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Sample records for abnormal cholesterol metabolism

  1. The Role of Dietary Cholesterol in Lipoprotein Metabolism and Related Metabolic Abnormalities: A Mini-review.

    PubMed

    Kapourchali, Fatemeh Ramezani; Surendiran, Gangadaran; Goulet, Amy; Moghadasian, Mohammed H

    2016-10-25

    Cholesterol plays a vital role in cell biology. Dietary cholesterol or "exogenous" cholesterol accounts for approximately one-third of the pooled body cholesterol, and the remaining 70% is synthesized in the body (endogenous cholesterol). Increased dietary cholesterol intake may result in increased serum cholesterol in some individuals, while other subjects may not respond to dietary cholesterol. However, diet-increased serum cholesterol levels do not increase the low-density lipoprotein/high-density lipoprotein (LDL/HDL) cholesterol ratio, nor do they decrease the size of LDL particles or HDL cholesterol levels. Elevated levels of LDL cholesterol, reduced HDL cholesterol levels, and small, dense LDL particles are independent risk factors for coronary artery disease. Dietary cholesterol is the primary approach for treatment of conditions such as the Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome. Recent studies have highlighted mechanisms for absorption of dietary cholesterol. These studies have help understand how dietary and/or pharmaceutical agents inhibit cholesterol absorption and thereby reduce LDL cholesterol concentrations. In this article, various aspects of cholesterol metabolism, including dietary sources, absorption, and abnormalities in cholesterol metabolism, have been summarized and discussed. PMID:26055276

  2. Holoprosencephaly in RSH/Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome: Does abnormal cholesterol metabolism affect the function of sonic hedgehog?

    SciTech Connect

    Kelley, R.I.; Roessler, E.; Muenke, M.

    1996-12-30

    The RAH/Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome (RAH/SLOS) is an autosomal recessive malformation syndrome associated with increased levels of 7-dehydrocholesterol (7-DHC) and a defect of cholesterol biosynthesis at the level of 3{beta}-hydroxy-steroid-{Delta}{sup 7}-reductase (7-DHC reductase). Because rats exposed to inhibitors of 7-DHC reductase during development have a high frequency of holoprosencephaly (HPE), we have undertaken a search for biochemical evidence of RSH/SLOS and other possible defects of sterol metabolism among patients with various forms of HPE. We describe 4 patients, one with semilobar HPE and three others with less complete forms of the HPE sequence, in whom we have made a biochemical diagnosis of RAH/SLOS. The clinical and biochemical spectrum of these and other patients with RAH/SLOS suggests a role of abnormal sterol metabolism in the pathogenesis of their malformations. The association of HPE and RAH/SLOS is discussed in light of the recent discoveries that mutations in the embryonic patterning gene, Sonic Hedgehog (SHH), can cause HPE in humans and that the sonic hedgehog protein product undergoes autoproteolysis to form a cholesterol-modified active product. These clinical, biochemical, and molecular studies suggest that HPE and other malformations in SLOS may be caused by incomplete or abnormal modification of the sonic hedgehog protein and, possibly, other patterning proteins of the hedgehog class, a hypothesis testable in somatic cell systems. 37 refs., 1 fig.

  3. Computational model for monitoring cholesterol metabolism.

    PubMed

    Selvakumar, R; Rashith Muhammad, M; Poornima Devi, G

    2014-12-01

    A non-deterministic finite automaton is designed to observe the cholesterol metabolism with the states of acceptance and rejection. The acceptance state of the automaton depicts the normal level of metabolism and production of good cholesterol as an end product. The rejection state of this machine shows the inhibition of enzymatic activity in cholesterol synthesis and removal of free fatty acids. The deficiency in human cholesterol metabolism pathway results in abnormal accumulation of cholesterol in plasma, arterial tissues leading to diseases such as hypercholesterolemia, atherosclerosis respectively and formation of gallstones. The designed machine can be used to monitor the cholesterol metabolism at molecular level through regulation of enzymes involved in the biosynthesis and metabolism of cholesterol for the treatment of diseases incident due to the respective metabolic disorder. In addition, an algorithm for this machine has been developed to compare the programmed string with the given string. This study demonstrates the construction of a machine that is used for the development of molecular targeted therapy for the disorders in cholesterol metabolism. PMID:26396654

  4. Is abnormal non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol a gender-specific predictor for metabolic syndrome in patients with schizophrenia taking second-generation antipsychotics?

    PubMed

    Lin, Esther Ching-Lan; Shao, Wen-Chuan; Yang, Hsin-Ju; Yen, Miaofen; Lee, Sheng-Yu; Wu, Pei-Chun; Lu, Ru-Band

    2015-02-01

    Evidence supports an association between metabolic syndrome (MetS) and schizophrenia. However, specific risk factors for MetS and gender differences in patients with schizophrenia taking second-generation antipsychotics (SGAs) have not been well explored. A cross-sectional cohort of 329 Han Chinese patients was recruited in a psychiatric hospital in central Taiwan. Using the definitions of the International Diabetes Federation for Chinese, the prevalence of MetS was 23.7% (men: 25.7%; women: 21.2%). Logistic regression analyses showed that patients with a BMI ≥ 24 and an abnormal non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (non-HDL-C) were significantly (p < 0.001) more likely to develop MetS. A BMI ≥ 24 was a significant risk factor in men (OR: 6.092, p < 0.001) and women (OR: 5.886, p < 0.001). An abnormal non-HDL-C was a significant specific risk factor for men with MetS (OR: 4.127, p < 0.001), but not for women. This study supports a greater prevalence of MetS in patients with schizophrenia taking SGAs than in the general population. Abnormal BMI and non-HDL-C were significantly associated with developing MetS, and an abnormal non-HDL-C was a specific risk factor for men. Future development of specific interventions and regular monitoring for MetS is imperative for early identification and prevention. PMID:25034455

  5. Cholesterol Absorption and Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Howles, Philip N

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitors of cholesterol absorption have been sought for decades as a means to treat and prevent cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) associated with hypercholesterolemia. Ezetimibe is the one clear success story in this regard, and other compounds with similar efficacy continue to be sought. In the last decade, the laboratory mouse, with all its genetic power, has become the premier experimental model for discovering the mechanisms underlying cholesterol absorption and has become a critical tool for preclinical testing of potential pharmaceutical entities. This chapter briefly reviews the history of cholesterol absorption research and the various gene candidates that have come under consideration as drug targets. The most common and versatile method of measuring cholesterol absorption is described in detail along with important considerations when interpreting results, and an alternative method is also presented. In recent years, reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) has become an area of intense new interest for drug discovery since this process is now considered another key to reducing CVD risk. The ultimate measure of RCT is sterol excretion and a detailed description is given for measuring neutral and acidic fecal sterols and interpreting the results. PMID:27150091

  6. microRNAs and cholesterol metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Kathryn J.; Rayner, Katey J.; Suárez, Yajaira; Fernández-Hernando, Carlos

    2010-01-01

    Cholesterol metabolism is tightly regulated at the cellular level. In addition to classic transcriptional regulation of cholesterol metabolism (e.g., by SREBP and LXR), members of a class of non-coding RNAs termed microRNAs (miRNAs) have recently been identified to be potent post-transcriptional regulators of lipid metabolism genes, including cholesterol homeostasis. We and others have recently shown that miR-33 regulates cholesterol efflux and HDL biogenesis by downregulating the expression of the ABC transporters, ABCA1 and ABCG1. In addition to miR-33, miR-122 and miR-370 have been shown to play important roles in regulating cholesterol and fatty acid metabolism. These new data suggest important roles of microRNAs in the epigenetic regulation of cholesterol metabolism and have opened new avenues for the treatment of dyslipidemias. PMID:20880716

  7. Mitochondria, cholesterol and cancer cell metabolism.

    PubMed

    Ribas, Vicent; García-Ruiz, Carmen; Fernández-Checa, José C

    2016-12-01

    Given the role of mitochondria in oxygen consumption, metabolism and cell death regulation, alterations in mitochondrial function or dysregulation of cell death pathways contribute to the genesis and progression of cancer. Cancer cells exhibit an array of metabolic transformations induced by mutations leading to gain-of-function of oncogenes and loss-of-function of tumor suppressor genes that include increased glucose consumption, reduced mitochondrial respiration, increased reactive oxygen species generation and cell death resistance, all of which ensure cancer progression. Cholesterol metabolism is disturbed in cancer cells and supports uncontrolled cell growth. In particular, the accumulation of cholesterol in mitochondria emerges as a molecular component that orchestrates some of these metabolic alterations in cancer cells by impairing mitochondrial function. As a consequence, mitochondrial cholesterol loading in cancer cells may contribute, in part, to the Warburg effect stimulating aerobic glycolysis to meet the energetic demand of proliferating cells, while protecting cancer cells against mitochondrial apoptosis due to changes in mitochondrial membrane dynamics. Further understanding the complexity in the metabolic alterations of cancer cells, mediated largely through alterations in mitochondrial function, may pave the way to identify more efficient strategies for cancer treatment involving the use of small molecules targeting mitochondria, cholesterol homeostasis/trafficking and specific metabolic pathways. PMID:27455839

  8. Obesity, Cholesterol Metabolism and Breast Cancer Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    McDonnell, Donald P.; Park, Sunghee; Goulet, Matthew T.; Jasper, Jeff; Wardell, Suzanne E.; Chang, Ching-yi; Norris, John D.; Guyton, John R.; Nelson, Erik R.

    2014-01-01

    Obesity and altered lipid metabolism are risk factors for breast cancer in pre- and post-menopausal women. These pathologic relationships have been attributed in part to the impact of cholesterol on the biophysical properties of cell membranes and to the influence of these changes on signaling events initiated at the membrane. However, more recent studies have indicated that the oxysterol 27-hydroxycholesterol (27HC), and not cholesterol per se, may be the primary biochemical link between lipid metabolism and cancer. The enzyme responsible for production of 27HC from cholesterol, CYP27A1, is expressed primarily in the liver and in macrophages. In addition significantly elevated expression of this enzyme within breast tumors has also been observed. It is believed that 27HC, acting through the liver X receptor (LXR) in macrophages and possibly other cells is involved in maintaining organismal cholesterol homeostasis. It has also been shown recently that 27HC is an estrogen receptor (ER) agonist in breast cancer cells and that it stimulates the growth and metastasis of tumors in several models of breast cancer. These findings provide the rationale for the clinical evaluation of pharmaceutical approaches that interfere with cholesterol/27HC synthesis as a means to mitigate the impact of cholesterol on breast cancer pathogenesis. PMID:25060521

  9. Obesity, cholesterol metabolism, and breast cancer pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    McDonnell, Donald P; Park, Sunghee; Goulet, Matthew T; Jasper, Jeff; Wardell, Suzanne E; Chang, Ching-Yi; Norris, John D; Guyton, John R; Nelson, Erik R

    2014-09-15

    Obesity and altered lipid metabolism are risk factors for breast cancer in pre- and post-menopausal women. These pathologic relationships have been attributed in part to the impact of cholesterol on the biophysical properties of cell membranes and to the influence of these changes on signaling events initiated at the membrane. However, more recent studies have indicated that the oxysterol 27-hydroxycholesterol (27HC), and not cholesterol per se, may be the primary biochemical link between lipid metabolism and cancer. The enzyme responsible for production of 27HC from cholesterol, CYP27A1, is expressed primarily in the liver and in macrophages. In addition, significantly elevated expression of this enzyme within breast tumors has also been observed. It is believed that 27HC, acting through the liver X receptor in macrophages and possibly other cells, is involved in maintaining organismal cholesterol homeostasis. It has also been shown recently that 27HC is an estrogen receptor agonist in breast cancer cells and that it stimulates the growth and metastasis of tumors in several models of breast cancer. These findings provide the rationale for the clinical evaluation of pharmaceutical approaches that interfere with cholesterol/27HC synthesis as a means to mitigate the impact of cholesterol on breast cancer pathogenesis. Cancer Res; 74(18); 4976-82. ©2014 AACR. PMID:25060521

  10. Non-cholesterol sterols and cholesterol metabolism in sitosterolemia.

    PubMed

    Othman, Rgia A; Myrie, Semone B; Jones, Peter J H

    2013-12-01

    Sitosterolemia (STSL) is a rare autosomal recessive disease, manifested by extremely elevated plant sterols (PS) in plasma and tissue, leading to xanthoma and premature atherosclerotic disease. Therapeutic approaches include limiting PS intake, interrupting enterohepatic circulation of bile acid using bile acid binding resins such as cholestyramine, and/or ileal bypass, and inhibiting intestinal sterol absorption by ezetimibe (EZE). The objective of this review is to evaluate sterol metabolism in STSL and the impact of the currently available treatments on sterol trafficking in this disease. The role of PS in initiation of xanthomas and premature atherosclerosis is also discussed. Blocking sterols absorption with EZE has revolutionized STSL patient treatment as it reduces circulating levels of non-cholesterol sterols in STSL. However, none of the available treatments including EZE have normalized plasma PS concentrations. Future studies are needed to: (i) explore where cholesterol and non-cholesterol sterols accumulate, (ii) assess to what extent these sterols in tissues can be mobilized after blocking their absorption, and (iii) define the factors governing sterol flux. PMID:24267242

  11. [Abnormality in bone metabolism after burn].

    PubMed

    Gong, X; Xie, W G

    2016-08-20

    Burn causes bone metabolic abnormality in most cases, including the changes in osteoblasts and osteoclasts, bone mass loss, and bone absorption, which results in decreased bone mineral density. These changes are sustainable for many years after burn and even cause growth retardation in burned children. The mechanisms of bone metabolic abnormality after burn include the increasing glucocorticoids due to stress response, a variety of cytokines and inflammatory medium due to inflammatory response, vitamin D deficiency, hypoparathyroidism, and bone loss due to long-term lying in bed. This article reviews the pathogenesis and regularity of bone metabolic abnormality after burn, the relationship between bone metabolic abnormality and burn area/depth, and the treatment of bone metabolic abnormality, etc. and discusses the research directions in the future. PMID:27562160

  12. Quercetin regulates hepatic cholesterol metabolism by promoting cholesterol-to-bile acid conversion and cholesterol efflux in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Min; Xie, Zongkai; Gao, Weina; Pu, Lingling; Wei, Jingyu; Guo, Changjiang

    2016-03-01

    Quercetin, a common member of the flavonoid family, is widely present in plant kingdom. Despite that quercetin is implicated in regulating cholesterol metabolism, the molecular mechanism is poorly understood. We hypothesized that quercetin regulates cholesterol homeostasis through regulating the key enzymes involved in hepatic cholesterol metabolism. To test this hypothesis, we compared the profile of key enzymes and transcription factors involved in the hepatic cholesterol metabolism in rats with or without quercetin supplementation. Twenty male Wistar rats were randomly divided into control and quercetin-supplemented groups. Serum total cholesterol, triglyceride, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and total bile acids in feces and bile were measured. Hepatic enzymatic activities were determined by activity assay kit and high-performance liquid chromatography-based analyses. The messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein expressions were determined by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analyses, respectively. The results showed that the activity of hepatic cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase, a critical enzyme in the conversion of cholesterol to bile acids, was significantly elevated by quercetin. The expression of cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase, as well as liver X receptor α, an important transcription factor, was also increased at both mRNA and protein levels by quercetin. However, quercetin exposure had no impact on the activity of hepatic HMG-CoA reductase, a rate-limiting enzyme in the biosynthesis of cholesterol. We also found that quercetin treatment significantly increased ATP binding cassette transporter G1 mRNA and protein expression in the liver, suggesting that quercetin may increase hepatic cholesterol efflux. Collectively, the results presented here indicate that quercetin regulates hepatic cholesterol metabolism mainly through the pathways that promote cholesterol-to-bile acid conversion and

  13. Cholesterol-metabolizing cytochromes P450: implications for cholesterol lowering

    PubMed Central

    Pikuleva, Irina A.

    2010-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) continues to be a leading cause of death worldwide. Elevated serum cholesterol is one of the classical risk factors for CVD which also include age, hypertension, smoking, diabetes mellitus, obesity and family history. A number of therapeutic drug classes have been developed to treat hypercholesterolemia, yet, an important percentage of patients do not reach their treatment goals. Therefore, new cholesterol-lowering medications, having a site of action different from that of currently available drugs need to be developed. This review summarizes new information about cytochrome P450 enzymes 7A1, 27A1, and 46A1, that play key roles in cholesterol elimination and that have potential to serve as targets for cholesterol-lowering. PMID:18950282

  14. Cholesterol Metabolism and Prostate Cancer Lethality.

    PubMed

    Stopsack, Konrad H; Gerke, Travis A; Sinnott, Jennifer A; Penney, Kathryn L; Tyekucheva, Svitlana; Sesso, Howard D; Andersson, Swen-Olof; Andrén, Ove; Cerhan, James R; Giovannucci, Edward L; Mucci, Lorelei A; Rider, Jennifer R

    2016-08-15

    Cholesterol metabolism has been implicated in prostate cancer pathogenesis. Here, we assessed the association of intratumoral mRNA expression of cholesterol synthesis enzymes, transporters, and regulators in tumor specimen at diagnosis and lethal prostate cancer, defined as mortality or metastases from prostate cancer in contrast to nonlethal disease without evidence of metastases after at least 8 years of follow-up. We analyzed the prospective prostate cancer cohorts within the Health Professionals Follow-up Study (n = 249) and the Physicians' Health Study (n = 153) as well as expectantly managed patients in the Swedish Watchful Waiting Study (n = 338). The expression of squalene monooxygenase (SQLE) was associated with lethal cancer in all three cohorts. Men with high SQLE expression (>1 standard deviation above the mean) were 8.3 times (95% confidence interval, 3.5 to 19.7) more likely to have lethal cancer despite therapy compared with men with the mean level of SQLE expression. Absolute SQLE expression was associated with lethal cancer independently from Gleason grade and stage, as was a SQLE expression ratio in tumor versus surrounding benign prostate tissue. Higher SQLE expression was tightly associated with increased histologic markers of angiogenesis. Collectively, this study establishes the prognostic value of intratumoral cholesterol synthesis as measured via SQLE, its second rate-limiting enzyme. SQLE expression at cancer diagnosis is prognostic for lethal prostate cancer both after curative-intent prostatectomy and in a watchful waiting setting, possibly by facilitating micrometastatic disease. Cancer Res; 76(16); 4785-90. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27325648

  15. Intestinal nuclear receptors in HDL cholesterol metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Degirolamo, Chiara; Sabbà, Carlo; Moschetta, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    The intestine plays a pivotal role in cholesterol homeostasis by functioning as an absorptive and secretory organ in the reverse cholesterol transport pathway. Enterocytes control cholesterol absorption, apoAI synthesis, HDL biogenesis, and nonbiliary cholesterol fecal disposal. Thus, intestine-based therapeutic interventions may hold promise in the management of diseases driven by cholesterol overload. Lipid-sensing nuclear receptors (NRs) are highly expressed in the intestinal epithelium and regulate transcriptionally the handling of cholesterol by the enterocytes. Here, we discuss the NR regulation of cholesterol fluxes across the enterocytes with special emphasis on NR exploitation as a bona fide novel HDL-raising strategy. PMID:25070952

  16. Intestinal nuclear receptors in HDL cholesterol metabolism.

    PubMed

    Degirolamo, Chiara; Sabbà, Carlo; Moschetta, Antonio

    2015-07-01

    The intestine plays a pivotal role in cholesterol homeostasis by functioning as an absorptive and secretory organ in the reverse cholesterol transport pathway. Enterocytes control cholesterol absorption, apoAI synthesis, HDL biogenesis, and nonbiliary cholesterol fecal disposal. Thus, intestine-based therapeutic interventions may hold promise in the management of diseases driven by cholesterol overload. Lipid-sensing nuclear receptors (NRs) are highly expressed in the intestinal epithelium and regulate transcriptionally the handling of cholesterol by the enterocytes. Here, we discuss the NR regulation of cholesterol fluxes across the enterocytes with special emphasis on NR exploitation as a bona fide novel HDL-raising strategy. PMID:25070952

  17. Mathematically modelling the dynamics of cholesterol metabolism and ageing.

    PubMed

    Morgan, A E; Mooney, K M; Wilkinson, S J; Pickles, N A; Mc Auley, M T

    2016-07-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the UK. This condition becomes increasingly prevalent during ageing; 34.1% and 29.8% of males and females respectively, over 75 years of age have an underlying cardiovascular problem. The dysregulation of cholesterol metabolism is inextricably correlated with cardiovascular health and for this reason low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) are routinely used as biomarkers of CVD risk. The aim of this work was to use mathematical modelling to explore how cholesterol metabolism is affected by the ageing process. To do this we updated a previously published whole-body mathematical model of cholesterol metabolism to include an additional 96 mechanisms that are fundamental to this biological system. Additional mechanisms were added to cholesterol absorption, cholesterol synthesis, reverse cholesterol transport (RCT), bile acid synthesis, and their enterohepatic circulation. The sensitivity of the model was explored by the use of both local and global parameter scans. In addition, acute cholesterol feeding was used to explore the effectiveness of the regulatory mechanisms which are responsible for maintaining whole-body cholesterol balance. It was found that our model behaves as a hypo-responder to cholesterol feeding, while both the hepatic and intestinal pools of cholesterol increased significantly. The model was also used to explore the effects of ageing in tandem with three different cholesterol ester transfer protein (CETP) genotypes. Ageing in the presence of an atheroprotective CETP genotype, conferring low CETP activity, resulted in a 0.6% increase in LDL-C. In comparison, ageing with a genotype reflective of high CETP activity, resulted in a 1.6% increase in LDL-C. Thus, the model has illustrated the importance of CETP genotypes such as I405V, and their potential role in healthy ageing. PMID:27157786

  18. Dietary cholesterol and fats at a young age: do they influence cholesterol metabolism in adult life?

    PubMed

    Temmerman, A M; Vonk, R J; Niezen-Koning, K; Berger, R; Fernandes, J

    1989-01-01

    The effects of dietary cholesterol and fats on cholesterol metabolism later in life were studied in Mongolian gerbils. Three groups were given a basic diet with soybean oil, palm kernel oil amounting to 8.75% (w/w), or the basic diet only. In three other groups, cholesterol (0.05%) was added to the above diets. Measurements were done in animals of the third generation on the diets. On all diets, teh serum cholesterol of the sucklings was increased as compared to the young that were suckled by mothers on the basic diet only, while body cholesterol was highest in sucklings of mothers on the basic diet or palm-kernel-oil-enriched diets. When the diets were replaced by the basic diets at 6 months of age, serum cholesterol was still increased at 12 months of age in animals previously fed on the cholesterol-enriched diets. Tissue cholesterol did not differ. However, after a challenge with cholesterol at that age, the differences in serum cholesterol were not significantly different. PMID:2802529

  19. The Metabolism of Cholestanol, Cholesterol, and Bile Acids in Cerebrotendinous Xanthomatosis

    PubMed Central

    Salen, Gerald; Grundy, Scott M.

    1973-01-01

    The metabolism of cholesterol and its 5-dihydro derivative, cholestanol, was investigated by means of sterol balance and isotope kinetic techniques in 3 subjects with cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis (CTX) and 11 other individuals. All subjects were hospitalized on a metabolic ward and were fed diets practically free of cholesterol and cholestanol. After the intravenous administration of [1,2-3H]cholestanol, the radioactive sterol was transported and esterified in plasma lipoproteins in an identical manner to cholesterol. In these short-term experiments, the specific activity-time curves of plasma cholestanol conformed to two-pool models in both the CTX and control groups. However, cholestanol plasma concentrations, total body miscible pools, and daily synthesis rates were two to five times greater in the CTX than control individuals. The short-term specific activity decay curves of plasma [4-14C]cholesterol also conformed to two-pool models in both groups. However, in the CTX subjects the decay was more rapid, and daily cholesterol synthesis was nearly double that of the control subjects. Plasma concentrations and the sizes of the rapidly turning over pool of exchangeable cholesterol were apparently small in the CTX subjects, and these measurements did not correlate with the large cholesterol deposits found in tendon and tuberous xanthomas. Despite active cholesterol synthesis, bile acid formation was subnormal in the CTX subjects. However, bile acid sequestration was accompanied by a rise in plasma cholestanol levels and greatly augmented fecal cholestanol outputs. In contrast, the administration of clofibrate lowered plasma cholesterol levels 50% and presumably reduced synthesis in the CTX subjects. Plasma cholesterol concentrations and fecal steroid excretion did not change significantly during this therapy. These findings indicate that the excessive tissue deposits of cholesterol and cholestanol that characterize CTX were associated with hyperactive neutral

  20. A novel alkyne cholesterol to trace cellular cholesterol metabolism and localization.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Kristina; Thiele, Christoph; Schött, Hans-Frieder; Gaebler, Anne; Schoene, Mario; Kiver, Yuriy; Friedrichs, Silvia; Lütjohann, Dieter; Kuerschner, Lars

    2014-03-01

    Cholesterol is an important lipid of mammalian cells and plays a fundamental role in many biological processes. Its concentration in the various cellular membranes differs and is tightly regulated. Here, we present a novel alkyne cholesterol analog suitable for tracing both cholesterol metabolism and localization. This probe can be detected by click chemistry employing various reporter azides. Alkyne cholesterol is accepted by cellular enzymes from different biological species (Brevibacterium, yeast, rat, human) and these enzymes include cholesterol oxidases, hydroxylases, and acyl transferases that generate the expected metabolites in in vitro and in vivo assays. Using fluorescence microscopy, we studied the distribution of cholesterol at subcellular resolution, detecting the lipid in the Golgi and at the plasma membrane, but also in the endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria. In summary, alkyne cholesterol represents a versatile, sensitive, and easy-to-use tool for tracking cellular cholesterol metabolism and localization as it allows for manifold detection methods including mass spectrometry, thin-layer chromatography/fluorography, and fluorescence microscopy. PMID:24334219

  1. Altered cholesterol metabolism in APP695-transfected neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Wirths, Oliver; Thelen, Karin M; Lütjohann, Dieter; Falkai, Peter; Bayer, Thomas A

    2007-06-01

    Cholesterol has been implicated to play an important role in the generation of Abeta peptides, which are the main component of beta-amyloid plaques in the brains of patients suffering from Alzheimer's disease (AD). Epidemiological data implicate that lowering cholesterol levels has beneficial effects on the extent of beta-amyloid pathology. Thus therapeutic intervention using cholesterol lowering drugs like statins seems to be a promising approach. A couple of studies, in vitro or in vivo by the use of AD transgenic mouse models, focused on the manipulation of cholesterol levels and the resulting effects on Abeta generation. In contrast, there is not much known about the effect of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) on cholesterol levels. In the present report, we transfected human neuroblastoma cells with human APP695 and compared cellular cholesterol levels with the respective levels in Mock-transfected control cells. Furthermore, we determined the levels of diverse cholesterol precursors and metabolites using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Significant differences in the levels of the respective cholesterol precursors were observed, whereas inhibition of gamma-secretase activity by the gamma-secretase inhibitor DAPT did not have a significant effect on cellular cholesterol metabolism. PMID:17428449

  2. Taurine ameliorates cholesterol metabolism by stimulating bile acid production in high-cholesterol-fed rats.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Shigeru; Fujita, Michiko; Nakamura, Masakazu; Sakono, Masanobu; Nishizono, Shoko; Sato, Masao; Imaizumi, Katsumi; Mori, Mari; Fukuda, Nobuhiro

    2016-03-01

    This study was designed to investigate the effects of dietary taurine on cholesterol metabolism in high-cholesterol-fed rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into two dietary groups (n = 6 in each group): a high-cholesterol diet containing 0.5% cholesterol and 0.15% sodium cholate, and a high-cholesterol diet with 5% (w/w) taurine. The experimental diets were given for 2 weeks. Taurine supplementation reduced the serum and hepatic cholesterol levels by 37% and 32%, respectively. Faecal excretion of bile acids was significantly increased in taurine-treated rats, compared with untreated rats. Biliary bile acid concentrations were also increased by taurine. Taurine supplementation increased taurine-conjugated bile acids by 61% and decreased glycine-conjugated bile acids by 53%, resulting in a significant decrease in the glycine/taurine (G/T) ratio. Among the taurine-conjugated bile acids, cholic acid and deoxycholic acid were significantly increased. In the liver, taurine supplementation increased the mRNA expression and enzymatic activity of hepatic cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase (CYP7A1), the rate-limiting enzyme for bile acid synthesis, by three- and two-fold, respectively. Taurine also decreased the enzymatic activity of acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) and microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP). These observations suggest that taurine supplementation increases the synthesis and excretion of taurine-conjugated bile acids and stimulates the catabolism of cholesterol to bile acid by elevating the expression and activity of CYP7A1. This may reduce cholesterol esterification and lipoprotein assembly for very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) secretion, leading to reductions in the serum and hepatic cholesterol levels. PMID:26710098

  3. Metabolism of low-density lipoprotein free cholesterol by human plasma lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase

    SciTech Connect

    Fielding, P.E.; Miida, Takashi; Fielding, C.J. )

    1991-09-03

    The metabolism of cholesterol derived from ({sup 3}H) cholesterol-labeled low-density lipoprotein (LDL) was determined in human blood plasma. LDL-derived free cholesterol first appeared in large {alpha}-migrating HDL (HDL{sub 2}) and was then transferred to small {alpha}-HDL (HDL{sub 3}) for esterification. The major part of such esters was retained within HDL of increasing size in the course of lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) activity; the balance was recovered in LDL. Transfer of preformed cholesteryl esters within HDL contributed little to the labeled cholesteryl ester accumulating HDL{sub 2}. When cholesterol for esterification was derived instead from cell membranes, a significantly smaller proportion of this cholesteryl ester was subsequently recovered in LDL. These data suggest compartmentation of cholesteryl esters within plasma that have been formed from cell membrane or LDL free cholesterol, and the role for HDL{sub 2} as a relatively unreactive sink for LCAT-derived cholesteryl esters.

  4. Hypertriglyceridemic Waist and Metabolic Abnormalities in Brazilian Schoolchildren

    PubMed Central

    Guilherme, Flávio Ricardo; Molena-Fernandes, Carlos Alexandre; Hintze, Luzia Jaeger; Fávero, Maria Teresa Martins; Cuman, Roberto Kenji Nakamura; Rinaldi, Wilson

    2014-01-01

    Objective To identify the prevalence of hypertriglyceridemic waist (HTW) phenotype and its association with metabolic abnormalities in schoolchildren. Methods A cross-sectional study, with a sample of 241 students aged 10 to 14 years from public schools (4 schools) and private (2 schools) from Paranavai town, in Parana State, Brazil. Anthropometric variables (weight, height, waist circumference) and levels of triglycerides, total cholesterol, HDL-C, non-HDL and LDL-C were analyzed. In statistical tests of Pearson partial correlation and multivariate logistic regression, considering p<0,05. Results The prevalence of HTW was 20,7% among schoolchildren, 14,1% in males and 6,6% among females with higher proportions aged 10–12 years old. Multivariate analysis indicated that the students who attended private schools were nearly three times more likely (95% CI: 1,2–5,6), to be diagnosed with HTW compared with those who attended public schools (p = 0,006), and LDL-C was the only metabolic variable positively associated with the outcome (p = 0,001), where the students categorized with elevated serum levels had odds 4,2 times (95% CI: 1,6–10,9) having the HTW compared to students in appropriate levels. Conclusion This study showed higher prevalence of hypertriglyceridemic waist phenotype in students when compared to prospective studies in Brazil and worldwide. It also showed that the only metabolic alteration associated with HTW phenotype was LDL-C (low density lipoprotein). PMID:25397885

  5. Pathogenesis of permeability barrier abnormalities in the ichthyoses: inherited disorders of lipid metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Elias, Peter M.; Williams, Mary L.; Holleran, Walter M.; Jiang, Yan J.; Schmuth, Matthias

    2010-01-01

    Many of the ichthyoses are associated with inherited disorders of lipid metabolism. These disorders have provided unique models to dissect physiologic processes in normal epidermis and the pathophysiology of more common scaling conditions. In most of these disorders, a permeability barrier abnormality “drives” pathophysiology through stimulation of epidermal hyperplasia. Among primary abnormalities of nonpolar lipid metabolism, triglyceride accumulation in neutral lipid storage disease as a result of a lipase mutation provokes a barrier abnormality via lamellar/nonlamellar phase separation within the extracellular matrix of the stratum corneum (SC). Similar mechanisms account for the barrier abnormalities (and subsequent ichthyosis) in inherited disorders of polar lipid metabolism. For example, in recessive X-linked ichthyosis (RXLI), cholesterol sulfate (CSO4) accumulation also produces a permeability barrier defect through lamellar/nonlamellar phase separation. However, in RXLI, the desquamation abnormality is in part attributable to the plurifunctional roles of CSO4 as a regulator of both epidermal differentiation and corneodesmosome degradation. Phase separation also occurs in type II Gaucher disease (GD; from accumulation of glucosylceramides as a result of to β-glucocerebrosidase deficiency). Finally, failure to assemble both lipids and desquamatory enzymes into nascent epidermal lamellar bodies (LBs) accounts for both the permeability barrier and desquamation abnormalities in Harlequin ichthyosis (HI). The barrier abnormality provokes the clinical phenotype in these disorders not only by stimulating epidermal proliferation, but also by inducing inflammation. PMID:18245815

  6. Protective Effects of Quetiapine on Metabolic and Inflammatory Abnormalities in Schizophrenic Patients during Exacerbated Stage.

    PubMed

    Kao, Yu-Chen; Ko, Chih-Yuan; Wang, Sheng-Chiang; Liu, Yia-Ping

    2016-04-30

    Inflammation has been considered important in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. Increasing evidence reveals that patients with schizophrenia have abnormal expression of cytokines, which are related to development of metabolic abnormalities. Metabolic abnormality has become a critical issue, though its longitudinal relationship with the disorder, such as the antipsychotics influence, is unclear. We aimed to investigate whether abnormalities of metabolic parameters and cytokine levels in acute exacerbated schizophrenic patients existed, and whether intervention of antipsychotic could help. The present study analyzed peripheral cytokines and metabolic/hemodynamic parameters in healthy controls and acute exacerbated schizophrenic patients hospitalized for three weeks under the unique treatment of quetiapine, a well-known second-generation antipsychotic. Our results showed that patients with schizophrenia were predisposed to metabolic abnormalities in acute exacerbation, including body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC). The patients were also prone to dysglycemia, lower high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c) levels, and higher blood pressure with concomitant of elevation of interleukin (IL)-2, IL-6 and IL-10 in which IL-6 was associated with BMI. After quetiapine treatment, IL-2, IL-6 and IL-10 remained higher than the controls, but IL-10 was significantly decreased in follow-up comparison. Glycemic-related indexes, HDL-c and IL-10 levels were significantly changed by variance analysis. Results of the present study imply that acute exacerbated schizophrenic patients with metabolism abnormalities may involve disruption of expression of cytokines, and that quetiapine may have therapeutic effects. Nonetheless, metabolism parameters of patients undergoing treatment with quetiapine should be closely monitored. PMID:27080462

  7. A freshwater clam (Corbicula fluminea) extract improves cholesterol metabolism in rats fed on a high-cholesterol diet.

    PubMed

    Chijimatsu, Takeshi; Tatsuguchi, Iwao; Abe, Kazuaki; Oda, Hiroaki; Mochizuki, Satoshi

    2008-10-01

    The effect of a freshwater clam (Corbicula fluminea) extract (FCE) on cholesterol metabolism in rats fed on a high-cholesterol diet was investigated. When rats were fed various amounts of FCE in addition to the high-cholesterol diet for 2 wk, the serum and hepatic cholesterol levels were gradually reduced in a dose-dependent manner, as compared with the control group. The excretion of neutral sterols and bile acids into the feces was increased by feeding FCE. Several phytosterols were detected in the feces of rats fed on the FCE-containing diet. In addition, substantial amounts of phytosterols were found in FCE. Cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase (CYP7A1) mRNA in the liver of the rats fed on the FCE-containing diets was higher than that of rats fed on the high-cholesterol diets without FCE. These results may suggest that enhanced cholesterol degradation and the excretion of neutral sterols and bile acids contributed to the hypocholesterolemic effect of FCE observed in the hypercholesterolemic rats fed on the high-cholesterol diet. PMID:18838816

  8. Cholesterol Metabolism and Body Composition in Women: The Effects of Moderate Weight Loss

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective was to determine how moderate weight loss protocol through diet and exercise may affect changes in body composition, to determine the effects of weight loss on cholesterol metabolism, and to examine the relationship between cholesterol metabolism and changes in body composition. Thirt...

  9. Maternal exposure to di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate exposure deregulates blood pressure, adiposity, cholesterol metabolism and social interaction in mouse offspring.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kuan-I; Chiang, Chin-Wei; Lin, Hui-Ching; Zhao, Jin-Feng; Li, Cheng-Ta; Shyue, Song-Kun; Lee, Tzong-Shyuan

    2016-05-01

    Long-term exposure to di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) is highly associated with carcinogenicity, fetotoxicity, psychological disorders and metabolic diseases, but the detrimental effects and mechanisms are not fully understood. We investigated the effect of exposing mouse mothers to DEHP, and the underlying mechanism, on blood pressure, obesity and cholesterol metabolism as well as psychological and learning behaviors in offspring. Tail-cuff plethysmography was used for blood pressure measurement; Western blot used was for phosphorylation and expression of protein; hematoxylin and eosin staining, Nissl staining and Golgi staining were used for histological examination. The serum levels of cholesterol, triglycerides and glucose were measured by blood biochemical analysis. Hepatic cholesterol and triglyceride levels were assessed by colorimetric assay kits. Offspring behaviors were evaluated by open-field activity, elevated plus maze, social preference test and Morris water maze. Maternal DEHP exposure deregulated the phosphorylation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase and upregulated angiotensin type 1 receptor in offspring, which led to increased blood pressure. It led to obesity in offspring by increasing the size of adipocytes in white adipose tissue and number of adipocytes in brown adipose tissue. It increased the serum level of cholesterol in offspring by decreasing the hepatic capacity for cholesterol clearance. The impaired social interaction ability induced by maternal DEHP exposure might be due to abnormal neuronal development. Collectively, our findings provide new evidence that maternal exposure to DEHP has a lasting effect on the physiological functions of the vascular system, adipose tissue and nerve system in offspring. PMID:25995009

  10. Cholesterol Crystals Activate the NLRP3 Inflammasome in Human Macrophages: A Novel Link between Cholesterol Metabolism and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Rajamäki, Kristiina; Lappalainen, Jani; Öörni, Katariina; Välimäki, Elina; Matikainen, Sampsa; Kovanen, Petri T.; Eklund, Kari K.

    2010-01-01

    Background Chronic inflammation of the arterial wall is a key element in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, yet the factors that trigger and sustain the inflammation remain elusive. Inflammasomes are cytoplasmic caspase-1-activating protein complexes that promote maturation and secretion of the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin(IL)-1β and IL-18. The most intensively studied inflammasome, NLRP3 inflammasome, is activated by diverse substances, including crystalline and particulate materials. As cholesterol crystals are abundant in atherosclerotic lesions, and IL-1β has been linked to atherogenesis, we explored the possibility that cholesterol crystals promote inflammation by activating the inflammasome pathway. Principal Findings Here we show that human macrophages avidly phagocytose cholesterol crystals and store the ingested cholesterol as cholesteryl esters. Importantly, cholesterol crystals induced dose-dependent secretion of mature IL-1β from human monocytes and macrophages. The cholesterol crystal-induced secretion of IL-1β was caspase-1-dependent, suggesting the involvement of an inflammasome-mediated pathway. Silencing of the NLRP3 receptor, the crucial component in NLRP3 inflammasome, completely abolished crystal-induced IL-1β secretion, thus identifying NLRP3 inflammasome as the cholesterol crystal-responsive element in macrophages. The crystals were shown to induce leakage of the lysosomal protease cathepsin B into the cytoplasm and inhibition of this enzyme reduced cholesterol crystal-induced IL-1β secretion, suggesting that NLRP3 inflammasome activation occurred via lysosomal destabilization. Conclusions The cholesterol crystal-induced inflammasome activation in macrophages may represent an important link between cholesterol metabolism and inflammation in atherosclerotic lesions. PMID:20668705

  11. [Metabolic abnormalities as a basis for age-dependent diseases and aging? State of the art].

    PubMed

    Tereshina, E V

    2009-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MS) is a number of certain criteria reflecting abnormalities in lipid and glucose metabolism. These abnormalities are considered to be a reason for atherosclerosis, cardiovascular diseases (CVD) and diabetes mellitus type 2. The prevalence of CVD among those with diabetes is 3-5 folds higher than without diabetes. MS demonstrates ethnic and gender variants, its frequency depends on the lifestyle and age. Attention to MS has been attracted in the last decades induced by the obesity epidemic in US. The adipose tissue and high triglyceride blood levels have been regarded as hallmark of MS. It has appeared that metabolic ways of cholesterol, fat and glucose were tightly connected and united in a system of energy expenditure and reproduction. The high prevalence of MS, heart attacks and diabetes in the elderly population makes the evidence of age to be an independent risk factor of the development of metabolic abnormalities. But this problem is still out of the field of interest in gerontology. There exist a number of unsolved questions concerning the function of visceral adipose tissue, the role of free fatty acids in the insulin resistance, mechanisms of inflammation in the old age and so on that can be an object of gerontology. So, a program of advanced researches in this field is discussed. PMID:19827683

  12. Cholesterol metabolism: A review of how ageing disrupts the biological mechanisms responsible for its regulation.

    PubMed

    Morgan, A E; Mooney, K M; Wilkinson, S J; Pickles, N A; Mc Auley, M T

    2016-05-01

    Cholesterol plays a vital role in the human body as a precursor of steroid hormones and bile acids, in addition to providing structure to cell membranes. Whole body cholesterol metabolism is maintained by a highly coordinated balancing act between cholesterol ingestion, synthesis, absorption, and excretion. The aim of this review is to discuss how ageing interacts with these processes. Firstly, we will present an overview of cholesterol metabolism. Following this, we discuss how the biological mechanisms which underpin cholesterol metabolism are effected by ageing. Included in this discussion are lipoprotein dynamics, cholesterol absorption/synthesis and the enterohepatic circulation/synthesis of bile acids. Moreover, we discuss the role of oxidative stress in the pathological progression of atherosclerosis and also discuss how cholesterol biosynthesis is effected by both the mammalian target of rapamycin and sirtuin pathways. Next, we examine how diet and alterations to the gut microbiome can be used to mitigate the impact ageing has on cholesterol metabolism. We conclude by discussing how mathematical models of cholesterol metabolism can be used to identify therapeutic interventions. PMID:27045039

  13. Effects of dietary fucoxanthin on cholesterol metabolism in diabetic/obese KK-Ay mice

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Fucoxanthin is a xanthophyll present in brown seaweeds and has several beneficial effects, including anti-obesity and anti-diabetic effects. However, we and another group previously observed that fucoxanthin increases serum cholesterol levels in rodents. Cholesterol is an important component of cell membranes and biosynthesis of bile acids. Serum cholesterol levels are also closely associated with atherosclerosis. Therefore, we sought to identify the mechanism underlying the increase in serum cholesterol levels by fucoxanthin. Methods Diabetic/obese KK-Ay mice were fed a diet containing 0.2% fucoxanthin for 4 weeks. The mice were sacrificed, and total blood samples were collected for the measurement of serum total cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol and non-HDL-cholesterol levels. Cholesterol content in tissues was also analyzed. Real-time PCR and Western blotting were performed to determine hepatic mRNA and protein expression of genes involved in cholesterol metabolism, respectively. Results Dietary fucoxanthin significantly increased serum HDL and non-HDL cholesterol levels, and reduced hepatic cholesterol content. In liver, the expression of SREBP1, SREBP2 and their target genes involved in cholesterol biosynthesis significantly increased and tended to increase in the fucoxanthin-fed mice, respectively. In contrast, hepatic levels of LDLR and SR-B1 proteins which is important factors for LDL-cholesterol and HDL-cholesterol uptake in the liver from serum, decreased to 60% and 80% in the fucoxanthin-fed mice, respectively, compared with the control mice. Further, we found that dietary fucoxanthin significantly increased the mRNA expression of proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9), which enhances intracellular degradation of LDLR in lysosomes. Conclusions Fucoxanthin increased HDL-cholesterol and non-HDL-cholesterol levels in KK-Ay mice by inducing SREBP expression and reduced cholesterol uptake in the liver via down-regulation of LDLR and SR

  14. Tissue storage and control of cholesterol metabolism in man on high cholesterol diets.

    PubMed

    Quintão, E C; Brumer, S; Stechhahn, K

    1977-03-01

    The possibility of accumulation of tissue cholesterol in human beings submitted to high cholesterol feeding was investigated in liver biopsies and through fecal sterol balance studies. Feeding to 10 individuals 3.1 to 3.4 g/day of cholesterol for 3 weeks raised the mean serum level from 293 to 349 mg/100 ml, namely 19%, whereas the liver cholesterol content was 417 mg/100 g of wet weight. In 10 control cases eating 0.1--0.4 g/day of cholesterol serum cholesterol remained stable throughout the experimental period and the liver cholesterol content was 256 mg/100 g. Difference of liver colesterol level between the two groups was 62%. In 7 patients submitted to two periods of balance investigation on a cholesterol-free synthetic formula diet respectively prior to (PI) and after (PIII) eating the high cholesterol solid food from 4 to 15 weeks (PII), fecal steroid excretion in PIII exceeded PI in 3 patients. Such data are a direct evidence for the existence of an efficient system to release acutely stored cholesterol. In one patient bile acid excretion accounted for the difference between PIII and PI. PMID:849375

  15. Metabolic abnormalities in cachexia and anorexia.

    PubMed

    Tisdale, M J

    2000-10-01

    An increased glucose requirement by many solid tumors produces an increased metabolic demand on the liver, resulting in an increased energy expenditure. In addition, several cytokines and tumor catabolic products have been suggested as being responsible for the depletion of adipose tissue and skeletal-muscle mass in cachexia. A sulphated glycoprotein of molecular mass 24 kDa, produced by cachexia-inducing tumors and present in the urine of cancer patients actively losing weight, has been shown to be capable of inducing direct muscle catabolism in vitro and a state of cachexia in vivo, with specific loss of the non-fat carcass mass. In vitro studies have shown the bioactivity of this proteolysis-inducing factor to be attenuated by the polyunsaturated fatty acid, eicosapentaenoic acid. Preliminary clinical studies have shown that eicosapentaenoic acid stabilizes body weight and protein and fat reserves in patients with pancreatic carcinoma. Further trials are required to confirm the efficacy of eicosapentaenoic acid and to determine the anticachectic activity in other types of cancer. PMID:11054609

  16. Dietary lipids and blood cholesterol: quantitative meta-analysis of metabolic ward studies.

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, R.; Frost, C.; Collins, R.; Appleby, P.; Peto, R.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the quantitative importance of dietary fatty acids and dietary cholesterol to blood concentrations of total, low density lipoprotein, and high density lipoprotein cholesterol. DESIGN: Meta-analysis of metabolic ward studies of solid food diets in healthy volunteers. SUBJECTS: 395 dietary experiments (median duration 1 month) among 129 groups of individuals. RESULTS: Isocaloric replacement of saturated fats by complex carbohydrates for 10% of dietary calories resulted in blood total cholesterol falling by 0.52 (SE 0.03) mmol/l and low density lipoprotein cholesterol falling by 0.36 (0.05) mmol/l. Isocaloric replacement of complex carbohydrates by polyunsaturated fats for 5% of dietary calories resulted in total cholesterol falling by a further 0.13 (0.02) mmol/l and low density lipoprotein cholesterol falling by 0.11 (0.02) mmol/l. Similar replacement of carbohydrates by monounsaturated fats produced no significant effect on total or low density lipoprotein cholesterol. Avoiding 200 mg/day dietary cholesterol further decreased blood total cholesterol by 0.13 (0.02) mmol/l and low density lipoprotein cholesterol by 0.10 (0.02) mmol/l. CONCLUSIONS: In typical British diets replacing 60% of saturated fats by other fats and avoiding 60% of dietary cholesterol would reduce blood total cholesterol by about 0.8 mmol/l (that is, by 10-15%), with four fifths of this reduction being in low density lipoprotein cholesterol. PMID:9006469

  17. Brain Cholesterol Metabolism and Its Defects: Linkage to Neurodegenerative Diseases and Synaptic Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Petrov, A M; Kasimov, M R; Zefirov, A L

    2016-01-01

    Cholesterol is an important constituent of cell membranes and plays a crucial role in the compartmentalization of the plasma membrane and signaling. Brain cholesterol accounts for a large proportion of the body's total cholesterol, existing in two pools: the plasma membranes of neurons and glial cells and the myelin membranes . Cholesterol has been recently shown to be important for synaptic transmission, and a link between cholesterol metabolism defects and neurodegenerative disorders is now recognized. Many neurodegenerative diseases are characterized by impaired cholesterol turnover in the brain. However, at which stage the cholesterol biosynthetic pathway is perturbed and how this contributes to pathogenesis remains unknown. Cognitive deficits and neurodegeneration may be associated with impaired synaptic transduction. Defects in cholesterol biosynthesis can trigger dysfunction of synaptic transmission. In this review, an overview of cholesterol turnover under physiological and pathological conditions is presented (Huntington's, Niemann-Pick type C diseases, Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome). We will discuss possible mechanisms by which cholesterol content in the plasma membrane influences synaptic processes. Changes in cholesterol metabolism in Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and autistic disorders are beyond the scope of this review and will be summarized in our next paper. PMID:27099785

  18. Brain Cholesterol Metabolism and Its Defects: Linkage to Neurodegenerative Diseases and Synaptic Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Petrov, A. M.; Kasimov, M. R.; Zefirov, A. L.

    2016-01-01

    Cholesterol is an important constituent of cell membranes and plays a crucial role in the compartmentalization of the plasma membrane and signaling. Brain cholesterol accounts for a large proportion of the body’s total cholesterol, existing in two pools: the plasma membranes of neurons and glial cells and the myelin membranes . Cholesterol has been recently shown to be important for synaptic transmission, and a link between cholesterol metabolism defects and neurodegenerative disorders is now recognized. Many neurodegenerative diseases are characterized by impaired cholesterol turnover in the brain. However, at which stage the cholesterol biosynthetic pathway is perturbed and how this contributes to pathogenesis remains unknown. Cognitive deficits and neurodegeneration may be associated with impaired synaptic transduction. Defects in cholesterol biosynthesis can trigger dysfunction of synaptic transmission. In this review, an overview of cholesterol turnover under physiological and pathological conditions is presented (Huntington’s, Niemann-Pick type C diseases, Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome). We will discuss possible mechanisms by which cholesterol content in the plasma membrane influences synaptic processes. Changes in cholesterol metabolism in Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, and autistic disorders are beyond the scope of this review and will be summarized in our next paper. PMID:27099785

  19. Effects of a lifestyle modification trial among phenotypically obese metabolically normal and phenotypically obese metabolically abnormal adolescents in comparison with phenotypically normal metabolically obese adolescents.

    PubMed

    Kelishadi, Roya; Hashemipour, Mahin; Sarrafzadegan, Nizal; Mohammadifard, Noushin; Alikhasy, Hasan; Beizaei, Maryam; Sajjadi, Firouzeh; Poursafa, Parinaz; Amin, Zahra; Ghatreh-Samani, Shohreh; Khavarian, Noushin; Siadat, Zahra Dana

    2010-07-01

    This study aimed to assess the effects of a 2-month lifestyle modification trial on cardio-metabolic abnormalities and C-reactive protein (CRP) among obese adolescents with metabolic syndrome [phenotypically obese metabolically abnormal (POMA)] and obese adolescents without a cardio-metabolic disorder [phenotypically obese metabolically normal (POMN)], as well as in normal-weight adolescents with at least one cardio-metabolic disorder [phenotypically normal metabolically obese (PNMO)]. The study comprised 360 adolescents assigned in three groups of equal number of POMN, POMA and PNMO. They were enrolled in a trial consisting of aerobic activity classes, diet and behaviour modification, and were recalled after 6 months. Overall, 94.7% of participants completed the 2-month trial, and 87.3% of them returned after 6 months. The mean CRP was not significantly different between the POMA and PNMO groups, but was higher than in the POMN group. After the trial, body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC) decreased in obese participants, and the mean body fat mass decreased in all groups. At 2 months, the mean total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), triglycerides (TG) and CRP decreased in the POMA and PNMO groups. After 2 and 6 months, the decrease in mean TC, LDL-C, TG, CRP and systolic blood pressure was greater in the POMA than in the POMN group. The magnitude of decrease in CRP correlated with that of BMI, WC, fat mass, TG, TC and LDL-C. Lifestyle modification programmes for primordial/primary prevention of chronic diseases would be beneficial at the population level and should not be limited to obese children. PMID:20929499

  20. Cholesterol Status Modulates mRNA and Protein Levels of Genes Associated with Cholesterol Metabolism

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dietary saturated (S), monounsaturated (MU) and polyunsaturated (PU) fatty acids (FA) and cholesterol have been shown to be major determinants of plasma lipoprotein profiles. The objective was to determine the effect of whole body cholesterol status and dietary fatty acid saturation on genes associ...

  1. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor regulates cholesterol metabolism for synapse development.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Shingo; Kiyosue, Kazuyuki; Hazama, Shunsuke; Ogura, Akihiko; Kashihara, Megumi; Hara, Tomoko; Koshimizu, Hisatsugu; Kojima, Masami

    2007-06-13

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) exerts multiple biological functions in the CNS. Although BDNF can control transcription and protein synthesis, it still remains open to question whether BDNF regulates lipid biosynthesis. Here we show that BDNF elicits cholesterol biosynthesis in cultured cortical and hippocampal neurons. Importantly, BDNF elicited cholesterol synthesis in neurons, but not in glial cells. Quantitative reverse transcriptase-PCR revealed that BDNF stimulated the transcription of enzymes in the cholesterol biosynthetic pathway. BDNF-induced cholesterol increases were blocked by specific inhibitors of cholesterol synthesis, mevastatin and zaragozic acid, suggesting that BDNF stimulates de novo synthesis of cholesterol rather than the incorporation of extracellular cholesterol. Because cholesterol is a major component of lipid rafts, we investigated whether BDNF would increase the cholesterol content in lipid rafts or nonraft membrane domains. Interestingly, the BDNF-mediated increase in cholesterol occurred in rafts, but not in nonrafts, suggesting that BDNF promotes the development of neuronal lipid rafts. Consistent with this notion, BDNF raised the level of the lipid raft marker protein caveolin-2 in rafts. Remarkably, BDNF increased the levels of presynaptic proteins in lipid rafts, but not in nonrafts. An electrophysiological study revealed that BDNF-dependent cholesterol biosynthesis plays an important role for the development of a readily releasable pool of synaptic vesicles. Together, these results suggest a novel role for BDNF in cholesterol metabolism and synapse development. PMID:17567802

  2. A diet rich in leafy vegetable fiber improves cholesterol metabolism in high-cholesterol fed rats.

    PubMed

    Ezz El-Arab, A M

    2009-10-01

    In the present study, the hypocholesterolemic effect of leaf vegetable (Jew's mallow) was studied in high-cholesterol fed rats. The animals were fed diets supplemented with cholesterol (0.25%) for 4 weeks. Leaf vegetable diet produced an important hypocholesterolemic action: it led to a significant lowering (p<0.05) of cholesterol in the plasma and liver, as well as of the atherogenic index and a significant increase (p<0.05) in cecal short chain fatty acids, with respect to the control group. Concurrently, total fecal neutral sterols in the excretion increased (p<0.05) and apparent absorption of dietary cholesterol was significantly depressed (-58%). The consumption of leaf vegetable (Jew's mallow) with a hypercholesterolemic diet improved the lipidemic profile and increased excretion of the total cholesterol end-products. PMID:20387744

  3. Cholesterol metabolism in cholestatic liver disease and liver transplantation: From molecular mechanisms to clinical implications

    PubMed Central

    Nemes, Katriina; Åberg, Fredrik; Gylling, Helena; Isoniemi, Helena

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this review is to enlighten the critical roles that the liver plays in cholesterol metabolism. Liver transplantation can serve as gene therapy or a source of gene transmission in certain conditions that affect cholesterol metabolism, such as low-density-lipoprotein (LDL) receptor gene mutations that are associated with familial hypercholesterolemia. On the other hand, cholestatic liver disease often alters cholesterol metabolism. Cholestasis can lead to formation of lipoprotein X (Lp-X), which is frequently mistaken for LDL on routine clinical tests. In contrast to LDL, Lp-X is non-atherogenic, and failure to differentiate between the two can interfere with cardiovascular risk assessment, potentially leading to prescription of futile lipid-lowering therapy. Statins do not effectively lower Lp-X levels, and cholestasis may lead to accumulation of toxic levels of statins. Moreover, severe cholestasis results in poor micellar formation, which reduces cholesterol absorption, potentially impairing the cholesterol-lowering effect of ezetimibe. Apolipoprotein B-100 measurement can help distinguish between atherogenic and non-atherogenic hypercholesterolemia. Furthermore, routine serum cholesterol measurements alone cannot reflect cholesterol absorption and synthesis. Measurements of serum non-cholesterol sterol biomarkers - such as cholesterol precursor sterols, plant sterols, and cholestanol - may help with the comprehensive assessment of cholesterol metabolism. An adequate cholesterol supply is essential for liver-regenerative capacity. Low preoperative and perioperative serum cholesterol levels seem to predict mortality in liver cirrhosis and after liver transplantation. Thus, accurate lipid profile evaluation is highly important in liver disease and after liver transplantation. PMID:27574546

  4. Cholesterol metabolism in cholestatic liver disease and liver transplantation: From molecular mechanisms to clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Nemes, Katriina; Åberg, Fredrik; Gylling, Helena; Isoniemi, Helena

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this review is to enlighten the critical roles that the liver plays in cholesterol metabolism. Liver transplantation can serve as gene therapy or a source of gene transmission in certain conditions that affect cholesterol metabolism, such as low-density-lipoprotein (LDL) receptor gene mutations that are associated with familial hypercholesterolemia. On the other hand, cholestatic liver disease often alters cholesterol metabolism. Cholestasis can lead to formation of lipoprotein X (Lp-X), which is frequently mistaken for LDL on routine clinical tests. In contrast to LDL, Lp-X is non-atherogenic, and failure to differentiate between the two can interfere with cardiovascular risk assessment, potentially leading to prescription of futile lipid-lowering therapy. Statins do not effectively lower Lp-X levels, and cholestasis may lead to accumulation of toxic levels of statins. Moreover, severe cholestasis results in poor micellar formation, which reduces cholesterol absorption, potentially impairing the cholesterol-lowering effect of ezetimibe. Apolipoprotein B-100 measurement can help distinguish between atherogenic and non-atherogenic hypercholesterolemia. Furthermore, routine serum cholesterol measurements alone cannot reflect cholesterol absorption and synthesis. Measurements of serum non-cholesterol sterol biomarkers - such as cholesterol precursor sterols, plant sterols, and cholestanol - may help with the comprehensive assessment of cholesterol metabolism. An adequate cholesterol supply is essential for liver-regenerative capacity. Low preoperative and perioperative serum cholesterol levels seem to predict mortality in liver cirrhosis and after liver transplantation. Thus, accurate lipid profile evaluation is highly important in liver disease and after liver transplantation. PMID:27574546

  5. TMEM55B is a Novel Regulator of Cellular Cholesterol Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Medina, Marisa W.; Bauzon, Frederick; Naidoo, Devesh; Theusch, Elizabeth; Stevens, Kristen; Schilde, Jessica; Schubert, Christian; Mangravite, Lara M.; Rudel, Lawrence L.; Temel, Ryan E.; Runz, Heiko; Krauss, Ronald M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Inter-individual variation in pathways impacting cellular cholesterol metabolism can influence levels of plasma cholesterol, a well-established risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Inherent variation among immortalized lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) from different donors can be leveraged to discover novel genes that modulate cellular cholesterol metabolism. The objective of this study was to identify novel genes that regulate cholesterol metabolism by testing for evidence of correlated gene expression with cellular levels of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGCR) mRNA, a marker for cellular cholesterol homeostasis, in a large panel of LCLs. Approach and Results Expression array profiling was performed on 480 LCLs established from participants of the Cholesterol and Pharmacogenetics statin clinical trial, and transcripts were tested for evidence of correlated expression with HMGCR as a marker of intracellular cholesterol homeostasis. Of these, transmembrane protein 55b (TMEM55B) showed the strongest correlation (r=0.29, p=4.0E-08) of all genes not previously implicated in cholesterol metabolism and was found to be sterol regulated. TMEM55B knock-down in human hepatoma cell lines promoted the decay rate of the low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR), reduced cell surface LDLR protein, impaired LDL uptake, and reduced intracellular cholesterol. Conclusions Here we report identification of TMEM55B as a novel regulator of cellular cholesterol metabolism through the combination of gene expression profiling and functional studies. The findings highlight the value of an integrated genomic approach for identifying genes that influence cholesterol homeostasis. PMID:25035345

  6. Profile of metabolic abnormalities seen in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and their first degree relatives with metabolic syndrome seen in Benin City, Edo state Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background To determine the profile of metabolic abnormalities in T2DM persons with metabolic syndrome and their non-diabetic first-degree relatives who also had metabolic syndrome in Benin City. Methodology This was a cross sectional case controlled study in which convenience sampling technique was used to recruit 106 persons with T2DM, 96 people who are first degree relatives of type 2 diabetic persons and 96 controls using a interviewer administered questionnaire technique. The following were assessed: anthropometric indices, blood pressure, serum lipid profile, fasting blood sugar, proteinuria, and microalbuminuria. The data obtained were analyzed using the statistical software-Statistical package for social sciences [SPSS] version 16. A p-value of less than 0.05 was taken as statistically significant. Results The mean age (SD) of the study groups were: persons living with T2DM: 58.6 ± 11.2 years, control: 57.69 ± 60.8 years and FDR: 57.4 ± 10.6 years. No significant age and sex differences were observed in these groups. There were more females (59.7%) than males (40.3%) with T2DM. The prevalence of MS was 13.5%, 16.7%, and 87.1% in the control, FDR and T2DM patients respectively. For the T2DM group of subjects, impaired fasting glycaemia was the commonest metabolic abnormality followed by microalbuminuria, low HDL cholesterol, high LDL cholesterol, hypercholesterolaemia and hypertriglyceridaemia in decreasing frequency. For the FDR group, low HDL cholesterol was the commonest metabolic abnormality followed by hypertriglyceridaemia, impaired fasting glucose, high LDL cholesterol, hypertriglyceridaemia and microalbuminuria in decreasing frequency. Hypercholesterolemia and low HDL cholesterol were the commonest metabolic abnormalities in the control group. Conclusion The prevalence of the MS in persons with T2DM in Nigeria appears to be high. Secondly, there is a high prevalence of lipid abnormalities in all the study groups. PMID:24932458

  7. Effects of Gemfibrozil on Cholesterol Metabolism, Steroidogenesis, and Reproduction in the Fathead Minnow (Pimephales promelas)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fibrates are a class of pharmaceuticals that indirectly modulate cholesterol biosynthesis through effects on peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR), which are transcriptional cofactors that regulate expression of genes related to lipid metabolism. Gemfibrozil is a fib...

  8. Effects of Gemfibrozil on Cholesterol Metabolism, Steroidogenesis, and Reproduction in the Fathead Minnow (Pimephales promelas)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fibrates are a class of pharmaceuticals that indirectly modulate cholesterol biosynthesis through effects on peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors, which are transcriptional cofactors that regulate expression of genes related to lipid metabolism. Gemfibrozil is a fibrate th...

  9. Effects of Gemfibrozil on Cholesterol Metabolism and Steroidogenesis in the Fathead Minnow (Pimephales promelas)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fibrates are a class of pharmaceuticals that indirectly modulate cholesterol biosynthesis through effects on peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR), which are transcriptional cofactors that regulate expression of genes related to lipid metabolism. Gemfibrozil is a fib...

  10. A specific cholesterol metabolic pathway is established in a subset of HCCs for tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Ming; Hu, Xi-Han; Li, Qin; Xiong, Ying; Hu, Guang-Jing; Xu, Jia-Jia; Zhao, Xiao-Nan; Wei, Xi-Xiao; Chang, Catherine C.Y.; Liu, Yin-Kun; Nan, Fa-Jun; Li, Jia; Chang, Ta-Yuan; Song, Bao-Liang; Li, Bo-Liang

    2013-01-01

    The liver plays a central role in cholesterol homeostasis. It exclusively receives and metabolizes oxysterols, which are important metabolites of cholesterol and are more cytotoxic than free cholesterol, from all extrahepatic tissues. Hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs) impair certain liver functions and cause pathological alterations in many processes including cholesterol metabolism. However, the link between an altered cholesterol metabolism and HCC development is unclear. Human ACAT2 is abundantly expressed in intestine and fetal liver. Our previous studies have shown that ACAT2 is induced in certain HCC tissues. Here, by investigating tissue samples from HCC patients and HCC cell lines, we report that a specific cholesterol metabolic pathway, involving induction of ACAT2 and esterification of excess oxysterols for secretion to avoid cytotoxicity, is established in a subset of HCCs for tumor growth. Inhibiting ACAT2 leads to the intracellular accumulation of unesterified oxysterols and suppresses the growth of both HCC cell lines and their xenograft tumors. Further mechanistic studies reveal that HCC-linked promoter hypomethylation is essential for the induction of ACAT2 gene expression. We postulate that specifically blocking this HCC-established cholesterol metabolic pathway may have potential therapeutic applications for HCC patients. PMID:24163426

  11. Abnormal barrier function in the pathogenesis of ichthyosis: Therapeutic implications for lipid metabolic disorders☆

    PubMed Central

    Elias, Peter M.; Williams, Mary L.; Feingold, Kenneth R.

    2013-01-01

    Ichthyoses, including inherited disorders of lipid metabolism, display a permeability barrier abnormality in which the severity of the clinical phenotype parallels the prominence of the barrier defect. The pathogenesis of the cutaneous phenotype represents the consequences of the mutation for epidermal function, coupled with a “best attempt” by affected epidermis to generate a competent barrier in a terrestrial environment. A compromised barrier in normal epidermis triggers a vigorous set of metabolic responses that rapidly normalizes function, but ichthyotic epidermis, which is inherently compromised, only partially succeeds in this effort. Unraveling mechanisms that account for barrier dysfunction in the ichthyoses has identified multiple, subcellular, and biochemical processes that contribute to the clinical phenotype. Current treatment of the ichthyoses remains largely symptomatic: directed toward reducing scale or corrective gene therapy. Reducing scale is often minimally effective. Gene therapy is impeded by multiple pitfalls, including difficulties in transcutaneous drug delivery, high costs, and discomfort of injections. We have begun to use information about disease pathogenesis to identify novel, pathogenesis-based therapeutic strategies for the ichthyoses. The clinical phenotype often reflects not only a deficiency of pathway end product due to reduced-function mutations in key synthetic enzymes but often also accumulation of proximal, potentially toxic metabolites. As a result, depending upon the identified pathomechanism(s) for each disorder, the accompanying ichthyosis can be treated by topical provision of pathway product (eg, cholesterol), with or without a proximal enzyme inhibitor (eg, simvastatin), to block metabolite production. Among the disorders of distal cholesterol metabolism, the cutaneous phenotype in Congenital Hemidysplasia with Ichthyosiform Erythroderma and Limb Defects (CHILD syndrome) and X-linked ichthyosis reflect metabolite

  12. Epiberberine reduces serum cholesterol in diet-induced dyslipidemia Syrian golden hamsters via network pathways involving cholesterol metabolism.

    PubMed

    Zou, Zong-Yao; Hu, Yin-Ran; Ma, Hang; Feng, Min; Li, Xue-Gang; Ye, Xiao-Li

    2016-03-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the cholesterol-lowering effect of epiberberine in dyslipidemia Syrian golden hamsters induced by high fat and high cholesterol (HFHC) diet and its regulation mechanism on some key genes involved in cholesterol metabolism. Hamsters were divided into six groups: normal control group (NC), HFHC group, simvastatin (Sim) and three doses of epiberberine group. The body weight, organs weight and serum lipid levels, as well as total cholesterol (TC) and total bile acids (TBA) levels in liver and feces were determined. Furthermore, the antidyslipidemia effect of epiberberine on key genes involved in cholesterol biosynthesis, uptake, conversion and elimination such as 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGCR), low density lipoprotein receptor (LDL receptor), 7-alpha-hydroxylase (CYP7A1) and apical sodium dependent bile acid transporter (ASBT) were investigated. The results showed that epiberberine at high dosage significantly reduced serum TC, low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-c) and TBA levels by 20.2%, 22.3% and 43.8%, respectively, and increased TBA and TC levels in feces. Epiberberine inhibited HMGCR mRNA and protein expressions and slightly reduced the protein level of ASBT, as well as dramatically up-regulated mRNA and protein expressions of CYP7A1 and LDL receptor. These findings suggested that the antidyslipidemia effects of epiberberine can be achieved via inhibiting the synthesis of cholesterol, promoting the uptake and conversion of TC in liver and increasing the excretion of TC and TBA in feces. Thus, epiberberine should be considered as one of the promising natural drugs for the treatment of dyslipidemia. PMID:26593426

  13. Cardiovascular Disease Risk of Abdominal Obesity versus Metabolic Abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Wildman, Rachel P.; McGinn, Aileen P.; Lin, Juan; Wang, Dan; Muntner, Paul; Cohen, Hillel W.; Reynolds, Kristi; Fonseca, Vivian; Sowers, MaryFran R.

    2011-01-01

    It remains unclear whether abdominal obesity increases cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk independent of the metabolic abnormalities which often accompany it. Therefore, the objective of the current study was to evaluate the independent effects of abdominal obesity versus metabolic syndrome and diabetes on the risk for incident coronary heart disease and stroke. The Framingham Offspring, Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities, and Cardiovascular Health studies were pooled to assess the independent effects of abdominal obesity (waist circumference >102 cm for men and >88 cm for women) versus metabolic syndrome (excluding the waist circumference criterion) and diabetes on risk for incident coronary heart disease and stroke in 20,298 men and women aged ≥45 years. The average follow-up was 8.3 (standard deviation 1.9) years. There were 1,766 CVD events. After adjustment for demographic factors, smoking, alcohol intake, number of metabolic syndrome components and diabetes, abdominal obesity was not significantly associated with an increased risk of CVD (hazard ratio [95% confidence interval] 1.09 [0.98, 1.20]). However, after adjustment for demographics, smoking, alcohol intake, and abdominal obesity, having 1–2 metabolic syndrome components, the metabolic syndrome, and diabetes were each associated with a significantly increased risk of CVD (2.12 [1.80, 2.50], 2.82 [1.92, 4.12] and 5.33 [3.37, 8.41], respectively). Although abdominal obesity is an important clinical tool for identification of individuals likely to possess metabolic abnormalities, these data suggest that the metabolic syndrome and diabetes are considerably more important prognostic indicators of CVD risk. PMID:20725064

  14. Cholesterol uptake disruption, in association with chemotherapy, is a promising combined metabolic therapy for pancreatic adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Guillaumond, Fabienne; Bidaut, Ghislain; Ouaissi, Mehdi; Servais, Stéphane; Gouirand, Victoire; Olivares, Orianne; Lac, Sophie; Borge, Laurence; Roques, Julie; Gayet, Odile; Pinault, Michelle; Guimaraes, Cyrille; Nigri, Jérémy; Loncle, Céline; Lavaut, Marie-Noëlle; Garcia, Stéphane; Tailleux, Anne; Staels, Bart; Calvo, Ezequiel; Tomasini, Richard; Iovanna, Juan Lucio; Vasseur, Sophie

    2015-01-01

    The malignant progression of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is accompanied by a profound desmoplasia, which forces proliferating tumor cells to metabolically adapt to this new microenvironment. We established the PDAC metabolic signature to highlight the main activated tumor metabolic pathways. Comparative transcriptomic analysis identified lipid-related metabolic pathways as being the most highly enriched in PDAC, compared with a normal pancreas. Our study revealed that lipoprotein metabolic processes, in particular cholesterol uptake, are drastically activated in the tumor. This process results in an increase in the amount of cholesterol and an overexpression of the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) in pancreatic tumor cells. These findings identify LDLR as a novel metabolic target to limit PDAC progression. Here, we demonstrate that shRNA silencing of LDLR, in pancreatic tumor cells, profoundly reduces uptake of cholesterol and alters its distribution, decreases tumor cell proliferation, and limits activation of ERK1/2 survival pathway. Moreover, blocking cholesterol uptake sensitizes cells to chemotherapeutic drugs and potentiates the effect of chemotherapy on PDAC regression. Clinically, high PDAC Ldlr expression is not restricted to a specific tumor stage but is correlated to a higher risk of disease recurrence. This study provides a precise overview of lipid metabolic pathways that are disturbed in PDAC. We also highlight the high dependence of pancreatic cancer cells upon cholesterol uptake, and identify LDLR as a promising metabolic target for combined therapy, to limit PDAC progression and disease patient relapse. PMID:25675507

  15. Cholesterol uptake disruption, in association with chemotherapy, is a promising combined metabolic therapy for pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Guillaumond, Fabienne; Bidaut, Ghislain; Ouaissi, Mehdi; Servais, Stéphane; Gouirand, Victoire; Olivares, Orianne; Lac, Sophie; Borge, Laurence; Roques, Julie; Gayet, Odile; Pinault, Michelle; Guimaraes, Cyrille; Nigri, Jérémy; Loncle, Céline; Lavaut, Marie-Noëlle; Garcia, Stéphane; Tailleux, Anne; Staels, Bart; Calvo, Ezequiel; Tomasini, Richard; Iovanna, Juan Lucio; Vasseur, Sophie

    2015-02-24

    The malignant progression of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is accompanied by a profound desmoplasia, which forces proliferating tumor cells to metabolically adapt to this new microenvironment. We established the PDAC metabolic signature to highlight the main activated tumor metabolic pathways. Comparative transcriptomic analysis identified lipid-related metabolic pathways as being the most highly enriched in PDAC, compared with a normal pancreas. Our study revealed that lipoprotein metabolic processes, in particular cholesterol uptake, are drastically activated in the tumor. This process results in an increase in the amount of cholesterol and an overexpression of the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) in pancreatic tumor cells. These findings identify LDLR as a novel metabolic target to limit PDAC progression. Here, we demonstrate that shRNA silencing of LDLR, in pancreatic tumor cells, profoundly reduces uptake of cholesterol and alters its distribution, decreases tumor cell proliferation, and limits activation of ERK1/2 survival pathway. Moreover, blocking cholesterol uptake sensitizes cells to chemotherapeutic drugs and potentiates the effect of chemotherapy on PDAC regression. Clinically, high PDAC Ldlr expression is not restricted to a specific tumor stage but is correlated to a higher risk of disease recurrence. This study provides a precise overview of lipid metabolic pathways that are disturbed in PDAC. We also highlight the high dependence of pancreatic cancer cells upon cholesterol uptake, and identify LDLR as a promising metabolic target for combined therapy, to limit PDAC progression and disease patient relapse. PMID:25675507

  16. Is cancer a disease of abnormal cellular metabolism?

    PubMed Central

    DeBerardinis, Ralph J.

    2009-01-01

    In the 1920s, Otto Warburg observed that tumor cells consume a large amount of glucose, much more than normal cells, and convert most of it to lactic acid. This phenomenon, now known as the ‘Warburg effect,’ is the foundation of one of the earliest general concepts of cancer: that a fundamental disturbance of cellular metabolic activity is at the root of tumor formation and growth. In the ensuing decades, as it became apparent that abnormalities in chromosomes and eventually individual genes caused cancer, the ‘metabolic’ model of cancer lost a good deal of its appeal, even as emerging technologies were exploiting the Warburg effect clinically to detect tumors in vivo. We now know that tumor suppressors and proto-oncogenes influence metabolism, and that mutations in these genes can promote a metabolic phenotype supporting cell growth and proliferation. Thus, these advances have unified aspects of the metabolic and genetic models of cancer, and have stimulated a renewed interest in the role of cellular metabolism in tumorigenesis. This review reappraises the notion that dysregulated cellular metabolism is a key feature of cancer, and discusses some metabolic issues that have escaped scrutiny over the years and now deserve closer attention. PMID:18941420

  17. PPAR{gamma} regulates the expression of cholesterol metabolism genes in alveolar macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, Anna D.; Malur, Anagha; Barna, Barbara P.; Kavuru, Mani S.; Malur, Achut G.; Thomassen, Mary Jane

    2010-03-19

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPAR{gamma}) is a nuclear transcription factor involved in lipid metabolism that is constitutively expressed in the alveolar macrophages of healthy individuals. PPAR{gamma} has recently been implicated in the catabolism of surfactant by alveolar macrophages, specifically the cholesterol component of surfactant while the mechanism remains unclear. Studies from other tissue macrophages have shown that PPAR{gamma} regulates cholesterol influx, efflux, and metabolism. PPAR{gamma} promotes cholesterol efflux through the liver X receptor-alpha (LXR{alpha}) and ATP-binding cassette G1 (ABCG1). We have recently shown that macrophage-specific PPAR{gamma} knockout (PPAR{gamma} KO) mice accumulate cholesterol-laden alveolar macrophages that exhibit decreased expression of LXR{alpha} and ABCG1 and reduced cholesterol efflux. We hypothesized that in addition to the dysregulation of these cholesterol efflux genes, the expression of genes involved in cholesterol synthesis and influx was also dysregulated and that replacement of PPAR{gamma} would restore regulation of these genes. To investigate this hypothesis, we have utilized a Lentivirus expression system (Lenti-PPAR{gamma}) to restore PPAR{gamma} expression in the alveolar macrophages of PPAR{gamma} KO mice. Our results show that the alveolar macrophages of PPAR{gamma} KO mice have decreased expression of key cholesterol synthesis genes and increased expression of cholesterol receptors CD36 and scavenger receptor A-I (SRA-I). The replacement of PPAR{gamma} (1) induced transcription of LXR{alpha} and ABCG1; (2) corrected suppressed expression of cholesterol synthesis genes; and (3) enhanced the expression of scavenger receptors CD36. These results suggest that PPAR{gamma} regulates cholesterol metabolism in alveolar macrophages.

  18. Cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase-deficient mice are protected from high-fat/high-cholesterol diet-induced metabolic disorders.

