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Sample records for abnormal circadian blood

  1. Prediabetes is associated with abnormal circadian blood pressure variability.

    PubMed

    Gupta, A K; Greenway, F L; Cornelissen, G; Pan, W; Halberg, F

    2008-09-01

    Blood pressure (BP) exhibits a circadian variation characterized by a morning increase, followed by a small postprandial valley and a deeper descent during nocturnal rest. Although abnormal 24-h variability (abnormal circadian variability (ACV)) predicts adverse cardiovascular disease (CVD) outcomes, a 7-day automatic ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM) and subsequent chronobiologic analysis of the gathered data, permits identification of consistency of any abnormal circadian variation. To test whether normal overweight healthy men and women with prediabetes differed from subjects with normoglycemia in having ACV with a 7-day ABPM. Consent for a 7-day ABPM was obtained from subjects with family history of diabetes mellitus, who were participating in the screening phase for a randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled weight loss trial in prediabetics to prevent progression to diabetes mellitus. The automatic 7-day ABPM device recorded BP and heart rate every 30 min during the day and every 60 min during the night. Normoglycemic and prediabetic subjects matched for age, sex, race, BP, BMI, waist circumference and glycemic control, differed statistically significantly only in their fasting and/or 2-h postprandial serum glucose concentrations. Chronobiologically-interpreted 7-day ABPM uncovered no abnormalities in normoglycemics, whereas prediabetics had a statistically significantly higher incidence of high mean BP (MESOR-hypertension), excessive pulse pressure and/or circadian hyper-amplitude-tension (CHAT) (P<0.001). ACV detected with 7-day ABPM may account for the enhanced CVD risk in prediabetes. These findings provide a basis for larger-scale studies to assess the predictive value of 7-day ABPM over the long term. PMID:18480832

  2. [Renin-angiotensin-aldosterone inhibitors for treatment of hypertension with abnormal circadian rhythm of blood pressure].

    PubMed

    Yagi, Shusuke; Sata, Masataka

    2014-08-01

    Circadian rhythm of blood pressure (BP) has recently been focused on because increase in nocturnal BP and morning BP surge have been shown to be risks for cardio-cerebrovascular diseases independent of 24-h BP level. The renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) is involved in BP circadian rhythm, and RAAS inhibitors therefore play an important role in the control of circadian rhythm of BP. Bedtime administration of RAAS inhibitors is more effective than morning administration for reducing nocturnal and morning BP levels in addition to converting the BP profile into a dipper pattern, which is known as chronotherapy. For reducing cardio-cerebro-vascular events, controlling abnormal circadian rhythm of BP in addition to 24-h BP using RAAS inhibitors with optimal time dosing should be considered.

  3. Melatonin secretion is impaired in women with preeclampsia and an abnormal circadian blood pressure rhythm.

    PubMed

    Bouchlariotou, Sofia; Liakopoulos, Vassilios; Giannopoulou, Myrto; Arampatzis, Spyridon; Eleftheriadis, Theodoros; Mertens, Peter R; Zintzaras, Elias; Messinis, Ioannis E; Stefanidis, Ioannis

    2014-08-01

    Non-dipping circadian blood pressure (BP) is a common finding in preeclampsia, accompanied by adverse outcomes. Melatonin plays pivotal role in biological circadian rhythms. This study investigated the relationship between melatonin secretion and circadian BP rhythm in preeclampsia. Cases were women with preeclampsia treated between January 2006 and June 2007 in the University Hospital of Larissa. Volunteers with normal pregnancy, matched for chronological and gestational age, served as controls. Twenty-four hour ambulatory BP monitoring was applied. Serum melatonin and urine 6-sulfatoxymelatonin levels were determined in day and night time samples by enzyme-linked immunoassays. Measurements were repeated 2 months after delivery. Thirty-one women with preeclampsia and 20 controls were included. Twenty-one of the 31 women with preeclampsia were non-dippers. Compared to normal pregnancy, in preeclampsia there were significantly lower night time melatonin (48.4 ± 24.7 vs. 85.4 ± 26.9 pg/mL, p<0.001) levels. Adjustment for circadian BP rhythm status ascribed this finding exclusively to non-dippers (p<0.01). Two months after delivery, in 11 of the 21 non-dippers both circadian BP and melatonin secretion rhythm reappeared. In contrast, in cases with retained non-dipping status (n=10) melatonin secretion rhythm remained impaired: daytime versus night time melatonin (33.5 ± 13.0 vs. 28.0 ± 13.8 pg/mL, p=0.386). Urinary 6-sulfatoxymelatonin levels were, overall, similar to serum melatonin. Circadian BP and melatonin secretion rhythm follow parallel course in preeclampsia, both during pregnancy and, at least 2 months after delivery. Our findings may be not sufficient to implicate a putative therapeutic effect of melatonin, however, they clearly emphasize that its involvement in the pathogenesis of a non-dipping BP in preeclampsia needs intensive further investigation.

  4. Circadian Rhythm Abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Zee, Phyllis C.; Attarian, Hrayr; Videnovic, Aleksandar

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This article reviews the recent advances in understanding of the fundamental properties of circadian rhythms and discusses the clinical features, diagnosis, and treatment of circadian rhythm sleep disorders (CRSDs). Recent Findings: Recent evidence strongly points to the ubiquitous influence of circadian timing in nearly all physiologic functions. Thus, in addition to the prominent sleep and wake disturbances, circadian rhythm disorders are associated with cognitive impairment, mood disturbances, and increased risk of cardiometabolic disorders. The recent availability of biomarkers of circadian timing in clinical practice has improved our ability to identify and treat these CRSDs. Summary: Circadian rhythms are endogenous rhythms with a periodicity of approximately 24 hours. These rhythms are synchronized to the physical environment by social and work schedules by various photic and nonphotic stimuli. CRSDs result from a misalignment between the timing of the circadian rhythm and the external environment (eg, jet lag and shift work) or a dysfunction of the circadian clock or its afferent and efferent pathways (eg, delayed sleep-phase, advanced sleep-phase, non–24-hour, and irregular sleep-wake rhythm disorders). The most common symptoms of these disorders are difficulties with sleep onset and/or sleep maintenance and excessive sleepiness that are associated with impaired social and occupational functioning. Effective treatment for most of the CRSDs requires a multimodal approach to accelerate circadian realignment with timed exposure to light, avoidance of bright light at inappropriate times, and adherence to scheduled sleep and wake times. In addition, pharmacologic agents are recommended for some of the CRSDs. For delayed sleep-phase, non–24-hour, and shift work disorders, timed low-dose melatonin can help advance or entrain circadian rhythms; and for shift work disorder, wake-enhancing agents such as caffeine, modafinil, and armodafinil are options

  5. Circadian rhythm abnormalities of melatonin in Smith-Magenis syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Potocki, L.; Glaze, D.; Tan, D.; Park, S.; Kashork, C.; Shaffer, L.; Reiter, R.; Lupski, J.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS) is a multiple congenital anomalies/mental retardation syndrome associated with a hemizygous deletion of chromosome 17, band p11.2. Characteristic features include neurobehavioural abnormalities such as aggressive and self-injurious behaviour and significant sleep disturbances. The majority of patients have a common deletion characterised at the molecular level. Physical mapping studies indicate that all patients with the common deletion are haploinsufficient for subunit 3 of the COP9 signalosome (COPS3), which is conserved from plants to humans, and in the plant Arabidopis thaliana regulates gene transcription in response to light. Haploinsufficiency of this gene is hypothesised to be potentially involved in the sleep disturbances seen in these patients. Melatonin is a hormone secreted by the pineal gland. SMS patients are reported to have fewer sleep disturbances when given a night time dose of this sleep inducing hormone.
METHODS—Urinary excretion of 6-sulphatoxymelatonin (aMT6s), the major hepatic metabolite of melatonin, in 19 SMS patients were measured in conjunction with 24 hour sleep studies in 28 SMS patients. Five of the 28 patients did not have the common SMS deletion. To investigate a potential correlation of COPS3 haploinsufficiency and disturbed melatonin excretion, we performed fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) using two BACs containing coding exons of COPS3.
RESULTS—All SMS patients show significant sleep disturbances when assessed by objective criteria. Abnormalities in the circadian rhythm of aMT6s were observed in all but one SMS patient. Interestingly this patient did not have the common deletion. All patients studied, including the one patient with a normal melatonin rhythm, were haploinsufficient for COPS3.
CONCLUSIONS—Our data indicate a disturbed circadian rhythm in melatonin and document the disturbed sleep pattern in Smith-Magenis syndrome. Our findings suggest that the

  6. Psychiatric features and disturbance of circadian rhythm of temperature, pulse, and blood pressure in Wilson's disease.

    PubMed

    Matarazzo, Eneida B

    2002-01-01

    Wilson's disease (hepatolenticular degeneration), a disease of genetic origin, is due to abnormal copper metabolism affecting many organs and systems, especially the liver and the nervous system. The initial symptoms can be exclusively or predominantly psychiatric, including psychotic features. Three cases are reported in which the clinical picture at the beginning was compatible with a psychiatric diagnosis. During hospitalization, before treatment, there were abnormal and spontaneous changes in the circadian rhythm of temperature, pulse, and blood pressure, recorded every 6 hours, with febrile peaks in the absence of infectious focus. Because the hypothalamus is important in the regulation of these autonomic functions, the hypothesis of a possible hypothalamic dysfunction was made, justifying a wide clinical and laboratory investigation that allowed the diagnosis of Wilson's disease. Alertness to circadian rhythm abnormalities in such cases may help the psychiatrist avoid an erroneous diagnosis.

  7. Relationship between circadian blood pressure variation and circadian protein excretion in CKD.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Rajiv

    2007-09-01

    Circadian blood pressure changes are blunted in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Proteinuria is the most important correlate of hypertension in CKD. However, little is known about the influence of circadian blood pressure changes and variation in protein excretion rate. Furthermore, the impact of blood pressure components, e.g., mean arterial pressure and pulse pressure, on proteinuria has not been evaluated. To analyze the relationship of circadian changes in blood pressure on urinary protein excretion patterns, glomerular filtration rate was measured with iothalamate clearance and 24-h ambulatory blood pressure with SpaceLabs 90207 monitor in 22 patients with CKD. It was found that hourly protein excretion rates were 31% higher during the night. Excretion results of sodium, potassium, chloride, urea, and creatinine were also between 30 and 40% higher at night. Systolic, mean arterial, and pulse pressures but not diastolic pressure were related to daytime protein excretion rate. At night, the relationship of systolic, diastolic, and mean arterial pressures was significantly lower and essentially flat with respect to protein excretion rate, but the relationship of pulse pressure and proteinuria was not different from that seen during the day. Circadian variation in blood pressure did not impact circadian sodium excretion rate. In conclusion, these data suggest that patients with CKD have patterns of proteinuria that share different relationships with blood pressure components depending on the awake-sleep state. Pulse pressure is related to proteinuria independent of the awake-sleep state. Reducing mean arterial pressure during the day and pulse pressure during the day or night may be effective antiproteinuric strategies. PMID:17581923

  8. Early and progressive circadian abnormalities in Huntington's disease sheep are unmasked by social environment.

    PubMed

    Morton, A Jennifer; Rudiger, Skye R; Wood, Nigel I; Sawiak, Stephen J; Brown, Gregory C; Mclaughlan, Clive J; Kuchel, Timothy R; Snell, Russell G; Faull, Richard L M; Bawden, C Simon

    2014-07-01

    Insidious changes in behaviour herald the onset of progressive neurodegenerative disorders such as Huntington's disease (HD), sometimes years before overt symptoms are seen. Sleep and circadian disturbances are particularly disruptive symptoms in patients with neurological disorders, but they are difficult to measure in humans. Here we studied circadian behaviour in transgenic HD sheep expressing the full-length human huntingtin protein with an expanded CAG repeat mutation in the juvenile range. Young HD sheep with no other symptoms exhibited circadian behavioural abnormalities that worsened with age. The most obvious change was a disturbed evening behaviour reminiscent of 'sundowning' that is seen in some patients with dementia. There were no structural abnormalities seen with magnetic resonance imaging, even in 5-year-old HD sheep. Interestingly, detection of the circadian abnormalities depended upon their social grouping. Abnormalities emerged in sheep kept in an 'HD-only' flock, whereas the behaviour of HD sheep kept mixed with normal sheep was relatively normal. Sleep-wake abnormalities in HD patients are also likely to be hidden, and may precede overt symptoms by many years. Sleep disruption has deleterious effects, even in normal people. The knock-on effects of sleep-wake disturbance may exacerbate, or even cause symptoms such as irritability and depression that are common in early stage HD patients. HD sheep will be useful models for probing the mechanisms underlying circadian behavioural disorder in HD. PMID:24488771

  9. [Effect of alcohol on circadian blood pressure].

    PubMed

    Stiffler, B; Suter, P M; Vetter, W

    1999-09-30

    The effects of alcohol on blood pressure have been studied extensively. Abstention is recommended in high blood pressure as basic non pharmacological treatment. On the other hand short term lowering of blood pressure by alcohol is known. Blood pressure effects of alcohol vary according to chronicity and amount of intake. It is not known how alcohol affects the 24 hour profile of blood pressure, in particular day- and night-time differences. This explorative study investigates the effects of a single dose of alcohol in the evening on the 24 hour blood pressure profile. Nine individuals with essential hypertension (mean age 65.4 +/- 8.7 years) were compared to 10 normotensives (29.6 +/- 3.0 years). Blood pressure was followed on 2 consecutive days by means of a 24 hour ABPM. On one evening the test persons consumed 0.6 g/kg ethanol before bed time. Apart from the direct comparison of the two groups, effects of body weight and daily alcohol consumption were also considered. For analysis of the 24 hour recording the mean 24 hour values, the mean difference between day and night and loads (fraction of blood pressure > 140/90 mm Hg) as well as heart rate were used. Ethanol led to nocturnal drops of blood pressure in normotensives and hypertensives alike and thus to an increased day/night difference. The latter increased by 2 +/- 4 mm Hg for the systolic and 2 +/- 1 mm Hg for the diastole values in normotensives and by 6 +/- 2 mm Hg and 3 +/- 1 mm Hg, respectively, in hypertensives on the day of alcohol intake. This trend was more marked in individuals with smaller daily alcohol consumption as well as in obese hypertensives. The blood pressure differences were not significant in our test sample because of a large variance in the response. Two normotensives were found to be borderline hypertensives. They exhibited a marked increase of nocturnal blood pressure values above 140/90 mm Hg when compared to the control night. Our study indicates that alcohol consumption should

  10. Circadian rhythm abnormalities - Association with the course of inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Sobolewska-Włodarczyk, Aleksandra; Włodarczyk, Marcin; Szemraj, Janusz; Stec-Michalska, Krystyna; Fichna, Jakub; Wiśniewska-Jarosińska, Maria

    2016-08-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) are the main representatives of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), a group of chronic, immune system-mediated inflammatory diseases of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. The pathogenesis of the intestinal lesions in IBD is not entirely identified and understood: excessive activation of the immune system may come as a result of the interaction of various environmental and infectious factors, genetic predisposition, and the mediation of abnormal intestinal flora. The main objective of the current study is to further identify the risk factors for the development of IBD. Currently, there is very little knowledge about circadian rhythm and IBD and there are only a few studies on the relationship between sleep disturbances and the course of the disease, as well as pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine profile and general immune system functioning. Furthermore, the relationship between the expression of circadian rhythm genes and severe course of IBD is still unknown. The aim of this review is to show the current state of knowledge about the relationship between circadian rhythm disorders, sleep disturbance and inflammation in the GI tract and to analyze the possibility of employing this knowledge in diagnosis and treatment of IBD.

  11. Dipper and non-dipper blood pressure 24-hour patterns: circadian rhythm-dependent physiologic and pathophysiologic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Fabbian, Fabio; Smolensky, Michael H; Tiseo, Ruana; Pala, Marco; Manfredini, Roberto; Portaluppi, Francesco

    2013-03-01

    Neuroendocrine mechanisms are major determinants of the normal 24-h blood pressure (BP) pattern. At the central level, integration of the major driving factors of this temporal variability is mediated by circadian rhythms of monoaminergic systems in conjunction with those of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal, hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid, opioid, renin-angiotensin-aldosterone, plus endothelial systems and specific vasoactive peptides. Humoral secretions are typically episodic, coupled either to sleep and/or the circadian endogenous (suprachiasmatic nucleus) central pacemaker clock, but exhibiting also weekly, monthly, seasonal, and annual periodicities. Sleep induction and arousal are influenced also by many hormones and chemical substances that exhibit 24-h variation, e.g., arginine vasopressin, vasoactive intestinal peptide, melatonin, somatotropin, insulin, steroids, serotonin, corticotropin-releasing factor, adrenocorticotropic hormone, thyrotropin-releasing hormone, endogenous opioids, and prostaglandin E2, all with established effects on the cardiovascular system. As a consequence, physical, mental, and pathologic stimuli that activate or inhibit neuroendocrine effectors of biological rhythmicity may also interfere with, or modify, the temporal BP structure. Moreover, immediate adjustment to exogenous components/environment demands by BP rhythms is modulated by the circadian-time-dependent responsiveness of biological oscillators and their neuroendocrine effectors. This knowledge contributes to a better understanding of the pathophysiology of abnormalities of the 24-h BP pattern and level and their correction through circadian rhythm-based chronotherapeutic strategies. PMID:23002916

  12. Effect of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibition on circadian blood pressure during the development of salt-dependent hypertension in rats

    PubMed Central

    Sufiun, Abu; Rafiq, Kazi; Fujisawa, Yoshihide; Rahman, Asadur; Mori, Hirohito; Nakano, Daisuke; Kobori, Hiroyuki; Ohmori, Koji; Masaki, Tsutomu; Kohno, Masakazu; Nishiyama, Akira

    2015-01-01

    A growing body of evidence has indicated that dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors have antihypertensive effects. Here, we aim to examine the effect of vildagliptin, a DPP-4-specific inhibitor, on blood pressure and its circadian-dipping pattern during the development of salt-dependent hypertension in Dahl salt-sensitive (DSS) rats. DSS rats were treated with a high-salt diet (8% NaCl) plus vehicle or vildagliptin (3 or 10 mg kg−1 twice daily by oral gavage) for 7 days. Blood pressure was measured by the telemetry system. High-salt diet for 7 days significantly increased the mean arterial pressure (MAP), systolic blood pressure (SBP) and were also associated with an extreme dipping pattern of blood pressure in DSS rats. Treatment with vildagliptin dose-dependently decreased plasma DPP-4 activity, increased plasma glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) levels and attenuated the development of salt-induced hypertension. Furthermore, vildagliptin significantly increased urine sodium excretion and normalized the dipping pattern of blood pressure. In contrast, intracerebroventricular infusion of vildagliptin (50, 500 or 2500 μg) did not alter MAP and heart rate in DSS rats. These data suggest that salt-dependent hypertension initially develops with an extreme blood pressure dipping pattern. The DPP-4 inhibitor, vildagliptin, may elicit beneficial antihypertensive effects, including the improvement of abnormal circadian blood pressure pattern, by enhancing urinary sodium excretion. PMID:25588850

  13. Effect of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibition on circadian blood pressure during the development of salt-dependent hypertension in rats.

    PubMed

    Sufiun, Abu; Rafiq, Kazi; Fujisawa, Yoshihide; Rahman, Asadur; Mori, Hirohito; Nakano, Daisuke; Kobori, Hiroyuki; Ohmori, Koji; Masaki, Tsutomu; Kohno, Masakazu; Nishiyama, Akira

    2015-04-01

    A growing body of evidence has indicated that dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors have antihypertensive effects. Here, we aim to examine the effect of vildagliptin, a DPP-4-specific inhibitor, on blood pressure and its circadian-dipping pattern during the development of salt-dependent hypertension in Dahl salt-sensitive (DSS) rats. DSS rats were treated with a high-salt diet (8% NaCl) plus vehicle or vildagliptin (3 or 10 mg kg(-1) twice daily by oral gavage) for 7 days. Blood pressure was measured by the telemetry system. High-salt diet for 7 days significantly increased the mean arterial pressure (MAP), systolic blood pressure (SBP) and were also associated with an extreme dipping pattern of blood pressure in DSS rats. Treatment with vildagliptin dose-dependently decreased plasma DPP-4 activity, increased plasma glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) levels and attenuated the development of salt-induced hypertension. Furthermore, vildagliptin significantly increased urine sodium excretion and normalized the dipping pattern of blood pressure. In contrast, intracerebroventricular infusion of vildagliptin (50, 500 or 2500 μg) did not alter MAP and heart rate in DSS rats. These data suggest that salt-dependent hypertension initially develops with an extreme blood pressure dipping pattern. The DPP-4 inhibitor, vildagliptin, may elicit beneficial antihypertensive effects, including the improvement of abnormal circadian blood pressure pattern, by enhancing urinary sodium excretion.

  14. Smooth-muscle BMAL1 participates in blood pressure circadian rhythm regulation

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Zhongwen; Su, Wen; Liu, Shu; Zhao, Guogang; Esser, Karyn; Schroder, Elizabeth A.; Lefta, Mellani; Stauss, Harald M.; Guo, Zhenheng; Gong, Ming Cui

    2014-01-01

    As the central pacemaker, the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) has long been considered the primary regulator of blood pressure circadian rhythm; however, this dogma has been challenged by the discovery that each of the clock genes present in the SCN is also expressed and functions in peripheral tissues. The involvement and contribution of these peripheral clock genes in the circadian rhythm of blood pressure remains uncertain. Here, we demonstrate that selective deletion of the circadian clock transcriptional activator aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator–like (Bmal1) from smooth muscle, but not from cardiomyocytes, compromised blood pressure circadian rhythm and decreased blood pressure without affecting SCN-controlled locomotor activity in murine models. In mesenteric arteries, BMAL1 bound to the promoter of and activated the transcription of Rho-kinase 2 (Rock2), and Bmal1 deletion abolished the time-of-day variations in response to agonist-induced vasoconstriction, myosin phosphorylation, and ROCK2 activation. Together, these data indicate that peripheral inputs contribute to the daily control of vasoconstriction and blood pressure and suggest that clock gene expression outside of the SCN should be further evaluated to elucidate pathogenic mechanisms of diseases involving blood pressure circadian rhythm disruption. PMID:25485682

  15. [Circadian rhythm of arterial blood pressure in women with threatened miscarriage].

    PubMed

    Baszak, E; Radomański, T; Sikorski, R

    1998-12-01

    In the study circadian arterial blood pressure were estimated in 21 women hospitalised due to threaten abortion. The average values of systolic, diastolic and mean arterial blood pressure did not differ between the groups of women with threaten abortion and women with normal course of pregnancy. PMID:10224813

  16. Etiology, pathogenesis, and treatment of seasonal and non-seasonal mood disorders: possible role of circadian rhythm abnormalities related to developmental alcohol exposure.

    PubMed

    Sher, Leo

    2004-01-01

    Developmental alcohol exposure adversely influences the developing brain. Alcohol exposure during rapid brain growth causes cell loss, alters connections between brain regions, and lowers the production of biological substances responsible for the communication among neurons. It is reasonable to suggest that alcohol may adversely affect the development of suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN), the master circadian pacemaker. Multiple research reports suggest that abnormalities in circadian rhythms are involved in the etiopathogenesis of seasonal affective disorder (SAD), a syndrome in which depression develops during autumn or winter and remits the following spring or summer. Several lines of evidence suggest that changes in the circadian system are also involved in the development of nonseasonal mood disorders, such as major depression and bipolar disorder. Thus, developmental alcohol exposure produces subtle abnormalities in circadian rhythms that may contribute to the development of seasonal and nonseasonal mood disorders. Pharmacological, psychological, and light treatments of mood disorders have multiple effects on circadian function. The state of the circadian system may affect a response to treatment. Circadian rhythms have been reported for neurotransmitters, receptors, enzymes, and the second messenger system in the brain that are involved in the effects of treatments. Some of these rhythms have amplitudes as large as several 100%. Effects of many psychotropic medications depend on the time of administration in relation to body rhythmicity. Therefore, subtle circadian rhythm abnormalities related to developmental alcohol exposure may affect treatment response in patients with mood disorders.

  17. Circadian blood pressure and heart rate rhythms in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, P; Sur, S H; Mistlberger, R E; Morris, M

    1999-02-01

    The circadian pattern of mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR) was measured in C57BL mice with carotid arterial catheters. Cardiovascular parameters were recorded continuously with a computerized monitoring system at a sampling rate of 100 Hz. The tethered animals were healthy, showing stabilized drinking and eating patterns within 2 days of surgery and little loss of body weight. Analysis of the 24-h pattern of MAP and HR was conducted using data from 3-6 consecutive days of recording. A daily rhythm of MAP was evident in all mice, with group mean dark and light values of 101.4 +/- 7.3 and 93.1 +/- 2.9 mmHg, respectively. The group mean waveform was bimodal, with peak values evident early and late in the dark period, and a trough during the middle of the light period. The phase of maximum and minimum values showed low within-group variance. Mean heart rate was greater at night than during the day (561.9 +/- 22.7 vs. 530.3 +/- 22.3 beats/min). Peak values generally occurred at dark onset, and minimum values during the middle of both the dark and the light periods. We conclude that it is possible to perform measurements of circadian cardiovascular parameters in the mouse, providing new avenues for the investigation of genetic models.

  18. Do sleep abnormalities and misaligned sleep/circadian rhythm patterns represent early clinical characteristics for developing psychosis in high risk populations?

    PubMed

    Zanini, Marcio; Castro, Juliana; Coelho, Fernando Morgadinho; Bittencourt, Lia; Bressan, Rodrigo A; Tufik, Sergio; Brietzke, Elisa

    2013-12-01

    Sleep architecture changes, such as slow-wave sleep (SWS) percentage variations and reductions in latency and density of rapid eye movement (REM), are found in most patients with schizophrenia and are considered to be an important part of the pathophysiology of the disorder. In addition to these sleep parameters changes, disruptions in sleep homeostasis and the sleep/circadian rhythm also occur in these patients. Sleep/circadian rhythm abnormalities negatively affect neocortical plasticity and cognition and often precede the diagnosis of the illness. Thus, it has been suggested that the sleep/circadian rhythm might be involved in the pathophysiology of psychosis. Recent advances in the identification of individuals at a high risk for developing schizophrenia allow us to investigate several neurobiological processes involved in the development of psychosis. In this article, we review the current evidence of the effects of sleep parameter abnormalities, disruptions in sleep homeostasis and misalignments of sleep circadian rhythm on the early stages of schizophrenia. In addition, we discuss the preliminary evidence of sleep and circadian rhythm abnormalities during the prodromal stages of psychosis and propose that these abnormalities can be explored as potential predictors, as an adjunct to clinical diagnosis, of developing a psychotic disorder in at risk populations.

  19. Circadian blood pressure variability in type 1 diabetes subjects and their nondiabetic siblings - influence of erythrocyte electron transfer

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Normotensive non-diabetic relatives of type 1 diabetes (T1D) patients have an abnormal blood pressure response to exercise testing that is associated with indices of metabolic syndrome and increased oxidative stress. The primary aim of this study was to investigate the circadian variability of blood pressure and the ambulatory arterial stiffness index (AASI) in healthy siblings of T1D patients vs healthy control subjects who had no first-degree relative with T1D. Secondary aims of the study were to explore the influence of both cardiovascular autonomic function and erythrocyte electron transfer activity as oxidative marker on the ambulatory blood pressure profile. Methods Twenty-four hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) was undertaken in 25 controls, 20 T1D patients and 20 siblings. In addition to laboratory examination (including homeostasis model assessment of insulin sensitivity) and clinical testing of autonomic function, we measured the rate of oxidant-induced erythrocyte electron transfer to extracellular ferricyanide (RBC vfcy). Results Systolic blood pressure (SBP) midline-estimating statistic of rhythm and pulse pressure were higher in T1D patients and correlated positively with diabetes duration and RBC vfcy; autonomic dysfunction was associated with diastolic BP ecphasia and increased AASI. Siblings had higher BMI, lower insulin sensitivity, larger SBP amplitude, and higher AASI than controls. Daytime SBP was positively, independently associated with BMI and RBC vfcy. Among non-diabetic people, there was a significant correlation between AASI and fasting plasma glucose. Conclusions Siblings of T1D patients exhibited a cluster of sub-clinical metabolic abnormalities associated with consensual perturbations in BP variability. Moreover, our findings support, in a clinical setting, the proposed role of transplasma membrane electron transport systems in vascular pathobiology. PMID:20920366

  20. Abnormal rheology of oxygenated blood in sickle cell anemia

    PubMed Central

    Chien, Shu; Usami, Shunichi; Bertles, John F.

    1970-01-01

    The viscosity of oxygenated blood from patients with sickle cell anemia (Hb SS disease) was found to be abnormally increased, a property which contrasts with the well recognized viscous aberration produced by deoxygenation of Hb SS blood. Experiments designed to explain this finding led to considerations of deformation and aggregation, primary determinants of the rheologic behavior of erythrocytes as they traverse the microcirculation. Deformability of erythrocytes is in turn dependent upon internal viscosity (i.e. the state and concentration of hemoglobin in solution) and membrane flexibility. Definition of the contribution made by each of these properties to the abnormal viscosity of oxygenated Hb SS blood was made possible by analysis of viscosity measurements, made over a wide range of shear rates and cell concentrations, on Hb SS erythrocytes and normal erythrocytes suspended in Ringer's solution (where aggregation does not occur) and in plasma. Similar measurements were made on the two cell types separated by ultracentrifugation of Hb SS erythrocytes: high density erythrocytes composed of 50 to 70% irreversibly “sickled” cells (ISC) and low density erythrocytes composed of over 95% non-ISC. Under all experimental conditions (hematocrit, shear rate, and suspending medium) the viscosity of ISC exceeds that of normal erythrocytes. The viscosity of non-ISC is elevated only in the absence of aggregation and over intermediate ranges of hematocrit. Analyses of the data reveal (a) an elevated internal viscosity of ISC: (b) a reduced membrane flexibility of both ISC and non-ISC, particularly at low shear rates; and (c) a reduced tendency for aggregation displayed by both cell types. The abnormal viscosity of oxygenated Hb SS blood can be attributed to the altered rheology of ISC and, to a lesser extent, of non-ISC. These studies assign a role to the abnormal rheology of Hb SS erythrocytes in the pathogenesis of sickle cell anemia, even under conditions of complete

  1. Blood-Gene Expression Reveals Reduced Circadian Rhythmicity in Individuals Resistant to Sleep Deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Arnardottir, Erna S.; Nikonova, Elena V.; Shockley, Keith R.; Podtelezhnikov, Alexei A.; Anafi, Ron C.; Tanis, Keith Q.; Maislin, Greg; Stone, David J.; Renger, John J.; Winrow, Christopher J.; Pack, Allan I.

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: To address whether changes in gene expression in blood cells with sleep loss are different in individuals resistant and sensitive to sleep deprivation. Design: Blood draws every 4 h during a 3-day study: 24-h normal baseline, 38 h of continuous wakefulness and subsequent recovery sleep, for a total of 19 time-points per subject, with every 2-h psychomotor vigilance task (PVT) assessment when awake. Setting: Sleep laboratory. Participants: Fourteen subjects who were previously identified as behaviorally resistant (n = 7) or sensitive (n = 7) to sleep deprivation by PVT. Intervention: Thirty-eight hours of continuous wakefulness. Measurements and Results: We found 4,481 unique genes with a significant 24-h diurnal rhythm during a normal sleep-wake cycle in blood (false discovery rate [FDR] < 5%). Biological pathways were enriched for biosynthetic processes during sleep. After accounting for circadian effects, two genes (SREBF1 and CPT1A, both involved in lipid metabolism) exhibited small, but significant, linear changes in expression with the duration of sleep deprivation (FDR < 5%). The main change with sleep deprivation was a reduction in the amplitude of the diurnal rhythm of expression of normally cycling probe sets. This reduction was noticeably higher in behaviorally resistant subjects than sensitive subjects, at any given P value. Furthermore, blood cell type enrichment analysis showed that the expression pattern difference between sensitive and resistant subjects is mainly found in cells of myeloid origin, such as monocytes. Conclusion: Individual differences in behavioral effects of sleep deprivation are associated with differences in diurnal amplitude of gene expression for genes that show circadian rhythmicity. Citation: Arnardottir ES, Nikonova EV, Shockley KR, Podtelezhnikov AA, Anafi RC, Tanis KQ, Maislin G, Stone DJ, Renger JJ, Winrow CJ, Pack AI. Blood-gene expression reveals reduced circadian rhythmicity in individuals resistant to

  2. Circadian variability of blood pressure in liver transplant recipients without antihypertensive therapy.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Rey, C; Otero-Antón, E; Tomé, S; Rodríguez-Framil, M; González-Quintela, A; Calvo, C; Hermida, R C; Ayala, D; Varo, E

    2005-04-01

    Hypertension is a frequent cardiovascular risk factor in liver transplant recipients. The usefulness of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) in these patients is unknown. This study was aimed at evaluating the circadian rhythms of blood pressure in liver allograft recipients. In 53 liver transplant patients blood pressure was measured with the Spacelabs device program. No patient received antihypertensive therapy for at least 15 days beforehand. Clinical blood pressure measurement showed 26 patients to be hypertensive. Of these, ABPM verified the diagnosis in 23. Overall, 72% of the patients were hypertensive, and 39.5% showed a nondipper pattern. Diastolic hypertension was more frequent than systolic hypertension. No differences were found in renal function, immunosuppressive therapy, or corticosteroids. PMID:15866660

  3. Catecholamine excretion and circadian blood pressure profile in patients with pheochromocytoma.

    PubMed

    Dabrowska, Elzbieta; Lewandowski, Jacek; Jedrusik, Piotr; Symonides, Bartosz; Wocial, Bozena; Lapinski, Mariusz; Gaciong, Zbigniew

    2006-08-01

    Circadian blood pressure (BP) rhythm is often disturbed in patients with secondary forms of hypertension. The aim of the present article was to investigate changes in circadian BP profile parameters using two-step statistical approach by Fourier analysis in relation to day and night urinary catecholamine excretion in 35 patients with pheochromocytoma (mean age 42+/-19 years). Twenty-four-hour ambulatory BP measurements (ABPM) were obtained using the SpaceLabs 90,207 monitor. Daytime and night-time urine collection was obtained in all patients to determine circadian catecholamine excretion. Fourier analysis was applied to estimate measures of BP circadian rhythm in ABPM, including the highest (Max) and lowest (Min) systolic (SBP) and diastolic (DBP) BP values, norad (ampSBP, ampDBP), and early acrophase (APSBP, APDBP). The Fourier indices of circadian BP rhythm were: MaxSBP 153+/-28 mm Hg, MaxDBP 99+/-16 mm Hg, MinSBP 117+/-17 mm Hg, MinDBP 69+/-11 mm Hg, ampSBP 18+/-8 mm Hg, ampDBP 14+/-5 mm Hg, APSBP 10+/-5 (h), and APDBP 11+/-3 (h). Urine noradrenaline (NA), adrenaline (A), and dopamine (DA) excretion during the day (d) and night (n) were: dNA 103.5+/-89.8 microg/14 h, nNA 52+/-70.8 microg/10 h, dA 13.2+/-17.9 microg/14 h; nA 6.13+/-9.6 microg/10 h, dD 181.8+/-87.3 microg/14 h, and nD 89.3+/-59.8 microg/10 h. A positive correlation was observed between urine dNa excretion and MaxDBP (r=0.37, P<0.05), and urine nNA and urine dA excretion were correlated with APDBP (r=0.47, r=0.35, respectively, both P<0.05). Thus, in addition to the effect on mean 24-h BP values, catecholamines released by tumor may also disturb circadian BP rhythm in patients with pheochromocytoma. PMID:17102074

  4. Variations in 7-day/24-h circadian pattern of ambulatory blood pressure and heart rate of type 2 diabetes patients

    PubMed Central

    Bhardwaj, Shipra; Verma, Narsingh; Anjum, Baby; Bhardwaj, Kshitij

    2014-01-01

    Aims/Introduction Diabetes has profound consequences on the cardiovascular system leading to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in diabetic patients. Blood pressure (BP) has a characteristic and reproducible circadian pattern, with high values during the day and low values at night. A 7-day timed analysis of BP through ambulatory blood pressure monitoring has been used not only to diagnose day and night dipping patterns of blood pressure, but also to measure day-to-day variability and the circadian hyper-amplitude-tension, a condition in which excessive circadian BP amplitude precedes the chronic established hypertension. Our objective was to assess the 7-day/24-h circadian pattern of BP and heart rate in diabetic patients, as it could be helpful in the diagnosis and prevention of cardiovascular morbidity. Materials and Methods A total of 50 diabetic patients with type 2 diabetes and 50 non-diabetic participants were recruited for the study. General health records were individually maintained, and 7-day/24-h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring using an ambulatory blood pressure monitor was carried out. Results The rhythmic parameters of systolic and diastolic BP, heart rate, double amplitude, acrophase and 3-h fractionated hyperbaric index were found to be significantly high in diabetic patients. A total of 12 participants were diagnosed with circadian hyper-amplitude-tension. These data suggest that diabetic patients have certain variations in the circadian pattern of blood pressure and heart rate, which can result in disturbed vascular events, and thus are at greater risk of cardiovascular morbidity. Conclusion Seven-day/24-h monitoring might be useful as an early predictive tool in assessing future cardiovascular risk, guiding treatment and management of these patients. PMID:25422775

  5. Prevalence and factors associated with circadian blood pressure patterns in hypertensive patients.

    PubMed

    de la Sierra, Alejandro; Redon, Josep; Banegas, José R; Segura, Julián; Parati, Gianfranco; Gorostidi, Manuel; de la Cruz, Juan J; Sobrino, Javier; Llisterri, José L; Alonso, Javier; Vinyoles, Ernest; Pallarés, Vicente; Sarría, Antonio; Aranda, Pedro; Ruilope, Luis M

    2009-03-01

    Ambulatory blood pressure (BP) monitoring has become useful in the diagnosis and management of hypertensive individuals. In addition to 24-hour values, the circadian variation of BP adds prognostic significance in predicting cardiovascular outcome. However, the magnitude of circadian BP patterns in large studies has hardly been noticed. Our aims were to determine the prevalence of circadian BP patterns and to assess clinical conditions associated with the nondipping status in groups of both treated and untreated hypertensive subjects, studied separately. Clinical data and 24-hour ambulatory BP monitoring were obtained from 42,947 hypertensive patients included in the Spanish Society of Hypertension Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring Registry. They were 8384 previously untreated and 34,563 treated hypertensives. Twenty-four-hour ambulatory BP monitoring was performed with an oscillometric device (SpaceLabs 90207). A nondipping pattern was defined when nocturnal systolic BP dip was <10% of daytime systolic BP. The prevalence of nondipping was 41% in the untreated group and 53% in treated patients. In both groups, advanced age, obesity, diabetes mellitus, and overt cardiovascular or renal disease were associated with a blunted nocturnal BP decline (P<0.001). In treated patients, nondipping was associated with the use of a higher number of antihypertensive drugs but not with the time of the day at which antihypertensive drugs were administered. In conclusion, a blunted nocturnal BP dip (the nondipping pattern) is common in hypertensive patients. A clinical pattern of high cardiovascular risk is associated with nondipping, suggesting that the blunted nocturnal BP dip may be merely a marker of high cardiovascular risk. PMID:19171788

  6. [Development of a photoperiod-controllable clean rack for rats: circadian rhythms of water intake and blood corticosterone levels].

    PubMed

    Torii, R; Shimoda, K; Hanada, K; Takahashi, K

    1985-01-01

    We have experimentally developed a photoperiod-controllable clean rack for SPF rats. The effectiveness of this clean rack in preventing the infection was attested to by the fact that the SPF rats and nude mice housed in this rack maintained SPF conditions after six months. And we investigated circadian rhythms of water intake and blood corticosterone levels in rats kept in the rack under various lighting conditions. Both rat groups under diurnal and reversed lighting conditions manifested significant increase in both water and blood corticosterone levels, showing a reversed phase relationship of the circadian rhythms between the two groups. These facts indicate the usefulness of the rack newly developed in the studies on circadian rhythms, reproductive physiology and behavior. PMID:3157592

  7. Sleep Loss, Circadian Mismatch, and Abnormalities in Reorienting of Attention in Night Workers with Shift Work Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Gumenyuk, Valentina; Howard, Ryan; Roth, Thomas; Korzyukov, Oleg; Drake, Christopher L.

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: Permanent night-shift workers may develop shift-work disorder (SWD). In the current study, we evaluated neurophysiological and behavioral indices of distractibility across times prior to the night shift (T1), during night hours (T2), and after acute sleep deprivation (T3) in permanent hospital night workers with and without SWD. Methods: Ten asymptomatic night workers (NW) and 18 NW with SWD participated in a 25-h sleep deprivation study. Circadian phase was evaluated by dim-light salivary melatonin onset (DLMO). Objective sleepiness was evaluated using the Multiple Sleep Latency Test (MSLT). Electrophysiological distractibility was evaluated by brain event-related potentials (ERP), whereas behavioral distractibility was evaluated by performance on a visual task in an auditory-visual distraction paradigm. Statistical analyses: Comparisons of ERP results were performed by repeated-measures analysis of variance, and t-tests were used where appropriate. A Mann-Whitney U test was used for comparison of variables (MLST, Stanford Sleepiness Scale, and DLMO) that deviated from normal. Results: First, in the SWD group, the reorienting negativity ERP amplitude was significantly attenuated compared to that in the NW group. Second, the SWD group had shorter MSLT during night shift hours (4.8 ± 4.9 min) compared to that in NW (7.8 ± 3.7 min; U = 47; z = -2.1; P < 0.03). Third, NW with SWD had a DLMO at 20:27 ± 5.0 h, whereas healthy NW had a DLMO at 05:00 ± 3.4 h (U = 43.5; z = -2.22, P < 0.03). Finally, acute sleep deprivation impaired behavioral performance and the P3a ERP in both groups. Conclusions: Our results demonstrate specific deficits in neurophysiological activity in the attentional domain among the shift-work disorder group relative to night workers. Citation: Gumenyuk V; Howard R; Roth T; Korzyukov O; Drake CL. Sleep loss, circadian mismatch, and abnormalities in reorienting of attention in night workers with shift work disorder. SLEEP 2014

  8. Regional cerebral blood flow abnormalities in Alzheimer's Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Rezai, K.; Damasio, H.; Graff-Radford, N.; Eslinger, P.; Kirchner, P.

    1985-05-01

    In 37 patients (ages 58-81) with senile dementia of Alzheimer type (SDAT), regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was studied utilizing a dedicated SPECT system (Tomomatic-64) that produces rCBF images from 4-minute clearance of Xenon-133 in the brain. The authors have modified the device to acquire 5 continuous tomographic slices simultaneously. A consistent pattern of diminished blood flow was seen in 33 patients in the posterior-temporal and lower-parietal brain regions. Computer programs were developed to quantitate the size of the affected brain tissue in the posterolateral brain areas (confined to the posterior 40% and the lateral 25% of the major and minor brain axes respectively). They have previously reported normal rCBF in 25 volunteers to be greater than 45 ml/min/100g with less than 10% regional variation. Hence, an area was considered abnormal if rCBF measured less than 40 ml/min/100g or was less than 70% of the mean rCBF value in the anterior temporal-frontal regions.

  9. Circadian rhythms in blood pressure in free-ranging three-toed sloths (Bradypus variegatus).

    PubMed

    Duarte, D P F; Silva, V L; Jaguaribe, A M; Gilmore, D P; Da Costa, C P

    2003-02-01

    Blood pressure (BP) profiles were monitored in nine free-ranging sloths (Bradypus variegatus) by coupling one common carotid artery to a BP telemetry transmitter. Animals moved freely in an isolated and temperature-controlled room (24 degrees C) with 12/12-h artificial light-dark cycles and behaviors were observed during resting, eating and moving. Systolic (SBP) and diastolic (DBP) blood pressures were sampled for 1 min every 15 min for 24 h. BP rhythm over 24 h was analyzed by the cosinor method and the mesor, amplitude, acrophase and percent rhythm were calculated. A total of 764 measurements were made in the light cycle and 721 in the dark cycle. Twenty-four-hour values (mean +/- SD) were obtained for SBP (121 +/- 22 mmHg), DBP (86 +/- 17 mmHg), mean BP (MBP, 98 +/- 18 mmHg) and heart rate (73 +/- 16 bpm). The SBP, DBP and MBP were significantly higher (unpaired Student t-test) during the light period (125 +/- 21, 88 +/- 15 and 100 +/- 17 mmHg, respectively) than during the dark period (120 +/- 21, 85 +/- 17 and 97 +/- 17 mmHg, respectively) and the acrophase occurred between 16:00 and 17:45 h. This circadian variation is similar to that observed in cats, dogs and marmosets. The BP decreased during "behavioral sleep" (MBP down from 110 +/- 19 to 90 +/- 19 mmHg at 21:00 to 8:00 h). Both feeding and moving induced an increase in MBP (96 +/- 17 to 119 +/- 17 mmHg at 17:00 h and 97 +/- 19 to 105 +/- 12 mmHg at 15:00 h, respectively). The results show that conscious sloths present biphasic circadian fluctuations in BP levels, which are higher during the light period and are mainly synchronized with feeding.

  10. Chronic agomelatine treatment corrects the abnormalities in the circadian rhythm of motor activity and sleep/wake cycle induced by prenatal restraint stress in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Mairesse, Jerome; Silletti, Viviana; Laloux, Charlotte; Zuena, Anna Rita; Giovine, Angela; Consolazione, Michol; van Camp, Gilles; Malagodi, Marithe; Gaetani, Silvana; Cianci, Silvia; Catalani, Assia; Mennuni, Gioacchino; Mazzetta, Alessandro; van Reeth, Olivier; Gabriel, Cecilia; Mocaër, Elisabeth; Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Morley-Fletcher, Sara; Maccari, Stefania

    2013-03-01

    Agomelatine is a novel antidepressant acting as an MT1/MT2 melatonin receptor agonist/5-HT2C serotonin receptor antagonist. Because of its peculiar pharmacological profile, this drug caters the potential to correct the abnormalities of circadian rhythms associated with mood disorders, including abnormalities of the sleep/wake cycle. Here, we examined the effect of chronic agomelatine treatment on sleep architecture and circadian rhythms of motor activity using the rat model of prenatal restraint stress (PRS) as a putative 'aetiological' model of depression. PRS was delivered to the mothers during the last 10 d of pregnancy. The adult progeny ('PRS rats') showed a reduced duration of slow wave sleep, an increased duration of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, an increased number of REM sleep events and an increase in motor activity before the beginning of the dark phase of the light/dark cycle. In addition, adult PRS rats showed an increased expression of the transcript of the primary response gene, c-Fos, in the hippocampus just prior to the beginning of the dark phase. All these changes were reversed by a chronic oral treatment with agomelatine (2000 ppm in the diet). The effect of agomelatine on sleep was largely attenuated by treatment with the MT1/MT2 melatonin receptor antagonist, S22153, which caused PRS-like sleep disturbances on its own. These data provide the first evidence that agomelatine corrects sleep architecture and restores circadian homeostasis in a preclinical model of depression and supports the value of agomelatine as a novel antidepressant that resynchronizes circadian rhythms under pathological conditions.

  11. Circadian and Ultradian Rhythms of Free Glucocorticoid Hormone Are Highly Synchronized between the Blood, the Subcutaneous Tissue, and the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Xiaoxiao; Droste, Susanne K.; Lightman, Stafford L.; Reul, Johannes M. H. M.

    2012-01-01

    Total glucocorticoid hormone levels in plasma of various species, including humans, follow a circadian rhythm that is made up from an underlying series of hormone pulses. In blood most of the glucocorticoid is bound to corticosteroid-binding globulin and albumin, resulting in low levels of free hormone. Although only the free fraction is biologically active, surprisingly little is known about the rhythms of free glucocorticoid hormones. We used single-probe microdialysis to measure directly the free corticosterone levels in the blood of freely behaving rats. Free corticosterone in the blood shows a distinct circadian and ultradian rhythm with a pulse frequency of approximately one pulse per hour together with an increase in hormone levels and pulse height toward the active phase of the light/dark cycle. Similar rhythms were also evident in the subcutaneous tissue, demonstrating that free corticosterone rhythms are transferred from the blood into peripheral target tissues. Furthermore, in a dual-probe microdialysis study, we demonstrated that the circadian and ultradian rhythms of free corticosterone in the blood and the subcutaneous tissue were highly synchronized. Moreover, free corticosterone rhythms were also synchronous between the blood and the hippocampus. These data demonstrate for the first time an ultradian rhythm of free corticosterone in the blood that translates into synchronized rhythms of free glucocorticoid hormone in peripheral and central tissues. The maintenance of ultradian rhythms across tissue barriers in both the periphery and the brain has important implications for research into aberrant biological rhythms in disease and for the development of improved protocols for glucocorticoid therapy. PMID:22822164

  12. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN CIRCADIAN BLOOD PRESSURE VARIATION AND AGE ANALYSED FROM 7-DAY MONITORING

    PubMed Central

    SIEGELOVÁ, J.; DUŠEK, J.; FIŠER, B.; HOMOLKA, P.; VANK, P.; MAŠEK, M.; HAVELKOVÁ, A.; CORNÉLISSEN, G.; HALBERG, F.

    2009-01-01

    The relationship between age and circadian blood pressure (BP) variation was the aim of the present study. One hundred and eighty-seven subjects (130 males, 57 females), 20-77 years old, were recruited for seven-day BP monitoring. Colin medical instruments (Komaki, Japan) were used for ambulatory BP monitoring (oscillation method, 30-minute interval between measurements). A sinusoidal curve was fitted (minimum square method) and the mean value and amplitude of the curve (double amplitude corresponds to the night-day difference) were evaluated on every day of monitoring. The average 7-day values of the mean (M) and of double amplitude (2A) for systolic BP (SBP), diastolic BP (DBP), and heart rate (HR) were determined in each subject. The mean values of M (±SD) for the whole group were: SBP- 127±8, DBP - 79±6 mmHg, HR - 70±6 bpm; of 2A: SBP - 21±7, DBP - 15±5 mmHg, HR - 15±6 bpm. A linear relationship between M of SBP and age (r=0.341, p< 0.001) and DBP and age (r=0.384, p<0.001) was found (difference between 20 and 77 years: SBP - 16, DBP - 12 mmHg). 2A of SBP and DBP was increasing with age up to 35 years, then the curve remained relatively flat up to 55 years (maximum at 45 years), and then it decreased again (difference between 45 and 77 years: SBP - 13mmHg, DBP - 12 mmHg). Heart rate M and 2A were age-independent. The mean values of SBP and DBP were increasing with age up to 75 years, but the night-day difference of SBP and DBP reached its maximum value at 45 years and then decreased. PMID:19436777

  13. Daily Fasting Blood Glucose Rhythm in Male Mice: A Role of the Circadian Clock in the Liver.

    PubMed

    Ando, Hitoshi; Ushijima, Kentaro; Shimba, Shigeki; Fujimura, Akio

    2016-02-01

    Fasting blood glucose (FBG) and hepatic glucose production are regulated according to a circadian rhythm. An early morning increase in FBG levels, which is pronounced among diabetic patients, is known as the dawn phenomenon. Although the intracellular circadian clock generates various molecular rhythms, whether the hepatic clock is involved in FBG rhythm remains unclear. To address this issue, we investigated the effects of phase shift and disruption of the hepatic clock on the FBG rhythm. In both C57BL/6J and diabetic ob/ob mice, FBG exhibited significant daily rhythms with a peak at the beginning of the dark phase. Light-phase restricted feeding altered the phase of FBG rhythm mildly in C57BL/6J mice and greatly in ob/ob mice, in concert with the phase shifts of mRNA expression rhythms of the clock and glucose production-related genes in the liver. Moreover, the rhythmicity of FBG and Glut2 expression was not detected in liver-specific Bmal1-deficient mice. Furthermore, treatment with octreotide suppressed the plasma growth hormone concentration but did not affect the hepatic mRNA expression of the clock genes or the rise in FBG during the latter half of the resting phase in C57BL/6J mice. These results suggest that the hepatic circadian clock plays a critical role in regulating the daily FBG rhythm, including the dawn phenomenon. PMID:26653333

  14. Daily Fasting Blood Glucose Rhythm in Male Mice: A Role of the Circadian Clock in the Liver.

    PubMed

    Ando, Hitoshi; Ushijima, Kentaro; Shimba, Shigeki; Fujimura, Akio

    2016-02-01

    Fasting blood glucose (FBG) and hepatic glucose production are regulated according to a circadian rhythm. An early morning increase in FBG levels, which is pronounced among diabetic patients, is known as the dawn phenomenon. Although the intracellular circadian clock generates various molecular rhythms, whether the hepatic clock is involved in FBG rhythm remains unclear. To address this issue, we investigated the effects of phase shift and disruption of the hepatic clock on the FBG rhythm. In both C57BL/6J and diabetic ob/ob mice, FBG exhibited significant daily rhythms with a peak at the beginning of the dark phase. Light-phase restricted feeding altered the phase of FBG rhythm mildly in C57BL/6J mice and greatly in ob/ob mice, in concert with the phase shifts of mRNA expression rhythms of the clock and glucose production-related genes in the liver. Moreover, the rhythmicity of FBG and Glut2 expression was not detected in liver-specific Bmal1-deficient mice. Furthermore, treatment with octreotide suppressed the plasma growth hormone concentration but did not affect the hepatic mRNA expression of the clock genes or the rise in FBG during the latter half of the resting phase in C57BL/6J mice. These results suggest that the hepatic circadian clock plays a critical role in regulating the daily FBG rhythm, including the dawn phenomenon.

  15. Influence of circadian blood pressure profile on endothelial function in patients with and without arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Rekhviashvili, A; Giorgobiani, T; Minashvili, A; Baganashvili, E

    2015-03-01

    Little is known about the relationship between the circadian BP rhythm and endothelial function in patients with essential hypertension. Consequently, we have hypothesized, that hypertensive patients with non-dipper circadian BP profile have more deteriorated endothelial function, than those with dipper BP profile. 57 untreated hypertensive patients and 17 normotensive controls were undergone to the anthropometrical measurements, physical examinations, review of their medical histories, 24-hour ABPM and vascular doppler-echography with high resolution ultrasound. Circadian BP profile was not independent from the BP level; namely, dipper profile was more frequent in normotensives. Independent from hypertension, dipper patients had significantly higher FMD%. In the whole study population, FMD showed strong negative correlation with 24-hour SBP, DBP and PP. Our study confirms the presence of disturbed endothelium-dependent vasodilatation in AH. Furthermore, our study showed that non-dipper circadian BP rhythm is associated with the significant impairment of endothelial function. Consequently, we can suggest that patients with non-dipper circadian BP profile could be assessed as a high risk group, which might need permanent supervising for avoiding of future cardiovascular and cerebrovascular complications. PMID:25879555

  16. Influence of circadian blood pressure profile on endothelial function in patients with and without arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Rekhviashvili, A; Giorgobiani, T; Minashvili, A; Baganashvili, E

    2015-03-01

    Little is known about the relationship between the circadian BP rhythm and endothelial function in patients with essential hypertension. Consequently, we have hypothesized, that hypertensive patients with non-dipper circadian BP profile have more deteriorated endothelial function, than those with dipper BP profile. 57 untreated hypertensive patients and 17 normotensive controls were undergone to the anthropometrical measurements, physical examinations, review of their medical histories, 24-hour ABPM and vascular doppler-echography with high resolution ultrasound. Circadian BP profile was not independent from the BP level; namely, dipper profile was more frequent in normotensives. Independent from hypertension, dipper patients had significantly higher FMD%. In the whole study population, FMD showed strong negative correlation with 24-hour SBP, DBP and PP. Our study confirms the presence of disturbed endothelium-dependent vasodilatation in AH. Furthermore, our study showed that non-dipper circadian BP rhythm is associated with the significant impairment of endothelial function. Consequently, we can suggest that patients with non-dipper circadian BP profile could be assessed as a high risk group, which might need permanent supervising for avoiding of future cardiovascular and cerebrovascular complications.

  17. Albuminuria, renal dysfunction and circadian blood pressure rhythm in older men: a population-based longitudinal cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hong; Huang, Xiaoyan; Risérus, Ulf; Cederholm, Tommy; Sjögren, Per; Lindholm, Bengt; Ärnlöv, Johan; Carrero, Juan Jesús

    2015-01-01

    Background Both albuminuria and kidney dysfunction may affect circadian blood pressure (BP) rhythm, while exacerbating each other's effects. We investigated associations and interactions of these two risk factors with circadian BP rhythm variation and non-dipper pattern progression in community-dwelling older men. Methods This was a cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses in the third and fourth cycles of the Uppsala Longitudinal Study of Adult Men, including 1051 men (age 71 years) with assessments on urinary albumin excretion rate (UAER), 24-h ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM) and cystatin-C-estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). Of these, 574 men attended re-examination after 6 years. Study outcomes were ABMP changes and non-dipping BP pattern (prevalence and progression). Results UAER associated with circadian BP rhythm both cross-sectionally and longitudinally. Longitudinally, significant interactions were observed between UAER and kidney dysfunction (eGFR < 60 mL/min/1.73 m2) in its association with the changes of both night-time systolic BP (SBP) and night–day SBP ratio. After stratification, UAER strongly predicted night–day SBP ratio change only in those with concurrent kidney dysfunction. At re-examination, 221 new cases of non-dipper were identified. In multivariable logistic models, high UAER associated with increased likelihood of non-dipper progression, but more strongly so among individuals with concurrent kidney dysfunction. These associations were evident also in the subpopulation of non-diabetics and in participants with normal range UAER. Conclusions UAER associates with circadian BP rhythm variation and non-dipper progression in elderly men. Concurrent renal dysfunction modifies and exacerbates these associations. PMID:26413281

  18. [Abnormality of blood coagulation indexes in patients with de novo acute leukemia and its clinical significance].

    PubMed

    Xiao, Fang-Fang; Hu, Kai-Xun; Guo, Mei; Qiao, Jian-Hui; Sun, Qi-Yun; Ai, Hui-Sheng; Yu, Chang-Lin

    2013-04-01

    To explore hemorrhage risk and the clinical significance of abnormal change of prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), plasma fibrinogen (FIB), plasma thrombin time (TT) and d-dimer (D-D) in de novo acute leukemia (except for APL), the different bleeding manifestations of 114 cases of de novo acute leukemia with different coagulation indexes were analyzed retrospectively. The correlation between these blood coagulation indexes and the possible correlative clinical characteristics were analysed, including age, sex, type of acute leukemia, initial white blood cell(WBC) and platelet(Plt) count, the proportion of blast cells in bone marrow and cytogenetic abnormality of patients at diagnosis. The results indicated that the incidence of abnormal blood coagulation was as high as 78.1% for de novo AL patients. These patients with 5 normal blood coagulation indexes may have mild bleeding manifestation, but the more abnormal indexes, the more severe bleeding. Both PT and D-D were sensitive indexes for diagnosis of level II bleeding. Incidence of abnormal blood coagulation significantly correlates with the proportion of blast cells in bone marrow (χ(2) = 4.184, OR = 1.021, P < 0.05) and more with D-D (P < 0.01), while age, sex, type of AL, WBC count, Plt count and abnormality of cytogenetics did not correlate with abnormal blood coagulation. It is concluded that the coagulation and fibrinolysis are abnormal in most patients with de novo acute leukemia. More abnormal indexes indicate more severe bleeding, and both PT and D-D are sensitive indexes for diagnosis of level II bleeding. Higher proportion of blast cells in bone marrow predicts higher incidence of abnormal blood clotting. Acute leukemia with elderly age, high white blood cell count and adverse cytogenetics do not predict severer abnormal blood clotting. Detection of PT, APTT, TT, FIB, and D-D may help to judge whether the patients are in a state of hypercoagulability or disseminated

  19. Resynchronization of blood pressure circadian rhythm after westward trans-7-meridian flight with and without melatonin treatment.

    PubMed

    Barattini, P; Dolci, C; Montaruli, A; Roveda, E; Carandente, F

    2001-03-01

    Blood pressure (BP) of a healthy 37-yr-old male traveling from Milan to Houston was monitored for 36 h before the flight and continued for 5 d after the arrival. The rhythmometric analysis of BP data was made to investigate the rate of adaptation to a rapid rest-activity cycle shift. Since two trips were evaluated, during the second one the subject took melatonin (3 mg) before the nocturnal rest. In the first trip the BP circadian rhythm synchronization occurred on the 5th day. In the second trip melatonin promoted an immediate but unstable adaptation to the new rest-activity cycle.

  20. Continuous exposure to a novel stressor based on water aversion induces abnormal circadian locomotor rhythms and sleep-wake cycles in mice.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Koyomi; Itoh, Nanako; Ohyama, Sumika; Kadota, Koji; Oishi, Katsutaka

    2013-01-01

    Psychological stressors prominently affect diurnal rhythms, including locomotor activity, sleep, blood pressure, and body temperature, in humans. Here, we found that a novel continuous stress imposed by the perpetual avoidance of water on a wheel (PAWW) affected several physiological diurnal rhythms in mice. One week of PAWW stress decayed robust circadian locomotor rhythmicity, while locomotor activity was evident even during the light period when the mice are normally asleep. Daytime activity was significantly upregulated, whereas nighttime activity was downregulated, resulting in a low amplitude of activity. Total daily activity gradually decreased with increasing exposure to PAWW stress. The mice could be exposed to PAWW stress for over 3 weeks without adaptation. Furthermore, continuous PAWW stress enhanced food intake, but decreased body weight and plasma leptin levels, indicating that sleep loss and PAWW stress altered the energy balance in these mice. The diurnal rhythm of corticosterone levels was not severely affected. The body temperature rhythm was diurnal in the stressed mice, but significantly dysregulated during the dark period. Plasma catecholamines were elevated in the stressed mice. Continuous PAWW stress reduced the duration of daytime sleep, especially during the first half of the light period, and increased nighttime sleepiness. Continuous PAWW stress also simultaneously obscured sleep/wake and locomotor activity rhythms compared with control mice. These sleep architecture phenotypes under stress are similar to those of patients with insomnia. The stressed mice could be entrained to the light/dark cycle, and when they were transferred to constant darkness, they exhibited a free-running circadian rhythm with a timing of activity onset predicted by the phase of their entrained rhythms. Circadian gene expression in the liver and muscle was unaltered, indicating that the peripheral clocks in these tissues remained intact. PMID:23383193

  1. Cerebral blood flow in normal and abnormal sleep and dreaming

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, J.S.; Ishikawa, Y.; Hata, T.; Karacan, I.

    1987-07-01

    Measurements of regional or local cerebral blood flow (CBF) by the xenon-133 inhalation method and stable xenon computerized tomography CBF (CTCBF) method were made during relaxed wakefulness and different stages of REM and non-REM sleep in normal age-matched volunteers, narcoleptics, and sleep apneics. In the awake state, CBF values were reduced in both narcoleptics and sleep apneics in the brainstem and cerebellar regions. During sleep onset, whether REM or stage I-II, CBF values were paradoxically increased in narcoleptics but decreased severely in sleep apneics, while in normal volunteers they became diffusely but more moderately decreased. In REM sleep and dreaming CBF values greatly increased, particularly in right temporo-parietal regions in subjects experiencing both visual and auditory dreaming.

  2. Improved screening test for abnormal hemoglobins from dried blood samples.

    PubMed

    Altland, K; Kaempfer, M; Granda, H

    1979-01-01

    A method is described wherein blood samples taken from adults or newborns and dried on filter paper can be used for hemoglobin analysis within 2 years after sampling. The samples are eluted in 8 M urea in the presence of 5% 2-mercaptoethanol and 2% of the neutral detergent Nonidet P-40. Then the individual alpha, beta, gamma, and epsilon chains are separated by means of electrofocusing in 8 M urea-PAA gels. Up to 96 samples can be applied to a gel using multiple syringes. Several hundred samples can be analyzed daily by one person. This method may be especially useful for preventive programs against sickle cell anemia as well as for human mutation monitoring systems.

  3. Circadian Disruption in Psychiatric Disorders.

    PubMed

    Jones, Stephanie G; Benca, Ruth M

    2015-12-01

    Evidence suggests that abnormalities in circadian rhythms might prove causally or pathophysiologically significant in psychiatric illness. The circadian regulation of hormonal and behavioral timekeeping processes is often altered in patients with major depression, bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia, and a susceptibility to rhythm instability may contribute to the functional impairment. For some patients, interventions that stabilize or resynchronize circadian rhythms prove therapeutically effective. Circadian disruption in the clinical profiles of most psychiatric illnesses and the treatment efficacy of chronobiological interventions suggest that attention to circadian phenotypes in a range of psychiatric disorders may help to uncover shared pathophysiologic mechanisms. PMID:26568124

  4. Impact of Gender on the Association of Epicardial Fat Thickness, Obesity, and Circadian Blood Pressure Pattern in Hypertensive Patients

    PubMed Central

    Shim, In Kyoung; Cho, Kyoung-Im; Kim, Hyun-Su; Heo, Jung-Ho; Cha, Tae Joon

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of gender on the association between epicardial fat thickness (EFT) and circadian blood pressure (BP) changes in patients with recently diagnosed essential hypertension (EH). A total of 441 patients with EH (male/female: 236/205, mean age: 50.7 ± 13.8) and 83 control patients underwent 24-hour ambulatory BP monitoring and echocardiography. Obese EH patients had higher circadian BP profile with BP variability, wall thickness, and left ventricular mass than nonobese EH patients and controls (all p's <0.05) without gender differences. EFT was higher in female than in male patients (7.0 ± 2.5 versus 5.9 ± 2.2 mm, p < 0.001) and higher in the obese female EH group (7.5 ± 2.6 mm) than in the control (6.4 ± 2.8 mm) or nonobese EH group (6.7 ± 2.8 mm) among women, whereas EFT did not vary among males (5.9 ± 1.9 versus 6.0 ± 2.7 versus 5.9 ± 2.4 mm, p = 0.937). Multivariate logistic regression analysis demonstrated that the 24-hour mean BP variability was associated with SBP (p = 0.018) and EFT (p = 0.016) in female patients, but not in male patients. The relationships among circadian BP variability, obesity, and EFT were affected by gender in different manners. EFT may be a more valuable parameter in the evaluation of BP severity and obesity in women than in men. PMID:26064992

  5. Impact of Gender on the Association of Epicardial Fat Thickness, Obesity, and Circadian Blood Pressure Pattern in Hypertensive Patients.

    PubMed

    Shim, In Kyoung; Cho, Kyoung-Im; Kim, Hyun-Su; Heo, Jung-Ho; Cha, Tae Joon

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of gender on the association between epicardial fat thickness (EFT) and circadian blood pressure (BP) changes in patients with recently diagnosed essential hypertension (EH). A total of 441 patients with EH (male/female: 236/205, mean age: 50.7 ± 13.8) and 83 control patients underwent 24-hour ambulatory BP monitoring and echocardiography. Obese EH patients had higher circadian BP profile with BP variability, wall thickness, and left ventricular mass than nonobese EH patients and controls (all p's <0.05) without gender differences. EFT was higher in female than in male patients (7.0 ± 2.5 versus 5.9 ± 2.2 mm, p < 0.001) and higher in the obese female EH group (7.5 ± 2.6 mm) than in the control (6.4 ± 2.8 mm) or nonobese EH group (6.7 ± 2.8 mm) among women, whereas EFT did not vary among males (5.9 ± 1.9 versus 6.0 ± 2.7 versus 5.9 ± 2.4 mm, p = 0.937). Multivariate logistic regression analysis demonstrated that the 24-hour mean BP variability was associated with SBP (p = 0.018) and EFT (p = 0.016) in female patients, but not in male patients. The relationships among circadian BP variability, obesity, and EFT were affected by gender in different manners. EFT may be a more valuable parameter in the evaluation of BP severity and obesity in women than in men. PMID:26064992

  6. Circadian Rhythms

    MedlinePlus

    ... chronobiology. Are circadian rhythms the same thing as biological clocks? No, but they are related. Our biological clocks drive our circadian rhythms. What are biological clocks? The biological clocks that control circadian rhythms ...

  7. Why continued surveillance? Intermittent blood pressure and heart rate abnormality under treatment

    PubMed Central

    Katinas, G. S.; Cornélissen, G.; Otsuka, K.; Haus, E.; Bakken, E. E.; Halberg, F.

    2008-01-01

    Several opinion leaders have monitored their blood pressure systematically a sufficient number of times a day for chronomic (time structural) analyses, from the time of encountering chronobiology until their death; they set an example for others who also may not wish to base treatment on single spotchecks in a health care office. Such self-measurements, while extremely helpful, were not readily feasible without a noteworthy interruption of activities during waking as well as of sleep. New, relatively unobtrusive instrumentation now makes monitoring possible and cost-effective and will save lives. Illustrative results and problems encountered in an as-one-goes self-survey by GSK, a physician-scientist, are presented herein. Both MESOR-hypertension and CHAT (circadian hyper-amplitude-tension) can be intermittent conditions even under treatment, and treatment is best adjusted based on monitoring, rather than “flying blind”. PMID:16275483

  8. Eplerenone restores 24-h blood pressure circadian rhythm and reduces advanced glycation end-products in rhesus macaques with spontaneous hypertensive metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yan; Zheng, Wen; Liu, Yuli; Wang, Jue; Peng, Ying; Shang, Haibao; Hou, Ning; Hu, Xiaomin; Ding, Yi; Xiao, Yao; Wang, Can; Zeng, Fanxin; Mao, Jiaming; Zhang, Jun; Ma, Dongwei; Sun, Xueting; Li, Chuanyun; Xiao, Rui-Ping; Zhang, Xiuqin

    2016-01-01

    Hypertension is often associated with metabolic syndrome (MetS), and serves as a risk factor of MetS and its complications. Blood pressure circadian rhythm in hypertensive patients has been suggested to contribute to cardiovascular consequences and organ damage of hypertension. But circadian changes of BP and their response to drugs have not been clearly investigated in non-human primates (NHPs) of MetS with hypertension. Here, we identified 16 elderly, hypertensive MetS rhesus monkeys from our in-house cohort. With implanted telemetry, we investigate BP changes and its circadian rhythm, together with the effect of antihypertensive drugs on BP and its diurnal fluctuation. MetS hypertensive monkeys displayed higher BP, obesity, glucose intolerance, and dyslipidemia. We also confirmed impaired 24-h BP circadian rhythm in MetS hypertensive monkeys. Importantly, Eplerenone, a mineralocorticoid receptor blocker, exerts multiple beneficial effects in MetS hypertensive monkeys, including BP reduction, 24-h BP circadian rhythm restoration, and decreased plasma concentration of inflammation factors and advanced glycation end-products. In summary, we identified a naturally-developed hypertensive MetS NHP model, which is of great value in the studies on pathogenesis of MetS-associated hypertension and development of novel therapeutic strategies. We also provided multiple novel mechanistic insights of the beneficial effect of Eplerenone on MetS with hypertension. PMID:27032687

  9. Eplerenone restores 24-h blood pressure circadian rhythm and reduces advanced glycation end-products in rhesus macaques with spontaneous hypertensive metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Zheng, Wen; Liu, Yuli; Wang, Jue; Peng, Ying; Shang, Haibao; Hou, Ning; Hu, Xiaomin; Ding, Yi; Xiao, Yao; Wang, Can; Zeng, Fanxin; Mao, Jiaming; Zhang, Jun; Ma, Dongwei; Sun, Xueting; Li, Chuanyun; Xiao, Rui-Ping; Zhang, Xiuqin

    2016-04-01

    Hypertension is often associated with metabolic syndrome (MetS), and serves as a risk factor of MetS and its complications. Blood pressure circadian rhythm in hypertensive patients has been suggested to contribute to cardiovascular consequences and organ damage of hypertension. But circadian changes of BP and their response to drugs have not been clearly investigated in non-human primates (NHPs) of MetS with hypertension. Here, we identified 16 elderly, hypertensive MetS rhesus monkeys from our in-house cohort. With implanted telemetry, we investigate BP changes and its circadian rhythm, together with the effect of antihypertensive drugs on BP and its diurnal fluctuation. MetS hypertensive monkeys displayed higher BP, obesity, glucose intolerance, and dyslipidemia. We also confirmed impaired 24-h BP circadian rhythm in MetS hypertensive monkeys. Importantly, Eplerenone, a mineralocorticoid receptor blocker, exerts multiple beneficial effects in MetS hypertensive monkeys, including BP reduction, 24-h BP circadian rhythm restoration, and decreased plasma concentration of inflammation factors and advanced glycation end-products. In summary, we identified a naturally-developed hypertensive MetS NHP model, which is of great value in the studies on pathogenesis of MetS-associated hypertension and development of novel therapeutic strategies. We also provided multiple novel mechanistic insights of the beneficial effect of Eplerenone on MetS with hypertension.

  10. Data on copper level in the blood of patients with normal and abnormal angiography.

    PubMed

    Amiri, Leila; Movahed, Ali; Iranpour, Dariush; Ostovar, Afshin; Raeisi, Alireza; Keshtkar, Mozhgan; Hajian, Najmeh; Dobaradaran, Sina

    2016-12-01

    In this data article, we measured the levels of copper in the blood of patients undergoing coronary angiography. The samples were taken from patients with cardiovascular disease in Bushehr׳s university hospital, Iran. Patients were divided in two groups: normal angiography and abnormal angiography. After the chemical digestion of samples, the concentration levels of Cu in both groups were determined by using inductively coupled plasma optical spectrometry (ICP-OES). PMID:27622204

  11. Cerebral blood flow is an earlier indicator of perfusion abnormalities than cerebral blood volume in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Lacalle-Aurioles, María; Mateos-Pérez, José M; Guzmán-De-Villoria, Juan A; Olazarán, Javier; Cruz-Orduña, Isabel; Alemán-Gómez, Yasser; Martino, María-Elena; Desco, Manuel

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to elucidate whether cerebral blood flow (CBF) can better characterize perfusion abnormalities in predementia stages of Alzheimer's disease (AD) than cerebral blood volume (CBV) and whether cortical atrophy is more associated with decreased CBV or with decreased CBF. We compared measurements of CBV, CBF, and mean cortical thickness obtained from magnetic resonance images in a group of healthy controls, patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) who converted to AD after 2 years of clinical follow-up (MCI-c), and patients with mild AD. A significant decrease in perfusion was detected in the parietal lobes of the MCI-c patients with CBF parametric maps but not with CBV maps. In the MCI-c group, a negative correlation between CBF values and cortical thickness in the right parahippocampal gyrus suggests an increase in CBF that depends on cortical atrophy in predementia stages of AD. Our study also suggests that CBF deficits appear before CBV deficits in the progression of AD, as CBV abnormalities were only detected at the AD stage, whereas CBF changes were already detected in the MCI stage. These results confirm the hypothesis that CBF is a more sensitive parameter than CBV for perfusion abnormalities in MCI-c patients.

