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Sample records for abnormal cerebral perfusion

  1. Cerebral abnormalities in cocaine abusers: Demonstration by SPECT perfusion brain scintigraphy. Work in progress

    SciTech Connect

    Tumeh, S.S.; Nagel, J.S.; English, R.J.; Moore, M.; Holman, B.L. )

    1990-09-01

    Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) perfusion brain scans with iodine-123 isopropyl iodoamphetamine (IMP) were obtained in 12 subjects who acknowledged using cocaine on a sporadic to a daily basis. The route of cocaine administration varied from nasal to intravenous. Concurrent abuse of other drugs was also reported. None of the patients were positive for human immunodeficiency virus. Brain scans demonstrated focal defects in 11 subjects, including seven who were asymptomatic, and no abnormality in one. Among the findings were scattered focal cortical deficits, which were seen in several patients and which ranged in severity from small and few to multiple and large, with a special predilection for the frontal and temporal lobes. No perfusion deficits were seen on I-123 SPECT images in five healthy volunteers. Focal alterations in cerebral perfusion are seen commonly in asymptomatic drug users, and these focal deficits are readily depicted by I-123 IMP SPECT.

  2. Hydrostatic determinants of cerebral perfusion

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, E.M.; Traystman, R.J.

    1986-05-01

    We examined the cerebral blood flow response to alterations in perfusion pressure mediated through decreases in mean arterial pressure, increases in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure, and increases in jugular venous (JV) pressure in 42 pentobarbital anesthetized dogs. Each of these three pressures was independently controlled. Cerebral perfusion pressure was defined as mean arterial pressure minus JV or CSF pressure, depending on which was greater. Mean hemispheric blood flow was measured with the radiolabeled microsphere technique. Despite 30-mm Hg reductions in mean arterial pressure or increases in CSF or JV pressure, CBF did not change as long as the perfusion pressure remained greater than approximately 60 mm Hg. However, whenever perfusion pressure was reduced to an average of 48 mm Hg, cerebral blood flow decreased 27% to 33%. These results demonstrate the capacity of the cerebral vascular bed to respond similarly to changes in the perfusion pressure gradient obtained by decreasing mean arterial pressure, increasing JV pressure or increasing CSF pressure, and thereby support the above definition of cerebral perfusion pressure.

  3. [Abnormal cerebral blood flow distributions during the post-ictal phase of febrile status epilepticus in three pediatric patients measured by arterial spin labeling perfusion MRI].

    PubMed

    Hirano, Keiko; Fukuda, Tokiko

    2016-05-01

    The ability to visualize brain perfusion is important for identifying epileptic foci. We present three pediatric cases showing asymmetrical cerebral blood flow (CBF) distributions during the post-ictal phase of febrile status epilepticus measured by arterial spin labeling (ASL) perfusion MRI. During the acute phase, regional CBF measurements in the areas considered including epileptic foci were higher than in the corresponding area of the contralateral hemisphere, though the exact quantitative value varied between cases. We could not identify the correct epileptogenic foci, because those ASL images were taken after the prolonged and extraordinary activation of neurons in the affected area. During the recovery phase, the differences reduced and the average regional CBF measurement was 54.6 ± 6.1 ml/100 g per minute, which was a little less than the number of previous ASL studies. ASL perfusion MRI imaging provides a method for evaluating regional CBF by using magnetically labeled arterial blood water as an endogenous tracer. With this technique, we can repeatedly evaluate both the brain structure and the level of perfusion at the same time. ASL is noninvasive and easily accessible, and therefore it could become a routine tool for assessment of perfusion in daily practice of pediatric neurology. PMID:27349086

  4. Radionuclide cerebral perfusion imaging: Normal pattern

    SciTech Connect

    Goldsmith, S.J.; Stritzke, P.; Losonczy, M.; Vallabhajosula, S.; Holan, V.; DaCosta, M.; Muzinic, M.

    1991-12-31

    Regional cerebral perfusion imaging using a new class of {sup 99m}Tc and {sup 123}I labeled compounds which traverse the blood brain barrier and SPECT imaging technology provides an opportunity to assess this physiologic phenomenon during normal cerebral function and as a manifestation of disease in the central nervous system disease. These applications pose a challenge to the nuclear medicine physician for several reasons: (a) the complex and somewhat unfamiliar functional anatomy, (b) the marked regional differences in regional cerebral perfusion at rest, (c) the lack of understanding of the effect of variations in ambient conditions on regional cerebral perfusion. The difficulties in interpretation are augmented by the display itself. There is frequently no difficulty in differentiating between gray and white matter. However, the frequently used {open_quotes}hot body{close_quotes} color maps, introduce a good deal of contrast, producing displays with apparent interruption in regional cortical perfusion whereas black and white displays provide minimal contrast in the regional cortical activity. The authors sought to define how much variation in regional cerebral perfusion is {open_quotes}allowed{close_quotes} under controlled conditions, to establish a basis to interpret if changes in the environment, psychological interventions, or disease states are accompanied by a measurable change. 2 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Whole-Brain Computed Tomographic Perfusion Imaging in Acute Cerebral Venous Sinus Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Mokin, Maxim; Ciambella, Chelsey C.; Masud, Muhammad W.; Levy, Elad I.; Snyder, Kenneth V.; Siddiqui, Adnan H.

    2016-01-01

    Background Acute cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (VST) can be difficult to diagnose because of its diverse clinical presentation. The utility of perfusion imaging for diagnosing VST is not well understood. Summary We retrospectively reviewed cases of acute VST in patients who underwent whole-brain (320-detector-row) computed tomographic (CT) perfusion imaging in combination with craniocervical CT venography. Perfusion maps that were analyzed included cerebral blood volume (CBV), cerebral blood flow (CBF), mean transit time, and time to peak. Among the 10 patients with acute VST included in this study, 9 had perfusion abnormalities. All perfusion abnormalities were localized in areas adjacent to the occluded sinus and did not match typical anterior or posterior circulation arterial territories. Bilateral perfusion deficits were seen in 4 cases. In 2 cases, parenchymal hemorrhage was diagnosed on noncontrast CT imaging; in those cases, focal CBV and CBF were reduced. Key Messages Whole-brain CT perfusion imaging with 320-detector-row scanners can further assist in establishing the diagnosis of VST by detecting perfusion abnormalities corresponding to venous and not arterial territories. CT perfusion could assist in the differentiation between focal reversible changes, such as those caused by vasogenic edema, and irreversible changes due to infarction. PMID:27051406

  6. Assessment of cerebral perfusion in childhood strokes

    SciTech Connect

    Gates, G.F.; Fishman, L.S.; Segall, H.D.

    1982-11-01

    Thirty-three children who had strokes were studied by dynamic and static scintigraphy, 29 by CT scanning, and 10 by cerebral angiography. The accuracy of dynamic scintigraphy in stroke detection during the first week of clinical symptoms was 94% while CT scanning was 60% accurate and static scintigraphy 11% accurate. During the second week the accuracy of CT scanning increased to 100%, but static scintigraphy improved to only 50%. Fifty percent of scintiangiograms performed during the first week showed either luxuriant perfusion or flip-flop patterns. In some patients these two flow patterns changed to that of cerebral hemispheric ischemia after going through a phase during which perfusion appeared to be equal in the two hemispheres. Dynamic scintigraphy is believed to be the test of choice for stroke detection in children during the first week.

  7. Hepatic perfusion abnormalities during CT angiography: Detection and interpretation

    SciTech Connect

    Freeny, P.C.; Marks, W.M.

    1986-06-01

    Twenty-seven perfusion abnormalities were detected in 17 of 50 patients who underwent computed tomographic angiography (CTA) of the liver. All but one of the perfusion abnormalities occurred in patients with primary or metastatic liver tumors. Perfusion abnormalities were lobar in nine cases, segmental in 11, and subsegmental in seven; 14 were hypoperfusion and 13 were hyperperfusion abnormalities. The causes for the abnormalities included nonperfusion of a replaced hepatic artery (n = 11), cirrhosis and nodular regeneration (n = 3), altered hepatic hemodynamics (e.g., siphoning, laminar flow) caused by tumor (n = 7), contrast media washout from a nonperfused vessel (n = 1), compression of adjacent hepatic parenchyma (n = 1), and unknown (n = 4). Differentiation of perfusion abnormalities from tumor usually can be made by comparing the morphology of the known tumor with the suspected perfusion abnormality, changes of each on delayed CTA scans, and review of initial angiograms and other imaging studies.

  8. Effects of Steroid Hormones on Sex Differences in Cerebral Perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Ghisleni, Carmen; Bollmann, Steffen; Biason-Lauber, Anna; Poil, Simon-Shlomo; Brandeis, Daniel; Martin, Ernst; Michels, Lars; Hersberger, Martin; Suckling, John

    2015-01-01

    Sex differences in the brain appear to play an important role in the prevalence and progression of various neuropsychiatric disorders, but to date little is known about the cerebral mechanisms underlying these differences. One widely reported finding is that women demonstrate higher cerebral perfusion than men, but the underlying cause of this difference in perfusion is not known. This study investigated the putative role of steroid hormones such as oestradiol, testosterone, and dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate (DHEAS) as underlying factors influencing cerebral perfusion. We acquired arterial spin labelling perfusion images of 36 healthy adult subjects (16 men, 20 women). Analyses on average whole brain perfusion levels included a multiple regression analysis to test for the relative impact of each hormone on the global perfusion. Additionally, voxel-based analyses were performed to investigate the sex difference in regional perfusion as well as the correlations between local perfusion and serum oestradiol, testosterone, and DHEAS concentrations. Our results replicated the known sex difference in perfusion, with women showing significantly higher global and regional perfusion. For the global perfusion, DHEAS was the only significant predictor amongst the steroid hormones, showing a strong negative correlation with cerebral perfusion. The voxel-based analyses revealed modest sex-dependent correlations between local perfusion and testosterone, in addition to a strong modulatory effect of DHEAS in cortical, subcortical, and cerebellar regions. We conclude that DHEAS in particular may play an important role as an underlying factor driving the difference in cerebral perfusion between men and women. PMID:26356576

  9. Noninvasive testing of cerebral perfusion reserve prior to coronary artery bypass graft surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Levine, R.L.; Lagreze, H.L.; Berkoff, H.A.; Turnipseed, W.D.; Hanson, J.M.; Sunderland, J.J.; Nickles, R.J.; Rowe, B.R.

    1988-05-01

    Cerebral perfusion reserve testing using fluorine-18-fluoromethane and positron emission tomographic brain scanning to define cerebral blood flow abnormalities was performed in 5 patients being considered for combined coronary and carotid reconstructive surgery. Blood flow testing during normocapnia and following hypercapnia was utilized in these patients to determine the hemodynamic significance of known extracranial carotid artery occlusive lesions. Reserve diminution in 2 of these patients prompted combined surgery, whereas normal reserve values in the other 3 prompted coronary surgery alone. Results obtained in this preliminary series show how preoperative noninvasive testing of cerebral perfusion reserve adds to the diagnostic evaluation of patients with widespread vascular disease.

  10. Myocardial perfusion abnormalities in asymptomatic patients with systemic lupus erythematosus

    SciTech Connect

    Hosenpud, J.D.; Montanaro, A.; Hart, M.V.; Haines, J.E.; Specht, H.D.; Bennett, R.M.; Kloster, F.E.

    1984-08-01

    Accelerated coronary artery disease and myocardial infarction in young patients with systemic lupus erythematosus is well documented; however, the prevalence of coronary involvement is unknown. Accordingly, 26 patients with systemic lupus were selected irrespective of previous cardiac history to undergo exercise thallium-201 cardiac scintigraphy. Segmental perfusion abnormalities were present in 10 of the 26 studies (38.5 percent). Five patients had reversible defects suggesting ischemia, four patients had persistent defects consistent with scar, and one patient had both reversible and persistent defects in two areas. There was no correlation between positive thallium results and duration of disease, amount of corticosteroid treatment, major organ system involvement or age. Only a history of pericarditis appeared to be associated with positive thallium-201 results (p less than 0.05). It is concluded that segmental myocardial perfusion abnormalities are common in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. Whether this reflects large-vessel coronary disease or small-vessel abnormalities remains to be determined.

  11. How to Perfuse: Concepts of Cerebral Protection during Arch Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Habertheuer, Andreas; Wiedemann, Dominik; Kocher, Alfred; Laufer, Guenther; Vallabhajosyula, Prashanth

    2015-01-01

    Arch surgery remains undoubtedly among the most technically and strategically challenging endeavors in cardiovascular surgery. Surgical interventions of thoracic aneurysms involving the aortic arch require complete circulatory arrest in deep hypothermia (DHCA) or elaborate cerebral perfusion strategies with varying degrees of hypothermia to achieve satisfactory protection of the brain from ischemic insults, that is, unilateral/bilateral antegrade cerebral perfusion (ACP) and retrograde cerebral perfusion (RCP). Despite sophisticated and increasingly individualized surgical approaches for complex aortic pathologies, there remains a lack of consensus regarding the optimal method of cerebral protection and circulatory management during the time of arch exclusion. Many recent studies argue in favor of ACP with various degrees of hypothermic arrest during arch reconstruction and its advantages have been widely demonstrated. In fact ACP with more moderate degrees of hypothermia represents a paradigm shift in the cardiac surgery community and is widely adopted as an emergent strategy; however, many centers continue to report good results using other perfusion strategies. Amidst this important discussion we review currently available surgical strategies of cerebral protection management and compare the results of recent European multicenter and single-center data. PMID:26713319

  12. Perfusion Neuroimaging Abnormalities Alone Distinguish National Football League Players from a Healthy Population

    PubMed Central

    Amen, Daniel G.; Willeumier, Kristen; Omalu, Bennet; Newberg, Andrew; Raghavendra, Cauligi; Raji, Cyrus A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: National Football League (NFL) players are exposed to multiple head collisions during their careers. Increasing awareness of the adverse long-term effects of repetitive head trauma has raised substantial concern among players, medical professionals, and the general public. Objective: To determine whether low perfusion in specific brain regions on neuroimaging can accurately separate professional football players from healthy controls. Method: A cohort of retired and current NFL players (n = 161) were recruited in a longitudinal study starting in 2009 with ongoing interval follow up. A healthy control group (n = 124) was separately recruited for comparison. Assessments included medical examinations, neuropsychological tests, and perfusion neuroimaging with single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Perfusion estimates of each scan were quantified using a standard atlas. We hypothesized that hypoperfusion particularly in the orbital frontal, anterior cingulate, anterior temporal, hippocampal, amygdala, insular, caudate, superior/mid occipital, and cerebellar sub-regions alone would reliably separate controls from NFL players. Cerebral perfusion differences were calculated using a one-way ANOVA and diagnostic separation was determined with discriminant and automatic linear regression predictive models. Results: NFL players showed lower cerebral perfusion on average (p < 0.01) in 36 brain regions. The discriminant analysis subsequently distinguished NFL players from controls with 90% sensitivity, 86% specificity, and 94% accuracy (95% CI 95-99). Automatic linear modeling achieved similar results. Inclusion of age and clinical co-morbidities did not improve diagnostic classification. Conclusion: Specific brain regions commonly damaged in traumatic brain injury show abnormally low perfusion on SPECT in professional NFL players. These same regions alone can distinguish this group from healthy subjects with high diagnostic accuracy. This

  13. Frequency and patterns of abnormality detected by iodine-123 amine emission CT after cerebral infarction

    SciTech Connect

    Brott, T.G.; Gelfand, M.J.; Williams, C.C.; Spilker, J.A.; Hertzberg, V.S.

    1986-03-01

    Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) was performed in 31 patients with cerebral infarction and 13 who had had transient ischemic attacks, using iodine-123-labeled N,N,N'-trimethyl-N'-(2-hydroxyl-3-methyl-5-iodobenzyl)-1,3-propanediamin e (I-123-HIPDM) as the radiopharmaceutical. SPECT scans were compared with computed tomographic (CT) scans. SPECT was as sensitive as CT in detecting cerebral infarction (94% vs. 84%). The abnormalities were larger on the SPECT scans than on the CT scans in 19 cases, equal in seven, and smaller in five (SPECT abnormalities greater than or equal to CT abnormalities in 86% of cases). Fifteen of 30 patients with hemispheric infarction had decreased perfusion (decreased uptake of I-123-HIPDM) to the cerebellar hemisphere contralateral to the cerebral hemisphere involved by the infarction (crossed cerebellar diaschisis). Nine of these 15 patients had major motor deficits, while only one of the 15 without crossed cerebellar diaschisis had a major motor deficit.

  14. Noninvasive cerebral perfusion imaging in high-risk neonates.

    PubMed

    Goff, Donna A; Buckley, Erin M; Durduran, Turgut; Wang, Jiongjong; Licht, Daniel J

    2010-02-01

    Advances in medical and surgical care of the high-risk neonate have led to increased survival. A significant number of these neonates suffer from neurodevelopmental delays and failure in school. The focus of clinical research has shifted to understanding events contributing to neurological morbidity in these patients. Assessing changes in cerebral oxygenation and regulation of cerebral blood flow (CBF) is important in evaluating the status of the central nervous system. Traditional CBF imaging methods fail for both ethical and logistical reasons. Optical near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is increasingly being used for bedside monitoring of cerebral oxygenation and blood volume in both very low birth weight infants and neonates with congenital heart disease. Although trends in CBF may be inferred from changes in cerebral oxygenation and/or blood volume, NIRS does not allow a direct measure of CBF in these populations. Two relatively new modalities, arterial spin-labeled perfusion magnetic resonance imaging and optical diffuse correlation spectroscopy, provide direct, noninvasive measures of cerebral perfusion suitable for the high-risk neonates. Herein we discuss the instrumentation, applications, and limitations of these noninvasive imaging techniques for measuring and/or monitoring CBF. PMID:20109972

  15. Magnetic resonance perfusion imaging in proliferative cerebral angiopathy.

    PubMed

    Vargas, María Catalina; Castillo, Mauricio

    2011-01-01

    Cerebral proliferative angiopathy (CPA) is an unusual type of vascular malformation with unique clinical and imaging characteristics that distinguish it from the classic arteriovenous malformations. The features of CPA include absence of dominant arterial feeders or flow-related aneurysms, capillary angioectasia without large draining veins, and presence of intermingled normal brain parenchyma that is hypoperfused. We describe the magnetic resonance imaging findings including perfusion in 3 patients with CPA. PMID:21245687

  16. New technique for retrograde cerebral perfusion during arch aneurysm repair.

    PubMed

    Bartoccioni, S; Lanzillo, G; deJong, A A; Fiaschini, P; Martinelli, G; Fedeli, C; Di Lazarro, D; Mercati, U

    1995-09-01

    Many techniques are used to reduce brain damage during surgery for dissecting aneurysms of the ascending aorta and arch. Recently, new techniques of protection were proposed, consistent with hypothermic circulatory arrest in association with retrograde cerebral perfusion via superior vena cava. We propose a simple, time-saving method, which does not require any manipulation of the heart. We use a multilumen cannula for cardioplegia (D 860-DIDECO FUNDARO') with pressure transducer. This cannula is inserted in superior vena cava by means of a simple purse-string, and linked to the arterial line with a "Y" derivation, allowing retrograde perfusion of the brain and monitoring the perfusion pressure at every moment. The superior vena cava placed downstream from the cannula is closed by a small vascular clamp, to avoid blood reflux in the right atrium. This method is time- and money-saving, is readily available, and can be prepared whenever necessary, also in the middle of the surgical procedure. PMID:7488786

  17. Cerebral perfusion and neuropsychological follow up in mild traumatic brain injury: acute versus chronic disturbances?

    PubMed

    Metting, Zwany; Spikman, Jacoba M; Rödiger, Lars A; van der Naalt, Joukje

    2014-04-01

    In a subgroup of patients with mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) residual symptoms, interfering with outcome and return to work, are found. With neuropsychological assessment cognitive deficits can be demonstrated although the pathological underpinnings of these cognitive deficits are not fully understood. As the admission computed tomography (CT) often is normal, perfusion CT imaging may be a useful indicator of brain dysfunction in the acute phase after injury in these patients. In the present study, directly after admission perfusion CT imaging was performed in mild TBI patients with follow-up neuropsychological assessment in those with complaints and a normal non-contrast CT. Neuropsychological tests comprised the 15 Words test Immediate Recall, Trailmaking test part B, Zoo Map test and the FEEST, which were dichotomized into normal and abnormal. Perfusion CT results of patients with normal neuropsychological test scores were compared to those with abnormal test scores. In total eighteen patients were included. Those with an abnormal score on the Zoo Map test had a significant lower CBV in the right frontal and the bilateral parieto-temporal white matter. Patients with an abnormal score on the FEEST had a significant higher MTT in the bilateral frontal white matter and a significant decreased CBF in the left parieto-temporal grey matter. No significant relation between the perfusion CT parameters and the 15 Words test and the Trailmaking test part B was present. In conclusion, impairments in executive functioning and emotion perception assessed with neuropsychological tests during follow up were related to differences in cerebral perfusion at admission in mild TBI. The pathophysiological concept of these findings is discussed. PMID:24556319

  18. Cerebral perfusion reserve indexes determined by fluoromethane positron emission scanning

    SciTech Connect

    Levine, R.L.; Sunderland, J.J.; Lagreze, H.L.; Nickles, R.J.; Rowe, B.R.; Turski, P.A.

    1988-01-01

    An index of cerebral perfusion reserve (RES%), defined as the percent change of regional cerebral blood flow over baseline per mm Hg of end-tidal CO/sub 2/ tension, was determined for each middle cerebral artery (MCA) territory in patients with unilateral carotid distribution transient ischemic attacks or minor cerebrovascular accidents and was compared with that of age-matched, neurologically normal volunteers. Vasodilator responses to induced hypercapnia were tested during inhalation of 5% CO/sub 2/ in 95% O/sub 2/ while regional cerebral blood flow was measured by fluoromethane inhalation positron emission tomography. Mean RES% for 24 normal MCA territories was 5.2 +/- 0.8%. Mean RES% for 15 patient nonischemic MCA territories was 3.8 +/- 1.3% and for 15 ischemic MCA territories was 2.8 +/- 1.9% (both p less than 0.001). Individual RES% values and symmetry ratios between ischemic and nonischemic regions were also determined and compared with angiographic data. Areas of diminished, asymmetric, or paradoxical (two patients) CO/sub 2/ reactivity appear to correspond to areas of compensatory vasodilation. We found this technique to be a safe and reproducible method for defining and recording localized areas of cerebral tissue at apparent risk for hemodynamically related damage.

  19. Retrograde Cerebral Perfusion Results in Better Perfusion to the Striatum Than the Cerebral Cortex During Deep Hypothermic Circulatory Arrest: A Microdialysis Study.

    PubMed

    Liang, Meng-Ya; Chen, Guang-Xian; Tang, Zhi-Xian; Rong, Jian; Yao, Jian-ping; Wu, Zhong-Kai

    2016-03-01

    It remains controversial whether contemporary cerebral perfusion techniques, utilized during deep hypothermic circulatory arrest (DHCA), establish adequate perfusion to deep structures in the brain. This study aimed to investigate whether selective antegrade cerebral perfusion (SACP) or retrograde cerebral perfusion (RCP) can provide perfusion equally to various anatomical positions in the brain using metabolic evidence obtained from microdialysis. Eighteen piglets were randomly assigned to 40 min of circulatory arrest (CA) at 18°C without cerebral perfusion (DHCA group, n = 6) or with SACP (SACP group, n = 6) or RCP (RCP group, n = 6). Microdialysis parameters (glucose, lactate, pyruvate, and glutamate) were measured every 30 min in cortex and striatum. After 3 h of reperfusion, brain tissue was harvested for Western blot measurement of α-spectrin. After 40 min of CA, the DHCA group showed marked elevations of lactate and glycerol and a reduction in glucose in the microdialysis perfusate (all P < 0.05). The changes in glucose, lactate, and glycerol in the perfusate and α-spectrin expression in brain tissue were similar between cortex and striatum in the SACP group (all P > 0.05). In the RCP group, the cortex exhibited lower glucose, higher lactate, and higher glycerol in the perfusate and higher α-spectrin expression in brain tissue compared with the striatum (all P < 0.05). Glutamate showed no difference between cortex and striatum in all groups (all P > 0.05). In summary, SACP provided uniform and continuous cerebral perfusion to most anatomical sites in the brain, whereas RCP resulted in less sufficient perfusion to the cortex but better perfusion to the striatum. PMID:26333187

  20. Using Flat-Panel Perfusion Imaging to Measure Cerebral Hemodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chung-Jung; Guo, Wan-Yuo; Chang, Feng-Chi; Hung, Sheng-Che; Chen, Ko-Kung; Yu, Deuerling-Zheng; Wu, Chun-Hsien Frank; Liou, Jy-Kang Adrian

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Flat-detector CT perfusion (FD-CTP) imaging has demonstrated efficacy in qualitatively accessing the penumbra in acute stroke equivalent to that of magnetic resonance perfusion (MRP). The aim of our study was to evaluate the feasibility of quantifying oligemia in the brain in patients with carotid stenosis. Ten patients with unilateral carotid stenosis of >70% were included. All MRPs and FD-CTPs were performed before stenting. Region-of-interests (ROIs) including middle cerebral artery territory at basal ganglia level on both stenotic and contralateral sides were used for quantitative analysis. Relative time to peak (rTTP) was defined as TTP of the stenotic side divided by TTP of the contralateral side, and so as relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV), relative mean transit time (rMTT), and relative cerebral blood flow (rCBF). Absolute and relative TTP, CBV, MTT, CBF between two modalities were compared. For absolute quantitative analysis, the correlation of TTP was highest (r = 0.56), followed by CBV (r = 0.47), MTT (r = 0.47), and CBF (r = 0.43); for relative quantitative analysis, rCBF was the highest (r = 0.79), followed by rTTP (r = 0.75) and rCBV (r = 0.50). We confirmed that relative quantitative assessment of FD-CTP is feasible in chronic ischemic disease. Absolute quantitative measurements between MRP and FD-CTP only expressed moderate correlations. Optimization of acquisitions and algorithms is warranted to achieve better quantification. PMID:27196456

  1. Anticardiolipin antibodies in HIV infection: association with cerebral perfusion defects as detected by 99mTc-HMPAO SPECT.

    PubMed Central

    Rubbert, A; Bock, E; Schwab, J; Marienhagen, J; Nüsslein, H; Wolf, F; Kalden, J R

    1994-01-01

    Anticardiolipin antibodies (ACA) belong to a heterogeneous group of antibodies directed against negatively charged phospholipids. In patients with rheumatic disorders, their presence has been correlated to the occurrence of thromboembolic complications, thrombocytopenia, abortions and other disease manifestations. Several studies have revealed the detection of mostly high-titre ACA in a significant proportion of HIV-infected patients without any known clinical relationship. In our study, ACA were detected in 17/34 HIV-infected patients, and their presence was significantly associated with the detection of cerebral perfusion abnormalities by 99mTc-HMPAO SPECT. SPECT scans were classified as normal or as focal or diffuse defects in uptake. Most patients (13/16) with cerebral perfusion defects had elevated ACA titres in contrast to 4/18 patients with normal SPECT findings (P = 0.002). Focal uptake defects were always associated with the presence of ACA. No correlation to clinical features or other laboratory parameters was evident. Our results suggest a possible implication of autoimmune mechanisms in the pathogenesis of cerebral perfusion abnormalities detected by SPECT scanning in HIV-infected patients. However, further studies are needed to evaluate the clinical significance and to develop possible therapeutic consequences. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:7994900

  2. Abnormal myocardial perfusion and risk of heart failure in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Utrera-Lagunas, Marcelo; Orea-Tejeda, Arturo; Castillo-Martínez, Lilia; Balderas-Muñoz, Karla; Keirns-Davis, Candace; Espinoza-Rosas, Sarahi; Sánchez-Ortíz, Néstor Alonso; Olvera-Mayorga, Gabriela

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Diabetes is a major risk factor for heart failure (HF), although the pathophysiological processes have not been clarified. OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence of HF and of abnormal myocardial perfusion in diabetic patients evaluated using technetium (99m) sestamibi single-photon emission computed tomography. METHODS: An observational cross-sectional study was conducted that included patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus who underwent echocardiography to diagnose HF and a pharmacological stress test with intravenous dipyridamole to examine cardiac scintigraphic perfusion abnormalities. Clinical and biochemical data were also collected. RESULTS: Of the 160 diabetic patients included, 92 (57.6%) were in HF and 68 (42.5%) were not. When patients were stratified according to the presence of abnormal myocardial perfusion, those with abnormal perfusion had a higher prevalence of HF (93%) than those with normal perfusion (44.4%) (P<0.0001). Patients with HF weighed more (P=0.03), used insulin less frequently (P=0.01), had lower total cholesterol (P=0.05) and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations (P=0.002), and a greater number of their myocardial segments showed abnormal perfusion (P≤0.001). More HF patients had a history of myocardial infarction (P<0.001) compared with those without HF. In a logistic regression analysis, the number of segments exhibiting abnormal myocardial perfusion was an independent risk factor for HF. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of HF in diabetic patients was high and HF predominantly occured in association with myocardial ischemia. PMID:24294048

  3. Clinical Brain Death with False Positive Radionuclide Cerebral Perfusion Scans

    PubMed Central

    Venkatram, Sindhaghatta; Bughio, Sara; Diaz-Fuentes, Gilda

    2015-01-01

    Practice guidelines from the American Academy of Neurology for the determination of brain death in adults define brain death as “the irreversible loss of function of the brain, including the brainstem.” Neurological determination of brain death is primarily based on clinical examination; if clinical criteria are met, a definitive confirmatory test is indicated. The apnea test remains the gold standard for confirmation. In patients with factors that confound the clinical determination or when apnea tests cannot safely be performed, an ancillary test is required to confirm brain death. Confirmatory ancillary tests for brain death include (a) tests of electrical activity (electroencephalography (EEG) and somatosensory evoked potentials) and (b) radiologic examinations of blood flow (contrast angiography, transcranial Doppler ultrasound (TCD), and radionuclide methods). Of these, however, radionuclide studies are used most commonly. Here we present data from two patients with a false positive Radionuclide Cerebral Perfusion Scan (RCPS). PMID:26167307

  4. Cerebral hemodynamics in human acute ischemic stroke: a study with diffusion- and perfusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and SPECT.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Karonen, J O; Vanninen, R L; Ostergaard, L; Roivainen, R; Nuutinen, J; Perkiö, J; Könönen, M; Hämäläinen, A; Vanninen, E J; Soimakallio, S; Kuikka, J T; Aronen, H J

    2000-06-01

    Nineteen patients with acute ischemic stroke (<24 hours) underwent diffusion-weighted and perfusion-weighted (PWI) magnetic resonance imaging at the acute stage and 1 week later. Eleven patients also underwent technetium-99m ethyl cysteinate dimer single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) at the acute stage. Relative (ischemic vs. contralateral control) cerebral blood flow (relCBF), relative cerebral blood volume, and relative mean transit time were measured in the ischemic core, in the area of infarct growth, and in the eventually viable ischemic tissue on PWI maps. The relCBF was also measured from SPECT. There was a curvilinear relationship between the relCBF measured from PWI and SPECT (r = 0.854; P < 0.001). The tissue proceeding to infarction during the follow-up had significantly lower initial CBF and cerebral blood volume values on PWI maps (P < 0.001) than the eventually viable ischemic tissue had. The best value for discriminating the area of infarct growth from the eventually viable ischemic tissue was 48% for PWI relCBF and 87% for PWI relative cerebral blood volume. Combined diffusion and perfusion-weighted imaging enables one to detect hemodynamically different subregions inside the initial perfusion abnormality. Tissue survival may be different in these subregions and may be predicted. PMID:10894174

  5. Twin-reversed arterial perfusion sequence associated with decreased fetal cerebral vascular impedance

    PubMed Central

    Peyvandi, S.; Feldstein, V. A.; Hirose, S.; Rand, L.; Brook, M. M.; Moon-Grady, A. J.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Twin-reversed arterial perfusion (TRAP) sequence affects 1% of monochorionic twin pregnancies and is caused by abnormal vascular connections between a pump twin and an acardiac mass. The effects of abnormal vascular connections on cerebral vasculature in the pump twin are unknown. We hypothesize that abnormal cerebral vascular impedance, as assessed by the pulsatility index (PI), is present in pump twins and that fetal intervention alters cerebral impedance. Methods Fetal echocardiograms performed between 2010 and 2013 in pregnancies diagnosed with TRAP (n = 19), recorded at presentation, and uncomplicated monochorionic twin pregnancies (controls, n = 18; 36 fetuses) were analyzed. In all subjects, the middle cerebral artery (MCA)-PI, combined cardiac output (CCO) and cardiothoracic ratio were calculated, and the values for cases and controls were compared. Results The mean gestational age at the time of echocardiography was 20 weeks in both groups. MCA-PI was lower in TRAP cases than in controls (1.55 (95%CI, 1.47–1.64) vs 1.74 (95% CI, 1.65–1.82), respectively; P = 0.004). CCO in TRAP cases was mildly elevated for gestational age (199.7 (95% CI, 138.4–261.1) mL/min) compared with that of controls (131.4 (95% CI, 102.2–160.7) mL/min). In six TRAP cases with a second echocardiogram available, the mean MCA-PI increased after intervention, from 1.5 (95%CI, 1.3–1.7) to 1.8 (95% CI, 1.4–2.2). Conclusions TRAP pump twins have lower cerebral vascular impedance than do controls, suggestive of a brain-sparing effect. MCA-PI appeared to increase in a small group of pump twins after intervention. These findings suggest a fetal cerebral autoregulatory response to a high cardiac output state that begins to change after fetal intervention. The long-termimplications for neurodevelopmental outcome warrant further study. PMID:25157457

  6. Multiple sphingolipid abnormalities following cerebral microendothelial hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Testai, Fernando D.; Kilkus, John P.; Berdyshev, Evgeny; Gorshkova, Irina; Natarajan, Viswanathan; Dawson, Glyn

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia has been previously shown to inhibit the dihydroceramide (DHC) desaturase, leading to the accumulation of DHC. In this study, we used metabolic labeling with [3H]-palmitate, HPLC/MS/MS analysis, and specific inhibitors to show numerous sphingolipid changes after oxygen deprivation in cerebral microendothelial cells. The increased DHC, particularly long-chain forms, was observed in both whole cells and detergent-resistant membranes. This was reversed by reoxygenation and blocked by the de novo sphingolipid synthesis inhibitor myriocin, but not by the neutral sphingomyelinase inhibitor GW-4869. Furthermore, oxygen deprivation of microendothelial cells increased levels of dihydro-sphingosine (DH-Sph), DH-sphingosine1-phosphate (DH-S1P), DH-sphingomyelin (DH-SM), DH-glucosylceramide (DH-GlcCer), and S1P levels. In vitro assays revealed no changes in the activity of sphingomyelinases or sphingomyelin synthase, but resulted in reduced S1P lyase activity and 40% increase in glucosylceramide synthase (GCS) activity, which was reversed by reoxygenation. Inhibition of the de novo sphingolipid pathway (myriocin) or GCS (EtPoD4) induced endothelial barrier dysfunction and increased caspase 3-mediated cell death in response to hypoxia. Our findings suggest that hypoxia induces synthesis of S1P and multiple dihydrosphingolipids, including DHC, DH-SM, DH-GlcCer, DH-Sph and DH-S1P, which may be involved in ameliorating the effects of stroke. PMID:25060904

  7. Altered Cerebral Perfusion in Executive, Affective, and Motor Networks During Adolescent Depression

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Tiffany C.; Wu, Jing; Shin, David D.; Liu, Thomas T.; Tapert, Susan F.; Yang, Guang; Connolly, Colm G.; Frank, Guido K.W.; Max, Jeffrey E.; Wolkowitz, Owen; Eisendrath, Stuart; Hoeft, Fumiko; Banerjee, Dipavo; Hood, Korey; Hendren, Robert L.; Paulus, Martin P.; Simmons, Alan N.; Yang, Tony T.

    2013-01-01

    Objective While substantial literature has reported regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) abnormalities in adults with depression, these studies commonly necessitated the injection of radioisotopes into subjects. The recent development of arterial spin labeling (ASL), however, allows for noninvasive measurements of rCBF. Currently, no published ASL studies have examined cerebral perfusion in adolescents with depression. Thus, the aim of the present study was to examine baseline cerebral perfusion in adolescent depression using a newly developed ASL technique: pseudocontinuous arterial spin labeling (PCASL). Method 25 medication-naive adolescents (ages 13–17 years) diagnosed with major depressive disorder (MDD) and 26 well-matched controls underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging. Baseline rCBF was measured via a novel PCASL method that optimizes tagging efficiency. Results Voxel-based whole brain analyses revealed significant frontal, limbic, paralimbic, and cingulate hypoperfusion in the group with depression (p<0.05, corrected). Hyperperfusion was also observed within the subcallosal cingulate, putamen, and fusiform gyrus (p<0.05, corrected). Similarly, region-of-interest analyses revealed amygdalar and insular hypoperfusion in the group with depression, as well as hyperperfusion in the putamen and superior insula (p<0.05, corrected). Conclusions Adolescents with depression and healthy adolescents appear to differ on rCBF in executive, affective, and motor networks. Dysfunction in these regions may contribute to the cognitive, emotional, and psychomotor symptoms commonly present in adolescent depression. These findings point to possible biomarkers for adolescent depression that could inform early interventions and treatments and establishes a methodology for using PCASL to noninvasively measure rCBF in clinical and healthy adolescent populations. PMID:24074474

  8. Reversible cold-induced abnormalities in myocardial perfusion and function in systemic sclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, E.L.; Firestein, G.S.; Weiss, J.L.; Heuser, R.R.; Leitl, G.; Wagner, H.N. Jr.; Brinker, J.A.; Ciuffo, A.A.; Becker, L.C.

    1986-11-01

    The effects of peripheral cold exposure on myocardial perfusion and function were studied in 13 patients with scleroderma without clinically evident myocardial disease. Ten patients had at least one transient, cold-induced, myocardial perfusion defect visualized by thallium-201 scintigraphy, and 12 had reversible, cold-induced, segmental left ventricular hypokinesis by two-dimensional echocardiography. The 10 patients with transient perfusion defects all had anatomically corresponding ventricular wall motion abnormalities. No one in either of two control groups (9 normal volunteers and 7 patients with chest pain and normal coronary arteriograms) had cold-induced abnormalities. This study is the first to show the simultaneous occurrence of cold-induced abnormalities in myocardial perfusion and function in patients with scleroderma. The results suggest that cold exposure in such patients may elicit transient reflex coronary vasoconstriction resulting in reversible myocardial ischemia and dysfunction. Chronic recurrent episodes of coronary spasm may lead to focal myocardial fibrosis.

  9. Cerebral venous hemodynamic abnormalities in episodic and chronic migraine

    PubMed Central

    Petolicchio, Barbara; Viganò, Alessandro; di Biase, Lazzaro; Tatulli, Doriana; Toscano, Massimiliano; Vicenzini, Edoardo; Passarelli, Francesco; Di Piero, Vittorio

    2016-01-01

    Summary Alterations of cerebral venous drainage have been demonstrated in chronic migraine (CM), suggesting that cerebral venous hemodynamic abnormalities (CVHAs) play a role in this condition. The aim of the present study was to look for a correlation between CM and CVHAs. We recruited 33 subjects suffering from CM with or without analgesic overuse, 29 episodic migraine (EM) patients with or without aura, and 21 healthy subjects as controls (HCs). CVHAs were evaluated by transcranial and extracranial echo-color Doppler evaluation of five venous hemodynamic parameters. CVHAs were significantly more frequent in the CM and EM patients than in the HCs. In the migraine patients, CVHAs were not correlated with clinical features. The significantly greater frequency of CVHAs observed in the migraineurs may reflect a possible relationship between migraine and these abnormalities. Prospective longitudinal studies are needed to investigate whether CVHAs have a role in the processes of migraine chronification. PMID:27358220

  10. Aβ degradation or cerebral perfusion? Divergent effects of multifunctional enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Miners, J. Scott; Palmer, Jennifer C.; Tayler, Hannah; Palmer, Laura E.; Ashby, Emma; Kehoe, Patrick G.; Love, Seth

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that deficient clearance of β-amyloid (Aβ) contributes to its accumulation in late-onset Alzheimer disease (AD). Several Aβ-degrading enzymes, including neprilysin (NEP), endothelin-converting enzyme (ECE), and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) reduce Aβ levels and protect against cognitive impairment in mouse models of AD. In post-mortem human brain tissue we have found that the activity of these Aβ-degrading enzymes rise with age and increases still further in AD, perhaps as a physiological response that helps to minimize the build-up of Aβ. ECE-1/-2 and ACE are also rate-limiting enzymes in the production of endothelin-1 (ET-1) and angiotensin II (Ang II), two potent vasoconstrictors, increases in the levels of which are likely to contribute to reduced blood flow in AD. This review considers the possible interdependence between Aβ-degrading enzymes, ischemia and Aβ in AD: ischemia has been shown to increase Aβ production both in vitro and in vivo, whereas increased Aβ probably enhances ischemia by vasoconstriction, mediated at least in part by increased ECE and ACE activity. In contrast, NEP activity may help to maintain cerebral perfusion, by reducing the accumulation of Aβ in cerebral blood vessels and lessening its toxicity to vascular smooth muscle cells. In assessing the role of Aβ-degrading proteases in the pathogenesis of AD and, particularly, their potential as therapeutic agents, it is important to bear in mind the multifunctional nature of these enzymes and to consider their effects on other substrates and pathways. PMID:25309424

  11. The impact of age on cerebral perfusion, oxygenation and metabolism during exercise in humans.

    PubMed

    Braz, Igor D; Fisher, James P

    2016-08-15

    Age is one of the most important risk factors for dementia and stroke. Examination of the cerebral circulatory responses to acute exercise in the elderly may help to pinpoint the mechanisms by which exercise training can reduce the risk of brain diseases, inform the optimization of exercise training programmes and assist with the identification of age-related alterations in cerebral vascular function. During low-to-moderate intensity dynamic exercise, enhanced neuronal activity is accompanied by cerebral perfusion increases of ∼10-30%. Beyond ∼60-70% maximal oxygen uptake, cerebral metabolism remains elevated but perfusion in the anterior portion of the circulation returns towards baseline, substantively because of a hyperventilation-mediated reduction in the partial pressure of arterial carbon dioxide (P aC O2) and cerebral vasoconstriction. Cerebral perfusion is lower in older individuals, both at rest and during incremental dynamic exercise. Nevertheless, the increase in the estimated cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen and the arterial-internal jugular venous differences for glucose and lactate are similar in young and older individuals exercising at the same relative exercise intensities. Correction for the age-related reduction in P aC O2 during exercise by the provision of supplementary CO2 is suggested to remove ∼50% of the difference in cerebral perfusion between young and older individuals. A multitude of candidates could account for the remaining difference, including cerebral atrophy, and enhanced vasoconstrictor and blunted vasodilatory pathways. In summary, age-related reductions in cerebral perfusion during exercise are partly associated with a lower P aC O2 in exercising older individuals; nevertheless the cerebral extraction of glucose, lactate and oxygen appear to be preserved. PMID:26435295

  12. Double tracer autoradiographic method for sequential evaluation of regional cerebral perfusion

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuda, H.; Tsuji, S.; Oba, H.; Kinuya, K.; Terada, H.; Sumiya, H.; Shiba, K.; Mori, H.; Hisada, K.; Maeda, T. )

    1989-01-01

    A new double tracer autoradiographic method for the sequential evaluation of altered regional cerebral perfusion in the same animal is presented. This method is based on the sequential injection of two tracers, {sup 99m}Tc-hexamethylpropyleneamine oxime and N-isopropyl-({sup 125}I)p-iodoamphetamine. This method is validated in the assessment of brovincamine effects on regional cerebral perfusion in an experimental model of chronic brain ischemia in the rat. The drug enhanced perfusion recovery in low-flow areas, selectively in surrounding areas of infarction. The results suggest that this technique is of potential use in the study of neuropharmacological effects applied during the experiment.

  13. Arterial Spin Labeling Measurements of Cerebral Perfusion Territories in Experimental Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Leoni, Renata F.; Paiva, Fernando F.; Kang, Byeong-Teck; Henning, Erica C.; Nascimento, George C.; Tannús, Alberto; De Araújo, Dráulio B.; Silva, Afonso C.

    2016-01-01

    Collateral circulation, defined as the supplementary vascular network that maintains cerebral blood flow (CBF) when the main vessels fail, constitutes one important defense mechanism of the brain against ischemic stroke. In the present study, continuous arterial spin labeling (CASL) was used to quantify CBF and obtain perfusion territory maps of the major cerebral arteries in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and their normotensive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) controls. Results show that both WKY and SHR have complementary, yet significantly asymmetric perfusion territories. Right or left dominances were observed in territories of the anterior (ACA), middle and posterior cerebral arteries, and the thalamic artery. Magnetic resonance angiography showed that some of the asymmetries were correlated with variations of the ACA. The leptomeningeal circulation perfusing the outer layers of the cortex was observed as well. Significant and permanent changes in perfusion territories were obtained after temporary occlusion of the right middle cerebral artery in both SHR and WKY, regardless of their particular dominance. However, animals with right dominance presented a larger volume change of the left perfusion territory (23 ± 9%) than animals with left dominance (7 ± 5%, P < 0.002). The data suggest that animals with contralesional dominance primarily safeguard local CBF values with small changes in contralesional perfusion territory, while animals with ipsilesional dominance show a reversal of dominance and a substantial increase in contralesional perfusion territory. These findings show the usefulness of CASL to probe the collateral circulation. PMID:24323754

  14. Perfusion MR imaging and proton MR spectroscopic imaging in differentiating necrotizing cerebritis from glioblastoma multiforme.

    PubMed

    Pivawer, Gabriel; Law, Meng; Zagzag, David

    2007-02-01

    We describe a lesion with the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) characteristics of a glioblastoma mutiforme and demonstrate how perfusion MRI and proton MR spectroscopic imaging can be used to differentiate necrotizing cerebritis from what appeared to be a high-grade glioma. A 43-year-old woman presented to her physician complaining of progressive visual disturbance and headache for several weeks. Conventional MRI demonstrated a parietal peripherally enhancing mass with central necrosis and moderate to severe surrounding T2 hyperintensity, suggesting an infiltrating high-grade glioma. However, advanced imaging, including dynamic susceptibility contrast MRI (DSC MRI) and magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI), suggested a nonneoplastic lesion. The DSC MRI data demonstrated no hyperperfusion within the lesion and surrounding T2 signal abnormality, and the MRSI data showed overall decrease in metabolites in this region, except for lactate. Because of the aggressive appearance to the lesion and the patients' worsening symptoms, a biopsy was performed. The pathologic diagnosis was necrotizing cerebritis. After the commencement of steroid therapy, imaging findings and patient symptoms improved. This report will review the utility of advanced imaging for differentiating inflammatory from neoplastic appearing lesions on conventional imaging. PMID:17275620

  15. Atrial Fibrillation Exacerbates Cognitive Dysfunction and Cerebral Perfusion in Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Alosco, Michael L.; Spitznagel, Mary Beth; Sweet, Lawrence H.; Josephson, Richard; Hughes, Joel; Gunstad, John

    2014-01-01

    Background Heart failure (HF) increases risk for cognitive impairment in part due to the negative effects of cardiac dysfunction on cerebral perfusion. Atrial fibrillation (AF), an independent risk factor for cognitive impairment, often accompanies HF and is associated with lower systemic perfusion. However, no study has examined the associations among AF, cognitive function, and cerebral perfusion in patients with HF. Methods 187 HF patients completed neuropsychological testing and underwent transcranial Doppler ultrasonography. Cerebral blood flow velocity of the middle cerebral artery (CBF-V) operationalized cerebral perfusion. A medical chart review ascertained AF. Results 32.1% of HF patients had a history of AF. HF patients with AF exhibited worse global cognition, memory, and CBF-V relative to patients without AF. These effects remained after HF severity and other demographic and medical factors were taken into account. Partial correlations controlling for possible confounds showed decreased CBF-V predicted worse cognition in multiple domains in the overall sample (r = 0.13 to 0.15, p < 0.05) and in the subgroup of HF patients with AF (r = 0.26 to r = 0.28, p < 0.05), but not among HF patients without AF. Conclusions AF exacerbates cognitive deficits in HF possibly through its association with decreased cerebral perfusion. Longitudinal studies are needed to determine whether AF accelerates cognitive decline in HF and whether medical (e.g., ablation) and lifestyle interventions (e.g., exercise programs) that target cerebral perfusion improve cognitive outcomes in patients with HF and AF. PMID:25492027

  16. A study on cerebral hemodynamic analysis of moyamoya disease by using perfusion MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Kyung-Rae; Goo, Eun-Hoe; Lee, Jae-Seung; Chung, Woon-Kwan

    2013-10-01

    This study examined the clinical applications of perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with moyamoya disease (MMD). Twenty-two patients with moyamoya disease (9 men and 13 women) with a mean age of 9.3 years (range: 4-22 years) were enrolled in this study. Perfusion MRI was performed by scanning the patients7.5 cm upward from the base of the cerebellum before their being process for post-treatment. The scan led to the acquisition of the following four map images: the cerebral blood volume (CBV), the cerebral blood flow (CBF), the mean transit time (MTT) for the contrast medium, and the time to peak (TTP) for the contrast medium. The lesions were assessed using the CBV, the CBF, the MTT and the TTP maps of perfusion MRI; the MTT and the TTP were measured in the lesion areas, as well as in the normal and the symmetric areas. Perfusion defects were recognizable in all four perfusion MRI maps, and the MTT and the TTP showed a conspicuous delay in the parts where perfusion defects were recognized. The MTT and the TTP images of perfusion MRI reflected a significant correlation between the degrees of stenosis and occlusion in the posterior cerebral artery (PCA), as well as the development of collateral vessels. The four perfusion MRI maps could be used to predict the degrees of stenosis and occlusion in the posterior circulation, as well as the development of the collateral vessels, which enabled a hemodynamic evaluation of the parts with perfusion defects. Overall, perfusion MRI is useful for the diagnosis and the treatment of moyamoya disease and can be applied to clinical practice.

  17. REM sleep abnormalities in severe athetoid cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, M; Inoue, Y; Iwakawa, Y; Sasaki, H

    1990-01-01

    Various abnormalities of sleep have been reported in extrapyramidal diseases in adults. We have investigated the disturbances of REM sleep (SREM) in severe athetoid cerebral palsy (ACP) originating perinatally. Ten ACP patients, 5 males and 5 females ranging from 15 to 30 years old, were studied by means of all-night polygraphic examination. Three cases showed a marked decrease in rapid eye movements in SREM. Moreover, the tone of submental muscle in SREM was also disturbed in three. Regarding body movements during sleep, gross movements and twitch movements of the submental muscle were analyzed. In most of the patients, an abnormal distribution of body movements according to sleep stages was observed, the rate being significantly reduced in SREM. REMs, atonia and body movements are considered to be related to the brainstem function in animals. The results of the present study suggest that perinatal extrapyramidal diseases could also coincide with brainstem dysfunctions. PMID:2288380

  18. Regional cerebral blood flow abnormalities in chronic solvent abusers.

    PubMed

    Okada, S; Yamanouchi, N; Kodama, K; Uchida, Y; Hirai, S; Sakamoto, T; Noda, S; Komatsu, N; Sato, T

    1999-06-01

    This study aimed to reveal regional abnormalities of cerebral blood flow (CBF) and their relation to amotivational syndrome which causes poor social prognosis in solvent abusers Sixteen chronic solvent abusers (12 males and four females) along with five normal subjects underwent single photon emission computed tomography with N-isopropyl-p[123I]iodoamphetamine. The patients received a clinical evaluation with the Scale for the Assessment of Negative Symptoms. Using a semiquantitative method (normalized by the parietal cortex count), patients showed a statistically significant decrease in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in the bilateral prefrontal cortices (P<0.01). In addition, the severity of hypoperfusion in the bilateral prefrontal cortices was related to the degree of severity of the avolition-apathy scale on SANS (left; P<0.05, right; P<0.01) even after excluding the effect of antipsychotics. These results suggest that rCBF abnormalities, especially in the prefrontal cortex, develop in chronic solvent abusers, and that this frontal hypoperfusion may be a biological basis of amotivational syndrome. PMID:10459736

  19. A General Approach to the Evaluation of Ventilation-Perfusion Ratios in Normal and Abnormal Lungs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagner, Peter D.

    1977-01-01

    Outlines methods for manipulating multiple gas data so as to gain the greatest amount of insight into the properties of ventilation-perfusion distributions. Refers to data corresponding to normal and abnormal lungs. Uses a two-dimensional framework with the respiratory gases of oxygen and carbon dioxide. (CS)

  20. Disturbances in the cerebral perfusion of human immune deficiency virus-1 seropositive asymptomatic subjects: A quantitative tomography study of 18 cases

    SciTech Connect

    Tran Dinh, Y.R.; Mamo, H.; Cervoni, J.; Caulin, C.; Saimot, A.C. , Paris )

    1990-10-01

    Quantitative measurements of cerebral blood flow (CBF) by xenon-133 ({sup 133}Xe) tomography, together with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), electroencephalography (EEG), psychometric tests, and laboratory analyses were performed on 18 human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) seropositive asymptomatic subjects. Abnormalities of cerebral perfusion were observed in 16 cases (88%). These abnormalities were particularly frequent in the frontal regions (77% of cases). MRI demonstrated leucoencephalopathy in only two cases. EEG showed only induced diffuse abnormalities in two cases. Psychometric tests showed restricted moderate disturbances in 55% of patients. These disturbances mostly concerned those sectors involved in cognitive functions and memorization. These results indicate that quantitative measurements of CBF by {sup 133}Xe-SPECT is capable of detecting abnormalities of cerebral perfusion at a very early stage (Phase II) of HIV-1 infection. These abnormalities are indications of disturbances resulting from unidentified metabolic or vascular lesions. This technique appears to be superior to MRI at this stage of the disease's development. It could provide objective information leading to earlier treatment, and prove useful in evaluating potential antiviral chemotherapy.

  1. Evaluating CT Perfusion Deficits in Global Cerebral Edema after Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Baradaran, H.; Fodera, V.; Mir, D.; Kesavobhotla, K.; Ivanidze, J.; Ozbek, U.; Gupta, A.; Claassen, J.; Sanelli, P.C.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Global cerebral edema is an independent predictor of mortality and poor outcomes after aneurysmal SAH. Global cerebral edema, a complex disease process, is thought to be associated with an altered cerebral autoregulatory response. We studied the association between cerebral hemodynamics and early global cerebral edema by using CTP. MATERIALS AND METHODS We retrospectively studied consecutive patients with aneurysmal SAH with admission CTP performed at days 0–3. Two neuroradiologists classified global cerebral edema and hydrocephalus on NCCT performed concurrently with CTP. Global cerebral edema was defined as diffuse effacement of the sulci and/or basal cisterns or diffuse disruption of the cerebral gray-white matter junction. CTP was postprocessed into CBF and MTT maps by using a standardized method. Quantitative analysis of CTP was performed by using standard protocol with ROI sampling of the cerebral cortex. The Fisher exact test, Mann-Whitney test, and independent-samples t test were used to determine statistical associations. RESULTS Of the 45 patients included, 42% (19/45) had global cerebral edema and 58% (26/45) did not. Patient groups with and without global cerebral edema were well-matched for demographic and clinical data. Patients with global cerebral edema were more likely to have qualitative global CTP deficits than those without global cerebral edema (P = .001) with an OR = 13.3 (95% CI, 2.09–138.63). Patients with global cerebral edema also had a very strong trend toward statistical significance, with reduced quantitative CBF compared with patients without global cerebral edema (P = .064). CONCLUSIONS Global perfusion deficits are significantly associated with global cerebral edema in the early phase after aneurysmal SAH, supporting the theory that hemodynamic disturbances occur in global cerebral edema. PMID:25977478

  2. Intravascular Perfusion of Carbon Black Ink Allows Reliable Visualization of Cerebral Vessels

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Mohammad R.; Herz, Josephine; Hermann, Dirk M.; Doeppner, Thorsten R.

    2013-01-01

    The anatomical structure of cerebral vessels is a key determinant for brain hemodynamics as well as the severity of injury following ischemic insults. The cerebral vasculature dynamically responds to various pathophysiological states and it exhibits considerable differences between strains and under conditions of genetic manipulations. Essentially, a reliable technique for intracranial vessel staining is essential in order to study the pathogenesis of ischemic stroke. Until recently, a set of different techniques has been employed to visualize the cerebral vasculature including injection of low viscosity resin, araldite F, gelatin mixed with various dyes1 (i.e. carmine red, India ink) or latex with2 or without3 carbon black. Perfusion of white latex compound through the ascending aorta has been first reported by Coyle and Jokelainen3. Maeda et al.2 have modified the protocol by adding carbon black ink to the latex compound for improved contrast visualization of the vessels after saline perfusion of the brain. However, inefficient perfusion and inadequate filling of the vessels are frequently experienced due to high viscosity of the latex compound4. Therefore, we have described a simple and cost-effective technique using a mixture of two commercially available carbon black inks (CB1 and CB2) to visualize the cerebral vasculature in a reproducible manner5. We have shown that perfusion with CB1+CB2 in mice results in staining of significantly smaller cerebral vessels at a higher density in comparison to latex perfusion5. Here, we describe our protocol to identify the anastomotic points between the anterior (ACA) and middle cerebral arteries (MCA) to study vessel variations in mice with different genetic backgrounds. Finally, we demonstrate the feasibility of our technique in a transient focal cerebral ischemia model in mice by combining CB1+CB2-mediated vessel staining with TTC staining in various degrees of ischemic injuries. PMID:23328838

  3. Intracranial CT angiography obtained from a cerebral CT perfusion examination

    SciTech Connect

    Gratama van Andel, H. A. F.; Venema, H. W.; Majoie, C. B.; Den Heeten, G. J.; Grimbergen, C. A.; Streekstra, G. J.

    2009-04-15

    CT perfusion (CTP) examinations of the brain are performed increasingly for the evaluation of cerebral blood flow in patients with stroke and vasospasm after subarachnoid hemorrhage. Of the same patient often also a CT angiography (CTA) examination is performed. This study investigates the possibility to obtain CTA images from the CTP examination, thereby possibly obviating the CTA examination. This would save the patient exposure to radiation, contrast, and time. Each CTP frame is a CTA image with a varying amount of contrast enhancement and with high noise. To improve the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) we combined all 3D images into one 3D image after registration to correct for patient motion between time frames. Image combination consists of weighted averaging in which the weighting factor of each frame is proportional to the arterial contrast. It can be shown that the arterial CNR is maximized in this procedure. An additional advantage of the use of the time series of CTP images is that automatic differentiation between arteries and veins is possible. This feature was used to mask veins in the resulting 3D images to enhance visibility of arteries in maximum intensity projection (MIP) images. With a Philips Brilliance 64 CT scanner (64x0.625 mm) CTP examinations of eight patients were performed on 80 mm of brain using the toggling table technique. The CTP examination consisted of a time series of 15 3D images (2x64x0.625 mm; 80 kV; 150 mAs each) with an interval of 4 s. The authors measured the CNR in images obtained with weighted averaging, images obtained with plain averaging, and images with maximal arterial enhancement. The authors also compared CNR and quality of the images with that of regular CTA examinations and examined the effectiveness of automatic vein masking in MIP images. The CNR of the weighted averaged images is, on the average, 1.73 times the CNR of an image at maximal arterial enhancement in the CTP series, where the use of plain averaging

  4. Conditional Tat protein brain expression in the GT-tg bigenic mouse induces cerebral fractional anisotropy abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Carey, Amanda N.; Liu, Xiaoxu; Mintzopoulos, Dionyssios; Paris, Jason J.; McLaughlin, Jay P.; Kaufman, Marc J.

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral white matter changes including tissue water diffusion abnormalities detected with diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DTI) are commonly found in humans with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection, as well as in animal models of the disorder. The severities of some of these abnormalities have been reported to correlate with measures of disease progression or severity, or with the degree of cognitive dysfunction. Accordingly, DTI may be a useful translational biomarker. HIV-Tat protein appears to be an important factor in the viral pathogenesis of HIV-associated neurotoxicity. We previously reported cerebral gray matter density reductions in the GT-tg bigenic mouse treated with doxycycline (Dox) to conditionally induce Tat protein expression. Presently, we administered intraperitoneal (i.p.) Dox (100 mg/kg/day) for 7 days to GT-tg mice to determine whether induction of conditional Tat expression led to the development of cerebral DTI abnormalities. Perfused and fixed brains from eight GT-tg mice administered Dox and eight control mice administered saline i.p. were extracted and underwent DTI scans on a 9.4 Tesla scanner. A whole brain analysis detected fractional anisotropy (FA) reductions in several areas including insular and endopiriform regions, as well as within the dorsal striatum. These findings suggest that exposure to Tat protein is sufficient to induce FA abnormalities, and further support the use of the GT-tg mouse to model some effects of HIV. PMID:25619988

  5. Cerebral glucose metabolic abnormality in patients with congenital scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Park, Weon Wook; Suh, Kuen Tak; Kim, Jeung Il; Ku, Ja Gyung; Lee, Hong Seok; Kim, Seong-Jang; Kim, In-Ju; Kim, Yong-Ki; Lee, Jung Sub

    2008-07-01

    A possible association between congenital scoliosis and low mental status has been recognized, but there are no reports describing the mental status or cerebral metabolism in patients with congenital scoliosis in detail. We investigated the mental status using a mini-mental status exam as well as the cerebral glucose metabolism using F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose brain positron emission tomography in 12 patients with congenital scoliosis and compared them with those of 14 age-matched patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. The mean mini-mental status exam score in the congenital scoliosis group was significantly lower than that in the adolescent idiopathic scoliosis group. Group analysis found that various brain areas of patients with congenital scoliosis showed glucose hypometabolisms in the left prefrontal cortex (Brodmann area 10), right orbitofrontal cortex (Brodmann area 11), left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (Brodmann area 9), left anterior cingulate gyrus (Brodmann area 24) and pulvinar of the left thalamus. From this study, we could find the metabolic abnormalities of brain in patients with congenital scoliosis and suggest the possible role of voxel-based analysis of brain fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography. PMID:18446384

  6. The cerebral imaging using vessel-around method in the perfusion CT of the human brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Choong-Il; Choi, Seung-Wook; Park, Seung-Chul; Shin, Yeong-Gil; Kim, Jae-Hyoung; Chong, Gi-Bong

    2005-04-01

    Perfusion CT has been successfully used as a functional imaging technique for diagnosis of patients with hyperacute stroke. However, the commonly used methods based on curve-fitting are time consuming. Numerous researchers have investigated to what extent Perfusion CT can be used for the quantitative assessment of cerebral ischemia and to rapidly obtain comprehensive information regarding the extent of ischemic damage in acute stroke patients. The aim of this study is to propose an alternative approach to rapidly obtain the brain perfusion mapping and to show the proposed cerebral flow imaging of the vessel and tissue in human brain be reliable and useful. Our main design concern was algorithmic speed, robustness and automation in order to allow its potential use in the emergency situation of acute stroke. To obtain a more effective mapping, we analyzed the signal characteristics of Perfusion CT and defined the vessel-around model which includes the vessel and tissue. We proposed a nonparametric vessel-around approach which automatically discriminates the vessel and tissue around vessel from non-interested brain matter stratifying the level of maximum enhancement of pixel-based TAC. The stratification of pixel-based TAC was executed using the mean and standard deviation of the signal intensity of each pixel and mapped to the cerebral flow imaging. The defined vessel-around model was used to show the cerebral flow imaging and to specify the area of markedly reduced perfusion with loss of function of still viable neurons. Perfusion CT is a fast and practical technique for routine clinical application. It provides substantial and important additional information for the selection of the optimal treatment strategy for patients with hyperacute stroke. The vessel-around approach reduces the computation time significantly when compared with the perfusion imaging using the GVF. The proposed cerebral imaging shows reliable results which are validated by physicians and

  7. Modelling Brain Temperature and Perfusion for Cerebral Cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blowers, Stephen; Valluri, Prashant; Marshall, Ian; Andrews, Peter; Harris, Bridget; Thrippleton, Michael

    2015-11-01

    Brain temperature relies heavily on two aspects: i) blood perfusion and porous heat transport through tissue and ii) blood flow and heat transfer through embedded arterial and venous vasculature. Moreover brain temperature cannot be measured directly unless highly invasive surgical procedures are used. A 3D two-phase fluid-porous model for mapping flow and temperature in brain is presented with arterial and venous vessels extracted from MRI scans. Heat generation through metabolism is also included. The model is robust and reveals flow and temperature maps in unprecedented 3D detail. However, the Karmen-Kozeny parameters of the porous (tissue) phase need to be optimised for expected perfusion profiles. In order to optimise the K-K parameters a reduced order two-phase model is developed where 1D vessels are created with a tree generation algorithm embedded inside a 3D porous domain. Results reveal that blood perfusion is a strong function of the porosity distribution in the tissue. We present a qualitative comparison between the simulated perfusion maps and those obtained clinically. We also present results studying the effect of scalp cooling on core brain temperature and preliminary results agree with those observed clinically.

  8. Cerebral perfusion and cortical thickness indicate cortical involvement in mild Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Madhyastha, Tara M; Askren, Mary K; Boord, Peter; Zhang, Jing; Leverenz, James B; Grabowski, Thomas J

    2015-12-01

    Cortical dysfunction in Parkinson's disease (PD) may be caused by disruption to ascending systems or by intrinsic cortical neuropathology. We introduce and conduct a joint analysis of metabolism and atrophy capable of identifying whether metabolic disruption occurs in mild PD without cortical atrophy, to determine the extent and spatial pattern of cortical involvement in mild PD. The design was observational, studying 23 cognitively normal participants with mild PD (mean Hoehn & Yahr stage 2) and 21 healthy controls. Cortical thickness (obtained from analysis of structural magnetic resonance imaging [MRI] with FreeSurfer) and cerebral perfusion measures (obtained from arterial spin labeling [ASL]) analyzed independently and then together in a joint multiple factorial analysis to identify spatial patterns of perfusion and cortical thickness. We identify a pattern of changes in perfusion and cortical thickness characterized by symmetric parietal cortical thinning and reduced precuneus perfusion, with relative preservation of thickness and perfusion in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), right prefrontal gyrus, and medial frontal gyrus. The expression of this pattern is correlated with motor system symptoms and speed of processing. A spatial pattern of joint parietal cortical thinning and disproportionate reduction in perfusion occurs in our nondemented PD sample. We found no PD-related components of reduced perfusion without cortical thinning. This suggests that PD affects the cortex itself, even when symptoms are relatively mild. PMID:25759166

  9. Effect of propofol and remifentanil on cerebral perfusion and oxygenation in pigs: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Mikkelsen, Mai Louise Grandsgaard; Ambrus, Rikard; Miles, James Edward; Poulsen, Helle Harding; Moltke, Finn Borgbjerg; Eriksen, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this review is to evaluate the existing literature with regard to the influence of propofol and remifentanil total intravenous anaesthesia (TIVA) on cerebral perfusion and oxygenation in healthy pigs. Anaesthesia has influence on cerebral haemodynamics and it is important not only in human but also in veterinary anaesthesia to preserve optimal regulation of cerebral haemodynamics. Propofol and remifentanil are widely used in neuroanaesthesia and are increasingly used in experimental animal studies. In translational models, the pig has advantages compared to small laboratory animals because of brain anatomy, metabolism, neurophysiological maturation, and cerebral haemodynamics. However, reported effects of propofol and remifentanil on cerebral perfusion and oxygenation in pigs have not been reviewed. An electronic search identified 99 articles in English. Title and abstract screening selected 29 articles for full-text evaluation of which 19 were excluded with reasons. Of the 10 peer-reviewed articles included for review, only three had propofol or remifentanil anaesthesia as the primary study objective and only two directly investigated the effect of anaesthesia on cerebral perfusion and oxygenation (CPO). The evidence evaluated in this systematic review is limited, not focused on propofol and remifentanil and possibly influenced by factors of potential importance for CPO assessment. In one study of healthy pigs, CPO measures were within normal ranges following propofol-remifentanil anaesthesia, and addition of a single remifentanil bolus did not affect regional cerebral oxygen saturation (rSO2). Even though the pool of evidence suggests that propofol and remifentanil alone or in combination have limited effects on CPO in healthy pigs, confirmative evidence is lacking. PMID:27334375

  10. Spaceflight-induced alterations in cerebral artery vasoconstrictor, mechanical, and structural properties: implications for elevated cerebral perfusion and intracranial pressure

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Curtis R.; Hanna, Mina; Behnke, Bradley J.; Stabley, John N.; McCullough, Danielle J.; Davis, Robert T.; Ghosh, Payal; Papadopoulos, Anthony; Muller-Delp, Judy M.; Delp, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    Evidence indicates that cerebral blood flow is both increased and diminished in astronauts on return to Earth. Data from ground-based animal models simulating the effects of microgravity have shown that decrements in cerebral perfusion are associated with enhanced vasoconstriction and structural remodeling of cerebral arteries. Based on these results, the purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that 13 d of spaceflight [Space Transportation System (STS)-135 shuttle mission] enhances myogenic vasoconstriction, increases medial wall thickness, and elicits no change in the mechanical properties of mouse cerebral arteries. Basilar and posterior communicating arteries (PCAs) were isolated from 9-wk-old female C57BL/6 mice for in vitro vascular and mechanical testing. Contrary to that hypothesized, myogenic vasoconstrictor responses were lower and vascular distensibility greater in arteries from spaceflight group (SF) mice (n=7) relative to ground-based control group (GC) mice (n=12). Basilar artery maximal diameter was greater in SF mice (SF: 236±9 μm and GC: 215±5 μm) with no difference in medial wall thickness (SF: 12.4±1.6 μm; GC: 12.2±1.2 μm). Stiffness of the PCA, as characterized via nanoindentation, was lower in SF mice (SF: 3.4±0.3 N/m; GC: 5.4±0.8 N/m). Collectively, spaceflight-induced reductions in myogenic vasoconstriction and stiffness and increases in maximal diameter of cerebral arteries signify that elevations in brain blood flow may occur during spaceflight. Such changes in cerebral vascular control of perfusion could contribute to increases in intracranial pressure and an associated impairment of visual acuity in astronauts during spaceflight.—Taylor, C. R., Hanna, M., Behnke, B. J., Stabley, J. N., McCullough, D. J., Davis III, R. T., Ghosh, P., Papadopoulos, A., Muller-Delp, J. M., Delp, M. D. Spaceflight-induced alterations in cerebral artery vasoconstrictor, mechanical, and structural properties: implications for elevated

  11. Cerebral perfusion imaging with iodine 123-labeled amines

    SciTech Connect

    Holman, B.L.; Hill, T.C.; Polak, J.F.; Lee, R.G.; Royal, H.D.; O'Leary, D.H.

    1984-10-01

    Two amines, N-isopropyl p-iodoamphetamine and N,N,N'-trimethyl-N'-(2-hydroxyl-3-methyl-5-iodobenzyl)-1,3-prop anediamine, have been labeled with iodine 123. The brain uptake of these radioactive tracers is proportional to cerebral blood flow. These tracers are retained in the brain for a sufficiently long time so that imaging can be performed with standard, readily available instrumentation. Transaxial tomography with amines is useful in acute cerebral infarction, in which the x-ray computed tomographic scan may be normal for several days after onset of symptoms while the uptake of radioisotope-labeled amines will be altered immediately after the onset of the stroke. It is also useful in examining patients with cerebral vascular disease and in the preoperative examination of patients with partial epilepsy.

  12. Hyperthermia does not alter the increase in cerebral perfusion during cognitive activation

    PubMed Central

    Schlader, Zachary J.; Lucas, Rebekah A. I.; Pearson, James; Crandall, Craig G.

    2016-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that hyperthermia attenuates the increase in cerebral perfusion during cognitive activation. Mean middle cerebral artery blood velocity (MCAVmean) served as an index of cerebral perfusion, while the nBack test (a test of working memory) was the cognitive task. Hyperthermia was characterized by elevations (P < 0.001) in skin (by 5.0 ± 0.8°C) and intestinal temperatures (by 1.3 ± 0.1°C) and reductions (P < 0.020) in mean arterial pressure (by 11 ± 10 mmHg), end-tidal CO2 tension (by 3 ± 6 mmHg) and MCAVmean (by 10 ± 9 cm s−1). Hyperthermia had no influence on nBack test performance (mean difference from normothermia to hyperthermia, −1 ± 11%; P = 0.276) or, counter to the hypothesis, the increase in MCAVmean during nBack testing (mean difference from normothermia to hyperthermia: 0 ± 16 cm s−1; P = 0.608). These findings indicate that the capacity to increase cerebral perfusion during cognitive activation is unaffected by hyperthermia. PMID:23851918

  13. Spaceflight-induced alterations in cerebral artery vasoconstrictor, mechanical, and structural properties: implications for elevated cerebral perfusion and intracranial pressure.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Curtis R; Hanna, Mina; Behnke, Bradley J; Stabley, John N; McCullough, Danielle J; Davis, Robert T; Ghosh, Payal; Papadopoulos, Anthony; Muller-Delp, Judy M; Delp, Michael D

    2013-06-01

    Evidence indicates that cerebral blood flow is both increased and diminished in astronauts on return to Earth. Data from ground-based animal models simulating the effects of microgravity have shown that decrements in cerebral perfusion are associated with enhanced vasoconstriction and structural remodeling of cerebral arteries. Based on these results, the purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that 13 d of spaceflight [Space Transportation System (STS)-135 shuttle mission] enhances myogenic vasoconstriction, increases medial wall thickness, and elicits no change in the mechanical properties of mouse cerebral arteries. Basilar and posterior communicating arteries (PCAs) were isolated from 9-wk-old female C57BL/6 mice for in vitro vascular and mechanical testing. Contrary to that hypothesized, myogenic vasoconstrictor responses were lower and vascular distensibility greater in arteries from spaceflight group (SF) mice (n=7) relative to ground-based control group (GC) mice (n=12). Basilar artery maximal diameter was greater in SF mice (SF: 236±9 μm and GC: 215±5 μm) with no difference in medial wall thickness (SF: 12.4±1.6 μm; GC: 12.2±1.2 μm). Stiffness of the PCA, as characterized via nanoindentation, was lower in SF mice (SF: 3.4±0.3 N/m; GC: 5.4±0.8 N/m). Collectively, spaceflight-induced reductions in myogenic vasoconstriction and stiffness and increases in maximal diameter of cerebral arteries signify that elevations in brain blood flow may occur during spaceflight. Such changes in cerebral vascular control of perfusion could contribute to increases in intracranial pressure and an associated impairment of visual acuity in astronauts during spaceflight. PMID:23457215

  14. Kinetics of exercise-induced neural activation; interpretive dilemma of altered cerebral perfusion.

    PubMed

    Miyazawa, Taiki; Horiuchi, Masahiro; Ichikawa, Daisuke; Sato, Kohei; Tanaka, Naoki; Bailey, Damian M; Ogoh, Shigehiko

    2012-02-01

    Neural activation decreases cerebral deoxyhaemoglobin (HHb(C)) and increases oxyhaemoglobin concentration (O(2)Hb(C)). In contrast, patients who present with restricted cerebral blood flow, such as those suffering from cerebral ischaemia or Alzheimer's disease, and during the course of ageing the converse occurs, in that HHb(C) increases and O(2)Hb(C) decreases during neural activation. In the present study, we examined the interpretive implications of altered exercise-induced cerebral blood flow for cortical oxygenation in healthy subjects. Both O(2)Hb(C) and HHb(C) (prefrontal cortex) were determined in 11 healthy men using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). Middle cerebral artery mean blood velocity (MCA V(mean)) was determined via transcranial Doppler ultrasonography. Measurements were performed during contralateral hand-grip exercise during suprasystolic bilateral thigh-cuff occlusion (Cuff+) and within 2 s of cuff release (Cuff-) for the acute manipulation of cerebral perfusion. During Cuff+, both MCA V(mean) and O(2)Hb(C) increased during exercise, whereas HHb(C) decreased. In contrast, the opposite occurred during the Cuff- manipulation. These findings highlight the inverse relationship between cerebral blood flow and cerebral oxygenation as determined by NIRS, which has interpretive implications for the kinetics underlying exercise-induced neural activation. PMID:22041980

  15. Assessment of Specific Characteristics of Abnormal General Movements: Does It Enhance the Prediction of Cerebral Palsy?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamer, Elisa G.; Bos, Arend F.; Hadders-Algra, Mijna

    2011-01-01

    Aim: Abnormal general movements at around 3 months corrected age indicate a high risk of cerebral palsy (CP). We aimed to determine whether specific movement characteristics can improve the predictive power of definitely abnormal general movements. Method: Video recordings of 46 infants with definitely abnormal general movements at 9 to 13 weeks…

  16. Glycopyrrolate abolishes the exercise-induced increase in cerebral perfusion in humans.

    PubMed

    Seifert, Thomas; Fisher, James P; Young, Colin N; Hartwich, Doreen; Ogoh, Shigehiko; Raven, Peter B; Fadel, Paul J; Secher, Niels H

    2010-10-01

    Brain blood vessels contain muscarinic receptors that are important for cerebral blood flow (CBF) regulation, but whether a cholinergic receptor mechanism is involved in the exercise-induced increase in cerebral perfusion or affects cerebral metabolism remains unknown. We evaluated CBF and cerebral metabolism (from arterial and internal jugular venous O(2), glucose and lactate differences), as well as the middle cerebral artery mean blood velocity (MCA V(mean); transcranial Doppler ultrasound) during a sustained static handgrip contraction at 40% of maximal voluntary contraction (n = 9) and the MCA V(mean) during ergometer cycling (n = 8). Separate, randomized and counterbalanced trials were performed in control (no drug) conditions and following muscarinic cholinergic receptor blockade by glycopyrrolate. Glycopyrrolate increased resting heart rate from approximately 60 to approximately 110 beats min(-1) (P < 0.01) and cardiac output by approximately 40% (P < 0.05), but did not affect mean arterial pressure. The central cardiovascular responses to exercise with glycopyrrolate were similar to the control responses, except that cardiac output did not increase during static handgrip with glycopyrrolate. Glycopyrrolate did not significantly affect cerebral metabolism during static handgrip, but a parallel increase in MCA V(mean) (approximately 16%; P < 0.01) and CBF (approximately 12%; P < 0.01) during static handgrip, as well as the increase in MCA V(mean) during cycling (approximately 15%; P < 0.01), were abolished by glycopyrrolate (P < 0.05). Thus, during both cycling and static handgrip, a cholinergic receptor mechanism is important for the exercise-induced increase in cerebral perfusion without affecting the cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen. PMID:20660020

  17. Regional cerebral blood flow abnormalities in Alzheimer's Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Rezai, K.; Damasio, H.; Graff-Radford, N.; Eslinger, P.; Kirchner, P.