    PubMed

    Ferrell, Jessica M; Boehme, Shannon; Li, Feng; Chiang, John Y L

    2016-07-01

    Cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase (CYP7A1) is the first and rate-limiting enzyme in the conversion of cholesterol to bile acids in the liver. In addition to absorption and digestion of nutrients, bile acids play a critical role in the regulation of lipid, glucose, and energy homeostasis. We have backcrossed Cyp7a1(-/-) mice in a mixed B6/129Sv genetic background to C57BL/6J mice to generate Cyp7a1(-/-) mice in a near-pure C57BL/6J background. These mice survive well and have normal growth and a bile acid pool size ∼60% of WT mice. The expression of the genes in the alternative bile acid synthesis pathway are upregulated, resulting in a more hydrophilic bile acid composition with reduced cholic acid (CA). Surprisingly, Cyp7a1(-/-) mice have improved glucose sensitivity with reduced liver triglycerides and fecal bile acid excretion, but increased fecal fatty acid excretion and respiratory exchange ratio (RER) when fed a high-fat/high-cholesterol diet. Supplementing chow and Western diets with CA restored bile acid composition, reversed the glucose tolerant phenotype, and reduced the RER. Our current study points to a critical role of bile acid composition, rather than bile acid pool size, in regulation of glucose, lipid, and energy metabolism to improve glucose and insulin tolerance, maintain metabolic homeostasis, and prevent high-fat diet-induced metabolic disorders. PMID:27146480

  19. Abnormal neuronal metabolism and storage in mucopolysaccharidosis type VI (Maroteaux-Lamy) disease.

    PubMed

    Walkley, S U; Thrall, M A; Haskins, M E; Mitchell, T W; Wenger, D A; Brown, D E; Dial, S; Seim, H

    2005-10-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) type VI, also known as Maroteaux-Lamy disease, is an inherited disorder of glycosaminoglycan catabolism caused by deficient activity of the lysosomal hydrolase, N-acetylgalactosamine 4-sulphatase (4S). A variety of prominent visceral and skeletal defects are characteristic, but primary neurological involvement has generally been considered absent. We report here that the feline model of MPS VI exhibits abnormal lysosomal storage in occasional neurones and glia distributed throughout the cerebral cortex. Abnormal lysosomal inclusions were pleiomorphic with some resembling zebra bodies and dense core inclusions typical of other MPS diseases or the membranous storage bodies characteristic of the gangliosidoses. Pyramidal neurones were shown to contain abnormal amounts of GM2 and GM3 gangliosides by immunocytochemical staining and unesterified cholesterol by histochemical (filipin) staining. Further, Golgi staining of pyramidal neurones revealed that some possessed ectopic axon hillock neurites and meganeurites similar to those described in Tay-Sachs and other neuronal storage diseases with ganglioside storage. Some animals evaluated in this study also received allogeneic bone marrow transplants, but no significant differences in neuronal storage were noted between treated and untreated individuals. These studies demonstrate that deficiency of 4S activity can lead to metabolic abnormalities in the neurones of central nervous system in cats, and that these changes may not be readily amenable to correction by bone marrow transplantation. Given the close pathological and biochemical similarities between feline and human MPS VI, it is conceivable that children with this disease have similar neuronal involvement. PMID:16150124

  20. ACE Reduces Metabolic Abnormalities in a High-Fat Diet Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seong-Jong; Han, Jong-Min; Lee, Jin-Seok; Son, Chang-Gue; Im, Hwi-Jin; Jo, Hyun-Kyung; Yoo, Ho-Ryong; Kim, Yoon-Sik; Seol, In-Chan

    2015-01-01

    The medicinal plants Artemisia iwayomogi (A. iwayomogi) and Curcuma longa (C. longa) radix have been used to treat metabolic abnormalities in traditional Korean medicine and traditional Chinese medicine (TKM and TCM). In this study we evaluated the effect of the water extract of a mixture of A. iwayomogi and C. longa (ACE) on high-fat diet-induced metabolic syndrome in a mouse model. Four groups of C57BL/6N male mice (except for the naive group) were fed a high-fat diet freely for 10 weeks. Among these, three groups (except the control group) were administered a high-fat diet supplemented with ACE (100 or 200 mg/kg) or curcumin (50 mg/kg). Body weight, accumulation of adipose tissues in abdomen and size of adipocytes, serum lipid profiles, hepatic steatosis, and oxidative stress markers were analyzed. ACE significantly reduced the body and peritoneal adipose tissue weights, serum lipid profiles (total cholesterol and triglycerides), glucose levels, hepatic lipid accumulation, and oxidative stress markers. ACE normalized lipid synthesis-associated gene expressions (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma, PPARγ; fatty acid synthase, FAS; sterol regulatory element-binding transcription factor-1c, SREBP-1c; and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha, PPARα). The results from this study suggest that ACE has the pharmaceutical potential reducing the metabolic abnormalities in an animal model. PMID:26508977

  1. Rice bran proteins and their hydrolysates modulate cholesterol metabolism in mice on hypercholesterolemic diets.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huijuan; Wang, Jing; Liu, Yingli; Gong, Lingxiao; Sun, Baoguo

    2016-06-15

    The hypolipidemic properties of defatted rice bran protein (DRBP), fresh rice bran protein (FRBP), DRBP hydrolysates (DRBPH), and FRBP hydrolysates (FRBPH) were determined in mice on high fat diets for four weeks. Very low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (VLDL-C), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) contents, and the hepatic total cholesterol content were reduced while fecal total cholesterol and total bile acid (TBA) contents were increased in the FRBPH diet group. The expression levels of hepatic genes for cholesterol biosynthesis HMG-CoAR and SREBP-2 were lowest in the FRBPH diet group. The mRNA level of HMG-CoAR was significantly positively correlated with the hepatic TG content (r = 0.82, P < 0.05). The mRNA levels of genes related to bile acid biosynthesis and cholesterol efflux, CYP7A1, ABCA1, and PPARγ were up-regulated in all test groups. The results suggest that FRBPH regulates cholesterol metabolism in mice fed the high fat and cholesterol diet by increasing fecal steroid excretion and expression levels of genes related to bile acid synthesis and cholesterol efflux, and the down-regulation of the expression levels of genes related to cholesterol biosynthesis. PMID:27216972

  2. Inhibiting monoacylglycerol acyltransferase 1 ameliorates hepatic metabolic abnormalities but not inflammation and injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Soufi, Nisreen; Hall, Angela M; Chen, Zhouji; Yoshino, Jun; Collier, Sara L; Mathews, James C; Brunt, Elizabeth M; Albert, Carolyn J; Graham, Mark J; Ford, David A; Finck, Brian N

    2014-10-24

    Abnormalities in hepatic lipid metabolism and insulin action are believed to play a critical role in the etiology of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. Monoacylglycerol acyltransferase (MGAT) enzymes convert monoacylglycerol to diacylglycerol, which is the penultimate step in one pathway for triacylglycerol synthesis. Hepatic expression of Mogat1, which encodes an MGAT enzyme, is increased in the livers of mice with hepatic steatosis, and knocking down Mogat1 improves glucose metabolism and hepatic insulin signaling, but whether increased MGAT activity plays a role in the etiology of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis is unclear. To examine this issue, mice were placed on a diet containing high levels of trans fatty acids, fructose, and cholesterol (HTF-C diet) or a low fat control diet for 4 weeks. Mice were injected with antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) to knockdown Mogat1 or a scrambled ASO control for 12 weeks while remaining on diet. The HTF-C diet caused glucose intolerance, hepatic steatosis, and induced hepatic gene expression markers of inflammation, macrophage infiltration, and stellate cell activation. Mogat1 ASO treatment, which suppressed Mogat1 expression in liver and adipose tissue, attenuated weight gain, improved glucose tolerance, improved hepatic insulin signaling, and decreased hepatic triacylglycerol content compared with control ASO-treated mice on HTF-C chow. However, Mogat1 ASO treatment did not reduce hepatic diacylglycerol, cholesterol, or free fatty acid content; improve histologic measures of liver injury; or reduce expression of markers of stellate cell activation, liver inflammation, and injury. In conclusion, inhibition of hepatic Mogat1 in HTF-C diet-fed mice improves hepatic metabolic abnormalities without attenuating liver inflammation and injury. PMID:25213859

  3. Inhibiting Monoacylglycerol Acyltransferase 1 Ameliorates Hepatic Metabolic Abnormalities but Not Inflammation and Injury in Mice*

    PubMed Central

    Soufi, Nisreen; Hall, Angela M.; Chen, Zhouji; Yoshino, Jun; Collier, Sara L.; Mathews, James C.; Brunt, Elizabeth M.; Albert, Carolyn J.; Graham, Mark J.; Ford, David A.; Finck, Brian N.

    2014-01-01

    Abnormalities in hepatic lipid metabolism and insulin action are believed to play a critical role in the etiology of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. Monoacylglycerol acyltransferase (MGAT) enzymes convert monoacylglycerol to diacylglycerol, which is the penultimate step in one pathway for triacylglycerol synthesis. Hepatic expression of Mogat1, which encodes an MGAT enzyme, is increased in the livers of mice with hepatic steatosis, and knocking down Mogat1 improves glucose metabolism and hepatic insulin signaling, but whether increased MGAT activity plays a role in the etiology of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis is unclear. To examine this issue, mice were placed on a diet containing high levels of trans fatty acids, fructose, and cholesterol (HTF-C diet) or a low fat control diet for 4 weeks. Mice were injected with antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) to knockdown Mogat1 or a scrambled ASO control for 12 weeks while remaining on diet. The HTF-C diet caused glucose intolerance, hepatic steatosis, and induced hepatic gene expression markers of inflammation, macrophage infiltration, and stellate cell activation. Mogat1 ASO treatment, which suppressed Mogat1 expression in liver and adipose tissue, attenuated weight gain, improved glucose tolerance, improved hepatic insulin signaling, and decreased hepatic triacylglycerol content compared with control ASO-treated mice on HTF-C chow. However, Mogat1 ASO treatment did not reduce hepatic diacylglycerol, cholesterol, or free fatty acid content; improve histologic measures of liver injury; or reduce expression of markers of stellate cell activation, liver inflammation, and injury. In conclusion, inhibition of hepatic Mogat1 in HTF-C diet-fed mice improves hepatic metabolic abnormalities without attenuating liver inflammation and injury. PMID:25213859

  4. Cholesterol-Lowering Probiotics as Potential Biotherapeutics for Metabolic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Manoj; Nagpal, Ravinder; Kumar, Rajesh; Hemalatha, R.; Verma, Vinod; Kumar, Ashok; Chakraborty, Chaitali; Singh, Birbal; Marotta, Francesco; Jain, Shalini; Yadav, Hariom

    2012-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are one of the major causes of deaths in adults in the western world. Elevated levels of certain blood lipids have been reported to be the principal cause of cardiovascular disease and other disabilities in developed countries. Several animal and clinical trials have shown a positive association between cholesterol levels and the risks of coronary heart disease. Current dietary strategies for the prevention of cardiovascular disease advocate adherence to low-fat/low-saturated-fat diets. Although there is no doubt that, in experimental conditions, low-fat diets offer an effective means of reducing blood cholesterol concentrations on a population basis, these appear to be less effective, largely due to poor compliance, attributed to low palatability and acceptability of these diets to the consumers. Due to the low consumer compliance, attempts have been made to identify other dietary components that can reduce blood cholesterol levels. Supplementation of diet with fermented dairy products or lactic acid bacteria containing dairy products has shown the potential to reduce serum cholesterol levels. Various approaches have been used to alleviate this issue, including the use of probiotics, especially Bifidobacterium spp. and Lactobacillus spp.. Probiotics, the living microorganisms that confer health benefits on the host when administered in adequate amounts, have received much attention on their proclaimed health benefits which include improvement in lactose intolerance, increase in natural resistance to infectious disease in gastrointestinal tract, suppression of cancer, antidiabetic, reduction in serum cholesterol level, and improved digestion. In addition, there are numerous reports on cholesterol removal ability of probiotics and their hypocholesterolemic effects. Several possible mechanisms for cholesterol removal by probiotics are assimilation of cholesterol by growing cells, binding of cholesterol to cellular surface, incorporation of

  5. Effects of dietary cholesterol supplementation on growth and cholesterol metabolism of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) fed diets with cottonseed meal or rapeseed meal.

    PubMed

    Deng, Junming; Zhang, Xi; Long, Xiaowen; Tao, Linli; Wang, Zhen; Niu, Guoyi; Kang, Bin

    2014-12-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of cholesterol on growth and cholesterol metabolism of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) fed diets with cottonseed meal (CSM) or rapeseed meal (RSM). Four experimental diets were formulated to contain 550 g kg(-1) CSM or 450 g kg(-1) RSM with or without 9 g kg(-1) supplemental cholesterol. Growth rate and feed utilization efficiency of fish fed diets with 450 g kg(-1) RSM were inferior to fish fed diets with 550 g kg(-1) CSM regardless of cholesterol level. Dietary cholesterol supplementation increased the growth rate of fish fed diets with RSM, and growth rate and feed utilization efficiency of fish fed diets with CSM. Similarly, dietary cholesterol supplementation increased the plasma total cholesterol (TC), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and triiodothyronine levels, but decreased the plasma triglycerides and cortisol levels of fish fed diets with RSM or CSM. In addition, supplemental cholesterol increased the free cholesterol and TC levels in intestinal contents, but decreased the hepatic 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase activity of fish fed diets with RSM or CSM. These results indicate that 9 g kg(-1) cholesterol supplementation seems to improve the growth of rainbow trout fed diets with CSM or RSM, and the growth-promoting action may be related to the alleviation of the negative effects caused by antinutritional factors and/or make up for the deficiency of endogenous cholesterol in rainbow trout. PMID:25119853

  6. Cytochrome P450 metabolism of the post-lanosterol intermediates explains enigmas of cholesterol synthesis.

    PubMed

    Ačimovič, Jure; Goyal, Sandeep; Košir, Rok; Goličnik, Marko; Perše, Martina; Belič, Ales; Urlep, Žiga; Guengerich, F Peter; Rozman, Damjana

    2016-01-01

    Cholesterol synthesis is among the oldest metabolic pathways, consisting of the Bloch and Kandutch-Russell branches. Following lanosterol, sterols of both branches are proposed to be dedicated to cholesterol. We challenge this dogma by mathematical modeling and with experimental evidence. It was not possible to explain the sterol profile of testis in cAMP responsive element modulator tau (Crem τ) knockout mice with mathematical models based on textbook pathways of cholesterol synthesis. Our model differs in the inclusion of virtual sterol metabolizing enzymes branching from the pathway. We tested the hypothesis that enzymes from the cytochrome P450 (CYP) superfamily can participate in the catalysis of non-classical reactions. We show that CYP enzymes can metabolize multiple sterols in vitro, establishing novel branching points of cholesterol synthesis. In conclusion, sterols of cholesterol synthesis can be oxidized further to metabolites not dedicated to production of cholesterol. Additionally, CYP7A1, CYP11A1, CYP27A1, and CYP46A1 are parts of a broader cholesterol synthesis network. PMID:27334049

  7. Cytochrome P450 metabolism of the post-lanosterol intermediates explains enigmas of cholesterol synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Ačimovič, Jure; Goyal, Sandeep; Košir, Rok; Goličnik, Marko; Perše, Martina; Belič, Ales; Urlep, Žiga; Guengerich, F. Peter; Rozman, Damjana

    2016-01-01

    Cholesterol synthesis is among the oldest metabolic pathways, consisting of the Bloch and Kandutch-Russell branches. Following lanosterol, sterols of both branches are proposed to be dedicated to cholesterol. We challenge this dogma by mathematical modeling and with experimental evidence. It was not possible to explain the sterol profile of testis in cAMP responsive element modulator tau (Crem τ) knockout mice with mathematical models based on textbook pathways of cholesterol synthesis. Our model differs in the inclusion of virtual sterol metabolizing enzymes branching from the pathway. We tested the hypothesis that enzymes from the cytochrome P450 (CYP) superfamily can participate in the catalysis of non-classical reactions. We show that CYP enzymes can metabolize multiple sterols in vitro, establishing novel branching points of cholesterol synthesis. In conclusion, sterols of cholesterol synthesis can be oxidized further to metabolites not dedicated to production of cholesterol. Additionally, CYP7A1, CYP11A1, CYP27A1, and CYP46A1 are parts of a broader cholesterol synthesis network. PMID:27334049

  8. Cytochrome P450 metabolism of the post-lanosterol intermediates explains enigmas of cholesterol synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ačimovič, Jure; Goyal, Sandeep; Košir, Rok; Goličnik, Marko; Perše, Martina; Belič, Ales; Urlep, Žiga; Guengerich, F. Peter; Rozman, Damjana

    2016-06-01

    Cholesterol synthesis is among the oldest metabolic pathways, consisting of the Bloch and Kandutch-Russell branches. Following lanosterol, sterols of both branches are proposed to be dedicated to cholesterol. We challenge this dogma by mathematical modeling and with experimental evidence. It was not possible to explain the sterol profile of testis in cAMP responsive element modulator tau (Crem τ) knockout mice with mathematical models based on textbook pathways of cholesterol synthesis. Our model differs in the inclusion of virtual sterol metabolizing enzymes branching from the pathway. We tested the hypothesis that enzymes from the cytochrome P450 (CYP) superfamily can participate in the catalysis of non-classical reactions. We show that CYP enzymes can metabolize multiple sterols in vitro, establishing novel branching points of cholesterol synthesis. In conclusion, sterols of cholesterol synthesis can be oxidized further to metabolites not dedicated to production of cholesterol. Additionally, CYP7A1, CYP11A1, CYP27A1, and CYP46A1 are parts of a broader cholesterol synthesis network.

  9. Impact of Dietary Fat Type Within the Context of Altered Cholesterol Homeostasis on Cholesterol and Lipoprotein Metabolism in the F1B Hamster

    PubMed Central

    Lecker, Jaime L.; Matthan, Nirupa R.; Billheimer, Jeffrey T.; Rader, Daniel J.; Lichtenstein, Alice H.

    2010-01-01

    Cholesterol status and dietary fat alter several metabolic pathways reflected in lipoprotein profiles. To assess plasma lipoprotein response and mechanisms by which cholesterol and dietary fat type regulate expression of genes involved in lipoprotein metabolism we developed an experimental model system using F1B hamsters fed diets (12 weeks) enriched in 10% (w/w) coconut, olive or safflower oil with either high cholesterol (0.1%; cholesterol-supplemented) or low cholesterol coupled with cholesterol lowering drugs 10-days prior to killing (0.01% cholesterol, 0.15% lovastatin, 2% cholestyramine; cholesterol-depleted). Irrespective of dietary fat, cholesterol-depletion, relative to supplementation, resulted in lower plasma non-high density lipoprotein (HDL) and HDL cholesterol, and triglyceride concentrations (all P<0.05). In the liver, these differences were associated with higher sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP)-2, low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase and 7-α hydroxylase mRNA levels; higher scavenger receptor B1 and apolipoprotein (apo) A-I mRNA and protein levels; and lower apo E protein levels and in intestine modestly lower sterol transporters ATP binding cassette (ABC) A1, ABCG5 and ABCG8 mRNA levels. Irrespective of cholesterol status, coconut oil, relative to olive and safflower oils, resulted in higher non-HDL cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations (both P<0.05) and modestly higher SREBP-2 mRNA levels. These data suggest that in F1B hamsters, differences in plasma lipoprotein profiles in response to cholesterol depletion are associated with changes in the expression of genes involved in cholesterol metabolism, whereas the effect of dietary fat type on gene expression was modest which limits the usefulness of the experimental animal model. PMID:20197195

  10. Impact of dietary fat type within the context of altered cholesterol homeostasis on cholesterol and lipoprotein metabolism in the F1B hamster.

    PubMed

    Lecker, Jaime L; Matthan, Nirupa R; Billheimer, Jeffrey T; Rader, Daniel J; Lichtenstein, Alice H

    2010-10-01

    Cholesterol status and dietary fat alter several metabolic pathways reflected in lipoprotein profiles. To assess plasma lipoprotein response and mechanisms by which cholesterol and dietary fat type regulate expression of genes involved in lipoprotein metabolism, we developed an experimental model system using F1B hamsters fed diets (12 weeks) enriched in 10% (wt/wt) coconut, olive, or safflower oil with either high cholesterol (0.1%; cholesterol supplemented) or low cholesterol coupled with cholesterol-lowering drugs 10 days before killing (0.01% cholesterol, 0.15% lovastatin, 2% cholestyramine; cholesterol depleted). Irrespective of dietary fat, cholesterol depletion, relative to supplementation, resulted in lower plasma non-high-density lipoprotein (non-HDL) and HDL cholesterol, and triglyceride concentrations (all Ps < .05). In the liver, these differences were associated with higher sterol regulatory element binding protein-2, low-density lipoprotein receptor, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase, and 7α-hydroxylase messenger RNA (mRNA) levels; higher scavenger receptor B1 and apolipoprotein A-I mRNA and protein levels; lower apolipoprotein E protein levels; and in intestine, modestly lower sterol transporters adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette (ABC) A1, ABCG5, and ABCG8 mRNA levels. Irrespective of cholesterol status, coconut oil, relative to olive and safflower oils, resulted in higher non-HDL cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations (both Ps < .05) and modestly higher sterol regulatory element binding protein-2 mRNA levels. These data suggest that, in F1B hamsters, differences in plasma lipoprotein profiles in response to cholesterol depletion are associated with changes in the expression of genes involved in cholesterol metabolism, whereas the effect of dietary fat type on gene expression was modest, which limits the usefulness of the experimental animal model. PMID:20197195

  11. Association of periodontal status with liver abnormalities and metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Aisyah; Furuta, Michiko; Shinagawa, Takashi; Takeuchi, Kenji; Takeshita, Toru; Shimazaki, Yoshihiro; Yamashita, Yoshihisa

    2015-01-01

    Although an association between periodontal status and liver abnormalities has been reported, it has not been described in relation to metabolic syndrome (MetS), which often coexists with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. We examined the association of a combination of liver abnormality and MetS with periodontal condition in Japanese adults, based on the level of alcohol consumption. In 2008, 4,207 males aged 45.4 ± 8.9 years and 1,270 females aged 45.9 ± 9.7 years had annual workplace health check-ups at a company in Japan. Periodontal status was represented as periodontal pocket depth at the mesio-buccal and mid-buccal sites for all teeth. Alanine aminotransferase (ALT), and metabolic components were examined. Multiple linear regression analysis showed a significant association between deep pocket depth and the coexistence of elevated ALT and MetS in males with low alcohol consumption. Females showed no such relationship. In conclusion, the association between periodontal condition and the combination of elevated ALT and MetS was confirmed in males. That is, a clear association between liver abnormalities and periodontal condition was seen in male subjects with no or low alcohol consumption and MetS, providing new insights into the connection between liver function and periodontal health. PMID:26666857

  12. Empagliflozin, via Switching Metabolism Toward Lipid Utilization, Moderately Increases LDL Cholesterol Levels Through Reduced LDL Catabolism.

    PubMed

    Briand, François; Mayoux, Eric; Brousseau, Emmanuel; Burr, Noémie; Urbain, Isabelle; Costard, Clément; Mark, Michael; Sulpice, Thierry

    2016-07-01

    In clinical trials, a small increase in LDL cholesterol has been reported with sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors. The mechanisms by which the SGLT2 inhibitor empagliflozin increases LDL cholesterol levels were investigated in hamsters with diet-induced dyslipidemia. Compared with vehicle, empagliflozin 30 mg/kg/day for 2 weeks significantly reduced fasting blood glucose by 18%, with significant increase in fasting plasma LDL cholesterol, free fatty acids, and total ketone bodies by 25, 49, and 116%, respectively. In fasting conditions, glycogen hepatic levels were further reduced by 84% with empagliflozin, while 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase activity and total cholesterol hepatic levels were 31 and 10% higher, respectively (both P < 0.05 vs. vehicle). A significant 20% reduction in hepatic LDL receptor protein expression was also observed with empagliflozin. Importantly, none of these parameters were changed by empagliflozin in fed conditions. Empagliflozin significantly reduced the catabolism of (3)H-cholesteryl oleate-labeled LDL injected intravenously by 20%, indicating that empagliflozin raises LDL levels through reduced catabolism. Unexpectedly, empagliflozin also reduced intestinal cholesterol absorption in vivo, which led to a significant increase in LDL- and macrophage-derived cholesterol fecal excretion (both P < 0.05 vs. vehicle). These data suggest that empagliflozin, by switching energy metabolism from carbohydrate to lipid utilization, moderately increases ketone production and LDL cholesterol levels. Interestingly, empagliflozin also reduces intestinal cholesterol absorption, which in turn promotes LDL- and macrophage-derived cholesterol fecal excretion. PMID:27207551

  13. [Bone metabolic markers and diagnosis of abnormal bone and calcium metabolism].

    PubMed

    Fukunaga, M; Sone, T

    2001-07-01

    Bone metabolic markers increase in blood or urine, when bone formation or bone resorption accelerates. Reference values of bone metabolic markers are determined in male or female, and in pre- or post-menopause, respectively. Values of bone metabolic markers in most patients with primary osteoporosis were distributed within a reference value, mean+/-1.96 SD. When measured values exceeded a reference values, we should survey a possibility of abnormal calcium or bone metabolism such as primary hyperparathyroidism, renal osteodystrophy, hyperthyroidism and Paget's disease of bone or bone metastasis associated with malignant tumor. PMID:15775589

  14. Effect of clofibrate on cholesterol metabolism in rats treated with polychlorinated biphenyls

    SciTech Connect

    Nakagawa, M.; Shimokawa, T.; Noguchi, A.; Ishihara, N.; Kojima, S.

    1986-02-01

    Serum and hepatic cholesterol content in rats treated with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs, KC-400) were increased compared to those of control rats. This increase of cholesterol content was reduced to control level by simultaneous administration of ethyl p-chlorophenoxyisobutyrate (CPIB). Also, when lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) activity was expressed as the net cholesterol esterification, the acyltransferase activity in rats treated with PCBs was elevated, while the elevated acyltransferase activity was brought to control level by simultaneous administration of CPIB. On the other hand, the amount of bile of rats treated with CPIB, PCBs and PCBs-CPIB was increased, but free and total cholesterol content in bile of these treated rats was decreased to 40-60% of those of control rats. Moreover, cytochrome P-450 content in liver microsomes of rats treated with CPIB, PCBs and PCBs-CPIB was increased. At the same time, cholesterol-metabolizing activity in liver microsomes of rats treated with CPIB, PCBs and PCBs-CPIB also was elevated. Similar results were obtained for drug metabolizing (aniline hydroxylation and aminopyrine N-demethylation) activity. In addition, the amount of bile acids excreted from rats treated with CPIB, PCBs and PCBs-CPIB was increased compared to that of control rats. These results suggest that hypercholesterolemia induced by oral ingestion of PCBs is recovered by CPIB treatment and that this hypocholesterolemic effect of CPIB may be related partly to the elevation of hepatic mixed function oxidase activity for cholesterol catabolism.

  15. Transcription Factor Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor-1β Regulates Renal Cholesterol Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Aboudehen, Karam; Kim, Min Soo; Mitsche, Matthew; Garland, Kristina; Anderson, Norma; Noureddine, Lama; Pontoglio, Marco; Patel, Vishal; Xie, Yang; DeBose-Boyd, Russell; Igarashi, Peter

    2016-08-01

    HNF-1β is a tissue-specific transcription factor that is expressed in the kidney and other epithelial organs. Humans with mutations in HNF-1β develop kidney cysts, and HNF-1β regulates the transcription of several cystic disease genes. However, the complete spectrum of HNF-1β-regulated genes and pathways is not known. Here, using chromatin immunoprecipitation/next generation sequencing and gene expression profiling, we identified 1545 protein-coding genes that are directly regulated by HNF-1β in murine kidney epithelial cells. Pathway analysis predicted that HNF-1β regulates cholesterol metabolism. Expression of dominant negative mutant HNF-1β or kidney-specific inactivation of HNF-1β decreased the expression of genes that are essential for cholesterol synthesis, including sterol regulatory element binding factor 2 (Srebf2) and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (Hmgcr). HNF-1β mutant cells also expressed lower levels of cholesterol biosynthetic intermediates and had a lower rate of cholesterol synthesis than control cells. Additionally, depletion of cholesterol in the culture medium mitigated the inhibitory effects of mutant HNF-1β on the proteins encoded by Srebf2 and Hmgcr, and HNF-1β directly controlled the renal epithelial expression of proprotein convertase subtilisin-like kexin type 9, a key regulator of cholesterol uptake. These findings reveal a novel role of HNF-1β in a transcriptional network that regulates intrarenal cholesterol metabolism. PMID:26712526

  16. ABCC6- a new player in cellular cholesterol and lipoprotein metabolism?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Dysregulations in cholesterol and lipid metabolism have been linked to human diseases like hypercholesterolemia, atherosclerosis or the metabolic syndrome. Many ABC transporters are involved in trafficking of metabolites derived from these pathways. Pseudoxanthoma elasticum (PXE), an autosomal-recessive disease caused by ABCC6 mutations, is characterized by atherogenesis and soft tissue calcification. Methods In this study we investigated the regulation of cholesterol biosynthesis in human dermal fibroblasts from PXE patients and healthy controls. Results Gene expression analysis of 84 targets indicated dysregulations in cholesterol metabolism in PXE fibroblasts. Transcript levels of ABCC6 were strongly increased in lipoprotein-deficient serum (LPDS) and under serum starvation in healthy controls. For the first time, increased HMG CoA reductase activities were found in PXE fibroblasts. We further observed strongly elevated transcript and protein levels for the proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9), as well as a significant reduction in APOE mRNA expression in PXE. Conclusion Increased cholesterol biosynthesis, elevated PCSK9 levels and reduced APOE mRNA expression newly found in PXE fibroblasts could enforce atherogenesis and cardiovascular risk in PXE patients. Moreover, the increase in ABCC6 expression accompanied by the induction of cholesterol biosynthesis supposes a functional role for ABCC6 in human lipoprotein and cholesterol homeostasis. PMID:25064003

  17. Transcriptional profile reveals altered hepatic lipid and cholesterol metabolism in hyposulfatemic NaS1 null mice.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Paul Anthony; Gardiner, Brooke; Grimmond, Sean; Markovich, Daniel

    2006-07-12

    Sulfate plays an essential role in human growth and development, and its circulating levels are maintained by the renal Na+-SO42- cotransporter, NaS1. We previously generated a NaS1 knockout (Nas1-/-) mouse, an animal model for hyposulfatemia, that exhibits reduced growth and liver abnormalities including hepatomegaly. In this study, we investigated the hepatic gene expression profile of Nas1-/- mice using oligonucleotide microarrays. The mRNA expression levels of 92 genes with known functional roles in metabolism, cell signaling, cell defense, immune response, cell structure, transcription, or protein synthesis were increased (n = 51) or decreased (n = 41) in Nas1-/- mice when compared with Nas1+/+ mice. The most upregulated transcript levels in Nas1-/- mice were found for the sulfotransferase genes, Sult3a1 (approximately 500% increase) and Sult2a2 (100% increase), whereas the metallothionein-1 gene, Mt1, was among the most downregulated genes (70% decrease). Several genes involved in lipid and cholesterol metabolism, including Scd1, Acly, Gpam, Elov16, Acsl5, Mvd, Insig1, and Apoa4, were found to be upregulated (> or = 30% increase) in Nas1-/- mice. In addition, Nas1-/- mice exhibited increased levels of hepatic lipid (approximately 16% increase), serum cholesterol (approximately 20% increase), and low-density lipoprotein (approximately 100% increase) and reduced hepatic glycogen (approximately 50% decrease) levels. In conclusion, these data suggest an altered lipid and cholesterol metabolism in the hyposulfatemic Nas1-/- mouse and provide new insights into the metabolic state of the liver in Nas1-/- mice. PMID:16621889

  18. Psyllium husk. I: Effect on plasma lipoproteins, cholesterol metabolism, and atherosclerosis in African green monkeys.

    PubMed

    McCall, M R; Mehta, T; Leathers, C W; Foster, D M

    1992-08-01

    Psyllium's effects on plasma and lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations, cholesterol metabolism, and diet-induced atherosclerosis were studied in adult male African green monkeys (Cercopithecus aethiops). Animals were fed for 3.5 y one of three experimental diets: low-cholesterol cellulose (LCC), high-cholesterol cellulose (HCC), or high-cholesterol psyllium (HCP). The LCC and HCP groups had significantly (P less than 0.05) lower plasma cholesterol concentrations (39% lower) at 1 mo than did the HCC group. These responses persisted throughout the study. Plasma cholesterol changes were due to a reduction in intermediate-density and low-density lipoproteins; very-low and high-density-lipoprotein concentrations were similar among groups. Aortic atherosclerosis, evaluated as percent sudanophilia at 3.5 y, was lowest in the LCC group, intermediate in the HCP group, and highest in the HCC group. Cholesterol absorption, neutral steroid and fat excretion, HMGCoA reductase activity (in intestine and liver), and body weight were unrelated to psyllium's hypocholesterolemic effects. PMID:1322032

  19. Guar gum effects on plasma low-density lipoprotein and hepatic cholesterol metabolism in guinea pigs fed low- and high-cholesterol diets: a dose-response study.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, M L; Sun, D M; Tosca, M; McNamara, D J

    1995-01-01

    Guinea pigs were fed semipurified diets containing either 0% or 12.5% guar gum (GG) with 0.04% cholesterol or increasing concentrations of GG (0%, 2.5%, 5%, 7.5%, 10%, and 12.5%) with 0.25% cholesterol (by wt). Compared to the 0% GG diet with 0.04% cholesterol, intake of the 12.5% GG diet with 0.04% cholesterol lowered plasma low-density-lipoprotein (LDL) concentrations, the ratio of LDL cholesteryl ester to protein, hepatic cholesterol concentrations, and the activity of acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT), and increased 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG CoA) reductase activity and hepatic apo B/E receptor number (P < 0.01). Intake of GG by animals fed 0.25% cholesterol diets resulted in modest effects on hepatic cholesterol pools and plasma LDL concentrations; however, significant negative correlations were found between both plasma LDL cholesterol and hepatic free cholesterol concentrations with the amount of dietary GG (P < 0.05). Hepatic HMG-CoA reductase was suppressed by the 0.25% cholesterol intake, and GG did not reverse this suppression. In contrast, ACAT activity was negatively correlated with the amount of dietary GG (P < 0.05), and GG intake increased the number of hepatic apo B/E receptors at all intakes with the 0.25% cholesterol diets. These results demonstrate that intake of GG significantly alters endogenous cholesterol metabolism by decreasing hepatic cholesterol pools, altering hepatic cholesterol homeostasis, and reducing plasma LDL concentrations. PMID:7825524

  20. The cholesterol problem, the egg and lipid metabolism in the laying hen.

    PubMed

    Naber, E C

    1976-01-01

    There is little doubt that high blood serum lipid levels are related to a higher incidence of atherosclerotic disease in humans. Experimental evidence to date suggests that dietary intervention can reduce blood lipid levels in most cases and that some small reduction in occurrence of cardiovascular disease will probably result. On the other hand no reduction in total mortality has been demonstrated in the well constructed dietary studies. It appears that there is considerable variation in the human population with regard to their patterns of lipid metabolism. Some apparently regulate body production of cholesterol in response to dietary changes, others do not. Some seem to excrete excess sterols efficiently, while some do not. It seems likely, therefore, that dietary manipulation would be useful for those disposed by heredity and other conditions to accumulation of excessive sterols in the body. On the other hand drug control of cholesterol biosynthesis and/or sterol excretion may be more effective solutions to the problem of sterol accumulation. Irrespective of whether diet or drugs prove to be the best answer to control of sterol balance, these should be applied only to that segment of the population known to require such treatment. The egg is an important dietary source of cholesterol and as a result is used sparingly in low cholesterol diets. On the other hand normal egg consumption of two eggs per day does not appear to overload cholesterol balance in the healthy human adult since depression in cholesterol biosynthesis and increased sterol excretion will result. Investigation of the lipid metabolism of the laying hen has shown that most of the cholesterol found in the egg is synthesized in the liver where it is under both dietary and drug control. Most of the cholesterol deposited in egg yolk may be essential for embryonic development. Drugs that severely limit cholesterol biosynthesis probably also limit synthesis of adrenal and sex hormones and hence limit

  1. Plasma cholesterol metabolism in end-stage renal disease. Difference between treatment by hemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed Central

    Dieplinger, H; Schoenfeld, P Y; Fielding, C J

    1986-01-01

    Plasma cholesterol metabolism was investigated in normotriglyceridemic patients with end-stage renal disease treated by hemo- or continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD), and compared with that in a control group with normal renal function. A reversed net transport of free cholesterol from plasma to cultured fibroblasts, as well as greatly reduced levels of plasma cholesterol esterification and cholesterol ester transfer rates to low and very low density lipoproteins (LDL and VLDL), was found in the hemodialysis group compared to the controls. The LDL and VLDL contained increased amounts of free cholesterol and inhibited cholesterol ester transfer when recombined with control plasma. The LDL triglyceride content was doubled in the hemodialysis group, whereas cholesterol esters were decreased. Patients treated by CAPD, in marked contrast, had cholesterol metabolic rates that were within the normal range, as well as normal lipoprotein composition. PMID:3082933

  2. Potential Metabolic Biomarkers to Identify Interstitial Lung Abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Yong; Jia, Dongmei; Lin, Zhang; Guo, Baosheng; He, Bing; Lu, Cheng; Xiao, Cheng; Liu, Zhongdi; Zhao, Ning; Bian, Zhaoxiang; Zhang, Ge; Zhang, Weidong; Liu, Xinru; Lu, Aiping

    2016-01-01

    Determining sensitive biomarkers in the peripheral blood to identify interstitial lung abnormalities (ILAs) is essential for the simple early diagnosis of ILAs. This study aimed to determine serum metabolic biomarkers of ILAs and the corresponding pathogenesis. Three groups of subjects undergoing health screening, including healthy subjects, subjects with ILAs, and subjects who were healthy initially and with ILAs one year later (Healthy→ILAs), were recruited for this study. The metabolic profiles of all of the subjects’ serum were analyzed by liquid chromatography quadruple time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The metabolic characteristics of the ILAs subjects were discovered, and the corresponding biomarkers were predicted. The metabolomic data from the Healthy→ILAs subjects were collected for further verification. The results indicated that five serum metabolite alterations (up-regulated phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidic acid, betaine aldehyde and phosphatidylethanolamine, as well as down-regulated 1-acylglycerophosphocholine) were sensitive and reliable biomarkers for identifying ILAs. Perturbation of the corresponding biological pathways (RhoA signaling, mTOR/P70S6K signaling and phospholipase C signaling) might be at least partially responsible for the pathogenesis of ILAs. This study may provide a good template for determining the early diagnostic markers of subclinical disease status and for obtaining a better understanding of their pathogenesis. PMID:27438829

  3. Cerebral glucose metabolic abnormality in patients with congenital scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Park, Weon Wook; Suh, Kuen Tak; Kim, Jeung Il; Ku, Ja Gyung; Lee, Hong Seok; Kim, Seong-Jang; Kim, In-Ju; Kim, Yong-Ki; Lee, Jung Sub

    2008-07-01

    A possible association between congenital scoliosis and low mental status has been recognized, but there are no reports describing the mental status or cerebral metabolism in patients with congenital scoliosis in detail. We investigated the mental status using a mini-mental status exam as well as the cerebral glucose metabolism using F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose brain positron emission tomography in 12 patients with congenital scoliosis and compared them with those of 14 age-matched patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. The mean mini-mental status exam score in the congenital scoliosis group was significantly lower than that in the adolescent idiopathic scoliosis group. Group analysis found that various brain areas of patients with congenital scoliosis showed glucose hypometabolisms in the left prefrontal cortex (Brodmann area 10), right orbitofrontal cortex (Brodmann area 11), left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (Brodmann area 9), left anterior cingulate gyrus (Brodmann area 24) and pulvinar of the left thalamus. From this study, we could find the metabolic abnormalities of brain in patients with congenital scoliosis and suggest the possible role of voxel-based analysis of brain fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography. PMID:18446384

  4. Atypical antipsychotics alter cholesterol and fatty acid metabolism in vitro[S

    PubMed Central

    Canfrán-Duque, Alberto; Casado, María E.; Pastor, Óscar; Sánchez-Wandelmer, Jana; de la Peña, Gema; Lerma, Milagros; Mariscal, Paloma; Bracher, Franz; Lasunción, Miguel A.; Busto, Rebeca

    2013-01-01

    Haloperidol, a typical antipsychotic, has been shown to inhibit cholesterol biosynthesis by affecting Δ7-reductase, Δ8,7-isomerase, and Δ14-reductase activities, which results in the accumulation of different sterol intermediates. In the present work, we investigated the effects of atypical or second-generation antipsychotics (SGA), such as clozapine, risperidone, and ziprasidone, on intracellular lipid metabolism in different cell lines. All the SGAs tested inhibited cholesterol biosynthesis. Ziprasidone and risperidone had the same targets as haloperidol at inhibiting cholesterol biosynthesis, although with different relative activities (ziprasidone > haloperidol > risperidone). In contrast, clozapine mainly affected Δ24-reductase and Δ8,7-isomerase activities. These amphiphilic drugs also interfered with the LDL-derived cholesterol egress from the endosome/lysosome compartment, thus further reducing the cholesterol content in the endoplasmic reticulum. This triggered a homeostatic response with the stimulation of sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP)-regulated gene expression. Treatment with SGAs also increased the synthesis of complex lipids (phospholipids and triacylglycerides). Once the antipsychotics were removed from the medium, a rebound in the cholesterol biosynthesis rate was detected, and the complex-lipid synthesis further increased. In this condition, apolipoprotein B secretion was also stimulated as demonstrated in HepG2 cells. These effects of SGAs on lipid homeostasis may be relevant in the metabolic side effects of antipsychotics, especially hypertriglyceridemia. PMID:23175778

  5. GLP-1 receptor agonist liraglutide reverses long-term atypical antipsychotic treatment associated behavioral depression and metabolic abnormalities in rats.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Ajaykumar N; Ligade, Sagar S; Sharma, Jay N; Shukla, Praveen; Elased, Khalid M; Lucot, James B

    2015-04-01

    Mood disorder patients that are on long-term atypical antipsychotics treatment frequently experience metabolic dysfunctions. In addition to this, accumulating evidences points to increased risk of structural abnormalities, brain volume changes, altered neuroplasticity and behavioral depression with long-term antipsychotics use. However, there is paucity of preclinical evidences for long-term antipsychotic associated depression-like behavior. The objectives of the present study were: (1) to evaluate influence of long-term antipsychotic (olanzapine) treatment on rat behavior in forced swim test (FST) as a model for depression and; (2) to examine impact of glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist liraglutide - an antidiabetic medication for type II diabetes, on long-term olanzapine associated metabolic and behavioral changes in rats. Daily olanzapine treatment (0.5 mg/kg; p.o.) for 8-9 weeks significantly increased body weights, food and water intake, plasma cholesterol and triglycerides and immobility time in FST with parallel reduction in plasma HDL cholesterol levels. These results points to development of metabolic abnormalities and depression-like behavior with long-term olanzapine treatment. Acute liraglutide (50 μg/kg; i.p.) and imipramine (10 mg/kg, i. p.) treatment per se significantly decreased duration of immobility in FST compared to vehicle treated rats. Additionally, 3-week liraglutide treatment (50 μg/kg; i.p., daily) partially reversed metabolic abnormalities and depression-like behavior with long-term olanzapine-treatment in rats. None of these treatment regimens affected locomotor behavior of rats. In summary, add-on GLP-1 receptor agonists promise novel alternatives to counteract long-term antipsychotics associated behavioral and metabolic complications. PMID:25023888

  6. Role of UBIAD1 in Intracellular Cholesterol Metabolism and Vascular Cell Calcification.

    PubMed

    Liu, Sha; Guo, Wang; Han, Xue; Dai, Wendi; Diao, Zongli; Liu, Wenhu

    2016-01-01

    Vascular calcification is an important risk factor associated with mortality among patients with chronic kidney disease. Intracellular cholesterol metabolism is involved in the process of vascular cell calcification. In this study, we investigated the role of UbiA prenyltransferase domain containing 1 (UBIAD1) in intracellular cholesterol metabolism and vascular cell calcification, and identified its subcellular location. Primary human umbilical vein smooth muscle cells (HUVSMCs) were incubated with either growth medium (1.4 mmol/L Pi) or calcification medium (CM) (3.0 mmol/L Pi). Under treatment with CM, HUVSMCs were further incubated with exogenous cholesterol, or menaquinone-4, a product of UBIAD1. The plasmid and small interfering RNA were transfected in HUVSMCs to alter the expression of UBIAD1. Matrix calcium quantitation, alkaline phosphatase activity, intracellular cholesterol level and menaquinone-4 level were measured. The expression of several genes involved in cholesterol metabolism were analyzed. Using an anti-UBIAD1 antibody, an endoplasmic reticulum marker and a Golgi marker, the subcellular location of UBIAD1 in HUVSMCs was analyzed. CM increased matrix calcium, alkaline phosphatase activity and intracellular cholesterol level, and reduced UBIAD1 expression and menaquinone-4 level. Addition of cholesterol contributed to increased matrix calcification and alkaline phosphatase activity in a dose-dependent manner. Elevated expression of UBIAD1 or menaquinone-4 in HUVSMCs treated with CM significantly reduced intracellular cholesterol level, matrix calcification and alkaline phosphatase activity, but increased menaquinone-4 level. Elevated expression of UBIAD1 or menaquinone-4 reduced the gene expression of sterol regulatory element-binding protein-2, and increased gene expression of ATP binding cassette transporters A1, which are in charge of cholesterol synthesis and efflux. UBIAD1 co-localized with the endoplasmic reticulum marker and the Golgi

  7. Role of UBIAD1 in Intracellular Cholesterol Metabolism and Vascular Cell Calcification

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Sha; Guo, Wang; Han, Xue; Dai, Wendi; Diao, Zongli; Liu, Wenhu

    2016-01-01

    Vascular calcification is an important risk factor associated with mortality among patients with chronic kidney disease. Intracellular cholesterol metabolism is involved in the process of vascular cell calcification. In this study, we investigated the role of UbiA prenyltransferase domain containing 1 (UBIAD1) in intracellular cholesterol metabolism and vascular cell calcification, and identified its subcellular location. Primary human umbilical vein smooth muscle cells (HUVSMCs) were incubated with either growth medium (1.4 mmol/L Pi) or calcification medium (CM) (3.0 mmol/L Pi). Under treatment with CM, HUVSMCs were further incubated with exogenous cholesterol, or menaquinone-4, a product of UBIAD1. The plasmid and small interfering RNA were transfected in HUVSMCs to alter the expression of UBIAD1. Matrix calcium quantitation, alkaline phosphatase activity, intracellular cholesterol level and menaquinone-4 level were measured. The expression of several genes involved in cholesterol metabolism were analyzed. Using an anti-UBIAD1 antibody, an endoplasmic reticulum marker and a Golgi marker, the subcellular location of UBIAD1 in HUVSMCs was analyzed. CM increased matrix calcium, alkaline phosphatase activity and intracellular cholesterol level, and reduced UBIAD1 expression and menaquinone-4 level. Addition of cholesterol contributed to increased matrix calcification and alkaline phosphatase activity in a dose-dependent manner. Elevated expression of UBIAD1 or menaquinone-4 in HUVSMCs treated with CM significantly reduced intracellular cholesterol level, matrix calcification and alkaline phosphatase activity, but increased menaquinone-4 level. Elevated expression of UBIAD1 or menaquinone-4 reduced the gene expression of sterol regulatory element-binding protein-2, and increased gene expression of ATP binding cassette transporters A1, which are in charge of cholesterol synthesis and efflux. UBIAD1 co-localized with the endoplasmic reticulum marker and the Golgi

  8. Alleviation of metabolic abnormalities induced by excessive fructose administration in Wistar rats by Spirulina maxima

    PubMed Central

    Jarouliya, Urmila; Anish, Zacharia J.; Kumar, Pravin; Bisen, P.S.; Prasad, G.B.K.S.

    2012-01-01

    Background & objectives: Diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder characterized by hyperglycaemia. Several natural products have been isolated and identified to restore the complications of diabetes. Spirulina maxima is naturally occurring fresh water cyanobacterium, enriched with proteins and essential nutrients. The aim of the study was to determine whether S. maxima could serve as a therapeutic agent to correct metabolic abnormalities induced by excessive fructose administration in Wistar rats. Methods: Oral administration of 10 per cent fructose solution to Wistar rats (n=5 in each group) for 30 days resulted in hyperglycaemia and hyperlipidaemia. Aqueous suspension of S. maxima (5 or 10%) was also administered orally once daily for 30 days. The therapeutic potential of the preparation with reference to metformin (500 mg/kg) was assessed by monitoring various biochemical parameters at 10 day intervals during the course of therapy and at the end of 30 days S. maxima administration. Results: Significant (P<0.001) reductions in blood glucose, lipid profile (triglycerides, cholesterol and LDL, VLDL) and liver function markers (SGPT and SGOT) were recorded along with elevated level of HDL-C at the end of 30 days therapy of 5 or 10 per cent S. maxima aquous extract. Co-administration of S. maxima extract (5 or 10% aqueous) with 10 per cent fructose solution offered a significant protection against fructose induced metabolic abnormalities in Wistar rats. Interpretation & Conclusions: The present findings showed that S. maxima exhibited anti-hyperglycaemic, anti-hyperlipidaemic and hepatoprotective activity in rats fed with fructose. Further studies are needed to understand the mechanisms. PMID:22561632

  9. Metabolic abnormalities of the heart in type II diabetes.

    PubMed

    Amaral, Nelson; Okonko, Darlington O

    2015-07-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus escalates the risk of heart failure partly via its ability to induce a cardiomyopathic state that is independent of coronary artery disease and hypertension. Although the pathogenesis of diabetic cardiomyopathy has yet to be fully elucidated, aberrations in cardiac substrate metabolism and energetics are thought to be key drivers. These aberrations include excessive fatty acid utilisation and storage, suppressed glucose oxidation and impaired mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. An appreciation of how these abnormalities arise and synergise to promote adverse cardiac remodelling is critical to their effective amelioration. This review focuses on disturbances in myocardial fuel (fatty acids and glucose) flux and energetics in type 2 diabetes, how these disturbances relate to the development of diabetic cardiomyopathy and the potential therapeutic agents that could be used to correct them. PMID:25941161

  10. Abnormal gonadotropin release and carbohydrate metabolism in morbid obese women.

    PubMed

    Sheu, W H; Lee, W J

    1997-12-31

    Obese women are associated with clinical symptoms suggestive of abnormal reproductive functions including irregular menses and infertility. Previous studies of gonadotropin release in obese women, basal or after luteal hormone releasing hormone (LHRH) stimulation, are controversial. Obese women are also often characterized by glucose intolerance and hyperinsulinemia which might relate to their excessive body fat. To understand the link between abnormal gonadotropin release, carbohydrate metabolism and percent body fat, we examined 17 premenopausal morbid obese women with body mass index (BMI) 38.7 +/- 1.6 Kg/m2 (mean +/- SEM) and 16 age-matched lean controls with BMI 19.7 +/- 0.6 Kg/m2. Plasma glucose, insulin and C-peptide values were measured before and 30, 60, 90 and 120 min after a 75 gm oral glucose tolerant test (OGTT). Each individual also received LHRH test which involved determinations of serum LH and FSH values at basal, 15, 30 and 60 min after injection of LHRH for 0.1 mg intravenously. Women with morbid obesity had significantly greater responses of glucose, insulin and C-peptide values as compared with lean women (all p < 0.001, two-way ANOVA). Despite that basal concentrations were not different, serum LH, FSH and ratio of LH to FSH values in response to LHRH test showed significantly lesser increase in obese women than lean controls. Percent body fat, determined by bioelectrical impedance analysis, correlated positively with plasma glucose, insulin and C-peptide responses to OGTT while negatively with ratio of LH to FSH responses (r = -0.418, p < 0.01) to LHRH test. Body mass index also correlated inversely with ratio of LH to FSH responses (r = -0.472, p < 0.01). In conclusion, morbid obese women had glucose intolerance, hyperinsulinemia and lower responses of serum LH and FSH values as compared with lean women. Excessive body fat play an important role in mediating these carbohydrate and gonadotropin abnormalities. PMID:9551249

  11. Sudden infant death syndrome and abnormal metabolism of thiamin.

    PubMed

    Lonsdale, Derrick

    2015-12-01

    Although it has been generally accepted that moving the infant from the prone to the supine position has solved the problem of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), it has been hypothesized that this is an insufficient explanation and that a mixture of genetic risk, some form of stressful incident and marginal brain metabolism is proportionately required. It is suggested that each of these three variables, with dominance in one or more of them, act together in the common etiology. Much has been written about the association of thiamin and magnesium but the finding of extremely high concentrations of serum thiamin in SIDs victims has largely caused rejection of thiamin as being involved in the etiology. The publication of abnormal brainstem auditory evoked potentials strongly suggests that there are electrochemical changes in the brainstem affecting the mechanisms of automatic breathing and the control of cardiac rhythm. The brainstem, cerebellum and limbic system of the brain are known to be highly sensitive to thiamin deficiency (pseudo-hypoxia) and the pathophysiology is similar to a mild continued deprivation of oxygen. Little attention has been paid to the complex metabolism of thiamin. Dietary thiamin requires the cooperation of the SLC19 family of thiamin transporters for its absorption into cells and recent information has shown that transporter SNPs may be relatively common and can be expected to increase genetic risk. Thiamin must be phosphorylated to synthesize thiamin pyrophosphate (TPP), well established in its vital action in glucose metabolism. TPP is also a cofactor for the enzyme 2-hydroxyacyl-CoA lyase (HACL1) in the peroxisome, emphasizing its importance in alpha oxidation and plasmalogen synthesis in cell membrane physiology. The importance of thiamine triphosphate (TTP) in energy metabolism is still largely unknown. Thiamin metabolism has been implicated in hyperemesis gravidarum and iatrogenic Wernicke encephalopathy has been reported when the

  12. Mineral Metabolic Abnormalities and Mortality in Dialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Abe, Masanori; Okada, Kazuyoshi; Soma, Masayoshi

    2013-01-01

    The survival rate of dialysis patients, as determined by risk factors such as hypertension, nutritional status, and chronic inflammation, is lower than that of the general population. In addition, disorders of bone mineral metabolism are independently related to mortality and morbidity associated with cardiovascular disease and fracture in dialysis patients. Hyperphosphatemia is an important risk factor of, not only secondary hyperparathyroidism, but also cardiovascular disease. On the other hand, the risk of death reportedly increases with an increase in adjusted serum calcium level, while calcium levels below the recommended target are not associated with a worsened outcome. Thus, the significance of target levels of serum calcium in dialysis patients is debatable. The consensus on determining optimal parathyroid function in dialysis patients, however, is yet to be established. Therefore, the contribution of phosphorus and calcium levels to prognosis is perhaps more significant. Elevated fibroblast growth factor 23 levels have also been shown to be associated with cardiovascular events and death. In this review, we examine the associations between mineral metabolic abnormalities including serum phosphorus, calcium, and parathyroid hormone and mortality in dialysis patients. PMID:23525083

  13. The Conserved Rieske Oxygenase DAF-36/Neverland Is a Novel Cholesterol-metabolizing Enzyme*

    PubMed Central

    Yoshiyama-Yanagawa, Takuji; Enya, Sora; Shimada-Niwa, Yuko; Yaguchi, Shunsuke; Haramoto, Yoshikazu; Matsuya, Takeshi; Shiomi, Kensuke; Sasakura, Yasunori; Takahashi, Shuji; Asashima, Makoto; Kataoka, Hiroshi; Niwa, Ryusuke

    2011-01-01

    Steroid hormones play essential roles in a wide variety of biological processes in multicellular organisms. The principal steroid hormones in nematodes and arthropods are dafachronic acids and ecdysteroids, respectively, both of which are synthesized from cholesterol as an indispensable precursor. The first critical catalytic step in the biosynthesis of these ecdysozoan steroids is the conversion of cholesterol to 7-dehydrocholesterol. However, the enzymes responsible for cholesterol 7,8-dehydrogenation remain unclear at the molecular level. Here we report that the Rieske oxygenase DAF-36/Neverland (Nvd) is a cholesterol 7,8-dehydrogenase. The daf-36/nvd genes are evolutionarily conserved, not only in nematodes and insects but also in deuterostome species that do not produce dafachronic acids or ecdysteroids, including the sea urchin Hemicentrotus pulcherrimus, the sea squirt Ciona intestinalis, the fish Danio rerio, and the frog Xenopus laevis. An in vitro enzymatic assay system reveals that all DAF-36/Nvd proteins cloned so far have the ability to convert cholesterol to 7-dehydrocholesterol. Moreover, the lethality of loss of nvd function in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster is rescued by the expression of daf-36/nvd genes from the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, the insect Bombyx mori, or the vertebrates D. rerio and X. laevis. These data suggest that daf-36/nvd genes are functionally orthologous across the bilaterian phylogeny. We propose that the daf-36/nvd family of proteins is a novel conserved player in cholesterol metabolism across the animal phyla. PMID:21632547

  14. The conserved Rieske oxygenase DAF-36/Neverland is a novel cholesterol-metabolizing enzyme.

    PubMed

    Yoshiyama-Yanagawa, Takuji; Enya, Sora; Shimada-Niwa, Yuko; Yaguchi, Shunsuke; Haramoto, Yoshikazu; Matsuya, Takeshi; Shiomi, Kensuke; Sasakura, Yasunori; Takahashi, Shuji; Asashima, Makoto; Kataoka, Hiroshi; Niwa, Ryusuke

    2011-07-22

    Steroid hormones play essential roles in a wide variety of biological processes in multicellular organisms. The principal steroid hormones in nematodes and arthropods are dafachronic acids and ecdysteroids, respectively, both of which are synthesized from cholesterol as an indispensable precursor. The first critical catalytic step in the biosynthesis of these ecdysozoan steroids is the conversion of cholesterol to 7-dehydrocholesterol. However, the enzymes responsible for cholesterol 7,8-dehydrogenation remain unclear at the molecular level. Here we report that the Rieske oxygenase DAF-36/Neverland (Nvd) is a cholesterol 7,8-dehydrogenase. The daf-36/nvd genes are evolutionarily conserved, not only in nematodes and insects but also in deuterostome species that do not produce dafachronic acids or ecdysteroids, including the sea urchin Hemicentrotus pulcherrimus, the sea squirt Ciona intestinalis, the fish Danio rerio, and the frog Xenopus laevis. An in vitro enzymatic assay system reveals that all DAF-36/Nvd proteins cloned so far have the ability to convert cholesterol to 7-dehydrocholesterol. Moreover, the lethality of loss of nvd function in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster is rescued by the expression of daf-36/nvd genes from the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, the insect Bombyx mori, or the vertebrates D. rerio and X. laevis. These data suggest that daf-36/nvd genes are functionally orthologous across the bilaterian phylogeny. We propose that the daf-36/nvd family of proteins is a novel conserved player in cholesterol metabolism across the animal phyla. PMID:21632547

  15. Sasa quelpaertensis leaf extract improves high fat diet-induced lipid abnormalities and regulation of lipid metabolism genes in rats.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jina; Kim, Yoo-Sun; Lee, Hyun Ah; Lim, Ji Ye; Kim, Mina; Kwon, Oran; Ko, Hee-Chul; Kim, Se-Jae; Shin, Jae-Ho; Kim, Yuri

    2014-05-01

    Sasa quelpaertensis is a bamboo leaf that is only grown on Jeju Island in South Korea. It is used as a bamboo tea that is consumed for therapeutic purposes, particularly for its anti-diabetic, diuretic, and anti-inflammatory effects. This study investigated the effect of S. quelpaertensis leaf extract (SQE) on high fat-induced lipid abnormalities and regulation of lipid metabolism-related gene expressions in rats. SQE supplementation significantly decreased the levels of plasma triglycerides, total cholesterol, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol as well as the atherogenic index. SQE restored levels of plasma high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, which were lowered by a high fat diet. Plasma and cardiac resistin levels were also significantly decreased by SQE supplementation. In adipose tissue, mRNA levels of CAAT/enhancer-binding protein β (C/EBPβ) were suppressed in the SQE group. SQE supplementation decreased the accumulation of lipid droplets, inflammatory cell infiltrations, levels of triglycerides, and total lipids in the liver and effectively down-regulated expression of sterol regulatory element binding protein-1 (SREBP-1), fatty acid synthetase (FAS), and uncoupling protein 2 (UCP-2). These results suggest that SQE may be a potential treatment for high fat-related disorders by improving lipid profiles and modulating lipid metabolism. PMID:24738745

  16. The Arachidonic Acid Metabolome Serves as a Conserved Regulator of Cholesterol Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Demetz, Egon; Schroll, Andrea; Auer, Kristina; Heim, Christiane; Patsch, Josef R.; Eller, Philipp; Theurl, Markus; Theurl, Igor; Theurl, Milan; Seifert, Markus; Lener, Daniela; Stanzl, Ursula; Haschka, David; Asshoff, Malte; Dichtl, Stefanie; Nairz, Manfred; Huber, Eva; Stadlinger, Martin; Moschen, Alexander R.; Li, Xiaorong; Pallweber, Petra; Scharnagl, Hubert; Stojakovic, Tatjana; März, Winfried; Kleber, Marcus E.; Garlaschelli, Katia; Uboldi, Patrizia; Catapano, Alberico L.; Stellaard, Frans; Rudling, Mats; Kuba, Keiji; Imai, Yumiko; Arita, Makoto; Schuetz, John D.; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Tietge, Uwe J.F.; Trauner, Michael; Norata, Giuseppe D.; Claudel, Thierry; Hicks, Andrew A.; Weiss, Guenter; Tancevski, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Summary Cholesterol metabolism is closely interrelated with cardiovascular disease in humans. Dietary supplementation with omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids including arachidonic acid (AA) was shown to favorably affect plasma LDL-C and HDL-C. However, the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. By combining data from a GWAS screening in >100,000 individuals of European ancestry, mediator lipidomics, and functional validation studies in mice, we identify the AA metabolome as an important regulator of cholesterol homeostasis. Pharmacological modulation of AA metabolism by aspirin induced hepatic generation of leukotrienes (LTs) and lipoxins (LXs), thereby increasing hepatic expression of the bile salt export pump Abcb11. Induction of Abcb11 translated in enhanced reverse cholesterol transport, one key function of HDL. Further characterization of the bioactive AA-derivatives identified LX mimetics to lower plasma LDL-C. Our results define the AA metabolome as conserved regulator of cholesterol metabolism, and identify AA derivatives as promising therapeutics to treat cardiovascular disease in humans. PMID:25444678

  17. The Regulation of Alfalfa Saponin Extract on Key Genes Involved in Hepatic Cholesterol Metabolism in Hyperlipidemic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yinghua; Guo, Rui; Wang, Xianke; Yuan, Dedi; Zhang, Senhao; Wang, Jie; Yan, Xuebing; Wang, Chengzhang

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the cholesterol-lowering effects of alfalfa saponin extract (ASE) and its regulation mechanism on some key genes involved in cholesterol metabolism, 40 healthy 7 weeks old male Sprague Dawley (SD) rats were randomly divided into four groups with 10 rats in each group: control group, hyperlipidemic group, ASE treatment group, ASE prevention group. The body weight gain, relative liver weight and serum lipid 1evels of rats were determined. Total cholesterol (TC) and total bile acids (TBA) levels in liver and feces were also measured. Furthermore, the activity and mRNA expressions of Hmgcr, Acat2, Cyp7a1 and Ldlr were investigated. The results showed the following: (1) The abnormal serum lipid levels in hyperlipidemic rats were ameliorated by ASE administration (both ASE prevention group and treatment group) (P<0.05). (2) Both ASE administration to hyperlipidemic rats significantly reduced liver TC and increased liver TBA level (P<0.05). TC and TBA levels in feces of hyperlipidemic rats were remarkably elevated by both ASE administration (P<0.05). (3) mRNA expressions of Hmgcr and Acat2 in the liver of hyperlipidemic rats were remarkably down-regulated (P<0.05), as well as mRNA expressions of Cyp7a1 and Ldlr were dramatically up-regulated by both ASE administration (P<0.05). The activities of these enzymes also paralleled the observed changes in mRNA levels. (4) There was no significant difference between ASE treatment and ASE prevention group for most parameters evaluated. Our present study indicated that ASE had cholesterol-lowering effects. The possible mechanism could be attributed to (1) the down-regulation of Hmgcr and Acat2, as well as up-regulation of Cyp7a1 and Ldlr in the liver of hyperlipidemic rats, which was involved in cholesterol biosynthesis, uptake, and efflux pathway; (2) the increase in excretion of cholesterol. The findings in our study suggested ASE had great potential usefulness as a natural agent for treating hyperlipidemia. PMID

  18. The Essential Role of Cholesterol Metabolism in the Intracellular Survival of Mycobacterium leprae Is Not Coupled to Central Carbon Metabolism and Energy Production

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Maria Angela M.; Berrêdo-Pinho, Marcia; Rosa, Thabatta L. S. A.; Pujari, Venugopal; Lemes, Robertha M. R.; Lery, Leticia M. S.; Silva, Carlos Adriano M.; Guimarães, Ana Carolina R.; Atella, Georgia C.; Wheat, William H.; Brennan, Patrick J.; Crick, Dean C.; Belisle, John T.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mycobacterium leprae induces the formation of lipid droplets, which are recruited to pathogen-containing phagosomes in infected macrophages and Schwann cells. Cholesterol is among the lipids with increased abundance in M. leprae-infected cells, and intracellular survival relies on cholesterol accumulation. The present study investigated the capacity of M. leprae to acquire and metabolize cholesterol. In silico analyses showed that oxidation of cholesterol to cholest-4-en-3-one (cholestenone), the first step of cholesterol degradation catalyzed by the enzyme 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3β-HSD), is apparently the only portion of the cholesterol catabolic pathway seen in Mycobacterium tuberculosis preserved by M. leprae. Incubation of bacteria with radiolabeled cholesterol confirmed the in silico predictions. Radiorespirometry and lipid analyses performed after incubating M. leprae with [4-14C]cholesterol or [26-14C]cholesterol showed the inability of this pathogen to metabolize the sterol rings or the side chain of cholesterol as a source of energy and carbon. However, the bacteria avidly incorporated cholesterol and, as expected, converted it to cholestenone both in vitro and in vivo. Our data indicate that M. leprae has lost the capacity to degrade and utilize cholesterol as a nutritional source but retains the enzyme responsible for its oxidation to cholestenone. Thus, the essential role of cholesterol metabolism in the intracellular survival of M. leprae is uncoupled from central carbon metabolism and energy production. Further elucidation of cholesterol metabolism in the host cell during M. leprae infection will establish the mechanism by which this lipid supports M. leprae intracellular survival and will open new avenues for novel leprosy therapies. IMPORTANCE Our study focused on the obligate intracellular pathogen Mycobacterium leprae and its capacity to metabolize cholesterol. The data make an important contribution for those interested in

  19. Redox metabolism abnormalities in autistic children associated with mitochondrial disease.

    PubMed

    Frye, R E; Delatorre, R; Taylor, H; Slattery, J; Melnyk, S; Chowdhury, N; James, S J

    2013-01-01

    Research studies have uncovered several metabolic abnormalities associated with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), including mitochondrial disease (MD) and abnormal redox metabolism. Despite the close connection between mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress, the relation between MD and oxidative stress in children with ASD has not been studied. Plasma markers of oxidative stress and measures of cognitive and language development and ASD behavior were obtained from 18 children diagnosed with ASD who met criteria for probable or definite MD per the Morava et al. criteria (ASD/MD) and 18 age and gender-matched ASD children without any biological markers or symptoms of MD (ASD/NoMD). Plasma measures of redox metabolism included reduced free glutathione (fGSH), oxidized glutathione (GSSG), the fGSH/GSSG ratio and 3-nitrotyrosine (3NT). In addition, a plasma measure of chronic immune activation, 3-chlorotyrosine (3CT), was also measured. Language was measured using the preschool language scale or the expressive one-word vocabulary test (depending on the age), adaptive behaviour was measured using the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scale (VABS) and core autism symptoms were measured using the Autism Symptoms Questionnaire and the Social Responsiveness Scale. Children with ASD/MD were found to have lower scores on the communication and daily living skill subscales of the VABS despite having similar language and ASD symptoms. Children with ASD/MD demonstrated significantly higher levels of fGSH/GSSG and lower levels of GSSG as compared with children with ASD/NoMD, suggesting an overall more favourable glutathione redox status in the ASD/MD group. However, compare with controls, both ASD groups demonstrated lower fGSH and fGSH/GSSG, demonstrating that both groups suffer from redox abnormalities. Younger ASD/MD children had higher levels of 3CT than younger ASD/NoMD children because of an age-related effect in the ASD/MD group. Both ASD groups demonstrated significantly

  20. Redox metabolism abnormalities in autistic children associated with mitochondrial disease

    PubMed Central

    Frye, R E; DeLaTorre, R; Taylor, H; Slattery, J; Melnyk, S; Chowdhury, N; James, S J

    2013-01-01

    Research studies have uncovered several metabolic abnormalities associated with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), including mitochondrial disease (MD) and abnormal redox metabolism. Despite the close connection between mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress, the relation between MD and oxidative stress in children with ASD has not been studied. Plasma markers of oxidative stress and measures of cognitive and language development and ASD behavior were obtained from 18 children diagnosed with ASD who met criteria for probable or definite MD per the Morava et al. criteria (ASD/MD) and 18 age and gender-matched ASD children without any biological markers or symptoms of MD (ASD/NoMD). Plasma measures of redox metabolism included reduced free glutathione (fGSH), oxidized glutathione (GSSG), the fGSH/GSSG ratio and 3-nitrotyrosine (3NT). In addition, a plasma measure of chronic immune activation, 3-chlorotyrosine (3CT), was also measured. Language was measured using the preschool language scale or the expressive one-word vocabulary test (depending on the age), adaptive behaviour was measured using the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scale (VABS) and core autism symptoms were measured using the Autism Symptoms Questionnaire and the Social Responsiveness Scale. Children with ASD/MD were found to have lower scores on the communication and daily living skill subscales of the VABS despite having similar language and ASD symptoms. Children with ASD/MD demonstrated significantly higher levels of fGSH/GSSG and lower levels of GSSG as compared with children with ASD/NoMD, suggesting an overall more favourable glutathione redox status in the ASD/MD group. However, compare with controls, both ASD groups demonstrated lower fGSH and fGSH/GSSG, demonstrating that both groups suffer from redox abnormalities. Younger ASD/MD children had higher levels of 3CT than younger ASD/NoMD children because of an age-related effect in the ASD/MD group. Both ASD groups demonstrated significantly

  1. Cholesterol efflux and reverse cholesterol transport.

    PubMed

    Favari, Elda; Chroni, Angelika; Tietge, Uwe J F; Zanotti, Ilaria; Escolà-Gil, Joan Carles; Bernini, Franco

    2015-01-01

    Both alterations of lipid/lipoprotein metabolism and inflammatory events contribute to the formation of the atherosclerotic plaque, characterized by the accumulation of abnormal amounts of cholesterol and macrophages in the artery wall. Reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) may counteract the pathogenic events leading to the formation and development of atheroma, by promoting the high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-mediated removal of cholesterol from the artery wall. Recent in vivo studies established the inverse relationship between RCT efficiency and atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases (CVD), thus suggesting that the promotion of this process may represent a novel strategy to reduce atherosclerotic plaque burden and subsequent cardiovascular events. HDL plays a primary role in all stages of RCT: (1) cholesterol efflux, where these lipoproteins remove excess cholesterol from cells; (2) lipoprotein remodeling, where HDL undergo structural modifications with possible impact on their function; and (3) hepatic lipid uptake, where HDL releases cholesterol to the liver, for the final excretion into bile and feces. Although the inverse association between HDL plasma levels and CVD risk has been postulated for years, recently this concept has been challenged by studies reporting that HDL antiatherogenic functions may be independent of their plasma levels. Therefore, assessment of HDL function, evaluated as the capacity to promote cell cholesterol efflux may offer a better prediction of CVD than HDL levels alone. Consistent with this idea, it has been recently demonstrated that the evaluation of serum cholesterol efflux capacity (CEC) is a predictor of atherosclerosis extent in humans. PMID:25522988

  2. Dietary protein and cholesterol metabolism--interaction of minerals.

    PubMed

    Roberts, D C; Samman, S

    1990-10-01

    Increased dietary zinc has been shown to reduce plasma total cholesterol in rabbits fed casein. However, the mechanism is not clear. The minerals associated with casein and soya protein are different and present in amounts which can alter the overall mineral composition of the diet. In particular, casein has a much higher ratio of zinc/copper than soy protein. Utilising a range of copper concentrations (2-80 micrograms/g diet) in 14 experiments with casein diets showed a linear relationship between the cholesterolaemic response and copper concentration (when both log transformed) in groups (n = 6) of rabbits fed for 12 weeks (r = -0.70, p less than 0.05). The lower the copper, the greater the response. In no case was the copper content deficient, indicating some interaction must be reducing its availability. Similar analysis utilising the range of zinc (10-125 micrograms/g) in the diets also showed an enhanced response at low intakes (r = -0.85, p less than 0.05). To elucidate the mechanism, 2 groups of rabbits were fed casein diets containing 21 and 68 mg zinc/kg diet for 12 weeks. Low density apolipoprotein B (LDL-apoB) turnover was carried out using 125I labelled LDL-apoB and data was fitted to the 2 pool model. The production of LDL-apoB was reduced in animals fed the higher dietary zinc. Zinc appears to act by enhancing the production of LDL-apoB in casein fed animals, perhaps by reducing the availability of copper. PMID:2130143

  3. Exclusion of candidate loci and cholesterol biosynthetic abnormalities in familial Pallister-Hall syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Biesecker, L G; Kang, S; Schäffer, A A; Abbott, M; Kelley, R I; Allen, J C; Clericuzio, C; Grebe, T; Olney, A; Graham, J M

    1996-01-01

    Pallister-Hall syndrome (PHS) was originally described in 1980 in six sporadic cases of children with structural anomalies including hypothalamic hamartoma, polydactyly, imperforate anus, and renal and pulmonary anomalies. In 1993, the first familial cases were reported, including affected sibs and vertical transmission. Three of these families are sufficiently large to allow initial evaluation by linkage studies to candidate genes or loci. We have evaluated candidate loci for PHS based on three clinical observations. The first is a patient with PHS-like malformations, including a hypothalamic hamartoma, and an unbalanced translocation involving 7q and 3p. The second is a family with familial PHS where the founder's father had an autosomal dominant hand malformation previously mapped to 17q. The third is the phenotypic overlap of PHS and Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome. In this report, we exclude these loci as candidates for linkage to the PHS phenotype on the basis of lod scores of less than-2.0. We conclude that hypothalamic hamartoma is not specific to PHS and that the dominant hand malformation in one of the families was a coincidence. To evaluate the relationship of PHS to Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome, we analysed levels of cholesterol and intermediate metabolites of the later stages of cholesterol biosynthesis. There is no evidence of a generalised disorder of cholesterol biosynthesis in patients with familial PHS. On genetic and biochemical grounds, we conclude that PHS and Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome are not allelic variants of a single locus. PMID:8950676

  4. Feedback modulation of cholesterol metabolism by the lipid-responsive non-coding RNA LeXis.

    PubMed

    Sallam, Tamer; Jones, Marius C; Gilliland, Thomas; Zhang, Li; Wu, Xiaohui; Eskin, Ascia; Sandhu, Jaspreet; Casero, David; Vallim, Thomas Q de Aguiar; Hong, Cynthia; Katz, Melanie; Lee, Richard; Whitelegge, Julian; Tontonoz, Peter

    2016-06-01

    Liver X receptors (LXRs) are transcriptional regulators of cellular and systemic cholesterol homeostasis. Under conditions of excess cholesterol, LXR activation induces the expression of several genes involved in cholesterol efflux, facilitates cholesterol esterification by promoting fatty acid synthesis, and inhibits cholesterol uptake by the low-density lipoprotein receptor. The fact that sterol content is maintained in a narrow range in most cell types and in the organism as a whole suggests that extensive crosstalk between regulatory pathways must exist. However, the molecular mechanisms that integrate LXRs with other lipid metabolic pathways are incompletely understood. Here we show that ligand activation of LXRs in mouse liver not only promotes cholesterol efflux, but also simultaneously inhibits cholesterol biosynthesis. We further identify the long non-coding RNA LeXis as a mediator of this effect. Hepatic LeXis expression is robustly induced in response to a Western diet (high in fat and cholesterol) or to pharmacological LXR activation. Raising or lowering LeXis levels in the liver affects the expression of genes involved in cholesterol biosynthesis and alters the cholesterol levels in the liver and plasma. LeXis interacts with and affects the DNA interactions of RALY, a heterogeneous ribonucleoprotein that acts as a transcriptional cofactor for cholesterol biosynthetic genes in the mouse liver. These findings outline a regulatory role for a non-coding RNA in lipid metabolism and advance our understanding of the mechanisms that coordinate sterol homeostasis. PMID:27251289

  5. Abnormal copper metabolism in Menke's steely-hair syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lott, I T; Dipaolo, R; Raghavan, S S; Clopath, P; Milunsky, A; Robertson, W C; kanfer, J N

    1979-07-01

    Copper (Cu) metabolism was selectively studied in seven infants with Menke's steely-hair syndrome (SHS). A daily oral regimen of CuSO4 (584 microgram Cu/kg) and L-histidine (100 mg/kg) in three infants produced an increase in serum Cu concentrations ranging from 33-95% of normal, but without the formation of ceruloplasmin. Cohn serum protein fractionation after oral Cu/L-histidine loading showed a disproportionate accumulation of Cu in the albumin fraction (V). The electron spin resonance spectrum of fraction V showed a heightened signal for the SHS patients, suggesting that an increased concentration of a radical Cu species is present after oral loading. The Sephadex G-150 chromatographic profile of serum fraction V in SHS did not differ significantly from controls. These results suggest that, in SHS, Cu absorbed in the presence of L-histidine is in an abnormal complex involving albumin, which does not allow for holoceruloplasmin biosynthesis. Cu and ceruloplasmin concentrations in the cord blood specimen of an infant who went on to develop SHS were normal, a finding which may account for the transient period of seemingly normal development after birth in SHS patients. An almost 6-fold difference in mean Cu concentration was observed in SHS fibroblasts compared to controls. Fibroblast Cu concentration was elevated in one to two possible maternal heterozygotes, a finding which may permit diagnosis of the carrier state for some SHS heterozygotes. PMID:481958

  6. Cholesterol absorption.

    PubMed

    Ostlund, Richard E

    2002-03-01

    Cholesterol absorption is a key regulatory point in human lipid metabolism because it determines the amount of endogenous biliary as well as dietary cholesterol that is retained, thereby influencing whole body cholesterol balance. Plant sterols (phytosterols) and the drug ezetimibe reduce cholesterol absorption and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol in clinical trials, complementing the statin drugs, which inhibit cholesterol biosynthesis. The mechanism of cholesterol absorption is not completely known but involves the genes ABC1, ABCG5, and ABCG8, which are members of the ATP-binding cassette protein family and appear to remove unwanted cholesterol and phytosterols from the enterocyte. ABC1 is upregulated by the liver X (LXR) and retinoid X (RXR) nuclear receptors. Acylcholesterol acytransferase-2 is an intestinal enzyme that esterifies absorbed cholesterol and increases cholesterol absorption when dietary intake is high. New clinical treatments based on better understanding of absorption physiology are likely to substantially improve clinical cholesterol management in the future. PMID:17033296

  7. [Therapeutic action of vitamin C on cholesterol metabolism].

    PubMed

    Fidanza, A; Floridi, S; Martinoli, L; Mastroiacovo, P; Servi, M; Di Virgilio, D; Ravallese, F

    1979-03-30

    As a part of the research work on the role played by Vitamin C on lipidic metabolism, the effects on man were considered that result from the administration of high vitamin C doses, chiefly with reference to the serum levels of colesterol, of total lipids and of triglycerides. Our research was conducted on male subjects of 65-90 years, who were administered 3 g/day of vitamin C for three weeks. Our findings show that the administration of high vitamin C doses causes a statistically significant decrease in colesterol, in total lipids and in triglycerides, in all the subjects under consideration. This takes place not only when colesterol, total lipids and triglycerides present normal serum levels, but also when such levels show an increase. Conversely, vitamin C significantly increases, with treatment, in all subjects treated, both in plasma and in leukocytes. PMID:550886

  8. Effects of Cholesterol-altering Pharmaceuticals on Cholesterol Metabolism, Steroidogenesis, and Gene Expression in the Fathead Minnow (Pimephales promelas)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pharmaceuticals that target cholesterol biosynthesis and uptake are among the most widely prescribed drugs and have been detected in the aquatic environment. Fibrates are a class of pharmaceuticals that indirectly modulate cholesterol biosynthesis through effects on peroxisome pr...

  9. Effect of plant sterol-enriched diets on plasma and egg yolk cholesterol concentrations and cholesterol metabolism in laying hens.

