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Sample records for abnormal chromosome segregation

  1. Chromosome Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... decade, newer techniques have been developed that allow scientists and doctors to screen for chromosomal abnormalities without using a microscope. These newer methods compare the patient's DNA to a normal DNA ...

  2. Abnormal human sex chromosome constitutions

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 22, discusses abnormal human sex chromosome constitution. Aneuploidy of X chromosomes with a female phenotype, sex chromosome aneuploidy with a male phenotype, and various abnormalities in X chromosome behavior are described. 31 refs., 2 figs.

  3. Chromosome segregation in plant meiosis

    PubMed Central

    Zamariola, Linda; Tiang, Choon Lin; De Storme, Nico; Pawlowski, Wojtek; Geelen, Danny

    2014-01-01

    Faithful chromosome segregation in meiosis is essential for ploidy stability over sexual life cycles. In plants, defective chromosome segregation caused by gene mutations or other factors leads to the formation of unbalanced or unreduced gametes creating aneuploid or polyploid progeny, respectively. Accurate segregation requires the coordinated execution of conserved processes occurring throughout the two meiotic cell divisions. Synapsis and recombination ensure the establishment of chiasmata that hold homologous chromosomes together allowing their correct segregation in the first meiotic division, which is also tightly regulated by cell-cycle dependent release of cohesin and monopolar attachment of sister kinetochores to microtubules. In meiosis II, bi-orientation of sister kinetochores and proper spindle orientation correctly segregate chromosomes in four haploid cells. Checkpoint mechanisms acting at kinetochores control the accuracy of kinetochore-microtubule attachment, thus ensuring the completion of segregation. Here we review the current knowledge on the processes taking place during chromosome segregation in plant meiosis, focusing on the characterization of the molecular factors involved. PMID:24987397

  4. Chromosome abnormalities in glioma

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y.S.; Ramsay, D.A.; Fan, Y.S.

    1994-09-01

    Cytogenetic studies were performed in 25 patients with gliomas. An interesting finding was a seemingly identical abnormality, an extra band on the tip of the short arm of chromosome 1, add(1)(p36), in two cases. The abnormality was present in all cells from a patient with a glioblastoma and in 27% of the tumor cells from a patient with a recurrent irradiated anaplastic astrocytoma; in the latter case, 7 unrelated abnormal clones were identified except 4 of those clones shared a common change, -Y. Three similar cases have been described previously. In a patient with pleomorphic astrocytoma, the band 1q42 in both homologues of chromosome 1 was involved in two different rearrangements. A review of the literature revealed that deletion of the long arm of chromosome 1 including 1q42 often occurs in glioma. This may indicate a possible tumor suppressor gene in this region. Cytogenetic follow-up studies were carried out in two patients and emergence of unrelated clones were noted in both. A total of 124 clonal breakpoints were identified in the 25 patients. The breakpoints which occurred three times or more were: 1p36, 1p22, 1q21, 1q25, 3q21, 7q32, 8q22, 9q22, 16q22, and 22q13.

  5. A sexy spin on nonrandom chromosome segregation.

    PubMed

    Charville, Gregory W; Rando, Thomas A

    2013-06-01

    Nonrandom chromosome segregation is an intriguing phenomenon linked to certain asymmetric stem cell divisions. In a recent report in Nature, Yadlapalli and Yamashita (2013) observe nonrandom segregation of X and Y chromosomes in Drosophila germline stem cells and shed light on the complex mechanisms of this fascinating process.

  6. A sexy spin on nonrandom chromosome segregation.

    PubMed

    Charville, Gregory W; Rando, Thomas A

    2013-06-01

    Nonrandom chromosome segregation is an intriguing phenomenon linked to certain asymmetric stem cell divisions. In a recent report in Nature, Yadlapalli and Yamashita (2013) observe nonrandom segregation of X and Y chromosomes in Drosophila germline stem cells and shed light on the complex mechanisms of this fascinating process. PMID:23746972

  7. Chromosomal abnormalities in human sperm

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R.H.

    1985-01-01

    The ability to analyze human sperm chromosome complements after penetration of zona pellucida-free hamster eggs provides the first opportunity to study the frequency and type of chromosomal abnormalities in human gametes. Two large-scale studies have provided information on normal men. We have studied 1,426 sperm complements from 45 normal men and found an abnormality rate of 8.9%. Brandriff et al. (5) found 8.1% abnormal complements in 909 sperm from 4 men. The distribution of numerical and structural abnormalities was markedly dissimilar in the 2 studies. The frequency of aneuploidy was 5% in our sample and only 1.6% in Brandriff's, perhaps reflecting individual variability among donors. The frequency of 24,YY sperm was low: 0/1,426 and 1/909. This suggests that the estimates of nondisjunction based on fluorescent Y body data (1% to 5%) are not accurate. We have also studied men at increased risk of sperm chromosomal abnormalities. The frequency of chromosomally unbalanced sperm in 6 men heterozygous for structural abnormalities varied dramatically: 77% for t11;22, 32% for t6;14, 19% for t5;18, 13% for t14;21, and 0% for inv 3 and 7. We have also studied 13 cancer patients before and after radiotherapy and demonstrated a significant dose-dependent increase of sperm chromosome abnormalities (numerical and structural) 36 months after radiation treatment.

  8. Making chromosome abnormalities treatable conditions.

    PubMed

    Cody, Jannine DeMars; Hale, Daniel Esten

    2015-09-01

    Individuals affected by the classic chromosome deletion syndromes which were first identified at the beginning of the genetic age, are now positioned to benefit from genomic advances. This issue highlights five of these conditions (4p-, 5p-, 11q-, 18p-, and 18q-). It focuses on the increased in understanding of the molecular underpinnings and envisions how these can be transformed into effective treatments. While it is scientifically exciting to see the phenotypic manifestations of hemizygosity being increasingly understood at the molecular and cellular level, it is even more amazing to consider that we are now on the road to making chromosome abnormalities treatable conditions.

  9. Disruption of human vigilin impairs chromosome condensation and segregation.

    PubMed

    Wei, Ling; Xie, Xiaoyan; Li, Junhong; Li, Ran; Shen, Wenyan; Duan, Shuwang; Zhao, Rongce; Yang, Wenli; Liu, Qiuying; Fu, Qiang; Qin, Yang

    2015-11-01

    Appropriate packaging and condensation are critical for eukaryotic chromatin's accommodation and separation during cell division. Human vigilin, a multi-KH-domain nucleic acid-binding protein, is associated with alpha satellites of centromeres. DDP1, a vigilin's homolog, is implicated with chromatin condensation and segregation. The expression of vigilin was previously reported to elevate in highly proliferating tissues and increased in a subset of hepatocellular carcinoma patients. Other studies showed that vigilin interacts with CTCF, contributes to regulation of imprinted genes Igf2/H19, and colocalizes with HP1α on heterochromatic satellite 2 and β-satellite repeats. These studies indicate that human vigilin might be involved in chromatin remodeling and regular cell growth. To investigate the potential role of human vigilin in cell cycle, the correlations between vigilin and chromosomal condensation and segregation were studied. Depletion of human vigilin by RNA interference in HepG2 cells resulted in chromosome undercondensation and various chromosomal defects during mitotic phase, including chromosome misalignments, lagging chromosomes, and chromosome bridges. Aberrant polyploid nucleus in telophase was also observed. Unlike the abnormal staining pattern of chromosomes, the shape of spindle was normal. Furthermore, the chromatin showed a greater sensitivity to MNase digestion. Collectively, our findings show that human vigilin apparently participates in chromatin condensation and segregation.

  10. Disruption of human vigilin impairs chromosome condensation and segregation.

    PubMed

    Wei, Ling; Xie, Xiaoyan; Li, Junhong; Li, Ran; Shen, Wenyan; Duan, Shuwang; Zhao, Rongce; Yang, Wenli; Liu, Qiuying; Fu, Qiang; Qin, Yang

    2015-11-01

    Appropriate packaging and condensation are critical for eukaryotic chromatin's accommodation and separation during cell division. Human vigilin, a multi-KH-domain nucleic acid-binding protein, is associated with alpha satellites of centromeres. DDP1, a vigilin's homolog, is implicated with chromatin condensation and segregation. The expression of vigilin was previously reported to elevate in highly proliferating tissues and increased in a subset of hepatocellular carcinoma patients. Other studies showed that vigilin interacts with CTCF, contributes to regulation of imprinted genes Igf2/H19, and colocalizes with HP1α on heterochromatic satellite 2 and β-satellite repeats. These studies indicate that human vigilin might be involved in chromatin remodeling and regular cell growth. To investigate the potential role of human vigilin in cell cycle, the correlations between vigilin and chromosomal condensation and segregation were studied. Depletion of human vigilin by RNA interference in HepG2 cells resulted in chromosome undercondensation and various chromosomal defects during mitotic phase, including chromosome misalignments, lagging chromosomes, and chromosome bridges. Aberrant polyploid nucleus in telophase was also observed. Unlike the abnormal staining pattern of chromosomes, the shape of spindle was normal. Furthermore, the chromatin showed a greater sensitivity to MNase digestion. Collectively, our findings show that human vigilin apparently participates in chromatin condensation and segregation. PMID:26032007

  11. Chromosome positioning from activity-based segregation.

    PubMed

    Ganai, Nirmalendu; Sengupta, Surajit; Menon, Gautam I

    2014-04-01

    Chromosomes within eukaryotic cell nuclei at interphase are not positioned at random, since gene-rich chromosomes are predominantly found towards the interior of the cell nucleus across a number of cell types. The physical mechanisms that could drive and maintain the spatial segregation of chromosomes based on gene density are unknown. Here, we identify a mechanism for such segregation, showing that the territorial organization of chromosomes, another central feature of nuclear organization, emerges naturally from our model. Our computer simulations indicate that gene density-dependent radial segregation of chromosomes arises as a robust consequence of differences in non-equilibrium activity across chromosomes. Arguing that such differences originate in the inhomogeneous distribution of ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling and transcription machinery on each chromosome, we show that a variety of non-random positional distributions emerge through the interplay of such activity, nuclear shape and specific interactions of chromosomes with the nuclear envelope. Results from our model are in reasonable agreement with experimental data and we make a number of predictions that can be tested in experiments. PMID:24459132

  12. [Chromosome abnormalities in human cancer].

    PubMed

    Salamanca-Gómez, F

    1995-01-01

    Recent investigation on the presence of chromosome abnormalities in neoplasias has allowed outstanding advances in the knowledge of malignant transformation mechanisms and important applications in the clinical diagnosis and prognosis of leukaemias, lymphomas and solid tumors. The purpose of the present paper is to discuss the most relevant cytogenetic aberrations, some of them described at the Unidad de Investigación Médica en Genética Humana, Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social, and to correlate these abnormalities with recent achievements in the knowledge of oncogenes, suppressor genes or antioncogenes, their chromosome localization, and their mutations in human neoplasia; as well as their perspectives in prevention and treatment of cancer that such findings permit to anticipate.

  13. Adults with Chromosome 18 Abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Soileau, Bridgette; Hasi, Minire; Sebold, Courtney; Hill, Annice; O'Donnell, Louise; Hale, Daniel E; Cody, Jannine D

    2015-08-01

    The identification of an underlying chromosome abnormality frequently marks the endpoint of a diagnostic odyssey. However, families are frequently left with more questions than answers as they consider their child's future. In the case of rare chromosome conditions, a lack of longitudinal data often makes it difficult to provide anticipatory guidance to these families. The objective of this study is to describe the lifespan, educational attainment, living situation, and behavioral phenotype of adults with chromosome 18 abnormalities. The Chromosome 18 Clinical Research Center has enrolled 483 individuals with one of the following conditions: 18q-, 18p-, Tetrasomy 18p, and Ring 18. As a part of the ongoing longitudinal study, we collect data on living arrangements, educational level attained, and employment status as well as data on executive functioning and behavioral skills on an annual basis. Within our cohort, 28 of the 483 participants have died, the majority of whom have deletions encompassing the TCF4 gene or who have unbalanced rearrangement involving other chromosomes. Data regarding the cause of and age at death are presented. We also report on the living situation, educational attainment, and behavioral phenotype of the 151 participants over the age of 18. In general, educational level is higher for people with all these conditions than implied by the early literature, including some that received post-high school education. In addition, some individuals are able to live independently, though at this point they represent a minority of patients. Data on executive function and behavioral phenotype are also presented. Taken together, these data provide insight into the long-term outcome for individuals with a chromosome 18 condition. This information is critical in counseling families on the range of potential outcomes for their child.

  14. Meiotic segregation of a homeologous chromosome pair.

    PubMed

    Maxfield Boumil, R; Kemp, B; Angelichio, M; Nilsson-Tillgren, T; Dawson, D S

    2003-03-01

    During meiosis, the alignment of homologous chromosomes facilitates their subsequent migration away from one another to opposite spindle poles at anaphase I. Recombination is part of the mechanism by which chromosomes identify their homologous partners, and serves to link the homologs in a way that, in some organisms, has been shown to promote proper attachment to the meiotic spindle. We have built a diploid strain that contains a pair of homeologous chromosomes V': one is derived from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and one originates from S. carlsbergensis. Sequence analysis reveals that these chromosomes share 71% sequence identity. The homeologs experience high levels of meiotic double-stranded breaks. Despite their relatedness and their competence to initiate recombination, the meiotic segregation behavior of the homeologous chromosomes suggests that, in most meioses, they are partitioned by a meiotic segregation system that has been shown previously to partition non-exchange chromosomes and pairs with no homology. Though the homeologous chromosomes show a degree of meiotic segregation fidelity similar to that of other non-exchange pairs, our data provide evidence that their limited sequence homology may provide some bias in meiotic partner choice. PMID:12655401

  15. Controlling segregation speed of entangled polymers by the shapes: A simple model for eukaryotic chromosome segregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, Yuji; Tachikawa, Masashi; Mochizuki, Atsushi

    2016-10-01

    We report molecular dynamics simulations of the segregation of two overlapping polymers motivated by chromosome segregation in biological cells. We investigate the relationship between polymer shapes and segregation dynamics and show that elongation and compaction make entangled polymers segregate rapidly. This result suggests that eukaryotic chromosomes take such a characteristic rod-shaped structure, which is induced by condensins, to achieve rapid segregation.

  16. Numerically abnormal chromosome constitutions in humans

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 24, discusses numerically abnormal chromosome constitutions in humans. This involves abnormalities of human chromosome number, including polyploidy (when the number of sets of chromosomes increases) and aneuploidy (when the number of individual normal chromosomes changes). Chapter sections discuss the following chromosomal abnormalities: human triploids, imprinting and uniparental disomy, human tetraploids, hydatidiform moles, anomalies caused by chromosomal imbalance, 13 trisomy (D{sub 1} trisomy, Patau syndrome), 21 trisomy (Down syndrome), 18 trisomy syndrome (Edwards syndrome), other autosomal aneuploidy syndromes, and spontaneous abortions. The chapter concludes with remarks on the nonrandom participation of chromosomes in trisomy. 69 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  17. The XXXXY Sex Chromosome Abnormality

    PubMed Central

    Barr, M. L.; Carr, D. H.; Pozsonyi, J.; Wilson, R. A.; Dunn, H. G.; Jacobson, T. S.; Miller, J. R.; Chown, B.

    1962-01-01

    The most common sex chromosome complex in sex chromatin-positive males with Klinefelter's syndrome is XXY. When the complex is XXYY or XXXY, the clinical findings do not seem to differ materially from those seen in XXY subjects, although more patients with these intersexual chromosome complements need to be studied to establish possible phenotypical expressions of the chromosomal variants. Two male children with an XXXXY sex chromosome abnormality are described. The data obtained from the study of these cases and five others described in the literature suggest that the XXXXY patient is likely to have congenital defects not usually seen in the common form of the Klinefelter syndrome. These include a triad of (1) skeletal anomalies (including radioulnar synostosis), (2) hypogenitalism (hypoplasia of penis and scrotum, incomplete descent of testes and defective prepubertal development of seminiferous tubules), and (3) greater risk of severe mental deficiency. That the conclusions are based on data from a small number of patients is emphasized, together with the need for a cytogenetic survey of a large control or unselected population. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 7Fig. 8Fig. 9Fig. 10 PMID:13969480

  18. Chromosome segregation and aneuploidy. I

    SciTech Connect

    Vig, B.K.

    1993-12-31

    Of all genetic afflictions of man, aneuploidy ranks as the most prevalent. Among liveborn babies aneuploidy exist to the extent of about 0.3%, to about 0.5% among stillborns and a dramatic 25% among miscarriages. The burden is too heavy to be taken lightly. Whereas cytogeneticists are capable of tracing the origin of the extra or missing chromosome to the contributing parent, it is not certain what factors are responsible for this {open_quote}epidemic{close_quote} affecting the human genome. The matter is complicated by the observation that, to the best of our knowledge, all chromosomes do not malsegregate with equal frequency. Chromosome number 16, for example, is the most prevalent among abortuses - one-third of all aneuploid miscarriages are due to trisomy 16 - yet it never appears in aneuploid constitution among the liveborn. Some chromsomes, number 1, for example, appear only rarely, if at all. In the latter case painstaking efforts have to be made to karyotype very early stages of embryonic development, as early as the 8-cell stage. Even though no convincing data are yet available, it is conceivable that the product of most aneuploid zygotes is lost before implantation.

  19. Are topoisomerases required for mammalian chromosome segregation?

    SciTech Connect

    Sumner, A.T.; Perry, P.E.; Slavotinek, A.

    1993-12-31

    Theoretical considerations indicate that topoisomerase II should be involved in chromosome segregation, since newly replicated daughter DNA molecules must be interwined, and an enzyme such as topoisomerase II is needed to disentangle them. It has been shown, using scanning electron microscopy, that regions of centromeric heterochromatin are the last parts of the chromosomes to separate at anaphase. Such regions generally contain highly repetitive, satellite DNAs, whose function is obscure, since they vary extensively, and apparently randomly, in their sequence and average base composition. However, in spite of this compositional variation, it appears that many satellite DNAs show characteristic curvature, which may, rather than a specific nucleotide sequence, be a recognition site for topoisomerase II. Satellite DNA in centromeric heterochromatin might then, regardless of sequence, provide a specific substrate on which topoisomerase II could act in a concerted fashion at the beginning of anaphase to ensure orderly separation of the daughter chromosomes.

  20. Normal segregation of a foreign-species chromosome during Drosophila female meiosis despite extensive heterochromatin divergence.

    PubMed

    Gilliland, William D; Colwell, Eileen M; Osiecki, David M; Park, Suna; Lin, Deanna; Rathnam, Chandramouli; Barbash, Daniel A

    2015-01-01

    The abundance and composition of heterochromatin changes rapidly between species and contributes to hybrid incompatibility and reproductive isolation. Heterochromatin differences may also destabilize chromosome segregation and cause meiotic drive, the non-Mendelian segregation of homologous chromosomes. Here we use a range of genetic and cytological assays to examine the meiotic properties of a Drosophila simulans chromosome 4 (sim-IV) introgressed into D. melanogaster. These two species differ by ∼12-13% at synonymous sites and several genes essential for chromosome segregation have experienced recurrent adaptive evolution since their divergence. Furthermore, their chromosome 4s are visibly different due to heterochromatin divergence, including in the AATAT pericentromeric satellite DNA. We find a visible imbalance in the positioning of the two chromosome 4s in sim-IV/mel-IV heterozygote and also replicate this finding with a D. melanogaster 4 containing a heterochromatic deletion. These results demonstrate that heterochromatin abundance can have a visible effect on chromosome positioning during meiosis. Despite this effect, however, we find that sim-IV segregates normally in both diplo and triplo 4 D. melanogaster females and does not experience elevated nondisjunction. We conclude that segregation abnormalities and a high level of meiotic drive are not inevitable byproducts of extensive heterochromatin divergence. Animal chromosomes typically contain large amounts of noncoding repetitive DNA that nevertheless varies widely between species. This variation may potentially induce non-Mendelian transmission of chromosomes. We have examined the meiotic properties and transmission of a highly diverged chromosome 4 from a foreign species within the fruitfly Drosophila melanogaster. This chromosome has substantially less of a simple sequence repeat than does D. melanogaster 4, and we find that this difference results in altered positioning when chromosomes align

  1. Normal segregation of a foreign-species chromosome during Drosophila female meiosis despite extensive heterochromatin divergence.

    PubMed

    Gilliland, William D; Colwell, Eileen M; Osiecki, David M; Park, Suna; Lin, Deanna; Rathnam, Chandramouli; Barbash, Daniel A

    2015-01-01

    The abundance and composition of heterochromatin changes rapidly between species and contributes to hybrid incompatibility and reproductive isolation. Heterochromatin differences may also destabilize chromosome segregation and cause meiotic drive, the non-Mendelian segregation of homologous chromosomes. Here we use a range of genetic and cytological assays to examine the meiotic properties of a Drosophila simulans chromosome 4 (sim-IV) introgressed into D. melanogaster. These two species differ by ∼12-13% at synonymous sites and several genes essential for chromosome segregation have experienced recurrent adaptive evolution since their divergence. Furthermore, their chromosome 4s are visibly different due to heterochromatin divergence, including in the AATAT pericentromeric satellite DNA. We find a visible imbalance in the positioning of the two chromosome 4s in sim-IV/mel-IV heterozygote and also replicate this finding with a D. melanogaster 4 containing a heterochromatic deletion. These results demonstrate that heterochromatin abundance can have a visible effect on chromosome positioning during meiosis. Despite this effect, however, we find that sim-IV segregates normally in both diplo and triplo 4 D. melanogaster females and does not experience elevated nondisjunction. We conclude that segregation abnormalities and a high level of meiotic drive are not inevitable byproducts of extensive heterochromatin divergence. Animal chromosomes typically contain large amounts of noncoding repetitive DNA that nevertheless varies widely between species. This variation may potentially induce non-Mendelian transmission of chromosomes. We have examined the meiotic properties and transmission of a highly diverged chromosome 4 from a foreign species within the fruitfly Drosophila melanogaster. This chromosome has substantially less of a simple sequence repeat than does D. melanogaster 4, and we find that this difference results in altered positioning when chromosomes align

  2. Normal Segregation of a Foreign-Species Chromosome During Drosophila Female Meiosis Despite Extensive Heterochromatin Divergence

    PubMed Central

    Gilliland, William D.; Colwell, Eileen M.; Osiecki, David M.; Park, Suna; Lin, Deanna; Rathnam, Chandramouli; Barbash, Daniel A.

    2015-01-01

    The abundance and composition of heterochromatin changes rapidly between species and contributes to hybrid incompatibility and reproductive isolation. Heterochromatin differences may also destabilize chromosome segregation and cause meiotic drive, the non-Mendelian segregation of homologous chromosomes. Here we use a range of genetic and cytological assays to examine the meiotic properties of a Drosophila simulans chromosome 4 (sim-IV) introgressed into D. melanogaster. These two species differ by ∼12–13% at synonymous sites and several genes essential for chromosome segregation have experienced recurrent adaptive evolution since their divergence. Furthermore, their chromosome 4s are visibly different due to heterochromatin divergence, including in the AATAT pericentromeric satellite DNA. We find a visible imbalance in the positioning of the two chromosome 4s in sim-IV/mel-IV heterozygote and also replicate this finding with a D. melanogaster 4 containing a heterochromatic deletion. These results demonstrate that heterochromatin abundance can have a visible effect on chromosome positioning during meiosis. Despite this effect, however, we find that sim-IV segregates normally in both diplo and triplo 4 D. melanogaster females and does not experience elevated nondisjunction. We conclude that segregation abnormalities and a high level of meiotic drive are not inevitable byproducts of extensive heterochromatin divergence. Animal chromosomes typically contain large amounts of noncoding repetitive DNA that nevertheless varies widely between species. This variation may potentially induce non-Mendelian transmission of chromosomes. We have examined the meiotic properties and transmission of a highly diverged chromosome 4 from a foreign species within the fruitfly Drosophila melanogaster. This chromosome has substantially less of a simple sequence repeat than does D. melanogaster 4, and we find that this difference results in altered positioning when chromosomes align

  3. Chromosome and cell wall segregation in Streptococcus faecium ATCC 9790

    SciTech Connect

    Higgins, M.L.; Glaser, D.; Dicker, D.T.; Zito, E.T.

    1989-01-01

    Segregation was studied by measuring the positions of autoradiographic grain clusters in chains formed from single cells containing on average less than one radiolabeled chromosome strand. The degree to which chromosomal and cell wall material cosegregated was quantified by using the methods of S. Cooper and M. Weinberger, dividing the number of chains labeled at the middle. This analysis indicated that in contrast to chromosomal segregation in Escherichia coli and, in some studies, to that in gram-positive rods, chromosomal segregation in Streptococcus faecium was slightly nonrandom and did not vary with growth rate. Results were not significantly affected by strand exchange. In contrast, labeled cell wall segregated predominantly nonrandomly.

  4. Advances in understanding paternally transmitted Chromosomal Abnormalities

    SciTech Connect

    Marchetti, F; Sloter, E; Wyrobek, A J

    2001-03-01

    Multicolor FISH has been adapted for detecting the major types of chromosomal abnormalities in human sperm including aneuploidies for clinically-relevant chromosomes, chromosomal aberrations including breaks and rearrangements, and other numerical abnormalities. The various sperm FISH assays have been used to evaluate healthy men, men of advanced age, and men who have received mutagenic cancer therapy. The mouse has also been used as a model to investigate the mechanism of paternally transmitted genetic damage. Sperm FISH for the mouse has been used to detect chromosomally abnormal mouse sperm, while the PAINT/DAPI analysis of mouse zygotes has been used to evaluate the types of chromosomal defects that can be paternally transmitted to the embryo and their effects on embryonic development.

  5. Chromosomal abnormalities in the newborn period.

    PubMed

    Seashore, M R

    1993-10-01

    Chromosomal abnormalities account for a significant percentage of congenital malformations in the neonate. While some of the syndromes can be suspected on clinical grounds, the clinician will need to have a high index of suspicion based on the presence of multiple abnormalities that cannot be accounted for by other causes. Chromosome analysis should be performed promptly in these cases. Cultured lymphocytes are the standard preparation at present. However, new non-isotopic hybridization techniques are becoming available that allow analysis of interphase cells, and these may become more widely used as clinical experience with them is gained. Prognosis can usually be better defined once the chromosome analysis is complete. The information acquired may also be used to provide risk estimates for chromosomal abnormalities in future pregnancies of the parents of the affected infant and for other relatives. Empathetic counseling of the parents and family must be provided once the diagnosis is known. It must take into account the knowledge the chromosome analysis provides, be respectful of the parent's need for support, and be accurate as to prognosis of the condition diagnosed. When Down syndrome and Turner syndrome have been diagnosed, care must be taken to emphasize the positive aspects of the prognosis. When a chromosomal abnormality with an extremely poor prognosis is identified, support for withdrawal of medical intervention must be sensitively provided. The diagnosis and care of an infant with a chromosomal abnormality will challenge all of the pediatrician's diagnostic, therapeutic, and communication skills.

  6. Dynamics of Escherichia coli chromosome segregation during multifork replication.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Henrik J; Youngren, Brenda; Hansen, Flemming G; Austin, Stuart

    2007-12-01

    Slowly growing Escherichia coli cells have a simple cell cycle, with replication and progressive segregation of the chromosome completed before cell division. In rapidly growing cells, initiation of replication occurs before the previous replication rounds are complete. At cell division, the chromosomes contain multiple replication forks and must be segregated while this complex pattern of replication is still ongoing. Here, we show that replication and segregation continue in step, starting at the origin and progressing to the replication terminus. Thus, early-replicated markers on the multiple-branched chromosomes continue to separate soon after replication to form separate protonucleoids, even though they are not segregated into different daughter cells until later generations. The segregation pattern follows the pattern of chromosome replication and does not follow the cell division cycle. No extensive cohesion of sister DNA regions was seen at any growth rate. We conclude that segregation is driven by the progression of the replication forks.

  7. Dynamics of Escherichia coli Chromosome Segregation during Multifork Replication▿

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Henrik J.; Youngren, Brenda; Hansen, Flemming G.; Austin, Stuart

    2007-01-01

    Slowly growing Escherichia coli cells have a simple cell cycle, with replication and progressive segregation of the chromosome completed before cell division. In rapidly growing cells, initiation of replication occurs before the previous replication rounds are complete. At cell division, the chromosomes contain multiple replication forks and must be segregated while this complex pattern of replication is still ongoing. Here, we show that replication and segregation continue in step, starting at the origin and progressing to the replication terminus. Thus, early-replicated markers on the multiple-branched chromosomes continue to separate soon after replication to form separate protonucleoids, even though they are not segregated into different daughter cells until later generations. The segregation pattern follows the pattern of chromosome replication and does not follow the cell division cycle. No extensive cohesion of sister DNA regions was seen at any growth rate. We conclude that segregation is driven by the progression of the replication forks. PMID:17905986

  8. Four families with immunodeficiency and chromosome abnormalities.

    PubMed Central

    Candy, D C; Hayward, A R; Hughes, D T; Layward, L; Soothill, J F

    1979-01-01

    Six children, with severe deficiency of some or all of the immunoglobulins and minor somatic abnormalities, had chromosomal abnormalities: (1) 45,XY,t(13q/18q), (2) 46,XY,21ps +, (3) two brothers 46,XY (inv. 7) (4) 45,X,t(11p/10p)/46X,iXq,t(11p/10p) and, (5) in addendum, 45,XX,-18;46,XX, r18. The chromosome abnormalities were detected in B- as well as T-lymphocytes (as evidenced by using both PHA- and PWM-stimulated cultures) in all probands, but one was mosaic in PHA culture, although all his PWM-stimulated cells were abnormal. Chromosomal variants were also detected in relatives of three and immunodeficiency in relatives of two. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 PMID:314782

  9. Chromosomal abnormalities associated with cyclopia and synophthalmia.

    PubMed Central

    Howard, R O

    1977-01-01

    At the present time, essentially all known facts concerning cyclopia are consistent with some chromosomal disease, including clinical features of the pregnancy (fetal wastage, prematurity, intrauterine growth retardation, maternal age factor, complications of pregnancy), the generalized developmental abnormalities, specific ocular dysgenesis, by the high incidence of chromosomal abnormality already demonstrated, and the possibility of error in those cases of cyclopia with normal chromosomes. Even if chromosomal aberrations represent only one group of several different etiologic factors leading to cyclopia, at the present time chromosomal errors would seem to be the most common cause of cyclopia now recognized. Further studies will establish or disprove a chromosomal error in those instances which are now considered to be the result of an environmental factor alone or those with apparent familial patterns of inheritance. This apparent diverse origin of cyclopia can be clarified if future cyclopic specimens are carefully investigated. The evaluation should include a careful gross and microscopic examination of all organs, including the eye, and chromosome banding studies of all organs, including the eye, and chromosome banding studies of at least two cyclopic tissues. Then the presence or absence of multiple causative factors can be better evaluated. Images FIGURE 2 A FIGURE 2 B FIGURE 1 A FIGURE 1 B FIGURE 1 C FIGURE 1 D FIGURE 1 E FIGURE 1 F FIGURE 3 A FIGURE 3 B FIGURE 4 A FIGURE 4 B FIGURE 4 C FIGURE 4 D FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 A FIGURE 7 B PMID:418547

  10. Molecular mechanisms of homologous chromosome pairing and segregation in plants.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Bing; Su, Handong; Birchler, James A; Han, Fangpu

    2014-03-20

    In most eukaryotic species, three basic steps of pairing, recombination and synapsis occur during prophase of meiosis I. Homologous chromosomal pairing and recombination are essential for accurate segregation of chromosomes. In contrast to the well-studied processes such as recombination and synapsis, many aspects of chromosome pairing are still obscure. Recent progress in several species indicates that the telomere bouquet formation can facilitate homologous chromosome pairing by bringing chromosome ends into close proximity, but the sole presence of telomere clustering is not sufficient for recognizing homologous pairs. On the other hand, accurate segregation of the genetic material from parent to offspring during meiosis is dependent on the segregation of homologs in the reductional meiotic division (MI) with sister kinetochores exhibiting mono-orientation from the same pole, and the segregation of sister chromatids during the equational meiotic division (MII) with kinetochores showing bi-orientation from the two poles. The underlying mechanism of orientation and segregation is still unclear. Here we focus on recent studies in plants and other species that provide insight into how chromosomes find their partners and mechanisms mediating chromosomal segregation. PMID:24656232

  11. Chromosomal abnormalities in a psychiatric population

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, K.E.; Lubetsky, M.J.; Wenger, S.L.; Steele, M.W.

    1995-02-27

    Over a 3.5 year period of time, 345 patients hospitalized for psychiatric problems were evaluated cytogenetically. The patient population included 76% males and 94% children with a mean age of 12 years. The criteria for testing was an undiagnosed etiology for mental retardation and/or autism. Cytogenetic studies identified 11, or 3%, with abnormal karyotypes, including 4 fragile X positive individuals (2 males, 2 females), and 8 with chromosomal aneuploidy, rearrangements, or deletions. While individuals with chromosomal abnormalities do not demonstrate specific behavioral, psychiatric, or developmental problems relative to other psychiatric patients, our results demonstrate the need for an increased awareness to order chromosomal analysis and fragile X testing in those individuals who have combinations of behavioral/psychiatric, learning, communication, or cognitive disturbance. 5 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  12. A large dispersed chromosomal region required for chromosome segregation in sporulating cells of Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ling Juan; Errington, Jeff

    2002-08-01

    The cis-acting sequences required for chromosome segregation are poorly understood in most organisms, including bacteria. Sporulating cells of Bacillus subtilis undergo an unusual asymmetric cell division during which the origin of DNA replication (oriC) region of the chromosome migrates to an extreme polar position. We have now characterized the sequences required for this migration. We show that the previously characterized soj-spo0J chromosome segregation system is not essential for chromosome movement to the cell pole, so this must be driven by an additional segregation mechanism. Observations on a large set of precisely engineered chromosomal inversions and translocations have identified a polar localization region (PLR), which lies approximately 150-300 kbp to the left of oriC. Surprisingly, oriC itself has no involvement in this chromosome segregation system. Dissection of the PLR showed that it has internal functional redundancy, reminiscent of the large diffuse centromeres of most eukaryotic cells.

  13. The spindle checkpoint and chromosome segregation in meiosis.

    PubMed

    Gorbsky, Gary J

    2015-07-01

    The spindle checkpoint is a key regulator of chromosome segregation in mitosis and meiosis. Its function is to prevent precocious anaphase onset before chromosomes have achieved bipolar attachment to the spindle. The spindle checkpoint comprises a complex set of signaling pathways that integrate microtubule dynamics, biomechanical forces at the kinetochores, and intricate regulation of protein interactions and post-translational modifications. Historically, many key observations that gave rise to the initial concepts of the spindle checkpoint were made in meiotic systems. In contrast with mitosis, the two distinct chromosome segregation events of meiosis present a special challenge for the regulation of checkpoint signaling. Preservation of fidelity in chromosome segregation in meiosis, controlled by the spindle checkpoint, also has a significant impact in human health. This review highlights the contributions from meiotic systems in understanding the spindle checkpoint as well as the role of checkpoint signaling in controlling the complex divisions of meiosis.

  14. The spindle checkpoint and chromosome segregation in meiosis

    PubMed Central

    Gorbsky, Gary J.

    2014-01-01

    The spindle checkpoint is a key regulator of chromosome segregation in mitosis and meiosis. Its function is to prevent precocious anaphase onset before chromosomes have achieved bipolar attachment to the spindle. The spindle checkpoint comprises a complex set of signaling pathways that integrate microtubule dynamics, biomechanical forces at the kinetochores, and intricate regulation of protein interactions and post-translational modifications. Historically, many key observations that gave rise to the initial concepts of the spindle checkpoint were carried out in meiotic systems. In contrast with mitosis, the two distinct chromosome segregation events of meiosis present a special challenge for the regulation of checkpoint signaling. Preservation of fidelity in chromosome segregation in meiosis, controlled by the spindle checkpoint, also has significant impact in human health. This review highlights the contributions from meiotic systems in understanding the spindle checkpoint as well as the role of checkpoint signaling in controlling the complex divisions of meiosis. PMID:25470754

  15. Kinetochore-independent chromosome segregation driven by lateral microtubule bundles

    PubMed Central

    Muscat, Christina C; Torre-Santiago, Keila M; Tran, Michael V; Powers, James A; Wignall, Sarah M

    2015-01-01

    During cell division, chromosomes attach to spindle microtubules at sites called kinetochores, and force generated at the kinetochore-microtubule interface is the main driver of chromosome movement. Surprisingly, kinetochores are not required for chromosome segregation on acentrosomal spindles in Caenorhabditis elegans oocytes, but the mechanism driving chromosomes apart in their absence is not understood. In this study, we show that lateral microtubule–chromosome associations established during prometaphase remain intact during anaphase to facilitate separation, defining a novel form of kinetochore-independent segregation. Chromosome dynamics during congression and segregation are controlled by opposing forces; plus-end directed forces are mediated by a protein complex that forms a ring around the chromosome center and dynein on chromosome arms provides a minus-end force. At anaphase onset, ring removal shifts the balance between these forces, triggering poleward movement along lateral microtubule bundles. This represents an elegant strategy for controlling chromosomal movements during cell division distinct from the canonical kinetochore-driven mechanism. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06462.001 PMID:26026148

  16. Analysis of chromosome segregation during mammalian meiosis using combined immunofluorescence and fluorescence in situ hubridization

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, P.A.; Embury, P.B.; Mroz, K.M.

    1994-09-01

    Meiotic non-disjunction is thought to occur in 10-20% of all human oocytes, making this the most common genetic abnormality in our species. Aberrant recombination has been implicated in the genesis of these errors; however, direct studies of the meiotic process have been hampered by the lack of material and appropriate technology. We have developed a technique for the evaluation of meiosis in intact mammalian oocytes that combines immunofluorescence and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). This allows for simultaneous, 3-dimensional visualization of the meiotic spindle, the alignment of the chromosomes on the spindle, and the placement of specific chromosomes. We have used this technology to follow meiotic progression in oocytes from XO female mice to evaluate the behavior of an unsynapsed chromosome during mammalian meiosis. Perturbations in chromosome behavior are evident early in meiosis: during the formation of the first meiotic spindle, the univalent X chromosome is properly positioned. With the onset of anaphase, the single X chromosome most commonly segregates as an intact chromosome, although equational segregation of the X chromatids is seen in a significant minority (approximately 20%) of oocytes. These observations demonstrate that failure of pairing/recombination can result in segregation of sister chromatids at meiosis I. This has obvious implications for human non-disjunction, much of which is thought to be due to recombination deficiencies; accordingly, we are now extending our studies to include analyses of human oocytes.

  17. Chromosomal abnormalities as a cause of recurrent abortions in Egypt

    PubMed Central

    El-Dahtory, Faeza Abdel Mogib

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In 4%-8% of couples with recurrent abortion, at least one of the partners has chromosomal abnormality. Most spontaneous miscarriages which happen in the first and second trimesters are caused by chromosomal abnormalities. These chromosomal abnormalities may be either numerical or structural. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Cytogenetic study was done for 73 Egyptian couples who presented with recurrent abortion at Genetic Unit of Children Hospital, Mansoura University. RESULTS: We found that the frequency of chromosomal abnormalities was not significantly different from that reported worldwide. Chromosomal abnormalities were detected in 9 (6.1%) of 73 couples. Seven of chromosomal abnormalities were structural and two of them were numerical. CONCLUSION: Our results showed that 6.1% of the couples with recurrent abortion had chromosomal abnormalities, with no other abnormalities. We suggest that it is necessary to perform cytogenetic in vestigation for couples who have recurrent abortion. PMID:22090718

  18. Chromosome abnormalities in primary ovarian cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Yonescu, R.; Currie, J.; Griffin, C.A.

    1994-09-01

    Chromosome abnormalities that are specific and recurrent may occur in regions of the genome that are involved in the conversion of normal cells to those with tumorigenic potential. Ovarian cancer is the primary cause of death among patients with gynecological malignancies. We have performed cytogenetic analysis of 16 ovarian tumors from women age 28-82. Three tumors of low malignant potential and three granulosa cell tumors had normal karyotypes. To look for the presence of trisomy 12, which has been suggested to be a common aberration in this group of tumors, interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization was performed on direct preparations from three of these tumors using a probe for alpha satellite sequences of chromosome 12. In the 3 preparations, 92-98 percent of the cells contained two copies of chromosome 12, indicating that trisomy 12 is not a universal finding in low grade ovarian tumors. Endometrioid carcinoma of the ovary is histologically indistinguishable from endometial carcinoma of the uterus. We studied 10 endometrioid tumors to determine the degree of genetic similarity between these two carcinomas. Six out of ten endometrioid tumors showed a near-triploid modal number, and one presented with a tetraploid modal number. Eight of the ten contained structural chromosome abnormalities, of which the most frequent were 1p- (5 tumors), 19q+ (3 tumors), 6q- or ins(6) (4 tumors), 3q- or 3q+ (4 tumors). These cytogenetic results resemble those reported for papillary ovarian tumors and differ from those of endometrial carcinoma of the uterus. We conclude that despite the histologic similarities between the endometrioid and endometrial carcinomas, the genetic abnormalities in the genesis of these tumors differ significantly.

  19. Towards building a chromosome segregation machine

    PubMed Central

    Bloom, Kerry; Joglekar, Ajit

    2010-01-01

    All organisms, from bacteria to humans, face the daunting task of replicating, packaging and segregating up to two metres (about 6 × 109 base pairs) of DNA when each cell divides. This task is carried out up to a trillion times during the development of a human from a single fertilized cell. The strategy by which DNA is replicated is now well understood. But when it comes to packaging and segregating a genome, the mechanisms are only beginning to be understood and are often as variable as the organisms in which they are studied. PMID:20110988

  20. Meiotic Crossing over between Nonhomologous Chromosomes Affects Chromosome Segregation in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Jinks-Robertson, S.; Sayeed, S.; Murphy, T.

    1997-01-01

    Meiotic recombination between artificial repeats positioned on nonhomologous chromosomes occurs efficiently in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Both gene conversion and crossover events have been observed, with crossovers yielding reciprocal translocations. In the current study, 5.5-kb ura3 repeats positioned on chromosomes V and XV were used to examine the effect of ectopic recombination on meiotic chromosome segregation. Ura(+) random spores were selected and gene conversion vs. crossover events were distinguished by Southern blot analysis. Approximately 15% of the crossover events between chromosomes V and XV were associated with missegregation of one of these chromosomes. The missegregation was manifest as hyperploid spores containing either both translocations plus a normal chromosome, or both normal chromosomes plus one of the translocations. In those cases where it could be analyzed, missegregation occurred at the first meiotic division. These data are discussed in terms of a model in which ectopic crossovers compete efficiently with normal allelic crossovers in directing meiotic chromosome segregation. PMID:9136001

  1. RNAi pathway participates in chromosome segregation in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chuan; Wang, Xiaolin; Liu, Xu; Cao, Shuhuan; Shan, Ge

    2015-01-01

    The RNAi machinery is a mighty regulator in a myriad of life events. Despite lines of evidence that small RNAs and components of the RNAi pathway may be associated with structure and behavior of mitotic chromosomes in diverse organisms, a direct role of the RNAi pathway in mammalian mitotic chromosome segregation remains elusive. Here we report that Dicer and AGO2, two central components of the mammalian RNAi pathway, participate in the chromosome segregation. Knockdown of Dicer or AGO2 results in a higher incidence of chromosome lagging, and this effect is independent from microRNAs as examined with DGCR8 knockout cells. Further investigation has revealed that α-satellite RNA, a noncoding RNA derived from centromeric repeat region, is managed by AGO2 under the guidance of endogenous small interference RNAs (ASAT siRNAs) generated by Dicer. Furthermore, the slicer activity of AGO2 is essential for the chromosome segregation. Level and distribution of chromosome-associated α-satellite RNA have crucial regulatory effect on the localization of centromeric proteins such as centromere protein C1 (CENPC1). With these results, we also provide a paradigm in which the RNAi pathway participates in vital cellular events through the maintenance of level and distribution of noncoding RNAs in cells. PMID:27462427

  2. Autosomal Chromosome Abnormality: A Cause of Birth Defects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plumridge, Diane

    Intended for parents and professionals, the book explains chromosome abnormalities in lay terms and discusses the relationship of specific conditions to birth defects. Chromosomal abnormalities are defined and factors in diagnosis and recurrence are discussed. Normal chromosome reproduction processes are covered while such numerical abnormalities…

  3. Evolutionary cell biology of chromosome segregation: insights from trypanosomes

    PubMed Central

    Akiyoshi, Bungo; Gull, Keith

    2013-01-01

    Faithful transmission of genetic material is essential for the survival of all organisms. Eukaryotic chromosome segregation is driven by the kinetochore that assembles onto centromeric DNA to capture spindle microtubules and govern the movement of chromosomes. Its molecular mechanism has been actively studied in conventional model eukaryotes, such as yeasts, worms, flies and human. However, these organisms are closely related in the evolutionary time scale and it therefore remains unclear whether all eukaryotes use a similar mechanism. The evolutionary origins of the segregation apparatus also remain enigmatic. To gain insights into these questions, it is critical to perform comparative studies. Here, we review our current understanding of the mitotic mechanism in Trypanosoma brucei, an experimentally tractable kinetoplastid parasite that branched early in eukaryotic history. No canonical kinetochore component has been identified, and the design principle of kinetochores might be fundamentally different in kinetoplastids. Furthermore, these organisms do not appear to possess a functional spindle checkpoint that monitors kinetochore–microtubule attachments. With these unique features and the long evolutionary distance from other eukaryotes, understanding the mechanism of chromosome segregation in T. brucei should reveal fundamental requirements for the eukaryotic segregation machinery, and may also provide hints about the origin and evolution of the segregation apparatus. PMID:23635522

  4. A novel chromosome segregation mechanism during female meiosis.

    PubMed

    McNally, Karen Perry; Panzica, Michelle T; Kim, Taekyung; Cortes, Daniel B; McNally, Francis J

    2016-08-15

    In a wide range of eukaryotes, chromosome segregation occurs through anaphase A, in which chromosomes move toward stationary spindle poles, anaphase B, in which chromosomes move at the same velocity as outwardly moving spindle poles, or both. In contrast, Caenorhabditis elegans female meiotic spindles initially shorten in the pole-to-pole axis such that spindle poles contact the outer kinetochore before the start of anaphase chromosome separation. Once the spindle pole-to-kinetochore contact has been made, the homologues of a 4-μm-long bivalent begin to separate. The spindle shortens an additional 0.5 μm until the chromosomes are embedded in the spindle poles. Chromosomes then separate at the same velocity as the spindle poles in an anaphase B-like movement. We conclude that the majority of meiotic chromosome movement is caused by shortening of the spindle to bring poles in contact with the chromosomes, followed by separation of chromosome-bound poles by outward sliding.

  5. A novel chromosome segregation mechanism during female meiosis

    PubMed Central

    McNally, Karen Perry; Panzica, Michelle T.; Kim, Taekyung; Cortes, Daniel B.; McNally, Francis J.

    2016-01-01

    In a wide range of eukaryotes, chromosome segregation occurs through anaphase A, in which chromosomes move toward stationary spindle poles, anaphase B, in which chromosomes move at the same velocity as outwardly moving spindle poles, or both. In contrast, Caenorhabditis elegans female meiotic spindles initially shorten in the pole-to-pole axis such that spindle poles contact the outer kinetochore before the start of anaphase chromosome separation. Once the spindle pole-to-kinetochore contact has been made, the homologues of a 4-μm-long bivalent begin to separate. The spindle shortens an additional 0.5 μm until the chromosomes are embedded in the spindle poles. Chromosomes then separate at the same velocity as the spindle poles in an anaphase B–like movement. We conclude that the majority of meiotic chromosome movement is caused by shortening of the spindle to bring poles in contact with the chromosomes, followed by separation of chromosome-bound poles by outward sliding. PMID:27335123

  6. Down's Syndrome and Leukemia: Mechanism of Additional Chromosomal Abnormalities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    And Others; Goh, Kong-oo

    1978-01-01

    Chromosomal abnormalities, some appearing in a stepwise clonal evoluation, were found in five Down's syndrome patients (35 weeks to 12 years old), four with acute leukemia and one with abnormal regulation of leukopoiesis. (Author/SBH)

  7. The role of centromere alignment in meiosis I segregation of homologous chromosomes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Guerra, C E; Kaback, D B

    1999-01-01

    During meiosis, homologous chromosomes pair and then segregate from each other at the first meiotic division. Homologous centromeres appear to be aligned when chromosomes are paired. The role of centromere alignment in meiotic chromosome segregation was investigated in Saccharomyces cerevisiae diploids that contained one intact copy of chromosome I and one copy bisected into two functional centromere-containing fragments. The centromere on one fragment was aligned with the centromere on the intact chromosome while the centromere on the other fragment was either aligned or misaligned. Fragments containing aligned centromeres segregated efficiently from the intact chromosome, while fragments containing misaligned centromeres segregated much less efficiently from the intact chromosome. Less efficient segregation was correlated with crossing over in the region between the misaligned centromeres. Models that suggest that these crossovers impede proper segregation by preventing either a segregation-promoting chromosome alignment on the meiotic spindle or some physical interaction between homologous centromeres are proposed. PMID:10581265

  8. Significance of abnormalities of chromosomes 5 and 8 in chondroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Swarts, S J; Neff, J R; Johansson, S L; Nelson, M; Bridge, J A

    1998-04-01

    Tumor specific chromosomal abnormalities have been identified in several histologic subtypes of benign and malignant bone tumors. These anomalies have proven to be useful diagnostically. Characterization of recurrent chromosomal abnormalities also has provided direction for molecular investigations of pathogenetically important genes. Cytogenetic reports of chondroblastoma, a rare benign bone tumor, are few. Cytogenetic analysis of a benign and a malignant chondroblastoma in this study revealed the following abnormal chromosomal complements: 47,XY,+5,t(5;5)(p10;q10) and 45, XY,del(2)(p23),del(3)(q23q27),dup(8)(q12q21.), del(11) (q14q23), -13, add (17) (q25) x 2, respectively. Although a specific chromosomal abnormality has not yet emerged for chondroblastoma, abnormalities of chromosomes 5 and 8 have been reported previously in this neoplasm, suggesting preferential involvement of these two chromosomes. PMID:9584382

  9. Emerging roles for centromeres in meiosis I chromosome segregation

    PubMed Central

    Brar, Gloria A.; Amon, Angelika

    2009-01-01

    Centromeres are an essential and conserved feature of eukaryotic chromosomes, yet recent research indicates that we are just beginning to understand the numerous roles that centromeres play in chromosome segregation. During meiosis I, in particular, centromeres appear to function in many processes in addition to their canonical role in assembling kinetochores, the sites of microtubule attachment. Here we summarize recent advances that place centromeres at the centre of meiosis I, and discuss how these studies impact a variety of basic research fields and thus hold promise for increasing our understanding of human reproductive defects and disease states. PMID:18981989

  10. Arabidopsis Cell Division Cycle 20.1 Is Required for Normal Meiotic Spindle Assembly and Chromosome Segregation[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Baixiao; Wang, Liudan; Ren, Ding; Ren, Ren

    2015-01-01

    Cell division requires proper spindle assembly; a surveillance pathway, the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC), monitors whether the spindle is normal and correctly attached to kinetochores. The SAC proteins regulate mitotic chromosome segregation by affecting CDC20 (Cell Division Cycle 20) function. However, it is unclear whether CDC20 regulates meiotic spindle assembly and proper homolog segregation. Here, we show that the Arabidopsis thaliana CDC20.1 gene is indispensable for meiosis and male fertility. We demonstrate that cdc20.1 meiotic chromosomes align asynchronously and segregate unequally and the metaphase I spindle has aberrant morphology. Comparison of the distribution of meiotic stages at different time points between the wild type and cdc20.1 reveals a delay of meiotic progression from diakinesis to anaphase I. Furthermore, cdc20.1 meiocytes exhibit an abnormal distribution of a histone H3 phosphorylation mark mediated by the Aurora kinase, providing evidence that CDC20.1 regulates Aurora localization for meiotic chromosome segregation. Further evidence that CDC20.1 and Aurora are functionally related was provided by meiosis-specific knockdown of At-Aurora1 expression, resulting in meiotic chromosome segregation defects similar to those of cdc20.1. Taken together, these results suggest a critical role for CDC20.1 in SAC-dependent meiotic chromosome segregation. PMID:26672070

  11. The multiple roles of Bub1 in chromosome segregation during mitosis and meiosis

    SciTech Connect

    Marchetti, Francesco; Venkatachalam, Sundaresan

    2009-06-19

    Aneuploidy, any deviation from an exact multiple of the haploid number of chromosomes, is a common occurrence in cancer and represents the most frequent chromosomal disorder in newborns. Eukaryotes have evolved mechanisms to assure the fidelity of chromosome segregation during cell division that include a multiplicity of checks and controls. One of the main cell division control mechanisms is the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) that monitors the proper attachment of chromosomes to spindle fibers and prevents anaphase until all kinetochores are properly attached. The mammalian SAC is composed by at least 14 evolutionary-conserved proteins that work in a coordinated fashion to monitor the establishment of amphitelic attachment of all chromosomes before allowing cell division to occur. Among the SAC proteins, the budding uninhibited by benzimidazole protein 1 (Bub1), is a highly conserved protein of prominent importance for the proper functioning of the SAC. Studies have revealed many roles for Bub1 in both mitosis and meiosis, including the localization of other SAC proteins to the kinetochore, SAC signaling, metaphase congression and the protection of the sister chromatid cohesion. Recent data show striking sex specific differences in the response to alterations in Bub1 activity. Proper Bub1 functioning is particularly important during oogenesis in preventing the generation of aneuploid gametes that can have detrimental effects on the health status of the fetus and the newborn. These data suggest that Bub1 is a master regulator of SAC and chromosomal segregation in both mitosis and meiosis. Elucidating its many essential functions in regulating proper chromosome segregation can have important consequences for preventing tumorigenesis and developmental abnormalities.

  12. Visualizing how cancer chromosome abnormalities form in living cells

    Cancer.gov

    For the first time, scientists have directly observed events that lead to the formation of a chromosome abnormality that is often found in cancer cells. The abnormality, called a translocation, occurs when part of a chromosome breaks off and becomes attac

  13. A Case of ADHD and a Major Y Chromosome Abnormality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulligan, Aisling; Gill, Michael; Fitzgerald, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Background: ADHD is a common, heritable disorder of childhood. Sex chromosome abnormalities are relatively rare conditions that are sometimes associated with behavioral disorders. Method: The authors present a male child with ADHD and a major de-novo Y chromosome abnormality consisting of deletion of the long arm and duplication of the short arm.…

  14. Neocentromeres Provide Chromosome Segregation Accuracy and Centromere Clustering to Multiple Loci along a Candida albicans Chromosome

    PubMed Central

    Burrack, Laura S.; Hutton, Hannah F.; Clancey, Shelly Applen; Plemmons, Alexandra E.; Saha, Amrita; Turman, Breanna; Berman, Judith

    2016-01-01

    Assembly of kinetochore complexes, involving greater than one hundred proteins, is essential for chromosome segregation and genome stability. Neocentromeres, or new centromeres, occur when kinetochores assemble de novo, at DNA loci not previously associated with kinetochore proteins, and they restore chromosome segregation to chromosomes lacking a functional centromere. Neocentromeres have been observed in a number of diseases and may play an evolutionary role in adaptation or speciation. However, the consequences of neocentromere formation on chromosome missegregation rates, gene expression, and three-dimensional (3D) nuclear structure are not well understood. Here, we used Candida albicans, an organism with small, epigenetically-inherited centromeres, as a model system to study the functions of twenty different neocentromere loci along a single chromosome, chromosome 5. Comparison of neocentromere properties relative to native centromere functions revealed that all twenty neocentromeres mediated chromosome segregation, albeit to different degrees. Some neocentromeres also caused reduced levels of transcription from genes found within the neocentromere region. Furthermore, like native centromeres, neocentromeres clustered in 3D with active/functional centromeres, indicating that formation of a new centromere mediates the reorganization of 3D nuclear architecture. This demonstrates that centromere clustering depends on epigenetically defined function and not on the primary DNA sequence, and that neocentromere function is independent of its distance from the native centromere position. Together, the results show that a neocentromere can form at many loci along a chromosome and can support the assembly of a functional kinetochore that exhibits native centromere functions including chromosome segregation accuracy and centromere clustering within the nucleus. PMID:27662467

  15. Tumor-Specific Chromosome Mis-Segregation Controls Cancer Plasticity by Maintaining Tumor Heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yuanjie; Ru, Ning; Xiao, Huasheng; Chaturbedi, Abhishek; Hoa, Neil T.; Tian, Xiao-Jun; Zhang, Hang; Ke, Chao; Yan, Fengrong; Nelson, Jodi; Li, Zhenzhi; Gramer, Robert; Yu, Liping; Siegel, Eric; Zhang, Xiaona; Jia, Zhenyu; Jadus, Martin R.; Limoli, Charles L.; Linskey, Mark E.; Xing, Jianhua; Zhou, Yi-Hong

    2013-01-01

    Aneuploidy with chromosome instability is a cancer hallmark. We studied chromosome 7 (Chr7) copy number variation (CNV) in gliomas and in primary cultures derived from them. We found tumor heterogeneity with cells having Chr7-CNV commonly occurs in gliomas, with a higher percentage of cells in high-grade gliomas carrying more than 2 copies of Chr7, as compared to low-grade gliomas. Interestingly, all Chr7-aneuploid cell types in the parental culture of established glioma cell lines reappeared in single-cell-derived subcultures. We then characterized the biology of three syngeneic glioma cultures dominated by different Chr7-aneuploid cell types. We found phenotypic divergence for cells following Chr7 mis-segregation, which benefited overall tumor growth in vitro and in vivo. Mathematical modeling suggested the involvement of chromosome instability and interactions among cell subpopulations in restoring the optimal equilibrium of tumor cell types. Both our experimental data and mathematical modeling demonstrated that the complexity of tumor heterogeneity could be enhanced by the existence of chromosomes with structural abnormality, in addition to their mis-segregations. Overall, our findings show, for the first time, the involvement of chromosome instability in maintaining tumor heterogeneity, which underlies the enhanced growth, persistence and treatment resistance of cancers. PMID:24282558

  16. Directly transmitted unbalanced chromosome abnormalities and euchromatic variants

    PubMed Central

    Barber, J

    2005-01-01

    In total, 200 families were reviewed with directly transmitted, cytogenetically visible unbalanced chromosome abnormalities (UBCAs) or euchromatic variants (EVs). Both the 130 UBCA and 70 EV families were divided into three groups depending on the presence or absence of an abnormal phenotype in parents and offspring. No detectable phenotypic effect was evident in 23/130 (18%) UBCA families ascertained mostly through prenatal diagnosis (group 1). In 30/130 (23%) families, the affected proband had the same UBCA as other phenotypically normal family members (group 2). In the remaining 77/130 (59%) families, UBCAs had consistently mild consequences (group 3). In the 70 families with established EVs of 8p23.1, 9p12, 9q12, 15q11.2, and 16p11.2, no phenotypic effect was apparent in 38/70 (54%). The same EV was found in affected probands and phenotypically normal family members in 30/70 families (43%) (group 2), and an EV co-segregated with mild phenotypic anomalies in only 2/70 (3%) families (group 3). Recent evidence indicates that EVs involve copy number variation of common paralogous gene and pseudogene sequences that are polymorphic in the normal population and only become visible at the cytogenetic level when copy number is high. The average size of the deletions and duplications in all three groups of UBCAs was close to 10 Mb, and these UBCAs and EVs form the "Chromosome Anomaly Collection" at http://www.ngrl.org.uk/Wessex/collection. The continuum of severity associated with UBCAs and the variability of the genome at the sub-cytogenetic level make further close collaboration between medical and laboratory staff essential to distinguish clinically silent variation from pathogenic rearrangement. PMID:16061560

  17. Proposed Physical Mechanism of Chromosome Segregation in Caulobacter crescentus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banigan, Edward; Gelbart, Michael; Gitai, Zemer; Liu, Andrea; Wingreen, Ned

    2010-03-01

    Chromosome segregation is a fundamental process for all cells, but the force-generating mechanisms that drive chromosome movements in bacteria are especially unclear. In Caulobacter crescentus, recent work has demonstrated that a structure made up of the ParA protein elongates from one cell pole and interacts with ParB, a protein binding to the chromosome near the origin of replication (ori). ParB disassembles ParA, causing ParA to pull ParB, and thus, the ori to the opposite end of the cell. We performed Brownian dynamics simulations of this system in order to uncover the physical mechanism of this motion. We find that motion of the ori is robust to several variations of the model as long as a steady-state concentration gradient of ParA is established in the moving frame of the ParB-decorated chromosome. We suggest that the mechanism is ``self-diffusiophoretic'': by disassembling ParA, ParB creates a concentration gradient of ParA so that the ParA concentration is higher in front of the chromosome than behind it. Since the chromosome is attracted to ParA via ParB, it moves up the gradient in the desired direction.

  18. Identification of crossbred buffalo genotypes and their chromosome segregation patterns.

    PubMed

    Harisah, M; Azmi, T I; Hilmi, M; Vidyadaran, M K; Bongso, T A; Nava, Z M; Momongan, V; Basrur, P K

    1989-12-01

    Chromosome analysis on different breed types of water buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis) was undertaken to identify their karyotypes and to determine the pattern of chromosome segregation in crossbred water buffaloes. Altogether, 75 purebred and 198 crossbred buffaloes including 118 from Malaysia and 80 from the Philippines, were analyzed in this study. The diploid chromosome number of the swamp buffalo from both countries was 48 and that of the river buffalo was 50, while all F1 hybrids exhibited 49 chromosomes. The F2 hybrids consisted of three different karyotype categories (2n = 48, 2n = 49, and 2n = 50), whereas the backcrosses included two different karyotype categories each, with 2n = 48 and 2n = 49 in the three quarters swamp types and 2n = 49 and 2n = 50 in the three quarters river types. Chi-square tests on pooled data from Malaysia and the Philippines indicated that the distribution of different karyotype categories of F2 animals did not deviate significantly from the 1:2:1 ratio expected if only balanced gametes with 24 and 25 chromosomes were produced by the F1 hybrids. In the three quarters swamp and three quarters river types, the respective karyotypic categories were in ratios approximating 1:1. The distribution of chromosome categories among the F2 hybrids and backcrosses suggests that only genetically balanced gametes of the F1 hybrids are capable of producing viable F2 and backcross generations.

  19. Misregulation of mitotic chromosome segregation in a new type of autosomal recessive primary microcephaly.

    PubMed

    Marchal, Juan Alberto; Ghani, Mahdi; Schindler, Detlev; Gavvovidis, Ioannis; Winkler, Tina; Esquitino, Veronique; Sternberg, Nadine; Busche, Andreas; Krawitz, Peter; Hecht, Joachim; Robinson, Peter; Mundlos, Stephan; Graul-Neumann, Luitgard; Sperling, Karl; Trimborn, Marc; Neitzel, Heidemarie

    2011-09-01

    Primary autosomal recessive microcephaly (MCPH) is a congenital disorder characterized by a pronounced reduction of brain size and mental retardation. We present here a consanguineous Turkish family clinically diagnosed with MCPH and without linkage to any of the known loci (MCPH1-MCPH7). Autozygosity mapping identified a homozygous region of 15.8 Mb on chromosome 10q11.23-21.3, most likely representing a new locus for MCPH. Although we were unable to identify the underlying genetic defect after extensive molecular screening, we could delineate a possible molecular function in chromosome segregation by the characterization of mitosis in the patients' cells. Analyses of chromosome nondisjunction in T-lymphocytes and fibroblasts revealed a significantly elevated rate of nondisjunction in the patients' cells as compared to controls. Mitotic progression was further explored by immunofluorescence analyses of several chromosome and spindle associated proteins. We detected a remarkable alteration in the anaphase distribution of Aurora B and INCENP, which are key regulators of chromosome segregation. In particular, a fraction of both proteins remained abnormally loaded on chromosomes during anaphase in MCPH patients' cells while in cells of normal control subjects both proteins are completely transferred to the spindle midzone. We did not observe any other alterations regarding cell cycle progression, chromosome structure, or response to DNA damage. Our observations point towards a molecular role of the underlying gene product in the regulation of anaphase/telophase progression possibly through interaction with chromosomal passenger proteins. In addition, our findings represent further evidence for the proposed role of MCPH genes in the regulation of mitotic progression.

  20. Psychiatric syndromes in individuals with chromosome 18 abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Zavala, Juan; Ramirez, Mercedes; Medina, Rolando; Heard, Patricia; Carter, Erika; Crandall, AnaLisa; Hale, Daniel; Cody, Jannine; Escamilla, Michael

    2010-04-01

    Chromosome 18 abnormalities are associated with a range of physical abnormalities such as short stature and hearing impairments. Psychiatric manifestations have also been observed. This study focuses on the presentations of psychiatric syndromes as they relate to specific chromosomal abnormalities of chromosome 18. Twenty-five subjects (13 with an 18q deletion, 9 with 18p tetrasomy, and 3 with an 18p deletion), were interviewed by psychiatrists (blind to specific chromosomal abnormality) using the DIGS (subjects 18 and older) or KSADS-PL (subjects under 18). A consensus best estimation diagnostic process was employed to determine psychiatric syndromes. Oligonucleotide Array Comparative Genomic Hybridization (Agilent Technologies) was utilized to define specific regions of chromosome 18 that were deleted or duplicated. These data were further analyzed to determine critical regions of the chromosome as they relate to phenotypic manifestations in these subjects. 58.3% of the chromosome 18q- deletion subjects had depressive symptoms, 58.3% had anxiety symptoms, 25% had manic symptoms, and 25% had psychotic symptoms. 66.6% of the chromosome 18p- deletion subjects had anxiety symptoms, and none had depressive, manic, or psychotic symptoms. Fifty percent of the chromosome 18p tetrasomy subjects had anxiety symptoms, 12.5% had psychotic symptoms, and 12.5% had a mood disorder. All three chromosomal disorders were associated with high anxiety rates. Psychotic, manic and depressive disorders were seen mostly in 18q- subjects and this may be helpful in narrowing regions for candidate genes for these psychiatric conditions. PMID:19927307

  1. Back to the roots: segregation of univalent sex chromosomes in meiosis.

    PubMed

    Fabig, Gunar; Müller-Reichert, Thomas; Paliulis, Leocadia V

    2016-06-01

    In males of many taxa, univalent sex chromosomes normally segregate during the first meiotic division, and analysis of sex chromosome segregation was foundational for the chromosome theory of inheritance. Correct segregation of single or multiple univalent sex chromosomes occurs in a cellular environment where every other chromosome is a bivalent that is being partitioned into homologous chromosomes at anaphase I. The mechanics of univalent chromosome segregation vary among animal taxa. In some, univalents establish syntelic attachment of sister kinetochores to the spindle. In others, amphitelic attachment is established. Here, we review how this problem of segregation of unpaired chromosomes is solved in different animal systems. In addition, we give a short outlook of how mechanistic insights into this process could be gained by explicitly studying model organisms, such as Caenorhabditis elegans.

  2. Testicular microlithiasis in two boys with a chromosomal abnormality.

    PubMed

    Goede, Joery; Hack, W W M; Pierik, F H

    2012-04-01

    A nine and 13-year-old boy, previously diagnosed with 18q syndrome and an 11q deletion, respectively were diagnosed with testicular microlithiasis (TM). Both cases demonstrate that TM occurs in patients with various chromosomal abnormalities.

  3. Detection of chromosomal abnormalities in human sperm

    SciTech Connect

    Brandriff, B.; Gordon, L.; Ashworth, A.K.; Watchmaker, G.; Carrano, A.V.

    1985-06-19

    A new technology developed by Rudak, et al. for examining the chromosomal constitution of human sperm through fusion with eggs from the Syrian hamster was used to obtain baseline data on the types and frequencies of aberrations in sperm of normal men. The frequency of structural aberrations in 2724 sperm chromosome karyotypes from the 13 healthy non-exposed donors ranged from 2 to 15.8%, demonstrating significant interindividual variability. The most frequently occurring aberrations were chromosome breaks, followed by acentric fragments, chromatid exchanges, chromatid breaks, dicentrics and translocations, chromosome deletions and duplications, inversions, and chromatid deletions. Two donors previously reported had one cell each with multiple chromatid exchanges and breaks. In addition, the oldest donor, AA, had 5 cells out of 124 examined with multiple breaks and rearrangements too extensive to completely identify. 17 refs., 2 tabs.

  4. Chromosome abnormality incidence in fetuses with cerebral ventriculomegaly.

    PubMed

    Gezer, C; Ekin, A; Ozeren, M; Taner, C E; Ozer, O; Koc, A; Bilgin, M; Gezer, N S

    2014-07-01

    Ventriculomegaly (VM) is a marker of aneuploidy and warrants a detailed examination of fetal anatomy. Chromosomal abnormalities worsen the fetal and neonatal prognosis significantly and karyotyping of fetuses is critically important when accompanying anomalies are detected. Here, we report the genetic results of 140 fetuses with isolated and non-isolated VM detected during a second trimester ultrasound examination followed by invasive in utero diagnostic procedures for karyotyping. VM was diagnosed in seven (5%) fetuses with abnormal karyotype and the chromosomal abnormality incidence was higher in severe VM (6.8%) than mild (4.2%). Higher chromosomal abnormality rates were detected when VM was isolated (8.6%), rather than associated with any anomaly (3.8%). These results suggest that karyotype analysis should be offered to all patients with any degree of VM, regardless of its association with structural anomalies.

  5. Genomic imprinting as a probable explanation for variable intrafamilial phenotypic expression of an unusual chromosome 3 abnormality

    SciTech Connect

    Fryburg, J.S.; Shashi, V.; Kelly, T.E.

    1994-09-01

    We present a 4 generation family in which an abnormal chromosome 3 with dup(3)(q25) segregated from great-grandmother to grandmother to son without phenotypic effect. The son`s 2 daughters have dysmorphic features, mild developmental delays and congenital heart disease. Both girls have the abnormal chr. 3 but are the only family members with the abnormality to have phenotypic effects. An unaffected son of the father has normal chromosomes. FISH with whole chromosome paints for chromosomes 1, 2, 6, 7, 8, 14, 18, and 22 excluded these as the origin of the extra material. Chromosome 3-specific paint revealed a uniform pattern, suggesting that the extra material is from chromosome 3. Comparative genomic hybridization and DNA studies are pending. Possible explanations for the discordance in phenotypes between the 4th generation offspring and the first 3 generations include: an undetected rearrangement in the previous generations that is unbalanced in the two affected individuals; the chromosome abnormality may be a benign variant and unrelated to the phenotype; or, most likely, genomic imprinting. Genomic imprinting is suggested by the observation that a phenotypic effect was only seen after the chromosome was inherited from the father. The mothers in the first two generations appear to have passed the abnormal chr. 3 on without effect. This is an opportunity to delineate a region of the human genome affected by paternal imprinting.

  6. Replication initiator DnaA binds at the Caulobacter centromere and enables chromosome segregation

    PubMed Central

    Mera, Paola E.; Kalogeraki, Virginia S.; Shapiro, Lucy

    2014-01-01

    During cell division, multiple processes are highly coordinated to faithfully generate genetically equivalent daughter cells. In bacteria, the mechanisms that underlie the coordination of chromosome replication and segregation are poorly understood. Here, we report that the conserved replication initiator, DnaA, can mediate chromosome segregation independent of replication initiation. It does so by binding directly to the parS centromere region of the chromosome, and mutations that alter this interaction result in cells that display aberrant centromere translocation and cell division. We propose that DnaA serves to coordinate bacterial DNA replication with the onset of chromosome segregation. PMID:25349407

  7. Species-specific heterochromatin prevents mitotic chromosome segregation to cause hybrid lethality in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Ferree, Patrick M; Barbash, Daniel A

    2009-10-01

    Postzygotic reproductive barriers such as sterility and lethality of hybrids are important for establishing and maintaining reproductive isolation between species. Identifying the causal loci and discerning how they interfere with the development of hybrids is essential for understanding how hybrid incompatibilities (HIs) evolve, but little is known about the mechanisms of how HI genes cause hybrid dysfunctions. A previously discovered Drosophila melanogaster locus called Zhr causes lethality in F1 daughters from crosses between Drosophila simulans females and D. melanogaster males. Zhr maps to a heterochromatic region of the D. melanogaster X that contains 359-bp satellite repeats, suggesting either that Zhr is a rare protein-coding gene embedded within heterochromatin, or is a locus consisting of the noncoding repetitive DNA that forms heterochromatin. The latter possibility raises the question of how heterochromatic DNA can induce lethality in hybrids. Here we show that hybrid females die because of widespread mitotic defects induced by lagging chromatin at the time during early embryogenesis when heterochromatin is first established. The lagging chromatin is confined solely to the paternally inherited D. melanogaster X chromatids, and consists predominantly of DNA from the 359-bp satellite block. We further found that a rearranged X chromosome carrying a deletion of the entire 359-bp satellite block segregated normally, while a translocation of the 359-bp satellite block to the Y chromosome resulted in defective Y segregation in males, strongly suggesting that the 359-bp satellite block specifically and directly inhibits chromatid separation. In hybrids produced from wild-type parents, the 359-bp satellite block was highly stretched and abnormally enriched with Topoisomerase II throughout mitosis. The 359-bp satellite block is not present in D. simulans, suggesting that lethality is caused by the absence or divergence of factors in the D. simulans maternal

  8. Variation in Y chromosome segregation in natural populations of Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, A.G.

    1987-01-01

    Functional variation among Y chromosomes in natural populations of Drosophila melanogaster was assayed by a segregation study. A total of 36 Y chromosomes was extracted and ten generations of replacement backcrossing yielded stocks with Y chromosomes in two different genetic backgrounds. Eleven of the Y chromosomes were from diverse geographic origins, and the remaining 25 were from locally captured flies. Segregation of sexes in adult offspring was scored for the four possible crosses among the two backgrounds with each Y chromosome. Although the design confounds meiotic drive and effects on viability, statistical partitioning of these effects reveals significant variation among lines in Y chromosome segregation. Results are discussed in regards to models of Y-linked segregation and viability effects, which suggest that Y-linked adaptive polymorphism is unlikely.

  9. Molecular cytogenetic studies in structural abnormalities of chromosome 13

    SciTech Connect

    Lozzio, C.B.; Bamberger, E.; Anderson, I.

    1994-09-01

    A partial trisomy 13 was detected prenatally in an amniocentesis performed due to the following ultrasound abnormalities: open sacral neural tube defect (NTD), a flattened cerebellum, and lumbar/thoracic hemivertebrae. Elevated AFP and positive acetylcholinesterase in amniotic fluid confirmed the open NTD. Chromosome analysis showed an extra acrocentric chromosome marker. FISH analysis with the painting probe 13 showed that most of the marker was derived from this chromosome. Chromosomes on the parents revealed that the mother had a balanced reciprocal translocation t(2;13)(q23;q21). Dual labeling with painting chromosomes 2 and 13 on cells from the mother and from the amniotic fluid identified the marker as a der(13)t(2;13)(p23;q21). Thus, the fetus had a partial trisomy 13 and a small partial trisomy 2p. The maternal grandfather was found to be a carrier for this translocation. Fetal demise occurred a 29 weeks of gestation. The fetus had open lumbar NTD and showed dysmorphic features, overlapping fingers and imperforate anus. This woman had a subsequent pregnancy and chorionic villi sample showed that this fetus was normal. Another case with an abnormal chromosome 13 was a newborn with partial monosomy 13 due to the presence of a ring chromosome 13. This infant had severe intrauterine growth retardation, oligohydramnios, dysmorphic features and multiple congenital microphthalmia, congenital heart disease, absent thumbs and toes and cervical vertebral anomalies. Chromosome studies in blood and skin fibroblast cultures showed that one chromosome 3 was replaced by a ring chromosome of various sizes. This ring was confirmed to be derived from chromosome 13 using the centromeric 21/13 probe.

  10. Detection of cryptic chromosomal abnormalities in unexplained mental retardation: a general strategy using hypervariable subtelomeric DNA polymorphisms.

    PubMed Central

    Wilkie, A O

    1993-01-01

    Given the availability of DNA from both parents, unusual segregation of hypervariable DNA polymorphisms (HVPs) in the offspring may be attributable to deletion, unbalanced chromosomal translocation, or uniparental disomy. The telomeric regions of chromosomes are rich in both genes and hypervariable minisatellite sequences and may also be particularly prone to cryptic breakage events. Here I describe and analyze a general approach to the detection of subtelomeric abnormalities and uniparental disomy in patients with unexplained mental retardation. With 29 available polymorphic systems, approximately 50%-70% of these abnormalities could currently be detected. Development of subtelomeric HVPs physically localized with respect to their telomeres should provide a valuable resource in routine diagnostics. PMID:8352277

  11. Physical Model of Segregation of E.coli Chromosomes using Molecular Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alnahhas, Faisal; Kharel, Savan

    2016-03-01

    Chromosome segregation is one of the most interesting physical processes during a bacterial cell cycle. We will use molecular dynamics simulations which will help us understand how strongly confined polymer segregates. In the presentation, we will discuss how segregation of initially overlapping circular chromosome occurs during a cell cycle. In particular, we will describe the role played by entropic mechanism in the demixing of overlapping circular polymer confined in a cylindrical boundary. We discuss how our polymer chains modeled as an E-coli chromosome experiences an effective repulsion, which ultimately leads to partition driven by the entropic forces. Also, we will also discuss how the segregation of circular chromosome in cylindrical confinement differs from a spherical confinement. Finally, we will discuss the role played by proteins and supercoiling in during the segregation process.