    1985-05-01

    In 37 patients (ages 58-81) with senile dementia of Alzheimer type (SDAT), regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was studied utilizing a dedicated SPECT system (Tomomatic-64) that produces rCBF images from 4-minute clearance of Xenon-133 in the brain. The authors have modified the device to acquire 5 continuous tomographic slices simultaneously. A consistent pattern of diminished blood flow was seen in 33 patients in the posterior-temporal and lower-parietal brain regions. Computer programs were developed to quantitate the size of the affected brain tissue in the posterolateral brain areas (confined to the posterior 40% and the lateral 25% of the major and minor brain axes respectively). They have previously reported normal rCBF in 25 volunteers to be greater than 45 ml/min/100g with less than 10% regional variation. Hence, an area was considered abnormal if rCBF measured less than 40 ml/min/100g or was less than 70% of the mean rCBF value in the anterior temporal-frontal regions.

  18. Postural influence on intracranial and cerebral perfusion pressure in ambulatory neurosurgical patients.

    PubMed

    Petersen, L G; Petersen, J C G; Andresen, M; Secher, N H; Juhler, M

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated postural effects on intracranial pressure (ICP) and cerebral perfusion pressure [CPP: mean arterial pressure (MAP) - ICP] in neurosurgical patients undergoing 24-h ICP monitoring as part of their diagnostic workup. We identified nine patients (5 women, age 44 ± 20 yr; means ± SD), who were "as normal as possible," i.e., without indication for neurosurgical intervention (e.g., focal lesions, global edema, abnormalities in ICP-profile, or cerebrospinal fluid dynamics). ICP (tip-transducer probe; Raumedic) in the brain parenchyma (n = 7) or in the lateral ventricles (n = 2) and cardiovascular variables (Nexfin) were determined from 20° head-down tilt to standing up. Compared with the supine position, ICP increased during 10° and 20° of head-down tilt (from 9.4 ± 3.8 to 14.3 ± 4.7 and 19 ± 4.7 mmHg; P < 0.001). Conversely, 10° and 20° head-up tilt reduced ICP to 4.8 ± 3.6 and 1.3 ± 3.6 mmHg and ICP reached -2.4 ± 4.2 mmHg in the standing position (P < 0.05). Concordant changes in MAP maintained CPP at 77 ± 7 mmHg regardless of body position (P = 0.95). During head-down tilt, the increase in ICP corresponded to a hydrostatic pressure gradient with reference just below the heart, likely reflecting the venous hydrostatic indifference point. When upright, the decrease in ICP was attenuated, corresponding to formation of a separate hydrostatic gradient with reference to the base of the skull, likely reflecting the site of venous collapse. ICP therefore seems to be governed by pressure in the draining veins and collapse of neck veins may protect the brain from being exposed to a large negative pressure when upright. Despite positional changes in ICP, MAP keeps CPP tightly regulated. PMID:26468260

  19. Impact of hypocapnia and cerebral perfusion on orthostatic tolerance.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Nia C S; Bain, Anthony R; MacLeod, David B; Wildfong, Kevin W; Smith, Kurt J; Willie, Christopher K; Sanders, Marit L; Numan, Tianne; Morrison, Shawnda A; Foster, Glen E; Stewart, Julian M; Ainslie, Philip N

    2014-12-01

    We examined two novel hypotheses: (1) that orthostatic tolerance (OT) would be prolonged when hyperventilatory-induced hypocapnia (and hence cerebral hypoperfusion) was prevented; and (2) that pharmacological reductions in cerebral blood flow (CBF) at baseline would lower the 'CBF reserve', and ultimately reduce OT. In study 1 (n = 24; aged 25 ± 4 years) participants underwent progressive lower-body negative pressure (LBNP) until pre-syncope; end-tidal carbon dioxide (P ET , CO 2) was clamped at baseline levels (isocapnic trial) or uncontrolled. In study 2 (n = 10; aged 25 ± 4 years), CBF was pharmacologically reduced by administration of indomethacin (INDO; 1.2 mg kg(-1)) or unaltered (placebo) followed by LBNP to pre-syncope. Beat-by-beat measurements of middle cerebral artery blood flow velocity (MCAv; transcranial Doppler), heart rate (ECG), blood pressure (BP; Finometer) and end-tidal gases were obtained continuously. In a subset of subjects' arterial-to-jugular venous differences were obtained to examine the independent impact of hypocapnia or cerebral hypoperfusion (following INDO) on cerebral oxygen delivery and extraction. In study 1, during the isocapnic trial, P ET , CO 2 was successfully clamped at baseline levels at pre-syncope (38.3 ± 2.7 vs. 38.5 ± 2.5 mmHg respectively; P = 0.50). In the uncontrolled trial, P ET , CO 2 at pre-syncope was reduced by 10.9 ± 3.9 mmHg (P ≤ 0.001). Compared to the isocapnic trial, the decline in mean MCAv was 15 ± 4 cm s(-1) (35%; P ≤ 0.001) greater in the uncontrolled trial, yet the time to pre-syncope was comparable between trials (544 ± 130 vs. 572 ± 180 s; P = 0.30). In study 2, compared to placebo, INDO reduced resting MCAv by 19 ± 4 cm s(-1) (31%; P ≤ 0.001), but time to pre-syncope remained similar between trials (placebo: 1123 ± 138 s vs. INDO: 1175 ± 212 s; P = 0.53). The brain extracted more oxygen in face of hypocapnia (34% to 53%) or cerebral

  20. Impact of hypocapnia and cerebral perfusion on orthostatic tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Nia C S; Bain, Anthony R; MacLeod, David B; Wildfong, Kevin W; Smith, Kurt J; Willie, Christopher K; Sanders, Marit L; Numan, Tianne; Morrison, Shawnda A; Foster, Glen E; Stewart, Julian M; Ainslie, Philip N

    2014-01-01

    We examined two novel hypotheses: (1) that orthostatic tolerance (OT) would be prolonged when hyperventilatory-induced hypocapnia (and hence cerebral hypoperfusion) was prevented; and (2) that pharmacological reductions in cerebral blood flow (CBF) at baseline would lower the ‘CBF reserve’, and ultimately reduce OT. In study 1 (n = 24; aged 25 ± 4 years) participants underwent progressive lower-body negative pressure (LBNP) until pre-syncope; end-tidal carbon dioxide () was clamped at baseline levels (isocapnic trial) or uncontrolled. In study 2 (n = 10; aged 25 ± 4 years), CBF was pharmacologically reduced by administration of indomethacin (INDO; 1.2 mg kg−1) or unaltered (placebo) followed by LBNP to pre-syncope. Beat-by-beat measurements of middle cerebral artery blood flow velocity (MCAv; transcranial Doppler), heart rate (ECG), blood pressure (BP; Finometer) and end-tidal gases were obtained continuously. In a subset of subjects’ arterial-to-jugular venous differences were obtained to examine the independent impact of hypocapnia or cerebral hypoperfusion (following INDO) on cerebral oxygen delivery and extraction. In study 1, during the isocapnic trial, was successfully clamped at baseline levels at pre-syncope (38.3 ± 2.7 vs. 38.5 ± 2.5 mmHg respectively; P = 0.50). In the uncontrolled trial, at pre-syncope was reduced by 10.9 ± 3.9 mmHg (P ≤ 0.001). Compared to the isocapnic trial, the decline in mean MCAv was 15 ± 4 cm s−1 (35%; P ≤ 0.001) greater in the uncontrolled trial, yet the time to pre-syncope was comparable between trials (544 ± 130 vs. 572 ± 180 s; P = 0.30). In study 2, compared to placebo, INDO reduced resting MCAv by 19 ± 4 cm s−1 (31%; P ≤ 0.001), but time to pre-syncope remained similar between trials (placebo: 1123 ± 138 s vs. INDO: 1175 ± 212 s; P = 0.53). The brain extracted more oxygen in face of hypocapnia (34% to 53%) or cerebral hypoperfusion (34% to 57%) to

  1. Radiation-induced myocardial perfusion abnormalities in breast cancer patients following external beam radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Eftekhari, Mohammad; Anbiaei, Robabeh; Zamani, Hanie; Fallahi, Babak; Beiki, Davood; Ameri, Ahmad; Emami-Ardekani, Alireza; Fard-Esfahani, Armaghan; Gholamrezanezhad, Ali; Seid Ratki, Kazem Razavi; Roknabadi, Alireza Momen

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): Radiation therapy for breast cancer can induce myocardial capillary injury and increase cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. A prospective cohort was conducted to study the prevalence of myocardial perfusion abnormalities following radiation therapy of left-sided breast cancer patients as compared to those with right–sided cancer. Methods: To minimize potential confounding factors, only those patients with low 10-year risk of coronary artery disease (based on Framingham risk scoring) were included. All patients were initially treated by modified radical mastectomy and then were managed by postoperative 3D Conformal Radiation Therapy (CRT) to the surgical bed with an additional 1-cm margin, delivered by 46-50 Gy (in 2 Gy daily fractions) over a 5-week course. The same dose-adjusted chemotherapy regimen (including anthracyclines, cyclophosphamide and taxol) was given to all patients. Six months after radiation therapy, all patients underwent cardiac SPECT for the evaluation of myocardial perfusion. Results: A total of 71 patients with a mean age of 45.3±7.2 years [35 patients with leftsided breast cancer (exposed) and 36 patients with right-sided cancer (controls)] were enrolled. Dose-volume histogram (DVH) [showing the percentage of the heart exposed to >50% of radiation] was significantly higher in patients with left-sided breast cancer. Visual interpretation detected perfusion abnormalities in 42.9% of cases and 16.7% of controls (P=0.02, Odds ratio=1.46). In semiquantitative segmental analysis, only apical (28.6% versus 8.3%, P=0.03) and anterolateral (17.1% versus 2.8%, P=0.049) walls showed significantly reduced myocardial perfusion in the exposed group. Summed Stress Score (SSS) of>3 was observed in twelve cases (34.3%), while in five of the controls (13.9%),(Odds ratio=1.3). There was no significant difference between the groups regarding left ventricular ejection fraction. Conclusion: The risk of radiation induced myocardial perfusion

  2. Do thallium myocardial perfusion scan abnormalities predict survival in sarcoid patients without cardiac symptoms

    SciTech Connect

    Kinney, E.L.; Caldwell, J.W. )

    1990-07-01

    Whereas the total mortality rate for sarcoidosis is 0.2 per 100,000, the prognosis, when the heart is involved, is very much worse. The authors used the difference in mortality rate to infer whether thallium 201 myocardial perfusion scan abnormalities correspond to myocardial sarcoid by making the simplifying assumption that if they do, then patients with abnormal scans will be found to have a death rate similar to patients with sarcoid heart disease. The authors therefore analyzed complete survival data on 52 sarcoid patients without cardiac symptoms an average of eighty-nine months after they had been scanned as part of a protocol. By use of survival analysis (the Cox proportional hazards model), the only variable that was significantly associated with survival was age. The patients' scan pattern, treatment status, gender, and race were not significantly related to survival. The authors conclude that thallium myocardial perfusion scans cannot reliably be used to diagnose sarcoid heart disease in sarcoid patients without cardiac symptoms.

  3. Two-week normobaric intermittent-hypoxic exposures stabilize cerebral perfusion during hypocapnia and hypercapnia.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peizhen; Shi, Xiangrong; Downey, H Fred

    2015-07-01

    The effect of moderately extended, intermittent-hypoxia (IH) on cerebral perfusion during changes in CO2 was unknown. Thus, we assessed the changes in cerebral vascular conductance (CVC) and cerebral tissue oxygenation (ScO2) during experimental hypocapnia and hypercapnia following 14-day normobaric exposures to IH (10% O2). CVC was estimated from the ratio of mean middle cerebral arterial blood flow velocity (transcranial Doppler sonography) to mean arterial pressure (tonometry), and ScO2 in the prefrontal cortex was monitored by near-infrared spectroscopy. Changes in CVC and ScO2 during changes in partial pressure of end-tidal CO2 (PETCO2, mass spectrometry) induced by 30-s paced-hyperventilation (hypocapnia) and during 6-min CO2 rebreathing (hypercapnia) were compared before and after 14-day IH exposures in eight young nonsmokers. Repetitive IH exposures reduced the ratio of %ΔCVC/ΔPETCO2 during hypocapnia (1.00 ± 0.13 vs 1.94 ± 0.35 vs %/mmHg, P = 0.026) and the slope of ΔCVC/ΔPETCO2 during hypercapnia (1.79 ± 0.37 vs 2.97 ± 0.64 %/mmHg, P = 0.021), but had no significant effect on ΔScO2/ΔPETCO2. The ventilatory response to hypercapnia during CO2 rebreathing was significantly diminished following 14-day IH exposures (0.83 ± 0.07 vs 1.14 ± 0.09 L/min/mmHg, P = 0.009). We conclude that repetitive normobaric IH exposures significantly diminish variations of cerebral perfusion in response to hypercapnia and hypocapnia without compromising cerebral tissue oxygenation. This IH-induced blunting of cerebral vasoreactivity during CO2 variations helps buffer excessive oscillations of cerebral underperfusion and overperfusion while sustaining cerebral O2 homeostasis. PMID:25504012

  4. Patterns of postictal cerebral perfusion in idiopathic generalized epilepsy: a multi-delay multi-parametric arterial spin labelling perfusion MRI study

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guangxiang; Lei, Du; Ren, Jiechuan; Zuo, Panli; Suo, Xueling; Wang, Danny J. J.; Wang, Meiyun; Zhou, Dong; Gong, Qiyong

    2016-01-01

    The cerebral haemodynamic status of idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE) is a very complicated process. Little attention has been paid to cerebral blood flow (CBF) alterations in IGE detected by arterial spin labelling (ASL) perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, the selection of an optimal delay time is difficult for single-delay ASL. Multi-delay multi-parametric ASL perfusion MRI overcomes the limitations of single-delay ASL. We applied multi-delay multi-parametric ASL perfusion MRI to investigate the patterns of postictal cerebral perfusion in IGE patients with absence seizures. A total of 21 IGE patients with absence seizures and 24 healthy control subjects were enrolled. IGE patients exhibited prolonged arterial transit time (ATT) in the left superior temporal gyrus. The mean CBF of IGE patients was significantly increased in the left middle temporal gyrus, left parahippocampal gyrus and left fusiform gyrus. Prolonged ATT in the left superior temporal gyrus was negatively correlated with the age at onset in IGE patients. This study demonstrated that cortical dysfunction in the temporal lobe and fusiform gyrus may be related to epileptic activity in IGE patients with absence seizures. This information can play an important role in elucidating the pathophysiological mechanism of IGE from a cerebral haemodynamic perspective. PMID:27374369

  5. Current concepts of optimal cerebral perfusion pressure in traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Prabhakar, Hemanshu; Sandhu, Kavita; Bhagat, Hemant; Durga, Padmaja; Chawla, Rajiv

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) consists of varied pathophysiological consequences and alteration of intracranial dynamics, reduction of the cerebral blood flow and oxygenation. In the past decade more emphasis has been directed towards optimizing cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) in patients who have suffered TBI. Injured brain may show signs of ischemia if CPP remains below 50 mmHg and raising the CPP above 60 mmHg may avoid cerebral oxygen desaturation. Though CPP above 70 mmHg is influential in achieving an improved patient outcome, maintenance of CPP higher than 70 mmHg was associated with greater risk of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). The target CPP has been laid within 50-70 mmHg. Cerebral blood flow and metabolism are heterogeneous after TBI and with regional temporal differences in the requirement for CPP. Brain monitoring techniques such as jugular venous oximetry, monitoring of brain tissue oxygen tension (PbrO2), and cerebral microdialysis provide complementary and specific information that permits the selection of the optimal CPP. This review highlights the rationale for use CPP directed therapies and neuromonitoring to identify optimal CPP of head injured patients. The article also reviews the evidence provided by various clinical trials regarding optimal CPP and their application in the management of head injured patients. PMID:25190937

  6. Arterial Spin Labeling of Cerebral Perfusion Territories Using a Separate Labeling Coil

    PubMed Central

    Paiva, Fernando F.; Tannús, Alberto; Talagala, S. Lalith; Silva, Afonso C.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To obtain cerebral perfusion territories of the left, the right and the posterior circulation in humans with high SNR and robust delineation. Materials and Methods CASL was implemented using a dedicated RF coil, positioned over the neck, to label the major cerebral feeding arteries in humans. Selective labeling was achieved by flow-driven adiabatic fast passage and by tilting the longitudinal labeling gradient about the Y-axis by θ=±60°. Results Mean CBF values in gray and white matter were 74±13 ml·100g−1·min−1 and 14±13 ml·100g−1·min−1, respectively (N=14). There were no signal differences between left and right hemispheres when θ=0° (P>0.19), indicating efficient labeling of both hemispheres. When θ=+60°, the signal in GM on the left hemisphere, 0.07±0.06%, was 92% lower than on the right hemisphere, 0.85±0.30% (P<10−9), while for θ=−60°, the signal in the right hemisphere, 0.16±0.13%, was 82% lower than on the contralateral side, 0.89±0.22% (P<10−10). Similar attenuations were obtained in white matter. Conclusions Clear delineation of the left and right cerebral perfusion territories was obtained, allowing discrimination of the anterior and posterior circulation in each hemisphere. PMID:18425844

  7. Recovery from aphasia and neglect after subcortical stroke: neuropsychological and cerebral perfusion study.

    PubMed Central

    Vallar, G; Perani, D; Cappa, S F; Messa, C; Lenzi, G L; Fazio, F

    1988-01-01

    Cortical regional cerebral perfusion was assessed by N, N, N1-trimethyl-N1-(2)-hydroxy-3-methyl-5-(I-123) iodobenzyl-1, 3-propanediamine 2 HCl I-123 (HIPDM) and single photon emission computerised tomography (SPECT) in six aphasic and two neglect patients with unilateral subcortical vascular lesions. Assessments were carried out both in the acute phase and after a period ranging from 1 to 6 months after stroke onset. In all patients an almost complete spontaneous recovery occurred and was associated with a significant improvement of cortical perfusion. A relationship between severity of aphasia and degree of cortical hypoperfusion was found, in both the acute and the follow up assessments, in the aphasic subgroup. Images PMID:2465386

  8. Cardiovascular responses to water immersion in humans: impact on cerebral perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Spence, Angela L.; Pugh, Christopher J. A.; Ainslie, Philip; Naylor, Louise H.; Green, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01

    Episodic increases in cerebrovascular perfusion and shear stress may have beneficial impacts on endothelial function that improve brain health. We hypothesized that water immersion to the level of the right atrium in humans would increase cerebral perfusion. We continuously measured, in 9 young (means ± SD, 24.6 ± 2.0 yr) healthy men, systemic hemodynamic variables along with blood flows in the common carotid and middle and posterior cerebral arteries during controlled filling and emptying of a water tank to the level of the right atrium. Mean arterial pressure (80 ± 9 vs. 91 ± 12 mmHg, P < 0.05), cardiac output (4.8 ± 0.7 vs. 5.1 ± 0.6 l/min, P < 0.05) and end-tidal carbon dioxide (PetCO2, 39.5 ± 2.0 vs. 44.4 ± 3.5 mmHg, P < 0.05) increased with water immersion, along with middle (59 ± 6 vs. 64 ± 6 cm/s, P < 0.05) and posterior cerebral artery blood flow velocities (41 ± 9 vs. 44 ± 10 cm/s, P < 0.05). These changes were reversed when the tank was emptied. Water immersion is associated with hemodynamic and PetCO2 changes, which increase cerebral blood velocities in humans. This study provides an evidence base for future studies to examine the potential additive effect of exercise in water on improving cerebrovascular health. PMID:24553298

  9. Prevalence and Severity of Myocardial Perfusion Imaging Abnormalities in Inmate Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Acampa, Wanda; Nappi, Carmela; Gaudieri, Valeria; Frega, Nicola; D’Arienzo, Davide; Tuccillo, Marianna; Di Lorenzo, Pierpaolo; Buccelli, Claudio; Petretta, Mario; Cuocolo, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Aim We evaluated the prevalence and severity of myocardial perfusion abnormalities among inmates undergoing cardiac single-photon emission computed tomography. We also compared the results with those obtained in a cohort of non-inmates. Methods Between January 2009 and December 2013, 2420 consecutive subjects (258 inmates and 2162 non-inmates) with suspected or known coronary artery disease underwent stress myocardial perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography (MPS) to our institution. The decision to submit inmates to MPS was taken by the physicians of the penal institutions or ordered by the court based on the survey of part. To account for differences in clinical characteristics between inmates and non-inmates, we created a propensity score-matched cohort considering clinical variables and stress type. Results Before matching, inmates were younger and had higher prevalence of male gender, smoking, chest pain, and previous myocardial infarction or revascularization (all p < 0.001). After matching, all characteristics were comparable in 258 inmates and 258 non-inmates. The total amount of abnormal myocardium was similar in inmates and non-inmates before and after matching. Infarct size and severity were larger in inmates before (p < 0.001) and after (p < 0.01) matching and left ventricular ejection fraction was lower in inmates compared to non-inmates (p < 0.01). Conclusions Detention is associated with larger infarct size compared to a general population of subjects referred to stress MPS also after matching for clinical variables and stress type. The similar prevalence of normal MPS in the matched cohort suggests that this imaging technique might be appropriate in inmates. PMID:26200782

  10. Abnormal cerebral effective connectivity during explicit emotional processing in adults with autism spectrum disorder

    PubMed Central

    Fonlupt, Pierre; Hubert, Bénédicte; Tardif, Carole; Gepner, Bruno; Deruelle, Christine

    2008-01-01

    Several recent studies suggest that autism may result from abnormal communication between brain regions. We directly assessed this hypothesis by testing the presence of abnormalities in a model of the functional cerebral network engaged during explicit emotion processing in adults with high functioning autism or Asperger syndrome. Comparison of structural equation models revealed abnormal patterns of effective connectivity, with the prefrontal cortex as a key site of dysfunction. These findings provide evidence that abnormal long-range connectivity between structures of the ‘social brain’ could explain the socio-emotional troubles that characterize the autistic pathology. PMID:19015104

  11. Perfusion-Weighted MRI Parameters for Prediction of Early Progressive Infarction in Middle Cerebral Artery Occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hoon; Kim, Yerim; Kim, Young Woo; Kim, Seong Rim

    2016-01-01

    Objective Early progressive infarction (EPI) is frequently observed and related to poor functional outcome in patients with middle cerebral artery (MCA) infarction caused by MCA occlusion. We evaluated the perfusion parameters of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a predictor of EPI. Methods We retrospectively analyzed patients with acute MCA territory infarction caused by MCA occlusion. EPI was defined as a National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale increment ≥2 points during 24 hours despite receiving standard treatment. Regional parameter ratios, such as cerebral blood flow and volume (rCBV) ratio (ipsilateral value/contralateral value) on perfusion MRI were analyzed to investigate the association with EPI. Results Sixty-four patients were enrolled in total. EPI was present in 18 (28%) subjects and all EPI occurred within 3 days after hospitalization. Diabetes mellitus, rCBV ratio and regional time to peak (rTTP) ratio showed statically significant differences in both groups. Multi-variate analysis indicated that history of diabetes mellitus [odds ratio (OR), 6.13; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.55–24.24] and a low rCBV ratio (rCBV, <0.85; OR, 6.57; 95% CI, 1.4–30.27) was significantly correlated with EPI. Conclusion The incidence of EPI is considerable in patients with acute MCA territory infarction caused by MCA occlusion. We suggest that rCBV ratio is a useful neuro-imaging parameter to predict EPI. PMID:27446514

  12. Diabetic patients have abnormal cerebral autoregulation during cardiopulmonary bypass

    SciTech Connect

    Croughwell, N.; Lyth, M.; Quill, T.J.; Newman, M.; Greeley, W.J.; Smith, L.R.; Reves, J.G. )

    1990-11-01

    We tested the hypothesis that insulin-dependent diabetic patients with coronary artery bypass graft surgery experience altered coupling of cerebral blood flow and oxygen consumption. In a study of 23 patients (11 diabetics and 12 age-matched controls), cerebral blood flow was measured using 133Xe clearance during nonpulsatile, alpha-stat blood gas managed cardiopulmonary bypass at the conditions of hypothermia and normothermia. In diabetic patients, the cerebral blood flow at 26.6 +/- 2.42 degrees C was 25.3 +/- 14.34 ml/100 g/min and at 36.9 +/- 0.58 degrees C it was 27.3 +/- 7.40 ml/100 g/min (p = NS). The control patients increased cerebral blood flow from 20.7 +/- 6.78 ml/100 g/min at 28.4 +/- 2.81 degrees C to 37.6 +/- 8.81 ml/100 g/min at 36.5 +/- 0.45 degrees C (p less than or equal to 0.005). The oxygen consumption was calculated from jugular bulb effluent and increased from hypothermic values of 0.52 +/- 0.20 ml/100 g/min in diabetics to 1.26 +/- 0.28 ml/100 g/min (p = 0.001) at normothermia and rose from 0.60 +/- 0.27 to 1.49 +/- 0.35 ml/100 g/min (p = 0.0005) in the controls. Thus, despite temperature-mediated changes in oxygen consumption, diabetic patients did not increase cerebral blood flow as metabolism increased. Arteriovenous oxygen saturation gradients and oxygen extraction across the brain were calculated from arterial and jugular bulb blood samples. The increase in arteriovenous oxygen difference between temperature conditions in diabetic patients and controls was significantly different (p = 0.01). These data reveal that diabetic patients lose cerebral autoregulation during cardiopulmonary bypass and compensate for an imbalance in adequate oxygen delivery by increasing oxygen extraction.

  13. Apicoaortic conduit and cerebral perfusion in mixed aortic valve disease: a computational analysis

    PubMed Central

    Fragomeni, Gionata; Rossi, Michele; Condemi, Francesca; Mazzitelli, Rosario; Serraino, Giuseppe Filiberto; Renzulli, Attilio

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The revival of the apicoaortic conduit has attracted new interest in this alternative treatment for severe aortic stenosis unsuitable for conventional valve replacement. However, doubts still exist about the perfusion of the epiaortic vessels after apicoaortic conduit implantation, especially when severe aortic stenosis is associated with aortic valve insufficiency. The aim of the study was to evaluate the perfusion of the epiaortic vessels (innominate artery, left carodit artery and left subclavian artery) in cases of mixed aortic valve disease before and after apicoaortic conduit implantation. METHODS Starting from the data of a real patient with severe aortic stenosis and mild aortic insufficiency who underwent apicoaortic conduit implantation, we created a computational model where severe aortic valve stenosis was associated with different grades of aortic insufficiency (mild, medium and moderate). RESULTS A total of six combinations were analysed. In all simulations, the more severe the concomitant aortic insufficiency, the more the flow through the epiaortic vessels was diminished. After apicoaortic conduit implantation, there was an absolute augmentation of the median output in each epiaortic vessel compared with the same combination of mixed aortic valve disease before implantation. Interestingly, retrograde flow from the conduit in the descending aorta was minimal and did not contribute to the improved output of the epiaortic vessels. CONCLUSIONS The computational analysis suggested a protective effect, rather than steal phenomenon, of the apicoaortic conduit towards the cerebral perfusion, even in cases of mixed aortic valve disease. PMID:23962852

  14. Cerebral abnormalities: use of calculated T1 and T2 magnetic resonance images for diagnosis

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, C.M.; Crooks, L.E.; Kaufman, L.; Brant-Zawadzki, M.

    1984-01-01

    The potential clinical importance of T1 and T2 relaxation times in distinguishing normal and pathologic tissue with magnetic resonance (MR) is discussed and clinical examples of cerebral abnormalities are given. Five patients with cerebral infarction, 15 with multiple sclerosis, two with Wilson disease, and four with tumors were imaged. Hemorrhagic and ischemic cerebrovascular accidents were distinguished using the spin echo technique. In the patients with multiple sclerosis, lesions had prolonged T1 and T2 times, but the definition of plaque was limited by spatial resolution. No abnormalities in signal intensity were seen in the patient with Wilson disease who was no longer severly disabled; abnormal increased signal intensity in the basal ganglia was found in the second patient with Wilson disease. Four tumors produced abnormal T1 and T2 relaxation times but these values alone were not sufficient for tumor characterization.

  15. Cerebral perfusion reserve in carotid stenosis: Prognostic role in surgical and rheological therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ussov, W.; Shipulin, V.; Shvera, I.

    1994-05-01

    The study was aimed to evaluate the usefulness of the quantitative cerebral perfusion reserve SPECT for the prognosis in patients with critical stenoses of the internal carotid arteries treated surgically or rheotherapeutically. 23 patients with angiographically verified mono (n=12) or bilateral (n=11) stenosis of the internal carotid artery for more than 75% and with recent (>30 days) minor stroke or TIA events in anamnesis were referred for the study. 6 age-matched healthy persons served as controls. In everybody the cerebral perfusion reserve was studied by using of the local cerebral blood volume to cerebral blood flow (rCBV/rCBF, sec) index using a double isotope technique which combined Tl-199 diethyidithiocarbamate (Tl-199-DDC) SPECT with Tc-99m red blood cells (Tc-99m-RBC) SPECT. 12 patients underwent carotid endartherectomy and 11 were treated rheotherapeutically by nonselective plasma substitution (5 times x 400 ml, >1800 nil in total). Patients were studied twicely: before and 10 days after the treatment, and then followed-up neurologically in the course of 1 year. Patients who had regional rCBV/rCBF index increased in the stenosed a.carotis int. - dependent region before treatment (normal value 5.2, sd 0.2 sec) have got it significantly decreased after intervention both in surgical group (from 7.1, sd 0.4 sec, down to 5.3, sd 0.3 sec, p<0.01 n=7) and in rheotherapeutical one (from 7.3, sd 0.5 sec, to 5.9, sd 0.4 sec, p<0.02 n=8). In everybody who expressed the rCBV/rCBF decreased below 5.6 sec after intervention there were no cerebrovascular ischemic events observed in the course of 12 months after carotid surgery and during 5 months in patients treated by plasmapheresis. We conclude that rCBV/rCBF SPECT index gives an independent prognostic information useful for both rheologic and surgical treatment of cerebrovascular disease; and that plasmapheresis suppress the short-term rise of cerebral ischemic events, which effect is predictable by SPECT.

  16. Cerebral blood flow in normal and abnormal sleep and dreaming

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, J.S.; Ishikawa, Y.; Hata, T.; Karacan, I.

    1987-07-01

    Measurements of regional or local cerebral blood flow (CBF) by the xenon-133 inhalation method and stable xenon computerized tomography CBF (CTCBF) method were made during relaxed wakefulness and different stages of REM and non-REM sleep in normal age-matched volunteers, narcoleptics, and sleep apneics. In the awake state, CBF values were reduced in both narcoleptics and sleep apneics in the brainstem and cerebellar regions. During sleep onset, whether REM or stage I-II, CBF values were paradoxically increased in narcoleptics but decreased severely in sleep apneics, while in normal volunteers they became diffusely but more moderately decreased. In REM sleep and dreaming CBF values greatly increased, particularly in right temporo-parietal regions in subjects experiencing both visual and auditory dreaming.

  17. Correlations of leuko-araiosis with cerebral atrophy and perfusion in elderly normal subjects and demented patients.

    PubMed Central

    Kawamura, J; Meyer, J S; Ichijo, M; Kobari, M; Terayama, Y; Weathers, S

    1993-01-01

    CT images of leuko-araiosis in brain slices were quantified according to volumes of reduced Hounsfield units in frontal periventricular white matter in groups of elderly patients with multi-infarct dementia (MID, n = 23) and dementia of the Alzheimer type (DAT, n = 16). Volumes of leuko-araiosis, estimates of atrophic cerebral tissue, and local cerebral perfusion utilising inhalation of xenon gas as the indicator were correlated on the same CT slices. Ratios of frontal leuko-araiosis to total brain tissue volume were similar for patients with MID and DAT (mean 5.7 (SD 2.1)% v 6.5 (3.2%)), and both were significantly greater than ratios in elderly normal volunteers (3.1(1.3)%, 0 < 0.001). Cerebral atrophy (measured as the ratio of volumes of cerebrospinal fluid to total brain area) for DAT patients was 17.0 (6.7)%, which was greater than for MID patients (12.5 (5.4)%; p < 0.05) and both types of patients showed more cerebral atrophy than did age matched, elderly normal subjects. Cerebral perfusion was decreased in all regions measured in patients with MID and DAT compared with elderly normal subjects. Multi variate regression analyses correlated frontal leuko-araiosis with reductions of local cerebral blood flow in subcortical grey matter (p < 0.025) in patients with vascular dementia but not in those with DAT. These quantitative measures implicate decreased perfusion due to atherosclerosis in territories supplied by the deep penetrating cerebral arteries in the pathogenesis of leuko-araiosis in patients with vascular dementia, but suggest a different pathogenesis for leuko-araiosis in Alzheimer's disease. Images PMID:8437007

  18. Abnormality of low frequency cerebral hemodynamics oscillations in TBI population.

    PubMed

    Chernomordik, Victor; Amyot, Franck; Kenney, Kimbra; Wassermann, Eric; Diaz-Arrastia, Ramon; Gandjbakhche, Amir

    2016-05-15

    Functional Near Infrared Spectroscopy (fNIRS) can non-invasively capture dynamic cognitive activation and underlying physiological processes by measuring changes in oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin levels, correlated to brain activation. It is a portable, inexpensive and user-friendly device which is easily adapted to the outpatient setting for the assessment of cognitive functions after Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI). Low frequency oscillations in hemodynamic signal, attributed in the literature to cerebral autoregulation, were assessed using recently introduced metrics, Oxygenation Variability (OV Index), obtained from oxy/deoxy-hemoglobin variations in response to mental tasks for a group of healthy control (HC, n=14) and TBI (n=29). Participants responded to an action complexity judgment task (evaluating the complexity of daily life activities by classifying the number of steps as "few" or "many") with a varying degree of cognitive load to produce brain activation. During the task, we measured blood variations with fNIRS and analyzed OV Index changes. Mean OV indices, corresponding to high complexity tasks, are higher than that of low complexity tasks in the HC group, revealing strong parametric effect (0.039±0.017 for low, 0.057±0.036 for high, p-value=0.069). However, no significant difference has been recorded for the OV indexes for two different loads in the TBI group (0.055±0.033 for low, 0.054±0.035 for high, p=0.9). OV index metrics proves to be sensitive to chronic TBI and can potentially be used to separate subpopulations TBI vs. HC. Noticeable differences in OV index spatial distributions between subpopulations have been observed. PMID:26996413

  19. An a contrario approach for the detection of patient-specific brain perfusion abnormalities with arterial spin labelling.

    PubMed

    Maumet, Camille; Maurel, Pierre; Ferré, Jean-Christophe; Barillot, Christian

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we introduce a new locally multivariate procedure to quantitatively extract voxel-wise patterns of abnormal perfusion in individual patients. This a contrario approach uses a multivariate metric from the computer vision community that is suitable to detect abnormalities even in the presence of closeby hypo- and hyper-perfusions. This method takes into account local information without applying Gaussian smoothing to the data. Furthermore, to improve on the standard a contrario approach, which assumes white noise, we introduce an updated a contrario approach that takes into account the spatial coherency of the noise in the probability estimation. Validation is undertaken on a dataset of 25 patients diagnosed with brain tumours and 61 healthy volunteers. We show how the a contrario approach outperforms the massively univariate general linear model usually employed for this type of analysis. PMID:27039702

  20. A brain stress test: Cerebral perfusion during memory encoding in mild cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Xie, Long; Dolui, Sudipto; Das, Sandhitsu R; Stockbower, Grace E; Daffner, Molly; Rao, Hengyi; Yushkevich, Paul A; Detre, John A; Wolk, David A

    2016-01-01

    Arterial spin labeled perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (ASL MRI) provides non-invasive quantification of cerebral blood flow, which can be used as a biomarker of brain function due to the tight coupling between cerebral blood flow (CBF) and brain metabolism. A growing body of literature suggests that regional CBF is altered in neurodegenerative diseases. Here we examined ASL MRI CBF in subjects with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (n = 65) and cognitively normal healthy controls (n = 62), both at rest and during performance of a memory-encoding task. As compared to rest, task-enhanced ASL MRI improved group discrimination, which supports the notion that physiologic measures during a cognitive challenge, or "stress test", may increase the ability to detect subtle functional changes in early disease stages. Further, logistic regression analysis demonstrated that ASL MRI and concomitantly acquired structural MRI provide complementary information of disease status. The current findings support the potential utility of task-enhanced ASL MRI as a biomarker in early Alzheimer's disease. PMID:27222794

  1. Usefulness of Deep Hypothermic Circulatory Arrest and Regional Cerebral Perfusion in Children

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Zheng; Hu, Ren-Jie; Zhu, De-Ming; Zhu, Zhong-Qun; Zhang, Hai-Bo

    2013-01-01

    To compare the safety and usefulness of deep hypothermic circulatory arrest (DHCA) and regional cerebral perfusion (RCP) during pediatric open heart surgery. Between January 1, 2004 and September 30, 2012, 1250 children with congenital cardiac defect underwent corrective operation with the DHCA or RCP technique in the Shanghai Children's Medical Center. Of them, 947 cases underwent the operation with the aid of DHCA (DHCA group), and 303 cases with RCP (RCP group). The mean DHCA time was 30.64±15.81 (7–63) minutes and mean RCP time was 36.18±12.86 (10–82) minutes. The mortality rate was 7.18% (68/947) and 6.60% (20/30) in two groups, respectively. The postoperative incidences of temporary and permanent neurological dysfunction were 6.23% (59/947) in the DHCA group and 2.64% (8/303) in the RCP group (p<0.01). The incidence of other complications such as low cardiac output, renal dysfunction, and lung issues are similar in both groups. RCP is a reliable technique for cerebral protection and it facilitates time-consuming corrected procedures for complex congenital cardiac defect repair procedures. PMID:24066266

  2. A brain stress test: Cerebral perfusion during memory encoding in mild cognitive impairment

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Long; Dolui, Sudipto; Das, Sandhitsu R.; Stockbower, Grace E.; Daffner, Molly; Rao, Hengyi; Yushkevich, Paul A.; Detre, John A.; Wolk, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Arterial spin labeled perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (ASL MRI) provides non-invasive quantification of cerebral blood flow, which can be used as a biomarker of brain function due to the tight coupling between cerebral blood flow (CBF) and brain metabolism. A growing body of literature suggests that regional CBF is altered in neurodegenerative diseases. Here we examined ASL MRI CBF in subjects with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (n = 65) and cognitively normal healthy controls (n = 62), both at rest and during performance of a memory-encoding task. As compared to rest, task-enhanced ASL MRI improved group discrimination, which supports the notion that physiologic measures during a cognitive challenge, or “stress test”, may increase the ability to detect subtle functional changes in early disease stages. Further, logistic regression analysis demonstrated that ASL MRI and concomitantly acquired structural MRI provide complementary information of disease status. The current findings support the potential utility of task-enhanced ASL MRI as a biomarker in early Alzheimer's disease. PMID:27222794

  3. Comparison of Two Algorithms for Analysis of Perfusion Computed Tomography Data for Evaluation of Cerebral Microcirculation in Chronic Subdural Hematoma.

    PubMed

    Trofimov, Alexey O; Kalentiev, George; Voennov, Oleg; Yuriev, Michail; Agarkova, Darya; Trofimova, Svetlana; Bragin, Denis E

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this work was comparison of two algorithms of perfusion computed tomography (PCT) data analysis for evaluation of cerebral microcirculation in the perifocal zone of chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH). Twenty patients with CSDH after polytrauma were included in the study. The same PCT data were assessed quantitatively in cortical brain region beneath the CSDH (zone 1), and in the corresponding contralateral brain hemisphere (zone 2) without and with the use of perfusion calculation mode excluding vascular pixel 'Remote Vessels' (RV); 1st and 2nd analysis method, respectively. Comparison with normal values for perfusion indices in the zone 1 in the 1st analysis method showed a significant (p < 0.01) increase in CBV and CBF, and no significant increase in MTT and TTP. Use of the RV mode (2nd analysis method) showed no statistically reliable change of perfusion parameters in the microcirculatory blood flow of the 2nd zone. Maintenance of microcirculatory blood flow perfusion reflects the preservation of cerebral blood flow autoregulation in patients with CSDH. PMID:27526170

  4. Blood Pressure is Associated With Cerebral Blood Flow Alterations in Patients With T2DM as Revealed by Perfusion Functional MRI

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Wenqing; Rao, Hengyi; Spaeth, Andrea M.; Huang, Rong; Tian, Sai; Cai, Rongrong; Sun, Jie; Wang, Shaohua

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and hypertension are both associated with cognitive impairment and brain function abnormalities. We investigated whether abnormal cerebral blood flow (CBF) patterns exists in T2DM patients and possible relationships between aberrant CBF and cognitive performance. Furthermore, we examined the influence of hypertension on CBF alterations in T2DM patients. T2DM patients (n = 38) and non-T2DM subjects (n = 40) were recruited from clinics, hospitals, and normal community health screenings. Cerebral blood flow images were collected and analyzed using arterial spin labeling perfusion functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Regions with major CBF differences between T2DM patients and non-T2DM controls were detected via 1-way ANOVA. The interaction effects between hypertension and T2DM for CBF alterations were also examined. Correlation analyses illustrated the association between CBF values and cognitive performance and between CBF and blood pressure. Compared with non-T2DM controls, T2DM patients exhibited decreased CBF, primarily in the visual area and the default mode network (DMN); decreased CBF in these regions was correlated with cognitive performance. There was a significant interaction effect between hypertension and diabetes for CBF in the precuneus and the middle occipital gyrus. Additionally, blood pressure correlated negatively with CBF in T2DM patients. T2DM patients exhibited reduced CBF in the visual area and DMN. Hypertension may facilitate a CBF decrease in the setting of diabetes. T2DM patients may benefit from blood pressure control to maintain their brain perfusion through CBF preservation. PMID:26632913

  5. Absolute quantification of cerebral blood flow in neurologically normal volunteers: dynamic-susceptibility contrast MRI-perfusion compared with computed tomography (CT)-perfusion.

    PubMed

    Ziegelitz, Doerthe; Starck, Göran; Mikkelsen, Irene K; Tullberg, Mats; Edsbagge, Mikael; Wikkelsö, Carsten; Forssell-Aronson, Eva; Holtås, Stig; Knutsson, Linda

    2009-07-01

    To improve the reproducibility of arterial input function (AIF) registration and absolute cerebral blood flow (CBF) quantification in dynamic-susceptibility MRI-perfusion (MRP) at 1.5T, we rescaled the AIF by use of a venous output function (VOF). We compared CBF estimates of 20 healthy, elderly volunteers, obtained by computed tomography (CT)-perfusion (CTP) and MRP on two consecutive days. MRP, calculated without the AIF correction, did not result in any significant correlation with CTP. The rescaled MRP showed fair to moderate correlation with CTP for the central gray matter (GM) and the whole brain. Our results indicate that the method used for correction of partial volume effects (PVEs) improves MRP experiments by reducing AIF-introduced variance at 1.5T. PMID:19253361

  6. Monitoring cerebral oxygen saturation during cardiopulmonary bypass using near-infrared spectroscopy: the relationships with body temperature and perfusion rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, Yichao; Ding, HaiShu; Gong, Qingcheng; Jia, Zaishen; Huang, Lan

    2006-03-01

    During cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) because of weak arterial pulsation, near-IR spectroscopy (NIRS) is almost the only available method to monitor cerebral oxygenation noninvasively. Our group develops a NIRS oximeter to monitor regional cerebral oxygenation especially its oxygen saturation (rScO2). To achieve optimal coupling between the sensor and human brain, the distances between the light source and the detectors on it are properly chosen. The oximeter is calibrated by blood gas analysis, and the results indicate that its algorithm is little influenced by either background absorption or overlying tissue. We used it to measure the rScO2 of 15 patients during CPB. It is shown that rScO2 is negatively correlated with body temperature and positively with perfusion rate. There are two critical stages during CPB when rScO2 might be relatively low: one is the low-perfusion-rate stage, the other is the early rewarming stage. During cooling, the changes of total hemoglobin concentration (CtHb) compared with its original value is also monitored. It is shown that CtHb decreases to a small extent, which may mainly reflect cerebral vasoconstriction induced by cooling. All these results indicate that NIRS can be used to monitor cerebral oxygenation to protect cerebral tissue during CPB.

  7. Comparison of myocardial contrast echocardiography with NC100100 and 99mTc sestamibi SPECT for detection of resting myocardial perfusion abnormalities in patients with previous myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Jucquois, I; Nihoyannopoulos, P; D'Hondt, A; Roelants, V; Robert, A; Melin, J; Glass, D; Vanoverschelde, J

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To determine whether myocardial contrast echocardiography (MCE) following intravenous injection of perfluorocarbon microbubbles permits identification of resting myocardial perfusion abnormalities in patients who have had a previous myocardial infarction.
PATIENTS AND INTERVENTIONS—22 patients (mean (SD) age 66 (11) years) underwent MCE after intravenous injection of NC100100, a novel perfluorocarbon containing contrast agent, and resting 99mTc sestamibi single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). With both methods, myocardial perfusion was graded semiquantitatively as 1 = normal, 0.5 = mild defect, and 0 = severe defect.
RESULTS—Among the 203 normally contracting segments, 151 (74%) were normally perfused by SPECT and 145 (71%) by MCE. With SPECT, abnormal tracer uptake was mainly found among normally contracting segments from the inferior wall. By contrast, with MCE poor myocardial opacification was noted essentially among the normally contracting segments from the anterior and lateral walls. Of the 142 dysfunctional segments, 87 (61%) showed perfusion defects by SPECT, and 94 (66%) by MCE. With both methods, perfusion abnormalities were seen more frequently among akinetic than hypokinetic segments. MCE correctly identified 81/139 segments that exhibited a perfusion defect by SPECT (58%), and 135/206 segments that were normally perfused by SPECT (66%). Exclusion of segments with attenuation artefacts (defined as abnormal myocardial opacification or sestamibi uptake but normal contraction) by either MCE or SPECT improved both the sensitivity (76%) and the specificity (83%) of the detection of SPECT perfusion defects by MCE.
CONCLUSIONS—The data suggest that MCE allows identification of myocardial perfusion abnormalities in patients who have had a previous myocardial infarction, provided that regional wall motion is simultaneously taken into account.


Keywords: myocardial contrast echocardiography; NC100100

  8. CT perfusion cerebral blood volume does not always predict infarct core in acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    d'Esterre, Christopher D; Roversi, Gloria; Padroni, Marina; Bernardoni, Andrea; Tamborino, Carmine; De Vito, Alessandro; Azzini, Cristiano; Marcello, Onofrio; Saletti, Andrea; Ceruti, Stefano; Lee, Ting Yim; Fainardi, Enrico

    2015-10-01

    We investigated the practical clinical utility of the CT perfusion (CTP) cerebral blood volume (CBV) parameter for differentiating salvageable from non-salvageable tissue in acute ischemic stroke (AIS). Fifty-five patients with AIS were imaged within 6 h from onset using CTP. Admission CBV defect (CBVD) volume was outlined using previously established gray and white matter CBV thresholds for infarct core. Admission cerebral blood flow (CBF) hypoperfusion and CBF/CBV mismatch were visually evaluated. Truncation of the ischemic time-density curve (ITDC) and hypervolemia status at admission, recanalization at 24-h CT angiography, hemorrhagic transformation (HT) at 24 h and/or 7-day non-contrast CT (NCCT), final infarct volume as indicated by 3-month NCCT defect (NCCTD) and 3-month modified Rankin Score were determined. Patients with recanalization and no truncation had the highest correlation (R = 0.81) and regression slope (0.80) between CBVD and NCCTD. Regression slopes were close to zero for patients with admission hypervolemia with/without recanalization. Hypervolemia underestimated (p = 0.02), while recanalization and ITDC truncation overestimated (p = 0.03) the NCCTD. Among patients with confirmed recanalization at 24 h, 38 % patients had an admission CBF/CBV mismatch within normal appearing areas on respective NCCT. 83 % of these patients developed infarction in admission hypervolemic CBF/CBV mismatch tissue. A reduction in CBV is a valuable predictor of infarct core when the acquisition of ITDC data is complete and hypervolemia is absent within the tissue destined to infarct. Raised or normal CBV is not always indicative of salvageable tissue, contrary to the current definition of penumbra. PMID:25981225

  9. Endothelin-1 elevates regional cerebral perfusion during prolonged ventricular fibrillation cardiac arrest in pigs.

    PubMed

    Holzer, Michael; Sterz, Fritz; Behringer, Wilhelm; Oschatz, Elisabeth; Kofler, Julia; Eisenburger, Philip; Kittler, Harald; Konschitzky, Reinhard; Laggner, Anton N

    2002-12-01

    Since adrenaline (epinephrine) also has negative effects during and after cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) a non-adrenergic vasoconstrictor like endothelin might be an alternative to increase vital organ blood flow. We studied the effect of different doses of endothelin-1 compared with adrenaline on the ability to resuscitate, cerebral and myocardial blood flow (MBF) in a closed chest cardiac arrest pig model. After 5 min of ventricular fibrillation, CPR with a ventilator and a mechanical compression device was started. At 10 min, 31 pigs were randomized to receive a single dose of endothelin-1 50, 100 or 200 microg or repeated doses of adrenaline 0.04 mg kg(-1) or saline every 3 min. After 25 min, the pigs were defibrillated to achieve restoration of spontaneous circulation. Blood flow was measured with the fluorescent microsphere method. In animals receiving endothelin-1 50, 100 and 200 microg the cerebral blood flow (CBF) increased from median 28 (25th; 75th quartile: 16; 40), 32 (15; 48) and 17 (4; 65) to 36 (31; 54), 47 (39; 57) and 63 (35; 83) ml min(-1) per 100 g, respectively, 6 min after drug administration (P<0.05 endothelin-1 50 microg vs. Control, P<0.01 endothelin-1 100 and 200 microg vs. Control). At the same time CBF decreased in the control and adrenaline group from 36 (21; 41) and 39 (15; 50) to 12 (2; 25) and 24 (15; 26) ml min(-1) per 100 g, respectively, (P<0.05 adrenaline vs. endothelin-1 200 microg). There was no difference in MBF between the treatment groups despite a higher coronary perfusion pressure (CoPP) in the endothelin-1 groups. Restoration of spontaneous circulation could be only achieved in the endothelin-1 50 microg (3 of 7; 43%) and 100 microg (5 of 7; 71%) group. This study suggests that endothelin-1 enhances CBF during CPR better than adrenaline and increases resuscitation success. PMID:12458069

  10. Quantitative cerebral perfusion assessment using microscope-integrated analysis of intraoperative indocyanine green fluorescence angiography versus positron emission tomography in superficial temporal artery to middle cerebral artery anastomosis

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Shinya; Ishikawa, Tatsuya; Tanabe, Jun; Moroi, Junta; Suzuki, Akifumi

    2014-01-01

    Background: Intraoperative qualitative indocyanine green (ICG) angiography has been used in cerebrovascular surgery. Hyperperfusion may lead to neurological complications after superficial temporal artery to middle cerebral artery (STA-MCA) anastomosis. The purpose of this study is to quantitatively evaluate intraoperative cerebral perfusion using microscope-integrated dynamic ICG fluorescence analysis, and to assess whether this value predicts hyperperfusion syndrome (HPS) after STA-MCA anastomosis. Methods: Ten patients undergoing STA-MCA anastomosis due to unilateral major cerebral artery occlusive disease were included. Ten patients with normal cerebral perfusion served as controls. The ICG transit curve from six regions of interest (ROIs) on the cortex, corresponding to ROIs on positron emission tomography (PET) study, was recorded. Maximum intensity (IMAX), cerebral blood flow index (CBFi), rise time (RT), and time to peak (TTP) were evaluated. Results: RT/TTP, but not IMAX or CBFi, could differentiate between control and study subjects. RT/TTP correlated (|r| = 0.534-0.807; P < 0.01) with mean transit time (MTT)/MTT ratio in the ipsilateral to contralateral hemisphere by PET study. Bland–Altman analysis showed a wide limit of agreement between RT and MTT and between TTP and MTT. The ratio of RT before and after bypass procedures was significantly lower in patients with postoperative HPS than in patients without postoperative HPS (0.60 ± 0.032 and 0.80 ± 0.056, respectively; P = 0.017). The ratio of TTP was also significantly lower in patients with postoperative HPS than in patients without postoperative HPS (0.64 ± 0.081 and 0.85 ± 0.095, respectively; P = 0.017). Conclusions: Time-dependent intraoperative parameters from the ICG transit curve provide quantitative information regarding cerebral circulation time with quality and utility comparable to information obtained by PET. These parameters may help predict the occurrence of postoperative HPS. PMID

  11. Critical thresholds of intracranial pressure and cerebral perfusion pressure related to age in paediatric head injury

    PubMed Central

    Chambers, I R; Jones, P A; Lo, T Y M; Forsyth, R J; Fulton, B; Andrews, P J D; Mendelow, A D; Minns, R A

    2006-01-01

    Background The principal strategy for managing head injury is to reduce the frequency and severity of secondary brain insults from intracranial pressure (ICP) and cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP), and hence improve outcome. Precise critical threshold levels have not been determined in head injured children. Objective To create a novel pressure–time index (PTI) measuring both duration and amplitude of insult, and then employ it to determine critical insult thresholds of ICP and CPP in children. Methods Prospective, observational, physiologically based study from Edinburgh and Newcastle, using patient monitored blood pressure, ICP, and CPP time series data. The PTI for ICP and CPP for 81 children, using theoretical values derived from physiological norms, was varied systematically to derive critical insult thresholds which delineate Glasgow outcome scale categories. Results The PTI for CPP had a very high predictive value for outcome (receiver operating characteristic analyses: area under curve = 0.957 and 0.890 for mortality and favourable outcome, respectively) and was more predictive than for ICP. Initial physiological values most accurately predicted favourable outcome. The CPP critical threshold values determined for children aged 2–6, 7–10, and 11–15 years were 48, 54, and 58 mm Hg. respectively. Conclusions The PTI is the first substantive paediatric index of total ICP and CPP following head injury. The insult thresholds generated are identical to age related physiological values. Management guidelines for paediatric head injuries should take account of these CPP thresholds to titrate appropriate pressor therapy. PMID:16103043

  12. Perfusion functional MRI reveals cerebral blood flow pattern under psychological stress

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jiongjiong; Rao, Hengyi; Wetmore, Gabriel S.; Furlan, Patricia M.; Korczykowski, Marc; Dinges, David F.; Detre, John A.

    2005-01-01

    Despite the prevalence of stress in everyday life and its impact on happiness, health, and cognition, little is known about the neural substrate of the experience of everyday stress in humans. We use a quantitative and noninvasive neuroimaging technique, arterial spin-labeling perfusion MRI, to measure cerebral blood flow (CBF) changes associated with mild to moderate stress induced by a mental arithmetic task with performance monitoring. Elicitation of stress was verified by self-report of stress and emotional state and measures of heart rate and salivary-cortisol level. The change in CBF induced by the stress task was positively correlated with subjective stress rating in the ventral right prefrontal cortex (RPFC) and left insula/putamen area. The ventral RPFC along with right insula/putamen and anterior cingulate showed sustained activation after task completion in subjects reporting a high stress level during arithmetic tasks. Additionally, variations of baseline CBF in the ventral RPFC and right orbitofrontal cortex were found to correlate with changes in salivary-cortisol level and heart rate caused by undergoing stress tasks. We further demonstrated that the observed right prefrontal activation could not be attributed to increased cognitive demand accompanying stress tasks and extended beyond neural pathways associated with negative emotions. Our results provide neuroimaging evidence that psychological stress induces negative emotion and vigilance and that the ventral RPFC plays a key role in the central stress response. PMID:16306271

  13. Cerebral Perfusion Measurements in Elderly with Hypertension Using Arterial Spin Labeling

    PubMed Central

    Mutsaerts, H. J. M. M.; van Dalen, J. W.; Heijtel, D. F. R.; Groot, P. F. C.; Majoie, C. B. L. M.; Petersen, E. T.; Richard, E.; Nederveen, A. J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The current study assesses the feasibility and value of crushed cerebral blood flow (CBFcrushed) and arterial transit time (ATT) estimations for large clinical imaging studies in elderly with hypertension. Material and Methods Two pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling (ASL) scans with (CBFcrushed) and without flow crushers (CBFnon-crushed) were performed in 186 elderly with hypertension, from which CBF and ATT maps were calculated. Standard flow territory maps were subdivided into proximal, intermediate and distal flow territories, based on the measured ATT. The coefficient of variation (CV) and physiological correlations with age and gender were compared between the three perfusion parameters. Results There was no difference in CV between CBFcrushed and CBFnon-crushed (15–24%, p>0.4) but the CV of ATT (4–9%) was much smaller. The total gray matter correlations with age and gender were most significant with ATT (p = .016 and p<.001 respectively), in between for CBFcrushed (p = .206 and p = .019) and least significant for CBFnon-crushed (p = .236 and p = .100). Conclusion These data show the feasibility and added value of combined measurements of both crushed CBF and ATT for group analyses in elderly with hypertension. The obtained flow territories provide knowledge on vascular anatomy of elderly with hypertension and can be used in future studies to investigate regional vascular effects. PMID:26241897

  14. Perfusion functional MRI reveals cerebral blood flow pattern under psychological stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jiongjiong; Rao, Hengyi; Wetmore, Gabriel S.; Furlan, Patricia M.; Korczykowski, Marc; Dinges, David F.; Detre, John A.

    2005-12-01

    Despite the prevalence of stress in everyday life and its impact on happiness, health, and cognition, little is known about the neural substrate of the experience of everyday stress in humans. We use a quantitative and noninvasive neuroimaging technique, arterial spin-labeling perfusion MRI, to measure cerebral blood flow (CBF) changes associated with mild to moderate stress induced by a mental arithmetic task with performance monitoring. Elicitation of stress was verified by self-report of stress and emotional state and measures of heart rate and salivary-cortisol level. The change in CBF induced by the stress task was positively correlated with subjective stress rating in the ventral right prefrontal cortex (RPFC) and left insula/putamen area. The ventral RPFC along with right insula/putamen and anterior cingulate showed sustained activation after task completion in subjects reporting a high stress level during arithmetic tasks. Additionally, variations of baseline CBF in the ventral RPFC and right orbitofrontal cortex were found to correlate with changes in salivary-cortisol level and heart rate caused by undergoing stress tasks. We further demonstrated that the observed right prefrontal activation could not be attributed to increased cognitive demand accompanying stress tasks and extended beyond neural pathways associated with negative emotions. Our results provide neuroimaging evidence that psychological stress induces negative emotion and vigilance and that the ventral RPFC plays a key role in the central stress response. anterior cingulate cortex | arterial spin labeling | right prefrontal cortex

  15. Evaluation of Cerebral Perfusion in Patients Undergoing Intravenous Recombinant Tissue Plasminogen Activator Thrombolysis

    PubMed Central

    HIRANO, Teruyuki

    2015-01-01

    Currently, the indication for thrombolytic therapy using intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA) is restricted strictly to patients with acute ischemic stroke within 4.5 h of onset. The effect of rt-PA declines over time; therefore, we need to minimize the time delay while generating imaging information. The use of cerebral blood flow imaging is not recommended within this time window. Conversely, the balance of efficacy and the risk of bleeding complications differ among patients > 4.5 h after onset. Several ongoing studies are using mismatch concepts to extend the therapeutic time window for rt-PA. Long-awaited reliable software, such as RAPID and PMA, are now available to analyze computed tomography/magnetic resonance perfusion data. Patients with wake-up stroke (WUS) are another group that can be used to expand rt-PA candidates. Diffusion fluid- attenuated inversion recovery mismatch is a promising imaging surrogate to select good candidates with WUS. These trials will cause a therapeutic paradigm shift from time-based to tissue-based strategies in the near future. PMID:26369875

  16. Bernoulli's Principle Applied to Brain Fluids: Intracranial Pressure Does Not Drive Cerebral Perfusion or CSF Flow.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Eric; Ros, Maxime; Moyse, Emmanuel; Lorthois, Sylvie; Swider, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    In line with the first law of thermodynamics, Bernoulli's principle states that the total energy in a fluid is the same at all points. We applied Bernoulli's principle to understand the relationship between intracranial pressure (ICP) and intracranial fluids. We analyzed simple fluid physics along a tube to describe the interplay between pressure and velocity. Bernoulli's equation demonstrates that a fluid does not flow along a gradient of pressure or velocity; a fluid flows along a gradient of energy from a high-energy region to a low-energy region. A fluid can even flow against a pressure gradient or a velocity gradient. Pressure and velocity represent part of the total energy. Cerebral blood perfusion is not driven by pressure but by energy: the blood flows from high-energy to lower-energy regions. Hydrocephalus is related to increased cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) resistance (i.e., energy transfer) at various points. Identification of the energy transfer within the CSF circuit is important in understanding and treating CSF-related disorders. Bernoulli's principle is not an abstract concept far from clinical practice. We should be aware that pressure is easy to measure, but it does not induce resumption of fluid flow. Even at the bedside, energy is the key to understanding ICP and fluid dynamics. PMID:27165887

  17. Predicting Cerebral Hyperperfusion Syndrome Following Superficial Temporal Artery to Middle Cerebral Artery Bypass based on Intraoperative Perfusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Defeng; Zhu, Fengping; Fung, Ka Ming; Zhu, Wei; Luo, Yishan; Chu, Winnie Chiu Wing; Tong Mok, Vincent Chung; Wu, Jinsong; Shi, Lin; Ahuja, Anil T.; Mao, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Moyamoya disease leads to the formation of stenosis in the cerebrovasculature. A superficial temporal artery to middle cerebral artery (STA-MCA) bypass is an effective treatment for the disease, yet it is usually associated with postoperative cerebral hyperperfusion syndrome (CHS). This study aimed to evaluate cerebral hemodynamic changes immediately after surgery and assess whether a semiquantitative analysis of an intraoperative magnetic resonance perfusion-weighted image (PWI) is useful for predicting postoperative CHS. Fourteen patients who underwent the STA-MCA bypass surgery were included in this study. An atlas-based registration method was employed for studying hemodynamics in different cerebral regions. Pre- versus intraoperative and group-wise comparisons were conducted to evaluate the hemodynamic changes. A postoperative increase in relative cerebral blood flow (CBF) at the terminal MCA territory (P = 0.035) and drop in relative mean-time-transit at the central MCA territory (P = 0.012) were observed in all patients. However, a significant raise in the increasing ratio of relative-CBF at the terminal MCA territory was only found in CHS patients (P = 0.023). The cerebrovascular changes of the patients after revascularization treatment were confirmed. Intraoperative PWI might be helpful in predicting the change in relative-CBF at MCA terminal territory which might indicate a risk of CHS. PMID:26365751

  18. Persistence of cerebral metabolic abnormalities in chronic schizophrenia as determined by positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Wolkin, A.; Jaeger, J.; Brodie, J.D.; Wolf, A.P.; Fowler, J.; Rotrosen, J.; Gomez-Mont, F.; Cancro, R.

    1985-05-01

    Local cerebral metabolic rates were determined by positron emission tomography and the deoxyglucose method in a group of 10 chronic schizophrenic subjects before and after somatic treatment and in eight normal subjects. Before treatment, schizophrenic subjects had markedly lower absolute metabolic activity than did normal controls in both frontal and temporal regions and a trend toward relative hyperactivity in the basal ganglia area. After treatment, their metabolic rates approached those seen in normal subjects in nearly all regions except frontal. Persistence of diminished frontal metabolism was manifested as significant relative hypofrontality. These findings suggest specific loci of aberrant cerebral functioning in chronic schizophrenia and the utility of positron emission tomography in characterizing these abnormalities.

  19. Progressive bone and joint abnormalities of the spine and lower extremities in cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Morrell, David S; Pearson, J Michael; Sauser, Donald D

    2002-01-01

    Bone and joint changes in cerebral palsy result from muscle spasticity and contracture. The spine and the joints of the lower extremity are most commonly affected. Scoliosis may progress rapidly and may continue after skeletal maturity. Increased thoracic kyphosis and lumbar lordosis, spondylolisthesis, spondylolysis, and pelvic obliquity may accompany the scoliosis. Progressive hip flexion and adduction lead to windswept deformity, increased femoral anteversion, apparent coxa valga, subluxation, deformity of the femoral head, hip dislocation, and formation of a pseudoacetabulum. In the knee, flexion contracture, patella alta, and patellar fragmentation are the most commonly seen abnormalities. Recurvatum deformity can also develop in the knee secondary to contracture of the rectus femoris muscle. Progressive equinovalgus and equinovarus of the foot and ankle are associated with rocker-bottom deformity and subluxation of the talonavicular joint. Early recognition of progressive deformity in patients with cerebral palsy allows timely treatment and prevention of irreversible change. PMID:11896216

  20. Verapamil prevents silent myocardial perfusion abnormalities during exercise in asymptomatic patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Udelson, J.E.; Bonow, R.O.; O'Gara, P.T.; Maron, B.J.; Van Lingen, A.; Bacharach, S.L.; Epstein, S.E.

    1989-05-01

    Recent studies indicate that reversible 201Tl perfusion defects, compatible with silent myocardial ischemia, commonly develop during exercise in asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). To determine whether this represents a dynamic process that may be modified favorably by medical therapy, we studied 29 asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic patients with HCM, aged 12-55 years (mean, 28), with exercise 201Tl emission computed tomography under control conditions and again after 1 week of oral verapamil (mean dosage, 453 mg/day). Treadmill time increased slightly during verapamil (21.0 +/- 3.6 to 21.9 +/- 2.7 minutes, p less than 0.005), but peak heart rate-blood pressure product was unchanged (26.3 +/- 6.0 X 10(3)) compared with 25.0 +/- 6.4 X 10(3). Two midventricular short-axis images per study were divided into five regions each, and each of these 10 regions was then analyzed on a 0-2 scale by three observers blinded with regard to the patients' therapy. Average regional scores of 1.5 or less were considered to represent perfusion defects, and a change in regional score of 0.5 or more was considered to constitute a significant change. During control studies, 15 patients (52%) developed perfusion defects with exercise (average, 3.7 regions per patient). In 14 of these patients, all perfusion defects completely reversed after 3 hours of rest; one patient had fixed defects. After administration of verapamil, exercise perfusion scores improved in 10 of the 14 patients (71%) with reversible defects; there was overall improvement in 34 of 50 (68%) regions with initially reversible perfusion defects.

  1. Detecting the subregion proceeding to infarction in hypoperfused cerebral tissue: a study with diffusion and perfusion weighted MRI.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Karonen, J O; Vanninen, R L; Nuutinen, J; Perkiö, J; Vainio, P A; Soimakallio, S; Aronen, H J

    2003-06-01

    Diffusion and perfusion weighted MRI have been widely used in ischaemic stroke. We studied 17 patients in whom ischaemic areas showed an ischaemic core, an area of infarct growth and hypoperfused but ultimately surviving tissue. Apparent diffusion coefficients (ADC) were measured on days 1, 2, and 8 in the three subregions and in contralateral control areas. Cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral blood volume (CBV), and mean transit time (MTT) were measured in these regions on day 1 perfusion maps. On day 1, the ischaemic core had very low ADC and CBF and increased MTT. The ADC in the ischaemic core gradually increased during the week. The area of infarct growth on day 1 had slightly but significantly decreased ADC (96% of control, P=0.028), moderately decreased CBF and increased MTT. On day 1 the hypoperfused but surviving tissue had slightly but significantly increased ADC (103% of control, P=0.001), mildly decreased CBF and increased CBV and MTT. The ADC of the area of infarct growth decreased to the same level as in the ischaemic core on days 2 and 8. That of surviving tissue was still above normal on day 2 (103% of control), but had returned to the normal level by day 8. Measurement of ADC combined with perfusion MRI may help distinguish different subregions in acutely hypoperfused brain. PMID:12750863

  2. Optical bedside monitoring of cerebral perfusion: technological and methodological advances applied in a study on acute ischemic stroke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinkellner, Oliver; Gruber, Clemens; Wabnitz, Heidrun; Jelzow, Alexander; Steinbrink, Jens; Fiebach, Jochen B.; MacDonald, Rainer; Obrig, Hellmuth

    2010-11-01

    We present results of a clinical study on bedside perfusion monitoring of the human brain by optical bolus tracking. We measure the kinetics of the contrast agent indocyanine green using time-domain near-IR spectroscopy (tdNIRS) in 10 patients suffering from acute unilateral ischemic stroke. In all patients, a delay of the bolus over the affected when compared to the unaffected hemisphere is found (mean: 1.5 s, range: 0.2 s to 5.2 s). A portable time-domain near-IR reflectometer is optimized and approved for clinical studies. Data analysis based on statistical moments of time-of-flight distributions of diffusely reflected photons enables high sensitivity to intracerebral changes in bolus kinetics. Since the second centralized moment, variance, is preferentially sensitive to deep absorption changes, it provides a suitable representation of the cerebral signals relevant for perfusion monitoring in stroke. We show that variance-based bolus tracking is also less susceptible to motion artifacts, which often occur in severely affected patients. We present data that clearly manifest the applicability of the tdNIRS approach to assess cerebral perfusion in acute stroke patients at the bedside. This may be of high relevance to its introduction as a monitoring tool on stroke units.

  3. Embryologic Association of Tornwaldt's Cyst with Cerebral Artery Abnormalities and Infarction: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Osborn, Michael F.; Buchanan, Benjamin K.; Akle, Nassim; Badr, Ahmed; Zhang, Jun

    2012-01-01

    Background and Purpose. Tornwaldt's cysts are rare nasopharyngeal lesions that develop from remnants of the embryonic notochord. Summary of Case. We reported a twelve-year-old female stroke patient with Tornwaldt's cysts, whose father also suffered a stroke at age fifty two with the presence of an abdominal aortic aneurysm, suggesting a genetic influence in this case. Conclusions. This paper suggests an etiologic connection between Tornwaldt's cysts and cerebral vasculature abnormalities by way of notochordal dysfunction during development, likely the result of perturbation of notochord-derived molecular cues during development or biogenesis. PMID:23094173

  4. Early Cerebral Circulation Disturbance in Patients Suffering from Severe Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI): A Xenon CT and Perfusion CT Study

    PubMed Central

    HONDA, Mitsuru; ICHIBAYASHI, Ryo; YOKOMURO, Hiroki; YOSHIHARA, Katsunori; MASUDA, Hiroyuki; HAGA, Daisuke; SEIKI, Yoshikatsu; KUDOH, Chiaki; KISHI, Taichi

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is widely known to cause dynamic changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF). Ischemia is a common and deleterious secondary injury following TBI. Detecting early ischemia in TBI patients is important to prevent further advancement and deterioration of the brain tissue. The purpose of this study was to clarify the cerebral circulatory disturbance during the early phase and whether it can be used to predict patient outcome. A total of 90 patients with TBI underwent a xenon-computed tomography (Xe-CT) and subsequently perfusion CT to evaluate the cerebral circulation on days 1–3. We measured CBF using Xe-CT and mean transit time (MTT: the width between two inflection points [maximum upward slope and maximum downward slope from inflow to outflow of the contrast agent]) using perfusion CT and calculated the cerebral blood volume (CBV) using the AZ-7000W98 computer system. The relationships of the hemodynamic parameters CBF, MTT, and CBV to the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score and the Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) score were examined. There were no significant differences in CBF, MTT, and CBV among GCS3–4, GCS5–6, and GCS7–8 groups. The patients with a favorable outcome (GR and MD) had significantly higher CBF and lower MTT than those with an unfavorable one (SD, VS, or D). The discriminant analysis of these parameters could predict patient outcome with a probability of 70.6%. During the early phase, CBF reduction and MTT prolongation might influence the clinical outcome of TBI. These parameters are helpful for evaluating the severity of cerebral circulatory disturbance and predicting the outcome of TBI patients. PMID:27356957

  5. Early Cerebral Circulation Disturbance in Patients Suffering from Severe Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI): A Xenon CT and Perfusion CT Study.

    PubMed

    Honda, Mitsuru; Ichibayashi, Ryo; Yokomuro, Hiroki; Yoshihara, Katsunori; Masuda, Hiroyuki; Haga, Daisuke; Seiki, Yoshikatsu; Kudoh, Chiaki; Kishi, Taichi

    2016-08-15

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is widely known to cause dynamic changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF). Ischemia is a common and deleterious secondary injury following TBI. Detecting early ischemia in TBI patients is important to prevent further advancement and deterioration of the brain tissue. The purpose of this study was to clarify the cerebral circulatory disturbance during the early phase and whether it can be used to predict patient outcome. A total of 90 patients with TBI underwent a xenon-computed tomography (Xe-CT) and subsequently perfusion CT to evaluate the cerebral circulation on days 1-3. We measured CBF using Xe-CT and mean transit time (MTT: the width between two inflection points [maximum upward slope and maximum downward slope from inflow to outflow of the contrast agent]) using perfusion CT and calculated the cerebral blood volume (CBV) using the AZ-7000W98 computer system. The relationships of the hemodynamic parameters CBF, MTT, and CBV to the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score and the Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) score were examined. There were no significant differences in CBF, MTT, and CBV among GCS3-4, GCS5-6, and GCS7-8 groups. The patients with a favorable outcome (GR and MD) had significantly higher CBF and lower MTT than those with an unfavorable one (SD, VS, or D). The discriminant analysis of these parameters could predict patient outcome with a probability of 70.6%. During the early phase, CBF reduction and MTT prolongation might influence the clinical outcome of TBI. These parameters are helpful for evaluating the severity of cerebral circulatory disturbance and predicting the outcome of TBI patients. PMID:27356957

  6. Cortical electrical stimulation alters erythrocyte perfusion pattern in the cerebral capillary network of the rat.

    PubMed

    Schulte, M L; Wood, J D; Hudetz, A G

    2003-02-14

    The effect of direct cortical electrical stimulation on the pattern of erythrocyte perfusion in the capillary network of the rat cerebral cortex was studied by fluorescence intravital video-microscopy. The movement of fluorescently labeled red blood cells (FRBCs) in individual capillaries 50-70 microm subsurface in the dorsal somatosensory cortex was visualized using a closed cranial window. Cortical stimulation electrodes were placed on opposite sides of the window. FRBC velocity (mm/s) and supply rate (cells/s) were measured in 51 capillaries from six rats before and during electrical stimulation of increasing intensities (15-s trains of 3-Hz, 3-ms, 0.5-5.0-mA, square pulses). FRBC velocity, supply rate, and the instantaneous capillary erythrocyte content (lineal cell density, LCD, cells/mm) increased with the stimulation current and reached maxima of 110, 160 and 33% above control, respectively. Capillaries with low resting velocity showed a greater response than those with high resting velocity. The fraction of capillaries in which FRBC velocity increased was not constant, but increased with the stimulation current, as did the magnitude of the velocity change in these capillaries. A few capillaries showed a negative FRBC velocity response at stimulations <4 mA. These results suggest that a robust rise in the fraction of responding (engaged) capillaries and a smaller rise in the capillary LCD contribute to neuronal activation-induced cortical hyperemia. Thus, capillary engagement and erythrocyte recruitment appear to represent important components of the cortical functional hyperemic response. These results provide insight into some of the specific hemodynamic changes associated with functional hyperemia occurring at the capillary level. PMID:12560113

  7. In Utero Bisphenol A Exposure Induces Abnormal Neuronal Migration in the Cerebral Cortex of Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Wenting; Endo, Toshihiro; Kubo, Ken-ichiro; Nakajima, Kazunori; Kakeyama, Masaki; Tohyama, Chiharu

    2016-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) has been known to have endocrine-disrupting activity to induce reproductive and behavioral abnormalities in offspring of laboratory animal species. However, morphological basis of this abnormality during brain development is largely unknown. Cerebral cortex plays a crucial role in higher brain function, and its precisely laminated structure is formed by neuronal migration. In the present study, transfecting a plasmid (pCAG-mCherry) by in utero electroporation (IUE), we visualized developing neurons and investigated the possible effects of in utero BPA exposure on neuronal migration. Pregnant mice were exposed to BPA by osmotic pump at estimated daily doses of 0, 40 (BPA-40), or 400 (BPA-400) μg/kg from embryonic day 14.5 (E14.5) to E18.5. IUE was performed at E14.5 and neuronal migration was analyzed at E18.5. Compared with the control group, neuronal migration in the cortical plate was significantly decreased in the BPA-40 group; however, there was no significant difference in the BPA-400 group. Among several neuronal migration-related genes and cortical layer-specific genes, TrkB in the BPA-400 group was found significantly upregulated. In conclusion, in utero exposure to low BPA dose was found to disrupt neuronal migration in the cerebral cortex in a dose-specific manner. PMID:26869994

  8. Abnormal Excitability and Episodic Low-Frequency Oscillations in the Cerebral Cortex of the tottering Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Cramer, Samuel W.; Popa, Laurentiu S.; Carter, Russell E.; Chen, Gang

    2015-01-01

    The Ca2+ channelopathies caused by mutations of the CACNA1A gene that encodes the pore-forming subunit of the human Cav2.1 (P/Q-type) voltage-gated Ca2+ channel include episodic ataxia type 2 (EA2). Although, in EA2 the emphasis has been on cerebellar dysfunction, patients also exhibit episodic, nonmotoric abnormalities involving the cerebral cortex. This study demonstrates episodic, low-frequency oscillations (LFOs) throughout the cerebral cortex of tottering (tg/tg) mice, a widely used model of EA2. Ranging between 0.035 and 0.11 Hz, the LFOs in tg/tg mice can spontaneously develop very high power, referred to as a high-power state. The LFOs in tg/tg mice are mediated in part by neuronal activity as tetrodotoxin decreases the oscillations and cortical neuron discharge contain the same low frequencies. The high-power state involves compensatory mechanisms because acutely decreasing P/Q-type Ca2+ channel function in either wild-type (WT) or tg/tg mice does not induce the high-power state. In contrast, blocking l-type Ca2+ channels, known to be upregulated in tg/tg mice, reduces the high-power state. Intriguingly, basal excitatory glutamatergic neurotransmission constrains the high-power state because blocking ionotropic or metabotropic glutamate receptors results in high-power LFOs in tg/tg but not WT mice. The high-power LFOs are decreased markedly by acetazolamide and 4-aminopyridine, the primary treatments for EA2, suggesting disease relevance. Together, these results demonstrate that the high-power LFOs in the tg/tg cerebral cortex represent a highly abnormal excitability state that may underlie noncerebellar symptoms that characterize CACNA1A mutations. PMID:25855180

  9. Abnormal excitability and episodic low-frequency oscillations in the cerebral cortex of the tottering mouse.

    PubMed

    Cramer, Samuel W; Popa, Laurentiu S; Carter, Russell E; Chen, Gang; Ebner, Timothy J

    2015-04-01

    The Ca(2+) channelopathies caused by mutations of the CACNA1A gene that encodes the pore-forming subunit of the human Cav2.1 (P/Q-type) voltage-gated Ca(2+) channel include episodic ataxia type 2 (EA2). Although, in EA2 the emphasis has been on cerebellar dysfunction, patients also exhibit episodic, nonmotoric abnormalities involving the cerebral cortex. This study demonstrates episodic, low-frequency oscillations (LFOs) throughout the cerebral cortex of tottering (tg/tg) mice, a widely used model of EA2. Ranging between 0.035 and 0.11 Hz, the LFOs in tg/tg mice can spontaneously develop very high power, referred to as a high-power state. The LFOs in tg/tg mice are mediated in part by neuronal activity as tetrodotoxin decreases the oscillations and cortical neuron discharge contain the same low frequencies. The high-power state involves compensatory mechanisms because acutely decreasing P/Q-type Ca(2+) channel function in either wild-type (WT) or tg/tg mice does not induce the high-power state. In contrast, blocking l-type Ca(2+) channels, known to be upregulated in tg/tg mice, reduces the high-power state. Intriguingly, basal excitatory glutamatergic neurotransmission constrains the high-power state because blocking ionotropic or metabotropic glutamate receptors results in high-power LFOs in tg/tg but not WT mice. The high-power LFOs are decreased markedly by acetazolamide and 4-aminopyridine, the primary treatments for EA2, suggesting disease relevance. Together, these results demonstrate that the high-power LFOs in the tg/tg cerebral cortex represent a highly abnormal excitability state that may underlie noncerebellar symptoms that characterize CACNA1A mutations. PMID:25855180

  10. Automated registration of laser Doppler perfusion images by an adaptive correlation approach: application to focal cerebral ischemia in the rat.