    PubMed

    Liu, X; Zhao, H L; Thiessen, S; House, J D; Jones, P J H

    2010-02-01

    Egg exists as a major dietary source of cholesterol in Western diets. In North America, laying hen diets are usually devoid of cholesterol when diets are formulated to exclude animal-based products. Hence, laying hens meet their physiological cholesterol requirement through de novo synthesis. Plant sterols exert a cholesterol-lowering effect in humans by interfering with intestinal sterol absorption. However, it is unknown whether plant sterol supplementation could be effective in reducing intestinal reabsorption of biliary cholesterol in laying hens, thus modulating whole body cholesterol in favor of lower plasma and yolk cholesterol content. The current study was designed to investigate the effect of diets enriched with 0, 0.5, 1, and 2% plant sterols on cholesterol absorption, synthesis, as well as plasma, liver, and egg yolk cholesterol concentrations in laying hens. After 8 wk of plant sterol intervention (first 2 wk were acclimatization), feed intake, BW, egg weight, egg yolk weight, egg production, Haugh units, liver mass, plasma, and hepatic cholesterol concentrations did not differ as a function of plant sterol supplementation. Egg cholesterol concentrations (mg/g) fluctuated during the 6-wk experimental period. At wk 6, a minor reduction in egg yolk cholesterol concentration (mg per g of yolk, P<0.05, vs. control) was observed in hens fed 1 and 2% cholesterol-enriched diets, respectively. However, such result failed to affect total egg cholesterol content. No statistical difference was observed across treatments over 6 wk. Neither cholesterol absorption rates nor synthesis differed as a function of treatment. Results suggested that overall cholesterol content in egg yolk was not affected by feeding hens plant sterol-enriched diets over 6 wk. PMID:20075279

  10. Interaction between dietary lipids and gut microbiota regulates hepatic cholesterol metabolism.

    PubMed

    Caesar, Robert; Nygren, Heli; Orešič, Matej; Bäckhed, Fredrik

    2016-03-01

    The gut microbiota influences many aspects of host metabolism. We have previously shown that the presence of a gut microbiota remodels lipid composition. Here we investigated how interaction between gut microbiota and dietary lipids regulates lipid composition in the liver and plasma, and gene expression in the liver. Germ-free and conventionally raised mice were fed a lard or fish oil diet for 11 weeks. We performed lipidomics analysis of the liver and serum and microarray analysis of the liver. As expected, most of the variation in the lipidomics dataset was induced by the diet, and abundance of most lipid classes differed between mice fed lard and fish oil. However, the gut microbiota also affected lipid composition. The gut microbiota increased hepatic levels of cholesterol and cholesteryl esters in mice fed lard, but not in mice fed fish oil. Serum levels of cholesterol and cholesteryl esters were not affected by the gut microbiota. Genes encoding enzymes involved in cholesterol biosynthesis were downregulated by the gut microbiota in mice fed lard and were expressed at a low level in mice fed fish oil independent of microbial status. In summary, we show that gut microbiota-induced regulation of hepatic cholesterol metabolism is dependent on dietary lipid composition. PMID:26783361

  11. Differential lipid metabolism in monocytes and macrophages: influence of cholesterol loading.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Ruiz, Irene; Puchalska, Patrycja; Narasimhulu, Chandrakala Aluganti; Sengupta, Bhaswati; Parthasarathy, Sampath

    2016-04-01

    The influence of the hypercholesterolemia associated with atherosclerosis on monocytes is poorly understood. Monocytes are exposed to high concentrations of lipids, particularly cholesterol and lysophosphatidylcholine (lyso-PC). Indeed, in line with recent reports, we found that monocytes accumulate cholesteryl esters (CEs) in hypercholesterolemic mice, demonstrating the need for studies that analyze the effects of lipid accumulation on monocytes. Here we analyze the effects of cholesterol and lyso-PC loading in human monocytes and macrophages. We found that cholesterol acyltransferase and CE hydrolase activities are lower in monocytes. Monocytes also showed a different expression profile of cholesterol influx and efflux genes in response to lipid loading and a different pattern of lyso-PC metabolism. In monocytes, increased levels of CE slowed the conversion of lyso-PC into PC. Interestingly, although macrophages accumulated glycerophosphocholine, phosphocholine was the main water-soluble choline metabolite being generated in monocytes, suggesting a role for mono- and diacylglycerol in the chemoattractability of these cells. In summary, monocytes and macrophages show significant differences in lipid metabolism and gene expression profiles in response to lipid loading. These findings provide new insights into the mechanisms of atherosclerosis and suggest potentials for targeting monocyte chemotactic properties not only in atherosclerosis but also in other diseases. PMID:26839333

  12. Central Nervous System Lipoproteins: ApoE and Regulation of Cholesterol Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Mahley, Robert W

    2016-07-01

    ApoE on high-density lipoproteins is primarily responsible for lipid transport and cholesterol homeostasis in the central nervous system (CNS). Normally produced mostly by astrocytes, apoE is also produced under neuropathologic conditions by neurons. ApoE on high-density lipoproteins is critical in redistributing cholesterol and phospholipids for membrane repair and remodeling. The 3 main structural isoforms differ in their effectiveness. Unlike apoE2 and apoE3, apoE4 has markedly altered CNS metabolism, is associated with Alzheimer disease and other neurodegenerative disorders, and is expressed at lower levels in brain and cerebrospinal fluid. ApoE4-expressing cultured astrocytes and neurons have reduced cholesterol and phospholipid secretion, decreased lipid-binding capacity, and increased intracellular degradation. Two structural features are responsible for apoE4 dysfunction: domain interaction, in which arginine-61 interacts ionically with glutamic acid-255, and a less stable conformation than apoE3 and apoE2. Blocking domain interaction by gene targeting (replacing arginine-61 with threonine) or by small-molecule structure correctors increases CNS apoE4 levels and lipid-binding capacity and decreases intracellular degradation. Small molecules (drugs) that disrupt domain interaction, so-called structure correctors, could prevent the apoE4-associated neuropathology by blocking the formation of neurotoxic fragments. Understanding how to modulate CNS cholesterol transport and metabolism is providing important insights into CNS health and disease. PMID:27174096

  13. Effects of novel bile salts on cholesterol metabolism in rats and guinea-pigs.

    PubMed

    Fears, R; Brown, R; Ferres, H; Grenier, F; Tyrrell, A W

    1990-11-01

    Novel bile salts (quaternary ammonium conjugates) inhibited cholic acid binding and transport in everted ileal sacs in vitro. The cationic piperazine conjugate of lithocholic acid (di-iodide salt, compound 8, BRL 39924A) appeared most active, inhibiting binding by 29% and transport by 59% in guinea-pig ileum (200 microM). BRL 39924A also inhibited taurocholate uptake into guinea-pig ileal sacs and cholate uptake into rat ileal sacs and was selected for further study in vivo. In hyperlipidaemic rats, BRL 39924A significantly raised cholesterol 7 alpha-hydroxylase activity and decreased hepatic accumulation of exogenous cholic acid. HDL cholesterol concentration in the serum increased and the level of VLDL plus LDL cholesterol decreased. In hyperlipidaemic guinea-pigs. BRL 39924A lowered serum total cholesterol and triglyceride levels. Although metabolic changes were less than those achieved with the bile acid sequestrant, cholestyramine, the doses of BRL 39924A used were much lower (100-500 mg/kg body wt). Selective inhibition of receptor mediated bile acid uptake may be associated with local side-effects but these novel bile salts are useful pharmacological tools to examine the effects of receptor blockade on lipoprotein metabolism. PMID:2242032

  14. Effects of a Dietary Supplement with Barley Sprout Extract on Blood Cholesterol Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Byun, A Ri; Chun, Hyejin; Lee, Jin; Lee, Sang Wha; Lee, Hong Soo; Shim, Kyung Won

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Barley sprout (Hordeum vulgare L.) contains 4.97% fat, 52.6% polysaccharide, and 34.1% protein along with a variety of vitamins, minerals, and polyphenolic compounds. Hexacosanol is one such compound from the barley leaf that might improve cholesterol metabolism by decreasing cholesterol synthesis. Method. Therefore, this study was conducted to investigate the effects of barley sprout extract on serum lipid metabolism in healthy volunteers (n = 51). Subjects were randomly divided into two groups: one group consumed a single capsule of barley leaf extract daily (n = 25, 42.48 ± 13.58 years) and the other consumed placebo capsules (n = 26, 40.54 ± 11.1 years) for 12 weeks. Results. After 12 weeks, total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein- (LDL-) cholesterol were not lower in the barley sprout extract group compared to the placebo group (p = 0.415 and p = 0.351, resp.) and no differences in clinical or laboratory findings were observed between both groups. Conclusion. Our study failed to show significant lipid-lowering effects of barley sprout extract, possibly due to dosage, duration of therapy, and small sample size. Despite our nonsignificant findings, barley sprout has a possibility as a functional health food; therefore future research is needed. PMID:26101533

  15. Effects of a Dietary Supplement with Barley Sprout Extract on Blood Cholesterol Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Byun, A Ri; Chun, Hyejin; Lee, Jin; Lee, Sang Wha; Lee, Hong Soo; Shim, Kyung Won

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Barley sprout (Hordeum vulgare L.) contains 4.97% fat, 52.6% polysaccharide, and 34.1% protein along with a variety of vitamins, minerals, and polyphenolic compounds. Hexacosanol is one such compound from the barley leaf that might improve cholesterol metabolism by decreasing cholesterol synthesis. Method. Therefore, this study was conducted to investigate the effects of barley sprout extract on serum lipid metabolism in healthy volunteers (n = 51). Subjects were randomly divided into two groups: one group consumed a single capsule of barley leaf extract daily (n = 25, 42.48 ± 13.58 years) and the other consumed placebo capsules (n = 26, 40.54 ± 11.1 years) for 12 weeks. Results. After 12 weeks, total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein- (LDL-) cholesterol were not lower in the barley sprout extract group compared to the placebo group (p = 0.415 and p = 0.351, resp.) and no differences in clinical or laboratory findings were observed between both groups. Conclusion. Our study failed to show significant lipid-lowering effects of barley sprout extract, possibly due to dosage, duration of therapy, and small sample size. Despite our nonsignificant findings, barley sprout has a possibility as a functional health food; therefore future research is needed. PMID:26101533

  16. The Sterolgene v0 cDNA microarray: a systemic approach to studies of cholesterol homeostasis and drug metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Režen, Tadeja; Juvan, Peter; Fon Tacer, Klementina; Kuzman, Drago; Roth, Adrian; Pompon, Denis; Aggerbeck, Lawrence P; Meyer, Urs A; Rozman, Damjana

    2008-01-01

    Background Cholesterol homeostasis and xenobiotic metabolism are complex biological processes, which are difficult to study with traditional methods. Deciphering complex regulation and response of these two processes to different factors is crucial also for understanding of disease development. Systems biology tools as are microarrays can importantly contribute to this knowledge and can also discover novel interactions between the two processes. Results We have developed a low density Sterolgene v0 cDNA microarray dedicated to studies of cholesterol homeostasis and drug metabolism in the mouse. To illustrate its performance, we have analyzed mouse liver samples from studies focused on regulation of cholesterol homeostasis and drug metabolism by diet, drugs and inflammation. We observed down-regulation of cholesterol biosynthesis during fasting and high-cholesterol diet and subsequent up-regulation by inflammation. Drug metabolism was down-regulated by fasting and inflammation, but up-regulated by phenobarbital treatment and high-cholesterol diet. Additionally, the performance of the Sterolgene v0 was compared to the two commercial high density microarray platforms: the Agilent cDNA (G4104A) and the Affymetrix MOE430A GeneChip. We hybridized identical RNA samples to the commercial microarrays and showed that the performance of Sterolgene is comparable to commercial arrays in terms of detection of changes in cholesterol homeostasis and drug metabolism. Conclusion Using the Sterolgene v0 microarray we were able to detect important changes in cholesterol homeostasis and drug metabolism caused by diet, drugs and inflammation. Together with its next generations the Sterolgene microarrays represent original and dedicated tools enabling focused and cost effective studies of cholesterol homeostasis and drug metabolism. These microarrays have the potential of being further developed into screening or diagnostic tools. PMID:18261244

  17. ELECTROCARDIOGRAPHIC ABNORMALITIES AMONG MEXICAN AMERICANS: CORRELATIONS WITH DIABETES, OBESITY, AND THE METABOLIC SYNDROME

    PubMed Central

    Queen, Saulette R.; Smulevitz, Beverly; Rentfro, Anne R.; Vatcheva, Kristina P.; Kim, Hyunggun; McPherson, David D.; Hanis, Craig L.; Fisher-Hoch, Susan P.; McCormick, Joseph B.; Laing, Susan T.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY BACKGROUND Resting ischemic electrocardiographic abnormalities have been associated with cardiovascular mortality. Simple markers of abnormal autonomic tone have also been associated with diabetes, obesity, and the metabolic syndrome in some populations. Data on these electrocardiographic abnormalities and correlations with coronary risk factors are lacking among Mexican Americans wherein these conditions are prevalent. OBJECTIVE This study aimed to evaluate the prevalent resting electrocardiographic abnormalities among community-dwelling Mexican Americans, and correlate these findings with coronary risk factors, particularly diabetes, obesity, and the metabolic syndrome. METHODS Study subjects (n=1280) were drawn from the Cameron County Hispanic Cohort comprised of community-dwelling Mexican Americans living in Brownsville, Texas at the United States-Mexico border. Ischemic electrocardiographic abnormalities were defined as presence of ST/T wave abnormalities suggestive of ischemia, abnormal Q waves, and left bundle branch block. Parameters that reflect autonomic tone, such as heart rate-corrected QT interval and resting heart rate, were also measured. RESULTS Ischemic electrocardiographic abnormalities were more prevalent among older persons and those with hypertension, diabetes, obesity, and the metabolic syndrome. Subjects in the highest quartiles of QTc interval and resting heart rate were also more likely to be diabetic, hypertensive, obese, or have the metabolic syndrome. CONCLUSIONS Among Mexican Americans, persons with diabetes, obesity, and the metabolic syndrome were more likely to have ischemic electrocardiographic abnormalities, longer QTc intervals, and higher resting heart rates. A resting electrocardiogram can play a complementary role in the comprehensive evaluation of cardiovascular risk in this minority population. PMID:23515880

  18. Dietary intake and physical activity in a Canadian population sample of male patients with HIV infection and metabolic abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Arendt, Bianca Maria; Aghdassi, Elaheh; Mohammed, Saira Saddia; Fung, Lillia Yan; Jalali, Pegah; Salit, Irving Elliot; Allard, Johane Pierette

    2008-01-01

    Objective was to assess dietary intake and physical activity in a Canadian population sample of male patients with HIV and metabolic abnormalities and to compare the data to Canadian recommendations. Sixty-five HIV-infected men with at least one feature associated with the metabolic syndrome (insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, central obesity, or lipodystrophy) were enrolled. Results from 7-day food records and activity logs were compared to the Dietary Reference Intakes and recommendations of Canada's Physical Activity Guide, respectively. Anthropometric data were also measured. Fifty-two percent of the subjects were overweight, another 15% were obese. However, energy intake (mean+/-SEM) (2153+/-99 kcal/d) was lower than the estimated requirement (2854+/-62 kcal/d; p<0.0001), and 84.5% of the patients reached the recommended minimum of 60 min of mild or 30 min of moderate daily exercise. Intake was adequate for protein, but high for fat and cholesterol in 40% of patients. No patient reached the recommendation for fiber. Intake from diet alone was suboptimal for most micronutrients. Prevalence was highest for low vitamin E (91% of patients) and magnesium (68%) intake, and high sodium intake (72%). In summary, a large proportion of HIV patients with metabolic abnormalities were overweight or obese. However, this was not associated with high energy intake, or reduced physical activity. High fat, low fiber and inadequate micronutrient intakes were prevalent. PMID:18288980

  19. Potentiating the antitumour response of CD8(+) T cells by modulating cholesterol metabolism.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wei; Bai, Yibing; Xiong, Ying; Zhang, Jin; Chen, Shuokai; Zheng, Xiaojun; Meng, Xiangbo; Li, Lunyi; Wang, Jing; Xu, Chenguang; Yan, Chengsong; Wang, Lijuan; Chang, Catharine C Y; Chang, Ta-Yuan; Zhang, Ti; Zhou, Penghui; Song, Bao-Liang; Liu, Wanli; Sun, Shao-cong; Liu, Xiaolong; Li, Bo-liang; Xu, Chenqi

    2016-03-31

    CD8(+) T cells have a central role in antitumour immunity, but their activity is suppressed in the tumour microenvironment. Reactivating the cytotoxicity of CD8(+) T cells is of great clinical interest in cancer immunotherapy. Here we report a new mechanism by which the antitumour response of mouse CD8(+) T cells can be potentiated by modulating cholesterol metabolism. Inhibiting cholesterol esterification in T cells by genetic ablation or pharmacological inhibition of ACAT1, a key cholesterol esterification enzyme, led to potentiated effector function and enhanced proliferation of CD8(+) but not CD4(+) T cells. This is due to the increase in the plasma membrane cholesterol level of CD8(+) T cells, which causes enhanced T-cell receptor clustering and signalling as well as more efficient formation of the immunological synapse. ACAT1-deficient CD8(+) T cells were better than wild-type CD8(+) T cells at controlling melanoma growth and metastasis in mice. We used the ACAT inhibitor avasimibe, which was previously tested in clinical trials for treating atherosclerosis and showed a good human safety profile, to treat melanoma in mice and observed a good antitumour effect. A combined therapy of avasimibe plus an anti-PD-1 antibody showed better efficacy than monotherapies in controlling tumour progression. ACAT1, an established target for atherosclerosis, is therefore also a potential target for cancer immunotherapy. PMID:26982734

  20. Potentiating the antitumour response of CD8+ T cells by modulating cholesterol metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wei; Bai, Yibing; Xiong, Ying; Zhang, Jin; Chen, Shuokai; Zheng, Xiaojun; Meng, Xiangbo; Li, Lunyi; Wang, Jing; Xu, Chenguang; Yan, Chengsong; Wang, Lijuan; Chang, Catharine C. Y.; Chang, Ta-Yuan; Zhang, Ti; Zhou, Penghui; Song, Bao-Liang; Liu, Wanli; Sun, Shao-cong; Liu, Xiaolong; Li, Bo-liang; Xu, Chenqi

    2016-01-01

    CD8+ T cells have a central role in antitumour immunity, but their activity is suppressed in the tumour microenvironment1–4. Reactivating the cytotoxicity of CD8+ T cells is of great clinical interest in cancer immunotherapy. Here we report a new mechanism by which the antitumour response of mouse CD8+ T cells can be potentiated by modulating cholesterol metabolism. Inhibiting cholesterol esterification in T cells by genetic ablation or pharmacological inhibition of ACAT1, a key cholesterol esterification enzyme5, led to potentiated effector function and enhanced proliferation of CD8+ but not CD4+ T cells. This is due to the increase in the plasma membrane cholesterol level of CD8+ T cells, which causes enhanced T-cell receptor clustering and signalling as well as more efficient formation of the immunological synapse. ACAT1-deficient CD8+ T cells were better than wild-type CD8+ T cells at controlling melanoma growth and metastasis in mice. We used the ACAT inhibitor avasimibe, which was previously tested in clinical trials for treating atherosclerosis and showed a good human safety profile6,7, to treat melanoma in mice and observed a good antitumour effect. A combined therapy of avasimibe plus an anti-PD-1 antibody showed better efficacy than monotherapies in controlling tumour progression. ACAT1, an established target for atherosclerosis, is therefore also a potential target for cancer immunotherapy. PMID:26982734

  1. [Correlations of lipoprotein metabolism indicators in persons with low and high cholesterol ester transport activity].

    PubMed

    Tvorogova, M G; Rozhkova, T A; Kukharchuk, V V; Titov, V N

    1999-01-01

    For clarifying the role of plasma cholesterol ester transfer activity (CETA) in forming hyperlipoproteinemia (HLP) and determination of high density lipoproteins cholesterol (Ch HDL) level, lipoprotein metabolism indicators were compared for individuals with high and low CETA. 257 subjects were investigated: 195 patients with different forms of hereditary HLP and individuals without HLP: 34 healthy and 28 with coronary heart disease (CHD). Lipids were determined enzymatically, apoproteins content by immunoturbodimetric and immunodiffusion methods. CETA and cholesterol esterification rate (CER) were measured through autological methods. Selected groups of patients with high and low CETA were significantly distinguished only by plasma Ch level (average Ch > 6.2 mmol/l in both groups), free Ch HDL and CER. The groups were not significantly different by men-women ratio (chi 2 = 0.016, p = 0.9) and CHD patients share (chi 2 = 0.126, p = 0.723). The correlation between CETA and Ch levels was significant for healthy individuals only. The data does not correspond to assumption of exclusively atherogenic influence of high CETA: 1) no correlation between CETA and atherogenic parameters of LP metabolism among different HLP forms was found; 2) Ch HDL levels were not distinguished at high and low CETA; 3) no domination of CHD patients among the subjects with high CETA was found. PMID:10547884

  2. The epigenetic drug 5-azacytidine interferes with cholesterol and lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Poirier, Steve; Samami, Samaneh; Mamarbachi, Maya; Demers, Annie; Chang, Ta Yuan; Vance, Dennis E; Hatch, Grant M; Mayer, Gaétan

    2014-07-01

    DNA methylation and histone acetylation inhibitors are widely used to study the role of epigenetic marks in the regulation of gene expression. In addition, several of these molecules are being tested in clinical trials or already in use in the clinic. Antimetabolites, such as the DNA-hypomethylating agent 5-azacytidine (5-AzaC), have been shown to lower malignant progression to acute myeloid leukemia and to prolong survival in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes. Here we examined the effects of DNA methylation inhibitors on the expression of lipid biosynthetic and uptake genes. Our data demonstrate that, independently of DNA methylation, 5-AzaC selectively and very potently reduces expression of key genes involved in cholesterol and lipid metabolism (e.g. PCSK9, HMGCR, and FASN) in all tested cell lines and in vivo in mouse liver. Treatment with 5-AzaC disturbed subcellular cholesterol homeostasis, thereby impeding activation of sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (key regulators of lipid metabolism). Through inhibition of UMP synthase, 5-AzaC also strongly induced expression of 1-acylglycerol-3-phosphate O-acyltransferase 9 (AGPAT9) and promoted triacylglycerol synthesis and cytosolic lipid droplet formation. Remarkably, complete reversal was obtained by the co-addition of either UMP or cytidine. Therefore, this study provides the first evidence that inhibition of the de novo pyrimidine synthesis by 5-AzaC disturbs cholesterol and lipid homeostasis, probably through the glycerolipid biosynthesis pathway, which may contribute mechanistically to its beneficial cytostatic properties. PMID:24855646

  3. The Epigenetic Drug 5-Azacytidine Interferes with Cholesterol and Lipid Metabolism*

    PubMed Central

    Poirier, Steve; Samami, Samaneh; Mamarbachi, Maya; Demers, Annie; Chang, Ta Yuan; Vance, Dennis E.; Hatch, Grant M.; Mayer, Gaétan

    2014-01-01

    DNA methylation and histone acetylation inhibitors are widely used to study the role of epigenetic marks in the regulation of gene expression. In addition, several of these molecules are being tested in clinical trials or already in use in the clinic. Antimetabolites, such as the DNA-hypomethylating agent 5-azacytidine (5-AzaC), have been shown to lower malignant progression to acute myeloid leukemia and to prolong survival in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes. Here we examined the effects of DNA methylation inhibitors on the expression of lipid biosynthetic and uptake genes. Our data demonstrate that, independently of DNA methylation, 5-AzaC selectively and very potently reduces expression of key genes involved in cholesterol and lipid metabolism (e.g. PCSK9, HMGCR, and FASN) in all tested cell lines and in vivo in mouse liver. Treatment with 5-AzaC disturbed subcellular cholesterol homeostasis, thereby impeding activation of sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (key regulators of lipid metabolism). Through inhibition of UMP synthase, 5-AzaC also strongly induced expression of 1-acylglycerol-3-phosphate O-acyltransferase 9 (AGPAT9) and promoted triacylglycerol synthesis and cytosolic lipid droplet formation. Remarkably, complete reversal was obtained by the co-addition of either UMP or cytidine. Therefore, this study provides the first evidence that inhibition of the de novo pyrimidine synthesis by 5-AzaC disturbs cholesterol and lipid homeostasis, probably through the glycerolipid biosynthesis pathway, which may contribute mechanistically to its beneficial cytostatic properties. PMID:24855646

  4. Insulin resistance and endocrine-metabolic abnormalities in polycystic ovarian syndrome: Comparison between obese and non-obese PCOS patients

    PubMed Central

    Layegh, Parvin; Mousavi, Zohreh; Farrokh Tehrani, Donya; Parizadeh, Seyed Mohammad Reza; Khajedaluee, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Background: Insulin resistance has an important role in pathophysiology of polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS). Yet there are certain controversies regarding the presence of insulin resistance in non-obese patients. Objective: The aim was to compare the insulin resistance and various endocrine and metabolic abnormalities in obese and non-obese PCOS women. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study which was performed from 2007-2010, 115 PCOS patients, aged 16-45 years were enrolled. Seventy patients were obese (BMI ≥25) and 45 patients were non-obese (BMI <25). Presence of insulin resistance and endocrine-metabolic abnormalities were compared between two groups. Collected data were analyzed with SPSS version 16.0 and p<0.05 was considered as statistically significant. Results: There was no significant difference in presence of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR >2.3) between two groups (p=0.357). Waist circumference (p<0.001), waist/hip ratio (p<0.001), systolic (p<0.001) and diastolic (p<0.001) blood pressures, fasting blood sugar (p=0.003) and insulin (p=0.011), HOMA-IR (p=0.004), total cholesterol (p=0.001) and triglyceride (p<0.001) were all significantly higher in obese PCOS patients. There was no significant difference in total testosterone (p=0.634) and androstenedione (p=0.736) between groups whereas Dehydroepiandrotendione sulfate (DHEAS) was significantly higher in non-obese PCOS women (p=0.018). There was no case of fatty liver and metabolic syndrome in non-obese patients, whereas they were seen in 31.3% and 39.4% of obese PCOS women, respectively. Conclusion: Our study showed that metabolic abnormalities are more prevalent in obese PCOS women, but adrenal axis activity that is reflected in higher levels of DHEAS was more commonly pronounced in our non-obese PCOS patients. PMID:27351028

  5. High blood cholesterol levels

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/ency/article/000403.htm High blood cholesterol levels To use the sharing features on this page, ... called "bad" cholesterol For many people, abnormal cholesterol levels are partly due to an unhealthy lifestyle. This ...

  6. Correlations Between Abnormal Glucose Metabolism and Bone Mineral Density or Bone Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Qu, Yang; Kang, Ming-Yang; Dong, Rong-Peng; Zhao, Jian-Wu

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The aim of this meta-analysis was to explore the correlations of abnormal glucose metabolism (AGM) with bone mineral density (BMD) and bone metabolism. MATERIAL AND METHODS Relevant studies were identified using computerized and manual search strategies. The included studies were in strict accordance with inclusion and exclusion criteria. Statistical analyses were conducted with the Comprehensive Meta-analysis 2.0 (Biostat Inc., Englewood, NJ, USA). RESULTS Our present meta-analysis initially searched 844 studies, and 7 studies were eventually incorporated in the present meta-analysis. These 7 cohort studies included 1123 subjects altogether (560 patients with AGM and 563 healthy controls). The results showed that bone mass index (BMI), insulin, and insulin resistance (IR) of patients with AGM were significantly higher than that of the population with normal glucose metabolism (BMI: SMD=1.658, 95% CI=0.663~2.654, P=0.001; insulin: SMD=0.544, 95% CI=0.030~1.058, P=0.038; IR: SMD=8.767, 95% CI=4.178~13.356, P<0.001). However, the results also indicated there was no obvious difference in osteocalcin (OC) and BMD in patients with AGM and the population with normal glucose metabolism (OC: SMD=0.293, 95% CI=-0.023~0.609, P=0.069; BMD: SMD=0.805, 95% CI=-0. 212~1.821, P=0.121). CONCLUSIONS Our meta-analysis results suggest that AGM might lead to increased BMI, insulin, and IR, while it has no significant correlation with BMD or bone metabolism. PMID:26970713

  7. Correlations Between Abnormal Glucose Metabolism and Bone Mineral Density or Bone Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Yang; Kang, Ming-Yang; Dong, Rong-Peng; Zhao, Jian-Wu

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this meta-analysis was to explore the correlations of abnormal glucose metabolism (AGM) with bone mineral density (BMD) and bone metabolism. Material/Methods Relevant studies were identified using computerized and manual search strategies. The included studies were in strict accordance with inclusion and exclusion criteria. Statistical analyses were conducted with the Comprehensive Meta-analysis 2.0 (Biostat Inc., Englewood, NJ, USA). Results Our present meta-analysis initially searched 844 studies, and 7 studies were eventually incorporated in the present meta-analysis. These 7 cohort studies included 1123 subjects altogether (560 patients with AGM and 563 healthy controls). The results showed that bone mass index (BMI), insulin, and insulin resistance (IR) of patients with AGM were significantly higher than that of the population with normal glucose metabolism (BMI: SMD=1.658, 95% CI=0.663~2.654, P=0.001; insulin: SMD=0.544, 95% CI=0.030~1.058, P=0.038; IR: SMD=8.767, 95% CI=4.178~13.356, P<0.001). However, the results also indicated there was no obvious difference in osteocalcin (OC) and BMD in patients with AGM and the population with normal glucose metabolism (OC: SMD=0.293, 95% CI=−0.023~0.609, P=0.069; BMD: SMD=0.805, 95% CI=−0. 212~1.821, P=0.121). Conclusions Our meta-analysis results suggest that AGM might lead to increased BMI, insulin, and IR, while it has no significant correlation with BMD or bone metabolism. PMID:26970713

  8. Dietary Lipid and Cholesterol Induce Ovarian Dysfunction and Abnormal LH Response to Stimulation in Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Dupont, Charlotte; Tarrade, Anne; Picone, Olivier; Larcher, Thibaut; Dahirel, Michèle; Poumerol, Elodie; Mandon-Pepin, Béatrice; Lévy, Rachel; Chavatte-Palmer, Pascale

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aim Excess of fat intake is dramatically increasing in women of childbearing age and results in numerous health complications, including reproductive disorders. Using rabbit does as a biomedical model, the aim of this study was to evaluate onset of puberty, endocrine responses to stimulation and ovarian follicular maturation in females fed a high fat high cholesterol diet (HH diet) from 10 weeks of age (i.e., 2 weeks before normal onset of puberty) or a control diet (C diet). Methodology/Principal Findings Three experiments were performed, each including 8 treated (HH group) and 8 control (C group) does. In experiment 1, the endocrine response to Gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) was evaluated at 13, 18 and 22 weeks of age. In experiment 2, the follicular population was counted in ovaries of adult females (18 weeks of age). In experiment 3, the LH response to mating and steroid profiles throughout gestation were evaluated at 18 weeks of age. Fetal growth was monitored by ultrasound and offspring birth weight was recorded. Data showed a significantly higher Luteinizing hormone (LH) response after induction of ovulation at 13 weeks of age in the HH group. There was no difference at 18 weeks, but at 22 weeks, the LH response to GnRH was significantly reduced in the HH group. The number of atretic follicles was significantly increased and the number of antral follicles significantly reduced in HH does vs. controls. During gestation, the HH diet induced intra-uterine growth retardation (IUGR). Conclusion The HH diet administered from before puberty onwards affected onset of puberty, follicular growth, hormonal responses to breeding and GnRH stimulation in relation to age and lead to fetal IUGR. PMID:23690983

  9. Levels of adipocytokines and vitamin D in a biracial sample of young metabolically healthy obese and metabolically abnormal obese women

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Purpose: Adipocytokines and vitamin D (vitD) concentrations may contribute to cardiometabolic risk profiles in obese populations. The purpose was to determine if levels of adipocytokines and vitD differ between young metabolically healthy obese (MHO) and metabolically abnormal obese (MAO) black and ...

  10. Metabolic Abnormalities Are Common among South American Hispanics Subjects with Normal Weight or Excess Body Weight: The CRONICAS Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Benziger, Catherine P.; Bernabé-Ortiz, Antonio; Gilman, Robert H.; Checkley, William; Smeeth, Liam; Málaga, Germán; Miranda, J. Jaime

    2015-01-01

    Objective We aimed to characterize metabolic status by body mass index (BMI) status. Methods The CRONICAS longitudinal study was performed in an age-and-sex stratified random sample of participants aged 35 years or older in four Peruvian settings: Lima (Peru’s capital, costal urban, highly urbanized), urban and rural Puno (both high-altitude), and Tumbes (costal semirural). Data from the baseline study, conducted in 2010, was used. Individuals were classified by BMI as normal weight (18.5–24.9 kg/m2), overweight (25.0–29.9 kg/m2), and obese (≥30 kg/m2), and as metabolically healthy (0–1 metabolic abnormality) or metabolically unhealthy (≥2 abnormalities). Abnormalities included individual components of the metabolic syndrome, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, and insulin resistance. Results A total of 3088 (age 55.6±12.6 years, 51.3% females) had all measurements. Of these, 890 (28.8%), 1361 (44.1%) and 837 (27.1%) were normal weight, overweight and obese, respectively. Overall, 19.0% of normal weight in contrast to 54.9% of overweight and 77.7% of obese individuals had ≥3 risk factors (p<0.001). Among normal weight individuals, 43.1% were metabolically unhealthy, and age ≥65 years, female, and highest socioeconomic groups were more likely to have this pattern. In contrast, only 16.4% of overweight and 3.9% of obese individuals were metabolically healthy and, compared to Lima, the rural and urban sites in Puno were more likely to have a metabolically healthier profile. Conclusions Most Peruvians with overweight and obesity have additional risk factors for cardiovascular disease, as well as a majority of those with a healthy weight. Prevention programs aimed at individuals with a normal BMI, and those who are overweight and obese, are urgently needed, such as screening for elevated fasting cholesterol and glucose. PMID:26599322

  11. Bilirubin Increases Insulin Sensitivity by Regulating Cholesterol Metabolism, Adipokines and PPARγ Levels.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jinfeng; Dong, Huansheng; Zhang, Yong; Cao, Mingjun; Song, Lili; Pan, Qingjie; Bulmer, Andrew; Adams, David B; Dong, Xiao; Wang, Hongjun

    2015-01-01

    Obesity can cause insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Moderate elevations in bilirubin levels have anti-diabetic effects. This study is aimed at determining the mechanisms by which bilirubin treatment reduces obesity and insulin resistance in a diet-induced obesity (DIO) mouse model. DIO mice were treated with bilirubin or vehicle for 14 days. Body weights, plasma glucose, and insulin tolerance tests were performed prior to, immediately, and 7 weeks post-treatment. Serum lipid, leptin, adiponectin, insulin, total and direct bilirubin levels were measured. Expression of factors involved in adipose metabolism including sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP-1), insulin receptor (IR), and PPARγ in liver were measured by RT-PCR and Western blot. Compared to controls, bilirubin-treated mice exhibited reductions in body weight, blood glucose levels, total cholesterol (TC), leptin, total and direct bilirubin, and increases in adiponectin and expression of SREBP-1, IR, and PPARγ mRNA. The improved metabolic control achieved by bilirubin-treated mice was persistent: at two months after treatment termination, bilirubin-treated DIO mice remained insulin sensitive with lower leptin and higher adiponectin levels, together with increased PPARγ expression. These results indicate that bilirubin regulates cholesterol metabolism, adipokines and PPARγ levels, which likely contribute to increased insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance in DIO mice. PMID:26017184

  12. Novel role of a triglyceride-synthesizing enzyme: DGAT1 at the crossroad between triglyceride and cholesterol metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Sachdev, Vinay; Leopold, Christina; Bauer, Raimund; Patankar, Jay V.; Iqbal, Jahangir; Obrowsky, Sascha; Boverhof, Renze; Doktorova, Marcela; Scheicher, Bernhard; Goeritzer, Madeleine; Kolb, Dagmar; Turnbull, Andrew V.; Zimmer, Andreas; Hoefler, Gerald; Hussain, M. Mahmood; Groen, Albert K.; Kratky, Dagmar

    2016-01-01

    Acyl-CoA:diacylglycerol acyltransferase 1 (DGAT1) is a key enzyme in triacylglycerol (TG) biosynthesis. Here we show that genetic deficiency and pharmacological inhibition of DGAT1 in mice alters cholesterol metabolism. Cholesterol absorption, as assessed by acute cholesterol uptake, was significantly decreased in the small intestine and liver upon DGAT1 deficiency/inhibition. Ablation of DGAT1 in the intestine (I-DGAT1−/−) alone is sufficient to cause these effects. Consequences of I-DGAT1 deficiency phenocopy findings in whole-body DGAT1−/− and DGAT1 inhibitor-treated mice. We show that deficiency/inhibition of DGAT1 affects cholesterol metabolism via reduced chylomicron size and increased trans-intestinal cholesterol excretion. These effects are independent of cholesterol uptake at the apical surface of enterocytes but mediated through altered dietary fatty acid metabolism. Our findings provide insight into a novel role of DGAT1 and identify a pathway by which intestinal DGAT1 deficiency affects whole-body cholesterol homeostasis in mice. Targeting intestinal DGAT1 may represent a novel approach for treating hypercholesterolemia. PMID:27344248

  13. Novel role of a triglyceride-synthesizing enzyme: DGAT1 at the crossroad between triglyceride and cholesterol metabolism.

    PubMed

    Sachdev, Vinay; Leopold, Christina; Bauer, Raimund; Patankar, Jay V; Iqbal, Jahangir; Obrowsky, Sascha; Boverhof, Renze; Doktorova, Marcela; Scheicher, Bernhard; Goeritzer, Madeleine; Kolb, Dagmar; Turnbull, Andrew V; Zimmer, Andreas; Hoefler, Gerald; Hussain, M Mahmood; Groen, Albert K; Kratky, Dagmar

    2016-09-01

    Acyl-CoA:diacylglycerol acyltransferase 1 (DGAT1) is a key enzyme in triacylglycerol (TG) biosynthesis. Here we show that genetic deficiency and pharmacological inhibition of DGAT1 in mice alters cholesterol metabolism. Cholesterol absorption, as assessed by acute cholesterol uptake, was significantly decreased in the small intestine and liver upon DGAT1 deficiency/inhibition. Ablation of DGAT1 in the intestine (I-DGAT1(-/-)) alone is sufficient to cause these effects. Consequences of I-DGAT1 deficiency phenocopy findings in whole-body DGAT1(-/-) and DGAT1 inhibitor-treated mice. We show that deficiency/inhibition of DGAT1 affects cholesterol metabolism via reduced chylomicron size and increased trans-intestinal cholesterol excretion. These effects are independent of cholesterol uptake at the apical surface of enterocytes but mediated through altered dietary fatty acid metabolism. Our findings provide insight into a novel role of DGAT1 and identify a pathway by which intestinal DGAT1 deficiency affects whole-body cholesterol homeostasis in mice. Targeting intestinal DGAT1 may represent a novel approach for treating hypercholesterolemia. PMID:27344248

  14. In Ovo injection of betaine affects hepatic cholesterol metabolism through epigenetic gene regulation in newly hatched chicks.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yun; Sun, Qinwei; Li, Xiaoliang; Wang, Min; Cai, Demin; Li, Xi; Zhao, Ruqian

    2015-01-01

    Betaine is reported to regulate hepatic cholesterol metabolism in mammals. Chicken eggs contain considerable amount of betaine, yet it remains unknown whether and how betaine in the egg affects hepatic cholesterol metabolism in chicks. In this study, eggs were injected with betaine at 2.5 mg/egg and the hepatic cholesterol metabolism was investigated in newly hatched chicks. Betaine did not affect body weight or liver weight, but significantly increased the serum concentration (P < 0.05) and the hepatic content (P < 0.01) of cholesterol. Accordingly, the cholesterol biosynthetic enzyme HMGCR was up-regulated (P < 0.05 for both mRNA and protein), while CYP7A1 which converts cholesterol to bile acids was down-regulated (P < 0.05 for mRNA and P = 0.07 for protein). Moreover, hepatic protein content of the sterol-regulatory element binding protein 1 which regulates cholesterol and lipid biosynthesis, and the mRNA abundance of ATP binding cassette sub-family A member 1 (ABCA1) which mediates cholesterol counter transport were significantly (P < 0.05) increased in betaine-treated chicks. Meanwhile, hepatic protein contents of DNA methyltransferases 1 and adenosylhomocysteinase-like 1 were increased (P < 0.05), which was associated with global genomic DNA hypermethylation (P < 0.05) and diminished gene repression mark histone H3 lysine 27 trimethylation (P < 0.05). Furthermore, CpG methylation level on gene promoters was found to be increased (P < 0.05) for CYP7A1 yet decreased (P < 0.05) for ABCA1. These results indicate that in ovo betaine injection regulates hepatic cholesterol metabolism in chicks through epigenetic mechanisms including DNA and histone methylations. PMID:25860502

  15. In Ovo Injection of Betaine Affects Hepatic Cholesterol Metabolism through Epigenetic Gene Regulation in Newly Hatched Chicks

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yun; Sun, Qinwei; Li, Xiaoliang; Wang, Min; Cai, Demin; Li, Xi; Zhao, Ruqian

    2015-01-01

    Betaine is reported to regulate hepatic cholesterol metabolism in mammals. Chicken eggs contain considerable amount of betaine, yet it remains unknown whether and how betaine in the egg affects hepatic cholesterol metabolism in chicks. In this study, eggs were injected with betaine at 2.5 mg/egg and the hepatic cholesterol metabolism was investigated in newly hatched chicks. Betaine did not affect body weight or liver weight, but significantly increased the serum concentration (P < 0.05) and the hepatic content (P < 0.01) of cholesterol. Accordingly, the cholesterol biosynthetic enzyme HMGCR was up-regulated (P < 0.05 for both mRNA and protein), while CYP7A1 which converts cholesterol to bile acids was down-regulated (P < 0.05 for mRNA and P = 0.07 for protein). Moreover, hepatic protein content of the sterol-regulatory element binding protein 1 which regulates cholesterol and lipid biosynthesis, and the mRNA abundance of ATP binding cassette sub-family A member 1 (ABCA1) which mediates cholesterol counter transport were significantly (P < 0.05) increased in betaine-treated chicks. Meanwhile, hepatic protein contents of DNA methyltransferases 1 and adenosylhomocysteinase-like 1 were increased (P < 0.05), which was associated with global genomic DNA hypermethylation (P < 0.05) and diminished gene repression mark histone H3 lysine 27 trimethylation (P < 0.05). Furthermore, CpG methylation level on gene promoters was found to be increased (P < 0.05) for CYP7A1 yet decreased (P < 0.05) for ABCA1. These results indicate that in ovo betaine injection regulates hepatic cholesterol metabolism in chicks through epigenetic mechanisms including DNA and histone methylations. PMID:25860502

  16. Impact of the loss of caveolin-1 on lung mass and cholesterol metabolism in mice with and without the lysosomal cholesterol transporter, Niemann-Pick type C1

    PubMed Central

    Mundy, Dorothy I.; Lopez, Adam M.; Posey, Kenneth S.; Chuang, Jen-Chieh; Ramirez, Charina M.; Scherer, Philipp E.; Turley, Stephen D.

    2014-01-01

    Caveolin-1 (Cav-1) is a major structural protein in caveolae in the plasma membranes of many cell types, particularly endothelial cells and adipocytes. Loss of Cav-1 function has been implicated in multiple diseases affecting the cardiopulmonary and central nervous systems, as well as in specific aspects of sterol and lipid metabolism in the liver and intestine. Lungs contain an exceptionally high level of Cav-1. Parameters of cholesterol metabolism in the lung were measured, initially in Cav-1-deficient mice (Cav-1−/−), and subsequently in Cav-1−/− mice that also lacked the lysosomal cholesterol transporter Niemann-Pick C1 (Npc1) was also absent (Cav-1−/−:Npc1−/−). In 50-day-old Cav-1−/− mice fed a low- or high-cholesterol chow diet, the total cholesterol concentration (mg/g) in the lungs was marginally lower than in the Cav-1+/+ controls, but due to an expansion in their lung mass exceeding 30%, whole-lung cholesterol content (mg/organ) was moderately elevated. Lung mass (g) in the Cav-1−/−:Npc1−/− mice (0.356 ± 0.022) markedly exceeded that in their Cav-1+/+:Npc1+/+ controls (0.137 ± 0.009), as well as in their Cav-1−/−:Npc1+/+ (0.191 ± 0.013) and Cav-1+/+:Npc1−/− (0.213 ± 0.022) littermates. The corresponding lung total cholesterol content (mg/organ) in mice of these genotypes was 6.74 ± 0.17, 0.71 ± 0.05, 0.96 ± 0.05 and 3.12 ± 0.43, respectively, with the extra cholesterol in the Cav-1−/−:Npc1−/− and Cav-1+/+:Npc1−/− mice being nearly all unesterified (UC). The exacerbation of the Npc1 lung phenotype and increase in the UC level in the Cav-1−/−:Npc1−/− mice imply a regulatory role of Cav-1 in pulmonary cholesterol metabolism when lysosomal sterol transport is disrupted. PMID:24747682

  17. Zebrafish Lipid Metabolism: From Mediating Early Patterning to the Metabolism of Dietary Fat and Cholesterol

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Jennifer L.; Carten, Juliana D.; Farber, Steven A.

    2013-01-01

    Lipids serve essential functions in cells as signaling molecules, membrane components, and sources of energy. Defects in lipid metabolism are implicated in a number of pandemic human diseases, including diabetes, obesity, and hypercholesterolemia. approaches for disease prevention and treatment. Numerous studies have shown that the zebrafish is an excellent model for vertebrate lipid metabolism. In this chapter, we review studies that employ zebrafish to better understand lipid signaling and metabolism. PMID:21550441

  18. Influence of depleted uranium on hepatic cholesterol metabolism in apolipoprotein E-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Souidi, M; Racine, R; Grandcolas, L; Grison, S; Stefani, J; Gourmelon, P; Lestaevel, P

    2012-04-01

    Depleted uranium (DU) is uranium with a lower content of the fissile isotope U-235 than natural uranium. It is a radioelement and a waste product from the enrichment process of natural uranium. Because of its very high density, it is used in the civil industry and for military purposes. DU exposure can affect many vital systems in the human body, because in addition to being weakly radioactive, uranium is a toxic metal. It should be emphasized that, to be exposed to radiation from DU, you have to eat, drink, or breathe it, or get it on your skin. This particular study is focusing on the health effects of DU for the cholesterol metabolism. Previous studies on the same issue have shown that the cholesterol metabolism was modulated at molecular level in the liver of laboratory rodents contaminated for nine months with DU. However, this modulation was not correlated with some effects at organs or body levels. It was therefore decided to use a "pathological model" such as hypercholesterolemic apolipoprotein E-deficient laboratory mice in order to try to clarify the situation. The purpose of the present study is to assess the effects of a chronic ingestion (during 3 months) of a low level DU-supplemented water (20 mg L(-1)) on the above mentioned mice in order to determine a possible contamination effect. Afterwards the cholesterol metabolism was studied in the liver especially focused on the gene expressions of cholesterol-catabolising enzymes (CYP7A1, CYP27A1 and CYP7B1), as well as those of associated nuclear receptors (LXRα, FXR, PPARα, and SREBP 2). In addition, mRNA levels of other enzymes of interest were measured (ACAT 2, as well as HMGCoA Reductase and HMGCoA Synthase). The gene expression study was completed with SRB1 and LDLr, apolipoproteins A1 and B and membrane transporters ABC A1, ABC G5. The major effect induced by a low level of DU contamination in apo-E deficient mice was a decrease in hepatic gene expression of the enzyme CYP7B1 (-23%) and nuclear

  19. Hypertension, Abnormal Cholesterol, and High Body Mass Index among Non-Hispanic Asian Adults: United States, 2011-2012

    MedlinePlus

    ... high total cholesterol among non-Hispanic Asian adults did not differ by sex, age, education, or foreign- ... Figure 3 ). The prevalence of high total cholesterol did not differ significantly by sex, age, education, or ...

  20. Metabolic profiling of cholesterol and sex steroid hormones to monitor urological diseases.

    PubMed

    Moon, Ju-Yeun; Choi, Man Ho; Kim, Jayoung

    2016-10-01

    Cholesterol and sex steroid hormones including androgens and estrogens play a critical role in the development and progression of urological diseases such as prostate cancer. This disease remains the most commonly diagnosed malignant tumor in men and is the leading cause of death from different cancers. Attempts to understand the role of cholesterol and steroid metabolism in urological diseases have been ongoing for many years, but despite this, our mechanistic and translational understanding remains elusive. In order to further evaluate the problem, we have taken an interest in metabolomics; a discipline dedicated to the systematic study of biologically active metabolites in cells, tissues, hair and biofluids. Recently, we provided evidence that a quantitative measurement of cholesterol and sex steroid metabolites can be successfully achieved using hair of human and mouse models. The overall goal of this short review article is to introduce current metabolomic technologies for the quantitative biomarker assay development and also to provide new insight into understanding the underlying mechanisms that trigger the pathological condition. Furthermore, this review will place a particular emphasis on how to prepare biospecimens (e.g., hair fiber), quantify molecular profiles and assess their clinical significance in various urological diseases. PMID:27580660

  1. Cholesterol hydroperoxides as substrates for cholesterol-metabolizing cytochrome P450 enzymes and alternative sources of 25-hydroxycholesterol and other oxysterols.

    PubMed

    van Lier, Johan E; Mast, Natalia; Pikuleva, Irina A

    2015-09-14

    The interaction of the primary autoxidation products of cholesterol, namely 25- and 20ξ-hydroperoxides, with the four principal cholesterol-metabolizing cytochrome P450 enzymes is reported. Addition of cholesterol 25-hydroperoxide to the enzymes CYP27A1 and CYP11A1 induced well-defined spectral changes while generating 25-hydroxycholesterol as the major product. The 20ξ-hydroperoxides induced spectral shifts in CYP27A1 and CYP11A1 but glycol metabolites were detected only with CYP11A1. CYP7A1 and CYP46A1 failed to give metabolites with any of the hydroperoxides. A P450 hydroperoxide-shunt reaction is proposed, where the hydroperoxides serve as both donor for reduced oxygen and substrate. CYP27A1 was shown to mediate the reduction of cholesterol 25-hydroperoxide to 25-hydroxycholesterol, a role of potential significance for cholesterol-rich tissues with high oxidative stress. CYP27A1 may participate in the removal of harmful autoxidation products in these tissues, while providing a complementary source of 25-hydroxycholesterol, a modulator of immune cell function and mediator of viral cell entry. PMID:26230055

  2. Sugar-sweetened beverages and prevalence of the metabolically abnormal phenotype in the Framingham Heart Study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between usual sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) consumption and prevalence of abnormal metabolic health across body mass index (BMI) categories. The metabolic health of 6,842 non-diabetic adults was classified using cross-sectional data from the...

  3. Saturated fat and cholesterol are critical to inducing murine metabolic syndrome with robust nonalcoholic steatohepatitis☆

    PubMed Central

    Mells, Jamie E.; Fu, Ping P.; Kumar, Pradeep; Smith, Tekla; Karpen, Saul J.; Anania, Frank A.

    2016-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the hepatic manifestation of the metabolic syndrome (MetS). Up to a third of NAFLD subjects are at risk for developing nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Many rodent models fail to replicate both MetS and NASH. The purpose of this study was to develop a reliable mouse model of NASH and MetS using a diet containing cholesterol, saturated fat and carbohydrate that is reflective of Western diets of North Americans. Experimental design: We used adult male C57BL/6 J 4- to 5-week-old mice and administered a solid diet containing 0.2% cholesterol, 45% of its calories from fat, with 30% of the fat in the form of partially hydrogenated vegetable oil. We also provided carbohydrate largely as high-fructose corn syrup equivalent in water. In a separate cohort, we gave the identical diet in the absence of cholesterol. Glucose and insulin tolerance testing was conducted throughout the feeding period. The feeding was conducted for 16 weeks, and the mice were sacrificed for histological analysis, markers of MetS, liver inflammation, circulating lipids, as well as liver staining for fibrosis and alpha smooth muscle actin (α-SMA). Results: We found that cholesterol significantly increased serum leptin, interleukin-6, liver weight and liver weight/body weight ratio, fibrosis and liver α-SMA. Conclusions: Mice administered a diet accurately reflecting patterns associated with humans afflicted with MetS can reliably replicate features of MetS, NASH and significant liver fibrosis. The model we describe significantly reduces the time by several months for development of stage 3 hepatic fibrosis. PMID:25577467

  4. Genetic Evidence Implicates the Immune System and Cholesterol Metabolism in the Aetiology of Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hamshere, Marian L.; Harold, Denise; Moskvina, Valentina; Ivanov, Dobril; Pocklington, Andrew; Abraham, Richard; Hollingworth, Paul; Sims, Rebecca; Gerrish, Amy; Pahwa, Jaspreet Singh; Jones, Nicola; Stretton, Alexandra; Morgan, Angharad R.; Lovestone, Simon; Powell, John; Proitsi, Petroula; Lupton, Michelle K.; Brayne, Carol; Rubinsztein, David C.; Gill, Michael; Lawlor, Brian; Lynch, Aoibhinn; Morgan, Kevin; Brown, Kristelle S.; Passmore, Peter A.; Craig, David; McGuinness, Bernadette; Todd, Stephen; Holmes, Clive; Mann, David; Smith, A. David; Love, Seth; Kehoe, Patrick G.; Mead, Simon; Fox, Nick; Rossor, Martin; Collinge, John; Maier, Wolfgang; Jessen, Frank; Schürmann, Britta; van den Bussche, Hendrik; Heuser, Isabella; Peters, Oliver; Kornhuber, Johannes; Wiltfang, Jens; Dichgans, Martin; Frölich, Lutz; Hampel, Harald; Hüll, Michael; Rujescu, Dan; Goate, Alison M.; Kauwe, John S. K.; Cruchaga, Carlos; Nowotny, Petra; Morris, John C.; Mayo, Kevin; Livingston, Gill; Bass, Nicholas J.; Gurling, Hugh; McQuillin, Andrew; Gwilliam, Rhian; Deloukas, Panos; Al-Chalabi, Ammar; Shaw, Christopher E.; Singleton, Andrew B.; Guerreiro, Rita; Mühleisen, Thomas W.; Nöthen, Markus M.; Moebus, Susanne; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Klopp, Norman; Wichmann, H.-Erich; Rüther, Eckhard; Carrasquillo, Minerva M.; Pankratz, V. Shane; Younkin, Steven G.; Hardy, John; O'Donovan, Michael C.; Owen, Michael J.; Williams, Julie

    2010-01-01

    Background Late Onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD) is the leading cause of dementia. Recent large genome-wide association studies (GWAS) identified the first strongly supported LOAD susceptibility genes since the discovery of the involvement of APOE in the early 1990s. We have now exploited these GWAS datasets to uncover key LOAD pathophysiological processes. Methodology We applied a recently developed tool for mining GWAS data for biologically meaningful information to a LOAD GWAS dataset. The principal findings were then tested in an independent GWAS dataset. Principal Findings We found a significant overrepresentation of association signals in pathways related to cholesterol metabolism and the immune response in both of the two largest genome-wide association studies for LOAD. Significance Processes related to cholesterol metabolism and the innate immune response have previously been implicated by pathological and epidemiological studies of Alzheimer's disease, but it has been unclear whether those findings reflected primary aetiological events or consequences of the disease process. Our independent evidence from two large studies now demonstrates that these processes are aetiologically relevant, and suggests that they may be suitable targets for novel and existing therapeutic approaches. PMID:21085570

  5. Modulation of microRNA Expression in Subjects with Metabolic Syndrome and Decrease of Cholesterol Efflux from Macrophages via microRNA-33-Mediated Attenuation of ATP-Binding Cassette Transporter A1 Expression by Statins

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Pei-Chi; Lee, Tzong-Shyuan; Lee, Wen-Jane; Chang, Pey-Jium; Chiang, An-Na

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a complicated health problem that encompasses a variety of metabolic disorders. In this study, we analyzed the relationship between the major biochemical parameters associated with MetS and circulating levels of microRNA (miR)-33, miR-103, and miR-155. We found that miRNA-33 levels were positively correlated with levels of fasting blood glucose, glycosylated hemoglobin A1c, total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, and triacylglycerol, but negatively correlated with HDL-cholesterol levels. In the cellular study, miR-33 levels were increased in macrophages treated with high glucose and cholesterol-lowering drugs atorvastatin and pitavastatin. miR-33 has been reported to play an essential role in cholesterol homeostasis through ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) regulation and reverse cholesterol transport. However, the molecular mechanism underlying the linkage between miR-33 and statin treatment remains unclear. In the present study, we investigated whether atorvastatin and pitavastatin exert their functions through the modulation of miR-33 and ABCA1-mediated cholesterol efflux from macrophages. The results showed that treatment of the statins up-regulated miR-33 expression, but down-regulated ABCA1 mRNA levels in RAW264.7 cells and bone marrow-derived macrophages. Statin-mediated ABCA1 regulation occurs at the post-transcriptional level through targeting of the 3′-UTR of the ABCA1 transcript by miR-33. Additionally, we found significant down-regulation of ABCA1 protein expression in macrophages treated with statins. Finally, we showed that high glucose and statin treatment significantly suppressed cholesterol efflux from macrophages. These findings have highlighted the complexity of statins, which may exert detrimental effects on metabolic abnormalities through regulation of miR-33 target genes. PMID:27139226

  6. Modulation of microRNA Expression in Subjects with Metabolic Syndrome and Decrease of Cholesterol Efflux from Macrophages via microRNA-33-Mediated Attenuation of ATP-Binding Cassette Transporter A1 Expression by Statins.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Ming; Sheu, Wayne H-H; Tseng, Pei-Chi; Lee, Tzong-Shyuan; Lee, Wen-Jane; Chang, Pey-Jium; Chiang, An-Na

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a complicated health problem that encompasses a variety of metabolic disorders. In this study, we analyzed the relationship between the major biochemical parameters associated with MetS and circulating levels of microRNA (miR)-33, miR-103, and miR-155. We found that miRNA-33 levels were positively correlated with levels of fasting blood glucose, glycosylated hemoglobin A1c, total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, and triacylglycerol, but negatively correlated with HDL-cholesterol levels. In the cellular study, miR-33 levels were increased in macrophages treated with high glucose and cholesterol-lowering drugs atorvastatin and pitavastatin. miR-33 has been reported to play an essential role in cholesterol homeostasis through ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) regulation and reverse cholesterol transport. However, the molecular mechanism underlying the linkage between miR-33 and statin treatment remains unclear. In the present study, we investigated whether atorvastatin and pitavastatin exert their functions through the modulation of miR-33 and ABCA1-mediated cholesterol efflux from macrophages. The results showed that treatment of the statins up-regulated miR-33 expression, but down-regulated ABCA1 mRNA levels in RAW264.7 cells and bone marrow-derived macrophages. Statin-mediated ABCA1 regulation occurs at the post-transcriptional level through targeting of the 3'-UTR of the ABCA1 transcript by miR-33. Additionally, we found significant down-regulation of ABCA1 protein expression in macrophages treated with statins. Finally, we showed that high glucose and statin treatment significantly suppressed cholesterol efflux from macrophages. These findings have highlighted the complexity of statins, which may exert detrimental effects on metabolic abnormalities through regulation of miR-33 target genes. PMID:27139226

  7. Metabolic abnormalities in pituitary adenoma patients: a novel therapeutic target and prognostic factor

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xin; Li, Song; Zhang, Wei-hua; Yang, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic abnormalities are common in cancers, and targeting metabolism is emerging as a novel therapeutic approach to cancer management. Pituitary adenoma (PA) is a type of benign tumor. Impairment of tumor cells’ metabolism in PA seems not to be as apparent as that of other malignant tumor cells; however, aberrant hormone secretion is conspicuous in most PAs. Hormones have direct impacts on systemic metabolism, which in turn, may affect the progression of PA. Nowadays, conventional therapeutic strategies for PA do not include modalities of adjusting whole-body metabolism, which is most likely due to the current consideration of the aberrant whole-body metabolism of PA patients as a passive associated symptom and not involved in PA progression. Because systemic metabolic abnormalities are presented by 22.3%–52.5% PA patients and are closely correlated with disease progression and prognosis, we propose that assessment of metabolic status should be emphasized during the treatment of PA and that control of metabolic abnormalities should be added into the current therapies for PA. PMID:26347444

  8. Guar gum and similar soluble fibers in the regulation of cholesterol metabolism: Current understandings and future research priorities

    PubMed Central

    Rideout, Todd C; Harding, Scott V; Jones, Peter JH; Fan, Ming Z

    2008-01-01

    The hypocholesterolemic effects associated with soluble fiber consumption are clear from animal model and human clinical investigations. Moreover, the modulation of whole-body cholesterol metabolism in response to dietary fiber consumption, including intestinal cholesterol absorption and fecal sterol and bile acid loss, has been the subject of many published reports. However, our understanding of how dietary fibers regulate molecular events at the gene/protein level and alter cellular cholesterol metabolism is limited. The modern emphasis on molecular nutrition and rapid progress in ‘high-dimensional’ biological techniques will permit further explorations of the role of genetic polymorphisms in determining the variable interindividual responses to soluble fibers. Furthermore, with traditional molecular biology tools and the application of ‘omic’ technology, specific insight into how fibers modulate the expression of genes and proteins that regulate intestinal cholesterol absorption and alter hepatic sterol balance will be gained. Detailed knowledge of the molecular mechanisms by which soluble fibers reduce plasma cholesterol concentrations is paramount to developing novel fiber-based “cocktails” that target specific metabolic pathways to gain maximal cholesterol reductions. PMID:19183750

  9. Effects of two Lactobacillus strains on lipid metabolism and intestinal microflora in rats fed a high-cholesterol diet

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The hypocholesterolemic effects of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have now become an area of great interest and controversy for many scientists. In this study, we evaluated the effects of Lactobacillus plantarum 9-41-A and Lactobacillus fermentum M1-16 on body weight, lipid metabolism and intestinal microflora of rats fed a high-cholesterol diet. Methods Forty rats were assigned to four groups and fed either a normal or a high-cholesterol diet. The LAB-treated groups received the high-cholesterol diet supplemented with Lactobacillus plantarum 9-41-A or Lactobacillus fermentum M1-16. The rats were sacrificed after a 6-week feeding period. Body weights, visceral organ and fat pad weights, serum and liver cholesterol and lipid levels, and fecal cholesterol and bile acid concentrations were measured. Liver lipid deposition and adipocyte size were evaluated histologically. Results Compared with rats fed a high-cholesterol diet but without LAB supplementation, serum total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglycerides levels were significantly decreased in LAB-treated rats (p < 0.05), with no significant change in high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels. Hepatic cholesterol and triglyceride levels and liver lipid deposition were significantly decreased in the LAB-treated groups (p < 0.05). Accordingly, both fecal cholesterol and bile acids levels were significantly increased after LAB administration (p < 0.05). Intestinal Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium colonies were increased while Escherichia coli colonies were decreased in the LAB-treated groups. Fecal water content was higher in the LAB-treated groups. Compared with rats fed a high-cholesterol diet, administration of Lactobacillus plantarum 9-41-A resulted in decreases in the body weight gain, liver and fat pad weight, and adipocytes size (p < 0.05). Conclusions This study suggests that LAB supplementation has hypocholesterolemic effects in rats fed a high-cholesterol diet. The

  10. Virus-induced atherosclerosis. Herpesvirus infection alters aortic cholesterol metabolism and accumulation.

    PubMed Central

    Hajjar, D. P.; Fabricant, C. G.; Minick, C. R.; Fabricant, J.

    1986-01-01

    Infection of normocholesterolemic, specific-pathogen-free chickens with Marek's disease herpesvirus (MDV) has been shown histologically to lead to chronic atherosclerosis like that in humans. The development of herpesvirus-induced atherosclerosis in vivo and the presence of specific Marek's antigen within aortic cells suggested that MDV infection may modify lipid metabolism and lead to significant lipid accumulation. Experiments reported herein were designed to determine the types and quantity of lipid present in aortas from MDV-infected and uninfected chickens between 2 and 8 months of age following infection and assess one possible mechanism of lipid accumulation by evaluating the effect of MDV infection on aortic cholesterol and cholesteryl ester (CE) metabolism. Chromatographic-fluorometric analyses indicated that at 4 and 8 months of age after MDV inoculation, MDV-infected animals had a significant (P less than 0.05) two-fold to threefold increase in total aortic lipid accumulation characterized by significant increases in cholesterol, CE, triacylglycerol, and phospholipid as compared with aortas from uninfected animals. At 8 months of age, similar increases in aortic lipid accumulation were observed in MDV-infected animals as compared with those animals vaccinated with turkey herpesvirus and later challenged with MDV. CE synthetic activity was increased significantly by 50% at 4 months of age in the MDV-infected group as compared with the uninfected group, which could explain the initial increase in CE accumulation. By 8 months of age, the authors also observed a twofold increase in CE synthetic activity and a 30% and 80% reduction in lysosomal and cytoplasmic CE hydrolytic activities, respectively, in aortas of MDV-infected chickens as compared to controls. Moreover, infection with MDV blocked the activation of cytoplasmic CE hydrolytic activity by dibutyryl cyclic AMP or exogenous cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase. Taken together, these results suggest

  11. Dendrogenin A arises from cholesterol and histamine metabolism and shows cell differentiation and anti-tumour properties

    PubMed Central

    de Medina, Philippe; Paillasse, Michael R.; Segala, Gregory; Voisin, Maud; Mhamdi, Loubna; Dalenc, Florence; Lacroix-Triki, Magali; Filleron, Thomas; Pont, Frederic; Saati, Talal Al; Morisseau, Christophe; Hammock, Bruce D.; Silvente-Poirot, Sandrine; Poirot, Marc

    2013-01-01

    We previously synthesized dendrogenin A and hypothesized that it could be a natural metabolite occurring in mammals. Here we explore this hypothesis and report the discovery of dendrogenin A in mammalian tissues and normal cells as an enzymatic product of the conjugation of 5,6α-epoxy-cholesterol and histamine. Dendrogenin A was not detected in cancer cell lines and was fivefold lower in human breast tumours compared with normal tissues, suggesting a deregulation of dendrogenin A metabolism during carcinogenesis. We established that dendrogenin A is a selective inhibitor of cholesterol epoxide hydrolase and it triggered tumour re-differentiation and growth control in mice and improved animal survival. The properties of dendrogenin A and its decreased level in tumours suggest a physiological function in maintaining cell integrity and differentiation. The discovery of dendrogenin A reveals a new metabolic pathway at the crossroads of cholesterol and histamine metabolism and the existence of steroidal alkaloids in mammals. PMID:23673625

  12. [Clinical evaluation for abnormalities of bone and mineral metabolism in ESKD].

    PubMed

    Yano, Shozo

    2016-09-01

    In patients with end-stage kidney disease(ESKD), bone disorders are characterized by cortical porosity and by abnormal turnover of bone metabolism:adynamic(low turnover)bone disease and high turnover bone due to various degrees of secondary hyperparathyroidism. Abnormalities of bone metabolism are generally assessed by interview, X-ray, bone mineral density(BMD), serum phosphorus, calcium, and parathyroid hormone levels, and bone metabolic markers. Recent clinical studies have demonstrated that high turnover bone representing elevated bone metabolic markers and low BMD are independent risks of bone fractures as well as mortality among this population. Treatment of bone disorders in ESKD patients should be aiming at the normalization of mineral metabolism and the maintenance and/or improvement of BMD. PMID:27561341

  13. Associations between Ionomic Profile and Metabolic Abnormalities in Human Population

    PubMed Central

    An, Peng; Yu, Danxia; Yu, Zhijie; Li, Huaixing; Sheng, Hongguang; Cai, Lu; Xue, Jun; Jing, Miao; Li, Yixue; Lin, Xu; Wang, Fudi

    2012-01-01

    Background Few studies assessed effects of individual and multiple ions simultaneously on metabolic outcomes, due to methodological limitation. Methodology/Principal Findings By combining advanced ionomics and mutual information, a quantifying measurement for mutual dependence between two random variables, we investigated associations of ion modules/networks with overweight/obesity, metabolic syndrome (MetS) and type 2 diabetes (T2DM) in 976 middle-aged Chinese men and women. Fasting plasma ions were measured by inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy. Significant ion modules were selected by mutual information to construct disease related ion networks. Plasma copper and phosphorus always ranked the first two among three specific ion networks associated with overweight/obesity, MetS and T2DM. Comparing the ranking of ion individually and in networks, three patterns were observed (1) “Individual ion,” such as potassium and chrome, which tends to work alone; (2) “Module ion,” such as iron in T2DM, which tends to act in modules/network; and (3) “Module-individual ion,” such as copper in overweight/obesity, which seems to work equivalently in either way. Conclusions In conclusion, by using the novel approach of the ionomics strategy and the information theory, we observed potential associations of ions individually or as modules/networks with metabolic disorders. Certainly, these findings need to be confirmed in future biological studies. PMID:22719963

  14. Effect of a high intake of cheese on cholesterol and metabolic syndrome: results of a randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    Nilsen, Rita; Høstmark, Arne Torbjørn; Haug, Anna; Skeie, Siv

    2015-01-01

    Background Cheese is generally rich in saturated fat, which is associated with increased risk for cardiovascular diseases. Nevertheless, recent reports suggest that cheese may be antiatherogenic. Objective The goal of this study was to assess whether intake of two types of Norwegian cheese, with widely varying fat and calcium content, might influence factors of the metabolic syndrome and serum cholesterol levels differently. Design A total of 153 participants were randomized to one of three groups: Gamalost®, a traditional fat- and salt-free Norwegian cheese (50 g/day), Gouda-type cheese with 27% fat (80 g/day), and a control group with a limited cheese intake. Blood samples, anthropometric measurements, blood pressure, and questionnaires about lifestyle and diet were obtained at inclusion and end. Results At baseline, there were no differences between the groups in relevant baseline characteristics, mean age 43, 52.3% female. After 8 weeks’ intervention, there were no changes in any of the metabolic syndrome factors between the intervention groups compared with the control group. There were no increases in total- or LDL cholesterol in the cheese groups compared with the control. Stratified analysis showed that those in the Gouda group with metabolic syndrome at baseline had significant reductions in total cholesterol at the end of the trial compared with control (−0.70 mmol/L, p=0.013), and a significantly higher reduction in mean triglycerides. In the Gamalost group, those who had high total cholesterol at baseline had a significant reduction in total cholesterol compared with control (−0.40 mmol/L, p=0.035). Conclusions In conclusion, cholesterol levels did not increase after high intake of 27% fat Gouda-type cheese over 8 weeks’ intervention, and stratified analysis showed that participants with metabolic syndrome had reduced cholesterol at the end of the trial. PMID:26294049

  15. Screening of inherited metabolic abnormalities in 56 children with intractable epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    LIU, XIAOMING; LI, RUI; CHEN, SHENGZHI; SANG, YAN; ZHAO, JIAQIANG

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy is a common children's neural disease that is largely controlled by anti-epileptic drugs. Nevertheless, children experience repeated attacks that develop into intractable epilepsy (IE). The aim of the present study was to examine the inherited metabolic abnormalities in children with IE to provide early etiological and symptomatic treatment. Urine and blood samples of 56 children with IE served as the experimental group and 56 cases of children with IE, who were successfully treated served as the control group, and analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and tandem mass spectrometry for the metabolic screening of amino, organic, and fatty acids. Urine routine, hepatic function, blood biochemistry, imageology of encephalon and brain stem-evoked potential (auditory and optical) were also examined. Of the 27 IE children confirmed as abnormal in urine and blood screening, there were 19 cases (70.3%) of hypoevolutism or retrogression of intelligence and motor function, 15 cases (55.5%) of brain stem-evoked potential and of encephalic computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) abnormality, 6 cases (22.2%) of abnormal family history and of abnormal blood biochemistry and blood gas analysis, and 5 cases (18.5%) with skin change and of abnormal hepatic function. Of the 27 cases, 11 cases (19.6%) were diagnosed with inherited metabolic diseases. Among the children in the control group, 3 cases showed abnormal urine test results, one of which had family history, one had hypoevolutism or retrogression of intelligence and motor function, one had brain stem-evoked potential and encephalic CT or MRI abnormality, while two of the 3 cases had inherited metabolic abnormalities. The correlation analysis revealed that abnormal urine test was significantly correlated with inherited metabolic abnormalities (P<0.05). Of the 56 IE patients, 25 cases (44.6%) were identified as abnormal under urine screening, and of the 25 cases, 6 cases had simple

  16. IMPACT OF CHRONIC ANTI-CHOLESTEROL THERAPY ON DEVELOPMENT OF MICROVASCULAR RAREFACTION IN THE METABOLIC SYNDROME

    PubMed Central

    Goodwill, Adam G.; Frisbee, Stephanie J.; Stapleton, Phoebe A.; James, Milinda E.; Frisbee, Jefferson C.

    2011-01-01

    Object The obese Zucker rat (OZR) model of the metabolic syndrome is partly characterized by moderate hypercholesterolemia in addition to other contributing co-morbidities. Previous results suggest that vascular dysfunction in OZR is associated with chronic reduction in vascular nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability and chronic inflammation, both frequently associated with hypercholesterolemia. As such, we evaluated the impact of chronic cholesterol reducing therapy on the development of impaired skeletal muscle arteriolar reactivity and microvessel density in OZR and its impact on chronic inflammation and NO bioavailability. Materials and Methods Beginning at 7 weeks of age, male OZR were treated with gemfibrozil, probucol, atorvastatin or simvastatin (in chow) for 10 weeks. Subsequently, plasma and vascular samples were collected for biochemical/molecular analyses, while arteriolar reactivity and microvessel network structure were assessed using established methodologies after 3, 6 and 10 weeks of drug therapy Results All interventions were equally effective at reducing total cholesterol, although only the statins also blunted the progressive reductions to vascular NO bioavailability, evidenced by greater maintenance of acetylcholine-induced dilator responses, an attenuation of adrenergic constrictor reactivity, and an improvement in agonist-induced NO production. Comparably, while minimal improvements to arteriolar wall mechanics were identified with any of the interventions, chronic statin treatment reduced the rate of microvessel rarefaction in OZR. Associated with these improvements was a striking statin-induced reduction in inflammation in OZR, such that numerous markers of inflammation were correlated with improved microvascular reactivity and density. However, using multivariate discriminant analyses, plasma RANTES, IL-10, MCP-1 and TNF-α were determined to be the strongest contributors to differences between groups, although their relative importance varied

  17. Modifications of the expression of genes involved in cerebral cholesterol metabolism in the rat following chronic ingestion of depleted uranium.

    PubMed

    Racine, Radjini; Gueguen, Yann; Gourmelon, Patrick; Veyssiere, Georges; Souidi, Maâmar

    2009-06-01

    Depleted uranium results from the enrichment of natural uranium for energetic purpose. Its potential dispersion in the environment would set human populations at risk of being contaminated through ingestion. Uranium can build up in the brain and induce behavior disorders. As a major constituent of the myelin sheath, cholesterol is essential to brain function, and several neurological pathologies result from a disruption of cholesterol metabolism. To assess the effect of a chronic contamination with depleted uranium on cerebral cholesterol metabolism, rats were exposed to depleted uranium for 9 months through drinking water at 40 mg/l. The study focuses on gene expression. Cholesterol-catabolizing enzyme CYP46A1 displayed a 39% increase of its messenger RNA (mRNA) level. 3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutamyl CoA synthase gene expression rose from 91%. Concerning cholesterol transport, mRNA levels of scavenger receptor-B1 and adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette transporter A1 increased by 34% and that of apolipoprotein E by 75%. Concerning regulation, gene expression of nuclear receptors peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors alpha and gamma increased by 46% and 36% respectively, whereas that of retinoid-X-receptor decreased by 29%. In conclusion, a chronic internal contamination with depleted uranium does not affect the health status of rats but induces molecular changes in the dynamic equilibrium of the cerebral cholesterol pool. PMID:18792811

  18. QuickStats: Prevalence* of Abnormal Cholesterol(†) Levels Among Young Persons Aged 6-19 Years, by Sex and Weight Status(§) - National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, United States, 2011-2014.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    During 2011-2014, 21.0% of young persons aged 6-19 years had at least one of the three indicators of abnormal cholesterol. A larger percentage of persons categorized as obese (43.3%) had abnormal cholesterol than persons categorized as normal weight or overweight (13.8% and 22.3%, respectively). This pattern was found for both males and females. There were no significant differences between males and females in the prevalences of abnormal cholesterol within each of the weight status groups (e.g., males with obesity compared with females with obesity). PMID:27336214

  19. Neuronal cholesterol metabolism increases dendritic outgrowth and synaptic markers via a concerted action of GGTase-I and Trk.

    PubMed

    Moutinho, Miguel; Nunes, Maria João; Correia, Jorge C; Gama, Maria João; Castro-Caldas, Margarida; Cedazo-Minguez, Angel; Rodrigues, Cecília M P; Björkhem, Ingemar; Ruas, Jorge L; Rodrigues, Elsa

    2016-01-01

    Cholesterol 24-hydroxylase (CYP46A1) is responsible for brain cholesterol elimination and therefore plays a crucial role in the control of brain cholesterol homeostasis. Altered CYP46A1 expression has been associated with several neurodegenerative diseases and changes in cognition. Since CYP46A1 activates small guanosine triphosphate-binding proteins (sGTPases), we hypothesized that CYP46A1 might be affecting neuronal development and function by activating tropomyosin-related kinase (Trk) receptors and promoting geranylgeranyl transferase-I (GGTase-I) prenylation activity. Our results show that CYP46A1 triggers an increase in neuronal dendritic outgrowth and dendritic protrusion density, and elicits an increase of synaptic proteins in the crude synaptosomal fraction. Strikingly, all of these effects are abolished by pharmacological inhibition of GGTase-I activity. Furthermore, CYP46A1 increases Trk phosphorylation, its interaction with GGTase-I, and the activity of GGTase-I, which is crucial for the enhanced dendritic outgrowth. Cholesterol supplementation studies indicate that cholesterol reduction by CYP46A1 is the necessary trigger for these effects. These results were confirmed in vivo, with a significant increase of p-Trk, pre- and postsynaptic proteins, Rac1, and decreased cholesterol levels, in crude synaptosomal fractions prepared from CYP46A1 transgenic mouse cortex. This work describes the molecular mechanisms by which neuronal cholesterol metabolism effectively modulates neuronal outgrowth and synaptic markers. PMID:27491694

  20. Myocardial metabolic, hemodynamic, and electrocardiographic significance of reversible thallium-201 abnormalities in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Cannon, R.O. 3d.; Dilsizian, V.; O'Gara, P.T.; Udelson, J.E.; Schenke, W.H.; Quyyumi, A.; Fananapazir, L.; Bonow, R.O. )

    1991-05-01

    Exercise-induced abnormalities during thallium-201 scintigraphy that normalize at rest frequently occur in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. However, it is not known whether these abnormalities are indicative of myocardial ischemia. Fifty patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy underwent exercise {sup 201}Tl scintigraphy and, during the same week, measurement of myocardial lactate metabolism and hemodynamics during pacing stress. Thirty-seven patients (74%) had one or more {sup 201}Tl abnormalities that completely normalized after 3 hours of rest; 26 had regional myocardial {sup 201}Tl defects, and 26 had apparent left ventricular cavity dilatation with exercise, with 15 having coexistence of these abnormal findings. Of the 37 patients with reversible {sup 201}Tl abnormalities, 27 (73%) had metabolic evidence of myocardial ischemia during rapid atrial pacing compared with four of 13 patients (31%) with normal {sup 201}Tl scans (p less than 0.01). Eleven patients had apparent cavity dilatation as their only {sup 201}Tl abnormality; their mean postpacing left ventricular end-diastolic pressure was significantly higher than that of the 13 patients with normal {sup 201}Tl studies (33 +/- 5 versus 21 +/- 10 mm Hg, p less than 0.001). There was no correlation between the angiographic presence of systolic septal or epicardial coronary arterial compression and the presence or distribution of {sup 201}Tl abnormalities. Patients with ischemic ST segment responses to exercise had an 80% prevalence rate of reversible {sup 201}Tl abnormalities and a 70% prevalence rate of pacing-induced ischemia. However, 69% of patients with nonischemic ST segment responses had reversible {sup 201}Tl abnormalities, and 55% had pacing-induced ischemia. Reversible {sup 201}Tl abnormalities during exercise stress are markers of myocardial ischemia in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and most likely identify relatively underperfused myocardium.

  1. Impaired HDL cholesterol efflux in metabolic syndrome is unrelated to glucose tolerance status: the CODAM study

    PubMed Central

    Annema, Wijtske; Dikkers, Arne; de Boer, Jan Freark; van Greevenbroek, Marleen M. J.; van der Kallen, Carla J. H.; Schalkwijk, Casper G.; Stehouwer, Coen D. A.; Dullaart, Robin P. F.; Tietge, Uwe J. F.