  12. Cerebral blood flow is an earlier indicator of perfusion abnormalities than cerebral blood volume in Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Lacalle-Aurioles, María; Mateos-Pérez, José M; Guzmán-De-Villoria, Juan A; Olazarán, Javier; Cruz-Orduña, Isabel; Alemán-Gómez, Yasser; Martino, María-Elena; Desco, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to elucidate whether cerebral blood flow (CBF) can better characterize perfusion abnormalities in predementia stages of Alzheimer's disease (AD) than cerebral blood volume (CBV) and whether cortical atrophy is more associated with decreased CBV or with decreased CBF. We compared measurements of CBV, CBF, and mean cortical thickness obtained from magnetic resonance images in a group of healthy controls, patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) who converted to AD after 2 years of clinical follow-up (MCI-c), and patients with mild AD. A significant decrease in perfusion was detected in the parietal lobes of the MCI-c patients with CBF parametric maps but not with CBV maps. In the MCI-c group, a negative correlation between CBF values and cortical thickness in the right parahippocampal gyrus suggests an increase in CBF that depends on cortical atrophy in predementia stages of AD. Our study also suggests that CBF deficits appear before CBV deficits in the progression of AD, as CBV abnormalities were only detected at the AD stage, whereas CBF changes were already detected in the MCI stage. These results confirm the hypothesis that CBF is a more sensitive parameter than CBV for perfusion abnormalities in MCI-c patients. PMID:24424381

  13. The relationship between red blood cell distribution width and blood pressure abnormal dipping in patients with essential hypertension: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Su, Dan; Guo, Qi; Gao, Ya; Han, Jin; Yan, Bin; Peng, Liyuan; Song, Anqi; Zhou, Fuling; Wang, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether red blood cell distribution width (RDW) is associated with the blood pressure (BP) reverse-dipper pattern in patients with hypertension. Design Cross-sectional study. Setting Single centre. Participants Patients with essential hypertension were included in our study (n=708). The exclusion criteria included age <18 or >90 years, incomplete clinical data, night workers, diagnosis of secondary hypertension, under antihypertensive treatment, intolerance for the 24 h ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM) and BP reading success rate <70%. Measurement Physical examination and ABPM were performed for all patients in our study. The value of RDW was measured using an automated haematology analyser. Statistical methods The distribution of RDW in patients with hypertension among different circadian BP pattern groups was analyzed using analysis of variance (ANOVA). Multinomial logistic regression was applied to explore the associations of RDW and other relevant variables with ABPM results. Results There was significantly increased RDW in reverse dippers (13.52±1.05) than dippers (13.25±0.85) of hypertension (p=0.012). Moreover, multinomial logistic regression analysis showed that RDW (OR 1.325, 95% CI 1.037 to 1.692, p=0.024) and diabetes mellitus (OR 2.286, 95% CI 1.380 to 3.788, p=0.001) were significantly different when comparing the reverse-dipper BP pattern with the dipper pattern. However, there was no difference of RDW between the non-dipper pattern and the reverse-dipper pattern (OR 1.036, 95% CI 0.867 to 1.238, p=0.693). In addition to this, RDW was negatively correlated with the decline rate of nocturnal systolic BP (r=−0.113; p=0.003) and diastolic BP (r=−0.101; p=0.007). Conclusions Our results suggested that RDW might associate with the abnormal dipper BP patterns of either reverse dipping or non-dipping homogeneously examined with 24 h ABPM. PMID:26908530

  14. Association of depressive symptoms with circadian blood pressure alterations in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Vetrano, Davide L; Pisciotta, Maria S; Lo Monaco, Maria R; Onder, Graziano; Laudisio, Alice; Brandi, Vincenzo; La Carpia, Domenico; Guglielmo, Mauro; Nacchia, Antonio; Fusco, Domenico; Ricciardi, Diego; Bentivoglio, Anna R; Bernabei, Roberto; Zuccalà, Giuseppe

    2015-11-01

    To assess whether among patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) depression, a common non-motor symptom associated with reduced survival, is associated with cardiovascular dysautonomia. We enrolled 125 subjects with PD consecutively admitted to a geriatric day hospital. All participants underwent comprehensive evaluation, fasting blood sampling, and 24-h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring. The percent reduction in nocturnal blood pressure (dipping) was calculated. Depressive symptoms were assessed through the 15-item Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS); a score ≥5 identified moderate to severe symptoms. Among participants (mean age 72.7 ± 7.8 years, 32 % women) 61 subjects (49 %) presented with a GDS score ≥ 5. When compared with other participants, subjects with a GDS score ≥ 5 had reduced adjusted levels of percent systolic (-2.6 ± 2.7 vs. 4.7 ± 2.5; p = 0.003), diastolic (0.6 ± 2.8 vs. 7.4 ± 2.6; p = 0.007), and mean blood pressure dipping (-0.7 ± 2.6 vs. 6.8 ± 2.5; p = 0.002). In separate logistic regression models, depressive symptoms were associated with reduced systolic (OR 0.94; 95 % CI 0.89; 0.98), diastolic (OR 0.94; 95 % CI 0.90; 0.99), and mean blood pressure dipping (OR 0.93; 95 % CI 0.89; 0.98), after adjusting for potential confounders. Depressive symptoms are prevalent, and independently associated with cardiovascular dysautonomia among patients with Parkinson's disease. This might explain the remarkable incidence of sudden death, as well as the association of depressive symptoms with reduced survival reported in these patients. The finding of depressive symptoms in subjects with Parkinson's disease should therefore prompt assessment of cardiovascular autonomic function. PMID:26338815

  15. Chromosomal Abnormalities in Infertile Men Referred to Iran Blood Transfusion Organization Research Center

    PubMed Central

    Mahjoubi, Frouzandeh; Soleimani, Saeideh; Mantegy, Sanaz

    2010-01-01

    Introduction The prevalence of somatic chromosomal abnormalities in infertile male individuals has been reported to vary in different literatures. The aim of this study was to investigate the frequency of chromosomal aberrations among infertile men referred to the Cytogenetic Laboratory of Iran Blood Transfusion Organization Research Centre (IBTO). Materials and Methods Chromosomal analysis was performed on phytohemag-glutinin (PHA)-stimulated peripheral lymphocyte cultures of 1052 infertile men using standard cytogenetic methods. The study took place during 1997 to 2007. Results Total chromosome alterations were revealed in 161 (15.30%) infertile men. The most prevalent chromosomal abnormality in the infertile men was 47, XXY, that was seen in 94 (58.38%) men while one of them had a mosaic karyotype: mos 47, XX[54]/47,XXY[18]/46,XY[9]. In 37 (22.98%) cases, structural aberrations were detected. There were 30 (18.63%) cases of sex reversal. Conclusion Cytogenetic studies of these patients showed increased chromosomal abnormalities in infertile men in comparison with that of the normal population, justifying the need for cytogenetic analysis of men with idiopathic infertility. PMID:23926486

  16. Abnormal humoral immune responses in peripheral blood lymphocyte cultures of bone marrow transplant recipients.

    PubMed Central

    Pahwa, S G; Pahwa, R N; Friedrich, W; O'Reilly, R J; Good, R A

    1982-01-01

    The present study was aimed at investigating recovery of humoral immunity in vitro after bone marrow transplantation in patients with acute leukemia and severe aplastic anemia. Hemolytic plaque assays were utilized to quantitate pokeweed mitogen-stimulated polyclonal immunoglobulin production and sheep erythrocyte antigen-specific antibody responses in cultures of peripheral blood mononuclear cells of 39 patients beginning at 1 month, for variable periods up to a maximum of 4 years after marrow transplantation. Three phases were identified: an early period of primary B cell dysfunction with concomitant immunoregulatory T cell abnormalities--i.e., decreased helper and increased suppressor activities; an intermediate phase in which B cell dysfunction could be attributed in large measure to immunoregulatory T cell abnormalities; and a late phase of normal B and T lymphocyte functions. Patients with graft-versus-host disease differed from those without it in that they often did not manifest increased T cell suppressor activity in the early period, and they were noted to have prolonged and profound B and T cell abnormalities in the chronic phase of their disease. In selected patients, simultaneous assessment of ratios of Leu-2 to Leu-3 antigens on T cells by monoclonal antibodies and of immunoregulatory T cell functions revealed a correlation between the two only late in the post-transplant period. These studies provide an insight into the ontogeny of B cell function in the post-transplant period and indicate that in certain situations phenotypic alterations in T cell subsets cannot reliably be used to predict abnormalities in their function in recipients of marrow transplantation. Images PMID:6211673

  17. Circadian Disruption

    PubMed Central

    Voigt, Robin M.; Forsyth, Christopher B.; Keshavarzian, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are a prominent and critical feature of cells, tissues, organs, and behavior that help an organism function most efficiently and anticipate things such as food availability. Therefore, it is not surprising that disrupted circadian rhythmicity, a prominent feature of modern-day society, promotes the development and/or progression of a wide variety of diseases, including inflammatory, metabolic, and alcohol-associated disorders. This article will discuss the influence of interplay between alcohol consumption and circadian rhythmicity and how circadian rhythm disruption affects immune function and metabolism as well as potential epigenetic mechanisms that may be contributing to this phenomenon. PMID:24313168

  18. Adverse metabolic and cardiovascular consequences of circadian misalignment.

    PubMed

    Scheer, Frank A J L; Hilton, Michael F; Mantzoros, Christos S; Shea, Steven A

    2009-03-17

    There is considerable epidemiological evidence that shift work is associated with increased risk for obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease, perhaps the result of physiologic maladaptation to chronically sleeping and eating at abnormal circadian times. To begin to understand underlying mechanisms, we determined the effects of such misalignment between behavioral cycles (fasting/feeding and sleep/wake cycles) and endogenous circadian cycles on metabolic, autonomic, and endocrine predictors of obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular risk. Ten adults (5 female) underwent a 10-day laboratory protocol, wherein subjects ate and slept at all phases of the circadian cycle-achieved by scheduling a recurring 28-h "day." Subjects ate 4 isocaloric meals each 28-h "day." For 8 days, plasma leptin, insulin, glucose, and cortisol were measured hourly, urinary catecholamines 2 hourly (totaling approximately 1,000 assays/subject), and blood pressure, heart rate, cardiac vagal modulation, oxygen consumption, respiratory exchange ratio, and polysomnographic sleep daily. Core body temperature was recorded continuously for 10 days to assess circadian phase. Circadian misalignment, when subjects ate and slept approximately 12 h out of phase from their habitual times, systematically decreased leptin (-17%, P < 0.001), increased glucose (+6%, P < 0.001) despite increased insulin (+22%, P = 0.006), completely reversed the daily cortisol rhythm (P < 0.001), increased mean arterial pressure (+3%, P = 0.001), and reduced sleep efficiency (-20%, P < 0.002). Notably, circadian misalignment caused 3 of 8 subjects (with sufficient available data) to exhibit postprandial glucose responses in the range typical of a prediabetic state. These findings demonstrate the adverse cardiometabolic implications of circadian misalignment, as occurs acutely with jet lag and chronically with shift work. PMID:19255424

  19. Abnormal White Matter Blood-Oxygen-Level–Dependent Signals in Chronic Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Astafiev, Serguei V.; Shulman, Gordon L.; Metcalf, Nicholas V.; Rengachary, Jennifer; MacDonald, Christine L.; Harrington, Deborah L.; Maruta, Jun; Shimony, Joshua S.; Ghajar, Jamshid; Diwakar, Mithun; Huang, Ming-Xiong; Lee, Roland R.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Concussion, or mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), can cause persistent behavioral symptoms and cognitive impairment, but it is unclear if this condition is associated with detectable structural or functional brain changes. At two sites, chronic mTBI human subjects with persistent post-concussive symptoms (three months to five years after injury) and age- and education-matched healthy human control subjects underwent extensive neuropsychological and visual tracking eye movement tests. At one site, patients and controls also performed the visual tracking tasks while blood-oxygen-level–dependent (BOLD) signals were measured with functional magnetic resonance imaging. Although neither neuropsychological nor visual tracking measures distinguished patients from controls at the level of individual subjects, abnormal BOLD signals were reliably detected in patients. The most consistent changes were localized in white matter regions: anterior internal capsule and superior longitudinal fasciculus. In contrast, BOLD signals were normal in cortical regions, such as the frontal eye field and intraparietal sulcus, that mediate oculomotor and attention functions necessary for visual tracking. The abnormal BOLD signals accurately differentiated chronic mTBI patients from healthy controls at the single-subject level, although they did not correlate with symptoms or neuropsychological performance. We conclude that subjects with persistent post-concussive symptoms can be identified years after their TBI using fMRI and an eye movement task despite showing normal structural MRI and DTI. PMID:25758167

  20. Abnormal White Matter Blood-Oxygen-Level-Dependent Signals in Chronic Mild Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Astafiev, Serguei V; Shulman, Gordon L; Metcalf, Nicholas V; Rengachary, Jennifer; MacDonald, Christine L; Harrington, Deborah L; Maruta, Jun; Shimony, Joshua S; Ghajar, Jamshid; Diwakar, Mithun; Huang, Ming-Xiong; Lee, Roland R; Corbetta, Maurizio

    2015-08-15

    Concussion, or mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), can cause persistent behavioral symptoms and cognitive impairment, but it is unclear if this condition is associated with detectable structural or functional brain changes. At two sites, chronic mTBI human subjects with persistent post-concussive symptoms (three months to five years after injury) and age- and education-matched healthy human control subjects underwent extensive neuropsychological and visual tracking eye movement tests. At one site, patients and controls also performed the visual tracking tasks while blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) signals were measured with functional magnetic resonance imaging. Although neither neuropsychological nor visual tracking measures distinguished patients from controls at the level of individual subjects, abnormal BOLD signals were reliably detected in patients. The most consistent changes were localized in white matter regions: anterior internal capsule and superior longitudinal fasciculus. In contrast, BOLD signals were normal in cortical regions, such as the frontal eye field and intraparietal sulcus, that mediate oculomotor and attention functions necessary for visual tracking. The abnormal BOLD signals accurately differentiated chronic mTBI patients from healthy controls at the single-subject level, although they did not correlate with symptoms or neuropsychological performance. We conclude that subjects with persistent post-concussive symptoms can be identified years after their TBI using fMRI and an eye movement task despite showing normal structural MRI and DTI.

  1. Recurring structural chromosome abnormalities in peripheral blood lymphocytes of patients with mycosis fungoides/Sézary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Thangavelu, M; Finn, W G; Yelavarthi, K K; Roenigk, H H; Samuelson, E; Peterson, L; Kuzel, T M; Rosen, S T

    1997-05-01

    Cytogenetic analysis was performed on peripheral blood lymphocyte cultures from 19 patients with mycosis fungoides (MF)/Sézary syndrome (SS) stimulated with either phytohemagglutinin, a conventional mitogen, or a combination of interleukin-2 (IL-2) plus IL-7. The use of both PHA-stimulated and IL-2 plus IL-7-stimulated cultures enhanced the ability to identify clonal abnormalities. Clonal abnormalities were observed in 11 patients (53%) including one with monosomy for the sex chromosome as the sole abnormality. Five of the 11 patients with clonal abnormalities had normal peripheral white blood cell counts, indicating detectability of clones in the absence of frankly leukemic disease. The presence of clonal abnormalities correlated with advanced stage disease and a significantly reduced survival duration from the time of cytogenetic studies. Clonal abnormalities involving chromosomes 1 and 8 were observed in six cases. In five cases with aberrations of chromosome 1, loss of material involved the region between 1p22 and 1p36. In an additional case, a reciprocal translocation involving 1p33 was observed. Clonal abnormalities involving chromosomes 10 and 17 were observed in 5 cases, clonal abnormalities involving chromosome 2 in 4 cases, and clonal abnormalities involving chromosomes 4, 5, 6, 9, 13, 15, 19, and 20 in 3 cases. In 2 cases a der(8)t(8;17)(p11;q11) was observed. Regions of the genome that encode T-cell receptors were not involved in abnormalities. The region between 1p22 and 1p36 is identified as a region of the genome that requires detailed analysis toward the identification of potential gene(s) involved in the process of malignant transformation and/or progression in MF/SS.

  2. Cardiovascular abnormalities with normal blood pressure in tissue kallikrein-deficient mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meneton, Pierre; Bloch-Faure, May; Hagege, Albert A.; Ruetten, Hartmut; Huang, Wei; Bergaya, Sonia; Ceiler, Debbie; Gehring, Doris; Martins, Isabelle; Salmon, Georges; Boulanger, Chantal M.; Nussberger, Jürg; Crozatier, Bertrand; Gasc, Jean-Marie; Heudes, Didier; Bruneval, Patrick; Doetschman, Tom; Ménard, Joël; Alhenc-Gelas, François

    2001-02-01

    Tissue kallikrein is a serine protease thought to be involved in the generation of bioactive peptide kinins in many organs like the kidneys, colon, salivary glands, pancreas, and blood vessels. Low renal synthesis and urinary excretion of tissue kallikrein have been repeatedly linked to hypertension in animals and humans, but the exact role of the protease in cardiovascular function has not been established largely because of the lack of specific inhibitors. This study demonstrates that mice lacking tissue kallikrein are unable to generate significant levels of kinins in most tissues and develop cardiovascular abnormalities early in adulthood despite normal blood pressure. The heart exhibits septum and posterior wall thinning and a tendency to dilatation resulting in reduced left ventricular mass. Cardiac function estimated in vivo and in vitro is decreased both under basal conditions and in response to βadrenergic stimulation. Furthermore, flow-induced vasodilatation is impaired in isolated perfused carotid arteries, which express, like the heart, low levels of the protease. These data show that tissue kallikrein is the main kinin-generating enzyme in vivo and that a functional kallikrein-kinin system is necessary for normal cardiac and arterial function in the mouse. They suggest that the kallikrein-kinin system could be involved in the development or progression of cardiovascular diseases.

  3. Abnormalities in plasma and red blood cell fatty acid profiles of patients with colorectal cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Baró, L.; Hermoso, J. C.; Núñez, M. C.; Jiménez-Rios, J. A.; Gil, A.

    1998-01-01

    We evaluated total plasma fatty acid concentrations and percentages, and the fatty acid profiles for the different plasma lipid fractions and red blood cell lipids, in 17 patients with untreated colorectal cancer and 12 age-matched controls with no malignant diseases, from the same geographical area. Cancer patients had significantly lower total plasma concentrations of saturated, monounsaturated and essential fatty acids and their polyunsaturated derivatives than healthy controls; when the values were expressed as relative percentages, cancer patients had significantly higher proportions of oleic acid and lower levels of linoleic acid than controls. With regard to lipid fractions, cancer patients had higher proportions of oleic acid in plasma phospholipids, triglycerides and cholesterol esters, and lower percentages of linoleic acid and its derivatives. On the other hand, alpha-linolenic acid was significantly lower in triglycerides from cancer patients and tended to be lower in phospholipids. Its derivatives also tended to be lower in phospholipids and triglycerides from cancer patients. Our findings suggest that colorectal cancer patients present abnormalities in plasma and red blood cell fatty acid profiles characterized by lower amounts of most saturated, monounsaturated and essential fatty acids and their polyunsaturated derivatives, especially members of the n-6 series, than their healthy age-matched counterparts. These changes are probably due to metabolic changes caused by the illness per se but not to malnutrition. PMID:9667678

  4. Secondhand tobacco smoke, arterial stiffness, and altered circadian blood pressure patterns are associated with lung inflammation and oxidative stress in rats.

    PubMed

    Gentner, Nicole J; Weber, Lynn P

    2012-02-01

    Chronic smoking and secondhand tobacco smoke exposure are major risk factors for cardiovascular disease that are known to adversely alter the structural and mechanical properties of arteries. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of subchronic secondhand tobacco smoke exposure on circadian blood pressure patterns, arterial stiffness, and possible sources of oxidative stress in conscious, unsedated radiotelemetry-implanted rats. Pulse wave change in pressure over time (dP/dt) was used an indicator of arterial stiffness and was compared with both structural (wall thickness) and functional (nitric oxide production and bioactivity and endothelin-1 levels) features of the arterial wall. In addition, histology of lung, heart, and liver was examined as well as pulmonary and hepatic detoxifying enzyme activity (cytochrome P450, specifically CYP1A1). Subchronic secondhand tobacco smoke exposure altered the circadian pattern of heart rate and blood pressure, with a loss in the normal dipping pattern of blood pressure during sleep. Secondhand tobacco smoke exposure also increased pulse wave dP/dt in the absence of any structural modifications in the arterial wall. Furthermore, although nitric oxide production and endothelin-1 levels were not altered by secondhand tobacco smoke, there was increased inactivation of nitric oxide as indicated by peroxynitrite production. Increased lung neutrophils or pulmonary CYP1A1 may be responsible for the increase in oxidative stress in rats exposed to secondhand tobacco smoke. In turn, this may be related to the observed failure of blood pressure to dip during periods of sleep and a possible increase in arterial stiffness.

  5. Secondhand tobacco smoke, arterial stiffness, and altered circadian blood pressure patterns are associated with lung inflammation and oxidative stress in rats.

    PubMed

    Gentner, Nicole J; Weber, Lynn P

    2012-02-01

    Chronic smoking and secondhand tobacco smoke exposure are major risk factors for cardiovascular disease that are known to adversely alter the structural and mechanical properties of arteries. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of subchronic secondhand tobacco smoke exposure on circadian blood pressure patterns, arterial stiffness, and possible sources of oxidative stress in conscious, unsedated radiotelemetry-implanted rats. Pulse wave change in pressure over time (dP/dt) was used an indicator of arterial stiffness and was compared with both structural (wall thickness) and functional (nitric oxide production and bioactivity and endothelin-1 levels) features of the arterial wall. In addition, histology of lung, heart, and liver was examined as well as pulmonary and hepatic detoxifying enzyme activity (cytochrome P450, specifically CYP1A1). Subchronic secondhand tobacco smoke exposure altered the circadian pattern of heart rate and blood pressure, with a loss in the normal dipping pattern of blood pressure during sleep. Secondhand tobacco smoke exposure also increased pulse wave dP/dt in the absence of any structural modifications in the arterial wall. Furthermore, although nitric oxide production and endothelin-1 levels were not altered by secondhand tobacco smoke, there was increased inactivation of nitric oxide as indicated by peroxynitrite production. Increased lung neutrophils or pulmonary CYP1A1 may be responsible for the increase in oxidative stress in rats exposed to secondhand tobacco smoke. In turn, this may be related to the observed failure of blood pressure to dip during periods of sleep and a possible increase in arterial stiffness. PMID:22140051

  6. Physical exercise, fitness and dietary pattern and their relationship with circadian blood pressure pattern, augmentation index and endothelial dysfunction biological markers: EVIDENT study protocol

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Healthy lifestyles may help to delay arterial aging. The purpose of this study is to analyze the relationship of physical activity and dietary pattern to the circadian pattern of blood pressure, central and peripheral blood pressure, pulse wave velocity, carotid intima-media thickness and biological markers of endothelial dysfunction in active and sedentary individuals without arteriosclerotic disease. Methods/Design Design: A cross-sectional multicenter study with six research groups. Subjects: From subjects of the PEPAF project cohort, in which 1,163 who were sedentary became active, 1,942 were sedentary and 2,346 were active. By stratified random sampling, 1,500 subjects will be included, 250 in each group. Primary measurements: We will evaluate height, weight, abdominal circumference, clinical and ambulatory blood pressure with the Radial Pulse Wave Acquisition Device (BPro), central blood pressure and augmentation index with Pulse Wave Application Software (A-Pulse) and SphymgoCor System Px (Pulse Wave Analysis), pulse wave velocity (PWV) with SphymgoCor System Px (Pulse Wave Velocity), nutritional pattern with a food intake frequency questionnaire, physical activity with the 7-day PAR questionnaire and accelerometer (Actigraph GT3X), physical fitness with the cycle ergometer (PWC-170), carotid intima-media thickness by ultrasound (Micromax), and endothelial dysfunction biological markers (endoglin and osteoprotegerin). Discussion Determining that sustained physical activity and the change from sedentary to active as well as a healthy diet improve circadian pattern, arterial elasticity and carotid intima-media thickness may help to propose lifestyle intervention programs. These interventions could improve the cardiovascular risk profile in some parameters not routinely assessed with traditional risk scales. From the results of this study, interventional approaches could be obtained to delay vascular aging that combine physical exercise and diet

  7. Abnormal expression of A20 and its regulated genes in peripheral blood from patients with lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Cell-mediated immunity is often suppressed in patients with hematological malignancies. Recently, we found that low T cell receptor (TCR)-CD3 signaling was related to abnormal expression of the negative regulator of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) A20 in acute myeloid leukemia. To investigate the characteristics of T cell immunodeficiency in lymphomas, we analyzed the expression features of A20 and its upstream regulating factor mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma translocation gene 1 (MALT1) and genes downstream of NF-κB in patients with different lymphoma subtypes, including T cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (T-NHL), B cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (B-NHL) and NK/T cell lymphoma (NK/T-CL). Methods Real-time PCR was used to determine the expression level of the MALT1, MALT-V1 (variant 1), A20 and NF-κB genes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from 24 cases with T-NHL, 19 cases with B-NHL and 16 cases with NK/T-CL, and 31 healthy individuals (HI) served as control. Results Significantly lower A20 and NF-κB expression was found in patients with all three lymphoma subtypes compared with the healthy controls. Moreover, the MALT1 expression level was downregulated in all three lymphoma subtypes. A significant positive correlation between the expression level of MALT1 and A20, MALT1-V1 and A20, MALT1-V1 and NF-κB, and A20 and NF-κB was found. Conclusions An abnormal MALT1-A20-NF-κB expression pattern was found in patients with lymphoma, which may result a lack of A20 and dysfunctional MALT1 and may be related to lower T cell activation, which is a common feature in Chinese patients with lymphoma. This finding may at least partially explain the molecular mechanism of T cell immunodeficiency in lymphomas. PMID:24790527

  8. Factors Contributing to Massive Blood Loss on Peripartum Hysterectomy for Abnormally Invasive Placenta: Who Bleeds More?

    PubMed Central

    Usui, Rie; Suzuki, Hirotada; Baba, Yosuke

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. To identify factors that determine blood loss during peripartum hysterectomy for abnormally invasive placenta (AIP-hysterectomy). Methods. We reviewed all of the medical charts of 11,919 deliveries in a single tertiary perinatal center. We examined characteristics of AIP-hysterectomy patients, with a single experienced obstetrician attending all AIP-hysterectomies and using the same technique. Results. AIP-hysterectomy was performed in 18 patients (0.15%: 18/11,919). Of the 18, 14 (78%) had a prior cesarean section (CS) history and the other 4 (22%) were primiparous women. Planned AIP-hysterectomy was performed in 12/18 (67%), with the remaining 6 (33%) undergoing emergent AIP-hysterectomy. Of the 6, 4 (4/6: 67%) patients were primiparous women. An intra-arterial balloon was inserted in 9/18 (50%). Women with the following three factors significantly bled less in AIP-hysterectomy than its counterpart: the employment of an intra-arterial balloon (4,448 ± 1,948 versus 8,861 ± 3,988 mL), planned hysterectomy (5,003 ± 2,057 versus 9,957 ± 4,485 mL), and prior CS (5,706 ± 2,727 versus 9,975 ± 5,532 mL). Patients with prior CS (−) bled more: this may be because these patients tended to undergo emergent surgery or attempted placental separation. Conclusion. Patients with intra-arterial balloon catheter insertion bled less on AIP-hysterectomy. Massive bleeding occurred in emergent AIP-hysterectomy without prior CS. PMID:27630716

  9. Factors Contributing to Massive Blood Loss on Peripartum Hysterectomy for Abnormally Invasive Placenta: Who Bleeds More?

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Hironori; Ohkuchi, Akihide; Usui, Rie; Suzuki, Hirotada; Baba, Yosuke; Matsubara, Shigeki

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. To identify factors that determine blood loss during peripartum hysterectomy for abnormally invasive placenta (AIP-hysterectomy). Methods. We reviewed all of the medical charts of 11,919 deliveries in a single tertiary perinatal center. We examined characteristics of AIP-hysterectomy patients, with a single experienced obstetrician attending all AIP-hysterectomies and using the same technique. Results. AIP-hysterectomy was performed in 18 patients (0.15%: 18/11,919). Of the 18, 14 (78%) had a prior cesarean section (CS) history and the other 4 (22%) were primiparous women. Planned AIP-hysterectomy was performed in 12/18 (67%), with the remaining 6 (33%) undergoing emergent AIP-hysterectomy. Of the 6, 4 (4/6: 67%) patients were primiparous women. An intra-arterial balloon was inserted in 9/18 (50%). Women with the following three factors significantly bled less in AIP-hysterectomy than its counterpart: the employment of an intra-arterial balloon (4,448 ± 1,948 versus 8,861 ± 3,988 mL), planned hysterectomy (5,003 ± 2,057 versus 9,957 ± 4,485 mL), and prior CS (5,706 ± 2,727 versus 9,975 ± 5,532 mL). Patients with prior CS (-) bled more: this may be because these patients tended to undergo emergent surgery or attempted placental separation. Conclusion. Patients with intra-arterial balloon catheter insertion bled less on AIP-hysterectomy. Massive bleeding occurred in emergent AIP-hysterectomy without prior CS. PMID:27630716

  10. Factors Contributing to Massive Blood Loss on Peripartum Hysterectomy for Abnormally Invasive Placenta: Who Bleeds More?

    PubMed Central

    Usui, Rie; Suzuki, Hirotada; Baba, Yosuke

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. To identify factors that determine blood loss during peripartum hysterectomy for abnormally invasive placenta (AIP-hysterectomy). Methods. We reviewed all of the medical charts of 11,919 deliveries in a single tertiary perinatal center. We examined characteristics of AIP-hysterectomy patients, with a single experienced obstetrician attending all AIP-hysterectomies and using the same technique. Results. AIP-hysterectomy was performed in 18 patients (0.15%: 18/11,919). Of the 18, 14 (78%) had a prior cesarean section (CS) history and the other 4 (22%) were primiparous women. Planned AIP-hysterectomy was performed in 12/18 (67%), with the remaining 6 (33%) undergoing emergent AIP-hysterectomy. Of the 6, 4 (4/6: 67%) patients were primiparous women. An intra-arterial balloon was inserted in 9/18 (50%). Women with the following three factors significantly bled less in AIP-hysterectomy than its counterpart: the employment of an intra-arterial balloon (4,448 ± 1,948 versus 8,861 ± 3,988 mL), planned hysterectomy (5,003 ± 2,057 versus 9,957 ± 4,485 mL), and prior CS (5,706 ± 2,727 versus 9,975 ± 5,532 mL). Patients with prior CS (−) bled more: this may be because these patients tended to undergo emergent surgery or attempted placental separation. Conclusion. Patients with intra-arterial balloon catheter insertion bled less on AIP-hysterectomy. Massive bleeding occurred in emergent AIP-hysterectomy without prior CS.

  11. [Circadian rhythm of arterial blood pressure in adolescents during the study process in South-Western Siberia].

    PubMed

    Nedbaeva, N D; Osipov, V F

    1989-11-01

    During an academic year circadian rhythm of hemodynamics was studied in 14-17-aged local and newly arrived students of the physical and mathematical boarding school of Novosibirsk. It was demonstrated that to the end of the year total formation of daily arterial pressure rhythm adequate to the new place of residence was not completed. Elevation of average daily levels of diastolic pressure was noted in students to the end of the year, especially at night. This effect was most pronounced in newcomers.

  12. Red Blood Cells from Individuals with Abdominal Obesity or Metabolic Abnormalities Exhibit Less Deformability upon Entering a Constriction

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Nancy F.; Mancuso, Jordan E.; Zivkovic, Angela M.; Smilowitz, Jennifer T.; Ristenpart, William D.

    2016-01-01

    Abdominal obesity and metabolic syndrome (MS) are multifactorial conditions associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease and type II diabetes mellitus. Previous work has demonstrated that the hemorheological profile is altered in patients with abdominal obesity and MS, as evidenced for example by increased whole blood viscosity. To date, however, no studies have examined red blood cell (RBC) deformability of blood from individuals with obesity or metabolic abnormalities under typical physiological flow conditions. In this study, we pumped RBCs through a constriction in a microfluidic device and used high speed video to visualize and track the mechanical behavior of ~8,000 RBCs obtained from either healthy individuals (n = 5) or obese participants with metabolic abnormalities (OMA) (n = 4). We demonstrate that the OMA+ cells stretched on average about 25% less than the healthy controls. Furthermore, we examined the effects of ingesting a high-fat meal on RBC mechanical dynamics, and found that the postprandial period has only a weak effect on the stretching dynamics exhibited by OMA+ cells. The results suggest that chronic rigidification of RBCs plays a key role in the increased blood pressure and increased whole blood viscosity observed in OMA individuals and was independent of an acute response triggered by consumption of a high-fat meal. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01803633 PMID:27258098

  13. Chronobiological studies of chicken IgY: monitoring of infradian, circadian and ultradian rhythms of IgY in blood and yolk of chickens.

    PubMed

    He, Jin-Xin; Thirumalai, Diraviyam; Schade, Rüdiger; Zhang, Xiao-Ying

    2014-08-15

    IgY is the functional equivalent of mammalian IgG found in birds, reptiles and amphibians. Many of its biological aspects have been explored with different approaches. In order to evaluate the rhythmicity of serum and yolk IgY, four chickens were examined and reared under the same conditions. To monitor biological oscillations of IgY in yolk and serum, the eggs and blood samples were collected over a 60 day period and the rhythm of yolk and serum IgY was determined by direct-ELISA. Results indicated that, there is a significant circaseptan rhythm in yolk IgY and circaquattran rhythm in serum IgY. The serum IgY concentration reached a peak in the morning, decreased to a minimum during the daytime and increased again at night revealing a significant circadian rhythm was superimposed by an ultradian rhythm. These data are suited to address the controversies concerning the IgY concentration in egg yolk and blood of laying hens. In addition, this study raised new questions, if the different rhythms in yolk and serum are concerned.

  14. Peripheral Blood and Bone Marrow Abnormalities in the Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Frontiera, Michael; Myers, Adam M.

    1987-01-01

    In reviewing the peripheral hematologic manifestations, bone marrow changes and clinical course in 41 consecutive patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), frequent findings included anemia (95%), leukopenia (76%), bone marrow hypercellularity (73%) and pancytopenia (41%). These hematologic abnormalities were not clearly associated with specific clinical manifestations of AIDS, but support the conclusion that the hematopoietic system is a target organ in AIDS. The mechanisms of these abnormalities still need to be evaluated. Clinicians should be aware of these commonly encountered changes. Images PMID:3660772

  15. Circadian rhythms of women with fibromyalgia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klerman, E. B.; Goldenberg, D. L.; Brown, E. N.; Maliszewski, A. M.; Adler, G. K.

    2001-01-01

    Fibromyalgia syndrome is a chronic and debilitating disorder characterized by widespread nonarticular musculoskeletal pain whose etiology is unknown. Many of the symptoms of this syndrome, including difficulty sleeping, fatigue, malaise, myalgias, gastrointestinal complaints, and decreased cognitive function, are similar to those observed in individuals whose circadian pacemaker is abnormally aligned with their sleep-wake schedule or with local environmental time. Abnormalities in melatonin and cortisol, two hormones whose secretion is strongly influenced by the circadian pacemaker, have been reported in women with fibromyalgia. We studied the circadian rhythms of 10 women with fibromyalgia and 12 control healthy women. The protocol controlled factors known to affect markers of the circadian system, including light levels, posture, sleep-wake state, meals, and activity. The timing of the events in the protocol were calculated relative to the habitual sleep-wake schedule of each individual subject. Under these conditions, we found no significant difference between the women with fibromyalgia and control women in the circadian amplitude or phase of rhythms of melatonin, cortisol, and core body temperature. The average circadian phases expressed in hours posthabitual bedtime for women with and without fibromyalgia were 3:43 +/- 0:19 and 3:46 +/- 0:13, respectively, for melatonin; 10:13 +/- 0:23 and 10:32 +/- 0:20, respectively for cortisol; and 5:19 +/- 0:19 and 4:57 +/- 0:33, respectively, for core body temperature phases. Both groups of women had similar circadian rhythms in self-reported alertness. Although pain and stiffness were significantly increased in women with fibromyalgia compared with healthy women, there were no circadian rhythms in either parameter. We suggest that abnormalities in circadian rhythmicity are not a primary cause of fibromyalgia or its symptoms.

  16. Do high blood folate concentrations exacerbate metabolic abnormalities in people with low vitamin B-12 status?123

    PubMed Central

    Mills, James L; Carter, Tonia C; Scott, John M; Troendle, James F; Gibney, Eileen R; Shane, Barry; Kirke, Peadar N; Ueland, Per M; Brody, Lawrence C; Molloy, Anne M

    2011-01-01

    Background: In elderly individuals with low serum vitamin B-12, those who have high serum folate have been reported to have greater abnormalities in the following biomarkers for vitamin B-12 deficiency: low hemoglobin and elevated total homocysteine (tHcy) and methylmalonic acid (MMA). This suggests that folate exacerbates vitamin B-12–related metabolic abnormalities. Objective: We determined whether high serum folate in individuals with low serum vitamin B-12 increases the deleterious effects of low vitamin B-12 on biomarkers of vitamin B-12 cellular function. Design: In this cross-sectional study, 2507 university students provided data on medical history and exposure to folic acid and vitamin B-12 supplements. Blood was collected to measure serum and red blood cell folate (RCF), hemoglobin, plasma tHcy, and MMA, holotranscobalamin, and ferritin in serum. Results: In subjects with low vitamin B-12 concentrations (<148 pmol/L), those who had high folate concentrations (>30 nmol/L; group 1) did not show greater abnormalities in vitamin B-12 cellular function in any area than did those with lower folate concentrations (≤30 nmol/L; group 2). Group 1 had significantly higher holotranscobalamin and RCF, significantly lower tHcy, and nonsignificantly lower (P = 0.057) MMA concentrations than did group 2. The groups did not differ significantly in hemoglobin or ferritin. Compared with group 2, group 1 had significantly higher mean intakes of folic acid and vitamin B-12 from supplements and fortified food. Conclusions: In this young adult population, high folate concentrations did not exacerbate the biochemical abnormalities related to vitamin B-12 deficiency. These results provide reassurance that folic acid in fortified foods and supplements does not interfere with vitamin B-12 metabolism at the cellular level in a healthy population. PMID:21653798

  17. Abnormal Whole Blood Thrombi in Humans with Inherited Platelet Receptor Defects

    PubMed Central

    Castellino, Francis J.; Liang, Zhong; Davis, Patrick K.; Balsara, Rashna D.; Musunuru, Harsha; Donahue, Deborah L.; Smith, Denise L.; Sandoval-Cooper, Mayra J.; Ploplis, Victoria A.; Walsh, Mark

    2012-01-01

    To delineate the critical features of platelets required for formation and stability of thrombi, thromboelastography and platelet aggregation measurements were employed on whole blood of normal patients and of those with Bernard-Soulier Syndrome (BSS) and Glanzmann’s Thrombasthenia (GT). We found that separation of platelet activation, as assessed by platelet aggregation, from that needed to form viscoelastic stable whole blood thrombi, occurred. In normal human blood, ristocetin and collagen aggregated platelets, but did not induce strong viscoelastic thrombi. However, ADP, arachidonic acid, thrombin, and protease-activated-receptor-1 and -4 agonists, stimulated both processes. During this study, we identified the genetic basis of a very rare double heterozygous GP1b deficiency in a BSS patient, along with a new homozygous GP1b inactivating mutation in another BSS patient. In BSS whole blood, ADP responsiveness, as measured by thrombus strength, was diminished, while ADP-induced platelet aggregation was normal. Further, the platelets of 3 additional GT patients showed very weak whole blood platelet aggregation toward the above agonists and provided whole blood thrombi of very low viscoelastic strength. These results indicate that measurements of platelet counts and platelet aggregability do not necessarily correlate with generation of stable thrombi, a potentially significant feature in patient clinical outcomes. PMID:23300803

  18. Developmental abnormalities, blood pressure variability and renal disease in Riley Day syndrome.

    PubMed

    Norcliffe-Kaufmann, L; Axelrod, F B; Kaufmann, H

    2013-01-01

    Riley Day syndrome, commonly referred to as familial dysautonomia (FD), is a genetic disease with extremely labile blood pressure owing to baroreflex deafferenation. Chronic renal disease is very frequent in these patients and was attributed to recurrent arterial hypotension and renal hypoperfusion. Aggressive treatment of hypotension, however, has not reduced its prevalence. We evaluated the frequency of kidney malformations as well as the impact of hypertension, hypotension and blood pressure variability on the severity of renal impairment. We also investigated the effect of fludrocortisone treatment on the progression of renal disease. Patients with FD appeared to have an increased incidence of hydronephrosis/reflux and patterning defects. Patients <4 years old had hypertension and normal estimated glomerular filtration rates (eGFR). Patients with more severe hypertension and greater variability in their blood pressure had worse renal function (both, P<0.01). In contrast, there was no relationship between eGFR and the lowest blood pressure recorded during upright tilt. The progression of renal disease was faster in patients receiving fludrocortisone (P<0.02). Hypertension precedes kidney disease in these patients. Moreover, increased blood pressure variability as well as mineralocorticoid treatment accelerate the progression of renal disease. No association was found between hypotension and renal disease in patients with FD.

  19. Effects of music composed by Mozart and Ligeti on blood pressure and heart rate circadian rhythms in normotensive and hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Lemmer, Björn

    2008-11-01

    There is continuing discussion on the effect of music ("Mozart effect") on numerous functions in man and experimental animals. Radiotelemetry now allows one to monitor cardiovascular functions in freely-moving unrestrained experimental animals. Radiotelemetry was used to monitor systolic and diastolic blood pressure (SBP, DBP), heart rate (HR), and motor activity (MA) in male normotensive WKY and hypertensive SHR animals. Rats were synchronized to a 12 h light (L): 12 h dark (D) regimen in an isolated, ventilated, light-controlled, sound-isolated animal container. Music (Mozart, Symphony # 40; Ligeti, String Quartet # 2) were played for 2 h at 75 dB in the animal cabin starting at the onset of L or D in a cross-over design. Data were collected every 5 min for 24 h under control conditions and during and after music. In addition, plasma concentrations of norepinephrine (NE) were determined in unrestrained animals at 3 h intervals over 24 h. In both WKY and SHR, highly significant circadian rhythms were obtained in SBP, DBP, HR, and MA under control conditions; HR was lower and BP higher in SHR than in WKY. NE was circadian rhythmic in both strains with higher values in D; the increase in NE with immobilization was much more pronounced in SHR than in WKY. The music of Mozart had no effect on either parameter in WKY, neither in L nor in D. In contrast, in SHR, the music of Mozart presented in L significantly decreased HR and left BP unaffected, leading to a small decrease in cardiac output. The music of Ligeti significantly increased BP both in L and in D and reflexively reduced HR in L, the effects being long-lasting over 24 h. Interestingly, white noise at 75 dB had no effect at all on either function in both strains. The effects of both Mozart and Ligeti cannot be attributed to a stress reaction, as stress due to cage switch increased HR and BP both in WKY and SHR. The study clearly demonstrates that music of different character (tempo, rhythm, pitch, tonality) can

  20. Altered Circadian Rhythmicity in Patients in the ICU

    PubMed Central

    Gazendam, Joost A. C.; Van Dongen, Hans P. A.; Grant, Devon A.; Freedman, Neil S.; Zwaveling, Jan H.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Patients in the ICU are thought to have abnormal circadian rhythms, but quantitative data are lacking. Methods: To investigate circadian rhythms in the ICU, we studied core body temperatures over a 48-h period in 21 patients (59 ± 11 years of age; eight men and 13 women). Results: The circadian phase position for 17 of the 21 patients fell outside the published range associated with morningness/eveningness, which determines the normative range for variability among healthy normal subjects. In 10 patients, the circadian phase position fell earlier than the normative range; in seven patients, the circadian phase position fell later than the normative range. The mean ± SD of circadian displacement in either direction (advance or delay) was 4.44 ± 3.54 h. There was no significant day-to-day variation of the 24-h temperature profile within each patient. Stepwise linear regression was performed to determine if age, sex, APACHE (Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation) III score, or day in the ICU could predict the patient-specific magnitude of circadian displacement. The APACHE III score was found to be significantly predictive of circadian displacement. Conclusions: The findings indicate that circadian rhythms are present but altered in patients in the ICU, with the degree of circadian abnormality correlating with severity of illness. PMID:23471224

  1. Increasing Body Mass Index, Blood Pressure, and Acanthosis Nigricans Abnormalities in School-Age Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Otto, Debra E.; Wang, Xiaohui; Garza, Viola; Fuentes, Lilia A.; Rodriguez, Melinda C.; Sullivan, Pamela

    2013-01-01

    This retrospective quantitative study examined the relationships among gender, Acanthosis Nigricans (AN), body mass index (BMI), and blood pressure (BP) in children attending school Grades 1-9 in Southwest Texas. Of the 34,897 health screening records obtained for the secondary analysis, 32,788 were included for the study. A logistic regression…

  2. Dietary intake, food pattern, and abnormal blood glucose status of middle-aged adults: a cross-sectional community-based study in Myanmar

    PubMed Central

    Hlaing, Hlaing Hlaing; Liabsuetrakul, Tippawan

    2016-01-01

    Background Lifestyle changes, particularly dietary intake, had resulted in increasing trends of type-2 diabetes mellitus worldwide. However, dietary intake is diverse across country contexts. This study aimed to compare the dietary intake, food patterns, and blood glucose among middle-aged adults living in urban and suburban areas in Mandalay city, Myanmar, and explore their relationships. Methods A cross-sectional community-based study was conducted during June–November 2014. Adults aged 35–64 were randomly selected and requested to record all food they ate in a 4-day diary. Fasting and 2-hour postprandial blood glucose values were measured over two consecutive days. Dietary intakes were calculated in terms of energy, macronutrients, glycemic index, and glycemic load, and food patterns were identified by factor analysis. The relationships between food pattern, dietary intake, and blood glucose were assessed. Results Of 440 participants, dietary intake between urban and suburban residents was significantly different. Six food patterns were identified. There was no difference in fasting and 2-hour postprandial blood glucose between urban and suburban residents, but a strong correlation between fasting blood glucose and 2-hour postprandial blood glucose was found (correlation coefficient=0.8). Identification of abnormal blood glucose status using original fasting and converted 2-hour postprandial values showed substantial agreement (prevalence-adjusted bias-adjusted Kappa=0.8). Relationships between food patterns and blood glucose or abnormal blood glucose status were not found. Conclusion Food patterns were associated with dietary intake, not with abnormal blood glucose status. Two-hour postprandial blood glucose was highly correlated with fasting blood glucose and may be used for identifying abnormal blood glucose status. PMID:27150795

  3. [Relation between dementia and circadian rhythm disturbance].

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Kei; Meguro, Kenichi

    2014-03-01

    Dementia and circadian rhythm disturbance are closely linked. First, dementia patient shows circadian rhythm disorders (e.g. insomnia, night wandering, daytime sleep). These symptoms are a burden for caregivers. Circadian rhythm disturbance of dementia relates ADL and cognitive impairment, and diurnal rhythm disorder of blood pressure and body temperature. Some study shows that circadian rhythm disorders in dementia are a disturbance of neural network between suprachiasmatic nucleus and cerebral white matter, and involvement of both frontal lobes, left parietal and occipital cortex, left temporoparietal region. The first-line treatment of circadian rhythm disturbance should be non-drug therapy (e.g. exercise, bright light exposure, reduce caffeine intake, etc.). If physician prescribe drugs, keep the rule of low-dose and short-term and avoid benzodiazepines. Atypical antipsychotic drugs like risperidone and some antidepressants are useful for treatment of insomnia in dementia. But this usage is off-label. So we must well inform to patient and caregiver, and get consent about treatment. Second, some study shows circadian rhythm disorder is a risk factor of dementia. However, we should discuss that circadian rhythm disturbance is "risk factor of dementia" or "prodromal symptom of dementia". If a clinician finds circadian rhythm disorder in elderly people, should be examined cognitive and ADL function, and careful about that patients have dementia or will develop dementia.

  4. Abnormal resting regional cerebral blood flow patterns and their correlates in schizophrenia

    SciTech Connect

    Mathew, R.J.; Wilson, W.H.; Tant, S.R.; Robinson, L.; Prakash, R.

    1988-06-01

    Regional cerebral blood flow (CBF) was measured under resting conditions in 108 right-handed schizophrenic inpatients and a matched group of normal controls with the xenon 133 inhalation technique. Forty-six patients were free of all medication for two weeks. There were no significant differences in CBF to the two hemispheres. The patients showed a comparatively reduced anteroposterior (AP) gradient for CBF. Though there were no differences in frontal flow, the patients had higher flow to several postcentral brain regions, bilaterally. Cerebral blood flow in the patients correlated inversely with age and positively with carbon dioxide level. Women had higher flow than men. Duration of the illness was the only significant predictor of the reduced AP gradient in patients. Higher left temporal and right parietal flow were found to be the best discriminators between patients and controls. Mean hemispheric flow to both hemispheres and several brain regions correlated with the total score and the item, unusual thought content, of the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale. There were no differences in regional CBF between medicated and unmedicated patients.

  5. Studies of micronuclei and other nuclear abnormalities in red blood cells of Colossoma macropomum exposed to methylmercury

    PubMed Central

    da Rocha, Carlos Alberto Machado; da Cunha, Lorena Araújo; da Silva Pinheiro, Raul Henrique; de Oliveira Bahia, Marcelo; Burbano, Rommel Mario Rodríguez

    2011-01-01

    The frequencies of micronuclei (MN) and morphological nuclear abnormalities (NA) in erythrocytes in the peripheral blood of tambaqui (Colossoma macropomum), treated with 2 mg.L−1 methylmercury (MeHg), were analyzed. Two groups (nine specimens in each) were exposed to MeHg for different periods (group A - 24 h; group B - 120 h). A third group served as negative control (group C, untreated; n = 9). Although, when compared to the control group there were no significant differences in MN frequency in the treated groups, for NA, the differences between the frequencies of group B (treated for 120 h) and the control group were extremely significant (p < 0.02), thus demonstrating the potentially adverse effects of MeHg on C. macropomum erythrocytes after prolonged exposure. PMID:22215976

  6. Aspirin insensitive thrombophilia: Transcript profiling of blood identifies platelet abnormalities and HLA restriction

    PubMed Central

    Fallahi, Payam; Katz, Richard; Toma, Ian; Li, Ranyang; Reiner, Jonathan; VanHouten, Kiersten; Carpio, Larry; Marshall, Lorraine; Lian, Yi; Bupp, Sujata; Fu, Sidney W.; Rickles, Frederick; Leitenberg, David; Lai, Yinglei; Weksler, Babette B.; Rebling, Frederik; Yang, Zhaoqing; McCaffrey, Timothy A.

    2016-01-01

    Aspirin is the most widely used antiplatelet agent because it is safe, efficient, and inexpensive. However, a significant subset of patients does not exhibit a full inhibition of platelet aggregation, termed ‘aspirin resistance’ (AR). Several major studies have observed that AR patients have a 4-fold increased risk of myocardial infarction (MI), stroke, and other thrombotic events. Arachidonic acid-stimulated whole blood aggregation was tested in 132 adults at risk for ischemic events, and identified an inadequate response to aspirin therapy in 9 patients (6.8%). Expression profiling of blood RNA by microarray was used to generate new hypotheses about the etiology of AR. Among the differentially expressed genes, there were decreases in several known platelet transcripts, including clusterin (CLU), glycoproteins IIb/IIIa (ITGA2B/3), lipocalin (LCN2), lactoferrin (LTF), and the thrombopoetin receptor (MPL), but with increased mRNA for the T-cell Th1 chemokine CXCL10. There was a strong association of AR with expression of HLA-DRB4 and HLA-DQA1. Similar HLA changes have been linked to autoimmune disorders, particularly antiphospholipid syndrome (APS), in which autoantibodies to phospholipid/protein complexes can trigger platelet activation. Consistent with APS, AR patients exhibited a 30% reduction in platelet counts. Follow-up testing for autoimmune antibodies observed only borderline titers in AR patients. Overall, these results suggest that AR may be related to changes in platelet gene expression creating a hyperreactive platelet, despite antiplatelet therapy. Future studies will focus on determining the protein levels of these differential transcripts in platelets, and the possible involvement of HLA restriction as a contributing factor. PMID:23454623

  7. Office blood pressure, ambulatory blood pressure monitoring, and echocardiographic abnormalities in women with polycystic ovary syndrome: role of obesity and androgen excess.

    PubMed

    Luque-Ramírez, Manuel; Martí, David; Fernández-Durán, Elena; Alpañés, Macarena; Álvarez-Blasco, Francisco; Escobar-Morreale, Héctor F

    2014-03-01

    Whether or not blood pressure (BP) and heart function of women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) are altered remains unclear, albeit subtle abnormalities in the regulation of BP observed in these women might suggest a mild masculinization of their cardiovascular system. To study the influence of obesity and androgen excess on BP and echocardiographic profiles of women with the syndrome, we conducted a cross-sectional case-control study comparing office and ambulatory BP monitoring, as well as echocardiographic assessments, in 63 premenopausal women with the classic phenotype, 33 nonhyperandrogenic women with regular menses, and 25 young men. Forty-nine subjects were lean and 72 had weight excess (body mass index ≥25 kg/m(2)). Participants had no previous history of hypertension and were nonsmokers. Men showed the highest BP readings, and the lowest readings were observed in control women, whereas women with PCOS had intermediate values. Undiagnosed hypertension was more common in subjects with weight excess irrespective of sex and hyperandrogenism. Women with PCOS and weight excess showed frequencies of previously undiagnosed hypertension that were similar to those of men with weight excess and higher than those observed in nonhyperandrogenic women. Lastly, male sex, weight excess and hypertension, the latter in men as well as in women with PCOS, increased left ventricular wall thickness. In summary, our results show that patients with classic PCOS and weight excess frequently have undiagnosed BP abnormalities, leading to target organ damage.

  8. Circadian rhythm sleep disorders.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lirong; Zee, Phyllis C

    2012-11-01

    There have been remarkable advances in our understanding of the molecular, cellular, and physiologic mechanisms underlying the regulation of circadian rhythms, and of the impact of circadian dysfunction on health and disease. This information has transformed our understanding of the effect of circadian rhythm sleep disorders (CRSD) on health, performance, and safety. CRSDs are caused by alterations of the central circadian timekeeping system, or a misalignment of the endogenous circadian rhythm and the external environment. This article reviews circadian biology and discusses the pathophysiology, clinical features, diagnosis, and treatment of the most commonly encountered CRSDs in clinical practice.

  9. Circadian regulation of chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Atkins, Kelly A; Dodd, Antony N

    2014-10-01

    Circadian rhythms produce a biological measure of time that increases plant performance. The mechanisms that underlie this increase in productivity require investigation to provide information that will underpin future crop improvement. There is a growing body of evidence that a sophisticated signalling network interconnects the circadian oscillator and chloroplasts. We consider this in the context of circadian signalling to chloroplasts and the relationship between retrograde signalling and circadian regulation. We place circadian signalling to chloroplasts by sigma factors within an evolutionary context. We describe selected recent developments in the integration of light and circadian signals that control chloroplast gene expression.

  10. Circadian Rhythm Sleep Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Lirong; Zee, Phyllis C.

    2012-01-01

    There have been remarkable advances in our understanding of the molecular, cellular and physiological mechanisms underlying the regulation of circadian rhythms, as well as the impact of circadian dysfunction on health and disease. This information has transformed our understanding of the effect of circadian rhythm sleep disorders (CRSD) on health, performance and safety. CRSDs are caused by alterations of the central circadian time-keeping system, or a misalignment of the endogenous circadian rhythm and the external environment. In this section, we provide a review of circadian biology and discuss the pathophysiology, clinical features, diagnosis, and treatment of the most commonly encountered CRSDs in clinical practice. PMID:23099133

  11. Circadian rhythms, alcohol and gut interactions

    PubMed Central

    Forsyth, Christopher B.; Voigt, Rbin M.; Burgess, Helen J.; Swanson, Garth R.; Keshavarzian, Ali

    2015-01-01

    The circadian clock establishes rhythms throughout the body with an approximately 24 hour period that affect expression of hundreds of genes. Epidemiological data reveal chronic circadian misalignment, common in our society, significantly increases the risk for a myriad of diseases, including cardiovascular disease, diabetes, cancer, infertility and gastrointestinal disease. Disruption of intestinal barrier function, also known as gut leakiness, is especially important in alcoholic liver disease (ALD). Several studies have shown that alcohol causes ALD in only a 20–30% subset of alcoholics. Thus, a better understanding is needed of why only a subset of alcoholics develops ALD. Compelling evidence shows that increased gut leakiness to microbial products and especially LPS play a critical role in the pathogenesis of ALD. Clock and other circadian clock genes have been shown to regulate lipid transport, motility and other gut functions. We hypothesized that one possible mechanism for alcohol-induced intestinal hyper-permeability is through disruption of central or peripheral (intestinal) circadian regulation. In support of this hypothesis, our recent data shows that disruption of circadian rhythms makes the gut more susceptible to injury. Our in vitro data show that alcohol stimulates increased Clock and Per2 circadian clock proteins and that siRNA knockdown of these proteins prevents alcohol-induced permeability. We also show that intestinal Cyp2e1-mediated oxidative stress is required for alcohol-induced upregulation of Clock and Per2 and intestinal hyperpermeability. Our mouse model of chronic alcohol feeding shows that circadian disruption through genetics (in ClockΔ19 mice) or environmental disruption by weekly 12h phase shifting results in gut leakiness alone and exacerbates alcohol-induced gut leakiness and liver pathology. Our data in human alcoholics show they exhibit abnormal melatonin profiles characteristic of circadian disruption. Taken together our

  12. Circadian rhythms, alcohol and gut interactions.

    PubMed

    Forsyth, Christopher B; Voigt, Robin M; Burgess, Helen J; Swanson, Garth R; Keshavarzian, Ali

    2015-06-01

    The circadian clock establishes rhythms throughout the body with an approximately 24 hour period that affect expression of hundreds of genes. Epidemiological data reveal chronic circadian misalignment, common in our society, significantly increases the risk for a myriad of diseases, including cardiovascular disease, diabetes, cancer, infertility and gastrointestinal disease. Disruption of intestinal barrier function, also known as gut leakiness, is especially important in alcoholic liver disease (ALD). Several studies have shown that alcohol causes ALD in only a 20-30% subset of alcoholics. Thus, a better understanding is needed of why only a subset of alcoholics develops ALD. Compelling evidence shows that increased gut leakiness to microbial products and especially LPS play a critical role in the pathogenesis of ALD. Clock and other circadian clock genes have been shown to regulate lipid transport, motility and other gut functions. We hypothesized that one possible mechanism for alcohol-induced intestinal hyperpermeability is through disruption of central or peripheral (intestinal) circadian regulation. In support of this hypothesis, our recent data shows that disruption of circadian rhythms makes the gut more susceptible to injury. Our in vitro data show that alcohol stimulates increased Clock and Per2 circadian clock proteins and that siRNA knockdown of these proteins prevents alcohol-induced permeability. We also show that intestinal Cyp2e1-mediated oxidative stress is required for alcohol-induced upregulation of Clock and Per2 and intestinal hyperpermeability. Our mouse model of chronic alcohol feeding shows that circadian disruption through genetics (in Clock(▵19) mice) or environmental disruption by weekly 12h phase shifting results in gut leakiness alone and exacerbates alcohol-induced gut leakiness and liver pathology. Our data in human alcoholics show they exhibit abnormal melatonin profiles characteristic of circadian disruption. Taken together our

  13. Circadian rhythms, alcohol and gut interactions.

    PubMed

    Forsyth, Christopher B; Voigt, Robin M; Burgess, Helen J; Swanson, Garth R; Keshavarzian, Ali

    2015-06-01

    The circadian clock establishes rhythms throughout the body with an approximately 24 hour period that affect expression of hundreds of genes. Epidemiological data reveal chronic circadian misalignment, common in our society, significantly increases the risk for a myriad of diseases, including cardiovascular disease, diabetes, cancer, infertility and gastrointestinal disease. Disruption of intestinal barrier function, also known as gut leakiness, is especially important in alcoholic liver disease (ALD). Several studies have shown that alcohol causes ALD in only a 20-30% subset of alcoholics. Thus, a better understanding is needed of why only a subset of alcoholics develops ALD. Compelling evidence shows that increased gut leakiness to microbial products and especially LPS play a critical role in the pathogenesis of ALD. Clock and other circadian clock genes have been shown to regulate lipid transport, motility and other gut functions. We hypothesized that one possible mechanism for alcohol-induced intestinal hyperpermeability is through disruption of central or peripheral (intestinal) circadian regulation. In support of this hypothesis, our recent data shows that disruption of circadian rhythms makes the gut more susceptible to injury. Our in vitro data show that alcohol stimulates increased Clock and Per2 circadian clock proteins and that siRNA knockdown of these proteins prevents alcohol-induced permeability. We also show that intestinal Cyp2e1-mediated oxidative stress is required for alcohol-induced upregulation of Clock and Per2 and intestinal hyperpermeability. Our mouse model of chronic alcohol feeding shows that circadian disruption through genetics (in Clock(▵19) mice) or environmental disruption by weekly 12h phase shifting results in gut leakiness alone and exacerbates alcohol-induced gut leakiness and liver pathology. Our data in human alcoholics show they exhibit abnormal melatonin profiles characteristic of circadian disruption. Taken together our

  14. Increasing body mass index, blood pressure, and Acanthosis Nigricans abnormalities in school-age children.

    PubMed

    Otto, Debra E; Wang, Xiaohui; Garza, Viola; Fuentes, Lilia A; Rodriguez, Melinda C; Sullivan, Pamela

    2013-12-01

    This retrospective quantitative study examined the relationships among gender, Acanthosis Nigricans (AN), body mass index (BMI), and blood pressure (BP) in children attending school Grades 1-9 in Southwest Texas. Of the 34,897 health screening records obtained for the secondary analysis, 32,788 were included for the study. A logistic regression analysis was carried out with AN as the dependent variable, with year, gender, BMI, and BP as independent variables. The results indicate that the rate of children in each grade with three positive markers increased 2% during a 3-year period between 2008 and 2010. In the 5-year period between 2005 and 2010, a clear trend of significantly higher numbers of children with both AN and BMI markers was apparent. Gender played a significant role as females were more likely to have the AN marker than males. Further study is indicated based on the increasing trend of school-age children in Texas with positive markers for AN, increased BMI and BP.

  15. Personalized medicine for pathological circadian dysfunctions

    PubMed Central

    Skelton, Rachel L.; Kornhauser, Jon M.; Tate, Barbara A.

    2015-01-01

    The recent approval of a therapeutic for a circadian disorder has increased interest in developing additional medicines for disorders characterized by circadian disruption. However, previous experience demonstrates that drug development for central nervous system (CNS) disorders has a high failure rate. Personalized medicine, or the approach to identifying the right treatment for the right patient, has recently become the standard for drug development in the oncology field. In addition to utilizing Companion Diagnostics (CDx) that identify specific genetic biomarkers to prescribe certain targeted therapies, patient profiling is regularly used to enrich for a responsive patient population during clinical trials, resulting in fewer patients required for statistical significance and a higher rate of success for demonstrating efficacy and hence receiving approval for the drug. This personalized medicine approach may be one mechanism that could reduce the high clinical trial failure rate in the development of CNS drugs. This review will discuss current circadian trials, the history of personalized medicine in oncology, lessons learned from a recently approved circadian therapeutic, and how personalized medicine can be tailored for use in future clinical trials for circadian disorders to ultimately lead to the approval of more therapeutics for patients suffering from circadian abnormalities. PMID:26150790

  16. Aging and Circadian Rhythms.

    PubMed

    Duffy, Jeanne F; Zitting, Kirsi-Marja; Chinoy, Evan D

    2015-12-01

    Aging is associated with numerous changes, including changes in sleep timing, duration, and quality. The circadian timing system interacts with a sleep-wake homeostatic system to regulate human sleep, including sleep timing and structure. This article reviews key features of the human circadian timing system, age-related changes in the circadian timing system, and how those changes may contribute to the observed alterations in sleep. PMID:26568120

  17. Circadian Clocks and Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Marcheva, Biliana; Ramsey, Kathryn M.; Peek, Clara B.; Affinati, Alison; Maury, Eleonore; Bass, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Circadian clocks maintain periodicity in internal cycles of behavior, physiology, and metabolism, enabling organisms to anticipate the 24-h rotation of the Earth. In mammals, circadian integration of metabolic systems optimizes energy harvesting and utilization across the light/dark cycle. Disruption of clock genes has recently been linked to sleep disorders and to the development of cardiometabolic disease. Conversely, aberrant nutrient signaling affects circadian rhythms of behavior. This chapter reviews the emerging relationship between the molecular clock and metabolic systems and examines evidence that circadian disruption exerts deleterious consequences on human health. PMID:23604478

  18. The Arabidopsis Circadian System

    PubMed Central

    McClung, C. Robertson; Salomé, Patrice A.; Michael, Todd P.

    2002-01-01

    Rhythms with periods of approximately 24 hr are widespread in nature. Those that persist in constant conditions are termed circadian rhythms and reflect the activity of an endogenous biological clock. Plants, including Arabidopsis, are richly rhythmic. Expression analysis, most recently on a genomic scale, indicates that the Arabidopsis circadian clock regulates a number of key metabolic pathways and stress responses. A number of sensitive and high-throughput assays have been developed to monitor the Arabidopsis clock. These assays have facilitated the identification of components of plant circadian systems through genetic and molecular biological studies. Although much remains to be learned, the framework of the Arabidopsis circadian system is coming into focus. Dedication This review is dedicated to the memory of DeLill Nasser, a wonderful mentor and an unwavering advocate of both Arabidopsis and circadian rhythms research. PMID:22303209

  19. Circadian rhythm sleep disorders.

    PubMed

    Kanathur, Naveen; Harrington, John; Lee-Chiong, Teofilo

    2010-06-01

    Because there is insufficient cellular energy for organisms to perform their functions at the same constant rate and at the same time, all biologic processes show rhythmicity, each with its own unique frequency, amplitude, and phase. Optimal sleep and wakefulness requires proper timing and alignment of desired sleep-wake schedules and circadian rhythm-related periods of alertness. Persistent or recurrent mismatch between endogenous circadian rhythms and the conventional sleep-wake schedules of the environmental day can give rise to several circadian rhythm sleep disorders. Evaluation of suspected circadian rhythm sleep disorders requires proper monitoring of sleep diaries, often over several days to weeks. This article discusses the disorders of the circadian sleep-wake cycle and the therapeutic measures to correct the same.

  20. Circadian Regulation of Lipid Mobilization in White Adipose Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Shostak, Anton; Meyer-Kovac, Judit; Oster, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    In mammals, a network of circadian clocks regulates 24-h rhythms of behavior and physiology. Circadian disruption promotes obesity and the development of obesity-associated disorders, but it remains unclear to which extent peripheral tissue clocks contribute to this effect. To reveal the impact of the circadian timing system on lipid metabolism, blood and adipose tissue samples from wild-type, ClockΔ19, and Bmal1−/− circadian mutant mice were subjected to biochemical assays and gene expression profiling. We show diurnal variations in lipolysis rates and release of free fatty acids (FFAs) and glycerol into the blood correlating with rhythmic regulation of two genes encoding the lipolysis pacemaker enzymes, adipose triglyceride (TG) lipase and hormone-sensitive lipase, by self-sustained adipocyte clocks. Circadian clock mutant mice show low and nonrhythmic FFA and glycerol blood content together with decreased lipolysis rates and increased sensitivity to fasting. Instead circadian clock disruption promotes the accumulation of TGs in white adipose tissue (WAT), leading to increased adiposity and adipocyte hypertrophy. In summary, circadian modulation of lipolysis rates regulates the availability of lipid-derived energy during the day, suggesting a role for WAT clocks in the regulation of energy homeostasis. PMID:23434933

  1. The effect of abnormal birth history on ambulatory blood pressure and disease progression in children with chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Flynn, Joseph T; Ng, Derek K; Chan, Grace J; Samuels, Joshua; Furth, Susan; Warady, Bradley; Greenbaum, Larry A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To examine the associations between abnormal birth history (birth weight [BW] <2500 grams, gestational age <36 weeks, or small for gestational age), BP, and renal function among 332 participants (97 with abnormal and 235 with normal birth history) in the Chronic Kidney Disease in Children (CKiD) Study, a cohort of children with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Study design Casual and 24-hour ambulatory BP were obtained. Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) was determined by iohexol disappearance. Confounders (birth and maternal characteristics, socioeconomic status) were used to generate predicted probabilities of abnormal birth history for propensity score matching. Weighted linear and logistic regression models with adjustment for quintiles of propensity scores and CKD diagnosis were used to assess the impact of birth history on BP and GFR. Results Age at enrollment, percent with glomerular disease, and baseline GFR were similar between the groups. Those with abnormal birth history were more likely to be female, of Black race or Hispanic ethnicity, to have low household income, or part of a multiple birth. Unadjusted BP measurements, baseline GFR and change in GFR did not differ significantly between the groups; no differences were seen after adjusting for confounders by propensity score matching. Conclusions Abnormal birth history does not appear to have exerted a significant influence on BP or GFR in this cohort of children with CKD. The absence of an observed association is likely secondary to the dominant effects of underlying CKD and its treatment. PMID:24698454

  2. Extensive diversity in circadian regulation of plasma lipids and evidence for different circadian metabolic phenotypes in humans

    PubMed Central

    Chua, Eric Chern-Pin; Shui, Guanghou; Lee, Ivan Tian-Guang; Lau, Pauline; Tan, Luuan-Chin; Yeo, Sing-Chen; Lam, Buu Duyen; Bulchand, Sarada; Summers, Scott A.; Puvanendran, Kathiravelu; Rozen, Steven G.; Wenk, Markus R.; Gooley, Joshua J.

    2013-01-01

    The circadian system regulates daily rhythms in lipid metabolism and adipose tissue function. Although disruption of circadian clock function is associated with negative cardiometabolic end points, very little is known about interindividual variation in circadian-regulated metabolic pathways. Here, we used targeted lipidomics-based approaches to profile the time course of 263 lipids in blood plasma in 20 healthy individuals. Over a span of 28 h, blood was collected every 4 h and plasma lipids were analyzed by HPLC/MS. Across subjects, about 13% of lipid metabolites showed circadian variation. Rhythmicity spanned all metabolite classes examined, suggesting widespread circadian control of lipid-mediated energy storage, transport, and signaling. Intersubject agreement for lipids identified as rhythmic was only about 20%, however, and the timing of lipid rhythms ranged up to 12 h apart between individuals. Healthy subjects therefore showed substantial variation in the timing and strength of rhythms across different lipid species. Strong interindividual differences were also observed for rhythms of blood glucose and insulin, but not cortisol. Using consensus clustering with iterative feature selection, subjects clustered into different groups based on strength of rhythmicity for a subset of triglycerides and phosphatidylcholines, suggesting that there are different circadian metabolic phenotypes in the general population. These results have potential implications for lipid metabolism disorders linked to circadian clock disruption. PMID:23946426

  3. Brain imaging and blood biomarker abnormalities in children with autosomal-dominant Alzheimer's disease: A cross-sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Quiroz, Y.T.; Schultz, A.; Chen, K.; Protas, H.; Brickhouse, M.; Fleisher, A.S.; Langbaum, J.B.; Thiyyagura, P.; Fagan, A.M.; Shah, A.R.; Muniz, M.; Arboleda-Velasquez, JF; Munoz, C.; Garcia, G.; Acosta-Baena, N.; Giraldo, M.; Tirado, V.; Ramirez, D.; Tariot, PN; Dickerson, B.C.; Sperling, R.A.; Lopera, F.; Reiman, E.M.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Brain imaging and fluid biomarkers are characterized in children at risk for autosomal dominant Alzheimer disease (ADAD). OBJECTIVE To characterize and compare structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), resting-state and task-dependent functional MRI, and plasma amyloid-β (Aβ) measurements in presenilin 1 (PSEN1) E280A mutation–carrying and noncarrying children with ADAD. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Cross-sectional measures of structural and functional MRI and plasma Aβ assays were assessed in 18 PSEN1 E280A carriers and 19 noncarriers aged 9 to 17 years from a Colombian kindred with ADAD. Recruitment and data collection for this study were conducted at the University of Antioquia and the Hospital Pablo Tobon Uribe in Medellin, Colombia, between August 2011 and June 2012. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES All participants had blood sampling, structural MRI, and functional MRI during associative memory encoding and resting-state and cognitive assessments. Outcome measures included plasma Aβ1-42 concentrations and Aβ1-42:Aβ1-40 ratios, memory encoding–dependent activation changes, resting-state connectivity, and regional gray matter volumes. Structural and functional MRI data were compared using automated brain mapping algorithms and search regions related to AD. RESULTS Similar to findings in adult mutation carriers, in the later preclinical and clinical stages of ADAD, mutation-carrying children were distinguished from control individuals by significantly higher plasma Aβ1-42 levels (mean [SD]: carriers, 18.8 [5.1] pg/mL and noncarriers, 13.1 [3.2] pg/mL; P < .001) and Aβ1-42:Aβ1-40 ratios (mean [SD]: carriers, 0.32 [0.06] and noncarriers, 0.21 [0.03]; P < .001), as well as less memory encoding task–related deactivation in parietal regions (eg, mean [SD] parameter estimates for the right precuneus were −0.590 [0.50] for noncarriers and −0.087 [0.38] for carriers; P < .005 uncorrected). Unlike carriers in the later stages, mutation

  4. Decreased frequency and activated phenotype of blood CD27 IgD IgM B lymphocytes is a permanent abnormality in systemic lupus erythematosus patients

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is characterized by B cell hyper-activation and auto-reactivity resulting in pathogenic auto-antibody generation. The phenotypic analysis of blood B cell subsets can be used to understand these alterations. Methods The combined detection of CD19, CD27 and IgD (or IgM) by flow cytometry (FC) analysis delineates five well-defined blood B cell-subsets: naive, switched (S) memory, double negative (DN) memory and CD27 IgD IgM (non-switched memory) B lymphocytes, and plasma cells (PCs). This phenotypic study was performed in 69 consecutive SLE patients and 31 healthy controls. Results SLE patients exhibited several abnormalities in the distribution of these B cell subsets, including elevated levels of DN memory B cells and PCs, and decreased CD27 IgD IgM B cells. Active SLE patients also showed decreased presence of S memory B cells and increased proportions of naive B lymphocytes. Nevertheless, when the patients in remission who did not require treatment were studied separately, the only remaining abnormality was a reduction of the CD27 IgD IgM B cell-subset detectable in most of these patients. The level of reduction of CD27 IgD IgM B cells was associated with elevated values of serum SLE auto-antibodies. Further analysis of this latter B cell-subset specifically showed increased expression of CD80, CD86, CD95, 9G4 idiotype and functional CXCR3 and CXCR4. Conclusions The presence of a reduced blood CD27 IgD IgM B cell-subset, exhibiting an activated state and enriched for auto-reactivity, is a consistent B cell abnormality in SLE. These findings suggest that CD27 IgD IgM B lymphocytes play a role in the pathogenesis of this disease. PMID:20525218

  5. Physiological importance of a circadian clock outside the suprachiasmatic nucleus.

    PubMed

    Storch, K-F; Paz, C; Signorovitch, J; Raviola, E; Pawlyk, B; Li, T; Weitz, C J

    2007-01-01

    Circadian clocks are widely distributed in mammalian tissues, but little is known about the physiological functions of clocks outside the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the brain. The retina has an intrinsic circadian clock, but its importance for vision is unknown. Here, we show that mice lacking Bmal1, a gene required for clock function, had abnormal retinal transcriptional responses to light and defective inner retinal electrical responses to light, but normal photoreceptor responses to light and retinas that appeared structurally normal as observed by light and electron microscopy. We generated mice with a retina-specific genetic deletion of Bmal1, and they had defects of retinal visual physiology essentially identical to those of mice lacking Bmal1 in all tissues and lacked a circadian rhythm of inner retinal electrical responses to light. Our findings indicate that the intrinsic circadian clock of the retina regulates retinal visual processing in vivo.