  12. "Idiopathic" mental retardation and new chromosomal abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Mental retardation is a heterogeneous condition, affecting 1-3% of general population. In the last few years, several emerging clinical entities have been described, due to the advent of newest genetic techniques, such as array Comparative Genomic Hybridization. The detection of cryptic microdeletion/microduplication abnormalities has allowed genotype-phenotype correlations, delineating recognizable syndromic conditions that are herein reviewed. With the aim to provide to Paediatricians a combined clinical and genetic approach to the child with cognitive impairment, a practical diagnostic algorithm is also illustrated. The use of microarray platforms has further reduced the percentage of "idiopathic" forms of mental retardation, previously accounted for about half of total cases. We discussed the putative pathways at the basis of remaining "pure idiopathic" forms of mental retardation, highlighting possible environmental and epigenetic mechanisms as causes of altered cognition. PMID:20152051

  13. Chromosomal abnormalities are associated with aging and cancer

    Cancer.gov

    Two new studies have found that large structural abnormalities in chromosomes, some of which have been associated with increased risk of cancer, can be detected in a small fraction of people without a prior history of cancer. The studies found that these

  14. Cognitive and Academic Skills in Children with Sex Chromosome Abnormalities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bender, Bruce G.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Follows 46 unselected children with various sex chromosome abnormalities using intellectual, language, and achievement testing. Notes that, although most children were not mentally retarded, most received special education help. Finds support for the inference that learning disorders were genetically mediated in this group. (RS)

  15. Paternal Age and Numerical Chromosome Abnormalities in Human Spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Donate, Anna; Estop, Anna M; Giraldo, Jesús; Templado, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    This study explores the relationship between numerical chromosome abnormalities in sperm and age in healthy men. We performed FISH in the spermatozoa of 10 donors from the general population: 5 men younger than 40 years of age and 5 fertile men older than 60 years of age. For each chromosome, 1,000 sperm nuclei were analyzed, with a total of 15,000 sperm nuclei for each donor. We used a single sperm sample per donor, thus minimizing intra-donor variability and optimizing consistent analysis. FISH with a TelVysion assay, which provides data on aneuploidy of 19 chromosomes, was used in order to gain a more genome-wide perspective of the level of aneuploidy. Aneuploidy and diploidy rates observed in the younger and older groups were compared. There were no significant differences in the incidence of autosomal disomy, sex chromosome disomy, total chromosome disomy, diploidy, nor total numerical abnormalities between younger and older men. This work confirms that aneuploidy of the sex chromosomes is more common than that of autosomes and that this does not change with age. Our results suggest that some probe combinations have a tendency to indicate higher levels of diploidy, thus potentially affecting FISH results and highlighting the limitations of FISH. PMID:27322585

  16. Mechanisms and consequences of paternally transmitted chromosomal abnormalities

    SciTech Connect

    Marchetti, F; Wyrobek, A J

    2005-04-05

    Paternally transmitted chromosomal damage has been associated with pregnancy loss, developmental and morphological defects, infant mortality, infertility, and genetic diseases in the offspring including cancer. There is epidemiological evidence linking paternal exposure to occupational or environmental agents with an increased risk of abnormal reproductive outcomes. There is also a large body of literature on germ cell mutagenesis in rodents showing that treatment of male germ cells with mutagens has dramatic consequences on reproduction producing effects such as those observed in human epidemiological studies. However, we know very little about the etiology, transmission and early embryonic consequences of paternally-derived chromosomal abnormalities. The available evidence suggests that: (1) there are distinct patterns of germ cell-stage differences in the sensitivity of induction of transmissible genetic damage with male postmeiotic cells being the most sensitive; (2) cytogenetic abnormalities at first metaphase after fertilization are critical intermediates between paternal exposure and abnormal reproductive outcomes; and, (3) there are maternally susceptibility factors that may have profound effects on the amount of sperm DNA damage that is converted into chromosomal aberrations in the zygote and directly affect the risk for abnormal reproductive outcomes.

  17. [Consequences of abnormalities of chromosome structure in domestic animals].

    PubMed

    Popescu, C P

    1990-01-01

    Abnormalities in chromosome structure generally have no phenotypic expression but are very often associated with reproductive disorders. In cattle, sheep and goats, the robertsonian translocation seems to be the most frequent abnormality of chromosome structure. In the pig, reciprocal translocations are very common. The accumulation of data on the frequency of such abnormalities and their effects on reproductive performance prompted an evaluation of their economic consequences in cattle and pigs. In cattle, because of the negative effect of 1/29 translocation, an eradication program, based on the removal of carrier bulls from artificial insemination centers was established. In pig, the main effect of the reciprocal translocations was a reduction in the number of offspring, up to 50%, thus representing a considerable economic loss. PMID:2206288

  18. Multiple congenital abnormalities in a newborn with two supernumerary marker chromosomes derived from chromosome 14.

    PubMed

    Faas, B H W; Van Der Deure, J; Wunderink, M I; Merkx, G; Brunner, H G

    2006-01-01

    Pure partial duplication or triplication of the proximal part of chromosome 14 has been reported in only 4 patients. Other individuals with a duplication or triplication of this region have additional chromosome imbalances. We present a new case with a supernumerary marker chromosome in all blood cells and in 35% of the cells an additional smaller marker chromosome. Both markers appeared to be derived from chromosome 14 (del(14)(q21.2) in all cells and del(14)(q11.2) in 35% of the cells). This results in a partial duplication of the proximal region of chromosome 14, combined with a mosaic partial triplication of a smaller segment of the same region. In this paper, we compare the clinical features of this case to those of cases from the literature. Although most of the patients from literature were unbalanced translocation carriers, their clinical features were comparable, except from renal abnormalities.

  19. Dbl2 Regulates Rad51 and DNA Joint Molecule Metabolism to Ensure Proper Meiotic Chromosome Segregation

    PubMed Central

    Hyppa, Randy W.; Benko, Zsigmond; Misova, Ivana; Schleiffer, Alexander; Smith, Gerald R.; Gregan, Juraj

    2016-01-01

    To identify new proteins required for faithful meiotic chromosome segregation, we screened a Schizosaccharomyces pombe deletion mutant library and found that deletion of the dbl2 gene led to missegregation of chromosomes during meiosis. Analyses of both live and fixed cells showed that dbl2Δ mutant cells frequently failed to segregate homologous chromosomes to opposite poles during meiosis I. Removing Rec12 (Spo11 homolog) to eliminate meiotic DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) suppressed the segregation defect in dbl2Δ cells, indicating that Dbl2 acts after the initiation of meiotic recombination. Analyses of DSBs and Holliday junctions revealed no significant defect in their formation or processing in dbl2Δ mutant cells, although some Rec12-dependent DNA joint molecules persisted late in meiosis. Failure to segregate chromosomes in the absence of Dbl2 correlated with persistent Rad51 foci, and deletion of rad51 or genes encoding Rad51 mediators also suppressed the segregation defect of dbl2Δ. Formation of foci of Fbh1, an F-box helicase that efficiently dismantles Rad51-DNA filaments, was impaired in dbl2Δ cells. Our results suggest that Dbl2 is a novel regulator of Fbh1 and thereby Rad51-dependent DSB repair required for proper meiotic chromosome segregation and viable sex cell formation. The wide conservation of these proteins suggests that our results apply to many species. PMID:27304859

  20. Cytomixis and meiotic abnormalities during microsporogenesis are responsible for male sterility and chromosome variations in Houttuynia cordata.

    PubMed

    Guan, J-Z; Wang, J-J; Cheng, Z-H; Liu, Y; Li, Z-Y

    2012-01-01

    Houttuynia cordata (Saururaceae) is a leaf vegetable and a medicinal herb througout much of Asia. Cytomixis and meiotic abnormalities during microsporogenesis were found in two populations of H. cordata with different ploidy levels (2n = 38, 96). Cytomixis occurred in pollen mother cells during meiosis at high frequencies and with variable degrees of chromatin/chromosome transfer. Meiotic abnormalities, such as chromosome laggards, asymmetric segregation and polyads, also prevailed in pollen mother cells at metaphase of the first division and later stages. They were caused by cytomixis and resulted in very low pollen viability and male sterility. Pollen mother cells from the population with 2n = 38 showed only simultaneous cytokinesis, but most pollen mother cells from the population with 2n = 96 showed successive cytokinesis; a minority underwent simultaneous cytokinesis. Cytomixis and irregular meiotic divisions appear to be the origin of the intraspecific polyploidy in this species, which has large variations in chromosome numbers. PMID:22290472

  1. Physical modeling of chromosome segregation in escherichia coli reveals impact of force and DNA relaxation.

    PubMed

    Lampo, Thomas J; Kuwada, Nathan J; Wiggins, Paul A; Spakowitz, Andrew J

    2015-01-01

    The physical mechanism by which Escherichia coli segregates copies of its chromosome for partitioning into daughter cells is unknown, partly due to the difficulty in interpreting the complex dynamic behavior during segregation. Analysis of previous chromosome segregation measurements in E. coli demonstrates that the origin of replication exhibits processive motion with a mean displacement that scales as t(0.32). In this work, we develop a model for segregation of chromosomal DNA as a Rouse polymer in a viscoelastic medium with a force applied to a single monomer. Our model demonstrates that the observed power-law scaling of the mean displacement and the behavior of the velocity autocorrelation function is captured by accounting for the relaxation of the polymer chain and the viscoelastic environment. We show that the ratio of the mean displacement to the variance of the displacement during segregation events is a critical metric that eliminates the compounding effects of polymer and medium dynamics and provides the segregation force. We calculate the force of oriC segregation in E. coli to be ∼0.49 pN.

  2. Nuclear envelope expansion is crucial for proper chromosomal segregation during a closed mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Takemoto, Ai; Kawashima, Shigehiro A.; Li, Juan-Juan; Jeffery, Linda; Yamatsugu, Kenzo; Elemento, Olivier; Nurse, Paul

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Here, we screened a 10,371 library of diverse molecules using a drug-sensitive fission yeast strain to identify compounds which cause defects in chromosome segregation during mitosis. We identified a phosphorium-ylide-based compound Cutin-1 which inhibits nuclear envelope expansion and nuclear elongation during the closed mitosis of fission yeast, and showed that its target is the β-subunit of fatty acid synthase. A point mutation in the dehydratase domain of Fas1 conferred in vivo and in vitro resistance to Cutin-1. Time-lapse photomicrography showed that the bulk of the chromosomes were only transiently separated during mitosis, and nucleoli separation was defective. Subsequently sister chromatids re-associated leading to chromosomal mis-segregation. These segregation defects were reduced when the nuclear volume was increased and were increased when the nuclear volume was reduced. We propose that there needs to be sufficient nuclear volume to allow the nuclear elongation necessary during a closed mitosis to take place for proper chromosome segregation, and that inhibition of fatty acid synthase compromises nuclear elongation and leads to defects in chromosomal segregation. PMID:26869222

  3. Nuclear envelope expansion is crucial for proper chromosomal segregation during a closed mitosis.

    PubMed

    Takemoto, Ai; Kawashima, Shigehiro A; Li, Juan-Juan; Jeffery, Linda; Yamatsugu, Kenzo; Elemento, Olivier; Nurse, Paul

    2016-03-15

    Here, we screened a 10,371 library of diverse molecules using a drug-sensitive fission yeast strain to identify compounds which cause defects in chromosome segregation during mitosis. We identified a phosphorium-ylide-based compound Cutin-1 which inhibits nuclear envelope expansion and nuclear elongation during the closed mitosis of fission yeast, and showed that its target is the β-subunit of fatty acid synthase. A point mutation in the dehydratase domain of Fas1 conferred in vivo and in vitro resistance to Cutin-1. Time-lapse photomicrography showed that the bulk of the chromosomes were only transiently separated during mitosis, and nucleoli separation was defective. Subsequently sister chromatids re-associated leading to chromosomal mis-segregation. These segregation defects were reduced when the nuclear volume was increased and were increased when the nuclear volume was reduced. We propose that there needs to be sufficient nuclear volume to allow the nuclear elongation necessary during a closed mitosis to take place for proper chromosome segregation, and that inhibition of fatty acid synthase compromises nuclear elongation and leads to defects in chromosomal segregation.

  4. ETOPOSIDE INDUCES CHROMOSOMAL ABNORMALITIES IN SPERMATOCYTES AND SPERMATOGONIAL STEM CELLS

    SciTech Connect

    Marchetti, F; Pearson, F S; Bishop, J B; Wyrobek, A J

    2005-07-15

    Etoposide (ET) is a chemotherapeutic agent widely used in the treatment of leukemia, lymphomas and many solid tumors, such as testicular and ovarian cancers, that affect patients in their reproductive years. The purpose of the study was to use sperm FISH analyses to characterize the long-term effects of ET on male germ cells. We used a mouse model to characterize the induction of chromosomal aberrations (partial duplications and deletions) and whole chromosomal aneuploidies in sperm of mice treated with a clinical dose of ET. Semen samples were collected at 25 and 49 days after dosing to investigate the effects of ET on meiotic pachytene cells and spermatogonial stem-cells, respectively. ET treatment resulted in major increases in the frequencies of sperm carrying chromosomal aberrations in both meiotic pachytene (27- to 578-fold) and spermatogonial stem-cells (8- to 16-fold), but aneuploid sperm were induced only after treatment of meiotic cells (27-fold) with no persistent effects in stem cells. These results demonstrate that male meiotic germ cells are considerably more sensitive to ET than spermatogonial stem-cell and that increased frequencies of sperm with structural aberrations persist after spermatogonial stem-cell treatment. These findings predict that patients who undergo chemotherapy with ET may have transient elevations in the frequencies of aneuploid sperm, but more importantly, may have persistent elevations in the frequencies of sperm with chromosomal aberrations, placing them at higher risk for abnormal reproductive outcomes long after the end of their chemotherapy.

  5. Diagnosis of four chromosome abnormalities of unknown origin by chromosome microdissection and subsequent reverse and forward painting

    SciTech Connect

    Coelho, K.E.F.A. de; Egashira, M.; Kato, R.

    1996-06-14

    A molecular cytogenetic method consisting of chromosome microdissection and subsequent reverse/forward chromosome painting is a powerful tool to identify chromosome abnormalities of unknown origin. We present 4 cases of chromosome structural abnormalities whose origins were ascertained by this method. In one MCA/MR patient with an add(5q)chromosome, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), using probes generated from a microdissected additional segment of the add(5q) chromosome and then from a distal region of normal chromosome 5, confirmed that the patient had a tandem duplication for a 5q35-qter segment. Similarly, we ascertained that an additional segment of an add(3p) chromosome in another MCA/MR patient had been derived from a 7q32-qter segment. In a woman with a history of successive spontaneous abortions and with a minute marker chromosome, painting using microdissected probes from the whole marker chromosome revealed that it was i(15)(p10) or psu dic(15;15)(q11;q11). Likewise, a marker observed in a fetus was a ring chromosome derived from the paracentromeric region of chromosome 19. We emphasize the value of the microdissection-based chromosome painting method in the identification of unknown chromosomes, especially for marker chromosomes. The method may contribute to a collection of data among patients with similar or identical chromosome abnormalities, which may lead to a better clinical syndrome delineation. 15 refs., 2 figs.

  6. Different chromosome Y abnormalities in a case with short stature

    PubMed Central

    Balkan, Mahmut; Fidanboy, Mehmet; Özbek, M. Nuri; Alp, M. Nail; Budak, Turgay

    2012-01-01

    We report a case with different chromosome Y abnormalities. Case was an 11-year-old boy, who was diagnosed with short stature, referred to laboratory of human medical genetics laboratory for genetic evaluation. Chromosomal analysis of the case was carried out on peripheral blood lymphocyte culture. Classic cytogenetic analysis (G and C banding) was confirmed by using fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis (FISH) technique. Cytogenetic and FISH analysis showed a mosaic 46,X,i(Yq)/45,X/47,X,i(Yq)x2/47,XYY karyotype. Case, which was found interesting due to its rarity, is discussed with its clinical features and cytogenetic results, in the light of relevant source information. This case underlines the importance of karyotyping patients with unexplained short stature. This clinical report also will be helpful in defining the phenotypic range associated with these karyotypes.

  7. Different chromosome Y abnormalities in a case with short stature.

    PubMed

    Balkan, Mahmut; Fidanboy, Mehmet; Özbek, M Nuri; Alp, M Nail; Budak, Turgay

    2012-12-01

    We report a case with different chromosome Y abnormalities. Case was an 11-year-old boy, who was diagnosed with short stature, referred to laboratory of human medical genetics laboratory for genetic evaluation. Chromosomal analysis of the case was carried out on peripheral blood lymphocyte culture. Classic cytogenetic analysis (G and C banding) was confirmed by using fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis (FISH) technique. Cytogenetic and FISH analysis showed a mosaic 46,X,i(Yq)/45,X/47,X,i(Yq)x2/47,XYY karyotype. Case, which was found interesting due to its rarity, is discussed with its clinical features and cytogenetic results, in the light of relevant source information. This case underlines the importance of karyotyping patients with unexplained short stature. This clinical report also will be helpful in defining the phenotypic range associated with these karyotypes. PMID:27625830

  8. Prevalence of chromosomal abnormalities and Y chromosome microdeletion among men with severe semen abnormalities and its correlation with successful sperm retrieval

    PubMed Central

    Mascarenhas, Mariano; Thomas, Sumi; Kamath, Mohan S.; Ramalingam, Ramya; Kongari, Ann Marie; Yuvarani, S; Srivastava, Vivi M.; George, Korula

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To estimate the prevalence of chromosomal abnormalities and Y chromosome microdeletion among men with azoospermia and severe oligozoospermia and its correlation with successful surgical sperm retrieval. SETTING AND DESIGN: A prospective study in a tertiary level infertility unit. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In a prospective observation study, men with azoospermia and severe oligozoospermia (concentration <5 million/ml) attending the infertility center underwent genetic screening. Peripheral blood karyotype was done by Giemsa banding. Y chromosome microdeletion study was performed by a multiplex polymerase chain reaction. RESULTS: The study group consisted of 220 men, 133 of whom had azoospermia and 87 had severe oligozoospermia. Overall, 21/220 (9.5%) men had chromosomal abnormalities and 13/220 (5.9%) men had Y chromosome microdeletions. Chromosomal abnormalities were seen in 14.3% (19/133) of azoospermic men and Y chromosome microdeletions in 8.3% (11/133). Of the 87 men with severe oligozoospermia, chromosomal abnormalities and Y chromosome microdeletions were each seen in 2.3% (2/87). Testicular sperm aspiration was done in 13 men and was successful in only one, who had a deletion of azoospermia factor c. CONCLUSIONS: Our study found a fairly high prevalence of genetic abnormality in men with severe semen abnormalities and a correlation of genetic abnormalities with surgical sperm retrieval outcomes. These findings support the need for genetic screening of these men prior to embarking on surgical sperm retrieval and assisted reproductive technology intracytoplasmic sperm injection. PMID:27803587

  9. Chromosome mis-segregation and cytokinesis failure in trisomic human cells

    PubMed Central

    Nicholson, Joshua M; Macedo, Joana C; Mattingly, Aaron J; Wangsa, Darawalee; Camps, Jordi; Lima, Vera; Gomes, Ana M; Dória, Sofia; Ried, Thomas; Logarinho, Elsa; Cimini, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cells display aneuploid karyotypes and typically mis-segregate chromosomes at high rates, a phenotype referred to as chromosomal instability (CIN). To test the effects of aneuploidy on chromosome segregation and other mitotic phenotypes we used the colorectal cancer cell line DLD1 (2n = 46) and two variants with trisomy 7 or 13 (DLD1+7 and DLD1+13), as well as euploid and trisomy 13 amniocytes (AF and AF+13). We found that trisomic cells displayed higher rates of chromosome mis-segregation compared to their euploid counterparts. Furthermore, cells with trisomy 13 displayed a distinctive cytokinesis failure phenotype. We showed that up-regulation of SPG20 expression, brought about by trisomy 13 in DLD1+13 and AF+13 cells, is sufficient for the cytokinesis failure phenotype. Overall, our study shows that aneuploidy can induce chromosome mis-segregation. Moreover, we identified a trisomy 13-specific mitotic phenotype that is driven by up-regulation of a gene encoded on the aneuploid chromosome. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.05068.001 PMID:25942454

  10. The negatively charged carboxy-terminal tail of β-tubulin promotes proper chromosome segregation

    PubMed Central

    Fees, Colby P.; Aiken, Jayne; O’Toole, Eileen T.; Giddings, Thomas H.; Moore, Jeffrey K.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the broadly conserved role of microtubules in chromosome segregation, we have a limited understanding of how molecular features of tubulin proteins contribute to the underlying mechanisms. Here we investigate the negatively charged carboxy-terminal tail domains (CTTs) of α- and β-tubulins, using a series of mutants that alter or ablate CTTs in budding yeast. We find that ablating β-CTT causes elevated rates of chromosome loss and cell cycle delay. Complementary live-cell imaging and electron tomography show that β-CTT is necessary to properly position kinetochores and organize microtubules within the assembling spindle. We identify a minimal region of negatively charged amino acids that is necessary and sufficient for proper chromosome segregation and provide evidence that this function may be conserved across species. Our results provide the first in vivo evidence of a specific role for tubulin CTTs in chromosome segregation. We propose that β-CTT promotes the ordered segregation of chromosomes by stabilizing the spindle and contributing to forces that move chromosomes toward the spindle poles. PMID:27053662

  11. Chromosome mis-segregation and cytokinesis failure in trisomic human cells.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Joshua M; Macedo, Joana C; Mattingly, Aaron J; Wangsa, Darawalee; Camps, Jordi; Lima, Vera; Gomes, Ana M; Dória, Sofia; Ried, Thomas; Logarinho, Elsa; Cimini, Daniela

    2015-05-05

    Cancer cells display aneuploid karyotypes and typically mis-segregate chromosomes at high rates, a phenotype referred to as chromosomal instability (CIN). To test the effects of aneuploidy on chromosome segregation and other mitotic phenotypes we used the colorectal cancer cell line DLD1 (2n = 46) and two variants with trisomy 7 or 13 (DLD1+7 and DLD1+13), as well as euploid and trisomy 13 amniocytes (AF and AF+13). We found that trisomic cells displayed higher rates of chromosome mis-segregation compared to their euploid counterparts. Furthermore, cells with trisomy 13 displayed a distinctive cytokinesis failure phenotype. We showed that up-regulation of SPG20 expression, brought about by trisomy 13 in DLD1+13 and AF+13 cells, is sufficient for the cytokinesis failure phenotype. Overall, our study shows that aneuploidy can induce chromosome mis-segregation. Moreover, we identified a trisomy 13-specific mitotic phenotype that is driven by up-regulation of a gene encoded on the aneuploid chromosome.

  12. [Diagnosis of MDS: morphology, chromosome abnormalities and genetic mutations].

    PubMed

    Hata, Tomoko

    2015-10-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are a group of hematological neoplasms associated with ineffective hematopoiesis and that can transform into acute leukemia. The clinical classification of MDS which is defined by cytopenia, the rate of blasts in peripheral blood and bone marrow, dysplasia, and chromosomal abnormalities, has undergone continuous revision. To increase the accuracy of dysplastic evaluation, IWGM-MDS and the Research Committee for Idiopathic Hematopoietic Disorders, Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare, Japan have proposed a quantitative and qualitative definition of dysplasia. Recently, refining the definition of dysgranulopoiesis was proposed by IWGM-MDS. Neutrophils with abnormal clumping of chromatin, and harboring more than 4 nuclear projections, were recognized as dysplastic features. At present, karyotypic abnormalities are detected in approximately 50% of de novo MDS and these remain the most critical prognostic factor. In the new cytogenetic scoring system, cytogenetic abnormalities were classified into five prognostic subgroups. This new classification was adopted by the revised IPSS. Approximately 80% to 90% of MDS patients have detectable mutations by whole-exon sequencing or whole genome sequencing. Many genetic mutations had biological and prognostic significance. It is important to further understand the utility of this factor in determining prognosis and in selecting among therapeutic options. PMID:26458436

  13. Chromosome abnormalities in human arrested preimplantation embryos: A multiple-probe FISH study

    SciTech Connect

    Munne, S.; Grifo, J.; Cohen, J. ); Weier, H.U.G. )

    1994-07-01

    Numerical chromosome abnormalities were studied in single blastomeres from arrested or otherwise morphologically abnormal human preimplantation embryos. A 6-h FISH procedure with fluorochrome-labeled DNA probes was developed to determine numerical abnormalities of chromosomes X, Y, and 18. The three chromosomes were stained and detected simultaneously in 571 blastomeres from 131 embryos. Successful analysis including biopsy, fixation, and FISH analysis was achieved in 86.5% of all blastomeres. The procedure described here offers a reliable alternative to sexing of embryos by PCR and allows simultaneous ploidy assessment. For the three chromosomes tested, numerical aberrations were found in 56.5% of the embroys. Most abnormal embryos were polyploid or mosaics, and 6.1% were aneuploid for gonosomes or chromosome 18. Extrapolation of these results to all human chromosomes suggests that the majority of abnormally developing and arrested human embryos carry numerical chromosome abnormalities. 44 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  14. Direct kinetochore–spindle pole connections are not required for chromosome segregation

    PubMed Central

    Sikirzhytski, Vitali; Magidson, Valentin; Steinman, Jonathan B.; He, Jie; Le Berre, Maël; Tikhonenko, Irina; Ault, Jeffrey G.; McEwen, Bruce F.; Chen, James K.; Sui, Haixin; Piel, Matthieu; Kapoor, Tarun M.

    2014-01-01

    Segregation of genetic material occurs when chromosomes move to opposite spindle poles during mitosis. This movement depends on K-fibers, specialized microtubule (MT) bundles attached to the chromosomes′ kinetochores. A long-standing assumption is that continuous K-fibers connect every kinetochore to a spindle pole and the force for chromosome movement is produced at the kinetochore and coupled with MT depolymerization. However, we found that chromosomes still maintained their position at the spindle equator during metaphase and segregated properly during anaphase when one of their K-fibers was severed near the kinetochore with a laser microbeam. We also found that, in normal fully assembled spindles, K-fibers of some chromosomes did not extend to the spindle pole. These K-fibers connected to adjacent K-fibers and/or nonkinetochore MTs. Poleward movement of chromosomes with short K-fibers was uncoupled from MT depolymerization at the kinetochore. Instead, these chromosomes moved by dynein-mediated transport of the entire K-fiber/kinetochore assembly. Thus, at least two distinct parallel mechanisms drive chromosome segregation in mammalian cells. PMID:25023516

  15. The synaptonemal complex protein, Zip1, promotes the segregation of nonexchange chromosomes at meiosis I

    PubMed Central

    Newnham, Louise; Jordan, Philip; Rockmill, Beth; Roeder, G. Shirleen; Hoffmann, Eva

    2009-01-01

    Crossing over establishes connections between homologous chromosomes that promote their proper segregation at the first meiotic division. However, there exists a backup system to ensure the correct segregation of those chromosome pairs that fail to cross over. We have found that, in budding yeast, a mutation eliminating the synaptonemal complex protein, Zip1, increases the meiosis I nondisjunction rate of nonexchange chromosomes (NECs). The centromeres of NECs become tethered during meiotic prophase, and this tethering is disrupted by the zip1 mutation. Furthermore, the Zip1 protein often colocalizes to the centromeres of the tethered chromosomes, suggesting that Zip1 plays a direct role in holding NECs together. Zip3, a protein involved in the initiation of synaptonemal complex formation, is also important for NEC segregation. In the absence of Zip3, both the tethering of NECs and the localization of Zip1 to centromeres are impaired. A mutation in the MAD3 gene, which encodes a component of the spindle checkpoint, also increases the nondisjunction of NECs. Together, the zip1 and mad3 mutations have an additive effect, suggesting that these proteins act in parallel pathways to promote NEC segregation. We propose that Mad3 promotes the segregation of NECs that are not tethered by Zip1 at their centromeres. PMID:20080752

  16. Robin sequence associated with karyotypic mosaicism involving chromosome 22 abnormalities

    SciTech Connect

    Salinas, C.F.; Jastrzab, J.M.; Centu, E.S.

    1994-09-01

    Robin sequence is characterized by cleft palate, hypoplastic mandible, glossoptosis and respiratory difficulties. The Robin sequence may be observed as an isolated defect or as part of about 33 syndromes; however, to our knowledge, it has never been reported associated with chromosome 22 abnormalities. We examined a two-month-old black boy with a severe case of Robin sequence. Exam revealed a small child with hypoplastic mandible, glossoptosis, high palate and respiratory difficulty with continuous apnea episodes resulting in cyanotic lips and nails. In order to relieve the upper airway obstruction, his tongue was attached to the lower lip. Later a tracheostomy was performed. On follow-up exam, this patient was found to have developmental delay. Cytogenetic studies of both peripheral blood and fibroblast cells showed mosaicism involving chromosome 22 abnormalities which were designated as follows: 45,XY,-22/46,XY,-22,+r(22)/46,XY. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) studies confirmed the identity of the r(22) and showed the presence of the DiGeorge locus (D22575) but the absence of the D22539 locus which maps to 22q13.3. Reported cases of r(22) show no association with Robin sequence. However, r(22) has been associated with flat bridge of the nose, bulbous tip of the nose, epicanthus and high palate, all characteristics that we also observed in this case. These unusual cytogenetic findings may be causally related to the dysmorphology found in the patient we report.

  17. Spindle Assembly and Chromosome Segregation Requires Central Spindle Proteins in Drosophila Oocytes.

    PubMed

    Das, Arunika; Shah, Shital J; Fan, Bensen; Paik, Daniel; DiSanto, Daniel J; Hinman, Anna Maria; Cesario, Jeffry M; Battaglia, Rachel A; Demos, Nicole; McKim, Kim S

    2016-01-01

    Oocytes segregate chromosomes in the absence of centrosomes. In this situation, the chromosomes direct spindle assembly. It is still unclear in this system which factors are required for homologous chromosome bi-orientation and spindle assembly. The Drosophila kinesin-6 protein Subito, although nonessential for mitotic spindle assembly, is required to organize a bipolar meiotic spindle and chromosome bi-orientation in oocytes. Along with the chromosomal passenger complex (CPC), Subito is an important part of the metaphase I central spindle. In this study we have conducted genetic screens to identify genes that interact with subito or the CPC component Incenp. In addition, the meiotic mutant phenotype for some of the genes identified in these screens were characterized. We show, in part through the use of a heat-shock-inducible system, that the Centralspindlin component RacGAP50C and downstream regulators of cytokinesis Rho1, Sticky, and RhoGEF2 are required for homologous chromosome bi-orientation in metaphase I oocytes. This suggests a novel function for proteins normally involved in mitotic cell division in the regulation of microtubule-chromosome interactions. We also show that the kinetochore protein, Polo kinase, is required for maintaining chromosome alignment and spindle organization in metaphase I oocytes. In combination our results support a model where the meiotic central spindle and associated proteins are essential for acentrosomal chromosome segregation.

  18. Meiosis I chromosome segregation is established through regulation of microtubule-kinetochore interactions.

    PubMed

    Miller, Matthew P; Unal, Elçin; Brar, Gloria A; Amon, Angelika

    2012-12-18

    During meiosis, a single round of DNA replication is followed by two consecutive rounds of nuclear divisions called meiosis I and meiosis II. In meiosis I, homologous chromosomes segregate, while sister chromatids remain together. Determining how this unusual chromosome segregation behavior is established is central to understanding germ cell development. Here we show that preventing microtubule-kinetochore interactions during premeiotic S phase and prophase I is essential for establishing the meiosis I chromosome segregation pattern. Premature interactions of kinetochores with microtubules transform meiosis I into a mitosis-like division by disrupting two key meiosis I events: coorientation of sister kinetochores and protection of centromeric cohesin removal from chromosomes. Furthermore we find that restricting outer kinetochore assembly contributes to preventing premature engagement of microtubules with kinetochores. We propose that inhibition of microtubule-kinetochore interactions during premeiotic S phase and prophase I is central to establishing the unique meiosis I chromosome segregation pattern.DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00117.001.

  19. Effects of antitopoisomerase drugs on chromosome recombinations and segregation in grasshopper

    SciTech Connect

    Palitti, F.; Motta, S.; Grazioso, C.; Pisano, M.C.

    1993-12-31

    The role of different cellular functions which are required for the production of euploid cells can be studied through the use of mutants that are defective in the control of both the meiotic and mitotic cell cycle or through the use of compounds which interface with the various cellular targets which have a role in the segregation of chromosomes. The role of the achromatic part of the mitotic apparatus in the production of aneuploidy is well recognized. Substantial progress has been made in understanding the role of the chromatic part, for example, there are observations that disturbances in the normal {open_quotes}metabolism{close_quotes} of the chromosomes (i.e. chromosome condensation, defective DNA repair or recombination) can affect chromosome segregation. Between the processes of both meiosis and mitosis that lead to nuclear division there are, however, important differences.

  20. “Genome-wide recombination and chromosome segregation in human oocytes and embryos reveal selection for maternal recombination rates”

    PubMed Central

    Natesan, Senthilkumar A.; Joshi, Hrishikesh A.; Cimadomo, Danilo; Griffin, Darren K.; Sage, Karen; Summers, Michael C.; Thornhill, Alan R.; Housworth, Elizabeth; Herbert, Alex D.; Rienzi, Laura; Ubaldi, Filippo M.; Handyside, Alan H.; Hoffmann, Eva R.

    2015-01-01

    Crossover recombination reshuffles genes and prevents errors in segregation that lead to extra or missing chromosomes (aneuploidy) in human eggs, a major cause of pregnancy failure and congenital disorders. Here, we generate genome-wide maps of crossovers and chromosome segregation patterns by recovering all three products of single female meioses. Genotyping > 4 million informative single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from 23 complete meioses allowed us to map 2,032 maternal and 1,342 paternal crossovers and to infer the segregation patterns of 529 chromosome pairs. We uncover a novel reverse chromosome segregation pattern in which both homologs separate their sister chromatids at meiosis I; detect selection for higher recombination rates in the female germline by the elimination of aneuploid embryos; and report chromosomal drive against non-recombinant chromatids at meiosis II. Collectively, our findings reveal that recombination not only affects homolog segregation at meiosis I but also the fate of sister chromatids at meiosis II. PMID:25985139

  1. Chromosome abnormalities and the genetics of congenital corneal opacification.

    PubMed

    Mataftsi, A; Islam, L; Kelberman, D; Sowden, J C; Nischal, K K

    2011-01-01

    Congenital corneal opacification (CCO) encompasses a broad spectrum of disorders that have different etiologies, including genetic and environmental. Terminology used in clinical phenotyping is commonly not specific enough to describe separate entities, for example both the terms Peters anomaly and sclerocornea have been ascribed to a clinical picture of total CCO, without investigating the presence or absence of iridocorneal adhesions. This is not only confusing but also unhelpful in determining valid genotype-phenotype correlations, and thereby revealing clues for pathogenesis. We undertook a systematic review of the literature focusing on CCO as part of anterior segment developmental anomalies (ASDA), and analyzed its association specifically with chromosomal abnormalities. Genes previously identified as being associated with CCO are also summarized. All reports were critically appraised to classify phenotypes according to described features, rather than the given diagnosis. Some interesting associations were found, and are discussed.

  2. Segregation of recessive phenotypes in somatic cell hybrids role of mitotic recombination, gene inactivation, and chromosome nondisjunction

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, C.E.; Worton, R.G.

    1981-04-01

    Somatic cell hybrids heterozygous at the emetine resistance locus (emt/sup r//emt/sup +/) or the chromate resistance locus (chr/sup r//chr/sup +/) are known to segregate the recessive drug resistance phenotype at high frequency. The authors have examined mechanisms of segregation in Chinese hamster cell hybrids heterozygous at these two loci, both of which map to the long arm of Chinese hamster chromosome 2. To allow the fate of chromosomal arms through the segregation process, our hybrids were also heterozygous at the mtx (methotrexate resistance) locus on the short arm of chromosome 2 and carried cytogenetically marked chromosomes with either a short-arm deletion 2p/sup -/) or a long-arm addition (2q/sup +/). Karotype and phenotype analysis of emetine- or chromate-resistant segregants from such hybrids allowed us to distinguish four potential segregation mechanisms: (i) loss of the emt/sup +/ - or chr/sup +/-bearing chromosome; (ii) mitotic recombination between the centromere and the emt or chr loci giving rise to homozygous resistant segregants; (iii) inactivation of the emt/sup +/ or chr/sup +/ alleles; and (iv) loss of the emt/sup +/ - or chr/sup +/-bearing chromosome with duplication of the homologous chromosome carrying the emt/sup r/ or chr/sup r/ allele. Of 48 independent segregants examined, only 9 (20%) arose by simple chromosome loss. Two segregants (4%) were consistent with a gene inactivation mechanism, but because of their rarity, other mechanisms such as mutation or submicroscopic deletion could not be excluded. Twenty-one segregants (44%) arose by either mitotic recombination or chromosome loss and duplication; the two mechanisms were not distinguishable in that experiment. Finally, in hybrids allowing these two mechanisms to be distinguished, 15 segregants (31%) arose by chromosome loss and duplication, and none arose by mitotic recombination.

  3. The Drosophila l(1)zw10 gene product, required for accurate mitotic chromosome segregation, is redistributed at anaphase onset

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    Mutations in the gene l(1)zw10 disrupt the accuracy of chromosome segregation in a variety of cell types during the course of Drosophila development. Cytological analysis of mutant larval brain neuroblasts shows very high levels of aneuploid cells. Many anaphase figures are aberrant, the most frequent abnormality being the presence of lagging chromosomes that remain in the vicinity of the metaphase plate when the other chromosomes have migrated toward the spindle poles. Finally, the centromeric connection between sister chromatids in mutant neuroblasts treated with colchicine often appears to be broken, in contrast with similarly treated control neuroblasts. The 85-kD protein encoded by the l(1)zw10 locus displays a dynamic pattern of localization in the course of the embryonic cell cycle. It is excluded from the nuclei during interphase, but migrates into the nuclear zone during prometaphase. At metaphase, the zw10 antigen is found in a novel filamentous structure that may be specifically associated with kinetochore microtubules. Upon anaphase onset, there is an extremely rapid redistribution of the zw10 protein to a location at or near the kinetochores of the separating chromosomes. PMID:1339459

  4. Autophagy is required for efficient meiosis progression and proper meiotic chromosome segregation in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Matsuhara, Hirotada; Yamamoto, Ayumu

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy is a conserved intracellular degradation system, which contributes to development and differentiation of various organisms. Yeast cells undergo meiosis under nitrogen-starved conditions and require autophagy for meiosis initiation. However, the precise roles of autophagy in meiosis remain unclear. Here, we show that autophagy is required for efficient meiosis progression and proper meiotic chromosome segregation in fission yeast. Autophagy-defective strains bearing a mutation in the autophagy core factor gene atg1, atg7, or atg14 exhibit deformed nuclear structures during meiosis. These mutant cells require an extracellular nitrogen supply for meiosis progression following their entry into meiosis and show delayed meiosis progression even with a nitrogen supply. In addition, they show frequent chromosome dissociation from the spindle together with spindle overextension, forming extra nuclei. Furthermore, Aurora kinase, which regulates chromosome segregation and spindle elongation, is significantly increased at the centromere and spindle in the mutant cells. Aurora kinase down-regulation eliminated delayed initiation of meiosis I and II, chromosome dissociation, and spindle overextension, indicating that increased Aurora kinase activity may cause these aberrances in the mutant cells. Our findings show a hitherto unrecognized relationship of autophagy with the nuclear structure, regulation of cell cycle progression, and chromosome segregation in meiosis.

  5. Chromosome segregation and spindle structure in crane fly spermatocytes following Colcemid treatment.

    PubMed

    LaFountain, J R

    1985-01-01

    Chromosome segregation in primary spermatocytes of the crane fly Nephrotoma suturalis was studied after exposure to Colcemid at doses that did not completely inhibit spindle formation. Colcemid was added either to the medium in which larvae were cultured or to Tricine buffer in which isolated testes were incubated. Patterns of chromosome segregation were analyzed in fixed, Feulgen-stained smears of testes from Colcemid-treated larvae and in living cell preparations. Anomalies observed during the first meiotic division at higher than normal frequencies in Colcemid-treated spermatocytes included anaphase lagging of autosomes, chromosomal strands, tripolar and tetrapolar divisions, and unequal distribution of chromosomes to secondary cells. Following those doses of Colcemid that induced the above anomalies, the length of the birefringent spindle in primary spermatocytes was shorter than normal. This effect on spindle length also was apparent in Giemsa-stained preparations of fixed cells, in which the two centrosomes at the spindle poles were differentiated from the rest of the cytoplasm. The results indicate a correlation between the inhibition of spindle formation and the induction of anomalous patterns of chromosome segregation.

  6. Abnormal chromosome behavior in human oocytes which remained unfertilized during human in vitro fertilization.

    PubMed

    Spielmann, H; Krüger, C; Stauber, M; Vogel, R

    1985-09-01

    Chromosomal abnormalities and abnormal embryonic development have previously been observed after human in vitro fertilization (IVF). Chromosomal abnormalities may arise not only after fertilization but even earlier during meiotic maturation of human oocytes in culture. Since chromosomal analysis is simple in oocytes during meiotic maturation, the chromosomal status was analyzed in oocytes which remained unfertilized in a human in vitro fertilization program. In 50 fertilization attempts the chromosomes of 62 unfertilized oocytes could be analyzed; 45 of them were in the process of meiotic maturation. In three oocytes two small polar bodies were observed 16-18 hr after insemination in the absence of fertilization. In one oocyte abnormal chromosome behavior was found during the first meiotic division, and in four oocytes during metaphase of the second meiotic division. These data suggest that chromosomal analysis of unfertilized oocytes in human IVF may improve the understanding human oocyte maturation and fertilization.

  7. Connecting the dots of the bacterial cell cycle: Coordinating chromosome replication and segregation with cell division.

    PubMed

    Hajduk, Isabella V; Rodrigues, Christopher D A; Harry, Elizabeth J

    2016-05-01

    Proper division site selection is crucial for the survival of all organisms. What still eludes us is how bacteria position their division site with high precision, and in tight coordination with chromosome replication and segregation. Until recently, the general belief, at least in the model organisms Bacillus subtilis and Escherichia coli, was that spatial regulation of division comes about by the combined negative regulatory mechanisms of the Min system and nucleoid occlusion. However, as we review here, these two systems cannot be solely responsible for division site selection and we highlight additional regulatory mechanisms that are at play. In this review, we put forward evidence of how chromosome replication and segregation may have direct links with cell division in these bacteria and the benefit of recent advances in chromosome conformation capture techniques in providing important information about how these three processes mechanistically work together to achieve accurate generation of progenitor cells.

  8. The contribution of chromosomal abnormalities to congenital heart defects: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Hartman, Robert J; Rasmussen, Sonja A; Botto, Lorenzo D; Riehle-Colarusso, Tiffany; Martin, Christa L; Cragan, Janet D; Shin, Mikyong; Correa, Adolfo

    2011-12-01

    We aimed to assess the frequency of chromosomal abnormalities among infants with congenital heart defects (CHDs) in an analysis of population-based surveillance data. We reviewed data from the Metropolitan Atlanta Congenital Defects Program, a population-based birth-defects surveillance system, to assess the frequency of chromosomal abnormalities among live-born infants and fetal deaths with CHDs delivered from January 1, 1994, to December 31, 2005. Among 4430 infants with CHDs, 547 (12.3%) had a chromosomal abnormality. CHDs most likely to be associated with a chromosomal abnormality were interrupted aortic arch (type B and not otherwise specified; 69.2%), atrioventricular septal defect (67.2%), and double-outlet right ventricle (33.3%). The most common chromosomal abnormalities observed were trisomy 21 (52.8%), trisomy 18 (12.8%), 22q11.2 deletion (12.2%), and trisomy 13 (5.7%). In conclusion, in our study, approximately 1 in 8 infants with a CHD had a chromosomal abnormality. Clinicians should have a low threshold at which to obtain testing for chromosomal abnormalities in infants with CHDs, especially those with certain types of CHDs. Use of new technologies that have become recently available (e.g., chromosomal microarray) may increase the identified contribution of chromosomal abnormalities even further.

  9. The contribution of chromosomal abnormalities to congenital heart defects: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Hartman, Robert J; Rasmussen, Sonja A; Botto, Lorenzo D; Riehle-Colarusso, Tiffany; Martin, Christa L; Cragan, Janet D; Shin, Mikyong; Correa, Adolfo

    2011-12-01

    We aimed to assess the frequency of chromosomal abnormalities among infants with congenital heart defects (CHDs) in an analysis of population-based surveillance data. We reviewed data from the Metropolitan Atlanta Congenital Defects Program, a population-based birth-defects surveillance system, to assess the frequency of chromosomal abnormalities among live-born infants and fetal deaths with CHDs delivered from January 1, 1994, to December 31, 2005. Among 4430 infants with CHDs, 547 (12.3%) had a chromosomal abnormality. CHDs most likely to be associated with a chromosomal abnormality were interrupted aortic arch (type B and not otherwise specified; 69.2%), atrioventricular septal defect (67.2%), and double-outlet right ventricle (33.3%). The most common chromosomal abnormalities observed were trisomy 21 (52.8%), trisomy 18 (12.8%), 22q11.2 deletion (12.2%), and trisomy 13 (5.7%). In conclusion, in our study, approximately 1 in 8 infants with a CHD had a chromosomal abnormality. Clinicians should have a low threshold at which to obtain testing for chromosomal abnormalities in infants with CHDs, especially those with certain types of CHDs. Use of new technologies that have become recently available (e.g., chromosomal microarray) may increase the identified contribution of chromosomal abnormalities even further. PMID:21728077

  10. Psychological characteristics of and counseling for carriers of structural chromosome abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Wang, H L; Wu, B; Guo, K M; Tian, R H

    2016-01-01

    Infertility as a psychological problem has gained increasing attention. Male partners among infertile couples have elevated levels of psychological distress, which could affect semen quality, result in hormonal abnormalities, and increase the occurrence of early miscarriage. Infertile women are more vulnerable to psychological distress and require psychological support. Subfertile women who conceive after assisted reproduction have higher stress, anxiety, and depression levels. Psychological interventions have been shown to have beneficial effects on infertility patients. However, psychosocial characteristics of carriers of structural chromosome abnormalities have not been studied. We report the characteristics of carriers of structural chromosome abnormalities and their influence on psychological counseling. Seventy-five patients were carriers of reciprocal translocations, 25 carried Robertsonian translocations, 17 carried inversions, 10 carried deletions, and 3 carried isochromosomes. The main clinical characteristics were recurrent spontaneous abortion, oligospermatism, azoospermatism, primary amenorrhea, and fetal death. Self-rating anxiety scale (SAS) and self-rating depression scale (SDS) scores of women with structural chromosome abnormality were significantly higher than those scores of women with normal karyotype. SAS and SDS scores of men with structural chromosome abnormality were significantly higher than those of men with normal karyotype. SAS and SDS scores of women with structural chromosome abnormality were significantly higher than their scores of men with structural chromosome abnormality. Women carriers with structural chromosome abnormality were more vulnerable to psychological distress. Psychosocial counseling for carriers of structural chromosome abnormalities should focus on self-confidence and treatment with assisted reproductive technology. PMID:27173267

  11. [The relationship between clinical outcomes of reproduc-tive abnormalities and chromosome polymorphism].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Rong; Deng, Jian-Xia; Li, Jin-Jin

    2007-11-01

    To study the relationship between chromosome polymorphism and clinical effect of reproductive abnormalities, we prepared chromosomes from peripheral blood lymphocytes and carried out G/C banding and karyotype analyses. Out of 1 414 cases who came in for genetic counseling, 273 had chromosome abnormalities. Among these 273 cases, 180 cases (65.93%) were karyotype variations, with the remaining 93 cases (34.07%) being non-polymorphic chromosomal abnormalities. Karyotype variations included 10 cases of satellite increases in the D/G group, 35 cases of secondary constriction increases, 99 cases of big or small Y chromosome, 6 cases of pericentric inversion of chromosome Y and 30 cases of pericentric inversion of chromosome 9. These results indicated that clinical effect such as abortion, sterility, stillbirth and congenital malformation are mainly related to chromosome polymorphisms.

  12. Complex polar machinery required for proper chromosome segregation in vegetative and sporulating cells of Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Kloosterman, Tomas G.; Lenarcic, Rok; Willis, Clare R.; Roberts, David M.; Hamoen, Leendert W.; Errington, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    Summary Chromosome segregation is an essential process of cell multiplication. In prokaryotes, segregation starts with the newly replicated sister origins of replication, oriCs, which move apart to defined positions in the cell. We have developed a genetic screen to identify mutants defective in placement of oriC during spore development in the Gram‐positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis. In addition to the previously identified proteins Soj and DivIVA, our screen identified several new factors involved in polar recruitment of oriC: a reported regulator of competence ComN, and the regulators of division site selection MinD and MinJ. Previous work implicated Soj as an important regulator of oriC positioning in the cell. Our results suggest a model in which the DivIVA‐interacting proteins ComN and MinJ recruit MinD to the cell pole, and that these proteins work upstream of Soj to enable oriC placement. We show that these proteins form a polar complex, which acts in parallel with but distinct from the sporulation‐specific RacA pathway of oriC placement, and also functions during vegetative growth. Our study further shows that MinD has two distinct cell cycle roles, in cell division and chromosome segregation, and highlights that cell probably use multiple parallel mechanisms to ensure accurate chromosome segregation. PMID:27059541

  13. Noncomplementing Diploids from Bacillus Subtilis Protoplast Fusion: Relationship between Maintenance of Chromosomal Inactivation and Segregation Capacity

    PubMed Central

    Grandjean, V.; Hauck, Y.; Le-Derout, J.; Hirschbein, L.

    1996-01-01

    Fusions of Bacillus subtilis protoplasts from two genetically marked strains produce noncomplementing heterodiploid bacteria. These noncomplementing diploids (Ncds) carry both parental chromosomes, but only one is expressed. Fusion products of strains polymorphic for NotI restriction sites provide new physical evidence to support the conclusion that Ncds are not an artifact of cross feeding or cell adhesion. We show that reversible chromosomal inactivation can only account for the biparental trait of unstable Ncds. Two types of cells were recovered from the late progeny of unstable Ncds: Ncds with irreversible chromosome silencing (stable Ncds) and secondary recombinants that displayed a genomic mosaic NotI profile. Segregants from an unstable Ncd population gave rise to two viable haploid cell types. By contrast, stable Ncds segregated into a population of viable and inviable haploid cells. We propose that the latter are derived from irreversible chromosome silencing. Our results indicate that clonal populations of stable Ncds are heterogenous and suggest that segregation and inactivation are independent parameters. PMID:8913734

  14. TRF1 Ensures the Centromeric Function of Aurora-B and Proper Chromosome Segregation

    PubMed Central

    Ohishi, Tomokazu; Muramatsu, Yukiko; Yoshida, Haruka

    2014-01-01

    A cancer is a robustly evolving cell population originating from a normal diploid cell. Improper chromosome segregation causes aneuploidy, a driving force of cancer development and malignant progression. Telomeric repeat binding factor 1 (TRF1) has been established as a telomeric protein that negatively regulates telomere elongation by telomerase and promotes efficient DNA replication at telomeres. Intriguingly, overexpression of a mitotic kinase, Aurora-A, compromises efficient microtubule-kinetochore attachment in a TRF1-dependent manner. However, the precise role of TRF1 in mitosis remains elusive. Here we demonstrate that TRF1 is required for the centromeric function of Aurora-B, which ensures proper chromosome segregation. TRF1 depletion abolishes centromeric recruitment of Aurora-B and loosens sister centromere cohesion, resulting in the induction of merotelic kinetochore attachments, lagging chromosomes, and micronuclei. Accordingly, an absence of TRF1 in human and mouse diploid cells induces aneuploidy. These phenomena seem to be telomere independent, because a telomere-unbound TRF1 mutant can suppress the TRF1 knockdown phenotype. These observations indicate that TRF1 regulates the rigidity of the microtubule-kinetochore attachment, contributing to proper chromosome segregation and the maintenance of genomic integrity. PMID:24752893

  15. Large-scale selective sweep among Segregation Distorter chromosomes in African populations of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Presgraves, Daven C; Gérard, Pierre R; Cherukuri, Anjuli; Lyttle, Terrence W

    2009-05-01

    Segregation Distorter (SD) is a selfish, coadapted gene complex on chromosome 2 of Drosophila melanogaster that strongly distorts Mendelian transmission; heterozygous SD/SD(+) males sire almost exclusively SD-bearing progeny. Fifty years of genetic, molecular, and theory work have made SD one of the best-characterized meiotic drive systems, but surprisingly the details of its evolutionary origins and population dynamics remain unclear. Earlier analyses suggested that the SD system arose recently in the Mediterranean basin and then spread to a low, stable equilibrium frequency (1-5%) in most natural populations worldwide. In this report, we show, first, that SD chromosomes occur in populations in sub-Saharan Africa, the ancestral range of D. melanogaster, at a similarly low frequency (approximately 2%), providing evidence for the robustness of its equilibrium frequency but raising doubts about the Mediterranean-origins hypothesis. Second, our genetic analyses reveal two kinds of SD chromosomes in Africa: inversion-free SD chromosomes with little or no transmission advantage; and an African-endemic inversion-bearing SD chromosome, SD-Mal, with a perfect transmission advantage. Third, our population genetic analyses show that SD-Mal chromosomes swept across the African continent very recently, causing linkage disequilibrium and an absence of variability over 39% of the length of the second chromosome. Thus, despite a seemingly stable equilibrium frequency, SD chromosomes continue to evolve, to compete with one another, or evade suppressors in the genome.

  16. Mitotic Spindle Disruption by Alternating Electric Fields Leads to Improper Chromosome Segregation and Mitotic Catastrophe in Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Giladi, Moshe; Schneiderman, Rosa S; Voloshin, Tali; Porat, Yaara; Munster, Mijal; Blat, Roni; Sherbo, Shay; Bomzon, Zeev; Urman, Noa; Itzhaki, Aviran; Cahal, Shay; Shteingauz, Anna; Chaudhry, Aafia; Kirson, Eilon D; Weinberg, Uri; Palti, Yoram

    2015-01-01

    Tumor Treating Fields (TTFields) are low intensity, intermediate frequency, alternating electric fields. TTFields are a unique anti-mitotic treatment modality delivered in a continuous, noninvasive manner to the region of a tumor. It was previously postulated that by exerting directional forces on highly polar intracellular elements during mitosis, TTFields could disrupt the normal assembly of spindle microtubules. However there is limited evidence directly linking TTFields to an effect on microtubules. Here we report that TTFields decrease the ratio between polymerized and total tubulin, and prevent proper mitotic spindle assembly. The aberrant mitotic events induced by TTFields lead to abnormal chromosome segregation, cellular multinucleation, and caspase dependent apoptosis of daughter cells. The effect of TTFields on cell viability and clonogenic survival substantially depends upon the cell division rate. We show that by extending the duration of exposure to TTFields, slowly dividing cells can be affected to a similar extent as rapidly dividing cells. PMID:26658786

  17. Mitotic Spindle Disruption by Alternating Electric Fields Leads to Improper Chromosome Segregation and Mitotic Catastrophe in Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Giladi, Moshe; Schneiderman, Rosa S; Voloshin, Tali; Porat, Yaara; Munster, Mijal; Blat, Roni; Sherbo, Shay; Bomzon, Zeev; Urman, Noa; Itzhaki, Aviran; Cahal, Shay; Shteingauz, Anna; Chaudhry, Aafia; Kirson, Eilon D; Weinberg, Uri; Palti, Yoram

    2015-01-01

    Tumor Treating Fields (TTFields) are low intensity, intermediate frequency, alternating electric fields. TTFields are a unique anti-mitotic treatment modality delivered in a continuous, noninvasive manner to the region of a tumor. It was previously postulated that by exerting directional forces on highly polar intracellular elements during mitosis, TTFields could disrupt the normal assembly of spindle microtubules. However there is limited evidence directly linking TTFields to an effect on microtubules. Here we report that TTFields decrease the ratio between polymerized and total tubulin, and prevent proper mitotic spindle assembly. The aberrant mitotic events induced by TTFields lead to abnormal chromosome segregation, cellular multinucleation, and caspase dependent apoptosis of daughter cells. The effect of TTFields on cell viability and clonogenic survival substantially depends upon the cell division rate. We show that by extending the duration of exposure to TTFields, slowly dividing cells can be affected to a similar extent as rapidly dividing cells. PMID:26658786

  18. Function and regulation of dynein in mitotic chromosome segregation.

    PubMed

    Raaijmakers, J A; Medema, R H

    2014-10-01

    Cytoplasmic dynein is a large minus-end-directed microtubule motor complex, involved in many different cellular processes including intracellular trafficking, organelle positioning, and microtubule organization. Furthermore, dynein plays essential roles during cell division where it is implicated in multiple processes including centrosome separation, chromosome movements, spindle organization, spindle positioning, and mitotic checkpoint silencing. How is a single motor able to fulfill this large array of functions and how are these activities temporally and spatially regulated? The answer lies in the unique composition of the dynein motor and in the interactions it makes with multiple regulatory proteins that define the time and place where dynein becomes active. Here, we will focus on the different mitotic processes that dynein is involved in, and how its regulatory proteins act to support dynein. Although dynein is highly conserved amongst eukaryotes (with the exception of plants), there is significant variability in the cellular processes that depend on dynein in different species. In this review, we concentrate on the functions of cytoplasmic dynein in mammals but will also refer to data obtained in other model organisms that have contributed to our understanding of dynein function in higher eukaryotes.

  19. Genetic Recombination in Bacillus subtilis 168: Contribution of Holliday Junction Processing Functions in Chromosome Segregation

    PubMed Central

    Carrasco, Begoña; Cozar, M. Castillo; Lurz, Rudi; Alonso, Juan C.; Ayora, Silvia

    2004-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis mutants classified within the ɛ (ruvA, ΔruvB, ΔrecU, and recD) and η (ΔrecG) epistatic groups, in an otherwise rec+ background, render cells impaired in chromosomal segregation. A less-pronounced segregation defect in ΔrecA and Δsms (ΔradA) cells was observed. The repair deficiency of addAB, ΔrecO, ΔrecR, recH, ΔrecS, and ΔsubA cells did not correlate with a chromosomal segregation defect. The sensitivity of ɛ epistatic group mutants to DNA-damaging agents correlates with ongoing DNA replication at the time of exposure to the agents. The Δsms (ΔradA) and ΔsubA mutations partially suppress the DNA repair defect in ruvA and recD cells and the segregation defect in ruvA and ΔrecG cells. The Δsms (ΔradA) and ΔsubA mutations partially suppress the DNA repair defect of ΔrecU cells but do not suppress the segregation defect in these cells. The ΔrecA mutation suppresses the segregation defect but does not suppress the DNA repair defect in ΔrecU cells. These results result suggest that (i) the RuvAB and RecG branch migrating DNA helicases, the RecU Holliday junction (HJ) resolvase, and RecD bias HJ resolution towards noncrossovers and that (ii) Sms (RadA) and SubA proteins might play a role in the stabilization and or processing of HJ intermediates. PMID:15317759

  20. Strand-seq: a unifying tool for studies of chromosome segregation.

    PubMed

    Falconer, Ester; Lansdorp, Peter M

    2013-01-01

    Non random segregation of sister chromatids has been implicated to help specify daughter cell fate (the Silent Sister Hypothesis [1]) or to protect the genome of long-lived stem cells (the Immortal Strand Hypothesis [2]). The idea that sister chromatids are non-randomly segregated into specific daughter cells is only marginally supported by data in sporadic and often contradictory studies. As a result, the field has moved forward rather slowly. The advent of being able to directly label and differentiate sister chromatids in vivo using fluorescence in situ hybridization [3] was a significant advance for such studies. However, this approach is limited by the need for large tracks of unidirectional repeats on chromosomes and the reliance on quantitative imaging of fluorescent probes and rigorous statistical analysis to discern between the two competing hypotheses. A novel method called Strand-seq which uses next-generation sequencing to assay sister chromatid inheritance patterns independently for each chromosome [4] offers a comprehensive approach to test for non-random segregation. In addition Strand-seq enables studies on the deposition of chromatin marks in relation to DNA replication. This method is expected to help unify the field by testing previous claims of non-random segregation in an unbiased way in many model systems in vitro and in vivo. PMID:23665005

  1. Identification of Conserved MEL-28/ELYS Domains with Essential Roles in Nuclear Assembly and Chromosome Segregation.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Saldivar, Georgina; Fernandez, Anita; Hirano, Yasuhiro; Mauro, Michael; Lai, Allison; Ayuso, Cristina; Haraguchi, Tokuko; Hiraoka, Yasushi; Piano, Fabio; Askjaer, Peter

    2016-06-01

    Nucleoporins are the constituents of nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) and are essential regulators of nucleocytoplasmic transport, gene expression and genome stability. The nucleoporin MEL-28/ELYS plays a critical role in post-mitotic NPC reassembly through recruitment of the NUP107-160 subcomplex, and is required for correct segregation of mitotic chromosomes. Here we present a systematic functional and structural analysis of MEL-28 in C. elegans early development and human ELYS in cultured cells. We have identified functional domains responsible for nuclear envelope and kinetochore localization, chromatin binding, mitotic spindle matrix association and chromosome segregation. Surprisingly, we found that perturbations to MEL-28's conserved AT-hook domain do not affect MEL-28 localization although they disrupt MEL-28 function and delay cell cycle progression in a DNA damage checkpoint-dependent manner. Our analyses also uncover a novel meiotic role of MEL-28. Together, these results show that MEL-28 has conserved structural domains that are essential for its fundamental roles in NPC assembly and chromosome segregation. PMID:27341616

  2. Identification of Conserved MEL-28/ELYS Domains with Essential Roles in Nuclear Assembly and Chromosome Segregation

    PubMed Central

    Hirano, Yasuhiro; Mauro, Michael; Lai, Allison; Ayuso, Cristina; Haraguchi, Tokuko; Hiraoka, Yasushi; Piano, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    Nucleoporins are the constituents of nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) and are essential regulators of nucleocytoplasmic transport, gene expression and genome stability. The nucleoporin MEL-28/ELYS plays a critical role in post-mitotic NPC reassembly through recruitment of the NUP107-160 subcomplex, and is required for correct segregation of mitotic chromosomes. Here we present a systematic functional and structural analysis of MEL-28 in C. elegans early development and human ELYS in cultured cells. We have identified functional domains responsible for nuclear envelope and kinetochore localization, chromatin binding, mitotic spindle matrix association and chromosome segregation. Surprisingly, we found that perturbations to MEL-28’s conserved AT-hook domain do not affect MEL-28 localization although they disrupt MEL-28 function and delay cell cycle progression in a DNA damage checkpoint-dependent manner. Our analyses also uncover a novel meiotic role of MEL-28. Together, these results show that MEL-28 has conserved structural domains that are essential for its fundamental roles in NPC assembly and chromosome segregation. PMID:27341616

  3. Chromosome segregation impacts on cell growth and division site selection in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Donovan, Catriona; Schauss, Astrid; Krämer, Reinhard; Bramkamp, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Spatial and temporal regulation of bacterial cell division is imperative for the production of viable offspring. In many rod-shaped bacteria, regulatory systems such as the Min system and nucleoid occlusion ensure the high fidelity of midcell divisome positioning. However, regulation of division site selection in bacteria lacking recognizable Min and nucleoid occlusion remains less well understood. Here, we describe one such rod-shaped organism, Corynebacterium glutamicum, which does not always place the division septum precisely at midcell. Here we now show at single cell level that cell growth and division site selection are spatially and temporally regulated by chromosome segregation. Mutants defective in chromosome segregation have more variable cell growth and aberrant placement of the division site. In these mutants, division septa constrict over and often guillotine the nucleoid, leading to nonviable, DNA-free cells. Our results suggest that chromosome segregation or some nucleoid associated factor influences growth and division site selection in C. glutamicum. Understanding growth and regulation of C. glutamicum cells will also be of importance to develop strains for industrial production of biomolecules, such as amino acids.

  4. Role of the Number of Microtubules in Chromosome Segregation during Cell Division

    PubMed Central

    Bertalan, Zsolt; Budrikis, Zoe; La Porta, Caterina A. M.; Zapperi, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Faithful segregation of genetic material during cell division requires alignment of chromosomes between two spindle poles and attachment of their kinetochores to each of the poles. Failure of these complex dynamical processes leads to chromosomal instability (CIN), a characteristic feature of several diseases including cancer. While a multitude of biological factors regulating chromosome congression and bi-orientation have been identified, it is still unclear how they are integrated so that coherent chromosome motion emerges from a large collection of random and deterministic processes. Here we address this issue by a three dimensional computational model of motor-driven chromosome congression and bi-orientation during mitosis. Our model reveals that successful cell division requires control of the total number of microtubules: if this number is too small bi-orientation fails, while if it is too large not all the chromosomes are able to congress. The optimal number of microtubules predicted by our model compares well with early observations in mammalian cell spindles. Our results shed new light on the origin of several pathological conditions related to chromosomal instability. PMID:26506005

  5. Sex ratio in normal and disomic sperm: Evidence that the extra chromosome 21 preferentially segregates with the Y chromosome

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, D.K.; Millie, E.A.; Hassold, T.J. |

    1996-11-01

    In humans, deviations from a 1:1 male:female ratio have been identified in both chromosomally normal and trisomic live births: among normal newborns there is a slight excess of males, among trisomy 18 live borns a large excess of females, and among trisomy 21 live borns an excess of males. These differences could arise from differential production of or fertilization by Y- or X-bearing sperm or from selection against male or female conceptions. To examine the proportion of Y- and X- bearing sperm in normal sperm and in sperm disomic for chromosomes 18 or 21, we used three-color FISH (to the X and Y and either chromosome 18 or chromosome 21) to analyze > 300,000 sperm from 24 men. In apparently normal sperm, the sex ratio was nearly 1:1 (148,074 Y-bearing to 148,657 X-bearing sperm), and the value was not affected by the age of the donor. Certain of the donors, however, had significant excesses of Y- or X-bearing sperm. In disomy 18 sperm, there were virtually identical numbers of Y- and X-bearing sperm; thus, the excess of females in trisomy 18 presumably is due to selection against male trisomic conceptions. In contrast, we observed 69 Y-bearing and 44 X-bearing sperm disomic for chromosome 21. This is consistent with previous molecular studies, which have identified an excess of males among paternally derived cases of trisomy 21, and suggests that some of the excess of males among Down syndrome individuals is attributable to a nondisjunctional mechanism in which the extra chromosome 21 preferentially segregates with the Y chromosome. 17 refs., 2 tabs.

  6. Fifty probands with extra structurally abnormal chromosomes characterized by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Blennow, E.; Telenius, H.; Nordenskjoeld, M.

    1995-01-02

    Extra structurally abnormal chromosomes (ESACs) are small supernumerary chromosomes often associated with developmental abnormalities and malformations. We present 50 probands with ESACs characterized by fluorescence in situ hybridization using centromere-specific probes and chromosome-specific libraries. ESAC-specific libraries were constructed by flow sorting and subsequent amplification by DOP-PCR. Using such ESAC-specific libraries we were able to outline the chromosome regions involved. Twenty-three of the 50 ESACs were inverted duplications of chromosome 15 (inv dup(15)), including patients with normal phenotypes and others with similar clinical symptoms. These 2 groups differed in size and shape of the inv dup(15). Patients with a large inv dup(15), which included the Prader-Willi region, had a high risk of abnormality, whereas patients with a small inv dup(15), not including the Prader-Willi region, were normal. ESACs derived from chromosomes 13 or 21 appeared to have a low risk of abnormality, while one out of 3 patients with an ESAC derived from chromosome 14 had discrete symptoms. One out of 3 patients with an ESAC derived from chromosome 22 had severe anomalies, corresponding to some of the manifestations of the cat eye syndrome. Small extra ring chromosomes of autosomal origin and ESACs identified as i(12p) or i(18p) were all associated with a high risk of abnormality. 42 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Multiple subunits of the Caenorhabditis elegans anaphase-promoting complex are required for chromosome segregation during meiosis I.

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Edward S; Wille, Lucia; Chestnut, Barry A; Sadler, Penny L; Shakes, Diane C; Golden, Andy

    2002-01-01

    Two genes, originally identified in genetic screens for Caenorhabditis elegans mutants that arrest in metaphase of meiosis I, prove to encode subunits of the anaphase-promoting complex or cyclosome (APC/C). RNA interference studies reveal that these and other APC/C subunits are essential for the segregation of chromosomal homologs during meiosis I. Further, chromosome segregation during meiosis I requires APC/C functions in addition to the release of sister chromatid cohesion. PMID:11861581

  8. CDE-1 affects chromosome segregation through uridylation of CSR-1-bound siRNAs.

    PubMed

    van Wolfswinkel, Josien C; Claycomb, Julie M; Batista, Pedro J; Mello, Craig C; Berezikov, Eugene; Ketting, René F

    2009-10-01

    We have studied the function of a conserved germline-specific nucleotidyltransferase protein, CDE-1, in RNAi and chromosome segregation in C. elegans. CDE-1 localizes specifically to mitotic chromosomes in embryos. This localization requires the RdRP EGO-1, which physically interacts with CDE-1, and the Argonaute protein CSR-1. We found that CDE-1 is required for the uridylation of CSR-1 bound siRNAs, and that in the absence of CDE-1 these siRNAs accumulate to inappropriate levels, accompanied by defects in both meiotic and mitotic chromosome segregation. Elevated siRNA levels are associated with erroneous gene silencing, most likely through the inappropriate loading of CSR-1 siRNAs into other Argonaute proteins. We propose a model in which CDE-1 restricts specific EGO-1-generated siRNAs to the CSR-1 mediated, chromosome associated RNAi pathway, thus separating it from other endogenous RNAi pathways. The conserved nature of CDE-1 suggests that similar sorting mechanisms may operate in other animals, including mammals.

  9. Different segregation patterns in five carriers due to a pericentric inversion of chromosome 1.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yuqin; Xu, Chenming; Sun, Yixi; Wang, Liya; Chen, Songchang; Jin, Fan

    2014-12-01

    Pericentric inversion can produce recombinant gametes; however, meiotic segregation studies on the relationship between the frequency of recombinants and the inverted segment size are rare. Triple-color fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was performed to analyze the meiotic behavior in five inv(1) carriers with different breakpoints. Recombination gametes were absent in Patient 1, whereas the percentages of the recombinants in Patients 2, 3, 4, and 5 were of 9.2%, 15.3%, 17.3%, and 40.9%, respectively. A significant difference was present for the frequencies of the recombinant spermatozoa among the five patients (p < 0.001). For each patient, the frequency of the two types of recombinant gametes (dup(1p)/del(1q) or del(1p)/dup(1q)) did not exhibit a significant difference in comparison with the expected 1:1 ratio (p > 0.05). The meiotic segregation of nine inv(1) carriers (including those presented in this paper) is now available. A significant correlation was discovered between the rate of recombination and the proportion of the chromosome implicated in the inversion (R = 0.9435, p < 0.001). The frequency of the recombinant gametes was directly related to the proportion of the chromosome that was inverted. Sperm-FISH allowed an additional comprehension of the patterns of meiotic segregation and provided accurate genetic counseling. PMID:25096371

  10. Different segregation patterns in five carriers due to a pericentric inversion of chromosome 1.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yuqin; Xu, Chenming; Sun, Yixi; Wang, Liya; Chen, Songchang; Jin, Fan

    2014-12-01

    Pericentric inversion can produce recombinant gametes; however, meiotic segregation studies on the relationship between the frequency of recombinants and the inverted segment size are rare. Triple-color fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was performed to analyze the meiotic behavior in five inv(1) carriers with different breakpoints. Recombination gametes were absent in Patient 1, whereas the percentages of the recombinants in Patients 2, 3, 4, and 5 were of 9.2%, 15.3%, 17.3%, and 40.9%, respectively. A significant difference was present for the frequencies of the recombinant spermatozoa among the five patients (p < 0.001). For each patient, the frequency of the two types of recombinant gametes (dup(1p)/del(1q) or del(1p)/dup(1q)) did not exhibit a significant difference in comparison with the expected 1:1 ratio (p > 0.05). The meiotic segregation of nine inv(1) carriers (including those presented in this paper) is now available. A significant correlation was discovered between the rate of recombination and the proportion of the chromosome implicated in the inversion (R = 0.9435, p < 0.001). The frequency of the recombinant gametes was directly related to the proportion of the chromosome that was inverted. Sperm-FISH allowed an additional comprehension of the patterns of meiotic segregation and provided accurate genetic counseling.

  11. Cell division patterns and chromosomal segregation defects in oral cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kaseb, Hatem O; Lewis, Dale W; Saunders, William S; Gollin, Susanne M

    2016-09-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is a serious public health problem caused primarily by smoking and alcohol consumption or human papillomavirus. The cancer stem cell (CSC) theory posits that CSCs show unique characteristics, including self-renewal and therapeutic resistance. Examining biomarkers and other features of CSCs is critical to better understanding their biology. To this end, the results show that cellular SOX2 immunostaining correlates with other CSC biomarkers in OSCC cell lines and marks the rare CSC population. To assess whether CSC division patterns are symmetrical, resulting in two CSC, or asymmetrical, leading to one CSC and one cancer cell, cell size and fluorescence intensity of mitotic cells stained with SOX2 were analyzed. Asymmetrical SOX2 distribution in ≈25% of the mitoses analyzed was detected. Chromosomal instability, some of which is caused by chromosome segregation defects (CSDs), is a feature of cancer cells that leads to altered gene copy numbers. We compare chromosomal instability (as measured by CSDs) between CSCs (SOX2+) and non-CSCs (SOX2-) from the same OSCC cell lines. CSDs were more common in non-CSCs (SOX2-) than CSCs (SOX2+) and in symmetrical CSC (SOX2+) mitotic pairs than asymmetrical CSC (SOX2+/SOX2-) mitotic pairs. CSCs showed fewer and different types of CSDs after ionizing radiation treatment than non-CSCs. Overall, these data are the first to demonstrate both symmetrical and asymmetrical cell divisions with CSDs in OSCC CSC. Further, the results suggest that CSCs may undergo altered behavior, including therapeutic resistance as a result of chromosomal instability due to chromosome segregation defects. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Cell division patterns and chromosomal segregation defects in oral cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kaseb, Hatem O; Lewis, Dale W; Saunders, William S; Gollin, Susanne M

    2016-09-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is a serious public health problem caused primarily by smoking and alcohol consumption or human papillomavirus. The cancer stem cell (CSC) theory posits that CSCs show unique characteristics, including self-renewal and therapeutic resistance. Examining biomarkers and other features of CSCs is critical to better understanding their biology. To this end, the results show that cellular SOX2 immunostaining correlates with other CSC biomarkers in OSCC cell lines and marks the rare CSC population. To assess whether CSC division patterns are symmetrical, resulting in two CSC, or asymmetrical, leading to one CSC and one cancer cell, cell size and fluorescence intensity of mitotic cells stained with SOX2 were analyzed. Asymmetrical SOX2 distribution in ≈25% of the mitoses analyzed was detected. Chromosomal instability, some of which is caused by chromosome segregation defects (CSDs), is a feature of cancer cells that leads to altered gene copy numbers. We compare chromosomal instability (as measured by CSDs) between CSCs (SOX2+) and non-CSCs (SOX2-) from the same OSCC cell lines. CSDs were more common in non-CSCs (SOX2-) than CSCs (SOX2+) and in symmetrical CSC (SOX2+) mitotic pairs than asymmetrical CSC (SOX2+/SOX2-) mitotic pairs. CSCs showed fewer and different types of CSDs after ionizing radiation treatment than non-CSCs. Overall, these data are the first to demonstrate both symmetrical and asymmetrical cell divisions with CSDs in OSCC CSC. Further, the results suggest that CSCs may undergo altered behavior, including therapeutic resistance as a result of chromosomal instability due to chromosome segregation defects. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27123539

  13. A Nucleoporin Docks Protein Phosphatase 1 to Direct Meiotic Chromosome Segregation and Nuclear Assembly.

    PubMed

    Hattersley, Neil; Cheerambathur, Dhanya; Moyle, Mark; Stefanutti, Marine; Richardson, Amelia; Lee, Kian-Yong; Dumont, Julien; Oegema, Karen; Desai, Arshad

    2016-09-12

    During M-phase entry in metazoans with open mitosis, the concerted action of mitotic kinases disassembles nuclei and promotes assembly of kinetochores-the primary microtubule attachment sites on chromosomes. At M-phase exit, these major changes in cellular architecture must be reversed. Here, we show that the conserved kinetochore-localized nucleoporin MEL-28/ELYS docks the catalytic subunit of protein phosphatase 1 (PP1c) to direct kinetochore disassembly-dependent chromosome segregation during oocyte meiosis I and nuclear assembly during the transition from M phase to interphase. During oocyte meiosis I, MEL-28-PP1c disassembles kinetochores in a timely manner to promote elongation of the acentrosomal spindles that segregate homologous chromosomes. During nuclear assembly, MEL-28 recruits PP1c to the periphery of decondensed chromatin, where it directs formation of a functional nuclear compartment. Thus, a pool of phosphatase activity associated with a kinetochore-localized nucleoporin contributes to two key events that occur during M-phase exit in metazoans: kinetochore disassembly and nuclear reassembly. PMID:27623381

  14. Long G2 accumulates recombination intermediates and disturbs chromosome segregation at dysfunction telomere in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Habib, Ahmed G K; Masuda, Kenta; Yukawa, Masashi; Tsuchiya, Eiko; Ueno, Masaru

    2015-08-14

    Protection of telomere (Pot1) is a single-stranded telomere binding protein which is essential for chromosome ends protection. Fission yeast Rqh1 is a member of RecQ helicases family which has essential roles in the maintenance of genomic stability and regulation of homologous recombination. Double mutant between fission yeast pot1Δ and rqh1 helicase dead (rqh1-hd) maintains telomere by homologous recombination. In pot1Δ rqh1-hd double mutant, recombination intermediates accumulate near telomere which disturb chromosome segregation and make cells sensitive to microtubule inhibitors thiabendazole (TBZ). Deletion of chk1(+) or mutation of its kinase domain shortens the G2 of pot1Δ rqh1-hd double mutant and suppresses both the accumulation of recombination intermediates and the TBZ sensitivity of that double mutant. In this study, we asked whether the long G2 is the reason for the TBZ sensitivity of pot1Δ rqh1-hd double mutant. We found that shortening the G2 of pot1Δ rqh1-hd double mutant by additional mutations of wee1 and mik1 or gain of function mutation of Cdc2 suppresses both the accumulation of recombination intermediates and the TBZ sensitivity of pot1Δ rqh1-hd double mutant. Our results suggest that long G2 of pot1Δ rqh1-hd double mutant may allow time for the accumulation of recombination intermediates which disturb chromosome segregation and make cells sensitive to TBZ.

