, Hall MH, Franzen PL, Nofzinger EA, Buysse DJ. Sleep-wake differences in relative regional cerebral metabolic rate for glucose among

  3. Metabolic Characterization of Acutely Isolated Hippocampal and Cerebral Cortical Slices Using [U-13C]Glucose and [1,2-13C]Acetate as Substrates.

    PubMed

    McNair, Laura F; Kornfelt, Rasmus; Walls, Anne B; Andersen, Jens V; Aldana, Blanca I; Nissen, Jakob D; Schousboe, Arne; Waagepetersen, Helle S

    2017-03-01

    Brain slice preparations from rats, mice and guinea pigs have served as important tools for studies of neurotransmission and metabolism. While hippocampal slices routinely have been used for electrophysiology studies, metabolic processes have mostly been studied in cerebral cortical slices. Few comparative characterization studies exist for acute hippocampal and cerebral cortical slices, hence, the aim of the current study was to characterize and compare glucose and acetate metabolism in these slice preparations in a newly established incubation design. Cerebral cortical and hippocampal slices prepared from 16 to 18-week-old mice were incubated for 15-90 min with unlabeled glucose in combination with [U- 13 C]glucose or [1,2- 13 C]acetate. Our newly developed incubation apparatus allows accurate control of temperature and is designed to avoid evaporation of the incubation medium. Subsequent to incubation, slices were extracted and extracts analyzed for 13 C-labeling (%) and total amino acid contents (µmol/mg protein) using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and high performance liquid chromatography, respectively. Release of lactate from the slices was quantified by analysis of the incubation media. Based on the measured 13 C-labeling (%), total amino acid contents and relative activity of metabolic enzymes/pathways, we conclude that the slice preparations in the current incubation apparatus exhibited a high degree of metabolic integrity. Comparison of 13 C-labeling observed with [U- 13 C]glucose in slices from cerebral cortex and hippocampus revealed no significant regional differences regarding glycolytic or total TCA cycle activities. On the contrary, results from the incubations with [1,2- 13 C]acetate suggest a higher capacity of the astrocytic TCA cycle in hippocampus compared to cerebral cortex. Finally, we propose a new approach for assessing compartmentation of metabolite pools between astrocytes and neurons using 13 C-labeling (%) data obtained from

  4. Structural and Perfusion Abnormalities of Brain on MRI and Technetium-99m-ECD SPECT in Children With Cerebral Palsy: A Comparative Study.

    PubMed

    Rana, Kamer Singh; Narwal, Varun; Chauhan, Lokesh; Singh, Giriraj; Sharma, Monica; Chauhan, Suneel

    2016-04-01

    Cerebral palsy has traditionally been associated with hypoxic ischemic brain damage. This study was undertaken to demonstrate structural and perfusion brain abnormalities. Fifty-six children diagnosed clinically as having cerebral palsy were studied between 1 to 14 years of age and were subjected to 3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Brain and Technetium-99m-ECD brain single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) scan. Male to female ratio was 1.8:1 with a mean age of 4.16 ± 2.274 years. Spastic cerebral palsy was the most common type, observed in 91%. Birth asphyxia was the most common etiology (69.6%). White matter changes (73.2%) such as periventricular leukomalacia and corpus callosal thinning were the most common findings on MRI. On SPECT all cases except one revealed perfusion impairments in different regions of brain. MRI is more sensitive in detecting white matter changes, whereas SPECT is better in detecting cortical and subcortical gray matter abnormalities of perfusion. © The Author(s) 2015.

  5. Changes in glutamate concentration, glucose metabolism, and cerebral blood flow during focal brain cooling of the epileptogenic cortex in humans.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Sadahiro; Fujii, Masami; Inoue, Takao; He, Yeting; Maruta, Yuichi; Koizumi, Hiroyasu; Suehiro, Eiichi; Imoto, Hirochika; Ishihara, Hideyuki; Oka, Fumiaki; Matsumoto, Mishiya; Owada, Yuji; Yamakawa, Takeshi; Suzuki, Michiyasu

    2014-05-01

    Recently, focal brain cooling (FBC) was proposed as a method for treating refractory epilepsy. However, the precise influence of cooling on the molecular basis of epilepsy has not been elucidated. Thus the aim of this study was to assess the effect of FBC on glutamate (Glu) concentration, cerebral blood flow (CBF), and glucose metabolism in patients with intractable epilepsy. Nine patients underwent FBC at 15°C for 30 min prior to cortical resection (n = 6) or hippocampectomy (n = 3). Measurement of metabolites and CBF, as well as electrocorticography (ECoG), was performed. Epileptic discharge (ED), as observed by ECoG, disappeared in the cooling period and reappeared in the rewarming period. Glu concentrations were high during the precooling period and were reduced to 51.2% during the cooling period (p = 0.025). Glycerol levels showed a similar decrease (p = 0.028). Lactate concentration was high during the precooling period and was reduced during the cooling period (21.3% decrease; p = 0.005). Glucose and pyruvate levels were maintained throughout the procedure. Changes in CBF were parallel to those observed by ECoG. FBC reduced EDs and concentrations of Glu and glycerol. This demonstrates the neuroprotective effect of FBC. Our findings confirm that FBC is a reasonable and optimal treatment option for patients with intractable epilepsy. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2014 International League Against Epilepsy.

  6. Drug-induced cerebral glucose metabolism resembling Alzheimer's Disease: a case study.

    PubMed

    Riepe, Matthias W; Walther, Britta; Vonend, Catharina; Beer, Ambros J

    2015-07-11

    With aging of society the absolute number and the proportion of patients with cognitive deficits increase. Multiple disorders and diseases can foster cognitive impairment, e.g., Alzheimer's disease (AD), depressive disorder, or polypharmacy. A 74 year old man presented to the Old Age Psychiatry Service with cognitive deficits while being treated for recurrent depressive episodes and essential tremor with Venlafaxine, Lithium, and Primidone. Neuropsychological testing revealed a medio-temporal pattern of deficits with pronounced impairment of episodic memory, particularly delayed recall. Likewise, cognitive flexibility, semantic fluency, and attention were impaired. Positron emission tomography (PET) with fluorodeoxyglucose was performed and revealed a pattern of glucose utilization deficit resembling AD. On cessation of treatment with Lithium and Primidone, cognitive performance improved, particularly episodic memory performance and cognitive flexibility. Likewise, glucose metabolism normalized. Despite normalization of both, clinical symptoms and glucose utilization, the patient remained worried about possible underlying Alzheimer's disease pathology. To rule this out, an amyloid-PET was performed. No cortical amyloid was observed. Pharmacological treatment of older subjects may mimic glucose metabolism and clinical symptoms of Alzheimer's disease. In the present case both, imaging and clinical findings, reversed to normal on change of treatment. Amyloid PET is a helpful tool to additionally rule out underlying Alzheimer's disease in situations of clinical doubt even if clinical or other imaging findings are suggestive of Alzheimer's disease.

  7. Intelligence and Changes in Regional Cerebral Glucose Metabolic Rate Following Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haier, Richard J.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    A study of eight normal right-handed men demonstrates widespread significant decreases in brain glucose metabolic rate (GMR) following learning a complex computer task, a computer game. Correlations between magnitude of GMR change and intelligence scores are also demonstrated. (SLD)

  8. Sleep-Wake Differences in Relative Regional Cerebral Metabolic Rate for Glucose among Patients with Insomnia Compared with Good Sleepers.

    PubMed

    Kay, Daniel B; Karim, Helmet T; Soehner, Adriane M; Hasler, Brant P; Wilckens, Kristine A; James, Jeffrey A; Aizenstein, Howard J; Price, Julie C; Rosario, Bedda L; Kupfer, David J; Germain, Anne; Hall, Martica H; Franzen, Peter L; Nofzinger, Eric A; Buysse, Daniel J

    2016-10-01

    The neurobiological mechanisms of insomnia may involve altered patterns of activation across sleep-wake states in brain regions associated with cognition, self-referential processes, affect, and sleep-wake promotion. The objective of this study was to compare relative regional cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (rCMR glc ) in these brain regions across wake and nonrapid eye movement (NREM) sleep states in patients with primary insomnia (PI) and good sleeper controls (GS). Participants included 44 PI and 40 GS matched for age (mean = 37 y old, range 21-60), sex, and race. We conducted [ 18 F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography scans in PI and GS during both morning wakefulness and NREM sleep at night. Repeated measures analysis of variance was used to test for group (PI vs. GS) by state (wake vs. NREM sleep) interactions in relative rCMR glc . Significant group-by-state interactions in relative rCMR glc were found in the precuneus/posterior cingulate cortex, left middle frontal gyrus, left inferior/superior parietal lobules, left lingual/fusiform/occipital gyri, and right lingual gyrus. All clusters were significant at P corrected < 0.05. Insomnia was characterized by regional alterations in relative glucose metabolism across NREM sleep and wakefulness. Significant group-by-state interactions in relative rCMR glc suggest that insomnia is associated with impaired disengagement of brain regions involved in cognition (left frontoparietal), self-referential processes (precuneus/posterior cingulate), and affect (left middle frontal, fusiform/lingual gyri) during NREM sleep, or alternatively, to impaired engagement of these regions during wakefulness. © 2016 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  9. Age- and sex-associated changes in cerebral glucose metabolism in normal healthy subjects: statistical parametric mapping analysis of F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose brain positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Kim, In-Ju; Kim, Seong-Jang; Kim, Yong-Ki

    2009-12-01

    The age- and sex-associated changes of brain development are unclear and controversial. Several previous studies showed conflicting results of a specific pattern of cerebral glucose metabolism or no differences of cerebral glucose metabolism in association with normal aging process and sex. To investigate the effects of age and sex on changes in cerebral glucose metabolism in healthy subjects using fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (F-18 FDG) brain positron emission tomography (PET) and statistical parametric mapping (SPM) analysis. Seventy-eight healthy subjects (32 males, mean age 46.6+/-18.2 years; 46 females, mean age 40.6+/-19.8 years) underwent F-18 FDG brain PET. Using SPM, age- and sex-associated changes in cerebral glucose metabolism were investigated. In males, a negative correlation existed in several gray matter areas, including the right temporopolar (Brodmann area [BA] 38), right orbitofrontal (BA 47), left orbitofrontal gyrus (BA 10), left dorsolateral frontal gyrus (BA 8), and left insula (BA 13) areas. A positive relationship existed in the left claustrum and left thalamus. In females, negative changes existed in the left caudate body, left temporopolar area (BA 38), right orbitofrontal gyri (BA 47 and BA 10), and right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (BA 46). A positive association was demonstrated in the left subthalamic nucleus and the left superior frontal gyrus. In white matter, an age-associated decrease in FDG uptake in males was shown in the left insula, and increased FDG uptake was found in the left corpus callosum. The female group had an age-associated negative correlation of FDG uptake only in the right corpus callosum. Using SPM, we found not only similar areas of brain, but also sex-specific cerebral areas of age-associated changes of FDG uptake.

  10. Factors associated with screening for glucose abnormalities after gestational diabetes mellitus: baseline cohort of the interventional IMPACT study.

    PubMed

    Bihan, H; Cosson, E; Khiter, C; Vittaz, L; Faghfouri, F; Leboeuf, D; Carbillon, L; Dauphin, H; Reach, G; Valensi, P

    2014-04-01

    Although it is important to screen women who have had gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) for abnormal post-partum glucose levels, such testing is rarely performed. The aim of this study was to use data from the first observational phase of the IMPACT study to determine rates of screening within 6 months of delivery in a multiethnic cohort, focusing in particular on the effects of social deprivation and the risk of future diabetes. To investigate the frequency of post-partum screening, charts were analyzed, and all women attending four centres located in a deprived area who had had GDM between January 2009 and December 2010 were contacted by phone. The Evaluation of Precarity and Inequalities in Health Examination Centres (EPICES) deprivation index and Finnish Diabetes Risk Score (FINDRISK) questionnaire were also evaluated. Data were evaluable for 589 of the 719 women contacted (mean age: 33.4 ± 5.2 years; mean body mass index: 27.6 ± 5.4 kg/m(2)), and 196 (33.3%) reported having been screened. On multivariate analysis, factors associated with a lack of screening were smoking [odds ratio (OR): 0.42 (0.20-0.90), P<0.05], low consumption of fruit and vegetables [OR: 0.58 (0.39-0.82), P<0.01] and heavier offspring birth weight (P<0.05), although there were no differences in FINDRISK and EPICES scores between screened and unscreened women. One-third of women who had had GDM reported having been screened for dysglycaemia at 6 months post-partum. However, it is expected that the interventional phase of the IMPACT study will increase screening rates, especially in women with the risk factors associated with lower screening rates during this observational phase. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. HbA1c in the diagnosis of diabetes and abnormal glucose tolerance in patients with Graves' hyperthyroidism.

    PubMed

    Yang, Liyong; Shen, Ximei; Yan, Sunjie; Yuan, Xin; Lu, Juanjuan; Wei, Wenfeng

    2013-07-01

    To assess the suitability of HbA1c as a criterion for the diagnosis of diabetes in patients with Graves' disease. This study enrolled 310 patients with untreated newly diagnosed Graves' disease, 208 patients with euthyroid goiter and 329 age-matched (control) subjects without thyroid disease from Fuzhou, China. The performance of HbA1c against the OGTT for diagnosing diabetes was determined. The Framingham risk score was used to assess general cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. The percentage of patients with abnormal glucose metabolism as classified by HbA1c levels was lower than by OGTT criteria in patients with Graves' disease-33.2% vs. 41.3% for pre-diabetes and 4.5% vs. 11.3% for diabetes, respectively. The sensitivity of HbA1c for diagnosing diabetes in patients with Graves' disease was lower than in patients with euthyroid goiter and subjects without thyroid disease (34.9%, 63.2% and 60.6% respectively), while the specificity was similar (99.3%, 98.6%, 97.4%). Approximately 7.4% of patients with Graves' disease diagnosed with diabetes according to OGTT criteria were misdiagnosed as not having the disease by HbA1c, much higher than that for the other two groups. Patients with Graves' disease with diabetes not diagnosed with the disease by HbA1c showed a high risk for CVD. The low sensitivity of the HbA1c criterion underestimated the percentage of diabetes in patients with Graves' disease. Patients with diabetes who were misdiagnosed as not having the disease by HbA1c were at high risk for CVD. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Prevalence of plasma lipid abnormalities and its association with glucose metabolism in Spain: the di@bet.es study.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Hervas, Sergio; Carmena, Rafael; Ascaso, Juan F; Real, Jose T; Masana, Luis; Catalá, Miguel; Vendrell, Joan; Vázquez, José Antonio; Valdés, Sergio; Urrutia, Inés; Soriguer, Federico; Serrano-Rios, Manuel; Rojo-Martínez, Gemma; Pascual-Manich, Gemma; Ortega, Emilio; Mora-Peces, Inmaculada; Menéndez, Edelmiro; Martínez-Larrad, Maria T; López-Alba, Alfonso; Gomis, Ramón; Goday, Albert; Girbés, Juan; Gaztambide, Sonia; Franch, Josep; Delgado, Elías; Castell, Conxa; Castaño, Luis; Casamitjana, Roser; Calle-Pascual, Alfonso; Bordiú, Elena

    2014-01-01

    Dyslipidemia is a significant contributor to the elevated CVD risk observed in type 2 diabetes mellitus. We assessed the prevalence of dyslipidemia and its association with glucose metabolism status in a representative sample of the adult population in Spain and the percentage of subjects at guideline-recommended LDL-C goals. The di@bet.es study is a national, cross-sectional population-based survey of 5728 adults. A total of 4776 subjects were studied. Dyslipidemia was diagnosed in 56.8% of subjects; only 13.2% of subjects were treated with lipid lowering drugs. Lipid abnormalities were found in 56.8% of Spanish adults: 23.3% with high LDL-C, 21.5% high TG, 35.8% high non-HDL-C, and 17.2% low HDL-C. Most normal subjects showed an LDL-C ≤ 3.36 mmol/l. Pre-diabetics presented similar proportion when considering a goal of 3.36 mmol/l, but only 35% of them reached an LDL-C goal ≤ 2.6 mmol/l. Finally, 45.3% of diabetics had an LDL-C ≤ 2.6 mmol/l, and only 11.3% achieved an LDL-C ≤ 1.8 mmol/l. Our study demonstrates a high prevalence of dyslipidemia in the adult Spanish population, and a low use of lipid-lowering drugs. Moreover, the number of subjects achieving their corresponding LDL-C goal is small, particularly in subjects at high cardiovascular risk, such as diabetics. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Arteriosclerosis. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  13. "Ecstasy"-induced changes of cerebral glucose metabolism and their correlation to acute psychopathology. An 18-FDG PET study.

    PubMed

    Schreckenberger, M; Gouzoulis-Mayfrank, E; Sabri, O; Arning, C; Zimny, M; Zeggel, T; Wagenknecht, G; Kaiser, H J; Sass, H; Buell, U

    1999-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the acute effects of the "Ecstasy" analogue MDE (3,4-methylene dioxyethamphetamine) on cerebral glucose metabolism (rMRGlu) of healthy volunteers and to correlate neurometabolism with acute psychopathology. In a randomized double-blind trial, 15 healthy volunteers without a history of drug abuse were examined with fluorine-18-deoxyglucose (18FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) 110-120 min after oral administration of 2 mg/kg MDE (n = 7) or placebo (n = 8). Two minutes prior to radiotracer injection, constant cognitive stimulation was started and maintained for 32 min using a word repetition paradigm to ensure constant and comparable mental conditions during cerebral glucose uptake. Individual brain anatomy was represented using Tl-weighted 3D flash magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), followed by manual regionalization into 108 regions of interest and PET/MRI overlay. After absolute quantification of rMRGlu and normalization to global metabolism, normalized rMRGlu under MDE was compared to placebo using the Mann-Whitney U-test. Acute psychopathology was assessed using the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) and rMRGlu was correlated to PANSS scores according to Spearman. MDE subjects showed significantly decreased rMRGlu in the bilateral frontal cortex: left frontal posterior (-7.1%, P < 0.05) and right prefrontal superior (-4.6%, P < 0.05). On the other hand, rMRGlu was significantly increased in the bilateral cerebellum (right: +10.1%, P < 0.05; left: +7.6%, P < 0.05) and in the right putamen (+6.2%, P < 0.05). There were positive correlations between rMRGlu in the middle right cingulate and grandiosity (r = 0.87, P < 0.05), both the right amygdala (r = 0.90, P < 0.01) and the left posterior cingulate (r = 0.90, P < 0.01) to difficulties in abstract thinking, and the right frontal inferior (r = 0.85, P < 0.05), right anterior cingulate (r = 0.93, P < 0.01), and left anterior cingulate (r = 0.85, P < 0.05) to

  14. Pair bond formation leads to a sustained increase in global cerebral glucose metabolism in monogamous male titi monkeys (Callicebus cupreus).

    PubMed

    Maninger, Nicole; Hinde, Katie; Mendoza, Sally P; Mason, William A; Larke, Rebecca H; Ragen, Benjamin J; Jarcho, Michael R; Cherry, Simon R; Rowland, Douglas J; Ferrer, Emilio; Bales, Karen L

    2017-04-21

    Social bonds, especially attachment relationships, are crucial to our health and happiness. However, what we know about the neural substrates of these bonds is almost exclusively limited to rodent models and correlational experiments in humans. Here, we used socially monogamous non-human primates, titi monkeys (Callicebus cupreus) to experimentally examine changes in regional and global cerebral glucose metabolism (GCGM) during the formation and maintenance of pair bonds. Baseline positron emission tomography (PET) scans were taken of thirteen unpaired male titi monkeys. Seven males were then experimentally paired with females, scanned and compared, after one week, to six age-matched control males. Five of the six control males were then also paired and scanned after one week. Scans were repeated on all males after four months of pairing. PET scans were coregistered with structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and region of interest (ROI) analysis was carried out. A primary finding was that paired males showed a significant increase in [ 18 F]-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake in whole brain following one week of pairing, which is maintained out to four months. Dopaminergic, "motivational" areas and those involved in social behavior showed the greatest change in glucose uptake. In contrast, control areas changed only marginally more than GCGM. These findings confirm the large effects of social bonds on GCGM. They also suggest that more studies should examine how social manipulations affect whole-brain FDG uptake, as opposed to assuming that it does not change across condition. Copyright © 2017 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Neuroprotective effect of noscapine on cerebral oxygen-glucose deprivation injury.

    PubMed

    Vahabzadeh, Gelareh; Rahbar-Roshandel, Nahid; Ebrahimi, Soltan-Ahmad; Mahmoudian, Massoud

    2015-04-01

    The present study aims to investigate the effect of noscapine (0.5-2.5 μM), an alkaloid from the opium poppy, on primary murine fetal cortical neurons exposed to oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD), an in vitro model of ischemia. Cells were transferred to glucose-free DMEM and were exposed to hypoxia in a small anaerobic chamber. Cell viability and nitric oxide production were evaluated by MTT assay and the Griess method, respectively. The neurotoxicities produced by all three hypoxia durations tested were significantly inhibited by 0.5 μM noscapine. Increasing noscapine concentration up to 2.5 μM produced a concentration-dependent inhibition of neurotoxicity. Pretreatment of cells with MK-801 (10 μM), a non-competitive NMDA antagonist, and nimodipine (10nM), an L-type Ca(2+) channel blockers, increased cell viability after 30 min OGD, while the application of NBQX (30 μM), a selective AMPA-kainate receptor antagonist partially attenuated cell injury. Subsequently, cells treated with noscapine in the presence of thapsigargin (1 μM), an inhibitor of endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) ATPases. After 60 min OGD, noscapine could inhibit the cell damage induced by thapsigargin. However, noscapine could not reduce cell damage induced by 240 min OGD in the presence of thapsigargin. Noscapine attenuated nitric oxide (NO) production in cortical neurons after 30 min OGD. We concluded that noscapine had a neuroprotective effect, which could be due to its interference with multiple targets in the excitotoxicity process. These effects could be mediated partially by a decrease in NO production and the modulation of intracellular calcium levels. Copyright © 2014 Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  16. Noninvasive quantification of cerebral metabolic rate for glucose in rats using 18F-FDG PET and standard input function

    PubMed Central

    Hori, Yuki; Ihara, Naoki; Teramoto, Noboru; Kunimi, Masako; Honda, Manabu; Kato, Koichi; Hanakawa, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Measurement of arterial input function (AIF) for quantitative positron emission tomography (PET) studies is technically challenging. The present study aimed to develop a method based on a standard arterial input function (SIF) to estimate input function without blood sampling. We performed 18F-fluolodeoxyglucose studies accompanied by continuous blood sampling for measurement of AIF in 11 rats. Standard arterial input function was calculated by averaging AIFs from eight anesthetized rats, after normalization with body mass (BM) and injected dose (ID). Then, the individual input function was estimated using two types of SIF: (1) SIF calibrated by the individual's BM and ID (estimated individual input function, EIFNS) and (2) SIF calibrated by a single blood sampling as proposed previously (EIF1S). No significant differences in area under the curve (AUC) or cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (CMRGlc) were found across the AIF-, EIFNS-, and EIF1S-based methods using repeated measures analysis of variance. In the correlation analysis, AUC or CMRGlc derived from EIFNS was highly correlated with those derived from AIF and EIF1S. Preliminary comparison between AIF and EIFNS in three awake rats supported an idea that the method might be applicable to behaving animals. The present study suggests that EIFNS method might serve as a noninvasive substitute for individual AIF measurement. PMID:25966947

  17. Noninvasive quantification of cerebral metabolic rate for glucose in rats using (18)F-FDG PET and standard input function.

    PubMed

    Hori, Yuki; Ihara, Naoki; Teramoto, Noboru; Kunimi, Masako; Honda, Manabu; Kato, Koichi; Hanakawa, Takashi

    2015-10-01

    Measurement of arterial input function (AIF) for quantitative positron emission tomography (PET) studies is technically challenging. The present study aimed to develop a method based on a standard arterial input function (SIF) to estimate input function without blood sampling. We performed (18)F-fluolodeoxyglucose studies accompanied by continuous blood sampling for measurement of AIF in 11 rats. Standard arterial input function was calculated by averaging AIFs from eight anesthetized rats, after normalization with body mass (BM) and injected dose (ID). Then, the individual input function was estimated using two types of SIF: (1) SIF calibrated by the individual's BM and ID (estimated individual input function, EIF(NS)) and (2) SIF calibrated by a single blood sampling as proposed previously (EIF(1S)). No significant differences in area under the curve (AUC) or cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (CMRGlc) were found across the AIF-, EIF(NS)-, and EIF(1S)-based methods using repeated measures analysis of variance. In the correlation analysis, AUC or CMRGlc derived from EIF(NS) was highly correlated with those derived from AIF and EIF(1S). Preliminary comparison between AIF and EIF(NS) in three awake rats supported an idea that the method might be applicable to behaving animals. The present study suggests that EIF(NS) method might serve as a noninvasive substitute for individual AIF measurement.

  18. Quadriceps femoris spasticity in children with cerebral palsy: measurement with the pendulum test and relationship with gait abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Szopa, Andrzej; Domagalska-Szopa, Małgorzata; Kidoń, Zenon; Syczewska, Małgorzata

    2014-12-16

    Development of a reliable and objective test of spasticity is important for assessment and treatment of children with cerebral palsy. The pendulum test has been reported to yield reliable measurements of spasticity and to be sensitive to variations in spasticity in these children. However, the relationship between the pendulum test scores and other objective measures of spasticity has not been studied. The present study aimed to assess the effectiveness of an accelerometer-based pendulum test as a measurement of spasticity in CP, and to explore the correlation between the measurements of this test and the global index of deviation from normal gait in in children with cerebral palsy. We studied thirty-six children with cerebral palsy, including 18 with spastic hemiplegia and 18 with spastic diplegia, and a group of 18 typically-developing children. Knee extensor spasticity was assessed bilaterally using the accelerometer-based pendulum test and three-dimensional gait analysis. The Gillette Gait Index was calculated from the results of the gait analysis. The data from the accelerometer-based pendulum test could be used to distinguish between able-bodied children and children with cerebral palsy. Additionally, two of the measurements, first swing excursion and relaxation index, could be used to differentiate the degree of knee extensor spasticity in the children with cerebral palsy. Only a few moderate correlations were found between the Gillette Gait Index and the pendulum test data. This study demonstrates that the pendulum test can be used to discriminate between typically developing children and children with CP, as well as between various degrees of spasticity, such as spastic hemiplegia and spastic diplegia, in the knee extensor muscle of children with CP. Deviations from normal gait in children with CP were not correlated with the results of the pendulum test.

  19. Oral glucose tolerance test significantly impacts the prevalence of abnormal glucose tolerance among Indian women with polycystic ovary syndrome: lessons from a large database of two tertiary care centers on the Indian subcontinent.

    PubMed

    Ganie, Mohd Ashraf; Dhingra, Atul; Nisar, Sobia; Sreenivas, Vishnubhatla; Shah, Zaffar Amin; Rashid, Aafia; Masoodi, Shariq; Gupta, Nandita

    2016-01-01

    To estimate the prevalence of abnormal glucose tolerance (AGT) among Indian women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and analyze the role of oral glucose tolerance (OGTT) test on its estimation. Cross-sectional clinical study. Tertiary care center. A total of 2,014 women with PCOS diagnosed on the basis of the Rotterdam 2003 criteria were enrolled, and the data of 1,746 subjects were analyzed. In addition to recording clinical, biochemical, and hormone parameters, a 75 g OGTT was administered. Prevalence of AGT and impact of age, body mass index (BMI), family history, and OGTT on its prevalence. The mean age of subjects was 23.8 ± 5.3 years, with a mean BMI of 24.9 ± 4.4 kg/m(2). The overall prevalence of AGT was 36.3% (6.3% diabetes and 30% impaired fasting plasma glucose/impaired glucose tolerance) using American Diabetes Association criteria. The glucose intolerance showed a rising trend with advancing age (30.3%, 35.4%, 51%, and 58.8% in the second, third, fourth, and fifth decades, respectively) and increasing BMI. Family history of diabetes mellitus was present in 54.6% (953/1,746) subjects, and it did not correlate with any of the studied parameters except waist circumference and BMI. Sensitivity was better with 2-hour post-OGTT glucose values as compared with fasting plasma glucose, since using fasting plasma glucose alone would have missed the diagnosis in 107 (6.1%) subjects. We conclude that AGT is high among young Indian women with PCOS and that it is not predicted by family history of type 2 DM. OGTT significantly improves the detection rate of AGT among Indian women with PCOS. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Ovarian SAHA syndrome is associated with a more insulin-resistant profile and represents an independent risk factor for glucose abnormalities in women with polycystic ovary syndrome: a prospective controlled study.

    PubMed

    Dalamaga, Maria; Papadavid, Evangelia; Basios, Georgios; Vaggopoulos, Vassilios; Rigopoulos, Dimitrios; Kassanos, Dimitrios; Trakakis, Eftihios

    2013-12-01

    SAHA syndrome is characterized by the tetrad: seborrhea, acne, hirsutism, and androgenetic alopecia. No previous study has examined the prevalence of glucose abnormalities in ovarian SAHA and explored whether it may be an independent risk factor for glucose abnormalities. In a prospective controlled study, we investigated the spectrum of glucose abnormalities in ovarian SAHA and explored whether it is associated with a more insulin-resistant profile. In all, 316 patients with a diagnosis of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) (56 with SAHA) and 102 age-matched healthy women were examined and underwent a 2-hour oral glucose tolerance test. Serum glucose homeostasis parameters, hormones, and adipokines were determined. SAHA prevalence was 17.7% in patients with PCOS and predominance of the severe PCOS phenotype. Ovarian SAHA was independently associated with a more insulin-resistant profile (higher homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance score, lower quantitative insulin sensitivity check index [QUICKI] and MATSUDA indices, and relative hypoadiponectinemia), and represented an independent risk factor for glucose abnormalities regardless of anthropometric features, age, and PCOS phenotype. There was no performance of skin biopsies. The prompt recognition of SAHA syndrome in women with PCOS permits an earlier diagnosis and surveillance of metabolic abnormalities, especially in Mediterranean PCOS population exhibiting a lower prevalence of glucose abnormalities. Copyright © 2013 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Gadd45b prevents autophagy and apoptosis against rat cerebral neuron oxygen-glucose deprivation/reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    He, Guoqian; Xu, Wenming; Tong, Linyan; Li, Shuaishuai; Su, Shiceng; Tan, Xiaodan; Li, Changqing

    2016-04-01

    Autophagic (type II) cell death has been suggested to play pathogenetic roles in cerebral ischemia. Growth arrest and DNA damage response 45b (Gadd45b) has been shown to protect against rat brain ischemia injury through inhibiting apoptosis. However, the relationship between Gadd45b and autophagy in cerebral ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury remains uncertain. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of Gadd45b on autophagy. We adopt the oxygen-glucose deprivation and reperfusion (OGD/R) model of rat primary cortex neurons, and lentivirus interference used to silence Gadd45b expression. Cell viability and injury assay were performed using CCK-8 and LDH kit. Autophagy activation was monitored by expression of ATG5, LC3, Beclin-1, ATG7 and ATG3. Neuron apoptosis was monitored by expression of Bcl-2, Bax, cleaved caspase3, p53 and TUNEL assay. Neuron neurites were assayed by double immunofluorescent labeling with Tuj1 and LC3B. Here, we demonstrated that the expression of Gadd45b was strongly up-regulated at 24 h after 3 h OGD treatment. ShRNA-Gadd45b increased the expression of autophagy related proteins, aggravated OGD/R-induced neuron cell apoptosis and neurites injury. ShRNA-Gadd45b co-treatment with autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine (3-MA) or Wortmannin partly inhibited the ratio of LC3II/LC3I, and slightly ameliorated neuron cell apoptosis under OGD/R. Furthermore, shRNA-Gadd45b inhibited the p-p38 level involved in autophagy, but increased the p-JNK level involved in apoptosis. ShRNA-Gadd45b co-treatment with p38 inhibitor obviously induced autophagy. ShRNA-Gadd45b co-treatment with JNK inhibitor alleviated neuron cell apoptosis. In conclusion, our data suggested that Gadd45b inhibited autophagy and apoptosis under OGD/R. Gadd45b may be a common regulatory protein to control autophagy and apoptosis.

  2. A randomised trial of salsalate for insulin resistance and cardiovascular risk factors in persons with abnormal glucose tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Goldfine, A. B.; Conlin, P. R.; Halperin, F.; Koska, J.; Permana, P.; Schwenke, D.; Shoelson, S. E.

    2016-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis Chronic sub-acute inflammation contributes to the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease. High doses of salicylate reduce inflammation, glucose and triacylglycerols, and may improve insulin sensitivity, suggesting therapeutic potential in impaired fasting glucose and/or impaired glucose tolerance. This trial aimed to evaluate the effect of salsalate vs placebo on insulin resistance and glycaemia in impaired fasting glucose and/or impaired glucose tolerance. Methods We conducted a 12 week, two-centre, randomised, placebo-controlled study to evaluate the effect of salsalate (up to 4 g/day) vs placebo on systemic glucose disposal. Secondary objectives included treatment effects on glycaemia, inflammation and cardiovascular risk factors. Seventy-eight participants with impaired fasting glucose and/or impaired glucose tolerance from two VA healthcare systems were enrolled. Randomisation assignment was provided by the coordinating center directly to site pharmacists, and participants and research staff were blinded to treatment assignment. Results Seventy-one individuals were randomised to placebo (n = 36) or salsalate (n = 35). Glucose disposal did not change in either group (salsalate 1% [95% CI −39%, 56%]; placebo 6% [95% CI −20%, 61%], p = 0.3 for placebo vs salsalate). Fasting glucose was reduced by 6% during the study by salsalate (p = 0.006) but did not change with placebo. Declines in glucose were accompanied by declines in fasting C-peptide with salsalate. Insulin clearance was reduced with salsalate. In the salsalate group, triacylglycerol levels were lower by 25% (p = 0.01) and adiponectin increased by 53% (p = 0.02) at the end of the study. Blood pressure, endothelial function and other inflammation markers did not differ between groups. Adipose tissue nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) activity declined in the salsalate group compared with placebo (−16% vs 42%, p = 0.005), but was not correlated with metabolic

  3. Apoptotic death in cerebral hemisphere cells is density dependent and modulated by transient oxygen and glucose deprivation.

    PubMed

    Yavin, E; Billia, D M

    1997-03-01

    Flow cytometry, light and fluorescence microscopy, and designated biochemical techniques were used to examine the type of death which occurs in cerebral cortex cells when grown under crowded vs. sparse conditions or after brief anoxia/hypoglycemia. A 4 hr episode of anoxia combined with glucose deprivation enhanced apoptotic cell death as assessed by 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) staining and reduced neutral red eye uptake. An additional form of cell death involving exclusion of the nucleus was recorded by time lapse cinematography and DAPI stain. The presence of the endonuclease inhibitor aurintricarboxylic acid (0.1 mM) reduced cell death by 56.6%, while the protein and RNA synthesis inhibitors actinomycin D and cycloheximide (each at 5 micrograms/ml) effectively decreased cell death by 83.3% and 90.6%, respectively. In contrast, 5 mM glutamate had no effect on cell death in accord with the immature state of the cells. Growth of cells under crowded conditions improved cell survival; after 2 h or 4 days in culture, cells seeded at high density (34 microgram cellular DNA/cm2) showed a nearly 3-fold decline in the amount of cell death in comparison to cells seeded at low density (5 micrograms cellular DNA/cm2). At high cell density, anoxic episodes enhanced cell death most likely by preventing a cell density-mediated rescue. Neutral red dye uptake, an index for cell viability, was enhanced with increasing cell density and in vitro maturation, but was reduced in dense cultures exposed to anoxic/hypoglycemic conditions. The data suggest that cell density may play a critical role in brain organogenesis and that anoxic stress is more deleterious in dense than sparse cell assemblies.

  4. Cerebral Glucose Metabolism is Associated with Verbal but not Visual Memory Performance in Community-Dwelling Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Gardener, Samantha L; Sohrabi, Hamid R; Shen, Kai-Kai; Rainey-Smith, Stephanie R; Weinborn, Michael; Bates, Kristyn A; Shah, Tejal; Foster, Jonathan K; Lenzo, Nat; Salvado, Olivier; Laske, Christoph; Laws, Simon M; Taddei, Kevin; Verdile, Giuseppe; Martins, Ralph N

    2016-03-31

    Increasing evidence suggests that Alzheimer's disease (AD) sufferers show region-specific reductions in cerebral glucose metabolism, as measured by [18F]-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography (18F-FDG PET). We investigated preclinical disease stage by cross-sectionally examining the association between global cognition, verbal and visual memory, and 18F-FDG PET standardized uptake value ratio (SUVR) in 43 healthy control individuals, subsequently focusing on differences between subjective memory complainers and non-memory complainers. The 18F-FDG PET regions of interest investigated include the hippocampus, amygdala, posterior cingulate, superior parietal, entorhinal cortices, frontal cortex, temporal cortex, and inferior parietal region. In the cohort as a whole, verbal logical memory immediate recall was positively associated with 18F-FDG PET SUVR in both the left hippocampus and right amygdala. There were no associations observed between global cognition, delayed recall in logical memory, or visual reproduction and 18F-FDG PET SUVR. Following stratification of the cohort into subjective memory complainers and non-complainers, verbal logical memory immediate recall was positively associated with 18F-FDG PET SUVR in the right amygdala in those with subjective memory complaints. There were no significant associations observed in non-memory complainers between 18F-FDG PET SUVR in regions of interest and cognitive performance. We observed subjective memory complaint-specific associations between 18F-FDG PET SUVR and immediate verbal memory performance in our cohort, however found no associations between delayed recall of verbal memory performance or visual memory performance. It is here argued that the neural mechanisms underlying verbal and visual memory performance may in fact differ in their pathways, and the characteristic reduction of 18F-FDG PET SUVR observed in this and previous studies likely reflects the pathophysiological changes in specific

  5. Differential effects of ibogaine on local cerebral glucose utilization in drug-naive and morphine-dependent rats.

    PubMed

    Levant, Beth; Pazdernik, Thomas L

    2004-04-02

    Ibogaine, a hallucinogenic indole alkaloid, has been proposed as a treatment for addiction to opioids and other drugs of abuse. The mechanism for its putative anti-addictive effects is unknown. In this study, the effects of ibogaine on local cerebral glucose utilization (LCGU) were determined in freely moving, drug-naive, or morphine-dependent adult, male, Sprague-Dawley rats using the [(14)C]2-deoxyglucose (2-DG) method. Morphine-dependent rats were treated with increasing doses of morphine (5-25 mg/kg, s.c., b.i.d.) and then maintained at 25 mg/kg (b.i.d.) for 4-7 days. For the 2-DG procedure, rats were injected with saline or ibogaine (40 mg/kg, i.p.). 2-DG was administered 1 h after administration of ibogaine. The rate of LCGU was determined by quantitative autoradiography in 46 brain regions. In drug-naive animals, ibogaine produced significant increases in LCGU in the parietal, cingulate, and occipital cortices and cerebellum compared to controls consistent with its activity as a hallucinogen and a tremorogen. Morphine-dependent rats had only minor alterations in LCGU at the time assessed in this experiment. However, in morphine-dependent animals, ibogaine produced a global decrease in LCGU that was greatest in brain regions such as the lateral and medial preoptic areas, nucleus of the diagonal band, nucleus accumbens shell, inferior colliculus, locus coeruleus, and flocculus compared to morphine-dependent animals treated with saline. These findings indicate that ibogaine produces distinctly different effects on LCGU in drug-naive and morphine-dependent rats. This suggests that different mechanisms may underlie ibogaine's hallucinogenic and anti-addictive effects.

  6. Cerebral signal intensity abnormalities on T2-weighted MR images in HIV patients with highly active antiretroviral therapy: relationship with clinical parameters and interval changes.

    PubMed

    Hanning, Uta; Husstedt, Ingo W; Niederstadt, Thomas-Ulrich; Evers, Stefan; Heindel, Walter; Kloska, Stephan P

    2011-09-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between immune state and cerebral signal intensity abnormalities (SIAs) on T2-weighted magnetic resonance images in subjects with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection and highly active antiretroviral therapy. Thirty-two subjects underwent a total of 109 magnetic resonance studies. The presence of human immunodeficiency virus-associated neurocognitive disorder, categorized CD4(+) T lymphocyte count, and plasma viral load were assessed for relationship with the severity and interval change of SIAs for different anatomic locations of the brain. Subjects with multifocal patterns of SIAs had CD4(+) cell counts < 200 cells/μL in 66.0%, whereas subjects with diffuse patterns of SIAs had CD4(+) cell counts < 200 cells/μL in only 31.4% (P < .001). Subjects without SIAs in the basal ganglia had CD4(+) cell counts < 200 cells/μL in 37.0%, whereas subjects with minor and moderate SIAs in the basal ganglia had CD4(+) cell counts < 200 cells/μL in 78.3% and 80.0%, respectively (P < .005). The percentage of subjects with CD4(+) cell counts < 200 cells/μL was 85.7% when there were progressive periventricular SIA changes and 45.5% when periventricular SIA changes were stable in follow-up (P < .05). The presence and progression of cerebral SIAs on T2-weighted magnetic resonance images reflecting cerebral infection with human immunodeficiency virus are significantly related to impaired immune state as measured by CD4(+) cell count. Copyright © 2011 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Neuropilin 2 deficiency does not affect cortical neuronal viability in response to oxygen-glucose-deprivation and transient middle cerebral artery occlusion.

    PubMed

    Hou, Sheng T; Jiang, Susan X; Slinn, Jacqueline; O'Hare, Michael; Karchewski, Laurie

    2010-04-01

    Neuropilin 2 (NRP2) is a type I transmembrane protein that binds to distinct members of the class III secreted Semaphorin subfamily. NRP2 plays important roles in repulsive axon guidance, angiogenesis and vasculogenesis through partnering with co-receptors such as vascular endothelial growth factor receptors (VEGFRs) during development. Emerging evidence also suggests that NRP2 contributes to injury response and environment changes in adult brains. In this study, we examined the contribution of NRP2 gene to cerebral ischemia-induced brain injury using NRP2 deficient mouse. To our surprise, the lack of NRP2 expression does not affect the outcome of brain injury induced by transient occlusion of the middle cerebral artery (MCAO) in mouse. The cerebral vasculature in terms of the middle cerebral artery anatomy and microvessel density in the cerebral cortex of NRP2 deficient homozygous (NRP2(-/-)) mice are normal and almost identical to those of the heterozygous (NRP2(+/-)) and wild type (NRP2(+/+)) littermates. MCAO (1h) and 24h reperfusion caused a brain infarction of 23% (compared to the contralateral side) in NRP2(-/-) mice, which is not different from those in NRP2(+/- and +/+) mice at 22 and 21%, respectively (n=19, p>0.05). Correspondingly, NRP2(-/-) mouse also showed a similar level of deterioration of neurological functions after stroke compared with their NRP2(+/- and +/+) littermates. Oxygen-glucose-deprivation (OGD) caused a significant neuronal death in NRP2(-/-) cortical neurons, at the level similar to that in NRP(+/+) cortical neurons (72% death in NRP(-/-) neurons vs. 75% death in NRP2(+/+) neurons; n=4; p>0.05). Together, these loss-of-function studies demonstrated that despite of its critical role in neuronal guidance and vascular formation during development, NRP2 expression dose not affect adult brain response to cerebral ischemia. Crown Copyright 2009. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Atlantic DIP: high prevalence of abnormal glucose tolerance post partum is reduced by breast-feeding in women with prior gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    O'Reilly, Michael W; Avalos, Gloria; Dennedy, Michael C; O'Sullivan, Eoin P; Dunne, Fidelma

    2011-12-01

    Gestational diabetes (GDM) is associated with adverse fetal and maternal outcomes, and identifies women at risk of future type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Breast-feeding may improve post partum maternal glucose tolerance. Our objective was to identify the prevalence of post partum dysglycemia after GDM, to delineate associated factors and to examine the effect of lactation on post partum glucose tolerance. We compared post partum 75 g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) results from 300 women with GDM and 220 controls with normal gestational glucose tolerance (NGT) in five regional centers. Breast-feeding data was collected at time of OGTT. Methods Post partum OGTT results were classified as normal (fasting plasma glucose (FPG) <5.6 mmol/l, 2 h <7.8 mmol/l) and abnormal (impaired fasting glucose (IFG), FPG 5.6-6.9 mmol/l; impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), 2 h glucose 7.8-11 mmol/l; IFG+IGT; T2DM, FPG ≥7 mmol/l±2 h glucose ≥11.1 mmol/l). Binary logistic regression was used to identify factors predictive of persistent hyperglycemia. Five hundred and twenty women were tested; six (2.7%) with NGT in pregnancy had post partum dysglycemia compared with 57 (19%) with GDM in index pregnancy (P<0.001). Non-European ethnicity (odds ratio (OR) 3.40; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.45-8.02, P=0.005), family history of T2DM (OR 2.14; 95% CI 1.06-4.32, P=0.034), and gestational insulin use (OR 2.62; 95% CI 1.17-5.87, P=0.019) were associated with persistent dysglycemia. The prevalence of persistent hyperglycemia was significantly lower in women who breast-fed vs bottle-fed post partum (8.2 vs 18.4%, P<0.001). Non-European ethnicity, gestational insulin use, family history of T2DM, and elevated body mass index were associated with persistent dysglycemia after GDM. Breast-feeding may confer beneficial metabolic effects after GDM and should be encouraged.