  6. Circadian genes, rhythms and the biology of mood disorders.

    PubMed

    McClung, Colleen A

    2007-05-01

    For many years, researchers have suggested that abnormalities in circadian rhythms may underlie the development of mood disorders such as bipolar disorder (BPD), major depression and seasonal affective disorder (SAD). Furthermore, some of the treatments that are currently employed to treat mood disorders are thought to act by shifting or "resetting" the circadian clock, including total sleep deprivation (TSD) and bright light therapy. There is also reason to suspect that many of the mood stabilizers and antidepressants used to treat these disorders may derive at least some of their therapeutic efficacy by affecting the circadian clock. Recent genetic, molecular and behavioral studies implicate individual genes that make up the clock in mood regulation. As well, important functions of these genes in brain regions and neurotransmitter systems associated with mood regulation are becoming apparent. In this review, the evidence linking circadian rhythms and mood disorders, and what is known about the underlying biology of this association, is presented.

  7. Abnormalities in the cellular phase of blood fibrinolytic activity in systemic lupus erythematosus and in venous thromboembolism

    SciTech Connect

    Moroz, L.A.; MacLean, L.D.; Langleben, D.

    1986-09-15

    Fibrinolytic activities of whole blood and plasma were determined by /sup 125/I-fibrin radiometric assay in 16 normal subjects, and in 11 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), 14 with progressive systemic sclerosis (PSS), 23 with venous thromboembolic disease, and 20 patients awaiting elective surgery. Mean whole blood and plasma activities for patients with PSS, and for those awaiting elective surgery, were similar to normal values, as was the mean plasma activity in patients with SLE. However, mean whole blood activity in SLE was significantly decreased compared with normals (p less than 0.05), with mean plasma activity accounting for 44% of mean whole blood activity (compared with 17% in normal subjects), representing a 67% decrease in mean calculated cellular phase activity in SLE, when compared with normals. Since the numbers of cells (neutrophils, monocytes) possibly involved in cellular activity were not decreased, the findings suggest a functional defect in fibrinolytic activity of one or more blood cell types in SLE. An additional finding was the participation of the cellular phase as well as the well-known plasma phase of blood in the fibrinolytic response to thromboembolism.

  8. Biophotonics: Circadian photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rea, Mark S.

    2011-05-01

    A growing body of medical evidence suggests that disrupting the body's biological clock can have adverse effects on health. Researchers are now creating the photonic tools to monitor, predict and influence the circadian rhythm.

  9. Assessment of abnormal blood flow and efficacy of treatment in patients with systemic sclerosis using a newly developed microwireless laser Doppler flowmeter and arm-raising test.

    PubMed

    Kido, M; Takeuchi, S; Hayashida, S; Urabe, K; Sawada, R; Furue, M

    2007-10-01

    Background Patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc) frequently suffer from recalcitrant digital ulceration because of impaired cutaneous blood flow (CBF). A simple and accurate CBF measurement would be helpful to evaluate the disease status and efficacy of treatment in such patients. Objectives To examine the feasibility of a newly developed, micromachined integrated laser blood flowmeter (MILBF) for evaluation of abnormal CBF responses in patients with SSc. Methods CBF of finger pulp was measured in eight patients with SSc and in six healthy controls using MILBF. CBF in the steady state and the responses to the arm-raising test and cold provocation were assessed. The therapeutic efficacy of a single and an intensive prostaglandin E(1) (PGE(1)) infusion treatment was also evaluated in some of the SSc patients. Results The patients with SSc showed significantly lower steady-state CBF than controls. The rate of blood flow with cold provocation and the velocity of blood flow recovery after cold provocation (VR-CP) tended to be lower in patients with SSc. Augmentation of amplitude of the digital pulse wave by arm raising (AA-AR) was observed in controls, but not in patients with SSc. We also found that VR-CP and AA-AR may be good markers for evaluating the efficacy of vasodilatory treatment. It should be noted that the examined patients did not complain of any pain and/or distress during the arm-raising test, as opposed to during cold provocation. Conclusions CBF assessment using MILBF and an arm-raising test is accurate, noninvasive and well tolerated and thus the combination may be a better alternative method to evaluate abnormal CBF and efficacy of treatment in patients with SSc.

  10. Feeding and circadian clocks.

    PubMed

    Pardini, Lissia; Kaeffer, Bertrand

    2006-01-01

    The mammalian genome encodes at least a dozen of genes directly involved in the regulation of the feedback loops constituting the circadian clock. The circadian system is built up on a multitude of oscillators organized according to a hierarchical model in which neurons of the suprachiasmatic nuclei of the hypothalamus may drive the central circadian clock and all the other somatic cells may possess the molecular components allowing tissues and organs to constitute peripheral clocks. Suprachiasmatic neurons are driving the central circadian clock which is reset by lighting cues captured and integrated by the melanopsin cells of the retina and define the daily rhythms of locomotor activity and associated physiological regulatory pathways like feeding and metabolism. This central clock entrains peripheral clocks which can be synchronized by non-photic environmental cues and uncoupled from the central one depending on the nature and the strength of the circadian signal. The human circadian clock and its functioning in central or peripheral tissues are currently being explored to increase the therapeutic efficacy of timed administration of drugs or radiation, and to offer better advice on lighting and meal timing useful for frequent travelers suffering from jet lag and for night workers' comfort. However, the molecular mechanism driving and coordinating the central and peripheral clocks through a wide range of synchronizers (lighting, feeding, physical or social activities) remains a mystery.

  11. Physiology of circadian entrainment.

    PubMed

    Golombek, Diego A; Rosenstein, Ruth E

    2010-07-01

    Mammalian circadian rhythms are controlled by endogenous biological oscillators, including a master clock located in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN). Since the period of this oscillation is of approximately 24 h, to keep synchrony with the environment, circadian rhythms need to be entrained daily by means of Zeitgeber ("time giver") signals, such as the light-dark cycle. Recent advances in the neurophysiology and molecular biology of circadian rhythmicity allow a better understanding of synchronization. In this review we cover several aspects of the mechanisms for photic entrainment of mammalian circadian rhythms, including retinal sensitivity to light by means of novel photopigments as well as circadian variations in the retina that contribute to the regulation of retinal physiology. Downstream from the retina, we examine retinohypothalamic communication through neurotransmitter (glutamate, aspartate, pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide) interaction with SCN receptors and the resulting signal transduction pathways in suprachiasmatic neurons, as well as putative neuron-glia interactions. Finally, we describe and analyze clock gene expression and its importance in entrainment mechanisms, as well as circadian disorders or retinal diseases related to entrainment deficits, including experimental and clinical treatments. PMID:20664079

  12. Circadian clocks and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Blakeman, Victoria; Williams, Jack L; Meng, Qing-Jun; Streuli, Charles H

    2016-01-01

    Circadian clocks respond to environmental time cues to coordinate 24-hour oscillations in almost every tissue of the body. In the breast, circadian clocks regulate the rhythmic expression of numerous genes. Disrupted expression of circadian genes can alter breast biology and may promote cancer. Here we overview circadian mechanisms, and the connection between the molecular clock and breast biology. We describe how disruption of circadian genes contributes to cancer via multiple mechanisms, and link this to increased tumour risk in women who work irregular shift patterns. Understanding the influence of circadian rhythms on breast cancer could lead to more efficacious therapies, reformed public health policy and improved patient outcome. PMID:27590298

  13. New insights into circadian aspects of health and disease.

    PubMed

    Singh, R B; Pella, D; Otsuka, Kuniaki; Halberg, F; Cornelissen, G

    2002-11-01

    Early awakening and early to bed as well as good conduct, thought, diet, interpersonal dealings and physical activity have been suggested for healthy life in Ayurveda. Circadian rhythms, coordinated in part by the parietal hypothalamic-pituitary and adrenal mechanisms, have been reported in almost all variables examined thus far, including the circulation. It is possible that all metabolic functions undergo circadian rhythms. It remains to be explored whether these rhythms may be optimized by Ayurvedic practices. The onsets of myocardial ischemia, unstable angina, acute myocardial infarction, sudden cardiac death, and strokes have been reported to exhibit a circadian variation, with increased frequency in the second quarter of the day. An increased physical and mental load caused by an attempt to prepare for the day may be important in triggering acute cardiovascular events. Depending on their timing, meditation (Ayurvedic practice), n-3 fatty acids, coenzyme Q10, beta-blockers and estrogens may have beneficial effects, whereas progestins and mental load may have adverse effects on heart rate and blood pressure variability, which may be expressed by different circadian patterns. Around the clock serial recordings of blood pressure and heart rate during usual activities and lifestyles may be recorded and may be analyzed by computer-implemented curve fitting to assess the about 24-hour (circadian) variation, among other rhythmic, chaotic, and trend components of the time structure (chronome) of these variables. The new disease risk syndrome circadian hyper-amplitude-tension (CHAT), a condition characterized by an excessive circadian amplitude of blood pressure, cannot be ascertained on the basis of single casual blood pressure measurements. The International Chronome Ecological Study of Heart Rate (and blood pressure) Variability in various ethnic groups aims at collecting further evidence regarding the role of blood pressure and heart rate variability in the

  14. Blood

    MedlinePlus

    ... solid part of your blood contains red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Red blood cells (RBC) deliver oxygen from your lungs to your tissues and organs. White blood cells (WBC) fight infection and are part of your ...

  15. Relationship between long-term exposure to low-level arsenic in drinking water and the prevalence of abnormal blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chuanwu; Mao, Guangyun; He, Suxia; Yang, Zuopeng; Yang, Wei; Zhang, Xiaojing; Qiu, Wenting; Ta, Na; Cao, Li; Yang, Hui; Guo, Xiaojuan

    2013-11-15

    Arsenic increases the risk and incidence of cardiovascular disease. To explore the impact of long-term exposure to low-level arsenic in drinking water on blood pressure including pulse pressure (PP) and mean arterial blood pressure (MAP), a cross-sectional study was conducted in 2010 in which the blood pressure of 405 villagers was measured, who had been drinking water with an inorganic arsenic content <50 μg/L. A multivariate logistic regression model was used to estimate odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals. After adjusting for age, gender, Body Mass Index (BMI), alcohol consumption and smoking, the odds ratios showed a 1.45-fold (95%CI: 0.63-3.35) increase in the group with >30-50 years of arsenic exposure and a 2.95-fold (95%CI: 1.31-6.67) increase in the group with >50 years exposure. Furthermore, the odds ratio for prevalence of abnormal PP and MAP were 1.06 (95%CI: 0.24-4.66) and 0.87 (95%CI: 0.36-2.14) in the group with >30-50 years of exposure, and were 2.46 (95%CI: 0.87-6.97) and 3.75 (95%CI: 1.61-8.71) for the group with >50 years exposure, compared to the group with arsenic exposure ≤ 30 years respectively. Significant trends for Hypertension (p<0.0001), PP (p<0.0001) and MAP (p=0.0016) were found. The prevalence of hypertension and abnormal PP as well as MAP is marked among a low-level arsenic exposure population, and significantly increases with the duration of arsenic exposure.

  16. Circadian misalignment increases cardiovascular disease risk factors in humans

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Christopher J.; Purvis, Taylor E.; Hu, Kun; Scheer, Frank A. J. L.

    2016-01-01

    Shift work is a risk factor for hypertension, inflammation, and cardiovascular disease. This increased risk cannot be fully explained by classic risk factors. One of the key features of shift workers is that their behavioral and environmental cycles are typically misaligned relative to their endogenous circadian system. However, there is little information on the impact of acute circadian misalignment on cardiovascular disease risk in humans. Here we show—by using two 8-d laboratory protocols—that short-term circadian misalignment (12-h inverted behavioral and environmental cycles for three days) adversely affects cardiovascular risk factors in healthy adults. Circadian misalignment increased 24-h systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) by 3.0 mmHg and 1.5 mmHg, respectively. These results were primarily explained by an increase in blood pressure during sleep opportunities (SBP, +5.6 mmHg; DBP, +1.9 mmHg) and, to a lesser extent, by raised blood pressure during wake periods (SBP, +1.6 mmHg; DBP, +1.4 mmHg). Circadian misalignment decreased wake cardiac vagal modulation by 8–15%, as determined by heart rate variability analysis, and decreased 24-h urinary epinephrine excretion rate by 7%, without a significant effect on 24-h urinary norepinephrine excretion rate. Circadian misalignment increased 24-h serum interleukin-6, C-reactive protein, resistin, and tumor necrosis factor-α levels by 3–29%. We demonstrate that circadian misalignment per se increases blood pressure and inflammatory markers. Our findings may help explain why shift work increases hypertension, inflammation, and cardiovascular disease risk. PMID:26858430

  17. Circadian misalignment increases cardiovascular disease risk factors in humans.

    PubMed

    Morris, Christopher J; Purvis, Taylor E; Hu, Kun; Scheer, Frank A J L

    2016-03-01

    Shift work is a risk factor for hypertension, inflammation, and cardiovascular disease. This increased risk cannot be fully explained by classic risk factors. One of the key features of shift workers is that their behavioral and environmental cycles are typically misaligned relative to their endogenous circadian system. However, there is little information on the impact of acute circadian misalignment on cardiovascular disease risk in humans. Here we show-by using two 8-d laboratory protocols-that short-term circadian misalignment (12-h inverted behavioral and environmental cycles for three days) adversely affects cardiovascular risk factors in healthy adults. Circadian misalignment increased 24-h systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) by 3.0 mmHg and 1.5 mmHg, respectively. These results were primarily explained by an increase in blood pressure during sleep opportunities (SBP, +5.6 mmHg; DBP, +1.9 mmHg) and, to a lesser extent, by raised blood pressure during wake periods (SBP, +1.6 mmHg; DBP, +1.4 mmHg). Circadian misalignment decreased wake cardiac vagal modulation by 8-15%, as determined by heart rate variability analysis, and decreased 24-h urinary epinephrine excretion rate by 7%, without a significant effect on 24-h urinary norepinephrine excretion rate. Circadian misalignment increased 24-h serum interleukin-6, C-reactive protein, resistin, and tumor necrosis factor-α levels by 3-29%. We demonstrate that circadian misalignment per se increases blood pressure and inflammatory markers. Our findings may help explain why shift work increases hypertension, inflammation, and cardiovascular disease risk.

  18. Abnormal expansion of naïve B lymphocytes after unrelated cord blood transplantation – a case report

    PubMed Central

    SHONO, Y; TOUBAI, T; OTA, S; IBATA, M; MASHIKO, S; HIRATE, D; MIURA, Y; UMEHARA, S; TOYOSHIMA, N; TANAKA, J; ASAKA, M; IMAMURA, M

    2006-01-01

    A 33-year-old woman underwent unrelated cord blood transplantation (U-CBT) for myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS)-related secondary AML. She showed impressive increases in the number of CD19+ B cells in bone marrow and CD19+27−IgD+ B cells in peripheral blood from about 1 month to 3 months after U-CBT. The serum level of IL-6 temporarily increased after transplantation, and this increase seemed to be correlated with the expansion of CD19+ B cells. Although, compared with BMT, little is known about the kinetics of hematological and immunological reconstitution in U-CBT, there was initial B-cell recovery after CBT as some described. This B cell recovery may be associated with a high number of B-cell precursors present in cord blood (CB). The phenomenon of naïve B lymphocyte expansion that we found might be associated with a high number of B-cell precursors present in CB. PMID:16999729

  19. Socially synchronized circadian oscillators

    PubMed Central

    Bloch, Guy; Herzog, Erik D.; Levine, Joel D.; Schwartz, William J.

    2013-01-01

    Daily rhythms of physiology and behaviour are governed by an endogenous timekeeping mechanism (a circadian ‘clock’). The alternation of environmental light and darkness synchronizes (entrains) these rhythms to the natural day–night cycle, and underlying mechanisms have been investigated using singly housed animals in the laboratory. But, most species ordinarily would not live out their lives in such seclusion; in their natural habitats, they interact with other individuals, and some live in colonies with highly developed social structures requiring temporal synchronization. Social cues may thus be critical to the adaptive function of the circadian system, but elucidating their role and the responsible mechanisms has proven elusive. Here, we highlight three model systems that are now being applied to understanding the biology of socially synchronized circadian oscillators: the fruitfly, with its powerful array of molecular genetic tools; the honeybee, with its complex natural society and clear division of labour; and, at a different level of biological organization, the rodent suprachiasmatic nucleus, site of the brain's circadian clock, with its network of mutually coupled single-cell oscillators. Analyses at the ‘group’ level of circadian organization will likely generate a more complex, but ultimately more comprehensive, view of clocks and rhythms and their contribution to fitness in nature. PMID:23825203

  20. [Circadian rhythm sleep disorder].

    PubMed

    Mishima, Kazuo

    2013-12-01

    Primary pathophysiology of circadian rhythm sleep disorders(CRSDs) is a misalignment between the endogenous circadian rhythm phase and the desired or socially required sleep-wake schedule, or dysfunction of the circadian pacemaker and its afferent/efferent pathways. CRSDs consist of delayed sleep phase type, advanced sleep phase type, free-running type, irregular sleep-wake type, shift work type and jet lag type. Chronotherapy using strong zeitgebers (time cues), such as bright light and melatonin/ melatonin type 2 receptor agonist, is effective when administered with proper timing. Bright light is the strongest entraining agent of circadian rhythms. Bright light therapy (appropriately-timed exposure to bright light) for CRSDs is an effective treatment option, and can shift the sleep-wake cycle to earlier or later times, in order to correct for misalignment between the circadian system and the desired sleep-wake schedule. Timed administration of melatonin, either alone or in combination with light therapy has also been shown to be useful in the treatment of CRSDs.

  1. Circadian Rhythms in Cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Susan E; Golden, Susan S

    2015-12-01

    Life on earth is subject to daily and predictable fluctuations in light intensity, temperature, and humidity created by rotation of the earth. Circadian rhythms, generated by a circadian clock, control temporal programs of cellular physiology to facilitate adaptation to daily environmental changes. Circadian rhythms are nearly ubiquitous and are found in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. Here we introduce the molecular mechanism of the circadian clock in the model cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942. We review the current understanding of the cyanobacterial clock, emphasizing recent work that has generated a more comprehensive understanding of how the circadian oscillator becomes synchronized with the external environment and how information from the oscillator is transmitted to generate rhythms of biological activity. These results have changed how we think about the clock, shifting away from a linear model to one in which the clock is viewed as an interactive network of multifunctional components that are integrated into the context of the cell in order to pace and reset the oscillator. We conclude with a discussion of how this basic timekeeping mechanism differs in other cyanobacterial species and how information gleaned from work in cyanobacteria can be translated to understanding rhythmic phenomena in other prokaryotic systems. PMID:26335718

  2. Circadian dysfunction in a rotenone-induced parkinsonian rodent model.

    PubMed

    Lax, Pedro; Esquiva, Gema; Esteve-Rudd, Julian; Otalora, Beatriz Baño; Madrid, Juan Antonio; Cuenca, Nicolás

    2012-03-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder that also involves circadian rhythm alterations. Modifications of circadian rhythm parameters have been shown to occur in both PD patients and toxin-induced PD animal models. In the latter case, rotenone, a potent inhibitor of mitochondrial complex I (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide [NADH]-quinone reductase), has been used to elicit degeneration of dopaminergic neurons and development of parkinsonian syndrome. The present work addresses alterations induced by rotenone on both locomotor and body temperature circadian rhythms in rats. Rotenone-treated rats exhibited abnormalities in equilibrium, postural instability, and involuntary movements. Long-term subcutaneous administration of rotenone significantly reduced mean daily locomotor activity in most animals. During rotenone administration, mean body temperatures (BTs) and BT rhythm amplitudes were significantly lower than those observed in the control group. After long-term rotenone administration, the circadian rhythms of both locomotor activity (LA) and BT displayed decreased amplitudes, lower interdaily phase stability, and higher rhythm fragmentation, as compared to the control rats. The magnitude of the LA and BT circadian rhythm alterations induced by rotenone positively correlated with degree of motor impairment. These results indicate that rotenone induces circadian dysfunction in rats through some of the same mechanisms as those responsible for the development of motor disturbances.

  3. Circadian Rhythm Sleep Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min Ju; Lee, Jung Hie; Duffy, Jeanne F.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To review circadian rhythm sleep disorders, including underlying causes, diagnostic considerations, and typical treatments. Methods Literature review and discussion of specific cases. Results Survey studies 1,2 suggest that up to 3% of the adult population suffers from a circadian rhythm sleep disorder (CRSD). However, these sleep disorders are often confused with insomnia, and an estimated 10% of adult and 16% of adolescent sleep disorders patients may have a CRSD 3-6. While some CRSD (such as jet lag) can be self-limiting, others when untreated can lead to adverse medical, psychological, and social consequences. The International Classification of Sleep Disorders classifies CRSD as dyssomnias, with six subtypes: Advanced Sleep Phase Type, Delayed Sleep Phase Type, Irregular Sleep Wake Type, Free Running Type, Jet Lag Type, and Shift Work Type. The primary clinical characteristic of all CRSD is an inability to fall asleep and wake at the desired time. It is believed that CRSD arise from a problem with the internal biological clock (circadian timing system) and/or misalignment between the circadian timing system and the external 24-hour environment. This misalignment can be the result of biological and/or behavioral factors. CRSD can be confused with other sleep or medical disorders. Conclusions Circadian rhythm sleep disorders are a distinct class of sleep disorders characterized by a mismatch between the desired timing of sleep and the ability to fall asleep and remain asleep. If untreated, CRSD can lead to insomnia and excessive daytime sleepiness, with negative medical, psychological, and social consequences. It is important for physicians to recognize potential circadian rhythm sleep disorders so that appropriate diagnosis, treatment, and referral can be made. PMID:25368503

  4. The use of antioxidative stress enzymes, lipid peroxidation, and red blood cell abnormalities as biomarkers of stress in Periphthalmus papilio of the polluted coastal Lagos lagoon.

    PubMed

    Nnamdi, Amaeze H; Olumide, Adebesin A; Adeladun, Adepegba E; Oyenike, Kolapo; Rosemary, Egonmwan I

    2015-03-01

    We assessed the mudskipper, Periphthalmus papilio inhabiting the coast line of the Lagos lagoon, Gulf of Guinea, to determine suitable biomarkers of stress due to its current status as a polluted water body. The gill and liver samples showed evidence of some activities of antioxidative stress enzymes including catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione-s-transferase, reduced glutahthione, as well as some detectable levels of lipid peroxidation product. The stress status of the fishes was also elucidated by nuclear abnormalities especially micronucleus formation and the presence of numerous vacuolated red blood cells. Given the current need for more sensitive bioindicators in monitoring pollution in this lagoon, we hereby present these inherent responses in P. papilio as a suitable candidate for incorporation into the current repertoire for ecotoxicological investigations in polluted water bodies of the Gulf of Guinea coastline. PMID:25666650

  5. Circadian variation in heart rate, blood pressure, body temperature and EEG of immature broiler breeder chickens in restricted-fed and ad libitum-fed states.

    PubMed

    Savory, C J; Kostal, L; Nevison, I M

    2006-10-01

    1. Heart rate, intra-aortic blood pressure, deep body temperature and telencephalic EEG were monitored by radiotelemetry in 6 freely moving immature broiler breeders (three in each of two years), during routine food restriction and then ad libitum feeding, over two 24-h periods in each feeding state.2. Heart rate, blood pressure and body temperature were all higher during ad libitum than restricted feeding, and heart rate and body temperature were higher by day (12 h) than at night (12 h). The decreases in heart rate and body temperature at night were greater during restricted than ad libitum feeding. Blood pressure tended to be higher at night, except in year 2 during restricted feeding. Body temperature and ambient temperature were higher in year 2 than year 1.3. During restricted feeding, marked peaks in heart rate, blood pressure and body temperature in the 15 min after provision of the daily food ration at 09:00 h, when birds were eating, were equivalent to corresponding values seen during ad libitum feeding.4. Relative powers in delta (1 to 4 Hz) and theta (4 to 8 Hz) frequency bands of the EEG power spectrum were higher at night in year 2 only, while power in the alpha (8 to 12 Hz) band was higher at night in both years.5. It is concluded that most of the variation in heart rate, blood pressure and body temperature between feeding states and times of day/night can be accounted for in terms of variation in food intake and energy expenditure. The greater slow wave (delta, theta) EEG activity seen after lights-off in year 2 may reflect non-paradoxical sleep at that time.

  6. Circadian Clocks, Stress, and Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Dumbell, Rebecca; Matveeva, Olga; Oster, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    In mammals, molecular circadian clocks are present in most cells of the body, and this circadian network plays an important role in synchronizing physiological processes and behaviors to the appropriate time of day. The hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal endocrine axis regulates the response to acute and chronic stress, acting through its final effectors – glucocorticoids – released from the adrenal cortex. Glucocorticoid secretion, characterized by its circadian rhythm, has an important role in synchronizing peripheral clocks and rhythms downstream of the master circadian pacemaker in the suprachiasmatic nucleus. Finally, glucocorticoids are powerfully anti-inflammatory, and recent work has implicated the circadian clock in various aspects and cells of the immune system, suggesting a tight interplay of stress and circadian systems in the regulation of immunity. This mini-review summarizes our current understanding of the role of the circadian clock network in both the HPA axis and the immune system, and discusses their interactions. PMID:27199894

  7. Biological Clocks & Circadian Rhythms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Laura; Jones, M. Gail

    2009-01-01

    The study of biological clocks and circadian rhythms is an excellent way to address the inquiry strand in the National Science Education Standards (NSES) (NRC 1996). Students can study these everyday phenomena by designing experiments, gathering and analyzing data, and generating new experiments. As students explore biological clocks and circadian…

  8. Circadian rhythm in handwriting.

    PubMed

    Jasper, Isabelle; Häussler, Andreas; Marquardt, Christian; Hermsdörfer, Joachim

    2009-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine whether the motor process of handwriting is influenced by a circadian rhythm. Nine healthy young male subjects underwent a 40-h sleep deprivation protocol under constant routine conditions. Starting at 09:00 hours, subjects performed every 3 h two handwriting tasks of different complexity. Handwriting performance was evaluated by writing speed, writing fluency and script size. The frequency of handwriting, as a measure of movement speed, revealed a circadian rhythm, validated by harmonic regression, with a slowing at the time of the onset of melatonin secretion (22:17 hours) and a trough in the very early morning at around 03:30 hours. In the temporal variability of handwriting an effect of task complexity was suggested in the direction of circadian variations in parallel with speed only for the sentence. Despite deficits of speed and temporal variability, writing fluency did not change significantly across sessions indicating that the basic automation of handwriting was preserved at any time. On the second day, daytime levels of the kinematics of handwriting did not reflect impaired performance after sleep deprivation. Our results show for the first time a clear circadian rhythm for the production of handwriting.

  9. Links between Circadian Rhythms and Psychiatric Disease.

    PubMed

    Karatsoreos, Ilia N

    2014-01-01

    Determining the cause of psychiatric disorders is a goal of modern neuroscience, and will hopefully lead to the discovery of treatments to either prevent or alleviate the suffering caused by these diseases. One roadblock to attaining this goal is the realization that neuropsychiatric diseases are rarely due to a single gene polymorphism, environmental exposure, or developmental insult. Rather, it is a complex interaction between these various influences that likely leads to the development of clinically relevant syndromes. Our lab is exploring the links between environmental exposures and neurobehavioral function by investigating how disruption of the circadian (daily) clock alters the structure and function of neural circuits, with the hypothesis that disrupting this crucial homeostatic system can directly contribute to altered vulnerability of the organism to other factors that interact to produce psychiatric illness. This review explores some historical and more recent findings that link disrupted circadian clocks to neuropsychiatric disorders, particularly depression, mania, and schizophrenia. We take a comparative approach by exploring the effects observed in human populations, as well as some experimental models used in the laboratory to unravel mechanistic and causal relationships between disruption of the circadian clock and behavioral abnormalities. This is a rich area of research that we predict will contribute greatly to our understanding of how genes, environment, and development interact to modulate an individual's vulnerability to psychiatric disorders. PMID:24834040

  10. Links between Circadian Rhythms and Psychiatric Disease

    PubMed Central

    Karatsoreos, Ilia N.

    2014-01-01

    Determining the cause of psychiatric disorders is a goal of modern neuroscience, and will hopefully lead to the discovery of treatments to either prevent or alleviate the suffering caused by these diseases. One roadblock to attaining this goal is the realization that neuropsychiatric diseases are rarely due to a single gene polymorphism, environmental exposure, or developmental insult. Rather, it is a complex interaction between these various influences that likely leads to the development of clinically relevant syndromes. Our lab is exploring the links between environmental exposures and neurobehavioral function by investigating how disruption of the circadian (daily) clock alters the structure and function of neural circuits, with the hypothesis that disrupting this crucial homeostatic system can directly contribute to altered vulnerability of the organism to other factors that interact to produce psychiatric illness. This review explores some historical and more recent findings that link disrupted circadian clocks to neuropsychiatric disorders, particularly depression, mania, and schizophrenia. We take a comparative approach by exploring the effects observed in human populations, as well as some experimental models used in the laboratory to unravel mechanistic and causal relationships between disruption of the circadian clock and behavioral abnormalities. This is a rich area of research that we predict will contribute greatly to our understanding of how genes, environment, and development interact to modulate an individual’s vulnerability to psychiatric disorders. PMID:24834040

  11. Circadian rhythm disorder in a rare disease: Smith-Magenis syndrome.

    PubMed

    De Leersnyder, Hélène; Claustrat, Bruno; Munnich, Arnold; Verloes, Alain

    2006-06-27

    Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS) is a clinically recognizable contiguous gene syndrome, caused by interstitial deletion of chromosome 17p11.2. The SMS phenotype include distinctive facial features, developmental delay and neurobehavioral abnormalities. The patients present major sleep disturbances ascribed to a phase shift of their circadian rhythm of melatonin with a paradoxical diurnal secretion of the hormone. Treatment with morning beta-blockers and evening melatonin reinstated a normally timed melatonin circadian rhythm, improved daytime behavior and restored normal sleep habits, resulting in a greatly improved quality of life for both SMS patients and their family. SMS is the demonstration of biological basis for sleep disorder in a genetic disease. Considering that clock genes mediate generation of circadian rhythms, we suggest that haploinsufficiency for a circadian system gene mapping to chromosome 17p11.2 may cause the inversion of circadian rhythm in SMS. PMID:16723183

  12. Thyroid circadian timing: roles in physiology and thyroid malignancies.

    PubMed

    Philippe, Jacques; Dibner, Charna

    2015-04-01

    The circadian clock represents an anticipatory mechanism, well preserved in evolution. It has a critical impact on most aspects of the physiology of light-sensitive organisms. These rhythmic processes are governed by environmental cues (fluctuations in light intensity and temperature), an internal circadian timing system, and interactions between this timekeeping system and environmental signals. Endocrine body rhythms, including hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis rhythms, are tightly regulated by the circadian system. Although the circadian profiles of thyroid-releasing hormone (TRH), thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), thyroxine (T4), and triiodothyronine (T3) in blood have been well described, relatively few studies have analyzed molecular mechanisms governing the circadian regulation of HPT axis function. In this review, we will discuss the latest findings in the area of complex regulation of thyroid gland function by the circadian oscillator. We will also highlight the molecular makeup of the human thyroid oscillator as well as the potential link between thyroid malignant transformation and alterations in the clockwork. PMID:25411240

  13. Tissue-intrinsic dysfunction of circadian clock confers transplant arteriosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Bo; Anea, Ciprian B; Yao, Lin; Chen, Feng; Patel, Vijay; Merloiu, Ana; Pati, Paramita; Caldwell, R William; Fulton, David J; Rudic, R Daniel

    2011-10-11

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus of the brain is the circadian center, relaying rhythmic environmental and behavioral information to peripheral tissues to control circadian physiology. As such, central clock dysfunction can alter systemic homeostasis to consequently impair peripheral physiology in a manner that is secondary to circadian malfunction. To determine the impact of circadian clock function in organ transplantation and dissect the influence of intrinsic tissue clocks versus extrinsic clocks, we implemented a blood vessel grafting approach to surgically assemble a chimeric mouse that was part wild-type (WT) and part circadian clock mutant. Arterial isografts from donor WT mice that had been anastamosed to common carotid arteries of recipient WT mice (WT:WT) exhibited no pathology in this syngeneic transplant strategy. Similarly, when WT grafts were anastamosed to mice with disrupted circadian clocks, the structural features of the WT grafts immersed in the milieu of circadian malfunction were normal and absent of lesions, comparable to WT:WT grafts. In contrast, aortic grafts from Bmal1 knockout (KO) or Period-2,3 double-KO mice transplanted into littermate control WT mice developed robust arteriosclerotic disease. These lesions observed in donor grafts of Bmal1-KO were associated with up-regulation in T-cell receptors, macrophages, and infiltrating cells in the vascular grafts, but were independent of hemodynamics and B and T cell-mediated immunity. These data demonstrate the significance of intrinsic tissue clocks as an autonomous influence in experimental models of arteriosclerotic disease, which may have implications with regard to the influence of circadian clock function in organ transplantation.

  14. Circadian rhythms, Wnt/beta-catenin pathway and PPAR alpha/gamma profiles in diseases with primary or secondary cardiac dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Lecarpentier, Yves; Claes, Victor; Duthoit, Guillaume; Hébert, Jean-Louis

    2014-01-01

    Circadian clock mechanisms are far-from-equilibrium dissipative structures. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR alpha, beta/delta, and gamma) play a key role in metabolic regulatory processes, particularly in heart muscle. Links between circadian rhythms (CRs) and PPARs have been established. Mammalian CRs involve at least two critical transcription factors, CLOCK and BMAL1 (Gekakis et al., 1998; Hogenesch et al., 1998). PPAR gamma plays a major role in both glucose and lipid metabolisms and presents circadian properties which coordinate the interplay between metabolism and CRs. PPAR gamma is a major component of the vascular clock. Vascular PPAR gamma is a peripheral regulator of cardiovascular rhythms controlling circadian variations in blood pressure and heart rate through BMAL1. We focused our review on diseases with abnormalities of CRs and with primary or secondary cardiac dysfunction. Moreover, these diseases presented changes in the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway and PPARs, according to two opposed profiles. Profile 1 was defined as follows: inactivation of the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway with increased expression of PPAR gamma. Profile 2 was defined as follows: activation of the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway with decreased expression of PPAR gamma. A typical profile 1 disease is arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy, a genetic cardiac disease which presents mutations of the desmosomal proteins and is mainly characterized by fatty acid accumulation in adult cardiomyocytes mainly in the right ventricle. The link between PPAR gamma dysfunction and desmosomal genetic mutations occurs via inactivation of the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway presenting oscillatory properties. A typical profile 2 disease is type 2 diabetes, with activation of the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway and decreased expression of PPAR gamma. CRs abnormalities are present in numerous pathologies such as cardiovascular diseases, sympathetic/parasympathetic dysfunction, hypertension, diabetes

  15. Circadian clocks and cell division

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Evolution has selected a system of two intertwined cell cycles: the cell division cycle (CDC) and the daily (circadian) biological clock. The circadian clock keeps track of solar time and programs biological processes to occur at environmentally appropriate times. One of these processes is the CDC, which is often gated by the circadian clock. The intermeshing of these two cell cycles is probably responsible for the observation that disruption of the circadian system enhances susceptibility to some kinds of cancer. The core mechanism underlying the circadian clockwork has been thought to be a transcription and translation feedback loop (TTFL), but recent evidence from studies with cyanobacteria, synthetic oscillators and immortalized cell lines suggests that the core circadian pacemaking mechanism that gates cell division in mammalian cells could be a post-translational oscillator (PTO). PMID:20890114

  16. CIRCADIAN REGULATION OF METABOLISM

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Shannon M.; Udoh, Uduak S.; Young, Martin E.

    2014-01-01

    In association with sleep/wake and fasting/feeding cycles, organisms experience dramatic oscillations in energetic demands and nutrient supply. It is therefore not surprising that various metabolic parameters, ranging from the activity status of molecular energy sensors to circulating nutrient levels, oscillate in time-of-day-dependent manners. It has become increasingly clear that rhythms in metabolic processes are not simply in response to daily environmental/behavioral influences, but are driven in part by cell autonomous circadian clocks. By synchronizing the cell with its environment, clocks modulate a host of metabolic processes in a temporally appropriate manner. The purpose of this article is to review current understanding of the interplay between circadian clocks and metabolism, in addition to the pathophysiologic consequences of disruption of this molecular mechanism, in terms of cardiometabolic disease development. PMID:24928941

  17. Sleep and circadian rhythms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monk, Timothy H.

    1991-01-01

    Three interacting processes are involved in the preservation of circadian rhythms: (1) endogenous rhythm generation mechanisms, (2) entrainment mechanisms to keep these rhythms 'on track', and (3) exogenous masking processes stemming from changes in environment and bahavior. These processes, particularly the latter two, can be dramatically affected in individuals of advanced age and in space travelers, with a consequent disruption in sleep and daytime functioning. This paper presents results of a phase-shift experiment investigating the age-related effects of the exogeneous component of circadian rhythms in various physiological and psychological functions by comparing these functions in middle aged and old subjects. Dramatic differences were found between the two age groups in measures of sleep, mood, activation, and performance efficiency.

  18. Sleep and circadian schedule disorders.

    PubMed

    Labyak, Susan

    2002-12-01

    The timing and synchronization of human circadian rhythms is important for health and well-being. Some individuals, for reasons that remain unclear, display less resilience or flexibility in their ability to synchronize to the 24-hour world and are thus diagnosed with a circadian schedule disorder. The objective of this article is to briefly introduce concepts about human circadian timing and to review what is known about chronic, long-term circadian schedule disorders such as delayed sleep phase syndrome, advanced sleep phase syndrome, irregular sleep-wake patterns, and non-24-hour sleep-wake disorder. Practical considerations for the clinician caring for these individuals are discussed. PMID:12587363

  19. Circadian Regulation of Synaptic Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Marcos G.

    2016-01-01

    Circadian rhythms refer to oscillations in biological processes with a period of approximately 24 h. In addition to the sleep/wake cycle, there are circadian rhythms in metabolism, body temperature, hormone output, organ function and gene expression. There is also evidence of circadian rhythms in synaptic plasticity, in some cases driven by a master central clock and in other cases by peripheral clocks. In this article, I review the evidence for circadian influences on synaptic plasticity. I also discuss ways to disentangle the effects of brain state and rhythms on synaptic plasticity. PMID:27420105

  20. Circadian Regulation of Synaptic Plasticity.

    PubMed

    Frank, Marcos G

    2016-01-01

    Circadian rhythms refer to oscillations in biological processes with a period of approximately 24 h. In addition to the sleep/wake cycle, there are circadian rhythms in metabolism, body temperature, hormone output, organ function and gene expression. There is also evidence of circadian rhythms in synaptic plasticity, in some cases driven by a master central clock and in other cases by peripheral clocks. In this article, I review the evidence for circadian influences on synaptic plasticity. I also discuss ways to disentangle the effects of brain state and rhythms on synaptic plasticity. PMID:27420105

  1. Circadian clock mutation disrupts estrous cyclicity and maintenance of pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Miller, Brooke H; Olson, Susan Losee; Turek, Fred W; Levine, Jon E; Horton, Teresa H; Takahashi, Joseph S

    2004-08-10

    Classic experiments have shown that ovulation and estrous cyclicity are under circadian control and that surgical ablation of the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) results in estrous acyclicity in rats. Here, we characterized reproductive function in the circadian Clock mutant mouse and found that the circadian Clock mutation both disrupts estrous cyclicity and interferes with the maintenance of pregnancy. Clock mutant females have extended, irregular estrous cycles, lack a coordinated luteinizing hormone (LH) surge on the day of proestrus, exhibit increased fetal reabsorption during pregnancy, and have a high rate of full-term pregnancy failure. Clock mutants also show an unexpected decline in progesterone levels at midpregnancy and a shortened duration of pseudopregnancy, suggesting that maternal prolactin release may be abnormal. In a second set of experiments, we interrogated the function of each level of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis in order to determine how the Clock mutation disrupts estrous cyclicity. We report that Clock mutants fail to show an LH surge following estradiol priming in spite of the fact that hypothalamic levels of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), pituitary release of LH, and serum levels of estradiol and progesterone are all normal in Clock/Clock females. These data suggest that Clock mutants lack an appropriate circadian daily-timing signal required to coordinate hypothalamic hormone secretion. Defining the mechanisms by which the Clock mutation disrupts reproductive function offers a model for understanding how circadian genes affect complex physiological systems.

  2. The circadian basis of mood disorders: recent developments and treatment implications.

    PubMed

    Monteleone, Palmiero; Maj, Mario

    2008-10-01

    In humans, most physiological and behavioural functions demonstrate a circadian rhythmicity, which is essential to adequately cope with dramatic fluctuations occurring in the external environment. Therefore, it is intuitive that alterations in the endogenous machinery regulating circadian oscillations may lead to physical and mental symptoms and morbidities. Mood disorders, especially unipolar depression and seasonal affective disorder, have been linked to circadian rhythm abnormalities. This paper provides a brief description of the molecular and genetic mechanisms regulating the endogenous clock system and reviews selected studies describing circadian abnormalities in patients with depression. Evidence is emerging that a disruption of the normal circadian rhythmicity occurs at least in a subgroup of depressed patients and that interventions able to resynchronize the human circadian system, including sleep deprivation, light therapy and drugs specifically acting on the endogenous clock system, have proven antidepressant effects. It seems likely that, in the future, the knowledge coming from the exploration of molecular and genetic mechanisms involved in the physiology of the circadian clock system will be fruitful for a deeper understanding of the etiopathogenesis of mood disorders and the development of more effective therapeutic strategies.

  3. Circadian rhythms of temperature and activity in obese and lean Zucker rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murakami, D. M.; Horwitz, B. A.; Fuller, C. A.

    1995-01-01

    The circadian timing system is important in the regulation of feeding and metabolism, both of which are aberrant in the obese Zucker rat. This study tested the hypothesis that these abnormalities involve a deficit in circadian regulation by examining the circadian rhythms of body temperature and activity in lean and obese Zucker rats exposed to normal light-dark cycles, constant light, and constant dark. Significant deficits in both daily mean and circadian amplitude of temperature and activity were found in obese Zucker female rats relative to lean controls in all lighting conditions. However, the circadian period of obese Zucker rats did not exhibit differences relative to lean controls in either of the constant lighting conditions. These results indicate that although the circadian regulation of temperature and activity in obese Zucker female rats is in fact depressed, obese rats do exhibit normal entrainment and pacemaker functions in the circadian timing system. The results suggest a deficit in the process that generates the amplitude of the circadian rhythm.

  4. Molecular analyses of circadian gene variants reveal sex-dependent links between depression and clocks.

    PubMed

    Shi, S-q; White, M J; Borsetti, H M; Pendergast, J S; Hida, A; Ciarleglio, C M; de Verteuil, P A; Cadar, A G; Cala, C; McMahon, D G; Shelton, R C; Williams, S M; Johnson, C H

    2016-03-01

    An extensive literature links circadian irregularities and/or sleep abnormalities to mood disorders. Despite the strong genetic component underlying many mood disorders, however, previous genetic associations between circadian clock gene variants and major depressive disorder (MDD) have been weak. We applied a combined molecular/functional and genetic association approach to circadian gene polymorphisms in sex-stratified populations of control subjects and case subjects suffering from MDD. This approach identified significant sex-dependent associations of common variants of the circadian clock genes hClock, hPer3 and hNpas2 with major depression and demonstrated functional effects of these polymorphisms on the expression or activity of the hCLOCK and hPER3 proteins, respectively. In addition, hCLOCK expression is affected by glucocorticoids, consistent with the sex-dependency of the genetic associations and the modulation of glucocorticoid-mediated stress response, providing a mechanism by which the circadian clock controls outputs that may affect psychiatric disorders. We conclude that genetic polymorphisms in circadian genes (especially hClock and hPer3, where functional assays could be tested) influence risk of developing depression in a sex- and stress-dependent manner. These studies support a genetic connection between circadian disruption and mood disorders, and confirm a key connection between circadian gene variation and major depression.

  5. Molecular analyses of circadian gene variants reveal sex-dependent links between depression and clocks

    PubMed Central

    Shi, S-q; White, M J; Borsetti, H M; Pendergast, J S; Hida, A; Ciarleglio, C M; de Verteuil, P A; Cadar, A G; Cala, C; McMahon, D G; Shelton, R C; Williams, S M; Johnson, C H

    2016-01-01

    An extensive literature links circadian irregularities and/or sleep abnormalities to mood disorders. Despite the strong genetic component underlying many mood disorders, however, previous genetic associations between circadian clock gene variants and major depressive disorder (MDD) have been weak. We applied a combined molecular/functional and genetic association approach to circadian gene polymorphisms in sex-stratified populations of control subjects and case subjects suffering from MDD. This approach identified significant sex-dependent associations of common variants of the circadian clock genes hClock, hPer3 and hNpas2 with major depression and demonstrated functional effects of these polymorphisms on the expression or activity of the hCLOCK and hPER3 proteins, respectively. In addition, hCLOCK expression is affected by glucocorticoids, consistent with the sex-dependency of the genetic associations and the modulation of glucocorticoid-mediated stress response, providing a mechanism by which the circadian clock controls outputs that may affect psychiatric disorders. We conclude that genetic polymorphisms in circadian genes (especially hClock and hPer3, where functional assays could be tested) influence risk of developing depression in a sex- and stress-dependent manner. These studies support a genetic connection between circadian disruption and mood disorders, and confirm a key connection between circadian gene variation and major depression. PMID:26926884

  6. Abnormal activation of calpain and protein kinase Cα promotes a constitutive release of matrix metalloproteinase 9 in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from cystic fibrosis patients.

    PubMed

    Averna, Monica; Bavestrello, Margherita; Cresta, Federico; Pedrazzi, Marco; De Tullio, Roberta; Minicucci, Laura; Sparatore, Bianca; Salamino, Franca; Pontremoli, Sandro; Melloni, Edon

    2016-08-15

    Matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9) is physiologically involved in remodeling the extracellular matrix components but its abnormal release has been observed in several human pathologies. We here report that peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), isolated from cystic fibrosis (CF) patients homozygous for F508del-cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), express constitutively and release at high rate MMP9 due to the alteration in their intracellular Ca(2+) homeostasis. This spontaneous and sustained MMP9 secretion may contribute to the accumulation of this protease in fluids of CF patients. Conversely, in PBMCs isolated from healthy donors, expression and secretion of MMP9 are undetectable but can be evoked, after 12 h of culture, by paracrine stimulation which also promotes an increase in [Ca(2+)]i. We also demonstrate that in both CF and control PBMCs the Ca(2+)-dependent MMP9 secretion is mediated by the concomitant activation of calpain and protein kinase Cα (PKCα), and that MMP9 expression involves extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) phosphorylation. Our results are supported by the fact that either the inhibition of Ca(2+) entry or chelation of [Ca(2+)]i as well as the inhibition of single components of the signaling pathway or the restoration of CFTR activity all promote the reduction of MMP9 secretion. PMID:27349634

  7. The systemic control of circadian gene expression.

    PubMed

    Gerber, A; Saini, C; Curie, T; Emmenegger, Y; Rando, G; Gosselin, P; Gotic, I; Gos, P; Franken, P; Schibler, U

    2015-09-01

    The mammalian circadian timing system consists of a central pacemaker in the brain's suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) and subsidiary oscillators in nearly all body cells. The SCN clock, which is adjusted to geophysical time by the photoperiod, synchronizes peripheral clocks through a wide variety of systemic cues. The latter include signals depending on feeding cycles, glucocorticoid hormones, rhythmic blood-borne signals eliciting daily changes in actin dynamics and serum response factor (SRF) activity, and sensors of body temperature rhythms, such as heat shock transcription factors and the cold-inducible RNA-binding protein CIRP. To study these systemic signalling pathways, we designed and engineered a novel, highly photosensitive apparatus, dubbed RT-Biolumicorder. This device enables us to record circadian luciferase reporter gene expression in the liver and other organs of freely moving mice over months in real time. Owing to the multitude of systemic signalling pathway involved in the phase resetting of peripheral clocks the disruption of any particular one has only minor effects on the steady state phase of circadian gene expression in organs such as the liver. Nonetheless, the implication of specific pathways in the synchronization of clock gene expression can readily be assessed by monitoring the phase-shifting kinetics using the RT-Biolumicorder.

  8. [Circadian rhythm sleep-wake disorder (circadian rhythm sleep disorder)].

    PubMed

    Tagaya, Hirokuni; Murayama, Norio; Fukase, Yuko

    2015-06-01

    The role of the circadian system is forecasting the daily and yearly change of environment. Circadian rhythm sleep-wake disorder (CRSWD) is defined as physical and social impairment caused by misalignment between circadian rhythm and desirable social schedule. CRSWDs are induced by medical or environmental factors as well as dysfunctions of circadian system. Clinicians should be aware that sleep-inducing medications, restless legs syndrome, delirium and less obedience to social schedule are frequent cause of CRSWD among elderly. Bright light therapy and orally administered small dose of melatonin or melatonin agonist at proper circadian phase are recommended treatments. Sleep-inducing medications should not be considered as CRSWD treatments, especially to elderly.

  9. Circadian systems biology in Metazoa.

    PubMed

    Lin, Li-Ling; Huang, Hsuan-Cheng; Juan, Hsueh-Fen

    2015-11-01

    Systems biology, which can be defined as integrative biology, comprises multistage processes that can be used to understand components of complex biological systems of living organisms and provides hierarchical information to decoding life. Using systems biology approaches such as genomics, transcriptomics and proteomics, it is now possible to delineate more complicated interactions between circadian control systems and diseases. The circadian rhythm is a multiscale phenomenon existing within the body that influences numerous physiological activities such as changes in gene expression, protein turnover, metabolism and human behavior. In this review, we describe the relationships between the circadian control system and its related genes or proteins, and circadian rhythm disorders in systems biology studies. To maintain and modulate circadian oscillation, cells possess elaborative feedback loops composed of circadian core proteins that regulate the expression of other genes through their transcriptional activities. The disruption of these rhythms has been reported to be associated with diseases such as arrhythmia, obesity, insulin resistance, carcinogenesis and disruptions in natural oscillations in the control of cell growth. This review demonstrates that lifestyle is considered as a fundamental factor that modifies circadian rhythm, and the development of dysfunctions and diseases could be regulated by an underlying expression network with multiple circadian-associated signals.

  10. Circadian Disorganization Alters Intestinal Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Voigt, Robin M.; Forsyth, Christopher B.; Green, Stefan J.; Mutlu, Ece; Engen, Phillip; Vitaterna, Martha H.; Turek, Fred W.; Keshavarzian, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Intestinal dysbiosis and circadian rhythm disruption are associated with similar diseases including obesity, metabolic syndrome, and inflammatory bowel disease. Despite the overlap, the potential relationship between circadian disorganization and dysbiosis is unknown; thus, in the present study, a model of chronic circadian disruption was used to determine the impact on the intestinal microbiome. Male C57BL/6J mice underwent once weekly phase reversals of the light:dark cycle (i.e., circadian rhythm disrupted mice) to determine the impact of circadian rhythm disruption on the intestinal microbiome and were fed either standard chow or a high-fat, high-sugar diet to determine how diet influences circadian disruption-induced effects on the microbiome. Weekly phase reversals of the light:dark (LD) cycle did not alter the microbiome in mice fed standard chow; however, mice fed a high-fat, high-sugar diet in conjunction with phase shifts in the light:dark cycle had significantly altered microbiota. While it is yet to be established if some of the adverse effects associated with circadian disorganization in humans (e.g., shift workers, travelers moving across time zones, and in individuals with social jet lag) are mediated by dysbiosis, the current study demonstrates that circadian disorganization can impact the intestinal microbiota which may have implications for inflammatory diseases. PMID:24848969

  11. Circadian disorganization alters intestinal microbiota.

    PubMed

    Voigt, Robin M; Forsyth, Christopher B; Green, Stefan J; Mutlu, Ece; Engen, Phillip; Vitaterna, Martha H; Turek, Fred W; Keshavarzian, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Intestinal dysbiosis and circadian rhythm disruption are associated with similar diseases including obesity, metabolic syndrome, and inflammatory bowel disease. Despite the overlap, the potential relationship between circadian disorganization and dysbiosis is unknown; thus, in the present study, a model of chronic circadian disruption was used to determine the impact on the intestinal microbiome. Male C57BL/6J mice underwent once weekly phase reversals of the light:dark cycle (i.e., circadian rhythm disrupted mice) to determine the impact of circadian rhythm disruption on the intestinal microbiome and were fed either standard chow or a high-fat, high-sugar diet to determine how diet influences circadian disruption-induced effects on the microbiome. Weekly phase reversals of the light:dark (LD) cycle did not alter the microbiome in mice fed standard chow; however, mice fed a high-fat, high-sugar diet in conjunction with phase shifts in the light:dark cycle had significantly altered microbiota. While it is yet to be established if some of the adverse effects associated with circadian disorganization in humans (e.g., shift workers, travelers moving across time zones, and in individuals with social jet lag) are mediated by dysbiosis, the current study demonstrates that circadian disorganization can impact the intestinal microbiota which may have implications for inflammatory diseases. PMID:24848969

  12. Circadian gene variants in cancer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Humans as diurnal beings are active during the day and rest at night. This daily oscillation of behavior and physiology is driven by an endogenous circadian clock not environmental cues. In modern societies, changes in lifestyle have led to a frequent disruption of the endogenous circadian homeostas...

  13. Circadian timing in cancer treatments.

    PubMed

    Lévi, Francis; Okyar, Alper; Dulong, Sandrine; Innominato, Pasquale F; Clairambault, Jean

    2010-01-01

    The circadian timing system is composed of molecular clocks, which drive 24-h changes in xenobiotic metabolism and detoxification, cell cycle events, DNA repair, apoptosis, and angiogenesis. The cellular circadian clocks are coordinated by endogenous physiological rhythms, so that they tick in synchrony in the host tissues that can be damaged by anticancer agents. As a result, circadian timing can modify 2- to 10-fold the tolerability of anticancer medications in experimental models and in cancer patients. Improved efficacy is also seen when drugs are given near their respective times of best tolerability, due to (a) inherently poor circadian entrainment of tumors and (b) persistent circadian entrainment of healthy tissues. Conversely, host clocks are disrupted whenever anticancer drugs are administered at their most toxic time. On the other hand, circadian disruption accelerates experimental and clinical cancer processes. Gender, circadian physiology, clock genes, and cell cycle critically affect outcome on cancer chronotherapeutics. Mathematical and systems biology approaches currently develop and integrate theoretical, experimental, and technological tools in order to further optimize and personalize the circadian administration of cancer treatments.

  14. Meiotic abnormalities

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 19, describes meiotic abnormalities. These include nondisjunction of autosomes and sex chromosomes, genetic and environmental causes of nondisjunction, misdivision of the centromere, chromosomally abnormal human sperm, male infertility, parental age, and origin of diploid gametes. 57 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Circadian Regulation of Macronutrient Absorption.

    PubMed

    Hussain, M Mahmood; Pan, Xiaoyue

    2015-12-01

    Various intestinal functions exhibit circadian rhythmicity. Disruptions in these rhythms as in shift workers and transcontinental travelers are associated with intestinal discomfort. Circadian rhythms are controlled at the molecular level by core clock and clock-controlled genes. These clock genes are expressed in intestinal cells, suggesting that they might participate in the circadian regulation of intestinal functions. A major function of the intestine is nutrient absorption. Here, we will review absorption of proteins, carbohydrates, and lipids and circadian regulation of various transporters involved in their absorption. A better understanding of circadian regulation of intestinal absorption might help control several metabolic disorders and attenuate intestinal discomfort associated with disruptions in sleep-wake cycles.

  16. [Circadian variation of lymphocyte subsets in health subjects].

    PubMed

    Mazzoccoli, G; Bianco, G; Correra, M; Carella, A M; Balzanelli, M; Giuliani, A; Tarquini, R

    1998-11-01

    In our study cortisol and interleukin 2 (IL-2) levels were measured and lymphocyte sub-population analyses were performed on blood samples collected every four hours, for 24 hours from 10 healthy subjects aged 38-65 years. A clear circadian rhythm was validated for cortisol serum levels, for CD8, CD8 dim, CD16 and delta TcS1 with acrophase in the morning, and for CD2, CD4, CD/CD8 ratio, HLA-DR, CD20 and CD25 with acrophase at night. CD8 bright and TcR delta 1 presented higher levels in the morning without validation of the circadian rhythm. Changes of serum levels of IL-2 did not show circadian rhythmicity. The results show that specific lymphocyte subsets present different profiles of nyctohemeral changes and this may explain time related variations of immune responses.

  17. Molecular bases of circadian rhythmicity in renal physiology and pathology

    PubMed Central

    Bonny, Olivier; Vinciguerra, Manlio; Gumz, Michelle L.; Mazzoccoli, Gianluigi

    2013-01-01

    The physiological processes that maintain body homeostasis oscillate during the day. Diurnal changes characterize kidney functions, comprising regulation of hydro-electrolytic and acid-base balance, reabsorption of small solutes and hormone production. Renal physiology is characterized by 24-h periodicity and contributes to circadian variability of blood pressure levels, related as well to nychthemeral changes of sodium sensitivity, physical activity, vascular tone, autonomic function and neurotransmitter release from sympathetic innervations. The circadian rhythmicity of body physiology is driven by central and peripheral biological clockworks and entrained by the geophysical light/dark cycle. Chronodisruption, defined as the mismatch between environmental–social cues and physiological–behavioral patterns, causes internal desynchronization of periodic functions, leading to pathophysiological mechanisms underlying degenerative, immune related, metabolic and neoplastic diseases. In this review we will address the genetic, molecular and anatomical elements that hardwire circadian rhythmicity in renal physiology and subtend disarray of time–dependent changes in renal pathology. PMID:23901050

  18. Analysis of the redox oscillations in the circadian clockwork

    PubMed Central

    Milev, Nikolay B.; Rey, Guillaume; Valekunja, Utham K.; Edgar, Rachel S.; O’Neill, John S.; Reddy, Akhilesh B.

    2016-01-01

    The evolution of tight coupling between the circadian system and redox homeostasis of the cell has been proposed to coincide roughly with the appearance of the first aerobic organisms, around 3 billion years ago. The rhythmic production of oxygen and its effect on core metabolism are thought to have exerted selective pressure for the temporal segregation of numerous metabolic pathways. Until recently, the only evidence for such coupling came from studies showing circadian cycles in the abundance of various redox metabolites, with many arguing that these oscillations are simply an output from the transcription/translation-feedback loop (TTFL). The recent discovery that the peroxiredoxin (PRX) proteins exhibit circadian cycles in their oxidation status, even in the absence of transcription, demonstrated the existence of autonomous oscillations in the redox status of the cell. The PRXs are a family of cellular thiol peroxidases whose abundance and high reaction rate make them the major cellular sink for cellular peroxides. Interestingly, as part of the normal catalytic cycle, PRXs become inactivated by their own substrate via over-oxidation of the catalytic residue, with the inactivated form of the enzyme displaying circadian accumulation. Here, we describe the biochemical properties of the PRX system, with particular emphasis on the features important for the experimental analysis of these enzymes. We will also present a detailed protocol for measuring PRX over-oxidation across circadian time in adherent cell cultures, red blood cells and fruit flies (Drosophila melanogaster), providing practical suggestions for ensuring consistency and reproducibility of the results. PMID:25707278

  19. Sleep, Circadian Rhythms, and Performance During Space Shuttle Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neri, David F.; Czeisler, Charles A.; Dijk, Derk-Jan; Wyatt, James K.; Ronda, Joseph M.; Hughes, Rod J.

    2003-01-01

    Sleep and circadian rhythms may be disturbed during spaceflight, and these disturbances can affect crewmembers' performance during waking hours. The mechanisms underlying sleep and circadian rhythm disturbances in space are not well understood, and effective countermeasures are not yet available. We investigated sleep, circadian rhythms, cognitive performance, and light-dark cycles in five astronauts prior to, during, and after the 16-day STS-90 mission and the IO-day STS-95 mission. The efficacy of low-dose, alternative-night, oral melatonin administration as a countermeasure for sleep disturbances was evaluated. During these missions, scheduled rest activity cycles were 20-35 minutes shorter than 24 hours. Light levels on the middeck and in the Spacelab were very low; whereas on the flight deck (which has several windows), they were highly variable. Circadian rhythm abnormalities were observed. During the second half of the missions, the rhythm of urinary cortisol appeared to be delayed relative to the sleep-wake schedule. Performance during wakefulness was impaired. Astronauts slept only about 6.5 hours per day, and subjective sleep quality was lower in space. No beneficial effects of melatonin (0.3 mg administered prior to sleep episodes on alternate nights) were observed. A surprising finding was a marked increase in rapid eye movement (REM) sleep upon return to Earth. We conclude that these Space Shuttle missions were associated with circadian rhythm disturbances, sleep loss, decrements in neurobehavioral performance, and alterations in REM sleep homeostasis. Shorter than 24-hour rest-activity schedules and exposure to light-dark cycles inadequate for optimal circadian synchronization may have contributed to these disturbances.

  20. Circadian Rhythm Disorders and Melatonin Production in 127 Blind Women with and without Light Perception.

    PubMed

    Flynn-Evans, Erin E; Tabandeh, Homayoun; Skene, Debra J; Lockley, Steven W

    2014-06-10

    Light is the major environmental time cue that synchronizes the endogenous central circadian pacemaker, located in the suprachiasmatic nuclei of the hypothalamus, and is detected exclusively by the eyes primarily via specialized non-rod, non-cone ganglion cell photoreceptors. Consequently, most blind people with no perception of light (NPL) have either nonentrained or abnormally phased circadian rhythms due to this inability to detect light. Conversely, most visually impaired participants with some degree of light perception (LP) exhibit normal entrainment, emphasizing the functional separation of visual and "nonvisual" photoreception. The aims of the study were to identify the prevalence of circadian disorders in blind women, with the further aim of examining how eye disease may relate to the type of circadian disorder. Participants (n = 127, age 50.8 ± 13.4 years) completed an 8-week field study including daily sleep diaries and sequential 4 to 8 hourly urine collections over 48 h on 2 to 3 occasions separated by at least 2 weeks. Circadian type was determined from the timing and time course of the melatonin rhythm measured by cosinor-derived urinary 6-sulfatoxymelatonin rhythm peak. Of the participants with NPL (n = 41), the majority were abnormally phased (24%) or nonentrained (39%), with 37% classified as normally entrained. Of the participants with LP (n = 86), the majority were normally entrained (69%). Eighteen LP participants (21%) were abnormally phased (8 advanced, 10 delayed). Nine LP participants (10%) were nonentrained. The eye conditions most associated with abnormal phase and/or nonentrained circadian rhythms were bilateral enucleation (67%) and retinopathy of prematurity (57%). By contrast, 84% of participants with retinitis pigmentosa and 83% of those with age-related macular degeneration were normally entrained. These findings suggest that the etiology of blindness in addition to LP status is related to an individual's ability to process the

  1. Circadian gene variants in cancer.

    PubMed

    Kettner, Nicole M; Katchy, Chinenye A; Fu, Loning

    2014-06-01

    Humans as diurnal beings are active during the day and rest at night. This daily oscillation of behavior and physiology is driven by an endogenous circadian clock not environmental cues. In modern societies, changes in lifestyle have led to a frequent disruption of the endogenous circadian homeostasis leading to increased risk of various diseases including cancer. The clock is operated by the feedback loops of circadian genes and controls daily physiology by coupling cell proliferation and metabolism, DNA damage repair, and apoptosis in peripheral tissues with physical activity, energy homeostasis, immune and neuroendocrine functions at the organismal level. Recent studies have revealed that defects in circadian genes due to targeted gene ablation in animal models or single nucleotide polymorphism, deletion, deregulation and/or epigenetic silencing in humans are closely associated with increased risk of cancer. In addition, disruption of circadian rhythm can disrupt the molecular clock in peripheral tissues in the absence of circadian gene mutations. Circadian disruption has recently been recognized as an independent cancer risk factor. Further study of the mechanism of clock-controlled tumor suppression will have a significant impact on human health by improving the efficiencies of cancer prevention and treatment. PMID:24901356

  2. Circadian gene variants in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kettner, Nicole M.; Katchy, Chinenye A.; Fu, Loning

    2014-01-01

    Humans as diurnal beings are active during the day and rest at night. This daily oscillation of behavior and physiology is driven by an endogenous circadian clock not environmental cues. In modern societies, changes in lifestyle have led to a frequent disruption of the endogenous circadian homeostasis leading to increased risk of various diseases including cancer. The clock is operated by the feedback loops of circadian genes and controls daily physiology by coupling cell proliferation and metabolism, DNA damage repair, and apoptosis in peripheral tissues with physical activity, energy homeostasis, immune and neuroendocrine functions at the organismal level. Recent studies have revealed that defects in circadian genes due to targeted gene ablation in animal models or single nucleotide polymorphism, deletion, deregulation and/or epigenetic silencing in humans are closely associated with increased risk of cancer. In addition, disruption of circadian rhythm can disrupt the molecular clock in peripheral tissues in the absence of circadian gene mutations. Circadian disruption has recently been recognized as an independent cancer risk factor. Further study of the mechanism of clock-controlled tumor suppression will have a significant impact on human health by improving the efficiencies of cancer prevention and treatment. PMID:24901356

  3. Craniofacial Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the skull and face. Craniofacial abnormalities are birth defects of the face or head. Some, like cleft ... palate, are among the most common of all birth defects. Others are very rare. Most of them affect ...

  4. Chromosome Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... decade, newer techniques have been developed that allow scientists and doctors to screen for chromosomal abnormalities without using a microscope. These newer methods compare the patient's DNA to a normal DNA ...

  5. Walking abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... include: Arthritis of the leg or foot joints Conversion disorder (a psychological disorder) Foot problems (such as a ... injuries. For an abnormal gait that occurs with conversion disorder, counseling and support from family members are strongly ...

  6. Nail abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    Beau's lines; Fingernail abnormalities; Spoon nails; Onycholysis; Leukonychia; Koilonychia; Brittle nails ... Just like the skin, the fingernails tell a lot about your health: ... the fingernail. These lines can occur after illness, injury to ...

  7. Nocturia: The circadian voiding disorder

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Young Tae; Kim, Kyung Do

    2016-01-01

    Nocturia is a prevalent condition of waking to void during the night. The concept of nocturia has evolved from being a symptomatic aspect of disease associated with the prostate or bladder to a form of lower urinary tract disorder. However, recent advances in circadian biology and sleep science suggest that it might be important to consider nocturia as a form of circadian dysfunction. In the current review, nocturia is reexamined with an introduction to sleep disorders and recent findings in circadian biology in an attempt to highlight the importance of rediscovering nocturia as a problem of chronobiology. PMID:27195315

  8. Nocturia: The circadian voiding disorder.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin Wook; Moon, Young Tae; Kim, Kyung Do

    2016-05-01

    Nocturia is a prevalent condition of waking to void during the night. The concept of nocturia has evolved from being a symptomatic aspect of disease associated with the prostate or bladder to a form of lower urinary tract disorder. However, recent advances in circadian biology and sleep science suggest that it might be important to consider nocturia as a form of circadian dysfunction. In the current review, nocturia is reexamined with an introduction to sleep disorders and recent findings in circadian biology in an attempt to highlight the importance of rediscovering nocturia as a problem of chronobiology. PMID:27195315

  9. Neurobiology of Circadian Rhythm Regulation.

    PubMed

    Rosenwasser, Alan M; Turek, Fred W

    2015-12-01

    Over the past few decades, multilevel research has elucidated the basic neuroanatomy, neurochemistry, and molecular neurobiology of the master circadian pacemaker located in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). The circadian timing system is composed of a large number of cellular oscillators located in the SCN, in non-SCN brain structures, and throughout the body. Cellular-level oscillations are generated by a molecular feedback loop in which circadian clock genes rhythmically regulate their own transcription, as well as that of hundreds of clock-controlled genes. The maintenance of proper coordination within this network of cellular- and tissue-level clocks is essential for health and well-being. PMID:26568118

  10. Neurobiology of Circadian Rhythm Regulation.

    PubMed

    Rosenwasser, Alan M; Turek, Fred W

    2015-12-01

    Over the past few decades, multilevel research has elucidated the basic neuroanatomy, neurochemistry, and molecular neurobiology of the master circadian pacemaker located in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). The circadian timing system is composed of a large number of cellular oscillators located in the SCN, in non-SCN brain structures, and throughout the body. Cellular-level oscillations are generated by a molecular feedback loop in which circadian clock genes rhythmically regulate their own transcription, as well as that of hundreds of clock-controlled genes. The maintenance of proper coordination within this network of cellular- and tissue-level clocks is essential for health and well-being.

  11. Modeling circadian clock-cell cycle interaction effects on cell population growth rates.

    PubMed

    El Cheikh, R; Bernard, S; El Khatib, N

    2014-12-21

    The circadian clock and the cell cycle are two tightly coupled oscillators. Recent analytical studies have shown counter-intuitive effects of circadian gating of the cell cycle on growth rates of proliferating cells which cannot be explained by a molecular model or a population model alone. In this work, we present a combined molecular-population model that studies how coupling the circadian clock to the cell cycle, through the protein WEE1, affects a proliferating cell population. We show that the cell cycle can entrain to the circadian clock with different rational period ratios and characterize multiple domains of entrainment. We show that coupling increases the growth rate for autonomous periods of the cell cycle around 24 h and above 48 h. We study the effect of mutation of circadian genes on the growth rate of cells and show that disruption of the circadian clock can lead to abnormal proliferation. Particularly, we show that Cry 1, Cry 2 mutations decrease the growth rate of cells, Per 2 mutation enhances it and Bmal 1 knockout increases it for autonomous periods of the cell cycle less than 21 h and decreases it elsewhere. Combining a molecular model to a population model offers new insight on the influence of the circadian clock on the growth of a cell population. This can help chronotherapy which takes benefits of physiological rhythms to improve anti-cancer efficacy and tolerance to drugs by administering treatments at a specific time of the day.

  12. Circadian rhythm profiles in women with night eating syndrome.

    PubMed

    Goel, Namni; Stunkard, Albert J; Rogers, Naomi L; Van Dongen, Hans P A; Allison, Kelly C; O'Reardon, John P; Ahima, Rexford S; Cummings, David E; Heo, Moonseong; Dinges, David F

    2009-02-01

    Night eating syndrome (NES) is characterized by evening hyperphagia and frequent awakenings accompanied by food intake. Patients with NES display a delayed circadian pattern of food intake but retain a normal sleep-wake cycle. These characteristics initiated the current study, in which the phase and amplitude of behavioral and neuroendocrine circadian rhythms in patients with NES were evaluated. Fifteen women with NES (mean age +/- SD, 40.8 +/- 8.7 y) and 14 control subjects (38.6 +/- 9.5 y) were studied in the laboratory for 3 nights, with food intake measured daily. Blood also was collected for 25 h (every 2 h from 0800 to 2000 h, and then hourly from 2100 to 0900 h) and assayed for glucose and 7 hormones (insulin, ghrelin, leptin, melatonin, cortisol, thyroid-stimulating hormone [TSH] and prolactin). Statistical analyses utilized linear mixed-effects cosinor analysis. Control subjects displayed normal phases and amplitudes for all circadian rhythms. In contrast, patients with NES showed a phase delay in the timing of meals, and delayed circadian rhythms for total caloric, fat, and carbohydrate intake. In addition, phase delays of 1.0 to 2.8 h were found in 2 food-regulatory rhythms-leptin and insulin-and in the circadian melatonin rhythm (with a trend for a delay in the circadian cortisol rhythm). In contrast, circulating levels of ghrelin, the primary hormone that stimulates food intake, were phase advanced by 5.2 h. The glucose rhythm showed an inverted circadian pattern. Patients with NES also showed reduced amplitudes in the circadian rhythms of food intake, cortisol, ghrelin, and insulin, but increased TSH amplitude. Thus, patients with NES demonstrated significant changes in the timing and amplitude of various behavioral and physiological circadian markers involved in appetite and neuroendocrine regulation. As such, NES may result from dissociations between central (suprachiasmatic nucleus) timing mechanisms and putative oscillators elsewhere in the

  13. Circadian rhythm profiles in women with night eating syndrome.

    PubMed

    Goel, Namni; Stunkard, Albert J; Rogers, Naomi L; Van Dongen, Hans P A; Allison, Kelly C; O'Reardon, John P; Ahima, Rexford S; Cummings, David E; Heo, Moonseong; Dinges, David F

    2009-02-01

    Night eating syndrome (NES) is characterized by evening hyperphagia and frequent awakenings accompanied by food intake. Patients with NES display a delayed circadian pattern of food intake but retain a normal sleep-wake cycle. These characteristics initiated the current study, in which the phase and amplitude of behavioral and neuroendocrine circadian rhythms in patients with NES were evaluated. Fifteen women with NES (mean age +/- SD, 40.8 +/- 8.7 y) and 14 control subjects (38.6 +/- 9.5 y) were studied in the laboratory for 3 nights, with food intake measured daily. Blood also was collected for 25 h (every 2 h from 0800 to 2000 h, and then hourly from 2100 to 0900 h) and assayed for glucose and 7 hormones (insulin, ghrelin, leptin, melatonin, cortisol, thyroid-stimulating hormone [TSH] and prolactin). Statistical analyses utilized linear mixed-effects cosinor analysis. Control subjects displayed normal phases and amplitudes for all circadian rhythms. In contrast, patients with NES showed a phase delay in the timing of meals, and delayed circadian rhythms for total caloric, fat, and carbohydrate intake. In addition, phase delays of 1.0 to 2.8 h were found in 2 food-regulatory rhythms-leptin and insulin-and in the circadian melatonin rhythm (with a trend for a delay in the circadian cortisol rhythm). In contrast, circulating levels of ghrelin, the primary hormone that stimulates food intake, were phase advanced by 5.2 h. The glucose rhythm showed an inverted circadian pattern. Patients with NES also showed reduced amplitudes in the circadian rhythms of food intake, cortisol, ghrelin, and insulin, but increased TSH amplitude. Thus, patients with NES demonstrated significant changes in the timing and amplitude of various behavioral and physiological circadian markers involved in appetite and neuroendocrine regulation. As such, NES may result from dissociations between central (suprachiasmatic nucleus) timing mechanisms and putative oscillators elsewhere in the

  14. Increase in circadian variation after continuous-flow ventricular assist device implantation.

    PubMed

    Slaughter, Mark S; Ising, Michael S; Tamez, Daniel; O'Driscoll, Gerry; Voskoboynikov, Neil; Bartoli, Carlo R; Koenig, Steven C; Giridharan, Guruprasad A

    2010-06-01

    The circadian rhythm of varying blood pressure and heart rate is attenuated or absent in patients with severe heart failure. In 28 patients supported by a left ventricular assist device (LVAD) for at least 30 days, a restoration of the circadian rhythm was demonstrated by a consistent nocturnal decrease, and then increase, of the LVAD flow while at a constant LVAD speed. The return of the circadian rhythm has implications for cardiac recovery, and the observation indicates that the continuous-flow LVAD has an intrinsic automatic response to physiologic demands. PMID:20207167

  15. Role of cardiomyocyte circadian clock in myocardial metabolic adaptation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Marked circadian rhythmicities in cardiovascular physiology and pathophysiology exist. The cardiomyocyte circadian clock has recently been linked to circadian rhythms in myocardial gene expression, metabolism, and contractile function. For instance, the cardiomyocyte circadian clock is essential f...