  15. Acetylation of Aurora B by TIP60 ensures accurate chromosomal segregation

    PubMed Central

    Mo, Fei; Zhuang, Xiaoxuan; Liu, Xing; Yao, Phil Y.; Qin, Bo; Su, Zeqi; Zang, Jianye; Wang, Zhiyong; Zhang, Jiancun; Dou, Zhen; Tian, Changlin; Teng, Maikun; Niu, Liwen; Hill, Donald L.; Fang, Guowei; Ding, Xia; Fu, Chuanhai; Yao, Xuebiao

    2015-01-01

    Faithful chromosome segregation in mammalian cells requires the bi-orientation of sister chromatids which relies on sensing correct attachments between spindle microtubules and kinetochores. Although the mechanisms underlying cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1) activation that triggers mitotic entry is extensively studied, the regulatory mechanisms that couple CDK1-cyclin B activity to chromosome stability are not well understood. Here, we identified a signaling axis in which Aurora B activity is modulated by CDK1-cyclin B via acetyltransferase TIP60 (Tat-interactive protein 60 kDa) in human cell division. CDK1-cyclin B phosphorylated Ser90 of TIP60, which elicited TIP60-dependent acetylation of Aurora B and promoted accurate chromosome segregation in mitosis. Mechanistically, TIP60 acetylation of Aurora B at Lys215 protected the phosphorylation of its activation loop from PP2A reactivation-elicited dephosphorylation to ensure a robust, error-free metaphase-anaphase transition. These findings delineated a conserved signaling cascade that integrates protein phosphorylation and acetylation to cell cycle progression for maintenance of genomic stability. PMID:26829474

  16. Acetylation of Aurora B by TIP60 ensures accurate chromosomal segregation.

    PubMed

    Mo, Fei; Zhuang, Xiaoxuan; Liu, Xing; Yao, Phil Y; Qin, Bo; Su, Zeqi; Zang, Jianye; Wang, Zhiyong; Zhang, Jiancun; Dou, Zhen; Tian, Changlin; Teng, Maikun; Niu, Liwen; Hill, Donald L; Fang, Guowei; Ding, Xia; Fu, Chuanhai; Yao, Xuebiao

    2016-04-01

    Faithful segregation of chromosomes in mammalian cells requires bi-orientation of sister chromatids, which relies on the sensing of correct attachments between spindle microtubules and kinetochores. Although the mechanisms underlying cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1) activation, which triggers mitotic entry, have been extensively studied, the regulatory mechanisms that couple CDK1-cyclin B activity to chromosome stability are not well understood. Here, we identified a signaling axis in which Aurora B activity is modulated by CDK1-cyclin B via the acetyltransferase TIP60 in human cell division. CDK1-cyclin B phosphorylates Ser90 of TIP60, which elicits TIP60-dependent acetylation of Aurora B and promotes accurate chromosome segregation in mitosis. Mechanistically, TIP60 acetylation of Aurora B at Lys215 protects Aurora B's activation loop from dephosphorylation by the phosphatase PP2A to ensure a robust, error-free metaphase-anaphase transition. These findings delineate a conserved signaling cascade that integrates protein phosphorylation and acetylation with cell cycle progression for maintenance of genomic stability. PMID:26829474

  17. Chromosomal abnormalities and polymorphic variants in couples with repeated miscarriage in Mexico.

    PubMed

    De la Fuente-Cortés, Beatriz E; Cerda-Flores, Ricardo M; Dávila-Rodríguez, Martha I; García-Vielma, Catalina; De la Rosa Alvarado, Rosa M; Cortés-Gutiérrez, Elva I

    2009-04-01

    Cytogenetic studies have an important role in the evaluation of couples with repeated miscarriages and poor obstetric history. To estimate the prevalence of chromosomal abnormalities and polymorphic variants in 158 couples with repeated miscarriages, a cross-sectional study was conducted in Monterrey, Mexico from 1995 to 2003. Peripheral blood lymphocytes were cultured for chromosomal studies using standard methods. Twelve couples showed chromosomal abnormalities (7.60%), two Robertsonian translocations (1.27%), two balanced translocations (1.27%), one inversion (0.63%), and one a novel insertion (0.63%). This insertion [46, XX, ins (15;8) (q26;p11p23)] is unique, and is the third reported in association with repeated abortion. Mosaicism was observed in six couples (3.80%, three with structural abnormalities and three with numerical abnormalities). A female to male ratio of 1.4:1 was observed. In addition to these chromosomal abnormalities, polymorphic variants in constitutive heterochromatin of the 1qh+, 9qh+, and 16qh+ chromosomes were observed in 25 couples (15.82%), of the Yqh+ chromosome in 21 couples (13.29%), and of satellite in 35 couples (22.15%). In conclusion, chromosome analysis is necessary for appropriate clinical management of these patients.

  18. Assessment of chromosomal abnormalities in sperm of infertile men using sperm karyotyping and multicolour fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH)

    SciTech Connect

    Moosani, N.; Martin, R.H.

    1994-09-01

    Individuals with male factor infertility resulting from idiopathic oligo-, astheno- or teratozoospermia are frequently offered IVF in an attempt to increase their chances of having a child. A concern remains whether these infertile males have an elevated risk of transmitting chromosomal abnormalities to their offspring. Sperm chromosomal complements from these men were assayed using the human sperm/hamster oocyte fusion system and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) on sperm nuclei. For each of 5 infertile patients, 100 sperm karyotypes were analyzed and multicolour FISH analysis was performed on a minimum of 10,000 sperm nuclei for each chromosome-specific DNA probe for chromosomes 1 (pUC1.77), 12 (D12Z3), X (XC) and Y (DYZ3). As a group, the infertile patients showed increased frequencies of both numerical ({chi}{sup 2}=17.26, {proportional_to} <0.001) and total abnormalities ({chi}{sup 2}=7.78, {proportional_to} <0.01) relative to control donors when assessed by sperm karyotypes. Analysis of sperm nuclei by FISH indicated a significant increase in the frequency of disomy for chromosome 1 in three of the five patients as compared to control donors ({chi}{sup 2}>8.35, {proportional_to} <0.005). In addition, the frequency of XY disomy was significantly higher in four of the five patients studied by FISH ({chi}{sup 2}>10.58, {proportional_to}<0.005), suggesting that mis-segregation caused by the failure of the XY bivalent to pair may play a role in idiopathic male infertility.

  19. mei-38 Is Required for Chromosome Segregation During Meiosis in Drosophila Females

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Changjian; Singaram, Vinod; McKim, Kim S.

    2008-01-01

    Meiotic chromosome segregation occurs in Drosophila oocytes on an acentrosomal spindle, which raises interesting questions regarding spindle assembly and function. One is how to organize a bipolar spindle without microtubule organizing centers at the poles. Another question is how to orient the chromosomes without kinetochore capture of microtubules that grow from the poles. We have characterized the mei-38 gene in Drosophila and found it may be required for chromosome organization within the karyosome. Nondisjunction of homologous chromosomes occurs in mei-38 mutants primarily at the first meiotic division in females but not in males where centrosomes are present. Most meiotic spindles in mei-38 oocytes are bipolar but poorly organized, and the chromosomes appear disorganized at metaphase. mei-38 encodes a novel protein that is conserved in the Diptera and may be a member of a multigene family. Mei-38 was previously identified (as ssp1) due to a role in mitotic spindle assembly in a Drosophila cell line. MEI-38 protein localizes to a specific population of spindle microtubules, appearing to be excluded from the overlap of interpolar microtubules in the central spindle. We suggest MEI-38 is required for the stability of parallel microtubules, including the kinetochore microtubules. PMID:18757915

  20. X Chromosome Abnormalities and Cognitive Development: Implications for Understanding Normal Human Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walzer, Stanley

    1985-01-01

    Argues that knowledge from studies of individuals with sex chromosome abnormalities can further understanding of aspects of normal human development. Studies of XO girls, XXY boys, XXX girls, and males with a fragile X chromosome are summarized to demonstrate how results contribute to knowledge about normal cognitive development and about…

  1. Non-random autosome segregation: a stepping stone for the evolution of sex chromosome complexes? Sex-biased transmission of autosomes could facilitate the spread of antagonistic alleles, and generate sex-chromosome systems with multiple X or Y chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Schwander, Tanja; Beukeboom, Leo W

    2011-02-01

    A new study in Caenorhabditis elegans shows that homologous autosomes segregate non-randomly with the sex chromosome in the heterogametic sex. Segregation occurs according to size, small autosomes segregating with, and large autosomes segregating away from the X-chromosome. Such sex-biased transmission of autosomes could facilitate the spread of sexually antagonistic alleles whose effects favor the fitness of one sex at the expense of the other. This may provide a first step toward the evolution of new sex determination systems.

  2. Hormad1 mutation disrupts synaptonemal complex formation, recombination, and chromosome segregation in mammalian meiosis.

    PubMed

    Shin, Yong-Hyun; Choi, Youngsok; Erdin, Serpil Uckac; Yatsenko, Svetlana A; Kloc, Malgorzata; Yang, Fang; Wang, P Jeremy; Meistrich, Marvin L; Rajkovic, Aleksandar

    2010-11-01

    Meiosis is unique to germ cells and essential for reproduction. During the first meiotic division, homologous chromosomes pair, recombine, and form chiasmata. The homologues connect via axial elements and numerous transverse filaments to form the synaptonemal complex. The synaptonemal complex is a critical component for chromosome pairing, segregation, and recombination. We previously identified a novel germ cell-specific HORMA domain encoding gene, Hormad1, a member of the synaptonemal complex and a mammalian counterpart to the yeast meiotic HORMA domain protein Hop1. Hormad1 is essential for mammalian gametogenesis as knockout male and female mice are infertile. Hormad1 deficient (Hormad1(-/) (-)) testes exhibit meiotic arrest in the early pachytene stage, and synaptonemal complexes cannot be visualized by electron microscopy. Hormad1 deficiency does not affect localization of other synaptonemal complex proteins, SYCP2 and SYCP3, but disrupts homologous chromosome pairing. Double stranded break formation and early recombination events are disrupted in Hormad1(-/) (-) testes and ovaries as shown by the drastic decrease in the γH2AX, DMC1, RAD51, and RPA foci. HORMAD1 co-localizes with γH2AX to the sex body during pachytene. BRCA1, ATR, and γH2AX co-localize to the sex body and participate in meiotic sex chromosome inactivation and transcriptional silencing. Hormad1 deficiency abolishes γH2AX, ATR, and BRCA1 localization to the sex chromosomes and causes transcriptional de-repression on the X chromosome. Unlike testes, Hormad1(-/) (-) ovaries have seemingly normal ovarian folliculogenesis after puberty. However, embryos generated from Hormad1(-/) (-) oocytes are hyper- and hypodiploid at the 2 cell and 8 cell stage, and they arrest at the blastocyst stage. HORMAD1 is therefore a critical component of the synaptonemal complex that affects synapsis, recombination, and meiotic sex chromosome inactivation and transcriptional silencing. PMID:21079677

  3. Marker chromosomes lacking {alpha}-satellite DNA: A new intriguing class of abnormalities

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, L.A.; Zinn, A.B.; Stallard, J.R.

    1994-09-01

    Recent studies have implicated {alpha}-satellite DNA as an integral part of the centromere and important for the normal segregation of chromosomes. We analyzed four supernumerary marker chromosomes in which fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) could detect neither pancentromeric or chromosome specific {alpha}-satellite DNA. Mosaicism of the markers existed, but each was present in the majority of cells indicating that they segregated normally. FISH with chromosome-specific libraries identified the origins of these markers as chromosomes 13 (1 case) and 15 (3 cases). High resolution analysis, combined with hybridization of a series of cosmid probes, revealed that each marker was a symmetrical duplication of the terminal long arm of the parent chromosome. Telomeric sequences were detected by FISH indicating linear structures. Breakpoint heterogeneity, as defined by cosmid probes, was demonstrated in the three cases involving chromosome 15. No pericentromeric satellite III DNA could be detected on three markers. Studies with anti-centromere antibodies are in progress to assay for centromeric antigens on the markers, as expected at functional centromeric sites. Our results demonstrate that the precise structural identification and heterogeneity of these markers can be easily elucidated using FISH with unique sequence cosmid probes. We conclude from our studies and others in the literature: (1) there is a newly defined class of markers lacking {alpha}-satellite DNA and containing duplications of terminal sequences; (2)neither {alpha}-satellite nor satellite III DNA at levels detectable by FISH is necessary for fidelity in the normal segregation of chromosomes; and (3) these markers were most likely formed by recombination of the long arms during meiosis.

  4. Structural Chromosome Abnormalities Associated with Obesity: Report of Four New subjects and Review of Literature.

    PubMed

    Dasouki, Majed J; Youngs, Erin L; Hovanes, Karine

    2011-05-01

    Obesity in humans is a complex polygenic trait with high inter-individual heritability estimated at 40-70%. Candidate gene, DNA linkage and genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have allowed for the identification of a large set of genes and genomic regions associated with obesity. Structural chromosome abnormalities usually result in congenital anomalies, growth retardation and developmental delay. Occasionally, they are associated with hyperphagia and obesity rather than growth delay. We report four new individuals with structural chromosome abnormalities involving 10q22.3-23.2, 16p11.2 and Xq27.1-q28 chromosomal regions with early childhood obesity and developmental delay. We also searched and summarized the literature for structural chromosome abnormalities reported in association with childhood obesity. PMID:22043167

  5. Structural Chromosome Abnormalities Associated with Obesity: Report of Four New subjects and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Dasouki, Majed J; Youngs, Erin L; Hovanes, Karine

    2011-01-01

    Obesity in humans is a complex polygenic trait with high inter-individual heritability estimated at 40–70%. Candidate gene, DNA linkage and genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have allowed for the identification of a large set of genes and genomic regions associated with obesity. Structural chromosome abnormalities usually result in congenital anomalies, growth retardation and developmental delay. Occasionally, they are associated with hyperphagia and obesity rather than growth delay. We report four new individuals with structural chromosome abnormalities involving 10q22.3-23.2, 16p11.2 and Xq27.1-q28 chromosomal regions with early childhood obesity and developmental delay. We also searched and summarized the literature for structural chromosome abnormalities reported in association with childhood obesity. PMID:22043167

  6. Kinesin 5B (KIF5B) is required for progression through female meiosis and proper chromosomal segregation in mitotic cells.

    PubMed

    Kidane, Dawit; Sakkas, Denny; Nottoli, Timothy; McGrath, James; Sweasy, Joann B

    2013-01-01

    The fidelity of chromosomal segregation during cell division is important to maintain chromosomal stability in order to prevent cancer and birth defects. Although several spindle-associated molecular motors have been shown to be essential for cell division, only a few chromosome arm-associated motors have been described. Here, we investigated the role of Kinesin 5b (Kif5b) during female mouse meiotic cell development and mitotic cell division. RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated silencing of Kif5b in mouse oocytes induced significant delay in germinal vesicle breakdown (GVBD) and failure in extrusion of the first polar body (PBE). In mitotic cells, knockdown of Kif5b leads to centrosome amplification and a chromosomal segregation defect. These data suggest that KIF5B is critical in suppressing chromosomal instability at the early stages of female meiotic cell development and mitotic cell division.

  7. Synchronizing chromosome segregation by flux-dependent force equalization at kinetochores

    PubMed Central

    Matos, Irina; Pereira, António J.; Lince-Faria, Mariana; Cameron, Lisa A.; Salmon, Edward D.

    2009-01-01

    The synchronous movement of chromosomes during anaphase ensures their correct inheritance in every cell division. This reflects the uniformity of spindle forces acting on chromosomes and their simultaneous entry into anaphase. Although anaphase onset is controlled by the spindle assembly checkpoint, it remains unknown how spindle forces are uniformly distributed among different chromosomes. In this paper, we show that tension uniformity at metaphase kinetochores and subsequent anaphase synchrony in Drosophila S2 cells are promoted by spindle microtubule flux. These results can be explained by a mechanical model of the spindle where microtubule poleward translocation events associated with flux reflect relaxation of the kinetochore–microtubule interface, which accounts for the redistribution and convergence of kinetochore tensions in a timescale comparable to typical metaphase duration. As predicted by the model, experimental acceleration of mitosis precludes tension equalization and anaphase synchrony. We propose that flux-dependent equalization of kinetochore tensions ensures a timely and uniform maturation of kinetochore–microtubule interfaces necessary for error-free and coordinated segregation of chromosomes in anaphase. PMID:19581410

  8. Spindle checkpoint-independent inhibition of mitotic chromosome segregation by Drosophila Mps1.

    PubMed

    Althoff, Friederike; Karess, Roger E; Lehner, Christian F

    2012-06-01

    Monopolar spindle 1 (Mps1) is essential for the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC), which prevents anaphase onset in the presence of misaligned chromosomes. Moreover, Mps1 kinase contributes in a SAC-independent manner to the correction of erroneous initial attachments of chromosomes to the spindle. Our characterization of the Drosophila homologue reveals yet another SAC-independent role. As in yeast, modest overexpression of Drosophila Mps1 is sufficient to delay progression through mitosis during metaphase, even though chromosome congression and metaphase alignment do not appear to be affected. This delay in metaphase depends on the SAC component Mad2. Although Mps1 overexpression in mad2 mutants no longer causes a metaphase delay, it perturbs anaphase. Sister kinetochores barely move apart toward spindle poles. However, kinetochore movements can be restored experimentally by separase-independent resolution of sister chromatid cohesion. We propose therefore that Mps1 inhibits sister chromatid separation in a SAC-independent manner. Moreover, we report unexpected results concerning the requirement of Mps1 dimerization and kinase activity for its kinetochore localization in Drosophila. These findings further expand Mps1's significance for faithful mitotic chromosome segregation and emphasize the importance of its careful regulation.

  9. Down-Turner Syndrome: A Case with Double Monoclonal Chromosomal Abnormality

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez-Manassero, Denisse; Merino-Luna, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. The coexistence of Down and Turner syndromes due to double chromosome aneuploidy is very rare; it is even more rare to find the presence of a double monoclonal chromosomal abnormality. Objective. To report a unique case of double monoclonal chromosomal abnormality with trisomy of chromosome 21 and an X ring chromosome in all cells studied; no previous report has been found. Case Report. Female, 28 months old, with pathological short stature from birth, with the following dysmorphic features: tilted upward palpebral fissures, short neck, brachycephaly, and low-set ears. During the neonatal period, the infant presented generalized hypotonia and lymphedema of hands and feet. Karyotype showed 47,X,r(X),+21 [30]. Conclusion. Clinical features of both Down and Turner syndromes were found, highlighting short stature that has remained below 3 z score from birth to the present, associated with delayed psychomotor development. G-banded karyotype analysis in peripheral blood is essential for a definitive diagnosis. PMID:27672470

  10. Down-Turner Syndrome: A Case with Double Monoclonal Chromosomal Abnormality.

    PubMed

    Manassero-Morales, Gioconda; Alvarez-Manassero, Denisse; Merino-Luna, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. The coexistence of Down and Turner syndromes due to double chromosome aneuploidy is very rare; it is even more rare to find the presence of a double monoclonal chromosomal abnormality. Objective. To report a unique case of double monoclonal chromosomal abnormality with trisomy of chromosome 21 and an X ring chromosome in all cells studied; no previous report has been found. Case Report. Female, 28 months old, with pathological short stature from birth, with the following dysmorphic features: tilted upward palpebral fissures, short neck, brachycephaly, and low-set ears. During the neonatal period, the infant presented generalized hypotonia and lymphedema of hands and feet. Karyotype showed 47,X,r(X),+21 [30]. Conclusion. Clinical features of both Down and Turner syndromes were found, highlighting short stature that has remained below 3 z score from birth to the present, associated with delayed psychomotor development. G-banded karyotype analysis in peripheral blood is essential for a definitive diagnosis. PMID:27672470

  11. Down-Turner Syndrome: A Case with Double Monoclonal Chromosomal Abnormality

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez-Manassero, Denisse; Merino-Luna, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. The coexistence of Down and Turner syndromes due to double chromosome aneuploidy is very rare; it is even more rare to find the presence of a double monoclonal chromosomal abnormality. Objective. To report a unique case of double monoclonal chromosomal abnormality with trisomy of chromosome 21 and an X ring chromosome in all cells studied; no previous report has been found. Case Report. Female, 28 months old, with pathological short stature from birth, with the following dysmorphic features: tilted upward palpebral fissures, short neck, brachycephaly, and low-set ears. During the neonatal period, the infant presented generalized hypotonia and lymphedema of hands and feet. Karyotype showed 47,X,r(X),+21 [30]. Conclusion. Clinical features of both Down and Turner syndromes were found, highlighting short stature that has remained below 3 z score from birth to the present, associated with delayed psychomotor development. G-banded karyotype analysis in peripheral blood is essential for a definitive diagnosis.

  12. Down-Turner Syndrome: A Case with Double Monoclonal Chromosomal Abnormality.

    PubMed

    Manassero-Morales, Gioconda; Alvarez-Manassero, Denisse; Merino-Luna, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. The coexistence of Down and Turner syndromes due to double chromosome aneuploidy is very rare; it is even more rare to find the presence of a double monoclonal chromosomal abnormality. Objective. To report a unique case of double monoclonal chromosomal abnormality with trisomy of chromosome 21 and an X ring chromosome in all cells studied; no previous report has been found. Case Report. Female, 28 months old, with pathological short stature from birth, with the following dysmorphic features: tilted upward palpebral fissures, short neck, brachycephaly, and low-set ears. During the neonatal period, the infant presented generalized hypotonia and lymphedema of hands and feet. Karyotype showed 47,X,r(X),+21 [30]. Conclusion. Clinical features of both Down and Turner syndromes were found, highlighting short stature that has remained below 3 z score from birth to the present, associated with delayed psychomotor development. G-banded karyotype analysis in peripheral blood is essential for a definitive diagnosis.

  13. Growth and differentiation of circulating hemopoietic stem cells with atomic bomb irradiation-induced chromosome abnormalities

    SciTech Connect

    Amenomori, T.; Honda, T.; Otake, M.; Tomonaga, M.; Ichimaru, M.

    1988-11-01

    The effects of atomic bomb irradiation on hemopoietic stem cells were studied cytogenetically using single colonies derived from hemopoietic progenitor cells. The subjects studied were 21 healthy atomic bomb survivors (10 males and 11 females) in the high dose exposure group (100+ rad) with a known high incidence (10% or more) of radiation-induced chromosome abnormalities in their peripheral blood lymphocytes (stimulated with phytohemagglutinin), and 11 nonexposed healthy controls (5 males and 6 females). Colony formation by circulating granulocyte-macrophage (GM-CFC) and erythroid (BFU-E) progenitor cells was made by the methylcellulose method using peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Chromosome specimens were prepared from single colonies by our micromethod. The total number of colonies analyzed in the exposed group was 131 for GM-CFC and 75 for BFU-E. Chromosome abnormalities were observed in 15 (11.5%) and 9 (12.0%) colonies, respectively. In the control group, the total number of colonies analyzed was 61 for GM-CFC and 41 for BFU-E. None of these colonies showed chromosome abnormalities. The difference in incidence of chromosome abnormalities was highly significant by an exact test; p = 0.003 for GM-CFC and 0.017 for BFU-E. The karyotypes of chromosome abnormalities obtained from the colonies in the exposed group were mostly translocations, but deletion and marker chromosomes were also observed. In two individuals, such karyotypic abnormalities as observed in the peripheral lymphocytes were also seen in the myeloid progenitor cells. This finding suggests that atomic bomb irradiation produced a chromosome aberration on multipotent hemopoietic stem cells common to myeloid and lymphoid lineages.

  14. Anal atresia, abnormal genitalia, and absent thumb: congenital malformations associated with mosaic ring chromosome 13.

    PubMed

    Ocak, Z; Ozlu, T; Vural, M

    2013-01-01

    Because of the deletion of a segment of the chromosome during the formation of a ring, several clinical findings may be associated with ring chromosomes. Ring chromosome 13 is one of such disorders in which the genotype-phenotype correlation is stronger by virtue of the accumulating literature. It can be associated with multiple congenital abnormalities and severe mental retardation. We report a case with mosaic ring chromosome 13 whose prenatal ultrasound revealed bilateral ventriculomegaly. Anal atresia, unidentifiable external genitalia, and an absent thumb were observed in the postmortem examination.

  15. Sex-specific differences in meiotic chromosome segregation revealed by dicentric bridge resolution in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Koehler, Kara E; Millie, Elise A; Cherry, Jonathan P; Burgoyne, Paul S; Evans, Edward P; Hunt, Patricia A; Hassold, Terry J

    2002-01-01

    The meiotic properties of paracentric inversion heterozygotes have been well studied in insects and plants, but not in mammalian species. In essence, a single meiotic recombination event within the inverted region results in the formation of a dicentric chromatid, which usually breaks or is stretched between the two daughter nuclei during the first meiotic anaphase. Here, we provide evidence that this is not the predominant mode of exchange resolution in female mice. In sharp contrast to previous observations in other organisms, we find that attempts to segregate the dicentric chromatid frequently result not in breakage, stretching, or loss, but instead in precocious separation of the sister centromeres of at least one homolog. This often further results in intact segregation of the dicentric into one of the meiotic products, where it can persist into the first few embryonic divisions. These novel observations point to an unusual mechanism for the processing of dicentric chromosomes in mammalian oogenesis. Furthermore, this mechanism is rare or nonexistent in mammalian spermatogenesis. Thus, our results provide additional evidence of sexual dimorphism in mammalian meiotic chromosome behavior; in "stressful" situations, meiotic sister chromatid cohesion is apparently handled differently in males than in females. PMID:12454080

  16. Chromosome segregation and organization are targets of 5′-Fluorouracil in eukaryotic cells

    PubMed Central

    Mojardín, Laura; Botet, Javier; Moreno, Sergio; Salas, Margarita

    2015-01-01

    The antimetabolite 5′-Fluorouracil (5FU) is an analog of uracil commonly employed as a chemotherapeutic agent in the treatment of a range of cancers including colorectal tumors. To assess the cellular effects of 5FU, we performed a genome-wide screening of the haploid deletion library of the eukaryotic model Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Our analysis validated previously characterized drug targets including RNA metabolism, but it also revealed unexpected mechanisms of action associated with chromosome segregation and organization (post-translational histone modification, histone exchange, heterochromatin). Further analysis showed that 5FU affects the heterochromatin structure (decreased levels of histone H3 lysine 9 methylation) and silencing (down-regulation of heterochromatic dg/dh transcripts). To our knowledge, this is the first time that defects in heterochromatin have been correlated with increased cytotoxicity to an anticancer drug. Moreover, the segregation of chromosomes, a process that requires an intact heterochromatin at centromeres, was impaired after drug exposure. These defects could be related to the induction of genes involved in chromatid cohesion and kinetochore assembly. Interestingly, we also observed that thiabendazole, a microtubule-destabilizing agent, synergistically enhanced the cytotoxic effects of 5FU. These findings point to new targets and drug combinations that could potentiate the effectiveness of 5FU-based treatments. PMID:25483073

  17. Chromosomal abnormalities in neutron-induced acute myeloid leukemias in CBA/H mice

    SciTech Connect

    Bouffler, S.D.; Meijne, E.I.M.; Huiskamp, R.

    1996-09-01

    Acute myeloid leukemias (AMLs) induced in CBA/H mice by 1 MeV fission neutrons have been examined for chromosomal abnormalities by G-band analysis. In common with X-ray- and {alpha}-particle-induced AMLs in CBA/H mice, more than 90% (16/17) of the myeloid leukemias had chromosome 2 abnormalities, in this case, all interstitial deletions. Chromosome 2 breakpoints were not wholly consistent, but clustering in three specific G-band regions was observed. Very distal (H-region) breakpoints were more common in the neutron AMLs than in X-ray- or {alpha}-particle-induced leukemias. These data indicate that neutron-induced AMLs in CBA/H mice are not characterized by a specific chromosome deletion but that a variety of chromosome 2 deletion types are associated with the disease. Trisomy of chromosome 1 (12.5% AMLs) and aneusomy of chromosomes 6 (31% AMLs) and Y (37.5% AMLs) were noted. While chromatid breakage was observed occasionally in neutron-induced AML, no clear indications of persistent chromosomal instability or high levels of stable chromosomal change were apparent. 19 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  18. Consistent chromosome abnormalities including double minutes (dms) in adenocarcinoma of the pancreas

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, C.A.; Morsberger, L.; Ellingham, T.

    1994-09-01

    Little is known about the somatic genetic changes which characterize pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PA), and identification of acquired genomic alterations would further our understanding of the biology of this neoplasm. We have studied 62 primary specimens of PA using classical and FISH methods. Clonally abnormal karyotypes were observed in 44 neoplasms. Karyotypes were generally complex (greater than 3 abnormalities) including both numerical and structural chromosome changes. Many tumors contained at least one marker chromosome. The most frequent whole chromosomal gains were chromosomes 20 (7 tumors) and 7 (5 tumors). Losses were much more frequent: chromosome 18 was lost in 22 tumors, followed by chromosomes 13 (15 tumors), 12 (13 tumors), and 6 (12 tumors). Structural abnormalities were common. 200 chromosome breakpoints were identified. Excluding Robertsonian translocations, chromosomal arms most frequently involved were 6q (12 chromosomes), 1p and 3p (10 each), 11p and 17p (9 each), 1q (8), 8p and 19q (7 each). Of particular interest, we found dms in 6 cases. These represent the first PAs with cytogenetic evidence of gene amplification, and are under investigation using chromosome microdissection. To begin to define the smallest region of 6q which is deleted, 5 tumors with 6q deletions were hybridized with a biotin-labeled probe, made by microdissection of 6q24-qter. Loss of one copy of this region was verified in 4/5 tumors; additional probes are being made. Our results are similar to those of 34 other reported PAs, and the combined data suggest that gains of chromosomes 7 and 20 and deletions and rearrangements of 1p and 6q may be particularly important in the biology of adenocarcinoma of the pancreas.

  19. Systematic review of accuracy of prenatal diagnosis for abnormal chromosome diseases by microarray technology.

    PubMed

    Xu, H B; Yang, H; Liu, G; Chen, H

    2014-10-31

    The accuracy of prenatal diagnosis for abnormal chromosome diseases by chromosome microarray technology and karyotyping were compared. A literature search was carried out in the MEDLINE database with the keywords "chromosome" and "karyotype" and "genetic testing" and "prenatal diagnosis" and "oligonucleotide array sequence". The studies obtained were filtered by using the QUADAS tool, and studies conforming to the quality standard were fully analyzed. There was one paper conforming to the QUADAS standards including 4406 gravidas with adaptability syndromes of prenatal diagnosis including elderly parturient women, abnormal structure by type-B ultrasound, and other abnormalities. Microarray technology yielded successful diagnoses in 4340 cases (98.8%), and there was no need for tissue culture in 87.9% of the samples. All aneuploids and non-parallel translocations in 4282 cases of non-chimera identified by karyotyping could be detected using microarray analysis technology, whereas parallel translocations and fetal triploids could not be detected by microarray analysis technology. In the samples with normal karyotyping results, type-B ultrasound showed that 6% of chromosomal deficiencies or chromosome duplications could be detected by microarray technology, and the same abnormal chromosomes were detected in 1.7% of elderly parturient women and samples with positive serology screening results. In the prenatal diagnosis test, compared with karyotyping, microarray technology could identify the extra cell genetic information with clinical significance, aneuploids, and non-parallel translocations; however, its disadvantage is that it could not identify parallel translocations and triploids.

  20. Detection of chromosomal abnormalities and the 22q11 microdeletion in fetuses with congenital heart defects.

    PubMed

    Lv, Wei; Wang, Shuyu

    2014-11-01

    Chromosomal abnormalities and the 22q11 microdeletion are implicated in congenital heart defects (CHDs). This study was designed to detect these abnormalities in fetuses and determine the effect of genetic factors on CHD etiology. Between January 2010 and December 2011, 113 fetuses with CHD treated at the Beijing Obstetrics and Gynecology Hospital were investigated, using chromosome karyotyping of either amniotic fluid cell or umbilical cord blood cell samples. Fetuses with a normal result were then investigated for the 22q11 microdeletion by fluorescence in situ hybridization. Of the 113 patients, 12 (10.6%) exhibited chromosomal abnormalities, while 6 (5.3%) of the remaining 101 cases presented with a 22q11 microdeletion. The incidence of chromosomal abnormalities was significantly higher in the group of fetuses presenting with extracardiac malformations in addition to CHD (P<0.001), although the detection of the 22q11 microdeletion was not significantly different between the two groups (P=0.583). In addition, all fetuses with the 22q11 microdeletion occurred de novo. In conclusion, genetic factors are important in the etiology of CHD. Where fetuses present with cardiac defects, additional chromosomal analysis is required to detect extracardiac abnormalities. Fetuses with heart defects should also be considered for 22q11 microdeletion detection to evaluate fetal prognosis, particularly prior to surgery.

  1. Long G2 accumulates recombination intermediates and disturbs chromosome segregation at dysfunction telomere in Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    SciTech Connect

    Habib, Ahmed G.K.; Masuda, Kenta; Yukawa, Masashi; Tsuchiya, Eiko; Ueno, Masaru

    2015-08-14

    Protection of telomere (Pot1) is a single-stranded telomere binding protein which is essential for chromosome ends protection. Fission yeast Rqh1 is a member of RecQ helicases family which has essential roles in the maintenance of genomic stability and regulation of homologous recombination. Double mutant between fission yeast pot1Δ and rqh1 helicase dead (rqh1-hd) maintains telomere by homologous recombination. In pot1Δ rqh1-hd double mutant, recombination intermediates accumulate near telomere which disturb chromosome segregation and make cells sensitive to microtubule inhibitors thiabendazole (TBZ). Deletion of chk1{sup +} or mutation of its kinase domain shortens the G2 of pot1Δ rqh1-hd double mutant and suppresses both the accumulation of recombination intermediates and the TBZ sensitivity of that double mutant. In this study, we asked whether the long G2 is the reason for the TBZ sensitivity of pot1Δ rqh1-hd double mutant. We found that shortening the G2 of pot1Δ rqh1-hd double mutant by additional mutations of wee1 and mik1 or gain of function mutation of Cdc2 suppresses both the accumulation of recombination intermediates and the TBZ sensitivity of pot1Δ rqh1-hd double mutant. Our results suggest that long G2 of pot1Δ rqh1-hd double mutant may allow time for the accumulation of recombination intermediates which disturb chromosome segregation and make cells sensitive to TBZ. - Ηighlights: • We show link between long G2 and accumulation of toxic recombination intermediates. • Accumulation of recombination intermediates at telomere results in TBZ sensitivity. • Activation of DNA damage checkpoint worsens cells' viability in presence of TBZ.

  2. Three-dimensional ultrasonographic visualization of fetal chromosome abnormalities: a preliminary experience report of 4 cases.

    PubMed

    Komwilaisak, Ratana; Ratanasiri, Thawalwong; Kleebkaow, Pilaiwan

    2004-10-01

    The accurate diagnosis of fetal malformations in utero can provide both heath care providers and parents a number of management options. Three-dimensional ultrasonography is a new technique of diagnosis which has several potential advantages to allow for evaluation of specific anomalies by permitting high-quality views of body surface. We report 4 cases of fetal chromosomal abnormalities including 2 cases of trisomy 21, 1 case of trisomy 13 and 1 case of 48, XXY/+18. All cases were proved to have abnormal chromosomes by amniocentesis or percutaneous umbilical cord blood sampling. After 3D reconstruction, we can identify specific facial abnormalities which can not be visualized by conventional two-dimensional ultrasound such as low set ear Mongolian's slant eyes, facial dysmorphism of trisomy 13 and trisomy 18. We also clearly visualized abnormalities of digits such as overlapping fingers, club hands and sandal gap. Three-dimensional reconstruction of the fetal body surface improves the antenatal diagnosis of chromosomal abnormalities characterized by a particular dysmorphism. Our report suggests that three-dimensional ultrasonography has the potential to provide novel informations on the fetal anatomy and be useful in visualization and identification of chromosomal abnormalities in utero.

  3. Unequal mitotic sister chromatid exchange: A rare mechanism for chromosomal abnormality resulting in duplication/deletion of chromosome 7q

    SciTech Connect

    Eydoux, P.; Ortenberg, J.; Chalifoux, N.

    1994-09-01

    We report a case of unequal mitotic chromatid exchange, which has rarely been reported as a mechanism for microscopic chromosomal anomalies. The proposita was born at 40 weeks, after an uneventful pregnancy, of parents with a negative family history. The baby was small for gestational age and had dysmorphic features, including scaphocephaly, bilateral epicanthal folds and palpebral ptosis, mild hypertelorism, hypoplasia of orbital contours, right coloboma, bulbous prominent nose, retrognathism, downturned mouth, low set posteriorly rotated ears, tapering of the limbs. bilateral Sydney creases. At 5 months, she was under the 5th percentile for height, weight and head circumference, and had a mild developmental delay. The karyotype showed an abnormality of chromosome 7 in all cells, half with a duplication and half with a deletion of the same region; 46,XX,del(7)(q33{yields}q34)/46,XX,dup(7)(q33{yields}q34). This chromosomal abnormality could be explained by an unequal chromatid exchange occuring in the first mitosis of the embryo. To our knowledge, only one such human microscopic abnormality, involving chromosome Y, has been reported to date. This type of genetic unbalance could be missed by molecular techniques.

  4. Msh2 deficiency leads to chromosomal abnormalities, centrosome amplification, and telomere capping defect

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yisong; Liu, Yie

    2006-01-01

    Msh2 is a key mammalian DNA mismatch repair (MMR) gene and mutations or deficiencies in mammalian Msh2 gene result in microsatellite instability (MSI+) and the development of cancer. Here, we report that primary mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) deficient in the murine MMR gene Msh2 (Msh2-/-) showed a significant increase in chromosome aneuploidy, centrosome amplification, and defective mitotic spindle organization and unequal chromosome segregation. Although Msh2-/- mouse tissues or primary MEFs had no apparent change in telomerase activity, telomere length, or recombination at telomeres, Msh2-/- MEFs showed an increase in chromosome end-to-end fusions or chromosome ends without detectable telomeric DNA. These data suggest that MSH2 helps to maintain genomic stability through the regulation of the centrosome and normal telomere capping in vivo and that defects in MMR can contribute to oncogenesis through multiple pathways.

  5. Aurora B–mediated localized delays in nuclear envelope formation facilitate inclusion of late-segregating chromosome fragments

    PubMed Central

    Karg, Travis; Warecki, Brandt; Sullivan, William

    2015-01-01

    To determine how chromosome segregation is coordinated with nuclear envelope formation (NEF), we examined the dynamics of NEF in the presence of lagging acentric chromosomes in Drosophila neuroblasts. Acentric chromosomes often exhibit delayed but ultimately successful segregation and incorporation into daughter nuclei. However, it is unknown whether these late-segregating acentric fragments influence NEF to ensure their inclusion in daughter nuclei. Through live analysis, we show that acentric chromosomes induce highly localized delays in the reassembly of the nuclear envelope. These delays result in a gap in the nuclear envelope that facilitates the inclusion of lagging acentrics into telophase daughter nuclei. Localized delays of nuclear envelope reassembly require Aurora B kinase activity. In cells with reduced Aurora B activity, there is a decrease in the frequency of local nuclear envelope reassembly delays, resulting in an increase in the frequency of acentric-bearing, lamin-coated micronuclei. These studies reveal a novel role of Aurora B in maintaining genomic integrity by promoting the formation of a passageway in the nuclear envelope through which late-segregating acentric chromosomes enter the telophase daughter nucleus. PMID:25877868

  6. Distance segregation of sex chromosomes in crane-fly spermatocytes studied using laser microbeam irradiations.

    PubMed

    Forer, Arthur; Ferraro-Gideon, Jessica; Berns, Michael

    2013-10-01

    Univalent sex chromosomes in crane-fly spermatocytes have kinetochore spindle fibres to each spindle pole (amphitelic orientation) from metaphase throughout anaphase. The univalents segregate in anaphase only after the autosomes approach the poles. As each univalent moves in anaphase, one spindle fibre shortens and the other spindle fibre elongates. To test whether the directionality of force production is fixed at anaphase, that is, whether one spindle fibre can only elongate and the other only shorten, we cut univalents in half with a laser microbeam, to create two chromatids. In both sex-chromosome metaphase and sex-chromosome anaphase, the two chromatids that were formed moved to opposite poles (to the poles to which their fibre was attached) at speeds about the same as autosomes, much faster than the usual speeds of univalent movements. Since the chromatids moved to the pole to which they were attached, independent of the direction to which the univalent as a whole was moving, the spindle fibre that normally elongates in anaphase still is able to shorten and produce force towards the pole when allowed (or caused) to do so. PMID:23315093

  7. Cyc17, a meiosis-specific cyclin, is essential for anaphase initiation and chromosome segregation in Tetrahymena thermophila.

    PubMed

    Yan, Guan-Xiong; Dang, Huai; Tian, Miao; Zhang, Jing; Shodhan, Anura; Ning, Ying-Zhi; Xiong, Jie; Miao, Wei

    2016-07-17

    Although the role of cyclins in controlling nuclear division is well established, their function in ciliate meiosis remains unknown. In ciliates, the cyclin family has undergone massive expansion which suggests that diverse cell cycle systems exist, and this warrants further investigation. A screen for cyclins in the model ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila showed that there are 34 cyclins in this organism. Only 1 cyclin, Cyc17, contains the complete cyclin core and is specifically expressed during meiosis. Deletion of CYC17 led to meiotic arrest at the diakinesis-like metaphase I stage. Expression of genes involved in DNA metabolism and chromosome organization (chromatin remodeling and basic chromosomal structure) was repressed in cyc17 knockout matings. Further investigation suggested that Cyc17 is involved in regulating spindle pole attachment, and is thus essential for chromosome segregation at meiosis. These findings suggest a simple model in which chromosome segregation is influenced by Cyc17.

  8. Cyc17, a meiosis-specific cyclin, is essential for anaphase initiation and chromosome segregation in Tetrahymena thermophila.

    PubMed

    Yan, Guan-Xiong; Dang, Huai; Tian, Miao; Zhang, Jing; Shodhan, Anura; Ning, Ying-Zhi; Xiong, Jie; Miao, Wei

    2016-07-17

    Although the role of cyclins in controlling nuclear division is well established, their function in ciliate meiosis remains unknown. In ciliates, the cyclin family has undergone massive expansion which suggests that diverse cell cycle systems exist, and this warrants further investigation. A screen for cyclins in the model ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila showed that there are 34 cyclins in this organism. Only 1 cyclin, Cyc17, contains the complete cyclin core and is specifically expressed during meiosis. Deletion of CYC17 led to meiotic arrest at the diakinesis-like metaphase I stage. Expression of genes involved in DNA metabolism and chromosome organization (chromatin remodeling and basic chromosomal structure) was repressed in cyc17 knockout matings. Further investigation suggested that Cyc17 is involved in regulating spindle pole attachment, and is thus essential for chromosome segregation at meiosis. These findings suggest a simple model in which chromosome segregation is influenced by Cyc17. PMID:27192402

  9. A time stamp comparative analysis of frequent chromosomal abnormalities in Romanian patients.

    PubMed

    Suciu, Nicolae; Plaiasu, Vasilica

    2014-01-01

    Chromosome abnormalities represent the leading cause in many human genetic disorders. Gain or loss of genetic material can disrupt the normal expression of genes important in fetal development and result in abnormal phenotypes. Approximately 60% of first-trimester spontaneous abortions exhibit karyotype abnormalities. The majority of these abnormalities consist of numerical chromosomal changes, such as autosomal trisomy, monosomy X and polyploidy. In our current study, 411 cases were analyzed over a period of 5 years, which reflected the incidence of cytogenetic abnormalities in Romania. Down syndrome showed the highest frequency at 79%. At 2.6% structural chromosome abnormality syndromes and Turner syndrome followed suit. Next were the Edwards and Patau syndromes with an incidence of 1.2%. Klinefelter, Cri du chat and Wolf-Hirschhorn syndromes all had an incidence of 0.7%. Finally, the lowest frequencies were shown by Williams at 0.4% and only one case of Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome with abnormal karyotype. The average maternal age at childbirth was 31.15 years (SD = 6.96) and the average paternal age was 33.41 years (SD = 7.17). PMID:23570267

  10. Benign parotid oncocytoma with the chromosomal abnormality trisomy 7.

    PubMed

    Mark, J; Dahlenfors, R; Havel, G; Böckmann, P

    1991-01-01

    This report concerns the first cytogenetical study of a benign salivary gland oncocytoma. The cultured tumor was studied in five consecutive preparations. The first three were dominated by cells with a normal karyotype. In the two subsequent preparations a hyperdiploid stemline characterized by trisomy 7 had taken over. Trisomy 7 has previously been observed in a number of different, benign, premalignant and malignant conditions. We interpreted trisomy 7 in the salivary gland oncocytoma, as in these other conditions, to be a neoplasia-related, probably primary, gross chromosomal change and not an expression of aging or comparable events in normal cells.

  11. [Lived experience of women with fetal chromosomal abnormality receiving termination at second trimester].

    PubMed

    Hsu, Chin-Mei; Su, Tsann-Juu; Chen, Yueh-Chih; Hwang, Jiann-Lonng

    2007-12-01

    Fetal chromosomal examination helps screen fetal chromosomal abnormalities prenatally. Diagnosis of such anomalies allows pregnancy termination, but causes tremendous trauma during pregnancy. The purpose of this study was to explore the lived experience of women suffering from fetal chromosomal abnormalities who are urgently required to terminate their pregnancy. The qualitative field study was conducted at a medical center in Taipei. The researcher, a primary nurse, conducted interviews with five women face to face or over the phone to collect the data. The period of care lasted for two weeks, beginning with confirmed diagnosis of fetal chromosomal abnormalities, followed by the subjects' decision on pregnancy termination, and ending up with their discharge from the hospital. The study is presented in narrative form and the data analyzed using interpretive research strategies of phenomenology. Three categories of lived experience emerged from the data: (1) recurring nightmares, (2) the torment from making the decision of pregnancy termination, and (3) frustration or sadness afterwards. The results illustrated that the lived experience of the women suffering from fetal chromosomal abnormalities and receiving termination was a continuous process. We suggest that medical staff concern themselves with the issue and provide humanistic caring for patients during the various different phases.

  12. ASPP1/2-PP1 complexes are required for chromosome segregation and kinetochore-microtubule attachments

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Kun; Wang, Yuqi; Jin, Xiaofeng; Wei, Youheng; Saiyin, Heige; Wang, Dejie; Peng, Jintao; Ma, Jian; Tang, Yan; Wumaier, Reziya; Yu, Hongxiu; Dong, Yimin; Huang, Haojie; Yu, Long; Wang, Chenji

    2015-01-01

    Regulated interactions between kinetochores and spindle microtubules are critical for maintaining genomic stability during chromosome segregation. Defects in chromosome segregation are widespread phenomenon in human cancers that are thought to serve as the fuel for tumorigenic progression. Tumor suppressor proteins ASPP1 and ASPP2, two members of the apoptosis stimulating proteins of p53 (ASPP) family, are frequently down-regulated in human cancers. Here we report that ASPP1/2 are required for proper mitotic progression. In ASPP1/2 co-depleted cells, the persistence of unaligned chromosomes and the reduction of tension across sister kinetochores on aligned chromosomes resulted in persistent spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) activation. Using protein affinity purification methods, we searched for functional partners of ASPP1/2, and found that ASPP1/2 were associated with a subset of kinetochore proteins (Hec1, KNL-1, and CENP-F). It was found that ASPP1/2 act as PP1-targeting subunits to facilitate the interaction between PP1 and Hec1, and catalyze Hec1 (Ser165) dephosphorylation during late mitosis. These observations revealed a previously unrecognized function of ASPP1/2 in chromosome segregation and kinetochore-microtubule attachments that likely contributes to their roles in chromosome stability and tumor suppression. PMID:26595804

  13. Chromosomal Abnormalities in Infertile Men Referred to Iran Blood Transfusion Organization Research Center

    PubMed Central

    Mahjoubi, Frouzandeh; Soleimani, Saeideh; Mantegy, Sanaz

    2010-01-01

    Introduction The prevalence of somatic chromosomal abnormalities in infertile male individuals has been reported to vary in different literatures. The aim of this study was to investigate the frequency of chromosomal aberrations among infertile men referred to the Cytogenetic Laboratory of Iran Blood Transfusion Organization Research Centre (IBTO). Materials and Methods Chromosomal analysis was performed on phytohemag-glutinin (PHA)-stimulated peripheral lymphocyte cultures of 1052 infertile men using standard cytogenetic methods. The study took place during 1997 to 2007. Results Total chromosome alterations were revealed in 161 (15.30%) infertile men. The most prevalent chromosomal abnormality in the infertile men was 47, XXY, that was seen in 94 (58.38%) men while one of them had a mosaic karyotype: mos 47, XX[54]/47,XXY[18]/46,XY[9]. In 37 (22.98%) cases, structural aberrations were detected. There were 30 (18.63%) cases of sex reversal. Conclusion Cytogenetic studies of these patients showed increased chromosomal abnormalities in infertile men in comparison with that of the normal population, justifying the need for cytogenetic analysis of men with idiopathic infertility. PMID:23926486

  14. Ring chromosome 5 associated with severe growth retardation as the sole major physical abnormality

    SciTech Connect

    Migliori, M.V.; Pettinari, A.; Cherubini, V.; Bartolotta, E.; Pecora, R.

    1994-01-01

    The authors report on a case of ring chromosome 5 in a 36-month-old girl with severe growth retardation, clinodactyly, mild psychological abnormalities, and normal facial appearance. Endocrine tests showed partial growth hormone deficiency. Cytogenetic investigation failed to demonstrate any apparent microscopic deletion of either the short or long arm of chromosome 5 as a consequence of ring formation. In 12% of cells examined, the ring was either absent or present in multiple copies. Only 3 previous cases of ring chromosome 5 have been reported in association with short stature of prenatal onset and minor anomalies, without mental retardation. 12 refs., 3 figs.

  15. Non-Mendelian segregation of sex chromosomes in heterospecific Drosophila males.

    PubMed Central

    Dermitzakis, E T; Masly, J P; Waldrip, H M; Clark, A G

    2000-01-01

    Interspecific hybrids and backcrossed organisms generally suffer from reduced viability and/or fertility. To identify and genetically map these defects, we introgressed regions of the Drosophila sechellia genome into the D. simulans genome. A female-biased sex ratio was observed in 24 of the 221 recombinant inbred lines, and subsequent tests attributed the skew to failure of Y-bearing sperm to fertilize the eggs. Apparently these introgressed lines fail to suppress a normally silent meiotic drive system. Using molecular markers we mapped two regions of the Drosophila genome that appear to exhibit differences between D. simulans and D. sechellia in their regulation of sex chromosome segregation distortion. The data indicate that the sex ratio phenotype results from an epistatic interaction between at least two factors. We discuss whether this observation is relevant to the meiotic drive theory of hybrid male sterility. PMID:10655222

  16. Method of detecting genetic translocations identified with chromosomal abnormalities

    DOEpatents

    Gray, Joe W.; Pinkel, Daniel; Tkachuk, Douglas

    2001-01-01

    Methods and compositions for staining based upon nucleic acid sequence that employ nucleic acid probes are provided. Said methods produce staining patterns that can be tailored for specific cytogenetic analyses. Said probes are appropriate for in situ hybridization and stain both interphase and metaphase chromosomal material with reliable signals. The nucleic acid probes are typically of a complexity greater than 50 kb, the complexity depending upon the cytogenetic application. Methods and reagents are provided for the detection of genetic rearrangements. Probes and test kits are provided for use in detecting genetic rearrangements, particularly for use in tumor cytogenetics, in the detection of disease related loci, specifically cancer, such as chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) and for biological dosimetry. Methods and reagents are described for cytogenetic research, for the differentiation of cytogenetically similar but genetically different diseases, and for many prognostic and diagnostic applications.

  17. Method of detecting genetic deletions identified with chromosomal abnormalities

    DOEpatents

    Gray, Joe W; Pinkel, Daniel; Tkachuk, Douglas

    2013-11-26

    Methods and compositions for staining based upon nucleic acid sequence that employ nucleic acid probes are provided. Said methods produce staining patterns that can be tailored for specific cytogenetic analyzes. Said probes are appropriate for in situ hybridization and stain both interphase and metaphase chromosomal material with reliable signals. The nucleic acids probes are typically of a complexity greater tha 50 kb, the complexity depending upon the cytogenetic application. Methods and reagents are provided for the detection of genetic rearrangements. Probes and test kits are provided for use in detecting genetic rearrangements, particlularly for use in tumor cytogenetics, in the detection of disease related loci, specifically cancer, such as chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) and for biological dosimetry. Methods and reagents are described for cytogenetic research, for the differentiation of cytogenetically similar ut genetically different diseases, and for many prognostic and diagnostic applications.

  18. No prognostic effect of additional chromosomal abnormalities in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and 11q23 abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Moorman, A V; Raimondi, S C; Pui, C H; Baruchel, A; Biondi, A; Carroll, A J; Forestier, E; Gaynon, P S; Harbott, J; Harms, D O; Heerema, N; Pieters, R; Schrappe, M; Silverman, L B; Vilmer, E; Harrison, C J

    2005-04-01

    This study characterized the additional chromosomal abnormalities (ACA) associated with 11q23 rearrangements in 450 infants and children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and examined the impact of these ACA on survival. Overall, 213 (47%) cases had ACA but the incidence varied according to patient age and 11q23 subgroup. Infants and patients with t(4;11)(q21;q23) had the lowest incidence of ACA (50/182 (27%) and 57/216 (26%) respectively), whereas patients with del(11)(q23) had the highest incidence (66/93 (71%)). Del(11)(q23) abnormalities were heterogeneous and occasionally secondary to t(9;22)(q34;q11.2). Thus, patients with del(11)(q23) comprised a separate biological entity, which was clearly distinct from those with an 11q23 translocation. The most frequent specific ACA were trisomy X (n = 38), abnormal 12p (n = 32), abnormal 9p (n = 28) and del(6q) (n = 19). The presence of ACA did not change the 5 year event-free survival estimates among children (56% (95% Cl 46-65%) vs 62% (54-69%)) or infants (22% (15-29%) vs 18% (9-29%)), nor when the different 11q23 subgroups were analyzed separately. This study has conclusively demonstrated that there is no prognostic effect of secondary chromosomal changes in association with 11q23 abnormalities in childhood ALL. However, characterization of these ACA is important to determine their potential role in initiation of MLL driven leukemogenesis.

  19. Two functionally distinct kinetochore pools of BubR1 ensure accurate chromosome segregation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Gang; Mendez, Blanca Lopez; Sedgwick, Garry G.; Nilsson, Jakob

    2016-01-01

    The BubR1/Bub3 complex is an important regulator of chromosome segregation as it facilitates proper kinetochore–microtubule interactions and is also an essential component of the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC). Whether BubR1/Bub3 localization to kinetochores in human cells stimulates SAC signalling or only contributes to kinetochore–microtubule interactions is debated. Here we show that two distinct pools of BubR1/Bub3 exist at kinetochores and we uncouple these with defined BubR1/Bub3 mutants to address their function. The major kinetochore pool of BubR1/Bub3 is dependent on direct Bub1/Bub3 binding and is required for chromosome alignment but not for the SAC. A distinct pool of BubR1/Bub3 localizes by directly binding to phosphorylated MELT repeats on the outer kinetochore protein KNL1. When we prevent the direct binding of BubR1/Bub3 to KNL1 the checkpoint is weakened because BubR1/Bub3 is not incorporated into checkpoint complexes efficiently. In conclusion, kinetochore localization supports both known functions of BubR1/Bub3. PMID:27457023

  20. Gene dosage methods as diagnostic tools for the identification of chromosome abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Gouas, L; Goumy, C; Véronèse, L; Tchirkov, A; Vago, P

    2008-09-01

    Cytogenetics is the part of genetics that deals with chromosomes, particularly with numerical and structural chromosome abnormalities, and their implications in congenital or acquired genetic disorders. Standard karyotyping, successfully used for the last 50 years in investigating the chromosome etiology in patients with infertility, fetal abnormalities and congenital disorders, is constrained by the limits of microscopic resolution and is not suited for the detection of subtle chromosome abnormalities. The ability to detect submicroscopic chromosomal rearrangements that lead to copy-number changes has escalated progressively in recent years with the advent of molecular cytogenetic techniques. Here, we review various gene dosage methods such as FISH, PCR-based approaches (MLPA, QF-PCR, QMPSF and real time PCR), CGH and array-CGH, that can be used for the identification and delineation of copy-number changes for diagnostic purposes. Besides comparing their relative strength and weakness, we will discuss the impact that these detection methods have on our understanding of copy number variations in the human genome and their implications in genetic counseling. PMID:18513889

  1. Chromosome 1 abnormalities in elderly patients with newly diagnosed multiple myeloma treated with novel therapies

    PubMed Central

    Caltagirone, Simona; Ruggeri, Marina; Aschero, Simona; Gilestro, Milena; Oddolo, Daniela; Gay, Francesca; Bringhen, Sara; Musolino, Caterina; Baldini, Luca; Musto, Pellegrino; Petrucci, Maria T.; Gaidano, Gianluca; Passera, Roberto; Bruno, Benedetto; Palumbo, Antonio; Boccadoro, Mario; Omedè, Paola

    2014-01-01

    Multiple myeloma is a plasma cell disorder characterized by malignant plasma cell infiltration in the bone marrow, serum and/or urine monoclonal protein and organ damage. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of chromosome 1 abnormalities in a group of elderly patients (>65 years) with newly diagnosed multiple myeloma enrolled in the GIMEMA-MM-03-05 trial and treated with bortezomib, melphalan and prednisone or bortezomib, melphalan, prednisone and thalidomide followed by bortezomib and thalidomide maintenance. We also evaluated the link between chromosome 1 abnormalities and other clinical, genetic and immunophenotypic features by a multivariate logistic regression model. Interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization on immunomagnetically purified plasma cells and bone marrow multiparameter flow cytometry were employed. A multivariate Cox model showed that chromosome 1 abnormalities, age >75 years and a CD19+/CD117− immunophenotype of bone marrow plasma cells were independent risk factors for overall survival in elderly patients with newly diagnosed multiple myeloma. Moreover, a detrimental effect of thalidomide, even when administered in association with bortezomib, was observed in patients with abnormal chromosome 1 as well as in those with 17p deletion, while the benefit of adding thalidomide to the bortezomib-melphalan-prednisone regimen was noted in patients carrying an aggressive CD19+/CD117− bone marrow plasma cell immunophenotype. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltri-als.gov as #NCT01063179. PMID:25015938

  2. Overview of epidemiology, genetics, birth defects, and chromosome abnormalities associated with CDH.

    PubMed

    Pober, Barbara R

    2007-05-15

    Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) is a common and well-studied birth defect. The etiology of most cases remains unknown but increasing evidence points to genetic causation. The data supporting genetic etiologies which are detailed below include the association of CDH with recurring chromosome abnormalities, the existence of CDH-multiplex families, and the co-occurrence of CDH with additional congenital malformations.

  3. Health-related quality of life experienced by children with chromosomal abnormalities and congenital heart defects.

    PubMed

    Garcia Guerra, Gonzalo; Joffe, Ari R; Robertson, Charlene M T; Atallah, Joseph; Alton, Gwen; Sauve, Reg S; Dinu, Irina A; Ross, David B; Rebeyka, Ivan M

    2014-03-01

    Long-term outcomes are fundamental in advising parents about the potential future of their children with congenital heart disease (CHD). No published reports have described the health-related quality of life (HRQL) experienced by children with chromosomal abnormalities who had surgery in early infancy for CHD. A study was undertaken to assess HRQL among children with chromosomal abnormalities and CHD. The authors hypothesized that these children have a worse HRQL than healthy children or a cohort of children matched for CHD diagnosis. Infants with chromosomal abnormalities undergoing cardiac surgery for CHD at 6 weeks of age or younger at the Stollery Children's Hospital between July 2000 and June 2005 were included in the study. The HRQL of these infants was assessed using the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory (PedsQL) 4.0 Generic Core Scales completed by their parents at a 4-year follow-up evaluation. The study compared the scores for 16 children with normative data. The children with chromosomal abnormalities and CHD had significantly lower mean total PedsQL (71.3 vs. 87.3; p < 0.0001), Psychosocial Summary (70.3 vs. 86.1; p < 0.0001), and Physical Summary (74.3 vs. 89.2; p = 0.0006) scores. Compared with the matched children, those with chromosomal abnormalities had a significantly lower median total PedsQL (75.0 vs. 84.6; p = 0.03), Physical Summary (79.5 vs. 96.9; p = 0.007), and School Functioning (68.5 vs. 83.0; p = 0.03) scores. A better understanding of the mechanisms and determinants of HRQL in these children has the potential to yield important implications for clinical practice including clarity for treatment decision making as well as determination of targeted supports and services to meet the needs of these children and their families differentially.

  4. AB155. Clinical presentation and its relationship with chromosomal abnormalities in Turner syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Thao, Bui Phuong; Dung, Vu Chi; Khanh, Nguyen Ngoc; Ngoc, Can Thi Bich; Hoan, Nguyen Thi; Phuong, Nguyen Thi

    2015-01-01

    Background Turner syndrome is a relatively common chromosomal disorder. The disease affects only females, causing hypogonadism and short stature. Early treatment can improve short stature and hypogonadism. The study aims to describe chromosomal abnormalities, clinical characteristics and its relationship with chromosomal abnormalities in patients with Turner syndrome. Methods A total of 213 patients with Turner syndrome diagnosed in National Hospital of Pediatrics, Hanoi. A cross section study was used. Results Mean age on diagnosis was 12.2±4.9 years. Monosomy 45,XO occupied 54,31%; 45,X/46,XX was seen in 14.66%; 27.59% had structural disorders of chromosome X. Short stature was found in all patients aged more than 15 years. Severity of short stature and percentage of patients with short stature went up with age. There was no difference in term of height between karyotype groups. In group aged ≥12 years, 95.2% of cases had hypogonadism. Other symptoms frequently seen were nail hypoplasia (77.4%), cubitus valgus (74.7%), broad chest (69.2%)/abnormalities in face and neck were epicanthic fold (55.6%), low posterior line (51.3%), excessive skin in the back of the neck/webbed neck (42.5%). In a group aged <1 year, lymphoedema of hands/feet, epicanthic fold, broad chest, cubitus valgus were found in 100%. Majority of symptoms, congenital defects of heart/kidney were seen more frequently in 45,X group. Conclusions Lymphoedema of hands/feet in infants, low growth velocity, delayed puberty, abnormalities in face and neck, and other symptoms should be checked to early diagnose and treat Turner syndrome. Patients with 45,X had more severe presentation compared to patients with 45,X/46,XX and structural abnormalities of X chromosome.

  5. Molecular investigation of a dicentric 13;17 chromosome found in a 21-week gestation fetus with multiple congenital abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Cockwell, A E; Maloney, V K; Thomas, N S; Smith, E L; Gonda, P; Bass, P; Crolla, J A

    2006-01-01

    We report a 21-week gestation fetus terminated because of multiple congenital abnormalities seen on ultrasound scan, including ventriculomegaly, possible clefting of the hard palate, cervical hemivertebrae, micrognathia, abnormal heart, horseshoe kidney and a 2-vessel umbilical cord. On cytogenetic examination, the fetus was found to have a male karyotype with 45 chromosomes with a dicentric chromosome, which appeared to consist of the long arms of chromosomes 13 and 17. Molecular genetic investigations and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) unexpectedly showed that the derivative chromosome contained two interstitial blocks of chromosome 17 short arm sequences, totalling approximately 7 Mb, between the two centromeres. This effectively made the fetus monosomic for approximately 15 Mb of 17p without the concurrent trisomy for another chromosome normally seen following malsegregation of reciprocal translocations. It also illustrates the complexity involved in the formation of some structurally abnormal chromosomes, which can only be resolved by detailed molecular investigations.

  6. Uniparental isodisomy of chromosome 14 in two cases: An abnormal child and a normal adult

    SciTech Connect

    Papenhausen, P.R.; Mueller, O.T.; Sutcliffe, M.; Diamond, T.M.; Kousseff, B.G.; Johnson, V.P.

    1995-11-20

    Uniparental disomy (UPD) of a number of different chromosomes has been found in association with abnormal phenotypes. A growing body of evidence for an imprinting effect involving chromosome 14 has been accumulating. We report on a case of paternal UPD of chromosome 14 studied in late gestation due to polyhydramnios and a ventral wall hernia. A prenatal karyotype documented a balanced Robertsonian 14:14 translocation. The baby was born prematurely with hairy forehead, retrognathia, mild puckering of the lips and finger contractures. Hypotonia has persisted since birth and at age one year, a tracheostomy for laryngomalacia and gastrostomy for feeding remain necessary. Absence of maternal VNTR polymorphisms and homozygosity of paternal polymorphisms using chromosome 14 specific probes at D14S22 and D14S13 loci indicated paternal uniparental isodisomy (pUPID). Parental chromosomes were normal. We also report on a case of maternal LTPD in a normal patient with a balanced Robertsonian 14:14 translocation and a history of multiple miscarriages. Five previous reports of chromosome 14 UPD suggest that an adverse developmental effect may be more severe whenever the UPD is paternal in origin. This is the second reported patient with paternal UPD and the fifth reported with maternal UPD, and only few phenotypic similarities are apparent. Examination of these chromosome 14 UPD cases of maternal and paternal origin suggests that there are syndromic imprinting effects. 30 refs., 3 figs.

  7. Analysis of non-clonal chromosome abnormalities observed in hematologic malignancies among Southwest Oncology Group patients

    SciTech Connect

    McConnell, T.S.; Dobin, S.M.

    1994-09-01

    From 1987-1994, the Southwest Oncology Group Cytogenetics Committee reviewed 1571 studies in 590 adult patient cases with ALL, AML, CML or CLL. These were analyzed for the presence of clinically important non-clonal abnormalities (NCA). Abnormalities were defined as non-clonal if one metaphase had a structural abnormality or an extra chromosome. Chromosome loss was not analyzed due to the possibility of random loss. In 72 cases (12%) comprising 136 studies, at least one NCA was observed. In 21 of these cases (29%), NCAs consisted of obvious clonal evolution or instability, and thus were not included in the analysis. At least one structural NCA was observed in which the abnormality differed from the mainline in 36 (50%) patients. Seventeen of the 36 cases had a normal mode. Nineteen of the 36 patients had an abnormal or normal/abnormal mode. At least one numerical NCA was found in 15 cases (21%). Fifteen cases (21%) contained at least one marker chromosome. Several cases involved NCA in more than one of the above divisions. NCAs could be classified into several categories: (1){open_quotes}the clone to come{close_quotes}, (2) evolving clones which then disappeared, (3) NCAs with putative clinical importance that never became clonal, (4) NCAs during remission identical to the preceding clonal abnormality, (5) NCAs which indicated clonal evolution or instability. Examples include one metaphase with t(9;22) or del(20q) or inv(16) or +8 which either preceded or followed clonal findings of the same aberration. Such findings should be communicated to the clinician.

  8. Clinical and molecular cytogenetic studies in ring chromosome 5: report of a child with congenital abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Basinko, Audrey; Giovannucci Uzielli, Maria Luisa; Scarselli, Gloria; Priolo, Manuela; Timpani, Giuseppina; De Braekeleer, Marc

    2012-02-01

    We report here a child with a ring chromosome 5 (r(5)) associated with facial dysmorphology and multiple congenital abnormalities. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) using bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones was performed to determine the breakpoints involved in the r(5). The 5p deletion extended from 5p13.2-3 to 5pter and measured 34.61 Mb (range: 33.7-35.52 Mb) while the 5q deletion extended from 5q35.3 to 5qter and measured 2.44 Mb (range: 2.31-2.57 Mb). The patient presented signs such as microcephaly, hypertelorism, micrognathia and epicanthal folds, partially recalling those of a deletion of the short arm of chromosome 5 and the "cri-du-chat" syndrome. The most striking phenotypic features were the congenital heart abnormalities which have been frequently reported in deletions of the distal part of the long arm of chromosome 5 and in rings leading to a 5q35-5qter deletion. However, the NKX2-5 gene, which has been related to congenital heart defects, was not deleted in our patient, nor presumably to some other patients with 5q35.3-5qter deletion. We propose that VEGFR3, deleted in our patient, could be a candidate gene for the congenital heart abnormalities observed.

  9. Clinical and molecular cytogenetic studies in ring chromosome 5: report of a child with congenital abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Basinko, Audrey; Giovannucci Uzielli, Maria Luisa; Scarselli, Gloria; Priolo, Manuela; Timpani, Giuseppina; De Braekeleer, Marc

    2012-02-01

    We report here a child with a ring chromosome 5 (r(5)) associated with facial dysmorphology and multiple congenital abnormalities. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) using bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones was performed to determine the breakpoints involved in the r(5). The 5p deletion extended from 5p13.2-3 to 5pter and measured 34.61 Mb (range: 33.7-35.52 Mb) while the 5q deletion extended from 5q35.3 to 5qter and measured 2.44 Mb (range: 2.31-2.57 Mb). The patient presented signs such as microcephaly, hypertelorism, micrognathia and epicanthal folds, partially recalling those of a deletion of the short arm of chromosome 5 and the "cri-du-chat" syndrome. The most striking phenotypic features were the congenital heart abnormalities which have been frequently reported in deletions of the distal part of the long arm of chromosome 5 and in rings leading to a 5q35-5qter deletion. However, the NKX2-5 gene, which has been related to congenital heart defects, was not deleted in our patient, nor presumably to some other patients with 5q35.3-5qter deletion. We propose that VEGFR3, deleted in our patient, could be a candidate gene for the congenital heart abnormalities observed. PMID:22193390

  10. Naturally Occurring Differences in CENH3 Affect Chromosome Segregation in Zygotic Mitosis of Hybrids

    PubMed Central

    Maheshwari, Shamoni; Tan, Ek Han; West, Allan; Franklin, F. Chris H.; Comai, Luca

    2015-01-01

    The point of attachment of spindle microtubules to metaphase chromosomes is known as the centromere. Plant and animal centromeres are epigenetically specified by a centromere-specific variant of Histone H3, CENH3 (a.k.a. CENP-A). Unlike canonical histones that are invariant, CENH3 proteins are accumulating substitutions at an accelerated rate. This diversification of CENH3 is a conundrum since its role as the key determinant of centromere identity remains a constant across species. Here, we ask whether naturally occurring divergence in CENH3 has functional consequences. We performed functional complementation assays on cenh3-1, a null mutation in Arabidopsis thaliana, using untagged CENH3s from increasingly distant relatives. Contrary to previous results using GFP-tagged CENH3, we find that the essential functions of CENH3 are conserved across a broad evolutionary landscape. CENH3 from a species as distant as the monocot Zea mays can functionally replace A. thaliana CENH3. Plants expressing variant CENH3s that are fertile when selfed show dramatic segregation errors when crossed to a wild-type individual. The progeny of this cross include hybrid diploids, aneuploids with novel genetic rearrangements and haploids that inherit only the genome of the wild-type parent. Importantly, it is always chromosomes from the plant expressing the divergent CENH3 that missegregate. Using chimeras, we show that it is divergence in the fast-evolving N-terminal tail of CENH3 that is causing segregation errors and genome elimination. Furthermore, we analyzed N-terminal tail sequences from plant CENH3s and discovered a modular pattern of sequence conservation. From this we hypothesize that while the essential functions of CENH3 are largely conserved, the N-terminal tail is evolving to adapt to lineage-specific centromeric constraints. Our results demonstrate that this lineage-specific evolution of CENH3 causes inviability and sterility of progeny in crosses, at the same time producing

  11. Additional chromosome abnormalities in patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia treated with all-trans retinoic acid and chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Cervera, José; Montesinos, Pau; Hernández-Rivas, Jesús M.; Calasanz, María J.; Aventín, Anna; Ferro, María T.; Luño, Elisa; Sánchez, Javier; Vellenga, Edo; Rayón, Chelo; Milone, Gustavo; de la Serna, Javier; Rivas, Concha; González, José D.; Tormo, Mar; Amutio, Elena; González, Marcos; Brunet, Salut; Lowenberg, Bob; Sanz, Miguel A.

