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Sample records for abnormal clinical signs

  1. Hush sign: a new clinical sign in temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Kutlu, Gulnihal; Bilir, Erhan; Erdem, Atilla; Gomceli, Yasemin B; Kurt, G Semiha; Serdaroglu, Ayse

    2005-05-01

    Neurologists have been analyzing the clinical behaviors that occur during seizures for many years. Several ictal behaviors have been defined in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Ictal behaviors are especially important in the evaluation of epilepsy surgery candidates. We propose a new lateralizing sign in TLE originating from the nondominant hemisphere-the "hush" sign. Our patients were 30- and 21-year old women (Cases 1 and 2, respectively). Their epileptogenic foci were localized to the right mesial temporal region after noninvasive presurgical investigations. Case 1 had no cranial MRI abnormality, whereas cranial MRI revealed right hippocampal atrophy in Case 2. These women repeatedly moved their right index fingers to their mouth while puckering their lips during complex partial seizures. We have named this ictal behavior the "hush" sign. Anterior temporal lobectomy with amygdalohippocampectomy was performed in both patients, and pathological examinations revealed hippocampal sclerosis. The "hush" sign no longer occurred after seizures were controlled. They were seizure free as of 30 and 31 months of follow-up, respectively. We believe that the "hush" sign may be supportive of a diagnosis of TLE originating from the nondominant hemisphere. This sign may occur as a result of ictal activation of a specific brain region in this hemisphere.

  2. Suicide warning signs in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Rudd, M David

    2008-02-01

    This review discusses suicide warning signs in clinical practice and has three simple goals: 1) to help practitioners differentiate in a clinically meaningful fashion between warning signs and risk factors for suicide; 2) to articulate the link among warning signs for suicide, hopelessness, and intent to die; and 3) to assist practitioners in applying warning signs in day-to-day clinical practice, doing so in a concrete and effective manner.

  3. Clinical relevance of abnormal scintigraphic findings of adult equine ribs.

    PubMed

    Dahlberg, Jessica A; Ross, Michael W; Martin, Benson B; Davidson, Elizabeth J; Leitch, Midge

    2011-01-01

    Horses with cranial rib abnormalities may exhibit severe acute lameness and may have unusual gait deficits characterized by forelimb abduction during protraction at the walk. Horses with caudal rib abnormalities may resent being saddled and ridden. In a retrospective evaluation of 20 horses with a documented rib lesion, 25 sites of increased radiopharmaceutical uptake were found in one or more ribs. Thirteen (52%) scintigraphic lesions involved the first rib; four were located immediately dorsal to the sternal articulation, eight were near the costochondral junction and one was at the costovertebral junction. Six (24%) scintigraphic rib lesions involved ribs 2-8; one was located immediately dorsal to the sternal articulation, three were at the costovertebral junction and two were near the costochondral junction. Six (24%) scintigraphic rib lesions involved the mid-portion (five) or costovertebral junction (one) of ribs 9-18. The 20 horses were divided into three groups based on the clinical relevance of the scintigraphic findings. Group 1 (n=3) horses had clinical signs attributed to a rib abnormality; Group 2 (n=6) horses had a rib abnormality that was a plausible explanation for clinical signs; Group 3 (n=11) horses had clinical signs that could not be attributed to a rib abnormality. For horses with cranial rib abnormalities, a modified lateral scintigraphic image with the ipsilateral limb pulled caudally and a left (right) 45° caudal-right (left) radiograph facilitated the diagnosis.

  4. Monitoring of clinical signs in goats with transmissible spongiform encephalopathies

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background As there is limited information about the clinical signs of BSE and scrapie in goats, studies were conducted to describe the clinical progression of scrapie and BSE in goats and to evaluate a short clinical protocol for its use in detecting scrapie-affected goats in two herds with previously confirmed scrapie cases. Clinical assessments were carried out in five goats intracerebrally infected with the BSE agent as well as five reported scrapie suspects and 346 goats subject to cull from the two herds, 24 of which were retained for further monitoring. The brain and selected lymphoid tissue were examined by postmortem tests for disease confirmation. Results The sensitivity and specificity of the short clinical protocol in detecting a scrapie case in the scrapie-affected herds was 3.9% and 99.6%, respectively, based on the presence of tremor, positive scratch test, extensive hair loss, ataxia and absent menace response. All BSE- and scrapie-affected goats displayed abnormalities in sensation (over-reactivity to external stimuli, startle responses, pruritus, absent menace response) and movement (ataxia, tremor, postural deficits) at an advanced clinical stage but the first detectable sign associated with scrapie or BSE could vary between animals. Signs of pruritus were not always present despite similar prion protein genotypes. Clinical signs of scrapie were also displayed by two scrapie cases that presented with detectable disease-associated prion protein only in lymphoid tissues. Conclusions BSE and scrapie may present as pruritic and non-pruritic forms in goats. Signs assessed for the clinical diagnosis of scrapie or BSE in goats should include postural and gait abnormalities, pruritus and visual impairment. However, many scrapie cases will be missed if detection is solely based on the display of clinical signs. PrPd accumulation in the brain appeared to be related to the severity of clinical disease but not to the display of individual neurological signs

  5. Canine hip dysplasia: clinical signs and physical diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Fry, T R; Clark, D M

    1992-05-01

    Clinical signs of hip dysplasia include lameness, gait abnormalities, reluctance to exercise, and pelvic limb muscle atrophy with compensatory shoulder muscle hypertrophy. Because these clinical signs are not pathognomonic for CHD, a thorough orthopedic and neurologic examination is recommended for all patients with suspected CHD. Specific maneuvers, including the Barlow, Ortolani, and Barden's signs are useful to characterize the degree of coxofemoral laxity, both as screening tools in young puppies and as diagnostic aids in clinically lame dogs. None of the signs are definitive diagnostic tests for CHD, but they should be performed as sequential maneuvers in the veterinarian's workup for suspected CHD. Pelvic radiography is mandatory to definitively diagnose CHD but should not be the first step in the workup, because other diagnoses may be missed or concurrent conditions may coexist with dysplasia.

  6. Ascaris suum Infection in Calves I. Clinical Signs

    PubMed Central

    Greenway, J. A.; McCraw, B. M.

    1970-01-01

    Clinical signs consistent with those of atypical interstitial pneumonia (AIP) were induced in calves sensitized with infective Ascaris suum eggs at seven to 20 weeks of age and challenged at three-week intervals one or more times. These signs usually appeared on the sixth or seventh day postinfection and reached maximum severity between the tenth and 13th days following infection. Prominent signs were: dyspnea, often with expiratory grunt, coughing, mouth breathing and emphysema as well as increased respiration and heart rates. In general, the intensity of signs was dependent upon dose size, although a single small dose resulted in acute signs and death in one calf. Intermittent coughing and vesicular sounds were induced in calves given A. suum eggs continually over prolonged periods. No respiratory abnormalities resulted from challenge with Toxocara canis after sensitization with A. suum. Antihistamine therapy did not alter the clinical signs in A. suum infected calves. ImagesFig. 1.Fig. 4.Fig. 5.Fig. 6.Fig. 7. PMID:4394225

  7. Understanding the significance, reasons and patterns of abnormal vital signs after gastric bypass for morbid obesity.

    PubMed

    Bellorin, Omar; Abdemur, Abraham; Sucandy, Iswanto; Szomstein, Samuel; Rosenthal, Raul J

    2011-06-01

    Anastomotic leaks and bleeding are the two most feared major complications in patients undergoing laparoscopic gastric bypass (LRYGB). This study was designed to evaluate if there is a clinical correlation between abnormal vital signs and postoperative leaks and bleeding. After IRB approval and adherence to HIPAA guidelines, a retrospective review of medical records was performed on 518 patients who underwent LRYGB between October 2002 and October 2006. Vital signs from each patient were monitored hourly. Eight patients out of 518 (1.54%) were discovered to have anastomotic leak. A marked increase in heart rate up to 120 bpm at 20 h after surgery occurred in five of eight patients (62.5%). Of the eight patients who had a leak, seven (87.5%) experienced sustained tachycardia above 120 bpm. On the other hand, 20 patients out of 518 (3.86%) were discovered to have postoperative bleeding. A gradual rather than a dramatic increase in heart rate was recorded in 17 of 20 patients (85%) starting 8 h after surgery. Five patients (25%) had unsustained tachycardia above 120 bpm. Twelve patients in this group (60%) were seen to have cyclical tachycardia that never exceeded 120 bpm at any point during hospitalization. Marginal hypotension was found in seven patients (35%) in this group. Sustained tachycardia with a heart rate exceeding 120 bpm appears to be an indicator of anastomotic leak. Tachycardia less than 120 bpm that has occurred in a cyclical pattern strongly pointed toward postoperative bleeding. Anastomotic leaks and bleeding are the two most feared major complications in patients undergoing LRYGB. This study was designed to evaluate if there is a clinical correlation between abnormal vital signs and postoperative leaks and bleeding.

  8. Clinical and magnetic resonance imaging findings in 92 cats with clinical signs of spinal cord disease.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Rita; Platt, Simon R; Llabrés-Díaz, Francisco J; Rogers, Katherine H; de Stefani, Alberta; Matiasek, Lara A; Adams, Vicki J

    2009-02-01

    Medical records of 92 cats presented with clinical signs of spinal cord disease, which had undergone magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), were reviewed. The cats were grouped into seven categories based upon the diagnosis suggested by results of MRI, cerebrospinal fluid analysis and other diagnostic procedures: neoplastic (n=25), inflammatory or infectious (n=13), traumatic (n=8), vascular (n=6), degenerative (n=5), anomalous (n=3) and those with an unremarkable MRI (n=32). There were two independent predictors of abnormal MRI findings: severity of clinical signs and presence of spinal pain. Abnormal MRI findings and speed of onset of disease were significantly associated with survival. For the 32 cats with unremarkable MRI findings, only nine died due to spinal disease and, therefore, the median survival time (MST) was not reached (lower 95% confidence interval (CI)=970 days). For the 60 cats with abnormal MRI findings, 37 died due to their disease and the MST was 138 days (95% CI: 7-807).

  9. Abnormal appearances: inspection, display and the clinic.

    PubMed

    Featherstone, Katie; Atkinson, Paul

    2014-01-01

    We provide an examination of the field of dysmorphology, a clinical speciality that in its current form combines a long history of inspection and display with the identification and representation of associated underlying molecular changes. The recognition and description of abnormal appearances is thus increasingly accompanied by genetic and other molecular investigations. Our analysis draws on our long-term ethnographic engagement with a UK clinical genetics service and the work of two clinical genetics teams within a regional teaching hospital. We document the intersection of genetic science with clinical work to suggest that while molecular testing often identifies the genetic basis for unusual appearances and abnormal development, it does not fully supplant clinical apperception and interpretation. The two modes of knowledge--the clinical and the biomedical--co-exist in the work and the discourse of dysmorphology practice. The contemporary dysmorphology clinic thus encapsulates the epistemological systems of modern medicine, grounded in the clinical gaze and on the classificatory systems of classic nosology. Within such a system of clinical knowledge, the 'monstrous' does not escape the boundaries of knowledge. Monstrous appearances are accommodated and domesticated within the classificatory systems of normal medicine.

  10. Gray matter abnormalities in pediatric autism spectrum disorder: a meta-analysis with signed differential mapping.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jieke; Yao, Li; Zhang, Wenjing; Xiao, Yuan; Liu, Lu; Gao, Xin; Shah, Chandan; Li, Siyi; Tao, Bo; Gong, Qiyong; Lui, Su

    2017-02-23

    The gray matter abnormalities revealed by magnetic resonance imaging are inconsistent, especially in pediatric individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) (age < 18 years old), a phenomenon possibly related to the core pathophysiology of ASD. The purpose of our meta-analysis was to identify and map the specific gray matter abnormalities in pediatric ASD individuals thereby exploring the potential effects of clinical and demographic characteristics of these gray matter changes. A systematic search was conducted to identify voxel-based morphometry studies in pediatric individuals with ASD. The effect-size signed differential mapping method was used to quantitatively estimate the regional gray matter abnormalities in pediatric ASD individuals. Meta-regression was used to examine the associations among age, gender, intelligence quotient, symptom severity and gray matter changes. Fifteen studies including 364 pediatric individuals with ASD (male = 282, age = 10.3 ± 4.4 years) and 377 healthy controls (male = 289, age = 10.5 ± 4.2 years) were included. Pediatric ASD individuals showed significant gray matter increases in the right angular gyrus, left superior and middle frontal gyrus, left precuneus, left inferior occipital gyrus and right inferior temporal gyrus, most of which involving the default mode network, and decreases in the left cerebellum and left postcentral gyrus. The meta-regression analysis showed that the repetitive behavior scores of the Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised were positively associated with increased gray matter volumes in the right angular gyrus. Increased rather than decreased gray matter volume, especially involving the angular gyrus and prefrontal cortex may be the core pathophysiology in the early course of ASD.

  11. Abnormal movements in first-episode, nonaffective psychosis: dyskinesias, stereotypies, and catatonic-like signs.

    PubMed

    Compton, Michael T; Fantes, Francisco; Wan, Claire Ramsay; Johnson, Stephanie; Walker, Elaine F

    2015-03-30

    Motor abnormalities represent a neurobehavioral domain of signs intrinsic to schizophrenia-spectrum disorders, though they are commonly attributed to medication side effects and remain understudied. Individuals with first-episode psychosis represent an ideal group to study innate movement disorders due to minimal prior antipsychotic exposure. We measured dyskinesias, stereotypies, and catatonic-like signs and examined their associations with: (1) age at onset of psychotic symptoms and duration of untreated psychosis; (2) positive, negative, and disorganized symptoms; (3) neurocognition; and (4) neurological soft signs. Among 47 predominantly African American first-episode psychosis patients in a public-sector hospital, the presence and severity of dyskinesias, stereotypies, and catatonic-like features were assessed using approximately 30-min video recordings. Movement abnormalities were rated utilizing three scales (Dyskinesia Identification System Condensed User Scale, Stereotypy Checklist, and Catatonia Rating Scale). Correlational analyses were conducted. Scores for each of three movement abnormality types were modestly inter-correlated (r=0.29-0.40). Stereotypy score was significantly associated with age at onset of psychotic symptoms (r=0.32) and positive symptom severity scores (r=0.29-0.41). There were no meaningful or consistent associations with negative symptom severity, neurocognition, or neurological soft signs. Abnormal movements appear to represent a relatively distinct phenotypic domain deserving of further research.

  12. [Clinical symptoms and signs in Kimmerle anomaly].

    PubMed

    Split, Wojciech; Sawrasewicz-Rybak, Małgorzata

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the study was to consider Kimmerle anomaly (ponticulus posterior of the atlas) as an anatomic variant, which can cause a set of clinical symptoms and signs. A hundred and eight patients, 58 females and 50 males at the age of 18-59 years (M. 36.9 years, SD = 9.6) with radiologically verified Kimmerle anomaly were examined. A control group comprised 40 healthy subjects at the similar age range. The diagnosis of headaches was based on the criteria proposed by the IHS. A character of headaches, their localization, frequency, duration, number of days with headaches per year, circumstances associated with their onset and concomitant symptoms were evaluated. All the patients were subjected to electrophysiological studies (ENG, EEG and VEP). The results were statistically analyzed using a SPSS/PC+ computer system. It was revealed that clinical symptoms and signs in Kimmerle anomaly occurred most frequently in the third and fourth decade of life (65% of cases). These were most often tension-type headaches (50% of cases with headaches), vascular headaches (26% of cases) and neuralgia (24% of cases). Intensity of headaches was high. Headaches were accompanied by other complaints like vertigo (59% of cases) and in one third of cases--nausea. About 10% of patients also suffered from vomiting, paresthesia, dizziness, short periods of loss of consciousness. Sporadically--tinitus, drop attack, and vegetative symptoms. In cases without pain the most frequent signs were short periods of loss of consciousness, dizziness, and also nausea and dizziness. The EEG examination revealed pathology in 40% of patients with Kimmerle anomaly. The ENG examination in more than 33% of anomaly cases showed injury in the central part of vestibular system. Improper answers were reported in about 75% of the patients during the VEP examination.

  13. Trombone tongue: a new clinical sign for significant medullary compression at the craniovertebral junction. Case report.

    PubMed

    Lee, Cheong H; Casey, Adrian T H; Allibone, James B; Chelvarajah, Ramesh

    2006-12-01

    The authors describe a previously unreported clinical sign that may indicate the onset of significant compression of the medulla oblongata in cases of craniovertebral junction abnormalities. This 17-year-old boy presented with mild bilateral leg weakness. Imaging studies revealed severe basilar invagination and a marked Chiari malformation. While awaiting surgery, his tongue developed an involuntary constant protrusion-intrusion repetitive motion. The onset of this so-named "trombone tongue" sign was followed shortly afterward by rapidly progressive spastic tetraparesis. After the authors performed a transmaxillary clivectomy, foramen magnum decompression, and occipitocervical fusion, they noted that the abnormal tongue motion promptly resolved and the tetraparesis gradually improved. The authors discuss their current understanding of the central control of tongue movements and present a hypothesis on the pathogenesis of trombone tongue based on the neuroanatomical basis of another abnormal tongue movement sign, lingual myoclonus.

  14. Relationship between Clinical Signs and Symptoms of Convergence Insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Bade, Annette; Boas, Mark; Gallaway, Michael; Mitchell, G. Lynn; Scheiman, Mitchell; Kulp, Marjean T.; Cotter, Susan A.; Rouse, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The percentage of children who are symptomatic has been shown to increase with the number of signs of convergence insufficiency (CI). Our goal was to investigate whether there is a relationship between the severity of the clinical signs of CI and symptom level reported in children with 3-sign symptomatic CI. Methods The Convergence Insufficiency Treatment Trial (CITT) enrolled 221 children with symptomatic CI from ages 9 to 17 years. Inclusion criteria included the following three signs of CI: (1) exophoria at near at least 4Δ greater than at distance, (2) insufficient positive fusional vergence (PFV) at near, and (3) a receded near point of convergence (NPC) of ≥ 6cm break. The relationships between the severity of each sign of CI (mild, moderate and severe) and the level of symptoms as measured by the Convergence Insufficiency Symptom Survey (CISS) at baseline were evaluated. Results Mean CISS scores were not significantly different between mild, moderate or severe exophoria (p=0.60), PFV blur (p=0.99), Sheard's criterion (p=0.89) or NPC break (p=0.84). There was also no difference in the frequency of subjects scoring at mild, moderate or severe levels on the CISS and the severity of each sign of CI. Correlations between individual clinical signs and the CISS score were very low and not statistically significant. Conclusions Among symptomatic children with a CISS score ≥ 16 and three clinical signs of CI, there is no further association between the severity of the clinical signs and their level of symptoms. PMID:23958713

  15. Orofacial granulomatosis: clinical signs of different pathologies.

    PubMed

    Troiano, Giuseppe; Dioguardi, Mario; Giannatempo, Giovanni; Laino, Luigi; Testa, Nunzio Francesco; Cocchi, Roberto; De Lillo, Alfredo; Lo Muzio, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    Orofacial granulomatosis (OFG) is an uncommon disease characterized by persistent or recurrent soft tissue enlargement, oral ulceration and a variety of other orofacial features. It could be an oral manifestation of a systemic disease. For a correct differential diagnosis, local and systemic conditions characterized by granulomatous inflammation should be excluded using appropriate clinical and laboratory investigations. In fact, the diagnosis of OFG may be confirmed only by histopathological identification of noncaseating granulomas. The literature from 1943 to 2014 was reviewed with emphasis on the etiology of OFG and on clinical manifestations of systemic pathologies associated with OFG. The precise cause of OFG is still unknown, although several theories have been suggested, such as infection, hereditary factors and allergy. OFG is a disease that has a wide spectrum of presentation, which may include the oral manifestation of a systemic condition such as Crohn's disease, sarcoidosis, granulomatosis with polyangiitis and Melkersson-Rosenthal syndrome.

  16. Clinical Signs and Pathology of Accidental Monensin Poisoning in Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Nation, P. N.; Crowe, S. P.; Harries, W. N.

    1982-01-01

    The clinical signs and postmortem findings in sheep from two flocks accidentally poisoned with monensin are described. Clinical signs began within 24 hours of exposure to monensin. In the acute stages they consisted of lethargy, stiffness, muscular weakness, a stilted gait and recumbency. Feed refusal was seen in one flock but not in the second. Subacute to chronic clinical signs were decreased muscle volume of the rump and thigh. When forced to run, chronically affected sheep had a stilted, stiff legged, rocking horse gait. Gross postmortem changes were not always visible. Where visible, they affected skeletal muscles and consisted of pale streaking, with atrophy in the chronic stages. Lesions were most severe in muscles of the rump and hind limbs. Microscopically myofiber swelling and hyalinization were seen with interstitial mononuclear cell reaction and extensive sarcoplasmic mineralization in some cases. Chronic lesions consisted of fibrosis and myofiber atrophy. In lambs less than one month old, diffuse gastrointestinal hemorrhage was the only finding. PMID:17422198

  17. Early Electrophysiological Abnormalities and Clinical Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Hyllienmark, Lars; Alstrand, Nils; Jonsson, Björn; Ludvigsson, Johnny; Cooray, Gerald; Wahlberg-Topp, Jeanette

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The aim of this study was to elucidate whether subclinical nerve dysfunction as reflected by neurophysiological testing predicts the development of clinical neuropathy in patients with type 1 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Fifty-nine patients were studied twice with neurophysiological measurements at baseline and at follow-up. At baseline, patients were 15.5 ± 3.22 years (range 7–22 years) of age, and duration of diabetes was 6.8 ± 3.3 years. At follow-up, patients were 20–35 years of age, and disease duration was 20 ± 5.3 years (range 10–31 years). RESULTS At baseline, patients showed modestly reduced nerve conduction velocities and amplitudes compared with healthy subjects, but all were free of clinical neuropathy. At follow-up, clinical neuropathy was present in nine (15%) patients. These patients had a more pronounced reduction in peroneal motor nerve conduction velocity (MCV), median MCV, and sural sensory nerve action potential at baseline (P < 0.010–0.003). In simple logistic regression analyses, the predictor with the strongest association with clinical neuropathy was baseline HbA1c (R2 = 48%, odds ratio 7.9, P < 0.002) followed by peroneal MCV at baseline (R2 = 38%, odds ratio 0.6, P < 0.006). With the use of a stepwise forward analysis that included all predictors, first baseline HbA1c and then only peroneal MCV at baseline entered significantly (R2 = 61%). Neuropathy impairment assessment showed a stronger correlation with baseline HbA1c (ρ = 0.40, P < 0.002) than with follow-up HbA1c (ρ = 0.034, P < 0.007). CONCLUSIONS Early defects in nerve conduction velocity predict the development of diabetic neuropathy. However, the strongest predictor was HbA1c during the first years of the disease. PMID:23723354

  18. Signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders and radiologically observed abnormalities in the condyles of the temporomandibular joints of professional violin and viola players.

    PubMed

    Kovero, O; Könönen, M

    1995-04-01

    The frequency of temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) and radiologically observed abnormalities in the condyles of the temporomandibular joints (TMJs) of professional violin and viola players was investigated in 26 orchestra violinists/violists (VP group) and in their sex-, age-, and dentition-matched controls (C group). A routine clinical stomatognathic examination, a standardized interview, and radiography of the condyles were carried out for all subjects. The VP group showed a higher frequency of subjective symptoms and clinical signs of TMD, such as palpatory tenderness of masticatory muscles, TMJ clicking, painful mandibular movements, and deviation on opening or closing. There was no difference between the groups in terms of radiologic findings in the condyles. Weekly playing hours correlated positively with some signs of TMD. It is concluded that professional violin or viola playing might be a predisposing factor for TMD.

  19. Prophylactic administration of ponazuril reduces clinical signs and delays seroconversion in horses challenged with Sarcocystis neurona.

    PubMed

    Furr, M; McKenzie, H; Saville, W J A; Dubey, J P; Reed, S M; Davis, W

    2006-06-01

    The ability of ponazuril to prevent or limit clinical signs of equine protozoal myeloencephalitis (EPM) after infection with Sarcocystis neurona was evaluated. Eighteen horses were assigned to 1 of 3 groups: no treatment, 2.5 mg/kg ponazuril, or 5.0 mg/kg ponazuril. Horses were administered ponazuril, once per day, beginning 7 days before infection (study day 0) and continuing for 28 days postinfection. On day 0, horses were stressed by transport and challenged with 1 million S. neurona sporocysts per horse. Sequential neurologic examinations were performed, and serum and cerebrospinal fluid were collected and assayed for antibodies to S. neurona. All horses in the control group developed neurologic signs, whereas only 71 and 40% of horses in the 2.5 and 5.0 mg/kg ponazuril groups, respectively, developed neurologic abnormalities. This was significant at P = 0.034 by using Fisher exact test. In addition, seroconversion was decreased in the 5.0 mg/kg group compared with the control horses (100 vs. 40%; P = 0.028). Horses with neurologic signs were killed, and a post-mortem examination was performed. Mild-to-moderate, multifocal signs of neuroinflammation were observed. These results confirm that treatment with ponazuril at 5.0 mg/kg minimizes, but does not eliminate, infection and clinical signs of EPM in horses.

  20. Clinical abnormalities in working donkeys and their associations with behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Regan (nee Ashley), F. H.; Hockenhull, J.; Pritchard, J. C.; Waterman-Pearson, A. E.; Whay, H. R.

    2015-01-01

    Introductions Working donkeys are at risk of developing multiple, acute and chronic health problems. The ability to recognise and assess pain in donkeys associated with these health problems is important for people responsible for their care and treatment, including owners and veterinary or animal health workers. Aims and objectives The aims of this study were firstly to quantify the prevalence of a range of clinical abnormalities within a sample of working donkeys; and secondly to find out whether these abnormalities were associated with potential behavioural indicators of pain. Materials and methods One hundred and thirty-three entire male adult working donkeys were observed for ten minutes before and after a one-hour rest period. Using an ethogram developed and refined in associated studies, posture and event behaviours were recorded by a single observer. The health of each donkey was then assessed by a veterinarian for specific clinical abnormalities. Results Working donkeys have a high prevalence of clinical abnormalities and a number of behaviours are associated with these. Significant associations were found between observed behaviours and systemic, ocular and limb-related clinical abnormalities. Cumulative clinical scores for limb-related problems were associated with a higher frequency of leg trembling, knuckling of the forelimb, leg-lifting and weight-shifting behaviours (all R≥0.4; P<0.001) and with a lower frequency of weight-bearing evenly on all four feet (R=-0.458; P<0.001). Conclusions The specific behaviour changes associated with clinical abnormalities identified in this study, together with general changes in demeanour identified in related studies, may be useful in assessing the presence and severity of pain in working donkeys and their response to medical and palliative interventions. PMID:26392903

  1. Clinical Correlation between Perverted Nystagmus and Brain MRI Abnormal Findings

    PubMed Central

    Han, Won-Gue; Yoon, Hee-Chul; Kim, Tae-Min; Rah, Yoon Chan

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives To analyze the clinical correlation between perverted nystagmus and brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) abnormal findings and to evaluate whether perverted nystagmus is clinically significant results of brain abnormal lesions or not. Subjects and Methods We performed medical charts review from January 2008 to July 2014, retrospectively. Patients who were suspected central originated vertigo at Frenzel goggles test were included among patients who visited our hospital. To investigate the correlation with nystagmus suspected central originated vertigo and brain MRI abnormal findings, we confirmed whether performing brain MRI or not. Then we exclude that patients not performed brain MRI. Results The number of patients with perverted nystagmus was 15, upbeating was 1 and down-beating was 14. Among these patients, 5 patients have brain MRI abnormal findings. However, 2 patients with MRI abnormal findings were not associated correctly with perverted nystagmus and only 3 patients with perverted nystagmus were considered central originated vertigo and further evaluation and treatment was performed by the department of neurology. Conclusions Perverted nystagmus was considered to the abnormalities at brain lesions, especially cerebellum, but neurologic symptoms and further evaluation were needed for exact diagnosis of central originated vertigo. PMID:27626081

  2. Assigning ethical weights to clinical signs observed during toxicity testing.

    PubMed

    Ringblom, Joakim; Törnqvist, Elin; Hansson, Sven Ove; Rudén, Christina; Öberg, Mattias

    2017-01-01

    Reducing the number of laboratory animals used and refining experimental procedures to enhance animal welfare are fundamental questions to be considered in connection with animal experimentation. Here, we explored the use of cardinal ethical weights for clinical signs and symptoms in rodents by conducting trade-off interviews with members of Swedish Animal Ethics Committees in order to derive such weights for nine typical clinical signs of toxicity. The participants interviewed represent researchers, politically nominated political nominees and representatives of animal welfare organizations. We observed no statistically significant differences between these groups with respect to the magnitude of the ethical weights assigned, though the political nominees tended to assign lower weights. Overall, hunched posture was considered the most severe clinical sign and body weight loss the least severe. The ethical weights assigned varied considerably between individuals, from zero to infinite value, indicating discrepancies in prioritization of reduction and refinement. Cardinal ethical weights may be utilized to include both animal welfare refinement and reduction of animal use in designing as well as in retrospective assessment of animal experiments. Such weights may also be used to estimate ethical costs of animal experiments.

  3. Voice-quality abnormalities as a sign of dysphagia: validation against acoustic and videofluoroscopic data.

    PubMed

    Waito, Ashley; Bailey, Gemma L; Molfenter, Sonja M; Zoratto, Dana C; Steele, Catriona M

    2011-06-01

    In this study we explored the validity of clinician judgments of voice abnormalities as indicators of penetration-aspiration or other swallowing abnormalities. Voice samples were collected using a high-quality microphone from 40 adults during videofluoroscopy (VFSS), at baseline and following each of four thin liquid swallows. Blinded speech-language pathologists (SLPs) rated the audio recordings for voice quality using the GRBAS scale and the VFSS recordings for abnormal swallow onset, penetration-aspiration, airway closure, and pharyngeal residues. Acoustic measures of % jitter, % shimmer, and signal-to-noise ratio were calculated using two /a/ vowel segments spliced from each voice recording. Preswallow to postswallow measures of voice-quality change were derived and the data were compared to determine the correspondence between perceived voice abnormalities, acoustic voice parameters, and radiographically confirmed swallowing abnormalities. The sensitivity of perceived postswallow changes in voice quality to dysphagia and penetration-aspiration was poor, ranging from 8 to 29%. Specificity was stronger for both penetration-aspiration (75-94%) and dysphagia (59-86%). Acoustic measures of voice quality had moderate sensitivity and specificity for both dysphagia and penetration-aspiration. Overall, perceptual judgments of postswallow wet voice showed the strongest potential for detecting penetration-aspiration (relative risk = 3.24). We conclude that a clear postswallow voice quality provides reasonable evidence that penetration-aspiration and dysphagia are absent. However, observations of abnormal postswallow voice quality can be misleading and are not a valid indication that penetration-aspiration or dysphagia exists.

  4. The SIGN nail for knee fusion: technique and clinical results

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Duane Ray; Anderson, Lucas Aaron; Haller, Justin M.; Feyissa, Abebe Chala

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Evaluate the efficacy of using the SIGN nail for instrumented knee fusion. Methods: Six consecutive patients (seven knees, three males) with an average age of 30.5 years (range, 18–50 years) underwent a knee arthrodesis with SIGN nail (mean follow-up 10.7 months; range, 8–14 months). Diagnoses included tuberculosis (two knees), congenital knee dislocation in two knees (one patient), bacterial septic arthritis (one knee), malunited spontaneous fusion (one knee), and severe gout with 90° flexion contracture (one knee). The nail was inserted through an anteromedial entry point on the femur and full weightbearing was permitted immediately. Results: All knees had clinical and radiographic evidence of fusion at final follow-up and none required further surgery. Four of six patients ambulated without assistive device, and all patients reported improved overall physical function. There were no post-operative complications. Conclusion: The technique described utilizing the SIGN nail is both safe and effective for knee arthrodesis and useful for austere environments with limited fluoroscopy and implant options. PMID:27163095

  5. ABNORMAL HEMOGLOBINS—Clinical Disorders Resulting from Various Combinations

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, John S.; Valentine, William N.

    1955-01-01

    Within the past few years it has been noted that abnormal types of hemoglobin found in certain persons are associated with definite clinical disorders. At least four different varieties of sickle cell anemia are now recognized, three of them being heterozygous and one homozygous. When the gene for sickling is represented once, the person is asymptomatic and is said to have “sickle cell trait.” However, when the sickle cell trait is present in combination with certain other hemoglobin abnormalities such as hemoglobin C or D or with thalassemia trait, symptomatic clinical disease results. The homozygous condition, in which two genes for hemoglobin C are present in the same person, has been observed in a few instances. A similar condition as regards hemoglobin D has not as yet been recognized. PMID:13230906

  6. Atypical Speech and Language Development: A Consensus Study on Clinical Signs in the Netherlands

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Visser-Bochane, Margot I.; Gerrits, Ellen; van der Schans, Cees P.; Reijneveld, Sijmen A.; Luinge, Margreet R.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Atypical speech and language development is one of the most common developmental difficulties in young children. However, which clinical signs characterize atypical speech-language development at what age is not clear. Aim: To achieve a national and valid consensus on clinical signs and red flags (i.e. most urgent clinical signs) for…

  7. Striatal Abnormalities and Spontaneous Dyskinesias in Non-Clinical Psychosis

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Vijay A.; Orr, Joseph M.; Turner, Jessica A.; Pelletier, Andrea L.; Dean, Derek J.; Lunsford-Avery, Jessica; Gupta, Tina

    2013-01-01

    Background Accumulating evidence suggests that individuals experiencing non-clinical psychosis (NCP) represent a critical group for improving understanding of etiological factors underlying the broader psychosis continuum. Although a wealth of evidence supports widespread neural dysfunction in formal psychosis, there has been little empirical evidence to support our understanding of putative vulnerability markers or brain structure in NCP. In this study, we examined the neural correlates of spontaneous movement abnormalities, a neural biomarker previously detected in NCP that is linked to abnormalities in the striatal dopamine. Methods We screened a total of 1,285 adolescents/young adults, and those scoring in the upper 15 percentile on a NCP scale were invited to participate; 20 of those invited agreed and these individuals were matched with healthy controls. Participants were administered a structural scan, clinical interviews, and an instrumental motor assessment. Results The NCP group showed elevated force variability, smaller putamen (but not caudate), and there was a significant relationship between motor dysfunction and striatal abnormalities for the sample. Elevated force variability was associated with both higher positive and negative symptoms, and there was a strong trend (p=.06) to suggest that smaller left putamen volumes were associated with elevated positive symptoms. Conclusions The results are among the first to suggest an association between neural structure and a risk marker in NCP. Findings indicate that vulnerabilities seen in schizophrenia also characterize the lower end of the psychosis spectrum. PMID:24156901

  8. Clinical signs of dysphagia in infants with acute viral bronchiolitis☆

    PubMed Central

    Barbosa, Lisiane De Rosa; Gomes, Erissandra; Fischer, Gilberto Bueno

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the occurrence of clinical signs of dysphagia in infants with acute viral bronchiolitis, to compare the respiratory parameters during deglutition, and to ensure the intra- and inter- examiners agreement, as well as to accomplish intra and interexaminators concordance of the clinical evaluation of the deglutition. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study of 42 infants aged 0-12 months. The clinical evaluation was accompanied by measurements of respiratory rate and pulse oximetry. A score of swallowing disorders was designed to establish associations with other studied variables and to ensure the intra- and interrater agreement of clinical feeding assessments. Caregivers also completed a questionnaire about feeding difficulties. Significance was set at p<0.05. Results: Changes in the oral phase (prolonged pauses) and pharyngeal phase (wheezing, coughing and gagging) of swallowing were found. A significant increase in respiratory rate between pre- and post-feeding times was found, and it was determined that almost half of the infants had tachypnea. An association was observed between the swallowing disorder scores and a decrease in oxygen saturation. Infants whose caregivers reported feeding difficulties during hospitalization stated a significantly greater number of changes in the swallowing evaluation. The intra-rater agreement was considered to be very good. Conclusions: Infants with acute viral bronchiolitis displayed swallowing disorders in addition to changes in respiratory rate and measures of oxygen saturation. It is suggested, therefore, that infants displaying these risk factors have a higher probability of dysphagia. PMID:25479843

  9. Reversible Brain Abnormalities in People Without Signs of Mountain Sickness During High-Altitude Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Cunxiu; Zhao, Yuhua; Yu, Qian; Yin, Wu; Liu, Haipeng; Lin, Jianzhong; Yang, Tianhe; Fan, Ming; Gesang, Luobu; Zhang, Jiaxing

    2016-01-01

    A large proportion of lowlanders ascending to high-altitude (HA) show no signs of mountain sickness. Whether their brains have indeed suffered from HA environment and the persistent sequelae after return to lowland remain unknown. Thirty-one sea-level college students, who had a 30-day teaching on Qinghai-Tibet plateau underwent MRI scans before, during, and two months after HA exposure. Brain volume, cortical structures, and white matter microstructure were measured. Besides, serum neuron-specific enolase (NSE), C-reactive protein, and interleukin-6 and neuropsychiatric behaviors were tested. After 30-day HA exposure, the gray and white matter volumes and cortical surface areas significantly increased, with cortical thicknesses and curvatures changed in a wide spread regions; Anisotropy decreased with diffusivities increased in multiple sites of white matter tracts. Two months after HA exposure, cortical measurements returned to basal level. However, increased anisotropy with decreased diffusivities was observed. Behaviors and serum inflammatory factor did not significant changed during three time-point tests. NSE significantly decreased during HA but increased after HA exposure. Results suggest brain swelling occurred in people without neurological signs at HA, but no negative sequelae in cortical structures and neuropsychiatric functions were left after the return to lowlands. Reoxygenation changed white matter microstructure. PMID:27633944

  10. Clinical and forensic signs related to cocaine abuse.

    PubMed

    Dinis-Oliveira, Ricardo Jorge; Carvalho, Félix; Duarte, José Alberto; Proença, Jorge Brandão; Santos, Agostinho; Magalhães, Teresa

    2012-03-01

    Good laboratory practice in toxicological analysis requires pre-analytical steps for collection of detailed information related to the suspected poisoning episodes, including biological and non-biological circumstantial evidences, which should be carefully scrutinized. This procedure provides great help to unveil the suspected cause of poisoning, to select the appropriate and correct samples to be analyzed and can facilitate the decision about the analytical techniques to perform. This implies a good knowledge of the signs related to acute and chronic intoxications by drugs of abuse. In this manuscript we highlight and discuss clinical and forensic imaging related to cocaine abuse, namely the midline destructive lesion, dental health, pseudoscleradermatous triad and crack hands, necrosis and gangrene of extremities and several other skin manifestations, reticular purpura, intracerebral and peripheral hemorrhages, angioneurotic edema, rhabdomyolysis, and crack lung. For this purpose, the state of the art on this topic is discussed, using clinical and forensic cases from our professional database in complement to images and mechanistic data from literature.

  11. Diverse Clinical Signs of Ocular Involvement in Cat Scratch Disease

    PubMed Central

    Oray, Merih; Önal, Sumru; Koç Akbay, Aylin; Tuğal Tutkun, İlknur

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: To describe ocular manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment of cat scratch disease. Materials and Methods: Clinical records of patients with ocular cat scratch disease were reviewed. Results: Thirteen eyes of 10 patients (7 female, 3 male) with a mean age of 26.9±18.5 years were included. Nine patients had a history of cat contact and had systemic symptoms associated with cat scratch disease 2-90 days prior to the ocular symptoms. Ocular signs were: neuroretinitis in 4 eyes (associated with serous retinal detachment in the inferior quadrant in 1 eye), optic neuropathy in 2 eyes (1 papillitis and optic disc infiltration, 1 optic neuritis), retinal infiltrates in 6 eyes, retinochoroiditis in 1 eye, branch retinal arteriolar occlusion in 3 eyes, and endophthalmitis in 1 eye. Visual acuities at presentation were 1.0 in 7 eyes, 0.3 in 1 eye, ≤0.1 in 4 eyes, and light perception in 1 eye. Bartonella henselae immunoglobulin (Ig) M and/or IgG were positive in all patients. Systemic antibiotic therapy was administered in all patients. Systemic corticosteroid treatment (15-40 mg/day) was added to the therapy in 4 patients, following 5 days of intravenous pulse methylprednisolone in 2 patients. Treatment was ongoing for 1 patient and the mean treatment duration of the other 9 patients was 47±14.5 days. Visual acuities at final visit were 1.0 in 9 eyes, 0.8 in 1 eye, 0.4 in 1 eye, and no light perception in 1 eye. Conclusion: Cat scratch disease may present with different ocular signs and should be considered in the differential diagnosis in patients with such presentations. PMID:28182175

  12. Ultrasonographic, endoscopic and histological appearances of the caecum in cats presenting with chronic clinical signs of caecocolic disease.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Harriet; Pey, Pascaline; Baril, Aurélie; Charpentier, Julie; Desquilbet, Loic; Le Poder, Sophie; Château-Joubert, Sophie; Laloy, Eve; Freiche, Valerie

    2017-02-01

    Objectives This study aimed to describe the ultrasonographic, endoscopic and histological characteristics of the caecum and ileocaecocolic junction in cats suffering from chronic clinical signs compatible with caecocolic disease. Methods Cats presenting with clinical signs suggestive of a caecocolic disease were prospectively recruited. All cats underwent an ultrasonographic examination of the caecum, ileum, colon, ileocolic lymph nodes and local mesenteric fat, in addition to comprehensive abdominal ultrasonography. This was followed by a colonoscopy with a macroscopic assessment of the caecocolic mucosa; caecocolic tissue samples were systematically collected for histologic analysis. Results Eighteen cats were included. Eleven of 18 cats had ultrasonographic abnormalities adjacent to the ileocaecocolic junction (lymphadenopathy, local steatitis) and 13/18 cats had abnormalities directly related to the junction (wall thickening, loss of wall layering). Seventeen of 18 cats had at least one ultrasonographic abnormality. Endoscopically, hyperaemia, oedema, discoloration and/or erosions were found in all cats. Each cat was classified as having mild or moderate-to-severe lesions according to endoscopic results; no classification could be established statistically for ultrasonographic results. The accentuation of the dimpled pattern tended to be inversely related to the severity of endoscopic lesion scoring. Histologically, a large proportion of cats showed typhlitis (13/16), one had lymphoma and two were normal. All cats with typhlitis also had colitis. There was only slight agreement between endoscopic and histological caecal results regarding the severity of lesions. Loss of caecal wall layering on ultrasound was found in 7/18 cats and, surprisingly, did not appear as a reliable predictor of the severity of inflammation or of malignancy; neither did local steatitis nor lymph node size. Conclusions and relevance Ultrasonography and endoscopy should not be used as the

  13. Clinical Signs and Subjective Symptoms of Temporomandibular Disorders in Instrumentalists

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Jae-Young; Kwon, Jeong-Seung; Lee, Debora H.; Bae, Jung-Hee

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Most of the reports on instrumentalists' experiences of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) have been reported not by clinical examinations but by subjective questionnaires. The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical signs and subjective symptoms of TMD in a large number of instrumentalists objectively. Materials and Methods A total of 739 musicians from a diverse range of instrument groups completed a TMD questionnaire. Among those who reported at least one symptom of TMD, 71 volunteers underwent clinical examinations and radiography for diag-nosis. Results Overall, 453 participants (61.3%) reported having one or more symptoms of TMD. The most frequently reported symptom was a clicking or popping sound, followed by temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pain, muscle pain, crepitus, and mouth opening limitations. Compared with lower-string instrumentalists, a clicking or popping sound was about 1.8 and 2 times more frequent in woodwind and brass instrumentalists, respectively. TMJ pain was about 3.2, 2.8, and 3.2 times more frequent in upper-string, woodwind, and brass instrumentalists, respectively. Muscle pain was about 1.5 times more frequent in instrumentalists with an elevated arm position than in those with a neutral arm position. The most frequent diagnosis was myalgia or myofascial pain (MFP), followed by disc displacement with reduction. Myalgia or MFP was 4.6 times more frequent in those practicing for no less than 3.5 hours daily than in those practicing for less than 3.5 hours. Conclusion The results indicate that playing instruments can play a contributory role in the development of TMD. PMID:27593881

  14. The relationship between clinical signs of respiratory system disorders and lung lesions at slaughter in veal calves.

    PubMed

    Leruste, H; Brscic, M; Heutinck, L F M; Visser, E K; Wolthuis-Fillerup, M; Bokkers, E A M; Stockhofe-Zurwieden, N; Cozzi, G; Gottardo, F; Lensink, B J; van Reenen, C G

    2012-06-01

    The presence and severity of lung lesions recorded post-mortem is commonly used as an indicator to assess the prevalence of respiratory problems in batches of bovines. In the context of a welfare monitoring based on on-farm measures, the recording of clinical signs on calves at the farm would be more convenient than the recording of lung lesions at slaughter. The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship between clinical respiratory signs at farm and post-mortem analyses of lung lesions observed at slaughter in veal calves. If clinical signs were a good predictor of lung lesions it could be possible to integrate only those measures in a welfare monitoring system. One-hundred-and-seventy-four batches of calves were observed 3 times: at 3 and 13 weeks after arrival of the calves at the unit and at 2 weeks before slaughter. For each batch a maximum of 300 calves was observed and the proportions of calves showing abnormal breathing, nasal discharge and coughing were recorded. Post-mortem inspection was carried out on a sample of lungs belonging to calves from the observed batches. Each examined lung was classified according to a 4-point scale for pneumonia from healthy lung (score 0) to severe lesions (score 3). The clinical signs recorded infra vitam were significantly correlated with moderate and severe lung lesions for observations at 13 weeks and 2 weeks before slaughter and the level of the correlation was highly variable (r(sp) from 0.16 to 0.40). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were created and the area under the curves showed that batches with a high proportion of lungs with moderate or severe lesions could not be accurately detected by the three clinical signs of respiratory disorders. These results suggest that both clinical signs and post-mortem inspection of lung lesions must be included in a welfare monitoring schemes for veal calves.

  15. Neurocognitive and Neuroplastic Mechanisms of Novel Clinical Signs in CRPS

    PubMed Central

    Kuttikat, Anoop; Noreika, Valdas; Shenker, Nicholas; Chennu, Srivas; Bekinschtein, Tristan; Brown, Christopher Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a chronic, debilitating pain condition that usually arises after trauma to a limb, but its precise etiology remains elusive. Novel clinical signs based on body perceptual disturbances have been reported, but their pathophysiological mechanisms remain poorly understood. Investigators have used functional neuroimaging techniques (including MEG, EEG, fMRI, and PET) to study changes mainly within the somatosensory and motor cortices. Here, we provide a focused review of the neuroimaging research findings that have generated insights into the potential neurocognitive and neuroplastic mechanisms underlying perceptual disturbances in CRPS. Neuroimaging findings, particularly with regard to somatosensory processing, have been promising but limited by a number of technique-specific factors (such as the complexity of neuroimaging investigations, poor spatial resolution of EEG/MEG, and use of modeling procedures that do not draw causal inferences) and more general factors including small samples sizes and poorly characterized patients. These factors have led to an underappreciation of the potential heterogeneity of pathophysiology that may underlie variable clinical presentation in CRPS. Also, until now, neurological deficits have been predominantly investigated separately from perceptual and cognitive disturbances. Here, we highlight the need to identify neurocognitive phenotypes of patients with CRPS that are underpinned by causal explanations for perceptual disturbances. We suggest that a combination of larger cohorts, patient phenotyping, the use of both high temporal, and spatial resolution neuroimaging methods, and the identification of simplified biomarkers is likely to be the most fruitful approach to identifying neurocognitive phenotypes in CRPS. Based on our review, we explain how such phenotypes could be characterized in terms of hierarchical models of perception and corresponding disturbances in recurrent processing

  16. Abnormal Congenital Location of Stapes' Superstructure: Clinical and Embryological Implications

    PubMed Central

    Teles, Rafaela; Sousa, Ana; Estevão, Roberto; Rodrigues, Jorge; Gomes, Alexandra; Silva, Francisco; Fernandes, Ângelo; Fernandes, Fausto

    2016-01-01

    Congenital middle ear malformations are rare. Most part of them are usually associated with other malformations, such as aural atresia, microtia, and dysmorphic craniofacial features. A clinical case of a 24-year-old male with a right-sided conductive hearing loss since his childhood, without craniofacial malformation, is presented. He was proposed for exploratory tympanotomy under the suspicious diagnosis of otosclerosis. The surgery revealed an abnormal location of stapes' superstructure, which was attached to the promontory and had an isolated and mobile osseous footplate in the oval window. A stapes prosthesis was inserted and resulted in closure of the air-bone gap by 25 dB. A review of the literature was also performed using MEDLINE. Two theories diverge on the embryologic origin of the stapes. Our findings seem to be in favour of the theory that defines two different embryologic origins to the stapes. PMID:27648330

  17. Warning Signs for Suicide: Theory, Research, and Clinical Applications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rudd, M. David; Berman, Alan L.; Joiner, Thomas E., Jr.; Nock, Matthew K.; Silverman, Morton M.; Mandrusiak, Michael; Van Orden, Kimberly; Witte, Tracy

    2006-01-01

    The current article addresses the issue of warning signs for suicide, attempting to differentiate the construct from risk factors. In accordance with the characteristic features discussed, a consensus set of warning signs identified by the American Association of Suicidology working group are presented, along with a discussion of relevant clinical…

  18. Red Flags: Clinical Signs for Identifying Autoimmune Encephalitis in Psychiatric Patients

    PubMed Central

    Herken, Julia; Prüss, Harald

    2017-01-01

    Autoimmune mechanisms causing diverse psychiatric symptoms are increasingly recognized and brought about a paradigm shift in neuropsychiatry. Identification of underlying antibodies against neuronal ion channels or receptors led to the speculation that a number of patients go misdiagnosed with a primary psychiatric disease. However, there is no clear consensus which clinical signs in psychiatric patients should prompt further investigations including measurement of anti-neuronal autoantibodies. We therefore aimed to analyze the presenting symptoms in patients with autoimmune encephalitis and the time between symptom onset and initiation of antibody diagnostics. For this, we recruited 100 patients from the Charité Center for Autoimmune Encephalitis between May and October 2016, including all types of autoimmune encephalitides. Psychiatric abnormalities were the most common clinical symptoms and were the presenting sign in 60%. One-third of patients were initially hospitalized in a psychiatric ward. All patients positive for antibodies against the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor showed behavioral changes, hallucinations, memory deficits, catatonia, or delusions. Patients positive for antibodies against other cell surface or intracellular antigens were often hospitalized with a psychosomatic diagnosis. The time between occurrence of first symptoms and antibody testing was often alarmingly prolonged. In patients with symptom onset between 2013 and 2016, the mean delay was 74 days, in cases diagnosed between 2007 and 2012 even 483 days, suggesting though that increased awareness of this novel disease group helped to expedite proper diagnosis and treatment. By analyzing the medical records in detail, we identified clinical signs that may help to assist in earlier diagnosis, including seizures, catatonia, autonomic instability, or hyperkinesia. Indeed, reanalyzing the whole cohort using these “red flags” led to a 58% reduction of time between symptom onset and

  19. Examination of Neurological Subtle Signs in ADHD as a Clinical Tool for the Diagnosis and Their Relationship to Spatial Working Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrin, Maite; Vance, Alasdair

    2012-01-01

    Background: Neurological subtle signs (NSS) are minor neurological abnormalities that have been shown to be increased in a number of neurodevelopmental conditions. For attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), it remains unclear whether NSS may aid the clinical diagnostic process. Methods: This study explored the association of total and…

  20. Radiographic basal ganglia abnormalities secondary to nonketotic hyperglycemia with unusual clinical features

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Ju Young; Park, Joon Min; Kim, Kyung Hwan; Park, Jun Seok; Shin, Dong Wun; Kim, Hoon; Jeon, Woo Chan; Kim, Hyun Jong

    2016-01-01

    A 77-year-old woman was admitted to a local clinic for altered consciousness and presented with a suspected basal ganglion hemorrhage detected on brain computed tomography. The patient was stuporous, but her vital signs were stable. Her initial blood glucose was 607 mg/dL, and a hyperdense lesion was found in the right basal ganglion on brain computed tomography. T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging revealed high signal intensity in the right basal ganglion. Electroencephalography showed no seizure activity. The patient was treated with a fluid infusion, and serum glucose level was controlled with insulin. The patient gradually recovered consciousness and was alert within 24 hours as serum glucose level normalized. The basal ganglion lesion caused by hyperglycemia was not accompanied by involuntary limb movement. This is the first report of a patient presenting with decreased consciousness and typical neural radiographic changes associated with nonketotic hyperglycemia but without movement abnormalities. PMID:28168232

  1. Hemifacial spasm and postural abnormalities; clinical and posturographical analyses.

    PubMed

    Degirmenci, Eylem; Oguzhanoglu, Attila; Atalay, Nilgun; Sahin, Fusun

    2015-09-01

    Hemifacial spasm (HFS) is defined as an involuntary, irregular clonic, or tonic movement of muscles innervated by the ipsilateral seventh cranial nerve. It is reported that the coexistence of non-motor- and motor-related symptoms can be seen in patients with HFS. Postural disturbances were investigated in some movement disorders; however, postural abnormalities due to HFS had not been reported before. In this study, we aimed to investigate the postural abnormalities in patients with HFS. In this cross-sectional, controlled study, Tinetti Balance and Gait Test (TBGT) scores and static posturography were performed on fifteen patients with HFS and fifteen healthy age- and sex-matched controls. The total TBGT score and TBGT-balance score were found to be significantly lower in the patient group than in the control group (p values were, respectively, 0.046 and 0.011). The ratio of the patients with high risk of falling was 40 %, and the difference was found to be significantly higher in the patient group (p value = 0.008). In Fourier analyses, a significant difference was found in the medium to high frequencies (F5-6) when the posturographic evaluation was performed on a solid ground with closed eyes, head rotated to right, and head rotated to the left positions (p values were, respectively, 0.045 and 0.007). The stability index of the HFS group was significantly higher than the control group when tested on the neutral, head right, and head left positions (p values were, respectively, 0.004, 0.049, and 0.003). In conclusion, our study showed that the patients with HFS have more balance and falling problems than the controls, which can be both clinically and posturographically determined.

  2. Clinical implications of chromosomal abnormalities in gastric adenocarcinomas

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Chew-Wun; Chen, Gen-Der; Fann, Cathy S.-J.; Lee, Anna F.-Y.; Chi, Chin-Wen; Liu, Jacqueline M.; Weier, Ulli; Chen, Jeou-Yuan

    2003-06-23

    Gastric carcinoma (GC) is one of the most common malignancies worldwide and has a very poor prognosis. Genetic imbalances in 62 primary gastric adenocarcinomas of various histopathologic types and pathologic stages and six gastric cancer-derived cell lines were analyzed by comparative genomic hybridization, and the relationship of genomic abnormalities to clinical features in primary GC was evaluated at a genome-wide level. Eighty-four percent of the tumors and all six cell lines showed DNA copy number changes. The recurrent chromosomal abnormalities including gains at 15 regions and losses at 8 regions were identified. Statistical analyses revealed that gains at 17q24-qter (53 percent), 20q13-qter (48 percent), 1p32-p36 (42 percent), 22q12-qter (27 percent), 17p13-pter (24 percent), 16p13-pter (21 percent), 6p21-pter (19 percent), 20p12-pter (19 percent), 7p21-pter (18 percent), 3q28-qter (8 percent), and 13q13-q14 (8 percent), and losses at 18q12-qter (11 percent), 3p12 (8 percent), 3p25-pter (8 percent), 5q14-q23 (8 percent), and 9p21-p23 (5 percent), are associated with unique patient or tumor-related features. GCs of differing histopathologic features were shown to be associated with distinct patterns of genetic alterations, supporting the notion that they evolve through distinct genetic pathways. Metastatic tumors were also associated with specific genetic changes. These regions may harbor candidate genes involved in the pathogenesis of this malignancy.

  3. Clinical disease and laboratory abnormalities in free-ranging desert tortoises in California (1990-1995)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Christopher, Mary M.; Berry, Kristin H.; Henen, Brian T.; Nagy, Kenneth A.

    2003-01-01

    Desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii) populations have experienced precipitous declines resulting from the cumulative impact of habitat loss and human and disease-related mortality. Diagnosis of disease in live, free-ranging tortoises is facilitated by evaluation of clinical signs and laboratory test results but may be complicated by seasonal and environmental effects. The goals of this study were: 1) to describe and monitor clinical and laboratory signs of disease in adult, free-ranging desert tortoises at three sites in the Mojave Desert of California (USA) between October 1990 and October 1995; 2) to evaluate associations between clinical signs and hematologic, biochemical, serologic, and microbiologic test results; 3) to characterize disease patterns by site, season, and sex; and 4) to assess the utility of diagnostic tests in predicting morbidity and mortality. Venous blood samples were obtained four times per year from tortoises of both sexes at the Desert Tortoise Research Natural Area (DTNA), Goffs/Fenner Valley, and Ivanpah Valley. Tortoises were given a physical examination, and clinical abnormalities were graded by type and severity. Of 108 tortoises, 68.5% had clinical signs of upper respiratory tract disease consistent with mycoplasmosis at least once during the study period. In addition, 48.1% developed moderate to severe shell lesions consistent with cutaneous dyskeratosis. Ulcerated or plaque-like oral lesions were noted on single occasions in 23% of tortoises at Goffs and 6% of tortoises at Ivanpah. Tortoises with oral lesions were significantly more likely than tortoises without lesions to have positive nasal cultures for Mycoplasma agassizii(P=0.001) and to be dehydrated (P=0.0007). Nine tortoises had marked azotemia (blood urea nitrogen [BUN] >100 mg/dl) or persistent azotemia (BUN 63–76 mg/dl); four of these died, three of which had necropsy confirmation of urinary tract disease. Laboratory tests had low sensitivity but high specificity in

  4. Two abnormalities of hexosaminidase A in clinically normal individuals.

    PubMed Central

    Grebner, E E; Mansfield, D A; Raghavan, S S; Kolodny, E H; d'Azzo, A; Neufeld, E F; Jackson, L G

    1986-01-01

    Two abnormalities of beta-hexosaminidase A (HEX A) activity are described. One, found in two unrelated Jewish children, was characterized by the complete absence of HEX A activity in serum, but low levels of activity in leukocytes and fibroblasts using artificial substrate. The other, found in a non-Jewish man, was characterized by uniformly low levels of HEX A activity in leukocytes, fibroblasts, and serum against artificial substrate. In all cases, the pH optimum of HEX A was normal, there was no increased lability at 37 degrees C, and no inhibitor was detected to account for the deficiency of activity. Cultured fibroblasts of these individuals were capable of synthesizing and processing alpha- and beta-subunits of HEX A and capable of cleaving GM2 ganglioside. The patients, ranging in age from 6 to 30 years, are clinically normal. They are probably genetic compounds carrying the classical Tay-Sachs gene and a differently mutated allele that imparts the anomalous phenotypic features observed. Images Fig. 2 PMID:2939713

  5. Socioecological correlates of clinical signs in two communities of wild chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) at Gombe National Park, Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Lonsdorf, Elizabeth V; Gillespie, Thomas R; Wolf, Tiffany M; Lipende, Iddi; Raphael, Jane; Bakuza, Jared; Murray, Carson M; Wilson, Michael L; Kamenya, Shadrack; Mjungu, Deus; Collins, D Anthony; Gilby, Ian C; Stanton, Margaret A; Terio, Karen A; Barbian, Hannah J; Li, Yingying; Ramirez, Miguel; Krupnick, Alexander; Seidl, Emily; Goodall, Jane; Hahn, Beatrice H; Pusey, Anne E; Travis, Dominic A

    2016-05-16

    Disease and other health hazards pose serious threats to the persistence of wild ape populations. The total chimpanzee population at Gombe National Park, Tanzania, has declined from an estimated 120 to 150 individuals in the 1960's to around 100 individuals by the end of 2013, with death associated with observable signs of disease as the leading cause of mortality. In 2004, we began a non-invasive health-monitoring program in the two habituated communities in the park (Kasekela and Mitumba) with the aim of understanding the prevalence of health issues in the population, and identifying the presence and impacts of various pathogens. Here we present prospectively collected data on clinical signs (observable changes in health) in the chimpanzees of the Kasekela (n = 81) and Mitumba (n = 32) communities over an 8-year period (2005-2012). First, we take a population approach and analyze prevalence of clinical signs in five different categories: gastrointestinal system (diarrhea), body condition (estimated weight loss), respiratory system (coughing, sneezing etc.), wounds/lameness, and dermatologic issues by year, month, and community membership. Mean monthly prevalence of each clinical sign per community varied, but typically affected <10% of observed individuals. Secondly, we analyze the presence of clinical signs in these categories as they relate to individual demographic and social factors (age, sex, and dominance rank) and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIVcpz) infection status. Adults have higher odds of being observed with diarrhea, loss of body condition, and wounds or lameness when compared to immatures, while males have a higher probability of being observed with wounds or lameness than females. In contrast, signs of respiratory illness appear not to be related to chimpanzee-specific factors and skin abnormalities are very rare. For a subset of known-rank individuals, dominance rank predicts the probability of wounding/lameness in adult males, but does

  6. Alveolar Bone Fracture: Pathognomonic Sign for Clinical Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Gutmacher, Zvi; Peled, Eli; Norman, Doron; Lin, Shaul

    2017-01-01

    Aim: Dental injuries, especially luxation and avulsion, are common. Dental trauma can cause alveolar bone fracture that can lead to tooth loss and malocclusion. Single tooth alveolar bone fractures are difficult to identify unless it protrudes through the overlying mucosa and can be visualized. Pain, malocclusion, and tooth mobility provide signs of suspected alveolar bone fractures. Integrity of the proximate alveolar bone should be examined for fractures where avulsion, luxation, or other tooth trauma is detected. Any suggestion of alveolar fractures should be further investigated with an appropriate radiograph. Summary: This case report shows a pathognomonic sign that detects and diagnosis single tooth alveolar bone fractures, i.e., a localized hematoma crossing the attached gingiva from the free gingival margin to the vestibular mucosa. This should serve as a warning for localized alveolar bone fracture. A visualized hematoma and gentle, careful palpation may help detect covered fractures when the overlying mucosa is not perforated.

  7. Video Taping and Abnormal Psychology: Dramatized Clinical Interviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyons, Michael J.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Students in an abnormal psychology course worked in teams to produce dramatizations of diagnostic interviews and then presented them in class. Positive and negative aspects of the activity are discussed. (RM)

  8. Workplace clinics: a sign of growing employer interest in wellness.

    PubMed

    Tu, Ha T; Boukus, Ellyn R; Cohen, Genna R

    2010-12-01

    Interest in workplace clinics has intensified in recent years, with employers moving well beyond traditional niches of occupational health and minor acute care to offering clinics that provide a full range of wellness and primary care services. Employers view workplace clinics as a tool to contain medical costs, boost productivity and enhance companies' reputations as employers of choice. The potential for clinics to transform primary care delivery through the trusted clinician model holds promise, according to experts interviewed for a new qualitative research study from the Center for Studying Health System Change (HSC). Achieving that model is dependent on gaining employee trust in the clinic, as well as the ability to recruit and retain clinicians with the right qualities--a particular challenge in communities with provider shortages. Even when clinic operations are outsourced to vendors, initial employer involvement--including the identification of the appropriate scope and scale of clinic services--and sustained employer attention over time are critical to clinic success. Measuring the impact of clinics is difficult, and credible evidence on return on investment (ROI) varies widely, with very high ROI claims made by some vendors lacking credibility. While well-designed, well-implemented workplace clinics are likely to achieve positive returns over the long term, expecting clinics to be a game changer in bending the overall health care cost curve may be unrealistic.

  9. Phenobarbitone-induced haematological abnormalities in idiopathic epileptic dogs: prevalence, risk factors, clinical presentation and outcome.

    PubMed

    Bersan, E; Volk, H A; Ros, C; De Risio, L

    2014-09-13

    The aim of this retrospective study was to assess prevalence, risk factors, clinical presentation and outcome of phenobarbitone induced haematological abnormalities (PBIHA) in dogs. The medical records of two veterinary referral institutions were searched for dogs diagnosed with idiopathic epilepsy and treated with PB as monotherapy or polytherapy between March 2003 and September 2010. Sixteen dogs had PBIHA; the median age at diagnosis was 69.5 months. Phenobarbitone was administered at a median dose of 3 mg/kg twice a day for a median period of 100.5 days and the median serum phenobarbitone level was 19 μg/ml. Two dogs had neutropenia, three had anaemia and thrombocytopenia, two had anaemia and neutropenia; the remaining nine had pancytopenia. All dogs were referred for non-specific clinical signs. Phenobarbitone was discontinued after diagnosis, and the median time to resolution of PBIHA was 17 days. The prevalence and risk factors for PBIHA were evaluated from a questionnaire survey of referring practices to obtain more detailed follow-up on cases diagnosed with idiopathic epilepsy. The prevalence rate of PBIHA was 4.2%, and the condition occurred in dogs treated with standard therapeutic doses often within the first three months after starting treatment. Serial haematological evaluations should be therefore considered from the beginning of phenobarbitone therapy to allow early diagnosis and treatment of PBIHA.

  10. About signs and symptoms: can semiotics expand the view of clinical medicine?

    PubMed

    Nessa, J

    1996-12-01

    Semiotics, the theory of sign and meaning, may help physicians complement the project of interpreting signs and symptoms into diagnoses. A sign stands for something. We communicate indirectly through signs, and make sense of our world by interpreting signs into meaning. Thus, through association and inference, we transform flowers into love, Othello into jealousy, and chest pain into heart attack. Medical semiotics is part of general semiotics, which means the study of life of signs within society. With special reference to a case story, elements from general semiotics, together with two theoreticians of equal importance, the Swiss linguist Ferdinand de Saussure and the American logician Charles Sanders Peirce, are presented. Two different modes of understanding clinical medicine are contrasted to illustrate the external link between what we believe or suggest, on the one hand, and the external reality on the other hand.

  11. Using clinical signs to diagnose anaemia in African children.

    PubMed Central

    Luby, S. P.; Kazembe, P. N.; Redd, S. C.; Ziba, C.; Nwanyanwu, O. C.; Hightower, A. W.; Franco, C.; Chitsulo, L.; Wirima, J. J.; Olivar, M. A.

    1995-01-01

    Anaemia is a serious and common problem among young children in sub-Saharan Africa. As a first step towards developing guidelines for its recognition and treatment, we conducted a study to evaluate the ability of health workers to use clinical findings to identify children with anaemia. Health care workers examined a total of 1104 children under 5 years of age at two hospital-based outpatient clinics in rural Malawi. Blood samples were taken to determine haemoglobin concentrations. Pallor of the conjunctiva, tongue, palm or nail beds was 66% sensitive and 68% specific in distinguishing children with moderate a anaemia (haemoglobin concentration, 5-8 g/dl) and 93% sensitive and 57% specific in distinguishing those with severe anaemia (haemoglobin concentration, < 5 g/dl). Even without laboratory support, which is often unavailable in rural Africa, clinical findings can identify the majority of children with anaemia. PMID:7554019

  12. [Malabsorption is a leading clinical sign of small bowel disease].

    PubMed

    Parfenov, A I; Krums, L M

    The paper presents a variety of clinical manifestations of malabsorption syndrome (MAS) in celiac disease, collagenous sprue, Whipple's disease, Crohn's disease, intestinal lymphangiectasia, amyloidosis, common variable immune deficiency, and treatment of short bowel syndrome. It shows the specific features of the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of MAS in small bowel diseases.

  13. Clinical signs suggestive of pharyngeal dysphagia in preschool children with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Benfer, Katherine A; Weir, Kelly A; Bell, Kristie L; Ware, Robert S; Davies, Peter S W; Boyd, Roslyn N

    2015-03-01

    This study aimed to determine the discriminative validity, reproducibility, and prevalence of clinical signs suggestive of pharyngeal dysphagia according to gross motor function in children with cerebral palsy (CP). It was a cross-sectional population-based study of 130 children diagnosed with CP at 18-36 months (mean=27.4, 81 males) and 40 children with typical development (TD, mean=26.2, 18 males). Sixteen signs suggestive of pharyngeal phase impairment were directly observed in a videoed mealtime by a speech pathologist, and reported by parents on a questionnaire. Gross motor function was classified using the Gross Motor Function Classification System. The study found that 67.7% of children had clinical signs, and this increased with poorer gross motor function (OR=1.7, p<0.01). Parents reported clinical signs in 46.2% of children, with 60% agreement with direct clinical mealtime assessment (kappa=0.2, p<0.01). The most common signs on direct assessment were coughing (44.7%), multiple swallows (25.2%), gurgly voice (20.3%), wet breathing (18.7%) and gagging (11.4%). 37.5% of children with TD had clinical signs, mostly observed on fluids. Dysphagia cut-points were modified to exclude a single cough on fluids, with a modified prevalence estimate proposed as 50.8%. Clinical signs suggestive of pharyngeal dysphagia are common in children with CP, even those with ambulatory CP. Parent-report on 16 specific signs remains a feasible screening method. While coughing was consistently identified by clinicians, it may not reflect children's regular performance, and was not sufficiently discriminative in children aged 18-36 months.

  14. Feline heartworm disease: correlations of clinical signs, serology, and other diagnostics--results of a multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Dillon, A R; Brawner, A R; Robertson-Plouch, C K; Guerrero, J

    2000-01-01

    cat was Ag positive and microfilaria positive but negative for Ab with both AD and HC tests. Although it has been presumed that most cats with FHD are Ag negative, it would appear that some individual cats with adult heartworms can also be Ab negative. Although eosinophilia and basophilia were more frequently associated with cats that were Ab positive, abnormal CBC values were observed in cats that were currently Ab negative. Radiographic lesions did not correlate with clinical signs or Ab levels. Some cats with no radiographic signs of FHD were Ag positive. Further, some cats with typical radiographic lesions of FHD were negative based on all serologic evaluations. These results demonstrate that successful transmission of heartworms to cats is more common than previously thought and is clinically associated with coughing, dyspnea, and vomiting. A cause and effect correlation cannot be proven between clinical signs and laboratory evaluation. Radiographic evidence of FHD in cats with repeated negative antibody results may be an indicator of residual damage from previous heartworm infections. Most experimental studies of FHD have been short-term (< 1 yr). However, in this study, many cats underwent repeated clinical evaluation over a relatively short time. This demonstrated that the clinical picture of spontaneous FHD is a constantly changing syndrome, highly dependent on the stage (immature L5, adult, adult death, residual damage) of the parasite in the cat and the individual cat's response. On evaluation of clinically affected cats, no one test proved to be definitive (without exceptions). The diagnosis of FHD continues to require a combination of clinical evaluation and a series of diagnostic tests, often requiring reevaluations over time.

  15. Hematologic and Biochemical Values of Wild Red-Tailed Amazon Parrot (Amazona brasiliensis) Nestlings With Abnormal Clinical Examination in Rasa Island, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Vaz, Frederico Fontanelli; Locatelli-Dittrich, Rosangela; Beltrame, Olair Carlos; Sipinski, Elenise Angelotti Bastos; Abbud, Maria Cecília; Sezerban, Rafael Meirelles

    2016-12-01

    The red-tailed Amazon parrot (Amazona brasiliensis) is an endangered psittacine species, but little information is available about abnormal clinical findings and hematologic and biochemical values of this species, which are important for monitoring the health of this population. To determine hematologic and biochemical values for wild red-tailed parrot nestlings exhibiting abnormal clinical findings, 31 nestlings from the Rasa Island (Paraná State, Southern Brazil) were physically restrained for clinical examination and blood sample collection. On physical examination, 26 birds had mild abnormalities and 5 had severe disorders. Parrots were divided into 5 groups according to the following clinical findings: presence of ectoparasites (group 1), respiratory disorders (group 2), chronic skin lesions caused by fly larvae (group 3), beak disorders (group 4), and severe clinical signs (group 5). Abnormal hematologic and biochemical findings in the nestlings were high total protein in group 3; low values for hemoglobin and mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration in group 4; low glucose concentration, high mean absolute heterophil count, and high heterophil : lymphocyte ratio in group 5; high concentrations of total plasma protein in groups 3 and 4; and high globulin concentration in groups 3 and 5. In general, the population assessed was in good condition. These results provide a guide to the expected clinical findings associated with hematologic and biochemical concentrations in a population of free-living parrots with abnormal clinical examination findings. The data support the conservation planning and health monitoring of the endangered red-tailed Amazon parrot.