    PubMed

    Riyamongkol, Panomkhawn; Zhao, Weizhao; Liu, Yitao; Belayev, Ludmila; Busto, Raul; Ginsberg, Myron D

    2002-12-31

    Hemodynamic changes are extremely important in analyzing responses from a brain subjected to a stimulus or treatment. The Laser Doppler technique has emerged as an important tool in neuroscience research. This non-invasive method scans a low-power laser beam in a raster pattern over a tissue surface to generate the time course of images in unit of relative flux changes. Laser Doppler imager (LDI) records cerebral perfusion not only in the temporal but also in the spatial domain. The traditional analysis of LD images has been focused on the region-of-interest (ROI) approach, in which the analytical accuracy in an experiment that necessitates a relative repositioning between the LDI and the scanned tissue area will be weakened due to the operator's subjective decision in data collecting. This report describes a robust image registration method designed to obviate this problem, which is based on the adaptive correlation approach. The assumption in mapping corresponding pixels in two images is to correlate the regions in which these pixels are centered. Based on this assumption, correlation coefficients are calculated between two regions by a method in which one region is moved around over the other in all possible combinations. To avoid ambiguity in distinguishing maximum correlation coefficients, an adaptive algorithm is adopted. Correspondences are then used to estimate the transformation by linear regression. We used a pair of phantom LD images to test this algorithm. A reliability test was also performed on each of the 15 sequential LD images derived from an actual experiment by imposing rotation and translation. The result shows that the calculated transformation parameters (rotation: theta =7.7+/-0.5 degrees; translation: Delta x =2.8+/-0.3, Deltaŷ=4.7+/-0.4) are very close to the prior-set parameters (rotation: theta=8 degrees; translation: Delta x=3, Delta y=5). This result indicates that this approach is a valuable adjunct to LD perfusion monitoring. An

  11. Potential of optical microangiography to monitor cerebral blood perfusion and vascular plasticity following traumatic brain injury in mice in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Yali; Alkayed, Nabil; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2009-07-01

    Optical microanglography (OMAG) is a recently developed imaging modality capable of volumetric imaging of dynamic blood perfusion, down to capillary level resolution, with an imaging depth up to 2.00 mm beneath the tissue surface. We report the use of OMAG to monitor the cerebral blood flow (CBF) over the cortex of mouse brain upon traumatic brain injury (TBI), with the cranium left intact, for a period of two weeks on the same animal. We show the ability of OMAG to repeatedly image 3-D cerebral vasculatures during pre- and post-traumatic phases, and to visualize the changes of regulated CBF and the vascular plasticity after TBI. The results indicate the potential of OMAG to explore the mechanism involved in the rehabilitation of TBI.

  12. Cerebral Metabolic Profiling of Hypothermic Circulatory Arrest with and Without Antegrade Selective Cerebral Perfusion: Evidence from Nontargeted Tissue Metabolomics in a Rabbit Model

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Li-Hua; Liu, Jin-Ping; Zhang, Hao; Wu, Shu-Bin; Ji, Bing-Yang

    2016-01-01

    Background: Antegrade selective cerebral perfusion (ASCP) is regarded to perform cerebral protection during the thoracic aorta surgery as an adjunctive technique to deep hypothermic circulatory arrest (DHCA). However, brain metabolism profile after ASCP has not been systematically investigated by metabolomics technology. Methods: To clarify the metabolomics profiling of ASCP, 12 New Zealand white rabbits were randomly assigned into 60 min DHCA with (DHCA+ASCP [DA] group, n = 6) and without (DHCA [D] group, n = 6) ASCP according to the random number table. ASCP was conducted by cannulation on the right subclavian artery and cross-clamping of the innominate artery. Rabbits were sacrificed 60 min after weaning off cardiopulmonary bypass. The metabolic features of the cerebral cortex were analyzed by a nontargeted metabolic profiling strategy based on gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Variable importance projection values exceeding 1.0 were selected as potentially changed metabolites, and then Student's t-test was applied to test for statistical significance between the two groups. Results: Metabolic profiling of brain was distinctive significantly between the two groups (Q2Y = 0.88 for partial least squares-DA model). In comparing to group D, 62 definable metabolites were varied significantly after ASCP, which were mainly related to amino acid metabolism, carbohydrate metabolism, and lipid metabolism. Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes analysis revealed that metabolic pathways after DHCA with ASCP were mainly involved in the activated glycolytic pathway, subdued anaerobic metabolism, and oxidative stress. In addition, L-kynurenine (P = 0.0019), 5-methoxyindole-3-acetic acid (P = 0.0499), and 5-hydroxyindole-3-acetic acid (P = 0.0495) in tryptophan metabolism pathways were decreased, and citrulline (P = 0.0158) in urea cycle was increased in group DA comparing to group D. Conclusions: The present study applied metabolomics analysis to identify the cerebral

  13. Resting cerebral glucose metabolism and perfusion patterns in women with posttraumatic stress disorder related to sexual assault.

    PubMed

    Kim, Shin-Young; Chung, Young-Ki; Kim, Bom Sahn; Lee, Su Jin; Yoon, Joon-Kee; An, Young-Sil

    2012-03-31

    In the literature, numerous trials using neuroimaging techniques have investigated brain function in patients with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). However, the contrasting results showed that improvements, including in the study design, were required to reach consistent and convincing conclusions. This study evaluated the functional neuroimaging pattern of resting cerebral blood flow and glucose metabolism in patients with PTSD related to sexual assault. Twelve patients were enrolled for both brain single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (PET) investigations. All data were analyzed with statistical parametric mapping 2 (SPM2). The PTSD patients showed significant relative decreases in perfusion in the left hippocampus and in the basal ganglia compared with the control group. The PTSD group also had significantly lower cerebral glucosemetabolic activity in the left hippocampus and the superior temporal and precentral gyri than in the control group. These specific patterns of perfusion and glucose metabolism may be closely related to various neurophysiologic symptoms of PTSD. PMID:22464826

  14. Three-dimensional mapping of local cerebral perfusion in alcoholic encephalopathy with and without Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Hata, T.; Meyer, J.S.; Tanahashi, N.; Ishikawa, Y.; Imai, A.; Shinohara, T.; Velez, M.; Fann, W.E.; Kandula, P.; Sakai, F.

    1987-02-01

    Seventeen severe chronic alcoholic patients with and without Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome (WKS) were examined prospectively after being treated by withdrawal from alcohol. The WKS patients also received thiamine supplements. Three-dimensional measurements of local cerebral blood flow (LCBF) and local partition coefficients (L lambda) were made utilizing xenon contrast computed tomography (Xe CT-CBF). Results were displayed as color-coded brain maps before and after treatment and these were correlated with neurological and cognitive examinations. Before treatment chronic alcoholics without WKS (n = 10) showed diffuse reductions of LCBF values throughout all gray matter including hypothalamus, vicinity of nucleus basalis of Meynert, thalamus, and basal ganglia. Similar, but more severe, reductions were seen in patients with WKS (n = 7), however, white matter perfusion was also reduced. In WKS, most prominent reductions of LCBF were also seen in hypothalamus and basal forebrain nuclei but thalamus, basal ganglia, and limbic systems were severely reduced. After treatment, both groups with alcoholic encephalopathy showed marked clinical improvement and cerebral perfusion was restored toward normal. Chronic alcohol abuse, in the absence of thiamine deficiency, reduces CBF by direct neurotoxic effects. If thiamine deficiency is also present, more severe and localized hemodynamic reductions are superimposed.

  15. The Effect of Equal Ratio Ventilation on Oxygenation, Respiratory Mechanics, and Cerebral Perfusion Pressure During Laparoscopy in the Trendelenburg Position.

    PubMed

    Jo, Youn Yi; Kim, Ji Young; Chang, Young Jin; Lee, Sehwan; Kwak, Hyun Jeong

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of equal ratio ventilation (ERV) on oxygenation, respiratory mechanics, and the cerebral perfusion pressure during pneumoperitoneum in the Trendelenburg position. Thirty patients undergoing laparoscopic low anterior resection (25 to 65 y) were enrolled. Mechanical ventilator was set to volume-controlled mode at an inspiratory to expiratory (I:E) ratio of 1:2 with a tidal volume of 8 mL/kg of ideal body weight with a 5 cm H2O positive end-expiratory pressure. Twenty minutes after pneumoperitoneum in the Trendelenburg position, the I:E ratio was changed to 1:1 for 20 minutes and then restored to 1:2. No significant changes in arterial oxygen tension and respiratory compliance after adopting ERV. Mean arterial pressure and cerebral perfusion pressure decreased significantly over time after adopting the Trendelenburg position during pneumoperitoneum (P=0.014 and 0.005, respectively). In conclusion, there was no improvement in oxygenation or respiratory mechanics with ERV. PMID:27258912

  16. Using Flat-Panel Perfusion Imaging to Measure Cerebral Hemodynamics: A Pilot Feasibility Study in Patients With Carotid Stenosis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chung-Jung; Guo, Wan-Yuo; Chang, Feng-Chi; Hung, Sheng-Che; Chen, Ko-Kung; Yu, Deuerling-Zheng; Wu, Chun-Hsien Frank; Liou, Jy-Kang Adrian

    2016-05-01

    Flat-detector CT perfusion (FD-CTP) imaging has demonstrated efficacy in qualitatively accessing the penumbra in acute stroke equivalent to that of magnetic resonance perfusion (MRP). The aim of our study was to evaluate the feasibility of quantifying oligemia in the brain in patients with carotid stenosis.Ten patients with unilateral carotid stenosis of >70% were included. All MRPs and FD-CTPs were performed before stenting. Region-of-interests (ROIs) including middle cerebral artery territory at basal ganglia level on both stenotic and contralateral sides were used for quantitative analysis. Relative time to peak (rTTP) was defined as TTP of the stenotic side divided by TTP of the contralateral side, and so as relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV), relative mean transit time (rMTT), and relative cerebral blood flow (rCBF). Absolute and relative TTP, CBV, MTT, CBF between two modalities were compared.For absolute quantitative analysis, the correlation of TTP was highest (r = 0.56), followed by CBV (r = 0.47), MTT (r = 0.47), and CBF (r = 0.43); for relative quantitative analysis, rCBF was the highest (r = 0.79), followed by rTTP (r = 0.75) and rCBV (r = 0.50).We confirmed that relative quantitative assessment of FD-CTP is feasible in chronic ischemic disease. Absolute quantitative measurements between MRP and FD-CTP only expressed moderate correlations. Optimization of acquisitions and algorithms is warranted to achieve better quantification. PMID:27196456

  17. Patterns of pulmonary perfusion scans in normal subjects. IV. The prevalence of abnormal scans in smokers 30 to 49 years of age

    SciTech Connect

    Fedullo, P.F.; Kapitan, K.S.; Brewer, N.S.; Ashburn, W.L.; Hartman, M.T.; Moser, K.M.

    1989-05-01

    The usefulness of ventilation-perfusion scans in the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism is limited by the wide range of pulmonary diseases that are associated with abnormal scans, and by the largely undetermined prevalence of abnormal scans in persons without cardiopulmonary disease. In prior studies, we found perfusion defects to be rarely present in young persons and in older nonsmokers. To determine if normal older smokers have a higher prevalence of abnormal ventilation and perfusion scans, we performed six-view /sup 99m/Tc perfusion (Q) scans and /sup 133/Xe ventilation (V) scans in 40 subjects 30 to 49 yr of age who had no known cardiopulmonary disease. Each subject had undergone a history, physical examination, electrocardiogram, spirometry, and posteroanterior chest roentgenogram prior to scanning. All V and Q scans were interpreted blindly and independently by two experienced readers. No subject demonstrated a lobar or segmental defect on two views. One subject had a matched subsegmental defect, and one subject had delayed washout from a subsegmental area of the right upper lobe during V scanning, with a normal Q scan. We conclude that abnormal V and Q scans are uncommon among normal smokers 30 to 49 yr of age.

  18. Differences in Cerebral Perfusion Deficits in Mild Traumatic Brain Injury and Depression Using Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Kristoffer; Black, Sandra E.; Feinstein, Anthony

    2014-01-01

    Background: Numerous studies have shown decreased perfusion in the prefrontal cortex following mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). However, similar hypoperfusion can also be observed in depression. Given the high prevalence of depressive symptoms following mTBI, it is unclear to what extent depression influences hypoperfusion in TBI. Methods: Mild TBI patients without depressive symptoms (mTBI-noD, n = 39), TBI patients with depressive symptoms (mTBI-D, n = 13), and 15 patients with major depressive disorder (MDD), but no TBI were given 99m T-ECD single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) scans within 2 weeks of injury. All subjects completed tests of information processing speed, complex attention, and executive functioning, and a self-report questionnaire measuring symptoms of psychological distress. Between-group comparisons of quantified SPECT perfusion were undertaken using univariate and multivariate (partial least squares) analyses. Results: mTBI-D and mTBI-noD groups did not differ in terms of cerebral perfusion. However, patients with MDD showed hypoperfusion compared to both TBI groups in several frontal (orbitofrontal, middle frontal, and superior frontal cortex), superior temporal, and posterior cingulate regions. The mTBI-D group showed poorer performance on a measure of complex attention and working memory compared to both the mTBI-noD and MDD groups. Conclusion: These results suggest that depressive symptoms do not affect SPECT perfusion in the sub-acute phase following a mild TBI. Conversely, MDD is associated with hypoperfusion primarily in frontal regions. PMID:25191305

  19. MR perfusion-weighted imaging and quantitative analysis of cerebral hemodynamics with symptom provocation in unmedicated patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiao-Li; Xie, Jing-Xia; Han, Hong-Bin; Cui, Yu-Hua; Zhang, Bai-Quan

    2004-11-11

    We evaluated the potential effectiveness of dynamic contrast-enhanced perfusion-weighted images (PWI) in determining hemodynamic activation in brain structures that may be involved in mediating the symptomatology of patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), as manifested by contamination obsessions with washing compulsions. Ten unmedicated female patients with OCD were subjected to PWI, and relative cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in each region of interest (ROI) and self-ratings of OCD symptoms were compared before and after symptom provocation. We found that increases in the Anxiety Analogue Scale (AAS) and OCD Analogue Scale (OCDAS) scores were each significantly associated with provocation. The correlations between OCDAS and AAS scores were also statistically significant during both the control and provoked conditions. Compared with the control state, there was a significant increase in rCBF during the symptomatic state in the right head of caudate nucleus, thalamus, and bilateral orbitofrontal cortices (OFC). No statistical changes in rCBF were found in the bilateral anterior cingulate cortices (ACC). These findings demonstrate that OCD symptomatology is accompanied by anxiety, and that abnormal features are particularly apparent in the orbitofrontal-subcortical circuits. PMID:15488324

  20. Cognitive impairment and gray matter volume abnormalities in silent cerebral infarction.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tao; Zhang, Lan; Xiang, Mingqing; Luo, Wei; Huang, Jinbai; Li, Maokun; Xiong, Xunbo; Wang, Hua

    2015-10-21

    To investigate the association between cognitive impairment and gray matter volume (GMV) abnormalities in silent cerebral infarction (SCI) patients, the GMV of 62 pairs of patients and well-matched healthy controls was calculated. All participants underwent a P300 test, a Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) test. Compared with controls, the patients showed decreased GMV in the left superior frontal gyrus, left inferior frontal gyrus, left superior temporal gyrus, right middle temporal gyrus, and bilateral parahippocampal gyrus; no significantly increasing GMV was found. The volumes of the frontal and temporal lobes were positively correlated with the score of the MoCA scale and P300 amplitudes (r≥0.62, P<0.01). The P300 latency was negatively correlated with the volumes of the frontal lobe, the temporal lobe, and the hippocampus (r≤-0.71, P<0.05). No significant correlations between the GMV of the abnormal brain regions and four clinical characteristics in SCI patients were found, suggesting that cognitive deficiency existed in SCI patients and the reduced GMV might contribute to the pathology of cognitive deficiency in SCI patients. PMID:26313037

  1. [A Case of Ruptured Peripheral Cerebral Aneurysm at Abnormal Vessels Associated with Middle Cerebral Artery Stenosis:Similarity to Moyamoya Disease].

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Hajime; Kohno, Kanehisa; Tanaka, Hideo; Fukumoto, Shinya; Ichikawa, Haruhisa; Onoue, Shinji; Fumoto, Noriyuki; Ozaki, Saya; Maeda, Toshiharu

    2016-04-01

    We report a case of ruptured peripheral cerebral aneurysm at abnormal vessels associated with severe stenosis at the middle cerebral artery (MCA). A 66-year-old woman was admitted at our hospital with headache on foot. Computed tomography (CT) showed intracerebral hemorrhage in the left fronto-basal area. Three-dimensional-CT and conventional angiogram revealed abnormal vessels, which were similar to those seen in moyamoya disease, with a small enhancement close to the hematoma. On day 11, subsequent cerebral angiogram demonstrated an aneurysm at the peripheral portion of an abnormal vessel arising from the left A2. On day 17, soon after the diagnosis of the ruptured aneurysm was made (while still at the subacute stage), we operated on the aneurysm. Superficial temporal artery (STA)-MCA anastomosis was also performed to preserve cerebral blood flow and reduce hemodynamic stress. Several days after the operation, she had transient aphasia due to hyperperfusion of the MCA territory, but eventually recovered with no neurological deficit at discharge. Follow-up study revealed revascularization from the branches of the external carotid artery as well as the STA. On admission, we initially thought that this patient had abnormal vessels associated with arteriosclerotic MCA stenosis. However, the postoperative clinical course as well as the histopathological specimens of both the abnormal artery with the aneurysm and the STA revealed similar findings to those of moyamoya disease. Although this case did not satisfy the criteria for moyamoya disease, it is conceivable that a single arterial occlusive lesion associated with moyamoya-like vessels might develop in the same mechanism with that of moyamoya disease. PMID:27056872

  2. Prolonged Cerebral Circulation Time Is the Best Parameter for Predicting Vasospasm during Initial CT Perfusion in Subarachnoid Hemorrhagic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chun Fu; Hsu, Sanford P. C.; Lin, Chung Jung; Guo, Wan Yuo; Liao, Chih Hsiang; Chu, Wei Fa; Hung, Sheng Che; Shih, Yang Shin; Lin, Yen Tzu

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We sought to imitate angiographic cerebral circulation time (CCT) and create a similar index from baseline CT perfusion (CTP) to better predict vasospasm in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Methods Forty-one SAH patients with available DSA and CTP were retrospectively included. The vasospasm group was comprised of patients with deterioration in conscious functioning and newly developed luminal narrowing; remaining cases were classified as the control group. The angiography CCT (XA-CCT) was defined as the difference in TTP (time to peak) between the selected arterial ROIs and the superior sagittal sinus (SSS). Four arterial ROIs were selected to generate four corresponding XA-CCTs: the right and left anterior cerebral arteries (XA-CCTRA2 and XA-CCTLA2) and right- and left-middle cerebral arteries (XA-CCTRM2 and XA-CCTLM2). The CCTs from CTP (CT-CCT) were defined as the differences in TTP from the corresponding arterial ROIs and the SSS. Correlations of the different CCTs were calculated and diagnostic accuracy in predicting vasospasm was evaluated. Results Intra-class correlations ranged from 0.96 to 0.98. The correlations of XA-CCTRA2, XA-CCTRM2, XA-CCTLA2, and XA-CCTLM2 with the corresponding CT-CCTs were 0.64, 0.65, 0.53, and 0.68, respectively. All CCTs were significantly prolonged in the vasospasm group (5.8–6.4 s) except for XA-CCTLA2. CT-CCTA2 of 5.62 was the optimal cut-off value for detecting vasospasm with a sensitivity of 84.2% and specificity 82.4% Conclusion CT-CCTs can be used to interpret cerebral flow without deconvolution algorithms, and outperform both MTT and TTP in predicting vasospasm risk. This finding may help facilitate management of patients with SAH. PMID:26986626

  3. Outcome, Pressure Reactivity and Optimal Cerebral Perfusion Pressure Calculation in Traumatic Brain Injury: A Comparison of Two Variants.

    PubMed

    Lang, Erhard W; Kasprowicz, Magdalena; Smielewski, Peter; Santos, Edgar; Pickard, John; Czosnyka, Marek

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the outcome prediction and calculation of optimal cerebral perfusion pressure (CPPopt) in 307 patients after severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) based on cerebrovascular reactivity calculation of a moving correlation correlation coefficient, named PRx, between mean arterial pressure (ABP) and intracranial pressure (ICP). The correlation coefficient was calculated from simultaneously recorded data using different frequencies. PRx was calculated from oscillations between 0.008 and 0.05Hz and the longPRx (L-PRx) was calculated from oscillations between 0.0008 and 0.016 Hz. PRx was a significant mortality predictor, whereas L-PRx was not. CPPopt for pooled data was higher for L-PRx than for PRx, with no statistical difference. Mortality was associated with mean CPP below CPPopt. Severe disability was associated with CPP above CPPopt (PRx). These relationships were not statistically significant for CPPopt (L-PRx). We conclude that PRx and L-PRx cannot be used interchangeably. PMID:27165910

  4. Stress myocardial imaging in patients with mitral valve prolapse: evidence of a perfusion abnormality

    SciTech Connect

    Butman, S.; Chandraratna, P.A.; Milne, N.; Olson, H.; Lyons, K.; Aronow, W.S.

    1982-01-01

    Twenty-four patients with mitral valve prolapse underwent cardiac catheterization, exercise testing, and exercise /sup 201/T1 scintigraphy. Of 10 patients with coronary artery disease, six had abnormal scintigrams. Two of these six had exercise-induced reversible defects, two had defects that persisted during redistribution, and two had both reversible and persistent defects. Of 14 patients with normal coronary arteries, five had negative scintigrams. Of the remaining nine patients, two had exercise-induced defects, and seven (50%) had defects involving the inferior or posterior wall that persisted during redistribution. Possible mechanisms for this latter finding are discussed. In contrast to previous reports, exercise /sup 201/T1 scintigraphy was not entirely successful in identifying patients with coronary artery disease in our patients with mitral valve prolapse.

  5. Comparison between antegrade and retrograde cerebral perfusion or profound hypothermia as brain protection strategies during repair of type A aortic dissection

    PubMed Central

    Rausch, Laura A.; Kouchoukos, Nicholas T.; Lobdell, Kevin W.; Khabbaz, Kamal; Murphy, Edward; Hagberg, Robert C.

    2016-01-01

    Background The goal of this study was to compare early postoperative outcomes and actuarial-free survival between patients who underwent repair of acute type A aortic dissection by the method of cerebral perfusion used. Methods A total of 324 patients from five academic medical centers underwent repair of acute type A aortic dissection between January 2000 and December 2010. Of those, antegrade cerebral perfusion (ACP) was used for 84 patients, retrograde cerebral perfusion (RCP) was used for 55 patients, and deep hypothermic circulatory arrest (DHCA) was used for 184 patients during repair. Major morbidity, operative mortality, and 5-year actuarial survival were compared between groups. Multivariate logistic regression was used to determine predictors of operative mortality and Cox Regression hazard ratios were calculated to determine the predictors of long term mortality. Results Operative mortality was not influenced by the type of cerebral protection (19% for ACP, 14.5% for RCP and 19.1% for DHCA, P=0.729). In multivariable logistic regression analysis, hemodynamic instability [odds ratio (OR) =19.6, 95% confidence intervals (CI), 0.102–0.414, P<0.001] and CPB time >200 min(OR =4.7, 95% CI, 1.962–1.072, P=0.029) emerged as independent predictors of operative mortality. Actuarial 5-year survival was unchanged by cerebral protection modality (48.8% for ACP, 61.8% for RCP and 66.8% for no cerebral protection, log-rank P=0.844). Conclusions During surgical repair of type A aortic dissection, ACP, RCP or DHCA are safe strategies for cerebral protection in selected patients with type A aortic dissection. PMID:27563545

  6. Acute and chronic head-down tail suspension diminishes cerebral perfusion in rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkerson, M. Keith; Colleran, Patrick N.; Delp, Michael D.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that regional brain blood flow and vascular resistance are altered by acute and chronic head-down tail suspension (HDT). Regional cerebral blood flow, arterial pressure, heart rate, and vascular resistance were measured in a group of control rats during normal standing and following 10 min of HDT and in two other groups of rats after 7 and 28 days of HDT. Heart rate was not different among conditions, whereas mean arterial pressure was elevated at 10 min of HDT relative to the other conditions. Total brain blood flow was reduced from that during standing by 48, 24, and 27% following 10 min and 7 and 28 days of HDT, respectively. Regional blood flows to all cerebral tissues and the eyes were reduced with 10 min of HDT and remained lower in the eye, olfactory bulbs, left and right cerebrum, thalamic region, and the midbrain with 7 and 28 days of HDT. Total brain vascular resistance was 116, 44, and 38% greater following 10 min and 7 and 28 days of HDT, respectively, relative to that during control standing. Vascular resistance was elevated in all cerebral regions with 10 min of HDT and remained higher than control levels in most brain regions. These results demonstrate that HDT results in chronic elevations in total and regional cerebral vascular resistance, and this may be the underlying stimulus for the HDT-induced smooth muscle hypertrophy of cerebral resistance arteries.

  7. Iterative image reconstruction for cerebral perfusion CT using a pre-contrast scan induced edge-preserving prior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jianhua; Zhang, Hua; Gao, Yang; Huang, Jing; Liang, Zhengrong; Feng, Qianjing; Chen, Wufan

    2012-11-01

    Cerebral perfusion x-ray computed tomography (PCT) imaging, which detects and characterizes the ischemic penumbra, and assesses blood-brain barrier permeability with acute stroke or chronic cerebrovascular diseases, has been developed extensively over the past decades. However, due to its sequential scan protocol, the associated radiation dose has raised significant concerns to patients. Therefore, in this study we developed an iterative image reconstruction algorithm based on the maximum a posterior (MAP) principle to yield a clinically acceptable cerebral PCT image with lower milliampere-seconds (mA s). To preserve the edges of the reconstructed image, an edge-preserving prior was designed using a normal-dose pre-contrast unenhanced scan. For simplicity, the present algorithm was termed as ‘MAP-ndiNLM’. Evaluations with the digital phantom and the simulated low-dose clinical brain PCT datasets clearly demonstrate that the MAP-ndiNLM method can achieve more significant gains than the existing FBP and MAP-Huber algorithms with better image noise reduction, low-contrast object detection and resolution preservation. More importantly, the MAP-ndiNLM method can yield more accurate kinetic enhanced details and diagnostic hemodynamic parameter maps than the MAP-Huber method.

  8. A Non-Invasive Method to Assess Cerebral Perfusion Pressure in Geriatric Patients with Suspected Cerebrovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Nan; He, Peng; Qin, Chunchang; Yang, Deyu; Li, Zhiwei; Xie, Peng

    2015-01-01

    Background Cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) can adversely impact cerebrovascular hemodynamics but cannot be practically measured in most clinical settings. Here, we aimed to establish a representative mathematical model for CPP in geriatric patients with suspected cerebrovascular disease. Methods A total of 100 patients (54 males and 46 females between 60–80 years of age) with suspected cerebrovascular disease and no obvious cerebrovascular stenosis were selected for invasive CPP monitoring via catheterization of the middle segment of the common carotid arteries and openings of the vertebral arteries bilaterally. Curves were function-fitted using MATLAB 7.0, and data was statistically processed by SPSS 20.0. Results MATLAB 7.0 constructed eighth-order Fourier functions that fit all recorded CPP curves. Since the coefficients of the 100 functions were significantly different, all functions were standardized to derive one representative function. By manipulating the heart rate and maximum/minimum CPP of the representative function, estimated CPP curves can be constructed for patients with differing heart rates, intracranial pressures (ICPs) and blood pressures. Conclusions CPP can be well-modeled through an eighth-order Fourier function that can be constructed from a patient’s brachial artery blood pressure (BABP), ICP and heart rate. This function is representative of geriatric patients with cerebrovascular disease and can be used in the future study of cerebral hemodynamics. PMID:25789855

  9. Iterative image reconstruction for cerebral perfusion CT using pre-contrast scan induced edge-preserving prior

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jianhua; Zhang, Hua; Gao, Yang; Huang, Jing; Liang, Zhengrong; Feng, Qianjing; Chen, Wufan

    2012-01-01

    Cerebral perfusion X-ray computed tomography (PCT) imaging, which detects and characterizes the ischemic penumbra, and assesses blood-brain barrier permeability with acute stroke or chronic cerebrovascular diseases, has been developed extensively over the past decades. However, due to its sequential scan protocol, the associated radiation dose has raised significant concerns to patients. Therefore, in this study we developed an iterative image reconstruction algorithm based on the maximum a posterior (MAP) principle to yield a clinically acceptable cerebral PCT image with lower milliampere seconds (mAs). To preserve the edges of the reconstructed image, an edge-preserving prior was designed using a normal-dose pre-contrast unenhanced scan. For simplicity, the present algorithm was termed as “MAP-ndiNLM”. Evaluations with the digital phantom and the simulated low-dose clinical brain PCT datasets clearly demonstrate that the MAP-ndiNLM method can achieve more significant gains than the existing FBP and MAP-Huber algorithms with better image noise reduction, low-contrast object detection and resolution preservation. More importantly, the MAP-ndiNLM method can yield more accurate kinetic enhanced details and diagnostic hemodynamic parameter maps than the MAP-Huber method. PMID:23104003

  10. Low-dose cerebral perfusion computed tomography image restoration via low-rank and total variation regularizations

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Shanzhou; Zhang, Shanli; Huang, Jing; Bian, Zhaoying; Chen, Wufan; Yu, Gaohang; Liang, Zhengrong; Ma, Jianhua

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral perfusion x-ray computed tomography (PCT) is an important functional imaging modality for evaluating cerebrovascular diseases and has been widely used in clinics over the past decades. However, due to the protocol of PCT imaging with repeated dynamic sequential scans, the associative radiation dose unavoidably increases as compared with that used in conventional CT examinations. Minimizing the radiation exposure in PCT examination is a major task in the CT field. In this paper, considering the rich similarity redundancy information among enhanced sequential PCT images, we propose a low-dose PCT image restoration model by incorporating the low-rank and sparse matrix characteristic of sequential PCT images. Specifically, the sequential PCT images were first stacked into a matrix (i.e., low-rank matrix), and then a non-convex spectral norm/regularization and a spatio-temporal total variation norm/regularization were then built on the low-rank matrix to describe the low rank and sparsity of the sequential PCT images, respectively. Subsequently, an improved split Bregman method was adopted to minimize the associative objective function with a reasonable convergence rate. Both qualitative and quantitative studies were conducted using a digital phantom and clinical cerebral PCT datasets to evaluate the present method. Experimental results show that the presented method can achieve images with several noticeable advantages over the existing methods in terms of noise reduction and universal quality index. More importantly, the present method can produce more accurate kinetic enhanced details and diagnostic hemodynamic parameter maps. PMID:27440948

  11. Changes of Cerebral Perfusion and Functional Brain Network Organization in Patients with Mild Cognitive Impairment.

    PubMed

    Lou, Wutao; Shi, Lin; Wong, Adrian; Chu, Winnie C W; Mok, Vincent C T; Wang, Defeng

    2016-08-10

    Disruptions of the functional brain network and cerebral blood flow (CBF) have been revealed in patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). However, the neurophysiological mechanism of hypoperfusion as well as the reorganization of the intrinsic whole brain network due to the neuropathology of MCI are still unclear. In this study, we aimed to investigate the changes of CBF and the whole brain network organization in MCI by using a multimodal MRI approach. Resting state ASL MRI and BOLD MRI were used to evaluate disruptions of CBF and underlying functional connectivity in 27 patients with MCI and 35 cognitive normal controls (NC). The eigenvector centrality mapping (ECM) was used to assess the whole brain network reorganization in MCI, and a seed-based ECM approach was proposed to reveal the contributions of the whole brain network on the ECM alterations. Significantly decreased perfusion in the posterior parietal cortex as well as its connectivity within the default mode network and occipital cortex were found in the MCI group compared to the NC group. The ECM analysis revealed decreased EC in the middle cingulate cortex, parahippocampal gyrus, medial frontal gyrus, and increased EC in the right calcarine sulcus, superior temporal gyrus, and supplementary motor area in the MCI group. The results of this study indicate that there are deficits in cerebral blood flow and functional connectivity in the default mode network, and that sensory-processing networks might play a compensatory role to make up for the decreased connections in MCI. PMID:27567823

  12. 3-Fluoro-Deoxyglucose for the assessment of cerebral perfusion and glucose transport - Indications for extracranial-intracranial arterial bypass and followup studies

    SciTech Connect

    Mehdorn, H.M.; Vyska, K.; Machulla, H.J.; Knust, E.J.

    1985-05-01

    3-Fluor-Deoxyglucose (3FDG) is a glucose-analogue which is transported across the blood-brain-barrier by the same carrier as glucose but is only phoshorylated to a minor part. By a newly developed model, it became possible to estimate both cerebral perfusion and glucose transport in a single examination, determining the Michaelis-Menten-constant K/sub M/ and the maximal velocity v/sub m/. Normal values were determined as follows: gray matter perfusion 88+-8 ml/ 100g min; v/sub m/ was 2.46 ..mu..mol/g min; K/sub M/ was 6.42 ..mu..mol/g. This method was applied successfully in a series of 15 patients with cerebral ischemia to select suitable candidates for extacranial-intracranial (EC-IC) arterial bypass surgery and to follow them up to 15 months postop. In patients with minor strokes and transient ischemic attacks (TIA), areas which appeared normal in conventional CT presented with reduced perfusion values (down to 67 ml/ 100 g min) and either normal or reduced v/sub m/ (down to 0.8 ..mu..mol/g min). These patients were thought optimal candidates for EC-IC bypass in order to improve the misery perfusion rate.

  13. Abnormal catecholamine urinary excretion after emotional stimulus in patients with cerebral hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Stoica, E; Enulescu, O

    1981-01-01

    The epinephrine (E) and norepinephrine (NE) urinary excretion before and after a mild "emotional stimulus" (ES) was determined in 22 patients with cerebral infarction and 30 patients with cerebral hemorrhage, as well as in 18 normotensive and 18 hypertensive controls. In patients with cerebral infarction, the majority normotensive, the "emotional stimulus" induced a significant increase in NE excretion, but non-significant alterations in E excretion. Similar changes were noted in normotensive controls. In patients with cerebral hemorrhage, almost all hypertensive, and in hypertensive controls, ES brought about a consistent rise in E excretion without influencing significantly the NE excretion. The presence of a constant increase in E excretion after a mild emotion not only in patients with cerebral hemorrhage but also in subjects with uncomplicated essential hypertension, suggests that the E release found in patients with cerebral hemorrhage is related to the hypertensive state pre-existing the stroke rather than to hemorrhagic stroke itself. The pattern of catecholamine discharge in hypertensive patients might play a part in the occurrence of cerebral hemorrhagic accidents. The epinephrine discharges induce sudden increases in systolic blood pressure which could lead to the rupture of cerebral vessels with hyalinotic or atherosclerotic alterations. PMID:7245303

  14. Beyond patient reported pain: perfusion magnetic resonance imaging demonstrates reproducible cerebral representation of ongoing post-surgical pain.

    PubMed

    Howard, Matthew A; Krause, Kristina; Khawaja, Nadine; Massat, Nathalie; Zelaya, Fernando; Schumann, Gunter; Huggins, John P; Vennart, William; Williams, Steven C R; Renton, Tara F

    2011-01-01

    Development of treatments for acute and chronic pain conditions remains a challenge, with an unmet need for improved sensitivity and reproducibility in measuring pain in patients. Here we used pulsed-continuous arterial spin-labelling [pCASL], a relatively novel perfusion magnetic-resonance imaging technique, in conjunction with a commonly-used post-surgical model, to measure changes in regional cerebral blood flow [rCBF] associated with the experience of being in ongoing pain. We demonstrate repeatable, reproducible assessment of ongoing pain that is independent of patient self-report. In a cross-over trial design, 16 participants requiring bilateral removal of lower-jaw third molars underwent pain-free pre-surgical pCASL scans. Following extraction of either left or right tooth, repeat scans were acquired during post-operative ongoing pain. When pain-free following surgical recovery, the pre/post-surgical scanning procedure was repeated for the remaining tooth. Voxelwise statistical comparison of pre and post-surgical scans was performed to reveal rCBF changes representing ongoing pain. In addition, rCBF values in predefined pain and control brain regions were obtained. rCBF increases (5-10%) representing post-surgical ongoing pain were identified bilaterally in a network including primary and secondary somatosensory, insula and cingulate cortices, thalamus, amygdala, hippocampus, midbrain and brainstem (including trigeminal ganglion and principal-sensory nucleus), but not in a control region in visual cortex. rCBF changes were reproducible, with no rCBF differences identified across scans within-session or between post-surgical pain sessions. This is the first report of the cerebral representation of ongoing post-surgical pain without the need for exogenous tracers. Regions of rCBF increases are plausibly associated with pain and the technique is reproducible, providing an attractive proposition for testing interventions for on-going pain that do not rely solely

  15. Long-term effects of cerebral hypoperfusion on neural density and function using misery perfusion animal model.

    PubMed

    Nishino, Asuka; Tajima, Yosuke; Takuwa, Hiroyuki; Masamoto, Kazuto; Taniguchi, Junko; Wakizaka, Hidekatsu; Kokuryo, Daisuke; Urushihata, Takuya; Aoki, Ichio; Kanno, Iwao; Tomita, Yutaka; Suzuki, Norihiro; Ikoma, Yoko; Ito, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the chronic effects of cerebral hypoperfusion on neuronal density and functional hyperemia using our misery perfusion mouse model under unilateral common carotid artery occlusion (UCCAO). Neuronal density evaluated 28 days after UCCAO using [(11)C]flumazenil-PET and histology indicated no neurologic deficit in the hippocampus and neocortex. CBF response to sensory stimulation was assessed using laser-Doppler flowmetry. Percentage changes in CBF response of the ipsilateral hemisphere to UCCAO were 18.4 ± 3.0%, 6.9 ± 2.8%, 6.8 ± 2.3% and 4.9 ± 2.4% before, and 7, 14 and 28 days after UCCAO, respectively. Statistical significance was found at 7, 14 and 28 days after UCCAO (P < 0.01). Contrary to our previous finding (Tajima et al. 2014) showing recovered CBF response to hypercapnia on 28 days after UCCAO using the same model, functional hyperemia was sustained and became worse 28 days after UCCAO. PMID:27116932

  16. Long-term effects of cerebral hypoperfusion on neural density and function using misery perfusion animal model

    PubMed Central

    Nishino, Asuka; Tajima, Yosuke; Takuwa, Hiroyuki; Masamoto, Kazuto; Taniguchi, Junko; Wakizaka, Hidekatsu; Kokuryo, Daisuke; Urushihata, Takuya; Aoki, Ichio; Kanno, Iwao; Tomita, Yutaka; Suzuki, Norihiro; Ikoma, Yoko; Ito, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the chronic effects of cerebral hypoperfusion on neuronal density and functional hyperemia using our misery perfusion mouse model under unilateral common carotid artery occlusion (UCCAO). Neuronal density evaluated 28 days after UCCAO using [11C]flumazenil-PET and histology indicated no neurologic deficit in the hippocampus and neocortex. CBF response to sensory stimulation was assessed using laser-Doppler flowmetry. Percentage changes in CBF response of the ipsilateral hemisphere to UCCAO were 18.4 ± 3.0%, 6.9 ± 2.8%, 6.8 ± 2.3% and 4.9 ± 2.4% before, and 7, 14 and 28 days after UCCAO, respectively. Statistical significance was found at 7, 14 and 28 days after UCCAO (P < 0.01). Contrary to our previous finding (Tajima et al. 2014) showing recovered CBF response to hypercapnia on 28 days after UCCAO using the same model, functional hyperemia was sustained and became worse 28 days after UCCAO. PMID:27116932

  17. Cerebral perfusion differences in women currently with and recovered from anorexia nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, Min; Lu, Hanzhang; Liu, Peiying; Thomas, Binu P.; McAdams, Carrie J.

    2015-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa is a serious psychiatric disorder characterized by restricted eating, a pursuit of thinness, and altered perceptions of body shape and size. Neuroimaging in anorexia nervosa has revealed morphological and functional alterations in the brain. A better understanding of physiological changes in anorexia nervosa could provide a brain-specific health marker relevant to treatment and outcomes. In this study, we applied several advanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques to quantify regional and global cerebral blood flow (CBF) in 25 healthy women (HC), 23 patients currently with anorexia (AN-C) and 19 patients in long-term weight recovery following anorexia (AN-WR). Specifically, CBF was measured with pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling (pCASL) MRI and then verified by a different technique, phase contrast (PC) MRI. Venous T2 values were determined by T2 relaxation under spin tagging (TRUST) MRI, and were used to corroborate the CBF results. These novel techniques were implemented on a standard 3T MRI scanner without any exogenous tracers, and the total scan duration was less than 10 min. Voxel-wise comparison revealed that the AN-WR group showed lower CBF in bilateral temporal and frontal lobes than the AN-C group. Compared with the HC group, the AN-C group also showed higher CBF in the right temporal lobe. Whole-brain-averaged CBF was significantly decreased in the AN-WR group compared with the AN-C group, consistent with the PC-MRI results. Venous T2 values were lower in the AN-WR group than in the AN-C group, consistent with the CBF results. A review of prior work examining CBF in anorexia nervosa is included in the discussion. This study identifies several differences in the cerebral physiological alterations in anorexia nervosa, and finds specific differences relevant to the current state of the disorder. PMID:25795596

  18. Cerebral perfusion differences in women currently with and recovered from anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Min; Lu, Hanzhang; Liu, Peiying; Thomas, Binu P; McAdams, Carrie J

    2015-05-30

    Anorexia nervosa is a serious psychiatric disorder characterized by restricted eating, a pursuit of thinness, and altered perceptions of body shape and size. Neuroimaging in anorexia nervosa has revealed morphological and functional alterations in the brain. A better understanding of physiological changes in anorexia nervosa could provide a brain-specific health marker relevant to treatment and outcomes. In this study, we applied several advanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques to quantify regional and global cerebral blood flow (CBF) in 25 healthy women (HC), 23 patients currently with anorexia (AN-C) and 19 patients in long-term weight recovery following anorexia (AN-WR). Specifically, CBF was measured with pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling (pCASL) MRI and then verified by a different technique, phase contrast (PC) MRI. Venous T2 values were determined by T2 relaxation under spin tagging (TRUST) MRI, and were used to corroborate the CBF results. These novel techniques were implemented on a standard 3T MRI scanner without any exogenous tracers, and the total scan duration was less than 10min. Voxel-wise comparison revealed that the AN-WR group showed lower CBF in bilateral temporal and frontal lobes than the AN-C group. Compared with the HC group, the AN-C group also showed higher CBF in the right temporal lobe. Whole-brain-averaged CBF was significantly decreased in the AN-WR group compared with the AN-C group, consistent with the PC-MRI results. Venous T2 values were lower in the AN-WR group than in the AN-C group, consistent with the CBF results. A review of prior work examining CBF in anorexia nervosa is included in the discussion. This study identifies several differences in the cerebral physiological alterations in anorexia nervosa, and finds specific differences relevant to the current state of the disorder. PMID:25795596

  19. Effect of age on exercise-induced alterations in cognitive executive function: relationship to cerebral perfusion.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Samuel J E; Ainslie, Philip N; Murrell, Carissa J; Thomas, Kate N; Franz, Elizabeth A; Cotter, James D

    2012-08-01

    Regular exercise improves the age-related decline in cerebral blood flow (CBF) and is associated with improved cognitive function; however, less is known about the direct relationship between CBF and cognitive function. We examined the influence of healthy aging on the capability of acute exercise to improve cognition, and whether exercise-induced improvements in cognition are related to CBF and cortical hemodynamics. Middle cerebral artery blood flow velocity (MCAv; Doppler) and cortical hemodynamics (NIRS) were measured in 13 young (24±5 y) and 9 older (62±3 y) participants at rest and during cycling at 30% and 70% of heart rate range (HRR). Cognitive performance was assessed using a computer-adapted Stroop task (i.e., test of executive function cognition) at rest and during exercise. Average response times on the Stroop task were slower for the older compared to younger group for both simple and difficult tasks (P<0.01). Independent of age, difficult-task response times improved during exercise (P<0.01), with the improvement greater at 70% HRR exercise (P=0.04 vs. 30% HRR). Higher MCAv was correlated with faster response times for simple and difficult tasks at rest (R(2)=0.47 and R(2)=0.47, respectively), but this relation uncoupled progressively during exercise. Exercise-induced increases in MCAv were similar and unaltered during cognitive tasks for both age groups. In contrast, prefrontal cortical hemodynamic NIRS measures [oxyhemoglobin (O(2)Hb) and total hemoglobin (tHb)] were differentially affected by exercise intensity, age and cognitive task; e.g., there were smaller increases in [O(2)Hb] and [tHb] in the older group between exercise intensities (P<0.05). These data indicate that: 1) Regardless of age, cognitive (executive) function is improved while exercising; 2) while MCAv is strongly related to cognition at rest, this relation becomes uncoupled during exercise, and 3) there is dissociation between global CBF and regional cortical oxygenation and

  20. Blockade of the renin-angiotensin system improves cerebral microcirculatory perfusion in diabetic hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Estato, Vanessa; Obadia, Nathalie; Carvalho-Tavares, Juliana; Freitas, Felipe Santos; Reis, Patrícia; Castro-Faria Neto, Hugo; Lessa, Marcos Adriano; Tibiriçá, Eduardo

    2013-05-01

    We examined the functional and structural microcirculatory alterations in the brain, skeletal muscle and myocardium of non-diabetic spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and diabetic SHR (D-SHR), as well as the effects of long-term treatment with the angiotensin AT1-receptor antagonist olmesartan and the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor enalapril. Diabetes was experimentally induced by a combination of a high-fat diet with a single low dose of streptozotocin (35 mg/kg, intraperitoneal injection). D-SHR were orally administered with olmesartan (5 mg/kg/day), enalapril (10 mg/kg/day) or vehicle for 28 days, and compared with vehicle-treated non-diabetic SHR or normotensive non-diabetic Wistar-Kyoto rats. The cerebral and skeletal muscle functional capillary density of pentobarbital-anesthetized rats was assessed using intravital fluorescence videomicroscopy. Chronic treatment with olmesartan or enalapril significantly lowered blood pressure and reversed brain functional capillary rarefaction. Brain oxidative stress was reduced to non-diabetic control levels in animals treated with olmesartan or enalapril. Histochemical analysis of the structural capillary density showed that both olmesartan and enalapril increased the capillary-to-fiber ratio in skeletal muscle and the capillary-to-fiber volume density in the left ventricle. Olmesartan and enalapril also prevented collagen deposition and the increase in cardiomyocyte diameter in the left ventricle. Our results suggest that the association between hypertension and diabetes results in microvascular alterations in the brain, skeletal muscle and myocardium that can be prevented by chronic blockade of the renin-angiotensin system. PMID:23466285

  1. A 3-year experience with Molecular Adsorbent Recirculating System (MARS): our results on 63 patients with hepatic failure and color Doppler US evaluation of cerebral perfusion.

    PubMed

    Novelli, Gilnardo; Rossi, Massimo; Pretagostini, Renzo; Novelli, Luigi; Poli, Luca; Ferretti, Giancarlo; Iappelli, Massimo; Berloco, Pasquale; Cortesini, Raffaello

    2003-01-01

    In our 3-year experience, we treated 63 patients with Molecular Adsorbent Recirculating System (MARS). The patients were divided as follows: 10 primary non-function (PNF) 16%, 10 delayed non-function (DNF) 16%, 16 Fulminant hepatitis (FH) 24%, 23 acute decompensation of chronic liver disease (ACLF) 38%, and 4 hepatic resection 6%. All patients who underwent MARS treatment had bilirubin >15 mg/dL, Glasgow Coma Score between 9 and 11, ammonium >160 microg/dL and non-coagulability. The determining factors taken into consideration for the continuation of MARS treatment were: an improvement in Glasgow Coma Score, and a decrease in ammonium and bilirubin. We also monitored hemodynamic parameters, acid-base equilibrium, and blood gas analysis before and after each treatment. In order to determine patients' neurological conditions, we not only took into account the Glasgow Coma Score, which does not give mathematically precise results but also took into account the fact that patients with hepatic coma had lower cerebral mean velocity in the cerebral arteries than patients without encephalopathy. For this reason, in the last 22 patients we monitored cerebral perfusion, determined by mean flow velocity (Vmean) in the middle cerebral artery. Our results were expressed as mean +/- SD and we analyzed the differences between mean values for each variable, before and after treatment by means of Student's t-test. At the end of treatment, we obtained significant P-values for bilirubin, ammonium, Glasgow Coma Score and creatinine. In 16/20 patients, we could demonstrate a clear correlation between the improvement in clinical conditions (especially neurological status) and improvement in cerebral perfusion, measured by color Doppler US. PMID:12950955

  2. Abnormal cerebral vasodilation in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage: use of serial 133Xe cerebral blood flow measurement plus acetazolamide to assess cerebral vasospasm.

    PubMed

    Tran Dinh, Y R; Lot, G; Benrabah, R; Baroudy, O; Cophignon, J; Seylaz, J

    1993-10-01

    A patient with cerebral vasospasm following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) was investigated by serial measurement of cerebral blood flow (CBF) using the xenon-133 emission tomography method. The CBF was measured before and after acetazolamide injection. On Day 2 after SAH, there was early local hyperperfusion in the middle cerebral artery (MCA) territory, ipsilateral to the left posterior communicating artery aneurysm. The regional CBF of this arterial territory decreased slightly after acetazolamide injection, probably because of vasoplegia and the "steal" phenomenon, and thus surgery was delayed. A right hemiplegia with aphasia and disturbed consciousness occurred 4 days later (on Day 6 after SAH) due to arterial vasospasm, despite treatment with a calcium-channel blocker. The initial hyperemia of the left MCA territory was followed by ischemia. The vasodilation induced by acetazolamide administration was significantly subnormal until Day 13, at which time CBF and vasoreactivity amplitude returned to normal and the patient's clinical condition improved. Surgery on Day 14 and outcome were without complication. It is concluded that serial CBF measurements plus acetazolamide injection are useful for monitoring the development of cerebral vasospasm to determine the most appropriate time for aneurysm surgery. PMID:8410215

  3. Children with New Onset Epilepsy Exhibit Diffusion Abnormalities in Cerebral White Matter in the Absence of Volumetric Differences

    PubMed Central

    Hutchinson, Elizabeth; Pulsipher, Dalin; Dabbs, Kevin; Myers y Gutierrez, Adan; Sheth, Raj; Jones, Jana; Seidenberg, Michael; Meyerand, Elizabeth; Hermann, Bruce

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY The purpose of this investigation was to examine the diffusion properties of cerebral white matter in children with recent onset epilepsy (n=19) compared to healthy controls (n=11). Subjects underwent DTI with quantification of mean diffusion (MD), fractional anisotropy (FA), axial diffusivity (Dax) and radial diffusivity (Drad) for regions of interest including anterior and posterior corpus callosum, fornix, cingulum, and internal and external capsules. Quantitative volumetrics were also performed for the corpus callosum and its subregions (anterior, midbody and posterior) and total lobar white and gray matter for the frontal, parietal, temporal and occipital lobes. The results demonstrated no group differences in total lobar gray or white matter volumes or volume of the corpus callosum and its subregions, but did show reduced FA and increased Drad in the posterior corpus callosum and cingulum. These results provide the earliest indication of microstructural abnormality in cerebral white matter among children with idiopathic epilepsies. This abnormality occurs in the context of normal volumetrics and suggests disruption in myelination processes. PMID:20044239

  4. Outcome of Fetuses with Cerebral Ventriculomegaly and Septum Pellucidum Leaflet Abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Li, Y; Sansgiri, R; Estroff, JA; Mehta, TS; Poussaint, TY; Robertson, RL; Robson, CD; Feldman, HA; Barnewolt, C; Levine, D

    2013-01-01

    Objective To assess outcomes of prenatal diagnosis of septal leaflet abnormality in fetuses referred for ventriculomegaly (VM). Methods In a prospective IRB-approved study with written informed consent, between 7/1/2003 to 5/15/2009, 425 pregnant women with 433 fetuses referred for VM were imaged with US and MRI. Four to six radiologists independently reviewed sonographic and MR images and recorded lateral ventricular diameters at the atrium and frontal horns, ventricular configuration, and the presence of VM and other CNS abnormalities. Final US, MR, and overall prenatal diagnoses were decided by consensus. Fetuses coded for septal leaflet abnormality were identified, and birth outcome, autopsy, postnatal imaging, and postnatal follow-up were obtained. Log-transformed ANCOVA, controlling for GA, was used to compare ventricular dimensions between fetuses with septal leaflet abnormalities and fetuses with isolated VM. Inter-rater agreement of septal leaflet abnormality was assessed with kappa statistics. Results 23 fetuses had septal leaflet abnormalities and 229 had isolated VM. Atrial and frontal horn diameters, adjusted for GA, were 77% and 98% larger, respectively, in fetuses with septal leaflet abnormalities than in fetuses with isolated VM (p<0.0001). Pre-conference consensus among US readers was moderate (kappa = 0.54) and among MR readers was good (kappa = 0.69). Additional MR CNS findings were seen in 12/23 (52%) fetuses. Eleven pregnancies with septal leaflet abnormalities underwent termination and 12 progressed to live birth with 3 neonatal demise. Neurodevelopmental follow-up was abnormal in all surviving children. Conclusion Even when septal leaflet abnormality is an isolated finding, developmental delay can occur postnatally. PMID:21178039

  5. Combined anatomical and functional imaging using coronary CT angiography and myocardial perfusion SPECT in symptomatic adults with abnormal origin of a coronary artery.

    PubMed

    Uebleis, C; Groebner, M; von Ziegler, F; Becker, A; Rischpler, C; Tegtmeyer, R; Becker, C; Lehner, S; Haug, A R; Cumming, P; Bartenstein, P; Franz, W M; Hacker, M

    2012-10-01

    There has been a lack of standardized workup guidelines for patients with congenital abnormal origin of a coronary artery from the opposite sinus (ACAOS). We aimed to evaluate the use of cardiac hybrid imaging using multi-detector row CT (MDCT) for coronary CT angiography (Coronary CTA) and stress-rest myocardial perfusion SPECT (MPS) for comprehensive diagnosis of symptomatic adult patients with ACAOS. Seventeen symptomatic patients (12 men; 54 ± 13 years) presenting with ACAOS underwent coronary CTA and MPS. Imaging data were analyzed by conventional means, and with additional use of 3D image fusion to allocate stress induced perfusion defects (PD) to their supplying coronary arteries. An anomalous RCA arose from the left anterior sinus in eight patients, an abnormal origin from the right sinus was detected in nine patients (5 left coronary arteries, LCA and 4 LCx). Five of the 17 patients (29%) demonstrated a reversible PD in MPS. There was no correlation between the anatomical variants of ACAOS and the presence of myocardial ischemia. Image fusion enabled the allocation of reversible PD to the anomalous vessel in three patients (two cases in the RCA and the other in the LCA territory); PD in two patients were allocated to the territory of artery giving rise to the anomalies, rather than the anomalies themselves. In a small cohort of adult symptomatic patients with ACAOS anomaly there was no relation found between the specific anatomical variant and the appearance of stress induced myocardial ischemia using cardiac hybrid imaging. PMID:22147107

  6. Cerebral perfusion alterations in epileptic patients during peri-ictal and post-ictal phase: PASL vs DSC-MRI.

    PubMed

    Pizzini, Francesca B; Farace, Paolo; Manganotti, Paolo; Zoccatelli, Giada; Bongiovanni, Luigi G; Golay, Xavier; Beltramello, Alberto; Osculati, Antonio; Bertini, Giuseppe; Fabene, Paolo F

    2013-07-01

    Non-invasive pulsed arterial spin labeling (PASL) MRI is a method to study brain perfusion that does not require the administration of a contrast agent, which makes it a valuable diagnostic tool as it reduces cost and side effects. The purpose of the present study was to establish the viability of PASL as an alternative to dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC-MRI) and other perfusion imaging methods in characterizing changes in perfusion patterns caused by seizures in epileptic patients. We evaluated 19 patients with PASL. Of these, the 9 affected by high-frequency seizures were observed during the peri-ictal period (within 5hours since the last seizure), while the 10 patients affected by low-frequency seizures were observed in the post-ictal period. For comparison, 17/19 patients were also evaluated with DSC-MRI and CBF/CBV. PASL imaging showed focal vascular changes, which allowed the classification of patients in three categories: 8 patients characterized by increased perfusion, 4 patients with normal perfusion and 7 patients with decreased perfusion. PASL perfusion imaging findings were comparable to those obtained by DSC-MRI. Since PASL is a) sensitive to vascular alterations induced by epileptic seizures, b) comparable to DSC-MRI for detecting perfusion asymmetries, c) potentially capable of detecting time-related perfusion changes, it can be recommended for repeated evaluations, to identify the epileptic focus, and in follow-up and/or therapy-response assessment. PMID:23623332

  7. Improvements in the Quantitative Assessment of Cerebral Blood Volume and Flow with the Removal of Vessel Voxels from MR Perfusion Images

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Michael Mu Huo; Cho, I-Chieh; Kao, Yi-Hsuan; Chuang, Chi-Shuo; Chiu, Fang-Ying; Chang, Feng-Chi

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To improve the quantitative assessment of cerebral blood volume (CBV) and flow (CBF) in the brain voxels from MR perfusion images. Materials and Methods. Normal brain parenchyma was automatically segmented with the time-to-peak criteria after cerebrospinal fluid removal and preliminary vessel voxel removal. Two scaling factors were calculated by comparing the relative CBV and CBF of the segmented normal brain parenchyma with the absolute values in the literature. Using the scaling factors, the relative values were converted to the absolute CBV and CBF. Voxels with either CBV > 8 mL/100 g or CBF > 100 mL/100 g/min were characterized as vessel voxels and were excluded from the quantitative measurements. Results. The segmented brain parenchyma with normal perfusion was consistent with the angiographic findings for each patient. We confirmed the necessity of dual thresholds including CBF and CBV for proper removal of vessel voxels. The scaling factors were 0.208 ± 0.041 for CBV, and 0.168 ± 0.037, 0.172 ± 0.037 for CBF calculated using standard and circulant singular value decomposition techniques, respectively. Conclusion. The automatic scaling and vessel removal techniques provide an alternative method for obtaining improved quantitative assessment of CBV and CBF in patients with thromboembolic cerebral arterial disease. PMID:23586033

  8. Abnormal sitting pressures of hemiplegic cerebral palsy children on a school chair

    PubMed Central

    Lee, In-Hee; Park, Sang-young

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the differences in symmetry of sitting posture between typical developmental (TD) children and hemi-cerebral palsy (CP) children. [Subjects and Methods] A school chair mounted on a force platform was used to assess the quiet-sitting pressure distribution of 10 TD and 10 CP children. [Results] The symmetry index of the TD children was significantly closer to zero than that of the CP children irrespective of the latter group’s hemiparetic side. [Conclusions] Sitting posture on school chairs of CP children was more asymmetrical than that of TD children. PMID:25729201

  9. Abnormal resting regional cerebral blood flow patterns and their correlates in schizophrenia

    SciTech Connect

    Mathew, R.J.; Wilson, W.H.; Tant, S.R.; Robinson, L.; Prakash, R.

    1988-06-01

    Regional cerebral blood flow (CBF) was measured under resting conditions in 108 right-handed schizophrenic inpatients and a matched group of normal controls with the xenon 133 inhalation technique. Forty-six patients were free of all medication for two weeks. There were no significant differences in CBF to the two hemispheres. The patients showed a comparatively reduced anteroposterior (AP) gradient for CBF. Though there were no differences in frontal flow, the patients had higher flow to several postcentral brain regions, bilaterally. Cerebral blood flow in the patients correlated inversely with age and positively with carbon dioxide level. Women had higher flow than men. Duration of the illness was the only significant predictor of the reduced AP gradient in patients. Higher left temporal and right parietal flow were found to be the best discriminators between patients and controls. Mean hemispheric flow to both hemispheres and several brain regions correlated with the total score and the item, unusual thought content, of the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale. There were no differences in regional CBF between medicated and unmedicated patients.

  10. Identification of abnormal motor cortex activation patterns in children with cerebral palsy by functional near-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Bilal; Tian, Fenghua; Behbehani, Khosrow; Romero, Mario I.; Delgado, Mauricio R.; Clegg, Nancy J.; Smith, Linsley; Reid, Dahlia; Liu, Hanli; Alexandrakis, George

    2010-05-01

    We demonstrate the utility of functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) as a tool for physicians to study cortical plasticity in children with cerebral palsy (CP). Motor cortex activation patterns were studied in five healthy children and five children with CP (8.4+/-2.3 years old in both groups) performing a finger-tapping protocol. Spatial (distance from center and area difference) and temporal (duration and time-to-peak) image metrics are proposed as potential biomarkers for differentiating abnormal cortical activation in children with CP from healthy pediatric controls. In addition, a similarity image-analysis concept is presented that unveils areas that have similar activation patterns as that of the maximum activation area, but are not discernible by visual inspection of standard activation images. Metrics derived from the images presenting areas of similarity are shown to be sensitive identifiers of abnormal activation patterns in children with CP. Importantly, the proposed similarity concept and related metrics may be applicable to other studies for the identification of cortical activation patterns by fNIRS.

  11. Identification of abnormal motor cortex activation patterns in children with cerebral palsy by functional near-infrared spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Bilal; Tian, Fenghua; Behbehani, Khosrow; Romero, Mario I.; Delgado, Mauricio R.; Clegg, Nancy J.; Smith, Linsley; Reid, Dahlia; Liu, Hanli; Alexandrakis, George

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate the utility of functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) as a tool for physicians to study cortical plasticity in children with cerebral palsy (CP). Motor cortex activation patterns were studied in five healthy children and five children with CP (8.4±2.3years old in both groups) performing a finger-tapping protocol. Spatial (distance from center and area difference) and temporal (duration and time-to-peak) image metrics are proposed as potential biomarkers for differentiating abnormal cortical activation in children with CP from healthy pediatric controls. In addition, a similarity image-analysis concept is presented that unveils areas that have similar activation patterns as that of the maximum activation area, but are not discernible by visual inspection of standard activation images. Metrics derived from the images presenting areas of similarity are shown to be sensitive identifiers of abnormal activation patterns in children with CP. Importantly, the proposed similarity concept and related metrics may be applicable to other studies for the identification of cortical activation patterns by fNIRS. PMID:20615010

  12. In-vitro investigation of cerebral-perfusion effects of a rotary blood pump installed in the descending aorta.

    PubMed

    Rezaienia, Mohammad Amin; Paul, Gordon; Avital, Eldad; Rahideh, Akbar; Rothman, Martin Terry; Korakianitis, Theodosios

    2016-06-14

    This study describes use of a cardiovascular simulator to replicate the hemodynamic responses of the cerebrovascular system with a mechanical circulatory support device operating in the descending aorta. To do so, a cerebral autoregulation unit was developed which replicates the dilation and constriction of the native cerebrovascular resistance system and thereby regulates the cerebral flow rate within defined limits. The efficacy of the replicated autoregulation mechanism was investigated by introducing a number of step alterations in mean aortic pressure and monitoring the cerebral flow. The steady responses of the cerebral flow to changes in mean aortic pressure were in good agreement with clinical data. Next, a rotary pump, modeling a mechanical circulatory support device, was installed in the descending aorta and the hemodynamic responses of the cerebral system were investigated over a wide range of pump operating conditions. Insertion of a mechanical circulatory support device in the descending aorta presented an improved cardiac output as a result of afterload reduction. It was observed that the primary drop in cerebral flow, caused by the pump in the descending aorta, was compensated over the course of five seconds due to a gradual decrease in cerebrovascular resistance. The experimental results suggest that the implantation of a mechanical circulatory support device in the descending aorta, a less invasive procedure than typical mechanical circulatory support implantation, will not have an adverse effect on the cognitive function, provided that the cerebral autoregulation is largely unimpaired. PMID:27155746

  13. Transcriptional Abnormalities of Hamstring Muscle Contractures in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Lucas R.; Chambers, Henry G.; Subramaniam, Shankar; Lieber, Richard L.

    2012-01-01

    Cerebral palsy (CP) is an upper motor neuron disease that results in a spectrum of movement disorders. Secondary to the neurological lesion, muscles from patients with CP are often spastic and form debilitating contractures that limit range of motion and joint function. With no genetic component, the pathology of skeletal muscle in CP is a response to aberrant complex neurological input in ways that are not fully understood. This study was designed to gain further understanding of the skeletal muscle response in CP using transcriptional profiling correlated with functional measures to broadly investigate muscle adaptations leading to mechanical deficits. Biospsies were obtained from both the gracilis and semitendinosus muscles from a cohort of patients with CP (n = 10) and typically developing patients (n = 10) undergoing surgery. Biopsies were obtained to define the unique expression profile of the contractures and passive mechanical testing was conducted to determine stiffness values in previously published work. Affymetrix HG-U133A 2.0 chips (n = 40) generated expression data, which was validated for selected transcripts using quantitative real-time PCR. Chips were clustered based on their expression and those from patients with CP clustered separately. Significant genes were determined conservatively based on the overlap of three summarization algorithms (n = 1,398). Significantly altered genes were analyzed for over-representation among gene ontologies and muscle specific networks. The majority of altered transcripts were related to increased extracellular matrix expression in CP and a decrease in metabolism and ubiquitin ligase activity. The increase in extracellular matrix products was correlated with mechanical measures demonstrating the importance in disability. These data lay a framework for further studies and development of novel therapies. PMID:22956992

  14. Association of brain amyloid-β with cerebral perfusion and structure in Alzheimer's disease and mild cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Mattsson, Niklas; Tosun, Duygu; Insel, Philip S; Simonson, Alix; Jack, Clifford R; Beckett, Laurel A; Donohue, Michael; Jagust, William; Schuff, Norbert; Weiner, Michael W

    2014-05-01

    Patients with Alzheimer's disease have reduced cerebral blood flow measured by arterial spin labelling magnetic resonance imaging, but it is unclear how this is related to amyloid-β pathology. Using 182 subjects from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative we tested associations of amyloid-β with regional cerebral blood flow in healthy controls (n = 51), early (n = 66) and late (n = 41) mild cognitive impairment, and Alzheimer's disease with dementia (n = 24). Based on the theory that Alzheimer's disease starts with amyloid-β accumulation and progresses with symptoms and secondary pathologies in different trajectories, we tested if cerebral blood flow differed between amyloid-β-negative controls and -positive subjects in different diagnostic groups, and if amyloid-β had different associations with cerebral blood flow and grey matter volume. Global amyloid-β load was measured by florbetapir positron emission tomography, and regional blood flow and volume were measured in eight a priori defined regions of interest. Cerebral blood flow was reduced in patients with dementia in most brain regions. Higher amyloid-β load was related to lower cerebral blood flow in several regions, independent of diagnostic group. When comparing amyloid-β-positive subjects with -negative controls, we found reductions of cerebral blood flow in several diagnostic groups, including in precuneus, entorhinal cortex and hippocampus (dementia), inferior parietal cortex (late mild cognitive impairment and dementia), and inferior temporal cortex (early and late mild cognitive impairment and dementia). The associations of amyloid-β with cerebral blood flow and volume differed across the disease spectrum, with high amyloid-β being associated with greater cerebral blood flow reduction in controls and greater volume reduction in late mild cognitive impairment and dementia. In addition to disease stage, amyloid-β pathology affects cerebral blood flow across the span from controls to

  15. Abnormal Secretion of Insulin and Glucagon by the In Vitro Perfused Pancreas of the Genetically Diabetic Chinese Hamster

    PubMed Central

    Frankel, Barbara J.; Gerich, John E.; Hagura, Ryoko; Fanska, Rudy E.; Gerritsen, George C.; Grodsky, Gerold M.

    1974-01-01

    Hereditary insulin-deficient diabetes mellitus occurs in certain sublines of nonobese Chinese hamsters. Several characteristics of this syndrome are similar to those seen in insulin-deficient human diabetics. Therefore, to characterize pancreatic islet function, dynamic insulin and glucagon release from normal and nonketotic diabetic hamster pancreases in response to glucose (300 mg/100 ml) and theophylline (10 mM), infused singly and together, was studied in vitro. 20-min glucose infusions of normal hamster pancreases caused biphasic insulin release, consisting of a rapid first peak and a gradually rising second phase, similar to that reported for man in vivo. Both phases were significantly reduced in the diabetic pancreases. Theophylline alone stimulated similar nonphasic insulin release in both the normal and the diabetic pancreases. Glucose and theophylline together caused greater insulin release than either stimulant alone in both normals and diabetics; however, the diabetic response was still subnormal. Glucose suppressed glucagon release from normal pancreases; suppression was significantly impaired in diabetics. Theophylline stimulated nonphasic glucagon release in both the normals and diabetics. Glucose partially suppressed the theophylline-stimulated release in both groups. Insulin/glucagon molar ratios of the diabetics were consistently subnormal, although individual hormone levels often overlapped into the normal range. In summary, the pancreases of genetically diabetic Chinese hamsters perfused in vitro showed: (a) decreased first and second phase insulin release in response to glucose-containing stimuli—only partially ameliorated by theophylline—, and (b) impaired suppression of glucagon in response to glucose, resulting in (c) a decreased insulin/glucagon molar ratio. These data support the suggestion that both alpha and beta cells of diabetic pancreases may be insensitive to glucose. Images PMID:4830228

  16. [THE EFFECTIVENESS OF DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT OF CEREBROVASCULAR DISORDERS IN HYPERTENSIVE ENCEPHALOPATHY IN ELDERLY PATIENTS BY STUDYING THE CHARACTERISTICS OF CEREBRAL HEMODYNAMICS AND CEREBRAL PERFUSION STATUS].

    PubMed

    Sviridova, N K; Yavorsky, V V

    2015-01-01

    Intrigue progression of hypertensive encephalopathy (HE) in older patients is that the development of cognitive impairment and high blood pressure underestimated, aslo exist without clinical manifestations. In recent decades convincing proved that the basis for the development of various diseases is cerebral dysfunction systems regulating brain blood flow, including--autoregulation system, which largely affects the blood supply to the brain. This explains the fact that patients with chronic brain ischemia cerebral hemodynamic status largely depends on the condition and stability of the regulatory mechanisms of systemic and cerebral hemodynamics, particularly of systemic blood pressure, regional cerebral blood supply, normalization which, in the early stages of development disorders, prevents of serious complications. In this paper the theoretical generalization and new solution of scientific and practical problems of hypertension influence on the formation of chronic cerebral ischemia in elderly patients on a background of hypertension--specified risk factors and especially the formation of a comprehensive study on the basis of clinical and neurological data, tool sand methods for neuroimaging research developed and improved methods of diagnosis. Found that in elderly patients with HE and HBP observed significant (P < 0.05) increase in the thickness of the intima-media complex was significantly higher (dextra--1.12 ± 0.03 and sinistra--1.11 ± 0.03), than middle-aged patients with hypertension at HE, which constitutes a violation of the elastic properties of the vascular wall. Established correlation data radionuclide study ultrasonic duplex scanning of vessels of the head and neck. A negative correlation of intima-media and severity of lesions according to hypoperfusion of computer tomography single photon emission (r = -0.49; P < 0.05); confirming the progression of HE in elderly patients needs improvement and treatment. PMID:27089714

  17. Multitracer study in Heidenhain variant of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease: mismatch pattern of cerebral hypometabolism and perfusion imaging.

    PubMed

    Pichler, Robert; Ciovica, Ioana; Rachinger, Johanna; Weiss, Serge; Aichner, Franz T

    2008-02-01

    Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) is a subacute spongiform encephalopathy. This fatal prion disease is characterized by rapidly progressive dementia with a variety of neurological disorders. Diagnostic methods provided by nuclear medicine might be helpful for evaluation of patients with probable CJD as additional diagnostic tools to MRI and cerebro-spinal fluid evaluation. The experience with FDG-PET and brain perfusion SPECT is presented. PMID:18283251

  18. The role of diffusion and perfusion weighted imaging in the differential diagnosis of cerebral tumors: a review and future perspectives

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The role of conventional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in the detection of cerebral tumors has been well established. However its excellent soft tissue visualization and variety of imaging sequences are in many cases non-specific for the assessment of brain tumor grading. Hence, advanced MRI techniques, like Diffusion-Weighted Imaging (DWI), Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) and Dynamic-Susceptibility Contrast Imaging (DSCI), which are based on different contrast principles, have been used in the clinical routine to improve diagnostic accuracy. The variety of quantitative information derived from these techniques provides significant structural and functional information in a cellular level, highlighting aspects of the underlying brain pathophysiology. The present work, reviews physical principles and recent results obtained using DWI/DTI and DSCI, in tumor characterization and grading of the most common cerebral neoplasms, and discusses how the available MR quantitative data can be utilized through advanced methods of analysis, in order to optimize clinical decision making. PMID:25609475

  19. Cerebral metabolism and perfusion in MR-negative individuals with refractory focal epilepsy assessed by simultaneous acquisition of (18)F-FDG PET and arterial spin labeling.

    PubMed

    Boscolo Galazzo, Ilaria; Mattoli, Maria Vittoria; Pizzini, Francesca Benedetta; De Vita, Enrico; Barnes, Anna; Duncan, John S; Jäger, Hans Rolf; Golay, Xavier; Bomanji, Jamshed B; Koepp, Matthias; Groves, Ashley M; Fraioli, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    The major challenge in pre-surgical epileptic patient evaluation is the correct identification of the seizure onset area, especially in MR-negative patients. In this study, we aimed to: (1) assess the concordance between perfusion, from ASL, and metabolism, from (18)F-FDG, acquired simultaneously on PET/MR; (2) verify the utility of a statistical approach as supportive diagnostic tool for clinical readers. Secondarily, we compared (18)F-FDG PET data from the hybrid PET/MR system with those acquired with PET/CT, with the purpose of validate the reliability of (18)F-FDG PET/MR data. Twenty patients with refractory focal epilepsy, negative MR and a defined electro-clinical diagnosis underwent PET/MR, immediately followed by PET/CT. Standardized uptake value ratio (SUVr) and cerebral blood flow (CBF) maps were calculated for PET/CT-PET/MR and ASL, respectively. For all techniques, z-score of the asymmetry index (zAI) was applied for depicting significant Right/Left differences. SUVr and CBF images were firstly visually assessed by two neuroimaging readers, who then re-assessed them considering zAI for reaching a final diagnosis. High agreement between (18)F-FDG PET/MR and ASL was found, showing hypometabolism and hypoperfusion in the same hemisphere in 18/20 patients, while the remaining were normal. They were completely concordant in 14/18, concordant in at least one lobe in the remaining. zAI maps improved readers' confidence in 12/20 and 15/20 patients for (18)F-FDG PET/MR and ASL, respectively. (18)F-FDG PET/CT-PET/MR showed high agreement, especially when zAI was considered. The simultaneous metabolism-perfusion acquisition provides excellent concordance on focus lateralisation and good concordance on localisation, determining useful complementary information. PMID:27222796

  20. Evaluation of a potential generator-produced PET tracer for cerebral perfusion imaging: Single-pass cerebral extraction measurements and imaging with radiolabeled Cu-PTSM

    SciTech Connect

    Mathias, C.J.; Welch, M.J.; Raichle, M.E.; Mintun, M.A.; Lich, L.L.; McGuire, A.H.; Zinn, K.R.; John, E.K.; Green, M.A. )

    1990-03-01

    Copper(II) pyruvaldehyde bis(N4-methylthiosemicarbazone) (Cu-PTSM), copper(II) pyruvaldehyde bis(N4-dimethylthiosemicarbazone) (Cu-PTSM2), and copper(II) ethylglyoxal bis(N4-methylthiosemicarbazone) (Cu-ETSM), have been proposed as PET tracers for cerebral blood flow (CBF) when labeled with generator-produced 62Cu (t1/2 = 9.7 min). To evaluate the potential of Cu-PTSM for CBF PET studies, baboon single-pass cerebral extraction measurements and PET imaging were carried out with the use of 67Cu (t1/2 = 2.6 days) and 64Cu (t1/2 = 12.7 hr), respectively. All three chelates were extracted into the brain with high efficiency. There was some clearance of all chelates in the 10-50-sec time frame and Cu-PTSM2 continued to clear. Cu-PTSM and Cu-ETSM have high residual brain activity. PET imaging of baboon brain was carried out with the use of (64Cu)-Cu-PTSM. For comparison with the 64Cu brain image, a CBF (15O-labeled water) image (40 sec) was first obtained. Qualitatively, the H2(15)O and (64Cu)-Cu-PTSM images were very similar; for example, a comparison of gray to white matter uptake resulted in ratios of 2.42 for H2(15)O and 2.67 for Cu-PTSM. No redistribution of 64Cu was observed in 2 hr of imaging, as was predicted from the single-pass study results. Quantitative determination of blood flow using Cu-PTSM showed good agreement with blood flow determined with H2(15)O. This data suggests that (62Cu)-Cu-PTSM may be a useful generator-produced radiopharmaceutical for blood flow studies with PET.