    2010-01-01

    Background Acute promyelocytic leukemia is a subtype of acute myeloid leukemia characterized by the t(15;17). The incidence and prognostic significance of additional chromosomal abnormalities in acute promyelocytic leukemia is still a controversial matter. Design and Methods Based on cytogenetic data available for 495 patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia enrolled in two consecutive PETHEMA trials (LPA96 and LPA99), we analyzed the incidence, characteristics, and outcome of patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia with and without additional chromosomal abnormalities who had been treated with all-trans retinoic acid plus anthracycline monochemotherapy for induction and consolidation. Results Additional chromosomal abnormalities were observed in 140 patients (28%). Trisomy 8 was the most frequent abnormality (36%), followed by abn(7q) (5%). Patients with additional chromosomal abnormalities more frequently had coagulopathy (P=0.03), lower platelet counts (P=0.02), and higher relapse-risk scores (P=0.02) than their counterparts without additional abnormalities. No significant association with FLT3/ITD or other clinicopathological characteristics was demonstrated. Patients with and without additional chromosomal abnormalities had similar complete remission rates (90% and 91%, respectively). Univariate analysis showed that additional chromosomal abnormalities were associated with a lower relapse-free survival in the LPA99 trial (P=0.04), but not in the LPA96 trial. However, neither additional chromosomal abnormalities overall nor any specific abnormality was identified as an independent risk factor for relapse in multivariate analysis. Conclusions The lack of independent prognostic value of additional chromosomal abnormalities in acute promyelocytic leukemia does not support the use of alternative therapeutic strategies when such abnormalities are found. PMID:19903674

  12. Combined Use of Cytogenetic and Molecular Methods in Prenatal Diagnostics of Chromosomal Abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Stomornjak-Vukadin, Meliha; Kurtovic-Basic, Ilvana; Mehinovic, Lejla; Konjhodzic, Rijad

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The aim of prenatal diagnostics is to provide information of the genetic abnormalities of the fetus early enough for the termination of pregnancy to be possible. Chromosomal abnormalities can be detected in an unborn child through the use of cytogenetic, molecular- cytogenetic and molecular methods. In between them, central spot is still occupied by cytogenetic methods. In cases where use of such methods is not informative enough, one or more molecular cytogenetic methods can be used for further clarification. Combined use of the mentioned methods improves the quality of the final findings in the diagnostics of chromosomal abnormalities, with classical cytogenetic methods still occupying the central spot. Material and methods: Conducted research represent retrospective-prospective study of a four year period, from 2008 through 2011. In the period stated, 1319 karyotyping from amniotic fluid were conducted, along with 146 FISH analysis. Results: Karyotyping had detected 20 numerical and 18 structural aberrations in that period. Most common observed numerical aberration were Down syndrome (75%), Klinefelter syndrome (10%), Edwards syndrome, double Y syndrome and triploidy (5% each). Within observed structural aberrations more common were balanced chromosomal aberrations then non balanced ones. Most common balanced structural aberrations were as follows: reciprocal translocations (60%), Robertson translocations (13.3%), chromosomal inversions, duplications and balanced de novo chromosomal rearrangements (6.6% each). Conclusion: With non- balanced aberrations observed in the samples of amniotic fluid, non- balanced translocations, deletions and derived chromosomes were equally represented. Number of detected aneuploidies with FISH, prior to obtaining results with karyotyping, were 6. PMID:26005269

  13. Retrospective evaluation of the clinical and laboratory data from 300 patients of various hematological malignancies with chromosome 3 abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dandan; Zhang, Yong; Chen, Suning; Pan, Jinlan; He, Xuefeng; Liang, Jianying; Chen, Zixing

    2015-06-01

    This retrospective study was designed to evaluate the clinical and laboratory behaviors of chromosome 3 abnormalities by analyzing the morphological, cytogenetic, and follow-up data from 300 patients of various hematological malignancies with chromosome 3 abnormalities. From the results, trisomy 3, translocation (3q), and del(3) were the abnormal types most frequently observed (>10%) among the chromosome 3 abnormalities. In hematological malignancies, chromosome 3 abnormalities were most frequently seen in the patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) (24.7%) and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) (16%), followed by those with acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) (13.7%) and multiple myeloma (MM) (12.7%). In this series, genomic losses were the most frequent genetic abnormalities in AML, ALL, and hybrid acute leukemia (HAL) patients, whereas structural rearrangements were frequently seen in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) and MDS patients, and genomic gains in MM, lymphoma and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) patients. Chromosome 3 abnormalities mainly occurred as a component of a complex abnormality (251/300) rather than a sole one (14/300). Survival analysis demonstrated a statistical difference between the patients with trisomy 3, who had a better prognosis, and patients with del(3), who had a worse prognosis in this series (P < 0.05). Abnormalities in chromosome 3 may imply an unfavorable outcome in CML and ALL.

  14. Segregation analysis in a man heterozygous for a pericentric inversion of chromosome 7 (p13; q36) by sperm chromosome studies

    SciTech Connect

    Navarror, J.; Benet, J.; Martorell, M.R.; Templado, C.; Egozcue, J. )

    1993-07-01

    The authors have analyzed 140 sperm chromosome complements from a subfertile man heterozygous for an inv(7)(p13;q36). Seventy-five percent of the chromosome complements were not recombinant: 37.9% contained the normal chromosome 7, and 37.1% contained the inverted chromosome 7. Twenty-five percent of the 140 were recombinant: 7.1% carried a recombinant chromosome 7 with a duplication p and deletion q, 17.1% carried a recombinant chromosome 7 with a duplication q and deletion p, and 0.7% carried both recombinant chromosomes. The frequency of structural chromosomal aberrations unrelated to the inversion was 11.4%, and the frequency of aneuploidy was 2.9%. Both frequencies were not significantly different from those in control donors. Two sperm complements with a second independent, contiguous inversion involving one of the original breakpoints (q36) were observed (1.4%). The risk of producing chromosomally abnormal offspring or spontaneous abortions would be 34.3%. The proportion of X-bearing and Y-bearing sperm was 46.8% and 53.2%, respectively, not significantly different from the expected 1:1 ratio. 28 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Overexpression and Mislocalization of the Chromosomal Segregation Protein Separase in Multiple Human Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Rene; Fofanov, Viacheslav; Panigrahi, Anil K.; Merchant, Fatima; Zhang, Nenggang; Pati, Debananda

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Separase, an endopeptidase, plays a pivotal role in chromosomal segregation by separating sister chromatids during the metaphase to anaphase transition. Using a mouse mammary tumor model we have recently demonstrated that overexpression of Separase induces aneuploidy and tumorigenesis (Zhang et al., 2008, PNAS 105:13033). In the present study, we have investigated the expression level of Separase across a wide range of human tumors. Experimental Design To examine the expression levels and localization of Separase in human tumors, we have performed immunofluorescence microscopy using human Separase antibody and tumor tissue arrays from osteosarcoma, colorectal, breast, and prostate cancers with appropriate normal controls. Results We show that Separase is significantly overexpressed in osteosarcoma, breast and prostate tumor specimens. There is a strong correlation of tumor status with the localization of Separase into the nucleus throughout all stages of the cell cycle. Unlike the normal control tissues, where Separase localization is exclusively cytoplasmic in non dividing cells, human tumor samples show significantly higher number of resting cells with a strong nuclear Separase staining. Additionally, overexpression of Separase transcript strongly correlates with high incidence of relapse, metastasis and lower 5 year overall survival rate in breast and prostate cancer patients. Conclusion These results further strengthen our hypothesis that Separase might be an oncogene, whose overexpression induces tumorigenesis, and indicates that Separase overexpression and aberrant nuclear localization are common in many tumor types and may predict outcome in some human cancers. PMID:19351757

  16. Implication of sperm chromosomal abnormalities in recurrent abortion and multiple implantation failure.

    PubMed

    Caseiro, Ana Lara; Regalo, Ana; Pereira, Elisa; Esteves, Telma; Fernandes, Fernando; Carvalho, Joaquim

    2015-10-01

    Currently, some infertility treatment centres provide sperm karyotype analysis, although the impact of sperm chromosomal abnormalities on fertility is not yet fully understood. Several studies using fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) to analyse sperm chromosomal constitution discovered that the incidence of aneuploidy is increased in individuals with a history of repeated abortion or implantation failure and is even higher in cases of oligoasthenoteratozoospermia (OAT), abnormal somatic karyotype or in spermatozoa retrieved directly from the testis or epididymis, showing that the application of FISH in these cases may be of some benefit for improving the reproductive outcome. This article presents the results of clinical trials of FISH analysis on spermatozoa, the medical indications for performing this examination, its results in infertile patients and the advantages when performing genetic counselling prior to treatment. Also discussed is the possibility of applying the latest techniques of genetic analysis in these cases and the potential benefits for improving the prognosis of male infertility. PMID:26299791

  17. Solar activity cycle and the incidence of foetal chromosome abnormalities detected at prenatal diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halpern, Gabrielle J.; Stoupel, Eliahu G.; Barkai, Gad; Chaki, Rina; Legum, Cyril; Fejgin, Moshe D.; Shohat, Mordechai

    1995-06-01

    We studied 2001 foetuses during the period of minimal solar activity of solar cycle 21 and 2265 foetuses during the period of maximal solar activity of solar cycle 22, in all women aged 37 years and over who underwent free prenatal diagnosis in four hospitals in the greater Tel Aviv area. There were no significant differences in the total incidence of chromosomal abnormalities or of trisomy between the two periods (2.15% and 1.8% versus 2.34% and 2.12%, respectively). However, the trend of excessive incidence of chromosomal abnormalities in the period of maximal solar activity suggests that a prospective study in a large population would be required to rule out any possible effect of extreme solar activity.

  18. Implication of sperm chromosomal abnormalities in recurrent abortion and multiple implantation failure.

    PubMed

    Caseiro, Ana Lara; Regalo, Ana; Pereira, Elisa; Esteves, Telma; Fernandes, Fernando; Carvalho, Joaquim

    2015-10-01

    Currently, some infertility treatment centres provide sperm karyotype analysis, although the impact of sperm chromosomal abnormalities on fertility is not yet fully understood. Several studies using fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) to analyse sperm chromosomal constitution discovered that the incidence of aneuploidy is increased in individuals with a history of repeated abortion or implantation failure and is even higher in cases of oligoasthenoteratozoospermia (OAT), abnormal somatic karyotype or in spermatozoa retrieved directly from the testis or epididymis, showing that the application of FISH in these cases may be of some benefit for improving the reproductive outcome. This article presents the results of clinical trials of FISH analysis on spermatozoa, the medical indications for performing this examination, its results in infertile patients and the advantages when performing genetic counselling prior to treatment. Also discussed is the possibility of applying the latest techniques of genetic analysis in these cases and the potential benefits for improving the prognosis of male infertility.

  19. Overview of Epidemiology, Genetics, Birth Defects, and Chromosome Abnormalities Associated With CDH

    PubMed Central

    Pober, Barbara R.

    2010-01-01

    Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) is a common and well-studied birth defect. The etiology of most cases remains unknown but increasing evidence points to genetic causation. The data supporting genetic etiologies which are detailed below include the association of CDH with recurring chromosome abnormalities, the existence of CDH-multiplex families, and the co-occurrence of CDH with additional congenital malformations. PMID:17436298

  20. Chromosomal abnormalities & oxidative stress in women with premature ovarian failure (POF)

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Manoj; Pathak, Dhananjay; Venkatesh, Sundararajan; Kriplani, Alka; Ammini, A.C.; Dada, Rima

    2012-01-01

    Background & objectives: Premature ovarian failure (POF) is defined as the cessation of ovarian function under the age of 40 yr and is characterized by amenorrhoea, hypoestrogenism and elevated serum gonadotrophin levels. The cause of POF remains undetermined in majority of the cases. This study was aimed to investigate the type and frequency of cytogenetic abnormalities in patients with idiopathic POF and also to study the role of oxidative stress in such cases. Methods: Seventy five women with idiopathic POF were included in this study. Chromosome analysis was done in peripheral blood lymphocytes by conventional GTG banding to identify numerical or structural abnormalities. Cytogenetically normal cases were investigated for reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels in their blood by luminol-chemiluminescence assay. Results: Eighteen chromosomal anomalies were identified in POF patients (24%). Majority of the cases were found to have X-chromosome abnormalities (28%). Overall median ROS range was found to be significantly higher (P<0.01) in POF patients [50480 (120,132966) RLU/min] compared to controls [340 (120,5094) RLU/min]. Among these, 50 per cent of the POF patients had higher ROS levels, 20 per cent had medium elevation and 30 per cent were found to have normal values comparable to controls. Interpretation & conclusions: X-chromosome anomalies were found to be the major contributor of POF. Oxidative stress may be the underlying aetiology in idiopathic premature ovarian failure. Thus the results of this study highlight the role of cytogenetic abnormalities and supraphysiological levels of ROS in causation of idiopathic POF. But the role of oxidative stress needs to be confirmed by other studies on patients from different geographical areas and from different ethnicities. PMID:22382189

  1. Meiotic chromosome segregation mutants identified by insertional mutagenesis of fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe; tandem-repeat, single-site integrations

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Mari K.; Young, Nathan P.; Glick, Gloria G.; Wahls, Wayne P.

    2004-01-01

    Identification of genes required for segregation of chromosomes in meiosis (scm) is difficult because in most organisms high-fidelity chromosome segregation is essential to produce viable meiotic products. The biology of fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe facilitates identification of such genes. Insertional mutagenesis was achieved by electroporation of linear ura4+ DNA into cells harboring a ura4 deletion. Approximately 1000 stable transformants were screened individually for the production of elevated frequencies of aneuploid spore colonies. Twenty-two candidates were subjected to a secondary screen for cytological defects. Five mutants exhibited significant levels of aberrant meiotic chromosome segregation, but were proficient for mating and completion of meiosis. Each mutant's phenotype cosegregated with its respective ura4+ transgene. The mutations were recessive and defined five complementation groups, revealing five distinct genes (scm1, scm2, scm3, scm4 and scm5). Southern blotting revealed single-site integration in each transformant, indicating that insertional mutagenesis is useful for generating single-locus scm mutations linked to a selectable marker. The transgene insertion points were refractory to analysis by inverse-PCR. Molecular and real-time PCR analyses revealed the presence of multiple, truncated copies of ura4+ at each integration site. Thus, electroporation-mediated insertional mutagenesis in S.pombe is preceded by exonucleolytic processing and concatomerization of the transforming DNA. PMID:15316103

  2. Meiotic chromosome segregation mutants identified by insertional mutagenesis of fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe; tandem-repeat, single-site integrations.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Mari K; Young, Nathan P; Glick, Gloria G; Wahls, Wayne P

    2004-01-01

    Identification of genes required for segregation of chromosomes in meiosis (scm) is difficult because in most organisms high-fidelity chromosome segregation is essential to produce viable meiotic products. The biology of fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe facilitates identification of such genes. Insertional mutagenesis was achieved by electroporation of linear ura4+ DNA into cells harboring a ura4 deletion. Approximately 1000 stable transformants were screened individually for the production of elevated frequencies of aneuploid spore colonies. Twenty-two candidates were subjected to a secondary screen for cytological defects. Five mutants exhibited significant levels of aberrant meiotic chromosome segregation, but were proficient for mating and completion of meiosis. Each mutant's phenotype cosegregated with its respective ura4+ transgene. The mutations were recessive and defined five complementation groups, revealing five distinct genes (scm1, scm2, scm3, scm4 and scm5). Southern blotting revealed single-site integration in each transformant, indicating that insertional mutagenesis is useful for generating single-locus scm mutations linked to a selectable marker. The transgene insertion points were refractory to analysis by inverse-PCR. Molecular and real-time PCR analyses revealed the presence of multiple, truncated copies of ura4+ at each integration site. Thus, electroporation-mediated insertional mutagenesis in S.pombe is preceded by exonucleolytic processing and concatomerization of the transforming DNA. PMID:15316103

  3. Three Different Pathways Prevent Chromosome Segregation in the Presence of DNA Damage or Replication Stress in Budding Yeast.

    PubMed

    Palou, Gloria; Palou, Roger; Zeng, Fanli; Vashisht, Ajay A; Wohlschlegel, James A; Quintana, David G

    2015-09-01

    A surveillance mechanism, the S phase checkpoint, blocks progression into mitosis in response to DNA damage and replication stress. Segregation of damaged or incompletely replicated chromosomes results in genomic instability. In humans, the S phase checkpoint has been shown to constitute an anti-cancer barrier. Inhibition of mitotic cyclin dependent kinase (M-CDK) activity by Wee1 kinases is critical to block mitosis in some organisms. However, such mechanism is dispensable in the response to genotoxic stress in the model eukaryotic organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We show here that the Wee1 ortholog Swe1 does indeed inhibit M-CDK activity and chromosome segregation in response to genotoxic insults. Swe1 dispensability in budding yeast is the result of a redundant control of M-CDK activity by the checkpoint kinase Rad53. In addition, our results indicate that Swe1 is an effector of the checkpoint central kinase Mec1. When checkpoint control on M-CDK and on Pds1/securin stabilization are abrogated, cells undergo aberrant chromosome segregation. PMID:26332045

  4. Structural chromosomal abnormalities in patients with mental retardation and/or multiple congenital anomalies: a new series of 24 patients.

    PubMed

    Tos, T; Karaman, A; Aksoy, A; Tukun, A

    2012-01-01

    Chromosomal abnormalities are a major cause of mental retardation and/or multiple congenital anomalies (MCA/MR). Screening for these chromosomal imbalances has mainly been done by standard karyotyping. The objective of this study was to report standard chromosome analysis and FISH screening of a series of 24 patients with MCA/MR. Structural chromosomal abnormalities were detected in 24 alterations and included 5 deletions, 2 duplications, 6 unbalanced translocations, 3 inversions, 2 insertions, 3 derivative chromosomes, 2 marker chromosomes and 1 isochromosome. We confirm that a high percentage of MCA/MR cases hitherto considered idiopathic is caused by chromosomal imbalances. We conclude that patients with MCA/MR should be routinely karyotyped.

  5. Radiation exposure and chromosome abnormalities. Human cytogenetic studies at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Japan, 1963-1988

    SciTech Connect

    Ishihara, T.; Kohno, S.; Minamihisamatsu, M. )

    1990-03-01

    The results of human cytogenetic studies performed at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), Chiba, Japan for about 25 years are described. The studies were pursued primarily under two major projects: one involving people exposed to radiation under various conditions and the other involving patients with malignant diseases, especially leukemias. Whereas chromosome abnormalities in radiation-exposed people are excellent indicators of radiation exposure, their behavior in bone marrow provide useful information for a better understanding of chromosome abnormalities in leukemias and related disorders. The role of chromosome abnormalities in the genesis and development of leukemia and related disorders is considered, suggesting a view for future studies in this field.

  6. Familial Constitutional Rearrangement of Chromosomes 4 & 8: Phenotypically Normal Mother and Abnormal Progeny.

    PubMed

    Kunwar, Fulesh; Bakshi, Sonal R

    2016-04-01

    Balanced chromosome translocations carriers mostly do not have recognizable phenotypic expression but may have more risk of recurrent spontaneous abortions &/or children with serious birth defects due to unbalanced chromosome complements. Unbalanced chromosomal rearrangements have variable clinical expression and are rare. We present here a case report of three siblings affected with intellectual disability and minor dysmorphic features of face and limbs, born to a non-consanguineous couple in which mother had 5 abortions. The constitutional chromosome analysis revealed balanced translocation t (4;8) in mother and all the three siblings were karyotypically normal. Chromosomal microarray in one of the probands revealed partial monosomy 8pter-p23 and a partial trisomy 4pter-p16. Phenotypic features were recorded in 3 probands using Human Phenotype Ontology terms to query web-based tool Phenomizer. The harmonized description using globally accepted ontology is very important especially in case of rare genetic conditions and the heterogeneous phenotypes which make it even more challenging. The prevalence of sub-microscopic unbalanced translocations may be under-reported due to lesser use of molecular genetic analysis. The familial expression of abnormal phenotypes including intellectual disability make the individuals candidate for molecular genetic analysis and phenotyping to help defer the status of idiopathic mental retardation and identify sub-entity of genetic condition. PMID:27190830

  7. Familial Constitutional Rearrangement of Chromosomes 4 & 8: Phenotypically Normal Mother and Abnormal Progeny

    PubMed Central

    Kunwar, Fulesh

    2016-01-01

    Balanced chromosome translocations carriers mostly do not have recognizable phenotypic expression but may have more risk of recurrent spontaneous abortions &/or children with serious birth defects due to unbalanced chromosome complements. Unbalanced chromosomal rearrangements have variable clinical expression and are rare. We present here a case report of three siblings affected with intellectual disability and minor dysmorphic features of face and limbs, born to a non-consanguineous couple in which mother had 5 abortions. The constitutional chromosome analysis revealed balanced translocation t (4;8) in mother and all the three siblings were karyotypically normal. Chromosomal microarray in one of the probands revealed partial monosomy 8pter-p23 and a partial trisomy 4pter-p16. Phenotypic features were recorded in 3 probands using Human Phenotype Ontology terms to query web-based tool Phenomizer. The harmonized description using globally accepted ontology is very important especially in case of rare genetic conditions and the heterogeneous phenotypes which make it even more challenging. The prevalence of sub-microscopic unbalanced translocations may be under-reported due to lesser use of molecular genetic analysis. The familial expression of abnormal phenotypes including intellectual disability make the individuals candidate for molecular genetic analysis and phenotyping to help defer the status of idiopathic mental retardation and identify sub-entity of genetic condition. PMID:27190830

  8. ParA and ParB coordinate chromosome segregation with cell elongation and division during Streptomyces sporulation

    PubMed Central

    Donczew, Magdalena; Mackiewicz, Paweł; Wróbel, Agnieszka; Flärdh, Klas; Zakrzewska-Czerwińska, Jolanta

    2016-01-01

    In unicellular bacteria, the ParA and ParB proteins segregate chromosomes and coordinate this process with cell division and chromosome replication. During sporulation of mycelial Streptomyces, ParA and ParB uniformly distribute multiple chromosomes along the filamentous sporogenic hyphal compartment, which then differentiates into a chain of unigenomic spores. However, chromosome segregation must be coordinated with cell elongation and multiple divisions. Here, we addressed the question of whether ParA and ParB are involved in the synchronization of cell-cycle processes during sporulation in Streptomyces. To answer this question, we used time-lapse microscopy, which allows the monitoring of growth and division of single sporogenic hyphae. We showed that sporogenic hyphae stop extending at the time of ParA accumulation and Z-ring formation. We demonstrated that both ParA and ParB affect the rate of hyphal extension. Additionally, we showed that ParA promotes the formation of massive nucleoprotein complexes by ParB. We also showed that FtsZ ring assembly is affected by the ParB protein and/or unsegregated DNA. Our results indicate the existence of a checkpoint between the extension and septation of sporogenic hyphae that involves the ParA and ParB proteins. PMID:27248800

  9. Molecular detection of chromosomal abnormalities in germ and somatic cells of aged male mice

    SciTech Connect

    Lowe, X.; Baulch, J.; Quintana, L.; Ramsey, M.; Breneman, J.; Tucker, J.; Wyrobek, A.; Collins, B.; Allen, J.; Holland, N.

    1994-12-31

    Three cytogenetic methods were applied to eight B6C3F1 male mice aged 22.5 - 30.5mo to determine if advanced age was associated with an elevated risk of producing chromosomally defective germinal and somatic cells; sperm aneuploidy analysis by multi-color fluorescence in situ hybridization for three chromosomes, spermatid micronucleus analysis with anti-kinetochore antibodies, and translocation analysis of somatic metaphases by {open_quotes}painting{close_quotes} for two chromosomes. Eight mice aged 2.4mo served as controls. Sperm aneuploidy was measured by multi-color fluorescence in situ co-hybridization with DNA probes specific for chromosomes X, Y and 8, scoring 10,000 cells per animal. The aged group showed significant 1.5 - 2.0 fold increases in the hyperhaploidy phenotypes X-X-8, Y-Y-8, 8-8-Y, and 8-8-X with the greater effects appearing in animals aged >29mo. The aged group also showed significantly increased frequencies of micronucleated spermatids (2.0 vs 0.4 per 1000; all were kinetochore negative). Analysis of metaphase chromosomes from blood by {open_quotes}painting{close_quotes} of chromosomes 2 and 8 yielded 4 translocation per 858 cell-equivalents in the aged group which was a non-significant elevation over 0/202 in controls. Although interpretation must be cautious due to the small number of animals analyzed, these findings suggest that advanced paternal age may be a risk factor for chromosomal abnormalities of reproductive and somatic importance.

  10. Segregation of chromosome arms in growing and non-growing Escherichia coli cells

    PubMed Central

    Woldringh, Conrad L.; Hansen, Flemming G.; Vischer, Norbert O. E.; Atlung, Tove

    2015-01-01

    In slow-growing Escherichia coli cells the chromosome is organized with its left (L) and right (R) arms lying separated in opposite halves of the nucleoid and with the origin (O) in-between, giving the pattern L-O-R. During replication one of the arms has to pass the other to obtain the same organization in the daughter cells: L-O-R L-O-R. To determine the movement of arms during segregation six strains were constructed carrying three colored loci: the left and right arms were labeled with red and cyan fluorescent-proteins, respectively, on loci symmetrically positioned at different distances from the central origin, which was labeled with green-fluorescent protein. In non-replicating cells with the predominant spot pattern L-O-R, initiation of replication first resulted in a L-O-O-R pattern, soon changing to O-L-R-O. After replication of the arms the predominant spot patterns were, L-O-R L-O-R, O-R-L R-O-L or O-L-R L-O-R indicating that one or both arms passed an origin and the other arm. To study the driving force for these movements cell growth was inhibited with rifampicin allowing run-off DNA synthesis. Similar spot patterns were obtained in growing and non-growing cells, indicating that the movement of arms is not a growth-sustained process, but may result from DNA synthesis itself. The distances between loci on different arms (LR-distances) and between duplicated loci (LL- or RR-distances) as a function of their distance from the origin, indicate that in slow-growing cells DNA is organized according to the so-called sausage model and not according to the doughnut model. PMID:26029188

  11. Azacitidine treatment for patients with myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia with chromosome 3q abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Wanquet, Anne; Prebet, Thomas; Berthon, Céline; Sebert, Marie; Roux, Clémence; Kulasekararaj, Austin; Micol, Jean-Baptiste; Esterni, Benjamin; Itzykson, Raphael; Thepot, Sylvain; Recher, Christian; Delaunay, Jacques; Dreyfus, François; Mufti, Ghulam; Fenaux, Pierre; Vey, Norbert

    2015-10-01

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) and myelodysplasia (MDS) with chromosome 3q abnormalities have a dismal outcome either untreated or with conventional treatments. Azacitidine (AZA) is now considered as the standard of care in high-risk MDS and oligoblastic AML patients. The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of azacitine treatment in this cytogenetic subgroup. We report here a multicentre retrospective study of 157 patients treated with AZA for AML/MDS with chromosome 3q abnormalities and 27 patients with isolated EVI-1 overexpression. Median age was 65 years, 40 patients (25%) had inv(3)(q21q26.2) or t(3;3)(q21;q26.2), 36 patients (23%) had other balanced 3q26 rearrangements, 8 patients (5%) had balanced 3q21 rearrangements and 73 patients (46%) had other 3q abnormalities. The overall response rate was 50% (29% CR). Median overall survival was 10.6 months. By multivariate analysis, patients with lower bone marrow blast counts, higher platelet counts, non-complex cytogenetics, and absence of prior treatment with intensive chemotherapy had a better outcome. 27 patients were allo-transplanted and achieved a 21-month median OS. Balanced 3q21 translocations were associated with a better response rate and overall survival. Outcome of patients with isolated EVI-1 overexpression was comparable to that of patients with chromosome 3q lesions. Thus, AML/MDS patients with 3q abnormalities appear to be a heterogeneous group in their response to AZA, and AZA may represent a suitable option in particular as a bridge to allogeneic transplantation.

  12. Transmission of clonal chromosomal abnormalities in human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells surviving radiation exposure.

    PubMed

    Kraft, Daniela; Ritter, Sylvia; Durante, Marco; Seifried, Erhard; Fournier, Claudia; Tonn, Torsten

    2015-07-01

    In radiation-induced acute myeloid leukemia (rAML), clonal chromosomal abnormalities are often observed in bone marrow cells of patients, suggesting that their formation is crucial in the development of the disease. Since rAML is considered to originate from hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC), we investigated the frequency and spectrum of radiation-induced chromosomal abnormalities in human CD34(+) cells. We then measured stable chromosomal abnormalities, a possible biomarker of leukemia risk, in clonally expanded cell populations which were grown for 14 days in a 3D-matrix (CFU-assay). We compared two radiation qualities used in radiotherapy, sparsely ionizing X-rays and densely ionizing carbon ions (29 and 60-85 keV/μm, doses between 0.5 and 4 Gy). Only a negligible number of de novo arising, unstable aberrations (≤ 0.05 aberrations/cell, 97% breaks) were measured in the descendants of irradiated HSPC. However, stable aberrations were detected in colonies formed by irradiated HSPC. All cells of the affected colonies exhibited one or more identical aberrations, indicating their clonal origin. The majority of the clonal rearrangements (92%) were simple exchanges such as translocations (77%) and pericentric inversions (15%), which are known to contribute to the development of rAML. Carbon ions were more efficient in inducing cell killing (maximum of ∼ 30-35% apoptotic cells for 2 Gy carbon ions compared to ∼ 25% for X-rays) and chromosomal aberrations in the first cell-cycle after exposure (∼ 70% and ∼ 40% for 1 Gy of carbon ions and X-rays, respectively), with a higher fraction of non-transmissible aberrations. In contrast, for both radiation qualities the percentage of clones with chromosomal abnormalities was similar (40%). Using the frequency of colonies with clonal aberrations as a surrogate marker for the leukemia risk following radiotherapy of solid tumors, charged particle therapy is not expected to lead to an increased risk of

  13. Transmission of clonal chromosomal abnormalities in human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells surviving radiation exposure.

    PubMed

    Kraft, Daniela; Ritter, Sylvia; Durante, Marco; Seifried, Erhard; Fournier, Claudia; Tonn, Torsten

    2015-07-01

    In radiation-induced acute myeloid leukemia (rAML), clonal chromosomal abnormalities are often observed in bone marrow cells of patients, suggesting that their formation is crucial in the development of the disease. Since rAML is considered to originate from hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC), we investigated the frequency and spectrum of radiation-induced chromosomal abnormalities in human CD34(+) cells. We then measured stable chromosomal abnormalities, a possible biomarker of leukemia risk, in clonally expanded cell populations which were grown for 14 days in a 3D-matrix (CFU-assay). We compared two radiation qualities used in radiotherapy, sparsely ionizing X-rays and densely ionizing carbon ions (29 and 60-85 keV/μm, doses between 0.5 and 4 Gy). Only a negligible number of de novo arising, unstable aberrations (≤ 0.05 aberrations/cell, 97% breaks) were measured in the descendants of irradiated HSPC. However, stable aberrations were detected in colonies formed by irradiated HSPC. All cells of the affected colonies exhibited one or more identical aberrations, indicating their clonal origin. The majority of the clonal rearrangements (92%) were simple exchanges such as translocations (77%) and pericentric inversions (15%), which are known to contribute to the development of rAML. Carbon ions were more efficient in inducing cell killing (maximum of ∼ 30-35% apoptotic cells for 2 Gy carbon ions compared to ∼ 25% for X-rays) and chromosomal aberrations in the first cell-cycle after exposure (∼ 70% and ∼ 40% for 1 Gy of carbon ions and X-rays, respectively), with a higher fraction of non-transmissible aberrations. In contrast, for both radiation qualities the percentage of clones with chromosomal abnormalities was similar (40%). Using the frequency of colonies with clonal aberrations as a surrogate marker for the leukemia risk following radiotherapy of solid tumors, charged particle therapy is not expected to lead to an increased risk of

  14. Endocrine abnormalities in ring chromosome 11: a case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Lange, Renata; Von Linsingen, Caoê; Mata, Fernanda; Moraes, Aline Barbosa; Arruda, Mariana

    2015-01-01

    Summary Ring chromosomes (RCs) are uncommon cytogenetic findings, and RC11 has only been described in 19 cases in the literature. Endocrine abnormalities associated with RC11 were reported for two of these cases. The clinical features of RC11 can result from an alteration in the structure of the genetic material, ring instability, mosaicism, and various extents of genetic material loss. We herein describe a case of RC11 with clinical features of 11q-syndrome and endocrine abnormalities that have not yet been reported. A 20-year-old female patient had facial dysmorphism, short stature, psychomotor developmental delays, a ventricular septal defect, and thrombocytopenia. Karyotyping demonstrated RC11 (46,XX,r(11)(p15q25)). This patient presented with clinical features that may be related to Jacobsen syndrome, which is caused by partial deletion of the long arm of chromosome 11. Regarding endocrine abnormalities, our patient presented with precocious puberty followed by severe hirsutism, androgenic alopecia, clitoromegaly, and amenorrhea, which were associated with overweight, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), and hyperinsulinemia; therefore, this case meets the diagnostic criteria for polycystic ovary syndrome. Endocrine abnormalities are rare in patients with RC11, and the association of RC11 with precocious puberty, severe clinical hyperandrogenism, insulin resistance, and T2DM has not been reported previously. We speculate that gene(s) located on chromosome 11 might be involved in the pathogenesis of these conditions. Despite the rarity of RCs, studies to correlate the genes located on the chromosomes with the phenotypes observed could lead to major advances in the understanding and treatment of more prevalent diseases. Learning points We hypothesize that the endocrine features of precocious puberty, severe clinical hyperandrogenism, insulin resistance, and T2DM might be associated with 11q-syndrome.A karyotype study should be performed in patients with short

  15. Scoliosis and vertebral anomalies: additional abnormal phenotypes associated with chromosome 16p11.2 rearrangement.

    PubMed

    Al-Kateb, Hussam; Khanna, Geetika; Filges, Isabel; Hauser, Natalie; Grange, Dorothy K; Shen, Joseph; Smyser, Christopher D; Kulkarni, Shashikant; Shinawi, Marwan

    2014-05-01

    The typical chromosome 16p11.2 rearrangements are estimated to occur at a frequency of approximately 0.6% of all samples tested clinically and have been identified as a major cause of autism spectrum disorders, developmental delay, behavioral abnormalities, and seizures. Careful examination of patients with these rearrangements revealed association with abnormal head size, obesity, dysmorphism, and congenital abnormalities. In this report, we extend this list of phenotypic abnormalities to include scoliosis and vertebral anomalies. We present detailed characterization of phenotypic and radiological data of 10 new patients, nine with the 16p11.2 deletion and one with the duplication within the coordinates chr16:29,366,195 and 30,306,956 (hg19) with a minimal size of 555 kb. We discuss the phenotypical and radiological findings in our patients and review 5 previously reported patients with 16p11.2 rearrangement and similar skeletal abnormalities. Our data suggest that patients with the recurrent 16p11.2 rearrangement have increased incidence of scoliosis and vertebral anomalies. However, additional studies are required to confirm this observation and to establish the incidence of these anomalies. We discuss the potential implications of our findings on the diagnosis, surveillance and genetic counseling of patients with 16p11.2 rearrangement. PMID:24458548

  16. Chromosome aberrations, micronucleus and sperm head abnormalities in mice treated with natamycin, [corrected] a food preservative.

    PubMed

    Rasgele, Pinar Goc; Kaymak, Fisun

    2010-03-01

    Natamycin [corrected] is used as preservative in foods. The genotoxic effects of the food preservative natamycin [corrected] were evaluated using chromosome aberrations and micronucleus test in bone marrow cells and sperm head abnormality assays in mice. Blood samples were taken from mice and levels of total testosterone in serum were also determined. Natamycin [corrected] was intraperitoneally (ip) injected at 200, 400 and 800 mg/kg. Natamycin [corrected] did not induce chromosome aberrations but significantly increased the number of micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes in bone marrow and sperm head abnormalities at all concentrations and treatment periods. It also decreased MI at all concentrations for 6, 12 and 24h treatment periods. Natamycin [corrected] decreased PCE/NCE ratio at all concentrations for 48h in female mice, for 24 and 48h treatment periods in male mice. At the 800 mg/kg concentration, natamycin [corrected] decreased PCE/NCE ratio for 24 and 72h in female mice. A dose dependent increase was observed in the percentage of sperm head abnormalities. The levels of serum testosterone decreased dose-dependently. The obtained results indicate that natamycin [corrected] is not clastogenic, but it is aneugenic in mice bone marrow and it is a potential germ cell mutagen in sperm cells.

  17. Recurring structural chromosome abnormalities in peripheral blood lymphocytes of patients with mycosis fungoides/Sézary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Thangavelu, M; Finn, W G; Yelavarthi, K K; Roenigk, H H; Samuelson, E; Peterson, L; Kuzel, T M; Rosen, S T

    1997-05-01

    Cytogenetic analysis was performed on peripheral blood lymphocyte cultures from 19 patients with mycosis fungoides (MF)/Sézary syndrome (SS) stimulated with either phytohemagglutinin, a conventional mitogen, or a combination of interleukin-2 (IL-2) plus IL-7. The use of both PHA-stimulated and IL-2 plus IL-7-stimulated cultures enhanced the ability to identify clonal abnormalities. Clonal abnormalities were observed in 11 patients (53%) including one with monosomy for the sex chromosome as the sole abnormality. Five of the 11 patients with clonal abnormalities had normal peripheral white blood cell counts, indicating detectability of clones in the absence of frankly leukemic disease. The presence of clonal abnormalities correlated with advanced stage disease and a significantly reduced survival duration from the time of cytogenetic studies. Clonal abnormalities involving chromosomes 1 and 8 were observed in six cases. In five cases with aberrations of chromosome 1, loss of material involved the region between 1p22 and 1p36. In an additional case, a reciprocal translocation involving 1p33 was observed. Clonal abnormalities involving chromosomes 10 and 17 were observed in 5 cases, clonal abnormalities involving chromosome 2 in 4 cases, and clonal abnormalities involving chromosomes 4, 5, 6, 9, 13, 15, 19, and 20 in 3 cases. In 2 cases a der(8)t(8;17)(p11;q11) was observed. Regions of the genome that encode T-cell receptors were not involved in abnormalities. The region between 1p22 and 1p36 is identified as a region of the genome that requires detailed analysis toward the identification of potential gene(s) involved in the process of malignant transformation and/or progression in MF/SS.

  18. Prenatal diagnosis of chromosome 15 abnormalities in the Prader-Willi/Angelman syndrome region by traditional and molecular cytogenetics

    SciTech Connect

    Toth-Fejel, S.; Magenis, R.E.; Leff, S.

    1995-02-13

    With improvements in culturing and banding techniques, amniotic fluid studies now achieve a level of resolution at which the Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) and Angelman syndrome (AS) region may be questioned. Chromosome 15 heteromorphisms, detected with Q- and R-banding and used in conjunction with PWS/AS region-specific probes, can confirm a chromosome deletion and establish origin to predict the clinical outcome. We report four de novo cases of an abnormal-appearing chromosome 15 in amniotic fluid samples referred for advanced maternal age or a history of a previous chromosomally abnormal child. The chromosomes were characterized using G-, Q-, and R-banding, as well as isotopic and fluorescent in situ hybridization of DNA probes specific for the proximal chromosome 15 long arm. In two cases, one chromosome 15 homolog showed a consistent deletion of the ONCOR PWS/AS region A and B. In the other two cases, one of which involved an inversion with one breakpoint in the PWS/AS region, all of the proximal chromosome 15 long arm DNA probes used in the in situ hybridization were present on both homologs. Clinical follow-up was not available on these samples, as in all cases the parents chose to terminate the pregnancies. These cases demonstrate the ability to prenatally diagnose chromosome 15 abnormalities associated with PWS/AS. In addition, they highlight the need for a better understanding of this region for accurate prenatal diagnosis. 41 refs., 5 figs.

  19. Loss of CENP-F results in distinct microtubule-related defects without chromosomal abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Pfaltzgraff, Elise R.; Roth, Gretchen M.; Miller, Paul M.; Gintzig, Anneelizabeth G.; Ohi, Ryoma; Bader, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Microtubule (MT)-binding centromere protein F (CENP-F) was previously shown to play a role exclusively in chromosome segregation during cellular division. Many cell models of CENP-F depletion show a lag in the cell cycle and aneuploidy. Here, using our novel genetic deletion model, we show that CENP-F also regulates a broader range of cellular functions outside of cell division. We characterized CENP-F+/+ and CENP-F–/– mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) and found drastic differences in multiple cellular functions during interphase, including cell migration, focal adhesion dynamics, and primary cilia formation. We discovered that CENP-F–/– MEFs have severely diminished MT dynamics, which underlies the phenotypes we describe. These data, combined with recent biochemical research demonstrating the strong binding of CENP-F to the MT network, support the conclusion that CENP-F is a powerful regulator of MT dynamics during interphase and affects heterogeneous cell functions. PMID:27146114

  20. Loss of CENP-F results in distinct microtubule-related defects without chromosomal abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Pfaltzgraff, Elise R; Roth, Gretchen M; Miller, Paul M; Gintzig, Anneelizabeth G; Ohi, Ryoma; Bader, David M

    2016-07-01

    Microtubule (MT)-binding centromere protein F (CENP-F) was previously shown to play a role exclusively in chromosome segregation during cellular division. Many cell models of CENP-F depletion show a lag in the cell cycle and aneuploidy. Here, using our novel genetic deletion model, we show that CENP-F also regulates a broader range of cellular functions outside of cell division. We characterized CENP-F(+/+) and CENP-F(-/-) mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) and found drastic differences in multiple cellular functions during interphase, including cell migration, focal adhesion dynamics, and primary cilia formation. We discovered that CENP-F(-/-) MEFs have severely diminished MT dynamics, which underlies the phenotypes we describe. These data, combined with recent biochemical research demonstrating the strong binding of CENP-F to the MT network, support the conclusion that CENP-F is a powerful regulator of MT dynamics during interphase and affects heterogeneous cell functions. PMID:27146114

  1. The Argonaute CSR-1 and its 22G-RNA cofactors are required for holocentric chromosome segregation.

    PubMed

    Claycomb, Julie M; Batista, Pedro J; Pang, Ka Ming; Gu, Weifeng; Vasale, Jessica J; van Wolfswinkel, Josien C; Chaves, Daniel A; Shirayama, Masaki; Mitani, Shohei; Ketting, René F; Conte, Darryl; Mello, Craig C

    2009-10-01

    RNAi-related pathways regulate diverse processes, from developmental timing to transposon silencing. Here, we show that in C. elegans the Argonaute CSR-1, the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase EGO-1, the Dicer-related helicase DRH-3, and the Tudor-domain protein EKL-1 localize to chromosomes and are required for proper chromosome segregation. In the absence of these factors chromosomes fail to align at the metaphase plate and kinetochores do not orient to opposing spindle poles. Surprisingly, the CSR-1-interacting small RNAs (22G-RNAs) are antisense to thousands of germline-expressed protein-coding genes. Nematodes assemble holocentric chromosomes in which continuous kinetochores must span the expressed domains of the genome. We show that CSR-1 interacts with chromatin at target loci but does not downregulate target mRNA or protein levels. Instead, our findings support a model in which CSR-1 complexes target protein-coding domains to promote their proper organization within the holocentric chromosomes of C. elegans.

  2. Rejuvenation of Meiotic Cohesion in Oocytes during Prophase I Is Required for Chiasma Maintenance and Accurate Chromosome Segregation

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Katherine A.; Jeffreys, Charlotte A.; Bickel, Sharon E.

    2014-01-01

    Chromosome segregation errors in human oocytes are the leading cause of birth defects, and the risk of aneuploid pregnancy increases dramatically as women age. Accurate segregation demands that sister chromatid cohesion remain intact for decades in human oocytes, and gradual loss of the original cohesive linkages established in fetal oocytes is proposed to be a major cause of age-dependent segregation errors. Here we demonstrate that maintenance of meiotic cohesion in Drosophila oocytes during prophase I requires an active rejuvenation program, and provide mechanistic insight into the molecular events that underlie rejuvenation. Gal4/UAS inducible knockdown of the cohesion establishment factor Eco after meiotic S phase, but before oocyte maturation, causes premature loss of meiotic cohesion, resulting in destabilization of chiasmata and subsequent missegregation of recombinant homologs. Reduction of individual cohesin subunits or the cohesin loader Nipped B during prophase I leads to similar defects. These data indicate that loading of newly synthesized replacement cohesin rings by Nipped B and establishment of new cohesive linkages by the acetyltransferase Eco must occur during prophase I to maintain cohesion in oocytes. Moreover, we show that rejuvenation of meiotic cohesion does not depend on the programmed induction of meiotic double strand breaks that occurs during early prophase I, and is therefore mechanistically distinct from the DNA damage cohesion re-establishment pathway identified in G2 vegetative yeast cells. Our work provides the first evidence that new cohesive linkages are established in Drosophila oocytes after meiotic S phase, and that these are required for accurate chromosome segregation. If such a pathway also operates in human oocytes, meiotic cohesion defects may become pronounced in a woman's thirties, not because the original cohesive linkages finally give out, but because the rejuvenation program can no longer supply new cohesive linkages

  3. Ring Chromosome 4 in a Child with Multiple Congenital Abnormalities: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Paththinige, C S; Sirisena, N D; Kariyawasam, U G I U; Saman Kumara, L P C; Dissanayake, V H W

    2016-01-01

    A female child born preterm with intrauterine growth retardation and presenting with facial dysmorphism with clefts, microcephaly, limb deformities, and congenital abnormalities involving cardiovascular and urinary systems is described. Chromosomal analysis showed a de novo 46,XX,r(4)(p15.3q35) karyotype. The clinical features of the patient were compared with the phenotypic characteristics of 17 previously reported cases with ring chromosome 4 and those with Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (4p-). Clinical features observed in this case are consistent with the consensus phenotype in ring chromosome 4. Patent ductus arteriosus and bilateral talipes equinovarus observed in this baby widen the phenotypic spectrum associated with ring chromosome 4.

  4. Ring Chromosome 4 in a Child with Multiple Congenital Abnormalities: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Saman Kumara, L. P. C.

    2016-01-01

    A female child born preterm with intrauterine growth retardation and presenting with facial dysmorphism with clefts, microcephaly, limb deformities, and congenital abnormalities involving cardiovascular and urinary systems is described. Chromosomal analysis showed a de novo 46,XX,r(4)(p15.3q35) karyotype. The clinical features of the patient were compared with the phenotypic characteristics of 17 previously reported cases with ring chromosome 4 and those with Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (4p-). Clinical features observed in this case are consistent with the consensus phenotype in ring chromosome 4. Patent ductus arteriosus and bilateral talipes equinovarus observed in this baby widen the phenotypic spectrum associated with ring chromosome 4.

  5. A cis-acting sequence involved in chromosome segregation in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Fekete, Richard A; Chattoraj, Dhruba K

    2005-01-01

    Eukaryotic chromosomes contain a locus, the centromere, at which force is applied to separate replicated chromosomes. A centromere analogue is also found in some bacterial plasmids and chromosomes, although not yet identified in the well-studied Escherichia coli chromosome. We aimed to identify centromere-like sequences in E. coli with the premise that such sequences would be the first to migrate towards the cell poles, away from the cell centre where DNA replication is believed to occur. We have labelled different loci on the chromosome by integrating arrays of binding sites for LacI-EYFP and phage lambdacI-ECFP and supplying these fusion proteins in trans. Comparison of such pairs of loci suggests the presence of a centromere-like site close to the origin of replication. Polar migration of the site was dependent on migS, a locus recently implicated in chromosome migration, thus providing strong support for migS being the E. coli centromere.

  6. Array-Based Comparative Genomic Hybridization for the Genomewide Detection of Submicroscopic Chromosomal Abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Vissers, Lisenka E. L. M. ; de Vries, Bert B. A. ; Osoegawa, Kazutoyo ; Janssen, Irene M. ; Feuth, Ton ; Choy, Chik On ; Straatman, Huub ; van der Vliet, Walter ; Huys, Erik H. L. P. G. ; van Rijk, Anke ; Smeets, Dominique ; van Ravenswaaij-Arts, Conny M. A. ; Knoers, Nine V. ; van der Burgt, Ineke ; de Jong, Pieter J. ; Brunner, Han G. ; van Kessel, Ad Geurts ; Schoenmakers, Eric F. P. M. ; Veltman, Joris A. 

    2003-01-01

    Microdeletions and microduplications, not visible by routine chromosome analysis, are a major cause of human malformation and mental retardation. Novel high-resolution, whole-genome technologies can improve the diagnostic detection rate of these small chromosomal abnormalities. Array-based comparative genomic hybridization allows such a high-resolution screening by hybridizing differentially labeled test and reference DNAs to arrays consisting of thousands of genomic clones. In this study, we tested the diagnostic capacity of this technology using ∼3,500 flourescent in situ hybridization–verified clones selected to cover the genome with an average of 1 clone per megabase (Mb). The sensitivity and specificity of the technology were tested in normal-versus-normal control experiments and through the screening of patients with known microdeletion syndromes. Subsequently, a series of 20 cytogenetically normal patients with mental retardation and dysmorphisms suggestive of a chromosomal abnormality were analyzed. In this series, three microdeletions and two microduplications were identified and validated. Two of these genomic changes were identified also in one of the parents, indicating that these are large-scale genomic polymorphisms. Deletions and duplications as small as 1 Mb could be reliably detected by our approach. The percentage of false-positive results was reduced to a minimum by use of a dye-swap-replicate analysis, all but eliminating the need for laborious validation experiments and facilitating implementation in a routine diagnostic setting. This high-resolution assay will facilitate the identification of novel genes involved in human mental retardation and/or malformation syndromes and will provide insight into the flexibility and plasticity of the human genome. PMID:14628292

  7. Brain abnormalities, defective meiotic chromosome synapsis and female subfertility in HSF2 null mice

    PubMed Central

    Kallio, Marko; Chang, Yunhua; Manuel, Martine; Alastalo, Tero-Pekka; Rallu, Murielle; Gitton, Yorick; Pirkkala, Lila; Loones, Marie-Thérèse; Paslaru, Liliana; Larney, Severine; Hiard, Sophie; Morange, Michel; Sistonen, Lea; Mezger, Valérie

    2002-01-01

    Heat shock factor 2, one of the four vertebrate HSFs, transcriptional regulators of heat shock gene expression, is active during embryogenesis and spermatogenesis, with unknown functions and targets. By disrupting the Hsf2 gene, we show that, although the lack of HSF2 is not embryonic lethal, Hsf2–/– mice suffer from brain abnormalities, and meiotic and gameto genesis defects in both genders. The disturbances in brain are characterized by the enlargement of lateral and third ventricles and the reduction of hippocampus and striatum, in correlation with HSF2 expression in proliferative cells of the neuroepithelium and in some ependymal cells in adults. Many developing spermatocytes are eliminated via apoptosis in a stage-specific manner in Hsf2–/– males, and pachytene spermatocytes also display structural defects in the synaptonemal complexes between homologous chromosomes. Hsf2–/– females suffer from multiple fertility defects: the production of abnormal eggs, the reduction in ovarian follicle number and the presence of hemorrhagic cystic follicles are consistent with meiotic defects. Hsf2–/– females also display hormone response defects, that can be rescued by superovulation treatment, and exhibit abnormal rates of luteinizing hormone receptor mRNAs. PMID:12032072

  8. Abnormal segregation of alleles in CEPH pedigree DNAs arising from allele loss in lymphoblastoid DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Royle, N.J.; Armour, J.A.L.; Crosier, M.; Jeffreys, A.J. )

    1993-01-01

    Somatic events that result in the reduction to hemior homozygosity at all loci affected by the event have been identified in lymphoblastoid DNA from mothers of two CEPH families. Using suitably informative probes, the allele deficiencies were detected by the abnormal transmission of alleles from grandparents to grandchildren, with the apparent absence of the alleles from the parent. Undetected somatic deficiencies in family DNAs could result in misscoring of recombination events and consequently introduce errors into linkage analysis. 15 refs., 2 figs.

  9. Chromosome rearrangements, recombination suppression, and limited segregation distortion in hybrids between Yellowstone cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarkii bouvieri) and rainbow trout (O. mykiss)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ostberg, Carl O.; Hauser, Lorenz; Pritchard, Victoria L.; Garza, John C.; Naish, Kerry A.

    2013-01-01

    Chromosome rearrangements suppressed recombination in the hybrids. This result supports several previous findings demonstrating that recombination suppression restricts gene flow between chromosomes that differ by arrangement. Conservation of synteny and map order between the hybrid and rainbow trout maps and minimal segregation distortion in the hybrids suggest rainbow and Yellowstone cutthroat trout genomes freely introgress across chromosomes with similar arrangement. Taken together, these results suggest that rearrangements impede introgression. Recombination suppression across rearrangements could enable large portions of non-recombined chromosomes to persist within admixed populations.

  10. High frequency of submicroscopic chromosomal imbalances in patients with syndromic craniosynostosis detected by a combined approach of microsatellite segregation analysis, multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification and array-based comparative genome hybridisation.

    PubMed

    Jehee, F S; Krepischi-Santos, A C V; Rocha, K M; Cavalcanti, D P; Kim, C A; Bertola, D R; Alonso, L G; D'Angelo, C S; Mazzeu, J F; Froyen, G; Lugtenberg, D; Vianna-Morgante, A M; Rosenberg, C; Passos-Bueno, M R

    2008-07-01

    We present the first comprehensive study, to our knowledge, on genomic chromosomal analysis in syndromic craniosynostosis. In total, 45 patients with craniosynostotic disorders were screened with a variety of methods including conventional karyotype, microsatellite segregation analysis, subtelomeric multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification) and whole-genome array-based comparative genome hybridisation. Causative abnormalities were present in 42.2% (19/45) of the samples, and 27.8% (10/36) of the patients with normal conventional karyotype carried submicroscopic imbalances. Our results include a wide variety of imbalances and point to novel chromosomal regions associated with craniosynostosis. The high incidence of pure duplications or trisomies suggests that these are important mechanisms in craniosynostosis, particularly in cases involving the metopic suture.

  11. Bub3–BubR1-dependent sequestration of Cdc20Fizzy at DNA breaks facilitates the correct segregation of broken chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Derive, Nicolas; Landmann, Cedric; Montembault, Emilie; Claverie, Marie-Charlotte; Pierre-Elies, Priscillia; Goutte-Gattat, Damien; Founounou, Nabila; McCusker, Derek

    2015-01-01

    The presence of DNA double-strand breaks during mitosis is particularly challenging for the cell, as it produces broken chromosomes lacking a centromere. This situation can cause genomic instability resulting from improper segregation of the broken fragments into daughter cells. We recently uncovered a process by which broken chromosomes are faithfully transmitted via the BubR1-dependent tethering of the two broken chromosome ends. However, the mechanisms underlying BubR1 recruitment and function on broken chromosomes were largely unknown. We show that BubR1 requires interaction with Bub3 to localize on the broken chromosome fragments and to mediate their proper segregation. We also find that Cdc20, a cofactor of the E3 ubiquitin ligase anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C), accumulates on DNA breaks in a BubR1 KEN box–dependent manner. A biosensor for APC/C activity demonstrates a BubR1-dependent local inhibition of APC/C around the segregating broken chromosome. We therefore propose that the Bub3–BubR1 complex on broken DNA inhibits the APC/C locally via the sequestration of Cdc20, thus promoting proper transmission of broken chromosomes. PMID:26553926

  12. Bub3-BubR1-dependent sequestration of Cdc20Fizzy at DNA breaks facilitates the correct segregation of broken chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Derive, Nicolas; Landmann, Cedric; Montembault, Emilie; Claverie, Marie-Charlotte; Pierre-Elies, Priscillia; Goutte-Gattat, Damien; Founounou, Nabila; McCusker, Derek; Royou, Anne

    2015-11-01

    The presence of DNA double-strand breaks during mitosis is particularly challenging for the cell, as it produces broken chromosomes lacking a centromere. This situation can cause genomic instability resulting from improper segregation of the broken fragments into daughter cells. We recently uncovered a process by which broken chromosomes are faithfully transmitted via the BubR1-dependent tethering of the two broken chromosome ends. However, the mechanisms underlying BubR1 recruitment and function on broken chromosomes were largely unknown. We show that BubR1 requires interaction with Bub3 to localize on the broken chromosome fragments and to mediate their proper segregation. We also find that Cdc20, a cofactor of the E3 ubiquitin ligase anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C), accumulates on DNA breaks in a BubR1 KEN box-dependent manner. A biosensor for APC/C activity demonstrates a BubR1-dependent local inhibition of APC/C around the segregating broken chromosome. We therefore propose that the Bub3-BubR1 complex on broken DNA inhibits the APC/C locally via the sequestration of Cdc20, thus promoting proper transmission of broken chromosomes.

  13. Abnormal chromosomal marker (D14 q+) in a patient with alpha heavy chain disease.

    PubMed Central

    Gafter, U; Kessler, E; Shabtay, F; Shaked, P; Djaldetti, M

    1980-01-01

    A patient with alpha heavy chain disease (alphaHCD), who showed an abnormal chromosomal marker (D14 q+) in 10% of the bone marrow cells, is described. The mesenteric lymph nodes, which showed reactive hyperplasia in the first biopsy, transformed later to a malignant lymphoma and finally to a plasma cell tumour. The small intestine revealed villous atrophy, diminished crypts, and intact surface epithelium. The ultrastructure of the goblet and epithelial cells appeared to be normal, and the microvilli were preserved except for circumscribed areas of destruction. The lamina propria was heavily infiltrated with mononuclear cells, mainly mature plasma cells. Alpha heavy chains (alphaHC) were found in the patient's saliva. Images Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 Fig. 11 Fig. 12 Fig. 13 PMID:6767755

  14. A Co-segregating Microduplication of Chromosome 15q11.2 Pinpoints Two Risk Genes for Autism Spectrum Disorder

    PubMed Central

    van der Zwaag, Bert; Staal, Wouter G; Hochstenbach, Ron; Poot, Martin; Spierenburg, Henk A; de Jonge, Maretha V; Verbeek, Nienke E; van ’t Slot, R.; van Es, Michael A; Staal, Frank J; Freitag, Christine M; Buizer-Voskamp, Jacobine E; Nelen, Marcel R; van den Berg, Leonard H; van Amstel, Hans K Ploos; van Engeland, Herman; Burbach, J Peter H

    2010-01-01

    High resolution genomic copy-number analysis has shown that inherited and de novo copy-number variations contribute significantly to autism pathology, and that identification of small chromosomal aberrations related to autism will expedite the discovery of risk genes involved. Here, we report a microduplication of chromosome 15q11.2, spanning only four genes, co-segregating with autism in a Dutch pedigree, identified by SNP microarray analysis, and independently confirmed by FISH and MLPA analysis. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis revealed over 70 % increase in peripheral blood mRNA levels for the four genes present in the duplicated region in patients, and RNA in situ hybridization on mouse embryonic and adult brain sections revealed that two of the four genes, CYFIP1 and NIPA1, were highly expressed in the developing mouse brain. These findings point towards a contribution of microduplications at chromosome 15q11.2 to autism, and highlight CYFIP1 and NIPA1 as autism risk genes functioning in axonogenesis and synaptogenesis. Thereby, these findings further implicate defects in dosage-sensitive molecular control of neuronal connectivity in autism. However, the prevalence of this microduplication in patient samples was statistically not significantly different from control samples (0.94% in patients vs 0.42% controls, p=0.247), which suggests that our findings should be interpreted with caution and indicates the need for studies that include large numbers of control subjects to ascertain the impact of these changes on a population scale. PMID:20029941

  15. Mutation of histone H3 serine 86 disrupts GATA factor Ams2 expression and precise chromosome segregation in fission yeast

    PubMed Central

    Kiat Lim, Kim; Rui Ong, Terenze Yao; Rong Tan, Yue; Guorong Yang, Eugene; Ren, Bingbing; Shan Seah, Kwi; Yang, Zhe; Soo Tan, Tsu; Dymock, Brian W.; Sin Chen, Ee

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotic genomes are packed into discrete units, referred to as nucleosomes, by organizing around scaffolding histone proteins. The interplay between these histones and the DNA can dynamically regulate the function of the chromosomal domain. Here, we interrogated the function of a pair of juxtaposing serine residues (S86 and S87) that reside within the histone fold of histone H3. We show that fission yeast cells expressing a mutant histone H3 disrupted at S86 and S87 (hht2-S86AS87A) exhibited unequal chromosome segregation, disrupted transcriptional silencing of centromeric chromatin, and reduced expression of Ams2, a GATA-factor that regulates localization of the centromere-specific histone H3 variant CENP-A. We found that overexpression of ams2+ could suppress the chromosome missegregation phenotype that arose in the hht2-S86AS87A mutant. We further demonstrate that centromeric localization of SpCENP-Acnp1-1 was significantly compromised in hht2-S86AS87A, suggesting synergism between histone H3 and the centromere-targeting domain of SpCENP-A. Taken together, our work presents evidence for an uncharacterized serine residue in fission yeast histone H3 that affects centromeric integrity via regulating the expression of the SpCENP-A-localizing Ams2 protein. [173/200 words] PMID:26369364

  16. A novel syndrome of abnormal striatum and congenital cataract: evidence for linkage to chromosomes 11.

    PubMed

    Al-Owain, M; Al-Zahrani, J; Al-Bakheet, A; Abudheim, N; Al-Younes, B; Aldhalaan, H; Al-Zaidan, H; Colak, D; Almohaileb, F; Abouzied, M E; Al-Fadhli, F; Meyer, B; Kaya, N

    2013-09-01

    We report a consanguineous family of three girls and one boy affected with a novel syndrome involving the lens and the basal ganglia. The phenotype is strikingly similar between affected siblings with cognitive impairment, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), microcephaly, growth retardation, congenital cataract, and dystonia. The magnetic resonance imaging showed unusual pattern of swelling of the caudate heads and thinning of the putamina with severe degree of hypometabolism on the [18F] deoxyglucose positron emission tomography. Furthermore, the clinical assessment provides the evidence that the neurological phenotype is very slowly progressive. We utilized the 10K single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) microarray genotyping for linkage analysis. Genome-wide scan indicated a 45.9-Mb region with a 4.2353 logarithm of the odds score on chromosome 11. Affymetrix genome-wide human SNP array 6.0 assay did not show any gross chromosomal abnormality. Targeted sequencing of two candidate genes within the linkage interval (PAX6 and B3GALTL) as well as mtDNA genome sequencing did not reveal any putative mutations.

  17. Down syndrome-associated haematopoiesis abnormalities created by chromosome transfer and genome editing technologies

    PubMed Central

    Kazuki, Yasuhiro; Yakura, Yuwna; Abe, Satoshi; Osaki, Mitsuhiko; Kajitani, Naoyo; Kazuki, Kanako; Takehara, Shoko; Honma, Kazuhisa; Suemori, Hirofumi; Yamazaki, Satoshi; Sakuma, Tetsushi; Toki, Tsutomu; Shimizu, Ritsuko; Nakauchi, Hiromitsu; Yamamoto, Takashi; Oshimura, Mitsuo

    2014-01-01

    Infants with Down syndrome (DS) are at a high risk of developing transient abnormal myelopoiesis (TAM). A GATA1 mutation leading to the production of N-terminally truncated GATA1 (GATA1s) in early megakaryocyte/erythroid progenitors is linked to the onset of TAM and cooperated with the effect of trisomy 21 (Ts21). To gain insights into the underlying mechanisms of the progression to TAM in DS patients, we generated human pluripotent stem cells harbouring Ts21 and/or GATA1s by combining microcell-mediated chromosome transfer and genome editing technologies. In vitro haematopoietic differentiation assays showed that the GATA1s mutation blocked erythropoiesis irrespective of an extra chromosome 21, while Ts21 and the GATA1s mutation independently perturbed megakaryopoiesis and the combination of Ts21 and the GATA1s mutation synergistically contributed to an aberrant accumulation of skewed megakaryocytes. Thus, the DS model cells generated by these two technologies are useful in assessing how GATA1s mutation is involved in the onset of TAM in patients with DS. PMID:25159877

  18. Inhibition of the Binding between RGS2 and β-Tubulin Interferes with Spindle Formation and Chromosome Segregation during Mouse Oocyte Maturation In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zhao-Gui; Zhang, Zhi; Zhu, Yan

    2016-01-01

    RGS2 is a negative regulator of G protein signaling that contains a GTPase-activating domain and a β-tubulin binding region. This study aimed to determine the localization and function of RGS2 during mouse oocyte maturation in vitro. Immunofluorescent staining revealed that RGS2 was widely expressed in the cytoplasm with a greater abundance on both meiotic spindles and first/second polar bodies from the fully-grown germinal vesicle (GV) stage to the MII stages. Co-expression of RGS2 and β-tubulin could also be detected in the spindle and polar body of mouse oocytes at the MI, AI, and MII stages. Inhibition of the binding site between RGS2 and β-tubulin was accomplished by injecting anti-RGS2 antibody into GV-stage oocytes, which could result in oocytes arrest at the MI or AI stage during in vitro maturation, but it did not affect germinal vesicle breakdown. Moreover, injecting anti-RGS2 antibody into oocytes resulted in a significant reduction in the rate of first polar body extrusion and abnormal spindle formation. Additionally, levels of phosphorylated MEK1/2 were significantly reduced in anti-RGS2 antibody injected oocytes compared with control oocytes. These findings suggest that RGS2 might play a critical role in mouse oocyte meiotic maturation by affecting β-tubulin polymerization and chromosome segregation. PMID:27463806

  19. A chromosomal translocation causing multiple abnormalities including open eyelids at birth and glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Guarnieri, Mary H; Cacheiro, Nestor L; Rudofsky, Ulrich H; Montgomery, Jeffry C; Collins, Doris N; Flaherty, Lorraine A

    2002-08-01

    We have characterized the phenotype of a mouse with a t(2;13) reciprocal translocation induced by chlorambucil. It results in abnormal eyelid formation as well as a series of neurological, physiological, and immunological abnormalities. This mutant has been termed T(2;13)1Fla/+. T(2;13)1Fla/+ mice exhibit open eyelids at birth, a dilute coat color, hyperactivity, and occasional circling and stargazing activity. At 1-6 months, T(2;13)1Fla/+ mice show signs of immune complex-mediated glomerulonephritis and die prematurely. Additionally, double-stranded DNA autoantibodies have been found in sera of T(2;13)1Fla/+ mice. Cytogenetic analysis situated the translocation breakpoint at the proximal end of Chromosome (chr) 2 at band A2, and on Chr 13 at band A4. The mutant phenotype completely correlated with the presence of the translocation. Additional genetic studies have mapped the mutation and translocation breakpoint to Chr 13 between D13Mit16 and D13Mit64, and to Chr 2 proximal to D2Mit5. By fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), the position of this mutation/translocation on Chr 13 has been mapped to a region less than 1cM from D13Mit61. PMID:12226706

  20. Amniotic fluid-AFP in Down syndrome and other chromosome abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Crandall, B F; Matsumoto, M; Perdue, S

    1988-05-01

    80.2 Per cent of 111 Down syndrome pregnancies had anmiotic fluid (AF) alpha fetoprotein (AFP) levels on or below the median and 10.8 per cent at or below 0.5 MoM compared with 41.9 and 1.4 per cent of controls. These differences were even more striking when the gestational age was less than 18 weeks compared with greater than or equal to 18 weeks. No such association was seen for other chromosome abnormalities including trisomy 18,45,X and mosaics, 47,XXY,47,XXX, and other structural abnormalities and triploidy, even when high levels due to defects such as omphalocele and cystic hygroma were excluded. All cases of trisomy 13 and 80 per cent with 47,XYY had AF-AFP levels above the median. Selection of cases for karyotyping by a low level of AF-AFP would clearly fail to detect aneuploidies other than Down syndrome and is not recommended. A possible weak association between low maternal serum (MS) and AF-AFPs in Down syndrome was most evident at less than 18 weeks, suggesting that MS screening between 16 and 18 weeks may be the most informative time. PMID:2456565

  1. Sequencing chromosomal abnormalities reveals neurodevelopmental loci that confer risk across diagnostic boundaries

    PubMed Central

    Talkowski, Michael E.; Rosenfeld, Jill A.; Blumenthal, Ian; Pillalamarri, Vamsee; Chiang, Colby; Heilbut, Adrian; Ernst, Carl; Hanscom, Carrie; Rossin, Elizabeth; Lindgren, Amelia; Pereira, Shahrin; Ruderfer, Douglas; Kirby, Andrew; Ripke, Stephan; Harris, David; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Ha, Kyungsoo; Kim, Hyung-Goo; Solomon, Benjamin D.; Gropman, Andrea L.; Lucente, Diane; Sims, Katherine; Ohsumi, Toshiro K.; Borowsky, Mark L.; Loranger, Stephanie; Quade, Bradley; Lage, Kasper; Miles, Judith; Wu, Bai-Lin; Shen, Yiping; Neale, Benjamin; Shaffer, Lisa G.; Daly, Mark J.; Morton, Cynthia C.; Gusella, James F.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Balanced chromosomal abnormalities (BCAs) represent a reservoir of single gene disruptions in neurodevelopmental disorders (NDD). We sequenced BCAs in autism and related NDDs, revealing disruption of 33 loci in four general categories: 1) genes associated with abnormal neurodevelopment (e.g., AUTS2, FOXP1, CDKL5), 2) single gene contributors to microdeletion syndromes (MBD5, SATB2, EHMT1, SNURF-SNRPN), 3) novel risk loci (e.g., CHD8, KIRREL3, ZNF507), and 4) genes associated with later onset psychiatric disorders (e.g., TCF4, ZNF804A, PDE10A, GRIN2B, ANK3). We also discovered profoundly increased burden of copy number variants among 19,556 neurodevelopmental cases compared to 13,991 controls (p = 2.07×10−47) and enrichment of polygenic risk alleles from autism and schizophrenia genome-wide association studies (p = 0.0018 and 0.0009, respectively). Our findings suggest a polygenic risk model of autism incorporating loci of strong effect and indicate that some neurodevelopmental genes are sensitive to perturbation by multiple mutational mechanisms, leading to variable phenotypic outcomes that manifest at different life stages. PMID:22521361

  2. Characterization of a complex chromosomal rearrangement using chromosome, FISH, and microarray assays in a girl with multiple congenital abnormalities and developmental delay.

    PubMed

    Hemmat, Morteza; Yang, Xiaojing; Chan, Patricia; McGough, Robert A; Ross, Leslie; Mahon, Loretta W; Anguiano, Arturo L; Boris, Wang T; Elnaggar, Mohamed M; Wang, Jia-Chi J; Strom, Charles M; Boyar, Fatih Z

    2014-01-01

    Complex chromosomal rearrangements (CCRs) are balanced or unbalanced structural rearrangements involving three or more cytogenetic breakpoints on two or more chromosomal pairs. The phenotypic anomalies in such cases are attributed to gene disruption, superimposed cryptic imbalances in the genome, and/or position effects. We report a 14-year-old girl who presented with multiple congenital anomalies and developmental delay. Chromosome and FISH analysis indicated a highly complex chromosomal rearrangement involving three chromosomes (3, 7 and 12), seven breakpoints as a result of one inversion, two insertions, and two translocations forming three derivative chromosomes. Additionally, chromosomal microarray study (CMA) revealed two submicroscopic deletions at 3p12.3 (467 kb) and 12q13.12 (442 kb). We postulate that microdeletion within the ROBO1 gene at 3p12.3 may have played a role in the patient's developmental delay, since it has potential activity-dependent role in neurons. Additionally, factors other than genomic deletions such as loss of function or position effects may also contribute to the abnormal phenotype in our patient.

  3. Characterization of a complex chromosomal rearrangement using chromosome, FISH, and microarray assays in a girl with multiple congenital abnormalities and developmental delay

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Complex chromosomal rearrangements (CCRs) are balanced or unbalanced structural rearrangements involving three or more cytogenetic breakpoints on two or more chromosomal pairs. The phenotypic anomalies in such cases are attributed to gene disruption, superimposed cryptic imbalances in the genome, and/or position effects. We report a 14-year-old girl who presented with multiple congenital anomalies and developmental delay. Chromosome and FISH analysis indicated a highly complex chromosomal rearrangement involving three chromosomes (3, 7 and 12), seven breakpoints as a result of one inversion, two insertions, and two translocations forming three derivative chromosomes. Additionally, chromosomal microarray study (CMA) revealed two submicroscopic deletions at 3p12.3 (467 kb) and 12q13.12 (442 kb). We postulate that microdeletion within the ROBO1 gene at 3p12.3 may have played a role in the patient’s developmental delay, since it has potential activity-dependent role in neurons. Additionally, factors other than genomic deletions such as loss of function or position effects may also contribute to the abnormal phenotype in our patient. PMID:25478007

  4. New tools for the study of chromosome segregation and aneuploidy at the molecular level

    SciTech Connect

    Charlieu, J.P.; Marcais, B.; Laurent, A.M.; Roizes, G.

    1993-12-31

    The molecular mechanisms which allow the correct distribution of chromosomes during cell division are not yet well known. The centromere, because of its possible involvement in the attachment of sister chromatids and its participation in the formation of the kinetochore, may play an important role in these mechanisms. Trisomy 21 (down syndrome, DS) provides a good model for studying aneuploidy resulting from the dysfunction of the chromosome distribution process. A possible means of analyzing the mechanisms leading to non-disjunction (NDJ) could be to determine the origin of the supernumerary chromosome 21 and to attempt to find some structural or physical characteristics of the potentially responsible centromere. This could be performed by using molecular tools which allow each of the two parental chromosomes 21 to be distinguished. Possible markers suitable for this purpose are DNA fragments that exhibit length polymorphisms. We present here some examples of such molecular tools, and discuss ways to use them in order to study the parental origin and the meiotic stage of nondisjunction, and we propose an hypothesis suggesting a possible cause of nondisjunction in human chromosomes.

  5. Disorders of sexual development and abnormal early development in domestic food-producing mammals: the role of chromosome abnormalities, environment and stress factors.

    PubMed

    Favetta, L A; Villagómez, D A F; Iannuzzi, L; Di Meo, G; Webb, A; Crain, S; King, W A

    2012-01-01

    The management of disorders of sexual development (DSD) in humans and domestic animals has been the subject of intense interest for decades. The association between abnormal chromosome constitutions and DSDs in domestic animals has been recorded since the beginnings of conventional cytogenetic analysis. Deviated karyotypes consisting of abnormal sex chromosome sets and/or the coexistence of cells with different sex chromosome constitutions in an individual seem to be the main causes of anomalies of sex determination and sex differentiation. In recent years, a growing interest has developed around the environmental insults, such as endocrine-disrupting compounds (EDC) and heat stressors, which affect fertility, early embryonic development and, in some instances, directly the sex ratio and/or the development of 1 specific sex versus the other. A variety of chemical compounds present in the environment at low doses has been shown to have major effects on the reproductive functions in human and domestic animals following prolonged exposure. In this review, we present an overview of congenital/chromosomal factors that are responsible for the DSDs and link them and the lack of proper embryonic development to environmental factors that are becoming a major global concern.

  6. Distorted genetic segregation of the transposon mPing at the long arm of chromosome 12 in rice

    PubMed Central

    Horibata, Akira; Kakikubo, Yoshihiro; Kato, Tsuneo

    2015-01-01

    A class II transposable element, mPing exists in the rice genome ubiquitously and can transpose even in ordinary cultivation conditions. A copy of mPing was identified at the long arm of chromosome 12. In reciprocal backcrossed F1s between a heterozygote and a homozygote without mPing, the male gametes with this mPing from heterozygotes were transmitted to the next generation at a lower frequency than those without mPing, resulting in distorted genetic segregation in self-fertilized progenies, as well as in F1s after backcrossing. Pollens with mPing tended to germinate on stigma less than those without mPing. These results, however, could not explain the lower transmission of male gametes with mPing. In addition, no excision of mPing was observed in a homozygote. Thus, it was suggested that male gametes with mPing were eliminated partly from pollination to fertilization by negative competition against male gametes without mPing. Less formation of microspores with mPing in meiosis could also be a cause for the distorted segregation, although this could not be examined. At least two ORFs, whose functions have not been identified, are located near this mPing. It is plausible that either of these ORFs or both are necessary for the normal functioning of male gametes. PMID:26366117

  7. Nuclear pore complex evolution: a trypanosome Mlp analogue functions in chromosomal segregation but lacks transcriptional barrier activity

    PubMed Central

    Holden, Jennifer M.; Koreny, Ludek; Obado, Samson; Ratushny, Alexander V.; Chen, Wei-Ming; Chiang, Jung-Hsien; Kelly, Steven; Chait, Brian T.; Aitchison, John D.; Rout, Michael P.; Field, Mark C.

    2014-01-01

    The nuclear pore complex (NPC) has dual roles in nucleocytoplasmic transport and chromatin organization. In many eukaryotes the coiled-coil Mlp/Tpr proteins of the NPC nuclear basket have specific functions in interactions with chromatin and defining specialized regions of active transcription, whereas Mlp2 associates with the mitotic spindle/NPC in a cell cycle–dependent manner. We previously identified two putative Mlp-related proteins in African trypanosomes, TbNup110 and TbNup92, the latter of which associates with the spindle. We now provide evidence for independent ancestry for TbNup92/TbNup110 and Mlp/Tpr proteins. However, TbNup92 is required for correct chromosome segregation, with knockout cells exhibiting microaneuploidy and lowered fidelity of telomere segregation. Further, TbNup92 is intimately associated with the mitotic spindle and spindle anchor site but apparently has minimal roles in control of gene transcription, indicating that TbNup92 lacks major barrier activity. TbNup92 therefore acts as a functional analogue of Mlp/Tpr proteins, and, together with the lamina analogue NUP-1, represents a cohort of novel proteins operating at the nuclear periphery of trypanosomes, uncovering complex evolutionary trajectories for the NPC and nuclear lamina. PMID:24600046

  8. The role of meiotic cohesin REC8 in chromosome segregation in {gamma} irradiation-induced endopolyploid tumour cells

    SciTech Connect

    Erenpreisa, Jekaterina; Cragg, Mark S.; Salmina, Kristine; Hausmann, Michael; Scherthan, Harry

    2009-09-10

    Escape from mitotic catastrophe and generation of endopolyploid tumour cells (ETCs) represents a potential survival strategy of tumour cells in response to genotoxic treatments. ETCs that resume the mitotic cell cycle have reduced ploidy and are often resistant to these treatments. In search for a mechanism for genome reduction, we previously observed that ETCs express meiotic proteins among which REC8 (a meiotic cohesin component) is of particular interest, since it favours reductional cell division in meiosis. In the present investigation, we induced endopolyploidy in p53-dysfunctional human tumour cell lines (Namalwa, WI-L2-NS, HeLa) by gamma irradiation, and analysed the sub-cellular localisation of REC8 in the resulting ETCs. We observed by RT-PCR and Western blot that REC8 is constitutively expressed in these tumour cells, along with SGOL1 and SGOL2, and that REC8 becomes modified after irradiation. REC8 localised to paired sister centromeres in ETCs, the former co-segregating to opposite poles. Furthermore, REC8 localised to the centrosome of interphase ETCs and to the astral poles in anaphase cells where it colocalised with the microtubule-associated protein NuMA. Altogether, our observations indicate that radiation-induced ETCs express features of meiotic cell divisions and that these may facilitate chromosome segregation and genome reduction.