  16. Neosporosis in Beagle dogs clinical signs, diagnosis, treatment, isolation and genetic characterization of Neospora caninum.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Clinical neosporosis was diagnosed in a litter of five pups born to a Beagle bitch from Virginia, USA. Four of the pups developed limb weakness starting at 4 weeks of age. The dogs were suspected to have neosporosis based on clinical signs and empirically treated with Clindamycin (75 mg, oral, twice...

  17. Clinical signs, therapy and zoonotic risk of pet guinea pigs with dermatophytosis.

    PubMed

    Kraemer, A; Hein, J; Heusinger, A; Mueller, R S

    2013-03-01

    Systematic studies about pet guinea pigs with dermatophytosis are rare. The aim of this study was to evaluate clinical signs, therapy and zoonotic risk of pet guinea pigs with dermatophytosis. Questionnaires from both owners (n = 74) of pet guinea pigs with dermatophytosis and their veterinarians (n = 101) were analysed regarding clinical signs, therapy and data pertinent to zoonotic potential. Trichophyton (T.) mentagrophytes was found in 97% of cases. In the weeks preceding the onset of the clinical signs, a new guinea pig joined the household in 43% of cases. One third of the affected guinea pigs had lived in the household for less than 3 months. Predominant clinical signs were alopecia (83%), scaling (73%) and crusting (70%). The most commonly affected body site was the head (75%). In approximately one quarter of the cases humans showed clinical signs of dermatophytosis, in half the households, only children were affected. Skin lesions were seen most often on the face, the neck and the arms. Pet guinea pigs carrying dermatophytes must be considered a serious zoonotic risk for their owners, especially for children. A major risk factor for dermatophytosis seems to be a recent acquisition of a new guinea pig.

  18. Clinical significance of the muscle-retracting sign during colorectal endoscopic submucosal dissection

    PubMed Central

    Toyonaga, Takashi; Tanaka, Shinwa; Man-I, Mariko; East, James; Ono, Wataru; Nishino, Eisei; Ishida, Tsukasa; Hoshi, Namiko; Morita, Yoshinori; Azuma, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    Background and study aims: During colorectal endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD), the feature of a muscle layer being pulled toward a neoplastic tumor is sometimes detected. We call this feature the muscle-retracting sign (MR sign). The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the MR sign is associated with particular types of neoplastic lesions and whether it has any clinical significance for ESD sessions. Patients and methods: A total of 329 patients underwent ESD for 357 colorectal neoplasms. The frequency of positivity for the MR sign was evaluated in different morphologic and histopathologic types of neoplasm. The success rate of complete resection and the incidence of complications were also evaluated according to whether lesions were positive or negative for the MR sign. Results: The rates of positivity for the MR sign in the various lesion types were as follows: laterally spreading tumor – granular nodular mixed type (LST-G-M), 9.6 %; laterally spreading tumor – granular homogeneous type (LST-G-H) and laterally spreading tumor – nongranular type (LST-NG), 0 %; sessile type, 41.2 %. The resection rate was 100 % (329 /329) in lesions negative for the MR sign; however, it was 64.3 % (18 /28) in lesions positive for the MR sign, which was significantly lower (P < 0.001). Conclusions: The MR sign was present only in some protruding lesions, and more importantly, it was associated with a high risk of incomplete tumor removal by ESD. Our data indicate that lesions positive for the MR sign lesions should be dissected with great caution; alternatively, based on the features of the individual case, a switch to surgery should be considered for the benefit of the patient. PMID:26171438

  19. Update on Clinical Features and Brain Abnormalities in Neurogenetics Syndromes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackowski, Andrea Parolin; Laureano, Maura Regina; Del'Aquilla, Marco Antonio; de Moura, Luciana Monteiro; Assuncao, Idaiane; Silva, Ivaldo; Schwartzman, Jose Salomao

    2011-01-01

    Neuroimaging methods represent a critical tool in efforts to join the study of the neurobiology of genes with the neurobiology of behaviour, and to understand the neurodevelopmental pathways that give rise to cognitive and behavioural impairments. This article reviews the clinical features and highlights studies with a focus on the relevant…

  20. [Clinical findings in a lamb with congenital multiple abnormalities].

    PubMed

    Chavez Moreno, V J; Henze, P

    1995-01-01

    A case of multiple, congenital malformations, with special emphasis on cardiac malformations (atrial- and ventricle septum defect, Ductus Botalli persistens, bilateral ventricle and atrial dilatation) in a lamb are described. Clinical findings, X-ray, ultrasound examination, electrocardio- and phonocardiogram, as well as pathology are discussed.

  1. Synergistic combination of clinical and imaging features predicts abnormal imaging patterns of pulmonary infections

    PubMed Central

    Bagci, Ulas; Jaster-Miller, Kirsten; Olivier, Kenneth N.; Yao, Jianhua; Mollura, Daniel J.

    2013-01-01

    We designed and tested a novel hybrid statistical model that accepts radiologic image features and clinical variables, and integrates this information in order to automatically predict abnormalities in chest computed-tomography (CT) scans and identify potentially important infectious disease biomarkers. In 200 patients, 160 with various pulmonary infections and 40 healthy controls, we extracted 34 clinical variables from laboratory tests and 25 textural features from CT images. From the CT scans, pleural effusion (PE), linear opacity (or thickening) (LT), tree-in-bud (TIB), pulmonary nodules, ground glass opacity (GGO), and consolidation abnormality patterns were analyzed and predicted through clinical, textural (imaging), or combined attributes. The presence and severity of each abnormality pattern was validated by visual analysis of the CT scans. The proposed biomarker identification system included two important steps: (i) a coarse identification of an abnormal imaging pattern by adaptively selected features (AmRMR), and (ii) a fine selection of the most important features from the previous step, and assigning them as biomarkers, depending on the prediction accuracy. Selected biomarkers were used to classify normal and abnormal patterns by using a boosted decision tree (BDT) classifier. For all abnormal imaging patterns, an average prediction accuracy of 76.15% was obtained. Experimental results demonstrated that our proposed biomarker identification approach is promising and may advance the data processing in clinical pulmonary infection research and diagnostic techniques. PMID:23930819

  2. Laboratory Persistence and Clinical Progression of Small Monoclonal Abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Murray, David L.; Seningen, Justin L.; Dispenzieri, Angela; Snyder, Melissa R.; Kyle, Robert A.; Rajkumar, S. Vincent; Katzmann, Jerry A.

    2014-01-01

    Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) that presents with no quantifiable M spike on immunofixation electrophoresis (IFE) can be termed IFE MGUS. We retrospectively identified patients with IFE MGUS who were monitored with at least 1 subsequent assessment that included an IFE, and evaluated the persistence of the monoclonal protein and the progression of disease. Although the monoclonal proteins persisted in the majority of patients, 16% did not experience this persistence, and had no documented immunomodulatory therapy. After a median follow-up of 3.9 years, the disease clinically progressed in 14 patients (3.2%). Eight of these 14 patients with clinical progression had an immunoglobulin (Ig) A IFE M protein and 6 had an IgG M protein. This study demonstrates that in some patients with IFE MGUS, the M proteins are transient and that IgA IFE MGUS is more likely to persist and progress to myeloma. PMID:23010717

  3. Clinical signs, treatment, and postmortem lesions in dairy goats with enterotoxemia: 13 cases (1979-1982).

    PubMed

    Blackwell, T E; Butler, D G

    1992-01-15

    Enterotoxemia attributable to Clostridium perfringens type D in goats is difficult to diagnose because of a lack of specific clinical signs or postmortem lesions, on which to base the diagnosis. This report describes the clinical signs, postmortem lesions, and clinical responses to treatment and vaccination in 4 goat herds, in which a diagnosis of enterotoxemia was confirmed. Four clinical cases had the diagnosis confirmed on the basis of signs of diarrhea or sudden death and the isolation of C perfringens and epsilon toxin from the feces at the time of admission. The 10 necropsy cases were diagnosed on the basis of the isolation of C perfringens (not typed) or epsilon toxin from the intestinal contents of goats that died with clinical signs compatible with enterotoxemia and without lesions associated with a second serious disease. Enterocolitis was the most consistent lesion reported at necropsy in the 10 goats with enterotoxemia. Ovine enterotoxemia vaccines were of limited value in preventing enterotoxemia. These observations imply that naturally induced enterotoxemia in goats involves a different pathophysiologic mechanism than that associated with enterotoxemia in sheep.

  4. The reporting of clinical signs in laboratory animals: FELASA Working Group Report.

    PubMed

    Fentener van Vlissingen, J M; Borrens, M; Girod, A; Lelovas, P; Morrison, F; Torres, Y Saavedra

    2015-10-01

    Observing and reporting clinical signs in laboratory animals is necessary for many reasons: the assessment of animal welfare, compliance with the principle of refinement (e.g. humane endpoints), regulatory compliance (e.g. reporting severity) and, importantly, as a scientific outcome, e.g. in animal models of disease or safety studies. Developments in the reporting of clinical signs will enhance the scientific value gained from animal experiments and further address the ethical cost. This paper discusses systematic approaches to the observation and reporting of clinical signs in animals (to be) used for research. Glossaries from public and corporate institutions have been consulted and a reference glossary has been set up, providing terminology to be tailored for institutional or project-specific use. The clinical examination of animals must be carried out by competent and specifically trained staff in a systematic way and repeated at adequate intervals and clinical observations must be registered effectively to allow this information to be used. The development of institutional or project-specific glossaries and the use of handwritten records or automated databases are discussed in detail. Among the users are animal care staff, veterinarians and researchers who will need to agree on a given set of clinical signs to be monitored routinely or as a scientific read-out and to train for the proper application. The paper introduces a long list of clinical signs with scientific terminology, descriptions and explanations as a reference glossary to be published and maintained online as a living document supported by the authors as an editorial committee.

  5. Cerebellar Ataxia with Bilateral Vestibulopathy: Description of a Syndrome and Its Characteristic Clinical Sign

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Migliaccio, Americo A.; Halmagyi, G. Michael; McGarvie, Leigh A.; Cremer, Phillip D.

    2004-01-01

    We report four patients with the syndrome of cerebellar ataxia with bilateral vestibulopathy (CABV) and, using search coil oculography, we validate its characteristic clinical sign, namely impairment of the visually enhanced vestibulo-ocular reflex (VVOR) or doll's head reflex. In our four patients, CABV began in the sixth decade of life; they are…

  6. The geyser sign and torn rotator cuff: clinical significance and pathomechanics.

    PubMed

    Craig, E V

    1984-12-01

    The geyser radiographic sign on shoulder arthrogram is characterized by leakage of dye from the glenohumeral joint into the subdeltoid bursa. The dye outlines the acromioclavicular joint. It is usually an indication of a full-thickness cuff tear of long duration. The clinical occurrence and pathomechanics of this finding indicate that repair is generally difficult.

  7. Increased expression of plasma membrane Ca(2+)ATPase 4b in platelets from hypertensives: a new sign of abnormal thrombopoiesis?

    PubMed

    Dally, Saoussen; Chaabane, Chiraz; Corvazier, Elisabeth; Bredoux, Raymonde; Bobe, Regis; Ftouhi, Bochra; Slimane, Hedia; Raies, Aly; Enouf, Jocelyne

    2007-11-01

    Platelet Ca(2+) homeostasis is controlled by a multi-Ca(2+)ATPase system including two PMCA (plasma membrane Ca(2+)ATPase) and seven SERCA (sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)ATPase) isoforms. Previous studies have shown similar platelet Ca(2+) abnormalities in diabetic and hypertensive patients, including an increase in intracellular [Ca(2+)](I), a possible modulation of PMCA activity and increased PMCA tyrosine phosphorylation. Very recently, we found that platelets from diabetic patients also exhibited increased PMCA4b expression. In the present study we looked for further similarities between diabetic and hypertensive patients. We first confirmed a decrease in Ca(2+)ATPase activity (mean 55 + 7%) in mixed platelet membranes isolated from 10 patients with hypertension compared with those from 10 healthy controls. In addition, the decreased Ca(2+)ATPase activity correlated with the DBP of the different patients, as expected for PMCA activity. Second, we performed a pilot study of six hypertensives to examine their expressions of PMCA and SERCA mRNA and proteins. Like the diabetic patients, 100% of hypertensives were found to present a major increase in PMCA4b expression (mean value of 218 +/- 21%). We thus determined that platelets from diabetic and hypertensive patients showed similar increased PMCA4b isoform. Since increased PMCA4b expression was recently found to be associated with a perturbation of megakaryocytopoiesis, these findings may also point to an abnormality in platelet maturation in hypertension.

  8. Clinical and forensic signs related to chemical burns: a mechanistic approach.

    PubMed

    Dinis-Oliveira, Ricardo Jorge; Carvalho, Félix; Moreira, Roxana; Proença, Jorge Brandão; Santos, Agostinho; Duarte, José Alberto; Bastos, Maria de Lourdes; Magalhães, Teresa

    2015-06-01

    This manuscript highlights and critically analyses clinical and forensic signs related to chemical burns. Signs that may lead to suspicion of a particular chemical are thoroughly discussed regarding its underlying mechanisms. Burns due to sulfuric, hydrofluoric, nitric, hydrochloric (muriatic) and acetic (including derivatives) acids, hydrogen sulphide, sodium (caustic soda) and calcium (cement) hydroxides, paraquat, burns after inflation and rupture of airbags, povidone-iodine, chlorhexidine/alcohol (in preterm infants), laxatives, and vesicants (warfare agents), will be reviewed since these are the most common agents found in daily practice, for which relevant and timed information may be helpful in formulating an emergency treatment protocols and toxicological analysis.

  9. The value of Bayes' theorem for interpreting abnormal test scores in cognitively healthy and clinical samples.

    PubMed

    Gavett, Brandon E

    2015-03-01

    The base rates of abnormal test scores in cognitively normal samples have been a focus of recent research. The goal of the current study is to illustrate how Bayes' theorem uses these base rates--along with the same base rates in cognitively impaired samples and prevalence rates of cognitive impairment--to yield probability values that are more useful for making judgments about the absence or presence of cognitive impairment. Correlation matrices, means, and standard deviations were obtained from the Wechsler Memory Scale--4th Edition (WMS-IV) Technical and Interpretive Manual and used in Monte Carlo simulations to estimate the base rates of abnormal test scores in the standardization and special groups (mixed clinical) samples. Bayes' theorem was applied to these estimates to identify probabilities of normal cognition based on the number of abnormal test scores observed. Abnormal scores were common in the standardization sample (65.4% scoring below a scaled score of 7 on at least one subtest) and more common in the mixed clinical sample (85.6% scoring below a scaled score of 7 on at least one subtest). Probabilities varied according to the number of abnormal test scores, base rates of normal cognition, and cutoff scores. The results suggest that interpretation of base rates obtained from cognitively healthy samples must also account for data from cognitively impaired samples. Bayes' theorem can help neuropsychologists answer questions about the probability that an individual examinee is cognitively healthy based on the number of abnormal test scores observed.

  10. Clinical Signs of Radiologic Pneumonia in Under-Five Hypokalemic Diarrheal Children Admitted to an Urban Hospital in Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Chisti, Mohammod Jobayer; Salam, Mohammed Abdus; Ashraf, Hasan; Faruque, Abu S. G.; Bardhan, Pradip Kumar; Das, Sumon Kumar; Shahunja, K. M.; Shahid, Abu S. M. S. B.; Ahmed, Tahmeed

    2013-01-01

    Background Clinical signs of pneumonia are often veiled in under-five diarrheal children presenting with hypokalemia, making clinical diagnosis of pneumonia very difficult in such population. However, there is no published report that describes the influences of hypokalemia on the clinical signs of pneumonia in diarrheal children. Our objective was to assess the influences of hypokalemia, and their outcome in such children. Methods We prospectively enrolled all under-five diarrheal children (n = 180) admitted to the Special Care Ward of the Dhaka Hospital of icddr,b from September-December 2007 with radiological pneumonia who also had their serum potassium estimated. We compared the clinical features and outcome of the diarrheal children having pneumonia with (cases = 55) and without hypokalemia (controls = 125). Results The case-fatality among the cases was 2 times higher compared to the controls, but the difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.202). In logistic regression analysis, after adjusting for potential confounders such as age of the patient, clinical dehydration, severe wasting, abnormally sleepy, lower chest wall in-drawing, nasal flaring and inability to drink on admission, under-five diarrheal children with pneumonia who presented with nutritional edema had 3 times more risk to have hypokalemia compared to those without nutritional edema (OR = 2.76, 95% CI = 1.01–7.51) and these hypokalemic children were 64% less likely to present with fast breathing (OR = 0.36, 95% CI = 0.17–0.74). Conclusion and significance The results of our analysis are simple but may have great public health implications and underscore the importance of diligent assessment for pneumonia in under-five diarrheal children having risk of hypokalemia as in children with nutritional edema even in absence of fast breathing, a useful sign of pneumonia. This may help for early initiation of first dose of parental antibiotics along with

  11. [The relationship between clinical outcomes of reproduc-tive abnormalities and chromosome polymorphism].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Rong; Deng, Jian-Xia; Li, Jin-Jin

    2007-11-01

    To study the relationship between chromosome polymorphism and clinical effect of reproductive abnormalities, we prepared chromosomes from peripheral blood lymphocytes and carried out G/C banding and karyotype analyses. Out of 1 414 cases who came in for genetic counseling, 273 had chromosome abnormalities. Among these 273 cases, 180 cases (65.93%) were karyotype variations, with the remaining 93 cases (34.07%) being non-polymorphic chromosomal abnormalities. Karyotype variations included 10 cases of satellite increases in the D/G group, 35 cases of secondary constriction increases, 99 cases of big or small Y chromosome, 6 cases of pericentric inversion of chromosome Y and 30 cases of pericentric inversion of chromosome 9. These results indicated that clinical effect such as abortion, sterility, stillbirth and congenital malformation are mainly related to chromosome polymorphisms.

  12. Scoring clinical signs can help diagnose canine visceral leishmaniasis in a highly endemic area in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Silva, Kleverton Ribeiro da; Mendonça, Vitor Rosa Ramos de; Silva, Kellen Matuzzy; Nascimento, Leopoldo Fabrício Marçal do; Mendes-Sousa, Antonio Ferreira; Pinho, Flaviane Alves de; Barral-Netto, Manoel; Barral, Aldina Maria Prado; Cruz, Maria do Socorro Pires E

    2017-01-01

    Canine visceral leishmaniasis (CVL) diagnosis is still a challenge in endemic areas with limited diagnostic resources. This study proposes a score with the potential to distinguish positive CVL cases from negative ones. We studied 265 dogs that tested positive for CVL on ELISA and parasitological tests. A score ranging between 0 and 19 was recorded on the basis of clinical signs. Dogs with CVL had an overall higher positivity of the majority of clinical signs than did dogs without CVL or with ehrlichiosis. Clinical signs such as enlarged lymph nodes (83.93%), muzzle/ear lesions (55.36%), nutritional status (51.79%), bristle condition (57.14%), pale mucosal colour (48.21%), onychogryphosis (58.93%), skin lesion (39.28%), bleeding (12.50%), muzzle depigmentation (41.07%), alopecia (39.29%), blepharitis (21.43%), and keratoconjunctivitis (42.86%) were more frequent in dogs with CVL than in dogs with ehrlichiosis or without CVL. Moreover, the clinical score increased according to the positivity of all diagnostic tests (ELISA, p < 0.001; parasite culture, p = 0.0021; and smear, p = 0.0003). Onychogryphosis (long nails) [odds ratio (OR): 3.529; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.832-6.796; p < 0.001], muzzle depigmentation (OR: 4.651; 95% CI: 2.218-9.750; p < 0.001), and keratoconjunctivitis (OR: 5.400; 95% CI: 2.549-11.441; p < 0.001) were highly associated with CVL. Interestingly, a score cut-off value ≥ 6 had an area under the curve of 0.717 (p < 0.0001), sensitivity of 60.71%, and specificity of 73.64% for CVL diagnosis. The clinical sign-based score for CVL diagnosis suggested herein can help veterinarians reliably identify dogs with CVL in endemic areas with limited diagnostic resources.

  13. Scoring clinical signs can help diagnose canine visceral leishmaniasis in a highly endemic area in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Kleverton Ribeiro; de Mendonça, Vitor Rosa Ramos; Silva, Kellen Matuzzy; do Nascimento, Leopoldo Fabrício Marçal; Mendes-Sousa, Antonio Ferreira; de Pinho, Flaviane Alves; Barral-Netto, Manoel; Barral, Aldina Maria Prado; Cruz, Maria do Socorro Pires e

    2017-01-01

    Canine visceral leishmaniasis (CVL) diagnosis is still a challenge in endemic areas with limited diagnostic resources. This study proposes a score with the potential to distinguish positive CVL cases from negative ones. We studied 265 dogs that tested positive for CVL on ELISA and parasitological tests. A score ranging between 0 and 19 was recorded on the basis of clinical signs. Dogs with CVL had an overall higher positivity of the majority of clinical signs than did dogs without CVL or with ehrlichiosis. Clinical signs such as enlarged lymph nodes (83.93%), muzzle/ear lesions (55.36%), nutritional status (51.79%), bristle condition (57.14%), pale mucosal colour (48.21%), onychogryphosis (58.93%), skin lesion (39.28%), bleeding (12.50%), muzzle depigmentation (41.07%), alopecia (39.29%), blepharitis (21.43%), and keratoconjunctivitis (42.86%) were more frequent in dogs with CVL than in dogs with ehrlichiosis or without CVL. Moreover, the clinical score increased according to the positivity of all diagnostic tests (ELISA, p < 0.001; parasite culture, p = 0.0021; and smear, p = 0.0003). Onychogryphosis (long nails) [odds ratio (OR): 3.529; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.832-6.796; p < 0.001], muzzle depigmentation (OR: 4.651; 95% CI: 2.218-9.750; p < 0.001), and keratoconjunctivitis (OR: 5.400; 95% CI: 2.549-11.441; p < 0.001) were highly associated with CVL. Interestingly, a score cut-off value ≥ 6 had an area under the curve of 0.717 (p < 0.0001), sensitivity of 60.71%, and specificity of 73.64% for CVL diagnosis. The clinical sign-based score for CVL diagnosis suggested herein can help veterinarians reliably identify dogs with CVL in endemic areas with limited diagnostic resources. PMID:28076469

  14. [Abnormality of blood coagulation indexes in patients with de novo acute leukemia and its clinical significance].

    PubMed

    Xiao, Fang-Fang; Hu, Kai-Xun; Guo, Mei; Qiao, Jian-Hui; Sun, Qi-Yun; Ai, Hui-Sheng; Yu, Chang-Lin

    2013-04-01

    To explore hemorrhage risk and the clinical significance of abnormal change of prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), plasma fibrinogen (FIB), plasma thrombin time (TT) and d-dimer (D-D) in de novo acute leukemia (except for APL), the different bleeding manifestations of 114 cases of de novo acute leukemia with different coagulation indexes were analyzed retrospectively. The correlation between these blood coagulation indexes and the possible correlative clinical characteristics were analysed, including age, sex, type of acute leukemia, initial white blood cell(WBC) and platelet(Plt) count, the proportion of blast cells in bone marrow and cytogenetic abnormality of patients at diagnosis. The results indicated that the incidence of abnormal blood coagulation was as high as 78.1% for de novo AL patients. These patients with 5 normal blood coagulation indexes may have mild bleeding manifestation, but the more abnormal indexes, the more severe bleeding. Both PT and D-D were sensitive indexes for diagnosis of level II bleeding. Incidence of abnormal blood coagulation significantly correlates with the proportion of blast cells in bone marrow (χ(2) = 4.184, OR = 1.021, P < 0.05) and more with D-D (P < 0.01), while age, sex, type of AL, WBC count, Plt count and abnormality of cytogenetics did not correlate with abnormal blood coagulation. It is concluded that the coagulation and fibrinolysis are abnormal in most patients with de novo acute leukemia. More abnormal indexes indicate more severe bleeding, and both PT and D-D are sensitive indexes for diagnosis of level II bleeding. Higher proportion of blast cells in bone marrow predicts higher incidence of abnormal blood clotting. Acute leukemia with elderly age, high white blood cell count and adverse cytogenetics do not predict severer abnormal blood clotting. Detection of PT, APTT, TT, FIB, and D-D may help to judge whether the patients are in a state of hypercoagulability or disseminated

  15. Clinical prediction of fall risk and white matter abnormalities: a diffusion tensor imaging study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Tinetti scale is a simple clinical tool designed to predict risk of falling by focusing on gait and stance impairment in elderly persons. Gait impairment is also associated with white matter (WM) abnormalities. Objective: To test the hypothesis that elderly subjects at risk for falling, as deter...

  16. Clinical and radiographic signs in primary and metastatic esophageal neoplasms of the dog.

    PubMed

    Ridgway, R L; Suter, P F

    1979-04-01

    Esophageal neoplasms were diagnosed in 8 of 49,229 dogs seen over the last 11 years at the Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital of the University of California at Davis. The neoplasms were primary in 2 dogs and metastatic to the esophagus in 6 dogs, with thyroid carcinoma being the most common site of the primary tumor. The most common clinical signs were regurgitation, dysphagia, weight loss, development of neck masses, and respiratory difficulties. It was concluded that the clinical signs often can be misleading. The interpretation of survey radiographs, barium contrast studies, or fluoroscopic studies often provide the initial data base. The final diagnosis requires histologic examination. Retention of air in the esophagus (with or without esophageal displacement) and motor dysfunction (with or without gross morphologic changes) are the most important criteria for radiographic diagnosis.

  17. Isolated fat pad sign in acute elbow injury: is it clinically relevant?

    PubMed

    Jie, Kim E; van Dam, Lisette F; Hammacher, Eric R

    2016-06-01

    An isolated fat pad sign (i.e. joint effusion without a visible fracture), commonly seen in acute elbow injury, is associated with occult fracture and treated as such. However, the clinical relevance of an isolated fat pad is unclear, thereby questioning the need for specialized follow-up. In this study, 111 patients (median age 15 years, interquartile range 9-27 years) with an isolated fat pad sign after acute elbow injury were included. The clinical relevance of an isolated fat pad sign was derived from descriptives on pain, elbow function, treatment change, number of revisits and recovery time after 1 week follow-up and long-term follow-up. Treatment alterations were rarely made and none of the patients needed an operative intervention; also, none of the patients had persistent symptoms. The median recovery time was 3 weeks (interquartile range 2-12 weeks). This study shows that, unless symptoms persist or worsen, regular follow-up at a specialized outpatient clinic is not needed.

  18. New Toronto clinic for men may be sign of growing entrepreneurship within medicine.

    PubMed Central

    Lowry, F

    1995-01-01

    A Toronto physician has opened a new clinic for male patients, particularly highly stressed executives, who pay to have their physical, mental and nutritional health assessed. The Health Institute for Men, which opened in January, is located close to the Toronto Stock Exchange. It charges $450 for the initial visit, which includes a complete history, mental-assessment exam and thorough physical. The chair of the CMA Board of Directors considers the clinic a sign of growing entrepreneurship within Canadian medicine. Images p204-a p204-b PMID:7600471

  19. Clinical value of color doppler ultrasound in prenatal diagnosis of umbilical cord entry abnormity

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jiandong; Wang, Li; Li, Yinghui

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To study the clinical value of prenatal diagnosis of umbilical cord entry abnormity (UCEA) by means of color Doppler ultrasound (CDUS). Methods: Clinical data of sixty-four cases with confirmed umbilical cord entry abnormity were reviewed and the specific UCEA conditions and the outcomes of perinatal infants were analyzed. Results: Detection rates of marginal umbilical cord entry abnormity and velamentous umbilical cord entry abnormity by means of CDUS at second trimester were 94.1% and 93.8% respecdtively much higher than 80.0% and 68.8% which were those of third trimester. Discrepancy had statistical significance (P<0.05). True positive rate of prenatal diagnosis of UCEA by means of CDUS was 85.9% (55/64), and false negative rate was 14.1% (9/64). Among sixty four patients with UCEA, seventeen patients (26.6%) underwent selective caesarean delivery; twenty-six patients (35.9%) underwent emergency caesarean delivery and twenty-four patients (37.5%) had normal delivery. Conclusion: Prenatal diagnosis of UCEA by means of CDUS is intuitive and accurate. It provides an evidence for determination of the best time to diagnose UCEA, and also offers a proper advice for pregnant women about delivery mode to ensure the fetus survival rate, which is clinically valuable. PMID:28083036

  20. Relation of clinical signs to pathological changes in 19 cases of canine distemper encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Koutinas, A F; Polizopoulou, Z S; Baumgaertner, W; Lekkas, S; Kontos, V

    2002-01-01

    In an attempt to associate the clinical neurological syndromes with the neuropathological features of canine distemper (CD), 19 spontaneous cases with neurological involvement were examined, before and after euthanasia. Seventeen dogs were less than one year of age and all except two (89.4%) were unvaccinated against CD. Various extraneural signs associated with CD encephalomyelitis (CDE) were seen in 15 dogs. Generalized or localized myoclonus was the most common sign observed (13/19). Seventeen of the dogs presented with signs suggestive of one neuroanatomical location of lesions. Of these animals, seven had signs of cerebral, two of cerebellar, four of cervical, one of cervicothoracic, two of thoracolumbar and two of lumbosacral syndrome. The diagnosis of CD was confirmed immunohistochemically (detection of CD viral antigen), serologically (neutralizing serum antibody titre > or = 16) and histopathologically (CDV inclusion bodies, type of central nervous system lesions). An association of the neuroanatomical lesion location and the histopathological findings was noted in 14 out of 17 dogs (82.3%). Myoclonus could be attributed to lower motor neuron damage in eight out of 13 dogs (61.5%).

  1. The Harmonising Outcome Measures for Eczema (HOME) statement to assess clinical signs of atopic eczema in trials.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Jochen; Spuls, Phyllis I; Thomas, Kim S; Simpson, Eric; Furue, Masutaka; Deckert, Stefanie; Dohil, Magdalene; Apfelbacher, Christian; Singh, Jasvinder A; Chalmers, Joanne; Williams, Hywel C

    2014-10-01

    The lack of core outcome sets for atopic eczema (AE) is a major obstacle for advancing evidence-based treatment. The global Harmonising Outcome Measures for Eczema (HOME) initiative has already defined clinical signs, symptoms, quality of life, and long-term control of flares as core outcome domains for AE trials. This article deals with the standardization of measurement instruments to assess clinical signs of AE. To resolve the current lack of standardization of the assessment of clinical signs of AE, we followed a structured process of systematic reviews and international consensus sessions to identify 1 core outcome measurement instrument for assessment of clinical signs in all future AE trials. Systematic reviews indicated that from 16 different instruments identified to assess clinical signs of AE, only the Eczema Area and Severity Index (EASI) and the objective Scoring Atopic Dermatitis (SCORAD) index were identified as extensively validated. The EASI has adequate validity, responsiveness, internal consistency, and intraobserver reliability. The objective SCORAD index has adequate validity, responsiveness, and interobserver reliability but unclear intraobserver reliability to measure clinical signs of AE. In an international consensus study, patients, physicians, nurses, methodologists, and pharmaceutical industry representatives agreed that the EASI is the preferred core instrument to measure clinical signs in all future AE trials. All stakeholders involved in designing, reporting, and using clinical trials on AE are asked to comply with this consensus to enable better evidence-based decision making, clearer scientific communication, and improved patient care.

  2. Adults with genetic syndromes and cardiovascular abnormalities: Clinical history and management

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Angela E.; Basson, Craig T.; Goldmuntz, Elizabeth; Magoulas, Pilar L.; McDermott, Deborah A.; McDonald-McGinn, Donna M.; McPherson, Elspeth; Morris, Colleen A.; Noonan, Jacqueline; Nowak, Catherine; Pierpont, Mary Ella; Pyeritz, Reed E.; Rope, Alan F.; Zackai, Elaine; Pober, Barbara R.

    2009-01-01

    Cardiovascular abnormalities, especially structural congenital heart defects (CHDs), commonly occur in malformation syndromes and genetic disorders. Individuals with syndromes comprise a significant proportion of those affected with selected CHDs such as complete atrioventricular canal, interrupted arch type B, supravalvar aortic stenosis and pulmonary stenosis. As these individuals age, they contribute to the growing population of adults with special health care needs. Although most will require longterm cardiology followup, primary care providers, geneticists and other specialists should be aware of (1) the type and frequency of cardiovascular abnormalities, (2) the range of clinical outcomes, and (3) guidelines for prospective management and treatment of potential complications. This article reviews fundamental genetic, cardiac, medical and reproductive issues associated with common genetic syndromes which are frequently associated with a cardiovascular abnormality. New data are also provided about the cardiac status of adults with a 22q11.2 deletion and with Down syndrome. PMID:18580689

  3. Clinical and molecular cytogenetic studies in ring chromosome 5: report of a child with congenital abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Basinko, Audrey; Giovannucci Uzielli, Maria Luisa; Scarselli, Gloria; Priolo, Manuela; Timpani, Giuseppina; De Braekeleer, Marc

    2012-02-01

    We report here a child with a ring chromosome 5 (r(5)) associated with facial dysmorphology and multiple congenital abnormalities. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) using bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones was performed to determine the breakpoints involved in the r(5). The 5p deletion extended from 5p13.2-3 to 5pter and measured 34.61 Mb (range: 33.7-35.52 Mb) while the 5q deletion extended from 5q35.3 to 5qter and measured 2.44 Mb (range: 2.31-2.57 Mb). The patient presented signs such as microcephaly, hypertelorism, micrognathia and epicanthal folds, partially recalling those of a deletion of the short arm of chromosome 5 and the "cri-du-chat" syndrome. The most striking phenotypic features were the congenital heart abnormalities which have been frequently reported in deletions of the distal part of the long arm of chromosome 5 and in rings leading to a 5q35-5qter deletion. However, the NKX2-5 gene, which has been related to congenital heart defects, was not deleted in our patient, nor presumably to some other patients with 5q35.3-5qter deletion. We propose that VEGFR3, deleted in our patient, could be a candidate gene for the congenital heart abnormalities observed.

  4. Clinical predictors of abnormal head computed tomography scan in patients who are conscious after head injury

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Rakesh Kumar; Munivenkatappa, Ashok; Prathyusha, Vasuki; Shukla, Dhaval P.; Devi, Bhagavatula Indira

    2017-01-01

    Background: Indication of a head computed tomography (CT) scan in a patient who remains conscious after head injury is controversial. We aimed to determine the clinical features that are most likely to be associated with abnormal CT scan in patients with a history of head injury, and who are conscious at the time of presentation to casualty. Materials and Methods: This is a prospective observation study of patients presented to casualty with history of head injury, and who were conscious, i.e., Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) 15 at the time of evaluation. All patients underwent head CT scan. The CT scan was reported as abnormal if it showed any pathology ascribed to trauma. The following variables were used: age, gender, mode of injury (road traffic accident, fall, assault, and others), duration since injury, and history of transient loss of consciousness, headache, vomiting, ear/nose bleeding, and seizures. Logistic regression analysis was used to identify the clinical features that predicted an abnormal CT scan. Results: During the observation period, a total of 1629 patients with head injury were evaluated, out of which 453 were in GCS 15. Abnormal CT scan was present in 195 (43%) patients. Among all the variables, the following were found significantly associated with abnormal CT scan: duration since injury (>12 h) P < 0.001; vomiting odds, ratio (OR) 1.89 (1.23, 2.80), P < 0.001; and presence of any symptom, OR 2.36 (1.52, 3.71), P < 0.001. Conclusion: A patient with GCS 15 presenting after 12 hours of injury with vomiting or combination of symptoms has a significant risk of abnormal head CT scan. PMID:28149084

  5. Domoic acid toxicity in Californian sea lions (Zalophus californianus): clinical signs, treatment and survival.

    PubMed

    Gulland, F M D; Haulena, M; Fauquier, D; Langlois, G; Lander, M E; Zabka, T; Duerr, R

    2002-04-13

    Eighty-one Californian sea lions (Zalophus californianus) with signs of domoic acid toxicity stranded along the coast of California in 1998 when there were blooms of the domoic acid-producing alga Pseudonitzschia australis off-shore. In 2000, a further 184 sea lions stranded with similar clinical signs, but the strandings occurred both during detectable algal blooms and after the blooms had subsided. The clinical signs in these 265 Californian sea lions included seizures, ataxia, head weaving, decreased responsiveness to stimuli and scratching behaviour. Affected animals had high haematocrits, and eosinophil counts, and high activities of serum creatine kinase. They were treated supportively by using fluid therapy, diazepam, lorazepam and phenobarbitone. Fifty-five of the 81 sea lions (68 per cent) affected in 1998 and 81 of the 184 (44 per cent) affected in 2000 died despite the treatment. Three of the 23 sea lions which survived in 1998 were tracked with satellite and radiotransmitters; they travelled as far south as San Miguel Island, California, and survived for at least three months. Eleven of the 129 animals which were released stranded within four months of being released.

  6. Clinical Signs and Symptoms and Laboratory Findings of Methadone Poisoning in Children

    PubMed Central

    Sharif, Mohammad Reza; Nouri, Saeed

    2015-01-01

    Background: Poisoning accounts for about 7% of all accidents in children under 5 years and is implicated in over 5% of all childhood deaths in developing countries. Objectives: Due to the potential risks of methadone poisoning in children and increased cases of methadone poisoning among Iranian children, this study was conducted to investigate the clinical signs and symptoms and laboratory findings of methadone toxicity in children. Patients and Methods: The present retrospective, descriptive, cross-sectional study describes the clinical symptoms and signs and laboratory findings of methadone poisoning in children under 12 years old in Shahid Beheshti Hospital, Kashan, during the years 2009 to 2013. Results: Of 58 patients, 33 (56.9%) were male and 25 (43.1%) female (P = 0.294). The mean age of patients was 5.2 ± 1.0 years. All the cases of poisoning happened with methadone syrup, due to unsafe keeping of methadone in mineral water bottles and containers of other drugs. Signs and symptoms included drowsiness (91.4 %), miosis (75.9%), vomiting (69.0%), ineffective breathing (any kind of breathing problem except apnea) (62.1%), apnea (53.4%), cyanosis (43.1%), seizure (8.6%), ataxia (6.9%) and delirium (3.4%). Conclusions: Keeping methadone in appropriate containers and warning methadone consumers about the dangerous side effects of its consumption and the symptoms of methadone poisoning in children may minimize the occurrence of this form of poisoning and its complications in children. PMID:26199683

  7. [Coefficients of correlation of clinical laboratory data as signs of mechanisms of regulation].

    PubMed

    Genkin, A A

    1996-01-01

    Differences in the coefficients of correlation of clinical laboratory signs in patients with diseases of the blood and lymph, respiratory organs, and cardiovascular system were analyzed using OMIS research biomedical system (Intellectual Systems, St. Petersburg. 1993). Correlation coefficient is interpreted not as a measure of relationship between signs, but as an indicator of regulation processes in a live organism. The coefficients of correlation are most frequently different for the signs whose mean values are unchanged under the same conditions. This means that a comparative analysis of relationship between the signs largely contributes to such branches of medicine in which the conclusions are based on analysis of the mean tendencies. Such branches are primarily new tests for early diagnosis of tumorous diseases, assessment of dissemination and malignancy of the process, understanding of the processes of malignant degeneration, etc. Automated analysis of differences in correlations may be useful to decipher the ambiguous and dynamic relationships between different submultiplicities of immunocompetent elements in different forms of immune response (and in various states of the organism). Use of the new system opens new vistas in studies of the signs of vital activity of cardiovascular and respiratory systems. Not only new mechanisms regulating the hemodynamics, respiration, and cardiorespiratory relationships were disclosed; relationships between physiological parameters and cellular elements were revealed, which could be hardly suspected before. A fragment of a study of survival factors in acute nonlymphoblastic leukemia (carried out in cooperation with N.N. Mamayev) is presented for illustration. A close positive relationship between the humoral and cellular immunity (at least of their components analyzed in this study) is demonstrated to be destructive for patients with acute nonlymphoblastic leukemia. An optimal variant is their independent regulation or

  8. Normal and abnormal development of pulmonary veins: state of the art and correlation with clinical entities.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Yvonne L; Jongbloed, Monique R M; Deruiter, Marco C; Gittenberger-de Groot, Adriana C

    2011-02-17

    Interest for the pulmonary veins has increased in the past decade after the potential arrhythmogenicity of the myocardial sleeve surrounding these structures has been recognized. Furthermore, there are several clinical entities, such as anomalous connection pattern and pulmonary vein stenosis, that are related to abnormal pulmonary vein development. In this review, we will describe current literature and aim to elucidate and reorganize current opinions on normal and abnormal pulmonary vein development in relation to clinical (management of) diseases. Several unresolved questions will be addressed, as well as current conceptual controversies. First, a general overview of development of structures at the venous pole of the heart, including normal development of the pulmonary vein from a primitive Anlage, will be provided. Recent insights indicate an important contributory role of the mesoderm behind the heart, the so-called second heart field, to this area. Subsequently, the formation of a myocardial and smooth muscle vascular wall of the pulmonary veins and the left atrium is described, as well as current insights in the mechanisms involved in the differentiation of these different cell types in this area. Next, developmental concepts of normal pulmonary venous drainage patterns are reviewed, and an overview is provided of clinical entities related to abnormal development at several anatomical levels. Lastly, attention is paid to arrhythmogenesis in relation to pulmonary vein development, as well the consequences for clinical management.

  9. Physical examination signs, clinical symptoms, and their relationship to electrodiagnostic findings and the presence of radiculopathy.

    PubMed

    Lauder, Tamara D

    2002-08-01

    The validity of the history and physical examination varies with study method and the gold standard used. In general, symptoms are more sensitive than specific, and most patients with radiculopathy do present with some characteristic complaints. With the exception of the ipsilateral SLR, most physical examination findings are more specific than sensitive. In patients with suspected radiculopathy, having at least one abnormal physical examination finding makes the probability of having an abnormal electrodiagnostic study more likely than if the results of the physical examination are normal. Having a normal physical examination, however, does not rule out the possibility of having a radiculopathy that is revealed either electrodiagnostically or surgically. Although the history and physical examination may not be perfect tools for the diagnosis of radiculopathy or predicting electrodiagnostic outcome, they are an essential part of the clinical evaluation to assist in formulating a differential diagnosis and guiding the electrodiagnostic study.

  10. Chlamydia felis: Lack of association between clinical signs and the presence of the cryptic plasmid.

    PubMed

    Gonsales, F F; Brandão, P E; Melville, P A; Zuniga, E; Benites, N R

    2016-08-01

    Chlamydia felis is an obligate intracellular bacterial pathogen that infects cats, causing severe conjunctivitis associated with upper respiratory tract disease (URTD). In the present study, 186 cats from three non-commercial catteries in São Paulo, SP, Brazil were evaluated. The detection of Chlamydia felis was performed by PCR. The clinical severity was scored from 1 to 4, with a score of 4 as the most severe manifestation. The total occurrence of C. felis was of 18.82% (35/186) of cats overall, but notably, 58.06% (18/31) of infected cats originated from a single cattery. All animals harboring C. felis had URTD clinical signs and higher scores (3 and 4). In addition, C. felis occurrence was associated with the presence of cryptic plasmid. However, the virulence and clinical severity were not correlated.

  11. Informed consent in clinical research; Do patients understand what they have signed?

    PubMed

    Villamañán, Elena; Ruano, Margarita; Fernández-de Uzquiano, Enma; Lavilla, Paz; González, Diana; Freire, Mercedes; Sobrino, Carmen; Herrero, Alicia

    2016-05-01

    Informed consent is an essential element of research, and signing this document is required to conduct most clinical trials. Its aim is to inform patients what their participation in the study will involve. However, increasingly, their complexity and length are making them difficult to understand, which might lead patients to give their authorization without having read them previously or without having understood what is stated. In this sense, the Ethics Committees for Clinical Research, and Pharmacists specialized in Hospital Pharmacy and Primary Care in their capacity as members of said committees, play an important and difficult role in defending the rights of patients. These Committees will review thoroughly these documents to guarantee that all legal requirements have been met and, at the same time, that they are easy to understand by the potential participants in a clinical trial.

  12. Cultures of Diabetic Foot Ulcers Without Clinical Signs of Infection Do Not Predict Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Haleem, Ambar; Jao, Ying-Ling; Hillis, Stephen L.; Femino, John E.; Phisitkul, Phinit; Heilmann, Kristopher P.; Lehman, Shannon M.; Franciscus, Carrie L.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE We examined associations between ulcer bioburden and ulcer outcomes in neuropathic diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) that lacked clinical signs of infection. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Three dimensions of bioburden (i.e., microbial load, microbial diversity, and the presence of likely pathogens) were measured at baseline using swab cultures obtained by Levine’s technique. Subjects were assessed every 2 weeks for 26 weeks to determine the rate of healing and development of infection-related complications. Foot ulcers were off-loaded using total-contact casts and routinely debrided. To establish associations between bioburden and rate of healing, Cox proportional hazards and least squares regression were used after adjusting for ulcer depth, surface area, and duration. RESULTS A total of 77 subjects completed the study. Sixty-five (84.4%) had ulcers that healed during follow-up; weeks-to-closure ranged from 2 to 26 (median 4.0). Mean (± SD) percent reduction in surface area/week was 25.0% (± 23.33). Five (6.5%) of the DFUs developed an infection-related complication. None of the bioburden dimensions (i.e., microbial load, microbial diversity, or presence of likely pathogens) was significantly associated with weeks-to-closure or percent reduction in surface area per week. Weeks-to-closure was best predicted by ulcer duration, depth, and surface area (c-statistic = 0.75). CONCLUSIONS Culturing DFUs that showed no clinical signs of infection had no predictive value for outcomes of DFUs managed with total-contact casts and routine debridement. These findings support recommendations of the Infectious Disease Society of America that culturing and antibiotics should be avoided in treating DFUs that show no clinical signs of infection. PMID:25011945

  13. Clinical and neuropsychological correlates of white matter abnormalities in recent onset schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Szeszko, Philip R; Robinson, Delbert G; Ashtari, Manzar; Vogel, Joshua; Betensky, Julia; Sevy, Serge; Ardekani, Babak A; Lencz, Todd; Malhotra, Anil K; McCormack, Joanne; Miller, Rachel; Lim, Kelvin O; Gunduz-Bruce, Handan; Kane, John M; Bilder, Robert M

    2008-04-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the clinical and neuropsychological correlates of white matter abnormalities in patients with schizophrenia studied early in the course of illness. A total of 33 (21 male/12 female) patients with recent onset schizophrenia and 30 (18 male/12 female) healthy volunteers completed structural and diffusion tensor imaging exams. Patients also received clinical and neuropsychological assessments. Fractional anisotropy (FA) maps were compared between groups in the white matter using a voxelwise analysis following intersubject registration to Talairach space and correlated with functional indices. Compared to healthy volunteers, patients demonstrated significantly (p<0.001, cluster size >or=100) lower FA within temporal lobe white matter regions corresponding approximately to the right and left uncinate fasciculus, left inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, and left superior longitudinal fasciculus. There were no areas of significantly higher FA in patients compared to healthy volunteers. Lower FA in the bilateral uncinate fasciculus correlated significantly with greater severity of negative symptoms (alogia and affective flattening), and worse verbal learning/memory functioning. In addition, higher FA in the inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus correlated significantly with greater severity of delusions and hallucinations. White matter abnormalities are evident in patients with schizophrenia early in the course of illness, appearing most robust in left temporal regions. These abnormalities have clinical and neuropsychological correlates, which may be useful in further characterizing structure-function relations in schizophrenia and constraining neurobiological models of the disorder.

  14. Clinical Utility and Lifespan Profiling of Neurological Soft Signs in Schizophrenia Spectrum Disorders.

    PubMed

    Chan, Raymond C K; Xie, Weizhen; Geng, Fu-lei; Wang, Ya; Lui, Simon S Y; Wang, Chuan-yue; Yu, Xin; Cheung, Eric F C; Rosenthal, Robert

    2016-05-01

    Neurological soft signs (NSSs) bear the promise for early detection of schizophrenia spectrum disorders. Nonetheless, the sensitivity and specificity of NSSs in the psychosis continuum remains a topic of controversy. It is also unknown how NSSs reveal neurodevelopmental abnormality in schizophrenia. We investigated the effect sizes of NSSs in differentiating individuals with schizophrenia spectrum disorders from individuals with other psychiatric conditions and from covariate-matched healthy subjects. We also investigated the partitioned age-related variations of NSSs in both schizophrenia and healthy individuals. NSSs were assessed by the abridged version of the Cambridge Neurological Inventory (CNI) in 3105 participants, consisting of healthy individuals (n=1577), unaffected first-degree relatives of schizophrenia patients (n= 155), individuals with schizotypal personality disorder (n= 256), schizophrenia patients (n= 738), and other psychiatric patients (n= 379). Exact matching and propensity score matching procedures were performed to control for covariates. Multiple regression was used to partition age-related variations. Individuals along the schizophrenia continuum showed elevated levels of NSSs, with moderate effect sizes, in contrast to other psychiatric patients who had minimal NSSs, as well as matched healthy controls. Furthermore, the age-and-NSS relationship in schizophrenia patients was represented by a flat but overall elevated pattern, in contrast to a U-shaped pattern in healthy individuals. In sum, NSSs capture a moderate portion of psychosis proneness with reasonable specificity. Lifespan profiling reveals an abnormal developmental trajectory of NSSs in schizophrenia patients, which supports the endophenotype hypothesis of NSSs by associating it with the neurodevelopmental model of schizophrenia.

  15. [Multi-organ failure as first clinical sign of macrophage activation syndrome in childhood Still's disease].

    PubMed

    López-Sánchez, M; Rubio-López, I; Obeso-González, T; Teja-Barbero, J L; Santidrián-Miguel, J P; Peiro-Callizo, E

    2010-10-01

    Macrophage activation syndrome is a form of secondary haemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis seen in the context of rheumatic diseases. It is seen most frequently in association with systemic onset juvenile arthritis or childhood Still's disease. Hemophagocytosis is part of a sepsis-like clinical syndrome caused by hypercytokinemia due to a highly stimulated but ineffective immune response. Coagulopathy and hemorrhages, decreased white cell count, elevated levels of aspartate aminotransferase, fever, rash, hepatosplenomegaly and central nervous system dysfunction are some of diagnostic criteria of macrophage activation syndrome, but it is very difficult to diagnose due to the lack of specific clinical signs. We report a 8-year-old child who was admitted to the ICU with lethargy, fever, acute respiratory failure, coagulopathy, metabolic acidosis and multiorgan failure. Septic shock was suspected, but he was diagnosed with macrophage activation syndrome and treated with corticosteroids and intravenous immunoglobulin and later discharged from the ICU.

  16. Multidisciplinary Modelling of Symptoms and Signs with Archetypes and SNOMED-CT for Clinical Decision Support.

    PubMed

    Marco-Ruiz, Luis; Maldonado, J Alberto; Karlsen, Randi; Bellika, Johan G

    2015-01-01

    Clinical Decision Support Systems (CDSS) help to improve health care and reduce costs. However, the lack of knowledge management and modelling hampers their maintenance and reuse. Current EHR standards and terminologies can allow the semantic representation of the data and knowledge of CDSS systems boosting their interoperability, reuse and maintenance. This paper presents the modelling process of respiratory conditions' symptoms and signs by a multidisciplinary team of clinicians and information architects with the help of openEHR, SNOMED and clinical information modelling tools for a CDSS. The information model of the CDSS was defined by means of an archetype and the knowledge model was implemented by means of an SNOMED-CT based ontology.

  17. Clinical signs of deformed wing virus infection are predictive markers for honey bee colony losses.

    PubMed

    Dainat, Benjamin; Neumann, Peter

    2013-03-01

    The ectoparasitic mite Varroa destructor acting as a virus vector constitutes a central mechanism for losses of managed honey bee, Apis mellifera, colonies. This creates demand for an easy, accurate and cheap diagnostic tool to estimate the impact of viruliferous mites in the field. Here we evaluated whether the clinical signs of the ubiquitous and mite-transmitted deformed wing virus (DWV) can be predictive markers of winter losses. In fall and winter 2007/2008, A.m. carnica workers with apparent wing deformities were counted daily in traps installed on 29 queenright colonies. The data show that colonies which later died had a significantly higher proportion of workers with wing deformities than did those which survived. There was a significant positive correlation between V. destructor infestation levels and the number of workers displaying DWV clinical signs, further supporting the mite's impact on virus infections at the colony level. A logistic regression model suggests that colony size, the number of workers with wing deformities and V. destructor infestation levels constitute predictive markers for winter colony losses in this order of importance and ease of evaluation.

  18. The value of 'positive' clinical signs for weakness, sensory and gait disorders in conversion disorder: a systematic and narrative review.

    PubMed

    Daum, Corinna; Hubschmid, Monica; Aybek, Selma

    2014-02-01

    Experts in the field of conversion disorder have suggested for the upcoming DSM-V edition to put less weight on the associated psychological factors and to emphasise the role of clinical findings. Indeed, a critical step in reaching a diagnosis of conversion disorder is careful bedside neurological examination, aimed at excluding organic signs and identifying 'positive' signs suggestive of a functional disorder. These positive signs are well known to all trained neurologists but their validity is still not established. The aim of this study is to provide current evidence regarding their sensitivity and specificity. We conducted a systematic search on motor, sensory and gait functional signs in Embase, Medline, PsycINfo from 1965 to June 2012. Studies in English, German or French reporting objective data on more than 10 participants in a controlled design were included in a systematic review. Other relevant signs are discussed in a narrative review. Eleven controlled studies (out of 147 eligible articles) describing 14 signs (7 motor, 5 sensory, 2 gait) reported low sensitivity of 8-100% but high specificity of 92-100%. Studies were evidence class III, only two had a blinded design and none reported on inter-rater reliability of the signs. Clinical signs for functional neurological symptoms are numerous but only 14 have been validated; overall they have low sensitivity but high specificity and their use should thus be recommended, especially with the introduction of the new DSM-V criteria.

  19. Rigid Bronchoscopy in Airway Foreign Bodies: Value of the Clinical and Radiological Signs

    PubMed Central

    Acharya, Kunjan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction  Foreign body in airway is a common emergency in ENT practice. As we know, Rigid Bronchoscopy is the method of choice for removing it, although at times it leads to specialists performing unnecessary bronchoscopy, exposing patients to hazards of general anesthesia. Objective  The objective of my study is to calculate sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, odds ratio from the clinical and radiological signs, comparing with the gold standard, the rigid bronchoscope procedure. Method  This is a prospective analytical study designed at University Teaching Hospital and conducted over a period of 18 months, from March 2011 to August 2012. Data collection was broadly classified into three different categories: (1) Symptomatology, such as presence or absence of choking, cyanosis, and difficulty in breathing; (2) Clinical signs, such as the presence or absence of air entry, crackles, and rhonchi 3. Chest X-ray findings were suggestive of a foreign body. Results  There were a total of 40 rigid bronchoscopies performed under general anesthesia for the diagnosis and therapeutic reasons. Among 40 patients who underwent rigid bronchoscopy, 32 (80%) were found to have varieties of foreign bodies in their airway while 8 patients (20%) had negative bronchoscopy. The history of choking is the only clinical symptoms which came out to be statistically Significant (p = 0.043) with odds ratio of 5. Conclusion  Rigid bronchoscopy is the gold standard technique for diagnosis and procedure of choice to remove FB from airway. Regardless, it still presents a small chance of negative result, especially when there is no history of aspiration. PMID:27413398

  20. Studies on clinical signs and biochemical alteration in pregnancy toxemic goats

    PubMed Central

    Vasava, Prasannkumar R.; Jani, R. G.; Goswami, H. V.; Rathwa, S. D.; Tandel, F. B.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: This study was planned to reveal the clinical signs and biochemical alterations in pregnancy toxemic goats. Materials and Methods: Blood samples were collected from 20 healthy pregnant and 45 pregnancy toxemic goats and analyzed biochemically. Results: The most significant clinical findings were observed in naturally affected goats with pregnancy toxemia included anorexia, recumbency, lethargy, opisthotonos, dropped head, periodic convulsion, sweetish fruity odor from breath, apparent blindness, bloat, grinding of teeth, and frothy salivation. In this study, the level of serum glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase (SGOT) (84.23±1.44 IU/L), serum glutamic pyruvic transaminase (SGPT) (216.01±4.07 IU/L), blood urea nitrogen (BUN) (22.24±0.31 mg/dl), creatinine (2.13±0.09 mg/dl), β-hydroxybutyric acid (BHBA) (0.46±0.83 mmol/L), and non-esterified fatty acid (NEFA) (1.67±0.71 mmol/L) was significantly higher whereas glucose (30.89±0.38 mg/dl) and calcium (8.10±0.20 mg/dl) levels were significantly decreased in pregnancy toxemic goats as compared to healthy goats. Conclusion: The goats with pregnancy toxemia exhibited clinical signs include anorexia, recumbency, sweetish fruity odor from breath, apparent blindness, bloat, grinding of teeth, and frothy salivation. Biochemically, there were significantly decreased the level of glucose and calcium, and increased level of SGPT, SGOT, BUN, creatinine, BHBA, and NEFA in the pregnancy toxemic goats. PMID:27651676

  1. Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) infections: clinical signs, pathology and laboratory diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Segalés, Joaquim

    2012-03-01

    Clinical signs and pathological features are still the corner-stones to suspect and diagnose overt disease associated with PCV2 infection. The clinico-pathological scope of this viral infection has been expanded over time. From the initial description of postweaning multisystemic wasting syndrome, some enteric, respiratory and reproductive disorders have been subsequently linked with PCV2. Porcine dermatitis and nephropathy syndrome, an immunocomplex disease, has also been associated with infection by this virus. All together, these conditions have been grouped under the name of porcine circovirus diseases (PCVD) or porcine circovirus associated diseases (PCVAD). The precise mechanisms by which a PCV2 infected pig develops a PCV2 subclinical infection or a clinical PCVD/PCVAD are still to be fully elucidated, but inferences based upon clinical, gross and histologic findings from field cases of disease have been useful to suggest the pathogenesis of this viral infection. The objective of the present review is to update the current knowledge on the clinical and pathological scope of PCV2 infections, as well as on their diagnosis. Moreover, a proposal on a unified PCVD/PCVAD terminology and clearly defined diagnostic criteria for these conditions are also given.

  2. Subtle clinical signs of a meningioma in an adult: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Meningiomas are the most common brain tumor in the adult population. This case report describes the epidemiology, the clinical presentation as well as the current treatment options for this condition. Case presentation A 49 year-old man attended a chiropractic clinic with non-specific chronic low back pain. Upon the history taking and the systems review, he reported a loss of both smell and taste for which investigations conducted by two different otolaryngologists did not yield a specific diagnosis. The patient was referred to a neurologist who ordered a computer tomography scan that eventually revealed a compression brain tumor. Brain tumors can produce a large variety of clinical presentations, such as upper motor neuron lesion symptoms, altered consciousness or vital functions which are easy to identify. However, subtle signs, such as those presented in this case, can be neglected. Conclusion Clinicians should be aware of uncommon clinical presentations including cranial nerve or neurological dysfunction and refer their patient to a specialist when detected. PMID:24490991

  3. Ultrasound lung comets: a clinically useful sign of extravascular lung water.

    PubMed

    Picano, Eugenio; Frassi, Francesca; Agricola, Eustachio; Gligorova, Suzana; Gargani, Luna; Mottola, Gaetano

    2006-03-01

    Assessment of extravascular lung water is a challenging task for the clinical cardiologist and an elusive target for the echocardiographer. Today chest x-ray is considered the best way to assess extravascular lung water objectively, but this requires radiology facilities and specific reading expertise, uses ionizing energy, and poses a significant logistic burden. Recently, a new method was developed using echocardiography (with cardiac probes) of the lung. An increase in extravascular lung water-as assessed independently by chest computed tomography, chest x-ray, and thermodilution techniques-is mirrored by appearance of ultrasound lung comets (ULCs). ULCs consist of multiple comet tails originating from water-thickened interlobular septa and fanning out from the lung surface. The technique requires ultrasound scanning of the anterior right and left chest, from the second to the fifth intercostal space. It is simple (with a learning curve of < 10 examinations) and fast to perform (requiring < 3 minutes). ULC assessment is independent of the cardiac acoustic window, because the lung on the anterior chest is scanned. It requires very basic 2-D technology imaging, even without a second harmonic or Doppler. ULCs probably represent an ultrasonic equivalent of radiologic Kerley B-lines. On still-frame assessment, cardiogenic watery comets can be difficult to distinguish from pneumogenic fibrotic comets, although the latter are usually more localized and are not dissolved by an acute diuretic challenge. Functionally, ULCs are a sign of distress of the alveolar-capillary membrane, often associated with reduced ejection fraction and increased pulmonary wedge pressure. The ULC sign is quantitative, reproducible, and ideally suited to complement conventional echocardiography in the evaluation of heart failure patients in the emergency department (for the differential diagnosis of dyspnea), in-hospital evaluation (for tailoring diuretic therapy), home care (with portable

  4. Facial Plethora: Modern Technology for Quantifying an Ancient Clinical Sign and Its Use in Cushing Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Afshari, Ali; Ardeshirpour, Yasaman; Gourgari, Evgenia; Sinaii, Ninet; Keil, Margaret; Belyavskaya, Elena; Lyssikatos, Charalampos; Chowdhry, Fatima A.; Chernomordik, Victor; Anderson, Afrouz A.; Mazzuchi, Thomas A.; Gandjbakhche, Amir; Stratakis, Constantine A.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Facial plethora is a clinical sign described since ancient times for a variety of diseases. In the 19th century, it was linked to increased blood volume or flow, but this has never been proven. Facial plethora is also one of the earliest described clinical features of Cushing's syndrome (CS). Objective: This study aimed to quantify facial plethora changes in CS as an early assessment of cure after surgery using noninvasive near-infrared multispectral imaging (MSI). Design: The longitudinal cohort study was initiated in August 2012 and completed in August 2014. Setting: Clinical research hospital, National Institutes of Health. Patients: Thirty-four of the 38 patients who received surgical treatment for CS under protocol 97CH0076 during this period were included. Intervention(s): MSI was performed on the right cheek of patients before surgery and 4.9 ± 3.1 days afterward. Main Outcome Measure(s): Average blood volume fraction as measured by MSI and serum cortisol. Results: All but four of the 28 patients (86%) who were assessed as cured by postoperative plasma cortisol measurements of < 3 μg/dL showed a decrease in blood volume fraction (17.7 ± 0.03 vs 15.8 ± 0.03%; P = .0019), whereas an increase was seen in patients with persistent CS (18.5 ± 0.03 vs 21.4 ± 0.04%; P = .0017). Change in blood volume fraction before and after surgery was correlated with postoperative cortisol (rs = 0.58; P = .0003). Conclusions: Clinical data obtained from 34 patients indicate that a decrease in facial plethora after surgery, as evidenced by a decrease in blood volume fraction, is correlated with CS outcome. This novel technology for the first time identified a physiological mechanism associated with an ancient clinical sign. Furthermore, as a proof of principle, MSI is a promising early marker of cure in patients with CS that complements biochemical and clinical data. PMID:26301943

  5. Coracoid pain test: a new clinical sign of shoulder adhesive capsulitis

    PubMed Central

    Gumina, S.; Vestri, A. R.; Postacchini, R.

    2009-01-01

    Patients with adhesive capsulitis were clinically evaluated to establish whether pain elicited by pressure on the coracoid area may be considered a pathognomonic sign of this condition. The study group included 85 patients with primary adhesive capsulitis, 465 with rotator cuff tear, 48 with calcifying tendonitis, 16 with glenohumeral arthritis, 66 with acromioclavicular arthropathy and 150 asymptomatic subjects. The test was considered positive when pain on the coracoid region was more severe than 3 points (VAS scale) with respect to the acromioclavicular joint and the anterolateral subacromial area. The test was positive in 96.4% of patients with adhesive capsulitis and in 11.1%, 14.5%, 6.2% and 10.6% of patients with the other four conditions, respectively. A positive result was obtained in 3/150 normal subjects (2%). With respect to the other four diseases, the test had a sensitivity of 0.96 and a specificity ranging from 0.87 to 0.89. With respect to controls, the sensitivity and specificity were 0.99 and 0.98, respectively. The coracoid pain test could be considered as a pathognomonic sign in physical examination of patients with stiff and painful shoulder. PMID:19418052

  6. Temporomandibular joint involvement in juvenile idiopathic arthritis: clinical predictors of magnetic resonance imaging signs.

    PubMed

    Argyropoulou, Maria I; Margariti, Persefoni N; Karali, Aikaterini; Astrakas, Loukas; Alfandaki, Sapfo; Kosta, Paraskevi; Siamopoulou, Antigoni

    2009-03-01

    The aim of the study was to define clinical predictors of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) involvement in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Forty-six patients, aged 2.08-36.7 years, with JIA (oligoartitular 18, polyarticular 17, systemic type 11) were examined with standard plain and contrast-enhanced sequences. Of 88 TMJs examined, an abnormal condyle was observed in 32%, flattened articular eminence in 27%, flattened articular disk in 17%, intra-articular fluid in 10%, enhancing pannus in 45% and restricted condylar motion in 9%. Logistic regression analysis revealed that for abnormal condyle and flattened articular eminence, independent predictors were type of JIA (P < 0.015), age at onset (P < 0.038), and duration of disease activity (P < 0.001). Plots of the logistic regression models showed that TMJ involvement approached certainty for systemic sooner than for the other JIA types. Pannus was present with probability >0.5 when the disease started before 4 years of age. In conclusion, the systemic type of JIA, young age at onset and long duration of activity are risk factors for TMJ damage. MRI of the TMJ should be performed in patients who are less than 4 years of age at the onset of JIA, and in those with the systemic type, whatever the age of onset.

  7. Aging and facial changes--documenting clinical signs, part 1: clinical changes of the aging face.

    PubMed

    Nkengne, Alex; Bertin, Christiane

    2012-01-01

    The process of aging induces the transformation of the face with changes that are usually classified as either chronological or photo induced and that affect the shape, the texture, and the color of the face. Facial shape is mainly transformed by the evolution of bones and soft tissues (muscles, fat, and skin) in addition to noticeable effects of gravity. Skin texture is mainly determined by wrinkles, which arise from atrophy of the skin layers, elastosis, and facial expressions. Skin color is related to the distribution of skin chromophores and the structure of the dermis, which affects light scattering. All facial changes are dependant on sex, ethnicity, and lifestyle. They affect self-perception and social interactions and can sometimes be slowed down or reversed using appropriate clinical procedures (e.g., dermatological, surgical, and cosmetic interventions).

  8. Aging and facial changes--documenting clinical signs, part 1: clinical changes of the aging face.

    PubMed

    Nkengne, Alex; Bertin, Christiane

    2013-01-01

    The process of aging induces the transformation of the face with changes that are usually classified as either chronological or photo-induced and that affect the shape, the texture, and the color of the face. Facial shape is mainly transformed by the evolution of bones and soft tissues (muscles, fat, and skin) in addition to noticeable effects of gravity. Skin texture is mainly determined by wrinkles, which arise from atrophy of the skin layers, elastosis, and facial expressions. Skin color is related to the distribution of skin chromophores and the structure of the dermis, which affects light scattering. All facial changes are dependant on sex, ethnicity, and lifestyle. They affect self-perception and social interactions and can sometimes be slowed down or reversed using appropriate clinical procedures (eg, dermatological, surgical, cosmetic interventions).

  9. Incidence, Prevalence, and Clinical Significance of Abnormal Hematologic Indices in Compensated Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Qamar, Amir A.; Grace, Norman D.; Groszmann, Roberto J.; Garcia–Tsao, Guadalupe; Bosch, Jaime; Burroughs, Andrew K.; Ripoll, Cristina; Maurer, Rie; Planas, Ramon; Escorsell, Angels; Garcia–Pagan, Juan Carlos; Patch, David; Matloff, Daniel S.; Makuch, Robert; Rendon, Gabriel

    2011-01-01

    Background & Aims Patients with cirrhosis develop abnormal hematologic indices (HI) from multiple factors, including hypersplenism. We aimed to analyze the sequence of events and determine whether abnormal HI has prognostic significance. Methods We analyzed a database of 213 subjects with compensated cirrhosis without esophageal varices. Subjects were followed for approximately 9 years until the development of varices or variceal bleeding or completion of the study; 84 subjects developed varices. Abnormal HI was defined as anemia at baseline (hemoglobin, ≤13.5 g/dL for men and 11.5 g/dL for women), leukopenia (white blood cell counts, ≤4000/mm3), or thrombocytopenia (platelet counts, ≤150,000/mm3). The primary end points were death or transplant surgery. Results Most subjects had thrombocytopenia at baseline. Kaplan–Meier analysis showed that leukopenia occurred by 30 months (95% confidence interval, 18.5–53.6), and anemia occurred by 39.6 months (95% confidence interval, 24.1–49.9). Baseline thrombocytopenia (P = .0191) and leukopenia (P = .0383) were predictors of death or transplant, after adjusting for baseline hepatic venous pressure gradient (HVPG), and Child–Pugh scores. After a median of 5 years, a significant difference in death or transplant, mortality, and clinical decompensation was observed in patients who had leukopenia combined with thrombocytopenia at baseline compared with patients with normal HI (P < .0001). HVPG correlated with hemoglobin and white blood cell count (hemoglobin, r = −0.35, P < .0001; white blood cell count, r = −0.31, P < .0001). Conclusions Thrombocytopenia is the most common and first abnormal HI to occur in patients with cirrhosis, followed by leukopenia and anemia. A combination of leukopenia and thrombocytopenia at baseline predicted increased morbidity and mortality. PMID:19281860

  10. Clinical validation study to measure the performance of the Nerve Root Sedimentation Sign for the diagnosis of lumbar spinal stenosis.

    PubMed

    Staub, Lukas P; Barz, Thomas; Melloh, Markus; Lord, Sarah J; Chatfield, Mark; Bossuyt, Patrick M

    2011-05-01

    Lumbar spinal stenosis is a common degenerative disorder of the spine in elderly patients that can be effectively treated with decompression surgery in some patients. Radiological findings in the diagnostic work-up of the patients do not always correlate well with clinical symptoms, and guidance about when to proceed to surgery is inconsistent. The recently described Nerve Root Sedimentation Sign in magnetic resonance scans has been shown to discriminate well between selected patients with and without lumbar spinal stenosis, but the performance of this new test, when used in a broad patient population, is not yet known. We describe the design of a single-centre retrospective chart review to assess the clinical validity of the Sedimentation Sign by evaluating its association with health outcomes in patients with suspected lumbar spinal stenosis. The Sedimentation Sign will be cross-classified with decisions for surgery based on existing tests and patient outcomes in follow-up examinations at 24months. The results will be used to estimate: i) how well the Sedimentation Sign can distinguish between patients that do or do not benefit from surgery, and ii) the concordance between the Sedimentation Sign and existing tests to explore its possible value as a triage test. This study design will provide data to estimate the potential benefits and harms of using the Sedimentation Sign to guide surgical decisions. The observed proportion of discordant test results will help inform the design of future randomised controlled trials of the Sedimentation Sign.