  9. Cerebral glucose metabolism and D2/D3 receptor availability in young adults with cannabis dependence measured with positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Sevy, Serge; Smith, Gwenn S; Ma, Yilong; Dhawan, Vijay; Chaly, Thomas; Kingsley, Peter B; Kumra, Sanjiv; Abdelmessih, Sherif; Eidelberg, David

    2008-05-01

    Cannabis users have been reported to have decreased regional cerebral glucose metabolism after short periods of abstinence. The purpose of this study was to measure striatal dopamine receptor (D2/D3) availability and cerebral glucose metabolism with positron emission tomography (PET) in young adults who had a prolonged exposure to cannabis and who had been abstinent for a period of at least 12 weeks. Six 18-21-year-old male subjects with cannabis dependence in early full remission and six age- and sex-matched healthy subjects underwent PET scans for D2/D3 receptor availability measured with [C11]-raclopride and glucose metabolism measured with [18F]-FDG. All subjects were sober for at least 12 weeks before PET scan procedures. PET data were analyzed with statistical parametric mapping software (SPM99; uncorrected p < 0.001, corrected p < 0.05 at the cluster level). Toxicology screening was performed prior to the PET scan to confirm the lack of drugs of abuse. Striatal D2/D3 receptor availability did not differ significantly between groups. Compared to controls, subjects with cannabis dependence had lower normalized glucose metabolism in the right orbitofrontal cortex, putamen bilaterally, and precuneus. There were no significant correlations between striatal D2/D3 receptor availability and normalized glucose metabolism in any region of the frontal cortex or striatum. These findings may reflect both cannabis exposure and adaptive changes that occur after a prolonged period of abstinence. Subsequent studies should address whether metabolic and dopamine receptor effects are associated with either active use or longer-term withdrawal in these relatively young subjects.

  10. Measurement of cerebral oxidative glucose consumption in patients with type 1 diabetes and hypoglycemia unawareness using 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Pierre-Gilles; Criego, Amy B.; Kumar, Anjali; Seaquist, Elizabeth R.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to use 13C NMR to measure the cerebral oxidative metabolic rate of glucose (CMRglc(ox)) in patients with diabetes and to compare these measurements with those collected from matched controls. We elected to study a group with type 1 diabetes and hypoglycemia unawareness, since we had previously found such patients to have higher brain glucose concentrations than normal volunteers under steady state conditions. We sought to determine if this difference in steady-state brain concentrations could be explained by a difference in CMRglc(ox). Time courses of 13C label incorporation in brain amino acids were measured in occipital cortex during infusion of [1-13C]glucose. These time courses were fitted using a one-compartment metabolic model to determine CMRglc(ox). Our results show that the TCA cycle rate (VTCA, which is twice CMRglc(ox)) in subjects with type 1 diabetes was not significantly different from normal controls (0.84 ± 0.03 vs 0.79 ± 0.03 μmol/gm/min, n=5 in each group, mean ± SEM). We conclude that the changes in steady-state brain glucose concentrations that we observed in patients with type 1 diabetes in a previous study (1) cannot be explained by changes in oxidative glucose consumption PMID:19766263

  11. Association of insulin resistance with cerebral glucose uptake in late middle-aged adults at risk for Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Willette, Auriel A.; Bendlin, Barbara B.; Starks, Erika J.; Birdsill, Alex C.; Johnson, Sterling C.; Christian, Bradley T.; Okonkwo, Ozioma C.; La Rue, Asenath; Hermann, Bruce P.; Koscik, Rebecca L.; Jonaitis, Erin M.; Sager, Mark A.; Asthana, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    related to worse immediate memory (β=0.317, p<.001) and delayed memory (β=0.305, p<.001) performance. Conclusions Our results show that IR, a prevalent and increasingly common condition in developed countries, is associated with significantly lower regional cerebral glucose metabolism, which in turn may predict worse memory performance. Midlife may be a critical period for initiating treatments to lower peripheral IR in order to maintain neural metabolism and cognitive function. PMID:26214150

  12. Positron emission tomography assessment of 8-OH-DPAT-mediated changes in an index of cerebral glucose metabolism in female marmosets

    PubMed Central

    Converse, Alexander K.; Aubert, Yves; Farhoud, Mohammed; Weichert, Jamey P.; Rowland, Ian J.; Ingrisano, Nicole M.; Allers, Kelly A.; Sommer, Bernd; Abbott, David H.

    2013-01-01

    As part of a larger experiment investigating serotonergic regulation of female marmoset sexual behavior, this study was designed to (1) advance methods for PET imaging of common marmoset monkey brain, (2) measure normalized FDG uptake as an index of local cerebral metabolic rates for glucose, and (3) study changes induced in this index of cerebral glucose metabolism by chronic treatment of female marmosets with a serotonin 1A receptor (5-HT1A) agonist. We hypothesized that chronic treatment with the 5-HT1A agonist 8-OH-DPAT would alter the glucose metabolism index in dorsal raphe (DR), medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), medial preoptic area of hypothalamus (mPOA), ventromedial nucleus of hypothalamus (VMH), and field CA1 of hippocampus. Eight adult ovariectomized female common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus) were studied with and without estradiol replacement. In a crossover design, each subject was treated daily with 8-OH-DPAT (0.1 mg/kg SC daily) or saline. After 42–49 days of treatment, the glucose metabolism radiotracer FDG was administered to each female immediately prior to 30 min of interaction with her male pairmate, after which the subject was anesthetized and imaged by PET. Whole brain normalized PET images were analyzed with anatomically defined regions of interest (ROI). Whole brain voxelwise mapping was also used to explore treatment effects and correlations between alterations in the glucose metabolism index and pairmate interactions. The rank order of normalized FDG uptake was VMH/mPOA>DR>mPFC/CA1 in both conditions. 8-OH-DPAT did not induce alterations in the glucose metabolism index in ROIs. Voxelwise mapping showed a significant reduction in normalized FDG uptake in response to 8-OH-DPAT in a cluster in medial occipital cortex as well as a significant correlation between increased rejection of mount attempts and reduced normalized FDG uptake in an overlapping cluster. In conclusion, PET imaging has been used to measure FDG uptake relative to whole

  13. Regional Cerebral Abnormalities Measured by Frequency-Domain Near-Infrared Spectroscopy in Pediatric Patients During Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Tian, Fenghua; Jenks, Christopher; Potter, Donald; Miles, Darryl; Raman, Lakshmi

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is a form of advanced cardiorespiratory support provided to critically ill patients with severe respiratory or cardiovascular failure. While children undergoing ECMO therapy have significant risk for neurological morbidity, currently there is a lack of reliable bedside tool to detect the neurologic events for patients on ECMO. This study assessed the feasibility of frequency-domain near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) for detection of intracranial complications during ECMO therapy. The frequency-domain NIRS device measured the absorption coefficient (µa) and reduced scattering coefficient (µs') at six cranial positions from seven pediatric patients (0-16 years) during ECMO support and five healthy controls (2-14 years). Regional abnormalities in both absorption and scattering were identified among ECMO patients. A main finding in this study is that the abnormalities in scattering appear to be associated with lower-than-normal µs' values in regional areas of the brain. Because light scattering originates from the intracellular structures (such as nuclei and mitochondria), a reduction in scattering primarily reflects loss or decreased density of the brain matter. The results from this study indicate a potential to use the frequency-domain NIRS as a safe and complementary technology for detection of intracranial complications during ECMO therapy.

  14. Acarbose, the α-glucosidase inhibitor, attenuates the blood pressure and splanchnic blood flow responses to meal in elderly patients with postprandial hypotension concomitant with abnormal glucose metabolism.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Wei; Li, Jing; Li, Ying; Qian, Duan; Chen, Lei; Wei, Xiansen; Jin, Jiangli; Wang, Yong

    2016-02-01

    Postprandial hypotension (PPH) is a unique clinical phenomenon in the elderly, but its underlying pathogenesis has not been completely elucidated, and drug treatment is still in clinical exploratory stage. The aim of the study was to evaluate the relationship between the fall in postprandial blood pressure and splanchnic blood flow, and to provide a theoretical basis for the treatment of PPH by taking acarbose. The study included 20 elderly inpatients diagnosed with PPH concomitant with abnormal glucose metabolism at stable condition. They were treated with 50 mg acarbose with their meal to observe the changes in blood pressure, heart rate, and blood glucose level, and to monitor the hemodynamics of the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) before and after treatment. Without acarbose treatment, patients after a meal had significantly decreased systolic and diastolic blood pressure, faster postprandial heart rate, higher postprandial glucose level at each period, and increased postprandial SMA blood flow compared with that at fasting state (P<0.05). Acarbose treatment significantly attenuated the decrease of postprandial systolic blood pressures from 35.50±12.66 to 22.25±6.90 mmHg (P=0.000), the increase of heart rate from 9.67±5.94 to 5.33±3.20 beats/min (P=0.016), the increase of postprandial blood glucose from 3.55±1.69 to 2.28±1.61 mmol/l (P=0.000), the increase of postprandial SMA blood flow from 496.80±147.15 to 374.55±97.89 ml/min (P=0.031), and the incidence of PPH, syncope, falls, dizziness, weakness, and angina pectoris (P<0.05). The maximal decrease of postprandial systolic blood pressure was positively associated with the maximal increase in postprandial SMA blood flow (r=0.351, P=0.026). Acarbose treatment showed no significant side effects. The increase in postprandial splanchnic perfusion is one of the reasons for PPH formation. Acarbose may exert its role in PPH treatment by reducing postprandial gastrointestinal blood perfusion. Giving

  15. SUGAR: spotting undiagnosed glucose abnormal results--a new protocol to increase postpartum testing among women with gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Carson, Michael P; Morgan, Benjamin; Gussman, Debra; Brown, Monica; Rothenberg, Karen; Wisner, Theresa A

    2015-02-01

    Over 70% of women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) will develop diabetes mellitus (DM), but only 30% follow through with the recommended postpartum oral glucose tolerance testing (OGTT). HbA1c is approved to diagnose DM, and combined with a fasting plasma glucose it can identify 93% of patients with dysglycemia. We tested the hypothesis that a single blood draw to assess for dysglycemia at the postpartum visit could improve testing rates compared with those required to obtain an OGTT at an outside laboratory. Prospective cohort study of all women with GDM who delivered between July 2010 and December 2011. When insurance status required testing at an outside laboratory an OGTT was ordered, when insurance allowed testing at our center a random sugar and HbA1c were drawn at the postpartum visit (SUGAR Protocol). Of the 40 women, 36 attended a postpartum visit. In the SUGAR arm, 19 of 19 (100%) were tested versus 9 of 17 (53%) in the OGTT arm; relative risk of testing was 1.9 (95% confidence interval, 1.2-3.0). 36% were glucose intolerant. This pilot study found that an in-office testing model doubled the rate of postpartum testing in this clinic population, and was reasonably sensitive at detecting dysglycemia. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  16. Long-term exposure to abnormal glucose levels alters drug metabolism pathways and insulin sensitivity in primary human hepatocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, Matthew D.; Ballinger, Kimberly R.; Khetani, Salman R.

    2016-06-01

    Hyperglycemia in type 2 diabetes mellitus has been linked to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, which can progress to inflammation, fibrosis/cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Understanding how chronic hyperglycemia affects primary human hepatocytes (PHHs) can facilitate the development of therapeutics for these diseases. Conversely, elucidating the effects of hypoglycemia on PHHs may provide insights into how the liver adapts to fasting, adverse diabetes drug reactions, and cancer. In contrast to declining PHH monocultures, micropatterned co-cultures (MPCCs) of PHHs and 3T3-J2 murine embryonic fibroblasts maintain insulin-sensitive glucose metabolism for several weeks. Here, we exposed MPCCs to hypo-, normo- and hyperglycemic culture media for ~3 weeks. While albumin and urea secretion were not affected by glucose level, hypoglycemic MPCCs upregulated CYP3A4 enzyme activity as compared to other glycemic states. In contrast, hyperglycemic MPCCs displayed significant hepatic lipid accumulation in the presence of insulin, while also showing decreased sensitivity to insulin-mediated inhibition of glucose output relative to a normoglycemic control. In conclusion, we show for the first time that PHHs exposed to hypo- and hyperglycemia can remain highly functional, but display increased CYP3A4 activity and selective insulin resistance, respectively. In the future, MPCCs under glycemic states can aid in novel drug discovery and mechanistic investigations.

  17. TGFβ pathway deregulation and abnormal phospho-SMAD2/3 staining in hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis-Dutch type.

    PubMed

    Grand Moursel, Laure; Munting, Leon P; van der Graaf, Linda M; van Duinen, Sjoerd G; Goumans, Marie-Jose T H; Ueberham, Uwe; Natté, Remco; van Buchem, Mark A; van Roon-Mom, Willeke M C; van der Weerd, Louise

    2017-05-29

    Hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis-Dutch type (HCHWA-D) is an early onset hereditary form of cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) pathology, caused by the E22Q mutation in the amyloid β (Aβ) peptide. Transforming growth factor β1 (TGFβ1) is a key player in vascular fibrosis and in the formation of angiopathic vessels in transgenic mice. Therefore, we investigated whether the TGFβ pathway is involved in HCHWA-D pathogenesis in human postmortem brain tissue from frontal and occipital lobes. Components of the TGFβ pathway were analyzed with quantitative RT-PCR. TGFβ1 and TGFβ Receptor 2 (TGFBR2) gene expression levels were significantly increased in HCHWA-D in comparison to the controls, in both frontal and occipital lobes. TGFβ-induced pro-fibrotic target genes were also upregulated. We further assessed pathway activation by detecting phospho-SMAD2/3 (pSMAD2/3), a direct TGFβ down-stream signaling mediator, using immunohistochemistry. We found abnormal pSMAD2/3 granular deposits specifically on HCHWA-D angiopathic frontal and occipital vessels. We graded pSMAD2/3 accumulation in angiopathic vessels and found a positive correlation with the CAA load independent of the brain area. We also observed pSMAD2/3 granules in a halo surrounding occipital vessels, which was specific for HCHWA-D. The result of this study indicates an upregulation of TGFβ1 in HCHWA-D, as was found previously in AD with CAA pathology. We discuss the possible origins and implications of the TGFβ pathway deregulation in the microvasculature in HCHWA-D. These findings identify the TGFβ pathway as a potential biomarker of disease progression and a possible target of therapeutic intervention in HCHWA-D. © 2017 The Authors. Brain Pathology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of International Society of Neuropathology.

  18. CSF glucose test

    MedlinePlus

    Glucose test - CSF; Cerebrospinal fluid glucose test ... The glucose level in the CSF should be 50 to 80 mg/100 mL (or greater than 2/3 ... Abnormal results include higher and lower glucose levels. Abnormal ... or fungus) Inflammation of the central nervous system Tumor

  19. Pitavastatin treatment induces neuroprotection through the BDNF-TrkB signalling pathway in cultured cerebral neurons after oxygen-glucose deprivation.

    PubMed

    Cui, Xiaoyan; Fu, Zhenqiang; Wang, Menghan; Nan, Xiaofei; Zhang, Boai

    2018-05-01

    Along with their lipid-lowering effect, statins have been reported to have neuroprotective function in both in vivo and in vitro models of neurodegenerative diseases. We conducted this study in order to uncover the he neuroprotective effect of the lipophilic statin pitavastatin (PTV) and investigate the underlying molecular mechanisms using primary cultured cerebral neurons exposed to oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD). The primary cultured cerebral neurons were randomly assigned into four groups: the control group, the pitavastatin treatment group, the OGD group and the OGD + pitavastatin treatment group. The pitavastatin's concentration were set as follows: 1μM, 15μM, 30μM. After 3 hours OGD treatment, we use MTT method to assessment cell viability, immunofluorescence to observe neuron morphology and western blot method analysis the BDNF, TrkB. PTV at concentrations of 1 μM and 15 μM elevated the survival rate of cortical neurons exposed to OGD, whereas 30 μM PTV did not show such an effect. Moreover, PTV promoted neuronal dendrite growth at concentrations of 1 μM and 15 μM. Increased expression levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB) were observed in both of the following two scenarios: when neurons were treated with PTV for 48 hours and when PTV was added after the OGD procedure. Pitavastatin treatment induces neuroprotection in cultured cerebral neurons after oxygen-glucose deprivation this neuroprotection induced by PTV involves the BDNF-TrkB signalling pathway.

  20. Microdialysis combined blood sampling technique for the determination of rosiglitazone and glucose in brain and blood of gerbils subjected to cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Sheu, Wayne H-H; Chuang, Hsiu-Chun; Cheng, Shiu-Min; Lee, Maw-Rong; Chou, Chi-Chi; Cheng, Fu-Chou

    2011-03-25

    Rosiglitazone is a potent synthetic peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPAR-γ) agonist which improves glucose control in the plasma and reduces ischemic brain injury. However, the pharmacokinetics of rosiglitazone in the brain is still unclear. In this study, a method using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry coupled with microdialysis and an auto-blood sampling system was developed to determine rosiglitazone and glucose concentration in the brain and blood of gerbils subjected to treatment with rosiglitazone (3.0 mg kg(-1), i.p.). The results showed the limit of detection was 0.04 μg L(-1) and the correlation coefficient was 0.9997 for the determination of rosiglitazone in the brain. The mean parameters, maximum drug concentration (C(max)) and the area under the concentration-time curve from time zero to time infinity (AUC(inf)), following rosiglitazone administration were 1.06±0.28 μg L(-1) and 296.82±44.67 μg min L(-1), respectively. The time to peak concentration (C(max) or T(max)) of rosiglitazone occurred at 105±17.10 min, and the mean elimination half-life (t(1/2)) from brain was 190.81±85.18 min after administration of rosiglitazone. The brain glucose levels decreased to 71% of the basal levels in the rosiglitazone-treated group when compared with those in the control (p<0.01). Treatment with rosiglitazone decreased blood glucose levels to 80% at 1h after pretreatment of rosiglitazone (p<0.05). In addition, pretreatment with rosiglitazone significantly reduced the cerebral infarct volume compared with that of the control group. These findings suggest that this method may be useful for simultaneous and continuous determination of rosiglitazone and glucose concentrations in brain and plasma. Rosiglitazone was effective at penetrating the blood-brain barrier as evidenced by the rapid appearance of rosiglitazone in the brain, and rosiglitazone may contribute to a reduction in the extent of injuries related to cerebral ischemic stroke

  1. The ratio of acetate-to-glucose oxidation in astrocytes from a single 13C NMR spectrum of cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Marin-Valencia, Isaac; Hooshyar, M Ali; Pichumani, Kumar; Sherry, A Dean; Malloy, Craig R

    2015-01-01

    The (13) C-labeling patterns in glutamate and glutamine from brain tissue are quite different after infusion of a mixture of (13) C-enriched glucose and acetate. Two processes contribute to this observation, oxidation of acetate by astrocytes but not neurons, and preferential incorporation of α-ketoglutarate into glutamate in neurons, and incorporation of α-ketoglutarate into glutamine in astrocytes. The acetate:glucose ratio, introduced previously for analysis of a single (13) C NMR spectrum, provides a useful index of acetate and glucose oxidation in the brain tissue. However, quantitation of relative substrate oxidation at the cell compartment level has not been reported. A simple mathematical method is presented to quantify the ratio of acetate-to-glucose oxidation in astrocytes, based on the standard assumption that neurons do not oxidize acetate. Mice were infused with [1,2-(13) C]acetate and [1,6-(13) C]glucose, and proton decoupled (13) C NMR spectra of cortex extracts were acquired. A fit of those spectra to the model indicated that (13) C-labeled acetate and glucose contributed approximately equally to acetyl-CoA (0.96) in astrocytes. As this method relies on a single (13) C NMR spectrum, it can be readily applied to multiple physiologic and pathologic conditions. Differences in (13) C labeling of brain glutamate and glutamine have been attributed to metabolic compartmentation. The acetate:glucose ratio, introduced for description of a (13) C NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) spectrum, is an index of glucose and acetate oxidation in brain tissue. A simple mathematical method is presented to quantify the ratio of acetate-to-glucose oxidation in astrocytes from a single NMR spectrum. As kinetic analysis is not required, the method is readily applicable to analysis of tissue extracts. α-KG = alpha-ketoglutarate; CAC = citric acid cycle; GLN = glutamine; GLU = glutamate. © 2014 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  2. Differences of prevalence of dyslipidemia and risk factors related to LDL-c in the patients with abnormal fasting glucose between Uygur and Han in Xinjiang.

    PubMed

    Quan, Li; Hu, Lin; Zhang, Li; Jiang, Sheng

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the incidence of dyslipidemia among Uygur and Han patients with impaired fasting glucose (IFG). To investigate the influence factors on LDL-c in this population. This cross-sectional study included a total of 4709 participants, consisting of Uygurs patients (n=2053) and Han patients (n=2656) from Xinjiang province, who were screened for diabetes mellitus. A stratified multistage sampling design was used to collect the participants. The influence factors on LDL-c were analyzed by Logistic regression analysis. Among the IFG patients (n=1757), Uighur IFG group had a higher prevalence of dyslipidemia than that of Han IFG group, 99.8% vs. 63.7%, P<0.05. Similar trends were existed in the prevalence of hypercholesteremia, hypertriglyceridemia, high LDL-c and low HDL-c (all P<0.05). Among the Uighur groups, IFG group had higher dyslipidemia rate than that of euglycemia group (74%). However, there was no such difference in the Han groups. Logistic regression analysis revealed that risk factors associated with LDL-c were age, total cholesterol and 2 h postprandial blood glucose for the Uighur IFG patients. However, gender and total cholesterol were risk factors for Han IFG patients. Uighur IFG patients had higher incidence of dyslipidemia than that of Han IFG patients. For Uyghur IFG patients, closing follow-up of total cholesterol and 2 h postprandial blood glucose were necessary. As to the Han IFG patients, we should pay more attention to male and total cholesterol in order to lower LDL-c levels. So, appropriately preventive and therapeutic measures should be chosen based on the characteristics of abnormal lipid profiles in different nationality.

  3. Hematological parameters and red blood cell morphological abnormality of Glucose-6-Phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency co-inherited with thalassemia.

    PubMed

    Pengon, Jutharat; Svasti, Saovaros; Kamchonwongpaisan, Sumalee; Vattanaviboon, Phantip

    2018-03-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G-6-PD) deficiency and thalassemia are genetically independent hemolytic disorders. Co-inheritance of both disorders may affect red blood cell pathology to a greater extent than normally seen in either disorder alone. This study determines the prevalence and evaluates hematological changes of G-6-PD deficiency and thalassemia co-inheritance. G-6-PD deficiency was screened from 200 male thalassemia blood samples using a fluorescent spot test. Hematological parameters and red blood cell morphology were evaluated among G-6-PD deficiency/thalassemia co-inheritance, G-6-PD deficiency alone, thalassemia alone, and normal individuals. G-6-PD deficiency was detected together with hemoglobin (Hb) E heterozygote, Hb E homozygote, β-thalassemia trait, and β-thalassemia/Hb E, α-thalassemia-2 trait, and Hb H disease. Hb level, hematocrit, mean cell volume, and mean cell Hb of G-6-PD deficiency co-inherited with asymptomatic thalassemia carriers show significantly lower mean values compared to carriers with only the same thalassemia genotypes. Higher mean red blood cell distribution width was observed in G-6-PD deficiency co-inherited with Hb E heterozygote, as with numbers of hemighost cells in G-6-PD deficiency/thalassemia co-inheritance compared to those with either disorder. Apart from Hb level, hematological parameters of co-inheritance disorders were not different from individuals with a single thalassemia disease. G-6-PD deficiency co-inherited with thalassemia in males was present in 10% of the participants, resulting in worsening of red blood cell pathology compared with inheritance of thalassemia alone. Copyright © 2017 King Faisal Specialist Hospital & Research Centre. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Cerebral Blood Flow and Glucose Metabolism in Appetite-Related Brain Regions in Type 1 Diabetic Patients After Treatment With Insulin Detemir and NPH Insulin

    PubMed Central

    van Golen, Larissa W.; IJzerman, Richard G.; Huisman, Marc C.; Hensbergen, Jolanda F.; Hoogma, Roel P.; Drent, Madeleine L.; Lammertsma, Adriaan A.; Diamant, Michaela

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To test the hypothesis that insulin detemir, which is associated with less weight gain than other basal insulin formulations, exerts its weight-modulating effects by acting on brain regions involved in appetite regulation, as represented by altered cerebral blood flow (CBF) or cerebral glucose metabolism (CMRglu). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Twenty-eight male type 1 diabetic patients (age 36.9 ± 9.7 years, BMI 24.9 ± 2.7 kg/m2, A1C 7.5 ± 0.6%) successfully completed a randomized crossover study, consisting of two periods of 12-week treatment with either insulin detemir or NPH insulin, both in combination with prandial insulin aspart. After each treatment period, patients underwent positron emission tomography scans to measure regional CBF and CMRglu. RESULTS After 12 weeks, A1C, daily insulin doses, fasting insulin, and blood glucose levels were similar between treatments. Insulin detemir resulted in body weight loss, whereas NPH insulin induced weight gain (between-treatment difference 1.3 kg; P = 0.02). After treatment with insulin detemir relative to NPH insulin, CBF was higher in brain regions involved in appetite regulation, whereas no significant difference in CMRglu was observed. CONCLUSIONS Treatment with insulin detemir versus NPH insulin resulted in weight loss, paralleled by increased CBF in appetite-related brain regions in the resting state, in men with well-controlled type 1 diabetes. These findings lend support to the hypothesis that a differential effect on the brain may contribute to the consistently observed weight-sparing effect of insulin detemir. PMID:24130356

  5. Evaluation of cerebral oxygenation and perfusion with conversion from an arterial-to-systemic shunt circulation to the bidirectional Glenn circulation in patients with univentricular cardiac abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Bertolizio, Gianluca; DiNardo, James A; Laussen, Peter C; Polito, Angelo; Pigula, Frank A; Zurakowski, David; Kussman, Barry D

    2015-02-01

    Superior vena cava pressure after the bidirectional Glenn operation usually is higher than that associated with the preceding shunt-dependent circulation. The aim of the present study was to determine whether the acute elevation in central venous pressure was associated with changes in cerebral oxygenation and perfusion. Single-center prospective, observational cohort study. Academic children's hospital. Infants with single-ventricle lesions and surgically placed systemic-to-pulmonary artery shunts undergoing the bidirectional Glenn operation. Near-infrared spectroscopy and transcranial Doppler sonography were used to measure regional cerebral oxygen saturation and cerebral blood flow velocity. Mean differences in regional cerebral oxygen saturation and cerebral blood flow velocity before anesthetic induction and shortly before hospital discharge were compared using the F-test in repeated measures analysis of variance. In the 24 infants studied, mean cerebral oxygen saturation increased from 49%±2% to 57%±2% (p = 0.007), mean cerebral blood flow velocity decreased from 57±4 cm/s to 47±4 cm/s (p = 0.026), and peak systolic cerebral blood flow velocity decreased from 111±6 cm/s to 99±6 cm/s (p = 0.046) after the bidirectional Glenn operation. Mean central venous pressure was 8±2 mmHg postinduction of anesthesia and 14±4 mmHg on the first postoperative day and was not associated with a change in cerebral perfusion pressure (p = 0.35). The bidirectional Glenn operation in infants with a shunt-dependent circulation is associated with an improvement in cerebral oxygenation, and the lower cerebral blood flow velocity is likely a response of intact cerebral autoregulation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Effects of glucose, insulin, and insulin resistance on cerebral 18F-FDG distribution in cognitively normal older subjects

    PubMed Central

    Onishi, Airin; Fujiwara, Yoshinori; Ishiwata, Kiichi; Ishii, Kenji

    2017-01-01

    Background Increasing plasma glucose levels and insulin resistance can alter the distribution pattern of fluorine-18-labeled fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) in the brain and relatively reduce 18F-FDG uptake in Alzheimer's disease (AD)-related hypometabolic regions, leading to the appearance of an AD-like pattern. However, its relationship with plasma insulin levels is unclear. We aimed to compare the effects of plasma glucose levels, plasma insulin levels and insulin resistance on the appearance of the AD-like pattern in 18F-FDG images. Methods Fifty-nine cognitively normal older subjects (age = 75.7 ± 6.4 years) underwent 18F-FDG positron emission tomography along with measurement of plasma glucose and insulin levels. As an index of insulin resistance, the Homeostasis model assessment of Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR) was calculated. Results Plasma glucose levels, plasma insulin levels, and HOMA-IR were 102.2 ± 8.1 mg/dL, 4.1 ± 1.9 μU/mL, and 1.0 ± 0.5, respectively. Whole-brain voxelwise analysis showed a negative correlation of 18F-FDG uptake with plasma glucose levels in the precuneus and lateral parietotemporal regions (cluster-corrected p < 0.05), and no correlation with plasma insulin levels or HOMA-IR. In the significant cluster, 18F-FDG uptake decreased by approximately 4–5% when plasma glucose levels increased by 20 mg/dL. In the precuneus region, volume-of-interest analysis confirmed a negative correlation of 18F-FDG uptake with plasma glucose levels (r = -0.376, p = 0.002), and no correlation with plasma insulin levels (r = 0.156, p = 0.12) or HOMA-IR (r = 0.096, p = 0.24). Conclusion This study suggests that, of the three parameters, plasma glucose levels have the greatest effect on the appearance of the AD-like pattern in 18F-FDG images. PMID:28715453

  7. Insulin Resistance and Prognosis of Nondiabetic Patients With Ischemic Stroke: The ACROSS-China Study (Abnormal Glucose Regulation in Patients With Acute Stroke Across China).

    PubMed

    Jing, Jing; Pan, Yuesong; Zhao, Xingquan; Zheng, Huaguang; Jia, Qian; Mi, Donghua; Chen, Weiqi; Li, Hao; Liu, Liping; Wang, Chunxue; He, Yan; Wang, David; Wang, Yilong; Wang, Yongjun

    2017-04-01

    Insulin resistance was common in patients with stroke. This study investigated the association between insulin resistance and outcomes in nondiabetic patients with first-ever acute ischemic stroke. Patients with ischemic stroke without history of diabetes mellitus in the ACROSS-China registry (Abnormal Glucose Regulation in Patients With Acute Stroke Across China) were included. Insulin resistance was defined as a homeostatis model assessment-insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) index in the top quartile (Q4). HOMA-IR was calculated as fasting insulin (μU/mL)×fasting glucose (mmol/L)/22.5. Multivariable logistic regression or Cox regression was performed to estimate the association between HOMA-IR and 1-year prognosis (mortality, stroke recurrence, poor functional outcome [modified Rankin scale score 3-6], and dependence [modified Rankin scale score 3-5]). Among the 1245 patients with acute ischemic stroke enrolled in this study, the median HOMA-IR was 1.9 (interquartile range, 1.1-3.1). Patients with insulin resistance were associated with a higher mortality risk than those without (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.68; 95% confidence interval, 1.12-2.53; P =0.01), stroke recurrence (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.57, 95% confidence interval, 1.12-2.19; P =0.008), and poor outcome (adjusted odds ratio, 1.42; 95% confidence interval, 1.03-1.95; P =0.03) but not dependence after adjustment for potential confounders. Higher HOMA-IR quartile categories were associated with a higher risk of 1-year death, stroke recurrence, and poor outcome ( P for trend =0.005, 0.005, and 0.001, respectively). Insulin resistance was associated with an increased risk of death, stroke recurrence, and poor outcome but not dependence in nondiabetic patients with acute ischemic stroke. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  8. Triheptanoin for glucose transporter type I deficiency (G1D): Modulation of human ictogenesis, cerebral metabolic rate and cognitive indices by a food supplement

    PubMed Central

    Pascual, Juan M.; Liu, Peiying; Mao, Deng; Kelly, Dorothy; Hernandez, Ana; Sheng, Min; Good, Levi B.; Ma, Qian; Marin-Valencia, Isaac; Zhang, Xuchen; Park, Jason Y.; Hynan, Linda S.; Stavinoha, Peter; Roe, Charles R.; Lu, Hanzhang

    2015-01-01

    Objective G1D is commonly associated with electrographic spike-wave and - less-noticeably – with absence seizures. The G1D syndrome has long been attributed to energy (i.e., ATP-synthetic) failure, as have experimental, toxic-rodent epilepsies to impaired brain metabolism and tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle intermediate depletion. Indeed, a (seldom-acknowledged) function of glucose and other substrates is the generation of brain TCAs via carbon-donor reactions collectively named anaplerosis. However, TCAs are preserved in murine G1D. This renders inferences about energy failure premature and suggests a different hypothesis, also grounded on our findings, that consumption of alternate TCA precursors is stimulated, potentially detracting from other functions. Second, common ketogenic diets can ameliorate G1D seizures, but lead to a therapeutically-counterintuitive reduction in blood glucose available to the brain, and they can prove ineffective in 1/3 of cases. While developing G1D treatments, all of this motivated us to: a) uphold (rather than attenuate) the residual brain glucose flux that all G1D patients possess; and b) stimulate the TCA cycle, including anaplerosis. Therefore, we tested the medium-chain triglyceride triheptanoin, a widely-used medical food supplement that can fulfill both of these metabolic roles. The rationale is that ketone bodies derived from ketogenic diets are not anaplerotic, in contrast with triheptanoin metabolites, as we have shown in the G1D mouse brain. Design We supplemented the regular diet of a case series of G1D patients with food-grade triheptanoin. First we confirmed that, despite their frequent electroencephalographic (EEG) presence as spike-waves, most seizures are rarely visible, such that perceptions by patients or others are inadequate for treatment evaluation. Thus, we used EEG, quantitative neuropsychological, blood analytical, and MRI cerebral metabolic rate measurements as main outcomes. Setting Academic and

  9. The SH2B1 obesity locus and abnormal glucose homeostasis: lack of evidence for association from a meta-analysis in individuals of European ancestry.

    PubMed

    Prudente, S; Copetti, M; Morini, E; Mendonca, C; Andreozzi, F; Chandalia, M; Baratta, R; Pellegrini, F; Mercuri, L; Bailetti, D; Abate, N; Frittitta, L; Sesti, G; Florez, J C; Doria, A; Trischitta, V

    2013-11-01

    The development of type 2 diabetes (T2D) is influenced both by environmental and by genetic determinants. Obesity is an important risk factor for T2D, mostly mediated by obesity-related insulin resistance. Obesity and insulin resistance are also modulated by the genetic milieu; thus, genes affecting risk of obesity and insulin resistance might also modulate risk of T2D. Recently, 32 loci have been associated with body mass index (BMI) by genome-wide studies, including one locus on chromosome 16p11 containing the SH2B1 gene. Animal studies have suggested that SH2B1 is a physiological enhancer of the insulin receptor and humans with rare deletions or mutations at SH2B1 are obese with a disproportionately high insulin resistance. Thus, the role of SH2B1 in both obesity and insulin resistance makes it a strong candidate for T2D. However, published data on the role of SH2B1 variability on the risk for T2D are conflicting, ranging from no effect at all to a robust association. The SH2B1 tag SNP rs4788102 (SNP, single nucleotide polymorphism) was genotyped in 6978 individuals from six studies for abnormal glucose homeostasis (AGH), including impaired fasting glucose, impaired glucose tolerance or T2D, from the GENetics of Type 2 Diabetes in Italy and the United States (GENIUS T2D) consortium. Data from these studies were then meta-analyzed, in a Bayesian fashion, with those from DIAGRAM+ (n = 47,117) and four other published studies (n = 39,448). Variability at the SH2B1 obesity locus was not associated with AGH either in the GENIUS consortium (overall odds ratio (OR) = 0.96; 0.89-1.04) or in the meta-analysis (OR = 1.01; 0.98-1.05). Our data exclude a role for the SH2B1 obesity locus in the modulation of AGH. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Effects of abnormal 75 g oral glucose tolerance test at different time points on neonatal complications and neurobehavioral development in the pregnant women with gestational diabetes mellitus (a STROBE-compliant article).

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jian-Li; Xing, Jun; Liu, Cong-Hui; Wen, Jie; Zhao, Nan-Nan; Kang, Yuan-Yuan; Shao, Ting

    2018-05-01

    With the improvement of living standard, gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) incidence is increasing every year. We observed the effects of abnormal 75 g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) at different time points on neonatal complications and neurobehavioral development in GDM.A total of 144 newborns whose mothers were diagnosed with GDM and received prenatal examination and childbirth in our hospital from October 2015 to April 2016, were observed in this study. Pregnant women underwent 75 g OGTT and the blood glucose level was recorded on an empty stomach, as well as postprandial 1 and 2 hours, respectively. Based on the frequency of 75 g OGTT-abnormal time points, the pregnant women were divided into group 1 (OGTT abnormality at 1 time point), group 2 (OGTT abnormality at 2 time points), and group 3 (OGTT abnormality at 3 time points). Neonatal behavioral neurological assessment (NBNA) was performed on the 3 groups, respectively.In the total score of NBNA, there was a significant difference among the 3 groups (F = 17.120, P = .000), and there were significant differences between the 3 groups (all P < .05). The incidence of neonatal hypoglycemia was significantly lower in groups 1 and 2 than in group 3, and the incidence of macrosomia was significantly lower in groups 1 than in groups 2 and 3 (all P < .05). In the 144 newborns, NBNA scoring was significantly lower in the newborns with hypoglycemia than in the newborns with normal blood glucose level, and in macrosomia than in the newborns with normal body weight (all P < .01).With the increase of OGTT-abnormal time points in the pregnant women with GDM, the incidences of neonatal hypoglycemia and macrosomia rise and neonatal NBNA score decreases. Therefore, reasonable measures should be adopted as early as possible to prevent poor prognosis in the pregnant women with GDM.

  11. Regional cerebral glucose metabolism differentiates danger- and non-danger-based traumas in post-traumatic stress disorder

    PubMed Central

    Litz, Brett T.; Resick, Patricia A.; Woolsey, Mary D.; Dondanville, Katherine A.; Young-McCaughan, Stacey; Borah, Adam M.; Borah, Elisa V.; Peterson, Alan L.; Fox, Peter T.

    2016-01-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is presumably the result of life threats and conditioned fear. However, the neurobiology of fear fails to explain the impact of traumas that do not entail threats. Neuronal function, assessed as glucose metabolism with 18fluoro-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography, was contrasted in active duty, treatment-seeking US Army Soldiers with PTSD endorsing either danger- (n = 19) or non-danger-based (n = 26) traumas, and was compared with soldiers without PTSD (Combat Controls, n = 26) and Civilian Controls (n = 24). Prior meta-analyses of regions associated with fear or trauma script imagery in PTSD were used to compare glucose metabolism across groups. Danger-based traumas were associated with higher metabolism in the right amygdala than the control groups, while non-danger-based traumas associated with heightened precuneus metabolism relative to the danger group. In the danger group, PTSD severity was associated with higher metabolism in precuneus and dorsal anterior cingulate and lower metabolism in left amygdala (R2 = 0.61). In the non-danger group, PTSD symptom severity was associated with higher precuneus metabolism and lower right amygdala metabolism (R2 = 0.64). These findings suggest a biological basis to consider subtyping PTSD according to the nature of the traumatic context. PMID:26373348

  12. Apolipoprotein E Mimetic Peptide Increases Cerebral Glucose Uptake by Reducing Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption after Controlled Cortical Impact in Mice: An 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose PET/CT Study.

    PubMed

    Qin, Xinghu; You, Hong; Cao, Fang; Wu, Yue; Peng, Jianhua; Pang, Jinwei; Xu, Hong; Chen, Yue; Chen, Ligang; Vitek, Michael P; Li, Fengqiao; Sun, Xiaochuan; Jiang, Yong

    2017-02-15

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) disrupts the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and reduces cerebral glucose uptake. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is believed to play a key role in TBI, and COG1410 has demonstrated neuroprotective activity in several models of TBI. However, the effects of COG1410 on VEGF and glucose metabolism following TBI are unknown. The current study aimed to investigate the expression of VEGF and glucose metabolism effects in C57BL/6J male mice subjected to experimental TBI. The results showed that controlled cortical impact (CCI)-induced vestibulomotor deficits were accompanied by increases in brain edema and the expression of VEGF, with a decrease in cerebral glucose uptake. COG1410 treatment significantly improved vestibulomotor deficits and glucose uptake and produced decreases in VEGF in the pericontusion and ipsilateral hemisphere of injury, as well as in brain edema and neuronal degeneration compared with the control group. These data support that COG1410 may have potential as an effective drug therapy for TBI.

  13. Detection by voxel-wise statistical analysis of significant changes in regional cerebral glucose uptake in an APP/PS1 transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Dubois, Albertine; Hérard, Anne-Sophie; Delatour, Benoît; Hantraye, Philippe; Bonvento, Gilles; Dhenain, Marc; Delzescaux, Thierry

    2010-06-01

    Biomarkers and technologies similar to those used in humans are essential for the follow-up of Alzheimer's disease (AD) animal models, particularly for the clarification of mechanisms and the screening and validation of new candidate treatments. In humans, changes in brain metabolism can be detected by 1-deoxy-2-[(18)F] fluoro-D-glucose PET (FDG-PET) and assessed in a user-independent manner with dedicated software, such as Statistical Parametric Mapping (SPM). FDG-PET can be carried out in small animals, but its resolution is low as compared to the size of rodent brain structures. In mouse models of AD, changes in cerebral glucose utilization are usually detected by [(14)C]-2-deoxyglucose (2DG) autoradiography, but this requires prior manual outlining of regions of interest (ROI) on selected sections. Here, we evaluate the feasibility of applying the SPM method to 3D autoradiographic data sets mapping brain metabolic activity in a transgenic mouse model of AD. We report the preliminary results obtained with 4 APP/PS1 (64+/-1 weeks) and 3 PS1 (65+/-2 weeks) mice. We also describe new procedures for the acquisition and use of "blockface" photographs and provide the first demonstration of their value for the 3D reconstruction and spatial normalization of post mortem mouse brain volumes. Despite this limited sample size, our results appear to be meaningful, consistent, and more comprehensive than findings from previously published studies based on conventional ROI-based methods. The establishment of statistical significance at the voxel level, rather than with a user-defined ROI, makes it possible to detect more reliably subtle differences in geometrically complex regions, such as the hippocampus. Our approach is generic and could be easily applied to other biomarkers and extended to other species and applications. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Cerebral Lateralization and Aggression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hillbrand, Marc; And Others

    1994-01-01

    A resurgence of interest in the relationship between cerebral lateralization (the functional asymmetry of the cerebral cortex) and aggression has occurred. Most recent studies have found that individuals with abnormal patterns of lateralization are overrepresented among violent individuals. Intervening variables (such as drug and alcohol abuse)…

  15. Activation of Wnt3α/β-catenin signal pathway attenuates apoptosis of the cerebral microvascular endothelial cells induced by oxygen-glucose deprivation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianshui; Zhang, Junfeng; Qi, Cunfang; Yang, Pengbo; Chen, Xinlin; Liu, Yong

    2017-08-19

    Brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMECs) play vital roles in cerebral ischemia, during which many signal pathways mediate BMECs apoptosis. In this study, we explored the potential role of Wnt3α/β-catenin signal in BMECs apoptosis induced by ischemia. Here, we found that oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) could induce apoptosis of BMECs with Wnt3a mRNA expression decrease. Meanwhile, activation Wnt3a/β-catenin signal with exogenous Wnt3α protein (100 ng/ml) or Lithium Chloride (LiCl, 4 mM) decreased significantly apoptosis of BMECs induced by OGD with increasing expression of Bcl-2 in the whole cell and β-catenin in the nucleus. But, inhibition Wnt3a/β-catenin signal with DKK1 (100 ng/ml) or 2.4-diamino quinazoline (DQ, 0.2 μM) increased apoptosis of BMECs with decreasing expression of Bcl-2. These results suggest that activation Wnt3α/β-catenin signal attenuate apoptosis of BMECs induced by ischemia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Magnolol protects against ischemic-reperfusion brain damage following oxygen-glucose deprivation and transient focal cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Huang, Sheng-Yang; Tai, Shih-Huang; Chang, Che-Chao; Tu, Yi-Fang; Chang, Chih-Han; Lee, E-Jian

    2018-04-01

    In the present study, the neuroprotective potential of magnolol against ischemia-reperfusion brain injury was examined via in vivo and in vitro experiments. Magnolol exhibited strong radical scavenging and antioxidant activity, and significantly inhibited the production of interleukin‑6, tumor necrosis factor‑a and nitrite/nitrate (NOX) in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated BV2 and RAW 264.7 cells when applied at concentrations of 10 and 50 µM, respectively. Magnolol (100 µM) also significantly attenuated oxygen‑glucose deprivation‑induced damage in neonatal rat hippocampal slice cultures, when administered up to 4 h following the insult. In a rat model of stable ischemia, compared with a vehicle‑treated ischemic control, pretreatment with magnolol (0.01‑1 mg/kg, intravenously) significantly reduced brain infarction following ischemic stroke, and post‑treatment with magnolol (1 mg/kg) remained effective and significantly reduced infarction when administered 2 h following the onset of ischemia. Additionally, magnolol (0.3 and 1 mg/kg) significantly reduced the accumulation of superoxide anions at the border zones of infarction and reduced oxidative damage in the ischemic brain. This was assessed by measuring the levels of NOX, malondialdehyde and myeloperoxidase, the ratio of glutathione/oxidized glutathione and the immunoreactions of 8‑hydroxy‑2'‑deoxyguanosine and 4‑hydroxynonenal. Thus, magnolol was revealed to protect against ischemia‑reperfusion brain damage. This may be partly attributed to its antioxidant, radical scavenging and anti‑inflammatory effects.

  17. Absolute quantification of regional cerebral glucose utilization in mice by 18F-FDG small animal PET scanning and 2-14C-DG autoradiography.