  16. Circadian Regulation of Cellular Physiology

    PubMed Central

    Peek, C.B; Ramsey, K.M; Levine, D.C; Marcheva, B; Perelis, M; Bass, J

    2015-01-01

    The circadian clock synchronizes behavioral and physiological processes on a daily basis in anticipation of the light–dark cycle. In mammals, molecular clocks are present in both the central pacemaker neurons and in nearly all peripheral tissues. Clock transcription factors in metabolic tissues coordinate metabolic fuel utilization and storage with alternating periods of feeding and fasting corresponding to the rest–activity cycle. In vitro and in vivo biochemical approaches have led to the discovery of mechanisms underlying the interplay between the molecular clock and the metabolic networks. For example, recent studies have demonstrated that the circadian clock controls rhythmic synthesis of the cofactor nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) and activity of NAD+-dependent sirtuin deacetylase enzymes to regulate mitochondrial function across the circadian cycle. In this chapter, we review current state-of-the-art methods to analyze circadian cycles in mitochondrial bioenergetics, glycolysis, and nucleotide metabolism in both cell-based and animal models. PMID:25707277

  17. Circadian regulation of cellular physiology.

    PubMed

    Peek, C B; Ramsey, K M; Levine, D C; Marcheva, B; Perelis, M; Bass, J

    2015-01-01

    The circadian clock synchronizes behavioral and physiological processes on a daily basis in anticipation of the light-dark cycle. In mammals, molecular clocks are present in both the central pacemaker neurons and in nearly all peripheral tissues. Clock transcription factors in metabolic tissues coordinate metabolic fuel utilization and storage with alternating periods of feeding and fasting corresponding to the rest-activity cycle. In vitro and in vivo biochemical approaches have led to the discovery of mechanisms underlying the interplay between the molecular clock and the metabolic networks. For example, recent studies have demonstrated that the circadian clock controls rhythmic synthesis of the cofactor nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) and activity of NAD(+)-dependent sirtuin deacetylase enzymes to regulate mitochondrial function across the circadian cycle. In this chapter, we review current state-of-the-art methods to analyze circadian cycles in mitochondrial bioenergetics, glycolysis, and nucleotide metabolism in both cell-based and animal models.

  18. Circadian Control of Global Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shujing; Zhang, Luoying

    2015-01-01

    Circadian rhythms exist in most if not all organisms on the Earth and manifest in various aspects of physiology and behavior. These rhythmic processes are believed to be driven by endogenous molecular clocks that regulate rhythmic expression of clock-controlled genes (CCGs). CCGs consist of a significant portion of the genome and are involved in diverse biological pathways. The transcription of CCGs is tuned by rhythmic actions of transcription factors and circadian alterations in chromatin. Here, we review the circadian control of CCG transcription in five model organisms that are widely used, including cyanobacterium, fungus, plant, fruit fly, and mouse. Comparing the similarity and differences in the five organisms could help us better understand the function of the circadian clock, as well as its output mechanisms adapted to meet the demands of diverse environmental conditions. PMID:26682214

  19. The circadian body temperature rhythm of Djungarian Hamsters (Phodopus sungorus) revealing different circadian phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Schöttner, Konrad; Waterhouse, Jim; Weinert, Dietmar

    2011-06-01

    obvious circadian signal. With regard to DAO hamsters, it remains to be investigated whether the clockwork itself or the afferent entraining pathways are abnormal in comparison with the WT hamsters.

  20. Environmental Perturbation of the Circadian Clock Disrupts Pregnancy in the Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Summa, Keith C.; Vitaterna, Martha Hotz; Turek, Fred W.

    2012-01-01

    Background The circadian clock has been linked to reproduction at many levels in mammals. Epidemiological studies of female shift workers have reported increased rates of reproductive abnormalities and adverse pregnancy outcomes, although whether the cause is circadian disruption or another factor associated with shift work is unknown. Here we test whether environmental disruption of circadian rhythms, using repeated shifts of the light:dark (LD) cycle, adversely affects reproductive success in mice. Methodology/Principal Findings Young adult female C57BL/6J (B6) mice were paired with B6 males until copulation was verified by visual identification of vaginal plug formation. Females were then randomly assigned to one of three groups: control, phase-delay or phase-advance. Controls remained on a constant 12-hr light:12-hr dark cycle, whereas phase-delayed and phase-advanced mice were subjected to 6-hr delays or advances in the LD cycle every 5–6 days, respectively. The number of copulations resulting in term pregnancies was determined. Control females had a full-term pregnancy success rate of 90% (11/12), which fell to 50% (9/18; p<0.1) in the phase-delay group and 22% (4/18; p<0.01) in the phase-advance group. Conclusions/Significance Repeated shifting of the LD cycle, which disrupts endogenous circadian timekeeping, dramatically reduces pregnancy success in mice. Advances of the LD cycle have a greater negative impact on pregnancy outcomes and, in non-pregnant female mice, require longer for circadian re-entrainment, suggesting that the magnitude or duration of circadian misalignment may be related to the severity of the adverse impact on pregnancy. These results explicitly link disruptions of circadian entrainment to adverse pregnancy outcomes in mammals, which may have important implications for the reproductive health of female shift workers, women with circadian rhythm sleep disorders and/or women with disturbed circadian rhythms for other reasons. PMID

  1. Drosophila spaghetti and doubletime link the circadian clock and light to caspases, apoptosis and tauopathy.

    PubMed

    Means, John C; Venkatesan, Anandakrishnan; Gerdes, Bryan; Fan, Jin-Yuan; Bjes, Edward S; Price, Jeffrey L

    2015-05-01

    While circadian dysfunction and neurodegeneration are correlated, the mechanism for this is not understood. It is not known if age-dependent circadian dysfunction leads to neurodegeneration or vice-versa, and the proteins that mediate the effect remain unidentified. Here, we show that the knock-down of a regulator (spag) of the circadian kinase Dbt in circadian cells lowers Dbt levels abnormally, lengthens circadian rhythms and causes expression of activated initiator caspase (Dronc) in the optic lobes during the middle of the day or after light pulses at night. Likewise, reduced Dbt activity lengthens circadian period and causes expression of activated Dronc, and a loss-of-function mutation in Clk also leads to expression of activated Dronc in a light-dependent manner. Genetic epistasis experiments place Dbt downstream of Spag in the pathway, and Spag-dependent reductions of Dbt are shown to require the proteasome. Importantly, activated Dronc expression due to reduced Spag or Dbt activity occurs in cells that do not express the spag RNAi or dominant negative Dbt and requires PDF neuropeptide signaling from the same neurons that support behavioral rhythms. Furthermore, reduction of Dbt or Spag activity leads to Dronc-dependent Drosophila Tau cleavage and enhanced neurodegeneration produced by human Tau in a fly eye model for tauopathy. Aging flies with lowered Dbt or Spag function show markers of cell death as well as behavioral deficits and shortened lifespans, and even old wild type flies exhibit Dbt modification and activated caspase at particular times of day. These results suggest that Dbt suppresses expression of activated Dronc to prevent Tau cleavage, and that the circadian clock defects confer sensitivity to expression of activated Dronc in response to prolonged light. They establish a link between the circadian clock factors, light, cell death pathways and Tau toxicity, potentially via dysregulation of circadian neuronal remodeling in the optic lobes.

  2. Novel description of the 24-hour circadian rhythms of brachial versus central aortic blood pressure and the impact of blood pressure treatment in a randomized controlled clinical trial: The Ambulatory Central Aortic Pressure (AmCAP) Study.

    PubMed

    Williams, Bryan; Lacy, Peter S; Baschiera, Fabio; Brunel, Patrick; Düsing, Rainer

    2013-06-01

    Elevated brachial blood pressure (BP) is associated with increased cardiovascular risk and predicts morbidity and mortality in humans. Recently, 24-hour ambulatory BP monitoring and assessment of central aortic BP have been introduced to improve BP phenotyping. The Ambulatory Central Aortic Pressure (AmCAP) study combines these approaches and describes, for the first time, the diurnal patterns of simultaneously measured 24-hour ambulatory brachial and central pressures in a prespecified substudy embedded within a clinical trial of BP lowering in patients with hypertension. Twenty-four-hour ambulatory brachial and central pressure measurements were acquired using a tonometer mounted into the articulating strap of a wristwatch-like device (BPro) in 171 participants with hypertension recruited into the ASSERTIVE (AliSkiren Study of profound antihypERtensive efficacy in hyperTensIVE patients) trial. Participants were randomly assigned to BP lowering with either aliskiren 300 mg QD or telmisartan 80 mg QD for 12 weeks. Ambulatory brachial and central BP was measured in all participants both at baseline and at study end. Brachial and central BP both demonstrated typical diurnal patterns with lower pressures at night. However, night time was associated with smaller reductions in central relative to brachial pressure and decreased pulse pressure amplification (P<0.0001 for both). These effects were not modulated after BP lowering and were maintained after adjustment for day and night-time BP and heart rate (P=0.02). This study demonstrates that brachial and central pressure show different diurnal patterns, which are not modulated by BP-lowering therapy, with relatively higher night-time central pressures. These novel data indicate that night-time central BP may provide prognostic importance and warrants further investigation. Clinical Trial Registration- URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00865020. PMID:23630950

  3. Phenotyping Circadian Rhythms in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Eckel-Mahan, Kristin; Sassone-Corsi, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Circadian rhythms take place with a periodicity of twenty-four hours, temporally following the rotation of the earth around its axis. Examples of circadian rhythms are the sleep/wake cycle, feeding, and hormone secretion. Light powerfully entrains the mammalian clock and assists in keeping animals synchronized to the 24-hour cycle of the earth by activating specific neurons in the “central pacemaker” of the brain, the suprachiasmatic nucleus. Absolute periodicity of an animal can deviate slightly from 24 hours as manifest when an animal is placed into constant dark- or “free running”- conditions. Simple measurements of an organism's activity in free running conditions reveal its intrinsic circadian period. Mice are a particularly useful model for studying circadian rhythmicity due to the ease of genetic manipulation, thus identifying molecular contributors to rhythmicity. Furthermore, their small size allows for monitoring locomotion or activity in their home cage environment with relative ease. Several tasks commonly used to analyze circadian periodicity and plasticity in mice are outlined here including the process of entrainment, determination of tau (period length) in free running conditions, determination of circadian periodicity in response to light disruption (i.e. jet lag studies), and evaluation of clock plasticity in non-twenty-four hour conditions (T-cycles). Studying the properties of circadian periods such as their phase, amplitude, and length in response to photic perturbation, can be particularly useful in understanding how humans respond to jet lag, night shifts, rotating shifts, or other transient or chronic disruption of one's environmental surroundings. PMID:26331760

  4. Circadian molecular clocks and cancer.

    PubMed

    Kelleher, Fergal C; Rao, Aparna; Maguire, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Physiological processes such as the sleep-wake cycle, metabolism and hormone secretion are controlled by a circadian rhythm adapted to 24h day-night periodicity. This circadian synchronisation is in part controlled by ambient light decreasing melatonin secretion by the pineal gland and co-ordinated by the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus. Peripheral cell autonomous circadian clocks controlled by the suprachiasmatic nucleus, the master regulator, exist within every cell of the body and are comprised of at least twelve genes. These include the basic helix-loop-helix/PAS domain containing transcription factors; Clock, BMal1 and Npas2 which activate transcription of the periodic genes (Per1 and Per2) and cryptochrome genes (Cry1 and Cry2). Points of coupling exist between the cellular clock and the cell cycle. Cell cycle genes which are affected by the molecular circadian clock include c-Myc, Wee1, cyclin D and p21. Therefore the rhythm of the circadian clock and cancer are interlinked. Molecular examples exist including activation of Per2 leads to c-myc overexpression and an increased tumor incidence. Mice with mutations in Cryptochrome 1 and 2 are arrhythmic (lack a circadian rhythm) and arrhythmic mice have a faster rate of growth of implanted tumors. Epidemiological finding of relevance include 'The Nurses' Health Study' where it was established that women working rotational night shifts have an increased incidence of breast cancer. Compounds that affect circadian rhythm exist with attendant future therapeutic possibilities. These include casein kinase I inhibitors and a candidate small molecule KL001 that affects the degradation of cryptochrome. Theoretically the cell cycle and malignant disease may be targeted vicariously by selective alteration of the cellular molecular clock. PMID:24099911

  5. Urinary Cortisol Circadian Rhythm in a Group of High-Functioning Children with Autism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richdale, Amanda L.; Prior, Margot R.

    1992-01-01

    This study found no evidence for abnormal temporal placement of the basal urinary cortisol circadian rhythm in a group of 18 high-functioning children (ages 4-14) with autism. There was a tendency toward cortisol hypersecretion during the day, predominantly in autistic children who were integrated into the normal school system. (Author/JDD)

  6. A Comparative Study of Circadian Rhythm Functioning and Sleep in People with Asperger Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hare, Dougal Julian; Jones, Steven; Evershed, Kate

    2006-01-01

    The circadian rhythm functioning and sleep patterns of 10 adults with Asperger syndrome were investigated using actigraphy. When compared with data from neurotypical adults, both statistical and clinically significant differences were found between the two groups, with the adults with Asperger syndrome showing marked abnormalities in both the…

  7. Chronic hyperammonemia alters the circadian rhythms of corticosteroid hormone levels and of motor activity in rats.

    PubMed

    Ahabrach, Hanan; Piedrafita, Blanca; Ayad, Abdelmalik; El Mlili, Nisrin; Errami, Mohammed; Felipo, Vicente; Llansola, Marta

    2010-05-15

    Patients with liver cirrhosis may present hepatic encephalopathy with a wide range of neurological disturbances and alterations in sleep quality and in the sleep-wake circadian rhythm. Hyperammonemia is a main contributor to the neurological alterations in hepatic encephalopathy. We have assessed, in an animal model of chronic hyperammonemia without liver failure, the effects of hyperammonemia per se on the circadian rhythms of motor activity, temperature, and plasma levels of adrenal corticosteroid hormones. Chronic hyperammonemia alters the circadian rhythms of locomotor activity and of cortisol and corticosterone levels in blood. Different types of motor activity are affected differentially. Hyperammonemia significantly alters the rhythm of spontaneous ambulatory activity, reducing strongly ambulatory counts and slightly average velocity during the night (the active phase) but not during the day, resulting in altered circadian rhythms. In contrast, hyperammonemia did not affect wheel running at all, indicating that it affects spontaneous but not voluntary activity. Vertical activity was affected only very slightly, indicating that hyperammonemia does not induce anxiety. Hyperammonemia abolished completely the circadian rhythm of corticosteroid hormones in plasma, completely eliminating the peaks of cortisol and corticosterone present in control rats at the start of the dark period. The data reported show that chronic hyperammonemia, similar to that present in patients with liver cirrhosis, alters the circadian rhythms of corticosteroid hormones and of motor activity. This suggests that hyperammonemia would be a relevant contributor to the alterations in corticosteroid hormones and in circadian rhythms in patients with liver cirrhosis.

  8. Redox regulation and pro-oxidant reactions in the physiology of circadian systems.

    PubMed

    Méndez, Isabel; Vázquez-Martínez, Olivia; Hernández-Muñoz, Rolando; Valente-Godínez, Héctor; Díaz-Muñoz, Mauricio

    2016-05-01

    Rhythms of approximately 24 h are pervasive in most organisms and are known as circadian. There is a molecular circadian clock in each cell sustained by a feedback system of interconnected "clock" genes and transcription factors. In mammals, the timing system is formed by a central pacemaker, the suprachiasmatic nucleus, in coordination with a collection of peripheral oscillators. Recently, an extensive interconnection has been recognized between the molecular circadian clock and the set of biochemical pathways that underlie the bioenergetics of the cell. A principle regulator of metabolic networks is the flow of electrons between electron donors and acceptors. The concomitant reduction and oxidation (redox) reactions directly influence the balance between anabolic and catabolic processes. This review summarizes and discusses recent findings concerning the mutual and dynamic interactions between the molecular circadian clock, redox reactions, and redox signaling. The scope includes the regulatory role played by redox coenzymes (NAD(P)+/NAD(P)H, GSH/GSSG), reactive oxygen species (superoxide anion, hydrogen peroxide), antioxidants (melatonin), and physiological events that modulate the redox state (feeding condition, circadian rhythms) in determining the timing capacity of the molecular circadian clock. In addition, we discuss a purely metabolic circadian clock, which is based on the redox enzymes known as peroxiredoxins and is present in mammalian red blood cells and in other biological systems. Both the timing system and the metabolic network are key to a better understanding of widespread pathological conditions such as the metabolic syndrome, obesity, and diabetes.

  9. Nutrition and the Circadian System

    PubMed Central

    Potter, Gregory D M; Cade, Janet E; Grant, Peter J; Hardie, Laura J

    2016-01-01

    The human circadian system anticipates and adapts to daily environmental changes to optimise behaviour according to time of day and temporally partition incompatible physiological processes. At the helm of this system is a master clock in the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) of the anterior hypothalamus. The SCN are primarily synchronised to the 24 hour day by the light/dark cycle; however, feeding/fasting cycles are the primary time cues for clocks in peripheral tissues. Aligning feeding/fasting cycles with clock-regulated metabolic changes optimises metabolism, and studies of other animals suggest that feeding at inappropriate times disrupts circadian system organisation and thereby contributes to adverse metabolic consequences and chronic disease development. ‘High-fat diets’ (HFDs) produce particularly deleterious effects on circadian system organisation in rodents by blunting feeding/fasting cycles. Time-of-day-restricted feeding, where food availability is restricted to a period of several hours, offsets many adverse consequences of HFDs in these animals; however, further evidence is required to assess whether the same is true in humans. Several nutritional compounds have robust effects on the circadian system. Caffeine, for example, can speed synchronisation to new time zones after jetlag. An appreciation of the circadian system has many implications for nutritional science and may ultimately help reduce the burden of chronic diseases. PMID:27221157

  10. Making circadian cancer therapy practical.

    PubMed

    Block, Keith I; Block, Penny B; Fox, Susan Reynolds; Birris, Jamie Stouffer; Feng, April Y; de la Torre, Michael; Nathan, Deva; Tothy, Peter; Maki, Amanda K; Gyllenhaal, Charlotte

    2009-12-01

    Practical circadian therapy for the cancer patient involves 3 spheres of intervention-improving lifestyle, optimizing internal biochemical milieu, and adjusting treatment times. The potential value of improving overall circadian functioning is shown in the work of Mormont et al in which pronounced rest-activity rhythms were associated with better survival in colorectal cancer patients receiving chronomodulated chemotherapy. Lifestyle interventions that may improve circadian functioning involve diet, physical activity, and mind-body therapies. A diet that is anti-inflammatory and has appropriate carbohydrate intake, as well as regular meal timing, encourages normal circadian cycles. Adequate daytime physical activity encourages restful sleep, and morning light exposure during exercise may entrain melatonin rhythms. Meditation and other mind-body therapies can reduce anxiety and depression that may disrupt sleep. Aspects of the biochemical milieu that specifically disrupt circadian functioning are inflammation and stress hormones. Inflammation and cytokine disruption can be addressed with diet, herbs, and other natural substances. Chronomodulation of chemotherapy in a US clinical setting will be discussed. A series of 12 cases will be presented of patients who experienced grade 3 to 4 toxicities with various chemotherapy regimens for colorectal cancer. When rechallenged with the same regimens administered chronotherapeutically, none of the patients experienced grade 3 to 4 toxicity. Integrating all the above treatment modalities has the potential to improve both the quality of life and disease outcomes in cancer patients.

  11. Analysis of Circadian Leaf Movements.

    PubMed

    Müller, Niels A; Jiménez-Gómez, José M

    2016-01-01

    The circadian clock is a molecular timekeeper that controls a wide variety of biological processes. In plants, clock outputs range from the molecular level, with rhythmic gene expression and metabolite content, to physiological processes such as stomatal conductance or leaf movements. Any of these outputs can be used as markers to monitor the state of the circadian clock. In the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, much of the current knowledge about the clock has been gained from time course experiments profiling expression of endogenous genes or reporter constructs regulated by the circadian clock. Since these methods require labor-intensive sample preparation or transformation, monitoring leaf movements is an interesting alternative, especially in non-model species and for natural variation studies. Technological improvements both in digital photography and image analysis allow cheap and easy monitoring of circadian leaf movements. In this chapter we present a protocol that uses an autonomous point and shoot camera and free software to monitor circadian leaf movements in tomato. PMID:26867616

  12. Circadian modulation of dopamine levels and dopaminergic neuron development contributes to attention deficiency and hyperactive behavior.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jian; Zhong, Zhaomin; Wang, Mingyong; Chen, Xifeng; Tan, Yicheng; Zhang, Shuqing; He, Wei; He, Xiong; Huang, Guodong; Lu, Haiping; Wu, Ping; Che, Yi; Yan, Yi-Lin; Postlethwait, John H; Chen, Wenbiao; Wang, Han

    2015-02-11

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is one of the most prevalent psychiatric disorders in children and adults. While ADHD patients often display circadian abnormalities, the underlying mechanisms are unclear. Here we found that the zebrafish mutant for the circadian gene period1b (per1b) displays hyperactive, impulsive-like, and attention deficit-like behaviors and low levels of dopamine, reminiscent of human ADHD patients. We found that the circadian clock directly regulates dopamine-related genes monoamine oxidase and dopamine β hydroxylase, and acts via genes important for the development or maintenance of dopaminergic neurons to regulate their number and organization in the ventral diencephalic posterior tuberculum. We then found that Per1 knock-out mice also display ADHD-like symptoms and reduced levels of dopamine, thereby showing highly conserved roles of the circadian clock in ADHD. Our studies demonstrate that disruption of a circadian clock gene elicits ADHD-like syndrome. The circadian model for attention deficiency and hyperactive behavior sheds light on ADHD pathogenesis and opens avenues for exploring novel targets for diagnosis and therapy for this common psychiatric disorder.

  13. Circadian Modulation of Dopamine Levels and Dopaminergic Neuron Development Contributes to Attention Deficiency and Hyperactive Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jian; Zhong, Zhaomin; Wang, Mingyong; Chen, Xifeng; Tan, Yicheng; Zhang, Shuqing; He, Wei; He, Xiong; Huang, Guodong; Lu, Haiping; Wu, Ping; Che, Yi; Yan, Yi-Lin; Postlethwait, John H.; Chen, Wenbiao

    2015-01-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is one of the most prevalent psychiatric disorders in children and adults. While ADHD patients often display circadian abnormalities, the underlying mechanisms are unclear. Here we found that the zebrafish mutant for the circadian gene period1b (per1b) displays hyperactive, impulsive-like, and attention deficit-like behaviors and low levels of dopamine, reminiscent of human ADHD patients. We found that the circadian clock directly regulates dopamine-related genes monoamine oxidase and dopamine β hydroxylase, and acts via genes important for the development or maintenance of dopaminergic neurons to regulate their number and organization in the ventral diencephalic posterior tuberculum. We then found that Per1 knock-out mice also display ADHD-like symptoms and reduced levels of dopamine, thereby showing highly conserved roles of the circadian clock in ADHD. Our studies demonstrate that disruption of a circadian clock gene elicits ADHD-like syndrome. The circadian model for attention deficiency and hyperactive behavior sheds light on ADHD pathogenesis and opens avenues for exploring novel targets for diagnosis and therapy for this common psychiatric disorder. PMID:25673850

  14. Circadian variation of the human metabolome captured by real-time breath analysis.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Lozano Sinues, Pablo; Tarokh, Leila; Li, Xue; Kohler, Malcolm; Brown, Steven A; Zenobi, Renato; Dallmann, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Circadian clocks play a significant role in the correct timing of physiological metabolism, and clock disruption might lead to pathological changes of metabolism. One interesting method to assess the current state of metabolism is metabolomics. Metabolomics tries to capture the entirety of small molecules, i.e. the building blocks of metabolism, in a given matrix, such as blood, saliva or urine. Using mass spectrometric approaches we and others have shown that a significant portion of the human metabolome in saliva and blood exhibits circadian modulation; independent of food intake or sleep/wake rhythms. Recent advances in mass spectrometry techniques have introduced completely non-invasive breathprinting; a method to instantaneously assess small metabolites in human breath. In this proof-of-principle study, we extend these findings about the impact of circadian clocks on metabolomics to exhaled breath. As previously established, our method allows for real-time analysis of a rich matrix during frequent non-invasive sampling. We sampled the breath of three healthy, non-smoking human volunteers in hourly intervals for 24 hours during total sleep deprivation, and found 111 features in the breath of all individuals, 36-49% of which showed significant circadian variation in at least one individual. Our data suggest that real-time mass spectrometric "breathprinting" has high potential to become a useful tool to understand circadian metabolism, and develop new biomarkers to easily and in real-time assess circadian clock phase and function in experimental and clinical settings. PMID:25545545

  15. Individualized cosinor assessment of circadian hormonal variation in third trimester human pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Meis, P J; Buster, J E; Kundu, N; Magyar, D; Marshall, J R; Halberg, F

    1983-01-01

    Two clinically healthy pregnant women were studied in a single 24-h span during the third trimester. Blood drawn every 20 min was assayed for cortisol (F), dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEA-S), estriol (E3), and prolactin (PRL). Blood drawn hourly was assayed for progesterone (P), human placental lactogen (HPL) and 15alpha-hydroxyestriol (E4). Breast temperature (BT) was continuously monitored. Single cosinor analysis demonstrated statistically significant circadian rhythms for plasma concentrations of F, DHEA-S, and BT for both subjects, and of E3 for one subject. Statistically significant circadian rhythms in plasma concentrations of P, HPL, E4 or PRL could not be demonstrated in our third trimester subjects. However, analysis of data from subjects sampled at earlier gestational ages revealed highly significant PRL circadian rhythms. These results suggest that plasma concentrations of PRL show a progressive decrease in circadian amplitude despite a progressive increase in mesor with advancing gestational age. Frequent sampling and cosinor data analysis permit identification of circadian rhythms in BT. The use of BT as a potential marker for rhythms in plasma concentration of certain hormones awaits further scrutiny. The demonstration of several circadian endocrine rhythms in individual subjects in the third trimester of human pregnancy facilitates the usefulness of such marker rhythms. PMID:6221911

  16. Circadian Clock, Cancer, and Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The circadian clock is a global regulatory system that interfaces with most other regulatory systems and pathways in mammalian organisms. Investigations of the circadian clock–DNA damage response connections have revealed that nucleotide excision repair, DNA damage checkpoints, and apoptosis are appreciably influenced by the clock. Although several epidemiological studies in humans and a limited number of genetic studies in mouse model systems have indicated that clock disruption may predispose mammals to cancer, well-controlled genetic studies in mice have not supported the commonly held view that circadian clock disruption is a cancer risk factor. In fact, in the appropriate genetic background, clock disruption may instead aid in cancer regression by promoting intrinsic and extrinsic apoptosis. Finally, the clock may affect the efficacy of cancer treatment (chronochemotherapy) by modulating the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of chemotherapeutic drugs as well as the activity of the DNA repair enzymes that repair the DNA damage caused by anticancer drugs. PMID:25302769

  17. Cardiomyocyte Circadian Oscillations Are Cell-Autonomous, Amplified by β-Adrenergic Signaling, and Synchronized in Cardiac Ventricle Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Welsh, David K.

    2016-01-01

    Circadian clocks impact vital cardiac parameters such as blood pressure and heart rate, and adverse cardiac events such as myocardial infarction and sudden cardiac death. In mammals, the central circadian pacemaker, located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus, synchronizes cellular circadian clocks in the heart and many other tissues throughout the body. Cardiac ventricle explants maintain autonomous contractions and robust circadian oscillations of clock gene expression in culture. In the present study, we examined the relationship between intrinsic myocardial function and circadian rhythms in cultures from mouse heart. We cultured ventricular explants or dispersed cardiomyocytes from neonatal mice expressing a PER2::LUC bioluminescent reporter of circadian clock gene expression. We found that isoproterenol, a β-adrenoceptor agonist known to increase heart rate and contractility, also amplifies PER2 circadian rhythms in ventricular explants. We found robust, cell-autonomous PER2 circadian rhythms in dispersed cardiomyocytes. Single-cell rhythms were initially synchronized in ventricular explants but desynchronized in dispersed cells. In addition, we developed a method for long-term, simultaneous monitoring of clock gene expression, contraction rate, and basal intracellular Ca2+ level in cardiomyocytes using PER2::LUC in combination with GCaMP3, a genetically encoded fluorescent Ca2+ reporter. In contrast to robust PER2 circadian rhythms in cardiomyocytes, we detected no rhythms in contraction rate and only weak rhythms in basal Ca2+ level. In summary, we found that PER2 circadian rhythms of cardiomyocytes are cell-autonomous, amplified by adrenergic signaling, and synchronized by intercellular communication in ventricle explants, but we detected no robust circadian rhythms in contraction rate or basal Ca2+. PMID:27459195

  18. Metabolism and the circadian clock converge.

    PubMed

    Eckel-Mahan, Kristin; Sassone-Corsi, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    Circadian rhythms occur in almost all species and control vital aspects of our physiology, from sleeping and waking to neurotransmitter secretion and cellular metabolism. Epidemiological studies from recent decades have supported a unique role for circadian rhythm in metabolism. As evidenced by individuals working night or rotating shifts, but also by rodent models of circadian arrhythmia, disruption of the circadian cycle is strongly associated with metabolic imbalance. Some genetically engineered mouse models of circadian rhythmicity are obese and show hallmark signs of the metabolic syndrome. Whether these phenotypes are due to the loss of distinct circadian clock genes within a specific tissue versus the disruption of rhythmic physiological activities (such as eating and sleeping) remains a cynosure within the fields of chronobiology and metabolism. Becoming more apparent is that from metabolites to transcription factors, the circadian clock interfaces with metabolism in numerous ways that are essential for maintaining metabolic homeostasis.

  19. Nutrients and Circadian Rhythms in Mammals.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tao; Yao, Cencen; Huang, Liangfeng; Mao, Youxiang; Zhang, Wanjing; Jiang, Jianguo; Fu, Zhengwei

    2015-01-01

    The circadian rhythm is generally existed in mammalian behavior and metabolic processes, which results from the self-sustained circadian clocks. The mammalian circadian clocks are composed of a master clock located in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), and of many peripheral clocks in tissues and extra-SCN brain regions. It is indicated that feeding could take over part of the SCN signaling, and affect internal synchrony between the master clock and the peripheral clocks. Thus, recent studies focus more on the relationship between the nutrients and circadian rhythms. Various nutrient components (glucose, amino acid, alcohol) are found to be able to directly affect the circadian rhythm of clock genes. Moreover, the feeding schedule of nutrients is as important as the nutrient components in maintaining a healthy circadian rhythm. Therefore, the circadian homeostasis needs not only balanced nutrient components but also regular timed nutrients.

  20. Circadian Rhythm Disruption Promotes Lung Tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Papagiannakopoulos, Thales; Bauer, Matthew R; Davidson, Shawn M; Heimann, Megan; Subbaraj, Lakshmipriya; Bhutkar, Arjun; Bartlebaugh, Jordan; Vander Heiden, Matthew G; Jacks, Tyler

    2016-08-01

    Circadian rhythms are 24-hr oscillations that control a variety of biological processes in living systems, including two hallmarks of cancer, cell division and metabolism. Circadian rhythm disruption by shift work is associated with greater risk for cancer development and poor prognosis, suggesting a putative tumor-suppressive role for circadian rhythm homeostasis. Using a genetically engineered mouse model of lung adenocarcinoma, we have characterized the effects of circadian rhythm disruption on lung tumorigenesis. We demonstrate that both physiologic perturbation (jet lag) and genetic mutation of the central circadian clock components decreased survival and promoted lung tumor growth and progression. The core circadian genes Per2 and Bmal1 were shown to have cell-autonomous tumor-suppressive roles in transformation and lung tumor progression. Loss of the central clock components led to increased c-Myc expression, enhanced proliferation, and metabolic dysregulation. Our findings demonstrate that both systemic and somatic disruption of circadian rhythms contribute to cancer progression.

  1. Circadian Rhythm Disruption Promotes Lung Tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Papagiannakopoulos, Thales; Bauer, Matthew R; Davidson, Shawn M; Heimann, Megan; Subbaraj, Lakshmipriya; Bhutkar, Arjun; Bartlebaugh, Jordan; Vander Heiden, Matthew G; Jacks, Tyler

    2016-08-01

    Circadian rhythms are 24-hr oscillations that control a variety of biological processes in living systems, including two hallmarks of cancer, cell division and metabolism. Circadian rhythm disruption by shift work is associated with greater risk for cancer development and poor prognosis, suggesting a putative tumor-suppressive role for circadian rhythm homeostasis. Using a genetically engineered mouse model of lung adenocarcinoma, we have characterized the effects of circadian rhythm disruption on lung tumorigenesis. We demonstrate that both physiologic perturbation (jet lag) and genetic mutation of the central circadian clock components decreased survival and promoted lung tumor growth and progression. The core circadian genes Per2 and Bmal1 were shown to have cell-autonomous tumor-suppressive roles in transformation and lung tumor progression. Loss of the central clock components led to increased c-Myc expression, enhanced proliferation, and metabolic dysregulation. Our findings demonstrate that both systemic and somatic disruption of circadian rhythms contribute to cancer progression. PMID:27476975

  2. Temporal integration of light flashes by the human circadian system

    PubMed Central

    Najjar, Raymond P.; Zeitzer, Jamie M.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Beyond image formation, the light that is detected by retinal photoreceptors influences subcortical functions, including circadian timing, sleep, and arousal. The physiology of nonimage-forming (NIF) photoresponses in humans is not well understood; therefore, the development of therapeutic interventions based on this physiology, such as bright light therapy to treat chronobiological disorders, remains challenging. METHODS. Thirty-nine participants were exposed to 60 minutes of either continuous light (n = 8) or sequences of 2-millisecond light flashes (n = 31) with different interstimulus intervals (ISIs; ranging from 2.5 to 240 seconds). Melatonin phase shift and suppression, along with changes in alertness and sleepiness, were assessed. RESULTS. We determined that the human circadian system integrates flash sequences in a nonlinear fashion with a linear rise to a peak response (ISI = 7.6 ± 0.53 seconds) and a power function decrease following the peak of responsivity. At peak ISI, flashes were at least 2-fold more effective in phase delaying the circadian system as compared with exposure to equiluminous continuous light 3,800 times the duration. Flashes did not change melatonin concentrations or alertness in an ISI-dependent manner. CONCLUSION. We have demonstrated that intermittent light is more effective than continuous light at eliciting circadian changes. These findings cast light on the phenomenology of photic integration and suggest a dichotomous retinohypothalamic network leading to circadian phase shifting and other NIF photoresponses. Further clinical trials are required to judge the practicality of light flash protocols. TRIAL REGISTRATION. Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01119365. FUNDING. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (1R01HL108441-01A1) and Department of Veterans Affairs Sierra Pacific Mental Illness Research, Education, and Clinical Center. PMID:26854928

  3. Keeping circadian time with hormones.

    PubMed

    Challet, E

    2015-09-01

    Daily variations of metabolism, physiology and behaviour are controlled by a network of coupled circadian clocks, comprising a master clock in the suprachiasmatic nuclei of the hypothalamus and a multitude of secondary clocks in the brain and peripheral organs. Light cues synchronize the master clock that conveys temporal cues to other body clocks via neuronal and hormonal signals. Feeding at unusual times can reset the phase of most peripheral clocks. While the neuroendocrine aspect of circadian regulation has been underappreciated, this review aims at showing that the role of hormonal rhythms as internal time-givers is the rule rather than the exception. Adrenal glucocorticoids, pineal melatonin and adipocyte-derived leptin participate in internal synchronization (coupling) within the multi-oscillatory network. Furthermore, pancreatic insulin is involved in food synchronization of peripheral clocks, while stomach ghrelin provides temporal signals modulating behavioural anticipation of mealtime. Circadian desynchronization induced by shift work or chronic jet lag has harmful effects on metabolic regulation, thus favouring diabetes and obesity. Circadian deregulation of hormonal rhythms may participate in internal desynchronization and associated increase in metabolic risks. Conversely, adequate timing of endocrine therapies can promote phase-adjustment of the master clock (e.g. via melatonin agonists) and peripheral clocks (e.g. via glucocorticoid agonists).

  4. Circadian Clocks: Unexpected Biochemical Cogs

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Tetsuya; Mchaourab, Hassane; Johnson, Carl Hirschie

    2015-01-01

    A circadian oscillation can be reconstituted in vitro from three proteins that cycles with a period of ~24 h. Two recent studies provide surprising biochemical answers to why this remarkable oscillator has such a long time constant and how it can switch effortlessly between alternating enzymatic modes. PMID:26439342

  5. Cannabinoids excite circadian clock neurons.

    PubMed

    Acuna-Goycolea, Claudio; Obrietan, Karl; van den Pol, Anthony N

    2010-07-28

    Cannabinoids, the primary active agent in drugs of abuse such as marijuana and hashish, tend to generate a distorted sense of time. Here we study the effect of cannabinoids on the brain's circadian clock, the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), using patch clamp and cell-attached electrophysiological recordings, RT-PCR, immunocytochemistry, and behavioral analysis. The SCN showed strong expression of the cannabinoid receptor CB1R, as detected with RT-PCR. SCN neurons, including those using GABA as a transmitter, and axons within the SCN, expressed CB1R immunoreactivity. Behaviorally, cannabinoids did not alter the endogenous free-running circadian rhythm in the mouse brain, but did attenuate the ability of the circadian clock to entrain to light zeitgebers. In the absence of light, infusion of the CB1R antagonist AM251 caused a modest phase shift, suggesting endocannabinoid modulation of clock timing. Interestingly, cannabinoids had no effect on glutamate release from the retinohypothalamic projection, suggesting a direct action of cannabinoids on the retinohypothalamic tract was unlikely to explain the inhibition of the phase shift. Within the SCN, cannabinoids were excitatory by a mechanism based on presynaptic CB1R attenuation of axonal GABA release. These data raise the possibility that the time dissociation described by cannabinoid users may result in part from altered circadian clock function and/or entrainment to environmental time cues. PMID:20668190

  6. Circadian influences on myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Virag, Jitka A. I.; Lust, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    Components of circadian rhythm maintenance, or “clock genes,” are endogenous entrainable oscillations of about 24 h that regulate biological processes and are found in the suprachaismatic nucleus (SCN) and many peripheral tissues, including the heart. They are influenced by external cues, or Zeitgebers, such as light and heat, and can influence such diverse phenomena as cytokine expression immune cells, metabolic activity of cardiac myocytes, and vasodilator regulation by vascular endothelial cells. While it is known that the central master clock in the SCN synchronizes peripheral physiologic rhythms, the mechanisms by which the information is transmitted are complex and may include hormonal, metabolic, and neuronal inputs. Whether circadian patterns are causally related to the observed periodicity of events, or whether they are simply epi-phenomena is not well established, but a few studies suggest that the circadian effects likely are real in their impact on myocardial infarct incidence. Cycle disturbances may be harbingers of predisposition and subsequent response to acute and chronic cardiac injury, and identifying the complex interactions of circadian rhythms and myocardial infarction may provide insights into possible preventative and therapeutic strategies for susceptible populations. PMID:25400588

  7. The regulation of central and peripheral circadian clocks in humans.

    PubMed

    Cermakian, N; Boivin, D B

    2009-11-01

    Many circadian rhythms are controlled by the central clock of the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus, as well as clocks located in other brain regions and most peripheral tissues. These central and peripheral clocks are based on clock genes and their protein products. In recent years, the expression of clock genes has started to be investigated in human samples, primarily white blood cells, but also skin, oral mucosa, colon cells, adipose tissue as well as post-mortem brain tissue. The expression of clock genes in those peripheral tissues offers a way to monitor human peripheral clocks and to compare their function and regulation with those of the central clock, which is followed by markers such as melatonin, cortisol and core body temperature. We have recently used such an approach to compare central and peripheral rhythms in subjects under different lighting conditions. In particular, we have monitored the entrainment of the clock of blood cells in subjects undergoing a simulated night shift protocol with bright light treatment, known to efficiently reset the central clock. This line of research will be helpful for learning more about the human circadian system and to find ways to alleviate health problems of shift workers, and other populations experiencing altered circadian rhythms. PMID:19849799

  8. Therapeutics for Circadian Rhythm Sleep Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Dodson, Ehren R.; Zee, Phyllis C

    2010-01-01

    Synopsis The sleep-wake cycle is regulated by the interaction of endogenous circadian and homeostatic processes. The circadian system provides timing information for most physiological rhythms, including the sleep and wake cycle. In addition, the central circadian clock located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus has been shown to promote alertness during the day. Circadian rhythm sleep disorders arise when there is a misalignment between the timing of the endogenous circadian rhythms and the external environment or when there is dysfunction of the circadian clock or its entrainment pathways. The primary synchronizing agents of the circadian system are light and melatonin. Light is the strongest entraining agent of circadian rhythms and timed exposure to bright light is often used in the treatment of circadian rhythm sleep disorders. In addition, timed administration of melatonin, either alone or in combination with light therapy has been shown to be useful in the treatment of the following circadian rhythm sleep disorders: delayed sleep phase, advanced sleep phase, free-running, irregular sleep wake, jet lag and shift work. PMID:21243069

  9. Molecular clock is involved in predictive circadian adjustment of renal function.

    PubMed

    Zuber, Annie Mercier; Centeno, Gabriel; Pradervand, Sylvain; Nikolaeva, Svetlana; Maquelin, Lionel; Cardinaux, Léonard; Bonny, Olivier; Firsov, Dmitri

    2009-09-22

    Renal excretion of water and major electrolytes exhibits a significant circadian rhythm. This functional periodicity is believed to result, at least in part, from circadian changes in secretion/reabsorption capacities of the distal nephron and collecting ducts. Here, we studied the molecular mechanisms underlying circadian rhythms in the distal nephron segments, i.e., distal convoluted tubule (DCT) and connecting tubule (CNT) and the cortical collecting duct (CCD). Temporal expression analysis performed on microdissected mouse DCT/CNT or CCD revealed a marked circadian rhythmicity in the expression of a large number of genes crucially involved in various homeostatic functions of the kidney. This analysis also revealed that both DCT/CNT and CCD possess an intrinsic circadian timing system characterized by robust oscillations in the expression of circadian core clock genes (clock, bma11, npas2, per, cry, nr1d1) and clock-controlled Par bZip transcriptional factors dbp, hlf, and tef. The clock knockout mice or mice devoid of dbp/hlf/tef (triple knockout) exhibit significant changes in renal expression of several key regulators of water or sodium balance (vasopressin V2 receptor, aquaporin-2, aquaporin-4, alphaENaC). Functionally, the loss of clock leads to a complex phenotype characterized by partial diabetes insipidus, dysregulation of sodium excretion rhythms, and a significant decrease in blood pressure. Collectively, this study uncovers a major role of molecular clock in renal function.

  10. Mammalian circadian clock system: Molecular mechanisms for pharmaceutical and medical sciences.

    PubMed

    Okamura, Hitoshi; Doi, Masao; Fustin, Jean-Michel; Yamaguchi, Yoshiaki; Matsuo, Masahiro

    2010-07-31

    An internal circadian (from the Latin "circa" meaning "about" and "dien" meaning "day") clock has been found across kingdoms of life, a testimony that circadian rhythms are a basic feature of life on earth. Physiologically relevant circadian time is generated at the level of transcription-(post)translation feedback loop of clock genes, which machinery can be found in most cells throughout the body. Lesions of the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) abolish clock oscillations in the body, indicating thereby that rhythm generation is a hierarchial system with the SCN at the top. Disrupting this exquisitely harmonious system causes abnormal expression of cell-type specific clock-controlled genes, as revealed by the etiology of life-style related diseases such as hypertension. PMID:20620185

  11. Alzheimer Disease in a Mouse Model: MR Imaging–guided Focused Ultrasound Targeted to the Hippocampus Opens the Blood-Brain Barrier and Improves Pathologic Abnormalities and Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Dubey, Sonam; Yeung, Sharon; Hough, Olivia; Eterman, Naomi; Aubert, Isabelle; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To validate whether repeated magnetic resonance (MR) imaging–guided focused ultrasound treatments targeted to the hippocampus, a brain structure relevant for Alzheimer disease (ADAlzheimer disease), could modulate pathologic abnormalities, plasticity, and behavior in a mouse model. Materials and Methods All animal procedures were approved by the Animal Care Committee and are in accordance with the Canadian Council on Animal Care. Seven-month-old transgenic (TgCRND8) (Tg) mice and their nontransgenic (non-Tg) littermates were entered in the study. Mice were treated weekly with MR imaging–guided focused ultrasound in the bilateral hippocampus (1.68 MHz, 10-msec bursts, 1-Hz burst repetition frequency, 120-second total duration). After 1 month, spatial memory was tested in the Y maze with the novel arm prior to sacrifice and immunohistochemical analysis. The data were compared by using unpaired t tests and analysis of variance with Tukey post hoc analysis. Results Untreated Tg mice spent 61% less time than untreated non-Tg mice exploring the novel arm of the Y maze because of spatial memory impairments (P < .05). Following MR imaging–guided focused ultrasound, Tg mice spent 99% more time exploring the novel arm, performing as well as their non-Tg littermates. Changes in behavior were correlated with a reduction of the number and size of amyloid plaques in the MR imaging–guided focused ultrasound–treated animals (P < .01). Further, after MR imaging–guided focused ultrasound treatment, there was a 250% increase in the number of newborn neurons in the hippocampus (P < .01). The newborn neurons had longer dendrites and more arborization after MR imaging–guided focused ultrasound, as well (P < .01). Conclusion Repeated MR imaging–guided focused ultrasound treatments led to spatial memory improvement in a Tg mouse model of ADAlzheimer disease. The behavior changes may be mediated by decreased amyloid pathologic abnormalities and increased neuronal

  12. Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) detected in abnormally high concentrations in postmortem blood and urine from two persons found dead inside a car containing a gasoline spill.

    PubMed

    Karinen, Ritva; Vindenes, Vigdis; Morild, Inge; Johnsen, Lene; Le Nygaard, Ilah; Christophersen, Asbjørg S

    2013-09-01

    Two deep frozen persons, a female and a male, were found dead in a car. There had been an explosive fire inside the car which had extinguished itself. On the floor inside the car were large pools of liquid which smelled of gasoline. The autopsy findings and routine toxicological analyses could not explain the cause of death. Carboxyhemoglobin levels in the blood samples were <10%. Analysis with a headspace gas chromatography revealed methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) concentrations of 185 mg/L (female victim) and 115 mg/L (male victim) in peripheral blood. The urine MTBE concentrations were 150 mg/L and 256 mg/L, respectively. MTBE is a synthetic chemical which is added to gasoline as a fuel oxygenate. Gasoline poisoning is likely to be the cause of the death in these two cases, and MTBE can be a suitable marker of gasoline exposure, when other volatile components have vaporized. PMID:23879346

  13. Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) detected in abnormally high concentrations in postmortem blood and urine from two persons found dead inside a car containing a gasoline spill.

    PubMed

    Karinen, Ritva; Vindenes, Vigdis; Morild, Inge; Johnsen, Lene; Le Nygaard, Ilah; Christophersen, Asbjørg S

    2013-09-01

    Two deep frozen persons, a female and a male, were found dead in a car. There had been an explosive fire inside the car which had extinguished itself. On the floor inside the car were large pools of liquid which smelled of gasoline. The autopsy findings and routine toxicological analyses could not explain the cause of death. Carboxyhemoglobin levels in the blood samples were <10%. Analysis with a headspace gas chromatography revealed methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) concentrations of 185 mg/L (female victim) and 115 mg/L (male victim) in peripheral blood. The urine MTBE concentrations were 150 mg/L and 256 mg/L, respectively. MTBE is a synthetic chemical which is added to gasoline as a fuel oxygenate. Gasoline poisoning is likely to be the cause of the death in these two cases, and MTBE can be a suitable marker of gasoline exposure, when other volatile components have vaporized.

  14. Caffeine lengthens circadian rhythms in mice.

    PubMed

    Oike, Hideaki; Kobori, Masuko; Suzuki, Takahiro; Ishida, Norio

    2011-07-01

    Although caffeine alters sleep in many animals, whether or not it affects mammalian circadian clocks remains unknown. Here, we found that incubating cultured mammalian cell lines, human osteosarcoma U2OS cells and mouse fibroblast NIH3T3 cells, with caffeine lengthened the period of circadian rhythms. Adding caffeine to ex vivo cultures also lengthened the circadian period in mouse liver explants from Per2::Luciferase reporter gene knockin mice, and caused a phase delay in brain slices containing the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), where the central circadian clock in mammals is located. Furthermore, chronic caffeine consumption ad libitum for a week delayed the phase of the mouse liver clock in vivo under 12 h light-dark conditions and lengthened the period of circadian locomotor rhythms in mice under constant darkness. Our results showed that caffeine alters circadian clocks in mammalian cells in vitro and in the mouse ex vivo and in vivo. PMID:21684260

  15. Unraveling the circadian clock in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoxue; Ma, Ligeng

    2013-01-01

    The circadian clock is an endogenous timing system responsible for coordinating an organism’s biological processes with its environment. Interlocked transcriptional feedback loops constitute the fundamental architecture of the circadian clock. In Arabidopsis, three feedback loops, the core loop, morning loop and evening loop, comprise a network that is the basis of the circadian clock. The components of these three loops are regulated in distinct ways, including transcriptional, post-transcriptional and posttranslational mechanisms. The discovery of the DNA-binding and repressive activities of TOC1 has overturned our initial concept of its function in the circadian clock. The alternative splicing of circadian clock-related genes plays an essential role in normal functioning of the clock and enables organisms to sense environmental changes. In this review, we describe the regulatory mechanisms of the circadian clock that have been identified in Arabidopsis. PMID:23221775

  16. Circadian rhythm reprogramming during lung inflammation.

    PubMed

    Haspel, Jeffrey A; Chettimada, Sukrutha; Shaik, Rahamthulla S; Chu, Jen-Hwa; Raby, Benjamin A; Cernadas, Manuela; Carey, Vincent; Process, Vanessa; Hunninghake, G Matthew; Ifedigbo, Emeka; Lederer, James A; Englert, Joshua; Pelton, Ashley; Coronata, Anna; Fredenburgh, Laura E; Choi, Augustine M K

    2014-09-11

    Circadian rhythms are known to regulate immune responses in healthy animals, but it is unclear whether they persist during acute illnesses where clock gene expression is disrupted by systemic inflammation. Here we use a genome-wide approach to investigate circadian gene and metabolite expression in the lungs of endotoxemic mice and find that novel cellular and molecular circadian rhythms are elicited in this setting. The endotoxin-specific circadian programme exhibits unique features, including a divergent group of rhythmic genes and metabolites compared with the basal state and a distinct periodicity and phase distribution. At the cellular level, endotoxin treatment also alters circadian rhythms of leukocyte counts within the lung in a bmal1-dependent manner, such that granulocytes rather than lymphocytes become the dominant oscillating cell type. Our results show that inflammation produces a complex re-organization of cellular and molecular circadian rhythms that are relevant to early events in lung injury.

  17. Metabolic and Nontranscriptional Circadian Clocks: Eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Akhilesh B.; Rey, Guillaume

    2016-01-01

    Circadian clocks are cellular timekeeping mechanisms that coordinate behavior and physiology around the 24-h day in most living organisms. Misalignment of an organism’s clock with its environment is associated with long-term adverse fitness consequences, as exemplified by the link between circadian disruption and various age-related diseases in humans. Current eukaryotic models of the circadian oscillator rely on transcription/translation feedback loop mechanisms, supplemented with accessory cytosolic loops that connect them to cellular physiology. However, there is mounting evidence questioning the absolute necessity of transcription-based oscillators for circadian rhythmicity, supported by the recent discovery of oxidation-reduction cycles of peroxiredoxin proteins, which persist even in the absence of transcription. A more fundamental mechanism based on metabolic cycles could thus underlie circadian transcriptional and cytosolic rhythms, thereby promoting circadian oscillations to integral properties of cellular metabolism. PMID:24606143

  18. Analysis of circadian rhythms in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Hirayama, Jun; Kaneko, Maki; Cardone, Luca; Cahill, Gregory; Sassone-Corsi, Paolo

    2005-01-01

    The zebrafish probably constitutes the best animal system to study the complexity of the circadian clock machinery and the influence that light has on it. The possibilities of producing transgenic fishes, to establish light-responsive cultured cells, and to directly explore light phototransduction on single clock cells are all remarkable features of this circadian system. This article describes some of the most useful methodologies to analyze the behavioral, cellular, and molecular aspects of the zebrafish circadian clock system. PMID:15817288

  19. [Genetic Control of Circadian Rhythms and Aging].

    PubMed

    Solovyeva, I A; Dobrovolskayaa, E V; Moskalev, A A

    2016-04-01

    The review establishes a link between a group of genes which are conserved in evolution and form a molecular oscillator responsible for generation of circadian rhythms and genetic determinants of aging including associated pathways of intracellular signaling. An analysis of mechanisms of development of age-dependent pathologies is conducted from the viewpoint of circadian genetics. Systematic data of circadian gene expression studies in animals demonstrating different rates of aging from accelerated to negligible are presented. PMID:27529973

  20. Red blood cells, sickle cell (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... is an inherited blood disease in which the red blood cells produce abnormal pigment (hemoglobin). The abnormal hemoglobin causes deformity of the red blood cells into crescent or sickle-shapes, as ...

  1. Circadian misalignment in mood disturbances.

    PubMed

    Lewy, Alfred J

    2009-12-01

    Recent refinements in methodology allow chronobiological researchers to answer the following questions: is there circadian misalignment in sleep and mood disturbances, and, if so, is it of the phase-advance or phase-delay type? Measurement of the dim light melatonin onset-to-midsleep interval, or phase-angle difference, in sleep and mood disorders should answer these questions. Although the phase-advance hypothesis of affective disorders was formulated three decades ago, recent studies suggest that many, if not all, mood disturbances have a circadian misalignment component of the phase-delay type, operationally defined as a delay in the dim light melatonin onset relative to the sleep/wake cycle. Phase-delayed disorders can be treated with bright light in the morning and/or low-dose melatonin in the afternoon/evening. Phase-advanced disorders can be treated with bright light in the evening and/or low-dose melatonin in the morning.

  2. Circadian Rhythm Control: Neurophysiological Investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glotzbach, S. F.

    1985-01-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) was implicated as a primary component in central nervous system mechanisms governing circadian rhythms. Disruption of the normal synchronization of temperature, activity, and other rhythms is detrimental to health. Sleep wake disorders, decreases in vigilance and performance, and certain affective disorders may result from or be exacerbated by such desynchronization. To study the basic neurophysiological mechanisms involved in entrainment of circadian systems by the environment, Parylene-coated, etched microwire electrode bundles were used to record extracellular action potentials from the small somata of the SCN and neighboring hypothalamic nuclei in unanesthetized, behaving animals. Male Wistar rats were anesthetized and chronically prepared with EEG ane EMG electrodes in addition to a moveable microdrive assembly. The majority of cells had firing rates 10 Hz and distinct populations of cells which had either the highest firing rate or lowest firing rate during sleep were seen.

  3. Circadian clocks in the ovary.

    PubMed

    Sellix, Michael T; Menaker, Michael

    2010-10-01

    Clock gene expression has been observed in tissues of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis. Whereas the contribution of hypothalamic oscillators to the timing of reproductive biology is well known, the role of peripheral oscillators like those in the ovary is less clear. Circadian clocks in the ovary might play a role in the timing of ovulation. Disruption of the clock in ovarian cells or desynchrony between ovarian clocks and circadian oscillators elsewhere in the body may contribute to the onset and progression of various reproductive pathologies. In this paper, we review evidence for clock function in the ovary across a number of species and offer a novel perspective into the role of this clock in normal ovarian physiology and in diseases that negatively affect fertility.

  4. Circadian clocks: lessons from fish.

    PubMed

    Idda, M Laura; Bertolucci, Cristiano; Vallone, Daniela; Gothilf, Yoav; Sánchez-Vázquez, Francisco Javier; Foulkes, Nicholas S

    2012-01-01

    Our understanding of the molecular and cellular organization of the circadian timing system in vertebrates has increased enormously over the past decade. In large part, progress has been based on genetic studies in the mouse as well as on fundamental similarities between vertebrate and Drosophila clocks. The zebrafish was initially considered as a potentially attractive genetic model for identifying vertebrate clock genes. However, instead, fish have ultimately proven to be valuable complementary models for studying various aspects of clock biology. For example, many fish can shift from diurnal to nocturnal activity implying specific flexibility in their clock function. We have learned much about the function of light input pathways, and the ontogeny and function of the pineal organ, the fish central pacemaker. Finally, blind cavefish have also provided new insight into the evolution of the circadian clock under extreme environmental conditions. PMID:22877658

  5. Circadian rhythmometry of mammalian radiosensitivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haus, E.; Halberg, F.; Loken, M. K.; Kim, Y. S.

    1974-01-01

    In the case of human bone marrow, the largest number of mitoses is seen in the evening in diurnally active men, mitotic activity being at a minimum in the morning. The opposite pattern is observed for nocturnal animals such as rats and mice on a regimen of light during the daytime alternating with darkness during the night hours. The entirety of these rhythms plays an important role in the organism's responses to environmental stimuli, including its resistance to potentially harmful agents. Conditions under which circadian rhythms can be observed and validated by inferential statistical means are discussed while emphasizing how artifacts of the laboratory environment can be shown to obscure circadian periodic variations in radiosensitivity.

  6. Evolutionary Endocrinology of Hormonal Rhythms: Juvenile Hormone Titer Circadian Polymorphism in Gryllus firmus.

    PubMed

    Zera, Anthony J

    2016-08-01

    Daily rhythms for hormonal traits are likely widespread and important aspects of organismal (e.g., life history) adaptation. Yet they remain substantially understudied, especially with respect to variable rhythms within species. The cricket, Gryllus firmus, exhibits a genetically polymorphic circadian rhythm for the blood titer of the key hormone, juvenile hormone (JH). Gryllus firmus is also wing-polymorphic, consisting of a dispersing morph that delays reproduction and a flightless morph with substantially enhanced egg production. JH circadian phenotype strongly covaries with morph type: The blood JH titer is strongly rhythmic in multiple populations artificially-selected for the dispersing morph (LW(f) = long wings with functional flight muscles) and is essentially arrhythmic in populations selected for the SW (short-winged) morph. Association between JH titer cycle and LW(f) morph is also found in natural populations of G. firmus and in several related species in the field. This is one of the very few studies of endocrine titer variation in natural populations of an insect. The morph-specific cycle is underlain by a circadian rhythm in hormone biosynthesis, which in turn is underlain by a rhythm in a brain neuropeptide regulator of JH biosynthesis. The morph-specific JH titer circadian cycle is also strongly correlated with a morph-specific daily rhythm in global gene expression. This is currently the only example of a genetically-variable hormone circadian rhythm in both the laboratory and field that is strongly associated with an ecologically important polymorphism. The extensive information on the underlying causes of the morph-specific JH titer rhythm, coupled with the strong association between the JH circadian rhythm and wing polymorphism makes this system in G. firmus an exceptional experimental model to investigate the mechanisms underlying circadian hormonal adaptations. Genetic polymorphism for the JH titer circadian rhythm in G. firmus is discussed

  7. Circadian rhythm dysfunction in glaucoma: A hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Jean-Louis, Girardin; Zizi, Ferdinand; Lazzaro, Douglas R; Wolintz, Arthur H

    2008-01-01

    The absence of circadian zeitgebers in the social environment causes circadian misalignment, which is often associated with sleep disturbances. Circadian misalignment, defined as a mismatch between the sleep-wake cycle and the timing of the circadian system, can occur either because of inadequate exposure to the light-dark cycle, the most important synchronizer of the circadian system, or reduction in light transmission resulting from ophthalmic diseases (e.g., senile miosis, cataract, diabetic retinopathy, macular degeneration, retinitis pigmentosa, and glaucoma). We propose that glaucoma may be the primary ocular disease that directly compromises photic input to the circadian time-keeping system because of inherent ganglion cell death. Glaucomatous damage to the ganglion cell layer might be particularly harmful to melanopsin. According to histologic and circadian data, a subset of intrinsically photoresponsive retinal ganglion cells, expressing melanopsin and cryptochromes, entrain the endogenous circadian system via transduction of photic input to the thalamus, projecting either to the suprachiasmatic nucleus or the lateral geniculate nucleus. Glaucoma provides a unique opportunity to explore whether in fact light transmission to the circadian system is compromised as a result of ganglion cell loss. PMID:18186932

  8. Circadian Rhythm Sleep-Wake Disorders.

    PubMed

    Abbott, Sabra M; Reid, Kathryn J; Zee, Phyllis C

    2015-12-01

    The circadian system regulates the timing and expression of nearly all biological processes, most notably, the sleep-wake cycle, and disruption of this system can result in adverse effects on both physical and mental health. The circadian rhythm sleep-wake disorders (CRSWDs) consist of 5 disorders that are due primarily to pathology of the circadian clock or to a misalignment of the timing of the endogenous circadian rhythm with the environment. This article outlines the nature of these disorders, the association of many of these disorders with psychiatric illness, and available treatment options.

  9. Local renal circadian clocks control fluid-electrolyte homeostasis and BP.

    PubMed

    Tokonami, Natsuko; Mordasini, David; Pradervand, Sylvain; Centeno, Gabriel; Jouffe, Céline; Maillard, Marc; Bonny, Olivier; Gachon, Frédéric; Gomez, R Ariel; Sequeira-Lopez, Maria Luisa S; Firsov, Dmitri

    2014-07-01

    The circadian timing system is critically involved in the maintenance of fluid and electrolyte balance and BP control. However, the role of peripheral circadian clocks in these homeostatic mechanisms remains unknown. We addressed this question in a mouse model carrying a conditional allele of the circadian clock gene Bmal1 and expressing Cre recombinase under the endogenous Renin promoter (Bmal1(lox/lox)/Ren1(d)Cre mice). Analysis of Bmal1(lox/lox)/Ren1(d)Cre mice showed that the floxed Bmal1 allele was excised in the kidney. In the kidney, BMAL1 protein expression was absent in the renin-secreting granular cells of the juxtaglomerular apparatus and the collecting duct. A partial reduction of BMAL1 expression was observed in the medullary thick ascending limb. Functional analyses showed that Bmal1(lox/lox)/Ren1(d)Cre mice exhibited multiple abnormalities, including increased urine volume, changes in the circadian rhythm of urinary sodium excretion, increased GFR, and significantly reduced plasma aldosterone levels. These changes were accompanied by a reduction in BP. These results show that local renal circadian clocks control body fluid and BP homeostasis. PMID:24652800

  10. Codon usage affects the structure and function of the Drosophila circadian clock protein PERIOD.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jingjing; Murphy, Katherine A; Zhou, Mian; Li, Ying H; Lam, Vu H; Tabuloc, Christine A; Chiu, Joanna C; Liu, Yi

    2016-08-01

    Codon usage bias is a universal feature of all genomes, but its in vivo biological functions in animal systems are not clear. To investigate the in vivo role of codon usage in animals, we took advantage of the sensitivity and robustness of the Drosophila circadian system. By codon-optimizing parts of Drosophila period (dper), a core clock gene that encodes a critical component of the circadian oscillator, we showed that dper codon usage is important for circadian clock function. Codon optimization of dper resulted in conformational changes of the dPER protein, altered dPER phosphorylation profile and stability, and impaired dPER function in the circadian negative feedback loop, which manifests into changes in molecular rhythmicity and abnormal circadian behavioral output. This study provides an in vivo example that demonstrates the role of codon usage in determining protein structure and function in an animal system. These results suggest a universal mechanism in eukaryotes that uses a codon usage "code" within genetic codons to regulate cotranslational protein folding. PMID:27542830

  11. Circadian rhythms: glucocorticoids and arthritis.

    PubMed

    Cutolo, Maurizio; Sulli, Alberto; Pizzorni, Carmen; Secchi, Maria Elena; Soldano, Stefano; Seriolo, Bruno; Straub, Rainer H; Otsa, Kati; Maestroni, Georges J

    2006-06-01

    Circadian rhythms are driven by biological clocks and are endogenous in origin. Therefore, circadian changes in the metabolism or secretion of endogenous glucocorticoids are certainly responsible in part for the time-dependent changes observed in the inflammatory response and arthritis. More recently, melatonin (MLT), another circadian hormone that is the secretory product of the pineal gland, has been found implicated in the time-dependent inflammatory reaction with effects opposite those of cortisol. Interestingly, cortisol and MLT show an opposite response to the light. The light conditions in the early morning have a strong impact on the morning cortisol peak, whereas MLT is synthesized in a strictly nocturnal pattern. Recently, a diurnal rhythmicity in healthy humans between cellular (Th1 type) or humoral (Th2 type) immune responses has been found and related to immunomodulatory actions of cortisol and MLT. The interferon (IFN)-gamma/interleukin (IL)-10 ratio peaked during the early morning and correlated negatively with plasma cortisol and positively with plasma MLT. Accordingly, the intensity of the arthritic pain varies consistently as a function of the hour of the day: pain is greater after waking up in the morning than in the afternoon or evening. The reduced cortisol and adrenal androgen secretion, observed during testing in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients not treated with glucocoticoids, should be clearly considered as a "relative adrenal insufficiency" in the presence of a sustained inflammatory process, and allows Th1 type cytokines to be produced in higher amounts during the late night. In conclusion, the right timing (early morning) for the glucocorticoid therapy in arthritis is fundamental and well justified by the circadian rhythms of the inflammatory mechanisms. PMID:16855156

  12. [Abnormal cerebral blood flow distributions during the post-ictal phase of febrile status epilepticus in three pediatric patients measured by arterial spin labeling perfusion MRI].

    PubMed

    Hirano, Keiko; Fukuda, Tokiko

    2016-05-01

    The ability to visualize brain perfusion is important for identifying epileptic foci. We present three pediatric cases showing asymmetrical cerebral blood flow (CBF) distributions during the post-ictal phase of febrile status epilepticus measured by arterial spin labeling (ASL) perfusion MRI. During the acute phase, regional CBF measurements in the areas considered including epileptic foci were higher than in the corresponding area of the contralateral hemisphere, though the exact quantitative value varied between cases. We could not identify the correct epileptogenic foci, because those ASL images were taken after the prolonged and extraordinary activation of neurons in the affected area. During the recovery phase, the differences reduced and the average regional CBF measurement was 54.6 ± 6.1 ml/100 g per minute, which was a little less than the number of previous ASL studies. ASL perfusion MRI imaging provides a method for evaluating regional CBF by using magnetically labeled arterial blood water as an endogenous tracer. With this technique, we can repeatedly evaluate both the brain structure and the level of perfusion at the same time. ASL is noninvasive and easily accessible, and therefore it could become a routine tool for assessment of perfusion in daily practice of pediatric neurology. PMID:27349086

  13. Diurnal variation in myocardial ischemia/reperfusion tolerance; mediation by the circadian clock within the cardiomyocyte

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Circadian rhythms in cardiovascular physiology (e.g. blood pressure and heart rate) and pathophysiology (e.g. myocardial infarction (MI)) exist. Humans exhibit a marked increase in MI frequency during the early hours of the morning. However, MIs occurring during the evening are more likely to result...

  14. Racial Differences in Abnormal Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring Measures: Results From the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) Study

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Cora E.; Diaz, Keith M.; Carson, April P.; Kim, Yongin; Calhoun, David; Yano, Yuichiro; Viera, Anthony J.; Shimbo, Daichi

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Several ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) measures have been associated with increased cardiovascular disease risk independent of clinic blood pressure (BP). African Americans have higher clinic BP compared with Whites but few data are available on racial differences in ABPM measures. METHODS We compared ABPM measures between African American (n = 178) and White (n = 103) participants at the Year 5 Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults study visit. BP was measured during a study visit and the second and third measurements were averaged. ABPM was conducted over the following 24 hours. RESULTS Mean ± SD age of participants was 29.8±3.8 years and 30.8±3.5 years for African Americans and Whites, respectively. Mean daytime systolic BP (SBP) was 3.90 (SD 1.18) mm Hg higher among African Americans compared with Whites (P < 0.001) after age–gender adjustment and 1.71 (SD 1.03) mm Hg higher after multivariable adjustment including mean clinic SBP (P = 0.10). After multivariable adjustment including mean clinic SBP, nighttime SBP was 4.83 (SD 1.11) mm Hg higher among African Americans compared with Whites (P < 0.001). After multivariable adjustment, the African Americans were more likely than Whites to have nocturnal hypertension (prevalence ratio: 2.44, 95% CI: 0.99–6.05) and nondipping (prevalence ratio: 2.50, 95% CI: 1.39–4.48). The prevalence of masked hypertension among African Americans and Whites was 4.4% and 2.1%, respectively, (P = 0.49) and white coat hypertension was 3.3% and 3.9%, respectively (P = 0.99). Twenty-four hour BP variability on ABPM was higher among African Americans compared with Whites. CONCLUSIONS These data suggest racial differences in several ABPM measures exist. PMID:25376639

  15. Molecular Mechanisms of Circadian Regulation During Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zanello, S. B.; Boyle, R.

    2012-01-01

    The physiology of both vertebrates and invertebrates follows internal rhythms coordinated in phase with the 24-hour daily light cycle. This circadian clock is governed by a central pacemaker, the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) in the brain. However, peripheral circadian clocks or oscillators have been identified in most tissues. How the central and peripheral oscillators are synchronized is still being elucidated. Light is the main environmental cue that entrains the circadian clock. Under the absence of a light stimulus, the clock continues its oscillation in a free-running condition. In general, three functional compartments of the circadian clock are defined. The vertebrate retina contains endogenous clocks that control many aspects of retinal physiology, including retinal sensitivity to light, neurohormone synthesis (melatonin and dopamine), rod disk shedding, signalling pathways and gene expression. Neurons with putative local circadian rhythm generation are found among all the major neuron populations in the mammalian retina. In the mouse, clock genes and function are more localized to the inner retinal and ganglion cell layers. The photoreceptor, however, secrete melatonin which may still serve a an important circadian signal. The reception and transmission of the non-visual photic stimulus resides in a small subpopulation (1-3%) or retinal ganglion cells (RGC) that express the pigment melanopsin (Opn4) and are called intrisically photoreceptive RGC (ipRGC). Melanopsin peak absorption is at 420 nm and all the axons of the ipRGC reach the SCN. A common countermeasure for circadian re-entrainment utilizes blue-green light to entrain the circadian clock and mitigate the risk of fatigue and health and performance decrement due to circadian rhythm disruption. However, an effective countermeasure targeting the photoreceptor system requires that the basic circadian molecular machinery remains intact during spaceflight. We hypothesize that spaceflight may affect ip

  16. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring and cardiovascular function tests in multiple system atrophy.

    PubMed

    Frongillo, D; Stocchi, F; Buccolini, P; Stecconi, P; Viselli, F; Ruggieri, S; Cannata, D

    1995-01-01

    Cardiovascular tests (CT) of autonomic function and non-invasive ambulatory blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) monitoring were performed in 17 patients with multiple system atrophy (MSA) (mean age 61 +/- 9 years) and in 12 healthy subjects matched for sex and age. CT showed severe autonomic dysfunction with orthostatic hypertension (OH) in eight patients with MSA (47%) (Group I). The remaining nine out of the 17 patients didn't show BP abnormalities during CT but an impaired HR reflex response was found (Group II). BP monitoring showed a reversed circadian BP rhythm in Group I with higher night-time than day-time values, a blunted circadian BP pattern in Group II and a normal day-night BP reduction in controls. Day-night HR reduction was poor in Group II and absent in Group I. Post-prandial hypotension was evaluated after a standard meal. In Group I systolic/diastolic BP fell within 30 minutes after meal (from 135 +/- 16/89 +/- 13 to 118 +/- 17/73 +/- 12 mmHg; p < 0.05) and after two hours had not returned to basal levels. In Group II a reduction of only systolic BP was found within 45 minutes after meal and persisted for one hour. OH clinically identifies a subgroup of MSA patients with a more severe BP dysregulation characterized by severe post-prandial hypotension and reversed circadian BP rhythm. CT and ambulatory BP monitoring are useful tools in identifying early stage of cardiovascular autonomic impairment.

  17. Circadian variation in sports performance.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, G; Reilly, T

    1996-04-01

    Chronobiology is the science concerned with investigations of time-dependent changes in physiological variables. Circadian rhythms refer to variations that recur every 24 hours. Many physiological circadian rhythms at rest are endogenously controlled, and persist when an individual is isolated from environmental fluctuations. Unlike physiological variables, human performance cannot be monitored continuously in order to describe circadian rhythmicity. Experimental studies of the effect of circadian rhythms on performance need to be carefully designed in order to control for serial fatigue effects and to minimise disturbances in sleep. The detection of rhythmicity in performance variables is also highly influenced by the degree of test-retest repeatability of the measuring equipment. The majority of components of sports performance, e.g. flexibility, muscle strength, short term high power output, vary with time of day in a sinusoidal manner and peak in the early evening close to the daily maximum in body temperature. Psychological tests of short term memory, heart rate-based tests of physical fitness, and prolonged submaximal exercise performance carried out in hot conditions show peak times in the morning. Heart rate-based tests of work capacity appear to peak in the morning because the heart rate responses to exercise are minimal at this time of day. Post-lunch declines are evident with performance variables such as muscle strength, especially if measured frequently enough and sequentially within a 24-hour period to cause fatigue in individuals. More research work is needed to ascertain whether performance in tasks demanding fine motor control varies with time of day. Metabolic and respiratory rhythms are flattened when exercise becomes strenuous whilst the body temperature rhythm persists during maximal exercise. Higher work-rates are selected spontaneously in the early evening. At present, it is not known whether time of day influences the responses of a set

  18. Morning Circadian Misalignment during Short Sleep Duration Impacts Insulin Sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Eckel, Robert H; Depner, Christopher M; Perreault, Leigh; Markwald, Rachel R; Smith, Mark R; McHill, Andrew W; Higgins, Janine; Melanson, Edward L; Wright, Kenneth P

    2015-11-16

    Short sleep duration and circadian misalignment are hypothesized to causally contribute to health problems including obesity, diabetes, metabolic syndrome, heart disease, mood disorders, cognitive impairment, and accidents. Here, we investigated the influence of morning circadian misalignment induced by an imposed short nighttime sleep schedule on impaired insulin sensitivity, a precursor to diabetes. Imposed short sleep duration resulted in morning wakefulness occurring during the biological night (i.e., circadian misalignment)-a time when endogenous melatonin levels were still high indicating the internal circadian clock was still promoting sleep and related functions. We show the longer melatonin levels remained high after wake time, insulin sensitivity worsened. Overall, we find a simulated 5-day work week of 5-hr-per-night sleep opportunities and ad libitum food intake resulted in ∼20% reduced oral and intravenous insulin sensitivity in otherwise healthy men and women. Reduced insulin sensitivity was compensated by an increased insulin response to glucose, which may reflect an initial physiological adaptation to maintain normal blood sugar levels during sleep loss. Furthermore, we find that transitioning from the imposed short sleep schedule to 9-hr sleep opportunities for 3 days restored oral insulin sensitivity to baseline, but 5 days with 9-hr sleep opportunities was insufficient to restore intravenous insulin sensitivity to baseline. These findings indicate morning wakefulness and eating during the biological night is a novel mechanism by which short sleep duration contributes to metabolic dysregulation and suggests food intake during the biological night may contribute to other health problems associated with short sleep duration.