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and metabolic syndrome (MetS) increase atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease risk. Cholesterol efflux capacity (CEC) is a key metric of the anti-atherosclerotic functionality of high-density lipoproteins (HDL). The present study aimed to delineate if T2DM and MetS cross-sectionally associate with altered CEC in a large high cardiometabolic risk population. CEC was determined from THP-1 macrophage foam cells towards apolipoprotein B-depleted plasma from 552 subjects of the CODAM cohort (288 controls, 126 impaired glucose metabolism [IGM], 138 T2DM). MetS was present in 297 participants. CEC was not different between different glucose tolerance categories but was lower in MetS (P < 0.001), at least partly attributable to lower HDL cholesterol (HDL-C) and apoA-I levels (P < 0.001 for each). Low grade inflammation was increased in IGM, T2DM and MetS as determined by a score comprising 8 different biomarkers (P < 0.05-< 0.001; n = 547). CEC inversely associated with low-grade inflammation taking account of HDL-C or apoA-I in MetS (P < 0.02), but not in subjects without MetS (interaction: P = 0.015). This study demonstrates that IGM and T2DM do not impact the HDL CEC function, while efflux is lower in MetS, partly dependent on plasma HDL-C levels. Enhanced low-grade inflammation in MetS may conceivably impair CEC even independent of HDL-C and apoA-I. PMID:27270665

  2. Impaired HDL cholesterol efflux in metabolic syndrome is unrelated to glucose tolerance status: the CODAM study.

    PubMed

    Annema, Wijtske; Dikkers, Arne; de Boer, Jan Freark; van Greevenbroek, Marleen M J; van der Kallen, Carla J H; Schalkwijk, Casper G; Stehouwer, Coen D A; Dullaart, Robin P F; Tietge, Uwe J F

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and metabolic syndrome (MetS) increase atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease risk. Cholesterol efflux capacity (CEC) is a key metric of the anti-atherosclerotic functionality of high-density lipoproteins (HDL). The present study aimed to delineate if T2DM and MetS cross-sectionally associate with altered CEC in a large high cardiometabolic risk population. CEC was determined from THP-1 macrophage foam cells towards apolipoprotein B-depleted plasma from 552 subjects of the CODAM cohort (288 controls, 126 impaired glucose metabolism [IGM], 138 T2DM). MetS was present in 297 participants. CEC was not different between different glucose tolerance categories but was lower in MetS (P < 0.001), at least partly attributable to lower HDL cholesterol (HDL-C) and apoA-I levels (P < 0.001 for each). Low grade inflammation was increased in IGM, T2DM and MetS as determined by a score comprising 8 different biomarkers (P < 0.05-< 0.001; n = 547). CEC inversely associated with low-grade inflammation taking account of HDL-C or apoA-I in MetS (P < 0.02), but not in subjects without MetS (interaction: P = 0.015). This study demonstrates that IGM and T2DM do not impact the HDL CEC function, while efflux is lower in MetS, partly dependent on plasma HDL-C levels. Enhanced low-grade inflammation in MetS may conceivably impair CEC even independent of HDL-C and apoA-I. PMID:27270665

  3. Pathway profiling in Mycobacterium tuberculosis: elucidation of cholesterol-derived catabolite and enzymes that catalyze its metabolism.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Suzanne T; VanderVen, Brian C; Sherman, David R; Russell, David G; Sampson, Nicole S

    2011-12-23

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the bacterium that causes tuberculosis, imports and metabolizes host cholesterol during infection. This ability is important in the chronic phase of infection. Here we investigate the role of the intracellular growth operon (igr), which has previously been identified as having a cholesterol-sensitive phenotype in vitro and which is important for intracellular growth of the mycobacteria. We have employed isotopically labeled low density lipoproteins containing either [1,7,15,22,26-(14)C]cholesterol or [1,7,15,22,26-(13)C]cholesterol and high resolution LC/MS as tools to profile the cholesterol-derived metabolome of an igr operon-disrupted mutant (Δigr) of M. tuberculosis. A partially metabolized cholesterol species accumulated in the Δigr knock-out strain that was absent in the complemented and parental wild-type strains. Structural elucidation by multidimensional 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy revealed the accumulated metabolite to be methyl 1β-(2'-propanoate)-3aα-H-4α-(3'-propanoic acid)-7aβ-methylhexahydro-5-indanone. Heterologously expressed and purified FadE28-FadE29, an acyl-CoA dehydrogenase encoded by the igr operon, catalyzes the dehydrogenation of 2'-propanoyl-CoA ester side chains in substrates with structures analogous to the characterized metabolite. Based on the structure of the isolated metabolite, enzyme activity, and bioinformatic annotations, we assign the primary function of the igr operon to be degradation of the 2'-propanoate side chain. Therefore, the igr operon is necessary to completely metabolize the side chain of cholesterol metabolites. PMID:22045806

  4. A review on lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Saeedi, Ramesh; Li, Min; Frohlich, Jiri

    2015-05-01

    Lecithin cholesterol acyl transferase (LCAT) is a plasma enzyme which esterifies cholesterol, and plays a key role in the metabolism of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C). Genetic disorders of LCAT are associated with lipoprotein abnormalities including low levels of HDL-C and presence of lipoprotein X, and clinical features mainly corneal opacities, changes in erythrocyte morphology and renal failure. Recombinant LCAT is being developed for the treatment of patients with LCAT deficiency. PMID:25172171

  5. TMEM199 Deficiency Is a Disorder of Golgi Homeostasis Characterized by Elevated Aminotransferases, Alkaline Phosphatase, and Cholesterol and Abnormal Glycosylation

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, Jos C.; Timal, Sharita; van Scherpenzeel, Monique; Michelakakis, Helen; Vicogne, Dorothée; Ashikov, Angel; Moraitou, Marina; Hoischen, Alexander; Huijben, Karin; Steenbergen, Gerry; van den Boogert, Marjolein A.W.; Porta, Francesco; Calvo, Pier Luigi; Mavrikou, Mersyni; Cenacchi, Giovanna; van den Bogaart, Geert; Salomon, Jody; Holleboom, Adriaan G.; Rodenburg, Richard J.; Drenth, Joost P.H.; Huynen, Martijn A.; Wevers, Ron A.; Morava, Eva; Foulquier, François; Veltman, Joris A.; Lefeber, Dirk J.

    2016-01-01

    Congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDGs) form a genetically and clinically heterogeneous group of diseases with aberrant protein glycosylation as a hallmark. A subgroup of CDGs can be attributed to disturbed Golgi homeostasis. However, identification of pathogenic variants is seriously complicated by the large number of proteins involved. As part of a strategy to identify human homologs of yeast proteins that are known to be involved in Golgi homeostasis, we identified uncharacterized transmembrane protein 199 (TMEM199, previously called C17orf32) as a human homolog of yeast V-ATPase assembly factor Vph2p (also known as Vma12p). Subsequently, we analyzed raw exome-sequencing data from families affected by genetically unsolved CDGs and identified four individuals with different mutations in TMEM199. The adolescent individuals presented with a mild phenotype of hepatic steatosis, elevated aminotransferases and alkaline phosphatase, and hypercholesterolemia, as well as low serum ceruloplasmin. Affected individuals showed abnormal N- and mucin-type O-glycosylation, and mass spectrometry indicated reduced incorporation of galactose and sialic acid, as seen in other Golgi homeostasis defects. Metabolic labeling of sialic acids in fibroblasts confirmed deficient Golgi glycosylation, which was restored by lentiviral transduction with wild-type TMEM199. V5-tagged TMEM199 localized with ERGIC and COPI markers in HeLa cells, and electron microscopy of a liver biopsy showed dilated organelles suggestive of the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus. In conclusion, we have identified TMEM199 as a protein involved in Golgi homeostasis and show that TMEM199 deficiency results in a hepatic phenotype with abnormal glycosylation. PMID:26833330

  6. Rapid Communication: Cholesterol deficiency-associated APOB mutation impacts lipid metabolism in Holstein calves and breeding bulls.

    PubMed

    Gross, J J; Schwinn, A-C; Schmitz-Hsu, F; Menzi, F; Drögemüller, C; Albrecht, C; Bruckmaier, R M

    2016-04-01

    During the last months, the number of reports on Holstein calves suffering from incurable idiopathic diarrhea dramatically increased. Affected calves showed severe hypocholesterolemia and mostly died within days up to a few months after birth. This new autosomal monogenic recessive inherited fat metabolism disorder, termed cholesterol deficiency (CD), is caused by a loss of function mutation of the bovine gene. The objective of the present study was to investigate specific components of lipid metabolism in 6 homozygous for the mutation (CDS) and 6 normal Holstein calves with different genotypes. Independent of sex, CDS had significantly lower plasma concentrations of total cholesterol (TC), free cholesterol (FC), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), very-low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (VLDL-C), triacylglycerides (TAG), and phospholipids (PL) compared with homozygous wild-type calves ( < 0.05). Furthermore, we studied the effect of the genotype on cholesterol metabolism in adult Holstein breeding bulls of Swissgenetics. Among a total of 254 adult males, the homozygous mutant genotype was absent, 36 bulls were heterozygous carriers (CDC), and 218 bulls were homozygous wild-type (CDF). In CDC bulls, plasma concentrations of TC, FC, HDL-C, LDL-C, VLDL-C, TAG, and PL were lower compared with CDF bulls ( < 0.05). The ratios of FC:cholesteryl esters (CE) and FC:TC were higher in CDC bulls compared with CDF bulls, whereas the ratio of CE:TC was lower in CDC bulls compared with CDF bulls ( < 0.01). In conclusion, the CD-associated mutation was shown to affect lipid metabolism in affected Holstein calves and adult breeding bulls. Besides cholesterol, the concentrations of PL, TAG, and lipoproteins also were distinctly reduced in homozygous and heterozygous carriers of the mutation. Beyond malabsorption of dietary lipids, deleterious effects of apolipoprotein B deficiency on hepatic lipid metabolism, steroid

  7. Abnormal Transmethylation/Transsulfuration Metabolism and DNA Hypomethylation among Parents of Children with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, S. Jill; Melnyk, Stepan; Jernigan, Stefanie; Hubanks, Amanda; Rose, Shannon; Gaylor, David W.

    2008-01-01

    An integrated metabolic profile reflects the combined influence of genetic, epigenetic, and environmental factors that affect the candidate pathway of interest. Recent evidence suggests that some autistic children may have reduced detoxification capacity and may be under chronic oxidative stress. Based on reports of abnormal methionine and…

  8. Circulating palmitoleic acid and risk of metabolic abnormalities and new-onset diabetes1234

    PubMed Central

    Mozaffarian, Dariush; Cao, Haiming; King, Irena B; Lemaitre, Rozenn N; Song, Xiaoling; Siscovick, David S; Hotamisligil, Gökhan S

    2010-01-01

    Background: Animal experiments suggest that circulating palmitoleic acid (cis-16:1n–7) from adipocyte de novo fatty acid synthesis may directly regulate insulin resistance and metabolic dysregulation. Objective: We investigated the independent determinants of circulating palmitoleate in free-living humans and whether palmitoleate is related to lower metabolic risk and the incidence of diabetes. Design: In a prospective cohort of 3630 US men and women in the Cardiovascular Health Study, plasma phospholipid fatty acids, anthropometric variables, blood lipids, inflammatory markers, and glucose and insulin concentrations were measured between 1992 and 2006 by using standardized methods. Independent determinants of plasma phospholipid palmitoleate and relations of palmitoleate with metabolic risk factors were investigated by using multivariable-adjusted linear regression. Relations with incident diabetes (296 incident cases) were investigated by using Cox proportional hazards. Results: The mean (±SD) palmitoleate value was 0.49 ± 0.20% (range: 0.11–2.55%) of total fatty acids. Greater body mass index, carbohydrate intake, protein intake, and alcohol use were each independent lifestyle correlates of higher palmitoleate concentrations. In multivariable analyses that adjusted for these factors and other potential confounders, higher palmitoleate concentrations were independently associated with lower LDL cholesterol (P < 0.001), higher HDL cholesterol (P < 0.001), lower total:HDL-cholesterol ratio (P = 0.04), and lower fibrinogen (P < 0.001). However, palmitoleate was also associated with higher triglycerides (P < 0.001) and (in men only) with greater insulin resistance (P < 0.001). Palmitoleate was not significantly associated with incident diabetes. Conclusions: Adiposity (energy imbalance), carbohydrate consumption, and alcohol use—even within typical ranges—are associated with higher circulating palmitoleate concentrations. Circulating palmitoleate is

  9. Effects of dietary cellulose, psyllium husk and cholesterol level on fecal and colonic microbial metabolism in monkeys.

    PubMed

    Costa, M A; Mehta, T; Males, J R

    1989-07-01

    The effect of long-term feeding of dietary fiber and two levels of cholesterol on monkey colonic microbial metabolism was studied. Three groups of African green monkeys were fed for 3.5 yr purified diets containing 9.7% cellulose or psyllium husk and 0.8 mg cholesterol per kcal or 9.7% cellulose and 0.1 mg cholesterol per kcal. Total viable anaerobe and aerobe counts, microbial beta-glucuronidase activity, volatile fatty acid and ammonia nitrogen concentrations, dry matter and pH were determined in fecal and colonic samples. Compared to cellulose, psyllium husk feeding decreased (P less than 0.05) percentage dry matter, beta-glucuronidase (EC 3.2.1.31) activity and pH, and increased (P less than 0.05) ammonia nitrogen and volatile fatty acid output in feces and in colon contents. In all groups, colonic beta-glucuronidase activity was greater (P less than 0.05) than in fecal samples. Microbial beta-glucuronidase activity, pH or percentage dry matter in the ascending colon was not different from that in the transcending or descending segments. The ratio of anaerobic to aerobic bacteria was lower in colon contents from monkeys fed psyllium husk compared to those fed cellulose. Total viable bacterial counts were lower in monkeys fed low cholesterol compared to high cholesterol diets. The results suggest that chronic intake of dietary psyllium husk resulted in greater colonic microbial metabolism compared to cellulose feeding. PMID:2547038

  10. Loss of polyubiquitin gene Ubb leads to metabolic and sleep abnormalities in mice

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, K.-Y.; Fujiki, N.; Kazantzis, M.; Garza, J. C.; Bouley, D. M.; Stahl, A.; Lu, X.-Y.; Nishino, S.; Kopito, R. R.

    2010-01-01

    Aims Ubiquitin performs essential roles in a myriad of signalling pathways required for cellular function and survival. Recently, we reported that disruption of the stress-inducible ubiquitin-encoding gene Ubb reduces ubiquitin content in the hypothalamus and leads to adult-onset obesity coupled with a loss of arcuate nucleus neurones and disrupted energy homeostasis in mice. Neuropeptides expressed in the hypothalamus control both metabolic and sleep behaviours. In order to demonstrate that the loss of Ubb results in broad hypothalamic abnormalities, we attempted to determine whether metabolic and sleep behaviours were altered in Ubb knockout mice. Methods Metabolic rate and energy expenditure were measured in a metabolic chamber, and sleep stage was monitored via electroencephalographic/electromyographic recording. The presence of neurodegeneration and increased reactive gliosis in the hypothalamus were also evaluated. Results We found that Ubb disruption leads to early-onset reduced activity and metabolic rate. Additionally, we have demonstrated that sleep behaviour is altered and sleep homeostasis is disrupted in Ubb knockout mice. These early metabolic and sleep abnormalities are accompanied by persistent reactive gliosis and the loss of arcuate nucleus neurones, but are independent of neurodegeneration in the lateral hypothalamus. Conclusions Ubb knockout mice exhibit phenotypes consistent with hypothalamic dysfunction. Our data also indicate that Ubb is essential for the maintenance of the ubiquitin levels required for proper regulation of metabolic and sleep behaviours in mice. PMID:20002312

  11. Altered Clock and Lipid Metabolism-Related Genes in Atherosclerotic Mice Kept with Abnormal Lighting Condition

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Zhu; Hua, Bingxuan; Shang, Zhanxian; Yuan, Gongsheng; Xu, Lirong; Li, Ermin; Li, Xiaobo; Yan, Zuoqin; Qian, Ruizhe

    2016-01-01

    Background. The risk of atherosclerosis is elevated in abnormal lipid metabolism and circadian rhythm disorder. We investigated whether abnormal lighting condition would have influenced the circadian expression of clock genes and clock-controlled lipid metabolism-related genes in ApoE-KO mice. Methods. A mouse model of atherosclerosis with circadian clock genes expression disorder was established using ApoE-KO mice (ApoE-KO LD/DL mice) by altering exposure to light. C57 BL/6J mice (C57 mice) and ApoE-KO mice (ApoE-KO mice) exposed to normal day and night and normal diet served as control mice. According to zeitgeber time samples were acquired, to test atheromatous plaque formation, serum lipids levels and rhythmicity, clock genes, and lipid metabolism-related genes along with Sirtuin 1 (Sirt1) levels and rhythmicity. Results. Atherosclerosis plaques were formed in the aortic arch of ApoE-KO LD/DL mice. The serum lipids levels and oscillations in ApoE-KO LD/DL mice were altered, along with the levels and diurnal oscillations of circadian genes, lipid metabolism-associated genes, and Sirt1 compared with the control mice. Conclusions. Abnormal exposure to light aggravated plaque formation and exacerbated disorders of serum lipids and clock genes, lipid metabolism genes and Sirt1 levels, and circadian oscillation.

  12. [Research Progress on role of Abnormal Tryptophan Metabolism in Immune Thrombocytopenia].

    PubMed

    Li, Zhao-Jian; Liu, Xiao-Qian; Xu, Jun-Qing; Chu, Xiao-Xia

    2015-12-01

    Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is a common acquired autoimmune hematological disorders. Platelet autoantibodies lead to the decrease of platelet production and (or) increase of its destruction. The latest researches showed that the abnormal tryptophan metabolism mediated by indoleamine-2, 3-dioxygenase(IDO) is related with the pathogenesis of ITP. The patients with ITP show less expression of IDO, reduction of Treg cells and increase of autoreactive T cells and autoantibodies. CTLA-4-Ig can improve the expression of IDO in the patients with ITP, which also can inhibit the proliferation and activation of self-reactive T cells. Thus, clarifying the abnormal tryptophan metabolism mediated by IDO may provide a new idea for improving the understand of the pathogenesis and treatment of ITP. This review focuses on reasearch progress of the tryptophan metabolism mediated by IDO and ITP. PMID:26708916

  13. Gene-environment interactions reveal a homeostatic role for cholesterol metabolism during dietary folate perturbation in mice

    PubMed Central

    Kitami, Toshimori; Rubio, Renee; O'Brien, William; Quackenbush, John; Nadeau, Joseph H.

    2008-01-01

    Dietary folate supplementation can dramatically reduce the severity and incidence of several common birth defects and adult diseases that are associated with anomalies in homocysteine and folate metabolism. The common polymorphisms that adversely affect these metabolic pathways do not fully account for the particular birth defects and adult diseases that occur in at-risk individuals. To test involvement of folate, homocysteine, and other pathways in disease pathogenesis and treatment response, we analyzed global and pathway-specific changes in gene expression and levels of selected metabolites after depletion and repletion of dietary folate in two genetically distinct inbred strains of mice. Compared with the C57BL/6J strain, A/J showed greater homeostatic response to folate perturbation by retaining a higher serum folate level and minimizing global gene expression changes. Remarkably, folate perturbation led to systematic strain-specific differences only in the expression profile of the cholesterol biosynthesis pathway and to changes in levels of serum and liver total cholesterol. By genetically increasing serum and liver total cholesterol levels in APOE-deficient mice, we modestly but significantly improved folate retention during folate depletion, suggesting that homeostasis among the homocysteine, folate and cholesterol metabolic pathways contributes to the beneficial effects of dietary folate supplementation. PMID:18697859

  14. In patients with HIV-infection, chromium supplementation improves insulin resistance and other metabolic abnormalities: a randomized, double-blind, placebo controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Aghdassi, Elaheh; Arendt, Bianca M; Salit, Irving E; Mohammed, Saira S; Jalali, Pegah; Bondar, Helena; Allard, Johane P

    2010-03-01

    Chromium is an essential micronutrient; chromium deficiency has been reported to cause insulin resistance, hyperglycemia and hyperlipidemia. The aim was to investigate the effect of chromium supplementation on insulin-resistance, other metabolic abnormalities, and body composition in people living with HIV. This was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Fifty-two HIV-positive subjects with elevated glucose, lipids, or evidence of body fat redistribution, and who had insulin-resistance based on the calculation of homeostasis model of assessment (HOMA-IR > or = 2.5) were assessed. Subjects who were on insulin or hypoglycemic medications were excluded. Subjects were randomized to receive either 400 microg/day chromium-nicotinate or placebo for 16 weeks. Forty-six subjects, 23 in each group, completed the study. Fasting blood insulin, glucose, lipid profile and body composition were measured before and after intervention. Chromium was tolerated without side effects and resulted in a significant decrease in HOMA-IR (median (IQR) (pre:4.09 (3.02-8.79); post: 3.66 (2.40-5.46), p=0.004), insulin (pre: 102 (85-226); post: 99 (59-131) pmol/L, p=0.003), triglycerides, total body fat mass (mean+/-SEM) (pre: 17.3+/-1.7; post: 16.3+/-1.7 kg; p=0.002) and trunk fat mass (pre: 23.8+/-1.9; post: 22.7+/-2.0 %; p=0.008). Blood glucose, C-peptide, total, HDL and LDL cholesterol, and hemoglobin A1c remained unchanged. Biochemical parameters did not change in the placebo group except for LDL cholesterol which increased significantly. Body weight and medication profile remained stable throughout the study for both groups. In summary, chromium improved insulin resistance, metabolic abnormalities, and body composition in HIV+ patients. This suggests that chromium supplements alleviate some of the antiretroviral-associated metabolic abnormalities. PMID:20163347

  15. The "selfish brain" hypothesis for metabolic abnormalities in bipolar disorder and schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Mansur, Rodrigo Barbachan; Brietzke, Elisa

    2012-09-01

    Metabolic abnormalities are frequent in patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder (BD), leading to a high prevalence of diabetes and metabolic syndrome in this population. Moreover, mortality rates among patients are higher than in the general population, especially due to cardiovascular diseases. Several neurobiological systems involved in energy metabolism have been shown to be altered in both illnesses; however, the cause of metabolic abnormalities and how they relate to schizophrenia and BD pathophysiology are still largely unknown. The "selfish brain" theory is a recent paradigm postulating that, in order to maintain its own energy supply stable, the brain modulates energy metabolism in the periphery by regulation of both allocation and intake of nutrients. We hypothesize that the metabolic alterations observed in these disorders are a result of an inefficient regulation of the brain energy supply and its compensatory mechanisms. The selfish brain theory can also expand our understanding of stress adaptation and neuroprogression in schizophrenia and BD, and, overall, can have important clinical implications for both illnesses. PMID:25923003

  16. A Biochemical Abnormality in Cerebrotendinous Xanthomatosis IMPAIRMENT OF BILE ACID BIOSYNTHESIS ASSOCIATED WITH INCOMPLETE DEGRADATION OF THE CHOLESTEROL SIDE CHAIN

    PubMed Central

    Setoguchi, T.; Salen, Gerald; Tint, G. S.; Mosbach, E. H.

    1974-01-01

    Bile acid production in cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis (CTX) is subnormal, yet the activity of cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase, the rate-determining enzyme of bile acid synthesis, is elevated. To explain this discrepancy, bile acid precursors were sought in bile and feces of three CTX subjects. Over 10% of the total sterols excreted in bile and feces consisted of compounds more polar than cholesterol. Chromatographic analysis of the polar fractions in conjunction with gasliquid chromatography (GLC)-mass spectrometry indicated two major constituents, 5β-cholestane-3α,7α,12α,25-tetrol and 5β-cholestane-3α,7α,12α,24ξ,25-pentol. After i.v. injection of [4-14C]cholesterol both bile alcohols were radioactive proving that they were derived from cholesterol. The accumulation of alcohols hydroxylated at C-25 and C-24,25 suggests that decreased bile acid synthesis in CTX results from impaired oxidation of the cholesterol side chain. This finding and the virtual absence of intermediates hydroxylated at C-26 indicate that current views of the major pathway of bile acid synthesis may require revision. PMID:4825231

  17. Response of the Cholesterol Metabolism to a Negative Energy Balance in Dairy Cows Depends on the Lactational Stage

    PubMed Central

    Albrecht, Christiane; Bruckmaier, Rupert M.

    2015-01-01

    The response of cholesterol metabolism to a negative energy balance (NEB) induced by feed restriction for 3 weeks starting at 100 days in milk (DIM) compared to the physiologically occurring NEB in week 1 postpartum (p.p.) was investigated in 50 dairy cows (25 control (CON) and 25 feed-restricted (RES)). Blood samples, liver biopsies and milk samples were taken in week 1 p.p., and in weeks 0 and 3 of feed restriction. Plasma concentrations of total cholesterol (C), phospholipids (PL), triglycerides (TAG), very low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (VLDL-C) and low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) increased in RES cows from week 0 to 3 during feed restriction and were higher in week 3 compared to CON cows. In contrast, during the physiologically occurring NEB in week 1 p.p., C, PL, TAG and lipoprotein concentrations were at a minimum. Plasma phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP) and lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) activities did not differ between week 0 and 3 for both groups, whereas during NEB in week 1 p.p. PLTP activity was increased and LCAT activity was decreased. Milk C concentration was not affected by feed restriction in both groups, whereas milk C mass was decreased in week 3 for RES cows. In comparison, C concentration and mass in milk were elevated in week 1 p.p. Hepatic mRNA abundance of sterol regulatory element-binding factor-2 (SREBF-2), 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A synthase 1 (HMGCS1), 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR), and ATP-binding cassette transporter (ABCA1) were similar in CON and RES cows during feed restriction, but were upregulated during NEB in week 1 p.p. compared to the non-lactating stage without a NEB. In conclusion, cholesterol metabolism in dairy cows is affected by nutrient and energy deficiency depending on the stage of lactation. PMID:26034989

  18. Response of the cholesterol metabolism to a negative energy balance in dairy cows depends on the lactational stage.

    PubMed

    Gross, Josef J; Kessler, Evelyne C; Albrecht, Christiane; Bruckmaier, Rupert M

    2015-01-01

    The response of cholesterol metabolism to a negative energy balance (NEB) induced by feed restriction for 3 weeks starting at 100 days in milk (DIM) compared to the physiologically occurring NEB in week 1 postpartum (p.p.) was investigated in 50 dairy cows (25 control (CON) and 25 feed-restricted (RES)). Blood samples, liver biopsies and milk samples were taken in week 1 p.p., and in weeks 0 and 3 of feed restriction. Plasma concentrations of total cholesterol (C), phospholipids (PL), triglycerides (TAG), very low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (VLDL-C) and low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) increased in RES cows from week 0 to 3 during feed restriction and were higher in week 3 compared to CON cows. In contrast, during the physiologically occurring NEB in week 1 p.p., C, PL, TAG and lipoprotein concentrations were at a minimum. Plasma phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP) and lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) activities did not differ between week 0 and 3 for both groups, whereas during NEB in week 1 p.p. PLTP activity was increased and LCAT activity was decreased. Milk C concentration was not affected by feed restriction in both groups, whereas milk C mass was decreased in week 3 for RES cows. In comparison, C concentration and mass in milk were elevated in week 1 p.p. Hepatic mRNA abundance of sterol regulatory element-binding factor-2 (SREBF-2), 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A synthase 1 (HMGCS1), 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR), and ATP-binding cassette transporter (ABCA1) were similar in CON and RES cows during feed restriction, but were upregulated during NEB in week 1 p.p. compared to the non-lactating stage without a NEB. In conclusion, cholesterol metabolism in dairy cows is affected by nutrient and energy deficiency depending on the stage of lactation. PMID:26034989

  19. Inhibition of cholesterol metabolism underlies synergy between mTOR pathway inhibition and chloroquine in bladder cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    King, M A; Ganley, I G; Flemington, V

    2016-01-01

    Mutations to fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) and phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN) signalling pathway components (for example, PTEN loss, PIK3CA, AKT1, TSC1/2) are common in bladder cancer, yet small-molecule inhibitors of these nodes (FGFR/PTENi) show only modest activity in preclinical models. As activation of autophagy is proposed to promote survival under FGFR/PTENi, we have investigated this relationship in a panel of 18 genetically diverse bladder cell lines. We found that autophagy inhibition does not sensitise bladder cell lines to FGFR/PTENi, but newly identify an autophagy-independent cell death synergy in FGFR3-mutant cell lines between mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) pathway inhibitors and chloroquine (CQ)—an anti-malarial drug used as a cancer therapy adjuvant in over 30 clinical trials. The mechanism of synergy is consistent with lysosomal cell death (LCD), including cathepsin-driven caspase activation, and correlates with suppression of cSREBP1 and cholesterol biosynthesis in sensitive cell lines. Remarkably, loss of viability can be rescued by saturating cellular membranes with cholesterol or recapitulated by statin-mediated inhibition, or small interfering RNA knockdown, of enzymes regulating cholesterol metabolism. Modulation of CQ-induced cell death by atorvastatin and cholesterol is reproduced across numerous cell lines, confirming a novel and fundamental role for cholesterol biosynthesis in regulating LCD. Thus, we have catalogued the molecular events underlying cell death induced by CQ in combination with an anticancer therapeutic. Moreover, by revealing a hitherto unknown aspect of lysosomal biology under stress, we propose that suppression of cholesterol metabolism in cancer cells should elicit synergy with CQ and define a novel approach to future cancer treatments. PMID:26853465

  20. Persistence of cerebral metabolic abnormalities in chronic schizophrenia as determined by positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Wolkin, A.; Jaeger, J.; Brodie, J.D.; Wolf, A.P.; Fowler, J.; Rotrosen, J.; Gomez-Mont, F.; Cancro, R.

    1985-05-01

    Local cerebral metabolic rates were determined by positron emission tomography and the deoxyglucose method in a group of 10 chronic schizophrenic subjects before and after somatic treatment and in eight normal subjects. Before treatment, schizophrenic subjects had markedly lower absolute metabolic activity than did normal controls in both frontal and temporal regions and a trend toward relative hyperactivity in the basal ganglia area. After treatment, their metabolic rates approached those seen in normal subjects in nearly all regions except frontal. Persistence of diminished frontal metabolism was manifested as significant relative hypofrontality. These findings suggest specific loci of aberrant cerebral functioning in chronic schizophrenia and the utility of positron emission tomography in characterizing these abnormalities.

  1. Effects of dietary hull-less barley β-glucan on the cholesterol metabolism of hypercholesterolemic hamsters.

    PubMed

    Tong, Li-Tao; Zhong, Kui; Liu, Liya; Zhou, Xianrong; Qiu, Ju; Zhou, Sumei

    2015-02-15

    The aim of the present study is to investigate the hypocholesterolemic effects of dietary hull-less barley β-glucan (HBG) on cholesterol metabolism in hamsters which were fed a hypercholesterolemic diet. The hamsters were divided into 3 groups and fed experimental diets, containing 5‰ HBG or 5‰ oat β-glucan (OG), for 30days. The HBG, as well as OG, lowered the concentration of plasma LDL-cholesterol significantly. The excretion of total lipids and cholesterol in feces were increased in HBG and OG groups compared with the control group. The activity of 3-hydroxy-3-methyl glutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase in liver was reduced significantly in the HBG group compared with the control and OG groups. The activity of cholesterol 7-α hydroxylase (CYP7A1) in the liver, in the HBG and OG groups, was significantly increased compared with the control group. The concentrations of acetate, propionate and total short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) were not significantly different between the HBG and control groups. These results indicate that dietary HBG reduces the concentration of plasma LDL cholesterol by promoting the excretion of fecal lipids, and regulating the activities of HMG-CoA reductase and CYP7A1 in hypercholesterolemic hamsters. PMID:25236236

  2. Pectin isolated from prickly pear (Opuntia SSP) modifies LDL metabolism in cholesterol-fed guinea pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, M.L.; McNamara, D.J. )

    1990-02-26

    The effects of dietary pectin on plasma and hepatic cholesterol (CH) levels, plasma lipoprotein profiles, hepatic 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl Coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase activity, and low density lipoprotein (LDL) binding to hepatic membranes were investigated by feeding 1% pectin to guinea pigs on a high CH diet. Animals were fed either chow + 0.25% CH (HC diet) or the CH diet + 1% prickly pear pectin (HC-P diet) for 25 days. Plasma CH levels were decreased 26% by the HC-P with 33% decreases in LDL and KDL. LDL peak density shifted from 1.040 to 1.055 g/ml with pectin. Hepatic total, free and esterified CH levels were reduced 60, 40 and 85% respectively by the HC-P diet. In contrast, HMG-CoA reductase activity was unaffected. {sup 125}I-LDL binding to hepatic membranes was increased by intake of the HC-P diet compared to the HC diet. The affinity of the apo B/E receptor for LDL was not affected by dietary pectin while the receptor number was increased 1.5-fold in animals on the HC-P diet. These data suggest that the parameters of HC metabolism affected by dietary pectin are consistent with an increased demand on the hepatic CH pools which possibly results from increased fecal excretion of bile acids.

  3. A community-based exercise intervention transitions metabolically abnormal obese adults to a metabolically healthy obese phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Dalleck, Lance C; Van Guilder, Gary P; Richardson, Tara B; Bredle, Donald L; Janot, Jeffrey M

    2014-01-01

    Background Lower habitual physical activity and poor cardiorespiratory fitness are common features of the metabolically abnormal obese (MAO) phenotype that contribute to increased cardiovascular disease risk. The aims of the present study were to determine 1) whether community-based exercise training transitions MAO adults to metabolically healthy, and 2) whether the odds of transition to metabolically healthy were larger for obese individuals who performed higher volumes of exercise and/or experienced greater increases in fitness. Methods and results Metabolic syndrome components were measured in 332 adults (190 women, 142 men) before and after a supervised 14-week community-based exercise program designed to reduce cardiometabolic risk factors. Obese (body mass index ≥30 kg · m2) adults with two to four metabolic syndrome components were classified as MAO, whereas those with no or one component were classified as metabolically healthy but obese (MHO). After community exercise, 27/68 (40%) MAO individuals (P<0.05) transitioned to metabolically healthy, increasing the total number of MHO persons by 73% (from 37 to 64). Compared with the lowest quartiles of relative energy expenditure and change in fitness, participants in the highest quartiles were 11.6 (95% confidence interval: 2.1–65.4; P<0.05) and 7.5 (95% confidence interval: 1.5–37.5; P<0.05) times more likely to transition from MAO to MHO, respectively. Conclusion Community-based exercise transitions MAO adults to metabolically healthy. MAO adults who engaged in higher volumes of exercise and experienced the greatest increase in fitness were significantly more likely to become metabolically healthy. Community exercise may be an effective model for primary prevention of cardiovascular disease. PMID:25120373

  4. Limbic Metabolic Abnormalities in Remote Traumatic Brain Injury and Correlation With Psychiatric Morbidity and Social Functioning

    PubMed Central

    Capizzano, Arístides A.; Jorge, Ricardo E.; Robinson, Robert G.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate limbic metabolic abnormalities in remote traumatic brain injury (TBI) and their psychiatric correlates. Twenty patients and 13 age-matched comparison subjects received complete psychiatric evaluation and brain MRI and MR spectroscopy at 3 Tesla. Patients had reduced NAA to creatine ratio in the left hippocampus relative to comparison subjects (mean=1.3 [SD=0.21] compared with mean=1.55 [SD=0.21]; F=10.73, df=1, 30, p=0.003), which correlated with the Social Functioning Examination scores (rs=−0.502, p=0.034). Furthermore, patients with mood disorders had reduced NAA to creatine ratio in the left cingulate relative to patients without mood disorders (1.47 compared with 1.68; F=3.393, df=3, 19, p=0.044). Remote TBI displays limbic metabolic abnormalities, which correlate to social outcome and psychiatric status. PMID:21037120

  5. Development and partial metabolic characterization of a dietary cholesterol-resistant colony of rabbits

    SciTech Connect

    Overturf, M.L.; Smith, S.A.; Hewett-Emmett, D.; Loose-Mitchell, D.S.; Soma, M.R.; Gotto, A.M. Jr.; Morrisett, J.D. )

    1989-02-01

    A colony of New Zealand white rabbits has been developed which, when fed a cholesterol-supplemented diet, exhibit unusual resistance to hypercholesterolemia and atherosclerosis, disorders usually observed in normal cholesterol-fed rabbits. When resistant rabbits (RT) were fed a normal low cholesterol diet (ND), their plasma lipoprotein patterns were significantly different from those of normal rabbits (NR) fed the same diet. The low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-c)/high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c) ratio and LDL-c/very low density lipoprotein cholesterol (VLDL-c) ratio were lower in the resistant rabbits. The hydrated density of HDL of the normal-responsive rabbits was greater than that of the resistant rabbits. LDL from resistant rabbits contained a lower proportion of esterified cholesterol and protein than LDL from normal rabbits. Peripheral mononuclear cells from resistant rabbits bound about 30% more {sup 125}I-labeled rabbit LDL than mononuclear cells from normal rabbits. These results demonstrate that the plasma cholesterol levels of these animals is at least partly under genetic control and that compositional differences exist between the major plasma lipoprotein classes of normal and resistant rabbits even during the ingestion of low-cholesterol diet. The results indicate that at least a part of the difference in the cholesterolemic responses between the two rabbit groups is due to an enhanced LDL uptake by the mononuclear cells, and presumably by other somatic cells of the resistant group.

  6. Metabolism, Energetics, and Lipid Biology in the Podocyte – Cellular Cholesterol-Mediated Glomerular Injury

    PubMed Central

    Merscher, Sandra; Pedigo, Christopher E.; Mendez, Armando J.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with a high risk of death. Dyslipidemia is commonly observed in patients with CKD and is accompanied by a decrease in plasma high-density lipoprotein, and an increase in plasma triglyceride-rich lipoproteins and oxidized lipids. The observation that statins may decrease albuminuria but do not stop the progression of CKD indicates that pathways other than the cholesterol synthesis contribute to cholesterol accumulation in the kidneys of patients with CKD. Recently, it has become clear that increased lipid influx and impaired reverse cholesterol transport can promote glomerulosclerosis, and tubulointerstitial damage. Lipid-rafts are cholesterol-rich membrane domains with important functions in regulating membrane fluidity, membrane protein trafficking, and in the assembly of signaling molecules. In podocytes, which are specialized cells of the glomerulus, they contribute to the spatial organization of the slit diaphragm (SD) under physiological and pathological conditions. The discovery that podocyte-specific proteins such as podocin can bind and recruit cholesterol contributing to the formation of the SD underlines the importance of cholesterol homeostasis in podocytes and suggests cholesterol as an important regulator in the development of proteinuric kidney disease. Cellular cholesterol accumulation due to increased synthesis, influx, or decreased efflux is an emerging concept in podocyte biology. This review will focus on the role of cellular cholesterol accumulation in the pathogenesis of kidney diseases with a focus on glomerular diseases. PMID:25352833

  7. Exosomal Protein Deficiencies: How Abnormal RNA Metabolism Results in Childhood-Onset Neurological Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Juliane S.; Giunta, Michele; Horvath, Rita

    2016-01-01

    Defects of RNA metabolism have been increasingly identified in various forms of inherited neurological diseases. Recently, abnormal RNA degradation due to mutations in human exosome subunit genes has been shown to cause complex childhood onset neurological presentations including spinal muscular atrophy, pontocerebellar hypoplasia and myelination deficiencies. This paper summarizes our current knowledge about the exosome in human neurological disease and provides some important insights into potential disease mechanisms. PMID:27127732

  8. Polymorphisms of ATP binding cassette G5 and G8 transporters: their effect on cholesterol metabolism after moderate weight loss in overweight and obese hyperlipidemic women

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To determine the effect of polymorphisms ABCG5 and ABCG8 transporters on changes in lipid levels, cholesterol absorption rate (ABS), fractional synthesis rate (FSR), and turnover (TO) after moderate weight loss (WtL) in women. Cholesterol metabolism was measured pre and post WtL in 35 hyperlipidemic...

  9. Cholesterol Transporters ABCA1 and ABCG1 Gene Expression in Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells in Patients with Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Tavoosi, Zahra; Moradi-Sardareh, Hemen; Saidijam, Massoud; Yadegarazari, Reza; Borzuei, Shiva; Soltanian, Alireza; Goodarzi, Mohammad Taghi

    2015-01-01

    ABCA1 and ABCG1 genes encode the cholesterol transporter proteins that play a key role in cholesterol and phospholipids homeostasis. This study was aimed at evaluating and comparing ABCA1 and ABCG1 genes expression in metabolic syndrome patients and healthy individuals. This case-control study was performed on 36 patients with metabolic syndrome and the same number of healthy individuals in Hamadan (west of Iran) during 2013-2014. Total RNA was extracted from mononuclear cells and purified using RNeasy Mini Kit column. The expression of ABCA1 and ABCG1 genes was performed by qRT-PCR. Lipid profile and fasting blood glucose were measured using colorimetric procedures. ABCG1 expression in metabolic syndrome patients was significantly lower (about 75%) compared to that of control group, while for ABCA1 expression, there was no significant difference between the two studied groups. Comparison of other parameters such as HDL-C, FBS, BMI, waist circumference, and systolic and diastolic blood pressure between metabolic syndrome patients and healthy individuals showed significant differences (P < 0.05). Decrease in ABCG1 expression in metabolic syndrome patients compared to healthy individuals suggests that hyperglycemia, related metabolites, and hyperlipidemia over the transporter capacity resulted in decreased expression of ABCG1. Absence of a significant change in ABCA1 gene expression between two groups can indicate a different regulation mechanism for ABCA1 expression. PMID:26788366

  10. Effect of apolipoprotein E-free high density lipoproteins on cholesterol metabolism in cultured pig hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Bachorik, P.S.; Virgil, D.G.; Kwiterovich, P.O. Jr.

    1987-10-05

    We studied cholesterol synthesis from (/sup 14/C)acetate, cholesterol esterification from (/sup 14/C)oleate, and cellular cholesterol and cholesteryl ester levels after incubating cells with apoE-free high density lipoproteins (HDL) or low density lipoproteins (LDL). LDL suppressed synthesis by up to 60%, stimulated esterification by up to 280%, and increased cell cholesteryl ester content about 4-fold. Esterification increased within 2 h, but synthesis was not suppressed until after 6 h. ApoE-free HDL suppressed esterification by about 50% within 2 h. Cholesterol synthesis was changed very little within 6 h, unless esterification was maximally suppressed; synthesis was then stimulated about 4-fold. HDL lowered cellular unesterified cholesterol by 13-20% within 2 h and promoted the removal of newly synthesized cholesterol and cholesteryl esters. These changes were transient; by 24 h, both esterification and cellular unesterified cholesterol returned to control levels, and cholesteryl esters increased 2-3-fold. HDL core lipid was taken up selectively from /sup 125/I-labeled (/sup 3/H)cholesteryl ester- and ether-labeled HDL. LDL core lipid uptake was proportional to LDL apoprotein uptake. The findings suggest that 1) the cells respond initially to HDL or LDL with changes in esterification, and 2) HDL mediates both the removal of free cholesterol from the cell and the delivery of HDL cholesteryl esters to the cell.

  11. [Inhibitory action of natural compounds of microbial origin on cholesterol metabolism].

    PubMed

    Fujioka, T

    1997-10-01

    1) Repeated administration of pravastatin significantly increased serum and liver cholesterol in rats. Hepatic LDL receptor activity was not changed and VLDL cholesterol secretion from the liver was increased. Net cholesterol synthesis in rat liver was increased after 7 days of repeated pravastatin administration. These results suggest that for rats, unlike other animals for which serum cholesterol is decreased, induced HMG-CoA reductase activity due to pravastatin treatment might overcome the inhibitory capability of pravastatin. 2) In the course of screening for squalene synthase inhibitors, novel zaragozic acids-F10863A, B, C and D-containing zaragozic acid D3 were isolated. F10863A was most potent and selectively inhibited cholesterol synthesis in freshly isolated rat hepatocytes among several cultured and isolated cells. It also showed in vivo serum cholesterol-lowering effects in hamsters and marmosets. However, the inhibition for squalene synthase proved to cause acidosis due to the accumulation of farnesol-derived dicarboxylic acids in urines. 3) A novel acyl-CoA: cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) inhibitor, designated epi-cochlioquinone A, a stereoisomer of cochlioquinone A, which has been previously reported as a nematocidal agent, was isolated from the fermentation broth of Stachybotrys bisbyi. It inhibited in vivo cholesterol absorption in rats by 50% at 75 mg/kg. PMID:9503410

  12. Waist:height ratio, waist circumference and metabolic syndrome abnormalities in Colombian schooled adolescents: a multivariate analysis considering located adiposity.

    PubMed

    Agredo-Zúñiga, Ricardo Antonio; Aguilar-de Plata, Cecilia; Suárez-Ortegón, Milton Fabian

    2015-09-14

    Very few large studies in Latin America have evaluated the association between waist:height ratio (W-HtR) and cardiometabolic risk in children and adolescents. Further, multivariable analyses verifying the independence of located subcutaneous fat have not been conducted so far. The aim of this study was to evaluate the associations of W-HtR and waist circumference (WC) with metabolic syndrome abnormalities and high LDL-cholesterol levels in schooled adolescents before and after adjusting for trunk skinfolds and BMI. The sample consisted of 831 boys and 841 girls aged 10-17 years. Biochemical, blood pressure and anthropometrical variables were measured. Age- and sex-specific quartiles of W-HtR and WC were used in Poisson regression models to evaluate the associations. High WC values (highest quartile v. quartiles 1-3) were associated with high TAG levels in both sexes (prevalence ratio, boys: 2·57 (95 % CI 1·91, 3·44); girls: 1·92 (95 % CI 1·49, 2·47); P0·05). High W-HtR (highest quartile v. quartiles 1-3) was only independently associated with high TAG in female adolescents (1·99 (95 % CI 1·55, 2·56); P<0·05). In conclusion, WC showed better association with cardiometabolic risk than W-HtR in the children of this study. This observation does not support W-HtR as a relevant adiposity marker for cardiovascular and metabolic risk in adolescence. PMID:26279413

  13. Food Intake Does Not Differ between Obese Women Who Are Metabolically Healthy or Abnormal1234

    PubMed Central

    Kimokoti, Ruth W; Judd, Suzanne E; Shikany, James M; Newby, PK

    2014-01-01

    Background: Metabolically healthy obesity may confer lower risk of adverse health outcomes compared with abnormal obesity. Diet and race are postulated to influence the phenotype, but their roles and their interrelations on healthy obesity are unclear. Objective: We evaluated food intakes of metabolically healthy obese women in comparison to intakes of their metabolically healthy normal-weight and metabolically abnormal obese counterparts. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study in 6964 women of the REasons for Geographic And Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) study. Participants were aged 45–98 y with a body mass index (BMI; kg/m2) ≥18.5 and free of cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, and cancer. Food intake was collected by using a food-frequency questionnaire. BMI phenotypes were defined by using metabolic syndrome (MetS) and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) criteria. Mean differences in food intakes among BMI phenotypes were compared by using ANCOVA. Results: Approximately one-half of obese women (white: 45%; black: 55%) as defined by MetS criteria and approximately one-quarter of obese women (white: 28%; black: 24%) defined on the basis of HOMA-IR values were metabolically healthy. In age-adjusted analyses, healthy obesity and normal weight as defined by both criteria were associated with lower intakes of sugar-sweetened beverages compared with abnormal obesity among both white and black women (P < 0.05). HOMA-IR–defined healthy obesity and normal weight were also associated with higher fruit and low-fat dairy intakes compared with abnormal obesity in white women (P < 0.05). Results were attenuated and became nonsignificant in multivariable-adjusted models that additionally adjusted for BMI, marital status, residential region, education, annual income, alcohol intake, multivitamin use, cigarette smoking status, physical activity, television viewing, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, menopausal status, hormone therapy

  14. Antifungal Azoles: Structural Insights into Undesired Tight Binding to Cholesterol-Metabolizing CYP46A1.

    PubMed

    Mast, Natalia; Zheng, Wenchao; Stout, C David; Pikuleva, Irina A

    2013-07-01

    Although there are currently three generations of antifungal azoles on the market, even the third-generation agents show undesirable interactions with human cytochrome P450 (P450) enzymes. CYP46A1 is a cholesterol-metabolizing P450 in the brain that tightly binds a number of structurally distinct azoles. Previously, we determined the crystal structures of CYP46A1 in complex with voriconazole and clotrimazole, and in the present work we cocrystallized the P450 with posaconazole at 2.5 Å resolution. This long antifungal drug coordinates the P450 heme iron with the nitrogen atom of its terminal azole ring and adopts a linear configuration occupying the whole length of the substrate access channel and extending beyond the protein surface. Numerous drug-protein interactions determine the submicromolar Kd of posaconazole for CYP46A1. We compared the crystal structure of posaconazole-bound CYP46A1 with those of the P450 in complex with other drugs, including the antifungal voriconazole and clotrimazole. We also analyzed the accommodation of posaconazole in the active site of the target enzymes, CYPs 51, from several pathogenic species. These and the solution studies with different marketed azoles, collectively, allowed us to identify the determinants of tight azole binding to CYP46A1 and generate an overall picture of azole binding to this important P450. The data obtained suggest that development of CYP51-specific antifungal agents will continue to be a challenge. Therefore, structural understanding of the azole binding not only to CYPs 51 from the pathogenic species but also to different human P450s is required to deal efficiently with this challenge. PMID:23604141

  15. Absorption of dietary cholesterol oxidation products and their downstream metabolic effects are reduced by dietary apple polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Ogino, Yamato; Osada, Kyoichi; Nakamura, Shingo; Ohta, Yutaka; Kanda, Tomomasa; Sugano, Michihiro

    2007-03-01

    Exogenous and endogenous cholesterol oxidation products (COPs) perturb various metabolic processes, and thereby they may induce various homeostasis-related disorders. Here, we observed that procyanidin-rich dietary apple polyphenol (APP) from unripe apples alleviates the perturbation of lipid metabolism by decreasing the exogenous COP levels in rats. Dietary COPs may be the greatest source of COPs found in the human body. Rats (4 weeks of age) were fed AIN-purified diets containing 0.3% COPs supplemented with 0.5 or 2.5% APP for 3 weeks. Dietary APP alleviated the growth inhibition action of the exogenous COPs. The modulations of the liver lipid profile by COPs remained unchanged. However, serum total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and triglyceride levels increased following the intake of dietary APP. Further, dietary APP inhibited the increase in lipid peroxide levels in the liver and serum by COPs. The activity of hepatic Delta6 desaturase was lowered by dietary APP in a dose-dependent manner, although exogenous COPs generally increased the activity of this enzyme. In keeping with this observation, Delta6 desaturation indices in the phospholipids and cholesteryl esters of the liver and serum lipids were lower in the APP-fed groups than those in the control group. Dietary APP also promoted the excretion of exogenous COPs, cholesterol, and acidic steroids in feces. Therefore, the inhibition of intestinal absorption of COPs may partly contribute to the alleviation of the perturbation of lipid metabolism and lipid peroxidation levels. Thus, APP may be an important removal agent of exogenous toxic material such as COPs contained in processed or fast foods. PMID:17393221

  16. Multiple genetic imaging study of the association between cholesterol metabolism and brain functional alterations in individuals with risk factors for Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Feng; Yuan, Yonggui; Shi, Yongmei; Zhang, Zhijun

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous neurodegenerative disease. Genes involved in cholesterol metabolism may play a role in the pathological changes of AD. However, the imaging genetics-based endophenotypes derived from polymorphisms in multiple functionally related genes are unclear in individuals with risk factors for AD. Forty-three amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) subjects and 30 healthy controls underwent resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) measurements of brain topological organization. Thirty-three previously suggested tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from 12 candidate genes in the cholesterol metabolism pathway were further investigated. A cholesterol metabolism pathway gene-based imaging genetics approach was then utilized to investigate disease-related differences between the groups based on genotype-by-aMCI interactions. The cholesterol metabolism pathway genes exerted widespread effects on the cortico-subcortical-cerebellar spontaneous brain activity. Meanwhile, left lateralization of global brain connectivity was associated with cholesterol metabolism pathway genes. The APOE rs429358 variation significantly influenced the brain network characteristics, affecting the activation of nodes as well as the connectivity of edges in aMCI subjects. The cholesterol metabolism pathway gene-based imaging genetics approach may provide new opportunities to understand the mechanisms underlying AD and suggested that APOE rs429358 is a core genetic variation that is associated with disease-related differences in brain function. PMID:26985771

  17. Effect of dietary vegetable (water convolvulus) on cholesterol metabolism in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, M.L.; Chia, D.F.; Run, J.Q.

    1984-03-01

    Male rats were fed diets containing 0.5% cholesterol with or without vegetable (water convolvulus) or neutral detergent fiber supplementation. After 2 weeks, rats were given (4-14C)cholesterol i.p. Feces were collected for 1 week. Three hours prior to necropsy, (3H)acetate was administered i.p. Samples of serum, liver, adipose tissue, muscle and brain were obtained for analysis. Concentrations of total lipids and cholesterol and synthesis and recovery of labeled steroids are reported. Results showed that the growth of animals and food utilization were not significantly affected by different dietary treatments. The notable effect of vegetable was that the elevated liver and serum cholesterol levels due to increased intake can be nearly offset by increasing the fecal excretion. The high rate of excretion of 14C-labeled steroids shown in vegetable-fed rats indicated that both decreased absorption and increased endogenous excretion occurred in these animals. The synthesis of total lipids as demonstrated by (3H)acetate incorporation was not affected appreciably by diet. In liver, however, cholesterol synthesis appeared to be lower in rats receiving cholesterol-supplemented diet, but higher in rats fed vegetable diets. The ratio of 3H:14C of liver cholesterol was significantly higher in rats fed the vegetable diet. In brain cholesterol we also found consistently high 3H:14C ratios, which were not affected by dietary intake. It appears that brain cholesterol level is maintained mainly by synthesis in situ and not by uptake from dietary or other sources.

  18. Effect of dietary vegetable (water convolvulus) on cholesterol metabolism in rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, M L; Chia, D F; Run, J Q

    1984-03-01

    Male rats were fed diets containing 0.5% cholesterol with or without vegetable (water convolvulus) or neutral detergent fiber supplementation. After 2 weeks, rats were given [4-14C]cholesterol i.p. Feces were collected for 1 week. Three hours prior to necropsy, [3H]acetate was administered i.p. Samples of serum, liver, adipose tissue, muscle and brain were obtained for analysis. Concentrations of total lipids and cholesterol and synthesis and recovery of labeled steroids are reported. Results showed that the growth of animals and food utilization were not significantly affected by different dietary treatments. The notable effect of vegetable was that the elevated liver and serum cholesterol levels due to increased intake can be nearly offset by increasing the fecal excretion. The high rate of excretion of 14C-labeled steroids shown in vegetable-fed rats indicated that both decreased absorption and increased endogenous excretion occurred in these animals. The synthesis of total lipids as demonstrated by [3H]acetate incorporation was not affected appreciably by diet. In liver, however, cholesterol synthesis appeared to be lower in rats receiving cholesterol-supplemented diet, but higher in rats fed vegetable diets. The ratio of 3H:14C of liver cholesterol was significantly higher in rats fed the vegetable diet. In brain cholesterol we also found consistently high 3H:14C ratios, which were not affected by dietary intake. It appears that brain cholesterol level is maintained mainly by synthesis in situ and not by uptake from dietary or other sources. PMID:6321703

  19. Differences in brain cholesterol metabolism and insulin in two subgroups of patients with different CSF biomarkers but similar white matter lesions suggest different pathogenic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Besga, A; Cedazo-Minguez, A; Kåreholt, I; Solomon, A; Björkhem, I; Winblad, B; Leoni, V; Hooshmand, B; Spulber, G; Gonzalez-Pinto, A; Kivipelto, M; Wahlund, L O

    2012-02-29

    Investigate possible associations of white matter hyperintensities (WMHs) with the metabolism of cholesterol and insulin in two subgroups of patients with memory complaints and different CSF Aβ42 and CSF tau levels. 59 patients from the memory clinic at Karolinska Hospital were included. Degree of WMHs was rated using the ARWMC scale and the following biomarkers were measured in CSF and plasma: insulin, cholesterol, lanosterol, lathosterol, and oxidized cholesterol metabolites. The WMHs in CSF control-like group correlated with increased brain cholesterol synthesis and reduced efflux of oxysterols and insulin in CSF. In the CSF AD-like group, the WMHs correlated with increased peripheral cholesterol metabolism. Despite having similar appearance on FLAIR images, the pathogenic mechanisms of WMHS are likely to be different in the two groups investigated. PMID:22281444

  20. Reproductive and metabolic abnormalities associated with bipolar disorder and its treatment.

    PubMed

    Kenna, Heather A; Jiang, Bowen; Rasgon, Natalie L

    2009-01-01

    Women with mood disorders, especially bipolar disorder (BD), have been shown to have high rates of reproductive and metabolic dysfunction. The available data on the functional, anatomic, and clinical neuroendocrine abnormalities in women with BD suggest a two-tiered relationship with mood pathology. First, many of the medications commonly used in the treatment of BD can have deleterious effects on blood levels of reproductive hormones and consequently on the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis and reproductive function. Studies that have specifically addressed the association between psychotropic medications and menstrual abnormalities, polycystic ovary syndrome, and overall reproductive endocrine function in women with BD have found high rates of HPG irregularities in women with BD. Second, there is evidence of reproductive dysfunction in women with BD prior to treatment. In addition, many of the psychotropic medications used in the treatment of BD are associated with weight gain, insulin resistance, and dyslipidemia. These metabolic side effects further compound the neuroendocrine system dysregulation in women with BD. Current understanding of the reproductive and metabolic function in women with BD points to vulnerability, which in turn increases the risk of later-life cardiovascular disease and diabetes, among other morbidities, for women with BD. PMID:19373621

  1. The Severity of Fatty Liver Disease Relating to Metabolic Abnormalities Independently Predicts Coronary Calcification

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ying-Hsiang; Wu, Yih-Jer; Liu, Chuan-Chuan; Hou, Charles Jia-Yin; Yeh, Hung-I.; Tsai, Cheng-Ho; Shih, Shou-Chuan; Hung, Chung-Lieh

    2011-01-01

    Background. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is one of the metabolic disorders presented in liver. The relationship between severity of NAFLD and coronary atherosclerotic burden remains largely unknown. Methods and Materials. We analyzed subjects undergoing coronary calcium score evaluation by computed tomography (MDCT) and fatty liver assessment using abdominal ultrasonography. Framingham risk score (FRS) and metabolic risk score (MRS) were obtained in all subjects. A graded, semiquantitative score was established to quantify the severity of NAFLD. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to depict the association between NAFLD and calcium score. Results. Of all, 342 participants (female: 22.5%, mean age: 48.7 ± 7.0 years) met the sufficient information rendering detailed analysis. The severity of NAFLD was positively associated with MRS (X2 = 6.12, trend P < 0.001) and FRS (X2 = 5.88, trend P < 0.001). After multivariable adjustment for clinical variables and life styles, the existence of moderate to severe NAFLD was independently associated with abnormal calcium score (P < 0.05). Conclusion. The severity of NAFLD correlated well with metabolic abnormality and was independently predict coronary calcification beyond clinical factors. Our data suggests that NAFLD based on ultrasonogram could positively reflect the burden of coronary calcification. PMID:22254139

  2. Branched-chain amino acid metabolism in rat muscle: abnormal regulation in acidosis

    SciTech Connect

    May, R.C.; Hara, Y.; Kelly, R.A.; Block, K.P.; Buse, M.G.; Mitch, W.E.

    1987-06-01

    Branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) metabolism is frequently abnormal in pathological conditions accompanied by chronic metabolic acidosis. To study how metabolic acidosis affects BCAA metabolism in muscle, rats were gavage fed a 14% protein diet with or without 4 mmol NH/sub 4/Cl x 100 g body wt/sup -1/ x day/sup -1/. Epitrochlearis muscles were incubated with L-(1-/sup 14/C)-valine and L-(1-/sup 14/C)leucine, and rates of decarboxylation, net transamination, and incorporation into muscle protein were measured. Plasma and muscle BCAA levels were lower in acidotic rats. Rates of valine and leucine decarboxylation and net transamination were higher in muscles from acidotic rats; these differences were associated with a 79% increase in the total activity of branched-chain ..cap alpha..-keto acid dehydrogenase and a 146% increase in the activated form of the enzyme. They conclude that acidosis affects the regulation of BCAA metabolism by enhancing flux through the transaminase and by directly stimulating oxidative catabolism through activation of branched-chain ..cap alpha..-keto acid dehydrogenase.

  3. Effect of lifibrol on the metabolism of low density lipoproteins and cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Vega, G L; von Bergmann, K; Grundy, S M; Blumenschein, S; Carter, N B; Laeis, P; Lindenthal, B; von Bergmann, J; Simatupang, A; Lutjohann, D; Adams-Huet, B

    1999-07-01

    Lifibrol is a powerful cholesterol-lowering drug of unknown mechanism of action. This investigation was carried out to determine whether the major action of lifibrol is to enhance clearance of low density lipoproteins (LDL) through the LDL-receptor pathway, and if so, whether the drug exerts its action by altering the excretion of bile acids (acidic steroids), the absorption of cholesterol, or the synthesis of cholesterol. In a first study, in two patients with complete absence of LDL receptors, lifibrol therapy had essentially no effect on plasma LDL concentrations; in two others who had a marked reduction in LDL-receptor activity, response to the drug was attenuated. These findings suggest that lifibrol requires an intact LDL-receptor pathway to exert its action. In a second study, in patients with primary moderate hypercholesterolemia, isotope kinetic studies showed that lifibrol enhanced the fractional catabolic rate of LDL-apolipoprotein B (apo B), but had no effect on transport rates of LDL; these observations likewise support the probability that lifibrol acts mainly to increase the activity of the LDL-receptor pathway. However, in a third study in hypercholesterolemic patients, lifibrol therapy failed to increase acidic steroid excretion, inhibit cholesterol absorption, or reduce net cholesterol balance. Furthermore, lifibrol treatment did not significantly reduce urinary excretion of mevalonic acid. In contrast, in a parallel study, simvastatin therapy, which is known to inhibit cholesterol synthesis, gave the expected decrease in net cholesterol balance and reduction in urinary excretion of mevalonic acid. Thus, lifibrol, like statins, appears to increase the activity of LDL receptors; but in contrast to findings with statins, it was not possible to detect a significant decreased synthesis of cholesterol, either from balance studies or from urinary excretion of mevalonic acid. This finding raises the possibility that lifibrol activates the LDL

  4. [Effect of a new low-cholesterol meat and vegetal product on correction of simulated lipid metabolism disorders in rats].

    PubMed

    Gorlov, I F; Slozhenkina, M I; Karpenko, E V; Giro, T M; Andreeva, S V

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents the biomedical evaluation of meat and cereal spread from low-cholesterol raw material with vegetable ingredients, recommended as a functional food. The experimental model with myocardial infarction like changes in hearts of the animals, accompanied by vascular changes similar to atherosclerotic changes in humans, as well as the modeling of the metabolic imbalance of lipids have been carried out by intramuscular injection of epinephrine and unbalanced feeding the animals with food rich in cholesterol, with a high content of carbohydrates and fats. Wistar rats were divided into 4 groups of 12 animals each. The rats in groups 1-3 were induced the cardio distress with intramuscular injection of epinephrine; group IV consisted of intact (healthy) animals. Dramatic changes in biochemical blood status that indicated heart disease have been observed within 2 days after the injection of epinephrine (0.2 ml per 1 kg of animal body weight) to the tested animals. During the experiment a sharp increase in activity of indicator enzymes of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferases (AST), with a predominance of AST over ALT, along with an increase in LDH activity have been observed. The 1.4-1.6 fold increase in blood serum creatinine has also been found. Later the animals in groups 1, 2, 3 with simulated cardio pathology were fed a ration with intervention of food rich in cholesterol, with a high content of carbohydrates and fats (50% of the diet) for a month for induction of lipid metabolism disorders. An increase in the concentration of cholesterol and triglycerides by 3 fold or more has been observed. In addition, an accumulation of sulfhydryl groups has been noted, as evidenced by increased rates of thymol. For further normalization of lipid metabolism, the animals in tested group I were fed the diet with intervention of spread, developed in accordance with GOST 12318-91 "Canned meat "Meat spread"; the rats of group 2 were fed with

  5. New CETP inhibitor K-312 reduces PCSK9 expression: a potential effect on LDL cholesterol metabolism.

    PubMed

    Miyosawa, Katsutoshi; Watanabe, Yuichiro; Murakami, Kentaro; Murakami, Takeshi; Shibata, Haruki; Iwashita, Masaya; Yamazaki, Hiroyuki; Yamazaki, Koichi; Ohgiya, Tadaaki; Shibuya, Kimiyuki; Mizuno, Ken; Tanabe, Sohei; Singh, Sasha A; Aikawa, Masanori

    2015-07-15

    Despite significant reduction of cardiovascular events by statin treatment, substantial residual risk persists, driving emerging needs for the development of new therapies. We identified a novel cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) inhibitor, K-312, that raises HDL and lowers LDL cholesterol levels in animals. K-312 also suppresses hepatocyte expression of proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin 9 (PCSK9), a molecule that increases LDL cholesterol. We explored the underlying mechanism for the reduction of PCSK9 expression by K-312. K-312 inhibited in vitro human plasma CETP activity (IC50; 0.06 μM). Administration of K-312 to cholesterol-fed New Zealand White rabbits for 18 wk raised HDL cholesterol, decreased LDL cholesterol, and attenuated aortic atherosclerosis. Our search for additional beneficial characteristics of this compound revealed that K-312 decreases PCSK9 expression in human primary hepatocytes and in the human hepatoma cell line HepG2. siRNA silencing of CETP in HepG2 did not compromise the suppression of PCSK9 by K-312, suggesting a mechanism independent of CETP. In HepG2 cells, K-312 treatment decreased the active forms of sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBP-1 and -2) that regulate promoter activity of PCSK9. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated that K-312 decreased the occupancy of SREBP-1 and SREBP-2 on the sterol regulatory element of the PCSK9 promoter. PCSK9 protein levels decreased by K-312 treatment in the circulating blood of cholesterol-fed rabbits, as determined by two independent mass spectrometry approaches, including the recently developed, highly sensitive parallel reaction monitoring method. New CETP inhibitor K-312 decreases LDL cholesterol and PCSK9 levels, serving as a new therapy for dyslipidemia and cardiovascular disease. PMID:26015437

  6. Association of the ADRA1A gene and the severity of metabolic abnormalities in patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Chin; Chiu, Hsien-Jane; Loh, El-Wui; Chan, Chin-Hong; Hwu, Tzong-Ming; Liu, Yun-Ru; Lan, Tsuo-Hung

    2012-01-10

    Patients with schizophrenia have a higher risk of developing metabolic abnormalities and their associated diseases. Some studies found that the accumulative number of metabolic syndrome components was associated with the severity of metabolic abnormalities. The purpose of this study was to examine the roles of the ADRA1A, ADRA2A, ADRB3, and 5HT2A genes in the risk of having more severe metabolic abnormalities among patients with schizophrenia. We studied a sample of 232 chronic inpatients with schizophrenia (120 males and 112 females) to explore the associations between the four candidate genes and the severity of metabolic syndrome by accumulative number of the components. Four single nucleotide polymorphisms in the candidate genes were genotyped, including the Arg347Cys in ADRA1A, the C1291G in ADRA2A, the Try64Arg in ADRB3, and the T102C in 5HT2A. An association between the accumulative number of metabolic syndrome components and the ADRA1A gene was found after adjusting age, sex, and other related variables (p-value=0.036). Presence of the Arg347 allele in the ADRA1A gene is a risk factor for having more severe metabolic abnormalities. These findings suggest a medical attention of closely monitoring metabolic risks for schizophrenia patients with high-risk genotypes. PMID:22037178

  7. Consistent abnormalities in metabolic network activity in idiopathic rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ping; Yu, Huan; Peng, Shichun; Dauvilliers, Yves; Wang, Jian; Ge, Jingjie; Zhang, Huiwei; Eidelberg, David

    2014-01-01

    Rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder has been evaluated using Parkinson’s disease-related metabolic network. It is unknown whether this disorder is itself associated with a unique metabolic network. 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography was performed in 21 patients (age 65.0 ± 5.6 years) with idiopathic rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder and 21 age/gender-matched healthy control subjects (age 62.5 ± 7.5 years) to identify a disease-related pattern and examine its evolution in 21 hemi-parkinsonian patients (age 62.6 ± 5.0 years) and 16 moderate parkinsonian patients (age 56.9 ± 12.2 years). We identified a rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder-related metabolic network characterized by increased activity in pons, thalamus, medial frontal and sensorimotor areas, hippocampus, supramarginal and inferior temporal gyri, and posterior cerebellum, with decreased activity in occipital and superior temporal regions. Compared to the healthy control subjects, network expressions were elevated (P < 0.0001) in the patients with this disorder and in the parkinsonian cohorts but decreased with disease progression. Parkinson’s disease-related network activity was also elevated (P < 0.0001) in the patients with rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder but lower than in the hemi-parkinsonian cohort. Abnormal metabolic networks may provide markers of idiopathic rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder to identify those at higher risk to develop neurodegenerative parkinsonism. PMID:25338949

  8. Prevalence and predictors of metabolic abnormalities in Chinese women with PCOS: a cross- sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a common condition estimated to affect 5.61% of Chinese women of reproductive age, but little is known about the prevalence and predictors in Chinese PCOS patients. This study aimed to determine the prevalence and predictors of the metabolic abnormalities in Chinese women with and without PCOS. Methods A large-scale national epidemiological investigation was conducted in reproductive age women (19 to 45 years) across China. 833 reproductive aged PCOS women, who participated in the healthcare screening, were recruited from ten provinces in China. Clinical history, ultrasonographic exam (ovarian follicle), hormonal and metabolic parameters were the main outcome measures. Results The prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MetS) as compared in PCOS and non-PCOS women from community were 18.2% vs 14.7%, and IR (insulin resistance) were 14.2% vs 9.3% (p < 0.001) respectively. After adjusting for age, the indicators (central obesity, hypertension, fasting insulin, SHBG, dyslipinaemia) for metabolic disturbances were significantly higher in PCOS than in non-PCOS groups. Using multivariate logistic regression, central obesity and FAI were risk factors, while SHBG was a protective factor on the occurrence of Mets and IR in PCOS women (OR: 1.132, 1.105 and 0.995). Conclusions The risk factors of the metabolic syndrome and insulin resistance were BMI and FAI for PCOS women, respectively. The decrease of SHBG level was also a risk factor for insulin resistance in both PCOS and metabolic disturbance. PMID:25223276

  9. Regulation of Adaptive Immunity in Health and Disease by Cholesterol Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Fessler, Michael B

    2015-08-01

    Four decades ago, it was observed that stimulation of T cells induces rapid changes in cellular cholesterol that are required before proliferation can commence. Investigators returning to this phenomenon have finally revealed its molecular underpinnings. Cholesterol trafficking and its dysregulation are now also recognized to strongly influence dendritic cell function, T cell polarization, and antibody responses. In this review, the state of the literature is reviewed on how cholesterol and its trafficking regulate the cells of the adaptive immune response and in vivo disease phenotypes of dysregulated adaptive immunity, including allergy, asthma, and autoimmune disease. Emerging evidence supporting a potential role for statins and other lipid-targeted therapies in the treatment of these diseases is presented. Just as vascular biologists have embraced immunity in the pathogenesis and treatment of atherosclerosis, so should basic and clinical immunologists in allergy, pulmonology, and other disciplines seek to encompass a basic understanding of lipid science. PMID:26149587

  10. Regulation of Adaptive Immunity in Health and Disease by Cholesterol Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Fessler, Michael B.

    2015-01-01

    Four decades ago, it was observed that stimulation of T cells induces rapid changes in cellular cholesterol that are required before proliferation can commence. Investigators returning to this phenomenon have finally revealed its molecular underpinnings. Cholesterol trafficking and its dysregulation are now also recognized to strongly influence dendritic cell function, T cell polarization, and antibody responses. In this review, the state of the literature is reviewed on how cholesterol and its trafficking regulate the cells of the adaptive immune response and in vivo disease phenotypes of dysregulated adaptive immunity, including allergy, asthma, and autoimmune disease. Emerging evidence supporting a potential role for statins and other lipid-targeted therapies in the treatment of these diseases is presented. Just as vascular biologists have embraced immunity in the pathogenesis and treatment of atherosclerosis, so should basic and clinical immunologists in allergy, pulmonology, and other disciplines seek to encompass a basic understanding of lipid science. PMID:26149587

  11. Selective oxidative stress and cholesterol metabolism in lipid-metabolizing cell classes: Distinct regulatory roles for pro-oxidants and antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Rosenblat, Mira; Volkova, Nina; Aviram, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Atherogenesis is associated with macrophage cholesterol and oxidized lipids accumulation and foam cell formation. However, two other major lipid-metabolizing cell classes, namely intestinal and liver cells, are also associated with atherogenesis. This study demonstrates that manipulations of cellular oxidative stress (by fatty acids, glucose, low-density lipoprotein, angiotensin II, polyphenolic antioxidants, or the glutathione/paraoxonase 1 systems) have some similar, but also some different effects on cholesterol metabolism in macrophages (J774A.1) versus intestinal cells (HT-29) versus liver cells (HuH7). Cellular oxidative stress was ≈3.5-folds higher in both intestinal and liver cells versus macrophages. In intestinal cells or liver cells versus macrophages, the cholesterol biosynthesis rate was increased by 9- or 15-fold, respectively. In both macrophages and intestinal cells C-18:1 and C-18:2 but not C-18:0, fatty acids significantly increased oxidative stress, whereas in liver cells oxidative stress was significantly decreased by all three fatty acids. In liver cells, trans C-18:1 versus cis C-18:1, unlike intestinal cells or macrophages, significantly increased cellular oxidative stress and cellular cholesterol biosynthesis rate. Pomegranate juice (PJ), red wine, or their phenolics gallic acids or quercetin significantly reduced cellular oxidation mostly in macrophages. Recombinant PON1 significantly decreased macrophage (but not the other cells) oxidative stress by ≈30%. We conclude that cellular atherogenesis research should look at atherogenicity, not only in macrophages but also in intestinal and liver cells, to advance our understanding of the complicated mechanisms behind atherogenesis. © 2015 BioFactors, 41(4):273-288, 2015. PMID:26228307

  12. A diet-sensitive BAF60a-mediated pathway links hepatic bile acid metabolism to cholesterol absorption and atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Zhuo-Xian; Wang, Lin; Chang, Lin; Sun, Jingxia; Bao, Jiangyin; Li, Yaqiang; Chen, Y. Eugene; Lin, Jiandie D.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Dietary nutrients interact with gene networks to orchestrate adaptive responses during metabolic stress. Here we identify Baf60a as a diet-sensitive subunit of the SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling complexes in the mouse liver that links the consumption of fat- and cholesterol-rich diet to elevated plasma cholesterol levels. Baf60a expression was elevated in the liver following feeding with a western diet. Hepatocyte-specific inactivation of Baf60a reduced bile acid production and cholesterol absorption, and attenuated diet-induced hypercholesterolemia and atherosclerosis in mice. Baf60a stimulates expression of genes involved in bile acid synthesis, modification, and transport through a CAR/Baf60a feedforward regulatory loop. Baf60a is required for the recruitment of the SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling complexes to facilitate an activating epigenetic switch on target genes. These studies elucidate a regulatory pathway that mediates the hyperlipidemic and atherogenic effects of western diet consumption. PMID:26586440

  13. Differences in X-Chromosome Transcriptional Activity and Cholesterol Metabolism between Placentae from Swine Breeds from Asian and Western Origins

    PubMed Central

    Bischoff, Steve R.; Tsai, Shengdar Q.; Hardison, Nicholas E.; Motsinger-Reif, Alison A.; Freking, Bradley A.; Nonneman, Dan J.; Rohrer, Gary A.; Piedrahita, Jorge A.

    2013-01-01

    To gain insight into differences in placental physiology between two swine breeds noted for their dissimilar reproductive performance, that is, the Chinese Meishan and white composite (WC), we examined gene expression profiles of placental tissues collected at 25, 45, 65, 85, and 105 days of gestation by microarrays. Using a linear mixed model, a total of 1,595 differentially expressed genes were identified between the two pig breeds using a false-discovery rate q-value ≤0.05. Among these genes, we identified breed-specific isoforms of XIST, a long non-coding RNA responsible X-chromosome dosage compensation in females. Additionally, we explored the interaction of placental gene expression and chromosomal location by DIGMAP and identified three Sus scrofa X chromosomal bands (Xq13, Xq21, Xp11) that represent transcriptionally active clusters that differ between Meishan and WC during placental development. Also, pathway analysis identified fundamental breed differences in placental cholesterol trafficking and its synthesis. Direct measurement of cholesterol confirmed that the cholesterol content was significantly higher in the Meishan versus WC placentae. Taken together, this work identifies key metabolic pathways that differ in the placentae of two swine breeds noted for differences in reproductive prolificacy. PMID:23383161

  14. A Diet-Sensitive BAF60a-Mediated Pathway Links Hepatic Bile Acid Metabolism to Cholesterol Absorption and Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Meng, Zhuo-Xian; Wang, Lin; Chang, Lin; Sun, Jingxia; Bao, Jiangyin; Li, Yaqiang; Chen, Y Eugene; Lin, Jiandie D

    2015-11-24

    Dietary nutrients interact with gene networks to orchestrate adaptive responses during metabolic stress. Here, we identify Baf60a as a diet-sensitive subunit of the SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling complexes in the mouse liver that links the consumption of fat- and cholesterol-rich diet to elevated plasma cholesterol levels. Baf60a expression was elevated in the liver following feeding with a western diet. Hepatocyte-specific inactivation of Baf60a reduced bile acid production and cholesterol absorption, and attenuated diet-induced hypercholesterolemia and atherosclerosis in mice. Baf60a stimulates expression of genes involved in bile acid synthesis, modification, and transport through a CAR/Baf60a feedforward regulatory loop. Baf60a is required for the recruitment of the SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling complexes to facilitate an activating epigenetic switch on target genes. These studies elucidate a regulatory pathway that mediates the hyperlipidemic and atherogenic effects of western diet consumption. PMID:26586440

  15. Teneligliptin improves metabolic abnormalities in a mouse model of postmenopausal obesity.

    PubMed

    Sameshima, Azusa; Wada, Tsutomu; Ito, Tetsuo; Kashimura, Ayaka; Sawakawa, Kanae; Yonezawa, Rika; Tsuneki, Hiroshi; Ishii, Yoko; Sasahara, Masakiyo; Saito, Shigeru; Sasaoka, Toshiyasu

    2015-10-01

    A decrease in serum estrogen levels in menopause is closely associated with the development of visceral obesity and the onset of type 2 diabetes in women. In the present study, we demonstrated the therapeutic effects of the novel DPP4 inhibitor, teneligliptin, on the features of postmenopausal obesity in mice. In the control group, female C57BL/6 mice were sham-operated and maintained on a standard diet. In the postmenopausal obese group, ovariectomized (OVX) mice were maintained on a high-fat diet, and were referred to as OVX-HF. In the treated group, teneligliptin at 60 mg/kg per day was administrated to OVX-HF, and were referred to as Tene. After a 12-week food challenge, the metabolic phenotypes of these mice were analyzed. Body weight, fat accumulation, and glucose intolerance were greater in OVX-HF than in control, while these abnormalities were markedly improved without alterations in calorie intake in Tene. Teneligliptin effectively ameliorated the characteristics of metabolic abnormalities associated with postmenopausal obesity. Regarding chronic inflammation in visceral adipose tissue, the numbers of F4/80(+)CD11c(+)CD206(-) M1-macrophages in flow cytometry, crown-like structure formation in immunohistochemistry, and proinflammatory cytokine expression were significantly attenuated in Tene. Hepatic steatosis was also markedly improved. Furthermore, decreased energy consumption in the dark and light phases, reduced locomotor activity in the dark phase, and lowered core body temperature in OVX-HF were ameliorated in Tene. Since obesity and reduced energy metabolism are a common physiology of menopause, teneligliptin appears to be beneficial as a treatment for type 2 diabetes in postmenopausal obesity. PMID:26264980

  16. Targeting the NLRP3 Inflammasome to Reduce Diet-Induced Metabolic Abnormalities in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chiazza, Fausto; Couturier-Maillard, Aurélie; Benetti, Elisa; Mastrocola, Raffaella; Nigro, Debora; Cutrin, Juan C; Serpe, Loredana; Aragno, Manuela; Fantozzi, Roberto; Ryffel, Bernard; Collino, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Although the molecular links underlying the causative relationship between chronic low-grade inflammation and insulin resistance are not completely understood, compelling evidence suggests a pivotal role of the nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain (NOD)-like receptor pyrin domain containing 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome. Here we tested the hypothesis that either a selective pharmacological inhibition or a genetic downregulation of the NLRP3 inflammasome results in reduction of the diet-induced metabolic alterations. Male C57/BL6 wild-type mice and NLRP3−/− littermates were fed control diet or high-fat, high-fructose diet (HD). A subgroup of HD-fed wild-type mice was treated with the NLRP3 inflammasome inhibitor BAY 11-7082 (3 mg/kg intraperitoneally [IP]). HD feeding increased plasma and hepatic lipids and impaired glucose homeostasis and renal function. Renal and hepatic injury was associated with robust increases in profibrogenic markers, while only minimal fibrosis was recorded. None of these metabolic abnormalities were detected in HD-fed NLRP3−/− mice, and they were dramatically reduced in HD-mice treated with the NLRP3 inflammasome inhibitor. BAY 11-7082 also attenuated the diet-induced increase in NLRP3 inflammasome expression, resulting in inhibition of caspase-1 activation and interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-18 production (in liver and kidney). Interestingly, BAY 11-7082, but not gene silencing, inhibited nuclear factor (NF)-κB nuclear translocation. Overall, these results demonstrate that the selective pharmacological modulation of the NLRP3 inflammasome attenuates the metabolic abnormalities and the related organ injury/dysfunction caused by chronic exposure to HD, with effects similar to those obtained by NLRP3 gene silencing. PMID:26623925

  17. Studies of a Ring-Cleaving Dioxygenase Illuminate the Role of Cholesterol Metabolism in the Pathogenesis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Haizhong; Wang, Jian-Xin; Snieckus, Victor; Ly, Lan H.; Converse, Paul J.; Jacobs, William R.; Strynadka, Natalie; Eltis, Lindsay D.