    PubMed

    Toyama, Hiroshi; Ichise, Masanori; Liow, Jeih-San; Modell, Kendra J; Vines, Douglass C; Esaki, Takanori; Cook, Michelle; Seidel, Jurgen; Sokoloff, Louis; Green, Michael V; Innis, Robert B

    2004-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of absolute quantification of regional cerebral glucose utilization (rCMR(glc)) in mice by use of (18)F-FDG and a small animal PET scanner. rCMR(glc) determined with (18)F-FDG PET was compared with values determined simultaneously by the autoradiographic 2-(14)C-DG method. In addition, we compared the rCMR(glc) values under isoflurane, ketamine and xylazine anesthesia, and awake states. Immediately after injection of (18)F-FDG and 2-(14)C-DG into mice, timed arterial samples were drawn over 45 min to determine the time courses of (18)F-FDG and 2-(14)C-DG. Animals were euthanized at 45 min and their brain was imaged with the PET scanner. The brains were then processed for 2-(14)C-DG autoradiography. Regions of interest were manually placed over cortical regions on corresponding coronal (18)F-FDG PET and 2-(14)C-DG autoradiographic images. rCMR(glc) values were calculated for both tracers by the autoradiographic 2-(14)C-DG method with modifications for the different rate and lumped constants for the 2 tracers. Average rCMR(glc) values in cerebral cortex with (18)F-FDG PET under normoglycemic conditions (isoflurane and awake) were generally lower (by 8.3%) but strongly correlated with those of 2-(14)C-DG (r(2) = 0.95). On the other hand, under hyperglycemic conditions (ketamine/xylazine) average cortical rCMR(glc) values with (18)F-FDG PET were higher (by 17.3%) than those with 2-(14)C-DG. Values for rCMR(glc) and uptake (percentage injected dose per gram [%ID/g]) with (18)F-FDG PET were significantly lower under both isoflurane and ketamine/xylazine anesthesia than in the awake mice. However, the reductions of rCMR(glc) were markedly greater under isoflurane (by 57%) than under ketamine and xylazine (by 19%), whereas more marked reductions of %ID/g were observed with ketamine/xylazine (by 54%) than with isoflurane (by 37%). These reverse differences between isoflurane and ketamine/xylazine may be due to

  18. Correlation between physical examination and three-dimensional gait analysis in the assessment of rotational abnormalities in children with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Fernando Borge; Ramalho Júnior, Amancio; Morais Filho, Mauro César de; Speciali, Danielli Souza; Kawamura, Catia Miyuki; Lopes, José Augusto Fernandes; Blumetti, Francesco Camara

    2018-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the correlation between physical examination data concerning hip rotation and tibial torsion with transverse plane kinematics in children with cerebral palsy; and to determine which time points and events of the gait cycle present higher correlation with physical examination findings. Methods A total of 195 children with cerebral palsy seen at two gait laboratories from 2008 and 2016 were included in this study. Physical examination measurements included internal hip rotation, external hip rotation, mid-point hip rotation and the transmalleolar axis angle. Six kinematic parameters were selected for each segment to assess hip rotation and shank-based foot rotation. Correlations between physical examination and kinematic measures were analyzed by Spearman correlation coefficients, and a significance level of 5% was considered. Results Comparing physical examination measurements of hip rotation and hip kinematics, we found moderate to strong correlations for all variables (p<0.001). The highest coefficients were seen between the mid-point hip rotation on physical examination and hip rotation kinematics (rho range: 0.48-0.61). Moderate correlations were also found between the transmalleolar axis angle measurement on physical examination and foot rotation kinematics (rho range 0.44-0.56; p<0.001). Conclusion These findings may have clinical implications in the assessment and management of transverse plane gait deviations in children with cerebral palsy.

  19. Postpartum screening practices, progression to abnormal glucose tolerance and its related risk factors in Asian women with a known history of gestational diabetes: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Nouhjah, Sedigheh; Shahbazian, Hajieh; Amoori, Neda; Jahanfar, Shayesteh; Shahbazian, Nahid; Jahanshahi, Alireza; Cheraghian, Bahman

    2017-12-01

    Rate of postpartum screening and progression to glucose intolerance (diabetes and/or pre-diabetes) in Asian women with prior GDM and risk factors of diversion to abnormal glucose tolerance were reviewed. We searched Pub Med, Cochrane Library, Web of Science, EMBASE, and Ovid data base. About 1300 studies were screened and 27 articles were selected. Meta-analysis using Comprehensive Meta -Analysis software was conducted. All results were reported at the pooled ORs and 95% CI. Quantitative heterogeneity (I 2 ) was assessed. To estimate the variances between studies, the statistical method "tau-squared" was applied. Statistical models like fixed effect or Mantel-Haenszel, and random effect (REM) or Dersimonian-laird were used for the analysis and integration of results. Rate of glucose testing ranged from 13.1% to 81.9%. Prevalence of pre-diabetes was 3.9%-50.9%. Diabetes was reported in 2.8%-58% of women with history of gestational diabetes based on length of follow-up. Factor associated with postpartum diabetes mellitus included family History of diabetes mellitus, gestational age at diagnosis of GDM, insulin use during pregnancy and pre-pregnancy BMI. Rate of postpartum screening in most of the Asian countries population is sub-optimal, in spite of high rate of glucose intolerance in this high risk group of women. Risk factors of progression to pre-diabetes and diabetes are similar to previous reported in developed countries. Copyright © 2017 Diabetes India. All rights reserved.

  20. Diabetes mellitus and abnormal glucose tolerance development after gestational diabetes: A three-year, prospective, randomized, clinical-based, Mediterranean lifestyle interventional study with parallel groups.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Ferre, Natalia; Del Valle, Laura; Torrejón, Maria José; Barca, Idoya; Calvo, María Isabel; Matía, Pilar; Rubio, Miguel A; Calle-Pascual, Alfonso L

    2015-08-01

    Women with prior gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) have a high risk of developing type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2) in later life. The study aim was to evaluate the efficacy of a lifestyle intervention for the prevention of glucose disorders (impaired fasting glucose, impaired glucose tolerance or DM2) in women with prior GDM. A total of 260 women with prior GDM who presented with normal fasting plasma glucose at six to twelve weeks postpartum were randomized into two groups: a Mediterranean lifestyle intervention group (n = 130) who underwent an educational program on nutrition and a monitored physical activity program and a control group (n = 130) with a conventional follow-up. A total of 237 women completed the three-year follow-up (126 in the intervention group and 111 in the control group). Their glucose disorders rates, clinical and metabolic changes and rates of adherence to the Mediterranean lifestyle were analyzed. Less women in the intervention group (42.8%) developed glucose disorders at the end of the three-year follow-up period compared with the control group (56.75%), p < 0.05. The multivariate analysis indicated a reduction in the rate of glucose disorders with a BMI of less than 27 kg/m(2) (OR 0.28; 0.12-0.65; p < 0.003), low fat intake pattern (OR 0.30; 0.13-0.70; p < 0.005), low saturated fat pattern (OR 0.30; 0.13-0.69; p < 0.005) and healthy fat pattern (OR 0.34; 0.12-0.94; p < 0.04). Lifestyle intervention was effective for the prevention of glucose disorders in women with prior GDM. Body weight gain and an unhealthy fat intake pattern were found to be the most predictive factors for the development of glucose disorders. Current Controlled trials: ISRCTN24165302. http://www.controlled-trials.com/isrctn/pf/24165302. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  1. Cerebral perfusion abnormalities in therapy-resistant epilepsy in childhood: comparison between EEG, MRI and 99Tcm-ECD brain SPET.

    PubMed

    Vattimo, A; Burroni, L; Bertelli, P; Volterrani, D; Vella, A

    1996-01-01

    We performed 99Tcm-ethyl cysteinate dimer (ECD) interictal single photon emission tomography (SPET) in 26 children with severe therapy-resistant epilepsy. All the children underwent a detailed clinical examination, an electroencephalogram (EEG) investigation and brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In 21 of the 26 children, SPET demonstrated brain blood flow abnormalities, in 13 cases in the same territories that showed EEG alterations. MRI showed structural lesions in 6 of the 26 children, while SPET imaging confirmed these abnormalities in only 5 children. The lesion not detected on SPET was shown to be 3 mm thick on MRI. Five symptomatic patients had normal SPET. In one of these patients, the EEG findings were normal and MRI revealed a small calcific nodule (4 mm thick); in the others, the EEG showed non-focal but diffuse abnormalities. These data confirm that brain SPET is sensitive in detecting and localizing hypoperfused areas that could be associated with epileptic foci in this group of patients, even when the MRI image is normal.

  2. A novel SOD mimic with a redox-modulating mn (II) complex, ML1 attenuates high glucose-induced abnormalities in intracellular Ca2+ transients and prevents cardiac cell death through restoration of mitochondrial function.

    PubMed

    Kain, Vasundhara; Sawant, Mithila A; Dasgupta, Aparajita; Jaiswal, Gaurav; Vyas, Alok; Padhye, Subhash; Sitasawad, Sandhya L

    2016-03-01

    A key contributor to the pathophysiology of diabetic cardiomyopathy, mitochondrial superoxide can be adequately countered by Mn-superoxide dismutase, which constitutes the first line of defense against mitochondrial oxidative stress. Our group has recently synthesized low molecular weight SOD mimics, demonstrating superior protection against oxidative damages to kidney cells. In the current study, we sought to evaluate the protective effect of the SOD mimic ML1 against high glucose induced cardiomyopathy in diabetes. Mechanistic studies using rat cardiac myoblast H9c2 showed that ML1 markedly inhibited High Glucose (HG) induced cytotoxicity. This was associated with increased Mn-SOD expression along with decreased mitochondrial [Formula: see text], ONOO- and Ca 2+ accumulation, unveiling its anti-oxidant potentials. ML1 also attenuated HG-induced loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (Δ Ψ m ) and release of cytochrome c, suggesting that ML1 effectuates its cytoprotective action via the preservation of mitochondrial function. In an ex-vivo model normal adult rat ventricular myocytes (ARVMs) were isolated and cultured in either normal glucose (5.5 mmol/l glucose) or HG (25.5 mmol/l glucose) conditions and the efficiency of ML-1 was analyzed by studying contractile function and calcium indices. Mechanical properties were assessed using a high-speed video-edge detection system, and intracellular Ca 2+ transients were recorded in fura-2-loaded myocytes. Pretreatment of myocytes with ML1 (10 nM) ameliorated HG induced abnormalities in relaxation including depressed peak shortening, prolonged time to 90% relenghthening, and slower Ca 2+ transient decay. Thus, ML1 exhibits significant cardio protection against oxidative damage, perhaps through its potent antioxidant action via activation of Mn-SOD.

  3. Abnormal N-Glycosylation of a Novel Missense Creatine Transporter Mutant, G561R, Associated with Cerebral Creatine Deficiency Syndromes Alters Transporter Activity and Localization.

    PubMed

    Uemura, Tatsuki; Ito, Shingo; Ohta, Yusuke; Tachikawa, Masanori; Wada, Takahito; Terasaki, Tetsuya; Ohtsuki, Sumio

    2017-01-01

    Cerebral creatine deficiency syndromes (CCDSs) are caused by loss-of-function mutations in creatine transporter (CRT, SLC6A8), which transports creatine at the blood-brain barrier and into neurons of the central nervous system (CNS). This results in low cerebral creatine levels, and patients exhibit mental retardation, poor language skills and epilepsy. We identified a novel human CRT gene missense mutation (c.1681 G>C, G561R) in Japanese CCDSs patients. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the reduction of creatine transport in G561R-mutant CRT-expressing 293 cells, and to clarify the mechanism of its functional attenuation. G561R-mutant CRT exhibited greatly reduced creatine transport activity compared to wild-type CRT (WT-CRT) when expressed in 293 cells. Also, the mutant protein is localized mainly in intracellular membrane fraction, while WT-CRT is localized in plasma membrane. Western blot analysis revealed a 68 kDa band of WT-CRT protein in plasma membrane fraction, while G561R-mutant CRT protein predominantly showed bands at 55, 110 and 165 kDa in crude membrane fraction. The bands of both WT-CRT and G561R-mutant CRT were shifted to 50 kDa by N-glycosidase treatment. Our results suggest that the functional impairment of G561R-mutant CRT was probably caused by incomplete N-linked glycosylation due to misfolding during protein maturation, leading to oligomer formation and changes of cellular localization.

  4. Impaired embryonic development in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase-deficient Caenorhabditis elegans due to abnormal redox homeostasis induced activation of calcium-independent phospholipase and alteration of glycerophospholipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tzu-Ling; Yang, Hung-Chi; Hung, Cheng-Yu; Ou, Meng-Hsin; Pan, Yi-Yun; Cheng, Mei-Ling; Stern, Arnold; Lo, Szecheng J; Chiu, Daniel Tsun-Yee

    2017-01-12

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is a commonly pervasive inherited disease in many parts of the world. The complete lack of G6PD activity in a mouse model causes embryonic lethality. The G6PD-deficient Caenorhabditis elegans model also shows embryonic death as indicated by a severe hatching defect. Although increased oxidative stress has been implicated in both cases as the underlying cause, the exact mechanism has not been clearly delineated. In this study with C. elegans, membrane-associated defects, including enhanced permeability, defective polarity and cytokinesis, were found in G6PD-deficient embryos. The membrane-associated abnormalities were accompanied by impaired eggshell structure as evidenced by a transmission electron microscopic study. Such loss of membrane structural integrity was associated with abnormal lipid composition as lipidomic analysis revealed that lysoglycerophospholipids were significantly increased in G6PD-deficient embryos. Abnormal glycerophospholipid metabolism leading to defective embryonic development could be attributed to the increased activity of calcium-independent phospholipase A 2 (iPLA) in G6PD-deficient embryos. This notion is further supported by the fact that the suppression of multiple iPLAs by genetic manipulation partially rescued the embryonic defects in G6PD-deficient embryos. In addition, G6PD deficiency induced disruption of redox balance as manifested by diminished NADPH and elevated lipid peroxidation in embryos. Taken together, disrupted lipid metabolism due to abnormal redox homeostasis is a major factor contributing to abnormal embryonic development in G6PD-deficient C. elegans.

  5. BID Mediates Oxygen-Glucose Deprivation-Induced Neuronal Injury in Organotypic Hippocampal Slice Cultures and Modulates Tissue Inflammation in a Transient Focal Cerebral Ischemia Model without Changing Lesion Volume

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Nellie Anne; Bonner, Helena; Elkjær, Maria Louise; D’Orsi, Beatrice; Chen, Gang; König, Hans Georg; Svensson, Martina; Deierborg, Tomas; Pfeiffer, Shona; Prehn, Jochen H.; Lambertsen, Kate Lykke

    2016-01-01

    The BH3 interacting-domain death agonist (BID) is a pro-apoptotic protein involved in death receptor-induced and mitochondria-mediated apoptosis. Recently, it has also been suggested that BID is involved in the regulation of inflammatory responses in the central nervous system. We found that BID deficiency protected organotypic hippocampal slice cultures in vitro from neuronal injury induced by oxygen-glucose deprivation. In vivo, BID-knockout (KO) mice and wild type (WT) mice were subjected to 60 min of transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO) to induce focal cerebral ischemia, and allowed to recover for 24 h. Infarct volumes and functional outcome were assessed and the inflammatory response was evaluated using immunofluorescence, Western blotting, quantitative PCR (qPCR) and Mesoscale multiplex analysis. We observed no difference in the infarct volume or neurological outcome between BID-KO and WT mice. The inflammatory response was reduced by BID deficiency as indicated by a change in microglial/leukocyte response. In conclusion, our data suggest that BID deficiency is neuroprotective in an in vitro model and modulates the inflammatory response to focal cerebral ischemia in vivo. However, this is not translated into a robust neuroprotection in vivo. PMID:26869884

  6. Abnormal white matter tractography of visual pathways detected by high-angular-resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI) corresponds to visual dysfunction in cortical/cerebral visual impairment

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Corinna M.; Heidary, Gena; Koo, Bang-Bon; Killiany, Ronald J.; Bex, Peter; Merabet, Lotfi B.

    2014-01-01

    Cortical (cerebral) visual impairment (CVI) is characterized by visual dysfunction associated with damage to the optic radiations and/or visual cortex. Typically it results from pre- or perinatal hypoxic damage to postchiasmal visual structures and pathways. The neuroanatomical basis of this condition remains poorly understood, particularly with regard to how the resulting maldevelopment of visual processing pathways relates to observations in the clinical setting. We report our investigation of 2 young adults diagnosed with CVI and visual dysfunction characterized by difficulties related to visually guided attention and visuospatial processing. Using high-angular-resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI), we characterized and compared their individual white matter projections of the extrageniculo-striate visual system with a normal-sighted control. Compared to a sighted control, both CVI cases revealed a striking reduction in association fibers, including the inferior frontal-occipital fasciculus as well as superior and inferior longitudinal fasciculi. This reduction in fibers associated with the major pathways implicated in visual processing may provide a neuroanatomical basis for the visual dysfunctions observed in these patients. PMID:25087644

  7. Abnormally phosphorylated tau protein related to the formation of neurofibrillary tangles and neuropil threads in the cerebral cortex of sheep and goat.

    PubMed

    Braak, H; Braak, E; Strothjohann, M

    1994-04-25

    Frontal sections including temporal isocortex, entorhinal region and hippocampus from aged domestic animals (dog, cat, horse, sheep and goat) were studied for Alzheimer-related changes using immunostaining with the AT8 antibody for abnormally phosphorylated tau protein and selective silver techniques for A4 amyloid and neurofibrillary changes of the Alzheimer type. The material available to us did not show A4 amyloid deposits or argyrophilic neurofibrillary changes. Only the brains of aged sheep and goat exhibited the presence of AT8-immunoreactive pyramidal cells in the entorhinal region and hippocampal formation. Two groups of AT8-positive neurons could be observed: The first group contained evenly distributed immunoreactive material in all parts of the soma, the dendrites and the axon. The neuronal processes appeared quite normal. The second group, however, showed conspicuous changes in the cellular processes consisting of a loss of immunoreactivity within the axon and the proximal dendrites and the appearance of intensely stained swellings within the curved distal dendrites. These changes were closely reminiscent to alterations of the cytoskeleton known to occur at the same location in the aging human brain and in Alzheimer's disease. The findings justify a closer look at sheep and goat when searching for suitable animal models for experimental studies of the conditions responsible for the development of Alzheimer-related neurofibrillary changes.

  8. Altered cerebral glucose metabolism normalized in a patient with a pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorder after streptococcal infection (PANDAS)-like condition following treatment with plasmapheresis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Nave, A H; Harmel, P; Buchert, R; Harms, L

    2018-05-02

    Pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorder after streptococcal infection (PANDAS) is a specific autoimmune response to group-A streptococcal infections in children and adolescents with a sudden onset of obsessive-compulsive disorders or tic-like symptoms. Cerebral metabolic changes of patients have not yet been observed. We present a case of an 18-year old male with a PANDAS-like condition after developing tic-like symptoms and involuntary movements three weeks after cardiac surgery. The patient had suffered from pharyngotonsillitis before the symptoms started. The anti-streptolysin O (ASO) titer was elevated (805 kU/l). Antibiotic therapy did not improve his condition. Intravenous immunoglobulins and high-dose cortisone therapy had minor beneficial effects on his involuntary movements. 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/ computer tomography (18F-FDG PET/CT) demonstrated pronounced hypermetabolism of the basal ganglia and cortical hypometabolism. The patient was treated with five cycles of plasmapheresis. A marked clinical improvement was observed after four months. Cerebral metabolic alterations had completely normalized. This is the first report of cerebral metabolic changes observed on FDG-PET/CT in a patient with a PANDAS-like condition with a normalization following immunomodulatory treatment. Cerebral FDG-PET/CT might be a promising tool in the diagnosis of PANDAS.

  9. Glucose Tolerance and Hyperkinesis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langseth, Lillian; Dowd, Judith

    Examined were medical records of 265 hyperkinetic children (7-9 years old). Clinical blood chemistries, hematology, and 5-hour glucose tolerance test (GTT) results indicated that hematocrit levels were low in 27% of the Ss, eosinophil levels were abnormally high in 86% of the Ss, and GTT results were abnormal in a maority of Ss. (CL)

  10. Molecular pathophysiology of cerebral edema

    PubMed Central

    Gerzanich, Volodymyr; Simard, J Marc

    2015-01-01

    Advancements in molecular biology have led to a greater understanding of the individual proteins responsible for generating cerebral edema. In large part, the study of cerebral edema is the study of maladaptive ion transport. Following acute CNS injury, cells of the neurovascular unit, particularly brain endothelial cells and astrocytes, undergo a program of pre- and post-transcriptional changes in the activity of ion channels and transporters. These changes can result in maladaptive ion transport and the generation of abnormal osmotic forces that, ultimately, manifest as cerebral edema. This review discusses past models and current knowledge regarding the molecular and cellular pathophysiology of cerebral edema. PMID:26661240

  11. Evaluation of drug effects on cerebral blood flow and glucose uptake in un-anesthetized and un-stimulated rats: application of free-moving apparatus enabling to keep rats free during PET/SPECT tracer injection and uptake.

    PubMed

    Sugita, Taku; Kondo, Yusuke; Ishino, Seigo; Mori, Ikuo; Horiguchi, Takashi; Ogawa, Mikako; Magata, Yasuhiro

    2018-05-15

    The purpose of this study is the development of novel fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose (F-FDG)-PET and Tc-hexamethylpropylene amine oxime (HMPAO) SPECT methods with free-moving apparatus on conscious rats to investigate brain activity without the effects of anesthesia and tactual stimulation. We also assessed the sensitivity of the experimental system by an intervention study using fluoxetine as a reference drug. A catheter was inserted into the femoral vein and connected to a free-moving cannula system. After fluoxetine administration, the rats were given an injection of F-FDG or Tc-HMPAO via the intravenous cannula and released into a free-moving cage. After the tracer was trapped in the brain, the rats were anesthetized and scanned with PET or SPECT scanners. Then a volume of interest analysis and statistical parametric mapping were performed. We could inject the tracer without touching the rats, while keeping them conscious until the tracers were distributed and trapped in the brain using the developed system. The effects of fluoxetine on glucose uptake and cerebral blood flow were perceptively detected by volume of interest and statistical parametric mapping analysis. We successfully developed free-moving F-FDG-PET and Tc-HMPAO-SPECT imaging systems and detected detailed glucose uptake and cerebral blood flow changes in the conscious rat brain with fluoxetine administration. This system is expected to be useful to assess brain activity without the effects of anesthesia and tactual stimulation to evaluate drug effect or animal brain function.This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives License 4.0 (CCBY-NC-ND), where it is permissible to download and share the work provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be changed in any way or used commercially without permission from the journal. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/.

  12. Monogenic syndromes of abnormal glucose homeostasis: clinical review and relevance to the understanding of the pathology of insulin resistance and ß cell failure

    PubMed Central

    Porter, J; Barrett, T

    2005-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is caused by a combination of insulin resistance and ß cell failure. The polygenic nature of type 2 diabetes has made it difficult to study. Although many candidate genes for this condition have been suggested, in most cases association studies have been equivocal. Monogenic forms of diabetes have now been studied extensively, and the genetic basis of many of these syndromes has been elucidated, leading to greater understanding of the functions of the genes involved. Common variations in the genes causing monogenic disorders have been associated with susceptibility to type 2 diabetes in several populations and explain some of the linkage seen in genome-wide scans. Monogenic disorders are also helpful in understanding both normal and disordered glucose and insulin metabolism. Three main areas of defect contribute to diabetes: defects in insulin signalling leading to insulin resistance; defects of insulin secretion leading to hypoinsulinaemia; and apoptosis leading to decreased ß cell mass. These three pathological pathways are reviewed, focusing on rare genetic syndromes which have diabetes as a prominent feature. Apoptosis seems to be a final common pathway in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Study of rare forms of diabetes may help ion determining new therapeutic targets to preserve or increase ß cell mass and function. PMID:15772126

  13. Quantitative assessment of cerebral glucose metabolic rates after blood-brain barrier disruption induced by focused ultrasound using FDG-MicroPET.

    PubMed

    Yang, Feng-Yi; Chang, Wen-Yuan; Chen, Jyh-Cheng; Lee, Lin-Chien; Hung, Yi-Shun

    2014-04-15

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the pharmacokinetics of (18)F-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose ((18)F-FDG) and the expression of glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1) protein after blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption of normal rat brains by focused ultrasound (FUS). After delivery of an intravenous bolus of ~37 MBq (1 mCi) (18)F-FDG, dynamic positron emission tomography scans were performed on rats with normal brains and those whose BBBs had been disrupted by FUS. Arterial blood sampling was collected throughout the scanning procedure. A 2-tissue compartmental model was used to estimate (18)F-FDG kinetic parameters in brain tissues. The rate constants Ki, K1, and k3 were assumed to characterize the uptake, transport, and hexokinase activity, respectively, of (18)F-FDG. The uptake of (18)F-FDG in brains significantly decreased immediately after the blood-brain barrier was disrupted. At the same time, the derived values of Ki, K1, and k3 for the sonicated brains were significantly lower than those for the control brains. In agreement with the reduction in glucose, Western blot analyses confirmed that focused ultrasound exposure significantly reduced the expression of GLUT1 protein in the brains. Furthermore, the effect of focused ultrasound on glucose uptake was transient and reversible 24h after sonication. Our results indicate that focused ultrasound may inhibit GLUT1 expression to decrease the glucose uptake in brain tissue during the period of BBB disruption. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Reduction in cardiolipin decreases mitochondrial spare respiratory capacity and increases glucose transport into and across human brain cerebral microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Hieu M; Mejia, Edgard M; Chang, Wenguang; Wang, Ying; Watson, Emily; On, Ngoc; Miller, Donald W; Hatch, Grant M

    2016-10-01

    Microvessel endothelial cells form part of the blood-brain barrier, a restrictively permeable interface that allows transport of only specific compounds into the brain. Cardiolipin is a mitochondrial phospholipid required for function of the electron transport chain and ATP generation. We examined the role of cardiolipin in maintaining mitochondrial function necessary to support barrier properties of brain microvessel endothelial cells. Knockdown of the terminal enzyme of cardiolipin synthesis, cardiolipin synthase, in hCMEC/D3 cells resulted in decreased cellular cardiolipin levels compared to controls. The reduction in cardiolipin resulted in decreased mitochondrial spare respiratory capacity, increased pyruvate kinase activity, and increased 2-deoxy-[(3) H]glucose uptake and glucose transporter-1 expression and localization to membranes in hCMEC/D3 cells compared to controls. The mechanism for the increase in glucose uptake was an increase in adenosine-5'-monophosphate kinase and protein kinase B activity and decreased glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta activity. Knockdown of cardiolipin synthase did not affect permeability of fluorescent dextran across confluent hCMEC/D3 monolayers grown on Transwell(®) inserts. In contrast, knockdown of cardiolipin synthase resulted in an increase in 2-deoxy-[(3) H]glucose transport across these monolayers compared to controls. The data indicate that in hCMEC/D3 cells, spare respiratory capacity is dependent on cardiolipin. In addition, reduction in cardiolipin in these cells alters their cellular energy status and this results in increased glucose transport into and across hCMEC/D3 monolayers. Microvessel endothelial cells form part of the blood-brain barrier, a restrictively permeable interface that allows transport of only specific compounds into the brain. In human adult brain endothelial cell hCMEC/D3 monolayers cultured on Transwell(®) plates, knockdown of cardiolipin synthase results in decrease in mitochondrial

  15. Resistance training in the treatment of the metabolic syndrome: a systematic review and meta-analysis of the effect of resistance training on metabolic clustering in patients with abnormal glucose metabolism.

    PubMed

    Strasser, Barbara; Siebert, Uwe; Schobersberger, Wolfgang

    2010-05-01

    Over the last decade, investigators have given increased attention to the effects of resistance training (RT) on several metabolic syndrome variables. The metabolic consequences of reduced muscle mass, as a result of normal aging or decreased physical activity, lead to a high prevalence of metabolic disorders. The purpose of this review is: (i) to perform a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) regarding the effect of RT on obesity-related impaired glucose tolerance and type 2 diabetes mellitus; and (ii) to investigate the existence of a dose-response relationship between intensity, duration and frequency of RT and the metabolic clustering. Thirteen RCTs were identified through a systematic literature search in MEDLINE ranging from January 1990 to September 2007. We included all RCTs comparing RT with a control group in patients with abnormal glucose regulation. For data analysis, we performed random effects meta-analyses to determine weighted mean differences (WMD) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for each endpoint. All data were analysed with the software package Review Manager 4.2.10 of the Cochrane Collaboration. In the 13 RCTs included in our analysis, RT reduced glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA(1c)) by 0.48% (95% CI -0.76, -0.21; p = 0.0005), fat mass by 2.33 kg (95% CI -4.71, 0.04; p = 0.05) and systolic blood pressure by 6.19 mmHg (95% CI 1.00, 11.38; p = 0.02). There was no statistically significant effect of RT on total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglyceride and diastolic blood pressure. Based on our meta-analysis, RT has a clinically and statistically significant effect on metabolic syndrome risk factors such as obesity, HbA(1c) levels and systolic blood pressure, and therefore should be recommended in the management of type 2 diabetes and metabolic disorders.

  16. Meiotic abnormalities

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 19, describes meiotic abnormalities. These include nondisjunction of autosomes and sex chromosomes, genetic and environmental causes of nondisjunction, misdivision of the centromere, chromosomally abnormal human sperm, male infertility, parental age, and origin of diploid gametes. 57 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Cerebral glucose uptake in patients with chronic mental and cognitive sequelae following a single blunt mild TBI without visible brain lesions.

    PubMed

    Komura, Akifumi; Kawasaki, Tomohiro; Yamada, Yuichi; Uzuyama, Shiho; Asano, Yoshitaka; Shinoda, Jun

    2018-06-19

    The aim of this study is to investigate glucose uptake on FDG-PET in patients with chronic mental and cognitive symptoms following a single blunt mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) and without visible brain lesions on CT/MRI. Eighty-nine consecutive patients (mean age 43.8±10.75) who had a single blunt mild TBI from a traffic accident and suffering from chronic mental and cognitive symptoms without visible brain lesions on CT/MRI were enrolled in the study. Patients underwent FDG-PET imaging, and the mean interval between the TBI and FDG-PET was 50.0 months. The Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale version III testing was performed within one month of the FDG-PET. A control group consisting of 93 healthy adult volunteers (mean age 42.2±14.3 years) also underwent FDG-PET. The glucose uptake pattern from FDG-PET in the patient group was compared to that from normal controls using statistical parametric mapping. Glucose uptake was significantly decreased in the bilateral prefrontal area and significantly increased around the limbic system in the patient group compared to normal controls. This topographical pattern of glucose uptake is different from that reported previously in patients with diffuse axonal injury (DAI), but may be similar to that seen in patients with major depression disorder. These results suggest that the pathological mechanism causing chronic mental and cognitive symptoms in patients with a single blunt mild TBI and without visible brain lesions might be different from that due to primary axonopathy in patients with DAI.

  18. Neurologic abnormalities in murderers.

    PubMed

    Blake, P Y; Pincus, J H; Buckner, C

    1995-09-01

    Thirty-one individuals awaiting trial or sentencing for murder or undergoing an appeal process requested a neurologic examination through legal counsel. We attempted in each instance to obtain EEG, MRI or CT, and neuropsychological testing. Neurologic examination revealed evidence of "frontal" dysfunction in 20 (64.5%). There were symptoms or some other evidence of temporal lobe abnormality in nine (29%). We made a specific neurologic diagnosis in 20 individuals (64.5%), including borderline or full mental retardation (9) and cerebral palsy (2), among others. Neuropsychological testing revealed abnormalities in all subjects tested. There were EEG abnormalities in eight of the 20 subjects tested, consisting mainly of bilateral sharp waves with slowing. There were MRI or CT abnormalities in nine of the 19 subjects tested, consisting primarily of atrophy and white matter changes. Psychiatric diagnoses included paranoid schizophrenia (8), dissociative disorder (4), and depression (9). Virtually all subjects had paranoid ideas and misunderstood social situations. There was a documented history of profound, protracted physical abuse in 26 (83.8%) and of sexual abuse in 10 (32.3%). It is likely that prolonged, severe physical abuse, paranoia, and neurologic brain dysfunction interact to form the matrix of violent behavior.

  19. Cerebral Palsy

    MedlinePlus

    Cerebral palsy is a group of disorders that affect a person's ability to move and to maintain balance ... do not get worse over time. People with cerebral palsy may have difficulty walking. They may also have ...

  20. Cerebral aneurysm

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    The tissue of the brain is supplied by a network of cerebral arteries. If the wall of a cerebral artery becomes weakened, a portion of the wall may balloon out forming an aneurysm. A cerebral aneurysm may enlarge until it bursts, sending blood ...

  1. Towards quantitative [18F]FDG-PET/MRI of the brain: Automated MR-driven calculation of an image-derived input function for the non-invasive determination of cerebral glucose metabolic rates.

    PubMed

    Sundar, Lalith Ks; Muzik, Otto; Rischka, Lucas; Hahn, Andreas; Rausch, Ivo; Lanzenberger, Rupert; Hienert, Marius; Klebermass, Eva-Maria; Füchsel, Frank-Günther; Hacker, Marcus; Pilz, Magdalena; Pataraia, Ekaterina; Traub-Weidinger, Tatjana; Beyer, Thomas

    2018-01-01

    Absolute quantification of PET brain imaging requires the measurement of an arterial input function (AIF), typically obtained invasively via an arterial cannulation. We present an approach to automatically calculate an image-derived input function (IDIF) and cerebral metabolic rates of glucose (CMRGlc) from the [18F]FDG PET data using an integrated PET/MRI system. Ten healthy controls underwent test-retest dynamic [18F]FDG-PET/MRI examinations. The imaging protocol consisted of a 60-min PET list-mode acquisition together with a time-of-flight MR angiography scan for segmenting the carotid arteries and intermittent MR navigators to monitor subject movement. AIFs were collected as the reference standard. Attenuation correction was performed using a separate low-dose CT scan. Assessment of the percentage difference between area-under-the-curve of IDIF and AIF yielded values within ±5%. Similar test-retest variability was seen between AIFs (9 ± 8) % and the IDIFs (9 ± 7) %. Absolute percentage difference between CMRGlc values obtained from AIF and IDIF across all examinations and selected brain regions was 3.2% (interquartile range: (2.4-4.3) %, maximum < 10%). High test-retest intravariability was observed between CMRGlc values obtained from AIF (14%) and IDIF (17%). The proposed approach provides an IDIF, which can be effectively used in lieu of AIF.

  2. Congenital Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... tube defects. However, there is also a genetic influence to this type of congenital anomaly. Unknown Causes The vast majority of congenital abnormalities have no known cause. This is particularly troubling for parents who plan to have more children, because there is no way to predict if ...

  3. [Advances in genetic research of cerebral palsy].

    PubMed

    Wang, Fang-Fang; Luo, Rong; Qu, Yi; Mu, De-Zhi

    2017-09-01

    Cerebral palsy is a group of syndromes caused by non-progressive brain injury in the fetus or infant and can cause disabilities in childhood. Etiology of cerebral palsy has always been a hot topic for clinical scientists. More and more studies have shown that genetic factors are closely associated with the development of cerebral palsy. With the development and application of various molecular and biological techniques such as chromosome microarray analysis, genome-wide association study, and whole exome sequencing, new achievements have been made in the genetic research of cerebral palsy. Chromosome abnormalities, copy number variations, susceptibility genes, and single gene mutation associated with the development of cerebral palsy have been identified, which provides new opportunities for the research on the pathogenesis of cerebral palsy. This article reviews the advances in the genetic research on cerebral palsy in recent years.

  4. Glucose metabolism in the developing brain.

    PubMed

    Vannucci, R C; Vannucci, S J

    2000-04-01

    As in adults, glucose is the predominant cerebral energy fuel for the fetus and newborn. Studies in experimental animals and humans indicate that cerebral glucose utilization initially is low and increases with maturation with increasing regional heterogeneity. The increases in cerebral glucose utilization with advancing age occurs as a consequence of increasing functional activity and cerebral energy demands. The levels of expression of the 2 primary facilitative glucose transporter proteins in brain, GLUT1 (blood-brain barrier and glia) and GLUT3 (neuronal), display a similar maturational pattern. Alternate cerebral energy fuels, specifically the ketone bodies and lactate, can substitute for glucose, especially during hypoglycemia, thereby protecting the immature brain from potential untoward effects of hypoglycemia. Unlike adults, glucose supplementation during hypoxia-ischemia is protective in the immature brain, whereas hypoglycemia is deleterious. Accordingly, glucose plays a critical role in the developing brain, not only as the primary substrate for energy production but also to allow for normal biosynthetic processes to proceed.

  5. Cerebral Atrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Alzheimer’s disease, Pick’s disease, and fronto-temporal dementia cerebral palsy , in which lesions (damaged areas) may impair motor ... Alzheimer’s disease, Pick’s disease, and fronto-temporal dementia cerebral palsy , in which lesions (damaged areas) may impair motor ...

  6. Effects of Insulin on Brain Glucose Metabolism in Impaired Glucose Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Hirvonen, Jussi; Virtanen, Kirsi A.; Nummenmaa, Lauri; Hannukainen, Jarna C.; Honka, Miikka-Juhani; Bucci, Marco; Nesterov, Sergey V.; Parkkola, Riitta; Rinne, Juha; Iozzo, Patricia; Nuutila, Pirjo

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Insulin stimulates brain glucose metabolism, but this effect of insulin is already maximal at fasting concentrations in healthy subjects. It is not known whether insulin is able to stimulate glucose metabolism above fasting concentrations in patients with impaired glucose tolerance. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We studied the effects of insulin on brain glucose metabolism and cerebral blood flow in 13 patients with impaired glucose tolerance and nine healthy subjects using positron emission tomography (PET). All subjects underwent PET with both [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose (for brain glucose metabolism) and [15O]H2O (for cerebral blood flow) in two separate conditions (in the fasting state and during a euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp). Arterial blood samples were acquired during the PET scans to allow fully quantitative modeling. RESULTS The hyperinsulinemic clamp increased brain glucose metabolism only in patients with impaired glucose tolerance (whole brain: +18%, P = 0.001) but not in healthy subjects (whole brain: +3.9%, P = 0.373). The hyperinsulinemic clamp did not alter cerebral blood flow in either group. CONCLUSIONS We found that insulin stimulates brain glucose metabolism at physiological postprandial levels in patients with impaired glucose tolerance but not in healthy subjects. These results suggest that insulin stimulation of brain glucose metabolism is maximal at fasting concentrations in healthy subjects but not in patients with impaired glucose tolerance. PMID:21270256

  7. Abnormal placentation.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Samuel T; Bonanno, Clarissa

    2009-04-01

    Abnormal placentation poses a diagnostic and treatment challenge for all providers caring for pregnant women. As one of the leading causes of postpartum hemorrhage, abnormal placentation involves the attachment of placental villi directly to the myometrium with potentially deeper invasion into the uterine wall or surrounding organs. Surgical procedures that disrupt the integrity of uterus, including cesarean section, dilatation and curettage, and myomectomy, have been implicated as key risk factors for placenta accreta. The diagnosis is typically made by gray-scale ultrasound and confirmed with magnetic resonance imaging, which may better delineate the extent of placental invasion. It is critical to make the diagnosis before delivery because preoperative planning can significantly decrease blood loss and avoid substantial morbidity associated with placenta accreta. Aggressive management of hemorrhage through the use of uterotonics, fluid resuscitation, blood products, planned hysterectomy, and surgical hemostatic agents can be life-saving for these patients. Conservative management, including the use of uterine and placental preservation and subsequent methotrexate therapy or pelvic artery embolization, may be considered when a focal accreta is suspected; however, surgical management remains the current standard of care.

  8. Cerebral metabolic dysfunction and impaired vigilance in recently abstinent methamphetamine abusers.

    PubMed

    London, Edythe D; Berman, Steven M; Voytek, Bradley; Simon, Sara L; Mandelkern, Mark A; Monterosso, John; Thompson, Paul M; Brody, Arthur L; Geaga, Jennifer A; Hong, Michael S; Hayashi, Kiralee M; Rawson, Richard A; Ling, Walter

    2005-11-15

    Methamphetamine (MA) abusers have cognitive deficits, abnormal metabolic activity and structural deficits in limbic and paralimbic cortices, and reduced hippocampal volume. The links between cognitive impairment and these cerebral abnormalities are not established. We assessed cerebral glucose metabolism with [F-18]fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography in 17 abstinent (4 to 7 days) methamphetamine users and 16 control subjects performing an auditory vigilance task and obtained structural magnetic resonance brain scans. Regional brain radioactivity served as a marker for relative glucose metabolism. Error rates on the task were related to regional radioactivity and hippocampal morphology. Methamphetamine users had higher error rates than control subjects on the vigilance task. The groups showed different relationships between error rates and relative activity in the anterior and middle cingulate gyrus and the insula. Whereas the MA user group showed negative correlations involving these regions, the control group showed positive correlations involving the cingulate cortex. Across groups, hippocampal metabolic and structural measures were negatively correlated with error rates. Dysfunction in the cingulate and insular cortices of recently abstinent MA abusers contribute to impaired vigilance and other cognitive functions requiring sustained attention. Hippocampal integrity predicts task performance in methamphetamine users as well as control subjects.

  9. Blood-Brain Glucose Transfer: Repression in Chronic Hyperglycemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gjedde, Albert; Crone, Christian

    1981-10-01

    Diabetic patients with increased plasma glucose concentrations may develop cerebral symptoms of hypoglycemia when their plasma glucose is rapidly lowered to normal concentrations. The symptoms may indicate insufficient transport of glucose from blood to brain. In rats with chronic hyperglycemia the maximum glucose transport capacity of the blood-brain barrier decreased from 400 to 290 micromoles per 100 grams per minute. When plasma glucose was lowered to normal values, the glucose transport rate into brain was 20 percent below normal. This suggests that repressive changes of the glucose transport mechanism occur in brain endothelial cells in response to increased plasma glucose.

  10. [Research on brain white matter network in cerebral palsy infant].

    PubMed

    Li, Jun; Yang, Cheng; Wang, Yuanjun; Nie, Shengdong

    2017-10-01

    Present study used diffusion tensor image and tractography to construct brain white matter networks of 15 cerebral palsy infants and 30 healthy infants that matched for age and gender. After white matter network analysis, we found that both cerebral palsy and healthy infants had a small-world topology in white matter network, but cerebral palsy infants exhibited abnormal topological organization: increased shortest path length but decreased normalize clustering coefficient, global efficiency and local efficiency. Furthermore, we also found that white matter network hub regions were located in the left cuneus, precuneus, and left posterior cingulate gyrus. However, some abnormal nodes existed in the frontal, temporal, occipital and parietal lobes of cerebral palsy infants. These results indicated that the white matter networks for cerebral palsy infants were disrupted, which was consistent with previous studies about the abnormal brain white matter areas. This work could help us further study the pathogenesis of cerebral palsy infants.

  11. Cerebral Palsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... her strength. Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Cerebral palsy (CP) is a group of disorders that affect a ... ability to move and maintain balance and posture. CP is the most common motor disability in childhood. ...

  12. Cerebral palsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Map FAQs Customer Support Health Topics Drugs & Supplements Videos & Tools Español You Are Here: Home → Medical Encyclopedia → Cerebral palsy URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/ ...

  13. Cerebral metabolic intermediate response following severe canine intrauterine growth retardation.

    PubMed

    Kliegman, R M

    1986-07-01

    The effect of intrauterine growth retardation and neonatal hypoglycemia on cerebral metabolic intermediates were determined in newborn dogs subjected to 5 days of maternal canine starvation (MCS) before birth. Birth weight was reduced 23% (232 +/- 6 versus 300 +/- 10 g). Circulating blood glucose was reduced after 3 h of neonatal fasting in MCS pups (2.7 +/- 0.4 +/- versus 5.7 +/- 1.1 mM). Cerebral cortical levels of glucose were also reduced at this time. Cerebral glucose-6-phosphate was not altered; nonetheless fructose-6-phosphate was lower in MCS pups at 6 and 9 h, while fructose 1,6-diphosphate appeared elevated at 3 h. These data suggest that cerebral glycolytic activity may be increased by increased activity of phosphofructokinase. Cerebral glutamine appeared reduced in fasting MCS pups at 3, 6, and 8 h of age. A considerable disturbance of the adenine nucleotide pool was noted between 3-9 h in MCS pups; while the cerebral energy reserve was diminished in MCS pups between 3-24 h. The data of reduced cerebral energy status and reserve suggest that cerebral energy production was diminished. Although glucose levels were low at 3 h, subsequent recovery was not immediate as adenine-nucleotides remained low beyond the period of hypoglycemia. The combined effects of intrauterine growth retardation and transient neonatal hypoglycemia appear to result in reduced cerebral oxidative metabolism; this occurs despite an apparent enhanced utilization of alternate fuels.