  11. Limited Clinical Utility of Non-invasive Prenatal Testing for Subchromosomal Abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Kitty K.; Karampetsou, Evangelia; Boustred, Christopher; McKay, Fiona; Mason, Sarah; Hill, Melissa; Plagnol, Vincent; Chitty, Lyn S.

    2016-01-01

    The use of massively parallel sequencing of maternal cfDNA for non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT) of aneuploidy is widely available. Recently, the scope of testing has increased to include selected subchromosomal abnormalities, but the number of samples reported has been small. We developed a calling pipeline based on a segmentation algorithm for the detection of these rearrangements in maternal plasma. The same read depth used in our standard pipeline for aneuploidy NIPT detected 15/18 (83%) samples with pathogenic rearrangements > 6 Mb but only 2/10 samples with rearrangements < 6 Mb, unless they were maternally inherited. There were two false-positive calls in 534 samples with no known subchromosomal abnormalities (specificity 99.6%). Using higher read depths, we detected 29/31 fetal subchromosomal abnormalities, including the three samples with maternally inherited microduplications. We conclude that test sensitivity is a function of the fetal fraction, read depth, and size of the fetal CNV and that at least one of the two false negatives is due to a low fetal fraction. The lack of an independent method for determining fetal fraction, especially for female fetuses, leads to uncertainty in test sensitivity, which currently has implications for this technique’s future as a clinical diagnostic test. Furthermore, to be effective, NIPT must be able to detect chromosomal rearrangements across the whole genome for a very low false-positive rate. Because standard NIPT can only detect the majority of larger (>6 Mb) chromosomal rearrangements and requires knowledge of fetal fraction, we consider that it is not yet ready for routine clinical implementation. PMID:26708752

  12. [Clinical signs, diagnostic approach and therapy for the so-called ovarian remnant syndrome in the bitch].

    PubMed

    Günzel-Apel, A-R; Buschhaus, J; Urhausen, C; Masal, C; Wolf, K; Meyer-Lindenberg, A; Piechotta, M; Beyerbach, M; Schoon, H-A

    2012-01-01

    The ovarian remnant syndrome arises as a consequence of incomplete ovariectomy or ovariohysterectomy. Remnant ovarian tissue which has been left mostly unintentionally in the bitch may show endocrine activity a few weeks to several years after surgery, provoking a variety of clinical signs. The majority of affected bitches return to heat, in other cases signs of pseudopregnancy and endometritis may be observed. Occasionally, bitches with unclear clinical signs are presented with the suspicion of an inactive ovarian remnant. The following article intends to place the origin of the ovarian remnant syndrome into a factual context regarding the responsibility of the veterinarian and to demonstrate a reasonable diagnostic procedure according to the respective clinical signs. In this regard, the clinical-gynaecological examination, including vaginal cytology, must receive high priority, with the addition of progesterone analysis in peripheral blood plasma or serum if required. Using these combined diagnostic tools, ovarian remnants in stages of endocrine activity (follicular and luteal phases as well as cystic or tumourous ovarian tissue) can be easily unequivocally diagnosed. The application of a GnRH-stimulation test is only reasonable in bitches in which clinical signs are missing. In this context, the usefulness of semi-quantitative LH-assays is also discussed.

  13. Changes in retinal function and morphology are early clinical signs of disease in cattle with bovine spongiform encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Greenlee, M Heather West; Smith, Jodi D; Platt, Ekundayo M; Juarez, Jessica R; Timms, Leo L; Greenlee, Justin J

    2015-01-01

    Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) belongs to a group of fatal, transmissible protein misfolding diseases known as transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs). All TSEs are caused by accumulation of misfolded prion protein (PrPSc) throughout the central nervous system (CNS), which results in neuronal loss and ultimately death. Like other protein misfolding diseases including Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease, TSEs are generally not diagnosed until the onset of disease after the appearance of unequivocal clinical signs. As such, identification of the earliest clinical signs of disease may facilitate diagnosis. The retina is the most accessible part of the central nervous system, and retinal pathology in TSE affected animals has been previously reported. Here we describe antemortem changes in retinal function and morphology that are detectable in BSE inoculated animals several months (up to 11 months) prior to the appearance of any other signs of clinical disease. We also demonstrate that differences in the severity of these clinical signs reflect the amount of PrPSc accumulation in the retina and the resulting inflammatory response of the tissue. These results are the earliest reported clinical signs associated with TSE infection and provide a basis for understanding the pathology and evaluating therapeutic interventions.

  14. Respiratory systems abnormalities and clinical milestones for patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis with emphasis upon survival.

    PubMed

    Vender, Robert L; Mauger, David; Walsh, Susan; Alam, Shoaib; Simmons, Zachary

    2007-02-01

    Respiratory system complications and abnormalities are common in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and respiratory failure remains the most common cause of death. Extensive epidemiological longitudinal data have documented the extent, magnitude, and clinical course of these abnormalities, but few studies have provided objective information that can have prognostic significance for individual patients. In this study, the reported data represent results from a retrospective review of the medical records of 153 patients with ALS cared for at a single institution (The Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center) over a 50-month period. Medical information in relation to respiratory system abnormalities and complications including pulmonary function measurements was extracted for data analyses. The intent of this review of longitudinal data from a relatively large cohort of patients with ALS was to identify clinically relevant easily-identifiable objective information and clinical milestones that could have potential prognostic significance when applied to individual patients. Demographic data including gender, survival outcome, respiratory symptoms, age of disease onset, and age at death were similar to previously published epidemiological studies: mean age at ALS disease onset was 58.9+/-12.7 years, and mean age at death was 66.7+/-10.8 years. For 151 patients with available data, the incidence of study defined respiratory complications included infectious pneumonia 13 (9%), venothromboembolism 9 (6%), and tracheostomy and mechanical ventilation 6 (4%). For 139 patients with serial measurements of forced vital capacity (FVC), median values for calculated rate of decline in FVC was 97 ml/30 days (2.4% predicted/30 days); 25% of patients had FVC rates of decline less than 52 ml/30 days (1.4% predicted/30 days) and 25% had rates of decline greater than 170 ml/30 days (4.4% predicted/30 days). Stratifying patients into two distinct clinical subgroups based

  15. Clinical features and associated abnormalities in children and adolescents with corpus callosal anomalies.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Uhk; Park, Eun Sook; Jung, Soojin; Suh, Miri; Choi, Hyo Seon; Rha, Dong-Wook

    2014-02-01

    Callosal anomalies are frequently associated with other central nervous system (CNS) and/or somatic anomalies. We retrospectively analyzed the clinical features of corpus callosal agenesis/hypoplasia accompanying other CNS and/or somatic anomalies. We reviewed the imaging and clinical information of patients who underwent brain magnetic resonance imaging in our hospital, between 2005 and 2012. Callosal anomalies were isolated in 13 patients, accompanied by other CNS anomalies in 10 patients, associated with only non-CNS somatic anomalies in four patients, and with both CNS and non-CNS abnormalities in four patients. Out of 31 patients, four developed normally, without impairments in motor or cognitive functions. Five of nine patients with cerebral palsy were accompanied by other CNS and/or somatic anomalies, and showed worse Gross Motor Function Classification System scores, compared with the other four patients with isolated callosal anomaly. In addition, patients with other CNS anomalies also had a higher seizure risk.

  16. EEG abnormalities in clinically diagnosed brain death organ donors in Iranian tissue bank.

    PubMed

    Tavakoli, Seyed Amir Hossein; Khodadadi, Abbas; Azimi Saein, Amir Reza; Bahrami-Nasab, Hasan; Hashemi, Behnam; Tirgar, Niloufar; Nozary Heshmati, Behnaz

    2012-01-01

    Brain death is defined as the permanent, irreversible and concurrent loss of all brain and brain stem functions. Brain death diagnosis is based on clinical criteria and it is not routine to use paraclinical studies. In some countries, electroencephalogram (EEG) is performed in all patients for the determination of brain death while there is some skepticism in relying on EEG as a confirmatory test for brain death diagnosis. In this study, we assessed the validity of EEG and its abnormalities in brain death diagnosis. In this retrospective study, we used 153 EEGs from medical records of 89 brain death patients in organ procurement unit of the Iranian Tissue Bank admitted during 2002-2008. We extracted and analyzed information including EEGs, which were examined by a neurologist for waves, artifacts and EEG abnormalities. The mean age of the patients was 27.2±12.7 years. The most common cause of brain death was multiple traumas due to accident (65%). The most prevalent artifact was electrical transformer. 125 EEGs (82%) were isoelectric (ECS) and seven EEGs (5%) were depictive of some cerebral activity which upon repeat EEGs, they showed ECS patterns too. There was no relationship between cause of brain death and cerebral activity in EEGs of the patients. In this study, we could confirm ECS patterns in all brain death patients whose status had earlier been diagnosed clinically. Considering the results of this study, it seems sensible to perform EEG as a final confirmatory test as an assurance to the patients' families.

  17. Using Clinical Signs and Symptoms for Medical Management of Radiation Casualties - 2015 NATO Exercise.

    PubMed

    Dörr, H; Abend, M; Blakely, W F; Bolduc, D L; Boozer, D; Costeira, T; Dant, T; De Amicis, A; De Sanctis, S; Dondey, M; Drouet, M; Entine, F; Francois, S; Gagna, G; Guitard, N; Hérodin, F; Hoefer, M; Lamkowski, A; Sala, G La; Lista, F; Loiacono, P; Majewski, M; Martigne, P; Métivier, D; Michel, X; Pateux, J; Pejchal, J; Reeves, G; Riccobono, D; Sinkorova, Z; Soyez, L; Stricklin, D; Tichy, A; Valente, M; Woodruff, C R; Zarybnicka, L; Port, M

    2017-02-20

    The utility of early-phase (≤5 days) radiation-induced clinical signs and symptoms (e.g., vomiting, diarrhea, erythema and changes in blood cell counts) was examined for the prediction of later occurring acute radiation syndrome (ARS) severity and the development of medical management strategies. Medical treatment protocols for radiation accident victims (METREPOL) was used to grade ARS severities, which were assigned response categories (RCs). Data on individuals (n = 191) with mild (RC1, n = 45), moderate (RC2, n = 19), severe (RC3, n = 20) and fatal (RC4, n = 18) ARS, as well as nonexposed individuals (RC0, n = 89) were generated using either METREPOL (n = 167) or the system for evaluation and archiving of radiation accidents based on case histories (SEARCH) database (n = 24), the latter comprised of real-case descriptions. These data were converted into tables reflecting clinical signs and symptoms, and submitted to eight teams representing five participating countries. The teams were comprised of medical doctors, biologists and pharmacists with subject matter expertise. The tables comprised cumulated clinical data from day 1-3 and day 1-5 postirradiation. While it would have reflected a more realistic scenario to provide the data to the teams over the course of a 3- or 5-day period, the logistics of doing so proved too challenging. In addition, the team members participating in this exercise chose to receive the cumulated reports of day 1-3 and 1-5. The teams were tasked with predicting ARS incidence, ARS severity and the requirement for hospitalization for multiple cases, as well as providing the certainty of their diagnosis. Five of the teams also performed dose estimates. The teams did not employ harmonized methodologies, and the expertise among the members varied, as did the tools used and the means of analyzing the clinical data. The earliest report time was 3 h after the tables were sent to the team members. The majority of cases developing ARS (89

  18. Malassezia dermatitis in dogs in Brazil: diagnosis, evaluation of clinical signs and molecular identification.

    PubMed

    Machado, Mauro L S; Ferreiro, Laerte; Ferreira, Rafael R; Corbellini, Luis G; Deville, Manjula; Berthelemy, Madeleine; Guillot, Jacques

    2011-02-01

    Skin carriage and quantification of Malassezia yeasts were evaluated in 180 healthy dogs (group 1) and 117 dogs with clinical signs (pruritus, erythema, lichenification/seborrhoea, excoriations and alopecia) that could be related to Malassezia dermatitis (group 2) in Brazil. The lesions in the group 2 dogs were evaluated using CADESI-03 scores. Samples were collected from five different anatomical areas. Direct examination was performed using the tape strip technique, and results were expressed as the mean number of yeasts per ×1000 microscopic field per dog. For mycological culture, a single piece of sterilized carpet was applied to the same areas sampled for cytology, and transferred onto Dixon's modified medium. Yeast populations were expressed as mean colony forming units (CFU)/plate. Malassezia isolates were characterized by polymerase chain reaction-restriction endonuclease analysis of the large subunit (LSU) of ribosomal RNA gene. The probability of culturing Malassezia from dogs with skin lesions was significantly higher (P<0.001) than from healthy dogs. There was a linear trend between CADESI-03 score and mean CFU/plate. Group 2 dogs with positive cultures had higher CADESI-03 scores than those with negative cultures (P<0.05). Almost all isolates were identified as Malassezia pachydermatis. Only one isolate (group 2) was identified as Malassezia furfur. These data suggest that dogs with skin disorders harbouring Malassezia yeasts in quantities higher than 120 mean CFU/plate should be considered as having Malassezia dermatitis. The presence of Malassezia appears to exacerbate clinical lesions in dogs.

  19. Solar exposure(s) and facial clinical signs of aging in Chinese women: impacts upon age perception.

    PubMed

    Flament, Frederic; Bazin, Roland; Qiu, Huixia; Ye, Chengda; Laquieze, Sabine; Rubert, Virginie; Decroux, Aurelie; Simonpietri, Elisa; Piot, Bertrand

    2015-01-01

    A new reference clinical atlas of facial signs dedicated to photoaging was applied to 301 Chinese women of various ages through standardized photographs. Such approach aimed at better describing the facial changes induced by both real/chronological age and sun exposure and their respective impact on two subcohorts of different behavior with regard to sun exposure. A total of 28 various facial signs were individually graded according to their severity by a panel of experts, and a perceived apparent age of each subject was assessed. Results showed that the severity of major signs significantly increased rather linearly with age, with a higher rate in sun-exposed subjects as compared with subjects who regularly avoid sun exposure. The severity of facial signs, all impacted by sun exposure, better correlated with perceived apparent age than real/chronological age. The protocol used in the present work, similar to that previously applied to two cohorts of French women, assigned a greater impact of sun exposure in the facial aging signs of Asian women - all clinical signs are influenced by extrinsic factors - as compared with Caucasian women of comparable ages, likely related to much more intense ultraviolet (UV) radiation.

  20. Chicken infectious anemia virus infection in Israeli commercial flocks: virus amplification, clinical signs, performance, and antibody status.

    PubMed

    Davidson, I; Kedem, M; Borochovitz, H; Kass, N; Ayali, G; Hamzani, E; Perelman, B; Smith, B; Perk, S

    2004-01-01

    The impact of chicken infectious anemia virus (CIAV) infection on commercial chicken flocks in Israel was examined by analyzing flocks with or without typical CIAV signs, signs of other diseases, or apparently healthy flocks. In 23 flocks (broilers and layers) of ages up to 8 wk, typical signs of CIAV infection (stunting, gangrenous dermatitis, and secondary bacterial infections) were recorded. When permitted by flock owners, in several cases among these 23 flocks the morbidity, mortality, and performance parameters were recorded; the presence of CIAV was detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR); and the antibody status of parents and broilers was measured. In addition, total mortality, number of birds sold, total kilograms of meat sold, density (kg/m2), mean age at slaughter, daily growth rate in grams, total kilogram of food consumed, food conversion rate, and the European Index were calculated. We also surveyed flocks affected by other diseases, such as tumors, respiratory diseases, or coccidiosis, and flocks with no apparent clinical signs. The latter flocks were negative by CIAV-PCR, indicating that typical CIAV clinical signs are associated with one-step PCR-CIAV amplification. However, a small amount of CIAV might still be present in these flocks, acting to induce the subclinical effects of CIAV infection. These data indicate a link between the presence of virus sequences and typical CIAV signs and strengthen the concept that CIAV infection has a negative economic impact on the chicken industry.

  1. Abnormalities of Bell's phenomenon in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: a clinical and electrophysiological evaluation.

    PubMed Central

    Esteban, A; De Andrés, C; Giménez-Roldán, S

    1978-01-01

    A clinical and electromyographic study of oculomotor function was carried out in a series of 24 patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). In 15 cases an alteration of Bell's phenomenon was found. In addition, three patients showed some impairment of conjugate ocular motility in the form of upward gaze paly. All cases had preserved oculocephalic reflexes in the vertical and horizontal planes. On clinical and electromyographic grounds, three degrees of altered Bell's phenomenon are suggested: attenuated (short and unsustained upward displacement of the eyeballs after forced closure of the eyelids), abolished (no upward displacement), and inverted (downward instead of upward displacement of the eyes). These oculomotor alterations were not directly related to the type of ALS at onset of the illness, nor with its duration. However they were correlated with the relative degree of the clinical bilateral pyramidal tract signs at the supraspinal level. The common involvement of the corticogeniculate tract in ALS could explain the unexpectedly high incidence of alteration of Bell's phenomenon found in this disease, but is is non-specific and similar lesions from different causes may also produce it. Images PMID:681956

  2. Clinical research into anesthetic neurotoxicity: does anesthesia cause neurological abnormalities in humans?

    PubMed

    Lei, Susan Y; Hache, Manon; Loepke, Andreas W

    2014-10-01

    General anesthetics mitigate distress and exaggerated hemodynamic responses to pain and stressful stimulation, allowing surgery and diagnostic procedures to be performed worldwide in millions of children every year. Emerging studies, mainly carried out in early postnatal laboratory animals, demonstrate widespread neuronal elimination, alteration in neuronal circuitry, and long-term neurological disabilities following exposure to all commonly used sedatives and anesthetics. These findings have raised concerns among parents, anesthesiologists, neuroscientists, and government regulators about the safety of anesthetic drugs in children, especially infants. Accumulating evidence from epidemiological studies suggests an association between surgery with anesthesia in early childhood and subsequent behavioral and cognitive abnormalities. During the Fourth Pediatric Anesthesia NeuroDevelopmental Assessment (PANDA) symposium, a meeting attended by many stakeholders, the most recent findings in the field were presented and discussed. This review summarizes the current state of clinical research into the effects of anesthetic exposure in human brain development, addresses some of the difficulties in examining the phenomenon, and introduces the most recent clinical findings presented at the PANDA symposium. The unanimous consensus among participants was that additional preclinical and clinical research efforts are urgently required to address this important concern for child health.

  3. CLINICAL PRACTICES FOR INTERMEDIATE/EQUIVICAL SWEAT TESTS FOLLOWING ABNORMAL CYSTIC FIBROSIS NEWBORN SCREENS

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Megan R.; Adamski, Craig R.; Tluczek, Audrey

    2013-01-01

    Background Newborn screening (NBS) for cystic fibrosis (CF) has become standard practice in many countries. Consequently, the prevalence of infants with intermediate/equivalent sweat test results has increased. This study examined clinical practices in the United States (US) related to intermediate sweat test results subsequent to NBS. Methods Telephone surveys were conducted with staff from 77 (47% response rate) US CF centers documenting clinical practices related to intermediate/equivalent sweat chloride levels (30–59 mmol/L) following abnormal NBS. Results Thirty percent of centers followed CF Foundation guidelines for classifying intermediate/equivalent results. There was much variability in sweat testing procedures, diagnostic labels, additional diagnostics, addressing prognosis, and services offered to parents. CF center staff identified a need for resources to better address the uncertainty associated with intermediate/equivalent results. Conclusion Findings warrant evaluation of barriers to adherence with existing guidelines and establishment of internationally accepted, evidenced-based, clinical standards for infants with intermediate/equivalent CF NBS results. PMID:21855423

  4. [Biochemical and clinical findings in congenital abnormalities of galactose metabolism (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Sitzmann, F C; Kaloud, H; Istvan, L

    1975-01-10

    Current knowledge of the biochemical basis of abnormalities in galactose metabolism are discussed. The clinical picture, analysis of frequency and therapy are described. Although the galactokinase defect hat been described only rarely, abundant literature has been published on the Gal-1-PUT defect. Five variations of this defect are known (Duarte, Los Angeles, Rennes, Indiana and Negro variants), but these simulate only partially the clinical picture of galactosaemia. The UDP-Gal-4-epimerase defect has only once been described. Defects in galactose metabolism which show autosomal recessive inheritance are demonstrated in milk-fed infants by means of the Guthrie test. If the clinical picture arouses the suspicion of a defect in Gal-1-PUT or galactokinase, then a milk-free diet should be given until the diagnosis has been verified by enzyme analysis. Children who have been fed on a lactose-free diet show normal physical and mental development. If possible the entire family of the proband should undergo enzyme analysis in order to detect and to counsel all the heterozygotes in the family. Genetic counselling is considered to be absolutely indicated in this case. Termination of pregnancy is not indicated under any circumstances.

  5. [Correlations between clinical signs and hormonal parameters in young women with hirsutism].

    PubMed

    Kristesashvili, J; Chanukvadze, D

    2011-11-01

    Hyperandrogenism is the pathological condition, which clinical signs are "androgendependent dermopathies" (seborrhea, acne, hirsutism, alopecia) and not in every cases evidence with hyperandrogenemia. Free testosterone is the most frequent marker of hyperandrogenism, but its determination routinely not feasible in all laboratories. Therefore, some models for calculating free and bioavailable testosterone have been developed. In women the testosterone sources are not only ovaries and adrenal glands, but also abdominal and peripheral fat. There are many investigations to definite correlations between body mass index, androgens and sex hormone binding globulin. The aim of this study was to define the correlations between clinical, biochemical markers of hyperandrogenism and body mass index, with regard of abdominal obesity in young women with hirsutism. 83 female adolescents (14-20 year) with hirsutism and 20 female adolescents in control group were included. C-peptide, estradiol, total testosterone, sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) were measured. Free androgen index (FAI), free (cFT) and bioavailable (Bio-T) testosterone were calculated. The levels of C-peptide and glucose were used to compute Homa-IR (homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance). There were detected significant high levels by all hormonal parameters of hyperandrogenism in women with hirsutism, than in control group. In patients with abdominal obesity were also found significant high levels by all calculated parameters of hyperandrogenism and significant low level of steroid-bind globulin, than in patients with central obesity. In two groups by hirsutism degree were not detected any differences between androgen markers. The findigs of this research suggest, that android obesity in female adolescents with hirsutism can cause harder hyperandrogenism and elevate free androgen index, free and bioavailable testosterone levels. The prophylactic reduction of body mass index may prevent

  6. Contact Lens Care Solutions: A Pilot Study of Ethnic Differences in Clinical Signs and Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Meng C.; Yuen, Jenny; Graham, Andrew D.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To determine whether Asian and Caucasian subjects differ in clinical signs or subjective symptoms in response to use of different biguanide-preserved contact lens care solutions. Methods Forty-two subjects (15 Asian, 27 Caucasian) wearing lotrafilcon B silicone hydrogel contact lenses used a preservative-free lens care solution (Clear Care®, CIBA VISION, Atlanta, GA, USA) bilaterally for 2 weeks, then used 2 biguanide-preserved solutions (Solution 1: ReNu MPS®, Bausch & Lomb, Rochester, NY, USA; Solution 2: AQuify MPS®, CIBA VISION, Atlanta, GA, USA) contralaterally in randomly assigned eyes for 4 weeks. Comprehensive ocular surface exams were performed and symptomatology questionnaires were administered every 2 weeks. Investigators were masked as to solution assignment during examinations, while subjects were not in order to avoid potential difficulties in compliance with the protocol. Results With Solution 1, the majority of both Asian and Caucasian subjects had grade 2 or greater corneal staining after 2 weeks (67% and 59%, respectively) and 4 weeks (60% and 67%, respectively). With Solution 2, grade 2 or greater corneal staining occurred in 40% of Asians after 2 weeks and in 13% after 4 weeks, but in only 4% of Caucasians after 2 weeks and 0% after 4 weeks. Caucasians reported significantly better average comfort (p = 0.046) and less dryness (p < 0.001) than did Asians. Conclusions Asians and Caucasians differ in both ocular response to use of contact lens care solutions and in reporting of subjective symptoms. Racial and ethnic differences should be considered when evaluating and treating contact lens patients in a clinical setting. PMID:24887209

  7. Clinical signs, magnetic resonance imaging features, and outcome after surgical and medical treatment of otogenic intracranial infection in 11 cats and 4 dogs.

    PubMed

    Sturges, Beverly K; Dickinson, Peter J; Kortz, Gregg D; Berry, Wayne L; Vernau, Karen M; Wisner, Erik R; LeCouteur, Richard A

    2006-01-01

    Brainstem dysfunction resulting from central extension of infection is a life-threatening complication of otitis media/interna (OMI) that has been described infrequently in dogs and cats. We review the clinical signs of disease, diagnostic findings, and results of surgical and medical treatments of brainstem disease attributable to otogenic intracranial infection in cats and dogs. Eleven cats and 4 dogs were examined because of acute, subacute, or chronic clinical signs of brain disease including central vestibular signs, altered mentation, abnormal posture/gait, cranial nerve deficits, and seizures. Results of a minimal database (CBC, serum biochemical panel, urinalysis, thoracic radiographs, and abdominal ultrasonographic images or radiographs) were within reference intervals in all animals. Magnetic resonance (MR) images of the head were acquired for all animals, and cisternal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from 9 of 11 cats and 3 of 4 dogs was examined. Surgical exploration and ventral bulla osteotomy were done for 12 of 15 animals, followed by 1-3 months of antibiotic therapy; the remaining animals were euthanized before treatment. In all animals, MR imaging was effective in characterizing the location and extent of the pathologic changes intracranially as well as within middle/inner ear structures. Results of CSF analysis were characteristic of bacterial infection in most of the animals with acute or subacute disease. Since long-term outcome in all treated animals was very good to excellent, it was concluded that dogs and cats with intracranial disease secondary to extension of otitis media/interna have a good-to-excellent prognosis when the condition was diagnosed and was treated by surgical exploration and appropriate antibiotic therapy.

  8. 1989 Volvo Award in clinical sciences. Reproducibility of physical signs in low-back pain.

    PubMed

    McCombe, P F; Fairbank, J C; Cockersole, B C; Pynsent, P B

    1989-09-01

    The reproducibility between observers of physical signs in patients with low-back pain was investigated. Fifty patients were examined by two surgeons and another sample of 33 patients was examined by a surgeon and a physiotherapist. Continuous data on five signs were analyzed by Pearsons' correlation coefficient, and binary data on 54 signs were analyzed by the Kappa agreement coefficient. Reliable signs consisted of measurements of lordosis and flexion range, determination of pain on flexion and lateral bend, nearly all measurements associated with the straight leg raising test, determination of pain location in the thigh and legs, and determination of sensory changes in the legs. Signs of root tension showed better agreement when qualified with a description of where the pain was experienced. Bony tenderness was more reliable than soft tissue tenderness.

  9. Sperm Chromatin Integrity: Etiologies and Mechanisms of Abnormality, Assays, Clinical Importance, Preventing and Repairing Damage

    PubMed Central

    Hekmatdoost, Azita; Lakpour, Niknam; Sadeghi, Mohammad Reza

    2009-01-01

    The standard semen analysis is the first line and the most popular laboratory test in the diagnosis of male fertility. It evaluates sperm concentration, motility, morphology and their vitality. However, it is well-known that normal results of semen analysis can not exclude men from the causes of couples′ infertility. One of the most important parameters of sperm in its fertilizing potential is “Sperm chromatin integrity” that has direct positive correlation with Assisted Reproductive Techniques (ART) outcomes including; fertilization rate, embryo quality, pregnancy and successful delivery rate. It seems that sperm DNA chromatin integrity provides better diagnostic and prognostic approaches than standard semen parameters. For these reasons under-standing the sperm chromatin structure, etiology of sperm chromatin abnormality, identification factors that disturbs sperm chromatin integrity and the mechanism of their action can help in recognizing the causes of couples′ infertility. Various methods of its evaluation, its importance in male fertility, clinical relevance in the outcomes of ART and application of laboratory and medical protocols to improve this integrity have valuable position in diagnosis and treatment of male infertility. There has recently been interest in the subject and its application in the field of andrology. Therefore, with regard to the above mentioned importance of sperm chromatin integrity, this review article describes details of the useful information pertaining to sperm DNA damage including the origins, assessments, etiologies, clinical aspects, and prevention of it. PMID:23408441

  10. Clinics in diagnostic imaging (151). Acromioclavicular joint geyser sign with chronic full-thickness supraspinatus tendon (SST) tear.

    PubMed

    Khor, Andrew Yu Keat; Wong, Steven Bak Siew

    2014-02-01

    An 82-year-old man presented with neck pain, right upper limb radiculopathy and right shoulder pain. Physical examination revealed a soft lump over the right shoulder joint, as well as reduced range of shoulder movements. On magnetic resonance imaging, the soft lump was shown to be a cystic mass over the acromioclavicular joint and was related to a full-thickness supraspinatus tendon tear. This is the classic geyser sign. The pathophysiology and clinical features of the geyser sign, and its imaging features with various imaging modalities, are discussed.

  11. Taping patients with clinical signs of subacromial impingement syndrome: the design of a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Shoulder problems are a common complaint of the musculoskeletal system. Physical therapists treat these patients with different modalities such as exercise, massage, and shoulder taping. Although different techniques have been described, the effectiveness of taping has not yet been established. The aim of this study is to assess the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of usual physical therapy care in combination with a particular tape technique for subacromial impingement syndrome of the shoulder compared to usual physical therapy care without this tape technique in a primary healthcare setting. Methods and design An economic evaluation alongside a randomized controlled trial will be conducted. A sample of 140 patients between 18 and 65 years of age with a diagnosis of subacromial impingement syndrome (SAIS) as assessed by physical therapists will be recruited. Eligible patients will be randomized to either the intervention group (usual care in combination with the particular tape technique) or the control group (usual care without this tape technique). In both groups, usual care will consist of individualized physical therapy care. The primary outcomes will be shoulder-specific function (the Simple Shoulder Test) and pain severity (11-point numerical rating scale). The economic evaluation will be performed using a societal perspective. All relevant costs will be registered using cost diaries. Utilities (Quality Adjusted Life Years) will be measured using the EuroQol. The data will be collected at baseline, and 4, 12, and 26 weeks follow-up. Discussion This pragmatic study will provide information about the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of taping in patients presenting with clinical signs of SAIS. Trial registration Trial registration number: NTR2575 PMID:21849055

  12. Depression Dimensions: Integrating Clinical Signs and Symptoms from the Perspectives of Clinicians and Patients

    PubMed Central

    Vares, Edgar Arrua; Salum, Giovanni Abrahão; Spanemberg, Lucas; Caldieraro, Marco Antônio; Fleck, Marcelo P.

    2015-01-01

    Background Several studies have recognized that depression is a multidimensional construct, although the scales that are currently available have been shown to be limited in terms of the ability to investigate the multidimensionality of depression. The objective of this study is to integrate information from instruments that measure depression from different perspectives–a self-report symptomatic scale, a clinician-rated scale, and a clinician-rated scale of depressive signs–in order to investigate the multiple dimensions underlying the depressive construct. Methods A sample of 399 patients from a mood disorders outpatient unit was investigated with the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS), and the Core Assessment of Psychomotor Change (CORE). Exploratory Factor Analysis (EFA) and Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA) were used to investigate underlying dimensions of depression, including item level analysis with factor loadings and item thresholds. Results A solution of six depression dimensions has shown good-fit to the data, with no cross-loading items, and good interpretability. Item-level analysis revealed that the multidimensional depressive construct might be organized into a continuum of severity in the following ascending order: sexual, cognitive, insomnia, appetite, non-interactiveness/motor retardation, and agitation. Conclusion An integration of both signs and symptoms, as well as the perspectives of clinicians and patients, might be a good clinical and research alternative for the investigation of multidimensional issues within the depressive syndrome. As predicted by theoretical models of depression, the melancholic aspects of depression (non-interactiveness/motor retardation and agitation) lie at the severe end of the depressive continuum. PMID:26313556

  13. Renal functional reserve is impaired in patients with systemic sclerosis without clinical signs of kidney involvement

    PubMed Central

    Livi, R; Teghini, L; Pignone, A; Generini, S; Matucci-Cerinic, M; Cagnoni, M

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the functional response of the kidney to an amino acid challenge (the so called renal functional reserve (RFR)) in patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc) with no clinical sign of renal involvement. Methods: Before and after an intravenous amino acid load (Freamine III Baxter, 8.5% solution, 4.16 ml/min for two hours), glomerular filtration rate (GFR, as creatinine clearance), effective renal plasma flow (ERPF, as para-aminohyppurate clearance), and calculated total renal vascular resistance (TRVR) were measured in 21 patients with SSc with apparently normal renal function and 10 normal controls. Results: In basal conditions, patients had lower ERPF (403.5 (SD 43.8) v 496.4 (SD 71.3) ml/min, p<0.0002) and higher TRVR (10 822 (SD 2044) v 8874 (SD 1639) dyne/sxcm-5, p<0.014) than controls. The RFR, evaluated as the percentage increase of GFR after the amino acid load, was significantly reduced in patients with SSc (SSc +1.9 (SD18.6)%, controls +34.8 (SD 13.9)%; p<0.0002). However, the response of patients was not uniform. Multiple regression analysis showed that the RFR was inversely dependent on the patients' mean arterial pressure at admission and basal GFR (R2=65%, p<0.0001). Conclusions: Most patients with SSc cannot increase renal filtration under the challenge of a protein overload. This defective renal response to the amino acid load test sustains the concept of the prevalence of vasoconstrictor over vasodilating factors in the kidney of these patients. PMID:12117672

  14. Alterations of Innate Immunity Reactants in Transition Dairy Cows before Clinical Signs of Lameness

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Guanshi; Hailemariam, Dagnachew; Dervishi, Elda; Deng, Qilan; Goldansaz, Seyed A.; Dunn, Suzanna M.; Ametaj, Burim N.

    2015-01-01

    Simple Summary Lameness is prevalent in dairy cows and early diagnosis and timely treatment of the disease can lower animal suffering, improve recovery rate, increase longevity, and minimize cow loss. However, there are no indications of disease until it appears clinically, and presently the only approach to deal with the sick cow is intensive treatment or culling. The results suggest that lameness affected serum concentrations of the several parameters related to innate immunity and carbohydrate metabolism that might be used to monitor health status of transition dairy cows in the near future. Abstract The objectives of this study were to evaluate metabolic and innate immunity alterations in the blood of transition dairy cows before, during, and after diagnosis of lameness during periparturient period. Blood samples were collected from the coccygeal vain once per week before morning feeding from 100 multiparous Holstein dairy cows during −8, −4, disease diagnosis, and +4 weeks (wks) relative to parturition. Six healthy cows (CON) and six cows that showed clinical signs of lameness were selected for intensive serum analyses. Concentrations of interleukin-1 (IL-1), interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor (TNF), haptoglobin (Hp), serum amyloid A (SAA), lipopolysaccharide binding protein (LBP), lactate, non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA), and β-hydroxybutyrate (BHBA) were measured in serum by ELISA or colorimetric methods. Health status, DMI, rectal temperature, milk yield, and milk composition also were monitored for each cow during the whole experimental period. Results showed that cows affected by lameness had greater concentrations of lactate, IL-6, and SAA in the serum vs. CON cows. Concentrations of TNF tended to be greater in cows with lameness compared with CON. In addition, there was a health status (Hs) by time (week) interaction for IL-1, TNF, and Hp in lameness cows vs. CON ones. Enhanced serum concentrations of lactate, IL-6, and SAA at −8 and

  15. Prevalence of Cryptosporidium, Giardia and Isospora species infections in pet cats with clinical signs of gastrointestinal disease.

    PubMed

    Tzannes, Sophia; Batchelor, Daniel J; Graham, Peter A; Pinchbeck, Gina L; Wastling, Jonathan; German, Alexander J

    2008-02-01

    This study reports the prevalence of Cryptosporidium, Giardia and Isospora species in cats showing signs of gastrointestinal disease. Records from a United Kingdom commercial diagnostic laboratory between December 2003 and December 2005 were reviewed. Of 1355 cats, Cryptosporidium species oocysts were found in 13 cats (1%), Giardia species trophozoites in 74 (6%), and Isospora felis oocysts in 46 (3%). In a second group of 48 cats, prevalence of Giardia species was 15% using an immunoassay for detection of antigen compared to 4% detected with microscopy. Prevalence of Giardia (9%) and Isospora (9%) species was higher in cats less than 6 months old. Gender and breed did not affect prevalence. There was a trend for Cryptosporidium and Isospora species infections to be detected in late autumn and early winter. Regional differences in prevalence were not detected. None of these organisms show a characteristic pattern of clinical signs. This study demonstrates that enteric protozoal infection is common in domestic cats showing signs of alimentary disease.

  16. Clinical, laboratory and molecular signs of immunodeficiency in patients with partial oculo-cutaneous albinism.

    PubMed

    Dotta, Laura; Parolini, Silvia; Prandini, Alberto; Tabellini, Giovanna; Antolini, Maddalena; Kingsmore, Stephen F; Badolato, Raffaele

    2013-10-17

    Hypopigmentation disorders that are associated with immunodeficiency feature both partial albinism of hair, skin and eyes together with leukocyte defects. These disorders include Chediak Higashi (CHS), Griscelli (GS), Hermansky-Pudlak (HPS) and MAPBP-interacting protein deficiency syndromes. These are heterogeneous autosomal recessive conditions in which the causal genes encode proteins with specific roles in the biogenesis, function and trafficking of secretory lysosomes. In certain specialized cells, these organelles serve as a storage compartment. Impaired secretion of specific effector proteins from that intracellular compartment affects biological activities. In particular, these intracellular granules are essential constituents of melanocytes, platelets, granulocytes, cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) and natural killer (NK) cells. Thus, abnormalities affect pigmentation, primary hemostasis, blood cell counts and lymphocyte cytotoxic activity against microbial pathogens. Among eight genetically distinct types of HPS, only type 2 is characterized by immunodeficiency. Recently, a new subtype, HPS9, was defined in patients presenting with immunodeficiency and oculocutaneous albinism, associated with mutations in the pallidin-encoding gene, PLDN.Hypopigmentation together with recurrent childhood bacterial or viral infections suggests syndromic albinism. T and NK cell cytotoxicity are generally impaired in patients with these disorders. Specific clinical and biochemical phenotypes can allow differential diagnoses among these disorders before molecular testing. Ocular symptoms, including nystagmus, that are usually evident at birth, are common in patients with HPS2 or CHS. Albinism with short stature is unique to MAPBP-interacting protein (MAPBPIP) deficiency, while hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) mainly suggests a diagnosis of CHS or GS type 2 (GS2). Neurological disease is a long-term complication of CHS, but is uncommon in other syndromic albinism. Chronic

  17. Ivy Sign on Fluid-Attenuated Inversion Recovery Images in Moyamoya Disease: Correlation with Clinical Severity and Old Brain Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Kwon-Duk; Suh, Sang Hyun; Kim, Yong Bae; Kim, Ji Hwa; Ahn, Sung Jun; Kim, Dong-Seok

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Leptomeningeal collateral, in moyamoya disease (MMD), appears as an ivy sign on fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery (FLAIR) images. There has been little investigation into the relationship between presentation of ivy signs and old brain lesions. We aimed to evaluate clinical significance of ivy signs and whether they correlate with old brain lesions and the severity of clinical symptoms in patients with MMD. Materials and Methods FLAIR images of 83 patients were reviewed. Each cerebral hemisphere was divided into 4 regions and each region was scored based on the prominence of the ivy sign. Total ivy score (TIS) was defined as the sum of the scores from the eight regions and dominant hemispheric ivy sign (DHI) was determined by comparing the ivy scores from each hemisphere. According to the degree of ischemic symptoms, patients were classified into four subgroups: 1) nonspecific symptoms without motor weakness, 2) single transient ischemic attack (TIA), 3) recurrent TIA, or 4) complete stroke. Results TIS was significantly different as follows: 4.86±2.55 in patients with nonspecific symptoms, 5.89±3.10 in patients with single TIA, 9.60±3.98 in patients with recurrent TIA and 8.37±3.39 in patients with complete stroke (p=0.003). TIS associated with old lesions was significantly higher than those not associated with old lesions (9.35±4.22 vs. 7.49±3.37, p=0.032). We found a significant correlation between DHI and motor symptoms (p=0.001). Conclusion Because TIS has a strong tendency with severity of ischemic motor symptom and the presence of old lesions, the ivy sign may be useful in predicting severity of disease progression. PMID:26256975

  18. Adult Spinal Cord Injury without Radiographic Abnormalities (SCIWORA): Clinical and Radiological Correlations

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Siddhartha; Singh, Manjeet; Wani, Iftikhar H; Sharma, Sushil; Sharma, Narendra; Singh, Dara

    2009-01-01

    Background This study is aimed to determine the clinical and radiological corellations of adult patients with Spinal Cord Injury Without Radiographic Abnormalities (SCIWORA). Methods The study population consisted of all adult patients with suspected cervical spine injury. SCIWORA was defined as the presence of either no injury or a neural injury on Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in the absence of radiographic or Computed Tomographic (CT) Scan findings suggestive of trauma in patients with neurological deficit. Purely extra neural compressive lesions were excluded from the study. Results Twelve of ninety seven (12.4%) patients had a neural injury on MRI with normal radiographs and CT scan. These included cord contusion in five cases, cord edema in five cases and cord hemorrhage in two cases. Ten patients were managed conservatively and two patients with disc prolapse were managed surgically. All patients showed at least one ASIA Impairment Scale (AIS) grade improvement and three patients (25%) recovered completely. Conclusions Parenchymal spinal cord injury is the single most important determinant in the long term outcome of adult SCIWORA patients. Cord hemorrhage has the worst prognosis and cord edema has the best. Longitudinal signal extension and associated extra neural injuries are also associated with poorer outcomes. Cases with purely neural injuries can be managed conservatively, but associated extra neural injuries, especially disc prolapse and ligamentous instability, warrant surgical management. Keywords Post Traumatic Myelopathy; Spinal Cord Trauma; Computed tomography; Magnetic resonance imaging; SCIWORA PMID:22493651

  19. Clinical significance of the appearance of abnormal protein band in patients with multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Jo, Jae-Cheol; Yoon, Dok Hyun; Kim, Shin; Lee, Kyoungmin; Kang, Eun Hee; Jang, Seongsoo; Park, Chan-Jeoung; Chi, Hyun-Sook; Huh, Jooryung; Park, Chan-Sik; Suh, Cheolwon

    2014-03-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is characterized by clonal expansion of malignant bone marrow cells producing a unique monoclonal immunoglobulin. The appearance of abnormal protein band (APB) in MM has been reported during follow-up. We aimed to evaluate the clinical characteristics and outcomes of patients with APB in a single center cohort. A total of 377 consecutive MM patients were treated at the Asan Medical Center between January 2002 and December 2012. We compared clinical characteristics and survival outcome between those with and without APB. Of the 377 patients, 34 (9 %) experienced APB. They comprised 18.2 % (27/148) of patients treated with autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) and 3.1 % (7/229) of those not receiving ASCT. APB occurred after a median of 7.9 months (range, 2.2-95.7 months) from diagnosis. Immunoglobulin isotypes at diagnosis were as follows: IgG (n = 10), IgA (n = 8), IgD (n = 5), free κ (n = 4), and free λ (n = 7). Nine patients experienced a second APB. With a median follow-up of 54.1 months, the median overall survival (OS) has not been reached in patients with APB and was 38.3 months in patients without (P < 0.001). Multivariate analysis indicated that the development of APB was a significant favorable prognostic factor for OS (hazard ratio 0.21; 95 % confidence interval 0.08-0.52). Serum β₂-microglobulin, albumin, creatinine, and ASCT were also independent prognostic factors for OS. Further investigation is required to establish the mechanisms underlying APB in MM.

  20. Oral and Craniofacial Clinical Signs Associated to Genetic Conditions in Human Identification Part I: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Ayoub, Fouad; Aoun, Nicole; el Husseini, Hassan; Jassar, Houssam; Sayah, Fida; Salameh, Ziad

    2015-01-01

    Background: Forensic dentistry is one of the most reliable methods used in human identification when other technique as fingerprint, DNA, visual identification cannot be used. Genetic disorders have several manifestations that can target the intra-oral cavity, the cranio-facial area or any location in the human body. Materials and Methods: A literature search of the scientific database (Medline and Science Direct) for the years 1990 to 2014 was carried out to find out all the available papers that indicate oral, cranio-facial signs, genetic and human identification. Results: A table with 10 genetic conditions was described with oral and cranio-facial signs that can help forensic specialist in human identification. Conclusion: This review showed a correlation between genetics, facial and intra-oral signs that would help forensic ondontologist in the identification procedures. PMID:26028912

  1. A Longitudinal Evaluation of the Effects of Orthodontic Treatment on Clinical Signs and Symptoms of Temporomandibular Disorders.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-05-01

    0.3, were found between morphological malocclusions and the presence of frequent headaches, bruxism , symptoms or clinical signs of TMD (Egermark...clenching during the day, and frequent stress (Locker and Slade, 1988). History of trauma and orthodontic treatment were not found to be associated...of this study in terms of the differences found between men and women may be attributable to the greater stress in an urban lifestyle. A cross

  2. Lethal dose and clinical signs of Aeromonas hydrophila in Arapaima gigas (Arapaimidae), the giant fish from Amazon.

    PubMed

    Dias, Marcia K R; Sampaio, Luciana S; Proietti-Junior, Aldo A; Yoshioka, Eliane T O; Rodrigues, Dália P; Rodriguez, Anselmo F R; Ribeiro, Ricardo A; Faria, Fernando S E D V; Ozório, Rodrigo O A; Tavares-Dias, Marcos

    2016-05-30

    Aeromonas hydrophila is causing substantial economic losses in world aquaculture. This study determined the tolerance limit (LD50-96h) of A. hydrophila in Arapaima gigas, and also investigated the clinical signs after intradermal inoculation. Arapaima gigas fingerlings were inoculated intraperitoneally with 0 (control), 1.0×10(5), 1.0×10(6), 1.0×10(7), 1.0×10(9) and 1.0×10(10)CFU/mL of A. hydrophila for the determination of LD50-96h, which was 1.8×10(8)CFU/mL. In another trial with intradermal inoculation of 1.8×10(8)CFU/mL A. hydrophila, there was a 91.6% of mortality between 8 and 23h, and several clinical signs were found. As follows: depigmentation in the tegument, lesions in the tail and fins, loss of balance, reduction of respiratory movements, hemorrhagic foci, necrotic hemorrhages in the kidney, liver and swim bladder, splenomegaly, ascites in the abdominal cavity and hyperemia, enlargement of the gall bladder, among other clinical signs observed. The results showed that A. gigas has a relative tolerance to A. hydrophila when compared to other Neotropical fish species.

  3. Cytogenetic abnormalities and monosomal karyotypes in children and adolescents with acute myeloid leukemia: correlations with clinical characteristics and outcome.

    PubMed

    Manola, Kalliopi N; Panitsas, Fotios; Polychronopoulou, Sophia; Daraki, Aggeliki; Karakosta, Maria; Stavropoulou, Cryssa; Avgerinou, Georgia; Hatzipantelis, Emmanuel; Pantelias, Gabriel; Sambani, Constantina; Pagoni, Maria

    2013-03-01

    The whole spectrum of chromosomal abnormalities and their prognostic significance in children and adolescents with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) has not been fully elucidated yet, although a considerable amount of knowledge has been gained recently. Moreover, the incidence and prognostic impact of monosomal karyotypes (MKs), which are new cytogenetic categories reported recently in adults with AML, are currently unknown for childhood and adolescent AML. In this study, we investigated the cytogenetic and clinical characteristics of 140 children and adolescents (≤21 y) with AML, and correlated their cytogenetic features with both the clinical characteristics and outcomes of our patient cohort. The most frequent cytogenetic abnormality found in our study was the t(15;17), followed by the t(8;21). Striking differences in the genetic abnormalities and French-American-British subtypes were found among infants, children, and adolescents. Of 124 cases, 15 (12.1%) met the criteria of the MK definition, and 12 of the 15 MKs (80%) were complex karyotypes. Of 124 cases, 27 (21.8%) had cytogenetic abnormalities sufficient to be diagnosed as AML with myelodyspastic sydrome-related features. As expected, patients with the t(15;17) had the most favorable outcomes, whereas patients with 11q23 rearrangements and monosomy 7 had the worst outcomes. These data expand our knowledge by providing novel insights into the cytogenetic features and their correlations with clinical characteristics and outcomes in childhood and adolescent AML.

  4. Look what else we found - clinically significant abnormalities detected during routine ROP screening

    PubMed Central

    Jayadev, Chaitra; Vinekar, Anand; Bauer, Noel; Mangalesh, Shwetha; Mahendradas, Padmamalini; Kemmanu, Vasudha; Mallipatna, Ashwin; Shetty, Bhujang

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to report the spectrum of anterior and posterior segment diagnoses in Asian Indian premature infants detected serendipitously during routine retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) screening during a 1 year period. Methods: A retrospective review of all Retcam (Clarity MSI, USA) imaging sessions during the year 2011 performed on infants born either <2001 g at birth and/or <34.1 weeks of gestation recruited for ROP screening was performed. All infants had a minimum of seven images at each session, which included the dilated anterior segment, disc, and macula center and the four quadrants using the 130° lens. Results: Of the 8954 imaging sessions of 1450 new infants recruited in 2011, there were 111 (7.66%) with a diagnosis other than ROP. Anterior segment diagnoses seen in 31 (27.9%) cases included clinically significant cataract, lid abnormalities, anophthalmos, microphthalmos, and corneal diseases. Posterior segment diagnoses in 80 (72.1%) cases included retinal hemorrhages, cherry red spots, and neonatal uveitis of infective etiologies. Of the 111 cases, 15 (13.5%) underwent surgical procedures and 24 (21.6%) underwent medical procedures; importantly, two eyes with retinoblastoma were detected which were managed timely. Conclusions: This study emphasizes the importance of ocular digital imaging in premature infants. Visually significant, potentially life-threatening, and even treatable conditions were detected serendipitously during routine ROP screening that may be missed or detected late otherwise. This pilot data may be used to advocate for a possible universal infant eye screening program using digital imaging. PMID:26139795

  5. The challenges of translating the clinical outcomes in Routine Evaluation-Outcome Measure (CORE-OM) into British Sign Language.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Katherine D; Young, Alys; Lovell, Karina; Evans, Chris

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses translation issues arising during the production of a British Sign Language (BSL) version of the psychological outcome measure "Clinical Outcomes in Routine Evaluation-Outcome Measure" (CORE-OM). The process included forward translation, meeting with a team of translators, producing a second draft of the BSL version and back translating into English. Further modifications were made to the BSL version before piloting it with d/Deaf populations. Details of the translation process are addressed, including (a) the implications of translating between modalities (written text to visual language); (b) clarity of frequency anchors: analog versus digital encoding; (c) pronouns and the direction of signing; and (iv) the influence of the on-screen format. The discussion of item-specific issues encountered when producing a BSL version of the CORE-OM includes the expression of precise emotional states in a language that uses visual modifiers, problems associated with iconic signs, and the influence of Deaf world knowledge when interpreting specific statements. Finally, it addresses the extent to which lessons learned through this translation process are generalizable to other signed languages and spoken language translations of standardized instruments. Despite the challenges, a BSL version of the CORE-OM has been produced and found to be reliable.

  6. Clinical characterization of cardiovascular abnormalities associated with feline mucopolysaccharidosis I and VI

    PubMed Central

    Sleeper, Meg M.; Kusiak, Catherine M.; Shofer, Frances S.; O’Donnell, Patricia; Bryan, Caroline; Ponder, Katherine P.; Haskins, Mark E.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Objective The purpose of this study was to define the cardiovascular abnormalities present in young and adult cats affected with the lysosomal storage diseases mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) I and MPS VI. Method Eighteen cats affected with MPS I and fifteen cats affected with MPS VI were evaluated by physical examination, electrocardiography and echocardiography. Electrocardiograms were performed on all MPS I and all but 7 of the MPS VI cats. Ten unaffected cats underwent complete examinations for comparison purposes. Results No cardiovascular physical examination abnormalities were noted. ECG intervals were normal in affected cats; however, changes consistent with aberrant conduction were noted more frequently than in unaffected cats. Significant echocardiographic abnormalities included valve thickening and regurgitation (aortic and mitral) and aortic root dilation, particularly in the older cats. Conclusion As affected animals increased in age, more cardiac abnormalities were found with increasing severity. MPS I and MPS VI cats have similar cardiovascular findings to those seen in children and MPS VII dogs. PMID:18509743

  7. Systemic signs of neutrophil mobilization during clinically stable periods and during exacerbations in smokers with obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Andelid, Kristina; Andersson, Anders; Yoshihara, Shigemi; Åhrén, Christina; Jirholt, Pernilla; Ekberg-Jansson, Ann; Lindén, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Background It is still unclear whether signs of neutrophil mobilization in the blood of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease represent true systemic events and how these relate to bacterial colonization in the airways. In this study, we evaluated these issues during clinically stable periods and during exacerbations in smokers with obstructive pulmonary disease and chronic bronchitis (OPD-CB). Methods Over a period of 60 weeks for each subject, blood samples were repeatedly collected from 60 smokers with OPD-CB during clinically stable periods, as well as during and after exacerbations. Myeloperoxidase (MPO) and neutrophil elastase (NE) protein and mRNA, growth of bacteria in sputum, and clinical parameters were analyzed. Ten asymptomatic smokers and ten never-smokers were included as controls. Results We found that, during clinically stable periods, neutrophil and NE protein concentrations were increased in smokers with OPD-CB and in the asymptomatic smokers when compared with never-smokers. During exacerbations, neutrophil and MPO protein concentrations were further increased in smokers with OPD-CB, without a detectable increase in the corresponding mRNA during exacerbations. However, MPO and NE protein and mRNA displayed positive correlations. During exacerbations, only increased neutrophil concentrations were associated with growth of bacteria in sputum. Among patients with low transcutaneous oxygen saturation during exacerbations, PaO2 (partial oxygen pressure) correlated with concentrations of MPO and NE protein and neutrophils in a negative manner. Conclusion There are signs of systemic neutrophil mobilization during clinically stable periods and even more so during exacerbations in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. In this condition, MPO and NE may share a cellular origin, but its location remains uncertain. Factors other than local bacteria, including hypoxemia, may be important for driving systemic signs of neutrophil mobilization

  8. Effects of Atorvastatin on Negative Sign in Chronic Schizophrenia: a Double Blind Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Sayyah, Mehdi; Boostani, Hatam; Ashrafpoori, Mitra; Pakseresht, Siroos

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of Atorvastatin on negative symptoms in patients with chronic schizophrenia. The study was a prospective, double-blind, 6-week trial. Forty patients participated in the study; 19 patients were assigned to the Atorvastatin group as well as 21 patients to the placebo group. For assessing negative signs, we used Scale for the Assessment of Negative Symptoms (SANS) in weeks 1st, 3nd, 4th, and 6th. Moreover, patients were randomly assigned to treatment groups with Risperidone (6 mg/day) plus 20 mg Atorvastatin or with Risperidone (6 mg/day) plus placebo. Mean scores of Scale for the Assessment of Negative Symptoms (SANS) decreased during the treatment but there was no significant difference between the mean scores of two groups. The result of this trial suggested that Atorvastatin can be effective in reducing negative sign in schizophrenia although further studies seem to be needed. PMID:26664396

  9. Leukocyte abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Gabig, T G

    1980-07-01

    Certain qualitative abnormalities in neutrophils and blood monocytes are associated with frequent, severe, and recurrent bacterial infections leading to fatal sepsis, while other qualitative defects demonstrated in vitro may have few or no clinical sequelae. These qualitative defects are discussed in terms of the specific functions of locomotion, phagocytosis, degranulation, and bacterial killing.

  10. "Roadblocks, Stop Signs": Health Literacy, Education and Communication at a Free Medical Clinic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huntington, Sally J.

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative study, which takes place in a free medical clinic for low-income and uninsured patients, addresses the patients' health literacy and access to health information inside and outside of the clinic setting, as well as the strategies clinic providers use to effectively communicate health information. This study is based on participant…

  11. Evaluation of clinical signs to diagnose anaemia in Uganda and Bangladesh, in areas with and without malaria.

    PubMed

    Kalter, H D; Burnham, G; Kolstad, P R; Hossain, M; Schillinger, J A; Khan, N Z; Saha, S; de Wit, V; Kenya-Mugisha, N; Schwartz, B; Black, R E

    1997-01-01

    The object of this study was to assess the ability of pallor and other clinical signs, including those in the Integrated Management of Childhood Illness (IMCI) guidelines developed by WHO and UNICEF, to identify severe anaemia and some anaemia in developing country settings with and without malaria. A total of 1226 and 668 children aged 2 months to 5 years were prospectively sampled from patients presenting at, respectively, a district hospital in rural Uganda and a children's hospital in Dhaka, Bangladesh. The study physicians obtained a standardized history and carried out a physical examination that included pallor, signs of respiratory distress, and the remaining IMCI referral signs. The haematocrit or haemoglobin level was determined in all children with conjunctival or palmar pallor, and in a sample of the rest. Children with a blood level measurement and assessment of pallor at both sites were included in the anaemia analysis. Using the haematocrit or haemoglobin level as the reference standard, the correctness of assessments using severe and some pallor and other clinical signs in classifying severe and some anaemia was determined. While the full IMCI process would have referred most of the children in Uganda and nearly all the children in Bangladesh with severe anaemia to hospital, few would have received a diagnosis of severe anaemia. Severe palmar and conjunctival pallor, individually and together, had 10-50% sensitivity and 99% specificity for severe anaemia; the addition of grunting increased the sensitivity to 37-80% while maintaining a reasonable positive predictive value. Palmar pallor did not work as well as conjunctival pallor in Bangladesh for the detection for severe or some anaemia. Combining "conjunctival or palmar pallor" detected 71-87% of moderate anaemia and half or more of mild anaemia. About half the children with no anaemia were incorrectly classified as having "moderate or mild" anaemia. Anaemia was more easily diagnosed in Uganda in

  12. PREVENTION OF CONVERSION TO ABNORMAL TCD WITH HYDROXYUREA IN SICKLE CELL ANEMIA: A PHASE III INTERNATIONAL RANDOMIZED CLINICAL TRIAL

    PubMed Central

    Hankins, Jane S.; McCarville, M. Beth; Rankine-Mullings, Angela; Reid, Marvin E.; Lobo, Clarisse L.C.; Moura, Patricia G.; Ali, Susanna; Soares, Deanne; Aldred, Karen; Jay, Dennis W.; Aygun, Banu; Bennett, John; Kang, Guolian; Goldsmith, Jonathan C.; Smeltzer, Matthew P.; Boyett, James M.; Ware, Russell E.

    2015-01-01

    Children with sickle cell anemia (SCA) and conditional transcranial Doppler (TCD) ultrasound velocities (170-199 cm/sec) may develop stroke. However, with limited available clinical data, the current standard of care for conditional TCD velocities is observation. The efficacy of hydroxyurea in preventing conversion from conditional to abnormal TCD (≥200 cm/sec), which confers a higher stroke risk, has not been studied prospectively in a randomized trial. Sparing Conversion to Abnormal TCD Elevation (SCATE #NCT01531387) was an NHLBI-funded Phase III multicenter international clinical trial comparing alternative therapy (hydroxyurea) to standard care (observation) to prevent conversion from conditional to abnormal TCD velocity in children with SCA. SCATE enrolled 38 children from the United States, Jamaica, and Brazil [HbSS (36), HbSβ0-thalassemia (1), and HbSD (1), median age 5.4 years (range, 2.7-9.8)]. Due to slow patient accrual and administrative delays, SCATE was terminated early. In an intention-to-treat analysis, the cumulative incidence of abnormal conversion was 9% (95% CI 0 to 35%) in the hydroxyurea arm and 47% (95% CI 6 to 81%) in observation arm at 15 months (p=0.16). In post-hoc analysis according to treatment received, significantly fewer children on hydroxyurea converted to abnormal TCD velocities, compared to observation (0% versus 50%, p=0.02). After a mean of 10.1 months, a significant change in mean TCD velocity was observed with hydroxyurea treatment (−15.5 versus +10.2 cm/sec, p=0.02). No stroke events occurred in either arm. Hydroxyurea reduces TCD velocities in children with SCA and conditional velocities. PMID:26414435

  13. Prevention of conversion to abnormal transcranial Doppler with hydroxyurea in sickle cell anemia: A Phase III international randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Hankins, Jane S; McCarville, Mary Beth; Rankine-Mullings, Angela; Reid, Marvin E; Lobo, Clarisse L C; Moura, Patricia G; Ali, Susanna; Soares, Deanne P; Aldred, Karen; Jay, Dennis W; Aygun, Banu; Bennett, John; Kang, Guolian; Goldsmith, Jonathan C; Smeltzer, Matthew P; Boyett, James M; Ware, Russell E

    2015-12-01

    Children with sickle cell anemia (SCA) and conditional transcranial Doppler (TCD) ultrasound velocities (170-199 cm/sec) may develop stroke. However, with limited available clinical data, the current standard of care for conditional TCD velocities is observation. The efficacy of hydroxyurea in preventing conversion from conditional to abnormal TCD (≥200 cm/sec), which confers a higher stroke risk, has not been studied prospectively in a randomized trial. Sparing Conversion to Abnormal TCD Elevation (SCATE #NCT01531387) was a National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute-funded Phase III multicenter international clinical trial comparing alternative therapy (hydroxyurea) to standard care (observation) to prevent conversion from conditional to abnormal TCD velocity in children with SCA. SCATE enrolled 38 children from the United States, Jamaica, and Brazil [HbSS (36), HbSβ(0) -thalassemia (1), and HbSD (1), median age = 5.4 years (range, 2.7-9.8)]. Because of the slow patient accrual and administrative delays, SCATE was terminated early. In an intention-to-treat analysis, the cumulative incidence of abnormal conversion was 9% (95% CI = 0-35%) in the hydroxyurea arm and 47% (95% CI = 6-81%) in observation arm at 15 months (P = 0.16). In post hoc analysis according to treatment received, significantly fewer children on hydroxyurea converted to abnormal TCD velocities when compared with observation (0% vs. 50%, P = 0.02). After a mean of 10.1 months, a significant change in mean TCD velocity was observed with hydroxyurea treatment (-15.5 vs. +10.2 cm/sec, P = 0.02). No stroke events occurred in either arm. Hydroxyurea reduces TCD velocities in children with SCA and conditional velocities.

  14. Clinical signs and physical function in neck and upper extremities among elderly female computer users: the NEW study.

    PubMed

    Juul-Kristensen, B; Kadefors, R; Hansen, K; Byström, P; Sandsjö, L; Sjøgaard, G

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the study was to present the prevalence of clinical signs and symptoms among female computer users above 45 years, both in a group with self-reported neck/shoulder trouble (NS cases) and in a group without such trouble (NS controls). The hypothesis was that computer users with self-reported neck/shoulder trouble have more clinical findings than those not reporting trouble, and that a corresponding pattern holds true for physical function. In total 42 and 61 questionnaire-defined NS cases and NS controls participated and went through a clinical examination of the neck and upper extremities and five physical function tests: maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) of shoulder elevation, abduction, and handgrip, as well as endurance at 30% MVC shoulder elevation and a physical performance test. Based on clinical signs and symptoms, trapezius myalgia (38%), tension neck syndrome (17%) and cervicalgia (17%) were the most frequent diagnoses among NS cases, and were significantly more frequent among NS cases than NS controls. A total of 60% of the subjects with reported trouble had one or several of the diagnoses located in the neck/shoulder. Physical function of the shoulder was lower in subjects with self-reported trouble as well as in the subgroup of NS cases with clinical diagnoses. In conclusion, the present clinical diagnoses and physical function tests differed between NS cases and NS controls, and are therefore recommended to be included as quantitative objective measures in assessing musculoskeletal health. Physical function tests should be further developed in order to be able to detect pre-stages of work-related disorders for preventive strategies.

  15. Effect of Massage Therapy on Vital Signs and GCS Scores of ICU Patients: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Vahedian-Azimi, Amir; Ebadi, Abbas; Asghari Jafarabadi, Mohammad; Saadat, Soheil; Ahmadi, Fazlollah

    2014-01-01

    Background: Unalleviated complications related to hospitalization, including stress, anxiety, and pain, can easily influence different structures, like the neural system, by enhancing the stimulation of sympathetic nervous pathways and causing unstable vital signs and deterioration in the level of consciousness. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of massage therapy by family members on vital signs and Glasgow Coma Scale Score (GCS) of patients hospitalized in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU). Patients and Methods: This randomized controlled clinical trial was conducted at the ICU of the Shariati Hospital during 2012; 45 ICU patients and 45 family members in the experimental group and the same number of patients and family members in the control group were consecutively selected . The data collection instrument consisted of two parts. The first part included demographic data (age, marital status and Body Mass Index) and the second part included a checklist to record the patient’s vital signs (systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), respiratory rate (RR), pulse rate (PR)) and GCS. All measurements were done at the same time in both groups before the intervention (full body massage therapy), and 1 hour, 2 hours, 3 hours, and 4 hours after intervention. The patients were provided with a 60-minute full body massage The massage protocol included static, surface tension, stretching, superficial lymph unload, transverse friction, and myofacial releasing techniques. Results: Significant differences were observed between experimental and control groups in the SBP at 1 hour, SBP 2 hours, and SBP 3 hours, and also in GCS at 1 hour to GCS at 4 hours (P < 0.05). Multivariate analysis revealed a significant difference between experimental and control groups in SBP at all time points (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Massage via family members had several positive effects on the patients’ clinical conditions, and therefore, it should

  16. Scuticociliatid ciliate outbreak in Australian potbellied seahorse, Hippocampus abdominalis (Lesson, 1827): clinical signs, histopathologic findings, and treatment with metronidazole.

    PubMed

    Di Cicco, Emiliano; Paradis, Erika; Stephen, Craig; Turba, Maria Elena; Rossi, Giacomo

    2013-06-01

    A severe outbreak of scuticociliatosis occurred in Australian pot-bellied seahorse, Hippocampus abdominalis (Lesson, 1872), kept at the Vancouver Aquarium Marine Science Centre (Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada). Clinical signs included anorexia, lethargy, irregular respiration, and death. Cytology and histopathology revealed a high number of histophagous ciliated protozoa within the tissues. The parasite, identified as Philasterides dicentrarchi, was observed in several internal organs that appeared edematous and hemorrhagic upon postmortem examination. Severe histopathologic lesions were reported in particular in the ovary, the kidney, and the intestine. This infection was successfully treated with metronidazole via bath therapy. No further evidence of this parasite was found in the treated fish.

  17. Association between the findings on magnetic resonance imaging screening for syringomyelia in asymptomatic Cavalier King Charles spaniels and observation of clinical signs consistent with syringomyelia in later life.

    PubMed

    Ives, E J; Doyle, L; Holmes, M; Williams, T L; Vanhaesebrouck, A E

    2015-01-01

    A questionnaire-based study was used to investigate the association between the findings on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) screening for syringomyelia (SM) in 79 asymptomatic Cavalier King Charles spaniels (CKCS) and the subsequent development of clinical signs consistent with SM in later life. Owners reported clinical signs consistent with SM in 13/79 (16%) dogs at the time of the questionnaire. A significantly greater proportion of CKCS with a syrinx visible on MRI screening showed clinical signs in later life (9/25, 36%) than dogs without a visible syrinx (4/54, 7%; odds ratio 6.9). Whether the findings of MRI screening can be used to indicate the likelihood of an asymptomatic CKCS developing clinical signs consistent with SM in later life warrants further prospective study in a larger cohort of dogs.

  18. Association of clinical signs and symptoms of Ebola viral disease with case fatality: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Moole, Harsha; Chitta, Swetha; Victor, Darlyn; Kandula, Manasa; Moole, Vishnu; Ghadiam, Harshavardhan; Akepati, Anusha; Yerasi, Charan; Uppu, Achuta; Dharmapuri, Sowmya; Boddireddy, Raghuveer; Fischer, Jacqueline; Lynch, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Background Ebola virus disease (EVD) is a public health emergency of international concern. There is limited laboratory and clinical data available on patients with EVD. This is a meta-analysis to assess the utility of clinical signs, symptoms, and laboratory data in predicting mortality in EVD. Aim To assess the utility of clinical signs, symptoms, and laboratory data in predicting mortality in EVD. Method Study selection criterion: EVD articles with more than 35 EVD cases that described the clinical features were included. Data collection and extraction: Articles were searched in Medline, PubMed, Ovid journals, and CDC and WHO official websites. Statistical methods: Pooled proportions were calculated using DerSimonian Laird method (random effects model). Results Initial search identified 634 reference articles, of which 67 were selected and reviewed. Data were extracted from 10 articles (N=5,792) of EVD which met the inclusion criteria. Bleeding events (64.5% vs. 25.1%), abdominal pain (58.3% vs. 37.5%), vomiting (60.8% vs. 31.7%), diarrhea (69.9% vs. 37.8%), cough (31.6% vs. 22.3%), sore throat (47.7% vs. 19.8%), and conjunctivitis (39.3% vs. 20.3%) were more often present in pooled proportion of fatal cases as compared to EVD survivors. Conclusions Clinical features of EVD that may be associated with higher mortality include bleeding events, vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain, cough, sore throat, and conjunctivitis. These patients should be identified promptly, and appropriate management should be instituted immediately. PMID:26333864

  19. Clinical signs of androgen excess as risk factors for coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Wild, R A; Grubb, B; Hartz, A; Van Nort, J J; Bachman, W; Bartholomew, M

    1990-08-01

    Women with androgen excess have been found to have higher triglycerides and lower high-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations than nonhirsute women and are presumed to be at increased risk of coronary artery disease. However, definitive data linking androgen excess with coronary artery disease is lacking. We evaluated 102 women coming to coronary artery catheterization for signs and symptoms of androgen excess. Hirsutism was found more commonly in those women with confirmed coronary artery disease (chi 2 = 10.11). Waist:hip ratio (an index of android fat distribution) was associated with hirsutism (by ANOVA, F-test) and with coronary artery disease (t-test). The strongest associations were found in older women (aged greater than or equal to 60). Androgen excess in women may signal risk for coronary artery disease.

  20. The Effectiveness of Transcranial Brain Stimulation in Improving Clinical Signs of Hyperkinetic Movement Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Obeso, Ignacio; Cerasa, Antonio; Quattrone, Aldo

    2016-01-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is a safe and painless method for stimulating cortical neurons. In neurological realm, rTMS has prevalently been applied to understand pathophysiological mechanisms underlying movement disorders. However, this tool has also the potential to be translated into a clinically applicable therapeutic use. Several available studies supported this hypothesis, but differences in protocols, clinical enrollment, and variability of rTMS effects across individuals complicate better understanding of efficient clinical protocols. The aim of this present review is to discuss to what extent the evidence provided by the therapeutic use of rTMS may be generalized. In particular, we attempted to define optimal cortical regions and stimulation protocols that have been demonstrated to maximize the effectiveness seen in the actual literature for the three most prevalent hyperkinetic movement disorders: Parkinson's disease (PD) with levodopa-induced dyskinesias (LIDs), essential tremor (ET) and dystonia. A total of 28 rTMS studies met our search criteria. Despite clinical and methodological differences, overall these studies demonstrated that therapeutic applications of rTMS to “normalize” pathologically decreased or increased levels of cortical activity have given moderate progress in patient's quality of life. Moreover, the present literature suggests that altered pathophysiology in hyperkinetic movement disorders establishes motor, premotor or cerebellar structures as candidate regions to reset cortico-subcortical pathways back to normal. Although rTMS has the potential to become a powerful tool for ameliorating the clinical outcome of hyperkinetic neurological patients, until now there is not a clear consensus on optimal protocols for these motor disorders. Well-controlled multicenter randomized clinical trials with high numbers of patients are urgently required. PMID:26778947

  1. [Concordance of clinical signs of schizophrenia in families with hereditary loading].