  19. Adaptation to Experimental Jet-Lag in R6/2 Mice despite Circadian Dysrhythmia

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Nigel I.; McAllister, Catherine J.; Cuesta, Marc; Aungier, Juliet; Fraenkel, Eloise; Morton, A. Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    The R6/2 transgenic mouse model of Huntington’s disease (HD) shows a disintegration of circadian rhythms that can be delayed by pharmacological and non-pharmacological means. Since the molecular machinery underlying the circadian clocks is intact, albeit progressively dysfunctional, we wondered if light phase shifts could modulate the deterioration in daily rhythms in R6/2 mice. Mice were subjected to four x 4 hour advances in light onset. R6/2 mice adapted to phase advances, although angles of entrainment increased with age. A second cohort was subjected to a jet-lag paradigm (6 hour delay or advance in light onset, then reversal after 2 weeks). R6/2 mice adapted to the original shift, but could not adjust accurately to the reversal. Interestingly, phase shifts ameliorated the circadian rhythm breakdown seen in R6/2 mice under normal LD conditions. Our previous finding that the circadian period (tau) of 16 week old R6/2 mice shortens to approximately 23 hours may explain how they adapt to phase advances and maintain regular circadian rhythms. We tested this using a 23 hour period light/dark cycle. R6/2 mice entrained to this cycle, but onsets of activity continued to advance, and circadian rhythms still disintegrated. Therefore, the beneficial effects of phase-shifting are not due solely to the light cycle being closer to the tau of the mice. Our data show that R6/2 mice can adapt to changes in the LD schedule, even beyond the age when their circadian rhythms would normally disintegrate. Nevertheless, they show abnormal responses to changes in light cycles. These might be caused by a shortened tau, impaired photic re-synchronization, impaired light detection and/or reduced masking by evening light. If similar abnormalities are present in HD patients, they may suffer exaggerated jet-lag. Since the underlying molecular clock mechanism remains intact, light may be a useful treatment for circadian dysfunction in HD. PMID:23390510

  20. Identifying Novel Transcriptional Regulators with Circadian Expression

    PubMed Central

    Schick, Sandra; Thakurela, Sudhir; Fournier, David; Hampel, Mareike Hildegard

    2015-01-01

    Organisms adapt their physiology and behavior to the 24-h day-night cycle to which they are exposed. On a cellular level, this is regulated by intrinsic transcriptional-translational feedback loops that are important for maintaining the circadian rhythm. These loops are organized by members of the core clock network, which further regulate transcription of downstream genes, resulting in their circadian expression. Despite progress in understanding circadian gene expression, only a few players involved in circadian transcriptional regulation, including transcription factors, epigenetic regulators, and long noncoding RNAs, are known. Aiming to discover such genes, we performed a high-coverage transcriptome analysis of a circadian time course in murine fibroblast cells. In combination with a newly developed algorithm, we identified many transcription factors, epigenetic regulators, and long intergenic noncoding RNAs that are cyclically expressed. In addition, a number of these genes also showed circadian expression in mouse tissues. Furthermore, the knockdown of one such factor, Zfp28, influenced the core clock network. Mathematical modeling was able to predict putative regulator-effector interactions between the identified circadian genes and may help for investigations into the gene regulatory networks underlying circadian rhythms. PMID:26644408

  1. Circadian dysfunction induces leptin resistance in mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Circadian disruption is associated with obesity, implicating the central clock in body weight control. Our comprehensive screen of wild-type and three circadian mutant mouse models, with or without chronic jet lag, shows that distinct genetic and physiologic interventions differentially disrupt over...

  2. [Circadian rhythm sleep disorders in psychiatric diseases].

    PubMed

    Bromundt, Vivien

    2014-11-01

    Circadian rhythm sleep disorders are prevalent among psychiatric patients. This is most probable due to a close relationship between functional disturbances of the internal clock, sleep regulation and mental health. Mechanisms on molecular level of the circadian clock and neurotransmitter signalling are involved in the development of both disorders. Moreover, circadian disorders and psychiatric diseases favour each other by accessory symptoms such as stress or social isolation. Actimetry to objectively quantify the rest-activity cycle and salivary melatonin profiles as marker for the circadian phase help to diagnose circadian rhythm sleep disorders in psychiatric patients. Chronotherapeutics such as bright light therapy, dark therapy, melatonin administration, and wake therapy are used to synchronise and consolidate circadian rhythms and help in the treatment of depression and other psychiatric disorders, but are still neglected in medicine. More molecular to behavioural research is needed for the understanding of the development of circadian disorders and their relationship to psychiatric illnesses. This will help to boost the awareness and treatment of circadian rhythm sleep disorders in psychiatry.

  3. Circadian dysregulation disrupts bile acid homeostasis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bile acids are potentially toxic compounds and their levels of hepatic production, uptake, and export are tightly regulated by many inputs, including circadian rhythm. We tested the impact of disrupting the peripheral circadian clock on integral steps of bile acid homeostasis. Both restricted feedi...

  4. Circadian rhythms in myocardial metabolism and function

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Circadian rhythms in myocardial function and dysfunction are firmly established in both animal models and humans. For example, the incidence of arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death increases when organisms awaken. Such observations have classically been explained by circadian rhythms in neurohumoral...

  5. The Circadian Clock and Human Health.

    PubMed

    Roenneberg, Till; Merrow, Martha

    2016-05-23

    Epidemiological studies provided the first evidence suggesting a connection between the circadian clock and human health. Mutant mice convincingly demonstrate the principle that dysregulation of the circadian system leads to a multitude of pathologies. Chrono-medicine is one of the most important upcoming themes in the field of circadian biology. Although treatments counteracting circadian dysregulation are already being applied (e.g., prescribing strong and regular zeitgebers), we need to comprehend entrainment throughout the body's entire circadian network before understanding the mechanisms that tie circadian dysregulation to pathology. Here, we attempt to provide a systematic approach to understanding the connection between the circadian clock and health. This taxonomy of (mis)alignments on one hand exposes how little we know about entrainment within any organism and which 'eigen-zeitgeber' signals are used for entrainment by the different cells and tissues. On the other hand, it provides focus for experimental approaches and tools that will logically map out how circadian systems contribute to disease as well as how we can treat and prevent them. PMID:27218855

  6. Hemorheological abnormalities in human arterial hypertension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo Presti, Rosalia; Hopps, Eugenia; Caimi, Gregorio

    2014-05-01

    Blood rheology is impaired in hypertensive patients. The alteration involves blood and plasma viscosity, and the erythrocyte behaviour is often abnormal. The hemorheological pattern appears to be related to some pathophysiological mechanisms of hypertension and to organ damage, in particular left ventricular hypertrophy and myocardial ischemia. Abnormalities have been observed in erythrocyte membrane fluidity, explored by fluorescence spectroscopy and electron spin resonance. This may be relevant for red cell flow in microvessels and oxygen delivery to tissues. Although blood viscosity is not a direct target of antihypertensive therapy, the rheological properties of blood play a role in the pathophysiology of arterial hypertension and its vascular complications.

  7. SCOP/PHLPP1β in the basolateral amygdala regulates circadian expression of mouse anxiety-like behavior

    PubMed Central

    Nakano, Jun J.; Shimizu, Kimiko; Shimba, Shigeki; Fukada, Yoshitaka

    2016-01-01

    While disruption of the circadian clock triggers a spectrum of affective abnormalities, how the clock regulates mammalian emotionality remains unclear. Here, we characterized the time-of-day-dependent regulation of mouse anxiety-like behaviors. We show that anxiety-like behaviors are expressed in a circadian manner in mice and demonstrate that the clock machineries in the dorsal telencephalon (dTel) are required for the time-of-day-dependent regulation of anxiety-like behaviors. We identify suprachiasmatic nucleus circadian oscillatory protein (SCOP/PHLPP1β) as an essential intracellular signaling molecule mediating this temporal regulation downstream of the clock. Using viral-mediated, basolateral amygdala (BLA)-specific knockout of Scop, we demonstrate that deletion of SCOP in the BLA exerts anxiolytic effects on the elevated plus maze at early subjective night, thereby blunting the circadian variation in the anxiety-like behavior. We conclude that the circadian expression of SCOP in the BLA plays a key role in generating circadian rhythmicity in the anxiety-like behavior. Our results demonstrate SCOP as a regulator of anxiety-like behaviors and reveal its key roles in the anxiogenic functions of the BLA. PMID:27640726

  8. Altered Clock and Lipid Metabolism-Related Genes in Atherosclerotic Mice Kept with Abnormal Lighting Condition

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Zhu; Hua, Bingxuan; Shang, Zhanxian; Yuan, Gongsheng; Xu, Lirong; Li, Ermin; Li, Xiaobo; Yan, Zuoqin; Qian, Ruizhe

    2016-01-01

    Background. The risk of atherosclerosis is elevated in abnormal lipid metabolism and circadian rhythm disorder. We investigated whether abnormal lighting condition would have influenced the circadian expression of clock genes and clock-controlled lipid metabolism-related genes in ApoE-KO mice. Methods. A mouse model of atherosclerosis with circadian clock genes expression disorder was established using ApoE-KO mice (ApoE-KO LD/DL mice) by altering exposure to light. C57 BL/6J mice (C57 mice) and ApoE-KO mice (ApoE-KO mice) exposed to normal day and night and normal diet served as control mice. According to zeitgeber time samples were acquired, to test atheromatous plaque formation, serum lipids levels and rhythmicity, clock genes, and lipid metabolism-related genes along with Sirtuin 1 (Sirt1) levels and rhythmicity. Results. Atherosclerosis plaques were formed in the aortic arch of ApoE-KO LD/DL mice. The serum lipids levels and oscillations in ApoE-KO LD/DL mice were altered, along with the levels and diurnal oscillations of circadian genes, lipid metabolism-associated genes, and Sirt1 compared with the control mice. Conclusions. Abnormal exposure to light aggravated plaque formation and exacerbated disorders of serum lipids and clock genes, lipid metabolism genes and Sirt1 levels, and circadian oscillation. PMID:27631008

  9. Altered Clock and Lipid Metabolism-Related Genes in Atherosclerotic Mice Kept with Abnormal Lighting Condition

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Zhu; Hua, Bingxuan; Shang, Zhanxian; Yuan, Gongsheng; Xu, Lirong; Li, Ermin; Li, Xiaobo; Yan, Zuoqin; Qian, Ruizhe

    2016-01-01

    Background. The risk of atherosclerosis is elevated in abnormal lipid metabolism and circadian rhythm disorder. We investigated whether abnormal lighting condition would have influenced the circadian expression of clock genes and clock-controlled lipid metabolism-related genes in ApoE-KO mice. Methods. A mouse model of atherosclerosis with circadian clock genes expression disorder was established using ApoE-KO mice (ApoE-KO LD/DL mice) by altering exposure to light. C57 BL/6J mice (C57 mice) and ApoE-KO mice (ApoE-KO mice) exposed to normal day and night and normal diet served as control mice. According to zeitgeber time samples were acquired, to test atheromatous plaque formation, serum lipids levels and rhythmicity, clock genes, and lipid metabolism-related genes along with Sirtuin 1 (Sirt1) levels and rhythmicity. Results. Atherosclerosis plaques were formed in the aortic arch of ApoE-KO LD/DL mice. The serum lipids levels and oscillations in ApoE-KO LD/DL mice were altered, along with the levels and diurnal oscillations of circadian genes, lipid metabolism-associated genes, and Sirt1 compared with the control mice. Conclusions. Abnormal exposure to light aggravated plaque formation and exacerbated disorders of serum lipids and clock genes, lipid metabolism genes and Sirt1 levels, and circadian oscillation.

  10. Altered Clock and Lipid Metabolism-Related Genes in Atherosclerotic Mice Kept with Abnormal Lighting Condition.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhu; Hua, Bingxuan; Shang, Zhanxian; Yuan, Gongsheng; Xu, Lirong; Li, Ermin; Li, Xiaobo; Sun, Ning; Yan, Zuoqin; Qian, Ruizhe; Lu, Chao

    2016-01-01

    Background. The risk of atherosclerosis is elevated in abnormal lipid metabolism and circadian rhythm disorder. We investigated whether abnormal lighting condition would have influenced the circadian expression of clock genes and clock-controlled lipid metabolism-related genes in ApoE-KO mice. Methods. A mouse model of atherosclerosis with circadian clock genes expression disorder was established using ApoE-KO mice (ApoE-KO LD/DL mice) by altering exposure to light. C57 BL/6J mice (C57 mice) and ApoE-KO mice (ApoE-KO mice) exposed to normal day and night and normal diet served as control mice. According to zeitgeber time samples were acquired, to test atheromatous plaque formation, serum lipids levels and rhythmicity, clock genes, and lipid metabolism-related genes along with Sirtuin 1 (Sirt1) levels and rhythmicity. Results. Atherosclerosis plaques were formed in the aortic arch of ApoE-KO LD/DL mice. The serum lipids levels and oscillations in ApoE-KO LD/DL mice were altered, along with the levels and diurnal oscillations of circadian genes, lipid metabolism-associated genes, and Sirt1 compared with the control mice. Conclusions. Abnormal exposure to light aggravated plaque formation and exacerbated disorders of serum lipids and clock genes, lipid metabolism genes and Sirt1 levels, and circadian oscillation.

  11. Altered Clock and Lipid Metabolism-Related Genes in Atherosclerotic Mice Kept with Abnormal Lighting Condition.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhu; Hua, Bingxuan; Shang, Zhanxian; Yuan, Gongsheng; Xu, Lirong; Li, Ermin; Li, Xiaobo; Sun, Ning; Yan, Zuoqin; Qian, Ruizhe; Lu, Chao

    2016-01-01

    Background. The risk of atherosclerosis is elevated in abnormal lipid metabolism and circadian rhythm disorder. We investigated whether abnormal lighting condition would have influenced the circadian expression of clock genes and clock-controlled lipid metabolism-related genes in ApoE-KO mice. Methods. A mouse model of atherosclerosis with circadian clock genes expression disorder was established using ApoE-KO mice (ApoE-KO LD/DL mice) by altering exposure to light. C57 BL/6J mice (C57 mice) and ApoE-KO mice (ApoE-KO mice) exposed to normal day and night and normal diet served as control mice. According to zeitgeber time samples were acquired, to test atheromatous plaque formation, serum lipids levels and rhythmicity, clock genes, and lipid metabolism-related genes along with Sirtuin 1 (Sirt1) levels and rhythmicity. Results. Atherosclerosis plaques were formed in the aortic arch of ApoE-KO LD/DL mice. The serum lipids levels and oscillations in ApoE-KO LD/DL mice were altered, along with the levels and diurnal oscillations of circadian genes, lipid metabolism-associated genes, and Sirt1 compared with the control mice. Conclusions. Abnormal exposure to light aggravated plaque formation and exacerbated disorders of serum lipids and clock genes, lipid metabolism genes and Sirt1 levels, and circadian oscillation. PMID:27631008

  12. Aberrant Development of the Suprachiasmatic Nucleus and Circadian Rhythms in Mice Lacking the Homeodomain Protein Six6

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Daniel D.; Gorman, Michael R.; Hatori, Megumi; Meadows, Jason D.; Panda, Satchidananda; Mellon, Pamela L.

    2013-01-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the mammalian hypothalamus is the central pacemaker for peripheral and organismal circadian rhythms. The development of this hypothalamic structure depends on genetic programs throughout embryogenesis. We have investigated the role of the homeodomain transcription factor Six6 in the development of the SCN. We first showed that Six6 mRNA has circadian regulation in the mouse SCN. We then characterized the behavioral activity patterns of Six6-null mice under various photoperiod manipulations and stained their hypothalami using SCN-specific markers. Six6-null mice display abnormal patterns of circadian behavior indicative of SCN abnormalities. The ability of light exposure to reset rhythms correlates with the presence or absence of optic nerves, but all Six6-null mice show irregular rhythms. In contrast, wild-type mice with crushed optic nerves maintain regular rhythms regardless of light exposure. Using immunohistochemistry for arginine vasopressin (AVP), vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP), and β-galactosidase, we demonstrated the lack of these SCN markers in all Six6- null mice regardless of the presence of optic nerve or partial circadian rhythms. Therefore, Six6 is required for the normal development of the SCN, and the Six6-null mouse can mount independent, although irregular, circadian rhythms despite the apparent absence of a histochemically defined SCN. PMID:23382588

  13. Metabolic consequences of sleep and circadian disorders

    PubMed Central

    Depner, Christopher M.; Stothard, Ellen R.; Wright, Kenneth P.

    2014-01-01

    Sleep and circadian rhythms modulate or control daily physiological patterns with importance for normal metabolic health. Sleep deficiencies associated with insufficient sleep schedules, insomnia with short-sleep duration, sleep apnea, narcolepsy, circadian misalignment, shift work, night eating syndrome and sleep-related eating disorder may all contribute to metabolic dysregulation. Sleep deficiencies and circadian disruption associated with metabolic dysregulation may contribute to weight gain, obesity, and type 2 diabetes potentially by altering timing and amount of food intake, disrupting energy balance, inflammation, impairing glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity. Given the rapidly increasing prevalence of metabolic diseases, it is important to recognize the role of sleep and circadian disruption in the development, progression, and morbidity of metabolic disease. Some findings indicate sleep treatments and countermeasures improve metabolic health, but future clinical research investigating prevention and treatment of chronic metabolic disorders through treatment of sleep and circadian disruption is needed. PMID:24816752

  14. Phase sensitivity analysis of circadian rhythm entrainment.

    PubMed

    Gunawan, Rudiyanto; Doyle, Francis J

    2007-04-01

    As a biological clock, circadian rhythms evolve to accomplish a stable (robust) entrainment to environmental cycles, of which light is the most obvious. The mechanism of photic entrainment is not known, but two models of entrainment have been proposed based on whether light has a continuous (parametric) or discrete (nonparametric) effect on the circadian pacemaker. A novel sensitivity analysis is developed to study the circadian entrainment in silico based on a limit cycle approach and applied to a model of Drosophila circadian rhythm. The comparative analyses of complete and skeleton photoperiods suggest a trade-off between the contribution of period modulation (parametric effect) and phase shift (nonparametric effect) in Drosophila circadian entrainment. The results also give suggestions for an experimental study to (in)validate the two models of entrainment.

  15. Metabolic consequences of sleep and circadian disorders.

    PubMed

    Depner, Christopher M; Stothard, Ellen R; Wright, Kenneth P

    2014-07-01

    Sleep and circadian rhythms modulate or control daily physiological patterns with importance for normal metabolic health. Sleep deficiencies associated with insufficient sleep schedules, insomnia with short-sleep duration, sleep apnea, narcolepsy, circadian misalignment, shift work, night eating syndrome, and sleep-related eating disorder may all contribute to metabolic dysregulation. Sleep deficiencies and circadian disruption associated with metabolic dysregulation may contribute to weight gain, obesity, and type 2 diabetes potentially by altering timing and amount of food intake, disrupting energy balance, inflammation, impairing glucose tolerance, and insulin sensitivity. Given the rapidly increasing prevalence of metabolic diseases, it is important to recognize the role of sleep and circadian disruption in the development, progression, and morbidity of metabolic disease. Some findings indicate sleep treatments and countermeasures improve metabolic health, but future clinical research investigating prevention and treatment of chronic metabolic disorders through treatment of sleep and circadian disruption is needed.

  16. Circadian light-input pathways in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Yoshii, Taishi; Hermann-Luibl, Christiane; Helfrich-Förster, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    Light is the most important environmental cue to entrain the circadian clock in most animals. In the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, the light entrainment mechanisms of the clock have been well-studied. The Drosophila brain contains approximately 150 neurons that rhythmically express circadian clock genes. These neurons are called "clock neurons" and control behavioral activity rhythms. Many clock neurons express the Cryptochrome (CRY) protein, which is sensitive to UV and blue light, and thus enables clock neurons deep in the brain to directly perceive light. In addition to the CRY protein, external photoreceptors in the Drosophila eyes play an important role in circadian light-input pathways. Recent studies have provided new insights into the mechanisms that integrate these light inputs into the circadian network of the brain. In this review, we will summarize the current knowledge on the light entrainment pathways in the Drosophila circadian clock. PMID:27066180

  17. Central and peripheral circadian clocks in mammals.

    PubMed

    Mohawk, Jennifer A; Green, Carla B; Takahashi, Joseph S

    2012-01-01

    The circadian system of mammals is composed of a hierarchy of oscillators that function at the cellular, tissue, and systems levels. A common molecular mechanism underlies the cell-autonomous circadian oscillator throughout the body, yet this clock system is adapted to different functional contexts. In the central suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus, a coupled population of neuronal circadian oscillators acts as a master pacemaker for the organism to drive rhythms in activity and rest, feeding, body temperature, and hormones. Coupling within the SCN network confers robustness to the SCN pacemaker, which in turn provides stability to the overall temporal architecture of the organism. Throughout the majority of the cells in the body, cell-autonomous circadian clocks are intimately enmeshed within metabolic pathways. Thus, an emerging view for the adaptive significance of circadian clocks is their fundamental role in orchestrating metabolism.

  18. Circadian regulation of human cortical excitability

    PubMed Central

    Ly, Julien Q. M.; Gaggioni, Giulia; Chellappa, Sarah L.; Papachilleos, Soterios; Brzozowski, Alexandre; Borsu, Chloé; Rosanova, Mario; Sarasso, Simone; Middleton, Benita; Luxen, André; Archer, Simon N.; Phillips, Christophe; Dijk, Derk-Jan; Maquet, Pierre; Massimini, Marcello; Vandewalle, Gilles

    2016-01-01

    Prolonged wakefulness alters cortical excitability, which is essential for proper brain function and cognition. However, besides prior wakefulness, brain function and cognition are also affected by circadian rhythmicity. Whether the regulation of cognition involves a circadian impact on cortical excitability is unknown. Here, we assessed cortical excitability from scalp electroencephalography (EEG) responses to transcranial magnetic stimulation in 22 participants during 29 h of wakefulness under constant conditions. Data reveal robust circadian dynamics of cortical excitability that are strongest in those individuals with highest endocrine markers of circadian amplitude. In addition, the time course of cortical excitability correlates with changes in EEG synchronization and cognitive performance. These results demonstrate that the crucial factor for cortical excitability, and basic brain function in general, is the balance between circadian rhythmicity and sleep need, rather than sleep homoeostasis alone. These findings have implications for clinical applications such as non-invasive brain stimulation in neurorehabilitation. PMID:27339884

  19. Genetic Basis of Human Circadian Rhythm Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Christopher R.; Huang, Angela L.; Ptáček, Louis J.; Fu, Ying-Hui

    2012-01-01

    Circadian rhythm disorders constitute a group of phenotypes that usually present as altered sleep-wake schedules. Until a human genetics approach was applied to investigate these traits, the genetic components regulating human circadian rhythm and sleep behaviors remained mysterious. Steady advances in the last decade have dramatically improved our understanding of the genes involved in circadian rhythmicity and sleep regulation. Finding these genes presents new opportunities to use a wide range of approaches, including in vitro molecular studies and in vivo animal modeling, to elevate our understanding of how sleep and circadian rhythms are regulated and maintained. Ultimately, this knowledge will reveal how circadian and sleep disruption contribute to various ailments and shed light on how best to maintain and recover good health. PMID:22849821

  20. Circadian regulation of human cortical excitability.

    PubMed

    Ly, Julien Q M; Gaggioni, Giulia; Chellappa, Sarah L; Papachilleos, Soterios; Brzozowski, Alexandre; Borsu, Chloé; Rosanova, Mario; Sarasso, Simone; Middleton, Benita; Luxen, André; Archer, Simon N; Phillips, Christophe; Dijk, Derk-Jan; Maquet, Pierre; Massimini, Marcello; Vandewalle, Gilles

    2016-06-24

    Prolonged wakefulness alters cortical excitability, which is essential for proper brain function and cognition. However, besides prior wakefulness, brain function and cognition are also affected by circadian rhythmicity. Whether the regulation of cognition involves a circadian impact on cortical excitability is unknown. Here, we assessed cortical excitability from scalp electroencephalography (EEG) responses to transcranial magnetic stimulation in 22 participants during 29 h of wakefulness under constant conditions. Data reveal robust circadian dynamics of cortical excitability that are strongest in those individuals with highest endocrine markers of circadian amplitude. In addition, the time course of cortical excitability correlates with changes in EEG synchronization and cognitive performance. These results demonstrate that the crucial factor for cortical excitability, and basic brain function in general, is the balance between circadian rhythmicity and sleep need, rather than sleep homoeostasis alone. These findings have implications for clinical applications such as non-invasive brain stimulation in neurorehabilitation.

  1. Deregulated expression of circadian clock and clock-controlled cell cycle genes in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Rana, Sobia; Munawar, Mustafa; Shahid, Adeela; Malik, Meera; Ullah, Hafeez; Fatima, Warda; Mohsin, Shahida; Mahmood, Saqib

    2014-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are endogenous and self-sustained oscillations of multiple biological processes with approximately 24-h rhythmicity. Circadian genes and their protein products constitute the molecular components of the circadian oscillator that form positive/negative feedback loops and generate circadian rhythms. The circadian regulation extends from core clock genes to various clock-controlled genes that include various cell cycle genes. Aberrant expression of circadian clock genes, therefore, may lead to genomic instability and accelerated cellular proliferation potentially promoting carcinogenesis. The current study encompasses the investigation of simultaneous expression of four circadian clock genes (Bmal1, Clock, Per1 and Per2) and three clock-controlled cell cycle genes (Myc, Cyclin D1 and Wee1) at mRNA level and determination of serum melatonin levels in peripheral blood samples of 37 CLL (chronic lymphocytic leukemia) patients and equal number of age- and sex-matched healthy controls in order to indicate association between deregulated circadian clock and manifestation of CLL. Results showed significantly down-regulated expression of Bmal1, Per1, Per2 and Wee1 and significantly up-regulated expression of Myc and Cyclin D1 (P < 0.0001) in CLL patients as compared to healthy controls. When expression of these genes was compared between shift-workers and non-shift-workers within the CLL group, the expression was found more aberrant in shift-workers as compared to non-shift-workers. However, this difference was found statistically significant for Myc and Cyclin D1 only (P < 0.05). Serum melatonin levels were found significantly low (P < 0.0001) in CLL subjects as compared to healthy controls whereas melatonin levels were found still lower in shift-workers as compared to non-shift-workers within CLL group (P < 0.01). Our results suggest that aberrant expression of circadian clock genes can lead to aberrant expression of their downstream targets that are

  2. Circadian melatonin rhythm and excessive daytime sleepiness in Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Videnovic, Aleksandar; Noble, Charleston; Reid, Kathryn J.; Peng, Jie; Turek, Fred W.; Marconi, Angelica; Rademaker, Alfred W.; Simuni, Tanya; Zadikoff, Cindy; Zee, Phyllis C.

    2014-01-01

    Importance Diurnal fluctuations of motor and non-motor symptoms and high prevalence of sleep/wake disturbances in Parkinson’s disease (PD) suggest a role of the circadian system in the modulation of these symptoms. Yet, surprisingly little is known regarding circadian function in PD, and whether circadian dysfunction is involved in the development of sleep/wake disturbances in PD. Objective The objective of this study was to determine the relationship between the timing and amplitude of the 24-hour melatonin rhythm, a marker of endogenous circadian rhythmicity, with self-reported sleep quality, the severity of daytime sleepiness and disease metrics. Design A cross-sectional study, (2009–2012). Setting PD and Movement Disorders Center, Northwestern University, Chicago. Participants Twenty PD patients on stable dopaminergic therapy and 15 age-matched controls underwent blood sampling for the measurement of serum melatonin levels at 30-minute intervals for 24 hours under modified constant routine conditions. Main Outcome Measure(s) Clinical and demographic data, self-reported measures of sleep quality (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI)) and daytime sleepiness (Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS)), circadian markers of the melatonin rhythm, including the amplitude, area-under-the-curve (AUC), and phase of the 24-hour rhythm. Results Participants with PD had a blunted circadian rhythms of melatonin secretion compared to controls; both the amplitude of the melatonin rhythm and the 24-hour AUC for circulating melatonin levels were significantly lower in PD participants compared with controls (p<0.001). Markers of circadian phase were not significantly different between the two groups. Among PD participants, those with excessive daytime sleepiness (ESS score ≥10) had a significantly lower amplitude of the melatonin rhythm and the 24-hour melatonin AUC compared with PD participants without excessive sleepiness (p=0.001). Disease duration, UPDRS scores, levodopa

  3. Dissociation in circadian rhythms in a pseudohypersomnia form of fatal familial insomnia.

    PubMed

    Dauvilliers, Y; Cervena, K; Carlander, B; Espa, F; Bassetti, C; Claustrat, B; Laplanche, J L; Billiard, M; Touchon, J

    2004-12-28

    The authors present clinical, sleep, and neuroendocrine features of a patient with genetically confirmed fatal familial insomnia (D178N mutation with heterozygosity at codon 129 of the prion protein gene). The patient exhibited pseudohypersomnia behavior instead of insomnia. There was profound alteration in the sleep-wake cycle with a clear dissociation in the disappearance of circadian and neuroendocrine rhythms, findings unrelated to abnormalities in the hypocretinergic system.

  4. Voxel-wise meta-analyses of brain blood flow and local synchrony abnormalities in medication-free patients with major depressive disorder

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zi-Qi; Du, Ming-Ying; Zhao, You-Jin; Huang, Xiao-Qi; Li, Jing; Lui, Su; Hu, Jun-Mei; Sun, Huai-Qiang; Liu, Jia; Kemp, Graham J.; Gong, Qi-Yong

    2015-01-01

    Background Published meta-analyses of resting-state regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) studies of major depressive disorder (MDD) have included patients receiving antidepressants, which might affect brain activity and thus bias the results. To our knowledge, no meta-analysis has investigated regional homogeneity changes in medication-free patients with MDD. Moreover, an association between regional homogeneity and rCBF has been demonstrated in some brain regions in healthy controls. We sought to explore to what extent resting-state rCBF and regional homogeneity changes co-occur in the depressed brain without the potential confound of medication. Methods Using the effect-size signed differential mapping method, we conducted 2 meta-analyses of rCBF and regional homogeneity studies of medication-free patients with MDD. Results Our systematic search identified 14 rCBF studies and 9 regional homogeneity studies. We identified conjoint decreases in resting-state rCBF and regional homogeneity in the insula and superior temporal gyrus in medication-free patients with MDD compared with controls. Other changes included altered resting-state rCBF in the precuneus and in the frontal–limbic–thalamic–striatal neural circuit as well as altered regional homogeneity in the uncus and parahippocampal gyrus. Meta-regression revealed that the percentage of female patients with MDD was negatively associated with resting-state rCBF in the right anterior cingulate cortex and that the age of patients with MDD was negatively associated with rCBF in the left insula and with regional homogeneity in the left uncus. Limitations The analysis techniques, patient characteristics and clinical variables of the included studies were heterogeneous. Conclusion The conjoint alterations of rCBF and regional homogeneity in the insula and superior temporal gyrus may be core neuropathological changes in medication-free patients with MDD and serve as a specific region of interest for further studies

  5. Assessing circadian rhythms in propofol PK and PD during prolonged infusion in ICU patients.

    PubMed

    Bienert, Agnieszka; Kusza, Krzysztof; Wawrzyniak, Katarzyna; Grześkowiak, Edmund; Kokot, Zenon J; Matysiak, Jan; Grabowski, Tomasz; Wolc, Anna; Wiczling, Paweł; Regulski, Miłosz

    2010-06-01

    This study evaluates possible circadian rhythms during prolonged propofol infusion in patients in the intensive care unit. Eleven patients were sedated with a constant propofol infusion. The blood samples for the propofol assay were collected every hour during the second day, the third day, and after the termination of the propofol infusion. Values of electroencephalographic bispectral index (BIS), arterial blood pressure, heart rate, blood oxygen saturation and body temperature were recorded every hour at the blood collection time points. A two-compartment model was used to describe propofol pharmacokinetics. Typical values of the central and peripheral volume of distribution and inter-compartmental clearance were V(C) = 27.7 l, V(T) = 801 l, and CL(D) = 2.73 l/min. The systolic blood pressure (SBP) was found to influence the propofol metabolic clearance according to Cl (l/min) = 2.65 x (1-0.00714 x (SBP-135)). There was no significant circadian rhythm detected with respect to propofol pharmacokinetics. The BIS score was assessed as a direct effect model with EC(50) equal 1.98 mg/l. There was no significant circadian rhythm detected within the BIS scores. We concluded that the light-dark cycle did not influence propofol pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics in intensive care units patients. The lack of night-day differences was also noted for systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure and blood oxygenation. Circadian rhythms were detected for heart rate and body temperature, however they were severely disturbed from the pattern of healthy patients.

  6. Assessing circadian rhythms in propofol PK and PD during prolonged infusion in ICU patients

    PubMed Central

    Kusza, Krzysztof; Wawrzyniak, Katarzyna; Grześkowiak, Edmund; Kokot, Zenon J.; Matysiak, Jan; Grabowski, Tomasz; Wolc, Anna; Wiczling, Paweł; Regulski, Miłosz

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluates possible circadian rhythms during prolonged propofol infusion in patients in the intensive care unit. Eleven patients were sedated with a constant propofol infusion. The blood samples for the propofol assay were collected every hour during the second day, the third day, and after the termination of the propofol infusion. Values of electroencephalographic bispectral index (BIS), arterial blood pressure, heart rate, blood oxygen saturation and body temperature were recorded every hour at the blood collection time points. A two-compartment model was used to describe propofol pharmacokinetics. Typical values of the central and peripheral volume of distribution and inter-compartmental clearance were VC = 27.7 l, VT = 801 l, and CLD = 2.73 l/min. The systolic blood pressure (SBP) was found to influence the propofol metabolic clearance according to Cl (l/min) = 2.65·(1 − 0.00714·(SBP − 135)). There was no significant circadian rhythm detected with respect to propofol pharmacokinetics. The BIS score was assessed as a direct effect model with EC50 equal 1.98 mg/l. There was no significant circadian rhythm detected within the BIS scores. We concluded that the light–dark cycle did not influence propofol pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics in intensive care units patients. The lack of night–day differences was also noted for systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure and blood oxygenation. Circadian rhythms were detected for heart rate and body temperature, however they were severely disturbed from the pattern of healthy patients. PMID:20544262

  7. Disruption of cardiovascular circadian rhythms in mice post myocardial infarction: relationship with central angiotensin II receptor expression

    PubMed Central

    Mousa, Tarek M.; Schiller, Alicia M.; Zucker, Irving H.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Angiotensin II (Ang II) is well known to participate in the abnormal autonomic cardiovascular control that occurs during the development of chronic heart failure (CHF). Disrupted cardiovascular circadian rhythm in CHF is also well accepted; however, the mechanisms underlying and the role of central Ang II type 1 receptors (AT1R) and oxidative stress in mediating such changes are not clear. In a post myocardial infarction (MI) CHF mouse model we investigated the circadian rhythm for mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR), and baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) following MI. The cardiovascular parameters represent the middle 6‐h averages during daytime (6:00–18:00) and nighttime (18:00–6:00). HR increased with the severity of CHF reaching its maximum by 12 weeks post‐MI; loss of circadian HR and BRS rhythms were observed as early as 4 weeks post‐MI in conjunction with a significant blunting of the BRS and an upregulation in the AT1R and gp91phox proteins in the brainstem. Loss of MAP circadian rhythm was observed 8 weeks post‐MI. Circadian AT1R expression was demonstrated in sham animals but was lost 8 weeks following MI. Losartan reduced AT1R expression in daytime (1.18 ± 0.1 vs. 0.85 ± 0.1; P < 0.05) with a trend toward a reduction in the AT1R mRNA expression in the nighttime (1.2 ± 0.1 vs. 1.0 ± 0.1; P > 0.05) but failed to restore circadian variability. The disruption of circadian rhythm for HR, MAP and BRS along with the upregulation of AT1 and gp91phox suggests a possible role for central oxidative stress as a mediator of circadian cardiovascular parameters in the post‐MI state. PMID:25413327

  8. Melanopsin retinal ganglion cell loss and circadian dysfunction in Alzheimer's disease (Review)

    PubMed Central

    FENG, RUIQI; LI, LIJUAN; YU, HAIYAN; LIU, MIN; ZHAO, WEI

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease affects 27 million individuals and is the most common cause of dementia worldwide. The pathology of Alzheimer's disease is primarily due to the β-amyloid deposits and neurofibrillary tangles. These deposits exist largely in the cerebral blood vessels, but have also been shown to exist in retinal vessels. A new class of cells that were recently identified, known as melanopsin-expressing retinal ganglion cells (mRGCs), are involved in the non-image forming functions of the eye. These functions include circadian activities such as temperature rhythms, melatonin release and rest-activity cycles. Circadian dysfunction has been investigated in many cases of Alzheimer's disease. In this review, we outline the current accepted Alzheimer's disease pathology, the role of mRCGs in optic neuropathies and the role of mRCGs, leading to circadian dysfunction, in Alzheimer's disease. PMID:26935586

  9. The Circadian System: A Regulatory Feedback Network of Periphery and Brain.

    PubMed

    Buijs, Frederik N; León-Mercado, Luis; Guzmán-Ruiz, Mara; Guerrero-Vargas, Natali N; Romo-Nava, Francisco; Buijs, Ruud M

    2016-05-01

    Circadian rhythms are generated by the autonomous circadian clock, the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), and clock genes that are present in all tissues. The SCN times these peripheral clocks, as well as behavioral and physiological processes. Recent studies show that frequent violations of conditions set by our biological clock, such as shift work, jet lag, sleep deprivation, or simply eating at the wrong time of the day, may have deleterious effects on health. This infringement, also known as circadian desynchronization, is associated with chronic diseases like diabetes, hypertension, cancer, and psychiatric disorders. In this review, we will evaluate evidence that these diseases stem from the need of the SCN for peripheral feedback to fine-tune its output and adjust physiological processes to the requirements of the moment. This feedback can vary from neuronal or hormonal signals from the liver to changes in blood pressure. Desynchronization renders the circadian network dysfunctional, resulting in a breakdown of many functions driven by the SCN, disrupting core clock rhythms in the periphery and disorganizing cellular processes that are normally driven by the synchrony between behavior and peripheral signals with neuronal and humoral output of the hypothalamus. Consequently, we propose that the loss of synchrony between the different elements of this circadian network as may occur during shiftwork and jet lag is the reason for the occurrence of health problems. PMID:27053731

  10. Post-transcriptional control of the mammalian circadian clock: implications for health and disease.

    PubMed

    Preußner, Marco; Heyd, Florian

    2016-06-01

    Many aspects of human physiology and behavior display rhythmicity with a period of approximately 24 h. Rhythmic changes are controlled by an endogenous time keeper, the circadian clock, and include sleep-wake cycles, physical and mental performance capability, blood pressure, and body temperature. Consequently, many diseases, such as metabolic, sleep, autoimmune and mental disorders and cancer, are connected to the circadian rhythm. The development of therapies that take circadian biology into account is thus a promising strategy to improve treatments of diverse disorders, ranging from allergic syndromes to cancer. Circadian alteration of body functions and behavior are, at the molecular level, controlled and mediated by widespread changes in gene expression that happen in anticipation of predictably changing requirements during the day. At the core of the molecular clockwork is a well-studied transcription-translation negative feedback loop. However, evidence is emerging that additional post-transcriptional, RNA-based mechanisms are required to maintain proper clock function. Here, we will discuss recent work implicating regulated mRNA stability, translation and alternative splicing in the control of the mammalian circadian clock, and its role in health and disease.

  11. Post-transcriptional control of the mammalian circadian clock: implications for health and disease.

    PubMed

    Preußner, Marco; Heyd, Florian

    2016-06-01

    Many aspects of human physiology and behavior display rhythmicity with a period of approximately 24 h. Rhythmic changes are controlled by an endogenous time keeper, the circadian clock, and include sleep-wake cycles, physical and mental performance capability, blood pressure, and body temperature. Consequently, many diseases, such as metabolic, sleep, autoimmune and mental disorders and cancer, are connected to the circadian rhythm. The development of therapies that take circadian biology into account is thus a promising strategy to improve treatments of diverse disorders, ranging from allergic syndromes to cancer. Circadian alteration of body functions and behavior are, at the molecular level, controlled and mediated by widespread changes in gene expression that happen in anticipation of predictably changing requirements during the day. At the core of the molecular clockwork is a well-studied transcription-translation negative feedback loop. However, evidence is emerging that additional post-transcriptional, RNA-based mechanisms are required to maintain proper clock function. Here, we will discuss recent work implicating regulated mRNA stability, translation and alternative splicing in the control of the mammalian circadian clock, and its role in health and disease. PMID:27108448

  12. Circadian clock proteins and immunity.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Anne M; Bellet, Marina M; Sassone-Corsi, Paolo; O'Neill, Luke A J

    2014-02-20

    Immune parameters change with time of day and disruption of circadian rhythms has been linked to inflammatory pathologies. A circadian-clock-controlled immune system might allow an organism to anticipate daily changes in activity and feeding and the associated risk of infection or tissue damage to the host. Responses to bacteria have been shown to vary depending on time of infection, with mice being more at risk of sepsis when challenged ahead of their activity phase. Studies highlight the extent to which the molecular clock, most notably the core clock proteins BMAL1, CLOCK, and REV-ERBα, control fundamental aspects of the immune response. Examples include the BMAL1:CLOCK heterodimer regulating toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) expression and repressing expression of the inflammatory monocyte chemokine ligand (CCL2) as well as REV-ERBα suppressing the induction of interleukin-6. Understanding the daily rhythm of the immune system could have implications for vaccinations and how we manage infectious and inflammatory diseases.

  13. Design principles underlying circadian clocks.

    PubMed Central

    Rand, D. A.; Shulgin, B. V.; Salazar, D.; Millar, A. J.

    2004-01-01

    A fundamental problem for regulatory networks is to understand the relation between form and function: to uncover the underlying design principles of the network. Circadian clocks present a particularly interesting instance, as recent work has shown that they have complex structures involving multiple interconnected feedback loops with both positive and negative feedback. While several authors have speculated on the reasons for this, a convincing explanation is still lacking.We analyse both the flexibility of clock networks and the relationships between various desirable properties such as robust entrainment, temperature compensation, and stability to environmental variations and parameter fluctuations. We use this to argue that the complexity provides the flexibility necessary to simultaneously attain multiple key properties of circadian clocks. As part of our analysis we show how to quantify the key evolutionary aims using infinitesimal response curves, a tool that we believe will be of general utility in the analysis of regulatory networks. Our results suggest that regulatory and signalling networks might be much less flexible and of lower dimension than their apparent complexity would suggest. PMID:16849158

  14. Circadian Clocks in the Immune System.

    PubMed

    Labrecque, Nathalie; Cermakian, Nicolas

    2015-08-01

    The immune system is a complex set of physiological mechanisms whose general aim is to defend the organism against non-self-bodies, such as pathogens (bacteria, viruses, parasites), as well as cancer cells. Circadian rhythms are endogenous 24-h variations found in virtually all physiological processes. These circadian rhythms are generated by circadian clocks, located in most cell types, including cells of the immune system. This review presents an overview of the clocks in the immune system and of the circadian regulation of the function of immune cells. Most immune cells express circadian clock genes and present a wide array of genes expressed with a 24-h rhythm. This has profound impacts on cellular functions, including a daily rhythm in the synthesis and release of cytokines, chemokines and cytolytic factors, the daily gating of the response occurring through pattern recognition receptors, circadian rhythms of cellular functions such as phagocytosis, migration to inflamed or infected tissue, cytolytic activity, and proliferative response to antigens. Consequently, alterations of circadian rhythms (e.g., clock gene mutation in mice or environmental disruption similar to shift work) lead to disturbed immune responses. We discuss the implications of these data for human health and the areas that future research should aim to address.

  15. Nonphotic entrainment of the human circadian pacemaker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klerman, E. B.; Rimmer, D. W.; Dijk, D. J.; Kronauer, R. E.; Rizzo, J. F. 3rd; Czeisler, C. A.

    1998-01-01

    In organisms as diverse as single-celled algae and humans, light is the primary stimulus mediating entrainment of the circadian biological clock. Reports that some totally blind individuals appear entrained to the 24-h day have suggested that nonphotic stimuli may also be effective circadian synchronizers in humans, although the nonphotic stimuli are probably comparatively weak synchronizers, because the circadian rhythms of many totally blind individuals "free run" even when they maintain a 24-h activity-rest schedule. To investigate entrainment by nonphotic synchronizers, we studied the endogenous circadian melatonin and core body temperature rhythms of 15 totally blind subjects who lacked conscious light perception and exhibited no suppression of plasma melatonin in response to ocular bright-light exposure. Nine of these fifteen blind individuals were able to maintain synchronization to the 24-h day, albeit often at an atypical phase angle of entrainment. Nonphotic stimuli also synchronized the endogenous circadian rhythms of a totally blind individual to a non-24-h schedule while living in constant near darkness. We conclude that nonphotic stimuli can entrain the human circadian pacemaker in some individuals lacking ocular circadian photoreception.

  16. Circadian regulators of intestinal lipid absorption.

    PubMed

    Hussain, M Mahmood; Pan, Xiaoyue

    2015-04-01

    Among all the metabolites present in the plasma, lipids, mainly triacylglycerol and diacylglycerol, show extensive circadian rhythms. These lipids are transported in the plasma as part of lipoproteins. Lipoproteins are synthesized primarily in the liver and intestine and their production exhibits circadian rhythmicity. Studies have shown that various proteins involved in lipid absorption and lipoprotein biosynthesis show circadian expression. Further, intestinal epithelial cells express circadian clock genes and these genes might control circadian expression of different proteins involved in intestinal lipid absorption. Intestinal circadian clock genes are synchronized by signals emanating from the suprachiasmatic nuclei that constitute a master clock and from signals coming from other environmental factors, such as food availability. Disruptions in central clock, as happens due to disruptions in the sleep/wake cycle, affect intestinal function. Similarly, irregularities in temporal food intake affect intestinal function. These changes predispose individuals to various metabolic disorders, such as metabolic syndrome, obesity, diabetes, and atherosclerosis. Here, we summarize how circadian rhythms regulate microsomal triglyceride transfer protein, apoAIV, and nocturnin to affect diurnal regulation of lipid absorption.

  17. [Molecular mechanisms of circadian clock functioning].

    PubMed

    Karbovskyĭ, L L; Minchenko, D O; Garmash, Ia A; Minchenko, O G

    2011-01-01

    Most physiological processes of all organisms are rhythmic with a period of about 24 h and are generated by an endogenous biological CLOCK present in all cells. However, there is also a central CLOCK--the primary circadian pacemaker which is localized in the suprachiasmatic nuclei of the mammalian hypothalamus. Factors of groups Period (PER1, PER2 and PER3), BMAL (BMAL1 and BMAL2), CRYptochromes (CRY1 and CRY2) as well as some other factors are the components of this circadian CLOCK system. Some of these genes contain E-box sequences and their expression is regulated by a transcription factor complex CLOCK-BMAL1. The enzymes responsible for the post-translational modification of circadian gene products are also the components of circadian CLOCK system. These enzymes define CLOCK's work and determine the duration of circadian biorhythm and functional state of the whole organism. The most important of these enzymes are casein kinase-1epsilon and -1delta. We have analysed data about the interconnection between the circadian CLOCK system, cell cycle, and cancerogenesis as well as about the sensitivity of circadian gene expression to the action of toxic agents and nanomaterials.

  18. IL-6 and its circadian secretion in humans.

    PubMed

    Vgontzas, A N; Bixler, E O; Lin, H-M; Prolo, P; Trakada, G; Chrousos, G P

    2005-01-01

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is a pleiotropic cytokine produced by numerous types of immune and nonimmune cells and is involved in many pathophysiologic mechanisms in humans. Many studies suggest that IL-6 is a putative 'sleep factor' and its circadian secretion correlates with sleep/sleepiness. IL-6 is elevated in disorders of excessive daytime sleepiness such as narcolepsy and obstructive sleep apnea. It correlates positively with body mass index and may be a mediator of sleepiness in obesity. Also the secretion of this cytokine is stimulated by total acute or partial short-term sleep loss reflecting the increased sleepiness experienced by sleep-deprived individuals. Studies that evaluated the 24-hour secretory pattern of IL-6 in healthy young adults suggest that IL-6 is secreted in a biphasic circadian pattern with two nadirs at about 08.00 and 21.00, and two zeniths at about 19.00 and 05.00 h. In contrast, following sleep deprivation or in disorders of sleep disturbance, e.g., insomnia, IL-6 peaks during the day and, based on the level of stress system activity, i.e., cortisol secretion, contributes to either sleepiness and deep sleep (low cortisol) or feelings of tiredness and fatigue and poor sleep (high cortisol). In order to address concerns about the potential impact of differences of IL-6 levels between the beginning and the end of the 24-hour blood-drawing experiment, we proceeded with a cosinor analysis of 'detrended' data in young and old healthy individuals. This new analysis did not affect the biphasic circadian pattern of IL-6 secretion in young adults, while it augmented the flattened circadian pattern in old individuals in whom the difference was greater. Finally, IL-6 appears to be somnogenic in rats and exhibits a diurnal rhythm that follows the sleep/wake cycle in these animals. We conclude that IL-6 is a mediator of sleepiness and its circadian pattern reflects the homeostatic drive for sleep. PMID:15905620

  19. Association of intrinsic circadian period with morningness-eveningness, usual wake time, and circadian phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duffy, J. F.; Rimmer, D. W.; Czeisler, C. A.

    2001-01-01

    The biological basis of preferences for morning or evening activity patterns ("early birds" and "night owls") has been hypothesized but has remained elusive. The authors reported that, compared with evening types, the circadian pacemaker of morning types was entrained to an earlier hour with respect to both clock time and wake time. The present study explores a chronobiological mechanism by which the biological clock of morning types may be set to an earlier hour. Intrinsic period, a fundamental property of the circadian system, was measured in a month-long inpatient study. A subset of participants also had their circadian phase assessed. Participants completed a morningness-eveningness questionnaire before study. Circadian period was correlated with morningness-eveningness, circadian phase, and wake time, demonstrating that a fundamental property of the circadian pacemaker is correlated with the behavioral trait of morningness-eveningness.

  20. Characterisation of circadian rhythms of various duckweeds.

    PubMed

    Muranaka, T; Okada, M; Yomo, J; Kubota, S; Oyama, T

    2015-01-01

    The plant circadian clock controls various physiological phenomena that are important for adaptation to natural day-night cycles. Many components of the circadian clock have been identified in Arabidopsis thaliana, the model plant for molecular genetic studies. Recent studies revealed evolutionary conservation of clock components in green plants. Homologues of clock-related genes have been isolated from Lemna gibba and Lemna aequinoctialis, and it has been demonstrated that these homologues function in the clock system in a manner similar to their functioning in Arabidopsis. While clock components are widely conserved, circadian phenomena display diversity even within the Lemna genus. In order to survey the full extent of diversity in circadian rhythms among duckweed plants, we characterised the circadian rhythms of duckweed by employing a semi-transient bioluminescent reporter system. Using a particle bombardment method, circadian bioluminescent reporters were introduced into nine strains representing five duckweed species: Spirodela polyrhiza, Landoltia punctata, Lemna gibba, L. aequinoctialis and Wolffia columbiana. We then monitored luciferase (luc+) reporter activities driven by AtCCA1, ZmUBQ1 or CaMV35S promoters under entrainment and free-running conditions. Under entrainment, AtCCA1::luc+ showed similar diurnal rhythms in all strains. This suggests that the mechanism of biological timing under day-night cycles is conserved throughout the evolution of duckweeds. Under free-running conditions, we observed circadian rhythms of AtCCA1::luc+, ZmUBQ1::luc+ and CaMV35S::luc+. These circadian rhythms showed diversity in period length and sustainability, suggesting that circadian clock mechanisms are somewhat diversified among duckweeds. PMID:24942699

  1. The circadian timing system in clinical oncology.

    PubMed

    Innominato, Pasquale F; Roche, Véronique P; Palesh, Oxana G; Ulusakarya, Ayhan; Spiegel, David; Lévi, Francis A

    2014-06-01

    The circadian timing system (CTS) controls several critical molecular pathways for cancer processes and treatment effects over the 24 hours, including drug metabolism, cell cycle, apoptosis, and DNA damage repair mechanisms. This results in the circadian time dependency of whole-body and cellular pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of anticancer agents. However, CTS robustness and phase varies among cancer patients, based on circadian monitoring of rest- activity, body temperature, sleep, and/or hormonal secretion rhythms. Circadian disruption has been further found in up to 50% of patients with metastatic cancer. Such disruption was associated with poor outcomes, including fatigue, anorexia, sleep disorders, and short progression-free and overall survival. Novel, minimally invasive devices have enabled continuous CTS assessment in non-hospitalized cancer patients. They revealed up to 12-hour differences in individual circadian phase. Taken together, the data support the personalization of chronotherapy. This treatment method aims at the adjustment of cancer treatment delivery according to circadian rhythms, using programmable-in-time pumps or novel release formulations, in order to increase both efficacy and tolerability. A fixed oxaliplatin, 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin chronotherapy protocol prolonged median overall survival in men with metastatic colorectal cancer by 3.3 months as compared to conventional delivery, according to a meta-analysis (P=0.009). Further analyses revealed the need for the prevention of circadian disruption or the restoration of robust circadian function in patients on chronotherapy, in order to further optimize treatment effects. The strengthening of external synchronizers could meet such a goal, through programmed exercise, meal timing, light exposure, improved social support, sleep scheduling, and the properly timed administration of drugs that target circadian clocks. Chrono-rehabilitation warrants clinical testing for improving

  2. Congenital anophthalmia: a circadian rhythm study.

    PubMed

    Ardura, Julio; Andres, Jesus; Aragon, Maria P; Agapito, Teresa

    2004-03-01

    A circadian rhythm of heart rate and respiratory rate was seen at 1, 8, and 12 months of age in an infant born without ocular tissue, which supports the possibility that the time cues were nonphotic. No melatonin circadian rhythm was detected at any age up to 9 years of age, and this is most likely associated with the anophthalmia and lack of photic input to the suprachiasmatic nucleus. Usually circadian organization is present after the neonatal period and approaches adult levels with development.

  3. New models for circadian systems in microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Lakin-Thomas, Patricia L

    2006-06-01

    Microorganisms provide important model systems for studying circadian rhythms, and they are overturning established ideas about the molecular mechanisms of rhythmicity. The transcription/translation feedback model that has been accepted as the basis of circadian clock mechanisms in eukaryotes does not account for old data from the alga Acetabularia demonstrating that transcription is not required for rhythmicity. Moreover, new results showing in vitro rhythmicity of KaiC protein phosphorylation in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus, and rhythmicity in strains of the fungus Neurospora carrying clock gene null mutations, require new ways of looking at circadian systems.

  4. Altered circadian clock gene expression in patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Anne-Sofie; Owe-Larsson, Björn; Hetta, Jerker; Lundkvist, Gabriella B

    2016-07-01

    Impaired circadian rhythmicity has been reported in several psychiatric disorders. Schizophrenia is commonly associated with aberrant sleep-wake cycles and insomnia. It is not known if schizophrenia is associated with disturbances in molecular rhythmicity. We cultured fibroblasts from skin samples obtained from patients with chronic schizophrenia and from healthy controls, respectively, and analyzed the circadian expression during 48h of the clock genes CLOCK, BMAL1, PER1, PER2, CRY1, CRY2, REV-ERBα and DBP. In fibroblasts obtained from patients with chronic schizophrenia, we found a loss of rhythmic expression of CRY1 and PER2 compared to cells from healthy controls. We also estimated the sleep quality in these patients and found that most of them suffered from poor sleep in comparison with the healthy controls. In another patient sample, we analyzed mononuclear blood cells from patients with schizophrenia experiencing their first episode of psychosis, and found decreased expression of CLOCK, PER2 and CRY1 compared to blood cells from healthy controls. These novel findings show disturbances in the molecular clock in schizophrenia and have important implications in our understanding of the aberrant rhythms reported in this disease. PMID:27132483

  5. Circadian dysregulation of clock genes: clues to rapid treatments in major depressive disorder

    PubMed Central

    Bunney, BG; Li, JZ; Walsh, DM; Stein, R; Vawter, MP; Cartagena, P; Barchas, JD; Schatzberg, AF; Myers, RM; Watson, SJ; Akil, H; Bunney, WE

    2016-01-01

    Conventional antidepressants require 2–8 weeks for a full clinical response. In contrast, two rapidly acting antidepressant interventions, low-dose ketamine and sleep deprivation (SD) therapy, act within hours to robustly decrease depressive symptoms in a subgroup of major depressive disorder (MDD) patients. Evidence that MDD may be a circadian-related illness is based, in part, on a large set of clinical data showing that diurnal rhythmicity (sleep, temperature, mood and hormone secretion) is altered during depressive episodes. In a microarray study, we observed widespread changes in cyclic gene expression in six regions of postmortem brain tissue of depressed patients matched with controls for time-of-death (TOD). We screened 12 000 transcripts and observed that the core clock genes, essential for controlling virtually all rhythms in the body, showed robust 24-h sinusoidal expression patterns in six brain regions in control subjects. In MDD patients matched for TOD with controls, the expression patterns of the clock genes in brain were significantly dysregulated. Some of the most robust changes were seen in anterior cingulate (ACC). These findings suggest that in addition to structural abnormalities, lesion studies, and the large body of functional brain imaging studies reporting increased activation in the ACC of depressed patients who respond to a wide range of therapies, there may be a circadian dysregulation in clock gene expression in a subgroup of MDDs. Here, we review human, animal and neuronal cell culture data suggesting that both low-dose ketamine and SD can modulate circadian rhythms. We hypothesize that the rapid antidepressant actions of ketamine and SD may act, in part, to reset abnormal clock genes in MDD to restore and stabilize circadian rhythmicity. Conversely, clinical relapse may reflect a desynchronization of the clock, indicative of a reactivation of abnormal clock gene function. Future work could involve identifying specific small

  6. Circadian dysregulation of clock genes: clues to rapid treatments in major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Bunney, B G; Li, J Z; Walsh, D M; Stein, R; Vawter, M P; Cartagena, P; Barchas, J D; Schatzberg, A F; Myers, R M; Watson, S J; Akil, H; Bunney, W E

    2015-02-01

    Conventional antidepressants require 2-8 weeks for a full clinical response. In contrast, two rapidly acting antidepressant interventions, low-dose ketamine and sleep deprivation (SD) therapy, act within hours to robustly decrease depressive symptoms in a subgroup of major depressive disorder (MDD) patients. Evidence that MDD may be a circadian-related illness is based, in part, on a large set of clinical data showing that diurnal rhythmicity (sleep, temperature, mood and hormone secretion) is altered during depressive episodes. In a microarray study, we observed widespread changes in cyclic gene expression in six regions of postmortem brain tissue of depressed patients matched with controls for time-of-death (TOD). We screened 12 000 transcripts and observed that the core clock genes, essential for controlling virtually all rhythms in the body, showed robust 24-h sinusoidal expression patterns in six brain regions in control subjects. In MDD patients matched for TOD with controls, the expression patterns of the clock genes in brain were significantly dysregulated. Some of the most robust changes were seen in anterior cingulate (ACC). These findings suggest that in addition to structural abnormalities, lesion studies, and the large body of functional brain imaging studies reporting increased activation in the ACC of depressed patients who respond to a wide range of therapies, there may be a circadian dysregulation in clock gene expression in a subgroup of MDDs. Here, we review human, animal and neuronal cell culture data suggesting that both low-dose ketamine and SD can modulate circadian rhythms. We hypothesize that the rapid antidepressant actions of ketamine and SD may act, in part, to reset abnormal clock genes in MDD to restore and stabilize circadian rhythmicity. Conversely, clinical relapse may reflect a desynchronization of the clock, indicative of a reactivation of abnormal clock gene function. Future work could involve identifying specific small

  7. Low-Salt Diet and Circadian Dysfunction Synergize to Induce Angiotensin II-Dependent Hypertension in Mice.

    PubMed

    Pati, Paramita; Fulton, David J R; Bagi, Zsolt; Chen, Feng; Wang, Yusi; Kitchens, Julia; Cassis, Lisa A; Stepp, David W; Rudic, R Daniel

    2016-03-01

    Blood pressure exhibits a robust circadian rhythm in health. In hypertension, sleep apnea, and even shift work, this balanced rhythm is perturbed via elevations in night-time blood pressure, inflicting silent damage to the vasculature and body organs. Herein, we examined the influence of circadian dysfunction during experimental hypertension in mice. Using radiotelemetry to measure ambulatory blood pressure and activity, the effects of angiotensin II administration were studied in wild-type (WT) and period isoform knockout (KO) mice (Per2-KO, Per2, 3-KO, and Per1, 2, 3-KO/Per triple KO [TKO] mice). On a normal diet, administration of angiotensin II caused nondipping blood pressure and exacerbated vascular hypertrophy in the Period isoform KO mice relative to WT mice. To study the endogenous effects of angiotensin II stimulation, we then administered a low-salt diet to the mice, which does stimulate endogenous angiotensin II in addition to lowering blood pressure. A low-salt diet decreased blood pressure in wild-type mice. In contrast, Period isoform KO mice lost their circadian rhythm in blood pressure on a low-salt diet, because of an increase in resting blood pressure, which was restorable to rhythmicity by the angiotensin receptor blocker losartan. Chronic administration of low salt caused vascular hypertrophy in Period isoform KO mice, which also exhibited increased renin levels and altered angiotensin 1 receptor expression. These data suggest that circadian clock genes may act to inhibit or control renin/angiotensin signaling. Moreover, circadian disorders such as sleep apnea and shift work may alter the homeostatic responses to sodium restriction to potentially influence nocturnal hypertension.

  8. Photopic transduction implicated in human circadian entrainment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeitzer, J. M.; Kronauer, R. E.; Czeisler, C. A.

    1997-01-01

    Despite the preeminence of light as the synchronizer of the circadian timing system, the phototransductive machinery in mammals which transmits photic information from the retina to the hypothalamic circadian pacemaker remains largely undefined. To determine the class of photopigments which this phototransductive system uses, we exposed a group (n = 7) of human subjects to red light below the sensitivity threshold of a scotopic (i.e. rhodopsin/rod-based) system, yet of sufficient strength to activate a photopic (i.e. cone-based) system. Exposure to this light stimulus was sufficient to reset significantly the human circadian pacemaker, indicating that the cone pigments which mediate color vision can also mediate circadian vision.

  9. Functional neuroanatomy of sleep and circadian rhythms.

    PubMed

    Rosenwasser, Alan M

    2009-10-01

    The daily sleep-wake cycle is perhaps the most dramatic overt manifestation of the circadian timing system, and this is especially true for the monophasic sleep-wake cycle of humans. Considerable recent progress has been made in elucidating the neurobiological mechanisms underlying sleep and arousal, and more generally, of circadian rhythmicity in behavioral and physiological systems. This paper broadly reviews these mechanisms from a functional neuroanatomical and neurochemical perspective, highlighting both historical and recent advances. In particular, I focus on the neural pathways underlying reciprocal interactions between the sleep-regulatory and circadian timing systems, and the functional implications of these interactions. While these two regulatory systems have often been considered in isolation, sleep-wake and circadian regulation are closely intertwined processes controlled by extensively integrated neurobiological mechanisms.

  10. Pilot Fatigue and Circadian Desynchronosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Pilot fatigue and circadian desynchronosis, its significance to air transport safety, and research approaches, were examined. There is a need for better data on sleep, activity, and other pertinent factors from pilots flying a variety of demanding schedules. Simulation studies of flight crew performance should be utilized to determine the degree of fatigue induced by demanding schedules and to delineate more precisely the factors responsible for performance decrements in flight and to test solutions proposed to resolve problems induced by fatigue and desynchronosis. It was concluded that there is a safety problem of uncertain magnitude due to transmeridian flying and a potential problem due to fatigue associated with various factors found in air transport operations.

  11. Circadian rhythms of performance: new trends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carrier, J.; Monk, T. H.

    2000-01-01

    This brief review is concerned with how human performance efficiency changes as a function of time of day. It presents an overview of some of the research paradigms and conceptual models that have been used to investigate circadian performance rhythms. The influence of homeostatic and circadian processes on performance regulation is discussed. The review also briefly presents recent mathematical models of alertness that have been used to predict cognitive performance. Related topics such as interindividual differences and the postlunch dip are presented.

  12. Red blood cells, multiple sickle cells (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Sickle cell anemia is an inherited disorder in which abnormal hemoglobin (the red pigment inside red blood cells) is produced. The abnormal hemoglobin causes red blood cells to assume a sickle shape, like the ones seen in this photomicrograph.

  13. UNTREATED TRANSIENT LONGER THAN 7-DAY CHAT, CIRCADIAN HYPER-AMPLITUDE TENSION, IN A 7-YEAR PERSPECTIVE

    PubMed Central

    SCHWARTZKOPFF, O.; CORNÉLISSEN, G.; HALPIN, C.; KATINAS, G.; SIEGELOVÁ, J.; FIŠER, B.; DUŠEK, J.; HALBERG, F.

    2008-01-01

    The case report presented herein aims at promoting the awareness in medical, notably cardiological, practice of the importance of, first, collecting at least a week-long record of around-the-clock measurements of blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) (and a much longer record if the 7 day record so indicates) and, second, of analysing the data chronobiologically in the light of reference values specified as a function of time, gender and age as a minimum. In addition to diagnosing deviations in a chronome (time structure)-adjusted mean value, a chronobiological approach identifies abnormalities in the variability of BP and/or HR, gauged by the circadian characteristics (double amplitude and acrophase, measures of the extent and timing of predictable change within a cycle) and by the standard deviation. A woman in presumably good health was 60 years of age at the start of intermittent monitoring over a 7 year span. The case report illustrates the extent to which a decision based on single BP readings and even on 24 hour averages may be misleading. Treatment based on an initial week-long monitoring may benefit from continued long-term monitoring. PMID:19018290

  14. Circadian Clock Control of Liver Metabolic Functions.

    PubMed

    Reinke, Hans; Asher, Gad

    2016-03-01

    The circadian clock is an endogenous biological timekeeping system that synchronizes physiology and behavior to day/night cycles. A wide variety of processes throughout the entire gastrointestinal tract and notably the liver appear to be under circadian control. These include various metabolic functions such as nutrient uptake, processing, and detoxification, which align organ function to cycle with nutrient supply and demand. Remarkably, genetic or environmental disruption of the circadian clock can cause metabolic diseases or exacerbate pathological states. In addition, modern lifestyles force more and more people worldwide into asynchrony between the external time and their circadian clock, resulting in a constant state of social jetlag. Recent evidence indicates that interactions between altered energy metabolism and disruptions in the circadian clock create a downward spiral that can lead to diabetes and other metabolic diseases. In this review, we provide an overview of rhythmic processes in the liver and highlight the functions of circadian clock genes under physiological and pathological conditions; we focus on their roles in regulation of hepatic glucose as well as lipid and bile acid metabolism and detoxification and their potential effects on the development of fatty liver and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis.

  15. Individual differences in subjective circadian flexibility.

    PubMed

    Marcoen, Nele; Vandekerckhove, Marie; Neu, Daniel; Pattyn, Nathalie; Mairesse, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate individual differences in the subjective flexibility of the circadian system in a community sample, with respect to age, gender, chronotype, and sleepiness perceptions. An online questionnaire containing the Circadian Type Inventory, the Composite Scale of Morningness, the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index and the Epworth Sleepiness Scale was administered. In addition, participants performed a visuo-verbal judgment task to determine time-of-day variations in estimated sleepiness. We analyzed data of 752 participants, aged between 18 and 83 years, who reported good sleep quality, no sleep disturbances, no excessive daytime sleepiness, and no engagement in shiftwork. Our results suggest gender- and chronotype-related differences in the subjective flexibility of the circadian system. Subjective circadian flexibility was higher in men in comparison with women and was positively related to evening preference. Age was not associated with flexibility scores. Additionally, the subjective flexibility of the circadian system had an influence on estimated sleepiness profiles: individuals with a high flexibility displayed lower sleepiness estimations during the biological night in comparison to individuals with a low flexibility. These findings suggests that, next to known chronotype and other dispositional differences, subjective circadian flexibility should be taken into account when evaluating tolerance to activities associated with nighttime functioning (e.g. night shifts).

  16. Sleep and circadian rhythm disruption in schizophrenia†

    PubMed Central

    Wulff, Katharina; Dijk, Derk-Jan; Middleton, Benita; Foster, Russell G.; Joyce, Eileen M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Sleep disturbances comparable with insomnia occur in up to 80% of people with schizophrenia, but very little is known about the contribution of circadian coordination to these prevalent disruptions. Aims A systematic exploration of circadian time patterns in individuals with schizophrenia with recurrent sleep disruption. Method We examined the relationship between sleep-wake activity, recorded actigraphically over 6 weeks, along with ambient light exposure and simultaneous circadian clock timing, by collecting weekly 48 h profiles of a urinary metabolite of melatonin in 20 out-patients with schizophrenia and 21 healthy control individuals matched for age, gender and being unemployed. Results Significant sleep/circadian disruption occurred in all the participants with schizophrenia. Half these individuals showed severe circadian misalignment ranging from phase-advance/delay to non-24 h periods in sleep-wake and melatonin cycles, and the other half showed patterns from excessive sleep to highly irregular and fragmented sleep epochs but with normally timed melatonin production. Conclusions Severe circadian sleep/wake disruptions exist despite stability in mood, mental state and newer antipsychotic treatment. They cannot be explained by the individuals' level of everyday function. PMID:22194182

  17. Linking Core Promoter Classes to Circadian Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Westermark, Pål O.

    2016-01-01

    Circadian rhythms in transcription are generated by rhythmic abundances and DNA binding activities of transcription factors. Propagation of rhythms to transcriptional initiation involves the core promoter, its chromatin state, and the basal transcription machinery. Here, I characterize core promoters and chromatin states of genes transcribed in a circadian manner in mouse liver and in Drosophila. It is shown that the core promoter is a critical determinant of circadian mRNA expression in both species. A distinct core promoter class, strong circadian promoters (SCPs), is identified in mouse liver but not Drosophila. SCPs are defined by specific core promoter features, and are shown to drive circadian transcriptional activities with both high averages and high amplitudes. Data analysis and mathematical modeling further provided evidence for rhythmic regulation of both polymerase II recruitment and pause release at SCPs. The analysis provides a comprehensive and systematic view of core promoters and their link to circadian mRNA expression in mouse and Drosophila, and thus reveals a crucial role for the core promoter in regulated, dynamic transcription. PMID:27504829

  18. Circadian rhythms and mood: opportunities for multi-level analyses in genomics and neuroscience: circadian rhythm dysregulation in mood disorders provides clues to the brain's organizing principles, and a touchstone for genomics and neuroscience.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun Z

    2014-03-01

    In the healthy state, both circadian rhythm and mood are stable against perturbations, yet they are capable of adjusting to altered internal cues or ongoing changes in external conditions. The dual demands of stability and flexibility are met by the collective properties of complex neural networks. Disruption of this balance underlies both circadian rhythm abnormality and mood disorders. However, we do not fully understand the network properties that govern the crosstalk between the circadian system and mood regulation. This puzzle reflects a challenge at the center of neurobiology, and its solution requires the successful integration of existing data across all levels of neural organization, from molecules, cells, circuits, network dynamics, to integrated mental function. This essay discusses several open questions confronting the cross-level synthesis, and proposes that circadian regulation, and its role in mood, stands as a uniquely tractable system to study the causal mechanisms of neural adaptation. Also watch the Video Abstract. Editor's suggested further reading in BioEssays Major depressive disorder: A loss of circadian synchrony? Abstract.

  19. Diurnal Preference Predicts Phase Differences in Expression of Human Peripheral Circadian Clock Genes

    PubMed Central

    Ferrante, Andrew; Gellerman, David; Ay, Ahmet; Woods, Kerri Pruitt; Filipowicz, Allan Michael; Jain, Kriti; Bearden, Neil

    2015-01-01

    Background: Circadian rhythms play an integral role in human behavior, physiology and health. Individual differences in daily rhythms (chronotypes) can affect individual sleep-wake cycles, activity patterns and behavioral choices. Diurnal preference, the tendency towards morningness or eveningness among individuals, has been associated with interpersonal variation in circadian clock-related output measures, including body temperature, melatonin levels and clock gene mRNA in blood, oral mucosa, and dermal fibroblast cell cultures. Methods: Here we report gene expression data from two principal clock genes sampled from hair follicle cells, a peripheral circadian clock. Hair follicle cells from fourteen individuals of extreme morning or evening chronotype were sampled at three time points. RNA was extracted and quantitative PCR assays were used to measure mRNA expression patterns of two clock genes, Per3 and Nr1d2. Results: We found significant differences in clock gene expression over time between chronotype groups, independent of gender or age of participants. Extreme evening chronotypes have a delay in phase of circadian clock gene oscillation relative to extreme morning types. Variation in the molecular clockwork of chronotype groups represents nearly three-hour phase differences (Per3: 2.61 hours; Nr1d2: 3.08 hours, both: 2.86) in circadian oscillations of these clock genes. Conclusions: The measurement of gene expression from hair follicles at three time points allows for a direct, efficient method of estimating phase shifts of a peripheral circadian clock in real-life conditions. The robust phase differences in temporal expression of clock genes associated with diurnal preferences provide the framework for further studies of the molecular mechanisms and gene-by-environment interactions underlying chronotype-specific behavioral phenomena, including social jetlag. PMID:27103930

  20. The Circadian Clock Maintains Cardiac Function by Regulating Mitochondrial Metabolism in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kohsaka, Akira; Das, Partha; Hashimoto, Izumi; Nakao, Tomomi; Deguchi, Yoko; Gouraud, Sabine S.; Waki, Hidefumi; Muragaki, Yasuteru; Maeda, Masanobu

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac function is highly dependent on oxidative energy, which is produced by mitochondrial respiration. Defects in mitochondrial function are associated with both structural and functional abnormalities in the heart. Here, we show that heart-specific ablation of the circadian clock gene Bmal1 results in cardiac mitochondrial defects that include morphological changes and functional abnormalities, such as reduced enzymatic activities within the respiratory complex. Mice without cardiac Bmal1 function show a significant decrease in the expression of genes associated with the fatty acid oxidative pathway, the tricarboxylic acid cycle, and the mitochondrial respiratory chain in the heart and develop severe progressive heart failure with age. Importantly, similar changes in gene expression related to mitochondrial oxidative metabolism are also observed in C57BL/6J mice subjected to chronic reversal of the light-dark cycle; thus, they show disrupted circadian rhythmicity. These findings indicate that the circadian clock system plays an important role in regulating mitochondrial metabolism and thereby maintains cardiac function. PMID:25389966

  1. Circadian Rhythms in Acute Intermittent Porphyria—a Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Larion, Sebastian; Caballes, F. Ryan; Hwang, Sun-Il; Lee, Jin-Gyun; Rossman, Whitney Ellefson; Parsons, Judy; Steuerwald, Nury; Li, Ting; Maddukuri, Vinaya; Groseclose, Gale; Finkielstein, Carla V.; Bonkovsky, Herbert L.