  14. Cerebral Gluconeogenesis and Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Yip, James; Geng, Xiaokun; Shen, Jiamei; Ding, Yuchuan

    2017-01-01

    The gluconeogenesis pathway, which has been known to normally present in the liver, kidney, intestine, or muscle, has four irreversible steps catalyzed by the enzymes: pyruvate carboxylase, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, fructose 1,6-bisphosphatase, and glucose 6-phosphatase. Studies have also demonstrated evidence that gluconeogenesis exists in brain astrocytes but no convincing data have yet been found in neurons. Astrocytes exhibit significant 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase-3 activity, a key mechanism for regulating glycolysis and gluconeogenesis. Astrocytes are unique in that they use glycolysis to produce lactate, which is then shuttled into neurons and used as gluconeogenic precursors for reduction. This gluconeogenesis pathway found in astrocytes is becoming more recognized as an important alternative glucose source for neurons, specifically in ischemic stroke and brain tumor. Further studies are needed to discover how the gluconeogenesis pathway is controlled in the brain, which may lead to the development of therapeutic targets to control energy levels and cellular survival in ischemic stroke patients, or inhibit gluconeogenesis in brain tumors to promote malignant cell death and tumor regression. While there are extensive studies on the mechanisms of cerebral glycolysis in ischemic stroke and brain tumors, studies on cerebral gluconeogenesis are limited. Here, we review studies done to date regarding gluconeogenesis to evaluate whether this metabolic pathway is beneficial or detrimental to the brain under these pathological conditions. PMID:28101056

  15. Cerebral Gluconeogenesis and Diseases.

    PubMed

    Yip, James; Geng, Xiaokun; Shen, Jiamei; Ding, Yuchuan

    2016-01-01

    The gluconeogenesis pathway, which has been known to normally present in the liver, kidney, intestine, or muscle, has four irreversible steps catalyzed by the enzymes: pyruvate carboxylase, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, fructose 1,6-bisphosphatase, and glucose 6-phosphatase. Studies have also demonstrated evidence that gluconeogenesis exists in brain astrocytes but no convincing data have yet been found in neurons. Astrocytes exhibit significant 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase-3 activity, a key mechanism for regulating glycolysis and gluconeogenesis. Astrocytes are unique in that they use glycolysis to produce lactate, which is then shuttled into neurons and used as gluconeogenic precursors for reduction. This gluconeogenesis pathway found in astrocytes is becoming more recognized as an important alternative glucose source for neurons, specifically in ischemic stroke and brain tumor. Further studies are needed to discover how the gluconeogenesis pathway is controlled in the brain, which may lead to the development of therapeutic targets to control energy levels and cellular survival in ischemic stroke patients, or inhibit gluconeogenesis in brain tumors to promote malignant cell death and tumor regression. While there are extensive studies on the mechanisms of cerebral glycolysis in ischemic stroke and brain tumors, studies on cerebral gluconeogenesis are limited. Here, we review studies done to date regarding gluconeogenesis to evaluate whether this metabolic pathway is beneficial or detrimental to the brain under these pathological conditions.

  16. Evidence for brain glucose dysregulation in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    An, Yang; Varma, Vijay R; Varma, Sudhir; Casanova, Ramon; Dammer, Eric; Pletnikova, Olga; Chia, Chee W; Egan, Josephine M; Ferrucci, Luigi; Troncoso, Juan; Levey, Allan I; Lah, James; Seyfried, Nicholas T; Legido-Quigley, Cristina; O'Brien, Richard; Thambisetty, Madhav

    2018-03-01

    It is unclear whether abnormalities in brain glucose homeostasis are associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis. Within the autopsy cohort of the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging, we measured brain glucose concentration and assessed the ratios of the glycolytic amino acids, serine, glycine, and alanine to glucose. We also quantified protein levels of the neuronal (GLUT3) and astrocytic (GLUT1) glucose transporters. Finally, we assessed the relationships between plasma glucose measured before death and brain tissue glucose. Higher brain tissue glucose concentration, reduced glycolytic flux, and lower GLUT3 are related to severity of AD pathology and the expression of AD symptoms. Longitudinal increases in fasting plasma glucose levels are associated with higher brain tissue glucose concentrations. Impaired glucose metabolism due to reduced glycolytic flux may be intrinsic to AD pathogenesis. Abnormalities in brain glucose homeostasis may begin several years before the onset of clinical symptoms. Copyright © 2017 the Alzheimer's Association. All rights reserved.

  17. [Cerebral protection].

    PubMed

    Cattaneo, A D

    1993-09-01

    Cerebral protection means prevention of cerebral neuronal damage. Severe brain damage extinguishes the very "human" functions such as speech, consciousness, intellectual capacity, and emotional integrity. Many pathologic conditions may inflict injuries to the brain, therefore the protection and salvage of cerebral neuronal function must be the top priorities in the care of critically ill patients. Brain tissue has unusually high energy requirements, its stores of energy metabolites are small and, as a result, the brain is totally dependent on a continuous supply of substrates and oxygen, via the circulation. In complete global ischemia (cardiac arrest) reperfusion is characterized by an immediate reactive hyperemia followed within 20-30 min by a delayed hypoperfusion state. It has been postulated that the latter contributes to the ultimate neurologic outcome. In focal ischemia (stroke) the primary focus of necrosis is encircled by an area (ischemic penumbra) that is underperfused and contains neurotoxic substances such as free radicals, prostaglandins, calcium, and excitatory neurotransmitters. The variety of therapeutic effort that have addressed the question of protecting the brain reflects their limited success. 1) Barbiturates. After an initial enthusiastic endorsement by many clinicians and years of vigorous controversy, it can now be unequivocally stated that there is no place for barbiturate therapy following resuscitation from cardiac arrest. One presumed explanation for this negative statement is that cerebral metabolic suppression by barbiturates (and other anesthetics) is impossible in the absence of an active EEG. Conversely, in the event of incomplete ischemia EEG activity in usually present (albeit altered) and metabolic suppression and hence possibly protection can be induced with barbiturates. Indeed, most of the animal studies led to a number of recommendations for barbiturate therapy in man for incomplete ischemia. 2) Isoflurane. From a cerebral

  18. Cerebral ketone body metabolism.

    PubMed

    Morris, A A M

    2005-01-01

    Ketone bodies (KBs) are an important source of energy for the brain. During the neonatal period, they are also precursors for the synthesis of lipids (especially cholesterol) and amino acids. The rate of cerebral KB metabolism depends primarily on the concentration in blood; high concentrations occur during fasting and on a high-fat diet. Cerebral KB metabolism is also regulated by the permeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), which depends on the abundance of monocarboxylic acid transporters (MCT1). The BBB's permeability to KBs increases with fasting in humans. In rats, permeability increases during the suckling period, but human neonates have not been studied. Monocarboxylic acid transporters are also present in the plasma membranes of neurons and glia but their role in regulating KB metabolism is uncertain. Finally, the rate of cerebral KB metabolism depends on the activities of the relevant enzymes in brain. The activities vary with age in rats, but reliable results are not available for humans. Cerebral KB metabolism in humans differs from that in the rat in several respects. During fasting, for example, KBs supply more of the brain's energy in humans than in the rat. Conversely, KBs are probably used more extensively in the brain of suckling rats than in human neonates. These differences complicate the interpretation of rodent studies. Most patients with inborn errors of ketogenesis develop normally, suggesting that the only essential role for KBs is as an alternative fuel during illness or prolonged fasting. On the other hand, in HMG-CoA lyase deficiency, imaging generally shows asymptomatic white-matter abnormalities. The ability of KBs to act as an alternative fuel explains the effectiveness of the ketogenic diet in GLUT1 deficiency, but its effectiveness in epilepsy remains unexplained.

  19. Sotos syndrome (cerebral gigantism): analysis of 8 cases.

    PubMed

    Melo, Débora Gusmão; Acosta, Angelina Xavier; Salles, Maria Aparecida de Almeida; Pina-Neto, João Monteiro de; Castro, José Daniel Vieira de; Santos, Antonio Carlos

    2002-06-01

    Sotos syndrome or cerebral gigantism is characterized by macrocephaly, overgrowth, mental retardation and central nervous system abnormalities. Congenital heart defects may be present. We report 8 patients with this syndrome and relate their clinical features, neuroimaging and echocardiographic findings.

  20. Glucose Metabolic Profile by Visual Assessment Combined with Statistical Parametric Mapping Analysis in Pediatric Patients with Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yuankai; Feng, Jianhua; Wu, Shuang; Hou, Haifeng; Ji, Jianfeng; Zhang, Kai; Chen, Qing; Chen, Lin; Cheng, Haiying; Gao, Liuyan; Chen, Zexin; Zhang, Hong; Tian, Mei

    2017-08-01

    PET with 18 F-FDG has been used for presurgical localization of epileptogenic foci; however, in nonsurgical patients, the correlation between cerebral glucose metabolism and clinical severity has not been fully understood. The aim of this study was to evaluate the glucose metabolic profile using 18 F-FDG PET/CT imaging in patients with epilepsy. Methods: One hundred pediatric epilepsy patients who underwent 18 F-FDG PET/CT, MRI, and electroencephalography examinations were included. Fifteen age-matched controls were also included. 18 F-FDG PET images were analyzed by visual assessment combined with statistical parametric mapping (SPM) analysis. The absolute asymmetry index (|AI|) was calculated in patients with regional abnormal glucose metabolism. Results: Visual assessment combined with SPM analysis of 18 F-FDG PET images detected more patients with abnormal glucose metabolism than visual assessment only. The |AI| significantly positively correlated with seizure frequency ( P < 0.01) but negatively correlated with the time since last seizure ( P < 0.01) in patients with abnormal glucose metabolism. The only significant contributing variable to the |AI| was the time since last seizure, in patients both with hypometabolism ( P = 0.001) and with hypermetabolism ( P = 0.005). For patients with either hypometabolism ( P < 0.01) or hypermetabolism ( P = 0.209), higher |AI| values were found in those with drug resistance than with seizure remission. In the post-1-y follow-up PET studies, a significant change of |AI| (%) was found in patients with clinical improvement compared with those with persistence or progression ( P < 0.01). Conclusion: 18 F-FDG PET imaging with visual assessment combined with SPM analysis could provide cerebral glucose metabolic profiles in nonsurgical epilepsy patients. |AI| might be used for evaluation of clinical severity and progress in these patients. Patients with a prolonged period of seizure freedom may have more subtle (or no) metabolic

  1. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding FAQ

    MedlinePlus

    ... Abnormal Uterine Bleeding • What is a normal menstrual cycle? • When is bleeding abnormal? • At what ages is ... abnormal bleeding? •Glossary What is a normal menstrual cycle? The normal length of the menstrual cycle is ...

  2. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding

    MedlinePlus

    ... abnormal uterine bleeding? Abnormal uterine bleeding is any heavy or unusual bleeding from the uterus (through your ... one symptom of abnormal uterine bleeding. Having extremely heavy bleeding during your period can also be considered ...

  3. Cerebral Palsy (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Cerebral Palsy KidsHealth / For Parents / Cerebral Palsy What's in this ... Ahead Print en español Parálisis cerebral What Is Cerebral Palsy? Cerebral palsy (CP) is a disorder that affects ...

  4. Cerebral gigantism (Sotos' syndrome) and cataracts.

    PubMed

    Yeh, H; Price, R L; Lonsdale, D

    1978-01-01

    A five-year-old girl with cerebral gigantism (Sotos' syndrome) and cataracts is described. Sotos' syndrome, characterized by generalized gigantism with normal endocrine studies has rarely been reported with ocular abnormalities and never with cataracts. It is important to study any child with cataracts for systemic disease.

  5. Pathophysiology of dysarthria in cerebral palsy.

    PubMed Central

    Neilson, P D; O'Dwyer, N J

    1981-01-01

    Electromyograms were recorded with hooked-wire electrodes from sixteen lip, tongue and jaw muscles in six normal and seven cerebral palsied adult subjects during a variety of speech and non-speech tasks. The recorded patterns of muscle activity fail to support a number of theories concerning the pathophysiology of dysarthria in cerebral palsy. There was no indication of weakness in individual articulator muscles. There was no evidence of uncontrolled sustained background activity or of abnormal tonic stretch reflex responses in lip or tongue muscles. Primitive or pathological reflexes could not be elicited by orofacial stimulation. No imbalance between positive and negative oral responses was observed. The view that random involuntary movement disrupts essentially normal voluntary control in athetosis was not supported. Each cerebral palsied subject displayed an idiosyncratic pattern of abnormal muscle activity which was reproduced across repetitions of the same phrase, indicating a consistent defect in motor programming. PMID:7334387

  6. Investigating cerebral oedema using poroelasticity.

    PubMed

    Vardakis, John C; Chou, Dean; Tully, Brett J; Hung, Chang C; Lee, Tsong H; Tsui, Po-Hsiang; Ventikos, Yiannis

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral oedema can be classified as the tangible swelling produced by expansion of the interstitial fluid volume. Hydrocephalus can be succinctly described as the abnormal accumulation of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) within the brain which ultimately leads to oedema within specific sites of parenchymal tissue. Using hydrocephalus as a test bed, one is able to account for the necessary mechanisms involved in the interaction between oedema formation and cerebral fluid production, transport and drainage. The current state of knowledge about integrative cerebral dynamics and transport phenomena indicates that poroelastic theory may provide a suitable framework to better understand various diseases. In this work, Multiple-Network Poroelastic Theory (MPET) is used to develop a novel spatio-temporal model of fluid regulation and tissue displacement within the various scales of the cerebral environment. The model is applied through two formats, a one-dimensional finite difference - Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) coupling framework, as well as a two-dimensional Finite Element Method (FEM) formulation. These are used to investigate the role of endoscopic fourth ventriculostomy in alleviating oedema formation due to fourth ventricle outlet obstruction (1D coupled model) in addition to observing the capability of the FEM template in capturing important characteristics allied to oedema formation, like for instance in the periventricular region (2D model). Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  7. Ketosis proportionately spares glucose utilization in brain

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yifan; Kuang, Youzhi; Xu, Kui; Harris, Donald; Lee, Zhenghong; LaManna, Joseph; Puchowicz, Michelle A

    2013-01-01

    The brain is dependent on glucose as a primary energy substrate, but is capable of utilizing ketones such as β-hydroxybutyrate and acetoacetate, as occurs with fasting, starvation, or chronic feeding of a ketogenic diet. The relationship between changes in cerebral metabolic rates of glucose (CMRglc) and degree or duration of ketosis remains uncertain. To investigate if CMRglc decreases with chronic ketosis, 2-[18F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose in combination with positron emission tomography, was applied in anesthetized young adult rats fed 3 weeks of either standard or ketogenic diets. Cerebral metabolic rates of glucose (μmol/min per 100 g) was determined in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum using Gjedde–Patlak analysis. The average CMRglc significantly decreased in the cerebral cortex (23.0±4.9 versus 32.9±4.7) and cerebellum (29.3±8.6 versus 41.2±6.4) with increased plasma ketone bodies in the ketotic rats compared with standard diet group. The reduction of CMRglc in both brain regions correlates linearly by ∼9% for each 1 mmol/L increase of total plasma ketone bodies (0.3 to 6.3 mmol/L). Together with our meta-analysis, these data revealed that the degree and duration of ketosis has a major role in determining the corresponding change in CMRglc with ketosis. PMID:23736643

  8. Ketosis proportionately spares glucose utilization in brain.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yifan; Kuang, Youzhi; Xu, Kui; Harris, Donald; Lee, Zhenghong; LaManna, Joseph; Puchowicz, Michelle A

    2013-08-01

    The brain is dependent on glucose as a primary energy substrate, but is capable of utilizing ketones such as β-hydroxybutyrate and acetoacetate, as occurs with fasting, starvation, or chronic feeding of a ketogenic diet. The relationship between changes in cerebral metabolic rates of glucose (CMRglc) and degree or duration of ketosis remains uncertain. To investigate if CMRglc decreases with chronic ketosis, 2-[(18)F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose in combination with positron emission tomography, was applied in anesthetized young adult rats fed 3 weeks of either standard or ketogenic diets. Cerebral metabolic rates of glucose (μmol/min per 100 g) was determined in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum using Gjedde-Patlak analysis. The average CMRglc significantly decreased in the cerebral cortex (23.0±4.9 versus 32.9±4.7) and cerebellum (29.3±8.6 versus 41.2±6.4) with increased plasma ketone bodies in the ketotic rats compared with standard diet group. The reduction of CMRglc in both brain regions correlates linearly by ∼9% for each 1 mmol/L increase of total plasma ketone bodies (0.3 to 6.3 mmol/L). Together with our meta-analysis, these data revealed that the degree and duration of ketosis has a major role in determining the corresponding change in CMRglc with ketosis.

  9. Simultaneous measurement of glucose transport and utilization in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Shestov, Alexander A; Emir, Uzay E; Kumar, Anjali; Henry, Pierre-Gilles; Seaquist, Elizabeth R; Öz, Gülin

    2011-11-01

    Glucose is the primary fuel for brain function, and determining the kinetics of cerebral glucose transport and utilization is critical for quantifying cerebral energy metabolism. The kinetic parameters of cerebral glucose transport, K(M)(t) and V(max)(t), in humans have so far been obtained by measuring steady-state brain glucose levels by proton ((1)H) NMR as a function of plasma glucose levels and fitting steady-state models to these data. Extraction of the kinetic parameters for cerebral glucose transport necessitated assuming a constant cerebral metabolic rate of glucose (CMR(glc)) obtained from other tracer studies, such as (13)C NMR. Here we present new methodology to simultaneously obtain kinetic parameters for glucose transport and utilization in the human brain by fitting both dynamic and steady-state (1)H NMR data with a reversible, non-steady-state Michaelis-Menten model. Dynamic data were obtained by measuring brain and plasma glucose time courses during glucose infusions to raise and maintain plasma concentration at ∼17 mmol/l for ∼2 h in five healthy volunteers. Steady-state brain vs. plasma glucose concentrations were taken from literature and the steady-state portions of data from the five volunteers. In addition to providing simultaneous measurements of glucose transport and utilization and obviating assumptions for constant CMR(glc), this methodology does not necessitate infusions of expensive or radioactive tracers. Using this new methodology, we found that the maximum transport capacity for glucose through the blood-brain barrier was nearly twofold higher than maximum cerebral glucose utilization. The glucose transport and utilization parameters were consistent with previously published values for human brain.

  10. Simultaneous measurement of glucose transport and utilization in the human brain

    PubMed Central

    Shestov, Alexander A.; Emir, Uzay E.; Kumar, Anjali; Henry, Pierre-Gilles; Seaquist, Elizabeth R.

    2011-01-01

    Glucose is the primary fuel for brain function, and determining the kinetics of cerebral glucose transport and utilization is critical for quantifying cerebral energy metabolism. The kinetic parameters of cerebral glucose transport, KMt and Vmaxt, in humans have so far been obtained by measuring steady-state brain glucose levels by proton (1H) NMR as a function of plasma glucose levels and fitting steady-state models to these data. Extraction of the kinetic parameters for cerebral glucose transport necessitated assuming a constant cerebral metabolic rate of glucose (CMRglc) obtained from other tracer studies, such as 13C NMR. Here we present new methodology to simultaneously obtain kinetic parameters for glucose transport and utilization in the human brain by fitting both dynamic and steady-state 1H NMR data with a reversible, non-steady-state Michaelis-Menten model. Dynamic data were obtained by measuring brain and plasma glucose time courses during glucose infusions to raise and maintain plasma concentration at ∼17 mmol/l for ∼2 h in five healthy volunteers. Steady-state brain vs. plasma glucose concentrations were taken from literature and the steady-state portions of data from the five volunteers. In addition to providing simultaneous measurements of glucose transport and utilization and obviating assumptions for constant CMRglc, this methodology does not necessitate infusions of expensive or radioactive tracers. Using this new methodology, we found that the maximum transport capacity for glucose through the blood-brain barrier was nearly twofold higher than maximum cerebral glucose utilization. The glucose transport and utilization parameters were consistent with previously published values for human brain. PMID:21791622

  11. Cerebral Palsy (For Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Cerebral Palsy KidsHealth / For Teens / Cerebral Palsy What's in this ... do just what everyone else does. What Is Cerebral Palsy? Cerebral palsy (CP) is a disorder of the ...

  12. Is cerebral glucose metabolism related to blood-brain barrier dysfunction and intrathecal IgG synthesis in Alzheimer disease?: A 18F-FDG PET/CT study.

    PubMed

    Chiaravalloti, Agostino; Fiorentini, Alessandro; Ursini, Francesco; Martorana, Alessandro; Koch, Giacomo; Belli, Lorena; Toniolo, Sofia; Di Pietro, Barbara; Motta, Caterina; Schillaci, Orazio

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationships between blood-brain barrier (BBB) dysfunction, intrathecal IgG synthesis, and brain glucose consumption as detectable by means of serum/cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) albumin index (Qalb) and IgG index [(CSF IgG/serum IgG) × Serum albumin/CSF albumin)] and 2-deoxy-2-(F) fluoro-D-glucose (F-FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) in a selected population affected by Alzheimer disease (AD). The study included 134 newly diagnosed AD patients according to the NINCDS-ADRDA criteria. The mean (±SD) age of the patients was 70 (±6) years; 60 were male and 64 were female. Mini mental State Examination was equal to 18.9 (±7.2). All patients underwent a CSF assay and magnetic resonance before F-FDG PET scanning. The relationships were evaluated by means of statistical parametric mapping (SPM8). We found a significant negative correlation between the increase of Qalb and F-FDG uptake in the Brodmann Area 42 and 22 that corresponds to the left superior temporal gyrus, with higher Qalb values being related to a reduced glucose consumption in these areas. No significant relationships have been found between brain glucose consumption and IgG index. The results of our study suggest that BBB dysfunction is related to reduction of cortical activity in the left temporal cortex in AD subjects.

  13. Urine - abnormal color

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003139.htm Urine - abnormal color To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The usual color of urine is straw-yellow. Abnormally colored urine ...

  14. Blood Test: Glucose

    MedlinePlus

    ... Videos for Educators Search English Español Blood Test: Glucose KidsHealth / For Parents / Blood Test: Glucose What's in ... liver or kidneys) is working. What Is a Glucose Test? A glucose test measures how much glucose ...

  15. Continuous glucose monitoring, oral glucose tolerance, and insulin - glucose parameters in adolescents with simple obesity.

    PubMed

    El Awwa, A; Soliman, A; Al-Ali, M; Yassin, M; De Sanctis, V

    2012-09-01

    In obese adolescents pancreatic beta-cells may not be able to cope with insulin resistance leading to hyperglycemia and type2 diabetes (T2DM To assess oral glucose tolerance, 72-h continuous blood glucose concentrations (CGM) and calculate homeostatic model assessment (HOMA), and the quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (QUICKI) in 13 adolescents with simple obesity (BMI SDS=4 ± 1.06). OGTT performed in 13 obese adolescents (13.47 ± 3 years) revealed 3 cases (23%) with impaired fasting glucose (IFG: fasting glucose >5.6 mmol/L), 4 cases (30%) with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT: 2h blood glucose >7.8 <11.1 mmol/L), and none with diabetes. Using the continuous glucose monitoring system ( CGMS), IFG was detected in 4 cases, the maximum serum blood glucose (BG : 2h or more after meal) was >7.8 and <11.1 mmol/L (IGT) in 9 children (69%) and >11.1 mmol/L (diabetes) in one case (7.6%). Five cases had a minimum BG recorded of <2.7 mmol/L (hypoglycemia). No glycemic abnormality was detected using HbA1C (5.7 ± 0.3%). 11/13 patients had HOMA values >2.6 and QUICKI values <0.35 denoting insulin resistance. Beta cell mass percent (B %) = 200 ± 94.8% and insulin sensitivity values (IS)=50.4 ± 45.5% denoted insulin resistance with hyper-insulinaemia and preserved beta cell mass. In obese adolescents, CGMS is superior to OGTT and HbA1C in detecting glycemic abnormalities, which appears to be secondary to insulin resistance.

  16. Brain 18F-FDG PET Metabolic Abnormalities in Patients with Long-Lasting Macrophagic Myofascitis.

    PubMed

    Van Der Gucht, Axel; Aoun Sebaiti, Mehdi; Guedj, Eric; Aouizerate, Jessie; Yara, Sabrina; Gherardi, Romain K; Evangelista, Eva; Chalaye, Julia; Cottereau, Anne-Ségolène; Verger, Antoine; Bachoud-Levi, Anne-Catherine; Abulizi, Mukedaisi; Itti, Emmanuel; Authier, François-Jérôme

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize brain metabolic abnormalities in patients with macrophagic myofascitis (MMF) and the relationship with cognitive dysfunction through the use of PET with 18 F-FDG. Methods: 18 F-FDG PET brain imaging and a comprehensive battery of neuropsychological tests were performed in 100 consecutive MMF patients (age [mean ± SD], 45.9 ± 12 y; 74% women). Images were analyzed with statistical parametric mapping (SPM12). Through the use of analysis of covariance, all 18 F-FDG PET brain images of MMF patients were compared with those of a reference population of 44 healthy subjects similar in age (45.4 ± 16 y; P = 0.87) and sex (73% women; P = 0.88). The neuropsychological assessment identified 4 categories of patients: those with no significant cognitive impairment ( n = 42), those with frontal subcortical (FSC) dysfunction ( n = 29), those with Papez circuit dysfunction ( n = 22), and those with callosal disconnection ( n = 7). Results: In comparison with healthy subjects, the whole population of patients with MMF exhibited a spatial pattern of cerebral glucose hypometabolism ( P < 0.001) involving the occipital lobes, temporal lobes, limbic system, cerebellum, and frontoparietal cortices, as shown by analysis of covariance. The subgroup of patients with FSC dysfunction exhibited a larger extent of involved areas (35,223 voxels vs. 13,680 voxels in the subgroup with Papez circuit dysfunction and 5,453 voxels in patients without cognitive impairment). Nonsignificant results were obtained for the last subgroup because of its small population size. Conclusion: Our study identified a peculiar spatial pattern of cerebral glucose hypometabolism that was most marked in MMF patients with FSC dysfunction. Further studies are needed to determine whether this pattern could represent a diagnostic biomarker of MMF in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome and cognitive dysfunction. © 2017 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging.

  17. Electrical Cerebral Stimulation Modifies Inhibitory Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuéllar-Herrera, M.; Rocha, L.

    2003-09-01

    Electrical stimulation of the nervous tissue has been proposed as a method to treat some neurological disorders, such as epilepsy. Epileptic seizures result from excessive, synchronous, abnormal firing patterns of neurons that are located predominantly in the cerebral cortex. Many people with epilepsy continue presenting seizures even though they are under regimens of antiepileptic medications. An alternative therapy for treatment resistant epilepsy is cerebral electrical stimulation. The present study is focused to review the effects of different types of electrical stimulation and specifically changes in amino acids.

  18. [INDIVIDUAL EVALUATION OF LORETA ABNORMALITIES IN IDIOPATHIC GENERALIZED EPILEPSY].

    PubMed

    Clemens, Béla; Puskás, Szilvia; Besenyei, Mónika; Kondákor, István; Hollódy, Katalin; Fogarasi, Andrós; Bense, Katalin; Emri, Miklós; Opposits Gábor; Kovács, Noémi Zsuzsanna; Fekete, István

    2016-03-30

    Contemporary neuroimaging methods disclosed structural and functional cerebral abnormalities in idiopathic generalized epilepsies (IGEs). However, individual electrical (EEG) abnormalities have not been evaluated yet in IGE patients. IGE patients were investigated in the drug-free condition and after 3-6 month of antiepileptic treatment. To estimate the reproducibility of qEEG variables a retrospective recruited cohort of IGE patients was investigated. 19-channel resting state EEG activity was recorded. For each patient a total of 2 minutes EEG activity was analyzed by LORETA (Low Resolution Electromagnetic Tomography). Raw LORETA values were Z-transformed and projected to a MRI template. Z-values outside within the [+3Z] to [-3Z] range were labelled as statistically abnormal. 1. In drug-free condition, 41-50% of IGE patients showed abnormal LORETA values. 2. Abnormal LORETA findings showed great inter-individual variability. 3. Most abnormal LORETA-findings were symmetrical. 4. Most maximum Z-values were localized to frontal or temporal cortex. 5. Succesfull treatment was mostly coupled with disappearence of LORETA-abnormality, persistent seizures were accompanied by persistent LORETA abnormality. 1. LORETA abnormalities detected in the untreated condition reflect seizure-generating property of the cortex in IGE patients. 2. Maximum LORETA-Z abnormalities were topographically congruent with structural abnormalities reported by other research groups. 3. LORETA might help to investigate drug effects at the whole-brain level.

  19. Moderate hyperventilation during intravenous anesthesia increases net cerebral lactate efflux.

    PubMed

    Grüne, Frank; Kazmaier, Stephan; Sonntag, Hans; Stolker, Robert Jan; Weyland, Andreas

    2014-02-01

    Hyperventilation is known to decrease cerebral blood flow (CBF) and to impair cerebral metabolism, but the threshold in patients undergoing intravenous anesthesia is unknown. The authors hypothesized that reduced CBF associated with moderate hyperventilation might impair cerebral aerobic metabolism in patients undergoing intravenous anesthesia. Thirty male patients scheduled for coronary surgery were included in a prospective, controlled crossover trial. Measurements were performed under fentanyl-midazolam anesthesia in a randomized sequence aiming at partial pressures of carbon dioxide of 30 and 50 mmHg. Endpoints were CBF, blood flow velocity in the middle cerebral artery, and cerebral metabolic rates for oxygen, glucose, and lactate. Global CBF was measured using a modified Kety-Schmidt technique with argon as inert gas tracer. CBF velocity of the middle cerebral artery was recorded by transcranial Doppler sonography. Data were presented as mean (SD). Two-sided paired t tests and one-way ANOVA for repeated measures were used for statistical analysis. Moderate hyperventilation significantly decreased CBF by 60%, blood flow velocity by 41%, cerebral oxygen delivery by 58%, and partial pressure of oxygen of the jugular venous bulb by 45%. Cerebral metabolic rates for oxygen and glucose remained unchanged; however, net cerebral lactate efflux significantly increased from -0.38 (2.18) to -2.41(2.43) µmol min 100 g. Moderate hyperventilation, when compared with moderate hypoventilation, in patients with cardiovascular disease undergoing intravenous anesthesia increased net cerebral lactate efflux and markedly reduced CBF and partial pressure of oxygen of the jugular venous bulb, suggesting partial impairment of cerebral aerobic metabolism at clinically relevant levels of hypocapnia.

  20. The cerebral neurobiology of anxiety, anxiety displacement, and anxiety denial.

    PubMed

    Gottschalk, L A; Fronczek, J; Abel, L; Buchsbaum, M S; Fallon, J H

    2001-01-01

    Previous studies examining the relationship of anxiety scores, derived from the content analysis of speech of normal individuals, have revealed that the anxiety scores occurring in the dreams associated with rapid eye movement (REM) sleep are significantly correlated with localized cerebral glucose metabolic rates assessed by positron emission tomography (PET) scanning. These significant intercorrelations occur in different cerebral areas when the anxiety scores are obtained from mental experiences reported during non-REM sleep or during wakeful silent mentation. The purpose of the present study was to examine the intercorrelations found between anxiety attributed to the self, anxiety-displacement, and anxiety denial measured from computerized content analysis of 5-min verbal reports of subjective thoughts and feelings obtained from wakeful normal subjects and localized cerebral glucose metabolic rates during PET scanning. The subjects were 10 wakeful young males. Their anxiety scores were derived from computerized content analysis of 5-min reports they gave of their subjective thoughts, feelings and fantasies during a 30-min period following an intravenous injection of F D-deoxyglucose (FDG). The subjects were moved 32--45 min after this injection to obtain a PET scan, which records all of the localized cerebral glucose metabolic rates during the 30 min following the FDG injection. Significant intercorrelations of localized cerebral glucose metabolic rates with the scores of self-anxiety, anxiety displacement, and anxiety-denial were found in dissimilar cerebral locations depending on the type of anxiety involved. The significant correlations occurred in brain regions known to be associated with the functions of emotions, cognition, memory, and vision. Specific combinations of cerebral areas, based on glucose metabolic rates, appear to distinguish and be associated with different verbal expressions of anxiety. Replication of this preliminary research will be

  1. R6/2 Huntington's disease mice develop early and progressive abnormal brain metabolism and seizures.

    PubMed

    Cepeda-Prado, Efrain; Popp, Susanna; Khan, Usman; Stefanov, Dimitre; Rodríguez, Jorge; Menalled, Liliana B; Dow-Edwards, Diana; Small, Scott A; Moreno, Herman

    2012-05-09

    A hallmark feature of Huntington's disease pathology is the atrophy of brain regions including, but not limited to, the striatum. Though MRI studies have identified structural CNS changes in several Huntington's disease (HD) mouse models, the functional consequences of HD pathology during the progression of the disease have yet to be investigated using in vivo functional MRI (fMRI). To address this issue, we first established the structural and functional MRI phenotype of juvenile HD mouse model R6/2 at early and advanced stages of disease. Significantly higher fMRI signals [relative cerebral blood volumes (rCBVs)] and atrophy were observed in both age groups in specific brain regions. Next, fMRI results were correlated with electrophysiological analysis, which showed abnormal increases in neuronal activity in affected brain regions, thus identifying a mechanism accounting for the abnormal fMRI findings. [(14)C] 2-deoxyglucose maps to investigate patterns of glucose utilization were also generated. An interesting mismatch between increases in rCBV and decreases in glucose uptake was observed. Finally, we evaluated the sensitivity of this mouse line to audiogenic seizures early in the disease course. We found that R6/2 mice had an increased susceptibility to develop seizures. Together, these findings identified seizure activity in R6/2 mice and show that neuroimaging measures sensitive to oxygen metabolism can be used as in vivo biomarkers, preceding the onset of an overt behavioral phenotype. Since fMRI-rCBV can also be obtained in patients, we propose that it may serve as a translational tool to evaluate therapeutic responses in humans and HD mouse models.

  2. Impaired brain energy gain upon a glucose load in obesity.

    PubMed

    Wardzinski, Ewelina K; Kistenmacher, Alina; Melchert, Uwe H; Jauch-Chara, Kamila; Oltmanns, Kerstin M

    2018-03-06

    There is evidence that the brain's energy status is lowered in obesity despite of chronic hypercaloric nutrition. The underlying mechanisms are unknown. We hypothesized that the brain of obese people does not appropriately generate energy in response to a hypercaloric supply. Glucose was intravenously infused in 17 normal weights and 13 obese participants until blood glucose concentrations reached the postprandial levels of 7 mmol/L and 10 mmol/L. Changes in cerebral adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and phosphocreatine (PCr) content were measured by 31 phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy and stress hormonal measures regulating glucose homeostasis were monitored. Because vitamin C is crucial for a proper neuronal energy synthesis we determined circulating concentrations during the experimental testing. Cerebral high-energy phosphates were increased at blood glucose levels of 7 mmol/L in normal weights, which was completely missing in the obese. Brain energy content moderately raised only at blood glucose levels of 10 mmol/L in obese participants. Vitamin C concentrations generally correlated with the brain energy content at blood glucose concentrations of 7 mmol/L. Our data demonstrate an inefficient cerebral energy gain upon a glucose load in obese men, which may result from a dysfunctional glucose transport across the blood-brain barrier or a downregulated energy synthesis in mitochondrial oxidation processes. Our finding offers an explanation for the chronic neuroenergetic deficiency and respectively missing satiety perception in obesity. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Neonatal White Matter Abnormalities an Important Predictor of Neurocognitive Outcome for Very Preterm Children

    PubMed Central

    Woodward, Lianne J.; Clark, Caron A. C.; Bora, Samudragupta; Inder, Terrie E.

    2012-01-01

    Background Cerebral white matter abnormalities on term MRI are a strong predictor of motor disability in children born very preterm. However, their contribution to cognitive impairment is less certain. Objective Examine relationships between the presence and severity of cerebral white matter abnormalities on neonatal MRI and a range of neurocognitive outcomes assessed at ages 4 and 6 years. Design/Methods The study sample consisted of a regionally representative cohort of 104 very preterm (≤32 weeks gestation) infants born from 1998–2000 and a comparison group of 107 full-term infants. At term equivalent, all preterm infants underwent a structural MRI scan that was analyzed qualitatively for the presence and severity of cerebral white matter abnormalities, including cysts, signal abnormalities, loss of white matter volume, ventriculomegaly, and corpus callosal thinning/myelination. At corrected ages 4 and 6 years, all children underwent a comprehensive neurodevelopmental assessment that included measures of general intellectual ability, language development, and executive functioning. Results At 4 and 6 years, very preterm children without cerebral white matter abnormalities showed no apparent neurocognitive impairments relative to their full-term peers on any of the domain specific measures of intelligence, language, and executive functioning. In contrast, children born very preterm with mild and moderate-to-severe white matter abnormalities were characterized by performance impairments across all measures and time points, with more severe cerebral abnormalities being associated with increased risks of cognitive impairment. These associations persisted after adjustment for gender, neonatal medical risk factors, and family social risk. Conclusions Findings highlight the importance of cerebral white matter connectivity for later intact cognitive functioning amongst children born very preterm. Preterm born children without cerebral white matter abnormalities on

  4. [Cerebral aspergillosis].

    PubMed

    Tattevin, P; Jauréguiberry, S; Gangneux, J-P

    2004-05-01

    The brain is almost always a localization of invasive aspergillosis, after hematogenous spread from pulmonary aspergillosis. Brain aspergilosis is not rare and is one of the worst prognosis factors of invasive aspergillosis. The incidence of this severe mycosis is currently on the rise due to the development of major immunosuppressive treatments. Brain aspergillosis is noteworthy for its vascular tropism, leading to infectious cerebral vasculitis, mainly involving thalamoperforating and lenticulostriate arteries, with a high frequency of thalamic or basal nuclei lesions. Extra-neurologic features that suggest this diagnosis are: i) risk factors for invasive aspergillosis (major or prolonged neutropenia, hematologic malignancies, prolonged corticosteroid treatment, bone marrow or solid organ transplant, AIDS); ii) persistent fever not responding to presumptive antibacterial treatment; iii) respiratory signs (brain aspergillosis is associated with pulmonary aspergillosis in 80 to 95 p. 100 of cases). Perspectives. Two recent major improvements in brain aspergillosis management must be outlined: i) for diagnostic purposes, the development of testing for Aspergillus antigenemia (a non-invasive procedure with good diagnostic value for invasive aspergillosis); ii) for therapeutic purposes, the demonstration that voriconazole is better than amphotericin B in terms of clinical response, tolerance and survival, for all types of invasive aspergillosis, the benefit being probably even greater in case of brain aspergillosis because of the good diffusion of voriconazole into the central nervous system. Brain aspergillosis is a severe emerging opportunistic infection for which diagnostic and therapeutic tools have recently improved. Thus, this diagnostic must be suspected early, especially in the immunocompromised patient, in the event of respiratory symptoms and when the brain lesions are localized in the central nuclei and the thalamus.

  5. Tooth - abnormal shape

    MedlinePlus

    Hutchinson incisors; Abnormal tooth shape; Peg teeth; Mulberry teeth; Conical teeth ... The appearance of normal teeth varies, especially the molars. ... conditions. Specific diseases can affect tooth shape, tooth ...

  6. Cerebral palsy - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - cerebral palsy ... The following organizations are good resources for information on cerebral palsy : National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke -- www.ninds.nih.gov/Disorders/Patient-Caregiver-Education/Hope- ...

  7. Cerebral Palsy (For Kids)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Cerebral Palsy KidsHealth / For Kids / Cerebral Palsy What's in this ... the things that kids do every day. What's CP? Some kids with CP use wheelchairs and others ...

  8. Cerebral arteriovenous malformation

    MedlinePlus

    AVM - cerebral; Arteriovenous hemangioma; Stroke - AVM; Hemorrhagic stroke - AVM ... The cause of cerebral AVM is unknown. An AVM occurs when arteries in the brain connect directly to nearby veins without having the ...

  9. Glucose transport in brain - effect of inflammation.

    PubMed

    Jurcovicova, J

    2014-01-01

    Glucose is transported across the cell membrane by specific saturable transport system, which includes two types of glucose transporters: 1) sodium dependent glucose transporters (SGLTs) which transport glucose against its concentration gradient and 2) sodium independent glucose transporters (GLUTs), which transport glucose by facilitative diffusion in its concentration gradient. In the brain, both types of transporters are present with different function, affinity, capacity, and tissue distribution. GLUT1 occurs in brain in two isoforms. The more glycosylated GLUT1 is produced in brain microvasculature and ensures glucose transport across the blood brain barrier (BBB). The less glycosylated form is localized in astrocytic end-feet and cell bodies and is not present in axons, neuronal synapses or microglia. Glucose transported to astrocytes by GLUT1 is metabolized to lactate serving to neurons as energy source. Proinflammatory cytokine interleukin (IL)-1β upregulates GLUT1 in endothelial cells and astrocytes, whereas it induces neuronal death in neuronal cell culture. GLUT2 is present in hypothalamic neurons and serves as a glucose sensor in regulation of food intake. In neurons of the hippocampus, GLUT2 is supposed to regulate synaptic activity and neurotransmitter release. GLUT3 is the most abundant glucose transporter in the brain having five times higher transport capacity than GLUT1. It is present in neuropil, mostly in axons and dendrites. Its density and distribution correlate well with the local cerebral glucose demands. GLUT5 is predominantly fructose transporter. In brain, GLUT5 is the only hexose transporter in microglia, whose regulation is not yet clear. It is not present in neurons. GLUT4 and GLUT8 are insulin-regulated glucose transporters in neuronal cell bodies in the cortex and cerebellum, but mainly in the hippocampus and amygdala, where they maintain hippocampus-dependent cognitive functions. Insulin translocates GLUT4 from cytosol to plasma

  10. Aging and Cerebral Palsy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Networker, 1993

    1993-01-01

    This special edition of "The Networker" contains several articles focusing on aging and cerebral palsy (CP). "Aging and Cerebral Palsy: Pathways to Successful Aging" (Jenny C. Overeynder) reports on the National Invitational Colloquium on Aging and Cerebral Palsy held in April 1993. "Observations from an Observer" (Kathleen K. Barrett) describes…

  11. Propofol Compared to Isoflurane Inhibits Mitochondrial Metabolism in Immature Swine Cerebral Cortex

    SciTech Connect

    Kajimoto, Masaki; Atkinson, D. B.; Ledee, Dolena R.

    2014-01-08

    Anesthetics used in infants and children are implicated in development of neurocognitive disorders. Although propofol induces neuroapoptosis in developing brain, the underlying mechanisms require elucidation and may have an energetic basis. We studied substrate utilization in an immature swine model anesthetized with either propofol or isoflurane for 4 hours. Piglets were infused with 13-Carbon labeled glucose and leucine in the common carotid artery in order to assess citric acid cycle (CAC) metabolism in the parietal cortex. The anesthetics produced similar systemic hemodynamics and cerebral oxygen saturation by near-infrared-spectroscopy. Compared to isoflurane, propofol depleted ATP and glycogen stores. Propofol also decreasedmore » pools of the CAC intermediates, citrate and α-ketoglutarate, while markedly increasing succinate along with decreasing mitochondrial complex II activity. Propofol also inhibited acetyl-CoA entry into the CAC through pyruvate dehydrogenase, while promoting glycolytic flux with marked accumulation of lactate. Although oxygen supply appeared similar between the anesthetic groups, propofol yielded a metabolic phenotype which resembled a hypoxic state. Propofol impairs substrate flux through the CAC in the immature cerebral cortex. These impairments occurred without systemic metabolic perturbations which typically accompany propofol infusion syndrome. These metabolic abnormalities may play a role in neurotoxity observed with propofol in the vulnerable immature brain.« less

  12. Glucose Metabolism After Renal Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Hecking, Manfred; Kainz, Alexander; Werzowa, Johannes; Haidinger, Michael; Döller, Dominik; Tura, Andrea; Karaboyas, Angelo; Hörl, Walter H.; Wolzt, Michael; Sharif, Adnan; Roden, Michael; Moro, Ermanno; Pacini, Giovanni; Port, Friedrich K.; Säemann, Marcus D.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE We determined prevalence, risk factors, phenotype, and pathophysiological mechanism of new-onset diabetes after transplantation (NODAT) to generate strategies for optimal pharmacological management of hyperglycemia in NODAT patients. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Retrospective cohort study comparing demographics, laboratory data, and oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT)-derived metabolic parameters from kidney transplant recipients versus subjects not receiving transplants. RESULTS Among 1,064 stable kidney transplant recipients (≥6 months posttransplantation), 113 (11%) had a history of NODAT and 132 (12%) had pretransplant diabetes. In the remaining patients, randomly assigned OGTTs showed a high prevalence of abnormal glucose metabolism (11% diabetes; 32% impaired fasting glucose, impaired glucose tolerance, or both), predominantly in older patients who received tacrolimus as the primary immunosuppressant. Compared with 1,357 nontransplant subjects, stable kidney transplant recipients had lower basal glucose, higher glycated hemoglobin, lower insulin secretion, and greater insulin sensitivity in each of the three subgroups, defined by OGTT 2-h glucose (<140, 140–199, ≥200 mg/dL). These findings were reinforced in linear spline interpolation models of insulin secretion and sensitivity (all P < 0.001) and in another regression model in which the estimated oral glucose insulin sensitivity index was substantially higher (by 79–112 mL/min m2) for transplant versus nontransplant subjects despite adjustments for age, sex, and BMI (all P < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS Glucose metabolism differs substantially between kidney transplant recipients and nontransplant controls. Because impaired insulin secretion appears to be the predominant pathophysiological feature after renal transplantation, early therapeutic interventions that preserve, maintain, or improve β-cell function are potentially beneficial in this population. PMID:23656979

  13. Isolated benign cerebral vasculitis or migrainous vasospasm?

    PubMed Central

    Serdaru, M; Chiras, J; Cujas, M; Lhermitte, F

    1984-01-01

    A 39-year-old woman experienced severe headache, epilepsy and rapidly progressive aphasia and hemianopia. Carotid angiograms displayed segmentary narrowing of intracranial arteries as previously described in benign cerebral vasculitis. Her superficial temporal artery was also involved, allowing a biopsy of the abnormal part of the vessel. Microscopical study of this artery was normal. A second carotid angiogram, 14 days later, showed normal intracranial arteries. These findings suggest arterial spasm rather than distal arteritis. Images PMID:6693916

  14. Familial occurrence of cerebral gigantism, Sotos' syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hansen, F J; Friis, B

    1976-05-01

    Since the original description of cerebral gigantism, about 85 cases have been reported. Four papers comment on familial occurrence but never in parents and their children. This paper describes the syndrome in a mother and her child, which, together with facts pointing towards prenatal etiology, such as excessive birthweight, striking mutual resemblance and abnormal dermatoglyphics, points to a genetic defect. Previous endocrine studies are enlarged by the findings of normal serum somatomedin and serum prolactin.