  1. Sequential hypothesis testing for automatic detection of task-related changes in cerebral perfusion in a brain-computer interface.

    PubMed

    Faulkner, Hayley G; Myrden, Andrew; Li, Michael; Mamun, Khondaker; Chau, Tom

    2015-11-01

    Evidence suggests that the cerebral blood flow patterns accompanying cognitive activity are retained in many locked-in patients. These patterns can be monitored using transcranial Doppler ultrasound (TCD), a medical imaging technique that measures bilateral cerebral blood flow velocities. Recently, TCD has been proposed as an alternative imaging modality for brain-computer interfaces (BCIs). However, most previous TCD-BCI studies have performed offline analyses with impractically lengthy tasks. In this study, we designed a BCI that automatically differentiates between counting and verbal fluency tasks using sequential hypothesis testing to make decisions as quickly as possible. Ten able-bodied participants silently alternated between counting and verbal fluency tasks within the paradigm of a simulated on-screen keyboard. During this experiment, blood flow velocities were recorded within the left and right middle cerebral arteries using bilateral TCD. Twelve features were used to characterize TCD signals. In a simulated online analysis, sequential hypothesis testing was used to update estimates of class probability every 250 ms as TCD data were processed. Classification was terminated once a threshold level of certainty was reached. Mean classification accuracy across all participants was 72% after an average of 23s, compared to an offline analysis which obtained a classification accuracy of 80% after 45 s. This represents a substantial gain in data transmission rate, while maintaining classification accuracies exceeding 70%. Furthermore, a range of decision times between 19 and 28s was observed, suggesting that the ability of sequential hypothesis testing to adapt the task duration for each individual participant is critical to achieving consistent performance across participants. These results indicate that sequential hypothesis testing is a promising alternative for online TCD-BCIs. PMID:26163771

  2. The effects of open and closed endotracheal suctioning on intracranial pressure and cerebral perfusion pressure: a crossover, single-blind clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Uğraş, Gülay Altun; Aksoy, Güler

    2012-12-01

    Although endotracheal suctioning is a routine nursing intervention, this procedure can lead to an increase in intracranial pressure (ICP). This study was planned to determine the appropriate suctioning technique (open system suctioning [OS] and closed system suctioning [CS]) to minimize variability of ICP and cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) in neurologically impaired patients. The study, which was designed as a crossover, single-blind clinical trial, consisted of 32 neurosurgical patients who underwent ICP monitoring, intra-arterial blood pressure monitoring, and endotracheal intubation in the intensive care unit. According to the need for suctioning, each patient in the experimental and control groups underwent suctioning with both closed and open systems. Recordings were composed of the patients' ICP, mean arterial blood pressure, CPP, heart rate (HR), and arterial blood gases during suctioning. It was observed that both suctioning techniques significantly increased ICP, mean arterial blood pressure, CPP, and HR; ICP was found to be significantly higher in OS compared with CS, whereas there were no significant differences in CPP and HR between the two techniques. The patients suctioned using OS had significantly lower mean PaO(2) than those suctioned using CS; however, the comparison of the two techniques revealed no significant differences in PaCO(2). The data obtained indicate that CS, compared with OS, can be used safely on this patient group. PMID:23124126

  3. Effects of Open and Closed Endotracheal Suctioning on Intracranial Pressure and Cerebral Perfusion Pressure in Adult Patients With Severe Brain Injury: A Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Galbiati, Giancarlo; Paola, Cattaneo

    2015-08-01

    In neurologically impaired adult patients, endotracheal suctioning is a potentially dangerous nursing procedure because it can increase intracranial pressure (ICP) and decrease cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP). This article presents an overview of the literature relating to the appropriate techniques (open system suctioning and closed system suctioning) for minimizing variability in ICP and CPP. The research used databases such as Medline, CINAHL, Embase, Scopus, Cochrane Library, and TripDataBase. Literature published from January 1, 2002, to August 31, 2013, that involved adult patients was reviewed. The main search strings were obtained using the following keyword combinations: "suction AND intracranial pressure AND cerebrovascular circulation," "brain injuries OR craniocerebral trauma AND suction," and "brain injuries OR craniocerebral trauma AND suction AND intracranial pressure." Fourteen articles were included: two systematic reviews, two prospective nonrandomized studies, two prospective double-blind clinical trials, a crossover single-blind clinical trial, three prospective interventionist case studies, a case-control study, and three observational studies. Although most of the articles show an increased ICP above 20 mm Hg when using open system suctioning (as opposed to closed system suctioning), it is still not clear which technique is best for maintaining CPP. Therefore, further studies are needed to determine the best technique for nursing practice. PMID:25951310

  4. Absolute Cerebral Blood Flow Infarction Threshold for 3-Hour Ischemia Time Determined with CT Perfusion and 18F-FFMZ-PET Imaging in a Porcine Model of Cerebral Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Cockburn, Neil; Kovacs, Michael

    2016-01-01

    CT Perfusion (CTP) derived cerebral blood flow (CBF) thresholds have been proposed as the optimal parameter for distinguishing the infarct core prior to reperfusion. Previous threshold-derivation studies have been limited by uncertainties introduced by infarct expansion between the acute phase of stroke and follow-up imaging, or DWI lesion reversibility. In this study a model is proposed for determining infarction CBF thresholds at 3hr ischemia time by comparing contemporaneously acquired CTP derived CBF maps to 18F-FFMZ-PET imaging, with the objective of deriving a CBF threshold for infarction after 3 hours of ischemia. Endothelin-1 (ET-1) was injected into the brain of Duroc-Cross pigs (n = 11) through a burr hole in the skull. CTP images were acquired 10 and 30 minutes post ET-1 injection and then every 30 minutes for 150 minutes. 370 MBq of 18F-FFMZ was injected ~120 minutes post ET-1 injection and PET images were acquired for 25 minutes starting ~155–180 minutes post ET-1 injection. CBF maps from each CTP acquisition were co-registered and converted into a median CBF map. The median CBF map was co-registered to blood volume maps for vessel exclusion, an average CT image for grey/white matter segmentation, and 18F-FFMZ-PET images for infarct delineation. Logistic regression and ROC analysis were performed on infarcted and non-infarcted pixel CBF values for each animal that developed infarct. Six of the eleven animals developed infarction. The mean CBF value corresponding to the optimal operating point of the ROC curves for the 6 animals was 12.6 ± 2.8 mL·min-1·100g-1 for infarction after 3 hours of ischemia. The porcine ET-1 model of cerebral ischemia is easier to implement then other large animal models of stroke, and performs similarly as long as CBF is monitored using CTP to prevent reperfusion. PMID:27347877

  5. Value of Perfusion-Weighted MR Imaging in the Assessment of Early Cerebral Alterations in Neurologically Asymptomatic HIV-1-Positive and HCV-Positive Patients

    PubMed Central

    Bladowska, Joanna; Knysz, Brygida; Zimny, Anna; Małyszczak, Krzysztof; Kołtowska, Anna; Szewczyk, Paweł; Gąsiorowski, Jacek; Furdal, Michał; Sąsiadek, Marek J.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Asymptomatic central nervous system (CNS) involvement occurs in the early stage of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. It has been documented that the hepatitis C virus (HCV) can replicate in the CNS. The aim of the study was to evaluate early disturbances in cerebral microcirculation using magnetic resonance (MR) perfusion-weighted imaging (PWI) in asymptomatic HIV-1-positive and HCV-positive patients, as well as to assess the correlation between PWI measurements and the clinical data. Materials and Methods Fifty-six patients: 17 HIV-1-positive non-treated, 18 HIV-1-positive treated with combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), 7 HIV-1/HCV-positive non-treated, 14 HCV-positive before antiviral therapy and 18 control subjects were enrolled in the study. PWI was performed with a 1.5T MR unit using dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) method. Cerebral blood volume (CBV) measurements relative to cerebellum (rCBV) were evaluated in the posterior cingulated region (PCG), basal ganglia (BG), temporoparietal (TPC) and frontal cortices (FC), as well as in white matter of frontoparietal areas. Correlations of rCBV values with immunologic data and liver histology activity index (HAI) were analyzed. Results Significantly lower rCBV values were found in the right TPC and left FC as well as in PCG in HIV-1-positive naïve (p = 0.009; p = 0.020; p = 0.012), HIV-1 cART treated (p = 0.007; p = 0.009; p = 0.033), HIV-1/HCV-positive (p = 0.007; p = 0.027; p = 0.045) and HCV-positive patients (p = 0.010; p = 0.005; p = 0.045) compared to controls. HIV-1-positive cART treated and HIV-1/HCV-positive patients demonstrated lower rCBV values in the right FC (p = 0.009; p = 0.032, respectively) and the left TPC (p = 0.036; p = 0.005, respectively), while HCV-positive subjects revealed lower rCBV values in the left TPC region (p = 0.003). We found significantly elevated rCBV values in

  6. Microdialysis Assessment of Cerebral Perfusion during Cardiac Arrest, Extracorporeal Life Support and Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation in Rats – A Pilot Trial

    PubMed Central

    Schober, Andreas; Warenits, Alexandra M.; Testori, Christoph; Weihs, Wolfgang; Hosmann, Arthur; Högler, Sandra; Sterz, Fritz; Janata, Andreas; Scherer, Thomas; Magnet, Ingrid A. M.; Ettl, Florian; Laggner, Anton N.; Herkner, Harald; Zeitlinger, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral metabolic alterations during cardiac arrest, cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and extracorporeal cardiopulmonary life support (ECLS) are poorly explored. Markers are needed for a more personalized resuscitation and post—resuscitation care. Aim of this study was to investigate early metabolic changes in the hippocampal CA1 region during ventricular fibrillation cardiac arrest (VF-CA) and ECLS versus conventional CPR. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (350g) underwent 8min untreated VF-CA followed by ECLS (n = 8; bloodflow 100ml/kg), mechanical CPR (n = 18; 200/min) until return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC). Shams (n = 2) were included. Glucose, glutamate and lactate/pyruvate ratio were compared between treatment groups and animals with and without ROSC. Ten animals (39%) achieved ROSC (ECLS 5/8 vs. CPR 5/18; OR 4,3;CI:0.7–25;p = 0.189). During VF-CA central nervous glucose decreased (0.32±0.1mmol/l to 0.04±0.01mmol/l; p<0.001) and showed a significant rise (0.53±0.1;p<0.001) after resuscitation. Lactate/pyruvate (L/P) ratio showed a 5fold increase (31 to 164; p<0.001; maximum 8min post ROSC). Glutamate showed a 3.5-fold increase to (2.06±1.5 to 7.12±5.1μmol/L; p<0.001) after CA. All parameters normalized after ROSC with no significant differences between ECLS and CPR. Metabolic changes during ischemia and resuscitation can be displayed by cerebral microdialysis in our VF-CA CPR and ECLS rat model. We found similar microdialysate concentrations and patterns of normalization in both resuscitation methods used. Institutional Protocol Number: GZ0064.11/3b/2011 PMID:27175905

  7. Cerebral perfusion and oxygenation are impaired by folate deficiency in rat: absolute measurements with noninvasive near-infrared spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Hallacoglu, Bertan; Sassaroli, Angelo; Fantini, Sergio; Troen, Aron M

    2011-01-01

    Brain microvascular pathology is a common finding in Alzheimer's disease and other dementias. However, the extent to which microvascular abnormalities cause or contribute to cognitive impairment is unclear. Noninvasive near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) can address this question, but its use for clarifying the role of microvascular dysfunction in dementia has been limited due to theoretical and practical considerations. We developed a new noninvasive NIRS method to obtain quantitative, dynamic measurements of absolute brain hemoglobin concentration and oxygen saturation and used it to show significant cerebrovascular impairments in a rat model of diet-induced vascular cognitive impairment. We fed young rats folate-deficient (FD) and control diets and measured absolute brain hemoglobin and hemodynamic parameters at rest and during transient mild hypoxia and hypercapnia. With respect to control animals, FD rats featured significantly lower brain hemoglobin concentration (72±4 μmol/L versus 95±6 μmol/L) and oxygen saturation (54%±3% versus 65%±2%). By contrast, resting arterial oxygen saturation was the same for both groups (96%±4%), indicating that decrements in brain hemoglobin oxygenation were independent of blood oxygen carrying capacity. Vasomotor reactivity in response to hypercapnia was also impaired in FD rats. Our results implicate microvascular abnormality and diminished oxygen delivery as a mechanism of cognitive impairment. PMID:21386853

  8. Voxel-Wise Perfusion Assessment in Cerebral White Matter with PCASL at 3T; Is It Possible and How Long Does It Take?

    PubMed Central

    Skurdal, Mikjel Johannes; Bjørnerud, Atle; van Osch, Matthias J. P.; Nordhøy, Wibeke; Lagopoulos, Jim; Groote, Inge Rasmus

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To establish whether reliable voxel-wise assessment of perfusion in cerebral white matter (WM) is possible using arterial spin labeling (ASL) at 3T in a cohort of healthy subjects. Materials and Methods Pseudo-continuous ASL (PCASL) with background suppression (BS) optimized for WM measurements was performed at 3T in eight healthy male volunteers aged 25–41. Four different labeling schemes were evaluated by varying the labeling duration (LD) and post-labeling delay (PLD). Eight slices with voxel dimension 3.75x3.75x5 mm3 were acquired from the anterosuperior aspect of the brain, and 400 image/control pairs were collected for each run. Rigid head immobilization was applied using individually fitted thermoplastic masks. For each voxel in the resulting ASL time series, the time needed to reach a 95% significance level for the ASL signal to be higher than zero (paired t-test), was estimated. Results The four protocols detected between 88% and 95% (after Bonferroni correction: 75% and 88%) of WM voxels at 95% significance level. In the most efficient sequence, 80% was reached after 5 min and 95% after 53 min (after Bonferroni correction 40% and 88% respectively). For all protocols, the fraction of significant WM voxels increased in an asymptotic fashion with increasing scan time. A small subgroup of voxels was shown to not benefit at all from prolonged measurement. Conclusion Acquisition of a significant ASL signal from a majority of WM voxels is possible within clinically acceptable scan times, whereas full coverage needs prohibitively long scan times, as a result of the asymptotic trajectory. PMID:26267661

  9. Interhemispheric Cerebral Blood Flow Balance during Recovery of Motor Hand Function after Ischemic Stroke—A Longitudinal MRI Study Using Arterial Spin Labeling Perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Missimer, John; Schroth, Gerhard; Hess, Christian W.; Sturzenegger, Matthias; Wang, Danny J. J.; Weder, Bruno; Federspiel, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Background Unilateral ischemic stroke disrupts the well balanced interactions within bilateral cortical networks. Restitution of interhemispheric balance is thought to contribute to post-stroke recovery. Longitudinal measurements of cerebral blood flow (CBF) changes might act as surrogate marker for this process. Objective To quantify longitudinal CBF changes using arterial spin labeling MRI (ASL) and interhemispheric balance within the cortical sensorimotor network and to assess their relationship with motor hand function recovery. Methods Longitudinal CBF data were acquired in 23 patients at 3 and 9 months after cortical sensorimotor stroke and in 20 healthy controls using pulsed ASL. Recovery of grip force and manual dexterity was assessed with tasks requiring power and precision grips. Voxel-based analysis was performed to identify areas of significant CBF change. Region-of-interest analyses were used to quantify the interhemispheric balance across nodes of the cortical sensorimotor network. Results Dexterity was more affected, and recovered at a slower pace than grip force. In patients with successful recovery of dexterous hand function, CBF decreased over time in the contralesional supplementary motor area, paralimbic anterior cingulate cortex and superior precuneus, and interhemispheric balance returned to healthy control levels. In contrast, patients with poor recovery presented with sustained hypoperfusion in the sensorimotor cortices encompassing the ischemic tissue, and CBF remained lateralized to the contralesional hemisphere. Conclusions Sustained perfusion imbalance within the cortical sensorimotor network, as measured with task-unrelated ASL, is associated with poor recovery of dexterous hand function after stroke. CBF at rest might be used to monitor recovery and gain prognostic information. PMID:25191858

  10. Cerebral air embolism and subsequent transient neurologic abnormalities in a liver transplant recipient following the removal of the pulmonary artery catheter from the central venous access device: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sun-Key; Jun, In-Gu; Jang, Dong-Min; Lim, Jinwook; Hwang, Gyu-Sam

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral air embolism is a rare but potentially life-threatening complication. We experienced a living-donor liver transplant recipient who presented with unexpected cerebral air embolism and transient neurologic abnormalities that subsequently developed just after the removal of the pulmonary artery catheter from the central venous access device. One day after the initial event, the patient's neurologic status gradually improved. The patient was discharged 30 days after liver transplantation without neurologic sequelae. PMID:26885308

  11. Yokukansan, a traditional Japanese medicine, ameliorates memory disturbance and abnormal social interaction with anti-aggregation effect of cerebral amyloid β proteins in amyloid precursor protein transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, H; Takayama, S; Iwasaki, K; Tabuchi, M; Yamaguchi, T; Sekiguchi, K; Ikarashi, Y; Kudo, Y; Kase, Y; Arai, H; Yaegashi, N

    2011-04-28

    The deposition of amyloid β protein (Aβ) is a consistent pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD) brains. Therefore, inhibition of Aβ aggregation in the brain is an attractive therapeutic and preventive strategy in the development of disease-modifying drugs for AD. An in vitro study demonstrated that yokukansan (YKS), a traditional Japanese medicine, inhibited Aβ aggregation in a concentration-dependent manner. An in vivo study demonstrated that YKS and Uncaria hook (UH), a constituent of YKS, prevented the accumulation of cerebral Aβ. YKS also improved the memory disturbance and abnormal social interaction such as increased aggressive behavior and decreased social behavior in amyloid precursor protein transgenic mice. These results suggest that YKS is likely to be a potent and novel therapeutic agent to prevent and/or treat AD, and that this may be attributed to UH. PMID:21303686

  12. Anti-Aβ Autoantibodies in Amyloid Related Imaging Abnormalities (ARIA): Candidate Biomarker for Immunotherapy in Alzheimer’s Disease and Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy

    PubMed Central

    DiFrancesco, Jacopo C.; Longoni, Martina; Piazza, Fabrizio

    2015-01-01

    Amyloid-related imaging abnormalities (ARIA) represent the major severe side effect of amyloid-beta (Aβ) immunotherapy for Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Early biomarkers of ARIA represent an important challenge to ensure safe and beneficial effects of immunotherapies, given that different promising clinical trials in prodromal and subjects at risk for AD are underway. The recent demonstration that cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) anti-Aβ autoantibodies play a key role in the development of the ARIA-like events characterizing cerebral amyloid angiopathy-related inflammation generated great interest in the field of immunotherapy. Herein, we critically review the growing body of evidence supporting the monitoring of CSF anti-Aβ autoantibody as a promising candidate biomarker for ARIA in clinical trials. PMID:26441825

  13. {sup 99m}Tc radiopharmaceuticals for brain perfusion imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Deutsch, E.; Volkert, W.A.

    1991-12-31

    It is well established that small, neutral, lipophilic technetium complexes can diffuse into the brain and then be trapped intracellularly by a variety of mechanisms. A more detailed understanding of the structural and chemical parameters which promote efficient diffusion into the brain, and which underlie the trapping mechanisms, will be necessary to delineate the clinical relevance of current agents, and to design improved technetium 99 pharmaceuticals. Current technetium 99 brain-perfusion imaging agents do not show ideal characteristics of brain uptake and retention. Furthermore, significant fractions of the technetium 99 complexes are lost between site of injection and the brain. Thus, it is difficult to use these current agents to quantitate regional cerebral blood flow. Nevertheless, these agents are proving extremely valuable for the SPECT evaluation of abnormalities in brain perfusion patients with neurological disorders.

  14. Differential diagnosis of regional cerebral hyperfixation of TC-99m HMPAO on SPECT imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Shirazi, P.; Konopka, L.; Crayton, J.W.

    1994-05-01

    Accurate diagnostic evaluation of patients with neurologic and neuropsychiatric disease is important because early treatment may halt disease progression and prevent impairment or disability. Cerebral hyperfixation of HMPAO has been ascribed to luxury perfusion following ischemic infarction. The present study sought to identify other conditions that also display radiotracer hyperfixation in order to develop a differential diagnosis of this finding on SPECT imaging. Two hundred fifty (n=250) successive cerebral SPECT images were reviewed for evidence of HMPAO hyperfixation. Hyperfixation was defined as enhanced focal perfusion surrounded by a zone of diminished or normal cerebral perfusion. All patients were scanned after intravenous injection of 25 mCi Tc-99m HMPAO. Volume-rendered and oblique images were obtained with a Trionix triple-head SPECT system using ultra high resolution fan beam collimators. Thirteen (13/250; 5%) of the patients exhibited regions of HMPAO hyperfixation. CT or MRI abnormalities were detected in 6/13 cases. Clinical diagnoses in these patients included intractable psychosis, post-traumatic stress disorder, alcohol and narcotic dependence, major depression, acute closed-head trauma, hypothyroidism, as well as subacute ischemic infarction. A wide variety of conditions may be associated with cerebral hyperfixation of HMPAO. These conditions include neurologic and psychiatric diagnoses, and extend the consideration of hyperfixation beyond ischemic infarction. Consequently, a differential diagnosis of HMPAO hyperfixation may be broader than originally considered, and this may suggest a fundamental role for local cerebral hyperperfusion. Elucidation of the fundamental mechanism(s) for cerebral hyperperfusion requires further investigation.

  15. Improved Sensitivity to Cerebral White Matter Abnormalities in Alzheimer’s Disease with Spherical Deconvolution Based Tractography

    PubMed Central

    Reijmer, Yael D.; Leemans, Alexander; Heringa, Sophie M.; Wielaard, Ilse; Jeurissen, Ben; Koek, Huiberdina L.; Biessels, Geert Jan

    2012-01-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) based fiber tractography (FT) is the most popular approach for investigating white matter tracts in vivo, despite its inability to reconstruct fiber pathways in regions with “crossing fibers.” Recently, constrained spherical deconvolution (CSD) has been developed to mitigate the adverse effects of “crossing fibers” on DTI based FT. Notwithstanding the methodological benefit, the clinical relevance of CSD based FT for the assessment of white matter abnormalities remains unclear. In this work, we evaluated the applicability of a hybrid framework, in which CSD based FT is combined with conventional DTI metrics to assess white matter abnormalities in 25 patients with early Alzheimer’s disease. Both CSD and DTI based FT were used to reconstruct two white matter tracts: one with regions of “crossing fibers,” i.e., the superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF) and one which contains only one fiber orientation, i.e. the midsagittal section of the corpus callosum (CC). The DTI metrics, fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD), obtained from these tracts were related to memory function. Our results show that in the tract with “crossing fibers” the relation between FA/MD and memory was stronger with CSD than with DTI based FT. By contrast, in the fiber bundle where one fiber population predominates, the relation between FA/MD and memory was comparable between both tractography methods. Importantly, these associations were most pronounced after adjustment for the planar diffusion coefficient, a measure reflecting the degree of fiber organization complexity. These findings indicate that compared to conventionally applied DTI based FT, CSD based FT combined with DTI metrics can increase the sensitivity to detect functionally significant white matter abnormalities in tracts with complex white matter architecture. PMID:22952880

  16. Biphasic thallium 201 SPECT-imaging for the noninvasive diagnosis of myocardial perfusion abnormalities in a child with Kawasaki disease--a case report

    SciTech Connect

    Hausdorf, G.; Nienaber, C.A.; Spielman, R.P.

    1988-02-01

    The mucocutaneous lymph node syndrome (Kawasaki disease) is of increasing importance for the pediatric cardiologist, for coronary aneurysms with the potential of thrombosis and subsequent stenosis can develop in the course of the disease. The authors report a 2 1/2-year-old female child in whom, fourteen months after the acute phase of Kawasaki disease, myocardial infarction occurred. Biphasic thallium 201 SPECT-imaging using dipyridamole depicted anterior wall ischemia and inferolateral infarction. This case demonstrates that noninvasive vasodilation-redistribution thallium 201 SPECT-imaging has the potential to predict reversible myocardial perfusion defects and myocardial necrosis, even in small infants with Kawasaki disease.

  17. In Acute Stroke, Can CT Perfusion-Derived Cerebral Blood Volume Maps Substitute for Diffusion-Weighted Imaging in Identifying the Ischemic Core?

    PubMed Central

    Copen, William A.; Morais, Livia T.; Wu, Ona; Schwamm, Lee H.; Schaefer, Pamela W.; González, R. Gilberto; Yoo, Albert J.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose In the treatment of patients with suspected acute ischemic stroke, increasing evidence suggests the importance of measuring the volume of the irreversibly injured “ischemic core.” The gold standard method for doing this in the clinical setting is diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI), but many authors suggest that maps of regional cerebral blood volume (CBV) derived from computed tomography perfusion imaging (CTP) can substitute for DWI. We sought to determine whether DWI and CTP-derived CBV maps are equivalent in measuring core volume. Methods 58 patients with suspected stroke underwent CTP and DWI within 6 hours of symptom onset. We measured low-CBV lesion volumes using three methods: “objective absolute,” i.e. the volume of tissue with CBV below each of six published absolute thresholds (0.9–2.5 mL/100 g), “objective relative,” whose six thresholds (51%-60%) were fractions of mean contralateral CBV, and “subjective,” in which two radiologists (R1, R2) outlined lesions subjectively. We assessed the sensitivity and specificity of each method, threshold, and radiologist in detecting infarction, and the degree to which each over- or underestimated the DWI core volume. Additionally, in the subset of 32 patients for whom follow-up CT or MRI was available, we measured the proportion of CBV- or DWI-defined core lesions that exceeded the follow-up infarct volume, and the maximum amount by which this occurred. Results DWI was positive in 72% (42/58) of patients. CBV maps’ sensitivity/specificity in identifying DWI-positive patients were 100%/0% for both objective methods with all thresholds, 43%/94% for R1, and 83%/44% for R2. Mean core overestimation was 156–699 mL for objective absolute thresholds, and 127–200 mL for objective relative thresholds. For R1 and R2, respectively, mean±SD subjective overestimation were -11±26 mL and -11±23 mL, but subjective volumes differed from DWI volumes by up to 117 and 124

  18. Major and minor arterial malformations in patients with cutaneous vascular abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Pascual-Castroviejo, Ignacio; Pascual-Pascual, Samuel I; Viaño, Juan; López-Gutierrez, Juan C; Palencia, Rafael

    2010-05-01

    The association of persistent embryonic arteries and the absence of 1 carotid or vertebral arteries with facial or neck hemangioma or vascular malformation have been frequently described. The abnormalities can involve major or minor vessels. Of 22 patients of our series with this neurocutaneous syndrome, 20 had the origin of both anterior cerebral arteries from the same internal carotid artery. Thirteen patients showed absence or hypoplasia of 1 carotid artery and 10 of 1 vertebral artery; 10 showed persistence of the trigeminal artery; 3 had persistent proatlantal artery; 6 showed the absence of the posterior communicating artery; and 4 had hypoplastic posterior cerebral artery. Other less frequent abnormalities were found in 7 patients. Intellectual level of most patients was either borderline or below normal. Abnormalities in the vascularization and perfusion of the frontal lobes may contribute to the borderline or lower mental level of these patients. PMID:19808986

  19. I-123 hydroxyiodobenzyl propanediamine (HIPDM) cerebral blood flow imaging demonstrating transtentorial diaschisis

    SciTech Connect

    Shih, W.J.; Dekosky, S.T.; Coupal, J.J.; Simmons, G.; Pulmano, C.; Kung, H.F.; Ryo, U.Y.; Clark, D.B. )

    1990-09-01

    To assess the clinical significance of transtentorial diaschisis (TTD) as demonstrated by I-123 HIPDM brain imaging, SPECT and/or planar images of 35 patients with stroke, 26 patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD), 2 patients with Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), and 1 patient with a schizoaffective disorder were analyzed. TTD was observed in 21 of the 35 patients with strokes. In 13 stroke patients, TTD was associated with large infarcts in the middle cerebral artery (MCA) territory; in the remaining 8 stroke patients, TTD was associated with internal capsule and/or basal ganglia infarcts. TTD was not associated with small occipital or parietal infarcts. Despite cortical perfusion decrements, TTD was not seen in the AD patients, the CJD patients, or the patient with schizoaffective disorder. It is concluded that (1) TTD frequently occurs following cerebral infarct of the MCA territory (60% of the patients in this sample); (2) absence of TTD in the presence of a large cerebral perfusion abnormality may represent neuronal dysfunction of the cerebral cortex; and (3) the presence of TTD without a significant cortical perfusion abnormality may indicate basal ganglia and/or internal capsule infarct.

  20. A Selective Review of Cerebral Abnormalities in Patients With First-Episode Schizophrenia Before and After Treatment.

    PubMed

    Gong, Qiyong; Lui, Su; Sweeney, John A

    2016-03-01

    The question of whether there are significant changes in brain anatomy and function at illness onset and over the early course of schizophrenia is a crucial issue with broad implications for prognosis, patient care, and models of illness pathophysiology. Prefrontal hypoactivity and hippocampal and subcortical hyperactivity at the onset of illness may represent a core illness pathophysiology. Gray matter changes have been most robust within thalamo-cortical networks, whereas altered brain activity has been most pronounced in fronto-parietal and default-mode networks. These findings indicate that regional anatomical and functional brain abnormalities are significantly dissociated during the early course of schizophrenia prior to antipsychotic treatment. One possible explanation is that functional MRI may reflect physiological alterations related to acute psychosis or consequences of distal anatomic changes, while changes in brain anatomy reflect more stable and long-standing alterations. The relative stability of brain measures in the early years after illness onset stands in contrast to indirect evidence for moderate progressive changes provided by our recent study of chronic never-treated patients. Our recent cross-sectional study of never-treated patients with chronic schizophrenia found an accelerated age-related decline in cortical thickness, relative to healthy controls, that could not be attributed to medication effects. Studies must consider both the clinical heterogeneity that affects findings of brain changes within schizophrenia and the low specificity of the brain changes, which can occur in other early-onset mental disorders as well. PMID:26621570

  1. The active transport of 5-hydroxyindol-3-ylacetic acid and 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid from a recirculatory perfusion system of the cerebral ventricles of the unanaesthetized dog

    PubMed Central

    Ashcroft, G. W.; Dow, R. C.; Moir, A. T. B.

    1968-01-01

    1. An operation on dogs for the implantation of guide tubes to the lateral ventricle and cisterna magna and a method whereby the ventricular space can be repeatedly perfused in conscious and unrestrained animals are described. 2. The characteristics of a recirculatory perfusion system were examined and the bulk formation and absorption of cerebrospinal fluid and the volume of the ventricular space perfused were derived from the concentrations achieved during the infusion of inulin into the system. 3. 5-hydroxyindol-3-ylacetic acid (5-HIAA), the acid metabolite of 5-hydroxytryptamine, and 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid (HVA), the main acid metabolite of dopamine, were demonstrated to be mainly removed from cerebrospinal fluid (c.s.f.) by an active transport system localized in the region of the fourth ventricle. 4. It was possible to inhibit the active transport of these acids from cerebrospinal fluid by pre-treating the dogs with probenecid. ImagesPlate 1Plate 2 PMID:5723518

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging of experimental cerebral oedema.

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, D; McDonald, W I; Tofts, P S; Johnson, G; Landon, D N

    1986-01-01

    Triethyl tin(TET)-induced cerebral oedema has been studied in cats by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and the findings correlated with the histology and fine structure of the cerebrum following perfusion-fixation. MRI is a sensitive technique for detecting cerebral oedema, and the distribution and severity of the changes correlate closely with the morphological abnormalities. The relaxation times, T1 and T2 increase progressively as the oedema develops, and the proportional increase in T2 is approximately twice that in T1. Analysis of the magnetisation decay curves reveals slowly-relaxing and rapidly-relaxing components which probably correspond to oedema fluid and intracellular water respectively. The image appearances taken in conjunction with relaxation data provide a basis for determining the nature of the oedema in vivo. Images PMID:3806109

  3. Arterial Spin Labeling Perfusion Study in the Patients with Subacute Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Che-Ming; Tseng, Ying-Chi; Hsu, Hui-Ling; Chen, Chi-Jen; Chen, David Yen-Ting; Yan, Feng-Xian; Chiu, Wen-Ta

    2016-01-01

    Background This study uses a MRI technique, three-dimension pulse continuous arterial spin labeling (3D-PCASL), to measure the patient’s cerebral blood flow (CBF) at the subacute stage of mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) in order to analyze the relationship between cerebral blood flow and neurocognitive deficits. Objective To provide the relationship between cortical CBF and neuropsychological dysfunction for the subacute MTBI patients. Methods After MTBI, perfusion MR imaging technique (3D-PCASL) measures the CBF of MTBI patients (n = 23) within 1 month and that of normal controls (n = 22) to determine the quantity and location of perfusion defect. The correlation between CBF abnormalities and cognitive deficits was elucidated by combining the results of the neuropsychological tests of the patients. Result We observed a substantial reduction in CBF in the bilateral frontal and left occipital cortex as compared with the normal persons. In addition, there were correlation between post concussive symptoms (including dizziness and simulator sickness) and CBF in the hypoperfused areas. The more severe symptom was correlated with higher CBF in bilateral frontal and left occipital lobes. Conclusion First, this study determined that despite no significant abnormality detected on conventional CT and MRI studies, hypoperfusion was observed in MTBI group using 3D-PCASL technique in subacute stage, which suggested that this approach may increase sensitivity to MTBI. Second, the correlation between CBF and the severity of post concussive symptoms suggested that changes in cerebral hemodynamics may play a role in pathophysiology underlies the symptoms. PMID:26871696

  4. Voxel-by-voxel analysis of brain SPECT perfusion in Fibromyalgia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guedj, Eric; Taïeb, David; Cammilleri, Serge; Lussato, David; de Laforte, Catherine; Niboyet, Jean; Mundler, Olivier

    2007-02-01

    We evaluated brain perfusion SPECT at rest, without noxious stiumuli, in a homogeneous group of hyperalgesic FM patients. We performed a voxel-based analysis in comparison to a control group, matched for age and gender. Under such conditions, we made the assumption that significant cerebral perfusion abnormalities could be demonstrated, evidencing altered cerebral processing associated with spontaneous pain in FM patients. The secondary objective was to study the reversibility and the prognostic value of such possible perfusion abnormalities under specific treatment. Eighteen hyperalgesic FM women (mean age 48 yr; range 25-63 yr; ACR criteria) and 10 healthy women matched for age were enrolled in the study. A voxel-by-voxel group analysis was performed using SPM2 ( p<0.05, corrected for multiple comparisons). All brain SPECT were performed before any change was made in therapy in the pain care unit. A second SPECT was performed a month later after specific treatment by Ketamine. Compared to control subjects, we observed individual brain SPECT abnormalities in FM patients, confirmed by SPM2 analysis with hyperperfusion of the somatosensory cortex and hypoperfusion of the frontal, cingulate, medial temporal and cerebellar cortices. We also found that a medial frontal and anterior cingulate hypoperfusions were highly predictive (PPV=83%; NPV=91%) of non-response on Ketamine, and that only responders showed significant modification of brain perfusion, after treatment. In the present study performed without noxious stimuli in hyperalgesic FM patients, we found significant hyperperfusion in regions of the brain known to be involved in sensory dimension of pain processing and significant hypoperfusion in areas assumed to be associated with the affective dimension. As current pharmacological and non-pharmacological therapies act differently on both components of pain, we hypothesize that SPECT could be a valuable and readily available tool to guide individual therapeutic

  5. Computed tomography perfusion imaging in spectacular shrinking deficit.

    PubMed

    Lee, Vivien H; John, Sayona; Mohammad, Yousef; Prabhakaran, Shyam

    2012-02-01

    Spectacular shrinking deficit (SSD) is characterized by abrupt onset of a major hemispheric stroke syndrome, followed by dramatic and rapid improvement. We retrospectively identified patients with SSD diagnosed at our institution between December 1, 2007, and June 30, 2009. We reviewed computed tomography perfusion (CTP) imaging to determine perfusion defect as a measure of initial ischemic penumbra, and magnetic resonance imaging diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) to determine the final infarct core. Among the 472 consecutive ischemic stroke patients, 126 (27%) presented with major hemispheric ischemic stroke syndrome, defined as National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score (NIHSS) ≥8 in the territory of the middle cerebral artery (MCA) or internal carotid artery (ICA). Out of these patients, we identified 8 SSD patients with available CTP data. In these 8 patients, the mean time to dramatic recovery was 3.4 hours (range, 0.75-7 hours), and the mean time from onset to CTP was 12.7 hours (range, 3-30 hours). All 8 patients had perfusion abnormalities in portions of the MCA territory (partial MCA territory in 5 patients and complete MCA territory in 3 patients). The mean time from onset to MRI DWI was 15.5 hours (range, 7.9-34 hours). Restricted diffusion was present in all patients in the corresponding MCA distribution. Vascular imaging revealed MCA occlusion in 2 patients. Cervical vascular imaging revealed carotid occlusion in 2 patients and high-grade carotid stenosis in 2 patients. The stroke mechanisms were cardioembolism in 2 patients, large artery in 4 patients, and unknown in 2 patients. Four patients had repeat CTP imaging available that demonstrated eventual resolution of the perfusion defect. SSD is associated with a "shrinking" clinical syndrome and a "shrinking" perfusion pattern on CTP that lags behind clinical recovery. CTP imaging corroborates that a larger territory is at risk in SSD and contributes to better understanding of SSD. PMID:20702113

  6. Psychosis of Alzheimer's disease: Gender differences in regional perfusion.

    PubMed

    Moran, E K; Becker, J A; Satlin, A; Lyoo, In Kyoon; Fischman, A J; Johnson, K A

    2008-08-01

    We sought to determine whether the presence of psychotic symptoms in patients with Alzheimer's disease is associated with abnormal regional cerebral function. Perfusion single photon emission computed tomography images from 51 AD patients with psychotic symptoms were compared to images of 52 AD patients without such symptoms. Group comparisons were made with a voxel-based method, Statistical Parametric Mapping. We found that perfusion was lower in female patients with psychotic symptoms in right infero-lateral prefrontal cortex and in inferior temporal regions compared to female patients without such symptoms. In contrast, perfusion was higher in male patients with psychotic symptoms in the right striatum compared to male patients without such symptoms. Comparison groups did not differ in age or in dementia severity, as estimated by the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE). These results support the role of right hemisphere prefrontal and lateral temporal cortex in the psychosis of AD in women but not in men, and raise the possibility that these dysfunctional processes have a gender-specific regional pathophysiology in AD. PMID:17408808

  7. Perfusion single photon emission computed tomography in a mouse model of neurofibromatosis type 1: towards a biomarker of neurologic deficits.

    PubMed

    Apostolova, Ivayla; Niedzielska, Dagmara; Derlin, Thorsten; Koziolek, Eva J; Amthauer, Holger; Salmen, Benedikt; Pahnke, Jens; Brenner, Winfried; Mautner, Victor F; Buchert, Ralph

    2015-08-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is a single-gene disorder affecting neurologic function in humans. The NF1+/- mouse model with germline mutation of the NF1 gene presents with deficits in learning, attention, and motor coordination, very similar to NF1 patients. The present study performed brain perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in NF1+/- mice to identify possible perfusion differences as surrogate marker for altered cerebral activity in NF1. Cerebral perfusion was measured with hexamethyl-propyleneamine oxime (HMPAO) SPECT in NF1+/- mice and their wild-type littermates longitudinally at juvenile age and at young adulthood. Histology and immunohistochemistry were performed to test for structural changes. There was increased HMPAO uptake in NF1 mice in the amygdala at juvenile age, which reduced to normal levels at young adulthood. There was no genotype effect on thalamic HMPAO uptake, which was confirmed by ex vivo measurements of F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose uptake in the thalamus. Morphologic analyses showed no major structural abnormalities. However, there was some evidence of increased density of microglial somata in the amygdala of NF1-deficient mice. In conclusion, there is evidence of increased perfusion and increased density of microglia in juvenile NF1 mice specifically in the amygdala, both of which might be associated with altered synaptic plasticity and, therefore, with cognitive deficits in NF1. PMID:25785829

  8. Perfusion magnetic resonance imaging correlates of neuropsychological impairment in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Inglese, Matilde; Adhya, Sumita; Johnson, Glyn; Babb, James S; Miles, Laura; Jaggi, Hina; Herbert, Joseph; Grossman, Robert I

    2008-01-01

    Although cognitive impairment is common in multiple sclerosis (MS), its pathophysiology is still poorly understood. Abnormalities of cerebral blood flow (CBF) have long been acknowledged in MS and advances in perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) allow for their assessment in vivo. We investigated the relationship between regional perfusion changes and neuropsychological (NP) dysfunctions in patients with relapsing-remitting and primary-progressive MS. Absolute CBF, cerebral blood volume (CBV) and mean transit time were measured in 32 MS patients and 11 healthy controls using dynamic susceptibility contrast-enhanced T2*-weighted MRI. A comprehensive NP test battery was administered to all patients. A mixed model analysis of covariance was performed for group comparisons in terms of perfusion measures in normal-appearing white matter (NAWM) and deep gray matter (GM). Pearson’s correlations were used to describe the association of perfusion metrics with NP Z-scores. CBF and CBV values were significantly decreased in both NAWM and deep GM in MS patients compared with controls (P = 0.01). In all patients, deep GM CBF was significantly associated with Rey Complex Figure Test (RCFT)-Copy (r = 0.5; P = 0.001) and deep GM CBV and NAWM CBV were significantly associated with Color-Word Interference Inhibition Switching test (D-KEFSIS) (r = 0.4; P = 0.008 and r = 0.4; P = 0.02). However, the only associations that remained significant after Bonferroni correction were between deep GM CBF and RCFT-Copy (P = 0.006), and deep GM CBV and D-KEFSIS (P = 0.04). Our results suggest a role for tissue perfusion impairment in NP dysfunction in MS. Large-scale studies are needed to characterize better this association. PMID:17473851

  9. Perfusion harmonic imaging of the human brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzler, Volker H.; Seidel, Guenter; Wiesmann, Martin; Meyer, Karsten; Aach, Til

    2003-05-01

    The fast visualisation of cerebral microcirculation supports diagnosis of acute cerebrovascular diseases. However, the commonly used CT/MRI-based methods are time consuming and, moreover, costly. Therefore we propose an alternative approach to brain perfusion imaging by means of ultrasonography. In spite of the low signal/noise-ratio of transcranial ultrasound and the high impedance of the skull, flow images of cerebral blood flow can be derived by capturing the kinetics of appropriate contrast agents by harmonic ultrasound image sequences. In this paper we propose three different methods for human brain perfusion imaging, each of which yielding flow images indicating the status of the patient's cerebral microcirculation by visualising local flow parameters. Bolus harmonic imaging (BHI) displays the flow kinetics of bolus injections, while replenishment (RHI) and diminution harmonic imaging (DHI) compute flow characteristics from contrast agent continuous infusions. RHI measures the contrast agents kinetics in the influx phase and DHI displays the diminution kinetics of the contrast agent acquired from the decay phase. In clinical studies, BHI- and RHI-parameter images were found to represent comprehensive and reproducible distributions of physiological cerebral blood flow. For DHI it is shown, that bubble destruction and hence perfusion phenomena principally can be displayed. Generally, perfusion harmonic imaging enables reliable and fast bedside imaging of human brain perfusion. Due to its cost efficiency it complements cerebrovascular diagnostics by established CT/MRI-based methods.

  10. Abnormal regional cerebral blood flow found by technetium-99m ethyl cysteinate dimer brain single photon emission computed tomography in systemic lupus erythematosus patients with normal brain MRI findings.

    PubMed

    Chen, J J-H; Yen, R-F; Kao, A; Lin, C-C; Lee, C-C

    2002-11-01

    In this study, technetium-(99m) ethyl cysteinate dimer ((99m)Tc ECD) brain single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) was used to detect regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) of the brain in SLE patients with normal brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings. Twenty female SLE patients were enrolled in this study, divided into two groups. Group 1 consisted of 10 patients with neuropsychiatric manifestations. Group 2 consisted of 10 patients without neuropsychiatric manifestations. All patients had normal brain MRI findings. Another 10 SLE patients with abnormal MRI findings were included as group 3 for comparison. Meanwhile, 10 healthy female volunteers also underwent brain MRI and (99m)Tc ECD brain SPECT for comparison. The scans revealed hypoperfusion lesions in 9/20 (45%) SLE patients, including 7/10 (70%) cases in group 1 and 2/10 (20%) cases in group 2. In contrast, all 10 patients (100%) in group 3 had abnormal (99m)Tc ECD brain SPECT findings. The parietal lobes were the most commonly involved areas. We conclude that (99m)Tc ECD brain SPECT is more sensitive for detecting rCBF changes than is brain MRI in detecting the brain anatomic changes, and may have a diagnostic value in lupus cerebral involvement. However, (99m)Tc ECD brain SPECT may not be indicated for SLE patients with normal MRI and mild neuropsychiatric symptoms/signs, such headaches and dizziness. PMID:12447638

  11. Value of Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast Perfusion MRI in the Acute Phase of Transient Global Amnesia

    PubMed Central

    Förster, Alex; Al-Zghloul, Mansour; Kerl, Hans U.; Böhme, Johannes; Mürle, Bettina; Groden, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Transient global amnesia (TGA) is a transitory, short-lasting neurological disorder characterized by a sudden onset of antero- and retrograde amnesia. Perfusion abnormalities in TGA have been evaluated mainly by use of positron emission tomography (PET) or single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). In the present study we explore the value of dynamic susceptibility contrast perfusion-weighted MRI (PWI) in TGA in the acute phase. Methods From a MRI report database we identified TGA patients who underwent MRI including PWI in the acute phase and compared these to control subjects. Quantitative perfusion maps (cerebral blood flow (CBF) and volume (CBV)) were generated and analyzed by use of Signal Processing In NMR-Software (SPIN). CBF and CBV values in subcortical brain regions were assessed by use of VOI created in FIRST, a model-based segmentation tool in the Oxford Centre for Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Brain (FMRIB) Software Library (FSL). Results Five TGA patients were included (2 men, 3 women). On PWI, no relevant perfusion alterations were found by visual inspection in TGA patients. Group comparisons for possible differences between TGA patients and control subjects showed significant lower rCBF values bilaterally in the hippocampus, in the left thalamus and globus pallidus as well as bilaterally in the putamen and the left caudate nucleus. Correspondingly, significant lower rCBV values were observed bilaterally in the hippocampus and the putamen as well as in the left caudate nucleus. Group comparisons for possible side differences in rCBF and rCBV values in TGA patients revealed a significant lower rCBV value in the left caudate nucleus. Conclusions Mere visual inspection of PWI is not sufficient for the assessment of perfusion changes in TGA in the acute phase. Group comparisons with healthy control subjects might be useful to detect subtle perfusion changes on PWI in TGA patients. However, this should be confirmed in

  12. Cerebral blood flow in patients with peritoneal dialysis by an easy Z-score imaging system for brain perfusion single-photon emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Isshiki, Rei; Kobayashi, Shuzo; Iwagami, Masao; Tsutumi, Daimu; Mochida, Yasuhiro; Ishioka, Kunihiro; Oka, Machiko; Maesato, Kyoko; Moriya, Hidekazu; Ohtake, Takayasu; Hidaka, Sumi

    2014-06-01

    Cognitive impairment has long been recognized as a complication of chronic kidney disease. However, there is little information available regarding regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in patients with peritoneal dialysis (PD). Therefore, we evaluated rCBF using brain single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). We conducted a cross-sectional study in our hospital. Eighteen consecutive PD patients who could visit the hospital by themselves without any history of stroke were examined by Technetium-99 m-labeled ethylcrysteinate dimer brain SPECT. An easy Z-score imaging system (eZIS) was used to compare rCBF in PD patients with those in age-matched healthy controls. We also evaluated cognitive dysfunction with the mini-mental state examination (MMSE) questionnaire. Only one patient showed an MMSE score of 18 points, and the remaining 14 patients were considered as normal (MMSE ≥ 27), and three patients were considered to have mild cognitive impairment (24 ≤ MMSE ≤ 26). In all patients, rCBF in the posterior cingulated gyri, precunei, and parietal cortices was significantly decreased. The ratio of the reduction of rCBF in each region relative to that of rCBF across the whole brain correlated positively with the PD duration (r = 0.559; P < 0.05). The serum β2-microglobulin level was significantly higher in patients who had a higher ratio of rCBF reduction compared with those with lower ratios. In conclusion, all PD patients in the present study had decreased rCBF irrespective of MMSE scores. PMID:24965295

  13. Clinical Neuroimaging Using Arterial Spin-Labeled Perfusion MRI

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Ronald L.; Detre, John A.

    2007-01-01

    SUMMARY The two most common methods for measuring perfusion with MRI are based on dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) and arterial spin labeling (ASL). Although clinical experience to date is much more extensive with DSC perfusion MRI, ASL methods offer several advantages. The primary advantages are that completely noninvasive absolute cerebral blood flow (CBF) measurements are possible with relative insensitivity to permeability, and that multiple repeated measurements can be obtained to evaluate one or more interventions or to perform perfusion-based functional MRI. ASL perfusion and perfusion-based fMRI methods have been applied in many clinical settings, including acute and chronic cerebrovascular disease, CNS neoplasms, epilepsy, aging and development, neurodegenerative disorders, and neuropsychiatric diseases. Recent technical advances have improved the sensitivity of ASL perfusion MRI, and increasing use is expected in the coming years. This review focuses on ASL perfusion MRI and applications in clinical neuroimaging. PMID:17599701

  14. Alterations in regional cerebral blood flow in neonatal stroke: preliminary findings with color Doppler sonography.

    PubMed

    Taylor, G A

    1994-01-01

    Little information is available regarding alterations in regional cerebral blood flow and vascularity on cranial sonography in infants with focal ischemic brain injury. This study describes the use of color Doppler sonography in the characterization of these changes following acute neonatal stroke. Color Doppler examinations were performed as part of the series of clinically indicated cranial sonograms in eight infants with clinical, sonographic, and CT evidence of acute cerebral infarction. The cerebral vascularity of each hemisphere was assessed for symmetry and for presence of abnormal blood vessels. Initial Doppler study in four infants with hypoxic-ischemic infarcts showed increased size and number of visible vessels in the periphery of the infarct and increased mean blood flow velocity in vessels supplying or draining the infarcted areas. Diminished vessel number and size and frequency shifts suggestive of decreased hemispheric perfusion was identified in one infant with middle cerebral artery insufficiency. Repeat Doppler studies were performed on two infants. These showed the development of multiple small, irregular blood vessels in the periphery of the infarct. Focal abnormalities in regional cerebral blood flow may be present as part of the normal healing process following neonatal stroke, and can be demonstrated with color Doppler sonography. PMID:7915832

  15. Walking abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... or head trauma Brain tumor Cerebrovascular accident (stroke) Cerebral palsy Cervical spondylosis with myelopathy (a problem with the ... 22. Read More Arthritis Bunions Central nervous system Cerebral palsy Dizziness Ingrown toenail Multiple sclerosis Muscular dystrophy Myositis ...

  16. Cerebral dysgenesis. An overview.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, G B; Sheth, R D; Bodensteiner, J B

    1994-11-01

    A significant portion of patients with neurodevelopmental abnormalities (mental retardation, learning disabilities, and so forth) have no definable cause for these problems. Mounting evidence suggests a substantial number of these idiopathic conditions have subtle abnormalities of brain development (cerebral dysgenesis) as the inherent pathophysiologic event. In this article the authors summarize normal and abnormal brain development, the diagnostic approach to idiopathic neurodevelopmental anomalies, and the new molecular genetic insights into the underlying causes of brain malformations. PMID:7845342

  17. Pattern of Hemodynamic Impairment in Multiple Sclerosis: Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast Perfusion MR Imaging at 3.0 T

    PubMed Central

    Adhya, Sumita; Johnson, Glyn; Herbert, Joseph; Jaggi, Hina; Babb, James S.; Grossman, Robert I.; Inglese, Matilde

    2006-01-01

    This study aimed to determine regional pattern of tissue perfusion in the normal-appearing white matter (NAWM) of patients with primary-progressive (PP), relapsing-remitting (RR) multiple sclerosis (MS) and healthy controls, and to investigate the association between perfusion abnormalities and clinical disability. Using dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) perfusion MRI at 3 Tesla, we studied twenty-two patients with clinically definite MS, eleven with PP-MS and eleven with RR-MS and eleven age- and gender-matched healthy volunteers. The MRI protocol included axial dual-echo, dynamic susceptibility contrast enhanced (DSC) T2*-weighted and post-contrast T1-weighted images. Absolute cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral blood volume (CBV) and mean transit time (MTT) were measured in the periventricular, frontal, occipital NAWM, and in the splenium of the corpus callosum. Compared to controls, CBF and CBV were significantly lower in all NAWM regions in both PP-MS patients (p values from <0.0001 to 0.001) and RR-MS (p values from <0.0001 to 0.020). Compared to RR-MS, PP-MS patients showed significantly lower CBF in the periventricular NAWM (p= 0.002) and lower CBV in the periventricular and frontal NAWM (p values: 0.0029 and 0.022). EDSS was significantly correlated with the periventricular CBF (r=−0.48, p=0.0016) and with the periventricular and frontal CBV (r=−0.42, p=0.015; r=−0.35, p=0.038, respectively). This study suggests that the hemodynamic abnormalities of NAWM have clinical relevance in patients with MS. DSC perfusion MRI might provide a relevant objective measure of disease activity and treatment efficacy. PMID:16996280

  18. Voxel-level comparison of arterial spin-labeled perfusion magnetic resonance imaging in adolescents with internet gaming addiction

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Although recent studies have clearly demonstrated functional and structural abnormalities in adolescents with internet gaming addiction (IGA), less is known about how IGA affects perfusion in the human brain. We used pseudocontinuous arterial spin-labeling (ASL) perfusion functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to measure the effects of IGA on resting brain functions by comparing resting cerebral blood flow in adolescents with IGA and normal subjects. Methods Fifteen adolescents with IGA and 18 matched normal adolescents underwent structural and perfusion fMRI in the resting state. Direct subtraction, voxel-wise general linear modeling was performed to compare resting cerebral blood flow (CBF) between the 2 groups. Correlations were calculated between the mean CBF value in all clusters that survived AlphaSim correction and the Chen Internet Addiction Scale (CIAS) scores, Barratt Impulsiveness Scale-11 (BIS-11) scores, or hours of Internet use per week (hours) in the 15 subjects with IGA. Results Compared with control subjects, adolescents with IGA showed significantly higher global CBF in the left inferior temporal lobe/fusiform gyrus, left parahippocampal gyrus/amygdala, right medial frontal lobe/anterior cingulate cortex, left insula, right insula, right middle temporal gyrus, right precentral gyrus, left supplementary motor area, left cingulate gyrus, and right inferior parietal lobe. Lower CBF was found in the left middle temporal gyrus, left middle occipital gyrus, and right cingulate gyrus. There were no significant correlations between mean CBF values in all clusters that survived AlphaSim correction and CIAS or BIS-11 scores or hours of Internet use per week. Conclusions In this study, we used ASL perfusion fMRI and noninvasively quantified resting CBF to demonstrate that IGA alters the CBF distribution in the adolescent brain. The results support the hypothesis that IGA is a behavioral addiction that may share similar neurobiological

  19. Stroke prognosis by applying double thresholds on CT-perfusion-brain images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chokchaitam, Somchart; Santipromwong, Nittaya; Muengtaweepongsa, Sombat

    2013-03-01

    The CT-perfusion image shows information of brain abnormalities such as its size and location. Generally, neurologist diagnoses stroke disease using CT-perfusion images such as Cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral blood volume (CBV). In our previous report, we applied threshold technique to divide amount of CBV and CBF into low and high level. Then, their levels are applied to identify normal tissue areas, dead tissue areas (infract core) and blood-cot tissue areas (infract penumbra). However, it's not totally correct, if the same threshold is applied to the whole area (it must depend on size of blood vessel in that area. In this report, we propose double thresholds to divided CBV and CBF into 3 levels: very low, medium and very high levels. Very low and very high levels are definitely implied to bad areas and good areas, respectively. The proposed double thresholds makes stroke prognosis more accurate. The simulation results confirm that our proposed results closed to results defined from neurologist comparing to the conventional results.

  20. Cerebral Palsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Cerebral Palsy KidsHealth > For Teens > Cerebral Palsy Print A A ... do just what everyone else does. What Is Cerebral Palsy? Cerebral palsy (CP) is a disorder of the ...

  1. Caffeine induced changes in cerebral circulation

    SciTech Connect

    Mathew, R.J.; Wilson, W.H.

    1985-09-01

    While the caffeine induced cerebral vasoconstriction is well documented, the effects of oral ingestion of the drug in a dose range comparable to the quantities in which it is usually consumed and the intensity and duration of the associated reduction in cerebral circulation are unknown. Cerebral blood flow was measured via the TTXenon inhalation technique before and thirty and ninety minutes after the oral administration of 250 mg of caffeine or a placebo, under double-blind conditions. Caffeine ingestion was found to be associated with significant reductions in cerebral perfusion thirty and ninety minutes later. The placebo group showed no differences between the three sets of cerebral blood flow values.

  2. Perfusion deficits and functional connectivity alterations in patients with post-traumatic stress disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang; Li, Baojuan; Zhang, Xi; Zhang, Linchuan; Li, Liang; Lu, Hongbing

    2016-03-01

    To explore the alteration in cerebral blood flow (CBF) and functional connectivity between survivors with recent onset post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and without PTSD, survived from the same coal mine flood disaster. In this study, a processing pipeline using arterial spin labeling (ASL) sequence was proposed. Considering low spatial resolution of ASL sequence, a linear regression method was firstly used to correct the partial volume (PV) effect for better CBF estimation. Then the alterations of CBF between two groups were analyzed using both uncorrected and PV-corrected CBF maps. Based on altered CBF regions detected from the CBF analysis as seed regions, the functional connectivity abnormities in PTSD patients was investigated. The CBF analysis using PV-corrected maps indicates CBF deficits in the bilateral frontal lobe, right superior frontal gyrus and right corpus callosum of PTSD patients, while only right corpus callosum was identified in uncorrected CBF analysis. Furthermore, the regional CBF of the right superior frontal gyrus exhibits significantly negative correlation with the symptom severity in PTSD patients. The resting-state functional connectivity indicates increased connectivity between left frontal lobe and right parietal lobe. These results indicate that PV-corrected CBF exhibits more subtle perfusion changes and may benefit further perfusion and connectivity analysis. The symptom-specific perfusion deficits and aberrant connectivity in above memory-related regions may be putative biomarkers for recent onset PTSD induced by a single prolonged trauma exposure and help predict the severity of PTSD.

  3. Pulmonary ventilation/perfusion scan

    MedlinePlus

    V/Q scan; Ventilation/perfusion scan; Lung ventilation/perfusion scan ... A pulmonary ventilation/perfusion scan is actually two tests. They may be done separately or together. During the perfusion scan, a health ...

  4. Parallel perfusion imaging processing using GPGPU

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Fan; Gonzalez, David Rodriguez; Carpenter, Trevor; Atkinson, Malcolm; Wardlaw, Joanna

    2012-01-01

    Background and purpose The objective of brain perfusion quantification is to generate parametric maps of relevant hemodynamic quantities such as cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral blood volume (CBV) and mean transit time (MTT) that can be used in diagnosis of acute stroke. These calculations involve deconvolution operations that can be very computationally expensive when using local Arterial Input Functions (AIF). As time is vitally important in the case of acute stroke, reducing the analysis time will reduce the number of brain cells damaged and increase the potential for recovery. Methods GPUs originated as graphics generation dedicated co-processors, but modern GPUs have evolved to become a more general processor capable of executing scientific computations. It provides a highly parallel computing environment due to its large number of computing cores and constitutes an affordable high performance computing method. In this paper, we will present the implementation of a deconvolution algorithm for brain perfusion quantification on GPGPU (General Purpose Graphics Processor Units) using the CUDA programming model. We present the serial and parallel implementations of such algorithms and the evaluation of the performance gains using GPUs. Results Our method has gained a 5.56 and 3.75 speedup for CT and MR images respectively. Conclusions It seems that using GPGPU is a desirable approach in perfusion imaging analysis, which does not harm the quality of cerebral hemodynamic maps but delivers results faster than the traditional computation. PMID:22824549

  5. Does Preoperative Measurement of Cerebral Blood Flow with Acetazolamide Challenge in Addition to Preoperative Measurement of Cerebral Blood Flow at the Resting State Increase the Predictive Accuracy of Development of Cerebral Hyperperfusion after Carotid Endarterectomy? Results from 500 Cases with Brain Perfusion Single-photon Emission Computed Tomography Study

    PubMed Central

    OSHIDA, Sotaro; OGASAWARA, Kuniaki; SAURA, Hiroaki; YOSHIDA, Koji; FUJIWARA, Shunro; KOJIMA, Daigo; KOBAYASHI, Masakazu; YOSHIDA, Kenji; KUBO, Yoshitaka; OGAWA, Akira

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine whether preoperative measurement of cerebral blood flow (CBF) with acetazolamide in addition to preoperative measurement of CBF at the resting state increases the predictive accuracy of development of cerebral hyperperfusion after carotid endarterectomy (CEA). CBF at the resting state and cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR) to acetazolamide were quantitatively assessed using N-isopropyl-p-[123I]-iodoamphetamine (IMP)-autoradiography method with single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) before CEA in 500 patients with ipsilateral internal carotid artery stenosis (≥ 70%). CBF measurement using 123I-IMP SPECT was also performed immediately and 3 days after CEA. A region of interest (ROI) was automatically placed in the middle cerebral artery territory in the affected cerebral hemisphere using a three-dimensional stereotactic ROI template. Preoperative decreases in CBF at the resting state [95% confidence intervals (CIs), 0.855 to 0.967; P = 0.0023] and preoperative decreases in CVR to acetazolamide (95% CIs, 0.844 to 0.912; P < 0.0001) were significant independent predictors of post-CEA hyperperfusion. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve for prediction of the development of post-CEA hyperperfusion was significantly greater for CVR to acetazolamide than for CBF at the resting state (difference between areas, 0.173; P < 0.0001). Sensitivity, specificity, and positive- and negative-predictive values for the prediction of the development of post-CEA hyperperfusion were significantly greater for CVR to acetazolamide than for CBF at the resting state (P < 0.05, respectively). The present study demonstrated that preoperative measurement of CBF with acetazolamide in addition to preoperative measurement of CBF at the resting state increases the predictive accuracy of the development of post-CEA hyperperfusion. PMID:25746308

  6. Cerebral malaria.

    PubMed

    Postels, Douglas G; Birbeck, Gretchen L

    2013-01-01

    Malaria, the most significant parasitic disease of man, kills approximately one million people per year. Half of these deaths occur in those with cerebral malaria (CM). The World Health Organization (WHO) defines CM as an otherwise unexplained coma in a patient with malarial parasitemia. Worldwide, CM occurs primarily in African children and Asian adults, with the vast majority (greater than 90%) of cases occurring in children 5 years old or younger in sub-Saharan Africa. The pathophysiology of the disease is complex and involves infected erythrocyte sequestration, cerebral inflammation, and breakdown of the blood-brain barrier. A recently characterized malarial retinopathy is visual evidence of Plasmodium falciparum's pathophysiological processes occurring in the affected patient. Treatment consists of supportive care and antimalarial administration. Thus far, adjuvant therapies have not been shown to improve mortality rates or neurological outcomes in children with CM. For those who survive CM, residual neurological abnormalities are common. Epilepsy, cognitive impairment, behavioral disorders, and gross neurological deficits which include motor, sensory, and language impairments are frequent sequelae. Primary prevention strategies, including bed nets, vaccine development, and chemoprophylaxis, are in varied states of development and implementation. Continuing efforts to find successful primary prevention options and strategies to decrease neurological sequelae are needed. PMID:23829902

  7. Cerebral Hypoxia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Cerebral Hypoxia Information Page Synonym(s): Hypoxia, Anoxia Table of Contents ( ... Trials Organizations Publicaciones en Español What is Cerebral Hypoxia? Cerebral hypoxia refers to a condition in which ...

  8. Molecular pathophysiology of cerebral edema.

    PubMed

    Stokum, Jesse A; Gerzanich, Volodymyr; Simard, J Marc

    2016-03-01

    Advancements in molecular biology have led to a greater understanding of the individual proteins responsible for generating cerebral edema. In large part, the study of cerebral edema is the study of maladaptive ion transport. Following acute CNS injury, cells of the neurovascular unit, particularly brain endothelial cells and astrocytes, undergo a program of pre- and post-transcriptional changes in the activity of ion channels and transporters. These changes can result in maladaptive ion transport and the generation of abnormal osmotic forces that, ultimately, manifest as cerebral edema. This review discusses past models and current knowledge regarding the molecular and cellular pathophysiology of cerebral edema. PMID:26661240

  9. Molecular pathophysiology of cerebral edema

    PubMed Central

    Gerzanich, Volodymyr; Simard, J Marc

    2015-01-01

    Advancements in molecular biology have led to a greater understanding of the individual proteins responsible for generating cerebral edema. In large part, the study of cerebral edema is the study of maladaptive ion transport. Following acute CNS injury, cells of the neurovascular unit, particularly brain endothelial cells and astrocytes, undergo a program of pre- and post-transcriptional changes in the activity of ion channels and transporters. These changes can result in maladaptive ion transport and the generation of abnormal osmotic forces that, ultimately, manifest as cerebral edema. This review discusses past models and current knowledge regarding the molecular and cellular pathophysiology of cerebral edema. PMID:26661240

  10. Early perfusion changes in patients with recurrent high-grade brain tumor treated with Bevacizumab: preliminary results by a quantitative evaluation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background To determine whether early monitoring of the effects of bevacizumab in patients with recurrent high-grade gliomas, by a Perfusion Computed Tomography (PCT), may be a predictor of the response to treatment assessed through conventional MRI follow-up. Methods Sixteen patients were enrolled in the present study. For each patient, two PCT examinations, before and after the first dose of bevacizumab, were acquired. Areas of abnormal Cerebral Blood Volume (CBV) were manually defined on the CBV maps, using co-registered T1- weighted images, acquired before treatment, as a guide to the tumor location. Different perfusion metrics were derived from the histogram analysis of the normalized CBV (nCBV) maps; both hyper and hypo-perfused sub-volumes were quantified in the lesion, including tumor necrosis. A two-tailed Wilcoxon test was used to establish the significance of changes in the different perfusion metrics, observed at baseline and during treatment. The relationships between changes in perfusion and morphological MRI modifications at first follow-up were investigated. Results Significant reductions in mean and median nCBV were detected throughout the entire patient population, after only a single dose of bevacizumab. The nCBV histogram modifications indicated the normalization effect of bevacizumab on the tumor abnormal vasculature. An improvement in hypoxia after a single dose of bevacizumab was predictive of a greater reduction in T1-weighted contrast-enhanced volumes at first follow-up. Conclusions These preliminary results show that a quantification of changes in necrotic intra-tumoral regions could be proposed as a potential imaging biomarker of tumor response to anti-VEGF therapies. PMID:22494770

  11. A novel quantification method for determining previously undetected silent infarcts on MR-perfusion in patients following carotid endarterectomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xin; Imielinska, Celina; Rosiene, Joel; Rampersad, Anita; Zurica, Joseph; Wilson, David; Halazun, Hadi; Williams, Susan C.; Ligneli, Angela; D'Ambrosio, Anthony; Sughrue, Michael; Connolly, E. S., Jr.; Heyer, Eric J.

    2005-04-01

    The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the post-operative Magnetic Resonance Perfusion (MRP) scans of patients undergoing carotid endarterectomy (CEA), using a novel image-analysis algorithm, to determine if post-operative neurocognitive decline is associated with cerebral blood flow changes. CEA procedure reduces the risk of stroke in appropriately selected patients with significant carotid artery stenosis. However, 25% of patients experience subtle cognitive deficits after CEA compared to a control group. It was hypothesized that abnormalities in cerebral blood flow (CBF) are responsible for these cognitive deficits. A novel algorithm for analyzing MR-perfusion (MRP) scans to identify and quantify the amount of CBF asymmetry in each hemisphere was developed and to quantify the degree of relative difference between three corresponding vascular regions in the ipsilateral and contralateral hemispheres, the Relative Difference Map (RDM). Patients undergoing CEA and spine surgery (controls) were examined preoperatively, and one day postoperatively with a battery of neuropsychometric (NPM) tests, and labeled "injured" patients with significant cognitive deficits, and "normal" if they demonstrated no decline in neurocognitive function. There are apparently significant RDM differences with MRP scans between the two hemispheres in patients with cognitive deficits which can be used to guide expert reviews of the imagery. The proposed methodology aids in the analysis of MRP parameters in patients with cognitive impairment.

  12. CAD of myocardial perfusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storm, Corstiaan J.; Slump, Cornelis H.

    2007-03-01

    Our purpose is in the automated evaluation of the physiological relevance of lesions in coronary angiograms. We aim to extract as much as possible quantitative information about the physiological condition of the heart from standard angiographic image sequences. Coronary angiography is still the gold standard for evaluating and diagnosing coronary abnormalities as it is able to locate precisely the coronary artery lesions. The dimensions of the stenosis can be assessed nowadays successfully with image processing based Quantitative Coronary Angiography (QCA) techniques. Our purpose is to assess the clinical relevance of the pertinent stenosis. We therefore analyze the myocardial perfusion as revealed in standard angiographic image sequences. In a Region-of-Interest (ROI) on the angiogram (without an overlaying major blood vessel) the contrast is measured as a function of time (the so-called time-density curve). The required hyperemic state of exercise is induced artificially by the injection of a vasodilator drug e.g. papaverine. In order to minimize motion artifacts we select based on the recorded ECG signal end-diastolic images in both a basal and a hyperemic run in the same projection to position the ROI. We present the development of the algorithms together with results of a small study of 20 patients which have been catheterized following the standard protocol.

  13. Nifedipine and thallium-201 myocardial perfusion in progressive systemic sclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Kahan, A.; Devaux, J.Y.; Amor, B.; Menkes, C.J.; Weber, S.; Nitenberg, A.; Venot, A.; Guerin, F.; Degeorges, M.; Roucayrol, J.C.

    1986-05-29

    Heart disease in patients with progressive systemic sclerosis may be due in part to myocardial ischemia caused by a disturbance of the coronary microcirculation. To determine whether abnormalities of myocardial perfusion in this disorder are potentially reversible, we evaluated the effect of the coronary vasodilator nifedipine on myocardial perfusion assessed by thallium-201 scanning in 20 patients. Thallium-201 single-photon-emission computerized tomography was performed under control conditions and 90 minutes after 20 mg of oral nifedipine. The mean (+/- SD) number of left ventricular segments with perfusion defects decreased from 5.3 +/- 2.0 to 3.3 +/- 2.2 after nifedipine (P = 0.0003). Perfusion abnormalities were quantified by a perfusion score (0 to 2.0) assigned to each left ventricular segment and by a global perfusion score (0 to 18) for the entire left ventricle. The mean perfusion score in segments with resting defects increased from 0.97 +/- 0.24 to 1.26 +/- 0.44 after nifedipine (P less than 0.00001). The mean global perfusion score increased from 11.2 +/- 1.7 to 12.8 +/- 2.4 after nifedipine (P = 0.003). The global perfusion score increased by at least 2.0 in 10 patients and decreased by at least 2.0 in only 1. These observations reveal short-term improvement in thallium-201 myocardial perfusion with nifedipine in patients with progressive systemic sclerosis. The results are consistent with a potentially reversible abnormality of coronary vasomotion in this disorder, but the long-term therapeutic effects of nifedipine remain to be determined.

  14. Meiotic abnormalities

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 19, describes meiotic abnormalities. These include nondisjunction of autosomes and sex chromosomes, genetic and environmental causes of nondisjunction, misdivision of the centromere, chromosomally abnormal human sperm, male infertility, parental age, and origin of diploid gametes. 57 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Towards robust deconvolution of low-dose perfusion CT: sparse perfusion deconvolution using online dictionary learning.

    PubMed

    Fang, Ruogu; Chen, Tsuhan; Sanelli, Pina C

    2013-05-01

    Computed tomography perfusion (CTP) is an important functional imaging modality in the evaluation of cerebrovascular diseases, particularly in acute stroke and vasospasm. However, the post-processed parametric maps of blood flow tend to be noisy, especially in low-dose CTP, due to the noisy contrast enhancement profile and the oscillatory nature of the results generated by the current computational methods. In this paper, we propose a robust sparse perfusion deconvolution method (SPD) to estimate cerebral blood flow in CTP performed at low radiation dose. We first build a dictionary from high-dose perfusion maps using online dictionary learning and then perform deconvolution-based hemodynamic parameters estimation on the low-dose CTP data. Our method is validated on clinical data of patients with normal and pathological CBF maps. The results show that we achieve superior performance than existing methods, and potentially improve the differentiation between normal and ischemic tissue in the brain. PMID:23542422

  16. Towards robust deconvolution of low-dose perfusion CT: Sparse perfusion deconvolution using online dictionary learning

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Ruogu; Chen, Tsuhan; Sanelli, Pina C.

    2014-01-01

    Computed tomography perfusion (CTP) is an important functional imaging modality in the evaluation of cerebrovascular diseases, particularly in acute stroke and vasospasm. However, the post-processed parametric maps of blood flow tend to be noisy, especially in low-dose CTP, due to the noisy contrast enhancement profile and the oscillatory nature of the results generated by the current computational methods. In this paper, we propose a robust sparse perfusion deconvolution method (SPD) to estimate cerebral blood flow in CTP performed at low radiation dose. We first build a dictionary from high-dose perfusion maps using online dictionary learning and then perform deconvolution-based hemodynamic parameters estimation on the low-dose CTP data. Our method is validated on clinical data of patients with normal and pathological CBF maps. The results show that we achieve superior performance than existing methods, and potentially improve the differentiation between normal and ischemic tissue in the brain. PMID:23542422

  17. Post-mortem assessment of hypoperfusion of cerebral cortex in Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Taya; Miners, Scott; Love, Seth

    2015-04-01

    Perfusion is reduced in the cerebral neocortex in Alzheimer's disease. We have explored some of the mechanisms, by measurement of perfusion-sensitive and disease-related proteins in post-mortem tissue from Alzheimer's disease, vascular dementia and age-matched control brains. To distinguish physiological from pathological reduction in perfusion (i.e. reduction exceeding the decline in metabolic demand), we measured the concentration of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a protein induced under conditions of tissue hypoxia through the actions of hypoxia-inducible factors, and the myelin associated glycoprotein to proteolipid protein 1 (MAG:PLP1) ratio, which declines in chronically hypoperfused brain tissue. To evaluate possible mechanisms of hypoperfusion, we also measured the levels of amyloid-β40, amyloid-β42, von Willebrand factor (VWF; a measure of microvascular density) and the potent vasoconstrictor endothelin 1 (EDN1); we assayed the activity of angiotensin I converting enzyme (ACE), which catalyses the production of another potent vasoconstrictor, angiotensin II; and we scored the severity of arteriolosclerotic small vessel disease and cerebral amyloid angiopathy, and determined the Braak tangle stage. VEGF was markedly increased in frontal and parahippocampal cortex in Alzheimer's disease but only slightly and not significantly in vascular dementia. In frontal cortex the MAG:PLP1 ratio was significantly reduced in Alzheimer's disease and even more so in vascular dementia. VEGF but not MAG:PLP1 increased with Alzheimer's disease severity, as measured by Braak tangle stage, and correlated with amyloid-β42 and amyloid-β42: amyloid-β40 but not amyloid-β40. Although MAG:PLP1 tended to be lowest in cortex from patients with severe small vessel disease or cerebral amyloid angiopathy, neither VEGF nor MAG:PLP1 correlated significantly with the severity of structural vascular pathology (small vessel disease, cerebral amyloid angiopathy or VWF

  18. Pattern of brain blood perfusion in tinnitus patients using technetium-99m SPECT imaging

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoudian, Saeid; Farhadi, Mohammad; Gholami, Saeid; Saddadi, Fariba; Karimian, Ali Reza; Mirzaei, Mohammad; Ghoreyshi, Esmaeel; Ahmadizadeh, Majid; Lenarz, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Tinnitus is associated with an increased activity in central auditory system as demonstrated by neuroimaging studies. Brain perfusion scanning using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) was done to understand the pattern of brain blood perfusion of tinnitus subjects and find the areas which are mostly abnormal in these patients. Materials and Methods: A number of 122 patients with tinnitus were enrolled to this cross-sectional study. They underwent SPECT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of brain, and the images were fused to find the regions with abnormal perfusion. Results: SPECT scan results were abnormal in 101 patients (83%). Most patients had bilateral abnormal perfusion (N = 65, 53.3%), and most subjects had abnormality in middle-temporal gyrus (N = 83, 68%) and temporoparietal cortex (N = 46, 37.7%). Patients with multifocal involvement had the least mean age than other 2 groups (patients with no abnormality and unifocal abnormality) (P value = 0.045). Conclusions: Brain blood perfusion pattern differs in patient with tinnitus than others. These patients have brain perfusion abnormality, mostly in auditory gyrus (middle temporal) and associative cortex (temporoparietal cortex). Multifocal abnormalities might be due to more cognitive and emotional brain centers involvement due to tinnitus or more stress and anxiety of tinnitus in the young patients. PMID:23267375

  19. Progressive intracranial hypertension and cerebral hypoperfusion in a fatal case of cerebral aspergilloma

    PubMed Central

    Toksvang, Linea Natalie; Plovsing, Ronni R; Berg, Ronan M G

    2014-01-01

    Summary We report a case of cerebral aspergilloma in a 25-year-old immunoincompetent man admitted to a general intensive care unit. Monitoring of intracranial pressure was instigated and revealed hour-long epochs of severe intracranial hypertension, despite a normal opening pressure, with decreases in cerebral perfusion pressure. We documented that this was associated with cerebral hypoperfusion by transcranial Doppler ultrasound. The present case illustrates that severe intracranial hypertension may evolve despite a normal opening pressure; it furthermore shows that continuous monitoring of intracranial pressure may be used to predict changes in cerebral haemodynamics in critically ill patients with neuroinfection. PMID:24907204

  20. Myocardial perfusion as an indicator of graft patency after coronary artery bypass surgery. [Thallium 201

    SciTech Connect

    Kolibash, A.J.; Call, T.D.; Bush, C.A.; Tetalman, M.R.; Lewis, R.P.