    PubMed

    Kornetov, A N; Samokhvalov, V P

    1980-01-01

    A study of the clinical concordancy in 410 schizophrenic patients (sibs and parents -- children) detected the most frequent coinciding traits of the disease in the sibs and parent -- children pairs. The following traits were attributed to the coinciding features: premorbid schizoid personality traits, a short initial period, a pseudopsychopath syndrome in the initial period, paranoid manifest symptomatology, paranoid form of schizophrenia, a continuous progressive development of the process, apathico-abulic defect symptomatology. It was demonstrated that the variance of traits in the clinical picture of schizophrenia in hereditary loaded families is subjected to the impact of such factors as sex, age, supplementary hereditary loading by psychoses, exogenous factors.

  2. Vital Signs Screening for Alcohol Misuse in a Rural Primary Care Clinic: A Feasibility Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seale, J. Paul; Guyinn, Monique R.; Matthews, Michael; Okosun, Ike; Dent, M. Marie

    2008-01-01

    Context: Alcohol misuse is more common in rural areas, and rural problem drinkers are less likely to seek alcohol treatment services. Rural clinics face unique challenges to implementing routine alcohol screening and intervention. Purpose: To assess the feasibility of using the single alcohol screening question (SASQ) during routine nursing vital…

  3. Association between patterns of jaw motor activity during sleep and clinical signs and symptoms of sleep bruxism.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Yuya; Suganuma, Takeshi; Takaba, Masayuki; Ono, Yasuhiro; Abe, Yuka; Yoshizawa, Shuichiro; Sakai, Takuro; Yoshizawa, Ayako; Nakamura, Hirotaka; Kawana, Fusae; Baba, Kazuyoshi

    2016-12-20

    The aim of this study was to investigate the association between patterns of jaw motor activity during sleep and clinical signs and symptoms of sleep bruxism. A total of 35 university students and staff members participated in this study after providing informed consent. All participants were divided into either a sleep bruxism group (n = 21) or a control group (n = 14), based on the following clinical diagnostic criteria: (1) reports of tooth-grinding sounds for at least two nights a week during the preceding 6 months by their sleep partner; (2) presence of tooth attrition with exposed dentin; (3) reports of morning masticatory muscle fatigue or tenderness; and (4) presence of masseter muscle hypertrophy. Video-polysomnography was performed in the sleep laboratory for two nights. Sleep bruxism episodes were measured using masseter electromyography, visually inspected and then categorized into phasic or tonic episodes. Phasic episodes were categorized further into episodes with or without grinding sounds as evaluated by audio signals. Sleep bruxism subjects with reported grinding sounds had a significantly higher total number of phasic episodes with grinding sounds than subjects without reported grinding sounds or controls (Kruskal-Wallis/Steel-Dwass tests; P < 0.05). Similarly, sleep bruxism subjects with tooth attrition exhibited significantly longer phasic burst durations than those without or controls (Kruskal-Wallis/Steel-Dwass tests; P < 0.05). Furthermore, sleep bruxism subjects with morning masticatory muscle fatigue or tenderness exhibited significantly longer tonic burst durations than those without or controls (Kruskal-Wallis/Steel-Dwass tests; P < 0.05). These results suggest that each clinical sign and symptom of sleep bruxism represents different aspects of jaw motor activity during sleep.

  4. Comparison of parasitological, immunological and molecular methods for the diagnosis of leishmaniasis in dogs with different clinical signs.

    PubMed

    Moreira, M A B; Luvizotto, M C R; Garcia, J F; Corbett, C E P; Laurenti, M D

    2007-04-30

    Aiming to improve the diagnosis of canine leishmaniasis (CanL) in an endemic area of the Northwest region of São Paulo State, Brazil, the efficacy of parasitological, immunological and molecular diagnostic methods were studied. Dogs with and without clinical signs of the disease and positive for Leishmania, by direct parasite identification on lymph node smears and/or specific antibody detection by ELISA, were selected for the study. According to the clinical signs, 89 dogs attending the Veterinary Hospital of UNESP in Araçatuba (SP, Brazil) were divided into three groups: symptomatic (36%), oligosymptomatic (22%) and asymptomatic (22%). Twenty-six dogs from an area non-endemic for CanL were used as negative controls (20%). Fine-needle aspiration biopsies (FNA) of popliteal lymph nodes were collected and Diff-Quick-stained for optical microscopy. Direct immunofluorescence, immunocytochemistry and parasite DNA amplification by PCR were also performed. After euthanasia, fragments of popliteal lymph nodes, spleen, bone marrow and liver were collected and processed for HE and immunohistochemistry. Parasite detection by both HE and immunohistochemistry was specifically more effective in lymph nodes, when compared with the other organs. Immunolabeling provided higher sensitivity for parasite detection in the tissues. In the symptomatic group, assay sensitivity was 75.61% for direct parasite search on Diff-Quick-stained FNAs, 92.68% for direct immunofluorescence, 92.68% for immunocytochemistry and 100% for PCR; the corresponding values in the other clinical groups were: 32, 60, 76 and 96% (oligosymptomatic), and 39.13, 73.91, 100 and 95.65% (asymptomatic). Results of the control animals from the CanL non-endemic area were all negative, indicating that the methods used were 100% specific.

  5. The anal reflex elicited by cough and sniff: validation of a neglected clinical sign

    PubMed Central

    Chan, C; Ponsford, S; Swash, M

    2004-01-01

    Background: It is unclear whether contraction of the external anal sphincter (EAS) following a voluntary cough is an integral component of the cough response itself, or a reflex response to the abdominal and pelvic floor dynamics induced by the cough. Clinical experience suggests a reflex origin for this response. Objective: To compare motor latencies for intercostal, abdominal, and EAS muscle contraction after transcranial magnetic stimulation with those following voluntary coughing and sniffing. Methods: A needle electrode inserted into the EAS measured responses, which were confirmed by tonic electromyographic recording. Direct motor latencies from the cerebral cortex to the intercostal, rectus abdominis and EAS muscles were obtained using transcranial magnetic stimulation. Sniff and cough induced responses were also recorded in these muscles. Results: The results suggest that EAS responses following a voluntary cough or sniff represent a polysynaptic reflex. Conclusions: As the cough induced anal reflex response is consistent and easily elicited, its use in clinical neurological examination is appropriate. PMID:15377694

  6. Identifying Signs of Tinea Pedis: A Key to Understanding Clinical Variables.

    PubMed

    Canavan, Theresa N; Elewski, Boni E

    2015-10-01

    Tinea pedis is a frequently encountered dermatophytosis affecting the superficial skin of the feet, primarily of adults. The prevalence of tinea pedis has increased over the last several decades due to an increase in multiple risk factors. Infection from dermatophytes is most common, but infection from other fungi can also result in tinea pedis. Four distinct clinical presentations occur: interdigital, moccasin, vesicular, and acute ulcerative types. A variety of physical exam findings can help the clinician identify patients with tinea pedis.

  7. Congenital Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Congenital Abnormalities Page Content Article Body About 3% to 4% ... of congenital abnormalities earlier. 5 Categories of Congenital Abnormalities Chromosome Abnormalities Chromosomes are structures that carry genetic ...

  8. Vertical eye movements during horizontal head impulse test: a new clinical sign of superior vestibular neuritis.

    PubMed

    D'Onofrio, F

    2013-12-01

    In some patients suffering from acute unilateral peripheral vestibular deficit, the head impulse test performed towards the affected side reveals the typical catch-up saccade in the horizontal plane, and an oblique, mostly vertical, upward catch-up saccade after the rotation of the head towards the healthy side. Three cases are reported herein, which have been studied using slow motion video analysis of the eye movements captured by a high-speed webcam (90 fps). The clinical evidence is discussed and a pathophysiological explanation is proposed, consisting in a selective hypofunction of the superior semicircular canal during superior vestibular neuritis.

  9. Clinical validation of LTMS-S: A wearable system for vital signs monitoring.

    PubMed

    Chételat, Olivier; Ferrario, Damien; Proença, Martin; Porchet, Jacques-André; Falhi, Abdessamad; Grossenbacher, Olivier; Delgado-Gonzalo, Ricard; Della Ricca, Nicolas; Sartori, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    LTMS-S is a new wearable system for the monitoring of several physiological signals--including a two-lead electrocardiogram (ECG)--and parameters, such as the heart rate, the breathing rate, the peripheral oxygen saturation (SpO2), the core body temperature (CBT), and the physical activity. All signals are measured using only three sensors embedded within a vest. The sensors are standalone with their own rechargeable battery, memory, wireless communication and with an autonomy exceeding 24 hours. This paper presents the results of the clinical validation of the LTMS-S system.

  10. Early Signs of Memory Impairment among Multiple Sclerosis Patients with Clinically Isolated Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Panou, Theodora; Mastorodemos, Vasileios; Papadaki, Efrosyni; Simos, Panagiotis G.; Plaitakis, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    The study investigates primary and secondary verbal memory and motor/executive functions (response inhibition and strategy shifting ability) in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients with clinically isolated syndrome (CIS). We studied 44 CIS patients and compared them to 49 patients with relapsing remitting MS (RR-MS) displaying mild disability and to a large cohort of age- and education level-matched healthy volunteers (n = 230). Results showed that both CIS and RR-MS patients evidenced a disproportionate impairment in the immediate and delayed recall of the second (as compared to the first) of two short narratives of the Logical Memory WMS-III subtest, and reduced performance on the Memory for Digits-Forward. Performance of either group on the executive tasks was not impaired, showing evidence of a reversed speed-accuracy trade-off. Illness duration emerged as a significant predictor of memory and executive task performance. Clinical, psychoemotional, and brain imaging findings were also examined as potential correlates of memory deficits and disease progression among CIS patients. These findings may signify early-onset decline of specific cognitive functions in CIS, which merits regular follow-up assessments and monitoring of psychoemotional adaptation and everyday functioning. PMID:22713377

  11. Exacerbation of Darier Disease under Interferon-α-2a Therapy with Clinical Signs of Lichen Nitidus

    PubMed Central

    Karagiannidis, Ioannis; Brunner, Martina; Zouboulis, Christos C.

    2016-01-01

    Darier disease/dyskeratosis follicularis is a genodermatosis characterized by brown, oily keratotic papules and plaques in the seborrheic areas of the face and chest. Responsible for the disease are mutations in the ATP2A2 gene, encoding SERCA2, a calcium pump of the sarco-/endoplasmic reticulum. Mechanical trauma, heat, humidity, ultraviolet B radiation, oral corticosteroids and lithium are known trigger factors of the disorder. We report on a 48-year-old German woman with a flare-up of Darier disease under interferon-α-2a (IFNα-2a) therapy with clinical signs of lichen nitidus. Due to the fulminant course of the eruption, we suspected IFNα as a possible trigger. To our knowledge there are no reports regarding exacerbation of Darier disease during IFNα therapy. Possible pathogenetic mechanisms are being discussed. PMID:27721754

  12. Hemoptysis as the Presenting Clinical Sign of a T8-T9 Spine Fracture with Diffuse Idiopathic Skeletal Hyperostosis Changes

    PubMed Central

    Pollina, John; Dimopoulos, Vassilios G.

    2016-01-01

    Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH) is a noninflammatory degenerative disease that affects multiple spine levels and, in combination with osteoporosis, makes vertebrae more prone to fractures, especially in elderly people. We describe a rare case of thoracic fracture in an ankylosed spine in which hemoptysis was the only clinical sign. The patient (age in the early 80s) presented with chest pain and a cough associated with hemoptysis. The patient had no complaints of back pain and no neurological symptoms. Computed tomography (CT) angiography of the chest revealed changes consistent with DISH, with fractures at the T8 and T9 vertebra as well as lung hemorrhage or contusion in the right lung base. CT and magnetic resonance imaging of the thoracic spine showed similar findings, with a recent T8-T9 fracture and DISH changes. The patient underwent percutaneous pedicle screw fixation from T7 to T11 and remained neurologically intact with an uneventful postoperative course. PMID:27418984

  13. Correlations between severity of clinical signs and histopathological changes in 60 dogs with spinal cord injury associated with acute thoracolumbar intervertebral disc disease.

    PubMed

    Henke, D; Vandevelde, M; Doherr, M G; Stöckli, M; Forterre, F

    2013-10-01

    The outcome of spinal surgery in dogs with absent voluntary motor function and nociception following intervertebral disc (IVD) herniation is highly variable, which likely attests to differences in the severity of spinal cord damage. This retrospective study evaluated the extent to which neurological signs correlated with histologically detected spinal cord damage in 60 dogs that were euthanased because of thoracolumbar IVD herniation. Clinical neurological grades correlated significantly with the extent of white matter damage (P<0.001). However, loss of nociception also occurred in 6/31 (19%) dogs with relatively mild histological changes. The duration of clinical signs, Schiff-Sherrington posture, loss of reflexes and pain on spinal palpation were not significantly associated with the severity of spinal cord damage. Although clinical-pathological correlation was generally good, some clinical signs frequently thought to indicate severe cord injury did not always correlate with the degree of cord damage, suggesting functional rather than structural impairment in some cases.

  14. Clinical and electroencephalographic abnormalities during the full duration of a sporadic hemiplegic migraine attack.

    PubMed

    Chastan, Nathalie; Lebas, Axel; Legoff, Floriane; Parain, Dominique; Guyant-Marechal, Lucie

    2016-11-01

    Electroencephalographic (EEG) abnormalities have been reported during migraine attacks but their spatial and temporal distributions are not well known. We report the temporospatial dynamics of EEG during the full duration of a migraine attack with aura in a 19-year-old woman. She experienced episodes of hemiplegic migraine since the age of 2.5 years, with right hemibody paralysis preceded by visual symptoms. She reported severe pain of the right hemibody just before hemiplegia that was enventually suggestive of possible epileptic seizure, justifying diagnostic video-EEG monitoring. Sporadic hemiplegic migraine was diagnosed in the absence of family history. EEG was normal at the beginning of visual aura. After 15minutes, posterior slow waves appeared over the migrainous hemisphere, spreading progressively towards anterior regions: first the central region (5minutes after onset of contralateral hemiplegia), then the frontal region and over both hemispheres. A new de novo mutation was identified in the SCN1A gene.

  15. Intervention to Improve Follow-up for Abnormal Papanicolaou Tests: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Breitkopf, Carmen Radecki; Dawson, Lauren; Grady, James J.; Breitkopf, Daniel M.; Nelson-Becker, Carolyn; Snyder, Russell R.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effect of a theory-based, culturally-targeted intervention on adherence to follow-up among low-income and minority women who experience an abnormal Pap test. Methods 5,049 women were enrolled and underwent Pap testing. Of these, 378 had an abnormal result and 341 (90%) were randomized to 1 of 3 groups to receive their results: Intervention (I): culturally-targeted behavioral and normative beliefs + knowledge/skills + salience + environmental constraints/barriers counseling; Active Control (AC): non-targeted behavioral and normative beliefs + knowledge/skills + salience + environmental constraints/barriers counseling; or Standard Care Only (SCO). The primary outcome was attendance at the initial follow-up appointment. Secondary outcomes included delay in care, completion of care at 18 months, state anxiety (STAI Y-6), depressive symptoms (CES-D), and distress (CDDQ). Anxiety was assessed at enrollment, notification of results, and 7–14 days later with the CDDQ and CES-D. Results 299 women were included in intent-to-treat analyses. Adherence rates were 60% (I), 54% (AC), and 58% (SCO), p=0.73. Completion rates were 39% (I) and 35% in the AC and SCO groups, p=0.77. Delay in care (in days) was (M ±SD): 58 ±75 (I), 69 ±72 (AC), and 54 ±75 (SCO), p=0.75. Adherence was associated with higher anxiety at notification, p<0.01 while delay <90 days (vs. 90+) was associated with greater perceived personal responsibility, p<0.05. Women not completing their care (vs. those who did) had higher CES-D scores at enrollment, p<0.05. Conclusions A theory-based, culturally-targeted message was not more effective than a non-targeted message or standard care in improving behavior. PMID:23730719

  16. Determination of bacterial aetiologic factor on tracheobronchial lavage in relation to clinical signs of bovine respiratory disease.

    PubMed

    França Dias de Oliveira, Bernardo Augusto; Carrillo Gaeta, Natália; Mendonça Ribeiro, Bruno Leonardo; Reyes Alemán, Mário Augusto; Miranda Marques, Lucas; Timenetsky, Jorge; Melville, Priscila Anne; Avansi Marques, Júlia; Marvulle, Valdecir; Gregory, Lilian

    2016-10-01

    This study aimed to determine the occurrence of Mannheimiahaemolytica, Pasteurella multocida and Mycoplasma spp., in relation to clinical signs of respiratory disease. Tracheobronchial lavage samples were collected from 96 (healthy and unhealthy) cattle in the State of São Paulo, Brazil. Mycoplasma spp. (12.5 %) and Pasteurellamultocida (15.50 %) were the most prevalent species. Bacillus sp., Staphylococcus sp., Escherichia coli, Klebsiella oxytoca, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Klebsiella pneumoniae were also isolated. Mollicutes (70.83 %), Mycoplasmabovis (2.94 %) and Mycoplasma dispar (38.23 %) were identified using conventional PCR. Submassive sound on acoustic percussion of the thorax was associated with the absence of Mollicutes (P=0.025). Whistling (P=0.076) and coarse crackle (P=0.046) were associated with the absence of Mycoplasma dispar. Clear sound on acoustic percussion of the thorax was associated with the absence of Mycoplasmabovis (P=0.007). Coughing was associated with the presence of Pasteurellamultocida [P=0.035; confidence interval (CI), 1.12-26.89], but its absence was associated with mucopurulent (P=0.0215; CI, 1.55-34.5) and mucoid nasal discharge (P=0.068; CI, 19-28.5), submassive sound (P=0.031; CI, 1.23-75.5), fine crackle (P=0.058; CI, 1.23-20.1) and coarse crackle (P=0.046; CI, 2.38-70.8). The high prevalence of Pasteurella multocida and Mycoplasma spp. in unhealthy calves increases the importance of these micro-organisms in the pathogenesis of respiratory diseases. This study increases the information about the role of Mycoplasma dispar in respiratory diseases. Differences in some species in relation to clinical signs can be applied as a presumptive diagnosis.

  17. Evaluation of the Cerebral State Index in Cats under Isoflurane Anaesthesia: Dose-Effect Relationship and Prediction of Clinical Signs

    PubMed Central

    Sousa, Joana R.; Ribeiro, Lénio; Ferreira, David A.

    2014-01-01

    The performance of the cerebral state index (CSI) in reflecting different levels of isoflurane anaesthesia was evaluated in ten cats subjected to four end-tidal isoflurane concentrations (EtIso), each maintained for 15 minutes (0.8%, 1.2%, 1.6%, or 2.0% EtIso). The CSI, hemodynamic data, ocular reflexes, and eye position were recorded for each EtIso concentration. Pharmacodynamic analysis of CSI with EtIso was performed, as well as prediction probability analysis with a clinical scale based on the eye reflexes. The CSI values showed great variability. Between all parameters, burst suppression ratio showed the better fitting with the sigmoidal concentration-effect model (R2 = 0.93) followed by CSI (R2 = 0.82) and electromyographic activity (R2 = 0.79). EtIso was the variable with better prediction of the clinical scale of anaesthesia (prediction probability value of 0.94). Although the CSI values decrease with increasing isoflurane concentrations, the huge variability in CSI values may be a strong limitation for its use in cats and it seems to be no better than EtIso as a predictor of clinical signs. PMID:24616823

  18. Clinical characteristics and outcomes of veterans hospitalised with purulent soft tissue infections with and without systemic signs of infection.

    PubMed

    Gunderson, Craig G; Holleck, Jurgen; Chang, John J; Lin, Shin; Merchant, Naseema; Gupta, Shaili

    2016-07-01

    Objective To describe the frequency of systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) criteria in a cohort of patients hospitalised with purulent soft tissue infections and to determine their impact on clinical characteristics, microbiology and outcomes. Methods Retrospective cohort study of adults hospitalised at the West Haven Veteran's Hospital with purulent soft tissue infections between 1 October 2008 and 30 September 2013. Results A total of 173 patients were included with purulent soft tissue infections; 60 patients had no SIRS, 48 had one SIRS and 65 had ≥ 2 SIRS. Most clinical characteristics were similar between the different SIRS groups, although patients with SIRS were more likely to have severe sepsis and acute kidney injury and to already be on antibiotics at the time of hospitalisation. The microbiology of the infections was similar between SIRS groups. All patients received parenteral antibiotics when admitted and the majority of patients in all SIRS categories received antibiotics with broad Gram-negative activity. Outcomes were generally benign for all SIRS groups, although patients with SIRS had a longer length of stay and a trend towards more bacteremia. Conclusions SIRS are common in patients hospitalised with purulent soft tissue infections, although one third had no systemic signs of infection. Severe sepsis and septic shock are rare. Clinical characteristics, microbiology and antibiotic use are similar among patients in different SIRS groups, although the group without SIRS had a shorter hospitalisation and no episodes of bacteremia. Over-use of antibiotics is common in all SIRS categories.

  19. Glycogen storage diseases: a brief review and update on clinical features, genetic abnormalities, pathologic features, and treatment.

    PubMed

    Hicks, John; Wartchow, Eric; Mierau, Gary

    2011-10-01

    Glycogen storage diseases (GSD) affect primarily the liver, skeletal muscle, heart, and sometimes the central nervous system and the kidneys. These unique diseases are quite varied in age of onset of symptoms, morbidity, and mortality. Glycogen storage diseases are classified according to their individual enzyme deficiency. Each of these enzymes regulates synthesis or degradation of glycogen. Interestingly, there is great phenotypic variation and variable clinical courses even when a specific enzyme is altered by mutation. Depending on the specific mutation in an enzyme, a GSD patient may have a favorable or unfavorable prognosis. With neonatal or infantile forms, some GSDs lead to death within the first year of life, whereas other glycogen storage diseases are relatively asymptomatic or may cause only exercise intolerance. The paper provides a brief review and update of glycogen storage diseases, with respect to clinical features, genetic abnormalities, pathologic features, and treatment.

  20. Abnormalities of Thyroid Hormone Metabolism during Systemic Illness: The Low T3 Syndrome in Different Clinical Settings

    PubMed Central

    Zantut-Wittmann, Denise Engelbrecht

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid hormone abnormalities are common in critically ill patients. For over three decades, a mild form of these abnormalities has been described in patients with several diseases under outpatient care. These alterations in thyroid hormone economy are a part of the nonthyroidal illness and keep an important relationship with prognosis in most cases. The main feature of this syndrome is a fall in free triiodothyronine (T3) levels with normal thyrotropin (TSH). Free thyroxin (T4) and reverse T3 levels vary according to the underlying disease. The importance of recognizing this condition in such patients is evident to physicians practicing in a variety of specialties, especially general medicine, to avoid misdiagnosing the much more common primary thyroid dysfunctions and indicating treatments that are often not beneficial. This review focuses on the most common chronic diseases already known to present with alterations in serum thyroid hormone levels. A short review of the common pathophysiology of the nonthyroidal illness is followed by the clinical and laboratorial presentation in each condition. Finally, a clinical case vignette and a brief summary on the evidence about treatment of the nonthyroidal illness and on the future research topics to be addressed are presented. PMID:27803712

  1. High-affinity σ1 protein agonist reduces clinical and pathological signs of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Oxombre, B; Lee-Chang, C; Duhamel, A; Toussaint, M; Giroux, M; Donnier-Maréchal, M; Carato, P; Lefranc, D; Zéphir, H; Prin, L; Melnyk, P; Vermersch, P

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Selective agonists of the sigma-1 receptor (σ1 protein) are generally reported to protect against neuronal damage and modulate oligodendrocyte differentiation. Human and rodent lymphocytes possess saturable, high-affinity binding sites for compounds binding to the σ1 protein and potential immunomodulatory properties have been described for σ1 protein ligands. Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is recognized as a valuable model of the inflammatory aspects of multiple sclerosis (MS). Here, we have assessed the role of a σ1 protein agonist, containing the tetrahydroisoquinoline-hydantoin structure, in EAE. Experimental Approach EAE was induced in SJL/J female mice by active immunization with myelin proteolipid protein (PLP)139–151 peptide. The σ1 protein agonist was injected i.p. at the time of immunization (day 0). Disease severity was assessed clinically and by histopathological evaluation of the CNS. Phenotyping of B-cell subsets and regulatory T-cells were performed by flow cytometry in spleen and cervical lymph nodes. Key Results Prophylactic treatment of EAE mice with the σ1 protein agonist prevented mononuclear cell accumulation and demyelination in brain and spinal cord and increased T2 B-cells and regulatory T-cells, resulting in an overall reduction in the clinical progression of EAE. Conclusions and Implications This σ1 protein agonist, containing the tetrahydroisoquinoline-hydantoin structure, decreased the magnitude of inflammation in EAE. This effect was associated with increased proportions of B-cell subsets and regulatory T-cells with potential immunoregulatory functions. Targeting of the σ1 protein might thus provide new therapeutic opportunities in MS. PMID:25521311

  2. Treatment of patients with multifocal motor neuropathy with immunoglobulins in clinical practice: the SIGNS registry

    PubMed Central

    Stangel, Martin; Gold, Ralf; Pittrow, David; Baumann, Ulrich; Borte, Michael; Fasshauer, Maria; Hensel, Manfred; Huscher, Dörte; Reiser, Marcel; Sommer, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The management of patients with multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN) under everyday clinical conditions has been insufficiently studied. We therefore collected comprehensive observational data on patients with MMN who received intravenous (IV) or subcutaneous (SC) immunoglobulins (IGs) as maintenance therapy. Methods: This was a prospective, noninterventional study (registry) in neurological centres (hospitals and offices) throughout Germany. Results: As of 1 December 2015, 80 patients with MMN were included (mean age 55.4 ± 9.8 years, 67% males, mean disease duration 10.7 ± 10.2 years). The affected limb regions were predominantly distal muscle groups of the upper extremities. On the inflammatory neuropathy cause and treatment (INCAT) scale, 94% of the patients had some disability in the arms and 61% in the legs. At inclusion, 98.8% received IVIG and 1.3% SCIG. Substantial variation was observed between IVIG treatment intervals (every 0.7 to 17.3 weeks) and dosage (0.2–2.1 g/kg body weight received during a single administration; mean monthly dosage, 0.9 g/kg body weight). However, the mean monthly dosage was steady over time. At 1-year follow up, improvement was seen in muscle strength, INCAT and quality of life (QoL) scores (SF-36 questionnaire). Conclusions: The management of patients with MMN in everyday clinical practice demonstrates a wide range of absolute dosages and treatment intervals of IG, supporting the recommended practice of determining treatment dose on an individual patient basis. The improvements in muscle strength and reduction in disability, accompanied by increased QoL, strengthen the case for use of IG as a maintenance treatment for MMN. PMID:27134672

  3. Validity and reliability of haemoglobin colour scale and its comparison with clinical signs in diagnosing anaemia in pregnancy in Ahmedabad, India.

    PubMed

    Bala, D V; Vyas, S; Shukla, A; Tiwari, H; Bhatt, G; Gupta, K

    2012-07-01

    This study compared the validity of the haemoglobin colour scale (HCS) and clinical signs in diagnosing anaemia against Sahli's haemoglobinometer method as the gold standard, and assessed the reliability of HCS. The sample comprised 129 pregnant women recruited from 6 urban health centres in Ahmedabad. The prevalence of anaemia was 69.8% by Sahli's method, 78.3% by HCS and 89.9% by clinical signs; there was no statistically significant difference between Sahli's method and HCS whereas there was between Sahlis method and clinical signs. The mean haemoglobin level by Sahli's method and HCS differed significantly. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of HCS was 83.3%, 33.3%, 74.3% and 46.4% respectively and that of clinical signs was 91.1%, 12.8%, 70.7% and 38.5% respectively. Interobserver agreement for HCS was moderate (K = 0.43). Clinical signs are better than HCS for diagnosing anaemia. HCS can be used in the field provided assessors are adequately trained.

  4. Polythelia: simple atavistic remnant or a suspicious clinical sign for investigation?

    PubMed

    Galli-Tsinopoulou, Assimina; Stergidou, Dorothea

    2014-03-01

    Supernumerary nipples (or polythelia) usually appear along the embryonic milk lines or in other sites including the back, thigh, vulva, neck etc. The frequency of polythelia ranges from 0.2% to 5.6%. Despite the plethora of published cases concerning its association with other congenital malformations or syndromes with different patterns of inheritance, polythelia still remains a controversial and theoretical issue. Although most reports describe a link between supernumerary nipples and kidney/urinary tract anomalies, a potential relationship with other congenital anomalies or malignancies has also been speculated. Additionally, polythelia has been associated with genodermatoses, thus being related with an increased malignant potential, as well as with an increased risk for solid tumors such as renal adenocarcinoma, testicular cancer, prostate cancer, and urinary bladder carcinoma. The fact that the Scaramanga (ska) mutant mice presented with ectopic breast tissue imply that misregulation of the neuregulin-3 signaling pathway may be critical in the occurrence of polythelia. This is an attempt to review existing literature in order to (a) draw reliable conclusions whether polythelia is a manifestation of simple atavism or may be associated with concomitant severe conditions needing further investigation and/or management, (b) elucidate its aetiology and (c) establish appropriate clinical and laboratory approach.

  5. Diagnostic Validity of Clinical Signs Associated with a Large Exophoria at Near

    PubMed Central

    Cacho-Martínez, Pilar; García-Muñoz, Ángel; Ruiz-Cantero, María Teresa

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. To analyze the diagnostic validity of accommodative and binocular tests in a sample of patients with a large near exophoria with moderate to severe symptoms. Methods. Two groups of patients between 19 and 35 years were recruited from a university clinic: 33 subjects with large exophoria at near vision and moderate or high visual discomfort and 33 patients with normal heterophoria and low visual discomfort. Visual discomfort was defined using the Conlon survey. A refractive exam and an exhaustive evaluation of accommodation and vergence were assessed. Diagnostic validity by means of receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curves, sensitivity (S), specificity (Sp), and positive and negative likelihood ratios (LR+, LR−) were assessed. This analysis was also carried out considering multiple tests as serial testing strategy. Results. ROC analysis showed the best diagnostic accuracy for receded near point of convergence (NPC) recovery (area = 0.929) and binocular accommodative facility (BAF) (area = 0.886). Using the cut-offs obtained with ROC analysis, the best diagnostic validity was obtained for the combination of NPC recovery and BAF (S  =  0.77, Sp = 1, LR+ = value tending to infinity, LR− = 0.23) and the combination of NPC break and recovery with BAF (S  =  0.73, Sp = 1, LR+ = tending to infinity, LR− = 0.27). Conclusions. NPC and BAF tests were the tests with the best diagnostic accuracy for subjects with large near exophoria and moderate to severe symptoms. PMID:23997945

  6. Kidney Stones as an Under-Recognized Clinical Sign in Pediatric Cushing Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Sara H.; Papadakis, Georgios Z.; Keil, Margaret F.; Faucz, Fabio R.; Lodish, Maya B.; Stratakis, Constantine A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the prevalence of kidney stones in a population of children with Cushing disease (CD) and to compare this prevalence with that of healthy children. Study design Clinical and biochemical data from 139 pediatric patients with CD (68 female, 71 male) were retrospectively analyzed. Computed tomography (CT) scans were reviewed for kidney stones. Results Of 139 patients, 27 children with CD (19.4%) had either radiographic evidence and/or a history of kidney stones. Those with kidney stones had higher urine free cortisol (p-value = 0.008) and a transsphenoidal surgery at an older age (p-value = 0.007). Average urinary calcium creatinine ratio was elevated in patients with CD (0.22 ± 0.11). The prevalence of kidney stones in children with CD was higher than in normal children (19.42% vs 1.0%, p-value <0.001). Conclusion Our results illustrate that kidney stones are an under-estimated complication of pediatric CD, especially when compared with the prevalence of nephrolithiasis in the general pediatric population. Long term consequences for kidney function are not known and need to be studied. PMID:26703870

  7. Clinical predictors of chest radiographic abnormalities in young children hospitalized with bronchiolitis: a single center study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ga Ram; Na, Min Sun; Baek, Kyung Suk; Lee, Seung Jin; Lee, Kyung Suk; Jung, Young Ho; Jee, Hye Mi; Kwon, Tae Hee; Han, Man Yong

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Chest radiography is often performed on patients hospitalized with typical clinical manifestations of bronchiolitis. We aimed to determine the proportion of subjects with pathologic chest radiographic findings and the clinical predictors associated with pathologic chest radiographic findings in young children admitted with the typical presentation of bronchiolitis. Methods We obtained the following data at admission: sex, age, neonatal history, past history of hospitalization for respiratory illnesses, heart rate, respiratory rate, the presence of fever, total duration of fever, oxygen saturation, laboratory parameters (i.e., complete blood cell count, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein [hs-CRP], etc.), and chest radiography. Results The study comprised 279 young children. Of these, 26 had a chest radiograph revealing opacity (n=24) or atelectasis (n=2). Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that after adjustment for confounding factors, the clinical predictors associated with pathologic chest radiographic findings in young children admitted with bronchiolitis were elevated hs-CRP level (>0.3 mg/dL) and past history of hospitalization for respiratory illnesses (all P<0.05). Conclusion The current study suggests that chest radiographs in young children with typical clinical manifestations of bronchiolitis have limited value. Nonetheless, young children with clinical factors such as high hs-CRP levels at admission or past history of hospitalization for respiratory illnesses may be more likely to have pathologic chest radiographic findings. PMID:28194212

  8. Non-invasive prenatal testing for fetal chromosome abnormalities: review of clinical and ethical issues

    PubMed Central

    Gekas, Jean; Langlois, Sylvie; Ravitsky, Vardit; Audibert, François; van den Berg, David Gradus; Haidar, Hazar; Rousseau, François

    2016-01-01

    Genomics-based non-invasive prenatal screening using cell-free DNA (cfDNA screening) was proposed to reduce the number of invasive procedures in current prenatal diagnosis for fetal aneuploidies. We review here the clinical and ethical issues of cfDNA screening. To date, it is not clear how cfDNA screening is going to impact the performances of clinical prenatal diagnosis and how it could be incorporated in real life. The direct marketing to users may have facilitated the early introduction of cfDNA screening into clinical practice despite limited evidence-based independent research data supporting this rapid shift. There is a need to address the most important ethical, legal, and social issues before its implementation in a mass setting. Its introduction might worsen current tendencies to neglect the reproductive autonomy of pregnant women. PMID:26893576

  9. Relative Role of Genetic Complement Abnormalities in Sporadic and Familial aHUS and Their Impact on Clinical Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Caprioli, Jessica; Bresin, Elena; Mossali, Chiara; Pianetti, Gaia; Gamba, Sara; Daina, Erica; Fenili, Chiara; Castelletti, Federica; Sorosina, Annalisa; Piras, Rossella; Donadelli, Roberta; Maranta, Ramona; van der Meer, Irene; Conway, Edward M.; Zipfel, Peter F.; Goodship, Timothy H.; Remuzzi, Giuseppe

    2010-01-01

    Background and objectives: Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is characterized by microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and renal impairment. Most childhood cases are caused by Shiga toxin–producing bacteria. The other form, atypical HUS (aHUS), accounts for 10% of cases and has a poor prognosis. Genetic complement abnormalities have been found in aHUS. Design, setting, participants, and measurements: We screened 273 consecutive patients with aHUS for complement abnormalities and studied their role in predicting clinical phenotype and response to treatment. We compared mutation frequencies and localization and clinical outcome in familial (82) and sporadic (191) cases. Results: In >70% of sporadic and familial cases, gene mutations, disease-associated factor H (CFH) polymorphisms, or anti-CFH autoantibodies were found. Either mutations or CFH polymorphisms were also found in the majority of patients with secondary aHUS, suggesting a genetic predisposition. Familial cases showed a higher prevalence of mutations in SCR20 of CFH and more severe disease than sporadic cases. Patients with CFH or THBD (thrombomodulin) mutations had the earliest onset and highest mortality. Membrane-cofactor protein (MCP) mutations were associated with the best prognosis. Plasma therapy induced remission in 55 to 80% of episodes in patients with CFH, C3, or THBD mutations or autoantibodies, whereas patients with CFI (factor I) mutations were poor responders. aHUS recurred frequently after kidney transplantation except for patients with MCP mutations. Conclusions: Results underline the need of genetic screening for all susceptibility factors as part of clinical management of aHUS and for identification of patients who could safely benefit from kidney transplant. PMID:20595690

  10. Rutoside decreases human macrophage-derived inflammatory mediators and improves clinical signs in adjuvant-induced arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Kauss, Tina; Moynet, Daniel; Rambert, Jérôme; Al-Kharrat, Abir; Brajot, Stephane; Thiolat, Denis; Ennemany, Rachid; Fawaz, Fawaz; Mossalayi, M Djavad

    2008-01-01

    Background Dietary flavonols may play an important role in the adjunct therapy of chronic inflammation. The availability of therapeutic formulations of pentahydroxyflavone glycoside, rutoside (RU), led us to investigate the ability of this molecule to modulate the release of various proinflammatory mediators from human activated macrophages in vitro and to ameliorate arthritic markers in a rat model. Methods RU was added simultaneously to human macrophages during their activation. Cells were then analyzed for inflammation-related gene expression using a specific array, and cell supernatants were collected to measure inflammatory mediators. RU was also injected into adjuvant-induced arthritic rats, and disease progression and body weight were evaluated until 50 days after injection. Sera and peritoneal macrophages were also collected to quantify the RU effect on various inflammatory markers. Results RU inhibited inflammation-related gene expression in activated human macrophages and the release of nitric oxide, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin (IL)-1, and IL-6 from these cells. In a rat model, RU inhibited clinical signs of chronic arthritis, correlating with decreased levels of inflammatory cytokines detected in rat sera and macrophage supernatants. Conclusion Thus, RU may have clinical value in reducing inflammatory manifestations in human arthritis and other inflammatory diseases. PMID:18252009

  11. Monosomy 1p36 - a multifaceted and still enigmatic syndrome: four clinically diverse cases with shared white matter abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Õiglane-Shlik, Eve; Puusepp, Sanna; Talvik, Inga; Vaher, Ulvi; Rein, Reet; Tammur, Pille; Reimand, Tiia; Teek, Rita; Žilina, Olga; Tomberg, Tiiu; Õunap, Katrin

    2014-05-01

    Monosomy 1p36 is the most common subtelomeric deletion syndrome seen in humans. Uniform features of the syndrome include early developmental delay and consequent intellectual disability, muscular hypotonia, and characteristic dysmorphic facial features. The gene-rich nature of the chromosomal band, inconsistent deletion sizes and overlapping clinical features have complicated relevant genotype-phenotype correlations. We describe four patients with isolated chromosome 1p36 deletions. All patients shared white matter abnormalities, allowing us to narrow the critical region for white matter involvement to the deletion size of up to 2.5 Mb from the telomere. We hypothesise that there might be a gene(s) responsible for myelin development in the 1p36 subtelomeric region. Other significant clinical findings were progressive spastic paraparesis, epileptic encephalopathy, various skeletal anomalies, Prader-Willi-like phenotype, neoplastic changes - a haemangioma and a benign skin tumour, and in one case, sleep myoclonus, a clinical entity not previously described in association with 1p36 monosomy. Combined with prior studies, our results suggest that the clinical features seen in monosomy 1p36 have more complex causes than a classical contiguous gene deletion syndrome.

  12. Beak and feather disease virus: correlation between viral load and clinical signs in wild Cape parrots (Poicepahlus robustus) in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Regnard, Guy L; Boyes, Rutledge S; Martin, Rowan O; Hitzeroth, Inga I; Rybicki, Edward P

    2015-01-01

    Psittacine beak and feather disease (PBFD), the most prevalent viral disease affecting psittacines, is caused by beak and feather disease virus (BFDV). This study assessed viral load using qPCR in a wild Cape parrot population affected by PBFD and compared it to overall physical condition based on clinical signs attributable to PBFD. A significant inverse correlation between viral load and overall physical condition was found, which confirmed that clinical signs may confidently be used to diagnose the relative severity of BFDV infections in wild populations. This is the first assessment of BFDV viral load in a wild psittacine population.

  13. The role of interleukin-6 in cases of cardiac myxoma. Clinical features, immunologic abnormalities, and a possible role in recurrence.

    PubMed

    Mendoza, C E; Rosado, M F; Bernal, L

    2001-01-01

    We performed this prospective study to evaluate the correlation of interleukin-6 serum levels with preoperative constitutional symptoms and immunologic abnormalities, and the possible role played by this cytokine in tumor recurrence. Eight patients with atrial myxoma were evaluated at our institution from July 1993 to November 1998. We measured their interleukin-6 serum levels by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method preoperatively and 1 and 6 months after surgery. Two of the cases involved recurrent tumor, 1 patient had undergone his 1st surgery at a different institution and died during the 2nd procedure, so his data were incomplete. Preoperatively the whole group of patients had elevated interleukin-6 serum levels. Although patients with a 1st occurrence of tumor demonstrated a positive correlation between interleukin-6 serum level and tumor size, the 2 patients with recurrent tumors appeared to have higher interleukin-6 levels regardless of tumor size. Once the tumor was surgically removed, interleukin-6 levels returned to normal values, and this was associated with regression of clinical manifestations and immunologic features. According to our study, the overproduction of interleukin-6 by cardiac myxomas is responsible for the constitutional symptoms and immunologic abnormalities observed in patients with such tumors and might also play a role as a marker of recurrence. This study also suggests that recurrent cardiac myxomas form a subgroup of cardiac myxomas with a highly intrinsic aggressiveness, as implied by their greater interleukin-6 production despite their smaller size. Further studies are needed to confirm these results.

  14. The Role of Interleukin-6 in Cases of Cardiac Myxoma: Clinical Features, Immunologic Abnormalities, and a Possible Role in Recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza, Cesar Emilio; Rosado, Manuel Francisco; Bernal, Leon

    2001-01-01

    We performed this prospective study to evaluate the correlation of interleukin-6 serum levels with preoperative constitutional symptoms and immunologic abnormalities, and the possible role played by this cytokine in tumor recurrence. Eight patients with atrial myxoma were evaluated at our institution from July 1993 to November 1998. We measured their interleukin-6 serum levels by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method preoperatively and 1 and 6 months after surgery. Two of the cases involved recurrent tumor; 1 patient had undergone his 1st surgery at a different institution and died during the 2nd procedure, so his data were incomplete. Preoperatively, the whole group of patients had elevated interleukin-6 serum levels. Although patients with a 1st occurrence of tumor demonstrated a positive correlation between interleukin-6 serum level and tumor size, the 2 patients with recurrent tumors appeared to have higher interleukin-6 levels regardless of tumor size. Once the tumor was surgically removed, interleukin-6 levels returned to normal values, and this was associated with regression of clinical manifestations and immunologic features. According to our study, the overproduction of interleukin-6 by cardiac myxomas is responsible for the constitutional symptoms and immunologic abnormalities observed in patients with such tumors and might also play a role as a marker of recurrence. This study also suggests that recurrent cardiac myxomas form a subgroup of cardiac myxomas with a highly intrinsic aggressiveness, as implied by their greater interleukin-6 production despite their smaller size. Further studies are needed to confirm these results. PMID:11330738

  15. Comparison of clinical features of left-sided infective endocarditis involving previously normal versus previously abnormal valves.

    PubMed

    Olmos, Carmen; Vilacosta, Isidre; Fernández, Cristina; Sarriá, Cristina; López, Javier; Del Trigo, María; Ferrera, Carlos; Vivas, David; Maroto, Luis; Hernández, Miguel; Rodríguez, Enrique; San Román, José Alberto

    2014-07-15

    Native valve infective endocarditis (IE) in patients with normal valves has increased in the last decades. Whether patients with normal valves present a similar prognosis to those with pathologic valves is unresolved. Our aim is to describe epidemiologic and clinical differences between patients with left-sided IE and normal valves and those with native pathologic valves. We analyzed 945 consecutive episodes of IE, 435 of which involved left-sided nonprosthetic IE. They were classified into 2 groups: episodes in normal valves (normal group, n=173) and episodes in pathologic valves (abnormal group, n=262). Patients in the normal group were younger, Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus bovis were more frequently isolated, and vegetations were more frequently found. Heart failure, septic shock, and the need for surgery or death were more common. Multivariate analysis identified the following as factors independently associated with normal valve IE: age<65 years, S bovis, S aureus, heart failure, and vegetation detection. Factors independently associated with in-hospital events included S aureus, periannular complications, heart failure, and septic shock development. In conclusion, compared with patients with abnormal valve IE, patients with IE on normal valves were younger, had a more virulent microbiological profile, developed heart failure and septic shock more frequently, needed more surgical procedures, and had worse prognosis.

  16. Improvement in clinical signs and cellular immunity of dogs with visceral leishmaniasis using the immunomodulator P-MAPA.

    PubMed

    Santiago, Maria Emília B; Neto, Luiz Silveira; Alexandre, Eduardo Costa; Munari, Danísio Prado; Andrade, Mariana Macedo C; Somenzari, Marcos Arruda; Ciarlini, Paulo César; de Lima, V M F

    2013-09-01

    This study investigated the immunotherapeutic potential of the protein aggregate magnesium-ammonium phospholinoleate-palmitoleate anhydride immuno-modulator (P-MAPA) on canine visceral leishmaniasis. Twenty mongrel dogs presenting clinical symptoms compatible with leishmaniasis and diagnosis confirmed by the detection of anti-leishmania antibodies were studied. Ten dogs received 15 doses of the immunomodulator (2.0 mg/kg) intramuscularly, and 10 received saline as a placebo. Skin and peripheral blood samples were collected following administration of the immunomodulator. The groups were followed to observe for clinical signals of remission; parasite load in the skin biopsies using real-time PCR, the cytokines IL-2, IL-10 and IFN-γ in the supernatant of peripheral blood mononuclear cells stimulated in vitro with either total promastigote antigen or phytohemagglutinin measured by capture ELISA, and changes in CD4⁺ and CD8⁺ T cell subpopulations evaluated by flow cytometry. Comparison between the groups showed that treatment with the immunomodulator promoted improvement in clinical signs and a significant reduction in parasite load in the skin. In peripheral blood mononuclear cell cultures, supernatants showed a decrease in IL-10 levels and an increase in IL-2 and IFN-γ. An increase in CD8⁺ T cells was observed in peripheral blood. In addition, the in vitro leishmanicidal action of P-MAPA was investigated using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) and no leishmanicidal activity was detected. These findings suggest that P-MAPA has potential as an immunotherapeutic drug in canine visceral leishmaniasis, since it assists in reestablishing partial immunocompetence of infected dogs.

  17. Signes Iconiques, Signes Linguistiques (Iconic Signs, Linguistic Signs)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Besse, Henri

    1974-01-01

    This article discusses the audiovisual image as sign; the classification of signs according to two different semiologies, and two different semantic theories; and the relation to different pedagogical approaches. (Text is in French.) (AM)

  18. Do preclinical findings of methamphetamine-induced motor abnormalities translate to an observable clinical phenotype?

    PubMed

    Caligiuri, Michael P; Buitenhuys, Casey

    2005-12-01

    This review summarizes the preclinical literature of the effects of methamphetamine (MA) on subcortical dopaminergic and GABAergic mechanisms underlying motor behavior with the goal of elucidating the clinical presentation of human MA-induced movement disorders. Acute and chronic MA exposure in laboratory animal can lead to a variety of motor dysfunctions including increased locomotor activity, stereotypies, diminished or enhanced response times, and parkinsonian-like features. With the exception of psychomotor impairment and hyperkinesia, MA-induced movement disorders are not well documented in humans. This review attempts to draw parallels between the animal and human changes in basal ganglia neurochemistry associated with MA exposure and offers explanations for why a parkinsonian phenotype is not apparent among individuals who use and abuse MA. Significant differences in the expression of neurotoxicity and presence of multiple environmental and pharmacologic confounds may account for the lack of a parkinsonian phenotype in humans despite evidence of altered dopamine function.

  19. Cystoisospora canis Nemeséri, 1959 (syn. Isospora canis), infections in dogs: clinical signs, pathogenesis, and reproducible clinical disease in beagle dogs fed oocysts.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Sheila M; Zajac, Anne M; Charles, Sam; Duncan, Robert B; Lindsay, David S

    2007-04-01

    Canine intestinal coccidiosis is a cause of diarrhea in young dogs and dogs that are immunocompromised. Reports in the literature indicate that experimental reproduction of clinical coccidiosis with Cystoisospora canis (syn. Isospora canis) is difficult, and few studies have been done with C. canis. Experimental oral infections were attempted in 22, 6- to 8-wk-old female beagles with 5 x 10(4) (n = 2) or 1 x 10(5) (n = 20) sporulated C. canis oocysts. Diarrhea was observed in all inoculated dogs. Diarrhea began 2-3 days before oocyst excretion. Five of the 22 dogs were given an anticoccidial (sulfadimethoxine) because of their clinical signs. The mean prepatent period was 9.8 days (range, 9-11 days, n = 22 dogs), and the patent period was 8.9 days (range, 7-18 days, n = 20 dogs). Two dogs exhibiting clinical coccidiosis were examined at necropsy 10 days after infection. Developmental stages of C. canis were present in cells in the lamina propria throughout the entire small intestine in both dogs. Microscopic lesions observed in both of these dogs were villous atrophy, dilation of lacteals, and hyperplasia of lymph nodes in Peyer's patches. Results of bacterial and viral examinations of these 2 dogs were negative, indicating that intestinal coccidiosis was the cause of the diarrhea. Our study indicates that C. canis can be a primary cause of diarrhea in young dogs.

  20. Persistence of clinical signs associated with rotavirus following an outbreak of porcine epidemic diarrhea (PED) on a farrow-to-grow swine operation in southwestern Ontario

    PubMed Central

    Tenbergen, Ryan; O’Sullivan, Terri; Poljak, Zvonimir; DeLay, Josepha; Charbonneau, George

    2016-01-01

    Clinical signs attributed to porcine epidemic diarrhea (PED) persisted for several months in a southwestern Ontario farm following an outbreak of PED. Extensive testing revealed rotavirus infection and absence of PED in nursing and nursery pigs, highlighting the importance of repeated diagnostic testing following a disease outbreak. PMID:27247460

  1. Clinical and biochemical characteristics of acromegalic patients with different abnormalities in glucose metabolism.

    PubMed

    Espinosa-de-los-Monteros, Ana Laura; González, Baldomero; Vargas, Guadalupe; Sosa, Ernesto; Mercado, Moisés

    2011-09-01

    To determine the prevalence of diabetes, glucose intolerance and impaired fasting glucose in Mexican patients with acromegaly and establish associations with clinical, anthropometric and biochemical variables. 257 patients with acromegaly were evaluated by a 75 g-oral glucose tolerance test with measurements of both GH and glucose (0, 30, 60, 90 120 min) as well as baseline IGF-1. Normal glucose tolerance (NGT), impaired fasting glucose (IFG), impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and diabetes (DM) were defined based on the 2003 ADA criteria. NGT, IFG, IGT and DM were found in 27.6, 8.9, 31.6 and 31.9% of the subjects, respectively; 42 of the DM patients were unaware of the diagnosis. Patients with diabetes were older than subjects in the other 3 categories (P = 0.001), and the proportion of women was significantly higher in the DM (74%) and IGT (68%) groups than in the NGT group (52%) (P = 0.004). Odds ratio for the development of DM was 3.29 (95% CI 3.28-3.3). GH and IGF-1 levels were comparable among the different groups. In a multivariable analysis DM was significantly associated with age, presence of a macroadenoma, disease duration and a basal GH > 30 μg/dl. DM and probably IGT are more prevalent in acromegaly than in the general Mexican population. DM was more frequent in females of all ages, in subjects with severely elevated GH concentrations, in patients with macroadenomas, and long-standing disease duration. The odds ratio for DM in our subjects with acromegaly is more than 3 times higher than in the general population.

  2. Prospective study on the incidence and progression of clinical signs in naïve dogs naturally infected by Leishmania infantum.

    PubMed

    Foglia Manzillo, Valentina; Di Muccio, Trentina; Cappiello, Sivia; Scalone, Aldo; Paparcone, Rosa; Fiorentino, Eleonora; Gizzarelli, Manuela; Gramiccia, Marina; Gradoni, Luigi; Oliva, Gaetano

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of clinical and clinicopathological signs associated with the progression of infection was evaluated prospectively in 329 naïve young dogs exposed to Leishmania infantum transmission and examined periodically during 22 months (M). The dogs were part of Leishmania vaccine investigations performed under natural conditions. Vaccinated groups were considered in the evaluation when the vaccine resulted non-protective and the appearance and progression of signs did not differ statistically from controls at each time point, otherwise only control groups were included. 115 beagles were part of 3 studies (A to C) performed in the same kennel; 214 owned dogs (29 breeds, 2.3% beagles) were included in a study (D) performed in 45 endemic sites. At M22 the prevalence of any Leishmania infection stage classified as subpatent, active asymptomatic, or symptomatic was 59.8% in studies A-C and 29.2% in study D. Despite different breed composition and infection incidence, the relative proportion of active infections and the progression and type of clinical and clinicopathological signs have been similar in both study sets. All asymptomatic active infections recorded have invariably progressed to full-blown disease, resulting in 56 sick dogs at M22. In these dogs, lymph nodes enlargement and weight loss--recorded from M12--were the most common signs. Cutaneous signs were seen late (M18) and less frequently. Ocular signs appeared even later, being sporadically recorded at M22. Most clinicopathological alterations became evident from M12, although a few cases of thrombocytopenia or mild non-regenerative anemia were already observed at M6. Albumin/globulin inversions were recorded from M12 and urea/creatinine increase appeared mostly from M18. Altogether our findings indicate that any susceptible young dogs naturally infected by L. infantum present a common pattern of progression of signs during 2 years post infection, providing clues for medical and epidemiological

  3. Signs and Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ban For Clinicians Clinical Recognition Specimen Collection Treatment Smallpox Vaccine Guidance Infection Control: Hospital Infection Control: Home ... Mouth Infection) Poxvirus and Rabies Branch Travelers’ Health: Smallpox & Other Orthopoxvirus-Associated Infections Poxvirus Signs and Symptoms ...

  4. Well-differentiated systemic mastocytosis showed excellent clinical response to imatinib in the absence of known molecular genetic abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Lanshan; Wang, Sa A.; Konoplev, Sergej; Bueso-Ramos, Carlos E.; Thakral, Beenu; Miranda, Roberto N.; Jabbour, Elias; Medeiros, L. Jeffrey; Kanagal-Shamanna, Rashmi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Well-differentiated systemic mastocytosis (WDSM) is a rare, recently recognized provisional subvariant of systemic mastocytosis (SM). We report a case of WDSM that showed excellent clinical and cutaneous response to imatinib in the absence of known molecular genetic abnormalities. Clinical Findings/Diagnoses: We present a 24-year-old woman with childhood onset of skin manifestations that progressed to mediator-related systemic events, and a gastrointestinal tract mastocytoma. A subsequent bone marrow examination showed WDSM. Treatment with imatinib resulted in complete resolution of cutaneous lesions and systemic symptoms, which relapsed with the discontinuation of the drug. Targeted next-generation sequencing-based mutation analysis did not demonstrate any mutations in the coding regions of KIT or other genes commonly associated with myeloid neoplasms. Conclusions: The diagnosis of WDSM is challenging in the absence of spindle-shaped mast cells, CD2 or CD25 expression, and KIT D816 mutation. This case illustrated the need for recognizing this unique variant of SM for diagnostic and therapeutic implications. PMID:27741105

  5. Clinical significance of mesenteric panniculitis-like abnormalities on abdominal computerized tomography in patients with malignant neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Ehrenpreis, Eli D; Roginsky, Grigory; Gore, Richard M

    2016-01-01

    AIM To clarify the association of malignancy with mesenteric panniculitis-like changes on computed tomography (CT). METHODS All abdominal CT scans performed at NorthShore University HealthSystem showing mesenteric panniculitis from January 2005 to August 2010 were identified in the Radnet (RadNet Corporation, Los Angeles, CA) database. Patients with a new or known diagnosis of a malignancy were included for this analysis. Longitudinal clinical histories were obtained from electronic medical records. RESULTS In total, 147794 abdominal CT scans were performed during the study period. Three hundred and fifty-nine patients had mesenteric panniculitis (MP)-like abnormalities on their abdominal CT. Of these patients, 81 patients (22.6%) had a known history of cancer at the time of their CT scan. Nineteen (5.3%) had a new diagnosis of cancer in concurrence with their CT, but the majority of these (14/19, 74%) were undergoing CT as part of a malignancy evaluation. Lymphomas were the most common cancers associated with MP-like findings on CT (36 cases, 36%), with follicular lymphoma being the most frequent subtype (17/36). A variety of solid tumors, most commonly prostate (7) and renal cell cancers (6) also were seen. CT follow up was obtained in 56 patients. Findings in the mesentery were unchanged in 45 (80%), worsened in 6 (11%), and improved in 5 patients (9%). Positron emission tomography (PET) scans performed in 44 patients only showed a positive uptake in the mesenteric mass in 2 patients (5%). CONCLUSION A new diagnosis of cancer is uncommon in patients with CT findings suggestive of MP. MP-like mesenteric abnormalities on CT generally remain stable in patients with associated malignancies. PET scanning is not recommended in the evaluation of patients with mesenteric panniculitis-like findings on CT. PMID:28082812

  6. Early permanent disappearance of abnormal muscle response during microvascular decompression for hemifacial spasm: a retrospective clinical study.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Chengrong; Xu, Wu; Dai, Yuxiang; Lu, Tianyu; Jin, Wei; Liang, Weibang

    2016-12-15

    The objective of this study is to explore the cause of early abnormal muscle response (AMR) disappearance during microvascular decompression for hemifacial spasm and the clinical outcomes of these patients. Three hundred seventy-two patients received microvascular decompression (MVD) under intraoperative electrophysiological monitoring in Nanjing Drum Tower Hospital in 2014; the characteristic AMR of HFS was observed in 359 patients during the operation. And the 359 patients were divided into two groups based on whether AMR had remained before the beginning of the decompression procedure for offending vessels. Thirty-three patients who showed a permanent disappearance of AMR before the beginning of decompression were regarded as group I. Dural opening and the succeeding CSF drainage produced a permanent disappearance of AMR in 13. During the dissection of lateral cerebellomedullary cistern, a permanent disappearance of AMR was found in 20 patients. Thirty-two patients were cured immediately; delayed resolution (7 days after surgery) was found in one patient. No complications were observed and no recurrence was found during the follow-up period in the 33 patients. In the other 326 patients (group II), AMR disappeared temporarily before the beginning of the decompression procedure for offending vessels in 42 patients. After decompression, AMR disappeared completely in 305 patients. Two hundred sixty-seven patients were cured immediately and 57 patients got a delayed resolution (2 days to 45 weeks after surgery). The two left did not get a complete abolition of spasm. Three cases of hearing loss, one hoarseness, and nine delayed facial paralysis were observed. The reason of early abnormal muscle response disappearance may be that the degree of neurovascular compression was not serious; these patients were more likely to get an immediate cure. Continuous intraoperative electrophysiological monitoring of AMR is necessary.

  7. The Chronic Encephalopathy of Parry Romberg Syndrome and En Coupe De Sabre with a 31-Year-History in a West Indian Woman: Clinical, Immunologic and Neuroimaging Abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Seegobin, Karan; Abdool, Kamille; Ramcharan, Kanterpersad; Dyaanand, Haramnauth; Rampersad, Fidel

    2016-01-01

    We describe a case of Parry Romberg syndrome/en coupe de sabre in a woman whose disease started as seizures at age 8 but was diagnosed at the age 39. During these 31 years she got married, completed a first degree at university, had two successful pregnancies and has been gainfully employed. The features of generalized tonic-clonic seizures, autoimmune abnormalities, ocular abnormalities, morphea en coup de sabre and brain imaging abnormalities were present. Areas of parietal lobe cerebral calcification were encountered on the computed tomographic scan and bilateral periventricular white matter changes on the magnetic resonance imaging with frontal, temporal and parietal lobe brain atrophy ipsilateral to the facial hemiatrophy. Clinical, immunologic and neuroradiological abnormalities are discussed. In some cases, this illness can run a benign and stable course. PMID:27761227

  8. Preconditioning with Triiodothyronine Improves the Clinical Signs and Acute Tubular Necrosis Induced by Ischemia/Reperfusion in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ferreyra, Carla; Vargas, Félix; Rodríguez-Gómez, Isabel; Pérez-Abud, Rocío; O'Valle, Francisco; Osuna, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Background Renal ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury is manifested by acute renal failure (ARF) and acute tubular necrosis (ATN). The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of preconditioning with 3, 3, 5 triiodothyronine (T3) to prevent I/R renal injury. Methodology/Principal Findings The rats were divided into four groups: sham-operated, placebo-treated (SO-P), sham-operated T3- treated (SO- T3), I/R-injured placebo-treated (IR-P), and I/R-injured T3-treated (IR- T3) groups. At 24 h before ischemia, the animals received a single dose of T3 (100 μg/kg). Renal function and plasma, urinary, and tissue variables were studied at 4, 24, and 48 h of reperfusion, including biochemical, oxidative stress, and inflammation variables, PARP-1 immunohistochemical expression, and ATN morphology. In comparison to the SO groups, the IR-P groups had higher plasma urea and creatinine levels and greater proteinuria (at all reperfusion times) and also showed: increased oxidative stress-related plasma, urinary, and tissue variables; higher plasma levels of IL6 (proinflammatory cytokine); increased glomerular and tubular nuclear PARP-1 expression; and a greater degree of ATN. The IR-T3 group showed a marked reduction in all of these variables, especially at 48 h of reperfusion. No significant differences were observed between SO-P and SO-T3 groups. Conclusions This study demonstrates that preconditioning rats with a single dose of T3 improves the clinical signs and ATN of renal I/R injury. These beneficial effects are accompanied by reductions in oxidative stress, inflammation, and renal PARP-1 expression, indicating that this sequence of factors plays an important role in the ATN induced by I/R injury. PMID:24086411

  9. Clinicopathological findings in dogs with distemper encephalomyelitis presented without characteristic signs of the disease.

    PubMed

    Amude, A M; Alfieri, A A; Alfieri, A F

    2007-06-01

    The clinical diagnosis of distemper is difficult in dogs presented with nervous deficits in the absence of extraneural signs and myoclonus. The aim of this study is to verify how the clinicopathological findings may suggest distemper encephalomyelitis in such cases. We prospectively investigated 20 necropsied dogs presented with neurological signs without those characteristic signs of distemper at the time of hospital admission. Eight out of 20 dogs were diagnosed with distemper encephalomyelitis at post mortem by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and histological examination. Cerebellar and/or vestibular signs progressing to tetraparesis/plegia were frequent neurological signs. Abnormalities in hematologic findings were non-specific, nevertheless the cerebrospinal fluid evaluation could suggest canine distemper virus (CDV) infection by a lymphocytic pleocytosis. At post mortem chronic CDV encephalomyelitis was predominant. Our clinical results, as well as the predominance of chronic encephalomyelitis, differ from other studies about CDV encephalomyelitis with naturally infected dogs presenting extraneural signs and myoclonus.

  10. Preliminary findings of cortical thickness abnormalities in blast injured service members and their relationship to clinical findings

    PubMed Central

    York, G. E.; Reid, M. W.; Cooper, D. B.; Jones, L.; Robin, D. A.; Kennedy, J. E.; Lewis, J.

    2014-01-01

    Though cortical abnormalities have been demonstrated in moderate and severe traumatic brain injured (TBI) patients, there have been no studies examining cortical changes following blast related mild TBI (mTBI). The purpose of this study was to determine the effects and functional relevance of blast mTBI on cortical thickness in a small cohort of carefully screened blast injured US Service Members (SM). Twelve SM with mTBI acquired through blast injury were compared to 11 demographically matched control SM without TBI. Both mTBI and control participants were active duty and had completed a combat deployment. Subjects underwent MRI examination and the T1 weighted anatomic images were processed using the FreeSurfer suite of tools. Cortical thickness maps were compared between groups and examined for relationships with time since injury (TSI). Utilizing a large database of functional imaging results (BrainMap), significant regions of interest (ROI) were used to determine the behavioral profiles most consistently associated with the specific ROI. In addition, clinical variables were examined as part of post-hoc analysis of functional relevance. Group comparisons controlling for age demonstrated several significant clusters of cortical thinning for the blast injured SM. After multiple comparisons correction (False Discovery Rate (FDR)), two left hemisphere clusters remained significant (left superior temporal (STG) and frontal (SFG) gyri). No clusters were significantly correlated with TSI after FDR correction. Behavioral analysis for the STG and SFG clusters demonstrated three significant behavioral/cognitive sub-domains, each associated with audition and language. Blast injured SMs demonstrated distinct areas of cortical thinning in the STG and SFG. These areas have been previously shown to be associated with audition and language. Post-hoc analyses of clinical records demonstrated significant abnormal audiology reports for the blast injured SM suggesting that the

  11. Pilot Study to Evaluate the Effect of Topical Dimethicone on Clinical Signs and Skin Barrier Function in Dogs with Naturally Occurring Atopic Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Pellicoro, C.; Marsella, R.; Ahrens, K.

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of a skin protectant solution (dimethicone 2%) on clinical signs and skin barrier function in canine atopic dermatitis (AD). Eighteen dogs with AD were randomly divided into two groups, one received dimethicone and the other received the vehicle (cyclomethicone) on selected areas (pinnae, groin, and axillae) daily for 4 weeks. Owners and investigators were blinded regarding group allocation. Clinical efficacy was evaluated using a scoring system and skin barrier by measuring the transepidermal water loss. Twelve dogs completed the study (50% drop rate in the vehicle and 20% in the dimethicone). For clinical signs, analysis of variance showed an effect of time (P < 0.005; day 0 > day 28) and region (axillae < groin < pinnae) but no effect of group or group × time interaction. For transepidermal water loss, analysis of variance showed only a main effect of region (axillae > pinnae > groin). Pearson found no correlation between transepidermal water loss and clinical scores. In this pilot study dimethicone had no significant effect on clinical signs and transepidermal water loss in canine atopic dermatitis. PMID:23710417

  12. Pilot study to evaluate the effect of topical dimethicone on clinical signs and skin barrier function in dogs with naturally occurring atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Pellicoro, C; Marsella, R; Ahrens, K

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of a skin protectant solution (dimethicone 2%) on clinical signs and skin barrier function in canine atopic dermatitis (AD). Eighteen dogs with AD were randomly divided into two groups, one received dimethicone and the other received the vehicle (cyclomethicone) on selected areas (pinnae, groin, and axillae) daily for 4 weeks. Owners and investigators were blinded regarding group allocation. Clinical efficacy was evaluated using a scoring system and skin barrier by measuring the transepidermal water loss. Twelve dogs completed the study (50% drop rate in the vehicle and 20% in the dimethicone). For clinical signs, analysis of variance showed an effect of time (P < 0.005; day 0 > day 28) and region (axillae < groin < pinnae) but no effect of group or group × time interaction. For transepidermal water loss, analysis of variance showed only a main effect of region (axillae > pinnae > groin). Pearson found no correlation between transepidermal water loss and clinical scores. In this pilot study dimethicone had no significant effect on clinical signs and transepidermal water loss in canine atopic dermatitis.

  13. Pseudohypoparathyroidism Type 1A-Subclinical Hypothyroidism and Rapid Weight Gain as Early Clinical Signs: A Clinical Review of 10 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Kayemba-Kay’s, Simon; Tripon, Cedric; Heron, Anne; Hindmarsh, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical signs and symptoms that would help clinicians to consider pseudohypoparathyroidism (PHP) type 1A as a diagnosis in a child. Methods: A retrospective review of the medical records of children diagnosed by erythrocyte Gsα activity and/or GNAS1 gene study and followed-up for PHP type 1A. Clinical and biochemical parameters along with epidemiological data were extracted and analyzed. Weight gain during infancy and early childhood was calculated as change in weight standard deviation score (SDS), using the French growth reference values. An upward gain in weight ≥0.67 SDS during these periods was considered indicative of overweight and/or obesity. Results: Ten cases of PHP type 1A were identified (mean age 41.1 months, range from 4 to 156 months). In children aged ≤2 years, the commonest clinical features were round lunar face, obesity (70%), and subcutaneous ossifications (60%). In older children, brachydactyly was present in 60% of cases. Seizures occurred in older children (3 cases). Short stature was common at all ages. Subclinical hypothyroidism was present in 70%, increased parathormone (PTH) in 83%, and hyperphosphatemia in 50%. Only one case presented with hypocalcemia. Erythrocyte Gsα activity tested in seven children was reduced; GNAS1 gene testing was performed in 9 children. Maternal transmission was the most common (six patients). In three other cases, the mutations were de novo, c.585delGACT in exon 8 (case 2) and c.344C>TP115L in exon 5 (cases 6&7). Conclusion: Based on our results, PHP type 1A should be considered in toddlers presenting with round face, rapid weight gain, subcutaneous ossifications, and subclinical hypothyroidism. In older children, moderate mental retardation, brachydactyly, afebrile seizures, short stature, and thyroid-stimulating hormone resistance are the most suggestive features. PMID:27467896

  14. Clinical, electrocardiographic and echocardiographic abnormalities in Latin American migrants with newly diagnosed Chagas disease 2005-2009, Barcelona, Spain.

    PubMed

    Valerio, L; Roure, S; Sabria, M; Balanzo, X; Valles, X; Seres, L

    2011-09-22

    Following Latin American migration, Chagas disease has inevitably appeared in non-endemic countries in Europe and elsewhere. New policies are necessary to prevent transmission in those countries but the long, often undetected chronic period of the early stages of the disease also renders epidemiological studies important. The main objective of our study was to determine the presence of clinical, electrocardiogram (ECG) and echocardiographic abnormalities in a population of Latin American migrants infected with Trypanosoma cruzi at the moment of diagnosis. We performed a hospital-based observational study of 100 adult patients with newly diagnosed Chagas infection between January 2005 and December 2009. Thirty-seven patients were classified within the Brazilian Consensus on Chagas cardiomyopathy early cardiac stages (A or B1) and 49 presented pathological findings (stage B2) according to the Panamerican Health Organization Classification. Overall, 49 patients showed ECG and/or echocardiographic alterations. The presence of ECG and ecocardiographic alterations were significantly associated (p=0.038). The most frequent ECG and echocardiographic findings were right bundle branch block (12 cases) and impaired left ventricular wall relaxation (24 cases), respectively. In conclusion, ECG and echocardiographic alterations coherent with Chagas cardiomyopathy were found in a large proportion of newly diagnosed Latin American migrants infected with T. cruzi. In the mid-term, Chagas disease might become an important cause of chronic cadiomyopathy in our attendance area.

  15. Alveolar abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001093.htm Alveolar abnormalities To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Alveolar abnormalities are changes in the tiny air sacs in ...

  16. Nail abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    Beau's lines; Fingernail abnormalities; Spoon nails; Onycholysis; Leukonychia; Koilonychia; Brittle nails ... 2012:chap 71. Zaiac MN, Walker A. Nail abnormalities associated with systemic pathologies. Clin Dermatol . 2013;31: ...

  17. Distribution of cow-calf producers' beliefs about reporting cattle with clinical signs of foot-and-mouth disease to a veterinarian before or during a hypothetical outbreak.