  15. Hypothalamic neurones governing glucose homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Coppari, R

    2015-06-01

    The notion that the brain directly controls the level of glucose in the blood (glycaemia) independent of its known action on food intake and body weight has been known ever since 1849. That year, the French physiologist Dr Claude Bernard reported that physical puncture of the floor of the fourth cerebral ventricle rapidly leads to an increased level of sugar in the blood (and urine) in rabbits. Despite this important discovery, it took approximately 150 years before significant efforts aimed at understanding the underlying mechanism of brain-mediated control of glucose metabolism were made. Technological developments allowing for genetically-mediated manipulation of selected molecular pathways in a neurone-type-specific fashion unravelled the importance of specific molecules in specific neuronal populations. These neuronal pathways govern glucose metabolism in the presence and even in the absence of insulin. Also, a peculiarity of these pathways is that certain biochemically-defined neurones govern glucose metabolism in a tissue-specific fashion. © 2015 British Society for Neuroendocrinology.

  16. Pregnancy Complications: Umbilical Cord Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... before and during delivery, which may contribute to cerebral palsy and other forms of brain damage References Cruikshank, ... before and during delivery, which may contribute to cerebral palsy and other forms of brain damage References Cruikshank, ...

  17. Cerebral ischemia and neuroregeneration

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Reggie H. C.; Lee, Michelle H. H.; Wu, Celeste Y. C.; Couto e Silva, Alexandre; Possoit, Harlee E.; Hsieh, Tsung-Han; Minagar, Alireza; Lin, Hung Wen

    2018-01-01

    Cerebral ischemia is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Although stroke (a form of cerebral ischemia)-related costs are expected to reach 240.67 billion dollars by 2030, options for treatment against cerebral ischemia/stroke are limited. All therapies except anti-thrombolytics (i.e., tissue plasminogen activator) and hypothermia have failed to reduce neuronal injury, neurological deficits, and mortality rates following cerebral ischemia, which suggests that development of novel therapies against stroke/cerebral ischemia are urgently needed. Here, we discuss the possible mechanism(s) underlying cerebral ischemia-induced brain injury, as well as current and future novel therapies (i.e., growth factors, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, melatonin, resveratrol, protein kinase C isozymes, pifithrin, hypothermia, fatty acids, sympathoplegic drugs, and stem cells) as it relates to cerebral ischemia. PMID:29623912

  18. Association of Lead Levels and Cerebral Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Neha; Aggarwal, Anju; Faridi, M. M. A.; Sharma, Tusha; Baneerjee, B. D.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Cerebral palsy is a common motor disability in childhood. Raised lead levels affect cognition. Children with cerebral palsy may have raised lead levels, further impairing their residual cognitive motor and behavioral abilities. Environmental exposure and abnormal eating habits may lead to increased lead levels. Aims and Objectives: To measure blood lead levels in children with cerebral palsy and compare them with healthy neurologically normal children. To correlate blood lead levels with environmental factors. Material and Methods: Design: Prospective case-control study. Setting: Tertiary care hospital. Participants: Cases comprised 34 children with cerebral palsy, and controls comprised 34 neurologically normal, age- and sex-matched children. Methods: Clinical and demographic details were recorded as per proforma. Detailed environmental history was recorded to know the source of exposure to lead. These children were investigated and treated as per protocol. Venous blood was collected in ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid vials for analysis of blood lead levels. Lead levels were estimated by Schimadzu Flame AA-6800 (atomic absorption spectrophotometer). Data were analyzed using SPSS version 17. P < .05 was taken as significant. Results: Mean blood lead levels were 9.20 ± 8.31 µg/dL in cerebral palsy cases and 2.89 ± 3.04 µg/dL in their controls (P < .001). Among children with cerebral palsy, 19 (55.88%) children had blood lead levels ≥5 µg/dL. Lead levels in children with pica were 12.33 ± 10.02 µg/dL in comparison to children with no history of pica, 6.70 ± 4.60 µg/dL (P = .029). No correlation was found between hemoglobin and blood lead levels in cases and controls. Conclusion: In our study, blood lead levels are raised in children with cerebral palsy. However, further studies are required to show effects of raised levels in these children. PMID:28491920

  19. Abnormal endocrine pancreas function at birth in cystic fibrosis ferrets

    PubMed Central

    Olivier, Alicia K.; Yi, Yaling; Sun, Xingshen; Sui, Hongshu; Liang, Bo; Hu, Shanming; Xie, Weiliang; Fisher, John T.; Keiser, Nicholas W.; Lei, Diana; Zhou, Weihong; Yan, Ziying; Li, Guiying; Evans, Turan I.A.; Meyerholz, David K.; Wang, Kai; Stewart, Zoe A.; Norris, Andrew W.; Engelhardt, John F.

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes is a common comorbidity in cystic fibrosis (CF) that worsens prognosis. The lack of an animal model for CF-related diabetes (CFRD) has made it difficult to dissect how the onset of pancreatic pathology influences the emergence of CFRD. We evaluated the structure and function of the neonatal CF endocrine pancreas using a new CFTR-knockout ferret model. Although CF kits are born with only mild exocrine pancreas disease, progressive exocrine and endocrine pancreatic loss during the first months of life was associated with pancreatic inflammation, spontaneous hyperglycemia, and glucose intolerance. Interestingly, prior to major exocrine pancreas disease, CF kits demonstrated significant abnormalities in blood glucose and insulin regulation, including diminished first-phase and accentuated peak insulin secretion in response to glucose, elevated peak glucose levels following glucose challenge, and variably elevated insulin and C-peptide levels in the nonfasted state. Although there was no difference in lobular insulin and glucagon expression between genotypes at birth, significant alterations in the frequencies of small and large islets were observed. Newborn cultured CF islets demonstrated dysregulated glucose-dependent insulin secretion in comparison to controls, suggesting intrinsic abnormalities in CF islets. These findings demonstrate that early abnormalities exist in the regulation of insulin secretion by the CF endocrine pancreas. PMID:22996690

  20. "Jeopardy" in Abnormal Psychology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keutzer, Carolin S.

    1993-01-01

    Describes the use of the board game, Jeopardy, in a college level abnormal psychology course. Finds increased student interaction and improved application of information. Reports generally favorable student evaluation of the technique. (CFR)

  1. Cerebral metabolic adaptation and ketone metabolism after brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Prins, Mayumi L

    2010-01-01

    The developing central nervous system has the capacity to metabolize ketone bodies. It was once accepted that on weaning, the ‘post-weaned/adult’ brain was limited solely to glucose metabolism. However, increasing evidence from conditions of inadequate glucose availability or increased energy demands has shown that the adult brain is not static in its fuel options. The objective of this review is to summarize the body of literature specifically regarding cerebral ketone metabolism at different ages, under conditions of starvation and after various pathologic conditions. The evidence presented supports the following findings: (1) there is an inverse relationship between age and the brain’s capacity for ketone metabolism that continues well after weaning; (2) neuroprotective potentials of ketone administration have been shown for neurodegenerative conditions, epilepsy, hypoxia/ischemia, and traumatic brain injury; and (3) there is an age-related therapeutic potential for ketone as an alternative substrate. The concept of cerebral metabolic adaptation under various physiologic and pathologic conditions is not new, but it has taken the contribution of numerous studies over many years to break the previously accepted dogma of cerebral metabolism. Our emerging understanding of cerebral metabolism is far more complex than could have been imagined. It is clear that in addition to glucose, other substrates must be considered along with fuel interactions, metabolic challenges, and cerebral maturation. PMID:17684514

  2. [Etiology of cerebral palsy].

    PubMed

    Jaisle, F

    1996-01-01

    The "perinatal asphyxia" is regarded to be one of the causes of cerebral palsy, though in the very most of the children with cerebral palsy there is found no hypoxia during labour. It should be mentioned, that the definition of "perinatal" and "asphyxia" neither are unic nor concret. And also there is no correlation between nonreassuring fetal heart rate patterns and acidosis in fetal blood with the incidence of cerebral palsy. Numerous studies in pregnant animals failed in proving an acute intrapartal hypoxia to be the origin of the cerebral palsy. Myers (1975) describes four patterns of anatomic brain damage after different injuries. Only his so called oligo-acidotic hypoxia, which is protracted and lasts over a longer time is leading to brain injury, which can be regarded in analogy to the injury of children with cerebral palsy. Summarising the update publications about the causes of cerebral palsy and the studies in pregnant animals there is no evidence that hypoxia during labour may be the cause of cerebral palsy. There is a great probability of a pre(and post-)natal origin of brain injury (for instance a periventricular leucomalacia found after birth) which leads to cerebral palsy. Short after labour signs of a so called "asphyxia" may occur in addition to this preexisting injury and misrepresent the cause of cerebral palsy. Finally the prepartal injury may cause both: Cerebral palsy and hypoxia.

  3. Optoacoustic mapping of cerebral blood oxygenation in humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, Yuriy; Prough, Donald S.; Petrov, Irene Y.; Richardson, C. Joan; Fonseca, Rafael A.; Robertson, Claudia S.; Esenaliev, Rinat O.

    2017-03-01

    Noninvasive, transcranial mapping, monitoring, and imaging are highly important for detection and management of cerebral abnormalities and neuroscience research. Mapping, imaging, and monitoring of cerebral blood oxygenation are necessary for diagnostics and management of patients with traumatic brain injury, stroke, and other neurological conditions. We proposed to use optoacoustic technology for noninvasive, transcranial monitoring and imaging. In this work, we developed optoacoustic systems for mapping of cerebral blood oxygenation in humans and tested them in adults and neonates. The systems provide noninvasive, transcranial optoacoustic measurements in the transmission (forward) and reflection (backward) modes in the near infrared spectral range. Novel, ultra-sensitive probes were built for detection of optoacoustic signals and measurement of blood oxygenation in neonates and adults. Cerebral oxygenation was measured at different lateral sites from the superior sagittal sinus (SSS), a large central cerebral vein, located immediately beneath the midline of the human skull. In neonates, cerebral oxygenation was measured through open anterior and posterior fontanelles. Optoacoustic signal detection at different locations allowed for mapping of cerebral blood oxygenation. Our future studies will be focused on 3D mapping of cerebral blood oxygenation.

  4. Cannabidiol attenuates OGD/R-induced damage by enhancing mitochondrial bioenergetics and modulating glucose metabolism via pentose-phosphate pathway in hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shanshan; Hu, Fangyuan; Wu, Jihong; Zhang, Shenghai

    2017-04-01

    Deficient bioenergetics and diminished redox conservation have been implicated in the development of cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury. In this study, the mechanisms underlying the neuroprotective effects of cannabidiol (CBD), a nonpsychotropic compound derived from Cannabis sativa with FDA-approved antiepilepsy properties, were studied in vitro using an oxygen-glucose-deprivation/reperfusion (OGD/R) model in a mouse hippocampal neuronal cell line. CBD supplementation during reperfusion rescued OGD/R-induced cell death, attenuated intracellular ROS generation and lipid peroxidation, and simultaneously reversed the abnormal changes in antioxidant biomarkers. Using the Seahorse XF e 24 Extracellular Flux Analyzer, we found that CBD significantly improved basal respiration, ATP-linked oxygen consumption rate, and the spare respiratory capacity, and augmented glucose consumption in OGD/R-injured neurons. The activation of glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase and the preservation of the NADPH/NADP + ratio implies that the pentose-phosphate pathway is stimulated by CBD, thus protecting hippocampal neurons from OGD/R injury. This study is the first to document the neuroprotective effects of CBD against OGD/R insult, which depend in part on attenuating oxidative stress, enhancing mitochondrial bioenergetics, and modulating glucose metabolism via the pentose-phosphate pathway, thus preserving both energy and the redox balance. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Hepatic glucose sensing is required to preserve β cell glucose competence

    PubMed Central

    Seyer, Pascal; Vallois, David; Poitry-Yamate, Carole; Schütz, Frédéric; Metref, Salima; Tarussio, David; Maechler, Pierre; Staels, Bart; Lanz, Bernard; Grueter, Rolf; Decaris, Julie; Turner, Scott; da Costa, Anabela; Preitner, Frédéric; Minehira, Kaori; Foretz, Marc; Thorens, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    Liver glucose metabolism plays a central role in glucose homeostasis and may also regulate feeding and energy expenditure. Here we assessed the impact of glucose transporter 2 (Glut2) gene inactivation in adult mouse liver (LG2KO mice). Loss of Glut2 suppressed hepatic glucose uptake but not glucose output. In the fasted state, expression of carbohydrate-responsive element-binding protein (ChREBP) and its glycolytic and lipogenic target genes was abnormally elevated. Feeding, energy expenditure, and insulin sensitivity were identical in LG2KO and control mice. Glucose tolerance was initially normal after Glut2 inactivation, but LG2KO mice exhibited progressive impairment of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion even though β cell mass and insulin content remained normal. Liver transcript profiling revealed a coordinated downregulation of cholesterol biosynthesis genes in LG2KO mice that was associated with reduced hepatic cholesterol in fasted mice and reduced bile acids (BAs) in feces, with a similar trend in plasma. We showed that chronic BAs or farnesoid X receptor (FXR) agonist treatment of primary islets increases glucose-stimulated insulin secretion, an effect not seen in islets from Fxr–/– mice. Collectively, our data show that glucose sensing by the liver controls β cell glucose competence and suggest BAs as a potential mechanistic link. PMID:23549084

  6. [The cerebral hemodynamics in cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy].

    PubMed

    Jin, De-xin; Chen, Xiu-yun; Huang, He; Zhang, Xu

    2006-12-01

    To investigate the cerebral hemodynamics in cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL). The blood flow velocity of cerebral arteries was measured by using transcranial Doppler ultrasound (TCD) in 6 cases with CADASIL and a quite number of age and sex matched control subjects. All patients (4 were symptomatic and 2 asymptomatic), being an established CADASIL family with the diagnosis confirmed by clinical characteristics, neuroimaging, pathology and molecular genetics, had abnormal mark signals on MR imagining and no history of hypertension, diabetes, heart disease and migraine. A routinely TCD detection, including peak-systolic velocity (Vp), end-diastolic velocity (Vd), mean velocity (Vm) and pulsatility index (PI), was carried out on the bilateral middle cerebral arteries (MCA), anterior cerebral arteries (ACA), posterior cerebral arteries (PCA) and vertebral arteries (VA) as well as the basilar artery (BA). A comparison between the cases and controls was made. Then, the changes of flow velocity in middle cerebral arteries (MCA) of the patients with CADASIL were observed before and after breathholding tests. In addition, brain CT perfusion imaging (CTP) was carried out in all the cases by using 16-slice spiral CT. The appearances of frequency spectrum were nearly normal in all the cases and there was no abnormality between the two sides on velocity (P > 0.05). As compared with the controls, the bilateral Vp, Vd and Vm in ACA and PCA were decreased obviously (P < 0.05). The velocity parameters of MCA with the exception of left Vm and right PI showed changes (P < 0.05) and there were no changes of PI in the bilateral ACA, PCA and Left MCA (P > 0.05). Moreover, there were marked changes in MCA (including Vm, Vd and PI) of all the cases as compared with the controls after breathholding (P < 0.01). Brain perfusion imaging showing the regional cerebral blood flow and regional cerebral blood volume in frontal

  7. Lenticular abnormalities in children.

    PubMed

    Khokhar, Sudarshan; Agarwal, Tushar; Kumar, Gaurav; Kushmesh, Rakhi; Tejwani, Lalit Kumar

    2012-01-01

    To study the lenticular problems in children presenting at an apex institute. Retrospective analysis of records (< 14 years) of new lens clinic cases was done. Of 1,047 children, 687 were males. Mean age at presentation was 6.35 ± 4.13 years. Developmental cataract was seen in 45.6% and posttraumatic cataract in 29.7% of patients. Other abnormalities were cataract with retinal detachment, persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous, subluxated lens, micro/spherophakia, cataract secondary to uveitis, intraocular lens complications, cataract with choroidal coloboma, and visual axis opacification. Developmental and posttraumatic cataracts were the most common abnormalities. Delayed presentation is of concern. Copyright 2012, SLACK Incorporated.

  8. Renal glucose metabolism in normal physiological conditions and in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Alsahli, Mazen; Gerich, John E

    2017-11-01

    The kidney plays an important role in glucose homeostasis via gluconeogenesis, glucose utilization, and glucose reabsorption from the renal glomerular filtrate. After an overnight fast, 20-25% of glucose released into the circulation originates from the kidneys through gluconeogenesis. In this post-absorptive state, the kidneys utilize about 10% of all glucose utilized by the body. After glucose ingestion, renal gluconeogenesis increases and accounts for approximately 60% of endogenous glucose release in the postprandial period. Each day, the kidneys filter approximately 180g of glucose and virtually all of this is reabsorbed into the circulation. Hormones (most importantly insulin and catecholamines), substrates, enzymes, and glucose transporters are some of the various factors influencing the kidney's role. Patients with type 2 diabetes have an increased renal glucose uptake and release in the fasting and the post-prandial states. Additionally, glucosuria in these patients does not occur at plasma glucose levels that would normally produce glucosuria in healthy individuals. The major abnormality of renal glucose metabolism in type 1 diabetes appears to be impaired renal glucose release during hypoglycemia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Cerebral vasculopathy in children with sickle cell anemia.

    PubMed

    Fasano, Ross M; Meier, Emily R; Hulbert, Monica L

    2015-01-01

    Sickle cell anemia (SCA)-associated cerebral vasculopathy and moyamoya is a unique entity reflecting the abnormal interactions between sickled red blood cells (RBCs) and the cerebral arterial endothelium. Endothelial injury, coagulation activation, and the inflammatory response generated by sickled RBCs are implicated in the development of cerebral vasculopathy, but the pathophysiology remains incompletely understood. SCA-specific screening and treatment guidelines have successfully reduced the incidence of overt strokes in this high-risk population. However, despite aggressive hematological management, many children with cerebral vasculopathy due to SCA have progressive vasculopathy and recurrent strokes; therefore, more effective therapies, such as revascularization surgery and curative hematopoietic stem cell transplant, are urgently needed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Cerebral Small Vessel Disease: Targeting Oxidative Stress as a Novel Therapeutic Strategy?

    PubMed Central

    De Silva, T. Michael; Miller, Alyson A.

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral small vessel disease (SVD) is a major contributor to stroke, and a leading cause of cognitive impairment and dementia. Despite the devastating effects of cerebral SVD, the pathogenesis of cerebral SVD is still not completely understood. Moreover, there are no specific pharmacological strategies for its prevention or treatment. Cerebral SVD is characterized by marked functional and structural abnormalities of the cerebral microcirculation. The clinical manifestations of these pathological changes include lacunar infarcts, white matter hyperintensities, and cerebral microbleeds. The main purpose of this review is to discuss evidence implicating oxidative stress in the arteriopathy of both non-amyloid and amyloid (cerebral amyloid angiopathy) forms of cerebral SVD and its most important risk factors (hypertension and aging), as well as its contribution to cerebral SVD-related brain injury and cognitive impairment. We also highlight current evidence of the involvement of the NADPH oxidases in the development of oxidative stress, enzymes that are a major source of reactive oxygen species in the cerebral vasculature. Lastly, we discuss potential pharmacological strategies for oxidative stress in cerebral SVD, including some of the historical and emerging NADPH oxidase inhibitors. PMID:27014073

  11. Cerebral Ketone Metabolism During Development and Injury

    PubMed Central

    Prins, Mayumi L.

    2011-01-01

    Cerebral metabolism of ketones is a normal part of the process of brain development. While the mature brain relies on glucose as a primary fuel source, metabolism of ketone bodies remains an alternative energy source under conditions of starvation. The neuroprotective properties of brain ketone metabolism make this alternative substrate a viable therapeutic option for various pathologies. Since the ability to revert to utilizing ketones as an alternative substrate is greatest in the younger post-weaned brain, this particular therapeutic approach remains an untapped resource particularly for pediatric pathological conditions. PMID:22104087

  12. Analysis of blood glucose distribution characteristics in a health examination population in Chengdu (2007-2015).

    PubMed

    Huang, Wenxia; Xu, Wangdong; Zhu, Ping; Yang, Hanwei; Su, Linchong; Tang, Huairong; Liu, Yi

    2017-12-01

    With socioeconomic growth and cultural changes in China, the level of blood glucose may have changed in recent years. This study aims to detect the blood glucose distribution characteristics with a large size of health examination population.A total of 641,311 cases (360,259 males and 281,052 females) more than 18 years old during 2007 to 2015 were recruited from the Health Examination Center at West China hospital, Sichuan University.The percentage of cases with abnormal glucose level and the mean level of glucose were significantly increased since 2007 to 2015 overall. The percentage of cases with abnormal glucose level in males was significantly higher than that in females every year, and the percentage of cases with abnormal glucose level in aged population was higher than the young population. In addition, the mean level of glucose was higher in aged population with normal level of glucose than the young population with normal level of glucose, and the mean level of glucose was higher in males with normal level of glucose than the females with normal level of glucose.The population showed an increased level of blood glucose. Some preventive action may be adopted early and more attention can be paid to them.

  13. Cranial Ultrasound Lesions in the NICU Predict Cerebral Palsy at Age 2 Years in Children Born at Extremely Low Gestational Age

    PubMed Central

    Kuban, Karl C. K.; Allred, Elizabeth N.; O’Shea, T. Michael; Paneth, Nigel; Pagano, Marcello; Dammann, Olaf; Leviton, Alan; Du Plessis, Adré; Westra, Sjirk J.; Miller, Cindy R.; Bassan, Haim; Krishnamoorthy, Kalpathy; Junewick, Joseph; Olomu, Nicholas; Romano, Elaine; Seibert, Joanna; Engelke, Steve; Karna, Padmani; Batton, Daniel; O’Connor, Sunila E.; Keller, Cecelia E.

    2009-01-01

    Our prospective cohort study of extremely low gestational age newborns evaluated the association of neonatal head ultrasound abnormalities with cerebral palsy at age 2 years. Cranial ultrasounds in 1053 infants were read with respect to intraventricular hemorrhage, ventriculomegaly, and echolucency, by multiple sonologists. Standardized neurological examinations classified cerebral palsy, and functional impairment was assessed. Forty-four percent with ventriculomegaly and 52% with echolucency developed cerebral palsy. Compared with no ultrasound abnormalities, children with echolucency were 24 times more likely to have quadriparesis and 29 times more likely to have hemiparesis. Children with ventriculomegaly were 17 times more likely to have quadriparesis or hemiparesis. Forty-three percent of children with cerebral palsy had normal head ultrasound. Focal white matter damage (echolucency) and diffuse damage (late ventriculomegaly) are associated with a high probability of cerebral palsy, especially quadriparesis. Nearly half the cerebral palsy identified at 2 years is not preceded by a neonatal brain ultrasound abnormality. PMID:19168819

  14. Bihemispheric cerebral FDG PET correlates of cognitive dysfunction as assessed by the CERAD in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Schönknecht, Oskar Dieter Peter; Hunt, Aoife; Toro, Pablo; Guenther, Thomas; Henze, Marcus; Haberkorn, Uwe; Schröder, Johannes

    2011-04-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by a variety of cognitive deficits which can be reliably assessed by the neuropsychological test battery of the Consortium to Establish a Registry for Alzheimer's Disease (CERAD), but the cerebral changes underlying the respective cognitive deficits are only partly understood. Measures of severity of dementia in AD as well as delayed episodic memory performance in mild cognitive impairment significantly correlated with bihemispheric cerebral glucose hypometabolism. We therefore hypothesized that the CERAD cognitive battery may represent cerebral dysfunction of both hemispheres in patients with AD. In 32 patients with AD, cerebral glucose metabolism was investigated using positron-emission-tomography with 18Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG PET) and associated with the test scores of the CERAD cognitive battery by statistical parametric mapping. Episodic memory scores significantly correlated with temporopari etal glucose metabolism of both hemispheres while delayed episodic memory significantly was correlated with the right frontotemporal cortices. Verbal fluency and naming scores significantly correlated with glucose metabolism in left temporoparietal and right frontal cortices, whereas constructional praxis predominantly correlated significantly with the bilateral precuneus. In conclusion, the results of our study demonstrate that not only memory function but also functions of language and constructional praxis in AD are associated with glucose metabolism as revealed by FDG PET in subsets of uni- and bilateral brain areas. The findings of our study for the first time demonstrate that in AD neuropsychological deficits as assessed by the CERAD refer to different cerebral sites of both hemispheres.

  15. Abnormality, rationality, and sanity.

    PubMed

    Hertwig, Ralph; Volz, Kirsten G

    2013-11-01

    A growing body of studies suggests that neurological and mental abnormalities foster conformity to norms of rationality that are widely endorsed in economics and psychology, whereas normality stands in the way of rationality thus defined. Here, we outline the main findings of these studies, discuss their implications for experimental design, and consider how 'sane' some benchmarks of rationality really are. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Why control blood glucose levels?

    PubMed

    Rossini, A A

    1976-03-01

    The controversy as to the relationship between the degree of control of diabetes and the progression of the complications of the disease has not been solved. However, in this review, various studies suggesting a relationship between the metabolic abnormality and the diabetic complications are examined. The disadvantages of the uncontrolled diabetes mellitus can be divided into two major categories-short-term and long-term. The short-term disadvantages of controlled diabetes mellitus include the following: (1) ketoacidosis and hyperosmolar coma; (2) intracellular dehydration; (3) electrolyte imbalance; (4) decreased phagocytosis; (5) immunologic and lymphocyte activity; (6) impairment of wound healing; and (7) abnormality of lipids. The long-term disadvantages of uncontrolled diabetes melitus include the following: (1) nephropathy; (2) neuropathy; (3) retinopathy; (4) cataract formation; (5) effect on perinatal mortality; (6) complications of vascular disease; and (7) the evaluation of various clinical studies suggesting the relationship of elevated blood glucose levels and complications of diabetes mellitus. It is suggested that until the question of control can absolutely be resolved, the recommendation is that the blood glucose levels should be controlled as close to the normal as possible.

  17. Sex-specific effects of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) on glucose metabolism in the CNS.

    PubMed

    Vieira-Marques, Claudia; Arbo, Bruno Dutra; Cozer, Aline Gonçalves; Hoefel, Ana Lúcia; Cecconello, Ana Lúcia; Zanini, Priscila; Niches, Gabriela; Kucharski, Luiz Carlos; Ribeiro, Maria Flávia M

    2017-07-01

    DHEA is a neuroactive steroid, due to its modulatory actions on the central nervous system (CNS). DHEA is able to regulate neurogenesis, neurotransmitter receptors and neuronal excitability, function, survival and metabolism. The levels of DHEA decrease gradually with advancing age, and this decline has been associated with age related neuronal dysfunction and degeneration, suggesting a neuroprotective effect of endogenous DHEA. There are significant sex differences in the pathophysiology, epidemiology and clinical manifestations of many neurological diseases. The aim of this study was to determine whether DHEA can alter glucose metabolism in different structures of the CNS from male and female rats, and if this effect is sex-specific. The results showed that DHEA decreased glucose uptake in some structures (cerebral cortex and olfactory bulb) in males, but did not affect glucose uptake in females. When compared, glucose uptake in males was higher than females. DHEA enhanced the glucose oxidation in both males (cerebral cortex, olfactory bulb, hippocampus and hypothalamus) and females (cerebral cortex and olfactory bulb), in a sex-dependent manner. In males, DHEA did not affect synthesis of glycogen, however, glycogen content was increased in the cerebral cortex and olfactory bulb. DHEA modulates glucose metabolism in a tissue-, dose- and sex-dependent manner to increase glucose oxidation, which could explain the previously described neuroprotective role of this hormone in some neurodegenerative diseases. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Abnormal pressures as hydrodynamic phenomena

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neuzil, C.E.

    1995-01-01

    So-called abnormal pressures, subsurface fluid pressures significantly higher or lower than hydrostatic, have excited speculation about their origin since subsurface exploration first encountered them. Two distinct conceptual models for abnormal pressures have gained currency among earth scientists. The static model sees abnormal pressures generally as relict features preserved by a virtual absence of fluid flow over geologic time. The hydrodynamic model instead envisions abnormal pressures as phenomena in which flow usually plays an important role. This paper develops the theoretical framework for abnormal pressures as hydrodynamic phenomena, shows that it explains the manifold occurrences of abnormal pressures, and examines the implications of this approach. -from Author

  19. Left globus pallidus abnormality in never-medicated patients with schizophrenia

    SciTech Connect

    Early, T.S.; Reiman, E.M.; Raichle, M.E.

    1987-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a severe psychiatric disorder characterized by onset in young adulthood, the occurrence of hallucinations and delusions, and the development of enduring psychosocial disability. The pathophysiology of this disorder remains unknown. Studies of cerebral blood flow and metabolism designed to identify brain abnormalities in schizophrenia have been limited by inadequate methods of anatomical localization and the possibility of persistent medication effects. The authors have now used positron emission tomography and a validated method of anatomical localization in an attempt to identify abnormalities of regional cerebral blood flow in newly diagnosed never-medicated patients with schizophrenia. An exploratory study of 5more » patients and 10 normal control subjects identified abnormally high blood flow in the left globus pallidus of patients with schizophrenia. A replication study of 5 additional patients and 10 additional control subjects confirmed this finding. No other abnormalities were found.« less

  20. Revisiting cerebral thromboangiitis obliterans.

    PubMed

    Hurelbrink, Carrie B; Barnett, Yael; Buckland, Michael E; Wilkinson, Mark; Leicester, Jon; Anderson, Craig; Brennan, Jeffrey; Barnett, Michael

    2012-06-15

    We describe a 56-year-old patient with progressive cognitive decline in the context of heavy tobacco use and migraine, and imaging evidence of an occlusive terminal cerebral vasculopathy. The results of brain biopsy recapitulated the pathological features described by Lindenberg and Spatz in their classic 1939 treatise on cerebral thromboangiitis obliterans, or cerebral Buerger's disease. Although the condition is associated with heavy smoking, the identification of a hypercoagulable state in our patient suggests a multifactorial pathogenesis. The diagnosis of cerebral thromboangiitis obliterans in life is facilitated by modern neuroimaging and should prompt immediate cessation of smoking and a search for an underlying prothrombotic tendency. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Glycolysis-induced discordance between glucose metabolic rates measured with radiolabeled fluorodeoxyglucose and glucose

    SciTech Connect

    Ackermann, R.F.; Lear, J.L.

    We have developed an autoradiographic method for estimating the oxidative and glycolytic components of local CMRglc (LCMRglc), using sequentially administered ({sup 18}F)fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and ({sup 14}C)-6-glucose (GLC). FDG-6-phosphate accumulation is proportional to the rate of glucose phosphorylation, which occurs before the divergence of glycolytic (GMg) and oxidative (GMo) glucose metabolism and is therefore related to total cerebral glucose metabolism GMt: GMg + GMo = GMt. With oxidative metabolism, the {sup 14}C label of GLC is temporarily retained in Krebs cycle-related substrate pools. We hypothesize that with glycolytic metabolism, however, a significant fraction of the {sup 14}C label is lost frommore » the brain via lactate production and efflux from the brain. Thus, cerebral GLC metabolite concentration may be more closely related to GMo than to GMt. If true, the glycolytic metabolic rate will be related to the difference between FDG- and GLC-derived LCMRglc. Thus far, we have studied normal awake rats, rats with limbic activation induced by kainic acid (KA), and rats visually stimulated with 16-Hz flashes. In KA-treated rats, significant discordance between FDG and GLC accumulation, which we attribute to glycolysis, occurred only in activated limbic structures. In visually stimulated rats, significant discordance occurred only in the optic tectum.« less

  2. Feeling Abnormal: Simulation of Deviancy in Abnormal and Exceptionality Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernald, Charles D.

    1980-01-01

    Describes activity in which student in abnormal psychology and psychology of exceptional children classes personally experience being judged abnormal. The experience allows the students to remember relevant research, become sensitized to the feelings of individuals classified as deviant, and use caution in classifying individuals as abnormal.…

  3. SUPPLY AND DEMAND IN CEREBRAL ENERGY METABOLISM: THE ROLE OF NUTRIENT TRANSPORTERS

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Ian A.; Carruthers, Anthony; Vannucci, Susan J.

    2007-01-01

    Glucose is the obligate energetic fuel for the mammalian brain and most studies of cerebral energy metabolism assume that the vast majority of cerebral glucose utilization fuels neuronal activity via oxidative metabolism, both in the basal and activated state. Glucose transporter proteins (GLUTs) deliver glucose from the circulation to the brain: GLUT1 in the microvascular endothelial cells of the blood brain barrier (BBB) and glia; GLUT3 in neurons. Lactate, the glycolytic product of glucose metabolism, is transported into and out of neural cells by the monocarboxylate transporters: MCT1 in the BBB and astrocytes and MCT2 in neurons. The proposal of the astrocyte-neuron lactate shuttle hypothesis (Pellerin and Magistretti, 1994) suggested that astrocytes play the primary role in cerebral glucose utilization and generate lactate for neuronal energetics, especially during activation. Since the identification of the GLUTs and MCTs in brain, much has been learned about their transport properties, i.e. capacity and affinity for substrate, which must be considered in any model of cerebral glucose uptake and utilization. Using concentrations and kinetic parameters of GLUT1 and GLUT3 in BBB endothelial cells, astrocytes and neurons, along with the corresponding kinetic properties of the monocarboxylate transporters, we have successfully modeled brain glucose and lactate levels as well as lactate transients in response to neuronal stimulation. Simulations based on these parameters suggest that glucose readily diffuses through the basal lamina and interstitium to neurons, which are primarily responsible for glucose uptake, metabolism, and the generation of the lactate transients observed upon neuronal activation. PMID:17579656

  4. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding.

    PubMed

    Benetti-Pinto, Cristina Laguna; Rosa-E-Silva, Ana Carolina Japur de Sá; Yela, Daniela Angerame; Soares Júnior, José Maria

    2017-07-01

    Abnormal uterine bleeding is a frequent condition in Gynecology. It may impact physical, emotional sexual and professional aspects of the lives of women, impairing their quality of life. In cases of acute and severe bleeding, women may need urgent treatment with volumetric replacement and prescription of hemostatic substances. In some specific cases with more intense and prolonged bleeding, surgical treatment may be necessary. The objective of this chapter is to describe the main evidence on the treatment of women with abnormal uterine bleeding, both acute and chronic. Didactically, the treatment options were based on the current International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) classification system (PALM-COEIN). The etiologies of PALM-COEIN are: uterine Polyp (P), Adenomyosis (A), Leiomyoma (L), precursor and Malignant lesions of the uterine body (M), Coagulopathies (C), Ovulatory dysfunction (O), Endometrial dysfunction (E), Iatrogenic (I), and Not yet classified (N). The articles were selected according to the recommendation grades of the PubMed, Cochrane and Embase databases, and those in which the main objective was the reduction of uterine menstrual bleeding were included. Only studies written in English were included. All editorial or complete papers that were not consistent with abnormal uterine bleeding, or studies in animal models, were excluded. The main objective of the treatment is the reduction of menstrual flow and morbidity and the improvement of quality of life. It is important to emphasize that the treatment in the acute phase aims to hemodynamically stabilize the patient and stop excessive bleeding, while the treatment in the chronic phase is based on correcting menstrual dysfunction according to its etiology and clinical manifestations. The treatment may be surgical or pharmacological, and the latter is based mainly on hormonal therapy, anti-inflammatory drugs and antifibrinolytics. Thieme Revinter Publicações Ltda Rio de Janeiro

  5. Data based abnormality detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purwar, Yashasvi

    Data based abnormality detection is a growing research field focussed on extracting information from feature rich data. They are considered to be non-intrusive and non-destructive in nature which gives them a clear advantage over conventional methods. In this study, we explore different streams of data based anomalies detection. We propose extension and revisions to existing valve stiction detection algorithm supported with industrial case study. We also explored the area of image analysis and proposed a complete solution for Malaria diagnosis. The proposed method is tested over images provided by pathology laboratory at Alberta Health Service. We also address the robustness and practicality of the solution proposed.

  6. Morphological abnormalities in elasmobranchs.

    PubMed

    Moore, A B M

    2015-08-01

    A total of 10 abnormal free-swimming (i.e., post-birth) elasmobranchs are reported from The (Persian-Arabian) Gulf, encompassing five species and including deformed heads, snouts, caudal fins and claspers. The complete absence of pelvic fins in a milk shark Rhizoprionodon acutus may be the first record in any elasmobranch. Possible causes, including the extreme environmental conditions and the high level of anthropogenic pollution particular to The Gulf, are briefly discussed. © 2015 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  7. Topography of brain glucose hypometabolism and epileptic network in glucose transporter 1 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Akman, Cigdem Inan; Provenzano, Frank; Wang, Dong; Engelstad, Kristin; Hinton, Veronica; Yu, Julia; Tikofsky, Ronald; Ichese, Masonari; De Vivo, Darryl C

    2015-02-01

    (18)F fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography ((18)F FDG-PET) facilitates examination of glucose metabolism. Previously, we described regional cerebral glucose hypometabolism using (18)F FDG-PET in patients with Glucose transporter 1 Deficiency Syndrome (Glut1 DS). We now expand this observation in Glut1 DS using quantitative image analysis to identify the epileptic network based on the regional distribution of glucose hypometabolism. (18)F FDG-PET scans of 16 Glut1 DS patients and 7 healthy participants were examined using Statistical parametric Mapping (SPM). Summed images were preprocessed for statistical analysis using MATLAB 7.1 and SPM 2 software. Region of interest (ROI) analysis was performed to validate SPM results. Visual analysis of the (18)F FDG-PET images demonstrated prominent regional glucose hypometabolism in the thalamus, neocortical regions and cerebellum bilaterally. Group comparison using SPM analysis confirmed that the regional distribution of glucose hypo-metabolism was present in thalamus, cerebellum, temporal cortex and central lobule. Two mildly affected patients without epilepsy had hypometabolism in cerebellum, inferior frontal cortex, and temporal lobe, but not thalamus. Glucose hypometabolism did not correlate with age at the time of PET imaging, head circumference, CSF glucose concentration at the time of diagnosis, RBC glucose uptake, or CNS score. Quantitative analysis of (18)F FDG-PET imaging in Glut1 DS patients confirmed that hypometabolism was present symmetrically in thalamus, cerebellum, frontal and temporal cortex. The hypometabolism in thalamus correlated with the clinical history of epilepsy. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Unmasking glucose metabolism alterations in stable renal transplant recipients: a multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Delgado, Patricia; Diaz, Juan Manuel; Silva, Irene; Osorio, José M; Osuna, Antonio; Bayés, Beatriz; Lauzurica, Ricardo; Arellano, Edgar; Campistol, Jose Maria; Dominguez, Rosa; Gómez-Alamillo, Carlos; Ibernon, Meritxell; Moreso, Francisco; Benitez, Rocio; Lampreave, Ildefonso; Porrini, Esteban; Torres, Armando

    2008-05-01

    Emerging information indicates that glucose metabolism alterations are common after renal transplantation and are associated with carotid atheromatosis. The aims of this study were to investigate the prevalence of different glucose metabolism alterations in stable recipients as well as the factors related to the condition. A multicenter, cross-sectional study was conducted of 374 renal transplant recipients without pre- or posttransplantation diabetes. A standard 75-g oral glucose tolerance test was performed. Glucose metabolism alterations were present in 119 (31.8%) recipients: 92 (24.6%) with an abnormal oral glucose tolerance test and 27 (7.2%) with isolated impaired fasting glucose. The most common disorder was impaired glucose tolerance (17.9%), and an abnormal oral glucose tolerance test was observed for 21.5% of recipients with a normal fasting glucose. By multivariate analysis, age, prednisone dosage, triglyceride/high-density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio, and beta blocker use were shown to be factors related to glucose metabolism alterations. Remarkably, triglyceride levels, triglyceride/high-density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio, and the proportion of recipients with impaired fasting glucose were already higher throughout the first posttransplantation year in recipients with a current glucose metabolism alteration as compared with those without the condition. Glucose metabolism alterations are common in stable renal transplant recipients, and an oral glucose tolerance test is required for its detection. They are associated with a worse metabolic profile, which is already present during the first posttransplantation year. These findings may help planning strategies for early detection and intervention.

  9. The impact of age on cerebral perfusion, oxygenation and metabolism during exercise in humans

    PubMed Central

    Braz, Igor D.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Age is one of the most important risk factors for dementia and stroke. Examination of the cerebral circulatory responses to acute exercise in the elderly may help to pinpoint the mechanisms by which exercise training can reduce the risk of brain diseases, inform the optimization of exercise training programmes and assist with the identification of age‐related alterations in cerebral vascular function. During low‐to‐moderate intensity dynamic exercise, enhanced neuronal activity is accompanied by cerebral perfusion increases of ∼10–30%. Beyond ∼60–70% maximal oxygen uptake, cerebral metabolism remains elevated but perfusion in the anterior portion of the circulation returns towards baseline, substantively because of a hyperventilation‐mediated reduction in the partial pressure of arterial carbon dioxide (P aC O2) and cerebral vasoconstriction. Cerebral perfusion is lower in older individuals, both at rest and during incremental dynamic exercise. Nevertheless, the increase in the estimated cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen and the arterial–internal jugular venous differences for glucose and lactate are similar in young and older individuals exercising at the same relative exercise intensities. Correction for the age‐related reduction in P aC O2 during exercise by the provision of supplementary CO2 is suggested to remove ∼50% of the difference in cerebral perfusion between young and older individuals. A multitude of candidates could account for the remaining difference, including cerebral atrophy, and enhanced vasoconstrictor and blunted vasodilatory pathways. In summary, age‐related reductions in cerebral perfusion during exercise are partly associated with a lower P aC O2 in exercising older individuals; nevertheless the cerebral extraction of glucose, lactate and oxygen appear to be preserved. PMID:26435295

  10. Association of Retinopathy and Retinal Microvascular Abnormalities with Stroke and Cerebrovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Alun D; Falaschetti, Emanuela; Witt, Nicholas; Wijetunge, Sumangali; Thom, Simon A McG; Tillin, Therese; Aldington, Steve J; Chaturvedi, Nish

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose Abnormalities of the retinal circulation may be associated with cerebrovascular disease. We investigated associations between retinal microvascular abnormalities and 1) strokes and subclinical cerebral infarcts and 2) cerebral white matter lesions in a UK-based tri-ethnic population-based cohort. Methods 1185 participants (age 68.8±6.1y; 77% male) underwent retinal imaging and cerebral MRI. Cerebral infarcts and white matter hyperintensities (WMH) were identified on MRI, retinopathy was graded and retinal vessels were measured. Results Higher retinopathy grade (odds ratio (OR) = 1.40 (1.16, 1.70)), narrower arteriolar diameter (OR = 0.98 (0.97, 0.99)), fewer symmetrical arteriolar bifurcations (OR = 0.84 (0.75, 0.95)), higher arteriolar optimality deviation (OR = 1.16 (1.00, 1.34)) and more tortuous venules (OR = 1.20(1.09, 1.32)) were associated with strokes/infarcts and WMH. Associations with quantitative retinal microvascular measures were independent of retinopathy. Conclusions Abnormalities of the retinal microvasculature are independently associated with stroke, cerebral infarcts and white matter lesions. PMID:27729577

  11. Association of Retinopathy and Retinal Microvascular Abnormalities With Stroke and Cerebrovascular Disease.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Alun D; Falaschetti, Emanuela; Witt, Nicholas; Wijetunge, Sumangali; Thom, Simon A McG; Tillin, Therese; Aldington, Steve J; Chaturvedi, Nish

    2016-11-01

    Abnormalities of the retinal circulation may be associated with cerebrovascular disease. We investigated associations between retinal microvascular abnormalities and (1) strokes and subclinical cerebral infarcts and (2) cerebral white matter lesions in a UK-based triethnic population-based cohort. A total of 1185 participants (age, 68.8±6.1 years; 77% men) underwent retinal imaging and cerebral magnetic resonance imaging. Cerebral infarcts and white matter hyperintensities were identified on magnetic resonance imaging, retinopathy was graded, and retinal vessels were measured. Higher retinopathy grade (odds ratio [OR], 1.40 [95% confidence interval (95% CI), 1.16-1.70]), narrower arteriolar diameter (OR, 0.98 [95% CI, 0.97-0.99]), fewer symmetrical arteriolar bifurcations (OR, 0.84 [95% CI, 0.75-0.95]), higher arteriolar optimality deviation (OR, 1.16 [95% CI, 1.00-1.34]), and more tortuous venules (OR, 1.20 [95% CI, 1.09-1.32]) were associated with strokes/infarcts and white matter hyperintensities. Associations with quantitative retinal microvascular measures were independent of retinopathy. Abnormalities of the retinal microvasculature are independently associated with stroke, cerebral infarcts, and white matter lesions. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  12. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003671.htm Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) is a protein that helps ...

  13. Glucose test (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... person with diabetes constantly manages their blood's sugar (glucose) levels. After a blood sample is taken and tested, it is determined whether the glucose levels are low or high. Following your health ...

  14. VEGF inhibitors in the treatment of cerebral edema in patients with brain cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gerstner, Elizabeth R.; Duda, Dan G.; di Tomaso, Emmanuelle; Ryg, Peter A.; Loeffler, Jay S.; Sorensen, A. Gregory; Ivy, Percy; Jain, Rakesh K.; Batchelor, Tracy T.