    2009-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the etiological agent of TB, possesses a cholesterol catabolic pathway implicated in pathogenesis. This pathway includes an iron-dependent extradiol dioxygenase, HsaC, that cleaves catechols. Immuno-compromised mice infected with a ΔhsaC mutant of M. tuberculosis H37Rv survived 50% longer than mice infected with the wild-type strain. In guinea pigs, the mutant disseminated more slowly to the spleen, persisted less successfully in the lung, and caused little pathology. These data establish that, while cholesterol metabolism by M. tuberculosis appears to be most important during the chronic stage of infection, it begins much earlier and may contribute to the pathogen's dissemination within the host. Purified HsaC efficiently cleaved the catecholic cholesterol metabolite, DHSA (3,4-dihydroxy-9,10-seconandrost-1,3,5(10)-triene-9,17-dione; kcat/Km = 14.4±0.5 µM−1 s−1), and was inactivated by a halogenated substrate analogue (partition coefficient<50). Remarkably, cholesterol caused loss of viability in the ΔhsaC mutant, consistent with catechol toxicity. Structures of HsaC:DHSA binary complexes at 2.1 Å revealed two catechol-binding modes: bidentate binding to the active site iron, as has been reported in similar enzymes, and, unexpectedly, monodentate binding. The position of the bicyclo-alkanone moiety of DHSA was very similar in the two binding modes, suggesting that this interaction is a determinant in the initial substrate-binding event. These data provide insights into the binding of catechols by extradiol dioxygenases and facilitate inhibitor design. PMID:19300498

  18. Synergic hypocholesterolaemic effect of n-3 PUFA and oestrogen by modulation of hepatic cholesterol metabolism in female rats.

    PubMed

    Oh, Yuna; Jin, Youri; Park, Yongsoon

    2015-12-14

    n-3 PUFA such as EPA and DHA as well as oestrogen have been reported to decrease blood levels of cholesterol, but their underlying mechanism is unclear. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of the combination of n-3 PUFA supplementation and oestrogen injection on hepatic cholesterol metabolism. Rats were fed a modified AIN-93G diet with 0, 1 or 2 % n-3 PUFA (EPA+DHA) relative to the total energy intake for 12 weeks. Rats were surgically ovariectomised at week 8, and, after 1-week recovery, rats were injected with 17β-oestradiol-3-benzoate (E2) or maize oil for the last 3 weeks. Supplementation with n-3 PUFA and E2 injection significantly increased the ratio of the hepatic expression of phosphorylated AMP activated protein kinase (p-AMPK):AMP activated protein kinase (AMPK) and decreased sterol regulatory element-binding protein-2, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase and proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9. Supplementation with n-3 PUFA increased hepatic expression of cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase (CYP7A1), sterol 12α-hydroxylase (CYP8B1) and sterol 27-hydroxylase (CYP27A1); however, E2 injection decreased CYP7A1 and CYP8B1 but not CYP27A1. Additionally, E2 injection increased hepatic expression of oestrogen receptor-α and β. In conclusion, n-3 PUFA supplementation and E2 injection had synergic hypocholesterolaemic effects by down-regulating hepatic cholesterol synthesis (n-3 PUFA and oestrogen) and up-regulating bile acid synthesis (n-3 PUFA) in ovariectomised rats. PMID:26388416

  19. Metabolic abnormalities and hypoleptinemia in α-synuclein A53T mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Rothman, Sarah M; Griffioen, Kathleen J; Fishbein, Kenneth W; Spencer, Richard G; Makrogiannis, Sokratis; Cong, Wei-Na; Martin, Bronwen; Mattson, Mark P

    2014-05-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) patients frequently display loss of body fat mass and increased energy expenditure, and several studies have outlined a relationship between these metabolic abnormalities and disease severity, yet energy metabolism is largely unstudied in mouse models of PD. Here we characterize metabolic and physiologic responses to a high calorie diet (HCD) in mice expressing in neurons a mutant form of human α-synuclein (A53T) that causes dominantly inherited familial forms of the disease. A53T (SNCA) and wild type (WT) littermate mice were placed on a HCD for 12 weeks and evaluated for weight gain, food intake, body fat, blood plasma leptin, hunger, glucose tolerance, and energy expenditure. Results were compared with both SNCA and WT mice on a control diet. Despite consuming similar amounts of food, WT mice gained up to 66% of their original body weight on a HCD, whereas SNCA mice gained only 17%. Further, after 12 weeks on a HCD, magnetic resonance imaging analysis revealed that WT mice had significantly greater total and visceral body fat compared with SNCA mice (p < 0.007). At the age of 24 weeks SNCA mice displayed significantly increased hunger compared with WT (p < 0.03). At the age of 36 weeks, SNCA mice displayed significant hypoleptinemia compared with WT, both on a normal diet and a HCD (p < 0.03). The HCD induced insulin insensitivity in WT, but not SNCA mice, as indicated by an oral glucose tolerance test. Finally, SNCA mice displayed greater energy expenditure compared with WT, as measured in a Comprehensive Laboratory Animal Monitoring System, after 12 weeks on a HCD. Thus, SNCA mice are resistant to HCD-induced obesity and insulin resistance and display reduced body fat, increased hunger, hypoleptinemia and increased energy expenditure. Our findings reveal a profile of metabolic dysfunction in a mouse model of PD that is similar to that of human PD patients, thus providing evidence that α-synuclein pathology is sufficient to drive such

  20. Streptococcal serum opacity factor promotes cholesterol ester metabolism and bile acid secretion in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Gillard, Baiba K; Rodriguez, Perla J; Fields, David W; Raya, Joe L; Lagor, William R; Rosales, Corina; Courtney, Harry S; Gotto, Antonio M; Pownall, Henry J

    2016-03-01

    Plasma high density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) concentrations negatively correlate with atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. HDL is thought to have several atheroprotective functions, which are likely distinct from the epidemiological inverse relationship between HDL-C levels and risk. Specifically, strategies that reduce HDL-C while promoting reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) may have therapeutic value. The major product of the serum opacity factor (SOF) reaction versus HDL is a cholesteryl ester (CE)-rich microemulsion (CERM), which contains apo E and the CE of ~400,000 HDL particles. Huh7 hepatocytes take up CE faster when delivered as CERM than as HDL, in part via the LDL-receptor (LDLR). Here we compared the final RCT step, hepatic uptake and subsequent intracellular processing to cholesterol and bile salts for radiolabeled HDL-, CERM- and LDL-CE by Huh7 cells and in vivo in C57BL/6J mice. In Huh7 cells, uptake from LDL was greater than from CERM (2-4X) and HDL (5-10X). Halftimes for [(14)C]CE hydrolysis were 3.0±0.2, 4.4±0.6 and 5.4±0.7h respectively for HDL, CERM and LDL-CE. The fraction of sterols secreted as bile acids was ~50% by 8h for all three particles. HDL, CERM and LDL-CE metabolism in mice showed efficient plasma clearance of CERM-CE, liver uptake and metabolism, and secretion as bile acids into the gall bladder. This work supports the therapeutic potential of the SOF reaction, which diverts HDL-CE to the LDLR, thereby increasing hepatic CE uptake, and sterol disposal as bile acids. PMID:26709142

  1. Prolonged sleep restriction induces changes in pathways involved in cholesterol metabolism and inflammatory responses

    PubMed Central

    Aho, Vilma; Ollila, Hanna M.; Kronholm, Erkki; Bondia-Pons, Isabel; Soininen, Pasi; Kangas, Antti J.; Hilvo, Mika; Seppälä, Ilkka; Kettunen, Johannes; Oikonen, Mervi; Raitoharju, Emma; Hyötyläinen, Tuulia; Kähönen, Mika; Viikari, Jorma S.A.; Härmä, Mikko; Sallinen, Mikael; Olkkonen, Vesa M.; Alenius, Harri; Jauhiainen, Matti; Paunio, Tiina; Lehtimäki, Terho; Salomaa, Veikko; Orešič, Matej; Raitakari, Olli T.; Ala-Korpela, Mika; Porkka-Heiskanen, Tarja

    2016-01-01

    Sleep loss and insufficient sleep are risk factors for cardiometabolic diseases, but data on how insufficient sleep contributes to these diseases are scarce. These questions were addressed using two approaches: an experimental, partial sleep restriction study (14 cases and 7 control subjects) with objective verification of sleep amount, and two independent epidemiological cohorts (altogether 2739 individuals) with questions of sleep insufficiency. In both approaches, blood transcriptome and serum metabolome were analysed. Sleep loss decreased the expression of genes encoding cholesterol transporters and increased expression in pathways involved in inflammatory responses in both paradigms. Metabolomic analyses revealed lower circulating large HDL in the population cohorts among subjects reporting insufficient sleep, while circulating LDL decreased in the experimental sleep restriction study. These findings suggest that prolonged sleep deprivation modifies inflammatory and cholesterol pathways at the level of gene expression and serum lipoproteins, inducing changes toward potentially higher risk for cardiometabolic diseases. PMID:27102866

  2. Prolonged sleep restriction induces changes in pathways involved in cholesterol metabolism and inflammatory responses.

    PubMed

    Aho, Vilma; Ollila, Hanna M; Kronholm, Erkki; Bondia-Pons, Isabel; Soininen, Pasi; Kangas, Antti J; Hilvo, Mika; Seppälä, Ilkka; Kettunen, Johannes; Oikonen, Mervi; Raitoharju, Emma; Hyötyläinen, Tuulia; Kähönen, Mika; Viikari, Jorma S A; Härmä, Mikko; Sallinen, Mikael; Olkkonen, Vesa M; Alenius, Harri; Jauhiainen, Matti; Paunio, Tiina; Lehtimäki, Terho; Salomaa, Veikko; Orešič, Matej; Raitakari, Olli T; Ala-Korpela, Mika; Porkka-Heiskanen, Tarja

    2016-01-01

    Sleep loss and insufficient sleep are risk factors for cardiometabolic diseases, but data on how insufficient sleep contributes to these diseases are scarce. These questions were addressed using two approaches: an experimental, partial sleep restriction study (14 cases and 7 control subjects) with objective verification of sleep amount, and two independent epidemiological cohorts (altogether 2739 individuals) with questions of sleep insufficiency. In both approaches, blood transcriptome and serum metabolome were analysed. Sleep loss decreased the expression of genes encoding cholesterol transporters and increased expression in pathways involved in inflammatory responses in both paradigms. Metabolomic analyses revealed lower circulating large HDL in the population cohorts among subjects reporting insufficient sleep, while circulating LDL decreased in the experimental sleep restriction study. These findings suggest that prolonged sleep deprivation modifies inflammatory and cholesterol pathways at the level of gene expression and serum lipoproteins, inducing changes toward potentially higher risk for cardiometabolic diseases. PMID:27102866

  3. Investigation on Abnormal Iron Metabolism and Related Inflammation in Parkinson Disease Patients with Probable RBD

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yang; Yu, Shu-Yang; Zuo, Li-Jun; Piao, Ying-Shan; Cao, Chen-Jie; Wang, Fang; Chen, Ze-Jie; Du, Yang; Lian, Teng-Hong; Liu, Gai-Fen; Wang, Ya-Jie; Chan, Piu; Chen, Sheng-Di; Wang, Xiao-Min; Zhang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate potential mechanisms involving abnormal iron metabolism and related inflammation in Parkinson disease (PD) patients with probable rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder (PRBD). Methods Total 210 PD patients and 31 controls were consecutively recruited. PD patients were evaluated by RBD Screening Questionnaire (RBDSQ) and classified into PRBD and probable no RBD (NPRBD) groups. Demographics information were recorded and clinical symptoms were evaluated by series of rating scales. Levels of iron and related proteins and inflammatory factors in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and serum were detected. Comparisons among control, NPRBD and PRBD groups and correlation analyses between RBDSQ score and levels of above factors were performed. Results (1)The frequency of PRBD in PD patients is 31.90%. (2)PRBD group has longer disease duration, more advanced disease stage, severer motor symptoms and more non-motor symptoms than NPRBD group. (3)In CSF, levels of iron, transferrin, NO and IL–1β in PRBD group are prominently increased. RBDSQ score is positively correlated with the levels of iron, transferrin, NO and IL–1β in PD group. Iron level is positively correlated with the levels of NO and IL–1β in PD group. (4)In serum, transferrin level is prominently decreased in PRBD group. PGE2 level in PRBD group is drastically enhanced. RBDSQ score exhibits a positive correlation with PGE2 level in PD group. Conclusions PRBD is common in PD patients. PRBD group has severer motor symptoms and more non-motor symptoms. Excessive iron in brain resulted from abnormal iron metabolism in central and peripheral systems is correlated with PRBD through neuroinflammation. PMID:26431210

  4. Abnormal transsulfuration metabolism and reduced antioxidant capacity in Chinese children with autism spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Han, Yu; Xi, Qian-qian; Dai, Wei; Yang, Shu-han; Gao, Lei; Su, Yuan-yuan; Zhang, Xin

    2015-11-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a neurological disorder that presents a spectrum of qualitative impairments in social interaction, communication, as well as restricted and stereotyped behavioral patterns, interests, and activities. Several studies have suggested that the etiology of ASD can be partly explained by oxidative stress. However, the implications of abnormal transsulfuration metabolism and oxidative stress, and their relation with ASD are still unclear. The purpose of this study was to evaluate several transsulfuration pathway metabolites in Chinese participants diagnosed with ASD, to better understand their role in the etiology of this disorder. Fifty children (39 male, 11 female) diagnosed with ASD and 50 age- and gender-matched non-ASD children (i.e., control group) were included in this study. This prospective blinded study was undertaken to assess transsulfuration and oxidative metabolites, including levels of homocysteine (Hcy), cysteine (Cys), total glutathione (tGSH), reduced glutathione (GSH), oxidized glutathione (GSSG), and glutathione ratio (GSH/GSSG). The clinical severity of ASD was evaluated with the Childhood Autism Rating Scale (CARS), and the autistic children's present behavior was measured by the Autism Behavior Checklist (ABC). The results indicated that Hcy and GSSG levels were significantly higher in children diagnosed with ASD, Cys, tGSH and GSH levels as well as the GSH/GSSG ratio showed remarkably lower values in ASD children compared to control subjects. Hcy levels correlated significantly with increasing CARS scores and GSSG levels in children with ASD. Our results suggest that an abnormal transsulfuration metabolism and reduced antioxidant capacity (i.e., hyperhomocysteinemia and increased oxidative stress), and Hcy level appears to have a potentially negative impact on clinical severity of autistic disorder. PMID:26150135

  5. TRAMP Prostate Tumor Growth Is Slowed by Walnut Diets Through Altered IGF-1 Levels, Energy Pathways, and Cholesterol Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyunsook; Yokoyama, Wallace

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Dietary changes could potentially reduce prostate cancer morbidity and mortality. Transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate (TRAMP) prostate tumor responses to a 100 g of fat/kg diet (whole walnuts, walnut oil, and other oils; balanced for macronutrients, tocopherols [α-and γ]) for 18 weeks ad libitum were assessed. TRAMP mice (n=17 per group) were fed diets with 100 g fat from either whole walnuts (diet group WW), walnut-like fat (diet group WLF, oils blended to match walnut's fatty acid profile), or as walnut oil (diet group WO, pressed from the same walnuts as WW). Fasted plasma glucose was from tail vein blood, blood was obtained by cardiac puncture, and plasma stored frozen until analysis. Prostate (genitourinary intact [GUI]) was weighed and stored frozen at −80°C. Plasma triglyceride, lipoprotein cholesterol, plasma multianalyte levels (Myriad RBM Rat Metabolic MAP), prostate (GUI), tissue metabolites (Metabolon, Inc., Durham, NC, USA), and mRNA (by Illumina NGS) were determined. The prostate tumor size, plasma insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), high density lipoprotein, and total cholesterol all decreased significantly (P<.05) in both WW and WO compared to WLF. Both WW and WO versus WLF showed increased insulin sensitivity (Homeostasis Model Assessment [HOMA]), and tissue metabolomics found reduced glucose-6-phosphate, succinylcarnitine, and 4-hydroxybutyrate in these groups suggesting effects on cellular energy status. Tissue mRNA levels also showed changes suggestive of altered glucose metabolism with WW and WO diet groups having increased PCK1 and CIDEC mRNA expression, known for their roles in gluconeogenesis and increased insulin sensitivity, respectively. WW and WO group tissues also had increased MSMB mRNa a tumor suppressor and decreased COX-2 mRNA, both reported to inhibit prostate tumor growth. Walnuts reduced prostate tumor growth by affecting energy metabolism along with decreased plasma IGF-1 and cholesterol. These

  6. TRAMP prostate tumor growth is slowed by walnut diets through altered IGF-1 levels, energy pathways, and cholesterol metabolism.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyunsook; Yokoyama, Wallace; Davis, Paul Andrew

    2014-12-01

    Dietary changes could potentially reduce prostate cancer morbidity and mortality. Transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate (TRAMP) prostate tumor responses to a 100 g of fat/kg diet (whole walnuts, walnut oil, and other oils; balanced for macronutrients, tocopherols [α-and γ]) for 18 weeks ad libitum were assessed. TRAMP mice (n=17 per group) were fed diets with 100 g fat from either whole walnuts (diet group WW), walnut-like fat (diet group WLF, oils blended to match walnut's fatty acid profile), or as walnut oil (diet group WO, pressed from the same walnuts as WW). Fasted plasma glucose was from tail vein blood, blood was obtained by cardiac puncture, and plasma stored frozen until analysis. Prostate (genitourinary intact [GUI]) was weighed and stored frozen at -80°C. Plasma triglyceride, lipoprotein cholesterol, plasma multianalyte levels (Myriad RBM Rat Metabolic MAP), prostate (GUI), tissue metabolites (Metabolon, Inc., Durham, NC, USA), and mRNA (by Illumina NGS) were determined. The prostate tumor size, plasma insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), high density lipoprotein, and total cholesterol all decreased significantly (P<.05) in both WW and WO compared to WLF. Both WW and WO versus WLF showed increased insulin sensitivity (Homeostasis Model Assessment [HOMA]), and tissue metabolomics found reduced glucose-6-phosphate, succinylcarnitine, and 4-hydroxybutyrate in these groups suggesting effects on cellular energy status. Tissue mRNA levels also showed changes suggestive of altered glucose metabolism with WW and WO diet groups having increased PCK1 and CIDEC mRNA expression, known for their roles in gluconeogenesis and increased insulin sensitivity, respectively. WW and WO group tissues also had increased MSMB mRNa a tumor suppressor and decreased COX-2 mRNA, both reported to inhibit prostate tumor growth. Walnuts reduced prostate tumor growth by affecting energy metabolism along with decreased plasma IGF-1 and cholesterol. These effects are

  7. Abnormal Glucose Tolerance Is Associated with a Reduced Myocardial Metabolic Flexibility in Patients with Dilated Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Tricò, Domenico; Baldi, Simona; Frascerra, Silvia; Venturi, Elena; Marraccini, Paolo; Neglia, Danilo; Natali, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is characterized by a metabolic shift from fat to carbohydrates and failure to increase myocardial glucose uptake in response to workload increments. We verified whether this pattern is influenced by an abnormal glucose tolerance (AGT). In 10 patients with DCM, 5 with normal glucose tolerance (DCM-NGT) and 5 with AGT (DCM-AGT), and 5 non-DCM subjects with AGT (N-AGT), we measured coronary blood flow and arteriovenous differences of oxygen and metabolites during Rest, Pacing (at 130 b/min), and Recovery. Myocardial lactate exchange and oleate oxidation were also measured. At Rest, DCM patients showed a reduced nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA) myocardial uptake, while glucose utilization increased only in DCM-AGT. In response to Pacing, glucose uptake promptly rose in N-AGT (from 72 ± 21 to 234 ± 73 nmol/min/g, p < 0.05), did not change in DCM-AGT, and slowly increased in DCM-NGT. DCM-AGT sustained the extra workload by increasing NEFA oxidation (from 1.3 ± 0.2 to 2.9 ± 0.1 μmol/min/gO2 equivalents, p < 0.05), while DCM-NGT showed a delayed increase in glucose uptake. Substrate oxidation rates paralleled the metabolites data. The presence of AGT in patients with DCM exacerbates both the shift from fat to carbohydrates in resting myocardial metabolism and the reduced myocardial metabolic flexibility in response to an increased workload. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrial.gov NCT02440217. PMID:26798650

  8. Abnormal Glucose Tolerance Is Associated with a Reduced Myocardial Metabolic Flexibility in Patients with Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Tricò, Domenico; Baldi, Simona; Frascerra, Silvia; Venturi, Elena; Marraccini, Paolo; Neglia, Danilo; Natali, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is characterized by a metabolic shift from fat to carbohydrates and failure to increase myocardial glucose uptake in response to workload increments. We verified whether this pattern is influenced by an abnormal glucose tolerance (AGT). In 10 patients with DCM, 5 with normal glucose tolerance (DCM-NGT) and 5 with AGT (DCM-AGT), and 5 non-DCM subjects with AGT (N-AGT), we measured coronary blood flow and arteriovenous differences of oxygen and metabolites during Rest, Pacing (at 130 b/min), and Recovery. Myocardial lactate exchange and oleate oxidation were also measured. At Rest, DCM patients showed a reduced nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA) myocardial uptake, while glucose utilization increased only in DCM-AGT. In response to Pacing, glucose uptake promptly rose in N-AGT (from 72 ± 21 to 234 ± 73 nmol/min/g, p < 0.05), did not change in DCM-AGT, and slowly increased in DCM-NGT. DCM-AGT sustained the extra workload by increasing NEFA oxidation (from 1.3 ± 0.2 to 2.9 ± 0.1 μmol/min/gO2 equivalents, p < 0.05), while DCM-NGT showed a delayed increase in glucose uptake. Substrate oxidation rates paralleled the metabolites data. The presence of AGT in patients with DCM exacerbates both the shift from fat to carbohydrates in resting myocardial metabolism and the reduced myocardial metabolic flexibility in response to an increased workload. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrial.gov NCT02440217. PMID:26798650

  9. Kinetic assessment and therapeutic modulation of metabolic and inflammatory profiles in mice on a high-fat and cholesterol diet.

    PubMed

    Engstrom, Laura W; Bober, Loretta; Chen, Shu-Cheng; Fine, Jay S; Li, Ying; Stanton, Michaela C; Kinsley, David; Cui, Long; Jackson, James V; Rojas-Triana, Alberto; Lundell, Daniel; Laverty, Maureen; Gustafson, Eric L; Jenh, Chung-Her; Kowalski, Timothy J; Manfra, Denise J

    2010-01-01

    The kinetics of metabolic and inflammatory parameters associated with obesity were evaluated in a murine diet-induced obesity (DIO) model using a diet high in fat and cholesterol. Cellular infiltration and mediator production were assessed and shown to be therapeutically modulated by the PPARgamma agonist rosiglitazone. C57BL/6 mice were maintained on a 45% fat/ 0.12% cholesterol (HF/CH) or Chow diet for 3, 6, 16, or 27 weeks. Flow cytometry was employed to monitor peripheral blood monocytes and adipose tissue macrophages (ATM). Gene expression and protein analysis methods were used to evaluate mediator production from total epididymal fat (EF), stromal vascular fraction (SVF), and sorted SVF cells. To investigate therapeutic intervention, mice were fed a HF/CH diet for 12 weeks and then a diet formulated with rosiglitazone (5 mg/kg) for an additional 6 weeks. A HF/CH diet correlated with obesity and a dramatic proinflammatory state. Therapeutic intervention with rosiglitazone attenuated the HF/CH induced inflammation. In addition, a novel population was found that expressed the highest levels of the pro-inflammatory mediators CCL2 and IL-6. PMID:20445733

  10. Kinetic Assessment and Therapeutic Modulation of Metabolic and Inflammatory Profiles in Mice on a High-Fat and Cholesterol Diet

    PubMed Central

    Engstrom, Laura W.; Bober, Loretta; Chen, Shu-Cheng; Fine, Jay S.; Li, Ying; Stanton, Michaela C.; Kinsley, David; Cui, Long; Jackson, James V.; Rojas-Triana, Alberto; Lundell, Daniel; Laverty, Maureen; Gustafson, Eric L.; Jenh, Chung-Her; Kowalski, Timothy J.; Manfra, Denise J.

    2010-01-01

    The kinetics of metabolic and inflammatory parameters associated with obesity were evaluated in a murine diet-induced obesity (DIO) model using a diet high in fat and cholesterol. Cellular infiltration and mediator production were assessed and shown to be therapeutically modulated by the PPARgamma agonist rosiglitazone. C57BL/6 mice were maintained on a 45% fat/ 0.12% cholesterol (HF/CH) or Chow diet for 3, 6, 16, or 27 weeks. Flow cytometry was employed to monitor peripheral blood monocytes and adipose tissue macrophages (ATM). Gene expression and protein analysis methods were used to evaluate mediator production from total epididymal fat (EF), stromal vascular fraction (SVF), and sorted SVF cells. To investigate therapeutic intervention, mice were fed a HF/CH diet for 12 weeks and then a diet formulated with rosiglitazone (5 mg/kg) for an additional 6 weeks. A HF/CH diet correlated with obesity and a dramatic proinflammatory state. Therapeutic intervention with rosiglitazone attenuated the HF/CH induced inflammation. In addition, a novel population was found that expressed the highest levels of the pro-inflammatory mediators CCL2 and IL-6. PMID:20445733

  11. Sex Differences in Associations Among Obesity, Metabolic Abnormalities, and Chronic Kidney Disease in Japanese Men and Women

    PubMed Central

    Sakurai, Masaru; Kobayashi, Junji; Takeda, Yasuo; Nagasawa, Shin-Ya; Yamakawa, Junichi; Moriya, Junji; Mabuchi, Hiroshi; Nakagawa, Hideaki

    2016-01-01

    Aims The present study aimed to investigate relationships among abdominal obesity, metabolic abnormalities, and the prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in relatively lean Japanese men and women. Participants and methods The participants included 8133 men and 15 934 women between 40 and 75 years of age recruited from the government health check-up center in Kanazawa City, Japan. The prevalence of abdominal obesity, high blood pressure, dyslipidemia, and high fasting plasma glucose levels were assessed according to the Japanese criteria for metabolic syndrome. The estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was calculated using the modified Modification of Diet in Renal Disease equation for the Japanese population, and participants with an eGFR <60 mL/min/1.73 m2 and/or proteinuria were diagnosed with CKD. Results Overall, 23% of males and 14% of females met criteria for CKD. Having more numerous complicated metabolic abnormalities was significantly associated with a higher odds ratio (OR) of CKD for men and women, irrespective of abdominal obesity. However, there was a sex difference in the OR of CKD for obese participants without metabolic abnormalities, such that abdominal obesity without metabolic abnormalities was significantly associated with a higher OR for men (multivariate-adjusted OR 1.63; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.16–2.28) but not for women (OR 1.01; 95% CI, 0.71–1.44). Conclusions The present findings demonstrated that obesity without metabolic abnormalities was associated with a higher risk of CKD in men but not women in a relatively lean Japanese population. PMID:27087606

  12. Variation in the Phosphoinositide 3-Kinase Gamma Gene Affects Plasma HDL-Cholesterol without Modification of Metabolic or Inflammatory Markers

    PubMed Central

    Kächele, Martin; Hennige, Anita M.; Machann, Jürgen; Hieronimus, Anja; Lamprinou, Apostolia; Machicao, Fausto; Schick, Fritz; Fritsche, Andreas; Stefan, Norbert; Nürnberg, Bernd; Häring, Hans-Ulrich; Staiger, Harald

    2015-01-01

    via altered PIK3CG gene expression, determines plasma HDL-cholesterol concentrations. Since HDL2-, but not HDL3-, cholesterol is influenced by PIK3CG variants, PI3Kγ may play a role in HDL clearance rather than in HDL biogenesis. Even though the molecular pathways connecting PI3Kγ and HDL metabolism remain to be further elucidated, this finding could add a novel aspect to the pathophysiological role of PI3Kγ in atherogenesis. PMID:26658747

  13. In Vivo Effects of Free Form Astaxanthin Powder on Anti-Oxidation and Lipid Metabolism with High-Cholesterol Diet

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yung-Yi; Lee, Pei-Chi; Wu, Yi-Long; Liu, Li-Yun

    2015-01-01

    Astaxanthin extracted from Pomacea canaliculata eggs was made into free-form astaxanthin powder (FFAP) and its effects on lipid metabolism, liver function, antioxidants activities and astaxanthin absorption rate were investigated. 45 hamsters were split into 5 groups and fed with normal diet, high-cholesterol control (0.2% cholesterol), 1.6FFAP (control+1.6% FFAP), 3.2FFAP (control+3.2% FFAP) and 8.0FFAP (control+8.0% FFAP), respectively, for 6 weeks. FFAP diets significantly decreased the liver total cholesterol, triglyceride levels and increased liver fatty acids (C20:5n3; C22:6n3) compositions. It decreased plasma alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase. In terms of anti-oxidative activities, we found 8.0 FFAP diet significantly decreased plasma and liver malonaldehyde (4.96±1.96 μg TEP eq./mL and 1.56±0.38 μg TEP eq./g liver) and liver 8-isoprostane levels (41.48±13.69 μg 8-ISOP/g liver). On the other hand, it significantly increased liver catalase activity (149.10±10.76 μmol/min/g liver), Vitamin C (2082.97±142.23 μg/g liver), Vitamin E (411.32±81.67 μg/g liver) contents, and glutathione levels (2.13±0.42 mg GSH eq./g liver). Furthermore, 80% of astaxanthin absorption rates in all FFAP diet groups suggest FFAP is an effective form in astaxanthin absorption. Finally, astaxanthin was found to re-distribute to the liver and eyes in a dose dependent manner. Taken together, our results suggested that the appropriate addition of FFAP into high cholesterol diets increases liver anti-oxidative activity and reduces the concentration of lipid peroxidase and therefore, it may be beneficial as a material in developing healthy food. PMID:26262684

  14. Combined Effects of Rosuvastatin and Exercise on Gene Expression of Key Molecules Involved in Cholesterol Metabolism in Ovariectomized Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ngo Sock, Emilienne Tudor; Mayer, Gaétan; Lavoie, Jean-Marc

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of three weeks of rosuvastatin (Ros) treatment alone and in combination with voluntary training (Tr) on expression of genes involved in cholesterol metabolism (LDLR, PCSK9, LRP-1, SREBP-2, IDOL, ACAT-2 and HMGCR) in the liver of eight week-old ovariectomized (Ovx) rats. Sprague Dawley rats were Ovx or sham-operated (Sham) and kept sedentary for 8 weeks under a standard diet. Thereafter, rats were transferred for three weeks in running wheel cages for Tr or kept sedentary (Sed) with or without Ros treatment (5mg/kg/day). Six groups were formed: Sham-Sed treated with saline (Sal) or Ros (Sham-Sed-Sal; Sham-Sed-Ros), Ovx-Sed treated with Sal or Ros (Ovx-Sed-Sal; Ovx-Sed-Ros), Ovx trained treated with Sal or Ros (Ovx-Tr-Sal; Ovx-Tr-Ros). Ovx-Sed-Sal rats depicted higher (P < 0.05) body weight, plasma total cholesterol (TC) and LDL-C, and liver TC content compared to Sham-Sed-Sal rats. In contrast, mRNA levels of liver PCSK9, LDLR, LRP-1 as well as plasma PCSK9 concentrations and protein levels of LRP-1 were reduced (P < 0.01) in Ovx-Sed-Sal compared to Sham-Sed-Sal rats. However, protein levels of LDLR increased (P < 0.05) in Ovx-Sed-Sal compared to Sham-Sed-Sal rats. Treatment of Ovx rats with Ros increased (P < 0.05) mRNA and protein levels of LRP-1 and PCSK9 but not mRNA levels of LDLR, while its protein abundance was reduced at the level of Sham rats. As a result, plasma LDL-C was not reduced. Exercise alone did not affect the expression of any of these markers in Ovx rats. Overall, Ros treatment corrected Ovx-induced decrease in gene expression of markers of cholesterol metabolism in liver of Ovx rats, but without reducing plasma LDL-C concentrations. Increased plasma PCSK9 levels could be responsible for the reduction of liver LDLR protein abundance and the absence of reduction of plasma LDL-C after Ros treatment. PMID:27442011

  15. Agonistic Human Antibodies Binding to Lecithin-Cholesterol Acyltransferase Modulate High Density Lipoprotein Metabolism*

    PubMed Central

    Gunawardane, Ruwanthi N.; Fordstrom, Preston; Piper, Derek E.; Masterman, Stephanie; Siu, Sophia; Liu, Dongming; Brown, Mike; Lu, Mei; Tang, Jie; Zhang, Richard; Cheng, Janet; Gates, Andrew; Meininger, David; Chan, Joyce; Carlson, Tim; Walker, Nigel; Schwarz, Margrit; Delaney, John; Zhou, Mingyue

    2016-01-01

    Drug discovery opportunities where loss-of-function alleles of a target gene link to a disease-relevant phenotype often require an agonism approach to up-regulate or re-establish the activity of the target gene. Antibody therapy is increasingly recognized as a favored drug modality due to multiple desirable pharmacological properties. However, agonistic antibodies that enhance the activities of the target enzymes are rarely developed because the discovery of agonistic antibodies remains elusive. Here we report an innovative scheme of discovery and characterization of human antibodies capable of binding to and agonizing a circulating enzyme lecithin cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT). Utilizing a modified human LCAT protein with enhanced enzymatic activity as an immunogen, we generated fully human monoclonal antibodies using the XenoMouseTM platform. One of the resultant agonistic antibodies, 27C3, binds to and substantially enhances the activity of LCAT from humans and cynomolgus macaques. X-ray crystallographic analysis of the 2.45 Å LCAT-27C3 complex shows that 27C3 binding does not induce notable structural changes in LCAT. A single administration of 27C3 to cynomolgus monkeys led to a rapid increase of plasma LCAT enzymatic activity and a 35% increase of the high density lipoprotein cholesterol that was observed up to 32 days after 27C3 administration. Thus, this novel scheme of immunization in conjunction with high throughput screening may represent an effective strategy for discovering agonistic antibodies against other enzyme targets. 27C3 and other agonistic human anti-human LCAT monoclonal antibodies described herein hold potential for therapeutic development for the treatment of dyslipidemia and cardiovascular disease. PMID:26644477

  16. Agonistic Human Antibodies Binding to Lecithin-Cholesterol Acyltransferase Modulate High Density Lipoprotein Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Gunawardane, Ruwanthi N; Fordstrom, Preston; Piper, Derek E; Masterman, Stephanie; Siu, Sophia; Liu, Dongming; Brown, Mike; Lu, Mei; Tang, Jie; Zhang, Richard; Cheng, Janet; Gates, Andrew; Meininger, David; Chan, Joyce; Carlson, Tim; Walker, Nigel; Schwarz, Margrit; Delaney, John; Zhou, Mingyue

    2016-02-01

    Drug discovery opportunities where loss-of-function alleles of a target gene link to a disease-relevant phenotype often require an agonism approach to up-regulate or re-establish the activity of the target gene. Antibody therapy is increasingly recognized as a favored drug modality due to multiple desirable pharmacological properties. However, agonistic antibodies that enhance the activities of the target enzymes are rarely developed because the discovery of agonistic antibodies remains elusive. Here we report an innovative scheme of discovery and characterization of human antibodies capable of binding to and agonizing a circulating enzyme lecithin cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT). Utilizing a modified human LCAT protein with enhanced enzymatic activity as an immunogen, we generated fully human monoclonal antibodies using the XenoMouse(TM) platform. One of the resultant agonistic antibodies, 27C3, binds to and substantially enhances the activity of LCAT from humans and cynomolgus macaques. X-ray crystallographic analysis of the 2.45 Å LCAT-27C3 complex shows that 27C3 binding does not induce notable structural changes in LCAT. A single administration of 27C3 to cynomolgus monkeys led to a rapid increase of plasma LCAT enzymatic activity and a 35% increase of the high density lipoprotein cholesterol that was observed up to 32 days after 27C3 administration. Thus, this novel scheme of immunization in conjunction with high throughput screening may represent an effective strategy for discovering agonistic antibodies against other enzyme targets. 27C3 and other agonistic human anti-human LCAT monoclonal antibodies described herein hold potential for therapeutic development for the treatment of dyslipidemia and cardiovascular disease. PMID:26644477

  17. The non-psychoactive plant cannabinoid, cannabidiol affects cholesterol metabolism-related genes in microglial cells.

    PubMed

    Rimmerman, Neta; Juknat, Ana; Kozela, Ewa; Levy, Rivka; Bradshaw, Heather B; Vogel, Zvi

    2011-08-01

    Cannabidiol (CBD) is a non-psychoactive plant cannabinoid that is clinically used in a 1:1 mixture with the psychoactive cannabinoid Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) for the treatment of neuropathic pain and spasticity in multiple sclerosis. Our group previously reported that CBD exerts anti-inflammatory effects on microglial cells. In addition, we found that CBD treatment increases the accumulation of the endocannabinoid N-arachidonoyl ethanolamine (AEA), thus enhancing endocannabinoid signaling. Here we proceeded to investigate the effects of CBD on the modulation of lipid-related genes in microglial cells. Cell viability was tested using FACS analysis, AEA levels were measured using LC/MS/MS, gene array analysis was validated with real-time qPCR, and cytokine release was measured using ELISA. We report that CBD significantly upregulated the mRNAs of the enzymes sterol-O-acyl transferase (Soat2), which synthesizes cholesteryl esters, and of sterol 27-hydroxylase (Cyp27a1). In addition, CBD increased the mRNA of the lipid droplet-associated protein, perilipin2 (Plin2). Moreover, we found that pretreatment of the cells with the cholesterol chelating agent, methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MBCD), reversed the CBD-induced increase in Soat2 mRNA but not in Plin2 mRNA. Incubation with AEA increased the level of Plin2, but not of Soat2 mRNA. Furthermore, MBCD treatment did not affect the reduction by CBD of the LPS-induced release of the proinflammatory cytokine IL-1β. CBD treatment modulates cholesterol homeostasis in microglial cells, and pretreatment with MBCD reverses this effect without interfering with CBD's anti-inflammatory effects. The effects of the CBD-induced increase in AEA accumulation on lipid-gene expression are discussed. PMID:21533611

  18. Effects of diets enriched in n-6 or n-3 fatty acids on cholesterol metabolism in older rats chronically fed a cholesterol-enriched diet.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, M; Ohhashi, T; Ohno, S; Saitoh, H; Sonoyama, K; Shimada, K; Sekikawa, M; Nakano, M

    2001-03-01

    Hypocholesterolemic effects in older animals after long-term feeding are unknown. Therefore, aged rats (24 wk of age) fed a conventional diet were shifted to diets containing 10% perilla oil [PEO; oleic acid + linoleic acid + alpha-linolenic acid; n-6/n-3, 0.3; polyunsaturated fatty acid/saturated fatty acid (P/S), 9.6], borage oil [oleic acid + linoleic acid + alpha-linolenic acid; n-6/n-3, 15.1; P/S, 5.3], evening primrose oil (EPO; linoleic acid + gamma-linolenic acid; P/S, 10.5), mixed oil (MIO; oleic acid + linoleic acid + gamma-linolenic acid + alpha-linolenic acid; n-6/n-3, 1.7; P/S, 6.7), or palm oil (PLO; palmitic acid + oleic acid + linoleic acid; n-6/n-3, 25.3; P/S, 0.2) with 0.5% cholesterol for 15 wk in this experiment. There were no significant differences in the food intake and body weight gain among the groups. The liver weight in the PEO (n-6/n-3, 0.3) group was significantly higher than those of other groups in aged rats. The serum total cholesterol and very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) + intermediate density lipoprotein (IDL) + low density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol concentrations of the PLO (25.3) group were consistently higher than those in the other groups. The serum high density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations of the PEO (0.3) and EPO groups were significantly lower than in the other groups at the end of the 15-wk feeding period. The liver cholesterol concentration of the PLO (25.3) group was significantly higher than those of other groups. There were no significant differences in the hepatic LDL receptor mRNA level among the groups. Hepatic apolipoprotein (apo) B mRNA levels were not affected by the experimental conditions. The fecal neutral steroid excretion of the PLO (25.3) group tended to be low compared to the other groups. The results of this study demonstrate that both n-6 fatty acid and n-3 fatty acids such as gamma-linolenic acid and alpha-linolenic acid inhibit the increase of serum total cholesterol and VLDL + IDL

  19. Blood Lipid Distribution, Aortic Cholesterol Concentrations, and Selected Inflammatory and Bile Metabolism Markers in Syrian Hamsters Fed a Standard Breeding Diet

    PubMed Central

    Stephens, Amanda M; Sanders, Timothy H

    2015-01-01

    Hamsters are often used to determine the effects of various dietary ingredients on the development of cardiovascular disease (CVD). The study was conducted to obtain baseline data on CVD risk factors and mRNA expression of selected genes in hamsters fed a standard maintenance diet (STD) for 24 wk, beginning when animals were 7 wk old. Plasma triacylglycerol and aortic cholesteryl ester concentrations did not significantly change during the study. Total plasma cholesterol (75.9–127.9 mg/dL), LDL- (3.2–12.2 mg/dL), and HDL- (53.8–98.9 mg/dL) cholesterols increased over the 24wk study. Aortic total cholesterol increased from 9.72 to 12.20 μg/mg protein, whereas aortic cholesteryl ester, a measure of atherosclerosis development, was less than 0.18 μg/mg protein throughout the study. The expression of hepatic endothelin 1, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α , and hepatic cholesterol 7-α-hydroxylase mRNA did not change throughout the study, indicating that fatty acid β-oxidation and cholesterol metabolism remained consistent. The mRNA expression of ATP-binding cassette, subfamily B member 11 increased between wk 0 and 8 but then remained unchanged, suggesting increased requirements for cholesterol in early growth. These results indicate that the consumption of a STD does not increase atherosclerotic disease risk factors in golden Syrian hamsters through 31 wk of age. PMID:26224433

  20. Stimulation of adenosine A2A receptors reduces intracellular cholesterol accumulation and rescues mitochondrial abnormalities in human neural cell models of Niemann-Pick C1.

    PubMed

    Ferrante, A; De Nuccio, C; Pepponi, R; Visentin, S; Martire, A; Bernardo, A; Minghetti, L; Popoli, P

    2016-04-01

    Niemann Pick C 1 (NPC1) disease is an incurable, devastating lysosomal-lipid storage disorder characterized by hepatosplenomegaly, progressive neurological impairment and early death. Current treatments are very limited and the research of new therapeutic targets is thus mandatory. We recently showed that the stimulation of adenosine A2A receptors (A2ARs) rescues the abnormal phenotype of fibroblasts from NPC1 patients suggesting that A2AR agonists could represent a therapeutic option for this disease. However, since all NPC1 patients develop severe neurological symptoms which can be ascribed to the complex pathology occurring in both neurons and oligodendrocytes, in the present paper we tested the effects of the A2AR agonist CGS21680 in human neuronal and oligodendroglial NPC1 cell lines (i.e. neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y and oligodendroglial MO3.13 transiently transfected with NPC1 small interfering RNA). The down-regulation of the NPC1 protein effectively resulted in intracellular cholesterol accumulation and altered mitochondrial membrane potential. Both effects were significantly attenuated by CGS21680 (500 nM). The protective effects of CGS were prevented by the selective A2AR antagonist ZM241385 (500 nM). The involvement of calcium modulation was demonstrated by the ability of Bapta-AM (5-7 μM) in reverting the effect of CGS. The A2A-dependent activity was prevented by the PKA-inhibitor KT5720, thus showing the involvement of the cAMP/PKA signaling. These findings provide a clear in vitro proof of concept that A2AR agonists are promising potential drugs for NPC disease. PMID:26631535

  1. Identification of miR-148a as a novel regulator of cholesterol metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Goedeke, Leigh; Rotllan, Noemi; Canfrán-Duque, Alberto; Aranda, Juan F.; Ramírez, Cristina M.; Araldi, Elisa; Lin, Chin-Sheng; Anderson, Norma N.; Wagschal, Alexandre; de Cabo, Rafael; Horton, Jay D.; Lasunción, Miguel A.; Näär, Anders M.; Suárez, Yajaira; Fernández-Hernando, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    The hepatic low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) pathway is essential for clearing circulating LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C). While the transcriptional regulation of LDLR is well-characterized, the post-transcriptional mechanisms which govern LDLR expression are just beginning to emerge. Here, we developed a high-throughput genome-wide screening assay to systematically identify microRNAs (miRNAs) that regulate LDLR activity in human hepatic cells. From this screen, we characterize miR-148a as a negative regulator of LDLR expression and activity, and define a novel SREBP1-mediated pathway by which miR-148a regulates LDL-C uptake. Importantly, inhibition of miR-148a increases hepatic LDLR expression and decreases plasma LDL-C in vivo. We also provide evidence that miR-148a regulates hepatic ABCA1 expression and circulating HDL-C levels. Collectively, these studies uncover miR-148a as an important regulator of hepatic LDL-C clearance through direct regulation of LDLR expression, and demonstrate the therapeutic potential of inhibiting miR-148a to ameliorate the elevated LDL-C/HDL-C ratio, a prominent risk factor for cardiovascular disease. PMID:26437365

  2. SU-E-J-122: Detecting Treatment-Induced Metabolic Abnormalities in Craniopharyngioma Patients Undergoing Surgery and Proton Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Hua, C; Shulkin, B; Li, Y; LI, X; Merchant, T; Indelicato, D; Boop, F

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To identify treatment-induced defects in the brain of children with craniopharyngioma receiving surgery and proton therapy using fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET). Methods: Forty seven patients were enrolled on a clinical trial for craniopharyngioma with serial imaging and functional evaluations. Proton therapy was delivered using the double-scattered beams with a prescribed dose of 54 Cobalt Gray Equivalent. FDG tracer uptake in each of 63 anatomical regions was computed after warping PET images to a 3D reference template in Talairach coordinates. Regional uptake was deemed significantly low or high if exceeding two standard deviations of normal population from the mean. For establishing the normal ranges, 132 children aged 1–20 years with noncentral nervous system related diseases and normal-appearing cerebral PET scans were analyzed. Age- and gender-dependent regional uptake models were developed by linear regression and confidence intervals were calculated. Results: Most common PET abnormality before proton therapy was significantly low uptake in the frontal lobe, the occipital lobe (particularly in cuneus), the medial and ventral temporal lobe, cingulate gyrus, caudate nuclei, and thalamus. They were related to injury from surgical corridors, tumor mass effect, insertion of a ventricular catheter, and the placement of an Ommaya reservoir. Surprisingly a significantly high uptake was observed in temporal gyri and the parietal lobe. In 13 patients who already completed 18-month PET scans, metabolic abnormalities improved in 11 patients from baseline. One patient had persistent abnormalities. Only one revealed new uptake abnormalities in thalamus, brainstem, cerebellum, and insula. Conclusion: Postoperative FDG PET of craniopharyngioma patients revealed metabolic abnormalities in specific regions of the brain. Proton therapy did not appear to exacerbate these surgery- and tumor-induced defects. In patients with persistent and

  3. What's Cholesterol?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Most cholesterol is LDL (low-density lipoprotein) cholesterol. LDL cholesterol is more likely to clog blood vessels because ... Here's a way to remember the difference: the LDL cholesterol is the bad kind, so call it "lousy" ...

  4. Cholesterol-Lowering Potentials of Lactic Acid Bacteria Based on Bile-Salt Hydrolase Activity and Effect of Potent Strains on Cholesterol Metabolism In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Pei-Pei; Hsieh, You-Miin; Zhang, Zi-yi; Wu, Hui-Ching; Huang, Chun-Chih

    2014-01-01

    This study collected different probiotic isolates from animal and plant sources to evaluate the bile-salt hydrolase activity of probiotics in vitro. The deconjugation potential of bile acid was determined using high-performance liquid chromatography. HepG2 cells were cultured with probiotic strains with high BSH activity. The triglyceride (TG) and apolipoprotein B (apo B) secretion by HepG2 cells were evaluated. Our results show that the BSH activity and bile-acid deconjugation abilities of Pediococcus acidilactici NBHK002, Bifidobacterium adolescentis NBHK006, Lactobacillus rhamnosus NBHK007, and Lactobacillus acidophilus NBHK008 were higher than those of the other probiotic strains. The cholesterol concentration in cholesterol micelles was reduced within 24 h. NBHK007 reduced the TG secretion by 100% after 48 h of incubation. NBHK002, NBHK006, and NBHK007 could reduce apo B secretion by 33%, 38%, and 39%, respectively, after 24 h of incubation. The product PROBIO S-23 produced a greater decrease in the total concentration of cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein, TG, and thiobarbituric acid reactive substance in the serum or livers of hamsters with hypercholesterolemia compared with that of hamsters fed with a high-fat and high-cholesterol diet. These results show that the three probiotic strains of lactic acid bacteria are better candidates for reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease. PMID:25538960

  5. Cholesterol-lowering potentials of lactic acid bacteria based on bile-salt hydrolase activity and effect of potent strains on cholesterol metabolism in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Cheng-Chih; Lin, Pei-Pei; Hsieh, You-Miin; Zhang, Zi-yi; Wu, Hui-Ching; Huang, Chun-Chih

    2014-01-01

    This study collected different probiotic isolates from animal and plant sources to evaluate the bile-salt hydrolase activity of probiotics in vitro. The deconjugation potential of bile acid was determined using high-performance liquid chromatography. HepG2 cells were cultured with probiotic strains with high BSH activity. The triglyceride (TG) and apolipoprotein B (apo B) secretion by HepG2 cells were evaluated. Our results show that the BSH activity and bile-acid deconjugation abilities of Pediococcus acidilactici NBHK002, Bifidobacterium adolescentis NBHK006, Lactobacillus rhamnosus NBHK007, and Lactobacillus acidophilus NBHK008 were higher than those of the other probiotic strains. The cholesterol concentration in cholesterol micelles was reduced within 24 h. NBHK007 reduced the TG secretion by 100% after 48 h of incubation. NBHK002, NBHK006, and NBHK007 could reduce apo B secretion by 33%, 38%, and 39%, respectively, after 24 h of incubation. The product PROBIO S-23 produced a greater decrease in the total concentration of cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein, TG, and thiobarbituric acid reactive substance in the serum or livers of hamsters with hypercholesterolemia compared with that of hamsters fed with a high-fat and high-cholesterol diet. These results show that the three probiotic strains of lactic acid bacteria are better candidates for reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease. PMID:25538960

  6. Metabolic syndrome and prostate abnormalities in male subjects of infertile couples

    PubMed Central

    Lotti, Francesco; Corona, Giovanni; Vignozzi, Linda; Rossi, Matteo; Maseroli, Elisa; Cipriani, Sarah; Gacci, Mauro; Forti, Gianni; Maggi, Mario

    2014-01-01

    No previous study has evaluated systematically the relationship between metabolic syndrome (MetS) and prostate-related symptoms and signs in young infertile men. We studied 171 (36.5 ± 8.3-years-old) males of infertile couples. MetS was defined based on the National Cholesterol Education Program Third Adult Treatment Panel. All men underwent hormonal (including total testosterone (TT) and insulin), seminal (including interleukin-8 (IL-8), seminal plasma IL-8 (sIL-8)), scrotal and transrectal ultrasound evaluations. Because we have previously assessed correlations between MetS and scrotal parameters in a larger cohort of infertile men, here, we focused on transrectal features. Prostate-related symptoms were assessed using the National Institutes of Health Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index (NIH-CPSI) and the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS). Twenty-two subjects fulfilled MetS criteria. In an age-adjusted logistic ordinal model, insulin levels increased as a function of MetS components (Wald = 29.5, P < 0.0001) and showed an inverse correlation with TT (adjusted r = -0.359, P< 0.0001). No association between MetS and NIH-CPSI or IPSS scores was observed. In an age-, TT-, insulin-adjusted logistic ordinal model, an increase in number of MetS components correlated negatively with normal sperm morphology (Wald = 5.59, P< 0.02) and positively with sIL-8 levels (Wald = 4.32, P < 0.05), which is a marker of prostate inflammation, with prostate total and transitional zone volume assessed using ultrasound (Wald = 17.6 and 12.5, both P < 0.0001), with arterial peak systolic velocity (Wald = 9.57, P = 0.002), with texture nonhomogeneity (hazard ratio (HR) = 1.87 (1.05–3.33), P < 0.05), with calcification size (Wald = 3.11, P < 0.05), but not with parameters of seminal vesicle size or function. In conclusion, in males of infertile couples, MetS is positively associated with prostate enlargement, biochemical (sIL8) and ultrasound-derived signs of prostate

  7. Atheroprotective effects of (poly)phenols: a focus on cell cholesterol metabolism.

    PubMed

    Zanotti, Ilaria; Dall'Asta, Margherita; Mena, Pedro; Mele, Laura; Bruni, Renato; Ray, Sumantra; Del Rio, Daniele

    2015-01-01

    Collated observations from several epidemiological studies have demonstrated that dietary intake of (poly)phenols from nuts, coffee, cocoa, grapes, and berries may protect against the development of atherosclerosis. Whereas this beneficial activity has previously been linked mainly to antioxidant or anti-inflammatory properties, recently emerging data suggest mechanisms by which (poly)phenolic substances can modulate cellular lipid metabolism, thereby mitigating atherosclerotic plaque formation. In this review, both experimental studies and clinical trials investigating the atheroprotective effects of the most relevant dietary (poly)phenols are critically discussed. PMID:25367393

  8. A panel of free fatty acid ratios to predict the development of metabolic abnormalities in healthy obese individuals

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Linjing; Ni, Yan; Ma, Xiaojing; Zhao, Aihua; Bao, Yuqian; Liu, Jiajian; Chen, Tianlu; Xie, Guoxiang; Panee, Jun; Su, Mingming; Yu, Herbert; Wang, Congrong; Hu, Cheng; Jia, Weiping; Jia, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidences support that metabolically healthy obese (MHO) is a transient state. However, little is known about the early markers associated with the development of metabolic abnormalities in MHO individuals. Serum free fatty acids (FFAs) profile is highlighted in its association with obesity-related insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and cardiovascular diseases (CVD). To examine the association of endogenous fatty acid metabolism with future development of metabolic abnormalities in MHO individuals, we retrospectively analyzed 24 [product FFA]/[precursor FFA] ratios in fasting sera and clinical data from 481 individuals who participated in three independent studies, including 131 metabolic healthy subjects who completed the 10-year longitudinal Shanghai Diabetes Study (SHDS), 312 subjects cross-sectionally sampled from the Shanghai Obesity Study (SHOS), and 38 subjects who completed an 8-week very low carbohydrate diet (VLCD) intervention study. Results showed that higher baseline level of oleic acid/stearic acid (OA/SA), and lower levels of stearic acid/palmitic acid (SA/PA) and arachidonic acid/dihomo-γ-linolenic acid (AA/DGLA) ratios were associated with higher rate of MHO to MUO conversion in the longitudinal SHDS. Further, the finding was validated in the cross-sectional and interventional studies. This panel of FFA ratios could be used for identification and early intervention of at-risk obese individuals. PMID:27344992

  9. A panel of free fatty acid ratios to predict the development of metabolic abnormalities in healthy obese individuals.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Linjing; Ni, Yan; Ma, Xiaojing; Zhao, Aihua; Bao, Yuqian; Liu, Jiajian; Chen, Tianlu; Xie, Guoxiang; Panee, Jun; Su, Mingming; Yu, Herbert; Wang, Congrong; Hu, Cheng; Jia, Weiping; Jia, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidences support that metabolically healthy obese (MHO) is a transient state. However, little is known about the early markers associated with the development of metabolic abnormalities in MHO individuals. Serum free fatty acids (FFAs) profile is highlighted in its association with obesity-related insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and cardiovascular diseases (CVD). To examine the association of endogenous fatty acid metabolism with future development of metabolic abnormalities in MHO individuals, we retrospectively analyzed 24 [product FFA]/[precursor FFA] ratios in fasting sera and clinical data from 481 individuals who participated in three independent studies, including 131 metabolic healthy subjects who completed the 10-year longitudinal Shanghai Diabetes Study (SHDS), 312 subjects cross-sectionally sampled from the Shanghai Obesity Study (SHOS), and 38 subjects who completed an 8-week very low carbohydrate diet (VLCD) intervention study. Results showed that higher baseline level of oleic acid/stearic acid (OA/SA), and lower levels of stearic acid/palmitic acid (SA/PA) and arachidonic acid/dihomo-γ-linolenic acid (AA/DGLA) ratios were associated with higher rate of MHO to MUO conversion in the longitudinal SHDS. Further, the finding was validated in the cross-sectional and interventional studies. This panel of FFA ratios could be used for identification and early intervention of at-risk obese individuals. PMID:27344992

  10. Cooked rice prevents hyperlipidemia in hamsters fed a high-fat/cholesterol diet by the regulation of the expression of hepatic genes involved in lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Choi, Won Hee; Gwon, So Young; Ahn, Jiyun; Jung, Chang Hwa; Ha, Tae Youl

    2013-07-01

    Rice has many health-beneficial components for ameliorating obesity, diabetes, and dyslipidemia. However, the effect of cooked rice as a useful carbohydrate source has not been investigated yet; so we hypothesized that cooked rice may have hypolipidemic effects. In the present study, we investigated the effect of cooked rice on hyperlipidemia and on the expression of hepatic genes involved in lipid metabolism. Golden Syrian hamsters were divided into 2 groups and fed a high-fat (15%, wt/wt)/cholesterol (0.5%, wt/wt) diet supplemented with either corn starch (HFD, 54.5% wt/wt) or cooked rice (HFD-CR, 54.5% wt/wt) as the main carbohydrate source for 8 weeks. In the HFD-CR group, the triglyceride and total cholesterol levels in the serum and liver were decreased, and the total lipid, total cholesterol, and bile acid levels in the feces were increased, compared with the HFD group. In the cooked-rice group, the messenger RNA and protein levels of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase were significantly downregulated; and the messenger RNA and protein levels of the low-density lipoprotein receptor and cholesterol-7α-hydroxylase were upregulated. Furthermore, the expressions of lipogenic genes such as sterol response element binding protein-1, fatty acid synthase, acetyl CoA carboxylase, and stearoyl CoA desaturase-1 were downregulated, whereas the β-oxidation related genes (carnitine palmitoyl transferase-1, acyl CoA oxidase, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α) were upregulated, in the cooked-rice group. Our results suggest that the hypolipidemic effect of cooked rice is partially mediated by the regulation of hepatic genes involved in lipid metabolism, which results in the suppression of cholesterol and fatty acid synthesis and the enhancement of cholesterol excretion and fatty acid β-oxidation. PMID:23827132

  11. Effects of disturbed liver growth and oxidative stress of high-fat diet-fed dams on cholesterol metabolism in offspring mice

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Juyoung; Kim, Juhae

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES Changes in nutritional status during gestation and lactation have detrimental effects on offspring metabolism. Several animal studies have shown that maternal high-fat diet (HFD) can predispose the offspring to development of obesity and metabolic diseases, however the mechanisms underlying these transgenerational effects are poorly understood. Therefore, we examined the effect of maternal HFD consumption on metabolic phenotype and hepatic expression of involved genes in dams to determine whether any of these parameters were associated with the metabolic outcomes in the offspring. MATERIALS/METHODS Female C57BL/6 mice were fed a low-fat diet (LFD: 10% calories from fat) or a high-fat diet (HFD: 45% calories from fat) for three weeks before mating, and during pregnancy and lactation. Dams and their male offspring were studied at weaning. RESULTS Dams fed an HFD had significantly higher body and adipose tissue weights and higher serum triglyceride and cholesterol levels than dams fed an LFD. Hepatic lipid levels and mRNA levels of genes involved in lipid metabolism, including LXRα, SREBP-2, FXR, LDLR, and ABCG8 were significantly changed by maternal HFD intake. Significantly lower total liver DNA and protein contents were observed in dams fed an HFD, implicating the disturbed liver adaptation in the pregnancy-related metabolic demand. HFD feeding also induced significant oxidative stress in serum and liver of dams. Offspring of dams fed an HFD had significantly higher serum cholesterol levels, which were negatively correlated with liver weights of dams and positively correlated with hepatic lipid peroxide levels in dams. CONCLUSIONS Maternal HFD consumption induced metabolic dysfunction, including altered liver growth and oxidative stress in dams, which may contribute to the disturbed cholesterol homeostasis in the early life of male mice offspring. PMID:27478544

  12. High consumption of pulses is associated with lower risk of abnormal glucose metabolism in women in Mauritius

    PubMed Central

    Wennberg, M.; Söderberg, S.; Uusitalo, U.; Tuomilehto, J.; Shaw, J. E.; Zimmet, P. Z.; Kowlessur, S.; Pauvaday, V.; Magliano, D. J.

    2014-01-01

    Aims To investigate if consumption of pulses was associated with a reduced risk of developing abnormal glucose metabolism, increases in body weight and increases in waist circumference in a multi-ethnic cohort in Mauritius. Methods Population-based surveys were performed in Mauritius in 1992 and in 1998. Pulse consumption was estimated from a food frequency questionnaire in 1992 and outcomes were measured in 1998. At both time points, anthropometry was undertaken and an oral glucose tolerance test was performed. Results Mauritian women with the highest consumption of pulses (highest tertile) had a reduced risk of developing abnormal glucose metabolism [odds ratio 0.52; 95% CI 0.27, 0.99) compared with those with the lowest consumption, and also after multivariable adjustments. In women, a high consumption of pulses was associated with a smaller increase in BMI. Conclusions High consumption of pulses was associated with a reduced risk of abnormal glucose metabolism and a smaller increase in BMI in Mauritian women. Promotion of pulse consumption could be an important dietary intervention for the prevention of Type 2 diabetes and obesity in Mauritius and should be examined in other populations and in clinical trials. PMID:25346062

  13. Maternal protein restriction induces alterations in hepatic tumor necrosis factor-α/CYP7A1 signaling and disorders regulation of cholesterol metabolism in the adult rat offspring

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaomei; Qi, Ying; Tian, Baoling; Chen, Dong; Gao, Hong; Xi, Chunyan; Xing, Yanlin; Yuan, Zhengwei

    2014-01-01

    It is well recognized that adverse events in utero impair fetal development and lead to the development of obesity and metabolic syndrome in adulthood. To investigate the mechanisms linking impaired fetal growth to increased cholesterol, an important clinical risk factor characterizing the metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease, we examined the impact of maternal undernutrition on tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α)/c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling pathway and the cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase (CYP7A1) expression in the livers of the offspring with a protein restriction model. The male offspring with intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) caused by the isocaloric low-protein diet showed decreased liver weight at birth and augmented circulation and hepatic cholesterol levels at 40 weeks of age. Maternal undernutrition significantly upregulated cytokine TNF-α expression and JNK phospholytion levels in the livers from fetal age to adulthood. Elevated JNK phospholytion could be linked to downregulated hepatocyte nuclear factor-4α and CYP7A1 expression, subsequently led to higher hepatic cholesterol. This work demonstrated that intrauterine malnutrition-induced IUGR might result in intrinsic disorder in hepatic TNF-α/CYP7A1 signaling, and contribute to the development of hypercholesterolemia in later life. PMID:25120278

  14. Shrinking the FadE Proteome of Mycobacterium tuberculosis: Insights into Cholesterol Metabolism through Identification of an α2β2 Heterotetrameric Acyl Coenzyme A Dehydrogenase Family

    PubMed Central

    Wipperman, Matthew F.; Yang, Meng; Thomas, Suzanne T.

    2013-01-01

    The ability of the pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis to metabolize steroids like cholesterol and the roles that these compounds play in the virulence and pathogenesis of this organism are increasingly evident. Here, we demonstrate through experiments and bioinformatic analysis the existence of an architecturally distinct subfamily of acyl coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) dehydrogenase (ACAD) enzymes that are α2β2 heterotetramers with two active sites. These enzymes are encoded by two adjacent ACAD (fadE) genes that are regulated by cholesterol. FadE26-FadE27 catalyzes the dehydrogenation of 3β-hydroxy-chol-5-en-24-oyl-CoA, an analog of the 5-carbon side chain cholesterol degradation intermediate. Genes encoding the α2β2 heterotetrameric ACAD structures are present in multiple regions of the M. tuberculosis genome, and subsets of these genes are regulated by four different transcriptional repressors or activators: KstR1 (also known as KstR), KstR2, Mce3R, and SigE. Homologous ACAD gene pairs are found in other Actinobacteria, as well as Proteobacteria. Their structures and genomic locations suggest that the α2β2 heterotetrameric structural motif has evolved to enable catalysis of dehydrogenation of steroid- or polycyclic-CoA substrates and that they function in four subpathways of cholesterol metabolism. PMID:23836861

  15. Do obese but metabolically normal women differ in intra-abdominal fat and physical activity levels from those with the expected metabolic abnormalities? A cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Obesity remains a major public health problem, associated with a cluster of metabolic abnormalities. However, individuals exist who are very obese but have normal metabolic parameters. The aim of this study was to determine to what extent differences in metabolic health in very obese women are explained by differences in body fat distribution, insulin resistance and level of physical activity. Methods This was a cross-sectional pilot study of 39 obese women (age: 28-64 yrs, BMI: 31-67 kg/m2) recruited from community settings. Women were defined as 'metabolically normal' on the basis of blood glucose, lipids and blood pressure. Magnetic Resonance Imaging was used to determine body fat distribution. Detailed lifestyle and metabolic profiles of participants were obtained. Results Women with a healthy metabolic profile had lower intra-abdominal fat volume (geometric mean 4.78 l [95% CIs 3.99-5.73] vs 6.96 l [5.82-8.32]) and less insulin resistance (HOMA 3.41 [2.62-4.44] vs 6.67 [5.02-8.86]) than those with an abnormality. The groups did not differ in abdominal subcutaneous fat volume (19.6 l [16.9-22.7] vs 20.6 [17.6-23.9]). A higher proportion of those with a healthy compared to a less healthy metabolic profile met current physical activity guidelines (70% [95% CIs 55.8-84.2] vs 25% [11.6-38.4]). Intra-abdominal fat, insulin resistance and physical activity make independent contributions to metabolic status in very obese women, but explain only around a third of the variance. Conclusion A sub-group of women exists who are metabolically normal despite being very obese. Differences in fat distribution, insulin resistance, and physical activity level are associated with metabolic differences in these women, but account only partially for these differences. Future work should focus on strategies to identify those obese individuals most at risk of the negative metabolic consequences of obesity and on identifying other factors that contribute to metabolic status

  16. Pancreatic β-Cell Dysfunction in Diet-Induced Obese Mice: Roles of AMP-Kinase, Protein Kinase Cε, Mitochondrial and Cholesterol Metabolism, and Alterations in Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Pepin, Émilie; Al-Mass, Anfal; Attané, Camille; Zhang, Kezhuo; Lamontagne, Julien; Lussier, Roxane; Madiraju, S R Murthy; Joly, Erik; Ruderman, Neil B; Sladek, Robert; Prentki, Marc; Peyot, Marie-Line

    2016-01-01

    Diet induced obese (DIO) mice can be stratified according to their weight gain in response to high fat diet as low responders (LDR) and high responders (HDR). This allows the study of β-cell failure and the transitions to prediabetes (LDR) and early diabetes (HDR). C57BL/6N mice were fed for 8 weeks with a normal chow diet (ND) or a high fat diet and stratified as LDR and HDR. Freshly isolated islets from ND, LDR and HDR mice were studied ex-vivo for mitochondrial metabolism, AMPK activity and signalling, the expression and activity of key enzymes of energy metabolism, cholesterol synthesis, and mRNA profiling. Severely compromised glucose-induced insulin secretion in HDR islets, as compared to ND and LDR islets, was associated with suppressed AMP-kinase activity. HDR islets also showed reduced acetyl-CoA carboxylase activity and enhanced activity of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase, which led respectively to elevated fatty acid oxidation and increased cholesterol biosynthesis. HDR islets also displayed mitochondrial membrane hyperpolarization and reduced ATP turnover in the presence of elevated glucose. Expression of protein kinase Cε, which reduces both lipolysis and production of signals for insulin secretion, was elevated in DIO islets. Genes whose expression increased or decreased by more than 1.2-fold were minor between LDR and ND islets (17 differentially expressed), but were prominent between HDR and ND islets (1508 differentially expressed). In HDR islets, particularly affected genes were related to cell cycle and proliferation, AMPK signaling, mitochondrial metabolism and cholesterol metabolism. In conclusion, chronically reduced AMPK activity, mitochondrial dysfunction, elevated cholesterol biosynthesis in islets, and substantial alterations in gene expression accompany β-cell failure in HDR islets. The β-cell compensation process in the prediabetic state (LDR) is largely independent of transcriptional adaptive changes, whereas the transition

  17. Pancreatic β-Cell Dysfunction in Diet-Induced Obese Mice: Roles of AMP-Kinase, Protein Kinase Cε, Mitochondrial and Cholesterol Metabolism, and Alterations in Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Pepin, Émilie; Al-Mass, Anfal; Attané, Camille; Zhang, Kezhuo; Lamontagne, Julien; Lussier, Roxane; Madiraju, S. R. Murthy; Joly, Erik; Ruderman, Neil B.; Sladek, Robert; Prentki, Marc; Peyot, Marie-Line

    2016-01-01

    Diet induced obese (DIO) mice can be stratified according to their weight gain in response to high fat diet as low responders (LDR) and high responders (HDR). This allows the study of β-cell failure and the transitions to prediabetes (LDR) and early diabetes (HDR). C57BL/6N mice were fed for 8 weeks with a normal chow diet (ND) or a high fat diet and stratified as LDR and HDR. Freshly isolated islets from ND, LDR and HDR mice were studied ex-vivo for mitochondrial metabolism, AMPK activity and signalling, the expression and activity of key enzymes of energy metabolism, cholesterol synthesis, and mRNA profiling. Severely compromised glucose-induced insulin secretion in HDR islets, as compared to ND and LDR islets, was associated with suppressed AMP-kinase activity. HDR islets also showed reduced acetyl-CoA carboxylase activity and enhanced activity of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase, which led respectively to elevated fatty acid oxidation and increased cholesterol biosynthesis. HDR islets also displayed mitochondrial membrane hyperpolarization and reduced ATP turnover in the presence of elevated glucose. Expression of protein kinase Cε, which reduces both lipolysis and production of signals for insulin secretion, was elevated in DIO islets. Genes whose expression increased or decreased by more than 1.2-fold were minor between LDR and ND islets (17 differentially expressed), but were prominent between HDR and ND islets (1508 differentially expressed). In HDR islets, particularly affected genes were related to cell cycle and proliferation, AMPK signaling, mitochondrial metabolism and cholesterol metabolism. In conclusion, chronically reduced AMPK activity, mitochondrial dysfunction, elevated cholesterol biosynthesis in islets, and substantial alterations in gene expression accompany β-cell failure in HDR islets. The β-cell compensation process in the prediabetic state (LDR) is largely independent of transcriptional adaptive changes, whereas the transition

  18. Dysregulation of testicular cholesterol metabolism following spontaneous mutation of the niemann-pick c1 gene in mice.

    PubMed

    Akpovi, Casimir D; Murphy, Bruce D; Erickson, Robert P; Pelletier, R-Marc

    2014-08-01

    The Niemann-Pick-type C1 (Npc1) protein mobilizes LDL-derived cholesterol from lysosomes. Npc1 deficiency disease is a panethnic autosomal recessive disorder of intracellular cholesterol trafficking, leading to accumulation of cholesterol in endosomes/lysosomes. This report assesses the effects of a spontaneous inactivating mutation of the Npc1 gene on spermatogenesis and cholesterol homeostasis in mice. We quantified 1) free and esterified cholesterol levels by enzymatic analysis, 2) cholesterol enzymes and transporter protein expression by Western blotting, and 3) the number of Apostain-labeled apoptotic germ cells and apoptosis levels by ELISA in seminiferous tubule-enriched fractions. In wild-type (WT) mice, esterified cholesterol was elevated when Npc1 expression was low during puberty, while in adulthood, the levels were low (P < 0.05) when Npc1 expression was high (P < 0.01). In Npc1-/- mice, free and esterified cholesterol were significantly elevated. The abundance of cholesterol regulatory proteins, HMGR ACAT1, ACAT2, SR-BI, and ABCA1 was significantly higher in Npc1-/- than in WT mice. The level of apoptosis determined by ELISA and the number of Apostain-labeled cells/tubule were higher in Npc1-/- than in WT mice. Circulating testosterone levels in the Npc1-/- males were threefold lower than those observed in the WT. Deleting the Npc1 gene is accompanied by an increase in germ cell apoptosis and compensatory imbalances in the expression of cholesterol enzymatic and transporter factors and is associated with esterified cholesterol accumulation in seminiferous tubules. PMID:25009206

  19. Glucose Metabolism during Resting State Reveals Abnormal Brain Networks Organization in the Alzheimer’s Disease and Mild Cognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Montes, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    This paper aims to study the abnormal patterns of brain glucose metabolism co-variations in Alzheimer disease (AD) and Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) patients compared to Normal healthy controls (NC) using the Alzheimer Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) database. The local cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (CMRgl) in a set of 90 structures belonging to the AAL atlas was obtained from Fluro-Deoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography data in resting state. It is assumed that brain regions whose CMRgl values are significantly correlated are functionally associated; therefore, when metabolism is altered in a single region, the alteration will affect the metabolism of other brain areas with which it interrelates. The glucose metabolism network (represented by the matrix of the CMRgl co-variations among all pairs of structures) was studied using the graph theory framework. The highest concurrent fluctuations in CMRgl were basically identified between homologous cortical regions in all groups. Significant differences in CMRgl co-variations in AD and MCI groups as compared to NC were found. The AD and MCI patients showed aberrant patterns in comparison to NC subjects, as detected by global and local network properties (global and local efficiency, clustering index, and others). MCI network’s attributes showed an intermediate position between NC and AD, corroborating it as a transitional stage from normal aging to Alzheimer disease. Our study is an attempt at exploring the complex association between glucose metabolism, CMRgl covariations and the attributes of the brain network organization in AD and MCI. PMID:23894356

  20. ACAT2 and human hepatic cholesterol metabolism: identification of important gender-related differences in normolipidemic, non-obese Chinese patients

    PubMed Central

    Parini, Paolo; Jiang, Zhao-Yan; Einarsson, Curt; Eggertsen, Gösta; Zhang, Sheng-Dao; Rudel, Lawrence L; Han, Tian-Quan; Eriksson, Mats

    2009-01-01

    Objective ACAT2 is a major cholesterol esterification enzyme specifically expressed in hepatocytes and may control the amount of hepatic free (unesterified) cholesterol available for secretion into bile or into HDL. This study aims to further elucidate physiologic roles of ACAT2 in human hepatic cholesterol metabolism. Methods and Results Liver biopsies from 40 normolipidemic, non-obese gallstone patients including some gallstone-free patients (female/male, 18/22) were collected and analyzed for microsomal ACAT2 activity, protein and mRNA expression. Plasma HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C) was significantly higher in females than in males, while triglycerides were significantly lower. ACAT2 activity in females was significantly lower than observed in males, regardless of the presence of gallstone disease. Moreover, the activity of ACAT2 correlated negatively with plasma levels of HDL-C (r=−0.57, P<0.05) and with Apo AI (r=−0.49, P<0.05). Conclusion This is the first description of a gender-related difference in hepatic ACAT2 activity in normolipidemic non-obese Chinese patients suggesting a possible role for ACAT2 in the regulation of cholesterol metabolism in humans. The negative correlation between ACAT2 activity and HDL-C or Apo AI may reflect this regulation. Since ACAT2 activity generally has been found to be pro-atherogenic in animal models, the observed sex-related difference may contribute to female protection from complications of coronary heart disease (CHD). PMID:19467657

  1. About Cholesterol

    MedlinePlus

    ... High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More About Cholesterol Updated:Aug 10,2016 It may surprise you ... our bodies to keep us healthy. What is cholesterol and where does it come from? Cholesterol is ...

  2. Red Blood Cells from Individuals with Abdominal Obesity or Metabolic Abnormalities Exhibit Less Deformability upon Entering a Constriction

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Nancy F.; Mancuso, Jordan E.; Zivkovic, Angela M.; Smilowitz, Jennifer T.; Ristenpart, William D.

    2016-01-01

    Abdominal obesity and metabolic syndrome (MS) are multifactorial conditions associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease and type II diabetes mellitus. Previous work has demonstrated that the hemorheological profile is altered in patients with abdominal obesity and MS, as evidenced for example by increased whole blood viscosity. To date, however, no studies have examined red blood cell (RBC) deformability of blood from individuals with obesity or metabolic abnormalities under typical physiological flow conditions. In this study, we pumped RBCs through a constriction in a microfluidic device and used high speed video to visualize and track the mechanical behavior of ~8,000 RBCs obtained from either healthy individuals (n = 5) or obese participants with metabolic abnormalities (OMA) (n = 4). We demonstrate that the OMA+ cells stretched on average about 25% less than the healthy controls. Furthermore, we examined the effects of ingesting a high-fat meal on RBC mechanical dynamics, and found that the postprandial period has only a weak effect on the stretching dynamics exhibited by OMA+ cells. The results suggest that chronic rigidification of RBCs plays a key role in the increased blood pressure and increased whole blood viscosity observed in OMA individuals and was independent of an acute response triggered by consumption of a high-fat meal. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01803633 PMID:27258098

  3. Maternal high-fat hypercaloric diet during pregnancy results in persistent metabolic and respiratory abnormalities in offspring

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, Pamela S.; Walton, Cheryl; Samsell, Lennie; Perez, Miriam K.; Piedimonte, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Background: We have shown in a previous population-based study significant correlation between childhood asthma and early abnormalities of lipid and glucose metabolism. This study's specific aim was to determine whether maternal nutrition in pregnancy affects postnatal metabolic and respiratory outcomes in the offspring. Methods: On gestation day 1, dams were switched from standard chow to either high-fat hypercaloric diet or control diet. Terminal experiments were performed on newborn and weanling offspring of dams fed the study diet during gestation and lactation, and on adult offspring maintained on the same diet as their mother. Results: Pups born from high-fat hypercaloric diet (HFD) dams developed metabolic abnormalities persistent throughout development. Cytokine expression analysis of lung tissues from newborns born to HFD dams revealed a strong proinflammatory pattern. Gene expression of neurotrophic factors and receptors was upregulated in lungs of weanlings born to HFD dams, and this was associated to higher respiratory system resistance and lower compliance at baseline, as well as hyperreactivity to aerosolized methacholine. Furthermore, HFD dams delivered pups prone to develop more severe disease after respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection. Conclusion: Maternal nutrition in pregnancy is a critical determinant of airway inflammation and hyperreactivity in offspring and also increases risk for bronchiolitis independent from prepregnancy nutrition. PMID:26539661

  4. Contribution of Accelerated Degradation to Feedback Regulation of 3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl Coenzyme A Reductase and Cholesterol Metabolism in the Liver.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Seonghwan; Hartman, Isamu Z; Calhoun, Leona N; Garland, Kristina; Young, Gennipher A; Mitsche, Matthew A; McDonald, Jeffrey; Xu, Fang; Engelking, Luke; DeBose-Boyd, Russell A

    2016-06-24

    Accumulation of sterols in endoplasmic reticulum membranes stimulates the ubiquitination of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR), which catalyzes a rate-limiting step in synthesis of cholesterol. This ubiquitination marks HMGCR for proteasome-mediated degradation and constitutes one of several mechanisms for feedback control of cholesterol synthesis. Mechanisms for sterol-accelerated ubiquitination and degradation of HMGCR have been elucidated through the study of cultured mammalian cells. However, the extent to which these reactions modulate HMGCR and contribute to control of cholesterol metabolism in whole animals is unknown. Here, we examine transgenic mice expressing in the liver the membrane domain of HMGCR (HMGCR (TM1-8)), a region necessary and sufficient for sterol-accelerated degradation, and knock-in mice in which endogenous HMGCR harbors mutations that prevent sterol-induced ubiquitination. Characterization of transgenic mice revealed that HMGCR (TM1-8) is appropriately regulated in the liver of mice fed a high cholesterol diet or chow diet supplemented with the HMGCR inhibitor lovastatin. Ubiquitination-resistant HMGCR protein accumulates in the liver and other tissues disproportionately to its mRNA, indicating that sterol-accelerated degradation significantly contributes to feedback regulation of HMGCR in vivo Results of these studies demonstrate that HMGCR is subjected to sterol-accelerated degradation in the liver through mechanisms similar to those established in cultured cells. Moreover, these studies designate sterol-accelerated degradation of HMGCR as a potential therapeutic target for prevention of atherosclerosis and associated cardiovascular disease. PMID:27129778

  5. Cholesterol stimulation of HDL binding to human endothelial cells EAhy 926 and skin fibroblasts: evidence for a mechanism independent of cellular metabolism.