    PubMed

    Delgado, Amy H; Norby, Bo; Scott, H Morgan; Dean, Wesley; McIntosh, W Alex; Bush, Eric

    2014-12-01

    Understanding the prevalence of cattle producers' beliefs regarding disease reporting can help officials improve surveillance programs with passive data collection. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in Texas in 2008 and 2009 to determine beliefs about reporting cattle with clinical signs consistent with foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) either prior to (scenario 1) or during an on-going outbreak of FMD (scenario 2). Two questionnaires were developed and distributed to Texas cow-calf producers in order to evaluate their behavioral, control, and normative beliefs related to disease reporting. The context for each behavior was provided through the use of scenarios, and belief strength was measured using a 7-point Likert-like scale. Beliefs were compared across scenarios and demographic categories, and the effect of scenario on belief examined using ordinal logistic regression. Respondents agreed that reporting clinically suspect cases would have positive economic and emotional consequences; however, when an outbreak was known to be present, producers were less likely to agree with many of the positive outcomes of reporting. Important barriers to disease reporting indicated by producers included a lack of knowledge related to clinical signs of highly contagious cattle diseases and which cattle are at risk of contracting FMD. In general, beliefs about barriers to reporting did not differ based on scenario. Veterinarians and regulatory authorities were the groups perceived to most strongly expect disease reporting, regardless of the scenario. Risk education for producers related to clinical signs of reportable livestock diseases, post-reporting procedures, and an understanding of FMD introduction and spread may improve the reporting of cattle with clinical signs consistent with FMD.

  18. Do Subjects at Clinical High Risk for Psychosis Differ from those with a Genetic High Risk? – A Systematic Review of Structural and Functional Brain Abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Smieskova, R; Marmy, J; Schmidt, A; Bendfeldt, K; Riecher-Rössler, A; Walter, M; Lang, UE; Borgwardt, S

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Pre-psychotic and early psychotic characteristics are investigated in the high-risk (HR) populations for psychosis. There are two different approaches based either on hereditary factors (genetic high risk, G-HR) or on the clinically manifested symptoms (clinical high risk, C-HR). Common features are an increased risk for development of psychosis and similar cognitive as well as structural and functional brain abnormalities. Methods: We reviewed the existing literature on longitudinal structural, and on functional imaging studies, which included G-HR and/or C-HR individuals for psychosis, healthy controls (HC) and/or first episode of psychosis (FEP) or schizophrenia patients (SCZ). Results: With respect to structural brain abnormalities, vulnerability to psychosis was associated with deficits in frontal, temporal, and cingulate regions in HR, with additional insular and caudate deficits in C-HR population. Furthermore, C-HR had progressive prefrontal deficits related to the transition to psychosis. With respect to functional brain abnormalities, vulnerability to psychosis was associated with prefrontal, cingulate and middle temporal abnormalities in HR, with additional parietal, superior temporal, and insular abnormalities in C-HR population. Transition-to-psychosis related differences emphasized prefrontal, hippocampal and striatal components, more often detectable in C-HR population. Multimodal studies directly associated psychotic symptoms displayed in altered prefrontal and hippocampal activations with striatal dopamine and thalamic glutamate functions. Conclusion: There is an evidence for similar structural and functional brain abnormalities within the whole HR population, with more pronounced deficits in the C-HR population. The most consistent evidence for abnormality in the prefrontal cortex reported in structural, functional and multimodal studies of HR population may underlie the complexity of higher cognitive functions that are impaired

  19. Dropped head as an unusual presenting sign of myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    D'Amelio, M; Di Benedetto, N; Ragonese, P; Daniele, O; Brighina, F; Fierro, B; Savettieri, G

    2007-04-01

    Prominent or isolated weakness of cervical extensor muscles is a relatively rare clinical sign. Commonly, this is known as "dropped-head syndrome". This abnormal flexion of the head may occur in a variety of neuromuscular diseases and in a few non-neurological disorders as well. The case we describe concerns a 61-year-old woman with dropped-head syndrome as the unique complaint of myasthenia gravis.

  20. Evaluation of the effect of hand hygiene reminder signs on the use of antimicrobial hand gel in a clinical skills center.

    PubMed

    Wearn, Andy; Bhoopatkar, Harsh; Nakatsuji, Miriam

    2015-01-01

    Hand hygiene is a critical element of patient care, which needs to be learned and reinforced to become an autonomous behavior. Previous studies have explored aspects of hand hygiene behavior in the clinical workplace, but not in controlled learning environments with health professional students. Development of good hand hygiene behavior requires a multi-faceted approach, including education, reinforcement, feedback and audit. Our study aimed to identify the effect of unannounced hand hygiene reminder signs on the use of antimicrobial hand gel in a clinical skills center. Year 2 MBChB students received practical learning regarding hand hygiene in their clinical skills sessions. Baseline hand gel use was measured using before and after weighing of the bottles. An A5 sign was created to remind the students to hand cleanse and was used as an unannounced intervention. In semester 2 (2012), the student groups were randomly allocated as intervention (signs) or control (no signs). Hand gel use at all sessions was measured. Data were compared between groups and over time. In total, 237 students attended the skills sessions twice during the study. Hand gel use was not significantly different between the two study arms. Overall use was low, typically 1-2 hand gel pumps per student per session. In addition, hand gel use fell over time. A visual reminder to cleanse hands did not appear to have any effect on behavior. These findings may have implications for their value in a clinical setting. Low overall use of hand gel may be context-dependent. Students are in a simulated environment and examine 'healthy' peers or actors. There may have been inconsistent tutor role-modeling or problems with the educational approach to the skill. Analysis at the level of the group, and not the individual, may have also limited our study.

  1. Heightened pain sensitivity in individuals with signs and symptoms of carpal tunnel syndrome and the relationship to clinical outcomes following a manual therapy intervention.

    PubMed

    Bialosky, Joel E; Bishop, Mark D; Robinson, Michael E; Price, Donald D; George, Steven Z

    2011-12-01

    Neurophysiological responses related to lessening of pain sensitivity are a suggested mechanism of manual therapy. Prior studies have observed generalized lower pain thresholds associated with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) in comparison to healthy controls. The present study sought to determine whether similar findings were present in suprathreshold measures and measures specific to central integration of pain (temporal summation and after sensations). Additionally, we wished to determine whether measures of pain sensitivity were related to clinical outcomes in participants with signs and symptoms of CTS receiving a manual therapy intervention. Individuals with signs and symptoms of CTS reported greater pain sensitivity to suprathreshold measures of mechanical pain, temporal summation, and after sensation in comparison to healthy controls. Immediate lessening of mechanical pain sensitivity and after sensations in response to a manual therapy intervention and 3-week attenuation of temporal summation following a 3-week course of manual therapy were associated with 3-week changes in clinical pain intensity in participants with signs and symptoms of CTS. These findings suggest heightened pain sensitivity across several parameters may be associated with CTS. Furthermore, changes in mechanical pain, after sensation, and temporal summation may be related to improvements in clinical outcomes.

  2. Vital Signs

    MedlinePlus

    ... and your weight. Respiratory rate, which measures your breathing. Mild breathing changes can be from causes such as a ... nose or hard exercise. But slow or fast breathing can also be a sign of a serious ...

  3. Cytogenetic and Clinical Features in Children Suspected With Congenital Abnormalities in 1 Medical Center of Zhejiang Province From 2011 to 2014

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Shujiong; Sun, Liying; Tu, Miaoying; Zou, Chaochun; Wang, Xiumin

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This study aimed to investigate the detection rate of chromosome abnormalities in children suspected with congenital disorders in 1 single center, identify any differences according to different classification criteria, and try to enlighten the medical professionals what clinical features should be transferred for cytogenetic analysis. From January 1, 2011 to March 31, 2014, children who were suspected with chromosomal disorders were included. All the cytogenetic analyses were performed in the Medical Biology and Genetic Department Laboratory in Zhejiang DIAN Diagnostics. We evaluated the variants of clinical indications, and incidence and types of chromosomal abnormalities among groups. During the study period, 4129 samples were collected and analyzed. Among them, 769 children were detected with chromosome abnormalities, accounting for 18.62% of all referral cases. The ratio of sex-linked chromosomal abnormalities to autosomal ones was 1:3.2. The detection rates were 19.66% (365/1857) for boys and 17.78% (404/2272) for girls. Most of trisomy 21 were found before the age of 1 year old, while most of children with Turner syndrome were found after 6 years old. The group presenting with specific clinical stigmata had highest detection rate of 59.1%. We demonstrated the detection rates of chromosome abnormalities in children who were suspected with chromosomal disorders. Combined with previous report, we established a database of common chromosomal anomalies and the clinical features that could be useful for genetic counseling and remind the medical professionals what kind of patients should be transferred to genetic analysis. PMID:26496335

  4. Cytogenetic and Clinical Features in Children Suspected With Congenital Abnormalities in 1 Medical Center of Zhejiang Province From 2011 to 2014.

    PubMed

    Mao, Shujiong; Sun, Liying; Tu, Miaoying; Zou, Chaochun; Wang, Xiumin

    2015-10-01

    This study aimed to investigate the detection rate of chromosome abnormalities in children suspected with congenital disorders in 1 single center, identify any differences according to different classification criteria, and try to enlighten the medical professionals what clinical features should be transferred for cytogenetic analysis.From January 1, 2011 to March 31, 2014, children who were suspected with chromosomal disorders were included. All the cytogenetic analyses were performed in the Medical Biology and Genetic Department Laboratory in Zhejiang DIAN Diagnostics. We evaluated the variants of clinical indications, and incidence and types of chromosomal abnormalities among groups.During the study period, 4129 samples were collected and analyzed. Among them, 769 children were detected with chromosome abnormalities, accounting for 18.62% of all referral cases. The ratio of sex-linked chromosomal abnormalities to autosomal ones was 1:3.2. The detection rates were 19.66% (365/1857) for boys and 17.78% (404/2272) for girls. Most of trisomy 21 were found before the age of 1 year old, while most of children with Turner syndrome were found after 6 years old. The group presenting with specific clinical stigmata had highest detection rate of 59.1%.We demonstrated the detection rates of chromosome abnormalities in children who were suspected with chromosomal disorders. Combined with previous report, we established a database of common chromosomal anomalies and the clinical features that could be useful for genetic counseling and remind the medical professionals what kind of patients should be transferred to genetic analysis.

  5. Clinical, pathological, and molecular analyses of cardiovascular abnormalities in Costello syndrome: a Ras/MAPK pathway syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lin, Angela E; Alexander, Mark E; Colan, Steven D; Kerr, Bronwyn; Rauen, Katherine A; Noonan, Jacqueline; Baffa, Jeanne; Hopkins, Elizabeth; Sol-Church, Katia; Limongelli, Giuseppe; Digilio, Maria Christina; Marino, Bruno; Innes, A Micheil; Aoki, Yoko; Silberbach, Michael; Delrue, Marie-Ange; White, Susan M; Hamilton, Robert M; O'Connor, William; Grossfeld, Paul D; Smoot, Leslie B; Padera, Robert F; Gripp, Karen W

    2011-03-01

    Cardiovascular abnormalities are important features of Costello syndrome and other Ras/MAPK pathway syndromes ("RASopathies"). We conducted clinical, pathological and molecular analyses of 146 patients with an HRAS mutation including 61 enrolled in an ongoing longitudinal study and 85 from the literature. In our study, the most common (84%) HRAS mutation was p.G12S. A congenital heart defect (CHD) was present in 27 of 61 patients (44%), usually non-progressive valvar pulmonary stenosis. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), typically subaortic septal hypertrophy, was noted in 37 (61%), and 5 also had a CHD (14% of those with HCM). HCM was chronic or progressive in 14 (37%), stabilized in 10 (27%), and resolved in 5 (15%) patients with HCM; follow-up data was not available in 8 (22%). Atrial tachycardia occurred in 29 (48%). Valvar pulmonary stenosis rarely progressed and atrial septal defect was uncommon. Among those with HCM, the likelihood of progressing or remaining stable was similar (37%, 41% respectively). The observation of myocardial fiber disarray in 7 of 10 (70%) genotyped specimens with Costello syndrome is consistent with sarcomeric dysfunction. Multifocal atrial tachycardia may be distinctive for Costello syndrome. Potentially serious atrial tachycardia may present in the fetus, and may continue or worsen in about one-fourth of those with arrhythmia, but is generally self-limited in the remaining three-fourths of patients. Physicians should be aware of the potential for rapid development of severe HCM in infants with Costello syndrome, and the need for cardiovascular surveillance into adulthood as the natural history continues to be delineated.

  6. Isolated Cortical Vein Thrombosis - The Cord Sign

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Vijay K.; Teoh, Hock L

    2009-01-01

    Isolated cortical vein thrombosis is an uncommon condition and often difficult to diagnose, both clinically and radiologically. We report a case of a 38 years old man who presented with headache of new onset and clinical examination was unremarkable. The unenhanced brain CT did not reveal any abnormality. In view of unrelenting headache and partial seizures, we performed magnetic resonance imaging (with axial T1, T2 and gradient echo sequences, coronal FLAIR, diffusion weighted imaging as well as Gadolinium contrast-enhanced images) and magnetic resonance venography of the brain that revealed an isolated parietal cortical vein thrombosis with the rarely reported 'cord sign'. We report the clinical and radiological findings in our patient with isolated parietal cortical vein thrombosis. PMID:22470649

  7. Pilot study investigating the ability of an herbal composite to alleviate clinical signs of respiratory dysfunction in horses with recurrent airway obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, Wendy; Charch, Armen; Brewer, Dyanne; Clarke, Andrew F.

    2007-01-01

    Recurrent airway obstruction (RAO), known previously as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), is a debilitating respiratory condition that significantly contributes to lost training days and illness in racehorses. Herbs are becoming increasingly popular for the prophylaxis or treatment of the clinical signs of RAO despite a paucity of research on efficacy and safety. We evaluated the ability of an herbal composite containing garlic, white horehound, boneset, aniseed, fennel, licorice, thyme, and hyssop to reduce the clinical signs of RAO, hypothesizing that the product would safely reduce signs and would improve the inflammatory cell profile within the lungs. The composite was fed to 6 horses with symptomatic RAO for 21 d in a crossover manner. Ventigraphs were used to record respiratory rate and intrapleural pressure; the proportion of inflammatory cells in fluid aspirated from the trachea was determined. Blood biochemical and hematologic screening was conducted to identify possible adverse effects. Treatment with the composite did not result in statistically significant changes in any of the parameters evaluated. A trend to a decrease in respiratory rate (P = 0.1) and an increase in the proportion of macrophages (P = 0.1) was observed in the horses receiving the herbal composite compared with placebo. These data indicate a potential for the herbal composite to safely reduce the elevated respiratory rate in horses with RAO. Future research with a greater number of horses is warranted to further characterize the effect of this product on horses with RAO. PMID:17479778

  8. Influence of headache frequency on clinical signs and symptoms of TMD in subjects with temple headache and TMD pain

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Gary C.; John, Mike T.; Ohrbach, Richard; Nixdorf, Donald R.; Schiffman, Eric L.; Truelove, Edmond S.; List, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    The relationship of the frequency of temple headache to signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) was investigated in a subset of a larger convenience sample of community TMD cases. The study sample included: 86 painful TMD, non-headache subjects; 309 painful TMD subjects with varied frequency of temple headaches; and 149 subjects without painful TMD or headache for descriptive comparison. Painful TMD included Research Diagnostic Criteria (RDC) diagnoses of myofascial pain, TMJ arthralgia and TMJ osteoarthritis. Mild to moderate intensity temple headaches were classified by frequency using criteria based on the ICHD-II classification of TTH. Outcomes included TMD signs and symptoms (pain duration, pain intensity, number of painful masticatory sites on palpation, mandibular range of motion), PPTs and temple headache resulting from masticatory provocation tests. Trend analyses across the painful TMD groups showed a substantial trend for aggravation of all of the TMD signs and symptoms associated with increased frequency of the temple headaches. In addition, increased headache frequency showed significant trends associated with reduced PPTs and reported temple headache with masticatory provocation tests. In conclusion, these findings suggest that these headaches may be TMD-related, as well as a possible role for peripheral and central sensitization in TMD patients. PMID:21196079

  9. Clinical significance of exercise-induced left ventricular wall motion abnormality occurring at a low heart rate

    SciTech Connect

    Kimchi, A.; Rozanski, A.; Fletcher, C.; Maddahi, J.; Swan, H.J.; Berman, D.S.

    1987-10-01

    We studied the relationship between the heart rate at the time of onset of exercise-induced wall motion abnormality and the severity of coronary artery disease in 89 patients who underwent exercise equilibrium radionuclide ventriculography as part of their evaluation for coronary artery disease. Segmental wall motion was scored with a five-point system (3 = normal; -1 = dyskinesis); a decrease of one score defined the onset of wall motion abnormality. The onset of wall motion abnormality at less than or equal to 70% of maximal predicted heart rate had 100% predictive accuracy for coronary artery disease and higher sensitivity than the onset of ischemic ST segment depression at similar heart rate during exercise: 36% (25 of 69 patients with coronary disease) vs 19% (13 of 69 patients), p = 0.01. Wall motion abnormality occurring at less than or equal to 70% of maximal predicted heart rate was present in 49% of patients (23 of 47) with critical stenosis (greater than or equal to 90% luminal diameter narrowing), and in only 5% of patients (2 of 42) without such severe stenosis, p less than 0.001. The sensitivity of exercise-induced wall motion abnormality occurring at a low heart rate for the presence of severe coronary artery disease was similar to that of a deterioration in wall motion by more than two scores during exercise (49% vs 53%) or an absolute decrease of greater than or equal to 5% in exercise left ventricular ejection fraction (49% vs 45%).

  10. Eponymous signs in dermatology

    PubMed Central

    Madke, Bhushan; Nayak, Chitra

    2012-01-01

    Clinical signs reflect the sheer and close observatory quality of an astute physician. Many new dermatological signs both in clinical and diagnostic aspects of various dermatoses are being reported and no single book on dermatology literature gives a comprehensive list of these “signs” and postgraduate students in dermatology finds it difficult to have access to the description, as most of these resident doctor do not have access to the said journal articles. “Signs” commonly found in dermatologic literature with a brief discussion and explanation is reviewed in this paper. PMID:23189246

  11. Candida species isolation in peristomal skin in patients with abdominal stomas and correlation to clinical signs: a descriptive pilot study.

    PubMed

    Morales-Mendoza, Yamilett; Fernández-Martínez, Ramón; Fabián-Victoriano, Ma Rosy; Contreras-Ruiz, José; Vásquez-del-Mercado, Elsa; de Lourdes Suárez-Roa, Maria; Arenas-Guzman, Roberto

    2014-11-01

    The reported prevalence of candidiasis in peristomal skin varies greatly. Very few studies exist that correlate the clinical findings around the peristomal skin to the mycology. In this study, the authors report on Candida species prevalence, clinical correlation, and mycology.

  12. Abnormal production of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) -- alpha and clinical efficacy of the TNF inhibitor etanercept in a patient with PAPA syndrome [corrected].

    PubMed

    Cortis, Elisabetta; De Benedetti, Fabrizio; Insalaco, Antonella; Cioschi, Stefania; Muratori, Flaminia; D'Urbano, Leila E; Ugazio, Alberto G

    2004-12-01

    We report a family with pyogenic sterile arthritis, pyoderna and acne syndrome (PAPA). The proband presented several episodes of sterile pyogenic arthritis and became unresponsive to glucocorticoids. After treatment with the tumor necrosis factor inhibitor etanercept, the disease underwent rapid and sustained clinical remission. Production of tumor necrosis factor-alpha by mononuclear cells of the proband and of the affected relatives was abnormally elevated.

  13. [Diagnostic exercise for the medical school student: how to analyze an abnormality of eye movements?].

    PubMed

    Moonen, V; Phan Ba, R; Rikir, E; Andris, C; Moonen, G

    2010-01-01

    Eye movements abnormalities are common symptoms in neurology. We report a clinical observation of ischemic unilateral internuclear ophtalmoplegia to illustrate how much anatomical diagnosis is based on 1) a detailed neurological examination and 2) a deep knowledge and understanding of the anatomy and physiology of ocular movements. We also take this opportunity to review ocular symptoms and signs encountered in neurological practice.

  14. Meiotic abnormalities

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 19, describes meiotic abnormalities. These include nondisjunction of autosomes and sex chromosomes, genetic and environmental causes of nondisjunction, misdivision of the centromere, chromosomally abnormal human sperm, male infertility, parental age, and origin of diploid gametes. 57 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Vital Signs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Lester R.

    1993-01-01

    Presents an excerpt from the first edition of Vital Signs, a Worldwide Institute publication that provides an annual update on global environmental trends. Includes discussion of the dismantling of nuclear arms, reduction in chlorofluorocarbon production, growth in bicycle production, the decline in cigarette smoking, and decline in military…

  16. Vital signs

    MedlinePlus

    ... overall health. Normal vital sign ranges for the average healthy adult while resting are: Blood pressure: 90/60 mm/Hg to 120/80 mm/Hg Breathing: 12 to 18 breaths per minute Pulse: 60 to 100 beats per minute Temperature: 97.8°F to 99.1°F (36. ...

  17. Enteric viruses in Brazilian turkey flocks: single and multiple virus infection frequency according to age and clinical signs of intestinal disease.

    PubMed

    Moura-Alvarez, J; Chacon, J V; Scanavini, L S; Nuñez, L F N; Astolfi-Ferreira, C S; Jones, R C; Piantino Ferreira, A J

    2013-04-01

    Poult enteritis complex has been associated with enteritis and reduction in growth rates in commercial turkeys worldwide. Intestinal samples from 76 turkey flocks from different Brazilian states affected or not with intestinal disorders were evaluated for the presence of adenovirus groups 1 and 2 (TAV), astrovirus types 1 and 2 (TAstV-1 and TAstV-2), turkey coronavirus (TCoV), reovirus, rotavirus, and avian nephritis virus (ANV) using PCR. The percentage of positive samples was categorized according to the geographic origin, age of the flocks, and presence of clinical signs of intestinal disease. The percentage of samples that were positive for at least one virus was 93.4%, whereas the percentage of samples that were positive for more than one virus was 69.7%. An average of 3.20 viruses per sample was detected in turkeys in the growing phase of the production cycle (1 to 4 wk of age). The TAstV-1 and TCoV were the most frequently observed viruses in growing phase turkeys and occurred simultaneously in 85% of these samples. In turkeys in the finishing phase of development (5 to 18 wk), a lower average number of viruses was observed (2.41), and the most frequent viruses isolated in these turkeys were TAstV-1 (57.1%) and rotavirus (51.8%). Overall, every virus was detected more frequently in growing phase turkeys than in finishing phase turkeys with the exception of TAV. Samples from flocks exhibiting clinical signs of intestinal disease showed a higher rate of positivity, and TAstV-1, TAstV-2, and TCoV were the most frequently occurring viruses in this cohort. Birds without clinical signs most frequently harbored TAstV-1 and rotavirus. Future studies should focus on the description and elucidation of the role of each virus, as well as the pathogenic and immunological implications of the different combinations of viruses in turkeys.

  18. Clinical signs, pathology and dose-dependent survival of adult wood frogs, Rana sylvatica, inoculated orally with frog virus 3 Ranavirus sp., Iridoviridae.

    PubMed

    Forzn, Mara J; Jones, Kathleen M; Vanderstichel, Raphal V; Wood, John; Kibenge, Frederick S B; Kuiken, Thijs; Wirth, Wytamma; Ariel, Ellen; Daoust, Pierre-Yves

    2015-05-01

    Amphibian populations suffer massive mortalities from infection with frog virus 3 FV3, genus Ranavirus, family Iridoviridae, a pathogen also involved in mortalities of fish and reptiles. Experimental oral infection with FV3 in captive-raised adult wood frogs, Rana sylvatica Lithobates sylvaticus, was performed as the first step in establishing a native North American animal model of ranaviral disease to study pathogenesis and host response. Oral dosing was successful LD50 was 10(2.93 2.423.44) p.f.u. for frogs averaging 35mm in length. Onset of clinical signs occurred 614days post-infection p.i. median 11 days p.i. and time to death was 1014 days p.i. median 12 days p.i.. Each tenfold increase in virus dose increased the odds of dying by 23-fold and accelerated onset of clinical signs and death by approximately 15. Ranavirus DNA was demonstrated in skin and liver of all frogs that died or were euthanized because of severe clinical signs. Shedding of virus occurred in faeces 710 days p.i. 34.5days before death and skin sheds 10 days p.i. 01.5days before death of some frogs dead from infection. Most common lesions were dermal erosion and haemorrhages haematopoietic necrosis in bone marrow, kidney, spleen and liver and necrosis in renal glomeruli, tongue, gastrointestinal tract and urinary bladder mucosa. Presence of ranavirus in lesions was confirmed by immunohistochemistry. Intracytoplasmic inclusion bodies probably viral were present in the bone marrow and the epithelia of the oral cavity, gastrointestinal tract, renal tubules and urinary bladder. Our work describes a ranaviruswood frog model and provides estimates that can be incorporated into ranavirus disease ecology models.

  19. A retrospective epidemiological study of clinical signs and familial predisposition associated with aseptic meningitis in the Norwegian population of Nova Scotia duck tolling retrievers born 1994–2003

    PubMed Central

    Anfinsen, Kristin P.; Berendt, Mette; Liste, Flora J.H.; Haagensen, Therese R.; Indrebo, Astrid; Lingaas, Frode; Stigen, Oyvind; Alban, Lis

    2008-01-01

    Aseptic meningitis (AM) is a disease that causes grave clinical signs such as intensive neck pain, fever, and lethargy. The severity of this disease is reflected in the fact that affected animals require long-term, and in chronic cases, lifelong therapy with corticosteroids. A number of dogs must be euthanized because of therapeutic failure. In recent years, the Norwegian population of Nova Scotia duck tolling retrievers has experienced an increase in individuals with AM. The aim of the present study was to investigate the prevalence of AM and to pursue the suspicion of hereditary factors influencing an accumulation of AM cases in the breed. Using the Norwegian Kennel Club registery, a random sample (362 dogs) stratified by year of birth was drawn from the total population born from 1994 to 2003 (1525 individuals). The owners were contacted and questioned about clinical signs of AM in their dogs. Subsequently, the practising veterinarians and the breeders of positive responders were contacted in order to confirm a clinical diagnosis of AM and to identify possible affected family members. Pedigrees of AM positive individuals and affected relatives were investigated. The study estimated a prevalence of AM of 2.5%. For all affected dogs, it was possible to trace the pedigree of both parents of affected dogs back to a specific founder dog. The genealogical investigation strongly indicates that genetic factors are involved in the etiology of the disease. PMID:18783024

  20. Do sleep abnormalities and misaligned sleep/circadian rhythm patterns represent early clinical characteristics for developing psychosis in high risk populations?

    PubMed

    Zanini, Marcio; Castro, Juliana; Coelho, Fernando Morgadinho; Bittencourt, Lia; Bressan, Rodrigo A; Tufik, Sergio; Brietzke, Elisa

    2013-12-01

    Sleep architecture changes, such as slow-wave sleep (SWS) percentage variations and reductions in latency and density of rapid eye movement (REM), are found in most patients with schizophrenia and are considered to be an important part of the pathophysiology of the disorder. In addition to these sleep parameters changes, disruptions in sleep homeostasis and the sleep/circadian rhythm also occur in these patients. Sleep/circadian rhythm abnormalities negatively affect neocortical plasticity and cognition and often precede the diagnosis of the illness. Thus, it has been suggested that the sleep/circadian rhythm might be involved in the pathophysiology of psychosis. Recent advances in the identification of individuals at a high risk for developing schizophrenia allow us to investigate several neurobiological processes involved in the development of psychosis. In this article, we review the current evidence of the effects of sleep parameter abnormalities, disruptions in sleep homeostasis and misalignments of sleep circadian rhythm on the early stages of schizophrenia. In addition, we discuss the preliminary evidence of sleep and circadian rhythm abnormalities during the prodromal stages of psychosis and propose that these abnormalities can be explored as potential predictors, as an adjunct to clinical diagnosis, of developing a psychotic disorder in at risk populations.

  1. A randomized controlled clinical trial to assess the efficacy of Nasya in reducing the signs and symptoms of cervical spondylosis

    PubMed Central

    Radhika, C; Kumar, G. Vinod; Mihirjan, K.

    2012-01-01

    This work was designed to assess the efficacy of Nasya in reducing the signs and symptoms of cervical spondylosis. The patients attending the O. P. D of Department of Kaya Chikitsa and Panchakarma, Government Ayurveda College Hospital, Thiruvananthapuram were enrolled and subjected to the treatment schedule. Total duration of treatment was 21days. The schedule for the first 14 days was similar in both the groups. It included Rooksha Sveda for 7days followed by Patra Pottali Sveda for 7days. During this period, 90 ml Gandharvahastadi Kashaya twice and Guggulu Tiktaka Kashaya once were given internally. After this, in the Nasya group Nasya was done for 7days with Dhanwantaram Tailam (21times Aavartita), Mridu Paka in Madhyama Matra (8Bindu). Along with this Guggulu Tiktaka Kashaya was given thrice. In the control group, Guggulu Tiktaka kashaya alone was given thrice daily. Assessments were done with regard to pain, tenderness, radiation of pain, numbness, range of movements and hand grip strength. These were done before treatment, before nasya, after treatment and after 1month follow-up. The statistical hypothesis was tested using paired ‘t’ test and ‘Z’ test for proportion. The trial proved that conventional management along with Nasya was more efficacious than conventional management alone in reducing the signs and symptoms of cervical spondylosis. PMID:23049188

  2. Cerebral ultrasound abnormalities in preterm infants caused by late-onset sepsis

    PubMed Central

    van den Dungen, F. A. M.; Vermeulen, R. J.; van Weissenbruch, M. M.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction This study describes cerebral ultrasound abnormalities caused by late-onset sepsis (LOS) in very preterm infants with a gestational age of < 32 weeks and/or birthweight < 1500 grams. Methods The prospective study (“INFANT study”) included 117 preterm infants with suspected LOS. Proven LOS was defined as a positive blood culture after 72 hours of life. In case of coagulase-negative staphylococci an elevated C-reactive protein was additionally required to establish proven LOS. Patients were identified as proven LOS and patients with only clinical symptoms of LOS. Cerebral ultrasound images were obtained in the first week after birth, during/after LOS and before discharge. Cerebral findings were divided in no/minor and major abnormalities. Results Eighty-six preterm infants had proven LOS and 31 preterm infants had only clinical signs of LOS. Four infants were excluded because pre-existing major brain abnormalities. No significant differences (p = 0.624) for incidence of major brain abnormalities on cerebral ultrasound were found. Conclusion No differences were revealed in prevalence of major brain abnormalities between the groups with proven LOS and with clinical signs of LOS. Both infants with a gram negative sepsis developed major brain abnormalities, whereas only two of 66 preterm infants coagulase-negative staphylococci sepsis developed major brain abnormalities. PMID:28301503

  3. Clinical signs of fatty liver and kidney syndrome in broilers and their alleviation by the short-term use of biotin or animal tallow.

    PubMed

    1977-11-01

    1. Birds affected by fatty liver and kidney syndrome (FLKS) had elevated concentrations of serum Na+, K+, lactate, pyruvate and uric acid and reduced concentrations of serum HCO-3 and glucose. 2. Short-term treatment with biotin or animal tallow reduced the mortality from FLKS and prevented the clinical signs. 3. Lactic acidosis may be a major factor contributing to the mortality and physical symptoms observed in birds affected by FLKS. The lactic acidosis and the hypoglycaemia observed in FLKS are due primarily to an accumulation of pyruvate as a result of an insufficiency of biotin for normal pyruvate carboxylase activity.

  4. A new multivalent (DHPPi/L4R) canine combination vaccine prevents infection, shedding and clinical signs following experimental challenge with four Leptospira serovars.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Stephen; Stirling, Catrina; Thomas, Anne; King, Vickie; Plevová, Edita; Chromá, Ludmila; Siedek, Elisabeth; Illambas, Joanna; Salt, Jeremy; Sture, Gordon

    2013-06-28

    Although effective vaccines have been developed against the common Leptospira serovars, they are still reported in clinical cases, while others are increasingly prevalent. The results from four challenge studies following vaccination of dogs with a new combination vaccine (DHPPi/L4R) containing inactivated L. serovars, L. canicola, L. icterohaemorrhagiae, L. bratislava and L. grippotyphosa conducted to satisfy the requirements of the European Pharmacopoeia monograph (01/2008:0447), are reported. Six week old dogs received two vaccinations, three weeks apart, and were challenged 25 days later with different isolates of the L. serovars. Clinical observations were recorded, and blood, urine and tissue samples were collected for analysis. Following challenge, non-vaccinated dogs demonstrated various clinical signs, while no vaccinated dogs were affected; significant differences in mean clinical scores were observed. Measurable antibody titres to each Leptospira antigen were seen in vaccinated dogs 21 days following the first vaccination, with further increases in antibody titres observed following challenge with the respective Leptospira strain. Non-vaccinated dogs remained seronegative until challenge. Leptospira were re-isolated from the blood, urine, kidney and liver of all non-vaccinated dogs following challenge. In contrast no vaccinated dogs had Leptospira re-isolated from the same tissues. Significant differences were seen in number of days with positive isolation (blood and urine) and in number of dogs with positive samples (kidney and liver). In conclusion, vaccination of dogs with the new vaccine induces protective immunity 25 days after second vaccination with protection against infection, renal infection and clinical signs following challenge.

  5. 20 CFR 416.928 - Symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ....), roentgenological studies (X-rays), and psychological tests. .... (b) Signs are anatomical, physiological, or psychological abnormalities which can be observed, apart... techniques. Psychiatric signs are medically demonstrable phenomena that indicate specific...

  6. 20 CFR 404.1528 - Symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ....), roentgenological studies (X-rays), and psychological tests. .... (b) Signs are anatomical, physiological, or psychological abnormalities which can be observed, apart... techniques. Psychiatric signs are medically demonstrable phenomena that indicate specific...

  7. 20 CFR 416.928 - Symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ....), roentgenological studies (X-rays), and psychological tests. .... (b) Signs are anatomical, physiological, or psychological abnormalities which can be observed, apart... techniques. Psychiatric signs are medically demonstrable phenomena that indicate specific...

  8. 20 CFR 416.928 - Symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ....), roentgenological studies (X-rays), and psychological tests. .... (b) Signs are anatomical, physiological, or psychological abnormalities which can be observed, apart... techniques. Psychiatric signs are medically demonstrable phenomena that indicate specific...

  9. 20 CFR 404.1528 - Symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ....), roentgenological studies (X-rays), and psychological tests. .... (b) Signs are anatomical, physiological, or psychological abnormalities which can be observed, apart... techniques. Psychiatric signs are medically demonstrable phenomena that indicate specific...

  10. 20 CFR 416.928 - Symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ....), roentgenological studies (X-rays), and psychological tests. .... (b) Signs are anatomical, physiological, or psychological abnormalities which can be observed, apart... techniques. Psychiatric signs are medically demonstrable phenomena that indicate specific...

  11. 20 CFR 404.1528 - Symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ....), roentgenological studies (X-rays), and psychological tests. .... (b) Signs are anatomical, physiological, or psychological abnormalities which can be observed, apart... techniques. Psychiatric signs are medically demonstrable phenomena that indicate specific...

  12. 20 CFR 404.1528 - Symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ....), roentgenological studies (X-rays), and psychological tests. .... (b) Signs are anatomical, physiological, or psychological abnormalities which can be observed, apart... techniques. Psychiatric signs are medically demonstrable phenomena that indicate specific...

  13. 20 CFR 404.1528 - Symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ....), roentgenological studies (X-rays), and psychological tests. .... (b) Signs are anatomical, physiological, or psychological abnormalities which can be observed, apart... techniques. Psychiatric signs are medically demonstrable phenomena that indicate specific...

  14. 20 CFR 416.928 - Symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ....), roentgenological studies (X-rays), and psychological tests. .... (b) Signs are anatomical, physiological, or psychological abnormalities which can be observed, apart... techniques. Psychiatric signs are medically demonstrable phenomena that indicate specific...

  15. Clinical and polygraphic improvement of breathing abnormalities after valproate in a case of Pitt-Hopkins syndrome.

    PubMed

    Maini, Ilenia; Cantalupo, Gaetano; Turco, Emanuela Claudia; De Paolis, Fernando; Magnani, Cinzia; Parrino, Liborio; Terzano, Mario Giovanni; Pisani, Francesco

    2012-12-01

    Pitt-Hopkins syndrome is a rare genetic form of severe psychomotor delay, caused by mutations in transcription cell factor-4 gene and characterized by distinctive dysmorphic features and abnormal breathing pattern. The current report describes the polygraphic features of the syndrome's typical breathing pattern in a patient both in wakefulness and in sleep. The control of these breathing alterations is important to prevent the neurological sequelae linked to chronic cerebral hypoxemia in early ages. No data are available on effective treatment options for breathing abnormalities of Pitt-Hopkins syndrome. The authors polygraphically documented a reduction of apneic and hypopneic phenomena, with a significant improvement in saturation values, after the introduction of sodium valproate.

  16. Clinical utility of a multigated modified anterior projection in the detection of left ventricular inferior and apical wall motion abnormalities

    SciTech Connect

    Polak, J.F.; Bianco, J.A.; Kemper, A.J.; Tow, D.E.

    1982-04-01

    Recent evidence indicates that the left anterior oblique projection (LAO) multigated radionuclide ventriculogram (RVG) underestimates presence and extent of apical and inferior left ventricular (LV) wall motion abnormalities. We investigated, prospectively, the sensitivity and specificity of a modified anterior projection (MAP), which incorporates cephalad tilting. Thirty-three consecutive patients undergoing cardiac catheterization suspected to have coronary artery disease were studied with RVG, using both the MAP and LAO views. LAO views were analyzed using the ejection fraction image (REFI), and the regional ejection fraction (REF) of the inferoapical region. The MAP studies were analyzed using stroke volume image (SVI) to evaluate apical and inferior LV regions. Results were as follows: (Formula: see text), Both intraobserver and interobserver variabilities were comparable to those of conventional angiographic studies used in detection of apical and inferior asynergy. It is concluded that the multigated MAP offers additional information about abnormalities of the LV inferior and apical regions.

  17. Clinical application of three-dimensional printing to the management of complex univentricular hearts with abnormal systemic or pulmonary venous drainage.

    PubMed

    McGovern, Eimear; Kelleher, Eoin; Snow, Aisling; Walsh, Kevin; Gadallah, Bassem; Kutty, Shelby; Redmond, John M; McMahon, Colin J

    2017-02-06

    In recent years, three-dimensional printing has demonstrated reliable reproducibility of several organs including hearts with complex congenital cardiac anomalies. This represents the next step in advanced image processing and can be used to plan surgical repair. In this study, we describe three children with complex univentricular hearts and abnormal systemic or pulmonary venous drainage, in whom three-dimensional printed models based on CT data assisted with preoperative planning. For two children, after group discussion and examination of the models, a decision was made not to proceed with surgery. We extend the current clinical experience with three-dimensional printed modelling and discuss the benefits of such models in the setting of managing complex surgical problems in children with univentricular circulation and abnormal systemic or pulmonary venous drainage.

  18. The Frequency of Methylation Abnormalities Among Estonian Patients Selected by Clinical Diagnostic Scoring Systems for Silver–Russell Syndrome and Beckwith–Wiedemann Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Yakoreva, Maria; Kahre, Tiina; Mee, Pille; Muru, Kai; Joost, Kairit; Teek, Rita; Soellner, Lukas; Eggermann, Thomas; Õunap, Katrin

    2015-01-01

    Aims: To study the frequency of methylation abnormalities among Estonian patients selected according to published clinical diagnostic scoring systems for Silver–Russell syndrome (SRS) and Beckwith–Wiedemann syndrome (BWS). Materials and Methods: Forty-eight patients with clinical suspicion of SRS (n = 20) or BWS (n = 28) were included in the study group, to whom methylation-specific multiplex ligation-dependant probe amplification analysis of 11p15 region was made. In addition, to patients with minimal diagnostic score for either SRS or BWS, multilocus methylation-specific single nucleotide primer extension assay was performed. Results: Five (38%) SRS patients with positive clinical scoring had abnormal methylation pattern at chromosome 11p15, whereas in the BWS group, only one patient was diagnosed with imprinting control region 2 (ICR2) hypomethylation (8%). An unexpected hypomethylation of the PLAGL1 (6q24) and IGF2R (6q25) genes in the patient with the highest BWS scoring was found. Conclusions: Compared to BWS, diagnostic criteria used for selecting SRS patients gave us a similar detection rate of 11p15 imprinting disorders as seen in other studies. A more careful selection of patients with possible BWS should be considered to improve the detection of molecularly confirmed cases. Genome-wide multilocus methylation tests could be used in routine clinical practice as it increases the detection rates of imprinting disorders. PMID:26505556

  19. The significance of patient's age and sex in the interpretation of signs and symptoms in clinically suspected acute deep vein thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Kierkegaard, A

    1982-01-01

    876 consecutive patients with clinically suspected acute deep vein thrombosis (DVR) in the leg were studied with an ascending phlebography, and the patient's age and sex were correlated to the phlebographic diagnosis. In unoperated patients a thrombus was demonstrated significantly more often in males and in older patients than in females and in younger patients. In operated patients no correlation could be noted between the phlebographic diagnosis and patients's age and sex, but a thrombus was demonstrated significantly more often in operated than in unoperated patients. The results suggest that signs and symptoms of thrombosis are less reliable in females and younger patients than in males and older patients, when a DVT is suspected clinically in unoperated patients.

  20. The Meaning of Signs:

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Claudia

    2006-01-01

    This article reconstructs the diagnostic act of the French pox in the French-disease hospital of sixteenth-century Augsburg. It focuses on how the participants in the clinical encounter imagined the configuration of the pox and its localization in the human body. Of central importance for answering this question is the early modern conception of physical signs. It has been argued that it was due to a specific understanding of bodily signs and their relationship to a disease and its causes, that disease definition and classification in the early modern period showed a high degree of flexibility and fluidity. This paper looks at how the sixteenth-century theoretical conception of physical signs not only shaped the diagnosis and treatment of the pox but also reflected the overall organization of institutions. PMID:17242549

  1. p27KIP1 is abnormally expressed in Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphomas and is associated with an adverse clinical outcome

    PubMed Central

    Sáez, Al; Sánchez, E; Sánchez-Beato, M; Cruz, M A; Chacón, I; Muñoz, E; Camacho, F I; Martínez-Montero, J C; Mollejo, M; Garcia, J F; Piris, M A

    1999-01-01

    Cell cycle progression is regulated by the combined action of cyclins, cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs), and CDK-inhibitors (CDKi), which are negative cell cycle regulators. p27KIP1 is a CDKi key in cell cycle regulation, whose degradation is required for G1/S transition. In spite of the absence of p27KIP1 expression in proliferating lymphocytes, some aggressive B-cell lymphomas have been reported to show an anomalous p27KIP1 staining. We analysed p27KIP1 expression in a series of Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma (DLBCL), correlating it with the proliferative index and clinical outcome, to characterize the implications of this anomalous staining in lymphomagenesis in greater depth. For the above mentioned purposes, an immunohistochemical technique in paraffin-embedded tissues was employed, using commercially available antibodies, in a series of 133 patients with known clinical outcomes. Statistical analysis was performed in order to ascertain which clinical and molecular variables may influence outcome, in terms of disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS). The relationships between p27KIP1 and MIB-1 (Ki-67) were also tested. An abnormally high expression of p27KIP1 was found in lymphomas of this type. The overall correlation between p27KIP1 and MIB-1 showed there to be no significant relationship between these two parameters, this differing from observations in reactive lymphoid and other tissues. Analysis of the clinical relevance of these findings showed that a high level of p27KIP1 expression in this type of tumour is an adverse prognostic marker, in both univariate and multivariate analysis. These results show that there is abnormal p27KIP1 expression in DLBCL, with adverse clinical significance, suggesting that this anomalous p27KIP1 protein may be rendered non-functional through interaction with other cell cycle regulator proteins. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10424746

  2. Comparative investigation of clinical/radiographical signs of mineral trioxide aggregate and formocresol on pulpotomized primary molars.

    PubMed

    Hugar, Shivayogi M; Deshpande, Shobha D

    2010-07-01

    The objectives of this study were (1) to evaluate clinically and radiographically the effects of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) as a pulp dressing after coronal pulp amputation (pulpotomy) in primary molars, (2) to compare the effects of MTA and formocresol in pulpotomized primary teeth. Sixty primary mandibular molars of thirty healthy children aged between 5-8 years were treated by conventional pulpotomy technique. The teeth on the right side are assigned to MTA (Group A) and the left side for the Formocresol (Group B). The children were examined clinically and radiographically every 6 months over a period of 36 months. Results of present study revealed that both MTA and Formocresol has the same effect on the first as well as second primary molars, with chi-square value being 1.1483 (P ≥ 0.05). None of the teeth in either group showed any clinical pathology, showing 100% success rate but radiographically formocresol group showed one case of internal resorption that was regarded as failure in the present study. MTA seems to be more promising predictable with positive response in vital pulp therapy in future than formocresol pulpotomy except for the cost factor.

  3. Clinical and biochemical signs in Fleckvieh cattle with genetically confirmed Fanconi-Bickel syndrome (cattle homozygous for Fleckvieh haplotype 2).

    PubMed

    Burgstaller, Johann; Url, Angelika; Pausch, Hubert; Schwarzenbacher, Hermann; Egerbacher, Monika; Wittek, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Fanconi-Bickel Syndrome (FBS) is an autosomal recessive disorder of the carbohydrate metabolism, which has been reported in human and some animals (OMIA 000366-9913). In Fleckvieh cattle it is caused by mutations in SLC2A2, a gene encoding for glucose transporter protein 2 (GLUT2), which is primarily expressed in liver, kidney, pancreas and intestines. The causal mutation resides in a previously reported Fleckvieh Haplotype 2 (FH-2). FH-2 homozygous individuals are rare, but due to widespread use of heterozygous bulls in artificial insemination, heterozygous animals are likely to be present in a larger number in the cattle population. Two clinical cases of Fleckvieh cattle with a syndrome resembling the phenotypic appearance of FBS are presented in the present study describing the association between the clinical manifestations of FBS and the postulated frameshift mutation in bovine SLC2A2. Clinical examination showed poor growth, retarded development, polyuria, and polydipsia. Laboratory analyses showed an increased plasma glucose but normal insulin concentration and increased renal glucose excretion. Histopathological examination of kidney and liver samples revealed massively increased liver glycogen storage and nephrosis. Sires of both cases were tested positive for being heterozygous carriers for the same frameshift mutation in SLC2A2 as was originally reported in Fleckvieh cattle. DNA of both cases described was analyzed and Sanger sequencing confirmed homozygosity for the frameshift mutation in SLC2A2.

  4. [Renal abnormalities in ankylosing spondylitis].

    PubMed

    Samia, Barbouch; Hazgui, Faiçal; Abdelghani, Khaoula Ben; Hamida, Fethi Ben; Goucha, Rym; Hedri, Hafedh; Taarit, Chokri Ben; Maiz, Hedi Ben; Kheder, Adel

    2012-07-01

    We will study the epidemiologic, clinical, biological, therapeutic, prognostic characteristics and predictive factors of development of nephropathy in ankylosing spondylitis patients. We retrospectively reviewed the medical record of 32 cases with renal involvement among 212 cases of ankylosing spondylitis followed in our service during the period spread out between 1978 and 2006. The renal involvement occurred in all patients a mean of 12 years after the clinical onset of the rheumatic disease. Thirty-two patients presented one or more signs of renal involvement: microscopic hematuria in 22 patients, proteinuria in 23 patients, nephrotic syndrome in 11 patients and decreased renal function in 24 patients (75%). Secondary renal amyloidosis (13 patients), which corresponds to a prevalence of 6,1% and tubulointerstitial nephropathy (7 patients) were the most common cause of renal involvement in ankylosing spondylitis followed by IgA nephropathy (4 patients). Seventeen patients evolved to the end stage renal disease after an average time of 29.8 ± 46 months. The average follow-up of the patients was 4,4 years. By comparing the 32 patients presenting a SPA and renal disease to 88 with SPA and without nephropathy, we detected the predictive factors of occurred of nephropathy: tobacco, intense inflammatory syndrome, sacroileite stage 3 or 4 and presence of column bamboo. The finding of 75% of the patients presented a renal failure at the time of the diagnosis of renal involvement suggests that evidence of renal abnormality involvement should be actively sought in this disease.

  5. Use of an augmented reality display of patient monitoring data to enhance anesthesiologists' response to abnormal clinical events.

    PubMed

    Ormerod, D F; Ross, B; Naluai-Cecchini, A

    2003-01-01

    One obstacle to safety in the operating room is anesthesiologist distraction having to shift attention back and forth from the patient to a vital sign monitor while performing either routine or emergency procedures. The purpose of this study was to measure the decrease in anesthesiologist distraction made possible by using a head-worn, see-through personal display (HWD) using retinal scanning technology. With the head-up display, they were able to focus their attention exclusively on the patient and the task at hand. The Nomad reduced the number of times the anesthesiologist had to shift their attention by a more than a third (17 times versus 58 times). This allowed them to spend more time focused on the patient.

  6. An abnormal clinical course of an ultrasound-guided supraclavicular brachial plexus block using 0.375% bupivacaine.

    PubMed

    Sites, Brian D; Bertrand, Marc L; Gallagher, John D

    2006-09-01

    We report on the case of a reappearance of a supraclavicular nerve block after the apparent initiation of its resolution in a 21-year-old athlete undergoing repair of a valgus impaction syndrome of his right elbow. The patient's anesthetic management consisted of a supraclavicular nerve block and general anesthesia. The patient was discharged home with an apparent resolving nerve block. He returned to the hospital urgently when, at 7 hours after blockade, he lost all motor-sensory function in his arm. His workup ultimately yielded negative results, and the block resolved at 23 hours. In addition to documenting an abnormal course of a supraclavicular block, this case report questions the appropriateness of placing long-acting nerve blocks in outpatients.

  7. Integrated Genomic Analysis Identifies Clinically Relevant Subtypes of Glioblastoma Characterized by Abnormalities in PDGFRA, IDH1, EGFR, and NF1

    SciTech Connect

    Verhaak, Roel GW; Hoadley, Katherine A; Purdom, Elizabeth; Wang, Victoria; Qi, Yuan; Wilkerson, Matthew D; Miller, C Ryan; Ding, Li; Golub, Todd; Mesirov, Jill P; Alexe, Gabriele; Lawrence, Michael; O'Kelly, Michael; Tamayo, Pablo; Weir, Barbara A; Gabriel, Stacey; Winckler, Wendy; Gupta, Supriya; Jakkula, Lakshmi; Feiler, Heidi S; Hodgson, J Graeme; James, C David; Sarkaria, Jann N; Brennan, Cameron; Kahn, Ari; Spellman, Paul T; Wilson, Richard K; Speed, Terence P; Gray, Joe W; Meyerson, Matthew; Getz, Gad; Perou, Charles M; Hayes, D Neil; Network, The Cancer Genome Atlas Research

    2009-09-03

    The Cancer Genome Atlas Network recently cataloged recurrent genomic abnormalities in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). We describe a robust gene expression-based molecular classification of GBM into Proneural, Neural, Classical, and Mesenchymal subtypes and integrate multidimensional genomic data to establish patterns of somatic mutations and DNA copy number. Aberrations and gene expression of EGFR, NF1, and PDGFRA/IDH1 each define the Classical, Mesenchymal, and Proneural subtypes, respectively. Gene signatures of normal brain cell types show a strong relationship between subtypes and different neural lineages. Additionally, response to aggressive therapy differs by subtype, with the greatest benefit in the Classical subtype and no benefit in the Proneural subtype. We provide a framework that unifies transcriptomic and genomic dimensions for GBM molecular stratification with important implications for future studies.

  8. Development of antihuman IgG antibodies and hematologic deficits but not clinical abnormalities in C57BL/6 mice after repeated administration of human intravenous immunoglobulin.

    PubMed

    Loeffler, David A; Smith, Lynnae M; Klaver, Andrea C; Brzezinski, Heather A; Morrison, Essie I; Coffey, Mary P; Steficek, Barbara A; Cook, Susan S

    2012-02-01

    Intravenous immunoglobulin (IvIg) preparations consist of purified human immunoglobulins collected from large numbers of healthy persons and are used to treat autoimmune, immunodeficiency, and inflammatory disorders. Studying the effects of IvIg effects in experimental animal models might clarify its mechanisms of action in these disorders, but whether 'serum sickness' or other abnormalities occur after repeated IvIg administration to immunocompetent animals is unknown. In the current study, male C57BL/6 mice (8 to 10 wk old; n = 27) received IvIg (1 g/kg IP) weekly for 6 wk. They were observed for clinical abnormalities, and body weight, temperature, renal function, hematologic parameters, and serum antihuman IgG antibodies were measured before and during treatment. Postmortem evaluations were performed on kidney, spleen, liver, and heart. No clinical or histologic abnormalities were noted despite a transient increase in BUN. Mean antibody levels to human IgG on days 21 and 43 after IvIg administration were increased by 23-fold compared with pretreatment levels. 88% and 89% of the mice were antibody responders on those days. Unexpectedly, hemoglobin, hematocrit, and RBC, WBC, lymphocyte, and platelet counts decreased after IvIg administration. These findings suggest that although it does not produce serum sickness, repeated IvIg administration to immunocompetent mice induces a strong humoral immune response and hematologic deficits of unknown etiology. These factors could cause the effects of IvIg preparations in mouse models of human disease to differ from their effects in the human disorders.

  9. Characterisation of liver chemistry abnormalities associated with pazopanib monotherapy: a systematic review and meta-analysis of clinical trials in advanced cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Powles, Thomas; Bracarda, Sergio; Chen, Mei; Norry, Elliot; Compton, Natalie; Heise, Mark; Hutson, Thomas; Harter, Philipp; Carpenter, Christopher; Pandite, Lini; Kaplowitz, Neil

    2015-07-01

    Drug-induced liver chemistry abnormalities, primarily transaminase elevations, are commonly observed in pazopanib-treated patients. This meta-analysis characterises liver chemistry abnormalities associated with pazopanib. Data of pazopanib-treated patients from nine prospective trials were integrated (N=2080). Laboratory datasets were used to characterise the incidence, timing, recovery and patterns of liver events, and subsequent rechallenge with pazopanib. Severe cases of liver chemistry abnormalities were clinically reviewed. Multivariate analyses identified predisposing factors. Twenty percent of patients developed elevated alanine aminotransferase (ALT) >3×ULN. Incidence of peak ALT >3-5×ULN, >5-8×ULN, >8-20×ULN and >20×ULN was 8%, 5%, 5% and 1%, respectively. Median time to onset for all events was 42days; 91% of events were observed within 18weeks. Recovery rates based on peak ALT >3-5×ULN, >5-8×ULN, >8-20×ULN and >20×ULN were 91%, 90%, 90% and 64%, respectively. Median time from onset to recovery was 30days, but longer in patients without dose interruption. Based on clinical review, no deaths were associated with drug-induced liver injury. Overall, 38% of rechallenged patients had ALT elevation recurrence, with 9-day median time to recurrence. Multivariate analysis showed that older age was associated with development of ALT >8×ULN. There was no correlation between hypertension and transaminitis. Our data support the current guidelines on regular liver chemistry tests after initiation of pazopanib, especially during the first 9 or 10weeks, and also demonstrate the safety of rechallenge with pazopanib.

  10. H9N2 influenza viruses isolated from poultry in Korean live bird markets continuously evolve and cause the severe clinical signs in layers.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin A; Cho, Sung Hwan; Kim, Hyun Soo; Seo, Sang Heui

    2006-12-20

    H9N2 influenza viruses are endemic in many Asian countries. We demonstrated that H9N2 influenza viruses isolated from poultry in Korean live bird markets are genetically changing and could cause the clinical signs in layers. Genetic analysis showed that Korean avian H9N2 influenza viruses are distinct from H9N2 influenza viruses circulating in poultry in China and Hong Kong. When we infected layers with H9N2 isolates, layers showed about 30% mortality and the reduction of egg productions. Considering that H9N2 influenza virus is one of potential pandemic candidates, the continuous surveillance is needed to monitor avian H9N2 influenza viruses for the poultry industry and humans.

  11. A dual-strain feline calicivirus vaccine stimulates broader cross-neutralization antibodies than a single-strain vaccine and lessens clinical signs in vaccinated cats when challenged with a homologous feline calicivirus strain associated with virulent systemic disease.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chengjin; Hess, Jennifer; Gill, Michael; Hustead, David

    2010-02-01

    Feline calicivirus (FCV) causes an array of clinical disease in cats. Traditionally this disease has been associated with respiratory disease, limping, or chronic stomatitis. Within the last 10 years, virulent systemic feline calicivirus (VS-FCV) has been recognized which causes additional clinical signs and has a higher fatality rate. A dual-strain FCV vaccine containing a strain of FCV associated with traditional respiratory disease and a VS-FCV strain stimulates serum cross-neutralization antibodies when tested against field strains from Europe and VS-FCV strains from USA. Following challenge with a homologous VS-FCV strain, vaccinated cats had significantly reduced clinical signs.

  12. Environmental and physiological correlates of the severity of clinical signs of snake fungal disease in a population of pigmy rattlesnakes, Sistrurus miliarius

    PubMed Central

    McCoy, Ciera M.; Lind, Craig M.; Farrell, Terence M.

    2017-01-01

    In the past decade, snake fungal disease (SFD) has been identified as an emerging threat to snake populations throughout the eastern USA. Snake fungal disease is caused by the fungus Ophidiomyces ophiodiicola. Little is known regarding the environmental or physiological variables that affect host vulnerability and O. ophiodiicola virulence in wild snake populations. Understanding the intrinsic and extrinsic factors that correlate with infection severity is a key first step in understanding host–pathogen dynamics. Host vulnerability may vary seasonally as a result of thermal conditions or energetic trade-offs, and pathogen growth rates or dispersal may be tied to seasonal trends in climate. To determine whether season, environmental temperature or energetic trade-offs associated with life-history stage influence an individual's susceptibility to infection, we monitored the severity of clinical signs of SFD, surface air temperature, reproductive status, body condition and serum complement activity (plasma bactericidal ability) in free-ranging pigmy rattlesnakes, Sistrurus miliarius, over the course of 18 months. Seasonal increases in the severity of clinical signs of SFD were correlated negatively with monthly air surface temperature and the mean body condition of the population. Bactericidal ability varied seasonally, but pigmy rattlesnakes suffering from active SFD infections did not exhibit deficits in innate immune function. Infected snakes were in significantly lower body condition when compared with the general population, but seasonal patterns in the mean body condition of the population were not driven by seasonal patterns of infection severity. Our results highlight the potential importance of the thermal environment and energetic status in determining infection severity and outcomes and the need for managers and researchers to consider seasonality of symptom presentation when the goal is to identify the prevalence or incidence of SFD in populations. PMID

  13. Environmental and physiological correlates of the severity of clinical signs of snake fungal disease in a population of pigmy rattlesnakes, Sistrurus miliarius.

    PubMed

    McCoy, Ciera M; Lind, Craig M; Farrell, Terence M

    2017-01-01

    In the past decade, snake fungal disease (SFD) has been identified as an emerging threat to snake populations throughout the eastern USA. Snake fungal disease is caused by the fungus Ophidiomyces ophiodiicola. Little is known regarding the environmental or physiological variables that affect host vulnerability and O. ophiodiicola virulence in wild snake populations. Understanding the intrinsic and extrinsic factors that correlate with infection severity is a key first step in understanding host-pathogen dynamics. Host vulnerability may vary seasonally as a result of thermal conditions or energetic trade-offs, and pathogen growth rates or dispersal may be tied to seasonal trends in climate. To determine whether season, environmental temperature or energetic trade-offs associated with life-history stage influence an individual's susceptibility to infection, we monitored the severity of clinical signs of SFD, surface air temperature, reproductive status, body condition and serum complement activity (plasma bactericidal ability) in free-ranging pigmy rattlesnakes, Sistrurus miliarius, over the course of 18 months. Seasonal increases in the severity of clinical signs of SFD were correlated negatively with monthly air surface temperature and the mean body condition of the population. Bactericidal ability varied seasonally, but pigmy rattlesnakes suffering from active SFD infections did not exhibit deficits in innate immune function. Infected snakes were in significantly lower body condition when compared with the general population, but seasonal patterns in the mean body condition of the population were not driven by seasonal patterns of infection severity. Our results highlight the potential importance of the thermal environment and energetic status in determining infection severity and outcomes and the need for managers and researchers to consider seasonality of symptom presentation when the goal is to identify the prevalence or incidence of SFD in populations.

  14. Heterologous live infectious bronchitis virus vaccination in day-old commercial broiler chicks: clinical signs, ciliary health, immune responses and protection against variant infectious bronchitis viruses.

    PubMed

    Awad, Faez; Hutton, Sally; Forrester, Anne; Baylis, Matthew; Ganapathy, Kannan

    2016-01-01

    Groups of one-day-old broiler chicks were vaccinated via the oculo-nasal route with different live infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) vaccines: Massachusetts (Mass), 793B, D274 or Arkansas (Ark). Clinical signs and gross lesions were evaluated. Five chicks from each group were humanely killed at intervals and their tracheas collected for ciliary activity assessment and for the detection of CD4+, CD8+ and IgA-bearing B cells by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Blood samples were collected at intervals for the detection of anti-IBV antibodies. At 21 days post-vaccination (dpv), protection conferred by different vaccination regimes against virulent M41, QX and 793B was assessed. All vaccination programmes were able to induce high levels of CD4+, CD8+ and IgA-bearing B cells in the trachea. Significantly higher levels of CD4+ and CD8+ expression were observed in the Mass2 + 793B2-vaccinated group compared to the other groups (subscripts indicate different manufacturers). Protection studies showed that the group of chicks vaccinated with Mass2 + 793B2 produced 92% ciliary protection against QX challenge; compared to 53%, 68% and 73% ciliary protection against the same challenge virus by Mass1 + D274, Mass1 + 793B1 and Mass3 + Ark, respectively. All vaccination programmes produced more than 85% ciliary protection against M41 and 793B challenges. It appears that the variable levels of protection provided by different heterologous live IBV vaccinations are dependent on the levels of local tracheal immunity induced by the respective vaccine combination. The Mass2 + 793B2 group showed the worst clinical signs, higher mortality and severe lesions following vaccination, but had the highest tracheal immune responses and demonstrated the best protection against all three challenge viruses.

  15. The Development, Clinical Signs and Economic Losses of Gastrointestinal Parasitism in Feeder Cattle on Irrigated and Non-irrigated Dikeland and Upland Pastures

    PubMed Central

    Smith, H. J.; Calder, F. W.

    1972-01-01

    Investigations were carried out over three grazing seasons with parasitized and treated (control) steers on irrigated and non-irrigated upland and dikeland pastures. The stocking rate in each paddock was adjusted by either adding or removing animals so as to maintain as uniform a sward and rate of grazing as possible. Animals were weighed on and off the pastures and fortnightly during the grazing seasons. During the first grazing season clinically normal steers shedding low numbers of gastrointestinal worm eggs contaminated the parasite-free pastures sufficiently to give rise to large residual pasture infections and clinical parasitic gastroenteritis in grazing stock during the second grazing season. Worm burdens of 100,000 to 200,000 Ostertagia ostertagi and Cooperia oncophora were established in several steers showing marked clinical signs. In spite of treatments with high dosages of thiabendazole in attempts to keep worm burdens at a minimum, there was a slow but gradual buildup of pasture infections in the paddocks grazed by the control steers over the three year period. During the second and third grazing seasons there were significant differences in the daily rate of gain between the parasitized and control animals on both upland and dikeland pastures. The parasitized groups of steers had daily rates of gain ranging from 0.29 to 0.80 pounds less than their comparable control groups. Under Maritime conditions, irrigation did not have a consistent effect on weight gains and development of parasitism. PMID:4263919

  16. Bromfenac 0.09% bioavailability in aqueous humor, prophylactic effect on cystoid macular edema, and clinical signs of ocular inflammation after phacoemulsification in a Mexican population

    PubMed Central

    Palacio, Claudia; Fernández De Ortega, Lourdes; Bustos, Francisco R; Chávez, Eduardo; Oregon-Miranda, Aldo A; Mercado-Sesma, Arieh R

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate the aqueous humor bioavailability and clinical efficacy of bromfenac 0.09% vs nepafenac on the presence of cystoid macular edema (CME) after phacoemulsification. Material and methods A Phase II, double-blind, masked, active-controlled, multicenter, clinical trial of 139 subjects, randomized to either a bromfenac 0.09% ophthalmic solution (n=69) or nepafenac 0.1% (n=70). Subjects instilled a drop three times a day for a period of 30 days. Follow-up visits were on days 2, 7, 15, 30, and 60. Biomicroscopy, clinical ocular signs, and assessment of posterior segment were performed. The primary efficacy endpoints included the presence of CME evaluated by optical coherence tomography. Safety evaluation included intraocular pressure, transaminase enzymes, lissamine green, and fluorescein stain. Results The demographic and efficacy variables were similar between groups at baseline. The presence of pain, photophobia, conjunctival hyperemia, chemosis, cellularity, and corneal edema disappeared by day 30 in both groups. The central retinal thickness did not show significant changes after treatment when compared to baseline as follows: in the bromfenac group (247.2±32.9 vs 252.0±24.9 μm; P=0.958) and in nepafenac group (250.8±34 vs 264.0±34.1 μm; P=0.137), respectively. A statistically significant difference was observed between bromfenac and nepafenac group: (252.0±24.9 vs 264.0±34.1 μm; P=0.022), at day 30, respectively; even though there was no clinical relevance in the presentation of CME. There were no significant alterations in intraocular pressure, either lissamine green or fluorescein stains. The adverse events were not related to the interventions. Conclusion Bromfenac 0.09% ophthalmic solution showed similar clinical efficacy to reduce the presentation of CME after phacoemulsification compared to nepafenac 0.01%. PMID:26869758

  17. Associations between the clinical signs of chronic endometritis with ovarian cysts and body condition loss in German Holstein Friesian cows

    PubMed Central

    Sharifi, Reza; Hoedemaker, Martina

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this retrospective field study was to associate the type and smell of discharge, the size of the uterus, the ovarian and treatment status, and the time to diagnosis of animals with chronic clinical endometritis (CCE) with the incidence of ovarian cysts and with a marked loss in body condition in German Holstein Friesian cows. Two hundred and sixty-four cows diagnosed with CCE from day 14 to day 42 postpartum participated in this study. In addition, 100 days milk production and the parity of the animals were included in the analysis. With the use of logistic regression, a purulent vaginal discharge (≥ 50% pus), the decision not to treat the animals for CCE and a high 100 days milk production proved to be significant factors for the incidence of ovarian cysts. Additionally, the type of discharge showed interactions with the parity and the smell of the discharge, as more animals with fetid and purulent discharge and more animals in the first lactation with a purulent discharge developed ovarian cysts. A high milk production and the parity showed associations with an excessive body condition score loss. Additionally, more animals with a diagnosis of an oversized uterus in comparison to cows with an early involution experienced a considerable reduction in their nutritional condition. PMID:19934600

  18. Associations between the clinical signs of chronic endometritis with ovarian cysts and body condition loss in German Holstein Friesian cows.

    PubMed

    Tsousis, Georgios; Sharifi, Reza; Hoedemaker, Martina

    2009-12-01

    The objective of this retrospective field study was to associate the type and smell of discharge, the size of the uterus, the ovarian and treatment status, and the time to diagnosis of animals with chronic clinical endometritis (CCE) with the incidence of ovarian cysts and with a marked loss in body condition in German Holstein Friesian cows. Two hundred and sixty-four cows diagnosed with CCE from day 14 to day 42 postpartum participated in this study. In addition, 100 days milk production and the parity of the animals were included in the analysis. With the use of logistic regression, a purulent vaginal discharge (>/= 50% pus), the decision not to treat the animals for CCE and a high 100 days milk production proved to be significant factors for the incidence of ovarian cysts. Additionally, the type of discharge showed interactions with the parity and the smell of the discharge, as more animals with fetid and purulent discharge and more animals in the first lactation with a purulent discharge developed ovarian cysts. A high milk production and the parity showed associations with an excessive body condition score loss. Additionally, more animals with a diagnosis of an oversized uterus in comparison to cows with an early involution experienced a considerable reduction in their nutritional condition.

  19. Signing off

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-05-01

    sharp that they cause paper cuts. Stains. If you accidentally spill some food or drink on your clothes, make sure you attempt to remove it as soon as possible and preferably within the same lunar cycle. Some teachers seem to think they should be worn with pride like the stains on a chemistry teacher's white coat. This is a myth. Materials. For scientists continually teaching about the wonder of smart materials, physics teachers are remarkably conservative in their choice of materials for their clothes. Try to break out from the traditional corduroy and tweed and practise what you teach. It is not acceptable to wear the actual tie you wore at school, as this will be at least 20 years old, be rather frayed and will have your name sewn in the back by your mum. Steven Chapman Science Year Manager, British Association for the Advancement of Science Signing Off takes a humorous and irreverent look at physics education. The views expressed here are those of the author and are not endorsed by the Editorial Board for Physics Education. Can you contribute a zany attitude or humorous anecdote? Please send your offering to ped@iop.org marked Signing Off.

  20. High levels of serum mannose-binding lectin are associated with the severity of clinical signs of leptospirosis.

    PubMed

    Miranda, K A; Vasconcelos, L R S; Coelho, L C B B; Lima Filho, J L; Cavalcanti, M S M; Moura, P

    2009-04-01

    The clinical heterogeneity observed in leptospirosis may be associated with host factors or bacteria virulence. Human serum mannose-binding lectin (MBL) recognizes many pathogens, and low levels of this lectin are associated with susceptibility to infection. MBL is also implicated in the modulation of the inflammatory process. We determined the levels of serum MBL during leptospirosis infection. A double-antibody sandwich ELISA was used to detect the immunoreactive serum MBL. The ELISA plates were coated with monoclonal antibody to MBL and bound MBL or recombinant human MBL were detected by rabbit anti-human MBL serum. HRPO-conjugated goat anti-rabbit antibody was used for detection of the reaction. Two groups of patients seen at referral hospitals in Recife, PE, Brazil, were divided according to the year of infection, 2001 (N = 61) or 2002 (N = 57) and compared in terms of disease severity and levels of serum MBL. A group of healthy volunteers (N = 97) matched by age, gender, and ethnic background was used as control. Patients infected in 2001 had more severe outcomes than those infected in 2002, including jaundice, hemorrhage, respiratory alteration, and renal complication (P = 0.0009; chi-square test). The frequency of patients producing serum MBL >1000 ng/mL was higher in the 2001 group than in the 2002 and control groups (P < 0.01), suggesting an association of MBL level with disease severity. The involvement of MBL and genetic variation of the MBL2 gene should be further evaluated to establish the role of this lectin in the pathogenesis of leptospirosis.