    2016-01-01

    Most brain tumors oversecrete vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), which leads to an abnormally permeable tumor vasculature. This hyperpermeability allows fluid to leak from the intravascular space into the brain parenchyma, which causes vasogenic cerebral edema and increased interstitial fluid pressure. Increased interstitial fluid pressure has an important role in treatment resistance by contributing to tumor hypoxia and preventing adequate tumor penetration of chemotherapy agents. In addition, edema and the corticosteroids needed to control cerebral edema cause significant morbidity and mortality. Agents that block the VEGF pathway are able to decrease vascular permeability and, thus, cerebral edema, by restoring the abnormal tumor vasculature to a more normal state. Decreasing cerebral edema minimizes the adverse effects of corticosteroids and could improve clinical outcomes. Anti-VEGF agents might also be useful in other cancer-related conditions that increase vascular permeability, such as malignant pleural effusions or ascites. PMID:19333229

  15. Ischemic brain injury in cerebral amyloid angiopathy

    PubMed Central

    van Veluw, Susanne J; Greenberg, Steven M

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) is a common form of cerebral small vessel disease and an important risk factor for intracerebral hemorrhage and cognitive impairment. While the majority of research has focused on the hemorrhagic manifestation of CAA, its ischemic manifestations appear to have substantial clinical relevance as well. Findings from imaging and pathologic studies indicate that ischemic lesions are common in CAA, including white-matter hyperintensities, microinfarcts, and microstructural tissue abnormalities as detected with diffusion tensor imaging. Furthermore, imaging markers of ischemic disease show a robust association with cognition, independent of age, hemorrhagic lesions, and traditional vascular risk factors. Widespread ischemic tissue injury may affect cognition by disrupting white-matter connectivity, thereby hampering communication between brain regions. Challenges are to identify imaging markers that are able to capture widespread microvascular lesion burden in vivo and to further unravel the etiology of ischemic tissue injury by linking structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) abnormalities to their underlying pathophysiology and histopathology. A better understanding of the underlying mechanisms of ischemic brain injury in CAA will be a key step toward new interventions to improve long-term cognitive outcomes for patients with CAA. PMID:25944592

  16. Impaired glucose tolerance in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Pradat, Pierre-Francois; Bruneteau, Gaelle; Gordon, Paul H; Dupuis, Luc; Bonnefont-Rousselot, Dominique; Simon, Dominique; Salachas, Francois; Corcia, Philippe; Frochot, Vincent; Lacorte, Jean-Marc; Jardel, Claude; Coussieu, Christiane; Le Forestier, Nadine; Lacomblez, Lucette; Loeffler, Jean-Philippe; Meininger, Vincent

    2010-01-01

    Our objectives were to analyse carbohydrate metabolism in a series of ALS patients and to examine potential association with parameters of lipid metabolism and clinical features. Glucose tolerance was assessed by the oral glucose tolerance test in 21 non-diabetic ALS patients and compared with 21 age- and sex-matched normal subjects. Lipids and lactate/pyruvate ratio, levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (tumour necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-6) and adipocytokines (leptin and adiponectin) were also measured in ALS patients. Mann-Whitney U-tests analysed continuous data and Fisher's exact tests assessed categorical data. Blood glucose determined 120 min after the glucose bolus was significantly higher in patients with ALS (7.41 mmol/l+/-1.68) compared to controls (6.05+/-1.44, p=0.006). ALS patients with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) according to WHO criteria (n=7, 33%) were more likely to have elevated free fatty acids (FFA) levels compared to patients with normal glucose tolerance (0.77 nmol/l+/-0.30 vs. 0.57+/-0.19, p=0.04). IGT was not associated with disease duration or severity. In conclusion, patients with ALS show abnormal glucose tolerance that could be associated with increased FFA levels, a key determinant of insulin resistance. The origin of glucose homeostasis abnormalities in ALS may be multifactorial and deserves further investigation.

  17. Improved cerebral energetics and ketone body metabolism in db/db mice

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Jens V; Christensen, Sofie K; Nissen, Jakob D

    2016-01-01

    It is becoming evident that type 2 diabetes mellitus is affecting brain energy metabolism. The importance of alternative substrates for the brain in type 2 diabetes mellitus is poorly understood. The aim of this study was to investigate whether ketone bodies are relevant candidates to compensate for cerebral glucose hypometabolism and unravel the functionality of cerebral mitochondria in type 2 diabetes mellitus. Acutely isolated cerebral cortical and hippocampal slices of db/db mice were incubated in media containing [U-13C]glucose, [1,2-13C]acetate or [U-13C]β-hydroxybutyrate and tissue extracts were analysed by mass spectrometry. Oxygen consumption and ATP synthesis of brain mitochondria of db/db mice were assessed by Seahorse XFe96 and luciferin-luciferase assay, respectively. Glucose hypometabolism was observed for both cerebral cortical and hippocampal slices of db/db mice. Significant increased metabolism of [1,2-13C]acetate and [U-13C]β-hydroxybutyrate was observed for hippocampal slices of db/db mice. Furthermore, brain mitochondria of db/db mice exhibited elevated oxygen consumption and ATP synthesis rate. This study provides evidence of several changes in brain energy metabolism in type 2 diabetes mellitus. The increased hippocampal ketone body utilization and improved mitochondrial function in db/db mice, may act as adaptive mechanisms in order to maintain cerebral energetics during hampered glucose metabolism. PMID:28058963

  18. Ictal Cardiac Ryhthym Abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Ali, Rushna

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac rhythm abnormalities in the context of epilepsy are a well-known phenomenon. However, they are under-recognized and often missed. The pathophysiology of these events is unclear. Bradycardia and asystole are preceded by seizure onset suggesting ictal propagation into the cortex impacting cardiac autonomic function, and the insula and amygdala being possible culprits. Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) refers to the unanticipated death of a patient with epilepsy not related to status epilepticus, trauma, drowning, or suicide. Frequent refractory generalized tonic-clonic seizures, anti-epileptic polytherapy, and prolonged duration of epilepsy are some of the commonly identified risk factors for SUDEP. However, the most consistent risk factor out of these is an increased frequency of generalized tonic-clonic seizures (GTC). Prevention of SUDEP is extremely important in patients with chronic, generalized epilepsy. Since increased frequency of GTCS is the most consistently reported risk factor for SUDEP, effective seizure control is the most important preventive strategy.

  19. Differential diagnosis of bilateral parietal abnormalities in I-123 IMP SPECT imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Kuwabara, Y.; Ichiya, Y.; Otsuka, M.

    1990-12-01

    This report discusses the clinical significance of bilateral parietal abnormalities on I-123 IMP SPECT imaging in 158 patients with cerebral disorders. This pattern was seen in 15 out of 21 patients with Alzheimer's disease; it was also seen in 4 out of 5 patients with Parkinson's disease with dementia, in 3 out of 17 patients with vascular dementia, in 1 out of 36 patients with cerebral infarction without dementia, in 1 out of 2 patients with hypoglycemia, and in 1 out of 2 patients with CO intoxication. Detection of bilateral parietal abnormalities is a useful finding in the diagnosis ofmore » Alzheimer's disease, but one should keep in mind that other cerebral disorders may also show a similar pattern with I-123 IMP SPECT imaging.« less

  20. Glucose screening tests during pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    Oral glucose tolerance test - pregnancy; OGTT - pregnancy; Glucose challenge test - pregnancy; Gestational diabetes - glucose screening ... first step, you will have a glucose screening test: You DO NOT need to prepare or change ...

  1. Duplicated middle cerebral artery

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Jesus; Machado, Calixto; Scherle, Claudio; Hierro, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Duplicated middle cerebral artery (DMCA) is an anomalous vessel arising from the internal carotid artery. The incidence DMCA is relatively law, and an association between this anomaly and cerebral aneurysms has been documented. There is a controversy whether DMCA may have perforating arteries. This is an important fact to consider in aneurysm surgery. We report the case of a 34-year-old black woman who suffered a subarachnoid hemorrhage and the angiography a left DMCA, and an aneurysm in an inferior branch of the main MCA. The DMCA and the MCA had perforating arteries. The aneurysm was clipped without complications. The observation of perforating arteries in our patient confirms that the DMCA may have perforating arteries. This is very important to be considered in cerebral aneurysms surgery. Moreover, the DMCA may potentially serve as a collateral blood supply to the MCA territory in cases of MCA occlusion. PMID:22140405

  2. Involuntary masturbation and hemiballismus after bilateral anterior cerebral artery infarction.

    PubMed

    Bejot, Yannick; Caillier, Marie; Osseby, Guy-Victor; Didi, Roy; Ben Salem, Douraied; Moreau, Thibault; Giroud, Maurice

    2008-02-01

    Ischemia of the areas supplied by the anterior cerebral artery is relatively uncommon. In addition, combined hemiballismus and masturbation have rarely been reported in patients with cerebrovascular disease. We describe herein a 62-year-old right-handed man simultaneously exhibiting right side hemiballismus and involuntary masturbation with the left hand after bilateral infarction of the anterior cerebral artery territory. Right side hemiballismus was related to the disruption of afferent fibers from the left frontal lobe to the left subthalamic nucleus. Involuntary masturbation using the left hand was exclusively linked to a callosal type of alien hand syndrome secondary to infarction of the right side of the anterior corpus callosum. After 2 weeks, these abnormal behaviours were completely extinguished. This report stresses the wide diversity of clinical manifestations observed after infarction of the anterior cerebral artery territory.

  3. [Trismus, pseudobulbar syndrome and cerebral deep venous thrombosis].

    PubMed

    Alecu, C; De Bray, J M; Penisson-Besnier, I; Pasco-Papon, A; Dubas, F

    2001-03-01

    We report a case of cerebral deep venous thrombosis that manifested clinically by a pseudobulbar syndrome with major trismus, abnormal movements and static cerebellar syndrome. To our knowledge, only three other cases of deep cerebral venous thrombosis associated with cerebellar or pseudobulbar syndrome have been published since 1985. The relatively good prognosis in our patient could be explained by the partially intact internal cerebral veins as well as use of early anticoagulant therapy. There was a spontaneous hyperdensity of the falx cerebri and the tentorium cerebelli on the brain CT scan, an aspect highly contributive to diagnosis. This hyperdensity of the falx cerebri was found in 19 out of 22 cases of deep venous thrombosis detailed in the literature.

  4. Effect of gender on glucose utilization rates in healthy humans: A positron emission tomography study

    SciTech Connect

    Miura, S.A.; Schapiro, M.B.; Grady, C.L.

    Positron emission tomography (PET) was used with 18fluorodeoxyglucose to see if gender differences in resting cerebral glucose utilization could be detected. Thirty-two healthy subjects (15 women and 17 men; age range: 21-38 yr) were examined using a high-resolution PET scanner to determine the regional cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (CMRglc) in 65 gray matter regions of interest. Whole brain CMRglc did not differ significantly between the two genders, nor did any of the regional CMRglc values. Only 1 of 65 ratios of regional-to-whole brain CMRglc differed significantly between men and women, which is consistent with chance. These results indicate thatmore » there are no differences in resting regional cerebral glucose utilization between young men and women.« less

  5. Voxel-based mapping of grey matter volume and glucose metabolism profiles in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Buhour, M-S; Doidy, F; Mondou, A; Pélerin, A; Carluer, L; Eustache, F; Viader, F; Desgranges, B

    2017-12-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a rapidly progressive disease of the nervous system involving both upper and lower motor neurons. The patterns of structural and metabolic brain alterations are still unclear. Several studies using anatomical MRI yielded a number of discrepancies in their results, and a few PET studies investigated the effect of ALS on cerebral glucose metabolism. The aim of this study was threefold: to highlight the patterns of grey matter (GM) atrophy, hypometabolism and hypermetabolism in patients with ALS, then to understand the neurobehavioral significance of hypermetabolism and, finally, to investigate the regional differences between the morphologic and functional changes in ALS patients, using a specially designed voxel-based method. Thirty-seven patients with ALS and 37 age- and sex-matched healthy individuals underwent both structural MRI and 18 [F]-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET examinations. PET data were corrected for partial volume effects. Structural and metabolic abnormalities were examined in ALS patients compared with control subjects using two-sample t tests in statistical parametric mapping (SPM). Then, we extracted the metabolic values of clusters presenting hypermetabolism to correlate with selected cognitive scores. Finally, GM atrophy and hypometabolism patterns were directly compared with a one-paired t test in SPM. We found GM atrophy as well as hypometabolism in motor and extra motor regions and hypermetabolism in medial temporal lobe and cerebellum. We observed negative correlations between the metabolism of the right and left parahippocampal gyri and episodic memory and between the metabolism of right temporal pole and cognitive theory of mind. GM atrophy predominated in the temporal pole, left hippocampus and right thalamus, while hypometabolism predominated in a single cluster in the left frontal superior medial cortex. Our findings provide direct evidence of regional variations in the hierarchy and relationships

  6. Increased cerebellar PET glucose metabolism corresponds to ataxia in Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fellgiebel, Andreas; Siessmeier, Thomas; Winterer, Georg; Lüddens, Hartmut; Mann, Klaus; Schmidt, Lutz G; Bartenstein, Peter

    2004-01-01

    To investigate a possible relationship between cerebellar glucose metabolism and recovery from ataxia in the first months of acute Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome. Two cases of alcoholic Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome were followed up with the clinical status and cerebral glucose metabolism over a 4- and 9-month period. Initially both patients showed severe ataxia and elevated cerebellar glucose metabolism that decreased corresponding to the restitution of stance and gait. Increased cerebellar glucose metabolism at the onset of the illness may reflect the reorganization process of disturbed motor skills and may indicate cerebellar plasticity.

  7. Perioperative cerebral hemodynamics and oxygen metabolism in neonates with single-ventricle physiology

    PubMed Central

    Dehaes, Mathieu; Cheng, Henry H.; Buckley, Erin M.; Lin, Pei-Yi; Ferradal, Silvina; Williams, Kathryn; Vyas, Rutvi; Hagan, Katherine; Wigmore, Daniel; McDavitt, Erica; Soul, Janet S.; Franceschini, Maria Angela; Newburger, Jane W.; Ellen Grant, P.

    2015-01-01

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) patients are at risk for neurodevelopmental delay. The etiology of these delays is unclear, but abnormal prenatal cerebral maturation and postoperative hemodynamic instability likely play a role. A better understanding of these factors is needed to improve neurodevelopmental outcome. In this study, we used bedside frequency-domain near infrared spectroscopy (FDNIRS) and diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) to assess cerebral hemodynamics and oxygen metabolism in neonates with single-ventricle (SV) CHD undergoing surgery and compared them to controls. Our goals were 1) to compare cerebral hemodynamics between unanesthetized SV and healthy neonates, and 2) to determine if FDNIRS-DCS could detect alterations in cerebral hemodynamics beyond cerebral hemoglobin oxygen saturation (SO2). Eleven SV neonates were recruited and compared to 13 controls. Preoperatively, SV patients showed decreased cerebral blood flow (CBFi), cerebral oxygen metabolism (CMRO2i) and SO2; and increased oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) compared to controls. Compared to preoperative values, unstable postoperative SV patients had decreased CMRO2i and CBFi, which returned to baseline when stable. However, SO2 showed no difference between unstable and stable states. Preoperative SV neonates are flow-limited and show signs of impaired cerebral development compared to controls. FDNIRS-DCS shows potential to improve assessment of cerebral development and postoperative hemodynamics compared to SO2 alone. PMID:26713191

  8. Neuroimaging findings in children with retinopathy-confirmed cerebral malaria.

    PubMed

    Potchen, Michael J; Birbeck, Gretchen L; Demarco, J Kevin; Kampondeni, Sam D; Beare, Nicholas; Molyneux, Malcolm E; Taylor, Terrie E

    2010-04-01

    To describe brain CT findings in retinopathy-confirmed, paediatric cerebral malaria. In this outcomes study of paediatric cerebral malaria, a subset of children with protracted coma during initial presentation was scanned acutely. Survivors experiencing adverse neurological outcomes also underwent a head CT. All children had ophthalmological examination to confirm the presence of the retinopathy specific for cerebral malaria. Independent interpretation of CT images was provided by two neuroradiologists. Acute brain CT findings in three children included diffuse oedema with obstructive hydrocephalus (2), acute cerebral infarctions in multiple large vessel distributions with secondary oedema and herniation (1), and oedema of thalamic grey matter (1). One child who was reportedly normal prior to admission had parenchymal atrophy suggestive of pre-existing CNS injury. Among 56 survivors (9-84 months old), 15 had adverse neurologic outcomes-11/15 had a follow-up head CT, 3/15 died and 1/15 refused CT. Follow-up head CTs obtained 7-18 months after the acute infection revealed focal and multifocal lobar atrophy correlating to regions affected by focal seizures during the acute infection (5/11). Other findings were communicating hydrocephalus (2/11), vermian atrophy (1/11) and normal studies (3/11). The identification of pre-existing imaging abnormalities in acute cerebral malaria suggests that population-based studies are required to establish the rate and nature of incidental imaging abnormalities in Malawi. Children with focal seizures during acute cerebral malaria developed focal cortical atrophy in these regions at follow-up. Longitudinal studies are needed to further elucidate mechanisms of CNS injury and death in this common fatal disease. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Luzzatto, Lucio; Nannelli, Caterina; Notaro, Rosario

    2016-04-01

    G6PD is a housekeeping gene expressed in all cells. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) is part of the pentose phosphate pathway, and its main physiologic role is to provide NADPH. G6PD deficiency, one of the commonest inherited enzyme abnormalities in humans, arises through one of many possible mutations, most of which reduce the stability of the enzyme and its level as red cells age. G6PD-deficient persons are mostly asymptomatic, but they can develop severe jaundice during the neonatal period and acute hemolytic anemia when they ingest fava beans or when they are exposed to certain infections or drugs. G6PD deficiency is a global health issue. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Prediction of vascular abnormalities on CT angiography in patients with acute headache.

    PubMed

    Alons, Imanda M E; Goudsmit, Ben F J; Jellema, Korné; van Walderveen, Marianne A A; Wermer, Marieke J H; Algra, Ale

    2018-05-09

    Patients with acute headache increasingly undergo CT-angiography (CTA) to evaluate underlying vascular causes. The aim of this study is to determine clinical and non-contrast CT (NCCT) criteria to select patients who might benefit from CTA. We retrospectively included patients with acute headache who presented to the emergency department of an academic medical center and large regional teaching hospital and underwent NCCT and CTA. We identified factors that increased the probability of finding a vascular abnormality on CTA, performed multivariable regression analyses and determined discrimination with the c-statistic. A total of 384 patients underwent NCCT and CTA due to acute headache. NCCT was abnormal in 194 patients. Among these, we found abnormalities in 116 cases of which 99 aneurysms. In the remaining 190 with normal NCCT we found abnormalities in 12 cases; four unruptured aneurysms, three cerebral venous thrombosis', two reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndromes, two cervical arterial dissections and one cerebellar infarction. In multivariable analysis abnormal NCCT, lowered consciousness and presentation within 6 hr of headache onset were independently associated with abnormal CTA. The c-statistic of abnormal NCCT alone was 0.80 (95% CI: 0.75-0.80), that also including the other two variables was 0.84 (95% CI: 0.80-0.88). If NCCT was normal no other factors could help identify patients at risk for abnormalities. In patients with acute headache abnormal NCCT is the strongest predictor of a vascular abnormality on CTA. If NCCT is normal no other predictors increase the probability of finding an abnormality on CTA and diagnostic yield is low. © 2018 The Authors. Brain and Behavior published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Diagnosing cerebral visual impairment in children with good visual acuity.

    PubMed

    van Genderen, Maria; Dekker, Marjoke; Pilon, Florine; Bals, Irmgard

    2012-06-01

    To identify elements that could facilitate the diagnosis of cerebral visual impairment (CVI) in children with good visual acuity in the general ophthalmic clinic. We retrospectively investigated the clinical characteristics of 30 children with good visual acuity and CVI and compared them with those of 23 children who were referred with a suspicion of CVI, but proved to have a different diagnosis. Clinical characteristics included medical history, MRI findings, visual acuity, crowding ratio (CR), visual field assessment, and the results of ophthalmologic and orthoptic examination. We also evaluated the additional value of a short CVI questionnaire. Eighty-three percent of the children with an abnormal medical history (mainly prematurity and perinatal hypoxia) had CVI, in contrast with none of the children with a normal medical history. Cerebral palsy, visual field defects, and partial optic atrophy only occurred in the CVI group. 41% of the children with CVI had a CR ≥2.0, which may be related to dorsal stream dysfunction. All children with CVI, but also 91% of the children without CVI gave ≥3 affirmative answers on the CVI questionnaire. An abnormal pre- or perinatal medical history is the most important risk factor for CVI in children, and therefore in deciding which children should be referred for further multidisciplinary assessment. Additional symptoms of cerebral damage, i.e., cerebral palsy, visual field defects, partial optic atrophy, and a CR ≥2 may support the diagnosis. CVI questionnaires should not be used for screening purposes as they yield too many false positives.

  12. Delayed coma in head injury: consider cerebral fat embolism.

    PubMed

    Metting, Zwany; Rödiger, Lars A; Regtien, Joost G; van der Naalt, Joukje

    2009-09-01

    To describe a case of a young man with delayed coma after mild head injury, suggestive of cerebral fat embolism (CFE). To underline the value of MR imaging in the differential diagnosis of secondary deterioration in mild head injury. A 21-year-old man admitted with mild head injury after a fall with facial fractures and long bone fractures. He was admitted to the intensive care unit and was mechanically ventilated. Weaning was not possible because of desaturations and pulmonary congestion. Low platelet count and anaemia developed. On several time points during his admission cerebral imaging data were obtained. Non-contrast CT on admission was normal while follow-up MRI showed extensive white matter abnormalities. These imaging abnormalities combined with the clinical presentation suggests cerebral fat embolism (CFE) as the most likely cause of secondary deterioration in our patient. In head injured patients with long bone fractures one should consider cerebral fat embolism. When the classical clinical syndrome is not present, MR imaging is warranted for diagnosis and to exclude other causes of secondary deterioration.

  13. Regional analyses of CNS microdialysate glucose and lactate in seizure patients.

    PubMed

    Cornford, Eain M; Shamsa, Kamran; Zeitzer, Jamie M; Enriquez, Cathleen M; Wilson, Charles L; Behnke, Eric J; Fried, Itzhak; Engel, Jerome

    2002-11-01

    To correlate glucose (and lactate) results obtained from microdialysate to recent studies suggesting that glucose transporter activity may be significantly altered in seizures. We used a fluorometric technique to quantify glucose and lactate levels in microdialysates collected from two to four depth electrodes implanted per patient in the temporal and frontal lobes of a series of four patients. Hour-by-hour and day-to-day changes in brain glucose and lactate levels at the same site were recorded. Additionally we compared regional variations in lactate/glucose ratios around the predicted epileptogenic region. Lactate/glucose ratios in the range of 1-2:1 were the most commonly seen. When the lactate/glucose ratio was <1:1, we typically observed a relative increase in local glucose concentration (rather than decreased lactate), suggesting increased transport, perhaps without increased glycolysis. In some sites, lactate/glucose ratios of 3:1-15:1 were seen, suggesting that a circumscribed zone of inhibition of tricarboxylic acid cycle activity may have been locally induced. In these dialysates, collected from probes closer to the epileptogenic region, the large increase in lactate/glucose ratios was a result of both increased lactate and reduced glucose levels. We conclude that regional variations in brain extracellular glucose concentrations may be of greater magnitude than previously believed and become even more accentuated in partial seizure patients. Data from concomitant assays of microdialysate lactate and glucose may aid in understanding cerebral metabolism.

  14. A Stepwise Approach: Decreasing Infection in Deep Brain Stimulation for Childhood Dystonic Cerebral Palsy.

    PubMed

    Johans, Stephen J; Swong, Kevin N; Hofler, Ryan C; Anderson, Douglas E

    2017-09-01

    Dystonia is a movement disorder characterized by involuntary muscle contractions, which cause twisting movements or abnormal postures. Deep brain stimulation has been used to improve the quality of life for secondary dystonia caused by cerebral palsy. Despite being a viable treatment option for childhood dystonic cerebral palsy, deep brain stimulation is associated with a high rate of infection in children. The authors present a small series of patients with dystonic cerebral palsy who underwent a stepwise approach for bilateral globus pallidus interna deep brain stimulation placement in order to decrease the rate of infection. Four children with dystonic cerebral palsy who underwent a total of 13 surgical procedures (electrode and battery placement) were identified via a retrospective review. There were zero postoperative infections. Using a multistaged surgical plan for pediatric patients with dystonic cerebral palsy undergoing deep brain stimulation may help to reduce the risk of infection.

  15. Dynamic change in cerebral microcirculation and focal cerebral metabolism in experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Song, Jin-Ning; Chen, Hu; Zhang, Ming; Zhao, Yong-Lin; Ma, Xu-Dong

    2013-03-01

    Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in the cerebral metabolism and energy metabolism measurements can be used to assess blood flow of brain cells and to detect cell activity. Changes of rCBF in the cerebral microcirculation and energy metabolism were determined in an experimental model of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) model in 56 large-eared Japanese rabbits about 12 to 16-month old. Laser Doppler flowmetry was used to detect the blood supply to brain cells. Internal carotid artery and vein blood samples were used for duplicate blood gas analysis to assess the energy metabolism of brain cells. Cerebral blood flow (CBF) was detected by single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) perfusion imaging using Tc-99m ethyl cysteinate dimer (Tc-99m ECD) as an imaging reagent. The percentage of injected dose per gram of brain tissue was calculated and analyzed. There were positive correlations between the percentage of radionuclide injected per gram of brain tissue and rCBF supply and cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen (P < 0.05). However, there was a negative correlation between radioactivity counts per unit volume detected on the SPECT rheoencephalogram and lactic acid concentration in the homolateral internal carotid artery and vein. In summary, this study found abnormal CBF in metabolism and utilization of brain cells after SAH, and also found that deterioration of energy metabolism of brain cells played a significant role in the development of SAH. There are matched reductions in CBF and metabolism. Thus, SPECT imaging could be used as a noninvasive method to detect CBF.

  16. Abnormal uterine bleeding.

    PubMed

    Cheong, Ying; Cameron, Iain T; Critchley, Hilary O D

    2017-09-01

    It is not uncommon for a woman to suffer from abnormal uterine bleeding (AUB) or heavy menstrual bleeding (HMB) at some point during her lifetime. Once pathology is excluded, in practice, management needs to be individualised, taking into account the improvement of the woman's symptoms and quality of life. Peer-reviewed journals, governmental and professional society publications. There is now agreement on a structured, universal approach to the diagnosis of AUB, with the aide memoirs PALM (polyps, adenomyosis, leiomyoma, malignancy) and COEIN (coagulopathies, ovulatory dysfunction, endometrial, iatrogenic, not otherwise classified). Once malignancy and significant pelvic pathology have been ruled out, medical treatment is an effective first-line therapeutic option, with surgery, including endometrial ablation and hysterectomy, offered when medical management has failed to resolve symptoms and fertility is no longer desired. There remains controversy around the management of the types and subtypes of adenomyosis and leiomyoma, and understanding their impact on clinical reproductive outcomes. Standardised assessment tools for measuring outcomes of AUB are being developed. Novel diagnostic and monitoring tools should be developed to help stratify treatment for women with AUB, particularly relating to 'unclassified' and 'endometrial' causes. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  17. Communication and abnormal behaviour.

    PubMed

    Crown, S

    1979-01-01

    In this paper the similarities between normal and abnormal behaviour are emphasized and selected aspects of communication, normal and aberrant, between persons are explored. Communication in a social system may be verbal or non-verbal: one person's actions cause a response in another person. This response may be cognitive, behavioural or physiological. Communication may be approached through the individual, the social situation or social interaction. Psychoanalysis approaches the individual in terms of the coded communications of psychoneurotic symptoms or psychotic behaviour; the humanist-existential approach is concerned more with emotional expression. Both approaches emphasize the development of individual identity. The interaction between persons and their social background is stressed. Relevant are sociological concepts such as illness behaviour, stigma, labelling, institutionalization and compliance. Two approaches to social interactions are considered: the gamesplaying metaphor, e.g. back pain as a psychosocial manipulation--the 'pain game'; and the 'spiral of reciprocal perspectives' which emphasizes the interactional complexities of social perceptions. Communicatory aspects of psychological treatments are noted: learning a particular metaphor such as 'resolution' of the problem (psychotherapy), learning more 'rewarding' behaviour (learning theory) or learning authenticity or self-actualization (humanist-existential).

  18. Autoshaping of abnormal children.

    PubMed

    Deckner, C W; Wilcox, L M; Maisto, S A; Blanton, R L

    1980-09-01

    Three experimentally naive abnormal children were exposed to a terminal operant contingency, i.e., reinforcement was delivered only if the children pressed a panel during intervals when it was lighted. Despite the absence of both successive approximation and manual shaping, it was found that each child began to respond discriminatively within a small number of trials. These data replicated previous animal studies concerned with the phenomena of autoshaping and signal-controlled responding. It was also found, however, that one type of autoshaping, the classical conditioning procedure, had a powerful suppressive effect on the discriminative responding. An experimental analysis that consisted procedure, had a powerful suppressive effect on discriminative responding. An experimental analysis that consisted of intrasubject reversal an multiple baseline designs established the internal validity of the findings. The finding of rapid acquisition of signal-controlled responding obtained with the initial procedure is suggessted to have practical significance. The disruptive effects of the classical form of autoshaping are discussed in terms of negative behavioral contrast.

  19. Frequency of impaired glucose tolerance and diabetes mellitus in subjects with fasting blood glucose below 6.1 mmol/L (110 mg/dL).

    PubMed

    Khan, S H; Ijaz, A; Bokhari, S A Raza; Hanif, M S; Azam, N

    2013-02-01

    The diagnosis of diabetes mellitus by the available criteria is controversial and relies heavily on fasting glucose results. This cross-sectional study in 2010-2011 aimed to measure the frequency of impaired glucose tolerance and diabetes mellitus in 127 subjects having fasting blood glucose < 7.0 mmol/L and to measure the agreement between different standard diagnostic criteria. Subjects presenting to a laboratory for analysis of fasting blood glucose for excluding diabetes mellitus underwent a 2-hour 75 g oral glucose challenge. A total of 40.6% of subjects with fasting blood glucose from 5.6-6.0 mmol/L had abnormal glucose regulation on the basis ofthe gold standard glucose challenge. Agreement between American Diabetes Association and World Health Organization diagnostic criteria was only fair (kappa = 0.32). Abnormalities of glucose metabolism including impaired glucose tolerance and diabetes mellitus can exist at fasting blood glucose results < 6.1 mmol/L (110 mg/dL).

  20. Rapid changes in local extracellular rat brain glucose observed with an in vivo glucose sensor.

    PubMed

    Hu, Y; Wilson, G S

    1997-04-01

    A needle-type electrochemically based microsensor for glucose (110 microns o.d.) is described. This sensor, designed for monitoring transient glucose content changes in response to neural stimuli, has a response time of approximately 5 s and has been shown to be free of interference from endogenous electroactive species such as ascorbate, urate, and various neurotransmitters. It exhibits linear response to glucose up to 10 mM. The usefulness of the sensor has been demonstrated by examining the time-dependent interstitial glucose concentration in the rat hippocampus in response to KCl depolarization and by stimulation of glutamate neurons through a perforant pathway. Simultaneous monitoring of oxygen is also carried out and demonstrates that for both oxygen and glucose there is substantial local depletion of both species and that their pools are replenished by increased regional cerebral blood flow. The transient initial rapid (10-13 s) decrease up to 20-34%, observed on a time scale comparable to that for neurotransmitter release, may be involved in a recently suggested astrocytic uptake for glutamate-stimulated aerobic glycolysis possibly needed to meet energy homeostasis in brain. These studies demonstrate the importance of microsensors in monitoring transient events linked to neuronal stimulation.

  1. Characteristics of (3H)2-Deoxyglucose Uptake by Slices of Rat Cerebral Cortex

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-05-17

    phlorizin or by phloretin , two compounds known to inhibit glucose transport by kidney and by erythrocytes, respectively. Net [-̂ H]2-de- oxyglucose uptake...Hexoses 53 17. The Effect of Phlorizin and Phloretin on Net [3H]2-Deoxy- glucose Transport by Slices of Cerebral Cortex 55 18. The Effect of Sodium...LeFevre, 1961). Transport by erythrocytes is not dependent on sodium (Silverman, 1976). Transport is, however, sensitive to inhibition by phloretin

  2. High Altitude Cerebral Edema

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-03-01

    described neuropathological findings of cerebral edema and wi4espread petechial hemorrhages in two HAPE fatalities and later reported (52...lethargy, thirst, indigestion, hysterical outburst o: other behavior disturbances, decreased concentration, fever , couhh and peripheral edema (52...autopsy results from the two fatalities in their series. In both cases multiple, widespread petechial hemorrhages were noted throughout the brain. One

  3. Cerebral Palsy Litigation

    PubMed Central

    Sartwelle, Thomas P.

    2015-01-01

    The cardinal driver of cerebral palsy litigation is electronic fetal monitoring, which has continued unabated for 40 years. Electronic fetal monitoring, however, is based on 19th-century childbirth myths, a virtually nonexistent scientific foundation, and has a false positive rate exceeding 99%. It has not affected the incidence of cerebral palsy. Electronic fetal monitoring has, however, increased the cesarian section rate, with the expected increase in mortality and morbidity risks to mothers and babies alike. This article explains why electronic fetal monitoring remains endorsed as efficacious in the worlds’ labor rooms and courtrooms despite being such a feeble medical modality. It also reviews the reasons professional organizations have failed to condemn the use of electronic fetal monitoring in courtrooms. The failures of tort reform, special cerebral palsy courts, and damage limits to stem the escalating litigation are discussed. Finally, the authors propose using a currently available evidence rule—the Daubert doctrine that excludes “junk science” from the courtroom—as the beginning of the end to cerebral palsy litigation and electronic fetal monitoring’s 40-year masquerade as science. PMID:25183322

  4. Cerebral Folate Deficiency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Neil

    2009-01-01

    Cerebral folate deficiency (CFD) is associated with low levels of 5-methyltetrahydrofolate in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) with normal folate levels in the plasma and red blood cells. The onset of symptoms caused by the deficiency of folates in the brain is at around 4 to 6 months of age. This is followed by delayed development, with deceleration…

  5. Localized 1H NMR measurement of glucose consumption in the human brain during visual stimulation.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, W; Novotny, E J; Zhu, X H; Rothman, D L; Shulman, R G

    1993-01-01

    Spatially localized 1H NMR spectroscopy has been applied to measure changes in brain glucose concentration during 8-Hz photic stimulation. NMR spectroscopic measurements were made in a 12-cm3 volume centered on the calcarine fissure and encompassing the primary visual cortex. The average maximum change in glucose levels was 0.34 mumol.g-1 (n = 5) at 15 min; glucose level had turned toward resting level at 25 min. The glucose change was used to calculate the increase of glucose cerebral metabolic rate in the visual cortex region for individual subjects by using the Michaelis-Menten model of glucose transport on the assumption of constant transport kinetics. The glucose cerebral metabolic rate was calculated to increase over the nonstimulated rate by 22% during the first 15 min of photic stimulation. A model in which the glucose metabolic rate gradually decreases during stimulation was proposed as a possible explanation for the recovery of brain glucose and previously measured lactate concentrations to prestimulus values after 15 min. Images Fig. 1 PMID:8234332

  6. Brain glucose transport and phosphorylation under acute insulin-induced hypoglycemia in mice: an 18F-FDG PET study.

    PubMed

    Alf, Malte F; Duarte, João M N; Schibli, Roger; Gruetter, Rolf; Krämer, Stefanie D

    2013-12-01

    We addressed the questions of how cerebral glucose transport and phosphorylation change under acute hypoglycemia and what the underlying mechanisms of adaptation are. Quantitative (18)F-FDG PET combined with the acquisition of real-time arterial input function was performed on mice. Hypoglycemia was induced and maintained by insulin infusion. PET data were analyzed with the 2-tissue-compartment model for (18)F-FDG, and the results were evaluated with Michaelis-Menten saturation kinetics. Glucose clearance from plasma to brain (K1,glc) and the phosphorylation rate constant increased with decreasing plasma glucose (Gp), in particular at a Gp of less than 2.5 mmol/L. Estimated cerebral glucose extraction ratios taking into account an increased cerebral blood flow (CBF) at a Gp of less than 2 mmol/L were between 0.14 and 0.79. CBF-normalized K1,glc values were in agreement with saturation kinetics. Phosphorylation rate constants indicated intracellular glucose depletion at a Gp of less than 2-3 mmol/L. When brain regions were compared, glucose transport under hypoglycemia was lowest in the hypothalamus. Alterations in glucose transport and phosphorylation, as well as intracellular glucose depletion, under acute hypoglycemia can be modeled by saturation kinetics taking into account an increase in CBF. Distinct transport kinetics in the hypothalamus may be involved in its glucose-sensing function.

  7. Coronary vasomotor abnormalities in insulin-resistant individuals.

    PubMed

    Quiñones, Manuel J; Hernandez-Pampaloni, Miguel; Schelbert, Heinrich; Bulnes-Enriquez, Isabel; Jimenez, Xochitl; Hernandez, Gustavo; De La Rosa, Roxana; Chon, Yun; Yang, Huiying; Nicholas, Susanne B; Modilevsky, Tamara; Yu, Katherine; Van Herle, Katja; Castellani, Lawrence W; Elashoff, Robert; Hsueh, Willa A

    2004-05-04

    Insulin resistance is a metabolic spectrum that progresses from hyperinsulinemia to the metabolic syndrome, impaired glucose tolerance, and finally type 2 diabetes mellitus. It is unclear when vascular abnormalities begin in this spectrum of metabolic effects. To evaluate the association of insulin resistance with the presence and reversibility of coronary vasomotor abnormalities in young adults at low cardiovascular risk. Cross-sectional study followed by prospective, open-label treatment study. University hospital. 50 insulin-resistant and 22 insulin-sensitive, age-matched Mexican-American participants without glucose intolerance or traditional risk factors for or evidence of coronary artery disease. 3 months of thiazolidinedione therapy for 25 insulin-resistant patients. Glucose infusion rate in response to insulin infusion was used to define insulin resistance (glucose infusion rate < or = 4.00 mg/kg of body weight per minute [range, 0.90 to 3.96 mg/kg per minute]) and insulin sensitivity (glucose infusion rate > or = 7.50 mg/kg per minute [range, 7.52 to 13.92 mg/kg per minute]). Myocardial blood flow was measured by using positron emission tomography at rest, during cold pressor test (largely endothelium-dependent), and after dipyridamole administration (largely vascular smooth muscle-dependent). Myocardial blood flow responses to dipyridamole were similar in the insulin-sensitive and insulin-resistant groups. However, myocardial blood flow response to cold pressor test increased by 47.6% from resting values in insulin-sensitive patients and by 14.4% in insulin-resistant patients. During thiazolidinedione therapy in a subgroup of insulin-resistant patients, insulin sensitivity improved, fasting plasma insulin levels decreased, and myocardial blood flow responses to cold pressor test normalized. The study was not randomized, and it included only 1 ethnic group. Insulin-resistant patients who do not have hypercholesterolemia or hypertension and do not smoke

  8. Noninvasive monitoring of cerebral oxygenation in preterm infants: preliminary observations.

    PubMed

    Brazy, J E; Lewis, D V; Mitnick, M H; Jöbsis vander Vliet, F F

    1985-02-01

    A noninvasive optical method for bedside monitoring of cerebral oxygenation in small preterm infants was evaluated. Through differential absorbance of near infrared light, changes in the oxidation-reduction level of cytochrome aa3, in the oxygenation state of hemoglobin and in tissue blood volume were assessed in the transilluminated anterior cerebral field. Overall, cerebral oxygenated hemoglobin correlated significantly with transcutaneous oxygen, r = .44 p less than .0001; however, correlation was best in the absence of cardiorespiratory disease. Hypoxia with or without bradycardia led to hemoglobin deoxygenation and a shift in cytochrome aa3 to a more reduced state. When hypoxic episodes came in series or were prolonged, aa3 reduction occurred simultaneous with hemoglobin deoxygenation but its recovery to base-line values sometimes lagged behind the return of hemoglobin oxygenation. In one infant with a large patent ductus arteriosus, even brief episodes of mild bradycardia caused precipitous reduction of cytochrome aa3 before any shift to greater hemoglobin deoxygenation. This response disappeared after ductal ligation. In general, the antecedent state of cerebral oxygenation, the severity and duration of deoxygenation, and the presence or absence of circulatory abnormalities all influenced the aa3 response to hypoxia. Continuous noninvasive near infrared monitoring of cerebral oxygenation can be performed on sick preterm infants at the bedside.

  9. Abnormal pressure in hydrocarbon environments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Law, B.E.; Spencer, C.W.

    1998-01-01

    Abnormal pressures, pressures above or below hydrostatic pressures, occur on all continents in a wide range of geological conditions. According to a survey of published literature on abnormal pressures, compaction disequilibrium and hydrocarbon generation are the two most commonly cited causes of abnormally high pressure in petroleum provinces. In young (Tertiary) deltaic sequences, compaction disequilibrium is the dominant cause of abnormal pressure. In older (pre-Tertiary) lithified rocks, hydrocarbon generation, aquathermal expansion, and tectonics are most often cited as the causes of abnormal pressure. The association of abnormal pressures with hydrocarbon accumulations is statistically significant. Within abnormally pressured reservoirs, empirical evidence indicates that the bulk of economically recoverable oil and gas occurs in reservoirs with pressure gradients less than 0.75 psi/ft (17.4 kPa/m) and there is very little production potential from reservoirs that exceed 0.85 psi/ft (19.6 kPa/m). Abnormally pressured rocks are also commonly associated with unconventional gas accumulations where the pressuring phase is gas of either a thermal or microbial origin. In underpressured, thermally mature rocks, the affected reservoirs have most often experienced a significant cooling history and probably evolved from an originally overpressured system.

  10. The glucose oxidase-peroxidase assay for glucose

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The glucose oxidase-peroxidase assay for glucose has served as a very specific, sensitive, and repeatable assay for detection of glucose in biological samples. It has been used successfully for analysis of glucose in samples from blood and urine, to analysis of glucose released from starch or glycog...

  11. Glucose metabolism in obese and lean adolescents with polycystic ovary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Poomthavorn, Preamrudee; Chaya, Weerapong; Mahachoklertwattana, Pat; Sukprasert, Matchuporn; Weerakiet, Sawaek

    2013-01-01

    Data on glucose metabolism in Asian adolescents with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) are limited. Glucose metabolism assessment using an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in obese and lean Thai adolescents with PCOS, and a comparison between the two groups were done. Thirty-one patients (19 obese, 12 lean) were enrolled. Their median (range) age was 14.9 (11.0-21.0) years. Eighteen patients had abnormal glucose metabolism (13 hyperinsulinemia, 4 impaired glucose tolerance, and 1 diabetes). Compared between obese [median (range) BMI Z-score, 1.6 (1.2-2.6)] and lean [median (range) BMI Z-score, 0.1 (-1.4 to 0.6)] patients, the frequencies of each abnormal OGTT category, areas under the curves of glucose and insulin levels, and insulinogenic index were not different; however, insulin resistance was greater in the obese group. In conclusion, a high proportion of our adolescents with PCOS had abnormal glucose metabolism. Therefore, OGTT should be performed in adolescents with PCOS for the early detection of abnormal glucose metabolism.

  12. High glucose-induced resistance to 5-fluorouracil in pancreatic cancer cells alleviated by 2-deoxy-D-glucose.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yao; Diao, Dongmei; Zhang, Hao; Guo, Qi; Wu, Xuandi; Song, Yongchun; Dang, Chengxue

    2014-03-01

    Abnormal glucose metabolism from hyperglycemia or diabetes aggravates the progression of pancreatic cancer. It is unknown whether high glucose has an impact on the antitumor effect of 5-fluorouracil (5-Fu) and whether targeting aberrant glucose metabolism using 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG) may reverse this effect in high-glucose microenvironments. The cell viability of AsPC-1 and Panc-1 was analyzed by MTT assay following 5-Fu treatment at different glucose concentrations. Altered sensitivity to 5-Fu by 2-DG was also analyzed. LY294002 was used to inhibit PI3K-Akt signaling to determine the mechanism involved. In response to glucose, 5-Fu-induced cell growth inhibition was attenuated in a dose-dependent manner, accompanied with activated p-Akt, while 2-DG enhanced 5-Fu-induced cell growth inhibition. Moreover, blocking the PI3K/Akt pathway by LY294002 effectively eliminated 2-DG-induced apoptosis. In conclusion, high glucose weakens the antitumor effect of 5-Fu via PI3K / Akt signaling. Using 2-DG in combination with 5-Fu significantly increased their therapeutic effectiveness in high-glucose microenvironments.

  13. Association Between Prolonged Seizures and Malignant Middle Cerebral Artery Infarction in Children With Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Andrea; Bigi, Sandra; Laughlin, Suzanne; Parthasarathy, Sujatha; Sinclair, Adriane; Dirks, Peter; Pontigon, Ann Marie; Moharir, Mahendranath; Askalan, Rand; MacGregor, Daune; deVeber, Gabrielle

    2016-11-01

    Malignant middle cerebral artery infarct syndrome is a potentially fatal complication of stroke that is poorly understood in children. We studied the frequency, associated characteristics, and outcomes of this condition in children. Children, aged two months to 18 years with acute middle cerebral artery infarct diagnosed at our center between January 2005 and December 2012 were studied. Associations with malignant middle cerebral artery infarct syndrome were sought, including age, seizures, neurological deficit severity (Pediatric National Institute of Health Stroke Severity Score), stroke etiology, fever, blood pressure, blood glucose, infarct location, infarct volume (modified pediatric Alberta Stroke Program Early Computed Tomography Score), and arterial occlusion. Death and neurological outcomes were determined. Among 66 children with middle cerebral artery stroke, 12 (18%) developed malignant middle cerebral artery infarct syndrome, fatal in three. Prolonged seizures during the first 24 hours (odds ratio, 25.51; 95% confidence interval, 3.10 to 334.81; P = 0.005) and a higher Pediatric National Institute of Health Stroke Severity Score (odds ratio, 1.22; 95% confidence interval, 1.08 to 1.45; P = 0.006) were independently associated with malignant middle cerebral artery infarct syndrome. All children aged greater than two years with a Pediatric National Institute of Health Stroke Severity Score ≥8 and initial seizures ≥5 minutes duration developed malignant middle cerebral artery infarct syndrome (100%). Malignant middle cerebral artery infarct syndrome affects nearly one in five children with acute middle cerebral artery stroke. Children with higher Pediatric National Institute of Health Stroke Severity Scores and prolonged initial seizures are at greatly increased risk for malignant middle cerebral artery infarct syndrome. Children with middle cerebral artery infarcts warrant intensive neuroprotective management and close monitoring to enable

  14. Transcranial Doppler-based assessment of cerebral autoregulation in critically ill children during diabetic ketoacidosis treatment.