  9. PP2ACdc55’s role in reductional chromosome segregation during achiasmate meiosis in budding yeast is independent of its FEAR function

    PubMed Central

    Kerr, Gary W.; Wong, Jin Huei; Arumugam, Prakash

    2016-01-01

    PP2ACdc55 is a highly conserved serine-threonine protein phosphatase that is involved in diverse cellular processes. In budding yeast, meiotic cells lacking PP2ACdc55 activity undergo a premature exit from meiosis I which results in a failure to form bipolar spindles and divide nuclei. This defect is largely due to its role in negatively regulating the Cdc Fourteen Early Anaphase Release (FEAR) pathway. PP2ACdc55 prevents nucleolar release of the Cdk (Cyclin-dependent kinase)-antagonising phosphatase Cdc14 by counteracting phosphorylation of the nucleolar protein Net1 by Cdk. CDC55 was identified in a genetic screen for monopolins performed by isolating suppressors of spo11Δ spo12Δ lethality suggesting that Cdc55 might have a role in meiotic chromosome segregation. We investigated this possibility by isolating cdc55 alleles that suppress spo11Δ spo12Δ lethality and show that this suppression is independent of PP2ACdc55’s FEAR function. Although the suppressor mutations in cdc55 affect reductional chromosome segregation in the absence of recombination, they have no effect on chromosome segregation during wild type meiosis. We suggest that Cdc55 is required for reductional chromosome segregation during achiasmate meiosis and this is independent of its FEAR function. PMID:27455870

  10. PP2A(Cdc55)'s role in reductional chromosome segregation during achiasmate meiosis in budding yeast is independent of its FEAR function.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Gary W; Wong, Jin Huei; Arumugam, Prakash

    2016-07-26

    PP2A(Cdc55) is a highly conserved serine-threonine protein phosphatase that is involved in diverse cellular processes. In budding yeast, meiotic cells lacking PP2A(Cdc55) activity undergo a premature exit from meiosis I which results in a failure to form bipolar spindles and divide nuclei. This defect is largely due to its role in negatively regulating the Cdc Fourteen Early Anaphase Release (FEAR) pathway. PP2A(Cdc55) prevents nucleolar release of the Cdk (Cyclin-dependent kinase)-antagonising phosphatase Cdc14 by counteracting phosphorylation of the nucleolar protein Net1 by Cdk. CDC55 was identified in a genetic screen for monopolins performed by isolating suppressors of spo11Δ spo12Δ lethality suggesting that Cdc55 might have a role in meiotic chromosome segregation. We investigated this possibility by isolating cdc55 alleles that suppress spo11Δ spo12Δ lethality and show that this suppression is independent of PP2A(Cdc55)'s FEAR function. Although the suppressor mutations in cdc55 affect reductional chromosome segregation in the absence of recombination, they have no effect on chromosome segregation during wild type meiosis. We suggest that Cdc55 is required for reductional chromosome segregation during achiasmate meiosis and this is independent of its FEAR function.

  11. Haspin inhibitors reveal centromeric functions of Aurora B in chromosome segregation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fangwei; Ulyanova, Natalia P.; Daum, John R.; Patnaik, Debasis; Kateneva, Anna V.; Gorbsky, Gary J.

    2012-01-01

    Haspin phosphorylates histone H3 at threonine-3 (H3T3ph), providing a docking site for the Aurora B complex at centromeres. Aurora B functions to correct improper kinetochore–microtubule attachments and alert the spindle checkpoint to the presence of misaligned chromosomes. We show that Haspin inhibitors decreased H3T3ph, resulting in loss of centromeric Aurora B and reduced phosphorylation of centromere and kinetochore Aurora B substrates. Consequently, metaphase chromosome alignment and spindle checkpoint signaling were compromised. These effects were phenocopied by microinjection of anti-H3T3ph antibodies. Retargeting Aurora B to centromeres partially restored checkpoint signaling and Aurora B–dependent phosphorylation at centromeres and kinetochores, bypassing the need for Haspin activity. Haspin inhibitors did not obviously affect phosphorylation of histone H3 at serine-10 (H3S10ph) by Aurora B on chromosome arms but, in Aurora B reactivation assays, recovery of H3S10ph was delayed. Haspin inhibitors did not block Aurora B localization to the spindle midzone in anaphase or Aurora B function in cytokinesis. Thus, Haspin inhibitors reveal centromeric roles of Aurora B in chromosome movement and spindle checkpoint signaling. PMID:23071152

  12. Mouse oocytes depend on BubR1 for proper chromosome segregation but not for prophase I arrest

    PubMed Central

    Touati, Sandra A.; Buffin, Eulalie; Cladière, Damien; Hached, Khaled; Rachez, Christophe; van Deursen, Jan M.; Wassmann, Katja

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian female meiosis is error prone, with rates of meiotic chromosome missegregations strongly increasing towards the end of the reproductive lifespan. A strong reduction of BubR1 has been observed in oocytes of women approaching menopause and in ovaries of aged mice, which led to the hypothesis that a gradual decline of BubR1 contributes to age-related aneuploidization. Here we employ a conditional knockout approach in mouse oocytes to dissect the meiotic roles of BubR1. We show that BubR1 is required for diverse meiotic functions, including persistent spindle assembly checkpoint activity, timing of meiosis I and the establishment of robust kinetochore-microtubule attachments in a meiosis-specific manner, but not prophase I arrest. These data reveal that BubR1 plays a multifaceted role in chromosome segregation during the first meiotic division and suggest that age-related decline of BubR1 is a key determinant of the formation of aneuploid oocytes as women approach menopause. PMID:25897860

  13. Ring Chromosome 4 in a Child with Multiple Congenital Abnormalities: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Saman Kumara, L. P. C.

    2016-01-01

    A female child born preterm with intrauterine growth retardation and presenting with facial dysmorphism with clefts, microcephaly, limb deformities, and congenital abnormalities involving cardiovascular and urinary systems is described. Chromosomal analysis showed a de novo 46,XX,r(4)(p15.3q35) karyotype. The clinical features of the patient were compared with the phenotypic characteristics of 17 previously reported cases with ring chromosome 4 and those with Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (4p-). Clinical features observed in this case are consistent with the consensus phenotype in ring chromosome 4. Patent ductus arteriosus and bilateral talipes equinovarus observed in this baby widen the phenotypic spectrum associated with ring chromosome 4. PMID:27610251

  14. Ring Chromosome 4 in a Child with Multiple Congenital Abnormalities: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Paththinige, C S; Sirisena, N D; Kariyawasam, U G I U; Saman Kumara, L P C; Dissanayake, V H W

    2016-01-01

    A female child born preterm with intrauterine growth retardation and presenting with facial dysmorphism with clefts, microcephaly, limb deformities, and congenital abnormalities involving cardiovascular and urinary systems is described. Chromosomal analysis showed a de novo 46,XX,r(4)(p15.3q35) karyotype. The clinical features of the patient were compared with the phenotypic characteristics of 17 previously reported cases with ring chromosome 4 and those with Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (4p-). Clinical features observed in this case are consistent with the consensus phenotype in ring chromosome 4. Patent ductus arteriosus and bilateral talipes equinovarus observed in this baby widen the phenotypic spectrum associated with ring chromosome 4. PMID:27610251

  15. Genetic Counseling for a Prenatal Diagnosis of Structural Chromosomal Abnormality with High-Resolution Analysis Using a Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Microarray

    PubMed Central

    Takashima, Akiko; Takeshita, Naoki; Kinoshita, Toshihiko

    2016-01-01

    A 41-year old pregnant woman underwent amniocentesis to conduct a conventional karyotyping analysis; the analysis reported an abnormal karyotype: 46, XY, add(9)(p24). Chromosomal microarray analysis (CMA) is utilized in prenatal diagnoses. A single nucleotide polymorphism microarray revealed a male fetus with balanced chromosomal translocations on 9p and balanced chromosomal rearrangements, but another chromosomal abnormality was detected. The fetus had microduplication. The child was born as a phenotypically normal male. CMA is a simple and informative procedure for prenatal genetic diagnosis. CMA is the detection of chromosomal variants of unknown clinical significance; therefore, genetic counseling is important during prenatal genetic testing. PMID:27777709

  16. Studies on Brahma rasayana in male swiss albino mice: Chromosomal aberrations and sperm abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Guruprasad, K. P.; Mascarenhas, Roshan; Gopinath, P. M.; Satyamoorthy, K.

    2010-01-01

    Ayurveda, the Indian holistic healthcare system encompasses traditional medicines with a principle of creating harmony and maintaining balance within the natural rhythms of the body. Rasayana is one of the branches of Ayurveda frequently used as rejuvenant therapy to overcome many discomforts and prevent diseases. It has been reported that rasayanas have immunomodulatory, antioxidant and antitumor functions. However, the genotoxic potential of many rasayanas remains to be evaluated. The present study was undertaken to assess the role of Brahma rasayana(BR) on genotoxicity in vivo in a mouse test system. The older mice (9 months) were orally fed with rasayana for 8 weeks. The treated groups showed no signs of dose-dependent toxicity at the dosage levels tested. The body weight loss/gain and feed consumption were unaffected at tested doses. Furthermore, sperm abnormalities and chromosomal aberrations were insignificant in the treatment group when compared to controls. However, there was a marginal increase in sperm count in the BR treated animals. These findings clearly indicate that there are no observed adverse genotoxic effects elicited by BR in experimental animals such as mice. PMID:21829300

  17. Analysis of Turner syndrome patients within the Jordanian population, with a focus on four patients with Y chromosome abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Daggag, H; Srour, W; El-Khateeb, M; Ajlouni, K

    2013-01-01

    This study presents findings in Turner syndrome (TS) patients from the Jordanian population, with focus on 4 patients with Y chromosomal abnormalities. From 1989 to 2011, 504 patients with TS stigmata were referred to our institute for karyotyping, resulting in 142 positive TS cases. Of these, 62 (43.7%) had the typical 45,X karyotype and the remaining individuals (56.3%) were found to be mosaics. Fifteen TS patients (10.5%) carried a structural abnormality of the Y chromosome and presented with the mosaic 45,X/46,XY karyotype. From these, 4 TS cases were investigated further. Karyotyping revealed that 1 patient carried a small supernumerary marker chromosome, whereas cytogenetic and molecular analyses showed that 3 patients carried 2 copies of the SRY gene. Further analysis by SRY sequencing revealed no mutations within the gene. The analyzed patients were found to be phenotypically either females or males, depending on the predominance of the cell line carrying the Y chromosome. This study demonstrates the importance of detailed cytogenetic analysis (such as FISH) in TS patients, and it also emphasizes the need for molecular analysis (such as PCR and sequencing) when fragments of the Y chromosome are present.

  18. Rare chromosome abnormalities, prevalence and prenatal diagnosis rates from population-based congenital anomaly registers in Europe.

    PubMed

    Wellesley, Diana; Dolk, Helen; Boyd, Patricia A; Greenlees, Ruth; Haeusler, Martin; Nelen, Vera; Garne, Ester; Khoshnood, Babak; Doray, Berenice; Rissmann, Anke; Mullaney, Carmel; Calzolari, Elisa; Bakker, Marian; Salvador, Joaquin; Addor, Marie-Claude; Draper, Elizabeth; Rankin, Judith; Tucker, David

    2012-05-01

    The aim of this study is to quantify the prevalence and types of rare chromosome abnormalities (RCAs) in Europe for 2000-2006 inclusive, and to describe prenatal diagnosis rates and pregnancy outcome. Data held by the European Surveillance of Congenital Anomalies database were analysed on all the cases from 16 population-based registries in 11 European countries diagnosed prenatally or before 1 year of age, and delivered between 2000 and 2006. Cases were all unbalanced chromosome abnormalities and included live births, fetal deaths from 20 weeks gestation and terminations of pregnancy for fetal anomaly. There were 10,323 cases with a chromosome abnormality, giving a total birth prevalence rate of 43.8/10,000 births. Of these, 7335 cases had trisomy 21,18 or 13, giving individual prevalence rates of 23.0, 5.9 and 2.3/10,000 births, respectively (53, 13 and 5% of all reported chromosome errors, respectively). In all, 473 cases (5%) had a sex chromosome trisomy, and 778 (8%) had 45,X, giving prevalence rates of 2.0 and 3.3/10,000 births, respectively. There were 1,737 RCA cases (17%), giving a prevalence of 7.4/10,000 births. These included triploidy, other trisomies, marker chromosomes, unbalanced translocations, deletions and duplications. There was a wide variation between the registers in both the overall prenatal diagnosis rate of RCA, an average of 65% (range 5-92%) and the prevalence of RCA (range 2.4-12.9/10,000 births). In all, 49% were liveborn. The data provide the prevalence of families currently requiring specialised genetic counselling services in the perinatal period for these conditions and, for some, long-term care.

  19. Chromosome abnormalities diagnosed in utero: a Japanese study of 28 983 amniotic fluid specimens collected before 22 weeks gestations.

    PubMed

    Nishiyama, Miyuki; Yan, Jim; Yotsumoto, Junko; Sawai, Hideaki; Sekizawa, Akihiko; Kamei, Yoshimasa; Sago, Haruhiko

    2015-03-01

    To investigate the frequency and type of abnormal karyotype in Japan by amniocentesis before 22 weeks of gestation. We performed a retrospective analysis of 28 983 amniotic fluid specimens in a local population collected before 22 weeks gestations for fetal karyotyping. The incidence of abnormal karyotype was 6.0%. The main indication was advanced maternal age (AMA) of 35 years and older, which represented over half of the clinical indications. Abnormal karyotype was most frequently reported among the referrals for abnormal ultrasound findings (21.8%), followed by positive maternal serum screen results (5.3%). Three-fourths of abnormal karyotype was either autosomal aneuploidy (64.0%) or sex chromosome aneuploidy (11.6%). Abnormal karyotype was detected in 2.8% of pregnant women referred for AMA. Clinically significant abnormal karyotype increased with advancing maternal age. The frequency and type of abnormal karyotype detected by amniocentesis for various indications were determined. Amniocentesis was mainly performed among the referrals for AMA, which is a characteristic distribution of indications of Japan.

  20. Moderate Ovarian Stimulation Does Not Increase the Incidence of Human Embryo Chromosomal Abnormalities in in Vitro Fertilization Cycles

    PubMed Central

    Bosch, Ernesto; Alamá, Pilar; Rubio, Carmen; Rodrigo, Lorena; Pellicer, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Context: A high chromosomal abnormalities rate has been observed in human embryos derived from in vitro fertilization (IVF) treatments. The real incidence in natural cycles has been poorly studied, so whether this frequency may be induced by external factors, such as use of gonadotropins for ovarian stimulation, remains unknown. Design: We conducted a prospective cohort study in a University-affiliated private infertility clinic with a comparison between unstimulated and stimulated ovarian cycles in the same women. Preimplantation genetic screening by fluorescence in situ hybridization was performed in all viable d 3 embryos. Objective: The primary objective was to compare the incidence of embryo chromosomal abnormalities in an unstimulated cycle and in an ulterior moderate ovarian stimulated cycle. Secondary outcome measures were embryo quality, blastocyst rate of biopsied embryos, number of normal blastocysts per donor, type of chromosomal abnormalities, and clinical outcome. Results: One hundred eighty-five oocyte donors were initially recruited for the unstimulated cycle, and preimplantation genetic screening could be performed in 51 of them, showing 35.3% of embryo chromosomal abnormalities. Forty-six of them later completed a stimulated cycle. The sperm donor sample was the same for both cycles. The proportion of embryos displaying abnormalities in the unstimulated cycle was 34.8% (16 of 46), whereas it was 40.6% (123 of 303) in the stimulated cycle with risk difference = 5.8 [95% confidence interval (CI) = −20.6–9.0], and relative risk = 1.17 (95% CI = 0.77–1.77) (P = 0.45). When an intrasubject comparison was made, the abnormalities rate was 34.8% (95% CI = 20.5–49.1) in the unstimulated cycle and 38.2% (95% CI = 30.5–45.8) in the stimulated cycle [risk difference = 3.4 (95% CI = −17.9–11.2); P = 0.64]. No differences were observed for embryo quality and type of chromosomal abnormalities. Conclusions: Moderate ovarian stimulation in young

  1. CDC-48/p97 is required for proper meiotic chromosome segregation via controlling AIR-2/Aurora B kinase localization in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Sasagawa, Yohei; Higashitani, Atsushi; Urano, Takeshi; Ogura, Teru; Yamanaka, Kunitoshi

    2012-08-01

    CDC-48/p97 is a AAA (ATPases associated with diverse cellular activities) chaperone involved in protein conformational changes such as the disassembly of protein complexes. We previously reported that Caenorhabditis elegans CDC-48.1 and CDC-48.2 (CDC-48s) are essential for the progression of meiosis I metaphase. Here, we report that CDC-48s are required for proper chromosome segregation during meiosis in C. elegans. In wild-type worms, at the diakinesis phase, phosphorylation of histone H3, one of the known substrates of aurora B kinase (AIR-2), on meiosis I chromatids correlated with AIR-2 localization at the cohesion sites of homologous chromatids. Conversely, depletion of CDC-48s resulted in a significant expansion of signals for AIR-2 and phosphorylated histone H3 over the entire length of meiotic chromosomes, leading to defective chromosome segregation, while the total amount of AIR-2 in lysates was not changed by the depletion of CDC-48s. The defective segregation of meiotic chromosomes caused by the depletion of CDC-48s was suppressed by the simultaneous depletion of AIR-2 and is similar to that observed following the depletion of protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) phosphatases. However, the amount and localization of PP1 were not changed by the depletion of CDC-48s. These results suggest that CDC-48s control the restricted localization of AIR-2 to the cohesion sites of homologous chromatids in meiosis I.

  2. Multifunctional Centromere Binding Factor 1 Is Essential for Chromosome Segregation in the Human Pathogenic Yeast Candida glabrata

    PubMed Central

    Stoyan, Tanja; Gloeckner, Gernot; Diekmann, Stephan; Carbon, John

    2001-01-01

    The CBF1 (centromere binding factor 1) gene of Candida glabrata was cloned by functional complementation of the methionine biosynthesis defect of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae cbf1 deletion mutant. The C. glabrata-coded protein, CgCbf1, contains a basic-helix-loop-helix leucine zipper domain and has features similar to those of other budding yeast Cbf1 proteins. CgCbf1p binds in vitro to the centromere DNA element I (CDEI) sequence GTCACATG with high affinity (0.9 × 109 M−1). Bandshift experiments revealed a pattern of protein-DNA complexes on CgCEN DNA different from that known for S. cerevisiae. We examined the effect of altering the CDEI binding site on CEN plasmid segregation, using a newly developed colony-sectoring assay. Internal deletion of the CDEI binding site led only to a fivefold increase in rates of plasmid loss, indicating that direct binding of Cbf1p to the centromere DNA is not required for full function. Additional deletion of sequences to the left of CDEI, however, led to a 70-fold increase in plasmid loss rates. Deletion of the CBF1 gene proved to be lethal in C. glabrata. C. glabrata cells containing the CBF1 gene under the influence of a shutdown promoter (tetO-ScHOP) arrested their growth after 5 h of cultivation in the presence of the reactive drug doxycycline. DAPI (4′,6′-diamidino-2-phenylindole) staining of the arrested cells revealed a significant increase in the number of large-budded cells with single nuclei, 2C DNA content, and short spindles, indicating a defect in the G2/M transition of the cell cycle. Thus, we conclude that Cbf1p is required for chromosome segregation in C. glabrata. PMID:11438645

  3. Increased likelihood of post-polycythemia vera myelofibrosis in Ph-negative MPN patients with chromosome 12 abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Benton, Christopher B; Tanaka, Maria; Wilson, Catherine; Pierce, Sherry; Zhou, Lingsha; Cortes, Jorge; Kantarjian, Hagop; Verstovsek, Srdan

    2015-04-01

    Chromosome 12 (Chr12) abnormalities have been described for individual patients with Philadelphia chromosome-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms (Ph-neg MPN), however the frequency, characteristics, and outcomes of such patients as a whole have not been investigated. We reviewed a database of 1787 consecutive Ph-neg MPN patients seen at our institution and determined that 2% of Ph-neg MPN patients harbored an alteration involving Chr12 by cytogenetic evaluation. Retrospective chart review revealed that patients with Chr12 abnormalities had a higher likelihood of having myelofibrosis (MF) compared to patients without a Chr12 abnormality, and were more likely to have post-polycythemia vera MF. The most common alterations in Chr12 in MF patients involved 12q13, 12q15, 12q24, and trisomy 12, and >40% of Chr12 Ph-neg MPN patients had cytogenetic evolution. Chr12 abnormalities did not significantly correlate with JAK2 status, progression to acute myeloid leukemia, or survival, however patients with 12q24 abnormalities trended toward poorer outcomes.

  4. Automated identification of abnormal metaphase chromosome cells for the detection of chronic myeloid leukemia using microscopic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xingwei; Zheng, Bin; Li, Shibo; Mulvihill, John J.; Chen, Xiaodong; Liu, Hong

    2010-07-01

    Karyotyping is an important process to classify chromosomes into standard classes and the results are routinely used by the clinicians to diagnose cancers and genetic diseases. However, visual karyotyping using microscopic images is time-consuming and tedious, which reduces the diagnostic efficiency and accuracy. Although many efforts have been made to develop computerized schemes for automated karyotyping, no schemes can get be performed without substantial human intervention. Instead of developing a method to classify all chromosome classes, we develop an automatic scheme to detect abnormal metaphase cells by identifying a specific class of chromosomes (class 22) and prescreen for suspicious chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). The scheme includes three steps: (1) iteratively segment randomly distributed individual chromosomes, (2) process segmented chromosomes and compute image features to identify the candidates, and (3) apply an adaptive matching template to identify chromosomes of class 22. An image data set of 451 metaphase cells extracted from bone marrow specimens of 30 positive and 30 negative cases for CML is selected to test the scheme's performance. The overall case-based classification accuracy is 93.3% (100% sensitivity and 86.7% specificity). The results demonstrate the feasibility of applying an automated scheme to detect or prescreen the suspicious cancer cases.

  5. Variation in the levels of pregnancy-specific beta-1-glycoprotein in maternal serum from chromosomally abnormal pregnancies.

    PubMed

    Graham, G W; Crossley, J A; Aitken, D A; Connor, J M

    1992-06-01

    Human pregnancy-specific beta-1-glycoprotein (SP1) was assayed retrospectively in stored maternal serum (MS) samples from 82 chromosomally abnormal pregnancies and 377 matched controls. The median MSSP1 concentration in 48 Down's syndrome pregnancies was significantly elevated at 1.17 multiples of the control median (MOM), and significantly reduced (0.5 MOM) in a group of eight cases of unbalanced translocations. There was no significant difference in median SP1 concentrations in cases of trisomy 18, trisomy 13, balanced translocations, or sex chromosome abnormalities. A comparison with human chorionic gonadotrophin results in the same series of samples indicates that SP1 is a less sensitive predictor of Down's syndrome pregnancies. PMID:1387478

  6. Detection of numerical chromosomal abnormalities (chr. 1 and 18) before and after photodynamic therapy of human bladder carcinoma cells in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachor, Ruediger; Reich, Ella D.; Kleinschmidt, Klaus; Hautmann, Richard E.

    1997-12-01

    The application of nonradioactive in situ hybridization with chromosome-specific probes for cytogenetic analysis has increased significantly in recent years. In the field of photodynamic therapy (PDT) the hypothesis is that after PDT the remaining viable malignant cells are potentially metastatic cells. Therefore, we performed in vitro experiments on human bladder carcinoma cells to evaluate numerical chromosomal abnormalities before and after PDT. The possible genotoxic effect of PDT with porphycene (AamTPPn) appears to be small based on criteria such as numerical chromosomal abnormalities for chromosome 1 and 18.

  7. Transient pancytopenia preceding adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia with chromosomal abnormalities including the Philadelphia chromosome: A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    LIANG, YUN; DING, LUYIN; LI, XIAN; WANG, WEIQIN; ZHANG, XIAOHONG

    2015-01-01

    A preleukaemic phase, typified by transient pancytopenia, is a rare occurrence that usually affects children and adolescents. The present study reports the case of a 50-year-old woman with transient pancytopenia, which manifested as a fever, cough and severe anemia. Three weeks following treatment of pancytopenia with antibiotics, red blood cell and platelet transfusion, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and human γ globulin, the condition of the patient was improved. However, 3 weeks following discharge from hospital, the patient was diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) with complex chromosomal abnormalities, including Philadelphia chromosome and P190 breakpoint cluster region-ABL. Complete remission was achieved following one course of combination chemotherapy. In conclusion, adult ALL with pancytopenia as a preceding symptom is rare, difficult to diagnose early and easily misdiagnosed. In addition, the pathogenesis of ALL and the precipitating factors underlying this disease require further investigation. PMID:26788209

  8. Delineation of candidate genes responsible for structural brain abnormalities in patients with terminal deletions of chromosome 6q27

    PubMed Central

    Peddibhotla, Sirisha; Nagamani, Sandesh CS; Erez, Ayelet; Hunter, Jill V; Holder Jr, J Lloyd; Carlin, Mary E; Bader, Patricia I; Perras, Helene MF; Allanson, Judith E; Newman, Leslie; Simpson, Gayle; Immken, LaDonna; Powell, Erin; Mohanty, Aaron; Kang, Sung-Hae L; Stankiewicz, Pawel; Bacino, Carlos A; Bi, Weimin; Patel, Ankita; Cheung, Sau W

    2015-01-01

    Patients with terminal deletions of chromosome 6q present with structural brain abnormalities including agenesis of corpus callosum, hydrocephalus, periventricular nodular heterotopia, and cerebellar malformations. The 6q27 region harbors genes that are important for the normal development of brain and delineation of a critical deletion region for structural brain abnormalities may lead to a better genotype–phenotype correlation. We conducted a detailed clinical and molecular characterization of seven unrelated patients with deletions involving chromosome 6q27. All patients had structural brain abnormalities. Using array comparative genomic hybridization, we mapped the size, extent, and genomic content of these deletions. The smallest region of overlap spans 1.7 Mb and contains DLL1, THBS2, PHF10, and C6orf70 (ERMARD) that are plausible candidates for the causation of structural brain abnormalities. Our study reiterates the importance of 6q27 region in normal development of brain and helps identify putative genes in causation of structural brain anomalies. PMID:24736736

  9. Delineation of candidate genes responsible for structural brain abnormalities in patients with terminal deletions of chromosome 6q27.

    PubMed

    Peddibhotla, Sirisha; Nagamani, Sandesh C S; Erez, Ayelet; Hunter, Jill V; Holder, J Lloyd; Carlin, Mary E; Bader, Patricia I; Perras, Helene M F; Allanson, Judith E; Newman, Leslie; Simpson, Gayle; Immken, LaDonna; Powell, Erin; Mohanty, Aaron; Kang, Sung-Hae L; Stankiewicz, Pawel; Bacino, Carlos A; Bi, Weimin; Patel, Ankita; Cheung, Sau W

    2015-01-01

    Patients with terminal deletions of chromosome 6q present with structural brain abnormalities including agenesis of corpus callosum, hydrocephalus, periventricular nodular heterotopia, and cerebellar malformations. The 6q27 region harbors genes that are important for the normal development of brain and delineation of a critical deletion region for structural brain abnormalities may lead to a better genotype-phenotype correlation. We conducted a detailed clinical and molecular characterization of seven unrelated patients with deletions involving chromosome 6q27. All patients had structural brain abnormalities. Using array comparative genomic hybridization, we mapped the size, extent, and genomic content of these deletions. The smallest region of overlap spans 1.7 Mb and contains DLL1, THBS2, PHF10, and C6orf70 (ERMARD) that are plausible candidates for the causation of structural brain abnormalities. Our study reiterates the importance of 6q27 region in normal development of brain and helps identify putative genes in causation of structural brain anomalies.

  10. Molecular analysis of a chromosome 4 inversion segregating in a large schizophrenia kindred from Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Mensah, Albert K; De Luca, Vincenzo; Stachowiak, Beata; Noor, Abdul; Windpassinger, Christian; Lam, Stephen T S; Kennedy, James L; Scherer, Stephen W; Lo, Ivan F M; Vincent, John B

    2007-09-01

    The present study looks at a paracentric inversion on chromosome 4 [inv(4)(q13;q25)] in members of a large schizophrenia kindred from Hong Kong, and the possibility of a susceptibility gene for schizophrenia at one of the inversion breakpoints. Fluorescence in situ hybridization with BAC and fosmid clones was used to determine the location of the 4q13 and 4q25 breakpoints, however bioinformatic analysis indicated that no known genes are directly disrupted by the breakpoints. We identified several putative genes and expressed sequence tags (ESTs) from around the breakpoint regions, and have characterized them further in order to determine whether they may represent full-length mRNAs that are disrupted by the inversion. Overall, it appears that, while no known genes are disrupted, an as yet undiscovered gene, or indeed, a known gene, may be present near one of the breakpoints and may be disrupted by position effect. We hypothesized that either the 4q13 or 4q25 breakpoint region may contain a common susceptibility gene for schizophrenia. We genotyped 117 schizophrenia families for several short tandem repeat polymorphisms close to the breakpoints. Family based association testing showed no association at the 4q13 breakpoint region, but showed significant allelic association for marker D4S2989 at the 4q25 breakpoint region (p=0.016). This study suggests that the 4q breakpoint regions may harbour a gene that contributes to the illness in the large Hong Kong pedigree, and this 4q25 region should be examined further in other schizophrenia samples.

  11. Cdk5rap2 regulates centrosome function and chromosome segregation in neuronal progenitors.

    PubMed

    Lizarraga, Sofia B; Margossian, Steven P; Harris, Marian H; Campagna, Dean R; Han, An-Ping; Blevins, Sherika; Mudbhary, Raksha; Barker, Jane E; Walsh, Christopher A; Fleming, Mark D

    2010-06-01

    Microcephaly affects approximately 1% of the population and is associated with mental retardation, motor defects and, in some cases, seizures. We analyzed the mechanisms underlying brain size determination in a mouse model of human microcephaly. The Hertwig's anemia (an) mutant shows peripheral blood cytopenias, spontaneous aneuploidy and a predisposition to hematopoietic tumors. We found that the an mutation is a genomic inversion of exon 4 of Cdk5rap2, resulting in an in-frame deletion of exon 4 from the mRNA. The finding that CDK5RAP2 human mutations cause microcephaly prompted further analysis of Cdk5rap2(an/an) mice and we demonstrated that these mice exhibit microcephaly comparable to that of the human disease, resulting from striking neurogenic defects that include proliferative and survival defects in neuronal progenitors. Cdk5rap2(an/an) neuronal precursors exit the cell cycle prematurely and many undergo apoptosis. These defects are associated with impaired mitotic progression coupled with abnormal mitotic spindle pole number and mitotic orientation. Our findings suggest that the reduction in brain size observed in humans with mutations in CDK5RAP2 is associated with impaired centrosomal function and with changes in mitotic spindle orientation during progenitor proliferation. PMID:20460369

  12. Complex chromosomal rearrangements leading to MECOM overexpression are recurrent in myeloid malignancies with various 3q abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Baldazzi, Carmen; Luatti, Simona; Zuffa, Elisa; Papayannidis, Cristina; Ottaviani, Emanuela; Marzocchi, Giulia; Ameli, Gaia; Bardi, Maria Antonella; Bonaldi, Laura; Paolini, Rossella; Gurrieri, Carmela; Rigolin, Gian Matteo; Cuneo, Antonio; Martinelli, Giovanni; Cavo, Michele; Testoni, Nicoletta

    2016-04-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements involving 3q26 are recurrent findings in myeloid malignancies leading to MECOM overexpression, which has been associated with a very poor prognosis. Other 3q abnormalities have been reported and cryptic MECOM rearrangements have been identified in some cases. By fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis, we investigated 97 acute myeloid leukemia/myelodysplastic syndrome patients with various 3q abnormalities to determine the role and the frequency of the involvement of MECOM. We identified MECOM rearrangements in 51 patients, most of them showed 3q26 involvement by chromosome banding analysis (CBA): inv(3)/t(3;3) (n = 26) and other balanced 3q26 translocations (t(3q26)) (n = 15); the remaining cases (n = 10) showed various 3q abnormalities: five with balanced translocations involving 3q21 or 3q25; two with homogenously staining region (hsr) on 3q; and three with other various 3q abnormalities. Complex rearrangements with multiple breakpoints on 3q, masking 3q26 involvement, were identified in cases with 3q21/3q25 translocations. Furthermore, multiple breaks were observed in two cases with t(3q26), suggesting that complex rearrangement may also occur in apparently simple t(3q26). Intrachromosomal gene amplification was another mechanism leading to MECOM overexpression in two cases with hsr on 3q. In the last three cases, FISH analysis revealed 3q26 involvement that was missed by CBA because of metaphases' suboptimal quality. All cases with MECOM rearrangements showed overexpression by real-time quantitative PCR. Finally, MECOM rearrangements can occur in patients with 3q abnormalities even in the absence of specific 3q26 involvement, underlining that their frequency is underestimated. As MECOM rearrangement has been associated with very poor prognosis, its screening should be performed in patients with any 3q abnormalities.

  13. Complex chromosomal rearrangements leading to MECOM overexpression are recurrent in myeloid malignancies with various 3q abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Baldazzi, Carmen; Luatti, Simona; Zuffa, Elisa; Papayannidis, Cristina; Ottaviani, Emanuela; Marzocchi, Giulia; Ameli, Gaia; Bardi, Maria Antonella; Bonaldi, Laura; Paolini, Rossella; Gurrieri, Carmela; Rigolin, Gian Matteo; Cuneo, Antonio; Martinelli, Giovanni; Cavo, Michele; Testoni, Nicoletta

    2016-04-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements involving 3q26 are recurrent findings in myeloid malignancies leading to MECOM overexpression, which has been associated with a very poor prognosis. Other 3q abnormalities have been reported and cryptic MECOM rearrangements have been identified in some cases. By fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis, we investigated 97 acute myeloid leukemia/myelodysplastic syndrome patients with various 3q abnormalities to determine the role and the frequency of the involvement of MECOM. We identified MECOM rearrangements in 51 patients, most of them showed 3q26 involvement by chromosome banding analysis (CBA): inv(3)/t(3;3) (n = 26) and other balanced 3q26 translocations (t(3q26)) (n = 15); the remaining cases (n = 10) showed various 3q abnormalities: five with balanced translocations involving 3q21 or 3q25; two with homogenously staining region (hsr) on 3q; and three with other various 3q abnormalities. Complex rearrangements with multiple breakpoints on 3q, masking 3q26 involvement, were identified in cases with 3q21/3q25 translocations. Furthermore, multiple breaks were observed in two cases with t(3q26), suggesting that complex rearrangement may also occur in apparently simple t(3q26). Intrachromosomal gene amplification was another mechanism leading to MECOM overexpression in two cases with hsr on 3q. In the last three cases, FISH analysis revealed 3q26 involvement that was missed by CBA because of metaphases' suboptimal quality. All cases with MECOM rearrangements showed overexpression by real-time quantitative PCR. Finally, MECOM rearrangements can occur in patients with 3q abnormalities even in the absence of specific 3q26 involvement, underlining that their frequency is underestimated. As MECOM rearrangement has been associated with very poor prognosis, its screening should be performed in patients with any 3q abnormalities. PMID:26815134

  14. Mitotic Spindle Defects and Chromosome Mis-Segregation Induced by LDL/Cholesterol—Implications for Niemann-Pick C1, Alzheimer’s Disease, and Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Granic, Antoneta; Potter, Huntington

    2013-01-01

    Elevated low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol is a risk factor for both Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and Atherosclerosis (CVD), suggesting a common lipid-sensitive step in their pathogenesis. Previous results show that AD and CVD also share a cell cycle defect: chromosome instability and up to 30% aneuploidy–in neurons and other cells in AD and in smooth muscle cells in atherosclerotic plaques in CVD. Indeed, specific degeneration of aneuploid neurons accounts for 90% of neuronal loss in AD brain, indicating that aneuploidy underlies AD neurodegeneration. Cell/mouse models of AD develop similar aneuploidy through amyloid-beta (Aß) inhibition of specific microtubule motors and consequent disruption of mitotic spindles. Here we tested the hypothesis that, like upregulated Aß, elevated LDL/cholesterol and altered intracellular cholesterol homeostasis also causes chromosomal instability. Specifically we found that: 1) high dietary cholesterol induces aneuploidy in mice, satisfying the hypothesis’ first prediction, 2) Niemann-Pick C1 patients accumulate aneuploid fibroblasts, neurons, and glia, demonstrating a similar aneugenic effect of intracellular cholesterol accumulation in humans 3) oxidized LDL, LDL, and cholesterol, but not high-density lipoprotein (HDL), induce chromosome mis-segregation and aneuploidy in cultured cells, including neuronal precursors, indicating that LDL/cholesterol directly affects the cell cycle, 4) LDL-induced aneuploidy requires the LDL receptor, but not Aß, showing that LDL works differently than Aß, with the same end result, 5) cholesterol treatment disrupts the structure of the mitotic spindle, providing a cell biological mechanism for its aneugenic activity, and 6) ethanol or calcium chelation attenuates lipoprotein-induced chromosome mis-segregation, providing molecular insights into cholesterol’s aneugenic mechanism, specifically through its rigidifying effect on the cell membrane, and potentially explaining why ethanol

  15. Mitotic spindle defects and chromosome mis-segregation induced by LDL/cholesterol-implications for Niemann-Pick C1, Alzheimer's disease, and atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Granic, Antoneta; Potter, Huntington

    2013-01-01

    Elevated low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol is a risk factor for both Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Atherosclerosis (CVD), suggesting a common lipid-sensitive step in their pathogenesis. Previous results show that AD and CVD also share a cell cycle defect: chromosome instability and up to 30% aneuploidy-in neurons and other cells in AD and in smooth muscle cells in atherosclerotic plaques in CVD. Indeed, specific degeneration of aneuploid neurons accounts for 90% of neuronal loss in AD brain, indicating that aneuploidy underlies AD neurodegeneration. Cell/mouse models of AD develop similar aneuploidy through amyloid-beta (Aß) inhibition of specific microtubule motors and consequent disruption of mitotic spindles. Here we tested the hypothesis that, like upregulated Aß, elevated LDL/cholesterol and altered intracellular cholesterol homeostasis also causes chromosomal instability. Specifically we found that: 1) high dietary cholesterol induces aneuploidy in mice, satisfying the hypothesis' first prediction, 2) Niemann-Pick C1 patients accumulate aneuploid fibroblasts, neurons, and glia, demonstrating a similar aneugenic effect of intracellular cholesterol accumulation in humans 3) oxidized LDL, LDL, and cholesterol, but not high-density lipoprotein (HDL), induce chromosome mis-segregation and aneuploidy in cultured cells, including neuronal precursors, indicating that LDL/cholesterol directly affects the cell cycle, 4) LDL-induced aneuploidy requires the LDL receptor, but not Aß, showing that LDL works differently than Aß, with the same end result, 5) cholesterol treatment disrupts the structure of the mitotic spindle, providing a cell biological mechanism for its aneugenic activity, and 6) ethanol or calcium chelation attenuates lipoprotein-induced chromosome mis-segregation, providing molecular insights into cholesterol's aneugenic mechanism, specifically through its rigidifying effect on the cell membrane, and potentially explaining why ethanol

  16. Clinical and prognostic significance of 3q26.2 and other chromosome 3 abnormalities in CML in the era of tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Cortes, Jorge E; Lin, Pei; Beaty, Michael W; Ai, Di; Amin, Hesham M; McDonnell, Timothy J; Ok, Chi Young; Kantarjian, Hagop M; Medeiros, L Jeffrey; Hu, Shimin

    2015-10-01

    Chromosome 3q26.2 abnormalities in acute myeloid leukemia, including inv(3)/t(3;3) and t(3;21), have been studied and are associated with a poor prognosis. Their prevalence, response to tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) treatment, and prognostic significance in chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) are largely unknown. In this study, we explored these aspects using a cohort of 2013 patients with CML diagnosed in the era of TKI therapy. Chromosome 3 abnormalities were observed in 116 (5.8%) of 2013 cases. These cases were divided into 5 distinct groups: A, inv(3)(q21q26.2)/t(3;3)(q21;q26.2), 26%; B, t(3;21)(q26.2;q22), 17%; C, other 3q26.2 rearrangements, 7%; D, rearrangements involving chromosome 3 other than 3q26.2 locus, 32%; and E, gain or loss of partial or whole chromosome 3, 18%. In all, 3q26.2 rearrangements were the most common chromosome 3 abnormalities (50%, groups A-C). 3q26.2 rearrangements emerged at different leukemic phases. For cases with 3q26.2 rearrangements that initially emerged in chronic or accelerated phase, they had a high rate of transformation to blast phase. Patients with 3q26.2 abnormalities showed a marginal response to TKI treatment, and no patients achieved a long-term sustainable response at a cytogenetic or molecular level. Compared with other chromosomal abnormalities in CML, patients with 3q26.2 rearrangements had poorer overall survival. The presence or absence of other concurrent chromosomal abnormalities did not affect survival in these patients, reflecting the predominant role of 3q26.2 rearrangements in determining prognosis. Interestingly, although heterogeneous, chromosome 3 abnormalities involving non-3q26.2 loci (groups D, E) also conferred a worse prognosis compared with changes involving other chromosomes in this cohort.

  17. Fluorescence in situ hybridization of TP53 for the detection of chromosome 17 abnormalities in myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Castro, Judit; Marco-Betés, Víctor; Gómez-Arbonés, Xavier; García-Cerecedo, Tomás; López, Ricard; Talavera, Elisabeth; Fernández-Ruiz, Sara; Ademà, Vera; Marugan, Isabel; Luño, Elisa; Sanzo, Carmen; Vallespí, Teresa; Arenillas, Leonor; Marco Buades, Josefa; Batlle, Ana; Buño, Ismael; Martín Ramos, María Luisa; Blázquez Rios, Beatriz; Collado Nieto, Rosa; Vargas, Ma Teresa; González Martínez, Teresa; Sanz, Guillermo; Solé, Francesc

    2015-01-01

    Conventional G-banding cytogenetics (CC) detects chromosome 17 (chr17) abnormalities in 2% of patients with de novo myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). We used CC and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) (LSI p53/17p13.1) to assess deletion of 17p in 531 patients with de novo MDS from the Spanish Group of Hematological Cytogenetics. FISH detected - 17 or 17p abnormalities in 13 cases (2.6%) in whom no 17p abnormalities were revealed by CC: 0.9% of patients with a normal karyotype, 0% in non-informative cytogenetics, 50% of patients with a chr17 abnormality without loss of 17p and 4.7% of cases with an abnormal karyotype not involving chr17. Our results suggest that applying FISH of 17p13 to identify the number of copies of the TP53 gene could be beneficial in patients with a complex karyotype. We recommend using FISH of 17p13 in young patients with a normal karyotype or non-informative cytogenetics, and always in isolated del(17p). PMID:25754580

  18. PprA Protein Is Involved in Chromosome Segregation via Its Physical and Functional Interaction with DNA Gyrase in Irradiated Deinococcus radiodurans Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Devigne, Alice; Guérin, Philippe; Lisboa, Johnny; Quevillon-Cheruel, Sophie; Armengaud, Jean; Sommer, Suzanne; Bouthier de la Tour, Claire

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT PprA, a radiation-induced Deinococcus-specific protein, was previously shown to be required for cell survival and accurate chromosome segregation after exposure to ionizing radiation. Here, we used an in vivo approach to determine, by shotgun proteomics, putative PprA partners coimmunoprecipitating with PprA when cells were exposed to gamma rays. Among them, we found the two subunits of DNA gyrase and, thus, chose to focus our work on characterizing the activities of the deinococcal DNA gyrase in the presence or absence of PprA. Loss of PprA rendered cells hypersensitive to novobiocin, an inhibitor of the B subunit of DNA gyrase. We showed that treatment of bacteria with novobiocin resulted in induction of the radiation desiccation response (RDR) regulon and in defects in chromosome segregation that were aggravated by the absence of PprA. In vitro, the deinococcal DNA gyrase, like other bacterial DNA gyrases, possesses DNA negative supercoiling and decatenation activities. These two activities are inhibited in vitro by novobiocin and nalidixic acid, whereas PprA specifically stimulates the decatenation activity of DNA gyrase. Together, these results suggest that PprA plays a major role in chromosome decatenation via its interaction with the deinococcal DNA gyrase when D. radiodurans cells are recovering from exposure to ionizing radiation. IMPORTANCE D. radiodurans is one of the most radiation-resistant organisms known. This bacterium is able to cope with high levels of DNA lesions generated by exposure to extreme doses of ionizing radiation and to reconstruct a functional genome from hundreds of radiation-induced chromosomal fragments. Here, we identified partners of PprA, a radiation-induced Deinococcus-specific protein, previously shown to be required for radioresistance. Our study leads to three main findings: (i) PprA interacts with DNA gyrase after irradiation, (ii) treatment of cells with novobiocin results in defects in chromosome segregation

  19. Stabilization of mini-chromosome segregation during mitotic growth by overexpression of YCR041W and its application to chromosome engineering in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Sasano, Yu; Yamagishi, Kazuo; Tanikawa, Marie; Nakazawa, Toshimasa; Sugiyama, Minetaka; Kaneko, Yoshinobu; Harashima, Satoshi

    2015-05-01

    Chromosome engineering enables large-scale genome manipulation and can be used as a novel technology for breeding of yeasts. PCR-mediated chromosome splitting (PCS) offers a powerful tool for chromosome engineering by enabling a yeast chromosome to be split at any desired site. By applying PCS, a huge variety of chromosome combinations can be created and the best strain under specific conditions can be selected-a technology that we have called genome reorganization. Once the optimal strain is obtained, chromosome constitutions need to be maintained stably; however, mini-chromosomes of less than 50 kb are at relatively high frequency lost during cultivation. To overcome this problem, in this study we screened for multicopy suppressors of the high loss of mini-chromosomes by using a multicopy genomic library of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We identified a novel gene, YCR041W, that stabilizes mini-chromosomes. The translational product of YCR041W was suggested to play an important role in increasing stability for mini-chromosome maintenance, probably by decreasing the rate of loss during mitotic cell division. The stabilization of mini-chromosomes conferred by YCR041W overexpression was completely dependent on the silencing protein Sir4, suggesting that a process related to telomere function might be involved in mini-chromosome stabilization. Overexpression of YCR041W stabilized not only a yeast artificial chromosome vector, but also a mini-chromosome derived from a natural chromosome. Taking these results together, we propose that YCR041W overexpression can be used as a novel chromosome engineering tool for controlling mini-chromosome maintenance and loss.

  20. Abnormal pairing of X and Y sex chromosomes during meiosis I in interspecific hybrids of Phodopus campbelli and P. sungorus

    PubMed Central

    Ishishita, Satoshi; Tsuboi, Kazuma; Ohishi, Namiko; Tsuchiya, Kimiyuki; Matsuda, Yoichi

    2015-01-01

    Hybrid sterility plays an important role in the maintenance of species identity and promotion of speciation. Male interspecific hybrids from crosses between Campbell's dwarf hamster (Phodopus campbelli) and the Djungarian hamster (P. sungorus) exhibit sterility with abnormal spermatogenesis. However, the meiotic phenotype of these hybrids has not been well described. In the present work, we observed the accumulation of spermatocytes and apoptosis of spermatocyte-like cells in the testes of hybrids between P. campbelli females and P. sungorus males. In hybrid spermatocytes, a high frequency of asynapsis of X and Y chromosomes during the pachytene-like stage and dissociation of these chromosomes during metaphase I (MI) was observed. No autosomal univalency was observed during pachytene-like and MI stages in the hybrids; however, a low frequency of synapsis between autosomes and X or Y chromosomes, interlocking and partial synapsis between autosomal pairs, and γ-H2AFX staining in autosomal chromatin was observed during the pachytene-like stage. Degenerated MI-like nuclei were frequently observed in the hybrids. Most of the spermatozoa in hybrid epididymides exhibited head malformation. These results indicate that the pairing of X and Y chromosomes is more adversely affected than that of autosomes in Phodopus hybrids. PMID:25801302

  1. Abnormal pairing of X and Y sex chromosomes during meiosis I in interspecific hybrids of Phodopus campbelli and P. sungorus.

    PubMed

    Ishishita, Satoshi; Tsuboi, Kazuma; Ohishi, Namiko; Tsuchiya, Kimiyuki; Matsuda, Yoichi

    2015-03-24

    Hybrid sterility plays an important role in the maintenance of species identity and promotion of speciation. Male interspecific hybrids from crosses between Campbell's dwarf hamster (Phodopus campbelli) and the Djungarian hamster (P. sungorus) exhibit sterility with abnormal spermatogenesis. However, the meiotic phenotype of these hybrids has not been well described. In the present work, we observed the accumulation of spermatocytes and apoptosis of spermatocyte-like cells in the testes of hybrids between P. campbelli females and P. sungorus males. In hybrid spermatocytes, a high frequency of asynapsis of X and Y chromosomes during the pachytene-like stage and dissociation of these chromosomes during metaphase I (MI) was observed. No autosomal univalency was observed during pachytene-like and MI stages in the hybrids; however, a low frequency of synapsis between autosomes and X or Y chromosomes, interlocking and partial synapsis between autosomal pairs, and γ-H2AFX staining in autosomal chromatin was observed during the pachytene-like stage. Degenerated MI-like nuclei were frequently observed in the hybrids. Most of the spermatozoa in hybrid epididymides exhibited head malformation. These results indicate that the pairing of X and Y chromosomes is more adversely affected than that of autosomes in Phodopus hybrids.

  2. Analysis of chromosomal abnormalities by CGH-array in patients with dysmorphic and intellectual disability with normal karyotype

    PubMed Central

    Pratte-Santos, Rodrigo; Ribeiro, Katyanne Heringer; Santos, Thainá Altoe; Cintra, Terezinha Sarquis

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective To investigate chromosomal abnormalities by CGH-array in patients with dysmorphic features and intellectual disability with normal conventional karyotype. Methods Retrospective study, carried out from January 2012 to February 2014, analyzing the CGH-array results of 39 patients. Results Twenty-six (66.7%) patients had normal results and 13 (33.3%) showed abnormal results - in that, 6 (15.4%) had pathogenic variants, 6 (15.4%) variants designated as uncertain and 1 (2.5%) non-pathogenic variants. Conclusion The characterization of the genetic profile by CGH-array in patients with intellectual disability and dysmorphic features enabled making etiologic diagnosis, followed by genetic counseling for families and specific treatment. PMID:27074231

  3. Identification of Chromosome Abnormalities in Subtelomeric Regions by Microarray Analysis: A Study of 5,380 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Lina; Shaw, Chad A.; Lu, Xin-Yan; Sahoo, Trilochan; Bacino, Carlos A.; Lalani, Seema R.; Stankiewicz, Pawel; Yatsenko, Svetlana A.; Li, Yinfeng; Neill, Sarah; Pursley, Amber N.; Chinault, A. Craig; Patel, Ankita; Beaudet, Arthur L.; Lupski, James R.; Cheung, Sau W.

    2009-01-01

    Subtelomeric imbalances are a significant cause of congenital disorders. Screening for these abnormalities has traditionally utilized GTG-banding analysis, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) assays, and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification. Microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH) is a relatively new technology that can identify microscopic and submicroscopic chromosomal imbalances. It has been proposed that an array with extended coverage at subtelomeric regions could characterize subtelomeric aberrations more efficiently in a single experiment. The targeted arrays for chromosome microarray analysis (CMA), developed by Baylor College of Medicine, have on average 12 BAC/PAC clones covering 10 Mb of each of the 41 subtelomeric regions. We screened 5,380 consecutive clinical patients using CMA. The most common reasons for referral included developmental delay (DD), and/or mental retardation (MR), dysmorphic features (DF), multiple congenital anomalies (MCA), seizure disorders (SD), and autistic, or other behavioral abnormalities. We found pathogenic rearrangements at subtelomeric regions in 236 patients (4.4%). Among these patients, 103 had a deletion, 58 had a duplication, 44 had an unbalanced translocation, and 31 had a complex rearrangement. The detection rates varied among patients with a normal karyotype analysis (2.98%), with an abnormal karyotype analysis (43.4%), and with an unavailable or no karyotype analysis (3.16%). Six patients out of 278 with a prior normal subtelomere-FISH analysis showed an abnormality including an interstitial deletion, two terminal deletions, two interstitial duplications, and a terminal duplication. In conclusion, genomic imbalances at subtelomeric regions contribute significantly to congenital disorders. Targeted array-CGH with extended coverage (up to 10 Mb) of subtelomeric regions will enhance the detection of subtelomeric imbalances, especially for submicroscopic imbalances. PMID

  4. Chromosome

    MedlinePlus

    Chromosomes are structures found in the center (nucleus) of cells that carry long pieces of DNA. DNA ... is the building block of the human body. Chromosomes also contain proteins that help DNA exist in ...

  5. Characterization of the temporal persistence of chromosomal abnormalities in the semen of Hodkin`s disease patients after treatment with NOVP chemotherapy using multi-chromosome fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Cassel, M.J.; Robbins, W.A.; Wyrobek, A.J.; Meistrich, M.L.

    1994-12-31

    Three-chromosome fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was applied to sperm of men with Hodgkin`s disease to measure the persistence of chromosomally abnormal sperm within the time interval of 3 to 33 months after the end of treatment. NOVP chemotherapy includes the agents novantrone, oncovin, vinblastine, and prednisone, two of which are spindle poisons expected to induce aneuploidy. Semen samples were evaluated for the frequencies of fluorescence phenotypes representing hyperhaploidy, hypohaploidy, and genomic duplications using DNA probes specific for repetitive sequences on chromosomes X,Y, and 8. Using this procedure, NOVP was previously shown to induce chromosomally abnormal sperm in treated patients. In a longitudinal assessment of 11 semen samples from 2 men, frequencies of abnormal sperm appeared to return to pre-treatment levels at {approximately}6 months after the end of treatment and remained at these levels up to 33 months after the end of treatment. However, pre-treatment frequencies of chromosomally abnormal cells in Hodgkin`s patients were elevated above those found in normal healthy men. Additional patients are being evaluated to determine how long after therapy Hodgkin`s disease patients remain at increased risk for producing chromosomally abnormal sperm.

  6. Characterization of chromosome 14 abnormalities by interphase in situ hybridization and comparative genomic hybridization in 124 meningiomas: correlation with clinical, histopathologic, and prognostic features.

    PubMed

    Tabernero, María Dolores; Espinosa, Ana Belén; Maíllo, Angel; Sayagués, José María; Alguero, María del Carmen; Lumbreras, Eva; Díaz, Pedro; Gonçalves, Jesús María; Onzain, Ignacio; Merino, Marta; Morales, Francisco; Orfao, Alberto

    2005-05-01

    We analyzed quantitative chromosome 14 abnormalities in 124 meningiomas by interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization (iFISH) and confirmed the nature of abnormalities by comparative genomic hybridization (CGH). We correlated the abnormalities with clinical, histopathologic, and prognostic factors. Of 124 cases, 50 (40.3%) showed loss (14.5%) or gain (25.8%) of the 14q32 chromosome region by iFISH. Most corresponded to numeric abnormalities: monosomy (12.9%), trisomy (1.6%), or tetrasomy (24.2%); in only 2 cases (1.6%), chromosome 14 loss did not involve the whole chromosome and was restricted to the 14q31-q32 region (confirmed by CGH). Cases with gain or monosomy corresponded more frequently to histologically malignant tumors (P = .009). Patients with monosomy 14/14q-, but not those with gain, more often were male (P = .04) and had a greater incidence of recurrence (P = .003) and shorter relapse-free survival (P = .03). The 2 patients with loss limited to 14q31-q32 had histologically benign tumors and no relapse after more than 5 years' follow-up. Most meningiomas with chromosome 14 abnormalities have numeric changes, with interstitial deletions of 14q31-q32 present in few cases. Of the abnormalities detected, only monosomy 14 showed an adverse prognostic impact. PMID:15981814

  7. The Localization and Action of Topoisomerase IV in Escherichia coli Chromosome Segregation Is Coordinated by the SMC Complex, MukBEF.

    PubMed

    Zawadzki, Pawel; Stracy, Mathew; Ginda, Katarzyna; Zawadzka, Katarzyna; Lesterlin, Christian; Kapanidis, Achillefs N; Sherratt, David J

    2015-12-22

    The type II topoisomerase TopoIV, which has an essential role in Escherichia coli chromosome decatenation, interacts with MukBEF, an SMC (structural maintenance of chromosomes) complex that acts in chromosome segregation. We have characterized the intracellular dynamics of individual TopoIV molecules and the consequences of their interaction with MukBEF clusters by using photoactivated-localization microscopy. We show that ~15 TopoIV molecules per cell are associated with MukBEF clusters that are preferentially localized to the replication origin region (ori), close to the long axis of the cell. A replication-dependent increase in the fraction of immobile molecules, together with a proposed catalytic cycle of ~1.8 s, is consistent with the majority of active TopoIV molecules catalyzing decatenation, with a minority maintaining steady-state DNA supercoiling. Finally, we show that the MukB-ParC interaction is crucial for timely decatenation and segregation of newly replicated ori DNA.

  8. Transcriptional activation by TAL1 and FUS-CHOP proteins expressed in acute malignancies as a result of chromosomal abnormalities.

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-García, I; Rabbitts, T H

    1994-01-01

    Proteins that appear to participate in transcriptional control of gene expression are increasingly implicated in leukemias and malignant solid tumors. We report here that the N-terminal domains of the proteins TAL1 (ectopically activated in T-cell acute leukemias after chromosomal abnormalities caused by V-D-J recombinase error) (V, variable; D, diversity; J, joining) and FUS-CHOP (a liposarcoma tumor-specific fusion protein that is produced as a result of a chromosomal translocation) can function as transcription activators of specific responsive reporter genes. The result with TAL1 provides evidence that transcriptional activation can be mediated by a gene activated by translocation in T-cell acute leukemias. In the case of the liposarcoma, transactivation by the FUS-CHOP protein occurs because the FUS transcriptional activation domain is added to the DNA-binding CHOP protein normally lacking such activity. Therefore, the association of transcriptional activation and DNA-binding elements is a common consequence in proteins activated or newly created as fusion proteins after chromosomal translocations in acute leukemias and in malignant solid tumors. Images PMID:8058726

  9. Risk stratification of chromosomal abnormalities in chronic myelogenous leukemia in the era of tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Cortes, Jorge E; Tang, Guilin; Khoury, Joseph D; Wang, Sa; Bueso-Ramos, Carlos E; DiGiuseppe, Joseph A; Chen, Zi; Kantarjian, Hagop M; Medeiros, L Jeffrey; Hu, Shimin

    2016-06-01

    Clonal cytogenetic evolution with additional chromosomal abnormalities (ACAs) in chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) is generally associated with decreased response to tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) therapy and adverse survival. Although ACAs are considered as a sign of disease progression and have been used as one of the criteria for accelerated phase, the differential prognostic impact of individual ACAs in CML is unknown, and a classification system to reflect such prognostic impact is lacking. In this study, we aimed to address these questions using a large cohort of CML patients treated in the era of TKIs. We focused on cases with single chromosomal changes at the time of ACA emergence and stratified the 6 most common ACAs into 2 groups: group 1 with a relatively good prognosis including trisomy 8, -Y, and an extra copy of Philadelphia chromosome; and group 2 with a relatively poor prognosis including i(17)(q10), -7/del7q, and 3q26.2 rearrangements. Patients in group 1 showed much better treatment response and survival than patients in group 2. When compared with cases with no ACAs, ACAs in group 2 conferred a worse survival irrelevant to the emergence phase and time. In contrast, ACAs in group 1 had no adverse impact on survival when they emerged from chronic phase or at the time of CML diagnosis. The concurrent presence of 2 or more ACAs conferred an inferior survival and can be categorized into the poor prognostic group. PMID:27006386

  10. Discovery of genes involved in mitosis, cell division, cell wall integrity and chromosome segregation through construction of Schizosaccharomyces pombe deletion strains.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jun-Song; Beckley, Janel R; Ren, Liping; Feoktistova, Anna; Jensen, Michael A; Rhind, Nicholas; Gould, Kathleen L

    2016-09-01

    The fission yeast model system Schizosaccharomyces pombe is used to study fundamental biological processes. To continue to fill gaps in the Sz. pombe gene deletion collection, we constructed a set of 90 haploid gene deletion strains covering many previously uncharacterized genes. To begin to understand the function of these genes, we exposed this collection of strains to a battery of stress conditions. Using this information in combination with microscopy, proteomics and mini-chromosome loss assays, we identified genes involved in cell wall integrity, cytokinesis, chromosome segregation and DNA metabolism. This subset of non-essential gene deletions will add to the toolkits available for the study of biological processes in Sz. pombe. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Eosinophilic fasciitis associated with hypereosinophilia, abnormal bone-marrow karyotype and inversion of chromosome 5.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, J S; Bosworth, J; Min, T; Mercieca, J; Holden, C A

    2014-03-01

    We report the case of a male patient presenting with eosinophilia, pulmonary oedema and eosinophilic fasciitis (EF). He had the classic clinical appearance and magnetic resonance imaging of EF. Cytogenetic analysis of the bone marrow revealed a previously undescribed pericentric inversion of chromosome 5. Overall, the presentation was consistent with a diagnosis of chronic eosinophilic leukaemia, not otherwise specified (CEL-NOS). Dermatologists should consult a haematologist in cases of EF, in order to rule out possible haematological malignancies.

  12. Prevalence of chromosomal abnormalities and timing of karyotype analysis in patients with recurrent implantation failure (RIF) following assisted reproduction

    PubMed Central

    De Sutter, P.; Stadhouders, R.; Dutré, M.; Gerris, J.; Dhont, M.

    2012-01-01

    Aims: To analyze the prevalence and type of karyotype abnormalities in RIF patients and to evaluate the adequate timing for analysis and the presence of possible risk factors. Methods: 615 patients (317 women and 298 men) with RIF, having undergone at least 3 sequential failed IVF/ICSI cycles prior to karyotype analysis, were included in this study. Anomaly rates found were compared with published series. Results: Chromosomal abnormalities were diagnosed in 2.1% of patients (13/615): 8 females (2.5%) and 5 males (1.7%) which is significantly higher for the females than in unselected newborns (0.8%) and normo-ovulatory women (0.6%) but lower than in women with high-order implantation failure (10.8%). No significant differences were found with couples at the start of IVF/ICSI (2.0%). Karyotyping all patients prior to IVF/ICSI results in a higher cost than selecting RIF patients. Two subgroups showed an increased prevalence of abnormalities: secondary infertile women with a history of only miscarriages (9.1%) and women with female infertility (6.0%). Conclusion: A karyotype analysis is indicated in all women with RIF. Nulliparous women with a history of miscarriage and women with documented infertility are at greater risk of CA and are to be advised to undergo karyotyping. PMID:24753890

  13. Meiotic abnormalities

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 19, describes meiotic abnormalities. These include nondisjunction of autosomes and sex chromosomes, genetic and environmental causes of nondisjunction, misdivision of the centromere, chromosomally abnormal human sperm, male infertility, parental age, and origin of diploid gametes. 57 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Prolonged exposure to acid and bile induces chromosome abnormalities that precede malignant transformation of benign Barrett’s epithelium

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Barrett’s esophagus (BE) is an asymptomatic, pre-malignant condition of the esophagus that can progress to esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC). BE arises typically in individuals with long-standing gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). The neoplastic progression of BE has been extensively studied histologically and defined as a metaplasia- dyplasia- carcinoma sequence. However the genetic basis of this process is poorly understood. It is conceived that preclinical models of BE may facilitate discovery of molecular markers due to ease of longitudinal sampling. Clinical markers to stratify the patients at higher risk are vital to institute appropriate therapeutic intervention since EAC has very poor prognosis. We developed a dynamic in-vitro BE carcinogenesis (BEC) model by exposing naïve Barrett’s epithelium cell line (BAR-T) to acid and bile at pH4 (B4), 5min/day for a year. The BEC model acquired malignant characteristics after chronic repeated exposure to B4 similar to the sequential progression of BE to EAC in vivo. Aim To study cytogenetic changes during progressive transformation in the BEC model. Results We observed that the BAR-T cells progressively acquired several chromosomal abnormalities in the BEC model. Evidence of chromosomal loss (-Y) rearrangements [t(10;16) and dup (11q)] and clonal selection appeared during the early stages of the BEC model. Clonal selection resulted in a stabilized monoclonal population of cells that had a changed morphology and formed colony in soft agar. BAR-T cells grown in parallel without any exposure did not show any of these abnormalities. Conclusions Prolonged acid and bile exposure induced chromosomal aberrations and clonal selection in benign BAR-T cells. Since aneuploidy preceded morphological/dysplastic changes in the BEC model, chromosomal aberrations may be an early predictor of BE progression. The [t(10;16) and dup(11q)] aberrations identified in this study harbor several genes associated with cancer

  15. Genetic Counseling for Patients Considering Screening and Diagnosis for Chromosomal Abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Chard, Renée L; Norton, Mary E

    2016-06-01

    With the introduction of cell-free DNA screening for fetal aneuploidy and chromosomal microarray for prenatal diagnostic testing, options for pregnant women have become increasingly complex. Discussions regarding options for prenatal testing for aneuploidy should occur prior to any testing and should include pertinent risks and benefits of each alternative test. There is no single screening or diagnostic test option that is the right choice for all patients; patient decisions should be based on each individual woman's values and preferences after a discussion of all options. PMID:27235908

  16. Effects of oocyte quality, incubation time and maturation environment on the number of chromosomal abnormalities in IVF-derived early bovine embryos.

    PubMed

    Demyda-Peyrás, Sebastian; Dorado, Jesus; Hidalgo, Manuel; Anter, Jaouad; De Luca, Leonardo; Genero, Enrique; Moreno-Millán, Miguel

    2013-01-01

    Chromosomal aberrations are one of the major causes of embryo developmental failures in mammals. The occurrence of these types of abnormalities is higher in in vitro-produced (IVP) embryos. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of oocyte morphology and maturation conditions on the rate of chromosomal abnormalities in bovine preimplantational embryos. To this end, 790 early cattle embryos derived from oocytes with different morphologies and matured under different conditions, including maturation period (24 v. 36h) and maturation media (five different serum supplements in TCM-199), were evaluated cytogenetically in three sequential experiments. The rates of normal diploidy and abnormal haploidy, polyploidy and aneuploidy were determined in each embryo. Throughout all the experiments, the rate of chromosomal abnormalities was significantly (P<0.05) affected by oocyte morphology and maturation conditions (maturation time and culture medium). Lower morphological quality was associated with a high rate of chromosome abnormalities (P<0.05). Moreover, polyploidy was associated with increased maturation time (P<0.01), whereas the maturation medium significantly (P<0.05) affected the rates of haploidy and polyploidy. In general, supplementing the maturation medium with oestrous cow serum or fetal calf serum resulted in higher rates of chromosomal aberrations (P<0.05) compared with the other serum supplements tested (bovine steer serum, anoestroues cow serum, bovine amniotic fluid and bovine serum albumin). On the basis of the results of the present study, we conclude that the morphological quality of oocytes and the maturation conditions affect the rate of chromosomal abnormalities in IVP bovine embryos.

  17. Use of a 10,600-nm CO2 Laser Mandibular Vestibular Extension in a Patient With a Chromosomal Abnormality.

    PubMed

    Levine, Robert; Vitruk, Peter

    2016-09-01

    Vestibuloplasty involves a series of surgical procedures designed to restore alveolar ridge height by lowering the muscles attached to the buccal, labial, and lingual aspects of the jaws. The technique is indicated in cases of insufficient vestibular depth that may result from atrophy of the alveolar ridge and/or high attachment of muscle or movable mucosa. This article focuses on a carbon dioxide (CO2) laser vestibular extension procedure performed in a patient with Klinefelter syndrome, which is caused by a chromosomal abnormality. The 10,600-nm CO2 laser is shown to offer several advantages over a conventional scalpel and other laser wavelengths for soft-tissue pre-prosthetic surgery, including vestibular extension. PMID:27608196

  18. The use of molecular and cytogenetic methods as a valuable tool in the detection of chromosomal abnormalities in horses: a case of sex chromosome chimerism in a Spanish purebred colt.

    PubMed

    Demyda-Peyrás, S; Membrillo, A; Bugno-Poniewierska, M; Pawlina, K; Anaya, G; Moreno-Millán, M

    2013-01-01

    Chromosomal abnormalities associated to sex chromosomes are reported as a problem more common than believed to be in horses. Most of them remain undiagnosed due to the complexity of the horse karyotype and the lack of interest of breeders and veterinarians in this type of diagnosis. Approximately 10 years ago, the Spanish Purebred Breeders Association implemented a DNA paternity test to evaluate the pedigree of every newborn foal. All candidates who showed abnormal or uncertain results are routinely submitted to cytogenetical analysis to evaluate the presence of chromosomal abnormalities. We studied the case of a foal showing 3 and even 4 different alleles in several loci in the short tandem repeat (STR) -based DNA parentage test. To confirm these results, a filiation test was repeated using follicular hair DNA showing normal results. A complete set of conventional and molecular cytogenetic analysis was performed to determine their chromosomal complements. C-banding and FISH had shown that the foal presents a sex chimerism 64,XX/64,XY with a cellular percentage of approximately 70/30, diagnosed in blood samples. The use of a diagnostic approach combining routine parentage QF-PCR-based STR screening tested with classical or molecular cytogenetic analysis could be a powerful tool that allows early detection of foals that will have a poor or even no reproductive performance due to chromosomal abnormalities, saving time, efforts and breeders' resources.

  19. Delineation of a deletion region critical for corpus callosal abnormalities in chromosome 1q43–q44

    PubMed Central

    Nagamani, Sandesh C Sreenath; Erez, Ayelet; Bay, Carolyn; Pettigrew, Anjana; Lalani, Seema R; Herman, Kristin; Graham, Brett H; Nowaczyk, Malgorzata JM; Proud, Monica; Craigen, William J; Hopkins, Bobbi; Kozel, Beth; Plunkett, Katie; Hixson, Patricia; Stankiewicz, Pawel; Patel, Ankita; Cheung, Sau Wai

    2012-01-01

    Submicroscopic deletions involving chromosome 1q43–q44 result in cognitive impairment, microcephaly, growth restriction, dysmorphic features, and variable involvement of other organ systems. A consistently observed feature in patients with this deletion are the corpus callosal abnormalities (CCAs), ranging from thinning and hypoplasia to complete agenesis. Previous studies attempting to delineate the critical region for CCAs have yielded inconsistent results. We conducted a detailed clinical and molecular characterization of seven patients with deletions of chromosome 1q43–q44. Using array comparative genomic hybridization, we mapped the size, extent, and genomic content of these deletions. Four patients had CCAs, and shared the smallest region of overlap that contains only three protein coding genes, CEP170, SDCCAG8, and ZNF238. One patient with a small deletion involving SDCCAG8 and AKT3, and another patient with an intragenic deletion of AKT3 did not have any CCA, implying that the loss of these two genes is unlikely to be the cause of CCA. CEP170 is expressed extensively in the brain, and encodes for a protein that is a component of the centrosomal complex. ZNF238 is involved in control of neuronal progenitor cells and survival of cortical neurons. Our results rule out the involvement of AKT3, and implicate CEP170 and/or ZNF238 as novel genes causative for CCA in patients with a terminal 1q deletion. PMID:21934713

  20. Prenatal diagnosis of a small supernumerary, XIST-negative, mosaic ring X chromosome identified by fluorescence in situ hybridization in an abnormal male fetus.

    PubMed

    Le Caignec, C; Boceno, M; Joubert, M; Winer, N; Aubron, F; Fallet-Bianco, C; Rival, J M

    2003-02-01

    Marker or ring X [r(X)] chromosomes of varying size are often found in patients with Turner syndrome. Patients with very small r(X) chromosomes that did not include the X-inactivation locus (XIST) have been described with a more severe phenotype. Small r(X) chromosomes are rare in males and there are only five previous reports of such cases. We report the identification of a small supernumerary X chromosome in an abnormal male fetus. Cytogenetic analysis from chorionic villus sampling was performed because of fetal nuchal translucency thickness and it showed mosaicism 46,XY/47,XY,+r(X)/48,XY,+r(X),+r(X). Fluorescence in situ hybridizations (FISH) showed the marker to be of X-chromosome origin and not to contain the XIST locus. Additional specific probes showed that the r(X) included a euchromatic region in proximal Xq. At 20 weeks gestation, a second ultrasound examination revealed cerebral abnormalities. After genetic counselling, the pregnancy was terminated. The fetus we describe is the first male with a mosaic XIST-negative r(X) chromosome identified at prenatal diagnosis. The phenotype we observed was probably the result of functional disomy of the genes in the r(X) chromosome, secondary to loss of the XIST locus. PMID:12575022

  1. Structural and functional conservation of the human homolog of the Schizosaccharomyces pombe rad2 gene, which is required for chromosome segregation and recovery from DNA damage.

    PubMed Central

    Murray, J M; Tavassoli, M; al-Harithy, R; Sheldrick, K S; Lehmann, A R; Carr, A M; Watts, F Z

    1994-01-01

    The rad2 mutant of Schizosaccharomyces pombe is sensitive to UV irradiation and deficient in the repair of UV damage. In addition, it has a very high degree of chromosome loss and/or nondisjunction. We have cloned the rad2 gene and have shown it to be a member of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae RAD2/S. pombe rad13/human XPG family. Using degenerate PCR, we have cloned the human homolog of the rad2 gene. Human cDNA has 55% amino acid sequence identity to the rad2 gene and is able to complement the UV sensitivity of the rad2 null mutant. We have thus isolated a novel human gene which is likely to be involved both in controlling the fidelity of chromosome segregation and in the repair of UV-induced DNA damage. Its involvement in two fundamental processes for maintaining chromosomal integrity suggests that it is likely to be an important component of cancer avoidance mechanisms. Images PMID:8007985

  2. High Mitotic Activity of Polo-like Kinase 1 Is Required for Chromosome Segregation and Genomic Integrity in Human Epithelial Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Lera, Robert F.; Burkard, Mark E.

    2012-01-01

    Protein kinases play key roles in regulating human cell biology, but manifold substrates and functions make it difficult to understand mechanism. We tested whether we could dissect functions of a pleiotropic mitotic kinase, Polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1), via distinct thresholds of kinase activity. We accomplished this by titrating Plk1 activity in RPE1 human epithelial cells using chemical genetics and verifying results in additional lines. We found that distinct activity thresholds are required for known functions of Plk1 including (from low to high activity) bipolar spindle formation, timely mitotic entry, and formation of a cytokinesis cleavage furrow. Subtle losses in Plk1 activity impaired chromosome congression and produced severe anaphase dysfunction characterized by poor separation of chromosome masses. These two phenotypes were separable, suggesting that they stem from distinct phosphorylation events. Impaired chromosome segregation in anaphase was the most sensitive to modest loss in Plk1 activity. Mechanistically, it was associated with unpaired sister chromatids with stretched kinetochores, suggestive of merotelic attachments. The C-terminal Polo box domain of Plk1 was required for its anaphase function, although it was dispensable for forming a bipolar spindle. The ultimate effect of partial inhibition of Plk1 was the formation of micronuclei, an increase in tetraploid progeny, and senescence. These results demonstrate that different thresholds of Plk1 activity can elicit distinct phenotypes, illustrating a general method for separating pleiotropic functions of a protein kinase even when these are executed close in time. PMID:23105120

  3. Application of molecular cytogenetic techniques to clarify apparently balanced complex chromosomal rearrangements in two patients with an abnormal phenotype: case report

    PubMed Central

    de Vree, Paula JP; Simon, Marleen EH; van Dooren, Marieke F; Stoevelaar, Gerda HT; Hilkmann, José TW; Rongen, Michel A; Huijbregts, Gido CM; Verkerk, Annemieke JMH; Poddighe, Pino J

    2009-01-01

    Background Complex chromosomal rearrangements (CCR) are rare cytogenetic findings that are difficult to karyotype by conventional cytogenetic analysis partially because of the relative low resolution of this technique. High resolution genotyping is necessary in order to identify cryptic imbalances, for instance near the multiple breakpoints, to explain the abnormal phenotype in these patients. We applied several molecular techniques to elucidate the complexity of the CCRs of two adult patients with abnormal phenotypes. Results Multicolour fluorescence in situ hybridization (M-FISH) showed that in patient 1 the chromosomes 1, 10, 15 and 18 were involved in the rearrangement whereas for patient 2 the chromosomes 5, 9, 11 and 13 were involved. A 250 k Nsp1 SNP-array analysis uncovered a deletion in chromosome region 10p13 for patient 1, harbouring 17 genes, while patient 2 showed no pathogenic gains or losses. Additional FISH analysis with locus specific BAC-probes was performed, leading to the identification of cryptic interstitial structural rearrangements in both patients. Conclusion Application of M-FISH and SNP-array analysis to apparently balanced CCRs is useful to delineate the complex chromosomal rearrangement in detail. However, it does not always identify cryptic imbalances as an explanation for the abnormal phenotype in patients with a CCR. PMID:19594915

  4. Dynein Promotes Achiasmate Segregation in Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Luther; Smith, Gerald R.