    PubMed

    Bernini, F; Bellosta, S; Corsini, A; Maggi, F M; Fumagalli, R; Catapano, A L

    1991-04-24

    The properties of the HDL binding site on the permanent human cell line EAhy 926 were studied. This cell line presents with highly differentiated functions of vascular endothelium. EAhy 926 cells possess HDL3 saturable binding sites with a Kd of about 20 micrograms/ml, which were up-regulated by cholesterol and were pronase- and EDTA-insensitive. Furthermore, HDL3 promoted cholesterol efflux from EAhy 926 cells in a dose-dependent manner. Thus, the HDL-binding site in EAhy 926 cells is similar to that present in fibroblasts, smooth muscle cells and endothelial cells. Up-regulation of HDL binding by cholesterol did not require de novo synthesis of HDL 'receptor' protein, as shown by the lack of effect of cycloheximide and alpha-amanitin and also occurred in fixed, non-living cells. Similar results were obtained using human skin fibroblasts. From these data we conclude that: (a) EAhy 926 cells are a good model for studying the HDL interaction with endothelial cells; (b) a mechanism independent of cellular metabolism is involved in the cholesterol-mediated up-regulation of HDL binding sites in EAhy 926 cells and human skin fibroblasts. PMID:1851638

  6. Prenatal ethanol exposure induces the osteoarthritis-like phenotype in female adult offspring rats with a post-weaning high-fat diet and its intrauterine programming mechanisms of cholesterol metabolism.

    PubMed

    Ni, Qubo; Wang, Linlong; Wu, Yunpeng; Shen, Lang; Qin, Jun; Liu, Yansong; Magdalou, Jacques; Chen, Liaobin; Wang, Hui

    2015-10-14

    Osteoarthritis (OA) development is associated with hypercholesterolemia in adults. Our previous study demonstrated that offspring with intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR) due to prenatal ethanol exposure (PEE) had a high risk of developing hypercholesterolemia and metabolic syndrome when fed a post-weaning high-fat diet (HFD). In this study, we examined the changes in articular chondrocytes of IUGR offspring induced by PEE and explored its intrauterine programming mechanisms related to cholesterol metabolism. Using the PEE/IUGR model, serum and tibias from female fetuses and adult female offspring fed a post-weaning HFD were collected and examined for cholesterol metabolism and histology. The results showed that PEE adult offspring manifested significant catch-up growth. Their serum total cholesterol (TCH) and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol increased and high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol decreased; the osteoarthritis-like phenotype and an increased TCH content were observed in articular cartilage; and the expression of insulin-like growth factor1 (IGF1) and cholesterol efflux pathway, including ATP-binding-cassette transporter A1 and liver X receptor, was reduced. The expression of IGF1 and cholesterol efflux pathway was also lower in the PEE fetuses. This study showed PEE could induce an enhanced susceptibility to HFD-induced OA in adult female IUGR offspring. The underlying mechanism related to cholesterol accumulation in cartilage mediated by intrauterine programming. PMID:26220516

  7. Evaluation of plasma cholestane-3β,5α,6β-triol and 7-ketocholesterol in inherited disorders related to cholesterol metabolism.

    PubMed

    Boenzi, Sara; Deodato, Federica; Taurisano, Roberta; Goffredo, Bianca Maria; Rizzo, Cristiano; Dionisi-Vici, Carlo

    2016-03-01

    Oxysterols are intermediates of cholesterol metabolism and are generated from cholesterol via either enzymatic or nonenzymatic pathways under oxidative stress conditions. Cholestan-3β,5α,6β-triol (C-triol) and 7-ketocholesterol (7-KC) have been proposed as new biomarkers for the diagnosis of Niemann-Pick type C (NP-C) disease, representing an alternative tool to the invasive and time-consuming method of fibroblast filipin test. To test the efficacy of plasma oxysterol determination for the diagnosis of NP-C, we systematically screened oxysterol levels in patients affected by different inherited disorders related with cholesterol metabolism, which included Niemann-Pick type B (NP-B) disease, lysosomal acid lipase (LAL) deficiency, Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome (SLOS), congenital familial hypercholesterolemia (FH), and sitosterolemia (SITO). As expected, NP-C patients showed significant increase of both C-triol and 7-KC. Strong increase of both oxysterols was observed in NP-B and less pronounced in LAL deficiency. In SLOS, only 7-KC was markedly increased, whereas in both FH and in SITO, oxysterol concentrations were normal. Interestingly, in NP-C alone, we observed that plasma oxysterols correlate negatively with patient's age and positively with serum total bilirubin, suggesting the potential relationship between oxysterol levels and hepatic disease status. Our results indicate that oxysterols are reliable and sensitive biomarkers of NP-C. PMID:26733147

  8. Transcription factor ATF4 directs basal and stress-induced gene expression in the unfolded protein response and cholesterol metabolism in the liver

    PubMed Central

    Fusakio, Michael E.; Willy, Jeffrey A.; Wang, Yongping; Mirek, Emily T.; Al Baghdadi, Rana J. T.; Adams, Christopher M.; Anthony, Tracy G.; Wek, Ronald C.

    2016-01-01

    Disturbances in protein folding and membrane compositions in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) elicit the unfolded protein response (UPR). Each of three UPR sensory proteins—PERK (PEK/EIF2AK3), IRE1, and ATF6—is activated by ER stress. PERK phosphorylation of eIF2 represses global protein synthesis, lowering influx of nascent polypeptides into the stressed ER, coincident with preferential translation of ATF4 (CREB2). In cultured cells, ATF4 induces transcriptional expression of genes directed by the PERK arm of the UPR, including genes involved in amino acid metabolism, resistance to oxidative stress, and the proapoptotic transcription factor CHOP (GADD153/DDIT3). In this study, we characterize whole-body and tissue-specific ATF4-knockout mice and show in liver exposed to ER stress that ATF4 is not required for CHOP expression, but instead ATF6 is a primary inducer. RNA-Seq analysis indicates that ATF4 is responsible for a small portion of the PERK-dependent UPR genes and reveals a requirement for expression of ATF4 for expression of genes involved in oxidative stress response basally and cholesterol metabolism both basally and under stress. Consistent with this pattern of gene expression, loss of ATF4 resulted in enhanced oxidative damage, and increased free cholesterol in liver under stress accompanied by lowered cholesterol in sera. PMID:26960794

  9. Role of abnormal lipid metabolism in development, progression, diagnosis and therapy of pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Swierczynski, Julian; Hebanowska, Areta; Sledzinski, Tomasz

    2014-01-01

    There is growing evidence that metabolic alterations play an important role in cancer development and progression. The metabolism of cancer cells is reprogrammed in order to support their rapid proliferation. Elevated fatty acid synthesis is one of the most important aberrations of cancer cell metabolism. An enhancement of fatty acids synthesis is required both for carcinogenesis and cancer cell survival, as inhibition of key lipogenic enzymes slows down the growth of tumor cells and impairs their survival. Based on the data that serum fatty acid synthase (FASN), also known as oncoantigen 519, is elevated in patients with certain types of cancer, its serum level was proposed as a marker of neoplasia. This review aims to demonstrate the changes in lipid metabolism and other metabolic processes associated with lipid metabolism in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), the most common pancreatic neoplasm, characterized by high mortality. We also addressed the influence of some oncogenic factors and tumor suppressors on pancreatic cancer cell metabolism. Additionally the review discusses the potential role of elevated lipid synthesis in diagnosis and treatment of pancreatic cancer. In particular, FASN is a viable candidate for indicator of pathologic state, marker of neoplasia, as well as, pharmacological treatment target in pancreatic cancer. Recent research showed that, in addition to lipogenesis, certain cancer cells can use fatty acids from circulation, derived from diet (chylomicrons), synthesized in liver, or released from adipose tissue for their growth. Thus, the interactions between de novo lipogenesis and uptake of fatty acids from circulation by PDAC cells require further investigation. PMID:24605027

  10. Higher breakfast glycaemic load is associated with increased metabolic syndrome risk, including lower HDL-cholesterol concentrations and increased TAG concentrations, in adolescent girls.

    PubMed

    Nicholl, Analise; du Heaume, Mary; Mori, Trevor A; Beilin, Lawrence J; Oddy, Wendy H; Bremner, Alexandra P; O'Sullivan, Therese A

    2014-12-28

    Almost all previous studies examining the associations between glycaemic load (GL) and metabolic syndrome risk have used a daily GL value. The daily value does not distinguish between peaks of GL intake over the day, which may be more closely associated with the risk of the metabolic syndrome. The aim of the present study was to investigate the cross-sectional associations between daily and mealtime measures of GL and metabolic syndrome risk, including metabolic syndrome components, in adolescents. Adolescents participating in the 14-year follow-up of the Western Australian Pregnancy Cohort (Raine) Study completed 3 d food records and metabolic assessments. Breakfast GL, lunch GL, dinner GL and a score representing meal GL peaks over the day were determined in 516 adolescents. Logistic regression models were used to investigate whether GL variables were independent predictors of the metabolic syndrome in this population-based cohort (3.5% prevalence of the metabolic syndrome). Breakfast GL was found to be predictive of the metabolic syndrome in girls (OR 1.15, 95% CI 1.04, 1.27; P <0.01), but not in boys. Other meal GL values and daily GL were found to be not significant predictors of the metabolic syndrome. When breakfast GL was examined in relation to each of the components of the metabolic syndrome in girls, it was found to be negatively associated with fasting HDL-cholesterol concentrations (P= 0.037; β = - 0.004; 95% CI - 0.008, - 0.002) and positively associated with fasting TAG concentrations (P= 0.008; exp(β) = 1.002; 95% CI 1.001, 1.004). he results of the present study suggest that there may be an association between breakfast composition and metabolic syndrome components in adolescent girls. These findings support further investigation into including lower-GL foods as part of a healthy breakfast in adolescence, particularly for girls. PMID:25327283

  11. Abnormal vitamin K metabolism in the presence of normal clotting factor activity in factory workers exposed to 4-hydroxycoumarins.

    PubMed

    Park, B K; Choonara, I A; Haynes, B P; Breckenridge, A M; Malia, R G; Preston, F E

    1986-03-01

    The case histories of two patients exposed to the novel anticoagulants brodifacoum and difenacoum are reported. Abnormal vitamin K1 metabolism, as indicated by elevated vitamin K1 2,3-epoxide plasma concentrations after i.v. administration of vitamin K1, could be detected for more than 18 months after exposure to the anticoagulants. There was a marked prolongation of prothrombin time (greater than 50 s) in both cases, at the time of exposure. However, subsequent haematological investigations (prothrombin time and vitamin K-dependent clotting factor activity) have been shown to be normal in both cases for at least 18 months. These cases confirm the long-acting nature of brodifacoum and difenacoum and present an apparent dissociation between the effect of coumarin anticoagulants on vitamin K1 metabolism and clotting factor activity. PMID:3964529

  12. Abnormal vitamin K metabolism in the presence of normal clotting factor activity in factory workers exposed to 4-hydroxycoumarins.

    PubMed Central

    Park, B K; Choonara, I A; Haynes, B P; Breckenridge, A M; Malia, R G; Preston, F E

    1986-01-01

    The case histories of two patients exposed to the novel anticoagulants brodifacoum and difenacoum are reported. Abnormal vitamin K1 metabolism, as indicated by elevated vitamin K1 2,3-epoxide plasma concentrations after i.v. administration of vitamin K1, could be detected for more than 18 months after exposure to the anticoagulants. There was a marked prolongation of prothrombin time (greater than 50 s) in both cases, at the time of exposure. However, subsequent haematological investigations (prothrombin time and vitamin K-dependent clotting factor activity) have been shown to be normal in both cases for at least 18 months. These cases confirm the long-acting nature of brodifacoum and difenacoum and present an apparent dissociation between the effect of coumarin anticoagulants on vitamin K1 metabolism and clotting factor activity. PMID:3964529

  13. Deciphering metabolic abnormalities associated with Alzheimer's disease in the APP/PS1 mouse model using integrated metabolomic approaches.

    PubMed

    González-Domínguez, Raúl; García-Barrera, Tamara; Vitorica, Javier; Gómez-Ariza, José Luis

    2015-03-01

    The transgenic mouse APP/PS1 is widely employed by neuroscientists because reproduces well some of the neuropathological and cognitive deficits observed in human Alzheimer's disease. In this study, serum samples from APP/PS1 mice (n = 30) and wild-type controls (n = 30) were analyzed using a metabolomic multiplatform based on the combination of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, in order to obtain wide information about serum metabolome. Metabolic profiles showed significant differences between the groups of study, and numerous metabolites were identified as potential players in the development of Alzheimer-type disorders in this transgenic model. Pathway analysis revealed the involvement of multiple metabolic networks in the underlying pathology, such as deficiencies in energy metabolism, altered amino acid homeostasis, abnormal membrane lipid metabolism, and other impairments related to the integrity of the central nervous system. It is noteworthy that some of these metabolomic markers are in accordance with pathological alterations observed in human Alzheimer's disease, while others have not been previously described. Therefore, these results demonstrate the potential of metabolomics and the use of transgenic animal models to understand the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. PMID:25597416

  14. Current Views on Genetics and Epigenetics of Cholesterol Gallstone Disease

    PubMed Central

    Di Ciaula, Agostino; Wang, David Q.-H.; Bonfrate, Leonilde; Portincasa, Piero

    2013-01-01

    Cholesterol gallstone disease, one of the commonest digestive diseases in western countries, is induced by an imbalance in cholesterol metabolism, which involves intestinal absorption, hepatic biosynthesis, and biliary output of cholesterol, and its conversion to bile acids. Several components of the metabolic syndrome (e.g., obesity, type 2 diabetes, dyslipidemia, and hyperinsulinemia) are also well-known risk factors for gallstones, suggesting the existence of interplay between common pathophysiological pathways influenced by insulin resistance, genetic, epigenetic, and environmental factors. Cholesterol gallstones may be enhanced, at least in part, by the abnormal expression of a set of the genes that affect cholesterol homeostasis and lead to insulin resistance. Additionally, epigenetic mechanisms (mainly DNA methylation, histone acetylation/deacetylation, and noncoding microRNAs) may modify gene expression in the absence of an altered DNA sequence, in response to different lithogenic environmental stimuli, such as diet, lifestyle, pollutants, also occurring in utero before birth. In this review, we will comment on various steps of the pathogenesis of cholesterol gallstones and interaction between environmental and genetic factors. The epigenomic approach may offer new options for therapy of gallstones and better possibilities for primary prevention in subjects at risk. PMID:23691293

  15. Impact of physiological levels of chenodeoxycholic acid supplementation on intestinal and hepatic bile acid and cholesterol metabolism in Cyp7a1-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Ryan D.; Lopez, Adam M.; Tong, Ernest Y.; Posey, Kenneth S.; Chuang, Jen-Chieh; Repa, Joyce J.; Turley, Stephen D.

    2014-01-01

    Mice deficient in cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase (Cyp7a1) have a diminished bile acid pool (BAP) and therefore represent a useful model for investigating the metabolic effects of restoring the pool with a specific BA. Previously we carried out such studies in Cyp7a1−/−mice fed physiological levels of cholic acid (CA) and achieved BAP restoration, along with an increased CA enrichment, at a dietary level of just 0.03% (w/w). Here we demonstrate that in Cyp7a1−/− mice fed chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) at a level of 0.06 % (w/w), the BAP was restored to normal size and became substantially enriched with muricholic acid (MCA)(>70%), leaving the combined contribution of CA and CDCA to be <15%. This resulted in a partial to complete reversal of the main changes in cholesterol and BA metabolism associated with Cyp7a1 deficiency such as an elevated rate of intestinal sterol synthesis, an enhanced level of mRNA for Cyp8b1 in the liver, and depressed mRNA levels for Ibabp, Shp and Fgf15 in the distal small intestine. When Cyp7a1−/− and matching Cyp7a1+/+ mice were fed a diet with added cholesterol (0.2%) (w/w), either alone, or also containing CDCA (0.06%) (w/w) or CA (0.03%) (w/w) for 18 days, the hepatic total cholesterol concentrations (mg/g) in the Cyp7a1−/− mice were 26.9±3.7, 16.4±0.9 and 47.6±1.9, respectively, vs 4.9±0.4, 5.0±0.7 and 6.4±1.9, respectively in the corresponding Cyp7a1+/+ controls. These data affirm the importance of using moderate levels of dietary BA supplementation to elicit changes in hepatic cholesterol metabolism through shifts in BAP size and composition. PMID:25447797

  16. Association of neural tube defects in children of mothers with MTHFR 677TT genotype and abnormal carbohydrate metabolism risk: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Cadenas-Benitez, N M; Yanes-Sosa, F; Gonzalez-Meneses, A; Cerrillos, L; Acosta, D; Praena-Fernandez, J M; Neth, O; Gomez de Terreros, I; Ybot-González, P

    2014-01-01

    Abnormalities in maternal folate and carbohydrate metabolism have both been shown to induce neural tube defects (NTD) in humans and animal models. However, the relationship between these two factors in the development of NTDs remains unclear. Data from mothers of children with spina bifida seen at the Unidad de Espina Bífida del Hospital Infantil Virgen del Rocío (case group) were compared to mothers of healthy children with no NTD (control group) who were randomly selected from patients seen at the outpatient ward in the same hospital. There were 25 individuals in the case group and 41 in the control group. Analysis of genotypes for the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) 677CT polymorphism in women with or without risk factors for abnormal carbohydrate metabolism revealed that mothers who were homozygous for the MTHFR 677TT polymorphism and at risk of abnormal carbohydrate metabolism were more likely to have offspring with spina bifida and high levels of homocysteine, compared to the control group. The increased incidence of NTDs in mothers homozygous for the MTHFR 677TT polymorphism and at risk of abnormal carbohydrate metabolism stresses the need for careful metabolic screening in pregnant women, and, if necessary, determination of the MTHFR 677CT genotype in those mothers at risk of developing abnormal carbohydrate metabolism. PMID:24737468

  17. Prevalence of Metabolic Syndrome and Metabolic Abnormalities in Schizophrenia and Related Disorders—A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Alex J.; Vancampfort, Davy; Sweers, Kim; van Winkel, Ruud; Yu, Weiping; De Hert, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Individuals with schizophrenia have high levels of medical comorbidity and cardiovascular risk factors. The presence of 3 or more specific factors is indicative of metabolic syndrome, which is a significant influence upon future morbidity and mortality. We aimed to clarify the prevalence and predictors of metabolic syndrome (MetS) in adults with schizophrenia and related disorders, accounting for subgroup differences. A PRISMA systematic search, appraisal, and meta-analysis were conducted of 126 analyses in 77 publications (n = 25 692). The overall rate of MetS was 32.5% (95% CI = 30.1%–35.0%), and there were only minor differences according to the different definitions of MetS, treatment setting (inpatient vs outpatient), by country of origin and no appreciable difference between males and females. Older age had a modest influence on the rate of MetS (adjusted R 2 = .20; P < .0001), but the strongest influence was of illness duration (adjusted R 2 = .35; P < .0001). At a study level, waist size was most useful in predicting high rate of MetS with a sensitivity of 79.4% and a specificity of 78.8%. Sensitivity and specificity of high blood pressure, high triglycerides, high glucose and low high-density lipoprotein, and age (>38 y) are shown in supplementary appendix 2 online. Regarding prescribed antipsychotic medication, highest rates were seen in those prescribed clozapine (51.9%) and lowest rates of MetS in those who were unmedicated (20.2%). Present findings strongly support the notion that patients with schizophrenia should be considered a high-risk group. Patients with schizophrenia should receive regular monitoring and adequate treatment of cardio-metabolic risk factors. PMID:22207632

  18. Abnormal high density lipoproteins in cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis

    SciTech Connect

    Shore, V.; Salen, G.; Cheng, F.W.; Forte, T.; Shefer, S.; Tint, G.S.

    1981-11-01

    The plasma lipoprotein profiles and high density lipoproteins (HDL) were characterized in patients with the genetic disease cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis (CTX). The mean HDL-cholesterol concentration in the CTX plasmas was 14.5 +/- 3.2 mg/dl, about one-third the normal value. The low HDL-cholesterol reflects a low concentration and an abnormal lipid composition of the plasma HDL. Relative to normal HDL, the cholesteryl esters are low, free cholesterol and phospholipids essentially normal, and triglycerides increased. The ratio of apoprotein (apo) to total cholesterol in the HDL of CTX was two to three times greater than normal. In the CTX HDL, the ratio of apoAI to apoAII was high, the proportion of apoC low, and a normally minor form of apoAI increased relative to other forms. The HDL in electron micrographs appeared normal morphologically and in particle size. The adnormalities in lipoprotein distribution profiles and composition of the plasma HDL result from metabolic defects that are not understood but may be linked to the genetic defect in bile acid synthesis in CTX. As a consequence, it is probable that the normal functions of the HDL, possibly including modulation of LDL-cholesterol uptake and the removal of excess cholesterol from peripheral tissues, are perturbed significantly in this disease.

  19. The prevalence of carotid plaque with different stability and its association with metabolic syndrome in China: The Asymptomatic Polyvascular Abnormalities Community study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Anxin; Wu, Lingyun; Liu, Xiaoxue; Su, Zhaoping; Luo, Yanxia; Chen, Shuohua; Li, Haibin; Liu, Xiangtong; Tao, Lixin; Guo, Jin; Zhang, Feng; Cao, Yibin; Zhao, Xingquan; Wu, Shouling; Guo, Xiuhua

    2016-08-01

    Few studies have investigated the prevalence of carotid plaque with different stability in Chinese. As is well known, carotid atherosclerosis is tightly associated with metabolic syndrome (MetS); however, the data about the association between the presence of carotid plaque with different stability and MetS was limited. The aim of our study was to investigate the prevalence of carotid plaque with different stability and its potential association with MetS in general Chinese population.The Asymptomatic Polyvascular Abnormalities Community study is a community-based study to investigate the epidemiology of asymptomatic polyvascular abnormalities in Chinese adults. A total of 5393 participants were finally eligible and included in this study. The carotid plaque and its stability were assessed using ultrasonography. The MetS was defined using the criteria from US National Cholesterol Education Program-Adult Treatment Panel III. Data were analyzed with multivariate logistic regression models.Of the 5393 subjects, 1397 (25.9%) participants had stable carotid plaque, 1518 (28.1%) had unstable carotid plaque in participants, and 1456 (27.0%) had a MetS. MetS was, respectively, significantly associated with the prevalence of carotid plaque (odds ratio [OR]: 1.25; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.07, 1.47), stable carotid plaque (OR: 1.23; 95% CI: 1.02,1.48), and unstable carotid plaque (OR: 1.27; 95% CI: 1.03,1.56) after adjusting for age, gender, level of education, income, smoking, drinking, physical activity, body mass index, low-density lipoprotein, and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein. With the number of MetS components, the prevalence of carotid plaque, stable carotid plaque, and unstable carotid plaque significantly increased (P for trend <0.0001), respectively.In summary, the prevalence of carotid plaque was 54.1%, stable carotid plaque was 25.9%, and unstable carotid plaque was 28.1%. Our study revealed that the prevalence of carotid plaque, stable carotid plaque

  20. Discordance of Low-Density Lipoprotein and High-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol Particle Versus Cholesterol Concentration for the Prediction of Cardiovascular Disease in Patients With Metabolic Syndrome and Diabetes Mellitus (from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis [MESA]).

    PubMed

    Tehrani, David M; Zhao, Yanglu; Blaha, Michael J; Mora, Samia; Mackey, Rachel H; Michos, Erin D; Budoff, Matthew J; Cromwell, William; Otvos, James D; Rosenblit, Paul D; Wong, Nathan D

    2016-06-15

    A stronger association for low-density lipoprotein particle (LDL-P) and high-density lipoprotein particle (HDL-P) versus cholesterol concentrations (LDL-C and HDL-C) in predicting coronary heart disease (CHD) has been noted. We evaluate the role of these factors and extent of particle-cholesterol discordance in those with diabetes mellitus (DM) and metabolic syndrome (MetS) for event prediction. In the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis, we examined discordance of LDL and HDL (defined as a subject's difference between baseline particle and cholesterol percentiles), LDL-C, LDL-P, HDL-C, and HDL-P in relation to incident CHD and cardiovascular disease (CVD) events in subjects with DM, MetS (without DM), or neither condition using Cox regression. Of the 6,417 subjects with 10-year follow-up, those with MetS (n = 1,596) and DM (n = 838) had significantly greater LDL and HDL discordance compared with those without these conditions. In discordance models, only LDL discordance (per SD) within the MetS group was positively associated with CHD events (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] = 1.22, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.01 to 1.48, p <0.05). In models with individual particle/cholesterol variables (per SD), within the DM group, HDL-P was inversely (HR 0.71, 95% CI 0.52 to 0.96, p <0.05) and LDL-C positively (HR 1.47, 95% CI 1.07 to 2.03, p <0.05) associated with CHD. In those with MetS, only LDL-P was positively associated with CHD (HR 1.34, 95% CI 1.00 to 1.78, p <0.05). Similar findings were also seen for CVD. LDL discordance and higher LDL-P in MetS, and higher LDL-C and lower HDL-P in DM, predict CHD and CVD, supporting a potential role for examining lipoprotein particles and discordances in those with MetS and DM. PMID:27156827

  1. Water-Soluble Compounds from Lentinula edodes Influencing the HMG-CoA Reductase Activity and the Expression of Genes Involved in the Cholesterol Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Gil-Ramírez, Alicia; Caz, Víctor; Smiderle, Fhernanda R; Martin-Hernandez, Roberto; Largo, Carlota; Tabernero, María; Marín, Francisco R; Iacomini, Marcello; Reglero, Guillermo; Soler-Rivas, Cristina

    2016-03-01

    A water extract from Lentinula edodes (LWE) showed HMG-CoA reductase inhibitory activity but contained no statins. NMR indicated the presence of water-soluble α- and β-glucans and fucomannogalactans. Fractions containing derivatives of these polysaccharides with molecular weight down to approximately 1 kDa still retained their inhibitory activity. Once digested LWE was applied to Caco2 in transport experiments, no significant effect was noticed on the modulation of cholesterol-related gene expression. But, when the lower compartment of the Caco2 monolayer was applied to HepG2, some genes were modulated (after 24 h). LWE was also administrated to normo- and hypercholesterolemic mice, and no significant lowering of serum cholesterol levels was observed; but reduction of triglycerides in liver was observed. However, LWE supplementation modulated the transcriptional profile of some genes involved in the cholesterol metabolism similarly to simvastatin, suggesting that it could hold potential as a hypolipidemic/hypocholesterolemic extract, although further dose-dependent studies should be carried out. PMID:26877235

  2. Endocrine, metabolic, nutritional and body composition abnormalities are common in advanced intensively-treated (transplanted) multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Greenfield, D M; Boland, E; Ezaydi, Y; Ross, R J M; Ahmedzai, S H; Snowden, J A

    2014-07-01

    Modern treatment strategies have increased life expectancy in multiple myeloma, but little is known about the endocrine, metabolic and nutritional status of long-term survivors. We performed endocrine, metabolic, bone, body composition and nutritional evaluations in 32 patients with intensively-treated, advanced but stable, myeloma a median duration of 6 years from diagnosis and three lines of intensive treatment, including at least one haematopoietic SCT procedure. All patients were off active treatment. There was a high prevalence of endocrine dysfunction: hypothyroidism (9%), hypogonadism (65% males) and elevated prolactin (19%). Adrenocortical function was preserved despite large cumulative corticosteroid pretreatment. Biochemical markers were consistent with postmenopausal status in all females and infertility in males. Nutritionally, 59% were vitamin D insufficient/deficient, reduced serum folate in 25% and vitamin B12 in 6%. Total body DEXA scanning confirmed 'sarcopenic-obesity' in 65%, but reduced bone density was seen in a minority. We conclude that potentially correctable endocrine, metabolic and nutritional abnormalities are prevalent in heavily-treated patients with stable multiple myeloma. Preservation of bone supports the efficacy of bisphosphonate treatment from diagnosis, but sarcopenic-obesity may contribute to frailty. Ultimately, multi-system screening and appropriate interventions may optimise quality of long-term survival and further studies are warranted. PMID:24710566

  3. Impaired energy metabolism and abnormal muscle histology in mut- methylmalonic aciduria.

    PubMed

    Østergaard, E; Wibrand, F; Ørngreen, M C; Vissing, J; Horn, N

    2005-09-27

    The authors report a 27-year-old man with B12-responsive mut- methylmalonic aciduria associated with pure muscle symptoms. Two mutations were found in the methylmalonyl-CoA mutase gene. An exercise test showed a reduced maximal workload and reduced oxygen uptake, and a muscle biopsy showed subsarcolemmal accumulation of mitochondria and normal respiratory chain enzyme activities. These findings may be caused by inhibition of mitochondrial energy metabolism by methylmalonate or its metabolites. PMID:16186538

  4. Transmural Distribution of Metabolic Abnormalities and Glycolytic Activity during Dobutamine Induced Demand Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Jameel, Mohammad N; Wang, Xiaohong; Eijgelshoven, Marcel H.J.; Mansoor, Abdul; Zhang, Jianyi

    2008-01-01

    The heterogeneity across the LV wall is characterized by higher rates of oxygen consumption, systolic thickening fraction, myocardial perfusion and lower energetic state in the subendocardial layers (ENDO). During dobutamine stimulation induced demand ischemia, the transmural distribution of energy demand and metabolic markers of ischemia are not known. In this study, hemodynamics, transmural high energy phosphate (HEP) and 2-deoxyglucose-6-phosphate (2DGP) levels and myocardial blood flow (MBF) were determined under basal conditions (B), during dobutamine infusion (DOB: 20 μg/kg/min iv.), and during coronary stenosis+DOB+2-deoxy-glucose (2DG) infusion. DOB increased rate pressure products (RPP) and MBF significantly without affecting subendocardial to subepicardial blood flow ratio (ENDO/EPI) or HEP levels. During coronary stenosis+DOB+2-deoxy-glucose (2DG) infusion RPP, ischemic zone (IZ) MBF and ENDO/EPI decreased significantly. IZ PCr/ATP decreased significantly (2.30 +/- 0.14, 2.06 +/- 0.13 and 2.04 +/- 0.11 to 1.77 +/- 0.12, 1.70 +/- 0.11 and 1.72 +/- 0.12; EPI, MID and ENDO, respectively) and 2DG6P accumulated in all layers as evidenced by the 2DG6P/PCr (0.55 +/- 0.12, 0.52 +/- 0.10 and 0.37 +/- 0.08; EPI, MID and ENDO respectively; p<0.05, EPI>ENDO). In the IZ the wet weight/dry weight ratio was significantly increased as compared to the normal zone (5.9 +/- 0.5 vs. 4.4 +/- 0.4; p<0.05). Thus, in stenotic perfused bed, during dobutamine induced high cardiac workstate, despite higher blood flow the subepicardial layers showed the greater metabolic changes that characterized by a shift toward higher carbohydrate metabolism suggesting a homeostatic responses to high cardiac workstate is characterized by more glucose utilization in energy metabolism. PMID:18424629

  5. Prenatal caffeine exposure induces a poor quality of articular cartilage in male adult offspring rats via cholesterol accumulation in cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Hanwen; Li, Jing; Cao, Hong; Tan, Yang; Magdalou, Jacques; Chen, Liaobin; Wang, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiological investigations indicate that osteoarthritis is associated with intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR) and abnormal cholesterol metabolism. Our previous studies showed that prenatal caffeine exposure (PCE) induced chondrogenesis retardation in IUGR offspring rats. The current study sought to investigate the effects of PCE on male IUGR offspring rats’ articular cartilage, and the mechanisms associated with abnormal cholesterol metabolism. Based on the results from both male fetal and adult fed a high-fat diet (HFD) studies of rats that experienced PCE (120 mg/kg.d), the results showed a poor quality of articular cartilage and cholesterol accumulation in the adult PCE group. Meanwhile, the serum total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol concentrations were increased in adult PCE offspring. We also observed lower expression of insulin-like growth factor1 (IGF1) and impaired cholesterol efflux in adult articular cartilage. Furthermore, the expression of cartilage functional genes, components of the IGF1 signaling pathway and cholesterol efflux pathway related genes were decreased in PCE fetal cartilage. In conclusion, PCE induced a poor quality of articular cartilage in male adult offspring fed a HFD. This finding was shown to be due to cholesterol accumulation in the cartilage, which may have resulted from intrauterine reduced activity of the IGF1 signaling pathway. PMID:26639318

  6. Phosphatidylcholine: Greasing the Cholesterol Transport Machinery

    PubMed Central

    Lagace, Thomas A.

    2015-01-01

    Negative feedback regulation of cholesterol metabolism in mammalian cells ensures a proper balance of cholesterol with other membrane lipids, principal among these being the major phospholipid phosphatidylcholine (PC). Processes such as cholesterol biosynthesis and efflux, cholesteryl ester storage in lipid droplets, and uptake of plasma lipoproteins are tuned to the cholesterol/PC ratio. Cholesterol-loaded macrophages in atherosclerotic lesions display increased PC biosynthesis that buffers against elevated cholesterol levels and may also facilitate cholesterol trafficking to enhance cholesterol sensing and efflux. These same mechanisms could play a generic role in homeostatic responses to acute changes in membrane free cholesterol levels. Here, I discuss the established and emerging roles of PC metabolism in promoting intracellular cholesterol trafficking and membrane lipid homeostasis. PMID:27081313

  7. Effects of ellagic acid-rich extract of pomegranates peel on regulation of cholesterol metabolism and its molecular mechanism in hamsters.

    PubMed

    Liu, Run; Li, Jianke; Cheng, Yujiang; Huo, Tianbo; Xue, Jiayi; Liu, Yingli; Liu, Jianshu; Chen, Xiping

    2015-03-01

    The study investigated the effect of pomegranates ellagic acid (PEA) on blood cholesterol and investigated its effects on LXR/RXR/PPAR-ABCA1 nuclear receptors-signaling pathways of cholesterol metabolism on molecular level in hamsters. In this experiment, hamsters were randomly divided into two groups: the first group (NG, n = 9) was always fed the normal diet, whereas the other group (HFG, n = 45) was fed a high fat diet during the first 4 weeks and then fed the normal diet for the last 4 weeks. In HFG, which was divided into five groups (n = 9) during the last 4 weeks, three groups were treated with PEA at 44 mg per kg bw, 88 mg per kg bw and 177 mg per kg bw, one group was treated with simvastatin at 1.77 mg per kg bw, and one was given sterile double-distilled water. The data validated that PEA dose-dependently decreased plasma total cholesterol and triglyceride level accompanied by a greater excretion of fecal bile acid. The result of RT-PCR revealed that PEA up-regulated liver X receptor (LXRα), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) and their downstream gene ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1), with no effect on retinoid X receptor (RXRα). PEA promoted cholesterol removal by enhancing fecal bile acid and up-regulation of the two pathways, LXR/PPAR-ABCA1. Moreover, PEA was stronger than simvastatin in some aspects. PMID:25579987

  8. Prevalence of the metabolic syndrome in patients with hypertension treated in general practice in Spain: an assessment of blood pressure and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol control and accuracy of diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Barrios, Vivencio; Escobar, Carlos; Calderón, Alberto; Llisterri, José L; Alegría, Eduardo; Muñiz, Javier; Matalí, Arantxa

    2007-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate whether primary care physicians in Spain accurately diagnose the metabolic syndrome in hypertensive patients, to define the profile and management of these patients in clinical practice, and to ascertain the level of blood pressure and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol control. Data were analyzed from a cross-sectional survey involving 12,954 patients with hypertension (Prevención Cardiovascular en España en Atención Primaria: Intervención Sobre el Colesterol en Hipertensión [PRESCOT] study), wherein 52% of the cohort fulfilled the National Cholesterol Education Program-Adult Treatment Panel criteria for the metabolic syndrome. The majority of patients (54.6%) had 3 risk factors, 32.4% had 4, and 13% had 5 risk factors. Physician diagnosis of the metabolic syndrome was poor, with 43.7% of physicians missing the diagnosis and 12.9% wrongly diagnosing the metabolic syndrome. Blood pressure and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol control rates were very low, with only 4.7% of metabolic syndrome patients achieving control for both blood pressure and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol vs 13.5% for non-metabolic syndrome patients (P<.0001). These findings demonstrate that the metabolic syndrome is common in patients with hypertension and that it is generally poorly diagnosed and treated by primary care physicians. PMID:17684454

  9. Cholesterol (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Cholesterol is a soft, waxy substance that is present in all parts of the body including the ... and obtained from animal products in the diet. Cholesterol is manufactured in the liver and is needed ...

  10. Late Antiretroviral Therapy (ART) Initiation Is Associated with Long-Term Persistence of Systemic Inflammation and Metabolic Abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Ghislain, Mathilde; Bastard, Jean-Philippe; Meyer, Laurence; Capeau, Jacqueline; Fellahi, Soraya; Gérard, Laurence; May, Thierry; Simon, Anne; Vigouroux, Corinne; Goujard, Cécile

    2015-01-01

    Objectives HIV-induced immunodeficiency is associated with metabolic abnormalities and systemic inflammation. We investigated the effect of antiretroviral therapy (ART) on restoration of insulin sensitivity, markers of immune activation and inflammation. Methods Immunological, metabolic and inflammatory status was assessed at antiretroviral therapy initiation and three years later in 208 patients from the ANRS-COPANA cohort. Patients were compared according to their pre-ART CD4+ cell count (group 1: ≤ 200/mm3, n = 66 vs. group 2: > 200/mm3, n = 142). Results Median CD4+ cell count increased in both groups after 3 years of successful ART but remained significantly lower in group 1 than in group 2 (404 vs 572 cells/mm3). Triglyceride and insulin levels were higher or tended to be higher in group 1 than in group 2 at ART initiation (median: 1.32 vs 0.97 mmol/l, p = 0.04 and 7.6 vs 6.8 IU, p = 0.09, respectively) and remained higher after three years of ART (1.42 vs 1.16 mmol/L, p = 0.0009 and 8.9 vs 7.2 IU, p = 0.01). After adjustment for individual characteristics and antiretroviral therapy regimens (protease inhibitor (PI), zidovudine), insulin levels remained significantly higher in patients with low baseline CD4+ cell count. Baseline IL-6, sCD14 and sTNFR2 levels were higher in group 1 than in group 2. Most biomarkers of immune activation/inflammation declined during ART, but IL-6 and hsCRP levels remained higher in patients with low baseline CD4+ cell count than in the other patients (median are respectively 1.4 vs 1.1 pg/ml, p = 0.03 and 2.1 vs 1.3 mg/ml, p = 0.07). Conclusion After three years of successful ART, low pretreatment CD4+ T cell count remained associated with elevated insulin, triglyceride, IL-6 and hsCRP levels. These persistent metabolic and inflammatory abnormalities could contribute to an increased risk of cardiovascular and metabolic disease. PMID:26636578

  11. Transmural distribution of metabolic abnormalities and glycolytic activity during dobutamine-induced demand ischemia.

    PubMed

    Jameel, Mohammad N; Wang, Xiaohong; Eijgelshoven, Marcel H J; Mansoor, Abdul; Zhang, Jianyi

    2008-06-01

    The heterogeneity across the left ventricular wall is characterized by higher rates of oxygen consumption, systolic thickening fraction, myocardial perfusion, and lower energetic state in the subendocardial layers (ENDO). During dobutamine stimulation-induced demand ischemia, the transmural distribution of energy demand and metabolic markers of ischemia are not known. In this study, hemodynamics, transmural high-energy phosphate (HEP), 2-deoxyglucose-6-phosphate (2-DGP) levels, and myocardial blood flow (MBF) were determined under basal conditions, during dobutamine infusion (DOB: 20 microg x kg(-1) x min(-1) iv), and during coronary stenosis + DOB + 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG) infusion. DOB increased rate pressure products (RPP) and MBF significantly without affecting the subendocardial-to-subepicardial blood flow ratio (ENDO/EPI) or HEP levels. During coronary stenosis + DOB + 2-DG infusion, RPP, ischemic zone (IZ) MBF, and ENDO/EPI decreased significantly. The IZ ratio of creatine phosphate-to-ATP decreased significantly [2.30 +/- 0.14, 2.06 +/- 0.13, and 2.04 +/- 0.11 to 1.77 +/- 0.12, 1.70 +/- 0.11, and 1.72 +/- 0.12 for EPI, midmyocardial (MID), and ENDO, respectively], and 2-DGP accumulated in all layers, as evidenced by the 2-DGP/PCr (0.55 +/- 0.12, 0.52 +/- 0.10, and 0.37 +/- 0.08 for EPI, MID, and ENDO, respectively; P < 0.05, EPI > ENDO). In the IZ the wet weight-to-dry weight ratio was significantly increased compared with the normal zone (5.9 +/- 0.5 vs. 4.4 +/- 0.4; P < 0.05). Thus, in the stenotic perfused bed, during dobutamine-induced high cardiac work state, despite higher blood flow, the subepicardial layers showed the greater metabolic changes characterized by a shift toward higher carbohydrate metabolism, suggesting that a homeostatic response to high-cardiac work state is characterized by more glucose utilization in energy metabolism. PMID:18424629

  12. Lack of significant metabolic abnormalities in mice with liver-specific disruption of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1.

    PubMed

    Lavery, Gareth G; Zielinska, Agnieszka E; Gathercole, Laura L; Hughes, Beverly; Semjonous, Nina; Guest, Phillip; Saqib, Khalid; Sherlock, Mark; Reynolds, Gary; Morgan, Stuart A; Tomlinson, Jeremy W; Walker, Elizabeth A; Rabbitt, Elizabeth H; Stewart, Paul M

    2012-07-01

    Glucocorticoids (GC) are implicated in the development of metabolic syndrome, and patients with GC excess share many clinical features, such as central obesity and glucose intolerance. In patients with obesity or type 2 diabetes, systemic GC concentrations seem to be invariably normal. Tissue GC concentrations determined by the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and local cortisol (corticosterone in mice) regeneration from cortisone (11-dehydrocorticosterone in mice) by the 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11β-HSD1) enzyme, principally expressed in the liver. Transgenic mice have demonstrated the importance of 11β-HSD1 in mediating aspects of the metabolic syndrome, as well as HPA axis control. In order to address the primacy of hepatic 11β-HSD1 in regulating metabolism and the HPA axis, we have generated liver-specific 11β-HSD1 knockout (LKO) mice, assessed biomarkers of GC metabolism, and examined responses to high-fat feeding. LKO mice were able to regenerate cortisol from cortisone to 40% of control and had no discernible difference in a urinary metabolite marker of 11β-HSD1 activity. Although circulating corticosterone was unaltered, adrenal size was increased, indicative of chronic HPA stimulation. There was a mild improvement in glucose tolerance but with insulin sensitivity largely unaffected. Adiposity and body weight were unaffected as were aspects of hepatic lipid homeostasis, triglyceride accumulation, and serum lipids. Additionally, no changes in the expression of genes involved in glucose or lipid homeostasis were observed. Liver-specific deletion of 11β-HSD1 reduces corticosterone regeneration and may be important for setting aspects of HPA axis tone, without impacting upon urinary steroid metabolite profile. These discordant data have significant implications for the use of these biomarkers of 11β-HSD1 activity in clinical studies. The paucity of metabolic abnormalities in LKO points to important compensatory effects by HPA

  13. Lack of Significant Metabolic Abnormalities in Mice with Liver-Specific Disruption of 11β-Hydroxysteroid Dehydrogenase Type 1

    PubMed Central

    Zielinska, Agnieszka E.; Gathercole, Laura L.; Hughes, Beverly; Semjonous, Nina; Guest, Phillip; Saqib, Khalid; Sherlock, Mark; Reynolds, Gary; Morgan, Stuart A.; Tomlinson, Jeremy W.; Walker, Elizabeth A.; Rabbitt, Elizabeth H.; Stewart, Paul M.

    2012-01-01

    Glucocorticoids (GC) are implicated in the development of metabolic syndrome, and patients with GC excess share many clinical features, such as central obesity and glucose intolerance. In patients with obesity or type 2 diabetes, systemic GC concentrations seem to be invariably normal. Tissue GC concentrations determined by the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and local cortisol (corticosterone in mice) regeneration from cortisone (11-dehydrocorticosterone in mice) by the 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11β-HSD1) enzyme, principally expressed in the liver. Transgenic mice have demonstrated the importance of 11β-HSD1 in mediating aspects of the metabolic syndrome, as well as HPA axis control. In order to address the primacy of hepatic 11β-HSD1 in regulating metabolism and the HPA axis, we have generated liver-specific 11β-HSD1 knockout (LKO) mice, assessed biomarkers of GC metabolism, and examined responses to high-fat feeding. LKO mice were able to regenerate cortisol from cortisone to 40% of control and had no discernible difference in a urinary metabolite marker of 11β-HSD1 activity. Although circulating corticosterone was unaltered, adrenal size was increased, indicative of chronic HPA stimulation. There was a mild improvement in glucose tolerance but with insulin sensitivity largely unaffected. Adiposity and body weight were unaffected as were aspects of hepatic lipid homeostasis, triglyceride accumulation, and serum lipids. Additionally, no changes in the expression of genes involved in glucose or lipid homeostasis were observed. Liver-specific deletion of 11β-HSD1 reduces corticosterone regeneration and may be important for setting aspects of HPA axis tone, without impacting upon urinary steroid metabolite profile. These discordant data have significant implications for the use of these biomarkers of 11β-HSD1 activity in clinical studies. The paucity of metabolic abnormalities in LKO points to important compensatory effects by HPA

  14. Cardiovascular biomarkers in vertically HIV-infected children without metabolic abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Sainz, Talía; Diaz, Laura; Navarro, María Luisa; Rojo, Pablo; Blázquez, Daniel; Ramos, José Tomás; de José, María Isabel; Álvarez-Fuente, María; Serrano-Villar, Sergio; Mellado, María José; Muñoz-Fernández, María Angeles

    2014-04-01

    Early cardiovascular disease is a major concern for ART-suppressed vertically HIV-infected children; however, evidence is lacking regarding specific preventive measures. In this study, a complete panel of biomarkers was determined together with carotid intima-media thickness (IMT), in a cohort of 64 HIV-infected children and 30 controls. Mean age of participants was 14.1±5 years. HIV-infected patients showed normal lipid profile, with only slightly higher triglycerides, and no differences between groups were found regarding IMT. HIV-infected patients displayed higher levels of soluble CD14 (sCD14) and soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (sVCAM) (all p<0.05). However, levels of C-reactive protein, interleukin-6, myeloperoxidase, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, P-selectin and tissue plasminogen activator were similar between groups. Vertically HIV-infected subjects on ART with no significant metabolic disturbances displayed increased sCD14 and sVCAM but not up-regulation of proinflammatory pathways. Larger studies are warranted to assess the impact of a strict metabolic control on cardiovascular risk and to define specific cardiovascular disease preventive strategies in this population. PMID:24530771

  15. Sitting time, physical fitness impairments and metabolic abnormalities in people with bipolar disorder: An exploratory study.

    PubMed

    Vancampfort, Davy; Sienaert, Pascal; Wyckaert, Sabine; De Hert, Marc; Stubbs, Brendon; Probst, Michel

    2016-08-30

    A sedentary lifestyle is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease and mortality. Little is known however about sedentary behavior in people with bipolar disorder (BD). The primary aim of this study was to explore associations between sitting time (as a proxy for a sedentary lifestyle) and physical fitness and metabolic parameters in BD. A secondary aim was to investigate associations between psychiatric symptoms, psychotropic medication use and sitting time. Thirty-nine (21♀) participants (43.7±12.4 years) completed a full metabolic screening, the sitting time item of the International Physical Activity Questionnaire, the Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology self-report and the Hypomania Checklist-32. Additionally participants performed the Eurofit-test battery and 6-min walk test. The mean time spent sitting per day for the entire sample was 7.0±3.0h. A higher body mass index, worse physical fitness and higher antipsychotic medication dose were identified as independent predictors of higher levels of sitting behavior. The model explained 76.5% of the variability in the sitting time. Given that a sedentary lifestyle is an independent predictor of cardiovascular disease, future interventions specifically targeting time spend sitting are warranted in BD, with a particular emphasis on those with high body mass index and low fitness levels. PMID:27235986

  16. Abnormalities of acid-base balance and predisposition to metabolic acidosis in Metachromatic Leukodystrophy patients.

    PubMed

    Lorioli, L; Cicalese, M P; Silvani, P; Assanelli, A; Salvo, I; Mandelli, A; Fumagalli, F; Fiori, R; Ciceri, F; Aiuti, A; Sessa, M; Roncarolo, M G; Lanzani, C; Biffi, A

    2015-05-01

    Metachromatic Leukodystrophy (MLD; MIM# 250100) is a rare inherited lysosomal storage disorder caused by the deficiency of Arylsulfatase A (ARSA). The enzymatic defect results in the accumulation of the ARSA substrate that is particularly relevant in myelin forming cells and leads to progressive dysmyelination and dysfunction of the central and peripheral nervous system. Sulfatide accumulation has also been reported in various visceral organs, although little is known about the potential clinical consequences of such accumulation. Different forms of MLD-associated gallbladder disease have been described, and there is one reported case of an MLD patient presenting with functional consequences of sulfatide accumulation in the kidney. Here we describe a wide cohort of MLD patients in whom a tendency to sub-clinical metabolic acidosis was observed. Furthermore in some of them we report episodes of metabolic acidosis of different grades of severity developed in acute clinical conditions of various origin. Importantly, we finally show how a careful acid-base balance monitoring and prompt correction of imbalances might prevent severe consequences of acidosis. PMID:25796965

  17. Metabolic abnormalities associated with weight loss during chemoirradiation of head-and-neck cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Alexander; Jabbari, Siavash; Worden, Francis P.; Chepeha, Douglas B.; Teknos, Theodoros N.; Nyquist, Gurston G.; Tsien, Christina; Schipper, Matthew J.; Urba, Susan . E-mail: eisbruch@umich.edu

    2005-12-01

    Purpose: Weight loss caused by acute mucositis and dysphagia is common during concurrent chemoirradiation (chemo-RT) of head-and-neck (HN) cancer. The metabolic consequences of weight loss during chemo-RT were investigated. Patients and Methods: Ninety-six patients with locally advanced HN cancer were treated from 1995 to 2001 on protocols that consisted of 1 to 2 cycles of induction cisplatin/5-fluorouracil followed by irradiation (70 Gy over 7 weeks) concurrent with cisplatin (100 mg/m{sup 2} every 3 weeks). Body weights and metabolic evaluations were obtained before and during induction chemotherapy and chemo-RT. Greatest percent changes in weight and in the laboratory values were calculated for each phase of therapy. Results: During induction chemotherapy, significant changes were found in BUN, BUN:creatinine ratio, HCO{sub 3}, Mg, and albumin, but not in creatinine, Na, K, or weight. During chemo-RT, significant additional changes were observed in all parameters measured, including increases in BUN, creatinine, BUN: creatinine ratio, and HCO{sub 3} and decreases in Mg, albumin, Na, K, and weight. The magnitude of most of these changes was significantly greater during chemo-RT than during induction chemotherapy. During chemo-RT, 35% of the patients had more than 10% body weight loss and 6 patients had an increase in creatinine of more than 100%, including 5 patients with Grade 2 nephrotoxicity, all of whom had weight loss 10% or more. Significant correlations were found between weight loss and creatinine (p < 0.0001) or BUN (p = 0.0002) rises, but not with BUN:creatinine ratio or other metabolic changes. Age, gender, tobacco history, hypertension, and diabetes mellitus were not significant predictors of nephrotoxicity. Conclusions: Weight loss during cisplatin-containing chemo-RT was found to be associated with reduced kidney function. These findings do not establish cause-effect relationships; however, they highlight the importance of intensive supportive

  18. [Metabolic abnormalities, lipodystrophy and cardiovascular risk in HIV-infected patients].

    PubMed

    Leclercq, Pascale; Blanc, Myriam

    2006-05-15

    Life expectancy of HIV-infected patients has improved considerably with HAART. However long term use of HAART is linked with lipodystrophy syndrom (subcutaneous lipoatrophy and central fat accumulation) associated with dyslipemia (hypoHDL, hyperLDL and hypertriglyceridemia) and insulin resistance. It is also linked with mitochondrial toxicity clinically expressed by chronic fatigue syndrom and premature aging. The induced metabolic syndrom has cardiovascular consequences and myocardial infarction is the cause of 7% of the HIV-infected deaths in 2000. Assessment of these complications should be done at least every year. Treatment options concern antiretroviral therapy with the search for the least toxic drug (but with equal antiviral efficacy), symptomatic treatment (statin, fibrates, thiazolidinediones, metformin) and lifestyle modifications (first of all, stopping cigarette smoking!) PMID:16775979

  19. Abnormal Collagen Metabolism in Cultured Skin Fibroblasts from Patients with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodemann, H. Peter; Bayreuther, Klaus

    1984-08-01

    Total collagen synthesis is decreased by about 29% (P < 0.01) in skin fibroblasts established in vitro from male patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) as compared with that in normal male skin fibroblasts in vitro. The reduction in collagen synthesis is associated with an approximately 2-fold increase in collagen degradation in DMD fibroblasts. Correlated to these alterations in the metabolism of collagen, DMD fibroblasts express a significantly higher hydroxyproline/proline ratio (DMD: 1.36-1.45; P < 0.01) than do normal fibroblasts (controls: 0.86-0.89). The increased hydroxylation of proline residues of collagen (composed of type I and type III) could be the cause for the enhanced degradation of collagen in DMD fibroblasts.

  20. Dysfunctional protection against advanced glycation due to thiamine metabolism abnormalities in gestational diabetes.

    PubMed

    Bartáková, Vendula; Pleskačová, Anna; Kuricová, Katarína; Pácal, Lukáš; Dvořáková, Veronika; Bělobrádková, Jana; Tomandlová, Marie; Tomandl, Josef; Kaňková, Kateřina

    2016-08-01

    While the pathogenic role of dicarbonyl stress and accelerated formation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) to glucose intolerance and to the development of diabetic complications is well established, little is known about these processes in gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), a condition pathogenically quite similar to type 2 diabetes. The aims of the present study were (i) to determine plasma thiamine and erythrocyte thiamine diphosphate (TDP) and transketolase (TKT) activity in pregnant women with and without GDM, (ii) to assess relationships between thiamine metabolism parameters and selected clinical, biochemical and anthropometric characteristics and, finally, (iii) to analyse relationship between variability in the genes involved in the regulation of transmembrane thiamine transport (i.e. SLC19A2 and SLC19A3) and relevant parameters of thiamine metabolism. We found significantly lower plasma BMI adjusted thiamine in women with GDM (P = 0.002, Mann-Whitney) while levels of erythrocyte TDP (an active TKT cofactor) in mid-trimester were significantly higher in GDM compared to controls (P = 0.04, Mann-Whitney). However, mid-gestational TKT activity - reflecting pentose phosphate pathway activity - did not differ between the two groups (P > 0.05, Mann-Whitney). Furthermore, we ascertained significant associations of postpartum TKT activity with SNPs SLC19A2 rs6656822 and SLC19A3 rs7567984 (P = 0.03 and P = 0.007, resp., Kruskal-Wallis). Our findings of increased thiamine delivery to the cells without concomitant increase of TKT activity in women with GDM therefore indicate possible pathogenic role of thiamine mishandling in GDM. Further studies are needed to determine its contribution to maternal and/or neonatal morbidity. PMID:27287225

  1. Association of Serum Ferritin Level with Risk of Incident Abnormal Glucose Metabolism in Southwestern China: a Prospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Fangli; Zhao, Zhuoxian; Tian, Li; Zheng, Tianpeng; Gao, Yun; Chen, Tao; Yan, Fangfang; Tian, Haoming

    2016-01-01

    This prospective cohort study aimed to analyze the association between serum ferritin levels and the risk of abnormal glucose metabolism (AGM) in Southwestern Chinese population. The 383 subjects who are aged ≥20 years and free of AGM at baseline between in 2007 and in 2008 were included in Southwestern China, and their baseline serum ferritin levels were measured. Among these subjects, 140 subjects were developed into AGM during the follow-up (2008-2012). In logistic regression models, the relative risk in the top versus that in the lowest quartile of serum ferritin levels was 2.86 (p = 0.013) in females and 3.50 (p = 0.029) in males after adjusting the age, gender, family history of diabetes, current smoking, and alcohol; however, serum ferritin levels were not significantly associated with incident of AGM after controlling for metabolic factors (waist circumference, systolic pressure (SBP), triglyceride (TG), and homeostasis model assessment formula insulin resistance (HOMA-IR)). Elevated serum ferritin levels are associated with AGM but not an independent risk factor. PMID:26073512

  2. Reversal of brain metabolic abnormalities following treatment of AIDS dementia complex with 3'-azido-2',3'-dideoxythymidine (AZT, zidovudine): a PET-FDG study

    SciTech Connect

    Brunetti, A.; Berg, G.; Di Chiro, G.; Cohen, R.M.; Yarchoan, R.; Pizzo, P.A.; Broder, S.; Eddy, J.; Fulham, M.J.; Finn, R.D.

    1989-05-01

    Brain glucose metabolism was evaluated in four patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) dementia complex using (/sup 18/F)fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and positron emission tomography (PET) scans at the beginning of therapy with 3'-azido-2',3'-dideoxythymidine (AZT, zidovudine), and later in the course of therapy. In two patients, baseline, large focal cortical abnormalities of glucose utilization were reversed during the course of therapy. In the other two patients, the initial PET study did not reveal pronounced focal alterations, while the post-treatment scans showed markedly increased cortical glucose metabolism. The improved cortical glucose utilization was accompanied in all patients by immunologic and neurologic improvement. PET-FDG studies can detect cortical metabolic abnormalities associated with AIDS dementia complex, and may be used to monitor the metabolic improvement in response to AZT treatment.

  3. ABCG5/ABCG8 in cholesterol excretion and atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiao-Hua; Qian, Kun; Jiang, Na; Zheng, Xi-Long; Cayabyab, Francisco S; Tang, Chao-Ke

    2014-01-20

    Cholesterol is essential for the growth and function of all mammalian cells, but abnormally increased blood cholesterol is a major risk factor for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters G5 (ABCG5) and G8 (ABCG8) form an obligate heterodimer that limits intestinal absorption and facilitates biliary secretion of cholesterol and phytosterols. Consistent with their function, ABCG5 and ABCG8 are located on the apical membrane of enterocytes and hepatocytes. Liver X receptor is the major positive regulator of ABCG5 and ABCG8 expression. Mutations in either of the two genes cause sitosterolemia, a condition in which cholesterol and plant sterols accumulate in the circulation leading to premature cardiovascular disease. Overexpression of ABCG5 and ABCG8 in mice retards diet-induced atherosclerosis because of reduced circulating and hepatic cholesterol. In the current review, we summarize recent developments and propose a future framework that provides new perspectives on the regulation of cholesterol metabolism and treatment of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. PMID:24252657

  4. Sensitivity of cholecystokinin receptors to membrane cholesterol content

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Aditya J.; Miller, Laurence J.

    2012-01-01

    Cholesterol represents a structurally and functionally important component of the eukaryotic cell membrane, where it increases lipid order, affects permeability, and influences the lateral mobility and conformation of membrane proteins. Several G protein-coupled receptors have been shown to be affected by the cholesterol content of the membrane, with functional impact on their ligand binding and signal transduction characteristics. The effects of cholesterol can be mediated directly by specific molecular interactions with the receptor and/or indirectly by altering the physical properties of the membrane. This review focuses on the importance and differential effects of membrane cholesterol on the activity of cholecystokinin (CCK) receptors. The type 1 CCK receptor is quite sensitive to its cholesterol environment, while the type 2 CCK receptor is not. The possible structural basis for this differential impact is explored and the implications of pathological states, such as metabolic syndrome, in which membrane cholesterol may be increased and CCK1R function may be abnormal are discussed. This is believed to have substantial potential importance for the development of drugs targeting the CCK receptor. PMID:23087674

  5. Metabolic Dyslipidemia and Risk of Coronary Heart Disease in 28,318 Adults With Diabetes Mellitus and Low-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol <100 mg/dl.

    PubMed

    Rana, Jamal S; Liu, Jennifer Y; Moffet, Howard H; Solomon, Matthew D; Go, Alan S; Jaffe, Marc G; Karter, Andrew J

    2015-12-01

    The risk of future coronary heart disease (CHD) in subjects with diabetes and "metabolic dyslipidemia" (high triglyceride [TGs] and low high-density cholesterol levels) remains a matter of concern. Little is known regarding the risk of CHD for this phenotype with low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels <100 mg/dl. We analyzed a diabetes cohort of 28,318 members (aged 30 to 90 years) of Kaiser Permanente Northern California during 2002 to 2011 (192,356 person-years [p-y] follow-up), with LDL-C levels <100 mg/dl and without known CHD. We compared the incidence and hazard ratios (HRs) for CHD events in groups using Cox models: normal high-density lipoprotein (HDL) and TG (reference; n = 7,278, 25.7%); normal HDL and high TG (≥ 150 mg/dl; n = 4,484,15.8%); low HDL (≤ 50 mg/dl for women and ≤ 40 mg/dl for men) and normal TG (n = 4,048, 14.3%); low HDL and high TG (metabolic dyslipidemia; n = 12,508, 44%). Patients with metabolic dyslipidemia had the highest age-adjusted CHD events/1,000 p-y (12.7/1,000 p-y and 19.0/1,000 p-y for women and men, respectively). After multivariate adjustment for age, gender, ethnicity, hypertension, smoking, statin use, duration of diabetes, and hemoglobin A1c, we observed an increased CHD risk in women (HR 1.35, 95% confidence interval 1.14 to 1.60) and men (HR 1.62, 95% confidence interval 1.43 to 1.83) with metabolic dyslipidemia compared to those with normal HDL and TG. Even in subjects with an LDL-C <100 mg/dl, presence of metabolic dyslipidemia in adults with diabetes is associated with an increased risk of CHD. In conclusion, effective CHD prevention strategies are needed for adults with diabetes and metabolic dyslipidemia. PMID:26428026

  6. Statins increase hepatic cholesterol synthesis and stimulate fecal cholesterol elimination in mice.

    PubMed

    Schonewille, Marleen; Freark de Boer, Jan; Mele, Laura; Wolters, Henk; Bloks, Vincent W; Wolters, Justina C; Kuivenhoven, Jan A; Tietge, Uwe J F; Brufau, Gemma; Groen, Albert K

    2016-08-01

    Statins are competitive inhibitors of HMG-CoA reductase, the rate-limiting enzyme of cholesterol synthesis. Statins reduce plasma cholesterol levels, but whether this is actually caused by inhibition of de novo cholesterol synthesis has not been clearly established. Using three different statins, we investigated the effects on cholesterol metabolism in mice in detail. Surprisingly, direct measurement of whole body cholesterol synthesis revealed that cholesterol synthesis was robustly increased in statin-treated mice. Measurement of organ-specific cholesterol synthesis demonstrated that the liver is predominantly responsible for the increase in cholesterol synthesis. Excess synthesized cholesterol did not accumulate in the plasma, as plasma cholesterol decreased. However, statin treatment led to an increase in cholesterol removal via the feces. Interestingly, enhanced cholesterol excretion in response to rosuvastatin and lovastatin treatment was mainly mediated via biliary cholesterol secretion, whereas atorvastatin mainly stimulated cholesterol removal via the transintestinal cholesterol excretion pathway. Moreover, we show that plasma cholesterol precursor levels do not reflect cholesterol synthesis rates during statin treatment in mice. In conclusion, cholesterol synthesis is paradoxically increased upon statin treatment in mice. However, statins potently stimulate the excretion of cholesterol from the body, which sheds new light on possible mechanisms underlying the cholesterol-lowering effects of statins. PMID:27313057

  7. 1H-NMR Spectroscopy Revealed Mycobacterium tuberculosis Caused Abnormal Serum Metabolic Profile of Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Xuekai; Hu, Xidan; Huang, Jiong; Xu, Zhiguang; Zhang, Xiansong; Hu, Changmin; Hu, Xueying; Guo, Aizhen; Wang, Yulan; Chen, Huanchun

    2013-01-01

    To re-evaluate virulence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb) in cattle, we experimentally infected calves with M. tb andMycobacterium bovisvia intratracheal injection at a dose of 2.0×107 CFU and observed the animals for 33 weeks. The intradermal tuberculin test and IFN-γin vitro release assay showed that both M. tb and M. bovis induced similar responses. Immunohistochemical staining of pulmonary lymph nodes indicated that the antigen MPB83 of both M. tb and M. bovis were similarly distributed in the tissue samples. Histological examinations showed all of the infected groups exhibited neutrophil infiltration to similar extents. Although the infected cattle did not develop granulomatous inflammation, the metabolic profiles changed significantly, which were characterized by a change in energy production pathways and increased concentrations of N-acetyl glycoproteins. Glycolysis was induced in the infected cattle by decreased glucose and increased lactate content, and enhanced fatty acid β-oxidation was induced by decreased TG content, and decreased gluconeogenesis indicated by the decreased concentration of glucogenic and ketogenic amino acids promoted utilization of substances other than glucose as energy sources. In addition, an increase in acute phase reactive serum glycoproteins, together with neutrophil infiltration and increased of IL-1β production indicated an early inflammatory response before granuloma formation. In conclusion, this study indicated that both M. tb and M.bovis were virulent to cattle. Therefore, it is likely that cattle with M. tb infections would be critical to tuberculosis transmission from cattle to humans. Nuclear magnetic resonance was demonstrated to be an efficient method to systematically evaluate M. tb and M. bovi sinfection in cattle. PMID:24098654

  8. Cholesterol, inflammasomes, and atherogenesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plasma cholesterol levels have been strongly associated with atherogenesis, underscoring the role of lipid metabolism in defining cardiovascular disease risk. However, atherosclerotic plaque is highly dynamic and contains elements of both the innate and adaptive immune system that respond to the abe...

  9. Association between adherence to the Korean Food Guidance System and the risk of metabolic abnormalities in Koreans.

    PubMed

    Jung, Hyun Ju; Han, Sung Nim; Song, Sujin; Paik, Hee Young; Baik, Hyun Wook; Joung, Hyojee

    2011-12-01

    Consumption of a diet consistent with dietary guidelines is believed to have a beneficial effect on the prevention of chronic diseases and the promotion of general health. This study was conducted to explore the relationship between adherence to the Korean Food Guidance System (KFGS), which was based on the 2010 revised KDRIs, and the risk of metabolic abnormalities. Five hundred and ninety-six Korean adults between 30 and 59 years of age were recruited by advertisement to the Bundang Jesaeng General Hospital (BJGH), and those not taking regular medications and without diagnoses of fulminant disease were included. Data were collected on anthropometric measurements, diagnostic parameters for metabolic syndrome (MetS), and 3-day dietary intakes from individuals in the study. The number of servings consumed from each food group was compared to the KFGS recommended servings for each of the 6 food groups. Poor adherence to the recommendations for servings of milk and dairy products (OR: 2.038, 1.128-3.682) was associated with a higher risk of MetS, and poor adherence to the guidelines for fruit consumption (OR: 1.849, 1.027-3.329) was associated with a higher risk for the existence an elevated waist circumference. Conversely, the consumption of meat, fish, eggs, and beans above the recommended number of servings was associated with a lower risk of having an elevated waist circumference (OR: 0.523, 0.288-0.950), and the consumption of vegetables above the recommended number of servings was associated with a reduced risk of having elevated fasting glucose (OR: 0.533, 0.298-0.954). These results suggest that adherence to the KFGS guidelines helps to prevent the development of MetS, but this association needs to be confirmed by prospective studies. PMID:22259682

  10. An in-silico model of lipoprotein metabolism and kinetics for the evaluation of targets and biomarkers in the reverse cholesterol transport pathway.

    PubMed

    Lu, James; Hübner, Katrin; Nanjee, M Nazeem; Brinton, Eliot A; Mazer, Norman A

    2014-03-01

    High-density lipoprotein (HDL) is believed to play an important role in lowering cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk by mediating the process of reverse cholesterol transport (RCT). Via RCT, excess cholesterol from peripheral tissues is carried back to the liver and hence should lead to the reduction of atherosclerotic plaques. The recent failures of HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C) raising therapies have initiated a re-examination of the link between CVD risk and the rate of RCT, and have brought into question whether all target modulations that raise HDL-C would be atheroprotective. To help address these issues, a novel in-silico model has been built to incorporate modern concepts of HDL biology, including: the geometric structure of HDL linking the core radius with the number of ApoA-I molecules on it, and the regeneration of lipid-poor ApoA-I from spherical HDL due to remodeling processes. The ODE model has been calibrated using data from the literature and validated by simulating additional experiments not used in the calibration. Using a virtual population, we show that the model provides possible explanations for a number of well-known relationships in cholesterol metabolism, including the epidemiological relationship between HDL-C and CVD risk and the correlations between some HDL-related lipoprotein markers. In particular, the model has been used to explore two HDL-C raising target modulations, Cholesteryl Ester Transfer Protein (CETP) inhibition and ATP-binding cassette transporter member 1 (ABCA1) up-regulation. It predicts that while CETP inhibition would not result in an increased RCT rate, ABCA1 up-regulation should increase both HDL-C and RCT rate. Furthermore, the model predicts the two target modulations result in distinct changes in the lipoprotein measures. Finally, the model also allows for an evaluation of two candidate biomarkers for in-vivo whole-body ABCA1 activity: the absolute concentration and the % lipid-poor ApoA-I. These findings illustrate the

  11. Metabolic differentiation and classification of abnormal Savda Munziq's pharmacodynamic role on rat models with different diseases by nuclear magnetic resonance-based metabonomics

    PubMed Central

    Mamtimin, Batur; Xia, Guo; Mijit, Mahmut; Hizbulla, Mawlanjan; Kurbantay, Nazuk; You, Li; Upur, Halmurat

    2015-01-01

    Background: Abnormal Savda Munziq (ASMq) is a traditional Uyghur herbal preparation used as a therapy for abnormal Savda-related diseases. In this study, we investigate ASMq's dynamic effects on abnormal Savda rat models under different disease conditions. Materials and Methods: Abnormal Savda rat models with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), and asthma dosed of ASMq. Serum samples of each animal tested by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and analyzed by orthogonal projection to latent structure with discriminant analysis. Results: Compared with healthy controls, HCC rats had higher concentrations of amino acids, fat-related metabolites, lactate, myoinositol, and citrate, but lower concentrations of α-glucose, β-glucose, and glutamine. Following ASMq treatment, the serum acetone very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL), LDL, unsaturated lipids, acetylcysteine, and pyruvate concentration decreased, but α-glucose, β-glucose, and glutamine concentration increased (P < 0.05). T2DM rats had higher concentrations of α- and β-glucose, but lower concentrations of isoleucine, leucine, valine, glutamine, glycoprotein, lactate, tyrosine, creatine, alanine, carnitine, and phenylalanine. After ASMq treated T2DM groups showed reduced α- and β-glucose and increased creatine levels (P < 0.05). Asthma rats had higher acetate, carnitine, formate, and phenylalanine levels, but lower concentrations of glutamine, glycoprotein, lactate, VLDL, LDL, and unsaturated lipids. ASMq treatment showed increased glutamine and reduced carnitine, glycoprotein, formate, and phenylalanine levels (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Low immune function, decreased oxidative defense, liver function abnormalities, amino acid deficiencies, and energy metabolism disorders are common characteristics of abnormal Savda-related diseases. ASMq may improve the abnormal metabolism and immune function of rat models with different diseases combined abnormal Savda. PMID:26600713

  12. Blood metabolomics analysis identifies abnormalities in the citric acid cycle, urea cycle, and amino acid metabolism in bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    Yoshimi, Noriko; Futamura, Takashi; Kakumoto, Keiji; Salehi, Alireza M.; Sellgren, Carl M.; Holmén-Larsson, Jessica; Jakobsson, Joel; Pålsson, Erik; Landén, Mikael; Hashimoto, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Background Bipolar disorder (BD) is a severe and debilitating psychiatric disorder. However, the precise biological basis remains unknown, hampering the search for novel biomarkers. We performed a metabolomics analysis to discover novel peripheral biomarkers for BD. Methods We quantified serum levels of 116 metabolites in mood-stabilized male BD patients (n = 54) and age-matched male healthy controls (n = 39). Results After multivariate logistic regression, serum levels of pyruvate, N-acetylglutamic acid, α-ketoglutarate, and arginine were significantly higher in BD patients than in healthy controls. Conversely, serum levels of β-alanine, and serine were significantly lower in BD patients than in healthy controls. Chronic (4-weeks) administration of lithium or valproic acid to adult male rats did not alter serum levels of pyruvate, N-acetylglutamic acid, β-alanine, serine, or arginine, but lithium administration significantly increased serum levels of α-ketoglutarate. Conclusions The metabolomics analysis demonstrated altered serum levels of pyruvate, N-acetylglutamic acid, β-alanine, serine, and arginine in BD patients. General significance The present findings suggest that abnormalities in the citric acid cycle, urea cycle, and amino acid metabolism play a role in the pathogenesis of BD. PMID:27114925

  13. Cholesterol Sulfate and Cholesterol Sulfotransferase Inhibit Gluconeogenesis by Targeting Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor 4α

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xiongjie; Cheng, Qiuqiong; Xu, Leyuan; Yan, Jiong; Jiang, Mengxi; He, Jinhan; Xu, Meishu; Stefanovic-Racic, Maja; Sipula, Ian; O'Doherty, Robert Martin; Ren, Shunlin

    2014-01-01

    Sulfotransferase (SULT)-mediated sulfation represents a critical mechanism in regulating the chemical and functional homeostasis of endogenous and exogenous molecules. The cholesterol sulfotransferase SULT2B1b catalyzes the sulfoconjugation of cholesterol to synthesize cholesterol sulfate (CS). In this study, we showed that the expression of SULT2B1b in the liver was induced in obese mice and during the transition from the fasted to the fed state, suggesting that the regulation of SULT2B1b is physiologically relevant. CS and SULT2B1b inhibited gluconeogenesis by targeting the gluconeogenic factor hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α (HNF4α) in both cell cultures and transgenic mice. Treatment of mice with CS or transgenic overexpression of the CS-generating enzyme SULT2B1b in the liver inhibited hepatic gluconeogenesis and alleviated metabolic abnormalities both in mice with diet-induced obesity (DIO) and in leptin-deficient (ob/ob) mice. Mechanistically, CS and SULT2B1b inhibited gluconeogenesis by suppressing the expression of acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) synthetase (Acss), leading to decreased acetylation and nuclear exclusion of HNF4α. Our results also suggested that leptin is a potential effector of SULT2B1b in improving metabolic function. We conclude that SULT2B1b and its enzymatic by-product CS are important metabolic regulators that control glucose metabolism, suggesting CS as a potential therapeutic agent and SULT2B1b as a potential therapeutic target for metabolic disorders. PMID:24277929

  14. Molecular Mechanisms Underlying the Link between Nuclear Receptor Function and Cholesterol Gallstone Formation

    PubMed Central

    Vázquez, Mary Carmen; Rigotti, Attilio; Zanlungo, Silvana

    2012-01-01

    Cholesterol gallstone disease is highly prevalent in western countries, particularly in women and some specific ethnic groups. The formation of water-insoluble cholesterol crystals is due to a misbalance between the three major lipids present in the bile: cholesterol, bile salts, and phospholipids. Many proteins implicated in biliary lipid secretion in the liver are regulated by several transcription factors, including nuclear receptors LXR and FXR. Human and murine genetic, physiological, pathophysiological, and pharmacological evidence is consistent with the relevance of these nuclear receptors in gallstone formation. In addition, there is emerging data that also suggests a role for estrogen receptor ESR1 in abnormal cholesterol metabolism leading to gallstone disease. A better comprehension of the role of nuclear receptor function in gallstone formation may help to design new and more effective therapeutic strategies for this highly prevalent disease condition. PMID:22132343

  15. Hepatitis B virus X protein (HBx)-induced abnormalities of nucleic acid metabolism revealed by 1H-NMR-based metabonomics

    PubMed Central

    Dan Yue; Zhang, Yuwei; Cheng, Liuliu; Ma, Jinhu; Xi, Yufeng; Yang, Liping; Su, Chao; Shao, Bin; Huang, Anliang; Xiang, Rong; Cheng, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus X protein (HBx) plays an important role in HBV-related hepatocarcinogenesis; however, mechanisms underlying HBx-mediated carcinogenesis remain unclear. In this study, an NMR-based metabolomics approach was applied to systematically investigate the effects of HBx on cell metabolism. EdU incorporation assay was conducted to examine the effects of HBx on DNA synthesis, an important feature of nucleic acid metabolism. The results revealed that HBx disrupted metabolism of glucose, lipids, and amino acids, especially nucleic acids. To understand the potential mechanism of HBx-induced abnormalities of nucleic acid metabolism, gene expression profiles of HepG2 cells expressing HBx were investigated. The results showed that 29 genes involved in DNA damage and DNA repair were differentially expressed in HBx-expressing HepG2 cells. HBx-induced DNA damage was further demonstrated by karyotyping, comet assay, Western blotting, immunofluorescence and immunohistochemistry analyses. Many studies have previously reported that DNA damage can induce abnormalities of nucleic acid metabolism. Thus, our results implied that HBx initially induces DNA damage, and then disrupts nucleic acid metabolism, which in turn blocks DNA repair and induces the occurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). These findings further contribute to our understanding of the occurrence of HCC. PMID:27075403

  16. Investigation of gene expressions related to cholesterol metabolism in rats fed diets enriched in n-6 or n-3 fatty acid with a cholesterol after long-term feeding using quantitative-competitive RT-PCR analysis.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, M; Shimada, K; Ohashi, E; Saitoh, H; Sonoyama, K; Sekikawa, M; Nakano, M

    2001-06-01

    We have developed a method to quantitate hepatic apolipoprotein (apo) B, LDL receptor, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutary coenzyme A reductase (HMG-CoA reductase) and cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase mRNA expression in rats fed a cholesterol-enriched diet after long-term feeding using competitive RT-RCR. Rats (8 wk of age) fed a conventional diet were shifted to diets containing 10% perilla oil (PEO, oleic acid+linoleic acid+alpha-linolenic acid), borage oil (BRO, oleic acid+linoleic acid+gamma-linolenic acid), evening primrose oil (EPO, linoleic acid+gamma-linolenic acid), mixed oil (MIO, oleic acid+linoleic acid+gamma-linolenic acid+alpha-linolenic acid), or palm oil (PLO, palmitic acid+oleic acid+linoleic acid) with 0.5% cholesterol for 15 wk. There were no significant differences in the food intake and body weight gain among the groups. The liver weight in the PEO and PLO groups was significantly higher than other groups. The serum total cholesterol and very low density lipoprotein (VLDL)+intermediate density lipoprotein (IDL)+low density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol concentrations were consistently higher in PLO group than in the other groups. The serum high density lipoprotein cholesterol concentration was significantly lower in the PEO group than in the other groups. The liver cholesterol concentration group was significantly higher in the PEO than in the other groups. There were no significant differences in the hepatic LDL receptor mRNA level among the groups. Hepatic apo B, HMG-CoA reductase and cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase mRNA levels were not affected by the experimental conditions. However, hepatic cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase mRNA level in the PEO and MIO groups tended to be higher than in the other groups. The fecal cholesterol extraction was significantly higher in the MIO and PLO groups than in the PEO and EPO groups and the total bile acid extraction was significantly higher in the PEO and MIO groups than in the PLO group. The results of this study

  17. Soya protein ameliorates the metabolic abnormalities of dysfunctional adipose tissue of dyslipidaemic rats fed a sucrose-rich diet.