    PubMed

    Ma, Li; Roberts, Joan S; Pihoker, Catherine; Richards, Todd L; Shaw, Dennis W W; Marro, Ken I; Vavilala, Monica S

    2014-10-01

    Impaired cerebral autoregulation may be associated with poor outcome in diabetic ketoacidosis. We examined change in cerebral autoregulation during diabetic ketoacidosis treatment. Prospective observational cohort study. Tertiary care children's hospital. Children admitted to the ICU with diabetic ketoacidosis (venous pH < 7.3, glucose > 300 mg/dL, HCO3 < 15 mEq/L, and ketonuria) constituted cases, and children with type I diabetes without diabetic ketoacidosis constituted controls. None. Between 2005 and 2009, 32 cases and 50 controls were enrolled. Transcranial Doppler ultrasonography was used to measure middle cerebral artery flow velocities, and cerebral autoregulation testing was achieved via tilt-table testing. Cases underwent two and controls underwent one cerebral autoregulation test. Cerebral autoregulation was quantified by the autoregulatory index (autoregulatory index < 0.4 = impaired and autoregulatory index 0.4-1.0 = intact autoregulation). The first autoregulation test was obtained early (time 1, 12-24 hr; median [interquartile range], 8 hr [5-18 hr]) during diabetic ketoacidosis treatment, and a second autoregulation test was obtained during recovery (time 2, 36-72 hr; median [ interquartile range], 46 hr [40-59 hr]) from time 0 (defined as time of insulin start). Cases had lower autoregulatory index at time 1 than time 2 (p < 0.001) as well lower autoregulatory index than control subjects (p < 0.001). Cerebral autoregulation was impaired in 40% (n = 13) of cases at time 1 and in 6% (n = 2) of cases at time 2. Five cases (17%) showed persistent impairment of cerebral autoregulation between times 1 and 2 of treatment. All control subjects had intact cerebral autoregulation. Impaired cerebral autoregulation was common early during diabetic ketoacidosis treatment. Although the majority improved during diabetic ketoacidosis treatment, 17% of subjects had impairment between 36 and 72 hours after start of insulin therapy. The observed impaired cerebral

  15. Effects of tetrahydrocannabinol on glucose uptake in the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Miederer, I; Uebbing, K; Röhrich, J; Maus, S; Bausbacher, N; Krauter, K; Weyer-Elberich, V; Lutz, B; Schreckenberger, M; Urban, R

    2017-05-01

    Δ 9 -Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) is the psychoactive component of the plant Cannabis sativa and acts as a partial agonist at cannabinoid type 1 and type 2 receptors in the brain. The goal of this study was to assess the effect of THC on the cerebral glucose uptake in the rat brain. 21 male Sprague Dawley rats (12-13 w) were examined and received five different doses of THC ranging from 0.01 to 1 mg/kg. For data acquisition a Focus 120 small animal PET scanner was used and 24.1-28.0 MBq of [ 18 F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose were injected. The data were acquired for 70 min and arterial blood samples were collected throughout the scan. THC, THC-OH and THC-COOH were determined at 55 min p.i. Nine volumes of interest were defined, and the cerebral glucose uptake was calculated for each brain region. Low blood THC levels of < 1 ng/ml (injected dose: ≤ 0.01 mg/kg) corresponded to an increased glucose uptake (6-30 %), particularly in the hypothalamus (p = 0.007), while blood THC levels > 10 ng/ml (injected dose: ≥ 0.05 mg/kg) coincided with a decreased glucose uptake (-2 to -22 %), especially in the cerebellar cortex (p = 0.008). The effective concentration in this region was estimated 2.4 ng/ml. This glucose PET study showed that stimulation of CB1 receptors by THC affects the glucose uptake in the rat brain, whereby the effect of THC is regionally different and dependent on dose - an effect that may be of relevance in behavioural studies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Glucose, Insulin and C-peptide Kinetics during an Oral Glucose Tolerance Test in Patients with Chronic Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Min, Yong Ki; Suh, Kyo II; Choi, Sang Jeon; Lee, Hong Kyu; Kim, Chung Yong; Koh, Chang-Soon; Min, Hun Ki

    1987-01-01

    To elucidate the mechanism of glucose intolerance in patients with chronic liver disease(CLD), we measured the levels of plasma glucose, insulin and C-peptide during oral glucose tolerance test and urinary excretion of C-peptide per 24 hours during a weight maintenance diet in 20 patients with CLD who had fasting plasma glucose(FBS) of less than 100 mg/dl. The patients with CLD who had normal FBS(FBS less than 100 mg/dl) were divided into two groups by the National Diabetes Data Group Criteria: one with abnormal glucose tolerance (abnormal GTT, Group 1) and the other with normal glucose tolerance (normal GTT. Group 2). Group 1 patients showed significantly higher plasma insulin (p<0.02 and p<0.01, respectively) and C-peptide concentrations (p<0.01) in the fasting state and 2 hours after a 75gram oral glucose loading (PP2) than group 2 patients. Urinary excretion of C-peptide per 24 hours was also higher in group 1 patients than in group 2 patients (p<0.01). Group 2 patients demonstrated similar plasma insulin, C-peptide and urinary excretion of C-peptide per 24 hours to normal subjects (p>0.05). These results suggest that patients with CLD who had normal FBS can be divided into two groups by oral glucose tolerance test(GTT) and those with abnormal GTT have hyperinsulinemia the mechanism of which is insulin hypersecretion from pancreatic B-cell. PMID:3154815

  17. Chromosomal abnormalities in human sperm

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R.H.

    1985-01-01

    The ability to analyze human sperm chromosome complements after penetration of zona pellucida-free hamster eggs provides the first opportunity to study the frequency and type of chromosomal abnormalities in human gametes. Two large-scale studies have provided information on normal men. We have studied 1,426 sperm complements from 45 normal men and found an abnormality rate of 8.9%. Brandriff et al. (5) found 8.1% abnormal complements in 909 sperm from 4 men. The distribution of numerical and structural abnormalities was markedly dissimilar in the 2 studies. The frequency of aneuploidy was 5% in our sample and only 1.6% in Brandriff's, perhapsmore » reflecting individual variability among donors. The frequency of 24,YY sperm was low: 0/1,426 and 1/909. This suggests that the estimates of nondisjunction based on fluorescent Y body data (1% to 5%) are not accurate. We have also studied men at increased risk of sperm chromosomal abnormalities. The frequency of chromosomally unbalanced sperm in 6 men heterozygous for structural abnormalities varied dramatically: 77% for t11;22, 32% for t6;14, 19% for t5;18, 13% for t14;21, and 0% for inv 3 and 7. We have also studied 13 cancer patients before and after radiotherapy and demonstrated a significant dose-dependent increase of sperm chromosome abnormalities (numerical and structural) 36 months after radiation treatment.« less

  18. Glucose: detection and analysis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Glucose is an aldosic monosaccharide that is centrally entrenched in the processes of photosynthesis and respiration, serving as an energy reserve and metabolic fuel in most organisms. As both a monomer and as part of more complex structures such as polysaccharides and glucosides, glucose also pla...

  19. Phenylpropanolamine and cerebral hemorrhage

    SciTech Connect

    McDowell, J.R.; LeBlanc, H.J.

    1985-05-01

    Computerized tomography, carotid angiograms, and arteriography were used to diagnose several cases of cerebral hemorrhage following the use of phenylpropanolamine. The angiographic picture in one of the three cases was similar to that previously described in association with amphetamine abuse and pseudoephedrine overdose, both substances being chemically and pharmacologically similar to phenylpropanolamine. The study suggests that the arterial change responsible for symptoms may be due to spasm rather than arteriopathy. 14 references, 5 figures.

  20. [Insomnia and cerebral hypoperfusion].

    PubMed

    Káposzta, Zoltán; Rácz, Klára

    2007-11-18

    Insomnia is defined as difficulty with the initiation, maintenance, duration, or quality of sleep that results in the impairment of daytime functioning, despite adequate opportunity and circumstances for sleep. In most countries approximately every third inhabitant has insomnia. Insomnia can be classified as primary and secondary. The pathogenesis of primary insomnia is unknown, but available evidence suggests a state of hyperarousal. Insomnia secondary to other causes is more common than primary insomnia. Cerebral hypoperfusion can be the cause of insomnia in some cases. In such patients the cerebral blood flow should be improved using parenteral vascular therapy. If insomnia persists despite treatment, then therapy for primary insomnia should be instituted using benzodiazepine-receptor agonists such as Zolpidem, Zopiclone, or Zaleplon. In those cases Midazolam cannot be used for the treatment of insomnia due to its marked negative effect on cerebral blood flow. In Hungary there is a need to organize multidisciplinary Insomnia Clinics because insomnia is more than a disease, it is a public health problem in this century.

  1. Skin - abnormally dark or light

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003242.htm Abnormally dark or light skin To use the sharing features ... The bronze color can range from light to dark (in fair-skinned people) with the degree of ...

  2. Fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG)-PET in APOEepsilon4 carriers in the Australian population.

    PubMed

    Rimajova, Mira; Lenzo, Nat P; Wu, Jing-Shan; Bates, Kristyn A; Campbell, Andrew; Dhaliwal, Satvinder S; McCarthy, Michael; Rodrigues, Mark; Paton, Athena; Rowe, Christopher; Foster, Jonathan K; Martins, Ralph N

    2008-03-01

    Apolipoprotein E-epsilon4 (APOEepsilon4) has been associated with increased risk of developing Alzheimer's disease (AD) and regional cerebral glucose hypometabolism, as measured by fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET). We report here preliminary data from studies that aim to determine whether cerebral glucose hypometabolism is observed in APOEepsilon4 positive, cognitively intact individuals between the ages of 50 and 80, and whether there is an additional impact of subjective memory complainer (SMC) status on glucose metabolism determined by NeuroStat analysis. FDG-PET was conducted in 30 community dwelling, APOE-epsilon4 carriers without clinical evidence of dementia and objective cognitive impairment as assessed using a neuropsychological battery. Neurological soft-signs (NSS) were also assessed. Glucose hypometabolism was demonstrated in the anterior and posterior cingulate cortex and in the temporal association cortices in APOEepsilon4 carriers compared to the normative NeuroStat database. This pattern was particularly evident in APOEepsilon4 heterozygous individuals. SMC showed hypometabolism in the aforementioned brain regions, whereas non-SMC showed no significant pattern of glucose hypometabolism. FDG-PET with NeuroStat analysis showed that APOEepsilon4 carriers have mild glucose hypometabolism in areas associated with AD. SMC may be associated with AD-related differences in regional cerebral glucose metabolism. These findings are currently being investigated in a larger group of APOEepsilon4 carriers.

  3. Hyperventilation, cerebral perfusion, and syncope.

    PubMed

    Immink, R V; Pott, F C; Secher, N H; van Lieshout, J J

    2014-04-01

    This review summarizes evidence in humans for an association between hyperventilation (HV)-induced hypocapnia and a reduction in cerebral perfusion leading to syncope defined as transient loss of consciousness (TLOC). The cerebral vasculature is sensitive to changes in both the arterial carbon dioxide (PaCO2) and oxygen (PaO2) partial pressures so that hypercapnia/hypoxia increases and hypocapnia/hyperoxia reduces global cerebral blood flow. Cerebral hypoperfusion and TLOC have been associated with hypocapnia related to HV. Notwithstanding pronounced cerebrovascular effects of PaCO2 the contribution of a low PaCO2 to the early postural reduction in middle cerebral artery blood velocity is transient. HV together with postural stress does not reduce cerebral perfusion to such an extent that TLOC develops. However when HV is combined with cardiovascular stressors like cold immersion or reduced cardiac output brain perfusion becomes jeopardized. Whether, in patients with cardiovascular disease and/or defect, cerebral blood flow cerebral control HV-induced hypocapnia elicits cerebral hypoperfusion, leading to TLOC, remains to be established.

  4. Cerebral near-infrared spectroscopy insensitively detects low cerebral venous oxygen saturations after stage 1 palliation.

    PubMed

    Rescoe, Erin; Tang, Xiaoqi; Perry, Dorothy Alison; Sleeper, Lynn A; DiNardo, James A; Kussman, Barry D; Kheir, John N

    2017-09-01

    Measurement of cerebral venous oxyhemoglobin saturation (ScvO 2 ) is considered a gold standard in assessing the adequacy of tissue oxygen delivery (DO 2 ) after the stage 1 palliation (S1P), with SvO 2  <30% often representing severely compromised DO 2 . Regional oxygenation index (rSO 2 ) based on near-infrared resonance spectroscopy (NIRS) frequently is used to screen for compromised DO 2 , although its sensitivity to detect severe abnormalities in SvO 2 is uncertain. ScvO 2 was measured by co-oximetry from the internal jugular vein as clinically indicated in 73 neonates after S1P. These values were compared with cerebral rSO 2 (FORE-SIGHT; CASMED) via mixed effects model linear regression, Bland-Altman analysis, and sensitivity analysis. Because NIRS devices measure a composite of arterial and venous blood, we calculated an rSO 2 -based ScvO 2 designed to remove arterial contamination from the rSO 2 signal: rSO 2 -based ScvO 2  = (rSO 2 - arterial oxygen saturation × 0.3)/0.7. Among 520 time-matched pairs of ScvO 2 and cerebral rSO 2 , the slope of the relationship between rSO 2 and ScvO 2 (after we adjusted for effects of hemoglobin) was 0.37 ± 0.04 with only modest correlation (r 2  = 0.39), and mean bias of +8.26. When ScvO 2 was <30%, cerebral rSO 2 was <30 in less than 1%, <40 less than 1%, and <50 in 45.7% of data points; specificity of rSO 2 in the same range is >99%. Correction of rSO 2 for arterial contamination significantly decreased mean bias (+3.03) and improved the sensitivity of rSO 2 to detect ScvO 2  <30 to 6.5% for rSO 2  <30, 29% for rSO 2  <40, and 77.4% for rSO 2  <50. Cerebral rSO 2 in isolation should not be used to detect low ScvO 2 , because its sensitivity is low, although correction of rSO 2 for arterial contamination may improve sensitivity. Cerebral rSO 2 of 50 or greater should not be considered reassuring, though values below 30 are specific for low ScvO 2 . Copyright © 2017 The American Association for Thoracic

  5. Biochemical abnormalities in neonatal seizures.

    PubMed

    Sood, Arvind; Grover, Neelam; Sharma, Roshan

    2003-03-01

    The presence of seizure does not constitute a diagnoses but it is a symptom of an underlying central nervous system disorder due to systemic or biochemical disturbances. Biochemical disturbances occur frequently in the neonatal seizures either as an underlying cause or as an associated abnormality. In their presence, it is difficult to control seizure and there is a risk of further brain damage. Early recognition and treatment of biochemical disturbances is essential for optimal management and satisfactory long term outcome. The present study was conducted in the department of pediatrics in IGMC Shimla on 59 neonates. Biochemical abnormalities were detected in 29 (49.15%) of cases. Primary metabolic abnormalities occurred in 10(16.94%) cases of neonatal seizures, most common being hypocalcaemia followed by hypoglycemia, other metabolic abnormalities include hypomagnesaemia and hyponateremia. Biochemical abnormalities were seen in 19(38.77%) cases of non metabolic seizure in neonates. Associated metabolic abnormalities were observed more often with Hypoxic-ischemic-encephalopathy (11 out of 19) cases and hypoglycemia was most common in this group. No infant had hyponateremia, hyperkelemia or low zinc level.

  6. Retrograde Cerebral Perfusion Results in Better Perfusion to the Striatum Than the Cerebral Cortex During Deep Hypothermic Circulatory Arrest: A Microdialysis Study.

    PubMed

    Liang, Meng-Ya; Chen, Guang-Xian; Tang, Zhi-Xian; Rong, Jian; Yao, Jian-ping; Wu, Zhong-Kai

    2016-03-01

    It remains controversial whether contemporary cerebral perfusion techniques, utilized during deep hypothermic circulatory arrest (DHCA), establish adequate perfusion to deep structures in the brain. This study aimed to investigate whether selective antegrade cerebral perfusion (SACP) or retrograde cerebral perfusion (RCP) can provide perfusion equally to various anatomical positions in the brain using metabolic evidence obtained from microdialysis. Eighteen piglets were randomly assigned to 40 min of circulatory arrest (CA) at 18°C without cerebral perfusion (DHCA group, n = 6) or with SACP (SACP group, n = 6) or RCP (RCP group, n = 6). Microdialysis parameters (glucose, lactate, pyruvate, and glutamate) were measured every 30 min in cortex and striatum. After 3 h of reperfusion, brain tissue was harvested for Western blot measurement of α-spectrin. After 40 min of CA, the DHCA group showed marked elevations of lactate and glycerol and a reduction in glucose in the microdialysis perfusate (all P < 0.05). The changes in glucose, lactate, and glycerol in the perfusate and α-spectrin expression in brain tissue were similar between cortex and striatum in the SACP group (all P > 0.05). In the RCP group, the cortex exhibited lower glucose, higher lactate, and higher glycerol in the perfusate and higher α-spectrin expression in brain tissue compared with the striatum (all P < 0.05). Glutamate showed no difference between cortex and striatum in all groups (all P > 0.05). In summary, SACP provided uniform and continuous cerebral perfusion to most anatomical sites in the brain, whereas RCP resulted in less sufficient perfusion to the cortex but better perfusion to the striatum. Copyright © 2015 International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Continuous Glucose Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    van Beers, Cornelis A. J.; DeVries, J. Hans

    2016-01-01

    The necessity of strict glycemic control is unquestionable. However, hypoglycemia remains a major limiting factor in achieving satisfactory glucose control, and evidence is mounting to show that hypoglycemia is not benign. Over the past decade, evidence has consistently shown that real-time continuous glucose monitoring improves glycemic control in terms of lowering glycated hemoglobin levels. However, real-time continuous glucose monitoring has not met the expectations of the diabetes community with regard to hypoglycemia prevention. The earlier trials did not demonstrate any effect on either mild or severe hypoglycemia and the effect of real-time continuous glucose monitoring on nocturnal hypoglycemia was often not reported. However, trials specifically designed to reduce hypoglycemia in patients with a high hypoglycemia risk have demonstrated a reduction in hypoglycemia, suggesting that real-time continuous glucose monitoring can prevent hypoglycemia when it is specifically used for that purpose. Moreover, the newest generation of diabetes technology currently available commercially, namely sensor-augmented pump therapy with a (predictive) low glucose suspend feature, has provided more convincing evidence for hypoglycemia prevention. This article provides an overview of the hypoglycemia outcomes of randomized controlled trials that investigate the effect of real-time continuous glucose monitoring alone or sensor-augmented pump therapy with a (predictive) low glucose suspend feature. Furthermore, several possible explanations are provided why trials have not shown a reduction in severe hypoglycemia. In addition, existing evidence is presented of real-time continuous glucose monitoring in patients with impaired awareness of hypoglycemia who have the highest risk of severe hypoglycemia. PMID:27257169

  8. [Cardiac risk profile in diabetes mellitus and impaired fasting glucose].

    PubMed

    Schaan, Beatriz D'Agord; Harzheim, Erno; Gus, Iseu

    2004-08-01

    Mortality of diabetic patients is higher than that of the population at large, and mainly results from cardiovascular diseases. The purpose of the present study was to identify the prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors in subjects with diabetes mellitus (DM) or abnormal fasting glucose (FG) in order to guide health actions. A population-based cross-sectional study was carried out in a representative random cluster sampling of 1,066 adult urban population (> or =20 years) in the state of Rio Grande do Sul between 1999 and 2000. A structured questionnaire on coronary risk factors was applied and sociodemographic characteristics of all adults older than 20 years living in the same dwelling were collected. Subjects were clinically evaluated and blood samples were obtained for measuring total cholesterol and fasting glycemia. Statistical analysis was performed using Stata 7 and a 5% significance level was set. Categorical variables were compared by Pearson's chi-square and continuous variables were compared using Student's t-test or Anova and multivariate analysis, all controlled for the cluster effect. Of 992 subjects, 12.4% were diabetic and 7.4% had impaired fasting glucose. Among the risk factors evaluated, subjects who presented any kind of glucose homeostasis abnormality were at a higher prevalence of obesity (17.8, 29.2 and 35.3% in healthy subjects, impaired fasting glucose and DM respectively, p<0.001), hypertension (30.1, 56.3 and 50.5% in healthy subjects, impaired fasting glucose and DM, respectively, p<0.001), and hypercholesterolemia (23.2, 35.1 and 39.5 in healthy subjects, impaired fasting glucose and DM respectively, p=0.01). Subjects with any kind of glucose homeostasis abnormality represent a group, which preventive individual and population health policies should target since they have higher prevalence of coronary artery disease risk factors.

  9. Reversible changes in brain glucose metabolism following thyroid function normalization in hyperthyroidism.

    PubMed

    Miao, Q; Zhang, S; Guan, Y H; Ye, H Y; Zhang, Z Y; Zhang, Q Y; Xue, R D; Zeng, M F; Zuo, C T; Li, Y M

    2011-01-01

    Patients with hyperthyroidism frequently present with regional cerebral metabolic changes, but the consequences of endocrine-induced brain changes after thyroid function normalization are unclear. We hypothesized that the changes of regional cerebral glucose metabolism are related to thyroid hormone levels in patients with hyperthyroid, and some of these changes can be reversed with antithyroid therapy. Relative regional cerebral glucose metabolism was compared between 10 new-onset untreated patients with hyperthyroidism and 20 healthy control participants by using brain FDG-PET scans. Levels of emotional distress were evaluated by using the SAS and SDS. Patients were treated with methimazole. A follow-up PET scan was performed to assess metabolic changes of the brain when thyroid functions normalized. Compared with controls, patients exhibited lower activity in the limbic system, frontal lobes, and temporal lobes before antithyroid treatment. There were positive correlations between scores of depression and regional metabolism in the cingulate and paracentral lobule. The severity of depression and anxiety covaried negatively with pretreatment activity in the inferior temporal and inferior parietal gyri respectively. Compared with the hyperthyroid status, patients with normalized thyroid functions showed an increased metabolism in the left parahippocampal, fusiform, and right superior frontal gyri. The decrease in both FT3 and FT4 was associated with increased activity in the left parahippocampal and right superior frontal gyri. The changes of regional cerebral glucose metabolism are related to thyroid hormone levels in patients with hyperthyroidism, and some cerebral hypometabolism can be improved after antithyroid therapy.

  10. In vivo proton MRS to quantify anesthetic effects of pentobarbital on cerebral metabolism and brain activity in rat.

    PubMed

    Du, Fei; Zhang, Yi; Iltis, Isabelle; Marjanska, Malgorzata; Zhu, Xiao-Hong; Henry, Pierre-Gilles; Chen, Wei

    2009-12-01

    To quantitatively investigate the effects of pentobarbital anesthesia on brain activity, brain metabolite concentrations and cerebral metabolic rate of glucose, in vivo proton MR spectra, and electroencephalography were measured in the rat brain with various doses of pentobarbital. The results show that (1) the resonances attributed to propylene glycol, a solvent in pentobarbital injection solution, can be robustly detected and quantified in the brain; (2) the concentration of most brain metabolites remained constant under the isoelectric state (silent electroencephalography) with a high dose of pentobarbital compared to mild isoflurane anesthesia condition, except for a reduction of 61% in the brain glucose level, which was associated with a 37% decrease in cerebral metabolic rate of glucose, suggesting a significant amount of "housekeeping" energy for maintaining brain cellular integrity under the isoelectric state; and (3) electroencephalography and cerebral metabolic activities were tightly coupled to the pentobarbital anesthesia depth and they can be indirectly quantified by the propylene glycol resonance signal at 1.13 ppm. This study indicates that in vivo proton MR spectroscopy can be used to measure changes in cerebral metabolite concentrations and cerebral metabolic rate of glucose under varied pentobarbital anesthesia states; moreover, the propylene glycol signal provides a sensitive biomarker for quantitatively monitoring these changes and anesthesia depth noninvasively. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  11. Electrocardiographic abnormalities in opiate addicts.

    PubMed

    Wallner, Christina; Stöllberger, Claudia; Hlavin, Anton; Finsterer, Josef; Hager, Isabella; Hermann, Peter

    2008-12-01

    To determine in a cross-sectional study the prevalence of electrocardiographic (ECG) abnormalities in opiate addicts who were therapy-seeking and its association with demographic, clinical and drug-specific parameters. In consecutive therapy-seeking opiate addicts, a 12-lead ECG was registered within 24 hours after admission and evaluated according to a pre-set protocol between October 2004 and August 2006. Additionally, demographic, clinical and drug-specific parameters were recorded. Included were 511 opiate-addicts, 25% female, with a mean age of 29 years (range 17-59 years). One or more ECG abnormalities were found in 314 patients (61%). In the 511 patients we found most commonly ST abnormalities (19%), QTc prolongation (13%), tall R- and/or S-waves (11%) and missing R progression (10%). ECG abnormalities were more common in males than in females (64 versus 54%, P < 0.05), and in patients with positive than negative urine findings for cannabis (68 versus 57%, P < 0.05). Patients with ST abnormalities were more often males than females (21 versus 11%, P < 0.05), had a history of seizures less often (16 versus 27%, P < 0.05), had positive than negative urine findings for cannabis more often (26 versus 15%, P < 0.01) and had negative than positive urine findings for methadone more often (21 versus 11%, P < 0.05). QTc prolongation was more frequent in patients with high dosages of maintenance drugs than in patients with medium or low dosages (27 versus 12 versus 10%, P < 0.05) and in patients whose urine findings were positive than negative for methadone (23 versus 11%, P < 0.001) as well as for benzodiazepines (17 versus 9%, P < 0.05). Limitations of the data are that in most cases other risk factors for the cardiac abnormalities were not known. ECG abnormalities are frequent in opiate addicts. The most frequent ECG abnormalities are ST abnormalities, QTc prolongation and tall R- and/or S-waves. ST abnormalities are associated with cannabis, and QTc prolongation

  12. Comparison of retrograde cerebral perfusion to antegrade cerebral perfusion and hypothermic circulatory arrest in a chronic porcine model.

    PubMed

    Midulla, P S; Gandsas, A; Sadeghi, A M; Mezrow, C K; Yerlioglu, M E; Wang, W; Wolfe, D; Ergin, M A; Griepp, R B

    1994-09-01

    Retrograde cerebral perfusion (RCP) is a new method of cerebral protection that has been touted as an improvement over hypothermic circulatory arrest (HCA). However, RCP has been used clinically for durations and at temperatures that are "safe" for HCA alone. This study was designed to compare RCP to HCA and antegrade cerebral perfusion (ACP) deliberately exceeding "safe" limits, in order to determine unequivocally whether RCP provides better cerebral protection than HCA. Four groups of six Yorkshire pigs (20 to 30 kg) were randomly assigned to undergo 90 minutes of RCP, ACP, HCA, or HCA with heads packed in ice (HCA-HP) at an esophageal temperature of 20 degrees C. Arterial, mixed venous and cerebral venous oxygen, glucose and lactate contents; quantitative EEG; were monitored at baseline (37 degrees C); at the end of cooling cardiopulmonary bypass (20 degrees C); during rewarming (30 degrees C); and at two and four hours post intervention. Animals were recovered and were evaluated daily using a quantitative behavioral score (0 to 9). Mean behavioral score was lower in the HCA group than in the other three groups at seven days (HCA 5.8 +/- 1.1; RCP 8.5 +/- 0.2; ACP 9.0 +/- 0.0; HCA-HP 8.5 +/- 0.2, p < 0.05). Recovery of QEEG was better in the ACP group than in all others, but the RCP group had faster EEG recovery than HCA alone, although not better than HCA-HP (HCA 15 +/- 4; RCP 27 +/- 3; ACP 78 +/- 5; HCA-HP 19 +/- 3, p < 0.001). However, histopathological evidence of ischemic injury was present in 5 of 6 HCA animals and also in 4 of 6 of the HCP-HP group, but only in 1 of 6 RCP animals and in none of the ACP group. This study demonstrates that ACP affords the best cerebral protection by all outcome measures, but RCP provides clear improvement compared to HCA.

  13. T2 Relaxometry MRI Predicts Cerebral Palsy in Preterm Infants.

    PubMed

    Chen, L-W; Wang, S-T; Huang, C-C; Tu, Y-F; Tsai, Y-S

    2018-01-18

    T2-relaxometry brain MR imaging enables objective measurement of brain maturation based on the water-macromolecule ratio in white matter, but the outcome correlation is not established in preterm infants. Our study aimed to predict neurodevelopment with T2-relaxation values of brain MR imaging among preterm infants. From January 1, 2012, to May 31, 2015, preterm infants who underwent both T2-relaxometry brain MR imaging and neurodevelopmental follow-up were retrospectively reviewed. T2-relaxation values were measured over the periventricular white matter, including sections through the frontal horns, midbody of the lateral ventricles, and centrum semiovale. Periventricular T2 relaxometry in relation to corrected age was analyzed with restricted cubic spline regression. Prediction of cerebral palsy was examined with the receiver operating characteristic curve. Thirty-eight preterm infants were enrolled for analysis. Twenty patients (52.6%) had neurodevelopmental abnormalities, including 8 (21%) with developmental delay without cerebral palsy and 12 (31.6%) with cerebral palsy. The periventricular T2-relaxation values in relation to age were curvilinear in preterm infants with normal development, linear in those with developmental delay without cerebral palsy, and flat in those with cerebral palsy. When MR imaging was performed at >1 month corrected age, cerebral palsy could be predicted with T2 relaxometry of the periventricular white matter on sections through the midbody of the lateral ventricles (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve = 0.738; cutoff value of >217.4 with 63.6% sensitivity and 100.0% specificity). T2-relaxometry brain MR imaging could provide prognostic prediction of neurodevelopmental outcomes in premature infants. Age-dependent and area-selective interpretation in preterm brains should be emphasized. © 2018 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  14. Altered Regional Cerebral Blood Flow in Idiopathic Hypersomnia.

    PubMed

    Boucetta, Soufiane; Montplaisir, Jacques; Zadra, Antonio; Lachapelle, Francis; Soucy, Jean-Paul; Gravel, Paul; Dang-Vu, Thien Thanh

    2017-10-01

    Idiopathic hypersomnia is characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness, despite normal or long sleep time. Its pathophysiological mechanisms remain unclear. This pilot study aims at characterizing the neural correlates of idiopathic hypersomnia using single photon emission computed tomography. Thirteen participants with idiopathic hypersomnia and 16 healthy controls were scanned during resting wakefulness using a high-resolution single photon emission computed tomography scanner with 99mTc-ethyl cysteinate dimer to assess cerebral blood flow. The main analysis compared regional cerebral blood flow distribution between the two groups. Exploratory correlations between regional cerebral blood flow and clinical characteristics evaluated the functional correlates of those brain perfusion patterns. Significance was set at p < .05 after correction for multiple comparisons. Participants with idiopathic hypersomnia showed regional cerebral blood flow decreases in medial prefrontal cortex and posterior cingulate cortex and putamen, as well as increases in amygdala and temporo-occipital cortices. Lower regional cerebral blood flow in the medial prefrontal cortex was associated with higher daytime sleepiness. These preliminary findings suggest that idiopathic hypersomnia is characterized by functional alterations in brain areas involved in the modulation of vigilance states, which may contribute to the daytime symptoms of this condition. The distribution of regional cerebral blood flow changes was reminiscent of the patterns associated with normal non-rapid-eye-movement sleep, suggesting the possible presence of incomplete sleep-wake transitions. These abnormalities were strikingly distinct from those induced by acute sleep deprivation, suggesting that the patterns seen here might reflect a trait associated with idiopathic hypersomnia rather than a non-specific state of sleepiness. © Sleep Research Society 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Sleep

  15. Linking neuronal brain activity to the glucose metabolism

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Energy homeostasis ensures the functionality of the entire organism. The human brain as a missing link in the global regulation of the complex whole body energy metabolism is subject to recent investigation. The goal of this study is to gain insight into the influence of neuronal brain activity on cerebral and peripheral energy metabolism. In particular, the tight link between brain energy supply and metabolic responses of the organism is of interest. We aim to identifying regulatory elements of the human brain in the whole body energy homeostasis. Methods First, we introduce a general mathematical model describing the human whole body energy metabolism. It takes into account the two central roles of the brain in terms of energy metabolism. The brain is considered as energy consumer as well as regulatory instance. Secondly, we validate our mathematical model by experimental data. Cerebral high-energy phosphate content and peripheral glucose metabolism are measured in healthy men upon neuronal activation induced by transcranial direct current stimulation versus sham stimulation. By parameter estimation we identify model parameters that provide insight into underlying neurophysiological processes. Identified parameters reveal effects of neuronal activity on regulatory mechanisms of systemic glucose metabolism. Results Our examinations support the view that the brain increases its glucose supply upon neuronal activation. The results indicate that the brain supplies itself with energy according to its needs, and preeminence of cerebral energy supply is reflected. This mechanism ensures balanced cerebral energy homeostasis. Conclusions The hypothesis of the central role of the brain in whole body energy homeostasis as active controller is supported. PMID:23988084

  16. Linking neuronal brain activity to the glucose metabolism.

    PubMed

    Göbel, Britta; Oltmanns, Kerstin M; Chung, Matthias

    2013-08-29

    Energy homeostasis ensures the functionality of the entire organism. The human brain as a missing link in the global regulation of the complex whole body energy metabolism is subject to recent investigation. The goal of this study is to gain insight into the influence of neuronal brain activity on cerebral and peripheral energy metabolism. In particular, the tight link between brain energy supply and metabolic responses of the organism is of interest. We aim to identifying regulatory elements of the human brain in the whole body energy homeostasis. First, we introduce a general mathematical model describing the human whole body energy metabolism. It takes into account the two central roles of the brain in terms of energy metabolism. The brain is considered as energy consumer as well as regulatory instance. Secondly, we validate our mathematical model by experimental data. Cerebral high-energy phosphate content and peripheral glucose metabolism are measured in healthy men upon neuronal activation induced by transcranial direct current stimulation versus sham stimulation. By parameter estimation we identify model parameters that provide insight into underlying neurophysiological processes. Identified parameters reveal effects of neuronal activity on regulatory mechanisms of systemic glucose metabolism. Our examinations support the view that the brain increases its glucose supply upon neuronal activation. The results indicate that the brain supplies itself with energy according to its needs, and preeminence of cerebral energy supply is reflected. This mechanism ensures balanced cerebral energy homeostasis. The hypothesis of the central role of the brain in whole body energy homeostasis as active controller is supported.

  17. Metabolic abnormalities in Williams-Beuren syndrome.

    PubMed

    Palacios-Verdú, María Gabriela; Segura-Puimedon, Maria; Borralleras, Cristina; Flores, Raquel; Del Campo, Miguel; Campuzano, Victoria; Pérez-Jurado, Luis Alberto

    2015-04-01

    Williams-Beuren syndrome (WBS, OMIM-194050) is a neurodevelopmental disorder with multisystemic manifestations caused by a 1.55-1.83 Mb deletion at 7q11.23 including 26-28 genes. Reported endocrine and metabolic abnormalities include transient hypercalcaemia of infancy, subclinical hypothyroidism in ∼ 30% of children and impaired glucose tolerance in ∼ 75% of adult individuals. The purpose of this study was to further study metabolic alterations in patients with WBS, as well as in several mouse models, to establish potential candidate genes. We analysed several metabolic parameters in a cohort of 154 individuals with WBS (data available from 69 to 151 cases per parameter), as well as in several mouse models with complete and partial deletions of the orthologous WBS locus, and searched for causative genes and potential modifiers. Triglyceride plasma levels were significantly decreased in individuals with WBS while cholesterol levels were slightly decreased compared with controls. Hyperbilirubinemia, mostly unconjugated, was found in 18.3% of WBS cases and correlated with subclinical hypothyroidism and hypotriglyceridemia, suggesting common pathogenic mechanisms. Haploinsufficiency at MLXIPL and increased penetrance for hypomorphic alleles at the UGT1A1 gene promoter might underlie the lipid and bilirubin alterations. Other disturbances included increased protein and iron levels, as well as the known subclinical hypothyroidism and glucose intolerance. Our results show that several unreported biochemical alterations, related to haploinsufficiency for specific genes at 7q11.23, are relatively common in WBS. The early diagnosis, follow-up and management of these metabolic disturbances could prevent long-term complications in this disorder. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  18. Tanshinone inhibits neuronal cell apoptosis and inflammatory response in cerebral infarction rat model

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Liang; Zhang, Jie; Wang, Chao; Sun, Qiangsan

    2017-01-01

    We aimed to investigate the effect and mechanisms of tanshinone (TSN) IIA in cerebral infarction. The cerebral infarction rat model was established by middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). After pretreatment with TSN, cerebral infarct volume, cerebral edema, and neurological deficits score were evaluated, as well as cell apoptosis in hippocampus and cortex of the brain was examined with terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) and the levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and C-reactive protein (CRP) were determined by Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA). In addition, rat primary neuronal cells were isolated and cultured in oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) conditions. After pretreatment with TSN, cell viability and apoptosis were observed by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and flow cytometry analysis, respectively. The expressions of Bax and B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) were detected by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and western blotting. Compared with untreated cerebral infarction rat, TSN treatment significantly reduced cerebral infarct volume, cerebral edema, and neurological deficits score (P < 0.05). Cell apoptosis as well as the levels of IL-6, TNF-α, and CRP in hippocampus and cortex of cerebral infarction rat were inhibited after pretreatment with TSN (P < 0.05). Furthermore, TSN remarkably increased cell viability and inhibited cell apoptosis ratio (P < 0.05) in OGD-induced rat neuronal cells. Besides, TSN significantly downregulated the expression of Bax and upregulated Bcl-2 (P < 0.05). TSN IIA has a preventive effect on cerebral infarction by inhibiting neuronal cell apoptosis and inflammatory response in vitro and in vivo. PMID:28402151

  19. Tanshinone inhibits neuronal cell apoptosis and inflammatory response in cerebral infarction rat model.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Liang; Zhang, Jie; Wang, Chao; Sun, Qiangsan

    2017-06-01

    We aimed to investigate the effect and mechanisms of tanshinone (TSN) IIA in cerebral infarction. The cerebral infarction rat model was established by middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). After pretreatment with TSN, cerebral infarct volume, cerebral edema, and neurological deficits score were evaluated, as well as cell apoptosis in hippocampus and cortex of the brain was examined with terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) and the levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and C-reactive protein (CRP) were determined by Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA). In addition, rat primary neuronal cells were isolated and cultured in oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) conditions. After pretreatment with TSN, cell viability and apoptosis were observed by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and flow cytometry analysis, respectively. The expressions of Bax and B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) were detected by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and western blotting. Compared with untreated cerebral infarction rat, TSN treatment significantly reduced cerebral infarct volume, cerebral edema, and neurological deficits score ( P < 0.05). Cell apoptosis as well as the levels of IL-6, TNF-α, and CRP in hippocampus and cortex of cerebral infarction rat were inhibited after pretreatment with TSN ( P < 0.05). Furthermore, TSN remarkably increased cell viability and inhibited cell apoptosis ratio ( P < 0.05) in OGD-induced rat neuronal cells. Besides, TSN significantly downregulated the expression of Bax and upregulated Bcl-2 ( P < 0.05). TSN IIA has a preventive effect on cerebral infarction by inhibiting neuronal cell apoptosis and inflammatory response in vitro and in vivo.

  20. Techniques in cerebral protection.

    PubMed

    Fanelli, Fabrizio; Bezzi, Mario; Boatta, Emanuele; Passariello, Roberto

    2006-10-01

    Carotid angioplasty and stenting is a valid alternative option to conventional carotid endarterectomy in the treatment of carotid artery stenosis. During the stenting process, however, distal embolization can occur with neurological consequences. To avoid this, cerebral protection devices have been introduced. Three principal types of protection system have been developed: distal balloon occlusion, distal filters and proximal protection with or without reversal of flow. As protection devices became the focus of interest by manufactures and physicians, several trials are going on worldwide to analyze the characteristics of each of them and to evaluate their efficacy to reduce the rate of distal embolization.

  1. Glucose urine test

    MedlinePlus

    Urine sugar test; Urine glucose test; Glucosuria test; Glycosuria test ... After you provide a urine sample, it is tested right away. The health care provider uses a dipstick made with a color-sensitive pad. The ...

  2. Continuous Glucose Monitoring

    MedlinePlus

    ... transmit- ter sends information about glucose levels via radio waves from the sensor to a pagerlike wireless ... 703–738–4929 Email: ndep@mail.nih.gov Internet: www.ndep.nih.gov American Diabetes Association 1701 ...

  3. Blood Glucose Monitoring Devices

    MedlinePlus

    ... of interferences ability to transmit data to a computer cost of the meter cost of the test ... Performance FDA expands indication for continuous glucose monitoring system, first to replace fingerstick testing for diabetes treatment ...

  4. Recombinant glucose uptake system

    DOEpatents

    Ingrahm, Lonnie O.; Snoep, Jacob L.; Arfman, Nico

    1997-01-01

    Recombinant organisms are disclosed that contain a pathway for glucose uptake other than the pathway normally utilized by the host cell. In particular, the host cell is one in which glucose transport into the cell normally is coupled to PEP production. This host cell is transformed so that it uses an alternative pathway for glucose transport that is not coupled to PEP production. In a preferred embodiment, the host cell is a bacterium other than Z. mobilis that has been transformed to contain the glf and glk genes of Z. mobilis. By uncoupling glucose transport into the cell from PEP utilization, more PEP is produced for synthesis of products of commercial importance from a given quantity of biomass supplied to the host cells.

  5. Neonatal brain abnormalities and memory and learning outcomes at 7 years in children born very preterm.

    PubMed

    Omizzolo, Cristina; Scratch, Shannon E; Stargatt, Robyn; Kidokoro, Hiroyuki; Thompson, Deanne K; Lee, Katherine J; Cheong, Jeanie; Neil, Jeffrey; Inder, Terrie E; Doyle, Lex W; Anderson, Peter J

    2014-01-01

    Using prospective longitudinal data from 198 very preterm and 70 full term children, this study characterised the memory and learning abilities of very preterm children at 7 years of age in both verbal and visual domains. The relationship between the extent of brain abnormalities on neonatal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and memory and learning outcomes at 7 years of age in very preterm children was also investigated. Neonatal MRI scans were qualitatively assessed for global, white-matter, cortical grey-matter, deep grey-matter, and cerebellar abnormalities. Very preterm children performed less well on measures of immediate memory, working memory, long-term memory, and learning compared with term-born controls. Neonatal brain abnormalities, and in particular deep grey-matter abnormality, were associated with poorer memory and learning performance at 7 years in very preterm children. Findings support the importance of cerebral neonatal pathology for predicting later memory and learning function.

  6. The Frequency and Severity of Magnetic Resonance Imaging Abnormalities in Infants with Mild Neonatal Encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Brian H; Neil, Jeffrey; Morey, JoAnn; Yang, Edward; Silvera, Michelle V; Inder, Terrie E; Ortinau, Cynthia

    2017-08-01

    To assess and contrast the incidence and severity of abnormalities on cerebral magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) between infants with mild, moderate, and severe neonatal encephalopathy who received therapeutic hypothermia. This retrospective cohort studied infants with mild, moderate, and severe neonatal encephalopathy who received therapeutic hypothermia at a single tertiary neonatal intensive care unit between 2013 and 2015. Two neuroradiologists masked to the clinical condition evaluated brain MRIs for cerebral injury after therapeutic hypothermia using the Barkovich classification system. Additional abnormalities not included in this classification system were also noted. The rate, pattern, and severity of abnormalities/injury were compared across the grades of neonatal encephalopathy. Eighty-nine infants received therapeutic hypothermia and met study criteria, 48 with mild neonatal encephalopathy, 35 with moderate neonatal encephalopathy, and 6 with severe neonatal encephalopathy. Forty-eight infants (54%) had an abnormality on MRI. There was no difference in the rate of overall MRI abnormalities by grade of neonatal encephalopathy (mild neonatal encephalopathy 54%, moderate neonatal encephalopathy 54%, and severe neonatal encephalopathy 50%; P= .89). Basal ganglia/thalamic injury was more common in those with severe neonatal encephalopathy (mild neonatal encephalopathy 4%, moderate neonatal encephalopathy 9%, severe neonatal encephalopathy 34%; P = .03). In contrast, watershed injury did not differ between neonatal encephalopathy grades (mild neonatal encephalopathy 36%, moderate neonatal encephalopathy 32%, severe neonatal encephalopathy 50%; P = .3). Mild neonatal encephalopathy is commonly associated with MRI abnormalities after therapeutic hypothermia. The grade of neonatal encephalopathy during the first hours of life may not discriminate adequately between infants with and without cerebral injury noted on MRI after therapeutic hypothermia

  7. Glucose sensing based on Pt-MWCNT and MWCNT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aryasomayajula, Lavanya; Xie, Jining; Wang, Shouyan; Varadan, Vijay K.

    2007-04-01

    It is known that multi walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) is an excellent materials for biosensing applications and with the introduction of Pt nanoparticles (Pt-MWCNTs) of about 3nm in diameter in MWCNTs greatly increases the current sensitivity and also the signal to noise ratio. We fabricated the CNT- based glucose sensor by immobilization the bio enzyme, glucose oxidase (GoX), on the Pt-MWCNT and electrode were prepared. The sensor has been tested effectively for both the abnormal blood glucose levels- greater than 6.9 mM and less than 3.5 mM which are the prediabetic and diabetic glucose levels, respectively. The current signal obtained from the Pt-MWCNT was much higher compared to the MWCNT based sensors.