    2013-01-01

    Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP) is an inherited disorder of heme synthesis wherein a partial deficiency of porphobilinogen [PBG] deaminase [PBGD], with other factors may give rise to biochemical and clinical manifestations of disease. The biochemical hallmarks of active AIP are relative hepatic heme deficiency and uncontrolled up-regulation of hepatic 5-aminolevulinic acid [ALA] synthase-1 [ALAS1] with overproduction of ALA and PBG. The treatment of choice is intravenous heme, which restores the deficient regulatory heme pool of the liver and represses ALAS1. Recently, heme has been shown to influence circadian rhythms by controlling their negative feedback loops. We evaluated whether subjects with AIP exhibited an altered circadian profile. Over a 21 h period, we measured levels of serum cortisol, melatonin, ALA, PBG, and mRNA levels [in peripheral blood mononuclear cells] of selected clock-controlled genes and genes involved in heme synthesis in 10 Caucasian [European-American] women who were either post-menopausal or had been receiving female hormone therapy, 6 of whom have AIP and 4 do not and are considered controls. Four AIP subjects with biochemical activity exhibited higher levels of PBG and lower levels and dampened oscillation of serum cortisol, and a trend for lower levels of serum melatonin, than controls or AIP subjects without biochemical activity. Levels of clock-controlled gene mRNAs showed significant increases over baseline in all subjects at 5 am and 11 pm, whereas mRNA levels of ALAS1, ALAS2, and PBGD were increased only at 11 pm in subjects with active AIP. This pilot study provides evidence for disturbances of circadian markers in women with active AIP that may trigger or sustain some common clinical features of AIP. PMID:23650938

  2. Disruption of MeCP2 attenuates circadian rhythm in CRISPR/Cas9-based Rett syndrome model mouse.

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, Yoshiki; Minami, Yoichi; Umemura, Yasuhiro; Watanabe, Hitomi; Ono, Daisuke; Nakamura, Wataru; Takahashi, Tomoyuki; Honma, Sato; Kondoh, Gen; Matsuishi, Toyojiro; Yagita, Kazuhiro

    2015-12-01

    Methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (Mecp2) is an X-linked gene encoding a methylated DNA-binding nuclear protein which regulates transcriptional activity. The mutation of MECP2 in humans is associated with Rett syndrome (RTT), a neurodevelopmental disorder. Patients with RTT frequently show abnormal sleep patterns and sleep-associated problems, in addition to autistic symptoms, raising the possibility of circadian clock dysfunction in RTT. In this study, we investigated circadian clock function in Mecp2-deficient mice. We successfully generated both male and female Mecp2-deficient mice on the wild-type C57BL/6 background and PER2(Luciferase) (PER2(Luc)) knock-in background using the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/Cas9 system. Generated Mecp2-deficient mice recapitulated reduced activity in mouse models of RTT, and their activity rhythms were diminished in constant dark conditions. Furthermore, real-time bioluminescence imaging showed that the amplitude of PER2(Luc)-driven circadian oscillation was significantly attenuated in Mecp2-deficient SCN neurons. On the other hand, in vitro circadian rhythm development assay using Mecp2-deficient mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) did not show amplitude changes of PER2(Luc) bioluminescence rhythms. Together, these results show that Mecp2 deficiency abrogates the circadian pacemaking ability of the SCN, which may be a therapeutic target to treat the sleep problems of patients with RTT.

  3. Circadian profiling in two mouse models of lysosomal storage disorders; Niemann Pick type-C and Sandhoff disease

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Katie; Livieratos, Achilleas; Dumbill, Richard; Hughes, Steven; Ang, Gauri; Smith, David A.; Morris, Lauren; Brown, Laurence A.; Peirson, Stuart N.; Platt, Frances M.; Davies, Kay E.; Oliver, Peter L.

    2016-01-01

    Sleep and circadian rhythm disruption is frequently associated with neurodegenerative disease, yet it is unclear how the specific pathology in these disorders leads to abnormal rest/activity profiles. To investigate whether the pathological features of lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs) influence the core molecular clock or the circadian behavioural abnormalities reported in some patients, we examined mouse models of Niemann-Pick Type-C (Npc1 mutant, Npc1nih) and Sandhoff (Hexb knockout, Hexb−/−) disease using wheel-running activity measurement, neuropathology and clock gene expression analysis. Both mutants exhibited regular, entrained rest/activity patterns under light:dark (LD) conditions despite the onset of their respective neurodegenerative phenotypes. A slightly shortened free-running period and changes in Per1 gene expression were observed in Hexb−/− mice under constant dark conditions (DD); however, no overt neuropathology was detected in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). Conversely, despite extensive cholesterol accumulation in the SCN of Npc1nih mutants, no circadian disruption was observed under constant conditions. Our results indicate the accumulation of specific metabolites in LSDs may differentially contribute to circadian deregulation at the molecular and behavioural level. PMID:26467605

  4. Barley Hv CIRCADIAN CLOCK ASSOCIATED 1 and Hv PHOTOPERIOD H1 Are Circadian Regulators That Can Affect Circadian Rhythms in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Martí, María C.; Laurie, David A.; Greenland, Andy J.; Hall, Anthony; Webb, Alex A. R.

    2015-01-01

    Circadian clocks regulate many aspects of plant physiology and development that contribute to essential agronomic traits. Circadian clocks contain transcriptional feedback loops that are thought to generate circadian timing. There is considerable similarity in the genes that comprise the transcriptional and translational feedback loops of the circadian clock in the plant Kingdom. Functional characterisation of circadian clock genes has been restricted to a few model species. Here we provide a functional characterisation of the Hordeum vulgare (barley) circadian clock genes Hv CIRCADIAN CLOCK ASSOCIATED 1 (HvCCA1) and Hv PHOTOPERIODH1, which are respectively most similar to Arabidopsis thaliana CIRCADIAN CLOCK ASSOCIATED 1 (AtCCA1) and PSEUDO RESPONSE REGULATOR 7 (AtPRR7). This provides insight into the circadian regulation of one of the major crop species of Northern Europe. Through a combination of physiological assays of circadian rhythms in barley and heterologous expression in wild type and mutant strains of A. thaliana we demonstrate that HvCCA1 has a conserved function to AtCCA1. We find that Hv PHOTOPERIOD H1 has AtPRR7-like functionality in A. thaliana and that the effects of the Hv photoperiod h1 mutation on photoperiodism and circadian rhythms are genetically separable. PMID:26076005

  5. Dysregulation of neuroendocrine crossroads: depression, circadian rhythms and the retina--a hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Steiner, M; Werstiuk, E S; Seggie, J

    1987-01-01

    The pathophysiology of depression and the mechanism of action of lithium and other antidepressant drugs involve alterations in circadian rhythms. These include changes in both the intrinsic rhythm of circadian oscillators and in the sensitivity of the retina to LIGHT. The retina in humans is the only photoreceptor for circadian entrainment. The retinal-hypothalamic-pineal axis is the essential pathway for neuronal entrainment of rhythms which use light as a phase cue. A common substance throughout this axis in many species is MELATONIN. Retinal melatonin has been implicated in regulation of the sensitivity of the retina to light. The hypothalamus, at THE NEUROENDOCRINE CROSSROADS, has a central role in the integration of neurotransmitters and hormones in circadian rhythms. DYSREGULATION of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal, as well as -gonadal, axes has been documented in depressed patients. Abnormalities in circulating melatonin have also been found in patients with affective disorders. It is speculated that the availability of melatonin along the retinal-hypothalamic-pineal axis may have important implications in the genesis of affective disorders. More specifically--is there a latent biochemical defect which causes a phase shift and change in circadian rhythms of melatonin and/or other neurotransmitters in the retina which then alters the sensitivity of the retina to light (for the visible spectrum) which in turn desynchronizes all other biological rhythms thus disrupting mental well-being? We suggest that variations of retinal photosensitivity in humans can be measured by using a visual testing system, and that depressed patients might show changes in photosensitivity which could be corrected when treated with lithium and/or antidepressants. It is our working hypothesis that the primary defect in depression may be a change in retinal function, and that behavioural and neuroendocrine concomitants of this disorder are secondary events.

  6. Dysregulation of neuroendocrine crossroads: depression, circadian rhythms and the retina--a hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Steiner, M; Werstiuk, E S; Seggie, J

    1987-01-01

    The pathophysiology of depression and the mechanism of action of lithium and other antidepressant drugs involve alterations in circadian rhythms. These include changes in both the intrinsic rhythm of circadian oscillators and in the sensitivity of the retina to LIGHT. The retina in humans is the only photoreceptor for circadian entrainment. The retinal-hypothalamic-pineal axis is the essential pathway for neuronal entrainment of rhythms which use light as a phase cue. A common substance throughout this axis in many species is MELATONIN. Retinal melatonin has been implicated in regulation of the sensitivity of the retina to light. The hypothalamus, at THE NEUROENDOCRINE CROSSROADS, has a central role in the integration of neurotransmitters and hormones in circadian rhythms. DYSREGULATION of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal, as well as -gonadal, axes has been documented in depressed patients. Abnormalities in circulating melatonin have also been found in patients with affective disorders. It is speculated that the availability of melatonin along the retinal-hypothalamic-pineal axis may have important implications in the genesis of affective disorders. More specifically--is there a latent biochemical defect which causes a phase shift and change in circadian rhythms of melatonin and/or other neurotransmitters in the retina which then alters the sensitivity of the retina to light (for the visible spectrum) which in turn desynchronizes all other biological rhythms thus disrupting mental well-being? We suggest that variations of retinal photosensitivity in humans can be measured by using a visual testing system, and that depressed patients might show changes in photosensitivity which could be corrected when treated with lithium and/or antidepressants. It is our working hypothesis that the primary defect in depression may be a change in retinal function, and that behavioural and neuroendocrine concomitants of this disorder are secondary events. PMID:2888161

  7. Do permanent night workers show circadian adjustment? A review based on the endogenous melatonin rhythm.

    PubMed

    Folkard, Simon

    2008-04-01

    "Permanent" or "fixed" night shifts have been argued to offer a potential benefit over rotating shift systems in that they may serve to maximize circadian adjustment and hence minimize the various health and safety problems associated with night work. For this reason, some authors have argued in favor of permanent shift systems, but their arguments assume at least a substantial, if not complete, adjustment of the circadian clock. They have emphasized the finding that the day sleeps taken between successive night shifts by permanent night workers are rather longer than those of either slowly or rapidly rotating shift workers, but this could simply reflect increased pressure for sleep. The present paper reviews the literature on the adjustment to permanent night work of the circadian rhythm in the secretion of melatonin, which is generally considered to be the best known indicator of the state of the endogenous circadian body clock. Studies of workers in "abnormal" environments, such as oil rigs and remote mining operations, were excluded, as the nature of these unique settings might serve to assist adjustment. The results of the six studies included indicate that only a very small minority (<3%) of permanent night workers evidence "complete"adjustment of their endogenous melatonin rhythm to night work, less than one in four permanent night workers evidence sufficiently "substantial" adjustment to derive any benefit from it, there is no difference between studies conducted in normal or dim lighting, and there is no evidence of gender difference in the adjustment to permanent night work. It is concluded that in normal environments, permanent night-shift systems are unlikely to result in sufficient circadian adjustment in most individuals to benefit health and safety. PMID:18533325

  8. Disruption of Sirtuin 1-Mediated Control of Circadian Molecular Clock and Inflammation in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Yao, Hongwei; Sundar, Isaac K; Huang, Yadi; Gerloff, Janice; Sellix, Michael T; Sime, Patricia J; Rahman, Irfan

    2015-12-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is the fourth most common cause of death, and it is characterized by abnormal inflammation and lung function decline. Although the circadian molecular clock regulates inflammatory responses, there is no information available regarding the impact of COPD on lung molecular clock function and its regulation by sirtuin 1 (SIRT1). We hypothesize that the molecular clock in the lungs is disrupted, leading to increased inflammatory responses in smokers and patients with COPD and its regulation by SIRT1. Lung tissues, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), and sputum cells were obtained from nonsmokers, smokers, and patients with COPD for measurement of core molecular clock proteins (BMAL1, CLOCK, PER1, PER2, and CRY1), clock-associated nuclear receptors (REV-ERBα, REV-ERBβ, and RORα), and SIRT1 by immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence, and immunoblot. PBMCs were treated with the SIRT1 activator SRT1720 followed by LPS treatment, and supernatant was collected at 6-hour intervals. Levels of IL-8, IL-6, and TNF-α released from PBMCs were determined by ELISA. Expression of BMAL1, PER2, CRY1, and REV-ERBα was reduced in PBMCs, sputum cells, and lung tissues from smokers and patients with COPD when compared with nonsmokers. SRT1720 treatment attenuated LPS-mediated reduction of BMAL1 and REV-ERBα in PBMCs from nonsmokers. Additionally, LPS differentially affected the timing and amplitude of cytokine (IL-8, IL-6, and TNF-α) release from PBMCs in nonsmokers, smokers, and patients with COPD. Moreover, SRT1720 was able to inhibit LPS-induced cytokine release from cultured PBMCs. In conclusion, disruption of the molecular clock due to SIRT1 reduction contributes to abnormal inflammatory response in smokers and patients with COPD.

  9. The circadian rhythm controls telomeres and telomerase activity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Dar; Wen, Ming-Shien; Shie, Shian-Sen; Lo, Yu-Lun; Wo, Hung-Ta; Wang, Chun-Chieh; Hsieh, I-Chang; Lee, Tsong-Hai; Wang, Chao-Yung

    2014-08-29

    Circadian clocks are fundamental machinery in organisms ranging from archaea to humans. Disruption of the circadian system is associated with premature aging in mice, but the molecular basis underlying this phenomenon is still unclear. In this study, we found that telomerase activity exhibits endogenous circadian rhythmicity in humans and mice. Human and mouse TERT mRNA expression oscillates with circadian rhythms and are under the control of CLOCK-BMAL1 heterodimers. CLOCK deficiency in mice causes loss of rhythmic telomerase activities, TERT mRNA oscillation, and shortened telomere length. Physicians with regular work schedules have circadian oscillation of telomerase activity while emergency physicians working in shifts lose the circadian rhythms of telomerase activity. These findings identify the circadian rhythm as a mechanism underlying telomere and telomerase activity control that serve as interconnections between circadian systems and aging.

  10. Testosterone induces "splitting" of circadian locomotor activity rhythms in birds.

    PubMed

    Gwinner, E

    1974-07-01

    Under the influence of testosterone, the free-running circadian rhythm of locomotor activity of the starling, Sturnus vulgaris, tends to "split" into two components which temporarily run with different circadian frequencies: "splitting" occurred in intact birds whose testes grew, and in castrated birds that were injected with testosterone. Since "splitting" most probably reflects the temporal separation of two (or two groups of) circadian oscillators, these results suggest that testosterone affects the mutual coupling of circadian oscillators controlling locomotor activity.

  11. Hormonal and behavioural abnormalities induced by stress in utero: an animal model for depression.

    PubMed

    Maccari, S; Darnaudery, M; Van Reeth, O

    2001-09-01

    Prenatal stress in rats can exert profound influence on the off spring's development, inducing abnormalities such as increased "anxiety", "emotionality" or "depression-like" behaviours.Prenatal stress has long-term effects on the development of the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal(HPA) axis and forebrain cholinergic systems. These long-term neuroendocrinological effects are mediated, at least in part, by stress-induced maternal corticosterone increase during pregnancy and stress-induced maternal anxiety during the postnatal period. We have shown a significant phase advance in the circadian rhythms of corticosterone secretion and locomotor activity in prenatally-stressed (PNS) rats. When subjected to an abrupt shift in the light-dark(LD) cycle, PNS rats resynchronized their activity rhythm more slowly than control rats. In view of the data suggesting abnormalities in the circadian timing system in these animals, we have investigated the effects of prenatal stress on the sleep-wake cycle in adult male rats. PNS rats exhibited various changes in sleep-wake parameters, including a dramatic increase in the amount of paradoxical sleep. Taken together, our results indicate that prenatal stress can induce increased responses to stress and abnormal circadian rhythms and sleep in adult rats.Various clinical observations in humans suggest a possible pathophysiological link between depression and disturbances in circadian rhythmicity. Circadian abnormalities in depression can be related to those found in PNS rats. Interestingly, we have recently shown that the increased immobility in the forced swimming test observed in PNS rats can be corrected by chronic treatment with the antidepressant tianeptine, or with melatonin or S23478, a melatonin agonist. Those results reinforce the idea of the usefulness of PNS rats as an appropriate animal model to study human depression and support a new antidepressant-like effect of melatonin and the melatonin agonist S23478. PMID:22432138

  12. Effects of Topical Bimatoprost 0.01% and Timolol 0.5% on Circadian IOP, Blood Pressure and Perfusion Pressure in Patients with Glaucoma or Ocular Hypertension: A Randomized, Double Masked, Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Tanga, Lucia; Berardo, Francesca; Ferrazza, Manuela; Michelessi, Manuele; Roberti, Gloria

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To compare the 24-hour (24h) effects on intraocular pressure (IOP) and cardiovascular parameters of timolol 0.5% and bimatoprost 0.01% in open angle glaucoma and ocular hypertensive subjects. Methods In this prospective, randomized, double masked, crossover, clinical trial, after washout from previous medications enrolled subjects underwent 24h IOP, blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) measurements and were randomized to either topical bimatoprost 0.01% at night plus placebo in the morning or to timolol 0.5% bid. After 8 weeks of treatment a second 24h assessment of IOP, BP and HR was performed and then subjects switched to the opposite treatment for additional 8 weeks when a third 24h assessment was performed. The primary endpoint was the comparison of the mean 24h IOP after each treatment. Secondary endpoints included the comparisons of IOP at each timepoint of the 24h curve and the comparison of BP, HR, ocular perfusion pressure and tolerability. Results Mean untreated 24h IOP was 20.3 mmHg (95%CI 19.0 to 21.6). Mean 24h IOP was significantly lower after 8 weeks of treatment with bimatoprost 0.01% than after 8 weeks of treatment with timolol 0.5% bid (15.7 vs 16.8 mmHg, p = 0.0003). Mean IOP during the day hours was significantly reduced from baseline by both drugs while mean IOP during the night hours was reduced by -2.3 mmHg (p = 0.0002) by bimatoprost 0.01% plus placebo and by -1.1 mmHg by timolol 0.5% bid (p = 0.06). Timolol 0.5% significantly reduced the mean 24h systolic BP from baseline, the diastolic BP during the day hours, the HR during the night hours, and the mean 24h systolic ocular perfusion pressure. Conclusion Both Bimatoprost 0.01% and Timolol 0.5% are effective in reducing the mean 24h IOP from an untreated baseline but Bimatoprost 0.01% is more effective than timolol 0.5% throughout the 24h. Timolol 0.5% effect on IOP is reduced during the night hours and is associated with reduced BP, HR and ocular perfusion pressure. Trial

  13. Molecular Mechanisms of Circadian Regulation During Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zanello, Susana; Boyle, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Disruption of the regular environmental circadian cues in addition to stringent and demanding operational schedules are two main factors that undoubtedly impact sleep patterns and vigilant performance in the astronaut crews during spaceflight. Most research is focused on the behavioral aspects of the risk of circadian desynchronization, characterized by fatigue and health and performance decrement. A common countermeasure for circadian re-entrainment utilizes blue-green light to entrain the circadian clock and mitigate this risk. However, an effective countermeasure targeting the photoreceptor system requires that the basic circadian molecular machinery remains intact during spaceflight. The molecular clock consists of sets of proteins that perform different functions within the clock machinery: circadian oscillators (genes whose expression levels cycle during the day, keep the pass of cellular time and regulate downstream effector genes), the effector or output genes (those which impact the physiology of the tissue or organism), and the input genes (responsible for sensing the environmental cues that allow circadian entrainment). The main environmental cue is light. As opposed to the known photoreceptors (rods and cones), the non-visual light stimulus is received by a subset of the population of retinal ganglion cells called intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGC) that express melanopsin (opsin 4 -Opn4-) as the photoreceptor. We hypothesize that spaceflight may affect ipRGC and melanopsin expression, which may be a contributing cause of circadian disruption during spaceflight. To answer this question, eyes from albino Balb/cJ mice aboard STS-133 were collected for histological analysis and gene expression profiling of the retina at 1 and 7 days after landing. Both vivarium and AEM (animal enclosure module) mice were used as ground controls. Opn4 expression was analyzed by real time RT/qPCR and retinal sections were stained for Opn4

  14. Circadian typology: a comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Adan, Ana; Archer, Simon N; Hidalgo, Maria Paz; Di Milia, Lee; Natale, Vincenzo; Randler, Christoph

    2012-11-01

    The interest in the systematic study of the circadian typology (CT) is relatively recent and has developed rapidly in the two last decades. All the existing data suggest that this individual difference affects our biological and psychological functioning, not only in health, but also in disease. In the present study, we review the current literature concerning the psychometric properties and validity of CT measures as well as individual, environmental and genetic factors that influence the CT. We present a brief overview of the biological markers that are used to define differences between CT groups (sleep-wake cycle, body temperature, cortisol and melatonin), and we assess the implications for CT and adjustment to shiftwork and jet lag. We also review the differences between CT in terms of cognitive abilities, personality traits and the incidence of psychiatric disorders. When necessary, we have emphasized the methodological limitations that exist today and suggested some future avenues of work in order to overcome these. This is a new field of interest to professionals in many different areas (research, labor, academic and clinical), and this review provides a state of the art discussion to allow professionals to integrate chronobiological aspects of human behavior into their daily practice. PMID:23004349

  15. Impact of nutrients on circadian rhythmicity

    PubMed Central

    Oosterman, Johanneke E.; Kalsbeek, Andries; la Fleur, Susanne E.

    2014-01-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) in the mammalian hypothalamus functions as an endogenous pacemaker that generates and maintains circadian rhythms throughout the body. Next to this central clock, peripheral oscillators exist in almost all mammalian tissues. Whereas the SCN is mainly entrained to the environment by light, peripheral clocks are entrained by various factors, of which feeding/fasting is the most important. Desynchronization between the central and peripheral clocks by, for instance, altered timing of food intake can lead to uncoupling of peripheral clocks from the central pacemaker and is, in humans, related to the development of metabolic disorders, including obesity and Type 2 diabetes. Diets high in fat or sugar have been shown to alter circadian clock function. This review discusses the recent findings concerning the influence of nutrients, in particular fatty acids and glucose, on behavioral and molecular circadian rhythms and will summarize critical studies describing putative mechanisms by which these nutrients are able to alter normal circadian rhythmicity, in the SCN, in non-SCN brain areas, as well as in peripheral organs. As the effects of fat and sugar on the clock could be through alterations in energy status, the role of specific nutrient sensors will be outlined, as well as the molecular studies linking these components to metabolism. Understanding the impact of specific macronutrients on the circadian clock will allow for guidance toward the composition and timing of meals optimal for physiological health, as well as putative therapeutic targets to regulate the molecular clock. PMID:25519730

  16. Circadian systems biology: When time matters

    PubMed Central

    Fuhr, Luise; Abreu, Mónica; Pett, Patrick; Relógio, Angela

    2015-01-01

    The circadian clock is a powerful endogenous timing system, which allows organisms to fine-tune their physiology and behaviour to the geophysical time. The interplay of a distinct set of core-clock genes and proteins generates oscillations in expression of output target genes which temporally regulate numerous molecular and cellular processes. The study of the circadian timing at the organismal as well as at the cellular level outlines the field of chronobiology, which has been highly interdisciplinary ever since its origins. The development of high-throughput approaches enables the study of the clock at a systems level. In addition to experimental approaches, computational clock models exist which allow the analysis of rhythmic properties of the clock network. Such mathematical models aid mechanistic understanding and can be used to predict outcomes of distinct perturbations in clock components, thereby generating new hypotheses regarding the putative function of particular clock genes. Perturbations in the circadian timing system are linked to numerous molecular dysfunctions and may result in severe pathologies including cancer. A comprehensive knowledge regarding the mechanistic of the circadian system is crucial to develop new procedures to investigate pathologies associated with a deregulated clock. In this manuscript we review the combination of experimental methodologies, bioinformatics and theoretical models that have been essential to explore this remarkable timing-system. Such an integrative and interdisciplinary approach may provide new strategies with regard to chronotherapeutic treatment and new insights concerning the restoration of the circadian timing in clock-associated diseases. PMID:26288701

  17. A novel animal model linking adiposity to altered circadian rhythms

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Researchers have provided evidence for a link between obesity and altered circadian rhythms (e.g., shift work, disrupted sleep), but the mechanism for this association is still unknown. Adipocytes possess an intrinsic circadian clock, and circadian rhythms in adipocytokines and adipose tissue metab...

  18. The circadian clock in cancer development and therapy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Most aspects of mammalian function display circadian rhythms driven by an endogenous clock. The circadian clock is operated by genes and comprises a central clock in the brain that responds to environmental cues and controls subordinate clocks in peripheral tissues via circadian output pathways. The...

  19. Circadian rhythms in Macaca mulatta monkeys during Bion 11 flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alpatov, A. M.; Hoban-Higgins, T. M.; Klimovitsky, V. Y.; Tumurova, E. G.; Fuller, C. A.

    2000-01-01

    Circadian rhythms of primate brain temperature, head and ankle skin temperature, motor activity, and heart rate were studied during spaceflight and on the ground. In space, the circadian rhythms of all the parameters were synchronized with diurnal Zeitgebers. However, in space the brain temperature rhythm showed a significantly more delayed phase angle, which may be ascribed to an increase of the endogenous circadian period.

  20. Circadian and wakefulness-sleep modulation of cognition in humans

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Kenneth P.; Lowry, Christopher A.; LeBourgeois, Monique K.

    2012-01-01

    Cognitive and affective processes vary over the course of the 24 h day. Time of day dependent changes in human cognition are modulated by an internal circadian timekeeping system with a near-24 h period. The human circadian timekeeping system interacts with sleep-wakefulness regulatory processes to modulate brain arousal, neurocognitive and affective function. Brain arousal is regulated by ascending brain stem, basal forebrain (BF) and hypothalamic arousal systems and inhibition or disruption of these systems reduces brain arousal, impairs cognition, and promotes sleep. The internal circadian timekeeping system modulates cognition and affective function by projections from the master circadian clock, located in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN), to arousal and sleep systems and via clock gene oscillations in brain tissues. Understanding the basic principles of circadian and wakefulness-sleep physiology can help to recognize how the circadian system modulates human cognition and influences learning, memory and emotion. Developmental changes in sleep and circadian processes and circadian misalignment in circadian rhythm sleep disorders have important implications for learning, memory and emotion. Overall, when wakefulness occurs at appropriate internal biological times, circadian clockwork benefits human cognitive and emotion function throughout the lifespan. Yet, when wakefulness occurs at inappropriate biological times because of environmental pressures (e.g., early school start times, long work hours that include work at night, shift work, jet lag) or because of circadian rhythm sleep disorders, the resulting misalignment between circadian and wakefulness-sleep physiology leads to impaired cognitive performance, learning, emotion, and safety. PMID:22529774

  1. Circadian variations of cortisol, melatonin and lymphocyte subpopulations in geriatric age.

    PubMed

    Mazzoccoli, G; Vendemiale, G; La Viola, M; De Cata, A; Carughi, S; Greco, A; Balzanelli, M; Tarquini, R

    2010-01-01

    A number of age-related changes in the 24-hour hormonal and non-hormonal rhythms have been found in older human beings. Lymphocyte subpopulations present circadian variation of some of their subsets and this variation may influence magnitude and expression of the immune responses. Numerous interactions exist among the nervous, endocrine and immune systems, mediated by neurotransmitters, hormones and cytokines. The aim of this study is to evaluate circadian variations of some endocrine and immune factors in older adults. Cortisol and melatonin serum levels were measured and lymphocyte subpopulation analyses were performed on blood samples collected every four hours for 24 hours from ten healthy young and middle-aged subjects and from ten healthy elderly subjects. There was a statistically significant difference between the groups in the observed values of CD20 (higher in young and middle-aged subjects) and CD25 and DR+ T cells (higher in elderly subjects). In the group of young and middle-aged subjects a clear circadian rhythm was validated for the time-qualified changes of all the factors studied. In the group of elderly subjects a number of rhythms were absent or altered. The results of the current study show that aging is associated with enhanced responsiveness of T cell compartment and alterations of circadian rhythmicity.

  2. Sleep Disturbance and Altered Expression of Circadian Clock Genes in Patients With Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chao-Hui; Hwang, Chung-Feng; Lin, Pai-Mei; Chuang, Jiin-Haur; Hsu, Cheng-Ming; Lin, Sheng-Fung; Yang, Ming-Yu

    2015-07-01

    The cause of sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) remains unclear and therefore it is often considered as idiopathic. Sleep disturbance has been linked to SSNHL and circadian rhythm disruption, but the link between circadian rhythm disruption and SSNHL has never been investigated.In this study, we surveyed the sleep quality of 38 patients with SSNHL using a simple insomnia sleep questionnaire. The expression of circadian clock genes in peripheral blood (PB) leukocytes from 38 patients with SSNHL and 71 healthy subjects was accessed using real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and validated using immunocytochemical staining.We found that 61.8% of patients with SSNHL suffered from insomnia before the insult of hearing loss. Besides, significantly decreased expression of PER1, CRY1, CRY2, CLOCK, BMAL1, and CKlε was found in PB leukocytes of patients with SSNHL when compared with healthy subjects. SSNHL patients with vertigo had significantly lower expression of CRY1 and CKlε than patients without vertigo symptoms. Our results imply the association of sleep disturbance and disrupted circadian rhythm in SSNHL.

  3. The effect of constant darkness and circadian resynchronization on the recovery of alcohol hangover.

    PubMed

    Karadayian, Analía G; Lores-Arnaiz, Silvia; Cutrera, Rodolfo A

    2014-07-15

    Alcohol hangover (AH) is a particular state after binge-like drinking. AH begins when ethanol is absent in plasma and is characterized by a cluster of physical and psychological symptoms. Alcohol disrupts circadian patterns of behavioral and physiological parameters; however, the involvement of circadian clock on the recovery of AH was not explored. Our aim was to study the effect of continuous darkness and the possible involvement of the circadian clock in the recovery time of neuromuscular impairment and anxiety related-behavior due to AH. Male Swiss mice were habituated to 12:12 L:D or continuous darkness. Each group was injected i.p. either with saline (control group) or with ethanol (3.8 g/kg BW) (hangover group). Motor performance and anxiety phenotype were evaluated at a basal point (ZT0) and every 2 h up to 20 h after blood alcohol levels were close to zero (hangover onset). A third group was subjected to a phase advance during which a hangover episode was induced and behavioral tests were carried out for each group of treatment and resynchronization day. Constant darkness resulted to be in a faster recovery of both motor and anxiety impairments in AH compared with the recovery pattern observed under normal light-dark conditions. Mice suffering from a phase shift exhibited behavioral disruptions due to both AH and phase advance. Results indicated that a synchronized circadian clock is necessary for an adequate recovery of alcohol hangover symptoms.

  4. The epigenetic language of circadian clocks.

    PubMed

    Sahar, Saurabh; Sassone-Corsi, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    Epigenetic control, which includes DNA methylation and histone modifications, leads to chromatin remodeling and regulated gene expression. Remodeling of chromatin constitutes a critical interface of transducing signals, such as light or nutrient availability, and how these are interpreted by the cell to generate permissive or silenced states for transcription. CLOCK-BMAL1-mediated activation of clock-controlled genes (CCGs) is coupled to circadian changes in histone modification at their promoters. Several chromatin modifiers, such as the deacetylases SIRT1 and HDAC3 or methyltransferase MLL1, have been shown to be recruited to the promoters of the CCGs in a circadian manner. Interestingly, the central element of the core clock machinery, the transcription factor CLOCK, also possesses histone acetyltransferase activity. Rhythmic expression of the CCGs is abolished in the absence of these chromatin modifiers. Here we will discuss the evidence demonstrating that chromatin remodeling is at the crossroads of circadian rhythms and regulation of metabolism and cellular proliferation. PMID:23604474

  5. Quantification of Circadian Rhythms in Single Cells

    PubMed Central

    Westermark, Pål O.; Welsh, David K.; Okamura, Hitoshi; Herzel, Hanspeter

    2009-01-01

    Bioluminescence techniques allow accurate monitoring of the circadian clock in single cells. We have analyzed bioluminescence data of Per gene expression in mouse SCN neurons and fibroblasts. From these data, we extracted parameters such as damping rate and noise intensity using two simple mathematical models, one describing a damped oscillator driven by noise, and one describing a self-sustained noisy oscillator. Both models describe the data well and enabled us to quantitatively characterize both wild-type cells and several mutants. It has been suggested that the circadian clock is self-sustained at the single cell level, but we conclude that present data are not sufficient to determine whether the circadian clock of single SCN neurons and fibroblasts is a damped or a self-sustained oscillator. We show how to settle this question, however, by testing the models' predictions of different phases and amplitudes in response to a periodic entrainment signal (zeitgeber). PMID:19956762

  6. Optimal Implementations for Reliable Circadian Clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Yoshihiko; Arita, Masanori

    2014-09-01

    Circadian rhythms are acquired through evolution to increase the chances for survival through synchronizing with the daylight cycle. Reliable synchronization is realized through two trade-off properties: regularity to keep time precisely, and entrainability to synchronize the internal time with daylight. We find by using a phase model with multiple inputs that achieving the maximal limit of regularity and entrainability entails many inherent features of the circadian mechanism. At the molecular level, we demonstrate the role sharing of two light inputs, phase advance and delay, as is well observed in mammals. At the behavioral level, the optimal phase-response curve inevitably contains a dead zone, a time during which light pulses neither advance nor delay the clock. We reproduce the results of phase-controlling experiments entrained by two types of periodic light pulses. Our results indicate that circadian clocks are designed optimally for reliable clockwork through evolution.

  7. Developmental alcohol and circadian clock function.

    PubMed

    Earnest, D J; Chen, W J; West, J R

    2001-01-01

    Studies in rats found that alcohol exposure during the early postnatal period, particularly during the brain-growth-spurt period, can result in cell loss in various brain regions and persistent behavioral impairments. Some investigators have speculated that the body's internal clock, which is located in the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) in the brain, may also be affected by developmental alcohol exposure. For example, alcohol-induced damage to the SCN cells and their function could result in disturbances of the circadian timekeeping function, and these disturbances might contribute to the behavioral impairments and affective disorders observed in people prenatally exposed to alcohol. Preliminary findings of studies conducted in rats suggest that developmental alcohol exposure may indeed interfere with circadian clock function as evidenced by a shortened circadian sleep-wake cycle and changes in the release of certain brain chemicals (i.e., neuropeptides) by SCN cells. PMID:11584552

  8. Intact Interval Timing in Circadian CLOCK Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Cordes, Sara; Gallistel, C. R.

    2008-01-01

    While progress has been made in determining the molecular basis for the circadian clock, the mechanism by which mammalian brains time intervals measured in seconds to minutes remains a mystery. An obvious question is whether the interval timing mechanism shares molecular machinery with the circadian timing mechanism. In the current study, we trained circadian CLOCK +/− and −/− mutant male mice in a peak-interval procedure with 10 and 20-s criteria. The mutant mice were more active than their wild-type littermates, but there were no reliable deficits in the accuracy or precision of their timing as compared with wild-type littermates. This suggests that expression of the CLOCK protein is not necessary for normal interval timing. PMID:18602902

  9. Circadian clock: linking epigenetics to aging.

    PubMed

    Orozco-Solis, Ricardo; Sassone-Corsi, Paolo

    2014-06-01

    Circadian rhythms are generated by an intrinsic cellular mechanism that controls a large array of physiological and metabolic processes. There is erosion in the robustness of circadian rhythms during aging, and disruption of the clock by genetic ablation of specific genes is associated with aging-related features. Importantly, environmental conditions are thought to modulate the aging process. For example, caloric restriction is a very strong environmental effector capable of delaying aging. Intracellular pathways implicating nutrient sensors, such as SIRTs and mTOR complexes, impinge on cellular and epigenetic mechanisms that control the aging process. Strikingly, accumulating evidences indicate that these pathways are involved in both the modulation of the aging process and the control of the clock. Hence, innovative therapeutic strategies focused at controlling the circadian clock and the nutrient sensing pathways might beneficially influence the negative effects of aging. PMID:25033025

  10. Studying circadian rhythms in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Tataroglu, Ozgur; Emery, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Circadian rhythms have a profound influence on most bodily functions: from metabolism to complex behaviors. They ensure that all these biological processes are optimized with the time-of-day. They are generated by endogenous molecular oscillators that have a period that closely, but not exactly, matches day length. These molecular clocks are synchronized by environmental cycles such as light intensity and temperature. Drosophila melanogaster has been a model organism of choice to understand genetically, molecularly and at the level of neural circuits how circadian rhythms are generated, how they are synchronized by environmental cues, and how they drive behavioral cycles such as locomotor rhythms. This review will cover a wide range of techniques that have been instrumental to our understanding of Drosophila circadian rhythms, and that are essential for current and future research. PMID:24412370

  11. Genome-wide analyses of circadian systems.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Akhilesh B

    2013-01-01

    Circadian gene expression is a pervasive feature of tissue physiology, regulating approx. 10% of transcript and protein abundance in tissues such as the liver. Technological developments have accelerated our ability to probe circadian variation of gene expression, in particular by using microarrays. Recent advances in high-throughput sequencing have similarly led to novel insights into the regulation of genes at the DNA and chromatin levels. Furthermore, tools such as RNA interference are being used to perturb gene function at a truly systems level, allowing dissection of the clockwork in increasing depth. This chapter will highlight progress in these areas, focusing on key techniques that have helped, and will continue to help, with the investigation of circadian physiology.

  12. [Erythrocyte membrane abnormalities - hereditary elliptocytosis].

    PubMed

    Kvezereli-Kopadze, M; Kvezereli-Kopadze, A; Mtvarelidze, Z; Bubuteishvili, A

    2015-04-01

    This study was designed to investigate the 4 year old boy with Hereditary Elliptocitosis (HE). The diagnosis of this rare hemolytic anemia was based on detailed family history (positive in the 4-th generation), physical examination and Para-clinical data analyses. The vast majority of patients with HE are asymptomatic, severe forms are rare. The most important is examination of blood films, which is helpful to detect the morphology abnormalities of red cells. In case of HE a different approach is required. Positive family history and series of investigations should be conducted to determine the HE.

  13. Analysis of gene regulatory networks in the mammalian circadian rhythm.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jun; Wang, Haifang; Liu, Yuting; Shao, Chunxuan

    2008-10-01

    Circadian rhythm is fundamental in regulating a wide range of cellular, metabolic, physiological, and behavioral activities in mammals. Although a small number of key circadian genes have been identified through extensive molecular and genetic studies in the past, the existence of other key circadian genes and how they drive the genomewide circadian oscillation of gene expression in different tissues still remains unknown. Here we try to address these questions by integrating all available circadian microarray data in mammals. We identified 41 common circadian genes that showed circadian oscillation in a wide range of mouse tissues with a remarkable consistency of circadian phases across tissues. Comparisons across mouse, rat, rhesus macaque, and human showed that the circadian phases of known key circadian genes were delayed for 4-5 hours in rat compared to mouse and 8-12 hours in macaque and human compared to mouse. A systematic gene regulatory network for the mouse circadian rhythm was constructed after incorporating promoter analysis and transcription factor knockout or mutant microarray data. We observed the significant association of cis-regulatory elements: EBOX, DBOX, RRE, and HSE with the different phases of circadian oscillating genes. The analysis of the network structure revealed the paths through which light, food, and heat can entrain the circadian clock and identified that NR3C1 and FKBP/HSP90 complexes are central to the control of circadian genes through diverse environmental signals. Our study improves our understanding of the structure, design principle, and evolution of gene regulatory networks involved in the mammalian circadian rhythm.

  14. Circadian rhythms in the green sunfish retina

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    We investigated the occurrence of circadian rhythms in retinomotor movements and retinal sensitivity in the green sunfish, Lepomis cyanellus. When green sunfish were kept in constant darkness, cone photoreceptors exhibited circadian retinomotor movements; rod photoreceptors and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) pigment granules did not. Cones elongated during subjective night and contracted during subjective day. These results corroborate those of Burnside and Ackland (1984. Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science. 25:539-545). Electroretinograms (ERGs) recorded in constant darkness in response to dim flashes (lambda = 640 nm) exhibited a greater amplitude during subjective night than during subjective day. The nighttime increase in the ERG amplitude corresponded to a 3-10-fold increase in retinal sensitivity. The rhythmic changes in the ERG amplitude continued in constant darkness with a period of approximately 24 h, which indicates that the rhythm is generated by a circadian oscillator. The spectral sensitivity of the ERG recorded in constant darkness suggests that cones contribute to retinal responses during both day and night. Thus, the elongation of cone myoids during the night does not abolish the response of the cones. To examine the role of retinal efferents in generating retinal circadian rhythms, we cut the optic nerve. This procedure did not abolish the rhythms of retinomotor movement or of the ERG amplitude, but it did reduce the magnitude of the nighttime phases of both rhythms. Our results suggest that more than one endogenous oscillator regulates the retinal circadian rhythms in green sunfish. Circadian signals controlling the rhythms may be either generated within the eye or transferred to the eye via a humoral pathway. PMID:3598559

  15. Effect of Spectral Transmittance through Red-Tinted Rodent Cages on Circadian Metabolism and Physiology in Nude Rats

    PubMed Central

    Dauchy, Robert T; Wren, Melissa A; Dauchy, Erin M; Hanifin, John P; Jablonski, Michael R; Warfield, Benjamin; Brainard, George C; Hill, Steven M; Mao, Lulu; Dupepe, Lynell M; Ooms, Tara G; Blask, David E

    2013-01-01

    Light entrains normal circadian rhythms of physiology and metabolism in all mammals. Previous studies from our laboratory demonstrated that spectral transmittance (color) of light passing through cages affects these responses in rats. Here, we addressed the hypothesis that red tint alters the circadian nocturnal melatonin signal and circadian oscillation of other metabolic and physiologic functions. Female nude rats (Hsd:RH-Foxn1rnu; n = 12 per group) were maintained on a 12:12-h light (300 lx; 123.0 μW/cm2; lights on 0600):dark regimen in standard polycarbonate translucent clear or red-tinted cages. After 1 wk, rats underwent 6 low-volume blood draws via cardiocentesis over a 4-wk period. Plasma melatonin levels were low during the light phase (1.0 ± 0.2 pg/mL) in rats in both types of cages but were significantly lower in red-tinted (105.0 ± 2.4 pg/mL) compared with clear (154.8 ± 3.8 pg/mL) cages during the dark. Normal circadian rhythm of plasma total fatty acid was identical between groups. Although phase relationships of circadian rhythms in glucose, lactic acid, pO2, and pCO2 were identical between groups, the levels of these analytes were lower in rats in red-tinted compared with clear cages. Circadian rhythms of plasma corticosterone, insulin, and leptin were altered in terms of phasing, amplitude, and duration in rats in red-tinted compared with clear cages. These findings indicate that spectral transmittance through red-colored cages significantly affects circadian regulation of neuroendocrine, metabolic, and physiologic parameters, potentially influencing both laboratory animal health and wellbeing and scientific outcomes. PMID:24351763

  16. Tooth - abnormal shape

    MedlinePlus

    Hutchinson incisors; Abnormal tooth shape; Peg teeth; Mulberry teeth; Conical teeth ... The appearance of normal teeth varies, especially the molars. ... conditions. Specific diseases can affect tooth shape, tooth ...

  17. Plant circadian clocks increase photosynthesis, growth, survival, and competitive advantage.

    PubMed

    Dodd, Antony N; Salathia, Neeraj; Hall, Anthony; Kévei, Eva; Tóth, Réka; Nagy, Ferenc; Hibberd, Julian M; Millar, Andrew J; Webb, Alex A R

    2005-07-22

    Circadian clocks are believed to confer an advantage to plants, but the nature of that advantage has been unknown. We show that a substantial photosynthetic advantage is conferred by correct matching of the circadian clock period with that of the external light-dark cycle. In wild type and in long- and short-circadian period mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana, plants with a clock period matched to the environment contain more chlorophyll, fix more carbon, grow faster, and survive better than plants with circadian periods differing from their environment. This explains why plants gain advantage from circadian control.

  18. Circadian oscillations of cytosolic and chloroplastic free calcium in plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, C. H.; Knight, M. R.; Kondo, T.; Masson, P.; Sedbrook, J.; Haley, A.; Trewavas, A.

    1995-01-01

    Tobacco and Arabidopsis plants, expressing a transgene for the calcium-sensitive luminescent protein apoaequorin, revealed circadian oscillations in free cytosolic calcium that can be phase-shifted by light-dark signals. When apoaequorin was targeted to the chloroplast, circadian chloroplast calcium rhythms were likewise observed after transfer of the seedlings to constant darkness. Circadian oscillations in free calcium concentrations can be expected to control many calcium-dependent enzymes and processes accounting for circadian outputs. Regulation of calcium flux is therefore fundamental to the organization of circadian systems.

  19. High-resolution measurement of circadian periodicities in Acetabularia.

    PubMed

    von Lindern, L; Berger, S; Mergenhagen, D

    1994-02-01

    Well-expressed endogenous circadian rhythms in Acetabularia acetabulum were spectrally analyzed and recorded in time-period distributions. The stability of the circadian periods under constant conditions and their changes could be monitored continually in step sizes close to the circadian period length. The resolution of period estimates of the circadian component was increased by a factor of approximately 4-10 by adapting analyzed interval lengths to full period sizes of the corresponding main component. Methodological aspects of the applied algorithms are discussed by means of examples that measure the temperature dependency of the circadian period.

  20. Mechanisms of circadian rhythmicity of carbon tetrachloride hepatotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Bruckner, James V; Ramanathan, Raghupathy; Lee, K Monica; Muralidhara, Srinivasa

    2002-01-01

    The toxicity of carbon tetrachloride (CCl(4)) and certain other chemicals varies over a 24-h period. Because the metabolism of some drugs follows a diurnal rhythm, it was decided to investigate whether the hepatic metabolic activation of CCl(4) was rhythmic and coincided in time with maximum susceptibility to CCl(4) hepatotoxicity. A related objective was to test the hypothesis that abstinence from food during the sleep cycle results in lipolysis and formation of acetone, which participates in induction of liver microsomal cytochrome P450IIE1 (CYP2E1), resulting in a diurnal increase in CCl(4) metabolic activation and acute liver injury. Groups of fed and fasted male Sprague-Dawley rats were given a single oral dose of 800 mg of CCl(4)/kg at 2- to 4-h intervals over a 24-h period. Serum enzyme activities, measured 24 h post dosing as indices of acute liver injury, exhibited distinct maxima in both fed and fasted animals dosed with CCl(4) near the beginning of their dark/active cycle. Blood acetone, hepatic CYP2E1 activity, and covalent binding of (14)CCl(4)/metabolites to hepatic microsomal proteins in untreated rats fed ad libitum followed circadian rhythms similar to that of susceptibility to CCl(4). Parallel fluctuations of greater amplitude were seen in rats fasted for 24 h. Hepatic glutathione levels were lowest at the time of greatest susceptibility to CCl(4). Acetone dose-response experiments showed high correlations between blood acetone levels, CYP2E1 induction, and CCl(4)-induced liver injury. Pretreatment with diallyl sulfide suppressed CYP2E1 and abolished the circadian rhythmicity of susceptibility to CCl(4). These findings provide additional support for acetone's physiological role in CYP2E1 induction and for CYP2E1's role in modulating CCl(4) chronotoxicity in rats. PMID:11752126

  1. The Pentose Phosphate Pathway Regulates the Circadian Clock.

    PubMed

    Rey, Guillaume; Valekunja, Utham K; Feeney, Kevin A; Wulund, Lisa; Milev, Nikolay B; Stangherlin, Alessandra; Ansel-Bollepalli, Laura; Velagapudi, Vidya; O'Neill, John S; Reddy, Akhilesh B

    2016-09-13

    The circadian clock is a ubiquitous timekeeping system that organizes the behavior and physiology of organisms over the day and night. Current models rely on transcriptional networks that coordinate circadian gene expression of thousands of transcripts. However, recent studies have uncovered phylogenetically conserved redox rhythms that can occur independently of transcriptional cycles. Here we identify the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP), a critical source of the redox cofactor NADPH, as an important regulator of redox and transcriptional oscillations. Our results show that genetic and pharmacological inhibition of the PPP prolongs the period of circadian rhythms in human cells, mouse tissues, and fruit flies. These metabolic manipulations also cause a remodeling of circadian gene expression programs that involves the circadian transcription factors BMAL1 and CLOCK, and the redox-sensitive transcription factor NRF2. Thus, the PPP regulates circadian rhythms via NADPH metabolism, suggesting a pivotal role for NADPH availability in circadian timekeeping.

  2. Melatonin is required for the circadian regulation of sleep.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Avni V; Mosser, Eric A; Oikonomou, Grigorios; Prober, David A

    2015-03-18

    Sleep is an evolutionarily conserved behavioral state whose regulation is poorly understood. A classical model posits that sleep is regulated by homeostatic and circadian mechanisms. Several factors have been implicated in mediating the homeostatic regulation of sleep, but molecules underlying the circadian mechanism are unknown. Here we use animals lacking melatonin due to mutation of arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase 2 (aanat2) to show that melatonin is required for circadian regulation of sleep in zebrafish. Sleep is dramatically reduced at night in aanat2 mutants maintained in light/dark conditions, and the circadian regulation of sleep is abolished in free-running conditions. We find that melatonin promotes sleep downstream of the circadian clock as it is not required to initiate or maintain circadian rhythms. Additionally, we provide evidence that melatonin may induce sleep in part by promoting adenosine signaling, thus potentially linking circadian and homeostatic control of sleep.

  3. Melatonin is required for the circadian regulation of sleep

    PubMed Central

    Gandhi, Avni V.; Mosser, Eric; Oikonomou, Grigorios; Prober, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Sleep is an evolutionarily conserved behavioral state whose regulation is poorly understood. A classical model posits that sleep is regulated by homeostatic and circadian mechanisms. Several factors have been implicated in mediating the homeostatic regulation of sleep, but molecules underlying the circadian mechanism are unknown. Here we use animals lacking melatonin due to mutation of arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase 2 (aanat2) to show that melatonin is required for circadian regulation of sleep in zebrafish. Sleep is dramatically reduced at night in aanat2 mutants maintained in light/dark conditions, and the circadian regulation of sleep is abolished in free-running conditions. We find that melatonin promotes sleep downstream of the circadian clock as it is not required to initiate or maintain circadian rhythms. Additionally, we provide evidence that melatonin may induce sleep in part by promoting adenosine signaling, thus potentially linking circadian and homeostatic control of sleep. PMID:25754820

  4. Circadian and Circalunar Clock Interactions in a Marine Annelid

    PubMed Central

    Zantke, Juliane; Ishikawa-Fujiwara, Tomoko; Arboleda, Enrique; Lohs, Claudia; Schipany, Katharina; Hallay, Natalia; Straw, Andrew D.; Todo, Takeshi; Tessmar-Raible, Kristin

    2013-01-01

    Summary Life is controlled by multiple rhythms. Although the interaction of the daily (circadian) clock with environmental stimuli, such as light, is well documented, its relationship to endogenous clocks with other periods is little understood. We establish that the marine worm Platynereis dumerilii possesses endogenous circadian and circalunar (monthly) clocks and characterize their interactions. The RNAs of likely core circadian oscillator genes localize to a distinct nucleus of the worm’s forebrain. The worm’s forebrain also harbors a circalunar clock entrained by nocturnal light. This monthly clock regulates maturation and persists even when circadian clock oscillations are disrupted by the inhibition of casein kinase 1δ/ε. Both circadian and circalunar clocks converge on the regulation of transcript levels. Furthermore, the circalunar clock changes the period and power of circadian behavior, although the period length of the daily transcriptional oscillations remains unaltered. We conclude that a second endogenous noncircadian clock can influence circadian clock function. PMID:24075994

  5. The pervasiveness and plasticity of circadian oscillations: the coupled circadian-oscillators framework

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Vishal R.; Ceglia, Nicholas; Zeller, Michael; Eckel-Mahan, Kristin; Sassone-Corsi, Paolo; Baldi, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Motivation: Circadian oscillations have been observed in animals, plants, fungi and cyanobacteria and play a fundamental role in coordinating the homeostasis and behavior of biological systems. Genetically encoded molecular clocks found in nearly every cell, based on negative transcription/translation feedback loops and involving only a dozen genes, play a central role in maintaining these oscillations. However, high-throughput gene expression experiments reveal that in a typical tissue, a much larger fraction (∼10%) of all transcripts oscillate with the day–night cycle and the oscillating species vary with tissue type suggesting that perhaps a much larger fraction of all transcripts, and perhaps also other molecular species, may bear the potential for circadian oscillations. Results: To better quantify the pervasiveness and plasticity of circadian oscillations, we conduct the first large-scale analysis aggregating the results of 18 circadian transcriptomic studies and 10 circadian metabolomic studies conducted in mice using different tissues and under different conditions. We find that over half of protein coding genes in the cell can produce transcripts that are circadian in at least one set of conditions and similarly for measured metabolites. Genetic or environmental perturbations can disrupt existing oscillations by changing their amplitudes and phases, suppressing them or giving rise to novel circadian oscillations. The oscillating species and their oscillations provide a characteristic signature of the physiological state of the corresponding cell/tissue. Molecular networks comprise many oscillator loops that have been sculpted by evolution over two trillion day–night cycles to have intrinsic circadian frequency. These oscillating loops are coupled by shared nodes in a large network of coupled circadian oscillators where the clock genes form a major hub. Cells can program and re-program their circadian repertoire through epigenetic and other mechanisms

  6. Protracted cocaine withdrawal produces circadian rhythmic alterations of phosphorylated GSK-3β in reward-related brain areas in rats.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yi-ming; Li, Su-xia; Shi, Hai-shui; Ding, Zeng-bo; Luo, Yi-xiao; Xue, Yan-xue; Lu, Lin; Yu, Chang-xi

    2011-03-17

    Protracted cocaine withdrawal can extend for months and contribute to cocaine seeking and relapse. However, no previous studies have reported the manifestation of protracted withdrawal from chronic cocaine in rats. Glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK-3β) can phosphorylate PER2, CRY2, Rev-erbα, and BMAL1 in mammals. The circadian rhythmic expression of GSK-3β in reward-related brain areas is unclear. We examined rodent behaviors and circadian disturbances of GSK-3β expression during 30 days of protracted cocaine withdrawal. The behavioral tests included open field, elevated plus maze, weight gain, and sucrose preference tests performed 3, 10, and 30 days after stopping cocaine. At these three assessment points, we collected brain samples every 4h for 24h to examine the circadian rhythmic expression of GSK-3β. Decreased locomotor activity, weight loss, decreased sucrose consumption on day 3, and increased time spent in the open arms of the elevated plus maze on day 10 after cocaine administration were found. Blunted circadian rhythms of phosphorylated GFK-3β (pGSK-3β) persisted for at least 30 days in all examined brain areas, with the exception of 10 days in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) and nucleus accumbens (NAc). The expression of pGSK-3β decreased in the SCN and increased in the NAc and ventral tegmental area persisted for at least 30 days, whereas in the prefrontal cortex decreased during withdrawal for 10 days but then reversed to abnormally high levels with protracted withdrawal. These long-lasting changes disrupted circadian rhythms and produced abnormal levels of phosphorylated GSK-3β protein in reward-related brain circuits, which may play a role in protracted cocaine withdrawal and contribute to relapse.

  7. Manipulating the Cellular Circadian Period of Arginine Vasopressin Neurons Alters the Behavioral Circadian Period.

    PubMed

    Mieda, Michihiro; Okamoto, Hitoshi; Sakurai, Takeshi

    2016-09-26

    As the central pacemaker in mammals, the circadian clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus is a heterogeneous structure consisting of multiple types of GABAergic neurons with distinct chemical identities [1, 2]. Although individual cells have a cellular clock driven by autoregulatory transcriptional/translational feedback loops of clock genes, interneuronal communication among SCN clock neurons is likely essential for the SCN to generate a highly robust, coherent circadian rhythm [1]. However, neuronal mechanisms that determine circadian period length remain unclear. The SCN is composed of two subdivisions: a ventral core region containing vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP)-producing neurons and a dorsal shell region characterized by arginine vasopressin (AVP)-producing neurons. Here we examined whether AVP neurons act as pacemaker cells that regulate the circadian period of behavior rhythm in mice. The deletion of casein kinase 1 delta (CK1δ) specific to AVP neurons, which was expected to lengthen the period of cellular clocks [3-6], lengthened the free-running period of circadian behavior as well. Conversely, the overexpression of CK1δ specific to SCN AVP neurons shortened the free-running period. PER2::LUC imaging in slices confirmed that cellular circadian periods of the SCN shell were lengthened in mice without CK1δ in AVP neurons. Thus, AVP neurons may be an essential component of circadian pacemaker cells in the SCN. Remarkably, the alteration of the shell-core phase relationship in the SCN of these mice did not impair the generation per se of circadian behavior rhythm, thereby underscoring the robustness of the SCN network. PMID:27568590

  8. Role of Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor in Circadian Clock Disruption and Metabolic Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Jaeger, Cassie; Tischkau, Shelley A

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of metabolic syndrome, a clustering of three or more risk factors that include abdominal obesity, increased blood pressure, and high levels of glucose, triglycerides, and high-density lipoproteins, has reached dangerous and costly levels worldwide. Increases in morbidity and mortality result from a combination of factors that promote altered glucose metabolism, insulin resistance, and metabolic dysfunction. Although diet and exercise are commonly touted as important determinants in the development of metabolic dysfunction, other environmental factors, including circadian clock disruption and activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) by dietary or other environmental sources, must also be considered. AhR binds a range of ligands, which prompts protein-protein interactions with other Per-Arnt-Sim (PAS)-domain-containing proteins and subsequent transcriptional activity. This review focuses on the reciprocal crosstalk between the activated AhR and the molecular circadian clock. AhR exhibits a rhythmic expression and time-dependent sensitivity to activation by AhR agonists. Conversely, AhR activation influences the amplitude and phase of expression of circadian clock genes, hormones, and the behavioral responses of the clock system to changes in environmental illumination. Both the clock and AhR status and activation play significant and underappreciated roles in metabolic homeostasis. This review highlights the state of knowledge regarding how AhR may act together with the circadian clock to influence energy metabolism. Understanding the variety of AhR-dependent mechanisms, including its interactions with the circadian timing system that promote metabolic dysfunction, reveals new targets of interest for maintenance of healthy metabolism. PMID:27559298

  9. Role of Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor in Circadian Clock Disruption and Metabolic Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Jaeger, Cassie; Tischkau, Shelley A.

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of metabolic syndrome, a clustering of three or more risk factors that include abdominal obesity, increased blood pressure, and high levels of glucose, triglycerides, and high-density lipoproteins, has reached dangerous and costly levels worldwide. Increases in morbidity and mortality result from a combination of factors that promote altered glucose metabolism, insulin resistance, and metabolic dysfunction. Although diet and exercise are commonly touted as important determinants in the development of metabolic dysfunction, other environmental factors, including circadian clock disruption and activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) by dietary or other environmental sources, must also be considered. AhR binds a range of ligands, which prompts protein–protein interactions with other Per-Arnt-Sim (PAS)-domain-containing proteins and subsequent transcriptional activity. This review focuses on the reciprocal crosstalk between the activated AhR and the molecular circadian clock. AhR exhibits a rhythmic expression and time-dependent sensitivity to activation by AhR agonists. Conversely, AhR activation influences the amplitude and phase of expression of circadian clock genes, hormones, and the behavioral responses of the clock system to changes in environmental illumination. Both the clock and AhR status and activation play significant and underappreciated roles in metabolic homeostasis. This review highlights the state of knowledge regarding how AhR may act together with the circadian clock to influence energy metabolism. Understanding the variety of AhR-dependent mechanisms, including its interactions with the circadian timing system that promote metabolic dysfunction, reveals new targets of interest for maintenance of healthy metabolism. PMID:27559298

  10. Melatonin administration modifies circadian motor activity under constant light depending on the lighting conditions during suckling.

    PubMed

    Carpentieri, Agata R; Oliva, Clara; Díez-Noguera, Antoni; Cambras, Trinitat

    2015-01-01

    Early lighting conditions have been described to produce long-term effects on circadian behavior, which may also influence the response to agents acting on the circadian system. It has been suggested that melatonin (MEL) may act on the circadian pacemaker and as a scavenger of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. Here, we studied the oxidative and behavioral changes caused by prolonged exposure to constant light (LL) in groups of rats that differed in MEL administration and in lighting conditions during suckling. The rats were exposed to either a light-dark cycle (LD) or LL. At 40 days old, rats were treated for 2 weeks with a daily subcutaneous injection of MEL (10 mg/kg body weight) or a vehicle at activity onset. Blood samples were taken before and after treatment, to determine catalase (CAT) activity and nitrite level in plasma. As expected, LL-reared rats showed a more stable motor activity circadian rhythm than LD rats. MEL treatment produced more reactivity in LD- than in LL rats, and was also able to alter the phase of the rhythm in LD rats. There were no significant differences in nitrite levels or CAT activity between the groups, although both variables increased with time. Finally, we also tested depressive signs by means of sucrose consumption, and anhedonia was found in LD males treated with MEL. The results suggest that the lighting conditions in early infancy are important for the long-term functionality of the circadian system, including rhythm manifestation, responses to MEL and mood alterations.

  11. Structurally abnormal human autosomes

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 25, discusses structurally abnormal human autosomes. This discussion includes: structurally abnormal chromosomes, chromosomal polymorphisms, pericentric inversions, paracentric inversions, deletions or partial monosomies, cri du chat (cat cry) syndrome, ring chromosomes, insertions, duplication or pure partial trisomy and mosaicism. 71 refs., 8 figs.

  12. Morphological abnormalities among lampreys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Manion, Patrick J.

    1967-01-01

    The experimental control of the sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) in the Great Lakes has required the collection of thousands of lampreys. Representatives of each life stage of the four species of the Lake Superior basin were examined for structural abnormalities. The most common aberration was the presence of additional tails. The accessory tails were always postanal and smaller than the normal tail. The point of origin varied; the extra tails occurred on dorsal, ventral, or lateral surfaces. Some of the extra tails were misshaped and curled, but others were normal in shape and pigment pattern. Other abnormalities in larval sea lampreys were malformed or twisted tails and bodies. The cause of the structural abnormalities is unknown. The presence of extra caudal fins could be genetically controlled, or be due to partial amputation or injury followed by abnormal regeneration. Few if any lampreys with structural abnormalities live to sexual maturity.

  13. Circadian Rhythm Disruption in Cancer Biology

    PubMed Central

    Savvidis, Christos; Koutsilieris, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Circadian rhythms show universally a 24-h oscillation pattern in metabolic, physiological and behavioral functions of almost all species. This pattern is due to a fundamental adaptation to the rotation of Earth around its own axis. Molecular mechanisms of generation of circadian rhythms organize a biochemical network in suprachiasmatic nucleus and peripheral tissues, building cell autonomous clock pacemakers. Rhythmicity is observed in transcriptional expression of a wide range of clock-controlled genes that regulate a variety of normal cell functions, such as cell division and proliferation. Desynchrony of this rhythmicity seems to be implicated in several pathologic conditions, including tumorigenesis and progression of cancer. In 2007, the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) categorized “shiftwork that involves circadian disruption [as] probably carcinogenic to humans” (Group 2A in the IARC classification system of carcinogenic potency of an agentagent) (Painting, Firefighting, and Shiftwork; IARC; 2007). This review discusses the potential relation between disruptions of normal circadian rhythms with genetic driving machinery of cancer. Elucidation of the role of clockwork disruption, such as exposure to light at night and sleep disruption, in cancer biology could be important in developing new targeted anticancer therapies, optimizing individualized chronotherapy and modifying lighting environment in workplaces or homes. PMID:22811066

  14. Procedures for numerical analysis of circadian rhythms

    PubMed Central

    REFINETTI, ROBERTO; LISSEN, GERMAINE CORNÉ; HALBERG, FRANZ

    2010-01-01

    This article reviews various procedures used in the analysis of circadian rhythms at the populational, organismal, cellular and molecular levels. The procedures range from visual inspection of time plots and actograms to several mathematical methods of time series analysis. Computational steps are described in some detail, and additional bibliographic resources and computer programs are listed. PMID:23710111

  15. Circadian variation of brain histamine in goldfish.

    PubMed

    Burns, Tiffany A; Huston, Joseph P; Spieler, Richard E

    2003-01-15

    Teleosts may make an excellent model to study brain histamine function. Fishes are phylogenetically closer to the basic vertebrate blueprint than higher vertebrates. They appear to have a simpler histaminergic system in terms of central nervous system distribution and, contrary to higher vertebrates, brain histamine appears to be strictly neuronal. In this preliminary study, we examined circadian variation of brain histamine in goldfish, Carassius auratus, as this neurotransmitter correlates with circadian behavior of some mammals. Two groups of juvenile goldfish were held in 24 60L aquaria, six fish per aquarium, on reversed photoperiods; L:D 12:12 with light onset either at 0700 or 1900h. Fish were sampled every 4h. At a sampling time, all the fish in a tank were taken; each sampling, for both groups, was done in replicate. Brain histamine was determined by immunoassay. There was a significant circadian variation in histamine on both photoperiod regimes with the highest levels during the photophase. These results support the hypothesis of an early phylogenic role for histamine in vertebrate circadian physiology.

  16. Molecular Regulation of Circadian Rhythms by Polyamines.

    PubMed

    Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Pietrocola, Federico; Kroemer, Guido

    2015-11-01

    In this issue of Cell Metabolism, Zwighaft and colleagues (Zwighaft et al., 2015) describe a novel mechanism through which intracellular polyamines regulate circadian rhythms. These findings are significant, as they add yet another layer of complexity to the interplay between environmental, dietary, and organismal factors in the molecular control of daily behavioral oscillations.

  17. Temperature compensation and entrainment in circadian rhythms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodenstein, C.; Heiland, I.; Schuster, S.

    2012-06-01

    To anticipate daily variations in the environment and coordinate biological activities into a daily cycle many organisms possess a circadian clock. In the absence of external time cues the circadian rhythm persists with a period of approximately 24 h. The clock phase can be shifted by single pulses of light, darkness, chemicals, or temperature and this allows entrainment of the clock to exactly 24 h by cycles of these zeitgebers. On the other hand, the period of the circadian rhythm is kept relatively constant within a physiological range of constant temperatures, which means that the oscillator is temperature compensated. The mechanisms behind temperature compensation and temperature entrainment are not fully understood, neither biochemically nor mathematically. Here, we theoretically investigate the interplay of temperature compensation and entrainment in general oscillatory systems. We first give an analytical treatment for small temperature shifts and derive that every temperature-compensated oscillator is entrainable to external small-amplitude temperature cycles. Temperature compensation ensures that this entrainment region is always centered at the endogenous period regardless of possible seasonal temperature differences. Moreover, for small temperature cycles the entrainment region of the oscillator is potentially larger for rectangular pulses. For large temperature shifts we numerically analyze different circadian clock models proposed in the literature with respect to these properties. We observe that for such large temperature shifts sinusoidal or gradual temperature cycles allow a larger entrainment region than rectangular cycles.

  18. Circadian Typology and Style of Thinking Differences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fabbri, Marco; Antonietti, Alessandro; Giorgetti, Marisa; Tonetti, Lorenzo; Natale, Vincenzo

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of the present study aims to investigate the relationship between circadian typology and learning-thinking styles conceptualised as a preference toward information processing typical of the right vs. the left cerebral hemisphere. A sample of 1254 undergraduates (380 boys and 874 girls; mean age=21.86+/-2.37,) was administered the…

  19. Circadian Metabolism in the Light of Evolution

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Circadian rhythm, or daily oscillation, of behaviors and biological processes is a fundamental feature of mammalian physiology that has developed over hundreds of thousands of years under the continuous evolutionary pressure of energy conservation and efficiency. Evolution has fine-tuned the body's clock to anticipate and respond to numerous environmental cues in order to maintain homeostatic balance and promote survival. However, we now live in a society in which these classic circadian entrainment stimuli have been dramatically altered from the conditions under which the clock machinery was originally set. A bombardment of artificial lighting, heating, and cooling systems that maintain constant ambient temperature; sedentary lifestyle; and the availability of inexpensive, high-calorie foods has threatened even the most powerful and ancient circadian programming mechanisms. Such environmental changes have contributed to the recent staggering elevation in lifestyle-influenced pathologies, including cancer, cardiovascular disease, depression, obesity, and diabetes. This review scrutinizes the role of the body's internal clocks in the hard-wiring of circadian networks that have evolved to achieve energetic balance and adaptability, and it discusses potential therapeutic strategies to reset clock metabolic control to modern time for the benefit of human health. PMID:25927923

  20. The Neurospora circadian clock: simple or complex?

    PubMed Central

    Bell-Pedersen, D; Crosthwaite, S K; Lakin-Thomas, P L; Merrow, M; Økland, M

    2001-01-01

    The fungus Neurospora crassa is being used by a number of research groups as a model organism to investigate circadian (daily) rhythmicity. In this review we concentrate on recent work relating to the complexity of the circadian system in this organism. We discuss: the advantages of Neurospora as a model system for clock studies; the frequency (frq), white collar-1 and white collar-2 genes and their roles in rhythmicity; the phenomenon of rhythmicity in null frq mutants and its implications for clock mechanisms; the study of output pathways using clock-controlled genes; other rhythms in fungi; mathematical modelling of the Neurospora circadian system; and the application of new technologies to the study of Neurospora rhythmicity. We conclude that there may be many gene products involved in the clock mechanism, there may be multiple interacting oscillators comprising the clock mechanism, there may be feedback from output pathways onto the oscillator(s) and from the oscillator(s) onto input pathways, and there may be several independent clocks coexisting in one organism. Thus even a relatively simple lower eukaryote can be used to address questions about a complex, networked circadian system. PMID:11710976

  1. Circadian biology: rhythms leave their imprint.

    PubMed

    Ray, David W

    2015-03-01

    A recent study has revealed that loss of neuronal expression of the paternally imprinted gene Ube3a in Angelman syndrome results in selective neuronal loss of robust circadian oscillations, with a resulting behavioural phenotype, and adipose tissue accumulation. PMID:25734270

  2. Circadian rhythms in liver metabolism and disease.

    PubMed

    Ferrell, Jessica M; Chiang, John Y L

    2015-03-01

    Mounting research evidence demonstrates a significant negative impact of circadian disruption on human health. Shift work, chronic jet lag and sleep disturbances are associated with increased incidence of metabolic syndrome, and consequently result in obesity, type 2 diabetes and dyslipidemia. Here, these associations are reviewed with respect to liver metabolism and disease.

  3. Circadian rhythms in handwriting kinematics and legibility.

    PubMed

    Jasper, Isabelle; Gordijn, Marijke; Häussler, Andreas; Hermsdörfer, Joachim

    2011-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to analyze the circadian rhythmicity in handwriting kinematics and legibility and to compare the performance between Dutch and German writers. Two subject groups underwent a 40 h sleep deprivation protocol under Constant Routine conditions either in Groningen (10 Dutch subjects) or in Berlin (9 German subjects). Both groups wrote every 3h a test sentence of similar structure in their native language. Kinematic handwriting performance was assessed with a digitizing tablet and evaluated by writing speed, writing fluency, and script size. Writing speed (frequency of strokes and average velocity) revealed a clear circadian rhythm, with a parallel decline during night and a minimum around 3:00 h in the morning for both groups. Script size and movement fluency did not vary with time of day in neither group. Legibility of handwriting was evaluated by intra-individually ranking handwriting specimens of the 13 sessions by 10 German and 10 Dutch raters. Whereas legibility ratings of the German handwriting specimens deteriorated during night in parallel with slower writing speed, legibility of the Dutch handwriting deteriorated not until the next morning. In conclusion, the circadian rhythm of handwriting kinematics seems to be independent of script language at least among the two tested western countries. Moreover, handwriting legibility is also subject to a circadian rhythm which, however, seems to be influenced by variations in the assessment protocol.

  4. Circadian rhythms in liver metabolism and disease.

    PubMed

    Ferrell, Jessica M; Chiang, John Y L

    2015-03-01

    Mounting research evidence demonstrates a significant negative impact of circadian disruption on human health. Shift work, chronic jet lag and sleep disturbances are associated with increased incidence of metabolic syndrome, and consequently result in obesity, type 2 diabetes and dyslipidemia. Here, these associations are reviewed with respect to liver metabolism and disease. PMID:26579436

  5. A Role for Id2 in Regulating Photic Entrainment of the Mammalian Circadian System

    PubMed Central

    Duffield, Giles E.; Watson, Nathan P.; Mantani, Akio; Peirson, Stuart N.; Robles-Murguia, Maricela; Loros, Jennifer J.; Israel, Mark A.; Dunlap, Jay C.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Inhibitor of DNA binding genes (Id1–Id4) encode helix-loop-helix (HLH) transcriptional repressors associated with development and tumorigenesis [1, 2], but little is known concerning the function(s) of these genes in normal adult animals. Id2 was identified in DNA microarray screens for rhythmically expressed genes [3–5], and further analysis revealed a circadian pattern of expression of all four Id genes in multiple tissues including the suprachiasmatic nucleus. To explore an in vivo function, we generated and characterized deletion mutations of Id2 and of Id4. Id2−/− mice exhibit abnormally rapid entrainment and an increase in the magnitude of the phase shift of the pacemaker. A significant proportion of mice also exhibit disrupted rhythms when maintained under constant darkness. Conversely, Id4−/− mice did not exhibit a noticeable circadian phenotype. In vitro studies using an mPer1 and an AVP promoter reporter revealed the potential for ID1, ID2, and ID3 proteins to interact with the canonical basic HLH clock proteins BMAL1 and CLOCK. These data suggest that the Id genes may be important for entrainment and operation of the mammalian circadian system, potentially acting through BMAL1 and CLOCK targets. PMID:19217292

  6. Apoptosis regulates ipRGC spacing necessary for rods and cones to drive circadian photoentrainment

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shih-Kuo; Chew, Kylie S.; McNeill, David S.; Keeley, Patrick W.; Ecker, Jennifer L.; Mao, Buqing Q.; Pahlberg, Johan; Kim, Bright; Lee, Sammy C. S.; Fox, Michael; Guido, William; Wong, Kwoon Y.; Sampath, Alapakkam P.; Reese, Benjamin E.; Kuruvilla, Rejji; Hattar, Samer

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY The retina consists of ordered arrays of individual types of neurons for processing vision. Here we show that such order is necessary for intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs) to function as irradiance detectors. We found that during development, ipRGCs undergo proximity-dependent Bax-mediated apoptosis. Bax mutant mice exhibit disrupted ipRGC spacing and dendritic stratification with an increase in abnormally localized synapses. ipRGCs are the sole conduit for light input to circadian photoentrainment, and either their melanopsin-based photosensitivity or ability to relay rod-cone input is sufficient for circadian photoentrainment. Remarkably, the disrupted ipRGC spacing does not affect melanopsin-based circadian photoentrainment, but severely impairs rod/cone-driven photoentrainment. We demonstrate reduced rod-cone driven cFos activation and electrophysiological responses in ipRGCs, suggesting that impaired synaptic input to ipRGCs underlies the photoentrainment deficits. Thus, for irradiance detection, developmental apoptosis is necessary for the spacing and connectivity of ipRGCs that underlie their functioning within a neural network. PMID:23395376

  7. Circadian rhythms, sleep, and performance in space.

    PubMed

    Mallis, M M; DeRoshia, C W

    2005-06-01

    Maintaining optimal alertness and neurobehavioral functioning during space operations is critical to enable the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) vision "to extend humanity's reach to the Moon, Mars and beyond" to become a reality. Field data have demonstrated that sleep times and performance of crewmembers can be compromised by extended duty days, irregular work schedules, high workload, and varying environmental factors. This paper documents evidence of significant sleep loss and disruption of circadian rhythms in astronauts and associated performance decrements during several space missions, which demonstrates the need to develop effective countermeasures. Both sleep and circadian disruptions have been identified in the Behavioral Health and Performance (BH&P) area and the Advanced Human Support Technology (AHST) area of NASA's Bioastronautics Critical Path Roadmap. Such disruptions could have serious consequences on the effectiveness, health, and safety of astronaut crews, thus reducing the safety margin and increasing the chances of an accident or incident. These decrements oftentimes can be difficult to detect and counter effectively in restrictive operational environments. NASA is focusing research on the development of optimal sleep/wake schedules and countermeasure timing and application to help mitigate the cumulative effects of sleep and circadian disruption and enhance operational performance. Investing research in humans is one of NASA's building blocks that will allow for both short- and long-duration space missions and help NASA in developing approaches to manage and overcome the human limitations of space travel. In addition to reviewing the current state of knowledge concerning sleep and circadian disruptions during space operations, this paper provides an overview of NASA's broad research goals. Also, NASA-funded research, designed to evaluate the relationships between sleep quality, circadian rhythm stability, and

  8. Light and the human circadian clock.

    PubMed

    Roenneberg, Till; Kantermann, Thomas; Juda, Myriam; Vetter, Céline; Allebrandt, Karla V

    2013-01-01

    The circadian clock can only reliably fulfil its function if it is stably entrained. Most clocks use the light-dark cycle as environmental signal (zeitgeber) for this active synchronisation. How we think about clock function and entrainment has been strongly influenced by the early concepts of the field's pioneers, and the astonishing finding that circadian rhythms continue a self-sustained oscillation in constant conditions has become central to our understanding of entrainment.Here, we argue that we have to rethink these initial circadian dogmas to fully understand the circadian programme and how it entrains. Light is also the prominent zeitgeber for the human clock, as has been shown experimentally in the laboratory and in large-scale epidemiological studies in real life, and we hypothesise that social zeitgebers act through light entrainment via behavioural feedback loops (zeitnehmer). We show that human entrainment can be investigated in detail outside of the laboratory, by using the many 'experimental' conditions provided by the real world, such as daylight savings time, the 'forced synchrony' imposed by the introduction of time zones, or the fact that humans increasingly create their own light environment. The conditions of human entrainment have changed drastically over the past 100 years and have led to an increasing discrepancy between biological and social time (social jetlag). The increasing evidence that social jetlag has detrimental consequences for health suggests that shift-work is only an extreme form of circadian misalignment, and that the majority of the population in the industrialised world suffers from a similarly 'forced synchrony'.