    1980-05-01

    Stress and resting myocardial perfusion were assessed in 38 patients who received 96 grafts. Stress perfusion was evaluated with thallium-201 and resting myocardial blood flow distribution with radiolabeled particles. When both stress and rest perfusion were normal, graft patency was 82% (51 of 62 grafts). Graft patency was also high (81%, 13 of 16) in areas where stress perfusion abnormalities resolved or become less apparent at rest. However, when stress perfusion defects remained unchanged at rest, the graf was likely to be occuluded (73%, 11 of 15). Maintenance of normal rest perfusion or improvement of rest perfusion postoperatively was also associated with a high graft patency rate (80%, 35 of 44), whereas the development of new rest perfusion defects postoperatively implied graft occlusion (86%, six of seven).

  1. Congenital Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... serious health problems (e.g. Down syndrome ). Single-Gene Abnormalities Sometimes the chromosomes are normal in number, ... blood flow to the fetus impair fetal growth. Alcohol consumption and certain drugs during pregnancy significantly increase ...

  2. Craniofacial Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the skull and face. Craniofacial abnormalities are birth defects of the face or head. Some, like cleft ... palate, are among the most common of all birth defects. Others are very rare. Most of them affect ...

  3. Walking abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... include: Arthritis of the leg or foot joints Conversion disorder (a psychological disorder) Foot problems (such as a ... injuries. For an abnormal gait that occurs with conversion disorder, counseling and support from family members are strongly ...

  4. Chromosome Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... decade, newer techniques have been developed that allow scientists and doctors to screen for chromosomal abnormalities without using a microscope. These newer methods compare the patient's DNA to a normal DNA ...

  5. Nail abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    Nail abnormalities are problems with the color, shape, texture, or thickness of the fingernails or toenails. ... Fungus or yeast cause changes in the color, texture, and shape of the nails. Bacterial infection may ...

  6. Heterogeneity of cortical lesions in multiple sclerosis: an MRI perfusion study

    PubMed Central

    Peruzzo, Denis; Castellaro, Marco; Calabrese, Massimiliano; Veronese, Elisa; Rinaldi, Francesca; Bernardi, Valentina; Favaretto, Alice; Gallo, Paolo; Bertoldo, Alessandra

    2013-01-01

    In this study, dynamic susceptibility contrast-magnetic resonance imaging (DSC-MRI) was used to quantify the cerebral blood flow (CBF), the cerebral blood volume (CBV), and the mean transit time (MTT) and to analyze the changes in cerebral perfusion associated with the cortical lesions in 44 patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. The cortical lesions showed a statistically significant reduction in CBF and CBV compared with the normal-appearing gray matter, whereas there were no significant changes in the MTT. The reduced perfusion suggests a reduction of metabolism because of the loss of cortical neurons. A small population of outliers showing an increased CBF and/or CBV has also been detected. The presence of hyperperfused outliers may imply that perfusion could evolve during inflammation. These findings show that perfusion is altered in cortical lesions and that DSC-MRI can be a useful tool to investigate more deeply the evolution of cortical lesions in multiple sclerosis. PMID:23250108

  7. Deep Vein Thrombosis Presenting on Pulmonary Ventilation and Perfusion Scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Itani, Malak; Fair, Joanna; Hillman, Zachary; Behnia, Fatemeh; Elojeimy, Saeed

    2016-10-01

    A 52-year-old woman presenting with dyspnea was referred for a ventilation and perfusion scan (VQ). VQ images (with Tc-DTPA [diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid aerosol] and Tc-MAA [macroaggregated albumin]) initially appeared normal; however, count rates on perfusion images were similar to ventilation images, implying little Tc-MAA had reached the lungs. Spot images of the injected extremity demonstrated focal Tc-MAA accumulation worrisome for a venous thrombus, subsequently confirmed by Doppler ultrasound. Careful attention to relative radiotracer count rates on VQ scans is crucial to ensure diagnostic utility. In addition, abnormal low perfusion radiotracer counts may unveil other pathology with important clinical implications. PMID:27556796

  8. Prognostic value of normal regadenoson stress perfusion cardiovascular magnetic resonance

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Regadenoson is a vasodilator stress agent that selectively activates the A2A receptor. Compared to adenosine, regadenoson is easier to administer and results in fewer side effects. Although extensively studied in patients undergoing nuclear perfusion imaging (MPI), its use for perfusion cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) is not well described. The aim of this study was to determine the prognostic value of a normal regadenoson perfusion CMR in patients with known or suspected coronary artery disease. Methods Patients with known or suspected coronary artery disease were prospectively enrolled to receive perfusion CMR (Philips 1.5 T) with regadenoson. Three short-axis slices of the left ventricle (LV) were obtained during first pass of contrast using a hybrid GRE-EPI pulse sequence (0.075 mmol/kg Gadolinium-DTPA-BMA at 4 ml/sec). Imaging was performed 1 minute after injection of regadenoson (0.4 mg) and repeated 15 minutes after reversal of hyperemia with aminophylline (125 mg). Perfusion defects were documented if they persisted for ≥2 frames after peak enhancement of the LV cavity. CMR was considered abnormal if there was a resting wall motion abnormality, decreased LVEF (<40%), presence of LGE, or the presence of a perfusion defect during hyperemia. All patients were followed for a minimum of 1 year for major adverse cardiovascular event (MACE) defined as coronary revascularization, non-fatal myocardial infarction, and cardiovascular death. Results 149 patients were included in the final analysis. Perfusion defects were noted in 43/149 (29%) patients; 59/149 (40%) had any abnormality on CMR. During the mean follow-up period of 24 ± 9 months, 17/149 (11.4%) patients experienced MACE. The separation in the survival distributions for those with perfusion defects and those without perfusion defects was highly significant (log-rank p = 0.0001). When the absence of perfusion defects was added to the absence of other resting CMR

  9. Cerebral Palsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Got Homework? Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Cerebral Palsy KidsHealth > For Kids > Cerebral Palsy Print A A ... the things that kids do every day. What's CP? Some kids with CP use wheelchairs and others ...

  10. Cerebral Palsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss > Birth defects & other health conditions > Cerebral palsy Cerebral palsy E-mail to a friend Please fill in ... movement problems a child has. What is spastic CP? Spastic means tight or stiff muscles, or muscles ...

  11. Cerebral Palsy

    MedlinePlus

    Cerebral palsy is a group of disorders that affect a person's ability to move and to maintain balance ... do not get worse over time. People with cerebral palsy may have difficulty walking. They may also have ...

  12. Cerebral palsy

    MedlinePlus

    Cerebral palsy is a group of disorders that can involve brain and nervous system functions, such as movement, ... and thinking. There are several different types of cerebral palsy, including spastic, dyskinetic, ataxic, hypotonic, and mixed.

  13. Multiparametric Characterization of Grade 2 Glioma Subtypes Using Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic, Perfusion, and Diffusion Imaging1

    PubMed Central

    Bian, Wei; Khayal, Inas S; Lupo, Janine M; McGue, Colleen; Vandenberg, Scott; Lamborn, Kathleen R; Chang, Susan M; Cha, Soonmee; Nelson, Sarah J

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to derive quantitative parameters from magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopic, perfusion, and diffusion imaging of grade 2 gliomas according to the World Health Organization and to investigate how these multiple imaging modalities can contribute to evaluating their histologic subtypes and spatial characteristics. MATERIALS AND METHODS: MR spectroscopic, perfusion, and diffusion images from 56 patients with newly diagnosed grade 2 glioma (24 oligodendrogliomas, 18 astrocytomas, and 14 oligoastrocytomas) were retrospectively studied. Metabolite intensities, relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV), and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) were statistically evaluated. RESULTS: The 75th percentile rCBV and median ADC were significantly different between oligodendrogliomas and astrocytomas (P < .0001) and between oligodendrogliomas and oligoastrocytomas (P < .001). Logistic regression analysis identified both 75th percentile rCBV and median ADC as significant variables in the differentiation of oligodendrogliomas from astrocytomas and oligoastrocytomas. Group differences in metabolite intensities were not significant, but there was a much larger variation in the volumes and maximum values of metabolic abnormalities for patients with oligodendroglioma compared with the other tumor subtypes. CONCLUSIONS: Perfusion and diffusion imaging provide quantitative MR parameters that can help to differentiate grade 2 oligodendrogliomas from grade 2 astrocytomas and oligoastrocytomas. The large variations in the magnitude and spatial extent of the metabolic lesions between patients and the fact that their values are not correlated with the other imaging parameters indicate that MR spectroscopic imaging may provide complementary information that is helpful in targeting therapy, evaluating residual disease, and assessing response to therapy. PMID:19956389

  14. Cerebral pathology post heart transplantation.

    PubMed

    Peteghem, S Van; Pauw, M De

    2015-04-01

    Cerebral pathology is frequently encountered post heart transplantation with a cumulative incidence of about 80% after 15 years. A broad spectrum of disease entities is reported, from minor abnormalities to life-threatening diseases. Although cerebral infections and malignancies are rare in this patient population, they have a high mortality rate. Since 1991, 171 orthotopic heart transplantations were performed at the Ghent University Hospital with a 10-year survival rate of 75%. Severe cerebral complications occurred in 10 patients, with epilepsy in 2 patients, cerebrovascular accidents in 4 patients, cerebral infections in 3 patients and a cerebral malignancy in 1 patient, resulting in a fatal outcome in 7 patients. We present four of these cases. PMID:25292206

  15. Cerebral Palsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Cerebral Palsy Information Page Clinical Trials Trial of Erythropoietin Neuroprotection ... en Español Additional resources from MedlinePlus What is Cerebral Palsy? The term cerebral palsy refers to a group ...

  16. Cerebral Aneurysms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Cerebral Aneurysms Information Page Synonym(s): Aneurysm, Brain Aneurysm Condensed from ... Español Additional resources from MedlinePlus What is Cerebral Aneurysms? A cerebral aneurysm is a weak or thin ...

  17. Blood flow distribution in cerebral arteries

    PubMed Central

    Zarrinkoob, Laleh; Ambarki, Khalid; Wåhlin, Anders; Birgander, Richard; Eklund, Anders; Malm, Jan

    2015-01-01

    High-resolution phase–contrast magnetic resonance imaging can now assess flow in proximal and distal cerebral arteries. The aim of this study was to describe how total cerebral blood flow (tCBF) is distributed into the vascular tree with regard to age, sex and anatomic variations. Forty-nine healthy young (mean 25 years) and 45 elderly (mean 71 years) individuals were included. Blood flow rate (BFR) in 21 intra- and extracerebral arteries was measured. Total cerebral blood flow was defined as BFR in the internal carotid plus vertebral arteries and mean cerebral perfusion as tCBF/brain volume. Carotid/vertebral distribution was 72%/28% and was not related to age, sex, or brain volume. Total cerebral blood flow (717±123 mL/min) was distributed to each side as follows: middle cerebral artery (MCA), 21% distal MCA, 6% anterior cerebral artery (ACA), 12%, distal ACA, 4% ophthalmic artery, 2% posterior cerebral artery (PCA), 8% and 20% to basilar artery. Deviating distributions were observed in subjects with ‘fetal' PCA. Blood flow rate in cerebral arteries decreased with increasing age (P<0.05) but not in extracerebral arteries. Mean cerebral perfusion was higher in women (women: 61±8; men: 55±6 mL/min/100 mL, P<0.001). The study describes a new method to outline the flow profile of the cerebral vascular tree, including reference values, and should be used for grading the collateral flow system. PMID:25564234

  18. Hippocampal Dysfunction in Gulf War Veterans: Investigation with ASL Perfusion MR Imaging and Physostigmine Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiufeng; Spence, Jeffrey S.; Buhner, David M.; Hart, John; Cullum, C. Munro; Biggs, Melanie M.; Hester, Andrea L.; Odegard, Timothy N.; Carmack, Patrick S.; Haley, Robert W.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To determine, with arterial spin labeling (ASL) perfusion magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and physostigmine challenge, if abnormal hippocampal blood flow in ill Gulf War veterans persists 11 years after initial testing with single photon emission computed tomography and nearly 20 years after the 1991 Gulf War. Materials and Methods: The local institutional review board approved this HIPAA-compliant study. Veterans were screened for contraindications and gave written informed consent before the study. In a semiblinded retrospective protocol, veterans in three Gulf War illness groups—syndrome 1 (impaired cognition), syndrome 2 (confusion-ataxia), and syndrome 3 (central neuropathic pain)—and a control group received intravenous infusions of saline in an initial session and physostigmine in a second session, 48 hours later. Each infusion was followed by measurement of hippocampal regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) with pulsed ASL. A mixed-effects linear model adjusted for age was used to test for differences in rCBF after the cholinergic challenge across the four groups. Results: Physostigmine significantly decreased hippocampal rCBF in control subjects (P < .0005) and veterans with syndrome 1 (P < .05) but significantly increased hippocampal rCBF in veterans with syndrome 2 (P < .005) and veterans with syndrome 3 (P < .002). The abnormal increase in rCBF was found to have progressed to the left hippocampus of the veterans with syndrome 2 and to both hippocampi of the veterans with syndrome 3. Conclusion: Chronic hippocampal perfusion dysfunction persists or worsens in veterans with certain Gulf War syndromes. ASL MR imaging examination of hippocampal rCBF in a cholinergic challenge experiment may be useful as a diagnostic test for this condition. © RSNA, 2011 Supplemental material: http://radiology.rsna.org/lookup/suppl/doi:10.1148/radiol.11101715/-/DC1 PMID:21914840

  19. Regional Myocardial Perfusion Rates in Patients with Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Cannon, Paul J.; Dell, Ralph B.; Dwyer, Edward M.

    1972-01-01

    Regional myocardial perfusion rates were estimated from the myocardial washout of 133Xenon in 24 patients with heart disease whose coronary arteriograms were abnormal and 17 similar subjects whose coronary arteriograms were judged to be normal. Disappearance rates of 133Xe from multiple areas of the heart were monitored externally with a multiple-crystal scintillation camera after the isotope had been injected into a coronary artery and local myocardial perfusion rates were calculated by the Kety formula. The mean myocardial perfusion rates in the left ventricle exceeded those in the right ventricle or atrial regions in subjects without demonstrable coronary artery disease. In this group there was a significant lack of homogeneity of local perfusion rates in left ventricular myocardium; the mean coefficient of variation of left ventricular local perfusion rates was 15.8%. In the patients with radiographically demonstrable coronary artery disease, a variety of myocardial perfusion patterns were observed. Local capillary blood flow rates were depressed throughout the myocardium of patients with diffuse coronary disease but were subnormal only in discrete myocardial regions of others with localized occlusive disease. Local myocardial perfusion rates were similar to those found in the group with normal coronary arteriograms in patients with slight degrees of coronary disease and in those areas of myocardium distal to marked coronary constrictions or occlusions which were well supplied by collateral vessels. In subjects with right coronary disease, the mean right ventricular perfusion rates were significantly subnormal; in seven subjects of this group perfusion of the inferior left ventricle by a dominant right coronary artery was absent or depressed. The average mean left ventricular perfusion rate of 12 subjects with significant disease of two or more branches of the left coronary artery was significantly lower than that of the group with normal left coronary

  20. Cerebral oxygenation and hyperthermia

    PubMed Central

    Bain, Anthony R.; Morrison, Shawnda A.; Ainslie, Philip N.

    2014-01-01

    Hyperthermia is associated with marked reductions in cerebral blood flow (CBF). Increased distribution of cardiac output to the periphery, increases in alveolar ventilation and resultant hypocapnia each contribute to the fall in CBF during passive hyperthermia; however, their relative contribution remains a point of contention, and probably depends on the experimental condition (e.g., posture and degree of hyperthermia). The hyperthermia-induced hyperventilatory response reduces arterial CO2 pressure (PaCO2) causing cerebral vasoconstriction and subsequent reductions in flow. During supine passive hyperthermia, the majority of recent data indicate that reductions in PaCO2 may be the primary, if not sole, culprit for reduced CBF. On the other hand, during more dynamic conditions (e.g., hemorrhage or orthostatic challenges), an inability to appropriately decrease peripheral vascular conductance presents a condition whereby adequate cerebral perfusion pressure may be compromised secondary to reductions in systemic blood pressure. Although studies have reported maintenance of pre-frontal cortex oxygenation (assessed by near-infrared spectroscopy) during exercise and severe heat stress, the influence of cutaneous blood flow is known to contaminate this measure. This review discusses the governing mechanisms associated with changes in CBF and oxygenation during moderate to severe (i.e., 1.0°C to 2.0°C increase in body core temperature) levels of hyperthermia. Future research directions are provided. PMID:24624095

  1. Regional cerebral blood flow characteristics of the Sturge-Weber syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Riela, A.R.; Stump, D.A.; Roach, E.S.; McLean, W.T. Jr.; Garcia, J.C.

    1985-03-01

    Four patients with the Sturge-Weber syndrome were studied using the non-invasive Xenon-133 inhalation technique. All four patients had decreased regional cerebral blood flow in the area of their lesion, and in two patients who were subsequently tested with 5% carbon dioxide inhalation, impaired vasomotor reactivity was documented. Diminished regional cerebral blood flow is consistent with previously described nuclide flow studies which demonstrated a delay in the initial perfusion blush in the region of the abnormal vasculature. The focal decrease in blood flow was greatest in the most severely affected patient, but was also prominent in the two younger patients, both of whom have excellent neurologic function. These studies suggest that localized decrease in blood flow and vasomotor dysfunction in Sturge-Weber syndrome can precede the occurrence of severe neurologic impairment and extensive cerebral atrophy and possibly be a major contributing factor in progressive dysfunction. A secondary observation was that the blood flow in the unaffected hemisphere was significantly greater in two children compared to the two adults and was similar to the age-related differences reported for normal children and adults.

  2. Abnormal brain scan with subacute extradural haematomas

    PubMed Central

    Morley, J. Barrie; Langford, Keith H.

    1970-01-01

    Four patients are described with proven subacute extradural haematomas, each with an abnormal cerebral scan of diagnostic assistance. A possible mechanism of production of the subacute extradural haematoma is discussed, and appears to be similar to the mechanism involved in the subacute subdural haematoma. The means by which the abnormal scan results in such cases is also examined, from which it appears that non-specific meningeal membrane inflammatory reaction surrounding the haematoma is significant. Images PMID:5478950

  3. Diagnosing acute lacunar infarction using CT perfusion.

    PubMed

    Cao, Wenjie; Yassi, Nawaf; Sharma, Gagan; Yan, Bernard; Desmond, Patricia M; Davis, Stephen M; Campbell, Bruce C V

    2016-07-01

    The value of CT perfusion (CTP) in detecting acute lacunar infarcts (LACI) has not been well established. We tested the sensitivity of CTP for LACI. CTP maps of consecutive stroke patients from 2009-2013 were examined. MRI diffusion imaging was used to identify those with LACI. Two stroke neurologists independently evaluated the CTP maps for evidence of a perfusion lesion in a deep perforating artery territory. Cerebral blood volume (CBV), cerebral blood flow (CBF), mean transit time (MTT) and time to maximum (Tmax) maps were first examined in isolation and then in combination. Inter-observer agreement was measured using Cohen's κ. The lesions identified were later confirmed against the diffusion MRI reference and the sensitivity and specificity of CTP maps calculated. A total of 63 patient scans were analysed. There were 32 patients with MRI-confirmed LACI within the coverage of CTP; 18 in the striatum, 10 thalamic, and four in the corona radiata. Another 31 patients had normal MRI. Inter-rater agreement was good (κ=0.83). Sensitivity (blinded consensus) was highest for MTT (56.2%) compared to Tmax (25%, p<0.001), CBV (9.3%, p=0.021) and CBF (43.7%, p<0.001). MTT maps enable detection of a significant proportion of LACI using CTP. PMID:26899357

  4. Multiple medullary venous malformations decreasing cerebral blood flow: Case report

    SciTech Connect

    Tomura, N.; Inugami, A.; Uemura, K.; Hadeishi, H.; Yasui, N. )

    1991-02-01

    A rare case of multiple medullary venous malformations in the right cerebral hemisphere is reported. The literature review yielded only one case of multiple medullary venous malformations. Computed tomography scan showed multiple calcified lesions with linear contrast enhancement representing abnormal dilated vessels and mild atrophic change of the right cerebral hemisphere. Single-photon emission computed tomography using N-isopropyl-p-({sup 123}I) iodoamphetamine demonstrated decreased cerebral blood flow in the right cerebral hemisphere.

  5. Correlation of CT cerebral vascular territories with function. 3. Middle cerebral artery

    SciTech Connect

    Berman, S.A.; Hayman, L.A.; Hinck, V.C.

    1984-05-01

    Schematic displays are presented of the cerebral territories supplied by branches of the middle cerebral artery as they would appear on axial and coronal computed tomographic (CT) scan sections. Companion diagrams of regional cortical function and a discussion of the fiber tracts are provided to simplify correlation of clinical deficits with coronal and axial CT abnormalities.

  6. Baseline brain perfusion and brain structure in patients with major depression: a multimodal magnetic resonance imaging study

    PubMed Central

    Vasic, Nenad; Wolf, Nadine D.; Grön, Georg; Sosic-Vasic, Zrinka; Connemann, Bernhard J.; Sambataro, Fabio; von Strombeck, Anna; Lang, Dirk; Otte, Stefanie; Dudek, Manuela; Wolf, Robert C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Abnormal regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and grey matter volume have been frequently reported in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). However, it is unclear to what extent structural and functional change co-occurs in patients with MDD and whether markers of neural activity, such as rCBF, can be predicted by structural change. Methods Using MRI, we investigated resting-state rCBF and brain structure in patients with MDD and healthy controls between July 2008 and January 2013. We acquired perfusion images obtained with continuous arterial spin labelling, used voxel-based morphometry to assess grey matter volume and integrated biological parametric mapping analyses to investigate the impact of brain atrophy on rCBF. Results We included 43 patients and 29 controls in our study. Frontotemporal grey matter volume was reduced in patients compared with controls. In patients, rCBF was reduced in the anterior cingulate and bilateral parahippocampal areas and increased in frontoparietal and striatal regions. These abnormalities were confirmed by analyses with brain volume as a covariate. In patients with MDD there were significant negative correlations between the extent of depressive symptoms and bilateral parahippocampal rCBF. We found a positive correlation between depressive symptoms and rCBF for right middle frontal cortical blood flow. Limitations Medication use in patients has to be considered as a limitation of our study. Conclusion Our data suggest that while changes of cerebral blood flow and brain volume co-occur in patients with MDD, structural change is not sufficient to explain altered neural activity in patients at rest. Abnormal brain structure and function in patients with MDD appear to reflect distinct levels of neuropathology. PMID:26125119

  7. Contralateral stroke during carotid endarterectomy due to abnormalities in the circle of Willis.

    PubMed

    Moritz, Andrea; Koci, Gerda; Steinlechner, Barbara; Hölzenbein, Thomas; Nasel, Christian; Grubhofer, Georg; Dworschak, Martin

    2007-01-01

    Approximately 10-20% of patients will not tolerate cross-clamping of the common carotid artery for carotid endarterectomy procedures. The most frequent causes of neurological deficits are either embolization of particulate matter or cerebral hypoperfusion. Insufficient blood flow through primary collaterals of the circle of Willis is the main reason for hypoperfusion that requires immediate shunt placement. Although excessive preoperative imaging is not indicated in many patients undergoing disobliteration of a stenosed internal carotid artery, there are some patients with particular anatomic constellations who would benefit from a more detailed preoperative work-up. In these cases, the specific risk should be evaluated prior to surgery in order to make plans for appropriate intraoperative management regarding neurologic monitoring and shunt insertion. As regional anesthesia permits early detection of ischemic symptoms, it is advantageous in these patients. We report a case where regional anesthesia allowed early detection of rapidly progressing signs of bi-hemispheric brain ischemia in a patient with diabetes and with at that time unknown severe abnormalities of the circle of Willis. Lack of adequate collateralization was detected only after surgery, in a combined perfusion-magnetic resonance imaging study. In symptomatic diabetics with low-grade stenosis of the internal carotid artery, preoperative assessment of the function of the circle of Willis may therefore be helpful in predicting any increased risk for intraoperative cerebral ischemia. PMID:18043888

  8. Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. A rare cause of scintigraphic ventilation-perfusion mismatch

    SciTech Connect

    Pochis, W.T.; Krasnow, A.Z.; Collier, B.D.; Mewissen, M.W.; Almagro, U.A.; Hellman, R.S.; Isitman, A.T. )

    1990-05-01

    A case of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis with multiple areas of mismatch on ventilation-perfusion lung imaging in the absence of pulmonary embolism is presented. Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is one of the few nonembolic diseases producing a pulmonary ventilation-perfusion mismatch. In this condition, chest radiographs may not detect the full extent of disease, and xenon-133 ventilation imaging may be relatively insensitive to morbid changes in small airways. Thus, when examining patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, one should be aware that abnormal perfusion imaging patterns without matching ventilation abnormalities are not always due to embolism. In this setting, contrast pulmonary angiography is often needed for accurate differential diagnosis.

  9. Cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Wimalasundera, Neil; Stevenson, Valerie L

    2016-06-01

    Cerebral palsy has always been known as a disorder of movement and posture resulting from a non-progressive injury to the developing brain; however, more recent definitions allow clinicians to appreciate more than just the movement disorder. Accurate classification of cerebral palsy into distribution, motor type and functional level has advanced research. It also facilitates appropriate targeting of interventions to functional level and more accurate prognosis prediction. The prevalence of cerebral palsy remains fairly static at 2-3 per 1000 live births but there have been some changes in trends for specific causal groups. Interventions for cerebral palsy have historically been medical and physically focused, often with limited evidence to support their efficacy. The use of more appropriate outcome measures encompassing quality of life and participation is helping to deliver treatments which are more meaningful for people with cerebral palsy and their carers. PMID:26837375

  10. Dynamic Chest Image Analysis: Model-Based Perfusion Analysis in Dynamic Pulmonary Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Jianming; Järvi, Timo; Kiuru, Aaro; Kormano, Martti; Svedström, Erkki

    2003-12-01

    The "Dynamic Chest Image Analysis" project aims to develop model-based computer analysis and visualization methods for showing focal and general abnormalities of lung ventilation and perfusion based on a sequence of digital chest fluoroscopy frames collected with the dynamic pulmonary imaging technique. We have proposed and evaluated a multiresolutional method with an explicit ventilation model for ventilation analysis. This paper presents a new model-based method for pulmonary perfusion analysis. According to perfusion properties, we first devise a novel mathematical function to form a perfusion model. A simple yet accurate approach is further introduced to extract cardiac systolic and diastolic phases from the heart, so that this cardiac information may be utilized to accelerate the perfusion analysis and improve its sensitivity in detecting pulmonary perfusion abnormalities. This makes perfusion analysis not only fast but also robust in computation; consequently, perfusion analysis becomes computationally feasible without using contrast media. Our clinical case studies with 52 patients show that this technique is effective for pulmonary embolism even without using contrast media, demonstrating consistent correlations with computed tomography (CT) and nuclear medicine (NM) studies. This fluoroscopical examination takes only about 2 seconds for perfusion study with only low radiation dose to patient, involving no preparation, no radioactive isotopes, and no contrast media.

  11. Ex vivo lung perfusion.

    PubMed

    Reeb, Jeremie; Cypel, Marcelo

    2016-03-01

    Lung transplantation is an established life-saving therapy for patients with end-stage lung disease. Unfortunately, greater success in lung transplantation is hindered by a shortage of lung donors and the relatively poor early-, mid-, and long-term outcomes associated with severe primary graft dysfunction. Ex vivo lung perfusion has emerged as a modern preservation technique that allows for a more accurate lung assessment and improvement in lung quality. This review outlines the: (i) rationale behind the method; (ii) techniques and protocols; (iii) Toronto ex vivo lung perfusion method; (iv) devices available; and (v) clinical experience worldwide. We also highlight the potential of ex vivo lung perfusion in leading a new era of lung preservation. PMID:26700566

  12. Influence of Thin Slice Reconstruction on CT Brain Perfusion Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bennink, Edwin; Oosterbroek, Jaap; Horsch, Alexander D.; Dankbaar, Jan Willem; Velthuis, Birgitta K.; Viergever, Max A.; de Jong, Hugo W. A. M.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Although CT scanners generally allow dynamic acquisition of thin slices (1 mm), thick slice (≥5 mm) reconstruction is commonly used for stroke imaging to reduce data, processing time, and noise level. Thin slice CT perfusion (CTP) reconstruction may suffer less from partial volume effects, and thus yield more accurate quantitative results with increased resolution. Before thin slice protocols are to be introduced clinically, it needs to be ensured that this does not affect overall CTP constancy. We studied the influence of thin slice reconstruction on average perfusion values by comparing it with standard thick slice reconstruction. Materials and Methods From 50 patient studies, absolute and relative hemisphere averaged estimates of cerebral blood volume (CBV), cerebral blood flow (CBF), mean transit time (MTT), and permeability-surface area product (PS) were analyzed using 0.8, 2.4, 4.8, and 9.6 mm slice reconstructions. Specifically, the influence of Gaussian and bilateral filtering, the arterial input function (AIF), and motion correction on the perfusion values was investigated. Results Bilateral filtering gave noise levels comparable to isotropic Gaussian filtering, with less partial volume effects. Absolute CBF, CBV and PS were 22%, 14% and 46% lower with 0.8 mm than with 4.8 mm slices. If the AIF and motion correction were based on thin slices prior to reconstruction of thicker slices, these differences reduced to 3%, 4% and 3%. The effect of slice thickness on relative values was very small. Conclusions This study shows that thin slice reconstruction for CTP with unaltered acquisition protocol gives relative perfusion values without clinically relevant bias. It does however affect absolute perfusion values, of which CBF and CBV are most sensitive. Partial volume effects in large arteries and veins lead to overestimation of these values. The effects of reconstruction slice thickness should be taken into account when absolute perfusion values are

  13. Dynamic chest image analysis: model-based pulmonary perfusion analysis with pyramid images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Jianming; Haapanen, Arto; Jaervi, Timo; Kiuru, Aaro J.; Kormano, Martti; Svedstrom, Erkki; Virkki, Raimo

    1998-07-01

    The aim of the study 'Dynamic Chest Image Analysis' is to develop computer analysis and visualization methods for showing focal and general abnormalities of lung ventilation and perfusion based on a sequence of digital chest fluoroscopy frames collected at different phases of the respiratory/cardiac cycles in a short period of time. We have proposed a framework for ventilation study with an explicit ventilation model based on pyramid images. In this paper, we extend the framework to pulmonary perfusion study. A perfusion model and the truncated pyramid are introduced. The perfusion model aims at extracting accurate, geographic perfusion parameters, and the truncated pyramid helps in understanding perfusion at multiple resolutions and speeding up the convergence process in optimization. Three cases are included to illustrate the experimental results.

  14. Multimodal imaging in diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease and amnestic mild cognitive impairment: value of magnetic resonance spectroscopy, perfusion, and diffusion tensor imaging of the posterior cingulate region.

    PubMed

    Zimny, Anna; Szewczyk, Pawel; Trypka, Elzbieta; Wojtynska, Renata; Noga, Leszek; Leszek, Jerzy; Sasiadek, Marek

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess metabolic, perfusion, and microstructural changes within the posterior cingulate area in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) using advanced MR techniques such as: spectroscopy (MRS), perfusion weighted imaging (PWI), and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Thirty patients with AD (mean age 71.5 y, MMSE 18), 23 with aMCI (mean age 66 y, MMSE 27.4), and 15 age-matched normal controls (mean age 69 y, MMSE 29.5) underwent conventional MRI followed by MRS, PWI, and DTI on 1.5 Tesla MR unit. Several metabolite ratios (N-acetylaspartate [NAA]/creatine [Cr], choline [Ch]/Cr, myoinositol [mI]/Cr, mI/NAA, mI/Cho) as well as parameters of cerebral blood volume relative to cerebellum and fractional anisotropy were obtained in the posterior cingulate region. The above parameters were correlated with the results of neuropsychological tests. AD patients showed significant abnormalities in all evaluated parameters while subjects with aMCI showed only perfusion and diffusion changes in the posterior cingulate area. Only PWI and DTI measurements revealed significant differences among the three evaluated subject groups. DTI, PWI, and MRS results showed significant correlations with neuropsychological tests. DTI changes correlated with both PWI and MRS abnormalities. Of neuroimaging methods, DTI revealed the highest accuracy in diagnosis of AD and aMCI (0.95, 0.79) followed by PWI (0.87, 0.67) and MRS (0.82, 0.47), respectively. In conclusion, AD is a complex pathology regarding both grey and white matter. DTI seems to be the most useful imaging modality to distinguish between AD, aMCI, and control group, followed by PWI and MRS. PMID:21841260

  15. Cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Graham, H Kerr; Rosenbaum, Peter; Paneth, Nigel; Dan, Bernard; Lin, Jean-Pierre; Damiano, Diane L; Becher, Jules G; Gaebler-Spira, Deborah; Colver, Allan; Reddihough, Dinah S; Crompton, Kylie E; Lieber, Richard L

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral palsy is the most common cause of childhood-onset, lifelong physical disability in most countries, affecting about 1 in 500 neonates with an estimated prevalence of 17 million people worldwide. Cerebral palsy is not a disease entity in the traditional sense but a clinical description of children who share features of a non-progressive brain injury or lesion acquired during the antenatal, perinatal or early postnatal period. The clinical manifestations of cerebral palsy vary greatly in the type of movement disorder, the degree of functional ability and limitation and the affected parts of the body. There is currently no cure, but progress is being made in both the prevention and the amelioration of the brain injury. For example, administration of magnesium sulfate during premature labour and cooling of high-risk infants can reduce the rate and severity of cerebral palsy. Although the disorder affects individuals throughout their lifetime, most cerebral palsy research efforts and management strategies currently focus on the needs of children. Clinical management of children with cerebral palsy is directed towards maximizing function and participation in activities and minimizing the effects of the factors that can make the condition worse, such as epilepsy, feeding challenges, hip dislocation and scoliosis. These management strategies include enhancing neurological function during early development; managing medical co-morbidities, weakness and hypertonia; using rehabilitation technologies to enhance motor function; and preventing secondary musculoskeletal problems. Meeting the needs of people with cerebral palsy in resource-poor settings is particularly challenging. PMID:27188686

  16. Role of dynamic CT perfusion study in evaluating various intracranial space-occupying lesions

    PubMed Central

    Kamble, Ravindra B; Jayakumar, Peruvumba N; Shivashankar, Ravishankar

    2015-01-01

    Aims: Differentiating intracranial mass lesions on CT scan is challenging. The purpose of our study was to determine the perfusion parameters in various intracranial space-occupying lesions (ICSOL), differentiate benign and malignant lesions, and differentiate between grades of gliomas. Materials and Methods: We performed CT perfusion (CTP) in 64 patients, with age ranging from 17 to 68 years, having space-occupying lesions in brain and calculated relative cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV). Results: We found significantly lower perfusion in low-grade gliomas as compared to high-grade tumors, lymphoma, and metastases. Similarly in infective lesions, TWT and abscesses showed significantly lower perfusion compared to TOT. In ring enhancing lesions, capsule of TWT showed significantly lower perfusion as compared to abscesses, TOT, and metastases. Conclusion: Thus, in conclusion, infective lesions can be differentiated from tumors like lymphomas, high-grade gliomas, or metastases based on perfusion parameters. The cut off value of rCBV 1.64 can be used to differentiate between low grade and high grade gliomas. However, depending only on perfusion parameters, differentiation between the tumors like lymphomas, high-grade gliomas, and metastases may not be possible. PMID:25969639

  17. Hemodynamics of Cerebral Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Sforza, Daniel M.; Putman, Christopher M.; Cebral, Juan Raul

    2009-01-01

    The initiation and progression of cerebral aneurysms are degenerative processes of the arterial wall driven by a complex interaction of biological and hemodynamic factors. Endothelial cells on the artery wall respond physiologically to blood-flow patterns. In normal conditions, these responses are associated with nonpathological tissue remodeling and adaptation. The combination of abnormal blood patterns and genetics predisposition could lead to the pathological formation of aneurysms. Here, we review recent progress on the basic mechanisms of aneurysm formation and evolution, with a focus on the role of hemodynamic patterns. PMID:19784385

  18. Acute subendocardial infarction with diffuse intense Tc-99m PYP uptake and minimal Tl-201 abnormality.

    PubMed

    Taki, J; Taki, S; Ichiyanagi, K; Akashi, Y; Hisada, K

    1992-08-01

    Tc-99m PYP scintigraphy performed on a patient with severe anterior chest pain showed diffuse intense uptake with central decreased activity corresponding to the left ventricular cavity. Tl-201 myocardial perfusion scintigraphy at rest revealed a minimal perfusion abnormality with decreased apical uptake in the lateral view. Because of these findings, diffuse subendocardial infarction was suggested. PMID:1387053

  19. Distribution of perfusion.

    PubMed

    Glenny, Robb; Robertson, H Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Local driving pressures and resistances within the pulmonary vascular tree determine the distribution of perfusion in the lung. Unlike other organs, these local determinants are significantly influenced by regional hydrostatic and alveolar pressures. Those effects on blood flow distribution are further magnified by the large vertical height of the human lung and the relatively low intravascular pressures in the pulmonary circulation. While the distribution of perfusion is largely due to passive determinants such as vascular geometry and hydrostatic pressures, active mechanisms such as vasoconstriction induced by local hypoxia can also redistribute blood flow. This chapter reviews the determinants of regional lung perfusion with a focus on vascular tree geometry, vertical gradients induced by gravity, the interactions between vascular and surrounding alveolar pressures, and hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction. While each of these determinants of perfusion distribution can be examined in isolation, the distribution of blood flow is dynamically determined and each component interacts with the others so that a change in one region of the lung influences the distribution of blood flow in other lung regions. PMID:23737171

  20. Importance of capillary perfusion.

    PubMed

    Hardaway, R M

    1979-11-01

    Perfusion is more critical than oxygen in the maintenance of cell viability. A high hematocrit or high fibrinogen level increases blood viscosity and predisposes to disseminated intravascular coagulation. It is recommended that a hematocrit of about 30 be maintained in periods of circulatory stress such as shock or extracorporeal circulation. PMID:495856

  1. Cerebral venous angiomas

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, E.; Gilmor, R.L.; Richmond, B.

    1984-04-01

    Several unusual cases of cerebral venous angiomas as well as some characteristic cases are reported. The characteristic angiographic feature is that of a collection of dilated medullary veins draining into a single large draining vein, which appears first in the early venous phase and persists into the late venous phase of the arteriogram. Computed tomography (CT) was abnormal in 12/13 cases. The draining vein was the most common abnormality identified on CT. Coronal and sagittal reconstruction may be helpful in demonstrating the draining vein. A case of large twin venous angiomas, a case of hemorrhage from a venous angioma, and a case of a venous angioma with an incidentally associated glioblastoma are presented.

  2. Cerebral Palsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Cerebral palsy (CP) is a group of disorders that affect a ... ability to move and maintain balance and posture. CP is the most common motor disability in childhood. ...

  3. Cerebral Arteriosclerosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cerebral arteriosclerosis is the result of thickening and hardening of the walls of the arteries in the ... cause an ischemic stroke. When the thickening and hardening is uneven, arterial walls can develop bulges (called ...

  4. Cerebral angiography

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cerebral angiography is done in the hospital or radiology center. You lie on an x-ray table. ... be done in preparation for medical treatment (interventional radiology procedures) by way of certain blood vessels. What ...

  5. The Significance of Cerebral Hemodynamics Imaging in Carotid Endarterectomy: A Brief Review

    PubMed Central

    Hosoda, Kohkichi

    2015-01-01

    The indication of carotid endarterectomy (CEA) is principally determined by the presence or absence of symptoms and the degree of stenosis. However, the results of recent studies have implicated the usefulness of cerebral hemodynamics imaging for perioperative assessments. Many studies using single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) have demonstrated that cerebral hemodynamics imaging assessments are useful in the prediction and assessment of post-CEA hyperperfusion. In studies using transcranial Doppler ultrasonography, SPECT, or positron-emission tomography (PET), cerebral hemodynamic impairment is highly likely to increase the risk of cerebral infarction in patients with asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis. In other studies using the same modalities, cerebral hemodynamic impairment might be related to cognitive impairment in carotid artery stenosis, and this cognitive impairment might be improved with CEA. Nuclear medicine techniques involve the injection of radioactive tracers. Arterial spin labeling (ASL) is an emerging technique of perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the noninvasive measurement of cerebral perfusion. ASL could detect pathologic states such as hypoperfusion, impaired vasoreactivity, and postoperative hyperperfusion activities that are equivalent to SPECT. In addition, regional perfusion imaging visualizes cerebral perfusion territories by selective ASL. In conclusion, cerebral hemodynamic imaging would be useful for the perioperative assessment of CEA. However, there is a lack of sufficient scientific evidence to confirm the benefits, necessitating further study. PMID:26369874

  6. EFFECTS OF 2-DEOXY-D-GLUCOSE ON FOCAL CEREBRAL ISCHEMIA IN HYPERGLYCEMIC RATS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We examined the effects of pretreatment with 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2DG) on the middle cerebral artery occlusion/reperfusion (MCAO/R) model in hyperglycemic rats. Proton magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy (MRI/MRS) were used to measure the lesion size, the level of cerebral perfusion deficit, a...

  7. The Significance of Cerebral Hemodynamics Imaging in Carotid Endarterectomy: A Brief Review.

    PubMed

    Hosoda, Kohkichi

    2015-01-01

    The indication of carotid endarterectomy (CEA) is principally determined by the presence or absence of symptoms and the degree of stenosis. However, the results of recent studies have implicated the usefulness of cerebral hemodynamics imaging for perioperative assessments. Many studies using single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) have demonstrated that cerebral hemodynamics imaging assessments are useful in the prediction and assessment of post-CEA hyperperfusion. In studies using transcranial Doppler ultrasonography, SPECT, or positron-emission tomography (PET), cerebral hemodynamic impairment is highly likely to increase the risk of cerebral infarction in patients with asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis. In other studies using the same modalities, cerebral hemodynamic impairment might be related to cognitive impairment in carotid artery stenosis, and this cognitive impairment might be improved with CEA. Nuclear medicine techniques involve the injection of radioactive tracers. Arterial spin labeling (ASL) is an emerging technique of perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the noninvasive measurement of cerebral perfusion. ASL could detect pathologic states such as hypoperfusion, impaired vasoreactivity, and postoperative hyperperfusion activities that are equivalent to SPECT. In addition, regional perfusion imaging visualizes cerebral perfusion territories by selective ASL. In conclusion, cerebral hemodynamic imaging would be useful for the perioperative assessment of CEA. However, there is a lack of sufficient scientific evidence to confirm the benefits, necessitating further study. PMID:26369874

  8. Increased perfusion in motor areas after constraint-induced movement therapy in chronic stroke: a single-photon emission computerized tomography study.

    PubMed

    Könönen, Mervi; Kuikka, Jyrki T; Husso-Saastamoinen, Minna; Vanninen, Esko; Vanninen, Ritva; Soimakallio, Seppo; Mervaala, Esa; Sivenius, Juhani; Pitkänen, Kauko; Tarkka, Ina M

    2005-12-01

    Hemiparesis is the most common deficit after cerebral stroke. Constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT) is a new neurorehabilitation method that emphasizes task-relevant repetitive training for the stroke hand. Twelve chronic stroke patients were studied with single-photon emission computerized tomography at rest before and after the two-week CIMT period. Increased perfusion was found in motor control related areas. The specific areas with an increase in perfusion in the affected hemisphere were in the precentral gyrus, premotor cortex (Brodmann's area 6 (BA6)), frontal cortex, and superior frontal gyrus (BA10). In the nonaffected hemisphere, perfusion was increased in the superior frontal gyrus (BA6) and cingulate gyrus (BA31). In the cerebellum increased perfusion was seen bilaterally. The brain areas with increased perfusion receive and integrate the information from different sensory systems and plan the movement execution. Regional cerebral perfusion decreased in the lingual gyrus (BA18) in the affected hemisphere. In the nonaffected frontal cortex, two areas with decreased perfusion were found in the middle frontal gyrus (BA8/10). Also, the fusiform gyrus (BA20) and inferior temporal gyrus (BA37) in the nonaffected hemisphere showed decreased perfusion. Intensive movement therapy appears to change local cerebral perfusion in areas known to participate in movement planning and execution. These changes might be a sign of active reorganization processes after CIMT in the chronic state of stroke. PMID:15931162

  9. Objective Quantification of the Regional Distribution of Radioactivity in Cerebral Emission Computed Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Gordon Jonathan

    It is essential in the analysis of emission computed tomography (ECT) scans of the living human brain to be able to reliably and objectively obtain regional quantitative data. Therefore, the following thesis describes new methods for the analysis of the regional distribution of radioactivity in brain ECT images, which reduces the variability inherent in observer guided region of interest placement. The analysis methods developed include the definition of a cortical ring for producing a "cortical circumferential profile" of the cortical distribution of radioactivity. This method treats the cortex as a continuous annulus on the outer brain rim. The outer boundary of the brain can be defined either manually, or using a matched, registered magnetic resonance image (MRI), which can also be used for analysis of discrete subcortical regions, a difficult task using ECT images alone. The methods developed here were then applied to the analysis of alterations in the regional cerebral perfusion patterns which are seen in neuro-psychiatric illness. Alzheimer's Dementia, Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder and HIV Dementia were all found to have perfusion abnormalities compared to matched control groups.

  10. Cerebral Palsy (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Cerebral Palsy KidsHealth > For Parents > Cerebral Palsy Print A A ... kids who are living with the condition. About Cerebral Palsy Cerebral palsy is one of the most common ...

  11. Cerebral palsy - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - cerebral palsy ... The following organizations are good resources for information on cerebral palsy : National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke -- www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/cerebral_palsy/cerebral_palsy. ...

  12. Brain perfusion in polysubstance users: Relationship to substance and tobacco use, cognition, and self-regulation*

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Donna E.; Durazzo, Timothy C.; Mon, Anderson; Schmidt, Thomas P.; Meyerhoff, Dieter J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Brain perfusion is altered in both alcohol dependence and stimulant dependence. Although most substance users also abuse/depend on alcohol concurrently (polysubstance users; PSU), rigorous perfusion research in PSU is limited. Also, the relationships of perfusion abnormalities with cognition, impulsivity or decision making are not well known. Methods Arterial spin labeling MRI and neuropsychological measures assessed perfusion levels and neurocognition in 20 alcohol dependent individuals with comorbid stimulant dependence (PSU), 26 individuals dependent on alcohol only (ALC), and 31 light/non-drinking controls (LD). The patient groups included smokers and non-smokers. Results ALC had lower perfusion than LD in subcortical and cortical brain regions including the brain reward/executive oversight system (BREOS). Contrary to our hypothesis, regional perfusion was generally not lower in PSU than ALC. However, smoking PSU had lower perfusion than smoking ALC in several regions, including BREOS. Lower BREOS perfusion related to greater drinking severity in smoking substance users and to greater smoking severity in smoking ALC. Lower regional perfusion in ALC and PSU correlated with worse performance in different cognitive domains; smoking status affected perfusion-cognition relationships in ALC only. Lower BREOS perfusion in both substance using groups related to higher impulsivity. Conclusion Although regional perfusion was not decreased in PSU as a group, the combination of cigarette smoking and polysubstance use is strongly related to hypoperfusion in important cortical and subcortical regions. As lower perfusion relates to greater smoking severity, worse cognition and higher impulsivity, smoking cessation is warranted for treatment-seeking PSU and ALC. PMID:25772434

  13. Schizophrenia patients differentiation based on MR vascular perfusion and volumetric imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spanier, A. B.; Joskowicz, L.; Moshel, S.; Israeli, D.

    2015-03-01

    Candecomp/Parafac Decomposition (CPD) has emerged as a framework for modeling N-way arrays (higher-order matrices). CPD is naturally well suited for the analysis of data sets comprised of observations of a function of multiple discrete indices. In this study we evaluate the prospects of using CPD for modeling MRI brain properties (i.e. brain volume and gray-level) for schizophrenia diagnosis. Taking into account that 3D imaging data consists of millions of pixels per patient, the diagnosis of a schizophrenia patient based on pixel analysis constitutes a methodological challenge (e.g. multiple comparison problem). We show that the CPD could potentially be used as a dimensionality redaction method and as a discriminator between schizophrenia patients and match control, using the gradient of pre- and post Gd-T1-weighted MRI data, which is strongly correlated with cerebral blood perfusion. Our approach was tested on 68 MRI scans: 40 first-episode schizophrenia patients and 28 matched controls. The CPD subject's scores exhibit statistically significant result (P < 0.001). In the context of diagnosing schizophrenia with MRI, the results suggest that the CPD could potentially be used to discriminate between schizophrenia patients and matched control. In addition, the CPD model suggests for brain regions that might exhibit abnormalities in schizophrenia patients for future research.

  14. Acute effect of a high nitrate diet on brain perfusion in older adults

    PubMed Central

    Presley, Tennille D.; Morgan, Ashley R.; Bechtold, Erika; Clodfelter, William; Dove, Robin W.; Jennings, Janine M.; Kraft, Robert A.; King, S. Bruce; Laurienti, Paul J.; Rejeski, W. Jack; Burdette, Jonathan H.; Kim-Shapiro, Daniel B.; Miller, Gary D.

    2010-01-01

    Aims Poor blood flow and hypoxia/ischemia contribute to many disease states and may also be a factor in the decline of physical and cognitive function in aging. Nitrite has been discovered to be a vasodilator that is preferentially harnessed in hypoxia. Thus, both infused and inhaled nitrite are being studied as therapeutic agents for a variety of diseases. In addition, nitrite derived from nitrate in the diet has been shown to decrease blood pressure and improve exercise performance. Thus, dietary nitrate may also be important when increased blood flow in hypoxic or ischemic areas is indicated. These conditions could include age-associated dementia and cognitive decline. The goal of this study was to determine if dietary nitrate would increase cerebral blood flow in older adults. Methods and Results In this investigation we administered a high vs. low nitrate diet to older adults (74.7 ± 6.9 years) and measured cerebral perfusion using arterial spin labeling magnetic resonance imaging. We found that the high nitrate diet did not alter global cerebral perfusion, but did lead to increased regional cerebral perfusion in frontal lobe white matter, especially between the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and anterior cingulate cortex. Conclusion These results suggest that dietary nitrate may be useful in improving regional brain perfusion in older adults in critical brain areas known to be involved in executive functioning. PMID:20951824

  15. Oculoauriculovertebral spectrum and cerebral anomalies.

    PubMed Central

    Schrander-Stumpel, C T; de Die-Smulders, C E; Hennekam, R C; Fryns, J P; Bouckaert, P X; Brouwer, O F; da Costa, J J; Lommen, E J; Maaswinkel-Mooy, P D

    1992-01-01

    We report on three Dutch children with a clinical diagnosis of oculoauriculovertebral spectrum (OAVS) and hydrocephalus. The clinical features are compared to 15 published cases of OAVS and hydrocephalus. Several other cerebral abnormalities were present in the whole group. About half of the cases had cleft lip/palate, anophthalmia/microphthalmia, or a cardiac defect. Mental retardation was found in five of the surviving 11 patients and early death occurred in one-third. We compared the cases with OAVS and hydrocephalus with published reports of OAVS and other cerebral anomalies and found no significant clinical differences. However, the clinical characteristics were clearly more severely expressed than generally found in patients with OAVS. Children with OAVS and more severe clinical features, especially anophthalmia/microphthalmia and cleft lip/palate, seem to be at an increased risk for cerebral malformations and for mental retardation. Images PMID:1583660

  16. Evidence for Cerebral Hemodynamic Measurement-based Therapy in Symptomatic Major Cerebral Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    YAMAUCHI, Hiroshi

    In patients with atherosclerotic internal carotid artery or middle cerebral artery occlusive disease, chronic reduction in cerebral perfusion pressure (chronic hemodynamic compromise) increases the risk of ischemic stroke and can be detected by directly measuring hemodynamic parameters. However, strategies for selecting treatments based on hemodynamic measurements have not been clearly established. Bypass surgery has been proven to improve hemodynamic compromise. However, the benefit of bypass surgery for reducing the stroke risk in patients with hemodynamic compromise is controversial. The results of the two randomized controlled trials were inconsistent. Hypertension is a major risk factor for stroke, and antihypertensive therapy provides general benefit to patients with symptomatic atherosclerotic major cerebral artery disease. However, the benefit of strict control of blood pressure for reducing the stroke risk in patients with hemodynamic compromise is a matter of debate. The results of the two observational studies were different. We must establish strategies for selecting treatments based on hemodynamic measurements in atherosclerotic major cerebral artery disease. PMID:26041631

  17. Regional pulmonary perfusion following human heart-lung transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Lisbona, R.; Hakim, T.S.; Dean, G.W.; Langleben, D.; Guerraty, A.; Levy, R.D. )

    1989-08-01

    Ventilation and perfusion scans were obtained in six subjects who had undergone heart-lung transplantation with consequent denervation of the cardiopulmonary axis. Two of the subjects had developed obliterative bronchiolitis, which is believed to be a form of chronic rejection. Their pulmonary function tests demonstrated airflow obstruction and their scintigraphic studies were abnormal. In the remaining four subjects without obstructive airways disease, ventilation and planar perfusion scans were normal. Single photon emission computed tomography imaging of pulmonary perfusion in these patients revealed a layered distribution of blood flow indistinguishable from that of normal individuals. It is concluded that neurogenic mechanisms have little influence on the pattern of local pulmonary blood flow at rest.

  18. Reversibility of hepatopulmonary syndrome evidenced by serial pulmonary perfusion scan.

    PubMed

    Shijo, H; Sasaki, H; Sakata, H; Kusuhara, H; Ueki, T; Okumura, M

    1993-02-01

    A patient with liver cirrhosis who exhibited marked hypoxemia is presented. An abnormal dilatation of intrapulmonary capillaries was evidenced by perfusion lung scan, contrast-enhanced echocardiography, and histological examinations of lungs. Serial perfusion lung scan disclosed that the radioisotope uptake by extrapulmonary organs was significantly increased and uptake by both lungs was significantly decreased during the state of severer hypoxemia. Shunt quantification method revealed that intrapulmonary right-to-left shunt ratio also paralleled the extent of hypoxemia. The pathophysiology of hepatopulmonary syndrome appeared to involve a reversible intrapulmonary vascular dilatation. The perfusion lung scan could semiquantitate the severity of intrapulmonary vascular dilatation and could offer the efficient method to follow their progress. PMID:8440418

  19. Sequential assessment of regional cerebral blood flow, regional cerebral blood volume, and blood-brain barrier in focal cerebral ischemia: a case report

    SciTech Connect

    Di Piero, V.; Perani, D.; Savi, A.; Gerundini, P.; Lenzi, G.L.; Fazio, F.

    1986-06-01

    Regional CBF (rCBF) and regional cerebral blood volume (rCBV) were evaluated by N,N,N'-trimethyl-N'-(2)-hydroxy-3-methyl-5-(123I)iodobenzyl-1, 3-propanediamine-2 HCl- and /sup 99m/TC-labeled red blood cells, respectively, and single-photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) in a patient with focal cerebral ischemia. Sequential transmission computerized tomography (TCT) and SPECT functional data were compared with clinical findings to monitor the pathophysiological events occurring in stroke. A lack of correlation between rCBF-rCBV distributions and blood-brain barrier (BBB) breakdown was found in the acute phase. In the face of more prolonged alteration of BBB, as seen by TCT enhancement, a rapid evolution of transient phenomena such as luxury perfusion was shown by SPECT studies. Follow-up of the patient demonstrated a correlation between the neurological recovery and a parallel relative improvement of the cerebral perfusion.

  20. Autoregulation of cerebral blood circulation under orthostatic tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gayevyy, M. D.; Maltsev, V. G.; Pogorelyy, V. E.

    1980-01-01

    Autoregulation of cerebral blood flow (ACBF) under orthostatic tests (OT) was estimated in acute experiments on rabbits and cats under local anesthesia according to changes of perfusion pressure (PP) in carotid arteries, cerebral blood flow, pressure in the venous system of the brain, and resistance of cerebral vessels. The OT were conducted by turning a special table with the animal fastened to it from a horizontal to a vertical (head up or head down) position at 40 to 80 deg. In most experiments ACBF correlated with the changes of PP. Different variations of ACBF and its possible mechanisms are discussed.

  1. ASFNR recommendations for clinical performance of MR dynamic susceptibility contrast perfusion imaging of the brain.

    PubMed

    Welker, K; Boxerman, J; Kalnin, A; Kaufmann, T; Shiroishi, M; Wintermark, M

    2015-06-01

    MR perfusion imaging is becoming an increasingly common means of evaluating a variety of cerebral pathologies, including tumors and ischemia. In particular, there has been great interest in the use of MR perfusion imaging for both assessing brain tumor grade and for monitoring for tumor recurrence in previously treated patients. Of the various techniques devised for evaluating cerebral perfusion imaging, the dynamic susceptibility contrast method has been employed most widely among clinical MR imaging practitioners. However, when implementing DSC MR perfusion imaging in a contemporary radiology practice, a neuroradiologist is confronted with a large number of decisions. These include choices surrounding appropriate patient selection, scan-acquisition parameters, data-postprocessing methods, image interpretation, and reporting. Throughout the imaging literature, there is conflicting advice on these issues. In an effort to provide guidance to neuroradiologists struggling to implement DSC perfusion imaging in their MR imaging practice, the Clinical Practice Committee of the American Society of Functional Neuroradiology has provided the following recommendations. This guidance is based on review of the literature coupled with the practice experience of the authors. While the ASFNR acknowledges that alternate means of carrying out DSC perfusion imaging may yield clinically acceptable results, the following recommendations should provide a framework for achieving routine success in this complicated-but-rewarding aspect of neuroradiology MR imaging practice. PMID:25907520

  2. Congenital Absence of Internal Carotid Artery with Rare Type of Intercavernous Anastamosis and Ruptured Cerebral Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Alurkar, Anand; Oak, Sagar; Kori, Smita

    2016-01-01

    Congenital absence of Internal Carotid Artery (ICA) is a rare anomaly seen in <0.01% of the population. Various collateral circulations develop in these cases to maintain adequate cerebral perfusion. High incidence of aneurysms is reported in these cases. Complete evaluation is required to detect other abnormalities usually seen in these patients. We report a case of congenital absence of right ICA in a 39-year-old female who presented with Subarachnoid Haemorrhage (SAH) and had a Middle Cerebral Artery Aneurysm (MCA). The right MCA got supply from the intercavernous communication from the left internal carotid artery. Skull base Computed Tomogram (CT) confirmed the congenital absence of right ICA. She underwent successful surgical clipping for the aneurysm. The high incidence of aneurysms, collateral circulations, embryological development and postulated mechanisms of this anomaly were discussed. The exact aetiology behind the absence of ICA remains unclear. It is important to differentiate this condition from acquired stenosis/occlusion due to atherosclerosis and carotid dissection. Recognising the anomaly is important and gains even more significance during surgical planning in cases of direct aneurysm clipping, carotid endarterectomy and transphenoidal surgeries. PMID:27190916

  3. Prognostic value of quantitative high-speed myocardial perfusion imaging

    PubMed Central

    Nakazato, Ryo; Berman, Daniel S.; Gransar, Heidi; Hyun, Mark; Miranda-Peats, Romalisa; Kite, Faith C.; Hayes, Sean W.; Thomson, Louise E.J.; Friedman, John D.; Rozanski, Alan; Slomka, Piotr J.

    2012-01-01

    Background Most studies have reported using semi-quantitative analysis to assess the prognostic utility of SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI). Thus we studied the prognostic value of fully automated quantitative analysis software applied to new solid-state, high-speed (HS) SPECT-MPI. Methods 1613 consecutive patients undergoing exercise or adenosine HS-MPI were followed for 2.6±0.5 years for all-cause mortality (ACM). Automated quantitative software was used for assessing stress total perfusion deficit (sTPD) and was compared to semi-quantitative visual analysis. MPI was characterized as 0% (normal); 1–4% (minimal perfusion defect); 5–10% (mildly abnormal); and >10% (moderately/severely abnormal). Results During follow-up, 79 patients died (4.9%). Annualized ACM increased with progressively increasing sTPD; 0% (0.87%), 1–4% (1.94%), 5–10% (3.10%) and >10% (5.33%) (log-rank p<0.0001). While similar overall findings were observed with visual analysis, only sTPD demonstrated increased risk in patients with minimal perfusion defects. In multivariable analysis, sTPD >10% was a mortality predictor (HR 3.03, 95% CI 1.30–7.09, p=0.01). Adjusted mortality rate was substantial in adenosine MPI, but low in exercise MPI (9.0% versus 1.0%, p<0.0001). Conclusions By quantitative analysis, ACM increases with increasing perfusion abnormality among patients undergoing stress HS-MPI. These findings confirm previous results obtained with visual analysis using conventional Anger camera imaging systems. PMID:23065414

  4. Framework for cognitive analysis of dynamic perfusion computed tomography with visualization of large volumetric data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hachaj, Tomasz; Ogiela, Marek R.

    2012-10-01

    The proposed framework for cognitive analysis of perfusion computed tomography images is a fusion of image processing, pattern recognition, and image analysis procedures. The output data of the algorithm consists of: regions of perfusion abnormalities, anatomy atlas description of brain tissues, measures of perfusion parameters, and prognosis for infracted tissues. That information is superimposed onto volumetric computed tomography data and displayed to radiologists. Our rendering algorithm enables rendering large volumes on off-the-shelf hardware. This portability of rendering solution is very important because our framework can be run without using expensive dedicated hardware. The other important factors are theoretically unlimited size of rendered volume and possibility of trading of image quality for rendering speed. Such rendered, high quality visualizations may be further used for intelligent brain perfusion abnormality identification, and computer aided-diagnosis of selected types of pathologies.

  5. The accessible cerebral vascular proteome in a mouse model of cerebral β-amyloidosis.

    PubMed

    Roesli, Christoph; Fugmann, Tim; Borgia, Beatrice; Schliemann, Christoph; Neri, Dario; Jucker, Mathias

    2011-04-01

    Assessing protein changes in the cerebral vasculature of brain disorders may increase our understanding of disease pathogenesis and facilitate diagnostic and therapeutic intervention. By combining perfusion of mice with a charged reactive biotin derivative and subsequent quantification of the biotinylated proteins, the proteome accessible from the vasculature in an APPPS1 transgenic mouse model of cerebral β-amyloidosis was identified and compared to that in non-transgenic control mice. Our results provide proof-of-concept of this technology for the identification of new targets for antibody-based therapy or pharmacodelivery, and for neuroimaging in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:21262399

  6. Dopaminergic Therapy Modulates Cortical Perfusion in Parkinson Disease With and Without Dementia According to Arterial Spin Labeled Perfusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Wei-Che; Chen, Pei-Chin; Huang, Yung-Cheng; Tsai, Nai-Wen; Chen, Hsiu-Ling; Wang, Hung-Chen; Lin, Tsu-Kung; Chou, Kun-Hsien; Chen, Meng-Hsiang; Chen, Yi-Wen; Lu, Cheng-Hsien

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Arterial spin labeling (ASL) magnetic resonance imaging analyses allow for the quantification of altered cerebral blood flow, and provide a novel means of examining the impact of dopaminergic treatments. The authors examined the cerebral perfusion differences among 17 Parkinson disease (PD) patients, 17 PD with dementia (PDD) patients, and 17 healthy controls and used ASL-MRI to assess the effects of dopaminergic therapies on perfusion in the patients. The authors demonstrated progressive widespread cortical hypoperfusion in PD and PDD and robust effects for the dopaminergic therapies. Specifically, dopaminergic medications further decreased frontal lobe and cerebellum perfusion in the PD and PDD groups, respectively. These patterns of hypoperfusion could be related to cognitive dysfunctions and disease severity. Furthermore, desensitization to dopaminergic therapies in terms of cortical perfusion was found as the disease progressed, supporting the concept that long-term therapies are associated with the therapeutic window narrowing. The highly sensitive pharmaceutical response of ASL allows clinicians and researchers to easily and effectively quantify the absolute perfusion status, which might prove helpful for therapeutic planning. PMID:26844450

  7. Perfusion Angiography in Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Scalzo, Fabien; Liebeskind, David S

    2016-01-01

    Visualization and quantification of blood flow are essential for the diagnosis and treatment evaluation of cerebrovascular diseases. For rapid imaging of the cerebrovasculature, digital subtraction angiography (DSA) remains the gold standard as it offers high spatial resolution. This paper lays out a methodological framework, named perfusion angiography, for the quantitative analysis and visualization of blood flow parameters from DSA images. The parameters, including cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral blood volume (CBV), mean transit time (MTT), time-to-peak (TTP), and T max, are computed using a bolus tracking method based on the deconvolution of the time-density curve on a pixel-by-pixel basis. The method is tested on 66 acute ischemic stroke patients treated with thrombectomy and/or tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) and also evaluated on an estimation task with known ground truth. This novel imaging tool provides unique insights into flow mechanisms that cannot be observed directly in DSA sequences and might be used to evaluate the impact of endovascular interventions more precisely. PMID:27446232

  8. Perfusion Angiography in Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Liebeskind, David S.

    2016-01-01

    Visualization and quantification of blood flow are essential for the diagnosis and treatment evaluation of cerebrovascular diseases. For rapid imaging of the cerebrovasculature, digital subtraction angiography (DSA) remains the gold standard as it offers high spatial resolution. This paper lays out a methodological framework, named perfusion angiography, for the quantitative analysis and visualization of blood flow parameters from DSA images. The parameters, including cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral blood volume (CBV), mean transit time (MTT), time-to-peak (TTP), and Tmax, are computed using a bolus tracking method based on the deconvolution of the time-density curve on a pixel-by-pixel basis. The method is tested on 66 acute ischemic stroke patients treated with thrombectomy and/or tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) and also evaluated on an estimation task with known ground truth. This novel imaging tool provides unique insights into flow mechanisms that cannot be observed directly in DSA sequences and might be used to evaluate the impact of endovascular interventions more precisely. PMID:27446232

  9. Acute Chagas Disease Induces Cerebral Microvasculopathy in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Nisimura, Lindice Mitie; Estato, Vanessa; de Souza, Elen Mello; Reis, Patricia A.; Lessa, Marcos Adriano; Castro-Faria-Neto, Hugo Caire; Pereira, Mirian Claudia de Souza; Tibiriçá, Eduardo; Garzoni, Luciana Ribeiro

    2014-01-01

    Cardiomyopathy is the main clinical form of Chagas disease (CD); however, cerebral manifestations, such as meningoencephalitis, ischemic stroke and cognitive impairment, can also occur. The aim of the present study was to investigate functional microvascular alterations and oxidative stress in the brain of mice in acute CD. Acute CD was induced in Swiss Webster mice (SWM) with the Y strain of Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi). Cerebral functional capillary density (the number of spontaneously perfused capillaries), leukocyte rolling and adhesion and the microvascular endothelial-dependent response were analyzed over a period of fifteen days using intravital video-microscopy. We also evaluated cerebral oxidative stress with the thiobarbituric acid reactive species TBARS method. Compared with the non-infected group, acute CD significantly induced cerebral functional microvascular alterations, including (i) functional capillary rarefaction, (ii) increased leukocyte rolling and adhesion, (iii) the formation of microvascular platelet-leukocyte aggregates, and (iv) alteration of the endothelial response to acetylcholine. Moreover, cerebral oxidative stress increased in infected animals. We concluded that acute CD in mice induced cerebral microvasculopathy, characterized by a reduced incidence of perfused capillaries, a high number of microvascular platelet-leukocyte aggregates, a marked increase in leukocyte-endothelium interactions and brain arteriolar endothelial dysfunction associated with oxidative stress. These results suggest the involvement of cerebral microcirculation alterations in the neurological manifestations of CD. PMID:25010691

  10. Cerebral blood flow variations in CNS lupus

    SciTech Connect

    Kushner, M.J.; Tobin, M.; Fazekas, F.; Chawluk, J.; Jamieson, D.; Freundlich, B.; Grenell, S.; Freemen, L.; Reivich, M. )

    1990-01-01

    We studied the patterns of cerebral blood flow (CBF), over time, in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and varying neurologic manifestations including headache, stroke, psychosis, and encephalopathy. For 20 paired xenon-133 CBF measurements, CBF was normal during CNS remissions, regardless of the symptoms. CBF was significantly depressed during CNS exacerbations. The magnitude of change in CBF varied with the neurologic syndrome. CBF was least affected in patients with nonspecific symptoms such as headache or malaise, whereas patients with encephalopathy or psychosis exhibited the greatest reductions in CBF. In 1 patient with affective psychosis, without clinical or CT evidence of cerebral ischemia, serial SPECT studies showed resolution of multifocal cerebral perfusion defects which paralleled clinical recovery.

  11. Cerebral perturbations during exercise in hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Verges, Samuel; Rupp, Thomas; Jubeau, Marc; Wuyam, Bernard; Esteve, François; Levy, Patrick; Perrey, Stéphane; Millet, Guillaume Y

    2012-04-15

    Reduction of aerobic exercise performance observed under hypoxic conditions is mainly attributed to altered muscle metabolism due to impaired O(2) delivery. It has been recently proposed that hypoxia-induced cerebral perturbations may also contribute to exercise performance limitation. A significant reduction in cerebral oxygenation during whole body exercise has been reported in hypoxia compared with normoxia, while changes in cerebral perfusion may depend on the brain region, the level of arterial oxygenation and hyperventilation induced alterations in arterial CO(2). With the use of transcranial magnetic stimulation, inconsistent changes in cortical excitability have been reported in hypoxia, whereas a greater impairment in maximal voluntary activation following a fatiguing exercise has been suggested when arterial O(2) content is reduced. Electromyographic recordings during exercise showed an accelerated rise in central motor drive in hypoxia, probably to compensate for greater muscle contractile fatigue. This accelerated development of muscle fatigue in moderate hypoxia may be responsible for increased inhibitory afferent signals to the central nervous system leading to impaired central drive. In severe hypoxia (arterial O(2) saturation <70-75%), cerebral hypoxia per se may become an important contributor to impaired performance and reduced motor drive during prolonged exercise. This review examines the effects of acute and chronic reduction in arterial O(2) (and CO(2)) on cerebral blood flow and cerebral oxygenation, neuronal function, and central drive to the muscles. Direct and indirect influences of arterial deoxygenation on central command are separated. Methodological concerns as well as future research avenues are also considered. PMID:22319046

  12. Perfusion lung scan: an aid in detection of lymphangitic carcinomatosis

    SciTech Connect

    Bates, S.E.; Tranum, B.L.

    1982-07-15

    Lymphangitic carcinomatosis is usually a late manifestation of metastatic disease. The patient usually presents with cough or dyspnea, and the chest radiograph is often nondiagnostic. Two patients are presented who developed symptoms while on adjuvant chemotherapy. Both had abnormal perfusion lung scans. One had matching ventilation defects; the other a normal ventilation study. Biopsy revealed metastatic carcinoma; in one case tumor was seen in both the pulmonary lymphatics and arterioles; in technique which can speed diagnosis and institution of therapy in lymphangitic carcinomatosis.

  13. A comparative analysis of the dependences of the hemodynamic parameters on changes in ROI's position in perfusion CT scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Yong-Seok; Cho, Jae-Hwan; Namgung, Jang-Sun; Kim, Hyo-Jin; Yoon, Dae-Young; Lee, Han-Joo

    2013-05-01

    This study performed a comparative analysis of cerebral blood volume (CBV), cerebral blood flow (CBF), mean transit time (MTT), and mean time-to-peak (TTP) obtained by changing the region of interest's (ROI) anatomical positions, during CT brain perfusion. We acquired axial source images of perfusion CT from 20 patients undergoing CT perfusion exams due to brain trauma. Subsequently, the CBV, CBF, MTT, and TTP values were calculated through data-processing of the perfusion CT images. The color scales for the CBV, CBF, MTT, and TTP maps were obtained using the image data. Anterior cerebral artery (ACA) was taken as the standard ROI for the calculations of the perfusion values. Differences in the hemodynamic average values were compared in a quantitative analysis by placing ROI and the dividing axial images into proximal, middle, and distal segments anatomically. By performing the qualitative analysis using a blind test, we observed changes in the sensory characteristics by using the color scales of the CBV, CBF, and MTT maps in the proximal, middle, and distal segments. According to the qualitative analysis, no differences were found in CBV, CBF, MTT, and TTP values of the proximal, middle, and distal segments and no changes were detected in the color scales of the the CBV, CBF, MTT, and TTP maps in the proximal, middle, and distal segments. We anticipate that the results of the study will useful in assessing brain trauma patients using by perfusion imaging.

  14. Evaluation of pulmonary perfusion in lung regions showing isolated xenon-133 ventilation washout defects

    SciTech Connect

    Bushnell, D.L.; Sood, K.B.; Shirazi, P.; Pal, I. )

    1990-08-01

    Xenon-133 washout phase imaging is often used to help determine whether the etiology of a perfusion defect is embolic or due to pulmonary parenchymal pathology, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. This study was designed to evaluate the pulmonary blood flow patterns associated with isolated defects on xenon washout images. Scintigraphic lung studies were reviewed until 100 cases with abnormal ventilation results were obtained. Ventilation abnormalities were compared with the corresponding perfusion scan results at the same anatomic site. Of the 208 individual lung regions with xenon abnormalities, 111 showed isolated washout defects (that is, with normal washin). Ninety-four of these 111 sites showed either normal perfusion or a small, nonsegmental corresponding perfusion defect. Three segmental perfusion defects were noted in association with isolated xenon retention. In each of these cases, however, the patient was felt actually to have pulmonary embolism. Thus, it is recommended that, for interpretation of scintigraphic images in the assessment of pulmonary embolism, lung pathology associated with isolated xenon retention not be considered a potential cause for large or segmental perfusion defects.

  15. Bilateral basal Xe-133 retention and ventilation/perfusion patterns in mild and subclinical congestive heart failure

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, H.K.; Skarzynski, J.J.; Spadaro, A. )

    1989-12-01

    The Xe-133 ventilation pattern in congestive heart failure (CHF) was assessed using 24 inpatient ventilation/perfusion studies performed to rule out pulmonary embolism. Patients with histories of CHF, myocardial infarction (MI), and cardiomyopathy were included in the study. Frank pulmonary edema, pulmonary embolism, and other known lung diseases such as chronic obstructive lung disease, tumor, and pneumonia were excluded. Fifteen of the 24 patients had abnormal ventilation scans. Twelve of the 15 showed bilateral basal Xe-133 retention on washout; the remaining 3 showed diffuse, posterior regional retention. On perfusion scans, 14 of the 15 abnormal ventilation patients showed evidence of CHF such as inverted perfusion gradient, enlarged cardiac silhouette, or patchy perfusion, and all of them had a history of CHF or cardiac disease. Nine of the 24 patients had normal ventilation scans, including normal washout patterns. Seven of the nine had normal perfusion (p less than 0.01). Four of the nine normal ventilation patients had a history of cardiac disease or CHF but no recent acute MI. Bilateral basal regional Xe-133 retention, coupled with perfusion scan evidence of CHF such as inverted perfusion gradient, enlarged cardiac silhouette, and patchy perfusion pattern, appears to be a sensitive and characteristic ventilation/perfusion finding in mild or subclinical CHF.