  8. Effect of anxiety on cortical cerebral blood flow and metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Gur, R.C.; Gur, R.E.; Resnick, S.M.

    1987-04-01

    The relation between anxiety and cortical activity was compared in two samples of normal volunteers. One group was studied with the noninvasive xenon-133 inhalation technique for measuring cerebral blood flow (CBF) and the other with positron emission tomography (PET) using /sup 18/Flurodeoxyglucose (/sup 18/FDG) for measuring cerebral metabolic rates (CMR) for glucose. The inhalation technique produced less anxiety than the PET procedure, and for low anxiety subjects, there was a linear increase in CBF with anxiety. For higher anxiety subjects, however, there was a linear decrease in CBF with increased anxiety. The PET group manifested a linear decrease in CMRmore » with increased anxiety. The results indicate that anxiety can have systematic effects on cortical activity, and this should be taken into consideration when comparing data from different procedures. They also suggest a physiologic explanation of a fundamental behavioral law that stipulates a curvilinear, inverted-U relationship between anxiety and performance.« less

  9. Pinna abnormalities and low-set ears

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pinna abnormalities; Genetic defect - pinna; Congenital defect - pinna Images Ear abnormalities Pinna of the newborn ear References Haddad J, Keesecker S. Congenital malformations. In: Kliegman RM, Stanton BF, ...

  10. Therapeutic interventions in cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Patel, Dilip R

    2005-11-01

    Various therapeutic interventions have been used in the management of children with cerebral palsy. Traditional physiotherapy and occupational therapy are widely used interventions and have been shown to be of benefit in the treatment of cerebral palsy. Evidence in support of the effectiveness of the neurodevelopmental treatment is equivocal at best. There is evidence to support the use and effectiveness of neuromuscular electrical stimulation in children with cerebral palsy. The effectiveness of many other interventions used in the treatment of cerebral palsy has not been clearly established based on well-controlled trials. These include: sensory integration, body-weight support treadmill training, conductive education, constraint-induced therapy, hyperbaric oxygen therapy, and the Vojta method. This article provides an overview of salient aspects of popular interventions used in the management of children with cerebral palsy.

  11. Cerebral cartography and connectomics.

    PubMed

    Sporns, Olaf

    2015-05-19

    Cerebral cartography and connectomics pursue similar goals in attempting to create maps that can inform our understanding of the structural and functional organization of the cortex. Connectome maps explicitly aim at representing the brain as a complex network, a collection of nodes and their interconnecting edges. This article reflects on some of the challenges that currently arise in the intersection of cerebral cartography and connectomics. Principal challenges concern the temporal dynamics of functional brain connectivity, the definition of areal parcellations and their hierarchical organization into large-scale networks, the extension of whole-brain connectivity to cellular-scale networks, and the mapping of structure/function relations in empirical recordings and computational models. Successfully addressing these challenges will require extensions of methods and tools from network science to the mapping and analysis of human brain connectivity data. The emerging view that the brain is more than a collection of areas, but is fundamentally operating as a complex networked system, will continue to drive the creation of ever more detailed and multi-modal network maps as tools for on-going exploration and discovery in human connectomics. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  12. Cerebral cartography and connectomics

    PubMed Central

    Sporns, Olaf

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral cartography and connectomics pursue similar goals in attempting to create maps that can inform our understanding of the structural and functional organization of the cortex. Connectome maps explicitly aim at representing the brain as a complex network, a collection of nodes and their interconnecting edges. This article reflects on some of the challenges that currently arise in the intersection of cerebral cartography and connectomics. Principal challenges concern the temporal dynamics of functional brain connectivity, the definition of areal parcellations and their hierarchical organization into large-scale networks, the extension of whole-brain connectivity to cellular-scale networks, and the mapping of structure/function relations in empirical recordings and computational models. Successfully addressing these challenges will require extensions of methods and tools from network science to the mapping and analysis of human brain connectivity data. The emerging view that the brain is more than a collection of areas, but is fundamentally operating as a complex networked system, will continue to drive the creation of ever more detailed and multi-modal network maps as tools for on-going exploration and discovery in human connectomics. PMID:25823870

  13. Complex patterns of abnormal heartbeats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulte-Frohlinde, Verena; Ashkenazy, Yosef; Goldberger, Ary L.; Ivanov, Plamen Ch; Costa, Madalena; Morley-Davies, Adrian; Stanley, H. Eugene; Glass, Leon

    2002-01-01

    Individuals having frequent abnormal heartbeats interspersed with normal heartbeats may be at an increased risk of sudden cardiac death. However, mechanistic understanding of such cardiac arrhythmias is limited. We present a visual and qualitative method to display statistical properties of abnormal heartbeats. We introduce dynamical "heartprints" which reveal characteristic patterns in long clinical records encompassing approximately 10(5) heartbeats and may provide information about underlying mechanisms. We test if these dynamics can be reproduced by model simulations in which abnormal heartbeats are generated (i) randomly, (ii) at a fixed time interval following a preceding normal heartbeat, or (iii) by an independent oscillator that may or may not interact with the normal heartbeat. We compare the results of these three models and test their limitations to comprehensively simulate the statistical features of selected clinical records. This work introduces methods that can be used to test mathematical models of arrhythmogenesis and to develop a new understanding of underlying electrophysiologic mechanisms of cardiac arrhythmia.

  14. Unmasking Glucose Metabolism Alterations in Stable Renal Transplant Recipients: A Multicenter Study

    PubMed Central

    Delgado, Patricia; Diaz, Juan Manuel; Silva, Irene; Osorio, José M.; Osuna, Antonio; Bayés, Beatriz; Lauzurica, Ricardo; Arellano, Edgar; Campistol, Jose Maria; Dominguez, Rosa; Gómez-Alamillo, Carlos; Ibernon, Meritxell; Moreso, Francisco; Benitez, Rocio; Lampreave, Ildefonso; Porrini, Esteban; Torres, Armando

    2008-01-01

    Background and objectives: Emerging information indicates that glucose metabolism alterations are common after renal transplantation and are associated with carotid atheromatosis. The aims of this study were to investigate the prevalence of different glucose metabolism alterations in stable recipients as well as the factors related to the condition. Design, setting, participants, & measurements: A multicenter, cross-sectional study was conducted of 374 renal transplant recipients without pre- or posttransplantation diabetes. A standard 75-g oral glucose tolerance test was performed. Results: Glucose metabolism alterations were present in 119 (31.8%) recipients: 92 (24.6%) with an abnormal oral glucose tolerance test and 27 (7.2%) with isolated impaired fasting glucose. The most common disorder was impaired glucose tolerance (17.9%), and an abnormal oral glucose tolerance test was observed for 21.5% of recipients with a normal fasting glucose. By multivariate analysis, age, prednisone dosage, triglyceride/high-density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio, and β blocker use were shown to be factors related to glucose metabolism alterations. Remarkably, triglyceride levels, triglyceride/high-density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio, and the proportion of recipients with impaired fasting glucose were already higher throughout the first posttransplantation year in recipients with a current glucose metabolism alteration as compared with those without the condition. Conclusions: Glucose metabolism alterations are common in stable renal transplant recipients, and an oral glucose tolerance test is required for its detection. They are associated with a worse metabolic profile, which is already present during the first posttransplantation year. These findings may help planning strategies for early detection and intervention. PMID:18322043

  15. Brain abnormalities in murderers indicated by positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Raine, A; Buchsbaum, M; LaCasse, L

    1997-09-15

    Murderers pleading not guilty by reason of insanity (NGRI) are thought to have brain dysfunction, but there have been no previous studies reporting direct measures of both cortical and subcortical brain functioning in this specific group. Positron emission tomography brain imaging using a continuous performance challenge task was conducted on 41 murderers pleading not guilty by reason of insanity and 41 age- and sex-matched controls. Murderers were characterized by reduced glucose metabolism in the prefrontal cortex, superior parietal gyrus, left angular gyrus, and the corpus callosum, while abnormal asymmetries of activity (left hemisphere lower than right) were also found in the amygdala, thalamus, and medial temporal lobe. These preliminary findings provide initial indications of a network of abnormal cortical and subcortical brain processes that may predispose to violence in murderers pleading NGRI.

  16. Subclinical metabolic abnormalities associated with obesity in prepubertal Mexican schoolchildren.

    PubMed

    Romero, Juana B; Briones, Evangelina; Palacios, Gerardo C; Castelán, Kathia

    2010-06-01

    Childhood obesity has increased to epidemic levels and is considered a public health problem due to its association with a number of metabolic abnormalities, which are being detected at earlier stages of life. The objective was to evaluate the association between the presence of subclinical metabolic abnormalities (SMA) and obesity in a sample of pre-pubertal Mexican schoolchildren. Children of both sexes and 6 to 13 years old were questioned for signs of puberty, underwent anthropometric measurement and had their Body Mass Index (BMI) calculated. Two groups were formed: those with obesity (case group) and those with normal weight paired by age and chosen randomly (control group). Fasting insulin, glucose and cholesterol were measured. 92 children were included, 46 in each group, mean age 9.9 and 9.5 years old, respectively (p = 0.97). A higher frequency of hyperinsulinism was found in the case group: Fasting insulin > 15 mU/ml, 75% vs. 21% (case group vs. control group, respectively); fasting glucose to insulin ratio < 6, 72% vs. 24%; HOMA IR > 2.7, 83% vs. 14%; and decrease in QUICKI (< 0.3), 80% vs. 19% (p = 0.000). Hypercholesterolemia was 25% vs. 15% (p = 0.22), impaired fasting glucose 28% vs. 8% (p = 0.01), and family history of diabetes mellitus (DM) 35% vs. 9% (OR = 5.6; 95% CI = 1.5-22.2; p = 0.002). In this sample of Mexican schoolchildren, obesity was associated to a higher frequency of SMA, such as hyperinsulinism and impaired fasting glucose, and to a family history of DM.

  17. Quantitative assessment of brain glucose metabolic rates using in vivo deuterium magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ming; Zhu, Xiao-Hong; Zhang, Yi; Mateescu, Gheorghe; Chen, Wei

    2017-11-01

    Quantitative assessment of cerebral glucose consumption rate (CMR glc ) and tricarboxylic acid cycle flux (V TCA ) is crucial for understanding neuroenergetics under physiopathological conditions. In this study, we report a novel in vivo Deuterium ( 2 H) MRS (DMRS) approach for simultaneously measuring and quantifying CMR glc and V TCA in rat brains at 16.4 Tesla. Following a brief infusion of deuterated glucose, dynamic changes of isotope-labeled glucose, glutamate/glutamine (Glx) and water contents in the brain can be robustly monitored from their well-resolved 2 H resonances. Dynamic DMRS glucose and Glx data were employed to determine CMR glc and V TCA concurrently. To test the sensitivity of this method in response to altered glucose metabolism, two brain conditions with different anesthetics were investigated. Increased CMR glc (0.46 vs. 0.28 µmol/g/min) and V TCA (0.96 vs. 0.6 µmol/g/min) were found in rats under morphine as compared to deeper anesthesia using 2% isoflurane. This study demonstrates the feasibility and new utility of the in vivo DMRS approach to assess cerebral glucose metabolic rates at high/ultrahigh field. It provides an alternative MRS tool for in vivo study of metabolic coupling relationship between aerobic and anaerobic glucose metabolisms in brain under physiopathological states.

  18. Endocrine abnormalities in lithium toxicity.

    PubMed

    Shanks, Gabriella; Mishra, Vinita; Nikolova, Stanka

    2017-10-01

    Lithium toxicity can manifest as a variety of biochemical -abnormalities. This case report describes a patient -presenting to the emergency department with neuropsychiatric -symptoms on a background of bipolar disorder, for which she was prescribed lithium for 26 years previously. Cases of lithium toxicity are rare but can be severe and this case report -demonstrates to clinicians that they must be thorough in investigating patients with lithium toxicity, as there are many potential abnormalities that can manifest concurrently. © Royal College of Physicians 2017. All rights reserved.

  19. Cerebral Palsy: A Lifelong Challenge Asks for Early Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Panteliadis, Christos P; Hagel, Christian; Karch, Dieter; Heinemann, Karl

    2015-01-01

    One of the oldest and probably well-known examples of cerebral palsy is the mummy of the Pharaoh Siptah about 1196–1190 B.C., and a letter from Hippocrates (460–390 B.C.). Cerebral palsy (CP) is one of the most common congenital or acquired neurological impairments in paediatric patients, and refers to a group of children with motor disability and related functional defects. The visible core of CP is characterized by abnormal coordination of movements and/or muscle tone which manifest very early in the development. Resulting from pre- or perinatal brain damage CP is not a progressive condition per se. However, without systematic medical and physiotherapeutic support the dystonia leads to muscle contractions and to deterioration of the handicap. Here we review the three general spastic manifestations of CP hemiplegia, diplegia and tetraplegia, describe the diagnostic procedures and delineate a time schedule for an early intervention. PMID:26191093

  20. Fetal cerebral imaging - ultrasound vs. MRI: an update.

    PubMed

    Blondiaux, Eléonore; Garel, Catherine

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this article is to analyze the advantages and limitations of prenatal ultrasonography (US) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the evaluation of the fetal brain. These imaging modalities should not be seen as competitive but rather as complementary. There are wide variations in the world regarding screening policies, technology, skills, and legislation about termination of pregnancy, and these variations markedly impact on the way of using prenatal imaging. According to the contribution expected from each technique and to local working conditions, one should choose the most appropriate imaging modality on a case-by-case basis. The advantages and limitations of US and MRI in the setting of fetal brain imaging are displayed. Different anatomical regions (midline, ventricles, subependymal area, cerebral parenchyma, pericerebral space, posterior fossa) and pathological conditions are analyzed and illustrated in order to compare the respective contribution of each technique. An accurate prenatal diagnosis of cerebral abnormalities is of utmost importance for prenatal counseling.

  1. Neurodevelopmental origins of abnormal cortical morphology in dissociative identity disorder.

    PubMed

    Reinders, A A T S; Chalavi, S; Schlumpf, Y R; Vissia, E M; Nijenhuis, E R S; Jäncke, L; Veltman, D J; Ecker, C

    2018-02-01

    To examine the two constitutes of cortical volume (CV), that is, cortical thickness (CT) and surface area (SA), in individuals with dissociative identity disorder (DID) with the view of gaining important novel insights into the underlying neurobiological mechanisms mediating DID. This study included 32 female patients with DID and 43 matched healthy controls. Between-group differences in CV, thickness, and SA, the degree of spatial overlap between differences in CT and SA, and their relative contribution to differences in regional CV were assessed using a novel spatially unbiased vertex-wise approach. Whole-brain correlation analyses were performed between measures of cortical anatomy and dissociative symptoms and traumatization. Individuals with DID differed from controls in CV, CT, and SA, with significantly decreased CT in the insula, anterior cingulate, and parietal regions and reduced cortical SA in temporal and orbitofrontal cortices. Abnormalities in CT and SA shared only about 3% of all significantly different cerebral surface locations and involved distinct contributions to the abnormality of CV in DID. Significant negative associations between abnormal brain morphology (SA and CV) and dissociative symptoms and early childhood traumatization (0 and 3 years of age) were found. In DID, neuroanatomical areas with decreased CT and SA are in different locations in the brain. As CT and SA have distinct genetic and developmental origins, our findings may indicate that different neurobiological mechanisms and environmental factors impact on cortical morphology in DID, such as early childhood traumatization. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Electrogastrography abnormalities appear early in children with diabetes type 1.

    PubMed

    Posfay-Barbe, Klara M; Lindley, Keith J; Schwitzgebel, Valérie M; Belli, Dominique C; Schäppi, Michela G

    2011-10-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate gastric myoelectrical activity in young patients with diabetes and to correlate it with their metabolic control [fasting blood glucose, glycosylated haemoglobin, and fructosamine] and BMI during a 3 years follow-up. Surface electrogastrography (EGG) was performed on 49 children with diabetes aged 10.3±4.4 (mean±SD) years and 17 age-matched healthy controls after fasting glucose, glycosylated haemoglobin, and fructosamine were measured. EGG parameters [percentage of bradygastria, 3 cycles per minute, tachygastria, dominant frequency instability coefficient, and power ratio] were analysed and compared with blood analysis. Patients with diabetes exhibited an increase in preprandial bradygastria 7.9±8.8 cpm (mean±SD) compared with controls 2.1±1.0 (P=0.011), with an associated decrease in preprandial normogastria (72.2±14.5 vs. 82.7±14.7; P=0.013). Normogastric power ratio (postprandial/ preprandial power) was significantly increased in the children with diabetes compared with controls (mean: 6.67 vs. 3.14, P=0.034). A longer duration of diabetes was associated with an increased risk of EGG abnormalities (P=0.036). Marked hyperglycaemia at the time of study was associated with postprandial bradygastria (P=0.01) and power ratio bradygastria (P=0.042). Changes in glycosylated haemoglobin, fructosamine and BMI did not affect EGG parameters. EGG abnormalities, presented early in a high proportion of diabetic children, are related to the acute hyperglycaemia. These abnormalities are not consistently present in the follow-up studies and not related to the glycosylated haemoglobin and fructosamine. Diabetic autonomic neuropathy is therefore an unlikely pathogenic factor for EGG abnormalities in children with diabetes.

  3. Relationships between obesity, lipids and fasting glucose in the menopause.

    PubMed

    Netjasov, Aleksandra Simoncig; Vujović, Svetlana; Ivović, Miomira; Tancić-Gajić, Milina; Marina, Ljiljana; Barać, Marija

    2013-01-01

    Menopause leads to the development of central adiposity, a more atherogenic lipid profile and increased incidence of metabolic syndrome independent of age and other factors. The aim of the study was to investigate the relationships between anthropometric characteristics, sex hormones, lipids and fasting glucose in menopausal women. The study included 87 menopausal women, who where divided into groups according to two criteria: BMI > or = 26.7 kg/m2 and BMI > or = 25 kg/m2. Anthropometric characteristics and blood pressure were measured. Blood was taken at 08.00 h for fasting glucose, triglycerides, cholesterol, HDL, LDL, apolipoprotein A, apolipoprotein B, lipoprotein(a) (Lp(a)), C-reactive protein, fibrinogen, follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), prolactin (PRL), estradiol, progesterone, testosterone and sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG). Significant differences between groups were found for weight, BMI, waist, hips circumference, waist/hip ratio (WHR), systolic and diastolic blood pressure, Lp(a), FSH, LH, PRL (for systolic blood pressure p < 0.05, for the rest p < 0.01) and fasting glucose (p < 0.05). In obese and overweight women with BMI > or = 26.7 kg/m2 significant negative correlations were found for FSH and glucose, SHBG and LDL, SHBG and total cholesterol, SHBG and glucose, BMI and HDL, WC and HDL. In obese and overweight women with BMI > or = 25 kg/m2 significant negative correlations were found for BMI and HDL, waist circumference (WC) and HDL, WHR and HDL, FSH and glucose, SHBG and glucose; significant positive correlations were between BMI and glucose, WC and glucose and WHR with triglycerides. Gaining weight and decreased SHBG are related to dyslipidemia and increased fasting glucose confirming increased incidence of metabolic abnormalities in the menopause.

  4. Glucose metabolism transporters and epilepsy: only GLUT1 has an established role.

    PubMed

    Hildebrand, Michael S; Damiano, John A; Mullen, Saul A; Bellows, Susannah T; Oliver, Karen L; Dahl, Hans-Henrik M; Scheffer, Ingrid E; Berkovic, Samuel F

    2014-02-01

    The availability of glucose, and its glycolytic product lactate, for cerebral energy metabolism is regulated by specific brain transporters. Inadequate energy delivery leads to neurologic impairment. Haploinsufficiency of the glucose transporter GLUT1 causes a characteristic early onset encephalopathy, and has recently emerged as an important cause of a variety of childhood or later-onset generalized epilepsies and paroxysmal exercise-induced dyskinesia. We explored whether mutations in the genes encoding the other major glucose (GLUT3) or lactate (MCT1/2/3/4) transporters involved in cerebral energy metabolism also cause generalized epilepsies. A cohort of 119 cases with myoclonic astatic epilepsy or early onset absence epilepsy was screened for nucleotide variants in these five candidate genes. No epilepsy-causing mutations were identified, indicating that of the major energetic fuel transporters in the brain, only GLUT1 is clearly associated with generalized epilepsy. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2014 International League Against Epilepsy.

  5. Brain glucose and acetoacetate metabolism: a comparison of young and older adults.

    PubMed

    Nugent, Scott; Tremblay, Sebastien; Chen, Kewei W; Ayutyanont, Napatkamon; Roontiva, Auttawut; Castellano, Christian-Alexandre; Fortier, Melanie; Roy, Maggie; Courchesne-Loyer, Alexandre; Bocti, Christian; Lepage, Martin; Turcotte, Eric; Fulop, Tamas; Reiman, Eric M; Cunnane, Stephen C

    2014-06-01

    The extent to which the age-related decline in regional brain glucose uptake also applies to other important brain fuels is presently unknown. Ketones are the brain's major alternative fuel to glucose, so we developed a dual tracer positron emission tomography protocol to quantify and compare regional cerebral metabolic rates for glucose and the ketone, acetoacetate. Twenty healthy young adults (mean age, 26 years) and 24 healthy older adults (mean age, 74 years) were studied. In comparison with younger adults, older adults had 8 ± 6% (mean ± SD) lower cerebral metabolic rates for glucose in gray matter as a whole (p = 0.035), specifically in several frontal, temporal, and subcortical regions, as well as in the cingulate and insula (p ≤ 0.01, false discovery rate correction). The effect of age on cerebral metabolic rates for acetoacetate in gray matter did not reach significance (p = 0.11). Rate constants (min(-1)) of glucose (Kg) and acetoacetate (Ka) were significantly lower (-11 ± 6%; [p = 0.005], and -19 ± 5%; [p = 0.006], respectively) in older adults compared with younger adults. There were differential effects of age on Kg and Ka as seen by significant interaction effects in the caudate (p = 0.030) and post-central gyrus (p = 0.023). The acetoacetate index, which expresses the scaled residuals of the voxel-wise linear regression of glucose on ketone uptake, identifies regions taking up higher or lower amounts of acetoacetate relative to glucose. The acetoacetate index was higher in the caudate of young adults when compared with older adults (p ≤ 0.05 false discovery rate correction). This study provides new information about glucose and ketone metabolism in the human brain and a comparison of the extent to which their regional use changes during normal aging. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Low cerebral blood flow is associated with lower memory function in metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Birdsill, Alex C; Carlsson, Cynthia M; Willette, Auriel A; Okonkwo, Ozioma C; Johnson, Sterling C; Xu, Guofan; Oh, Jennifer M; Gallagher, Catherine L; Koscik, Rebecca L; Jonaitis, Erin M; Hermann, Bruce P; LaRue, Asenath; Rowley, Howard A; Asthana, Sanjay; Sager, Mark A; Bendlin, Barbara B

    2013-07-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS)--a cluster of cardiovascular risk factors--is linked with cognitive decline and dementia. However, the brain changes underlying this link are presently unknown. In this study, we tested the relationship between MetS, cerebral blood flow (CBF), white matter hyperintensity burden, and gray matter (GM) volume in cognitively healthy late middle-aged adults. Additionally, the extent to which MetS was associated with cognitive performance was assessed. Late middle-aged adults from the Wisconsin Registry for Alzheimer's Prevention (N = 69, mean age = 60.4 years) underwent a fasting blood draw, arterial spin labeling perfusion MRI, T1-weighted MRI, T2FLAIR MRI, and neuropsychological testing. MetS was defined as abnormalities on three or more factors, including abdominal obesity, triglycerides, HDL-cholesterol, blood pressure, and fasting glucose. Mean GM CBF was 15% lower in MetS compared to controls. Voxel-wise image analysis indicated that the MetS group had lower CBF across a large portion of the cortical surface, with the exception of medial and inferior parts of the occipital and temporal lobes. The MetS group also had lower immediate memory function; a mediation analysis indicated this relationship was partially mediated by CBF. Among the MetS factors, abdominal obesity and elevated triglycerides were most strongly associated with lower CBF. The results underscore the importance of reducing the number of cardiovascular risk factors for maintaining CBF and cognition in an aging population. Copyright © 2012 The Obesity Society.

  7. Dynamic changes of striatal and extrastriatal abnormalities in glutaric aciduria type I.

    PubMed

    Harting, Inga; Neumaier-Probst, Eva; Seitz, Angelika; Maier, Esther M; Assmann, Birgit; Baric, Ivo; Troncoso, Monica; Mühlhausen, Chris; Zschocke, Johannes; Boy, Nikolas P S; Hoffmann, Georg F; Garbade, Sven F; Kölker, Stefan

    2009-07-01

    In glutaric aciduria type I, an autosomal recessive disease of mitochondrial lysine, hydroxylysine and tryptophan catabolism, striatal lesions are characteristically induced by acute encephalopathic crises during a finite period of brain development (age 3-36 months). The frequency of striatal injury is significantly less in patients diagnosed as asymptomatic newborns by newborn screening. Most previous studies have focused on the onset and mechanism of striatal injury, whereas little is known about neuroradiological abnormalities in pre-symptomatically diagnosed patients and about dynamic changes of extrastriatal abnormalities. Thus, the major aim of the present retrospective study was to improve our understanding of striatal and extrastriatal abnormalities in affected individuals including those diagnosed by newborn screening. To this end, we systematically analysed magnetic resonance imagings (MRIs) in 38 patients with glutaric aciduria type I diagnosed before or after the manifestation of neurological symptoms. To identify brain regions that are susceptible to cerebral injury during acute encephalopathic crises, we compared the frequency of magnetic resonance abnormalities in patients with and without such crises. Major specific changes after encephalopathic crises were found in the putamen (P < 0.001), nucleus caudatus (P < 0.001), globus pallidus (P = 0.012) and ventricles (P = 0.001). Analysis of empirical cumulative distribution frequencies, however, demonstrated that isolated pallidal abnormalities did not significantly differ over time in both groups (P = 0.544) suggesting that isolated pallidal abnormalities are not induced by acute crises--in contrast to striatal abnormalities. The manifestation of motor disability was associated with signal abnormalities in putamen, caudate, pallidum and ventricles. In addition, we found a large number of extrastriatal abnormalities in patients with and without preceding encephalophatic crises. These abnormalities

  8. The influence of hyperthermia on intracranial pressure, cerebral oximetry and cerebral metabolism in traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Nyholm, Lena; Howells, Tim; Lewén, Anders; Hillered, Lars; Enblad, Per

    2017-01-01

    Background Hyperthermia is a common secondary insult in traumatic brain injury (TBI). The aim was to evaluate the relationship between hyperthermia and intracranial pressure (ICP), and if intracranial compliance and cerebral blood flow (CBF) pressure autoregulation affected that relationship. The relationships between hyperthermia and cerebral oximetry (BtipO2) and cerebral metabolism were also studied. Methods A computerized multimodality monitoring system was used for data collection at the neurointensive care unit. Demographic and monitoring data (temperature, ICP, blood pressure, microdialysis, BtipO2) were analyzed from 87 consecutive TBI patients. ICP amplitude was used as measure of compliance, and CBF pressure autoregulation status was calculated using collected blood pressure and ICP values. Mixed models and comparison between groups were used. Results The influence of hyperthermia on intracranial dynamics (ICP, brain energy metabolism, and BtipO2) was small, but individual differences were seen. Linear mixed models showed that hyperthermia raises ICP slightly more when temperature increases in the groups with low compliance and impaired CBF pressure autoregulation. There was also a tendency (not statistically significant) for increased BtipO2, and for increased pyruvate and lactate, with higher temperature, while the lactate/pyruvate ratio and glucose were stable. Conclusions The major finding was that the effects of hyperthermia on intracranial dynamics (ICP, brain energy metabolism, and BtipO2) were not extensive in general, but there were exceptional cases. Hyperthermia treatment has many side effects, so it is desirable to identify cases in which hyperthermia is dangerous. Information from multimodality monitoring may be used to guide treatment in individual patients. PMID:28463046

  9. Multimorbidity in Middle-Aged Adults with Cerebral Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Cremer, Nicole; Hurvitz, Edward A.; Peterson, Mark D.

    2017-01-01

    Background Individuals with cerebral palsy have less lean body mass, greater relative adiposity, and lower fitness and physical activity participation; and yet, the prevalence of age-related multimorbidity in this population has yet to be established. Purpose To examine the prevalence of lifestyle-related chronic conditions and multimorbidity in a sample of middle-aged adults with cerebral palsy. Methods A clinic-based sample of middle-aged adults with cerebral palsy was examined using Electronic Medical Records Search Engine (EMERSE) software. Our cohort included n= 435 individuals aged 40–60 years old, with an ICD-9/10-CM Diagnosis Code for cerebral palsy. Prevalence of 12 chronic conditions were evaluated, including existing diagnoses or historical record of: osteopenia/osteoporosis, myocardial infarction, stroke, coronary artery disease, impaired glucose tolerance/type 2 diabetes, other cardiovascular conditions, rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, asthma, emphysema, pre-hypertension/hypertension, and hyperlipidemia. Multivariate logistic models were used to estimate adjusted mulitmorbidity (i.e., ≥2 chronic conditions), adjusting for age, sex, smoking status, obesity, and Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS). Results There were 137 unique multimorbidity combinations. Multimorbidity was significantly more prevalent among obese versus non-obese individuals for both GMFCS I–III (75.8% vs. 53.6%) and GMFCS IV–V (79.0% vs 64.2%), but was also significantly higher in non-obese individuals with GMFCS IV–V (64.2%) compared to individuals with non-obese individuals with GMFCS I–III (53.6%). Both obesity status (OR: 2.20; 95% CI 1.32–2.79) and the GMFCS IV–V category (OR: 1.81; 95% CI 1.32–3.68) were independently associated with multimorbidity. Conclusion Middle-aged adults with cerebral palsy have high estimates of multimorbidity, and both obesity and higher GMFCS levels are independently associated with greater risk. PMID:28065772

  10. Predictors of cerebral venous thrombosis and arterial ischemic stroke in young Asian women.

    PubMed

    Wasay, Mohammad; Saadatnia, Mohammad; Venketasubramanian, Narayanaswamy; Kaul, Subhash; Menon, Bindu; Gunaratne, Padma; Malik, Abdul; Mehmood, Kauser; Ahmed, Shahzad; Awan, Safia; Mehndiratta, M M

    2012-11-01

    The management and outcome of cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) may be different from that of arterial ischemic stroke (AIS). Clinically differentiating the 2 diseases on clinical grounds may be difficult. The main objective of this study was to identify predictors differentiating CVT from AIS in a large cohort of young Asian women, based on risk factors and investigations. Twelve centers in 8 Asian countries participated. Women aged 15-45 years were included if they had a diagnosis of first-ever symptomatic AIS or CVT confirmed by brain computed tomography scan or magnetic resonance imaging/magnetic resonance venography. Patients with head trauma, cerebral contusions, intracranial hemorrhage, and subarachnoid or subdural hemorrhage were excluded. Data, including demographic data, risk factor assessment, neuroimaging studies, blood tests, and cardiac studies, were collected by retrospective and then prospective chart review between January 2001 and July 2008. Outcome was based on the modified Rankin Scale (mRS) score at admission, discharge, and latest follow-up. A total of 958 patients (204 with CVT and 754 with AIS) were included in the study. Age under 36 years, anemia, pregnancy or postpartum state, and presence of hemorrhagic infarcts on computed tomography scan or magnetic resonance imaging were significant predictors of CVT on univariate analysis. Age over 36 years, diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidemia, recent myocardial infarction, electrocardiogram abnormalities, and blood glucose level >150 mg/dL were strong predictors of AIS. On multivariate analysis, postpartum state and hemorrhagic infarct were the strongest predictors of CVT (P < .001). Mortality was comparable in the 2 patient groups. Prognosis was significantly better for patients with CVT than for those with AIS (mRS score 0-2, 74% v 46%; P < .001). There was no difference in outcome between patients with obstetric and nonobstetric CVT. Our data indicate that in young Asian women, predictors of CVT

  11. The laforin-malin complex negatively regulates glycogen synthesis by modulating cellular glucose uptake via glucose transporters.

    PubMed

    Singh, Pankaj Kumar; Singh, Sweta; Ganesh, Subramaniam

    2012-02-01

    Lafora disease (LD), an inherited and fatal neurodegenerative disorder, is characterized by increased cellular glycogen content and the formation of abnormally branched glycogen inclusions, called Lafora bodies, in the affected tissues, including neurons. Therefore, laforin phosphatase and malin ubiquitin E3 ligase, the two proteins that are defective in LD, are thought to regulate glycogen synthesis through an unknown mechanism, the defects in which are likely to underlie some of the symptoms of LD. We show here that laforin's subcellular localization is dependent on the cellular glycogen content and that the stability of laforin is determined by the cellular ATP level, the activity of 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase, and the affinity of malin toward laforin. By using cell and animal models, we further show that the laforin-malin complex regulates cellular glucose uptake by modulating the subcellular localization of glucose transporters; loss of malin or laforin resulted in an increased abundance of glucose transporters in the plasma membrane and therefore excessive glucose uptake. Loss of laforin or malin, however, did not affect glycogen catabolism. Thus, the excessive cellular glucose level appears to be the primary trigger for the abnormally higher levels of cellular glycogen seen in LD.

  12. The collective therapeutic potential of cerebral ketone metabolism in traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Prins, Mayumi L.; Matsumoto, Joyce H.

    2014-01-01

    The postinjury period of glucose metabolic depression is accompanied by adenosine triphosphate decreases, increased flux of glucose through the pentose phosphate pathway, free radical production, activation of poly-ADP ribose polymerase via DNA damage, and inhibition of glyceraldehyde dehydrogenase (a key glycolytic enzyme) via depletion of the cytosolic NAD pool. Under these post-brain injury conditions of impaired glycolytic metabolism, glucose becomes a less favorable energy substrate. Ketone bodies are the only known natural alternative substrate to glucose for cerebral energy metabolism. While it has been demonstrated that other fuels (pyruvate, lactate, and acetyl-L-carnitine) can be metabolized by the brain, ketones are the only endogenous fuel that can contribute significantly to cerebral metabolism. Preclinical studies employing both pre- and postinjury implementation of the ketogenic diet have demonstrated improved structural and functional outcome in traumatic brain injury (TBI) models, mild TBI/concussion models, and spinal cord injury. Further clinical studies are required to determine the optimal method to induce cerebral ketone metabolism in the postinjury brain, and to validate the neuroprotective benefits of ketogenic therapy in humans. PMID:24721741

  13. The collective therapeutic potential of cerebral ketone metabolism in traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Prins, Mayumi L; Matsumoto, Joyce H

    2014-12-01

    The postinjury period of glucose metabolic depression is accompanied by adenosine triphosphate decreases, increased flux of glucose through the pentose phosphate pathway, free radical production, activation of poly-ADP ribose polymerase via DNA damage, and inhibition of glyceraldehyde dehydrogenase (a key glycolytic enzyme) via depletion of the cytosolic NAD pool. Under these post-brain injury conditions of impaired glycolytic metabolism, glucose becomes a less favorable energy substrate. Ketone bodies are the only known natural alternative substrate to glucose for cerebral energy metabolism. While it has been demonstrated that other fuels (pyruvate, lactate, and acetyl-L-carnitine) can be metabolized by the brain, ketones are the only endogenous fuel that can contribute significantly to cerebral metabolism. Preclinical studies employing both pre- and postinjury implementation of the ketogenic diet have demonstrated improved structural and functional outcome in traumatic brain injury (TBI) models, mild TBI/concussion models, and spinal cord injury. Further clinical studies are required to determine the optimal method to induce cerebral ketone metabolism in the postinjury brain, and to validate the neuroprotective benefits of ketogenic therapy in humans. Copyright © 2014 by the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  14. Blood Glucose Levels Following Intra-Articular Steroid Injections in Patients with Diabetes: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Choudhry, M N; Malik, R A; Charalambous, Charalambos Panayiotou

    2016-03-22

    Parenterally administered steroids have been shown to affect the metabolism of glucose and to cause abnormal blood glucose levels in diabetic patients. These abnormal blood glucose levels in diabetic patients raise concerns that intra-articular steroid injections also may affect blood glucose levels. We performed a systematic review of studies examining the effect of intra-articular steroid injections on blood glucose levels in patients with diabetes mellitus. A literature search of the PubMed, EMBASE, AMED, and CINAHL databases using all relevant keywords and phrases revealed 532 manuscripts. After the application of inclusion criteria, seven studies with a total of seventy-two patients were analyzed. All studies showed a rise in blood glucose levels following intra-articular steroid injection. Four of the seven studies showed a substantial increase in blood glucose. Peak values reached as high as 500 mg/dL. The peak increase in blood glucose did not occur immediately following intra-articular steroid injection, and in some cases it took several days to occur. In many patients, post-injection hyperglycemia occurred within twenty-four to seventy-two hours. Intra-articular steroid injections may cause hyperglycemia in patients with diabetes mellitus, and patients should be warned of this complication. Diabetic patients should be advised to regularly monitor their blood glucose levels for up to a week after injection and should seek medical advice if safe thresholds are breached. Therapeutic Level IV. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  15. [Cerebral gigantism. Review of the literature apropos of one case].

    PubMed

    Maes, B; Caron, J; Couchot, J; Gross, A; Leutenegger, M

    The authors report a case of cerebral gigantism and review 83 cases found in the world literature. The diagnosis depends on the association of several factors, none of which alone are specific but which, on the whole, form a fairly characteristic picture. Large size at birth, leading only rarely to gigantism at adult age. Facial dysmorphia of acromegaloid type. Ecephalopathy with mental deficiency without any neuroradiological abnormality. Finally, endocrine investigations and somatotropic function were normal. No etiology has been found up to now. The most satisfactory theory is that of a hypothalamopituitary disturbance. Treatment may simple avoid excess height at adult age and is based on sex hormone therapy to accelerate bony maturation.

  16. [Macro- and microscopic systematization of cerebral cortex malformations in children].

    PubMed

    Milovanov, A P; Milovanova, O A

    2011-01-01

    For the first time in pediatric pathologicoanatomic practice the complete systematization of cerebral cortex malformations is represented. Organ, macroscopic forms: microencephaly, macroencephaly, micropolygyria, pachygyria, schizencephaly, porencephaly, lissencephaly. Histic microdysgenesis of cortex: type I includes isolated abnormalities such as radial (IA) and tangential (I B) subtypes of cortical dislamination; type II includes sublocal cortical dislamination with immature dysmorphic neurons (II A) and balloon cells (II B); type III are the combination focal cortical dysplasia with tuberous sclerosis of the hippocampus (III A), tumors (III B) and malformations of vessels, traumatic and hypoxic disorders (III C). Band heterotopias. Subependimal nodular heterotopias. Tuberous sclerosis. Cellular typification of cortical dysplasia: immature neurons and balloon cells.

  17. Effect of ezetimibe on lipid and glucose metabolism after a fat and glucose load.

    PubMed

    Hiramitsu, Shinya; Miyagishima, Kenji; Ishii, Junichi; Matsui, Shigeru; Naruse, Hiroyuki; Shiino, Kenji; Kitagawa, Fumihiko; Ozaki, Yukio

    2012-11-01

    The clinical benefit of ezetimibe, an intestinal cholesterol transporter inhibitor, for treatment of postprandial hyperlipidemia was assessed in subjects who ingested a high-fat and high-glucose test meal to mimic westernized diet. We enrolled 20 male volunteers who had at least one of the following: waist circumference ≥ 85 cm, body mass index ≥ 25 kg/m(2), or triglycerides (TG) from 150 to 400mg/dL. After 4 weeks of treatment with ezetimibe (10mg/day), the subjects ingested a high-fat and high-glucose meal. Then changes in serum lipid and glucose levels were monitored after 0, 2, 4, and 6h, and the area under the curve (AUC) was calculated for the change in each parameter. At 4 and 6h postprandially, TG levels were decreased (p<0.01) after 4 weeks of ezetimibe treatment, and the AUC for TG was also decreased (p<0.01). Apolipoprotein B48 (apo-B48) levels at 4 and 6h postprandially were significantly decreased after ezetimibe treatment (p<0.01 and p<0.001, respectively), and the AUC for apo-B48 was also significantly decreased (p<0.01). Blood glucose and insulin levels at 2h postprandially were significantly decreased by ezetimibe (p<0.05). The AUCs for blood glucose and insulin were also significantly decreased (p<0.05 and p<0.01, respectively). Since ezetimibe improved postprandial lipid and glucose metabolism, this drug is likely to be beneficial for dyslipidemia in patients with postprandial metabolic abnormalities. Copyright © 2012 Japanese College of Cardiology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Redundancy in Glucose Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Sharifi, Amin; Varsavsky, Andrea; Ulloa, Johanna; Horsburgh, Jodie C.; McAuley, Sybil A.; Krishnamurthy, Balasubramanian; Jenkins, Alicia J.; Colman, Peter G.; Ward, Glenn M.; MacIsaac, Richard J.; Shah, Rajiv; O’Neal, David N.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Current electrochemical glucose sensors use a single electrode. Multiple electrodes (redundancy) may enhance sensor performance. We evaluated an electrochemical redundant sensor (ERS) incorporating two working electrodes (WE1 and WE2) onto a single subcutaneous insertion platform with a processing algorithm providing a single real-time continuous glucose measure. Methods: Twenty-three adults with type 1 diabetes each wore two ERSs concurrently for 168 hours. Post-insertion a frequent sampling test (FST) was performed with ERS benchmarked against a glucose meter (Bayer Contour Link). Day 4 and 7 FSTs were performed with a standard meal and venous blood collected for reference glucose measurements (YSI and meter). Between visits, ERS was worn with capillary blood glucose testing ≥8 times/day. Sensor glucose data were processed prospectively. Results: Mean absolute relative deviation (MARD) for ERS day 1-7 (3,297 paired points with glucose meter) was (mean [SD]) 10.1 [11.5]% versus 11.4 [11.9]% for WE1 and 12.0 [11.9]% for WE2; P < .0001. ERS Clarke A and A+B were 90.2% and 99.8%, respectively. ERS day 4 plus day 7 MARD (1,237 pairs with YSI) was 9.4 [9.5]% versus 9.6 [9.7]% for WE1 and 9.9 [9.7]% for WE2; P = ns. ERS day 1-7 precision absolute relative deviation (PARD) was 9.9 [3.6]% versus 11.5 [6.2]% for WE1 and 10.1 [4.4]% for WE2; P = ns. ERS sensor display time was 97.8 [6.0]% versus 91.0 [22.3]% for WE1 and 94.1 [14.3]% for WE2; P < .05. Conclusions: Electrochemical redundancy enhances glucose sensor accuracy and display time compared with each individual sensing element alone. ERS performance compares favorably with ‘best-in-class’ of non-redundant sensors. PMID:26499476

  19. Weight loss after bariatric surgery reverses insulin-induced increases in brain glucose metabolism of the morbidly obese.

    PubMed

    Tuulari, Jetro J; Karlsson, Henry K; Hirvonen, Jussi; Hannukainen, Jarna C; Bucci, Marco; Helmiö, Mika; Ovaska, Jari; Soinio, Minna; Salminen, Paulina; Savisto, Nina; Nummenmaa, Lauri; Nuutila, Pirjo

    2013-08-01

    Obesity and insulin resistance are associated with altered brain glucose metabolism. Here, we studied brain glucose metabolism in 22 morbidly obese patients before and 6 months after bariatric surgery. Seven healthy subjects served as control subjects. Brain glucose metabolism was measured twice per imaging session: with and without insulin stimulation (hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp) using [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose scanning. We found that during fasting, brain glucose metabolism was not different between groups. However, the hyperinsulinemic clamp increased brain glucose metabolism in a widespread manner in the obese but not control subjects, and brain glucose metabolism was significantly higher during clamp in obese than in control subjects. After follow-up, 6 months postoperatively, the increase in glucose metabolism was no longer observed, and this attenuation was coupled with improved peripheral insulin sensitivity after weight loss. We conclude that obesity is associated with increased insulin-stimulated glucose metabolism in the brain and that this abnormality can be reversed by bariatric surgery.

  20. Single Fasting Plasma Glucose Versus 75-g Oral Glucose-Tolerance Test in Prediction of Adverse Perinatal Outcomes: A Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Shen, Songying; Lu, Jinhua; Zhang, Lifang; He, Jianrong; Li, Weidong; Chen, Niannian; Wen, Xingxuan; Xiao, Wanqing; Yuan, Mingyang; Qiu, Lan; Cheng, Kar Keung; Xia, Huimin; Mol, Ben Willem J; Qiu, Xiu

    2017-02-01

    There remains uncertainty regarding whether a single fasting glucose measurement is sufficient to predict risk of adverse perinatal outcomes. We included 12,594 pregnant women who underwent a 75-g oral glucose-tolerance test (OGTT) at 22-28weeks' gestation in the Born in Guangzhou Cohort Study, China. Outcomes were large for gestational age (LGA) baby, cesarean section, and spontaneous preterm birth. We calculated the area under the receiver operator characteristic curves (AUCs) to assess the capacity of OGTT glucose values to predict adverse outcomes, and compared the AUCs of different components of OGTT. 1325 women had a LGA baby (10.5%). Glucose measurements were linearly associated with LGA, with strongest associations for fasting glucose (odds ratio 1.37, 95% confidence interval 1.30-1.45). Weaker associations were observed for cesarean section and spontaneous preterm birth. Fasting glucose have a comparable discriminative power for prediction of LGA to the combination of fasting, 1h, and 2h glucose values during OGTT (AUCs, 0.611 vs. 0.614, P=0.166). The LGA risk was consistently increased in women with abnormal fasting glucose (≥5.1mmol/l), irrespective of 1h or 2h glucose levels. A single fasting glucose measurement performs comparably to 75-g OGTT in predicting risk of having a LGA baby. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.