  9. Circadian rhythms, sleep, and performance in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mallis, M. M.; DeRoshia, C. W.

    2005-01-01

    Maintaining optimal alertness and neurobehavioral functioning during space operations is critical to enable the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) vision "to extend humanity's reach to the Moon, Mars and beyond" to become a reality. Field data have demonstrated that sleep times and performance of crewmembers can be compromised by extended duty days, irregular work schedules, high workload, and varying environmental factors. This paper documents evidence of significant sleep loss and disruption of circadian rhythms in astronauts and associated performance decrements during several space missions, which demonstrates the need to develop effective countermeasures. Both sleep and circadian disruptions have been identified in the Behavioral Health and Performance (BH&P) area and the Advanced Human Support Technology (AHST) area of NASA's Bioastronautics Critical Path Roadmap. Such disruptions could have serious consequences on the effectiveness, health, and safety of astronaut crews, thus reducing the safety margin and increasing the chances of an accident or incident. These decrements oftentimes can be difficult to detect and counter effectively in restrictive operational environments. NASA is focusing research on the development of optimal sleep/wake schedules and countermeasure timing and application to help mitigate the cumulative effects of sleep and circadian disruption and enhance operational performance. Investing research in humans is one of NASA's building blocks that will allow for both short- and long-duration space missions and help NASA in developing approaches to manage and overcome the human limitations of space travel. In addition to reviewing the current state of knowledge concerning sleep and circadian disruptions during space operations, this paper provides an overview of NASA's broad research goals. Also, NASA-funded research, designed to evaluate the relationships between sleep quality, circadian rhythm stability, and

  10. Skin, Reactive Oxygen Species, and Circadian Clocks

    PubMed Central

    Ndiaye, Mary A.; Nihal, Minakshi; Wood, Gary S.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Skin, a complex organ and the body's first line of defense against environmental insults, plays a critical role in maintaining homeostasis in an organism. This balance is maintained through a complex network of cellular machinery and signaling events, including those regulating oxidative stress and circadian rhythms. These regulatory mechanisms have developed integral systems to protect skin cells and to signal to the rest of the body in the event of internal and environmental stresses. Recent Advances: Interestingly, several signaling pathways and many bioactive molecules have been found to be involved and even important in the regulation of oxidative stress and circadian rhythms, especially in the skin. It is becoming increasingly evident that these two regulatory systems may, in fact, be interconnected in the regulation of homeostasis. Important examples of molecules that connect the two systems include serotonin, melatonin, vitamin D, and vitamin A. Critical Issues: Excessive reactive oxygen species and/or dysregulation of antioxidant system and circadian rhythms can cause critical errors in maintaining proper barrier function and skin health, as well as overall homeostasis. Unfortunately, the modern lifestyle seems to contribute to increasing alterations in redox balance and circadian rhythms, thereby posing a critical problem for normal functioning of the living system. Future Directions: Since the oxidative stress and circadian rhythm systems seem to have areas of overlap, future research needs to be focused on defining the interactions between these two important systems. This may be especially important in the skin where both systems play critical roles in protecting the whole body. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 2982–2996. PMID:24111846

  11. Circadian rhythms, sleep, and performance in space.

    PubMed

    Mallis, M M; DeRoshia, C W

    2005-06-01

    Maintaining optimal alertness and neurobehavioral functioning during space operations is critical to enable the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) vision "to extend humanity's reach to the Moon, Mars and beyond" to become a reality. Field data have demonstrated that sleep times and performance of crewmembers can be compromised by extended duty days, irregular work schedules, high workload, and varying environmental factors. This paper documents evidence of significant sleep loss and disruption of circadian rhythms in astronauts and associated performance decrements during several space missions, which demonstrates the need to develop effective countermeasures. Both sleep and circadian disruptions have been identified in the Behavioral Health and Performance (BH&P) area and the Advanced Human Support Technology (AHST) area of NASA's Bioastronautics Critical Path Roadmap. Such disruptions could have serious consequences on the effectiveness, health, and safety of astronaut crews, thus reducing the safety margin and increasing the chances of an accident or incident. These decrements oftentimes can be difficult to detect and counter effectively in restrictive operational environments. NASA is focusing research on the development of optimal sleep/wake schedules and countermeasure timing and application to help mitigate the cumulative effects of sleep and circadian disruption and enhance operational performance. Investing research in humans is one of NASA's building blocks that will allow for both short- and long-duration space missions and help NASA in developing approaches to manage and overcome the human limitations of space travel. In addition to reviewing the current state of knowledge concerning sleep and circadian disruptions during space operations, this paper provides an overview of NASA's broad research goals. Also, NASA-funded research, designed to evaluate the relationships between sleep quality, circadian rhythm stability, and

  12. Age-associated circadian period changes in Arabidopsis leaves.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyunmin; Kim, Yumi; Yeom, Miji; Lim, Junhyun; Nam, Hong Gil

    2016-04-01

    As most organisms age, their appearance, physiology, and behaviour alters as part of a life history strategy that maximizes their fitness over their lifetime. The passage of time is measured by organisms and is used to modulate these age-related changes. Organisms have an endogenous time measurement system called the circadian clock. This endogenous clock regulates many physiological responses throughout the life history of organisms to enhance their fitness. However, little is known about the relation between ageing and the circadian clock in plants. Here, we investigate the association of leaf ageing with circadian rhythm changes to better understand the regulation of life-history strategy in Arabidopsis. The circadian periods of clock output genes were approximately 1h shorter in older leaves than younger leaves. The periods of the core clock genes were also consistently shorter in older leaves, indicating an effect of ageing on regulation of the circadian period. Shortening of the circadian period with leaf age occurred faster in plants grown under a long photoperiod compared with a short photoperiod. We screened for a regulatory gene that links ageing and the circadian clock among multiple clock gene mutants. Only mutants for the clock oscillator TOC1 did not show a shortened circadian period during leaf ageing, suggesting that TOC1 may link age to changes in the circadian clock period. Our findings suggest that age-related information is incorporated into the regulation of the circadian period and that TOC1 is necessary for this integrative process.

  13. Age-associated circadian period changes in Arabidopsis leaves

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyunmin; Kim, Yumi; Yeom, Miji; Lim, Junhyun; Nam, Hong Gil

    2016-01-01

    As most organisms age, their appearance, physiology, and behaviour alters as part of a life history strategy that maximizes their fitness over their lifetime. The passage of time is measured by organisms and is used to modulate these age-related changes. Organisms have an endogenous time measurement system called the circadian clock. This endogenous clock regulates many physiological responses throughout the life history of organisms to enhance their fitness. However, little is known about the relation between ageing and the circadian clock in plants. Here, we investigate the association of leaf ageing with circadian rhythm changes to better understand the regulation of life-history strategy in Arabidopsis. The circadian periods of clock output genes were approximately 1h shorter in older leaves than younger leaves. The periods of the core clock genes were also consistently shorter in older leaves, indicating an effect of ageing on regulation of the circadian period. Shortening of the circadian period with leaf age occurred faster in plants grown under a long photoperiod compared with a short photoperiod. We screened for a regulatory gene that links ageing and the circadian clock among multiple clock gene mutants. Only mutants for the clock oscillator TOC1 did not show a shortened circadian period during leaf ageing, suggesting that TOC1 may link age to changes in the circadian clock period. Our findings suggest that age-related information is incorporated into the regulation of the circadian period and that TOC1 is necessary for this integrative process. PMID:27012281

  14. Carcinogenic effects of circadian disruption: an epigenetic viewpoint.

    PubMed

    Salavaty, Abbas

    2015-08-08

    Circadian rhythms refer to the endogenous rhythms that are generated to synchronize physiology and behavior with 24-h environmental cues. These rhythms are regulated by both external cues and molecular clock mechanisms in almost all cells. Disruption of circadian rhythms, which is called circadian disruption, affects many biological processes within the body and results in different long-term diseases, including cancer. Circadian regulatory pathways result in rhythmic epigenetic modifications and the formation of circadian epigenomes. Aberrant epigenetic modifications, such as hypermethylation, due to circadian disruption may be involved in the transformation of normal cells into cancer cells. Several studies have indicated an epigenetic basis for the carcinogenic effects of circadian disruption. In this review, I first discuss some of the circadian genes and regulatory proteins. Then, I summarize the current evidence related to the epigenetic modifications that result in circadian disruption. In addition, I explain the carcinogenic effects of circadian disruption and highlight its potential role in different human cancers using an epigenetic viewpoint. Finally, the importance of chronotherapy in cancer treatment is highlighted.

  15. Abnormal uterine bleeding.

    PubMed

    Jennings, J C

    1995-11-01

    Physicians who care for female patients cannot avoid the frequent complaint of abnormal uterine bleeding. Knowledge of the disorders that cause this problem can prevent serious consequences in many patients and improve the quality of life for many others. The availability of noninvasive and minimally invasive diagnostic studies and minimally invasive surgical treatment has revolutionized management of abnormal uterine bleeding. Similar to any other disorder, the extent to which a physician manages abnormal uterine bleeding depends on his or her own level of comfort. When limitations of either diagnostic or therapeutic capability are encountered, consultation and referral should be used to the best interest of patients.

  16. Expression of the circadian clock gene Period2 in the hippocampus: possible implications for synaptic plasticity and learned behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Louisa M-C; Dragich, Joanna M; Kudo, Takashi; Odom, Irene H; Welsh, David K; O'Dell, Thomas J; Colwell, Christopher S

    2009-01-01

    Genes responsible for generating circadian oscillations are expressed in a variety of brain regions not typically associated with circadian timing. The functions of this clock gene expression are largely unknown, and in the present study we sought to explore the role of the Per2 (Period 2) gene in hippocampal physiology and learned behaviour. We found that PER2 protein is highly expressed in hippocampal pyramidal cell layers and that the expression of both protein and mRNA varies with a circadian rhythm. The peaks of these rhythms occur in the late night or early morning and are almost 180° out-of-phase with the expression rhythms measured from the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the same animals. The rhythms in Per2 expression are autonomous as they are present in isolated hippocampal slices maintained in culture. Physiologically, Per2-mutant mice exhibit abnormal long-term potentiation. The underlying mechanism is suggested by the finding that levels of phosphorylated cAMP-response-element-binding protein, but not phosphorylated extracellular-signal-regulated kinase, are reduced in hippocampal tissue from mutant mice. Finally, Per2-mutant mice exhibit deficits in the recall of trace, but not cued, fear conditioning. Taken together, these results provide evidence that hippocampal cells contain an autonomous circadian clock. Furthermore, the clock gene Per2 may play a role in the regulation of long-term potentiation and in the recall of some forms of learned behaviour. PMID:19570032

  17. Maternal obesity disrupts circadian rhythms of clock and metabolic genes in the offspring heart and liver.

    PubMed

    Wang, Danfeng; Chen, Siyu; Liu, Mei; Liu, Chang

    2015-06-01

    Early life nutritional adversity is tightly associated with the development of long-term metabolic disorders. Particularly, maternal obesity and high-fat diets cause high risk of obesity in the offspring. Those offspring are also prone to develop hyperinsulinemia, hepatic steatosis and cardiovascular diseases. However, the precise underlying mechanisms leading to these metabolic dysregulation in the offspring remain unclear. On the other hand, disruptions of diurnal circadian rhythms are known to impair metabolic homeostasis in various tissues including the heart and liver. Therefore, we investigated that whether maternal obesity perturbs the circadian expression rhythms of clock, metabolic and inflammatory genes in offspring heart and liver by using RT-qPCR and Western blotting analysis. Offspring from lean and obese dams were examined on postnatal day 17 and 35, when pups were nursed by their mothers or took food independently. On P17, genes examined in the heart either showed anti-phase oscillations (Cpt1b, Pparα, Per2) or had greater oscillation amplitudes (Bmal1, Tnf-α, Il-6). Such phase abnormalities of these genes were improved on P35, while defects in amplitudes still existed. In the liver of 17-day-old pups exposed to maternal obesity, the oscillation amplitudes of most rhythmic genes examined (except Bmal1) were strongly suppressed. On P35, the oscillations of circadian and inflammatory genes became more robust in the liver, while metabolic genes were still kept non-rhythmic. Maternal obesity also had a profound influence in the protein expression levels of examined genes in offspring heart and liver. Our observations indicate that the circadian clock undergoes nutritional programing, which may contribute to the alternations in energy metabolism associated with the development of metabolic disorders in early life and adulthood.

  18. Manipulating the Circadian and Sleep Cycles to Protect Against Metabolic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nohara, Kazunari; Yoo, Seung-Hee; Chen, Zheng (Jake)

    2015-01-01

    Modernization of human society parallels an epidemic of metabolic disorders including obesity. Apart from excess caloric intake, a 24/7 lifestyle poses another important challenge to our metabolic health. Recent research under both laboratory and epidemiological settings has indicated that abnormal temporal organization of sleep and wakeful activities including food intake is a significant risk factor for metabolic disease. The circadian clock system is our intrinsic biological timer that regulates internal rhythms such as the sleep/wake cycle and also responses to external stimuli including light and food. Initially thought to be mainly involved in the timing of sleep, the clock, and/or clock genes may also play a role in sleep architecture and homeostasis. Importantly, an extensive body of evidence has firmly established a master regulatory role of the clock in energy balance. Together, a close relationship between well-timed circadian/sleep cycles and metabolic health is emerging. Exploiting this functional connection, an important holistic strategy toward curbing the epidemic of metabolic disorders (e.g., obesity) involves corrective measures on the circadian clock and sleep. In addition to behavioral and environmental interventions including meal timing and light control, pharmacological agents targeting sleep and circadian clocks promise convenient and effective applications. Recent studies, for example, have reported small molecules targeting specific clock components and displaying robust beneficial effects on sleep and metabolism. Furthermore, a group of clock-amplitude-enhancing small molecules (CEMs) identified via high-throughput chemical screens are of particular interest for future in vivo studies of their metabolic and sleep efficacies. Elucidating the functional relationship between clock, sleep, and metabolism will also have far-reaching implications for various chronic human diseases and aging. PMID:25852644

  19. "Jeopardy" in Abnormal Psychology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keutzer, Carolin S.

    1993-01-01

    Describes the use of the board game, Jeopardy, in a college level abnormal psychology course. Finds increased student interaction and improved application of information. Reports generally favorable student evaluation of the technique. (CFR)

  20. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding

    MedlinePlus

    ... Abnormal uterine bleeding is any bleeding from the uterus (through your vagina) other than your normal monthly ... or fibroids (small and large growths) in the uterus can also cause bleeding. Rarely, a thyroid problem, ...

  1. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding FAQ

    MedlinePlus

    ... as cancer of the uterus, cervix, or vagina • Polycystic ovary syndrome How is abnormal bleeding diagnosed? Your health care ... before the fetus can survive outside the uterus. Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: A condition characterized by two of the following ...

  2. Preliminary characterization of persisting circadian rhythms during space flight: Neurospora as a model system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sulzman, F. W.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of the Spacelab environment on the circadian rhythms in microorganisms are investigated. Neurospora is chosen because of its well characterized circadian rhythm of growth. Growth rate, banding patterns, and circadian period and phase information are studied.

  3. Ontogeny of circadian organization in the rat.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Shin; Yoshikawa, Tomoko; Biscoe, Elizabeth W; Numano, Rika; Gallaspy, Lauren M; Soulsby, Stacy; Papadimas, Evagelia; Pezuk, Pinar; Doyle, Susan E; Tei, Hajime; Sakaki, Yoshiyuki; Block, Gene D; Menaker, Michael

    2009-02-01

    The mammalian circadian system is orchestrated by a master pacemaker in the brain, but many peripheral tissues also contain independent or quasi-independent circadian oscillators. The adaptive significance of clocks in these structures must lie, in large part, in the phase relationships between the constituent oscillators and their micro- and macroenvironments. To examine the relationship between postnatal development, which is dependent on endogenous programs and maternal/environmental influences, and the phase of circadian oscillators, the authors assessed the circadian phase of pineal, liver, lung, adrenal, and thyroid tissues cultured from Period 1-luciferase (Per1-luc ) rat pups of various postnatal ages. The liver, thyroid, and pineal were rhythmic at birth, but the phases of their Per1-luc expression rhythms shifted remarkably during development. To determine if the timing of the phase shift in each tissue could be the result of changing environmental conditions, the behavior of pups and their mothers was monitored. The circadian phase of the liver shifted from the day to night around postnatal day (P) 22 as the pups nursed less during the light and instead ate solid food during the dark. Furthermore, the phase of Per1-luc expression in liver cultures from nursing neonates could be shifted experimentally from the day to the night by allowing pups access to the dam only during the dark. Peak Per1-luc expression also shifted from midday to early night in thyroid cultures at about P20, concurrent with the shift in eating times. The phase of Per1-luc expression in the pineal gland shifted from day to night coincident with its sympathetic innervation at around P5. Per1-luc expression was rhythmic in adrenal cultures and peaked around the time of lights-off throughout development; however, the amplitude of the rhythm increased at P25. Lung cultures were completely arrhythmic until P12 when the pups began to leave the nest. Taken together, the data suggest that the

  4. Circadian Organization of Behavior and Physiology in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Allada, Ravi; Chung, Brian Y.

    2010-01-01

    Circadian clocks organize behavior and physiology to adapt to daily environmental cycles. Genetic approaches in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, have revealed widely conserved molecular gears of these 24-h timers. Yet much less is known about how these cell-autonomous clocks confer temporal information to modulate cellular functions. Here we discuss our current knowledge of circadian clock function in Drosophila, providing an overview of the molecular underpinnings of circadian clocks. We then describe the neural network important for circadian rhythms of locomotor activity, including how these molecular clocks might influence neuronal function. Finally, we address a range of behaviors and physiological systems regulated by circadian clocks, including discussion of specific peripheral oscillators and key molecular effectors where they have been described. These studies reveal a remarkable complexity to circadian pathways in this “simple” model organism. PMID:20148690

  5. The role of circadian rhythm in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Shujing; Ao, Xiang; Wu, Huijian

    2013-08-01

    The circadian rhythm is an endogenous time keeping system shared by most organisms. The circadian clock is comprised of both peripheral oscillators in most organ tissues of the body and a central pacemaker located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the central nervous system. The circadian rhythm is crucial in maintaining the normal physiology of the organism including, but not limited to, cell proliferation, cell cycle progression, and cellular metabolism; whereas disruption of the circadian rhythm is closely related to multi-tumorigenesis. In the past several years, studies from different fields have revealed that the genetic or functional disruption of the molecular circadian rhythm has been found in various cancers, such as breast, prostate, and ovarian. In this review, we will investigate and present an overview of the current research on the influence of circadian rhythm regulating proteins on breast cancer.

  6. Effects of circadian disruption on mental and physical health.

    PubMed

    Karatsoreos, Ilia N

    2012-04-01

    Circadian (daily) rhythms in physiology and behavior are phylogenetically ancient and are present in almost all plants and animals. In mammals, these rhythms are generated by a master circadian clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus, which in turn synchronizes "peripheral oscillators" throughout the brain and body in almost all cell types and organ systems. Although circadian rhythms are phylogenetically ancient, modern industrialized society and the ubiquity of electric lighting has resulted in a fundamental alteration in the relationship between an individual's endogenous circadian rhythmicity and the external environment. The ramifications of this desynchronization for mental and physical health are not fully understood, although numerous lines of evidence are emerging that link defects in circadian timing with negative health outcomes. This article explores the function of the circadian system, the effects of disrupted clocks on the brain and body, and how these effects impact mental and physical health.

  7. A tunable artificial circadian clock in clock-defective mice

    PubMed Central

    D'Alessandro, Matthew; Beesley, Stephen; Kim, Jae Kyoung; Chen, Rongmin; Abich, Estela; Cheng, Wayne; Yi, Paul; Takahashi, Joseph S.; Lee, Choogon

    2015-01-01

    Self-sustaining oscillations are essential for diverse physiological functions such as the cell cycle, insulin secretion and circadian rhythms. Synthetic oscillators using biochemical feedback circuits have been generated in cell culture. These synthetic systems provide important insight into design principles for biological oscillators, but have limited similarity to physiological pathways. Here we report the generation of an artificial, mammalian circadian clock in vivo, capable of generating robust, tunable circadian rhythms. In mice deficient in Per1 and Per2 genes (thus lacking circadian rhythms), we artificially generate PER2 rhythms and restore circadian sleep/wake cycles with an inducible Per2 transgene. Our artificial clock is tunable as the period and phase of the rhythms can be modulated predictably. This feature, and other design principles of our work, might enhance the study and treatment of circadian dysfunction and broader aspects of physiology involving biological oscillators. PMID:26617050

  8. A tunable artificial circadian clock in clock-defective mice.

    PubMed

    D'Alessandro, Matthew; Beesley, Stephen; Kim, Jae Kyoung; Chen, Rongmin; Abich, Estela; Cheng, Wayne; Yi, Paul; Takahashi, Joseph S; Lee, Choogon

    2015-11-30

    Self-sustaining oscillations are essential for diverse physiological functions such as the cell cycle, insulin secretion and circadian rhythms. Synthetic oscillators using biochemical feedback circuits have been generated in cell culture. These synthetic systems provide important insight into design principles for biological oscillators, but have limited similarity to physiological pathways. Here we report the generation of an artificial, mammalian circadian clock in vivo, capable of generating robust, tunable circadian rhythms. In mice deficient in Per1 and Per2 genes (thus lacking circadian rhythms), we artificially generate PER2 rhythms and restore circadian sleep/wake cycles with an inducible Per2 transgene. Our artificial clock is tunable as the period and phase of the rhythms can be modulated predictably. This feature, and other design principles of our work, might enhance the study and treatment of circadian dysfunction and broader aspects of physiology involving biological oscillators.

  9. Light-Induced Changes of the Circadian Clock of Humans: Increasing Duration is More Effective than Increasing Light Intensity

    PubMed Central

    Dewan, Karuna; Benloucif, Susan; Reid, Kathryn; Wolfe, Lisa F.; Zee, Phyllis C.

    2011-01-01

    Study Objectives: To evaluate the effect of increasing the intensity and/or duration of exposure on light-induced changes in the timing of the circadian clock of humans. Design: Multifactorial randomized controlled trial, between and within subject design Setting: General Clinical Research Center (GCRC) of an academic medical center Participants: 56 healthy young subjects (20-40 years of age) Interventions: Research subjects were admitted for 2 independent stays of 4 nights/3 days for treatment with bright or dim-light (randomized order) at a time known to induce phase delays in circadian timing. The intensity and duration of the bright light were determined by random assignment to one of 9 treatment conditions (duration of 1, 2, or 3 hours at 2000, 4000, or 8000 lux). Measurements and Results: Treatment-induced changes in the dim light melatonin onset (DLMO) and dim light melatonin offset (DLMOff) were measured from blood samples collected every 20-30 min throughout baseline and post-treatment nights. Comparison by multi-factor analysis of variance (ANOVA) of light-induced changes in the time of the circadian melatonin rhythm for the 9 conditions revealed that changing the duration of the light exposure from 1 to 3 h increased the magnitude of light-induced delays. In contrast, increasing from moderate (2,000 lux) to high (8,000 lux) intensity light did not alter the magnitude of phase delays of the circadian melatonin rhythm. Conclusions: Results from the present study suggest that for phototherapy of circadian rhythm sleep disorders in humans, a longer period of moderate intensity light may be more effective than a shorter exposure period of high intensity light. Citation: Dewan K; Benloucif S; Reid K; Wolfe LF; Zee PC. Light-induced changes of the circadian clock of humans: increasing duration is more effective than increasing light intensity. SLEEP 2011;34(5):593-599. PMID:21532952

  10. Methods to Record Circadian Rhythm Wheel Running Activity in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Siepka, Sandra M.; Takahashi, Joseph S.

    2013-01-01

    Forward genetic approaches (phenotype to gene) are powerful methods to identify mouse circadian clock components. The success of these approaches, however, is highly dependent on the quality of the phenotype— specifically, the ability to measure circadian rhythms in individual mice. This article outlines the factors necessary to measure mouse circadian rhythms, including choice of mouse strain, facilities and equipment design and construction, experimental design, high-throughput methods, and finally methods for data analysis. PMID:15817291

  11. Central circadian control of female reproductive function.

    PubMed

    Miller, Brooke H; Takahashi, Joseph S

    2013-01-01

    Over the past two decades, it has become clear just how much of our physiology is under the control of the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) and the cell-intrinsic molecular clock that ticks with a periodicity of approximately 24 h. The SCN prepares our digestive system for meals, our adrenal axis for the stress of waking up in the morning, and the genes expressed in our muscles when we prepare to exercise. Long before molecular studies of genes such as Clock, Bmal1, and the Per homologs were possible, it was obvious that female reproductive function was under strict circadian control at every level of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, and in the establishment and successful maintenance of pregnancy. This review highlights our current understanding of the role that the SCN plays in regulating female reproductive physiology, with a special emphasis on the advances made possible through the use of circadian mutant mice.

  12. Avian circadian organization: a chorus of clocks.

    PubMed

    Cassone, Vincent M

    2014-01-01

    In birds, biological clock function pervades all aspects of biology, controlling daily changes in sleep: wake, visual function, song, migratory patterns and orientation, as well as seasonal patterns of reproduction, song and migration. The molecular bases for circadian clocks are highly conserved, and it is likely the avian molecular mechanisms are similar to those expressed in mammals, including humans. The central pacemakers in the avian pineal gland, retinae and SCN dynamically interact to maintain stable phase relationships and then influence downstream rhythms through entrainment of peripheral oscillators in the brain controlling behavior and peripheral tissues. Birds represent an excellent model for the role played by biological clocks in human neurobiology; unlike most rodent models, they are diurnal, they exhibit cognitively complex social interactions, and their circadian clocks are more sensitive to the hormone melatonin than are those of nocturnal rodents. PMID:24157655

  13. Circadian rhythms, athletic performance, and jet lag

    PubMed Central

    Manfredini, R.; Manfredini, F.; Fersini, C.; Conconi, F.

    1998-01-01

    Rapid air travel across several time zones exposes the traveller to a shift in his/her internal biological clock. The result is a transient desynchronisation of the circadian rhythm, called jet lag, lasting until the rhythm is rephased to the new environmental conditions. The most commonly experienced symptoms are sleep disorders, difficulties with concentrating, irritability, depression, fatigue, disorientation, loss of appetite, and gastrointestinal disturbance. Apart from the decrements in mental and physical performance directly consequent on such symptoms, competitive athletes are also exposed to the additional negative consequences of a shift from the optimal circadian window of performance. A brief summary of the possible negative effects of jet lag on athletic performance and potentially alleviating strategies is given. 




 PMID:9631214

  14. Thermoplasticity in the plant circadian clock

    PubMed Central

    James, Allan B.; Syed, Naeem Hasan; Brown, John W. S.; Nimmo, Hugh G.

    2012-01-01

    In the March 2012 issue of The Plant Cell we describe extensive alternative splicing (AS) of Arabidopsis circadian clock genes. Notably these distinct post-transcriptional events associate with different steady-state temperatures and also with plants undergoing temperature transitions leading us to propose that temperature-associated AS is an additional mechanism involved in the operation and control of the plant circadian clock. Here we show that temperature associated AS also extends to REVEILLE 8 (RVE8), demonstrating a hitherto unrecognized link between the expression of this clock associated gene and temperature. Finally we discuss our observations of the plastic nature of clock gene expression at the post-transcriptional level in the context of the ongoing fascination of how plants respond to temperature. PMID:22902701

  15. Avian Circadian Organization: A Chorus of Clocks

    PubMed Central

    Cassone, Vincent M

    2013-01-01

    In birds, biological clock function pervades all aspects of biology, controlling daily changes in sleep: wake, visual function, song, migratory patterns and orientation, as well as seasonal patterns of reproduction, song and migration. The molecular bases for circadian clocks are highly conserved, and it is likely the avian molecular mechanisms are similar to those expressed in mammals, including humans. The central pacemakers in the avian pineal gland, retinae and SCN dynamically interact to maintain stable phase relationships and then influence downstream rhythms through entrainment of peripheral oscillators in the brain controlling behavior and peripheral tissues. Birds represent an excellent model for the role played by biological clocks in human neurobiology; unlike most rodent models, they are diurnal, they exhibit cognitively complex social interactions, and their circadian clocks are more sensitive to the hormone melatonin than are those of nocturnal rodents. PMID:24157655

  16. Sleep, circadian rhythms, and athletic performance.

    PubMed

    Thun, Eirunn; Bjorvatn, Bjørn; Flo, Elisabeth; Harris, Anette; Pallesen, Ståle

    2015-10-01

    Sleep deprivation and time of day are both known to influence performance. A growing body of research has focused on how sleep and circadian rhythms impact athletic performance. This review provides a systematic overview of this research. We searched three different databases for articles on these issues and inspected relevant reference lists. In all, 113 articles met our inclusion criteria. The most robust result is that athletic performance seems to be best in the evening around the time when the core body temperature typically is at its peak. Sleep deprivation was negatively associated with performance whereas sleep extension seems to improve performance. The effects of desynchronization of circadian rhythms depend on the local time at which performance occurs. The review includes a discussion of differences regarding types of skills involved as well as methodological issues.

  17. Central Circadian Control of Female Reproductive Function

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Brooke H.; Takahashi, Joseph S.

    2014-01-01

    Over the past two decades, it has become clear just how much of our physiology is under the control of the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) and the cell-intrinsic molecular clock that ticks with a periodicity of approximately 24 h. The SCN prepares our digestive system for meals, our adrenal axis for the stress of waking up in the morning, and the genes expressed in our muscles when we prepare to exercise. Long before molecular studies of genes such as Clock, Bmal1, and the Per homologs were possible, it was obvious that female reproductive function was under strict circadian control at every level of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, and in the establishment and successful maintenance of pregnancy. This review highlights our current understanding of the role that the SCN plays in regulating female reproductive physiology, with a special emphasis on the advances made possible through the use of circadian mutant mice. PMID:24478756

  18. Circadian clock genes: effects on dopamine, reward and addiction.

    PubMed

    Parekh, Puja K; Ozburn, Angela R; McClung, Colleen A

    2015-06-01

    Addiction is a widespread public health issue with social and economic ramifications. Substance abuse disorders are often accompanied by disruptions in circadian rhythms including sleep/wake cycles, which can exacerbate symptoms of addiction and dependence. Additionally, genetic disturbance of circadian molecular mechanisms can predispose some individuals to substance abuse disorders. In this review, we will discuss how circadian genes can regulate midbrain dopaminergic activity and subsequently, drug intake and reward. We will also suggest future directions for research on circadian genes and drugs of abuse.

  19. NONO couples the circadian clock to the cell cycle

    PubMed Central

    Kowalska, Elzbieta; Ripperger, Juergen A.; Hoegger, Dominik C.; Bruegger, Pascal; Buch, Thorsten; Birchler, Thomas; Mueller, Anke; Albrecht, Urs; Contaldo, Claudio; Brown, Steven A.

    2013-01-01

    Mammalian circadian clocks restrict cell proliferation to defined time windows, but the mechanism and consequences of this interrelationship are not fully understood. Previously we identified the multifunctional nuclear protein NONO as a partner of circadian PERIOD (PER) proteins. Here we show that it also conveys circadian gating to the cell cycle, a connection surprisingly important for wound healing in mice. Specifically, although fibroblasts from NONO-deficient mice showed approximately normal circadian cycles, they displayed elevated cell doubling and lower cellular senescence. At a molecular level, NONO bound to the p16-Ink4A cell cycle checkpoint gene and potentiated its circadian activation in a PER protein-dependent fashion. Loss of either NONO or PER abolished this activation and circadian expression of p16-Ink4A and eliminated circadian cell cycle gating. In vivo, lack of NONO resulted in defective wound repair. Because wound healing defects were also seen in multiple circadian clock-deficient mouse lines, our results therefore suggest that coupling of the cell cycle to the circadian clock via NONO may be useful to segregate in temporal fashion cell proliferation from tissue organization. PMID:23267082

  20. Circadian Clock Genes: Effects on Dopamine, Reward and Addiction

    PubMed Central

    Parekh, Puja K.; Ozburn, Angela R.; McClung, Colleen A.

    2015-01-01

    Addiction is a widespread public health issue with social and economic ramifications. Substance abuse disorders are often accompanied by disruptions in circadian rhythms including sleep/wake cycles, which can exacerbate symptoms of addiction and dependence. Additionally, genetic disturbance of circadian molecular mechanisms can predispose some individuals to substance abuse disorders. In this review, we will discuss how circadian genes can regulate midbrain dopaminergic activity and subsequently, drug intake and reward. We will also suggest future directions for research on circadian genes and drugs of abuse. PMID:25641765

  1. Circadian rhythms and addiction: Mechanistic insights and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Logan, Ryan W.; Williams, Wilbur P.; McClung, Colleen A.

    2014-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are prominent in many physiological and behavioral functions. Circadian disruptions either by environmental or molecular perturbation can have profound health consequences, including the development and progression of addiction. Both animal and humans studies indicate extensive bidirectional relationships between the circadian system and drugs of abuse. Addicted individuals display disrupted rhythms, and chronic disruption or particular chronotypes, may increase the risk for substance abuse and relapse. Moreover, polymorphisms in circadian genes and an evening chronotype have been linked to mood and addiction disorders, and recent efforts suggest an association with the function of reward neurocircuitry. Animal studies are beginning to determine how altered circadian gene function results in drug induced neuroplasticity and behaviors. Many studies suggest a critical role for circadian rhythms in reward-related pathways in the brain and indicate that drugs of abuse directly affect the central circadian pacemaker. In this review, we highlight key findings demonstrating the importance of circadian rhythms in addiction, and how future studies will reveal important mechanistic insights into the involvement of circadian rhythms in drug addiction. PMID:24731209

  2. Circadian Control of Antibacterial Immunity: Findings from Animal Models

    PubMed Central

    Tsoumtsa, Landry L.; Torre, Cedric; Ghigo, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Most of the biological functions, including the immune system, are linked to circadian rhythms in living organisms. Changes occurring to biological parameters as the result of these circadian rhythms can therefore affect the outcome of a disease. For decades, model organisms have proven to be a great tool to understanding biological mechanisms such as circadian cycle and immunity. In this review, we created an inventory of the use of model organisms in order to decipher the relation between circadian rhythms and antibacterial immunity. PMID:27242972

  3. Assignment of circadian function for the Neurospora clock gene frequency.

    PubMed

    Merrow, M; Brunner, M; Roenneberg, T

    1999-06-10

    Circadian clocks consist of three elements: entrainment pathways (inputs), the mechanism generating the rhythmicity (oscillator), and the output pathways that control the circadian rhythms. It is difficult to assign molecular clock components to any one of these elements. Experiments show that inputs can be circadianly regulated and outputs can feed back on the oscillator. Mathematical simulations indicate that under- or overexpression of a gene product can result in arrhythmicity, whether the protein is part of the oscillator or substantially part of a rhythmically expressed input pathway. To distinguish between these two possibilities, we used traditional circadian entrainment protocols on a genetic model system, Neurospora crassa.

  4. Circadian Clocks as Modulators of Metabolic Comorbidity in Psychiatric Disorders.

    PubMed

    Barandas, Rita; Landgraf, Dominic; McCarthy, Michael J; Welsh, David K

    2015-12-01

    Psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and major depressive disorder are often accompanied by metabolic dysfunction symptoms, including obesity and diabetes. Since the circadian system controls important brain systems that regulate affective, cognitive, and metabolic functions, and neuropsychiatric and metabolic diseases are often correlated with disturbances of circadian rhythms, we hypothesize that dysregulation of circadian clocks plays a central role in metabolic comorbidity in psychiatric disorders. In this review paper, we highlight the role of circadian clocks in glucocorticoid, dopamine, and orexin/melanin-concentrating hormone systems and describe how a dysfunction of these clocks may contribute to the simultaneous development of psychiatric and metabolic symptoms. PMID:26483181

  5. Endotoxin Disrupts Circadian Rhythms in Macrophages via Reactive Oxygen Species

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yusi; Pati, Paramita; Xu, Yiming; Chen, Feng; Stepp, David W.; Huo, Yuqing; Rudic, R. Daniel; Fulton, David J. R.

    2016-01-01

    The circadian clock is a transcriptional network that functions to regulate the expression of genes important in the anticipation of changes in cellular and organ function. Recent studies have revealed that the recognition of pathogens and subsequent initiation of inflammatory responses are strongly regulated by a macrophage-intrinsic circadian clock. We hypothesized that the circadian pattern of gene expression might be influenced by inflammatory stimuli and that loss of circadian function in immune cells can promote pro-inflammatory behavior. To investigate circadian rhythms in inflammatory cells, peritoneal macrophages were isolated from mPer2luciferase transgenic mice and circadian oscillations were studied in response to stimuli. Using Cosinor analysis, we found that LPS significantly altered the circadian period in peritoneal macrophages from mPer2luciferase mice while qPCR data suggested that the pattern of expression of the core circadian gene (Bmal1) was disrupted. Inhibition of TLR4 offered protection from the LPS-induced impairment in rhythm, suggesting a role for toll-like receptor signaling. To explore the mechanisms involved, we inhibited LPS-stimulated NO and superoxide. Inhibition of NO synthesis with L-NAME had no effect on circadian rhythms. In contrast, inhibition of superoxide with Tempol or PEG-SOD ameliorated the LPS-induced changes in circadian periodicity. In gain of function experiments, we found that overexpression of NOX5, a source of ROS, could significantly disrupt circadian function in a circadian reporter cell line (U2OS) whereas iNOS overexpression, a source of NO, was ineffective. To assess whether alteration of circadian rhythms influences macrophage function, peritoneal macrophages were isolated from Bmal1-KO and Per-TKO mice. Compared to WT macrophages, macrophages from circadian knockout mice exhibited altered balance between NO and ROS release, increased uptake of oxLDL and increased adhesion and migration. These results

  6. Circadian Phase Preference in Pediatric Bipolar Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kerri L.; Weissman, Alexandra B.; Puzia, Megan E.; Cushman, Grace K.; Seymour, Karen E.; Wegbreit, Ezra; Carskadon, Mary A.; Dickstein, Daniel P.

    2014-01-01

    Pediatric bipolar disorder (BD) rates have notably increased over the past three decades. Given the significant morbidity and mortality associated with BD, efforts are needed to identify factors useful in earlier detection to help address this serious public health concern. Sleep is particularly important to consider given the sequelae of disrupted sleep on normative functioning and that sleep is included in diagnostic criteria for both Major Depressive and Manic Episodes. Here, we examine one component of sleep—i.e., circadian phase preference with the behavioral construct of morningness/eveningness (M/E). In comparing 30 BD and 45 typically developing control (TDC) participants, ages 7–17 years, on the Morningness-Eveningness Scale for Children (MESC), no between-group differences emerged. Similar results were found when comparing three groups (BD−ADHD; BD+ADHD; TDC). Consistent with data available on circadian phase preference in adults with BD, however, we found that BD adolescents, ages 13 years and older, endorsed significantly greater eveningness compared to their TDC peers. While the current findings are limited by reliance on subjective report and the high-rate of comorbid ADHD among the BD group, this finding that BD teens demonstrate an exaggerated shift towards eveningness than would be developmentally expected is important. Future studies should compare the circadian rhythms across the lifespan for individuals diagnosed with BD, as well as identify the point at which BD youth part ways with their healthy peers in terms of phase preference. In addition, given our BD sample was overall euthymic, it may be that M/E is more state vs. trait specific in latency age youth. Further work would benefit from assessing circadian functioning using a combination of rating forms and laboratory-based measures. Improved understanding of sleep in BD may identify behavioral targets for inclusion in prevention and intervention protocols. PMID:26237260

  7. Photoreception for circadian, neuroendocrine, and neurobehavioral regulation.

    PubMed

    Hanifin, John P; Brainard, George C

    2007-03-01

    In the art and science of lighting, four traditional objectives have been to provide light that: 1) is optimum for visual performance; 2) is visually comfortable; 3) permits aesthetic appreciation of the space; and 4) conserves energy. Over the past 25 years, it has been demonstrated that there are nonvisual, systemic effects of light in healthy humans. Furthermore, light has been used to successfully treat patients with selected affective and sleep disorders as well as healthy individuals who have circadian disruption due to shift work, transcontinental jet travel, or space flight. Recently, there has been an upheaval in the understanding of photoreceptive input to the circadian system of humans and other mammals. Analytical action spectra in rodents, primates, and humans have identified 446-484 nm (predominantly the blue part of the spectrum) as the most potent wavelength region for neuroendocrine, circadian, and neurobehavioral responses. Those studies suggested that a novel photosensory system, distinct from the visual rods and cones, is primarily responsible for this regulation. Studies have now shown that this new photosensory system is based on a small population of widely dispersed retinal ganglion cells that are intrinsically responsive to light, and project to the suprachiasmatic nuclei and other nonvisual centers in the brain. These light-sensitive retinal ganglion cells contain melanopsin, a vitamin A photopigment that mediates the cellular phototransduction cascade. Although light detection for circadian and neuroendocrine phototransduction seems to be mediated principally by a novel photosensory system in the eye, the classic rod and cone photoreceptors appear to play a role as well. These findings are important in understanding how humans adapt to lighting conditions in modern society and will provide the basis for major changes in future architectural lighting strategies.

  8. The 24-hour pulse wave velocity, aortic augmentation index, and central blood pressure in normotensive volunteers.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsova, Tatyana Y; Korneva, Viktoria A; Bryantseva, Evgeniya N; Barkan, Vitaliy S; Orlov, Artemy V; Posokhov, Igor N; Rogoza, Anatoly N

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the pulse wave velocity, aortic augmentation index corrected for heart rate 75 (AIx@75), and central systolic and diastolic blood pressure during 24-hour monitoring in normotensive volunteers. Overall, 467 subjects (206 men and 261 women) were recruited in this study. Participants were excluded from the study if they were less than 19 years of age, had blood test abnormalities, had a body mass index greater than 2 7.5 kg/m(2), had impaired glucose tolerance, or had hypotension or hypertension. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) with the BPLab(®) device was performed in each subject. ABPM waveforms were analyzed using the special automatic Vasotens(®) algorithm, which allows the calculation of pulse wave velocity, AIx@75, central systolic and diastolic blood pressure for "24-hour", "awake", and "asleep" periods. Circadian rhythms and sex differences in these indexes were identified. Pending further validation in prospective outcome-based studies, our data may be used as preliminary diagnostic values for the BPLab ABPM additional index in adult subjects.

  9. The 24-hour pulse wave velocity, aortic augmentation index, and central blood pressure in normotensive volunteers.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsova, Tatyana Y; Korneva, Viktoria A; Bryantseva, Evgeniya N; Barkan, Vitaliy S; Orlov, Artemy V; Posokhov, Igor N; Rogoza, Anatoly N

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the pulse wave velocity, aortic augmentation index corrected for heart rate 75 (AIx@75), and central systolic and diastolic blood pressure during 24-hour monitoring in normotensive volunteers. Overall, 467 subjects (206 men and 261 women) were recruited in this study. Participants were excluded from the study if they were less than 19 years of age, had blood test abnormalities, had a body mass index greater than 2 7.5 kg/m(2), had impaired glucose tolerance, or had hypotension or hypertension. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) with the BPLab(®) device was performed in each subject. ABPM waveforms were analyzed using the special automatic Vasotens(®) algorithm, which allows the calculation of pulse wave velocity, AIx@75, central systolic and diastolic blood pressure for "24-hour", "awake", and "asleep" periods. Circadian rhythms and sex differences in these indexes were identified. Pending further validation in prospective outcome-based studies, our data may be used as preliminary diagnostic values for the BPLab ABPM additional index in adult subjects. PMID:24812515

  10. Circadian rhythms. A protein fold switch joins the circadian oscillator to clock output in cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yong-Gang; Cohen, Susan E; Phong, Connie; Myers, William K; Kim, Yong-Ick; Tseng, Roger; Lin, Jenny; Zhang, Li; Boyd, Joseph S; Lee, Yvonne; Kang, Shannon; Lee, David; Li, Sheng; Britt, R David; Rust, Michael J; Golden, Susan S; LiWang, Andy

    2015-07-17

    Organisms are adapted to the relentless cycles of day and night, because they evolved timekeeping systems called circadian clocks, which regulate biological activities with ~24-hour rhythms. The clock of cyanobacteria is driven by a three-protein oscillator composed of KaiA, KaiB, and KaiC, which together generate a circadian rhythm of KaiC phosphorylation. We show that KaiB flips between two distinct three-dimensional folds, and its rare transition to an active state provides a time delay that is required to match the timing of the oscillator to that of Earth's rotation. Once KaiB switches folds, it binds phosphorylated KaiC and captures KaiA, which initiates a phase transition of the circadian cycle, and it regulates components of the clock-output pathway, which provides the link that joins the timekeeping and signaling functions of the oscillator.

  11. Epidemiology of the human circadian clock.

    PubMed

    Roenneberg, Till; Kuehnle, Tim; Juda, Myriam; Kantermann, Thomas; Allebrandt, Karla; Gordijn, Marijke; Merrow, Martha

    2007-12-01

    Humans show large inter-individual differences in organising their behaviour within the 24-h day-this is most obvious in their preferred timing of sleep and wakefulness. Sleep and wake times show a near-Gaussian distribution in a given population, with extreme early types waking up when extreme late types fall asleep. This distribution is predominantly based on differences in an individuals' circadian clock. The relationship between the circadian system and different "chronotypes" is formally and genetically well established in experimental studies in organisms ranging from unicells to mammals. To investigate the epidemiology of the human circadian clock, we developed a simple questionnaire (Munich ChronoType Questionnaire, MCTQ) to assess chronotype. So far, more than 55,000 people have completed the MCTQ, which has been validated with respect to the Horne-Østberg morningness-eveningness questionnaire (MEQ), objective measures of activity and rest (sleep-logs and actimetry), and physiological parameters. As a result of this large survey, we established an algorithm which optimises chronotype assessment by incorporating the information on timing of sleep and wakefulness for both work and free days. The timing and duration of sleep are generally independent. However, when the two are analysed separately for work and free days, sleep duration strongly depends on chronotype. In addition, chronotype is both age- and sex-dependent. PMID:17936039

  12. Coupling governs entrainment range of circadian clocks

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Ute; Granada, Adrián E; Westermark, Pål O; Heine, Markus; Kramer, Achim; Herzel, Hanspeter

    2010-01-01

    Circadian clocks are endogenous oscillators driving daily rhythms in physiology and behavior. Synchronization of these timers to environmental light–dark cycles (‘entrainment') is crucial for an organism's fitness. Little is known about which oscillator qualities determine entrainment, i.e., entrainment range, phase and amplitude. In a systematic theoretical and experimental study, we uncovered these qualities for circadian oscillators in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN—the master clock in mammals) and the lung (a peripheral clock): (i) the ratio between stimulus (zeitgeber) strength and oscillator amplitude and (ii) the rigidity of the oscillatory system (relaxation rate upon perturbation) determine entrainment properties. Coupling among oscillators affects both qualities resulting in increased amplitude and rigidity. These principles explain our experimental findings that lung clocks entrain to extreme zeitgeber cycles, whereas SCN clocks do not. We confirmed our theoretical predictions by showing that pharmacological inhibition of coupling in the SCN leads to larger ranges of entrainment. These differences between master and the peripheral clocks suggest that coupling-induced rigidity in the SCN filters environmental noise to create a robust circadian system. PMID:21119632

  13. Tuning the phase of circadian entrainment

    PubMed Central

    Bordyugov, Grigory; Abraham, Ute; Granada, Adrian; Rose, Pia; Imkeller, Katharina; Kramer, Achim; Herzel, Hanspeter

    2015-01-01

    The circadian clock coordinates daily physiological, metabolic and behavioural rhythms. These endogenous oscillations are synchronized with external cues (‘zeitgebers’), such as daily light and temperature cycles. When the circadian clock is entrained by a zeitgeber, the phase difference ψ between the phase of a clock-controlled rhythm and the phase of the zeitgeber is of fundamental importance for the fitness of the organism. The phase of entrainment ψ depends on the mismatch between the intrinsic period τ and the zeitgeber period T and on the ratio of the zeitgeber strength to oscillator amplitude. Motivated by the intriguing complexity of empirical data and by our own experiments on temperature entrainment of mouse suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) slices, we present a theory on how clock and zeitgeber properties determine the phase of entrainment. The wide applicability of the theory is demonstrated using mathematical models of different complexity as well as by experimental data. Predictions of the theory are confirmed by published data on Neurospora crassa strains for different period mismatches τ − T and varying photoperiods. We apply a novel regression technique to analyse entrainment of SCN slices by temperature cycles. We find that mathematical models can explain not only the stable asymptotic phase of entrainment, but also transient phase dynamics. Our theory provides the potential to explore seasonal variations of circadian rhythms, jet lag and shift work in forthcoming studies. PMID:26136227

  14. Circadian behaviour in neuroglobin deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Hundahl, Christian A; Fahrenkrug, Jan; Hay-Schmidt, Anders; Georg, Birgitte; Faltoft, Birgitte; Hannibal, Jens

    2012-01-01

    Neuroglobin (Ngb), a neuron-specific oxygen-binding globin with an unknown function, has been proposed to play a key role in neuronal survival. We have previously shown Ngb to be highly expressed in the rat suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). The present study addresses the effect of Ngb deficiency on circadian behavior. Ngb-deficient and wild-type (wt) mice were placed in running wheels and their activity rhythms, endogenous period and response to light stimuli were investigated. The effect of Ngb deficiency on the expression of Period1 (Per1) and the immediate early gene Fos was determined after light stimulation at night and the neurochemical phenotype of Ngb expressing neurons in wt mice was characterized. Loss of Ngb function had no effect on overall circadian entrainment, but resulted in a significantly larger phase delay of circadian rhythm upon light stimulation at early night. A light-induced increase in Per1, but not Fos, gene expression was observed in Ngb-deficient mice. Ngb expressing neurons which co-stored Gastrin Releasing Peptide (GRP) and were innervated from the eye and the geniculo-hypothalamic tract expressed FOS after light stimulation. No PER1 expression was observed in Ngb-positive neurons. The present study demonstrates for the first time that the genetic elimination of Ngb does not affect core clock function but evokes an increased behavioural response to light concomitant with increased Per1 gene expression in the SCN at early night.

  15. Circadian clock system in the pineal gland.

    PubMed

    Fukada, Yoshitaka; Okano, Toshiyuki

    2002-02-01

    The pineal gland is a neuroendocrine organ that functions as a central circadian oscillator in a variety of nonmammalian vertebrates. In many cases, the pineal gland retains photic input and endocrinal-output pathways both linked tightly to the oscillator. This contrasts well with the mammalian pineal gland equipped only with the output of melatonin production that is subject to neuronal regulation by central circadian oscillator located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus. Molecular studies on animal clock genes were performed first in Drosophila and later developed in rodents. More recently, clock genes such as Per, Cry, Clock, and Bmal have been found in a variety of vertebrate clock structures including the avian pineal gland. The profiles of the temporal change of the clock gene expression in the avian pineal gland are more similar to those in the mammalian SCN rather than to those in the mammalian pineal gland. Avian pineal gland and mammalian SCN seem to share a fundamental molecular framework of the clock oscillator composed of a transcription/translation-based autoregulatory feedback loop. The circadian time-keeping mechanism also requires several post-translational events, such as protein translocation and degradation processes, in which protein phosphorylation plays a very important role for the stable 24-h cycling of the oscillator and/or the photic-input pathway for entrainment of the clock. PMID:11890455

  16. Cardiovascular tissues contain independent circadian clocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, A. J.; London, B.; Block, G. D.; Menaker, M.

    2005-01-01

    Acute cardiovascular events exhibit a circadian rhythm in the frequency of occurrence. The mechanisms underlying these phenomena are not yet fully understood, but they may be due to rhythmicity inherent in the cardiovascular system. We have begun to characterize rhythmicity of the clock gene mPer1 in the rat cardiovascular system. Luciferase activity driven by the mPer1 gene promoter is rhythmic in vitro in heart tissue explants and a wide variety of veins and arteries cultured from the transgenic Per1-luc rat. The tissues showed between 3 and 12 circadian cycles of gene expression in vitro before damping. Whereas peak per1-driven bioluminescence consistently occurred during the late night in the heart and all arteries sampled, the phases of the rhythms in veins varied significantly by anatomical location. Varying the time of the culture procedure relative to the donor animal's light:dark cycle revealed that, unlike some other rat tissues such as liver, the phases of in vitro rhythms of arteries, veins, and heart explants were affected by culture time. However, phase relationships among tissues were consistent across culture times; this suggests diversity in circadian regulation among components of the cardiovascular system.

  17. Circadian Behaviour in Neuroglobin Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Hundahl, Christian A.; Fahrenkrug, Jan; Hay-Schmidt, Anders; Georg, Birgitte; Faltoft, Birgitte; Hannibal, Jens

    2012-01-01

    Neuroglobin (Ngb), a neuron-specific oxygen-binding globin with an unknown function, has been proposed to play a key role in neuronal survival. We have previously shown Ngb to be highly expressed in the rat suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). The present study addresses the effect of Ngb deficiency on circadian behavior. Ngb-deficient and wild-type (wt) mice were placed in running wheels and their activity rhythms, endogenous period and response to light stimuli were investigated. The effect of Ngb deficiency on the expression of Period1 (Per1) and the immediate early gene Fos was determined after light stimulation at night and the neurochemical phenotype of Ngb expressing neurons in wt mice was characterized. Loss of Ngb function had no effect on overall circadian entrainment, but resulted in a significantly larger phase delay of circadian rhythm upon light stimulation at early night. A light-induced increase in Per1, but not Fos, gene expression was observed in Ngb-deficient mice. Ngb expressing neurons which co-stored Gastrin Releasing Peptide (GRP) and were innervated from the eye and the geniculo-hypothalamic tract expressed FOS after light stimulation. No PER1 expression was observed in Ngb-positive neurons. The present study demonstrates for the first time that the genetic elimination of Ngb does not affect core clock function but evokes an increased behavioural response to light concomitant with increased Per1 gene expression in the SCN at early night. PMID:22496809

  18. Environmental synchronizers of squirrel monkey circadian rhythms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sulzman, F. M.; Fuller, C. A.; Moore-Ede, M. C.

    1977-01-01

    Various temporal signals in the environment were tested to determine if they could synchronize the circadian timing system of the squirrel monkey (Saimiri sciureus). The influence of cycles of light and dark, eating and fasting, water availability and deprivation, warm and cool temperature, sound and quiet, and social interaction and isolation on the drinking and activity rhythms of unrestrained monkeys was examined. In the absence of other time cues, 24-hr cycles of each of these potential synchronizers were applied for up to 3 wk, and the periods of the monkey's circadian rhythms were examined. Only light-dark cycles and cycles of food availability were shown to be entraining agents, since they were effective in determining the period and phase of the rhythmic variables. In the presence of each of the other environmental cycles, the monkey's circadian rhythms exhibited free-running periods which were significantly different from 24 hr with all possible phase relationships between the rhythms and the environmental cycles being examined.

  19. Environmental synchronizers of squirrel monkey circadian rhythms.

    PubMed

    Sulzman, F M; Fuller, C A; Moore-Ede, M C

    1977-11-01

    Various temporal signals in the environment were tested to determine if they could synchronize the circadian timing system of the squirrel monkey (Saimiri sciureus). The influence of cycles of light and dark, eating and fasting, water availability and deprivation, warm and cool temperature, sound and quiet, and social interaction and isolation was examined on the drinking and activity rhythms of unrestrained monkeys. In the absence of other time cues, 24-h cycles of each of these potential synchronizers were applied for up to 3 wk, and the periods of the monkey's circadian rhythms were examined. Only light-dark cycles and cycles of food availability were shown to be entraining agents, since they were effective in determining the period and phase of rhythmic variables. In the presence of each of the other environmental cycles, the monkey's circadian rhythms exhibited free-running periods which were significantly different from 24 h with all possible phase relationships between the rhythms and the environmental cycles being examined. PMID:412829

  20. Aligning work and circadian time in shift workers improves sleep and reduces circadian disruption.

    PubMed

    Vetter, Céline; Fischer, Dorothee; Matera, Joana L; Roenneberg, Till

    2015-03-30

    Sleep loss and circadian disruption-a state of misalignment between physiological functions and imposed sleep/wake behavior-supposedly play central roles in the etiology of shift work-related pathologies [1-4]. Circadian entrainment is, however, highly individual [5], resulting in different chronotypes [6, 7]. Chronotype in turn modulates the effects of working times: compared to late chronotypes, earlier ones sleep worse and shorter and show higher levels of circadian misalignment during night shifts, while late types experience more sleep and circadian disruption than early types when working morning shifts [8]. To promote sleep and reduce the mismatch between circadian and working time, we implemented a chronotype-adjusted (CTA) shift schedule in a factory. We abolished the most strenuous shifts for extreme chronotypes (i.e., mornings for late chronotypes, nights for early ones) and examined whether sleep duration and quality, social jetlag [9, 10], wellbeing, subjective stress perception, and satisfaction with leisure time improved in this schedule. Intermediate chronotypes (quartiles 2 and 3) served as a control group, still working morning (6:00-14:00), evening (14:00-22:00), and night (22:00-6:00) shifts, with two strenuous shifts (out of twelve per month) replaced by evening ones. We observed a significant increase of self-reported sleep duration and quality, along with increased wellbeing ratings on workdays among extreme chronotypes. The CTA schedule reduced overall social jetlag by 1 hr, did not alter stress levels, and increased satisfaction with leisure time (early types only). Chronotype-based schedules thus can reduce circadian disruption and improve sleep; potential long-term effects on health and economic indicators need to be elucidated in future studies. PMID:25772446

  1. Circadian and extracircadian exploration during daytime hours of circulating corticosterone and other endocrine chronomes.

    PubMed

    Jozsa, R; Olah, A; Cornélissen, G; Csernus, V; Otsuka, K; Zeman, M; Nagy, G; Kaszaki, J; Stebelova, K; Csokas, N; Pan, W; Herold, M; Bakken, E E; Halberg, F

    2005-10-01

    During 7 consecutive days, blood and several tissues were collected during daytime working hours only, three times per day at 4-h intervals from inbred Wistar rats, which had been previously standardized for 1 month in two rooms on a regimen of 12 h of light (L) alternating with 12 h of darkness (LD12:12). In one room, lights were on from 09:00 to 21:00 and in the other room, lights were on from 21:00 to 09:00 (DL12:12; reversed lighting regimen). This setup provides a convenient design to study circadian and extracircadian variations over long (e.g., 7-day) spans. Prior checking of certain circadian rhythms in animals reared in the room on reversed lighting (DL) as compared with animals in the usual (LD) regimen provided evidence that the 180 degrees phase-shift had occurred. These measurements were limited to the circadian (and not extended to infradian) variation. As marker rhythm, the core temperature of a subsample of rats was measured every 4 h around the clock (by night as well as by day) before the start of the 7-day sampling. An antiphase of the circadian rhythm in core temperature was thus demonstrated between rats in the LD vs. DL rooms. A sex difference in core temperature was also found in each room. A reversed rhythm in animals kept in DL and an antiphase between rats kept in DL vs. LD was again shown for the circulating corticosterone rhythm documented in subsamples of 8 animals of each sex sampled around the clock during the first approximately 1.5 day of the 7-day sampling. The findings were in keeping with the proposition that sampling rats at three timepoints 4 h apart during daytime from two rooms on opposite lighting regimens allows the assessment of circadian changes, the daytime samples from animals kept on the reversed lighting regimen accounting for the samples that would have to be obtained by night from animals kept in the room with the usual lighting regimen. During the 7-day-long follow-up, circadian and extracircadian spectral

  2. Final Report for CRADA Agreement , AL-C-2006-01 with Microsens Biotechnologies: Detection of the Abnormal Prion Protein in Blood by Improving the Extraction of this Protein

    SciTech Connect

    Schmerr, Mary Jo

    2009-03-31

    Several conditions were examined to optimize the extraction protocol using Seprion beads for the abnormal prion protein. Different combinations of water, hexafluro-2-propanol and formic acid were used. The results of these extraction protocols showed that the magnetic beads coated with Seprion reagents were subject to degradation, themselves, when the extraction conditions that would solubilize the abnormal prion protein were used. These compounds caused interference in the immunoassay for the abnormal prion protein and rendered these protocols incompatible with the assay systems. In an attempt to overcome this problem, another approach was then used. The coated beads were used as an integral part of the assay platform. After washing away denaturing agents, the beads with the 'captured' abnormal prion were incubated directly in the immunoassay, followed by analysis by the capillary electrophoresis. When a capillary electrophoresis electro-kinetic separation was attempted, the beads disturbed the analysis making it impossible to interpret. A pressure separation method was then developed for capillary electrophoresis analysis. When 20 samples, 5 of which were positive were analyzed, the assay identified 4 of the 5 positives and had no false positives. When a larger number of samples were analyzed the results were not as good - there were false positives and false negatives. It was then observed that the amount of beads that were loaded was dependent upon how long the beads were allowed to settle before loading them into the capillary. This resulted in unacceptable variations in the results and explained that when large numbers of samples were evaluated the results were not consistent. Because the technical difficulties with using the Seprion beads could not be overcome at this time, another approach is underway that is outside of the scope of this CRADA. No further agreements have been developed. Because the results were not favorable, no manuscripts were written nor

  3. Synergistic interactions between the molecular and neuronal circadian networks drive robust behavioral circadian rhythms in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Ron; Bartok, Osnat; Mezan, Shaul; Malka, Yuval; Kadener, Sebastian

    2014-04-01

    Most organisms use 24-hr circadian clocks to keep temporal order and anticipate daily environmental changes. In Drosophila melanogaster CLOCK (CLK) and CYCLE (CYC) initiates the circadian system by promoting rhythmic transcription of hundreds of genes. However, it is still not clear whether high amplitude transcriptional oscillations are essential for circadian timekeeping. In order to address this issue, we generated flies in which the amplitude of CLK-driven transcription can be reduced partially (approx. 60%) or strongly (90%) without affecting the average levels of CLK-target genes. The impaired transcriptional oscillations lead to low amplitude protein oscillations that were not sufficient to drive outputs of peripheral oscillators. However, circadian rhythms in locomotor activity were resistant to partial reduction in transcriptional and protein oscillations. We found that the resilience of the brain oscillator is depending on the neuronal communication among circadian neurons in the brain. Indeed, the capacity of the brain oscillator to overcome low amplitude transcriptional oscillations depends on the action of the neuropeptide PDF and on the pdf-expressing cells having equal or higher amplitude of molecular rhythms than the rest of the circadian neuronal groups in the fly brain. Therefore, our work reveals the importance of high amplitude transcriptional oscillations for cell-autonomous circadian timekeeping. Moreover, we demonstrate that the circadian neuronal network is an essential buffering system that protects against changes in circadian transcription in the brain. PMID:24698952

  4. Circadian rhythm phase shifts and endogenous free-running circadian period differ between African-Americans and European-Americans.

    PubMed

    Eastman, Charmane I; Suh, Christina; Tomaka, Victoria A; Crowley, Stephanie J

    2015-02-11

    Successful adaptation to modern civilization requires the internal circadian clock to make large phase shifts in response to circumstances (e.g., jet travel and shift work) that were not encountered during most of our evolution. We found that the magnitude and direction of the circadian clock's phase shift after the light/dark and sleep/wake/meal schedule was phase-advanced (made earlier) by 9 hours differed in European-Americans compared to African-Americans. European-Americans had larger phase shifts, but were more likely to phase-delay after the 9-hour advance (to phase shift in the wrong direction). The magnitude and direction of the phase shift was related to the free-running circadian period, and European-Americans had a longer circadian period than African-Americans. Circadian period was related to the percent Sub-Saharan African and European ancestry from DNA samples. We speculate that a short circadian period was advantageous during our evolution in Africa and lengthened with northern migrations out of Africa. The differences in circadian rhythms remaining today are relevant for understanding and treating the modern circadian-rhythm-based disorders which are due to a misalignment between the internal circadian rhythms and the times for sleep, work, school and meals.

  5. Serotonin, a possible intermediate between disturbed circadian rhythms and metabolic disease.

    PubMed

    Versteeg, R I; Serlie, M J; Kalsbeek, A; la Fleur, S E

    2015-08-20

    It is evident that eating in misalignment with the biological clock (such as in shift work, eating late at night and skipping breakfast) is associated with increased risk for obesity and diabetes. The biological clock located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus dictates energy balance including feeding behavior and glucose metabolism. Besides eating and sleeping patterns, glucose metabolism also exhibits clear diurnal variations with higher blood glucose concentrations, glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity prior to waking up. The daily variation in plasma glucose concentrations in rats, is independent of the rhythm in feeding behavior. On the other hand, feeding itself has profound effects on glucose metabolism, but differential effects occur depending on the time of the day. We here review data showing that a disturbed diurnal eating pattern results in alterations in glucose metabolism induced by a disrupted circadian clock. We first describe the role of central serotonin on feeding behavior and glucose metabolism and subsequently describe the effects of central serotonin on the circadian system. We next explore the interaction between the serotonergic system and the circadian clock in conditions of disrupted diurnal rhythms in feeding and how this might be involved in the metabolic dysregulation that occurs with chronodisruption.

  6. Energy intake and the circadian rhythm of core body temperature in sheep

    PubMed Central

    Maloney, Shane K; Meyer, Leith C R; Blache, D; Fuller, A

    2013-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that different levels of energy intake would alter the circadian rhythm of core body temperature (Tc) in ovariectomized sheep. We measured arterial blood temperature every 5 min while ten sheep were offered a maintenance diet, 70% of maintenance requirements, or 150% of maintenance requirements, for 12 days, and later fasted for 2 days. The rhythmicity of Tc was analyzed for its dominant period and then a least-squares cosine wave was fitted to the data that generated a mesor, amplitude, and acrophase for the rhythm. When energy intake was less than maintenance requirements we observed a significant decrease in the mesor and minimum, and a significant increase in the amplitude and goodness of fit, of the body temperature rhythm. Fasting also resulted in a decrease in the maximum of the body temperature rhythm. Feeding the sheep to excess did not affect the mesor or maximum of the rhythm, but did result in a decrease in the goodness of fit of the rhythm in those sheep that consumed more energy than when they were on the maintenance diet, indicating that circadian rhythmicity was decreased when energy intake increased. Our data indicate that modulation of the circadian rhythm of body temperature, characterized by inactive-phase hypothermia, occurs when energy intake is reduced. The response may be an adaptation to energy imbalance in large mammals. PMID:24303185

  7. Energy intake and the circadian rhythm of core body temperature in sheep.

    PubMed

    Maloney, Shane K; Meyer, Leith C R; Blache, D; Fuller, A

    2013-10-01

    We tested the hypothesis that different levels of energy intake would alter the circadian rhythm of core body temperature (Tc) in ovariectomized sheep. We measured arterial blood temperature every 5 min while ten sheep were offered a maintenance diet, 70% of maintenance requirements, or 150% of maintenance requirements, for 12 days, and later fasted for 2 days. The rhythmicity of Tc was analyzed for its dominant period and then a least-squares cosine wave was fitted to the data that generated a mesor, amplitude, and acrophase for the rhythm. When energy intake was less than maintenance requirements we observed a significant decrease in the mesor and minimum, and a significant increase in the amplitude and goodness of fit, of the body temperature rhythm. Fasting also resulted in a decrease in the maximum of the body temperature rhythm. Feeding the sheep to excess did not affect the mesor or maximum of the rhythm, but did result in a decrease in the goodness of fit of the rhythm in those sheep that consumed more energy than when they were on the maintenance diet, indicating that circadian rhythmicity was decreased when energy intake increased. Our data indicate that modulation of the circadian rhythm of body temperature, characterized by inactive-phase hypothermia, occurs when energy intake is reduced. The response may be an adaptation to energy imbalance in large mammals.

  8. Influence of estrous and circadian cycles on calcium intake of the rat.

    PubMed

    Voznesenskaya, Anna; Tordoff, Michael G

    2013-03-15

    The food, water and sodium intake of laboratory rats fluctuates over the circadian and estrous cycles. Blood calcium and calcium-regulating hormones also wax and wane in response to these cycles, raising the possibility that the same might be true of calcium intake. To investigate this, we monitored the fluid intakes of female Long-Evans rats given a choice between water and 10mM CaCl2 solution for two consecutive estrous cycles. We found that calcium solution intake changed over the circadian cycle in a similar manner to water intake; the preference scores for CaCl2 solution remained stable. We did not detect any changes in calcium solution intake or preference scores during the estrous cycle despite a decrease in fluid intake at estrus. Thus, fluctuations in intake of calcium solution during the circadian cycle appear to be nonspecific and probably the result of changes in fluid balance. Estrous changes either do not influence calcium intake or their effects are masked by other factors, resulting in stable levels of calcium intake.

  9. [Hair shaft abnormalities].

    PubMed

    Itin, P H; Düggelin, M

    2002-05-01

    Hair shaft disorders may lead to brittleness and uncombable hair. In general the hair feels dry and lusterless. Hair shaft abnormalities may occur as localized or generalized disorders. Genetic predisposition or exogenous factors are able to produce and maintain hair shaft abnormalities. In addition to an extensive history and physical examination the most important diagnostic examination to analyze a hair shaft problem is light microscopy. Therapy of hair shaft disorders should focus to the cause. In addition, minimizing traumatic influences to hair shafts, such as dry hair with an electric dryer, permanent waves and dyes is important. A short hair style is more suitable for such patients with hair shaft disorders.

  10. Circadian arrhythmia dysregulates emotional behaviors in aged Siberian hamsters

    PubMed Central

    Prendergast, Brian J.; Onishi, Kenneth G.; Patel, Priyesh N.; Stevenson, Tyler J.

    2014-01-01

    Emotional behaviors are influenced by the circadian timing system. Circadian disruptions are associated with depressive-like symptoms in clinical and preclinical populations. Circadian rhythm robustness declines markedly with aging and may contribute to susceptibility to emotional dysregulation in aged individuals. The present experiments used a model of chronic circadian arrhythmia generated noninvasively, via a series of circadian-disruptive light treatments, to investigate interactions between circadian desynchrony and aging on depressive- and anxiety-like behaviors, and on limbic neuroinflammatory gene expression that has been linked with emotionality. We also examined whether a social manipulation (group housing) would attenuate effects of arrhythmia on emotionality. In aged (14-18 months of age) male Siberian hamsters, circadian arrhythmia increased behavioral despair and decreased social motivation, but decreased exploratory anxiety. These effects were not evident in younger (5-9 months of age) hamsters. Social housing (3-5 hamsters/cage) abolished the effects of circadian arrhythmia on emotionality. Circadian arrhythmia alone was without effect on hippocampal or cortical interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (Ido) mRNA expression in aged hamsters, but social housing decreased hippocampal IL-1β and Ido mRNAs. The data demonstrate that circadian disruption can negatively impact affective state, and that this effect is pronounced in older individuals. Although clear associations between circadian arrhythmia and constitutive limbic proinflammatory activity were not evident, the present data suggest that social housing markedly inhibits constitutive hippocampal IL-1β and Ido activity, which may contribute to the ameliorating effects of social housing on a number of emotional behaviors. PMID:24333374

  11. Circadian arrhythmia dysregulates emotional behaviors in aged Siberian hamsters.

    PubMed

    Prendergast, Brian J; Onishi, Kenneth G; Patel, Priyesh N; Stevenson, Tyler J

    2014-03-15

    Emotional behaviors are influenced by the circadian timing system. Circadian disruptions are associated with depressive-like symptoms in clinical and preclinical populations. Circadian rhythm robustness declines markedly with aging and may contribute to susceptibility to emotional dysregulation in aged individuals. The present experiments used a model of chronic circadian arrhythmia generated noninvasively, via a series of circadian-disruptive light treatments, to investigate interactions between circadian desynchrony and aging on depressive- and anxiety-like behaviors, and on limbic neuroinflammatory gene expression that has been linked with emotionality. We also examined whether a social manipulation (group housing) would attenuate effects of arrhythmia on emotionality. In aged (14-18 months of age) male Siberian hamsters, circadian arrhythmia increased behavioral despair and decreased social motivation, but decreased exploratory anxiety. These effects were not evident in younger (5-9 months of age) hamsters. Social housing (3-5 hamsters/cage) abolished the effects of circadian arrhythmia on emotionality. Circadian arrhythmia alone was without effect on hippocampal or cortical interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (Ido) mRNA expression in aged hamsters, but social housing decreased hippocampal IL-1β and Ido mRNAs. The data demonstrate that circadian disruption can negatively impact affective state, and that this effect is pronounced in older individuals. Although clear associations between circadian arrhythmia and constitutive limbic proinflammatory activity were not evident, the present data suggest that social housing markedly inhibits constitutive hippocampal IL-1β and Ido activity, which may contribute to the ameliorating effects of social housing on a number of emotional behaviors.

  12. Circadian integration of sleep-wake and feeding requires NPY receptor-expressing neurons in the mediobasal hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Wiater, M F; Mukherjee, S; Li, A-J; Dinh, T T; Rooney, E M; Simasko, S M; Ritter, S

    2011-11-01

    Sleep and feeding rhythms are highly coordinated across the circadian cycle, but the brain sites responsible for this coordination are unknown. We examined the role of neuropeptide Y (NPY) receptor-expressing neurons in the mediobasal hypothalamus (MBH) in this process by injecting the targeted toxin, NPY-saporin (NPY-SAP), into the arcuate nucleus (Arc). NPY-SAP-lesioned rats were initially hyperphagic, became obese, exhibited sustained disruption of circadian feeding patterns, and had abnormal circadian distribution of sleep-wake patterns. Total amounts of rapid eye movement sleep (REMS) and non-REMS (NREMS) were not altered by NPY-SAP lesions, but a peak amount of REMS was permanently displaced to the dark period, and circadian variation in NREMS was eliminated. The phase reversal of REMS to the dark period by the lesion suggests that REMS timing is independently linked to the function of MBH NPY receptor-expressing neurons and is not dependent on NREMS pattern, which was altered but not phase reversed by the lesion. Sleep-wake patterns were altered in controls by restricting feeding to the light period, but were not altered in NPY-SAP rats by restricting feeding to either the light or dark period, indicating that disturbed sleep-wake patterns in lesioned rats were not secondary to changes in food intake. Sleep abnormalities persisted even after hyperphagia abated during the static phase of the lesion. Results suggest that the MBH is required for the essential task of integrating sleep-wake and feeding rhythms, a function that allows animals to accommodate changeable patterns of food availability. NPY receptor-expressing neurons are key components of this integrative function.