    2005-01-01

    Most organisms use crossovers (chiasmata) to maintain physical connections between homologous chromosomes that ensure their proper segregation at the first meiotic division. The fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe has a residual ability to segregate homologous chromosomes in the absence of meiotic recombination (achiasmate segregation). Using cytologically tagged chromosomes, we established a role for the microtubule motor dynein in meiotic chromosome segregation. Dhc1, the motor subunit of dynein, is required for chromosome segregation in both the presence and the absence of recombination. Dlc1, a member of the Tctex-1 dynein light-chain family, preferentially affects the segregation of achiasmate chromosomes. Dlc1 is the first identified protein, outside of Drosophila, that preferentially affects achiasmate chromosome segregation. We discuss possible roles of the dynein motor in this process. PMID:15802518

  5. Rothmund-Thomson syndrome: two case reports show heterogeneous cutaneous abnormalities, an association with genetically programmed ageing changes, and increased chromosomal radiosensitivity.

    PubMed Central

    Kerr, B; Ashcroft, G S; Scott, D; Horan, M A; Ferguson, M W; Donnai, D

    1996-01-01

    Rothmund-Thomson syndrome is a rare, autosomal recessive disorder associated with characteristic cutaneous changes, sparse hair, juvenile cataracts, short stature, skeletal defects, dystrophic teeth and nails, and hypogonadism. Mental retardation is unusual. An increased incidence of certain malignancies has been reported. Clonal or mosaic chromosome abnormalities and abnormalities in DNA repair mechanisms have been reported in some cases. We report two cases of Rothmund-Thomson syndrome, both with intellectual handicap, associated in one with a previously undescribed histological appearance of involved skin, suggesting that the spectrum of abnormalities is even more heterogeneous than previously presumed. Both cases exhibited chromosomal radiosensitivity of lymphocytes which may be an indication of a DNA repair defect. This is the first report of an association between Rothmund-Thomson syndrome and unique, intrinsic, age related skin changes. Images PMID:8950673

  6. Live births after simultaneous avoidance of monogenic diseases and chromosome abnormality by next-generation sequencing with linkage analyses

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Liying; Huang, Lei; Xu, Liya; Huang, Jin; Ma, Fei; Zhu, Xiaohui; Tang, Yaqiong; Liu, Mingshan; Lian, Ying; Liu, Ping; Li, Rong; Lu, Sijia; Tang, Fuchou; Qiao, Jie; Xie, X. Sunney

    2015-01-01

    In vitro fertilization (IVF), preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD), and preimplantation genetic screening (PGS) help patients to select embryos free of monogenic diseases and aneuploidy (chromosome abnormality). Next-generation sequencing (NGS) methods, while experiencing a rapid cost reduction, have improved the precision of PGD/PGS. However, the precision of PGD has been limited by the false-positive and false-negative single-nucleotide variations (SNVs), which are not acceptable in IVF and can be circumvented by linkage analyses, such as short tandem repeats or karyomapping. It is noteworthy that existing methods of detecting SNV/copy number variation (CNV) and linkage analysis often require separate procedures for the same embryo. Here we report an NGS-based PGD/PGS procedure that can simultaneously detect a single-gene disorder and aneuploidy and is capable of linkage analysis in a cost-effective way. This method, called “mutated allele revealed by sequencing with aneuploidy and linkage analyses” (MARSALA), involves multiple annealing and looping-based amplification cycles (MALBAC) for single-cell whole-genome amplification. Aneuploidy is determined by CNVs, whereas SNVs associated with the monogenic diseases are detected by PCR amplification of the MALBAC product. The false-positive and -negative SNVs are avoided by an NGS-based linkage analysis. Two healthy babies, free of the monogenic diseases of their parents, were born after such embryo selection. The monogenic diseases originated from a single base mutation on the autosome and the X-chromosome of the disease-carrying father and mother, respectively. PMID:26712022

  7. Live births after simultaneous avoidance of monogenic diseases and chromosome abnormality by next-generation sequencing with linkage analyses.

    PubMed

    Yan, Liying; Huang, Lei; Xu, Liya; Huang, Jin; Ma, Fei; Zhu, Xiaohui; Tang, Yaqiong; Liu, Mingshan; Lian, Ying; Liu, Ping; Li, Rong; Lu, Sijia; Tang, Fuchou; Qiao, Jie; Xie, X Sunney

    2015-12-29

    In vitro fertilization (IVF), preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD), and preimplantation genetic screening (PGS) help patients to select embryos free of monogenic diseases and aneuploidy (chromosome abnormality). Next-generation sequencing (NGS) methods, while experiencing a rapid cost reduction, have improved the precision of PGD/PGS. However, the precision of PGD has been limited by the false-positive and false-negative single-nucleotide variations (SNVs), which are not acceptable in IVF and can be circumvented by linkage analyses, such as short tandem repeats or karyomapping. It is noteworthy that existing methods of detecting SNV/copy number variation (CNV) and linkage analysis often require separate procedures for the same embryo. Here we report an NGS-based PGD/PGS procedure that can simultaneously detect a single-gene disorder and aneuploidy and is capable of linkage analysis in a cost-effective way. This method, called "mutated allele revealed by sequencing with aneuploidy and linkage analyses" (MARSALA), involves multiple annealing and looping-based amplification cycles (MALBAC) for single-cell whole-genome amplification. Aneuploidy is determined by CNVs, whereas SNVs associated with the monogenic diseases are detected by PCR amplification of the MALBAC product. The false-positive and -negative SNVs are avoided by an NGS-based linkage analysis. Two healthy babies, free of the monogenic diseases of their parents, were born after such embryo selection. The monogenic diseases originated from a single base mutation on the autosome and the X-chromosome of the disease-carrying father and mother, respectively. PMID:26712022

  8. Live births after simultaneous avoidance of monogenic diseases and chromosome abnormality by next-generation sequencing with linkage analyses.

    PubMed

    Yan, Liying; Huang, Lei; Xu, Liya; Huang, Jin; Ma, Fei; Zhu, Xiaohui; Tang, Yaqiong; Liu, Mingshan; Lian, Ying; Liu, Ping; Li, Rong; Lu, Sijia; Tang, Fuchou; Qiao, Jie; Xie, X Sunney

    2015-12-29

    In vitro fertilization (IVF), preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD), and preimplantation genetic screening (PGS) help patients to select embryos free of monogenic diseases and aneuploidy (chromosome abnormality). Next-generation sequencing (NGS) methods, while experiencing a rapid cost reduction, have improved the precision of PGD/PGS. However, the precision of PGD has been limited by the false-positive and false-negative single-nucleotide variations (SNVs), which are not acceptable in IVF and can be circumvented by linkage analyses, such as short tandem repeats or karyomapping. It is noteworthy that existing methods of detecting SNV/copy number variation (CNV) and linkage analysis often require separate procedures for the same embryo. Here we report an NGS-based PGD/PGS procedure that can simultaneously detect a single-gene disorder and aneuploidy and is capable of linkage analysis in a cost-effective way. This method, called "mutated allele revealed by sequencing with aneuploidy and linkage analyses" (MARSALA), involves multiple annealing and looping-based amplification cycles (MALBAC) for single-cell whole-genome amplification. Aneuploidy is determined by CNVs, whereas SNVs associated with the monogenic diseases are detected by PCR amplification of the MALBAC product. The false-positive and -negative SNVs are avoided by an NGS-based linkage analysis. Two healthy babies, free of the monogenic diseases of their parents, were born after such embryo selection. The monogenic diseases originated from a single base mutation on the autosome and the X-chromosome of the disease-carrying father and mother, respectively.

  9. Lycopene modulates initiation of N-nitrosodiethylamine induced hepatocarcinogenesis: studies on chromosomal abnormalities, membrane fluidity and antioxidant defense system.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Prachi; Bansal, Mohinder Pal; Koul, Ashwani

    2013-11-25

    Oxidative damage due to free radicals generated during nitrosamine metabolism has been suggested as one of the major cause for the initiation of hepatocarcinogenesis. Lycopene, is a well known antioxidant and have promising preventive potentials, however the mechanism of action remain hypothetical and unclear. To investigate the involvement of lycopene extracted from tomatoes (LycT) against oxidative stress induced deleterious effect of N-nitrosodiethylamine (NDEA) on cellular macromolecules, female Balb/c mice were divided in four groups: Control, NDEA (cumulative dose of 200mg NDEA/kg body weight injected intraperitoneally in 8 weeks), LycT (5mg/kg body weight given orally on alternate days, throughout the study) and LycT+NDEA (co-administration of LycT and NDEA). NDEA treatment commenced after 2 weeks of LycT administration. At the end of NDEA exposure i.e., at 10th week, enhanced activities of hepatic phase I enzymes, levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), lipid peroxidation (LPO) was observed in NDEA group which may have contributed in chromosomal aberrations, enhanced micronucleated cell score, membrane fluidity and serum liver marker enzymes. A significant decrease in enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidant system could delineate the mechanism behind such NDEA insults. LycT pre-treatment to NDEA challenged group showed lower chromosomal abnormalities, micronucleated cells score, ROS, LPO levels and liver enzymes. Lycopene aids in normalizing the membrane fluidity and enhancing the activity of antioxidant enzymes and reduced glutathione which could account for the reduced oxidative damage in LycT+NDEA group. It seemed that lycopene supplementation target multiple dys-regulated pathways during initiation of carcinogenesis. Thus, dietary supplementation with lycopene can serve as an alternate measure to intervene the initiation of carcinogenesis. PMID:24144777

  10. Karyotypes, B-chromosomes and meiotic abnormalities in 13 populations of Alebra albostriella and A. wahlbergi (Hemiptera, Auchenorrhyncha, Cicadellidae) from Greece

    PubMed Central

    Kuznetsova, Valentina G.; Golub, Natalia V.; Aguin-Pombo, Dora

    2013-01-01

    Abstract In this work 13 populations of the leafhopper species Alebra albostriella (Fallén, 1826) (6 populations) and A. wahlbergi (Boheman, 1845) (7 populations) (Cicadellidae: Typhlocybinae) from Greece were studied cytogenetically. We examined chromosomal complements and meiosis in 41 males of A. albostriella sampled from Castanea sativa, Fagus sylvatica and Quercus cerris and in 21 males of A. wahlbergi sampled from C. sativa, Acer opalus and Ulmus sp. The species were shown to share 2n = 22 + X(0) and male meiosis of the chiasmate preductional type typical for Auchenorrhyncha. In all populations of A. albostriella and in all but two populations of A. wahlbergi B chromosomes and/or different meiotic abnormalities including the end-to-end non-homologous chromosomal associations, translocation chains, univalents, anaphasic laggards besides aberrant sperms were encountered. This study represents the first chromosomal record for the genus Alebra and one of the few population-cytogenetic studies in the Auchenorrhyncha. PMID:24455103

  11. Karyotypes, B-chromosomes and meiotic abnormalities in 13 populations of Alebra albostriella and A. wahlbergi (Hemiptera, Auchenorrhyncha, Cicadellidae) from Greece.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsova, Valentina G; Golub, Natalia V; Aguin-Pombo, Dora

    2013-11-26

    In this work 13 populations of the leafhopper species Alebra albostriella (Fallén, 1826) (6 populations) and A. wahlbergi (Boheman, 1845) (7 populations) (Cicadellidae: Typhlocybinae) from Greece were studied cytogenetically. We examined chromosomal complements and meiosis in 41 males of A. albostriella sampled from Castanea sativa, Fagus sylvatica and Quercus cerris and in 21 males of A. wahlbergi sampled from C. sativa, Acer opalus and Ulmus sp. The species were shown to share 2n = 22 + X(0) and male meiosis of the chiasmate preductional type typical for Auchenorrhyncha. In all populations of A. albostriella and in all but two populations of A. wahlbergi B chromosomes and/or different meiotic abnormalities including the end-to-end non-homologous chromosomal associations, translocation chains, univalents, anaphasic laggards besides aberrant sperms were encountered. This study represents the first chromosomal record for the genus Alebra and one of the few population-cytogenetic studies in the Auchenorrhyncha. PMID:24455103

  12. Allozyme Segregation Ratios in the Interspecific Cross CUCURBITA MAXIMAxC. ECUADORENSIS Suggest That Hybrid Breakdown Is Not Caused by Minor Alterations in Chromosome Structure

    PubMed Central

    Weeden, N. F.; Robinson, R. W.

    1986-01-01

    The parentals of the interspecific cross Cucurbita maxima x C. ecuadorensis had different isozyme phenotypes for 12 enzyme systems. Characterization of the systems demonstrated that the expression and intracellular distribution of the isozymes were similar to those in other plant taxa; however, a considerable number of duplicate loci were identified, indicative of a polyploid ancestry for Cucurbita. Genetic analysis provided evidence for 20 loci segregating in F2 and backcross populations. Five linkage groups were identified, consisting of the loci Aat-mb – – Mdh-m2; Gal-1 – – Gal-2; Aat-p2 – – Gpi-c2; Acp-1 – – Pgm-c2 – – Pgm-p; and Est-1 – – Tpi-c2. Significant deviations from Mendelian segregation ratios were observed in 14% of the data sets for individual loci. However, these instances were scattered among the loci, no single locus consistently displaying skewed ratios. Recombination frequencies between linked loci were similar to those observed in intraspecific crosses, and the ratio of heterozygous to homozygous genotypes in backcross populations was very close to one. These results suggest that small differences in chromosome structure were not the major cause of the loss of fertility observed in F2 and backcross populations. PMID:17246350

  13. LIN-41 inactivation leads to delayed centrosome elimination and abnormal chromosome behavior during female meiosis in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Rieko; Ashikawa, Tomoko; Nozaki, Yuka; Kitagawa, Daiju

    2016-03-01

    During oogenesis, two successive meiotic cell divisions occur without functional centrosomes because of the inactivation and subsequent elimination of maternal centrosomes during the diplotene stage of meiosis I. Despite being a conserved phenomenon in most metazoans, the means by which this centrosome behavior is controlled during female meiosis remain elusive. Here, we conducted a targeted RNAi screening in the Caenorhabditis elegans gonad to identify novel regulators of centrosome behavior during oogenesis. We screened 513 genes known to be essential for embryo production and directly visualized GFP-γ-tubulin to monitor centrosome behavior at all stages of oogenesis. In the screening, we found that RNAi-mediated inactivation of 33 genes delayed the elimination of GFP-γ-tubulin at centrosomes during oogenesis, whereas inactivation of nine genes accelerated the process. Depletion of the TRIM-NHL protein LIN-41 led to a significant delay in centrosome elimination and to the separation and reactivation of centrosomes during oogenesis. Upon LIN-41 depletion, meiotic chromosomes were abnormally condensed and pulled toward one of the two spindle poles around late pachytene even though the spindle microtubules emanated from both centrosomes. Overall, our work provides new insights into the regulation of centrosome behavior to ensure critical meiotic events and the generation of intact oocytes.

  14. LIN-41 inactivation leads to delayed centrosome elimination and abnormal chromosome behavior during female meiosis in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Matsuura, Rieko; Ashikawa, Tomoko; Nozaki, Yuka; Kitagawa, Daiju

    2016-01-01

    During oogenesis, two successive meiotic cell divisions occur without functional centrosomes because of the inactivation and subsequent elimination of maternal centrosomes during the diplotene stage of meiosis I. Despite being a conserved phenomenon in most metazoans, the means by which this centrosome behavior is controlled during female meiosis remain elusive. Here, we conducted a targeted RNAi screening in the Caenorhabditis elegans gonad to identify novel regulators of centrosome behavior during oogenesis. We screened 513 genes known to be essential for embryo production and directly visualized GFP–γ-tubulin to monitor centrosome behavior at all stages of oogenesis. In the screening, we found that RNAi-mediated inactivation of 33 genes delayed the elimination of GFP–γ-tubulin at centrosomes during oogenesis, whereas inactivation of nine genes accelerated the process. Depletion of the TRIM-NHL protein LIN-41 led to a significant delay in centrosome elimination and to the separation and reactivation of centrosomes during oogenesis. Upon LIN-41 depletion, meiotic chromosomes were abnormally condensed and pulled toward one of the two spindle poles around late pachytene even though the spindle microtubules emanated from both centrosomes. Overall, our work provides new insights into the regulation of centrosome behavior to ensure critical meiotic events and the generation of intact oocytes. PMID:26764090

  15. Mapping the Flavor Contributing Traits on "Fengwei Melon" (Cucumis melo L.) Chromosomes Using Parent Resequencing and Super Bulked-Segregant Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hong; Yi, Hongping; Wu, Mingzhu; Zhang, Yongbin; Zhang, Xuejin; Li, Meihua; Wang, Guangzhi

    2016-01-01

    We used a next-generation high-throughput sequencing platform to resequence the Xinguowei and Shouxing melon cultivars, the parents of Fengwei melon. We found 84% of the reads (under a coverage rate of “13×”) placed on the reference genome DHL92. There were 2,550,000 single-nucleotide polymorphisms and 140,000 structural variations in the two genomes. We also identified 1,290 polymorphic genes between Xinguowei and Shouxing. We combined specific length amplified fragment sequencing (SLAF-seq) and bulked-segregant analysis (super-BSA) to analyze the two parents and the F2 extreme phenotypes. This combined method yielded 12,438,270 reads, 46,087 SLAF tags, and 4,480 polymorphic markers (average depth of 161.81×). There were six sweet trait-related regions containing 13 differential SLAF markers, and 23 sour trait-related regions containing 48 differential SLAF markers. We further fine-mapped the sweet trait to the genomic regions on chromosomes 6, 10, 11, and 12. Correspondingly, we mapped the sour trait-related genomic regions to chromosomes 2, 3, 4, 5, 9, and 12. Finally, we positioned nine of the 61 differential markers in the sweet and sour trait candidate regions on the parental genome. These markers corresponded to one sweet and eight sour trait-related genes. Our study provides a basis for marker-assisted breeding of desirable sweet and sour traits in Fengwei melons. PMID:26840947

  16. Mapping the Flavor Contributing Traits on "Fengwei Melon" (Cucumis melo L.) Chromosomes Using Parent Resequencing and Super Bulked-Segregant Analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong; Yi, Hongping; Wu, Mingzhu; Zhang, Yongbin; Zhang, Xuejin; Li, Meihua; Wang, Guangzhi

    2016-01-01

    We used a next-generation high-throughput sequencing platform to resequence the Xinguowei and Shouxing melon cultivars, the parents of Fengwei melon. We found 84% of the reads (under a coverage rate of "13×") placed on the reference genome DHL92. There were 2,550,000 single-nucleotide polymorphisms and 140,000 structural variations in the two genomes. We also identified 1,290 polymorphic genes between Xinguowei and Shouxing. We combined specific length amplified fragment sequencing (SLAF-seq) and bulked-segregant analysis (super-BSA) to analyze the two parents and the F2 extreme phenotypes. This combined method yielded 12,438,270 reads, 46,087 SLAF tags, and 4,480 polymorphic markers (average depth of 161.81×). There were six sweet trait-related regions containing 13 differential SLAF markers, and 23 sour trait-related regions containing 48 differential SLAF markers. We further fine-mapped the sweet trait to the genomic regions on chromosomes 6, 10, 11, and 12. Correspondingly, we mapped the sour trait-related genomic regions to chromosomes 2, 3, 4, 5, 9, and 12. Finally, we positioned nine of the 61 differential markers in the sweet and sour trait candidate regions on the parental genome. These markers corresponded to one sweet and eight sour trait-related genes. Our study provides a basis for marker-assisted breeding of desirable sweet and sour traits in Fengwei melons.

  17. Mapping the Flavor Contributing Traits on "Fengwei Melon" (Cucumis melo L.) Chromosomes Using Parent Resequencing and Super Bulked-Segregant Analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong; Yi, Hongping; Wu, Mingzhu; Zhang, Yongbin; Zhang, Xuejin; Li, Meihua; Wang, Guangzhi

    2016-01-01

    We used a next-generation high-throughput sequencing platform to resequence the Xinguowei and Shouxing melon cultivars, the parents of Fengwei melon. We found 84% of the reads (under a coverage rate of "13×") placed on the reference genome DHL92. There were 2,550,000 single-nucleotide polymorphisms and 140,000 structural variations in the two genomes. We also identified 1,290 polymorphic genes between Xinguowei and Shouxing. We combined specific length amplified fragment sequencing (SLAF-seq) and bulked-segregant analysis (super-BSA) to analyze the two parents and the F2 extreme phenotypes. This combined method yielded 12,438,270 reads, 46,087 SLAF tags, and 4,480 polymorphic markers (average depth of 161.81×). There were six sweet trait-related regions containing 13 differential SLAF markers, and 23 sour trait-related regions containing 48 differential SLAF markers. We further fine-mapped the sweet trait to the genomic regions on chromosomes 6, 10, 11, and 12. Correspondingly, we mapped the sour trait-related genomic regions to chromosomes 2, 3, 4, 5, 9, and 12. Finally, we positioned nine of the 61 differential markers in the sweet and sour trait candidate regions on the parental genome. These markers corresponded to one sweet and eight sour trait-related genes. Our study provides a basis for marker-assisted breeding of desirable sweet and sour traits in Fengwei melons. PMID:26840947

  18. Lack of the H-NS Protein Results in Extended and Aberrantly Positioned DNA during Chromosome Replication and Segregation in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Helgesen, Emily; Fossum-Raunehaug, Solveig

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The architectural protein H-NS binds nonspecifically to hundreds of sites throughout the chromosome and can multimerize to stiffen segments of DNA as well as to form DNA-protein-DNA bridges. H-NS has been suggested to contribute to the orderly folding of the Escherichia coli chromosome in the highly compacted nucleoid. In this study, we investigated the positioning and dynamics of the origins, the replisomes, and the SeqA structures trailing the replication forks in cells lacking the H-NS protein. In H-NS mutant cells, foci of SeqA, replisomes, and origins were irregularly positioned in the cell. Further analysis showed that the average distance between the SeqA structures and the replisome was increased by ∼100 nm compared to that in wild-type cells, whereas the colocalization of SeqA-bound sister DNA behind replication forks was not affected. This result may suggest that H-NS contributes to the folding of DNA along adjacent segments. H-NS mutant cells were found to be incapable of adopting the distinct and condensed nucleoid structures characteristic of E. coli cells growing rapidly in rich medium. It appears as if H-NS mutant cells adopt a “slow-growth” type of chromosome organization under nutrient-rich conditions, which leads to a decreased cellular DNA content. IMPORTANCE It is not fully understood how and to what extent nucleoid-associated proteins contribute to chromosome folding and organization during replication and segregation in Escherichia coli. In this work, we find in vivo indications that cells lacking the nucleoid-associated protein H-NS have a lower degree of DNA condensation than wild-type cells. Our work suggests that H-NS is involved in condensing the DNA along adjacent segments on the chromosome and is not likely to tether newly replicated strands of sister DNA. We also find indications that H-NS is required for rapid growth with high DNA content and for the formation of a highly condensed nucleoid structure under such

  19. Presence of XIST specific sequences and apparent failure of X dosage compensation by inactivation in a patient with a severe Turner phenotype and mosaicism for X chromosome abnormalities

    SciTech Connect

    Bent-Williams, A.H.; Felton, S.M.; Driscoll, D.J.

    1994-09-01

    An XIST FISH analysis and a late replication chromosome study was performed for a 10 year old female with Turner stigmata, mental retardation, multiple congenital anomalies and a cytogenetic mosaicism of 45,X,inv(9)(p11q13)/46,X,del(X)(q22),inv(9)(p11q13)/46,X,+mar,inv(9)(p11q13). The X chromosomes from a cell line in which one was deleted for the distal long arm segment (breakpoint of Xq22), observed in 6% of metaphase cells from peripheral blood and 23.3% of metaphase cells from skin fibroblasts, did not demonstrate an asynchronous or differential staining pattern by BrDU techniques. However, both the normal X chromosome and the deleted X chromosome were demonstrated to contain XIST specific sequences by FISH analysis. A very small marker chromosome, observed in 6% of metaphase cells from peripheral blood and 3.3% of metaphase cells from skin fibroblasts, appeared to consist exclusively of X chromosome alpha satellite centromeric material (DXZ1). This finding was consistent with the morphology of the marker chromosome as observed by conventional G-banding. Due to its small size and low level frequency, analysis by late replication BrDU techniques was not possible. The predominate cell line containing a signal X chromosome was observed in 88% of metaphase cells from peripheral blood and 73.3% of metaphase cells from skin fibroblasts. This case is significant because: (1) it represents another case of an X chromosome abnormality in which XIST is apparently present but not expressed; and (2) the more severe phenotype expressed is probably attributable to the failure of X gene dosage compensation by inactivation.

  20. Abnormal mitosis induced by wheat-rye 1R monosomic addition lines.

    PubMed

    Fu, Shu-Lan; Yang, Man-Yu; Ren, Zheng-Long; Yan, Ben-Ju; Tang, Zong-Xiang

    2014-01-01

    Octoploid triticale were derived from common wheat (Triticum aestivum L. 'Mianyang11') × rye (Secale cereale L. 'Kustro'), and some progeny were obtained by the backcrossing of triticale with 'Mianyang11' followed by self-fertilization. In situ hybridization using rye genomic DNA and repetitive sequences pAs1 and pSc119.2 as probes was used to analyze the mitotic chromosomes of these progeny. Three wheat-rye 1R monosomic addition lines and a wheat line (12FT-1685) containing a 1R and a 1BL.1RS translocation chromosome were identified. Abnormal mitosis was observed in the two lines. During mitosis of a 1R monosomic addition line (3-8-20-1R-2), lagging chromosomes, micronuclei, chromosomal bridges, and the one pole segregation of 1R chromosome were observed. Abnormal mitotic behaviour of chromosomes was also observed in some of the self-progeny plants of lines 12FT-1685 and 3-8-20-1R-2. These progeny contained 1R chromosome or 1R chromosome arm. In addition, 4B chromosomes were absent from one of the progeny of 3-8-20-1R-2. This abnormal mitotic behaviour of chromosomes was not observed in two other 1R monosomic addition lines. These results indicate that a single 1R chromosome added to wheat might cause abnormal mitotic behaviour of both wheat and rye chromosomes and different genetic variations might occurr among the sibling 1R monosomic addition lines. PMID:24564212

  1. Abnormal mitosis induced by wheat-rye 1R monosomic addition lines.

    PubMed

    Fu, Shu-Lan; Yang, Man-Yu; Ren, Zheng-Long; Yan, Ben-Ju; Tang, Zong-Xiang

    2014-01-01

    Octoploid triticale were derived from common wheat (Triticum aestivum L. 'Mianyang11') × rye (Secale cereale L. 'Kustro'), and some progeny were obtained by the backcrossing of triticale with 'Mianyang11' followed by self-fertilization. In situ hybridization using rye genomic DNA and repetitive sequences pAs1 and pSc119.2 as probes was used to analyze the mitotic chromosomes of these progeny. Three wheat-rye 1R monosomic addition lines and a wheat line (12FT-1685) containing a 1R and a 1BL.1RS translocation chromosome were identified. Abnormal mitosis was observed in the two lines. During mitosis of a 1R monosomic addition line (3-8-20-1R-2), lagging chromosomes, micronuclei, chromosomal bridges, and the one pole segregation of 1R chromosome were observed. Abnormal mitotic behaviour of chromosomes was also observed in some of the self-progeny plants of lines 12FT-1685 and 3-8-20-1R-2. These progeny contained 1R chromosome or 1R chromosome arm. In addition, 4B chromosomes were absent from one of the progeny of 3-8-20-1R-2. This abnormal mitotic behaviour of chromosomes was not observed in two other 1R monosomic addition lines. These results indicate that a single 1R chromosome added to wheat might cause abnormal mitotic behaviour of both wheat and rye chromosomes and different genetic variations might occurr among the sibling 1R monosomic addition lines.

  2. Uniparental disomy analysis in carriers of balanced chromosome rearrangements

    SciTech Connect

    May, K.M.; Pettay, D.; Muralidharan, K.

    1994-09-01

    Although most individuals who carry a balanced familial chromosome rearrangement are phenotypically normal, those who are clinically abnormal raise the question of whether or not the rearrangement plays a causative role. One possible mechanism involves meiotic segregation of a normal homolog along with the rearranged chromosome(s) such that a trisomic conception occurs. Subsequent loss by mitotic nondisjunction of the structurally normal chromosome contributed by the non-carrier parent would then result in uniparental disomy (UPD) in a conceptus carrying a balanced rearrangement. UPD for chromosomes 14 and 15 has been demonstrated in several clinically abnormal individuals who carry a familial Robertsonian translocation. We have extended this type of analysis to include other forms of balanced chromosome rearrangements. We report the results of UPD analysis of 14 families who have a phenotypically abnormal child with an apparently balanced rearrangement. The series includes 4 reciprocal translocations, 4 Robertsonian translocations, 2 X;autosome translocations, and 4 inversions. High resolution chromosomes were used to compare breakpoints between parent and offspring to exclude the possibility of further rearrangements. Parental origin of the chromosome(s) involved was determined by DNA polymorphism analysis using PCR or Southern blotting techniques. We found no evidence of UPD in any of the 14 cases. Our data suggest that UPD is not a common explanation for phenotypically abnormal carriers of balanced chromosome rearrangements.

  3. A Role for the CAL1-Partner Modulo in Centromere Integrity and Accurate Chromosome Segregation in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chin-Chi; Greene, Elizabeth; Bowers, Sarion R.; Mellone, Barbara G.

    2012-01-01

    The relationship between the nucleolus and the centromere, although documented, remains one of the most elusive aspects of centromere assembly and maintenance. Here we identify the nucleolar protein, Modulo, in complex with CAL1, a factor essential for the centromeric deposition of the centromere-specific histone H3 variant, CID, in Drosophila. Notably, CAL1 localizes to both centromeres and the nucleolus. Depletion of Modulo, by RNAi, results in defective recruitment of newly-synthesized CAL1 at the centromere. Furthermore, depletion of Modulo negatively affects levels of CID at the centromere and results in chromosome missegregation. Interestingly, examination of Modulo localization during mitosis reveals it localizes to the chromosome periphery but not the centromere. Combined, the data suggest that rather than a direct regulatory role at the centromere, it is the nucleolar function of modulo which is regulating the assembly of the centromere by directing the localization of CAL1. We propose that a functional link between the nucleolus and centromere assembly exists in Drosophila, which is regulated by Modulo. PMID:23028777

  4. Epigenetic abnormality of SRY gene in the adult XY female with pericentric inversion of the Y chromosome.

    PubMed

    Mitsuhashi, Tomoko; Warita, Katsuhiko; Sugawara, Teruo; Tabuchi, Yoshiaki; Takasaki, Ichiro; Kondo, Takashi; Hayashi, Fumio; Wang, Zhi-Yu; Matsumoto, Yoshiki; Miki, Takanori; Takeuchi, Yoshiki; Ebina, Yasuhiko; Yamada, Hideto; Sakuragi, Noriaki; Yokoyama, Toshifumi; Nanmori, Takashi; Kitagawa, Hiroshi; Kant, Jeffrey A; Hoshi, Nobuhiko

    2010-06-01

    In normal ontogenetic development, the expression of the sex-determining region of the Y chromosome (SRY) gene, involved in the first step of male sex differentiation, is spatiotemporally regulated in an elaborate fashion. SRY is expressed in germ cells and Sertoli cells in adult testes. However, only few reports have focused on the expressions of SRY and the other sex-determining genes in both the classical organ developing through these genes (gonad) and the peripheral tissue (skin) of adult XY females. In this study, we examined the gonadal tissue and fibroblasts of a 17-year-old woman suspected of having disorders of sexual differentiation by cytogenetic, histological, and molecular analyses. The patient was found to have the 46,X,inv(Y)(p11.2q11.2) karyotype and streak gonads with abnormally prolonged SRY expression. The sex-determining gene expressions in the patient-derived fibroblasts were significantly changed relative to those from a normal male. Further, the acetylated histone H3 levels in the SRY region were significantly high relative to those of the normal male. As SRY is epistatic in the sex-determination pathway, the prolonged SRY expression possibly induced a destabilizing effect on the expressions of the downstream sex-determining genes. Collectively, alterations in the sex-determining gene expressions persisted in association with disorders of sexual differentiation not only in the streak gonads but also in the skin of the patient. The findings suggest that correct regulation of SRY expression is crucial for normal male sex differentiation, even if SRY is translated normally.

  5. Meiotic abnormalities in metaphase I human spermatocytes from infertile males: frequencies, chromosomes involved, and relationship with polymorphic karyotype and seminal parameters

    PubMed Central

    Sarrate, Zaida; Vidal, Francesca; Blanco, Joan

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to look in depth at the relationship between meiotic anomalies and male infertility, such as the determination of the chromosomes involved or the correlation with patient features. For this purpose, a total of 31 testicular tissue samples from individuals consulting for fertility problems were analyzed. Metaphase I cells were evaluated using a sequential methodology combining Leishman stained procedures and multiplex fluorescence in situ hybridization protocols. The number of chromosomal units and chiasmata count per bivalent were established and a hierarchical cluster analysis of the individuals was performed. The relationship of the seminogram and the karyotype over recombination were evaluated using Poisson regression models. Results obtained in this study show a significant percentage of infertile individuals with altered meiotic behavior, mostly specified as a reduction in chiasmata count in medium and large chromosomes, the presence of univalents, and the observation of tetraploid metaphases. Moreover, the number and the type of anomalies were found to be different between cells of the same individual, suggesting the coexistence of cell lines with normal meiotic behavior and cell lines with abnormalities. In addition, chromosomal abnormalities in metaphase I are significantly associated with oligozoospermia and/or polymorphic karyotype variants. PMID:25080930

  6. Identification and molecular characterization of a small chromosome 10q duplication [dir dup (10) (q24.2-24.3)] inherited from a mother mosaic for the abnormality

    SciTech Connect

    Tonk, V.; Schneider, N.R.; Schultz, R.A.

    1994-09-01

    Inheritance of a cytogenetic abnormality from a clinically normal parent who is mosaic for the anomaly is rare event, although recent data suggest that such events may be more frequent than originally thought. The identification of such cases can have important implications for genetic counseling and can offer valuable resources for the mapping and analysis of genes involved in human disease and development. We describe a family in which two siblings exhibited developmental delay and very specific neurological abnormalities which included normal muscle mass but reduced muscle tone and mild muscle weakness. Cytogenetic evaluation revealed that both children had inherited a tandem duplication of a small portion of the long arm of chromosome 10 [dir dup (10) (q24.2-24.3)]. The clinically normal mother was found to be mosaic for the duplication which was identified in only two of the twenty metaphases examined. Fluorescence in situ hybridization approaches, including total chromosome painting and the use of previously characterized regional-specific cosmid probes, were used to confirm and characterize the chromosome 10q origin of the duplicated material. This represents the smallest confirmed duplication of distal chromosome 10q reported to date.

  7. Chromosomal breakage in human spermatozoa, a heterozygous effect of the bloom syndrome mutation

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R.H.; Rademaker, A.; German, J.

    1994-12-01

    The chromosome complements of 662 spermatozoa produced by the three fathers of individuals with Bloom syndrome (BS) were analyzed to determine whether the BS mutation could affect chromosome segregation and the frequency of aneuploidy in sperm. The frequency of numerical abnormalities was not significantly different from that in normal controls studied in our laboratory, but the frequencies of structural abnormalities were significantly increased in two of the men, 14.3% and 15.9%, versus 8.6% in controls. More striking was the increase in these two men of cells with multiple structural abnormalities: 8.1% and 6.7% with multiple abnormalities, versus 2.3% in controls.

  8. Familial complex autosomal translocations involving chromosomes 7, 8, and 9 exhibiting male and female transmission with segregation and recombination.

    PubMed Central

    Walker, S; Howard, P J; Hunter, D

    1985-01-01

    A family showing a complex translocation between chromosomes 7, 8, and 9 with breakpoints at 7q21, 7q33, 8p23, and 9p23 is described. The proband had been referred because of repeated spontaneous abortions. This is only the second family to be ascertained in this way. Twenty-three other cases of complex translocations are briefly reviewed, eight of which were de novo in origin and 15 familial. All but one of the familial cases showed maternal transmission only. The present family shows both maternal and paternal transmission and is thought to be the first exhibiting recombination from a male carrier. The origin and transmission of the complex translocation is followed through three generations. Images PMID:3841161

  9. Extra structurally abnormal chromosomes (ESAC) detected at amniocentesis: frequency in approximately 75,000 prenatal cytogenetic diagnoses and associations with maternal and paternal age.

    PubMed Central

    Hook, E B; Cross, P K

    1987-01-01

    We analyzed rates of extra structurally abnormal chromosomes (ESAC) detected in prenatal cytogenetic diagnoses of amniotic fluid reported to the New York Chromosome Registry. These karyotypes include both extra unidentified structurally abnormal chromosomes (EUSAC)--often denoted as "markers"--and extra identified structurally abnormal chromosomes (EISAC). The rate of all EUSAC was 0.64/1,000 (0.32-0.40/1,000 mutant and 0.23-0.32 inherited), and that of all EISAC was 0.11/1,000 (0.07/1,000 mutant and 0.04/1,000 inherited). The rate of all ESAC was approximately 0.8/1,000-0.4-0.5/1,000 mutant and 0.3-0.4/1,000 inherited. Mean +/- SD maternal age of mutant cases was 37.5 +/- 2.9, significantly greater than the value of 35.8 years in controls. A regression analysis indicated a rate of change of the log of the rate of about +0.20 with each year of maternal age between 30 and 45 years. When paternal age was introduced, the maternal age coefficient increased to about +0.25--close to that seen for 47, +21--but the paternal age coefficient was -0.06. After being matched for maternal age and year of diagnosis, the case-control difference in paternal age for 24 mutant cases was -2.4 with a 95% confidence interval of -4.6 to -0.1 years. In a regression analysis of the effects of both parental ages on the (log) rate, the maternal age coefficient was +0.25 and the paternal age coefficient was -0.06. These results are consistent with a (weak) negative paternal age effect in the face of a strong maternal age effect. Since ESAC include a heterogeneous group of abnormalities, the maternal age and paternal age trends, if not the result of statistical fluctuation or undetected biases, may involve different types of events. Data in the literature suggest that chromosomes with de novo duplicated inversions of 15p have a strong maternal age effect (but little paternal age effect). Such chromosomes, however, do not account for the active maternal age trends seen in the data analyzed here

  10. Molecular analysis of chromosomal rearrangements using pulsed field gel electrophoresis and somatic cell hybrids

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, L.M. )

    1991-01-01

    Many human genetic diseases, including some cancers, are characterized by consistent chromosome abnormalities, such as deletions and translocations. Analyses of these mutations often prove crucial to the eventual cloning and characterization of the gene(s) responsible for the disease. Two methods for analyzing these chromosome abnormalities have been developed in recent years: somatic cell hybridization and pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Somatic cell hybridization is a technique for segregating an aberrant chromosome from its normal homologue in a cell derived from an unrelated species, which is usually a rodent. Demonstrations of these analytic techniques are presented, using as an example chromosomal abnormalities involving human chromosome band 11p13, the locus for the Wilms' tumor, aniridia, genitourinary abnormality, and mental retardation (WAGR) syndrome.

  11. Evolution and tinkering: what do a protein kinase, a transcriptional regulator and chromosome segregation/cell division proteins have in common?

    PubMed

    Derouiche, Abderahmane; Shi, Lei; Kalantari, Aida; Mijakovic, Ivan

    2016-02-01

    In this study, we focus on functional interactions among multi-domain proteins which share a common evolutionary origin. The examples we develop are four Bacillus subtilis proteins, which all possess an ATP-binding Walker motif: the bacterial tyrosine kinase (BY-kinase) PtkA, the chromosome segregation protein Soj (ParA), the cell division protein MinD and a transcription regulator SalA. These proteins have arisen via duplication of the ancestral ATP-binding domain, which has undergone fusions with other functional domains in the process of divergent evolution. We point out that these four proteins, despite having very different physiological roles, engage in an unusually high number of binary functional interactions. Namely, MinD attracts Soj and PtkA to the cell pole, and in addition, activates the kinase function of PtkA. SalA also activates the kinase function of PtkA, and it gets phosphorylated by PtkA as well. The consequence of this phosphorylation is the activation of SalA as a transcriptional repressor. We hypothesize that these functional interactions remain preserved during divergent evolution and represent a constraint on the process of evolutionary "tinkering", brought about by fusions of different functional domains.

  12. Structurally abnormal human autosomes

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 25, discusses structurally abnormal human autosomes. This discussion includes: structurally abnormal chromosomes, chromosomal polymorphisms, pericentric inversions, paracentric inversions, deletions or partial monosomies, cri du chat (cat cry) syndrome, ring chromosomes, insertions, duplication or pure partial trisomy and mosaicism. 71 refs., 8 figs.

  13. Four small supernumerary marker chromosomes derived from chromosomes 6, 8, 11 and 12 in a patient with minimal clinical abnormalities: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Small supernumerary marker chromosomes are still a problem in cytogenetic diagnostic and genetic counseling. This holds especially true for the rare cases with multiple small supernumerary marker chromosomes. Most such cases are reported to be clinically severely affected due to the chromosomal imbalances induced by the presence of small supernumerary marker chromosomes. Here we report the first case of a patient having four different small supernumerary marker chromosomes which, apart from slight developmental retardation in youth and non-malignant hyperpigmentation, presented no other clinical signs. Case presentation Our patient was a 30-year-old Caucasian man, delivered by caesarean section because of macrosomy. At birth he presented with bilateral cryptorchidism but no other birth defects. At age of around two years he showed psychomotor delay and a bilateral convergent strabismus. Later he had slight learning difficulties, with normal social behavior and now lives an independent life as an adult. Apart from hypogenitalism, he has multiple hyperpigmented nevi all over his body, short feet with pes cavus and claw toes. At age of 30 years, cytogenetic and molecular cytogenetic analysis revealed a karyotype of 50,XY,+min(6)(:p11.1-> q11.1:),+min(8)(:p11.1->q11.1:),+min(11)(:p11.11->q11:),+min(12)(:p11.2~12->q10:), leading overall to a small partial trisomy in 12p11.1~12.1. Conclusions Including this case, four single case reports are available in the literature with a karyotype 50,XN,+4mar. For prenatally detected multiple small supernumerary marker chromosomes in particular we learn from this case that such a cytogenetic condition may be correlated with a positive clinical outcome. PMID:20682055

  14. The long-term clinical implications of clonal chromosomal abnormalities in newly diagnosed chronic phase chronic myeloid leukemia patients treated with imatinib mesylate.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung-Eun; Choi, Soo Young; Bang, Ju-Hee; Kim, Soo-Hyun; Jang, Eun-Jung; Byeun, Ji-Young; Park, Jin Eok; Jeon, Hye-Rim; Oh, Yun Jeong; Kim, Myungshin; Kim, Dong-Wook

    2012-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the long-term clinical significance of an additional chromosomal abnormality (ACA), variant Philadelphia chromosome (vPh) at diagnosis, and newly developed other chromosomal abnormalities (OCA) in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) on imatinib (IM) therapy. Sequential cytogenetic data from 281 consecutive new chronic phase CML patients were analyzed. With a median follow-up of 78.6 months, the 22 patients with vPh (P = 0.034) or ACA (P = 0.034) at diagnosis had more events of IM failure than did the patients with a standard Ph. The 5-year overall survival (OS), event-free survival (EFS), and failure-free survival (FFS) rates for patients with vPh at diagnosis were 77.8%, 75.0%, and 53.3%, respectively; for patients with ACA at diagnosis, 100%, 66.3%, and 52.1%, respectively; and for patients with a standard Ph, 96.0%, 91.3%, and 83.7%, respectively. During IM therapy, eight patients developed an OCA, which had no impact on outcomes as a time-dependent covariate in our Cox proportional hazards regression models. This study showed that vPh was associated with poor OS and FFS and that ACA had adverse effects on EFS and FFS. In addition, no OCA, except monosomy 7, had any prognostic impact, suggesting that the development of OCA may not require a change in treatment strategy. PMID:23111092

  15. Dynamic mosaicism manifesting as loss, gain and rearrangement of an isodicentric Y chromosome in a male child with growth retardation and abnormal external genitalia.

    PubMed

    Iourov, I Y; Vorsanova, S G; Liehr, T; Monakhov, V V; Soloviev, I V; Yurov, Y B

    2008-01-01

    Isodicentric chromosomes are considered the most common structural abnormality of the human Y chromosome. Because of their instability during cell division, loss of an isodicentric Y seems mainly to lie at the origin of mosaicism in previously reported patients with a 45,X cell line. Here, we report on a similar case, which, however, turned out to be an example of dynamic mosaicism involving isodicentric chromosome Y and isochromosome Y after FISH with a set of chromosome Y-specific probes and multicolor banding. Cytogenetic analyses (GTG-, C-, and Q-banding) have shown three different cell lines: 45,X/46, X,idic(Y)(q12)/46,X,+mar. The application of molecular cytogenetic techniques established the presence of four cell lines: 45,X (48%), 46,X,idic(Y)(q11.23) (42%), 46,X,i(Y)(p10) (6%) and 47,X,idic(Y)(q11.23),+idic(Y)(q11.23) (4%). According to the available literature, this is the first case of dynamic mosaicism with up to four different cell lines involving loss, gain, and rearrangement of an idic(Y)(q11.23). The present report indicates that cases of mosaicism involving isodicentric and isochromosome Ys can be more dynamic in terms of somatic intercellular variability that probably has an underappreciated effect on the phenotype. PMID:18758177

  16. Mutations reducing replication from R-loops suppress the defects of growth, chromosome segregation and DNA supercoiling in cells lacking topoisomerase I and RNase HI activity.

    PubMed

    Usongo, Valentine; Martel, Makisha; Balleydier, Aurélien; Drolet, Marc

    2016-04-01

    R-loop formation occurs when the nascent RNA hybridizes with the template DNA strand behind the RNA polymerase. R-loops affect a wide range of cellular processes and their use as origins of replication was the first function attributed to them. In Escherichia coli, R-loop formation is promoted by the ATP-dependent negative supercoiling activity of gyrase (gyrA and gyrB) and is inhibited by topoisomerase (topo) I (topA) relaxing transcription-induced negative supercoiling. RNase HI (rnhA) degrades the RNA moiety of R-loops. The depletion of RNase HI activity in topA null mutants was previously shown to lead to extensive DNA relaxation, due to DNA gyrase inhibition, and to severe growth and chromosome segregation defects that were partially corrected by overproducing topo III (topB). Here, DNA gyrase assays in crude cell extracts showed that the ATP-dependent activity (supercoiling) of gyrase but not its ATP-independent activity (relaxation) was inhibited in topA null cells lacking RNase HI. To characterize the cellular event(s) triggered by the absence of RNase HI, we performed a genetic screen for suppressors of the growth defect of topA rnhA null cells. Suppressors affecting genes in replication (holC2::aph and dnaT18::aph) nucleotide metabolism (dcd49::aph), RNA degradation (rne59::aph) and fimbriae synthesis (fimD22::aph) were found to reduce replication from R-loops and to restore supercoiling, thus pointing to a correlation between R-loop-dependent replication in topA rnhA mutants and the inhibition of gyrase activity and growth. Interestingly, the position of fimD on the E. coli chromosome corresponds to the site of one of the five main putative origins of replication from R-loops in rnhA null cells recently identified by next-generation sequencing, thus suggesting that the fimD22::aph mutation inactivated one of these origins. Furthermore, we show that topo III overproduction is unable to complement the growth defect of topA rnhA null mutants at low

  17. Identification of the CIMP-like subtype and aberrant methylation of members of the chromosomal segregation and spindle assembly pathways in esophageal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Krause, Lutz; Nones, Katia; Loffler, Kelly A; Nancarrow, Derek; Oey, Harald; Tang, Yue Hang; Wayte, Nicola J; Patch, Ann Marie; Patel, Kalpana; Brosda, Sandra; Manning, Suzanne; Lampe, Guy; Clouston, Andrew; Thomas, Janine; Stoye, Jens; Hussey, Damian J; Watson, David I; Lord, Reginald V; Phillips, Wayne A; Gotley, David; Smithers, B Mark; Whiteman, David C; Hayward, Nicholas K; Grimmond, Sean M; Waddell, Nicola; Barbour, Andrew P

    2016-04-01

    The incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) has risen significantly over recent decades. Although survival has improved, cure rates remain poor, with <20% of patients surviving 5 years. This is the first study to explore methylome, transcriptome and ENCODE data to characterize the role of methylation in EAC. We investigate the genome-wide methylation profile of 250 samples including 125 EAC, 19 Barrett's esophagus (BE), 85 squamous esophagus and 21 normal stomach. Transcriptome data of 70 samples (48 EAC, 4 BE and 18 squamous esophagus) were used to identify changes in methylation associated with gene expression. BE and EAC showed similar methylation profiles, which differed from squamous tissue. Hypermethylated sites in EAC and BE were mainly located in CpG-rich promoters. A total of 18575 CpG sites associated with 5538 genes were differentially methylated, 63% of these genes showed significant correlation between methylation and mRNA expression levels. Pathways involved in tumorigenesis including cell adhesion, TGF and WNT signaling showed enrichment for genes aberrantly methylated. Genes involved in chromosomal segregation and spindle formation were aberrantly methylated. Given the recent evidence that chromothripsis may be a driver mechanism in EAC, the role of epigenetic perturbation of these pathways should be further investigated. The methylation profiles revealed two EAC subtypes, one associated with widespread CpG island hypermethylation overlapping H3K27me3 marks and binding sites of the Polycomb proteins. These subtypes were supported by an independent set of 89 esophageal cancer samples. The most hypermethylated tumors showed worse patient survival. PMID:26905591

  18. Identification of the CIMP-like subtype and aberrant methylation of members of the chromosomal segregation and spindle assembly pathways in esophageal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Krause, Lutz; Nones, Katia; Loffler, Kelly A.; Nancarrow, Derek; Oey, Harald; Tang, Yue Hang; Wayte, Nicola J.; Patch, Ann Marie; Patel, Kalpana; Brosda, Sandra; Manning, Suzanne; Lampe, Guy; Clouston, Andrew; Thomas, Janine; Stoye, Jens; Hussey, Damian J.; Watson, David I.; Lord, Reginald V.; Phillips, Wayne A.; Gotley, David; Smithers, B.Mark; Whiteman, David C.; Hayward, Nicholas K.; Grimmond, Sean M.; Waddell, Nicola; Barbour, Andrew P.

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) has risen significantly over recent decades. Although survival has improved, cure rates remain poor, with <20% of patients surviving 5 years. This is the first study to explore methylome, transcriptome and ENCODE data to characterize the role of methylation in EAC. We investigate the genome-wide methylation profile of 250 samples including 125 EAC, 19 Barrett’s esophagus (BE), 85 squamous esophagus and 21 normal stomach. Transcriptome data of 70 samples (48 EAC, 4 BE and 18 squamous esophagus) were used to identify changes in methylation associated with gene expression. BE and EAC showed similar methylation profiles, which differed from squamous tissue. Hypermethylated sites in EAC and BE were mainly located in CpG-rich promoters. A total of 18575 CpG sites associated with 5538 genes were differentially methylated, 63% of these genes showed significant correlation between methylation and mRNA expression levels. Pathways involved in tumorigenesis including cell adhesion, TGF and WNT signaling showed enrichment for genes aberrantly methylated. Genes involved in chromosomal segregation and spindle formation were aberrantly methylated. Given the recent evidence that chromothripsis may be a driver mechanism in EAC, the role of epigenetic perturbation of these pathways should be further investigated. The methylation profiles revealed two EAC subtypes, one associated with widespread CpG island hypermethylation overlapping H3K27me3 marks and binding sites of the Polycomb proteins. These subtypes were supported by an independent set of 89 esophageal cancer samples. The most hypermethylated tumors showed worse patient survival. PMID:26905591

  19. Persistence of histone H2AX phosphorylation after meiotic chromosome synapsis and abnormal centromere cohesion in Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (Parp-1) null oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Feikun; Baumann, Claudia; De La Fuente, Rabindranath

    2009-01-01

    In spite of the impact of aneuploidy on human health little is known concerning the molecular mechanisms involved in the formation of structural or numerical chromosome abnormalities during meiosis. Here, we provide novel evidence indicating that lack of PARP-1 function during oogenesis predisposes the female gamete to genome instability. During prophase I of meiosis, a high proportion of Parp-1 (−/−) mouse oocytes exhibit a spectrum of meiotic defects including incomplete homologous chromosome synapsis or persistent histone H2AX phosphorylation in fully synapsed chromosomes at the late pachytene stage. Moreover, the X chromosome bivalent is also prone to exhibit persistent double strand DNA breaks (DSBs). In striking contrast, such defects were not detected in mutant pachytene spermatocytes. In fully-grown wild type oocytes at the germinal vesicle stage, PARP-1 protein associates with nuclear speckles and upon meiotic resumption, undergoes a striking re-localization towards spindle poles as well as pericentric heterochromatin domains at the metaphase II stage. Notably, a high proportion of in vivo matured Parp-1 (−/−) oocytes show lack of recruitment of the kinetochore-associated protein BUB3 to centromeric domains and fail to maintain metaphase II arrest. Defects in chromatin modifications in the form of persistent histone H2AX phosphorylation during prophase I of meiosis and deficient sister chromatid cohesion during metaphase II predispose mutant oocytes to premature anaphase II onset upon removal from the oviductal environment. Our results indicate that PARP-1 plays a critical role in the maintenance of chromosome stability at key stages of meiosis in the female germ line. Moreover, in the metaphase II stage oocyte PARP-1 is required for the regulation of centromere structure and function through a mechanism that involves the recruitment of BUB3 protein to centromeric domains. PMID:19463809

  20. Distal 8p deletion (8) (p23.1): An easily missed chromosomal abnormality that may be associated with congenital heart defect and mental retardation

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Bai-Lin; Schneider, G.H.; Sabatino, D.E.

    1996-03-01

    We describe the clinical manifestations and molecular cytogenetic analyses of three patients with a similar distal deletion of chromosome 8. Each child had mild developmental delay and subtle minor anomalies. Two had cardiac anomalies but no other major congenital anomalies were present. High resolution G and R banding showed in all three patients del(8)(p23.1), but the breakpoint in case 1 was distal to 8p23.1, in case 2 was in the middle of 8p23.1, and in case 3 proximal to 8p23.1. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) studies with a chromosome 8 paint probe confirmed that no other rearrangement had occurred. FISH with a chromosome 8-specific telomere probe indicated that two patients had terminal deletions. Chromosome analysis of the parents of case 1 and mother of case 2 were normal; the remaining parents were not available for study. Thirteen individual patients including the three in this study, and three relatives in one family with del(8)(p23.1), have been reported in the past 5 years. Major congenital anomalies, especially congenital heart defects, are most often associated with a breakpoint proximal to 8p23.1. Three patients were found within a 3-year period in this study and five cases were found within 4 years by another group, indicating that distal 8p deletion might be a relatively common chromosomal abnormality. This small deletion is easily overlooked (i.e., cases 1 and 2 were reported as normal at amniocentesis) and can be associated with few or no major congenital anomalies. 31 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Prenatal diagnosis of sub-microscopic partial trisomy 10q using chromosomal microarray analysis in a phenotypically abnormal fetus with normal karyotype.

    PubMed

    Browne, P C; Adam, S; Badr, M; Brooks, C R; Edwards, J; Walker, P; Mohamed, S; Gregg, A R

    2016-05-17

    Partial trisomy of the 10q region was originally reported in 1979 [1]. For 25 years, the diagnosis was made microscopically based on large, visible insertions in the region identified by karyotype analysis. Previous case reports have included both unbalanced translocations and large duplications/insertions in the 10q region [2]. Probands with partial trisomy 10q syndrome often have an abnormal phenotype that may include developmental delay [3-5], craniofacial abnormalities [3, 5], talipes (clubfoot) [2], microcephaly [2-4], or congenital heart disease [2-6]. Prenatal diagnoses by karyotype have been made following ultrasound diagnosis of sacrococcygeal teratoma [7], renal pyelectasis [3, 8-10], and other fetal abnormalities [4]. In this case, we report the first prenatal diagnosis of partial trisomy 10q (10q22.3-10q23.2) with a normal karyotype and an abnormal chromosomal microarray analysis (CMA). This is the smallest copy number variant (CNV) (7.5 Mb) in the 10q22.3-10q23.2 regions yet reported. PMID:27197934

  2. Results of high-dose therapy for 1000 patients with multiple myeloma: durable complete remissions and superior survival in the absence of chromosome 13 abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Desikan, R; Barlogie, B; Sawyer, J; Ayers, D; Tricot, G; Badros, A; Zangari, M; Munshi, N C; Anaissie, E; Spoon, D; Siegel, D; Jagannath, S; Vesole, D; Epstein, J; Shaughnessy, J; Fassas, A; Lim, S; Roberson, P; Crowley, J

    2000-06-15

    High-dose therapy (HDT) has increased complete remission (CR) rates and survival in multiple myeloma (MM). We now report on continuous CR (CCR) and associated prognostic factors in 1000 consecutive patients receiving melphalan-based tandem HDT. Five-year CCR was 52% among 112 CR patients without chromosome 13 (triangle up13) abnormalities and with beta-2-microglobulin abnormalities, 35% enjoyed 5-year CCR but none of 54 with triangle up13 abnormalities. triangle up13 abnormalities, present in overall 16%, reduced 5-year event-free survival from 20% to 0% and overall survival from 44% to 16% (both P <.0001). CR and a second HDT cycle applied within 6 months both extended event-free and overall survival significantly, justifying further pursuit of HDT, especially toward curing non-triangle up13 MM. (Blood. 2000;95:4008-4010)

  3. Structural alterations of the c-mos locus in benign pleomorphic adenomas with chromosome abnormalities of 8q12.

    PubMed

    Stenman, G; Sahlin, P; Mark, J; Landys, D

    1991-07-01

    Recent mapping studies have assigned the human c-mos proto-oncogene to chromosome 8, bands q11-12. This region is frequently affected by chromosomal translocations in benign pleomorphic adenomas of the salivary glands. Using Southern blot analysis we report here that the c-mos gene and its flanking sequences are structurally altered in pleomorphic adenomas with chromosomal rearrangements of 8q12. Rearrangements were detected in two out of 23 tumors. Restriction fragment analysis indicated that the rearrangements were due to multiple, subtle mutations involving the c-mos open reading frame and its flanking sequences. There was no direct evidence of translocation of mos in any of the tumors. Control DNAs from the two patients showed a normal restriction pattern for all enzymes tested, indicating that the rearrangements are tumor specific. Collectively, our cytogenetic and molecular data suggest involvement of the c-mos gene in the pathogenesis of pleomorphic adenomas.

  4. Characterization of a 5.8-Mb interstitial deletion of chromosome 3p in a girl with 46,XX,inv(7)dn karyotype and phenotypic abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Morales, C; Mademont-Soler, I; Armengol, L; Milà, M; Badenas, C; Andrés, S; Soler, A; Sánchez, A

    2009-01-01

    Interstitial deletions of the short arm of chromosome 3 are rare, and a specific clinical phenotype has not been defined. We report the first isolated cryptic proximal interstitial 3p deletion, del(3)(p12.3p13), assessed by array-based comparative genomic hybridization in a girl with an inversion of chromosome 7, whose phenotype includes neurodevelopmental delay, growth retardation, dysmorphic facial features, hypophysis hypoplasia, gastroesophageal reflux, clinodactyly, preauricular appendix, and myopia. Her features are similar to those observed in the previously reported cases of proximal 3p deletions overlapping with our imbalance, indicating that her clinical manifestations are likely to be due to the deletion. As our patient's imbalance is the first non-cytogenetically visible proximal interstitial 3p deletion uncomplicated by other imbalances, its characterization has allowed us to narrow the minimal deletion interval associated with growth retardation and neurodevelopmental delay to the 3p12.3-p13 region. Among the genes found in this region, ROBO1, ROBO2, PDZRN3 and CNTN3 might play a role in the neurodevelopmental delay of the patient. This study provides additional evidence that cryptic imbalances anywhere along the genome can be found in patients with phenotypic abnormalities and a balanced chromosome rearrangement.

  5. Sex Chromosome Meiotic Drive Systems in DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER I. Abnormal Spermatid Development in Males with a Heterochromatin-Deficient X Chromosome (sc4sc8)

    PubMed Central

    Peacock, W. J.; Miklos, George L. Gabor; Goodchild, D. J.

    1975-01-01

    The meiotic drive characteristics of the In(1)sc4Lsc8R/Y system have been examined by genetic analysis and by light and electron microscopy. sc4sc8/Y males show a direct correlation between nondisjunction frequency and meiotic drive. Temperature-shift experiments reveal that the temperature-sensitive period for nondisjunction is at meiosis, whereas that for meiotic drive has both meiotic and post-meiotic components. Cytological analyses in the light and electron microscopes reveal failures in spermiogenesis in the testes of sc4sc8 males. The extent of abnormal spermatid development increases as nondisjunction becomes more extreme. PMID:805751

  6. Comparative genomics of the FtsK–HerA superfamily of pumping ATPases: implications for the origins of chromosome segregation, cell division and viral capsid packaging

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Lakshminarayan M.; Makarova, Kira S.; Koonin, Eugene V.; Aravind, L.

    2004-01-01

    Recently, it has been shown that a predicted P-loop ATPase (the HerA or MlaA protein), which is highly conserved in archaea and also present in many bacteria but absent in eukaryotes, has a bidirectional helicase activity and forms hexameric rings similar to those described for the TrwB ATPase. In this study, the FtsK–HerA superfamily of P-loop ATPases, in which the HerA clade comprises one of the major branches, is analyzed in detail. We show that, in addition to the FtsK and HerA clades, this superfamily includes several families of characterized or predicted ATPases which are predominantly involved in extrusion of DNA and peptides through membrane pores. The DNA-packaging ATPases of various bacteriophages and eukaryotic double-stranded DNA viruses also belong to the FtsK–HerA superfamily. The FtsK protein is the essential bacterial ATPase that is responsible for the correct segregation of daughter chromosomes during cell division. The structural and evolutionary relationship between HerA and FtsK and the nearly perfect complementarity of their phyletic distributions suggest that HerA similarly mediates DNA pumping into the progeny cells during archaeal cell division. It appears likely that the HerA and FtsK families diverged concomitantly with the archaeal–bacterial division and that the last universal common ancestor of modern life forms had an ancestral DNA-pumping ATPase that gave rise to these families. Furthermore, the relationship of these cellular proteins with the packaging ATPases of diverse DNA viruses suggests that a common DNA pumping mechanism might be operational in both cellular and viral genome segregation. The herA gene forms a highly conserved operon with the gene for the NurA nuclease and, in many archaea, also with the orthologs of eukaryotic double-strand break repair proteins MRE11 and Rad50. HerA is predicted to function in a complex with these proteins in DNA pumping and repair of double-stranded breaks introduced during this

  7. Induction of mitotic and chromosomal abnormalities on Allium cepa cells by pesticides imidacloprid and sulfentrazone and the mixture of them.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, Jaqueline; Fernandes, Thais Cristina Casimiro; Marin-Morales, Maria Aparecida

    2016-02-01

    To evaluate the cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of low concentrations of pesticides in non-target organisms, seeds of Allium cepa were exposed for 24 h to the imidacloprid insecticide, sulfentrazone herbicide and to the mixture of them, followed by recovery periods of 48 and 72 h. Imidacloprid results indicated an indirect genotoxic effect by inducing different types of chromosome aberration (CA), mainly bridges and chromosomal adherences. Cells with micronucleus (MN) were not significant in the analyzed meristems. Moreover, the 72-h recovery tests indicated that the two lower concentrations of the insecticide (0.036 and 0.36 g L(-1)) had their genotoxic effects minimized after discontinuation of treatment, differently to the observed for the field concentration (3.6 g L(-1)). Sulfentrazone herbicide at field concentration (6 g L(-1)) caused cytotoxic effects by inducing nuclear fragmentation and inhibition of cell division. The other concentrations (0.06, 0.6 and 1.2 g L(-1)) indicated genotoxic effects for this herbicide. The concentration of 0.06 g L(-1) induced persistent effects that could be visualized both by the induction of CA in the recovery times as by the presence of MN in meristematic and F1 cells. The induction of MN by this lowest concentration was associated with the great amount of breakage, losses and chromosomal bridges. The mixture of pesticides induced genotoxic and cytotoxic effects, by reducing the MI of the cells. The chromosomal damage induced by the mixture of pesticides was not persistent to the cells, since such damage was minimized 72 h after the interruption of the exposure. PMID:26386773

  8. Induction of mitotic and chromosomal abnormalities on Allium cepa cells by pesticides imidacloprid and sulfentrazone and the mixture of them.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, Jaqueline; Fernandes, Thais Cristina Casimiro; Marin-Morales, Maria Aparecida

    2016-02-01

    To evaluate the cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of low concentrations of pesticides in non-target organisms, seeds of Allium cepa were exposed for 24 h to the imidacloprid insecticide, sulfentrazone herbicide and to the mixture of them, followed by recovery periods of 48 and 72 h. Imidacloprid results indicated an indirect genotoxic effect by inducing different types of chromosome aberration (CA), mainly bridges and chromosomal adherences. Cells with micronucleus (MN) were not significant in the analyzed meristems. Moreover, the 72-h recovery tests indicated that the two lower concentrations of the insecticide (0.036 and 0.36 g L(-1)) had their genotoxic effects minimized after discontinuation of treatment, differently to the observed for the field concentration (3.6 g L(-1)). Sulfentrazone herbicide at field concentration (6 g L(-1)) caused cytotoxic effects by inducing nuclear fragmentation and inhibition of cell division. The other concentrations (0.06, 0.6 and 1.2 g L(-1)) indicated genotoxic effects for this herbicide. The concentration of 0.06 g L(-1) induced persistent effects that could be visualized both by the induction of CA in the recovery times as by the presence of MN in meristematic and F1 cells. The induction of MN by this lowest concentration was associated with the great amount of breakage, losses and chromosomal bridges. The mixture of pesticides induced genotoxic and cytotoxic effects, by reducing the MI of the cells. The chromosomal damage induced by the mixture of pesticides was not persistent to the cells, since such damage was minimized 72 h after the interruption of the exposure.

  9. Loss of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor genes and chromosome 9 karyotypic abnormalities in human bladder cancer cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Southgate, J.; Proffitt, J.; Roberts, P.; Smith, B.; Selby, P.

    1995-01-01

    Loss of cell cycle control through the structural or functional aberration of checkpoint genes and their products is a potentially important process in carcinogenesis. In this study, a panel of well-characterised established human bladder cancer cell lines was screened by the polymerase chain reaction for homozygous loss of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor genes p15, p16 and p27. The results demonstrate that, whereas there was no genetic loss of p27, homozygous deletion of both p15 and p16 genes occurred in seven of 13 (54%) independent bladder cell lines tested. Differential loss of either the p15 or p16 gene was not seen. The p15 and p16 genes are known to be juxtaposed on chromosome 9p21 at the locus of a putative tumour-suppressor gene involved in the initiation of bladder cancer. Cytogenetic analysis of the cell lines revealed karyotypes ranging from near diploid to near pentaploid with complex rearrangements of some chromosomes and a high prevalence of chromosome 9p rearrangements, although all cell lines contained at least one cytogenetically normal 9p21 region. These observations support a role for p15/p16 gene inactivation in bladder carcinogenesis and/or the promotion of cell growth in vitro and lend support to the hypothesis that homozygous deletion centred on 9p21 is a mechanism by which both p15 and p16 genes are co-inactivated. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:7577470

  10. Possible influences on the expression of X chromosome-linked dystrophin abnormalities by heterozygosity for autosomal recessive Fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Beggs, A.H.; Neumann, P.E.; Anderson, M.S.; Kunkel, L.M. ); Arahata, Kiichi; Arikawa, Eri; Nonaka, Ikuya )

    1992-01-15

    Abnormalities of dystrophin, a cytoskeletal protein of muscle and nerve, are generally considered specific for Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy. However, several patients have recently been identified with dystrophin deficiency who, before dystrophin testing, were considered to have Fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy (FCMD) on the basis of clinical findings. Epidemiologic data suggest that only 1/3,500 males with autosomal recessive FCMD should have abnormal dystrophin. To explain the observation of 3/23 FCMD males with abnormal dystrophin, the authors propose that dystrophin and the FCMD gene product interact and that the earlier onset and greater severity of these patients' phenotype (relative to Duchenne muscular dystrophy) are due to their being heterozygous for the FCMD mutation in addition to being hemizygous for Duchenne muscular dystrophy, a genotype that is predicted to occur in 1/175,000 Japanese males. This model may help explain the genetic basis for some of the clinical and pathological variability seen among patients with FCMD, and it has potential implications for understanding the inheritance of other autosomal recessive disorders in general. For example, sex ratios for rare autosomal recessive disorders caused by mutations in proteins that interact with X chromosome-linked gene products may display predictable deviation from 1:1.

  11. BubR1- and Polo-Coated DNA Tethers Facilitate Poleward Segregation of Acentric Chromatids

    PubMed Central

    Royou, Anne; Gagou, Mary E.; Karess, Roger; Sullivan, William

    2010-01-01

    Summary The mechanisms that safeguard cells against chromosomal instability (CIN) are of great interest, as CIN contributes to tumorigenesis. To gain insight into these mechanisms, we studied the behavior of cells entering mitosis with damaged chromosomes. We used the endonuclease I-CreI to generate acentric chromosomes in Drosophila larvae. While I-CreI expression produces acentric chromosomes in the majority of neuronal stem cells, remarkably, it has no effect on adult survival. Our live studies reveal that acentric chromatids segregate efficiently to opposite poles. The acentric chromatid poleward movement is mediated through DNA tethers decorated with BubR1, Polo, INCENP, and Aurora-B. Reduced BubR1 or Polo function results in abnormal segregation of acentric chromatids, a decrease in acentric chromosome tethering, and a great reduction in adult survival. We propose that BubR1 and Polo facilitate the accurate segregation of acentric chromatids by maintaining the integrity of the tethers that connect acentric chromosomes to their centric partners. PMID:20141837

  12. [Distribution of abnormal cell clone with deletion of chromosome 20q in marrow cell lineages and apoptosis cells in myelodysplastic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Qin, Ling; Wang, Chun; Qin, You-Wen; Xie, Kuang-Cheng; Yan, Shi-Ke; Gao, Yan-Rong; Wang, Xiao-Rui; Zhao, Chu-Xian

    2008-06-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the distribution of abnormal clone in marrow cell lineages and apoptosis cells in myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) with deletion of chromosome 20q. Monoclonal antibodies recognizing myeloid precursors (CD15), erythroid precursors (GPA), T cells (CD3(+)CD56(-)CD16(-)), B cells (CD19), NK cells (CD3(-)CD56(+)CD16(+)) were used to sort bone marrow cells in a MDS patient with del (20q) by fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS). Annexin V-FITC and PI were used to sort bone marrow Annexin V(+)PI(-) and Annexin V(-)PI(-) cells by FACS. The sorted positive cells were detected by interphase dual-color fluorescence in situ hybridization (D-FISH) using a LSI D20S108 probe (Spectrum Orange) and a Telvysion TM 20p probe (Spectrum Green). FACS and FISH analysis were also performed on the samples from 4 cases with normal karyotype. The results showed that the proportions of MDS clone in the myeloid and erythroid precursors were 70.50% and 93.33% respectively, in the RAEB-1 patient with del (20q) and were obviously higher than that in control group (5.39% and 6.17%). The proportions of abnormal clone in T, B and NK cells were 3.23%, 4.32% and 5.77% respectively and were less than that in control group (5.76%, 4.85%, 6.36%). The percentage of apoptotic cells in the bone marrow nucleated cells was 16.09%. The proportions of MDS clone in Annexin V(+)PI(-) and Annexin V(-)PI(-) cells were 32.48% and 70.11%, respectively. It is concluded that most myeloid and erythroid precursors are originated from the abnormal clone in MDS with del (20q). A little part of apoptotic cells are derived from the abnormal clone.

  13. A case of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with an unreported combination of chromosomal abnormalities: gain of isochromosome 5p, tetrasomy 8 and unbalanced translocation der(19)t(17;19)(q23;p13)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) comprises a spectrum of myeloid malignancies which are often associated with distinct chromosomal abnormalities, and the analysis of such abnormalities provides us with important information for disease classification, treatment selection and prognosis. Some chromosomal abnormalities albeit recurrent are rare such as tetrasomy 8 or isochromosome 5p. In addition, erratic chromosomal rearrangements may occur in AML, sometimes unbalanced and also accompanied by other abnormalities. Knowledge on the contribution of rare abnormalities to AML disease, progression and prognosis is limited. Here we report a unique case of acute monoblastic leukemia with gain of i(5)(p10), tetrasomy 8, an unbalanced translocation der(19)t(17;19)(q23;p13.3) and mutated NPM1. Results Bone marrow cells were examined by conventional karyotyping, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and mutation analysis at diagnosis and follow-up. At diagnosis we detected trisomy 8, an unbalanced translocation der(19)t(17;19)(q23;p13.3) and mutated NPM1. During the course of the disease we observed clonal evolution with gain of i(5)(p10), tetrasomy 8 and eventually duplication of der(19)t(17;19)(q23;p13.3). By using the der(19)t(17;19) as clonal marker, we found that i(5)(p10) and tetrasomy 8 were secondary genetic events and that tetrasomy 8 had clonally evolved from trisomy 8. Conclusions This case of acute monoblastic leukemia presents a combination of rare chromosomal abnormalities including the unbalanced translocation der(19)t(17;19)(q23;p13.3), hitherto un-reported in AML. In addition, our case supports the hypothesis of a step-wise clonal evolution from trisomy 8 to tetrasomy 8 in AML. Reporting and collecting data of rare chromosomal abnormalities will add information to AML disease, progression and prognosis, and may eventually translate to improved patient management. PMID:24079663

  14. Balancing acts of two HEAT subunits of condensin I support dynamic assembly of chromosome axes.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Kazuhisa; Kobayashi, Tetsuya J; Hirano, Tatsuya

    2015-04-01

    Condensin I is a five-subunit protein complex that plays a central role in mitotic chromosome assembly and segregation in eukaryotes. To dissect its mechanism of action, we reconstituted wild-type and mutant complexes from recombinant subunits and tested their abilities to assemble chromosomes in Xenopus egg cell-free extracts depleted of endogenous condensins. We find that ATP binding and hydrolysis by SMC subunits have distinct contributions to the action of condensin I and that continuous ATP hydrolysis is required for structural maintenance of chromosomes. Mutant complexes lacking either one of two HEAT subunits produce abnormal chromosomes with highly characteristic defects and have contrasting structural effects on chromosome axes preassembled with the wild-type complex. We propose that balancing acts of the two HEAT subunits support dynamic assembly of chromosome axes under the control of the SMC ATPase cycle, thereby governing construction of rod-shaped chromosomes in eukaryotic cells.

  15. SNP Array Karyotyping Allows for the Detection of Uniparental Disomy and Cryptic Chromosomal Abnormalities in MDS/MPD-U and MPD

    PubMed Central

    Gondek, Lukasz P.; Dunbar, Andrew J.; Szpurka, Hadrian; McDevitt, Michael A.; Maciejewski, Jaroslaw P.

    2007-01-01

    We applied single nucleotide polymorphism arrays (SNP-A) to study karyotypic abnormalities in patients with atypical myeloproliferative syndromes (MPD), including myeloproliferative/myelodysplastic syndrome overlap both positive and negative for the JAK2 V617F mutation and secondary acute myeloid leukemia (AML). In typical MPD cases (N = 8), which served as a control group, those with a homozygous V617F mutation showed clear uniparental disomy (UPD) of 9p using SNP-A. Consistent with possible genomic instability, in 19/30 MDS/MPD-U patients, we found additional lesions not identified by metaphase cytogenetics. In addition to UPD9p, we also have detected UPD affecting other chromosomes, including 1 (2/30), 11 (4/30), 12 (1/30) and 22 (1/30). Transformation to AML was observed in 8/30 patients. In 5 V617F+ patients who progressed to AML, we show that SNP-A can allow for the detection of two modes of transformation: leukemic blasts evolving from either a wild-type jak2 precursor carrying other acquired chromosomal defects, or from a V617F+ mutant progenitor characterized by UPD9p. SNP-A-based detection of cryptic lesions in MDS/MPD-U may help explain the clinical heterogeneity of this disorder. PMID:18030353

  16. INT1 and GLI genes are not rearranged or amplified in benign pleomorphic adenomas with chromosome abnormalities of 12q13-15.