    PubMed

    Oliva, María E; Selenscig, Dante; D'Alessandro, María E; Chicco, Adriana; Lombardo, Yolanda B

    2011-04-01

    The present study investigates whether the replacement of dietary casein by soya protein isolate could be able to improve and/or even revert the morphological and metabolic abnormalities underlying the adipose tissue dysfunction of dyslipidaemic rats chronically fed (8 months) a sucrose-rich (62·5 %) diet (SRD). For this purpose, Wistar rats were fed a SRD for 4 months. From months 4 to 8, half the animals continued with the SRD and the other half were fed a SRD in which the source of protein, casein, was substituted by soya. The control group received a diet in which the source of carbohydrate was maize starch. Compared with the SRD-fed group, the results showed that: (1) soya protein decreased body-weight gain, limited the accretion of visceral adiposity and decreased adipose tissue cell volume without changes in total cell number; (2) soya protein increased the protein mass expression of PPARγ, which was significantly reduced in the fat pad of the SRD-fed rats; (3) the activity of the enzymes involved in the de novo lipogenesis of adipose tissue was significantly decreased/normalised; (4) soya protein corrected the inhibitory effect of SRD upon the anti-lipolytic action of insulin, reduced basal lipolysis and normalised the protein mass expression of GLUT-4. Dyslipidaemia, glucose homeostasis and plasma leptin levels returned to control values. The present study provides data showing the beneficial effects of soya protein to improve and/or revert the adipose tissue dysfunction of a dyslipidaemic insulin-resistant rat model and suggests that soya could maintain the functionality of the adipose tissue-liver axis improving/reverting lipotoxicity. PMID:21118606

  18. Role of lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase in the metabolism of oxidized phospholipids in plasma: studies with platelet-activating factor-acetyl hydrolase-deficient plasma.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, V S; Goyal, J; Miwa, M; Sugatami, J; Akiyama, M; Liu, M; Subbaiah, P V

    1999-07-01

    To determine the relative importance of platelet-activating factor-acetylhydrolase (PAF-AH) and lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) in the hydrolysis of oxidized phosphatidylcholines (OXPCs) to lyso-phosphatidylcholine (lyso-PC), we studied the formation and metabolism of OXPCs in the plasma of normal and PAF-AH-deficient subjects. Whereas the loss of PC following oxidation was similar in the deficient and normal plasmas, the formation of lyso-PC was significantly lower, and the accumulation of OXPC was higher in the deficient plasma. Isolated LDL from the PAF-AH-deficient subjects was more susceptible to oxidation, and stimulated adhesion molecule synthesis in endothelial cells, more than the normal LDL. Oxidation of 16:0-[1-14C]-18:2 PC, equilibrated with plasma PC, resulted in the accumulation of labeled short- and long-chain OXPCs, in addition to the labeled aqueous products. The formation of the aqueous products decreased by 80%, and the accumulation of short-chain OXPC increased by 110% in the deficient plasma, compared to the normal plasma, showing that PAF-AH is predominantly involved in the hydrolysis of the truncated OXPCs. Labeled sn-2-acyl group from the long-chain OXPC was not only hydrolyzed to free fatty acid, but was preferentially transferred to diacylglycerol, in both the normal and deficient plasmas. In contrast, the acyl group from unoxidized PC was transferred only to cholesterol, showing that the specificity of LCAT is altered by OXPC. It is concluded that, while PAF-AH carries out the hydrolysis of mainly truncated OXPCs, LCAT hydrolyzes and transesterifies the long-chain OXPCs. PMID:10395969

  19. Low-dose dioxins alter gene expression related to cholesterol biosynthesis, lipogenesis, and glucose metabolism through the aryl hydrocarbon receptor-mediated pathway in mouse liver

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Shoko; Shirakawa, Hitoshi Tomita, Shuhei; Ohsaki, Yusuke; Haketa, Keiichi; Tooi, Osamu; Santo, Noriaki; Tohkin, Masahiro; Furukawa, Yuji; Gonzalez, Frank J.; Komai, Michio

    2008-05-15

    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) is a common environmental contaminant. TCDD binds and activates the transcription factor aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR), leading to adverse biological responses via the alteration of the expression of various AHR target genes. Although small amounts of TCDD are consumed via contaminated daily foodstuffs and environmental exposures, the effects of low-dose TCDD on gene expression in animal tissues have not been clarified, while a number of genes affected by high-dose TCDD were reported. In this study, we comprehensively analyzed gene expression profiles in livers of C57BL/6N mice that were orally administered relatively low doses of TCDD (5, 50, or 500 ng/kg body weight (bw) day{sup -1}) for 18 days. The hepatic TCDD concentrations, measured by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, were 1.2, 17, and 1063 pg toxicity equivalent quantity (TEQ)/g, respectively. The mRNA level of the cytochrome P450 CYP1A1 was significantly increased by treatment with only TCDD 500 ng/kg bw day{sup -1}. DNA microarray and quantitative RT-PCR analyses revealed changes in the expression of genes involved in the circadian rhythm, cholesterol biosynthesis, fatty acid synthesis, and glucose metabolism in the liver with at all doses of TCDD employed. However, repression of expression of genes involved in energy metabolism was not observed in the livers of Ahr-null mice that were administered the same dose of TCDD. These results indicate that changes in gene expression by TCDD are mediated by AHR and that exposure to low-dose TCDD could affect energy metabolism via alterations of gene expression.

  20. D38-cholesterol as a Raman active probe for imaging intracellular cholesterol storage.

    PubMed

    Alfonso-García, Alba; Pfisterer, Simon G; Riezman, Howard; Ikonen, Elina; Potma, Eric O

    2016-06-01

    We generated a highly deuterated cholesterol analog (D38-cholesterol) and demonstrated its use for selective vibrational imaging of cholesterol storage in mammalian cells. D38-cholesterol produces detectable signals in stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) imaging, is rapidly taken up by cells, and is efficiently metabolized by acyl-CoA cholesterol acyltransferase to form cholesteryl esters. Using hyperspectral SRS imaging of D38-cholesterol, we visualized cholesterol storage in lipid droplets. We found that some lipid droplets accumulated preferentially unesterified D38-cholesterol, whereas others stored D38-cholesteryl esters. In steroidogenic cells, D38-cholesteryl esters and triacylglycerols were partitioned into distinct sets of lipid droplets. Thus, hyperspectral SRS imaging of D38-cholesterol demonstrates a heterogeneous incorporation of neutral lipid species, i.e., free cholesterol, cholesteryl esters, and triacylglycerols, between individual lipid droplets in a cell. PMID:26719944

  1. D38-cholesterol as a Raman active probe for imaging intracellular cholesterol storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfonso-García, Alba; Pfisterer, Simon G.; Riezman, Howard; Ikonen, Elina; Potma, Eric O.

    2016-06-01

    We generated a highly deuterated cholesterol analog (D38-cholesterol) and demonstrated its use for selective vibrational imaging of cholesterol storage in mammalian cells. D38-cholesterol produces detectable signals in stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) imaging, is rapidly taken up by cells, and is efficiently metabolized by acyl-CoA cholesterol acyltransferase to form cholesteryl esters. Using hyperspectral SRS imaging of D38-cholesterol, we visualized cholesterol storage in lipid droplets. We found that some lipid droplets accumulated preferentially unesterified D38-cholesterol, whereas others stored D38-cholesteryl esters. In steroidogenic cells, D38-cholesteryl esters and triacylglycerols were partitioned into distinct sets of lipid droplets. Thus, hyperspectral SRS imaging of D38-cholesterol demonstrates a heterogeneous incorporation of neutral lipid species, i.e., free cholesterol, cholesteryl esters, and triacylglycerols, between individual lipid droplets in a cell.

  2. Cholesterol depletion induces autophagy

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Jinglei; Ohsaki, Yuki; Tauchi-Sato, Kumi; Fujita, Akikazu; Fujimoto, Toyoshi . E-mail: tfujimot@med.nagoya-u.ac.jp

    2006-12-08

    Autophagy is a mechanism to digest cells' own components, and its importance in many physiological and pathological processes is being recognized. But the molecular mechanism that regulates autophagy is not understood in detail. In the present study, we found that cholesterol depletion induces macroautophagy. The cellular cholesterol in human fibroblasts was depleted either acutely using 5 mM methyl-{beta}-cyclodextrin or 10-20 {mu}g/ml nystatin for 1 h, or metabolically by 20 {mu}M mevastatin and 200 {mu}M mevalonolactone along with 10% lipoprotein-deficient serum for 2-3 days. By any of these protocols, marked increase of LC3-II was detected by immunoblotting and by immunofluorescence microscopy, and the increase was more extensive than that caused by amino acid starvation, i.e., incubation in Hanks' solution for several hours. The induction of autophagic vacuoles by cholesterol depletion was also observed in other cell types, and the LC3-positive membranes were often seen as long tubules, >50 {mu}m in length. The increase of LC3-II by methyl-{beta}-cyclodextrin was suppressed by phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitors and was accompanied by dephosphorylation of mammalian target of rapamycin. By electron microscopy, autophagic vacuoles induced by cholesterol depletion were indistinguishable from those seen after amino acid starvation. These results demonstrate that a decrease in cholesterol activates autophagy by a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-dependent mechanism.

  3. Oncoprotein HBXIP Modulates Abnormal Lipid Metabolism and Growth of Breast Cancer Cells by Activating the LXRs/SREBP-1c/FAS Signaling Cascade.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yu; Li, Hang; Zhang, Yingyi; Li, Leilei; Fang, Runping; Li, Yinghui; Liu, Qian; Zhang, Weiying; Qiu, Liyan; Liu, Fabao; Zhang, Xiaodong; Ye, Lihong

    2016-08-15

    Abnormal lipid metabolism is a hallmark of tumorigenesis. Accumulating evidence demonstrates that fatty acid synthase (FAS, FASN) is a metabolic oncogene that supports the growth and survival of tumor cells and is highly expressed in many cancers. Here, we report that the oncoprotein, hepatitis B X-interacting protein (HBXIP, LAMTOR5) contributes to abnormal lipid metabolism. We show that high expression of HBXIP in 236 breast cancer patients was significantly associated with decreased overall survival and progression-free survival. Interestingly, the expression of HBXIP was positively related to that of FAS in clinical breast cancer tissues, and HBXIP overexpression in breast cancer cells resulted in FAS upregulation. Mechanistically, HBXIP upregulated SREBP-1c (SREBF1), which activates the transcription of FAS, by directly interacting with and coactivating nuclear receptor (NR) liver X receptors (LXR). Physiologically, LXRs are activated via a coactivator containing NR motif in a ligand-dependent manner. However, in breast cancer cells, HBXIP containing the corepressor/nuclear receptor motif with special flanking sequence could coactivate LXRs independent of ligand. Moreover, overexpressed SREBP-1c was able to activate the transcription of HBXIP, forming a positive-feedback loop. Functionally, HBXIP enhanced lipogenesis, resulting in the growth of breast cancer cells in vitro and in vivo Thus, we conclude that the oncoprotein HBXIP contributes to the abnormal lipid metabolism in breast cancer through LXRs/SREBP-1c/FAS signaling, providing new insights into the mechanisms by which cancer cells reprogram lipid metabolism in their favor. Cancer Res; 76(16); 4696-707. ©2016 AACR. PMID:26980761

  4. Associations between γ-glutamyl transferase, metabolic abnormalities and inflammation in healthy subjects from a population-based cohort: A possible implication for oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Bo, Simona; Gambino, Roberto; Durazzo, Marilena; Guidi, Sabrina; Tiozzo, Elisa; Ghione, Federica; Gentile, Luigi; Cassader, Maurizio; Pagano, Gian Franco

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To examine the relationships between γ -glutamyl-transferase (GGT), alanine-aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate-aminotransferase (AST) and various metabolic parameters, C-reactive protein (CRP) and an oxidative stress marker (nitrotyrosine, NT) in subjects without any metabolic abnormalities from a population-based sample. METHODS: Two hundred and five subjects with normal body mass index (BMI), glucose tolerance, and without any metabolic abnormality were studied out of 1 339 subjects, without known liver diseases, alcohol abuse or use of hepatotoxic drugs, who are representative of the 45-64 aged population of Asti (north-western Italy). RESULTS: In all patients metabolic parameters and hs-CRP levels linearly increase from the lowest to the highest ALT and GGT tertiles, while in subjects without metabolic abnormalities, there is a significant association between fasting glucose, uric acid, waist circumference, hs-CRP, triglyceride values, and GGT levels. In these subjects, male sex, higher hs-CRP and glucose levels are associated with GGT levels in a multiple regression model, after adjustments for multiple confounders. In the same model, median NT levels are significantly associated with the increasing GGT tertile (β = 1.06; 95%CI 0.67-1.45), but not with the AST and ALT tertiles. In a multiple regression model, after adjusting for age, sex, BMI, waist, smoking, and alcohol consumption, both NT (β = 0.05; 95%CI 0.02-0.08) and hs-CRP levels (β = 0.09; 95%CI 0.03-0.15) are significantly associated with fasting glycemia. CONCLUSION: GGT, an easy, universally standardized and available measurement, could represent an early marker of sub-clinical inflammation and oxidative stress in otherwise healthy individuals. Prospective studies are needed to establish if GGT could predict future diabetes in these subjects. PMID:16437656

  5. Dieting Frequency in Obese Patients With Binge Eating Disorder: Behavioral and Metabolic Correlates

    PubMed Central

    Roehrig, Megan; Masheb, Robin M.; White, Marney A.; Grilo, Carlos M.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the clinical significance of self-reported frequency of time spent dieting in obese patients with binge eating disorder (BED). A total of 207 treatment-seeking obese BED patients (57 men and 150 women) were dichotomized by dieting frequency and gender and compared on a number of historical, psychological, and metabolic variables. Frequent dieters reported significantly earlier age of onset for binge eating, dieting, and obesity, more episodes of weight cycling, greater weight suppression, and greater eating disorder pathology than infrequent dieters; no differences, however, emerged on current binge eating frequency or psychological distress. Among women but not among men, frequent dieters had consistently lower chances of abnormalities in total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, and the total/HDL cholesterol ratio while infrequent dieters had greater chances of abnormalities on these variables. Dietary restraint was inversely correlated with abnormalities in triglycerides, HDL cholesterol, and the total/HDL cholesterol ratio but was unrelated to low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol. In summary, frequent dieters of both genders had greater lifetime and current eating and weight concerns, and in women, decreased chance of metabolic abnormalities than infrequent dieters. Our findings suggest that frequent dieting attempts, particularly in women, are associated with greater eating disorder pathology but may have a beneficial effect on metabolic functioning and cardiovascular disease risk independent of actual weight status. These findings may have implications for clinical advice provided to obese BED patients. PMID:19165172

  6. An Abnormal Nitric Oxide Metabolism Contributes to Brain Oxidative Stress in the Mouse Model for the Fragile X Syndrome, a Possible Role in Intellectual Disability

    PubMed Central

    Lima-Cabello, Elena; Garcia-Guirado, Francisco; Calvo-Medina, Rocio; el Bekay, Rajaa; Perez-Costillas, Lucia; Quintero-Navarro, Carolina; Sanchez-Salido, Lourdes

    2016-01-01

    Background. Fragile X syndrome is the most common genetic cause of mental disability. Although many research has been performed, the mechanism underlying the pathogenesis is unclear and needs further investigation. Oxidative stress played major roles in the syndrome. The aim was to investigate the nitric oxide metabolism, protein nitration level, the expression of NOS isoforms, and furthermore the activation of the nuclear factor NF-κB-p65 subunit in different brain areas on the fragile X mouse model. Methods. This study involved adult male Fmr1-knockout and wild-type mice as controls. We detected nitric oxide metabolism and the activation of the nuclear factor NF-κBp65 subunit, comparing the mRNA expression and protein content of the three NOS isoforms in different brain areas. Results. Fmr1-KO mice showed an abnormal nitric oxide metabolism and increased levels of protein tyrosine nitrosylation. Besides that, nuclear factor NF-κB-p65 and inducible nitric oxide synthase appeared significantly increased in the Fmr1-knockout mice. mRNA and protein levels of the neuronal nitric oxide synthase appeared significantly decreased in the knockout mice. However, the epithelial nitric oxide synthase isoform displayed no significant changes. Conclusions. These data suggest the potential involvement of an abnormal nitric oxide metabolism in the pathogenesis of the fragile X syndrome. PMID:26788253

  7. Women and Cholesterol

    MedlinePlus

    ... Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Women and Cholesterol Updated:Apr 1,2016 The female sex hormone ... Glossary Related Sites Nutrition Center My Life Check Cholesterol • Home • About Cholesterol • Why Cholesterol Matters • Understand Your ...

  8. Cholesterol IQ Quiz

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pressure High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Cholesterol IQ Quiz Updated:Feb 2,2015 Begin the quiz Cholesterol • Home • About Cholesterol Introduction Good vs. Bad Cholesterol ...

  9. Cholesterol transport through lysosome-peroxisome membrane contacts.

    PubMed

    Chu, Bei-Bei; Liao, Ya-Cheng; Qi, Wei; Xie, Chang; Du, Ximing; Wang, Jiang; Yang, Hongyuan; Miao, Hong-Hua; Li, Bo-Liang; Song, Bao-Liang

    2015-04-01

    Cholesterol is dynamically transported among organelles, which is essential for multiple cellular functions. However, the mechanism underlying intracellular cholesterol transport has remained largely unknown. We established an amphotericin B-based assay enabling a genome-wide shRNA screen for delayed LDL-cholesterol transport and identified 341 hits with particular enrichment of peroxisome genes, suggesting a previously unappreciated pathway for cholesterol transport. We show dynamic membrane contacts between peroxisome and lysosome, which are mediated by lysosomal Synaptotagmin VII binding to the lipid PI(4,5)P2 on peroxisomal membrane. LDL-cholesterol enhances such contacts, and cholesterol is transported from lysosome to peroxisome. Disruption of critical peroxisome genes leads to cholesterol accumulation in lysosome. Together, these findings reveal an unexpected role of peroxisome in intracellular cholesterol transport. We further demonstrate massive cholesterol accumulation in human patient cells and mouse model of peroxisomal disorders, suggesting a contribution of abnormal cholesterol accumulation to these diseases. PMID:25860611

  10. Cholesterol and benign prostate disease.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Michael R; Solomon, Keith R

    2011-01-01

    The origins of benign prostatic diseases, such as benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS), are poorly understood. Patients suffering from benign prostatic symptoms report a substantially reduced quality of life, and the relationship between benign prostate conditions and prostate cancer is uncertain. Epidemiologic data for BPH and CP/CPPS are limited, however an apparent association between BPH symptoms and cardiovascular disease (CVD) has been consistently reported. The prostate synthesizes and stores large amounts of cholesterol and prostate tissues may be particularly sensitive to perturbations in cholesterol metabolism. Hypercholesterolemia, a major risk factor for CVD, is also a risk factor for BPH. Animal model and clinical trial findings suggest that agents that inhibit cholesterol absorption from the intestine, such as the class of compounds known as polyene macrolides, can reduce prostate gland size and improve lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). Observational studies indicate that cholesterol-lowering drugs reduce the risk of aggressive prostate cancer, while prostate cancer cell growth and survival pathways depend in part on cholesterol-sensitive biochemical mechanisms. Here we review the evidence that cholesterol metabolism plays a role in the incidence of benign prostate disease and we highlight possible therapeutic approaches based on this concept. PMID:21862201

  11. The effect of taurine on the cholesterol metabolism in rats fed diets supplemented with cholestyramine or high amounts of bile acid.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Naomichi; Umeda, Chie; Oda, Hiroaki; Yokogoshi, Hidehiko

    2003-02-01

    The effects of taurine on serum cholesterol levels and hepatic cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase activity (CYP7A1) were studied in rats fed cholestyramine or high amounts of sodium cholate in order to alter the intestinal pool of bile acids. Rats were fed a diet supplemented with 1% cholesterol and 0.25% sodium cholate (high cholesterol, control; C), and C supplemented with 4% cholestyramine (CH) or 0.75% sodium cholate (BA) for 14 d. Taurine groups were fed the diet supplemented with 3% taurine (CT, CHT and BAT). Compared to rats fed C and BA diets, serum cholesterol levels were significantly reduced in rats fed CT and BAT diets, but a significant reduction of serum cholesterol by taurine feeding was not observed in the CHT group as compared to the CH group. An increase in hepatic CYP7A1 activity due to taurine intake was observed in the CT and BAT groups. However, the simultaneous administration of cholestyramine and taurine (CHT group) did not increase hepatic CYP7A1 activity compared the intake of cholestyramine only (CH group). A significant increase in fecal bile acid excretion due to taurine intake was found only in rats fed the CT diet. In conclusion, it is suggested that taurine facilitates hepatic CYP7A1 activity regardless of the enlarged intestinal pool of bile acids due to increased intake of exogenous bile acid, and then reduces the serum cholesterol concentration. PMID:12882392

  12. Reduced cholesterol levels impair Smoothened activation in Smith–Lemli–Opitz syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Blassberg, Robert; Macrae, James I.; Briscoe, James; Jacob, John

    2016-01-01

    Smith–Lemli–Opitz syndrome (SLOS) is a common autosomal-recessive disorder that results from mutations in the gene encoding the cholesterol biosynthetic enzyme 7-dehydrocholesterol reductase (DHCR7). Impaired DHCR7 function is associated with a spectrum of congenital malformations, intellectual impairment, epileptiform activity and autism spectrum disorder. Biochemically, there is a deficit in cholesterol and an accumulation of its metabolic precursor 7-dehydrocholesterol (7DHC) in developing tissues. Morphological abnormalities in SLOS resemble those seen in congenital Sonic Hedgehog (SHH)-deficient conditions, leading to the proposal that the pathogenesis of SLOS is mediated by aberrant SHH signalling. SHH signalling is transduced through the transmembrane protein Smoothened (SMO), which localizes to the primary cilium of a cell on activation and is both positively and negatively regulated by sterol molecules derived from cholesterol biosynthesis. One proposed mechanism of SLOS involves SMO dysregulation by altered sterol levels, but the salient sterol species has not been identified. Here, we clarify the relationship between disrupted cholesterol metabolism and reduced SHH signalling in SLOS by modelling the disorder in vitro. Our results indicate that a deficit in cholesterol, as opposed to an accumulation of 7DHC, impairs SMO activation and its localization to the primary cilium. PMID:26685159

  13. NMR ({sup 1}H and {sup 13}C) based signatures of abnormal choline metabolism in oral squamous cell carcinoma with no prominent Warburg effect

    SciTech Connect

    Bag, Swarnendu; Banerjee, Deb Ranjan; Basak, Amit; Das, Amit Kumar; Pal, Mousumi; Banerjee, Rita; Paul, Ranjan Rashmi; Chatterjee, Jyotirmoy

    2015-04-17

    At functional levels, besides genes and proteins, changes in metabolome profiles are instructive for a biological system in health and disease including malignancy. It is understood that metabolomic alterations in association with proteomic and transcriptomic aberrations are very fundamental to unravel malignant micro-ambient criticality and oral cancer is no exception. Hence deciphering intricate dimensions of oral cancer metabolism may be contributory both for integrated appreciation of its pathogenesis and to identify any critical but yet unexplored dimension of this malignancy with high mortality rate. Although several methods do exist, NMR provides higher analytical precision in identification of cancer metabolomic signature. Present study explored abnormal signatures in choline metabolism in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) using {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR analysis of serum. It has demonstrated down-regulation of choline with concomitant up-regulation of its break-down product in the form of trimethylamine N-oxide in OSCC compared to normal counterpart. Further, no significant change in lactate profile in OSCC possibly indicated that well-known Warburg effect was not a prominent phenomenon in such malignancy. Amongst other important metabolites, malonate has shown up-regulation but D-glucose, saturated fatty acids, acetate and threonine did not show any significant change. Analyzing these metabolomic findings present study proposed trimethyl amine N-oxide and malonate as important metabolic signature for oral cancer with no prominent Warburg effect. - Highlights: • NMR ({sup 1}H and {sup 13}C) study of Oral Squamous cell Carcinoma Serum. • Abnormal Choline metabolomic signatures. • Up-regulation of Trimethylamine N-oxide. • Unchanged lactate profile indicates no prominent Warburg effect. • Proposed alternative glucose metabolism path through up-regulation of malonate.

  14. Cholesterol and Breast Cancer Pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Erik R.; Chang, Ching-yi; McDonnell, Donald P.

    2014-01-01

    Cholesterol is a risk factor for breast cancer although the mechanisms by which this occurs are not well understood. One hypothesis is that dyslipidemia results in increased cholesterol content in cell membranes thus impacting membrane fluidity and subsequent signaling. Additionally, studies demonstrate that the metabolite, 27-hydroxycholesterol (27HC), can function as an estrogen, increasing the proliferation of estrogen receptor positive breast cancer cells. This was unexpected as 27HC and other oxysterols activate the liver X receptors resulting in the reduction of intracellular cholesterol. Resolution of this paradox will require a dissection of the molecular mechanisms by which ER and LXR converge in breast cancer cells. Regardless, the observation that 27HC influences breast cancer provides rationale for strategies that target cholesterol metabolism. PMID:25458418

  15. Mutations in the clathrin-assembly gene Picalm are responsible for the hematopoietic and iron metabolism abnormalities in fit1 mice

    PubMed Central

    Klebig, Mitchell L.; Wall, Melissa D.; Potter, Mark D.; Rowe, Erica L.; Carpenter, Donald A.; Rinchik, Eugene M.

    2003-01-01

    Recessive N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU)-induced mutations recovered at the fitness-1 (fit1) locus in mouse chromosome 7 cause hematopoietic abnormalities, growth retardation, and shortened life span, with varying severity of the defects in different alleles. Abnormal iron distribution and metabolism and frequent scoliosis have also been associated with an allele of intermediate severity (fit14R). We report that fit14R, as well as the most severe fit15R allele, are nonsense point mutations in the mouse ortholog of the human phosphatidylinositol-binding clathrin assembly protein (PICALM) gene, whose product is involved in clathrin-mediated endocytosis. A variety of leukemias and lymphomas have been associated with translocations that fuse human PICALM with the putative transcription factor gene AF10. The Picalmfit1–5R and Picalmfit1–4R mutations are splice-donor alterations resulting in transcripts that are less abundant than normal and missing exons 4 and 17, respectively. These exon deletions introduce premature termination codons predicted to truncate the proteins near the N and C termini, respectively. No mutations in the genes encoding Picalm, clathrin, or components of the adaptor protein complex 2 (AP2) have been previously described in which the suite of disorders present in the Picalmfit1 mutant mice is apparent. These mutants thus provide unique models for exploring how the endocytic function of mouse Picalm and the transport processes mediated by clathrin and the AP2 complex contribute to normal hematopoiesis, iron metabolism, and growth. PMID:12832620

  16. Metabolic abnormalities induced by mitochondrial dysfunction in skeletal muscle of the renal carcinoma Eker (TSC2+/-) rat model.

    PubMed

    Aizawa, Yumi; Shirai, Tomomi; Kobayashi, Toshiyuki; Hino, Okio; Tsujii, Yoshimasa; Inoue, Hirofumi; Kazami, Machiko; Tadokoro, Tadahiro; Suzuki, Tsukasa; Kobayashi, Ken-Ichi; Yamamoto, Yuji

    2016-08-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex 2 (TSC2) is a mediator of insulin signal transduction, and a loss of function in TSC2 induces hyperactivation of mTORC1 pathway, which leads to tumorigenesis. We have previously demonstrated that Eker rat model, which is heterozygous for a TSC2 mutation, exhibits hyperglycemia and hyperketonemia. The present study was to investigate whether these changes also can affect metabolism in skeletal muscle of the Eker rat. Wild-type (TSC2+/+) and Eker (TSC2+/-) rats underwent an oral glucose tolerance test, and the latter showed decrease in whole-body glucose utilization. Additionally, reductions in the expression of glycolysis-, lipolysis-, and ketone body-related genes in skeletal muscle were observed in Eker rats. Furthermore, ATP content and mitochondrial DNA copy number were lower in skeletal muscle of Eker rats. These data demonstrate that heterozygous to mutation TSC2 not only affects the liver metabolism, but also skeletal muscle metabolism, via mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:27031579

  17. Molecular Phenotyping of Immune Cells from Young NOD Mice Reveals Abnormal Metabolic Pathways in the Early Induction Phase of Autoimmune Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jian; Kakoola, Dorothy N.; Lenchik, Nataliya I.; Desiderio, Dominic M.; Marshall, Dana R.; Gerling, Ivan C.

    2012-01-01

    Islet leukocytic infiltration (insulitis) is first obvious at around 4 weeks of age in the NOD mouse – a model for human type 1 diabetes (T1D). The molecular events that lead to insulitis and initiate autoimmune diabetes are poorly understood. Since TID is caused by numerous genes, we hypothesized that multiple molecular pathways are altered and interact to initiate this disease. We evaluated the molecular phenotype (mRNA and protein expression) and molecular networks of ex vivo unfractionated spleen leukocytes from 2 and 4 week-old NOD mice in comparison to two control strains. Analysis of the global gene expression profiles and hierarchical clustering revealed that the majority (∼90%) of the differentially expressed genes in NOD mice were repressed. Furthermore, analysis using a modern suite of multiple bioinformatics approaches identified abnormal molecular pathways that can be divided broadly into 2 categories: metabolic pathways, which were predominant at 2 weeks, and immune response pathways, which were predominant at 4 weeks. Network analysis by Ingenuity pathway analysis identified key genes/molecules that may play a role in regulating these pathways. These included five that were common to both ages (TNF, HNF4A, IL15, Progesterone, and YWHAZ), and others that were unique to 2 weeks (e.g. MYC/MYCN, TGFB1, and IL2) and to 4 weeks (e.g. IFNG, beta-estradiol, p53, NFKB, AKT, PRKCA, IL12, and HLA-C). Based on the literature, genes that may play a role in regulating metabolic pathways at 2 weeks include Myc and HNF4A, and at 4 weeks, beta-estradiol, p53, Akt, HNF4A and AR. Our data suggest that abnormalities in regulation of metabolic pathways in the immune cells of young NOD mice lead to abnormalities in the immune response pathways and as such may play a role in the initiation of autoimmune diabetes. Thus, targeting metabolism may provide novel approaches to preventing and/or treating autoimmune diabetes. PMID:23071669

  18. Molecular phenotyping of immune cells from young NOD mice reveals abnormal metabolic pathways in the early induction phase of autoimmune diabetes.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jian; Kakoola, Dorothy N; Lenchik, Nataliya I; Desiderio, Dominic M; Marshall, Dana R; Gerling, Ivan C

    2012-01-01

    Islet leukocytic infiltration (insulitis) is first obvious at around 4 weeks of age in the NOD mouse--a model for human type 1 diabetes (T1D). The molecular events that lead to insulitis and initiate autoimmune diabetes are poorly understood. Since TID is caused by numerous genes, we hypothesized that multiple molecular pathways are altered and interact to initiate this disease. We evaluated the molecular phenotype (mRNA and protein expression) and molecular networks of ex vivo unfractionated spleen leukocytes from 2 and 4 week-old NOD mice in comparison to two control strains. Analysis of the global gene expression profiles and hierarchical clustering revealed that the majority (~90%) of the differentially expressed genes in NOD mice were repressed. Furthermore, analysis using a modern suite of multiple bioinformatics approaches identified abnormal molecular pathways that can be divided broadly into 2 categories: metabolic pathways, which were predominant at 2 weeks, and immune response pathways, which were predominant at 4 weeks. Network analysis by Ingenuity pathway analysis identified key genes/molecules that may play a role in regulating these pathways. These included five that were common to both ages (TNF, HNF4A, IL15, Progesterone, and YWHAZ), and others that were unique to 2 weeks (e.g. MYC/MYCN, TGFB1, and IL2) and to 4 weeks (e.g. IFNG, beta-estradiol, p53, NFKB, AKT, PRKCA, IL12, and HLA-C). Based on the literature, genes that may play a role in regulating metabolic pathways at 2 weeks include Myc and HNF4A, and at 4 weeks, beta-estradiol, p53, Akt, HNF4A and AR. Our data suggest that abnormalities in regulation of metabolic pathways in the immune cells of young NOD mice lead to abnormalities in the immune response pathways and as such may play a role in the initiation of autoimmune diabetes. Thus, targeting metabolism may provide novel approaches to preventing and/or treating autoimmune diabetes. PMID:23071669

  19. Prevalence and determinants of metabolic syndrome: a cross-sectional survey of general medical outpatient clinics using National Cholesterol Education Program-Adult Treatment Panel III criteria in Botswana

    PubMed Central

    Omech, Bernard; Tshikuka, Jose-Gaby; Mwita, Julius C; Tsima, Billy; Nkomazana, Oathokwa; Amone-P’Olak, Kennedy

    2016-01-01

    Background Low- and middle-income countries, including Botswana, are facing rising prevalence of obesity and obesity-related cardiometabolic complications. Very little information is known about clustering of cardiovascular risk factors in the outpatient setting during routine visits. We aimed to assess the prevalence and identify the determinants of metabolic syndrome among the general outpatients’ attendances in Botswana. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted from August to October 2014 involving outpatients aged ≥20 years without diagnosis of diabetes mellitus. A precoded questionnaire was used to collect data on participants’ sociodemographics, risk factors, and anthropometric indices. Fasting blood samples were drawn and analyzed for glucose and lipid profile. Metabolic syndrome was assessed using National Cholesterol Education Program-Adult Treatment Panel III criteria. Results In total, 291 participants were analyzed, of whom 216 (74.2%) were females. The mean age of the total population was 50.1 (±11) years. The overall prevalence of metabolic syndrome was 27.1% (n=79), with no significant difference between the sexes (female =29.6%, males =20%, P=0.11). A triad of central obesity, low high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, and elevated blood pressure constituted the largest proportion (38 [13.1%]) of cases of metabolic syndrome, followed by a combination of low high-density lipoprotein, elevated triglycerides, central obesity, and elevated blood pressure, with 17 (5.8%) cases. Independent determinants of metabolic syndrome were antihypertensive use and increased waist circumference. Conclusion Metabolic syndrome is highly prevalent in the general medical outpatients clinics. Proactive approaches are needed to screen and manage cases targeting its most important predictors. PMID:27616893

  20. Anesthetic management of a patient with sustained severe metabolic alkalosis and electrolyte abnormalities caused by ingestion of baking soda.

    PubMed

    Soliz, Jose; Lim, Jeffrey; Zheng, Gang

    2014-01-01

    The use of alternative medicine is prevalent worldwide. However, its effect on intraoperative anesthetic care is underreported. We report the anesthetic management of a patient who underwent an extensive head and neck cancer surgery and presented with a severe intraoperative metabolic alkalosis from the long term ingestion of baking soda and other herbal remedies. PMID:25180100

  1. Anesthetic Management of a Patient with Sustained Severe Metabolic Alkalosis and Electrolyte Abnormalities Caused by Ingestion of Baking Soda

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    The use of alternative medicine is prevalent worldwide. However, its effect on intraoperative anesthetic care is underreported. We report the anesthetic management of a patient who underwent an extensive head and neck cancer surgery and presented with a severe intraoperative metabolic alkalosis from the long term ingestion of baking soda and other herbal remedies. PMID:25180100

  2. Abnormalities in carbohydrate and lipid metabolisms in high-fructose dietfed insulin-resistant rats: amelioration by Catharanthus roseus treatments.

    PubMed

    Rasineni, Karuna; Bellamkonda, Ramesh; Singareddy, Sreenivasa Reddy; Desireddy, Saralakumari

    2013-09-01

    High intake of dietary fructose has been shown to exert a number of adverse metabolic effects in humans and experimental animals. The present study was proposed to elucidate the effect of Catharanthus roseus (C. roseus) leaf powder treatment on alterations in carbohydrate and lipid metabolisms in rats fed with high-fructose diet. Male Wistar rats of body weight around 180 g were divided into four groups, two of these groups (groups C and C+CR) were fed with standard pellet diet and the other two groups (groups F and F+CR) were fed with high-fructose (66 %) diet. C. roseus leaf powder suspension in water (100 mg/kg body weight/day) was administered orally to group C+CR and group F+CR. At the end of a 60-day experimental period, biochemical parameters related to carbohydrate and lipid metabolisms were assayed. C. roseus treatment completely prevented the fructose-induced increased body weight, hyperglycemia, and hypertriglyceridemia. Hyperinsulinemia and insulin resistance observed in group F was significantly decreased with C. roseus treatment in group F+CR. The alterations observed in the activities of enzymes of carbohydrate and lipid metabolisms and contents of hepatic tissue lipids in group F rats were significantly restored to near normal values by C. roseus treatment in group F+CR. In conclusion, our study demonstrates that C. roseus treatment is effective in preventing fructose-induced insulin resistance and hypertriglyceridemia while attenuating the fructose-induced alterations in carbohydrate and lipid metabolisms. This study suggests that the plant can be used as an adjuvant for the prevention and/or management of insulin resistance and disorders related to it. PMID:23334857

  3. Ablating L-FABP in SCP-2/SCP-x null mice impairs bile acid metabolism and biliary HDL-cholesterol secretion

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Gregory G.; Atshaves, Barbara P.; Landrock, Kerstin K.; Landrock, Danilo; Storey, Stephen M.; Howles, Philip N.; Kier, Ann B.

    2014-01-01

    On the basis of their abilities to bind bile acids and/or cholesterol, the physiological role(s) of liver fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP) and sterol carrier protein (SCP) 2/SCP-x (SCP-2/SCP-x) gene products in biliary bile acid and cholesterol formation was examined in gene-ablated male mice. L-FABP (LKO) or L-FABP/SCP-2/SCP-x [triple-knockout (TKO)] ablation markedly decreased hepatic bile acid concentration, while SCP-2/SCP-x [double-knockout (DKO)] ablation alone had no effect. In contrast, LKO increased biliary bile acid, while DKO and TKO had no effect on biliary bile acid levels. LKO and DKO also altered biliary bile acid composition to increase bile acid hydrophobicity. Furthermore, LKO and TKO decreased hepatic uptake and biliary secretion of high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-derived 22-(N-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl)amino)-23,24-bisnor-5-cholen-3β-ol (NBD-cholesterol), while DKO alone had no effect. Finally, LKO and, to a lesser extent, DKO decreased most indexes contributing to cholesterol solubility in biliary bile. These results suggest different, but complementary, roles for L-FABP and SCP-2/SCP-x in biliary bile acid and cholesterol formation. L-FABP appears to function more in hepatic retention of bile acids as well as hepatic uptake and biliary secretion of HDL-cholesterol. Conversely, SCP-2/SCP-x may function more in formation and biliary secretion of bile acid, with less impact on hepatic uptake or biliary secretion of HDL-cholesterol. PMID:25277800

  4. Ablating L-FABP in SCP-2/SCP-x null mice impairs bile acid metabolism and biliary HDL-cholesterol secretion.

    PubMed

    Martin, Gregory G; Atshaves, Barbara P; Landrock, Kerstin K; Landrock, Danilo; Storey, Stephen M; Howles, Philip N; Kier, Ann B; Schroeder, Friedhelm

    2014-12-01

    On the basis of their abilities to bind bile acids and/or cholesterol, the physiological role(s) of liver fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP) and sterol carrier protein (SCP) 2/SCP-x (SCP-2/SCP-x) gene products in biliary bile acid and cholesterol formation was examined in gene-ablated male mice. L-FABP (LKO) or L-FABP/SCP-2/SCP-x [triple-knockout (TKO)] ablation markedly decreased hepatic bile acid concentration, while SCP-2/SCP-x [double-knockout (DKO)] ablation alone had no effect. In contrast, LKO increased biliary bile acid, while DKO and TKO had no effect on biliary bile acid levels. LKO and DKO also altered biliary bile acid composition to increase bile acid hydrophobicity. Furthermore, LKO and TKO decreased hepatic uptake and biliary secretion of high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-derived 22-(N-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl)amino)-23,24-bisnor-5-cholen-3β-ol (NBD-cholesterol), while DKO alone had no effect. Finally, LKO and, to a lesser extent, DKO decreased most indexes contributing to cholesterol solubility in biliary bile. These results suggest different, but complementary, roles for L-FABP and SCP-2/SCP-x in biliary bile acid and cholesterol formation. L-FABP appears to function more in hepatic retention of bile acids as well as hepatic uptake and biliary secretion of HDL-cholesterol. Conversely, SCP-2/SCP-x may function more in formation and biliary secretion of bile acid, with less impact on hepatic uptake or biliary secretion of HDL-cholesterol. PMID:25277800

  5. Abnormally activated one-carbon metabolic pathway is associated with mtDNA hypermethylation and mitochondrial malfunction in the oocytes of polycystic gilt ovaries

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Longfei; Li, Juan; He, Bin; Jia, Yimin; Niu, Yingjie; Wang, Chenfei; Zhao, Ruqian

    2016-01-01

    Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) is associated with hyperhomocysteinemia and polycystic ovaries (PCO) usually produce oocytes of poor quality. However, the intracellular mechanism linking hyperhomocysteinemia and oocyte quality remains elusive. In this study, the quality of the oocytes isolated from healthy and polycystic gilt ovaries was evaluated in vitro in association with one-carbon metabolism, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) methylation, and mitochondrial function. PCO oocytes demonstrated impaired polar body extrusion, and significantly decreased cleavage and blastocyst rates. The mitochondrial distribution was disrupted in PCO oocytes, together with decreased mitochondrial membrane potential and deformed mitochondrial structure. The mtDNA copy number and the expression of mtDNA-encoded genes were significantly lower in PCO oocytes. Homocysteine concentration in follicular fluid was significantly higher in PCO group, which was associated with significantly up-regulated one-carbon metabolic enzymes betaine homocysteine methyltransferase (BHMT), glycine N-methyltransferase (GNMT) and the DNA methyltransferase DNMT1. Moreover, mtDNA sequences coding for 12S, 16S rRNA and ND4, as well as the D-loop region were significantly hypermethylated in PCO oocytes. These results indicate that an abnormal activation of one-carbon metabolism and hypermethylation of mtDNA may contribute, largely, to the mitochondrial malfunction and decreased quality of PCO-derived oocytes in gilts. PMID:26758245

  6. HDL abnormalities in nephrotic syndrome and chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Vaziri, Nosratola D

    2016-01-01

    Normal HDL activity confers cardiovascular and overall protection by mediating reverse cholesterol transport and through its potent anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and antithrombotic functions. Serum lipid profile, as well as various aspects of HDL metabolism, structure, and function can be profoundly altered in patients with nephrotic range proteinuria or chronic kidney disease (CKD). These abnormalities can, in turn, contribute to the progression of cardiovascular complications and various other comorbidities, such as foam cell formation, atherosclerosis, and/or glomerulosclerosis, in affected patients. The presence and severity of proteinuria and renal insufficiency, as well as dietary and drug regimens, pre-existing genetic disorders of lipid metabolism, and renal replacement therapies (including haemodialysis, peritoneal dialysis, and renal transplantation) determine the natural history of lipid disorders in patients with kidney disease. Despite the adverse effects associated with dysregulated reverse cholesterol transport and advances in our understanding of the underlying mechanisms, safe and effective therapeutic interventions are currently lacking. This Review provides an overview of HDL metabolism under normal conditions, and discusses the features, mechanisms, and consequences of HDL abnormalities in patients with nephrotic syndrome or advanced CKD. PMID:26568191

  7. Adiposity and Insufficient MVPA Predict Cardiometabolic Abnormalities in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Mark D.; Snih, Soham Al; Stoddard, Jonathan; McClain, James; Lee, IMin

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To compare the extent to which different combinations of objectively measured sedentary behavior (SB) and physical activity contribute to cardiometabolic health. Design and Methods A population representative sample of 5,268 individuals, aged 20-85 years, was included from the combined 2003-2006 NHANES datasets. Activity categories were created on the combined basis of objectively measured SB and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) tertiles. Cardiometabolic abnormalities included elevated blood pressure, levels of triglycerides, fasting plasma glucose, C-reactive protein, homeostasis model assessment (HOMA) of insulin resistance value, and low HDL-cholesterol level. BMI, and DXA-derived percent body fat (% BF) and android adiposity were also compared across groups. Predictors for a metabolically abnormal phenotype (≥3 cardiometabolic abnormalities, or insulin resistance) were determined. Results Adults with the least SB and greatest MVPA exhibited the healthiest cardiometabolic profiles, whereas adults with the greatest SB and lowest MVPA were older and had elevated risk. Time spent in SB was not a predictor of the metabolically abnormal phenotype when MVPA was accounted for. Adults with the highest MVPA across SB tertiles did not differ markedly in prevalence of obesity, adiposity, and/or serum cardiometabolic risk factors; however, less MVPA was associated with substantial elevations of obesity and cardiometabolic risk. Android adiposity (per kilogram) was independently associated with the metabolically abnormal phenotype in both men (OR: 2.36 [95% CI, 1.76-3.17], p<0.001) and women (OR: 2.00 [95% CI, 1.63-2.45], p<0.001). Among women, greater SB, and less lifestyle moderate activity and MVPA were each independently associated with the metabolically abnormal phenotype, whereas only less MVPA was associated with it in men. Conclusions MVPA is a strong predictor of cardiometabolic health among adults, independent of time spent in SB. PMID

  8. Understanding Lipoproteins as Transporters of Cholesterol and Other Lipids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biggerstaff, Kyle D.; Wooten, Joshua S.

    2004-01-01

    A clear picture of lipoprotein metabolism is essential for understanding the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis. Many students are taught that low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol is "bad" and high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol is "good." This misconception leads to students thinking that lipoproteins are types of cholesterol rather than…

  9. TallyHO obese female mice experience poor reproductive outcomes and abnormal blastocyst metabolism which is reversed by metformin

    PubMed Central

    Louden, Erica D.; Luzzo, Kerri M.; Jimenez, Patricia T.; Chi, Tiffany; Chi, Maggie; Moley, Kelle H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Obese women experience worse reproductive outcomes compared to normal weight women, specifically infertility, pregnancy loss, fetal malformations and developmental delay. The objective of this study was to use a genetic mouse model of obesity in order to recapitulate the human reproductive phenotype and further examine potential mechanisms and therapies. Methods New inbred, polygenic Type 2 diabetic TallyHO mice and age matched control C57BL/6 mice were superovulated to obtain morulae or blastocysts stage embryos which were cultured in human tubal fluid media. Deoxyglucose uptake was performed on insulin-stimulated individual blastocysts. Apoptosis was detected by confocal microscopy using TUNEL assay and Topro-3 nuclear dye. Embryos were scored for %TUNEL positive/total nuclei. AMPK activation, TNFα expression, and adiponectin expression were analyzed by western immunoblot and confocal immunofluorescent microscopy. Lipid accumulation was assayed by Bodipy. Finally all measured parameters were compared between TallyHO mice in morulaes cultured to blastocyst embryos in either human tubal fluid (HTF) media or HTF with 25ug/ml metformin added. Results TallyHo mice developed whole body abnormal insulin tolerance, decreased litter number and increased NEFA. Blastocysts demonstrated increased apoptosis, decreased insulin sensitivity, and decreased activation of AMP activated protein-kinase (AMPK). As a possible cause of the insulin resistance/abnormal P-AMPK, we found that Tumor necrosis Factor (TNFα) expression and lipid accumulation as detected by BODIPY were increased in TallyHO blastocysts and adiponectin was decreased. Culturing TallyHO morulae with the AMPK activator, metformin lead to a reversal of all abnormal findings, including increased p-AMPK, improved insulin-stimulated glucose uptake and normalization of lipid accumulation. Conclusions Women with obesity and insulin resistance experience poor pregnancy outcomes. Previously we have shown in mouse

  10. All about Cholesterol

    MedlinePlus

    ... are several kinds of fats in your blood. • LDL cholesterol is sometimes called “bad” cholesterol. It can narrow ... medicine to manage blood fats. They help lower LDL cholesterol. They also help lower your risk for a ...

  11. Cholesterol testing and results

    MedlinePlus

    ... lipoprotein (LDL cholesterol) High density lipoprotein (HDL cholesterol) Triglycerides (another type of fat in your blood) Very ... made of fat and protein. They carry cholesterol, triglycerides, and other fats, called lipids, in the blood ...

  12. Abnormal Brain Iron Metabolism in Irp2 Deficient Mice Is Associated with Mild Neurological and Behavioral Impairments

    PubMed Central

    Zumbrennen-Bullough, Kimberly B.; Becker, Lore; Garrett, Lillian; Hölter, Sabine M.; Calzada-Wack, Julia; Mossbrugger, Ilona; Quintanilla-Fend, Leticia; Racz, Ildiko; Rathkolb, Birgit; Klopstock, Thomas; Wurst, Wolfgang; Zimmer, Andreas; Wolf, Eckhard; Fuchs, Helmut; Gailus-Durner, Valerie; de Angelis, Martin Hrabě; Romney, Steven J.; Leibold, Elizabeth A.

    2014-01-01

    Iron Regulatory Protein 2 (Irp2, Ireb2) is a central regulator of cellular iron homeostasis in vertebrates. Two global knockout mouse models have been generated to explore the role of Irp2 in regulating iron metabolism. While both mouse models show that loss of Irp2 results in microcytic anemia and altered body iron distribution, discrepant results have drawn into question the role of Irp2 in regulating brain iron metabolism. One model shows that aged Irp2 deficient mice develop adult-onset progressive neurodegeneration that is associated with axonal degeneration and loss of Purkinje cells in the central nervous system. These mice show iron deposition in white matter tracts and oligodendrocyte soma throughout the brain. A contrasting model of global Irp2 deficiency shows no overt or pathological signs of neurodegeneration or brain iron accumulation, and display only mild motor coordination and balance deficits when challenged by specific tests. Explanations for conflicting findings in the severity of the clinical phenotype, brain iron accumulation and neuronal degeneration remain unclear. Here, we describe an additional mouse model of global Irp2 deficiency. Our aged Irp2−/− mice show marked iron deposition in white matter and in oligodendrocytes while iron content is significantly reduced in neurons. Ferritin and transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1, Tfrc), expression are increased and decreased, respectively, in the brain from Irp2−/− mice. These mice show impairments in locomotion, exploration, motor coordination/balance and nociception when assessed by neurological and behavioral tests, but lack overt signs of neurodegenerative disease. Ultrastructural studies of specific brain regions show no evidence of neurodegeneration. Our data suggest that Irp2 deficiency dysregulates brain iron metabolism causing cellular dysfunction that ultimately leads to mild neurological, behavioral and nociceptive impairments. PMID:24896637

  13. Vescalagin from Pink Wax Apple [Syzygium samarangense (Blume) Merrill and Perry] Alleviates Hepatic Insulin Resistance and Ameliorates Glycemic Metabolism Abnormality in Rats Fed a High-Fructose Diet.

    PubMed

    Huang, Da-Wei; Chang, Wen-Chang; Wu, James Swi-Bea; Shih, Rui-Wen; Shen, Szu-Chuan

    2016-02-10

    This study investigates the ameliorative effect of vescalagin (VES) isolated from Pink wax apple fruit on hepatic insulin resistance and abnormal carbohydrate metabolism in high-fructose diet (HFD)-induced hyperglycemic rats. The results show that in HFD rats, VES significantly reduced the values of the area under the curve for glucose in an oral glucose tolerance test and the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance index. VES significantly enhanced the activity of hepatic antioxidant enzymes while reducing thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances in HFD rats. Western blot assay revealed that VES reduced hepatic protein expression involved in inflammation pathways while up-regulating expression of hepatic insulin signaling-related proteins. Moreover, VES up-regulated the expression of hepatic glycogen synthase and hepatic glycolysis-related proteins while down-regulating hepatic gluconeogenesis-related proteins in HFD rats. This study suggests some therapeutic potential of VES in preventing the progression of diabetes mellitus. PMID:26800576

  14. Abnormalities in myo-inositol metabolism associated with type 2 diabetes in mice fed a high-fat diet: benefits of a dietary myo-inositol supplementation.

    PubMed

    Croze, Marine L; Géloën, Alain; Soulage, Christophe O

    2015-06-28

    We previously reported that a chronic supplementation with myo-inositol (MI) improved insulin sensitivity and reduced fat accretion in mice. We then tested the potency of such dietary intervention in the prevention of insulin resistance in C57BL/6 male mouse fed a high-fat diet (HFD). In addition, some abnormalities in inositol metabolism were reported to be associated with insulin resistance in several animal and human studies. We then investigated the presence of such anomalies (i.e. inosituria and an inositol intra-tissue depletion) in this diet-induced obesity (DIO) mouse model, as well as the potential benefit of a MI supplementation for inositol intra-tissue deficiency correction. HFD (60 % energy from fat) feeding was associated with inosituria and inositol intra-tissue depletion in the liver and kidneys. MI supplementation (0·58 mg/g per d) restored inositol pools in kidneys (partially) and liver (fully). HFD feeding for 4 months induced ectopic lipid redistribution to liver and muscles, fasting hyperglycaemia and hyperinsulinaemia, insulin resistance and obesity that were not prevented by MI supplementation, despite a significant improvement in insulin sensitivity parameter K insulin tolerance test and a reduction in white adipose tissue (WAT) mass ( - 17 %, P< 0·05). MI supplementation significantly reduced fatty acid synthase activity in epididymal WAT, which might explain its beneficial, but modest, effect on WAT accretion in HFD-fed mice. Finally, we found some abnormalities in inositol metabolism in association with a diabetic phenotype (i.e. insulin resistance and fasting hyperglycaemia) in a DIO mouse model. Dietary MI supplementation was efficient in the prevention of inositol intra-tissue depletion, but did not prevent insulin resistance or obesity efficiently in this mouse model. PMID:25990651

  15. The Role of Cholesterol in Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kuzu, Omer F; Noory, Mohammad A; Robertson, Gavin P

    2016-04-15

    The roles played by cholesterol in cancer development and the potential of therapeutically targeting cholesterol homeostasis is a controversial area in the cancer community. Several epidemiologic studies report an association between cancer and serum cholesterol levels or statin use, while others suggest that there is not one. Furthermore, the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) project using next-generation sequencing has profiled the mutational status and expression levels of all the genes in diverse cancers, including those involved in cholesterol metabolism, providing correlative support for a role of the cholesterol pathway in cancer development. Finally, preclinical studies tend to more consistently support the role of cholesterol in cancer, with several demonstrating that cholesterol homeostasis genes can modulate development. Because of space limitations, this review provides selected examples of the epidemiologic, TCGA, and preclinical data, focusing on alterations in cholesterol homeostasis and its consequent effect on patient survival. In melanoma, this focused analysis demonstrated that enhanced expression of cholesterol synthesis genes was associated with decreased patient survival. Collectively, the studies in melanoma and other cancer types suggested a potential role of disrupted cholesterol homeostasis in cancer development but additional studies are needed to link population-based epidemiological data, the TCGA database results, and preclinical mechanistic evidence to concretely resolve this controversy. Cancer Res; 76(8); 2063-70. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27197250

  16. Fibroblasts from patients with Diamond-Blackfan anaemia show abnormal expression of genes involved in protein synthesis, amino acid metabolism and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Avondo, Federica; Roncaglia, Paola; Crescenzio, Nicoletta; Krmac, Helena; Garelli, Emanuela; Armiraglio, Marta; Castagnoli, Carlotta; Campagnoli, Maria Francesca; Ramenghi, Ugo; Gustincich, Stefano; Santoro, Claudio; Dianzani, Irma

    2009-01-01

    Background Diamond-Blackfan anaemia (DBA) is a rare inherited red cell hypoplasia characterised by a defect in the maturation of erythroid progenitors and in some cases associated with malformations. Patients have an increased risk of solid tumors. Mutations have been found in several ribosomal protein (RP) genes, i.e RPS19, RPS24, RPS17, RPL5, RPL11, RPL35A. Studies in haematopoietic progenitors from patients show that haplo-insufficiency of an RP impairs rRNA processing and ribosome biogenesis. DBA lymphocytes show reduced protein synthesis and fibroblasts display abnormal rRNA processing and impaired proliferation. Results To evaluate the involvement of non-haematopoietic tissues in DBA, we have analysed global gene expression in fibroblasts from DBA patients compared to healthy controls. Microarray expression profiling using Affymetrix GeneChip Human Genome U133A 2.0 Arrays revealed that 421 genes are differentially expressed in DBA patient fibroblasts. These genes include a large cluster of ribosomal proteins and factors involved in protein synthesis and amino acid metabolism, as well as genes associated to cell death, cancer and tissue development. Conclusion This analysis reports for the first time an abnormal gene expression profile in a non-haematopoietic cell type in DBA. These data support the hypothesis that DBA may be due to a defect in general or specific protein synthesis. PMID:19765279

  17. iTRAQ-based proteomic analysis of plasma reveals abnormalities in lipid metabolism proteins in chronic kidney disease-related atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Luczak, Magdalena; Formanowicz, Dorota; Marczak, Łukasz; Suszyńska-Zajczyk, Joanna; Pawliczak, Elżbieta; Wanic-Kossowska, Maria; Stobiecki, Maciej

    2016-01-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have a considerably higher risk of death due to cardiovascular causes. Using an iTRAQ MS/MS approach, we investigated the alterations in plasma protein accumulation in patients with CKD and classical cardiovascular disease (CVD) without CKD. The proteomic analysis led to the identification of 130 differentially expressed proteins among CVD and CKD patients and healthy volunteers. Bioinformatics analysis revealed that 29 differentially expressed proteins were involved in lipid metabolism and atherosclerosis, 20 of which were apolipoproteins and constituents of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) and low-density lipoprotein (LDL). Although dyslipidemia is common in CKD patients, we found that significant changes in apolipoproteins were not strictly associated with changes in plasma lipid levels. A lack of correlation between apoB and LDL concentration and an inverse relationship of some proteins with the HDL level were revealed. An increased level of apolipoprotein AIV, adiponectin, or apolipoprotein C, despite their anti-atherogenic properties, was not associated with a decrease in cardiovascular event risk in CKD patients. The presence of the distinctive pattern of apolipoproteins demonstrated in this study may suggest that lipid abnormalities in CKD are characterized by more qualitative abnormalities and may be related to HDL function rather than HDL deficiency. PMID:27600335

  18. iTRAQ-based proteomic analysis of plasma reveals abnormalities in lipid metabolism proteins in chronic kidney disease-related atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Luczak, Magdalena; Formanowicz, Dorota; Marczak, Łukasz; Suszyńska-Zajczyk, Joanna; Pawliczak, Elżbieta; Wanic-Kossowska, Maria; Stobiecki, Maciej

    2016-01-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have a considerably higher risk of death due to cardiovascular causes. Using an iTRAQ MS/MS approach, we investigated the alterations in plasma protein accumulation in patients with CKD and classical cardiovascular disease (CVD) without CKD. The proteomic analysis led to the identification of 130 differentially expressed proteins among CVD and CKD patients and healthy volunteers. Bioinformatics analysis revealed that 29 differentially expressed proteins were involved in lipid metabolism and atherosclerosis, 20 of which were apolipoproteins and constituents of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) and low-density lipoprotein (LDL). Although dyslipidemia is common in CKD patients, we found that significant changes in apolipoproteins were not strictly associated with changes in plasma lipid levels. A lack of correlation between apoB and LDL concentration and an inverse relationship of some proteins with the HDL level were revealed. An increased level of apolipoprotein AIV, adiponectin, or apolipoprotein C, despite their anti-atherogenic properties, was not associated with a decrease in cardiovascular event risk in CKD patients. The presence of the distinctive pattern of apolipoproteins demonstrated in this study may suggest that lipid abnormalities in CKD are characterized by more qualitative abnormalities and may be related to HDL function rather than HDL deficiency. PMID:27600335

  19. Genome-wide identification of microRNAs regulating cholesterol and triglyceride homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Wagschal, Alexandre; Najafi-Shoushtari, S Hani; Wang, Lifeng; Goedeke, Leigh; Sinha, Sumita; deLemos, Andrew S; Black, Josh C; Ramírez, Cristina M; Li, Yingxia; Tewhey, Ryan; Hatoum, Ida; Shah, Naisha; Lu, Yong; Kristo, Fjoralba; Psychogios, Nikolaos; Vrbanac, Vladimir; Lu, Yi-Chien; Hla, Timothy; de Cabo, Rafael; Tsang, John S; Schadt, Eric; Sabeti, Pardis C; Kathiresan, Sekar; Cohen, David E; Whetstine, Johnathan; Chung, Raymond T; Fernández-Hernando, Carlos; Kaplan, Lee M; Bernards, Andre; Gerszten, Robert E; Näär, Anders M

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have linked genes to various pathological traits. However, the potential contribution of regulatory noncoding RNAs, such as microRNAs (miRNAs), to a genetic predisposition to pathological conditions has remained unclear. We leveraged GWAS meta-analysis data from >188,000 individuals to identify 69 miRNAs in physical proximity to single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with abnormal levels of circulating lipids. Several of these miRNAs (miR-128-1, miR-148a, miR-130b, and miR-301b) control the expression of key proteins involved in cholesterol-lipoprotein trafficking, such as the low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor (LDLR) and the ATP-binding cassette A1 (ABCA1) cholesterol transporter. Consistent with human liver expression data and genetic links to abnormal blood lipid levels, overexpression and antisense targeting of miR-128-1 or miR-148a in high-fat diet–fed C57BL/6J and Apoe-null mice resulted in altered hepatic expression of proteins involved in lipid trafficking and metabolism, and in modulated levels of circulating lipoprotein-cholesterol and triglycerides. Taken together, these findings support the notion that altered expression of miRNAs may contribute to abnormal blood lipid levels, predisposing individuals to human cardiometabolic disorders. PMID:26501192

  20. Differential regulation of bile acid and cholesterol metabolism by the farnesoid X receptor in Ldlr −/− mice versus hamsters[S

    PubMed Central

    Gardès, Christophe; Chaput, Evelyne; Staempfli, Andreas; Blum, Denise; Richter, Hans; Benson, G. Martin

    2013-01-01

    Modulating bile acid synthesis has long been considered a good strategy by which to improve cholesterol homeostasis in humans. The farnesoid X receptor (FXR), the key regulator of bile acid synthesis, was, therefore, identified as an interesting target for drug discovery. We compared the effect of four, structurally unrelated, synthetic FXR agonists in two fat-fed rodent species and observed that the three most potent and selective agonists decreased plasma cholesterol in LDL receptor-deficient (Ldlr −/−) mice, but none did so in hamsters. Detailed investigation revealed increases in the expression of small heterodimer partner (Shp) in their livers and of intestinal fibroblast growth factor 15 or 19 (Fgf15/19) in mice only. Cyp7a1 expression and fecal bile acid (BA) excretion were strongly reduced in mice and hamsters by all four FXR agonists, whereas bile acid pool sizes were reduced in both species by all but the X-Ceptor compound in hamsters. In Ldlr −/− mice, the predominant bile acid changed from cholate to the more hydrophilic β-muricholate due to a strong repression of Cyp8b1 and increase in Cyp3a11 expression. However, FXR agonists caused only minor changes in the expression of Cyp8b1 and in bile acid profiles in hamsters. In summary, FXR agonist-induced decreases in bile acid pool size and lipophilicity and in cholesterol absorption and synthesis could explain the decreased plasma cholesterol in Ldlr −/− mice. In hamsters, FXR agonists reduced bile acid pool size to a smaller extent with minor changes in bile acid profile and reductions in sterol absorption, and consequently, plasma cholesterol was unchanged. PMID:23431047

  1. Cholesterol overload induces apoptosis in SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells through the up regulation of flotillin-2 in the lipid raft and the activation of BDNF/Trkb signaling.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yen-Ning; Lin, Ching-I; Liao, Hsiang; Liu, Chin-Yu; Chen, Yue-Hua; Chiu, Wan-Chun; Lin, Shyh-Hsiang

    2016-07-22

    Epidemiological investigations have shown that Alzheimer's disease (AD) is one of the most common neurodegenerative diseases. It has been indicated that the cholesterol concentration in the brain of AD patients is higher than that in normal people. In this study, we investigated the effects of cholesterol concentrations, 0, as the control, 3.125, 12.5, and 25μM, on cholesterol metabolism, neuron survival, AD-related protein expressions, and cell morphology and apoptosis using SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells. We observed that expressions of cholesterol hydroxylase (Cyp46), flotillin-2 (a marker of lipid raft content), and truncated tyrosine kinase B (TrkBtc) increased, while expressions of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and full-length TrkB (TrkBfl) decreased as the concentration of cholesterol loading increased. Down-regulation of the PI3K-Akt-glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3β cascade and cell apoptosis were also observed at higher concentrations of cholesterol, along with elevated levels of β-amyloid (Aβ), β-secretase (BACE), and reactive oxygen species (ROS). In conclusion, we found that cholesterol overload in neuronal cells imbalanced the cholesterol homeostasis and increased the protein expressions causing cell apoptosis, which illustrates the neurodegenerative pathology of abnormally elevated cholesterol concentrations found in AD patients. PMID:27155148

  2. Long-term exposure to abnormal glucose levels alters drug metabolism pathways and insulin sensitivity in primary human hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Matthew D.; Ballinger, Kimberly R.; Khetani, Salman R.

    2016-01-01

    Hyperglycemia in type 2 diabetes mellitus has been linked to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, which can progress to inflammation, fibrosis/cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Understanding how chronic hyperglycemia affects primary human hepatocytes (PHHs) can facilitate the development of therapeutics for these diseases. Conversely, elucidating the effects of hypoglycemia on PHHs may provide insights into how the liver adapts to fasting, adverse diabetes drug reactions, and cancer. In contrast to declining PHH monocultures, micropatterned co-cultures (MPCCs) of PHHs and 3T3-J2 murine embryonic fibroblasts maintain insulin-sensitive glucose metabolism for several weeks. Here, we exposed MPCCs to hypo-, normo- and hyperglycemic culture media for ~3 weeks. While albumin and urea secretion were not affected by glucose level, hypoglycemic MPCCs upregulated CYP3A4 enzyme activity as compared to other glycemic states. In contrast, hyperglycemic MPCCs displayed significant hepatic lipid accumulation in the presence of insulin, while also showing decreased sensitivity to insulin-mediated inhibition of glucose output relative to a normoglycemic control. In conclusion, we show for the first time that PHHs exposed to hypo- and hyperglycemia can remain highly functional, but display increased CYP3A4 activity and selective insulin resistance, respectively. In the future, MPCCs under glycemic states can aid in novel drug discovery and mechanistic investigations. PMID:27312339

  3. Long-term exposure to abnormal glucose levels alters drug metabolism pathways and insulin sensitivity in primary human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Matthew D; Ballinger, Kimberly R; Khetani, Salman R

    2016-01-01

    Hyperglycemia in type 2 diabetes mellitus has been linked to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, which can progress to inflammation, fibrosis/cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Understanding how chronic hyperglycemia affects primary human hepatocytes (PHHs) can facilitate the development of therapeutics for these diseases. Conversely, elucidating the effects of hypoglycemia on PHHs may provide insights into how the liver adapts to fasting, adverse diabetes drug reactions, and cancer. In contrast to declining PHH monocultures, micropatterned co-cultures (MPCCs) of PHHs and 3T3-J2 murine embryonic fibroblasts maintain insulin-sensitive glucose metabolism for several weeks. Here, we exposed MPCCs to hypo-, normo- and hyperglycemic culture media for ~3 weeks. While albumin and urea secretion were not affected by glucose level, hypoglycemic MPCCs upregulated CYP3A4 enzyme activity as compared to other glycemic states. In contrast, hyperglycemic MPCCs displayed significant hepatic lipid accumulation in the presence of insulin, while also showing decreased sensitivity to insulin-mediated inhibition of glucose output relative to a normoglycemic control. In conclusion, we show for the first time that PHHs exposed to hypo- and hyperglycemia can remain highly functional, but display increased CYP3A4 activity and selective insulin resistance, respectively. In the future, MPCCs under glycemic states can aid in novel drug discovery and mechanistic investigations. PMID:27312339

  4. Serum levels of immunoglobulins (IgG, IgA, IgM) in a general adult population and their relationship with alcohol consumption, smoking and common metabolic abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Quintela, A; Alende, R; Gude, F; Campos, J; Rey, J; Meijide, L M; Fernandez-Merino, C; Vidal, C

    2008-01-01

    The present study investigated serum immunoglobulin (Ig) concentrations in relation to demographic factors, common habits (alcohol consumption and smoking) and metabolic abnormalities in an adult population-based survey including 460 individuals. Serum levels of interleukin (IL)-6, a marker of inflammation, were also determined. After adjusting for confounders, male sex was associated positively with IgA levels and negatively with IgM levels. Age was associated positively with IgA and IgG levels. Smoking was associated negatively with IgG levels. Heavy drinking was associated positively with IgA levels. Metabolic abnormalities (obesity and metabolic syndrome) were associated positively with IgA levels. Abdominal obesity and hypertriglyceridaemia were the components of metabolic syndrome associated most strongly with serum IgA. Heavy drinkers with metabolic syndrome showed particularly high serum IgA levels. Serum IL-6 levels were correlated positively with IgA and IgG concentrations. It is concluded that sex, age, alcohol consumption, smoking and common metabolic abnormalities should be taken into account when interpreting serum levels of IgA, IgG and IgM. PMID:18005364

  5. Visualization of lipid metabolism in the larval zebrafish intestine reveals a relationship between NPC1L1 mediated cholesterol uptake and dietary fatty acids

    PubMed Central

    Walters, James W.; Anderson, Jennifer L.; Bittman, Robert; Pack, Michael; Farber, Steven A.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY The small intestine is the primary site of dietary lipid absorption in mammals. The balance of nutrients, microorganisms, bile, and mucus that determine intestinal luminal environment cannot be recapitulated ex vivo, thus complicating studies of lipid absorption. We show that fluorescently labeled lipids can be used to visualize and study lipid absorption in live zebrafish larvae. We demonstrate that the addition of BODIPY-fatty acid to a diet high in atherogenic lipids enables imaging of enterocyte lipid droplet dynamics in real time. We find that a lipid-rich meal promotes BODIPY-cholesterol absorption into an endosomal compartment distinguishable from lipid droplets. We also show that dietary fatty acids promote intestinal cholesterol absorption by rapid relocalization of NPC1L1 to intestinal brush border. These data illustrate the power of the zebrafish system to address longstanding questions in vertebrate digestive physiology. PMID:22749558

  6. Coenzyme Q10 supplementation improves metabolic parameters, liver function and mitochondrial respiration in rats with high doses of atorvastatin and a cholesterol-rich diet

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the actions of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) on rats with a cholesterol-rich diet (HD) and high doses of atorvastatin (ATV, 0.2, 0.56 or 1.42 mg/day). Methods Two experiments were done, the first one without coenzyme Q10 supplementation. On the second experiment all groups received coenzyme Q10 0.57 mg/day as supplement. After a 6-week treatment animals were sacrificed, blood and liver were analyzed and liver mitochondria were isolated and its oxygen consumption was evaluated in state 3 (phosphorylating state) and state 4 (resting state) in order to calculate the respiratory control (RC). Results HD increased serum and hepatic cholesterol levels in rats with or without CoQ10. ATV reduced these values but CoQ10 improved even more serum and liver cholesterol. Triacylglycerols (TAG) were also lower in blood and liver of rats with ATV + CoQ10. HDL-C decreased in HD rats. Treatment with ATV maintained HDL-C levels. However, these values were lower in HD + CoQ10 compared to control diet (CD) + CoQ10. RC was lessened in liver mitochondria of HD. The administration of ATV increased RC. All groups supplemented with CoQ10 showed an increment in RC. In conclusion, the combined administration of ATV and CoQ10 improved biochemical parameters, liver function and mitochondrial respiration in hypercholesterolemic rats. Conclusions Our results suggest a potential beneficial effect of CoQ10 supplementation in hypercholesterolemic rats that also receive atorvastatin. This beneficial effect of CoQ10 must be combined with statin treatment in patient with high levels of cholesterol. PMID:24460631

  7. Development of a diet-induced murine model of diabetes featuring cardinal metabolic and pathophysiological abnormalities of type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Jodie L.; Bridson, Tahnee L.; Alim, Md Abdul; Rush, Catherine M.; Rudd, Donna M.; Govan, Brenda L.; Ketheesan, Natkunam

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The persistent rise in global incidence of type 2 diabetes (T2D) continues to have significant public health and economic implications. The availability of relevant animal models of T2D is critical to elucidating the complexity of the pathogenic mechanisms underlying this disease and the implications this has on susceptibility to T2D complications. Whilst many high-fat diet-induced rodent models of obesity and diabetes exist, growing appreciation of the contribution of high glycaemic index diets on the development of hyperglycaemia and insulin resistance highlight the requirement for animal models that more closely represent global dietary patterns reflective of modern society. To that end, we sought to develop and validate a murine model of T2D based on consumption of an energy-dense diet containing moderate levels of fat and a high glycaemic index to better reflect the aetiopathogenesis of T2D. Male C57BL/6 mice were fed an energy-dense (ED) diet and the development of pathological features used in the clinical diagnosis of T2D was assessed over a 30-week period. Compared with control mice, 87% of mice fed an ED diet developed pathognomonic signs of T2D including glucose intolerance, hyperglycaemia, glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c) and glycosuria within 30 weeks. Furthermore, dyslipidaemia, chronic inflammation, alterations in circulating leucocytes and renal impairment were also evident in ED diet-fed mice compared with mice receiving standard rodent chow. Longitudinal profiling of metabolic and biochemical parameters provide support of an aetiologically and clinically relevant model of T2D that will serve as a valuable tool for mechanistic and therapeutic studies investigating the pathogenic complications of T2D. PMID:27402965

  8. Abnormal Cognition, Sleep, EEG and Brain Metabolism in a Novel Knock-In Alzheimer Mouse, PLB1

    PubMed Central

    Platt, Bettina; Drever, Benjamin; Koss, David; Stoppelkamp, Sandra; Jyoti, Amar; Plano, Andrea; Utan, Aneli; Merrick, Georgina; Ryan, Duncan; Melis, Valeria; Wan, Hong; Mingarelli, Marco; Porcu, Emanuele; Scrocchi, Louise; Welch, Andy; Riedel, Gernot

    2011-01-01

    Late-stage neuropathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD) are β-amyloid (βA) and hyperphosphorylated tau peptides, aggregated into plaques and tangles, respectively. Corresponding phenotypes have been mimicked in existing transgenic mice, however, the translational value of aggressive over-expression has recently been questioned. As controlled gene expression may offer animal models with better predictive validity, we set out to design a transgenic mouse model that circumvents complications arising from pronuclear injection and massive over-expression, by targeted insertion of human mutated amyloid and tau transgenes, under the forebrain- and neurone-specific CaMKIIα promoter, termed PLB1Double. Crossing with an existing presenilin 1 line resulted in PLB1Triple mice. PLB1Triple mice presented with stable gene expression and age-related pathology of intra-neuronal amyloid and hyperphosphorylated tau in hippocampus and cortex from 6 months onwards. At this early stage, pre-clinical 18FDG PET/CT imaging revealed cortical hypometabolism with increased metabolic activity in basal forebrain and ventral midbrain. Quantitative EEG analyses yielded heightened delta power during wakefulness and REM sleep, and time in wakefulness was already reliably enhanced at 6 months of age. These anomalies were paralleled by impairments in long-term and short-term hippocampal plasticity and preceded cognitive deficits in recognition memory, spatial learning, and sleep fragmentation all emerging at ∼12 months. These data suggest that prodromal AD phenotypes can be successfully modelled in transgenic mice devoid of fibrillary plaque or tangle development. PLB1Triple mice progress from a mild (MCI-like) state to a more comprehensive AD-relevant phenotype, which are accessible using translational tools such as wireless EEG and microPET/CT. PMID:22096518

  9. Development of a diet-induced murine model of diabetes featuring cardinal metabolic and pathophysiological abnormalities of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Morris, Jodie L; Bridson, Tahnee L; Alim, Md Abdul; Rush, Catherine M; Rudd, Donna M; Govan, Brenda L; Ketheesan, Natkunam

    2016-01-01

    The persistent rise in global incidence of type 2 diabetes (T2D) continues to have significant public health and economic implications. The availability of relevant animal models of T2D is critical to elucidating the complexity of the pathogenic mechanisms underlying this disease and the implications this has on susceptibility to T2D complications. Whilst many high-fat diet-induced rodent models of obesity and diabetes exist, growing appreciation of the contribution of high glycaemic index diets on the development of hyperglycaemia and insulin resistance highlight the requirement for animal models that more closely represent global dietary patterns reflective of modern society. To that end, we sought to develop and validate a murine model of T2D based on consumption of an energy-dense diet containing moderate levels of fat and a high glycaemic index to better reflect the aetiopathogenesis of T2D. Male C57BL/6 mice were fed an energy-dense (ED) diet and the development of pathological features used in the clinical diagnosis of T2D was assessed over a 30-week period. Compared with control mice, 87% of mice fed an ED diet developed pathognomonic signs of T2D including glucose intolerance, hyperglycaemia, glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c) and glycosuria within 30 weeks. Furthermore, dyslipidaemia, chronic inflammation, alterations in circulating leucocytes and renal impairment were also evident in ED diet-fed mice compared with mice receiving standard rodent chow. Longitudinal profiling of metabolic and biochemical parameters provide support of an aetiologically and clinically relevant model of T2D that will serve as a valuable tool for mechanistic and therapeutic studies investigating the pathogenic complications of T2D. PMID:27402965

  10. Changes during hibernation in different phospholipid and free and esterified cholesterol serum levels in black bears

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chauhan, V.; Sheikh, A.; Chauhan, A.; Tsiouris, J.; Malik, M.; Vaughan, M.

    2002-01-01

    During hibernation, fat is known to be the preferred source of energy. A detailed analysis of different phospholipids, as well as free and esterified cholesterol, was conducted to investigate lipid abnormalities during hibernation. The levels of total phospholipids and total cholesterol in the serum of black bears were found to increase significantly in hibernation as compared with the active state. Both free and esterified cholesterol were increased in the hibernating state in comparison with the active state (P < 0.05). The percentage increase during hibernation was more in free cholesterol (57%) than in esterified cholesterol (27%). Analysis of subclasses of serum phospholipids showed that choline containing phospholipids, i.e., sphingomyelin (SPG) (14%) and phosphatidylcholine (PC) (76%), are the major phospholipids in the serum of bear. The minor phospholipids included 8% of phosphatidylserine (PS) + phosphatidylinositol (PI), while phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) was only 2% of the total phospholipids. A comparison of phospholipid subclasses showed that PC, PS + PI and SPG were significantly increased, while PE was significantly decreased (P < 0.05) in the hibernating state as compared with the active state in black bears. These results suggest that the catabolism of phospholipids and cholesterol is decreased during hibernation in black bears, leading to their increased levels in the hibernating state as compared with the active state. In summary, our results indicate that serum cholesterol and phospholipid fractions (except PE) are increased during hibernation in bears. It is proposed that the increase of these lipids may be due to the altered metabolism of lipoproteins that are responsible for the clearance of the lipids. ?? 2002 E??ditions scientifiques et me??dicales Elsevier SAS and Socie??te?? franc??aise de biochimie et biologie mole??culaire. All rights reserved.

  11. Statin-induced chronic cholesterol depletion inhibits Leishmania donovani infection: Relevance of optimum host membrane cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Kumar, G Aditya; Roy, Saptarshi; Jafurulla, Md; Mandal, Chitra; Chattopadhyay, Amitabha

    2016-09-01

    Leishmania are obligate intracellular protozoan parasites that invade and survive within host macrophages leading to leishmaniasis, a major cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide, particularly among economically weaker sections in tropical and subtropical regions. Visceral leishmaniasis is a potent disease caused by Leishmania donovani. The detailed mechanism of internalization of Leishmania is poorly understood. A basic step in the entry of Leishmania involves interaction of the parasite with the host plasma membrane. In this work, we have explored the effect of chronic metabolic cholesterol depletion using lovastatin on the entry and survival of Leishmania donovani in host macrophages. We show here that chronic cholesterol depletion of host macrophages results in reduction in the attachment of Leishmania promastigotes, along with a concomitant reduction in the intracellular amastigote load. These results assume further relevance since chronic cholesterol depletion is believed to mimic physiological cholesterol modulation. Interestingly, the reduction in the ability of Leishmania to enter host macrophages could be reversed upon metabolic replenishment of cholesterol. Importantly, enrichment of host membrane cholesterol resulted in reduction in the entry and survival of Leishmania in host macrophages. As a control, the binding of Escherichia coli to host macrophages remained invariant under these conditions, thereby implying specificity of cholesterol requirement for effective leishmanial infection. To the best of our knowledge, these results constitute the first comprehensive demonstration that an optimum content of host membrane cholesterol is necessary for leishmanial infection. Our results assume relevance in the context of developing novel therapeutic strategies targeting cholesterol-mediated leishmanial infection. PMID:27319380

  12. Metabolic Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... as your liver, muscles, and body fat. A metabolic disorder occurs when abnormal chemical reactions in your body ... that produce the energy. You can develop a metabolic disorder when some organs, such as your liver or ...