  16. An Appeal to Standardize CT- and MR-Perfusion.

    PubMed

    Turowski, B; Schramm, P

    2015-10-01

    Multiple treatment options and risk assessment in cerebrovascular diseases are the actual challenges in diagnostic as well as in interventional neuroradiology.Acute ischemic stroke essentially requires rapid detection of the location and extent of infarction and tissue at risk for making treatment decisions. In the acute setting, modern multiparametric perfusion imaging protocols help to determine infarct core and adjacent penumbral tissue, and they enable the estimation of collateral flow of intra- and extracranial arteries. In subacute delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) or chronic occlusive neurovascular diseases estimation of residual and collateral flow may be even more difficult.Prediction of sufficient or insufficient supply of brain tissue may be essential to balance conservative against interventional therapies. However, so far no established reliable thresholds are available for determining tissue at acute, subacute, chronic progressive, or chronic risk.Reliable and reproducible thresholds require quantitative perfusion measurements with a calibrated instrument. But the measurement instrument is not at all defined-a variety of parameter settings, different algorithms based on multiple assumptions and a wide variety of published normal and pathologic values for perfusion parameters indicate the problem. In the following text, we explain how deep the problem may be enrooted within techniques and algorithms impeding broad use of perfusion for many clinical issues. PMID:26289412

  17. Susceptibility-Based Analysis Of Dynamic Gadolinium Bolus Perfusion MRI

    PubMed Central

    Bonekamp, David; Barker, Peter B.; Leigh, Richard; van Zijl, Peter C.M.; Li, Xu

    2014-01-01

    Purpose An algorithm is developed for the reconstruction of dynamic, gadolinium (Gd) bolus MR perfusion images of the human brain, based on quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM). Methods The method is evaluated in 5 perfusion scans obtained from 4 different patients scanned at 3T, and compared to the conventional analysis based on changes in the transverse relaxation rate ΔR2* and to theoretical predictions. QSM images were referenced to ventricular CSF for each dynamic of the perfusion sequence. Results Images of cerebral blood flow and blood volume were successfully reconstructed from the QSM-analysis, and were comparable to those reconstructed using ΔR2*. The magnitudes of the Gd-associated susceptibility effects in gray and white matter were consistent with theoretical predictions. Conclusion QSM-based analysis may have some theoretical advantages compared to ΔR2*, including a simpler relationship between signal change and Gd concentration. However, disadvantages are its much lower contrast-to-noise ratio, artifacts due to respiration and other effects, and more complicated reconstruction methods. More work is required to optimize data acquisition protocols for QSM-based perfusion imaging. PMID:24604343

  18. Lung Ventilation/Perfusion Scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is a Lung Ventilation/Perfusion Scan? A lung ventilation/perfusion scan, or VQ scan, is a ... that measures air and blood flow in your lungs. A VQ scan most often is used to ...

  19. [Negative symptoms and cerebral imaging].

    PubMed

    Kaladjian, A; Belzeaux, R; Adida, M; Azorin, J-M

    2015-12-01

    A number of neuroanatomical and neurofonctional abnormalities have been evidenced by cerebral imaging studies in patients suffering from schizophrenia. Nevertheless, those specifically associated with the negative symptoms of this disease are still insufficiently known. This work is a review of selected studies that have assessed the brain correlates of negative symptoms in schizophrenia. Approaches using structural imaging have highlighted reduction of gray matter density or cortical thickness associated with negative symptoms, which is rather sparsely distributed within the frontal and temporal regions, localized nevertheless more particularly in the frontal medial and orbitofrontal areas, as well as the amygdalo-hippocampic complex. These deficits are concurrent with a loss of integrity of the principal paths of white matter tracts between frontal and limbic regions. On the other hand, neurofonctional abnormalities associated with negative symptoms involve especially the frontal areas and limbic striatum. A disturbed functioning within the fronto-striatal loops, related to a striatal dopaminergic deficit, may represent a potential explanatory hypothesis of the negative symptoms of schizophrenia, as suggested by studies using Positron Emission Tomography on this topic or neuroimaging studies on the effects of antipsychotics. A better identification of the cerebral abnormalities associated with the negative dimension of schizophrenia, with regard to the lateralization of these abnormalities or to their changes during the course of the disease, could offer new therapeutic modalities for the treatment of this dimension which, until now, remains few responsive to conventional pharmacological treatments. PMID:26776387

  20. Patient-Specific Detection of Cerebral Blood Flow Alterations as Assessed by Arterial Spin Labeling in Drug-Resistant Epileptic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Boscolo Galazzo, Ilaria; Storti, Silvia Francesca; Del Felice, Alessandra; Pizzini, Francesca Benedetta; Arcaro, Chiara; Formaggio, Emanuela; Mai, Roberto; Chappell, Michael; Beltramello, Alberto; Manganotti, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Electrophysiological and hemodynamic data can be integrated to accurately and precisely identify the generators of abnormal electrical activity in drug-resistant focal epilepsy. Arterial Spin Labeling (ASL), a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique for quantitative noninvasive measurement of cerebral blood flow (CBF), can provide a direct measure of variations in cerebral perfusion associated with the epileptic focus. In this study, we aimed to confirm the ASL diagnostic value in the identification of the epileptogenic zone, as compared to electrical source imaging (ESI) results, and to apply a template-based approach to depict statistically significant CBF alterations. Standard video-electroencephalography (EEG), high-density EEG, and ASL were performed to identify clinical seizure semiology and noninvasively localize the epileptic focus in 12 drug-resistant focal epilepsy patients. The same ASL protocol was applied to a control group of 17 healthy volunteers from which a normal perfusion template was constructed using a mixed-effect approach. CBF maps of each patient were then statistically compared to the reference template to identify perfusion alterations. Significant hypo- and hyperperfused areas were identified in all cases, showing good agreement between ASL and ESI results. Interictal hypoperfusion was observed at the site of the seizure in 10/12 patients and early postictal hyperperfusion in 2/12. The epileptic focus was correctly identified within the surgical resection margins in the 5 patients who underwent lobectomy, all of which had good postsurgical outcomes. The combined use of ESI and ASL can aid in the noninvasive evaluation of drug-resistant epileptic patients. PMID:25946055

  1. Mismatch between iodine-123 IMP and technetium-99m HM-PAO brain perfusion imaging in a patient with meningioma

    SciTech Connect

    Hoshi, H.; Jinnouchi, S.; Watanabe, K.; Nakano, S.; Kinoshita, K.

    1987-09-01

    The discrepancy between three methods for cerebral perfusion imagings in the case of a man with meningioma is presented. Imaging with N-isopropyl-P-(I-123) iodoamphetamine (IMP) showed no activity in the tumor. Imaging with Tc-99m hexamethylpropyleneamine oxime (HM-PAO) and the local cerebral blood flow (LCBF) image with Xe-133 inhalation showed high tumor activity. IMP is a more accurate method for imaging the brain tissue blood flow.

  2. Metabolism, sperm and fluid production of the isolated perfused testis of the sheep and goat

    PubMed Central

    Linzell, J. L.; Setchell, B. P.

    1969-01-01

    1. A total of nineteen ram and three goat testes have been perfused in isolation at 34-35° C for 3½-9 hr with heparinized blood and an added 5-HT antagonist (bromolysergic acid diethylamide) and their function compared with that of the normal ram testes in vivo. 2. The metabolism of the perfused testes and the testes in vivo was similar but blood flow through the perfused testes was two to three times normal. 3. Vasoconstriction was produced by adrenaline and noradrenaline (10-20 μg I.A.) and by electrical stimulation of nerves in the spermatic cord or of the lumbar sympathetic chain; these responses were abolished or reduced by phenoxybenzamine. 4. Flow of fluid from the rete testis continued only if ischaemia was reduced to a minimum and glucose concentration in the blood perfusing the testis was kept above about 25 mg/100 ml.; the fluid secreted during perfusion was of normal composition. 5. The perfused testis showed no evidence of autoregulation and the flow of fluid was not affected by changes in perfusion pressure. 6. When the temperature of three testes was raised to 40° C for 2 hr, metabolism increased but blood flow was unaltered; the flow of fluid and the concentration of spermatozoa decreased during heating. 7. The testes perfused at normal scrotal temperatures (34-35° C) were histologically normal but some abnormalities were observed in the heated testes. ImagesFig. 3Fig. 4 PMID:5773547

  3. Dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasound of slaughterhouse porcine livers in machine perfusion.

    PubMed

    Izamis, Maria-Louisa; Efstathiades, Andreas; Keravnou, Christina; Leen, Edward L; Averkiou, Michalakis A

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to enable investigations into novel imaging and surgical techniques by developing a readily accessible, versatile liver machine perfusion system. Slaughterhouse pig livers were used, and dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasound was introduced to optimize the procurement process and provide real-time perfusion monitoring. The system comprised a single pump, oxygenator, bubble trap and two flowmeters for pressure-controlled perfusion of the vessels using an off-the-shelf perfusate at room temperature. Successful livers exhibited homogeneous perfusion in both the portal vein and hepatic artery with dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasound, which correlated with stable oxygen uptake, bile production and hepatic resistance and normal histology at the end of 3 h of perfusion. Dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasound revealed perfusion abnormalities invisible to the naked eye, thereby providing context to the otherwise systemic biochemical/hemodynamic measurements and focal biopsy findings. The model developed here is a simple, cost-effective approach for stable ex vivo whole-organ machine perfusion. PMID:25023101

  4. Partial Aortic Occlusion and Cerebral Venous Steal: Venous Effects of Arterial Manipulation in Acute Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Pranevicius, Osvaldas; Pranevicius, Mindaugas; Liebeskind, David S.

    2011-01-01

    Acute ischemic stroke therapy emphasizes early arterial clot lysis or removal. Partial aortic occlusion has recently emerged as an alternative hemodynamic approach to augment cerebral perfusion in acute ischemic stroke. The exact mechanism of cerebral flow augmentation with partial aortic occlusion remains unclear and may involve more than simple diversion of arterial blood flow from the lower body to cerebral collateral circulation. The cerebral venous steal hypothesis suggests that even a small increase in tissue pressure in the ischemic area will divert blood flow to surrounding regions with lesser tissue pressures. This may cause no-reflow (absence of flow after restoration of arterial patency) in the ischemic core and “luxury perfusion” in the surrounding regions. Such maldistribution may be reversed with increased venous pressure titrated to avoid changes in intracranial pressure. We propose that partial aortic occlusion enhances perfusion in the brain by offsetting cerebral venous steal. Partial aortic occlusion redistributes blood volume into the upper part of the body, manifest by an increase in central venous pressure. Increased venous pressure recruits the collapsed vascular network and, by eliminating cerebral venous steal, corrects perifocal perfusion maldistribution, analogous to positive end expiratory pressure recruitment of collapsed airways to decrease ventilation/perfusion mismatch in the lungs. PMID:21441149

  5. The effects of altered intrathoracic pressure on resting cerebral blood flow and its response to visual stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Hayen, Anja; Herigstad, Mari; Kelly, Michael; Okell, Thomas W.; Murphy, Kevin; Wise, Richard G.; Pattinson, Kyle T.S.

    2013-01-01

    Investigating how intrathoracic pressure changes affect cerebral blood flow (CBF) is important for a clear interpretation of neuroimaging data in patients with abnormal respiratory physiology, intensive care patients receiving mechanical ventilation and in research paradigms that manipulate intrathoracic pressure. Here, we investigated the effect of experimentally increased and decreased intrathoracic pressures upon CBF and the stimulus-evoked CBF response to visual stimulation. Twenty healthy volunteers received intermittent inspiratory and expiratory loads (plus or minus 9 cmH2O for 270 s) and viewed an intermittent 2 Hz flashing checkerboard, while maintaining stable end-tidal CO2. CBF was recorded with transcranial Doppler sonography (TCD) and whole-brain pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling magnetic resonance imaging (PCASL MRI). Application of inspiratory loading (negative intrathoracic pressure) showed an increase in TCD-measured CBF of 4% and a PCASL-measured increase in grey matter CBF of 5%, but did not alter mean arterial pressure (MAP). Expiratory loading (positive intrathoracic pressure) did not alter CBF, while MAP increased by 3%. Neither loading condition altered the perfusion response to visual stimulation in the primary visual cortex. In both loading conditions localized CBF increases were observed in the somatosensory and motor cortices, and in the cerebellum. Altered intrathoracic pressures, whether induced experimentally, therapeutically or through a disease process, have possible significant effects on CBF and should be considered as a potential systematic confound in the interpretation of perfusion-based neuroimaging data. PMID:23108273

  6. Functional cluster analysis of CT perfusion maps: a new tool for diagnosis of acute stroke?

    PubMed

    Baumgartner, Christian; Gautsch, Kurt; Böhm, Christian; Felber, Stephan

    2005-09-01

    CT perfusion imaging constitutes an important contribution to the early diagnosis of acute stroke. Cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral blood volume (CBV) and time-to-peak (TTP) maps are used to estimate the severity of cerebral damage after acute ischemia. We introduce functional cluster analysis as a new tool to evaluate CT perfusion in order to identify normal brain, ischemic tissue and large vessels. CBF, CBV and TTP maps represent the basis for cluster analysis applying a partitioning (k-means) and density-based (density-based spatial clustering of applications with noise, DBSCAN) paradigm. In patients with transient ischemic attack and stroke, cluster analysis identified brain areas with distinct hemodynamic properties (gray and white matter) and segmented territorial ischemia. CBF, CBV and TTP values of each detected cluster were displayed. Our preliminary results indicate that functional cluster analysis of CT perfusion maps may become a helpful tool for the interpretation of perfusion maps and provide a rapid means for the segmentation of ischemic tissue. PMID:15827821

  7. Cerebral autoregulation with changes in arterial and cerebral venous pressure

    SciTech Connect

    McPherson, R.W.; Traystman, R.J.

    1986-03-01

    The effect of cerebral venous pressure (Pcv) elevation on cerebral autoregulation has been incompletely studied. The authors compared the effect of decreased cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) by elevated Pcv and decreased arterial pressure (Pa) on cerebral blood flow (CBF) in a canine modified bypass model. CPP of 80, 70, 60, 50, 40 and 30 mmHg were produced by decreasing Pa with intracranial pressure (ICP) and Pcv maintained at 0 mmHg (group 1, n = 5), or by elevating Pcv as Pa was maintained at 80 mmHg (group 2, n = 5. CBF was measured using radiolabeled microspheres, and CMRO/sub 2/ = CBF times arterial-sagittal sinus O/sub 2/ content difference. Cerebrovascular resistance (CVR) = CPP/CBF. In group 1 CBF (ml/100 gm/min) was unchanged from control (36 +/- 4) as CPP was decreased from 80 to 40 mmHg. As CPP was decreased to 30 mmHg, CBF decreased to 28 +/- 1. CVR (mmHg/ml/min/100 gm) was 2.3 +/- 0.3 and progressively decreased to 1.0 +/- 0.1 at CPP of 30 mmHg. In group 2 CBF was 34 +/- 3 and was unchanged as CPP decreased to 50 mmHg. At CPP of 40 and 30 mmHg CBF decreased to 25 +/- 3 and 22 +/- 2 respectively. Control CRV was 2.4 +/- 0.2 and progressively decreased to 1.4 +/- 0.1 as CPP decreased to 30 mmHg. CMRO/sub 2/ was unchanged from control in both groups. Thus, CBF is maintained to low CPP regardless of whether vascular transmural pressure was decreased (decrease Pa) or increased (increased Pcv) demonstrating that the myogenic mechanism of autoregulation may be unimportant in normoxic dogs.

  8. Ex vivo lung perfusion.

    PubMed

    Machuca, Tiago N; Cypel, Marcelo

    2014-08-01

    Lung transplantation (LTx) is an established treatment option for eligible patients with end-stage lung disease. Nevertheless, the imbalance between suitable donor lungs available and the increasing number of patients considered for LTx reflects in considerable waitlist mortality. Among potential alternatives to address this issue, ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) has emerged as a modern preservation technique that allows for more accurate lung assessment and also improvement of lung function. Its application in high-risk donor lungs has been successful and resulted in safe expansion of the donor pool. This article will: (I) review the technical details of EVLP; (II) the rationale behind the method; (III) report the worldwide clinical experience with the EVLP, including the Toronto technique and others; (IV) finally, discuss the growing literature on EVLP application for donation after cardiac death (DCD) lungs. PMID:25132972

  9. Ex vivo lung perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Machuca, Tiago N.

    2014-01-01

    Lung transplantation (LTx) is an established treatment option for eligible patients with end-stage lung disease. Nevertheless, the imbalance between suitable donor lungs available and the increasing number of patients considered for LTx reflects in considerable waitlist mortality. Among potential alternatives to address this issue, ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) has emerged as a modern preservation technique that allows for more accurate lung assessment and also improvement of lung function. Its application in high-risk donor lungs has been successful and resulted in safe expansion of the donor pool. This article will: (I) review the technical details of EVLP; (II) the rationale behind the method; (III) report the worldwide clinical experience with the EVLP, including the Toronto technique and others; (IV) finally, discuss the growing literature on EVLP application for donation after cardiac death (DCD) lungs. PMID:25132972

  10. Employees with Cerebral Palsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources Home | Accommodation and Compliance Series: Employees with Cerebral Palsy (CP) By Eddie Whidden, MA Preface Introduction Information About ... SOAR) at http://AskJAN.org/soar. Information about Cerebral Palsy (CP) What is CP? Cerebral palsy is a ...

  11. Cerebral Aneurysms Fact Sheet

    MedlinePlus

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS Cerebral Aneurysms Fact Sheet See a list of all NINDS ... I get more information? What is a cerebral aneurysm? A cerebral aneurysm (also known as an intracranial ...

  12. CAD system for automatic analysis of CT perfusion maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hachaj, T.; Ogiela, M. R.

    2011-03-01

    In this article, authors present novel algorithms developed for the computer-assisted diagnosis (CAD) system for analysis of dynamic brain perfusion, computer tomography (CT) maps, cerebral blood flow (CBF), and cerebral blood volume (CBV). Those methods perform both quantitative analysis [detection and measurement and description with brain anatomy atlas (AA) of potential asymmetries/lesions] and qualitative analysis (semantic interpretation of visualized symptoms). The semantic interpretation (decision about type of lesion: ischemic/hemorrhagic, is the brain tissue at risk of infraction or not) of visualized symptoms is done by, so-called, cognitive inference processes allowing for reasoning on character of pathological regions based on specialist image knowledge. The whole system is implemented in.NET platform (C# programming language) and can be used on any standard PC computer with.NET framework installed.

  13. [Anatomo-pathologic lesions and gas exchange abnormalities in COPD].

    PubMed

    Barberà, J A; Rodriguez-Roisin, R

    1995-05-15

    Pulmonary emphysema and bronchiolar abnormalities are the most characteristic histological lesions in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Hypoxemia and hypercapnia are mainly due to ventilation-perfusion mismatching. Under stable clinical conditions, both intrapulmonary shunt and limitation of oxygen transport from the alveoli to the capillary do not play a critical role in the observed arterial oxygen pressure. During acute exacerbations, ventilation-perfusion inequality worsens, and some cases show mild to moderate shunting. Under these conditions extrapulmonary factors such as breathing pattern, cardiac output, and oxygen uptake have a crucial role in influencing the arterial oxygen pressure. PMID:7659964

  14. Reconstruction of cerebral hemodynamics with dynamic contrast-enhanced time-resolved near-infrared measurements before and during ischemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, Jonathan T.; Diop, Mamadou; Morrison, Laura B.; Lee, Ting-Yim; St. Lawrence, Keith

    2013-03-01

    We present a dynamic contrast-enhanced near-infrared (DCE-NIR) technique that is capable of non-invasive quantification of cerebral hemodynamics in adults. The challenge of removing extracerebral contamination is overcome through the use of multi-distance time-resolved DCE-NIR combined with the kinetic deconvolution optical reconstruction (KDOR) analytical method. As proof-of-principle, cerebral blood flow, cerebral blood volume and mean transit time recovered with DCE-NIR are compared with CT perfusion values in an adult pig during normocapnia, hypocapnia, and ischemia. Measurements of blood flow acquired with DCE-NIR were compared against concomitant measurements using CT Perfusion.

  15. Right axillary and femoral artery perfusion with mild hypothermia for aortic arch replacement

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Aortic arch replacement is associated with increased mortality and morbidity especially in acute type-A aortic dissection. Although hypothermic circulatory arrest with selective antegrade cerebral perfusion has been widely used because of its excellent cerebral protection, its optimal perfusion characteristics are unknown. The present study investigates clinical results obtained after perfusion method modification and temperature management during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). Methods Between July 2010 and August 2012, 16 consecutive adult patients (mean age 50.0 yr ± 14.1 yr, range 25 yr to 73 yr, 12 males, 4 females) who presented with acute Stanford type-A aortic dissection underwent aortic arch replacement (total arch, n = 11; hemiarch, n = 5) under mild hypothermia (31.1°C ± 1.5°C) with right axillary and femoral artery perfusion. Results The mean CPB time was 201 min ± 53 min, and the mean myocardial ischemic time was 140 min ± 42 min. The mean selective cerebral perfusion time was 80 min ± 16 min, and the mean lower-body circulatory arrest time was 20 min ± 13 min. No patient death occurred within 30 post-operative days. The following details were observed: new post-operative permanent neurologic deficit in 1 patient (6.3%), temporary neurologic deficit in 2 patients (12.5%), acute renal dysfunction (creatinine level > 230 umol/L) in 3 patients (18.8%) and mechanical ventilation > 72 h in 5 patients (31.2%). Conclusions Aortic arch replacement for acute type-A aortic dissection under mild hypothermia with right axillary and femoral artery perfusion could be safely performed in the patient cohort. PMID:24885031

  16. Autonomic and myocardial changes in middle cerebral artery occlusion: stroke models in the rat.

    PubMed

    Cechetto, D F; Wilson, J X; Smith, K E; Wolski, D; Silver, M D; Hachinski, V C

    1989-11-20

    Stroke models in larger animals such as the cat, dog and monkey are becoming increasingly more expensive and less readily available. However, the rat is an excellent model for focal cerebral ischemia. Rats are readily available, inexpensive and their neuroanatomy and brain function have been studied extensively. Increases in plasma catecholamines and myocardial damage have been observed in clinical stroke. We examined autonomic and myocardial changes in two rat stroke models. In one model only the middle cerebral artery was occluded (MCAO) while the other model involved occlusion of both the MCA and the common carotid artery (MCAO/CCAO). Arterial blood pressure and heart rate were monitored continuously in 25 male rats (326-430 g) that underwent one of the following procedures: (1) MCAO only; (2) MCAO/CCAO; (3) CCAO only; and (4) sham occlusions (SHAM). Arterial blood samples (0.5 ml) for radioenzymatic assay of norepinephrine (NE) and epinephrine (E) were taken twice before the occlusions and at 90 and 180 min after the occlusions. The animals were perfused at the end of the experiment and the heart removed and examined histologically. Tetrazolium salts were reacted with oxidative enzymes to delineate the region of inadequate perfusion. The mean blood pressure and pulse pressure of the SHAM, MCAO/CCAO and CCAO groups significantly declined from initial values (from an average of 78 to 53 mm Hg) during the course of the experiment. However, the mean blood pressure and pulse pressure of the MCAO rats did not change during the experiment, so that the final mean blood pressure and pulse pressure were significantly higher than in the other 3 groups. The levels of both NE and E increased significantly (NE, 1443 +/- 285.9 to 4095 +/- 929 pg/ml; E, 2402 +/- 623 to 3741 +/- 1166 pg/ml) following occlusion in the MCAO group only while the other 3 groups did not change. Four of 6 hearts in the MCAO group were abnormal, showing evidence of subendocardial hemorrhage, ischemic

  17. Mechanisms of Astrocyte-Mediated Cerebral Edema

    PubMed Central

    Stokum, Jesse A.; Kurland, David B.; Gerzanich, Volodymyr; Simard, J. Marc

    2014-01-01

    Cerebral edema formation stems from disruption of blood brain barrier (BBB) integrity and occurs after injury to the CNS. Due to the restrictive skull, relatively small increases in brain volume can translate into impaired tissue perfusion and brain herniation. In excess, cerebral edema can be gravely harmful. Astrocytes are key participants in cerebral edema by virtue of their relationship with the cerebral vasculature, their unique compliment of solute and water transport proteins, and their general role in brain volume homeostasis. Following the discovery of aquaporins, passive conduits of water flow, aquaporin 4 (AQP4) was identified as the predominant astrocyte water channel. Normally, AQP4 is highly enriched at perivascular endfeet, the outermost layer of the BBB, whereas after injury, AQP4 expression disseminates to the entire astrocytic plasmalemma, a phenomenon termed dysregulation. Arguably, the most important role of AQP4 is to rapidly neutralize osmotic gradients generated by ionic transporters. In pathological conditions, AQP4 is believed to be intimately involved in the formation and clearance of cerebral edema. In this review, we discuss aquaporin function and localization in the BBB during health and injury, and we examine post-injury ionic events that modulate AQP4- dependent edema formation. PMID:24996934

  18. Abnormal Head Position

    MedlinePlus

    ... cause. Can a longstanding head turn lead to any permanent problems? Yes, a significant abnormal head posture could cause permanent ... occipitocervical synostosis and unilateral hearing loss. Are there any ... postures? Yes. Abnormal head postures can usually be improved depending ...

  19. Urine - abnormal color

    MedlinePlus

    ... straw-yellow. Abnormally colored urine may be cloudy, dark, or blood-colored. Causes Abnormal urine color may ... red blood cells, or mucus in the urine. Dark brown but clear urine is a sign of ...

  20. Investigating cerebral oedema using poroelasticity.

    PubMed

    Vardakis, John C; Chou, Dean; Tully, Brett J; Hung, Chang C; Lee, Tsong H; Tsui, Po-Hsiang; Ventikos, Yiannis

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral oedema can be classified as the tangible swelling produced by expansion of the interstitial fluid volume. Hydrocephalus can be succinctly described as the abnormal accumulation of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) within the brain which ultimately leads to oedema within specific sites of parenchymal tissue. Using hydrocephalus as a test bed, one is able to account for the necessary mechanisms involved in the interaction between oedema formation and cerebral fluid production, transport and drainage. The current state of knowledge about integrative cerebral dynamics and transport phenomena indicates that poroelastic theory may provide a suitable framework to better understand various diseases. In this work, Multiple-Network Poroelastic Theory (MPET) is used to develop a novel spatio-temporal model of fluid regulation and tissue displacement within the various scales of the cerebral environment. The model is applied through two formats, a one-dimensional finite difference - Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) coupling framework, as well as a two-dimensional Finite Element Method (FEM) formulation. These are used to investigate the role of endoscopic fourth ventriculostomy in alleviating oedema formation due to fourth ventricle outlet obstruction (1D coupled model) in addition to observing the capability of the FEM template in capturing important characteristics allied to oedema formation, like for instance in the periventricular region (2D model). PMID:26749338

  1. Relation of global and regional left ventricular function to tomographic thallium-201 myocardial perfusion in patients with prior myocardial infarction

    SciTech Connect

    Stratton, J.R.; Speck, S.M.; Caldwell, J.H.; Martin, G.V.; Cerqueira, M.; Maynard, C.; Davis, K.B.; Kennedy, J.W.; Ritchie, J.L.

    1988-07-01

    To determine the relation between regional myocardial perfusion and regional wall motion in humans, tomographic thallium-201 imaging and two-dimensional echocardiography at rest were performed on the same day in 83 patients 4 to 12 weeks after myocardial infarction. Myocardial perfusion and wall motion were assessed independently in five left ventricular regions (total 415 regions). Regional myocardial perfusion was quantitated as a percent of the region infarcted (range 0 to 100%) using a previously validated method. Wall motion was graded on a four point scale as 1 = normal (n = 266 regions), 2 = hypokinesia (n = 64), 3 = akinesia (n = 70), 4 = dyskinesia (n = 13) or not evaluable (n = 2). Regional wall motion correlated directly with the severity of the perfusion deficit (r = 0.68, p less than 0.0001). Among normally contracting regions, the mean perfusion defect score was only 2 +/- 4. Increasingly severe wall motion abnormalities were associated with larger perfusion defect scores (hypokinesia = 6 +/- 5, akinesia = 11 +/- 7 and dyskinesia = 18 +/- 5, all p less than 0.01 versus normal. Among regions with normal wall motion, only 3% had a perfusion defect score greater than or equal to 10. Conversely, among 68 regions with a large (greater than or equal to 10) perfusion defect, only 13% had normal motion whereas 87% had abnormal wall motion. The relation between perfusion and wall motion noted for the entire cohort was also present in subgroups of patients with anterior or inferior infarction. In patients with prior myocardial infarction, the severity of the tomographic thallium perfusion defect correlates directly with echocardiographically defined wall motion abnormalities, both globally and regionally.

  2. Single perfusion defect and pulmonary embolism: Angiographic correlation

    SciTech Connect

    Catania, T.A.; Caride, V.J. )

    1990-03-01

    One hundred and thirty-three ventilation-perfusion scans (V-P) with angiographic correlation were retrospectively reviewed to evaluate the frequency of pulmonary emboli (PE) in single perfusion defects (SPD), regardless of ventilation or radiographic findings. By angiography, 15 of 30 SPD cases had PE. Demographic data and clinical presentation were similar for PE and non-PE patients. However, 9 out of 15 patients with PE had recent surgery compared to none of the non-PE patients. SPD were seen in areas of ventilation and chest x-ray abnormalities in 12 of 15 PE and 11 of 19 non-PE cases. Size of the actual lesion was underestimated by scintigraphy in most cases. In 7 of 15 PE cases, the perfusion defect was larger than the corresponding ventilation abnormality. Most SPD were located at the bases. Twelve of 15 SPD in the PE group were at the posterior basilar segment. In the appropriate clinical setting, SPD carries at least a moderate probability for PE. When the clinical suspicion is high, a pulmonary angiography will be needed to confirm the diagnosis.

  3. Myocardial perfusion echocardiography and coronary microvascular dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Barletta, Giuseppe; Del Bene, Maria Riccarda

    2015-01-01

    Our understanding of coronary syndromes has evolved in the last two decades out of the obstructive atherosclerosis of epicardial coronary arteries paradigm to include anatomo-functional abnormalities of coronary microcirculation. No current diagnostic technique allows direct visualization of coronary microcirculation, but functional assessments of this circulation are possible. This represents a challenge in cardiology. Myocardial contrast echocardiography (MCE) was a breakthrough in echocardiography several years ago that claimed the capability to detect myocardial perfusion abnormalities and quantify coronary blood flow. Research demonstrated that the integration of quantitative MCE and fractional flow reserve improved the definition of ischemic burden and the relative contribution of collaterals in non-critical coronary stenosis. MCE identified no-reflow and low-flow within and around myocardial infarction, respectively, and predicted the potential functional recovery of stunned myocardium using appropriate interventions. MCE exhibited diagnostic performances that were comparable to positron emission tomography in microvascular reserve and microvascular dysfunction in angina patients. Overall, MCE improved echocardiographic evaluations of ischemic heart disease in daily clinical practice, but the approval of regulatory authorities is lacking. PMID:26730291

  4. Myocardial perfusion echocardiography and coronary microvascular dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Barletta, Giuseppe; Del Bene, Maria Riccarda

    2015-12-26

    Our understanding of coronary syndromes has evolved in the last two decades out of the obstructive atherosclerosis of epicardial coronary arteries paradigm to include anatomo-functional abnormalities of coronary microcirculation. No current diagnostic technique allows direct visualization of coronary microcirculation, but functional assessments of this circulation are possible. This represents a challenge in cardiology. Myocardial contrast echocardiography (MCE) was a breakthrough in echocardiography several years ago that claimed the capability to detect myocardial perfusion abnormalities and quantify coronary blood flow. Research demonstrated that the integration of quantitative MCE and fractional flow reserve improved the definition of ischemic burden and the relative contribution of collaterals in non-critical coronary stenosis. MCE identified no-reflow and low-flow within and around myocardial infarction, respectively, and predicted the potential functional recovery of stunned myocardium using appropriate interventions. MCE exhibited diagnostic performances that were comparable to positron emission tomography in microvascular reserve and microvascular dysfunction in angina patients. Overall, MCE improved echocardiographic evaluations of ischemic heart disease in daily clinical practice, but the approval of regulatory authorities is lacking. PMID:26730291

  5. Technical Pitfalls of Signal Truncation in Perfusion MRI of Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Kelvin K.; Fung, Steve H.; New, Pamela Z.; Wong, Stephen T. C.

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) perfusion-weighted imaging (PWI) is widely used in clinical settings for the radiological diagnosis of brain tumor. The signal change in brain tissue in gradient echo-based DSC PWI is much higher than in spin echo-based DSC PWI. Due to its exquisite sensitivity, gradient echo-based sequence is the preferred method for imaging of all tumors except those near the base of the skull. However, high sensitivity also comes with a dynamic range problem. It is not unusual for blood volume to increase in gene-mediated cytotoxic immunotherapy-treated glioblastoma patients. The increase of fractional blood volume sometimes saturates the MRI signal during first-pass contrast bolus arrival and presents signal truncation artifacts of various degrees in the tumor when a significant amount of blood exists in the image pixels. It presents a hidden challenge in PWI, as this signal floor can be either close to noise level or just above and can go no lower. This signal truncation in the signal intensity time course is a significant issue that deserves attention in DSC PWI. In this paper, we demonstrate that relative cerebral blood volume and relative cerebral blood flow (rCBF) are underestimated due to signal truncation in DSC perfusion, in glioblastoma patients. We propose the use of second-pass tissue residue function in rCBF calculation using least-absolute-deviation deconvolution to avoid the underestimation problem. PMID:27531989

  6. Technical Pitfalls of Signal Truncation in Perfusion MRI of Glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Wong, Kelvin K; Fung, Steve H; New, Pamela Z; Wong, Stephen T C

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) perfusion-weighted imaging (PWI) is widely used in clinical settings for the radiological diagnosis of brain tumor. The signal change in brain tissue in gradient echo-based DSC PWI is much higher than in spin echo-based DSC PWI. Due to its exquisite sensitivity, gradient echo-based sequence is the preferred method for imaging of all tumors except those near the base of the skull. However, high sensitivity also comes with a dynamic range problem. It is not unusual for blood volume to increase in gene-mediated cytotoxic immunotherapy-treated glioblastoma patients. The increase of fractional blood volume sometimes saturates the MRI signal during first-pass contrast bolus arrival and presents signal truncation artifacts of various degrees in the tumor when a significant amount of blood exists in the image pixels. It presents a hidden challenge in PWI, as this signal floor can be either close to noise level or just above and can go no lower. This signal truncation in the signal intensity time course is a significant issue that deserves attention in DSC PWI. In this paper, we demonstrate that relative cerebral blood volume and relative cerebral blood flow (rCBF) are underestimated due to signal truncation in DSC perfusion, in glioblastoma patients. We propose the use of second-pass tissue residue function in rCBF calculation using least-absolute-deviation deconvolution to avoid the underestimation problem. PMID:27531989

  7. Regional brain perfusion in 10 normal dogs measured using Technetium-99m ethyl cysteinate dimer spect.

    PubMed

    Peremans, K; De Bondt, P; Audenaert, K; Van Laere, K; Gielen, I; Koole, M; Versijpt, J; Van Bree, H; Verschooten, F; Dierckx, R

    2001-01-01

    Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) of the brain using perfusion tracers allows estimation of regional brain perfusion. This allows in vivo examination of brain function in the setting of neuropsychologic and pathophysiologic changes. However functional imaging data on brain perfusion in dogs are limited. Hence, the aim of this study was to determine the scintigraphic regional perfusion pattern of the normal canine brain. Ten healthy shepherd type dogs were injected with 925 MBq Technetium-99m ethyl cysteinate (ECD) 20 minutes before the examination. Acquisition was performed using a triple head gamma camera equipped with fanbeam collimators. Uniform attenuation correction and triple energy window correction were applied. Computed tomographic images were obtained from the same dogs, reoriented along the orbito-meatal axis and SPECT perfusion data were coregistered to the CT-volume data. Based on morphological and suggested brain divisions, regions-of-interest (ROIs) were defined for the bilateral frontocerebral, temporocerebral, parietocerebral, occipitocerebral, cerebellar, thalamic, and striatal area. Regional count density was normalized on total counts. All dogs had the highest uptake in the thalamic/striatal area compared to a rather homogeneous cerebral uptake. No significant left/right count differences were found, but a rostro-caudal gradient (+12-13%) was present. In this group, age and gender did not influence the perfusion pattern. PMID:11768526

  8. Perfusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging: A Comprehensive Update on Principles and Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ka-Loh; Ostergaard, Leif; Calamante, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Perfusion is a fundamental biological function that refers to the delivery of oxygen and nutrients to tissue by means of blood flow. Perfusion MRI is sensitive to microvasculature and has been applied in a wide variety of clinical applications, including the classification of tumors, identification of stroke regions, and characterization of other diseases. Perfusion MRI techniques are classified with or without using an exogenous contrast agent. Bolus methods, with injections of a contrast agent, provide better sensitivity with higher spatial resolution, and are therefore more widely used in clinical applications. However, arterial spin-labeling methods provide a unique opportunity to measure cerebral blood flow without requiring an exogenous contrast agent and have better accuracy for quantification. Importantly, MRI-based perfusion measurements are minimally invasive overall, and do not use any radiation and radioisotopes. In this review, we describe the principles and techniques of perfusion MRI. This review summarizes comprehensive updated knowledge on the physical principles and techniques of perfusion MRI. PMID:25246817

  9. Effectiveness of CT Computed Tomography Perfusion in Diagnostics of Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Menzilcioglu, Mehmet Sait; Mete, Ahmet; Ünverdi, Zeyni

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Stroke is the third most common death reason after the cardiovascular disorders and cancer. Cerebral ischemia is a pathology that stems from a decrease in cerebral perfusion. Computed Tomography Perfusion (CTP) is an additional method to the conventional Computed Tomography (CT) that could be performed by using developed softwares, in a short period of time and with a low risk of complications. CTP not only allows early detection of cerebral ischemia but also gives valuable information on the ischemic penumbra which are very important in early diagnosis and treatment. Acute Ischemic Stroke (AIS) can be cured by trombolytic treapy within 3–6 hours after symptom onset. Since rapid screening and accurate diagnosis increase the success of the treatment, the role of neuroradiology in acute ischemia diagnostics and treatment has become more important. Our aim was to define CT skills in early diagnosis of AIS, to define its contribution to patient’s diagnosis and treatment and to define its importance regarding patient’s prognosis. Material/Methods We included 42 patients that presented to the emergency service and neurology outpatient clinic with the symptoms of acute cerebral incidence. Results In our study, we found that Cerebral Blood Flow (CBF) is 90.91% sensitive and 100% specific in examining ischemia. Conclusions Tissue hemodynamic data, especially sensitivity and specificity rates, which cannot be acquired by conventional CT and MRI methods, can be acquired by the CTP method. PMID:26740827

  10. MR Perfusion Imaging in Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Copen, William A.; Schaefer, Pamela W.; Wu, Ona

    2011-01-01

    MR perfusion imaging offers the potential for measuring brain perfusion in acute stroke patients, at a time when treatment decisions based upon these measurements may affect outcomes dramatically. Rapid advancements in both acute stroke therapy and perfusion imaging techniques have resulted in continuing redefinition of the role that perfusion imaging should play in patient management. This review first discusses the basic pathophysiology of acute stroke, with specific attention to alterations in the various perfusion-related parameters that can be studied by MR perfusion imaging. Although these parameters are sometimes treated as somewhat interchangeable, they reveal greatly different information about brain perfusion. Therefore, subsequent discussion of the utility of different kinds of perfusion images focuses on the differences between them, as well as important artifacts that can complicate their interpretation. Finally, research on the continually evolving role of MR perfusion imaging in acute stroke care is summarized. PMID:21640299

  11. Validating a local Arterial Input Function method for improved perfusion quantification in stroke

    PubMed Central

    Willats, Lisa; Christensen, Soren; K Ma, Henry; A Donnan, Geoffrey; Connelly, Alan; Calamante, Fernando

    2011-01-01

    In bolus-tracking perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), temporal dispersion of the contrast bolus due to stenosis or collateral supply presents a significant problem for accurate perfusion quantification in stroke. One means to reduce the associated perfusion errors is to deconvolve the bolus concentration time-course data with local Arterial Input Functions (AIFs) measured close to the capillary bed and downstream of the arterial abnormalities causing dispersion. Because the MRI voxel resolution precludes direct local AIF measurements, they must be extrapolated from the surrounding data. To date, there have been no published studies directly validating these local AIFs. We assess the effectiveness of local AIFs in reducing dispersion-induced perfusion error by measuring the residual dispersion remaining in the local AIF deconvolved perfusion maps. Two approaches to locating the local AIF voxels are assessed and compared with a global AIF deconvolution across 19 bolus-tracking data sets from patients with stroke. The local AIF methods reduced dispersion in the majority of data sets, suggesting more accurate perfusion quantification. Importantly, the validation inherently identifies potential areas for perfusion underestimation. This is valuable information for the identification of at-risk tissue and management of stroke patients. PMID:21629260

  12. What's new in cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    JONES, M H

    1953-11-01

    Among new researches bearing on cerebral palsy are the growth of brain cells in tissue cultures for experimentation; the use of polysaccharides to prevent the formation of a glial barrier to nerve growth after injury; observation of changes in reactions of neurons at various stages of development; the finding of hypernatremia and hyperchloremia in lesions of the frontal lobe and the thalamus; stimulation of cerebral blood flow by injection of sodium bicarbonate and retardation with ammonium chloride; and studies of serial sections of brains of palsied children who died. Study of development in the early months of life has made possible the detection of significant abnormalities in behavior early in life. Loss of hearing may be tested in very young children by measuring minute variations in electrical resistance of the skin upon auditory stimulation of the sympathetic nervous system. Conditions which have been described as having been confused with cerebral palsy are dislocation of a cervical vertebra, hereditary spastic paraplegia, transverse myelopathy, injury to the spinal cord or cauda equina by anomalous growths of the spine, and also encephalitis and meningitis. Sedation has proved a valuable adjunct to electroencephalographic study of cerebral palsy. Better criteria for abnormality in the young child should be determined and the application of them more clearly standardized. Simple exercises are useful for early training of palsied children to stimulate development. "Crossed laterality"-the dominant eye being contralateral to the preferred hand-has been counteracted by special training with great success in eliminating emotional and behavior problems and accelerating development.Recent studies indicate that only 50 per cent of cerebral palsy patients have normal or better intelligence. Subluxation of the hip joint, a common deformity associated with cerebral palsy, can sometimes be corrected by operation if detected at an early stage. Radical ablation of

  13. Mapping resting-state functional connectivity using perfusion MRI

    PubMed Central

    Chuang, Kai-Hsiang; van Gelderen, Peter; Merkle, Hellmut; Bodurka, Jerzy; Ikonomidou, Vasiliki N.; Koretsky, Alan P.; Duyn, Jeff H.; Talagala, S. Lalith

    2008-01-01

    Resting-state, low frequency (< 0.08 Hz) fluctuations of blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) magnetic resonance signal have been shown to exhibit high correlation among functionally connected regions. However, correlations of cerebral blood flow (CBF) fluctuations during the resting state have not been extensively studied. The main challenges of using arterial spin labeling perfusion magnetic resonance imaging to detect CBF fluctuations are low sensitivity, low temporal resolution, and contamination from BOLD. This work demonstrates CBF-based quantitative functional connectivity mapping by combining continuous arterial spin labeling (CASL) with a neck labeling coil and a multi-channel receiver coil to achieve high perfusion sensitivity. In order to reduce BOLD contamination, the CBF signal was extracted from the CASL signal time course by high frequency filtering. This processing strategy is compatible with sinc interpolation for reducing the timing mismatch between control and label images and has the flexibility of choosing an optimal filter cutoff frequency to minimize BOLD fluctuations. Most subjects studied showed high CBF correlation in bilateral sensorimotor areas with good suppression of BOLD contamination. Root-mean-square CBF fluctuation contributing to bilateral correlation was estimated to be 29% ± 19% (N = 13) of the baseline perfusion, while BOLD fluctuation was 0.26% ± 0.14% of the mean intensity (at 3T and 12.5 ms echo time). PMID:18314354

  14. Developmental disruptions underlying brain abnormalities in ciliopathies

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jiami; Higginbotham, Holden; Li, Jingjun; Nichols, Jackie; Hirt, Josua; Ghukasyan, Vladimir; Anton, E.S.

    2015-01-01

    Primary cilia are essential conveyors of signals underlying major cell functions. Cerebral cortical progenitors and neurons have a primary cilium. The significance of cilia function for brain development and function is evident in the plethora of developmental brain disorders associated with human ciliopathies. Nevertheless, the role of primary cilia function in corticogenesis remains largely unknown. Here we delineate the functions of primary cilia in the construction of cerebral cortex and their relevance to ciliopathies, using an shRNA library targeting ciliopathy genes known to cause brain disorders, but whose roles in brain development are unclear. We used the library to query how ciliopathy genes affect distinct stages of mouse cortical development, in particular neural progenitor development, neuronal migration, neuronal differentiation and early neuronal connectivity. Our results define the developmental functions of ciliopathy genes and delineate disrupted developmental events that are integrally related to the emergence of brain abnormalities in ciliopathies. PMID:26206566

  15. Cardiac PET Perfusion: Prognosis, Risk Stratification, Clinical Management

    PubMed Central

    Dorbala, Sharmila; Di Carli, Marcelo F.

    2014-01-01

    Myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) with positron emission tomography (PET) has expanded significantly over the past decade. With the wider availability of PET scanners and the routine use of quantitative blood flow imaging, the clinical use of PET MPI is expected to increase further. PET MPI is a powerful tool to identify risk, to quantify risk, and to guide therapy in patients with known or suspected coronary artery disease (CAD). A large body of evidence supports the prognostic value of PET MPI and ejection fraction in intermediate to high risk subjects, in women, in obese individuals and in post coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) individuals. A normal perfusion study indicates low risk (< 1% annualized rate of cardiac events of cardiac death and non-fatal myocardial infarction), while an abnormal study indicates high risk. With accurate risk stratification, high quality images, and quantitation PET MPI may transform the management of patients with known or suspected CAD. PMID:25234079

  16. [Cerebral palsy].

    PubMed

    Malagón Valdez, Jorge

    2007-01-01

    The term cerebral palsy (CP), is used for a great number of clinical neurological syndromes. The syndromes are characterized by having a common cause, motor defects. It is important, because they can cause a brain damage by presenting motor defects and some associated deficiencies, such as mental deficiency, epilepsy, language and visual defects and pseudobulbar paralysis, with the non-evolving fact. Some authors prefer using terms such as "non-evolving encephalopathies". In the treatment the utility of prevention programs of early stimulation and special rehabilitation methods, and treatment of associated deficiencies such as epilepsy, mental deficiency, language, audition and visual problems, and the attention deficit improve the prognosis in an important way. The prognosis depends on the severity of the disease and the associated manifestations. PMID:18422084

  17. Focal Hepatic Hot Spot From Superior Vena Cava Occlusion Visualized on Ventilation/Perfusion Scintigraphy With Contrast-Enhanced CT Correlate.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Michael; Schuster, David M

    2016-05-01

    A 57-year-old woman with superior vena cava stenosis from repeated central line placements underwent ventilation/perfusion scanning after presenting with pleuritic chest pain. The ventilation/perfusion scan was not characteristic for pulmonary embolus, but perfusion images demonstrated abnormal radiotracer activity within hepatic segment 4, along with extensive collateral vessels as seen on SPECT/CT. Two months later, the patient presented with similar complaints and had a chest CT with contrast to evaluate for pulmonary embolus. This showed occlusion of the superior vena cava and arterial enhancement within segment 4 in a similar distribution to the radiotracer in the perfusion scan. PMID:26825208

  18. High-altitude cerebral oedema mimicking stroke.

    PubMed

    Yanamandra, Uday; Gupta, Amul; Patyal, Sagarika; Varma, Prem Prakash

    2014-01-01

    High-altitude cerebral oedema (HACO) is the most fatal high-altitude illness seen by rural physicians practising in high-altitude areas. HACO presents clinically with cerebellar ataxia, features of raised intracranial pressure (ICP) and coma. Early identification is important as delay in diagnosis can be fatal. We present two cases of HACO presenting with focal deficits mimicking stroke. The first patient presented with left-sided hemiplegia associated with the rapid deterioration in the sensorium. Neuroimaging revealed features suggestive of vasogenic oedema. The second patient presented with monoplegia of the lower limb. Neuroimaging revealed perfusion deficit in anterior cerebral artery territory. Both patients were managed with dexamethasone and they improved dramatically. Clinical picture and neuroimaging closely resembled acute ischaemic stroke in both cases. Thrombolysis in these patients would have been disastrous. Recent travel to high altitude, young age, absence of atherosclerotic risk factors and features of raised ICP concomitantly directed the diagnosis to HACO. PMID:24671373

  19. Cerebral Autoregulation Real-Time Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Tsalach, Adi; Ratner, Eliahu; Lokshin, Stas; Silman, Zmira; Breskin, Ilan; Budin, Nahum; Kamar, Moshe

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral autoregulation is a mechanism which maintains constant cerebral blood flow (CBF) despite changes in mean arterial pressure (MAP). Assessing whether this mechanism is intact or impaired and determining its boundaries is important in many clinical settings, where primary or secondary injuries to the brain may occur. Herein we describe the development of a new ultrasound tagged near infra red light monitor which tracks CBF trends, in parallel, it continuously measures blood pressure and correlates them to produce a real time autoregulation index. Its performance is validated in both in-vitro experiment and a pre-clinical case study. Results suggest that using such a tool, autoregulation boundaries as well as its impairment or functioning can be identified and assessed. It may therefore assist in individualized MAP management to ensure adequate organ perfusion and reduce the risk of postoperative complications, and might play an important role in patient care. PMID:27571474

  20. Electrical Cerebral Stimulation Modifies Inhibitory Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuéllar-Herrera, M.; Rocha, L.

    2003-09-01

    Electrical stimulation of the nervous tissue has been proposed as a method to treat some neurological disorders, such as epilepsy. Epileptic seizures result from excessive, synchronous, abnormal firing patterns of neurons that are located predominantly in the cerebral cortex. Many people with epilepsy continue presenting seizures even though they are under regimens of antiepileptic medications. An alternative therapy for treatment resistant epilepsy is cerebral electrical stimulation. The present study is focused to review the effects of different types of electrical stimulation and specifically changes in amino acids.

  1. Subarachnoid hemorrhage as the initial presentation of cerebral venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Kato, Yuji; Takeda, Hidetaka; Furuya, Daisuke; Nagoya, Harumitsu; Deguchi, Ichiro; Fukuoka, Takuya; Tanahashi, Norio

    2010-01-01

    Cerebral venous thrombosis presenting as subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is very rare. We present a woman with thrombosis of the superior sagittal, straight, transverse and sigmoid sinuses who presented with SAH in the right temporal sulcus and bilateral cerebellar sulci. Brain perfusion CT demonstrated a delay of the mean transit time and high cerebral blood volume around the right posterior temporal lobe and cerebellum. These findings were compatible with venous congestion and they suggest the possibility that extension of the dural sinus thrombosis into the superficial veins caused localized venous hypertension with dilatation of the thin, fragile-walled cortical veins which eventually ruptured into the subarachnoid space. PMID:20190485

  2. Cerebral Hyperperfusion after Revascularization Inhibits Development of Cerebral Ischemic Lesions Due to Artery-to-Artery Emboli during Carotid Exposure in Endarterectomy for Patients with Preoperative Cerebral Hemodynamic Insufficiency: Revisiting the “Impaired Clearance of Emboli” Concept

    PubMed Central

    Fujimoto, Kentaro; Matsumoto, Yoshiyasu; Oikawa, Kohki; Nomura, Jun-ichi; Shimada, Yasuyoshi; Fujiwara, Shunrou; Terasaki, Kazunori; Kobayashi, Masakazu; Yoshida, Kenji; Ogasawara, Kuniaki

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine whether cerebral hyperperfusion after revascularization inhibits development of cerebral ischemic lesions due to artery-to-artery emboli during exposure of the carotid arteries in carotid endarterectomy (CEA). In patients undergoing CEA for internal carotid artery stenosis (≥70%), cerebral blood flow (CBF) was measured using single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) before and immediately after CEA. Microembolic signals (MES) were identified using transcranial Doppler during carotid exposure. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI) was performed within 24 h after surgery. Of 32 patients with a combination of reduced cerebrovascular reactivity to acetazolamide on preoperative brain perfusion SPECT and MES during carotid exposure, 14 (44%) showed cerebral hyperperfusion (defined as postoperative CBF increase ≥100% compared with preoperative values), and 16 (50%) developed DWI-characterized postoperative cerebral ischemic lesions. Postoperative cerebral hyperperfusion was significantly associated with the absence of DWI-characterized postoperative cerebral ischemic lesions (95% confidence interval, 0.001–0.179; p = 0.0009). These data suggest that cerebral hyperperfusion after revascularization inhibits development of cerebral ischemic lesions due to artery-to-artery emboli during carotid exposure in CEA, supporting the “impaired clearance of emboli” concept. Blood pressure elevation following carotid declamping would be effective when embolism not accompanied by cerebral hyperperfusion occurs during CEA. PMID:27527146

  3. Neonatal White Matter Abnormalities an Important Predictor of Neurocognitive Outcome for Very Preterm Children

    PubMed Central

    Woodward, Lianne J.; Clark, Caron A. C.; Bora, Samudragupta; Inder, Terrie E.

    2012-01-01

    Background Cerebral white matter abnormalities on term MRI are a strong predictor of motor disability in children born very preterm. However, their contribution to cognitive impairment is less certain. Objective Examine relationships between the presence and severity of cerebral white matter abnormalities on neonatal MRI and a range of neurocognitive outcomes assessed at ages 4 and 6 years. Design/Methods The study sample consisted of a regionally representative cohort of 104 very preterm (≤32 weeks gestation) infants born from 1998–2000 and a comparison group of 107 full-term infants. At term equivalent, all preterm infants underwent a structural MRI scan that was analyzed qualitatively for the presence and severity of cerebral white matter abnormalities, including cysts, signal abnormalities, loss of white matter volume, ventriculomegaly, and corpus callosal thinning/myelination. At corrected ages 4 and 6 years, all children underwent a comprehensive neurodevelopmental assessment that included measures of general intellectual ability, language development, and executive functioning. Results At 4 and 6 years, very preterm children without cerebral white matter abnormalities showed no apparent neurocognitive impairments relative to their full-term peers on any of the domain specific measures of intelligence, language, and executive functioning. In contrast, children born very preterm with mild and moderate-to-severe white matter abnormalities were characterized by performance impairments across all measures and time points, with more severe cerebral abnormalities being associated with increased risks of cognitive impairment. These associations persisted after adjustment for gender, neonatal medical risk factors, and family social risk. Conclusions Findings highlight the importance of cerebral white matter connectivity for later intact cognitive functioning amongst children born very preterm. Preterm born children without cerebral white matter abnormalities on

  4. Ventilation perfusion radionuclide imaging in cryptogenic fibrosing alveolitis.

    PubMed

    Bourke, S J; Hawkins, T; Keavey, P M; Gascoigne, A D; Corris, P A

    1993-06-01

    There is increasing interest in ventilation perfusion (V/Q) imaging in cryptogenic fibrosing alveolitis because of the data these scans provide on the dynamic V/Q relationships in such patients undergoing single lung transplantation. However, the full spectrum of V/Q abnormalities in this disease is poorly defined. We therefore analysed the V/Q scans of 45 consecutive patients with advanced cryptogenic fibrosing alveolitis being considered for single lung transplantation. Scans were classified according to the presence, severity and degree of matching of defects in ventilation and perfusion images and the results were compared with the data obtained from lung function tests. Ventilation images showed defects in 13 (29%) and 'washout delay' in 15 (33%) patients; 10 (22%) patients had asymmetric distribution of ventilation with one lung receiving > 60% of total ventilation. Perfusion images showed normal perfusion in 8 (18%), mild defects in 18 (40%) and major defects in 19 (42%) patients. The distribution of perfusion between lungs was significantly asymmetric in 20 (45%) patients. V/Q images were matched in 15 (33%), mildly mismatched in 15 (33%) and severely mismatched in 15 (33%) patients, but the degree of V/Q mismatch did not show a relationship to KCO, PaO2 or A-aO2 gradient. The appearances were atypical of pulmonary embolism in eight patients. V/Q images in cryptogenic fibrosing alveolitis show a diverse range of appearances and may mimic pulmonary embolism. V/Q imaging complements the data obtained from lung function tests and is particularly useful in defining the differential function of each lung which is particularly important in the assessment of patients for single lung transplantation. PMID:8321484

  5. Tooth - abnormal shape

    MedlinePlus

    Hutchinson incisors; Abnormal tooth shape; Peg teeth; Mulberry teeth; Conical teeth ... The appearance of normal teeth varies, especially the molars. ... conditions. Specific diseases can affect tooth shape, tooth ...

  6. Tooth - abnormal shape

    MedlinePlus

    Hutchinson incisors; Abnormal tooth shape; Peg teeth; Mulberry teeth; Conical teeth ... from many different conditions. Specific diseases can affect tooth shape, tooth color, time of appearance, or absence ...

  7. Whole-Brain CT Perfusion to Quantify Acute Ischemic Penumbra and Core.

    PubMed

    Lin, Longting; Bivard, Andrew; Krishnamurthy, Venkatesh; Levi, Christopher R; Parsons, Mark W

    2016-06-01

    Purpose To validate the use of perfusion computed tomography (CT) with whole-brain coverage to measure the ischemic penumbra and core and to compare its performance to that of limited-coverage perfusion CT. Materials and Methods Institutional ethics committee approval and informed consent were obtained. Patients (n = 296) who underwent 320-detector CT perfusion within 6 hours of the onset of ischemic stroke were studied. First, the ischemic volume at CT perfusion was compared with the penumbra and core reference values at magnetic resonance (MR) imaging to derive CT perfusion penumbra and core thresholds. Second, the thresholds were tested in a different group of patients to predict the final infarction at diffusion-weighted imaging 24 hours after CT perfusion. Third, the change in ischemic volume delineated by the optimal penumbra and core threshold was determined as the brain coverage was gradually reduced from 160 mm to 20 mm. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test, concordance correlation coefficient (CCC), and analysis of variance were used for the first, second, and third steps, respectively. Results CT perfusion at penumbra and core thresholds resulted in the least volumetric difference from MR imaging reference values with delay times greater than 3 seconds and delay-corrected cerebral blood flow of less than 30% (P = .34 and .33, respectively). When the thresholds were applied to the new group of patients, prediction of the final infarction was allowed with delay times greater than 3 seconds in patients with no recanalization of the occluded artery (CCC, 0.96 [95% confidence interval: 0.92, 0.98]) and with delay-corrected cerebral blood flow less than 30% in patients with complete recanalization (CCC, 0.91 [95% confidence interval: 0.83, 0.95]). However, the ischemic volume with a delay time greater than 3 seconds was underestimated when the brain coverage was reduced to 80 mm (P = .04) and the core volume measured as cerebral blood flow less than 30% was

  8. Unsupervised nonlinear dimensionality reduction machine learning methods applied to multiparametric MRI in cerebral ischemia: preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parekh, Vishwa S.; Jacobs, Jeremy R.; Jacobs, Michael A.

    2014-03-01

    The evaluation and treatment of acute cerebral ischemia requires a technique that can determine the total area of tissue at risk for infarction using diagnostic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences. Typical MRI data sets consist of T1- and T2-weighted imaging (T1WI, T2WI) along with advanced MRI parameters of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and perfusion weighted imaging (PWI) methods. Each of these parameters has distinct radiological-pathological meaning. For example, DWI interrogates the movement of water in the tissue and PWI gives an estimate of the blood flow, both are critical measures during the evolution of stroke. In order to integrate these data and give an estimate of the tissue at risk or damaged; we have developed advanced machine learning methods based on unsupervised non-linear dimensionality reduction (NLDR) techniques. NLDR methods are a class of algorithms that uses mathematically defined manifolds for statistical sampling of multidimensional classes to generate a discrimination rule of guaranteed statistical accuracy and they can generate a two- or three-dimensional map, which represents the prominent structures of the data and provides an embedded image of meaningful low-dimensional structures hidden in their high-dimensional observations. In this manuscript, we develop NLDR methods on high dimensional MRI data sets of preclinical animals and clinical patients with stroke. On analyzing the performance of these methods, we observed that there was a high of similarity between multiparametric embedded images from NLDR methods and the ADC map and perfusion map. It was also observed that embedded scattergram of abnormal (infarcted or at risk) tissue can be visualized and provides a mechanism for automatic methods to delineate potential stroke volumes and early tissue at risk.

  9. Neonatal White Matter Abnormality Predicts Childhood Motor Impairment in Very Preterm Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spittle, Alicia J.; Cheong, Jeanie; Doyle, Lex W.; Roberts, Gehan; Lee, Katherine J.; Lim, Jeremy; Hunt, Rod W.; Inder, Terrie E.; Anderson, Peter J.

    2011-01-01

    Aim: Children born very preterm are at risk for impaired motor performance ranging from cerebral palsy (CP) to milder abnormalities, such as developmental coordination disorder. White matter abnormalities (WMA) at term have been associated with CP in very preterm children; however, little is known about the impact of WMA on the range of motor…

  10. Cerebral Vasospasm Pharmacological Treatment: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Siasios, Ioannis; Kapsalaki, Eftychia Z.; Fountas, Kostas N.

    2013-01-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage- (aSAH-) associated vasospasm constitutes a clinicopathological entity, in which reversible vasculopathy, impaired autoregulatory function, and hypovolemia take place, and lead to the reduction of cerebral perfusion and finally ischemia. Cerebral vasospasm begins most often on the third day after the ictal event and reaches the maximum on the 5th–7th postictal days. Several therapeutic modalities have been employed for preventing or reversing cerebral vasospasm. Triple “H” therapy, balloon and chemical angioplasty with superselective intra-arterial injection of vasodilators, administration of substances like magnesium sulfate, statins, fasudil hydrochloride, erythropoietin, endothelin-1 antagonists, nitric oxide progenitors, and sildenafil, are some of the therapeutic protocols, which are currently employed for managing patients with aSAH. Intense pathophysiological mechanism research has led to the identification of various mediators of cerebral vasospasm, such as endothelium-derived, vascular smooth muscle-derived, proinflammatory mediators, cytokines and adhesion molecules, stress-induced gene activation, and platelet-derived growth factors. Oral, intravenous, or intra-arterial administration of antagonists of these mediators has been suggested for treating patients suffering a-SAH vasospam. In our current study, we attempt to summate all the available pharmacological treatment modalities for managing vasospasm. PMID:23431440

  11. Acute hypoxia increases the cerebral metabolic rate - a magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Vestergaard, Mark B; Lindberg, Ulrich; Aachmann-Andersen, Niels Jacob; Lisbjerg, Kristian; Christensen, Søren Just; Law, Ian; Rasmussen, Peter; Olsen, Niels V; Larsson, Henrik Bw

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine changes in cerebral metabolism by magnetic resonance imaging of healthy subjects during inhalation of 10% O2 hypoxic air. Hypoxic exposure elevates cerebral perfusion, but its effect on energy metabolism has been less investigated. Magnetic resonance imaging techniques were used to measure global cerebral blood flow and the venous oxygen saturation in the sagittal sinus. Global cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen was quantified from cerebral blood flow and arteriovenous oxygen saturation difference. Concentrations of lactate, glutamate, N-acetylaspartate, creatine and phosphocreatine were measured in the visual cortex by magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Twenty-three young healthy males were scanned for 60 min during normoxia, followed by 40 min of breathing hypoxic air. Inhalation of hypoxic air resulted in an increase in cerebral blood flow of 15.5% (p = 0.058), and an increase in cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen of 8.5% (p = 0.035). Cerebral lactate concentration increased by 180.3% ([Formula: see text]), glutamate increased by 4.7% ([Formula: see text]) and creatine and phosphocreatine decreased by 15.2% (p[Formula: see text]). The N-acetylaspartate concentration was unchanged (p = 0.36). In conclusion, acute hypoxia in healthy subjects increased perfusion and metabolic rate, which could represent an increase in neuronal activity. We conclude that marked changes in brain homeostasis occur in the healthy human brain during exposure to acute hypoxia. PMID:26661163

  12. Acute hypoxia increases the cerebral metabolic rate – a magnetic resonance imaging study

    PubMed Central

    Lindberg, Ulrich; Aachmann-Andersen, Niels Jacob; Lisbjerg, Kristian; Christensen, Søren Just; Law, Ian; Rasmussen, Peter; Olsen, Niels V; Larsson, Henrik BW

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine changes in cerebral metabolism by magnetic resonance imaging of healthy subjects during inhalation of 10% O2 hypoxic air. Hypoxic exposure elevates cerebral perfusion, but its effect on energy metabolism has been less investigated. Magnetic resonance imaging techniques were used to measure global cerebral blood flow and the venous oxygen saturation in the sagittal sinus. Global cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen was quantified from cerebral blood flow and arteriovenous oxygen saturation difference. Concentrations of lactate, glutamate, N-acetylaspartate, creatine and phosphocreatine were measured in the visual cortex by magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Twenty-three young healthy males were scanned for 60 min during normoxia, followed by 40 min of breathing hypoxic air. Inhalation of hypoxic air resulted in an increase in cerebral blood flow of 15.5% (p = 0.058), and an increase in cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen of 8.5% (p = 0.035). Cerebral lactate concentration increased by 180.3% (p<10-6), glutamate increased by 4.7% (p<10-4) and creatine and phosphocreatine decreased by 15.2% (p<10-3). The N-acetylaspartate concentration was unchanged (p = 0.36). In conclusion, acute hypoxia in healthy subjects increased perfusion and metabolic rate, which could represent an increase in neuronal activity. We conclude that marked changes in brain homeostasis occur in the healthy human brain during exposure to acute hypoxia. PMID:26661163

  13. Quantification of brain perfusion with tracers retained by the brain

    SciTech Connect

    Pupi, A.; Bacciottini, L.; De Cristofaro, M.T.R.; Formiconi, A.R.; Castagnoli, A.

    1991-12-31

    Almost a decade ago, tracers, labelled with {sup 123}I and {sup 99m}Tc, that are retained by the brain, started to be used for studies of regional brain perfusion (regional cerebral blood flow, rCBF). To date, these tracers have been used for brain perfusion imaging with SPECT in brain disorders as well as for physiological activation protocols. Only seldom, however, have they been used in protocols that quantitatively measure rCBF. Nevertheless, comparative studies with perfusion reference tracers have repeatedly demonstrated that the brain uptake of these brain-retained tracers is correlated to perfusion, the major determinant of the distribution of these tracers in the brain. The brain kinetics of {sup 99m}Tc HMPAO, which is the tracer most commonly used, was described with a two-compartment tissue model. The theoretical approach, which is, in itself, sufficient for modeling quantitative measurements with {sup 99m}Tc HMPAO, initially suggested the possibility of empirically narrowing the distance between the brain`s regional uptake of the tracer and rCBF with a linearization algorithm which uses the cerebellum as the reference region. The value of this empirical method is hampered by the fact that the cerebellum can be involved in cerebrovascular disease (i.e. cerebellar diaschisis) as well as in several other brain disorders (e.g. anxiety, and dementia of the Alzheimer type). It also was proposed that different reference regions (occipital, whole slice, or whole brain) should be selected in relation to the brain disorder under study. However, this approach does not solve the main problem because it does not equip us with a reliable tool to evaluate rCBF with a high predictive value, and, at the same time, to reduce intersubject variability. The solution would be to measure a quantitative parameter which directly reflects rCBF, such as the unidirectional influx constant of the freely diffusible flow-limited tracers. 45 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Initial testing of a 3D printed perfusion phantom using digital subtraction angiography

    PubMed Central

    Khobragade, Parag; Ying, Leslie; Snyder, Kenneth; Wack, David; Bednarek, Daniel R.; Rudin, Stephen; Ionita, Ciprian N.

    2015-01-01

    Perfusion imaging is the most applied modality for the assessment of acute stroke. Parameters such as Cerebral Blood Flow (CBF), Cerebral Blood volume (CBV) and Mean Transit Time (MTT) are used to distinguish the tissue infarct core and ischemic penumbra. Due to lack of standardization these parameters vary significantly between vendors and software even when provided with the same data set. There is a critical need to standardize the systems and make them more reliable. We have designed a uniform phantom to test and verify the perfusion systems. We implemented a flow loop with different flow rates (250, 300, 350 ml/min) and injected the same amount of contrast. The images of the phantom were acquired using a Digital Angiographic system. Since this phantom is uniform, projection images obtained using DSA is sufficient for initial validation. To validate the phantom we measured the contrast concentration at three regions of interest (arterial input, venous output, perfused area) and derived time density curves (TDC). We then calculated the maximum slope, area under the TDCs and flow. The maximum slope calculations were linearly increasing with increase in flow rate, the area under the curve decreases with increase in flow rate. There was 25% error between the calculated flow and measured flow. The derived TDCs were clinically relevant and the calculated flow, maximum slope and areas under the curve were sensitive to the measured flow. We have created a systematic way to calibrate existing perfusion systems and assess their reliability. PMID:26633914

  15. Discordance between cerebellar metabolism and perfusion: Explanation for SPECT vs. PET differences in the cerebellum

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, M.; Beltran, M.; Moore, M.

    1994-05-01

    The cerebellum normally has a level of HMPAO uptake that is equal to or greater than nearby frontal cortices on transaxial SPECT sections, whereas FDG PET studies shows the reverse. Since cerebral blood flow is generally coupled to metabolism in normal individuals, this study was performed to test the hypothesis that this difference represents a true discordance between cerebral perfusion and glucose metabolism of the cerebellar cortex. Thirty eight subjects underwent PET imaging after an intravenous bolus of N-13 ammonia (370 MBq) to image cerebral perfusion, later followed by an intravenous bolus of F-18 FDG (3 70 MBq) after the N-13 had disappeared by decay. All studies were acquired with a Siemens 931 ECAT camera with an initial 20 minute transmission scan of the head acquired to apply measured attenuation correction. PET imaging of N-13 ammonia was performed over the first 15 minutes after injection, and FDG imaging was performed between 40 and 55 minutes after injection. Regions of interest for both tracers in each of 38 patients were drawn over the cerebellar cortex from transaxial sections taken at the level of the dentate nuclei, and from the orbitofrontal cortex. Frontal to cerebellar cortex ratios are shown below for perfusion (open square) and metabolism (closed) for each of the 38 patients studied.

  16. Dehydration accelerates reductions in cerebral blood flow during prolonged exercise in the heat without compromising brain metabolism.

    PubMed

    Trangmar, Steven J; Chiesa, Scott T; Llodio, Iñaki; Garcia, Benjamin; Kalsi, Kameljit K; Secher, Niels H; González-Alonso, José

    2015-11-01

    Dehydration hastens the decline in cerebral blood flow (CBF) during incremental exercise, whereas the cerebral metabolic rate for O2 (CMRO2 ) is preserved. It remains unknown whether CMRO2 is also maintained during prolonged exercise in the heat and whether an eventual decline in CBF is coupled to fatigue. Two studies were undertaken. In study 1, 10 male cyclists cycled in the heat for ∼2 h with (control) and without fluid replacement (dehydration) while internal and external carotid artery blood flow and core and blood temperature were obtained. Arterial and internal jugular venous blood samples were assessed with dehydration to evaluate CMRO2 . In study 2, in 8 male subjects, middle cerebral artery blood velocity was measured during prolonged exercise to exhaustion in both dehydrated and euhydrated states. After a rise at the onset of exercise, internal carotid artery flow declined to baseline with progressive dehydration (P < 0.05). However, cerebral metabolism remained stable through enhanced O2 and glucose extraction (P < 0.05). External carotid artery flow increased for 1 h but declined before exhaustion. Fluid ingestion maintained cerebral and extracranial perfusion throughout nonfatiguing exercise. During exhaustive exercise, however, euhydration delayed but did not prevent the decline in cerebral perfusion. In conclusion, during prolonged exercise in the heat, dehydration accelerates the decline in CBF without affecting CMRO2 and also restricts extracranial perfusion. Thus, fatigue is related to a reduction in CBF and extracranial perfusion rather than CMRO2 . PMID:26371170

  17. Perioperative management of patients with lung carcinoma and cerebral metastases

    PubMed Central

    Gheorghita, Eva; Pruna, Viorel Mihai; Neagoe, Luminita; Bucur, Cristina; Cristescu, Catioara; Gorgan, Mircea Radu

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: The present study proposes to present the importance of perioperative therapeutic management in survival prolongation and the quality of life for patients that have undergone surgery for cerebral metastases secondary to pulmonary tumors. Method: During 2001-2009, 40 patients with ages between 43-74 years have been diagnosed in our clinic with pulmonary tumor and cerebral metastases. The patients presented single cerebral lesion (excepting one patient with 2 cerebral metastases) and pulmonary tumor. Intracranial pressure (ICP) was high in all cases. All patients have undergone operation with general anesthesia. Results:For all patients the reduction of ICP and keeping an optimal CPP (cerebral perfusion pressure) was pursued. In 38 cases, general anesthesia was performed with Sevoflurane and opioids (fentanyl, remifentanyl, sufentanyl) and in 2 cases the TIVA (total intravenous anesthesia) technique was used with propofol and remifentanyl. 14 of the patients required intraoperative depletive treatment through administering mannitol 20%. 37 patients (92%) have been discharged with improved neurological condition without showing signs of intracranial hypertension, convulsive seizures and with partially or totally remitted hemiparesis and one patient had worse postoperative neurological status. Conclusion:Pulmonary tumor with cerebral metastases represent an important cause for death rate. To solve secondary cerebral lesions, the perioperative management must include assesment and choosing an anesthesia technique with a proper intraoperative management. PMID:21977115

  18. Retrograde heart perfusion: the Langendorff technique of isolated heart perfusion.

    PubMed

    Bell, Robert M; Mocanu, Mihaela M; Yellon, Derek M

    2011-06-01

    In the late 19th century, a number of investigators were working on perfecting isolated heart model, but it was Oscar Langendorff who, in 1895, pioneered the isolated perfused mammalian heart. Since that time, the Langendorff preparation has evolved and provided a wealth of data underpinning our understanding of the fundamental physiology of the heart: its contractile function, coronary blood flow regulation and cardiac metabolism. In more recent times, the procedure has been used to probe pathophysiology of ischaemia/reperfusion and disease states, and with the dawn of molecular biology and genetic manipulation, the Langendorff perfused heart has remained a stalwart tool in the study of the impact upon the physiology of the heart by pharmacological inhibitors and targeted deletion or up-regulation of genes and their impact upon intracellular signalling and adaption to clinically relevant stressful stimuli. We present here the basic structure of the Langendorff system and the fundamental experimental rules which warrant a viable heart preparation. In addition, we discuss the use of the isolated retrograde perfused heart in the model of ischaemia-reperfusion injury ex-vivo, and its applicability to other areas of study. The Langendorff perfusion apparatus is highly adaptable and this is reflected not only in the procedure's longevity but also in the number of different applications to which it has been turned. PMID:21385587

  19. Structurally abnormal human autosomes

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 25, discusses structurally abnormal human autosomes. This discussion includes: structurally abnormal chromosomes, chromosomal polymorphisms, pericentric inversions, paracentric inversions, deletions or partial monosomies, cri du chat (cat cry) syndrome, ring chromosomes, insertions, duplication or pure partial trisomy and mosaicism. 71 refs., 8 figs.

  20. Perfusion lung scan: an aid in detection of lymphangitic carcinomatosis

    SciTech Connect

    Bates, S.E.; Tranum, B.L.

    1982-07-15

    Lymphangitic carcinomatosis is usually a late manifestation of metastatic disease. The patient usually presents with cough or dyspnea, and the chest radiograph is often nondiagnostic. Two patients are presented who developed symptoms while on adjuvant chemotherapy. Both had abnormal perfusion lung scans. One had matching ventilation defects; the other a normal ventilation study. Biopsy revealed metastatic carcinoma; in one case tumor was seen in both the pulmonary lymphatics and arterioles; in the other, tumor was identified but the site could not be specified. The radionuclide lung scan is a technique which can speed diagnosis and institution of therapy in lymphangitic carcinomatosis.

  1. Advanced Imaging Modalities in the Detection of Cerebral Vasospasm

    PubMed Central

    Mills, Jena N.; Mehta, Vivek; Russin, Jonathan; Amar, Arun P.; Rajamohan, Anandh; Mack, William J.

    2013-01-01

    The pathophysiology of cerebral vasospasm following aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is complex and is not entirely understood. Mechanistic insights have been gained through advances in the capabilities of diagnostic imaging. Core techniques have focused on the assessment of vessel caliber, tissue metabolism, and/or regional perfusion parameters. Advances in imaging have provided clinicians with a multifaceted approach to assist in the detection of cerebral vasospasm and the diagnosis of delayed ischemic neurologic deficits (DIND). However, a single test or algorithm with broad efficacy remains elusive. This paper examines both anatomical and physiological imaging modalities applicable to post-SAH vasospasm and offers a historical background. We consider cerebral blood flow velocities measured by Transcranial Doppler Ultrasonography (TCD). Structural imaging techniques, including catheter-based Digital Subtraction Angiography (DSA), CT Angiography (CTA), and MR Angiography (MRA), are reviewed. We examine physiologic assessment by PET, HMPAO SPECT, 133Xe Clearance, Xenon-Enhanced CT (Xe/CT), Perfusion CT (PCT), and Diffusion-Weighted/MR Perfusion Imaging. Comparative advantages and limitations are discussed. PMID:23476766

  2. Computation of ventilation-perfusion ratio with Kr-81m in pulmonary embolism

    SciTech Connect

    Meignan, M.; Simonneau, G.; Oliveira, L.; Harf, A.; Cinotti, L.; Cavellier, J.F.; Duroux, P.; Ansquer, J.C.; Galle, P.

    1984-02-01

    Diagnostic difficulties occur in pulmonary embolism (PE) during visual analysis of ventilation-perfusion images in matched defects or in chronic obstructive lung disease (COPD). In 44 patients with angiographically confirmed PE and in 40 patients with COPD, the regional ventilation-perfusion ratios (V/Q) were therefore computed using krypton-81m for each perfusion defect, and were displayed in a functional image. In patients with PE and mismatched defects, a high V/Q (1.96) was observed. A V/Q > 1.25 was also found in nine of 11 patients having PE and indeterminate studies (studies with perfusion abnormalities matched by radiographic abnormalities). COPD was characterized by matched defects and low V/Q. The percentage of patients correctly classified as having PE or COPD increased from 56% when considering the match or mismatched character to 88% when based on a V/Q of 1.25 in the region of the perfusion defect. This quantitative analysis, therefore, seems useful in classifying patients with scintigraphic suspicion of PE.