    PubMed

    Sahlin, P; Mark, J; Stenman, G

    1992-01-01

    A subgroup of pleomorphic adenomas of the salivary glands is characterized by translocations involving chromosome 12, with consistent breakpoints at 12q13-15. Two proto-oncogenes, INT1 and GLI, have been assigned to this region of chromosome 12. We studied the possible involvement of these genes in pleomorphic adenomas with different karyotypic abnormalities, including cases with involvement of 12q13-15. Using detailed restriction fragment analysis of tumor DNAs from 25 cases, we found no evidence of rearrangement or amplification of INT1 or GLI. Because we previously found an adenoma with a del(12)(q13q15), we also analyzed normal and tumor DNAs from the 25 tumors separately to identify possible allelic losses at the GLI locus. Thirteen of the 25 tumors were informative, and none of these showed evidence of allelic losses. Collectively, these findings indicate that neither the INT1 nor the GLI gene appears to be the primary target gene for the translocations and deletions involving the 12q13-15 region in pleomorphic adenomas.

  17. Human glioblastoma cells persistently infected with simian virus 40 carry nondefective episomal viral DNA and acquire the transformed phenotype and numerous chromosomal abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Norkin, L C; Steinberg, V I; Kosz-Vnenchak, M

    1985-02-01

    A stable, persistent infection of A172 human glioblastoma cells with simian virus 40 (SV40) was readily established after infection at an input of 450 PFU per cell. Only 11% of the cells were initially susceptible to SV40, as shown by indirect immunofluorescent staining for the SV40 T antigen at 48 h. However, all cells produced T antigen by week 11. In contrast, viral capsid proteins were made in only about 1% of the cells in the established carrier system. Weekly viral yields ranged between 10(4) and 10(6) PFU/ml. Most of the capsid protein-producing cells contained enormous aberrant (lobulated or multiple) nuclei. Persistent viral DNA appeared in an episomal or "free" state exclusively in Southern blots and was indistinguishable from standard SV40 DNA by restriction analysis. Viral autointerference activity was not detected, and yield reduction assays did not indicate defective interfering particle activity, further implying that variant viruses were not a factor in this carrier system. Interferon was also not a factor in the system, as shown by direct challenge with vesicular stomatitis virus. Persistent infection resulted in cellular growth changes (enhanced saturation density and plating efficiency) characteristic of SV40 transformation. Persistent infection also led to an increased frequency of cytogenetic effects. These included sister chromatid exchanges, a variety of chromosomal abnormalities (ring chromosomes, acentric fragments, breaks, and gaps), and an increase in the chromosome number. Nevertheless, the persistently infected cells continued to display a bipolar glial cell-like morphology with extensive process extension and intercellular contacts.

  18. Unique geometry of sister kinetochores in human oocytes during meiosis I may explain maternal age-associated increases in chromosomal abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Jessica; Tan, Seang Lin; Hartshorne, Geraldine M.; McAinsh, Andrew D.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The first meiotic division in human oocytes is highly error-prone and contributes to the uniquely high incidence of aneuploidy observed in human pregnancies. A successful meiosis I (MI) division entails separation of homologous chromosome pairs and co-segregation of sister chromatids. For this to happen, sister kinetochores must form attachments to spindle kinetochore-fibres emanating from the same pole. In mouse and budding yeast, sister kinetochores remain closely associated with each other during MI, enabling them to act as a single unified structure. However, whether this arrangement also applies in human meiosis I oocytes was unclear. In this study, we perform high-resolution imaging of over 1900 kinetochores in human oocytes, to examine the geometry and architecture of the human meiotic kinetochore. We reveal that sister kinetochores in MI are not physically fused, and instead individual kinetochores within a pair are capable of forming independent attachments to spindle k-fibres. Notably, with increasing female age, the separation between kinetochores increases, suggesting a degradation of centromeric cohesion and/or changes in kinetochore architecture. Our data suggest that the differential arrangement of sister kinetochores and dual k-fibre attachments may explain the high proportion of unstable attachments that form in MI and thus indicate why human oocytes are prone to aneuploidy, particularly with increasing maternal age. PMID:26718930

  19. Unique geometry of sister kinetochores in human oocytes during meiosis I may explain maternal age-associated increases in chromosomal abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Patel, Jessica; Tan, Seang Lin; Hartshorne, Geraldine M; McAinsh, Andrew D

    2015-12-30

    The first meiotic division in human oocytes is highly error-prone and contributes to the uniquely high incidence of aneuploidy observed in human pregnancies. A successful meiosis I (MI) division entails separation of homologous chromosome pairs and co-segregation of sister chromatids. For this to happen, sister kinetochores must form attachments to spindle kinetochore-fibres emanating from the same pole. In mouse and budding yeast, sister kinetochores remain closely associated with each other during MI, enabling them to act as a single unified structure. However, whether this arrangement also applies in human meiosis I oocytes was unclear. In this study, we perform high-resolution imaging of over 1900 kinetochores in human oocytes, to examine the geometry and architecture of the human meiotic kinetochore. We reveal that sister kinetochores in MI are not physically fused, and instead individual kinetochores within a pair are capable of forming independent attachments to spindle k-fibres. Notably, with increasing female age, the separation between kinetochores increases, suggesting a degradation of centromeric cohesion and/or changes in kinetochore architecture. Our data suggest that the differential arrangement of sister kinetochores and dual k-fibre attachments may explain the high proportion of unstable attachments that form in MI and thus indicate why human oocytes are prone to aneuploidy, particularly with increasing maternal age.

  20. The Molecular through Ecological Genetics of Abnormal Abdomen in Drosophila Mercatorum. VI. the Non-Neutrality of the Y Chromosome Rdna Polymorphism

    PubMed Central

    Hollocher, H.; Templeton, A. R.

    1994-01-01

    An association between quantitative variation of rDNA on the Y chromosome and male expression of the juvenilized, adult cuticle of the abnormal abdomen syndrome has been found for Drosophila mercatorum. Many pleiotropic effects of this syndrome have been described previously for females, but little was known about possible pleiotropic effects in males. The effects on males open up new avenues for the action of natural selection operating on the system. In females, the syndrome causes an increase in egg-to-adult development time, precocious sexual maturation, increased fecundity and decreased longevity. In addition to the cuticle phenotype, in males abnormal abdomen causes delayed sexual maturation, increased longevity, and decreased mating success, yet no change in egg-to-adult development time. Thus the syndrome has opposing fitness effects in the two sexes, which may help explain the genetic polymorphism observed in this system. Although investigated intensively, associations between naturally occurring Y-linked polymorphism and fitness phenotypes have not been found in Drosophila melanogaster. PMID:8013914

  1. High frequency of rare structural chromosome abnormalities at relapse of cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia with FLT3 internal tandem duplication.

    PubMed

    Gourdin, Theodore S; Zou, Ying; Ning, Yi; Emadi, Ashkan; Duong, Vu H; Tidwell, Michael L; Chen, Ching; Rassool, Feyruz V; Baer, Maria R

    2014-01-01

    FLT3 internal tandem duplication (ITD) mutations are present in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in 30% of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), most commonly in those with a normal karyotype, and are associated with short relapse-free survival. Both in vitro and in vivo studies of FLT3-ITD cell lines have demonstrated reactive oxygen species-mediated DNA double-strand breaks and associated error-prone DNA repair as a mechanism of genomic instability, and we hypothesized that genomic instability might be manifested by cytogenetic changes at relapse of FLT3-ITD AML. We retrospectively reviewed charts of patients with cytogenetically normal (CN) FLT3-ITD AML treated at the University of Maryland Greenebaum Cancer Center, with attention to metaphase analysis results at relapse. Cytogenetic data were available from first and, when applicable, subsequent relapses for 15 patients diagnosed with CN FLT3-ITD AML. Among 12 patients with documented FLT3-ITD at first and, when applicable, subsequent relapse, 10 had cytogenetic changes, including nine with rare structural abnormalities. The high frequency of rare structural chromosome abnormalities at relapse in our case series supports a role of genomic instability in the genesis of relapse, and suggests that reactive oxygen species-generating and DNA repair pathways might be therapeutic targets in FLT3-ITD AML. PMID:25441683

  2. Chromosomal aberrations and aneuploidies of spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Piomboni, Paola; Stendardi, Anita; Gambera, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Chromosomal abnormalities are relevant causes of human infertility, affecting 2 -14 % of infertile males. Patients with seminal anomalies could be affected by improper meiotic recombination and increased sperm chromosome aneuploidy. Since the transmission of a haploid chromosomal asset is fundamental for embryo vitality and development, the study of sperm chromosomes has become fundamental because intracytoplasmic sperm injection allows fertilization in cases of severe male infertility.In this chapter we summarize the data on the incidence of sperm aneuploidy, detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), in infertile men with normal or abnormal karyotype. The possibility of reducing sperm chromosomal imbalance is also reported.Among control males, the lowest aneuploidy rate was detected (range: 0.09 -0.14 % for autosomes; 0.04 -0.10 % for gonosomes). In infertile patients with normal karyotype, the severity of semen alteration is correlated with the frequency of aneuploidy, particularly for X and Y chromosomes. Among patients with abnormal karyotype, 47,XXY and 47,XYY carriers showed a high variability of sperm aneuploidy both for gonosomes and autosomes. In Robertsonian translocation carriers, the increase in aneuploidy rate was particularly evident for total sex disomy, and resulted mainly from interchromosomal effect (ICE). In reciprocal translocation carriers, a high percentage of unbalanced sperm (approximately 50 %) was detected, perhaps mostly related to ICE.Sperm chromosomal constitution could be analyzed to obtain more accurate information about the causes of male infertility. It would be worthwhile to evaluate the benefits of a therapy with recombinant Follicle Stimulating Hormone (rFSH) on sperm chromosome segregation in selected infertile males.

  3. Cloning a balanced t(9;11)(p24;q23.1) chromosomal translocation breakpoint segregating with bipolar affective disorder in a small pedigree

    SciTech Connect

    Duggan, D.J.; Baysal, B.E.; Gollin, S.M.

    1994-09-01

    A small multigenerational pedigree was previously identified in which a balanced 9;11 chromosomal translocation was cosegregating with bipolar affective disorder. We hypothesize that genes or gene regulatory sequences disrupted by the translocation are contributing to bipolar affective disorder in a dominant fashion. The general strategy involves (1) using somatic cell hybrids containing the derivative 9 or 11 chromosomes to identify the closest chromosome 9 and 11 flanking markers, (2) using the nearest markers as PCR and hybridization probes to isolate both normal DNA (YAC) and patient DNA (cosmid) adjacent to and incorporating the translocation breakpoint, and (3) identifying expressed sequences in the genomic DNA that may be disrupted by the translocation. From a fusion of the translocation patient cell line and a recipient hamster cell line, somatic cell hybrids were isolated which contain either the human derivative 9 or derivative 11 chromosome. Using PCR-based STS assays with these hybrids, the location of the translocation breakpoint was localized to an estimated 500 kb region at chromosome 11 band q23.1 and a 1 cM region in 9 band p24 (more telomeric than originally reported). From a large set of CEPH and Roswell Park yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs), six chromosome 11 YACs spanning the 11q23.1 breakpoint have now been identified. A combination of pulsed field gel eletrophoresis and YAC mapping has narrowed the chromosome 11 region to less than 430 kb. Current efforts are focused on generating new chromosome 11 probes within the flanking markers, mapping these probes back to the der(9) and der(11) containing hybrids and the chromosome 11 YAC mapping panel. As the region is physically narrowed, we will identify candidate genes whose expression may be altered by this t(9:11) translocation.

  4. Association of heteromorphism of chromosome 9 and recurrent abortion (ultrasound diagnosed blighted ovum): A case report

    PubMed Central

    Baghbani, Fatemeh; Mirzaee, Salmeh; Hassanzadeh-Nazarabadi, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Background: Chromosomal disorders are the most common cause of first trimester spontaneous abortion. Among the human chromosomes, chromosome no.9 was the most common structural chromosomal variant and it is not thought to be of any functional importance, which often considers as a normal variation in structural polymorphisms, nevertheless there are some studies which claim that there is an association between heteromorphism of chromosome no.9 and some pregnancy complication. Case: To postulate any correlation between chromosome no. 9 heteromorphism and recurrent abortion, chromosomal analysis was performed on the basis of G-banding technique at high resolution for a couple with the history of 4 ultrasound diagnosed blighted ovum and Chromosome constitution appeared with chromosome no.9 heteromorphism in all 30 metaphases screened for both partners (9p11-q13). Conclusion: Observation of reproductive failure in couples with heteromorohic pattern of chromosome no.9 suggests that, although the heteromorphism of chromosome no.9 is not a rare condition which often consider as a normal variation with no evidence of any phenotypic effect of patient, nevertheless it seems as if the location of heteromorphic region maybe interfere with meiotic events like the phenomenon of crossing over or miotic segregation of fertilized egg that eventually lead to the development of fertilized eggs with chromosomal abnormalities leading to the possibility of anemberyonic pregnancy, therefore chromosomal analysis for detecting of chromosome no.9 heteromorphism for couples with the history of ultrasound diagnosed blighted ovum will be strongly suggested. PMID:25031581

  5. Reproductive outcomes in men with karyotype abnormalities: Case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Kohn, Taylor P; Clavijo, Raul; Ramasamy, Ranjith; Hakky, Tariq; Candrashekar, Aravind; Lamb, Dolores J; Lipshultz, Larry I

    2015-01-01

    Reciprocal translocations of autosomal chromosomes are present in about 1/625 men, yet often there are no symptoms except primary infertility. Abnormal segregation during meiosis often produces sperm and subsequent embryos with unbalanced translocations that often ultimately result in spontaneous abortions. We report on a 37-year-old man and his 39-year-old wife who complained of primary infertility. Previous in vitro fertilization (IVF) had resulted in pregnancy, but two spontaneous abortions. Upon chromosomal testing, the man was diagnosed with a reciprocal translocation and his wife was diagnosed with mosaic Turner's syndrome. Through testicular sperm extraction (TESE) and IVF with preimplantation genetic screening (PGS), they succeeded in having two healthy children. Since men with different karyotype abnormalities can have male infertility, we reviewed the literature and summarized the reproductive outcomes for men with both autosome and sex chromosomal karyotype abnormalities. PMID:26425238

  6. The chromosome cycle of prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Kuzminov, Andrei

    2013-10-01

    In both eukaryotes and prokaryotes, chromosomal DNA undergoes replication, condensation-decondensation and segregation, sequentially, in some fixed order. Other conditions, like sister-chromatid cohesion (SCC), may span several chromosomal events. One set of these chromosomal transactions within a single cell cycle constitutes the 'chromosome cycle'. For many years it was generally assumed that the prokaryotic chromosome cycle follows major phases of the eukaryotic one: -replication-condensation-segregation-(cell division)-decondensation-, with SCC of unspecified length. Eventually it became evident that, in contrast to the strictly consecutive chromosome cycle of eukaryotes, all stages of the prokaryotic chromosome cycle run concurrently. Thus, prokaryotes practice 'progressive' chromosome segregation separated from replication by a brief SCC, and all three transactions move along the chromosome at the same fast rate. In other words, in addition to replication forks, there are 'segregation forks' in prokaryotic chromosomes. Moreover, the bulk of prokaryotic DNA outside the replication-segregation transition stays compacted. I consider possible origins of this concurrent replication-segregation and outline the 'nucleoid administration' system that organizes the dynamic part of the prokaryotic chromosome cycle.

  7. Fission yeast cut3 and cut14, members of a ubiquitous protein family, are required for chromosome condensation and segregation in mitosis.

    PubMed Central

    Saka, Y; Sutani, T; Yamashita, Y; Saitoh, S; Takeuchi, M; Nakaseko, Y; Yanagida, M

    1994-01-01

    Fission yeast temperature-sensitive mutants cut3-477 and cut14-208 fail to condense chromosomes but small portions of the chromosomes can separate along the spindle during mitosis, producing phi-shaped chromosomes. Septation and cell division occur in the absence of normal nuclear division, causing the cut phenotype. Fluorescence in situ hybridization demonstrated that the contraction of the chromosome arm during mitosis was defective. Mutant chromosomes are apparently not rigid enough to be transported poleward by the spindle. Loss of the cut3 protein by gene disruption fails to maintain the nuclear chromatin architecture even in interphase. Both cut3 and cut14 proteins contain a putative nucleoside triphosphate (NTP)-binding domain and belong to the same ubiquitous protein family which includes the budding yeast Smc1 protein. The cut3 mutant was suppressed by an increase in the cut14+ gene dosage. The cut3 protein, having the highest similarity to the mouse protein, is localized in the nucleus throughout the cell cycle. Plasmids carrying the DNA topoisomerase I gene partly suppressed the temperature sensitive phenotype of cut3-477, suggesting that the cut3 protein might be involved in chromosome DNA topology. Images PMID:7957061

  8. White matter microstructural abnormalities in girls with chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome, Fragile X or Turner syndrome as evidenced by diffusion tensor imaging

    PubMed Central

    Villalon, Julio; Jahanshad, Neda; Beaton, Elliott; Toga, Arthur W.; Thompson, Paul M.; Simon, Tony J.

    2014-01-01

    Children with chromosome 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome (22q11.2DS), Fragile X Syndrome (FXS), or Turner Syndrome (TS) are considered to belong to distinct genetic groups, as each disorder is caused by separate genetic alterations. Even so, they have similar cognitive and behavioral dysfunctions, particularly in visuospatial and numerical abilities. To assess evidence for common underlying neural microstructural alterations, we set out to determine whether these groups have partially overlapping white matter abnormalities, relative to typically developing controls. We scanned 101 female children between 7 and 14 years old: 25 with 22q11.2DS, 18 with FXS, 17 with TS, and 41 aged-matched controls using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Anisotropy and diffusivity measures were calculated and all brain scans were nonlinearly aligned to population and site-specific templates. We performed voxel-based statistical comparisons of the DTI-derived metrics between each disease group and the controls, while adjusting for age. Girls with 22q11.2DS showed lower fractional anisotropy (FA) than controls in the association fibers of the superior and inferior longitudinal fasciculi, the splenium of the corpus callosum, and the corticospinal tract. FA was abnormally lower in girls with FXS in the posterior limbs of the internal capsule, posterior thalami, and precentral gyrus. Girls with TS had lower FA in the inferior longitudinal fasciculus, right internal capsule and left cerebellar peduncle. Partially overlapping neurodevelopmental anomalies were detected in all three neurogenetic disorders. Altered white matter integrity in the superior and inferior longitudinal fasciculi and thalamic to frontal tracts may contribute to the behavioral characteristics of all of these disorders. PMID:23602925

  9. What`s in a name? Chromosome 22q abnormalities and the DiGeorge, velocardiofacial and conotruncal anomalies face syndromes

    SciTech Connect

    Wulfsberg, E.A.; Leana-Cox, J.; Neri, G.

    1996-11-11

    The recent advances in our understanding of the phenotype associated with deletion of the DiGeorge Chromosome Region (DGCR) at 22q11.2 are in many ways analogous to the fable about the blind men and the elephant. Originally described as three distinct phenotypes (DiGeorge (DG) syndrome, velocardiofacial (VCF) syndrome, and the conotruncal anomalies face (CTAF) syndrome), it is now clear that there is only a single broad and variable phenotype associated with deletion of the DGCR. As in the fable, distinguished clinicians approached this phenotypic {open_quotes}elephant{close_quotes} from different perspectives and provided three separate, although overlapping descriptions. Our analogy to this fable is not to imply some {open_quotes}blindness{close_quotes} on the part of these clinicians, but rather to point out the well-known difficulty in delineating the indistinct phenotypic boundaries of a syndrome until a genetic or biochemical marker for the condition is available. The recent availability of a fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) probe to detect deletion of the DGCR now allows delineation of the broad phenotype of our {open_quotes}elephant{close_quotes} which spans from lethal DG phenotypes through the intermediate VCF and CTAF phenotypes to the newly recognized {open_quotes}mild{close_quotes} phenotype consisting of only developmental delays and subtle facial abnormalities. 33 refs.

  10. [Successful treatment with idarubicin in a pediatric case of t(8;21) acute myelogenous leukemia with additional chromosomal abnormalities at relapse].

    PubMed

    Wakazono, Y; Kataoka, A; Fusaoka, T; Tunamoto, K

    1998-07-01

    A 9-year old boy was admitted to our hospital due to a relapse of acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). A chromosomal analysis at the time of relapse revealed abnormalities in addition to 45, X,-Y, t(8;21) (q22;q22) when AML was first diagnosed. The patient was given granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF), cytosine arabinoside (Ara-C) and aclarubicin (CAG therapy), but this treatment regimen was not effective. He was next treated with G-CSF (started 3 days prior to the administration of anticancer drugs), Ara-C, (200 mg/mm2 for 7 days), Etoposide (VP.16, 150 mg/mm2 for 5 days) and Idarubicin (8 mg/mm2 for 5 days) according to the modified Japan Cooperative Protocol ANLL 91 for children. Although his condition had been septic and he had experienced renal and respiratory failure, he achieved a complete remission after 140 days without additional therapy. The patient returned to a condition of health and received a bone marrow transplant from an unrelated donor. We concluded that this treatment regimen is effective for the relapse of AML in children.

  11. Assessment of Genotoxic Potential of Hridayarnava Rasa (A Herbo-Mineralo-Metallic Ayurvedic Formulation) Using Chromosomal Aberration and Sperm Abnormality Assays

    PubMed Central

    Jagtap, Chandrashekhar Y.; Chaudhari, Swapnil Y.; Thakkar, Jalaram H.; Galib, R.; Prajapati, P. K.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Herbo-mineral formulations are being successfully used in therapeutics since centuries. But recently, they came under the scanner for their metallic contents especially the presence of heavy metals. Hence it is the need of the hour to assess and establish the safety of these formulations through toxicity studies. In line with the various toxicity studies that are being carried out, Government of India expressed the need for conducting genotoxicity studies of different metal- or mineral-based drugs. Till date very few Ayurvedic herbo-mineral formulations have been studied for their genotoxic potential. The present study is aimed to evaluate the genotoxic potential of Hridayarnava Rasa. Materials and Methods: It was prepared as per classical guidelines and administered to Swiss albino mice for 14 consecutive days. Chromosomal aberration and sperm abnormality assay were done to evaluate the genotoxic potential of the test drugs. Cyclophosphamide (CP) was taken as positive group and results were compared. Results: All treated groups exhibited significant body weight gain in comparison to CP group. Results revealed no structural deformity in the above parameters in comparison to the CP-treated group. Conclusion: Reported data showed that both tested samples of Hridayarnava Rasa does not possess genotoxic potential under the experimental conditions and can be safely used. PMID:25948961

  12. Segregation of a paternal insertional translocation results in partial 4q monosomy or 4q trisomy in two siblings

    SciTech Connect

    Hegmann, K.M.; Spikes, A.S.; Orr-Urtreger, A.; Shaffer, L.G.

    1996-01-02

    A genetics evaluation was requested for a 6-week-old infant with multiple congenital malformations including mild craniofacial anomalies, truncal hypotonia, hypospadias, and a ventriculoseptal defect. Blood obtained for chromosome analysis revealed an abnormal chromosome 4. Paternal chromosome analysis showed a 46,XY, inv ins (3;4)(p21.32;q25q21.2), inv(4)(p15.3q21.2) karyotype. Therefore, the proband`s chromosome 4 was the unbalanced product of this insertional translocation from the father resulting in partial monosomy 4q. Additionally, the derivative 4 had a pericentric inversion which was also seen in the father`s chromosome 4. During genetic counseling, the proband`s 2-year-old brother was evaluated. He was not felt to be abnormal in appearance, but was described as having impulsive behavior. Chromosome analysis on this child revealed 46, XY, der(3) inv ins(3;4)(p21.32;q25q21.2)pat. This karyotype results in partial trisomy 4q. FISH using two-color {open_quotes}painting{close_quotes} probes for chromosomes 3 and 4 confirmed the G-banded interpretation in this family. The segregation seen in this family resulted in both reciprocal products being observed in the two children, with partial 4q monosomy showing multiple congenital anomalies, and partial 4q trisomy showing very few phenotypic abnormalities. 13 refs., 5 figs.

  13. The precarious prokaryotic chromosome.

    PubMed

    Kuzminov, Andrei

    2014-05-01

    Evolutionary selection for optimal genome preservation, replication, and expression should yield similar chromosome organizations in any type of cells. And yet, the chromosome organization is surprisingly different between eukaryotes and prokaryotes. The nuclear versus cytoplasmic accommodation of genetic material accounts for the distinct eukaryotic and prokaryotic modes of genome evolution, but it falls short of explaining the differences in the chromosome organization. I propose that the two distinct ways to organize chromosomes are driven by the differences between the global-consecutive chromosome cycle of eukaryotes and the local-concurrent chromosome cycle of prokaryotes. Specifically, progressive chromosome segregation in prokaryotes demands a single duplicon per chromosome, while other "precarious" features of the prokaryotic chromosomes can be viewed as compensations for this severe restriction.

  14. Finding the middle ground: how kinetochores power chromosome congression

    PubMed Central

    Saurin, Adrian T.

    2010-01-01

    Genomic stability requires error-free chromosome segregation during mitosis. Chromosome congression to the spindle equator precedes chromosome segregation in anaphase and is a hallmark of metazoan mitosis. Here we review the current knowledge and concepts on the processes that underlie chromosome congression, including initial attachment to spindle microtubules, biorientation, and movements, from the perspective of the kinetochore. PMID:20232224

  15. A dynamic meiotic SUN belt includes the zygotene-stage telomere bouquet and is disrupted in chromosome segregation mutants of maize (Zea mays L.).

    PubMed

    Murphy, Shaun P; Gumber, Hardeep K; Mao, Yunyun; Bass, Hank W

    2014-01-01

    The nuclear envelope (NE) plays an essential role in meiotic telomere behavior and links the cytoplasm and nucleoplasm during homologous chromosome pairing and recombination in many eukaryotic species. Resident NE proteins including SUN (Sad-1/UNC-84) and KASH (Klarsicht/ANC-1/Syne-homology) domain proteins are known to interact forming the Linker of Nucleoskeleton and Cytoskeleton (LINC) complex that connects chromatin to the cytoskeleton. To investigate the possible cross-kingdom conservation of SUN protein functions in plant meiosis, we immunolocalized maize SUN2 using 3D microscopy of pollen mother cells from maize (Zea mays L.), a large-genome plant model with a canonical NE zygotene-stage telomere bouquet. We detected SUN2 at the nuclear periphery and found that it exhibited a distinct belt-like structure that transitioned to a half-belt during the zygotene stage and back to a full belt during and beyond the pachytene stage. The zygotene-stage half-belt SUN structure was shown by 3D immuno-FISH to include the NE-associated telomere cluster that defines the bouquet stage and coincides with homologous chromosome synapsis. Microtubule and filamentous actin staining patterns did not show any obvious belt or a retracted-like structure other than a general enrichment of tubulin staining distributed widely around the nucleus and throughout the cytoplasm. Genetic disruption of the meiotic SUN belt staining patterns with three different meiosis-specific mutants, desynaptic (dy1), asynaptic1 (as1), and divergent spindle1 (dv1) provides additional evidence for the role of the nuclear envelope in meiotic chromosome behavior. Taking into account all of the observations from this study, we propose that the maize SUN belt is directly or indirectly involved in meiotic telomere dynamics, chromosome synapsis, and possibly integration of signals and forces across the meiotic prophase nuclear envelope. PMID:25071797

  16. Conserved mechanism of PLAG1 activation in salivary gland tumors with and without chromosome 8q12 abnormalities: identification of SII as a new fusion partner gene.

    PubMed

    Aström, A K; Voz, M L; Kas, K; Röijer, E; Wedell, B; Mandahl, N; Van de Ven, W; Mark, J; Stenman, G

    1999-02-15

    We have previously shown (K. Kas et al, Nat. Genet., 15: 170-174, 1997) that the developmentally regulated zinc finger gene pleomorphic adenoma gene 1 (PLAG1) is the target gene in 8q12 in pleomorphic adenomas of the salivary glands with t(3;8)(p21;q12) translocations. The t(3;8) results in promoter swapping between PLAG1 and the constitutively expressed gene for beta-catenin (CTNNB1), leading to activation of PLAG1 expression and reduced expression of CTNNB1. Here we have studied the expression of PLAG1 by Northern blot analysis in 47 primary benign and malignant human tumors with or without cytogenetic abnormalities of 8q12. Overexpression of PLAG1 was found in 23 tumors (49%). Thirteen of 17 pleomorphic adenomas with a normal karyotype and 5 of 10 with 12q13-15 abnormalities overexpressed PLAG1, which demonstrates that PLAG1 activation is a frequent event in adenomas irrespective of karyotype. In contrast, PLAG1 was overexpressed in only 2 of 11 malignant salivary gland tumors analyzed, which suggests that, at least in salivary gland tumors, PLAG1 activation preferentially occurs in benign tumors. PLAG1 over-expression was also found in three of nine mesenchymal tumors, i.e., in two uterine leiomyomas and one leiomyosarcoma. RNase protection, rapid amplification of 5'-cDNA ends (5'-RACE), and reverse transcription-PCR analyses of five adenomas with a normal karyotype revealed fusion transcripts in three tumors. Nucleotide sequence analysis of these showed that they contained fusions between PLAG1 and CTNNB1 (one case) or PLAG1 and a novel fusion partner gene, i.e., the gene encoding the transcription elongation factor SII (two cases). The fusions occurred in the 5' noncoding region of PLAG1, leading to exchange of regulatory control elements and, as a consequence, activation of PLAG1 gene expression. Because all of the cases had grossly normal karyotypes, the rearrangements must result from cryptic rearrangements. The results suggest that in addition to

  17. Treatment-influenced associations of PML-RARα mutations, FLT3 mutations, and additional chromosome abnormalities in relapsed acute promyelocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Moser, Barry K.; Racevskis, Janis; Poiré, Xavier; Bloomfield, Clara D.; Carroll, Andrew J.; Ketterling, Rhett P.; Roulston, Diane; Schachter-Tokarz, Esther; Zhou, Da-cheng; Chen, I-Ming L.; Harvey, Richard; Koval, Greg; Sher, Dorie A.; Feusner, James H.; Tallman, Martin S.; Larson, Richard A.; Powell, Bayard L.; Appelbaum, Frederick R.; Paietta, Elisabeth; Willman, Cheryl L.; Stock, Wendy

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in the all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA)–targeted ligand binding domain of PML-RARα (PRα/LBD+) have been implicated in the passive selection of ATRA-resistant acute promyelocytic leukemia clones leading to disease relapse. Among 45 relapse patients from the ATRA/chemotherapy arm of intergroup protocol C9710, 18 patients harbored PRα/LBD+ (40%), 7 of whom (39%) relapsed Off-ATRA selection pressure, suggesting a possible active role of PRα/LBD+. Of 41 relapse patients coanalyzed, 15 (37%) had FMS-related tyrosine kinase 3 internal tandem duplication mutations (FLT3-ITD+), which were differentially associated with PRα/LBD+ depending on ATRA treatment status at relapse: positively, On-ATRA; negatively, Off-ATRA. Thirteen of 21 patients (62%) had additional chromosome abnormalities (ACAs); all coanalyzed PRα/LBD mutant patients who relapsed off-ATRA (n = 5) had associated ACA. After relapse Off-ATRA, ACA and FLT3-ITD+ were negatively associated and were oppositely associated with presenting white blood count and PML-RARα type: ACA, low, L-isoform; FLT3-ITD+, high, S-isoform. These exploratory results suggest that differing PRα/LBD+ activities may interact with FLT3-ITD+ or ACA, that FLT3-ITD+ and ACA are associated with different intrinsic disease progression pathways manifest at relapse Off-ATRA, and that these different pathways may be short-circuited by ATRA-selectable defects at relapse On-ATRA. ACA and certain PRα/LBD+ were also associated with reduced postrelapse survival. PMID:22734072

  18. Chromosomal Disorders and Autism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillberg, Christopher

    1998-01-01

    This paper reviews the literature on chromosomal aberrations in autism, especially possible gene markers. It notes that Chromosome 15 and numerical and structural abnormalities of the sex chromosomes have been most frequently reported as related to the genesis of autism. (Author/DB)

  19. From equator to pole: splitting chromosomes in mitosis and meiosis.

    PubMed

    Duro, Eris; Marston, Adèle L

    2015-01-15

    During eukaryotic cell division, chromosomes must be precisely partitioned to daughter cells. This relies on a mechanism to move chromosomes in defined directions within the parental cell. While sister chromatids are segregated from one another in mitosis and meiosis II, specific adaptations enable the segregation of homologous chromosomes during meiosis I to reduce ploidy for gamete production. Many of the factors that drive these directed chromosome movements are known, and their molecular mechanism has started to be uncovered. Here we review the mechanisms of eukaryotic chromosome segregation, with a particular emphasis on the modifications that ensure the segregation of homologous chromosomes during meiosis I.

  20. From equator to pole: splitting chromosomes in mitosis and meiosis

    PubMed Central

    Duro, Eris

    2015-01-01

    During eukaryotic cell division, chromosomes must be precisely partitioned to daughter cells. This relies on a mechanism to move chromosomes in defined directions within the parental cell. While sister chromatids are segregated from one another in mitosis and meiosis II, specific adaptations enable the segregation of homologous chromosomes during meiosis I to reduce ploidy for gamete production. Many of the factors that drive these directed chromosome movements are known, and their molecular mechanism has started to be uncovered. Here we review the mechanisms of eukaryotic chromosome segregation, with a particular emphasis on the modifications that ensure the segregation of homologous chromosomes during meiosis I. PMID:25593304

  1. Near-absent levels of segregational variation suggest limited opportunities for the introduction of genetic variation via homeologous chromosome pairing in synthetic neoallotetraploid Mimulus.

    PubMed

    Modliszewski, Jennifer L; Willis, John H

    2014-03-01

    Genetic variation is the fundamental medium of evolution. In allopolyploids, which are the product of hybridization and whole genome duplication, if homologous chromosomes always pair, then all descendants of a single diploid F1 hybrid lineage will be genetically identical. Contrarily, genetic variation among initially isogenic lineages is augmented when homeologous chromosomes pair; this added variation may contribute to phenotypic evolution. Mimulus sookensis is a naturally occurring, small-flowered allotetraploid derived from the large-flowered Mimulus guttatus and small-flowered Mimulus nasutus. Because diploid F1 hybrids between M. guttatus and M. nasutus have large flowers, phenotypic evolution post-polyploidization is implied in M. sookensis. Here, we present genetic and phenotypic analyses of synthetic neoallotetraploid Mimulus derived from a cross between M. guttatus and M. nasutus. Genetic marker data from S2 and BC1N progeny suggest that chromosomes regularly pair with their homologous counterpart. By measuring the phenotype of synthetic neoallotetraploids, we demonstrate that polyploidization per se does not induce the small flowers of M. sookensis. Moreover, phenotypic measurements of synthetic allotetraploid F2s and S4 families suggest that rare homeologous recombination events have a negligible phenotypic effect in the first few generations. In total, the results are consistent with either exceedingly rare homeologous pairing and recombination or spontaneous fragment loss. The low levels of fragment loss and phenotypic variation in neoallotetraploids suggest that homeologous recombination after polyploidization is not a major mechanism of phenotypic evolution in M. sookensis. Rather, it may be that spontaneous mutations or epigenetic changes after allopolyploidization have driven phenotypic evolution in M. sookensis. PMID:24470218

  2. The S. pombe aurora-related kinase Ark1 associates with mitotic structures in a stage dependent manner and is required for chromosome segregation.

    PubMed

    Petersen, J; Paris, J; Willer, M; Philippe, M; Hagan, I M

    2001-12-01

    Metazoans contain three aurora-related kinases. Aurora A is required for spindle formation while aurora B is required for chromosome condensation and cytokinesis. Less is known about the function of aurora C. S. pombe contains a single aurora-related kinase, Ark1. Although Ark1 protein levels remained constant as cells progressed through the mitotic cell cycle, its distribution altered during mitosis and meiosis. Throughout G2 Ark1 was concentrated in one to three nuclear foci that were not associated with the spindle pole body/centromere complex. Following commitment to mitosis Ark1 associated with chromatin and was particularly concentrated at several sites including kinetochores/centromeres. Kinetochore/centromere association diminished during anaphase A, after which it was distributed along the spindle. The protein became restricted to a small central zone that transiently enlarged as the spindle extended. As in many other systems mitotic fission yeast cells exhibit a much greater degree of phosphorylation of serine 10 of histone H3 than interphase cells. A number of studies have linked this modification with chromosome condensation. Ark1 immuno-precipitates phosphorylated serine 10 of histone H3 in vitro. This activity was highest in mitotic extracts. The absence of the histone H3 phospho-serine 10 epitope from mitotic cells in which the ark1(+) gene had been deleted (ark1.Delta1); the inability of these cells to resolve their chromosomes during anaphase and the co-localisation of this phospho-epitope with Ark1 early in mitosis, all suggest that Ark1 phosphorylates serine 10 of histone H3 in vivo. ark1.Delta1 cells also exhibited a reduction in kinetochore activity and a minor defect in spindle formation. Thus the enzyme activity, localisation and phenotype arising from our manipulations of this single fission yeast aurora kinase family member suggest that this single kinase is executing functions that are separately implemented by distinct aurora A and aurora

  3. Near-Absent Levels of Segregational Variation Suggest Limited Opportunities for the Introduction of Genetic Variation Via Homeologous Chromosome Pairing in Synthetic Neoallotetraploid Mimulus

    PubMed Central

    Modliszewski, Jennifer L.; Willis, John H.

    2014-01-01

    Genetic variation is the fundamental medium of evolution. In allopolyploids, which are the product of hybridization and whole genome duplication, if homologous chromosomes always pair, then all descendants of a single diploid F1 hybrid lineage will be genetically identical. Contrarily, genetic variation among initially isogenic lineages is augmented when homeologous chromosomes pair; this added variation may contribute to phenotypic evolution. Mimulus sookensis is a naturally occurring, small-flowered allotetraploid derived from the large-flowered Mimulus guttatus and small-flowered Mimulus nasutus. Because diploid F1 hybrids between M. guttatus and M. nasutus have large flowers, phenotypic evolution post-polyploidization is implied in M. sookensis. Here, we present genetic and phenotypic analyses of synthetic neoallotetraploid Mimulus derived from a cross between M. guttatus and M. nasutus. Genetic marker data from S2 and BC1N progeny suggest that chromosomes regularly pair with their homologous counterpart. By measuring the phenotype of synthetic neoallotetraploids, we demonstrate that polyploidization per se does not induce the small flowers of M. sookensis. Moreover, phenotypic measurements of synthetic allotetraploid F2s and S4 families suggest that rare homeologous recombination events have a negligible phenotypic effect in the first few generations. In total, the results are consistent with either exceedingly rare homeologous pairing and recombination or spontaneous fragment loss. The low levels of fragment loss and phenotypic variation in neoallotetraploids suggest that homeologous recombination after polyploidization is not a major mechanism of phenotypic evolution in M. sookensis. Rather, it may be that spontaneous mutations or epigenetic changes after allopolyploidization have driven phenotypic evolution in M. sookensis. PMID:24470218

  4. Meiotic drive of chromosomal knobs reshaped the maize genome.

    PubMed Central

    Buckler, E S; Phelps-Durr, T L; Buckler, C S; Dawe, R K; Doebley, J F; Holtsford, T P

    1999-01-01

    Meiotic drive is the subversion of meiosis so that particular genes are preferentially transmitted to the progeny. Meiotic drive generally causes the preferential segregation of small regions of the genome; however, in maize we propose that meiotic drive is responsible for the evolution of large repetitive DNA arrays on all chromosomes. A maize meiotic drive locus found on an uncommon form of chromosome 10 [abnormal 10 (Ab10)] may be largely responsible for the evolution of heterochromatic chromosomal knobs, which can confer meiotic drive potential to every maize chromosome. Simulations were used to illustrate the dynamics of this meiotic drive model and suggest knobs might be deleterious in the absence of Ab10. Chromosomal knob data from maize's wild relatives (Zea mays ssp. parviglumis and mexicana) and phylogenetic comparisons demonstrated that the evolution of knob size, frequency, and chromosomal position agreed with the meiotic drive hypothesis. Knob chromosomal position was incompatible with the hypothesis that knob repetitive DNA is neutral or slightly deleterious to the genome. We also show that environmental factors and transposition may play a role in the evolution of knobs. Because knobs occur at multiple locations on all maize chromosomes, the combined effects of meiotic drive and genetic linkage may have reshaped genetic diversity throughout the maize genome in response to the presence of Ab10. Meiotic drive may be a major force of genome evolution, allowing revolutionary changes in genome structure and diversity over short evolutionary periods. PMID:10471723

  5. Induction of entropic segregation: the first step is the hardest.

    PubMed

    Minina, Elena; Arnold, Axel

    2014-08-21

    In confinement, overlapping polymers experience entropic segregating forces that tend to demix them. This plays a role during cell replication, where it facilitates the segregation of daughter chromosomes. It has been argued that these forces are strong enough to explain chromosome segregation in elongated bacteria such as E. coli without the need for additional active mechanisms [S. Jun and B. Mulder, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A., 2006, 103, 12388]. However, entropic segregation can only set in after the initial symmetry has been broken. We demonstrate that the timescale for this induction phase is exponentially growing in the chain length, while the actual segregation time scales only quadratically in the chain length. Thus the induction quickly becomes the dominating, slow process, and makes entropic segregation much less efficient than previously thought. The slow induction might also explain the long delay in chromosome segregation observed in experiments on E. coli. PMID:24974935

  6. Digital Quantification of DNA Replication and Chromosome Segregation Enables Determination of Antimicrobial Susceptibility after only 15 Minutes of Antibiotic Exposure.

    PubMed

    Schoepp, Nathan G; Khorosheva, Eugenia M; Schlappi, Travis S; Curtis, Matthew S; Humphries, Romney M; Hindler, Janet A; Ismagilov, Rustem F

    2016-08-01

    Rapid antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST) would decrease misuse and overuse of antibiotics. The "holy grail" of AST is a phenotype-based test that can be performed within a doctor visit. Such a test requires the ability to determine a pathogen's susceptibility after only a short antibiotic exposure. Herein, digital PCR (dPCR) was employed to test whether measuring DNA replication of the target pathogen through digital single-molecule counting would shorten the required time of antibiotic exposure. Partitioning bacterial chromosomal DNA into many small volumes during dPCR enabled AST results after short exposure times by 1) precise quantification and 2) a measurement of how antibiotics affect the states of macromolecular assembly of bacterial chromosomes. This digital AST (dAST) determined susceptibility of clinical isolates from urinary tract infections (UTIs) after 15 min of exposure for all four antibiotic classes relevant to UTIs. This work lays the foundation to develop a rapid, point-of-care AST and strengthen global antibiotic stewardship.

  7. A prenatally ascertained, maternally inherited 14.8 Mb duplication of chromosomal bands Xq13.2-q21.31 associated with multiple congenital abnormalities in a male fetus.

    PubMed

    Sismani, C; Donoghue, J; Alexandrou, A; Karkaletsi, M; Christopoulou, S; Konstantinidou, A E; Livanos, P; Patsalis, P C; Velissariou, V

    2013-11-01

    Duplications of the X chromosome are rare cytogenetic findings, and have been associated with an abnormal phenotype in the male offspring of apparently normal or near normal female carriers. We report on the prenatal diagnosis of a duplication on the long arm of chromosome X from chromosomal band Xq13.2 to q21.31 in a male fetus with increased nuchal translucency in the first trimester and polyhydramnios at 22 weeks of gestation. Amniocentesis was undertaken and cytogenetic analysis revealed additional chromosomal material in the long arm of chromosome X at position Xq13. Analysis with high resolution array CGH revealed the additional material is in fact a duplication of the region Xq13.2-q21.13. The duplication is 14.8 Mb in size and includes fourteen genes: SLC16A2, KIAA2022, ABCB7, ZDHHC15, ATRX, MAGT1, ATP7A, PGK1, TBX22, BRWD3, POU3F4, ZNF711, POF1B and CHM. Analysis of the parents revealed the mother to be a carrier of the same duplication. After elected termination of the pregnancy at 28 weeks a detailed autopsy of the fetus allowed for genotype-phenotype correlations.

  8. Meiotic behavior and chromosome number of Urochloa adspersa (Trin.) R. D. Webster from the Brazilian Chaco.

    PubMed

    Felismino, M F; Maior, R L S; Damasceno, G A; Pott, A; Pagliarini, M S

    2015-01-01

    This is the first report of meiotic division in Uro-chloa adspersa (Trin.) collected from the Brazilian Chaco. Meiotic analyses were performed on three specimens of U. adspersa named G10, G15, and G16. Inflorescences were collected and fixed in a mixture of ethanol and acetic acid (3:1, v/v) for 24 h and then stored in 70% alcohol. Diakinesis revealed different chromosome numbers and ploidy levels. All three plants were polyploids: G10 and G15 exhibited 2n = 6x = 54 chromosomes (arranged in 27 bivalents), while G16 exhibited 2n = 4x = 36 chromosomes (18 bivalents). Meiotic behavior was mainly normal in the hexaploid G15 and the tetraploid G16 (5.3 and 6.2% of the cells were abnormal, respective-ly), revealing only a few meiotic abnormalities that are common to polyploids, i.e., those related to irregular chromosome segregation. G10 exhibited other meiotic abnormalities during meiosis II, such as chromosome stickiness, irregular spindle orientation, and irregular cytokinesis, which led to the formation of a few triads, resulting in 16.9% of the cells being abnormal. The origin of these abnormalities is discussed, and we suggest that the genes that control meiotic steps may be present in the Urochloa gene pool. PMID:26214424

  9. Zygotes segregate entire parental genomes in distinct blastomere lineages causing cleavage-stage chimerism and mixoploidy.

    PubMed

    Destouni, Aspasia; Zamani Esteki, Masoud; Catteeuw, Maaike; Tšuiko, Olga; Dimitriadou, Eftychia; Smits, Katrien; Kurg, Ants; Salumets, Andres; Van Soom, Ann; Voet, Thierry; Vermeesch, Joris R

    2016-05-01

    Dramatic genome dynamics, such as chromosome instability, contribute to the remarkable genomic heterogeneity among the blastomeres comprising a single embryo during human preimplantation development. This heterogeneity, when compatible with life, manifests as constitutional mosaicism, chimerism, and mixoploidy in live-born individuals. Chimerism and mixoploidy are defined by the presence of cell lineages with different parental genomes or different ploidy states in a single individual, respectively. Our knowledge of their mechanistic origin results from indirect observations, often when the cell lineages have been subject to rigorous selective pressure during development. Here, we applied haplarithmisis to infer the haplotypes and the copy number of parental genomes in 116 single blastomeres comprising entire preimplantation bovine embryos (n = 23) following in vitro fertilization. We not only demonstrate that chromosome instability is conserved between bovine and human cleavage embryos, but we also discovered that zygotes can spontaneously segregate entire parental genomes into different cell lineages during the first post-zygotic cleavage division. Parental genome segregation was not exclusively triggered by abnormal fertilizations leading to triploid zygotes, but also normally fertilized zygotes can spontaneously segregate entire parental genomes into different cell lineages during cleavage of the zygote. We coin the term "heterogoneic division" to indicate the events leading to noncanonical zygotic cytokinesis, segregating the parental genomes into distinct cell lineages. Persistence of those cell lines during development is a likely cause of chimerism and mixoploidy in mammals. PMID:27197242

  10. Coddling Segregation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Josey, E. J.

    1971-01-01

    The American Library Association's (ALA) Black Caucus expects that the ALA Intellectual Freedom Committee will proceed to carry out the mandate--to censure and bring sanctions against those librarians and libraries that provide service to segregated schools established to circumvent the U. S. Supreme Court Decision. (Author/MF)

  11. Genetic dosage and position effect of small supernumerary marker chromosome (sSMC) in human sperm nuclei in infertile male patient.

    PubMed

    Olszewska, Marta; Wanowska, Elzbieta; Kishore, Archana; Huleyuk, Nataliya; Georgiadis, Andrew P; Yatsenko, Alexander N; Mikula, Mariya; Zastavna, Danuta; Wiland, Ewa; Kurpisz, Maciej

    2015-11-30

    Chromosomes occupy specific distinct areas in the nucleus of the sperm cell that may be altered in males with disrupted spermatogenesis. Here, we present alterations in the positioning of the human chromosomes 15, 18, X and Y between spermatozoa with the small supernumerary marker chromosome (sSMC; sSMC(+)) and spermatozoa with normal chromosome complement (sSMC(-)), for the first time described in the same ejaculate of an infertile, phenotypically normal male patient. Using classical and confocal fluorescent microscopy, the nuclear colocalization of chromosomes 15 and sSMC was analyzed. The molecular cytogenetic characteristics of sSMC delineated the karyotype as 47,XY,+der(15)(pter->p11.2::q11.1->q11.2::p11.2->pter)mat. Analysis of meiotic segregation showed a 1:1 ratio of sSMC(+) to sSMC(-) spermatozoa, while evaluation of sperm aneuploidy status indicated an increased level of chromosome 13, 18, 21 and 22 disomy, up to 7 × (2.7 - 15.1). Sperm chromatin integrity assessment did not reveal any increase in deprotamination in the patient's sperm chromatin. Importantly, we found significant repositioning of chromosomes X and Y towards the nuclear periphery, where both chromosomes were localized in close proximity to the sSMC. This suggests the possible influence of sSMC/XY colocalization on meiotic chromosome division, resulting in abnormal chromosome segregation, and leading to male infertility in the patient.

  12. Kif2a depletion generates chromosome segregation and pole coalescence defects in animal caps and inhibits gastrulation of the Xenopus embryo

    PubMed Central

    Eagleson, Gerald; Pfister, Katherine; Knowlton, Anne L.; Skoglund, Paul; Keller, Ray; Stukenberg, P. Todd

    2015-01-01

    Kif2a is a member of the kinesin-13 microtubule depolymerases, which tightly regulate microtubule dynamics for many cellular processes. We characterized Kif2a depletion in Xenopus animal caps and embryos. Kif2a depletion generates defects in blastopore closure. These defects are rescued by removing the animal cap, suggesting that Kif2a-depleted animal caps are not compliant enough to allow gastrulation movements. Gastrulation defects are not rescued by a Kif2a mutated in an Aurora kinase phosphorylation site, suggesting that the phenotypes are caused by problems in mitosis. During animal cap mitoses, Kif2a localizes to the spindle poles and centromeres. Depletion of Kif2a generated multipolar spindles in stage 12 embryos. Kif2a-depleted animal caps have anaphase lagging chromosomes in stage 9 and 10 embryos and subsequent cytokinesis failure. Later divisions have greater than two centrosomes, generating extra spindle poles. Kif2a-depleted embryos are also defective at coalescing extra spindle poles into a bipolar spindle. The gastrulation and mitotic phenotypes can be rescued by either human Kif2a or Kif2b, which suggests that the two homologues redundantly regulate mitosis in mammals. These studies demonstrate that defects in mitosis can inhibit large-scale developmental movements in vertebrate tissues. PMID:25568341

  13. Lack of segregation of a Marfan-like phenotype associating marfanoie habitus and mitral valve disease with fibrillin gene on chromosome 15

    SciTech Connect

    VanMaldergen, L.; Hilbert, P.; Gillerot, Y.

    1994-09-01

    Apart from typical Marfan syndrome (MS), several Marfan-like conditions are known. One of those is the MASS syndrome (Mitral involvement, Aortic dilatation, Skin and Skeletal abnormalities) defined by Pyeritz et al. Among these, a dominantly inherited mitral valve prolapse with marfanoid habitus have also been reported. Until now, except for a Marfan-like condition described by Boileau et al., all Marfan families are linked to fib 15. A large Belgian pedigree with 25 affected patients among 62 at risk subjects spanning four generations is described. A syndrome including marfanoid skeletal dysplasia (tall stature, dolichostenomelia, arachnodactyly, pectus carinatum joint dislocation), prolapse and/or myxomatous degeneration of the mitral valve, but without aortic dilatation of eye involvement was observed. Although the phenotype fulfills Berlin diagnostic criteria for MS, it closely resembles MASS syndrome. Preliminary linkage results show discordance aggregation insertion in the fib 15 gene, as evaluated by intragenic microsatellite fib 15. Since Dietz et al. described a similar patient with fib 15 gene, we suggest that this variant of Marfan syndrome is genetically heterogeneous and caused by mutations, some of which are allelic to classical Marfan syndrome plus a subtype, some of which are not. Linkage studies are under way to further characterize the gene involved in the present family.

  14. Micromechanics of human mitotic chromosomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Mingxuan; Kawamura, Ryo; Marko, John F.

    2011-02-01

    Eukaryote cells dramatically reorganize their long chromosomal DNAs to facilitate their physical segregation during mitosis. The internal organization of folded mitotic chromosomes remains a basic mystery of cell biology; its understanding would likely shed light on how chromosomes are separated from one another as well as into chromosome structure between cell divisions. We report biophysical experiments on single mitotic chromosomes from human cells, where we combine micromanipulation, nano-Newton-scale force measurement and biochemical treatments to study chromosome connectivity and topology. Results are in accord with previous experiments on amphibian chromosomes and support the 'chromatin network' model of mitotic chromosome structure. Prospects for studies of chromosome-organizing proteins using siRNA expression knockdowns, as well as for differential studies of chromosomes with and without mutations associated with genetic diseases, are also discussed.

  15. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) assessment of chromosome copy number in sperm

    SciTech Connect

    Sheu, M.; Sigman, M.; Mark, H.F.L.

    1994-09-01

    Approximately 15% of all recognized pregnancies end in spontaneous abortions. The overall frequency of chromosome abnormalities in spontaneous abortions is approximately 50%. Thus aneuploidy is a significant cause of fetal wastage. In addition, structural and numerical abnormalities of chromosomes can also lead to birth defects, developmental delay, mental retardation and infertility. Conventional cytogenetic analysis via GTG- and other banding techniques is a powerful tool in the elucidation of the nature of chromosomal abnormalities. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) enables detection of numerical chromosomal abnormalities, especially trisomies, in intact cells. Using FISH and commercially available biotin-labeled probes, we have initiated a prospective study to assess specific chromosome copy number of preparations of unstained smears from men referred for a male infertility evaluation as well as smears from normal control males chosen randomly from the sample of sperm donors. A total of approximately 19,000 sperm nuclei have been examined thus far. Of those suitable for analysis, 7382 (38.75%) were normal possessing one copy of chromosome 8, 155 (0.81%) were disomic, and 15 (0.079%) had more than two copies of chromosome 8. Comparisons with data available in the literature will be discussed. Work is ongoing to increase the efficiency of hybridization using both reported and previously untried pretreatment and fixation protocols. We have also initiated studies using multicolor FISH with various chromosome enumeration probes. The assay described here is a potentially powerful tool for detecting rare events such as spontaneous germ cell aneuploidy, aneuploidy detected in semen from men with carcinoma in situ of the testis and aneuploidy induced by potential environmental genotoxicants. It can also be utilized for segregation analysis and for correlating chromosome copy number with germ cell morphology.

  16. A new autosomal recessive non-progressive congenital cerebellar ataxia associated with mental retardation, optic atrophy, and skin abnormalities (CAMOS) maps to chromosome 15q24-q26 in a large consanguineous Lebanese Druze Family.

    PubMed

    Delague, Valérie; Bareil, Corinne; Bouvagnet, Patrice; Salem, Nabiha; Chouery, Eliane; Loiselet, Jacques; Mégarbané, André; Claustres, Mireille

    2002-03-01

    Congenital cerebellar ataxias are a heterogeneous group of non-progressive disorders characterized by hypotonia and developmental delay followed by the appearance of ataxia, and often associated with dysarthria, mental retardation, and atrophy of the cerebellum. We report the mapping of a disease gene in a large inbred Lebanese Druze family, with five cases of a new form of non-progressive autosomal recessive congenital ataxia associated with optic atrophy, severe mental retardation, and structural skin abnormalities, to a 3.6-cM interval on chromosome 15q24-15q26.

  17. Paternal adjacent I segregation of an insertional translocation results in partial 4q monosomy and 4q trisomy in two siblings

    SciTech Connect

    Hegman, K.; Spikes, A.S.; Orr-Urteger, A.

    1994-09-01

    A genetic evaluation was requested for a 6 week old infant with multiple congenital malformations including mild craniofacial anomalies, truncal hypotonia, hypospadias and a VSD. Blood obtained for chromosome analysis revealed an abnormal chromosome 4. Paternal chromosome analysis showed a 46,XY,inv ins(3;4)(p21.32;q25q21.2),inv(4)(p15.3q21.3) karyotype. Therefore, the proband`s chromosome 4 was the unbalanced product of this insertional translocation from the father resulting in partial monosomy 4q. Additionally, the derivative 4 had a pericentric inversion which was also seen in the father`s chromosome 4. During genetic counseling, the proband`s 2 year-old brother was evaluated. Although he was not felt to be dysmorphic, he was described as having impulsive behavior. Chromosome analysis on this child revealed 46,XY,der(3)inv ins(3;4)(p21.32;q25q21.2)pat. This karyotype results in partial trisomy 4q. FISH using two-color {open_quotes}painting{close_quotes} probes for chromosomes 3 and 4 confirmed the G-banded interpretation in this family. The segregation seen in this family was due to adjacent I segregation with both reciprocal products observed in the two children. Few patients with partial 4q trisomy or partial 4q monosomy have been described in the literature. This family revealed both possible unbalanced products from adjacent I segregation with partial 4q monosomy showing multiple congenital anomalies and partial 4q trisomy showing very few phenotypic abnormalities.

  18. Abnormal protein in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with a submicroscopic X-chromosomal deletion associated with Norrie disease: preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Joy, J E; Poglod, R; Murphy, D L; Sims, K B; de la Chapelle, A; Sankila, E M; Norio, R; Merril, C R

    1991-01-01

    Norrie disease is an X-linked recessive disorder characterized by congenital blindness and, in many cases, mental retardation. Some Norrie disease cases have been shown to be associated with a submicroscopic deletion in chromosomal region Xp11.3. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was collected from four male patients with an X-chromosomal deletion associated with Norrie disease. CSF proteins were resolved using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and then analyzed by computer using the Elsie V program. Our analysis revealed a protein that appears to be altered in patients with Norrie disease deletion.

  19. An interstitial deletion of 7.1Mb in chromosome band 6p22.3 associated with developmental delay and dysmorphic features including heart defects, short neck, and eye abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Bremer, Anna; Schoumans, Jacqueline; Nordenskjöld, Magnus; Anderlid, Britt-Marie; Giacobini, Maibritt

    2009-01-01

    Seven cases with an interstitial deletion of the short arm of chromosome 6 involving the 6p22 region have previously been reported. The clinical phenotype of these cases includes developmental delay, brain-, heart-, and kidney defects, eye abnormalities, short neck, craniofacial malformations, hypotonia, as well as clinodactyly or syndactyly. Here, we report a patient with a 7.1Mb interstitial deletion of chromosome band 6p22.3, detected by genome-wide screening array CGH. The patient is a 4-year-old girl with developmental delay and dysmorphic features including eye abnormalities, short neck, and a ventricular septum defect. The deleted region at 6p22.3 in our patient overlaps with six out of the seven previously reported cases with a 6p22-24 interstitial deletion. This enabled us to further narrow down the critical region for the 6p22 deletion phenotype to 2.2Mb. Twelve genes are mapped to the overlapping deleted region, among them the gene encoding the ataxin-1 protein, the ATXN1 gene. Mice with homozygous deletions in ATXN1 are phenotypically normal but show cognitive delay. Haploinsufficiency of ATXN1 may therefore contribute to the learning difficulties observed in the patients harboring a 6p22 deletion.

  20. Structural rearrangements of chromosome 15 satellites resulting in Prader-Willi syndrome suggest a complex mechanism for uniparental disomy

    SciTech Connect

    Toth-Fijel, S.; Gunter, K.; Olson, S.

    1994-09-01

    We report two cases of PWS in which there was abnormal meiosis I segregation of chromosome 15 following a rare translocation event between the heteromorphic satellite regions of chromosomes 14 and 15 and an apparent meiotic recombination in the unstable region of 15q11.2. PWS and normal appearing chromosomes in case one prompted a chromosome 15 origin analysis. PCR analysis indicated maternal isodisomy for the long arm of chromosome. However, only one chromosome 15 had short arm heteromorphisms consistent with either paternal or maternal inheritance. VNTR DNA analysis and heteromorphism data suggest that a maternal de novo translocation between chromosome 14 and 15 occurred prior to meiosis I. This was followed by recombination between D15Z1 and D15S11 and subsequent meiosis I nondisjunction. Proband and maternal karyotype display a distamycin A-DAPI positive region on the chromosome 14 homolog involved in the translocation. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) analyses of ONCOR probes D15S11, SNRPN, D15S11 and GABRB 3 were normal, consistent with the molecular data. Case two received a Robertsonian translocation t(14;15)(p13;p13) of maternal origin. Chromosome analysis revealed a meiosis I error producing UPD. FISH analysis of the proband and parents showed normal hybridization of ONCOR probes D15Z1, D15S11, SNRPN, D15S10 and GABRB3. In both cases the PWS probands received a structurally altered chromosome 15 that had rearranged with chromosome 14 prior to meiosis. If proper meiotic segregation is dependent on the resolution of chiasmata and/or the binding to chromosome-specific spindle fibers, then it may be possible that rearrangements of pericentric or unstable regions of the genome disrupt normal disjunction and lead to uniparental disomy.

  1. Application of the FICTION technique for the simultaneous detection of immunophenotype and chromosomal abnormalities in routinely fixed, paraffin wax embedded bone marrow trephines.

    PubMed

    Korac, P; Jones, M; Dominis, M; Kusec, R; Mason, D Y; Banham, A H; Ventura, R A

    2005-12-01

    The use of interphase fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) to study cytogenetic abnormalities in routinely fixed paraffin wax embedded tissue has become commonplace over the past decade. However, very few studies have applied FISH to routinely fixed bone marrow trephines (BMTs). This may be because of the acid based decalcification methods that are commonly used during the processing of BMTs, which may adversely affect the suitability of the sample for FISH analysis. For the first time, this report describes the simultaneous application of FISH and immunofluorescent staining (the FICTION technique) to formalin fixed, EDTA decalcified and paraffin wax embedded BMTs. This technique allows the direct correlation of genetic abnormalities to immunophenotype, and therefore will be particularly useful for the identification of genetic abnormalities in specific tumour cells present in BMTs. The application of this to routine clinical practice will assist diagnosis and the detection of minimal residual disease.

  2. [Hebephrenic symptoms as an expression of an XYY chromosome abnormality? Case report of a patient with suspected sexual abuse of his own 2 minor children].

    PubMed

    Dirksen, T; Mönikes, E

    1995-06-01

    A 48 year old patient was hospitalised because of parasuicidal behaviour and suicidal ideation. He was under suspicion of having sexually abused his 4-year old daughter and his 4-year old son. At the age of 17, he was hospitalised in a psychiatric ward under the diagnosis of hebephrenic schizophrenia. He successfully received an insulin coma therapy. Because of his increased height (1.89 m), mental retardation and other psychical disorders in his youth, we now suspected him of having an extra Y chromosome which was confirmed by chromosome analysis. The non-uniform symptomatology of XYY-individuals includes a hebephrenic aspect. Concerning the different therapeutical and juridical consequences, we considered a critical investigation of the former diagnosis "Hebephrenic Schizophrenia".

  3. Distal Partial Trisomy 15q26 and Partial Monosomy 16p13.3 in a 36-Year-Old Male with Clinical Features of Both Chromosomal Abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Cox, Devin M; Butler, Merlin G

    2015-01-01

    We report a 36-year-old Caucasian male identified with distal partial trisomy 15q and partial monosomy 16p from an unbalanced chromosome translocation detected by microarray and FISH analysis. He had a history of developmental delay and intellectual disability, chronic anemia, tall and slender stature, thoracic scoliosis and lumbar lordosis, and dysmorphic features. The distal partial trisomy 15q included the insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor gene involved with growth, while genes in the distal partial monosomy 16p region are involved with alpha hemoglobin production, intellectual disability, dysmorphic features, and acromegaly. The chromosome derivative found in our patient contains genes known to play a role in his phenotype.

  4. A prenatally ascertained de novo terminal deletion of chromosomal bands 1q43q44 associated with multiple congenital abnormalities in a female fetus.

    PubMed

    Sismani, Carolina; Christopoulou, Georgia; Alexandrou, Angelos; Evangelidou, Paola; Donoghue, Jacqueline; Konstantinidou, Anastasia E; Velissariou, Voula

    2015-01-01

    Terminal deletions in the long arm of chromosome 1 result in a postnatally recognizable disorder described as 1q43q44 deletion syndrome. The size of the deletions and the resulting phenotype varies among patients. However, some features are common among patients as the chromosomal regions included in the deletions. In the present case, ultrasonography at 22 weeks of gestation revealed choroid plexus cysts (CPCs) and a single umbilical artery (SUA) and therefore amniocentesis was performed. Chromosomal analysis revealed a possible terminal deletion in 1q and high resolution array CGH confirmed the terminal 1q43q44 deletion and estimated the size to be approximately 8 Mb. Following termination of pregnancy, performance of fetopsy allowed further clinical characterization. We report here a prenatal case with the smallest pure terminal 1q43q44 deletion, that has been molecularly and phenotypically characterized. In addition, to our knowledge this is the first prenatal case reported with 1q13q44 terminal deletion and Pierre-Robin sequence (PRS). Our findings combined with review data from the literature show the complexity of the genetic basis of the associated syndrome.

  5. Pericentric inversion of chromosome 11 (p14.3q21) associated with developmental delays, hypopigmented skin lesions and abnormal brain MRI findings - a new case report

    SciTech Connect

    Zachor, D.A.; Lofton, M.

    1994-09-01

    We report 3 year old male, referred for evaluation of developmental delays. Pregnancy was complicated by oligohydramnios, proteinuria and prematurity. Medical history revealed: bilateral inguinal hernia, small scrotal sac, undescended testes, developmental delays and behavioral problems. The child had: microcephaly, facial dysmorphic features, single palmar creases, hypopigmented skin lesions of variable size, intermittent exotropia and small retracted testes. Neurological examination was normal. Cognitive level was at the average range with mild delay in his adaptive behavior. Expressive language delays and severe articulation disorder were noted, as well as clumsiness, poor control and precision of gross and fine motor skills. Chromosomal analysis of peripheral leukocytes indicated that one of the number 11 chromosomes had undergone a pericentric inversion with breakpoints on the short (p) arm at band p14.3 and the long (q) arm at band q21. An MRI of the brain showed mild delay in myelinization pattern of white matter. Chromosome 11 inversion in other sites was associated with Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome and several malignancies. To our knowledge this is the first description of inv(11)(p14.3q21) that is associated with microcephaly, dysmorphic features, hypopigmented skin lesions and speech delay. This inversion may disrupt the expression of the involved genes. However, additional cases with the same cytogenetic anomaly are needed to explore the phenotypic significance of this disorder.

  6. Stella preserves maternal chromosome integrity by inhibiting 5hmC-induced γH2AX accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Nakatani, Tsunetoshi; Yamagata, Kazuo; Kimura, Tohru; Oda, Masaaki; Nakashima, Hiroyuki; Hori, Mayuko; Sekita, Yoichi; Arakawa, Tatsuhiko; Nakamura, Toshinobu; Nakano, Toru

    2015-01-01

    In the mouse zygote, Stella/PGC7 protects 5-methylcytosine (5mC) of the maternal genome from Tet3-mediated oxidation to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC). Although ablation of Stella causes early embryonic lethality, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unknown. In this study, we report impaired DNA replication and abnormal chromosome segregation (ACS) of maternal chromosomes in Stella-null embryos. In addition, phosphorylation of H2AX (γH2AX), which has been reported to inhibit DNA replication, accumulates in the maternal chromatin of Stella-null zygotes in a Tet3-dependent manner. Cell culture assays verified that ectopic appearance of 5hmC induces abnormal accumulation of γH2AX and subsequent growth retardation. Thus, Stella protects maternal chromosomes from aberrant epigenetic modifications to ensure early embryogenesis. PMID:25694116

  7. Inheritance of a Chromosome 3 and 21 Translocation in the Fetuses, with One also Having Trisomy 21, in Three Pregnancies in One Family.

    PubMed

    Pazarbasi, A; Demirhan, O; Alptekin, D; Ozgunen, Ft; Ozpak, L; Yilmaz, Mb; Nazlican, E; Tanriverdi, N; Luleyap, U; Gümürdülü, D

    2013-12-01

    The majority of chromosome rearrangements are balanced reciprocal and Robertsonian translocations. It is now known that such abnormalities cause no phenotypic effect on the carrier but lead to increased risk of producing unbalanced gametes. Here, we report the inheritance of a translocation between chromosomes 3 and 21 in a family with one of two fetuses with Down Syndrome carrying the same translocation and the other also carrying the same translocation without the additional chromosome 21. Chromosomal analysis from fetal amniotic fluid and peripheral blood lymphocytes from the family were performed at the Çukurova University Hospital at Adana, Turkey. We assessed a family in which the translocation between chromosomes 3 and 21 segregates: one of the three progenies carried the 47,XX,+21,t(3;21)(q21;q22) karyotype and presented with Down Syndrome; another of the three progenies carried the 46,XX,t(3;21) (q21;q22) karyotype and the third had the 46,XY karyotype. Their mother is phenotypically normal. Apparently this rearrangement occurred due to an unbalanced chromosome segregation of the mother [t(3;21)(q21;q22)mat]. This family will enable us to explain the behavior of segregation patterns and the mechanism for each type of translocation from carrier to carrier and their effects on reproduction and numerical aberrations. These findings can be used in clinical genetics and may be used as an effective tool for reproductive guidance and genetic counseling. PMID:24778571

  8. Cytogenetic Analysis of Segregation Distortion in Drosophila Melanogaster: The Cytological Organization of the Responder (Rsp) Locus

    PubMed Central

    Pimpinelli, S.; Dimitri, P.

    1989-01-01

    The segregation distortion phenomenon occurs in Drosophila melanogaster males carrying an SD second chromosome and an SD(+) homolog. In such males the SD chromosome is transmitted to the progeny more frequently than the expected 50% because of an abnormal differentiation of the SD(+)-bearing sperms. Three major loci are involved in this phenomenon: SD and Rsp, associated with the SD and SD(+) chromosome, respectively, and E(SD). In the present work we performed a cytogenetic analysis of the Rsp locus which was known to map to the centromeric heterochromatin of the second chromosome. Hoechst- and N-banding techniques were used to characterize chromosomes carrying Responder insensitive (Rsp(i)), Responder sensitive (Rsp(s)) and Responder supersensitive (Rsp(ss)) alleles. Our results locate the Rsp locus to the h39 region of 2R heterochromatin. This region is a Hoechstbright, N-banding negative heterochromatic block adjacent to the centromere. Quantitative variations of the h39 region were observed. The degree of sensitivity to Sd was found to be directly correlated with the physical size of that region, demonstrating that the Rsp locus is composed of repeated DNA. PMID:2470640

  9. Chromosome choreography: the meiotic ballet.

    PubMed

    Page, Scott L; Hawley, R Scott

    2003-08-01

    The separation of homologous chromosomes during meiosis in eukaryotes is the physical basis of Mendelian inheritance. The core of the meiotic process is a specialized nuclear division (meiosis I) in which homologs pair with each other, recombine, and then segregate from each other. The processes of chromosome alignment and pairing allow for homolog recognition. Reciprocal meiotic recombination ensures meiotic chromosome segregation by converting sister chromatid cohesion into mechanisms that hold homologous chromosomes together. Finally, the ability of sister kinetochores to orient to a single pole at metaphase I allows the separation of homologs to two different daughter cells. Failures to properly accomplish this elegant chromosome dance result in aneuploidy, a major cause of miscarriage and birth defects in human beings. PMID:12907787

  10. Continuous absence of metaphase-defined cytogenetic abnormalities, especially of chromosome 13 and hypodiploidy, ensures long-term survival in multiple myeloma treated with Total Therapy I: interpretation in the context of global gene expression.

    PubMed

    Shaughnessy, John; Jacobson, Joth; Sawyer, Jeff; McCoy, Jason; Fassas, Athanasios; Zhan, Fenghuang; Bumm, Klaus; Epstein, Joshua; Anaissie, Elias; Jagannath, Sundar; Vesole, David; Siegel, David; Desikan, Raman; Munshi, Nikhil; Badros, Ashraf; Tian, Erming; Zangari, Maurizio; Tricot, Guido; Crowley, John; Barlogie, Bart

    2003-05-15

    Metaphase cytogenetic abnormalities (CAs), especially of chromosome 13 (CA 13), confer a grave prognosis in multiple myeloma even with tandem autotransplantations as applied in Total Therapy I, which enrolled 231 patients between 1989 and 1994. With a median follow-up of almost 9 years, the prognostic implications of all individual CAs, detected prior to treatment and at relapse, were investigated. Among all CAs and standard prognostic factors examined prior to therapy, only hypodiploidy and CA 13 (hypo-13 CA), alone or in combination, were associated with shortest event-free survival and overall survival (OS). The shortest postrelapse OS was observed with hypo-13 CA, which was newly detected in 18 of all 28 patients presenting with this abnormality at relapse. Superior prognosis was associated with the absence of any CA at both diagnosis and relapse (10-year OS, 40%). The lack of independent prognostic implications of other CAs points to a uniquely aggressive behavior of hypo-13 CA (present in 16% of patients at diagnosis). With the use of microarray data in 146 patients enrolled in Total Therapy II, overexpression of cell cycle genes distinguished CA from no CA, especially in cases of del(13) detected by interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). FISH 13, resulting in a haploinsufficiency of RB1 and other genes mapping to chromosome 13, as well as activation of IGF1R, appears to have an amplifying effect on cell cycle gene expression, thus providing a molecular explanation for the dire outcome of patients with CA 13 compared with those with other CAs.

  11. The New Segregation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laosa, Luis M.

    2001-01-01

    This issue reviews national demographic trends in school segregation, summarizing research findings. Though the national debate on school segregation emphasizes blacks and whites, present-day school segregation includes segregation by socioeconomic level, ethnicity, and native language. The research study examined features of the ecology of…

  12. Detection of amplified or deleted chromosomal regions

    DOEpatents

    Stokke, T.; Pinkel, D.; Gray, J.W.

    1995-12-05

    The present invention relates to in situ hybridization methods for the identification of new chromosomal abnormalities associated with various diseases. In particular, it provides probes which are specific to a region of amplification in chromosome 20. 3 figs.

  13. Detection of amplified or deleted chromosomal regions

    SciTech Connect

    Stokke, Trond; Pinkel, Daniel; Gray, Joe W.

    1995-01-01

    The present invention relates to in situ hybridization methods for the identification of new chromosomal abnormalities associated with various diseases. In particular, it provides probes which are specific to a region of amplification in chromosome 20.

  14. Detection Of Amplified Or Deleted Chromosomal Regions

    SciTech Connect

    Stokke, Trond , Pinkel, Daniel , Gray, Joe W.

    1997-05-27

    The present invention relates to in situ hybridization methods for the identification of new chromosomal abnormalities associated with various diseases. In particular, it provides probes which are specific to a region of amplification in chromosome 20.