  13. Glucocorticoids Induce Nondipping Blood Pressure by Activating the Thiazide-Sensitive Cotransporter

    PubMed Central

    Ivy, Jessica R.; Oosthuyzen, Wilna; Peltz, Theresa S.; Howarth, Amelia R.; Hunter, Robert W.; Dhaun, Neeraj; Al-Dujaili, Emad A.S.; Webb, David J.; Dear, James W.; Flatman, Peter W.

    2016-01-01

    Blood pressure (BP) normally dips during sleep, and nondipping increases cardiovascular risk. Hydrochlorothiazide restores the dipping BP profile in nondipping patients, suggesting that the NaCl cotransporter, NCC, is an important determinant of daily BP variation. NCC activity in cells is regulated by the circadian transcription factor per1. In vivo, circadian genes are entrained via the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis. Here, we test whether abnormalities in the day:night variation of circulating glucocorticoid influence NCC activity and BP control. C57BL6/J mice were culled at the peak (1:00 AM) and trough (1:00 PM) of BP. We found no day:night variation in NCC mRNA or protein but NCC phosphorylation on threonine53 (pNCC), required for NCC activation, was higher when mice were awake, as was excretion of NCC in urinary exosomes. Peak NCC activity correlated with peak expression of per2 and bmal1 (clock genes) and sgk1 and tsc22d3 (glucocorticoid-responsive kinases). Adrenalectomy reduced NCC abundance and blunted the daily variation in pNCC levels without affecting variation in clock gene transcription. Chronic corticosterone infusion increased bmal1, per1, sgk1, and tsc22d3 expression during the inactive phase. Inactive phase pNCC was also elevated by corticosterone, and a nondipping BP profile was induced. Hydrochlorothiazide restored rhythmicity of BP in corticosterone-treated mice without affecting BP in controls. Glucocorticoids influence the day:night variation in NCC activity via kinases that control phosphorylation. Abnormal glucocorticoid rhythms impair NCC and induce nondipping. Night-time dosing of thiazides may be particularly beneficial in patients with modest glucocorticoid excess. PMID:26953322

  14. [Smith-Magenis syndrome is an association of behavioral and sleep/wake circadian rhythm disorders].

    PubMed

    Poisson, A; Nicolas, A; Sanlaville, D; Cochat, P; De Leersnyder, H; Rigard, C; Franco, P; des Portes, V; Edery, P; Demily, C

    2015-06-01

    Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS) is a genetic disorder characterized by the association of facial dysmorphism, oral speech delay, as well as behavioral and sleep/wake circadian rhythm disorders. Most SMS cases (90%) are due to a 17p11.2 deletion encompassing the RAI1 gene; other cases stem from mutations of the RAI1 gene. Behavioral issues may include frequent outbursts, attention deficit/hyperactivity disorders, self-injuries with onychotillomania and polyembolokoilamania (insertion of objects into bodily orifices), etc. It is noteworthy that the longer the speech delay and the more severe the sleep disorders, the more severe the behavioral issues are. Typical sleep/wake circadian rhythm disorders associate excessive daytime sleepiness with nocturnal agitation. They are related to an inversion of the physiological melatonin secretion cycle. Yet, with an adapted therapeutic strategy, circadian rhythm disorders can radically improve. Usually an association of beta-blockers in the morning (stops daily melatonin secretion) and melatonin in the evening (mimics the evening deficient peak) is used. Once the sleep disorders are controlled, effective treatment of the remaining psychiatric features is needed. Unfortunately, as for many orphan diseases, objective guidelines have not been drawn up. However, efforts should be focused on improving communication skills. In the same vein, attention deficit/hyperactivity disorders, aggressiveness, and anxiety should be identified and specifically treated. This whole appropriate medical management is underpinned by the diagnosis of SMS. Diagnostic strategies include fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) or array comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH) when a microdeletion is sought and Sanger sequencing when a point mutation is suspected. Thus, the diagnosis of SMS can be made from a simple blood sample and should be questioned in subjects of any age presenting with an association of facial dysmorphism, speech delay with

  15. [Smith-Magenis syndrome is an association of behavioral and sleep/wake circadian rhythm disorders].

    PubMed

    Poisson, A; Nicolas, A; Sanlaville, D; Cochat, P; De Leersnyder, H; Rigard, C; Franco, P; des Portes, V; Edery, P; Demily, C

    2015-06-01

    Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS) is a genetic disorder characterized by the association of facial dysmorphism, oral speech delay, as well as behavioral and sleep/wake circadian rhythm disorders. Most SMS cases (90%) are due to a 17p11.2 deletion encompassing the RAI1 gene; other cases stem from mutations of the RAI1 gene. Behavioral issues may include frequent outbursts, attention deficit/hyperactivity disorders, self-injuries with onychotillomania and polyembolokoilamania (insertion of objects into bodily orifices), etc. It is noteworthy that the longer the speech delay and the more severe the sleep disorders, the more severe the behavioral issues are. Typical sleep/wake circadian rhythm disorders associate excessive daytime sleepiness with nocturnal agitation. They are related to an inversion of the physiological melatonin secretion cycle. Yet, with an adapted therapeutic strategy, circadian rhythm disorders can radically improve. Usually an association of beta-blockers in the morning (stops daily melatonin secretion) and melatonin in the evening (mimics the evening deficient peak) is used. Once the sleep disorders are controlled, effective treatment of the remaining psychiatric features is needed. Unfortunately, as for many orphan diseases, objective guidelines have not been drawn up. However, efforts should be focused on improving communication skills. In the same vein, attention deficit/hyperactivity disorders, aggressiveness, and anxiety should be identified and specifically treated. This whole appropriate medical management is underpinned by the diagnosis of SMS. Diagnostic strategies include fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) or array comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH) when a microdeletion is sought and Sanger sequencing when a point mutation is suspected. Thus, the diagnosis of SMS can be made from a simple blood sample and should be questioned in subjects of any age presenting with an association of facial dysmorphism, speech delay with

  16. Sleep and circadian rhythms in hospitalized patients with decompensated cirrhosis: effect of light therapy.

    PubMed

    De Rui, M; Middleton, B; Sticca, A; Gatta, A; Amodio, P; Skene, D J; Montagnese, S

    2015-02-01

    Patients with liver cirrhosis often exhibit sleep-wake abnormalities, which are, at least to some extent, circadian in origin. A relatively novel non-pharmacological approach to circadian disruption is appropriately timed bright light therapy. The aims of this pilot study were to investigate sleep-wake characteristics of a well-characterized population of inpatients with cirrhosis, and to evaluate the efficacy of bright light therapy in the hospital setting. Twelve consecutive inpatients with cirrhosis underwent complete sleep-wake assessment, to include qualitative and semi-quantitative (actigraphic) indices of night-time sleep quality, daytime sleepiness, diurnal preference, habitual sleep timing, quality of life, mood and circadian rhythmicity [i.e. urine collections for measurement of the melatonin metabolite 6-sulphatoxymelatonin (aMT6s)]. Patients showed extremely impaired night sleep quality (Pittsburg Sleep Quality Index global score: 16.3 ± 2.1) and daytime sleepiness was common (Epworth Sleepiness Scale: 8.3 ± 3.2). Five patients were randomly assigned to a single room in which lighting was controlled in relation to timing, spectral composition and intensity (lights on at 06:30 and off at 22:30, blue-enriched, more intense light in the morning, red-enriched, less intense light in the afternoon/evening); the others stayed in identical rooms with standard lighting. Sleep diaries revealed poor sleep quality, prolonged sleep latency (67 ± 138 min) and a reduced sleep efficiency (69 ± 21%). These features were confirmed by actigraphy (sleep efficiency: 71 ± 13%; fragmentation index: 55 ± 15%). Quality of life was globally impaired, and mood moderately depressed (Beck Depression Inventory: 19.4 ± 7.9). Seven patients underwent serial urine collections: no circadian aMT6s rhythm was detected in any of them, neither at baseline, nor during the course of hospitalization in either room (n = 4). In conclusion, sleep and circadian rhythms in hospitalized

  17. The impact of kidney transplantation on 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure in end-stage renal disease patients.

    PubMed

    Lee, Myung Hyun; Ko, Kyung Min; Ahn, Seung Won; Bae, Myoung Nam; Choi, Bum Soon; Park, Cheol Whee; Kim, Yong-Soo; Yang, Chul Woo; Chung, Byung Ha

    2015-06-01

    In this study, we prospectively investigated the impact of kidney transplantation (KT) on the status of hypertension, including circadian rhythm in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients. We performed 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure (BP) monitoring and office BP measurement in 48 patients before and 1 year after KT. According to the nocturnal reduction in systolic BP (ΔSBP), the patients were divided into dippers, non-dippers, and reverse dippers. After KT, the mean BP value in office BP and 24-hour ambulatory BP monitoring did not change, but the proportion of patients taking anti-hypertensive drugs and the pill number significantly decreased. In contrast, the mean ΔSBP significantly decreased, and the proportion of non-dippers and reverse dippers did not decrease. Decrease in ΔSBP after KT was associated with inferior allograft function during follow-up. Our study suggests that KT improved the overall BP level, but it did not affect abnormal circadian rhythm in ESRD patients. PMID:26051924

  18. Estimating trace deposition time with circadian biomarkers: a prospective and versatile tool for crime scene reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Ackermann, Katrin; Ballantyne, Kaye N; Kayser, Manfred

    2010-09-01

    Linking biological samples found at a crime scene with the actual crime event represents the most important aspect of forensic investigation, together with the identification of the sample donor. While DNA profiling is well established for donor identification, no reliable methods exist for timing forensic samples. Here, we provide for the first time a biochemical approach for determining deposition time of human traces. Using commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays we showed that the characteristic 24-h profiles of two circadian hormones, melatonin (concentration peak at late night) and cortisol (peak in the morning) can be reproduced from small samples of whole blood and saliva. We further demonstrated by analyzing small stains dried and stored up to 4 weeks the in vitro stability of melatonin, whereas for cortisol a statistically significant decay with storage time was observed, although the hormone was still reliably detectable in 4-week-old samples. Finally, we showed that the total protein concentration, also assessed using a commercial assay, can be used for normalization of hormone signals in blood, but less so in saliva. Our data thus demonstrate that estimating normalized concentrations of melatonin and cortisol represents a prospective approach for determining deposition time of biological trace samples, at least from blood, with promising expectations for forensic applications. In the broader context, our study opens up a new field of circadian biomarkers for deposition timing of forensic traces; future studies using other circadian biomarkers may reveal if the time range offered by the two hormones studied here can be specified more exactly. PMID:20419380

  19. Circadian rhythms and endocrine functions in adult insects.

    PubMed

    Bloch, Guy; Hazan, Esther; Rafaeli, Ada

    2013-01-01

    Many behavioral and physiological processes in adult insects are influenced by both the endocrine and circadian systems, suggesting that these two key physiological systems interact. We reviewed the literature and found that experiments explicitly testing these interactions in adult insects have only been conducted for a few species. There is a shortage of measurements of hormone titers throughout the day under constant conditions even for the juvenile hormones (JHs) and ecdysteroids, the best studied insect hormones. Nevertheless, the available measurements of hormone titers coupled with indirect evidence for circadian modulation of hormone biosynthesis rate, and the expression of genes encoding proteins involved in hormone biosynthesis, binding or degradation are consistent with the hypothesis that the circulating levels of many insect hormones are influenced by the circadian system. Whole genome microarray studies suggest that the modulation of farnesol oxidase levels is important for the circadian regulation of JH biosynthesis in honey bees, mosquitoes, and fruit flies. Several studies have begun to address the functional significance of circadian oscillations in endocrine signaling. The best understood system is the circadian regulation of Pheromone Biosynthesis Activating Neuropeptide (PBAN) titers which is important for the temporal organization of sexual behavior in female moths. The evidence that the circadian and endocrine systems interact has important implications for studies of insect physiology and behavior. Additional studies on diverse species and physiological processes are needed for identifying basic principles underlying the interactions between the circadian and endocrine systems in insects.

  20. Circadian Modulation of Short-Term Memory in "Drosophila"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyons, Lisa C.; Roman, Gregg

    2009-01-01

    Endogenous biological clocks are widespread regulators of behavior and physiology, allowing for a more efficient allocation of efforts and resources over the course of a day. The extent that different processes are regulated by circadian oscillators, however, is not fully understood. We investigated the role of the circadian clock on short-term…

  1. Regulation of circadian rhythms in mammals by behavioral arousal.

    PubMed

    Webb, Ian C; Antle, Michael C; Mistlberger, Ralph E

    2014-06-01

    Circadian rhythms in most mammals are synchronized to local time by phase and period resetting actions of daily light-dark cycles on a retino-recipient, light-entrainable circadian pacemaker, the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). The SCN receives input from other brain regions, some of which mediate the phase and period resetting actions of behavioral arousal on circadian rhythms. We review historical milestones in the discovery of so-called "nonphotic" circadian clock resetting induced by environmentally stimulated arousal, or by feedback from clock-controlled rest-activity cycles. Topics include species generality, interactions between concurrent or successive photic and nonphotic inputs to the circadian clock, neural pathways, neurotransmitters, and clock cell responses that mediate resetting by behavioral arousal. The role of behavioral inputs to the circadian clock in determining the phase of entrainment to local time in natural environments is not well understood. Nonetheless, nonphotic effects are of sufficient magnitude to raise issues for the design of experiments in behavioral neuroscience (any procedure that is sufficiently arousing may alter the timing of circadian clocks that regulate dependent variables of primary interest). Nonphotic inputs to the clock may be exploited in strategies to reset or strengthen circadian rhythms in humans. PMID:24773430

  2. MicroRNA-mediated regulation in the mammalian circadian rhythm.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kaihui; Wang, Ruiqi

    2012-07-01

    Mammalian circadian rhythms have been extensively studied for many years and many computational models have been presented. Most of the circadian rhythms are based on interlocked positive and negative feedback loops involving coding regions of some 'clock' genes. Recent works have implicated that microRNAs (miRNAs) may play crucial roles in modulating the circadian clock. Here we develop a computational model involving four genes, Per, Cry, Bmal1, and Clock, and two miRNAs, miRNA-219 and miRNA-132, to show their post-transcriptional roles in the modulation of the circadian rhythm. The model is based on experimental observations, by which the miRNAs are incorporated into a classic model including only coding genes. In agreement with experimental observations, the model predicts that miRNA-mediated regulation plays critical roles in modulating the circadian clock. In addition, parameter sensitivity analysis indicates that the period of circadian rhythm with miRNA-mediated regulation is more insensitive to perturbations, showing that the miRNA-mediated regulation can enhance the robustness of the circadian rhythms. This study may help us understand the microRNA-mediated regulation in the mammalian circadian rhythm more clearly.

  3. Regulation of circadian rhythms in mammals by behavioral arousal.

    PubMed

    Webb, Ian C; Antle, Michael C; Mistlberger, Ralph E

    2014-06-01

    Circadian rhythms in most mammals are synchronized to local time by phase and period resetting actions of daily light-dark cycles on a retino-recipient, light-entrainable circadian pacemaker, the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). The SCN receives input from other brain regions, some of which mediate the phase and period resetting actions of behavioral arousal on circadian rhythms. We review historical milestones in the discovery of so-called "nonphotic" circadian clock resetting induced by environmentally stimulated arousal, or by feedback from clock-controlled rest-activity cycles. Topics include species generality, interactions between concurrent or successive photic and nonphotic inputs to the circadian clock, neural pathways, neurotransmitters, and clock cell responses that mediate resetting by behavioral arousal. The role of behavioral inputs to the circadian clock in determining the phase of entrainment to local time in natural environments is not well understood. Nonetheless, nonphotic effects are of sufficient magnitude to raise issues for the design of experiments in behavioral neuroscience (any procedure that is sufficiently arousing may alter the timing of circadian clocks that regulate dependent variables of primary interest). Nonphotic inputs to the clock may be exploited in strategies to reset or strengthen circadian rhythms in humans.

  4. Circadian Activity Rhythms, Time Urgency, and Achievement Concerns.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watts, Barbara L.

    Many physiological and psychological processes fluctuate throughout the day in fairly stable, rhythmic patterns. The relationship between individual differences in circadian activity rhythms and a sense of time urgency were explored as well as a number of achievement-related variables. Undergraduates (N=308), whose circadian activity rhythms were…

  5. Bidirectional Interactions between Circadian Entrainment and Cognitive Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gritton, Howard J.; Kantorowski, Ana; Sarter, Martin; Lee, Theresa M.

    2012-01-01

    Circadian rhythms influence a variety of physiological and behavioral processes; however, little is known about how circadian rhythms interact with the organisms' ability to acquire and retain information about their environment. These experiments tested whether rats trained outside their endogenous active period demonstrate the same rate of…

  6. The Molecular Circadian Clock and Alcohol-Induced Liver Injury

    PubMed Central

    Udoh, Uduak S.; Valcin, Jennifer A.; Gamble, Karen L.; Bailey, Shannon M.

    2015-01-01

    Emerging evidence from both experimental animal studies and clinical human investigations demonstrates strong connections among circadian processes, alcohol use, and alcohol-induced tissue injury. Components of the circadian clock have been shown to influence the pathophysiological effects of alcohol. Conversely, alcohol may alter the expression of circadian clock genes and the rhythmic behavioral and metabolic processes they regulate. Therefore, we propose that alcohol-mediated disruption in circadian rhythms likely underpins many adverse health effects of alcohol that cut across multiple organ systems. In this review, we provide an overview of the circadian clock mechanism and showcase results from new studies in the alcohol field implicating the circadian clock as a key target of alcohol action and toxicity in the liver. We discuss various molecular events through which alcohol may work to negatively impact circadian clock-mediated processes in the liver, and contribute to tissue pathology. Illuminating the mechanistic connections between the circadian clock and alcohol will be critical to the development of new preventative and pharmacological treatments for alcohol use disorders and alcohol-mediated organ diseases. PMID:26473939

  7. Circadian clock genes universally control key agricultural traits

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Circadian clocks are endogenous timers that enable plants to synchronize biological processes with daily and seasonal environmental conditions in order to allocate resources during the most beneficial times of day and year. The circadian clock regulates a number of central plant activities, includin...

  8. Programming of Mice Circadian Photic Responses by Postnatal Light Environment

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, Elisabeth; Patel, Dhruval; Canal, Maria Mercè

    2014-01-01

    Early life programming has important consequences for future health and wellbeing. A key new aspect is the impact of perinatal light on the circadian system. Postnatal light environment will program circadian behavior, together with cell morphology and clock gene function within the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus, the principal circadian clock in mammals. Nevertheless, it is still not clear whether the observed changes reflect a processing of an altered photic input from the retina, rather than an imprinting of the intrinsic molecular clock mechanisms. Here, we addressed the issue by systematically probing the mouse circadian system at various levels. Firstly, we used electroretinography, pupillometry and histology protocols to show that gross retinal function and morphology in the adult are largely independent of postnatal light experiences that modulate circadian photosensitivity. Secondly, we used circadian activity protocols to show that only the animal's behavioral responses to chronic light exposure, but not to constant darkness or the acute responses to a light stimulus depend on postnatal light experience. Thirdly, we used real-time PER2::LUC rhythm recording to show long-term changes in clock gene expression in the SCN, but also heart, lung and spleen. The data showed that perinatal light mainly targets the long-term adaptive responses of the circadian clock to environmental light, rather than the retina or intrinsic clock mechanisms. Finally, we found long-term effects on circadian peripheral clocks, suggesting far-reaching consequences for the animal's overall physiology. PMID:24842115

  9. Circadian clocks and memory: time-place learning

    PubMed Central

    Mulder, C. K.; Gerkema, M. P.; Van der Zee, E. A.

    2013-01-01

    Time-Place learning (TPL) refers to the ability of animals to remember important events that vary in both time and place. This ability is thought to be functional to optimize resource localization and predator avoidance in a circadian changing environment. Various studies have indicated that animals use their circadian system for TPL. However, not much is known about this specific role of the circadian system in cognition. This review aims to put TPL in a broader context and to provide an overview of historical background, functional aspects, and future perspectives of TPL. Recent advances have increased our knowledge on establishing TPL in a laboratory setting, leading to the development of a behavioral paradigm demonstrating the circadian nature of TPL in mice. This has enabled the investigation of circadian clock components on a functional behavioral level. Circadian TPL (cTPL) was found to be Cry clock gene dependent, confirming the essential role of Cry genes in circadian rhythms. In contrast, preliminary results have shown that cTPL is independent of Per genes. Circadian system decline with aging predicts that cTPL is age sensitive, potentially qualifying TPL as a functional model for episodic memory and aging. The underlying neurobiological mechanism of TPL awaits further examination. Here we discuss some putative mechanisms. PMID:23596390

  10. Intrinsic, nondeterministic circadian rhythm generation in identified mammalian neurons.

    PubMed

    Webb, Alexis B; Angelo, Nikhil; Huettner, James E; Herzog, Erik D

    2009-09-22

    Circadian rhythms are modeled as reliable and self-sustained oscillations generated by single cells. The mammalian suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) keeps near 24-h time in vivo and in vitro, but the identity of the individual cellular pacemakers is unknown. We tested the hypothesis that circadian cycling is intrinsic to a unique class of SCN neurons by measuring firing rate or Period2 gene expression in single neurons. We found that fully isolated SCN neurons can sustain circadian cycling for at least 1 week. Plating SCN neurons at <100 cells/mm(2) eliminated synaptic inputs and revealed circadian neurons that contained arginine vasopressin (AVP) or vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) or neither. Surprisingly, arrhythmic neurons (nearly 80% of recorded neurons) also expressed these neuropeptides. Furthermore, neurons were observed to lose or gain circadian rhythmicity in these dispersed cell cultures, both spontaneously and in response to forskolin stimulation. In SCN explants treated with tetrodotoxin to block spike-dependent signaling, neurons gained or lost circadian cycling over many days. The rate of PERIOD2 protein accumulation on the previous cycle reliably predicted the spontaneous onset of arrhythmicity. We conclude that individual SCN neurons can generate circadian oscillations; however, there is no evidence for a specialized or anatomically localized class of cell-autonomous pacemakers. Instead, these results indicate that AVP, VIP, and other SCN neurons are intrinsic but unstable circadian oscillators that rely on network interactions to stabilize their otherwise noisy cycling. PMID:19805326

  11. Integration of human sleep-wake regulation and circadian rhythmicity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dijk, Derk-Jan; Lockley, Steven W.

    2002-01-01

    The human sleep-wake cycle is generated by a circadian process, originating from the suprachiasmatic nuclei, in interaction with a separate oscillatory process: the sleep homeostat. The sleep-wake cycle is normally timed to occur at a specific phase relative to the external cycle of light-dark exposure. It is also timed at a specific phase relative to internal circadian rhythms, such as the pineal melatonin rhythm, the circadian sleep-wake propensity rhythm, and the rhythm of responsiveness of the circadian pacemaker to light. Variations in these internal and external phase relationships, such as those that occur in blindness, aging, morning and evening, and advanced and delayed sleep-phase syndrome, lead to sleep disruptions and complaints. Changes in ocular circadian photoreception, interindividual variation in the near-24-h intrinsic period of the circadian pacemaker, and sleep homeostasis can contribute to variations in external and internal phase. Recent findings on the physiological and molecular-genetic correlates of circadian sleep disorders suggest that the timing of the sleep-wake cycle and circadian rhythms is closely integrated but is, in part, regulated differentially.

  12. Physiological effects of light on the human circadian pacemaker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shanahan, T. L.; Czeisler, C. A.

    2000-01-01

    The physiology of the human circadian pacemaker and its influence and on the daily organization of sleep, endocrine and behavioral processes is an emerging interest in science and medicine. Understanding the development, organization and fundamental properties underlying the circadian timing system may provide insight for the application of circadian principles to the practice of clinical medicine, both diagnostically (interpretation of certain clinical tests are dependent on time of day) and therapeutically (certain pharmacological responses vary with the time of day). The light-dark cycle is the most powerful external influence acting upon the human circadian pacemaker. It has been shown that timed exposure to light can both synchronize and reset the phase of the circadian pacemaker in a predictable manner. The emergence of detectable circadian rhythmicity in the neonatal period is under investigation (as described elsewhere in this issue). Therefore, the pattern of light exposure provided in the neonatal intensive care setting has implications. One recent study identified differences in both amount of sleep time and weight gain in infants maintained in a neonatal intensive care environment that controlled the light-dark cycle. Unfortunately, neither circadian phase nor the time of day has been considered in most clinical investigations. Further studies with knowledge of principles characterizing the human circadian timing system, which governs a wide array of physiological processes, are required to integrate these findings with the practice of clinical medicine.

  13. The Molecular Circadian Clock and Alcohol-Induced Liver Injury.

    PubMed

    Udoh, Uduak S; Valcin, Jennifer A; Gamble, Karen L; Bailey, Shannon M

    2015-10-14

    Emerging evidence from both experimental animal studies and clinical human investigations demonstrates strong connections among circadian processes, alcohol use, and alcohol-induced tissue injury. Components of the circadian clock have been shown to influence the pathophysiological effects of alcohol. Conversely, alcohol may alter the expression of circadian clock genes and the rhythmic behavioral and metabolic processes they regulate. Therefore, we propose that alcohol-mediated disruption in circadian rhythms likely underpins many adverse health effects of alcohol that cut across multiple organ systems. In this review, we provide an overview of the circadian clock mechanism and showcase results from new studies in the alcohol field implicating the circadian clock as a key target of alcohol action and toxicity in the liver. We discuss various molecular events through which alcohol may work to negatively impact circadian clock-mediated processes in the liver, and contribute to tissue pathology. Illuminating the mechanistic connections between the circadian clock and alcohol will be critical to the development of new preventative and pharmacological treatments for alcohol use disorders and alcohol-mediated organ diseases.

  14. Transcriptional Control of Antioxidant Defense by the Circadian Clock

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Sonal A.; Velingkaar, Nikkhil S.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: The circadian clock, an internal timekeeping system, is implicated in the regulation of metabolism and physiology, and circadian dysfunctions are associated with pathological changes in model organisms and increased risk of some diseases in humans. Recent Advances: Data obtained in different organisms, including humans, have established a tight connection between the clock and cellular redox signaling making it among the major candidates for a link between the circadian system and physiological processes. Critical Issues: In spite of the recent progress in understanding the importance of the circadian clock in the regulation of reactive oxygen species homeostasis, molecular mechanisms and key regulators are mostly unknown. Future Directions: Here we review, with an emphasis on transcriptional control, the circadian-clock-dependent control of oxidative stress response system as a potential mechanism in age-associated diseases. We will discuss the roles of the core clock components such as brain and muscle ARNT-like 1, Circadian Locomotor Output Cycles Kaput, the circadian-clock-controlled transcriptional factors such as nuclear factor erythroid-2-related factor, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor and circadian clock control chromatin modifying enzymes from sirtuin family in the regulation of cellular and organism antioxidant defense. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 2997–3006. PMID:24111970

  15. Sex Differences in Circadian Timing Systems: Implications for Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Matthew; Silver, Rae

    2014-01-01

    Virtually every eukaryotic cell has an endogenous circadian clock and a biological sex. These cell-based clocks have been conceptualized as oscillators whose phase can be reset by internal signals such as hormones, and external cues such as light. The present review highlights the inter-relationship between circadian clocks and sex differences. In mammals, the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) serves as a master clock synchronizing the phase of clocks throughout the body. Gonadal steroid receptors are expressed in almost every site that receives direct SCN input. Here we review sex differences in the circadian timing system in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis (HPG), the hypothalamicadrenal-pituitary (HPA) axis, and sleep-arousal systems. We also point to ways in which disruption of circadian rhythms within these systems differs in the sexes and is associated with dysfunction and disease. Understanding sex differentiated circadian timing systems can lead to improved treatment strategies for these conditions. PMID:24287074

  16. Circadian Effects on Simple Components of Complex Task Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clegg, Benjamin A.; Wickens, Christopher D.; Vieane, Alex Z.; Gutzwiller, Robert S.; Sebok, Angelia L.

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study was to advance understanding and prediction of the impact of circadian rhythm on aspects of complex task performance during unexpected automation failures, and subsequent fault management. Participants trained on two tasks: a process control simulation, featuring automated support; and a multi-tasking platform. Participants then completed one task in a very early morning (circadian night) session, and the other during a late afternoon (circadian day) session. Small effects of time of day were seen on simple components of task performance, but impacts on more demanding components, such as those that occur following an automation failure, were muted relative to previous studies where circadian rhythm was compounded with sleep deprivation and fatigue. Circadian low participants engaged in compensatory strategies, rather than passively monitoring the automation. The findings and implications are discussed in the context of a model that includes the effects of sleep and fatigue factors.

  17. Sex differences in circadian timing systems: implications for disease.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Matthew; Silver, Rae

    2014-01-01

    Virtually every eukaryotic cell has an endogenous circadian clock and a biological sex. These cell-based clocks have been conceptualized as oscillators whose phase can be reset by internal signals such as hormones, and external cues such as light. The present review highlights the inter-relationship between circadian clocks and sex differences. In mammals, the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) serves as a master clock synchronizing the phase of clocks throughout the body. Gonadal steroid receptors are expressed in almost every site that receives direct SCN input. Here we review sex differences in the circadian timing system in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis (HPG), the hypothalamic-adrenal-pituitary (HPA) axis, and sleep-arousal systems. We also point to ways in which disruption of circadian rhythms within these systems differs in the sexes and is associated with dysfunction and disease. Understanding sex differentiated circadian timing systems can lead to improved treatment strategies for these conditions.

  18. Sex differences in circadian timing systems: implications for disease.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Matthew; Silver, Rae

    2014-01-01

    Virtually every eukaryotic cell has an endogenous circadian clock and a biological sex. These cell-based clocks have been conceptualized as oscillators whose phase can be reset by internal signals such as hormones, and external cues such as light. The present review highlights the inter-relationship between circadian clocks and sex differences. In mammals, the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) serves as a master clock synchronizing the phase of clocks throughout the body. Gonadal steroid receptors are expressed in almost every site that receives direct SCN input. Here we review sex differences in the circadian timing system in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis (HPG), the hypothalamic-adrenal-pituitary (HPA) axis, and sleep-arousal systems. We also point to ways in which disruption of circadian rhythms within these systems differs in the sexes and is associated with dysfunction and disease. Understanding sex differentiated circadian timing systems can lead to improved treatment strategies for these conditions. PMID:24287074

  19. [Diagnosis and treatment in circadian rhythm sleep disorders].

    PubMed

    Murakami, Junichi; Imai, Makoto; Yamada, Naoto

    2012-07-01

    Circadian rhythm sleep disorders (CRSD) are characterized by misalignment between major sleep episode and desired sleep phase, or symptoms associated with internal desynchronization between endogenous circadian rhythm and overt sleep-wake rhythm. Endogenous circadian rhythm is mainly regulated by master circadian clock located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus. Light entrains the circadian clock according to a phase-response curve. Furthermore, social time cue affects human sleep-wake rhythm. Instructions concerning sleep hygiene including light environment play fundamental role for the treatment in CRSD. In addition, light therapy and oral melatonin administration have application to delayed sleep phase type. Diagnostic classification and treatment in each types of CRSD are reviewed in this article.

  20. Calcium and SOL Protease Mediate Temperature Resetting of Circadian Clocks

    PubMed Central

    Tataroglu, Ozgur; Zhao, Xiaohu; Busza, Ania; Ling, Jinli; O’Neill, John S.; Emery, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Summary Circadian clocks integrate light and temperature input to remain synchronized with the day/night cycle. Although light input to the clock is well studied, the molecular mechanisms by which circadian clocks respond to temperature remain poorly understood. We found that temperature phase shifts Drosophila circadian clocks through degradation of the pacemaker protein TIM. This degradation is mechanistically distinct from photic CRY-dependent TIM degradation. Thermal TIM degradation is triggered by cytosolic calcium increase and CALMODULIN binding to TIM and is mediated by the atypical calpain protease SOL. This thermal input pathway and CRY-dependent light input thus converge on TIM, providing a molecular mechanism for the integration of circadian light and temperature inputs. Mammals use body temperature cycles to keep peripheral clocks synchronized with their brain pacemaker. Interestingly, downregulating the mammalian SOL homolog SOLH blocks thermal mPER2 degradation and phase shifts. Thus, we propose that circadian thermosensation in insects and mammals share common principles. PMID:26590423

  1. Can small shifts in circadian phase affect performance?

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, Helen J.; Legasto, Carlo S.; Fogg, Louis F.; Smith, Mark R.

    2012-01-01

    Small shifts in circadian timing occur frequently as a result of daylight saving time or later weekend sleep. These subtle shifts in circadian phase have been shown to influence subjective sleepiness, but it remains unclear if they can significantly affect performance. In a retrospective analysis we examined performance on the Psychomotor Vigilance Test before bedtime and after wake time in 11 healthy adults on fixed sleep schedules based on their habitual sleep times. The dim light melatonin onset, a marker of circadian timing, was measured on two occasions. An average 1.1 hour shift away from a proposed optimal circadian phase angle (6 hours between melatonin onset and midpoint of sleep) significantly slowed mean, median and fastest 10% reaction times before bedtime and after wake time (p<0.05). These results add to previous reports that suggest that humans may be sensitive to commonly occurring small shifts in circadian timing. PMID:22695081

  2. Effects of Gravity on Insect Circadian Rhythmicity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoban-Higgins, Tana M.

    2000-01-01

    Circadian rhythms - endogenous daily rhythmic fluctuations in virtually all characteristics of life - are generated and coordinated by the circadian timing system (CTS). The CTS is synchronized to the external 24-hour day by time cues such as the light/dark cycle. In an environment without time cues, the length of an animal's day is determined by the period of its internal pacemaker (tau) and the animal is said to be free-running. All life on earth evolved under the solar day; the CTS exists as an adaptation that allows organisms to anticipate and to prepare for rhythmic environmental fluctuations. All life on earth also evolved under the force of earth's gravitational environment. While it is therefore not surprising that changes in the lighting environment affect the CTS, it is surprising that changes in the gravitational environment would do so. However, recent data from one of our laboratories using the brn-3.1 knockout mouse revealed that this model, which lacks the sensory receptor hair cells within the neurovestibular system, does not respond to exposure to a hyperdynamic environment in the same fashion as normal mice. The brn-3.1 mice did not show the expected suppression of circadian rhythmicity shown by control mice exposed to 2G. Exposure to altered ambient force environments affects the amplitude, mean and timing of circadian rhythms in species from unicellular organisms to man. In addition, there is a circadian influence on the homeostatic response to acute 2G acceleration and pulses of 2G can act as a time cue, synchronizing the CTS. This is of significance because maintenance of internal and external temporal coordination is critical for normal physiological and psychological function. Typically, during adaptation to an increased gravitational environment (+G), an initial acute reaction is followed by adaptation and, eventually, a new steady state (14-16), which can take weeks to months to establish. Until the development of space stations, exposure

  3. Sleep- and circadian-dependent modulation of REM density.

    PubMed

    Khalsa, Sat Bir S; Conroy, Deirdre A; Duffy, Jeanne F; Czeisler, Charles A; Dijk, Derk-Jan

    2002-03-01

    Rapid eye movement (REM) density, a measure of the frequency of rapid eye movements during REM sleep, is known to increase over the course of the sleep episode. However, the circadian modulation of REM density has not been thoroughly evaluated. Data from a forced desynchrony protocol, in which 20 consecutive sleep opportunities were systematically scheduled over the entire circadian cycle, were analysed. The REM density was evaluated from polysomnographically recorded REM sleep episodes, and analyzed as a function of time in the sleep opportunity and as a function of phase in the circadian cycle. The REM density showed a robust increase over the course of the sleep episode. This sleep-dependent increase was observed regardless of circadian phase, because data analyzed from different thirds of the circadian cycle exhibited a similar pattern. The REM density did not show a significant circadian-dependent modulation for data from the entire sleep opportunity. However, analysis of circadian modulation from separate thirds of the sleep opportunity revealed a significant circadian modulation in the last third of the sleep episode. Maximum REM densities were observed when the last third of the sleep episode coincided with the wake-maintenance zone, i.e.;8-10 h before the crest of the circadian rhythm of REM sleep propensity. These results confirm the dominant sleep-dependent modulation of REM density, and indicate that the density of REMs is greatest when sleep pressure is low, such as in the latter part of the sleep episode, at which time the circadian modulation of REM density is also appreciable.

  4. Circadian photoentrainment: parameters of phase delaying.

    PubMed

    DeCoursey, P J

    1986-01-01

    Experiments were carried out using simulated den cages to delineate specific characteristics of phase delaying in circadian photoentrainment of a nocturnal rodent, the flying squirrel. The principal experiments entailed presentation of one to five consecutive 15-min white-light pulses per activity cycle at activity onset to animals free-running in darkness, in order to determine the immediate and final phase-shifting effect. Auxiliary experiments recorded entrainment patterns on light-dark (LD) schedules in the den cages. Phase response curves (PRCs) based on 15-min white-light pulses in standard wheel cages were also constructed for these animals as background information for interpreting the phase-delaying experiments. Exposure of a den animal to light by light sampling at the time of initial arousal from the rest state at circadian time (CT) 12, either by an LD schedule or by a 15-min light pulse, resulted in a return to the nest box for a short rest period. The phase delay occurring after a single light exposure at activity onset was equal to the induced rest, thus suggesting an immediate phase shift. The maximum delay was about 1 1/2 hr/cycle, with the amount of delay related to the number of light exposures. During the photoentrained state on an LD schedule, the activity rhythm of a den-housed animal was essentially free-running on the days following a phase delay. The data are used to expand current models for photoentrainment of circadian activity rhythms in nocturnal rodents. PMID:2979583

  5. Circadian Rhythms in Floral Scent Emission

    PubMed Central

    Fenske, Myles P.; Imaizumi, Takato

    2016-01-01

    To successfully recruit pollinators, plants often release attractive floral scents at specific times of day to coincide with pollinator foraging. This timing of scent emission is thought to be evolutionarily beneficial to maximize resource efficiency while attracting only useful pollinators. Temporal regulation of scent emission is tied to the activity of the specific metabolic pathways responsible for scent production. Although floral volatile profiling in various plants indicated a contribution by the circadian clock, the mechanisms by which the circadian clock regulates timing of floral scent emission remained elusive. Recent studies using two species in the Solanaceae family provided initial insight into molecular clock regulation of scent emission timing. In Petunia hybrida, the floral volatile benzenoid/phenylpropanoid (FVBP) pathway is the major metabolic pathway that produces floral volatiles. Three MYB-type transcription factors, ODORANT 1 (ODO1), EMISSION OF BENZENOIDS I (EOBI), and EOBII, all of which show diurnal rhythms in mRNA expression, act as positive regulators for several enzyme genes in the FVBP pathway. Recently, in P. hybrida and Nicotiana attenuata, homologs of the Arabidopsis clock gene LATE ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL (LHY) have been shown to have a similar role in the circadian clock in these plants, and to also determine the timing of scent emission. In addition, in P. hybrida, PhLHY directly represses ODO1 and several enzyme genes in the FVBP pathway during the morning as an important negative regulator of scent emission. These findings facilitate our understanding of the relationship between a molecular timekeeper and the timing of scent emission, which may influence reproductive success. PMID:27148293

  6. Ontogenetic development of the mammalian circadian system.

    PubMed

    Weinert, Dietmar

    2005-01-01

    This review summarizes the current knowledge about the ontogenetic development of the circadian system in mammals. The developmental changes of overt rhythms are discussed, although the main focus of the review is the underlying neuronal and molecular mechanisms. In addition, the review describes ontogenetic development, not only as a process of morpho-functional maturation. The need of repeated adaptations and readaptations due to changing developmental stage and environmental conditions is also considered. The review analyzes mainly rodent data, obtained from the literature and from the author's own studies. Results from other species, including humans, are presented to demonstrate common features and species-dependent differences. The review first describes the development of the suprachiasmatic nuclei as the central pacemaker system and shows that intrinsic circadian rhythms are already generated in the mammalian fetus. As in adult organisms, the period length is different from 24 h and needs continuous correction by environmental periodicities, or zeitgebers. The investigation of the ontogenetic development of the mechanisms of entrainment reveals that, at prenatal and early postnatal stages, non-photic cues deriving from the mother are effective. Light-dark entrainment develops later. At a certain age, both photic and non-photic zeitgebers may act in parallel, even though the respective time information is 12 h out of phase. That leads to a temporary internal desynchronization. Because rhythmic information needs to be transferred to effector organs, the corresponding neural and humoral signalling pathways are also briefly described. Finally, to be able to transform a rhythmic signal into an overt rhythm, the corresponding effector organs must be functionally mature. As many of these organs are able to generate their own intrinsic rhythms, another aspect of the review is dedicated to the development of peripheral oscillators and mechanisms of their entrainment

  7. Circadian Rhythms in Floral Scent Emission.

    PubMed

    Fenske, Myles P; Imaizumi, Takato

    2016-01-01

    To successfully recruit pollinators, plants often release attractive floral scents at specific times of day to coincide with pollinator foraging. This timing of scent emission is thought to be evolutionarily beneficial to maximize resource efficiency while attracting only useful pollinators. Temporal regulation of scent emission is tied to the activity of the specific metabolic pathways responsible for scent production. Although floral volatile profiling in various plants indicated a contribution by the circadian clock, the mechanisms by which the circadian clock regulates timing of floral scent emission remained elusive. Recent studies using two species in the Solanaceae family provided initial insight into molecular clock regulation of scent emission timing. In Petunia hybrida, the floral volatile benzenoid/phenylpropanoid (FVBP) pathway is the major metabolic pathway that produces floral volatiles. Three MYB-type transcription factors, ODORANT 1 (ODO1), EMISSION OF BENZENOIDS I (EOBI), and EOBII, all of which show diurnal rhythms in mRNA expression, act as positive regulators for several enzyme genes in the FVBP pathway. Recently, in P. hybrida and Nicotiana attenuata, homologs of the Arabidopsis clock gene LATE ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL (LHY) have been shown to have a similar role in the circadian clock in these plants, and to also determine the timing of scent emission. In addition, in P. hybrida, PhLHY directly represses ODO1 and several enzyme genes in the FVBP pathway during the morning as an important negative regulator of scent emission. These findings facilitate our understanding of the relationship between a molecular timekeeper and the timing of scent emission, which may influence reproductive success. PMID:27148293

  8. Circadian molecular clock in lung pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Sundar, Isaac K; Yao, Hongwei; Sellix, Michael T; Rahman, Irfan

    2015-11-15

    Disrupted daily or circadian rhythms of lung function and inflammatory responses are common features of chronic airway diseases. At the molecular level these circadian rhythms depend on the activity of an autoregulatory feedback loop oscillator of clock gene transcription factors, including the BMAL1:CLOCK activator complex and the repressors PERIOD and CRYPTOCHROME. The key nuclear receptors and transcription factors REV-ERBα and RORα regulate Bmal1 expression and provide stability to the oscillator. Circadian clock dysfunction is implicated in both immune and inflammatory responses to environmental, inflammatory, and infectious agents. Molecular clock function is altered by exposomes, tobacco smoke, lipopolysaccharide, hyperoxia, allergens, bleomycin, as well as bacterial and viral infections. The deacetylase Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) regulates the timing of the clock through acetylation of BMAL1 and PER2 and controls the clock-dependent functions, which can also be affected by environmental stressors. Environmental agents and redox modulation may alter the levels of REV-ERBα and RORα in lung tissue in association with a heightened DNA damage response, cellular senescence, and inflammation. A reciprocal relationship exists between the molecular clock and immune/inflammatory responses in the lungs. Molecular clock function in lung cells may be used as a biomarker of disease severity and exacerbations or for assessing the efficacy of chronotherapy for disease management. Here, we provide a comprehensive overview of clock-controlled cellular and molecular functions in the lungs and highlight the repercussions of clock disruption on the pathophysiology of chronic airway diseases and their exacerbations. Furthermore, we highlight the potential for the molecular clock as a novel chronopharmacological target for the management of lung pathophysiology.

  9. Circadian Kisspeptin expression in human term placenta.

    PubMed

    de Pedro, M A; Morán, J; Díaz, I; Murias, L; Fernández-Plaza, C; González, C; Díaz, E

    2015-11-01

    Kisspeptin is an essential gatekeeper of reproductive function. During pregnancy high circulating levels of kisspeptin have been described, however the clear role of this neuropeptide in pregnancy remains unknown. We tested the existence of rhythmic kisspeptin expression in human full-term placenta from healthy pregnant women at six different time points during the day. The data obtained by Western blotting were fitted to a mathematical model (Fourier series), demonstrating, for the first time, the existence of a circadian rhythm in placental kisspeptin expression.

  10. Circadian rhythm asynchrony in man during hypokinesis.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winget, C. M.; Vernikos-Danellis, J.; Cronin, S. E.; Leach, C. S.; Rambaut, P. C.; Mack, P. B.

    1972-01-01

    Posture and exercise were investigated as synchronizers of certain physiologic rhythms in eight healthy male subjects in a defined environment. Four subjects exercised during bed rest. Body temperature (BT), heart rate, plasma thyroid hormone, and plasma steroid data were obtained from the subjects for a 6-day ambulatory equilibration period before bed rest, 56 days of bed rest, and a 10-day recovery period after bed rest. The results indicate that the mechanism regulating the circadian rhythmicity of the cardiovascular system is rigorously controlled and independent of the endocrine system, while the BT rhythm is more closely aligned to the endocrine system.

  11. Morphological abnormalities in elasmobranchs.

    PubMed

    Moore, A B M

    2015-08-01

    A total of 10 abnormal free-swimming (i.e., post-birth) elasmobranchs are reported from The (Persian-Arabian) Gulf, encompassing five species and including deformed heads, snouts, caudal fins and claspers. The complete absence of pelvic fins in a milk shark Rhizoprionodon acutus may be the first record in any elasmobranch. Possible causes, including the extreme environmental conditions and the high level of anthropogenic pollution particular to The Gulf, are briefly discussed.

  12. Chromosome abnormalities in glioma

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y.S.; Ramsay, D.A.; Fan, Y.S.

    1994-09-01

    Cytogenetic studies were performed in 25 patients with gliomas. An interesting finding was a seemingly identical abnormality, an extra band on the tip of the short arm of chromosome 1, add(1)(p36), in two cases. The abnormality was present in all cells from a patient with a glioblastoma and in 27% of the tumor cells from a patient with a recurrent irradiated anaplastic astrocytoma; in the latter case, 7 unrelated abnormal clones were identified except 4 of those clones shared a common change, -Y. Three similar cases have been described previously. In a patient with pleomorphic astrocytoma, the band 1q42 in both homologues of chromosome 1 was involved in two different rearrangements. A review of the literature revealed that deletion of the long arm of chromosome 1 including 1q42 often occurs in glioma. This may indicate a possible tumor suppressor gene in this region. Cytogenetic follow-up studies were carried out in two patients and emergence of unrelated clones were noted in both. A total of 124 clonal breakpoints were identified in the 25 patients. The breakpoints which occurred three times or more were: 1p36, 1p22, 1q21, 1q25, 3q21, 7q32, 8q22, 9q22, 16q22, and 22q13.

  13. [Congenital foot abnormalities].

    PubMed

    Delpont, M; Lafosse, T; Bachy, M; Mary, P; Alves, A; Vialle, R

    2015-03-01

    The foot may be the site of birth defects. These abnormalities are sometimes suspected prenatally. Final diagnosis depends on clinical examination at birth. These deformations can be simple malpositions: metatarsus adductus, talipes calcaneovalgus and pes supinatus. The prognosis is excellent spontaneously or with a simple orthopedic treatment. Surgery remains outstanding. The use of a pediatric orthopedist will be considered if malposition does not relax after several weeks. Malformations (clubfoot, vertical talus and skew foot) require specialized care early. Clubfoot is characterized by an equine and varus hindfoot, an adducted and supine forefoot, not reducible. Vertical talus combines equine hindfoot and dorsiflexion of the forefoot, which is performed in the midfoot instead of the ankle. Skew foot is suspected when a metatarsus adductus is resistant to conservative treatment. Early treatment is primarily orthopedic at birth. Surgical treatment begins to be considered after walking age. Keep in mind that an abnormality of the foot may be associated with other conditions: malposition with congenital hip, malformations with syndromes, neurological and genetic abnormalities. PMID:25524290

  14. Synchrony and desynchrony in circadian clocks: impacts on learning and memory

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Harini C.

    2015-01-01

    Circadian clocks evolved under conditions of environmental variation, primarily alternating light dark cycles, to enable organisms to anticipate daily environmental events and coordinate metabolic, physiological, and behavioral activities. However, modern lifestyle and advances in technology have increased the percentage of individuals working in phases misaligned with natural circadian activity rhythms. Endogenous circadian oscillators modulate alertness, the acquisition of learning, memory formation, and the recall of memory with examples of circadian modulation of memory observed across phyla from invertebrates to humans. Cognitive performance and memory are significantly diminished when occurring out of phase with natural circadian rhythms. Disruptions in circadian regulation can lead to impairment in the formation of memories and manifestation of other cognitive deficits. This review explores the types of interactions through which the circadian clock modulates cognition, highlights recent progress in identifying mechanistic interactions between the circadian system and the processes involved in memory formation, and outlines methods used to remediate circadian perturbations and reinforce circadian adaptation. PMID:26286653

  15. Abnormal pressures as hydrodynamic phenomena

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neuzil, C.E.

    1995-01-01

    So-called abnormal pressures, subsurface fluid pressures significantly higher or lower than hydrostatic, have excited speculation about their origin since subsurface exploration first encountered them. Two distinct conceptual models for abnormal pressures have gained currency among earth scientists. The static model sees abnormal pressures generally as relict features preserved by a virtual absence of fluid flow over geologic time. The hydrodynamic model instead envisions abnormal pressures as phenomena in which flow usually plays an important role. This paper develops the theoretical framework for abnormal pressures as hydrodynamic phenomena, shows that it explains the manifold occurrences of abnormal pressures, and examines the implications of this approach. -from Author

  16. Rhythms of Life: The Plant Circadian Clock - (By Katherine Hubbard and Antony Dodd).

    PubMed

    2016-04-01

    Summaryplantcell;28/4/tpc.116.tt0416/FIG1F1fig1This teaching tool explores circadian rhythms in plants. The topic is presented as a series of concepts illustrated by examples, including the architecture of circadian clocks and the connections between the oscillator and circadian-regulated processes such as metabolism and flowering. The Teaching Tool introduces some of the techniques used to investigate circadian biology and explores how understanding circadian rhythms could lead to crop improvement. PMID:27169989

  17. Impairment of heme biosynthesis induces short circadian period in body temperature rhythms in mice.

    PubMed

    Iwadate, Reiko; Satoh, Yoko; Watanabe, Yukino; Kawai, Hiroshi; Kudo, Naomi; Kawashima, Yoichi; Mashino, Tadahiko; Mitsumoto, Atsushi

    2012-07-01

    It has been demonstrated that the function of mammalian clock gene transcripts is controlled by the binding of heme in vitro. To examine the effects of heme on biological rhythms in vivo, we measured locomotor activity (LA) and core body temperature (T(b)) in a mouse model of porphyria with impaired heme biosynthesis by feeding mice a griseofulvin (GF)-containing diet. Mice fed with a 2.0% GF-containing diet (GF2.0) transiently exhibited phase advance or phase advance-like phenomenon by 1-3 h in terms of the biological rhythms of T(b) or LA, respectively (both, P < 0.05) while mice were kept under conditions of a light/dark cycle (12 h:12 h). We also observed a transient, ~0.3 h shortening of the period of circadian T(b) rhythms in mice kept under conditions of constant darkness (P < 0.01). Interestingly, the observed duration of abnormal circadian rhythms in GF2.0 mice lasted between 1 and 3 wk after the onset of GF ingestion; this finding correlated well with the extent of impairment of heme biosynthesis. When we examined the effects of therapeutic agents for acute porphyria, heme, and hypertonic glucose on the pathological status of GF2.0 mice, it was found that the intraperitoneal administration of heme (10 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1)) or glucose (9 g·kg(-1)·day(-1)) for 7 days partially reversed (50%) increases in urinary δ-aminolevulinic acids levels associated with acute porphyria. Treatment with heme, but not with glucose, suppressed the phase advance (-like phenomenon) in the diurnal rhythms (P < 0.05) and restored the decrease of heme (P < 0.01) in GF2.0 mice. These results suggest that impairments of heme biosynthesis, in particular a decrease in heme, may affect phase and period of circadian rhythms in animals.

  18. Designing artificial environments for preterm infants based on circadian studies on pregnant uterus.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Shimpei; Akiyama, Shizuko; Hanita, Takushi; Li, Heng; Nakagawa, Machiko; Kaneshi, Yousuke; Ohta, Hidenobu

    2013-09-04

    Using uterine explants from Per1::Luc rats and in situ hybridization, we recently reported that the circadian property of the molecular clock in the uterus and placenta is stably maintained from non-pregnancy, right through to the end stage of pregnancy under regular light-dark (LD) cycles. Despite long-lasting increases in progesterone during gestation and an increase in estrogen before delivery, the uterus keeps a stable Per1::Luc rhythm throughout the pregnancy. The study suggests the importance of stable circadian environments for fetuses to achieve sound physiology and intrauterine development. This idea is also supported by epidemiological and animal studies, in which pregnant females exposed to repeated shifting of the LD cycles have increased rates of reproductive abnormalities and adverse pregnancy outcomes. Leading from this, we introduced artificial circadian environments with controlled lighting conditions to human preterm infants by developing and utilizing a specific light filter which takes advantage of the unique characteristics of infants' developing visual photoreceptors. In spite of growing evidence of the physiological benefits of nighttime exposure to darkness for infant development, many Japanese Neonatal Intensive Care Units (NICUs) still prefer to maintain constant light in preparation for any possible emergencies concerning infants in incubators. To protect infants from the negative effects of constant light on their development in the NICU, we have developed a new device similar to a magic mirror, by which preterm infants can be shielded from exposure to their visible wavelengths of light even in the constant light conditions of the NICU while simultaneously allowing medical care staff to visually monitor preterm infants adequately. The device leads to significantly increased infant activity during daytime than during night time and better weight gains.

  19. Phosphorylation Regulating the Ratio of Intracellular CRY1 Protein Determines the Circadian Period

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Na; Zhang, Eric Erquan

    2016-01-01

    The core circadian oscillator in mammals is composed of transcription/translation feedback loop, in which cryptochrome (CRY) proteins play critical roles as repressors of their own gene expression. Although post-translational modifications, such as phosphorylation of CRY1, are crucial for circadian rhythm, little is known about how phosphorylated CRY1 contributes to the molecular clockwork. To address this, we created a series of CRY1 mutants with single amino acid substitutions at potential phosphorylation sites and performed a cell-based, phenotype-rescuing screen to identify mutants with aberrant rhythmicity in CRY-deficient cells. We report 10 mutants with an abnormal circadian period length, including long period (S280D and S588D), short period (S158D, S247D, T249D, Y266D, Y273D, and Y432D), and arrhythmicity (S71D and S404D). When expressing mutated CRY1 in HEK293 cells, we show that most of the mutants (S71D, S247D, T249D, Y266D, Y273D, and Y432D) exhibited reduction in repression activity compared with wild-type (WT) CRY1, whereas other mutants had no obvious change. Correspondingly, these mutants also showed differences in protein stability and cellular localization. We show that most of mutants are more stable than WT, except S158D, T249D, and S280D. Although the characteristics of the 10 mutants are various, they all impair the ratio balance of intracellular CRY1 protein. Thus, we conclude that the mutations caused distinct phenotypes most likely through the ratio of functional CRY1 protein in cells. PMID:27721804

  20. Circadian disturbances after night-shift work onboard a naval ship.

    PubMed

    Goh, V H; Tong, T Y; Lim, C L; Low, E C; Lee, L K

    2000-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate how night duties can affect the circadian rhythms of military personnel working onboard a naval ship. Twenty individuals on a regular day-work schedule from 9:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. (serving as controls) and 40 individuals on night-shift duties participated in the study. Salivary melatonin and cortisol profiles were established within two 24-hour periods from 2-hour saliva samplings. Under the condition of abrupt shift in work/rest schedule, the majority of the navy officers (52%) retained their normal melatonin profiles. Twelve percent displayed a right phase shift in melatonin rhythm after night work. Nineteen percent exhibited distortions in the form of abnormal peaks or troughs, and 17% showed signs of disrupted rhythm in the form of low daytime levels of melatonin throughout the sampling period. No consistent relationship was found between the melatonin changes and various work stations of the ship. Prominent changes in the cortisol profile included unexpected peaks or troughs that may be related to the conditions that individuals were exposed to, i.e., high noise level in the engine room, as well as to performing intense tracking operations. The findings of this study (1) show the possible detrimental effects of shift duties on circadian rhythms, (2) highlight a wide interindividual variation in the manner in which the circadian systems respond to an abrupt phase shift in work/rest schedules, and (3) form the basis for further investigations into effective strategies to help military personnel cope with shift work, thereby maintaining health and high working standards while on duty.

  1. Designing Artificial Environments for Preterm Infants Based on Circadian Studies on Pregnant Uterus

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Shimpei; Akiyama, Shizuko; Hanita, Takushi; Li, Heng; Nakagawa, Machiko; Kaneshi, Yousuke; Ohta, Hidenobu

    2013-01-01

    Using uterine explants from Per1::Luc rats and in situ hybridization, we recently reported that the circadian property of the molecular clock in the uterus and placenta is stably maintained from non-pregnancy, right through to the end stage of pregnancy under regular light-dark (LD) cycles. Despite long-lasting increases in progesterone during gestation and an increase in estrogen before delivery, the uterus keeps a stable Per1::Luc rhythm throughout the pregnancy. The study suggests the importance of stable circadian environments for fetuses to achieve sound physiology and intrauterine development. This idea is also supported by epidemiological and animal studies, in which pregnant females exposed to repeated shifting of the LD cycles have increased rates of reproductive abnormalities and adverse pregnancy outcomes. Leading from this, we introduced artificial circadian environments with controlled lighting conditions to human preterm infants by developing and utilizing a specific light filter which takes advantage of the unique characteristics of infants’ developing visual photoreceptors. In spite of growing evidence of the physiological benefits of nighttime exposure to darkness for infant development, many Japanese Neonatal Intensive Care Units (NICUs) still prefer to maintain constant light in preparation for any possible emergencies concerning infants in incubators. To protect infants from the negative effects of constant light on their development in the NICU, we have developed a new device similar to a magic mirror, by which preterm infants can be shielded from exposure to their visible wavelengths of light even in the constant light conditions of the NICU while simultaneously allowing medical care staff to visually monitor preterm infants adequately. The device leads to significantly increased infant activity during daytime than during night time and better weight gains. PMID:24027556

  2. Abnormal intermittency of heart rate in patients with neurocardiogenic syncope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yum, Myung-Kul; Kim, Kyung-Sik; Kim, June-Soo

    2002-03-01

    Introduction: We aim to test our hypothesis that, during daily activity, though not as prominent as during HUT test, the patients may show different degree of intermittency in heart rates compared to healthy persons. METHOD AND RESULTS: Thirty patients with neurocardiogenic syncope who showed a positive HUT test and thirty healthy controls without history of syncope were included. Their twenty-four hour ambulatory electrocardiograms were digitized and RR interval (RRI) data of six-hour interval were analyzed. To quantify the intermittency (C1) behavior, The intermittency analysis was performed using Mexican hat wavelet. For the syncope group, the values of C1 were significantly higher at 6AM-6PM and lower at 6AM-midnight, respectively. However, the values were not different at midnight-6AM. The significant night-day circadian change shown in the control group was lost in C1. CONCLUSION: When compared to healthy control, the patients with neurocardiogenic syncope shows increased intermittency of heart rates in daytime during daily activity, and abnormal circadian rhythms of the index. These new findings may be useful for investigating the pathophysiology of neurocardiogenic syncope and early identification of the patients.

  3. Feeling Abnormal: Simulation of Deviancy in Abnormal and Exceptionality Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernald, Charles D.

    1980-01-01

    Describes activity in which student in abnormal psychology and psychology of exceptional children classes personally experience being judged abnormal. The experience allows the students to remember relevant research, become sensitized to the feelings of individuals classified as deviant, and use caution in classifying individuals as abnormal.…

  4. The circadian clock regulates inflammatory arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Hand, Laura E.; Hopwood, Thomas W.; Dickson, Suzanna H.; Walker, Amy L.; Loudon, Andrew S. I.; Ray, David W.; Bechtold, David A.; Gibbs, Julie E.

    2016-01-01

    There is strong diurnal variation in the symptoms and severity of chronic inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis. In addition, disruption of the circadian clock is an aggravating factor associated with a range of human inflammatory diseases. To investigate mechanistic links between the biological clock and pathways underlying inflammatory arthritis, mice were administered collagen (or saline as a control) to induce arthritis. The treatment provoked an inflammatory response within the limbs, which showed robust daily variation in paw swelling and inflammatory cytokine expression. Inflammatory markers were significantly repressed during the dark phase. Further work demonstrated an active molecular clock within the inflamed limbs and highlighted the resident inflammatory cells, fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLSs), as a potential source of the rhythmic inflammatory signal. Exposure of mice to constant light disrupted the clock in peripheral tissues, causing loss of the nighttime repression of local inflammation. Finally, the results show that the core clock proteins cryptochrome (CRY) 1 and 2 repressed inflammation within the FLSs, and provide novel evidence that a CRY activator has anti-inflammatory properties in human cells. We conclude that under chronic inflammatory conditions, the clock actively represses inflammatory pathways during the dark phase. This interaction has exciting potential as a therapeutic avenue for treatment of inflammatory disease.—Hand, L. E., Hopwood, T. W., Dickson, S. H., Walker, A. L., Loudon, A. S. I., Ray, D. W., Bechtold, D. A., Gibbs, J. E. The circadian clock regulates inflammatory arthritis. PMID:27488122

  5. Circadian variation of the pancreatic islet transcriptome.

    PubMed

    Rakshit, Kuntol; Qian, Jingyi; Ernst, Jason; Matveyenko, Aleksey V

    2016-09-01

    Pancreatic islet failure is a characteristic feature of impaired glucose control in diabetes mellitus. Circadian control of islet function is essential for maintaining proper glucose homeostasis. Circadian variations in transcriptional pathways have been described in diverse cell types and shown to be critical for optimization of cellular function in vivo. In the current study, we utilized Short Time Series Expression Miner (STEM) analysis to identify diurnally expressed transcripts and biological pathways from mouse islets isolated at 4 h intervals throughout the 24 h light-dark cycle. STEM analysis identified 19 distinct chronological model profiles, and genes belonging to each profile were subsequently annotated to significantly enriched Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes biological pathways. Several transcriptional pathways essential for proper islet function (e.g., insulin secretion, oxidative phosphorylation), cell survival (e.g., insulin signaling, apoptosis) and cell proliferation (DNA replication, homologous recombination) demonstrated significant time-dependent variations. Notably, KEGG pathway analysis revealed "protein processing in endoplasmic reticulum - mmu04141" as one of the most enriched time-dependent pathways in islets. This study provides unique data set on time-dependent diurnal profiles of islet gene expression and biological pathways, and suggests that diurnal variation of the islet transcriptome is an important feature of islet homeostasis, which should be taken into consideration for optimal experimental design and interpretation of future islet studies. PMID:27495157

  6. Circadian rhythms in rheumatology - a glucocorticoid perspective

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis plays an important role in regulating and controlling immune responses. Dysfunction of the HPA axis has been implicated in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and other rheumatic diseases. The impact of glucocorticoid (GC) therapy on HPA axis function also remains a matter of concern, particularly for longer treatment duration. Knowledge of circadian rhythms and the influence of GC in rheumatology is important: on the one hand we aim for optimal treatment of the daily undulating inflammatory symptoms, for example morning stiffness and swelling; on the other, we wish to disturb the HPA axis as little as possible. This review describes circadian rhythms in RA and other chronic inflammatory diseases, dysfunction of the HPA axis in RA and other rheumatic diseases and the recent concept of the hepato-hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal-renal axis, the problem of adrenal suppression by GC therapy and how it can be avoided, and evidence that chronotherapy with modified release prednisone effective at 02:00 a.m. can inhibit proinflammatory sequelae of nocturnal inflammation better compared with GC administration in the morning but does not increase the risk of HPA axis insufficiency in RA. PMID:25608777

  7. Crosstalk between circadian rhythmicity, mitochondrial dynamics and macrophage bactericidal activity

    PubMed Central

    Oliva-Ramírez, Jacqueline; Moreno-Altamirano, María Maximina B; Pineda-Olvera, Benjamín; Cauich-Sánchez, Patricia; Sánchez-García, F Javier

    2014-01-01

    Biological functions show rhythmic fluctuations with 24-hr periodicity regulated by circadian proteins encoded by the so-called ‘clock’ genes. The absence or deregulation of circadian proteins in mice leads to metabolic disorders and in vitro models have shown that the synthesis of pro-inflammatory cytokines by macrophages follows a circadian rhythm so showing a link between circadian rhythmicity, metabolism and immunity. Recent evidence reveals that mitochondrial shape, position and size, collectively referred to as mitochondrial dynamics, are related to both cell metabolism and immune function. However, studies addressing the simultaneous crosstalk between circadian rhythm, mitochondrial dynamics and cell immune function are scarce. Here, by using an in vitro model of synchronized murine peritoneal macrophages, we present evidence that the mitochondrial dynamics and the mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) follow a circadian rhythmic pattern. In addition, it is shown that the fusion of mitochondria along with high Δψm, indicative of high mitochondrial activity, precede the highest phagocytic and bactericidal activity of macrophages on Salmonella typhimurium. Taken together, our results suggest a timely coordination between circadian rhythmicity, mitochondrial dynamics, and the bactericidal capacity of macrophages. PMID:24903615

  8. Evolutionary links between circadian clocks and photoperiodic diapause in insects.

    PubMed

    Meuti, Megan E; Denlinger, David L

    2013-07-01

    In this article, we explore links between circadian clocks and the clock involved in photoperiodic regulation of diapause in insects. Classical resonance (Nanda-Hamner) and night interruption (Bünsow) experiments suggest a circadian basis for the diapause response in nearly all insects that have been studied. Neuroanatomical studies reveal physical connections between circadian clock cells and centers controlling the photoperiodic diapause response, and both mutations and knockdown of clock genes with RNA interference (RNAi) point to a connection between the clock genes and photoperiodic induction of diapause. We discuss the challenges of determining whether the clock, as a functioning module, or individual clock genes acting pleiotropically are responsible for the photoperiodic regulation of diapause, and how a stable, central circadian clock could be linked to plastic photoperiodic responses without compromising the clock's essential functions. Although we still lack an understanding of the exact mechanisms whereby insects measure day/night length, continued classical and neuroanatomical approaches, as well as forward and reverse genetic experiments, are highly complementary and should enable us to decipher the diverse ways in which circadian clocks have been involved in the evolution of photoperiodic induction of diapause in insects. The components of circadian clocks vary among insect species, and diapause appears to have evolved independently numerous times, thus, we anticipate that not all photoperiodic clocks of insects will interact with circadian clocks in the same fashion.

  9. Redox rhythm reinforces the circadian clock to gate immune response.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Mian; Wang, Wei; Karapetyan, Sargis; Mwimba, Musoki; Marqués, Jorge; Buchler, Nicolas E; Dong, Xinnian

    2015-07-23

    Recent studies have shown that in addition to the transcriptional circadian clock, many organisms, including Arabidopsis, have a circadian redox rhythm driven by the organism's metabolic activities. It has been hypothesized that the redox rhythm is linked to the circadian clock, but the mechanism and the biological significance of this link have only begun to be investigated. Here we report that the master immune regulator NPR1 (non-expressor of pathogenesis-related gene 1) of Arabidopsis is a sensor of the plant's redox state and regulates transcription of core circadian clock genes even in the absence of pathogen challenge. Surprisingly, acute perturbation in the redox status triggered by the immune signal salicylic acid does not compromise the circadian clock but rather leads to its reinforcement. Mathematical modelling and subsequent experiments show that NPR1 reinforces the circadian clock without changing the period by regulating both the morning and the evening clock genes. This balanced network architecture helps plants gate their immune responses towards the morning and minimize costs on growth at night. Our study demonstrates how a sensitive redox rhythm interacts with a robust circadian clock to ensure proper responsiveness to environmental stimuli without compromising fitness of the organism.

  10. A circadian rhythm regulating hyphal melanization in Cercospora kikuchii.

    PubMed

    Bluhm, Burton H; Burnham, A Michele; Dunkle, Larry D

    2010-01-01

    Many metabolic and developmental processes in fungi are controlled by biological rhythms. Circadian rhythms approximate a daily (24 h) cycle and have been thoroughly studied in the model fungus, Neurospora crassa. However relatively few examples of true circadian rhythms have been documented among other filamentous fungi. In this study we describe a circadian rhythm underlying hyphal melanization in Cercospora kikuchii, an important pathogen of soybean. After growth in light or light : dark cycles, colonies transferred to darkness produced zonate bands of melanized hyphae interspersed with bands of hyaline hyphae. Rhythmic production of bands was remarkably persistent in the absence of external cues, lasting at least 7 d after transfer to darkness, and was compensated over a range of temperatures. As in N. crassa, blue light but not red light was sufficient to entrain the circadian rhythm in C. kikuchii, and a putative ortholog of white collar-1, one of the genes required for light responses in N. crassa, was identified in C. kikuchii. Circadian regulation of melanization is conserved in other members of the genus: Similar rhythms were identified in another field isolate of C. kikuchii as well as field isolates of C. beticola and C. sorghi, but not in wild-type strains of C. zeae-maydis or C. zeina. This report represents the first documented circadian rhythm among Dothideomycete fungi and provides a new opportunity to dissect the molecular basis of circadian rhythms among filamentous fungi.

  11. A circadian rhythm regulating hyphal melanization in Cercospora kikuchii.

    PubMed

    Bluhm, Burton H; Burnham, A Michele; Dunkle, Larry D

    2010-01-01

    Many metabolic and developmental processes in fungi are controlled by biological rhythms. Circadian rhythms approximate a daily (24 h) cycle and have been thoroughly studied in the model fungus, Neurospora crassa. However relatively few examples of true circadian rhythms have been documented among other filamentous fungi. In this study we describe a circadian rhythm underlying hyphal melanization in Cercospora kikuchii, an important pathogen of soybean. After growth in light or light : dark cycles, colonies transferred to darkness produced zonate bands of melanized hyphae interspersed with bands of hyaline hyphae. Rhythmic production of bands was remarkably persistent in the absence of external cues, lasting at least 7 d after transfer to darkness, and was compensated over a range of temperatures. As in N. crassa, blue light but not red light was sufficient to entrain the circadian rhythm in C. kikuchii, and a putative ortholog of white collar-1, one of the genes required for light responses in N. crassa, was identified in C. kikuchii. Circadian regulation of melanization is conserved in other members of the genus: Similar rhythms were identified in another field isolate of C. kikuchii as well as field isolates of C. beticola and C. sorghi, but not in wild-type strains of C. zeae-maydis or C. zeina. This report represents the first documented circadian rhythm among Dothideomycete fungi and provides a new opportunity to dissect the molecular basis of circadian rhythms among filamentous fungi. PMID:20943572

  12. On the adaptive significance of circadian clocks for their owners.

    PubMed

    Vaze, Koustubh M; Sharma, Vijay Kumar

    2013-05-01

    Circadian rhythms are believed to be an evolutionary adaptation to daily environmental cycles resulting from Earth's rotation about its axis. A trait evolved through a process of natural selection is considered as adaptation; therefore, rigorous demonstration of adaptation requires evidence suggesting evolution of a trait by natural selection. Like any other adaptive trait, circadian rhythms are believed to be advantageous to living beings through some perceived function. Circadian rhythms are thought to confer advantage to their owners through scheduling of biological functions at appropriate time of daily environmental cycle (extrinsic advantage), coordination of internal physiology (intrinsic advantage), and through their role in responses to seasonal changes. So far, the adaptive value of circadian rhythms has been tested in several studies and evidence indeed suggests that they confer advantage to their owners. In this review, we have discussed the background for development of the framework currently used to test the hypothesis of adaptive significance of circadian rhythms. Critical examination of evidence reveals that there are several lacunae in our understanding of circadian rhythms as adaptation. Although it is well known that demonstrating a given trait as adaptation (or setting the necessary criteria) is not a trivial task, here we recommend some of the basic criteria and suggest the nature of evidence required to comprehensively understand circadian rhythms as adaptation. Thus, we hope to create some awareness that may benefit future studies in this direction.

  13. Evolutionary Links Between Circadian Clocks and Photoperiodic Diapause in Insects

    PubMed Central

    Meuti, Megan E.; Denlinger, David L.

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we explore links between circadian clocks and the clock involved in photoperiodic regulation of diapause in insects. Classical resonance (Nanda–Hamner) and night interruption (Bünsow) experiments suggest a circadian basis for the diapause response in nearly all insects that have been studied. Neuroanatomical studies reveal physical connections between circadian clock cells and centers controlling the photoperiodic diapause response, and both mutations and knockdown of clock genes with RNA interference (RNAi) point to a connection between the clock genes and photoperiodic induction of diapause. We discuss the challenges of determining whether the clock, as a functioning module, or individual clock genes acting pleiotropically are responsible for the photoperiodic regulation of diapause, and how a stable, central circadian clock could be linked to plastic photoperiodic responses without compromising the clock’s essential functions. Although we still lack an understanding of the exact mechanisms whereby insects measure day/night length, continued classical and neuroanatomical approaches, as well as forward and reverse genetic experiments, are highly complementary and should enable us to decipher the diverse ways in which circadian clocks have been involved in the evolution of photoperiodic induction of diapause in insects. The components of circadian clocks vary among insect species, and diapause appears to have evolved independently numerous times, thus, we anticipate that not all photoperiodic clocks of insects will interact with circadian clocks in the same fashion. PMID:23615363

  14. The methamphetamine-sensitive circadian oscillator (MASCO) in mice.

    PubMed

    Tataroglu, Ozgür; Davidson, Alec J; Benvenuto, Luke J; Menaker, Michael

    2006-06-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) orchestrates synchrony among many peripheral oscillators and is required for circadian rhythms of locomotor activity and many physiological processes. However, the unique effects of methamphetamine (MAP) on circadian behavior suggest the presence of an SCN-independent, methamphetamine-sensitive circadian oscillator (MASCO). Substantial data collected using rat models show that chronic methamphetamine dramatically lengthens circadian period of locomotor activity rhythms and induces rhythms in animals lacking an SCN. However, the anatomical substrate and the molecular components of the MASCO are unknown. The response to MAP is less well studied in mice, a model that would provide the genetic tools to probe the molecular components of this extra-SCN oscillator. The authors tested the effects of chronic MAP on 2 strains of intact and SCN-lesioned mice in constant dark and constant light. Furthermore, they applied various MAP availability schedules to SCN-lesioned mice to confirm the circadian nature of the underlying oscillator. The results indicate that this oscillator has circadian properties. In intact mice, the MASCO interacts with the SCN in a manner that is strain, sex, and dose dependent. In SCN-lesioned mice, it induces robust free-running locomotor rhythmicity, which persists for up to 14 cycl