  13. Localization of cholesterol in sphingomyelinase-treated fibroblasts.

    PubMed Central

    Pörn, M I; Slotte, J P

    1995-01-01

    for the sphingomyelinase-induced changes in the rates of cholesterol metabolism. Whereas the use of phospholipases to promote the oxidation of cholesterol in some instances might lead to misinterpretations, the use of hypotonic buffer together with cholesterol oxidase proved to be a more reliable method for the determination of cellular cholesterol distribution. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:7755574

  14. Cytotoxic effects of oxysterols produced during ozonolysis of cholesterol in murine GT1-7 hypothalamic neurons.

    PubMed

    Sathishkumar, K; Murthy, Subramanyam N; Uppu, Rao M

    2007-01-01

    Ozone present in the photochemical smog or generated at the inflammatory sites is known to oxidize cholesterol and its 3-acyl esters. The oxidation results in the formation of multiple "ozone-specific" oxysterols, some of which are known to cause abnormalities in the metabolism of cholesterol and exert cytotoxicity. The ozone-specific oxysterols have been shown to favor the formation of atherosclerotic plaques and amyloid fibrils involving pro-oxidant processes. In the present communication, cultured murine GT1-7 hypothalamic neurons were studied in the context of cholesterol metabolism, formation of reactive oxygen species, intracellular Ca2 + levels and cytotoxicity using two most commonly occurring cholesterol ozonolysis products, 3beta- hydroxy-5-oxo-5,6-secocholestan-6-al (ChSeco) and 5beta, 6beta-epoxy-cholesterol (ChEpo). It was found that ChSeco elicited cytotoxicity at lower concentration (IC50 = 21 +/- 2.4 microM) than did ChEpo (IC50 = 43 +/- 3.7 microM). When tested at their IC50 concentrations in GT1-7 cells, both ChSeco and ChEpo resulted in the generation of ROS, the magnitude of which was comparable. N-acetyl-l-cysteine and Trolox attenuated the cytotoxic effects of ChSeco and ChEpo. The intracellular Ca2 + levels were not altered by either ChSeco or ChEpo. Methyl-beta-cyclodextrins, which cause depletion of cellular cholesterol, prevented ChSeco- but not ChEpo-induced cytotoxicity. The cell death caused by ChEpo, but not ChSeco, was prevented by exogenous cholesterol. Although oxidative stress plays a significant role, the results of the present study indicate differences in the pathways of cell death induced by ChSeco and ChEpo in murine GT1-7 hypothalamic neurons. PMID:17164181

  15. Perturbed cholesterol homeostasis in aging spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Parkinson, Gemma M; Dayas, Christopher V; Smith, Doug W

    2016-09-01

    The spinal cord is vital for the processing of sensorimotor information and for its propagation to and from both the brain and the periphery. Spinal cord function is affected by aging, however, the mechanisms involved are not well-understood. To characterize molecular mechanisms of spinal cord aging, microarray analyses of gene expression were performed on cervical spinal cords of aging rats. Of the metabolic and signaling pathways affected, cholesterol-associated pathways were the most comprehensively altered, including significant downregulation of cholesterol synthesis-related genes and upregulation of cholesterol transport and metabolism genes. Paradoxically, a significant increase in total cholesterol content was observed-likely associated with cholesterol ester accumulation. To investigate potential mechanisms for the perturbed cholesterol homeostasis, we quantified the expression of myelin and neuroinflammation-associated genes and proteins. Although there was minimal change in myelin-related expression, there was an increase in phagocytic microglial and astrogliosis markers, particularly in the white matter. Together, these results suggest that perturbed cholesterol homeostasis, possibly as a result of increased inflammatory activation in spinal cord white matter, may contribute to impaired spinal cord function with aging. PMID:27459933

  16. Effects of metabolic and myocardial microcirculatory abnormalities on the pathogenesis of cardiac autonomic neuropathy in type 2 diabetes mellitus: A prospective study in Japanese patients*

    PubMed Central

    Komori, Hiromi

    2005-01-01

    Background: In diabetic patients, cardiac autonomic neuropathy is an important factor affecting prognosis. Whether this condition in diabetic patients is caused directly by neurovisceral metabolic disorder and/or indirectly by micro circulation remains to be clarified. Objective: The aim of this study was to determine whether cardiac sympathetic nerve dysfunction can be detected using adenosine triphosphate (ATP) testing, while also investigating the effects of metabolic and/or myocardial microcirculatory abnormalities on the pathogenesis of cardiac autonomic nerve dysfunction in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM-2) in Japan. Methods: This prospective study was performed at the Division of Diabetology Department of Internal Medicine, Toho University, Ohashi Hospital, Tokyo, Japan. Patients aged ≥ 18 years with DM-2 with no abnormalities on electrocardiography (ECG) or echocardiography were enrolled. An ATP thallium (Tl)-201 myocardial scintigraphy test (ATP test) and iodine (I)-123 metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) scintigraphy were performed. ATP was administered by continuous IV infusion over 6 minutes at 0.16 mg/kg · min. Five minutes after the ATP infusion was started, T1-201 111 MBq IV was administered. Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging was begun immediately after the end of ATP infusion and was completed 3 hours after stress to show washout from stress to rest. I-123 MIBG 111 MBq IV was administered. A planar image from the front side and a SPECT image (early phase) was obtained 15 to 30 minutes later. After 3 hours, a planar image from the front side and a SPECT image (late phase) were obtained to show washout from stress to rest. The mean TI washout rate (ATP-WR) and heart-to-mediastinum (H/M) ratio in the late-phase scintigraphic images and the washout rate of MIBG (MIBG-WR) in the left ventricle was determined. The correlations of these measurements with the mean values of glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) and fasting

  17. The link between cholesterol and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Sjögren, Magnus; Blennow, Kaj

    2005-01-01

    A leading hypothesis on the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the mis-metabolism of amyloid precursor protein. This mis-metabolism causes the 42-amino acid form of A beta(Abeta42) to form oligomers that in turn start a chain of events leading to the accumulation of amyloid plaques. Vascular factors such as hypertension, hypercholesterolemia and diabetes as well as the inheritance of the epsilon4 allele of the ApoE gene are risk factors for AD. These risks are thought to promote the production of beta-amyloid (Abeta). An association between cholesterol and the development of AD was suggested in 1994 and since then, research has confirmed a link between cholesterol and the development of AD. A high cholesterol level in mid-life is a risk for AD and statins i.e. cholesterol-lowering drugs, reduce this risk. Statins inhibit enzymes involved in the endogenous synthesis of cholesterol and evidence is mounting that they also affect enzymes in Abeta metabolism i.e. beta-secretase. This normalises the breakdown of the precursor of Abeta, amyloid precursor protein, thereby promoting the nonamyloidogenic pathway. This review focusses on the link between cholesterol and Alzheimer's disease. PMID:16156481

  18. Regulation of biliary cholesterol secretion. Functional relationship between the canalicular and sinusoidal cholesterol secretory pathways in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Nervi, F; Marinović, I; Rigotti, A; Ulloa, N

    1988-01-01

    The functional interrelationship between biliary cholesterol secretion, sinusoidal lipoprotein cholesterol secretion and bile salt synthesis was studied in the rat. Diosgenin, fructose, and colestipol in the diet were used to, respectively, influence biliary cholesterol output, VLDL production and bile salt synthesis. In the acute bile fistula rat, biliary cholesterol output was 700% increased by diosgenin and 50% decreased by fructose. In the rats fed both diosgenin and fructose, biliary cholesterol secretion was increased only by approximately 200%, whereas biliary bile salts and phospholipid outputs were unchanged. In the isolated perfused liver, VLDL-cholesterol output was 50% reduced by diosgenin alone, but was unchanged following feeding of diosgenin plus fructose. However, the livers of rats fed diosgenin plus fructose exhibited a 700% increase in VLDL-triglyceride production and a 200% increase in VLDL-cholesterol output. A significant reciprocal relationship between VLDL-cholesterol secretion and the coupling ratio of cholesterol to bile salts in bile was observed. Colestipol added to the diet maintained both sinusoidal and biliary cholesterol outputs within the normal range. In the chronic bile fistula rat, colestipol increased bile salt synthesis by 100% while diosgenin and fructose diets had no effect. Similarly, the addition of fructose to the colestipol diet did not decrease bile salt synthesis. These data suggest a reciprocal relationship between biliary cholesterol secretion and hepatic secretion of cholesterol as VLDL particles. The free cholesterol pool used for bile salt synthesis seems functionally unrelated to the pool from which VLDL-cholesterol and biliary cholesterol originate. These findings support the idea that metabolic compartmentalization of hepatic cholesterol is a major determinant of the quantity of cholesterol available for recruitment by the bile salt-dependent biliary cholesterol secretory mechanism. PMID:3198756

  19. Lecithin:Cholesterol Acyltransferase Deficiency Protects against Cholesterol-induced Hepatic Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in Mice*

    PubMed Central

    Hager, Lauren; Li, Lixin; Pun, Henry; Liu, Lu; Hossain, Mohammad A.; Maguire, Graham F.; Naples, Mark; Baker, Chris; Magomedova, Lilia; Tam, Jonathan; Adeli, Khosrow; Cummins, Carolyn L.; Connelly, Philip W.; Ng, Dominic S.

    2012-01-01

    We recently reported that lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) knock-out mice, particularly in the LDL receptor knock-out background, are hypersensitive to insulin and resistant to high fat diet-induced insulin resistance (IR) and obesity. We demonstrated that chow-fed Ldlr−/−xLcat+/+ mice have elevated hepatic endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, which promotes IR, compared with wild-type controls, and this effect is normalized in Ldlr−/−xLcat−/− mice. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that hepatic ER cholesterol metabolism differentially regulates ER stress using these models. We observed that the Ldlr−/−xLcat+/+ mice accumulate excess hepatic total and ER cholesterol primarily attributed to increased reuptake of biliary cholesterol as we observed reduced biliary cholesterol in conjunction with decreased hepatic Abcg5/g8 mRNA, increased Npc1l1 mRNA, and decreased Hmgr mRNA and nuclear SREBP2 protein. Intestinal NPC1L1 protein was induced. Expression of these genes was reversed in the Ldlr−/−xLcat−/− mice, accounting for the normalization of total and ER cholesterol and ER stress. Upon feeding a 2% high cholesterol diet (HCD), Ldlr−/−xLcat−/− mice accumulated a similar amount of total hepatic cholesterol compared with the Ldlr−/−xLcat+/+ mice, but the hepatic ER cholesterol levels remained low in conjunction with being protected from HCD-induced ER stress and IR. Hepatic ER stress correlates strongly with hepatic ER free cholesterol but poorly with hepatic tissue free cholesterol. The unexpectedly low ER cholesterol seen in HCD-fed Ldlr−/−xLcat−/− mice was attributable to a coordinated marked up-regulation of ACAT2 and suppressed SREBP2 processing. Thus, factors influencing the accumulation of ER cholesterol may be important for the development of hepatic insulin resistance. PMID:22500017

  20. Evidence of aberrant lipid metabolism in hepatitis C and hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jian-Min; Skill, Nicholas J; Maluccio, Mary A

    2010-01-01

    Objectives Lipids are linked to many pathological processes including hepatic steatosis and liver malignancy. This study aimed to explore lipid metabolism in hepatitis C virus (HCV) and HCV-related hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Methods Serum lipids were measured in normal, HCV and HCV-HCC patients. Whole-genome microarray was performed to identify potential signature genes involved in lipid metabolism characterizing normal vs. HCV vs. HCV-HCC conditions. Results Serum cholesterol was significantly reduced in HCV and HCV-HCC patients compared with normal controls, whereas there was no difference in glucose and triglycerides. Microarray analysis identified 224 probe sets with known functional roles in lipid metabolism (anova, 1.5-fold, P ≤ 0.001). Gene-mediated fatty acid (FA) de novo synthesis and uptake were upregulated in HCV and this upregulation was further enhanced in HCC. Genes involved in FA oxidation were downregulated in both the HCV and HCC groups. The abnormality of cholesterol metabolism in HCV was associated with downregulation of genes involved in cholesterol biosynthesis, absorption and transportation and bile acid synthesis; this abnormality was further intensified in HCC. Conclusions Our data support the notion that HCV-related lipid metabolic abnormalities may contribute to hepatic steatosis and the development of cancer. Identification of these aberrations would stratify patients and improve treatment algorithms. PMID:20961371

  1. Get Your Cholesterol Checked

    MedlinePlus

    ... You also get cholesterol by eating foods like egg yolks, fatty meats, and regular cheese. If you have too much cholesterol in your body, it can build up inside your blood vessels and make it hard for blood to ...

  2. Polyphenol-rich blackcurrant extract exerts hypocholesterolaemic and hypoglycaemic effects in mice fed a diet containing high fat and cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Benn, Tyler; Kim, Bohkyung; Park, Young-Ki; Yang, Yue; Pham, Tho X; Ku, Chai Siah; Farruggia, Callie; Harness, Ellen; Smyth, Joan A; Lee, Ji-Young

    2015-06-14

    Obesity is associated with an increased risk of metabolic abnormalities, such as hyperlipidaemia and hyperglycaemia. We investigated whether polyphenol-rich blackcurrant extract (BCE) can prevent high fat/high cholesterol (HF/HC) diet-induced metabolic disturbances in mice. Male C57BL/6J mice were fed a modified AIN-93M diet containing HF/HC (16% fat, 0·25% cholesterol, w/w) or the same diet supplemented with 0·1% BCE (w/w) for 12 weeks. There were no differences in total body weight and liver weight between groups. Plasma total cholesterol (TC) and glucose levels were significantly lower in BCE group than in controls, while plasma TAG levels were not significantly different. There was a decreasing trend in hepatic TAG levels, and histological evaluation of steatosis grade was markedly lower in the livers of mice fed BCE. Although the mRNA levels of major regulators of hepatic cholesterol metabolism, i.e. 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGR) and LDL receptor (LDLR), were not significantly altered by BCE supplementation, protein expression of mature sterol-regulatory element-binding protein and LDLR was significantly increased with no change in HMGR protein. The expression of proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 that facilitates LDLR protein degradation, as well as one of its transcriptional regulators, i.e. hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α, was significantly decreased in the livers of mice fed BCE. Taken together, BCE supplementation decreased plasma TC and glucose, and inhibited liver steatosis, suggesting that this berry may be consumed to prevent metabolic dysfunctions induced by diets high in fat and cholesterol. PMID:25899149

  3. Abnormal parathyroid hormone stimulation of 25-hydroxyvitamin D-1 alpha-hydroxylase activity in the hypophosphatemic mouse. Evidence for a generalized defect of vitamin D metabolism.

    PubMed Central

    Nesbitt, T; Drezner, M K; Lobaugh, B

    1986-01-01

    Abnormal regulation of vitamin D metabolism is a feature of X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets in man and of the murine homologue of the disease in the hypophosphatemic (Hyp)-mouse. We previously reported that mutant mice have abnormally low renal 25-hydroxyvitamin D-1 alpha-hydroxylase (1 alpha-hydroxylase) activity for the prevailing degree of hypophosphatemia. To further characterize this defect, we examined whether Hyp-mouse renal 1 alpha-hydroxylase activity responds normally to other stimulatory and inhibitory controls of enzyme function. We studied stimulation by parathyroid hormone (PTH) using: (a) a calcium-deficient (0.02% Ca) diet to raise endogenous PTH; or (b) 24-h continuous infusion of 0.25 IU/h bovine PTH via osmotic minipump. In both cases enzyme activity of identically treated normal mice increased to greater levels than those attained by Hyp-mice. The relative inability of PTH to stimulate 1 alpha-hydroxylase activity is not a function of the hypophosphatemia in the Hyp-mouse since PTH-infused, phosphate-depleted normal mice sustained a level of enzyme activity greater than that of normal and Hyp-mice. In further studies we investigated inhibition of enzyme activity by using: (a) a calcium-loaded (1.2% Ca) diet to suppress endogenous PTH; or (b) 24-h continuous infusion of 0.2 ng/h 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3). The 1 alpha-hydroxylase activity of normal and Hyp-mice was significantly reduced to similar absolute levels following maintenance on the calcium-loaded diet. Further, infusion of 1,25(OH)2D3 caused a comparable reduction of 1 alpha-hydroxylase activity in normal, Hyp-, and phosphate-depleted normal mice. These observations indicate that the inhibitory control of 1 alpha-hydroxylase by reduced levels of PTH or increased 1,25(OH)2D3 concentrations is intact in the mutants. However, the inability of PTH and hypophosphatemia to stimulate enzyme activity in a manner analogous to that in normal and phosphate-depleted mice indicates

  4. Brain morphometric correlates of metabolic variables in HIV: the CHARTER study.

    PubMed

    Archibald, S L; McCutchan, J A; Sanders, C; Wolfson, T; Jernigan, T L; Ellis, R J; Ances, B M; Collier, A C; McArthur, J C; Morgello, S; Simpson, D M; Marra, C; Gelman, B B; Clifford, D B; Grant, I; Fennema-Notestine, C

    2014-12-01

    Obesity and other metabolic variables are associated with abnormal brain structural volumes and cognitive dysfunction in HIV-uninfected populations. Since individuals with HIV infection on combined antiretroviral therapy (CART) often have systemic metabolic abnormalities and changes in brain morphology and function, we examined associations among brain volumes and metabolic factors in the multisite CNS HIV AntiRetroviral Therapy Effects Research (CHARTER) cohort, cross-sectional study of 222 HIV-infected individuals. Metabolic variables included body mass index (BMI), total blood cholesterol (C), low- and high-density lipoprotein C (LDL-C and HDL-C), blood pressure, random blood glucose, and diabetes. MRI measured volumes of cerebral white matter, abnormal white matter, cortical and subcortical gray matter, and ventricular and sulcal CSF. Multiple linear regression models allowed us to examine metabolic variables separately and in combination to predict each regional volume. Greater BMI was associated with smaller cortical gray and larger white matter volumes. Higher total cholesterol (C) levels were associated with smaller cortex volumes; higher LDL-C was associated with larger cerebral white matter volumes, while higher HDL-C levels were associated with larger sulci. Higher blood glucose levels and diabetes were associated with more abnormal white matter. Multiple atherogenic metabolic factors contribute to regional brain volumes in HIV-infected, CART-treated patients, reflecting associations similar to those found in HIV-uninfected individuals. These risk factors may accelerate cerebral atherosclerosis and consequent brain alterations and cognitive dysfunction. PMID:25227933

  5. Lysophosphatidylinositol Signalling and Metabolic Diseases.

    PubMed

    Arifin, Syamsul A; Falasca, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Metabolism is a chemical process used by cells to transform food-derived nutrients, such as proteins, carbohydrates and fats, into chemical and thermal energy. Whenever an alteration of this process occurs, the chemical balance within the cells is impaired and this can affect their growth and response to the environment, leading to the development of a metabolic disease. Metabolic syndrome, a cluster of several metabolic risk factors such as abdominal obesity, insulin resistance, high cholesterol and high blood pressure, and atherogenic dyslipidaemia, is increasingly common in modern society. Metabolic syndrome, as well as other diseases, such as diabetes, obesity, hyperlipidaemia and hypertension, are associated with abnormal lipid metabolism. Cellular lipids are the major component of cell membranes; they represent also a valuable source of energy and therefore play a crucial role for both cellular and physiological energy homeostasis. In this review, we will focus on the physiological and pathophysiological roles of the lysophospholipid mediator lysophosphatidylinositol (LPI) and its receptor G-protein coupled receptor 55 (GPR55) in metabolic diseases. LPI is a bioactive lipid generated by phospholipase A (PLA) family of lipases which is believed to play an important role in several diseases. Indeed LPI can affect various functions such as cell growth, differentiation and motility in a number of cell-types. Recently published data suggest that LPI plays an important role in different physiological and pathological contexts, including a role in metabolism and glucose homeostasis. PMID:26784247

  6. Lysophosphatidylinositol Signalling and Metabolic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Arifin, Syamsul A.; Falasca, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Metabolism is a chemical process used by cells to transform food-derived nutrients, such as proteins, carbohydrates and fats, into chemical and thermal energy. Whenever an alteration of this process occurs, the chemical balance within the cells is impaired and this can affect their growth and response to the environment, leading to the development of a metabolic disease. Metabolic syndrome, a cluster of several metabolic risk factors such as abdominal obesity, insulin resistance, high cholesterol and high blood pressure, and atherogenic dyslipidaemia, is increasingly common in modern society. Metabolic syndrome, as well as other diseases, such as diabetes, obesity, hyperlipidaemia and hypertension, are associated with abnormal lipid metabolism. Cellular lipids are the major component of cell membranes; they represent also a valuable source of energy and therefore play a crucial role for both cellular and physiological energy homeostasis. In this review, we will focus on the physiological and pathophysiological roles of the lysophospholipid mediator lysophosphatidylinositol (LPI) and its receptor G-protein coupled receptor 55 (GPR55) in metabolic diseases. LPI is a bioactive lipid generated by phospholipase A (PLA) family of lipases which is believed to play an important role in several diseases. Indeed LPI can affect various functions such as cell growth, differentiation and motility in a number of cell-types. Recently published data suggest that LPI plays an important role in different physiological and pathological contexts, including a role in metabolism and glucose homeostasis. PMID:26784247

  7. Cholesterol and Plants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Behrman, E. J.; Gopalan, Venkat

    2005-01-01

    There is a widespread belief among the public and even among chemist that plants do not contain cholesterol. This wrong belief is the result of the fact that plants generally contain only small quantities of cholesterol and that analytical methods for the detection of cholesterol in this range were not developed until recently.

  8. Meiotic abnormalities

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 19, describes meiotic abnormalities. These include nondisjunction of autosomes and sex chromosomes, genetic and environmental causes of nondisjunction, misdivision of the centromere, chromosomally abnormal human sperm, male infertility, parental age, and origin of diploid gametes. 57 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  9. LXR driven induction of HDL-cholesterol is independent of intestinal cholesterol absorption and ABCA1 protein expression.

    PubMed

    Kannisto, Kristina; Gåfvels, Mats; Jiang, Zhao-Yan; Slätis, Katharina; Hu, Xiaoli; Jorns, Carl; Steffensen, Knut R; Eggertsen, Gösta

    2014-01-01

    We investigated whether: (1) liver X receptor (LXR)-driven induction of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and other LXR-mediated effects on cholesterol metabolism depend on intestinal cholesterol absorption; and (2) combined treatment with the LXR agonist GW3965 and the cholesterol absorption inhibitor ezetimibe results in synergistic effects on cholesterol metabolism that could be beneficial for treatment of atherosclerosis. Mice were fed 0.2 % cholesterol and treated with GW3965+ezetimibe, GW3965 or ezetimibe. GW3965+ezetimibe treatment elevated serum HDL-C and Apolipoprotein (Apo) AI, effectively reduced the intestinal cholesterol absorption and increased the excretion of faecal neutral sterols. No changes in intestinal ATP-binding cassette (ABC) A1 or ABCG5 protein expression were observed, despite increased mRNA expression, while hepatic ABCA1 was slightly reduced. The combined treatment caused a pronounced down-regulation of intestinal Niemann-Pick C1-like 1 (NPC1L1) and reduced hepatic and intestinal cholesterol levels. GW3965 did not affect the intestinal cholesterol absorption, but increased serum HDL-C and ApoAI levels. GW3965 also increased Apoa1 mRNA levels in primary mouse hepatocytes and HEPA1-6 cells. Ezetimibe reduced the intestinal cholesterol absorption, ABCA1 and ABCG5, but did not affect the serum HDL-C or ApoAI levels. Thus, the LXR-driven induction of HDL-C and ApoAI was independent of the intestinal cholesterol absorption and increased expression of intestinal or hepatic ABCA1 was not required. Inhibited influx of cholesterol via NPC1L1 and/or low levels of intracellular cholesterol prevented post-transcriptional expression of intestinal ABCA1 and ABCG5, despite increased mRNA levels. Combined LXR activation and blocked intestinal cholesterol absorption induced effective faecal elimination of cholesterol. PMID:24163219

  10. Liver fatty acid binding protein gene ablation potentiates hepatic cholesterol accumulation in cholesterol-fed female mice.

    PubMed

    Martin, Gregory G; Atshaves, Barbara P; McIntosh, Avery L; Mackie, John T; Kier, Ann B; Schroeder, Friedhelm

    2006-01-01

    Although liver fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP) is postulated to influence cholesterol homeostasis, the physiological significance of this hypothesis remains to be resolved. This issue was addressed by examining the response of young (7 wk) female mice to L-FABP gene ablation and a cholesterol-rich diet. In control-fed mice, L-FABP gene ablation alone induced hepatic cholesterol accumulation (2.6-fold), increased bile acid levels, and increased body weight gain (primarily as fat tissue mass). In cholesterol-fed mice, L-FABP gene ablation further enhanced the hepatic accumulation of cholesterol (especially cholesterol ester, 12-fold) and potentiated the effects of dietary cholesterol on increased body weight gain, again mainly as fat tissue mass. However, in contrast to the effects of L-FABP gene ablation in control-fed mice, biliary levels of bile acids (as well as cholesterol and phospholipids) were reduced. These phenotypic alterations were not associated with differences in food intake. In conclusion, it was shown for the first time that L-FABP altered cholesterol metabolism and the response of female mice to dietary cholesterol. While the biliary and lipid phenotype of female wild-type L-FABP+/+ mice was sensitive to dietary cholesterol, L-FABP gene ablation dramatically enhanced many of the effects of dietary cholesterol to greatly induce hepatic cholesterol (primarily cholesterol ester) and triacylglycerol accumulation as well as to potentiate body weight gain (primarily as fat tissue mass). Taken together, these data support the hypothesis that L-FABP is involved in the physiological regulation of cholesterol metabolism, body weight gain, and obesity. PMID:16123197

  11. Metabolism

    MedlinePlus

    Metabolism refers to all the physical and chemical processes in the body that convert or use energy, ... Tortora GJ, Derrickson BH. Metabolism. In: Tortora GJ, Derrickson BH. Principles of Anatomy and Physiology . 14th ed. Hoboken, NJ: John H Wiley and Sons; 2013: ...

  12. Cholesterol suppresses antimicrobial effect of statins

    PubMed Central

    Haeri, Mohammad Reza; White, Kenneth; Qharebeglou, Mohammad; Ansar, Malek Moein

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): Isoprenoid biosynthesis is a key metabolic pathway to produce a wide variety of biomolecules such as cholesterol and carotenoids, which target cell membranes. On the other hand, it has been reported that statins known as inhibitors of isoprenoid biosynthesis and cholesterol lowering agents, may have a direct antimicrobial effect on the some bacteria. The exact action of statins in microbial metabolism is not clearly understood. It is possible that statins inhibit synthesis or utilization of some sterol precursor necessary for bacterial membrane integrity. Accordingly, this study was designed in order to examine if statins inhibit the production of a compound, which can be used in the membrane, and whether cholesterol would replace it and rescue bacteria from toxic effects of statins. Materials and Methods: To examine the possibility we assessed antibacterial effect of statins with different classes; lovastatin, simvastatin, and atorvastatin, alone and in combination with cholesterol on two Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus faecalis) and two Gram-negative (Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli) bacteria using gel diffusion assay. Results: Our results showed that all of the statins except for lovastatin had significant antibacterial property in S. aureus, E. coli, and Enter. faecalis. Surprisingly, cholesterol nullified the antimicrobial action of effective statins in statin-sensitive bacteria. Conclusion: It is concluded that statins may deprive bacteria from a metabolite responsible for membrane stability, which is effectively substituted by cholesterol. PMID:26877857

  13. Primary Low Level of High-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol and Risks of Coronary Heart Disease, Cardiovascular Disease, and Death: Results From the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Haitham M; Miller, Michael; Nasir, Khurram; McEvoy, John W; Herrington, David; Blumenthal, Roger S; Blaha, Michael J

    2016-05-15

    Prior studies observing associations between low levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol and cardiovascular disease (CVD) have often been conducted among persons with metabolic or other lipid abnormalities. In this study, we investigated the association between primary low HDL cholesterol and coronary heart disease (CHD), CVD, and all-cause death after adjustment for confounders in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA). Participants who were free of clinical CVD were recruited from 6 US research centers from 2000 to 2002 and followed for a median duration of 10.2 years. We defined "primary low HDL cholesterol" as HDL cholesterol level <40 mg/dL (men) or <50 mg/dL (women), triglyceride level <100 mg/dL, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol level <100 mg/dL (n = 158). We defined an "optimal" lipid profile as HDL cholesterol ≥40 mg/dL (men) or ≥50 mg/dL (women) and triglycerides and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol <100 mg/dL (n = 780). For participants with primary low HDL cholesterol versus those with an optimal lipid profile, adjusted hazard ratios for total CHD, CVD, and death were 2.25 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.20, 4.21; P = 0.011), 1.93 (95% CI: 1.11, 3.34; P = 0.020), and 1.11 (95% CI: 0.67, 1.84; P = 0.69), respectively. Participants with primary low HDL cholesterol had higher risks of CHD and CVD than participants with optimal lipid profiles but no difference in survival after a median 10.2 years of follow-up. PMID:27189327

  14. Cholesterol in pregnancy: a review of knowns and unknowns

    PubMed Central

    Bartels, Änne; O'Donoghue, Keelin

    2011-01-01

    Cholesterol forms part of every cell in the human body, and also helps make and metabolize hormones, bile acids and vitamin D. Human plasma cholesterol levels are determined by production in the liver and by dietary intake. Lipoproteins carry cholesterol around the body, and facilitate it crossing the placenta. Cholesterol is carefully monitored in the non-pregnant adult population, where its association with atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease is well understood. Although it is known that cholesterol rises in pregnancy, at present it is not routinely measured or treated. The effects of maternal high cholesterol on pregnancy and on fetal development are not yet fully understood. However, a growing body of evidence from animal and human studies suggests adverse consequences of high cholesterol levels in pregnancy.

  15. Effects of Dietary Carbohydrate Replaced with Wild Rice (Zizania latifolia (Griseb) Turcz) on Insulin Resistance in Rats Fed with a High-Fat/Cholesterol Diet

    PubMed Central

    Han, Shufen; Zhang, Hong; Qin, Liqiang; Zhai, Chengkai

    2013-01-01

    Wild rice (WR) is a very nutritious grain that has been used to treat diabetes in Chinese medicinal practice. City diet (CD) is based on the diet consumed by Asian area residents in modern society, which is rich in saturated fats, cholesterol and carbohydrates. The present study was aimed at evaluating the effects of replacing white rice and processed wheat starch of CD with WR as the chief source of dietary carbohydrates on insulin resistance in rats fed with a high-fat/cholesterol diet. Except the rats of the low-fat (LF) diet group, the rats of the other three groups, including to high-fat/cholesterol (HFC) diet, CD and WR diet, were fed with high-fat/cholesterol diets for eight weeks. The rats fed with CD exhibited higher weight gain and lower insulin sensitivity compared to the rats consuming a HFC diet. However, WR suppressed high-fat/cholesterol diet-induced insulin resistance. WR decreased liver homogenate triglyceride and free fatty acids levels, raised serum adiponectin concentration and reduced serum lipocalin-2 and visfatin concentrations. In addition, the WR diet potently augmented the relative expressions of adiponectin receptor 2, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors, alpha and gamma, and abated relative expressions of leptin and lipocalin-2 in the tissues of interest. These findings indicate that WR is effective in ameliorating abnormal glucose metabolism and insulin resistance in rats, even when the diet consumed is high in fat and cholesterol. PMID:23434909

  16. Effects of dietary carbohydrate replaced with wild rice (Zizania latifolia (Griseb) Turcz) on insulin resistance in rats fed with a high-fat/cholesterol diet.

    PubMed

    Han, Shufen; Zhang, Hong; Qin, Liqiang; Zhai, Chengkai

    2013-02-01

    Wild rice (WR) is a very nutritious grain that has been used to treat diabetes in Chinese medicinal practice. City diet (CD) is based on the diet consumed by Asian area residents in modern society, which is rich in saturated fats, cholesterol and carbohydrates. The present study was aimed at evaluating the effects of replacing white rice and processed wheat starch of CD with WR as the chief source of dietary carbohydrates on insulin resistance in rats fed with a high-fat/cholesterol diet. Except the rats of the low-fat (LF) diet group, the rats of the other three groups, including to high-fat/cholesterol (HFC) diet, CD and WR diet, were fed with high-fat/cholesterol diets for eight weeks. The rats fed with CD exhibited higher weight gain and lower insulin sensitivity compared to the rats consuming a HFC diet. However, WR suppressed high-fat/cholesterol diet-induced insulin resistance. WR decreased liver homogenate triglyceride and free fatty acids levels, raised serum adiponectin concentration and reduced serum lipocalin-2 and visfatin concentrations. In addition, the WR diet potently augmented the relative expressions of adiponectin receptor 2, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors, alpha and gamma, and abated relative expressions of leptin and lipocalin-2 in the tissues of interest. These findings indicate that WR is effective in ameliorating abnormal glucose metabolism and insulin resistance in rats, even when the diet consumed is high in fat and cholesterol. PMID:23434909

  17. Pantethine, a derivative of vitamin B(5) used as a nutritional supplement, favorably alters low-density lipoprotein cholesterol metabolism in low- to moderate-cardiovascular risk North American subjects: a triple-blinded placebo and diet-controlled investigation.

    PubMed

    Rumberger, John A; Napolitano, Joseph; Azumano, Isao; Kamiya, Toshikazu; Evans, Malkanthi

    2011-08-01

    Safety and efficacy of a biologically active derivative of vitamin B(5) (pantethine) on total cholesterol (TC) and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) metabolism was studied in North American subjects at conventional low to moderate cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. A total of 120 subjects initiated a therapeutic lifestyle change (TLC) diet 4 weeks before randomization (baseline) and maintained the diet throughout a 16-week study period; at baseline, subjects were randomized in a triple-blinded manner to either pantethine (600 mg/d, baseline to week 8, and 900 mg/d, weeks 9-16) or identically labeled, nonbiologically active placebo (n = 60 per group). We hypothesized that pantethine would lower TC and low-density lipoprotein in low-CVD-risk North American subjects in a similar manner as reported in high-CVD-risk subjects studied mainly in Italy and Japan. While sustaining a TLC diet and in comparison with placebo, pantethine demonstrated significant (P < .005) and sustained reductions (from baseline to week 16) in TC (6 mg/dL, 0.16 mmol/L, 3%), LDL-C (4 mg/dL, 0.10 mmol/L, 4%), and apolipoprotein B (4 mg/dL, 0.04 g/L, 5%). Our data suggest that pantethine supplementation for 16 weeks (600 mg/d for weeks 1-8 then 900 mg/d for weeks 9-16) is safe and significantly lowers TC and LDL-C over and above the effect of TLC diet alone. Although the absolute magnitude of these effects was small in these low- to moderate-risk North Americans (4-6 mg/dL), the results are noteworthy as prior studies have shown that, for each 1 mg/dL (0.026 mmol/L) reduction in LDL-C, there is a concomitant 1% reduction in overall future CVD risk. PMID:21925346

  18. Disorders of lipid metabolism in nephrotic syndrome: mechanisms and consequences.

    PubMed

    Vaziri, Nosratola D

    2016-07-01

    Nephrotic syndrome results in hyperlipidemia and profound alterations in lipid and lipoprotein metabolism. Serum cholesterol, triglycerides, apolipoprotein B (apoB)-containing lipoproteins (very low-density lipoprotein [VLDL], immediate-density lipoprotein [IDL], and low-density lipoprotein [LDL]), lipoprotein(a) (Lp[a]), and the total cholesterol/high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol ratio are increased in nephrotic syndrome. This is accompanied by significant changes in the composition of various lipoproteins including their cholesterol-to-triglyceride, free cholesterol-to-cholesterol ester, and phospholipid-to-protein ratios. These abnormalities are mediated by changes in the expression and activities of the key proteins involved in the biosynthesis, transport, remodeling, and catabolism of lipids and lipoproteins including apoproteins A, B, C, and E; 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase; fatty acid synthase; LDL receptor; lecithin cholesteryl ester acyltransferase; acyl coenzyme A cholesterol acyltransferase; HDL docking receptor (scavenger receptor class B, type 1 [SR-B1]); HDL endocytic receptor; lipoprotein lipase; and hepatic lipase, among others. The disorders of lipid and lipoprotein metabolism in nephrotic syndrome contribute to the development and progression of cardiovascular and kidney disease. In addition, by limiting delivery of lipid fuel to the muscles for generation of energy and to the adipose tissues for storage of energy, changes in lipid metabolism contribute to the reduction of body mass and impaired exercise capacity. This article provides an overview of the mechanisms, consequences, and treatment of lipid disorders in nephrotic syndrome. PMID:27165836

  19. The Effects of Cholesterol on Learning and Memory

    PubMed Central

    Schreurs, Bernard G.

    2010-01-01

    Cholesterol is vital to normal brain function including learning and memory but that involvement is as complex as the synthesis, metabolism and excretion of cholesterol itself. Dietary cholesterol influences learning tasks from water maze to fear conditioning even though cholesterol does not cross the blood brain barrier. Excess cholesterol has many consequences including peripheral pathology that can signal brain via cholesterol metabolites, proinflammatory mediators and antioxidant processes. Manipulations of cholesterol within the central nervous system through genetic, pharmacological, or metabolic means circumvent the blood brain barrier and affect learning and memory but often in animals already otherwise compromised. The human literature is no less complex. Cholesterol reduction using statins improves memory in some cases but not others. There is also controversy over statin use to alleviate memory problems in Alzheimer’s disease. Correlations of cholesterol and cognitive function are mixed and association studies find some genetic polymorphisms are related to cognitive function but others are not. In sum, the field is in flux with a number of seemingly contradictory results and many complexities. Nevertheless, understanding cholesterol effects on learning and memory is too important to ignore. PMID:20470821

  20. Congenital Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... serious health problems (e.g. Down syndrome ). Single-Gene Abnormalities Sometimes the chromosomes are normal in number, ... blood flow to the fetus impair fetal growth. Alcohol consumption and certain drugs during pregnancy significantly increase ...

  1. Craniofacial Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the skull and face. Craniofacial abnormalities are birth defects of the face or head. Some, like cleft ... palate, are among the most common of all birth defects. Others are very rare. Most of them affect ...

  2. Walking abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... include: Arthritis of the leg or foot joints Conversion disorder (a psychological disorder) Foot problems (such as a ... injuries. For an abnormal gait that occurs with conversion disorder, counseling and support from family members are strongly ...

  3. Chromosome Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... decade, newer techniques have been developed that allow scientists and doctors to screen for chromosomal abnormalities without using a microscope. These newer methods compare the patient's DNA to a normal DNA ...

  4. Nail abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    Nail abnormalities are problems with the color, shape, texture, or thickness of the fingernails or toenails. ... Fungus or yeast cause changes in the color, texture, and shape of the nails. Bacterial infection may ...

  5. Inhibition of ABCA1 Protein Expression and Cholesterol Efflux by TNF α in MLO-Y4 Osteocytes.

    PubMed

    Wehmeier, Kent R; Kurban, William; Chandrasekharan, Chandrikha; Onstead-Haas, Luisa; Mooradian, Arshag D; Haas, Michael J

    2016-06-01

    Hip fracture and myocardial infarction cause significant morbidity and mortality. In vivo studies raising serum cholesterol levels as well as pro-inflammatory cytokines such as TNF α manifest bone loss and atherosclerotic vascular disease, suggesting that abnormalities of cholesterol transport may contribute to osteoporosis. We used the mouse osteocyte cell line (MLO-Y4) to investigate the effects of TNF α on the expression of cholesterol acceptor proteins such as apolipoprotein A-I (apo A-I) and apolipoprotein E (apo E), as well as on the cholesterol transporters ATP-binding cassette-1 (ABCA1), scavenger receptor class B type 1 (SRB1), and cluster of differentiation 36 (CD36). MLO-Y4 cells do not express apo A-I or apo E; however, they do express all three cholesterol transporters (ABCA1, SRB1, and CD36). Treatment of MLO-Y4 cells with TNF α had no effect on SRB1, CD36, and osteocalcin levels; however, TNF α reduced ABCA1 protein levels in a dose-dependent manner and cholesterol efflux to apo A-I. Interestingly, TNF α treatment increased ABCA1 promoter activity and ABCA1 mRNA levels, and increased liver X receptor α protein expression, but had no effect on retinoid X receptor α and retinoic acid receptor α levels. Pharmacological inhibition of p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase, but not c-jun-N-terminal kinase 1 or mitogen-activated protein kinase (MEK), restored ABCA1 protein levels in TNF α-treated cells. These results suggest that pro-inflammatory cytokines regulate cholesterol metabolism in osteocytes in part by suppressing ABCA1 levels post-translationally in a p38 MAP kinase-dependent manner. PMID:26759003

  6. Transport of circulating serum cholesterol by human renal cell carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Clayman, R.V.; Figenshau, R.S.; Prigge, W.F.; Forstrom, L.; Gebhard, R.L.

    1987-06-01

    Clear cell renal cancer contains a large quantity of cholesterol ester (300-mg./gm. protein). To determine whether abnormalities in cholesterol transport could account for this sterol accumulation, the uptake, release, and imaging capabilities of intravenously injected /sup 131/I-6-iodomethyl-29-norcholesterol, a cholesterol analogue, were studied preoperatively in five patients with clear cell renal cancer. At surgery, samples of the liver, tumor, adrenal, and non-tumor kidney were obtained for analysis. /sup 131/I-sterol uptake by the tumor, when normalized for cholesterol content, was less than for adrenal, liver or kidney. In contrast, release of preloaded /sup 131/I-sterol from the human tumors was consistently slower than for normal kidney. The reduced release of free cholesterol from renal cancer cells may, in part, be responsible for the accumulation of cholesterol in human renal cancer.

  7. Chlordecone, a mixed pregnane X receptor (PXR) and estrogen receptor alpha (ER{alpha}) agonist, alters cholesterol homeostasis and lipoprotein metabolism in C57BL/6 mice

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Junga; Scheri, Richard C.; Zhang Yuan; Curtis, Lawrence R.

    2008-12-01

    Chlordecone (CD) is one of many banned organochlorine (OC) insecticides that are widespread persistent organic pollutants. OC insecticides alter lipid homeostasis in rodents at doses that are not neurotoxic or carcinogenic. Pretreatment of mice or rats with CD altered tissue distribution of a subsequent dose of [{sup 14}C]CD or [{sup 14}C]cholesterol (CH). Nuclear receptors regulate expression of genes important in the homeostasis of CH and other lipids. In this study, we report that CD suppresses in vitro reporter systems for human liver X receptors (LXRs) and activates those for human farnesoid X receptor (FXR), pregnane X receptor (PXR) and estrogen receptor {alpha} (ER{alpha}) in a concentration-dependent manner (0-50 {mu}M). Consistent with human PXR activation in vitro, three days after a single dose of CD (15 mg/kg) hepatic microsomal CYP3A11 protein increases in C57BL/6 mice. CD decreases hepatic CH ester content without altering total CH concentration. Apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) contents of hepatic lipoprotein-rich and microsomal fractions of CD-treated mice are higher than controls. There is a significant reduction in non-high density lipoprotein CH but not apolipoprotein B-48/100 (apoB-48/100) in plasma from CD-treated mice after a 4 h fast. At 14 days after 15 mg CD/kg apoA-I and apoB-100 proteins but not CYP3A11 protein in hepatic microsomes are similar to controls. This work indicates that altered CH homeostasis is a mode of OC insecticide action of relevance after a single dose. This at least partially explains altered CH tissue distribution in CD-pretreated mice.

  8. Expression and Localization of microRNAs in Perinatal Rat Pancreas: Role of miR-21 in Regulation of Cholesterol Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Gaarn, Louise W.; Bagge, Annika; Pedersen, Lykke; Dahmcke, Christina M.; Nielsen, Jens H.; Dalgaard, Louise T.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate the expression of pancreatic microRNAs (miRNAs) during the period of perinatal beta-cell expansion and maturation in rats, determine the localization of these miRNAs and perform a pathway analysis with predicted target mRNAs expressed in perinatal pancreas. Research Design and Methods RNA was extracted from whole pancreas at embryonic day 20 (E20), on the day of birth (P0) and two days after birth (P2) and hybridized to miRNA microarrays. Differentially expressed miRNAs were verified by northern blotting and their pancreatic localization determined by in situ hybridization. Pathway analysis was done using regulated sets of mRNAs predicted as targets of the miRNAs. Possible target genes were tested using reporter-gene analysis in INS-1E cells. Results Nine miRNAs were differentially expressed perinatally, seven were confirmed to be regulated at the level of the mature miRNA. The localization studies showed endocrine localization of six of these miRNAs (miR-21, -23a, -29a, -125b-5p, -376b-3p and -451), and all were expressed in exocrine cells at one time point at least. Pathways involving metabolic processes, terpenoid and sterol metabolism were selectively affected by concomitant regulation by miRNAs and mRNAs, and Srebf1 was validated as a target of miR-21. Conclusions The findings suggest that miRNAs are involved in the functional maturation of pancreatic exocrine and endocrine tissue following birth. Pathway analysis of target genes identify changes in sterol metabolism around birth as being selectively affected by differential miRNA expression during this period. PMID:22022489

  9. Cholesterol in the retina: the best is yet to come

    PubMed Central

    Pikuleva, Irina A.; Curcio, Christine A.

    2014-01-01

    Historically understudied, cholesterol in the retina is receiving more attention now because of genetic studies showing that several cholesterol-related genes are risk factors for age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and because eye pathology studies showing high cholesterol content of drusen, aging Bruch's membrane, and newly found subretinal lesions. The challenge before us is determining how the cholesterol-AMD link is realized. Meeting this challenge will require an excellent understanding these genes’ roles in retinal physiology and how chorioretinal cholesterol is maintained. In the first half of this review, we will succinctly summarize physico-chemical properties of cholesterol, its distribution in the human body, general principles of maintenance and metabolism, and differences in cholesterol handling in human and mouse that impact on experimental approaches. This information will provide a backdrop to the second part of the review focusing on unique aspects of chorioretinal cholesterol homeostasis, aging in Bruch's membrane, cholesterol in AMD lesions, a model for lesion biogenesis, a model for macular vulnerability based on vascular biology, and alignment of AMD-related genes and pathobiology using cholesterol and an atherosclerosis-like progression as unifying features. We conclude with recommendations for the most important research steps we can take towards delineating the cholesterol-AMD link. PMID:24704580

  10. Profile of Free Fatty Acids and Fractions of Phospholipids, Cholesterol Esters and Triglycerides in Serum of Obese Youth with and without Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Bermúdez-Cardona, Juliana; Velásquez-Rodríguez, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    The study evaluated the profile of circulating fatty acids (FA) in obese youth with and without metabolic syndrome (MetS) to determine its association with nutritional status, lifestyle and metabolic variables. A cross-sectional study was conducted in 96 young people, divided into three groups: obese with MetS (OBMS), obese (OB) and appropriate weight (AW). FA profiles were quantified by gas chromatography; waist circumference (WC), fat folds, lipid profile, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, glucose, insulin, the homeostasis model assessment (HOMA index), food intake and physical activity (PA) were assessed. The OBMS group had significantly greater total free fatty acids (FFAs), palmitic-16:0 in triglyceride (TG), palmitoleic-16:1n-7 in TG and phospholipid (PL); in the OB group, these FAs were higher than in the AW group. Dihomo-gamma-linolenic (DHGL-20:3n-6) was higher in the OBMS than the AW in PL and FFAs. Linoleic-18:2n-6 in TG and PL had the lowest proportion in the OBMS group. WC, PA, total FFA, linoleic-18:2n-6 in TG and DHGL-20:3n-6 in FFAs explained 62% of the HOMA value. The OB group presented some higher proportions of FA and biochemical values than the AW group. The OBMS had proportions of some FA in the TG, PL and FFA fractions that correlated with disturbances of MetS. PMID:26891317

  11. Serum cholesterol and variant in cholesterol-related gene CETP predict white matter microstructure.

    PubMed

    Warstadt, Nicholus M; Dennis, Emily L; Jahanshad, Neda; Kohannim, Omid; Nir, Talia M; McMahon, Katie L; de Zubicaray, Greig I; Montgomery, Grant W; Henders, Anjali K; Martin, Nicholas G; Whitfield, John B; Jack, Clifford R; Bernstein, Matt A; Weiner, Michael W; Toga, Arthur W; Wright, Margaret J; Thompson, Paul M

    2014-11-01

    Several common genetic variants influence cholesterol levels, which play a key role in overall health. Myelin synthesis and maintenance are highly sensitive to cholesterol concentrations, and abnormal cholesterol levels increase the risk for various brain diseases, including Alzheimer's disease. We report significant associations between higher serum cholesterol (CHOL) and high-density lipoprotein levels and higher fractional anisotropy in 403 young adults (23.8 ± 2.4 years) scanned with diffusion imaging and anatomic magnetic resonance imaging at 4 Tesla. By fitting a multi-locus genetic model within white matter areas associated with CHOL, we found that a set of 18 cholesterol-related, single-nucleotide polymorphisms implicated in Alzheimer's disease risk predicted fractional anisotropy. We focused on the single-nucleotide polymorphism with the largest individual effects, CETP (rs5882), and found that increased G-allele dosage was associated with higher fractional anisotropy and lower radial and mean diffusivities in voxel-wise analyses of the whole brain. A follow-up analysis detected white matter associations with rs5882 in the opposite direction in 78 older individuals (74.3 ± 7.3 years). Cholesterol levels may influence white matter integrity, and cholesterol-related genes may exert age-dependent effects on the brain. PMID:24997672

  12. Serum Cholesterol and Variant in Cholesterol-Related Gene CETP Predict White Matter Microstructure

    PubMed Central

    Warstadt, Nicholus M.; Dennis, Emily L.; Jahanshad, Neda; Kohannim, Omid; Nir, Talia M.; McMahon, Katie L.; de Zubicaray, Greig I.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Henders, Anjali K.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Whitfield, John B.; Jack, Clifford R.; Bernstein, Matt A.; Weiner, Michael W.; Toga, Arthur W.; Wright, Margaret J.; Thompson, Paul M.

    2014-01-01

    Several common genetic variants influence cholesterol levels, which play a key role in overall health. Myelin synthesis and maintenance are highly sensitive to cholesterol concentrations, and abnormal cholesterol levels increase the risk for various brain diseases, including Alzheimer's disease (AD). We report significant associations between higher serum cholesterol (CHOL) levels and high-density lipoproteins (HDL) and higher fractional anisotropy in 403 young adults (23.8±2.4 years) scanned with diffusion imaging and anatomical MRI at 4 Tesla. By fitting a multi-locus genetic model within white matter areas associated with CHOL, we found that a set of 18 cholesterol-related SNPs implicated in AD risk predicted FA. We focused on the SNP with the largest individual effects - CETP (rs5882) – and found that increased G-allele dosage was associated with higher FA and lower radial and mean diffusivities in voxel-wise analyses of the whole brain. A follow-up analysis detected WM associations with rs5882 in the opposite direction in 78 older individuals (74.3±7.3 years). Cholesterol levels may influence WM integrity, and cholesterol-related genes may exert age-dependent effects. PMID:24997672

  13. Home-Use Tests - Cholesterol

    MedlinePlus

    ... this test does: This is a home-use test kit to measure total cholesterol. What cholesterol is: Cholesterol is a fat (lipid) in your blood. High-density lipoprotein (HDL) ("good" cholesterol) helps protect your heart, but low-density lipoprotein (LDL) ("bad" cholesterol) can clog the arteries of your ...

  14. The Role of Microscopy in Understanding Atherosclerotic Lysosomal Lipid Metabolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray Jerome, W.; Yancey, Patricia G.

    2003-02-01

    Microscopy has played a critical role in first identifying and then defining the role of lysosomes in formation of atherosclerotic foam cells. We review the evidence implicating lysosomal lipid accumulation as a factor in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis with reference to the role of microscopy. In addition, we explore mechanisms by which lysosomal lipid engorgement occurs. Low density lipoproteins which have become modified are the major source of lipid for foam cell formation. These altered lipoproteins are taken into the cell via receptor-mediated endocytosis and delivered to lysosomes. Under normal conditions, lipids from these lipoproteins are metabolized and do not accumulate in lysosomes. In the atherosclerotic foam cell, this normal metabolism is inhibited so that cholesterol and cholesteryl esters accumulate in lysosomes. Studies of cultured cells incubated with modified lipoproteins suggests this abnormal metabolism occurs in two steps. Initially, hydrolysis of lipoprotein cholesteryl esters occurs normally, but the resultant free cholesterol cannot exit the lysosome. Further lysosomal cholesterol accumulation inhibits hydrolysis, producing a mixture of cholesterol and cholesteryl esters within swollen lysosomes. Various lipoprotein modifications can produce this lysosomal engorgement in vitro and it remains to be seen which modifications are most important in vivo.

  15. Caveolae and Caveolin-1 Integrate Reverse Cholesterol Transport and Inflammation in Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Li; Zhu, Neng; Ao, Bao-Xue; Liu, Chan; Shi, Ya-Ning; Du, Ke; Chen, Jian-Xiong; Zheng, Xi-Long; Liao, Duan-Fang

    2016-01-01

    Lipid disorder and inflammation play critical roles in the development of atherosclerosis. Reverse cholesterol transport is a key event in lipid metabolism. Caveolae and caveolin-1 are in the center stage of cholesterol transportation and inflammation in macrophages. Here, we propose that reverse cholesterol transport and inflammation in atherosclerosis can be integrated by caveolae and caveolin-1. PMID:27011179

  16. Children and Cholesterol

    MedlinePlus

    ... a coronary artery procedure; or who suffered a heart attack or sudden cardiac death before age 55. Those with a parent who has a history of high total cholesterol levels (240 mg/dL or higher). Talk to your child’s pediatrician ... Risk Calculator Printable Cholesterol Information Sheets Heart360 Health ...

  17. Kids and Cholesterol.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ficklen, Ellen

    1992-01-01

    According to a 1991 National Cholesterol Education Program report, the best way to avoid heart trouble is to take early preventive measures. This means that children over age two should follow the same low-fat, low-cholesterol guidelines already recommended for adults. Sidebars contain a fat glossary and tips for cutting fat in school lunches.…

  18. Electrochemical oxidation of cholesterol

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Summary Indirect cholesterol electrochemical oxidation in the presence of various mediators leads to electrophilic addition to the double bond, oxidation at the allylic position, oxidation of the hydroxy group, or functionalization of the side chain. Recent studies have proven that direct electrochemical oxidation of cholesterol is also possible and affords different products depending on the reaction conditions. PMID:25977713

  19. Cholesterol and Your Child

    MedlinePlus

    ... traveling together are called lipoproteins . Two kinds — low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) — are the ones that most of us have heard about. Low-density lipoproteins , or "bad cholesterol," are the primary cholesterol ...

  20. Lipid-based transfection reagents can interfere with cholesterol biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Danielli, Mauro; Marinelli, Raúl A

    2016-02-15

    Lipid-based transfection reagents are widely used for delivery of small interfering RNA into cells. We examined whether the commonly used commercial transfection reagents DharmaFECT-4 and Lipofectamine 2000 can interfere with lipid metabolism by studying cholesterogenesis. Cholesterol de novo synthesis from [(14)C]acetate was assessed in human hepatocyte-derived Huh-7 cells. The results revealed that DharmaFECT, but not Lipofectamine, markedly inhibited cholesterol biosynthesis by approximately 70%. Cell viability was not significantly altered. These findings suggest that caution is required in the choice of certain lipid-based transfection reagents for gene silencing experiments, particularly when assessing cholesterol metabolism. PMID:26656923

  1. Bile acid sequestrants for cholesterol

    MedlinePlus

    ... ency/patientinstructions/000787.htm Bile acid sequestrants for cholesterol To use the sharing features on this page, ... are medicines that help lower your LDL (bad) cholesterol . Too much cholesterol in your blood can stick ...

  2. What Your Cholesterol Levels Mean

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More What Your Cholesterol Levels Mean Updated:Aug 17,2016 How’s your cholesterol? Time to get it checked! Keeping your cholesterol levels healthy is a great way to keep your ...

  3. Electron Transfer Pathways in Cholesterol Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Porter, Todd D

    2015-10-01

    Cholesterol synthesis in the endoplasmic reticulum requires electron input at multiple steps and utilizes both NADH and NADPH as the electron source. Four enzymes catalyzing five steps in the pathway require electron input: squalene monooxygenase, lanosterol demethylase, sterol 4α-methyl oxidase, and sterol C5-desaturase. The electron-donor proteins for these enzymes include cytochrome P450 reductase and the cytochrome b5 pathway. Here I review the evidence for electron donor protein requirements with these enzymes, the evidence for additional electron donor pathways, and the effect of deletion of these redox enzymes on cholesterol and lipid metabolism. PMID:26344922

  4. The Role of Nutrition and Physical Activity in Cholesterol and Aging.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Sandra Maria Lima; Luz, Silmara Dos Santos; Aquino, Rita de Cássia

    2015-08-01

    Cholesterol is a precursor of several substances with important biologic activities; however, it is common to associate this molecule only with bad outcomes. This article reviews the cholesterol metabolism, its functions in the human body, its pathogenicity, and its elimination. The modifications in biochemical paths of cholesterol in aging are highlighted. Finally, the role of diet, physical activity, and exercise in cholesterol management is discussed. PMID:26195099

  5. Sterol Carrier Protein-2, a Nonspecific Lipid-Transfer Protein, in Intracellular Cholesterol Trafficking in Testicular Leydig Cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Nancy C; Fan, Jinjiang; Papadopoulos, Vassilios

    2016-01-01

    Sterol carrier protein-2 (SCP2), also called nonspecific lipid-transfer protein, is thought to play a major role in intracellular lipid transport and metabolism, and it has been associated with diseases involving abnormalities in lipid trafficking, such as Zellweger syndrome. The Scp2 gene encodes the 58 kDa sterol carrier protein-x (SCPX) and 15 kDa pro-SCP2 proteins, both of which contain a 13 kDa SCP2 domain in their C-termini. We found that 22-NBD-cholesterol, a fluorescent analog of cholesterol and a preferred SCP2 ligands, was not localized in the peroxisomes. This raises questions about previous reports on the localization of the SCPX and SCP2 proteins and their relationship to peroxisomes and mitochondria in intracellular cholesterol transport. Immunofluorescent staining of cryosections of mouse testis and of MA-10 mouse tumor Leydig cells showed that SCPX and SCP2 are present in both mouse testicular interstitial tissue and in MA-10 cells. Fluorescent fusion proteins of SCPX and SCP2, as well as confocal live-cell imaging, were used to investigate the subcellular targeting of these proteins and the function of the putative mitochondrial targeting sequence. The results showed that SCPX and SCP2 are targeted to the peroxisomes by the C-terminal PTS1 domain, but the putative N-terminal mitochondrial targeting sequence alone is not potent enough to localize SCPX and SCP2 to the mitochondria. Homology modeling and molecular docking studies indicated that the SCP2 domain binds cholesterol, but lacks specificity of the binding and/or transport. These findings further our understanding of the role of SCPX and SCP2 in intracellular cholesterol transport, and present a new point of view on the role of these proteins in cholesterol trafficking. PMID:26901662

  6. Sterol Carrier Protein-2, a Nonspecific Lipid-Transfer Protein, in Intracellular Cholesterol Trafficking in Testicular Leydig Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Nancy C.; Fan, Jinjiang; Papadopoulos, Vassilios

    2016-01-01

    Sterol carrier protein-2 (SCP2), also called nonspecific lipid-transfer protein, is thought to play a major role in intracellular lipid transport and metabolism, and it has been associated with diseases involving abnormalities in lipid trafficking, such as Zellweger syndrome. The Scp2 gene encodes the 58 kDa sterol carrier protein-x (SCPX) and 15 kDa pro-SCP2 proteins, both of which contain a 13 kDa SCP2 domain in their C-termini. We found that 22-NBD-cholesterol, a fluorescent analog of cholesterol and a preferred SCP2 ligands, was not localized in the peroxisomes. This raises questions about previous reports on the localization of the SCPX and SCP2 proteins and their relationship to peroxisomes and mitochondria in intracellular cholesterol transport. Immunofluorescent staining of cryosections of mouse testis and of MA-10 mouse tumor Leydig cells showed that SCPX and SCP2 are present in both mouse testicular interstitial tissue and in MA-10 cells. Fluorescent fusion proteins of SCPX and SCP2, as well as confocal live-cell imaging, were used to investigate the subcellular targeting of these proteins and the function of the putative mitochondrial targeting sequence. The results showed that SCPX and SCP2 are targeted to the peroxisomes by the C-terminal PTS1 domain, but the putative N-terminal mitochondrial targeting sequence alone is not potent enough to localize SCPX and SCP2 to the mitochondria. Homology modeling and molecular docking studies indicated that the SCP2 domain binds cholesterol, but lacks specificity of the binding and/or transport. These findings further our understanding of the role of SCPX and SCP2 in intracellular cholesterol transport, and present a new point of view on the role of these proteins in cholesterol trafficking. PMID:26901662

  7. Holter registers and metabolic syndrome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz-Diosdado, A.; Ramírez-Hernández, L.; Aguilar-Molina, A. M.; Zamora-Justo, J. A.; Gutiérrez-Calleja, R. A.; Virgilio-González, C. D.

    2014-11-01

    There is a relationship between the state of the cardiovascular system and metabolic syndrome (MS). A way to diagnose the heart state of a person is to monitor the electrical activity of the heart using a 24 hours Holter monitor. Scanned ECG signal can be analyzed beat-by-beat by algorithms that separate normal of abnormal heartbeats. If the percentage of abnormal heartbeats is too high it could be argued that the patient has heart problems. We have algorithms that can not only identify the abnormal heartbeats, but they can also classify them, so we classified and counted abnormal heartbeats in patients with MS and subjects without MS. Most of our patients have large waist circumference, high triglycerides and high levels of LDL (high-density lipoprotein) cholesterol although some of them have high blood pressure. We enrolled adult patients with MS free of diabetes in a four month lifestyle intervention program including diet and physical aerobic exercise, and compared with healthy controls. We made an initial registration with a Holter, and 24 hours ECG signal is analyzed to identify and classify the different types of heartbeats. The patients then begin with diet or exercise (at least half an hour daily). Periodically Holter records were taken up and we describe the evolution in time of the number and type of abnormal heartbeats. Results show that the percentage of abnormal heartbeats decreases over time, in some cases the decline is very significant, and almost a reduction to half or less of abnormal heartbeats after several months since the patients changed their eating or physical activity habits.

  8. A new subgroup of lectin-bound biliary proteins binds to cholesterol crystals, modifies crystal morphology, and inhibits cholesterol crystallization.

    PubMed Central

    Busch, N; Lammert, F; Marschall, H U; Matern, S

    1995-01-01

    Biliary proteins inhibiting or promoting cholesterol crystallization are assumed to play a major role in cholesterol gallstone pathogenesis. We now report a new group of biliary proteins that bind to cholesterol crystals, modify crystal morphology, and inhibit cholesterol crystallization. Various glycoprotein mixtures were extracted from abnormal human gallbladder bile using lectin affinity chromatography on concanavalin A, lentil, and Helix pomatia columns and were added to supersaturated model bile. Independent of the protein mixtures added, from the cholesterol crystals harvested, the same four GPs were isolated having molecular masses of 16, 28, 63, and 74 kD, respectively. Each protein was purified using preparative SDS-PAGE, and influence on cholesterol crystallization in model bile was tested at 10 microg/ml. Crystal growth was reduced by 76% (GP63), 65% (GP16), 55% (GP74), and 40% (GP28), respectively. Thus, these glycoproteins are the most potent biliary inhibitors of cholesterol crystallization known so far. Evidence that the inhibiting effect on cholesterol crystallization is mediated via protein-crystal interaction was further provided from scanning electron microscopy studies. Crystals grown in presence of inhibiting proteins showed significantly more ordered structures. Incidence of triclinic crystals and regular aggregates was shifted from 30 to 70% compared with controls. These observations may have important implications for understanding the role of biliary proteins in cholesterol crystallization and gallstone pathogenesis. Images PMID:8675674

  9. Dietary Fat and Cholesterol

    MedlinePlus

    ... Gynecology Medical Conditions Nutrition & Fitness Emotional Health Dietary Fat and Cholesterol Posted under Health Guides . Updated 23 ... warm What are the different types of dietary fat? The four main types of fat found in ...

  10. Get Your Cholesterol Checked

    MedlinePlus

    ... is checked with a blood test called a lipid profile. During the test, a nurse will take ... blood tests that can check cholesterol, but a lipid profile gives the most information. Find out more ...

  11. Compounds affecting cholesterol absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hua, Duy H. (Inventor); Koo, Sung I. (Inventor); Noh, Sang K. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A class of novel compounds is described for use in affecting lymphatic absorption of cholesterol. Compounds of particular interest are defined by Formula I: ##STR1## or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof.

  12. High Blood Cholesterol

    MedlinePlus

    ... of cholesterol is called plaque. Plaque Buildup Can Lead to… Click for more information Artherosclerosis. Over time, ... disease (CHD). Angina. The buildup of plaque can lead to chest pain called angina. Angina is a ...

  13. Common Misconceptions about Cholesterol

    MedlinePlus

    ... most (and preferably all) days; and stressing the importance of avoiding tobacco products. Learn more about cholesterol ... Privacy Policy Popular Articles 1 Understanding Blood Pressure Readings 2 Sodium and Salt 3 Low Blood Pressure ...

  14. Cholesterol and Statins

    MedlinePlus

    ... the liver makes ldl & hdl In the liver, triglycerides, cholesterol, and proteins form together to make LDL ... This is especially important for individuals with high triglyceride and/or low HDL levels who are overweight ...

  15. Cholesterol in unusual places

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kučerka, N.; Nieh, M. P.; Marquardt, D.; Harroun, T. A.; Wassail, S. R.; Katsaras, J.

    2010-11-01

    Cholesterol is an essential component of mammalian cells, and is required for building and maintaining cell membranes, regulating their fluidity, and possibly acting as an antioxidant. Cholesterol has also been implicated in cell signaling processes, where it has been suggested that it triggers the formation of lipid rafts in the plasma membrane. Aside from cholesterol's physiological roles, what is also becoming clear is its poor affinity for lipids with unsaturated fatty acids as opposed to saturated lipids, such as sphingomyelin with which it forms rafts. We previously reported the location of cholesterol in membranes with varying degrees of acyl chain unsaturation as determined by neutron diffraction studies (Harroun et al 2006 Biochemistry 45, 1227; Harroun et al 2008 Biochemistry 47, 7090). In bilayers composed of phosphatidylcholine (PC) molecules with a saturated acyl chain at the sn-1 position or a monounsaturated acyl chain at both sn-1 and sn-2 positions, cholesterol was found in its much-accepted "upright" position. However, in dipolyunsaturated 1,2-diarachidonyl phosphatidylcholine (20:4-20:4PC) membranes the molecule was found sequestered in the center of the bilayers. In further experiments, mixing l-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl phosphatidylcholine (16:0-18:1 PC) with 20:4-20:4PC resulted in cholesterol reverting to its upright orientation at approximately 40 mol% 16:0-18:1 PC. Interestingly, the same effect was achieved with only 5 mol% 1,2-dimyristoyl phosphatidylchoile (14:0-14:0PC).

  16. MD-2 binds cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Choi, Soo-Ho; Kim, Jungsu; Gonen, Ayelet; Viriyakosol, Suganya; Miller, Yury I

    2016-02-19

    Cholesterol is a structural component of cellular membranes, which is transported from liver to peripheral cells in the form of cholesterol esters (CE), residing in the hydrophobic core of low-density lipoprotein. Oxidized CE (OxCE) is often found in plasma and in atherosclerotic lesions of subjects with cardiovascular disease. Our earlier studies have demonstrated that OxCE activates inflammatory responses in macrophages via toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4). Here we demonstrate that cholesterol binds to myeloid differentiation-2 (MD-2), a TLR4 ancillary molecule, which is a binding receptor for bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and is indispensable for LPS-induced TLR4 dimerization and signaling. Cholesterol binding to MD-2 was competed by LPS and by OxCE-modified BSA. Furthermore, soluble MD-2 in human plasma and MD-2 in mouse atherosclerotic lesions carried cholesterol, the finding supporting the biological significance of MD-2 cholesterol binding. These results help understand the molecular basis of TLR4 activation by OxCE and mechanisms of chronic inflammation in atherosclerosis. PMID:26806306

  17. Comprehensive metabolic panel

    MedlinePlus

    ... panel - comprehensive; Chem-20; SMA20; Sequential multi-channel analysis with computer-20; SMAC20; Metabolic panel 20 ... How your kidneys and liver are working Blood sugar, cholesterol, and calcium levels Sodium, potassium, and chloride ...

  18. Cholesterol esterification during differentiation of mouse erythroleukemia (Friend) cells.

    PubMed

    Mulas, Maria Franca; Mandas, Antonella; Abete, Claudia; Dessì, Sandra; Mocali, Alessandra; Paoletti, Francesco

    2011-08-31

    Cholesterol is an essential constituent of all mammalian cell membranes and its availability is therefore a prerequisite for cellular growth and other functions. Several lines of evidence are now indicating an association between alterations of cholesterol homeostasis and cell cycle progression. However, the role of cholesterol in cell differentiation is still largely unknown. To begin to address this issue, in this study we examined changes in cholesterol metabolism and in the mRNA levels of proteins involved in cholesterol import and esterification (multi-drug resistance, MDR-3) and acylCoA: cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) and cholesterol export (caveolin-1) in Friend virus-induced erythroleukemia cells (MELC), in the absence or in the presence of the chemical inducer of differentiation, hexamethylene bisacetamide (HMBA). FBS-stimulated growth of MELC was accompanied by an immediate elevation of cholesterol synthesis and cholesterol esterification, and by an increase in the levels of MDR-3 and ACAT mRNAs. A decrease in caveolin-1 expression was also observed. However, when MELC were treated with HMBA, the inhibition of DNA synthesis caused by HMBA treatment, was associated with a decrease in cholesterol esterification and in ACAT and MDR-3 mRNA levels and an increase in caveolin-1 mRNA. Detection of cytoplasmic neutral lipids by staining MELC with oil red O, a dye able to evidence CE but not FC, revealed that HMBA-treatment also reduced growth-stimulated accumulation of cholesterol ester to approximately the same extent as the ACAT inhibitor, SaH. Overall, these results indicate for the first time a role of cholesterol esterification and of some related genes in differentiation of erythroid cells. PMID:22184540

  19. Cholesterol esterification during differentiation of mouse erythroleukemia (Friend) cells

    PubMed Central

    Mulas, Maria Franca; Mandas, Antonella; Abete, Claudia; Dessì, Sandra; Mocali, Alessandra; Paoletti, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    Cholesterol is an essential constituent of all mammalian cell membranes and its availability is therefore a prerequisite for cellular growth and other functions. Several lines of evidence are now indicating an association between alterations of cholesterol homeostasis and cell cycle progression. However, the role of cholesterol in cell differentiation is still largely unknown. To begin to address this issue, in this study we examined changes in cholesterol metabolism and in the mRNA levels of proteins involved in cholesterol import and esterification (multi-drug resistance, MDR-3) and acylCoA: cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) and cholesterol export (caveolin-1) in Friend virus-induced erythroleukemia cells (MELC), in the absence or in the presence of the chemical inducer of differentiation, hexamethylene bisacetamide (HMBA). FBS-stimulated growth of MELC was accompanied by an immediate elevation of cholesterol synthesis and cholesterol esterification, and by an increase in the levels of MDR-3 and ACAT mRNAs. A decrease in caveolin-1 expression was also observed. However, when MELC were treated with HMBA, the inhibition of DNA synthesis caused by HMBA treatment, was associated with a decrease in cholesterol esterification and in ACAT and MDR-3 mRNA levels and an increase in caveolin-1 mRNA. Detection of cytoplasmic neutral lipids by staining MELC with oil red O, a dye able to evidence CE but not FC, revealed that HMBA-treatment also reduced growth-stimulated accumulation of cholesterol ester to approximately the same extent as the ACAT inhibitor, SaH. Overall, these results indicate for the first time a role of cholesterol esterification and of some related genes in differentiation of erythroid cells. PMID:22184540

  20. Effect of extracorporeal ultraviolet blood irradiation on blood cholesterol level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zalesskaya, G. A.; Laskina, O. V.; Mitkovskaya, N. P.; Kirkovsky, V. V.

    2012-07-01

    We have studied the effect of extracorporeal ultraviolet blood irradiation on cholesterol metabolism in patients with cardiovascular diseases. We have carried out a comprehensive analysis of the spectral characteristics of blood and plasma, gas-exchange and oximetry parameters, and the results of a complete blood count and chemistry panel before and after UV blood irradiation. We have assessed the changes in concentrations of cholesterols (total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, triglycerides) in the blood of the patients in response to a five-day course of UV blood irradiation. The changes in the spectral characteristics of blood and plasma, the chemistry panel, the gas composition, and the fractional hemoglobin composition initiated by absorption of UV radiation are used to discuss the molecular mechanisms for the effect of therapeutic doses of UV radiation on blood cholesterols.

  1. SND1 overexpression deregulates cholesterol homeostasis in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Navarro-Imaz, Hiart; Rueda, Yuri; Fresnedo, Olatz

    2016-09-01

    SND1 is a multifunctional protein participating, among others, in gene transcription and mRNA metabolism. SND1 is overexpressed in cancer cells and promotes viability and tumourigenicity of hepatocellular carcinoma cells. This study shows that cholesterol synthesis is increased in SND1-overexpressing hepatoma cells. Neither newly synthesised nor extracellularly supplied cholesterol are able to suppress this increase; however, inhibition of cholesterol esterification reverted the activated state of sterol-regulatory element-binding protein 2 (SREBP2) and cholesterogenesis. These results highlight SND1 as a potential regulator of cellular cholesterol distribution and homeostasis in hepatoma cells, and support the rationale for the therapeutic use of molecules that influence cholesterol management when SND1 is overexpressed. PMID:27238764

  2. Metabolism of thyroxine-binding globulin in man. Abnormal rate of synthesis in inherited thyroxine-binding globulin deficiency and excess.

    PubMed Central

    Refetoff, S; Fang, V S; Marshall, J S; Robin, N I

    1976-01-01

    It has been previously suggested that inherited thyroxine-binding globulin (TBG) abnormalities in man may be due to mutations at a single X-chromosome-linked locus controlling TBG synthesis. However, abnormalities in TBG degradation have not been excluded. The availability of purified human TBG and its successful labeling with radioiodide allowed us to examine such possibility. Human TBG was purified by affinity chromatography, labeled under sterile conditions with 131I or 125I,, and mixed with [125I]thyroxine (T4) or [131I]T4, respectively, before their intravenous injection. Blood and urine samples were collected over a 10-day period, and the turnover parameters were calculated. In eight normal volunteers mean values +/-SD for TBG and T4 respectively, were as follows: Half time (t1/2) 5.3 +/- 0.4 and 7.0 +/- 0.6 days; distribution space (DS) 7.2 +/- 1.0 and 10.8 +/- 1.2 liters; and total daily degradation (D) 0.211 +/- 0.053 and 0.088 +/- 0.011 mumol/day. In all subjects, t1/2 of TBG was shorter than that of T4; and the DS was smaller. 2.4 mol of TBG was degraded for each mole of T4. In five of six subjects from four families, comprising hemizygous and heterozygous carriers of TBG absence, decrease, and excess, the t1/2 and DS for TBG were within the normal range. The D of TBG was proportional to the serum concentration of the protein. Changes in the T4 kinetics in these patients were compatible with euthyroidism and with the known alterations in the extrathyroidal T4 pool associated with the changes in serum TBG concentration. A striking decrease in the t1/2 of TBG was found only in a patient with acquired diminution in TBG concentration and in patients with thyrotoxicosis or other conditions apparently unrelated to thyroid dysfunction. TBG t1/2 was 2.5 days in a patient with multiple myeloma and 3.6 days in two patients with thyrotoxicosis. Decreased TBG t1/2 was also observed in three of six patients with nonthyroidal pathology and was associated with an

  3. Inhibition of intestinal absorption of cholesterol by ezetimibe or bile acids by SC-435 alters lipoprotein metabolism and extends the lifespan of SR-BI/apoE double knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Braun, Anne; Yesilaltay, Ayce; Acton, Susan; Broschat, Kay O; Krul, Elaine S; Napawan, Nida; Stagliano, Nancy; Krieger, Monty

    2008-05-01

    SR-BI/apoE double knockout (dKO) mice exhibit many features of human coronary heart disease (CHD), including hypercholesterolemia, occlusive coronary atherosclerosis, cardiac hypertrophy, myocardial infarctions, cardiac dysfunction and premature death. Ezetimibe is a FDA-approved, intestinal cholesterol absorption inhibitor that lowers plasma LDL cholesterol in humans and animals and inhibits aortic root atherosclerosis in apoE KO mice, but has not been proven to reduce CHD. Three-week-ezetimibe treatment of dKO mice (0.005% (w/w) in standard chow administered from weaning) resulted in a 35% decrease in cholesterol in IDL/LDL-size lipoproteins, but not in VLDL- and HDL-size lipoproteins. Ezetimibe treatment significantly reduced aortic root (57%) and coronary arterial (68%) atherosclerosis, cardiomegaly (24%) and cardiac fibrosis (57%), and prolonged the lives of the mice (27%). This represents the first demonstration of beneficial effects of ezetimibe treatment on CHD. The dKO mice were similarly treated with SC-435 (0.01% (w/w)), an apical sodium codependent bile acid transporter (ASBT) inhibitor, that blocks intestinal absorption of bile acids, lowers plasma cholesterol in animals, and reduces aortic root atherosclerosis in apoE KO mice. The effects of SC-435 treatment were similar to those of ezetimibe: 37% decrease in ILD/LDL-size lipoprotein cholesterol and 57% prolongation in median lifespan. Thus, inhibition of intestinal absorption of either cholesterol (ezetimibe) or bile acids (SC-435) significantly reduced plasma IDL/LDL-size lipoprotein cholesterol levels and improved survival of SR-BI/apoE dKO mice. The SR-BI/apoE dKO murine model of atherosclerotic occlusive, arterial CHD appears to provide a useful system to evaluate compounds that modulate cholesterol homeostasis and atherosclerosis. PMID:18054357

  4. Cryptosporidium parvum scavenges LDL-derived cholesterol and micellar cholesterol internalized into enterocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ehrenman, Karen; Wanyiri, Jane W.; Bhat, Najma; Ward, Honorine D.; Coppens, Isabelle

    2013-01-01

    Cryptosporidium spp. are responsible for devastating diarrhea in immunodeficient individuals. In the intestinal tract, the developmental stages of the parasite are confined to the apical surfaces of epithelial cells. Upon invasion, Cryptosporidium incorporates the microvillous membrane of the enterocyte to form the parasitophorous vacuole (PV) and sequesters itself from the host cytoplasm by rearranging the host cytoskeleton. Cryptosporidium parvum has minimal anabolic capabilities and relies on transporters and salvage pathways to meet its basic metabolic requirements. The cholesterol salvage pathway is crucial for the development of protozoan parasites. In this study, we have examined the sources of cholesterol from C. parvum infecting enterocytes. We illustrated that the intracellular stages of Cryptosporidium as well as the oocysts shed by the host, contain cholesterol. Incubation of infected enterocytes in lipoprotein-free medium impairs parasite development and results in substantial decrease in cholesterol content associated with the PV. Among lipoproteins, LDL constitutes an important source of cholesterol for Cryptosporidium. Dietary cholesterol incorporated into micelles is internalized into enterocytes by the NPC1L1 transporter. We showed that C. parvum also obtains cholesterol from micelles in enterocytes. Pharmacological blockade of NPC1L1 function by ezetimibe or moderate down-regulation of NPC1L1 expression decreases parasite infectivity. These observations indicate that, despite its dual sequestration from the intestinal lumen and the host cytoplasm, C. parvum can, in fact, obtain cholesterol both from the gut’s lumen and the host cell. This study highlights the evolutionary advantages for epicellular pathogens to access to nutrients from the outside and inside of the host cell. PMID:23311949

  5. Characterization of the abnormal lipid profile in Chinese patients with psoriasis

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Xiaowen; Lin, Kai; Liu, Wen; Zhang, Ping; Zhu, Sainan

    2015-01-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease that has been associated with abnormal lipid metabolism. To characterize the lipid profile in Chinese, 86 patients with psoriasis and 84 healthy control subjects were assessed. Compared with healthy controls, the fasting serum values of total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and apolipoprotein A-I (ApoA-I) were lower in the patient group. Compared with vulgaris psoriasis, special types of psoriasis had even lower levels of HDL-C and ApoA-I. Considering the severity of psoriasis, the level of ApoA-I and HDL-C were also the only two serum lipid parameters decreased in the mild group compared to those in controls. In the moderate and the severe group, the values of TC, LDL-C, HDL-C and ApoA-I were all decreased compared to healthy control group. Further analysis indicated that the values of HDL-C and ApoA-I were significantly lower in the severe group compared to the moderate group. Correlation analysis indicated that the levels of HDL-C but not ApoA-I was negatively associated with the severity of the disease. Interestingly, when psoriasis was improved by treatment, the serum levels of TG, TC, HDL-C and ApoA-I were increased from the pre-treatment values. We conclude that abnormalities in serum lipid metabolism may play an important role in the pathogenesis of Chinese patients with psoriasis. PMID:26823881

  6. Abnormalities in the Metabolism of Fatty Acids and Triacylglycerols in the Live