  1. A study of neurosonogram abnormalities, clinical correlation with neurosonogram findings, and immediate outcome of high-risk neonates in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Nagaraj, Niranjan; Berwal, Pramod Kumar; Srinivas, Anusha; Sehra, Ramnarayan; Swami, Sarika; Jeevaji, Prathyusha; Swami, Gotam; Choudary, Lokesh; Berwal, Ayush

    2016-01-01

    Background: Neonatal sonography of the brain is now an essential part of newborn care, particularly in high risk and unstable premature infants. Cranial ultrasound is the most available and easily repeatable imaging technique for the neonatal brain showing brain development and the most frequently occurring forms of cerebral injury in the preterm and terms. This study aims to assess the importance of cranial ultrasound as an investigatory modality for high-risk neonates and to find out the morphology of various cerebral lesions and correlate clinically. Methodology: An observational correlation clinical study was conducted at Sardar Patel Medical College, Bikaner involving 100 high-risk neonates admitted to Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) who was subjected to neurosonography on selected days as per protocol. Perinatal details were recorded, and clinical examination with appropriate investigations was done. The cranial ultrasound was done, and morphology of various findings was studied and recorded. Clinical correlation with cranial ultrasound findings and follow-up was done. Results: On cranial ultrasound, 38% of neonates had abnormal findings. Twelve percent of these had evidence of intracranial bleed, 13% periventricular echogenicity, 7% had ventriculomegaly, 2% had cerebral edema, and 1% had leukomalacia. Three neonates had findings suggestive of simple cyst in middle cranial fossa, agenesis of corpus callosum, and choroid plexus cyst. Conclusions: Cranial ultrasonography is the best point of care neuroimaging method available for high-risk neonates. It is critical as an investigatory modality in NICU and effectively documents morphology of cerebral damage. PMID:27857787

  2. Diffuse white matter tract abnormalities in clinically normal ageing retired athletes with a history of sports-related concussions.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, Sebastien; Henry, Luke C; Bedetti, Christophe; Larson-Dupuis, Camille; Gagnon, Jean-François; Evans, Alan C; Théoret, Hugo; Lassonde, Maryse; De Beaumont, Louis

    2014-11-01

    Sports-related concussions have been shown to lead to persistent subclinical anomalies of the motor and cognitive systems in young asymptomatic athletes. In advancing age, these latent alterations correlate with detectable motor and cognitive function decline. Until now, the interacting effects of concussions and the normal ageing process on white matter tract integrity remain unknown. Here we used a tract-based spatial statistical method to uncover potential white matter tissue damage in 15 retired athletes with a history of concussions, free of comorbid medical conditions. We also investigated potential associations between white matter integrity and declines in cognitive and motor functions. Compared to an age- and education-matched control group of 15 retired athletes without concussions, former athletes with concussions exhibited widespread white matter anomalies along many major association, interhemispheric, and projection tracts. Group contrasts revealed decreases in fractional anisotropy, as well as increases in mean and radial diffusivity measures in the concussed group. These differences were primarily apparent in fronto-parietal networks as well as in the frontal aspect of the corpus callosum. The white matter anomalies uncovered in concussed athletes were significantly associated with a decline in episodic memory and lateral ventricle expansion. Finally, the expected association between frontal white matter integrity and motor learning found in former non-concussed athletes was absent in concussed participants. Together, these results show that advancing age in retired athletes presenting with a history of sports-related concussions is linked to diffuse white matter abnormalities that are consistent with the effects of traumatic axonal injury and exacerbated demyelination. These changes in white matter integrity might explain the cognitive and motor function declines documented in this population.

  3. From primary care to hospitalization: clinical warning signs of severe dengue fever in children and adolescents during an outbreak in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Gerusa; Souza-Santos, Reinaldo; Brasil, Patrícia; Pacheco, Antonio Guilherme; Cruz, Oswaldo G; Honório, Nildimar Alves; Kubelka, Claire; Carvalho, Marilia Sá

    2013-01-01

    We analyzed factors associated with severe cases of dengue in children and adolescents hospitalized during the 2007/2008 epidemic in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. This is a retrospective case-control study that covers 88 cases of severe dengue in patients admitted to four tertiary care children's hospitals. Controls consisted of 22 children with non-severe dengue living in the same neighborhood as the patients with severe dengue. Differences in prevalence of the clinical signs - abdominal pain, breathing difficulty, drowsiness or irritability - emerged on the third day after the onset of symptoms, in the febrile stage. Cases and controls received first medical care at the same clinical stage of disease. However, hospital admission of severe cases occurred later, on average between the third and fourth day after the onset of the disease. Early discharge of patients with fever whose condition could have progressed to severe dengue may have been a consequence of the type of medical assistance provided by primary care units, suggesting deficiencies both in the use of the risk classification protocol and patient triage.

  4. The long-term clinical implications of clonal chromosomal abnormalities in newly diagnosed chronic phase chronic myeloid leukemia patients treated with imatinib mesylate.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung-Eun; Choi, Soo Young; Bang, Ju-Hee; Kim, Soo-Hyun; Jang, Eun-Jung; Byeun, Ji-Young; Park, Jin Eok; Jeon, Hye-Rim; Oh, Yun Jeong; Kim, Myungshin; Kim, Dong-Wook

    2012-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the long-term clinical significance of an additional chromosomal abnormality (ACA), variant Philadelphia chromosome (vPh) at diagnosis, and newly developed other chromosomal abnormalities (OCA) in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) on imatinib (IM) therapy. Sequential cytogenetic data from 281 consecutive new chronic phase CML patients were analyzed. With a median follow-up of 78.6 months, the 22 patients with vPh (P = 0.034) or ACA (P = 0.034) at diagnosis had more events of IM failure than did the patients with a standard Ph. The 5-year overall survival (OS), event-free survival (EFS), and failure-free survival (FFS) rates for patients with vPh at diagnosis were 77.8%, 75.0%, and 53.3%, respectively; for patients with ACA at diagnosis, 100%, 66.3%, and 52.1%, respectively; and for patients with a standard Ph, 96.0%, 91.3%, and 83.7%, respectively. During IM therapy, eight patients developed an OCA, which had no impact on outcomes as a time-dependent covariate in our Cox proportional hazards regression models. This study showed that vPh was associated with poor OS and FFS and that ACA had adverse effects on EFS and FFS. In addition, no OCA, except monosomy 7, had any prognostic impact, suggesting that the development of OCA may not require a change in treatment strategy.

  5. Signing off

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-09-01

    Physics Related Aptitude Test As the teacher shortage bites anyone with a degree in science expects to walk into a school and be received, with open arms, as a physics teacher. Are they really suitable? To help you decide Signing Off provides the following invaluable psychometric test. Extensively researched and, for single users only, it comes completely free to Physics Education subscribers! (Copies of this Physics Related Aptitude Test are available to credit-card customers from prat@realripoff.com priced #35 per client, 125 dollars to US customers.) This invaluable psychometric test has been extensively researched. Your first lesson of the new school year introduces the study of electricity. Do you: A Use the notes prepared by your predecessor. B Find a video on electricity and play it to the class. C Arrange a series of exciting practical demonstrations to stimulate the young inquiring mind. D Let the children design and make their own circuits to light flashlight bulbs. Your 14-year-olds have completed a written test on heat and energy. Do you: A Mark correct only the work of students who have written their names neatly at the top LEFT HAND corner, as required. B Only set multiple choice tests, so that the computer can mark them for you. C Mark carefully by hand, explaining in detail to each student exactly how and why they have made errors and adding encouraging comments with lots of praise. D Give out correct sets of answers and allow students to mark their own work. There is a staff social. Do you: A Ask for a definition of the term 'social'. B Ask for a web-based version. C Determine to go, so that you can discuss setting up cross-curricular links with colleagues. D Join the organizing committee. Who do you admire most? A Sir Isaac Newton. B Bill Gates. C Leonardo da Vinci. D Leonardo di Caprio. You are required to teach biology class. Your response is: A Denial. B To ask for an appropriate computer simulation. C To attend a specialized course for biology

  6. Topographic abnormalities of proinsulin to insulin conversion in functioning human insulinomas. Comparison of immunoelectron microscopic and clinical data.

    PubMed Central

    Roth, J.; Komminoth, P.; Heitz, P. U.

    1995-01-01

    It has been proposed that the major defect in human insulinomas is a decreased hormone storage capacity resulting in uncontrolled release of proinsulin and insulin. By immunoelectron microscopy with monoclonal antibodies we studied the subcellular distribution of proinsulin and insulin in benign and malignant functioning insulinomas of different histology and compared the findings with various clinical and pathohistological parameters. We found that, in contrast to normal B cells, the proinsulin to insulin conversion in insulinomas occurs already in the trans Golgi apparatus but remains incomplete, resulting in the formation of secretory granules containing both proinsulin and insulin. Thus, in functioning insulinomas, sorting into secretory granules is not a prerequisite for hormone conversion. Furthermore, proinsulin and insulin storage and most probably subsequent secretion occurs through the secretory granules via the regulated pathway. A substantial variability for both proinsulin and insulin immunolabeling in secretory granules was found not only in individual tumor cells but also among the insulinomas studied. This observed variability may account for the lack of correlation between pathohistological, immunohistochemical, and clinical parameters in functioning insulinomas. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:7639339

  7. Abnormalities of gonadal differentiation.

    PubMed

    Berkovitz, G D; Seeherunvong, T

    1998-04-01

    Gonadal differentiation involves a complex interplay of developmental pathways. The sex determining region Y (SRY) gene plays a key role in testis determination, but its interaction with other genes is less well understood. Abnormalities of gonadal differentiation result in a range of clinical problems. 46,XY complete gonadal dysgenesis is defined by an absence of testis determination. Subjects have female external genitalia and come to clinical attention because of delayed puberty. Individuals with 46,XY partial gonadal dysgenesis usually present in the newborn period for the valuation of ambiguous genitalia. Gonadal histology always shows an abnormality of seminiferous tubule formation. A diagnosis of 46,XY true hermaphroditism is made if the gonads contain well-formed testicular and ovarian elements. Despite the pivotal role of the SRY gene in testis development, mutations of SRY are unusual in subjects with a 46,XY karyotype and abnormal gonadal development. 46,XX maleness is defined by testis determination in an individual with a 46,XX karyotype. Most affected individuals have a phenotype similar to that of Klinefelter syndrome. In contrast, subjects with 46,XX true hermaphroditism usually present with ambiguous genitalia. The majority of subjects with 46,XX maleness have Y sequences including SRY in genomic DNA. However, only rare subjects with 46,XX true hermaphroditism have translocated sequences encoding SRY. Mosaicism and chimaerism involving the Y chromosome can also be associated with abnormal gonadal development. However, the vast majority of subjects with 45,X/46,XY mosaicism have normal testes and normal male external genitalia.

  8. Disturbed right ventricular ejection pattern as a new Doppler echocardiographic sign of acute pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Kurzyna, Marcin; Torbicki, Adam; Pruszczyk, Piotr; Burakowska, Barbara; Fijałkowska, Anna; Kober, Jaroslaw; Oniszh, Karina; Kuca, Paweł; Tomkowski, Witold; Burakowski, Janusz; Wawrzyńska, Liliana

    2002-09-01

    Transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) is frequently performed in patients with suspected acute pulmonary embolism (APE) to search for right ventricular (RV) pressure overload. We prospectively assessed the diagnostic value of a new Doppler echocardiographic sign of APE based on the disturbed RV ejection pattern ("60/60 sign") and compared its diagnostic performances with that of the presence of RV pressure overload, as well as with "McConnell sign" based on RV regional wall motion abnormalities. We assessed 100 consecutive patients with clinical suspicion of APE, including those with previous cardiorespiratory diseases. After TTE, all of the patients underwent reference diagnostic tests for APE. The 60/60 sign required RV acceleration time of sign correctly suggested APE, whereas 2 false-positive results were noted: in pulmonary fibrosis and in acute respiratory distress syndrome following lung resection. McConnell sign was fully specific but was noted in only 13 of 67 patients. Sensitivity and specificity were 81% and 45% for "RV-pressure overload" signs, 25% and 94% for 60/60 sign, and 19% and 100% for McConnell sign. When combined, the 2 latter signs were 94% specific and 36% sensitive in diagnosing APE. Thus, RV overload at echocardiography is not specific for APE. The 60/60 and McConnell signs are insensitive, but are reliable and helpful in bedside diagnosis of APE when direct visualization of the pulmonary arteries is impossible. Combining these 2 signs may increase the sensitivity without compromising the specificity of echocardiographic diagnosis of APE.

  9. [Neurological soft signs in schizophrenia: correlations with age, sex, educational status and psychopathology].

    PubMed

    Panagiotidis, P; Kaprinis, G; Iacovides, A; Fountoulakis, K

    2013-01-01

    Though the pathobiology of schizophrenia can be examined in multiple levels, the organic notion of brain disease suggests that neurological features will be present. One straightforward, inexpensive method of investigating brain dysfunction in schizophrenia is thought the bedside assessment of neurological abnormalities with a standard neurological examination. Neurological abnormalities are traditionally classified as "hard signs" (impairments in basic motor, sensory, and reflex behaviors, which do not appear to be affected in schizophrenia) and "soft signs", which refer to more complex phenomena such as abnormalities in motor control, integrative sensory function, sensorimotor integration, and cerebral laterality. Additionally, neurological soft signs (NSS) are minor motor and sensory abnormalities that are considered to be normal in the course of early development but abnormal when elicited in later life or persist beyond childhood. Soft signs also, have no definitive localizing significance but are indicative of subtle brain dysfunction. Most authors believe that they are a reflection not only of deficient integration between the sensory and motor systems, but also of dysfunctional neuronal circuits linking subcortical brain structures such as the basal ganglia, the brain stem, and the limbic system. Throughout the last four decades, studies have consistently shown that NSS are more frequently present in patients with schizophrenia than in normal subjects and non-psychotic psychiatric patients. However, the functional relevance of NSS remains unclear and their specificity has often been challenged, even though there is indication for a relative specificity with regard to diagnosis, or symptomatology. Many studies have considered soft signs as categorical variables thus hampering the evaluation of fluctuation with symptomatology and/or treatment, whereas other studies included insufficient number of assessed signs, or lacked a comprehensive assessment of

  10. [Hemiplegia with two Babinski's sign].

    PubMed

    Leon-Sarmiento, Fidias E; Montoya, María C; Camacho, John E; Bayona-Prieto, Jaime; Bayona, Edgardo

    2007-01-01

    Neurological signs and symptoms are very important to establish a correct neurological diagnosis. We present here a Colombian female patient, 60 years-old, who had ischaemic stroke in the left cerebral media artery. It produced right hemiplegia, motor aphasia, "central" facial palsy and atrophy of right platysma muscle. This latter finding, described originally by Joseph Babinski as "The Babinski Sign" was observed only two years and seven months after the ictus even when she had, previously, been evaluated by several neurologists. The underdiagnosis of clinical signs like the one described here may lead to erroneous diagnosis that will, ultimately, affect neurorehabilitation measures.

  11. Corneal abnormalities in Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type VI.

    PubMed

    Cameron, J A

    1993-01-01

    Eleven patients with blue sclera, limbus-to-limbus corneal thinning, hypermobile joints, and consanguineous parents were examined between January 1983 and September 1991. The clinical diagnosis was consistent with the Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type VI phenotype in all patients. A "halo" sign at the limbus was present in all patients. Corneal rupture occurred in seven patients (nine eyes) either spontaneously or following minimal trauma. Acute hydrops occurred in three patients. Bilateral microcornea was present in one patient and two patients had a unilateral increased corneal diameter as a result of secondary glaucoma after trauma. Peripheral sclerocornea was present bilaterally in five patients. Curvature abnormalities included cornea plana, keratoconus, and keratoglobus.

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging quality and volumes of brain structures from live and postmortem imaging of California sea lions with clinical signs of domoic acid toxicosis.

    PubMed

    Montie, Eric W; Wheeler, Elizabeth; Pussini, Nicola; Battey, Thomas W K; Barakos, Jerome; Dennison, Sophie; Colegrove, Kathleen; Gulland, Frances

    2010-09-17

    Our goal in this study was to compare magnetic resonance images and volumes of brain structures obtained alive versus postmortem of California sea lions Zalophus californianus exhibiting clinical signs of domoic acid (DA) toxicosis and those exhibiting normal behavior. Proton density-(PD) and T2-weighted images of postmortem-intact brains, up to 48 h after death, provided similar quality to images acquired from live sea lions. Volumes of gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM) of the cerebral hemispheres were similar to volumes calculated from images acquired when the sea lions were alive. However, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) volumes decreased due to leakage. Hippocampal volumes from postmortem-intact images were useful for diagnosing unilateral and bilateral atrophy, consequences of DA toxicosis. These volumes were similar to the volumes in the live sea lion studies, up to 48 h postmortem. Imaging formalin-fixed brains provided some information on brain structure; however, images of the hippocampus and surrounding structures were of poorer quality compared to the images acquired alive and postmortem-intact. Despite these issues, volumes of cerebral GM and WM, as well as the hippocampus, were similar to volumes calculated from images of live sea lions and sufficient to diagnose hippocampal atrophy. Thus, postmortem MRI scanning (either intact or formalin-fixed) with volumetric analysis can be used to investigate the acute, chronic and possible developmental effects of DA on the brain of California sea lions.

  13. The utility of testing tactile perception of direction of scratch as a sensitive clinical sign of posterior column dysfunction in spinal cord disorders.

    PubMed Central

    Hankey, G J; Edis, R H

    1989-01-01

    Classical beliefs about the functions of the dorsal columns of the spinal cord have been attacked following recent evidence that position and vibration sensations may be carried in the dorsal spinocerebellar tracts. There is evidence that the one specific function of the dorsal columns is for the transmission of information concerning the direction of tactile cutaneous movement. Thirty normal controls, 43 patients with spinal cord disorders and 10 patients with functional disorders were examined prospectively using an easily administered "direction of scratch" protocol. Interpretation of the direction of a 2 cm vertical tactile cutaneous movement over the lower limbs was found to be accurate in normal controls and grossly inaccurate in patients with functional disorders, exceeding the error rate of guessing. Detection of direction of 2 cm scratch was moderately impaired in 11 of 13 patients with spastic paraparesis and preserved sensation to all other modalities and 23 of 24 patients with spastic paraparesis and impaired proprioception and/or vibration sensations. Direction of 2 cm scratch, proprioception and vibration sensations were preserved in the three cases with anterior spinal cord syndromes. It is proposed that tactile perception of direction of 2 cm scratch over the lower limbs is a sensitive sign of posterior column function which can be usefully incorporated into the clinical sensory examination in the evaluation of spinal cord disorders. PMID:2926427

  14. Escherichia coli strain Nissle 1917 ameliorates experimental colitis by modulating intestinal permeability, the inflammatory response and clinical signs in a faecal transplantation model.

    PubMed

    Souza, Éricka L; Elian, Samir D; Paula, Laís M; Garcia, Cristiana C; Vieira, Angélica T; Teixeira, Mauro M; Arantes, Rosa M; Nicoli, Jacques R; Martins, Flaviano S

    2016-03-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) are a group of inflammatory conditions of the gut that include ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease. Probiotics are live micro-organisms that may be used as adjuvant therapy for patients with IBD. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of prophylactic ingestion of Escherichia coli strain Nissle 1917 (EcN) in a murine model of colitis. For induction of colitis, mice were given a 3.5% dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) solution for 7 days in drinking water. EcN administration to mice subjected to DSS-induced colitis resulted in significant reduction in clinical and histopathological signs of disease and preservation of intestinal permeability. We observed reduced inflammation, as assessed by reduced levels of neutrophils, eosinophils, chemokines and cytokines. We observed an increase in the number of regulatory T-cells in Peyer's patches. Germ-free mice received faecal content from control or EcN-treated mice and were then subjected to DSS-induced colitis. We observed protection from colitis in animals that were colonized with faecal content from EcN-treated mice. These results suggest that preventative oral administration of EcN or faecal microbiota transplantation with EcN-containing microbiota ameliorates DSS-induced colitis by modifying inflammatory responsiveness to DSS.

  15. Prevalence of bacterial species in cats with clinical signs of lower urinary tract disease: recognition of Staphylococcus felis as a possible feline urinary tract pathogen.

    PubMed

    Litster, Annette; Moss, Susan M; Honnery, Mary; Rees, Bob; Trott, Darren J

    2007-03-31

    This study investigated the prevalence of bacterial pathogens of the urinary tract in Australian cats. Urine was collected by cystocentesis and subjected to urinalysis, bacterial culture and susceptibility testing. A total of 126 isolates were obtained from 107 culture-positive cats. Escherichia coli was most commonly isolated (37.3% of isolates) with the majority of isolates showing susceptibility to the 14 antimicrobials tested. Just over a quarter of isolates (27.0%) were Enterococcus faecalis, which showed resistance to cephalosporins and clindamycin. Staphylococcus felis, a previously unreported feline urinary tract pathogen which was susceptible to all antimicrobial agents tested, comprised 19.8% of the isolates. S. felis was significantly associated with urine that had a higher specific gravity (p=0.011) and pH (p=0.006) and was more likely to contain crystals (p=0.002) than urine from which other bacterial species were isolated. This is the first published study that associates the isolation of S. felis with clinical signs of lower urinary tract disease in cats.

  16. The influence of Multiwave Locked System (MLS) laser therapy on clinical features, microcirculatory abnormalities and selected modulators of angiogenesis in patients with Raynaud's phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Kuryliszyn-Moskal, Anna; Kita, Jacek; Dakowicz, Agnieszka; Chwieśko-Minarowska, Sylwia; Moskal, Diana; Kosztyła-Hojna, Bożena; Jabłońska, Ewa; Klimiuk, Piotr Adrian

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of the Multiwave Locked System (MLS) laser therapy on clinical features, microvascular changes in nailfold videocapillaroscopy (NVC) and circulating modulators releasing as a consequence of vascular endothelium injury such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and angiopoietin 2 (Ang-2) in patients with primary and secondary Raynaud's phenomenon. Seventy-eight RP patients and 30 healthy volunteers were recruited into the study. All patients with RP received MLS laser irradiation for 3 weeks. Clinical, NVC and laboratory investigations were performed before and after the MLS laser therapy. The serum concentration of VEGF and Ang-2 were determined by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). After 3 weeks of MLS laser therapy, the clinical improvement manifested by decreasing of the number of RP attacks, mean duration of Raynaud's attack and pain intensity in RP patients was observed. After MLS laser therapy in 65% of patients with primary and in 35% with secondary RP, an increase in the loop number and/or a reduction in avascular areas in NVC were observed. In comparison with a control group, higher serum concentration of VEGF and Ang-2 in RP patients was demonstrated. After MLS laser therapy, a reduction of Ang-2 in both groups of RP patients was found. Our results suggest that NVC may reflect microvascular changes associated with clinical improvement after MLS laser therapy in patients with primary and secondary RP. Ang-2 serum levels may be a useful marker of microvascular abnormalities in RP patients treated with MLS laser therapy.

  17. Does Dietary Deoxynivalenol Modulate the Acute Phase Reaction in Endotoxaemic Pigs?—Lessons from Clinical Signs, White Blood Cell Counts, and TNF-Alpha

    PubMed Central

    Tesch, Tanja; Bannert, Erik; Kluess, Jeannette; Frahm, Jana; Kersten, Susanne; Breves, Gerhard; Renner, Lydia; Kahlert, Stefan; Rothkötter, Hermann-Josef; Dänicke, Sven

    2015-01-01

    We studied the interaction between deoxynivalenol (DON)-feeding and a subsequent pre- and post-hepatic immune stimulus with the hypothesis that the liver differently mediates the acute phase reaction (APR) in pigs. Barrows (n = 44) were divided into a DON-(4.59 mg DON/kg feed) and a control-diet group, surgically equipped with permanent catheters pre- (V. portae hepatis) and post-hepatic (V. jugularis interna) and infused either with 0.9% NaCl or LPS (7.5 µg/kg BW). Thus, combination of diet (CON vs. DON) and infusion (CON vs. LPS, jugular vs. portal) created six groups: CON_CONjug.-CONpor., CON_CONjug.-LPSpor., CON_LPSjug.-CONpor., DON_CONjug.-CONpor., DON_CONjug.-LPSpor., DON_LPSjug.-CONpor.. Blood samples were taken at −30, 15, 30, 45, 60, 75, 90, 120, 150, 180 min relative to infusion and analyzed for leukocytes and TNF-alpha. Concurrently, clinical signs were scored and body temperature measured during the same period. LPS as such induced a dramatic rise in TNF-alpha (p < 0.001), hyperthermia (p < 0.01), and severe leukopenia (p < 0.001). In CON-fed pigs, an earlier return to physiological base levels was observed for the clinical complex, starting at 120 min post infusionem (p < 0.05) and persisting until 180 min. DON_LPSjug.-CONpor. resulted in a lower temperature rise (p = 0.08) compared to CON_LPSjug.-CONpor.. In conclusion, APR resulting from a post-hepatic immune stimulus was altered by chronic DON-feeding. PMID:26703732

  18. Does Dietary Deoxynivalenol Modulate the Acute Phase Reaction in Endotoxaemic Pigs?--Lessons from Clinical Signs, White Blood Cell Counts, and TNF-Alpha.

    PubMed

    Tesch, Tanja; Bannert, Erik; Kluess, Jeannette; Frahm, Jana; Kersten, Susanne; Breves, Gerhard; Renner, Lydia; Kahlert, Stefan; Rothkötter, Hermann-Josef; Dänicke, Sven

    2015-12-23

    We studied the interaction between deoxynivalenol (DON)-feeding and a subsequent pre- and post-hepatic immune stimulus with the hypothesis that the liver differently mediates the acute phase reaction (APR) in pigs. Barrows (n = 44) were divided into a DON-(4.59 mg DON/kg feed) and a control-diet group, surgically equipped with permanent catheters pre- (V. portae hepatis) and post-hepatic (V. jugularis interna) and infused either with 0.9% NaCl or LPS (7.5 µg/kg BW). Thus, combination of diet (CON vs. DON) and infusion (CON vs. LPS, jugular vs. portal) created six groups: CON_CON(jug.)-CON(por.), CON_CON(jug.)-LPS(por.), CON_LPS(jug.)-CON(por.), DON_CON(jug.)-CON(por.), DON_CON(jug.)-LPS(por.), DON_LPS(jug.)-CON(por.). Blood samples were taken at -30, 15, 30, 45, 60, 75, 90, 120, 150, 180 min relative to infusion and analyzed for leukocytes and TNF-alpha. Concurrently, clinical signs were scored and body temperature measured during the same period. LPS as such induced a dramatic rise in TNF-alpha (p < 0.001), hyperthermia (p < 0.01), and severe leukopenia (p < 0.001). In CON-fed pigs, an earlier return to physiological base levels was observed for the clinical complex, starting at 120 min post infusionem (p < 0.05) and persisting until 180 min. DON_LPS(jug.)-CON(por.) resulted in a lower temperature rise (p = 0.08) compared to CON_LPS(jug.)-CON(por.). In conclusion, APR resulting from a post-hepatic immune stimulus was altered by chronic DON-feeding.

  19. Frontotemporal lobar degeneration with ubiquitin pathology: an autopsy case presenting with semantic dementia and upper motor neuron signs with a clinical course of 19 years.

    PubMed

    Yokota, Osamu; Tsuchiya, Kuniaki; Itoh, Yoshinori; Ishizu, Hideki; Akiyama, Haruhiko; Ikeda, Manabu; Kuzuhara, Shigeki; Otomo, Eiichi

    2006-12-01

    We report a case of a right-handed 74-year-old man who showed semantic dementia with a disease duration of 19 years. He initially presented with excessive use of pronouns and semantic paraphasia at the age of 55 years. Impairment of object recognition developed 5 years after the onset. Face recognition impairment and stereotypic behaviors developed 11 years after onset, and pyramidal signs 2 years before death. Pathological examination disclosed circumscribed severe atrophy in not only the bilateral temporal tips but also in the left precentral gyrus and pars opercularis in a motor speech field. Pyramidal tract involvement and loss of Betz cells were also evident. On the other hand, neurons in the anterior horns and hypoglossal nuclei were spared in number, although astrocytes were mildly proliferated. Ubiquitin-positive lesions were observed in the hippocampus, and frontal and temporal cortices. Neither Bunina bodies nor Pick bodies were present. These features clinically fit the international diagnostic criteria of semantic dementia and, histopathologically, frontotemporal lobar degeneration with motor neuron disease (FTLD-MND). This case suggests that (1) the distribution of cortical lesions associated with language disturbance is not uniform in FTLD-MND. It may be that only some cases of FTLD with ubiquitin pathology develop semantic dementia despite the high incidence of language disturbance, and (2) the precentral gyrus can be severely affected in FTLD-MND. After reviewing previous cases of FTLD-MND with a clinical course of more than 10 years, we also noticed that (3) FTLD-MND cases with a long disease duration often show upper motor neuron-predominant involvement.

  20. Electrocardiogram abnormalities among men with stress-related psychiatric disorders: implications for coronary heart disease and clinical research.

    PubMed

    Boscarino, J A; Chang, J

    1999-01-01

    Research suggests psychological distress could result in arterial endothelial injury and coronary heart disease (CHD). Studies also show Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) victims have higher circulating catecholamines and other sympathoadrenal-neuroendocrine bioactive agents implicated in arterial damage. Here we analyzed resting 12-lead electrocardiographic (ECG) results among a national sample of 4,462 nonhospitalized male veterans (mean age = 38) about 20 years after military service by current posttraumatic stress (n = 54), general anxiety (n = 186), and depression (n = 157) disorders. ECGs were interpreted by board-certified cardiologists and summarized using the Minnesota Code Manual of Electrocardiographic Findings. Psychiatric disorders were diagnosed based on the Diagnostic Interview Schedule, Version III. Controlling for age, place of service, illicit drug use, medication use, race, body mass index, alcohol use, cigarette smoking, and education, PTSD (odds ratio [OR] = 2.23, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.17-4.26, p < 0.05), anxiety (OR = 1.51, 95% CI = 1.03-2.22, p < 0.05), and depression (OR = 1.71, 95% CI = 1.13-2.58, p < 0.01) were associated with having a positive ECG finding. Specific results indicate PTSD was associated with atrioventricular (AV) conduction defects (OR = 2.81, 95% CI = 1.03-7.66, p < 0.05) and infarctions (OR = 4.44, 95% CI = 1.20-16.43, p < 0.05), while depression was associated with arrhythmias (OR = 1.98, 95% CI = 1.22-3.23, p < 0.01). The PTSD associations for AV conduction defects and infarctions held, even after controlling for current anxiety and depression. These findings suggest psychological distress may result in CHD, because we controlled for obvious biases and confounders, the men studied had current PTSD due to combat exposures 20 years ago, combat exposure was associated with anxiety and depression among these men, and the men were disease free a military induction. These findings suggest the need for clinical

  1. Importance of Assessing Cardiorespiratory Fitness in Clinical Practice: A Case for Fitness as a Clinical Vital Sign: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association.

    PubMed

    Ross, Robert; Blair, Steven N; Arena, Ross; Church, Timothy S; Després, Jean-Pierre; Franklin, Barry A; Haskell, William L; Kaminsky, Leonard A; Levine, Benjamin D; Lavie, Carl J; Myers, Jonathan; Niebauer, Josef; Sallis, Robert; Sawada, Susumu S; Sui, Xuemei; Wisløff, Ulrik

    2016-12-13

    Mounting evidence has firmly established that low levels of cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) are associated with a high risk of cardiovascular disease, all-cause mortality, and mortality rates attributable to various cancers. A growing body of epidemiological and clinical evidence demonstrates not only that CRF is a potentially stronger predictor of mortality than established risk factors such as smoking, hypertension, high cholesterol, and type 2 diabetes mellitus, but that the addition of CRF to traditional risk factors significantly improves the reclassification of risk for adverse outcomes. The purpose of this statement is to review current knowledge related to the association between CRF and health outcomes, increase awareness of the added value of CRF to improve risk prediction, and suggest future directions in research. Although the statement is not intended to be a comprehensive review, critical references that address important advances in the field are highlighted. The underlying premise of this statement is that the addition of CRF for risk classification presents health professionals with unique opportunities to improve patient management and to encourage lifestyle-based strategies designed to reduce cardiovascular risk. These opportunities must be realized to optimize the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular disease and hence meet the American Heart Association's 2020 goals.

  2. Pineal region tumors: Clinical symptoms and syndromes.

    PubMed

    Rousselle, C; des Portes, V; Berlier, P; Mottolese, C

    2015-01-01

    The present paper investigates the clinical picture and the different clinical signs that reveal pineal region tumors or appear during the course of the follow-up. Biological malignancy and tumor extension determine the semiology and its setting up mode. Typical endocrine signs, dominated by abnormal puberty development, are frequently a part of the clinical scene. Bifocal or ectopic localization in the hypothalamic-pituitary region is accompanied by other endocrine signs such as ante- or post-pituitary insufficiencies which occur several months or even years after the first neurological signs appear. Due to a mass syndrome and obstructive hydrocephalus, intracranial hypertension signs are frequent but unspecific. A careful ophthalmologic examination is essential to search upward gaze paralysis and other signs of the Parinaud's tetrad or pentad. Midbrain dysfunction, including extrinsic aqueduct stenosis, are also prevalent. Except for abnormal pubertal signs, hyper-melatoninemia (secretory tumors) or a-hypo-melatoninemia (tumors destructing pineal) generally remains dormant. Some patients present sleep problems such as narcolepsy or sleepiness during the daytime as well as behavioral problems. This suggests a hypothalamic extension rather than a true consequence of melatonin secretion anomalies. Similarly, some patients may present signs of a "pinealectomized" syndrome, including (cluster) headaches, tiredness, eventually responsive to melatonin.

  3. Effectiveness of individualized physiotherapy on pain and functioning compared to a standard exercise protocol in patients presenting with clinical signs of subacromial impingement syndrome. A randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Shoulder impingement syndrome is a common musculoskeletal complaint leading to significant reduction of health and disability. Physiotherapy is often the first choice of treatment although its effectiveness is still under debate. Systematic reviews in this field highlight the need for more high quality trials to investigate the effectiveness of physiotherapy interventions in patients with subacromial impingement syndrome. Methods/Design This randomized controlled trial will investigate the effectiveness of individualized physiotherapy in patients presenting with clinical signs and symptoms of subacromial impingement, involving 90 participants aged 18-75. Participants are recruited from outpatient physiotherapy clinics, general practitioners, and orthopaedic surgeons in Germany. Eligible participants will be randomly allocated to either individualized physiotherapy or to a standard exercise protocol using central randomization. The control group will perform the standard exercise protocol aiming to restore muscular deficits in strength, mobility, and coordination of the rotator cuff and the shoulder girdle muscles to unload the subacromial space during active movements. Participants of the intervention group will perform the standard exercise protocol as a home program, and will additionally be treated with individualized physiotherapy based on clinical examination results, and guided by a decision tree. After the intervention phase both groups will continue their home program for another 7 weeks. Outcome will be measured at 5 weeks and at 3 and 12 months after inclusion using the shoulder pain and disability index and patients' global impression of change, the generic patient-specific scale, the average weekly pain score, and patient satisfaction with treatment. Additionally, the fear avoidance beliefs questionnaire, the pain catastrophizing scale, and patients' expectancies of treatment effect are assessed. Participants' adherence to the protocol, use

  4. [C-sign and talocalcaneal coalition].

    PubMed

    Tomčovčík, L

    2011-01-01

    Talocalcaneal coalition is an abnormal bridge between talus and calcaneus, causing pain and restriction of subtalar movement; its incidence is less than 1 %. The signs and symptoms usually become manifest in the second decade of life with ossification of the lesion. They involve flat foot, peroneal muscle spasm, tarsal tunnel syndrome, or valgus tilt of the heel. The sings need not be noticeable and may appear only as tiredness and vague pain in the hind foot after exercise or an easily twisted ankle. The authors describe the case of talocalcaneal coalition in a 20-year-old man, incidentally diagnosed at ankle fracture. The presence of C-sign led to CT examination and the exact diagnosis. Radiological demonstration of this abnormality may be difficult because plain X-ray images in both projections may show normal findings. Literature data report, in addition to C-sign, further secondary signs of talocalcaneal coalition present on lateral radiographs of the ankle joint. Although these signs do not directly point to talocalcaneal coalition, they reveal abnormal anatomy or movement of the joint and may initiate more thorough examination by CT or MRI and the establishment of an exact diagnosis. Therefore, to know the secondary signs and pay attention to them is very useful.

  5. Elevated manganese levels in blood and central nervous system occur before onset of clinical signs in scrapie and bovine spongiform encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Hesketh, S; Sassoon, J; Knight, R; Hopkins, J; Brown, D R

    2007-06-01

    Prion diseases, or transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, are neurodegenerative diseases that can only be accurately diagnosed by analysis of central nervous system tissue for the presence of an abnormal isoform of the prion protein known as PrP(Sc). Furthermore, these diseases have long incubation periods during which there are no clear symptoms but where the infectious agent could still be present in the tissues. Therefore, the development of diagnostic assays to detect a surrogate marker for the presence of prion disease is essential. Previous studies on mice experimentally infected with scrapie, an ovine spongiform encephalopathy, suggested that changes in the levels of Mn occur in the blood and brain before the onset of symptoms of the disease. To assess whether these findings have relevance to the animal diseases scrapie and bovine spongiform encephalopathy, tissues from bovine spongiform encephalopathy- and scrapie-infected cattle and sheep were analyzed for their metal content and compared with values for noninfected animals. In field cases and experimentally infected animals, elevated Mn was associated with prion infection. Although some central nervous system regions showed elevated Mn, other regions did not. The most consistent finding was an elevation of Mn in blood. This change was present in experimentally infected animals before the onset of symptoms. In scrapie-infected sheep, elevated Mn levels occurred regardless of the genotype of the sheep and were even detected in scrapie-resistant sheep in which no symptoms of disease were detected. These findings suggest that elevated blood Mn could be a potential diagnostic marker for prion infection even in the absence of apparent clinical disease.

  6. Arm levitation sign in acute right frontoparietal infarct.

    PubMed

    Alanazy, Mohammed H; Menon, Bijoy K; Demchuk, Andrew M

    2011-01-01

    We present the case of an 80-year-old female with acute right fronto-parietal stroke and an interesting neurological sign on clinical examination; the arm levitation sign. We discuss the imaging correlates of this sign and hypothesize on the possible functional etiology of the sign. We also discuss in brief, the possibility of neuronal misconnections causing the sign and the resultant problems with rehabilitation when patients have this sign.

  7. Magnitude and sign correlations in heartbeat fluctuations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashkenazy, Y.; Ivanov, P. C.; Havlin, S.; Peng, C. K.; Goldberger, A. L.; Stanley, H. E.

    2001-01-01

    We propose an approach for analyzing signals with long-range correlations by decomposing the signal increment series into magnitude and sign series and analyzing their scaling properties. We show that signals with identical long-range correlations can exhibit different time organization for the magnitude and sign. We find that the magnitude series relates to the nonlinear properties of the original time series, while the sign series relates to the linear properties. We apply our approach to the heartbeat interval series and find that the magnitude series is long-range correlated, while the sign series is anticorrelated and that both magnitude and sign series may have clinical applications.

  8. Cutaneous abnormalities in rheumatoid arthritis compared with non‐inflammatory rheumatic conditions

    PubMed Central

    Douglas, K M J; Ladoyanni, E; Treharne, G J; Hale, E D; Erb, N; Kitas, G D

    2006-01-01

    Background Cutaneous abnormalities are common in rheumatoid arthritis, but exact prevalence estimates are yet to be established. Some abnormalities may be independent and coincidental, whereas others may relate to rheumatoid arthritis or its treatment. Objectives To determine the exact nature and point prevalence of cutaneous abnormalities in patients with rheumatoid arthritis compared with those in patients with non‐inflammatory rheumatic disease. Methods 349 consecutive outpatients for rheumatology (205 with rheumatoid arthritis and 144 with non‐inflammatory rheumatic conditions) were examined for skin and nail signs by a dermatologist. Histories of rheumatology, dermatology, drugs and allergy were noted in detail. Results Skin abnormalities were reported by more patients with rheumatoid arthritis (61%) than non‐inflammatory controls (47%). More patients with rheumatoid arthritis (39%) than controls (10%) attributed their skin abnormality to drugs. Cutaneous abnormalities observed by the dermatologist were also more common in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (76%) than in the group with non‐inflammatory disease (60%). Specifically, bruising, athlete's foot, scars, rheumatoid nodules and vasculitic lesions were more common in patients with rheumatoid arthritis than in controls. The presence of bruising was predicted only by current steroid use. The presence of any other specific cutaneous abnormalities was not predicted by any of the variables assessed. In the whole group, current steroid use and having rheumatoid arthritis were the only important predictors of having any cutaneous abnormality. Conclusions Self‐reported and observed cutaneous abnormalities are more common in patients with rheumatoid arthritis than in controls with non‐inflammatory disease. These include cutaneous abnormalities related to side effects of drugs or to rheumatoid arthritis itself and other abnormalities previously believed to be independent but which may be of clinical

  9. Association of Electrocardiographic Abnormalities with Coronary Artery Calcium and Carotid Artery Intima-Media Thickness in Individuals without Clinical Coronary Heart Disease (From the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis [MESA])

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd-Jones, Donald M.; Walsh, Joseph A; Prineas, Ronald J.; Ning, Hongyan; Liu, Kiang; Daviglus, Martha L.; Shea, Steven; Detrano, Robert C.; Tandri, Harikrishna; Greenland, Philip

    2010-01-01

    Isolated minor non-specific ST-segment and T-wave (NSSTA), minor and major electrocardiographic (ECG) abnormalities are established, independent risk markers for incident cardiovascular events. Their association with subclinical atherosclerosis has been postulated but is not clearly defined. The aim of this study is to define the association between ECG abnormalities and measures of subclinical atherosclerosis. We studied participants from MESA, a multi-ethnic sample of men and women aged 45–84 and free of clinical cardiovascular disease at enrollment. Baseline examination included measurement of traditional risk factors, resting 12-lead electrocardiograms, coronary artery calcium (CAC) measurement and common carotid intima-media thickness (CCIMT). Electrocardiograms were coded using Novacode criteria and were defined as having either minor abnormalities (e.g., minor non-specific STTA, first degree atrioventricular block, and QRS axis deviations) or major abnormalities (e.g., pathologic Q waves, major ST-segment and T-wave abnormalities, significant dysrhythmias and conduction system delays). Multivariable logistic and linear regressions were used to determine the cross-sectional associations of ECG abnormalities with CAC and common carotid-IMT. Among 6710 participants, 52.7% were women, with a mean age of 62 years. After multivariable-adjustment, isolated minor STTA, minor and major ECG abnormalities were not associated with the presence of CAC (>0) among men (OR 1.04, 95% CI 0.81–1.33; 1.10, 0.91–1.32; and 1.03, 0.81–1.31, respectively) or women (1.01, 0.82–1.24; 1.04, 0.87–1.23; and 0.94, 0.73–1.22, respectively). Lack of association remained consistent when using both log CAC and CC-IMT as continuous variables. ECG abnormalities are not associated with markers of subclinical atherosclerosis in a large multi-ethnic cohort. PMID:19801030

  10. Association of electrocardiographic abnormalities with coronary artery calcium and carotid artery intima-media thickness in individuals without clinical coronary heart disease (from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis [MESA]).

    PubMed

    Lloyd-Jones, Donald M; Walsh, Joseph A; Prineas, Ronald J; Ning, Hongyan; Liu, Kiang; Daviglus, Martha L; Shea, Steven; Detrano, Robert C; Tandri, Harikrishna; Greenland, Philip

    2009-10-15

    Isolated minor nonspecific ST-segment and T-wave abnormalities (NSSTAs), minor and major electrocardiographic (ECG) abnormalities are established, independent risk markers for incident cardiovascular events. Their association with subclinical atherosclerosis has been postulated but is not clearly defined. The aim of this study was to define the association between ECG abnormalities and measurements of subclinical atherosclerosis. We studied participants from MESA, a multiethnic sample of men and women 45 to 84 years of age and free of clinical cardiovascular disease at enrollment. Baseline examination included measurement of traditional risk factors, 12-lead electrocardiograms at rest, coronary artery calcium (CAC) measurement, and common carotid intima-media thickness (CC-IMT). Electrocardiograms were coded using Novacode criteria and were defined as having minor abnormalities (e.g., minor NSSTTAs, first-degree atrioventricular block, and QRS-axis deviations) or major abnormalities (e.g., pathologic Q waves, major STTAs, significant dysrhythmias, and conduction system delays). Multivariable logistic and linear regressions were used to determine cross-sectional associations of ECG abnormalities with CAC and CC-IMT. Of 6,710 participants, 52.7% were women, with a mean age of 62 years. After multivariable adjustment, isolated minor STTAs and minor and major ECG abnormalities were not associated with presence of CAC (>0) in men (odds ratio 1.04, 95% confidence interval 0.81 to 1.33; 1.10, 0.91 to 1.32; and 1.03, 0.81 to 1.31, respectively) or women (1.01, 0.82 to 1.24; 1.04, 0.87 to 1.23; and 0.94, 0.73 to 1.22, respectively). Lack of association remained consistent when using log CAC and CC-IMT as continuous variables. In conclusion, ECG abnormalities are not associated with markers of subclinical atherosclerosis in a large multiethnic cohort.

  11. Q-angle and J-sign: indicative of maltracking subgroups in patellofemoral pain.

    PubMed

    Sheehan, Frances T; Derasari, Aditya; Fine, Kenneth M; Brindle, Timothy J; Alter, Katharine E

    2010-01-01

    Mechanical factors related to patellofemoral pain syndrome and maltracking are poorly understood. Clinically, the Q-angle, J-sign, and lateral hypermobility commonly are used to evaluate patellar maltracking. However, these measures have yet to be correlated to specific three-dimensional patellofemoral displacements and rotations. Thus, we tested the hypotheses that increased Q-angle, lateral hypermobility, and J-sign correlate with three-dimensional patellofemoral displacements and rotations. We also determined whether multiple maltracking patterns can be discriminated, based on patellofemoral displacements and rotations. Three-dimensional patellofemoral motion data were acquired during active extension-flexion using dynamic MRI in 30 knees diagnosed with patellofemoral pain and at least one clinical sign of patellar maltracking (Q-angle, lateral hypermobility, or J-sign) and in 37 asymptomatic knees. Although the Q-angle is assumed to indicate lateral patellar subluxation, our data supported a correlation between the Q-angle and medial, not lateral, patellar displacement. We identified two distinct maltracking groups based on patellofemoral lateral-medial displacement, but the same groups could not be discriminated based on standard clinical measures (eg, Q-angle, lateral hypermobility, and J-sign). A more precise definition of abnormal three-dimensional patellofemoral motion, including identifying subgroups in the patellofemoral pain population, may allow more targeted and effective treatments.

  12. Roentgen signs in diagnostic imaging. Second edition

    SciTech Connect

    Meschan, I. Farrer-Meschan, R.M. )

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 13 chapters. Some of the titles are: Radiology of the diaphragm, pleura, thoracic cage, and upper air passages; Radiology of the breasts; Radiology of nodular lesions of the lung parenchyma; Roentgen signs of abnormalities in the lung: and overview; and Special examination of the larynx.

  13. Pattern of extrapyramidal signs in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Tosto, Giuseppe; Monsell, Sarah E; Hawes, Stephen E; Mayeux, Richard

    2015-11-01

    Patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) often develop extrapyramidal signs (EPS), which increase in frequency as the disease progresses. We aimed to investigate the patterns of presentation of EPS in AD and their correlation with clinical and neuropathological features. 4284 subjects diagnosed with AD from the National Alzheimer's Coordinating Center (NACC) database with at least one abnormal Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) assessment were included. Individuals were assigned to a discovery sample and a sensitivity analysis sample (moderate and mild dementia, respectively) and a subset of subjects provided neuropathological data (n = 284). Individuals from the Washington Heights and Inwood Columbia Aging Project (WHICAP) served as validation sample. Patterns of presentation of EPS were identified employing categorical principal component analysis (CATPCA). Six principal components were identified in both mild and moderate AD samples: (I) hand movements, alternating movements, finger tapping, leg agility ("limbs bradykinesia"); (II) posture, postural instability, arising from chair, gait and body bradykinesia/hypokinesia ("axial"); (III) limb rigidity ("rigidity"); (IV) postural tremor; (V) resting tremor; (VI) speech and facial expression. Similar results were obtained in the WHICAP cohort. Individuals with hallucinations, apathy, aberrant night behaviors and more severe dementia showed higher axial and limb bradykinesia scores. "Limb bradykinesia" component was associated with a neuropathological diagnosis of Lewy body disease and "axial" component with reduced AD-type pathology. Patterns of EPS in AD show distinct clinical and neuropathological correlates; they share a pattern of presentation similar to that seen in Parkinson's disease, suggesting common pathogenic mechanisms across neurodegenerative diseases.

  14. Epilepsy and chromosomal abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Many chromosomal abnormalities are associated with Central Nervous System (CNS) malformations and other neurological alterations, among which seizures and epilepsy. Some of these show a peculiar epileptic and EEG pattern. We describe some epileptic syndromes frequently reported in chromosomal disorders. Methods Detailed clinical assessment, electrophysiological studies, survey of the literature. Results In some of these congenital syndromes the clinical presentation and EEG anomalies seems to be quite typical, in others the manifestations appear aspecific and no strictly linked with the chromosomal imbalance. The onset of seizures is often during the neonatal period of the infancy. Conclusions A better characterization of the electro clinical patterns associated with specific chromosomal aberrations could give us a valuable key in the identification of epilepsy susceptibility of some chromosomal loci, using the new advances in molecular cytogenetics techniques - such as fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), subtelomeric analysis and CGH (comparative genomic hybridization) microarray. However further studies are needed to understand the mechanism of epilepsy associated with chromosomal abnormalities. PMID:20438626

  15. Anatomical Abnormalities in Autism?

    PubMed

    Haar, Shlomi; Berman, Sigal; Behrmann, Marlene; Dinstein, Ilan

    2016-04-01

    Substantial controversy exists regarding the presence and significance of anatomical abnormalities in autism spectrum disorders (ASD). The release of the Autism Brain Imaging Data Exchange (∼1000 participants, age 6-65 years) offers an unprecedented opportunity to conduct large-scale comparisons of anatomical MRI scans across groups and to resolve many of the outstanding questions. Comprehensive univariate analyses using volumetric, thickness, and surface area measures of over 180 anatomically defined brain areas, revealed significantly larger ventricular volumes, smaller corpus callosum volume (central segment only), and several cortical areas with increased thickness in the ASD group. Previously reported anatomical abnormalities in ASD including larger intracranial volumes, smaller cerebellar volumes, and larger amygdala volumes were not substantiated by the current study. In addition, multivariate classification analyses yielded modest decoding accuracies of individuals' group identity (<60%), suggesting that the examined anatomical measures are of limited diagnostic utility for ASD. While anatomical abnormalities may be present in distinct subgroups of ASD individuals, the current findings show that many previously reported anatomical measures are likely to be of low clinical and scientific significance for understanding ASD neuropathology as a whole in individuals 6-35 years old.

  16. Influence of the practice setting on diagnostic prediction rules using FENO measurement in combination with clinical signs and symptoms of asthma

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Antonius; Wagenpfeil, Gudrun; Jörres, Rudolf A; Wagenpfeil, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the influence of the practice setting on diagnostic accuracy of fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FENO) for diagnosing asthma; and to develop prediction rules for diagnostic decision-making including clinical signs and symptoms (CSS). Setting Patients from 10 general practices and 1 private practice of 5 pneumologists in ambulatory care. Participants 553 patients, 57.9% female. Consecutive inclusion of diagnostic-naive patients suspected of suffering from obstructive airway disease. Exclusion criteria were respiratory tract infections within the last 6 weeks. Interventions The index test was FENO measurement. Reference standard was the Tiffeneau ratio (forced expiratory volume in 1 s/vital capacity) or airway resistance as assessed by whole body plethysmography, with additional bronchoprovocation or bronchodilator testing. Primary and secondary outcome measures Asthma as determined by pneumologists, who were blind to FENO measurement results. Prediction rules were derived from multiple logistic regression analysis. A freely available calculator that allows computing all combinations was developed. Results The practice setting only had minor influence on sensitivities of FENO cut-off points. In the final model (n=472), allergic rhinitis, wheezing and previous medication were positively associated with asthma. Increasing age and recurrent respiratory tract infections were negatively associated. The area under the curve (AUC) of FENO (AUC=0.650; 95% CI 0.599 to 0.701) increased significantly (p<0.0001) when combined with CSS (AUC=0.753; 95% CI 0.707 to 0.798). Presence of wheezing and allergic rhinitis allowed ruling in asthma with FENO >30 ppb. Ruling out with FENO <16 ppb in patients <43 years was only possible without allergic symptoms when recurrent respiratory tract infections were present. Conclusions FENO results should be interpreted in the context of CSS to enhance their diagnostic value in primary care. The final diagnostic

  17. Electrocardiographic abnormalities in patients with Lassa fever.

    PubMed

    Cummins, D; Bennett, D; Fisher-Hoch, S P; Farrar, B; McCormick, J B

    1989-10-01

    Electrocardiograms from 32 patients with acute Lassa fever were abnormal in over 70% of cases. The changes noted included non-specific ST-segment and T-wave abnormalities, ST-segment elevation, generalized low-voltage complexes, and changes reflecting electrolyte disturbance. None of the abnormalities correlated with clinical severity of infection, serum transaminase levels, or eventual outcome. ECG changes are common in Lassa fever, but usually unassociated with clinical manifestations of myocarditis.

  18. Preliminary findings of similarities and differences in the signed and spoken language of children with autism.

    PubMed

    Shield, Aaron

    2014-11-01

    Approximately 30% of hearing children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) do not acquire expressive language, and those who do often show impairments related to their social deficits, using language instrumentally rather than socially, with a poor understanding of pragmatics and a tendency toward repetitive content. Linguistic abnormalities can be clinically useful as diagnostic markers of ASD and as targets for intervention. Studies have begun to document how ASD manifests in children who are deaf for whom signed languages are the primary means of communication. Though the underlying disorder is presumed to be the same in children who are deaf and children who hear, the structures of signed and spoken languages differ in key ways. This article describes similarities and differences between the signed and spoken language acquisition of children on the spectrum. Similarities include echolalia, pronoun avoidance, neologisms, and the existence of minimally verbal children. Possible areas of divergence include pronoun reversal, palm reversal, and facial grammar.

  19. Detection of canine distemper virus by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction in the urine of dogs with clinical signs of distemper encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Saito, T B; Alfieri, A A; Wosiacki, S R; Negrão, F J; Morais, H S A; Alfieri, A F

    2006-02-01

    In a prospective study we evaluated the use of the reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in urine samples to diagnose canine distemper virus in dogs with progressive neurological disease. A fragment of the nucleoprotein gene of canine distemper virus was amplified from the urine of 22 distemper dogs. The body fluids and leukocytes of 12 asymptomatic dogs were RT-PCR negative. RT-PCR of urine samples was more sensitive than serum and leukocytes and at least as sensitive as cerebrospinal fluid to screen for distemper in dogs with neurological signs and extraneural systemic signs.

  20. [The Einstein sign].

    PubMed

    Treska, V

    2003-02-01

    Untreated rupture of an aneurysm of the abdominal aorta is fatal in almost 100% of the patients. In the majority of cases the assessment of a correct, early diagnosis is simple (hypotension, backache, abdominal pain, pulsating resistance in the abdomen) and makes a prompt surgical or endovascular operation possible. In some instances however rupture of aneurysms of the abdominal aorta simulates other clinical conditions (acute cholecystitis, acute diverculitis of the sigmoid) which may delay the correct diagnosis and reduce the patient's chance of survival. The author describes, based on historical documents, the treacherous course of the disease in the scientific genius Albert Einstein where rupture of an aneurysm simulated acute cholecystitis, and in the world literature this symptomatology was subsequently described as Einstein's sign.

  1. Dorsal vertebral column abnormalities in dogs with disseminated idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH).

    PubMed

    Decker, S De; Volk, H A

    2014-06-21

    Although disseminated idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH) most often affects the ventral aspect of the vertebral column, this study evaluated the occurrence, nature and clinical relevance of dorsal vertebral column abnormalities in 10 dogs with DISH for which CT or MRI and a complete neurological examination were available. Dorsal vertebral column abnormalities were present in eight dogs and included articular process hypertrophy (n=7 dogs), periarticular new bone formation (n=1), pseudoarthrosis between spinous processes (n=4) and thickening of the dorsal lamina (n=4). These dorsal vertebral abnormalities caused clinically relevant vertebral canal stenosis in six dogs and were the only cause of clinical signs in four of these dogs. Although the lumbosacral joint was not affected by DISH, these six dogs demonstrated lumbosacral vertebral canal stenosis and clinical signs of cauda equina compression, which included paraparesis (n=5 dogs), lumbosacral pain (n=4), urinary incontinence (n=4), faecal incontinence (n=1) and urinary and faecal incontinence (n=1). There is a possible association between DISH and hypertrophy of dorsal vertebral structures, potentially resulting in vertebral canal stenosis. Although these changes occurred at segments fused by DISH, they predominantly affected adjacent non-affected segments.

  2. Hindlimb lameness and gait abnormalities in bitches with pyometra.

    PubMed

    Klainbart, S; Ranen, E; Glikman, G; Kelmer, E; Bdolah-Abram, T; Aroch, I

    2014-07-12

    The objective of this study was to assess the frequency of gait abnormalities and lameness (GAL) in bitches with pyometra, and their association with clinical and laboratory findings. The study included 79 bitches diagnosed with pyometra and 35 negative control intact bitches presented with other soft tissue surgical disorders. Dogs with a history of chronic lameness due to orthopaedic or neurological origin were excluded. A history of GAL was more frequent in the pyometra group (47 per cent) compared with the control group (20 per cent) (P=0.007). In the pyometra group, bitches presenting GAL had (P<0.04) higher frequencies of closed-cervix pyometra, anorexia and vomiting, as well as higher serum creatinine concentration and muscle enzymes activity, compared with those in without GAL. GAL signs resolved postovariohysterectomy in all but one bitch. The results suggest that GAL signs occur frequently in bitches with pyometra, especially in closed-cervix disease. Therefore, pyometra should be considered among the differential diagnoses when GAL occurs, especially when the clinical signs are non-specific and the reproductive history is unclear.

  3. Acute “Pseudoischemic” ECG Abnormalities after Right Pneumonectomy

    PubMed Central

    Dimic-Janjic, Sanja; Stevic, Ruza; Milenkovic, Branislava; Djukanovic, Verica

    2017-01-01

    New onset of electrocardiographic (ECG) abnormalities can occur after lung surgery due to the changes in the position of structures and organs in the chest cavity. The most common heart rhythm disorder is atrial fibrillation. So-called “pseudoischemic” ECG changes that mimic classic ECG signs of acute myocardial ischemia are also often noticed. We report the case of a 68-year-old male, with no prior cardiovascular disease, who underwent extensive surgical resection for lung cancer. On a second postoperative day, clinical and electrocardiographic signs of acute myocardial ischemia occurred. According to clinical course, diagnostic procedures, and therapeutic response, we excluded acute coronary syndrome. We concluded that physical lesion of the pericardium, caused by extended pneumonectomy with resection of the pericardium, provoked the symptoms and ECG signs that mimic acute coronary syndrome. Our final diagnosis was postpericardiotomy syndrome after extended pneumonectomy and further treatment with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) was recommended. It is necessary to consider possibility that nature of ECG changes after extended pneumonectomy could be “pseudoischemic.” PMID:28197356

  4. Skeletal abnormalities in homocystinuria.

    PubMed Central

    Brenton, D. P.

    1977-01-01

    The skeletal changes of thirty-four patients with the biochemical and clinical features of cystathionine synthase deficiency are described. It is emphasized that there is clinical evidence of excessive bone growth and the formation for bone which is structurally weaker than normal. The similarities and differences between this condition and Marfan's syndrome are stressed and the possible nature of the connective tissue defect leading to the skeletal changes discussed. The most characteristic skeletal changes in homocystinuria are the skeletal disproportion (pubis-heel length greater than crown-pubis length), the abnormal vertebrae, sternal deformities, genu valgum and large metaphyses and epiphyses. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 PMID:917963

  5. Warning Signs After Birth

    MedlinePlus

    ... what moms and moms-to-be need to know GO donate sign-up sign-in Sign out account center dashboard Our Cause Our mission Fighting premature birth About us Annual report Our work Community impact Global programs Research Need help? Frequently asked questions Contact us Tools & ...

  6. British Sign Name Customs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Day, Linda; Sutton-Spence, Rachel

    2010-01-01

    Research presented here describes the sign names and the customs of name allocation within the British Deaf community. While some aspects of British Sign Language sign names and British Deaf naming customs differ from those in most Western societies, there are many similarities. There are also similarities with other societies outside the more…

  7. Distal symmetrical polyneuropathy: definition for clinical research.

    PubMed

    England, J D; Gronseth, G S; Franklin, G; Miller, R G; Asbury, A K; Carter, G T; Cohen, J A; Fisher, M A; Howard, J F; Kinsella, L J; Latov, N; Lewis, R A; Low, P A; Sumner, A J

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this report was to develop a case definition of "distal symmetrical polyneuropathy" to standardize and facilitate clinical research and epidemiological studies. A formalized consensus process was employed to reach agreement after a systematic review and classification of evidence from the literature. The literature indicates that symptoms alone have relatively poor diagnostic accuracy in predicting the presence of polyneuropathy; signs are better predictors of polyneuropathy than symptoms; and single abnormalities on examination are less sensitive than multiple abnormalities in predicting the presence of polyneuropathy. The combination of neuropathic symptoms, signs, and electrodiagnostic findings provides the most accurate diagnosis of distal symmetrical polyneuropathy. A set of case definitions was rank ordered by likelihood of disease. The highest likelihood of polyneuropathy (useful for clinical trials) occurs with a combination of multiple symptoms, multiple signs, and abnormal electrodiagnostic studies. A modest likelihood of polyneuropathy (useful for field or epidemiological studies) occurs with a combination of multiple symptoms and multiple signs when the results of electrodiagnostic studies are not available. A lower likelihood of polyneuropathy occurs when electrodiagnostic studies and signs are discordant. For research purposes, the best approach for defining distal symmetrical polyneuropathy is a set of case definitions rank ordered by estimated likelihood of disease. The inclusion of this formalized case definition in clinical and epidemiological research studies will ensure greater consistency of case selection.

  8. On the System of Person-Denoting Signs in Estonian Sign Language: Estonian Name Signs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paales, Liina

    2010-01-01

    This article discusses Estonian personal name signs. According to study there are four personal name sign categories in Estonian Sign Language: (1) arbitrary name signs; (2) descriptive name signs; (3) initialized-descriptive name signs; (4) loan/borrowed name signs. Mostly there are represented descriptive and borrowed personal name signs among…

  9. Automated detection of malaria-associated pseudoeosinophilia and abnormal WBC scattergram by the Sysmex XE-2100 hematology analyzer: a clinical study with 1,801 patients and real-time quantitative PCR analysis in vivax malaria-endemic area.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Jong-Ha; Song, Jaewoo; Lee, Kyung-A; Sun, Young-Kyu; Kim, Young-Ah; Park, Tae Sung; Choi, Jong Rak

    2010-03-01

    Recently, the XE-2100 hematology analyzer was investigated in a rather small patient group; pseudoeosinophilia or abnormal white blood cell (WBC) scattergrams reported by this instrument were considered as significantly valuable diagnostic parameters in detecting vivax malaria. This study was conducted not only to assess the usefulness of pseudoeosinophilia or abnormal WBC scattergram in vivax malaria-endemic areas with large patient groups (N = 1,801) but also to investigate the correlation of parasitemia and platelet count with pseudoeosinophilia and abnormal WBC scattergrams. Of the 1,801 analyzed patients, 413 (22.9%) were found to have malaria by Wright-Giemsa stained blood smears. Overall, either pseudoeosinophilia or abnormal WBC scattergram was detected in 191 of 413 malaria patients and 4 of 1,388 patients without malaria (sensitivity = 46.2%, specificity = 99.7%). We suggest that clinical hematology laboratories using the XE-2100 analyzer should be aware of such specific parameters, even with the absence of a clinical request.

  10. Congenital hypothyroidism in a kitten resulting in decreased IGF-I concentration and abnormal liver function tests.

    PubMed

    Quante, Saskia; Fracassi, Federico; Gorgas, Daniela; Kircher, Patrick R; Boretti, Felicitas S; Ohlerth, Stefanie; Reusch, Claudia E

    2010-06-01

    A 7-month-old male kitten was presented with chronic constipation and retarded growth. Clinical examination revealed disproportional dwarfism with mild skeletal abnormalities and a palpable thyroid gland. The presumptive diagnosis of congenital hypothyroidism was confirmed by low serum total thyroxine (tT(4)) concentration prior to and after the administration of thyroid stimulation hormone (TSH), increased endogenous TSH concentration and abnormal thyroid scintigraphic scan. The kitten had abnormal liver function tests and decreased insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) concentration, both of which returned to normal in correspondence with an improvement of the clinical signs after 6 weeks of thyroxine therapy. Congenital hypothyroidism is a rare disease that may present with considerable variation in clinical manifestation. In cases in which clinical signs are ambiguous, disorders such as portosystemic shunt and hyposomatotropism have to be taken into account as differential diagnosis. As hypothyroidism may be associated with abnormal liver function tests and low IGF-1 concentrations, test results have to be interpreted carefully.

  11. Haematological abnormalities in mitochondrial disorders

    PubMed Central

    Finsterer, Josef; Frank, Marlies

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION This study aimed to assess the kind of haematological abnormalities that are present in patients with mitochondrial disorders (MIDs) and the frequency of their occurrence. METHODS The blood cell counts of a cohort of patients with syndromic and non-syndromic MIDs were retrospectively reviewed. MIDs were classified as ‘definite’, ‘probable’ or ‘possible’ according to clinical presentation, instrumental findings, immunohistological findings on muscle biopsy, biochemical abnormalities of the respiratory chain and/or the results of genetic studies. Patients who had medical conditions other than MID that account for the haematological abnormalities were excluded. RESULTS A total of 46 patients (‘definite’ = 5; ‘probable’ = 9; ‘possible’ = 32) had haematological abnormalities attributable to MIDs. The most frequent haematological abnormality in patients with MIDs was anaemia. 27 patients had anaemia as their sole haematological problem. Anaemia was associated with thrombopenia (n = 4), thrombocytosis (n = 2), leucopenia (n = 2), and eosinophilia (n = 1). Anaemia was hypochromic and normocytic in 27 patients, hypochromic and microcytic in six patients, hyperchromic and macrocytic in two patients, and normochromic and microcytic in one patient. Among the 46 patients with a mitochondrial haematological abnormality, 78.3% had anaemia, 13.0% had thrombopenia, 8.7% had leucopenia and 8.7% had eosinophilia, alone or in combination with other haematological abnormalities. CONCLUSION MID should be considered if a patient’s abnormal blood cell counts (particularly those associated with anaemia, thrombopenia, leucopenia or eosinophilia) cannot be explained by established causes. Abnormal blood cell counts may be the sole manifestation of MID or a collateral feature of a multisystem problem. PMID:26243978

  12. Eye abnormalities in Fryns syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pierson, Diane M; Taboada, Eugenio; Butler, Merlin G

    2004-03-15

    Fryns syndrome is a rare, generally lethal, autosomal recessive multiple congenital anomaly (MCA) syndrome first described in 1979. Patients with the syndrome present with the classical findings of cloudy cornea, brain malformations, diaphragmatic defects, and distal limb deformities. Over 70 patients have been reported revealing a wide variety of phenotypic features. Although initially considered a major feature of Fryns syndrome, cloudy cornea has been relegated as a minor diagnostic sign and not commonly reported in patients since the original description. However, eye findings per se are not uncommon. Abnormal eye findings occasionally reported in Fryns syndrome potentially result in amblyopia and blindness, profoundly affecting neurologic outcome of those who survive the neonatal period. We reviewed 77 reported patients with Fryns syndrome and summarized the abnormal eye findings identified in 12 of the reported cases. In addition, we contribute three new patients with Fryns syndrome, one of which demonstrated unilateral microphthalmia and cloudy cornea.

  13. Complex patterns of abnormal heartbeats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulte-Frohlinde, Verena; Ashkenazy, Yosef; Goldberger, Ary L.; Ivanov, Plamen Ch; Costa, Madalena; Morley-Davies, Adrian; Stanley, H. Eugene; Glass, Leon

    2002-01-01

    Individuals having frequent abnormal heartbeats interspersed with normal heartbeats may be at an increased risk of sudden cardiac death. However, mechanistic understanding of such cardiac arrhythmias is limited. We present a visual and qualitative method to display statistical properties of abnormal heartbeats. We introduce dynamical "heartprints" which reveal characteristic patterns in long clinical records encompassing approximately 10(5) heartbeats and may provide information about underlying mechanisms. We test if these dynamics can be reproduced by model simulations in which abnormal heartbeats are generated (i) randomly, (ii) at a fixed time interval following a preceding normal heartbeat, or (iii) by an independent oscillator that may or may not interact with the normal heartbeat. We compare the results of these three models and test their limitations to comprehensively simulate the statistical features of selected clinical records. This work introduces methods that can be used to test mathematical models of arrhythmogenesis and to develop a new understanding of underlying electrophysiologic mechanisms of cardiac arrhythmia.

  14. Sign language Web pages.

    PubMed

    Fels, Deborah I; Richards, Jan; Hardman, Jim; Lee, Daniel G

    2006-01-01

    The WORLD WIDE WEB has changed the way people interact. It has also become an important equalizer of information access for many social sectors. However, for many people, including some sign language users, Web accessing can be difficult. For some, it not only presents another barrier to overcome but has left them without cultural equality. The present article describes a system that allows sign language-only Web pages to be created and linked through a video-based technique called sign-linking. In two studies, 14 Deaf participants examined two iterations of signlinked Web pages to gauge the usability and learnability of a signing Web page interface. The first study indicated that signing Web pages were usable by sign language users but that some interface features required improvement. The second study showed increased usability for those features; users consequently couldnavigate sign language information with ease and pleasure.

  15. [Computerizing the radiological sign].

    PubMed

    Bertaud, V; Belhadj, I; Dameron, O; Garcelon, N; Hendaoui, L; Marin, F; Duvauferrier, R

    2007-01-01

    The goal of this article is to present to the radiologist the different theories of the sign and their consequences for sign representation in computer systems. All the theories of the sign are presented, but the most relevant are highlighted in order to explain the great modeling systems currently in use (such as DICOM-SR or the UMLS). The constructivist approach of the notion of disease, the semiosis process, which starting from signs produces new signs, and the structuralist analysis of sign through language are emphasized. The purpose of this analysis is to end up with a consensual representation of the sign that can be understood by human beings and processed by machines. Such a representation, also known as an ontology, is based on a semantic organization of language, thus allowing medicine to become a truly scientific discipline. It aims at disambiguating the symbols given to machines, which will help us in our reasoning.

  16. Development of a baby friendly non-contact method for measuring vital signs: First results of clinical measurements in an open incubator at a neonatal intensive care unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klaessens, John H.; van den Born, Marlies; van der Veen, Albert; Sikkens-van de Kraats, Janine; van den Dungen, Frank A.; Verdaasdonk, Rudolf M.

    2014-02-01

    For infants and neonates in an incubator vital signs, such as heart rate, breathing, skin temperature and blood oxygen saturation are measured by sensors and electrodes sticking to the skin. This can damage the vulnerable skin of neonates and cause infections. In addition, the wires interfere with the care and hinder the parents in holding and touching the baby. These problems initiated the search for baby friendly 'non-contact' measurement of vital signs. Using a sensitive color video camera and specially developed software, the heart rate was derived from subtle repetitive color changes. Potentially also respiration and oxygen saturation could be obtained. A thermal camera was used to monitor the temperature distribution of the whole body and detect small temperature variations around the nose revealing the respiration rate. After testing in the laboratory, seven babies were monitored (with parental consent) in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) simultaneously with the regular monitoring equipment. From the color video recordings accurate heart rates could be derived and the thermal images provided accurate respiration rates. To correct for the movements of the baby, tracking software could be applied. At present, the image processing was performed off-line. Using narrow band light sources also non-contact blood oxygen saturation could be measured. Non-contact monitoring of vital signs has proven to be feasible and can be developed into a real time system. Besides the application on the NICU non-contact vital function monitoring has large potential for other patient groups.

  17. [Molecular abnormalities in lymphomas].

    PubMed

    Delsol, G

    2010-11-01

    . Gene profiling analysis shows that the expression of several genes is deregulated including PDGFRA (platelet-derived growth factor receptor) gene, encoding a receptor with tyrosine kinase activity. In angio-immunoblastic T-cell lymphomas molecular abnormalities are found in follicular helper T-cell (TFH) that express some distinctive markers such as CD10, PD-1, CXCR5 and the CXCL13 chemokine. ALK-positive anaplastic large cell lymphoma is a paradigme of T-cell lymphoma since it is associated with an X-ALK oncogenic fusion protein due to a translocation involving ALK gene at 2p23. ALK tyrosine kinase activates downstream pathways (Stat3/5b, Src kinases, PLCγ, PI3 kinase) implicated in lymphomagenesis, proliferation and protection against apoptosis. Specific ALK inhibitors are currently in clinical evaluation. Lastly several lymphomas are associated with infectious agents that play a direct (EB virus, HTLV1) or indirect role (e.g. Helicobacter pylori in MALT lymphoma) in lymphomagenesis.