  15. Compaction and segregation of sister chromatids via active loop extrusion

    PubMed Central

    Goloborodko, Anton; Imakaev, Maxim V; Marko, John F; Mirny, Leonid

    2016-01-01

    The mechanism by which chromatids and chromosomes are segregated during mitosis and meiosis is a major puzzle of biology and biophysics. Using polymer simulations of chromosome dynamics, we show that a single mechanism of loop extrusion by condensins can robustly compact, segregate and disentangle chromosomes, arriving at individualized chromatids with morphology observed in vivo. Our model resolves the paradox of topological simplification concomitant with chromosome 'condensation', and explains how enzymes a few nanometers in size are able to control chromosome geometry and topology at micron length scales. We suggest that loop extrusion is a universal mechanism of genome folding that mediates functional interactions during interphase and compacts chromosomes during mitosis. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14864.001 PMID:27192037

  16. Bacterial partition complexes segregate within the volume of the nucleoid

    PubMed Central

    Le Gall, Antoine; Cattoni, Diego I.; Guilhas, Baptiste; Mathieu-Demazière, Céline; Oudjedi, Laura; Fiche, Jean-Bernard; Rech, Jérôme; Abrahamsson, Sara; Murray, Heath; Bouet, Jean-Yves; Nollmann, Marcelo

    2016-01-01

    Precise and rapid DNA segregation is required for proper inheritance of genetic material. In most bacteria and archaea, this process is assured by a broadly conserved mitotic-like apparatus in which a NTPase (ParA) displaces the partition complex. Competing observations and models imply starkly different 3D localization patterns of the components of the partition machinery during segregation. Here we use super-resolution microscopies to localize in 3D each component of the segregation apparatus with respect to the bacterial chromosome. We show that Par proteins locate within the nucleoid volume and reveal that proper volumetric localization and segregation of partition complexes requires ATPase and DNA-binding activities of ParA. Finally, we find that the localization patterns of the different components of the partition system highly correlate with dense chromosomal regions. We propose a new mechanism in which the nucleoid provides a scaffold to guide the proper segregation of partition complexes. PMID:27377966

  17. The chromosomal complements of multipronuclear human zygotes resulting from intracytoplasmic sperm injection.

    PubMed

    Macas, E; Imthurn, B; Rosselli, M; Keller, P J

    1996-11-01

    Implementation of intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) in human in-vitro fertilization (IVF) has highlighted the need for information about the risk of nuclear spindle damage caused by this procedure. For this purpose we studied the final products of oocyte meiosis at the first cleavage division of multipronuclear zygotes arising after ICSI, and compared the results with abnormally fertilized oocytes after conventional in-vitro insemination. Of 37 successfully analysed tripronuclear zygotes, 18 had three individual metaphases. Abnormal complements of 11 zygotes in this group indicated that non-disjunction occurred predominantly at the second meiotic division of the oocytes. Nine of the 37 tripronuclear zygotes exhibited two individual metaphases. Seven were abnormal and there were some indications that non-disjunction took place during oocyte meiosis. Of the 37 tripronuclear zygotes, 10 had a single metaphase and three showed an aneuploid number of chromosomes. The overall rate of aneuploidy among tripronuclear microinjected zygotes was 56.7%. In addition, seven zygotes with more than three pronuclei arising after ICSI displayed severely depleted chromosome complements. The incidence of non-disjunction in oocytes fertilized by conventional in-vitro insemination was significantly lower (20.0%, P < 0.01), since only four zygotes had an aneuploid number of chromosomes. Our findings suggest that ICSI might interfere with regular chromosome segregation at the second meiotic division of the oocytes.

  18. Chromosome interaction over a distance in meiosis.

    PubMed

    Brady, Mary; Paliulis, Leocadia V

    2015-02-01

    The challenge of cell division is to distribute partner chromosomes (pairs of homologues, pairs of sex chromosomes or pairs of sister chromatids) correctly, one into each daughter cell. In the 'standard' meiosis, this problem is solved by linking partners together via a chiasma and/or sister chromatid cohesion, and then separating the linked partners from one another in anaphase; thus, the partners are kept track of, and correctly distributed. Many organisms, however, properly separate chromosomes in the absence of any obvious physical connection, and movements of unconnected partner chromosomes are coordinated at a distance. Meiotic distance interactions happen in many different ways and in different types of organisms. In this review, we discuss several different known types of distance segregation and propose possible explanations for non-random segregation of distance-segregating chromosomes. PMID:26064610

  19. Chromosome interaction over a distance in meiosis

    PubMed Central

    Brady, Mary; Paliulis, Leocadia V.

    2015-01-01

    The challenge of cell division is to distribute partner chromosomes (pairs of homologues, pairs of sex chromosomes or pairs of sister chromatids) correctly, one into each daughter cell. In the ‘standard’ meiosis, this problem is solved by linking partners together via a chiasma and/or sister chromatid cohesion, and then separating the linked partners from one another in anaphase; thus, the partners are kept track of, and correctly distributed. Many organisms, however, properly separate chromosomes in the absence of any obvious physical connection, and movements of unconnected partner chromosomes are coordinated at a distance. Meiotic distance interactions happen in many different ways and in different types of organisms. In this review, we discuss several different known types of distance segregation and propose possible explanations for non-random segregation of distance-segregating chromosomes. PMID:26064610

  20. DE FACTO SCHOOL SEGREGATION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ROSE, ARNOLD

    A WIDE RANGE OF ISSUES INVOLVED IN DE FACTO SCHOOL SEGREGATION ARE DISCUSSED IN THIS MONOGRAPH. A SECTION ON THE BACKGROUND AND NATURE OF THE PROBLEM DEALS WITH THE HISTORY OF SEGREGATION LAWS, RESTRICTIVE COVENANTS, RESIDENTIAL SEGREGATION, AND THE MANIPULATION OF PUPIL TRANSFERS AS AVOIDANCE MANEUVERS. ANOTHER SECTION DISCUSSES THE…

  1. Chromosomal breakpoints characterization of two supernumerary ring chromosomes 20.

    PubMed

    Guediche, N; Brisset, S; Benichou, J-J; Guérin, N; Mabboux, P; Maurin, M-L; Bas, C; Laroudie, M; Picone, O; Goldszmidt, D; Prévot, S; Labrune, P; Tachdjian, G

    2010-02-01

    The occurrence of an additional ring chromosome 20 is a rare chromosome abnormality, and no common phenotype has been yet described. We report on two new patients presenting with a supernumerary ring chromosome 20 both prenatally diagnosed. The first presented with intrauterine growth retardation and some craniofacial dysmorphism, and the second case had a normal phenotype except for obesity. Conventional cytogenetic studies showed for each patient a small supernumerary marker chromosome (SMC). Using fluorescence in situ hybridization, these SMCs corresponded to ring chromosomes 20 including a part of short and long arms of chromosome 20. Detailed molecular cytogenetic characterization showed different breakpoints (20p11.23 and 20q11.23 for Patient 1 and 20p11.21 and 20q11.21 for Patient 2) and sizes of the two ring chromosomes 20 (13.6 Mb for case 1 and 4.8 Mb for case 2). Review of the 13 case reports of an extra r(20) ascertained postnatally (8 cases) and prenatally (5 cases) showed varying degrees of phenotypic abnormalities. We document a detailed molecular cytogenetic chromosomal breakpoints characterization of two cases of supernumerary ring chromosomes 20. These results emphasize the need to characterize precisely chromosomal breakpoints of supernumerary ring chromosomes 20 in order to establish genotype-phenotype correlation. This report may be helpful for prediction of natural history and outcome, particularly in prenatal diagnosis.

  2. Genetic dosage and position effect of small supernumerary marker chromosome (sSMC) in human sperm nuclei in infertile male patient

    PubMed Central

    Olszewska, Marta; Wanowska, Elzbieta; Kishore, Archana; Huleyuk, Nataliya; Georgiadis, Andrew P.; Yatsenko, Alexander N.; Mikula, Mariya; Zastavna, Danuta; Wiland, Ewa; Kurpisz, Maciej

    2015-01-01

    Chromosomes occupy specific distinct areas in the nucleus of the sperm cell that may be altered in males with disrupted spermatogenesis. Here, we present alterations in the positioning of the human chromosomes 15, 18, X and Y between spermatozoa with the small supernumerary marker chromosome (sSMC; sSMC+) and spermatozoa with normal chromosome complement (sSMC−), for the first time described in the same ejaculate of an infertile, phenotypically normal male patient. Using classical and confocal fluorescent microscopy, the nuclear colocalization of chromosomes 15 and sSMC was analyzed. The molecular cytogenetic characteristics of sSMC delineated the karyotype as 47,XY,+der(15)(pter->p11.2::q11.1->q11.2::p11.2->pter)mat. Analysis of meiotic segregation showed a 1:1 ratio of sSMC+ to sSMC− spermatozoa, while evaluation of sperm aneuploidy status indicated an increased level of chromosome 13, 18, 21 and 22 disomy, up to 7 × (2.7 − 15.1). Sperm chromatin integrity assessment did not reveal any increase in deprotamination in the patient’s sperm chromatin. Importantly, we found significant repositioning of chromosomes X and Y towards the nuclear periphery, where both chromosomes were localized in close proximity to the sSMC. This suggests the possible influence of sSMC/XY colocalization on meiotic chromosome division, resulting in abnormal chromosome segregation, and leading to male infertility in the patient. PMID:26616419

  3. Behavior of Aberrant Chromosome Configurations in Drosophila melanogaster Female Meiosis I

    PubMed Central

    Gilliland, William D.; Colwell, Eileen M.; Lane, Fiona M.; Snouffer, Ashley A.

    2014-01-01

    One essential role of the first meiotic division is to reduce chromosome number by half. Although this is normally accomplished by segregating homologous chromosomes from each other, it is possible for a genome to have one or more chromosomes that lack a homolog (such as compound chromosomes), or have chromosomes with multiple potential homologs (such as in XXY females). These configurations complete meiosis but engage in unusual segregation patterns. In Drosophila melanogaster females carrying two compound chromosomes, the compounds can accurately segregate from each other, a process known as heterologous segregation. Similarly, in XXY females, when the X chromosomes fail to cross over, they often undergo secondary nondisjunction, where both Xs segregate away from the Y. Although both of these processes have been known for decades, the orientation mechanisms involved are poorly understood. Taking advantage of the recent discovery of chromosome congression in female meiosis I, we have examined a number of different aberrant chromosome configurations. We show that these genotypes complete congression normally, with their chromosomes bioriented at metaphase I arrest at the same rates that they segregate, indicating that orientation must be established during prometaphase I before congression. We also show that monovalent chromosomes can move out on the prometaphase I spindle, but the dot 4 chromosomes appear required for this movement. Finally, we show that, similar to achiasmate chromosomes, heterologous chromosomes can be connected by chromatin threads, suggesting a mechanism for how heterochromatic homology establishes these unusual biorientation patterns. PMID:25491942

  4. Behavior of aberrant chromosome configurations in Drosophila melanogaster female meiosis I.

    PubMed

    Gilliland, William D; Colwell, Eileen M; Lane, Fiona M; Snouffer, Ashley A

    2014-12-09

    One essential role of the first meiotic division is to reduce chromosome number by half. Although this is normally accomplished by segregating homologous chromosomes from each other, it is possible for a genome to have one or more chromosomes that lack a homolog (such as compound chromosomes), or have chromosomes with multiple potential homologs (such as in XXY females). These configurations complete meiosis but engage in unusual segregation patterns. In Drosophila melanogaster females carrying two compound chromosomes, the compounds can accurately segregate from each other, a process known as heterologous segregation. Similarly, in XXY females, when the X chromosomes fail to cross over, they often undergo secondary nondisjunction, where both Xs segregate away from the Y. Although both of these processes have been known for decades, the orientation mechanisms involved are poorly understood. Taking advantage of the recent discovery of chromosome congression in female meiosis I, we have examined a number of different aberrant chromosome configurations. We show that these genotypes complete congression normally, with their chromosomes bioriented at metaphase I arrest at the same rates that they segregate, indicating that orientation must be established during prometaphase I before congression. We also show that monovalent chromosomes can move out on the prometaphase I spindle, but the dot 4 chromosomes appear required for this movement. Finally, we show that, similar to achiasmate chromosomes, heterologous chromosomes can be connected by chromatin threads, suggesting a mechanism for how heterochromatic homology establishes these unusual biorientation patterns.

  5. Behavior of aberrant chromosome configurations in Drosophila melanogaster female meiosis I.

    PubMed

    Gilliland, William D; Colwell, Eileen M; Lane, Fiona M; Snouffer, Ashley A

    2015-02-01

    One essential role of the first meiotic division is to reduce chromosome number by half. Although this is normally accomplished by segregating homologous chromosomes from each other, it is possible for a genome to have one or more chromosomes that lack a homolog (such as compound chromosomes), or have chromosomes with multiple potential homologs (such as in XXY females). These configurations complete meiosis but engage in unusual segregation patterns. In Drosophila melanogaster females carrying two compound chromosomes, the compounds can accurately segregate from each other, a process known as heterologous segregation. Similarly, in XXY females, when the X chromosomes fail to cross over, they often undergo secondary nondisjunction, where both Xs segregate away from the Y. Although both of these processes have been known for decades, the orientation mechanisms involved are poorly understood. Taking advantage of the recent discovery of chromosome congression in female meiosis I, we have examined a number of different aberrant chromosome configurations. We show that these genotypes complete congression normally, with their chromosomes bioriented at metaphase I arrest at the same rates that they segregate, indicating that orientation must be established during prometaphase I before congression. We also show that monovalent chromosomes can move out on the prometaphase I spindle, but the dot 4 chromosomes appear required for this movement. Finally, we show that, similar to achiasmate chromosomes, heterologous chromosomes can be connected by chromatin threads, suggesting a mechanism for how heterochromatic homology establishes these unusual biorientation patterns. PMID:25491942

  6. Secondary Tetrasomic Segregation of Mdh-B and Preferential Pairing of Homeologues in Rainbow Trout

    PubMed Central

    Allendorf, F. W.; Danzmann, R. G.

    1997-01-01

    We examined the inheritance of allelic variation at an isozyme locus, MDH-B, duplicated by ancestral polyploidy in salmonid fishes. We detected only disomic segregation in females. Segregation ratios in males were best explained by a mixture of disomic and tetrasomic inheritance. We propose a two-stage model of pairing in male meiosis in which, first, homologous chromosomes pair and recombine in the proximal region of the chromosome. Next, homeologous chromosomes pair and recombine distally. We suggest that this type of tetrasomic inheritance in which centromeres segregate disomically should be referred to as ``secondary tetrasomy'' to distinguish it from tetrasomy involving entire chromosomes (i.e., ``primary tetrasomy''). Differences in segregation ratios between males indicate differences between individuals in the amount of recombination between homeologous chromosomes. We also consider the implication of these results for estimation of allele frequencies at duplicated loci in salmonid populations. PMID:9093860

  7. Condensin-Based Chromosome Organization from Bacteria to Vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Tatsuya

    2016-02-25

    Condensins are large protein complexes that play a central role in chromosome organization and segregation in the three domains of life. They display highly characteristic, rod-shaped structures with SMC (structural maintenance of chromosomes) ATPases as their core subunits and organize large-scale chromosome structure through active mechanisms. Most eukaryotic species have two distinct condensin complexes whose balanced usage is adapted flexibly to different organisms and cell types. Studies of bacterial condensins provide deep insights into the fundamental mechanisms of chromosome segregation. This Review surveys both conserved features and rich variations of condensin-based chromosome organization and discusses their evolutionary implications.

  8. Polymer segregation under confinement: Influences of macromolecular crowding and the interaction between the polymer and crowders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yuhao; Yu, Wancheng; Wang, Jiajun; Luo, Kaifu

    2015-10-01

    Entropy driven polymer segregation in confinements as a model for chromosome separation in bacteria has attracted wide attention; however, the effects of macromolecular crowding and the interaction between the binding protein and the newly replicated DNA on the segregation dynamics are not clear. Using Langevin dynamics simulations, we investigate the influences of crowders and the attractive interaction between the polymer and a small number of crowders on segregation of two overlapping polymers under a cylindrical confinement. We find that the segregation time increases with increasing the volume fraction of crowders due to the slower chain diffusion in crowded environments. For a fixed volume fraction of crowders, the segregation time decreases with increasing the size of crowders. Moreover, the attractive interaction between the polymer and a small number of crowders can significantly facilitate the chain segregation. These results are important for understanding the chromosome segregation in living cells.

  9. Chromosomal Conditions

    MedlinePlus

    ... 150 babies is born with a chromosomal condition. Down syndrome is an example of a chromosomal condition. Because ... all pregnant women be offered prenatal tests for Down syndrome and other chromosomal conditions. A screening test is ...

  10. Autism Spectrum Disorders Associated with Chromosomal Abnormalities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lo-Castro, Adriana; Benvenuto, Arianna; Galasso, Cinzia; Porfirio, Cristina; Curatolo, Paolo

    2010-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) constitute a class of severe neurodevelopmental conditions with complex multifactorial and heterogeneous etiology. Despite high estimates of heritability, genetic causes of ASDs remain elusive, due to a high degree of genetic and phenotypic heterogeneity. So far, several "monogenic" forms of autism have been…

  11. Income inequality and income segregation.

    PubMed

    Reardon, Sean F; Bischoff, Kendra

    2011-01-01

    This article investigates how the growth in income inequality from 1970 to 2000 affected patterns of income segregation along three dimensions: the spatial segregation of poverty and affluence, race-specific patterns of income segregation, and the geographic scale of income segregation. The evidence reveals a robust relationship between income inequality and income segregation, an effect that is larger for black families than for white families. In addition, income inequality affects income segregation primarily through its effect on the large-scale spatial segregation of affluence rather than by affecting the spatial segregation of poverty or by altering small-scale patterns of income segregation.

  12. Down syndrome consequent to a cryptic maternal 12p;21q chromosome translocation

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, J.A.; Wenger, S.L.; Chakravarti, A.

    1995-03-13

    A 9-year-old, mildly mentally retarded girl presented with phenotypic manifestations of Down syndrome. G-banded chromosomal analyses of peripheral blood lymphocytes from the patient and her parents, and skin fibroblasts from the patient, did not detect any abnormality. Molecular analysis of 15 highly polymorphic chromosome 21 dinucleotide repeat markers demonstrated a partial duplication of the Down syndrome critical region (D21S55, subband 21q22.2) of maternal origin in the patient. The segmental trisomy was confirmed by FISH analysis using the cosmid probe D21S55. Further analysis demonstrated that the trisomy was due to segregation of an apparently balanced cryptic translocation from the mother. The patient`s karyotype is 46,XX,-12,tder(12)t(12;21)(p13.1;q22.2)mat. 21 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Wolfram syndrome maps to distal human chromosome 4p

    SciTech Connect

    Polymeropoulos, M.H.; Swift, R.; Swift, M.

    1994-09-01

    Wolfram syndrome (MIM 222300) is an autosomal recessive disorder defined by the occurrence of diabetes mellitus and progressive bilateral optic atrophy. Wolfram syndrome homozygotes develop widespread nervous system abnormalities; in particular, they exhibit severe behavioral difficulties that often lead to suicide attempts or psychiatric hospitalizations. The Wolfram syndrome gene also predisposes heterozygous carriers to psychiatric disorders. Since these heterozygotes are common in the general population, the Wolfram syndrome gene may contribute significantly to the overall burden of psychiatric illness. Based on a linkage analysis of 11 families segregating for this syndrome, using microsatellite repeat polymorphisms throughout the human genome, we found the Wolfram syndrome gene to be linked to markers on the short arm of human chromosome 4, with Zmax=6.46 at {theta}=0.02 for marker D4S431.

  14. Age Segregation in Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pratt, David

    Evidence from ethnology, anthropology, and educational history and research indicates that age segregation is neither necessary nor natural. An examination of primate and simple human societies suggests that rigid assumptions about age segregation of the young is a recent departure from social patterns existing for millions of years. The…

  15. Segregation and Civic Virtue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merry, Michael S.

    2012-01-01

    In this essay Michael Merry defends the following prima facie argument: that civic virtue is not dependent on integration and in fact may be best fostered under conditions of segregation. He demonstrates that civic virtue can and does take place under conditions of involuntary segregation, but that voluntary separation--as a response to…

  16. Craniofacial Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the skull and face. Craniofacial abnormalities are birth defects of the face or head. Some, like cleft ... palate, are among the most common of all birth defects. Others are very rare. Most of them affect ...

  17. Walking abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... include: Arthritis of the leg or foot joints Conversion disorder (a psychological disorder) Foot problems (such as a ... injuries. For an abnormal gait that occurs with conversion disorder, counseling and support from family members are strongly ...

  18. Nail abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    Beau's lines; Fingernail abnormalities; Spoon nails; Onycholysis; Leukonychia; Koilonychia; Brittle nails ... Just like the skin, the fingernails tell a lot about your health: ... the fingernail. These lines can occur after illness, injury to ...

  19. Characterization of the breakpoint regions of a pericentric inversion on chromosome 6

    SciTech Connect

    Gastier, J.M.; Brody, T.; Charfat, O.

    1994-09-01

    We are attempting to clone the breakpoints of a pericentric inversion [inv(6)(p23q23.1)] which segregates in a three generation family. Phenotypic abnormalities associated with this chromosome anomaly include senori-neural hearing loss, eye (anterior segment) abnormalities, dental anomalies, and mild mental retardation. The breakpoints have been microdissected and a small insert library was created. More than 100 sequence tagged sites (STSs) have been developed from these clones for screening of the CEPH mega-YAC library. This work will yield a high density physical map of the breakpoint regions for further characterization of the loci. YACs from the region are being screened by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to obtain a YAC which crosses the breakpoint as an initial step in defining the molecular basis of the disease phenotype. Progress towards cloning of the breakpoints will be described.

  20. Novel homozygous mutations in the EVC and EVC2 genes in two consanguineous families segregating autosomal recessive Ellis-van Creveld syndrome.

    PubMed

    Aziz, Abdul; Raza, Syed I; Ali, Salman; Ahmad, Wasim

    2016-01-01

    Ellis-van Creveld syndrome (EVC) is a rare developmental disorder characterized by short limbs, short ribs, postaxial polydactyly, dysplastic nails, teeth, oral and cardiac abnormalities. It is caused by biallelic mutations in the EVC or EVC2 gene, separated by 2.6 kb of genomic sequence on chromosome 4p16. In the present study, we have investigated two consanguineous families of Pakistani origin, segregating EVC in autosomal recessive manner. Linkage in the families was established to chromosome 4p16. Subsequently, sequence analysis identified a novel nonsense mutation (p.Trp234*) in exon 8 of the EVC2 gene and 15 bp duplication in exon 14 of the EVC gene in the two families. This further expands the mutations in the EVC or EVC2 genes resulting in the EVC syndrome.

  1. Molecular structure of the number 21 chromosome and Down syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, G.F.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 19 papers. Some of the titles are: The Biology of Down Syndrome, Human Chromosome Analysis, Expression of Genes on Human Chromosome 21, Comparative Gene Mapping of Human Chromosome 21 and Mouse Chromosome 16, and Relating Molecular Specificity to Normal and Abnormal Brain Development.

  2. Asplenia syndrome in a child with a reciprocal translocation of chromosomes 11 and 20 [46,XX,t(11;20)(q13.1;q13.13)

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, S.B.; Muraldharan, K.; Pettay, D.

    1994-09-01

    Failure to establish the left-right embryonic axis results in abnormalities of laterality; situs solitus is replaced by situs inversus totalis or various degrees of heterotaxy involving the heart, great vessels, lungs, liver, spleen, and/or bowel. Laterality syndromes are likely to be genetically heterogeneous although specific human genes have not been identified. Families with dominant, recessive, and X-linked laterality syndromes have been reported as well as individuals with situs abnormalities and chromosome rearrangements. The latter offer the possibility of narrowing the gene search to specific chromosome regions. A recent report described an infant with polysplenia syndrome and a paracentric inversion of chromosome 11 [46,XX,inv(11)(q13q25)pat]. We report the second case of a child with laterality abnormalities and a chromosome rearrangement involving a similar breakpoint on chromosome 11. The proband is a 6 y/o female with mental retardation, dysmorphic features, pulmonic stenosis, asplenia, Hirschsprung disease, and a balanced, reciprocal translocation involving chromosomes 11 and 20 [46,XX,t(11;20)(q13,1;q13.13)pat]. Using DNA probes we have excluded uniparental disomy for chromosomes 11 and 20. If a gene for determination of laterality lies in the 11q13 region, the proband`s abnormalities could be the result of her receiving an allele disrupted by the paternal translocation as well as a mutant allele from her mother. To investigate this possibility, we are studying the segregation of maternal chromosome 11 markers in the proband and her balanced carrier and non-carrier siblings.

  3. Learning Disabilities in Children with Sex Chromosome Anomalies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennington, Bruce F.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Results obtained from 44 children (ages 7 through 16) with sex chromosome abnormalities and from 17 chromosomally normal siblings demonstrated that children in the former group have an increased risk of encountering learning problems. (MP)

  4. Mechanisms of chromosome behaviour during mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Walczak, Claire E.; Cai, Shang; Khodjakov, Alexey

    2010-01-01

    For over a century, scientists have strived to understand the mechanisms that govern the accurate segregation of chromosomes during mitosis. The most intriguing feature of this process, which is particularly prominent in higher eukaryotes, is the complex behaviour exhibited by the chromosomes. This behaviour is based on specific and highly regulated interactions between the chromosomes and spindle microtubules. Recent discoveries, enabled by high-resolution imaging combined with the various genetic, molecular, cell biological and chemical tools, support the idea that establishing and controlling the dynamic interaction between chromosomes and microtubules is a major factor in genomic fidelity. PMID:20068571

  5. Mitosis. Microtubule detyrosination guides chromosomes during mitosis.

    PubMed

    Barisic, Marin; Silva e Sousa, Ricardo; Tripathy, Suvranta K; Magiera, Maria M; Zaytsev, Anatoly V; Pereira, Ana L; Janke, Carsten; Grishchuk, Ekaterina L; Maiato, Helder

    2015-05-15

    Before chromosomes segregate into daughter cells, they align at the mitotic spindle equator, a process known as chromosome congression. Centromere-associated protein E (CENP-E)/Kinesin-7 is a microtubule plus-end-directed kinetochore motor required for congression of pole-proximal chromosomes. Because the plus-ends of many astral microtubules in the spindle point to the cell cortex, it remains unknown how CENP-E guides pole-proximal chromosomes specifically toward the equator. We found that congression of pole-proximal chromosomes depended on specific posttranslational detyrosination of spindle microtubules that point to the equator. In vitro reconstitution experiments demonstrated that CENP-E-dependent transport was strongly enhanced on detyrosinated microtubules. Blocking tubulin tyrosination in cells caused ubiquitous detyrosination of spindle microtubules, and CENP-E transported chromosomes away from spindle poles in random directions. Thus, CENP-E-driven chromosome congression is guided by microtubule detyrosination.

  6. Microtubule detyrosination guides chromosomes during mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Barisic, Marin; Silva e Sousa, Ricardo; Tripathy, Suvranta K.; Magiera, Maria M.; Zaytsev, Anatoly V.; Pereira, Ana L.; Janke, Carsten; Grishchuk, Ekaterina L.; Maiato, Helder

    2015-01-01

    Before chromosomes segregate into daughter cells they align at the mitotic spindle equator, a process known as chromosome congression. CENP-E/Kinesin-7 is a microtubule plus-end-directed kinetochore motor required for congression of pole-proximal chromosomes. Because the plus-ends of many astral microtubules in the spindle point to the cell cortex, it remains unknown how CENP-E guides pole-proximal chromosomes specifically towards the equator. Here we found that congression of pole-proximal chromosomes depended on specific post-translational detyrosination of spindle microtubules that point to the equator. In vitro reconstitution experiments demonstrated that CENP-E-dependent transport was strongly enhanced on detyrosinated microtubules. Blocking tubulin tyrosination in cells caused ubiquitous detyrosination of spindle microtubules and CENP-E transported chromosomes away from spindle poles in random directions. Thus, CENP-E-driven chromosome congression is guided by microtubule detyrosination. PMID:25908662

  7. Mitosis. Microtubule detyrosination guides chromosomes during mitosis.

    PubMed

    Barisic, Marin; Silva e Sousa, Ricardo; Tripathy, Suvranta K; Magiera, Maria M; Zaytsev, Anatoly V; Pereira, Ana L; Janke, Carsten; Grishchuk, Ekaterina L; Maiato, Helder

    2015-05-15

    Before chromosomes segregate into daughter cells, they align at the mitotic spindle equator, a process known as chromosome congression. Centromere-associated protein E (CENP-E)/Kinesin-7 is a microtubule plus-end-directed kinetochore motor required for congression of pole-proximal chromosomes. Because the plus-ends of many astral microtubules in the spindle point to the cell cortex, it remains unknown how CENP-E guides pole-proximal chromosomes specifically toward the equator. We found that congression of pole-proximal chromosomes depended on specific posttranslational detyrosination of spindle microtubules that point to the equator. In vitro reconstitution experiments demonstrated that CENP-E-dependent transport was strongly enhanced on detyrosinated microtubules. Blocking tubulin tyrosination in cells caused ubiquitous detyrosination of spindle microtubules, and CENP-E transported chromosomes away from spindle poles in random directions. Thus, CENP-E-driven chromosome congression is guided by microtubule detyrosination. PMID:25908662

  8. Comparative Analysis of Regions with Distorted Segregation in Three Diploid Populations of Potato

    PubMed Central

    Manrique-Carpintero, Norma C.; Coombs, Joseph J.; Veilleux, Richard E.; Buell, C. Robin; Douches, David S.

    2016-01-01

    Genes associated with gametic and zygotic selection could underlie segregation distortion, observed as alterations of expected Mendelian genotypic frequencies in mapping populations. We studied highly dense genetic maps based on single nucleotide polymorphisms to elucidate the genetic nature of distorted segregation in potato. Three intra- and interspecific diploid segregating populations were used. DRH and D84 are crosses between the sequenced doubled monoploid DM 1-3 516 R44 Solanum tuberosum Group Phureja and either RH89-039-16 S. tuberosum or 84SD22, a S. tuberosum × S. chacoense hybrid. MSX902 is an interspecific cross between 84SD22 and Ber83 S. berthaultii × 2 × species mosaic. At the 0.05 significance level, 21%, 57%, and 51% of the total markers mapped in DRH, D84, and MSX902 exhibited distorted segregation, respectively. Segregation distortion regions for DRH were located on chromosomes 9 and 12; for D84 on chromosomes 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, and 8; and on chromosomes 1, 2, 7, 9, and 12 for MSX902. In general, each population had unique segregation distortion regions and directions of distortion. Interspecific crosses showed greater levels of distorted segregation and lower recombination rates as determined from the male parents. The different genomic regions where the segregation distortion regions occurred in the three populations likely reflect unique genetic combinations producing distorted segregation. PMID:27342736

  9. Evolutionary dynamics of adult stem cells: Comparison of random and immortal-strand segregation mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tannenbaum, Emmanuel; Sherley, James L.; Shakhnovich, Eugene I.

    2005-04-01

    This paper develops a point-mutation model describing the evolutionary dynamics of a population of adult stem cells. Such a model may prove useful for quantitative studies of tissue aging and the emergence of cancer. We consider two modes of chromosome segregation: (1) random segregation, where the daughter chromosomes of a given parent chromosome segregate randomly into the stem cell and its differentiating sister cell and (2) “immortal DNA strand” co-segregation, for which the stem cell retains the daughter chromosomes with the oldest parent strands. Immortal strand co-segregation is a mechanism, originally proposed by [Cairns Nature (London) 255, 197 (1975)], by which stem cells preserve the integrity of their genomes. For random segregation, we develop an ordered strand pair formulation of the dynamics, analogous to the ordered strand pair formalism developed for quasispecies dynamics involving semiconservative replication with imperfect lesion repair (in this context, lesion repair is taken to mean repair of postreplication base-pair mismatches). Interestingly, a similar formulation is possible with immortal strand co-segregation, despite the fact that this segregation mechanism is age dependent. From our model we are able to mathematically show that, when lesion repair is imperfect, then immortal strand co-segregation leads to better preservation of the stem cell lineage than random chromosome segregation. Furthermore, our model allows us to estimate the optimal lesion repair efficiency for preserving an adult stem cell population for a given period of time. For human stem cells, we obtain that mispaired bases still present after replication and cell division should be left untouched, to avoid potentially fixing a mutation in both DNA strands.

  10. International evaluation of unrecognizably uglifying human faces in late and severe secondary hyperparathyroidism in chronic kidney disease. Sagliker syndrome. A unique catastrophic entity, cytogenetic studies for chromosomal abnormalities, calcium-sensing receptor gene and GNAS1 mutations. Striking and promising missense mutations on the GNAS1 gene exons 1, 4, 10, 4.

    PubMed

    Yildiz, Ismail; Sagliker, Yahya; Demirhan, Osman; Tunc, Erdal; Inandiklioglu, Nihal; Tasdemir, Deniz; Acharya, Vidya; Zhang, Ling; Golea, Ovidia; Sabry, Alaa; Ookalkar, Dhananjay S; Capusa, Cristina; Radulescu, Dana; Garneata, Liliana; Mircescu, Gabriel; Ben Maiz, Hedi; Chen, Cheng Hsu; Prado Rome, Jorge; Benzegoutta, Mansour; Paylar, Nuray; Eyuboglu, Kamil; Karatepe, Ersin; Esenturk, Mustafa; Yavascan, Onder; Grzegorzevska, Alicza; Shilo, Valery; Mazdeh, Mitra Mahdavi; Francesco, Ramos Carillo; Gouda, Zaghloul; Adam, Siddik Momin; Emir, Idris; Ocal, Faith; Usta, Erol; Kiralp, Necati; Sagliker, Cemal; Ozkaynak, Piril Sagliker; Sagliker, Hasan Sabit; Bassuoni, Mahmoud; Sekin, Oktay

    2012-01-01

    Hypotheses explaining pathogenesis of secondary hyperparathyroidism (SH) in late and severe CKD as a unique entity called Sagliker syndrome (SS) are still unclear. This international study contains 60 patients from Turkey, India, Malaysia, China, Romania, Egypt, Tunisia, Taiwan, Mexico, Algeria, Poland, Russia, and Iran. We examined patients and first degree relatives for cytogenetic chromosomal abnormalities, calcium sensing receptor (Ca SR) genes in exons 2 and 3 abnormalities and GNAS1 genes mutations in exons 1, 4, 5, 7, 10, 13. Our syndrome could be a new syndrome in between SH, CKD, and hereditary bone dystrophies. We could not find chromosomal abnormalities in cytogenetics and on Ca SR gene exons 2 and 3. Interestingly, we did find promising missense mutations on the GNAS1 gene exons 1, 4, 10, 4. We finally thought that those catastrophic bone diseases were severe SH and its late treatments due to monetary deficiencies and iatrogenic mistreatments not started as early as possible. This was a sine qua non humanity task. Those brand new striking GNAS1 genes missense mutations have to be considered from now on for the genesis of SS. PMID:22200434

  11. A 1.6-Mb microdeletion in chromosome 17q22 leads to NOG-related symphalangism spectrum disorder without intellectual disability.

    PubMed

    Pang, Xiuhong; Luo, Huajie; Chai, Yongchuan; Wang, Xiaowen; Sun, Lianhua; He, Longxia; Chen, Penghui; Wu, Hao; Yang, Tao

    2015-01-01

    Microdeletions in chromosome 17q22, where the NOG gene resides, have been reported leading to the NOG-related symphalangism spectrum disorder (NOG-SSD), intellectual disability and other developmental abnormalities. In this study we reported a dominant Chinese Han family segregating with typical NOG-SSD symptoms including proximal symphalangism, conductive hearing loss, amblyopia and strabismus, but not intellectual disability. Sanger sequencing identified no pathogenic mutation in the coding regions of candidate genes NOG, GDF5 and FGF9. SNP genotyping in the genomic region surrounding NOG identified loss of heterozygosity in the affected family members. By array comparative genomic hybridization and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, we identified and mapped the breakpoints of a novel 1.6-Mb microdeletion in chromosome 17q22 that included NOG and twelve other genes. It is the first microdeletion reported in chromosome 17q22 that is associated with NOG-SSD only but not with intellectual disability. Our results may help identifying the dosage sensitive genes for intellectual disability and other developmental abnormalities in chromosome 17q22. Our study also suggested that genomic deletions in chromosome 17q22 should be screened in the NOG-SSD patients in which no pathogenic mutation is identified by conventional sequencing methods.

  12. Geminin overexpression prevents the completion of topoisomerase IIα chromosome decatenation, leading to aneuploidy in human mammary epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    localization and function. CKIε kinase overexpression or Cdc7 kinase silencing, which we show phosphorylates TopoIIα in vitro, restored DNA decatenation and chromosome segregation in geminin-silenced cells before triggering cell death. In vivo, at normal concentration, geminin recruits the deSUMOylating sentrin-specific proteases SENP1 and SENP2 enzymes to deSUMOylate chromosome-bound TopoIIα and promote its release from chromosomes following completion of DNA decatenation. In cells overexpressing geminin, premature departure of TopoIIα from chromosomes is thought to be due to the fact that geminin recruits more of these deSUMOylating enzymes, or recruits them earlier, to bound TopoIIα. This triggers premature release of TopoIIα from chromosomes, which we propose induces aneuploidy in HME cells, since chromosome breakage generated through this mechanism were not sensed and/or repaired and the cell cycle was not arrested. Expression of mitosis-inducing proteins such as cyclin A and cell division kinase 1 was also increased in these cells because of the overexpression of geminin. Conclusions TopoIIα recruitment and its chromosome decatenation function require a normal level of geminin. Geminin silencing induces a cytokinetic checkpoint in which Cdc7 phosphorylates TopoIIα and inhibits its chromosomal recruitment and decatenation and/or segregation function. Geminin overexpression prematurely deSUMOylates TopoIIα, triggering its premature departure from chromosomes and leading to chromosomal abnormalities and the formation of aneuploid, drug-resistant cancer cells. On the basis of our findings, we propose that therapeutic targeting of geminin is essential for improving the therapeutic potential of TopoIIα agents. PMID:21595939

  13. Chromosomal Aneuploidies and Early Embryonic Developmental Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Maurer, Maria; Ebner, Thomas; Puchner, Manuela; Mayer, Richard Bernhard; Shebl, Omar; Oppelt, Peter; Duba, Hans-Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Background Selecting the best embryo for transfer, with the highest chance of achieving a vital pregnancy, is a major goal in current in vitro fertilization (IVF) technology. The high rate of embryonic developmental arrest during IVF treatment is one of the limitations in achieving this goal. Chromosomal abnormalities are possibly linked with chromosomal arrest and selection against abnormal fertilization products. The objective of this study was to evaluate the frequency and type of chromosomal abnormalities in preimplantation embryos with developmental arrest. Materials and Methods This cohort study included blastomeres of embryos with early developmental arrest that were biopsied and analyzed by fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) with probes for chromosomes 13, 16, 18, 21 and 22. Forty-five couples undergoing IVF treatment were included, and 119 arrested embryos were biopsied. All probes were obtained from the Kinderwunsch Zentrum, Linz, Austria, between August 2009 and August 2011. Results Of these embryos, 31.6% were normal for all chromosomes tested, and 68.4% were abnormal. Eleven embryos were uniformly aneuploid, 20 were polyploid, 3 were haploid, 11 displayed mosaicism and 22 embryos exhibited chaotic chromosomal complement. Conclusion Nearly 70% of arrested embryos exhibit chromosomal errors, making chromosomal abnormalities a major cause of embryonic arrest and may be a further explanation for the high developmental failure rates during culture of the embryos in the IVF setting. PMID:26644858

  14. Homologue pairing, recombination and segregation in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Zetka, M

    2009-01-01

    Meiosis in the free-living, hermaphroditic nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is marked by the same highly conserved features observed in other sexually reproducing systems. Accurate chromosome segregation at the meiotic divisions depends on earlier landmark events of meiotic prophase, including the pairing of homologous chromosomes, synapsis between them, and the formation of crossovers. Dissection of these processes has revealed a unique simplification of meiotic mechanisms that impact the interpretation of meiotic chromosome behaviour in more complex systems. Chromosome sites required for chromosome pairing are consolidated to one end of each chromosome, the many sites of recombination initiation are resolved into a single crossover for each chromosome pair, and the diffuse (holocentric) kinetic activity that extends along the length of the mitotic chromosomes is reduced to a single end of each meiotic chromosome. Consequently, studies from the nematode have illuminated and challenged long-standing concepts of homologue pairing mechanisms, crossover interference, and kinetochore structure. Because chromosome pairing, synapsis, and recombination can proceed independently of one another, C. elegans has provided a simplified system for studying these processes and the mechanisms mediating their coordination during meiosis. This review covers the major features of C. elegans meiosis with emphasis on its contributions to understanding essential meiotic processes. PMID:18948706

  15. Aneuploidy in spermatids of Robertsonian (Rb) chromosome heterozygous mice.

    PubMed

    Manieu, Catalina; González, Marisel; López-Fenner, Julio; Page, Jesús; Ayarza, Eliana; Fernández-Donoso, Raúl; Berríos, Soledad

    2014-12-01

    Rb translocations are chromosomal rearrangements frequently found in natural populations of the house mouse Mus musculus domesticus. The standard diploid karyotype of the house mouse consisting of 40 telocentric chromosomes may be reduced by the emergence of metacentric Rb chromosomes. Multiple simple Rb heterozygotes form trivalents exhibiting higher anaphase nondisjunction frequency and consequently higher number of unbalanced gametes than in normal males. This work will attempt to establish whether frequencies of aneuploidy observed in heterozygote spermatids of the house mouse M. musculus domesticus show differences in chromosomes derived from different trivalents. Towards this goal, the number and distribution frequency of aneuploidy was assessed via FISH staining of specific chromosomes of spermatids derived from 2n = 32 individuals. Our results showed that for a given set of target chromosomes, 90% of the gametes were balanced, resulting from alternate segregation, and that there were no differences (approx. 10%) in aneuploidy frequencies in chromosomes derived from different trivalents. These observations suggest that segregation effectiveness does not depend on the type of chromosomes involved in trivalents. As a consequence of the trivalent's configuration, joint segregation of the telocentric chromosomes occurs thus favoring their appearance together in early spermatids. Our data suggest that Rb chromosomes and their telocentric homologs are subject to architectural constraints placing them close to each other. This proximity may ultimately facilitate fusion between them, hence contributing to a prevalence of Rb metacentric chromosomes. PMID:25385393

  16. Nondisjunctional segregations in Drosophila female meiosis I are preceded by homolog malorientation at metaphase arrest.

    PubMed

    Gillies, Shane C; Lane, Fiona M; Paik, Wonbeom; Pyrtel, Khateriaa; Wallace, Nneka T; Gilliland, William D

    2013-02-01

    The model of Drosophila female meiosis I was recently revised by the discovery that chromosome congression precedes metaphase I arrest. Use of the prior framework to interpret data from meiotic mutants led to the conclusion that chromosome segregation errors (nondisjunction, NDJ) occurred when nonexchange chromosomes moved out on the spindle in a maloriented configuration and became trapped there at metaphase arrest. The discovery that congression returns nonexchange chromosomes to the metaphase plate invalidates this interpretation and raises the question of what events actually do lead to NDJ. To address this, we have assayed an allelic series of ald (mps1) meiotic mutants that complete congression at wild-type rates, but have widely varying NDJ rates in an otherwise isogenic background, as well as a nod mutant background that primarily undergoes loss of chromosome 4. Using genetic assays to measure NDJ rates, and FISH assays to measure chromosome malorientation rates in metaphase-arrested oocytes, shows that these two rates are highly correlated across ald mutants, suggesting that malorientation during congression commits these chromosomes to eventually nondisjoin. Likewise, the rate of chromosome loss observed in nod is similar to the rate at which these chromosomes fail to associate with the main chromosome mass. Together these results provide a proximal mechanism for how these meiotic mutants cause NDJ and chromosome loss and improve our understanding of how prometaphase chromosome congression relates to anaphase chromosome segregation. PMID:23222652

  17. Nondisjunctional Segregations in Drosophila Female Meiosis I Are Preceded by Homolog Malorientation at Metaphase Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Gillies, Shane C.; Lane, Fiona M.; Paik, Wonbeom; Pyrtel, Khateriaa; Wallace, Nneka T.; Gilliland, William D.

    2013-01-01

    The model of Drosophila female meiosis I was recently revised by the discovery that chromosome congression precedes metaphase I arrest. Use of the prior framework to interpret data from meiotic mutants led to the conclusion that chromosome segregation errors (nondisjunction, NDJ) occurred when nonexchange chromosomes moved out on the spindle in a maloriented configuration and became trapped there at metaphase arrest. The discovery that congression returns nonexchange chromosomes to the metaphase plate invalidates this interpretation and raises the question of what events actually do lead to NDJ. To address this, we have assayed an allelic series of ald (mps1) meiotic mutants that complete congression at wild-type rates, but have widely varying NDJ rates in an otherwise isogenic background, as well as a nod mutant background that primarily undergoes loss of chromosome 4. Using genetic assays to measure NDJ rates, and FISH assays to measure chromosome malorientation rates in metaphase-arrested oocytes, shows that these two rates are highly correlated across ald mutants, suggesting that malorientation during congression commits these chromosomes to eventually nondisjoin. Likewise, the rate of chromosome loss observed in nod is similar to the rate at which these chromosomes fail to associate with the main chromosome mass. Together these results provide a proximal mechanism for how these meiotic mutants cause NDJ and chromosome loss and improve our understanding of how prometaphase chromosome congression relates to anaphase chromosome segregation. PMID:23222652

  18. Estimating tempo and mode of Y chromosome turnover: explaining Y chromosome loss with the fragile Y hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Blackmon, Heath; Demuth, Jeffery P

    2014-06-01

    Chromosomal sex determination is phylogenetically widespread, having arisen independently in many lineages. Decades of theoretical work provide predictions about sex chromosome differentiation that are well supported by observations in both XY and ZW systems. However, the phylogenetic scope of previous work gives us a limited understanding of the pace of sex chromosome gain and loss and why Y or W chromosomes are more often lost in some lineages than others, creating XO or ZO systems. To gain phylogenetic breadth we therefore assembled a database of 4724 beetle species' karyotypes and found substantial variation in sex chromosome systems. We used the data to estimate rates of Y chromosome gain and loss across a phylogeny of 1126 taxa estimated from seven genes. Contrary to our initial expectations, we find that highly degenerated Y chromosomes of many members of the suborder Polyphaga are rarely lost, and that cases of Y chromosome loss are strongly associated with chiasmatic segregation during male meiosis. We propose the "fragile Y" hypothesis, that recurrent selection to reduce recombination between the X and Y chromosome leads to the evolution of a small pseudoautosomal region (PAR), which, in taxa that require XY chiasmata for proper segregation during meiosis, increases the probability of aneuploid gamete production, with Y chromosome loss. This hypothesis predicts that taxa that evolve achiasmatic segregation during male meiosis will rarely lose the Y chromosome. We discuss data from mammals, which are consistent with our prediction.

  19. Estimating Tempo and Mode of Y Chromosome Turnover: Explaining Y Chromosome Loss With the Fragile Y Hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Blackmon, Heath; Demuth, Jeffery P.

    2014-01-01

    Chromosomal sex determination is phylogenetically widespread, having arisen independently in many lineages. Decades of theoretical work provide predictions about sex chromosome differentiation that are well supported by observations in both XY and ZW systems. However, the phylogenetic scope of previous work gives us a limited understanding of the pace of sex chromosome gain and loss and why Y or W chromosomes are more often lost in some lineages than others, creating XO or ZO systems. To gain phylogenetic breadth we therefore assembled a database of 4724 beetle species’ karyotypes and found substantial variation in sex chromosome systems. We used the data to estimate rates of Y chromosome gain and loss across a phylogeny of 1126 taxa estimated from seven genes. Contrary to our initial expectations, we find that highly degenerated Y chromosomes of many members of the suborder Polyphaga are rarely lost, and that cases of Y chromosome loss are strongly associated with chiasmatic segregation during male meiosis. We propose the “fragile Y” hypothesis, that recurrent selection to reduce recombination between the X and Y chromosome leads to the evolution of a small pseudoautosomal region (PAR), which, in taxa that require XY chiasmata for proper segregation during meiosis, increases the probability of aneuploid gamete production, with Y chromosome loss. This hypothesis predicts that taxa that evolve achiasmatic segregation during male meiosis will rarely lose the Y chromosome. We discuss data from mammals, which are consistent with our prediction. PMID:24939995

  20. Multiscale image enhancement of chromosome banding patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qiang; Castleman, Kenneth R.

    1996-10-01

    Visual examination of chromosome banding patterns is an important means of chromosome analysis. Cytogeneticists compare their patient's chromosome image against the prototype normal/abnormal human chromosome banding patterns. Automated chromosome analysis instruments facilitate this by digitally enhancing the chromosome images. Currently available systems employing traditional highpass/bandpass filtering and/or histogram equalization are approximately equivalent to photomicroscopy in their ability to support the detection of band pattern alterations. Improvements in chromosome image display quality, particularly in the detail of the banding pattern, would significantly increase the cost-effectiveness of these systems. In this paper we present our work on the use of multiscale transform and derivative filtering for image enhancement of chromosome banding patterns. A steerable pyramid representation of the chromosome image is generated by a multiscale transform. The derivative filters are designed to detect the bands of a chromosome, and the steerable pyramid transform is chosen based on its desirable properties of shift and rotation invariance. By processing the transform coefficients that correspond to the bands of the chromosome in the pyramid representation, contrast enhancement of the chromosome bands can be achieved with designed flexibility in scale, orientation and location. Compared with existing chromosome image enhancement techniques, this new approach offers the advantage of selective chromosome banding pattern enhancement that allows designated detail analysis. Experimental results indicate improved enhancement capabilities and promise more effective visual aid to comparison of chromosomes to the prototypes and to each other. This will increase the ability of automated chromosome analysis instruments to assist the evaluation of chromosome abnormalities in clinical samples.

  1. Understanding Segregation Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruch, Elizabeth

    There is growing consensus that living in neighborhoods of concentrated poverty increases the likelihood of social problems such as teenage parenthood, drug and alcohol use, crime victimization, and chronic unemployment. Neighborhood inequality is also implicated in studies of enduring race/ethnic health disparities, and there are recent moves to broaden the definition of health care policy to policies targeting social inequality (Mechanic 2007). Residential segregation affects health outcomes in several different ways. First, income, education, and occupation are all strongly related to health (Adler and Newman 2002). Segregation is a key mechanism through which socioeconomic inequality is perpetuated and reinforced, as it hinders the upward mobility of disadvantaged groups by limiting their educational and employment opportunities. Second, segregation increases minority exposure to unhealthy neighborhood environments. Residential segregation creates areas with concentrated poverty and unemployment, both of which are key factors that predict violence and create racial differences in homicide (Samson and Wilson 1995). Neighborhood characteristics, such as exposure to environmental hazards, fear of violence, and access to grocery stores, affect health risks and health behaviors (Cheadle et al. 1991). Tobacco and alcohol industries also advertise their products disproportionately in poor, minority areas (Moore, Williams, and Qualls 1996). Finally, residential segregation leads to inequalitie in health care resources, which contributes to disparities in quality of treatment (Smedley, Stith, and Nelson 2002).

  2. Automated clinical system for chromosome analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castleman, K. R.; Friedan, H. J.; Johnson, E. T.; Rennie, P. A.; Wall, R. J. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    An automatic chromosome analysis system is provided wherein a suitably prepared slide with chromosome spreads thereon is placed on the stage of an automated microscope. The automated microscope stage is computer operated to move the slide to enable detection of chromosome spreads on the slide. The X and Y location of each chromosome spread that is detected is stored. The computer measures the chromosomes in a spread, classifies them by group or by type and also prepares a digital karyotype image. The computer system can also prepare a patient report summarizing the result of the analysis and listing suspected abnormalities.

  3. Quantitative assessment of chromosome instability induced through chemical disruption of mitotic progression

    PubMed Central

    Markossian, Sarine; Arnaoutov, Alexei; Saba, Nakhle S.; Larionov, Vladimir; Dasso, Mary

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Most solid tumors are aneuploid, carrying an abnormal number of chromosomes, and they frequently missegregate whole chromosomes in a phenomenon termed chromosome instability (CIN). While CIN can be provoked through disruption of numerous mitotic pathways, it is not clear which of these mechanisms are most critical, or whether alternative mechanisms could also contribute significantly in vivo. One difficulty in determining the relative importance of candidate CIN regulators has been the lack of a straightforward, quantitative assay for CIN in live human cells: While gross mitotic abnormalities can be detected visually, moderate levels of CIN may not be obvious, and are thus problematic to measure. To address this issue, we have developed the first Human Artificial Chromosome (HAC)-based quantitative live-cell assay for mitotic chromosome segregation in human cells. We have produced U2OS-Phoenix cells carrying the alphoidtetO-HAC encoding copies of eGFP fused to the destruction box (DB) of anaphase promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) substrate hSecurin and sequences encoding the tetracycline repressor fused to mCherry (TetR-mCherry). Upon HAC missegregation, daughter cells that do not obtain a copy of the HAC are GFP negative in the subsequent interphase. The HAC can also be monitored live following the TetR-mCherry signal. U2OS-Phoenix cells show low inherent levels of CIN, which can be enhanced by agents that target mitotic progression through distinct mechanisms. This assay allows direct detection of CIN induced by clinically important agents without conspicuous mitotic defects, allowing us to score increased levels of CIN that fall below the threshold required for discernable morphological disruption. PMID:27104376

  4. Centromeric Heterochromatin: The Primordial Segregation Machine

    PubMed Central

    Bloom, Kerry S.

    2014-01-01

    Centromeres are specialized domains of heterochromatin that provide the foundation for the kinetochore. Centromeric heterochromatin is characterized by specific histone modifications, a centromere-specific histone H3 variant (CENP-A), and the enrichment of cohesin, condensin, and topo-isomerase II. Centromere DNA varies orders of magnitude in size from 125 bp (budding yeast) to several megabases (human). In metaphase, sister kinetochores on the surface of replicated chromosomes face away from each other, where they establish microtubule attachment and bi-orientation. Despite the disparity in centromere size, the distance between separated sister kinetochores is remarkably conserved (approximately 1 μm) throughout phylogeny. The centromere functions as a molecular spring that resists microtubule-based extensional forces in mitosis. This review explores the physical properties of DNA in order to understand how the molecular spring is built and how it contributes to the fidelity of chromosome segregation. PMID:25251850

  5. Asplenia syndrome in a child with a balanced reciprocal translocation of chromosomes 11 and 20 [46,XX,t(11;20)(q13.1;q13.13)

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, S.B.; May, K.M.; Blackston, R.D.; Muralidharan, K.

    1996-02-02

    We present a 6-year-old girl with a balanced 11;20 translocation [46,XX,t(11;20)(q13.1;q13.13)pat], asplenia, pulmonic stenosis, Hirschsprung disease, minor anomalies, and mental retardation. This case represents the second report of an individual with situs abnormalities and a balanced chromosome rearrangement involving a breakpoint at 11q13. Segregation analysis of markers in the 11q13 region in the proposita and her phenotypically normal carrier sibs did not show a unique combination of maternal and paternal alleles in the patient. We discuss several possible explanations for the simultaneous occurrence of situs abnormalities and a balanced 11;20 translocation. These include (1) chance, (2) a further chromosome rearrangement in the patient, (3) gene disruption and random situs determination, and (4) gene disruption plus transmission of a recessive or imprinted allele from the mother. 30 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  6. Cytogenetic abnormalities in Tunisian women with premature ovarian failure.

    PubMed

    Ayed, Wiem; Amouri, Ahlem; Hammami, Wajih; Kilani, Olfa; Turki, Zinet; Harzallah, Fatma; Bouayed-Abdelmoula, Nouha; Chemkhi, Imen; Zhioua, Fethi; Slama, Claude Ben

    2014-12-01

    To identify the distribution of chromosome abnormalities among Tunisian women with premature ovarian failure (POF) referred to the department of Cytogenetic at the Pasteur Institute of Tunis (Tunisia), standard cytogenetic analysis was carried out in a total of 100 women younger than 40 affected with premature ovarian failure. We identified 18 chromosomal abnormalities, including seven X-numerical anomalies in mosaic and non-mosaic state (45,X; 47,XXX), four sex reversal, three X-structural abnormalities (terminal deletion and isochromosomes), one autosomal translocation and one supernumerary marker. The overall prevalence of chromosomal abnormalities was 18% in our cohort. X chromosome aneuploidy was the most frequent aberration. This finding confirms the essential role of X chromosome in ovarian function and underlies the importance of cytogenetic investigations in the routine management of POF. PMID:25433561

  7. Centromere pairing – tethering partner chromosomes in meiosis I

    PubMed Central

    Kurdzo, Emily L; Dawson, Dean S

    2015-01-01

    In meiosis, homologous chromosomes face the obstacle of finding, holding onto and segregating away from their partner chromosome. There is increasing evidence, in a diverse range of organisms, that centromere–centromere interactions that occur in late prophase are an important mechanism in ensuring segregation fidelity. Centromere pairing appears to initiate when homologous chromosomes synapse in meiotic prophase. Structural proteins of the synaptonemal complex have been shown to help mediate centromere pairing, but how the structure that maintains centromere pairing differs from the structure of the synaptonemal complex along the chromosomal arms remains unknown. When the synaptonemal complex proteins disassemble from the chromosome arms in late prophase, some of these synaptonemal complex components persist at the centromeres. In yeast and Drosophila these centromere-pairing behaviors promote the proper segregation of chromosome partners that have failed to become linked by chiasmata. Recent studies of mouse spermatocytes have described centromere pairing behaviors that are similar in several respects to what has been described in the fly and yeast systems. In humans, chromosomes that fail to experience crossovers in meiosis are error-prone and are a major source of aneuploidy. The finding that centromere pairing is a conserved phenomenon raises the possibility that it may play a role in promoting the segregation fidelity of non-exchange chromosome pairs in humans. PMID:25817724

  8. Centromere pairing--tethering partner chromosomes in meiosis I.

    PubMed

    Kurdzo, Emily L; Dawson, Dean S

    2015-07-01

    In meiosis, homologous chromosomes face the obstacle of finding, holding onto and segregating away from their partner chromosome. There is increasing evidence, in a diverse range of organisms, that centromere-centromere interactions that occur in late prophase are an important mechanism in ensuring segregation fidelity. Centromere pairing appears to initiate when homologous chromosomes synapse in meiotic prophase. Structural proteins of the synaptonemal complex have been shown to help mediate centromere pairing, but how the structure that maintains centromere pairing differs from the structure of the synaptonemal complex along the chromosomal arms remains unknown. When the synaptonemal complex proteins disassemble from the chromosome arms in late prophase, some of these synaptonemal complex components persist at the centromeres. In yeast and Drosophila these centromere-pairing behaviors promote the proper segregation of chromosome partners that have failed to become linked by chiasmata. Recent studies of mouse spermatocytes have described centromere pairing behaviors that are similar in several respects to what has been described in the fly and yeast systems. In humans, chromosomes that fail to experience crossovers in meiosis are error-prone and are a major source of aneuploidy. The finding that centromere pairing is a conserved phenomenon raises the possibility that it may play a role in promoting the segregation fidelity of non-exchange chromosome pairs in humans.

  9. Newborn with Supernumerary Marker Chromosome Derived from Chromosomes 11 And 22- A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    VAHIDI MEHRJARDI, Mohammad Yahya; DEHGHAN TEZERJANI, Masoud; NORI-SHADKAM, Mahmoud; KALANTAR, Seyed Mehdi; DEHGHANI, Mohammadreza

    2016-01-01

    The interpretation of supernumerary chromosome is important for genetic counseling and prognosis. Here, we used SNP array and conventional karyotyping method to identify a denovo marker chromosome originated from chromosome 22 and 11 in a newborn transferred to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit of Shahid Sadoughi Hospital in 2015. Clinical abnormalities identified in the newborn were dysmorphic face, intrauterine growth retardation, atrial septal defect (ASD), the hypoplasia of corpus callosum and septum pellucidum. These clinical abnormalities can be related to this marker, and it may help genetic counselor for predicting abnormality risk in susceptible individuals as well as prenatal diagnosis. PMID:27141501

  10. Newborn with Supernumerary Marker Chromosome Derived from Chromosomes 11 And 22- A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Vahidi Mehrjardi, Mohammad Yahya; Dehghan Tezerjani, Masoud; Nori-Shadkam, Mahmoud; Kalantar, Seyed Mehdi; Dehghani, Mohammadreza

    2016-03-01

    The interpretation of supernumerary chromosome is important for genetic counseling and prognosis. Here, we used SNP array and conventional karyotyping method to identify a denovo marker chromosome originated from chromosome 22 and 11 in a newborn transferred to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit of Shahid Sadoughi Hospital in 2015. Clinical abnormalities identified in the newborn were dysmorphic face, intrauterine growth retardation, atrial septal defect (ASD), the hypoplasia of corpus callosum and septum pellucidum. These clinical abnormalities can be related to this marker, and it may help genetic counselor for predicting abnormality risk in susceptible individuals as well as prenatal diagnosis. PMID:27141501

  11. Newborn with Supernumerary Marker Chromosome Derived from Chromosomes 11 And 22- A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Vahidi Mehrjardi, Mohammad Yahya; Dehghan Tezerjani, Masoud; Nori-Shadkam, Mahmoud; Kalantar, Seyed Mehdi; Dehghani, Mohammadreza

    2016-03-01

    The interpretation of supernumerary chromosome is important for genetic counseling and prognosis. Here, we used SNP array and conventional karyotyping method to identify a denovo marker chromosome originated from chromosome 22 and 11 in a newborn transferred to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit of Shahid Sadoughi Hospital in 2015. Clinical abnormalities identified in the newborn were dysmorphic face, intrauterine growth retardation, atrial septal defect (ASD), the hypoplasia of corpus callosum and septum pellucidum. These clinical abnormalities can be related to this marker, and it may help genetic counselor for predicting abnormality risk in susceptible individuals as well as prenatal diagnosis.

  12. Whole Chromosome Instability induces senescence and promotes SASP

    PubMed Central

    Andriani, Grasiella Angelina; Almeida, Vinnycius Pereira; Faggioli, Francesca; Mauro, Maurizio; Tsai, Wanxia Li; Santambrogio, Laura; Maslov, Alexander; Gadina, Massimo; Campisi, Judith; Vijg, Jan; Montagna, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Age-related accumulation of ploidy changes is associated with decreased expression of genes controlling chromosome segregation and cohesin functions. To determine the consequences of whole chromosome instability (W-CIN) we down-regulated the spindle assembly checkpoint component BUB1 and the mitotic cohesin SMC1A, and used four-color-interphase-FISH coupled with BrdU incorporation and analyses of senescence features to reveal the fate of W-CIN cells. We observed significant correlations between levels of not-diploid cells and senescence-associated features (SAFs). W-CIN induced DNA double strand breaks and elevated oxidative stress, but caused low apoptosis. SAFs of W-CIN cells were remarkably similar to those induced by replicative senescence but occurred in only 13 days versus 4 months. Cultures enriched with not-diploid cells acquired a senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP) characterized by IL1B, CXCL8, CCL2, TNF, CCL27 and other pro-inflammatory factors including a novel SASP component CLEC11A. These findings suggest that W-CIN triggers premature senescence, presumably to prevent the propagation of cells with an abnormal DNA content. Cells deviating from diploidy have the ability to communicate with their microenvironment by secretion of an array of signaling factors. Our results suggest that aneuploid cells that accumulate during aging in some mammalian tissues potentially contribute to age-related pathologies and inflammation through SASP secretion. PMID:27731420

  13. [Induced acute non-lymphoblastic leukemia and prognostic significance of cytogenetic abnormalities: trisomy in chromosome 8, inv(16)(p13q22), and t(8;21)(q22;q22)].

    PubMed

    Tretiak, N M; Vakul'chuk, O M; Kalinina, S Iu

    2008-01-01

    3 patients with secondary acute non-lymphoblastic leucosis have been observed. The cytogenetic analysis revealed pathologic karyotypes: 46, XY,+8, t(8;21), inv 16. Two patients have been found with typical markers of damaged chromosome of radiation origion. Insensibility of blastic cells to cytostatic therapy was typical for the patients. PMID:18822849

  14. Chromosomal Flexibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of College Science Teaching, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Scientists have shown that a genetic element on one chromosome may direct gene activity on another. Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) researchers report that a multitasking master-control region appears to over-see both a set of its own genes and a related gene on a nearby chromosome. The findings reinforce the growing importance of location…

  15. Computational model for chromosomal instabilty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zapperi, Stefano; Bertalan, Zsolt; Budrikis, Zoe; La Porta, Caterina

    2015-03-01

    Faithful segregation of genetic material during cell division requires alignment of the chromosomes between the spindle poles and attachment of their kinetochores to each of the poles. Failure of these complex dynamical processes leads to chromosomal instability (CIN), a characteristic feature of several diseases including cancer. While a multitude of biological factors regulating chromosome congression and bi-orientation have been identified, it is still unclear how they are integrated into a coherent picture. Here we address this issue by a three dimensional computational model of motor-driven chromosome congression and bi-orientation. Our model reveals that successful cell division requires control of the total number of microtubules: if this number is too small bi-orientation fails, while if it is too large not all the chromosomes are able to congress. The optimal number of microtubules predicted by our model compares well with early observations in mammalian cell spindles. Our results shed new light on the origin of several pathological conditions related to chromosomal instability.

  16. Bacterial scaffold directs pole-specific centromere segregation

    PubMed Central

    Ptacin, Jerod L.; Gahlmann, Andreas; Bowman, Grant R.; Perez, Adam M.; von Diezmann, Alexander R. S.; Eckart, Michael R.; Moerner, W. E.; Shapiro, Lucy

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria use partitioning systems based on the ParA ATPase to actively mobilize and spatially organize molecular cargoes throughout the cytoplasm. The bacterium Caulobacter crescentus uses a ParA-based partitioning system to segregate newly replicated chromosomal centromeres to opposite cell poles. Here we demonstrate that the Caulobacter PopZ scaffold creates an organizing center at the cell pole that actively regulates polar centromere transport by the ParA partition system. As segregation proceeds, the ParB-bound centromere complex is moved by progressively disassembling ParA from a nucleoid-bound structure. Using superresolution microscopy, we show that released ParA is recruited directly to binding sites within a 3D ultrastructure composed of PopZ at the cell pole, whereas the ParB-centromere complex remains at the periphery of the PopZ structure. PopZ recruitment of ParA stimulates ParA to assemble on the nucleoid near the PopZ-proximal cell pole. We identify mutations in PopZ that allow scaffold assembly but specifically abrogate interactions with ParA and demonstrate that PopZ/ParA interactions are required for proper chromosome segregation in vivo. We propose that during segregation PopZ sequesters free ParA and induces target-proximal regeneration of ParA DNA binding activity to enforce processive and pole-directed centromere segregation, preventing segregation reversals. PopZ therefore functions as a polar hub complex at the cell pole to directly regulate the directionality and destination of transfer of the mitotic segregation machine. PMID:24778223

  17. Massively Parallel Sequencing Reveals the Complex Structure of an Irradiated Human Chromosome on a Mouse Background in the Tc1 Model of Down Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Clayton, Stephen; Prigmore, Elena; Langley, Elizabeth; Yang, Fengtang; Maguire, Sean; Fu, Beiyuan; Rajan, Diana; Sheppard, Olivia; Scott, Carol; Hauser, Heidi; Stephens, Philip J.; Stebbings, Lucy A.; Ng, Bee Ling; Fitzgerald, Tomas; Quail, Michael A.; Banerjee, Ruby; Rothkamm, Kai; Tybulewicz, Victor L. J.; Fisher, Elizabeth M. C.; Carter, Nigel P.

    2013-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is caused by trisomy of chromosome 21 (Hsa21) and presents a complex phenotype that arises from abnormal dosage of genes on this chromosome. However, the individual dosage-sensitive genes underlying each phenotype remain largely unknown. To help dissect genotype – phenotype correlations in this complex syndrome, the first fully transchromosomic mouse model, the Tc1 mouse, which carries a copy of human chromosome 21 was produced in 2005. The Tc1 strain is trisomic for the majority of genes that cause phenotypes associated with DS, and this freely available mouse strain has become used widely to study DS, the effects of gene dosage abnormalities, and the effect on the basic biology of cells when a mouse carries a freely segregating human chromosome. Tc1 mice were created by a process that included irradiation microcell-mediated chromosome transfer of Hsa21 into recipient mouse embryonic stem cells. Here, the combination of next generation sequencing, array-CGH and fluorescence in situ hybridization technologies has enabled us to identify unsuspected rearrangements of Hsa21 in this mouse model; revealing one deletion, six duplications and more than 25 de novo structural rearrangements. Our study is not only essential for informing functional studies of the Tc1 mouse but also (1) presents for the first time a detailed sequence analysis of the effects of gamma radiation on an entire human chromosome, which gives some mechanistic insight into the effects of radiation damage on DNA, and (2) overcomes specific technical difficulties of assaying a human chromosome on a mouse background where highly conserved sequences may confound the analysis. Sequence data generated in this study is deposited in the ENA database, Study Accession number: ERP000439. PMID:23596509

  18. Chromosome analysis of human spermatozoa from an oligoasthenozoospermic carrier for a 13;14 Robertsonian translocation by their injection into mouse oocytes.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, S; Araki, S; Araki, Y; Ohno, M; Sato, I

    2000-05-01

    We present a case of a 46,XY der(13;14) Robertsonian translocation carrier whose spermatozoa were karyotyped after injection into mouse oocytes. Fresh semen samples as well as recovered samples were used. There was no significant difference in the survival rate of mouse oocytes (fresh: 78.1% versus frozen: 81.7%), activation rate (fresh: 84.0% versus frozen: 90.6%), fertilization rate (fresh: 72.0% versus thawing of frozen: 76.5%) between fresh or frozen spermatozoa. Metaphase chromosome spreads from 45 spermatozoa were analysed. The frequency of spermatozoa that were chromosomally unbalanced with respect to the translocation was 8.9%, and the frequency of abnormalities unrelated to translocation was 4.4%. An excess of spermatozoa with balanced chromosomes was observed: compared with normal, 23 (51.1%) versus 16 (35.6%) respectively; but this segregation difference was not statistically significant (chi(2) = 0.9, P > 0.3). After genetic counselling with the carrier and his partner, intracytoplasmic sperm injection treatment was performed. Healthy female and male infants were delivered at 36 weeks gestation via a Caesarean section. Both babies were carriers for the balanced Robertsonian translocations detected for prenatal diagnosis at 16 weeks gestation. The present study demonstrates that patients can be given further information about the proportion of the spermatozoa which carry a chromosomal abnormality.

  19. Maintenance of chromosome structure in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Rybenkov, Valentin V.

    2014-01-01

    Replication and segregation of genetic information is an activity central to the well-being of all living cells. Concerted mechanisms have evolved that ensure that each cellular chromosome is replicated once and only once per cell cycle and then faithfully segregated into daughter cells. Despite remarkable taxonomic diversity, these mechanisms are largely conserved across eubacteria, although species specific distinctions can often be noted. Here, we provide an overview of the current state of knowledge about maintenance of the chromosome structure in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We focus on global chromosome organization and its dynamics during DNA replication and cell division. Special emphasis is made on contrasting these activities in P. aeruginosa and other bacteria. Among unique P. aeruginosa features are the presence of two distinct autonomously replicating sequences and multiple condensins, which suggests existence of novel regulatory mechanisms. PMID:24863732

  20. HIM-8 Binds to the X Chromosome Pairing Center and Mediates Chromosome-Specific Meiotic Synapsis

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Carolyn M.; Wong, Chihunt; Bhalla, Needhi; Carlton, Peter M.; Weiser, Pinky; Meneely, Philip M.; Dernburg, Abby F.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY The him-8 gene is essential for proper meiotic segregation of the X chromosomes in C. elegans. Here we show that loss of him-8 function causes profound X chromosome-specific defects in homolog pairing and synapsis. him-8 encodes a C2H2 zinc-finger protein that is expressed during meiosis and concentrates at a site on the X chromosome known as the meiotic pairing center (PC). A role for HIM-8 in PC function is supported by genetic interactions between PC lesions and him-8 mutations. HIM-8 bound chromosome sites associate with the nuclear envelope (NE) throughout meiotic prophase. Surprisingly, a point mutation in him-8 that retains both chromosome binding and NE localization fails to stabilize pairing or promote synapsis. These observations indicate that stabilization of homolog pairing is an active process in which the tethering of chromosome sites to the NE may be necessary but is not sufficient. PMID:16360035

  1. On the Components of Segregation Distortion in DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER

    PubMed Central

    Ganetzky, Barry

    1977-01-01

    The segregation distorter (SD) complex is a naturally occurring meiotic drive system with the property that males heterozygous for an SD-bearing chromosome 2 and an SD+-bearing homolog transmit the SD-bearing chromosome almost exclusively. This distorted segregation is the consequence of an induced dysfunction of those sperm that receive the SD+ homolog. From previous studies, two loci have been implicated in this phenomenon: the Sd locus which is required to produce distortion, and the Responder (Rsp) locus that is the site at which Sd acts. There are two allelic alternatives of Rsp—sensitive (Rspsens) and insensitive (Rspins); a chromosome carrying Rspins is not distorted by SD. In the present study, the function and location of each of these elements was examined by a genetic and cytological characterization of X-ray-induced mutations at each locus. The results indicate the following: (1) the Rsp locus is located in the proximal heterochromatin of 2R; (2) a deletion for the Rsp locus renders a chromosome insensitive to distortion; (3) the Sd locus is located to the left of pr (2-54.5), in the region from 37D2-D7 to 38A6-B2 of the salivary chromosome map; (4) an SD chromosome deleted for Sd loses its ability to distort; (5) there is another important component of the SD system, E(SD), in or near the proximal heterochromatin of 2L, that behaves as a strong enhancer of distortion. The results of these studies allow a reinterpretation of results from earlier analyses of the SD system and serve to limit the possible mechanisms to account for segregation distortion. PMID:407128

  2. Patterns of Chromosomal Aberrations in Solid Tumors.

    PubMed

    Grade, Marian; Difilippantonio, Michael J; Camps, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    Chromosomal abnormalities are a defining feature of solid tumors. Such cytogenetic alterations are mainly classified into structural chromosomal aberrations and copy number alterations, giving rise to aneuploid karyotypes. The increasing detection of these genetic changes allowed the description of specific tumor entities and the associated patterns of gene expression. In fact, tumor-specific landscapes of gross genomic copy number changes, including aneuploidies of entire chromosome arms and chromosomes result in a global deregulation of the transcriptome of cancer cells. Furthermore, the molecular characterization of cytogenetic abnormalities has provided insights into the mechanisms of tumorigenesis and has, in a few instances, led to the clinical implementation of effective diagnostic and prognostic tools, as well as treatment strategies that target a specific genetic abnormality. PMID:26376875

  3. Patterns of Chromosomal Aberrations in Solid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Grade, Marian; Difilippantonio, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Chromosomal abnormalities are a defining feature of solid tumors. Such cytogenetic alterations are mainly classified into structural chromosomal aberrations and copy number alterations, giving rise to aneuploid karyotypes. The increasing detection of these genetic changes allowed the description of specific tumor entities and the associated patterns of gene expression. In fact, tumor-specific landscapes of gross genomic copy number changes, including aneuploidies of entire chromosome arms and chromosomes result in a global deregulation of the transcriptome of cancer cells. Furthermore, the molecular characterization of cytogenetic abnormalities has provided insights into the mechanisms of tumorigenesis and has, in a few instances, led to the clinical implementation of effective diagnostic and prognostic tools, as well as treatment strategies that target a specific genetic abnormality. PMID:26376875

  4. Shaping mitotic chromosomes: From classical concepts to molecular mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Kschonsak, Marc; Haering, Christian H

    2015-01-01

    How eukaryotic genomes are packaged into compact cylindrical chromosomes in preparation for cell divisions has remained one of the major unsolved questions of cell biology. Novel approaches to study the topology of DNA helices inside the nuclei of intact cells, paired with computational modeling and precise biomechanical measurements of isolated chromosomes, have advanced our understanding of mitotic chromosome architecture. In this Review Essay, we discuss – in light of these recent insights – the role of chromatin architecture and the functions and possible mechanisms of SMC protein complexes and other molecular machines in the formation of mitotic chromosomes. Based on the information available, we propose a stepwise model of mitotic chromosome condensation that envisions the sequential generation of intra-chromosomal linkages by condensin complexes in the context of cohesin-mediated inter-chromosomal linkages, assisted by topoisomerase II. The described scenario results in rod-shaped metaphase chromosomes ready for their segregation to the cell poles. PMID:25988527

  5. Shaping mitotic chromosomes: From classical concepts to molecular mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Kschonsak, Marc; Haering, Christian H

    2015-07-01

    How eukaryotic genomes are packaged into compact cylindrical chromosomes in preparation for cell divisions has remained one of the major unsolved questions of cell biology. Novel approaches to study the topology of DNA helices inside the nuclei of intact cells, paired with computational modeling and precise biomechanical measurements of isolated chromosomes, have advanced our understanding of mitotic chromosome architecture. In this Review Essay, we discuss - in light of these recent insights - the role of chromatin architecture and the functions and possible mechanisms of SMC protein complexes and other molecular machines in the formation of mitotic chromosomes. Based on the information available, we propose a stepwise model of mitotic chromosome condensation that envisions the sequential generation of intra-chromosomal linkages by condensin complexes in the context of cohesin-mediated inter-chromosomal linkages, assisted by topoisomerase II. The described scenario results in rod-shaped metaphase chromosomes ready for their segregation to the cell poles.

  6. Chromosome Bridges Maintain Kinetochore-Microtubule Attachment throughout Mitosis and Rarely Break during Anaphase.

    PubMed

    Pampalona, Judit; Roscioli, Emanuele; Silkworth, William T; Bowden, Brent; Genescà, Anna; Tusell, Laura; Cimini, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Accurate chromosome segregation during cell division is essential to maintain genome stability, and chromosome segregation errors are causally linked to genetic disorders and cancer. An anaphase chromosome bridge is a particular chromosome segregation error observed in cells that enter mitosis with fused chromosomes/sister chromatids. The widely accepted Breakage/Fusion/Bridge cycle model proposes that anaphase chromosome bridges break during mitosis to generate chromosome ends that will fuse during the following cell cycle, thus forming new bridges that will break, and so on. However, various studies have also shown a link between chromosome bridges and aneuploidy and/or polyploidy. In this stu