  3. Suppression of cerebral hemodynamics is associated with reduced functional capacity in patients with heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Tieh-Cheng; Wang, Chao-Hung; Hsu, Chih-Chin; Cherng, Wen-Jin; Huang, Shu-Chun

    2011-01-01

    This investigation elucidated the underlying mechanisms of functional impairments in patients with heart failure (HF) by simultaneously comparing cardiac-cerebral-muscle hemodynamic and ventilatory responses to exercise among HF patients with various functional capacities. One hundred one patients with HF [New York Heart Association HF functional class II (HF-II, n = 53) and functional class III (HF-III, n = 48) patients] and 71 normal subjects [older control (O-C, n = 39) and younger control (Y-C, n = 32) adults] performed an incremental exercise test using a bicycle ergometer. A recently developed noninvasive bioreactance device was adopted to measure cardiac hemodynamics, and near-infrared spectroscopy was employed to assess perfusions in the frontal cerebral lobe (Δ[THb]FC) and vastus lateralis muscle (Δ[THb]VL). The results demonstrated that the Y-C group had higher levels of cardiac output, Δ[THb]FC, and Δ[THb]VL during exercise than the O-C group. Moreover, these cardiac/peripheral hemodynamic responses to exercise in HF-III group were smaller than those in both HF-II and O-C groups. Although the change of cardiac output caused by exercise was normalized, the amounts of blood distributed to frontal cerebral lobe and vastus lateralis muscle in the HF-III group significantly declined during exercise. The HF-III patients had lower oxygen-uptake efficiency slopes (OUES) and greater V̇e-V̇o2 slopes than the HF-II patients and age-matched controls. However, neither hemodynamic nor ventilatory response to exercise differed significantly between the HF-II and O-C groups. Cardiac output, Δ[THb]FC, and Δ[THb]VL during exercise were directly related to the OUES and V̇o2peak and inversely related to the V̇e-V̇co2 slope. Moreover, cardiac output or Δ[THb]FC was an effect modifier, which modulated the correlation status between Δ[THb]VL and V̇e-V̇co2 slope. We concluded that the suppression of cerebral/muscle hemodynamics during exercise is associated with

  4. Effects of video game playing on cerebral blood flow in young adults: a SPECT study.

    PubMed

    Chou, Yuan-Hwa; Yang, Bang-Hung; Hsu, Ju-Wei; Wang, Shyh-Jen; Lin, Chun-Lung; Huang, Kai-Lin; Chien Chang, Alice; Lee, Shin-Min

    2013-04-30

    To study the impact of video game playing on the human brain, the effects of two video games playing on cerebral blood flow (CBF) in young adults were determined. Thirty healthy subjects comprising 18 males and 12 females who were familiar with video game playing were recruited. Each subject underwent three sessions of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with a bolus injection of 20 mCi (99m)Tc ECD IV to measure their CBF. The first measurement was performed as baseline, the second and third measurements were performed after playing two different video games for 30 min, respectively. Statistic parametric mapping (SPM2) with Matlab 6.5 implemented on a personal computer was used for image analysis. CBF was significantly decreased in the prefrontal cortex and significantly increased in the temporal and occipital cortices after both video games playing. Furthermore, decreased CBF in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) which was significantly correlated with the number of killed characters was found after the violent game playing. The major finding of hypo-perfusion in prefrontal regions after video game playing is consistent with a previous study showing reduced or abnormal prefrontal cortex functions after video game playing. The second finding of decreased CBF in the ACC after playing the violent video game provides support for a previous hypothesis that the ACC might play a role in regulating violent behavior. PMID:23137807

  5. Developing a tissue perfusion sensor.

    PubMed

    Harvey, S L R; Parker, K H; O'Hare, D

    2007-01-01

    The development of a electrochemical tissue perfusion sensor is presented. The sensor is a platinum/platinum ring-disc microelectrode that relies on the principle of collector-generator to monitor mass transport within its vicinity. Tissue perfusion is a mass transport mechanism that describes the movement of respiratory gases, nutrients and metabolites in tissue. The sensor's capability of detecting perfusion at the cellular level in a continuous fashion is unique. This sensor will provide insight into the way nutrients and metabolites are transported in tissue especially in cases were perfusion is low such as in wounds or ischemic tissue. We present experimental work for the development and testing of the sensors in vitro. Experimental flow recordings in free steam solutions as well as the flow through tissue-like media are shown. Tests on post operative human tissue are also presented. The sensor's feature such as the continuous recoding capacities, spatial resolution and the measurement range from ml/min to microl/min are highlighted. PMID:18002549

  6. Pregnancy Complications: Umbilical Cord Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... before and during delivery, which may contribute to cerebral palsy and other forms of brain damage References Cruikshank, ... before and during delivery, which may contribute to cerebral palsy and other forms of brain damage References Cruikshank, ...

  7. United Cerebral Palsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... of UCP blog for the latest updates. United Cerebral Palsy UCP educates, advocates and provides support services to ... Partners Merz Logo Sprint Relay Copyright © 2015 United Cerebral Palsy 1825 K Street NW Suite 600 Washington, DC ...

  8. Cerebral amyloid angiopathy

    MedlinePlus

    Cerebral amyloid angiopathy is a neurological condition in which proteins called amyloid build up on the walls of the arteries ... The cause of cerebral amyloid angiopathy is unknown. Sometimes, it ... Persons with this condition have deposits of amyloid protein ...

  9. Cerebral Contusions and Lacerations

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stretch Additional Content Medical News Cerebral Contusions and Lacerations By James E. Wilberger, MD, Derrick A. Dupre, ... a direct, strong blow to the head. Cerebral lacerations are tears in brain tissue, caused by a ...

  10. A patient-specific visualization tool for comprehensive analysis of coronary CTA and perfusion MRI data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirisli, H. A.; Gupta, V.; Kirschbaum, S.; Neefjes, L.; van Geuns, R. J.; Mollet, N.; Lelieveldt, B. P. F.; Reiber, J. H. C.; van Walsum, T.; Niessen, W. J.

    2011-03-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance perfusion imaging (CMR) and computed tomography angiography (CTA) are widely used to assess heart disease. CMR is used to measure the global and regional myocardial function and to evaluate the presence of ischemia; CTA is used for diagnosing coronary artery disease, such as coronary stenoses. Nowadays, the hemodynamic significance of coronary artery stenoses is determined subjectively by combining information on myocardial function with assumptions on coronary artery territories. As the anatomy of coronary arteries varies greatly between individuals, we developed a patient-specific tool for relating CTA and perfusion CMR data. The anatomical and functional information extracted from CTA and CMR data are combined into a single frame of reference. Our graphical user interface provides various options for visualization. In addition to the standard perfusion Bull's Eye Plot (BEP), it is possible to overlay a 2D projection of the coronary tree on the BEP, to add a 3D coronary tree model and to add a 3D heart model. The perfusion BEP, the 3D-models and the CTA data are also interactively linked. Using the CMR and CTA data of 14 patients, our tool directly established a spatial correspondence between diseased coronary artery segments and myocardial regions with abnormal perfusion. The location of coronary stenoses and perfusion abnormalities were visualized jointly in 3D, thereby facilitating the study of the relationship between the anatomic causes of a blocked artery and the physiological effects on the myocardial perfusion. This tool is expected to improve diagnosis and therapy planning of early-stage coronary artery disease.

  11. Familial Precocious Fetal Abnormal Cortical Sulcation.

    PubMed

    Frassoni, Carolina; Avagliano, Laura; Inverardi, Francesca; Spaccini, Luigina; Parazzini, Cecilia; Rustico, Maria Angela; Bulfamante, Gaetano; Righini, Andrea

    2016-08-01

    The development of the human cerebral cortex is a complex and precisely programmed process by which alterations may lead to morphological and functional neurological abnormalities. We report familial cases of prenatally diagnosed abnormal brain, characterized by aberrant symmetrical mesial oversulcation of the parietooccipital lobes, in fetuses affected by abnormal skeletal features. Fetal brain anomalies were characterized by prenatal magnetic resonance imaging at 21 weeks of gestation and histologically evaluated at 22 weeks. Histological examination added relevant information showing some focal cortical areas of micropoligyria and heterotopic extension of the cortical plate into the marginal zone beneath the cortical surface. Genetic analysis of the fetuses excluded FGFR3 mutations known to be related to skeletal dysplasia and aberrant symmetrical oversulcation in other brain areas (temporal lobes). Hence, the present report suggests the existence of a class of rare syndromes of skeleton and brain development abnormality unrelated to FGFR3 mutations or related to other not described FGFR3 gene defects. Using magnetic resonance imaging, histopathology and molecular characterization we provide an example of a translational study of a rare and unreported brain congenital malformation. PMID:27177044

  12. Risk factors for cerebral hemorrhage and cerebral infarction in a Japanese rural community.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, H; Ueda, Y; Hayashi, M; Date, C; Baba, T; Yamashita, H; Shoji, H; Tanaka, Y; Owada, K; Detels, R

    1982-01-01

    A ten-year follow-up study of stroke among residents 40 years and older in a rural community located on Shikoku Island, Japan, was completed in 1977. The response rate for the initial examinations was 85% of 920 males and 90% of 1,012 females. Seven hundred and seventy-two males and 901 females who were initially free of stroke were followed from July 1967 through June 1977. The incidence of all strokes was 10.47 per thousand person-years for males and 6.41 per thousand person-years for females. The statistically significant risk factors for stroke were age, male sex, elevated blood pressure, ECG abnormalities, and funduscopic abnormalities. Elevated blood pressure was the strongest risk factor and mean arterial pressure was the best predictive measure. Twice as high a proportion of strokes were subclassified as cerebral hemorrhage (26%) in this study as have been reported in comparable studies in the United States (12-15%). An inverse relationship between serum cholesterol levels and cerebral hemorrhage incidence, but not cerebral infarct, was observed. High alcohol intake was a risk factor for cerebral hemorrhage but not for cerebral infarct. No relationship between stroke and weight was observed despite the relationship of stroke to blood pressure and of weight to blood pressure. PMID:7064181

  13. Myocardial function and perfusion in the CREST syndrome variant of progressive systemic sclerosis. Exercise radionuclide evaluation and comparison with diffuse scleroderma

    SciTech Connect

    Follansbee, W.P.; Curtiss, E.I.; Medsger, T.A. Jr.; Owens, G.R.; Steen, V.D.; Rodnan, G.P.

    1984-09-01

    Myocardial function and perfusion were evaluated in 22 patients with progressive systemic sclerosis with the CREST syndrome using exercise and radionuclide techniques, pulmonary function testing, and chest roentgenography. The results were compared with a similar study of 26 patients with progressive systemic sclerosis with diffuse scleroderma. The prevalence of thallium perfusion abnormalities was similar in the groups with CREST syndrome and diffuse scleroderma, (64 percent versus 77 percent), but the defects were significantly smaller in the CREST syndrome (p less than 0.01). Reperfusion thallium defects in the absence of extramural coronary artery disease were seen in 38 percent of patients with diffuse scleroderma. This finding was not seen in any of the patients with the CREST syndrome. In diffuse scleroderma, abnormalities of both right and left ventricular function were related to larger thallium perfusion defects. In the CREST syndrome, abnormalities of left ventricular function were minor, were seen only during exercise, and were unrelated to thallium perfusion defects. Abnormal resting right ventricular function was seen in 36 percent of the patients with the CREST syndrome and was associated with an isolated decrease in diffusing capacity of carbon monoxide. It is concluded that the cardiac manifestations of the CREST syndrome are distinct from those found in diffuse scleroderma. Unlike diffuse scleroderma, abnormalities of left ventricular function in the CREST syndrome are minor and are unrelated to abnormalities of coronary perfusion. Right ventricular dysfunction in the CREST syndrome appears to be primarily related to pulmonary vascular disease.

  14. Rho kinase as a target for cerebral vascular disorders

    PubMed Central

    Bond, Lisa M; Sellers, James R; McKerracher, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    The development of novel pharmaceutical treatments for disorders of the cerebral vasculature is a serious unmet medical need. These vascular disorders are typified by a disruption in the delicate Rho signaling equilibrium within the blood vessel wall. In particular, Rho kinase overactivation in the smooth muscle and endothelial layers of the vessel wall results in cytoskeletal modifications that lead to reduced vascular integrity and abnormal vascular growth. Rho kinase is thus a promising target for the treatment of cerebral vascular disorders. Indeed, preclinical studies indicate that Rho kinase inhibition may reduce the formation/growth/rupture of both intracranial aneurysms and cerebral cavernous malformations. PMID:26062400

  15. Diffusion and Perfusion MRI to Differentiate Treatment-Related Changes Including Pseudoprogression from Recurrent Tumors in High-Grade Gliomas with Histopathologic Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Prager, A.J.; Martinez, N.; Beal, K.; Omuro, A.; Zhang, Z.; Young, R.J.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Treatment-related changes and recurrent tumors often have overlapping features on conventional MR imaging. The purpose of this study was to assess the utility of DWI and DSC perfusion imaging alone and in combination to differentiate treatment-related effects and recurrent high-grade gliomas. MATERIALS AND METHODS We retrospectively identified 68 consecutive patients with high-grade gliomas treated by surgical resection followed by radiation therapy and temozolomide, who then developed increasing enhancing mass lesions indeterminate for treatment-related changes versus recurrent tumor. All lesions were diagnosed by histopathology at repeat surgical resection. ROI analysis was performed of the enhancing lesion on the ADC and DSC maps. Measurements made by a 2D ROI of the enhancing lesion on a single slice were recorded as ADCLesion and rCBVLesion, and measurements made by the most abnormal small fixed diameter ROI as ADCROI and rCBVROI. Statistical analysis was performed with Wilcoxon rank sum tests with P = .05. RESULTS Ten of the 68 patients (14.7%) had treatment-related changes, while 58 patients (85.3%) had recurrent tumor only (n = 19) or recurrent tumor mixed with treatment effect (n = 39). DWI analysis showed higher ADCLesion in treatment-related changes than in recurrent tumor (P = .003). DSC analysis revealed lower relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV)Lesion and rCBVROI in treatment-related changes (P=.003 andP=.011, respectively). Subanalysis of patients with suspected pseudoprogression also revealed higher ADCLesion (P = .001) and lower rCBVLesion (P = .028) and rCBVROI (P = .032) in treatment-related changes. Applying a combined ADCLesion and rCBVLesion model did not outperform either the ADC or rCBV metric alone. CONCLUSIONS Treatment-related changes showed higher diffusion and lower perfusion than recurrent tumor. Similar correlations were found for patients with suspected pseudoprogression. PMID:25593202

  16. Relationship between volume flow and velocity in the cerebral circulation1

    PubMed Central

    Rowan, J. O.; Harper, A. M.; Miller, J. D.; Tedeschi, G. M.; Jennett, W. B.

    1970-01-01

    The relationship between the velocity of the cerebral circulation and the cerebral blood flow was explored at varying levels of PaCO2, systemic arterial pressure, intracranial pressure, and perfusion pressure, using radioisotope techniques in baboons. Only at low flow rates did velocity increase with flow, and then non-linearly; at high rates velocity increased progressively less. Changes in flow are reflected by changes in velocity in such restricted circumstances that mean circulation time is a very unreliable indication of cerebral blood flow. PMID:5497874

  17. Sleep induced by small doses of tubocurarine injected into cerebral ventricles of dog

    PubMed Central

    Haranath, P. S. R. K.; Shyamalakumari, S.

    1973-01-01

    In unanaesthetized dogs, sleep with the typical sleep pattern in the E.E.G. was produced with (+)-tubocurarine when injected in a small dose (500 ng) into, or perfused in low concentration (100 ng/ml) through the cerebral ventricles. PMID:4362592

  18. Aging and Cerebral Palsy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Networker, 1993

    1993-01-01

    This special edition of "The Networker" contains several articles focusing on aging and cerebral palsy (CP). "Aging and Cerebral Palsy: Pathways to Successful Aging" (Jenny C. Overeynder) reports on the National Invitational Colloquium on Aging and Cerebral Palsy held in April 1993. "Observations from an Observer" (Kathleen K. Barrett) describes…

  19. "Jeopardy" in Abnormal Psychology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keutzer, Carolin S.

    1993-01-01

    Describes the use of the board game, Jeopardy, in a college level abnormal psychology course. Finds increased student interaction and improved application of information. Reports generally favorable student evaluation of the technique. (CFR)

  20. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding

    MedlinePlus

    ... Abnormal uterine bleeding is any bleeding from the uterus (through your vagina) other than your normal monthly ... or fibroids (small and large growths) in the uterus can also cause bleeding. Rarely, a thyroid problem, ...

  1. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding FAQ

    MedlinePlus

    ... as cancer of the uterus, cervix, or vagina • Polycystic ovary syndrome How is abnormal bleeding diagnosed? Your health care ... before the fetus can survive outside the uterus. Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: A condition characterized by two of the following ...

  2. [Differential approach to the application of hyperventilation in acute period of severe brain injury in relation to cerebral circulation].

    PubMed

    Oshorov, A V; Kozlova, E A; Moldotashova, A K; Amcheslavskiĭ, V G; Potapov, A A

    2004-01-01

    Seventeen patients with severe brain injury (Glasgow-8 Coma Scale 3-8 scores) complicated by traumatic subarachnoidal hemorrhage and severe cerebral hemodynamic disorders (hyperemia, vasospasm) were examined. Hyperventilation was performed in different phases of cerebral circulation under multiparametrical monitoring (intracranial pressure, cerebral perfusion pressure, jugular oximetry, Doppler study using the carotid compression test). The use of hyperventilation to eliminate intracranial hypertension in victims with brain hyperemia was shown to make cerebral circulation consistent with brain tissue oxygen demands and to improve the autoregulatory reserve of cerebral vessels. The application of hyperventilation to eliminate intracranial hypertension in vasospasm leads to a temporary reduction in intracranial pressure, but simultaneously causes cerebral circulatory changes that do not correspond to cerebral oxygen demands, as well as lowered cerebral perfusion pressure, which increases a risk for ischemic brain tissue lesion. This requires a strict rationale for the use of hyperventilation and for multiparametrical monitoring of cerebral functions, which includes jugular oximetry, Doppler transcranial study, and measurement of intracranial pressure throughout the hyperventilation period in order to prevent secondary brain lesion. PMID:15326763

  3. Incidental Cerebral Microbleeds and Cerebral Blood Flow in Elderly Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Gregg, Nicholas M.; Kim, Albert E.; Gurol, M. Edip; Lopez, Oscar L.; Aizenstein, Howard J.; Price, Julie C.; Mathis, Chester A.; James, Jeffrey A.; Snitz, Beth E.; Cohen, Ann D.; Kamboh, M. Ilyas; Minhas, Davneet; Weissfeld, Lisa A.; Tamburo, Erica L.; Klunk, William E.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Cerebral microbleeds (CMBs) are collections of blood breakdown products that are a common incidental finding in magnetic resonance imaging of elderly individuals. Cerebral microbleeds are associated with cognitive deficits, but the mechanism is unclear. Studies show that individuals with CMBs related to symptomatic cerebral amyloid angiopathy have abnormal vascular reactivity and cerebral blood flow (CBF), but, to our knowledge, abnormalities in cerebral blood flow have not been reported for healthy individuals with incidental CMBs. OBJECTIVE To evaluate the association of incidental CMBs with resting-state CBF, cerebral metabolism, cerebrovascular disease, β-amyloid (Aβ), and cognition. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS A cross-sectional study of 55 cognitively normal individuals with a mean (SD) age of 86.8 (2.7) years was conducted from May 1, 2010, to May 1, 2013, in an academic medical center in Pittsburgh; data analysis was performed between June 10, 2013, and April 9, 2015. INTERVENTIONS 3-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging was performed with susceptibility-weighted imaging or gradient-recalled echo to assess CMBs, arterial spin labeling for CBF, and T1- and T2-weighted imaging for atrophy, white matter hyperintensities, and infarcts. Positron emission tomography was conducted with fluorodeoxyglucose to measure cerebral metabolism and Pittsburgh compound B for fibrillar Aβ. Neuropsychological evaluation, including the Clinical Dementia Rating scale, was performed. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Magnetic resonance images were rated for the presence and location of CMBs. Lobar CMBs were subclassified as cortical or subcortical. Measurements of CBF, metabolism, and Aβ were compared with the presence and number of CMBs with voxelwise and region-of-interest analyses. RESULTS The presence of cortical CMBs was associated with significantly reduced CBF in multiple regions on voxelwise and region-of-interest analyses (percentage difference in global CBF,

  4. Visual disorders in children with brain lesions: 2. Visual impairment associated with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Guzzetta, A; Mercuri, E; Cioni, G

    2001-01-01

    Disorders of visual function are a common finding in children with cerebral palsy. In some cases they are secondary to ophthalmologic abnormalities such as cataract or retinopathy, but more often they are due to damage of the central visual pathway. We review the literature on the prevalence and distribution of visual abnormalities in children with cerebral palsy and their relation to cognitive, motor and emotional development. PMID:11589165

  5. Chromosomal Abnormalities and Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    BASSETT, ANNE S.; CHOW, EVA W.C.; WEKSBERG, ROSANNA

    2011-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a common and serious psychiatric illness with strong evidence for genetic causation, but no specific loci yet identified. Chromosomal abnormalities associated with schizophrenia may help to understand the genetic complexity of the illness. This paper reviews the evidence for associations between chromosomal abnormalities and schizophrenia and related disorders. The results indicate that 22q11.2 microdeletions detected by fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) are significantly associated with schizophrenia. Sex chromosome abnormalities seem to be increased in schizophrenia but insufficient data are available to indicate whether schizophrenia or related disorders are increased in patients with sex chromosome aneuploidies. Other reports of chromosomal abnormalities associated with schizophrenia have the potential to be important adjuncts to linkage studies in gene localization. Advances in molecular cytogenetic techniques (i.e., FISH) have produced significant increases in rates of identified abnormalities in schizophrenia, particularly in patients with very early age at onset, learning difficulties or mental retardation, or dysmorphic features. The results emphasize the importance of considering behavioral phenotypes, including adult onset psychiatric illnesses, in genetic syndromes and the need for clinicians to actively consider identifying chromosomal abnormalities and genetic syndromes in selected psychiatric patients. PMID:10813803

  6. Advanced cerebral monitoring in neurocritical care.

    PubMed

    Barazangi, Nobl; Hemphill, J Claude

    2008-01-01

    New cerebral monitoring techniques allow direct measurement of brain oxygenation and metabolism. Investigation using these new tools has provided additional insight into the understanding of the pathophysiology of acute brain injury and suggested new ways to guide management of secondary brain injury. Studies of focal brain tissue oxygen monitoring have suggested ischemic thresholds in focal regions of brain injury and demonstrated the interrelationship between brain tissue oxygen tension (P bt O 2 ) and other cerebral physiologic and metabolic parameters. Jugular venous oxygen saturation (SjVO 2 ) monitoring may evaluate global brain oxygen delivery and consumption, providing thresholds for detecting brain hypoperfusion and hyperperfusion. Furthermore, critically low values of P bt O 2 and SjVO 2 have also been predictive of mortality and worsened functional outcome, especially after head trauma. Cerebral microdialysis measures the concentrations of extracellular metabolites which may be relevant to cerebral metabolism or ischemia in focal areas of injury. Cerebral blood flow may be measured in the neurointensive care unit using continuous methods such as thermal diffusion and laser Doppler flowmetry. Initial studies have also attempted to correlate findings from advanced neuromonitoring with neuroimaging using dynamic perfusion computed tomography, positron emission tomography, and Xenon computed tomography. Additionally, new methods of data acquisition, storage, and analysis are being developed to address the increasing burden of patient data from neuromonitoring. Advanced informatics techniques such as hierarchical data clustering, generalized linear models, and heat map dendrograms are now being applied to multivariable patient data in order to better develop physiologic patient profiles to improve diagnosis and treatment. PMID:19127034

  7. Hemodynamic and metabolic effects of cerebral revascularization.

    PubMed

    Leblanc, R; Tyler, J L; Mohr, G; Meyer, E; Diksic, M; Yamamoto, L; Taylor, L; Gauthier, S; Hakim, A

    1987-04-01

    Pre- and postoperative positron emission tomography (PET) was performed in six patients undergoing extracranial to intracranial bypass procedures for the treatment of symptomatic extracranial carotid occlusion. The six patients were all men, aged 52 to 68 years. Their symptoms included transient ischemic attacks (five cases), amaurosis fugax (two cases), and completed stroke with good recovery (one case). Positron emission tomography was performed within 4 weeks prior to surgery and between 3 to 6 months postoperatively, using oxygen-15-labeled CO, O2, and CO2 and fluorine-18-labeled fluorodeoxyglucose. Cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral blood volume (CBV), cerebral metabolic rates for oxygen and glucose (CMRO2 and CMRGlu), and the oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) were measured in both hemispheres. Preoperatively, compared to five elderly control subjects, patients had increased CBV, a decreased CBF/CBV ratio, and decreased CMRO2, indicating reduced cerebral perfusion pressure and depressed oxygen metabolism. The CBF was decreased in only one patient who had bilateral carotid occlusions; the OEF, CMRGlu, and CMRO2/CMRGlu and CMRGlu/CBF ratios were not significantly different from control measurements. All bypasses were patent and all patients were asymptomatic following surgery. Postoperative PET revealed decreased CBV and an increased CBF/CBV ratio, indicating improved hemodynamic function and oxygen hypometabolism. This was associated with increased CMRO2 in two patients in whom the postoperative OEF was also increased. The CMRGlu and CMRGlu/CBF ratio were increased in five patients. Changes in CBF and the CMRO2/CMRGlu ratio were variable. One patient with preoperative progressive mental deterioration, documented by serial neuropsychological testing and decreasing CBF and CMRO2, had improved postoperative CBF and CMRO2 concomitant with improved neuropsychological functioning. It is concluded that symptomatic carotid occlusion is associated with altered

  8. Technical Description of the Use of Selective Perfusion Techniques During the Norwood Procedure for Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Chabot, David Leonard; Polimenakos, Anastasios C.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract: Since the introduction of the Norwood procedure for surgical palliation of hypoplastic left heart syndrome in 1983, refinements have been made to the original procedure to improve patient outcomes while still accomplishing the original goals of the procedure. One of these refinements has been the introduction of regional selective perfusion to limit the duration of circulatory arrest times and optimize the regional flow distribution. In this paper we describe our technique for performing selective cerebral and lower body perfusion during the Norwood procedure. PMID:22416608

  9. The cerebral effects of ascent to high altitudes.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Mark H; Newman, Stanton; Imray, Chris H

    2009-02-01

    Cellular hypoxia is the common final pathway of brain injury that occurs not just after asphyxia, but also when cerebral perfusion is impaired directly (eg, embolic stroke) or indirectly (eg, raised intracranial pressure after head injury). We Review recent advances in the understanding of neurological clinical syndromes that occur on exposure to high altitudes, including high altitude headache (HAH), acute mountain sickness (AMS), and high altitude cerebral oedema (HACE), and the genetics, molecular mechanisms, and physiology that underpin them. We also present the vasogenic and cytotoxic bases for HACE and explore venous hypertension as a possible contributory factor. Although the factors that control susceptibility to HACE are poorly understood, the effects of exposure to altitude (and thus hypobaric hypoxia) might provide a reproducible model for the study of cerebral cellular hypoxia in healthy individuals. The effects of hypobaric hypoxia might also provide new insights into the understanding of hypoxia in the clinical setting. PMID:19161909

  10. Cerebral tissue oxygenation impairment during experimental cerebral malaria

    PubMed Central

    Cabrales, Pedro; Martins, Yuri C; Ong, Peng Kai; Zanini, Graziela M; Frangos, John A; Carvalho, Leonardo JM

    2013-01-01

    Ischemia and hypoxia have been implicated in cerebral malaria (CM) pathogenesis, although direct measurements of hypoxia have not been conducted. C57BL/6 mice infected with Plasmodium berghei ANKA (PbA) develop a neurological syndrome known as experimental cerebral malaria (ECM), whereas BALB/c mice are resistant to ECM. In this study, intravital microscopy methods were used to quantify hemodynamic changes, vascular/tissue oxygen (O2) tension (PO2), and perivascular pH in vivo in ECM and non-ECM models, employing a closed cranial window model. ECM mice on day 6 of infection showed marked decreases in pial blood flow, vascular (arteriolar, venular), and perivascular PO2, perivascular pH, and systemic hemoglobin levels. Changes were more dramatic in mice with late-stage ECM compared with mice with early-stage ECM. These changes led to drastic decreases in O2 delivery to the brain tissue. In addition, ECM animals required a greater PO2 gradient to extract the same amount of O2 compared with non-infected animals, as the pial tissues extract O2 from the steepest portion of the blood O2 equilibrium curve. ECM animals also showed increased leukocyte adherence in postcapillary venules, and the intensity of adhesion was inversely correlated with blood flow and O2 extraction. PbA-infected BALB/c mice displayed no neurological signs on day 6 and while they did show changes similar to those observed in C57BL/6 mice (decreased pial blood flow, vascular/tissue PO2, perivascular pH, hemoglobin levels), non-ECM animals preserved superior perfusion and oxygenation compared with ECM animals at similar anemia and parasitemia levels, resulting in better O2 delivery and O2 extraction by the brain tissue. In conclusion, direct quantitative assessment of pial hemodynamics and oxygenation in vivo revealed that ECM is associated with severe progressive brain tissue hypoxia and acidosis. PMID:24128424

  11. Motor mapping in cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Wittenberg, George F

    2009-10-01

    The measurement of motor deficits in individuals with cerebral palsy (CP) has been largely based on clinical criteria. Yet functional imaging and non-invasive stimulation methods provide a means to measure directly abnormalities of the motor system. The size and location of muscles and movement representations can be determined with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and functional magnetics resonance imaging. Thus the homunculus can be individually mapped in children with CP. Because size of representation within the homunculus relates to quality of motor control, measurement of the distance between body parts provides a metric that may be useful in classifying deficits. Bilateral motor control in one hemisphere, while normal in neonates, persists variably in CP, providing another physiological metric. In this study, we used TMS to measure hand and ankle representations in a convenience sample of children with spastic CP. Overlapping thumb and ankle maps were found in children with both hemiplegia and diplegia, and these maps may be from either side of the body. While more participants are required to make conclusions about disability and compression/bilaterality of the homunculus, it appears as if TMS-derived metrics relate to motor abnormalities. These abnormal motor maps also are a therapeutic target, as stimulation methods are being developed as adjuncts to physical means of rehabilitation. PMID:19740221

  12. Effect of electroconvulsive stimulation on morphological and physiological aspects of post-cardiac arrest cerebral microcirculation.

    PubMed

    Sheleg, Sergey; Hixon, Hugh; Aizberg, Oleg R; Korotkevich, Alexander E; Nedzved, Mikhail K

    2008-09-01

    We investigated the effect of electroconvulsive stimulation (ECS) on cerebral circulation in vivo using the method for measuring microcirculation in real time with the photosensitizer dye Photosense and the fiber optic spectrofluorometer LESA-01-BIOSPEC. We have found that electroconvulsive stimulation significantly improved cerebral microcirculation (fourfold higher comparing to the control cerebral perfusion) after 30 min of room-temperature cardiac arrest. Morphologic study of the brain tissue showed the absence of rouleaux formation of erythrocytes ("sludged blood") in the cerebral cortex microcirculation after the application of electrical stimulus. Electroconvulsive stimulation may be useful for improving cerebral microcirculation (blood flow) in cases of long-term brain hypoxia/anoxia after prolonged cardiac arrest. PMID:18586374

  13. Successful repair of a syphilitic aortic arch aneurysm accompanied by serious cerebral infarction.

    PubMed

    Sato, Katsutoshi; Chiba, Kiyoshi; Koizumi, Nobusato; Ogino, Hitoshi

    2014-01-01

    We present a 52-year-old male with a syphilitic aortic arch aneurysm accompanied by relevant extensive cerebral infarction. He was admitted to a local hospital for sudden loss of consciousness, where he was diagnosed with serious cerebral infarction. During his treatment, a multilocular aortic arch aneurysm involving the arch vessels was found incidentally. He was transferred to our hospital for surgical treatment. A preoperative routine laboratory test for syphilis was highly positive, which suggested that the aneurysm was likely caused by syphilis and the cerebral infarction was also induced by the involvement of syphilitic aortitis or arteritis. After 2 weeks of antibiotic therapy for syphilis, total arch replacement was performed successfully using meticulous brain protection with antegrade selective cerebral perfusion and deep hypothermia. He recovered without any further cerebral deficits. The pathological examination of the surgical specimen showed some characteristic changes of syphilitic aortitis. PMID:24492165

  14. Correlation of CT perfusion and CT volumetry in patients with Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Czarnecka, Anna; Zimny, Anna; Sąsiadek, Marek

    2010-01-01

    Summary Background: Both brain atrophy and decrease of perfusion are observed in dementive diseases. The aim of the study was to correlate the results of brain perfusion CT (pCT) and CT volumetry in patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Material/Methods: Forty-eight patients with AD (mean age of 71.3 years) underwent brain pCT and CT volumetry. The pCT was performed at the level of basal ganglia after the injection of contrast medium (50 ml, 4 ml/sec.) with serial scanning (delay 7 sec, 50 scans, 1 scan/sec). Volumetric measurements were carried out on the basis of source images, with the use of a dedicated CT software combined with manual outlining of the regions of interest in extracerebral and intraventricular CSF spaces. Perfusion parameters of the cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral blood volume (CBV) from the grey matter of frontal and temporal as well as basal ganglia were compared statistically with the volumetric measurements of frontal and temporal cortical atrophy as well as subcortical atrophy. Results: A statistically significant positive correlation was found between the values of CBF and CBV in the basal ganglia and the volumes of the lateral and third ventricles. The comparison of CBF and CBV results with the volumetric measurements in the areas of the frontal and temporal lobes showed mostly negative correlations, but none of them was of statistical significance. Conclusions: In patients with AD, the degree of cortical atrophy is not correlated with the decrease of perfusion in the grey matter and subcortical atrophy is not correlated with the decrease of perfusion in the basal ganglia region. It suggests that functional and structural changes in AD are not related to each other. PMID:22802771

  15. Ventricular Volume Load Reveals the Mechanoelastic Impact of Communicating Hydrocephalus on Dynamic Cerebral Autoregulation.

    PubMed

    Haubrich, Christina; Czosnyka, Marek; Diehl, Rolf; Smielewski, Peter; Czosnyka, Zofia

    2016-01-01

    Several studies have shown that the progression of communicating hydrocephalus is associated with diminished cerebral perfusion and microangiopathy. If communicating hydrocephalus similarly alters the cerebrospinal fluid circulation and cerebral blood flow, both may be related to intracranial mechanoelastic properties as, for instance, the volume pressure compliance. Twenty-three shunted patients with communicating hydrocephalus underwent intraventricular constant-flow infusion with Hartmann's solution. The monitoring included transcranial Doppler (TCD) flow velocities (FV) in the middle (MCA) and posterior cerebral arteries (PCA), intracranial pressure (ICP), and systemic arterial blood pressure (ABP). The analysis covered cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP), the index of pressure-volume compensatory reserve (RAP), and phase shift angles between Mayer waves (3 to 9 cpm) in ABP and MCA-FV or PCA-FV. Due to intraventricular infusion, the pressure-volume reserve was exhausted (RAP) 0.84+/-0.1 and ICP was increased from baseline 11.5+/-5.6 to plateau levels of 20.7+/-6.4 mmHg. The ratio dRAP/dICP distinguished patients with large 0.1+/-0.01, medium 0.05+/-0.02, and small 0.02+/-0.01 intracranial volume compliances. Both M wave phase shift angles (r = 0.64; p<0.01) and CPP (r = 0.36; p<0.05) displayed a gradual decline with decreasing dRAP/dICP gradients. This study showed that in communicating hydrocephalus, CPP and dynamic cerebral autoregulation in particular, depend on the volume-pressure compliance. The results suggested that the alteration of mechanoelastic characteristics contributes to a reduced cerebral perfusion and a loss of autonomy of cerebral blood flow regulation. Results warrant a prospective TCD follow-up to verify whether the alteration of dynamic cerebral autoregulation may indicate a progression of communicating hydrocephalus. PMID:27415784

  16. Ventricular Volume Load Reveals the Mechanoelastic Impact of Communicating Hydrocephalus on Dynamic Cerebral Autoregulation

    PubMed Central

    Haubrich, Christina; Czosnyka, Marek; Diehl, Rolf; Smielewski, Peter; Czosnyka, Zofia

    2016-01-01

    Several studies have shown that the progression of communicating hydrocephalus is associated with diminished cerebral perfusion and microangiopathy. If communicating hydrocephalus similarly alters the cerebrospinal fluid circulation and cerebral blood flow, both may be related to intracranial mechanoelastic properties as, for instance, the volume pressure compliance. Twenty-three shunted patients with communicating hydrocephalus underwent intraventricular constant-flow infusion with Hartmann’s solution. The monitoring included transcranial Doppler (TCD) flow velocities (FV) in the middle (MCA) and posterior cerebral arteries (PCA), intracranial pressure (ICP), and systemic arterial blood pressure (ABP). The analysis covered cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP), the index of pressure-volume compensatory reserve (RAP), and phase shift angles between Mayer waves (3 to 9 cpm) in ABP and MCA-FV or PCA-FV. Due to intraventricular infusion, the pressure-volume reserve was exhausted (RAP) 0.84+/-0.1 and ICP was increased from baseline 11.5+/-5.6 to plateau levels of 20.7+/-6.4 mmHg. The ratio dRAP/dICP distinguished patients with large 0.1+/-0.01, medium 0.05+/-0.02, and small 0.02+/-0.01 intracranial volume compliances. Both M wave phase shift angles (r = 0.64; p<0.01) and CPP (r = 0.36; p<0.05) displayed a gradual decline with decreasing dRAP/dICP gradients. This study showed that in communicating hydrocephalus, CPP and dynamic cerebral autoregulation in particular, depend on the volume-pressure compliance. The results suggested that the alteration of mechanoelastic characteristics contributes to a reduced cerebral perfusion and a loss of autonomy of cerebral blood flow regulation. Results warrant a prospective TCD follow-up to verify whether the alteration of dynamic cerebral autoregulation may indicate a progression of communicating hydrocephalus. PMID:27415784

  17. PET evaluation of cerebral blood flow reactivity in symptomatic and asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis

    SciTech Connect

    Dey, H.M.; Brass, L.; Rich, D.

    1994-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to use acetazolamide (AZ) enhanced O-15 water PET to evaluate cerebral perfusion reserve in symptomatic and asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis. We hypothesized that impaired vasoreactivity would be associated with symptomatic disease and a higher likelihood of future ischemic events. Twenty-two patients with significant (>75%) carotid artery occlusion underwent cerebral blood flow imaging at baseline and following AZ infusion. Paired O-15 data sets were coregistered and globally normalized. Regions of interest were drawn on baseline blood flow images and superimposed upon (AZ - baseline) difference images to derive a % change in regional blood flow after AZ administration. The results showed a significant difference in cerebral perfusion reserve between symptomatic (n=19) and asymptomatic (n=3) carotid artery disease.

  18. Aerobic fitness is associated with greater hippocampal cerebral blood flow in children.

    PubMed

    Chaddock-Heyman, Laura; Erickson, Kirk I; Chappell, Michael A; Johnson, Curtis L; Kienzler, Caitlin; Knecht, Anya; Drollette, Eric S; Raine, Lauren B; Scudder, Mark R; Kao, Shih-Chun; Hillman, Charles H; Kramer, Arthur F

    2016-08-01

    The present study is the first to investigate whether cerebral blood flow in the hippocampus relates to aerobic fitness in children. In particular, we used arterial spin labeling (ASL) perfusion MRI to provide a quantitative measure of blood flow in the hippocampus in 73 7- to 9-year-old preadolescent children. Indeed, aerobic fitness was found to relate to greater perfusion in the hippocampus, independent of age, sex, and hippocampal volume. Such results suggest improved microcirculation and cerebral vasculature in preadolescent children with higher levels of aerobic fitness. Further, aerobic fitness may influence how the brain regulates its metabolic demands via blood flow in a region of the brain important for learning and memory. To add specificity to the relationship of fitness to the hippocampus, we demonstrate no significant association between aerobic fitness and cerebral blood flow in the brainstem. Our results reinforce the importance of aerobic fitness during a critical period of child development. PMID:27419884

  19. Ex vivo lung graft perfusion.

    PubMed

    Briot, Raphaël; Gennai, Stéphane; Maignan, Maxime; Souilamas, Redha; Pison, Christophe

    2016-04-01

    This review proposes an update of the state of the art and the ongoing clinical trials of ex vivo lung perfusion for lung transplantation in patients. Ex vivo lung perfusion techniques (EVLP) can be used to evaluate a lung graft outside of the body. The goal of EVLP is to study the functional status of lung grafts that were first rejected for transplantation because they did not match all criteria for a conventional transplantation. After an EVLP evaluation, some of these lungs may be requalified for a possible transplantation in patients. This article proposes an overview of the developments of EVLP techniques. During EVLP, the perfusion and ventilation of the isolated lung preparation are very progressive in order to avoid oedema due to ischaemia-reperfusion injuries. Lung evaluation is mainly based on gasometric (PaO2/FiO2) and rheological criteria (low pulmonary arterial resistance). Several series of patients transplanted with EVLP evaluated lungs have been recently published with promising results. EVLP preparations also allow a better understanding of the physiopathology and treatments of ischaemia-reperfusion injuries. Organ procurements from "non-heart-beating" donors will probably require a wider application of these ex vivo techniques. The development of semi-automated systems might facilitate the clinical use of EVLP techniques. PMID:26746565

  20. Intestinal perfusion monitoring using photoplethysmography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akl, Tony J.; Wilson, Mark A.; Ericson, M. Nance; Coté, Gerard L.

    2013-08-01

    In abdominal trauma patients, monitoring intestinal perfusion and oxygen consumption is essential during the resuscitation period. Photoplethysmography is an optical technique potentially capable of monitoring these changes in real time to provide the medical staff with a timely and quantitative measure of the adequacy of resuscitation. The challenges for using optical techniques in monitoring hemodynamics in intestinal tissue are discussed, and the solutions to these challenges are presented using a combination of Monte Carlo modeling and theoretical analysis of light propagation in tissue. In particular, it is shown that by using visible wavelengths (i.e., 470 and 525 nm), the perfusion signal is enhanced and the background contribution is decreased compared with using traditional near-infrared wavelengths leading to an order of magnitude enhancement in the signal-to-background ratio. It was further shown that, using the visible wavelengths, similar sensitivity to oxygenation changes could be obtained (over 50% compared with that of near-infrared wavelengths). This is mainly due to the increased contrast between tissue and blood in that spectral region and the confinement of the photons to the thickness of the small intestine. Moreover, the modeling results show that the source to detector separation should be limited to roughly 6 mm while using traditional near-infrared light, with a few centimeters source to detector separation leads to poor signal-to-background ratio. Finally, a visible wavelength system is tested in an in vivo porcine study, and the possibility of monitoring intestinal perfusion changes is showed.

  1. Abnormal norepinephrine clearance and adrenergic receptor sensitivity in idiopathic orthostatic intolerance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacob, G.; Shannon, J. R.; Costa, F.; Furlan, R.; Biaggioni, I.; Mosqueda-Garcia, R.; Robertson, R. M.; Robertson, D.

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chronic orthostatic intolerance (OI) is characterized by symptoms of inadequate cerebral perfusion with standing, in the absence of significant orthostatic hypotension. A heart rate increase of >/=30 bpm is typical. Possible underlying pathophysiologies include hypovolemia, partial dysautonomia, or a primary hyperadrenergic state. We tested the hypothesis that patients with OI have functional abnormalities in autonomic neurons regulating cardiovascular responses. METHODS AND RESULTS: Thirteen patients with chronic OI and 10 control subjects underwent a battery of autonomic tests. Systemic norepinephrine (NE) kinetics were determined with the patients supine and standing before and after tyramine administration. In addition, baroreflex sensitivity, hemodynamic responses to bolus injections of adrenergic agonists, and intrinsic heart rate were determined. Resting supine NE spillover and clearance were similar in both groups. With standing, patients had a greater decrease in NE clearance than control subjects (55+/-5% versus 30+/-7%, P<0.02). After tyramine, NE spillover did not change significantly in patients but increased 50+/-10% in control subjects (P<0.001). The dose of isoproterenol required to increase heart rate 25 bpm was lower in patients than in control subjects (0.5+/-0.05 versus 1.0+/-0.1 microg, P<0.005), and the dose of phenylephrine required to increase systolic blood pressure 25 mm Hg was lower in patients than control subjects (105+/-11 versus 210+/-12 microg, P<0.001). Baroreflex sensitivity was lower in patients (12+/-1 versus 18+/-2 ms/mm Hg, P<0.02), but the intrinsic heart rate was similar in both groups. CONCLUSIONS: The decreased NE clearance with standing, resistance to the NE-releasing effect of tyramine, and increased sensitivity to adrenergic agonists demonstrate dramatically disordered sympathetic cardiovascular regulation in patients with chronic OI.

  2. Brain perfusion in acute and chronic hyperglycemia in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Kikano, G.E.; LaManna, J.C.; Harik, S.I. )

    1989-08-01

    Recent studies show that acute and chronic hyperglycemia cause a diffuse decrease in regional cerebral blood flow and that chronic hyperglycemia decreases the brain L-glucose space. Since these changes can be caused by a decreased density of perfused brain capillaries, we used 30 adult male Wistar rats to study the effect of acute and chronic hyperglycemia on (1) the brain intravascular space using radioiodinated albumin, (2) the anatomic density of brain capillaries using alkaline phosphatase histochemistry, and (3) the fraction of brain capillaries that are perfused using the fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran method. Our results indicate that acute and chronic hyperglycemia do not affect the brain intravascular space nor the anatomic density of brain capillaries. Also, there were no differences in capillary recruitment among normoglycemic, acutely hyperglycemic, and chronically hyperglycemic rats. These results suggest that the shrinkage of the brain L-glucose space in chronic hyperglycemia is more likely due to changes in the blood-brain barrier permeability to L-glucose.

  3. [Etiology of cerebral palsy].

    PubMed

    Jaisle, F

    1996-01-01

    The "perinatal asphyxia" is regarded to be one of the causes of cerebral palsy, though in the very most of the children with cerebral palsy there is found no hypoxia during labour. It should be mentioned, that the definition of "perinatal" and "asphyxia" neither are unic nor concret. And also there is no correlation between nonreassuring fetal heart rate patterns and acidosis in fetal blood with the incidence of cerebral palsy. Numerous studies in pregnant animals failed in proving an acute intrapartal hypoxia to be the origin of the cerebral palsy. Myers (1975) describes four patterns of anatomic brain damage after different injuries. Only his so called oligo-acidotic hypoxia, which is protracted and lasts over a longer time is leading to brain injury, which can be regarded in analogy to the injury of children with cerebral palsy. Summarising the update publications about the causes of cerebral palsy and the studies in pregnant animals there is no evidence that hypoxia during labour may be the cause of cerebral palsy. There is a great probability of a pre(and post-)natal origin of brain injury (for instance a periventricular leucomalacia found after birth) which leads to cerebral palsy. Short after labour signs of a so called "asphyxia" may occur in addition to this preexisting injury and misrepresent the cause of cerebral palsy. Finally the prepartal injury may cause both: Cerebral palsy and hypoxia. PMID:9035826

  4. Ultrasound perfusion signal processing for tumor detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, MinWoo; Abbey, Craig K.; Insana, Michael F.

    2016-04-01

    Enhanced blood perfusion in a tissue mass is an indication of neo-vascularity and a sign of a potential malignancy. Ultrasonic pulsed-Doppler imaging is a preferred modality for noninvasive monitoring of blood flow. However, the weak blood echoes and disorganized slow flow make it difficult to detect perfusion using standard methods without the expense and risk of contrast enhancement. Our research measures the efficiency of conventional power-Doppler (PD) methods at discriminating flow states by comparing measurement performance to that of an ideal discriminator. ROC analysis applied to the experimental results shows that power Doppler methods are just 30-50 % efficient at perfusion flows less than 1ml/min, suggesting an opportunity to improve perfusion assessment through signal processing. A new perfusion estimator is proposed by extending the statistical discriminator approach. We show that 2-D perfusion color imaging may be enhanced using this approach.

  5. Simultaneous Noninvasive Determination of Regional Myocardial Perfusion and Oxygen Content in Rabbits: Toward Direct Measurement of Myocardial Oxygen Consumption at MR Imaging1

    PubMed Central

    Reeder, Scott B.; Holmes, A. Alexander; McVeigh, Elliot R.; Forder, John R.

    2007-01-01

    PURPOSE To determine whether myocardial arterial perfusion and oxygen concentration can be quantified simultaneously from the same images by using spin labeling and the blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) effect with fast spin-echo (SE) imaging. MATERIALS AND METHODS A T2-weighted fast SE pulse sequence was written to image isolated, arrested, blood-perfused rabbit hearts (n = 6) at 4.7 T. Perfusion images with intensity in units of milliliters per minute per gram that covered the entire left ventricle with 0.39 × 0.39 × 3.00-mm resolution were obtained in less than 15 minutes with a 32-fold reduction in imaging time from that of a previous study. Estimates of oxygen concentration were made from the same images acquired for calculation of perfusion images. RESULTS Estimates of regional myocardial oxygen content could be made from the perfusion images; this demonstrated the feasibility of three-dimensional calculation of regional oxygen consumption, which requires concomitant measurement of both oxygen content and flow. Fast SE imaging was shown to bas sensitive to hemoglobin desaturation as standard SE imaging. Perfusion abnormalities and oxygen deficits were easily identified and verified qualitatively with gadopentetate dimeglumine on both perfusion and BOLD images obtained after coronary arterial ligation. CONCLUSION T2-weighted fast SE imaging combined with perfusion-sensitive spin labeling can be used to measure myocardial arterial perfusion and oxygen concentration. This provides the groundwork for calculation of regional myocardial oxygen consumption. PMID:10478241

  6. Review of diagnostic uses of shunt fraction quantification with technetium-99m macroaggregated albumin perfusion scan as illustrated by a case of Osler–Weber–Rendu syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Chokkappan, Kabilan; Kannivelu, Anbalagan; Srinivasan, Sivasubramanian; Babut, Suresh Balasubramanian

    2016-01-01

    Bilateral pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) are rare and are often associated with the hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT/Osler–Weber–Rendu) syndrome. We present a woman who presented with neurological symptoms due to a cerebral abscess. On further evaluation, bilateral pulmonary AVMs were identified. The patient was diagnosed with HHT, based on positive family history and multiple cerebral AVMs recognized on subsequent catheter angiogram, in addition to the presence of bilateral pulmonary AVMs. Craniotomy with drainage of the brain abscess and endovascular embolization of the pulmonary AVMs was offered to the patient. As a preembolization work-up, the patient underwent nuclear lung perfusion scan with technetium-99m macroaggregated albumin (Tc-99m MAA) to assess the right-to-left shunt secondary to the pulmonary AVMs. Postembolization follow-up perfusion scan was also obtained to estimate the hemodynamic response. The case is presented to describe the role of Tc-99m MAA perfusion lung scan in preoperatively evaluating patients with pulmonary AVMs and to emphasize on the scan's utility in posttreatment follow-up. Various present day usages of the Tc-99m MAA lung perfusion scan, other than diagnosing pulmonary thromboembolism, are discussed. Providing background knowledge on the physiological and hemodynamic aspects of the Tc-99m MAA lung perfusion scan is also attempted. Various imaging pitfalls and necessary precautions while performing Tc-99m MAA lung perfusion scan are highlighted. PMID:27168866

  7. Review of diagnostic uses of shunt fraction quantification with technetium-99m macroaggregated albumin perfusion scan as illustrated by a case of Osler-Weber-Rendu syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chokkappan, Kabilan; Kannivelu, Anbalagan; Srinivasan, Sivasubramanian; Babut, Suresh Balasubramanian

    2016-01-01

    Bilateral pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) are rare and are often associated with the hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT/Osler-Weber-Rendu) syndrome. We present a woman who presented with neurological symptoms due to a cerebral abscess. On further evaluation, bilateral pulmonary AVMs were identified. The patient was diagnosed with HHT, based on positive family history and multiple cerebral AVMs recognized on subsequent catheter angiogram, in addition to the presence of bilateral pulmonary AVMs. Craniotomy with drainage of the brain abscess and endovascular embolization of the pulmonary AVMs was offered to the patient. As a preembolization work-up, the patient underwent nuclear lung perfusion scan with technetium-99m macroaggregated albumin (Tc-99m MAA) to assess the right-to-left shunt secondary to the pulmonary AVMs. Postembolization follow-up perfusion scan was also obtained to estimate the hemodynamic response. The case is presented to describe the role of Tc-99m MAA perfusion lung scan in preoperatively evaluating patients with pulmonary AVMs and to emphasize on the scan's utility in posttreatment follow-up. Various present day usages of the Tc-99m MAA lung perfusion scan, other than diagnosing pulmonary thromboembolism, are discussed. Providing background knowledge on the physiological and hemodynamic aspects of the Tc-99m MAA lung perfusion scan is also attempted. Various imaging pitfalls and necessary precautions while performing Tc-99m MAA lung perfusion scan are highlighted. PMID:27168866

  8. Ventilation/Perfusion Scintigraphy in Children with Post-Infectious Bronchiolitis Obliterans: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Bo-Qia; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Wen-Qian; Guo, Xin-Hua; Yang, Min-Fu; Wang, Li; He, Zuo-Xiang; Tian, Yue-Qin

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Childhood post-infectious bronchiolitis obliterans (BO) is an infrequent lung disease leading to narrowing and/or complete obliteration of small airways. Ventilation and perfusion (V/Q) scan can provide both regional and global pulmonary information. However, only few retrospective researches investigating post-infectious BO involved V/Q scan, the clinical value of this method is unknown. This preliminary prospective study was aimed to evaluate the correlation of V/Q scan with disease severity, pulmonary function test results, and prognosis in children with post-infectious BO. Methods Twenty-five post-infectious BO children (18 boys and 7 girls; mean age, 41 months) underwent V/Q scan and pulmonary function tests. Patients were followed after their inclusion. Ventilation index and perfusion index obtained from V/Q scan were used to measure pulmonary abnormalities. Spearman's rank correlation test of ventilation index and perfusion index on disease severity, lung function tests indices, and follow-up results were performed. Results The median follow-up period was 4.6 years (range, 2.2 to 5.0 years). Ventilation index and perfusion index were both correlated with disease severity (r = 0.72, p<0.01 and r = 0.73, p<0.01), but only ventilation index was related to pulmonary function tests results (all p<0.05). In addition, Spearman test yielded significant correlations between perfusion index and prognosis (r = 0.77, p<0.01), and ventilation index and prognosis (r = 0.63, p = 0.01). Conclusions For children with post-infectious BO, the present study preliminarily indicated that the degree of ventilation and perfusion abnormalities evaluated by V/Q scan may be used to assess disease severity, and may be predictive of patient's outcome. PMID:24852165

  9. Evaluation of the middle cerebral artery occlusion techniques in the rat by in-vitro 3-dimensional micro- and nano computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Animal models of focal cerebral ischemia are widely used in stroke research. The purpose of our study was to evaluate and compare the cerebral macro- and microvascular architecture of rats in two different models of permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion using an innovative quantitative micro- and nano-CT imaging technique. Methods 4h of middle cerebral artery occlusion was performed in rats using the macrosphere method or the suture technique. After contrast perfusion, brains were isolated and scanned en-bloc using micro-CT (8 μm)3 or nano-CT at 500 nm3 voxel size to generate 3D images of the cerebral vasculature. The arterial vascular volume fraction and gray scale attenuation was determined and the significance of differences in measurements was tested with analysis of variance [ANOVA]. Results Micro-CT provided quantitative information on vascular morphology. Micro- and nano-CT proved to visualize and differentiate vascular occlusion territories performed in both models of cerebral ischemia. The suture technique leads to a remarkable decrease in the intravascular volume fraction of the middle cerebral artery perfusion territory. Blocking the medial cerebral artery with macrospheres, the vascular volume fraction of the involved hemisphere decreased significantly (p < 0.001), independently of the number of macrospheres, and was comparable to the suture method. We established gray scale measurements by which focal cerebral ischemia could be radiographically categorized (p < 0.001). Nano-CT imaging demonstrates collateral perfusion related to different occluded vessel territories after macrosphere perfusion. Conclusion Micro- and Nano-CT imaging is feasible for analysis and differentiation of different models of focal cerebral ischemia in rats. PMID:20509884

  10. Vertebral artery hypoplasia, posterior circulation infarction and relative hypoperfusion detected by perfusion magnetic resonance imaging semiquantitatively.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dao Pei; Ma, Qian Kun; Zhang, Jie Wen; Zhang, Shu Ling; Lu, Gui Feng; Yin, Suo

    2016-09-15

    Vertebral artery hypoplasia (VAH) has been considered a risk factor of posterior circulation infarction (PCI), especially in the territory of the posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA). But whether VAH is an independent risk factor for PCI remains uncertain and how VAH participates in the evolvement of PCI is still not clear either. Therefore, this study aims to examine whether VAH is an independent risk factor for PCI and evaluate the effect of VAH on the cerebral perfusion in the territory of the PICA detected by perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) semiquantitatively. Both univariate and multivariate analyses showed that VAH, hypertension and smoking were more frequent in patients with PCI than in patients without PCI. Perfusion MRI analysis found that there were remarkable differences in the frequency of the relative cerebral blood flow (rCBF) value ≤0.85 and the relative time to peak (rTTP) values between VAH patients without PCI and non-VAH patients without PCI. Our results indicated that VAH may be an independent risk factor for PCI, especially in the presence of hypertension and smoking and that a relative hypoperfusion associates with VAH that may contribute to the evolvement of the infarction in the PICA territory. PMID:27538599

  11. Myocardial perfusion imaging using contrast echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Pathan, Faraz; Marwick, Thomas H

    2015-01-01

    Microbubbles are an excellent intravascular tracer, and both the rate of myocardial opacification (analogous to coronary microvascular perfusion) and contrast intensity (analogous to myocardial blood volume) provide unique insights into myocardial perfusion. A strong evidence base has been accumulated to show comparability with nuclear perfusion imaging and incremental diagnostic and prognostic value relative to wall motion analysis. This technique also provides the possibility to measure myocardial perfusion at the bedside. Despite all of these advantages, the technique is complicated, technically challenging, and has failed to scale legislative and financial hurdles. The development of targeted imaging and therapeutic interventions will hopefully rekindle interest in this interesting modality. PMID:25817740

  12. Estimating a regional ventilation-perfusion index

    PubMed Central

    Muller, P A; Li, T; Isaacson, D; Newell, J C; Saulnier, G J; Kao, Tzu-Jen; Ashe, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    This is a methods paper, where an approximation to the local ventilation-perfusion ratio is derived. This approximation, called the ventilation-perfusion index since it is not exactly the physiological ventilation-perfusion ratio, is calculated using conductivity reconstructions obtained using electrical impedance tomography. Since computation of the ventilation-perfusion index only requires knowledge of the internal conductivity, any conductivity reconstruction method may be used. The method is explained, and results are presented using conductivities obtained from two EIT systems, one using an iterative method and the other a linearization method. PMID:26006279

  13. Recurrent Bleeding in Hemorrhagic Moyamoya Disease : Prognostic Implications of the Perfusion Status

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Kyung-Il; Kim, Min Soo; Yeon, Je Young; Kim, Jong-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Objective Hemorrhagic moyamoya disease (hMMD) is associated with a poor clinical course. Furthermore, poorer clinical outcomes occur in cases of recurrent bleeding. However, the effect of hemodynamic insufficiency on rebleeding risk has not been investigated yet. This study evaluated the prognostic implications of the perfusion status during the clinical course of adult hMMD. Methods This retrospective study enrolled 52 adult hMMD patients between April 1995 and October 2010 from a single institute. Demographic data, clinical and radiologic characteristics, including hemodynamic status using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), and follow up data were obtained via a retrospective review of medical charts and imaging. Statistical analyses were performed to explore potential prognostic factors. Results Hemodynamic abnormality was identified in 44 (84.6%) patients. Subsequent revascularization surgery was performed in 22 (42.3%) patients. During a 58-month (median, range 3–160) follow-up assessment period, 17 showed subsequent stroke (hemorrhagic n=12, ischemic n=5, Actuarial stroke rate 5.8±1.4%/year). Recurrent hemorrhage was associated with decreased basal perfusion (HR 19.872; 95% CI=1.196–294.117) and omission of revascularization (10.218; 95%; CI=1.532–68.136). Conclusion Decreased basal perfusion seems to be associated with recurrent bleeding. Revascularization might prevent recurrent stroke in hMMD by rectifying the perfusion abnormality. A larger-sized, controlled study is required to address this issue. PMID:26962416

  14. Assessment of the myocardial perfusion pattern in patients with multivessel coronary artery disease

    SciTech Connect

    Iskandrian, A.S.; Hakki, A.H.; Segal, B.L.; Kane, S.A.; Amenta, A.

    1983-11-01

    A total of 42 symptomatic patients with coronary artery disease involving two or three vessels were studied using exercise thallium-201 myocardial scintigraphy. Qualitative analysis of the images predicted multivessel disease in 75% of the patients with two-vessel disease and in 82% of the patients with three-vessel disease. Quantitative analysis of the size of the perfusion defect indicated that approximately 40% of the left ventricular perimeter showed abnormal perfusion pattern during stress in these patients, and there was no significant difference in the size of the defect in patients with two-vessel disease or three-vessel disease (41 +/- 17% vs 42 +/- 14%, respectively, mean +/- SD). The exercise heart rate, exercise ECG response, and severity of narrowing did not correlate with the size of the perfusion defect. Patients with anterior infarction had larger defects in the distribution of the left anterior descending artery than those without infarction. Collaterals offered partial protection during exercise only when they were not jeopardized. This study confirms the value of qualitative analysis of exercise thallium-201 imaging in predicting multivessel disease, and describes a simple method of assessing the extent of perfusion abnormalities during stress in patients with multivessel disease. The results may be important in patient management and prognosis.

  15. Pharmacologic interventions for reducing spasticity in cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Patel, Dilip R; Soyode, Olufemi

    2005-10-01

    Motor function abnormalities are a key feature of cerebral palsy. Spasticity is one of the main motor abnormalities seen in children with cerebral palsy. Spasticity is a velocity dependent increased resistance to movement. While in some children, spasticity may adversely impact the motor abilities, in others, it may help maintain posture and ability to ambulate. Thus, treatment to reduce spasticity requires careful consideration of various factors. Non-pharmacologic interventions used to reduce spasticity include physiotherapy, occupational therapy, use of adaptive equipment, various orthopedic surgical procedures and neurosurgical procedures. Pharmacologic interventions used for reducing spasticity in children with cerebral palsy reviewed in this article include oral administration of baclofen, diazepam, dantrolene and tizanidine, intrathecal baclofen, and local injections of botulinum toxin, phenol, and alcohol. PMID:16272661

  16. Hemiparesis post cerebral malaria

    PubMed Central

    Taiaa, Oumkaltoum; Amil, Touriya; Darbi, Abdelatif

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral malaria is one of the most serious complications in the Plasmodium falciparum infection. In endemic areas, the cerebral malaria interested mainly children. The occurrence in adults is very rare and most interested adult traveling in tropical zones. This case report describes a motor deficit post cerebral malaria in a young adult traveling in malaria endemic area. This complication has been reported especially in children and seems very rare in adults. PMID:25995798

  17. Myocardial performance and perfusion during exercise in patients with coronary artery disease caused by Kawasaki disease

    SciTech Connect

    Paridon, S.M.; Ross, R.D.; Kuhns, L.R.; Pinsky, W.W. )

    1990-01-01

    For a study of the natural history of coronary artery lesions after Kawasaki disease and their effect on myocardial blood flow reserve with exercise, five such patients underwent exercise testing on a bicycle. Oxygen consumption, carbon dioxide production, minute ventilation, and electrocardiograms were monitored continuously. Thallium-201 scintigraphy was performed for all patients. One patient stopped exercise before exhaustion of cardiovascular reserve but had no evidence of myocardial perfusion abnormalities. Four patients terminated exercise because of exhaustion of cardiovascular reserve; one had normal cardiovascular reserve and thallium scintiscans, but the remaining patients had diminished cardiovascular reserve. Thallium scintigrams showed myocardial ischemia in two and infarction in one. No patient had exercise-induced electrocardiographic changes. These results indicate that patients with residual coronary artery lesions after Kawasaki disease frequently have reduced cardiovascular reserve during exercise. The addition of thallium scintigraphy and metabolic measurements to exercise testing improved the detection of exercise-induced abnormalities of myocardial perfusion.

  18. Cerebral Syndromes of Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Shavelle, Henry S.

    1969-01-01

    Three labile diabetic patients had recurring episodes of altered sensorium. Each had severe cerebrovascular disease with superimposed metabolic derangements, including ketoacidosis, hyperglycemia without ketosis, mild uremia, and possibly cerebral edema. Two of the patients were examined postmortem. Severe leptomeningeal scarring, basal ganglial calcification and destruction of small intracerebral vessels without evidence of large vessel atherosclerosis were found unexpectedly in one patient, a rare occurrence in this country although recently reported from Europe. The other patient had large vessel atherosclerosis only. The clinical expression of the vascular disease was modified by concurrent abnormalities and reflected the sum total of the complexities which coexisted. The pathophysiology of the unconscious state necessarily depends on the inciting factors. Ketoacidotic coma is associated with depressed cerebral oxygen consumption. Spinal fluid pH is usually maintained during ketosis but is sometimes lowered inadvertently during bicarbonate therapy, with resultant coma. Other variables influencing the clinical expression, with or without ketosis, would include, among others, blood viscosity alterations, rapid decrements in blood sugar, and existing degrees of lactic acidosis. The increasing life-span of the juvenile diabetics, favorably influenced by improved management and recently by hemodialysis, may uncover vascular complications heretofore rarely seen and create additional diagnostic and therapeutic enigmas. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3. PMID:5798497

  19. Hypercapnia-induced increases in cerebral blood flow do not improve lower body negative pressure tolerance during hyperthermia

    PubMed Central

    Lucas, Rebekah A. I.; Pearson, James; Schlader, Zachary J.

    2013-01-01

    Heat-related decreases in cerebral perfusion are partly the result of ventilatory-related reductions in arterial CO2 tension. Cerebral perfusion likely contributes to an individual's tolerance to a challenge like lower body negative pressure (LBNP). Thus increasing cerebral perfusion may prolong LBNP tolerance. This study tested the hypothesis that a hypercapnia-induced increase in cerebral perfusion improves LBNP tolerance in hyperthermic individuals. Eleven individuals (31 ± 7 yr; 75 ± 12 kg) underwent passive heat stress (increased intestinal temperature ∼1.3°C) followed by a progressive LBNP challenge to tolerance on two separate days (randomized). From 30 mmHg LBNP, subjects inhaled either (blinded) a hypercapnic gas mixture (5% CO2, 21% oxygen, balanced nitrogen) or room air (SHAM). LBNP tolerance was quantified via the cumulative stress index (CSI). Mean middle cerebral artery blood velocity (MCAvmean,) and end-tidal CO2 (PetCO2) were also measured. CO2 inhalation of 5% increased PetCO2 at ∼40 mmHg LBNP (by 16 ± 4 mmHg) and at LBNP tolerance (by 18 ± 5 mmHg) compared with SHAM (P < 0.01). Subsequently, MCAvmean was higher in the 5% CO2 trial during ∼40 mmHg LBNP (by 21 ± 12 cm/s, ∼31%) and at LBNP tolerance (by 18 ± 10 cm/s, ∼25%) relative to the SHAM (P < 0.01). However, hypercapnia-induced increases in MCAvmean did not alter LBNP tolerance (5% CO2 CSI: 339 ± 155 mmHg × min; SHAM CSI: 273 ± 158 mmHg × min; P = 0.26). These data indicate that inhaling a hypercapnic gas mixture increases cerebral perfusion during LBNP but does not improve LBNP tolerance when hyperthermic. PMID:23864641

  20. Soluble epoxide hydrolase gene deletion improves blood flow and reduces infarct size after cerebral ischemia in reproductively senescent female mice

    PubMed Central

    Zuloaga, Kristen L.; Zhang, Wenri; Roese, Natalie E.; Alkayed, Nabil J.

    2015-01-01

    Soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH), a key enzyme in the metabolism of vasodilatory epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs), is sexually dimorphic, suppressed by estrogen, and contributes to underlying sex differences in cerebral blood flow and injury after cerebral ischemia. We tested the hypothesis that sEH inhibition or gene deletion in reproductively senescent (RS) female mice would increase cerebral perfusion and decrease infarct size following stroke. RS (15–18 month old) and young (3–4 month old) female sEH knockout (sEHKO) mice and wild type (WT) mice were subjected to 45 min middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) with laser Doppler perfusion monitoring. WT mice were treated with vehicle or a sEH inhibitor t-AUCB at the time of reperfusion and every 24 h thereafter for 3 days. Differences in regional cerebral blood flow were measured in vivo using optical microangiography (OMAG). Infarct size was measured 3 days after reperfusion. Infarct size and cerebral perfusion 24 h after MCAO were not altered by age. Both sEH gene deletion and sEH inhibition increased cortical perfusion 24 h after MCAO. Neither sEH gene deletion nor sEH inhibition reduced infarct size in young mice. However, sEH gene deletion, but not sEH inhibition of the hydrolase domain of the enzyme, decreased infarct size in RS mice. Results of these studies show that sEH gene deletion and sEH inhibition enhance cortical perfusion following MCAO and sEH gene deletion reduces damage after ischemia in RS female mice; however this neuroprotection in absent is young mice. PMID:25642188

  1. Respiratory and psychiatric abnormalities in chronic symptomatic hyperventilation.

    PubMed Central

    Bass, C; Gardner, W N

    1985-01-01

    Many physicians believe that the hyperventilation syndrome is invariably associated with anxiety or undiagnosed organic disease such as asthma and pulmonary embolus, or both. Twenty one patients referred by specialist physicians with unexplained somatic symptoms and unequivocal chronic hypocapnia (resting end tidal Pco2 less than or equal to 4 kPa (30 mm Hg) on repeated occasions during prolonged measurement) were investigated. All but one complained of inability to take a satisfying breath. Standard lung function test results and chest radiographs were normal in all patients, but histamine challenge showed bronchial hyper-reactivity in two of 20 patients tested, and skin tests to common allergens were positive in three of 18. Ventilation-perfusion scanning was abnormal in a further three of 15 patients studied, with unmatched perfusion defects in two and isolated ventilation defects in one. None of the 21 had thyrotoxicosis, severe coronary heart disease, or other relevant cardiovascular abnormalities. Ten of the 21 patients were neurotic and suffered from chronic psychiatric disturbance characterised by anxiety, panic, and phobic symptoms. The remainder had no detectable psychiatric disorders but reported proportionately more somatic than anxiety symptoms. Severe hyperventilation can occur in the absence of formal psychiatric or detectable respiratory or other organic abnormalities. Asthma and pulmonary embolus must be specifically excluded. PMID:3922504

  2. Quantitative Cardiac Perfusion: A Noninvasive Spin-labeling Method That Exploits Coronary Vessel Geometry1

    PubMed Central

    Reeder, Scott B.; Atalay, Michael K.; McVeigh, Elliot R.; Zerhouni, Elias A.; Forder, John R.

    2007-01-01

    PURPOSE: To quantitate myocardial arterial perfusion with a noninvasive magnetic resonance (MR) imaging technique that exploits the geometry of coronary vessel anatomy. MATERIALS AND METHODS: MR imaging was performed with a spinlabeling method in six arrested rabbit hearts at 4.7 T. Selective inversion of magnetization in the short-axis imaging section along with all myocardium apical to that section produces signal enhancement from arterial perfusion. A linescan protocol was used for validation of flow enhancement. Flow was quantitated from two images and validated with spin-echo (SE) imaging. Regional perfusion defects were created by means of coronary artery ligation and delineated with gadolinium-enhanced imaging. RESULTS: Linescan estimates of T1 obtained at physiologic flows agreed with model predictions. Flow-induced signal enhancement measured on SE images also agreed with expected values. Finally, perfusion abnormalities created by means of coronary artery ligation were detected. CONCLUSION: This spin-labeling method provides quantitative estimates of myocardial arterial perfusion in this model and may hold promise for clinical applications. PMID:8657907

  3. Circular tomosynthesis for neuro perfusion imaging on an interventional C-arm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claus, Bernhard E.; Langan, David A.; Al Assad, Omar; Wang, Xin

    2015-03-01

    There is a clinical need to improve cerebral perfusion assessment during the treatment of ischemic stroke in the interventional suite. The clinician is able to determine whether the arterial blockage was successfully opened but is unable to sufficiently assess blood flow through the parenchyma. C-arm spin acquisitions can image the cerebral blood volume (CBV) but are challenged to capture the temporal dynamics of the iodinated contrast bolus, which is required to derive, e.g., cerebral blood flow (CBF) and mean transit time (MTT). Here we propose to utilize a circular tomosynthesis acquisition on the C-arm to achieve the necessary temporal sampling of the volume at the cost of incomplete data. We address the incomplete data problem by using tools from compressed sensing and incorporate temporal interpolation to improve our temporal resolution. A CT neuro perfusion data set is utilized for generating a dynamic (4D) volumetric model from which simulated tomo projections are generated. The 4D model is also used as a ground truth reference for performance evaluation. The performance that may be achieved with the tomo acquisition and 4D reconstruction (under simulation conditions, i.e., without considering data fidelity limitations due to imaging physics and imaging chain) is evaluated. In the considered scenario, good agreement between the ground truth and the tomo reconstruction in the parenchyma was achieved.

  4. Visual function and perinatal focal cerebral infarction.

    PubMed Central

    Mercuri, E; Atkinson, J; Braddick, O; Anker, S; Nokes, L; Cowan, F; Rutherford, M; Pennock, J; Dubowitz, L

    1996-01-01

    AIMS: To evaluate the visual function of infants with perinatal cerebral infarction in whom the site and size of the lesion has been determined using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). METHODS: Twelve infants with cerebral infarction on MRI were studied with a battery of tests specifically designed to evaluate visual function in infancy. This included tests: for visual attention (fixation shifts); of cerebral asymmetry (optokinetic nystagmus, visual fields); for assessment of acuity (forced choice preferential looking); and neurophysiological measures of vision (phase reversal and orientation reversal visual evoked potential). RESULTS: A considerable incidence of abnormalities on at least one of the tests for visual function used was observed. The presence or severity of visual abnormalities could not always be predicted by the site and extent of the lesion seen on imaging. CONCLUSIONS: Early focal lesions affecting the visual pathway can, to some extent, be compensated for by the immature developing brain. These data suggest that all the infants presenting with focal lesions need to be investigated with a detailed assessment of various aspects of vision. Images PMID:8949687

  5. Dissociative Part-Dependent Resting-State Activity in Dissociative Identity Disorder: A Controlled fMRI Perfusion Study

    PubMed Central

    Schlumpf, Yolanda R.; Reinders, Antje A. T. S.; Nijenhuis, Ellert R. S.; Luechinger, Roger; van Osch, Matthias J. P.; Jäncke, Lutz

    2014-01-01

    Background In accordance with the Theory of Structural Dissociation of the Personality (TSDP), studies of dissociative identity disorder (DID) have documented that two prototypical dissociative subsystems of the personality, the “Emotional Part” (EP) and the “Apparently Normal Part” (ANP), have different biopsychosocial reactions to supraliminal and subliminal trauma-related cues and that these reactions cannot be mimicked by fantasy prone healthy controls nor by actors. Methods Arterial spin labeling perfusion MRI was used to test the hypotheses that ANP and EP in DID have different perfusion patterns in response to rest instructions, and that perfusion is different in actors who were instructed to simulate ANP and EP. In a follow-up study, regional cerebral blood flow of DID patients was compared with the activation pattern of healthy non-simulating controls. Results Compared to EP, ANP showed elevated perfusion in bilateral thalamus. Compared to ANP, EP had increased perfusion in the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex, primary somatosensory cortex, and motor-related areas. Perfusion patterns for simulated ANP and EP were different. Fitting their reported role-play strategies, the actors activated brain structures involved in visual mental imagery and empathizing feelings. The follow-up study demonstrated elevated perfusion in the left temporal lobe in DID patients, whereas non-simulating healthy controls had increased activity in areas which mediate the mental construction of past and future episodic events. Conclusion DID involves dissociative part-dependent resting-state differences. Compared to ANP, EP activated brain structures involved in self-referencing and sensorimotor actions more. Actors had different perfusion patterns compared to genuine ANP and EP. Comparisons of neural activity for individuals with DID and non-DID simulating controls suggest that the resting-state features of ANP and EP in DID are not due to imagination. The findings are

  6. Cerebral extracellular lactate increase is predominantly nonischemic in patients with severe traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Sala, Nathalie; Suys, Tamarah; Zerlauth, Jean-Baptiste; Bouzat, Pierre; Messerer, Mahmoud; Bloch, Jocelyne; Levivier, Marc; Magistretti, Pierre J; Meuli, Reto; Oddo, Mauro

    2013-01-01

    Growing evidence suggests that endogenous lactate is an important substrate for neurons. This study aimed to examine cerebral lactate metabolism and its relationship with brain perfusion in patients with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). A prospective cohort of 24 patients with severe TBI monitored with cerebral microdialysis (CMD) and brain tissue oxygen tension (PbtO2) was studied. Brain lactate metabolism was assessed by quantification of elevated CMD lactate samples (>4 mmol/L); these were matched to CMD pyruvate and PbtO2 values and dichotomized as glycolytic (CMD pyruvate >119 μmol/L vs. low pyruvate) and hypoxic (PbtO2 <20 mm Hg vs. nonhypoxic). Using perfusion computed tomography (CT), brain perfusion was categorized as oligemic, normal, or hyperemic, and was compared with CMD and PbtO2 data. Samples with elevated CMD lactate were frequently observed (41±8%), and we found that brain lactate elevations were predominantly associated with glycolysis and normal PbtO2 (73±8%) rather than brain hypoxia (14±6%). Furthermore, glycolytic lactate was always associated with normal or hyperemic brain perfusion, whereas all episodes with hypoxic lactate were associated with diffuse oligemia. Our findings suggest predominant nonischemic cerebral extracellular lactate release after TBI and support the concept that lactate may be used as an energy substrate by the injured human brain. PMID:23963367

  7. Noise characteristics of CT perfusion imaging: how does noise propagate from source images to final perfusion maps?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ke; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2016-03-01

    Cerebral CT perfusion (CTP) imaging is playing an important role in the diagnosis and treatment of acute ischemic strokes. Meanwhile, the reliability of CTP-based ischemic lesion detection has been challenged due to the noisy appearance and low signal-to-noise ratio of CTP maps. To reduce noise and improve image quality, a rigorous study on the noise transfer properties of CTP systems is highly desirable to provide the needed scientific guidance. This paper concerns how noise in the CTP source images propagates to the final CTP maps. Both theoretical deviations and subsequent validation experiments demonstrated that, the noise level of background frames plays a dominant role in the noise of the cerebral blood volume (CBV) maps. This is in direct contradiction with the general belief that noise of non-background image frames is of greater importance in CTP imaging. The study found that when radiation doses delivered to the background frames and to all non-background frames are equal, lowest noise variance is achieved in the final CBV maps. This novel equality condition provides a practical means to optimize radiation dose delivery in CTP data acquisition: radiation exposures should be modulated between background frames and non-background frames so that the above equality condition is satisïnAed. For several typical CTP acquisition protocols, numerical simulations and in vivo canine experiment demonstrated that noise of CBV can be effectively reduced using the proposed exposure modulation method.