  18. Presymptomatic signs in healthy CJD mutation carriers.

    PubMed

    Gigi, Ariela; Vakil, Eli; Kahana, Ester; Hadar, Uri

    2005-01-01

    Creutzfeldt-Jacob disease (CJD) is a rapidly progressing dementia with neurological, psychiatric and cognitive symptoms. We focused our study on the familial CJD form among Libyan Jews (the E200K mutation), trying to identify preclinical neuropsychological signs in mutation carriers to facilitate early diagnosis of the disease. A wide range of neuropsychological tests was administered to 27 healthy volunteers, all first-degree relatives of genetic CJD patients. Thirteen of our participants were gene mutation carriers (E200K) and 14 controls. The healthy mutation carriers reported significantly lower Trait and higher State anxiety scores. Repeated Measure analysis showed statistical significance. The Anxiety Index (State-Trait Anxiety Score) progressed with age in the carriers' group but not in the controls. Since this was more pronounced in the older subjects, we suggest that abnormal stress mechanisms precede the clinical onset of CJD. Cognitive differences have also been found between carriers and controls, especially in visual recognition of pictured objects. Both kinds of differences (anxiety levels and cognitive deficits) were most pronounced in elderly subjects. This study is the first to show any dysfunction in healthy CJD mutation carriers.

  19. The "guitar pick" sign: a novel sign of retrobulbar hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Theoret, Jonathan; Sanz, Geoffrey E; Matero, David; Guth, Todd; Erickson, Catherine; Liao, Michael M; Kendall, John L

    2011-05-01

    Retrobulbar hemorrhage is a rare complication of blunt ocular trauma. Without prompt intervention, permanent reduction in visual acuity can develop in as little as 90 minutes. We report a novel bedside ultrasound finding of conical deformation of the posterior ocular globe: the "guitar pick" sign. In our elderly patient, the ocular globe shape normalized post-lateral canthotomy and inferior cantholysis. Identifying this sonographic finding may add to the clinical examination when deciding whether to perform decompression.

  20. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Bronchitis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Are the Signs and Symptoms of Bronchitis? Explore Bronchitis What Is... Other Names Causes Who Is at Risk Signs & Symptoms Diagnosis Treatments Prevention Living With Clinical Trials Links Related Topics ...

  1. 10 Early Signs and Symptoms of Alzheimer's

    MedlinePlus

    ... causes a slow decline in memory, thinking and reasoning skills. There are 10 warning signs and symptoms. ... may also increase your chances of participating in clinical drug trials that help advance research. > Learn more ...

  2. Signs and Symptoms of Mood Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... of your family's history. Signs and symptoms of bipolar disorder Bipolar disorder differs significantly from clinical depression, although ... or restlessness. Symptoms of mania - the "highs" of bipolar disorder Increased physical and mental activity and energy Heightened ...

  3. Water Breaking: Understand This Sign of Labor

    MedlinePlus

    Healthy Lifestyle Labor and delivery, postpartum care Water breaking worries? Prepare yourself for childbirth by getting the facts about this important sign of labor. By Mayo Clinic Staff If you're ...

  4. The pivotal sign of CANVAS.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Jens Alexander; Wichmann, Werner W; Weber, Konrad Peter

    2013-10-29

    A 75-year-old woman complained about insecure gait since age 55. Clinical examination revealed signs of cerebellar ataxia, bilateral vestibulopathy, and peripheral sensory impairment. Sensory nerve action potentials were absent. The visually enhanced vestibulo-ocular reflex (VVOR) was impaired (video on the Neurology(®) Web site at www.neurology.org, figure 1) and the diagnosis of cerebellar ataxia (figure 2) with neuropathy and bilateral vestibular areflexia syndrome (CANVAS) was made.(1) CANVAS is considered to be a recessive disorder with a mean age at onset of 60 years.(2) VVOR impairment is its characteristic clinical sign.(2) It can only be elicited if both smooth-pursuit eye movements and the vestibulo-ocular reflex are deficient. Normally, both are redundant at low head velocities.(2.)

  5. Clinical implications of the P wave duration and dispersion: relationship between atrial conduction defects and abnormally prolonged and fractionated atrial endocardial electrograms.

    PubMed

    Centurión, Osmar Antonio

    2009-05-01

    Atrial conduction disease provides a suitable substrate for reentry and appears to be a major predisposing factor for the development of atrial fibrillation. It was demonstrated that when depressed conduction was observed in recordings from human atrial muscle, the ultra-structure was usually abnormal. Areas of poorly coupled fibers in diseased atrial tissue with progressive fibro-degenerative changes may lead to abnormal electrophysiological characteristics. Structural inhomogeneity or local differences in electrophysiological or ultra-structural properties are considered to play a major role in the initiation of reentrant circuits due to the increased likelihood of unidirectional block of the premature impulse. The P wave of the electrocardiogram may show alterations that can be associated with atrial arrhythmias. It was shown that there is a statistical association between the low resting membrane potential and a prolonged P wave duration. Also a prolonged inter-atrial conduction time was significantly related to abnormal P wave morphology. In the evaluation of patients with altered P waves in the electrocardiogram, it is very important to keep in mind that, patients who have a great susceptibility to develop AF possess abnormally prolonged and fractionated atrial endocardial electrograms in sinus rhythm within the right atrium, a significantly longer P wave duration, a significantly longer intra-atrial and inter-atrial conduction time of sinus impulses; and a significantly greater sinus node dysfunction and higher incidence of induction of sustained atrial fibrillation. Awareness of this strong association may lead to a better therapeutic management in individual patients.

  6. Effects of Nigella sativa L. seed oil on abnormal semen quality in infertile men: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Kolahdooz, M; Nasri, S; Modarres, S Zadeh; Kianbakht, S; Huseini, H Fallah

    2014-05-15

    In recent years, wide utilization of herbal drugs has encouraged scientists to determine their impressive effects on health. Since Nigella sativa L. seed (N. sativa) has many uses including infertility in traditional medicine, the effects of Nigella sativa L. seed oil on abnormal semen quality in infertile men with abnormal semen quality are of interest. This study was conducted on Iranian infertile men with inclusion criteria of abnormal sperm morphology less than 30% or sperm counts below 20×10(6)/ml or type A and B motility less than 25% and 50% respectively. The patients in N. sativa oil group (n=34) received 2.5mlN. sativa oil and placebo group (n=34) received 2.5ml liquid paraffin two times a day orally for 2 months. At baseline and after 2 months, the sperm count, motility and morphology and semen volume, pH and round cells as primary outcomes were determined in both groups. Results showed that sperm count, motility and morphology and semen volume, pH and round cells were improved significantly in N. sativa oil treated group compared with placebo group after 2 months. It is concluded that daily intake of 5ml N. sativa oil for two months improves abnormal semen quality in infertile men without any adverse effects.

  7. Effects of intra-articularly administered endotoxin on clinical signs of disease and synovial fluid tumor necrosis factor, interleukin 6, and prostaglandin E2 values in horses.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, D L; MacKay, R J; Gum, G G; Colahan, P T; Meyer, J C

    1993-03-01

    In each of 4 horses, sterile synovitis was induced by intra-articular injection of 3 micrograms of Escherichia coli endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide, LPS) into one antebrachiocarpal joint; an equal volume (2 ml) of phosphate-buffered saline solution (PBSS) was injected into the opposite, control carpus. Blood and 1.5 ml of synovial fluid were obtained at postinjection hours (PIH) 0, 2, 4, 8, 12, 18, 42, 66, and 144. Synovial fluid sample collection was accomplished by use of an indwelling, intra-articular catheter through PIH 12, and by arthrocentesis subsequently. Joint fluid samples were analyzed for cell counts, protein concentration, cytologic variables, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF), interleukin 6 (IL-6), and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) values. Tumor necrosis factor and IL-6 activities and WBC count were also measured in blood. To monitor local inflammation, skin temperature of each carpus was imaged, using a thermographic scanner prior to each sample collection time. Horses had minimal systemic effects. Mean (+/- SEM) rectal temperature increased significantly to 39.02 +/- 0.15 C only at PIH 18 after intra-articular injection of LPS. One horse had signs of mild depression from PIH 7 to 18, but its vital signs did not change appreciably. Each horse had mild signs of discomfort in the LPS-injected limb from PIH 1 to 3 until PIH 8 to 10. Mean peak surface temperature of the LPS-injected carpi was significantly higher than that of control carpi from PIH 8 to 144 (P < 0.05).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. Sign language and autism.

    PubMed

    Bonvillian, J D; Nelson, K E; Rhyne, J M

    1981-03-01

    Research findings and issues in teaching sign language to nonspeaking autistic children are reviewed. Data on over 100 children indicate that nearly all autistic children learn receptive and expressive signs, and many learn to combine signs. These children also exhibit marked improvement in adaptive behaviors. Speech skills are acquired by fewer children and may be developed through simultaneous speech and sign training. Possible explanations for these results are given, together with suggestions for future research and data collection. Recommended innovations include exposure to fluent signers and training in discourse and code-switching. Different sign language teaching methods need to be investigated more fully, including emphasis on training sign language within the children's total environment and with greater staff and parental participation.

  9. Signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders in adolescent violin players.

    PubMed

    Kovero, O; Könönen, M

    1996-08-01

    Signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) and the frequency of radiologically observed abnormalities in the condyles of temporomandibular joints (TMJs) of adolescent violin players (VP group) were investigated in a group of 31 music students and in their age- and sex-matched controls (C group). All subjects underwent a routine clinical stomatognathic examination, a standardized interview, and radiography of the condyles. The VP group reported a higher frequency of the subjective symptoms: pain in the TMJ when chewing, a feeling of stiffness in the TMJ, and clenching of the teeth. Clinically, the VP group showed a greater range of maximal protrusion and of maximal laterotrusion to the right, and a greater frequency of deviation to the right on opening. They also showed more palpatory tenderness in the masticatory muscles and pain in the TMJ on maximal opening. The number of playing years and the number of weekly playing hours correlated with several signs and symptoms of TMDs. In terms of radiologic findings in the condyles of the TMJs there was no difference between the groups. It is concluded that intense violin playing may have a predisposing role in the etiology of TMDs in adolescence.

  10. Food Signs in Radiology

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Mehboob; Al Damegh, Saleh

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Certain diseases show classic radiological signs that resemble various types of food items like fruits, meat, vegetables, eggs, bakery, grocery and confectionary items. In this article various food signs are discussed and correlated with the various food items in a pictorial way. The objective of this pictorial essay is to provide the information and learn the characteristic radiological signs resembling various food items. These food signs are easy to recognize and allows a confident diagnosis on the basis of imaging findings alone or can narrow down the differential diagnosis. PMID:21475464

  11. Medullary infarcts may cause ipsilateral masseter reflex abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Thömke, Frank; Marx, Jürgen J; Cruccu, Giorgio; Stoeter, Peter; Hopf, Hanns C

    2007-10-01

    There is a suprasegmental influence on the masseter reflex (MassR) in animals, which is mediated via the fifth nerve spinal nucleus (5SpN). Corresponding data in humans are lacking. Out of 268 prospectively recruited patients with clinical signs of acute brainstem infarctions, we identified 38 with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-documented unilateral infarcts caudal to the levels of the fifth nerve motor and main sensory nuclei. All had biplanar T2- and echo planar diffusion-weighted MRI and MassR testing. Five patients (13%) had ipsilateral MassR abnormalities. In all, the infarcts involved the region of the 5SpN. Patients with medullary infarcts involving the region of the 5SpN may thus have ipsilateral MassR abnormalities. This possibly represents an interruption of an excitatory projection mediated via the 5SpN to masseter motoneurons in the fifth nerve motor nucleus. MassR abnormalities with medullary lesions restrict the topodiagnostic value of the MassR.

  12. Renal histomorphology in dogs with pyometra and control dogs, and long term clinical outcome with respect to signs of kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Heiene, Reidun; Kristiansen, Veronica; Teige, Jon; Jansen, Johan Høgset

    2007-01-01

    Background Age-related changes in renal histomorphology are described, while the presence of glomerulonephritis in dogs with pyometra is controversial in current literature. Methods Dogs with pyometra were examined retrospectively for evidence of secondary renal damage and persisting renal disease through two retrospective studies. In Study 1, light microscopic lesions of renal tissue were graded and compared in nineteen dogs with pyometra and thirteen age-matched control bitches. In Study 2, forty-one owners of dogs with pyometra were interviewed approximately 8 years after surgery for evidence ofclinical signs of renal failure in order to document causes of death/euthanasia. Results Interstitial inflammation and tubular atrophy were more pronounced in dogs with pyometra than in the control animals. Glomerular lesions classified as glomerular sclerosis were present in both groups. No unequivocal light microscopic features of glomerulonephritis were observed in bitches in any of the groups. Two bitches severely proteinuric at the time of surgery had developed end stage renal disease within 3 years. In five of the bitches polyuria persisted after surgery. Most bitches did not show signs of kidney disease at the time of death/euthanasia. Conclusion Tubulointerstitial inflammation was observed, but glomerular damage beyond age-related changes could not be demonstrated by light microscopy in the dogs with pyometra. However, severe proteinuria after surgery may predispose to development of renal failure. PMID:17480218

  13. Neuroendocrine abnormalities in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    De Pablo-Fernández, Eduardo; Breen, David P; Bouloux, Pierre M; Barker, Roger A; Foltynie, Thomas; Warner, Thomas T

    2017-02-01

    Neuroendocrine abnormalities are common in Parkinson's disease (PD) and include disruption of melatonin secretion, disturbances of glucose, insulin resistance and bone metabolism, and body weight changes. They have been associated with multiple non-motor symptoms in PD and have important clinical consequences, including therapeutics. Some of the underlying mechanisms have been implicated in the pathogenesis of PD and represent promising targets for the development of disease biomarkers and neuroprotective therapies. In this systems-based review, we describe clinically relevant neuroendocrine abnormalities in Parkinson's disease to highlight their role in overall phenotype. We discuss pathophysiological mechanisms, clinical implications, and pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions based on the current evidence. We also review recent advances in the field, focusing on the potential targets for development of neuroprotective drugs in Parkinson's disease and suggest future areas for research.

  14. Urine - abnormal color

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003139.htm Urine - abnormal color To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The usual color of urine is straw-yellow. Abnormally colored urine ...

  15. Tooth - abnormal colors

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003065.htm Tooth - abnormal colors To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Abnormal tooth color is any color other than white to yellowish- ...

  16. Abnormal Head Position

    MedlinePlus

    ... cause. Can a longstanding head turn lead to any permanent problems? Yes, a significant abnormal head posture could cause permanent ... occipitocervical synostosis and unilateral hearing loss. Are there any ... postures? Yes. Abnormal head postures can usually be improved depending ...

  17. Skeletal limb abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003170.htm Skeletal limb abnormalities To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Skeletal limb abnormalities refers to a variety of bone structure problems ...

  18. UCR Library Sign System Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Univ., Riverside. Library.

    This manual outlines the procedures to be used for producing and placing signs within the libraries of the University of California, Riverside and presents examples of signs which conform to the library sign policy. The sign policy itself is described as well as procedures for requesting new or revised signs and for sign removal. Drawings of…

  19. Sign-a-Palooza

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMorran, Charles; Reynolds, Veronica

    2010-01-01

    A halo of signs, some stuffed into thick plastic sheaths while others curled under yellow tape, cluttered the service desks of the New City Library. They bleated out messages of closings, procedures, and warnings. Their number undermined their cause. All too often a customer would ask a question that was answered by the very sign they had pushed…

  20. Standardization of Sign Languages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adam, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Over the years attempts have been made to standardize sign languages. This form of language planning has been tackled by a variety of agents, most notably teachers of Deaf students, social workers, government agencies, and occasionally groups of Deaf people themselves. Their efforts have most often involved the development of sign language books…

  1. Connecting the Equals Sign

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Ian; Pratt, Dave

    2006-01-01

    Children tend to view the equals sign as an operator symbol bereft of the rich relational properties of equality statements. It has been argued by some that this restricted view of the equals sign is due to cultural or cognitive factors. We suggest a significant factor is that rich relational meanings lack relevance within the context of…

  2. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding FAQ

    MedlinePlus

    ... PROBLEMS Abnormal Uterine Bleeding • What is a normal menstrual cycle? • When is bleeding abnormal? • At what ages is ... treat abnormal bleeding? •Glossary What is a normal menstrual cycle? The normal length of the menstrual cycle is ...

  3. Expressing hNF-LE397K results in abnormal gaiting in a transgenic model of CMT2E

    PubMed Central

    Dale, Jeffrey M.; Villalon, Eric; Shannon, Stephen G.; Barry, Devin M.; Markey, Rachel M.; Garcia, Virginia B.; Garcia, Michael L.

    2012-01-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) is the most commonly inherited peripheral neuropathy. CMT disease signs include distal limb neuropathy, abnormal gaiting, exacerbation of neuropathy, sensory defects, and deafness. We generated a novel line of CMT2E mice expressing a hNF-LE397K transgene, which displayed muscle atrophy of the lower limbs without denervation, proximal reduction in large caliber axons, and decreased nerve conduction velocity. In this study, we demonstrated that hNF-LE397K mice developed abnormal gait of the hind limbs. The identification of severe gaiting defects in combination with previously observed muscle atrophy, reduced axon caliber, and decreased nerve conduction velocity suggests that hNF-LE397K mice recapitulate many of clinical signs associated with CMT2E. Therefore, hNF-LE397K mice provide a context for potential therapeutic intervention. PMID:22288874

  4. Asymmetric gait nail unit syndrome: the most common worldwide toenail abnormality and onychomycosis.

    PubMed

    Zaias, Nardo; Rebell, Gerbert; Escovar, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    Asymmetric gait nail unit syndrome (AGNUS) is the result of asymmetric shoe pressure on the toes and foot caused by ubiquitous uneven flat feet that affect the gait. The pressure produces clinical changes in the toenails, which are identical to all clinical types of dermatophyte and opportunistic onychomycosis, yet they are dermatophytes-free. AGNUS produces additional signs that make it easy to identify. Its coexistence with fungal disease has resulted in reports describing new clinical types of onychomycosis, identifying signs of drug resistance, assessing severity index, and defining complete clinical cure when taking a systemic or topical antifungal, as well as "retronychia." These signs are typically seen in the toenails of patients with AGNUS. AGNUS has a mechanical etiology and can coexist with dermatophytosis, which is a hereditary disease. AGNUS can coexist with any other disease affecting the toenails and results in greater clinical severity than each condition individually. AGNUS is and has been the most common worldwide toenail abnormality in shoe-wearing societies.

  5. Neurological abnormalities in young adults born preterm

    PubMed Central

    Allin, M; Rooney, M; Griffiths, T; Cuddy, M; Wyatt, J; Rifkin, L; Murray, R

    2006-01-01

    Objective Individuals born before 33 weeks' gestation (very preterm, VPT) have an increased likelihood of neurological abnormality, impaired cognitive function, and reduced academic performance in childhood. It is currently not known whether neurological signs detected in VPT children persist into adulthood or become attenuated by maturation of the CNS. Method We assessed 153 VPT individuals and 71 term‐born controls at 17–18 years old, using a comprehensive neurological examination. This examination divides neurological signs into primary and integrative domains, the former representing the localising signs of classical neurology, and the latter representing signs requiring integration between different neural networks or systems. Integrative signs are sub‐divided into three groups: sensory integration, motor confusion, and sequencing. The VPT individuals have been followed up since birth, and neonatal information is available on them, along with the results of neurological assessment at 4 and 8 years of age and neuropsychological assessment at 18 years of age. Results The total neurology score and primary and integrative scores were significantly increased in VPT young adults compared to term‐born controls. Within the integrative domain, sensory integration and motor confusion scores were significantly increased in the VPT group, but sequencing was not significantly different between the VPT and term groups. Integrative neurological abnormalities at 18 were strongly associated with reduced IQ but primary abnormalities were not. Conclusions Neurological signs are increased in VPT adults compared to term‐born controls, and are strongly associated with reduced neuropsychological function. PMID:16543529

  6. The "double panda" sign in Leigh disease.

    PubMed

    Sonam, Kothari; Bindu, P S; Gayathri, Narayanappa; Khan, Nahid Akhtar; Govindaraju, C; Arvinda, Hanumanthapura R; Nagappa, Madhu; Sinha, Sanjib; Thangaraj, K; Taly, Arun B

    2014-07-01

    Although the "face of the giant panda" sign on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is traditionally considered to be characteristic of Wilson disease, it has also been reported in other metabolic disorders. This study describes the characteristic "giant panda" sign on MRI in a child with Leigh disease. The diagnosis was based on the history of neurological regression; examination findings of oculomotor abnormalities, hypotonia, and dystonia; raised serum lactate levels; and characteristic brain stem and basal ganglia signal changes on MRI. The midbrain and pontine tegmental signal changes were consistent with the "face of the giant panda and her cub" sign. In addition to Wilson disease, metabolic disorders such as Leigh disease should also be considered in the differential diagnosis of this rare imaging finding.

  7. Neuropsychological abnormalities in AIDS and asymptomatic HIV seropositive patients.

    PubMed Central

    Villa, G; Monteleone, D; Marra, C; Bartoli, A; Antinori, A; Pallavicini, F; Tamburrini, E; Izzi, I

    1993-01-01

    Neuropsychological and immunological parameters were studied in 36 AIDS patients with early disease and without clinical, laboratory, and neuroradiological signs of CNS impairment, and also in 33 asymptomatic HIV seropositive subjects. Many AIDS patients performed abnormally on timed psychomotor tasks, tasks involving sequencing and "set-shifting", and memory tasks stressing attention, learning, active retrieval, and monitoring of information. Asymptomatic HIV seropositive subjects as a group did not perform significantly worse than controls. However, on the basis of a cut off number of pathological performances on neuropsychological tasks, 52.8% of AIDS and 30.3% of asymptomatic HIV seropositive subjects had cognitive impairment, compared with 3.9% of HIV seronegative controls. Low values of CD4+ cells and of CD4+/CD8+ ratio and high titres of P-24 antigen in the blood prevailed among subjects with cognitive impairment, especially in the asymptomatic HIV seropositive group. PMID:8350104

  8. Nail abnormalities in patients with vitiligo*

    PubMed Central

    Topal, Ilteris Oguz; Gungor, Sule; Kocaturk, Ozgur Emek; Duman, Hatice; Durmuscan, Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    Background Vitiligo is an acquired pigmentary skin disorder affecting 0.1-4% of the general population. The nails may be affected in patients with an autoimmune disease such as psoriasis, and in those with alopecia areata. It has been suggested that nail abnormalities should be apparent in vitiligo patients. Objective We sought to document the frequency and clinical presentation of nail abnormalities in vitiligo patients compared to healthy volunteers. We also examined the correlations between nail abnormalities and various clinical parameters. Methods This study included 100 vitiligo patients and 100 healthy subjects. Full medical histories were collected from the subjects, who underwent thorough general and nail examinations. All nail changes were noted. In the event of clinical suspicion of a fungal infection, additional mycological investigations were performed. Results Nail abnormalities were more prevalent in the patients (78%) than in the controls (55%) (p=0.001). Longitudinal ridging was the most common finding (42%), followed by (in descending order): leukonychia, an absent lunula, onycholysis, nail bed pallor, onychomycosis, splinter hemorrhage and nail plate thinning. The frequency of longitudinal ridging was significantly higher in patients than in controls (p<0.001). Conclusions Nail abnormalities were more prevalent in vitiligo patients than in controls. Systematic examination of the nails in such patients is useful because nail abnormalities are frequent. However, the causes of such abnormalities require further study. Longitudinal ridging and leukonychia were the most common abnormalities observed in this study. PMID:27579738

  9. Pulmonary ultrasonographic abnormalities associated with naturally occurring equine influenza virus infection in standardbred racehorses.

    PubMed

    Gross, Diane K; Morley, Paul S; Hinchcliff, Kenneth W; Reichle, Jean K; Slemons, Richard D

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine if naturally occurring acute infectious upper respiratory disease (IRD) caused by equine influenza virus is associated with ultrasonographically detectable pleural and pulmonary abnormalities in horses. Standardbred racehorses were evaluated for signs of IRD, defined as acute coughing or mucopurulent nasal discharge. For every horse with IRD (n = 16), 1 or 2 horses with no signs of IRD and the same owner or trainer (n = 30) were included. Thoracic ultrasonography was performed within 5-10 days of the onset of clinical disease in horses with IRD. Horses without IRD were examined at the same time as the horses with IRD with which they were enrolled. The rank of the ultrasound scores of horses with IRD was compared to that of horses without IRD. Equine influenza virus was identified as the primary etiologic agent associated with IRD in this study. Mild lung consolidation and peripheral pulmonary irregularities were found in 11 (69%) of 16 of the horses with IRD and 11 (37%) of 30 of control horses. Lung consolidation (median score = 1) and peripheral irregularities scores (median score = 1) were greater in horses with IRD compared to horses without IRD (median score = 0; P < .05). Pleural effusion was not observed. Equine influenza virus infection can result in abnormalities of the equine lower respiratory tract. Despite the mild nature of IRD observed in this study, lung consolidation and peripheral pulmonary irregularities were more commonly observed in horses with clinical signs of IRD. Further work is needed to determine the clinical significance of these ultrasonographic abnormalities.

  10. Real-time PCR detection of Human Herpesvirus 1-5 in patients lacking clinical signs of a viral CNS infection

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Infections of the central nervous system (CNS) with herpes- or enterovirus can be self-limiting and benign, but occasionally result in severe and fatal disease. The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) has revolutionized the diagnostics of viral pathogens, and by multiple displacement amplification (MDA) prior to real-time PCR the sensitivity might be further enhanced. The aim of this study was to investigate if herpes- or enterovirus can be detected in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from patients without symptoms. Methods Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples from 373 patients lacking typical symptoms of viral CNS infection were analysed by real-time PCR targeting herpesviruses or enteroviruses with or without prior MDA. Results In total, virus was detected in 17 patients (4%). Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) was most commonly detected, in general from patients with other conditions (e.g. infections, cerebral hemorrhage). MDA satisfactorily amplified viral DNA in the absence of human nucleic acids, but showed poor amplification capacity for viral DNA in CSF samples, and did not increase the sensitivity for herpes virus-detection with our methodology. Conclusions Viral pathogens are rarely detected in CSF from patients without signs of CNS infection, supporting the view that real-time PCR is a highly specific method to detect symptomatic CNS-infection caused by these viruses. However, EBV may be subclinically reactivated due to other pathological conditions in the CNS. PMID:21849074

  11. Signs of Overload

    MedlinePlus

    ... Listen Text Size Email Print Share Signs of Overload Page Content Article Body Although stress is a ... 12 (Copyright © 2004 American Academy of Pediatrics) The information contained on this Web site should not be ...

  12. Dermatomyositis: Signs and Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Meet our Partners How to Get Involved Donate Dermatomyositis (DM) Share print email share facebook twitter google ... Signs and Symptoms What happens to someone with dermatomyositis? For many decades, DM was considered “ polymyositis with ...

  13. Traditional vs. Simulated Guided Methodology in Teaching Vital Sign Assessment of the Normal Newborn to the Nursing Student: A Clinical Outcome Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rivers, Joynelle L.

    2012-01-01

    Nursing education faces many challenges such as faculty shortages, inadequate clinical site placements, the inability to accept qualified students because of limited resources, and how to effectively educate students who are tech savvy, confident, highly motivated yet have differing needs from previous generations. This study sought to explore how…

  14. Detecting Signs of Intrusion.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-08-01

    your systems, you should investigate any warnings they sound. Although monitors are not fool- proof, they can be part of an effective early warning ...Carnegie Mellon University Software Engineering Institute Detecting Signs of Intrusion Robert Firth Gary Ford Barbara Fräser John Kochmar...1997 Detecting Signs of Intrusion Robert Firth Gary Ford Barbara Fräser John Kochmar Suresh Konda John Richael Derek Simmel Networked Systems

  15. The "shirt collar sign" of cervical dystonia.

    PubMed

    Silver, Michael R; Hanfelt, John; Factor, Stewart A

    2017-05-01

    The diagnosis of cervical dystonia (CD) is clinical. We describe a physical examination observation that has been noted in CD patients. There is a tendency for their shirt collars to be shifted to one side. We validated this apparently consistent finding by having blinded evaluators rating the symmetry of the shirt collars in CD and non-cervical dystonia control subjects. A high correlation was found between the physical finding which we call "shirt collar sign" and the diagnosis. "Shirt collar sign" may be a helpful sign in diagnosing CD.

  16. Efficacy of a new topical cationic emulsion of cyclosporine A on dry eye clinical signs in an experimental mouse model of dry eye.

    PubMed

    Daull, Philippe; Feraille, Laurence; Barabino, Stefano; Cimbolini, Nicolas; Antonelli, Sophie; Mauro, Virgine; Garrigue, Jean-Sébastien

    2016-12-01

    Dry eye disease (DED) is a complex, multifactorial pathology characterized by corneal epithelium lesions and inflammation. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of a cationic emulsion of cyclosporine A (CsA) in a mouse model that mimics severe dry eye. Eight to 12-week-old female C57BL/6N mice with tail patches of scopolamine were housed in controlled environment chambers to induce dry eye. At day three, following dry eye confirmation by corneal fluorescein staining (CFS, score 0-15) and phenol red thread (PRT) lacrimation test, the mice (n = 10/gp) were either treated 3 times a day in both eyes with drug-free cationic emulsion, a 0.1% CsA cationic emulsion, or 1% methylprednisolone (positive control), or non-treated. Aqueous tear production and CFS scores were evaluated at baseline and throughout the treatment period. The lacrimation test confirmed the scopolamine-induced decrease in aqueous production by the lacrimal gland. A reduction of 59% in induced-CFS was observed following topical treatment with 0.1% CsA. The beneficial effect of the cationic emulsion vehicle itself on keratitis was also clearly evidenced by its better performance over 1% methylprednisolone, -36%, vs. -28% on the CFS scores, respectively. This study indicates that the cationic emulsion of CsA (0.1%) was a very effective formulation for the management of corneal epithelium lesions in a severe DED mouse model. In addition, it performed better than a potent glucocorticosteroid (1% methylprednisolone). This cationic emulsion of CsA (0.1%), combining CsA and a tear film oriented therapy (TFOT), i.e. with vehicle properties that mechanically stabilize the tear film, represents a promising new treatment strategy for the management of the signs of dry eye.

  17. Somatosensory Profiles but Not Numbers of Somatosensory Abnormalities of Neuropathic Pain Patients Correspond with Neuropathic Pain Grading

    PubMed Central

    Konopka, Karl-Heinz; Harbers, Marten; Houghton, Andrea; Kortekaas, Rudie; van Vliet, Andre; Timmerman, Wia; den Boer, Johan A.; Struys, Michel M. R. F.; van Wijhe, Marten

    2012-01-01

    Due to the lack of a specific diagnostic tool for neuropathic pain, a grading system to categorize pain as ‘definite’, ‘probable’, ‘possible’ and ‘unlikely’ neuropathic was proposed. Somatosensory abnormalities are common in neuropathic pain and it has been suggested that a greater number of abnormalities would be present in patients with ‘probable’ and ‘definite’ grades. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the presence of somatosensory abnormalities by means of Quantitative Sensory Testing (QST) in patients with a clinical diagnosis of neuropathic pain and correlated the number of sensory abnormalities and sensory profiles to the different grades. Of patients who were clinically diagnosed with neuropathic pain, only 60% were graded as ‘definite’ or ‘probable’, while 40% were graded as ‘possible’ or ‘unlikely’ neuropathic pain. Apparently, there is a mismatch between a clinical neuropathic pain diagnosis and neuropathic pain grading. Contrary to the expectation, patients with ‘probable’ and ‘definite’ grades did not have a greater number of abnormalities. Instead, similar numbers of somatosensory abnormalities were identified for each grade. The profiles of sensory signs in ‘definite’ and ‘probable’ neuropathic pain were not significantly different, but different from the ‘unlikely’ grade. This latter difference could be attributed to differences in the prevalence of patients with a mixture of sensory gain and loss and with sensory loss only. The grading system allows a separation of neuropathic and non-neuropathic pain based on profiles but not on the total number of sensory abnormalities. Our findings indicate that patient selection based on grading of neuropathic pain may provide advantages in selecting homogenous groups for clinical research. PMID:22927981

  18. Clinical effects of bovine lactoferrin on two canine cases with familial neutrophil dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Sato, Reeko; Kobayashi, Saori; Abe, Yuya; Kamishina, Hiroaki; Oda, Shinichi; Yasuda, Jun; Sasaki, Juso

    2012-09-01

    This study reported detailed clinical effects of bovine lactoferrin on 2 canine littermates (1 female and 1 male) with familial neutrophil dysfunction and an investigation of their genetic background. Clinical signs caused by severe upper respiratory bacterial infections were observed in these dogs. Oral administration of bovine lactoferrin for a long duration improved their clinical signs (severe uveitis in the female dog and coughing from pneumonia in the male dog). Their backcross dogs that have the same father didn't show clinical signs of bacterial infection. Neutrophil function tests revealed that the backcross dogs didn't have any disorders. It is likely that abnormal clinical signs are associated with neutrophil dysfunction in the colony, and the mother dog of these cases might be the genetic carrier of this dysfunction.

  19. Diagnostic accuracy of the gravity stress test and clinical signs in cases of isolated supination-external rotation-type lateral malleolar fractures.

    PubMed

    Nortunen, S; Flinkkilä, T; Lantto, I; Kortekangas, T; Niinimäki, J; Ohtonen, P; Pakarinen, H

    2015-08-01

    We prospectively assessed the diagnostic accuracy of the gravity stress test and clinical findings to evaluate the stability of the ankle mortise in patients with supination-external rotation-type fractures of the lateral malleolus without widening of the medial clear space. The cohort included 79 patients with a mean age of 44 years (16 to 82). Two surgeons assessed medial tenderness, swelling and ecchymosis and performed the external rotation (ER) stress test (a reference standard). A diagnostic radiographer performed the gravity stress test. For the gravity stress test, the positive likelihood ratio (LR) was 5.80 with a 95% confidence interval (CI) of 2.75 to 12.27, and the negative LR was 0.15 (95% CI 0.07 to 0.35), suggesting a moderate change from the pre-test probability. Medial tenderness, both alone and in combination with swelling and/or ecchymosis, indicated a small change (positive LR, 2.74 to 3.25; negative LR, 0.38 to 0.47), whereas swelling and ecchymosis indicated only minimal changes (positive LR, 1.41 to 1.65; negative LR, 0.38 to 0.47). In conclusion, when gravity stress test results are in agreement with clinical findings, the result is likely to predict stability of the ankle mortise with an accuracy equivalent to ER stress test results. When clinical examination suggests a medial-side injury, however, the gravity stress test may give a false negative result.

  20. The Cohen syndrome: clinical and endocrinological studies of two new cases.

    PubMed Central

    Balestrazzi, P; Corrini, L; Villani, G; Bolla, M P; Casa, F; Bernasconi, S

    1980-01-01

    This report concerns two new cases of the Cohen syndrome and gives further information on the variable phenotypical pattern of the disease. The frequency of major and minor clinical signs is reviewed from all the published reports. Among the minor signs we found previously undescribed skeletal abnormalities in one of our patients. The reported delay onset of puberty, which appears to be a frequent aspect of the syndrome, seems to occur without LH and FSH deficiency, as our patients show. Images PMID:6782211

  1. Relations between depressive symptoms, anxiety, and T Wave abnormalities in subjects without clinically-apparent cardiovascular disease (from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis [MESA]).

    PubMed

    Whang, William; Peacock, James; Soliman, Elsayed Z; Alcantara, Carmela; Nazarian, Saman; Shah, Amit J; Davidson, Karina W; Shea, Steven; Muntner, Paul; Shimbo, Daichi

    2014-12-15

    The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that depression and anxiety are associated with electrocardiographic (ECG) repolarization abnormalities in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA), a cohort free of symptomatic cardiovascular disease. Depressive symptoms were assessed by using the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale and trait anxiety symptoms by using the Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory; both were categorized according to uppermost quartile. T-wave inversions in ECG leads other than V1 to V3 were obtained from electrocardiograms obtained at rest during the baseline examination. Participants with major intraventricular conduction abnormalities and those taking antiarrhythmics, antidepressants, and/or antipsychotics were excluded. Logistic regression models were estimated with multivariable adjustment for traditional cardiovascular disease risk factors. Among 5,906 participants, elevated depressive symptoms were associated with increased odds of T-wave inversion after multivariable adjustment (odds ratio 2.02, 95% confidence interval 1.33 to 3.06, p = 0.001), whereas greater trait anxiety was associated with reduced odds of T-wave inversion (odds ratio 0.47, 95% confidence interval 0.29 to 0.77, p = 0.003). The divergent associations of depressive symptoms and trait anxiety with ECG T-wave inversions were similar in men and women, and these associations were present across the racial and ethnic subgroups (non-Hispanic white, African-American, Hispanic, and Chinese). In conclusion, symptoms of depression and anxiety were independently yet oppositely associated with ECG T-wave inversions. Negative emotions may have a differential impact on cardiovascular mortality through unique relations with cardiac repolarization.

  2. Vestibular abnormalities in congenital disorders.

    PubMed

    Sando, I; Orita, Y; Miura, M; Balaban, C D

    2001-10-01

    This paper reviews the histopathologic features of vestibular abnormalities in congenital disorders affecting the inner ear, based upon a comprehensive literature survey and a review of cases in our temporal bone collection. The review proceeds in three systematic steps. First, we surveyed associated diseases with the major phenotypic features of congenital abnormalities of the inner ear (including the internal auditory canal and otic capsule). Second, the vestibular anomalies are examined specifically. Finally, the anomalies are discussed from a developmental perspective. Among vestibular anomalies, a hypoplastic endolymphatic duct and sac are observed most frequently. Anomalies of the semicircular canals are also often observed. From embryological and clinical viewpoints, many of these resemble the structural features from fetal stages and appear to be associated with vestibular dysfunction. It is expected that progress in genetic analysis and accumulation of temporal bone specimens with vestibular abnormalities in congenital diseases will provide crucial information not only for pathology of those diseases, but also for genetic factors that are responsible for the specific vestibular abnormalities.

  3. In utero transplantation of fetal liver cells in the mucopolysaccharidosis type VII mouse results in low-level chimerism, but overexpression of beta-glucuronidase can delay onset of clinical signs.

    PubMed

    Casal, M L; Wolfe, J H

    2001-03-15

    Mice with the lysosomal storage disease mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) VII, caused by a deficiency of beta-glucuronidase (GUSB), have signs of disease present at birth. Bone marrow transplantation (BMT) or retroviral vector-mediated gene transfer into hematopoietic stem cells can partially correct the disease in adult mice, and BMT performed at birth results in a better clinical outcome. Thus, treatment in utero may result in further improvement. However, this must be done without cyto-ablation, and the donor cells do not have a competitive repopulating advantage over host cells. Transplantation in utero of either syngeneic fetal liver hematopoietic stem cells marked with a retroviral vector, or allogeneic donor cells that constitutively express high levels of human GUSB from a transgene, resulted in only about 0.1% engraftment in the adult. Immuno-affinity enrichment of stem and progenitor cells of 5- to 10-fold resulted in significantly higher GUSB activities at 2 months of age, but by 6 months engraftment was about 0.1%. Attempts to further increase the number of stem and progenitor cells were deleterious to the recipients. Nevertheless, GUSB expressed during the first 2 months of life in MPS VII fetuses could delay the onset of overt signs of disease. This suggests that the expression of some normal enzyme activity beginning in fetal life may offer the possibility of slowing the progression of the disease until more definitive postnatal transplantation or gene transfer to stem cells could be accomplished.

  4. [Dynamics of tumour necrosis factor-alpha and clinical signs of osteoarthrosis during the treatment with alflutop in combination with peloid applications under conditions of health resort].

    PubMed

    Maganev, V A; Davletshin, R A; Davletshina, G K; Iapparov, G S

    2011-01-01

    The objective of the present work was to develop indications for the combined treatment of patients presenting with osteoarthrosis including the use of peloid applications and intramuscular injections of alflutop. The study was based at Yakty-Kul' health resort and included 94 patients at the age from 40 to 59 years. The proposed method was shown to have beneficial effect on the patients' clinical conditions. In addition, the treatment caused a decrease in the level of tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) that turned out to be related to the articular index.

  5. Clinical evaluation of BIOXTRA in relieving signs and symptoms of dry mouth after head and neck radiotherapy of cancer patients at Seyed-al-Shohada Hospital, Isfahan, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Gookizadeh, Abbas; Emami, Hamid; Najafizadeh, Nadia; Roayaei, Mahnaz

    2012-01-01

    Background: Radiotherapy of head and neck cancers causes acute and chronic xerostomia and acute mucositis. Xerostomia increases risk of radiation caries and affects on oral comfort, fit of prostheses, speech, swallowing, and the growth of caries-producing organisms. Salivary flow rate can be measured by asking patients some questions. There are different types of commercial synthetic saliva such as BIOXTRA, but until now, no one can effectively relieve xerostomia. We tried to design a clinical research on BIOXTRA efficacy for treating xerostomia. Materials and Methods: In this research, 58 patients with head and neck cancer (except salivary gland cancers) treated in Seyed-al-Shohada Hospital. The patients received at least 40-50 GY; and after 2 months of compilation treatment, they were evaluated by asking about having xerostomia. Before and after treatment with the BIOXTRA, the PH of the oral cavity, candida albicans, and lactobacillus counts measured and documented in laboratory. We used BIOXTRA for 2 weeks, 3 times daily, and then re-evaluated patients with some questions. Results: The counts of candida albicans and lactobacilli statistically significant decreased. Conclusion: Xerostomia for most patients improved clinically during the day and night while PH of the oral cavity increased. PMID:23326802

  6. Structurally abnormal human autosomes

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 25, discusses structurally abnormal human autosomes. This discussion includes: structurally abnormal chromosomes, chromosomal polymorphisms, pericentric inversions, paracentric inversions, deletions or partial monosomies, cri du chat (cat cry) syndrome, ring chromosomes, insertions, duplication or pure partial trisomy and mosaicism. 71 refs., 8 figs.

  7. Vital Signs Rate Meter.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-09-01

    S15 VITAL SIGNS RTE NETER(U) TEXAS R FW4D A UNIV COLLEGE 1/1 STATION IENGINEERING PROGM C S LESSAD ET RL. SEP 8? USRFSN-TR-$?-14 F33615-S3-D-0602...UNCLMSIFIED F/O 6/12 ML IIB 125 11 128 11.2.5_ ka7 U S S SS S S S S S0 02.2 36 * . * * * . - * . - .. . - - . Q -- .* USAFSAM-TR-87-1 4 VITAL SIGNS RATE...UNIT ELEMENT NO. INO.I NO. IACESSION NO. 622027 2729 02 21 11 TITLE ft ml’S111111:1111"ll vital Signs Rae ~t= 12. PERSONAL AUTWOR(S) Lessard, Cierles

  8. Morphological abnormalities among lampreys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Manion, Patrick J.

    1967-01-01

    The experimental control of the sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) in the Great Lakes has required the collection of thousands of lampreys. Representatives of each life stage of the four species of the Lake Superior basin were examined for structural abnormalities. The most common aberration was the presence of additional tails. The accessory tails were always postanal and smaller than the normal tail. The point of origin varied; the extra tails occurred on dorsal, ventral, or lateral surfaces. Some of the extra tails were misshaped and curled, but others were normal in shape and pigment pattern. Other abnormalities in larval sea lampreys were malformed or twisted tails and bodies. The cause of the structural abnormalities is unknown. The presence of extra caudal fins could be genetically controlled, or be due to partial amputation or injury followed by abnormal regeneration. Few if any lampreys with structural abnormalities live to sexual maturity.

  9. Meiotic abnormalities in infertile males.

    PubMed

    Egozcue, J; Sarrate, Z; Codina-Pascual, M; Egozcue, S; Oliver-Bonet, M; Blanco, J; Navarro, J; Benet, J; Vidal, F

    2005-01-01

    Meiotic anomalies, as reviewed here, are synaptic chromosome abnormalities, limited to germ cells that cannot be detected through the study of the karyotype. Although the importance of synaptic errors has been underestimated for many years, their presence is related to many cases of human male infertility. Synaptic anomalies can be studied by immunostaining of synaptonemal complexes (SCs), but in this case their frequency is probably underestimated due to the phenomenon of synaptic adjustment. They can also be studied in classic meiotic preparations, which, from a clinical point of view, is still the best approach, especially if multiplex fluorescence in situ hybridization is at hand to solve difficult cases. Sperm chromosome FISH studies also provide indirect evidence of their presence. Synaptic anomalies can affect the rate of recombination of all bivalents, produce achiasmate small univalents, partially achiasmate medium-sized or large bivalents, or affect all bivalents in the cell. The frequency is variable, interindividually and intraindividually. The baseline incidence of synaptic anomalies is 6-8%, which may be increased to 17.6% in males with a severe oligozoospermia, and to 27% in normozoospermic males with one or more previous IVF failures. The clinical consequences are the production of abnormal spermatozoa that will produce a higher number of chromosomally abnormal embryos. The indications for a meiotic study in testicular biopsy are provided.

  10. Efficacy of oclacitinib (Apoquel®) compared with prednisolone for the control of pruritus and clinical signs associated with allergic dermatitis in client-owned dogs in Australia

    PubMed Central

    Gadeyne, Caroline; Little, Peter; King, Vickie L; Edwards, Nigel; Davis, Kylie; Stegemann, Michael R

    2014-01-01

    Background Oral glucocorticoids are widely used to reduce pruritus and dermatitis associated with allergic dermatitis. Data suggest that oclacitinib, a Janus kinase inhibitor, is a safe and effective alternative. Hypothesis/Objectives To evaluate the efficacy and safety of oclacitinib compared with prednisolone for the control of pruritus associated with allergic dermatitis in a single-masked, controlled clinical trial with a randomized complete block design. Animals Client-owned dogs (n = 123) with a presumptive diagnosis of allergic dermatitis and moderate to severe pruritus as assessed by the pet owner were enrolled. Methods Dogs were randomized to treatment with either oclacitinib (0.4–0.6 mg/kg orally twice daily for 14 days, then once daily) or prednisolone (0.5–1.0 mg/kg once daily for 6 days, then every other day) for 28 days. An enhanced visual analog scale (VAS) was used by owners to assess pruritus and by veterinarians to assess dermatitis, at all time points assessed. Results Both treatments produced a rapid onset of efficacy within 4 h. The mean reductions in pruritus and dermatitis scores were not significantly different between the treatments except on day 14, when reductions were more pronounced for oclacitinib than prednisolone (P = 0.0193 for owner pruritus scores; P = 0.0252 for veterinarian dermatitis scores). Adverse events were reported with similar frequency in both groups. Conclusion and clinical importance In this study, both oclacitinib and prednisolone provided rapid, effective and safe control of pruritus associated with allergic dermatitis, with substantial improvement in pruritus, reported by owners, and dermatitis, reported by veterinarians. PMID:25109820

  11. With the Advent of Tomosynthesis in the Workup of Mammographic Abnormality, is Spot Compression Mammography Now Obsolete? An Initial Clinical Experience.

    PubMed

    Ni Mhuircheartaigh, Neasa; Coffey, Louise; Fleming, Hannah; O' Doherty, Ann; McNally, Sorcha

    2017-03-02

    To determine if the routine use of spot compression mammography is now obsolete in the assessment of screen detected masses, asymmetries and architectural distortion since the availability of digital breast tomosynthesis. We introduced breast tomosynthesis in the workup of screen detected abnormalities in our screening center in January 2015. During an initial learning period with tomosynthesis standard spot compression views were also performed. Three consultant breast radiologists retrospectively reviewed all screening mammograms recalled for assessment over the first 6-month period. We assessed retrospectively whether there was any additional diagnostic information obtained from spot compression views not already apparent on tomography. All cases were also reviewed for any additional lesions detected by tomosynthesis, not detected on routine 2-view screening mammography. 548 women screened with standard 2-view digital screening mammography were recalled for assessment in the selected period and a total of 565 lesions were assessed. 341 lesions were assessed by both tomosynthesis and routine spot compression mammography. The spot compression view was considered more helpful than tomosynthesis in only one patient. This was because the breast was inadequately positioned for tomosynthesis and the area in question was not adequately imaged. Apart from this technical error there was no asymmetry, distortion or mass where spot compression provided more diagnostic information than tomosynthesis alone. We detected three additional cancers on tomosynthesis, not detected by routine screening mammography. From our initial experience with tomosynthesis we conclude that spot compression mammography is now obsolete in the assessment of screen detected masses, asymmetries and distortions where tomosynthesis is available.

  12. Signs in Speare's "The Sign of the Beaver."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moseley, Ann

    1995-01-01

    Describes the use of signs in Elizabeth George Speare's "The Sign of the Beaver," in which a settler youth and a young Indian learn to communicate by signs, and how the signs reveal much about each character's culture. Summarizes the plot elements of the book, including characters who are not as sympathetic to the Indian point of view.…

  13. Endocrine abnormalities in anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Elizabeth A; Klibanski, Anne

    2008-07-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a psychiatric disease associated with notable medical complications and increased mortality. Endocrine abnormalities, including hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, hypercortisolemia, growth hormone resistance and sick euthyroid syndrome, mediate the clinical manifestations of this disease. Alterations in anorexigenic and orexigenic appetite-regulating pathways have also been described. Decreases in fat mass result in adipokine abnormalities. Although most of the endocrine changes that occur in AN represent physiologic adaptation to starvation, some persist after recovery and might contribute to susceptibility to AN recurrence. In this Review, we summarize key endocrine alterations in AN, with a particular focus on the profound bone loss that can occur in this disease. Although AN is increasingly prevalent among boys and men, the disorder predominantly affects girls and women who are, therefore, the focus of this Review.

  14. [Chromosome abnormalities in human cancer].

    PubMed

    Salamanca-Gómez, F

    1995-01-01

    Recent investigation on the presence of chromosome abnormalities in neoplasias has allowed outstanding advances in the knowledge of malignant transformation mechanisms and important applications in the clinical diagnosis and prognosis of leukaemias, lymphomas and solid tumors. The purpose of the present paper is to discuss the most relevant cytogenetic aberrations, some of them described at the Unidad de Investigación Médica en Genética Humana, Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social, and to correlate these abnormalities with recent achievements in the knowledge of oncogenes, suppressor genes or antioncogenes, their chromosome localization, and their mutations in human neoplasia; as well as their perspectives in prevention and treatment of cancer that such findings permit to anticipate.

  15. Spondylodiscitis after Cervical Nucleoplasty without Any Abnormal Laboratory Findings

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung Jun; Choi, Eun Joo

    2013-01-01

    Infective spondylodiscitis is a rare complication that can occur after interventional spinal procedures, of which symptoms are usually back pain and fever. Early diagnosis of infective spondylodiscitis is critical to start antibiotics and to improve prognosis. Laboratory examinations including complet blood cell count (CBC), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), and C-reactive protein (CRP) are conventional tools for the early detection of infectious spondylitis. However, we experienced infective spondylodiscitis after cervical nucleoplasty which did not display any laboratory abnormalities, but was diagnosed through an MRI. A patient with cervical disc herniation received nucleoplasty at C5/6 and C6/7. One month later, the patient complained of aggravated pain. There were neither signs of chill nor fever, and the laboratory results appeared normal. However, the MRI findings were compatible with infectious spondylodiscitis at the nucleoplasty site. In conclusion, infectious spondylodiscitis can develop after cervical nucleoplasty without any laboratory abnormalities. Therefore, an MRI should be taken when there is a clinical suspicion for infection in order to not miss complications after interventional procedures, even if the laboratory findings are normal. PMID:23614083

  16. Deficits in foot skin sensation are related to alterations in balance control in chronic low back patients experiencing clinical signs of lumbar nerve root impingement.

    PubMed

    Frost, Lydia R; Bijman, Marc; Strzalkowski, Nicholas D J; Bent, Leah R; Brown, Stephen H M

    2015-05-01

    Chronic low back pain (LBP) patients with radiculopathy, or sciatica, experience pain, tingling or numbness radiating down their leg due to compression of the lumbar nerve root. The resulting reduction in somatosensory information from the foot sole may contribute to deficits in standing balance control. This work was designed to investigate the relationship between foot skin sensitivity and standing balance control in chronic LBP patients with associated radiculopathy. Patients (n=9) and matched healthy controls (n=9) were recruited to the study, and were tested for balance control in both quiet standing as well as during rapid arm raise perturbation trials on a force plate. Foot skin sensitivity was tested bilaterally for vibratory threshold (3, 40 and 250 Hz) and touch (monofilament) threshold. Results demonstrate that patients had reduced sensitivity to 250 Hz vibration in their affected compared to unaffected foot (at the great toe and heel), as well as compared to controls (at the great toe), but there were no differences with lower frequency vibratory testing or with monofilament testing. While there were no significant between-group differences in balance measures, moderate statistically significant correlations between 250 Hz sensitivity and quiet standing balance parameters were uncovered. Thus, patients demonstrate reduced high-frequency vibratory sensitivity at the foot sole, and correlations with quiet standing balance measures indicate a connection between these foot skin sensitivity deficits and alterations in balance control. Clinically, this identifies high frequency vibration testing as an important measure of skin sensitivity in patients with radiculopathy.

  17. Derivative Sign Patterns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Jeffrey

    2011-01-01

    Analysis of the patterns of signs of infinitely differentiable real functions shows that only four patterns are possible if the function is required to exhibit the pattern at all points in its domain and that domain is the set of all real numbers. On the other hand all patterns are possible if the domain is a bounded open interval.

  18. Sign Language Web Pages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fels, Deborah I.; Richards, Jan; Hardman, Jim; Lee, Daniel G.

    2006-01-01

    The World Wide Web has changed the way people interact. It has also become an important equalizer of information access for many social sectors. However, for many people, including some sign language users, Web accessing can be difficult. For some, it not only presents another barrier to overcome but has left them without cultural equality. The…

  19. Signing in Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashby, Rachael

    2013-01-01

    This article describes British Sign Language (BSL) as a viable option for teaching science. BSL is used by a vast number of people in Britain but is seldom taught in schools or included informally alongside lessons. With its new addition of a large scientific glossary, invented to modernise the way science is taught to deaf children, BSL breaks…

  20. Warning Signs of Bullying

    MedlinePlus

    ... away from home, harming themselves, or talking about suicide If you know someone in serious distress or danger, don’t ignore the problem. Get help right away . Back to top Signs a Child is Bullying Others Kids may be bullying others if they: ...

  1. Sign-away Pressures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosen, Catherine E.

    1976-01-01

    Why would mental health clients sign release-of-information forms unless they thought a refusal to do so would jeopardize their access to service? The author believes that the practice of not advising clients of their rights to privacy has ethical implications that can compromise the value of the treatment. (Author)

  2. Relation between the persistence of an abnormal muscle response and the long-term clinical course after microvascular decompression for hemifacial spasm.

    PubMed

    Tobishima, Hana; Hatayama, Toru; Ohkuma, Hiroki

    2014-06-17

    Mentalis muscle responses to electrical stimulation of the zygomatic branch of the facial nerve are considered abnormal muscle responses (AMRs) and can be used to monitor the success of decompression in microvascular decompression (MVD) surgery. The aim of this study was to compare the long-term outcome of MVD surgery in which the AMR disappeared to the outcome of surgery in which the AMR persisted. From 2005 to 2009, 131 patients with hemifacial spasm received MVD surgery with intraoperative monitoring of AMR. At 1 week postsurgery, spasms had resolved in 82% of cases in the AMR-disappearance group and 46% of cases in the persistent-AMR group, mild spasms were present in 10% of cases in the AMR-disappearance group and 31% of cases in the persistent-AMR group, and moderate were present spasms in 8% of cases in the AMR-disappearance group and 23% of cases in the persistent-AMR group (P < 0.05). At 1 year postsurgery, spasms had resolved in 92% of cases in the AMR-disappearance group and 84% of cases in the persistent-AMR group, mild spasms were present in 6% of cases in the AMR-disappearance group and 8% of cases in the persistent-AMR group, and moderate spasms were present in 3% of cases in the AMR-disappearance group and 8% of the cases in the persistent-AMR group (P = 0.56). These results indicate that the long-term outcome of MVD surgery in which the AMR persisted was no different to that of MVD surgery in which the AMR disappeared.

  3. "Jeopardy" in Abnormal Psychology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keutzer, Carolin S.

    1993-01-01

    Describes the use of the board game, Jeopardy, in a college level abnormal psychology course. Finds increased student interaction and improved application of information. Reports generally favorable student evaluation of the technique. (CFR)

  4. Wrong Signs in Regression Coefficients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGee, Holly

    1999-01-01

    When using parametric cost estimation, it is important to note the possibility of the regression coefficients having the wrong sign. A wrong sign is defined as a sign on the regression coefficient opposite to the researcher's intuition and experience. Some possible causes for the wrong sign discussed in this paper are a small range of x's, leverage points, missing variables, multicollinearity, and computational error. Additionally, techniques for determining the cause of the wrong sign are given.

  5. The "pirate sign" in fibrous dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Singnurkar, Amit; Rush, Chris

    2006-11-01

    Fibrous dysplasia commonly involves the skull in both its monostotic and polyostotic variants. We present two cases of fibrous dysplasia involving the sphenoid wing, which were strikingly similar in their bone scan appearance. Both patients demonstrated intense increased uptake of Tc-99m MDP in a pattern reminding us of a "pirate wearing an eyepatch." We propose that this characteristic appearance of fibrous dysplasia of the sphenoid wing be called the "pirate sign." A review of the literature revealed several other pathologic conditions that have been reported to involve the sphenoid bone and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of abnormal bone tracer uptake in this region.

  6. Manual Signing in Adults with Intellectual Disability: Influence of Sign Characteristics on Functional Sign Vocabulary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meuris, Kristien; Maes, Bea; De Meyer, Anne-Marie; Zink, Inge

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of sign characteristics in a key word signing (KWS) system on the functional use of those signs by adults with intellectual disability (ID). Method: All 507 signs from a Flemish KWS system were characterized in terms of phonological, iconic, and referential characteristics.…

  7. Abnormalities in the Visual Processing of Viewing Complex Visual Stimuli Amongst Individuals With Body Image Concern

    PubMed Central

    Duncum, A. J. F.; Atkins, K. J.; Beilharz, F. L.; Mundy, M. E.

    2016-01-01

    Individuals with body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) and clinically concerning body-image concern (BIC) appear to possess abnormalities in the way they perceive visual information in the form of a bias towards local visual processing. As inversion interrupts normal global processing, forcing individuals to process locally, an upright-inverted stimulus discrimination task was used to investigate this phenomenon. We examined whether individuals with nonclinical, yet high levels of BIC would show signs of this bias, in the form of reduced inversion effects (i.e., increased local processing). Furthermore, we assessed whether this bias appeared for general visual stimuli or specifically for appearance-related stimuli, such as faces and bodies. Participants with high-BIC (n = 25) and low-BIC (n = 30) performed a stimulus discrimination task with upright and inverted faces, scenes, objects, and bodies. Unexpectedly, the high-BIC group showed an increased inversion effect compared to the low-BIC group, indicating perceptual abnormalities may not be present as local processing biases, as originally thought. There was no significant difference in performance across stimulus types, signifying that any visual processing abnormalities may be general rather than appearance-based. This has important implications for whether visual processing abnormalities are predisposing factors for BDD or develop throughout the disorder. PMID:27152128

  8. Abnormalities in the Visual Processing of Viewing Complex Visual Stimuli Amongst Individuals With Body Image Concern.

    PubMed

    Duncum, A J F; Atkins, K J; Beilharz, F L; Mundy, M E

    2016-01-01

    Individuals with body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) and clinically concerning body-image concern (BIC) appear to possess abnormalities in the way they perceive visual information in the form of a bias towards local visual processing. As inversion interrupts normal global processing, forcing individuals to process locally, an upright-inverted stimulus discrimination task was used to investigate this phenomenon. We examined whether individuals with nonclinical, yet high levels of BIC would show signs of this bias, in the form of reduced inversion effects (i.e., increased local processing). Furthermore, we assessed whether this bias appeared for general visual stimuli or specifically for appearance-related stimuli, such as faces and bodies. Participants with high-BIC (n = 25) and low-BIC (n = 30) performed a stimulus discrimination task with upright and inverted faces, scenes, objects, and bodies. Unexpectedly, the high-BIC group showed an increased inversion effect compared to the low-BIC group, indicating perceptual abnormalities may not be present as local processing biases, as originally thought. There was no significant difference in performance across stimulus types, signifying that any visual processing abnormalities may be general rather than appearance-based. This has important implications for whether visual processing abnormalities are predisposing factors for BDD or develop throughout the disorder.

  9. Abnormalities of the erythrocyte membrane.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Patrick G

    2013-12-01

    Primary abnormalities of the erythrocyte membrane are characterized by clinical, laboratory, and genetic heterogeneity. Among this group, hereditary spherocytosis patients are more likely to experience symptomatic anemia. Treatment of hereditary spherocytosis with splenectomy is curative in most patients. Growing recognition of the long-term risks of splenectomy has led to re-evaluation of the role of splenectomy. Management guidelines acknowledge these considerations and recommend discussion between health care providers, patient, and family. The hereditary elliptocytosis syndromes are the most common primary disorders of erythrocyte membrane proteins. However, most elliptocytosis patients are asymptomatic and do not require therapy.

  10. Vital signs monitoring system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffen, Dale A. (Inventor); Sturm, Ronald E. (Inventor); Rinard, George A. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A system is disclosed for monitoring vital physiological signs. Each of the system components utilizes a single hybrid circuit with each component having high accuracy without the necessity of repeated calibration. The system also has low power requirements, provides a digital display, and is of sufficiently small size to be incorporated into a hand-carried case for portable use. Components of the system may also provide independent outputs making the component useful, of itself, for monitoring one or more vital signs. The overall system preferably includes an ECG amplifier and cardiotachometer signal conditioner unit, an impedance pneumograph and respiration rate signal conditioner unit, a heart/breath rate processor unit, a temperature monitoring unit, a selector switch, a clock unit, and an LCD driver unit and associated LCDs, with the system being capable of being expanded as needed or desired, such as, for example, by addition of a systolic/diastolic blood pressure unit.

  11. Signs and Symptoms that Differentiate Acute Sinusitis from Viral Upper Respiratory Tract Infection

    PubMed Central

    Shaikh, Nader; Hoberman, Alejandro; Kearney, Diana H.; Colborn, D. Kathleen; Kurs-Lasky, Marcia; Jeong, Jong H.; Haralam, Mary Ann; Bowen, A’Delbert; Flom, Lynda L.; Wald, Ellen R.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Differentiating acute bacterial sinusitis from viral upper respiratory tract infection (URI) is challenging; 20% to 40% of children diagnosed with acute sinusitis based on clinical criteria likely have an uncomplicated URI. The objective of this study was to determine which signs and symptoms could be used to identify the subgroup of children who meet current clinical criteria for sinusitis but who nevertheless have a viral URI. Methods We obtained sinus radiographs in consecutive children meeting a priori clinical criteria for acute sinusitis. We considered the subgroup of children with completely normal sinus radiographs to have an uncomplicated URI despite meeting the clinical diagnostic criteria for sinusitis. We examined the utility of signs and symptoms in identifying children with URI. Results Of 258 children enrolled, 54 (20.9%) children had completely normal radiographs. The absence of green nasal discharge, the absence of disturbed sleep, and mild symptoms were associated with a diagnosis of URI. No physical exam findings were particularly helpful in distinguishing between children with normal vs. abnormal radiographs. Conclusions Among children meeting current criteria for the diagnosis of acute sinusitis, those with mild symptoms are significantly more likely to have a URI than those with severe symptoms. In addition to assessing overall severity of symptoms, practitioners should ask about sleep disturbance and green nasal discharge when assessing children with suspected sinusitis; their absence favors a diagnosis of URI. PMID:23694838

  12. The Integral Sign Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noll, Keith

    2007-07-01

    We will observe the unusual warped disk galaxy known as the Integral Sign Galaxy, UGC 3697, with a small two-position WFPC2 mosaic. Observations will be obtained in three broad band filters and the resulting image will be released on the 19th anniversary of the launch of the Hubble Space Telescope on ~April 24, 2009. Multidrizzled mosaics will be made available through the archive.

  13. Planetary Vital Signs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennel, Charles; Briggs, Stephen; Victor, David

    2016-07-01

    The climate is beginning to behave in unusual ways. The global temperature reached unprecedented highs in 2015 and 2016, which led climatologists to predict an enormous El Nino that would cure California's record drought. It did not happen the way they expected. That tells us just how unreliable temperature has become as an indicator of important aspects of climate change. The world needs to go beyond global temperature to a set of planetary vital signs. Politicians should not over focus policy on one indicator. They need to look at the balance of evidence. A coalition of scientists and policy makers should start to develop vital signs at once, since they should be ready at the entry into force of the Paris Agreement in 2020. But vital signs are only the beginning. The world needs to learn how to use the vast knowledge we will be acquiring about climate change and its impacts. Is it not time to use all the tools at hand- observations from space and ground networks; demographic, economic and societal measures; big data statistical techniques; and numerical models-to inform politicians, managers, and the public of the evolving risks of climate change at global, regional, and local scales? Should we not think in advance of an always-on social and information network that provides decision-ready knowledge to those who hold the responsibility to act, wherever they are, at times of their choosing?

  14. Assessment of clinical effects and safety of an oral supplement based on marine protein, vitamin C, grape seed extract, zinc, and tomato extract in the improvement of visible signs of skin aging in men

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Adilson; Pegas Pereira, Elisangela Samartin; Assumpção, Elvira Cancio; Calixto dos Santos, Felipe Borba; Ota, Fernanda Sayuri; de Oliveira Pereira, Margareth; Fidelis, Maria Carolina; Fávaro, Raquel; Barros Langen, Stephanie Selma; Favaro de Arruda, Lúcia Helena; Abildgaard, Eva Nydal

    2015-01-01

    Background Skin aging is a natural process that may be aggravated by environmental factors. Topical products are the conventional means to combat aging; however, the use of oral supplements is on the rise to assist in the management of aged skin. Objective The purpose of this study was to assess the effects and safety of an oral supplement containing (per tablet) marine protein (105 mg), vitamin C (27 mg), grape seed extract (13.75 mg), zinc (2 mg), and tomato extract (14.38 mg) in the improvement of skin aging in men. Methods This single-center, open-label, quasi-experimental clinical study enrolled 47 male subjects, aged 30–45 years, with phototypes I–IV on the Fitzpatrick scale. Subjects received two tablets of the oral supplement for 180 consecutive days. Each subject served as their own control. Clinical assessments were made by medical personnel and by the subjects, respectively. Objective assessments were carried out through pH measurements, sebumetry, corneometry, ultrasound scanning, skin biopsies, and photographic images. Results Forty-one subjects (87%) completed the study. Clinical improvements on both investigator- and subject-rated outcomes were found for the following parameters: erythema, hydration, radiance, and overall appearance (P<0.05). The objective measurements in the facial skin showed significant improvements from baseline in skin hydration (P<0.05), dermal ultrasound density (P<0.001), and reduction of skin pH (P<0.05). No statistical improvement in relation to sebum was found. The photographic assessment showed an improvement in the overall appearance. The results of the objective measurements were found to be correlated with the subjects’ satisfaction by an increase of collagen and elastic fibers. Conclusion The use of an oral supplement based on a unique biomarine complex, vitamin C, grape seed extract, zinc, and tomato extract produced improvements in the signs of skin aging in men. PMID:26170708

  15. Cutaneous signs of classical dermatomyositis.

    PubMed

    Auriemma, M; Capo, A; Meogrossi, G; Amerio, P

    2014-10-01

    Idiopathic immune myopathies (IIM) are an heterogeneous group of autoimmune muscle disorders characterized by progressive muscle involvement. Dermatomyositis (DM) is the most common form of IIM. It is a multisystem disorder characterized by symmetric proximal, extensor, inflammatory myopathy, vascular involvement and a characteristic cutaneous eruption. Six types of DM have been identified: idiopathic, juvenile (JDM), cancer-related other autoimmune diseases-related, iatrogenic DM and amyopathic DM. Cutaneous manifestations of DM are the most important aspect of this disease and can precede from several months to years muscle or systemic involvement. Three groups of signs have been described: pathognomonic, highly characteristic and compatible. Although differences exist among the different clinical presentation of skin lesions, they share common histological findings including the presence of interface dermatitis with epidermal atrophy, basement membrane degeneration, vacuolar alteration of basal keratinocytes, and dermal changes consisting of interstitial mucin deposition and a sparse lymphocytic infiltrate. DM is a serious disease; the correct evaluation of any skin lesion suggesting an early diagnosis is of utmost importance. Skin signs may, also, represent a marker of treatment efficacy even though systemic symptoms worsening may not always be followed by more severe skin lesions.

  16. Danger signs in drug hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Scherer, Kathrin; Bircher, Andreas J

    2010-07-01

    ADRs are frequently considered iatrogenic complications and, therefore, pose a specific challenge for the physician-patient relationship. Early recognition of a potential ADR is possible, especially on the skin, in addition to characteristic clinical danger signs. Cutaneous manifestations are variable, depending on the causative pathomechanism. It is impossible to conclude the causative agent from the morphology of the cutaneous lesions. The intake of several drugs in the time before the elicitation of the drug reaction usually poses a diagnostic challenge. It is crucial for the precision of any further allergological work-up to document the type of rash precisely as well as the time course of drug intake and appearance of the first symptoms. involvement of internal organs or circulating blood cells. Timely recognition of such cutaneous lesions and the correct differential diagnosis with prompt withdrawal of the putative culprit drug are essential to reducing morbidity and preventing mortality. This article discusses risk factors, early symptoms, and danger signs indicating a possibly severe course of an ADR and advises on early actions.

  17. The reliability of British Sign Language and English versions of the Clinical Outcomes in Routine Evaluation--Outcome Measure with d/Deaf populations in the UK: an initial study.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Katherine; Evans, Chris; Campbell, Malcolm; Young, Alys; Lovell, Karina

    2014-05-01

    Previous research has argued that the mental well-being of d/Deaf people is poorer than that of hearing populations. However, there is a paucity of valid and reliable mental health instruments in sign language that have been normalised with d/Deaf populations. The aim of this study was to determine the reliability of the Clinical Outcomes in Routine Evaluation - Outcome Measure (CORE-OM) with d/Deaf populations. A British Sign Language (BSL) version was produced using a team approach to forward translation, and a back-translation check. The CORE-OM was incorporated into an online survey, to be completed in either BSL or English, as preferred by the participant. From December 2010 to March 2011, data were collected from 136 d/Deaf people. Cronbach's α was used to measure the internal consistency of items in the CORE-OM. Comparisons were made between versions, including comparisons with the non-clinical hearing population (not in receipt of mental health services) in a previous study. The reliability of the overall score, as well as the non-risk items in both the BSL and English versions, was satisfactory. The internal reliability of each domain in the BSL version was good (Cronbach's α > 0.70) and comparable to the English version in the hearing population. This was true for most domains of the CORE-OM in the English version completed by d/Deaf people, although the Functioning domain had a relatively low α of 0.79 and the Risk domain had an α of only 0.66 This raised the question whether it is advisable to use a mental health assessment with d/Deaf populations that has been standardised with hearing populations. Nevertheless, this study has shown that it is possible to collect data from d/Deaf populations in the UK via the web (both in BSL and English), and an online BSL version of the CORE-OM is recommended for use with Deaf populations in the community.