  8. Cerebral Asymmetries and Reading Acquisition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pirozzolo, Francis J.

    1978-01-01

    Reviewed are historical developments regarding the concepts of cerebral localization, and analyzed are implications of current research on the role of the cerebral hemispheres in reading disorders. (CL)

  9. Regional Reproducibility of Pulsed Arterial Spin Labeling Perfusion Imaging at 3T

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wang; Saykin, Andrew J.; Pfeuffer, Josef; Lin, Chen; Mosier, Kristine M.; Shen, Li; Kim, Sungeun; Hutchins, Gary D.

    2010-01-01

    Arterial spin labeling (ASL) is a promising non-invasive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique for measuring regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) or perfusion in vivo. To evaluate the feasibility of ASL as a biomarker for clinical trials, it is important to examine test-retest reproducibility. We investigated both inter- and intra-session reproducibility of perfusion MRI using a pulsed ASL (PASL) sequence PICORE Q2TIPS with an echo-planar imaging (EPI) readout. Structural MRI regions of interest (ROIs) were extracted individually by automated parcellation and segmentation methods using FreeSurfer. These cortical and subcortical ROIs were used to assess regional perfusion stability. Our results indicated regional variability in grey matter rCBF. Although rCBF measurements were characterized by intersubject variation, our results also indicated relatively less within-subject variability estimated as within-subject standard deviation (SDW) (intersession SDW: 2.0 to 8.8; intrasession SDW: 2.8 to 9.6) and acceptable reliabilities as measured using intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) (intersession ICC: 0.68 to 0.94; intrasession ICC: 0.66 to 0.95) for regional MRI perfusion measurements using the PICORE Q2TIPS technique. Overall, our findings suggest that PASL is a technique with good within and between session reproducibility. Further reproducibility studies in target populations relevant for specific clinical trials of neurovascular related agents will be important and the present results provide a framework for such assessments. PMID:20800097

  10. Near-infrared spectroscopy provides continuous monitoring of compromised lower extremity perfusion during cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Prkic, Ivana; Stuth, Eckehard A E

    2016-06-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is more frequently used to monitor regional oxygenation/perfusion of the cerebral and somatorenal vascular bed during congenital heart surgery. However, NIRS probes can be placed elsewhere to assess regional perfusion. We report the intraoperative use of NIRS probes on both calves of an infant to continuously monitor changes in the regional oxygenation/perfusion of a lower extremity whose perfusion was compromised after femoral arterial line placement. The NIRS trend of the compromised limb was compared with the contralateral limb throughout congenital heart surgery including the period on cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). Our case report illustrates that NIRS technology can be used to monitor ongoing lower extremity vascular compromise during congenital heart surgery when it is not practical to directly access and continuously assess the limb. Transient vascular compromise after invasive femoral arterial line or sheath placement for cardiac catheterization in small infants is not infrequent. NIRS technology in such circumstances may help to decide whether watchful waiting is acceptable or immediate interventions are indicated. Continuous NIRS monitoring showed that limb regional oxygenation remained depressed during CPB but dramatically increased in the post-CPB period. PMID:27185674

  11. Increased Number of White Matter Lesions in Patients with Familial Cerebral Cavernous Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Golden, Michael J.; Morrison, Leslie A.; Kim, Helen; Hart, Blaine L.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGKROUND AND PURPOSE Familial cerebral cavernous malformations, an autosomal dominant disorder, result in excess morbidity and mortality in affected patients. The disorder is most prevalent in the Southwest United States, where the affected families are most often carriers of the CCM1-KRIT1 Common Hispanic Mutation. The brain and spinal cord parenchyma in these individuals is usually affected by multiple cavernous malformations. Previous studies have shown abnormalities of endothelial cell junctions and the blood-brain barrier in cerebral cavernous malformations. Endothelial cell abnormalities have also been described in pathologic studies of white matter hyperintensities. We compared the prevalence of white matter hyperintensities in a population with known familial cerebral cavernous malformations. MATERIALS AND METHODS We examined 191 subjects with familial cerebral cavernous malformations who were enrolled into an institutional review board-approved study. All carry the same Common Hispanic Mutation in the CCM1 gene. Each subject underwent 3TMR imaging, including gradient recalled-echo, SWI, and FLAIR sequences. The number of cavernous malformations and the number of nonhemorrhagic white matter hyperintensities were counted. Subjects older than 60 yearsof age were excluded due to the high prevalence of white matter lesions in this population, and children younger than 6 were excluded due to potential sedation requirements. Logistic regression analysis was performed to determine the prevalence of abnormal white matter hyperintensities in those with familial cerebral cavernous malformations compared with healthy controls or those with sporadic cerebral cavernous malformation within the familial cerebral cavernous malformations group; it was also performed to evaluate the associations between abnormal white matter hyperintensities and age, sex, headaches, thyroid disease, diabetes, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, seizure history, or modified Rankin Scale score

  12. Comparison of Perfusion- and Diffusion-weighted Imaging Parameters in Brain Tumor Studies Processed Using Different Software Platforms

    PubMed Central

    Milchenko, Mikhail V.; Rajderkar, Dhanashree; LaMontagne, Pamela; Massoumzadeh, Parinaz; Bogdasarian, Ronald; Schweitzer, Gordon; Benzinger, Tammie; Marcus, Dan; Shimony, Joshua S.; Fouke, Sarah Jost

    2015-01-01

    Rationale and Objectives To compare quantitative imaging parameter measures from diffusion- and perfusion-weighted imaging magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences in subjects with brain tumors that have been processed with different software platforms. Materials and Methods Scans from 20 subjects with primary brain tumors were selected from the Comprehensive Neuro-oncology Data Repository at Washington University School of Medicine (WUSM) and the Swedish Neuroscience Institute. MR images were coregistered, and each subject's data set was processed by three software packages: 1) vendor-specific scanner software, 2) research software developed at WUSM, and 3) a commercially available, Food and Drug Administration–approved, processing platform (Nordic Ice). Regions of interest (ROIs) were chosen within the brain tumor and normal nontumor tissue. The results obtained using these methods were compared. Results For diffusion parameters, including mean diffusivity and fractional anisotropy, concordance was high when comparing different processing methods. For perfusion-imaging parameters, a significant variance in cerebral blood volume, cerebral blood flow, and mean transit time (MTT) values was seen when comparing the same raw data processed using different software platforms. Correlation was better with larger ROIs (radii ≥ 5 mm). Greatest variance was observed in MTT. Conclusions Diffusion parameter values were consistent across different software processing platforms. Perfusion parameter values were more variable and were influenced by the software used. Variation in the MTT was especially large suggesting that MTT estimation may be unreliable in tumor tissues using current MRI perfusion methods. PMID:25088833

  13. Role of phorbol esters in regional cerebral blood flow regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Hanley, D.F.; Uhl, G.R.; Miyabe, M.; Traystman, R.J.

    1986-03-05

    Phorbol esters are known to activate protein kinase C, an intracellular enzyme capable of phosphorylating membrane associated receptors. By using phorbol-12-13-dibutyrate (PDBU), they investigated the presence and function of protein kinase C on canine cerebral vessels. In vitro tissue autoradiographic studies performed on 8 ..mu.. sections of canine cerebral vessels with H/sup 3/-PDBU revealed a 3 to 1 ratio of specific to nonspecific binding. Competitive displacement was demonstrated for 3 physiologically active phorbol esters but could not be demonstrated for 3 physiologically inactive phorbol derivatives. The effect of PDBU on regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was then studied in vivo using radiolabelled microspheres in 6 dogs. Measurements were made during control ventriculocisternal CSF infusions and 5,10,15,20 and 25 minutes after infusion of .1 nM/min PDBU. For grey matter regions in contact with the perfusate, caudate nucleus, cortical watershed and cerebellum, blood flow increased from 33 +/- 6 to 45 +/- 7, 20 +/- 2 to 27 +/- 2, and 31 +/- 2 to 42 +/- 5 ml/min/100 gm, respectively. rCBF was unchanged for brainstem, temporal lobe or white matter regions. They conclude (1) PDBU has high affinity binding to canine cerebral vascular smooth muscle, and (2) PDBU produces an increase in rCBF when delivered intraventricularly. These data suggest a possible role for protein kinase C in the regulation of cerebral blood flow.

  14. Urinary kallidinogenase for the treatment of cerebral arterial stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Liandong; Zhao, Ying; Wan, Qi; Zhang, Haijun

    2015-01-01

    Aim Urinary kallidinogenase (UK) has shown promise in improving cerebral perfusion. This study aimed to examine how UK affects cognitive status and serum levels of amyloid betas (Aβs) 1-40 and 1-42 in patients with cerebral arterial stenosis. Methods Ninety patients with cerebral arterial stenosis were enrolled, of whom 45 patients received UK + conventional treatment (UK group), and 45 patients received conventional treatment alone as control group. Cognitive status and Aβ1-40 and Aβ1-42 serum levels were determined before treatment and at 4 weeks and 8 weeks after treatment. Results At 4 weeks after treatment, cognitive status in patients treated with UK clearly improved accompanied by Aβ1-40 serum levels decreasing while there was no change of Aβ1-42. Cognitive status in patients receiving UK continued to improve, Aβ1-40 serum levels declined further as well as Aβ1-42 serum levels began to decrease dramatically at 8 weeks after treatment. Conclusion UK could improve cognitive status and decrease both Aβ1-40 and Aβ1-42 serum levels to prevent ischemic cerebral injury, which represents a good option for patients with cerebral arterial stenosis. PMID:26508834

  15. Evaluation of cerebral hemodynamic changes by Tc-99m HMPAO SPECT after radiosurgery of small arteriovenous malformations (AVM)

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, R.S.; Yeh, S.H.; Pan, H.C.

    1994-05-01

    Treatment of small AVMs (<3 cm) by stereotaxic radio-surgery using gamma unit has been a promising noninvasive method. However, cerebral hemodynamic changes after gamma unit treatment is obscure. This study assessed the effect of radiosurgery on the regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in treatment of small AVMs. Nine patients (pts) with small AVMs were imaged with SPECT using Tc-99m HMPAO prior to stereotactic radio-surgery. The pts were treated with a Leskell gamma unit with doses of radiation in the range of 36 Gy to 44 Gy at target center. All pts underwent HMPAO SPECT scans about 3 months after radiosurgery. Pts were also studied with CT/MR scans. Pre treatment HMPAO SPECT showed decreased rCBF in the regions of nidi of AVMs of all pts and in the adjacent zones in 2 pts. Increased rCBF surrounding the nidus was noted in 2 AVMs. After treatment, rCBF of 2 pts returned to normal, 6 pts showed much improvement of rCBF and 1 remained no change. No more perfusion abnormalities were seen in the adjacent zones of all AVMs after radiosurgery. Cross cerebellar diaschisis noted in one case also disappeared after radiosurgery. Post treatment CT/MR scans showed slightly decrease in size of AVMs in 6 pts. All pts had great improvement after treatment. Normalization of rCBF correlated well with improvements in the neurological symptoms. In conclusion, comparison of pre and post treatment Tc-99m HMPAO SPECT scans were useful in evaluating the effectiveness of gamma unit radiosurgery on small AVMs.

  16. Long term perfusion system supporting adipogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Abbott, Rosalyn D.; Raja, Waseem K.; Wang, Rebecca Y.; Stinson, Jordan A.; Glettig, Dean L.; Burke, Kelly A.; Kaplan, David L.

    2015-01-01

    Adipose tissue engineered models are needed to enhance our understanding of disease mechanisms and for soft tissue regenerative strategies. Perfusion systems generate more physiologically relevant and sustainable adipose tissue models, however adipocytes have unique properties that make culturing them in a perfusion environment challenging. In this paper we describe the methods involved in the development of two perfusion culture systems (2D and 3D) to test their applicability for long term in vitro adipogenic cultures. It was hypothesized that a silk protein biomaterial scaffold would provide a 3D framework, in combination with perfusion flow, to generate a more physiologically relevant sustainable adipose tissue engineered model than 2D cell culture. Consistent with other studies evaluating 2D and 3D culture systems for adipogenesis we found that both systems successfully model adipogensis, however 3D culture systems were more robust, providing the mechanical structure required to contain the large, fragile adipocytes that were lost in 2D perfused culture systems. 3D perfusion also stimulated greater lipogenesis and lipolysis and resulted in decreased secretion of LDH compared to 2D perfusion. Regardless of culture configuration (2D or 3D) greater glycerol was secreted with the increased nutritional supply provided by perfusion of fresh media. These results are promising for adipose tissue engineering applications including long term cultures for studying disease mechanisms and regenerative approaches, where both acute (days to weeks) and chronic (weeks to months) cultivation are critical for useful insight. PMID:25843606

  17. Myocardial perfusion with rubidium-82. III. Theory relating severity of coronary stenosis to perfusion deficit

    SciTech Connect

    Mullani, N.A.

    1984-11-01

    The relation between the quantitative perfusion deficit, as measured by emission computerized tomography, and the severity of coronary artery stenosis is important for the noninvasive clinical evaluation of coronary artery disease in man. Positron emission tomography allows direct noninvasive measurement of myocardial perfusion and quantification of the size of the perfusion defect. Given this important imformation, a mathematical model has been derived to gauge the severity of a coronary stenosis from quantitative perfusion measurements in the normal and poststenotic regions of the heart. The theoretical basis is presented for relating regional myocardial perfusion and regional perfusion resistance to total, coronary blood flow and resistance at normal resting flow and during maximal coronary vasodilation. The concept of perfusion reserve is presented as a clinical measure of the severity of a stenosis.

  18. Morphological abnormalities in elasmobranchs.

    PubMed

    Moore, A B M

    2015-08-01

    A total of 10 abnormal free-swimming (i.e., post-birth) elasmobranchs are reported from The (Persian-Arabian) Gulf, encompassing five species and including deformed heads, snouts, caudal fins and claspers. The complete absence of pelvic fins in a milk shark Rhizoprionodon acutus may be the first record in any elasmobranch. Possible causes, including the extreme environmental conditions and the high level of anthropogenic pollution particular to The Gulf, are briefly discussed. PMID:25903257

  19. Cerebral Small Vessel Disease: Targeting Oxidative Stress as a Novel Therapeutic Strategy?

    PubMed Central

    De Silva, T. Michael; Miller, Alyson A.

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral small vessel disease (SVD) is a major contributor to stroke, and a leading cause of cognitive impairment and dementia. Despite the devastating effects of cerebral SVD, the pathogenesis of cerebral SVD is still not completely understood. Moreover, there are no specific pharmacological strategies for its prevention or treatment. Cerebral SVD is characterized by marked functional and structural abnormalities of the cerebral microcirculation. The clinical manifestations of these pathological changes include lacunar infarcts, white matter hyperintensities, and cerebral microbleeds. The main purpose of this review is to discuss evidence implicating oxidative stress in the arteriopathy of both non-amyloid and amyloid (cerebral amyloid angiopathy) forms of cerebral SVD and its most important risk factors (hypertension and aging), as well as its contribution to cerebral SVD-related brain injury and cognitive impairment. We also highlight current evidence of the involvement of the NADPH oxidases in the development of oxidative stress, enzymes that are a major source of reactive oxygen species in the cerebral vasculature. Lastly, we discuss potential pharmacological strategies for oxidative stress in cerebral SVD, including some of the historical and emerging NADPH oxidase inhibitors. PMID:27014073

  20. Chromosome abnormalities in glioma

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y.S.; Ramsay, D.A.; Fan, Y.S.

    1994-09-01

    Cytogenetic studies were performed in 25 patients with gliomas. An interesting finding was a seemingly identical abnormality, an extra band on the tip of the short arm of chromosome 1, add(1)(p36), in two cases. The abnormality was present in all cells from a patient with a glioblastoma and in 27% of the tumor cells from a patient with a recurrent irradiated anaplastic astrocytoma; in the latter case, 7 unrelated abnormal clones were identified except 4 of those clones shared a common change, -Y. Three similar cases have been described previously. In a patient with pleomorphic astrocytoma, the band 1q42 in both homologues of chromosome 1 was involved in two different rearrangements. A review of the literature revealed that deletion of the long arm of chromosome 1 including 1q42 often occurs in glioma. This may indicate a possible tumor suppressor gene in this region. Cytogenetic follow-up studies were carried out in two patients and emergence of unrelated clones were noted in both. A total of 124 clonal breakpoints were identified in the 25 patients. The breakpoints which occurred three times or more were: 1p36, 1p22, 1q21, 1q25, 3q21, 7q32, 8q22, 9q22, 16q22, and 22q13.

  1. [Congenital foot abnormalities].

    PubMed

    Delpont, M; Lafosse, T; Bachy, M; Mary, P; Alves, A; Vialle, R

    2015-03-01

    The foot may be the site of birth defects. These abnormalities are sometimes suspected prenatally. Final diagnosis depends on clinical examination at birth. These deformations can be simple malpositions: metatarsus adductus, talipes calcaneovalgus and pes supinatus. The prognosis is excellent spontaneously or with a simple orthopedic treatment. Surgery remains outstanding. The use of a pediatric orthopedist will be considered if malposition does not relax after several weeks. Malformations (clubfoot, vertical talus and skew foot) require specialized care early. Clubfoot is characterized by an equine and varus hindfoot, an adducted and supine forefoot, not reducible. Vertical talus combines equine hindfoot and dorsiflexion of the forefoot, which is performed in the midfoot instead of the ankle. Skew foot is suspected when a metatarsus adductus is resistant to conservative treatment. Early treatment is primarily orthopedic at birth. Surgical treatment begins to be considered after walking age. Keep in mind that an abnormality of the foot may be associated with other conditions: malposition with congenital hip, malformations with syndromes, neurological and genetic abnormalities. PMID:25524290

  2. Cerebral Palsy (CP) Quiz

    MedlinePlus

    ... Submit Button Past Emails CDC Features Pop Quiz: Cerebral Palsy Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... Sandy is the parent of a child with cerebral palsy and the Board President of Gio’s Garden , a ...

  3. Regional Cerebral Blood Flow (rCBF) in Developmental Dyslexia: Activation during Reading in a Surface and Deep Dyslexic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hynd, George W.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    The exploratory study examined patterns of regional cerebral blood flow in a surface and a deep dyslexic during reading. Significant differences in gray matter blood flow were found between subjects and normal controls. Also differences existed between the surface and deep dyslexic in the distribution of cortical perfusion. (Author/DB)

  4. Abnormal pressures as hydrodynamic phenomena

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neuzil, C.E.

    1995-01-01

    So-called abnormal pressures, subsurface fluid pressures significantly higher or lower than hydrostatic, have excited speculation about their origin since subsurface exploration first encountered them. Two distinct conceptual models for abnormal pressures have gained currency among earth scientists. The static model sees abnormal pressures generally as relict features preserved by a virtual absence of fluid flow over geologic time. The hydrodynamic model instead envisions abnormal pressures as phenomena in which flow usually plays an important role. This paper develops the theoretical framework for abnormal pressures as hydrodynamic phenomena, shows that it explains the manifold occurrences of abnormal pressures, and examines the implications of this approach. -from Author

  5. Left globus pallidus abnormality in never-medicated patients with schizophrenia

    SciTech Connect

    Early, T.S.; Reiman, E.M.; Raichle, M.E.; Spitznagel, E.L.

    1987-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a severe psychiatric disorder characterized by onset in young adulthood, the occurrence of hallucinations and delusions, and the development of enduring psychosocial disability. The pathophysiology of this disorder remains unknown. Studies of cerebral blood flow and metabolism designed to identify brain abnormalities in schizophrenia have been limited by inadequate methods of anatomical localization and the possibility of persistent medication effects. The authors have now used positron emission tomography and a validated method of anatomical localization in an attempt to identify abnormalities of regional cerebral blood flow in newly diagnosed never-medicated patients with schizophrenia. An exploratory study of 5 patients and 10 normal control subjects identified abnormally high blood flow in the left globus pallidus of patients with schizophrenia. A replication study of 5 additional patients and 10 additional control subjects confirmed this finding. No other abnormalities were found.

  6. Left globus pallidus abnormality in never-medicated patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed Central

    Early, T S; Reiman, E M; Raichle, M E; Spitznagel, E L

    1987-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a severe psychiatric disorder characterized by onset in young adulthood, the occurrence of hallucinations and delusions, and the development of enduring psychosocial disability. The pathophysiology of this disorder remains unknown. Studies of cerebral blood flow and metabolism designed to identify brain abnormalities in schizophrenia have been limited by inadequate methods of anatomical localization and the possibility of persistent medication effects. We have now used positron emission tomography and a validated method of anatomical localization in an attempt to identify abnormalities of regional cerebral blood flow in newly diagnosed never-medicated patients with schizophrenia. An exploratory study of 5 patients and 10 normal control subjects identified abnormally high blood flow in the left globus pallidus of patients with schizophrenia. A replication study of 5 additional patients and 10 additional control subjects confirmed this finding. No other abnormalities were found. PMID:3467374

  7. Evaluation of mechanical dyssynchrony and myocardial perfusion using phase analysis of gated SPECT imaging in patients with left ventricular dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Trimble, Mark A.; Borges-Neto, Salvador; Honeycutt, Emily F.; Shaw, Linda K.; Pagnanelli, Robert; Chen, Ji; Iskandrian, Ami E.; Garcia, Ernest V.; Velazquez, Eric J.

    2010-01-01

    Background Using phase analysis of gated single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging, we examined the relation between myocardial perfusion, degree of electrical dyssynchrony, and degree of SPECT-derived mechanical dyssynchrony in patients with left ventricular (LV) dysfunction. Methods and Results We retrospectively examined 125 patients with LV dysfunction and ejection fraction of 35% or lower. Fourier analysis converts regional myocardial counts into a continuous thickening function, allowing resolution of phase of onset of myocardial thickening. The SD of LV phase distribution (phase SD) and histogram bandwidth describe LV phase dispersion as a measure of dyssynchrony. Heart failure (HF) patients with perfusion abnormalities ities have higher degrees of dyssynchrony measured by median phase SD (45.5° vs 27.7°, P < .0001) and bandwidth (117.0° vs 73.0°, P = .0006). HF patients with prolonged QRS durations have higher degrees of dyssynchrony measured by median phase SD (54.1° vs 34.7°, P < .0001) and bandwidth (136.5° vs 99.0°, P = .0005). Mild to moderate correlations exist between QRS duration and phase analysis indices of phase SD (r = 0.50) and bandwidth (r = 0.40). Mechanical dyssynchrony (phase SD >43°) was 43.2%. Conclusions HF patients with perfusion abnormalities or prolonged QRS durations QRS durations have higher degrees of mechanical dyssynchrony. Gated SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging can quantify myocardial function, perfusion, and dyssynchrony and may help in evaluating patients for cardiac resynchronization therapy. PMID:18761269

  8. Gene expression profiling in the human middle cerebral artery after cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Vikman, P; Edvinsson, L

    2006-12-01

    We have investigated the gene expression in human middle cerebral artery (MCA) after ischemia. Ischemic stroke affects the perfusion in the affected area and experimental cerebral ischemia results in upregulation of vasopressor receptors in the MCA leading to the ischemic area. We obtained human MCA samples distributing to the ischemic area, 7-10 days post-stroke. The gene expression was examined with real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and microarray, proteins were studied with immunohistochemistry. We investigated genes previously shown to be upregulated in animal models of cerebral ischemia (e.g. ET(A), ET(B), AT1, AT2, and 5-HT(2A/1B/1D)). Their mRNA expression was increased compared with controls, consistent with findings in experimental stroke. Immunohistochemistry showed upregulation of the receptors localized on the smooth muscle cells. The gene expression was profiled with microarray and seven genes chosen for further investigation with real-time PCR; ELK3, LY64, Metallothionin IG, POU3F4, Actin alpha2, RhoA and smoothelin. Six of these were regulated the same way when confirming array expression with real-time PCR. Gene expression studies in the human MCA leading to the ischemic region is similar to that seen after MCA occlusion in rats. We found new genes that support the dynamic changes that occur in the MCA distributing to the ischemic region. PMID:17116215

  9. Is Vasomotion in Cerebral Arteries Impaired in Alzheimer's Disease?

    PubMed

    Di Marco, Luigi Yuri; Farkas, Eszter; Martin, Chris; Venneri, Annalena; Frangi, Alejandro F

    2015-01-01

    A substantial body of evidence supports the hypothesis of a vascular component in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Cerebral hypoperfusion and blood-brain barrier dysfunction have been indicated as key elements of this pathway. Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) is a cerebrovascular disorder, frequent in AD, characterized by the accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide in cerebral blood vessel walls. CAA is associated with loss of vascular integrity, resulting in impaired regulation of cerebral circulation, and increased susceptibility to cerebral ischemia, microhemorrhages, and white matter damage. Vasomotion- the spontaneous rhythmic modulation of arterial diameter, typically observed in arteries/arterioles in various vascular beds including the brain- is thought to participate in tissue perfusion and oxygen delivery regulation. Vasomotion is impaired in adverse conditions such as hypoperfusion and hypoxia. The perivascular and glymphatic pathways of Aβ clearance are thought to be driven by the systolic pulse. Vasomotion produces diameter changes of comparable amplitude, however at lower rates, and could contribute to these mechanisms of Aβ clearance. In spite of potential clinical interest, studies addressing cerebral vasomotion in the context of AD/CAA are limited. This study reviews the current literature on vasomotion, and hypothesizes potential paths implicating impaired cerebral vasomotion in AD/CAA. Aβ and oxidative stress cause vascular tone dysregulation through direct effects on vascular cells, and indirect effects mediated by impaired neurovascular coupling. Vascular tone dysregulation is further aggravated by cholinergic deficit and results in depressed cerebrovascular reactivity and (possibly) impaired vasomotion, aggravating regional hypoperfusion and promoting further Aβ and oxidative stress accumulation. PMID:25720414

  10. Feeling Abnormal: Simulation of Deviancy in Abnormal and Exceptionality Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernald, Charles D.

    1980-01-01

    Describes activity in which student in abnormal psychology and psychology of exceptional children classes personally experience being judged abnormal. The experience allows the students to remember relevant research, become sensitized to the feelings of individuals classified as deviant, and use caution in classifying individuals as abnormal.…

  11. Isolation and Cannulation of Cerebral Parenchymal Arterioles.

    PubMed

    Pires, Paulo W; Dabertrand, Fabrice; Earley, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Intracerebral parenchymal arterioles (PAs), which include parenchymal arterioles, penetrating arterioles and pre-capillary arterioles, are high resistance blood vessels branching out from pial arteries and arterioles and diving into the brain parenchyma. Individual PA perfuse a discrete cylindrical territory of the parenchyma and the neurons contained within. These arterioles are a central player in the regulation of cerebral blood flow both globally (cerebrovascular autoregulation) and locally (functional hyperemia). PAs are part of the neurovascular unit, a structure that matches regional blood flow to metabolic activity within the brain and also includes neurons, interneurons, and astrocytes. Perfusion through PAs is directly linked to the activity of neurons in that particular territory and increases in neuronal metabolism lead to an augmentation in local perfusion caused by dilation of the feed PA. Regulation of PAs differs from that of better-characterized pial arteries. Pressure-induced vasoconstriction is greater in PAs and vasodilatory mechanisms vary. In addition, PAs do not receive extrinsic innervation from perivascular nerves - innervation is intrinsic and indirect in nature through contact with astrocytic endfeet. Thus, data regarding contractile regulation accumulated by studies using pial arteries does not directly translate to understanding PA function. Further, it remains undetermined how pathological states, such as hypertension and diabetes, affect PA structure and reactivity. This knowledge gap is in part a consequence of the technical difficulties pertaining to PA isolation and cannulation. In this manuscript we present a protocol for isolation and cannulation of rodent PAs. Further, we show examples of experiments that can be performed with these arterioles, including agonist-induced constriction and myogenic reactivity. Although the focus of this manuscript is on PA cannulation and pressure myography, isolated PAs can also be used for

  12. Perfusion measures from dynamic ICG scanning laser ophthalmoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larkin, Sean; Invernizzi, Alessandro; Beecher, David; Staurenghi, Giovanni; Holmes, Tim

    2010-02-01

    Movies acquired from fundus imaging using Indocyanine Green (ICG) and a scanning laser ophthalmoscope provide information for identifying vascular and other retinal abnormalities. Today, the main limitation of this modality is that it requires esoteric training for interpretation. A straightforward interpretation of these movies by objective measurements would aid in eliminating this training barrier. A software program has been developed and tested that produces and visualizes 2D maps of perfusion measures. The program corrects for frame-to-frame misalignment caused by eye motion, including rigid misalignment and warp. The alignment method uses a cross-correlation operation that automatically detects the distance due to motion between adjacent frames. The d-ICG movie is further corrected by removing flicker and vignetting artifacts. Each pixel in the corrected movie sequence is fit with a least-squares spline to yield a smooth intensity temporal profile. From the dynamics of these intensity curves, several perfusion measures are calculated. The most effective of these measures include a metric that represents the amount of time required for a vessel to fill with dye, a metric that represents the diffusion of dye, and a metric that is affected by local blood volume. These metrics are calculated from movies acquired before and after treatment for a neovascular condition. A comparison of these before and after measures may someday provide information to the clinician that helps them to evaluate disease progression and response to treatment.

  13. Abnormal human sex chromosome constitutions

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 22, discusses abnormal human sex chromosome constitution. Aneuploidy of X chromosomes with a female phenotype, sex chromosome aneuploidy with a male phenotype, and various abnormalities in X chromosome behavior are described. 31 refs., 2 figs.

  14. Exercises to Improve Gait Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home About iChip Articles Directories Videos Resources Contact Exercises to Improve Gait Abnormalities Home » Article Categories » Exercise and Fitness Font Size: A A A A Exercises to Improve Gait Abnormalities Next Page The manner ...

  15. Anxiety and cerebral blood flow during behavioral challenge. Dissociation of central from peripheral and subjective measures

    SciTech Connect

    Zohar, J.; Insel, T.R.; Berman, K.F.; Foa, E.B.; Hill, J.L.; Weinberger, D.R.

    1989-06-01

    To investigate the relationship between anxiety and regional cerebral blood flow, we administered behavioral challenges to 10 patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder while measuring regional cerebral blood flow with the xenon 133 inhalation technique. Each patient was studied under three conditions: relaxation, imaginal flooding, and in vivo (actual) exposure to the phobic stimulus. Subjective anxiety, obsessive-compulsive ratings, and autonomic measures (heart rate, blood pressure) increased significantly, but respiratory rate and PCO/sub 2/ did not change across the three conditions. Regional cerebral blood flow increased slightly (in the temporal region) during imaginal flooding, but decreased markedly in several cortical regions during in vivo exposure, when anxiety was highest by subjective and peripheral autonomic measures. These results demonstrate that intense anxiety can be associated with decreased rather than increased cortical perfusion and that ostensibly related states of anxiety (eg, anticipatory and obsessional anxiety) may be associated with opposite effects on regional cerebral blood flow.

  16. On line cerebral blood flow velocity and blood pressure measurement in neonates: a new method.

    PubMed Central

    Fenton, A C; Evans, D H; Levene, M I

    1990-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that impairment of cerebral perfusion and cerebrovascular autoregulation play a part in the pathogenesis of neurological injury in the critically sick neonate, we tested in 33 infants a small, light-weight probe and cable that are attached to the infant's skin to record cerebral blood flow velocity from the middle cerebral artery over a period of hours. This considerably reduced the amount of handling of the infant compared with conventional assessment. Captured data were analysed and displayed graphically at the cotside. The system is applicable for use on infants over a wide range of gestational ages and may give information on the complex haemodynamic changes occurring in the cerebral circulation. PMID:2407196

  17. TISSUE ENGINEERING PERFUSABLE CANCER MODELS

    PubMed Central

    Fong, E.L.; Santoro, M.; Farach-Carson, M.C.; Kasper, F.K.; Mikos, A.G.

    2014-01-01

    The effect of fluid flow on cancer progression is currently not well understood, highlighting the need for perfused tumor models to close this gap in knowledge. Enabling biological processes at the cellular level to be modeled with high spatiotemporal control, microfluidic tumor models have demonstrated applicability as platforms to study cell-cell interactions, effect of interstitial flow on tumor migration and the role of vascular barrier function. To account for the multi-scale nature of cancer growth and invasion, macroscale models are also necessary. The consideration of fluid dynamics within tumor models at both the micro- and macroscopic levels may greatly improve our ability to more fully mimic the tumor microenvironment. PMID:24634812

  18. Assessment of cardiac function using myocardial perfusion imaging technique on SPECT with 99mTc sestamibi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gani, M. R. A.; Nazir, F.; Pawiro, S. A.; Soejoko, D. S.

    2016-03-01

    Suspicion on coronary heart disease can be confirmed by observing the function of left ventricle cardiac muscle with Myocardial Perfusion Imaging techniques. The function perfusion itself is indicated by the uptake of radiopharmaceutical tracer. The 31 patients were studied undergoing the MPI examination on Gatot Soebroto Hospital using 99mTc-sestamibi radiopharmaceutical with stress and rest conditions. Stress was stimulated by physical exercise or pharmacological agent. After two hours, the patient did rest condition on the same day. The difference of uptake percentage between stress and rest conditions will be used to determine the malfunction of perfusion due to ischemic or infarct. Degradation of cardiac function was determined based on the image-based assessment of five segments of left ventricle cardiac. As a result, 8 (25.8%) patients had normal myocardial perfusion and 11 (35.5%) patients suspected for having partial ischemia. Total ischemia occurred to 8 (25.8%) patients with reversible and irreversible ischemia and the remaining 4 (12.9%) patients for partial infarct with characteristic the percentage of perfusion ≤50%. It is concluded that MPI technique of image-based assessment on uptake percentage difference between stress and rest conditions can be employed to predict abnormal perfusion as complementary information to diagnose the cardiac function.

  19. Perfusion Shift from White to Gray Matter May Account for Processing Speed Deficits in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Susan N.; Hong, L. Elliot; Winkler, Anderson M.; Chiappelli, Joshua; Nugent, Katie; Muellerklein, Florian; Du, Xioming; Rowland, Laura M.; Wang, Danny J. J.; Kochunov, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Reduced speed of cerebral information processing is a cognitive deficit associated with schizophrenia. Normal information processing speed (PS) requires intact white matter (WM) physiology to support information transfer. In a cohort of 107 subjects (47/60 patients/controls), we demonstrate that PS deficits in schizophrenia patients are explained by reduced WM integrity, which is measured using diffusion tensor imaging, mediated by the mismatch in WM/gray matter blood perfusion, and measured using arterial spin labeling. Our findings are specific to PS, and testing this hypothesis for patient-control differences in working memory produces no explanation. We demonstrate that PS deficits in schizophrenia can be explained by neurophysiological alterations in cerebral WM. Whether the disproportionately low WM integrity in schizophrenia is due to illness or secondary due to this disorder deserves further examination. PMID:26108347

  20. Perfusion shift from white to gray matter may account for processing speed deficits in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Wright, Susan N; Hong, L Elliot; Winkler, Anderson M; Chiappelli, Joshua; Nugent, Katie; Muellerklein, Florian; Du, Xioming; Rowland, Laura M; Wang, Danny J J; Kochunov, Peter

    2015-10-01

    Reduced speed of cerebral information processing is a cognitive deficit associated with schizophrenia. Normal information processing speed (PS) requires intact white matter (WM) physiology to support information transfer. In a cohort of 107 subjects (47/60 patients/controls), we demonstrate that PS deficits in schizophrenia patients are explained by reduced WM integrity, which is measured using diffusion tensor imaging, mediated by the mismatch in WM/gray matter blood perfusion, and measured using arterial spin labeling. Our findings are specific to PS, and testing this hypothesis for patient-control differences in working memory produces no explanation. We demonstrate that PS deficits in schizophrenia can be explained by neurophysiological alterations in cerebral WM. Whether the disproportionately low WM integrity in schizophrenia is due to illness or secondary due to this disorder deserves further examination. PMID:26108347

  1. CT Perfusion ASPECTS in the Evaluation of Acute Ischemic Stroke: Thrombolytic Therapy Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Sillanpaa, Niko; Saarinen, Jukka T.; Rusanen, Harri; Hakomaki, Jari; Lahteela, Arto; Numminen, Heikki; Elovaara, Irina; Dastidar, Prasun; Soimakallio, Seppo

    2011-01-01

    Background and Purpose Advances in the management of acute ischemic stroke and medical imaging are creating pressure to replace the rigid one-third middle cerebral artery (MCA) and non-contrast-enhanced CT (NCCT) Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Score (ASPECTS) thresholds used for the selection of patients eligible for intravenous thrombolytic therapy. The identification of potentially salvageable ischemic brain tissue lies at the core of this issue. In this study, the role of CT perfusion ASPECTS in the detection of reversible ischemia was analyzed. Materials and Methods We retrospectively reviewed the clinical and imaging data of 92 consecutive patients who received intravenous thrombolytic therapy for acute (duration <3 h) ischemic stroke. Most of the patients underwent admission multimodal CT, and all patients had follow-up NCCT at 24 h. ASPECTS was assigned to all modalities and correlated with clinical and imaging parameters. Receiver-operating characteristic curve analysis was performed to determine optimal thresholds for different parameters to predict clinical outcome. Results A perfusion defect could be detected in 50% of the patients. ASPECTS correlated inversely with the clinical outcome in the following order: follow-up NCCT > cerebral blood volume (CBV) > mean transit time (MTT) > admission NCCT. The follow-up NCCT and the CBV displayed a statistically significant difference from the admission NCCT, while the MTT did not reach statistical significance. The threshold that best differentiated between good and bad clinical outcome on admission was CBV ASPECTS ≥7. In patients with CT perfusion ASPECTS mismatch, MTT and CBV ASPECTS essentially provided the lower and upper limits for the follow-up NCCT ASPECTS, thus defining the spectrum of possible outcomes. Furthermore, CT perfusion ASPECTS mismatch strongly correlated (r = 0.83) with the mismatch between the tissue at risk and the final infarct, i.e. the amount of salvaged tissue. This finding suggests

  2. Evaluation of changes in the parameters of brain tissue perfusion in multi-slice computed tomography in patients after carotid artery stenting

    PubMed Central

    Szarmach, Arkadiusz; Halena, Grzegorz; Buczny, Jacek; Studniarek, Michał; Markiet, Karolina; Szurowska, Edyta; Retkowski, Mariusz; Piskunowicz, Maciej

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background: CT perfusion of the brain allows functional evaluation of cerebral blood flow. Patients with chronic internal carotid artery (ICA) stenosis may suffer from malperfusion. Improvement of cerebral blood flow and remission of neurological symptoms indicate the effectiveness of treatment of internal carotid artery stenosis. Material/Methods: The aim of the study was to analyze alterations within cerebral perfusion parameters in CT brain perfusion examination in patients who were scheduled for endovascular therapy due to ICA stenosis. Forty patients with ICA stenosis of over 79% who were included in this prospective study underwent perfusion CT examination twice – 24 hours prior to stenting and after 6–8 weeks following the procedure. CBF, CBV, MTT and TTP were evaluated. Results: Prior to endovascular therapy, an increase in MTT and TTP, and a decrease in CBV and CBF were observed within arterial supply of the hemisphere ipsilateral to stenosis. After the procedure, a decrease in MTT and TTP was seen in all cases, while no statistically significant changes of CBF or CBV were observed. MTT proved to be the most sensitive indicator of ICA stenosis, as its values allowed differentiation between critical and non-critical stenosis. No correlation between the degree of ICA stenosis and TTP values was found. Mild cerebral hyperperfusion syndrome (CHS) was observed in only one patient and the difference between pre-treatment MTT values calculated for both hemispheres was shown to be a prognostic factor for CHS incidence. Conclusions: Endovascular stent placing in patients with hemodynamically significant internal carotid artery stenosis results in alteration of perfusion parameters, especially concerning TTP and MTT. PMID:22802836

  3. Spirometric abnormalities among welders

    SciTech Connect

    Rastogi, S.K.; Gupta, B.N.; Husain, T.; Mathur, N.; Srivastava, S. )

    1991-10-01

    A group of manual welders age group 13-60 years having a mean exposure period of 12.4 {plus minus} 1.12 years were subjected to spirometry to evaluate the prevalence of spirometric abnormalities. The welders showed a significantly higher prevalence of respiratory impairment than that observed among the unexposed controls as a result of exposure to welding gases which comprised fine particles of lead, zinc, chromium, and manganese. This occurred despite the lower concentration of the pollutants at the work place. In the expose group, the smoking welders showed a prevalence of respiratory impairment significantly higher than that observed in the nonsmoking welders. The results of the pulmonary function tests showed a predominantly restrictive type of pulmonary impairment followed by a mixed ventilatory defect among the welders. The effect of age on pulmonary impairment was not discernible. Welders exposed for over 10 years showed a prevalence of respiratory abnormalities significantly higher than those exposed for less than 10 years. Smoking also had a contributory role.

  4. Spectrum of visual disorders in children with cerebral visual impairment.

    PubMed

    Fazzi, Elisa; Signorini, Sabrina Giovanna; Bova, Stefania Maria; La Piana, Roberta; Ondei, Paola; Bertone, Chiara; Misefari, Walter; Bianchi, Paolo Emilio

    2007-03-01

    Cerebral visual impairment is a visual function deficit caused by damage to the retrogeniculate visual pathways in the absence of any major ocular disease. It is the main visual deficit in children in the developed world. Preperinatal hypoxic-ischemic damage is the most frequent cause of cerebral visual impairment, but the etiology is variable. The authors set out to evaluate the presence of visual disorders not attributable to any major ocular pathology in a sample of children with central nervous system disease and to describe the clinical picture of cerebral visual impairment in this cohort. One hundred twenty-one patients with central nervous system damage and visual impairment underwent a protocol developed at the authors' center that included neurologic, neurophthalmologic, and neuroradiologic assessments (brain magnetic resonance imaging). Reduced visual acuity was found in 105 of 121 patients, reduced contrast sensitivity in 58, abnormal optokinetic nystagmus in 88, and visual field deficit in 7. Fixation was altered in 58 patients, smooth pursuit in 95, and saccadic movements in 41. Strabismus was present in 88 patients, and abnormal ocular movements were found in 43 patients. Of the 27 patients in whom they could be assessed, visual-perceptual abilities were found to be impaired in 24. Fundus oculi abnormalities and refractive errors were frequently associated findings. This study confirms that the clinical expression of cerebral visual impairment can be variable and that, in addition to already well-documented symptoms (such as reduced visual acuity, visual field deficits, reduced contrast sensitivity), the clinical picture can also be characterized by oculomotor or visual-cognitive disorders. Cerebral visual impairment is often associated with ophthalmologic abnormalities, and these should be carefully sought. Early and careful assessment, taking into account both the neurophthalmologic and the ophthalmologic aspects, is essential for a correct

  5. Ventilation-perfusion imaging in pulmonary papillomatosis

    SciTech Connect

    Espinola, D.; Rupani, H.; Camargo, E.E.; Wagner, H.N. Jr.

    1981-11-01

    Three children with laryngeal papillomas involving the lungs had serial ventilation-perfusion scintigrams to assess results of therapy designed to reduce the bronchial involvement. Different imaging patterns were observed depending on size, number, and location of lesions. In early parenchymal involvement a ventilation-perfusion mismatch was seen. The initial and follow-up studies correlated well with clinical and radiographic findings. This noninvasive procedure is helpful in evaluating ventilatory and perfusion impairment in these patients as well as their response to treatment.

  6. Cochlear perfusion with a viscous fluid.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Olson, Elizabeth S

    2016-07-01

    The flow of viscous fluid in the cochlea induces shear forces, which could provide benefit in clinical practice, for example to guide cochlear implant insertion or produce static pressure to the cochlear partition or wall. From a research standpoint, studying the effects of a viscous fluid in the cochlea provides data for better understanding cochlear fluid mechanics. However, cochlear perfusion with a viscous fluid may damage the cochlea. In this work we studied the physiological and anatomical effects of perfusing the cochlea with a viscous fluid. Gerbil cochleae were perfused at a rate of 2.4 μL/min with artificial perilymph (AP) and sodium hyaluronate (Healon, HA) in four different concentrations (0.0625%, 0.125%, 0.25%, 0.5%). The different HA concentrations were applied either sequentially in the same cochlea or individually in different cochleae. The perfusion fluid entered from the round window and was withdrawn from basal scala vestibuli, in order to perfuse the entire perilymphatic space. Compound action potentials (CAP) were measured after each perfusion. After perfusion with increasing concentrations of HA in the order of increasing viscosity, the CAP thresholds generally increased. The threshold elevation after AP and 0.0625% HA perfusion was small or almost zero, and the 0.125% HA was a borderline case, while the higher concentrations significantly elevated CAP thresholds. Histology of the cochleae perfused with the 0.0625% HA showed an intact Reissner's membrane (RM), while in cochleae perfused with 0.125% and 0.25% HA RM was torn. Thus, the CAP threshold elevation was likely due to the broken RM, likely caused by the shear stress produced by the flow of the viscous fluid. Our results and analysis indicate that the cochlea can sustain, without a significant CAP threshold shift, up to a 1.5 Pa shear stress. Beside these finding, in the 0.125% and 0.25% HA perfusion cases, a temporary CAP threshold shift was observed, perhaps due to the presence and

  7. Bioenergetic abnormalities associated with severe left ventricular hypertrophy.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, J; Merkle, H; Hendrich, K; Garwood, M; From, A H; Ugurbil, K; Bache, R J

    1993-01-01

    Transmurally localized 31P-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) was used to study the effect of severe pressure overload left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) on myocardial high energy phosphate content. Studies were performed on 8 normal dogs and 12 dogs with severe left ventricular hypertrophy produced by banding the ascending aorta at 8 wk of age. Spatially localized 31P-NMR spectroscopy provided measurements of the transmural distribution of myocardial ATP, phosphocreatine (CP), and inorganic phosphate (Pi); spectra were calibrated from measurements of ATP content in myocardial biopsies using HPLC. Blood flow was measured with microspheres. In hypertrophied hearts during basal conditions, ATP was decreased by 42%, CP by 58%, and the CP/ATP ratio by 32% in comparison with normal. Increasing myocardial blood flow with adenosine did not correct these abnormalities, indicating that they were not the result of persistent hypoperfusion. Atrial pacing at 200 and 240 beats per min caused no change in high energy phosphate content in normal hearts but resulted in further CP depletion with Pi accumulation in the inner left ventricular layers of the hypertrophied hearts. These changes were correlated with redistribution of blood flow away from the subendocardium in LVH hearts. These findings demonstrate that high energy phosphate levels and the CP/ATP ratio are significantly decreased in severe LVH. These abnormalities are proportional to the degree of hypertrophy but are not the result of persistent abnormalities of myocardial perfusion. In contrast, depletion of CP and accumulation of Pi during tachycardia in LVH are closely related to the pacing-induced perfusion abnormalities and likely reflect subendocardial ischemia. PMID:8349829

  8. Renal Perfusion Index Reflects Cardiac Systolic Function in Chronic Cardio-Renal Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lubas, Arkadiusz; Ryczek, Robert; Kade, Grzegorz; Niemczyk, Stanisław

    2015-01-01

    Background Cardiac dysfunction can modify renal perfusion, which is crucial to maintain sufficient kidney tissue oxygenation. Renal cortex perfusion assessed by dynamic ultrasound method is related both to renal function and cardiac hemodynamics. The aim of the study was to test the hypothesis that Renal Perfusion Index (RPI) can more closely reflect cardiac hemodynamics and differentiate etiology of chronic cardio-renal syndrome. Material/Methods Twenty-four patients with hypertension and chronic kidney disease (CKD) at 2–4 stage (12 with hypertensive nephropathy and 12 with CKD prior to hypertension) were enrolled in the study. Blood tests, 24-h ABPM, echocardiography, and ultrasonography with estimation of Total renal Cortical Perfusion intensity and Renal Perfusion Index (RPI) were performed. Results In the group of all patients, RPI correlated with left ventricular stoke volume (LVSV), and cardiac index, but not with markers of renal function. In multiple stepwise regression analysis CKD-EPI(Cys-Cr) (b=−0.360), LVSV (b=0.924) and MAP (b=0.376) together independently influenced RPI (R2=0.74; p<0.0001). RPI<0.567 allowed for the identification of patients with chronic cardio-renal syndrome with sensitivity of 41.7% and specificity of 83.3%. Conclusions Renal perfusion index relates more strongly to cardiac output than to renal function, and could be helpful in recognizing chronic cardio-renal syndrome. Applicability of RPI in diagnosing early abnormalities in the cardio-renal axis requires further investigation. PMID:25881555

  9. Effects of medetomidine and ketamine on the regional cerebral blood flow in cats: a SPECT study.

    PubMed

    Waelbers, T; Peremans, K; Vermeire, S; Piron, K; Doom, M; Boer, V O; de Leeuw, H; Vente, M A D; Dobbeleir, A; Gielen, I; Audenaert, K; Polis, I

    2012-04-01

    Brain perfusion can be investigated using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and the intravenous injection of (99m)technetium ethyl cysteinate dimer ((99m)Tc-ECD). However, sedation using medetomidine, an α(2)-agonist, or anaesthesia using medetomidine and ketamine, an N-methyl-d-aspartate-(NMDA)-antagonist, may be required for SPECT studies in cats but can affect the regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF). The effects of medetomidine, with or without ketamine, on regional brain perfusion were therefore investigated in six cats under three conditions. Injection of tracer occurred before sedation or anaesthesia (condition A), following intramuscular (IM) sedation with medetomidine (condition M) or after IM anaesthesia with medetomidine and ketamine (condition MK). Medetomidine and medetomidine with ketamine caused a significantly higher total tracer uptake in all brain regions. Semi-quantification of brain perfusion gave lower perfusion indices in several sub-cortical regions in conditions M and MK, compared to A. Left-right differences were observed in the temporal cortex (A), the temporal, parietal cortex and the thalamus (M) and the frontal cortex (MK). A significantly higher perfusion index in the sub-cortical regions, compared to the whole cortex, was only present in condition A. This study showed that caution is needed when quantifying brain perfusion indices when using sedative or anaesthetic agents that may affect rCBF. PMID:21636298

  10. Imaging Evidence for Cerebral Hyperperfusion Syndrome after Intravenous Tissue Plasminogen Activator for Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Background. Cerebral hyperperfusion syndrome (CHS), a rare complication after cerebral revascularization, is a well-described phenomenon after carotid endarterectomy or carotid artery stenting. However, the imaging evidence of CHS after intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (iv tPA) for acute ischemic stroke (AIS) has not been reported. Case Report. Four patients were determined to have manifestations of CHS with clinical deterioration after treatment with iv tPA, including one patient who developed seizure, one patient who had a deviation of the eyes toward lesion with worsened mental status, and two patients who developed worsened hemiparesis. In all four patients, postthrombolysis head CT examinations were negative for hemorrhage; CT angiogram showed patent cervical and intracranial arterial vasculature; CT perfusion imaging revealed hyperperfusion with increased relative cerebral blood flow and relative cerebral blood volume and decreased mean transit time along with decreased time to peak in the clinically related artery territory. Vascular dilation was also noted in three of these four cases. Conclusions. CHS should be considered in patients with clinical deterioration after iv tPA and imaging negative for hemorrhage. Cerebral angiogram and perfusion studies can be useful in diagnosing CHS thereby helping with further management. PMID:27242938

  11. Patterns of disturbed myocardial perfusion in patients with coronary artery disease. Regional myocardial perfusion in angina pectoris

    SciTech Connect

    Selwyn, A.P.; Forse, G.; Fox, K.; Jonathan, A.; Steiner, R.

    1981-07-01

    Fifty patients who presented with angina pectoris were studied to examine the disturbances of regional myocardial perfusion during stress. Each patient underwent 16-point precordial mapping of the ECG during an exercise test, and coronary and left ventricular angiography. Regional myocardial perfusion was assessed using an atrial pacing test and a short-lived radionuclide, krypton-81m. Eleven patients had negative exercise tests and uniform increases in myocardial activity of krypton-81m of 98 +/- 18.0% during pacing. Ten patients performed 30,000-43,000 J in positive exercise tests. These patients showed abnormal coronary anatomy and increases in myocardial activity of krypton-81m to remote and jeopardized myocardium at the onset of pacing. However, further pacing produced a decrease in activity in the affected segment of 68.0 +/- 9.0% accompanied by ST-segment depression and angina. Twelve patients achieved 26,000-32,000 J in positive exercise tests and had significant coronary artery disease. Atrial pacing produced increased activity of krypton-81m to remote myocardium. The jeopardized segment at first showed no change and then a decrease in regional activity of krypton-81m (89.0 +/- 17%) accompanied by ST-segment depression and chest pain. Seventeen patients achieved only 7000-22,000 J in positive exercise tests. These patients showed abnormal coronary anatomy and developed decreases in regional activity of krypton-81m to the affected segment of myocardium starting at the onset of atrial pacing and decreasing by 88 +/- 0 7.0% below control. We conclude that different patterns of disturbed myocardial distribution of krypton-81m are present during stress-induced ischemia in patients with coronary artery disease. There was a close temporal relationship between these disturbances and ST-segment depression.

  12. Perfusion deficits in patients with mild traumatic brain injury characterized by dynamic susceptibility contrast MRI.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Wang, Binquan; Wolfowitz, Rachel; Yeh, Ping-Hong; Nathan, Dominic E; Graner, John; Tang, Haiying; Pan, Hai; Harper, Jamie; Pham, Dzung; Oakes, Terrence R; French, Louis M; Riedy, Gerard

    2013-06-01

    Perfusion deficits in patients with mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) from a military population were characterized by dynamic susceptibility contrast perfusion imaging. Relative cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was calculated by a model-independent deconvolution approach from the tracer concentration curves following a bolus injection of gadolinium diethylenetriaminepentaacetate (Gd-DTPA) using both manually and automatically selected arterial input functions (AIFs). Linear regression analysis of the mean values of rCBF from selected regions of interest showed a very good agreement between the two approaches, with a regression coefficient of R = 0.88 and a slope of 0.88. The Bland-Altman plot also illustrated the good agreement between the two approaches, with a mean difference of 0.6 ± 12.4 mL/100 g/min. Voxelwise analysis of rCBF maps from both approaches demonstrated multiple clusters of decreased perfusion (p < 0.01) in the cerebellum, cuneus, cingulate and temporal gyrus in the group with mild TBI relative to the controls. MRI perfusion deficits in the cerebellum and anterior cingulate also correlated (p < 0.01) with neurocognitive results, including the mean reaction time in the Automated Neuropsychological Assessment Metrics and commission error and detection T-scores in the Continuous Performance Test, as well as neurobehavioral scores in the Post-traumatic Stress Disorder Checklist-Civilian Version. In conclusion, rCBF calculated using AIFs selected from an automated approach demonstrated a good agreement with the corresponding results using manually selected AIFs. Group analysis of patients with mild TBI from a military population demonstrated scattered perfusion deficits, which showed significant correlations with measures of verbal memory, speed of reaction time and self-report of stress symptoms. PMID:23456696

  13. Fractal dimension of cerebral surfaces using magnetic resonance images

    SciTech Connect

    Majumdar, S.; Prasad, R.R.

    1988-11-01

    The calculation of the fractal dimension of the surface bounded by the grey matter in the normal human brain using axial, sagittal, and coronal cross-sectional magnetic resonance (MR) images is presented. The fractal dimension in this case is a measure of the convolutedness of this cerebral surface. It is proposed that the fractal dimension, a feature that may be extracted from MR images, may potentially be used for image analysis, quantitative tissue characterization, and as a feature to monitor and identify cerebral abnormalities and developmental changes.

  14. Effect of certain cerebral hemispheric diseases on dreaming.

    PubMed

    Epstein, A W

    1979-02-01

    Dreaming may be altered by cerebral hemispheric disease. A woman who sustained a probable left posterior cerebral artery thrombosis, with right homonymous hemianopsia and alexia, had virtual cessation of dreaming for at least 9 months. Four individuals with temporal lobe epilepsy experienced recurrent painful (frightening) dreams, which in two patients showed features identical to seizures. Sleep recordings showed abnormalities in all four, including rhythmic temporal epileptiform activity during REM sleep. Lesions in parieto-occipital loci may interfere with production of the visual imagery required for dreaming (negative symptom in the Jacksonian sense) while epileptic activity in temporal loci may produce painful repetitive dream imagery (positive symptom). PMID:217457

  15. Cerebral amyloid angiopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Fenichel GM, Jankovic J, Mazziotta JC, eds. Bradley's Neurology in Clinical Practice . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier ... al. Course of cerebral amyloid angiopathy-related inflammation. Neurology. 2007;68:1411-1416. PMID: 17452586 www.ncbi. ...

  16. Endovascular treatment of symptomatic vestibular aqueduct dehiscence as a result of jugular bulb abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Thénint, Marie-Aude; Barbier, Charlotte; Hitier, Martin; Patron, Vincent; Saleme, Suzana; Courthéoux, Patrick

    2014-11-01

    A new endovascular treatment consisting of stent-assisted coil implantation is described for jugular bulb abnormalities causing symptomatic vestibular aqueduct dehiscence. Three patients presenting with vertigo associated with pulsatile tinnitus or hearing loss were treated. This technique cured the vertigo and pulsatile tinnitus in all patients and preserved normal cerebral venous drainage with no side effects. PMID:25442142

  17. Luminal distension as a possible consequence of experimental intestinal perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Wingate, David; Hyams, Ashley; Phillips, Sidney

    1974-01-01

    In an experimental jejunal perfusion study, distress in healthy subjects occurred during eight out of 16 perfusions in which intestinal secretion was provoked. Calculation demonstrates the volumetric consequences of inadequate recovery of secretory perfusates, and analysis of the perfusion studies shows that distress was significantly associated with poor recovery of the perfusate. These observations are pertinent to increasing interest in the phenomenon of intestinal fluid secretion. PMID:4435588

  18. Rehabilitation in cerebral palsy.

    PubMed Central

    Molnar, G. E.

    1991-01-01

    Cerebral palsy is the most frequent physical disability of childhood onset. Over the past four decades, prevalence has remained remarkably constant at 2 to 3 per 1,000 live births in industrialized countries. In this article I concentrate on the rehabilitation and outcome of patients with cerebral palsy. The epidemiologic, pathogenetic, and diagnostic aspects are highlighted briefly as they pertain to the planning and implementation of the rehabilitation process. PMID:1866952

  19. Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy: Emerging Concepts

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) involves cerebrovascular amyloid deposition and is classified into several types according to the amyloid protein involved. Of these, sporadic amyloid β-protein (Aβ)-type CAA is most commonly found in older individuals and in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Cerebrovascular Aβ deposits accompany functional and pathological changes in cerebral blood vessels (CAA-associated vasculopathies). CAA-associated vasculopathies lead to development of hemorrhagic lesions [lobar intracerebral macrohemorrhage, cortical microhemorrhage, and cortical superficial siderosis (cSS)/focal convexity subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH)], ischemic lesions (cortical infarction and ischemic changes of the white matter), and encephalopathies that include subacute leukoencephalopathy caused by CAA-associated inflammation/angiitis. Thus, CAA is related to dementia, stroke, and encephalopathies. Recent advances in diagnostic procedures, particularly neuroimaging, have enabled us to establish a clinical diagnosis of CAA without brain biopsies. Sensitive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) methods, such as gradient-echo T2* imaging and susceptibility-weighted imaging, are useful for detecting cortical microhemorrhages and cSS. Amyloid imaging with amyloid-binding positron emission tomography (PET) ligands, such as Pittsburgh Compound B, can detect CAA, although they cannot discriminate vascular from parenchymal amyloid deposits. In addition, cerebrospinal fluid markers may be useful, including levels of Aβ40 for CAA and anti-Aβ antibody for CAA-related inflammation. Moreover, cSS is closely associated with transient focal neurological episodes (TFNE). CAA-related inflammation/angiitis shares pathophysiology with amyloid-related imaging abnormalities (ARIA) induced by Aβ immunotherapies in AD patients. This article reviews CAA and CAA-related disorders with respect to their epidemiology, pathology, pathophysiology, clinical features, biomarkers, diagnosis

  20. Eye movement abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Moncayo, Jorge; Bogousslavsky, Julien

    2012-01-01

    Generation and control of eye movements requires the participation of the cortex, basal ganglia, cerebellum and brainstem. The signals of this complex neural network finally converge on the ocular motoneurons of the brainstem. Infarct or hemorrhage at any level of the oculomotor system (though more frequent in the brain-stem) may give rise to a broad spectrum of eye movement abnormalities (EMAs). Consequently, neurologists and particularly stroke neurologists are routinely confronted with EMAs, some of which may be overlooked in the acute stroke setting and others that, when recognized, may have a high localizing value. The most complex EMAs are due to midbrain stroke. Horizontal gaze disorders, some of them manifesting unusual patterns, may occur in pontine stroke. Distinct varieties of nystagmus occur in cerebellar and medullary stroke. This review summarizes the most representative EMAs from the supratentorial level to the brainstem. PMID:22377853

  1. Differential diagnosis of bilateral parietal abnormalities in I-123 IMP SPECT imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Kuwabara, Y.; Ichiya, Y.; Otsuka, M.; Tahara, T.; Fukumura, T.; Gunasekera, R.; Masuda, K. )

    1990-12-01

    This report discusses the clinical significance of bilateral parietal abnormalities on I-123 IMP SPECT imaging in 158 patients with cerebral disorders. This pattern was seen in 15 out of 21 patients with Alzheimer's disease; it was also seen in 4 out of 5 patients with Parkinson's disease with dementia, in 3 out of 17 patients with vascular dementia, in 1 out of 36 patients with cerebral infarction without dementia, in 1 out of 2 patients with hypoglycemia, and in 1 out of 2 patients with CO intoxication. Detection of bilateral parietal abnormalities is a useful finding in the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease, but one should keep in mind that other cerebral disorders may also show a similar pattern with I-123 IMP SPECT imaging.

  2. Perfusion education and training in Europe.

    PubMed

    Merkle, Frank

    2006-01-01

    Perfusion education and training varies considerably throughout Europe. Unlike in the US, where a common curriculum for perfusion education has been established, each European country has its own education system. This fact is further complicated by a multitude of national languages and cultures. Thus, perfusion education programmes vary, not only in content, but also in their academic levels. This article aims to give a comprehensive overview of the situation in each of the 20 member states of the European Board of Cardiovascular Perfusion (EBCP). The EBCP delegates were polled for a description of the process of training and education of clinical perfusionists in their respective countries. Following the initial delegate poll in 2001, an update of the material was performed in spring 2005. In summary, training of clinical perfusionists in Europe varies considerably between countries. A professional body is necessary to oversee the training process and to guarantee a minimum level of clinical competency for cardiovascular perfusionists. PMID:16485693

  3. Nanomedicine in cerebral palsy

    PubMed Central

    Balakrishnan, Bindu; Nance, Elizabeth; Johnston, Michael V; Kannan, Rangaramanujam; Kannan, Sujatha

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral palsy is a chronic childhood disorder that can have diverse etiologies. Injury to the developing brain that occurs either in utero or soon after birth can result in the motor, sensory, and cognitive deficits seen in cerebral palsy. Although the etiologies for cerebral palsy are variable, neuroinflammation plays a key role in the pathophysiology of the brain injury irrespective of the etiology. Currently, there is no effective cure for cerebral palsy. Nanomedicine offers a new frontier in the development of therapies for prevention and treatment of brain injury resulting in cerebral palsy. Nanomaterials such as dendrimers provide opportunities for the targeted delivery of multiple drugs that can mitigate several pathways involved in injury and can be delivered specifically to the cells that are responsible for neuroinflammation and injury. These materials also offer the opportunity to deliver agents that would promote repair and regeneration in the brain, resulting not only in attenuation of injury, but also enabling normal growth. In this review, the current advances in nanotechnology for treatment of brain injury are discussed with specific relevance to cerebral palsy. Future directions that would facilitate clinical translation in neonates and children are also addressed. PMID:24204146

  4. Increased Cerebral Blood Flow Associated with Better Response Inhibition in Bipolar Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Dev, Sheena I.; McKenna, Benjamin S.; Sutherland, Ashley N.; Shin, David D.; Liu, Thomas T.; Wierenga, Christina E.; Eyler, Lisa T.

    2015-01-01

    Impairment on inhibitory tasks has been well documented in bipolar disorder (BD). Differences in cerebral blood flow (CBF) between BD patients and healthy comparison (HC) participants have also been reported. Few studies have examined the relationship between cognitive performance and regional CBF in this patient population. We hypothesized that group differences on an inhibitory task (the Delis-Kaplan Executive Function Scale’s Color-Word Inhibition task) would be associated with differential CBF in bilateral anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), inferior parietal lobule (IPL) and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) regions. Whole brain resting CBF was measured using Multiphase Pseudocontinuous Arterial Spin Labeling MR imaging for 28 euthymic BD and 36 HC participants. Total gray matter (GM) CBF was measured, and regional CBF values were extracted for each region of interest (ROI) using Freesurfer-based individual parcellations. Group, CBF, and group-by-CBF interaction were examined as predictors of inhibition performance. Groups did not differ in age, gender or education. BD patients performed significantly worse on Color-Word inhibition. There were no significant group differences in CBF in either total GM or in any ROI. There was a group by CBF interaction in the bilateral ACC, right IPL and right DLPFC such that better inhibitory performance was generally associated with higher resting state CBF in BD subjects, but not HC participants. Although CBF was not abnormal in this euthymic BD sample, results confirm previous reports of inter-episode inhibitory deficits and indicate that the perfusion-cognition relationship is different in BD compared to HC individuals. PMID:25771682

  5. Myocardial perfusion imaging with 201Tl.

    PubMed

    Pagnanelli, Robert A; Basso, Danny A

    2010-03-01

    The object of this review is to provide information about (201)Tl-thallous chloride in radionuclide myocardial perfusion imaging. This technique has experienced a recent resurgence because of the shortage of (99m)Tc. After reading this article, the technologist will be able to describe the properties and uptake mechanism of (201)Tl, the procedure for myocardial perfusion imaging with this agent, and the advantages and disadvantages of thallium, compared with the technetium agents. PMID:20159930

  6. Improved exercise myocardial perfusion during lidoflazine therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, W.; Narahara, K.A.; Park, J.

    1983-11-01

    Lidoflazine is a synthetic drug with calcium-channel blocking effects. In a study of 6 patients with severe classic angina pectoris, single-blind administration of lidoflazine was associated with improved myocardial perfusion during exercise as determined by thallium-201 stress scintigraphy. These studies demonstrate that lidoflazine therapy is associated with relief of angina, an increased physical work capacity, and improved regional myocardial perfusion during exercise.

  7. Electrocardiographic abnormalities and cardiac arrhythmias in structural brain lesions.

    PubMed

    Katsanos, Aristeidis H; Korantzopoulos, Panagiotis; Tsivgoulis, Georgios; Kyritsis, Athanassios P; Kosmidou, Maria; Giannopoulos, Sotirios

    2013-07-31

    Cardiac arrhythmias and electrocardiographic abnormalities are frequently observed after acute cerebrovascular events. The precise mechanism that leads to the development of these arrhythmias is still uncertain, though increasing evidence suggests that it is mainly due to autonomic nervous system dysregulation. In massive brain lesions sympathetic predominance and parasympathetic withdrawal during the first 72 h are associated with the occurrence of severe secondary complications in the first week. Right insular cortex lesions are also related with sympathetic overactivation and with a higher incidence of electrocardiographic abnormalities, mostly QT prolongation, in patients with ischemic stroke. Additionally, female sex and hypokalemia are independent risk factors for severe prolongation of the QT interval which subsequently results in malignant arrhythmias and poor outcome. The prognostic value of repolarization changes commonly seen after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage, such as ST segment, T wave, and U wave abnormalities, still remains controversial. In patients with traumatic brain injury both intracranial hypertension and cerebral hypoperfusion correlate with low heart rate variability and increased mortality. Given that there are no firm guidelines for the prevention or treatment of the arrhythmias that appear after cerebral incidents this review aims to highlight important issues on this topic. Selected patients with the aforementioned risk factors could benefit from electrocardiographic monitoring, reassessment of the medications that prolong QTc interval, and administration of antiadrenergic agents. Further research is required in order to validate these assumptions and to establish specific therapeutic strategies. PMID:22809542

  8. Microvascular Abnormality in Schizophrenia as Shown by Retinal Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Meier, Madeline H.; Shalev, Idan; Moffitt, Terrie E.; Kapur, Shitij; Keefe, Richard S.E.; Wong, Tien; Belsky, Daniel W.; Harrington, HonaLee; Hogan, Sean; Houts, Renate; Caspi, Avshalom; Poulton, Richie

    2013-01-01

    Objective Retinal and cerebral microvessels are structurally and functionally homologous, but, unlike cerebral microvessels, retinal microvessels can be noninvasively measured in vivo via retinal imaging. Here we test the hypothesis that individuals with schizophrenia show microvascular abnormality and evaluate the utility of retinal imaging as a tool for future schizophrenia research. Methods Participants were members of the Dunedin Study, a population-representative cohort followed from birth with 95% retention. Study members underwent retinal imaging at age 38 years. We assessed retinal arteriolar and venular caliber for all members of the cohort, including individuals who developed schizophrenia. Results Study members who developed schizophrenia were distinguished by wider retinal venules, suggesting microvascular abnormality reflective of insufficient brain oxygen supply. Analyses that controlled for confounding health conditions suggested that wider retinal venules are not simply an artifact of co-occurring health problems in schizophrenia patients. Wider venules were also associated with a dimensional measure of adult psychosis symptoms and with psychosis symptoms reported in childhood. Conclusions Findings provide initial support for the hypothesis that individuals with schizophrenia show microvascular abnormality. Moreover, results suggest that the same vascular mechanisms underlie subthreshold symptoms and clinical disorder and that these associations may begin early in life. These findings highlight the promise of retinal imaging as a tool for understanding the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. PMID:24030514

  9. A venous outflow method for measurement of rapid changes of the cerebral blood flow and oxygen consumption in the rat.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, B; Siesjö, B K

    1983-01-01

    A technique for continuous measurement of cerebral venous outflow in the rat is described. The method involves cannulation of one retroglenoid vein close to its exit from the skull, and diversion of cerebral venous blood through a closed extracorporal circuit with a drop recording device, the blood being returned to the central venous circulation via a catheter in the external jugular vein. Occlusion of the contralateral retroglenoid vein increases measured flow and minimizes extracerebral contamination of the diverted cerebral venous blood. The venous outflow system is not further isolated from cerebral or potential extracerebral collaterals. Thus, the mass of tissue drained cannot be exactly defined anatomically. However, the experiments involving changes of PP, arterial CO2 tension, and induction of epileptic seizure activity, and simultaneous indirect measurements with radioactive tracer technique, indicate that significant extracerebral contamination does not occur and that in short term measurements the venous outflow represents cerebral blood flow (CBF) in a constant mass of (dorsal and central, mainly forebrain) cerebral tissue. Measurement of arterial blood pressure and pressure in the cisterna magna allows calculation of cerebral perfusion pressure (PP). By simultaneous measurement of arterial and cerebral venous oxygen content changes in cerebral oxygen consumption (CMRO2) can be calculated. The method has been applied to document several situations of transient CBF and CMRO2 changes. PMID:6658967

  10. Cerebral Blood Flow Alterations as Assessed by 3D ASL in Cognitive Impairment in Patients with Subcortical Vascular Cognitive Impairment: A Marker for Disease Severity

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yawen; Cao, Wenwei; Ding, Weina; Wang, Yao; Han, Xu; Zhou, Yan; Xu, Qun; Zhang, Yong; Xu, Jianrong

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal reductions in cortical cerebral blood flow (CBF) have been identified in subcortical vascular cognitive impairment (SVCI). However, little is known about the pattern of CBF reduction in relation with the degree of cognitive impairment. CBF measured with three-dimensional (3D) Arterial Spin Labeling (ASL) perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) helps detect functional changes in subjects with SVCI. We aimed to compare CBF maps in subcortical ischemic vascular disease (SIVD) subjects with and without cognitive impairment and to detect the relationship of the regions of CBF reduction in the brain with the degree of cognitive impairment according to the z-score. A total of 53 subjects with SVCI and 23 matched SIVD subjects without cognitive impairment (controls), underwent a whole-brain 3D ASL MRI in the resting state. Regional CBF (rCBF) was compared voxel wise by using an analysis of variance design in a statistical parametric mapping program, with patient age and sex as covariates. Correlations were calculated between the rCBF value in the whole brain and the z-score in the 53 subjects with SVCI. Compared with the control subjects, SVCI group demonstrated diffuse decreased CBF in the brain. Significant positive correlations were determined in the rCBF values in the left hippocampus, left superior temporal pole gyrus, right superior frontal orbital lobe, right medial frontal orbital lobe, right middle temporal lobe, left thalamus and right insula with the z-scores in SVCI group. The noninvasively quantified resting CBF demonstrated altered CBF distributions in the SVCI brain. The deficit brain perfusions in the temporal and frontal lobe, hippocampus, thalamus and insula was related to the degree of cognitive impairment. Its relationship to cognition indicates the clinical relevance of this functional marker. Thus, our results provide further evidence for the mechanisms underlying the cognitive deficit in patients with SVCI.

  11. SU-E-I-36: A KWIC and Dirty Look at Dose Savings and Perfusion Metrics in Simulated CT Neuro Perfusion Exams

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, J; Martin, T; Young, S; McNitt-Gray, M; Wang, D

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: CT neuro perfusion scans are one of the highest dose exams. Methods to reduce dose include decreasing the number of projections acquired per gantry rotation, however conventional reconstruction of such scans leads to sampling artifacts. In this study we investigated a projection view-sharing reconstruction algorithm used in dynamic MRI – “K-space Weighted Image Contrast” (KWIC) – applied to simulated perfusion exams and evaluated dose savings and impacts on perfusion metrics. Methods: A FORBILD head phantom containing simulated time-varying objects was developed and a set of parallel-beam CT projection data was created. The simulated scans were 60 seconds long, 1152 projections per turn, with a rotation time of one second. No noise was simulated. 5mm, 10mm, and 50mm objects were modeled in the brain. A baseline, “full dose” simulation used all projections and reduced dose cases were simulated by downsampling the number of projections per turn from 1152 to 576 (50% dose), 288 (25% dose), and 144 (12.5% dose). KWIC was further evaluated at 72 projections per rotation (6.25%). One image per second was reconstructed using filtered backprojection (FBP) and KWIC. KWIC reconstructions utilized view cores of 36, 72, 144, and 288 views and 16, 8, 4, and 2 subapertures respectively. From the reconstructed images, time-to-peak (TTP), cerebral blood flow (CBF) and the FWHM of the perfusion curve were calculated and compared against reference values from the full-dose FBP data. Results: TTP, CBF, and the FWHM were unaffected by dose reduction (to 12.5%) and reconstruction method, however image quality was improved when using KWIC. Conclusion: This pilot study suggests that KWIC preserves image quality and perfusion metrics when under-sampling projections and that the unique contrast weighting of KWIC could provided substantial dose-savings for perfusion CT scans. Evaluation of KWIC in clinical CT data will be performed in the near future. R01 EB014922, NCI

  12. The effect of captopril on thallium 201 myocardial perfusion in systemic sclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Kahan, A.; Devaux, J.Y.; Amor, B.; Menkes, C.J.; Weber, S.; Venot, A.; Strauch, G. )

    1990-04-01

    In systemic sclerosis, abnormalities of myocardial perfusion are common and may be caused by a disturbance of the coronary microcirculation. We evaluated the long-term effect of captopril (75 to 150 mg per day) on thallium 201 myocardial perfusion in 12 normotensive patients with systemic sclerosis. Captopril significantly decreased the mean (+/- SD) number of segments with thallium 201 myocardial perfusion defects (6.5 +/- 1.9 at baseline and 4.4 +/- 2.7 after 1 year of treatment with captopril; p less than 0.02) and increased the mean global thallium score (9.6 +/- 1.7 at baseline and 11.4 +/- 2.1 after captopril; p less than 0.05). In a control group of eight normotensive patients with systemic sclerosis who did not receive captopril, no significant modification in thallium results occurred. Side effects with captopril included hypotension (six patients), taste disturbances (one patient), and skin rash (one patient). These side effects subsided when the dosage was reduced. These findings demonstrate that captopril improves thallium 201 myocardial perfusion in patients with systemic sclerosis and may therefore have a beneficial effect on scleroderma myocardial disease.

  13. Dynamic chest radiography with a flat-panel detector (FPD): ventilation-perfusion study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, R.; Sanada, S.; Fujimura, M.; Yasui, M.; Tsuji, S.; Hayashi, N.; Okamoto, H.; Nanbu, Y.; Matsui, O.

    2011-03-01

    Pulmonary ventilation and blood flow are reflected in dynamic chest radiographs as changes in X-ray translucency, i.e., pixel values. This study was performed to investigate the feasibility of ventilation-perfusion (V/Q) study based on the changes in pixel value. Sequential chest radiographs of a pati