  18. The asymmetric gait toenail unit sign.

    PubMed

    Zaias, Nardo; Rebell, Gerbert; Casal, German; Appel, Jason

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this investigation was to resolve a diagnostic problem and report toenail unit changes attributable to shoe friction that resemble onychomycosis, but that are fungus-negative, and identify common skeletal causes in patients with an asymmetric walking gait. X-ray and clinical feet inspections were performed to evaluate skeletal components that change normal foot biodynamics. Forty-nine patients, all dermatophyte-negative, were reviewed. All patients were those seen in our private practice who demonstrated skeletal and toenail unit abnormalities such as onycholysis, nail bed keratosis resembling distal subungual onychomycosis, nail plate surface abnormalities, distal toe skin keratosis, a diagnostic nail plate shape, as well as several skeletal abnormalities. The clinical abnormalities of the asymmetric gait syndrome include onycholysis, nail bed keratosis, nail plate surface abnormalities, and a diagnostic nail plate shape. By the patient's history, the skeletal findings that were present worsened with age and, in many patients, they were familial. Onychomycosis does not lead to an asymmetric gait nail problem, asymmetric gait toenail does not favor dermatophyte infection, and not all nail dystrophies are the result of an asymmetric walking gait.

  19. Sign language perception research for improving automatic sign language recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ten Holt, Gineke A.; Arendsen, Jeroen; de Ridder, Huib; Koenderink-van Doorn, Andrea J.; Reinders, Marcel J. T.; Hendriks, Emile A.

    2009-02-01

    Current automatic sign language recognition (ASLR) seldom uses perceptual knowledge about the recognition of sign language. Using such knowledge can improve ASLR because it can give an indication which elements or phases of a sign are important for its meaning. Also, the current generation of data-driven ASLR methods has shortcomings which may not be solvable without the use of knowledge on human sign language processing. Handling variation in the precise execution of signs is an example of such shortcomings: data-driven methods (which include almost all current methods) have difficulty recognizing signs that deviate too much from the examples that were used to train the method. Insight into human sign processing is needed to solve these problems. Perceptual research on sign language can provide such insights. This paper discusses knowledge derived from a set of sign perception experiments, and the application of such knowledge in ASLR. Among the findings are the facts that not all phases and elements of a sign are equally informative, that defining the 'correct' form for a sign is not trivial, and that statistical ASLR methods do not necessarily arrive at sign representations that resemble those of human beings. Apparently, current ASLR methods are quite different from human observers: their method of learning gives them different sign definitions, they regard each moment and element of a sign as equally important and they employ a single definition of 'correct' for all circumstances. If the object is for an ASLR method to handle natural sign language, then the insights from sign perception research must be integrated into ASLR.

  20. Lithium toxicity: the importance of clinical signs.

    PubMed

    Dunne, Francis J

    2010-04-01

    Although there appears to be a decline in its use, lithium is still used extensively in the UK to treat bipolar disorder. However, lithium can be quite toxic and lead to long-term problems, rarely death. Therefore, doctors need to carefully monitor patients taking lithium and seek appropriate advice whenever concerns are raised.

  1. Sign Lowering and Phonetic Reduction in American Sign Language

    PubMed Central

    Tyrone, Martha E.; Mauk, Claude E.

    2010-01-01

    This study examines sign lowering as a form of phonetic reduction in American Sign Language. Phonetic reduction occurs in the course of normal language production, when instead of producing a carefully articulated form of a word, the language user produces a less clearly articulated form. When signs are produced in context by native signers, they often differ from the citation forms of signs. In some cases, phonetic reduction is manifested as a sign being produced at a lower location than in the citation form. Sign lowering has been documented previously, but this is the first study to examine it in phonetic detail. The data presented here are tokens of the sign WONDER, as produced by six native signers, in two phonetic contexts and at three signing rates, which were captured by optoelectronic motion capture. The results indicate that sign lowering occurred for all signers, according to the factors we manipulated. Sign production was affected by several phonetic factors that also influence speech production, namely, production rate, phonetic context, and position within an utterance. In addition, we have discovered interesting variations in sign production, which could underlie distinctions in signing style, analogous to accent or voice quality in speech. PMID:20607146

  2. Sign Language Comprehension: The Case of Spanish Sign Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez Ortiz, I. R.

    2008-01-01

    This study aims to answer the question, how much of Spanish Sign Language interpreting deaf individuals really understand. Study sampling included 36 deaf people (deafness ranging from severe to profound; variety depending on the age at which they learned sign language) and 36 hearing people who had good knowledge of sign language (most were…

  3. Chilaiditi's sign secondary to Richter's hernia or Chilaiditi's syndrome?

    PubMed Central

    Shakya, Vikal Chandra

    2015-01-01

    Chilaiditi's sign and syndrome seem similar but are actually different entities, difficult to distinguish from each other. A 60-year-old female presented with a clinical scenario of intestinal obstruction, which was thought to be Chilaiditi's syndrome because of the unusual impression of gas under the diaphragm, but was confirmed as Chilaiditi's sign after laparotomy. The interposition of dilated small bowel loops below the diaphragm due to distal obstruction somewhere else can also produce a Chilaiditi's sign. PMID:26270528

  4. Sign of coma.

    PubMed

    Skjaerlund, J M

    1988-06-15

    The oblique focusing defect of spherical lenses, known as coma, is described by Seidel as the second of five correction terms (third order) to the Gauss theory. The concept is clear for a refracting surface that is free of spherical aberration; however, the impossibility of eliminating spherical aberration from a single lens with spherical surfaces can confuse the understanding of the second aberration, coma. A way of understanding the comatic effect even in the presence of spherical aberration is described. Confusion over the sign of coma, as indicated by mistakes in optics textbooks, is addressed. This paper suggests corrections to some interpretations of coma found in the literature.

  5. Elbow clinical, ultrasonographic and radiographic study in patients with inflammatory joint diseases.

    PubMed

    Uson, Jacqueline; Miguélez-Sánchez, Roberto; de Los Riscos, Marina; Martínez-Blasco, María Jesús; Fernández-Espartero, Cruz; Villaverde-García, Virginia; Garrido, Jesús; Naredo, Esperanza

    2016-03-01

    The main objective of this cross-sectional observational study was to investigate the relationship between clinical, ultrasonographic (US) and radiographic elbow features in patients with inflammatory joint diseases (IJD). The secondary objective was to evaluate the association between regional clinical elbow diagnoses and imaging findings. Consecutive patients with IJD attending follow-up visits were assessed for elbow pain and standardized elbow examination. Seven regional clinical diagnoses were defined. Digital elbow radiographs were read for 9 abnormalities. A standardized elbow grayscale (GS) and power Doppler (PD) scan recorded 13 defined abnormalities. Analysis encompassed 361 clinical, 361 US and 340 radiographic elbow assessments from 181 patients. US and clinical assessments showed an overall higher agreement than radiographic and clinical assessments (68.8 vs 59.1%, p = 0.001). When structural US abnormalities were compared with radiographic findings, agreement was slightly higher than when comparing all US abnormalities with radiographic findings (77.3%, k 0.533 and 73.5%, k 0.492). Enthesophytes, the most common abnormalities, were not associated with clinical findings. Subclinical US-synovitis and US-enthesopathy were found, respectively, in 17.3 and 14.1% of the clinically normal elbows. Clinical elbow arthritis prevalence and bias-adjusted kappa (PABAK) agreement was good for radiographic fat pad sign, PD-synovitis and GS-synovitis. Clinical elbow enthesopathy PABAK agreement was moderate for GS-enthesopathy and radiographic calcifications. US showed acceptable agreement with clinical and radiographic assessments for detecting elbow inflammatory and structural abnormalities in patients with IJD. Because US detected more abnormalities than radiography and has the capability to detect more subclinical abnormalities, US may be potentially used as a first-line elbow diagnostic tool in this clinical setting.

  6. Signs of a Heart Attack

    MedlinePlus

    ... attack Heart Health and Stroke Signs of a heart attack Related information Make the Call. Don't Miss ... to top More information on Signs of a heart attack Read more from womenshealth.gov Make the Call, ...

  7. Improvement of bacterial clearance and relief of clinical signs of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium infection in pigs through upregulation of Th 1-specific responses by administration of a combination of two silicate minerals, biotite and bentonite.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin-A; Jung, Bock-Gie; Kim, Tae-Hoon; Kim, Yun-Mi; Koh, Hong-Bum; Lee, Bong-Joo

    2015-09-01

    Biotite and bentonite are phyllosilicate minerals that were originally used in industrial applications. Several beneficial activities of them have recently been reported, especially regulation of the immune system and antimicrobial effects. Therefore, we investigated the immune-enhancing and bacterial clearance effects of a biotite and bentonite mixture (BBM) on experimental infection of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) to determine whether the BBM could be used as an alternative antibiotic. We administered 1% or 2% BBM as a feed supplement. We then evaluated the bacterial clearance effects of the BBM against S. Typhimurium. We also evaluated the immune-enhancing effect of the BBM through several immunological experiments that included examination of the lysozyme activity, CD4(+)/CD8(+) T lymphocyte ratio and the T-helper type 1 (Th 1) cytokine profile. The clinical signs of S. Typhimurium and the number of viable bacteria in feces and tissues were significantly decreased in both BBM groups, especially in the 2% BBM group. The BBM also markedly enhanced the lysozyme activity, CD4(+)/CD8(+) T lymphocyte ratio and expression levels of IFN-γ and IL-12 in S. Typhimurium-challenged pigs. Therefore, the BBM could be a good candidate as an alternative antibiotic that improves Th 1-specific immune responses and the bacterial clearance effect.

  8. Improvement of bacterial clearance and relief of clinical signs of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium infection in pigs through upregulation of Th 1-specific responses by administration of a combination of two silicate minerals, biotite and bentonite

    PubMed Central

    LEE, Jin-A; JUNG, Bock-Gie; KIM, Tae-Hoon; KIM, Yun-Mi; KOH, Hong-Bum; LEE, Bong-Joo

    2015-01-01

    Biotite and bentonite are phyllosilicate minerals that were originally used in industrial applications. Several beneficial activities of them have recently been reported, especially regulation of the immune system and antimicrobial effects. Therefore, we investigated the immune-enhancing and bacterial clearance effects of a biotite and bentonite mixture (BBM) on experimental infection of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) to determine whether the BBM could be used as an alternative antibiotic. We administered 1% or 2% BBM as a feed supplement. We then evaluated the bacterial clearance effects of the BBM against S. Typhimurium. We also evaluated the immune-enhancing effect of the BBM through several immunological experiments that included examination of the lysozyme activity, CD4+/CD8+ T lymphocyte ratio and the T-helper type 1 (Th 1) cytokine profile. The clinical signs of S. Typhimurium and the number of viable bacteria in feces and tissues were significantly decreased in both BBM groups, especially in the 2% BBM group. The BBM also markedly enhanced the lysozyme activity, CD4+/CD8+ T lymphocyte ratio and expression levels of IFN-γ and IL-12 in S. Typhimurium-challenged pigs. Therefore, the BBM could be a good candidate as an alternative antibiotic that improves Th 1-specific immune responses and the bacterial clearance effect. PMID:25947887

  9. INFINITY construction contract signed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    Key state and community leaders celebrated April 6 with the signing of a construction contract for the state-of-the-art INFINITY Science Center planned near John C. Stennis Space Center in south Mississippi. Gulfport Mayor George Schloegel (l to r), chair of non-profit INFINITY Science Center Inc., was joined for the signing ceremony at the Hancock Bank in Gulfport by Virginia Wagner, sister of late Hancock Bank President Leo Seal Jr.; and Roy Anderson III, president and CEO of Roy Anderson Corp. Seal was the first chair of INFINITY Science Center Inc., which has led in development of the project. Roy Anderson Corp. plans to begin construction on the 72,000-square-foot, $28 million science and education center in May. The Mississippi Department of Transportation (MDOT) also is set to begin construction of a $2 million access road to the new center. The April 6 ceremony was attended by numerous officials, including former Stennis Space Center Directors Jerry Hlass and Roy Estess; Mississippi Senate President Pro Tempore Billy Hewes, R-Gulfport; Mississippi Rep. Diane Peranich, D-Pass Christian; and MDOT Southern District Commissioner Wayne Brown.

  10. Quine and the Segregrational Sign.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolf, George

    1999-01-01

    In the context of theory of integrational linguistics, the segregational sign is distinguished from the integrational sign, and the operation of the former is analyzed. Focus is on how logic guides the sign, and how the theory of W. V. Quine accounts for these issues. (MSE)

  11. Kinship in Mongolian Sign Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geer, Leah

    2011-01-01

    Information and research on Mongolian Sign Language is scant. To date, only one dictionary is available in the United States (Badnaa and Boll 1995), and even that dictionary presents only a subset of the signs employed in Mongolia. The present study describes the kinship system used in Mongolian Sign Language (MSL) based on data elicited from…

  12. Unusual and abnormal canine estrous cycles.

    PubMed

    Meyers-Wallen, V N

    2007-12-01

    Preovulatory serum progesterone concentrations are used to estimate the day of LH peak (day 0), not only to accurately time insemination and predict parturition, but to identify abnormal or unusual estrous cycles due to ovarian dysfunction. Early identification of these disorders is of therapeutic and economic importance. This review discusses anovulation, slow preovulatory progesterone rise, "split heat", insufficient luteal phase, and persistent estrus in the bitch. Some of these were temporary dysfunctions; with appropriate breeding management, pregnancy can be achieved. However, in other cases, these were signs of severe, permanent ovarian dysfunction associated with infertility, with potentially lethal sequelae.

  13. [The relativity of abnormity].

    PubMed

    Nilson, Annika

    2006-01-01

    In the late 19th century and in the beginning of the 20th century, mental diseases and abnormal behavior was considered to be a great danger to culture and society. "Degeneration" was the buzzword of the time, used and misused by artists and scientists alike. At the same time, some scientists saw abnormity as the key to unlock the mysteries of the ordinary mind. Naturalistic curiosity left Pandoras box open when religion declined in Darwins wake. Two swedish scientists, the physician Bror Gadelius (1862-1938) and his friend the philosopher Axel Herrlin (1870-1937), inspired by the French psychologist Theodule Ribots (1839-1916) "psychology without a soul", denied all fixed demarcation lines between abnormity and normality. All humans are natures creatures ruled by physiological laws, not ruled by God or convention. Even ordinary morality was considered to be an utterly backward explanation and guideline for complex human behavior. Different forms of therapy, not various kinds of penalties for wicked and disturbing behavior, are the now the solution for lots of people, "normal" as well as "abnormal". Psychiatry is expanding.

  14. Schizophrenia and abnormal brain network hubs.

    PubMed

    Rubinov, Mikail; Bullmore, Ed

    2013-09-01

    Schizophrenia is a heterogeneous psychiatric disorder of unknown cause or characteristic pathology. Clinical neuroscientists increasingly postulate that schizophrenia is a disorder of brain network organization. In this article we discuss the conceptual framework of this dysconnection hypothesis, describe the predominant methodological paradigm for testing this hypothesis, and review recent evidence for disruption of central/hub brain regions, as a promising example of this hypothesis. We summarize studies of brain hubs in large-scale structural and functional brain networks and find strong evidence for network abnormalities of prefrontal hubs, and moderate evidence for network abnormalities of limbic, temporal, and parietal hubs. Future studies are needed to differentiate network dysfunction from previously observed gray- and white-matter abnormalities of these hubs, and to link endogenous network dysfunction phenotypes with perceptual, behavioral, and cognitive clinical phenotypes of schizophrenia.

  15. An open, self-controlled study on the efficacy of topical indoxacarb for eliminating fleas and clinical signs of flea-allergy dermatitis in client-owned dogs in Queensland, Australia

    PubMed Central

    Fisara, Petr; Sargent, Roger M; Shipstone, Michael; von Berky, Andrew; von Berky, Janet

    2014-01-01

    Background Canine flea-allergy dermatitis (FAD), a hypersensitivity response to antigenic material in the saliva of feeding fleas, occurs worldwide and remains a common presentation in companion animal veterinary practice despite widespread availability of effective systemic and topical flea-control products. Hypothesis/Objectives To evaluate the clinical response in dogs with FAD treated topically with indoxacarb, a novel oxadiazine insecticide. Animals Twenty-five client-owned dogs in Queensland, Australia diagnosed with pre-existing FAD on the basis of clinical signs, flea-antigen intradermal and serological tests. Methods An open-label, noncontrolled study, in which all dogs were treated with topical indoxacarb at 4 week intervals, three times over 12 weeks. Results Twenty-four dogs completed the study. Complete resolution of clinical signs of FAD was observed in 21 cases (87.5%), with nearly complete resolution or marked improvement in the remaining three cases. Mean clinical scores (Canine Atopic Dermatitis Extent and Severity Index-03) were reduced by 93.3% at week 12. Mean owner-assessed pruritus scores were reduced by 88% by week 12. Mean flea counts reduced by 98.7 and 100% in weeks 8 and 12, respectively. Conclusions and clinical importance Topical indoxacarb treatment applied every 4 weeks for 12 weeks, without concomitant antipruritic or ectoparasiticide therapy, completely alleviated flea infestations in all dogs and associated clinical signs of FAD in a high proportion of this population of dogs in a challenging flea-infestation environment. Résumé Contexte La dermatite par allergie aux piqures de puces (FAD), une hypersensibilité aux antigènes salivaires des puces, est décrite dans le monde entier et reste une présentation fréquente en médicine vétérinaire des animaux de compagnie malgré une large gamme d'antiparasitaires topiques et systémiques efficaces disponibles. Hypothèses/Objectifs Estimer la réponse clinique des chiens

  16. Determination of a sedative protocol for use in California sea lions (Zalophus californianus) with neurologic abnormalities undergoing electroencephalographic examination.

    PubMed

    Dennison, Sophie; Haulena, Martin; Williams, D Colette; Dawson, John; Yandell, Brian S; Gulland, Frances M D

    2008-12-01

    Sedation in sea lions exhibiting abnormal neurologic signs may require modification of established sedatior protocols because of the likely interaction between effects of the sedative and physiologic changes in diseased animals The effects of two sedative combinations, 0.07 mg/kg medetomidine and 0.07 mg/kg medetomidine plus 0.2 mg/kg butorphanol, were compared between California sea lions (Zalophus californianus) with signs of neurologic dysfunctior (n=33) and without neurologic signs (n=8). Sedation depth was scored on a scale of 0 (no effect) to 4 (profound sedation) assessed by response to auditory, tactile, and visual stimuli at the time of perceived maximal sedative effect In the medetomidine-alone group, sea lions with neurologic signs attained a median sedation score of 4 compared to a median sedation score of 1 in the clinically normal sea lions. Sea lions with and without neurologic signs giver medetomidine-butorphanol attained a median sedation score of 4. No statistically significant difference in time to induction and respiratory rate was found between the two sedation protocols in all sea lions. In the sea lions with neurologic signs, the recovery time from medetomidine-butorphanol sedation was prolonged (P < 0.01) and minimum recorded heart rates, although remaining within normal physiologic limits, were lower (P = 0.02) when compared to the sea lions administered medetomidine alone. Muscle jerks were observed in many animals given medetomidine-butorphanol and were detrimental to the diagnostic quality of the electroencephalogram (EEG) recording. Medetomidine alone at a dose rate of 0.07 mg/kg thus provides adequate and safe sedation in sea lions with neurologic signs undergoing EEG evaluation.

  17. CT of trauma to the abnormal kidney

    SciTech Connect

    Rhyner, P.; Federle, M.P.; Jeffrey, R.B.

    1984-04-01

    Traumatic injuries to already abnormal kidneys are difficult to assess by excretory urography and clinical evaluation. Bleeding and urinary extravasation may accompany minor trauma; conversely, underlying tumors, perirenal hemorrhage, and extravasation may be missed on urography. Computed tomography (CT) was performed in eight cases including three neoplasms, one adult polycystic disease, one simple renal cyst, two hydronephrotic kidneys, and one horseshoe kidney. CT provided specific and clinically useful information in each case that was not apparent on excretory urography.

  18. [Heart rate variability analysis: a new approach in clinical research methodology for neonatal sepsis].

    PubMed

    Cuestas, Eduardo; Rizzotti, Alina; Agüero, Guillermo

    2011-08-01

    The knowledge on neonatal sepsis has increase significantly, but a clinical or biochemical marker is not available for an early and appropriate diagnosis. This fact results of an inadequate analysis which might be missing important quantum of biological information. A new method of nonlinear analysis have been proposed to investigate time series of physiological data, particularly heart rate variability analysis, that apparently would detect abnormal changes which precedes clinical or biochemical signs of infection by as much as 12-24 hours.

  19. The relationship between chief complaint and comparable sign in patients with spinal pain: An exploratory study.

    PubMed

    Cook, Chad; Learman, Kenneth; Showalter, Chris; O'Halloran, Bryan

    2015-06-01

    Many musculoskeletal management philosophies advocate the exploration of the relationship between the patient's chief complaint (CC) and the physical examination findings that reproduce/reduce/change that CC. Geoffrey Maitland developed the concept "comparable sign(s) (CS), which are physical examination findings related to the CC(s) that are reproduced during an examination/treatment. These include observed abnormalities of movement, postures or motor control, abnormal responses to movement, static deformities, and abnormal joint assessment findings. There are no studies that have explored the potential clinical relationships between the patient's CC and a CS, thus this exploratory study evaluated the associations, outcomes, and prevalence of the findings. This cohort study involved 112 subjects age 54.3 years (SD = 13.4 years), with neck (25.9%) or low back pain (74.1%) who were treated with physiotherapy for an average of 42 days. Data analysis revealed 88.4% identified a CC at baseline. There was a moderate statistical association between CC and the active physiological finding of a CS (r = 0.36), and small-moderate associations between all examination phases (r = 0.25-0.37). There were no statistical differences in pain and disability outcomes for those with and without a CC or CS; however, baseline pain levels were higher for those without CC (p = 0.04). Further, rate of recovery was lower in those without a CS during passive physiological examination. The results would suggest that there may be content validity to the concept of CS but further research with larger samples sizes is required to explore the extent of the validity is warranted.

  20. Headaches - danger signs

    MedlinePlus

    ... TJ, Robertson CE, Smith JH. Headache and other craniofacial pain. In: Daroff RB, Jankovic J, Mazziotta JC, Pomeroy SL, eds. Bradley's Neurology in Clinical Practice . 7th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; ...

  1. Prenatal diagnosis of limb abnormalities: role of fetal ultrasonography

    PubMed Central

    Ermito, Santina; Dinatale, Angela; Carrara, Sabina; Cavaliere, Alessandro; Imbruglia, Laura; Recupero, Stefania

    2009-01-01

    Fetal ultrasonografy is the most important tool to provide prenatal diagnosis of fetal anomalies. The detection of limb abnormalities may be a complex problem if the correct diagnostic approch is not established. A careful description of the abnormality using the rigth nomenclature is the first step. Looking for other associated abnormalities is the threshold to suspect chromosomal abnormalities or single gene disorder. According to the patogenic point of view, limb abnormalities may be the result of malformation, deformation, or disruption. The prenatal diagnosis and the management of limb abnormalities involve a multidisciplinary team of ostetrician, radiologist/sonologist, clinical geneticist, neonatologist, and orthopedic surgeons to provide the parents with the information regarding etiology of the disorder, prognosis, option related to the pregnancy and recurrence risk for future pregnancies. The aim of this review is to describe the importance of detailed fetal ultrasonography in prenatal diagnosis of limb abnormalities. PMID:22439035

  2. Sign language comprehension: the case of Spanish sign language.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez Ortiz, I R

    2008-01-01

    This study aims to answer the question, how much of Spanish Sign Language interpreting deaf individuals really understand. Study sampling included 36 deaf people (deafness ranging from severe to profound; variety depending on the age at which they learned sign language) and 36 hearing people who had good knowledge of sign language (most were interpreters). Sign language comprehension was assessed using passages of secondary level. After being exposed to the passages, the participants had to tell what they had understood about them, answer a set of related questions, and offer a title for the passage. Sign language comprehension by deaf participants was quite acceptable but not as good as that by hearing signers who, unlike deaf participants, were not only late learners of sign language as a second language but had also learned it through formal training.

  3. Heritable bovine fetal abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Whitlock, B K; Kaiser, L; Maxwell, H S

    2008-08-01

    The etiologies for congenital bovine fetal anomalies can be divided into heritable, toxic, nutritional, and infectious categories. Although uncommon in most herds, inherited congenital anomalies are probably present in all breeds of cattle and propagated as a result of specific trait selection that inadvertently results in propagation of the defect. In some herds, the occurrence of inherited anomalies has become frequent, and economically important. Anomalous traits can affect animals in a range of ways, some being lethal or requiring euthanasia on humane grounds, others altering structure, function, or performance of affected animals. Veterinary practitioners should be aware of the potential for inherited defects, and be prepared to investigate and report animals exhibiting abnormal characteristics. This review will discuss the morphologic characteristics, mode of inheritance, breeding lines affected, and the availability of genetic testing for selected heritable bovine fetal abnormalities.

  4. Liver abnormalities in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Than, Nwe Ni; Neuberger, James

    2013-08-01

    Abnormalities of liver function (notably rise in alkaline phosphatase and fall in serum albumin) are common in normal pregnancy, whereas rise in serum bilirubin and aminotransferase suggest either exacerbation of underlying pre-existing liver disease, liver disease related to pregnancy or liver disease unrelated to pregnancy. Pregnant women appear to have a worse outcome when infected with Hepatitis E virus. Liver diseases associated with pregnancy include abnormalities associated hyperemesis gravidarum, acute fatty liver disease, pre-eclampsia, cholestasis of pregnancy and HELLP syndrome. Prompt investigation and diagnosis is important in ensuring a successful maternal and foetal outcome. In general, prompt delivery is the treatment of choice for acute fatty liver, pre-eclampsia and HELLP syndrome and ursodeoxycholic acid is used for cholestasis of pregnancy although it is not licenced for this indication.

  5. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Pericarditis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Names Causes Who Is at Risk Signs & Symptoms Diagnosis Treatments Prevention Living With Clinical Trials Links Related Topics Cough Heart Attack Heart Palpitations Heart Surgery Hypotension Send a link ...

  6. Morphological abnormalities in elasmobranchs.

    PubMed

    Moore, A B M

    2015-08-01

    A total of 10 abnormal free-swimming (i.e., post-birth) elasmobranchs are reported from The (Persian-Arabian) Gulf, encompassing five species and including deformed heads, snouts, caudal fins and claspers. The complete absence of pelvic fins in a milk shark Rhizoprionodon acutus may be the first record in any elasmobranch. Possible causes, including the extreme environmental conditions and the high level of anthropogenic pollution particular to The Gulf, are briefly discussed.

  7. Mannose-binding lectin gene polymorphic variants predispose to the development of bronchopulmonary complications but have no influence on other clinical and laboratory symptoms or signs of common variable immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Litzman, J; Freiberger, T; Grimbacher, B; Gathmann, B; Salzer, U; Pavlík, T; Vlček, J; Postránecká, V; Trávníčková, Z; Thon, V

    2008-01-01

    Mannose-binding lectin (MBL), activating protein of the lectin pathway of the complement system, is an important component of the non-specific immune response. MBL2 gene polymorphisms, both in the coding and promoter regions, lead to low or deficient serum MBL levels. Low serum MBL levels were shown to be associated with serious infectious complications, mainly in patients in whom other non-specific immune system barriers were disturbed (granulocytopenia, cystic fibrosis). We have analysed two promoter (−550 and −221) and three exon (codons 52, 54 and 57) MBL2 polymorphisms in a total of 94 patients with common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) from two immunodeficiency centres. Low-producing genotypes were associated with the presence of bronchiectasis (P = 0·009), lung fibrosis (P = 0·037) and also with respiratory insufficiency (P = 0·029). We could not demonstrate any association of MBL deficiency with age at onset of clinical symptoms, age at diagnosis, the number of pneumonias before diagnosis or serum immunoglobulin (Ig)G, IgA and IgM levels before initiation of Ig treatment. No association with emphysema development was observed, such as with lung function test abnormalities. No effect of MBL2 genotypes on the presence of diarrhoea, granuloma formation, lymphadenopathy, splenomegaly, frequency of respiratory tract infection or the number of antibiotic courses of the patients was observed. Our study suggests that low MBL-producing genotypes predispose to bronchiectasis formation, and also fibrosis and respiratory insufficiency development, but have no effect on other complications in CVID patients. PMID:18637104

  8. LSE-Sign: A lexical database for Spanish Sign Language.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez-Sigut, Eva; Costello, Brendan; Baus, Cristina; Carreiras, Manuel

    2016-03-01

    The LSE-Sign database is a free online tool for selecting Spanish Sign Language stimulus materials to be used in experiments. It contains 2,400 individual signs taken from a recent standardized LSE dictionary, and a further 2,700 related nonsigns. Each entry is coded for a wide range of grammatical, phonological, and articulatory information, including handshape, location, movement, and non-manual elements. The database is accessible via a graphically based search facility which is highly flexible both in terms of the search options available and the way the results are displayed. LSE-Sign is available at the following website: http://www.bcbl.eu/databases/lse/.

  9. [Seizures revealing phosphocalcic metabolism abnormalities].

    PubMed

    Hmami, F; Chaouki, S; Benmiloud, S; Souilmi, F Z; Abourazzak, S; Idrissi, M; Atmani, S; Bouharrou, A; Hida, M

    2014-01-01

    Hypocalcemia due to hypoparathyroidism produces a broad spectrum of clinical manifestations, but overt symptoms may be sparse. One unusual presentation is onset or aggravation of epilepsy in adolescence revealing hypoparathyroidism. This situation can lead to delayed diagnosis, with inefficacity of the antiepileptic drugs. We report five cases of adolescence-onset epilepsy with unsuccessful antiepileptic therapy, even with gradually increasing dose. Physical examination revealed signs of hypocalcemia, confirmed biologically. Full testing disclosed the origin of the seizures: hypoparathyroidism in three patients and pseudohypoparathyroidism in the other two. In four of five patients, computed tomography showed calcification of the basal ganglia, defining Fahr's syndrome. The patients were treated with oral calcium and active vitamin D (1-alphahydroxy vitamin D3). Seizure frequency progressively decreased and serum calcium levels returned to normal. These cases illustrate the importance of the physical examination and of routine serum calcium assay in patients with new-onset epileptic seizures in order to detect hypocalcemia secondary to hypoparathyroidism.

  10. Connected care: reducing errors through automated vital signs data upload.

    PubMed

    Smith, Laura B; Banner, Laura; Lozano, Diego; Olney, Christine M; Friedman, Bruce

    2009-01-01

    Vital signs are a fundamental component of patient care. Omitted or inaccurately transcribed vital sign data could result in inappropriate, delayed, or missed treatment. A previous baseline study determined that error rates for vital signs captured on plain paper then entered into a paper chart or EMR were 10% and 4.4%, respectively. This study evaluated the impact of automated vital signs captured using a PDA with bar-code technology for patient identification. The PDA enabled the wireless capture and transmission of data directly from the vital sign monitor into the EMR. Researchers reviewed 1514 sets of vital signs collected electronically for accuracy and compared the error rate with data from the previous paper and EMR systems. Automated upload of vital signs directly into an EMR reduced the documentation error rate to less than 1%. This represented a significant reduction in vital sign documentation errors with the use of mobile technology when compared with traditional charting methods (P < .001). The automated vital sign data upload system helped promote a culture of patient safety by greatly reducing documentation error rates. Additional safety benefits may include improved timeliness to vital sign data and clinical work-flow processes.

  11. Abnormal pressures as hydrodynamic phenomena

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neuzil, C.E.

    1995-01-01

    So-called abnormal pressures, subsurface fluid pressures significantly higher or lower than hydrostatic, have excited speculation about their origin since subsurface exploration first encountered them. Two distinct conceptual models for abnormal pressures have gained currency among earth scientists. The static model sees abnormal pressures generally as relict features preserved by a virtual absence of fluid flow over geologic time. The hydrodynamic model instead envisions abnormal pressures as phenomena in which flow usually plays an important role. This paper develops the theoretical framework for abnormal pressures as hydrodynamic phenomena, shows that it explains the manifold occurrences of abnormal pressures, and examines the implications of this approach. -from Author

  12. Clinical features of avian vacuolar myelinopathy in American coots

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Larsen, R.S.; Nutter, F.B.; Augspurger, T.; Rocke, T.E.; Tomlinson, L.; Thomas, N.J.; Stoskopf, M.K.

    2002-01-01

    Objectivea??To characterize clinical features of avian vacuolar myelinopathy (AVM) in American coots. Designa??Case-control study. Animalsa??26 AVM-affected American coots and 12 unaffected coots. Proceduresa??Complete physical, neurologic, hematologic, and plasma biochemical evaluations were performed. Affected coots received supportive care. All coots died or were euthanatized, and AVM status was confirmed via histopathologic findings. Resultsa??3 severely affected coots were euthanatized immediately after examination. Seventeen affected coots were found dead within 7 days of admission, but 5 affected coots survived > 21 days and had signs of clinical recovery. Abnormal physical examination findings appeared to be related to general debilitation. Ataxia (88%), decreased withdrawal reflexes (88%), proprioceptive deficits (81%), decreased vent responses (69%), beak or tongue weakness (42%), and head tremors (31%), as well as absent pupillary light responses (46%), anisocoria (15%), apparent blindness (4%), nystagmus (4%), and strabismus (4%) were detected. Few gross abnormalities were detected at necropsy, but histologically, all AVM-affected coots had severe vacuolation of white matter of the brain. None of the control coots had vacuolation. Conclusions and Clinical Relevancea??Although there was considerable variability in form and severity of clinical neurologic abnormalities, clinical signs common in AVM-affected birds were identified. Clinical recovery of some AVM-affected coots can occur when supportive care is administered. Until the etiology is identified, caution should be exercised when rehabilitating and releasing coots thought to be affected by AVM.

  13. Effect of copper, manganese, and zinc supplementation on the performance, clinical signs, and mineral status of calves following exposure to bovine viral diarrhea virus type 1b and subsequent infection.

    PubMed

    Wilson, B K; Vazquez-Anon, M; Step, D L; Moyer, K D; Haviland, C L; Maxwell, C L; O'Neill, C F; Gifford, C A; Krehbiel, C R; Richards, C J

    2016-03-01

    Research has indicated that trace mineral (TM) supplementation may alter immune function and reduce morbidity associated with bovine respiratory disease. The objective of this experiment was to determine the influence of dietary Cu, Mn, and Zn supplementation on the performance, clinical signs, and TM balance of calves following a bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) and (MH) combination respiratory pathogen challenge. Steers ( = 16; 225 ± 20 kg BW) from a single ranch were processed, weaned, and randomly pairwise assigned to either the TM-supplemented (MIN) or the control (CON) experimental treatments. The MIN calves received an additional 150 mg of Cu, 130 mg of Mn, and 320 mg of Zn daily and the CON calves received the basal diet with no additional Cu, Mn, or Zn supplementation. The basal diet contained sufficient Mn and Zn but inadequate Cu based on published nutrient requirements. After 46 d on the experimental treatments, all calves were naturally exposed to a heifer persistently infected with BVDV type 1b for 4 d and then subsequently intratracheally challenged with MH. Data were analyzed using the GLIMMIX procedure of SAS with sampling time serving as a repeated measure and calf serving as the experimental unit. The respiratory challenge was validated via increased BVDV type 1b antibody concentrations, MH whole cell and leukotoxin antibody concentrations, rectal temperatures (TEMP), and subjective clinical severity scores (CS). Calf performance ( ≥ 0.48) was not affected by TM supplementation. Mineral supplementation also did not impact the CS or TEMP of calves ( ≥ 0.53). There was a treatment × time ( < 0.001) interaction observed for liver Cu concentrations. The concentrations of Cu, Mn, Zn, and Fe within the liver; Cu, Mn, and Zn within the muscle; and Cu, Zn, and Fe within the serum were all impacted by time ( ≤ 0.03). Calves receiving the MIN treatment had greater ( < 0.01) liver Cu and Mn concentrations compared with CON calves. In contrast

  14. Are interstitial lung abnormalities associated with COPD? A nested case–control study

    PubMed Central

    Bozzetti, Francesca; Paladini, Ilaria; Rabaiotti, Enrico; Franceschini, Alessandro; Alfieri, Veronica; Chetta, Alfredo; Crisafulli, Ernesto; Silva, Mario; Pastorino, Ugo; Sverzellati, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    Purpose In this study, we tested the association between COPD and interstitial lung abnormality (ILA), notably in relation to the presence of computed tomography (CT) signs of lung fibrosis. Patients and methods COPD cases were selected from participants undergoing lung cancer screening (Multicentric Italian Lung Detection trial) for airflow obstruction (n=311/2,303, 13.5%) and 146 consecutive patients with clinical COPD. In all, 457 COPD cases were selected and classified according to the stages of Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease. A nested matching (case:control = 1:2) according to age, sex, and smoking history was operated between each COPD case and two control subjects from Multicentric Italian Lung Detection trial without airflow obstruction. Low-dose CT scans of COPD cases and controls were reviewed for the presence of ILA, which were classified into definite or indeterminate according to the presence of signs of lung fibrosis. Results The frequency of definite ILA was similar between COPD cases and controls (P=0.2), independent of the presence of signs of lung fibrosis (P=0.07). Combined definite and indeterminate ILA was homogeneously distributed across Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease stages (P=0.6). Definite ILA was directly associated with current smoker status (odds ratio [OR] 4.05, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.2–7.4) and increasing pack-years (OR 1.01, 95% CI: 1–1.02). Subjects with any fibrotic ILA were more likely to be older (OR 1.17, 95% CI: 1.10–1.25) and male (OR 8.58, 95% CI: 1.58–68.9). Conclusion There was no association between COPD and definite ILA. However, low-dose CT signs of lung fibrosis were also observed in COPD, and their clinical relevance is yet to be determined. PMID:27307724

  15. Roentgenographic abnormalities in Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever.

    PubMed

    McCook, T A; Briley, C; Ravin, C E

    1982-02-01

    Rock Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) is a tick-borne rickettsial disease which produces a widespread vasculitis. A mortality of 7% to 13% has been reported in the United States which is due at least in part to delay in diagnosis and appropriate treatment. The classic features of this disease include a history of tick bite with the clinical presentation of skin rash and fever in association with thrombocytopenia. Few reports have emphasized the radiologic chest abnormalities in this disease or their relationship to thrombocytopenia. We review 70 cases of RMSF with abnormal roentgenographic features and their pathologic correlation.

  16. Clothing-related Eponyms and Signs

    PubMed Central

    Long, Valencia

    2016-01-01

    The world of dermatology is pieced together by clinical conditions unique in their colors, morphology, and configuration. Dermatological signs and terms are influenced by etymology, language, and history. Eponyms also make dermatology a fascinating but linguistically challenging subject. This article reviews dermatological conditions described in relation to fashion, and what we wear in everyday life from top to toe, demonstrating that dermatology can be inspired even in the most common things. PMID:27057040

  17. Stop Sign Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    With its rim eroded off by catastrophic floods in Tiu Vallis and its strangely angular shape, this 12 km diameter crater looks vaguely like a stop sign.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 8.6, Longitude 329.2 East (30.8 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

  18. Craniofacial abnormalities among patients with Edwards Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Rosa, Rafael Fabiano M.; Rosa, Rosana Cardoso M.; Lorenzen, Marina Boff; Zen, Paulo Ricardo G.; Graziadio, Carla; Paskulin, Giorgio Adriano

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine the frequency and types of craniofacial abnormalities observed in patients with trisomy 18 or Edwards syndrome (ES). METHODS This descriptive and retrospective study of a case series included all patients diagnosed with ES in a Clinical Genetics Service of a reference hospital in Southern Brazil from 1975 to 2008. The results of the karyotypic analysis, along with clinical data, were collected from medical records. RESULTS: The sample consisted of 50 patients, of which 66% were female. The median age at first evaluation was 14 days. Regarding the karyotypes, full trisomy of chromosome 18 was the main alteration (90%). Mosaicism was observed in 10%. The main craniofacial abnormalities were: microretrognathia (76%), abnormalities of the ear helix/dysplastic ears (70%), prominent occiput (52%), posteriorly rotated (46%) and low set ears (44%), and short palpebral fissures/blepharophimosis (46%). Other uncommon - but relevant - abnormalities included: microtia (18%), orofacial clefts (12%), preauricular tags (10%), facial palsy (4%), encephalocele (4%), absence of external auditory canal (2%) and asymmetric face (2%). One patient had an initial suspicion of oculo-auriculo-vertebral spectrum (OAVS) or Goldenhar syndrome. CONCLUSIONS: Despite the literature description of a characteristic clinical presentation for ES, craniofacial alterations may be variable among these patients. The OAVS findings in this sample are noteworthy. The association of ES with OAVS has been reported once in the literature. PMID:24142310

  19. Feeling Abnormal: Simulation of Deviancy in Abnormal and Exceptionality Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernald, Charles D.

    1980-01-01

    Describes activity in which student in abnormal psychology and psychology of exceptional children classes personally experience being judged abnormal. The experience allows the students to remember relevant research, become sensitized to the feelings of individuals classified as deviant, and use caution in classifying individuals as abnormal.…

  20. Abnormalities in Brainstem Auditory Evoked Potentials in Sheep with Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies and Lack of a Clear Pathological Relationship

    PubMed Central

    Konold, Timm; Phelan, Laura J.; Cawthraw, Saira; Simmons, Marion M.; Chaplin, Melanie J.; González, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    Scrapie is transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE), which causes neurological signs in sheep, but confirmatory diagnosis is usually made postmortem on examination of the brain for TSE-associated markers like vacuolar changes and disease-associated prion protein (PrPSc). The objective of this study was to evaluate whether testing of brainstem auditory evoked potentials (BAEPs) at two different sound levels could aid in the clinical diagnosis of TSEs in sheep naturally or experimentally infected with different TSE strains [classical and atypical scrapie and bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE)] and whether any BAEP abnormalities were associated with TSE-associated markers in the auditory pathways. BAEPs were recorded from 141 clinically healthy sheep of different breeds and ages that tested negative for TSEs on postmortem tests to establish a reference range and to allow comparison with 30 sheep clinically affected or exposed to classical scrapie (CS) without disease confirmation (test group 1) and 182 clinically affected sheep with disease confirmation (test group 2). Abnormal BAEPs were found in 7 sheep (23%) of group 1 and 42 sheep (23%) of group 2. The proportion of sheep with abnormalities did not appear to be influenced by TSE strain or PrPSc gene polymorphisms. When the magnitude of TSE-associated markers in the auditory pathways was compared between a subset of 12 sheep with and 12 sheep without BAEP abnormalities in group 2, no significant differences in the total PrPSc or vacuolation scores in the auditory pathways could be found. However, the data suggested that there was a difference in the PrPSc scores depending on the TSE strain because PrPSc scores were significantly higher in sheep with BAEP abnormalities infected with classical and L-type BSE, but not with CS. The results indicated that BAEPs may be abnormal in sheep infected with TSEs but the test is not specific for TSEs and that neither vacuolation nor PrPSc accumulation appears to be

  1. Planning Sign Languages: Promoting Hearing Hegemony? Conceptualizing Sign Language Standardization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eichmann, Hanna

    2009-01-01

    In light of the absence of a codified standard variety in British Sign Language and German Sign Language ("Deutsche Gebardensprache") there have been repeated calls for the standardization of both languages primarily from outside the Deaf community. The paper is based on a recent grounded theory study which explored perspectives on sign…

  2. Awareness of Deaf Sign Language and Gang Signs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Cynthia; Morgan, Robert L.

    There have been increasing incidents of innocent people who use American Sign Language (ASL) or another form of sign language being victimized by gang violence due to misinterpretation of ASL hand formations. ASL is familiar to learners with a variety of disabilities, particularly those in the deaf community. The problem is that gang members have…

  3. Signs of Change: Contemporary Attitudes to Australian Sign Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slegers, Claudia

    2010-01-01

    This study explores contemporary attitudes to Australian Sign Language (Auslan). Since at least the 1960s, sign languages have been accepted by linguists as natural languages with all of the key ingredients common to spoken languages. However, these visual-spatial languages have historically been subject to ignorance and myth in Australia and…

  4. Exercises to Improve Gait Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home About iChip Articles Directories Videos Resources Contact Exercises to Improve Gait Abnormalities Home » Article Categories » Exercise and Fitness Font Size: A A A A Exercises to Improve Gait Abnormalities Next Page The manner ...

  5. Abnormal human sex chromosome constitutions

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 22, discusses abnormal human sex chromosome constitution. Aneuploidy of X chromosomes with a female phenotype, sex chromosome aneuploidy with a male phenotype, and various abnormalities in X chromosome behavior are described. 31 refs., 2 figs.

  6. Visual perceptual abnormalities: hallucinations and illusions.

    PubMed

    Norton, J W; Corbett, J J

    2000-01-01

    Visual perceptual abnormalities may be caused by diverse etiologies which span the fields of psychiatry and neurology. This article reviews the differential diagnosis of visual perceptual abnormalities from both a neurological and a psychiatric perspective. Psychiatric etiologies include mania, depression, substance dependence, and schizophrenia. Common neurological causes include migraine, epilepsy, delirium, dementia, tumor, and stroke. The phenomena of palinopsia, oscillopsia, dysmetropsia, and polyopia among others are also reviewed. A systematic approach to the many causes of illusions and hallucinations may help to achieve an accurate diagnosis, and a more focused evaluation and treatment plan for patients who develop visual perceptual abnormalities. This article provides the practicing neurologist with a practical understanding and approach to patients with these clinical symptoms.

  7. Advances in understanding paternally transmitted Chromosomal Abnormalities

    SciTech Connect

    Marchetti, F; Sloter, E; Wyrobek, A J

    2001-03-01

    Multicolor FISH has been adapted for detecting the major types of chromosomal abnormalities in human sperm including aneuploidies for clinically-relevant chromosomes, chromosomal aberrations including breaks and rearrangements, and other numerical abnormalities. The various sperm FISH assays have been used to evaluate healthy men, men of advanced age, and men who have received mutagenic cancer therapy. The mouse has also been used as a model to investigate the mechanism of paternally transmitted genetic damage. Sperm FISH for the mouse has been used to detect chromosomally abnormal mouse sperm, while the PAINT/DAPI analysis of mouse zygotes has been used to evaluate the types of chromosomal defects that can be paternally transmitted to the embryo and their effects on embryonic development.

  8. Normal and clinical haematology of captive cranes (Gruiformes).

    PubMed

    Hawkey, C; Samour, J H; Ashton, D G; Hart, M G; Cindery, R N; Ffinch, J M; Jones, D M

    1983-01-01

    Fall blood counts on 56 clinically normal cranes of nine different species have provided reference values for the interpretation of haematological changes in 13 cranes presenting with abnormal clinical signs. Hypochromic anaemia, heterophilia and lymphocytosis were found in birds with probable Mycobacterium avium infection and heterophilia and lymphocytosis in birds with bumblefoot, arthritis, nephrosis and cardiac myopathy. In several of the cases with heterophilia and lymphocytosis the fibrinogen level was also raised. A senile bird with thickened heart valves showed macrocytosis. The potential diagnostic value of clinical haematology in cranes is discussed.

  9. [Characteristic asymmetric abnormal eye movement and dystonic posture as the first symptoms of alternating hemiplegia of childhood].

    PubMed

    Motoki, Takahiro; Sasaki, Masayuki; Ishii, Atsushi; Hirose, Shinichi

    2016-03-01

    A 3-month-old girl exhibited asymmetric abnormal eye movement and unilateral dystonic posture intermittently after the first few days of life. Unilateral ocular deviation or nystagmus were the main signs of abnormal eye movements. She was suspected to have alternating hemiplegia of childhood (AHC) despite the absence of apparent alternating hemiplegic episodes. Gene analysis revealed a de-novo missense mutation (Asp801Asn) of ATP1A3. AHC is a rare neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by recurrent transient attacks of hemiplegia affecting the unilateral or bilateral side of the body; in most cases, these attacks begin in the first 6 months of life. Initial symptoms of AHC are not alternating hemiplegic episodes, but rather asymmetric abnormal eye movement, dystonic posture, or seizures. It is difficult to diagnose AHC early because no specific findings are observed in the diagnostic laboratory or neuroradiological examinations. Early diagnosis is important because flunarizine may have a protective effect on the severe motor deterioration associated with AHC. Asymmetric abnormal eye movement could be an important clinical symptom for the diagnosis of AHC in early infancy.

  10. Association of interatrial septal abnormalities with cardiac impulse conduction disorders in adult patients: experience from a tertiary center in Kosovo

    PubMed Central

    Bakalli, Aurora; Pllana, Ejup; Koçinaj, Dardan; Bekteshi, Tefik; Dragusha, Gani; Gashi, Masar; Musliu, Nebih; Gashi, Zaim

    2011-01-01

    Interatrial septal disorders, which include: atrial septal defect, patent foramen ovale and atrial septal aneurysm, are frequent congenital anomalies found in adult patients. Early detection of these anomalies is important to prevent their hemodynamic and/or thromboembolic consequences. The aims of this study were: to assess the association between impulse conduction disorders and anomalies of interatrial septum; to determine the prevalence of different types of interatrial septum abnormalities; to assess anatomic, hemodynamic, and clinical consequences of interatrial septal pathologies. Fifty-three adult patients with impulse conduction disorders and patients without ECG changes but with signs of interatrial septal abnormalities, who were referred to our center for echocardiography, were included in a prospective transesophageal echocardiography study. Interatrial septal anomalies were detected in around 85% of the examined patients. Patent foramen ovale was encountered in 32% of the patients, and in combination with atrial septal aneurysm in an additional 11.3% of cases. Atrial septal aneurysm and atrial septal defect were diagnosed with equal frequency in 20.7% of our study population. Impulse conduction disorders were significantly more suggestive of interatrial septal anomalies than clinical signs and symptoms observed in our patients (84.91% vs 30.19%, P=0.002). Right bundle branch block was the most frequent impulse conduction disorder, found in 41 (77.36%) cases. We conclude that interatrial septal anomalies are highly associated with impulse conduction disorders, particularly with right bundle branch block. Impulse conduction disorders are more indicative of interatrial septal abnormalities in earlier stages than can be understood from the patient’s clinical condition. PMID:21977304

  11. MRI findings in eastern equine encephalitis: the "parenthesis" sign.

    PubMed

    Nickerson, Joshua P; Kannabiran, Suma; Burbank, Heather N

    2016-01-01

    Two patients with eastern equine encephalitis (EEE) presented to a tertiary referral center. Both subjects' brain magnetic resonance imaging showed T2/FLAIR (fluid-attenuated inversion recovery) hyperintensities including linear areas of hyperintensity in the external and internal capsules with sparing of the lentiform nuclei. Single case reports of imaging findings in EEE exist with nonspecific patterns of abnormality. We propose that this "( ) parentheses sign" on T2 or FLAIR imaging may distinguish EEE from other processes.

  12. Lupus and Depression: Know the Signs and How to Get Help

    MedlinePlus

    ... on Twitter Facebook Pinterest Email Print Lupus and depression: Know the signs and how to get help ... treatable illness called clinical depression. Symptoms of clinical depression People are considered clinically depressed when they have ...

  13. Symmetry in Sign Language Poetry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutton-Spence, Rachel; Kaneko, Michiko

    2007-01-01

    This paper considers the range of ways that sign languages use geometric symmetry temporally and spatially to create poetic effect. Poets use this symmetry in sign language art to highlight duality and thematic contrast, and to create symbolic representations of beauty, order and harmony. (Contains 8 tables, 14 figures and 6 notes.)

  14. NUHOMS{reg_sign} update

    SciTech Connect

    Rich, N.

    1995-12-31

    NUHOMS{reg_sign} is the dry spent fuel storage and transportation technology selected to date by the majority of commercial nuclear utilities. The author first gives a system overview of the NUHOMS{reg_sign}. Next she discusses the project status and licensing status. She closes with an update of the multi-purpose canister.

  15. The Typology of Literary Signs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Browne, Robert M.

    1971-01-01

    Discusses the usefulness for literary studies of some of Pierce's key terms and concepts: icon, index, symbol, image, and diagram. Argues that Pierce's description of signs may be usefully applied to literary signs and particularly to the problem of symbolism. Charts. (RB)

  16. Keresan Pueblo Indian Sign Language.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelley, Walter P.; McGregor, Tony L.

    This paper describes the use of Keresan Pueblo Indian Sign Language (KPISL) in one small, Keresan-speaking pueblo in central New Mexico, where 15 out of 650 tribal members have severe to profound hearing loss (twice the national average). KPISL did not originate for the same purposes as the Plains Indian Sign Language, (PISL) which was developed…

  17. Signing Apes and Evolving Linguistics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stokoe, William C.

    Linguistics retains from its antecedents, philology and the study of sacred writings, some of their apologetic and theological bias. Thus it has not been able to face squarely the question how linguistic function may have evolved from animal communication. Chimpanzees' use of signs from American Sign Language forces re-examination of language…

  18. Speech Cues and Sign Stimuli.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mattingly, Ignatius G.

    Parallels between sign stimuli and speech cues suggest some interesting speculations about the origins of language. Speech cues may belong to the class of human sign stimuli which, as in animal behavior, may be the product of an innate releasing mechanism. Prelinguistic speech for man may have functioned as a social-releaser system. Human language…

  19. 3 CFR - Presidential Signing Statements

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 3 The President 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Presidential Signing Statements Presidential Documents Other Presidential Documents Memorandum of March 9, 2009 Presidential Signing Statements Memorandum for the Heads of Executive Departments and Agencies For nearly two centuries, Presidents have issued statements addressing constitutional or...

  20. Arabic Sign Language: A Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abdel-Fattah, M. A.

    2005-01-01

    Sign language in the Arab World has been recently recognized and documented. Many efforts have been made to establish the sign language used in individual countries, including Jordan, Egypt, Libya, and the Gulf States, by trying to standardize the language and spread it among members of the Deaf community and those concerned. Such efforts produced…

  1. Activation Cascading in Sign Production

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Navarrete, Eduardo; Peressotti, Francesca; Lerose, Luigi; Miozzo, Michele

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we investigated how activation unfolds in sign production by examining whether signs that are not produced have their representations activated by semantics (cascading of activation). Deaf signers were tested with a picture-picture interference task. Participants were presented with pairs of overlapping pictures and named the green…

  2. Disappearance of the Hummingbird Sign after Shunt Surgery in a Case of Idiopathic Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Zen; Tsuruoka, Shin; Numasawa, Yoshiyuki; Tomimitsu, Hiroyuki; Shintani, Shuzo

    2016-01-01

    A 79-year-old man presented with a slowly progressive gait disturbance. Brain MRI demonstrated ventriculomegaly and the hummingbird sign. A lumbar puncture showed no abnormalities of the cerebrospinal fluid. The improvement of the gait disturbance after the ventriculoperitoneal shunt led to a diagnosis of idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus. Interestingly, postoperative brain MRI demonstrated the disappearance of not only ventriculomegaly, but also the hummingbird sign. The disappearance of the hummingbird sign suggests that an increase in the cerebrospinal fluid in the lateral and third ventricles could cause the compression of the superior surface of the midbrain tegmentum, which manifests as the hummingbird sign.

  3. Eye movement abnormalities in essential tremor

    PubMed Central

    Plinta, Klaudia; Krzak-Kubica, Agnieszka; Zajdel, Katarzyna; Falkiewicz, Marcel; Dylak, Jacek; Ober, Jan; Szczudlik, Andrzej; Rudzińska, Monika

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Essential tremor (ET) is the most prevalent movement disorder, characterized mainly by an action tremor of the arms. Only a few studies published as yet have assessed oculomotor abnormalities in ET and their results are unequivocal. The aim of this study was to assess the oculomotor abnormalities in ET patients compared with the control group and to find the relationship between oculomotor abnormalities and clinical features of ET patients. We studied 50 ET patients and 42 matched by age and gender healthy controls. Saccadometer Advanced (Ober Consulting, Poland) was used to investigate reflexive, pace-induced and cued saccades and conventional electrooculography for evaluation of smooth pursuit and fixation. The severity of the tremor was assessed by the Clinical Rating Scale for Tremor. Significant differences between ET patients and controls were found for the incidence of reflexive saccades dysmetria and deficit of smooth pursuit. Reflexive saccades dysmetria was more frequent in patients in the second and third phase of ET compared to the first phase. The reflexive saccades latency increase was correlated with severity of the tremor. In conclusion, oculomotor abnormalities were significantly more common in ET patients than in healthy subjects. The most common oculomotor disturbances in ET were reflexive saccades dysmetria and slowing of smooth pursuit. The frequency of reflexive saccades dysmetria increased with progression of ET. The reflexive saccades latency increase was related to the severity of tremor. PMID:28149393

  4. Radiographic abnormalities among construction workers exposed to quartz containing dust

    PubMed Central

    Tjoe, N; Burdorf, A; Parker, J; Attfield, M; van Duivenbooden, C; Heederik, D

    2003-01-01

    Background: Construction workers are exposed to quartz containing respirable dust, at levels that may cause fibrosis in the lungs. Studies so far have not established a dose-response relation for radiographic abnormalities for this occupational group. Aims: To measure the extent of radiographic abnormalities among construction workers primarily exposed to quartz containing respirable dust. Methods: A cross sectional study on radiographic abnormalities indicative of pneumoconiosis was conducted among 1339 construction workers mainly involved in grinding, (jack)-hammering, drilling, cutting, sawing, and polishing. Radiological abnormalities were determined by median results of the 1980 International Labour Organisation system of three certified "B" readers. Questionnaires were used for assessment of occupational history, presence of respiratory diseases, and symptoms and smoking habits. Results: An abnormality of ILO profusion category 1/0 and greater was observed on 10.2% of the chest radiographs, and profusion category of 1/1 or greater on 2.9% of the radiographs. The average duration of exposure of this group was 19 years and the average age was 42. The predominant type of small opacities (irregularly shaped) is presumably indicative of mixed dust pneumoconiosis. The prevalence of early signs of nodular silicosis (small rounded opacities of category 1/0 or greater) was low (0.8%). Conclusions: The study suggests an elevated risk of radiographic abnormalities among these workers with expected high exposure. An association between radiographic abnormalities and cumulative exposure to quartz containing dust from construction sites was observed, after correction for potentially confounding variables. PMID:12771392

  5. Abnormal pupillary light reflex with chromatic pupillometry in Gaucher disease

    PubMed Central

    Narita, Aya; Shirai, Kentarou; Kubota, Norika; Takayama, Rumiko; Takahashi, Yukitoshi; Onuki, Takanori; Numakura, Chikahiko; Kato, Mitsuhiro; Hamada, Yusuke; Sakai, Norio; Ohno, Atsuko; Asami, Maya; Matsushita, Shoko; Hayashi, Anri; Kumada, Tomohiro; Fujii, Tatsuya; Horino, Asako; Inoue, Takeshi; Kuki, Ichiro; Asakawa, Ken; Ishikawa, Hitoshi; Ohno, Koyo; Nishimura, Yoko; Tamasaki, Akiko; Maegaki, Yoshihiro; Ohno, Kousaku

    2014-01-01

    The hallmark of neuronopathic Gaucher disease (GD) is oculomotor abnormalities, but ophthalmological assessment is difficult in uncooperative patients. Chromatic pupillometry is a quantitative method to assess the pupillary light reflex (PLR) with minimal patient cooperation. Thus, we investigated whether chromatic pupillometry could be useful for neurological evaluations in GD. In our neuronopathic GD patients, red light-induced PLR was markedly impaired, whereas blue light-induced PLR was relatively spared. In addition, patients with non-neuronopathic GD showed no abnormalities. These novel findings show that chromatic pupillometry is a convenient method to detect neurological signs and monitor the course of disease in neuronopathic GD. PMID:25356393

  6. Eye movement abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Moncayo, Jorge; Bogousslavsky, Julien

    2012-01-01

    Generation and control of eye movements requires the participation of the cortex, basal ganglia, cerebellum and brainstem. The signals of this complex neural network finally converge on the ocular motoneurons of the brainstem. Infarct or hemorrhage at any level of the oculomotor system (though more frequent in the brain-stem) may give rise to a broad spectrum of eye movement abnormalities (EMAs). Consequently, neurologists and particularly stroke neurologists are routinely confronted with EMAs, some of which may be overlooked in the acute stroke setting and others that, when recognized, may have a high localizing value. The most complex EMAs are due to midbrain stroke. Horizontal gaze disorders, some of them manifesting unusual patterns, may occur in pontine stroke. Distinct varieties of nystagmus occur in cerebellar and medullary stroke. This review summarizes the most representative EMAs from the supratentorial level to the brainstem.

  7. Autism spectrum disorder and early motor abnormalities: Connected or coincidental companions?

    PubMed

    Setoh, Peipei; Marschik, Peter B; Einspieler, Christa; Esposito, Gianluca

    2017-01-01

    Research in the past decade has produced a growing body of evidence showing that motor abnormalities in individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are the rule rather than the exception. The paper by Chinello and colleagues furthers our understanding of the importance of studying motor functions in ASD by testing a non-clinical population of parents-infant triads. Chinello and colleagues' findings seem to suggest that subclinical motor impairments may exist in the typical population with inherited non-clinical ASD traits. Chinello and colleagues' discovery also urges us to ask why motor abnormalities exist in typically developing infants when their parents present some subclinical ASD traits. We believe that there are at least two possibilities. In the first possible scenario, motor impairments and ASD traits form a single cluster of symptoms unique to a subgroup of individuals with autism. A second possible scenario is that motor atypicalities are the first warning signs of vulnerability often associated with atypical development. In conclusion, Chinello et al.'s findings inform us that subclinical atypical phenotypes such as sociocommunicative anomalies may be related to subclinical motor performances in the next generation. This adds to our knowledge by shedding some light on the relation of vulnerability in one domain with vulnerability in another domain.

  8. The effects of anatomical information and observer expertise on abnormality detection task

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, L.; Cavaro-Ménard, C.; Le Callet, P.; Cooper, L. H. K.; Hunault, G.; Tanguy, J.-Y.

    2011-03-01

    This paper presents a novel study investigating the influences of Magnetic Resonance (MR) image anatomical information and observer expertise on an abnormality detection task. MRI is exquisitely sensitive for detecting brain abnormalities, particularly in the evaluation of white matter diseases, e.g. multiple sclerosis (MS). For this reason, MS lesions are simulated as the target stimuli for detection in the present study. Two different image backgrounds are used in the following experiments: a) homogeneous region of white matter tissue, and b) one slice of a healthy brain MR image. One expert radiologist (more than 10 years' experience), three radiologists (less than 5 years' experience) and eight naïve observers (without any prior medical knowledge) have performed these experiments, during which they have been asked different questions dependent upon level of experience; the three radiologists and eight naïve observers were asked if they were aware of any hyper-signal, likely to represent an MS lesion, while the most experienced consultant was asked if a clinically significant sign was present. With the percentages of response "yes" displayed on the y-axis and the lesion intensity contrasts on the x-axis, psychometric function is generated from the observer' responses. Results of psychometric functions and calculated thresholds indicate that radiologists have better hyper-signal detection ability than naïve observers, which is intuitively shown by the lower simple visibility thresholds of radiologists. However, when radiologists perform a task with clinical implications, e.g. to detect a clinically significant sign, their detection thresholds are elevated. Moreover, the study indicates that for the radiologists, the simple visibility thresholds remain the same with and without the anatomical information, which reduces the threshold for the clinically significant sign detection task. Findings provide further insight into human visual system processing for this

  9. [Chilaiditi's sign and syndrome. Case report].

    PubMed

    Aguilar-García, César Raúl; García-Acosta, Jesús

    2017-01-01

    The interposition of a portion of the colon between the liver and the diaphragm is called Chilaiditi sign and discovered incidentally during radiological study for other reasons and usually asymptomatic presentation. When the discovery is accompanied by clinical symptoms such as abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, bloating, constipation called Chilaiditi Syndrome. The Chilaiditi sign is a very rare condition, and the Chilaiditi syndrome is even more, especially if associated with other acute diseases. We report the case of a man of 41 years was admitted with right upper quadrant abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, difficulty was diagnosed with radiographic and tomographic images making the differential diagnosis with lung abscess and diaphragmatic hernia. The final diagnosis was Chilaiditi Syndrome associated with acute pancreatitis and penumonia.

  10. Signs and symptoms in common colds.

    PubMed Central

    Tyrrell, D. A.; Cohen, S.; Schlarb, J. E.

    1993-01-01

    The patterns of disease caused by five common viruses which infect the respiratory tract are described. The viruses were strains of rhinovirus types 2, 9, and 14, a strain of coronavirus type 229E and of respiratory syncytial virus. Volunteers were given nasal drops containing a low infectious dose of one of the viruses, quarantined from 2 days before to 5 days after inoculation, and examined daily by a clinician using a standard checklist of respiratory signs and symptoms. Only subjects who developed clinical illness accompanied by viral shedding and/or specific antibody production were analysed [n = 116]. The results confirm indication from earlier studies that the main difference between colds induced by different viruses is in duration of the incubation period. Patterns of symptom development were not substantially different with different viruses. Analyses of signs and symptoms in different categories, e.g. nasal symptoms v. coughing, justify treatment with different drugs either successively or simultaneously. PMID:8394240

  11. Signs and symptoms in common colds.

    PubMed

    Tyrrell, D A; Cohen, S; Schlarb, J E

    1993-08-01

    The patterns of disease caused by five common viruses which infect the respiratory tract are described. The viruses were strains of rhinovirus types 2, 9, and 14, a strain of coronavirus type 229E and of respiratory syncytial virus. Volunteers were given nasal drops containing a low infectious dose of one of the viruses, quarantined from 2 days before to 5 days after inoculation, and examined daily by a clinician using a standard checklist of respiratory signs and symptoms. Only subjects who developed clinical illness accompanied by viral shedding and/or specific antibody production were analysed [n = 116]. The results confirm indication from earlier studies that the main difference between colds induced by different viruses is in duration of the incubation period. Patterns of symptom development were not substantially different with different viruses. Analyses of signs and symptoms in different categories, e.g. nasal symptoms v. coughing, justify treatment with different drugs either successively or simultaneously.

  12. DC-SIGN(+) Macrophages Control the Induction of Transplantation Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Conde, Patricia; Rodriguez, Mercedes; van der Touw, William; Jimenez, Ana; Burns, Matthew; Miller, Jennifer; Brahmachary, Manisha; Chen, Hui-ming; Boros, Peter; Rausell-Palamos, Francisco; Yun, Tae Jin; Riquelme, Paloma; Rastrojo, Alberto; Aguado, Begoña; Stein-Streilein, Joan; Tanaka, Masato; Zhou, Lan; Zhang, Junfeng; Lowary, Todd L; Ginhoux, Florent; Park, Chae Gyu; Cheong, Cheolho; Brody, Joshua; Turley, Shannon J; Lira, Sergio A; Bronte, Vincenzo; Gordon, Siamon; Heeger, Peter S; Merad, Miriam; Hutchinson, James; Chen, Shu-Hsia; Ochando, Jordi

    2015-06-16

    Tissue effector cells of the monocyte lineage can differentiate into different cell types with specific cell function depending on their environment. The phenotype, developmental requirements, and functional mechanisms of immune protective macrophages that mediate the induction of transplantation tolerance remain elusive. Here, we demonstrate that costimulatory blockade favored accumulation of DC-SIGN-expressing macrophages that inhibited CD8(+) T cell immunity and promoted CD4(+)Foxp3(+) Treg cell expansion in numbers. Mechanistically, that simultaneous DC-SIGN engagement by fucosylated ligands and TLR4 signaling was required for production of immunoregulatory IL-10 associated with prolonged allograft survival. Deletion of DC-SIGN-expressing macrophages in vivo, interfering with their CSF1-dependent development, or preventing the DC-SIGN signaling pathway abrogated tolerance. Together, the results provide new insights into the tolerogenic effects of costimulatory blockade and identify DC-SIGN(+) suppressive macrophages as crucial mediators of immunological tolerance with the concomitant therapeutic implications in the clinic.

  13. Clinical predictors and radiological reliability in atlantoaxial subluxation in Down's syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Selby, K A; Newton, R W; Gupta, S; Hunt, L

    1991-01-01

    Clinical signs and symptoms that might predict atlantoaxial subluxation were studied prospectively in 135 of 180 children with Down's syndrome aged 6-14 years who form the Hester Adrian Research Centre cohort. Lateral radiographs of the cervical spine were taken in flexed, extended, and neutral positions, and the percentage of abnormalities in each view was 14, 10, and 10%, respectively. Gait was the only significant clinical predictor. The relative risk of having an abnormal neck radiograph with an abnormal gait was 2.91 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1 to 8). The sensitivity was 50% and the specificity 81%. Nineteen children had repeat radiographs to assess the reliability of radiological diagnosis. Six had abnormalities; five of 19 (26%) had an abnormality on the first radiograph, and four of 19 (21%) had an abnormality on a second radiograph, but only three (15%) had an abnormality on both occasions in any view (95% CI 0 to 25). We conclude that radiographs of the cervical spine are unreliable at identifying atlantoaxial subluxation in children with Down's syndrome, and we failed to identify any reliable clinical predictor. PMID:1830735

  14. [Skin signs in child abuse].

    PubMed

    Pau-Charles, I; Darwich-Soliva, E; Grimalt, R

    2012-03-01

    Child abuse is far more prevalent today than is generally recognized. Up to 90% of victims suffer physical abuse that can be observed in signs on the skin. Dermatologists are particularly qualified to identify these signs and distinguish them from other conditions that can mimic abuse. This review covers the signs of child abuse that can be observed on the skin. We discuss clues that can help differentiate between lesions caused by abuse and those that are accidental, and we describe the skin conditions that mimic physical abuse.

  15. Warning Signs of Mental Illnesses

    MedlinePlus

    ... Foundation APA Annual Meeting Psychiatric News PsychiatryOnline Workplace Mental Health Sign In Join General Residents and Fellows Medical Students International close menu Psychiatrists Education Practice Cultural Competency Awards & Leadership Opportunities Advocacy & APAPAC Meetings ...

  16. Signs and Symptoms of Mumps

    MedlinePlus

    ... Serology Publications and Resources Multimedia MMWR Articles Outbreak Articles Related Links World Health Organization Medline Plus Signs & Symptoms of Mumps Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ...

  17. Aging changes in vital signs

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/004019.htm Aging changes in vital signs To use the sharing ... Normal body temperature does not change much with aging. But as you get older, it becomes harder ...

  18. Sign Language Versus Spoken Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stokoe, William C.

    1978-01-01

    In the debate over continuities versus discontinuities in the emergence of language, sign language is not taken to be the antithesis, but is presented as the antecedent of spoken languages. (Author/HP)

  19. Diagnosing Dementia--Positive Signs

    MedlinePlus

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Diagnosing Dementia—Positive Signs Past Issues / Fall 2007 Table of ... easy, affordable blood test that could accurately diagnose Alzheimer's disease (AD)—even before symptoms began to show? Researchers ...

  20. The diagnostic value of halo and reversed halo signs for invasive mold infections in compromised hosts.

    PubMed

    Georgiadou, Sarah P; Sipsas, Nikolaos V; Marom, Edith M; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P

    2011-05-01

    The halo sign is a CT finding of ground-glass opacity surrounding a pulmonary nodule or mass. The reversed halo sign is a focal rounded area of ground-glass opacity surrounded by a crescent or complete ring of consolidation. In severely immunocompromised patients, these signs are highly suggestive of early infection by an angioinvasive fungus. The halo sign and reversed halo sign are most commonly associated with invasive pulmonary aspergillosis and pulmonary mucormycosis, respectively. Many other infections and noninfectious conditions, such as neoplastic and inflammatory processes, may also manifest with pulmonary nodules associated with either sign. Although nonspecific, both signs can be useful for preemptive initiation of antifungal therapy in the appropriate clinical setting. This review aims to evaluate the diagnostic value of the halo sign and reversed halo sign in immunocompromised hosts and describes the wide spectrum of diseases associated with them.